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Full text of "North Carolina schools and academies, 1790-1840; a documentary history"

THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 




THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 

PRESENTED BY 

Charlotte Public Library 



C370.9 

C77n 

1790-18L|0 



UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL 
III II lllll III Hill III 



000 



18462628 



This BOOK may be kept out ONE MONTH 

unless a recall notice is sent to you. A book 
may be renewed only once; it must be brought 
to the library for renewal. 




APR 7 2004 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://archive.org/details/northcarolinaschcoon 



INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENT 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

CHAPEL HILL 

NORTH CAROLINA 

SCHOOLS AND ACADEMIES 

1790-1840 



A DOCUMENTARY HISTORY 



BY 

Charles L. Coon 



RALEIGH 

Edwabds & Beoughton Printing Company 

State Printers and Binders 

1915 



PREFATORY NOTE 

The documents brought together in this volume attempt to portray 
education as it existed in North Carolina during the fifty years immedi- 
ately succeeding 1790. In two former volumes covering this same 
period an attempt was made to trace the development of the sentiment 
which led to the passage of our first public school law in 1839. In many 
ways this volume supplements the material brought together in the Be- 
ginnings of Public Education in JSTorth Carolina 1790-1840. 

ISTo claim is made that these documents are entirely complete. It has 
been impossible to get first hand information about many schools of the 
period. However, these documents are representative and typical. 

C. L. C. 



CO 
iO 

if) 



EDUCATION IN NORTH CAROLINA 1790-1840 

These documents reveal much that is interesting in our educational 
history. The influence of the University of the State, the kind of teach- 
ers who taught the schools and from whence they came, the equipment of 
the schools as to buildings and furniture, the salaries of teachers, school 
entertainments, methods of teaching and courses of study, the attempts 
to establish Lancaster schools, the current ideas of religious education, 
the beginnings of the denominational colleges, the military school craze, 
the first law schools, the general resort to lotteries to raise school funds, 
and the kinds of books sold in the bookstores of the day and the like are 
the topics which stand out as worthy of the notice of the student of our 
educational history. I shall try to show how a number of these topics 
are set forth in these documents, considering each in chronological order. 

Influence of the University — These documents contain many evidences 
of the educational influence of the University of ISTorth Carolina, which 
was opened for students in 1795. As early as 1801, Andrew Flinn, an 
A.B. graduate of that college, was principal of Hillsboro Academy. 1 
The next year he was principal of the Fayetteville Academy 2 , and re- 
mained there for several years. In 1803, Bartlett Yancey, an early 
graduate, was assistant to the principal of Caswell Academy 3 , where 
he was supposed to teach the "English Language grammatically." In 
1804, Chesley Daniel, another early graduate of the University, was 
principal of the Ealeigh Academy 4 ; and Wm. C. Love, a University 
man, was principal of the Springfield Academy in Caswell 5 . In 1805, 
Richard Henderson, another University man, was principal of the Hills- 
boro Academy, 6 and William Bingham, lately "one of the professors in 
the University," was principal of the Pittsboro Academy. 7 

In 1809, John B. Bobbitt was principal of the Westrayville Academy 
and "William Crawford presided over the Warrenton Academy. The 
Raleigh Star of that time said of Mr. Bobbitt : "jSTo small recommen- 
dation of the teacher is that he is a graduate of the University of Xorth 
Carolina." 8 

In 1810, Laurel Hill Academy gave notice that its principal was 
Murdoch McLean, "a graduate of the University of Xorth Carolina." 9 
During the same year the Raleigh Register said that Rev. Joseph Cald- 
well, President of the University, honored the Raleigh Academy with 
his presence during a part of the examination. 10 

In 1815, Laurel Hill Academy gave notice that "students will be pre- 
pared for any grade in the University," 11 while Tarboro Academy 
announced that Robert Hall, a graduate of the University, was its prin- 
cipal. 12 The same year Williamsboro Academy announced that An- 

VP. 280. 2 P. 61. 3 P. 19. 4 P. 391. 5 P. 29. «P. 281. 7 P. 37. S P. 263. 9 P. 343. I0 P. 420. "P. 344. 
12 P. 77. 

(V) 



vi Introduction 

drew Rhea, late a professor in the University, was the principal of that 
school. 13 

In 1816, Franklin Academy advertised that its principal, John B. 
Bobbitt, was "a graduate of our own University." 14 

In 1818, Hyco Academy stated that its principal, John H. Hinton, 
was educated at the University, and had taught there both in the College 
and in the preparatory school. 15 The same year Union Academy in 
Halifax County had William E. Webb as principal and said that "those 
who intend that their children or wards shall complete their education in 
North Carolina will do well, it is presumed, by availing themselves of 
this opportunity — the preceptor having been educated at the University 
and acted for some time therein as a Tutor and Professor." 16 During 
this year, Hyco Academy announced that "this school is strictly pre- 
paratory to the University," 17 and repeated the announcement in 1820. 18 

In 1819, Professor Mitchell of the University was commissioned by 
the Raleigh Academy to buy its "philosophical apparatus" ; 19 and Abner 
W. Clopton, a University graduate, founded the female academy at 
Milton. 29 

In 1820, Thomas G. Stone, a graduate of the University, began to 
teach at the Hilliardston Academy in Nash County; 21 and the next year 
Williamsboro Academy announced that "the different branches of edu- 
cation as established by the Faculty at the University of this State will 
be adopted in this Institution." 22 In 1824, the same school published 
that "Students may here be prepared for the Freshman or Sophomore 
class in the University." 23 The next year the principal of this school 
said that "the department immediately under my own care will hence- 
forth be divided into four classes, preparatory to the University." 24 
It is worthy of note, too, that in 1820 James F. Martin "a late graduate 
of the University of North Carolina" was principal of the Madison 
Academy; 25 and that James A. Craig of Chapel Hill Academy, said 
that "the course of studies in this Academy will be (as usual) so ar- 
ranged as to render it in every respect preparatory to the University" ; 26 
also that the Louisburg Male Academy claimed that "the plan of educa- 
tion is calculated to prepare young gentlemen for the University." 27 

In 1821, Shocco Male Academy announced, among other things, that 
"young men can be prepared for the University." 28 

In 1822, John Rodgers said that the studies in Hillsboro Academy 
were preparatory to the University. 29 From 1822 to 1828, Charles 
A. Hill conducted Midway Academy in Franklin County as a school 
preparatory to the University. A typical announcement of his said 
that the course of classical studies is so arranged as to constitute Mid- 
way Academy preparatory to our University. 30 During this year John 
Louis Taylor, an alumnus of the University, began his law school at 
Raleigh. 31 

In 1823, Warrenton Academy advertised that its principal was James 

"P. 125. 14 P. 95. 16 P. 25. i6 P. 178. 17 P. 26. 18 P. 27. 19 P. 455. 20 P. 30. "P. 264. "p. 125. 
"P. 125. 2*P. 126. "P. 345. 2 «P. 299. "P. 99. 28 P. 606. "P. 283. »°PP. 107-113. sip. 531. 



Introduction vii 

H. Otey, who was educated at the University of North Carolina. 32 
The same year the Ealeigh Academy gave notice that "the sessions and 
vacations of the school will be regulated for the present, by those of the 
University of North Carolina"; 33 and a like announcement was 
made in 1823 for the Episcopal School at Raleigh. 34 Wake Forest 
Academy this year announced that "the classical course prescribed 
by the University of North Carolina will be followed here." 35 Also, 
during the year 1823, John Rodgers of the Hillsboro Academy had pub- 
lished that "at the late Examination of the Faculty of the University 
of this State, fifteen young Gentlemen were approved on the studies 
preparatory to the Freshman Class, and six for the Sophomore." 36 
Finally, in 1823, the New Bern Academy Flan of Education announced 
that "the system of studies in the Classical Department shall be similar 
to that preparatory to admission into the University of N. C. and include 
the studies of the Freshman and Sophomore Classes of the University, 
when required." 37 

In 1824, the Catawba School in Lincoln County, advertised that its 
"course of instruction is such as to qualify students for admission into 
the University of this State." 3S Farmwell Grove Academy in Halifax 
announced that its principal was John Bragg, "a graduate of our Uni- 
versity." 39 William C. Love, who has already been mentioned as a 
University man, was now principal of the Springfield Academy. 40 
Morganton Academy advertised Alexander E. Wilson, a graduate of the 
University, as its principal; 41 and William Hooper announced that his 
Select Classical School at Fayetteville will prepare students to enter 
the University of North Carolina. 

In 1825, William M. Green, a distinguished graduate of Chapel Hill, 
began his famous female seminary at Hillsboro. 42 John Rodgers, of the 
Hillsboro Academy, announced that "we decline admitting students who 
are, at this time, qualified to enter the Freshman Class in Jhe University 
of North Carolina, as our scheme of studies extends no farther than a 
thorough preparation of our pupils for admission to this class" ; 43 and 
Pittsboro announced that Mr. Lalor's tuition prepares for the Univer- 
sity and that John D. Clancy, a University graduate, had succeeded to 
the principalship of that school. 44 

In 1826, John J. Wyche, a University man, took charge of the Fami- 
well Grove Academy in Halifax. 45 

In 1827, Smithfield Academy, then in charge of J. Warnock, a grad- 
uate of Glasgow, announced that "the classical course will be adapted to 
that observed at Chapel Hill." 46 The same year the Nashville Academy, 
then in charge of the Rev. John Armstrong, advertised that "the Trustees 
are well aware of the inconvenience a young man labors under, who enters 
College, having pursued a course of studies different from that taught in 
the University, and they are determined to have an eye to it." 47 On Jan- 
uary 1, 1827, William J. Bingham took charge of the Hillsboro Academy. 

> 2 P. 585. "P. 470. 34p. 535 ssp. 532. 3ep. 284. "P. 55. 3sp. 225. 39 P. 179. 4 °P. 29. "P. 17. 
< 2 P. 300. «'P. 286. "P. 39. «p, igo. 46p. 195. 4?p. 267. 



viii Introduction 

He was a graduate of Chapel Hill and was destined to attain great fame 
as a teacher." 48 

In 1828, Absalom K. Barr, a Chapel Hill man, took charge of the 
Lexington Academy, 49 and Thomas G. Stone, mentioned above, was in 
charge of Mount Welcome Academy in Franklin. 50 Charles A. Hill, 
then at Louisburg, gave notice that his "plan of education accords with 
that of our University." 51 

In 1829, William J. Bingham advertised that his "system of studies 
is, in general, preparatory to our University" ; 52 Pleasant Spring, in 
Wake, said that "the course of studies will be preparatory to the Uni- 
versity" ; 53 and H. R. Hall's Ebenezer Academy in Iredell claimed that 
"a course of studies is here pursued preparatory to admission into the 
University of this State." 54 

In 1831, James Grant took charge of the Raleigh Academy and 
printed the testimonials given him by his Chapel Hill teachers. 55 Of 
the examination at the end of his first term the Raleigh Register said: 
"We were gratified at the performances of the Senior Class, who are 
about to leave the Academy and enter College — more especially as their 
destination is our own University." 56 About this time Walker Ander- 
son began his female boarding school at Hillsboro, 57 which enjoyed con- 
siderable success for a number of years. Shortly after the founding of 
this school William E. Anderson, a graduate of the University assumed 
its management. 

In 1833, the Pittsboro Academy claimed to prepare students to enter 
any one of the three lower classes of the University. 58 During this 
year Benjamin Sumner took charge of Arcadia Academy in Person and 
advertised the fact that he was a graduate of the University and printed 
what his teachers said about him as a student. 59 A few years later on 
he says that the Arcadia "Course of Studies is usually preparatory to 
admission into the University." 60 In 1833, Ponoma Academy near 
Rowles' Store in Wake advertised with pride that its principal, William 
B. Strain, had been a tutor at Chapel Hill. 61 During this year J. D. 
Hooper, a distinguished graduate of the University, became connected 
with the Episcopal school at Raleigh. 62 

In 1834, Solomon Lea was made principal of Warrenton Academy. 
The trustees in a public statement said : "To those unacquainted, it 
will be sufficient to know that he graduated at Chapel Hill, and is 
recommended by the Faculty of that celebrated school." 63 The Raleigh 
Academy was now in charge of L. B. Johnson and Thomas B. Haywood. 
They announced that "the Classics will be pursued to any extent that 
may be desired. The excellent Prosody of Professor Hooper, and the 
Fine Scheme of Preparatory Studies prescribed by the Faculty of the 
University of this State will be constantly kept in view." 64 Joseph 
H. Saunders, during this year, became chaplain of the Episcopal School 

"P. 286. "P. 328. E °P. 115. 61 P. 102. "P. 288. "P. 560. "P. 190. esp. 497. sep, 500. 57p. 
312. 68 P. 41. 69 P. 331. 8 °P. 333. "P. 553. 62p. 536. 63p. 588. 64p. 503. 



Introduction ix 

at Ealeigh. He was a Chapel Hill graduate 65 and a distinguished 
minister and teacher. 

In 1835, William H. Owen took charge of the Leasburg Classical 
School in Caswell. He was a graduate of the University. 66 

In 1836, it was announced that Robert G. Allison had become prin- 
cipal of Raleigh Academy. It was also said that "he is a graduate of 
our University." 67 

In 1S37, the principal of the Northampton Academy said that "with 
boys who design to enter College, the Preparatory Course of Studies 
and the Standard authors adopted by the Faculty of our own excellent 
University at Chapel Hill, will be, henceforth, invariably adhered to." 68 
And the trustees of Stony Hill Academy in Nash the same year said 
that "those who intend a course at College will invariably use such au- 
thors as are recommended by the Faculty of our University." 69 

In 1838, there are numerous evidences of the influence of the Uni- 
versity on the schools of the State. The Oxford Academy gave notice 
that "Classical Students will be prepared to enter the Freshman or 
Sophomore class, agreeably to the course of studies prescribed by the 
University of the State." 70 Pomona Academy announced that it taught 
such studies as "prepare young men for entering the University." 71 
William B. Otis, Raleigh Classical Academy, advertised that its "pupils 
are prepared to enter the advanced classes of the University of this 
State." 72 Shocco Classical Seminary said that "students for the Uni- 
versity will be prepared to enter Freshman or Sophomore class." 73 
Finally, Manly's Private School, in Raleigh, announced that its prin- 
cipal was a graduate of the University of North Carolina. 74 

Physical Equipment of the Schools. — These documents give us only 
glimpses of the school buildings and their equipment. It is well to 
remember that the North Carolina of this period was a sparsely settled, 
agricultural State with no large towns. It is well to remember, too, 
that blackboards were not much in use anywhere in the world before 
1820 and that modern school desks and furniture were unknown every- 
where. 

The academy at Warrenton as early as 1795 was quite well known in 
the State. The first building was replaced in 1800 by a structure "forty 
feet by thirty-five, two stories high." 75 I have never been able to find a 
description of the first house used by this school. In 1805 the "Warren- 
ton trustees said that they had "contracted for the building of a stew- 
ard's house, together with all necessary outhouses." They also said the 
academy had "a good mathematical and philosophical (physics) appa- 
ratus, which most other institutions of the like kind in this State are 
destitute of." 76 In 1820, when Jones and Andrews had charge of the 
female academy they said they had "an extensive apparatus for Natural 
Philosophy and chemistry and an excellent Orrery" 77 and several 
pianos. 78 In 1826-7, when the female academy was in charge of 

65 P. 537. eep. 32. 6?p. 5ii. esp. 276. "P. 269. ™P. 147. 71 P. 554. 72 P. 570 73 P. 632. 7 "P. 
571. "p. 577. 78 p. 578. "p. 615. "P. 616. 



x Introduction 

Elijah Brainerd, it was said to have "a Chemical and Philosophical 
Apparatus and a choice Cabinet of Minerals, selected by Professors 
Silliman, Smith, and Dr. Manson, of Yale College." 79 

The Raleigh newspapers of this period give us a fairly good idea of 
what the school buildings of the Raleigh Academy were like. The first 
building, erected in 1802, was to be two stories high, pillared on brick or 
stone, forty feet long, twenty-four feet wide, with twelve feet pitch be- 
low and ten feet above, and a brick chimney at either end. There were 
to be two doors and eight windows of 18 panes each in the first story 
and ten windows of 18 panes each in the second story. The win- 
dow panes were ten by twelve inches in the lower story and eight by ten 
inches in the upper story. There were to be two rooms twelve feet 
square cut off from one end of the upper story. The house was to be 
painted inside and out. 80 In the fall of 1807 it was announced that "on 
the first day of January next, the new building for the Female Depart- 
ment will be finished." 81 In 1808, it was said that "the Students of the 
Raleigh Academy, who are members of the Polemic Society have deter- 
mined to establish among themselves a Circulating Library." 82 In 1810, 
the trustees of the Academy erected a home for their principal. This 
building was twenty-two by twenty-four feet, two stories high, and had 
a piazza. 83 In 1811, the trustees bought a second hand safe from the 
U. S. Internal Revenue Collector. 84 In 1813, the trustees "deemed it 
expedient from the great increase of students to erect a separate House 
for the Preparatory School." 85 In 1815, the Polemic Society Library 
and the Raleigh Subscription Library were united. 86 In 1815, the 
authorities of the Academy bought 90 shares of stock in the Bank of 
New Bern and several shares in the State Bank. 87 An account of the 
school closing for 1815 said that "the experiments made by the Students 
in Chemistry did honor to Miss Wye." Evidently the Academy then 
had some kind of chemical apparatus. In 1817, the trustees insured two 
school buildings for $1,000 each, a one-story building used by the female 
department for $250, and a one-story building used by the preparatory 
(elementary) school for $500. 88 In 1819, the trustees spent $500 for a 
philosophical apparatus, to be selected by Prof. Mitchell, of Chapel 
Hill. 89 An advertisement of 1823 refers to the fact that the Academy 
has a number of ancient maps. In 1835, a visitor to the academy, then 
conducted by Johnson and Haywood, spoke of small children using the 
blackboard in solving problems in arithmetic. 90 

In 1806, the Caswell Academy announced that it was "provided with 
an excellent pair of globes, a set of fine Maps, and some geometrical 
apparatus." 91 In 1807, John Henry Gault, a traveling teacher and 
braggart, claimed to have a pair of "New British Globes" for the use of 
his school. 92 The Salisbury Academy trustees, in 1807, said they had 
"procured for the accommodations of the students in a retired part of 
the town, a large and convenient pile of buildings, containing twelve 

79 P. 625. 8 °P. 388. s'P. 404. asp. 407. ssp. 419. 84p. 424. ssp. 433. sep. 444. 87pp. 445-449. 
ssp. 451. "p. 455. oop. 510. sip. 20. »2p. 514. 



Introduction xi 

rooms, of which nine are furnished with fire places." 93 In 1808, the 
Louisburg Male Academy was said to he "a pleasant building on the hill 
about one-fourth mile from the Village." 94 In 1810, the pupils of this 
academy gave a play "for the benefit of the Library lately established 
in that Institution." 95 

The trustees in letting out the contract for the academy building at 
Smithfleld in 1812 said that it was to be "22 feet by 40 feet two stories 
high, with such conveniences as is necessary for an academy." 96 The 
same year the trustees of Hyco Academy speak of the wood work of their 
"elegant brick building." 97 And the trustees of the Oxford Academy 
in 1812 refer with pride to "an elegant two-story Building, 50 feet 
long and 32 wide." 98 Tarboro erected a school building in 1813 which 
the trustees said was to be sixty feet by twenty-four feet and two stories 
high. 99 In 1814 the building of the Louisburg Female Academy was 
erected. The trustees specified that it was to be 30 feet by 20 feet and 
two stories high, with two chimneys, and painted outside. 100 In 1815, 
it was advertised that the Jamestown Female Seminary "School Room is 
furnished with a pair of Carey's Globes, a complete set of large Maps 
and one of the United States six feet square." 101 In 1818, the trustees 
of the Salisbury Academy say that "besides the large and elegant build- 
ing on Academy Square, provided for the Males, a very convenient 
house has been prepared for the Young Ladies." 102 In 1820, the two 
academy buildings were described as being "about 40 or 50 feet long and 
two stories high," situated upon handsome sites and surrounded with 
pleasant groves of native growth." 103 

The trustees of the Hillsboro Academy, in 1821, advertised that their 
new house was to be of brick and "large enough to contain about 150 
students." 104 The same year Mrs. Robert L. Edmonds claimed that 
her school room at Wadesboro was "furnished with Maps and Globes 
equal to any in the United States" 105 which reminds us that the modern 
habit of boasting about our schools is not really modern in origin after 
all. 

In 1822 Jones and Andrews conducted the Oxford Female Seminary. 
In one of their advertisements they declare that they "possess a better 
philosophical apparatus than most of our colleges." They also said they 
had "three excellent Piano Fortes" and that "the models for Drawing 
and Painting are numerous and good." 106 

In 1824 a committee of the trustees of the Charlotte Male and Female 
Academies gave notice that they intended to erect two academy buildings. 
These buildings were to be "fifty feet long by thirty feet wide, two 
stories high, on a stone foundation." 107 There were to be two partition 
walls in each building. In 1824, the trustees of Lincolnton Female 
Academy "Resolved unanimously that the building be brick." This 
school was 40 feet long and 25 feet wide, two stories high, the pitch 
below being eleven feet and the pitch above ten feet. 108 The window 

93 P. 346. 9 <P. 89. 9sp. 92. sep. 192. 97p. 25. 9 sp. 132 esp 77 loop 94 loip 170 102P 349 
103 P. 361. >»<P. 283. 105 P. 10. 106 P. 151. 107 P. 231. i°sp. 201. 



xii Introduction 

sills were made of good soapstone and cost sixty-two and a half cents a 
foot. 109 In 1825 the trustees authorized John Zimmerman "to contract 
for writing tables and seats for the Academy and to have three other 
tables made, one three feet square, and the other six feet long and four 
feet wide." 110 In 1827, a committee of the trustees was appointed "to 
purchase a sufficient quantity of calico to make a curtain in the Academy 
for the exhibition at the ensuing examination." 111 In 1828, Daniel 
Shuford was paid "for erecting a stage in the Female Academy." 112 
In 1836, a resolution of the board authorized "Mr. Johnson to procure 
for the Academy a pair of good globes when he visited the north." 113 

Possibly the best equipped school building in the State prior to 1840 
was the Fayetteville Academy building. In 1825 the trustees published 
the following description of it : "The main building and wing are three 
stories high, with a double Portico in front, and is surmounted with a 
beautiful Belfry — the length and breadth of the main building is 
about 65 by 45 feet, divided into large apartments, separated by large 
halls or passages through the center. They are sufficiently capacious to 
accommodate a school of 200 scholars and a family, and the lot is sup- 
plied from a Hydrant in the front yard with good and wholesome 
water." 114 

In 1826 the Salem Boys' School had sufficient buildings to accommo- 
date five teachers. 115 During this year the Oxford Female Seminary said •-' 
that "we have received a chemical and Philosophical Apparatus; and now 
each recitation in Chemistry, Philosophy and Astronomy is accom- 
panied with a Lecture and Experiments illustrating the principles of the 
sciences." 116 

In 1827, the Hillsboro Female Seminary prided itself on the "pos- 
session of an excellent Philosophical and Chemical Apparatus and Min- 
eralogical Cabinet." 117 A little later it was said that "a neat and well 
selected apparatus, together with a handsome cabinet of minerals facili- 
tate the task of instruction in the several studies of chemistry, Natural 
Philosophy and Mineralogy." 118 

In 1S30, the Southern Female Classical Seminary said that Mrs. Hol- 
lister "will bring with her on her return from Philadelphia an addi- 
tional Piano, so that the pupils in Music will have the use of two good 
Pianos." 119 

In 1831, Berkley's Literary and Scientific Institution announced that * 
it had "A small but well selected Cabinet of minerals," that it had _. 
"collections of flowers from the fields and gardens," that it also had 
"well executed engravings" on animal physiology and that the school was s 
equipped with some apparatus for teaching chemistry. 120 

For some years prior to 1833, unsuccessful attempts were made to 
establish an Episcopal school in North Carolina. In 1833, those who 
favored such a school met with enough success to secure funds to the 
amount of $5,000. 121 As a result, one stone building was erected on 

109 P. 203. 110 P. 205. mp. 211. 112 P. 214. 113 P. 220. 114 P. 71. 115 P. 82. i 16 P. 157. 117 P. 302. 
118 P. 304. " 9 P. 158. i 2 °P. 564. isip. 536. 



Introduction xiii 

the present site of St. Mary's school. In 1834, the trustees asked for 
proposals for the erection of another building "of the same dimensions 
and of. similar materials to that they have recently caused to be built, 
viz., 56 by 36 feet, two stories high — walls of rough granite, and roof 
covered with tin." 122 These two buildings are still standing and form 
a part of the present equipment of St. Mary's School. 

In 1S35, the trustees of Leasburg Classical School described their 
school house as being built "of brick and situated in a beautiful grove 
of oaks." 123 At this time Jesse Rankin was principal of the Oxford 
Female Seminary. It was advertised that this school was "furnished 
with Globes, Maps, Pianos, a collection of Geological Specimens, and a 
Chemical Apparatus." 124 

In 1837, the Northampton Academy had "an entirely new Mathemati- 
cal and Philosophical Apparatus." 125 The Stony Hill Academy in 
Nash at this time advertised that "a small tax of 50 cents for privileges 
of the Students' Library" would be collected from all pupils of that 
school. 126 

In 1838, the principal of Hemdon Academy in Franklin said that he 
had "a pair of globes for the use of Students in Geography, and appa- 
ratus to teach surveying practically." 127 The next year a visitor who 
attended the school closing of Asheboro Academy wrote that the house 
was "large enough to accommodate 60 Scholars, built and completely 
furnished off, with 12 large glass windows ; and furnished too with nec- 
essary seats, tables, and a fine Piano." 128 This school had a woman 
teacher and the only fault the visitor found with her work was that 
she did not use the blackboard in teaching arithmetic 129 Here was a 
village of less than 150 inhabitants, which had a school house large 
enough to accommodate 60 pupils, furnished with tables, chairs, black- 
boards, and a piano. There are many North Carolina school rooms 
in these modern times which would not compare favorably with that 
Asheboro school room of 75 years ago. And it may be added that the 
teacher of that school was trained at Mrs. Willard's Seminary, Troy, 
New York, then the best woman's school in the United States. 

Qualifications of Teachers. — These documents, as I have already 
pointed out above in setting forth the influence of the University, show 
the educational qualifications of many of the teachers of this period of 
our history. In 1790, a number of Presbyterian preachers who were 
Princeton graduates were teaching school in this State. What is known 
of the work of these preachers and their schools before 1790 has often 
been written about, notably by Foote in the earlier days and later by 
Smith in his History of Education in North Carolina and by TVeeks in 
his Beginnings of the Common School System in the South. Dr. Kemp 
P. Battle also has written of these early schools for the 1896-8 Report of 
the State Superintendent. There is little in the records gathered in this 

i 22 P. 540. 123 P. 33. 12«P. 160. 125 P. 277. 12 «P. 268. i"P. 119. 12S P. 333. 1J9 P. 340. 



xiv Introduction 

volume which tells anything about the schools or their teachers from 
1790 to 1800. 

In 1793, these documents show that Thomas Pitt Irving was prin- 
cipal of the New Bern school. It is well known that he was a Prince- 
ton graduate of 1789 and that he taught at New Bern from 1790 to 
1812. In 1794, Rev. Robert Tate was principal of the Wayne 
Academy. 130 He was a Presbyterian preacher and a college graduate. 
In 1794, Rev. David Kerr was principal of the Fayetteville Academy. 131 
He was a graduate of Trinity College, Dublin, and became head pro- 
fessor at Chapel Hill, when that school was opened in 1796. In 1801, 
Rev. John Robinson, another teacher and Presbyterian minister and 
college graduate, was principal of the Fayetteville Academy. 132 In 
1802, Rev. Andrew Minn, a North Carolina University graduate, suc- 
ceeded Robinson at Fayetteville. 133 In 1809, Flinn was succeeded by 
Rev. ¥m. L. Turner, another Presbyterian minister and college gradu- 
ate, who was assisted by Miss Beze "from New York." 134 In 1814, 
Rev. J. A. Turner, another Presbyterian minister, was the principal of 
this school. In 1802, the French language was taught in the Fayette- 
ville Academy by a Mr. Memorel, a French Gentleman of talents," 135 
and in 1823 by M. Laising, a native of France. 136 In 1838, the Fay- 
etteville Female Academy was in charge of Miss S. Bostock, an "Eng- 
lish Lady." 13 ? 

When the Raleigh Academy was established in 1800, German Guthrie, 
a teacher of note and experience, was made principal. 138 In 1804, he 
was succeeded by Rev. Marin Detargny, "late of Princeton College." 139 
He in turn was succeeded the same year by Chesley Daniel, a graduate 
of the University of North Carolina. 140 In 1806, Mr. Daniel left the 
school and Rev. W. L. Turner, "late Professor of Languages in Wash- 
ington Academy," at Lexington, Virginia, took the principalship 141 
held temporarily by Aaron F. McGready. 142 Beginning in 1808, T. 
Sambourne and his wife, who came from Philadelphia, taught music, 
drawing and painting for a time in the Raleigh Academy. They had 
been educated in England. 143 In 1809, Mr. Turner went to the Fayette- 
ville Academy and he was succeeded at Raleigh by Benjamin Rice, a 
graduate of Hampden Sydney College, Virginia. 144 In 1810, Rev. 
William McPheeters, of Virginia, took charge of the school and re- 
mained in the principalship for nearly 20 years. He was a Presbyterian 
minister, a college graduate, and a teacher of considerable ability. 145 
Under his direction the Raleigh Academy enjoyed its greatest pros- 
perity. At various times he had as his assistants such teachers as Josiah 
Crudup, 146 Rev. Benjamin Rice, 147 W. P. Mangum, 148 Miss Bosworth 
"from the State of New York," 149 Mr. Edmundson from Washington 
College, 150 Miss Nye "from the State of New York," 151 Stephen 
Frontis, "a native of France," 152 Rev. George W. Freeman, 153 Alexan- 

13 °P. 634. "IP. 60. 132 P. 60. 133 P. 62. ""PP. 65-66. 135 P. 68. 13 ep. 70. i«p. 72. issp. 388. 
139 P. 390. 14 op. 391. i«P. 396. i^P. 394. i« 3 P. 409. i 44 P. 418. i 45 PP. 419, 482. i^p. 428. i«P 
430. 148 P. 432. "'P. 437. 16 °P. 437. i"P. 444. i B2 P. 452. i"p. 454. 



Introduction xv 

der Wilson, 154 and Milton Barlow, "a graduate of one of the Northern 
Colleges from Connecticut." 155 

In 1827, Rev. J. O. Freeman, another Presbyterian preacher and a 
graduate of Trinity College, Dublin, succeeded McPheeters. 156 Free- 
man remained at the head of the school for nearly three years and was 
succeeded by Peter Le Messurier, 157 who had considerable reputation as 
a classical scholar and teacher. In 1831, James Grant who had re- 
cently graduated at the University was made principal. In 1834, Dr. 
McPheeters tried to revive the school and in a short time was succeeded 
by L. B. Johnson and Thomas B. Haywood. 158 Haywood was a Chapel 
Hill graduate. 

In 1835, Mrs. Hutchison (formerly Miss Nye) announced that she 
had recently "visited one of the most respectable Female Seminaries in 
the North, where she made herself familiar with the most popular 
methods of conducting such Institutes" as the Raleigh Female Acad- 
emy. 159 In 1836, the Raleigh Male Academy was said to be in charge 
of Robert G. Allison, a graduate of the University. 160 W. G. Catlin 
was the last principal before 1840. 161 These documents tell us nothing 
about his qualifications as a teacher. 

During this period the Pittsboro Academy was one of the leading 
schools in the State. In 1800, these records show that it was in charge 
of William Bingham. 162 Mr. Bingham was a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of Glasgow. In 1801, its principal for a short time was a Mr. 
Poe, 163 who was succeeded by David Caldwell, Jr., and German Guth- 
rie. Caldwell was the son of David Caldwell, the famous Guilford 
County teacher. In 1805, William Bingham returned to Pittsboro 164 
and continued the school until 1812. In 1820, Jacob Gillett "from 
New York" became principal. 165 Three years later Rev. Nathaniel 
H. Harris took the school. 166 In 1825 a Mr. Lalor taught there for a 
year, 167 followed by John D. Clancy, a graduate of the University. 
From 1831 to 1834, the school was conducted by Peter Le Messurier. 168 
In 1838, J. M. Lovejoy, "a graduate and a first rate mathematician and 
linguist" took charge of the school. Lovejoy was said to be a native of 
Vermont. 169 

Another one of the schools of this period which had more than local 
repute was the Hillsboro Academy. In 1801, Andrew Flinn, a graduate 
of the University was its principal. 170 In 1803, the principal was 
Thomas Barron, "from the University of Cambridge in Massachu- 
setts." 171 In 1805, Richard Henderson, "late Professor in the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina" 172 was principal. In 1812, William Bing- 
ham, who had taught at Pittsboro for a number of years, became prin- 
cipal of the academy. 173 He remained here for three years and then 
removed his school to Mt. Repose in Orange County. He was succeeded 
in 1815 by a Mr. Graham. 174 In 1818 John Witherspoon, a Presbyte- 
rian preacher and teacher, became principal. 175 He was succeeded, in 

154 P.458. i 55 P.459. 166 P.485. 157 P. 496. 158 PP. 491-503. 159 P. 507. 16 °P.510. i 61 P. 511. 162 P. 
35. "'P. 36. 164 P. 37. 166 P. 38. 166 P. 39. i 67 P. 39. 168 P. 40. 169 P. 42. i 7 °P. 280. 17l P. 281. 
172 P. 281. i 73 P. 281. 174 P. 282. "sp. 282. 



xvi Introduction 

1822, by Rev. John Rodgers, another preacher and teacher. Rodgers 
remained at the head of the school, until January 1, 1827. 176 Both 
Witherspoon and Rodgers had considerable reputation as excellent teach- 
ers. When Mr. Rodgers left this school, he was succeeded by William 
J. Bingham, a son of William Bingham. The younger Bingham was a 
graduate of the University and remained the principal of the school until 
1840, the last year covered by these documents. 177 William J. Bing- 
ham's assistant teachers during these years were Edward Smith, J. C. 
Norwood, John A. Bingham, W. C. Sutton, John McAlister, A. H. Ray, 
and S. W. Hughes, all of them said to be well qualified teachers and col- 
lege graduates. 

It has been impossible to find any records which contain much more 
than tradition about many of these early schools and their teachers. 
The Warrenton school is no exception. In 1795, the principal of this 
school was said to be Marcus George, a graduate of Trinity College, 
Dublin. It is certain he was the principal in 1802, 178 and in 1807 179 
and that he remained principal until 1810, when he was succeeded by 
William Crawford. 180 Crawford was evidently a man of some note as 
a teacher. In 1811, he was appointed to a position in the Fed- 
eral government, 181 and was succeeded in 1812 by a Mr. Halbert. 182 
Two years later the school was in charge of Mr. Morgan, "a graduate of 
Yale College." 183 For two years, 1818 to 1820, Charles A. Hill con- 
ducted the Academy, assisted by Rev. Ezekiel C. Whitman and James 
Kerr. 184 Hill was a graduate of the University of North Carolina, a 
Methodist preacher and a good teacher. He also found time enough at 
a later date while living and teaching in Franklin County to be elected 
to the State Senate, where he was the author of the law which created 
the Literary Fund of 1825. He was also the leader of the opposition 
to lotteries in the Senate of 1826 and was no small factor in creating 
enough sentiment to do away with those gambling devices in aid of 
schools and churches. (See Coon's Beginnings of Public Education, pp. 
281 and 230.) When Hill left the Academy, he taught a private school 
in Warrenton for a year and then moved to Franklin County. He was 
succeeded in the Academy by George W. Freeman. 185 Mr. Freeman 
afterwards taught in the Academy at Raleigh and in the Episcopal 
school. Later on in his career he became Episcopal bishop of Arkansas. 
In 1823, James H. Otey, a graduate of the University, served the 
academy two years as principal. 186 He then entered the Episcopal min- 
istry and finally became bishop of Tennessee. After Mr. Otey, George 
P. Williams, "of Vermont," became principal for a year, 187 followed by 
M. D. Donnellan, in 1826. 188 In 1832, the principal was Thomas J. 
Vaiden. He said with hardly becoming modesty that any of the Latin 
and Greek books read by senior students of the University of this State 
and of Virginia might be read under his tuition. 189 After two years 



""P. 286. "'PP. 286-293. i 7 «P. 577. i 79 P. 580. "op. 530. isip. 580. iszp. 681. 183 P. 582 
184pp. 583-584. 186pp. 584-585. i 86 P. 585. "»P. 586. "sp. 587. "sp. 5 g 7 . 



Intkoduction xvii 

Vaiden was succeeded by Solomon Lea, a recent graduate of the Uni- 
versity. 190 

Wherever the early Presbyterian ministers went they usually taught 
school as well as preached the gospel. In 1803, Rev. John Brown, 
assisted by David Dunlap, began an academic school at Wadesboro. 191 
Brown had a long and successful career as a Presbyterian minister and 
teacher. In 1819, Rev. Robert L. Edmonds who always put the A.M. 
to his name was principal of the Wadesboro Academy. 192 Timothy 
Mason was his assistant. In 1821, Mrs. Edmonds began a female board- 
ing school, assisted by Miss Haskins "from New York." Mrs. Edmonds 
claimed that she had had eight years experience as a teacher. 193 

During this period Caswell County usually had a good classical school 
within its borders. The first one mentioned in these documents is the 
Caswell Academy of 1803. Rev. Hugh Shaw, a Presbyterian minister, 
was its principal and Bartlett Yancey, a young Chapel Hill graduate, 
was the assistant. 194 Yancey soon quit teaching and entered upon the 
practice of law, much after the fashion still followed by many who use 
teaching as a stepping stone to some other profession. It has so often 
been asserted by North Carolina writers that Yancey was the author 
of the Literary Eund Law of 1825, that I hesitate to utter a dissenting 
opinion. But the credit for the authorship of that law belongs to 
Charles A. Hill of Eranklin, as I have said above. 

After two years Mr. Shaw left the Caswell Academy and went to 
teach in the Hyco Academy, another Caswell County school. Erom 
1805 to 1807, Sanders Donoho and James Bowles conducted the Caswell 
Academy with indifferent success. In 1807, John W. Caldwell, a son 
of the Guilford David Caldwell, took charge. He was advertised as 
"a profound linguist and a good teacher." 195 James Kerr was his 
assistant in 1810. 196 

During the period covered by these documents Franklin County 
usually had a good school. In 1S05, Matthew Dickinson, a Yale gradu- 
ate, became principal of the Franklin Academy at Louisburg. For four 
years Dickinson conducted the school with much success. At one time 
these documents say that 20 young men left the University on account 
of the monitorial system then in vogue there and entered Dickinson's 
School. The fact that he advertised to teach almost all the high school 
and college subjects of the day is likely accounted for by this incident. 
I have found no evidence to substantiate the traditional statement that 
Dickinson aspired to have his school supersede the University. In 
1807, Dickinson's assistant (Dickinson called him an usher) was Davis 
H. Mayhew, a "Williams College graduate. On January 1, 1809, Dick- 
inson began to practice law and was succeeded by Mayhew. 197 In 1810, 
James Bogle became principal for two years. 198 The Raleigh Star said 
that Bogle was "a man of genius and an excellent Classical Scholar." 199 
His assistant was Josiah Crudup, a future Baptist preacher and poli- 

i 90 P. 588. 191 P. 2. i 92 P. 3. 1B3 P. 10. 194 P. 19. i J5 P. 20. i 96 P. 21. 197 PP. 84-91. "'P. 91. 
»» 9 P. 92. 



xviii Introduction 

tician. In 1812, Davis H. Mayhew again became principal, assisted by 
William Hillman, 200 probably a Harvard graduate. In 1816, John B. 
Bobbitt, a Chapel Hill man, became principal. 201 About this time 
Miss Harriet Partridge, "a lady from Massachusetts," assumed charge 
of the female academy. 202 In 1821, Fitch Wheeler, a Yale graduate, 
was principal of the male and Miss Ann Benedict, who had taught in 
Connecticut and New York City, was principal of the female acad- 
emy. 203 For a short while in 1823, George Perry was principal of the 
male academy. 204 He was succeeded the same year by Addison H. 
White, another Yale graduate. 205 In 1824, Miss Mary Ramsey, "of 
New York," was principal of the female academy. 206 In 1825, Elijah 
Brewer, a graduate of Yale in 1824, became principal of the male 
school. 207 In 1828, Charles A. Hill, a graduate of the University and a 
former teacher at Warrenton and at Midway in Franklin, became prin- 
cipal of the male academy. 208 From 1831 to 3 837, the male and 
female academies were in charge of John B. Bobbitt and Mrs. Bobbitt. 
Mr. Bobbitt was an experienced teacher and a scholar of considerable 
attainments. He was a graduate of the University. 209 

Williamsboro, at this time in Granville County, was a neighborhood 
of cultured people. Its academy, in 1805, had John Hicks as its prin- 
cipal. 210 He taught school for a number of years and moved to Macon 
County. There seems to be no record of his education. He claimed 
to teach the usual subjects taught as preparation for college. In 1809, 
this school was in charge of James K. Burch and Benjamin Rice, of 
Hampden Sydney College. 211 From 1811 to 1815, Joel Strong, L. Hol- 
brooks, and William Hillman who had taught at Louisburg, were prin- 
cipals. 212 In 1815, Andrew Rhea, a college graduate and lately a pro- 
fessor at Chapel Hill, was principal. 213 From 1822 to 1829, Alexander 
Wilson, "late of Belfast Ireland," was principal. 214 Wilson later be- 
came a Presbyterian preacher and was made doctor of divinity by the 
University in 1839. 

In 1805 Hyco (Hico) Academy in Caswell advertised Rev. Hugh 
Shaw, who had formerly taught at the Caswell Academy, as its prin- 
cipal and Rev. Thomas Cottrell, a Methodist preacher and a doctor 
of medicine, as his assistant. 215 In 1812, Abel Graham was principal 
and in 1814 L. Holbrooks. 216 . In 1818, John II. Hinton, who was edu- 
cated at Chapel Hill and had taught in the preparatory school there, 
was principal. 217 In 1820, Mablon Kenyon, an xi.M. "graduate of one 
of the Northern Colleges," became principal. 218 In 1822, Dabney 
Rainey was his assistant. 219 In 1834, Hyco announced that its prin- 
cipal was "a man who has enjoyed the advantages of a regular collegiate 
education." 220 

From 1805 to 1837, there was a school of some pretensions in Wilkes. 
In 1805, this school was in charge of a Mr. Harrison, of South Caro- 
lina, evidently a college graduate. In 1810, Rev. Peter McMillan, a 

2 °°P. 93. 201 P. 95. 2 ° 2 P. 95. 203 P. 99. 2 °"P. 99. 205 P. 100. !06 P. 100. 2 °T\ 101. 20S P. 102. 
209 PP. 103-106. 21 »P. 121. 211 P. 121. 2 i 2 PP. 122-123. "'PP. 123-124. 214pp. 124-127. 215 P. 22. 
2iepp, 24-25. 2i7p, 25. 2isp, 26. 219 P. 27. 22 °P. 28. 



Introduction xix 

Presbyterian preacher and college graduate, was its principal. In 1828, 
another Presbyterian preacher was in charge, Rev. A. W. Gay. Finally 
the school was conducted, beginning in 1837, by Mr. and Mrs. Hall. 221 

These documents contain very little about the schools of Edenton. 
They do tell us, however, that Eev. J. 0. Freeman was teaching 
there in 1805, assisted by Messrs. Nye and Hilliard, who were recom- 
mended by "a number of respectable characters in the towns of Cam- 
bridge and Falmouth, in Massachusetts." 222 Likely they were Harvard 
graduates. 

As early as 1806, Guilford Academy was advertised with John "W. 
Caldwell as principal. 223 In 1818, the school was conducted by Na- 
thaniel H. Harris and James Kerr. 224 In 1819, Rev. William Paisley, 
a Presbyterian minister, became principal, assisted by his daughter and 
Iveson L. Brooks. 225 In 1821, Mr. Paisley was still principal, assisted 
by John W. Caldwell, Jonathan Worth and Miss Paisley. 226 In 1828, 
the school was in charge of John D. Clancy, a graduate of the Uni- 
versity. 227 The Jonathan Worth mentioned as a teacher in this school 
was the same Jonathan Worth who was afterwards governor of the State. 

When Liberty Hall Academy which was chartered in 1778 was aban- 
doned in 1780, it was removed to Salisbury. There is no authentic rec- 
ord of the Salisbury School prior to 1807. During that year, the trus- 
tees announced that they had secured Rev. John Brown, "some years 
at Wadesboro," to act as their principal teacher. 228 In 1818, the acad- 
emy was in charge of Robert L. Edmonds, who was "educated in the 
University of Glasgow" and at Trinity College, Dublin. Mr. Edmonds 
was assisted by Miss Eliza Slater and Miss Mitchell, "two young ladies 
who have been procured from New York." Later on Miss Mary Ann 
Slater, a sister of Miss Eliza Slater, was also a teacher in the 
academy. 229 Just as it often happens now, the women teachers of that 
day abandoned their school room duties and got married. The middle 
name of one of our present U. S. senators, whose home is at Salisbury, 
is Slater — Lee Slater Overman is his full name. 

In 1821, Rev. Jonathan O. Freeman became principal of the Salis- 
bury Academy. He was here when called to Raleigh to succeed Dr. 
McPheeters in 1827. In 1838, the Salisbury Female Academy was in 
charge of Mrs. Hutchison, formerly Miss Nye, who once taught at 
Raleigh. She was assisted by Miss Sarah Louise ISTye of New York, a 
niece, by Miss Emma J. Baker and by Rev. Stephen Frontis, the "native 
of France" who formerly taught at Raleigh. 230 

A number of other teachers are named in these records before 1810. 
Some of them, like Jacob Nelson 231 at Mt. Clio Academy and A. M. 
Rogers 232 at Greene Academy in 1807, are mentioned only once and 
nothing is known as to their antecedents. The Raleigh Star said that 
Jacob Mordecai, who conducted a female seminary at Warrenton from 
1808 to 1815, was a man of education and taste. 233 In 1808, Rev. Wil- 

22 'PP. 636-639. 2 22 PP. 326-327. 223 P. 168. 224 P. 168. 225 P. 168. 22 6PP. 169-170. 227 P. 170. 228 P. 
346. 22 9PP. 349-351. 23 °P. 381. 231 P. 343. 232 P. 167. 233 P. 595. 



xx Intkoduction 

Ham Paisley was teaching at Hawfield Academy, in Orange County. 234 
He was evidently a man of considerable ability as a teacher and also a 
man of collegiate training. In 1814, this school was in charge of John 
H. Pickard, 235 who taught the usual studies preparatory to college. 
In 1809, Pickard was the principal of the Sims Latin School and was 
said to be a graduate of the University of North Carolina. 236 

Shortly after 1800, the Westrayville Academy was established. From 
1809 to 1811, this school was in charge of John B. Bobbitt, a young 
graduate of the University, who was later to become one of the best known 
teachers in the State. 237 In 1809, Rev. Joseph D. Kilpatrick, a Pres- 
byterian preacher of Rowan, had charge of a school in that county 
which he called Kilpatrick's School. 238 Another Presbyterian preacher 
and teacher, Rev. George Newton, was principal of Union Hill Academy 
near Asheville in 1809, 239 while Rev. John Robinson was teaching at 
Poplar Tent in Cabarrus 240 and Rev. John M. Wilson at Rocky 
River. 24 i 

In 1810, the Rev. James Thompson, of Virginia, was principal of the 
Washington Academy in Beaufort County. 242 He was a Presbyterian 
preacher and a college graduate. The same year Murdoch McLean, a 
recent graduate of the University, began to teach at Laurel Hill in Robe- 
son County. 243 About this time the Raleigh Register contained a 
notice of the death of Rev. Joseph Alexander, who had graduated at 
Princeton in 1760 and whom it calls one of the fathers of learning in 
the "Western Woods of Carolina." 244 

During 1811, J. O. Freeman who was later on principal of the Salis- 
bury Academy and of the Raleigh Academy, was teaching at Murfrees- 
boro. 245 Daniel Adams who was formerly principal of an academy 
at Stratford, Connecticut, was principal of the Vine Hill Academy, Scot- 
land Neck. 246 In 1812, Adams was succeeded by a Mr. Jones, of Con- 
necticut. 247 Both Adams and Jones were probably Yale graduates. 
Rev. M. McMillan, a Presbyterian preacher and teacher, was principal 
of the Euphronian Academy in Moore County; 248 and Elijah Graves 
was teaching at Pleasant Grove in Granville County, in 1812. 249 Both 
of these teachers had collegiate training. 

From 1813 to 1840, these papers give a fairly connected account of the 
schools and teachers in Granville, especially those located in Oxford. 
In 1813, Thomas H. Willie, who had been educated by Thomas P. Irv- 
ing of Princeton in the New Bern Academy, was made principal of the 
Oxford Academy. 250 In 1815, Rev. James Thompson, a Presbyterian 
preacher and teacher, was principal and Mr. Willie was his assistant. 251 
In 1818, George W. Freeman, who has already been mentioned in con- 
nection with the Raleigh Academy, was principal for a year, assisted 
by Levi H. McLean, Lotan G. Watson, and Miss Bosworth. 252 From 
1819 to 1822, a Mr. Bugbee and Ransom Hubbill were principals. 253 
Their assistants were Miss Griswold, Miss Halcomb, Miss Mitchell and 

2J4 P. 295. 236 P. 296. 236 P. 603. 237 PP. 263-264. 23 sp. 332. 23 9p. 14. 24 °P. 329. 241 P. 329. 242 P. 
330. 243 P. 343. 244 P. 229. 246 P. 328. 2 "P. 175. 247p. 176. 24sp, 327. 249p. 132. 25op. 132. '26ip. 
133. 252 P. 133. 2 "P. 134. 



Introduction xxi 

Mr. Paschall. Misses Bosworth, Halcomb, Griswold and Mitchell were 
all educated "in the north." From 1822 to 1829, James D. Johnson, a 
Yale graduate, was principal. His assistants were Miss Mitchell, a 
Mr. Graham, who was a graduate of Washington College in Virginia, 
Miss Emma Stansbury, "a daughter of Rev. A. Stansbury, late of 
Albany," and Rev. Joseph Labaree, a Presbyterian minister and 
teacher. 254 In 1829, the Oxford Academy was in charge of Silas C. 
Lindsly, a graduate of Princeton. He continued principal for some 
three years 255 and was succeeded by James H. Wilkes, in 1832. In 
1838, A. Hart and T. Higgins were principals. Mr. Hart was said to be 
a "gentleman of considerable attainments in classical and scientific 
knowledge, acquired in England, Italy and France," while Mr. Higgins 
was described as "a graduate of an European College." 256 At the end of 
the year 1838, David F. Robertson, a native of Scotland and educated in 
that country, came to teach at Oxford. He had been a teacher in the 
Academy at Albany, J\ T ew York. 257 The next year Thomas H. Willie 
returned to Oxford and succeeded Robertson. 258 

For two years, 1822-4, Jones and Andrews who had formerly taught 
at Warrenton, conducted what they called the Oxford Seminary. On 
leaving Oxford, Mr. Jones became professor in the Franklin Institute of 
Philadelphia, and was later superintendent of the U. S. Patent Office 
and professor of chemistry in the medical department of Columbian 
College, Washington, D. C. 259 From 1826 to 1830, the Oxford Seminary 
was in charge of Rev. Joseph Labaree, assisted by Rev. Thomas Skel- 
ton and wife of Massachusetts and Miss Hannah Kennedy, a teacher 
who had come South to assist Jones and Andrews. 260 During the years 
1830-32, Rev. E. Hollister and wife conducted the Seminary. They had 
Miss E. Humphrey as their assistant. She had taught in the Moravian 
school at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, before coming to Oxford. 261 In 
1835, Rev. Jesse Rankin, a Presbyterian preacher and teacher, took 
charge of the Seminary. 262 In 1839, Rankin was succeeded by Ander- 
son G. Hughes and Anne E. Hughes, but these documents say nothing as 
to their previous professional training or experience. 263 

In 1815, Duncan McLaurin, "late of South Carolina," was teaching at 
Laurel Hill, in Robeson County. He was denominated by the board of 
trustees as "that eminent teacher." 264 The same year William E. 
Webb, "formerly Progfessor of Languages in the University of this 
State," was conducting the Union Academy in Halifax; 265 and Robert 
Hall, another University graduate and former teacher at Raleigh, was 
principal of the Tarboro Academy. 266 

In 1818, Austin A. Hersey, "a graduate of Dartmouth University," 
took charge of the school at Hookerton in Greene County; 267 and James 
A. Craig, a University of !North Carolina graduate, began to teach in the 
Wayne Academy. 268 This year Rev. Wm. Bingham began to teach at 
Mt. Repose in Orange, succeeded there by his son W. J. Bingham in 

2^PP. 135-146. 2"p, 146. 256p. 147. 257pp. 148-149. "sp. 150. " 9 P. 154. 2«°PP. 154-157. 
5tl PP. 157-159. 262P. 160. 2 "P. 160. 284 P. 344. "spp. 178-179. 2 ««P. 77. J67 P. 167. :es P. 635. 



xxii Introduction 

1826 and by W. P. Forrest in 1829.269 It was in 1819 that Rev. Elijah 
Graves and his wife announced the beginning of their school at Long 
Meadows in Orange. Mr. Graves had a long and honorable career as 
a teacher and Presbyterian preacher. 270 The year 1819 also marked 
the opening of the Milton Female Seminary under the principalship of 
Abner W. Clopton, assisted by the Misses Thomas, who had been edu- 
cated in New York. 271 

In 1819, John H. Hassam, a traveling teacher of English Grammar, 
came to Raleigh from New Hampshire and opened his Private Academy. 
Hassam professed to be able to teach "a correct and practical knowledge 
of English Grammar and Punctuation in twenty-four lectures of two 
hours each." Soon after his arrival, he associated himself with George 
W. Freeman. In three years Hassam had blossomed out as a lawyer 
and the owner of a farm of 150 acres. The Private Academy seems not 
to have lasted longer than three years, though all the subjects prepara- 
tory to college were taught. 272 

From 1818 to 1821, Rev. Thomas Cottrell, the Methodist minister, 
and his wife conducted the Shocco Female Academy in Halifax. 273 
After the Cottrells left, this school was conducted for a year by the 
Rev. Rufus "Wiley and his son and daughter. In 1822, Shocco was in 
charge of Philip Wiley and Mrs. Mary Lucas, widow of the Raleigh 
lawyer, Alexander Lucas. 274 

Beginning in 1819, the Warrenton Female Seminary was managed 
by Jones and Andrews. They succeeded J. Mordecai. Their school 
nourished for about three years. 275 From 1822 to 1824 Achilles Plunk- 
ett, J. D. Plunkett, Mrs. Plunkett and their associates conducted the 
school. 276 From 1825 to 1826, E. and C. C. Brainerd, of Massachusetts, 
were principals. C. C. Brainerd died in 1826 and his place was taken by 
John Kendrick, of Dartmouth College. In 1829 the school went back 
into the hands of Mrs. Plunkett who conducted it until 1834, 277 when 
she was succeeded by Mrs. Harriet J. Allen, 278 who had been educated 
in New York State. 

Beginning in 1820, Rev. John Mushat conducted the school at States- 
ville for two years. 279 Mushat was a Presbyterian preacher and had the 
reputation of being an excellent teacher. The same year that Mushat 
began his Statesville school saw the beginnings of a number of other 
schools, all in charge of graduates of the State University, viz., Charles 
A. Hill's private school at Warrenton, 280 James F. Martin's academy at 
Madison, 281 James A. Craig's Chapel Hill Academy, 282 and Thomas 
G. Stone's school at Hilliardston in Nash County. 283 In 1820, the 
Lawrenceville Male Academy was announced to begin on January 1, 
1821, "under the care of a Gentleman from the North, whose name we 
have not yet learned from our agent." The Female Academy at the 
same place was under the care of Mrs. Terrell, "late of Connecticut." 284 



269 PP. 296-298. "°P. 298. "ip. 30. 272 PP. 521-525. 273 P. 604. 27 *PP. 606-608. 275 PP. 612-618 
"spp. 618-620. 277 PP. 626-627. 278 P. 627. 279 P. 187. 28 °P. 628. 281 P. 345. 282 P. 299. 283 P. 264 
2 84 P. 328. 



Introduction xxiii 

Some time before 1820, there were schools for boys and girls at Lin- 
colnton. These records show that by 1820, the academies at that place 
were organized. From 1820 to 1822, Joseph E. Bell, 'late of Union 
Seminary in Tennessee," 285 was principal. Mr. Bell was at that time a 
Lutheran preacher. He later on entered the Presbyterian ministry. He 
was a man of considerable scholarship, but he was finally forced to 
leave the ministry and teaching because of conduct unbecoming his 
profession. In 1822, Rev. John Mushat became principal of the Lin- 
colnton schools. He was assisted by Nathaniel 1ST. Smith. 286 Both were 
men of good scholarship, being college graduates, as was the successor 
of Mr. Smith, James J. Watson. 287 In 1824, Allen D. Metcalf, "a 
graduate of Hampden Sydney College" 288 became the successor of 
Mushat. He remained only a year and was succeeded by Nathaniel N". 
Smith and Samuel P. Simpson. Mr. Simpson soon abandoned teaching 
and entered upon the practice of medicine. 289 From 1826 to 1S29, 
Miss Maria Allen had charge of the girls' school. 290 She was educated 
in New York State and left teaching to get married in 1829 when she 
was succeeded by her sister, Miss Harriet Allen. 291 In 1832, Miss 
Amelia Thompson, another teacher from the North, succeeded Miss 
Allen. 292 Two years later, 1834, the boys' school was in charge of 
George W. Morrow, a graduate of the University. 293 These records close 
this period of the history of the Lincolnton schools with the announce- 
ment that Miss Abigail Mason, of Pennsylvania, would take charge of 
the girls' school in 1841. 294 

When the Smithfield Academy was begun in February, 1820, the 
trustees said that it would be in charge of Robert Brevard Poor, who 
"graduated at Cambridge (Mass.) lastAugust," 295 In 1827, this school 
was conducted by A. W. Gay, who later taught in Wilkesboro, and Miss 
R. D. Salmon. 296 Mr. Gay was a Presbyterian minister and Miss 
Salmon was a graduate of one of the New York seminaries. In 1828, 
this academy had for its principal, J. Warnock, "a graduate of Glasgow 
University." 297 Seven years later William Broome was the teacher of 
this school. 298 Nothing is recorded as to his previous education. 

From 1820 to 1837, there was a school of some pretensions at Farmwell 
Grove in Halifax County. 299 The first teacher mentioned was Levi H. 
McLean. In 1824, Thomas Bragg, "a. graduate of our University," was 
the teacher. After two years he was succeeded by John J. Wyche, an- 
other University graduate. In 1827, this school was conducted by 
J. Judge. 

In 1821, Rev. John Williamson had a school at Hopewell in Meck- 
lenburg County. 300 Mr. Williamson was a Presbyterian preacher and 
a college bred man. From 1822 to 1828, Charles A. Hill taught at 
Midway in Franklin County. 301 In 1822, Rev. Chauncey Eddy, an- 
other Presbyterian minister, began a school at Morganton. He was 
assisted by Mrs. Eddy and by Miss Parkman. After two years the 

285 P. 196. *s«P. 197. 287 P. 200. 288 P. 200. 289 P. 200. 29 °P. 206. 2,1 PP. 216-217. 292 P 218 
293 P. 220. 294 P. 224. 295 P. 194. 2 ' 6 P. 194. 297 P. 195. 298 P. 195. 2 » 9 P. 179. 3 °°P. 230. 301 PP. 107-113! 



xxiv Introduction 

school was in charge of Alexander E. Wilson, "a graduate from the 
State University." 302 Miss Parkman was one of the numerous North 
Carolina teachers of this period who had been educated in one of the 
northern schools. The same year that Mr. Eddy began to teach at 
Morganton the trustees of the Littleton Select School announced that 
"the Male Department will be conducted by a young gentleman from 
1ST. York, who has received his education in Yale College." 303 From 
1822 to 1824, Rev. Thomas Cottrell, his wife, and his son Benjamin 
Cottrell began a school at Shady Grove in Warren County. 304 

In 1823, George W. Ereeman began the Episcopal School at Ra- 
leigh. 305 For ten years this school met with indifferent success. In 
1833, J. D. Hooper became principal. 306 During this year buildings 
were erected and the next year the school was put in charge of Joseph 
G. Cogswell, Joseph H. Saunders and J. D. Hooper. 307 After a year 
Cogswell left. 308 In 1837, Rev. M. A. Curtis became principal for two 
years. 309 Mr. Curtis was succeeded in 1839 by John A. Backhouse and 
Edwin Geer. 310 Hooper and Saunders were graduates of the Univer- 
sity. Mr. Cogswell became professor in the University of South Caro- 
lina and finally was librarian of the Astor Library in New York City. 
Mr. Curtis was a man of considerable learning, especially in the realm 
of natural science. Of the other teachers of this school, I have found 
out nothing as to their previous education. 

Between 1820 and 1830, there are a number of teachers and schools 
mentioned in these papers for short periods. An example is Hooper's 
Select Classical School at Fayetteville in 1824, of which William Hooper, 
"late a professor in the University," was principal. 311 In this class 
belongs the Tarboro Academy of 1824. At that time a Mr. Griswold 
resigned as principal and was succeeded by Eugene Farnan, "a native 
of Ireland." 312 Other examples are the following: Bertie Union 
Academy of 1825 under John D. Tate; 313 the Charlotte Female Academy 
of 1825-28 under Rev. Thomas Cottrell, 314 and the Charlotte Male 
Academy of 1826, in charge of the Rev. Allen D. Metcalf, A.B. ; 315 
Rev. John Witherspoon's Boarding School at Hillsboro from 1826 to 
1830 ; 316 Walter S. Pharos Sugar Creek Academy of 1827 ; 317 Rev. 
P. J. Sparrow's school at Buffalo in Lincoln County during the year 
1827 ; 318 Robert Timlin's Shiloh Academy of 1827, in Granville; 319 
the Spring Grove Academy of 1827 in Franklin under Mr. Guernsey, 
"a graduate of a Northern College," and Edward G. Benners; 320 the 
Nashville Academy of 1827 in charge of Rev. John Armstrong, a 
graduate of Columbian College, Washington, D. C.; 321 Rev. R. H. 
Chapman's Classical School of 1828 at Center Church in Iredell; 322 
Thomas G. Stone's Mount Welcome Academy of 1828 in Franklin; 323 
Absalom K. Barr's Lexington Academy of 1828, 324 H. R. Hall's Ebe- 
nezer Academy of 1829 in Iredell ; 325 and George W. Morrow's Bethle- 
hem School of 1829 in Orange. 326 

3 ° 2 PP. 16-17. 3 ° 3 P. 631. 8 °*P. 628. 3 ° 6 P. 535. 806 P. 536. 3 ° 7 P. 537. sospp. 545.548. sosp. 547. 
81 °P. 549. 311 P. 72. 3 i 2 P. 77. 313 P. 325. 31 <PP. 232-240. 31B P. 233. ""P. 310. 317 P. 241. '"P. 
226. 319 P. 163. 32 °P. 114. "'P. 266. 322 P. 191. 323 P. 115. 324 P. 328. » 26 P. 190. 82fl P.312. 



Introduction xxv 

Ealeigh and "Wake County had a number of schools begun before 
1830, which had more or less success. In 1823, James Pheelan at 
Wake Forest Academy was preparing students for the University, 327 
and J. E. Lumsden in his private school at Ealeigh also advertised 
that he would prepare pupils to enter the same college. 328 Mr. Lums- 
den and his wife continued to teach the remaining seventeen years 
covered by these documents. When the Ealeigh Academy, in 1827, 
had lost some of its former vigor and popularity, Timothy E. Dwight, 
a graduate of Yale, opened in Ealeigh what he called Dwight's Select 
School. 329 But the career of this school was short-lived. Even Dr. 
William McPheeters' attempt to establish in Ealeigh a Female Boarding 
School in 1827 seems to have finally met with failure after six years 
of experiment. 330 One of the assistants in this school was Miss M. C. 
Street, "an experienced Preceptress from the North." 331 In 1829, 
James Logan advertised that he prepared boys for the University at 
Pleasant Spring Academy in Wake County. 332 At the same time 
J. H. Wilkes was principal at Pomona Academy, also in Wake. 333 
This school was later taught by William B. Strain, 334 already referred 
to as a University graduate, and by the same Mr. Higgins who formerly 
taught in the Oxford Academy. 335 Beginning in 1829 the Wake Forest 
Pleasant Grove Academy in Wake County seems to have had a con- 
tinuous existence. 336 This school was first in charge of Daniel W. 
Kerr and his wife. Dr. Battle says Kerr was a good teacher. The 
other teachers here were Edward T. Fowlkes, who taught English gram- 
mar in seven weeks, Miss Eliza W. Bobbitt, and Miss Martha E, Eich- 
ardson, "a young lady from the North." 

There seems to have been a good school in Pitt County as early as 
1800. The first record of the school in these documents is dated 182S, 
when George Stokes, a graduate of Trinity College, Dublin, was the 
principal. 337 He was succeeded by William A. Walker in 1831, who 
taught the usual subjects preparatory to college. In 1S35, Mrs. Saffery 
was principal of the Greenville Female Seminary. She advertised 
that she followed the system of Mrs. Willard in her school at Troy, 
New York; and that she had resided nine years in Paris and vicinity. 338 

Possibly one of the best girls' schools of this period was the school 
conducted by William M. Green and his assistants at Hillsboro from 
1825 to 1840. 339 Mr. Green was a graduate of the University and 
after 1838 a professor in that institution. In later years he became the 
Protestant Episcopal Bishop of Mississippi. His principal assistants 
were Miss Lavinia Brainerd and Miss Maria L. Spear. Both were 
educated in the best schools for women in the North. In 1S39, Miss 
Spear said she followed the methods of the Common School Union. 

It would be an incomplete picture of the schools of this period to 
imagine that they all taught Latin, Greek and the other college prepara- 
tory studies. As early as 1802, A. Wills began "a cheap English 

3 "P. 532. '"p. 534. sup. 554, 330pp. 555.556. ssip. 556. 332p. 56O. 'asp. 552. 33ip. 553. 
3 "P. 554. ' 3 6 pp. 557-559. 3"P. 334. "sp. 335. ssspp. 300-310. 



xxvi Introduction 

school" in Raleigh. The term was three months at twenty shillings a 
quarter. He said he would wait until fall for his pay and would take 
produce for tuition. 340 In 1809, Wills said he would accept brandy in 
payment of board at $50 a year and tuition at 10 a year. 341 Later on 
he said he would take pay in old corn, tallow, and other produce; and 
that he wanted to hire a young man to keep a bar. 342 In 1807 John H. 
Gault taught an English school in Wake County. Gault said he de- 
clined to teach Latin and Greek. He claimed to lay great stress on 
reading, speaking, accent, cadence and spelling. He indulged in much 
high sounding talk about the progress of his pupils. 343 

These papers give us only a glimpse of the school of the negro John 
Chavis, who taught in Raleigh in 1808. Chavis was said to be a man 
of some education and a Presbyterian preacher. His Raleigh school 
was evidently a primary or an elementary school of small pretensions. 
At first he taught "children of colour" along with white children. But 
this plan evidently gave offense to some. So Chavis announced that he 
would "open an Evening School for the purpose of instructing Children 
of Colour, as he intends, for the accommodation of some of his employ- 
ers, to exclude Children of Colour from his Day School." 344 

In 1809, the Ealeigh Register, speaking of the death of William Hol- 
land, said that Holland was a native of England, that he was an Eng- 
lish school teacher of good qualifications, of correct manners, and that 
he wrote a beautiful hand. 345 In 1814, the same paper contained a 
death notice of Norman Campbell, "a respectable old schoolmaster who 
had taught for a number of years with general satisfaction, in different 
parts of the county." 346 

In 1813, B. Nichols advertised that he would teach writing in fifteen 
exercises of two hours each. 347 In 1815, Mrs. George Mumford, 
"recluse," had a school in Rowan. 348 At the same time Thomas L. 
Ragsdale was conducting what he called his Juvenile Academy in 
Wake. 349 After a number of years service as teachers at Warrenton 
and other places, Sarah and William Falkener died in 1819. They 
were natives of England and the Raleigh Register said they were the 
pioneers of female education in this section. 350 

From 1820 to 1830 Mr. and Mrs. J. Marling taught drawing and 
painting in Raleigh. 351 In 1820, Harvey James Bryan conducted a 
Saturday singing school in the Raleigh Methodist church. 352 The same 
year T. McQueen taught "a highly improved System of Stenography 
in Raleigh." 353 Two years later T. Mason taught stenography in 15 
lessons and Hebrew in 30 lessons to such persons in Raleigh as desired 
his services. 354 Anthony G. Glynn, who formerly taught in the Ra- 
leigh Academy announced, in 1822 the opening of his Athenaeum in the 
capital city. He claimed that his health would not permit him to 
practice law vigorously, so he opened his school to teach the English 
branches with special attention to graceful reading and speaking. He 
also said that he would not resort to corporal punishment. 355 

»*»P. 512. "lp. 512. 842p. 513. 343pp. 513-514. 344p. 515. 346p. 515. 34 6 p. 520. 347p. 516. 
848 P. 383. 349 P. 520. 360 P. 594. 3 "P. 526. 3&2p. 526. 8 & 8 P. 517. 354p. 527. ssep. 530. 



Introduction xxvii 

From 1811 to 1835, these documents show us that the school at Salem 
was usually trying to avoid having so many pupils. During these 
years this school was in charge of such scholars and teachers as Abra- 
ham Steiner, Benjamin Reichel, Jacob Van Vleck, Andrew Benade, and 
John C. Jacobson. 356 

From 1830 to 1840, there were a number of teachers employed in 
various schools, whose qualifications have already been referred to. In 
1831, John J. Wyche was at Midway in Franklin, 357 Mrs. Frances 
Bowen was conducting a private school in Raleigh, 358 and Daniel W. 
Kerr was in charge of Kerr's Select School in Raleigh. 359 In 1832, 
John Y. Hicks was teaching in the Nashville Academy 300 and Cowles 
M. Vaiden was at Woodville Academy in "Wake. 361 In 1833, Yaiden 
was conducting Vaiden's Seminary at Warrenton 362 and Benjamin Sum- 
ner was beginning to teach at Arcadia Academy in Person. 363 In 1835, 
William H. Owen was at the Leasburg Classical School in Caswell. 364 
In 1837, Daniel W. Kerr was teaching at Mt. Pleasant in Orange. 365 
In 1838, Alban Hart was teaching in the Shocco Classical Semi- 
nary. 366 From 1830 to 1839, Peter Le Messurier taught his Classical 
and English school in Raleigh. 367 In 1839, William B. Otis was con- 
ducting the Raleigh Classical School. 368 From 1836 to 1839, John Y. 
Hicks was principal of the Hemdon Academy in Franklin. 369 From 
1834 to 1839, J. H. Perry, Robert S. Anderson, William C. Sutton, and 
William P. Forrest taught at various places in Granville. 370 

From 1830 to 1840 these records disclose a number of traveling teach- 
ers of special subjects. Nothing is said of these except what they 
said of themselves. Such teachers were A. McLaurin and D. Easton 
who taught writing schools in 1830, 371 A. D. Smith who claimed in 
1831 to teach a new system of his own which made "bad writers to 
write an elegant hand in two or three days," 372 M. Osborne who con- 
ducted a Sacred Music School in 1834, 373 Mr. Tousey another writing 
teacher, 374 and John H. De Carteret who taught the French language 
"agreeably to the Parisian pronunciation." 375 

The last ten years of the period covered by these records marked the 
beginning of Anderson's Boarding School at Hillsboro, 376 Berkeley's 
Literary and Scientific Institute at Raleigh in 1S31, 377 Peach Tree 
Academy in 1834, 378 Phillips' Female Boarding School at Chapel Hill 
in 1836, 379 Burwell's Female School at Hillsboro, 380 and the Caldwell 
Institute at Greensboro, both begun in 1837. 381 The Caldwell Insti- 
tute was the best known of these schools. Its first teachers were Rev. 
Alexander Wilson who had been educated in Ireland, S. C. Lindsley of 
Princeton, and John A. Gretter of the University of Virginia. The 
Burwells had a long and honorable career as teachers at Hillsboro and 
later on at Charlotte and Raleigh. In 1839 this school employed a 
native German to teach music. The school conducted by Professor 

356 PP. 80-83. »"P. 113. 353 P. 566. 359 P. 561. "°P. 267. "'P. 567. »«-P 632 »« 3 P 331 364p 

32. "up. 317. 36ep. 632. "'P. 567. 333 P. 570. 369p hq. 370pp. 164-166 "ipp 517-518 "ap" 

519. 373 P. 529. 37 <P. 520. 375 P. 529. 37 «P. 312. 37 'PP. 563-566. 37 »P.267 379 PP 314-317 3 »°PP 
320-322. ssip. 172. 



xxviii Introduction 

Phillips and his wife in their home at Chapel Hill lasted only a few 
years. In 1836 they were assisted by "a lady from Mrs. Willard's 
Seminary at Troy." 

Then, as is now the case, many teachers taught only a short time at 
one place and moved on to new fields or out of the business. In 1830, 
"Mr. Barbour, a graduate of Washington College, Connecticut," was 
teaching what he called a select school in Raleigh. 382 In 1831, Wil- 
liam C. Clarke was teaching at Springfield in Caswell, 383 William A. 
Walker was teaching at Williamston, and Mrs. Phillips, who "had 
eighteen years experience as a teacher at the North and in this State," 
was principal of the Wake Forest Female School. 384 In 1833, Lemuel 
Murray was in charge of the Haywood Academy in Chatham. 385 In 
1837, William H. Hooper, a University man, was teaching what he 
called Hooper's School in Chatham; 386 M. R. Garrett was teaching at 
Stony Hill in Nash ; 387 Dr. William Flint was principal of Vine Hill 
Academy, and Miss Matilda B. Rowan of the female seminary at Sche- 
nectady, New York, was principal of the Scotland Neck Female Semi- 
nary, 388 assisted by Miss Hanks who had "finished her education at 
Mrs. Willard's celebrated school." During the years 1837-8, Robert A. 
Ezzell was teaching at Jackson in Northampton County. His assistant 
was Miss Harriet A. Dellay, "who was recommended to the Trustees by 
Mrs. Emma Willard, of the distinguished Female Seminary at Troy, 
N. Y." 389 

In 1838, Charles Manly employed a graduate of the University to 
teach a private school for 15 pupils in Raleigh; 390 Baxter Clegg, A.B., 
was then principal of Pleasant Hill Academy in Chatham; 391 and Miss 
Louisa Mooar, "a Lady from the North," educated at Mrs. Willard's 
Seminary, was conducting a school in Northampton. 392 

The year these records close, James P. Clarke began the Fairfield 
School and John R. Holt the Union Academy 393 in Orange County. 
Both these teachers prepared pupils for college. At the Goldsboro 
Academy, Rev. James Cowan, "a gentleman of the highest classical 
acquirements and of long and successful experience as a teacher" was 
beginning a successful school 394 and Miss Eliza Rae "of Boston" was 
teaching with considerable success at Asheboro. 395 

Course of Study. — These documents constantly refer to the useful and 
ornamental branches of knowledge. Drawing, music, painting, and 
needlework were generally regarded as the ornamental subjects. All 
other studies were regarded as useful. Geography, history, and hygiene 
as we now know those subjects were largely unknown in the schools of 
this period. It is true that geography and history were taught after a 
fashion, but they were usually taught in the high school grades. The 
geography was wholly place geography. The history was usually little 
more than chronology and memorizing history facts. There is no refer- 

352 P. 561. 883 P. 29. 384p. 533. sssp. 48. 38 «P. 48. 38?p. 2 68. ssspp. 177, 183. 339pp. 275-278 
89 °P. 571. 391 P. 48. 8 »2P. 278. 393 P. 323 8 '«P. 635. 396 P. 338. 



Introduction xxix 

ence in these documents to a book on health comparable to those of our 
times. Only one school offered a course in physiology. 

A study of these documents will show that but few people questioned 
the usefulness of Latin and Greek for boys. English on the formal 
side was paid great attention, but there was generally little teaching of 
the great literature of the mother tongue, especially in the elementary 
grades. The student will also be struck by the great number of sub- 
jects taught in the schools for girls, as well as those for boys. But the 
text-books of that day were not bulky, and memorizing the text was 
almost universal. Some details of what was attempted in some of the 
individual schools of this period will likely be worth while. The 
earliest reference to the course of study in these papers concerns Grove 
Academy in Duplin, 1787. It was said that the master of that school 
taught the Latin and the English grammar, and the Latin and the 
Greek language. Likely his assistant taught the more elementary sub- 
jects. 396 In 1793, Rev. Thomas P. Irving, the principal of the New 
Bern Academy, had his school divided into three classes. In the first 
class were taught reading, writing, and arithmetic at 20 shillings a 
quarter, in the second class, mathematics in its various branches at 30 
shillings a quarter; and, in the third class, the "dead languages" at 50 
shillings a quarter. 397 

In 1800, William Bingham taught reading, writing, arithmetic, Eng- 
lish grammar, geography, mathematics, and the classics (Latin and 
Greek) at Pittsboro. 398 In 1801, the same subjects with the addition of 
bookkeeping were taught in the Hillsboro Academy. 399 In 1802, Hugh 
Shaw was teaching natural and moral philosophy and astronomy in the 
Caswell xlcademy, in addition to Latin, Greek, geography, arithmetic, 
reading and writing. 400 In 1803, the boys' classes in the Fayetteville 
Academy were taught reading, spelling, cyphering, English grammar, 
geography, Latin Grammar, Nepos, Eutropius, Corderii, Caesar, Sal- 
lust, Virgil, and Euclid. The girls' classes were taught spelling, read- 
ing, English grammar, geography, letter writing, copy writing, cypher- 
ing, marking, Dresden, Tambour, and embroidery. 401 The next year 
there were boys' classes in Horace, in Webster's Spelling-book, and a 
spelling class using the dictionary, in addition to those mentioned the 
year before. 402 In 1805, Hugh Shaw was teaching the same subjects 
in Hyco Academy. He referred to the "common rules of arithmetic" 
and to "the higher branches of arithmetic" as a part of the course of 
study. 403 The Pittsboro Academy in 1805, still in charge of William 
Bingham, had added history, astronomy, and moral philosophy to the 
course since 1800. 404 When Matthew Dickinson took charge of the 
academy at Louisburg in 1805, he advertised to teach belles-lettres, 
rhetoric, ethics, metaphysics, Hebrew, French, Italian, algebra, geome- 
try, trigonometry, conic sections, surveying, natural philosophy, astron- 
omy, navigation, mensuration, altimetry, longimetry, Latin, and Greek, 

396 P. 74. 397 P. 50. 398 P. 35. 399 P. 280. 400 P. 18. 401 P. 62. <°=P. 63. «° 3 P. 23. <°*P. 37. 



xxx Introduction 

in addition to reading, writing, arithmetic, geography and English 
grammar. This is the most formidable array of subjects taught in any 
school of this period. Dickinson had one assistant. 405 

In 1807 the Salisbury Academy examination showed that there were 
classes in Virgil's Eclogues, Nepos, Erasmus, Morse's and Guthrie's 
Geographies, reading and parsing, reciting English grammar, Assembly 
Catechism, Church Catechism, arithmetic, writing, and composition. 406 
In May, 1807, the girls of the Raleigh Academy were examined. There 
were five classes in spelling, four in reading, one class in reading 
Blair's Lectures, four classes in English grammar, two classes in geog- 
raphy, two classes in arithmetic, four classes in writing, and classes in 
sewing, tambour, cotton floss work, and alphabetical samplers. 407 The 
most advanced class in arithmetic was studying simple division. The 
highest grammar class was parsing Blair's Lectures. There were boys' 
classes in philosophy and astronomy, Horace, Virgil, Csesar, Selectae 
Veterii, Erasmus, Aesop's Fables, Corderii, Greek Testament; two 
classes in Latin grammar, one in geography, four classes in English 
grammar, two classes in arithmetic, one class in the English Reader 
(Murray's), one class in writing, and two in spelling. 408 At the No- 
vember examination there were additional boys' classes in logic, Euclid, 
natural and moral philosophy, astronomy, rhetoric, Selectae Profanis, 
Horace, and Cicero's Orations. There were additional girls' classes in 
astronomy, Murray's Dictionary, and Murray's Introduction to Eng- 
lish Reading. 409 

In 1811, the girls of the Raleigh Academy, then in charge of Rev. 
William McPheeters, were classified as follows: 

1. Julian Class — Murray's Introduction to English Reading, spelling, 
writing, Dilworth's Arithmetic, including the rule of three. 

2. Cornelian Class — Murray's Reader, historical parts of the Old 
Testament, memorizing Murray's English Grammar, arithmetic through 
practice and interest, Dwight's Geography, etymological parsing. 

3. Decimore Class — Murray's Sequel, Cowper's Task, Morse's Geogra- 
phy, geographical cards, syntactical parsing in prose, remainder of 
arithmetic. 

4. Trophomore Class — Milton's Paradise Lost, Ossian's Poems, syn- 
tactical parsing in poetry, Murray's Exercises, English prosody, Blair's 
Lectures. 

5. Alphenor Class — Blair's Grammar of Natural and Experimental 
Philosophy, Blair's Chymical Grammar, Whelpley's Historical Com- 
pend, Goldsmith's History of Rome and History of England. 

6. Delphenor Class — Andrew's Logic, Paley's Moral Philosophy, and 
Paley's Natural Theology. 

It was set forth as part of this course that writing, spelling, and read- 
ing were common to all the classes; and that Latin, French, music, 
painting and needlework were elective. Upon the completion of the 

405p. 84. 4oep. 346. 4o;p. 400. 40 8 p. 399. 40spp. 400-406. 



Introduction xxxi 

course "an Honorary Certificate and a Golden Medal with an elegant 
inscription" was awarded. 410 This course is given here because it 
constitutes the most pretentious attempt during this period to systema- 
tize school instruction. It is evident that this course required some 
years of preparaion. Just how many years were embraced in the 
preparatory course is not stated, but evidently all the work outlined for 
the first class could not be done by a pupil below what we now call our 
fifth grade. This would make the Raleigh Academy for girls in 1811, 
so far as the length of its course is concerned, a school offering a course 
about the length of tbese present day schools which have seven ele- 
mentary grades or years and four high school grades or years. 

The course in the Raleigh Academy for boys was never outlined by 
years. But it is evident that the course offered in 1811 possibly required 
more time and work to complete than is now required to complete our 
elementary and high school courses. The Latin course included gram- 
mar, Corderii, Caesar, Ovid, Virgil, Odes of Horace, and Cicero. The 
Greek course embraced the grammar and Greek Testament. In mathe- 
matics, Euclid, Arithmetic, and surveying were required. In English, 
Grammar, parsing, and geography were taught. 411 

In 1815 Andrew Rhea who had previously taught in the University 
was teaching at Williamsboro ; 412 and W. E. Webb, a graduate of the 
University was teaching in Halifax. 413 Rhea's course in mathematics 
for boys consisted of Euclid, practical geometry, trigonometry, survey- 
ing, arithmetic, navigation, mensuration, and algebra. Webb's course 
in mathematics included arithmetic, Euclid, trigonometry, surveying, 
and mensuration. Both taught Latin and Greek. Mr. Webb taught 
Erench, general history and chronology. No mention of these three 
subjects was made by Mr. Rhea. 

In 1818, Robert L. Edmonds, who was then in charge of the Salisbury 
Academy, announced that he would "teach all the branches of English, 
Classical, Mathematical and Philosophical Literature which are taught 
in Universities, together with the French language, if required." 414 
Such advertisements seem not to have been regarded at that time as 
immodest. Mr. Edmonds was a college graduate and teacher of ex- 
perience. He was not alone in making such extravagant claims. Even 
Miss Rachel Prendergast the same year claimed she would teach 
spelling, reading, writing, arithmetic, English grammar, needlework, 
drawing, painting, embroidery, geography, and scanning poetry 413 in 
her school in Caswell. She was the only teacher of a school having 
beginners and pupils well advanced. 

What Mr. Edmonds meant by his announcement of 1818 appears in 
one of his 1819 advertisements. His course for boys was advertised 
to be Latin, Greek, Hebrew, French, prosody, history, geography, clas- 
sical antiquities, elementary and practical mathematics, moral and 
natural philosophy, astronomy, reading, writing, arithmetic, the Italian 
method of bookkeeping, English grammar, composition, elocution, rhet- 

41 °P. 421. "ip. 425. 4 lap. 124. 4isp. 178. 4 up. 349. 4i&p. 30. 



xxxii Introduction 

oric, and belles-lettres. 416 In June, 1820, the girls of the Salisbury 
Academy were publicly examined in six classes. The first and lowest 
class was examined on reading and spelling from the book words of two 
and three syllables. The second class was examined on spelling and 
reading in Murray's English Reader; the third class on reading Eng- 
lish history, Willett's Geography of Asia, English grammar, parsing and 
false syntax; the fourth class on reading the history of America, pars- 
ing and false syntax, Cummings' Geography, elements of astronomy, 
and the Compend of Universal History; the fifth class on reading the 
history of America, rules of punctuation and versification, the geogra- 
phy of Europe, "questions on government, religion, and the most re- 
markable empires that have existed" ; .and the sixth class on reading 
the history of Greece, ancient geography, moral philosophy, Karnes' 
Elements of Criticism and the use of the globes. There were classes 
in arithmetic, music, painting, embroidery and needlework composed of 
pupils belonging to the six classes. But all those subjects were elective. 
At this examination pieces of embroidery and shell work, card racks, 
pocket books, and work boxes were exhibited. 417 Thompson's Seasons 
and Cowper's Task seem to have been held in much favor as reading 
books in the Salisbury school for girls. 418 The boys of the Salisbury 
Academy in 1820 were divided into seven classes. The first class 
studied and was examined on Webster's Spelling Book; the second, 
spelled for examination in Walker's Dictionary; the third, spelled in 
Walker's Dictionary and read in Murray's English Reader; the fourth, 
spelled in Walker's Dictionary and read the history of Rome ; the fifth, 
parsed for examination in the history of Rome ; the sixth was examined 
on Corderii, Erasmus, Selectae, Yeterii; the seventh, on Caesar, Virgil's 
Bucolics, and Virgil's Aeneid. 419 

In 1820, the small girls of the Wadesboro Academy spelled in one, 
two, three and four syllables from the spelling book on examination. 
Another class spelled in Walker's Dictionary. There were also classes 
examined in reading in the Looking Glass, Murray's English Reader, 
history of America, English grammar, geography, polite literature, 
rhetoric, logic, natural philosophy, French, penmanship, and needle- 
work. 420 The smaller boys spelled in two, three and four syllables from 
Webster's Spelling Book; other boys spelled in Webster's and in 
Walker's Dictionary, read in the Looking Glass, the English Reader and 
in the history of America; others were examined on English grammar, 
parsing, Murray's Exercises, and geography ; still others on Viri Romae, 
Virgil's Bucolics, Virgil's Aeneid, the Odes of Horace, Sallust, and the 
Iliad of Homer. There were public speaking and dramatics during the 
progress of the examination. 421 

In 1820, the Louisburg Academy had a public examination. There 
were nineteen classes of girls examined on reading, spelling, parsing, 
English grammar, geography, history of America, rhetoric, history of 



"sp. 350. « 7 PP. 353-355. " 8 P. 351. « 9 PP. 355-356. * 2 "P. PP. 4-6. * "PP. 6-9. 



Introduction xxxiii 

Greece and Eome, chemistry and natural philosophy. "Work in drawing, 
painting, penmanship and music was exhibited. 422 

For many years the Salisbury Academy was one of the leading schools 
of the State. In 1821, Rev. J. O. Freeman was the principal of this 
school. He unblushingly printed his course of study, exhibiting the 
following bill of mental fare : Latin — Ruddiman's and Adams' gram- 
mars; Corderiae, Historiae Sacrae, Yiri Romae, Csesar, Ovid, Virgil, 
Cicero's Orations, Sallust, Horace, Mair's Introduction, and prosody. 
In Greek, he taught Valpley's or Wettenhall's grammar, Greek Testa- 
ment, Graeca Minora, Graeca Majora, Xenophon, Homer, Xeilson's 
Exercises, and prosody. In addition, he taught reading, writing, spell- 
ing, arithmetic, geography, natural and moral philosophy, rhetoric, 
logic, composition, and declamation. 423 Think of one man offering 
such a course of study in these modern times ! But there were only two 
teachers in the girls' school at that time and these offered to teach read- 
ing, writing, spelling, English grammar, arithmetic, geography, compo- 
sition, Whelpley's Compend of History, Blair's Rhetoric, natural phi- 
losophy, moral philosophy, astronomy, Andrews' Logic, chemistry, Eu- 
clid, algebra, and the languages if required. 424 

The names of the text-books of this period are interesting. Possibly 
the examination of the boys of the Lincolnton Academy in 1822 gives 
one of the most interesting lists to be found in these papers. Those 
boys studied Webster's Spelling Book, the Xew Testament, the Colum- 
bian Orator, Walker's Dictionary, the Child's Catechism, the Shorter 
Catechism, Blair's Catechism, Pike's Arithmetic, Murray's English 
Grammar, Bonneycastle's Algebra, Hutton's Algebra, Blair's Lectures, 
Selectae Veterii, Virgil, Cicero, Cyropaedia, Latin Grammar, Greek 
Grammar, and Greek Testament. 425 

When Jones and Andrews located their school at Oxford in 1822, they 
claimed to teach "the highest branches of science ever taught in female 
seminaries." 426 The subjects they taught were grammar and parsing, 
belles-lettres, geography, chemistry, botany, natural philosophy, astron- 
omy, Latin, Greek, music, dancing, drawing, painting, and "the rudi- 
ments." The next year the Raleigh Academy for girls introduced 
Latin and Greek. The "rudiments of Latin" and "committing Latin 
Grammar," and "Latin and Greek" was the way these subjects were put 
down in three classes mentioned as studying those languages. 427 

In 1823, the Xew Bern Academy printed its rules and its course of 
study. These are elaborately set forth beginning at page 56 of these rec- 
ords. The studies for boys prepared for the sophomore class of the Uni- 
versity of Xorth Carolina. The subjects taught the boys in that school 
are interesting. The "English studies" were Murray's English Reader 
and Sequel, Goldsmith's England, Rome, and Greece, Murray's English 
Grammar and Exercises, Adams' or Cummings' Geography, Walsh's 
Arithmetic, Gibson's Surveying, Hutton's Mathematics, Simpson's 
Euclid, Natural Philosophy, Clark's or Ferguson's Astronomy, Adams' 

*22P. 96. « 3 PP. 367-368. 424 P. 368. 425 P. 198. 426 P. 150. 427 P. 468. 

(C) 



xxxiv Introduction 

Greek Antiquities, Blair's Lectures, Andrews' Logic, Paley's Moral 
Philosophy, composition, declamation; and reading, spelling, writing, 
English grammar, arithmetic, composition, and oratory in all classes. 
The Greek studies were Wettenhall's Grammar, St. John and the Acts, 
all of Graeca Minora, the first volume of Graeca Majora, Neilson's Ex- 
ercises and prosody. The Latin studied embraced the Philadelphia 
Latin Grammar, Historia Sacra, Yiri Romae, Mair's Introduction, 
seven books of Caesar, Ovid, Virgil's Bucolics, and six books of the 
Aeneid, all the select orations of Cicero, Sallust's Cataline and Jugurtha, 
all of Horace, and prosody. This elaborate course was said to be suc- 
cessfully given. And there were but two teachers ! 

The 1823 New Bern Academy course for girls is also interesting. For 
entrance to the lowest of the four girls' classes a pupil was required to 
be able to read distinctly and tolerably accurately in Murray's Sequel, to 
write a joining hand, large and fine, to know Murray's English Gram- 
mar by heart, to have completed Murray's Exercises and the simple 
rules of arithmetic. At the present time these requirements could all 
hardly be met by pupils of the seventh grade. The studies prescribed 
for the four classes were as follows : 

1. Murray's English Grammar, reading and parsing Cowper's Task, 
Cummings' Geography, Walsh's Arithmetic. 

2. Punctuation, English grammar, reading and parsing Thompson's 
Seasons, all of geography, arithmetic through practice, all of Whelpley's 
Ancient History, the use of the globes. 

3. English grammar, reading and parsing Milton, ancient geography, 
all of arithmetic, Whelpley's Modern History, conversations on natural 
philosophy to optics, Clark's Astronomy, and Blair's Lectures. 

4. Reading and parsing Young's Night Thoughts, astronomy and 
natural philosophy completed, Blair's Lectures completed, logic, Paley's 
Moral Philosophy, reviews. 

Electives : Erench, Euclid, chemistry ; Goldsmith's Greece, Pome, 
and England; Paley's Natural Theology, Latin, and Greek. 

Reading Writing and instruction in "proper pronunciation" were 
common to all classes. Defining and composition were taught to all in 
the three higher classes. 428 

In 1825, the Hillsboro Eemale Seminary under the management of 
Wm. M. Green printed an elaborate course of study for its four classes. 
This course was likely modeled after those found in the New York 
female schools of that time. The studies by classes were as follows : 

1. Reading, writing, spelling, arithmetic, English grammar, modern 
geography, elements of composition. 

2. Ancient, modern and sacred geography, map drawing, natural his- 
tory and U. S. history. 

3. Algebra, Euclid, Tytler's History, rhetoric, elements of criticism, 
astronomy, chronology, natural philosophy. 

4 2sp. 57. 



Introduction xxxv 

4. Moral philosophy, evidences of Christianity, natural theology, 
chemistry, botany, mineralogy, and logic. 

Music, drawing and painting might be studied in any class. 429 

Alexander Wilson was teaching at Williamsboro in 1825. He printed 
an outline of his course of study which provided for four classes, the 
lowest class beginning Latin. His assistant taught the English depart- 
ment. Wilson taught from 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. He gave one and a half 
hours a day to each of the four classes. Algebra, arithmetic, English 
grammar, and reading were taught on Fridays. The subjects taught to 
the four classes were divided as follows : 430 

1. Latin Grammar, Viri Roniae, Historia Sacra, Mair's Introduction. 

2. Caesar, Valpley's Greek Grammar, Ovid, Latin prosody. 

3. Virgil, Graeca Minora, Modern geography, Greek Testament, Eng- 
lish grammar, Roman antiquities. 

4. Sallust, Graeca Majora, Adams' Ancient Geography and Myth- 
ology, Cicero (7 orations), algebra, English grammar. 

In 1825, the Warrenton Academy used mnemonics to help the girls 
learn chronology. 431 In 1827, the Oxford Academy for girls offered 
Latin, French, "philosophy of the mind," plain and ornamental penman- 
ship, biography, and botany as a part of its course of study. 432 In 
1828, the Lincolnton Academy examination included "polite learn- 
ing." 433 In 1831, Goslin Bluff advertised his "Refined Female College" 
course to satirize the theories and practices of the day relative to the 
education of girls. 434 In 1835, the Greenville Seminary for girls taught 
its first class the beginnings of reading, spelling, writing, and arithmetic. 
The fourth class was taught logic, composition, rhetoric, geography of 
the heavens, Euclid, and the like. This school taught calisthenics be- 
cause some parents objected to having their children taught to dance. 435 
In 1835 the Kelvin School at Pittsboro advertised that ancient languages 
and mathematics would be taught girls when they were desired. 436 
The Scotland Neck Female Seminary the same year offered Latin as a 
part of its course of study. 437 In 1838, the Salisbury Academy offered 
Latin as an extra study for girls. 438 From 1836-39 Mrs. Phillips' 
Female Seminary at Chapel Hill offered Latin as a part of its course 
of study for girls. 439 In 1839, the La Valle Female Seminary adver- 
tised geometry, algebra, Arnott's Physics, and physiology as part of its 
course of study. 440 From 1830 to 1840, these papers show a marked 
tendency to make the studies for girls similar to those for boys and to 
introduce such books as Olney's Geography, Parley's Geography, and 
Parley's U. S. History into the elementary classes for boys and girls. 

But educational practice makes slow progress even today. When 
the Caldwell Institute at Greensboro was established in 1837, the an- 
nouncement was made that "the Ancient Classics, in connection with the 
pure and mixed Mathematics, forming it is believed, the only sure 
basis of solid learning, will occupy chiefly the attention of Students." 441 

429 P. 300. "op. 126. 43ip. 621. 432 P. 156. 433 P. 215. 434 P. 562. < 33 P. 335. *»«P. 46. 437 P. 183. 
436 P. 381. 439 PP. 315-317. < 4 °P. 185. 441 P. 173. 



xxxvi Introduction 

Those wlio wisli to investigate further the course of study in the 
schools of this period will find much interesting material in these papers, 
especially the comparative table on pages 487-490, the course offered 
by the Episcopal School on page 542, and the Raleigh Academy course 
on page 502. 

Religious Instruction. — Nearly every school of this period claimed 
to pay much attention to the manners and morals of its pupils. The 
fifth rule of the Warrenton Academy of 1805 read : "It shall be earn- 
estly recommended to the principal to cause the students to meet at the 
Academy at twelve o'clock on every Sunday, by the ringing of the bell, 
and to deliver to them a discourse upon some moral or religious sub- 
ject. 442 In 1807, some of the Salisbury Academy pupils were examined 
at the close of the school on the Assembly Cathechism and some on the 
Church Catechism. 443 In 1813, Sampson's Beauties of the Bible was a 
text-book in the preparatory school of the Raleigh Academy. 444 In 1818, 
the Hillsboro Academy required each scholar to be present at morn- 
ing and evening worship, to attend recitations from the Scriptures on the 
Sabbath, and to observe the Lord's Day by refraining from study, riding, 
walking, visiting, and the like. Each pupil was required to attend public 
worship on Sunday. 445 In 1818, Wayne Academy taught McDowell's 
Bible Questions as a part of the school course. 446 

In 1821, the larger pupils of the Raleigh Academy were generally 
examined on Bible Questions. 447 The next year a class of boys on 
examination recited the Assembly Catechism, 448 and classes of girls 
were examined on the Westminster Catechism, the Methodist Cate- 
chism, Bible Questions and Scripture History. In June, 1824, each 
class of girls in the Raleigh Academy was examined on Bible Ques- 
tions. 450 In 1831, James Grant said that he would inculcate the truths 
and the morality of the Christian religion, yet he would keep in mind 
that the Raleigh Academy was a literary and not a theological school. 451 

In 1822, Bible Questions were a part of the examination held at the 
close of the Charlotte Female Academy. 452 The same year classes of 
boys in the Lincolnton Academy were examined on the Child's Cate- 
chism, the Shorter Catechism, and Blair's Catechism at the close of the 
school. 453 In 1827, classes of girls in this school were examined on 
the catechism. 454 In 1822, Garden's Lancaster School in Iredell an- 
nounced that it would teach "the fear of the Lord, veneration for His 
holy word — for the ordinances of the Lord's house and a due observ- 
ance of the Lord's Day." 455 In 1823, the Catawba School in Lincoln 
examined some of its pupils on the Child's Catechism and others on the 
Shorter Catechism as a part of its closing exercises. 456 In 1824, the 
management of the Morganton Academy announced that it would guard 
its pupils against vulgar and degrading amusements and that the school 
had for its object the intellectual and religious improvement of its 
pupils. 457 In 1828, the Chapman's Classical School in Iredell adver- 

*«P. 579. 443 P. 347. 444 P. 440. 445 P. 282. «««P. 635. 447 P. 459. 448 P. 462. 449 PP. 464-466. 
450pp. 473.476. 4 "P. 497. 452p. 230. 463 P. 198. 454 P. 209. 455 P. 189. ««P. 224. "'P. 16. 



Introduction xxxvii 

tised that "particular attention will be paid to the morals of youth, and 
the whole course conducted in the fear of God and with reference to the 
virtue of the Gospel." 458 In 1834, the pupils of the Episcopal School 
at Raleigh were required to attend the services of the Episcopal Church 
twice on Sunday and to study the Bible, the catechism, and ethics as a 
part of the regular school course. 459 

Caldwell Institute at Greensboro was established in 1837. The first 
advertisement of the school declared that "the Bible will occupy its 
proper place, and the paramount claims of a Christian Education will 
be duly and fully recognized." 460 And, it was added, that all students 
would be required to attend public worship on Sunday and to spend a 
part of each Sunday afternoon in the recitation of portions of the Bible 
and the Westminster Catechism. In 1837, John Y. Hicks, of the Hem- 
don Academy in Franklin, assured the patrons of his school that his 
pupils would not be permitted to run about the country on Sunday or be 
out at nights; that Bible Questions would be recited as a Sunday exer- 
cise, but that sectarian and bigoted discussions would be avoided. 461 

In 1839, the trustees of Oxford Academy advertised that "the serious 
perusal of the Bible forms a part of the daily exercises of this academy." 
It was also said that "Mr. Robertson acknowledges no system of morals 
or of academical government, that is not founded on the plain teaching 
of Scripture, as commonly understood by all good men." 462 The Mr. 
Robertson referred to was D. E. Robertson, the principal of the School. 

■ Methods of Teaching. — These papers show that twice each year it 
was the custom of nearly every school to hold a public oral examination 
of its pupils, to which parents and friends were invited. These exami- 
nations were sometimes conducted by the teachers, but more frequently 
by the trustees and other persons not directly concerned with the work 
of teaching. It is easy to see how this custom led to placing the em- 
phasis of teaching upon the formal and the memorizing of facts. 

In 1807, Rev. John Brown assured the patrons of the Salisbury 
Academy that "particular attention will be paid to the grammatical 
construction of the English Language, to reading and spelling it cor- 
rectly, and to writing a fair hand." 463 At the examination of his pupils 
that year, the girls "furnished the Trustees with specimens of their 
writing and composition in the form of letters." 464 In 1808, the trus- 
tees of the Raleigh Academy refused to print the usual report of the 
examination, "for various reasons, but more especially from the diffi- 
culty which they have heretofore experienced in fixing the honors of the 
different classes, so as to do exact justice to every student." 465 But the 
trustees soon returned to the prevailing custom. 

Many of the schools of this period experienced much trouble due to 
their pupils contracting debts without the knowledge of their parents. 
In 1808 the Raleigh Academy trustees made rules against this practice. 



«58P. 191. "9p. 542. 460p, 173. 46ip. 118. 462p, 149. 46jp. 346. 4t4p. 348. 465p. 4 H. 



xxxviii Introduction 

Pupils were forbidden to contract any debt without the consent of their 
parents and merchants were warned that debts contracted without the 
consent of parents would not be paid. The utmost plainness of dress 
was also recommended and the approbation of the trustees was given 
to homespun and the products of home manufacture. 466 In 1812, the 
trustees repeated their rule about going in debt and added one making 
parents liable to pay board for the term in cases where their sons or 
wards left their boarding places during the term. 467 In 1834, the 
Episcopal School committee made a rule that any debt contracted by a 
pupil without the consent of the rector would not be paid, and that, if 
such debt were paid by the student's parent, the student would be dis- 
missed from the school. 468 

There are few references in these papers to the teaching of literature 
as now carried on in our schools. One such reference is possibly worthy 
of note. In 1810, it was said that Mordecai's School at Warrenton paid 
much attention to literature. "The beauties of such authors as Addi- 
son and Pope are unfolded to the pupils in so interesting a manner that 
the taste is generally chastened and refined to the standard of classical 
purity." 469 It was the custom to have the compositions of the young 
girls of this school read to the audience at the end of the term by some 
visitor. 470 This seems to have been a part of the etiquette of other 
schools as well as this one. 

These documents give us glimpses of other school methods which would 
provoke a smile if practiced now. For example, in 1812, one of the 
assistant teachers solemnly printed an "Academy Summons" in the 
Raleigh Register, commanding two runaway boys of the Raleigh Acad- 
emy to return to school. These boys had left town some days before. 471 
In 1820, Rev. John Mushat advertised that he would examine the tavern 
accounts of the pupils of the Statesville Academy, also that he would 
examine into the conduct of his pupils in their boarding houses once each 
month. 472 In 1823, Dr. McPheeters notified the pupils of the Raleigh 
Academy that they must not ride any "ponies" in preparing their Latin 
and Greek lessons. 473 In 1834, some of the boys of the Raleigh Acad- 
emy delivered speeches in Latin and Greek at the closing of that 
school. 474 

Evidently it was often the custom of these times to memorize the rules 
of the arithmetic and English grammar. An account of the examination 
of the Charlotte Female Academy in 1822 said that "some who began 
to memorize grammar since the commencement of the session, parsed 
blank verse with uncommon ease and propriety." 475 In 1827, a class in 
the Lincolnton Academy was examined on "memorizing English Gram- 
mar" and another class was examined on "Reciting the Rules of Arith- 
metic." 476 

In many of the schools of this period, Saturday morning was spent 
in reciting English grammar, in parsing, reading, and declamation. 
This was notably true of the Catawba School. 477 There is only one 

""P. 413. 46?p, 435. 46sp. 539. 469p. 597. 4?op. 600. 47ip. 436. 47 2 p. 188. 4'sp. 469. 474p. 501. 
« 7B P. 230. 476pp. 212-213. 477p. 224. 



Introduction xxxix 

protest in these papers against corporal punishment. Anthony G. 
Glynn in advertising the Raleigh Athenaeum said he would never resort 
to that method. But Charles A. Hill announced that after advice and 
admonition unheeded he would use the rod with parental prudence. 4 ' 8 

A casual glance at these documents will disclose the great attention 
paid to Latin and Greek prosody during this period. Even scanning 
English poetry was often thought important enough to he regarded as 
a separate subject of study. J. 0. Freeman announced in 1823 that he 
followed the Port Royalists in his methods of teaching Latin and 
Greek. 479 The same year Dr. McPheeters advertised that he would 
devote much attention to the rules of prosody in teaching Latin and 
Greek in the Raleigh Academy, enough attention to render his pupils 
able to scan hexameter verse with ease. 4S0 This emphasis upon the 
formal side of Latin and Greek teaching drew from Judge A. D. Mur- 
phey a sharp criticism in 1827, in which he contended that too much 
time was being spent on the syntax and the etymology of these lan- 
guages. 481 

Attention has already been directed to the great number of subjects 
taught in the schools of this period. It would be strange if no one had 
raised his voice against this evil. In 1831, the Raleigh Register said 
that Berkeley's School at Raleigh used few books and imparted knowl- 
edge by oral methods. 482 William Hooper in his "Defects of the 
Primary Schools" said that pupils are often hurried through their books 
by teachers who have had little training for teaching, with the result 
that many students come to college greatly deficient in spelling, writing, 
English and the amount of knowledge necessary to carry on their college 
courses. 483 In 1835, the principal of the jSTorthampton Academy 
lamented the practice of hurrying primary pupils through their books. 484 
And William Hooper said that four years were not more than enough 
to prepare a boy for college after he began the study of Latin. 485 This 
view of the matter was also taken by William J. Bingham. 486 

These documents often refer to practical studies, useful studies, and 
the like. Keeping accounts, writing conveyances and other common 
business instruments, common everyday arithmetic and the like seem to 
have had considerable special attention in the Raleigh Academy in 
1834. 487 The work done by Johnson and Haywood in the Raleigh 
school appears to be the nearest approach revealed by these documents 
to our modern high school business courses. I have already called at- 
tention to the fact that the geography taught in the schools of this 
period consisted largely of memorizing names of places. There are 
many evidences to substantiate this opinion. At the examination of 
the pupils of the Episcopal School in 1834, "questions were asked rapidly, 
passing from one section of the Globe to the other." 488 This was the 
plan pursued in the Salisbury and in the Raleigh Academies and in many 
of the other schools of the day. 

There are only two references in these papers to the blackboard and 

478 P. 111. " 9 P. 370. 48 °P. 469. < 81 P. 723. * 82 P. 565. < S3 P. 731. iSi P. 275. « 8S PP. 731-750. 
< 86 P. 292. «siP. 502. 4ssp. 544. 



xl Introduction 

work on the blackboard. The first is to the use of the blackboard in 
the Raleigh Academy in 1835, when a visitor admired the facility with 
which ten to twelve year old boys solved problems in interest and the 
rule of three on the blackboard. 489 The other reference is to the fault 
found with Miss Rae at Asheboro because she did not use the blackboard 
in teaching arithmetic. 490 If a small school like Asheboro had black- 
boards in 1839, it is more than likely that blackboards were in common 
use in the schools of this state before 1840. 

Primary teachers of this day think they have done well when they are 
able to teach their pupils to read in four months. A visitor to 
Miss Rae's school at Asheboro in 1839 said that "the first class she 
examined consisted of some small ones who had commenced four months 
ago in the Alphabet. They could read and read correctly. They spoke 
loud, pronounced each word with distinctness, and after they had con- 
cluded the reading of their lesson, the tutoress gave out to them some of 
the most difficult words in the lesson, and they spelled them correctly, 
giving a distinct articulation to each letter and syllable." 491 From 
what this visitor said about the arithmetic teaching of Miss Rae, it is 
evident that she was a good teacher of that subject, because she took 
care that her pupils understood the reason underlying each operation 
and also that the oral work always preceded the written work in her 
classes. 492 

Lancaster Schools. — The first attempt to establish a Lancaster school 
in this State was likely made at Fayetteville. The trustees of the Fay- 
etteville Academy announced on January 6, 1814, that their preparatory 
or elementary school would hereafter be conducted "on this improved 
plan." 493 The same year Governor Stone, at the Falls of the Neuse 
in Wake County, opened a Lancaster school in charge of James Boyle 
who was trained at Georgetown, D. C. Children who were unable to 
pay tuition were admitted free. Mr. Boyle also offered to train Lan- 
caster teachers. He remained in Wake two years. 494 

During the year 1814 the trustees of the Raleigh Academy announced 
that the Lancaster plan would be introduced into the preparatory de- 
partment of the Raleigh Academy. Two hundred dollars were raised 
by private donations to send Rev. John Evans to Georgetown to learn 
the Lancaster system. 495 The Raleigh Register of Friday, February 
10, 1815, announced the opening of the Lancaster school at Raleigh on 
the following Monday and also said that it would be free to poor chil- 
dren. 496 On June 16, 1815, the Raleigh Star said that "though this 
school has had an existence of a few months only, the trustees find that 
children, who before they entered it, did not know a letter in the book, 
can read, write, have some knowledge of figures, and can repeat by heart 
a number of moral verses. Some, indeed, have obtained a considerable 
knowledge of English Grammar and Geography." 497 In November, 
1815, this school had "upwards of 100 scholars," and at the closing 

« 8 °P. 510. " "PP. 339-340. «»»P. 339. 4»2P. 340. "'P. 69. *»<PP. 512-513. <"PP. 441-443. "'P. 
443. "'P. 445. 



Introduction xli 

examination a "Lancastrian pupil was examined in Geography, astron- 
omy, arithmetic and some problems in Geometry and was highly ap- 
proved." 498 There is no further mention of the school after 1815. 

In 1822, Peter Ulrick was teaching a Lancaster school at Spratts- 
ville, six miles from Charlotte. He trained Lancaster teachers. 499 
This school was evidently in operation earlier than 1822, for Alexander 
Garden, who had been a pupil of Ulrick, was conducting a Lancaster 
school at Centre Church in Iredell in 1822. Garden advertised that he 
learned the Lancaster system from Ulrick who was taught by Edward 
Baker in Philadelphia. Baker was taught by Joseph Lancaster in 
England. 500 

When the trustees of the New Bern Academy issued their rules and 
course of study in printed form in 1823, they announced that tuition 
in the Lancastrian department would be two and a half dollars a 
quarter. 501 

Closing School. — It was the custom during this period to have two 
public examinations a year, usually in June and November. A vaca- 
tion followed each of these examinations. One of the 1794 examina- 
tions of the pupils of the New Bern Academy, for example, ended on 
July 4th. It was attended by "a brilliant assemblage of ladies and gen- 
tlemen." There were oral examinations iri Latin, Greek, mathematics, 
and logic during the first day. There was a theatrical exhibition in 
the evening, preceded by a salutatory address on American Independence 
by a pupil. There were also several orations by other pupils. Humor- 
ous dialogues were acted and extracts from various comedies presented. 
The valedictory address was made by "William Gaston, on the rising 
glory of America. The exercises were closed by an address on the ad- 
vantages of science, delivered by the principal of the x\cademy, Mr. 
Irving. 502 

In 1800, one of the examinations of the Fayetteville Academy lasted 
three days. On two nights there were theatrical performances by the 
young men of the academy and $100 were raised for the benefit of poor 
children. 503 On July 4, 1803, the Caswell Academy closed a half year's 
work with public oral examinations. There was public speaking by the 
pupils which met "with approbation and applause." 504 The same year 
the trustees, teachers and pupils of the Wadesboro Academy closed their 
school with a Eourth of July celebration which consisted of an oration, 
a parade, and a dinner. 505 On the Eourth of July, 1805, the Franklin 
Academy at Louisburg had a two days' school closing. The examina- 
tions were held the first day. The second day the pupils delivered ora- 
tions and presented dialogues. On the evening of the second day there 
was a play given for the benefit of the academy. 506 A special feature of 
the closing of the Raleigh Academy in November, 1807, was the presen- 
tation of a number of compositions. The subjects of the boys' essays 
were Slavery, An Address to Students, Eloquence, Improvement of 

< 88 P. 446. "'P. 240. 5 °°PP. 188-190. 501 P. 59. 502 P. 51. 503 P. 60. 6 ° 4 P. 19. 5 ° 5 P. 2. 5 ° 6 P. 85. 



xlii Introduction 

Time, Address to Youth, Study of the Dead Languages, and the Chris- 
tian Religion. The girls wrote about Astronomy, Friendship, Benevo- 
lence, Fashionable Amusements, Education, Religion, and Flattery. 
One of the boys delivered a valedictory oration. 507 

At one of the semi-annual closings of the Raleigh Academy in 1808, 
seventy boys and forty girls were examined on their studies. There was 
an exhibition of the embroidery and needlework of the girls. One after- 
noon was devoted to orations by the boys. The examination was closed 
by an address by one of the trustees and on the last night a play was 
given for the benefit of the academy. 508 The closing exercises of this 
school in June, 1812, occupied four days. The Raleigh Register said 
that "on four of the evenings orations were delivered by the older 
Students and most of the younger Boys delivered Speeches in the course 
of the Examination — so that, in the whole, upwards of sixty orations 
were delivered." 509 

In 1820 Jones and Andrews' School at Warrenton announced that 
there would be lectures on chemistry delivered on the evenings of the 
first and second days of the examination. 510 The same year an account 
of the closing of the Salisbury Academy said that "there were produced 
various elegant and tasteful specimens of Drawing, Painting, Em- 
broidery, Fancy and Needle Work ; and a variety of pleasing exhibitions 
upon the Piano Forte." 511 In 1825, the Oxford Academy had a ball for 
the visitors as a part of its closing exercises. 512 In 1827, this Academy 
had a musical exhibition. In 1834, the Raleigh Academy offered a 
medal for the best orator and the contest was held during the exami- 
nation. 513 

The Salisbury and the Raleigh Academy pupils usually had a May 
Day Fete each year. In 1821, Bishop Moore attended the Raleigh cele- 
bration. There was music by an amateur band, and refreshments were 
served. 514 In 1827, the Raleigh pupils celebrated the day by crowning 
one of their number queen, refreshments were served and music was 
rendered. 515 In 1839, the Salisbury Academy pupils celebrated May 
Day in the presence of a large crowd. One of the pupils was crowned 
queen and an address to the queen followed. There was music, and can- 
dies and fruits were served. 516 

Military Schools. — When the University was opened in 1795, William 
R. Davie advocated introducing military training as a part of the 
course of study. There seems to have been considerable sentiment at 
that time and later for the introduction of military training in the 
schools. When this country was entering upon its second war with 
England in 1809, the pupils of the Raleigh Academy organized a mili- 
tary company, led by one of their teachers. On one occasion during 
the year this company paraded on the State House Square and was 
presented with "a stand of colors," painted by the young ladies of the 



6 ° 7 P. 406. 608 P. 412. 6 ° 9 P. 434. 6 "P. 614. "'P. 351. 5l2 P. 154. 613 P. 501. 614 P. 458. 616 P. 
485. "ep. 382. 



Introduction xliii 

academy. The silk flag was decorated with the American coat of arms 
The inscription on the flag was "Virtue, Liberty, and Science." 517 

In 1810, the Raleigh Star said that Archibald Murphy had recently 
conducted schools for the training of militia officers in Stokes and ad- 
joining counties and had made $1,500 a year for his services. The Star 
also said that a man named Wren who had conducted such schools in 
Northampton had also been liberally compensated for such services. 518 
In 1812, Murphy advertised schools to teach the military discipline of 
the U. S. Army at Hillsboro, Chapel Hill, Raleigh, Louisburg, and 
Warrenton; and in Granville, Chatham, and Rockingham counties. 519 

In 1813, Simon Bruton, of Lenoir County, was president of a society 
to promote military knowledge. It was intended by this society to 
establish a school near Kinston to teach literature and military tac- 
tics. 520 The school was never established. 

The next serious attempt to establish a military school was made by 
D. H. Bingham, a graduate of the Partridge Military School in Con- 
necticut. On August 25, 1826, Bingham announced that he would 
establish his Southern Military School at Williamsboro, in Granville 
County. 521 For a short time the school was conducted at Williamsboro. 
In October, 1829, Bingham announced that the Roanoke Literary and 
Scientific Institution had been moved to Oxford. 522 For a short time 
previous to his removal to Oxford Bingham had located his school at 
Littleton and advertised an imposing course of study. 523 In Decem- 
ber, 1830, 20 cadets of Bingham's School and 40 belonging to a similar 
school at Fayetteville visited Raleigh. 524 The next year, June, 1831, 
Bingham moved his school from Oxford to Raleigh, 525 where it finally 
died in less than two years. 

The extravagant advertisements of the Fayetteville and the Oxford 
military schools soon attracted severe criticism. A writer who signed 
himself Gasca said that these schools had no endowment, no adequate 
buildings, no libraries, and few or no experienced teachers. 526 

From 1833 to 1836, Carter Jones conducted schools at Raleigh, Wil- 
mington and other places similar to those formerly conducted by Mur- 
phy, 527 but apparently with much less financial success. 

Lotteries for the Benefit of Schools. — An act of the Assembly of 1797 
provided that the Pittsboro Academy might raise $700 by means of 
lottery. 528 In 1810, the lottery which was begun in the interest of 
Newton Academy in Buncombe was advertised to have failed for lack of 
patronage. It had been intended to raise $7,000 to complete the build- 
ing of this school and to establish a female academy. 529 In 1810, Hyco 
Academy resorted to a lottery to raise funds for building. The trustees 
said in defense of the lottery that they were "conscious of the ill success 
in a direct application to the generosity of the public." 530 Other schools 
which resorted to lotteries were the Germanton Academy in 1811, 531 

6I7 P. 416. S18 P. 242. 5i9p. 243. 52 °P. 243. 621 P. 244. 622 P. 249. 5"P. 247. 62 <P. 253. 625 P. 
259. 626 P. 257. 627 P. 261. 528 P. 34. 629 P. 14. "op. 23. "'P. 387. 



xliv Introduction 

Oxford Academy in 1813 and in 1825, 532 the Smithfield Academy in 
1820, 533 and the Salisbury Academy in 1834. 534 

Salaries of Teachers. — There is little in these papers which shows the 
salaries paid teachers during this period. Matthew Dickinson received 
$1,000 for his first year's work at Louisburg, and $1,200 to $1,500 for 
the other years he taught there. Mayhew, his assistant, received $300 
a year. 535 Evidently a number of the other teachers received as much. 
In 1826, Dr. McPheeters was paid $800 and had a house and garden 
rent free. In addition he was paid a salary as pastor of the Raleigh 
Presbyterian church. 536 Miss Mariah Allen was paid $500 a year, in 
1826, as principal of the female academy at Lincolnton. 537 Dr. Battle 
says that David Ker was paid $400 salary as principal of the Fayette- 
ville Academy in 1794, and $400 more as pastor of the Presbyterian 
church of the town. The same authority says that J. O. Freeman 
was paid $600 a year as principal of the Edenton Academy and $400 
more for his services as pastor of one of the churches of the town. 

Law Schools. — The first law school in this state seems to have been 
conducted by Judge John L. Taylor at Raleigh in 1822. Judge Taylor 
aimed to enable young men to gain a scientific knowledge of law, so that 
they would not be forced to leave the State to get their legal educa- 
tion. 538 From 1826-28, Judge Leonard Henderson conducted a law 
school at Williamsboro. 539 In 1829, Richard T. Brumby advertised he 
would receive law students at Buffalo Shoal in Lincoln County. 540 
The Raleigh Star of December 16, 1831, contained this brief notice: 
"A. D. Murphy having settled himself in Hillsboro, will receive a few 
Law Students." 541 

The Beginnings of the Colleges. — In 1820 a movement was begun look- 
ing to the establishment of a university in western North Carolina. It 
was claimed that many parents could not send their sons to distant 
schools, that the university needed a rival, that another school would 
enable more young men in the ordinary walks of life to receive a college 
education, that the interests of religion and morality demanded a new 
college, and that a new college was necessary because the school then at 
Chapel Hill would soon become too large to maintain good order. 542 
In 1821, Rev. James McRee said that the object of the promoters of a 
western college was "to establish in the western part of the State of 
North Carolina a public Seminary of Learning, to prepare young men, 
by the knowledge and influence of the Christian religion, with the aid of 
sound science, to act with honor and advantage in those public depart- 
ments of life which the church, the State, and the condition of mankind 
now do, and will in the future require." 543 At another place in his 
address from which the above is quoted McRee said that "the great 
object of our Seminary" was to educate ministers of the gospel. 544 

632 PP. 132-136. E33 P. 193. 634 P. 371. 636 P. 89. 636 P. 483. 637 P. 206. 638 P. 531. 639 P. 162. 54 °P. 
237. "'P. 314. 642pp. 641-652. " 3 P. 657. ""P. 661. 



Introduction xlv 

The plan to establish this college failed in 1823. A writer in the 
Western Carolinian explained the failure thus : "It was estimated that 
Mecklenburg had subscribed $30,000, Burke 20 or 21,000, Lincoln 4 
or 5,000, Cabarrus and Iredell 4 or 5,000, etc. But the subscriptions 
were unfortunately taken in such a manner, that when the college was 
located at Lincolnton, the trustees could not claim more than 12 or 
1 5,000. " 545 During 1824, several efforts were made to revive interest 
in the establishment of this College, 546 but they failed. Finally in the 
spring of 1835, the Concord Presbytery undertook to establish a Manual 
Labor Seminary in Mecklenburg County, out of which grew the David- 
son College of a later date. 547 With the establishment of Davidson the 
dreams of those who had advocated Western College came true. 

About 1830 the Fellenberg idea of manual labor schools had found 
considerable favor in this State. The Baptists wanted a college to 
educate ministers. Both ideas were combined by John Armstrong and 
other leaders of that denomination. Hence the first statement setting 
forth the object in establishing Wake Forest Institute said : "The ob- 
ject of the Institute is to enable young ministers to obtain an education 
on moderate terms, and to train up youth in general to a knowledge of 
Science and practical Agriculture." 548 These papers also give some 
vivid pictures of the student life of Wake Forest Institute from 1832 to 
1835, 549 while the attempt to realize the dual purpose of its founding 
was in its infancy. 

Such in brief are some of the matters contained in these papers. I 
have not tried to call attention to everything of historical interest, but 
only to those phases of our educational history which stand out in 
greatest prominence in the pages which follow. 

Wilson, N". C, Mat, 1915. Charles L. Coon. 



54S P. 674. 546pp. 686-6S9. 547 P. 690. 548 P. 794. 6 »PP. 694-713. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Anson County Schools 1-13 

Wadesborough Academy, 1791 1 

Buncombe County Schools 14-15 

Newton Academy, 1809 14 

Burke County Schools 16-17 

Morganton Academy, 1822 16 

Caswell County Schools 18-33 

Caswell Academy, 1802 18 

Hyco Academy, 1804 21 

Springfield Academy, 1804 29 

Miss Prendergast's School, 1818 29 

Milton Female Academy, 1819 30 

Pickard's School, 1824 31 

Miss Ballantine's Seminary, 1825 31 

Mrs. Stith's Seminary, 1825 32 

Leasburg Classical School, 1835 32 

Chatham County Schools 34-49 

Pittsboro Academy, 1797 34 

The Kelvin School, 1828 43 

Haywood Academy, 1833 47 

Hooper's Select Preparatory School, 1837 48 

Pleasant Hill Academy, 1838 48 

Cobia's Select Female School, 1839 49 

Craven County Schools 50-59 

Newbern Academy, 1793 50 

Cumberland County Schools 60-73 

Fayetteville Academy, 1794 60 

Hooper's Classical School, 1824 72 

Donaldson Academy, 1835 73 

Duplin County Schools 74-76 

Grove Academy, 1786 74 

Hannah More Academy, 1837 75 

Edgecombe County Schools 77-79 

Tarboro Academy, 1813 77 

Sparta Academy, 1830 79 

Forsyth County Schools 80-83 

Salem Academy, 1811 80 

Clemmonsville School, 1837 83 

Franklin County Schools 84-120 

Louisburg Academy, 1802 ; 84 

Hickory Grove Seminary, 1813 107 

Midway Academy, 1822 107 

Spring Grove Academy, 1827 114 

Mount Welcome Academy, 1828 115 

(xlvii) 



xlviii Contents 

Franklin County Schools — Continued. page 

Miss Bobbitt's School, 1830 116 

Hemdon Academy, 1836 117 

Granville County Schools 121-166 

Williamsborough Academy, 1805 121 

Pleasant Grove Academy, 1812 132 

Oxford Academy, 1813 132 

Oxford Female Seminary, 1822 154 

Grassy Creek Private Academy, 1823 162 

Henderson Law School, 1823 162 

Shiloh Classical School, 1827 163 

Concord Academy, 1834 164 

Union Academy, 1837 164 

Ford Creek Academy, 1837 165 

Greene County Schools 167-167 

Greene Academy, 1807 167 

Hookerton Academy, 1818 167 

Guilford County Schools 168-174 

Greensboro Academy, 1806 168 

Jamestown Female Seminary, 1815 170 

Shields' Lancaster School, 1820 172 

Union Academy, 1821 172 

Caldwell Institute, 1837 172 

Halifax County Schools ■. 175-186 

Benson's English School, 1806 175 

Halifax Classical School, 1807 175 

Vine Hill Academy, 1811 175 

Union Academy, 1815 178 

Farmwell Grove Academy, 1820 179 

Enfield Academy, 1823 180 

Hyde Park Academy, 1828 , 181 

Scotland Neck Female Seminary, 1827 183 

La Vallee Female Seminary, 1837 184 

Grant's Female Boarding School, 1837 185 

Iredell County Schools 187-191 

Statesville Academy, 1815 187 

Garden's Lancaster School, 1822 188 

Ebenezer Academy, 1823 , 190 

Chapman's Classical School, 1828 191 

Johnston County Schools 192-195 

Averasborough Academy, 1804 192 

Smithfield Academy, 1812 192 

Lincoln County Schools 196-228 

Pleasant Retreat Academy, 1820 196 

Catawba School, 1823 224 

O'Reilly's School, 1826 226 

Buffalo Academy, 1827 226 

Buffalo Shoal School, 1829 227 

Mecklenburg County Schools 229-241 

Mrs. Milligan's School, 1807 229 

Death of Rev. Joseph Alexander, 1809 229 



Contents xlix 

Mecklenburg County Schools — Continued. page 

Mrs. Bevins' Boarding School, 1812 229 

Hopewell Academy, 1821 230 

Charlotte Academy, 1822 230 

Sprattsville Lancastrian School, 1822 240 

Sugar Creek School, 1827 241 

Mrs. Cushman's School, 1828 241 

Military Schools 242-262 

Davie Favors Military Instruction at University, 1795 242 

Murphey's Military Schools, 1810 243 

Lenoir County Military School, 1813 243 

Bingham's (D. H.) Military School, 1826 244 

Carter Jones' Military Schools, 1833 261 

Nash County Schools 263-269 

Westrayville Academy, 1809 263 

Hilliardston Academy, 1820 264 

Nashville Male Academy, 1827 266 

Peach Tree Academy, 1834 267 

Stony Hill Academy, 1837 268 

New Hanover County Schools 270-274 

Wilmington Academy, 1812 270 

Jewett's School, 1835 270 

Halsley's School, 1836 270 

Corbin's School, 1836 271 

Stanlift's Writing School, 1836 271 

Ryckman's School, 1836 272 

Spencer's Academy, 1836 272 

Crook's Grammar School, 1837 273 

Mulock's English School, 1838 273 

Simpson's School, 1839 274 

Lloyd and Bailey's School, 1840 274 

Repiton's School, 1840 274 

Northampton County Schools 275-279 

Northampton Academy, 1835 275 

Wood's Female School, 1838 278 

Orange County Schools 280-324 

Hillsboro Academy, 1801 280 

Gregory's Boarding School, 1808 295 

Hawfield Academy, 1808 ■. 295 

Mt. Repose School, 1818 296 

Union School, 1818 298 

Graves' Female School, 1819 298 

Chapel Hill Academy, 1820 299 

Hillsboro Female Seminary, 1825 300 

Witherspoon's Private Boarding School, 1826 310 

Bethlehem School, 1829 312 

Anderson's Female Boarding School, 1830 312 

Murphy's Law School, 1831 314 

Phillips' Female School, 1836 315 

Mt. Pleasant (Junto) Academy, 1837 317 

Burwell's Female School, 1837 320 

(D) 



1 Contents 

Orange County Schools — Continued. page 

Holden's English School, 1838 322 

Fairfield School, 1839 323 

Union Academy, 1839 323 

Other Schools 325-330 

Bertie Union Academy 325 

Eden ton Academy 326 

Euphronian Academy 327 

Hertford Academy 328 

Lawrenceville Academy 328 

Lexington Academy 328 

Montpelier Academy ■ 328 

Nixonton Academy 328 

Rocky River Academy 329 

Schools of Robinson and Wilson 329 

Trenton Female Academy 329 

Washington Academy 330 

Williamston Academy 330 

Person County Schools 331-333 

Arcadia Academy, 1833 331 

Pitt County Schools 334-336 

Pitt Academy, 1828 334 

Greenville Academy, 1831 334 

Female Seminary, 1835 335 

Randolph County Schools 337-343 

Evans' School, 1822 337 

Troy's School, 1837 337 

Randolph Female Academy, 1839 337 

Robeson County Schools 343-344 

Mt. Clio Academy, 1807 343 

Laurel Hill Academy, 1810 343 

Rockingham County Schools 345-345 

Leaksville Academy, 1820 345 

Madison Academy, 1820 345 

Rowan County Schools 346-386 

Salisbury Academy, 1807 346 

Kilpatrick's School, 1809 382 

Mumford's School, 1815 383 

Barry's School, 1828 383 

Willey's Select School, 1828 384 

Hall's School, 1829 386 

Stokes County Schools 387-387 

Germanton Academy, 1811 387 

Wake County Schools 388-573 

Raleigh Academy, 1800 388 

Wills' A Cheap English School, 1802 512 

John Henry Gault's School, 1807 513 

John Chavis' School, 1808 515 

Holland's English School, 1809 515 

Stone's Lancaster School, 1813 515 

Writing Schools, 1813-1840 516 



Contents li 

Wake County Schools — Continued. page 

Norman Campbell, Teacher, 1814 520 

Ragsdale's Juvenile Academy, 1819 520 

Hassam's Private Academy, 1819 521 

Forest Hill Academy, 1820 525 

Schools to Teach Special Subjects, 1820-1840 526 

Glynn's Athenaeum, 1822 530 

Taylor's Law School, 1822 531 

Macedonian Academy, 1822 532 

Wake Forest Academy, 1823 532 

Lumsden's Private School, 1823 534 

Episcopal School, 1823-1840 535 

Wetmore's School, 1824 550 

Lightfoot's Juvenile School, 1825 550 

Whitaker's Music School, 1825 550 

Pomona Academy, 1826 551 

Dwight's Select School, 1828 554 

Raleigh Female Seminary, 1828 , 555 

Wake Forest Pleasant Grove Academy, 1828 557 

Eastwood's School, 1828 559 

Pleasant Spring Academy, 1829 560 

Raleigh Infant School, 1830 560 

Barbour's Select School, 1831 561 

Kerr's Male and Female School, 1831 561 

Goslin Bluff's Refined Female College, 1831 562 

Berkeley's Literary and Scientific Institution, 1831 563 

Mrs. Bowen's Private School, 1831 566 

Le Messurier's Classical and English School, 1831 567 

Woodville Academy, 1832 567 

Rolesville Academy, 1832 568 

Bryan's Private School, 1833 569 

Mrs. Bingham's School, 1833 569 

Stedman's Private School, 1835 570 

Holland's Church English School, 1837 570 

Otis' Raleigh Classical School, 1838 570 

Manly's Private School, 1838 571 

Whitaker's Boarding School, 18-39 571 

Oaky Mount Academy, 1839 572 

Warren County Schools 574-633 

Whitaker's Juvenile School, 1840 574 

Warrenton Academy, 1786 574 

Falkner's Young Ladies School, 1802 588 

Mordecai's Female Seminary, 1808 595 

Sims' Latin and English School, 1809 603 

Nicholson's Grammar School, 1812 603 

Shocco Female Academy, 1818 604 

Warrenton Female Academy, 1819 612 

C. A. Hill's Private School, 1821 628 

Shady Grove Academy, 1822 628 

Littleton Select School, 1822 631 

Vaiden's Select Seminary, 1833 632 

Shocco Classical Seminary, 1838 632 



Hi Contents 

PAGE 

Wayne County Schools 634-635 

Wayne Academy, 1794 634 

Goldsboro Academy, 1840 635 

Wilkes County Schools 636-640 

Wilkes Academy, 1805 636 

Fort Defiance School, 1824 639 

Colleges 641-721 

Western College and Davidson, 1820-1840 641 

Wake Forest College, 1832-1840 694 

Trinity College, 1838-1840 719 

Defects of the Schools, 1827 722-728 

Imperfections of Our Primary Schools, 1833 729-750 

Labor System of Education, 1833 750-757 

Plan of Education by Philomathes, 1807 757-759 

Raleigh Reading Room, Library and Theater, 1813-1821 760-763 

Rules of School 763-764 

School and Other Books Advertised, 1800-1840 765-800 

School Days of Brantley York, 1809-1818 801-802 

Teachers Wanted, 1801-1840 803-820 



ANSON COUNTY SCHOOLS 

WADESBOKO ACADEMY, 1791. 

An Act to establish a seminary of learning in Wadesboroagh in Anson 
County. 

Whereas, the establishing a seminary of learning in the town of 
Wadesborongh in the said county, for the education of youth, will be 
attended with great productions to the state in general and the county 
of Anson in particular : 

1. Be it therefore enacted by the General Assembly of North Carolina 
and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That the Hon. 
Samuel Spencer, Esq., John Auld, Holden "Wade, James Pickett, Pat- 
trick Boggan, William Johnston, Burwell Lanier, James Marshall, 
William Pegues, Calvin Spencer, Morgan Brown, jun. and William 
Thomas, be and they are hereby constituted and appointed Trustees, with 
full power and authority to receive all donations, gifts or gratuities into 
their hands and possession and money and other property which may 
be subscribed for erecting and supporting the said seminary of learning 
in the county of Anson, by the name of Stokes; and the said Trustees 
and their successors shall be able and capable in law, to ask for, demand, 
recover, receive and possess of the several subscribers all sums by them 
respectively subscribed, and in case of refusal of any of them to 
pay the same,- to sue for and recover by action of debt or otherwise, in 
the name of the Trustees, the sum which such person so refusing shall 
have subscribed, in any jurisdiction having cognizance thereof; and the 
monies then collected and received to be applied by the said Trustees, or a 
majority of them, toward defraying the expence of employing a Tutor 
or Tutors and building a house for that purpose in said town and to per- 
form every act or thing which they or a majority of them shall think 
necessary and expedient for the advancement of said seminary and the 
promotion of learning therein. 

—Chapter XXXII, Laws 1791. 

An Act to establish an academy in the town of Wadesborough, in Anson 
County. 

Whereas, the establishing public seminaries of learning for the edu- 
cation of youth, is highly beneficial to the morals, happiness, and pros- 
perity of the community, and consequently well worthy legislative atten- 
tion, 

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina 
and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That James Mar- 
shall, Robert Troy, James Goodrich. Joseph Ingram, senior, James 
Douglas, Joshua Prout, William Lanier, Toddy Robinson, Pleasant 
May, John Jinnings, Esquires, the Reverend William Taylor, the Rev- 
erend John Culpepper, and the Reverend Daniel Gould, shall be and 

(1) 



2 Anson County Schools 

they are hereby declared to be a body politic and corporate, to be known 
and distinguished by the name of The Trustees of the Wadesborough 
Academy; and by that name shall have perpetual succession and a com- 
mon seal : And that the said Trustees and their successors by the name 
aforesaid, or a majority of them, shall be able and capable in law, to take, 
demand, receive, and possess all monies goods and chattels, that shall be 
given for the use of the said Academy and the same apply according to 
the will of the donors; and by gift, purchase or devise, to take, receive, 
possess and enjoy to them and their successors forever, any lands, tene- 
ments, and hereditaments of what kind or nature soever in special trust 
and confidence, that the same or the profits thereof, be applied to and for 
the use and purpose of establishing and endowing the said Academy. 
—Chapter XXV, Laws 1802. 

SCHOOL OPENED 1803. 

THE TKUSTEES 

OF THE 

WADESBOROUGH ACADEMY 

Inform the Public, That the said Academy is now opened for the Recep- 
tion of Students on the following Terms, viz. 

Reading, Writing and Arithmetic, eight Dollars per Scholar; English 
Grammar, Geography, and the lower Branches of the Mathematics, 
twelve Dollars; the Latin and Greek Languages, fifteen Dollars. Gen- 
teel Board may be had at fifty-two Dollars per Year. 

The Trustees having employed the Rev. John Brown as their Presi- 
dent, and Mr. David Dunlap as Assistant, flatter themselves, from the 
Respectability of their Characters, the Healthiness of the Situation, and 
the low Price of Board and Tuition, that they shall acquire a large Num- 
ber of Students, and that their Infant Institution will meet the Patron- 
age of every Eriend of Learning and Virtue. 

On Behalf of the Board of Trustees, Joshua Pbout, Sec. 

April 26. 

—Raleigh Register, May 9, 1803. 

FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION. 

The Trustees of the Wadesborough Academy, impressed with a due 
sense of the importance of that Liberty and Independence they have so 
long and happily enjoyed, in tribute of gratitude to the Supreme Dis- 
poser of Nations for the same, together with those noble patriots who 
fought and bled to purchase it, as a means to impress on the minds of 
the Rising Generation the necessity of preserving those inestimable 
blessings, concluded to spend the 4th of July in the following manner: 

The Students of the Academy assembled in the lower part of the town ; 
about 12 o'clock, they were waited upon by the Trustees and Tutors and 
having arranged themselves in proper order, the Trustees in front, the 



Anson County Schools 3 

Tutors next, and the Scholars in gradual proportion of size behind, 
marched to the Courthouse, where the business of the day was opened by 
the Rev. John Brown, by prayer. An oration was then delivered by 
Robt. Troy, Esq. on the subject of our independence, and the happiness 
arising from the liberties we enjoy. 

"We then marched in the same order, attended by Capt. Robert Jar- 
man's cavalry in the rear, to the Academy, where the exercise was in- 
troduced by singing a few tunes, with their respective parts, accompanied 
with drumming, until our Cavalry alighted, and the Audience were 
seated. Our Students then exhibited their orations, which were such as 
the solemnity of the day demanded. Politics were introduced with great 
applause, and we are happy to say, that the young gentlemen who per- 
formed did honor to themselves and the institution. This being over we 
were escorted by the cavalry to the Court-House, where the Students were 
dismissed ; and we are happy to inform the Public, that our infant Insti- 
tution exceeds our most sanguine expectations, our number having in- 
creased from 20 to 71. A Public dinner was prepared under a handsome 
shade of trees, where the Trustees and Capt. Jarman's Cavalry, with a 
number of citizens who favored us with their company, dined together, 
and spent the remainder of the day in innocent mirth and festivity. 

By Order of the Board. Joshua Peout, Secretary. 

— Raleigh Register, August 1, 1803. 

ME. AND MES. EDMONDS IN CHAEGE. 

The Trustees of the Wadesborough Academy feel pleasure in announc- 
ing to the public, that they have engaged Robert L. Edmonds, A.M. to 
superintend their Seminary for the ensuing year. * * * 

The Trustees have also made an engagement with Mrs. Julia F. Ed- 
monds, to take charge of the Female Department. * * * 

Wadesboro, N". C, Nov'r 23, 1819. W. F. Smith. 

— Raleigh Register, December 17, 1819. 

ME. MASON ASSISTANT. 
(ANSON) MALE AND FEMALE ACADEMY. 

The Exercises will recommence on the 1st Monday in July next. Mr. 
Timothy Mason, a Gentleman highly recommended for his literary quali- 
fications and morality has been engaged as an Assistant. * * * 

Every exertion will be used to engage a Lady qualified to assist in the 
Ornamental Branches, previous to the reopening of the School. 

By order of the Board, 

Wadesborough, May 13. W. F. Smith, Secy. 

—Raleigh Register, May 26, 1820. 



4 Anson County Schools 

EXAMINATION OF PUPILS, 1820. 

WADESBOROUGH ACADEMIES. 

Report of the Committee of Examination, Wadesboro, June 23, 1820. 

The Committee appointed to superintend the examination of the stu- 
dents in both departments of the Wadesborough Academies, having im- 
partially performed their duty, beg leave to remark, that from the youth 
and inexperience of many of the students, and from their dispositions, 
they find a difficult and delicate task in awarding distinctions, particu- 
larly where all have made rapid progress, and exhibited such accurate 
knowledge in the various branches of their studies. And they have no 
doubt that, from the degree of diffidence manifested by many of the 
students, they have been unable to notice some of those who deserved 
distinctions in their different classes. 

Report. 

1st Class — Spelling in two syllables — Carolina Billingsley, approved. 

2d Class — Spelling in two, three, and four syllables — Mary Jane Dis- 
mukes, Oen Dejarnatt, Sarah Watson. M. J. Dismukes is considered 
best, Oen Dejarnatt next, and Sarah Watson much approved. 

Spelling in Walker's Dictionary . 

1st Class — Consisting of Glorvina Pickett, Frances Pickett, Mary El- 
lerbee, Elizabeth Carr, Jane Little, Elizabeth R. May. Glorvina Pickett 
and Prances Pickett equal and best : Mary Ellerbee second ; the others 
well approved. 

2d Class — Consisting of Mary Cash, Elizabeth H. Slaughter, Eliza 
Ann Dismukes, Mary Sylvester, Frances Pickett, Laura A. Forniss, 
Mary Pegues, Louisa Boggan, Susan Pickett, Eleanor Pickett, Martha 
Carr, Sarah Lawrence, Martha Coleman, Rachel Coleman, Margaret Ed- 
monds, Eliza Lawrence. Mary Cash is considered best; Elizabeth H. 
Slaughter, Eliza A. Dismukes, Mary Sylvester, Frances Pickett, Laura 
Forniss, Mary Pegues, Louisa Boggan, Susan Pickett, Eleanor Pickett, 
Martha Carr, Sarah Lawrence, second and equal ; the others approved. 

Reading. 

1st Class — Frances Pickett, Mary Ellerbee, Glorvina Pickett, Eliza- 
beth Carr, Elizabeth R. May, and Jane Little, were examined on reading 
in Looking-Glass. Frances Pickett is considered best; Glorvina Pickett 
and Mary Ellerbee equal and next ; the others approved. 

2d Class — Elizabeth H. Slaughter, Eliza Ann Dismukes, Laura A. 
Forniss, Mary Sylvester, Mary Pegues, Susan Pickett, Sarah Lawrence, 
Fanny Pickett, Margaret Edmond, Eleanor Pickett, Louisa Boggan, 
Martha Coleman, Martha Carr, Eliza Lawrence, Avere examined on read- 
ing in the English Reader. In this class Laura A. Forniss is entitled to 
the first honor; Elizabeth H. Slaughter, Eliza A. Dismukes, Mary Syl- 



Anson County Schools 5 

vester, Fanny Pickett, Margaret Edrnond, Eleanor Pickett, Louisa Bog- 

gan, Martha Coleman, to the second; the others are approved. 

3d Class — Mary Cash and Eachel Coleman were examined in reading 

History of America, in which they are considered equal and very highly 

approved. 

English Grammar. 

1st Class — Consisting of Louisa Boggan, Martha Coleman, Margaret 
Edmond, Eliza Lawrence, and Sarah Lawrence. This class was exam- 
ined in orthography and part of etymology. The first honor is awarded 
to Louisa Boggan ; the second to Martha Coleman ; the others equal. 

2d Class — Consisting of Susan Pickett, Eliza A. Dismukes, Mary 
Pegues, Eleanor Pickett, who are equal, and merit approbation. 

3d Class — Laura Ann Eornis, Elizabeth H. Slaughter, Martha Carr, 
Fanny Pickett, and Mary Sylvester. This class was examined on Mur- 
ray's English Grammar throughout : Mary Sylvester is considered best ; 
Elizabeth H. Slaughter and Louisa A. Forniss next, the others are ap- 
proved. This class, (with the exception of E. H. Slaughter and M. 
Sylvester,) together with Mary Pegues, Susan Pickett, and Eleanor 
Pickett, constituted the first parsing class ; in which Fanny Pickett is en- 
titled to the first honor, Eliza A. Dismukes the second, the others are 
equal. 

4th Class — Mary Cash and Rachel Coleman, were examined on Mur- 
ray's Grammar, &c. and are considered equal. This class, with the addi- 
tion of Elizabeth H. Slaughter and Mary Sylvester, formed the second 
parsing class, in which there is no distinction ; all highly approved. 

Geography. 

Junior Class — Consisting of Elizabeth H. Slaughter, Martha Coleman, 
Mary Sylvester, Fanny Pickett, Eliza A. Dismukes, Eleanor Pickett, 
Mary Pegues, Laura A. Forniss, Susan Pickett, Louisa Boggan, Marga- 
ret Edmond, Martha Carr, Sarah Lawrence, Eliza Lawrence. This 
class was examined on the map of the world : Elizabeth H. Slaughter, 
Martba Coleman and Mary Sylvester, are distinguished as best, the oth- 
ers highly approved. It is but justice to observe, that those who are the 
most deserving are distinguished by the order in which they are named. 

Senior Class — Consisting of Rosanna R. Troy, Mary Cash and Rachel 
Coleman. This class was examined on the map of the World, Europe, 
jSTorth and South America, and the map of the United States. Those 
young ladies are collectively distinguished, and merit the warmest appro- 
bation of the committee for their promptness and accuracy, for which 
they award to them the first rank among the classes of the school. 

Polite Literature. 

1st Class — Consisting of Elizabeth H. Slaughter, Mary Sylvester, 
Louisa Boggan, Martha Carr, Elizabeth Lawrence, Susan Pickett, Fanny 
Pickett : Fanny Pickett is considered best, Elizabeth H. Slaughter and 
Mary Sylvester, second; the others approved. 



6 Anson County Schools 

2d Class — Consisting of Mary Coleman and Mary Cash; in which "both 
are considered equal, and highly approved. These young ladies compose, 
also, the first class in rhetoric, in which their examination was highly 
gratifying, and equal in point of merit. 

2d Class of Rhetoric — Rosaima R. Troy; who was examined on logic, 
natural philosophy, and the French language, whose display, in these 
various branches of education, was truly elegant and accurate, and justly 
merited the approbation of the committee. 

Penmanship. 

1st Class — Mary Ellerbee, Frances Pickett, Jane Little, Oen Dejarnatt, 
Glorvina Pickett, Elizabeth Carr. Mary Ellerbee is best ; the rest are 
equal. 

2d Class — Consisting of Eliza A. Dismukes, Eleanor Pickett, Susan 
Pickett, Sarah Lawrence, Fanny Pickett, Laura A. Forniss, Louisa Bog- 
gan, Eliza Lawrence, Mary Pegues : to Susan Pickett, Eliza Lawrence 
and Sarah Lawrence, is awarded the first honor; Laura A. Forniss the 
second, the others equal. 

3d Class — Consisting of Martha Coleman, Elizabeth LT. Slaughter and 
Martha Carr; equal, and highly approved. 

4th Class — Consisting of Mary Cash, Rosanna R. Troy, Rachel Cole- 
man, Mary Sylvester, and Margaret Edmond: It is with pleasure the 
committee observe, that all the specimens are executed with neatness; 
Miss Cash's is the best written. 

Needle-work. 

1st Class — Consisting of Margaret Edmonds, Eleanor Pickett and 
Laura A. Forniss. The honors are awarded in this class in the order in 
which they are named. 

2d Class — Consisting of Elizabeth H. Slaughter, Fanny Pickett, Sarah 
Lawrence and Eliza A. Dismukes: Of this class, E. H. Slaughter is 
best; the others equal. 

3d Class — Consisting of Mary Cash, Mary Sylvester, Martha Carr, 
Louisa Boggan and Eliza Lawrence : M. Cash is entitled to the first 
honor; the others are equal, except E. Lawrence, who is approved. 
There was also a class examined in catechism, which was highly ap- 
proved. 

MALE DEPARTMENT. 

Spelling. 

1st Class — Consisting of William Little and Ingoe Ellerbee ; who were 
examined on spelling, in two, three and four syllables : equal, and ap- 
proved. 

2d Class — Consisting of James Mendanhall, Peter Slaughter, Julius 
Beeman, Lawrence Moore, Benjamin E. Carr, William Ellerbee and 
Moore Moore. This class was examined in Webster's spelling-book and 



Anson County Schools 7 

dictionary, in which James Mendanhall is mentioned as deserving the 
first distinction, Peter Slaughter second, and Julius Beeman third ; the 
rest approved. 

3d Class — Consisting of James Bird, William Bird, William Beeman, 
Thomas J. Lockhart, James Dismukes, Hardy May, Cornelius Moore, 
Joseph Sylvester, James T. Dejarnatt, Jacob West, William Lockhart, 
Thomas Little, William Dejarnatt, William Lawrence, Burwell Carr, Ed- 
mond Walch, on spelling book throughout ; in which James Bird, Wil- 
liam Bird and William Beeman, Thomas Lockhart and James Dismukes 
are equal, and best ; those who maintained the second station in this class, 
are Hardy May, Cornelius Moore, Joseph Sylvester, and James T. De- 
jaimatt; the others all stand at No. 3, and are approved. The foregoing, 
together with the following, viz. William Pegues, George Little, Alexan- 
der May, Reuben Pickett, Giles W. Pearson, were examined on spelling, 
in Walker's dictionary, throughout ; James Bird, William Bird, Burwell 
Carr, Thomas J. Lockhart, James Dismukes and Giles W. Pearson, equal 
and best; William Beeman, Joseph Sylvester, James T. Dejarnatt, Ed- 
mond Walch, William Pegues, George Little, are entitled to the second 
place ; the others equal, and approved. 

Reading. 

1st Class — Consisting of Peter Slaughter, Moore Moore, James Men- 
danhall, Lawrence Moore, Benjamin L. Carr, Julius Beeman and Will- 
iam Ellerbee; who read in the Looking-Glass : James Mendanhall and 
Lawrence Moore are considered best ; the others equal, and approved. 

2d Class — Consisting of James T. Dejarnatt, William Dejarnatt, 
Thomas J. Lockhart, William Lawrence, William Lockhart, Edmond 
Walch, Jacob West, Giles W. Pearson, Joseph Sylvester, Cornelius 
Moore, Hardy May, William Bird, Thomas Little and William Beeman, 
who read in Murray's English Reader; Giles W. Pearson and William 
Beeman are awarded the first honor; William Dejarnatt, Thomas J. 
Lockhart, Edmond Walch, Jacob West, Joseph Sylvester, Cornelius 
Moore, William Bird and Thomas Little, the second; the rest approved. 

3d Class — Wm. Pegues, Reuben Pickett, Sidney Davidson, James Dis- 
mukes, George Little, Burwell Carr, James Bird, Alexander May, who 
read in the History of America ; in this class Sidney Davidson and James 
Dismukes are equal, and best; and James Bird, second; the others but 
little inferior, and highly approved. 

Murray's Grammar. 

1st Class — Burwell Bailey and Thomas Ledbetter ; equal, and ap- 
proved. 

2d Class — Giles W. Pearson, William Pegues, James Bird, Sidney 
Davidson, George Little, Cornelius Moore, Joseph Sylvester, Hardy May, 
Jacob West, William Lawrence, Reuben Pickett, Burwell Carr and James 
Dismukes ; in which Giles W. Pearson, Sidney Davidson, James Bird and 



8 Anson County Schools 

James Dismukes, are worthy of the first distinction, and considered 

equal; Cornelius Moore, Reuben Pickett and Burwell Carr, second; the 

rest approved. 

Parsing. 

1st Class — Thomas J. Lockhart, Hardy May, William Lawrence, 
James T. Dejarnatt, Cornelius Moore, William Beeman, William Bird, 
Edmond Walch and Jacob West : This class was examined in Murray's 
Exercises as far as the adjective and noun, in which Thomas J. Lockhart, 
William Beeman and William Bird distinguished themselves as first; 
Hardy May, J. T. Dejarnatt, William Dejarnatt and Cornelius Moore, 
second; the rest equal. 

2d Class — James Dismukes, Giles W. Pearson, James Bird, Burwell 
Carr, William Pegues, George Little, Joseph Sylvester, Sidney David- 
son ; Avho were examined in parsing promiscuous sentences in Murray's 
Exercises; James Dismukes and Sidney Davidson are mentioned as 
first; Giles W. Pearson, James Bird and Burwell Carr, second; the 
others equally approved. 

3d Class — William Le Grand, James Moore, William Johnson, Val- 
entine Park, Samuel Davidson, William May, Lyte Townsend, Alexan- 
der Thomas, James Slaughter : of this class, James Slaughter is con- 
sidered first; Samuel Davidson second; the rest equal, and highly ap- 
proved. 

4th Class — James Townsend ; who was examined on Murray's Gram- 
mar throughout, parsing poetry, correcting instances of false syntax, in 
which he evinced much previous application, and is justly entitled to the 
approbation of the committee. 

5th Class — Saml. Davidson, James Slaughter, Lyte Townsend, Alex- 
ander Thomas, William Le Grand, William May; all equal, and ap- 
proved, and distinguished by the order in which they are named. 

Geography. 

1st Class— James Bird, William Beeman, William Pegues, Hardy 
May, Jacob West, Cornelius Moore, Edmond Walch, William Dejar- 
natt and William Bird : This class was examined on the map of the 
world, and they are so nearly equal, that it would be unjust to make 
any distinction. 

2d Class — On the map of the world, and Europe, James Moore, Giles 
W. Pearson, Valentine D. Park, Leonidas King, Thomas J. Lockhart, 
Joseph Sylvester, Sidney Davidson, William Lawrence, Burwell Carr, 
James Dismukes and William Pickett : who were equal, and approved. 

3d Class— James Townsend, Lyte Townsend, William Johnson, Alex- 
ander Thomas, William May and George Little : this class was on the 
map of the world, Europe, North and South America, and are truly de- 
serving the applause of the committee for their promptness and accu- 
racy. 

4th Class — James Townsend, Lyte Townsend, William Johnson and 
Alexander Thomas, who were examined on the map of the United 



Anson County Schools 9 

States. The examination of this class was truly gratifying, and it is de- 
serving of the highest approbation. 

5th Class — John Bates and James Slaughter: examined on the map 
of the world, Europe, United States, &c. The accuracy which these 
young gentlemen evinced on their examination, was such as entitles 
them to the esteem and applause of the committee, who, in behalf of the 
trustees, pronounce them the greatest proficients in geography in this de- 
partment. 

Classics. 

1st Class — James M. Slaughter was examined on Viri Romse, and two 
of Virgil's Bucolics. This young gentleman recommenced the study of 
Latin about three months previous to his examination ; his advancement 
is truly gatifying to the committee. 

2d Class — "William Le Grand was examined on the Bucolics, and first 
two Eneids of Virgil : his examination was truly interesting. 

3d Class — Louis E. Stubbs, George Dismukes, Daniel C. Murdoch, 
John Stubbs, James Johnson, Joseph Pickett, Leonidas King and Sam- 
uel B. Davidson, were examined on the Bucolics and first four Eneids 
of Virgil; Louis E. Stubbs is best; George Dismukes, Daniel C. Mur- 
doch and John Stubbs, next; the rest equal. 

4th Class — Clement Marshall ; who was examined on the Bucolics and 
first six Eneids of Virgil, and on the Odes of Horace : the committee 
award to Mr. Marshall their applause and high approbation. 

5th Class — John Bates; who was examined on parsing blank verse, 
Sallust, Virgil, Horace to the Satires, and Homer's Iliad : for the cor- 
rect display he made on the above branches, he is entitled to the highest 
standing as the most prompt and accurate scholar in this Seminary. 

Public Speahmg and Dramatic Representations. 

James M. Slaughter, George W. Dismukes, Clement Marshall, Wil- 
liam P. Johnson, John P. S. Bates, James Mendanhall, Giles W. Pear- 
son, Sidney Davidson, delivered Orations, on various subjects, that were 
highly gratifying to the committee, and creditable to themselves. The 
"Tailor in high Life," and the humorous farce of "My Aunt," were per- 
formed in a style that is not often surpassed by students. 

The committee feel highly gratified with the progress of the students 
in both departments of the Seminary, which redounds to the credit of 
themselves, and to the honor of their Preceptors. Indeed, when we re- 
flect that a majority of the students have never before entered a regular 
Academy, we are agreeably surprised at their rapid progress and ac- 
quirements in so short a period. We are happy in attributing to Mrs. 
Edmonds that meed of praise which is so justly due her, for the able 
and assiduous discharge of the arduous and important trust committed to 
her care. The improvement made by the students under her direction 
is a high evidence of her superior talents as a tutoress. Mr. Edmonds 
has realized the expectations we had formed of him, from his high 



10 Anson County Schools 

character as a teacher; and we trust that by his zeal and industry our 
Academy will rank equal, if not superior, to any in the state. 

By order of the committee. W. F. Smith, Secretary. 

|J^P*The exercises of the Wadesborough Academies will recom- 
mence on Monday, 10th July, under the management of the same Teach- 
ers, assisted by Mr. T. Mason. 

— Western Carolinian, July J/., 1820. 

NOTICE OF EXAMINATION, 1820. 

WADESBOBO (ANSON) ACADEMY. 

The semi-annual Examination of the Pupils in both Departments of 
this Seminary, will commence on Monday the 4th December, and termi- 
nate on the Saturday following. Parents and guardians of pupils, and 
the public generally, are respectfully invited to attend. 

By order of the Board. 

November 4th, 1820. W. F. Smith, Secretary. 

N. B. — The exercises of this Seminary will recommence on the sec- 
ond Monday in January, 1821. 

— Western Carolinian, November 1J+, 1820. 

MRS. EDMONDS' BOARDING SCHOOL. 

Mrs. Robert L. Edmonds, assisted by Miss Haskins, from New York, 
proposes to open a Female Boarding School on the first day of January 
next, in Wadesborough, Anson county, N. C. Eight years devoted to 
the instruction of young ladies, has, she hopes, qualified her for this ar- 
duous task. In regard to the situation there is none, probably, in the 
State better adapted for an Institution of this kind. It has long 
proved to be very healthy, and in a School containing more than 100 pu- 
pils, for the last two years, not more than three cases of fever have oc- 
cured. * * * 

The course of education will embrace Beading, Writing, Arithmetic, 
English Grammar, Geography by the Use of Globes and Maps, Belles 
Lettres, Chemistry, Moral Philosophy, Ancient and Modern History, 
Composition, Mythology, Astronomy, the Latin and French Languages, 
Plain and Ornamental Needle Work, etc. One general charge of 130 
Dollars per annum, to be paid semi-annually, and always in advance, 
will include all the above branches, together with every article of board, 
medical aid and medicine. Music and Painting will constitute a sepa- 
rate charge. Mrs. E. is at present furnished with Maps and Globes 
equal to any in the United States. Mr. Edmonds will inspect the 
School daily, and deliver Lectures to the Young Ladies on Geography, 
Astronomy and Philosophy, three times a week. The Pupils will have an 
opportunity of attending Divine Service regularly on the Sabbath. 
The School will be limited to 30 boarders, and ten day scholars. There 



Anson County Schools 11 

will be a public Examination semi-annually, and a vacation during the 
month of December. * * * 

The School will not be attempted with less than 20 pupils; but as 
soon as that number of applications are made, public notice will be 
given in the Charleston papers, Raleigh Register, Georgia Advertiser 
and Pee Dee Gazette. 

References : 

Rev. Robert S. Symmes, D.D. ) ~ n . „ „ 

-r. a j -n i a tit r Charleston, b. C. 
Rev. Andrew Fowler, A.M., ) ' 

Moses Sanders, Esq. Darlington, (S. C.) 
Pleasant H. May, Esq., Statesburg, (S. C.) 
Augustus Longstreet, Esq. Greensborough, (Ga.) 
Joseph Pickett, Esq. "Wadesborough, (N. C.) 



12 



Anson County Schools 



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Anson County Schools 13 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF JULY, 1822. 

WADESBOROUGH 
MALE AND FEMALE ACADEMY. 

The exercises of this institution commenced on the 15th inst. under 
the superintendence of Mr. and Mrs. Edmonds. Parents and guar- 
dians, taking into consideration the healthy situation of our village, the 
cheapness of board, the qualifications of the teachers, would do well to 
send their children and wards. The board of managers pledge them- 
selves, that every attention shall be given to the morals and instruction 
of the pupils. William Dismukes, 

MlTMFORD DeJARNETTE, 

Thomas D. Parke, 
Alexander Little, 
Erancis A. Cash, 

Wadesboro', July 22, 1822. Managers. 

— Western Carolinian, July 30, 1822. 



BUNCOMBE COUNTY SCHOOLS 

FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION. 

Asheville, Buncombe County, July 7, 1809. 

The anniversary of our glorious Independence was pleasingly cele- 
brated in this little village on Tuesday last. Here was no bombastic dis- 
play of warlike ardour — no mock feats of chivalry — no firing of guns — 
no splendid feasting — no Bachanalian libations — and consequently no 
pestiferous, a baneful practice of assassinating characters with im- 
punity, and fomenting party strife. 

About 11 o'clock in the forenoon the Students of the Union Hill 
Academy (under the tuition of the Rev. George Newton) marched into 
town in handsome order, followed by their Teacher and the Trustees of 
this seminary, and had an exhibition at the house of Maj. Andrew Er- 
win, where a stage had been previously erected. The scene was beau- 
tiful; about 40 of the Students neatly clad in homespun garbs, exhib- 
ited various characters on the stage — while the expressive countenances 
of several hundreds of spectators bore testimony that their performances 
were such as did honour to themselves and their worthy Preceptor. 

—Raleigh Star, July 29, 1809. 

LOTTERY ADVERTISEMENT, 1810. 

LITERARY ADVANCEMENT. 



SEVEN THOUSAND DOLLARS ! 
May be gained for the small sum of 

FOUR DOLLARS ! 

In the 

NEWTON ACADEMY LOTTERY. 

* * * The above Lottery is authorized by an act of the Legislature 
of North Carolina, for the purpose of enabling the Trustees of the New- 
ton Academy near the town of Asheville, to compleat the necessary 
buildings belonging to the same — And also to establish a Female Acad- 
emy in the town of Asheville. * * * David Vance, 

Geo. Swaine, 
John Patton, 
Geo. Newton, 
Andkew Erwin, 
Asheville, January 26, 1810. Managers. 

— Raleigh Register, February 22, 1810. 

(14) 



Buncombe County Schools 15 

LOTTERY A FAILURE. 
ADVEKTISEMENT. 

The Managers of the ISTewton Lottery, return their sincere thanks to 
all who have evinced a willingness to aid them in carrying the Lottery 
into effect ; and with reluctance inform them, that owing to the extreme 
scarcity of cash, they are induced to believe that a sufficient number of 
Tickets, to justify the commencement of drawing in a reasonable time, 
cannot be sold. And lest those holding Tickets should become uneasy, 
we deem it our duty to discontinue the sale of Tickets ; and have re- 
funded all the money to the Post-Masters and other Agents, that was 
forwarded by them to us, with a request that they will take in all the 
tickets they have respectively sold, which request we flatter ourselves 
each will comply with. David Vance. 

George Swain. 
John Patton. 
George Newton. 

Asheville, December 21, 1811. Andrew Irvin. 

— The Star, January 2k, 1812. 



BURKE COUNTY SCHOOLS 

NOTICE OF OPENING OF ACADEMY. 

MORGANTON ACADEMY, 

Burke County, is now open for the reception of Scholars, under the 
patronage of a respectable Board of Trustees. The mode of instruc- 
tion pursued is the result of much attention and experience, and emi- 
nently calculated to fit young gentlemen and ladies for the active du- 
ties of life, and to prepare students successfully to pursue their colle- 
giate studies. 

Lectures in an easy, familiar style, are given three or four times a 
week, on Language, History, Rhetoric, or Moral, Intellectual, Natural 
or Political Philosophy. 

Great attention is paid to reading, speaking, writing, and pronounc- 
ing the English language with correctness and elegance, and to the 
manners and morals of the pupils; and every thing done to promote 
their happiness and improvement. Tuition $20 per annum, and board 
on the most reasonable terms. The village is pleasant and healthy. 

French and Italian will be taught grammatically, if requested. 

April 15, 1822. 

— Western Carolinian, June 11, 1822. 

FEMALE ACADEMY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

MORGANTON FEMALE ACADEMY. 

This institution will continue the current Year under the manage- 
ment of the Rev. Chauncey Eddy, Mrs. Eddy, and Miss Parkman, the 
same as the last year. 

The discipline and course of studies are the same as those adopted in 
the most approved seminaries of New England and New York. 

The first quarter of the present year has already commenced, but ad- 
mission can be obtained at any time, and the bills will be made out from 
the time of admission. 

As the object of the institution is the intellectual, and religious im- 
provement of the Young Ladies, the instructors feel themselves bound 
to exercise an attentive guardianship over them, — to check their de- 
sires for vulgar and degrading amusements, and to direct their attention 
to such things as are calculated to refine the manners, enlarge the mind 
and improve the heart. Good boarding can be obtained, either at the 
Academy, with the Instructors, or in the immediate vicinity, at the rate 
of eighty dollars per year. 

Terms, $6.25 per quarter; or $5, when instruction in Painting is not 
required; payable at the end of each quarter. 

Morganton, February 21, 1824. 

— Western Carolinian, March 2, 182 %. 

(16) 



Burke County Schools 17 

ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 1824. 

MORGANTON ACADEMY. 

This institution having received such assistance from the acts of the 
last Assembly, as places it on a stable and respectable foundation, and 
enjoying the labors of Mr. Alexander E. Wilson, a graduate from the 
State University, who has during the last year, given the most satisfac- 
tory proof of his faithfulness and ability, is now recommended to the 
attention of the public. * * * Under the instruction of Mr. Wil- 
son, * * * together with the Rev. Mr. Eddy, residing in the Acad- 
emy buildings, * * * those gentlemen who wish to fit their sons for 
college, or give them a valuable scientific education will be afforded fa- 
cilities at this institution equal to any in the State. 

Isaac T. Avery. 

— Western Carolinian, August 10, 182Jf. 



CASWELL COUNTY SCHOOLS 

CASWELL ACADEMY. 

Legislation. 
An Act to establish an Academy at the Courthouse in Caswell County: 

Whereas, a number of the citizens of said county, are desirous of es- 
tablishing an Academy for the promotion of learning, at the courthouse 
aforesaid, having by subscription, erected a convenient building on a 
lot appropriated to that purpose, and Trustees being already appointed 
by the Subscribers to carry the same into effect, and it is proper that 
they should be incorporated, therefore; 

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of North Caro- 
lina and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That 
Thomas Donoho, Solomon Graves, Jesse Carter, Alexander Murphey, 
David Mitchell, Richard Simpson, Marmaduke Williams, Michael 
Montgomery, John M'Aden, James Yancey and Henry Atkinson, Es- 
quires shall be, and they are hereby declared to be a body politic and cor- 
porate, to be known and distinguished by the name of "The Trustees of 
the Caswell Academy" and by that name shall have perpetual succes- 
sion and that they the Trustees, and their successors by the name afore- 
said, or a majority of them, shall be able and capable in law, to take, 
demand, receive and possess all monies, goods and chattels that shall be 
given for the use of the said Academy, and the same apply according 
to the will of the donors and by gift, purchase or devise, to take, have, 
receive, possess and enjoy and retain to them and their successors 
forever, any lands, rents, tenements, and hereditaments of what kind 
or nature soever, in special trust and confidence, that the same or the 
profits thereof, be applied to and for the use and purpose of establish- 
ing and endowing said academy. 

—Chapter XXXVII, Laws 1802. 

CASWELL ACADEMY OPEtfS. 

There will be opened in the County of Caswell, near the Courthouse, 
on the first day of January next, an Academy, known by the Name ol 
the Caswell Academy, for the Reception of Students, to be taught the 
different Branches of Literature; to wit, Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, 
the Latin and Greek Languages, Geography, Natural and Moral Phil- 
osophy, Astronomy, etc., etc., under the direction of the Rev. Hugh 
Shaw. The Terms for teaching the Latin and Greek Languages, to- 
gether with the Sciences, will be 14 Dollars per Annum; Reading, 
Writing, and Arithmetic, 7 Dollars per Annum. Boarding may be pro- 
cured convenient to the said Academy in good Houses, at the low Price 
of 33% Dollars, and from that to 40 dollars per annum. 

November 22, 1802. 

— Raleigh Register, November 22, 1802. 

(18) 



Caswell County Schools 19 

CASWELL ACADEMY EXAMINATION, 1803. 

On the 4th ult. the Public Speaking, etc., commenced at the Caswell 
Academy, which was performed with approbation and applause ; and 
on the 5th, the Examination began on those parts of the Studies in 
which the Students had been engaged the previous half year; and it 
is with pleasure the Trustees announce to the public, that the progress 
they have made, and the accuracy with which they passed their several 
examinations, much exceeded their expectations, and was honorable to 
themselves, and to their Preceptors. 

By Order of the Board, Henry Atkinson, Glk. 

— Raleigh Register, August 1, 1803. 

CASWELL ACADEMY UNDER HUGH SHAW. 

This Seminary, established on the pure patriotic Disposition of its 
Friends to cultivate Science and Literature, has increased in Number 
beyond the Expectation of its most sanguine Patronage. There are, 
at present, upwards of fifty Students who evince the strongest Proofs 
of expanding Genius, and discover the Advantage of an early Educa- 
tion. * * * The Trustees, at their last Meeting, have again con- 
tracted with the Rev. Hugh Shaw, as Principal Teacher, for the ensu- 
ing Year, whose Capability and moral Character has been highly 
approved. The School will also be furnished with an Assistant Teacher 
in the Languages. They have also employed Mr. Bartlett Yancey, a 
young Gentleman of approved Talents, to teach the English Language 
Grammatically, under the Direction of the Principal Teacher. * * * 

December 8, 1803. The Trustees. 



'A pair of Globes and a complete Set of Maps have just come to 
Hand. 

— Raleigh Register, December 9, 1803. 

CASWELL ACADEMY UNDER ME. DONOHO. 

The Exercises of Caswell Academy will commence with the beginning 
of the next year, under the direction of Mr. Sanders Donoho. Terms 
of Tuition will be Fourteen Dollars for the Latin and Greek Lan- 
guages, the same for Geography, with the use of the Maps and Globes ; 
and seven dollars for the English Language. 

December 20, 1804. Henry Atkinson, Treasurer. 

— Raleigh Register, January 28, 1805. 

CASWELL ACADEMY UNDER MR. EOWLES. 

The Exercises of the Caswell Academy will commence as usual, on 
the first of January next under the direction of Mr. James Bowles, 
who will teach the different branches of Literature, to wit : Reading, 
Writing, English Grammar, the Latin and Greek Languages, Arith- 



20 Caswell County Schools 

nietic, Geography, Geometry, Trigonometry, Natural and Moral Phil- 
osophy, with Astronomy, etc. 

The Trustees flatter themselves, that being provided with an excel- 
lent pair of Globes, a set of fine Maps, and some geometrical apparatus, 
with the healthy situation of the Academy, the cheapness of board, and 
the qualifications of their Teacher, Parents and Guardians will find 
it to their interest to send their children to this institution. 

The Trustees vouch themselves that due attention shall be paid to 
the tuition and morals of the Students. 

Boarding may be had in convenient and respectable families for 
forty and forty-five dollars per year. 

By order, A. Mubphey. 

December 23, 1805. 

— Raleigh Register, January 13, 1806. 

CASWELL ACADEMY UNDER ME. CALDWELL. 

The Trustees of Caswell Academy inform the Public, that they have 
employed Mr. John W. Caldwell, of Guilford county, to take charge 
of that Seminary, at the commencement of the ensuing year. * * * 

November 17, 1807. The Trustees. 

— Raleigh Register, December 21/., 1807. 

CASWELL ACADEMY ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1808. 

The Trustees of the Caswell Academy inform the Public, that they 
have employed Mr. John W. Caldwell, of Guilford County, to take 
charge of that Seminary, at the commencement of the ensuing year. 
Boarding can be had for fifty Students, within one mile and a half 
of the Academy, in genteel and respectable families, at forty-five and 
fifty dollars. It is presumed the situation and healthiness of the place, 
and the character and abilities of the teacher, will induce parents and 
others to send their children to this place. 

November 17, 1807. The Trustees. 

— Raleigh Register, November 19, 1807. 

CASWELL ACADEMY FOR 1809. 

The Trustees of this seminary have the pleasure of informing the 
public that they have again employed Mr. John W. Caldwell, formerly 
of Guilford as Principal Teacher in the Academy. The character of 
this gentleman as a profound linguist and a good teacher is well known. 
* * * The exercises of the Academy will go into operation on the 
1st of January. The superior advantage which this institution has 
over country seminaries of the kind, in having an elegant and com- 
plete set of Globes and Maps, and being situated in a healthy part of 
the country, where morality and religion are celebrated and respected, 
the Trustees offer as an inducement to parents and guardians to send 
"heir children and wards to this place. There is little or no induce- 



Caswell County Schools 21 

merit for young men to become dissipated, and every species of vice 
and irregularity is checked in its infancy. The laws of the institution 
and plan of education are modeled after those of the University, in 
order that boys who lay the rudiments of their education here may 
complete it at that place. B. Yancy, Secy. 

— Raleigh Register, December 22, 1808'. 

STAR EDITORIAL NOTICE, 1810. 

CASWELL ACADEMY. 

Of this Seminary Mr. John W. Caldwell is Principal. The School 
is said to be a good one. Board in the vicinity is remarkably low. 
— Raleigh Star, March 15, 1810. 

CASWELL ACADEMY STILL UNDER MR. CALDWELL. 

The Trustees of this Institution have the pleasure of announcing to 
the Public that they still retain in their employment for the next 
year Mr. John W. Caldwell, a gentleman of distinguished talents and 
learning as a Preceptor; and under whom has been the direction of 
the Academy for several years. * * * 

Caswell, December 30, 1809. B. Yancy, Secy. 

— Raleigh Star, January 18, 1810. 

CASWELL ACADEMY FOR 1811. 

The Trustees of the Caswell Academy have the pleasure of inform- 
ing the Public, that they have again employed Mr. John W. Caldwell 
as their Principal Teacher, for the ensuing year. * * * as also 
Mr. James Kerr, a young man of the strictest sobriety and temperance 
as an Assistant. * * * 

December 15. S. Graves, Secy. 

— Raleigh Register, December 27, 1810. 

CASWELL ACADEMY FOR 1812. 

The Trustees of Caswell Academy * * * have again employed 
Mr. John W. Caldwell, as Principal of the Academy. * * * 
Caswell County, December 27, 1811. 
— Raleigh Register, January 3, 1812. 

HICO ACADEMY. 

Legislation, 1804. 

An Act to Establish an Academy in the Lower End of Caswell County. 
Whereas, a number of the citizens of this and the adjacent coun- 
ties, are desirous of establishing an academy for the promotion of 
learning in the lower end of the county aforesaid, and having liberally 
subscribed for the purpose of carrying the same into effect, and trus- 



22 Caswell County Schools 

tees being appointed, they therefore are desirous of receiving the sanc- 
tion of the Legislature by an act to incorporate them. Therefore, 

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of North Caro- 
lina, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That John 
Ogilby, John M'Aden, Thomas J. Moore, Samuel Smith, James Rainey, 
Swepson Sims and Herndon Haralson, Esquires, shall be, and they 
are hereby declared to be a body politic and corporate, to be known 
and distinguished by the name of "The Trustees of the Hico Academy," 
and by that name shall have perpetual succession ; and that they the 
trustees and their successors by the name aforesaid, or a majority of 
them, shall be able and capable in law to take, demand, receive and 
possess all monies, goods and chattels that shall be given for the use 
of the said Academy, and the same apply according to the will of the 
donors; and by gift, purchase or devise, to take, have, receive, possess, 
enjoy and retain to them and their successors forever, any lands, rents, 
tenements and hereditaments of what kind or nature soever, in special 
trust and confidence, that the same or the profits thereof be applied 
to and for the use and purposes of establishing and endowing the said 
Academy, and all purchases by them made of real and personal estate 
in their names as trustees aforesaid, and all contracts entered into by 
them as aforesaid, are hereby declared to be as good and valid to all 
intents and purposes, as if they had been heretofore a body politic 
and corporate. 

— Chapter XLI, Laws of 180k- 

HICO ACADEMY WANTS A TEACHER. 

THE HICO ACADEMY. 
In the Lower end of Caswell County. 

Being nearly ready for the reception of Students, the Trustees are 
anxious to contract with some Gentleman as Principal Teacher, who 
can come well recommended for Morals and a Knowledge of the dif- 
ferent Languages, Arts and Sciences. A Person who has been in the 
habit of teaching, would be preferred. Such a character will meet 
with liberal Encouragement on early Application to 

James Rainey, 
Thomas I. Moore, 

July 26, 1805. John McAden. 

— Raleigh Register, August 26, 1805. 

HICO EMPLOYS SHAW AIVD COTTRELL. 

THE HYCO ACADEMY. 

The Trustees of the Hyco Academy (in the lower end of Caswell 
County) with pleasure inform the Public, that they have contracted 
with the Rev. Hugh Shaw, as Teacher of the Languages, etc. and the 
Rev. Thomas Cottrell, as Teacher of English, Reading, Writing, etc. 



Caswell County Schools 23 

who will take charge of this Seminary on the 1st of January next ; 
where will be taught the Latin and Greek Languages, Geography, Phil- 
osophy, Astronomy, History, Euclid's Elements, English Grammar, 
Arithmetic, Reading, Writing, etc. * * * Terms of Tuition, for 
Reading, Writing and the common Rules of Arithmetic, seven dollars; 
for English Grammar, and its application to the Languages, also the 
higher branches of Arithmetic, ten dollars; for Latin, Greek, etc. six- 
teen dollars per annum, paid quarterly in advance. 

November 10. Tho. I. Moore, Clh. 

— Raleigh Register, November 25, 1805. 

HICO COXTISUES ME. SHAW. 

HYCO ACADEMY 

Will open on the first day of January next, for the Reception of 
Students. The Trustees having again engaged the Rev. Hugh Shaw 
as Principal Teacher, with a suitable Teacher in the lower Branches, 
are induced to hope that they will again meet with that Encourage- 
ment from the Public which they have so liberally experienced the 
present Session, and which the advantages attached to the Institution 
are calculated to secure. 

December 18, 1806. 

— Raleigh Register, January 26, 1807. 

HICO CONTINUES ME. SHAW FOB 1808. 

HICO ACADEMY. 

The Trustees of the Hico Academy respectfully inform the Public, 
that they have engaged the Rev. Hugh Shaw, as Principal Teacher, 
and the Rev. Thomas Cotterell, as Assistant Teacher, for the ensuing 
year. * * * 

December 17. 

— Raleigh Register, December 2k, 1807. 

HICO ADVERTISES A LOTTERY. 

HYCO ACADEMY LOTTERY. 

The Trustees of the Hyco Academy, solicitous more liberally to en- 
courage and perpetuate the advantages arising from this Seminary, 
and conscious of the ill success in a direct application to the generosity 
of the public, obtained an act of the Legislature of this State, to raise 
a sum by way of Lottery to be applied by said Trustees to the use and 
benefit of the said Academy, and now most respectfully offer the scheme 
to their fellow citizens and solicit their patronage. * * * 

Red House, February 1, 1810. John McAden, President. 

— Raleigh Star, March 1, 1810. 



24 Caswell County Schools 

HICO LOTTERY DRAWING. 

HYCO ACADEMY LOTTERY. 

At a general meeting of the Trustees, they resolved to commence 
the drawing of the Hyco Academy Lottery on the 15th of August next, 
at the Red House, and have appointed the following gentlemen to 
superintend and manage the same, to wit : Dr. John M'Aden, Samuel 
Smith, James Rainey, Herndon Haralson, Col. George Lea, Edmond 
Dixon and Thomas Bouldin. It is expected that those gentlemen who 
have or may receive Tickets to sell and do not return them by that 
time, will account for the price thereof in cash. The Trustees flatter 
themselves that the benevolent and all friends to learning and virtue 
(particularly when they recollect the great misfortune in the destruc- 
tion of the late Hyco Academy by fire, and that a new and elegant two 
story building is contracted for, the first floor and walls of which 
are to be of brick, and are now in a considerable state of forwardness,) 
will not only themselves, but cause others to become adventurers in this 
Lottery. Few Lotteries of the same magnitude present prospects of 
equal benefit with as little risk. — Price of Tickets only three dollars — 
highest prize $1000, lowest $5, and two blanks to a prize only. — The 
known integrity of the managers warrants justice to adventurers. — 
Tickets may be had from any of the Trustees and at most of the Stores 
and Post-Offices in Person and Caswell. 

Geokge "W. Jeffreys, Cl'h. 

Red House, Caswell County, June 9, 1811. 

— The Star, June 28, 1811. 

HICO EMPLOYS ABEL GRAHAM. 

HYCO ACADEMY. 

The Trustees of Hyco Academy have completed an elegant Brick 
House Building, and have contracted with Mr. Abel Graham to super- 
intend this institution, the ensuing year. * * * English Language 
grammatically, the Latin and Greek Languages, with the usual branches 
of Science, will be taught in this Academy. * * * The Exercises 
will commence on the first day of January, 1813. * * * Board on 
moderate terms may be procured at the Red House, within half a mile 
of the Academy, where arrangements have been made to receive ten 
or fifteen Students. * * * 

At which place an assortment of Latin, Greek and English Books 
are now on hand for sale, for the accommodation of the Students. 

— Raleigh Register, November 27, 1812. 



Caswell County Schools 25 

HICO ACADEMY FIRE. 

HYCO ACADEMY. 

Notwithstanding the Wood Work of this Academy has again been 
consumed by Fire, Preparations have been made for the reception of 
Students, and the School will go into operation on Monday the 4th of 
January, 1813, under the superintendence of Mr. Abel Graham as 
Principal Teacher. * * * The Wood Work of the elegant Brick 
Building will be completed again perhaps by the first of May, for 
the reception of Students and for the operation of the School. 

Caswell County, H". C, December 28, (1812). 

— Raleigh Register, January 8, 1813. 

HICO BUYS MAPS AND GLOBES. 

THE HYCO ACADEMY. 

* * * rr^g Trustees have procured for the use of the school a pair 
of large and elegant Globes and a complete set of Maps on the most ap- 
proved scale. * * * They have employed Mr. Holbrook for the next 
year. * * * E. D. Jones, Clerk. 

Red House, Caswell, June 20. 
— Raleigh Register, July 1, 1811/.. 

HICO EMPLOYS L. HOLBEOOKS. 

THE HYCO ACADEMY. 

The Trustees take this method of announcing to the Public, that 
this institution, notwithstanding its several misfortunes, is now in a 
complete state of readiness for the reception and accommodation of 
Students, where they may be correctly taught the Latin and Greek 
Classics and a general course of Science by Mr. L. Holbrooks. * * * 
The above branches of Education will be taught for Twenty Dollars 
per year, paid quarterly in advance. The School will go into operation 
on the first Monday in January next. * * * 

Eed House, Caswell, December 23, 1813. E. D. Jones, Glh. 

— Raleigh Register, January 7, 1811/.. 

HICO EMPLOYS JOHX H. HI>TO> T . 

HYCO ACADEMY. 

* * * The services of Mr. John H. Hinton, under whose direction 
the Academy has been placed during the present year, are engaged for 
the next. He was educated at the University and afterwards taught, 
with reputation, both in the College and in the Preparatory depart- 
ment at that place. The system on which he teaches is, therefore, pre- 
cisely the same which is there adopted, and the course of studies such 



26 Caswell County Schools 

as to render the Academy in every respect preparatory to the 
University. 

The very essential branches of Classical education — correct pronun- 
ciation, according to the rules of Prosody, Scanning, and the derivation 
and composition of words — so much neglected in other Academies, 
here receive particular attention. 

Proper attention is also paid to the English education of classical 
students; and as a Sabbath exercise McDowell's Bible Questions will 
in future be taught. * * * Geo. W. Jeffreys, Secy. 

Red House, Caswell County, December 11. 

— Raleigh Register, December 24, 1818. 

HICO PREPARES FOR UNIVERSITY. 

HYCO ACADEMY, MAY 30TH, 1818. 

* * * "Pile inconvenience and loss of time the Students from many 
other Academies in the State experience on going to the College, from 
having attended to their studies in a different order from that established 
there, and from having pursued such as are not auxiliary to admittance, 
or if at all, are very remotely so, have been long and very justly a subject 
of dissatisfaction with those going to the University. These difficul- 
ties are obviated in this Academy by the establishment of precisely 
the same studies that are pursued at the College, in the lower classes 
and in the Preparatory School there. So it may be truly said that 
this school is strictly preparatory to the University. The Trustees 
would do great injustice to Mr. John H. Hinton, were they not to 
express in terms of high approbation their sense of the manner in 
which he has conducted this Institution during the last session. * * * 

June 2, 1818. George W. Jeffreys, Sec'y. 

[From account of the examination in 1818.] 

— Raleigh Register, June 12, 1818. 

HICO CONTINUES MR, HINTON. 

HYCO ACADEMY. 

The Exercises of this Institution will be resumed on Monday the 3d 
of January, 1820, under the superintendence of Mr. John H. Hinton 
(formerly of the University) as Principal. The Latin and Greek Lan- 
guages and the principal branches of the Sciences are taught here, and 
Students are prepared to enter the University with the highest credit. 
* * * G. W. Jeffreys, Sec'y. 

Red House, Caswell, December 14. 

— Raleigh Register, December 17, 1819. 



Caswell County Schools 27 

HICO EMPLOYS MABLON KENYON. 

HYCO ACADEMY. 

The Trustees of this institution have the pleasure of announcing to 
the public, that they have employed Mr. Mablon Kenyon, A. M., as 
principal teacher for the ensuing year. This gentleman is a graduate 
of one of the Northern Colleges, and has been engaged in teaching, 
both in public Academies and as a private tutor for several years. 
He is qualified to teach the various branches of the sciences, and the 
Latin and Greek Languages with skill and correctness; and under his 
care the Trustees will continue to render this academy in its studies 
strictly preparatory to the University, as it has been so eminently for 
several years. 

The exercises of this institution will commence on the 8th of Janu- 
ary ensuing. 

Board may be had in the neighborhood at many respectable houses 
convenient to the Academy, upon very cheap terms. 

The prices of tuition are as usual with other Academies. 

G. W. Jeffreys, Secy. 

Red House, Caswell County, December 11, 1820. 

— {Adv.) The Star, December 15, 1820. 

HICO EMPLOYS DABNEY RAINEY AS ASSISTANT. 
HYCO ACADEMY. 

The Trustees * * * have employed Mr. Mablon Kenyon, A. M. 
to take charge of this Academy for the ensuing year. * * * Mr. 
Dabney Rainey is employed as assistant. * * * 

November 22, 1821. Geo. W. Jeffreys, Secy. 

— Raleigh Register, November 30, 1821. 

HICO CONTINUES MR. KENYON. 

HYCO ACADEMY. 

The Trustees take pleasure in informing the Public, that they have 
employed Mr. Mablon Kenyon, A. M. to take charge of this Academy 
for the ensuing year. From his judicious management, upright con- 
duct, close attention to the duties of the institution and the consequent 
improvement of the Students, and the general satisfaction given the 
present year, we feel a confidence in asserting, that under its present 
Principal it as least equals its former character, and is in reality one 
of the most eligible institutions in the State for preparing Students 
to enter the University. We therefore again solicit patronage of our 
friends and the public in general. Mr. Dabney Painey is employed 
as assistant. His capability for governing and instructing has been 
manifested both in the Academy and elsewhere. Every branch of Eng- 
lish and Classical Education usually taught in Academies, will be 



28 Caswell County Schools 

taught in this; and no applicant for admission who bears a good moral 
character, will be rejected for want of preparatory study to enter the 
class. Prices of tuition on our usual moderate terms. Board and 
Washing can be had in the neighborhood in respectable families at 
thirty-five dollars per Session. Strict attention will be paid to the 
behavior and Moral deportment of the Students. 

The Exercises of the Academy will commence on Monday the 21st 
January. Geo. W. Jeffreys, Secy. 

Red House, Caswell County, November 22, 1821. 

JNT. B. — The almost invariable good health of the Students in Hyco 
Academy and its vicinity during the last summer when sickness pre- 
vailed in most other parts of the country, we think, is no small recom- 
mendation of the place. 

— Raleigh Register, January 11, 1822. 

HICO ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 1834. 

HYCO ACADEMY 

Situated near the Bed House 

Caswell County, ST. C. 

The Summer Session of Hyco Academy will commence on Tuesday 
the 1st day of July under the superintendence of a gentleman who has 
enjoyed the advantages of a regular collegiate education, and much 
successful experience as an instructor of youth, whose testimonials from 
the President and Professors of the College at which he was graduated, 
as well as from his patrons, and other gentlemen of great respectability, 
are full and unexceptional. At this Academy, young gentlemen may 
acquire a good English and classical education; or they may be thor- 
oughly prepared for admission to any College or University in the 
United States. The Superintendent pledges himself, that no exer- 
tions shall be wanting on his part, to promote the welfare and rapid 
improvement of his pupils, and merit the approbation and confidence 
of his patrons. The agreeable and well cultivated society, as well as 
the extraordinary healthfulness of the neighborhood in which this 
Academy is situated, (and it is confidently believed that no neighbor- 
hood in the United States is more healthy,) and its remoteness from 
scenes of dissipation, are circumstances well calculated to recommend 
it to the favorable consideration of parents and guardians. Board may 
be procured in the most respectable and well regulated families, at the 
rate of $7 per month. The scholastic year will be divided into two 
equal sessions of five months. The rate of tuition (payable in advance) 
will be as follows, viz. 

Some of the elementary branches of English education, per Session $8.00 
Other branches of English education, 10.00 

Latin or Greek Languages or Mathematics, 15.00 



Caswell County Schools 29 

Persons wishing to become acquainted with, further particulars, are 
respectfully referred to the following gentlemen and patrons of the 
Academy, viz. Dr. John McAden, Dr. David Pointer, Capt. William 
Irvine, James W. Jeffreys, Esq. and Rev. D. A. Montgomery, of Cas- 
well county, and Dr. Thomas P. Atkinson, of Halifax county, Va. 
Communications may be addressed to the Principal of the Academy, 
at the Eed House, N". C. 

June 10, 1S34. 

—The Star, Raleigh, June 19, 1884. 

SPRINGFIELD ACADEMY. 

SPRINGFIELD ACADEMY, 

In the upper end of Caswell County 

Will commence on the first day of October, under the direction of Mr. 
William C. Love, from the University of North Carolina, where the 
English and Latin Languages will be taught. 

Mr. Love is a young gentleman who possesses handsome acquirements, 
and a good moral character ; this, together with healthiness of the situ- 
tion, will doubtless be an inducement to many Gentlemen to send their 
sons. Boarding, Washing and Lodging (notwithstanding the bad pros- 
pect of Crops) may be had for twenty students, within one mile and a 
half of the School, at Forty-five dollars each, per annum ; and it is 
hoped this institution will be so conducted as to answer the most san- 
guine expectation of those Gentlemen who may think proper to send 
their sons. 

By order of the Trustees. M. Duke Mitchell, Clh. 

September 4, 1804. 

— Raleigh Register, September 2J/., 180 J/.. 

SPRINGFIELD EMPLOYS W. C. CLARKE. 

SPRINGFIELD ACADEMY. 

The Examination of the Students attached to the Seminary in this 
vicinity known by the name of Springfield Academy, under the superin- 
tendence of Mr. William C. Clarke, took place on Thursday last. A gen- 
tleman who was present and much gratified at the exhibition, informs 
us that the exercises were well sustained throughout, and that most of 
the pupils displayed a proficiency not less honorable to industry of the 
scholar than creditable to the talents of the Teacher. 

— Raleigh Register, Thursday, July 7, 1831. 

MISS PRENDERGAST'S SCHOOL. 

A Female Seminary is now preparing and will commence Teaching 
on the 1st day of next October, at Mr. Brice Collins, in Caswell county, 
North Carolina, about 4 miles north of Mr. McCauley's Store; where 
will be taught the following Sciences bv the Subscriber, to wit, Orthog- 



30 Caswell County Schools 

raphy, Eeading, Writing, Arithmetic, English Grammar, Needlework, 
Drawing, Painting, Embroidery, Geography and the Use of the Maps, 
also Scanning Poetry — where due attention will be given. The price 
of Tuition Ten Dollars per Year to be paid quarterly. * * * 

Caswell, September 9. Rachel Prendergast. 

— Raleigh Register, October 2, 1818. 

MILTON FEMALE ACADEMY, 1819. 

The building for the Female Academy in this place, being nearly com- 
pleted, the Trustees take this method to inform the public, that it will 
go into operation on the 2d Monday in January next under the special 
direction and superintendence of the Rev. Abner W. Clopton. In em- 
ploying Mr. Clopton to superintend the Academy, they have not only 
consulted their own feelings in regard to a public ministry, but they 
have had also particular regard to public sentiment in relation to the 
institution. Most parents choose to place their daughters at institu- 
tions where they may enjoy the advantages of religious instruction. 

And while the Trustees have acted with deference to this disposition, 
they have taken the necessary steps to secure the most efficient means 
of combining, with religious privileges, the best opportunities of the 
literary and ornamental branches of education. For this purpose they 
expect to have two of the best tutoresses that can be procured from 
Philadelphia or New York. 

The prices of Board and Tuition will be regulated by those of the Ox- 
ford Female Academy, and will be required in advance. 

The first session will end on the second Monday in June. 

By order, R. M. Sanders, Sec'y. 



Having been employed by the Trustees to superintend the Female 
Academy, in Milton, I submit the following remarks to the consider- 
ation of such as may be unacquainted with the prospects of this institu- 
tion. "While literary institutions are constantly multiplying, it must 
be a subject of pleasing reflection to pious parents, if not to others, that 
religious instruction forms a prominent feature in some of these insti- 
tutions. * * * It is a fact too notorious to be doubted, and too se- 
rious not to be lamented, that many parents have awfully neglected the 
pious instruction of their children. * * * The superintendent of 
the Salem Academy having been consulted on the subject gave it as his 
decided opinion, that a minister of the Gospel should take charge of our 
institution. And the Trustees, wishing to give to their system of edu- 
cation every advantage that the public might require, determined to 
follow his counsel. * * * 

We cannot, at present, name our Tutoresses. But it may be confi- 
dently understood, that none but such as are in all respects qualified, 
will be employed. The Trustees would not have delayed the procure- 
ment of them until this time, if they had not been disappointed in their 



Caswell County Schools 31 

expectations of obtaining some from Elizabeth Town. There will be 
public worship, in the Academy, regularly twice on every Lord's day — 
in the forenoon and at night; and the pupils will have religious exer- 
cises appointed them invariably, on the afternoon of the same day. 
* * * Parents may be well assured also, that their daughters, while 
here, will be as effectually debarred from all scenes of profane merri- 
ment, and revelling, as are the pupils of the Salem School. * * * 
Milton, 1ST. C, December 2, 1819. A. W. Clopton. 



In addition to the above, the Trustees have the pleasure to announce 
to the public, that two young Ladies, by the name of Thomas, of the city 
of New York, having offered their services, will be employed as Tutor- 
esses in our Academy. 

These ladies, being members of the Episcopal Church, whose pastor is 

the Rev. Mr. Lyle, will come recommended by him; and by the Rev. 

Dr. Spring, pastor of the Presbyterian Church ; and by the Rev. Mr. 

Williams, pastor of the 2d Baptist church, in the city of jSTew York. 
& % % 

— Raleigh Register, December 31, 1819 

PICKARD'S SCHOOL. 

The subscriber has opened a School in Caswell county, near Brown's 
Store, for the instruction of youth, in the rudiments of the English, 
Latin and Greek Languages. — Geography, with the use of the Globes. 
Natural and Moral Philosophy &c. will also be taught. This School 
is 10 miles west of Caswell Courthouse, and 7 miles east from Rocking- 
ham Springs. John H. Pickakd. 

November 25. 

— Raleigh Register, December 3, 182J+. 

MISS BALLAXTINE'S SEMINARY. 

Miss Ballajsttine will open a Seminary for Young Ladies, on the 5th 
September inst. at Gen. A. Graves' in the upper end of Caswell County. 
The situation is very pleasant and adjacent to the Rockingham Springs. 
The course of instruction will be carried on in a regular system, embrac- 
ing all the Scientific and Ornamental Branches necessary to complete 
the Female Education. She will also deem it her imperious duty to 
pay particular attention to the morals and manners of the Young Ladies 
committed to her care. 

Pupils from a distance can be accommodated with board by Mrs. 
Lea, whose residence is quite convenient to the school house. Her 
terms of board are $35 per session. The first session will end on the 
20th of December next; and a proportionable deduction will be made 
in the price of tuition and board on account of the shortness of the 
session. 



32 Caswell County Schools 

Prices of Tuition. 

For the 1st Class $10.00 

2d do 12.50 

3d and 4th Class 15.00 

All Ornamental Branches will be taught at the usual prices. 
Caswell County, September 1, 1825. 
— Raleigh Register, September 6, 1825. 

MRS. STITH'S SEMINARY. 

MES. STITH 

Has opened a Seminary for young Ladies near the store of Q. Ander- 
son, Esq. in Caswell County, where she proposes to teach the next 
year : — the next session will commence of the second day of January 
next. 

The course of instruction will be carried on in a regular system, em- 
bracing the Sciences and Ornamental branches usually taught in Fe- 
male Seminaries. She will also deem it her imperious duty to pay 
particular attention to the morals and manners of the young ladies 
committed to her care. Mrs. Stith would furnish young ladies with 
board, at Fifty Dollars per year. Tuition Sixteen Dollars — or in pro- 
portion for a shorter time. 

Caswell, September 25, 1825. 

— Raleigh Register, October )±, 1825. 

LEASBURG CLASSICAL SCHOOL.. 

TO THE PUBLIC. 

A ISTew Preparatory School. 

The Subscriber has, with a view to a permanent location, made ar- 
rangements to open on the 19th inst. a Classical School in Leasburg, 
Caswell county, ~N. C. in which will be taught those branches of Liter- 
ature and Science usually taught in the best Preparatory Schools. The 
much neglected studies of composition and declamation will receive 
more than an ordinary degree of attention. 

The Principal will conscientiously consider himself not only the in- 
structor of the minds of his pupils, but of their manners and morals 
also. The Principal considers himself as very fortunate in his location. 
He is convinced that students can pursue their studies here, with fewer 
temptations to morals and distractions to study than in most county 
seats, in which Classical Schools are generally located. 

Leasburg is a neat, rural village, and is every way eligible as a school 
location, whether we regard the healthiness of its situation, the intelli- 
gence and morality of its inhabitants, or the cheapness of board which 
(including firewood, washing, candles, &c. &c.) will range from five to 
seven dollars. 



Caswell County Schools 33 

The Academy is of brick, and situated in a beautiful grove of oaks. 
The school room is comfortable and commodious. The Tuition fees 
per session will be as follows, viz. 

For the languages, Greek, Latin and French $15.00 

" higher branches of English 12.50 

" lower do do 10.00 

Leasburg, Jan. 2, 1S35. Wji. H. Owen, Principal. 

— The Star, January 15, 1835. 



CHATHAM COUNTY SCHOOLS 

PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY LOTTERY. 

An Act to authorize the Trustees of the Pittsborough Academy to raise 
the sum of seven hundred dollars by way of Lottery. 

Whereas, the trustees of the academy aforesaid have represented 
to this General Assembly, that the raising the above sum of seven hun- 
dred dollars would be of great benefits to the said institution : 

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of North Caro- 
lina, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That the 
Trustees of the Academy aforesaid shall have leave to raise by way of 
Lottery the sum aforesaid; and that John Ramsey, James Taylor, 
Charles Chalmers, John Henderson, James Bradley, John Dabney and 
William Warden shall be, and they are hereby appointed Commission- 
ers for the purpose of opening and completing a scheme of lottery, cal- 
culated to raise the sum aforesaid, in the following manner: 

3,500 Tickets at two dollars each is $7,000 

1 Prize of four hundred dollars is 400 



2 Do 

4 Do 

8 Do 

18 Do 

200 Do 

490 Do 

400 Do 



of one hundred dollars is 200 

of fifty dollars is 200 

of thirty-five dollars is 280 

of twenty-five dollars is 450 

of ten dollars is .... ' 2,000 

of three dollars is 1,470 

of five dollars is 2,000 



1,123 Prizes. $7,000 

2,337 Blanks. 



3,500 Tickets at two dollars each is $7,000 

And the said commissioners or a majority of them shall be managers 
of said lottery, and shall be accountable for the prizes and profits 
thereof. 

II. And be it further enacted, That when three-fourths of the said 
tickets are sold, that the drawing of the said lottery shall commence, 
under the management of the said commissioners, they giving thirty 
days notice in the Fayetteville Gazette. 

III. And be it further enacted, That all prizes shall be paid in four 
weeks after the drawing is finished, upon the demand of a possessor of 
a fortunate ticket, which prize shall be subject to a deduction of ten 
per cent; and if such prize is not demanded within six months after the 
drawing is finished, of which notice shall be given in some public paper 
in this state, the same shall be considered as relinquished for the bene- 

(34) 



Chatham County Schools 35 

fit of said academy; and the produce of said lottery shall be vested in 
the Trustees aforesaid. 

IV. And be it further enacted, That before the Commissioners 
herein appointed shall begin to act in pursuance of this act, they shall 
enter into bond, with security to be judged sufficient by the Timstees 
aforesaid, for the sum of seven thousand pounds, payable to the Gov- 
ernor for the time being and his successors ; which bond shall be void on 
condition that they the Commissioners aforesaid shall well and truly per- 
form the trust hereby reposed in them, that is to say, that they will 
without fraud, delay or other deduction than ten per cent herein pre- 
scribed, pay to every fortunate adventurer in said lottery the prize he 
shall draw therein on the demand ; and further that the said commis- 
sioners shall fully and faithfully account for and pay to the Trustees 
of the academy all the profits which shall arise out of the scheme of the 
lottery aforesaid, without fraud or delay. 

V. And it is further enacted, That if the Commissioners aforesaid 
shall fail to perform any part of the condition of said bond, any per- 
son aggrieved by such failure may without assignment bring suit on said 
bond, in the name of the Governor, in any Court of record; and all 
sums recovered thereon, shall be to the use of the person or persons 
who shall so bring suit; and the said bond shall be lodged with the 
Clerk of the Superior Court of Hillsborough district, who shall keep 
the same as part of the records of said district. 

—Laws 1197, Chapter XXXII. 

PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY UNDER WILLIAM BINGHAM. 

PITTSBOKOTJGH ACADEMY. 

The Semi-Annual Examination of the students will commence on 
Tuesday the 1st of July next, and continue three days. * * * 

Terms of Tuition (in Advance one Quarter at least) : 

Eight Dollars per Annum for Reading, Writing and Arithmetic. 

Thirteen Dollars per Annum for the Classics, English Grammar, 
Geography, the Mathematics, etc., etc. 

Two Dollars Entrance for every new Scholar, unless the Parent or 
Guardian was a subscriber to the building of the Academy. 

The Price of Board (including Washing, Lodging and Mending) 
for a Student in Town is fifty-two Dollars per Annum, and may be had 
cheaper, some small distance from Town. 

Any Number can be very readily accommodated. 

Wanted — A Person qualified to fill the place of second Teacher in the 
Academy, which will be vacant the 1st July next. Tbe Qualifications 
necessary are a knowledge of the Classics, English Grammar, Arithme- 
tic, to write a fair Hand, and if acquainted with some of the practical 



36 Chatham County Schools 

Branches of the Mathematics the more agreeable. Any further Par- 
ticulars may be known by addressing a Line to the Rev. William Bing- 
ham or Mr. James Baker, Treasurer of the Academy. 

June, 1800. 

— Raleigh Register, June 10, 1800. 

PITTSBOBOUGH ACADEMY UNDEE POE. 

PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 



Examination. 

On Wednesday the first of July commenced the Examination of the 
Students of the Pittsborough Academy, and continued three Days. On 
the Evening of the third Day, the Students performed the celebrated 
Dramatic Piece, called the "Honest Farmer," in which they acquitted 
themselves with great Credit. * * * 

N". B. The Academy will resume its Exercises on Monday the 13th 
of July, under the Direction of Mr. Poe, second Teacher — the Trustees, 
as yet, not having been fortunate enough to engage a Principal 
Teacher. * * * James Baker, Secretary. 

Pittsborough, July 8, 1801. 

— Raleigh Register, July 28, 1801. 

PITTSBOBOUGH ACADEMY UNDEE DAYID CALDWELL, JE. 

PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The Trustees are happy in having it in their Power to inform the 
Public, that the Academy will be opened on the first Day of January 
next, under the Superintendence of Mr. David Caldwell, Son of the 
Rev. Dr. Caldwell, of Guilford County, as Teacher of the Latin and 
Greek Languages, and the useful and ornamental Branches of Learning ; 
assisted by Mr. German Guthrie, former Teacher at the Academy, in 
the English Grammar, Reading, Writing and Cyphering. The Trus- 
tees feel assured, from the known Abilities of the Teachers, and the 
strict Attention that will be paid to the Morals of the Students, that 
general Satisfaction will be given. The healthy situation of Pittsbor- 
ough, together with the Cheapness of Board, being generally to be had 
for Boys at fifty-two Dollars per Annum, must give it a decided Prefer- 
ence to most other Institutions of the kind. 

Price of Tuition. 
The Latin and Greek Languages, and Sciences, sixteen Dollars per 
Annum. 

English Grammar, with Reading, Writing, etc. thirteen ditto. 

Reading, Writing, Cyphering, etc., eight do. 

By order of the Trustees, 

December 1, 1801. James Baker, Secretary. 

— Raleigh Register, December 9, 1801. 



Chatham: County Schools 37 

PITTSBOBOUGH ANNOUNCEMENTS FOB 1S02. 

PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The Semi-Animal Examination of the Students of the Pittsborough 
Academy, will commence on Monday the 28th of June. The Trustees 
with Pleasure inform the Public, that since the Academy has been un- 
der the Superintendance of Dr. Caldwell and Mr. Guthrie, the Xumber 
of Students has greatly increased, and a considerable Addition daily 
expected. 

By order of the Board of Trustees, 

Pittsborough, May 31st. James Bakee, Treasurer. 

—Raleigh Register, June 8, 1802. 

WILLIAM BINGHAM RETURNS TO PITTSBOBOCGH ACADEMY. 
EDUCATION. 



Pittsborough Academy. 

The Trustees now have the pleasure of informing the Public that the 
Rev. >Vm. Bingham, one of the Professors in the University, has been 
engaged with them as President of this Academy, which will be opened 
for the rtception of students, under his Management, the first of April 
next. Pittsborough is thirty-five Miles west of Raleigh, in as pleasant 
and healthy a situation as any other in the State of Xorth Carolina ; and 
from the moderate Price of Boarding (which may be procured in reputa- 
ble Families, at from Fifty to Sixty Dollars ; with that of Tuition, the 
Prices of which are as follows, viz. Reading, "Writing and Arithmetic, 
eight Dollars ; the Latin and Greek Languages, Geography, History, 
Mathematics, Astronomy, Moral Philosophy, etc. thirteen dollars ; one 
fourth paid at Entrance, another fourth at the End of. six Months, and 
the Remainder at the End of the Year) the Trustees flatter themselves 
with a very considerable increase of Students. 

By order, B. Lightfoot, Sec. 

Pittsborough, January 21st, 1805. 

— Raleigh Register, February 25, 1805. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1806. 
PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The Trustees of the Pittsborough Academy have the pleasure of in- 
forming the Public that the Rev. Mr. Bingham yet continues as Presi- 
dent of said Academy. Boarding for Students may be had in Pittsbor- 
ough in respectable Families for sixty Dollars per year. 

April 1, 1806. B. Lightfoot, Sec. 

— Raleigh Register, April 7, 1806. 



38 Chatham County Schools 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOE 1807. 
PITTSBOKOUGH ACADEMY. 

The Exercises of the Academy for this Year terminated with the Ex- 
amination of the Students on the 12th inst. and will be resumed on the 
5th of January, 1807, under the Superintendance of the Rev. W. Bing- 
ham. 

— Raleigh Register, January 5, 1807. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1808. 
PITTSBOKOUGH ACADEMY. 

The Rev. ¥m. Bingham takes this method of informing his Friends 
and the Public, that he will continue the superintendance of the Acad- 
emy the ensuing year. He will pay every attention to the Morals as 
well as the Education of the Youth committed to his care. The Terms 
of Board and Tuition as formerly. 

December 7th, 1807. 

— Raleigh Register, December 10, 1807. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1810. 
PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The Exercises of the Academy, under the inspection of William 
Bingham, will be resumed on the 8th of next month, in a house at Pitts- 
borough, to be rendered commodious for the reception of Students. 

December 26, 1809. 

— Raleigh Register, January 1/-, 1810. 

PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY UNDER JACOB GILLET. 

PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY, 

(Chatham County.) 

The exercises of this institution are now in operation, under the su- 
perintendence of Mr. Jacob Gillet, from New- York. The Trustees 
feel themselves justified in saying from the high authority under which 
Mr. Gillet comes recommended to them, as well as his long experience as 
a teacher, that the most flattering results may be expected from, his ex- 
ertions in that line; this together with the cheapness of board, and tui- 
tion; the known and acknowledged healthiness of the situation, and the 
general morality which prevails in the place, must be an inducement to 
its preference. They at the same time pledge themselves for a joint 
exertion in the care and advancement of the pupils sent to their charge. 
The prices of tuition will be six dollars per session for Reading, Writ- 
ing, and Arithmetic ; eight dollars for all the other branches of the Eng- 



Chatham County Schools 39 

lish, usually taught iu Academies, and ten dollars for languages com- 
bined with the English. Board can be had in respectable families, 
from sixty to seventy-five dollars per year, in the place; and cheaper a 
short distance out. 

February 4, 1820. Z. Harman, Sec. 

—The Star, February 11, 1820. 

PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY UNDER NATHANIEL HARRIS. 

THE ACADEMY IN PITTSBOKOUGH 

Is still in operation, under the superintendence of the Rev. Nathaniel 
H. Harris. The 2d Session will commence on the 8th of July next. 
There is also an excellent Female School in the same village under the 
charge of Miss Mary McKenzie. Board can be obtained from $6 to 8 
per month. It is unnecessary to make any mention of the healthiness 
of the place, as it is well known to be as much so, as any situation in 
the State. Joseph Small, Secy. 

Pittsboro', Chatham county, June 13, 1823. 

— Raleigh Register, June 20, 1823. 

PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY UNDER MR. LALOR. 

PITTSBOKOUGH ACADEMY. 

The exercises of this Institution will be resumed on the first Monday 
of January next. The Trustees are happy to announce that they have 
contracted with Mr. Lalor for the ensuing year. Mr. Lalor's abilities, 
classical attainments and industry as a teacher are well known. Par- 
ents, Guardians, &c, who send young gentlemen to this Institution, may 
rest assured, that every exertion will be used by him for their moral 
and literary improvement, and that they will be properly instructed in 
that course of the Greek and Latin Classics necessary to qualify them 
to enter the University. The airy, dry, and elevated situation of the 
School House, the salubrity of the air and excellence of the water, the 
low price of Board and Tuition, are a few of the many advantages 
which recommend this Institution to public patronage. 

December 7th, 1824. Jos. Small, Secy. 

— Raleigh Register, January J h 1825. 

PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY UNDER JOHN D. CLANCY. 

PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The Trustees of the Pittsborough Academy are happy to announce 
to the public, that the exercises of this Institution are now conducted 
by Mr. John D. Clancy, a graduate of the University of North Caro- 
lina, who comes well recommended to them. It is unnecessary to name, 
that the place, in point of health, salubrity of climate, cheapness of 
board and tuition, is surpassed by no similar institution in the State. 



40 Chatham County Schools 

Parents and guardians who may send their children here, may rest 
assured that every exertion on the teacher's part will be used for their 
advancement in learning; and the trustees pledge themselves, together 
with the teacher, that a strict regard will be had to their moral deport- 
ment. Under these circumstances, we natter ourselves, that those who 
may try us will find that we have promised nothing more than will 
be performed. The trustees promise that there shall be nothing want- 
ing on their part to render this institution such as will be highly grati- 
fying to those who may intrust youth to their care. There is also a 
Female School conducted by Miss M. MacKenzie, whose method and 
capability of instruction is equal to any of the kind in the State. 

Board can be had in respectable families at from $7 to $8 per month, 
everything found that is usual to furnish boarders with. 

By order, Joseph Small, Sec'ry. 

July 11. 

— Raleigh Register, July 15, 1825. 

PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY UNDER P. IE MESSURIER. 

PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The Exercises of this Institution commenced on Monday the 14th 
instant, under the direction of the Subscriber. The course of Instruc- 
tion embraces, in addition to the usual branches of English, the Greek, 
Latin & French Languages. 

The healthiness and local advantages of the place are too well known 
to require comment. 

Board can be had on very reasonable terms with most of the respect- 
able families in the village. 

Terms per Session. 



1st Class $10.00 ) 

oi i 12 50 >- P a J a kle at the end of each 

3d do. 16.00 



( Session. 



Eifty cents extra for contingencies. 

February 20, 1831. P. Le Messurier. 

— Raleigh Register, February 21^, 1881. 

ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 1831. 

PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The Exercises of this Institution, for the second Session, will com- 
mence on Monday, the 11th instant. The local advantages of the place 
are not surpassed by any in the State. Its healthiness is proverbial, 



Chatham County Schools 41 

and its society moral and refined. Board can be obtained in the Bor- 
ough or its vicinity on the most reasonable terms. 

1st Class $10 ) 

9 1 i -<2 50 y Payable at the end of each 

3d do. ib'.oo j Session - 

July 1, 1831. P. Le Messurier. 

— Raleigh Register, Thursday, July 11+, 1831. 

ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 1833. 

THE EXERCISES 

Of the Pittsborough Academy will be resumed on the third Monday 
of this month. The course of instruction pursued in this Institution 
is such as to embrace within its range a due regard to the wants of 
every denomination of pupils, being so arranged as to exclude none 
who are desirous of receiving instruction. Parents desirous of having 
their children prepared for the University of North Carolina, can 
have them qualified for entering either the Junior, Sophomore or Fresh- 
man Class. Exclusive of the Greek and Latin Classics, the French 
language is also taught ; and the various branches of English education, 
including both the elementary and highest branches of Mathematics. 
The terms for a session of five months is $16.50 ; and no deduction will 
be made from this sum on account of a difference in the ages or studies 
of the students. 

There are many circumstances which conspire to render this an 
eminently desirable institution — being located in the heart of a highly 
moral and intelligent society, and in a region enjoying all the advan- 
tages resulting from an elevated situation, pure water and a salubrious 
atmosphere. Board can be obtained either in the family of the Prin- 
cipal or in private families of high respectability, on moderate terms; 
and Parents may rest assured that the attention of the Principal to 
the manners and morals of the pupils committed to his care, will prove 
unremitting in its character. 

The Central Reflector will publish the above until forbid. 

January 1, 1833. P. Le Messurier. 

— The Register, Raleigh, N. C, Friday, January J+, 1833. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1834. 

PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY 

The exercises of this School will resumed on the 27th instant. 
Terms — 10 dollars per session. 

January 1, 1833. P. Le Messurier. 

Music. 

In order to remove any objection on the part of Parents and Guar- 
dians to the Scholars coming into the village, Mrs. Le Messurier has 
determined to erect a Music Room within a few yards of Mrs. Jones's 



42 Chatham County Schools 

School, which, it is expected, will be completed by the next session. 
A first rate instrument for practice free of charge. 

Terms — $22.50 per session. 

Pittsborough, January 18. 

1ST. B. — Mrs. Le M. would receive 5 or 6 young Ladies, as boarders. 

Expenses, including board, instruction, &c. 70 dollars. 

— The Star, Raleigh, N. C, January 2Jf, 1884-. 

PITTSBOROUGH FEMALE ACADEMY. 

PITTSBORO' PEMALE ACADEMY 

Under the care of Miss Elizabeth Anderson. 

The first Term of this school will commence Feb. 12, and close on 

the 20th December next, with a vacation of two weeks at the close of 

the first session. 

Terms. 

For Orthography, Reading and Writing, per session of five months $6.00 
For English Grammar, Geography and Arithmetic, per session 

of five months $10.00 

For any other branches, in addition to those named, such as Philo- 
sophy, History, Botany, Chemistry, &c. per session of five 

months $12.50 

Miss A. will give instruction in Needle Work without any additional 
charge ; also lessons in Drawing and Painting at an extra charge of 
$8.00 per session. Tuition in advance, and no deduction for absence, 
except in case of sickness. 

Miss A. has had several years experience as a Tutoress in the 
Greensborough Female Academy, and the Trustees are well assured of 
her competency to give satisfaction in all the branches of a sound 
English Education. Board can be had in the Town with respectable 
Families, at a moderate price. 

Pittsboro', January 6, 1838. Trustees. 

— Raleigh Register, January 15, 1838. 

PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY UNDER J. M. LOYEJOY. 

PITTSBOROUGH ACADEMY, K C. 

The Trustees of this Academy take great pleasure in announcing to 
the friends of education throughout the State, that they have engaged 
the valuable services of Mr. J. M. Lovejoy to take charge of this 
Academy. The Trustees have received very flattering testimonials, 
which is an evidence of the estimation in which this gentleman was 
held. Mr. Lovejoy is a graduate, a first-rate mathematician and lin- 
guist, and is said to have the rare faculty of imparting knowledge with 
facility. It is unnecessary to speak of the great advantages Pittsbor- 
ough offers in point of health and society, and it is believed they are 
superior to those of any town in 1ST. C. 

M. Q. Waddell, Sec. to Trustees. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, June 8, 1838. 



Chatham County Schools 43 

ANNOUNCEMENT FOE 1839. 
PITTSBORO' ACADEMY. 

The Exercises of this Institution will commence on the 8th July 
next, under the superintendence of the former Instructor, Mr. J. M. 
Lovejoy. 

Terms. 

Classics, $18 ) 

-r, , . , _. „ r Per Session. 

English, 15 ) 

The following are the branches taught in this Institution, viz. Latin, 
Greek, French, Algebra, Arithmetic, Geometry, History, English Gram- 
mar, Ancient and Modern Geography, Navigation and Surveying, 
Reading, Writing and Spelling. 

In addition to the preparatory course in the Classics, Mr. Lovejoy 
will give unremitted attention to young gentlemen, in Algebra, Geome- 
try, History, Ancient and Modern Geography, and will permit no 
Scholar to pass out of his hands without a competent knowledge of 
the above branches. 

The Trustees of this Institution, under a deep sense of the great 
evil flowing from imperfect Teaching in some of our Academies, hesi- 
tate not in recommending this School to the public, having had ample 
testimony, during a twelve months residence among us, of the ability, 
propriety and general intelligence of Mr. Lovejoy in all matters con- 
nected with Teaching. 

Pittsboro', June, 1839. 

— Raleigh Register, July 20, 1839. 

THE KELVIN SCHOOL, 1828. 

Mrs. Jones's School for young ladies will commence again on the 
first of February next. Small girls, who are to be engaged in the 
mere elementary parts of education, will be taken at an inferior price. 
Letters on the subject may be addressed to Mrs. Jones, Rock Rest, 
Chatham County. 

January 7, 1828. 

— Raleigh Register, January 8, 1828. 

ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 1831. 

MRS. EDWARD JONES 

Private Boarding School for Young Ladies. 

The School which has for several years been conducted at Rock Rest, 
the family residence, is now removed to the vicinity of Pittsborough, 
and the next session will commence on Monday, the 7th of February, 
1831, and continue five months. 

The very remote situation of Rock Rest rendered it on many accounts 
inconvenient for a School, while all the advantages of retirement, with- 



44 Chatham County Schools 

out any of its inconveniences are secured by the present commodious 
and pleasant situation, a few hundred yards from the town. Pittsbor- 
ough, and its vicinity, are remarkable for health, being the resort of 
many families from the low country during the summer months. The 
young ladies will be chiefly under the instruction of Miss Charlotte 
Jones, with a competent Assistant. 

When it is desiredk.young ladies who have friends in town may be 
boarded with them. It is proper, however, to remark, that those who 
reside in the family must necessarily enjoy more opportunities for im- 
provement, and that the customary attentions to them during the in- 
tervals of school hours, will not be abated or interrupted on account 
of the admission of pupils that may board elsewhere. 

Terms Per Session. 

For young Ladies exceeding twelve years of age, Board and Tuition, 
$75, including Books and Stationary with all other necessary expenses. 

For children under twelve, $70, or $65 if Books & Stationary be 
furnished by themselves. 

Mrs. Jones has much pleasure in stating, that in the Musical De- 
partment, she has obtained the services of Mrs. Le Messurier, a lady 
well known as an accomplished instructress in Music. A practising 
Piano provided by Mrs. Jones without extra charge. 

Chatham Co. Jan. 29, 1831. 

— Raleigh Register, Thursday, Feb. 3, 1831. 

ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 1833. 

MRS. MARY JONES'S SCHOOL. 
PITTSBOROUGH. 

This School will commence again, as usual, on the first of February 
next ensuing. Miss Jones will have the aid of a competent assistant 
in the Literary Department, and provision is now made for Instruc- 
tion in Music. 

January 21, 1833. 

— The Register, Raleigh, N. C, Friday, January 25, 1833. 

ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 1835. 
FEMALE SCHOOL. 

The Exercises of Mrs. Edward Jones' Private Boarding School for 
Young Ladies at Kelvin, near Pittsborough, having just closed for the 
Second Session of the present year, will be resumed on the 1st Monday 
in February next. 

In order to prevent misunderstanding, it is thought expedient to 
mention, that as Mrs. Jones has been obliged to refuse many applicants 
for places in the School, and does not wish to depart from her original 
plan of accommodating only such a number of young Ladies as may 



Chatham County Schools 45 

be subjected to family government, Mr. William Harden, whose resi- 
dence is near that of Mrs. J. has been induced by his interest in the 
School to receive into his family a small number of pupils, who will 
be, as far as practicable, subjected to the same government as those 
placed in Mrs. Jones' family. 

The aid which Miss C. Jones will necessarily require in giving in- 
struction to an increased number of pupils, will be rendered by Mr. 
Harden and the Rev. P. B. "Wiley, gentlemen already experienced in 
the instruction of youth. 

Persons wishing to place their children or wards in this school, are 
requested to give early notice. 

Terms. — $75 per Session for Board, Tuition, Books, Stationary, 
&c. &c. 

Music, Drawing and Painting are taught by experienced instructors, 
and form separate charges. 

Pittsboro' December 20, 1834. 

The Raleigh Star, Fayetteville Observer, Western Carolinian, Wash- 
ington Statesman, Elizabeth City Star and Wilmington Press will in- 
sert the foregoing Advertisement twice, and forward their bills for 
payment. 

— Raleigh Register, December 23, 183J+. 

KELVIN SCHOOL UNDER W. H. HAEDIX, 1836. 

Private Boarding School, for Young Ladies, at Kelvin, ISTear Pitts- 
borough. 

This Institution, long known as Mrs. Edward Jones' School, will 
hereafter be conducted under the joint superintendence and instruc- 
tion of Miss Charlotte C. Jones, and Mr. W. H. Hardin. The next 
session will commence on the first Monday in February next, and con- 
tinue until the middle of July, including a short vacation, when the 
second session of the year 1836 will commence ; which will terminate on 
the 12th of December. A competent Assistant will be employed, if 
necessary. It is in contemplation to enlarge the accommodations for 
the school, and before the beginning of the next session, it is expected 
that every school-room convenience for each Young Lady will be pro- 
vided. 

As it is determined to preserve the private character of the school, 
the Pupils will board in the families of the Teachers ; exceptions to this 
rule will only be made to meet peculiar circumstances and the special 
wishes of friends and relations. 

Terms — Board, (including every necessary), Tuition, Stationary and 
the use of School Books, $75. per Session. Music and Drawing will 
form Separate Charges. Books and stationary will be furnished to the 
day scholars who reside in the Village and Vicinity, and those who 
may board in other families, at moderate prices. 

Near Pittsborough, December 20, 1835. W. H. Hardin. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, January 22, 1836. 



46 Chatham County Schools 

KELVIN SCHOOL ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 1837. 

BOABDING SCHOOL FOE YOUNG LADIES. 
Kelvin, near Pittsborough. 

The Exercises of this School, which have just closed for the second 
Session of the present year, will be rsumed on the 1st of February next, 
under the superintendence of Miss C. C. Jones and the Subscriber, 
assisted by a Lady in every respect suitably qualified. The first Session 
of the year 1837 will close on the 15th of July, including a short vaca- 
tion. * * * The second Session will commence on the 15th of July, 
and terminate on the 12th of December. The School will be, as hereto- 
fore, strictly private in its character. ~No young Ladies, except those resi- 
dent in the immediate vicinity, or so near the School as to be considered 
under the immediate care of their parents or guardians, will be per- 
mitted to board in any family of which a teacher is not a member. 
An arrangement has been made with Miss Holmes, with whom a lady 
connected with the School resides, to accommodate a small number of 
young ladies with board. Terms, for board and tuition, $85 per Ses- 
sion, payable in advance; tuition for day scholars, $15 for all over 
12 years of age; 12^2 for those under 12. 

Instruction in the Ancient Languages and Mathematics, will be given 
when desired. * * * Books and Stationary will be furnished to 
boarders and day scholars at the lowest retail prices. Music and draw- 
ing will form separate charges. The services of an additional Instruc- 
tor in Music having become necessary, one has been accordingly pro- 
vided. The services of a gentleman who is highly recommended, have 
been engaged for the next year (1837) who will give Instruction in the 
French and German, which will also form a separate charge. 

Pittsborough, December 15, 1836. "W. H. Hardin. 

— The Register, December 27, 18-36. 

KELVIN SCHOOL ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 1838. 

KELVIN BOAKDLTSTG SCHOOL. 
For Young Ladies. 

This Institution closed its second session of the present year on the 
15th inst. 

The first session of the next year will commerce on the 1st Monday 
in February, and end on the 15th of July, including the short summer 
vacation. The second session will commence on the 16th July and 
close on the 15th December. 

The School will be under the same superintendence and instruction 
as heretofore. 

It has been determined to receive no day scholars hereafter into 
this School. This determination is the result of experience and in 
accordance with the opinion of many judicious friends. The number of 
pupils will be limited; it is therefore important that applications for 
admission be made at as early a day as possible. 



Chatham County Schools 47 

Terms : Board and Tuition, $80 per session, payable in advance. 
Music, Drawing, & Painting, by competent instructors, at tbe usual 
rates. 

Books and Stationary furnished, for the convenience of pupils, at 
moderate prices. 

Near Pittsboro', December 27. W. H. Habdin. 

— Raleigh Register, February 19, 1838. 

KELVDT SCHOOL FOR 1839. 

ME. & MRS. HARDENS SCHOOL, 

At Kelvin, near Pittsborough, 1ST. C. 

Is limited to 20 or 25 young Ladies, of whom 8 or 10 will be re- 
ceived into their family. The terms are, for those who board in the 
family $80 per session. This charge includes Board, Tuition, &c. 
except Music and Drawing. Tuition for day Scholars, $20 per session, 
Music $22.50. Use of Piano, $2.50. Drawing and Painting $10. The 
course of instruction includes all the branches usually taught in Female 
Academies. 

The object in limiting the number of pupils is to give that particular 
attention to them which cannot be well afforded when the number is 
large. 

The present session will close on the 27th of April, and the next will 
commence the 1st of June and close on the 27th of October. Thus 
making the vacations fall in the months of May and November. 

February 15, 1839. 

— Raleigh Register, Raleigh, February 25, 1839. 

HAYWOOD ACADEMY, 1833. 

A school has been recently commenced at the Haywood Academy, in 
which will be taught all the branches preparatory to a Collegiate course. 
The patronage of parents and guardians is respectfully solicited. Price 
of tuition will be $12 V2 per session. Board can be had in respectable 
families for 6 dollars per month — the morals and general deportment 
of the boys that may be sent to this institution will be strictly attended to. 

Haywood, N. C, June 1, 1833. Lemuel Murray. 

The Fayettevillle Observer will please insert the above three times 
and forward their account to the subscriber for payment. 

L. M. 

— The Star, June 7, 1833. 

HAYWOOD ACADEMY FOE 1834. 

HAYWOOD ACADEMY. 

The Trustees of the Haywood Academy, in Chatham county, take 
this method of informing the public that the exercises in this institu- 
tion will recommence on the 6th January, 1834, under the superintend- 



48 Chatham County Schools 

ence of Mr. Lemuel Murray, a gentlleman eminently qualified to per- 
form all the duties of a teacher. The healthiness of the situation, and 
the reduced price of board in genteel families, offer advantages to par- 
ents and guardians seldom to be met with. 

By order of the Board of Trustees. 

December 21, 1833. W. D. Strain, Sec. 

—The Star, December 27, 1833. 

HOOPER'S SELECT PREPARATORY SCHOOL, 1837. 

The Subscriber, wishing to confine himself to a smaller number of 
pupils than hitherto, proposes opening a limited PRIVATE SCHOOL, 
number of boys not exceeding twenty; course of Instruction, prepara- 
tory to College. Tuition $15.50 per Session. 

The First Session will commence on the 16th of January, and end 
on the 15th of June. The second Session will commence on the 1st 
of July and end on the 1st of December. 

Pittsborough, N\ C. Wm, H. Hooper. 

December 20, 1837. 

To be inserted in the Fayetteville Observer, Raleigh Standard, Wil- 
mington Advertiser and Salisbury Watchman — each 4 weeks. 

— Raleigh Register, December 23, 1837. 

PLEASANT HILL ACADEMY, 1838. 

The Exercises of the Pleasant Hill Academy closed on the 18th inst. 
to be resumed on the 8th of January next. 

From the success attendant upon the Exercises of the past Session, 
conducted by BAXTER CLEGG, A. B., we cheerfully recommend the 
School to the patronage of our fellow citizens, and urge its claims 
especially on such as desire for their sons and wards a healthy location, 
at a distance from all scenes of dissipation. The Academy is located 
six miles south of Pittsboro. The high moral character of the neighbor- 
hood and the healthiness of the situation, commend it to the favorable 
regard of those preparing their sons for College, or training them for 
honor or usefulness. The following are the terms of the School per 
Session of five months, in advance : 

For English Grammar, Geography and Arithmetic $10 00' 

Algebra, Geometry, Surveying, &c 12 50 

Latin and Greek 15 00 

Board, including bedding, washing and firewood, can be obtained in 
private families, convenient to the Academy, at $6 per month, in 
advance. 



Chatham County Schools 49 

Further information respecting the School can he obtained by ad- 
dressing the Subscriber, or the Principal, B. Clegg, Pittsboro'. 

¥m. M. Burns, Ch. Com. 
Chatham county, December 13, 1838. 

Standard and Star, 4 times each, and send accounts to W. M. Burns. 
— Raleigh Register, December 2J+, 1838. 

COBIA'S SELECT FEMALE SCHOOL, 1839. 

SELECT FEMALE SCHOOL— Mrs. Cobia wishes to take as Board- 
ers and as Pupils, FIYE YOUJ^G LADIES, to whom her whole time 
would be devoted. She proposes to teach the ordinary English branches, 
and Music on the Piano and Guitar. As her number will be so limited, 
only those are desired who connect Music with their studies. The Farm 
on which she resides, situated about half a mile from Pittsborough, 
affords ample space for exercise and recreation ; and Mrs. Cobia pledges 
herself to keep her pupils, at all times, under her immediate inspection. 

TERMS. — Tuition: including Music on both Instruments, per Ses- 
sion, $50. 

Board and Washing $12 per month, or per Session, $60. 

Applications must be made by the end of the year. A Session of 
five months will commence on 15th of January next. 

Payment is required in advance. 

December 18. 

— Raleigh Register, December 21, 1839. 



CRAVEN COUNTY SCHOOLS 

NEW BERN ACADEMY, 1793. 

The Trustees of the ISTewbern Academy give notice that on the first 
Monday in November next, the said Academy will be opened for the 
reception of scholars, under the direction of Mr. Thomas P. Erving 
on the following terms, viz. 

The first class, in which reading, writing, and arithmetic will be 
taught; at 20s. per quarter. 

The second class, for the study of Mathematics, in the various 
branches of that science, at 30s. 

The third class where the scholars will be instructed in the dead 
languages, at 50s. 

By order of the Board, Samuel Chapman, Sec'y. 

October 5. 

— New Bern, (N. C.) Gazette, October 12, 1793. 

NEW BERN ACADEMY ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1794. 

NEWBERN ACADEMY. 

The Trustees met on Monday the 23 ult. at the academy when the 
pupils were examined in the Latin and English languages, Euclid's 
elements and geography : after the examination a dramatic piece in 
ridicule of scholastic pedantry was exhibited by Mr. Guion, Mr. Forbes, 
Mr. Gaston and Mr. Pasteur, and the business concluded by an oration 
delivered by Mr. Gaston on the blessings of American independence; 
the trustees expressed the highest pleasure at the whole performance 
which they considered as reflecting great credit on Mr. Irving's abili- 
ties and assiduity as an instructor and affording the most flattering 
prospect of the improvement of his pupils in every branch of literature. 

— New Bern (N. C.) Gazette, January 4, 1794-. 

NEW BERN ACADEMY EXAMINATION, 1794. 

The pupils of the Newbern Academy, were yesterday examined by 
the Trustees, (it being the day appointed for a quarterly examination,) 
a respectable number of the inhabitants of the town attended — Mr. 
Gaston and Mr. Guion cannot be too highly commended for the Accu- 
racy and elegancy of their translations of Homer and Horace — 

Those who were examined in Virgil and other classic authors, deserved 
applause — 

The Geography class astonished their auditors by the facility and 
accuracy with which they answered the most difficult questions that 
were proposed — 

(50) 



Craven County Schools 51 

A number of young gentlemen of the Mathematics class demonstrated 
several propositions of Euclid with great facility and exactitude — 

The younger Pupils to the number of fifty, who were examined in 
the Orthography of the English language, displayed a proficiency rarely 
to be found in scholars of a more advanced age — 

The business of the day was then closed by a parliamentary debate 
very spiritedly spoken, by Messieurs Gaston, Guion, Barron, Pasteur, 
Cobb, and Forbes — The whole performance was such as confers on 
Mr. Irving (the Preceptor) the highest praise — and we can congratu- 
late our friends on the flattering prospects afforded us by the proficiency 
of his Pupils — his abilities and assiduity as an instructor are evinced 
to be such as are seldom to be met with — From the present flourishing 
state of our Academy we have reason to hope that we shall no longer 
regret the disadvantages, under which we have long laboured in obtain- 
ing an education for our youth. 

April 5. 

— New Bern (A. C.) Gazette, April 5, 179Jf. 

SPECTATOR WRITES OF SEW BERX ACADEMY, 1794. 

On Thursday the 3d instant, the pupils of the Xewbern Academy 
were publicly examined, in the presence of the board of Trustees, and 
a brilliant assemblage of ladies and gentlemen ; their improvement in 
the various branches of useful science, particularly the Greek and Latin 
languages, the Mathematics and Logic, since the last public exhibition, 
demanded and procured their universal approbation. In the evening 
a very crowded and respectable audience were highly entertained by 
a theatrical exhibition — the salutatory address in commemoration of 
American Independence was delivered by Mr. Guion, with the utmost 
propriety of voice and gesture ; several orations were pronounced by 
Messrs. Baron, Stephens and Beesley with several excellence : to these 
succeeded several humorous dialogues, and a representation of the 
Farce entitled, "Mock Doctor or Dumb Lady cured" in which every part 
was well supported by the young gentlemen above mentioned and 
Messrs. Pasteur and Forbes. A number of extracts from various come- 
dies were also performed by Mr. Cobb, and those who had previously 
spoken, and a petite piece (supposed to be the production of Mr. Irving, 
the principal of the Academy) in which the pretender to science was 
highly characterized and ridiculed, afforded great entertainment to the 
spectators. The youthful performance was ended by a valedictory ora- 
tion on the rising glory of America, delivered with singular elegance 
by Mr. Gaston and the business of the evening concluded with an ele- 
gant extemporaneous address by Mr. Irving, in which he depicted in 
lively colours the numerous advantages of science. To bestow further 
eulogy on any particular characters, would be an act of injustice to 
the students in general, it is sufficient to say, that from the rapid prog- 
ress which the pupils have made in literature, since their last public 
exhibition, they received a justly deserved applause, and there is no 



52 Craven County Schools 

doubt, that from their great advancement, during the short period 
they have been under his tuition, that the principal of the ISTewbern 
Academy, will receive the profits and honours due to his indefatigable 
industry and other merits. A Spectator. 

— New Bern (A. C.) Gazette, July 12, 1791>. 

DEATH OF ME. IRVING. 

Died 

Lately, the Rev. Thomas Pitt Irving, Principal of the Hagerstown 
Academy, formerly of Newbern. 

— Raleigh Register, February 6, 1818. 

NEW BEEN ACADEMY PLAN OF EDUCATION, 1823. 

[Title page of pamphlet: Laws for the Government of New Bern Academy, 
with the Plan of Education Annexed: New Bern: Printed by S. Hall, 1823.] 

SECTION 1. 

Of the Faculty. 

1. The Faculty of ISTewbern Academy, shall be composed of the 
Teachers including the Principal— a majority of whom being assem- 
bled, after due notice given by the Principal to all the members, shall 
be competent to the performance of business. 

2. Every matter brought before the Faculty, shall be decided by 
votes, and it shall be the additional privilege of the Principal to give 
a casting vote, where there would otherwise be a tie. 

3. The opinion or vote of any member of the Faculty, shall not 
be made known to the Students, directly or indirectly, except when 
express order shall be given to that effect by an unanimous vote of the 
Faculty. 

4. It shall be the duty of each member of the Faculty to enforce the 
laws of the Academy, to prevent or put a stop to the violation of them, 
and to report to the Principal, or to the Faculty, such transgressions 
of them as ought to be punished by that body. 

5. The Faculty shall keep a book of records or minutes, and shall 
enter therein a fair statement of their transactions, resolutions and de- 
terminations ; which book shall be laid before the Trustees, at each of 
their stated meetings. 

6. ]STo act of the Faculty which is not recorded by their order, shall 
be considered as valid ; and when recorded shall always be subject to 
the approbation or disapprobation of the Trustees. 

7. The Faculty shall take the necessary steps under the laws of the 
Academy, to detect those who in any way may injure or deface the 
Academy, or other property connected with it, and make report to the 
Treasurer, when any offender fails to comply with the requisition of 
the 10th rule, that such person may be charged by him with the amount 
of the penalty. 



Craven County Schools 53 

S. Every scholar on first entering the Academy, shall be directed 
by the Principal to that room, and to the immediate charge and in- 
struction of that member of the Faculty, for which according to the 
plan of education, he or she may be found on examination to be best 
prepared. If, however, there be any objection, or any doubt on the 
mind of the Principal, or the wishes of the Parent or Guardian of such 
scholar, be inconsistent with the plan of education, it shall be the duty 
of the Principal to refer the matter to the Faculty. 

9. It shall be the duty of the Principal to visit the different rooms 
from time to time as necessity may require, and occasionally examine, 
or hear such classes recite as he may deem proper ; and to cause proper 
arrangements to be made for the semi-annual examination, and to give 
public notice thereof. 

10. Each one of the Trustees shall make, and cause to be posted up, 
such by-laws as he may deem necessary for the better government of 
his own room, provided such laws be not inconsistent with the general 
rules of the Institution. 

SECTION 2. 

Of Admission. 

1. The year shall be divided into two sessions, of two quarters each 
— each quarter to consist of eleven weeks. 

The first session, 1st quarter, to commence on January 1st and ter- 
minate 19th March. 

Second quarter, to commence March 19th and terminate 4th June. 

Second session, 1st quarter, to commence June 4th and terminate 
20th August. 

Second quarter, to commence October 9th, and terminate 25th De- 
cember. 

The regular times for entrance shall be at the beginning of each 
quarter. 

2. Every person previous to admission into the Academy, shall pro- 
duce to the Principal or Teacher under whose immediate charge he or 
she may be, the Treasurer's receipt for the tuition money. Every Stu- 
dent entering before a quarter is half expired, shall pay for the quar- 
ter; but if at or after the expiration of a half quarter, shall pay for 
only one-half of the quarter. 

3. Such a distribution shall be made of the pupils on their admis- 
sion, as may best accord with the plan of education hereafter mentioned, 
and conduce most to the benefit of the institution and convenience of 
the Teachers. 

4. No person, except by a special order of the Board of Trustees, 
shall be admitted as a student in the Academy, who has been suspended 
or expelled from any other public Seminary of Learning, during the 
continuance of such sentence of suspension or expulsion : — and should 
any person thus circumstanced be received, on proper information, he 
shall be immediately dismissed from the Academy, until his case be 
brought before the Trustees. 



54 Craven County Schools 

SECTION 3. 

Rules and Regulations for the Government of the Academy. 

1. From the 1st day of April until the 20th day of August, the 
hours of study and recitation at the Academy, shall be from 8 o'clock 
to 12 in the forenoon, and from 2 to 5 in the afternoon ; and from the 
9th. of October till the 1st. of April, from 9 to 12 o'clock in the fore- 
noon, and from 2 to 5 o'clock in the afternoon. 

2. Punctual attendance, at the stated hours, shall be given, or a writ- 
ten excuse offered. 

3. A regard to decency, it is expected, will induce the Pupils to ap- 
pear in proper neatness of person and dress. 

4. During school hours, due attention must be paid to study; and no 
Student will presume to disturb or interrupt any other Student, at any 
time, or to leave his, or her seat, without permission, unless with a view 
of speaking to the Instructors. — In assigning the Pupils their respective 
seats, from time to time, a regard will be had to merit and literary im- 
provement. 

5. As it is utterly impossible to attend to the various exercises of the 
Academy, unless profound silence be observed, all unnecessary conver- 
sation, laughing, whispering, or improper gestures, are strictly forbid- 
den. 

6. The Students are requested not to loiter on their way to and from 
school; and as they regard their reputation and happiness, not to min- 
gle or associate with the profligate and vicious in their youthful amuse- 
ments out of school. 

7. jSTo student shall knowingly associate or keep company with any 
person expelled from the Academy. 

8. Profane and obscene language is extremely vulgar, and highly 
reprehensible in all places; but if uttered within the hearing or cog- 
nizance of the Instructors, it will be severely punished. 

9. It is expected that the Pupils will not enter into their customary 
sports or amusements, on the Lord's day; and in attending publick 
worship, it is required that they behave with a becoming gravity and 
seriousness of deportment. 

10. The Pupils are required to preserve their books and manuscripts 
from being blotted or torn : and if any Student, shall break the windows, 
or otherwise injure or deface the Academy or its appendages, he shall 
immediately make it known and repair the injury. If the offender 
fails to do so, and be detected, he shall pay double damages and be duly 
punished. 

11. If any Student shall be detected playing at cards, it shall be the 
duty of the Principal to admonish him, and to acquaint his parent or 
guardian; if the offence be repeated, or he be guilty of gross immoral 
conduct, or his deportment be such that his longer continuance in the 
Academy is likely to be injurious, it shall be reported to the President 
of the Board of Trustees. 



Craven County Schools 55 

12. At all times the Students shall conduct and express themselves 
respectfully towards the Faculty, and towards every member of it. — And 
every deficiency in these respects, shall be considered as an essential 
departure from the laws and principles on which the Institution is 
founded, and by which it must be governed, and the offender must be 
punished accordingly. 

13. The Students are strictly required to behave with proper civility 
towards all they meet, or with whom they associate, and carefully to 
avoid injuring the property or disturbing the peace of any individual. 

14. The Students, it is expected, will also endeavor to promote har- 
mony and good feeling among themselves, that there be no cause for 
quarrels or complaints. Yet should anyone, unmindful of the urbanity 
and refinement which should mark the character of the young gentle- 
man and the scholar wantonly insult or attack his fellow-student ; the 
party injured is required to make his complaint known to the Instruc- 
tors, that immediate punishment, according to the nature of the offence, 
may be inflicted. 

15. All Students shall be required to undergo a public examination at 
the end of each session, and take such part in the exhibition as may be 
assigned them. — Any Student, failing to comply with this regulation, 
shall have his name handed to the Trustees as a delinquent, and be dealt 
with accordingly. 

SECTION 4. 

Miscellaneous Resolutions. 

Resolved, That there be a public examination by the Trustees of all 
the Pupils of the Academy, on the last week of each session : — 

That a Committee of the Trustees be appointed, whose duty it shall 
be to make out a report of each examination, to cause the pupils to be 
assembled, and the report read in the presence of such as feel an interest 
in the advancement of youth in learning and virtue, who may attend, 
and an appropriate address be delivered : — Also, that it be the duty of 
the said Committee, to carry into effect the resolutions relative to such 
as may have completed the course prescribed : — 

That the Academy be visited monthly by a Committee of the Trus- 
tees, whose duty it shall be, to inform themselves with respect to the 
improvement and conduct of the Students, and all matters interesting to 
the prosperity of the Institution ; and make report at the meetings of the 
Board. 

PLAX OF EDUCATION. 

Male Department. 

The system of Studies, in the Classical Department, shall be similar 
to that preparatory to admission into the University of 1ST. C. and in- 
clude the studies of the Freshman and Sophomore Classes of the Uni- 
versity, when required. 



56 Craven County Schools 

Latin Course. 

1. Philadelphia Latin Grammar, 

2. Historia Sacra, 

3. Viri Romse, 

5. Mair's Introduction, 

6. Caesar's Commentaries, — 7 books, 

7. Ovidii, Editio Expurgata, 

8. Yirgil — Bucolics, and 6 books of the iEneid, 

9. Cicero — all the select orations, 

10. Sallust — War with Cataline and Jugurtha, 

11. Horace, throughout, 

12. Prosody. 

Greek Course. 

1. Wettenhall's Greek Grammar, 

2. Greek Testament — St. John's Gospel, and the Acts of the Apostles, 

3. Graeca Minora — the whole. 

4. Grseca Majora — 1st. vol. or Xenophon, or Homer — 4 books, if 
particularly desired, 

5. Neilson's Exercises, 

6. Prosody. 

English. 

Murray's English Reader and Sequel, 

Goldsmith's England, Pome and Greece, 

Murray's Grammar and Exercises, 

Adam's or Cumming's Geography, 

Walsh's Arithmetic, 

Gibson's Surveying, 

Hutton's Mathematics, 

Simpson's Euclid, 

Natural Philosophy, (Conversations on, or Cavallo's, or Ferguson's, 
or Nicholson's Philosophy,) 

Astronomy — (Ferguson's or Clark's System,) 

Use of the Globes, 

Adams' Greek Antiquities, 

Blair's Lectures, 

Andrew's Logic, 

Paley's Moral Philosophy, 

Composition, 

Declamation. 

To promote the advancement of all the Students of the Academy, in 
the knowledge of the English Language, no one shall be exempted (un- 
less good and satisfactory excuse be offered) from some attention daily, 
to lessons in Reading and Spelling : — and proper attention shall also be 
given to writing, to English Grammar, with the application of the rules 
of Syntax, Composition, Oratory, and Arithmetic. 

Arrangements shall, from time to time, be made by the Faculty, un- 



Craven County Schools 57 

der the control of the Trustees, by which the pupils, in any of the de- 
partments, may receive instruction from the Preceptors of other depart- 
ments, in those branches of learning particularly taught by such Pre- 
ceptors. 

Such Students as stand an approved examination on the Latin and 
Greek, or the Scientific studies prescribed, shall, upon leaving the Acad- 
emy, be entitled to an Honorary Certificate, if requested. 

Preparatory Schools. 

Lancasterian Department. — In this, the plan of which is so admirably 
calculated to advance beginners, are taught the first Rudiments of the 
English Language, Spelling, Reading, Writing, Grammar, and Arith- 
metic. — In this school, the books, &c. are furnished the pupils, free of 
expence. — This, as well as the 

Common English School, includes both Males and Females — In the 
latter, attention will be paid to the above mentioned branches, Parsing, 
Geography, &c. 

Female Department. 

The lower eastern room of the Academy, shall be considered as appro- 
priated solely to young Ladies ; and shall be under the immediate care of 
the Principal. 

The qualifications preparatory to entering the Eemale Department 
shall be, 

That the person be able to read distinctly and with tolerable accuracy 
in Murray's Sequel ; — be able to write a joining hand, both large and 
fine; — have committed Murray's Grammar to memory — have gone 
through Murray's Exercises; — and advanced in arithmetic through the 
simple rules. 

To this Department, four classes shall be assigned; and the system 
of Studies as follows : viz. 

First Class. 

Murray's English Grammar, 
Reading and Parsing Cowper's Task, 
Cumming's Geography, Map of the World, 

North America, United States, and British Isles, 
Arithmetic, Walsh's. 

Second Class. 

English Grammar, continued — Punctuation, 
Reading and Parsing Thomson's Seasons, 
Geography continued. Modern, the whole, 
Arithmetic continued, through Practice, 
Whelpley's Compend of Ancient History — the whole. 
Use of the Terrestrial Globe. 



58 Ckaven County Schools 

Third Class. 

English Grammar, continued. 
Beading and Parsing Milton, 
Geography, Ancient, 
Arithmetic, the whole, 

Whelpley's Compend, continued — Modern History, the whole and An- 
cient reviewed. 

Conversations on Natural Philosophy, as far as Optics, 
Clark's Astronomy — Use of the Globes, 
Rhetoric, Blair's Lectures. 

Fourth Class. 

Reading and Parsing Young's Night Thoughts, 

Natural Philosophy and Astronomy, completed with illustrations, 

Blair's Lectures, completed, 

Logic — Andrew's Duncan, 

Paley's Moral Philosophy, 

All former studies reviewed. 

SglPIf it be particularly requested, Euclid, Conversations on Chem- 
istry, Goldsmith's History of Greece, of Rome, and England, (abridged,) 
or Paley's Natural Theology, may be included in the Eourth Class. — 
Also the Latin and Greek Languages. 

Writing and Reading, with particular attention to proper pronuncia- 
tion, shall be common to all the classes. — Also Spelling, and the three 
last classes, shall be required likewise to define. 

As standards of Orthography and Orthoepy, Walker's Dictionary and 
Key, are adopted. 

Compositions will be required of the 2d. 3d. and 4th. classes. 

No Miss shall advance to a higher class, until she have passed an 
approved examination on all the studies prescribed to her class. 

It is by no means to be understood that the whole course adopted in 
the Academy, shall be imperiously binding upon any Female, contrary 
to the wishes or instructions of Parents and Guardians, who are always 
considered as having a right to prescribe the portions of study. 

That due encouragement, however, may be given to Female Litera- 
ture, it is hereby announced to the public, that whenever any Young 
Lady shall submit to the regular course now adopted, and stand an ap- 
proved examination on the studies belonging to the several classes, she 
shall, upon leaving the Academy, be entitled to its distinguishing 
honours, viz : 

An Honorary Certificate, and a Golden Medal, with an appropriate 

Inscription. 

N. B. For the information of Parents and Guardians, it is hereby 
stated as the opinion of the Principal, that a Young Lady of ordinary 
talents and studious habits, commencing with the First Class, may, in 



Craven County Schools 59 

the course of a session, go through the studies assigned to one class ; and 
in two years, acquire a competent knowledge of all the studies belonging 
to the several classes. 

Price of Tuition. 

Lancasterian Department, 2 1-2 Dollars per quarter. 

Reading, Writing, Spelling, Arithmetic, and the elements of English 
Grammar, 4 Dollars, 

With Parsing 5 Dollars, 

Mathematics, the use of the Globes, or any other branches of learning, 
except the languages, 6 Dollars. 

Every Pupil of the Academy, may receive Lessons in the French Lan- 
guage also, on paying the additional sum of $2 per quarter. 

Resolved that 500 copies of the foregoing be printed and deposited with 
the Treasurer of the Board ; and that each Student, on entering the 
Academy, furnish him or herself with a copy. — Price, 10 cents, each. 



CUMBERLAND COUNTY SCHOOLS 

FATETTEVILLE ACADEMY UNDEK DAVID KEB, 

THE SCHOOL 

In Fayetteville under the care of the Rev. David Ker, will commence 
on Monday the 20th instant. 
Fayetteville, January 1793. 1 
— Fayetteville Gazette, Tuesday, January llf., 179J/.. 

FATETTEVILLE ACADEMY EXAMINATION IN 1800. 

On the 18th ult. was closed the semi-annual examination of the Fay- 
etteville Academy, under the tuition of Miss Taylor and Mr. Merroney, 
in presence of some of the Trustees, and a large number of Ladies and 
Gentlemen of Fayetteville and its vicinity; a number of Ladies and 
Gentlemen of Wilmington were also present. 

The Examination took up most of three days. The whole was con- 
ducted with much propriety, and greatly to the satisfaction of those 
Ladies and Gentlemen who honored the examination with their pres- 
ence, as well as those of the Trustees who were present. 

In justice to the Young Ladies and their Teachers, the Trustees with 
pleasure, remark, that, notwithstanding their attention and progress 
in needle-work, which increases the variety of their exercises and the 
objects of their attention, they generally excelled the Young Gentlemen, 
particularly in reading, spelling and English Grammar. 

On the evenings of the first and third days of the examination some 
theatrical performances were exhibited at the Theatre, by some of the 
Young Gentlemen of the Academy, assisted by some Gentlemen of the 
town, for the benefit of the Academy, the proceeds of which were up- 
wards of one hundred dollars. 

And on the evening of the 24th ult. was a performance at the Theatre 
by Mr. and Mrs. Hardinge, assisted by some Gentlemen of the town, for 
the benevolent and humane purpose of extending to poor children, and 
such as are deserted by their parents, the benefits of Education. The 
proceeds of the house were deposited by Mr. Hardinge in the hands of 
the Trustees of the Academy for the above purpose. 

— Raleigh Register, August 19, 1800. 

EXAMINATION OF FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY IN 1801. 

FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY. 

On the 7th of July commenced, and on the 9th closed, the semi-annual 
Examination of the Fayetteville Academy, under the superintendency of 
the Rev. Mr. Robinson. A majority of the Trustees, and a large num- 
ber of Ladies and Gentlemen, attended, who expressed their highest 

1 This is evidently intended for 1794. 
(60) 



Cumberland County Schools 61 

approbation at the performance generally, reflecting much credit on the 
Principal and Assistants of the Academy. The evening of the first day, 
the Young Gentlemen, at the Theatre, highly entertained a crowded 
audience by their Public Speaking, who were much pleased with their 
performance generally. * * * 

On the evenings of the two last days, the Students performed a 
variety of Theatrical Exhibitions, for the benefit of the Academy, the 
proceeds of which were upwards of 120 dollars. * * * 

[Then follows account of examination of Young Gentlemen in the 
following studies : "Greek, Latin, Euclid's Elements, Geography, Eng- 
lish Grammar, Arithmetic, Eeading, Spelling, Letter Writing, Copy 
Writing" ; and Young ladies in "Geography, Reading, Spelling, Arith- 
metic, Writing, Needle work — embroidery, tambour, Dresden, mark- 
mg."] 

— Raleigh Register, July 28, 1801. 

FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY EXHIBITION, 1801. 

EAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY. 

On Thursday Evening, ended the Exhibition of the Students of the 
Fayetteville Academy, preparatory to the Christmas Vacation. The 
Examination of this Seminary of useful Knowledge and elegant Arts, 
continued for three Days, before a respectable Audience, who expressed 
the highest Satisfaction of the Progress made by the Young Ladies and 
Gentlemen, which proves the Result of the Care of the Teachers of this 
Institution. The Number of the Young Gentlemen examined on this 
Occasion amounted to Sixty; that of the Young Ladies Classes to Fifty. 

The Academy will be opened for the Reception of Students of both 
Sexes, as usual, after the Holidays, on Monday the 4th of January next. 

•fc !f! # 

Fayetteville, December 21, 1801. 

— Raleigh Register, December 29, 1801. 

FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY UNDER ANDREW FLINN. 

The semi-annual Examination will commence on the 14th December 
next, after which will be a Vacation till the first Monday in January. 

The Trustees are happy to inform the Public, that they have engaged 
the Rev. Andrew Flinn, as Superintendent of their Seminary who will 
enter on that duty in January next. The acknowledged abilities of 
that Gentleman cannot fail to render the Institution more an Object of 
general Attention, and add to the Reputation it has already acquired. 

A Boarding House will be opened in December for the Reception of 
Young Gentlemen, under the Superintendence of the Trustees, and 
Management of one of the Teachers. The House is large and commo- 
dious, situated in a healthy and retired part of the Town and very con- 
venient to the Academy. Price of Board seventy dollars per annum. 



62 Cumberland County Schools 

Accommodations for Young Ladies to be had as usual. By order, 
November 18, 1802. W. B. Meroney, Sec. 

— Raleigh Register, November 22, 1802. 

FATETTEVILLE ACADEMY ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1803. 

FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY. 

* * * The Christmas Vacation will end on Monday the third of 
January, when the Academy will be again opened for the Reception of 
Students, under the Direction of the Rev. Mr. Flinn, who has heretofore 
taught at Hillsborough with much Reputation. Mr. Molie, late Pro- 
fessor of the French Language at the University of JNTorth Carolina, also 
proposes on that Day to open a Class for the French Tongue, for the 
Benefit of such Students of this Academy as may be desirous of acquir- 
ing a Knowledge of that useful Language. * * * 

By Order of the Board, 

Fayetteville, December 16, 1802. John Hay, President. 

— Raleigh Register, January 3, 1803. 

FATETTEVILLE ACADEMY EXAMINATION, 1803 

Fayetteville, July 13, 1803. 
The examination of the Young Ladies and Gentlemen belonging to 
the Academy at this place, commenced on the 10th inst. and concluded 
Yesterday. The several classes were so generally perfect in those 
branches of Literature which had been the objects of their attention, as 
almost to preclude the possibility of discrimination. The following 
statement, however, will contain a list of those who, in the opinion of 
the Trustees, were most particularly entitled to distinction : [Here 
follow names of young ladies and subjects. The subjects were spelling 
(four classes), reading (five classes), grammar (two classes), Geogra- 
phy, letter writing (two classes), copy-writing (three classes), cyphering 
(two classes), marking (two classes), Dresden work (one class), Tam- 
bour work (two classes), embroidery (two classes). The Young men's 
names and classes follow. They studied spelling (two classes), reading 
(three classes), cyphering, English grammar, Geography, Latin Gram- 
mar, ISTepos and Eutropius, Eutropious and Corderii, Csesar and Nepos, 
Csesar and Sallust, Virgil, Euclid, one class each.] 

The exercises of the Academy were then adjourned to Monday the 
25 inst. at which time the vacation will expire. 

The following are the names of the Trustees who attended the 
examination : David Anderson, 

Robert Donaldson, 
John Winslow, 
W. B. Grove, 
Robert Cochran, 
s. d. purviance. 
— Raleigh Register, August 1, 1803. 



Cumberland County Schools 63 

FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY EXAMINATION, 1804. 

FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY. 

On Monday the 2d of this month, commenced the examination of the 
Fayetteville Academy, in the presence of the Trustees and a numerous 
company of the Ladies and Gentlemen of the town and neighboring 
counties. The examination ended on Wednesday the 4th, to the general 
approbation of the spectators, after a short vacation until Monday the 
15th, the business of the school will again be opened. 

Whilst the high attention of the Teachers in the several classes was 
manifested, it is justice to remark the students of both sexes displayed 
on this occasion, proofs of industry, Knowledge and taste,- equal to the 
best hopes of the favourers of this institution. Whilst the applause to 
all cannot be withheld, it is impossible, from the different degrees of 
genius to be expected in a school of upwards of an hundred scholars, not 
to expect some cause of more particular distinction. It is therefore re- 
marked, 

The 1st Class examined in Virgil and Horace. A proper understand- 
ing of the Authors was evinced. * * * 

The 2d class, consisting of seven boys, was examined in Sallust and 
Virgil ; proved correct in grammatical construction and parsing. * * * 

To the students of the Roman Poetical Authors, a more strict atten- 
tion to the rules of Prosody is recommended. 

In the 3d class consisting of four, the students were examined in Caesar 
and Sallust. Much attention and knowledge of the Authors was indi- 
cated by all the Members of this class. 

The 4th Latin class of five scholars, was examined in Cordery and 
Eutropius. * * * 

The 5th Latin class of four scholars, was examined in Grammar and 
Cordery, and acquitted themselves well. * * * 

On a general revisal of Latin Grammar, 21 students were examined, 
and a complete knowledge of the grammer rules was evinced by each of 
the class. 

In English Grammar, 1st class of four members * * * were dis- 
tinguished. 

The 2d English Grammar class in English reading, ten scholars were 
examined in reading Prose and Verse, all deserving praise. 

1st class in English Reading, Ten scholars were examined in reading 
Prose and Verse, all deserving praise. 

The 2d class of English Readers ; eleven boys were examined. * * * 

The 3d class of English Readers, twelve Scholars were examined in 
reading prose, and well approved of. 

A 4th class of Readers, eight in number, are entitled to the same re- 
mark. 

The 5th class of Readers read well. * * * A class of young Read- 
ers and Spellers, seven in number, acquitted themselves well. 

A class of nineteen in number were examined in Arithmetic. * * * 



64 Cumberland County Schools 

It is observed, with concern, that * * * have not shown due 
diligence. In the general revisal of Spelling, throughout the Diction- 
ary, thirty three of the Scholars were examined, and * * * ex- 
celled ; but all acquitted themselves well. 

Of ten Young Spellers examined in Webster, * * * were most 
approved. 

In Writing, thirty four boys of different classes, exhibited Copies. 
* * * most excelled their respective classes. 

The evenings of the days of examination were engaged by the young 
Gentlemen of the Academy, to the number of sixteen, in delivering se- 
lect Orations to a respectable audience. The exhibition of all was re- 
ceived with applause; but * * * were most distinguished. 

The young Ladies of the Academy, to the number of fifty, were exam- 
ined in Spelling, Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, English Grammar and 
Letter writing, all evinced Knowledge of and application to their several 
employments in the school. 

Twelve young Ladies, in three classes, were examined in English 
Grammar, and so correct were they all, to distinguish would be im- 
proper. 

Twenty-eight young Ladies, in five classes, were examined in Reading 
and Spelling, and acquitted themselves well. * * * 

Specimens of the young Ladies Needle Work in Embroidery, in Dres- 
den and Marking were exhibited. * * * 

By order of the Trustees, 

John Hat, President. 

— Raleigh Register, July 26, 180k- 

[The * * indicate names omitted.] 

FATETTETILLE ACADEMY ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1805. 

FAYETTEYILLE ACADEMY 

* * * The Trustees of this Academy, in the discharge of that duty 
which they owe to the institution and to the parents and connections of 
the students in the school have strictly attended in rotation to the exami- 
nation of the classes. And they are happy in declaring, that after a fair 
investigation, they have in general been much pleased with the progress 
made by the scholars ; in some instances they have thought the pupils de- 
served the highest praise ; and but in one have they been constrained to 
censure. 

The progress of the scholars in their several departments of learning 
has been faithfully detailed in the foregoing report, and forms, as the 
Trustees imagine, the best eulogium on the conduct of the Teachers. 
The Trustees would believe they were unjust to the principal Teacher 
Mr. Elinn, if they did not thus publicly declare their approbation of his 
conduct in every instance, during the time he has presided. His atten- 
tion has been uniform — his behaviour to the scholars, while firm, has 
been marked with humanity and benevolence; and his stability of char- 



Cumberland County Schools 65 

acter has rendered the discipline of the school easy and regular. Nor 
have the other Teachers merited to pass unnoticed. Mr. Meroney has 
done much in the English classes and Mrs. Bowen who filled the place 
of Mrs. Flinn on the occasion of her ill health, merits the thanks of the 
Trustees. 

Such are the appearances of the School, and the Trustees flatter them- 
selves from the progress made by the students, it will continue to receive 
the public support. Heretofore the Tuition money has proved an equiv- 
alent to the expeiiees of the institution. The Trustees on enquiry of 
late have been found in arrears, but whilst this is a matter of consider- 
ation, it is their pleasure to remark the liberality with which individuals 
in their immediate neighborhood have stepped forward to augment the 
fund. 

Mr. Meroney's time of engagement being expired, his place will be 
filled by Mr. Thomas Scott, a gentleman whom the Trustees can venture 
to recommend as perfectly well qualified to fulfill the duties of his ap- 
pointment. Mrs. Bowen will continue to superintend the ladies' school 
until another selection shall be made. — The school will be resumed on 
the 1st day of the coming year — and it is earnestly requested that stu- 
dents of either sex will be punctual in their attendance on the day of 
commencement, or as early afterwards as possible in order to prevent 
confusion and loss of time in forming the classes. 

John Hay, President. 

— Raleigh Register, December 31, 1801+. 

FATETTETILLE ACADEMY UNDER WM. L. TURNER. 

The Trustees of the Fayetteville Academy with pleasure inform the 
Parents and Guardians of Children, that the Rev. William L. Turner is 
engaged as Principal Teacher in the Seminary, and will enter upon 
the duties of his appointment about the middle of November next. The 
degree of Reputation this gentleman has deserved and enjoyed as Prin- 
cipal of the Academy in Raleigh renders unnecessary the addition of 
anything on this head. * * * The Trustees contemplate and have 
partly arranged an enlarged plan of Education in the Female Depart- 
ment, and the addition of a Teacher in Music. * * * 

Fayetteville, Oct. 5, 1809. David Anderson, President. 

— Raleigh Star, October 5, 1809. 

FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY FOR 1810. 

The Trustees of the Fayetteville Academy are happy to announce to 
parents and Guardians, that this Institution will be ready for the re- 
ception of scholars on the first day of January. The school is divided 
into two departments, for the instruction of children of both sexes, with 
separate and appropriate rooms for each. In the male department will 
be taught, besides the first rudiments of education, Grammar, Arithme- 
5 



6o Cumberland County Schools. 

tic, Geography, Mathematics, the Belles-Lettres, Natural and Moral 
Philosophy, Rhetoric, and Logic ; also the Latin, Greek and French 
Languages. 

In the Female department will be taught Spelling, Reading, Writing, 
Arithmetic, Grammar, Geography, History, Needlework, and Embroid- 
ery; together with such other branches of education as Parents may 
desire. 

The whole School will be under the immediate care of Rev. William 
L. Turner. * * * Mr. Turner will be assisted in the male depart- 
ment by teachers of talents and reputation, who are already engaged. 
In the Femade department, the Trustees have engaged the services of a 
lady who has long taught with success. * * * She will be as- 
sisted by Mr. Robinson from New York, in teaching Spelling, Reading, 
Writing, Arithmetic and History. That the means of obtaining an ele- 
gant education at Fayetteville may be complete, the Trustees have, at 
great expense engaged Miss Beze, from New York. This lady will give 
lessons to those desirous to receive them, in Music, Drawing, Painting, 
and the French Language. * * * 

There will be two vacations in each year, the first during the whole 
month of September, and the last from the 20th day of December to the 
commencement of the New Year. * * * 
By order David Anderson, President. 

P. J. Tillinghast, jun. Sec'y. 

Fayetteville, N. C. December 18, 1809. 

— Raleigh Star, December 21, 1809. 

The * * indicate matter not material to this account; usually laudatory 
of the teachers and their acquirements, also of the fame and the health- 
fulness of the town. 

RALEIGH STAR EDITORIAL ON FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY. 

FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY 

Has upwards of 120 Students. The Rev. William L. Turner is Princi- 
pal, whose merits as the Chief of an Institution are well known. Music, 
Painting and the French Language are said to be taught in a very 
superior manner by Miss Beze, a native of France. Competent Assist- 
ants are provided for the several Departments. 
— Editorial, Raleigh Star, March 15, 1810. 

MRS. BOWE3T RETURNS TO FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY, 1810. 

TO PARENTS AND GUARDIANS. 

Circumstances of a domestic nature having rendered it necessary that 
Frances Bowen should return to her family in Fayetteville, she has 
(though reluctantly) withdrawn herself from the Raleigh Academy, 
and purposes opening a 



Cumberland County Schools. 67 

School in Fayetteville 

on the first Monday in March, for the reception of Young Ladies. She 
engages to teach them those various branches of Literature which she 
has taught with some success for three years past in the Raleigh Acad- 
emy. * * * Frances Bowen. 

Fayetteville, February 5, 1810. 

— Raleigh Star, February 22, 1810. 

FATETTEVILLE ACADEMY FOR 1811. 

FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY. 

The Examination of the Students of this Academy closed on the 20th 
instant. The Trustees with pleasure announce to the public the grati- 
fication which this display of the proficiency of the Students, in those 
branches of education in which they have been instructed during the last 
session, afforded them. 

The Students of the Male Department, in the Greek & Latin Lan- 
guages and other important studies, (a few excepted) discovered an 
accurate knowledge of the authors they had read, and an aptitude and 
promptness in the application of Grammar not often witnessed. The 
pupils in the inferior classes, in English Grammar, Reading, &c. gave 
pleasure to the parents and Trustees, and did honor to themselves. 

In the Female Department, in Astronomy, in History, and Geogra- 
phy; in Grammar, Reading, Writing &c. the young Ladies evinced in 
the course of their examination the assiduity and success with which 
they had devoted themselves to their studies. 

Every exertion has been made by the Trustees of this Seminary to 
render it eminently respectable, and extensively useful. The Rev. Wil- 
liam L. Turner will continue to preside over the Institution, assisted by 
Messrs. John E. Gunning and Colin M'lver, whose talents are known 
and approved. 

Mrs. Frances Bowen will superintend immediately the Female De- 
partment. The success with which Mrs. Bowen has for many years 
taught, and the celebrity which she has acquired both as preceptress and 
Governess, will hold out inducements to parents to confide their daugh- 
ters to her care. Mrs. B. will be assisted by Dr. James Bogle, late 
Principal of the Louisburg Academy, whose experience and former suc- 
cess promise much. 

The local situation of Fayetteville, the regular and firm basis upon 
which the Institution rests, and the capacity and the reputation of the 
several preceptors, will, it is presumed, insure to the Academy a liberal 
support. It is worthy of remark that there has been during the whole 
of the present year only two or three instances of indisposition, and 
those but slight, among the Students. 

The price of Tuition per quarter is from two and a half to six dol- 
lars. Board may be had in the most respectable families for eighteen 
or twenty-one dollars per quarter. 



68 Cumberland County Schools. 

The exercises of the Academy will commence on the first of January- 
next. 

Fayetteville, Dec. 21, 1810. 

— The Star, Raleigh, January 3, 1811. 

FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY FOR 1812. 

FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY. 

The Trustees of this Institution are happy to announce to the Public 
that its exercises commenced on the 1st day of this month. The 
Rev. ¥ra. L. Turner continues to superintend the whole school; Mrs. 
Bowen presides in the Female Department. * * * Mr. Memorel, a 
French Gentleman of talents and well qualified, will regularly attend 
the Academy to give instruction to such as may wish to become ac- 
quainted with the French Language. 

Mr. Baker from Richmond, who has taught with much celebrity and 
success, will give lessons on the Piano Forte to those Young Ladies who 
are desirous of learning music. * * * 

By order, Ben. Robinson, Prest. 

P. J. Tillinghast, Jun. Sec. 

Fayetteville, January 2nd. 1812. 

— Raleigh Star, January 10, 1812. 

DEATH OF WILLIAM L. TURNER, 1813. 

DIED, 

At Fayetteville, on Sunday last the Rev. Wm. L. Turner, Pastor and 
Principal of the Academy of that place, and formerly of this city. Mr. 
Turner had just paid us a visit, in perfect health. On his return, he 
was seized with a fever which carried him off. — Mr. T. was a Minister 
of respectable standing in the Presbyterian Church, an able and suc- 
cessful Teacher, a man of great plainness of manners and a highly re- 
spected citizen. 

— Raleigh Register, Friday, October 22, 1813. 

FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY UNDER MR. BARROWS. 

We are gratified to learn that the loss which the Fayetteville Acad- 
emy recently sustained in the death of its most estimable Principal, the 
Rev. Mr. Turner, has been well supplied in the appointment of Mr. 
Barrows, a gentleman of the first talents and character as his successor. 
Mrs. Sambourne, long known to the public as an approved teacher of 
music and painting in this city, is to assist Mrs. Bowen in the Female 
Department of that institution. 

— Editorial Raleigh Star, November 5, 1813. 



Cumberland County Schools. 69 

FATETTEVILLE ACADEMY ADOPTS LANCASTER PLAN. 

FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY. 

The trustees of this institution, with pleasure announce, that their 
hopes are again revived, by the appointment of the Rev. J. A. Turner, 
as prinicpal thereof. They have also employed Miss Bosworth, late of 
the Raleigh Academy, to superintend the Eemale Department. * * * 

The trustees have long looked with a favorable eye, on those obvious 
improvements in the art of school teaching, which were first brought into 
operation by Mr. Joseph Lancaster, of Great Britain, the beneficial ef- 
fects of which have already been felt and acknowledged by a great ma- 
jority of the large towns in the United States. They have therefore, 
only waited for a favorable opportunity to introduce this system in all 
its improvements into the institution under their care. This time, they 
are happy to say, has at last arrived. They did, therefore, at one of 
their late meetings, pass an order that the preparatory school attached 
to the academy, shall hereafter be conducted on this improved plan. 
Those acquainted with this mode of teaching, nothing need be said in 
commendation of it — those not acquainted with it, are hereby confidently 
assured, that in the opinion of all who have had a fair opportunity of 
judging, no plan has ever before been introduced into our schools com- 
bining so many advantages, both in regard to cheapness and the facility 
with which children acquire a knowledge of the most necessary 
branches of an English education. The members of this school, having 
been suitably prepared, shall (if desired) be advanced to other rooms, 
in which will be taught Arithmetic and English Grammar more per- 
fectly, Geography, Astronomy, Belles Lettres, Natural and Moral Phil- 
osophy, the Elements of Chemistry, the various branches of the Mathe- 
matics, the Latin and Greek Languages, etc. * * * 

P. J. TlLLINGHAST, JUN. SeC. • 

Fayetteville, December 14, 1814. 
— Raleigh Star, January 6, 1815. 

THE FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY BANK NOTES. 

ISTorth Carolina, 

In Senate Dec. 27, 1816. 
Resolved, 

That the Solicitor or Attorney prosecuting on behalf of the 
State within the fifth Judicial Circuit be instructed to take and pursue 
all legal steps to enquire by what authority the members of the Fayette- 
ville School Association incorporated by an act of the General Assem- 
bly passed in the year eighteen hundred and fifteen, exercise their cor- 
porate powers, and whether they have not forfeited the same by unlaw- 
fully issuing and circulating promissory notes commonly called Bank 
Notes. 

In House of Commons Dec. 28, 1816: Read and ordered to be indefi- 
nitely postponed. 

— Unpublished Legislative Documents 1816. 



70 Cumberland County Schools. 

FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY FOR 1823. 

FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY. 

This Institution now affords advantages equal to any in the South- 
ern States, being conducted upon the most approved principles, and pro- 
vided with superior Teachers in every branch of Useful and Ornamental 
Education. — * * * 

Terms. 

Female Department, conducted by Mrs. Hamilton with Assistant 

Teachers. 

Rudiments, per quarter $2.50 

Reading and Writing 3. 

English Grammar, Ancient and Modern Geography with the Use 
of the Maps and Globes, History, Chronology, Mythology, Rhet- 
oric, Belles Lettres, Composition, Natural Philosophy, Botany 
with Plain and Ornamental Needle Work 6.00 

Music, taught by Madame Villa, in the best Italian style. 
Per ann. taught in the Academy, $60, or $20 per quarter. 
Per ann. taught out of Academy, $100, $25 per quarter. 

Drawing, Painting, and Erench Language taught by M. Laising, 
a native of France. 

Drawing and Painting, per quarter $6. 

French 6.50 

Classical Department, under Dr. G. Davis's Tuition. 

The Latin and Greek Languages, Natural and Moral Philosophy, 
Logic, Astronomy, Mathematics, Geometry and Algebra $8. 

English Male Department. 

Rudiments $3. 

Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, English Grammar, Ancient and 

Modern Geography with the Use of the Maps and Globes .... $6. 

Pens and Ink provided the Students without charge. A tax of 25 
cents each Student for wood, water, etc. Board, including all the above 
Branches except Music, $35 per quarter — payable in advance. 

Wm. Hamilton. 

For the satisfaction of Parents and Guardians the following Gentle- 
men may be referred to. 

J. A. Cameron, Esq. Prest. of the School Committee. Rev'd R. H. 
Morrison. 

April 30, 1823. 

— Raleigh Register, November 18, 1823. 



Cumberland County Schools. 71 

FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY BUILDINGS FOR LEASE, 1825. 
FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY. 

A PRINCIPAL TEACHER is wanted in this institution, well quali- 
fied to instruct youths of both sexes in all the branches of an English 
and Classical Education, and to prepare young men for entrance into 
the Junior Class of any College in the Union. His moral character, 
and qualifications for teaching the Greek and Latin Classes, must be 
undoubted. 

It is the design of the Trustees to contract with a Gentleman who will 
take upon himself the sole management and responsibility of the School, 
comprehending both departments, Male & Female, supply the same 
with Teachers of his own choice, & furnish every other necessary, in 
consideration of which he will be entitled to regulate the price of tui- 
tion, and to receive all the emoluments derived from it. 

This plan is recommended by the experience, that salary employ- 
ments do not stimulate to that industry and zeal, which are necessary 
to the successful progress and reputation of a large School, and has its 
foundation in that principle of self love, which prompts the exertions 
most where interest lies, by identifying the interest of the Teacher with 
the character of the School, thus affording to the public the surest 
guaranty of having their children faithfully taught. 

The Academy lot and buildings are situated in very pleasant part of 
the town, on one of the principal streets, and in the neighborhood of 
the Episcopal and Presbyterian Churches. The lot is large, and well 
shaded in the front yard, which communicates with the street over a 
stile : The main building and wing are three stories high, with a double 
Portico in front, and is surmounted with a beautiful Belfry — the length 
and breadth of the main building is about 65 by 45 feet, divided into 
large apartments, separated by large halls or passages through the 
centre. 

They are sufficiently capacious to accommodate a School of 200 
scholars and a family, and the lot is supplied from a Hydrant in the 
front yard with good and wholesome water. 

Few prospects can be more inviting than the present, to a married 
gentleman with a family, qualified to assist in the school, or capable 
of taking boarders, (and such a person the Trustees would greatly 
prefer) for it combines the advantages of two fold profits, to be derived 
from teaching and boarding children from abroad. And when it is 
known that this Academy is situated in a town of 3000 souls, & that 
there is no Academy within 60 miles of it, in which the higher branches 
of learning are taught, the striking advantages of this offer cannot fail 
to make a strong appeal to the interests and enterprise of the first talents 
in the country, devoted from necessity to the vocations of Literature. 

The Trustees will lease the buildings, lot, &c, from the first day of 
January next; (when the present lease expires) for one year: after 



72 Cumberland County Schools. 

which they will extend the term to any number of years the contracting 

parties can agree upon. 

Letters, post paid, may be addressed to the subscribers at this place. 

Louis D. Henry, 
Fayetteville, August 10. Jno. W. Wright, 

— Raleigh Register, August 16, 1825. Committee. 

FAYETTEVILLE ACADEMY I]V 1838. 

Fayetteville Female Seminary — will open on the 15th of October. 
Besides the principal assistants of last year, three approved and experi- 
enced teachers will be added, viz : Miss S. Bostock, Miss J. Simpson, 
and Miss J. B. Simpson. Miss Bostock is an English lady, who has 
taught with success both in Europe & this country. She will teach in 
the literary & scientific depts, & will take a general & direct superin- 
tendence of the manners & deportment of the young ladies. Miss J. 
Simpson will take charge of the French dpt., & aid in the literary dpt. 
& music. Miss J. B. Simpson takes charge of the Music dpt. on the 
Piano, Guitar, and Parlor Organ. She will also teach Drawing, Paint- 
ing, Embroidery, etc. 

Good boarding may be readily obtained in genteel families, & parents 
will be assisted in placing their daughters on application to Judge 
Potter, Mr. LT. Leete, Mr. Geo. McNeill, or to 

B. W. Bailey. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, October 6, 1838. 

HOOPER'S SELECT CLASSICAL SCHOOL, 1824. 
SELECT CLASSICAL SCHOOL. 

THE subscriber proposes to open a select School for instruction in 
the Classics and the usual Elementary Branches of Education. He 
hopes, by confining his attention to a few, to give parents a greater 
security for the industry and thorough improvement of those whom 
they may entrust to his care, than is practicable at larger schools. 

It must be obvious, that as those belonging to a school of the kind 
proposed, will enjoy superior advantages, so they must expect to make 
a somewhat higher compensation. On no other condition, would the 
plan offer any adequate remuneration. The subscriber having been 
for several years engaged in the task of education in the University of 
the State, natters himself that he will be able to qualify his pupils well 
for entering that Institution. His terms will be $50 per annum to be 
paid semi-annually in advance. There will be a vacation of two months 
in summer. Those who intend to send their sons, will be pleased to 
give the subscriber immediate information, as he wishes to open the 
school on the 1st of January next. Care will be taken to obtain Board- 
ing in eligible houses and on reasonable terms. 

Fayetteville, November 22. William Hooper. 

— Raleigh Register, December 3, 182J+. 



Cumberland County Schools. 73 

D(mALDSO> ACADE3TT IN 1835. 

The Winter Session of the school in Donaldson Academy will be 
opened in the new building provided for the purpose, on Hay Mount, 
on the first Wednesday in January. 

Fayetteville, December 22d, 1834. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, January 7, 1835. 



DUPLIN COUNTY SCHOOLS 

GROVE ACADEMY IN 1786. 

At our last session of the Assembly in this State we got an act passed 
for establishing an Academy for the education of youth in the Grove 
neighborhood in this county. This school is fixed in the heart of the 
Presbyterian settlement where our family all live and we have a con- 
siderable share in conducting it. We have purchased a piece of ground 
pleasantly situated for the purpose, on which we are now building a 
house, which we expect will be finished about twelve months hence. 
* * * The presidency or tuition of this academy we think at the 
beginning or soon after will be as good as one hundred pounds sterling 
per annum, but no gentleman will be admitted to this charge unless 
he be of approved abilities and good conduct, and good sound moral 
character. * * * 

Last October I received your very affectionate letter of the 21st 
April last, which was sent me by Rev. Alexander Patrick who soon 
after made me a visit and tarried some days with me, in which time 
I contracted a small acquaintance with him. I heartily thank you 
for the recommendation you gave me in his favor * * * Mr. 

Patrick immediately on coming into this country got possession of one 
of the late Mr. Colvill's plantations on the 1ST. West River and some 
of his slaves; the plantation he has rented out and the negroes he has 
hired for wages, which rent and hire he tells me amount to about 
one hundred and thirty pounds per annum. About Christmas he came 
down to our neighborhood at the Grove where we made him up a small 
school of fourteen or fifteen boys which is the first attempt that has 
ever been made to teach the languages in this part of the country. This 
little school will be about as good as forty or fifty pounds sterling to 
him. Those now under his tuition are intended to be removed to the 
academy when opened, when it is probable Mr. Patrick may be em- 
ployed as a teacher if he is approved of; the school is in the same 
place where the academy is fixed. Mr. Patrick lives with my brother 
Joseph and has a convenient room and bed to himself. * * * 

Duplin County, 24th Feb., 1786. Wm. Dickson. 

— From Carrs Dickson Letters, pp. 29 et seq. 

GROVE ACADEMY IN 1787. 

* * * Our Grove Academy (as it is styled by the Legislature) is 
not in a more flourishing condition than when I wrote you last (altho' 
yet short of our expectations or of what you wish it to be), the house is 
now finished, the school was removed into it last week, there are yet 
but twenty-five students under a master who teaches only the Latin and 
English Grammar and the Latin and Greek languages. We have no 

74 



Duplin County Schools. 75 

other fund for the support of it but the fees of the students and the 
benevolence of public spirited gentlemen, which have as yet appeared 
to be very low. I wish I could with propriety give you a description of 
it more to your satisfaction. The Genius of the people of this part of 
the country is not adapted to the study of learning and science. The 
most desirable object that people here have in view are interest and 
pleasure, but I natter myself that that period will soon arrive when 
an emulation will take place amongst the youth (who are of most 
discernment) to aspire to the attainment of that which in the end will 
be most permanent and profitable, and that this infant institution 
(altho' far inferior to that erected at Strabane, or indeed almost any 
other), through the exertions of some who are concerned in it, may 
yet become profitable and rise to repute. * * * 

November 30, 1787. Wjt. Dickson. 

—From Carr's Dickson Letters, pp. 3J/. and 35. 

GROVE ACADEMY ANNOUNCEMENT, 1840. 

GROOVE ACADEMY, 

Duplin County, North Carolina. 

This institution, located in a healthy region of country, one mile 
from the village of Kenansville, is now in operation, under the super- 
intendence of the subscriber. Its design is to fit young men for college, 
or to prepare them for the ordinary walks of life. 

Teems. 

Reading, writing & spelling, with Parley's geography, & Emer- 
son's 1st. pt. arithmetic, per session $6.00 

English grammar, geography, history, arithmetic, composition 

& declamation 10.00 

Natural, moral and intellectual philosophy, chemistry, as- 
tronomy, algebra, and geometry, per session 12.00 

Greek & Latin with any of the above 12.50 

There is an apparatus attached to the school. 

Book-keeping will be taught at an extra charge of $5 to the regular 

scholars. 

N. B. — Board may be obtained in respectable families at $6 per 

month. Geo. W. Johnson. 

— Weekly Chronicle (Wilmington) May 27, 18J/.0. 

HANNAH MORE ACADEMY IN 1837. 

HANNAH MORE ACADEMY. 

This institution is now in successful operation under the direction 
of Miss L. E. Clarke, aided by Miss M. McDuffee, both of which ladies 
are eminently qualified for the stations which they fill; and from the 



76 Duplin County Schools. 

very satisfactory manner, (both to parents and pupils) in which they 
conduct the school, the Trustees feel well warranted in recommending 
it to the public patronage. 

Tuesday the 19th inst. is the closing day of the present session, when 
there will be a vacation till Monday 15th of Jan. next, at which time 
it is hoped that the young ladies for the next session will be in attend- 
ance. By order, 

J. Peaksall, Secretary. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, December 22, 1837. 



EDGECOMBE COUNTY SCHOOLS 

TARBOKO ACADEMY BUILDING. 

To Undertakers, 

Will be let to the lowest Undertaker, on Thursday the 26th of August 
next, the Building of an Academy in the Town of Tarborough, of the 
following dimensions, to wit : 60 feet in length by 24 feet in width, two 
stories high, the lower 12 feet, and the upper 10 feet pitch. * * * 
The materials are to be of Wood * * * Twelve months will be 
given to complete the Job in, and Bond with security will be required 
of the Undertaker for the faithful performance of the Work. 

Thomas Guion, 
Jas. Southerland, 
s. d. cotten, 
Jos. Bell, 
Theo. Parker, 
Tarborough, July 21. Commissioners. 

— Raleigh Register, July 30, 1813. 

TARBOROUGH ACADEMY UNDER ROBERT HALL. 

The exercises of this institution will commence on the second Mon- 
day in January next, under the superintendence of Mr. Robert Hall, 
a gentleman from the University of this state, who has taught school 
in the Raleigh Academy and comes well recommended by the principal 
of each of these institutions. 

The rates of tuition will be, for reading, writing, arithmetic, Eng- 
lish grammar, Geography and the use of the globes, sixteen dollars per 
annum. For the Latin and Greek languages, and the different branches 
of the mathematics, etc. twenty-two dollars, payable half yearly in 
advance; in which charges the price of fire wood is included. Genteel 
boarding can be procured upon reasonable terms. 

Tarborough, 24th Dec. 1814. Rob't Joyner, Sec. 

— Raleigh Star, January 6, 1815. 

TARBOROUGH ACADEMY UNDER EUGENE FARNAN. 

EDUCATION. 

THE Trustees of the Tarborough Academy take this method of an- 
nouncing to the public, that in consequence of the resignation of Mr. 
Griswold, they have employed Mr. Eugene Farnan, who is eminently 
qualified to teach all the branches of Education heretofore taught in 
this Seminary together with the French language. The exercises of 
the Academy will commence on the first Monday in next month. 

Tarborough, Sept, 4th, 1824. David Barnes, Sec. P. T. 

— Raleigh Register, September 10, 1821+. 

77 



78 Edgecombe County Schools. 

TARBOROUGH ACADEMY UNDER MISS RAGSDALE AND MR. FARNAN. 

TAKBOKOLTGH MALE AND FEMALE ACADEMY. 

THE Exercises of the Female Department of this Academy will 
re-commence on Monday the 3rd of January next, under the superin- 
tendence of Miss Anna Maria Ragsdale, a Lady eminently qualified to 
discharge the various duties of a tutoress, in the branches of Educa- 
tion assigned to her Department, which embraces all those branches 
of education, which constitute useful, accomplished, and polite litera- 
ture. Miss Ragsdale has taught in this Department of our Academy, 
for the last two years, and the parents and guardians of those young 
ladies who have been placed under her care, and the Trustees of the 
Institution, pronounce, unhesitating, that their expectations and wishes 
have been realized, and that in every particular, the most entire satis- 
faction has been given. 

The Trustees take pleasure in informing the public, that they have 
engaged Mr. Farnan to take charge of the Male Department of the 
Academy for the ensuing year. Mr. Farnan is a gentleman of moral 
and gentlemanly deportment — he is a native of Ireland, and admirably 
well qualified to discharge the duties of a teacher. He is a gentleman 
of classical knowledge and polite literature, a complete master of the 
dead languages, together with the Spanish, French and English. We 
have no hesitation in saying, as a linguist, that Mr. Farnan has not a 
superior in this State. Mr. Farnan has had charge of the Academy 
the last quarter, of the present year, and the Trustees and Parents 
feel much pleasure in stating their entire satisfaction at the progress 
of the Students and of the skill and manner in which the school is 
conducted. Mr. Farnan is eminently qualified to teach any branch of 
Education which is taught in any of our Academies, and even of Col- 
lege. Board and Tuition can be had upon reasonable terms, in the 
most genteel families. 

Tarborough, December 19. Robt. Joyner, Secy. 

— Raleigh Register, December 28, 182J;-. 

TARBOROUGH ACADEMY UNDER MISS RAGSDALE AND 
MR. HAMILTON. 

EDUCATION. 

The second session of the Tarborough Academy will commence on 
Monday the 12th of this month, and end on Friday the 22d December 
— with a vacation from the 3d Friday in August until the 2d Monday 
of October. 

The Trustees, in selecting this period for the vacation, (and no other 
is given except an interval of a week at Christmas) were governed by 
the consideration, that the time alloted for the vacation includes the 
most unhealthy period of the year, and consequently, that parents gen- 
erally would be pleased with the arrangement; and not from the par- 



Edgecombe County Schools. 79 

ticular unhealthiness of Tarborough, inasmuch as an experience of 
twelve years has proven, that (excluding the period allowed for the 
vacation) the Students, varying in number from sixty to eighty, have 
enjoyed as good health, as at any other institution in the State. 

The Female Department is now, and has been for several years, 
superintended by Miss Ann Maria Ragsdale — of whom it is deemed 
sufficient to say, that the reputation of the Institution has so much in- 
creased, as to require from the additional number of students, an assist- 
ant Teacher — who has been engaged, and will enter on the discharge 
of her duties, under the direction of Miss Ragsdale, at the commence- 
ment of the next session. The course of studies is as extensive as at 
other Female Seminaries, including Chemistry, Astronomy, Natural 
Philosophy, Rhetoric and History — and such as desire it, may be 
taught plain and ornamental jSTeedle Work, Painting on Paper and 
Velvet, and Music. 

The Male Department is conducted by Mr. Moses Hamilton, who has 
had the management of the school for the last year — and whose assidu- 
ity, moral deportment, and classical attainments, afford ample testi- 
monials of his fitness for the station which he occupies. Board can 
be had in respectable families at seven dollars per month. 

Tarborough, June 1. Robt. Joynee, Secy. 

— Raleigh Register, June 9, 1826. 

SPARTA ACADEMY UNDER IV. A. WALKER. 

MALE AOT FEMALE ACADEMY. 

¥M. A. WALKER respectfully informs the inhabitants of Edge- 
combe and adjacent Counties, that his second session commenced on 
the 4th instant, at his residence seven miles from Tarborough, in the 
immediate neighborhood of Sparta. 

Teems Pee Session of 5 Months. 

Greek, Latin, & the subordinate branches $14.00 

Geography, English Grammar, History, Composition, &c. &c. . 8.00 

Spelling, Reading and Writing 6.00 

Boarding, Washing and Mending 25.00 

Boarding may be had in many private families in the neighborhood, 
if preferred. 

Under an arrangement with his present patronisers, the vacation will 
commence 1st day of August and terminate 30th of September. 

Such as did not enter at the commencement of the session, will only 
be chargeable from the time of their entrance, up to the completion of 
their respective Sessions. 

June 23, 1830. 

—Raleigh Register, August 26, 1830. 



FORSYTH COUNTY SCHOOLS 

SALEM SEMINARY IN 1811. 

A correspondent informs us that there are now 79 students in the 
Female Seminary at Salem, commonly called the Moravian School. 
— Raleigh Star, April 5, 1811. 

SMALLPOX AT SALEM SCHOOL IN 1812. 

NOTICE (Salem School). 

The parents, guardians and friends of the young Ladies of the Salem 
Boarding School, are respectfully informed that the Small-pox, which 
in last January had been introduced into this place by a traveler from 
the northward, has entirely disappeared, and now not the least damage 
is to be apprehended from them. One person only had caught the in- 
fection, who is now quite well. A general health prevails at this place. 
The young Ladies of the School, as well as others have been vaccinated 
with success, and it is with satisfaction we can assure the public in 
general, not only that not the least sign or danger of the Small-pox now 
exists; but also, that on this occasion we have proved, that the genuine 
kine-pox, when the disease is in the regular form, is a sure preservative 
against the contagion of the Small-pox. Abraham Steinek, 

Inspector of the Female Boarding School, at Salem, N. C. 

March 2, 1812. 

— The Star, April 3, 1812. 

SALEM SCHOOL CROWDED, 1814. 

SALEM FEMALE BOARDING SCHOOL. 

The Trustees of the Boarding School for Female Education in Salem, 
Stokes county, 1ST. C. under the direction of the Rev. Abraham Steiner, 
deem it their duty to give notice to such Parents and Guardians, as 
may have it in contemplation to avail themselves of this Institution, 
that the Seminary is at present much crowded, and a sufficient number 
of candidates on the list, for the vacancies which may take place in 
the course of at least eight months, and to refer them particularly to 
that part of the terms of said Institution, in which it is requested, 
"That no child may be brought or sent without previous application 
having been made to the Inspector, the Rev. Abraham Steiner, and 
leave obtained by him in writing, appointing the time of admittance." 

Salem, F. C. Mar. 21. 

— Raleigh Register, April 1, 181k- 

80 



Forsyth County Schools. 81 

SALEM ACADEMY CAN NOT TAKE MORE PUPILS, 1818. 

The friends and patrons of Salem Academy, are respectfully in- 
formed, that the crowded state of this Institution will not admit of 
our receiving new Pupils for some time hence. Two causes, in par- 
ticular, have contributed in producing the present dilemma : 1st. The 
erroneous supposition, that many of our pupils who were taken home 
last fall, would not re-enter this School; and 2d. The unforeseen delays 
in obtaining additional room for the convenient accommodation of even 
an inferior number than the present. If acquiescence in the wishes of 
parents and guardians, too liberally extended, as the result has shown, 
involves us in very serious difficulties, may we not with some measure 
of assurance, claim a generous return of a similar display of good will 
towards us ? Those of our respected friends therefore who have already 
obtained leave to place one or more Scholars into this Academy are 
frankly requested not to avail themselves of this permission, until ap- 
prized of our ability to receive them. This Institution, thank God ! 
is again blessed with general good health. Its worthy patrons will be 
pleased to accept our grateful acknowledgments, for their confidence 
and good will hitherto evinced, and to assure themselves of our most 
respectful consideration. 

By order of the Board of Trustees, 

Benjamin Reichel, Act'g Inspector. 

Salem, K C. Feb. 3, 1818. 

— Raleigh Register, February 20, 1818. 

SALEM SCHOOL STILL CROWDED. 

CIRCULAR 

The Female Academy in Salem., Stokes county, 1ST. C. being over- 
crowded to the great detriment of the Institution, as justice cannot pos- 
sibly be done by the Tutoresses to such a number of pupils, not lo 
mention the risk of endangering the health of the same, etc. The Trus- 
tees of the Academy deem it their duty, hereby to give notice to all, 
whom it may concern, that under twelve months at least no attention 
can be paid to any application for entering the names on the book as 
Candidates for the school. Moreover the said Trustees find themselves 
under the imperious necessity to request those parents, relatives, guar- 
dians, etc. of young ladies, who upon former application have received 
the promise of their admission in the course of this year, to defer bring- 
ing or sending them till further notice from the Inspector of Salem 
Academy, there being no prospect of the possibility of their admittance 
in the present year. Jacob Van Veeck, 

Salem, July 7th. In the name and in behalf of the Trustees. 

—Raleigh Register, July 24, 1818. 



82 Forsyth County Schools. 

SALEM SCHOOL FOR BOYS OPENS, 1826. 

SALEM MALE ACADEMY. 

THE Public are respectfully informed, that the Trustees of the 
Female Academy at Salem, Stokes County, North Carolina, intend 
opening a BOARDING SCHOOL FOR BOYS, also, in the same place ; 
in which all the branches of a good English Education will be taught — 
and besides that, the Latin, Greek, French and Spanish languages. 

The undersigned, on whom the superintendence of this School will 
devolve, begs further leave to state, that five competent Teachers will 
be employed for the various branches of instruction; and that every 
exertion will be made to render this institution worthy of the patronage 
and confidence of parents and guardians, by adopting and pursuing 
such a course of education and school discipline, as will be calculated 
to improve the mind, regulate the conduct, and preserve the health of 
the pupils. And while endeavoring to prepare them for a life of use- 
fulness and respectability in this world, the higher concerns of eternity 
will not be lost sight of, but a conscientious care be taken, to imbue 
their minds with religious knowledge and impressions. 

The pupils will board and lodge under the same roof with their 
teachers, and be continually subject to their inspection. 

The School will commence, and be opened for the reception of 
scholars by the first of July next. 

Arrangements will be made to accommodate from thirty to forty 
pupils. 

The terms of admittance will be : Entrance money, $5. Board, in- 
cluding bedding, washing and tuition, embracing Reading, Grammar, 
Composition, Penmanship, Arithmetic, Mathematics, Book-keeping, 
Surveying, History and Geography, $35 per quarter, payable in ad- 
vance; instruction in Latin, Greek, French, Spanish, Music and Draw- 
ing, each $3 per quarter. Books, stationary, and other contingent ex- 
penses, placed to account. Clothes found by the parents, or placed to 
account at their option. No pupils are admitted under eight, or above 
twelve years of age. Applications, mentioning name, age, &c. received 
by Andrew Benade, 

Pastor of the Congregation at Salem, N. C. 

Salem, March 18. 

— Raleigh Register, May 19, 1826. 

SALEM SCHOOL NOTICE, 1835. 

SALEM (N. C.) BOARDING SCHOOL 

For Young Ladies. 

The Trustees of this well known Establishment for the Education 
of Young Ladies, feeling truly grateful for the very great and increas- 
ing confidence of Parents, Guardians and other patrons of their Insti- 
tution, are, at the same time, solicitous to preserve that high confidence, 



Forsyth County Schools. 83 

by endeavoring to accomplish their duties towards their pupils, and 
each individual among them, in the most conscientious manner. In 
order to attain this object, they must be enabled to keep up a due pro- 
portion between the number of their pupils and their own means for 
accommodating and instructing them. 

It is therefore most respectfully requested, that all those persons who 
wish to place Young Ladies under their care, will please give previous 
notice of such intention, and make application for a place in the Insti- 
tution to the subscriber. 

By order of the Board of Trustees. 

Jno. C. Jacobson, Inspector. 

Salem, Stokes county, K. C, July 20, 1835. 

—The Standard, Raleigh, N. C, July 31, 1835. 

CLEMMOXSYILLE ACADEMY IN 1837. 

The Trustees take this method of informing the public that the exer- 
cises of this Institution were resumed the 2d of this instant. It is still 
under the direction of Mr. W. W. Burrh and Miss E. J. W. Baker. 
Efforts are constantly making to render it more worthy of patronage, 
and we feel much pleasure in saying that no previous session has com- 
menced with brighter prospects than the present. Trustees. 

Clemmonsville, Davidson Co., 1ST. C. Jan. 3, 1837. 

— Raleigh Star, January 26, 1837. 

[The above advertisement appeared in Southern Citizen, March 4, 
1837. C. L. C] 



FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOLS 

LOUISBURG ACADEMY LEGISLATION, 1802. 

An Act to establish an Academy in the county of Franklin. 

Whereas, The establishing of Seminaries of Learning, for the pur- 
pose of educating youth is essential to the happiness and prosperity of 
the community, and therefore worthy of legislative attention : 

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina, 
and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That John Hunt, 
Francis Taylor, Epps Moody, John Haywood, Joshua Perry, Archibald 
Davis, William Lancaster, Jeremiah Perry, junior, Richard Fenner, 
George Tunstall, Green Hill, William Green, Alexander Falcon 1 and 
William Williams, junior, Esquires, and Major Jeremiah Perry, shall 
be and they are hereby declared to be a body politic and corporate, to 
be known and distinguished by the name of "The Trustees of the 
Franklin Academy," and by that name shall have perpetual succession ; 
and they and their successors, by the name aforesaid, or a majority 
of them, shall be able and capable in law, to take, demand, receive and 
possess, all monies, goods and chattels that shall be given for the use 
of said Academy, and the same apply according to the will of the donor ; 
and by gift, purchase or devise, to take, have, receive, possess, enjoy 
and retain, to them and their successors forever, any lands, rents, tene- 
ments of what kind or nature soever, in special trust and confidence, 
that the same or the profits thereof, be applied to and for the purpose 
of establishing and endowing the said Academy. 

—Laws 1802, chapter XXXVIII. 

MATTHEW DICKINSON OPENS FRANKLIN ACADEMY IN 1805. 

The Trustees of Franklin Academy inform the Public, that the said 
Academy will be opened on the first day of January next, for the 
Reception of Students on the following Terms, viz. That each Student 
shall pay to the Treasurer of the Academy, ten Dollars per Annum, for 
Instruction in Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, English Grammar, 
Geography, Belles Lettres and Rhetoric; and Sixteen Dollars for In- 
struction in Ethics and Metaphysics, the Latin, Greek, Hebrew, French 
and Italian Languages, and the higher Branches of Metaphysics and 
Philosophy, viz. Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Conic Sections, 
Altimetry, Longimetry, Mensuration of Superficies and Solids, Survey- 
ing, Navigation, Natural Philosophy and Astronomy. 

The Trustees having employed Mr. Matthew Dickinson, from Yale 
College, Newhaven, as the Principal of their Academy, flatter them- 
selves, from the Respectability of his Character, the universal Healthi- 
ness of the County, and the low Price of Board and Tuition, that they 

1 Alexander Falconer. 

(84) 



Franklin County Schools. 85 

will acquire a large Number of Students, and that the Institution will 
be patronized by every Friend of Virtue and Literature. 

The Public may be assured that the strictest Attention will be paid 
to the Deportment and Morals of the Youth entrusted to the Care of 
the Principal. 

By Order of the Board, G. Hill, Cleric. 

December 15. 

— Raleigh Register, December 17, 180k- 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY EXAMINATION IN 1805. 

/ 

The semi-annual Examination of the Students of the Franklin Acad- 
emy, will commence on Tuesday the 2d of July next, when the Trus- 
tees will attend to review the Merit and Scholarship of each Student. 

On Wednesday, the succeeding day, the Young Gentlemen will deliver 
Orations selected for the occasion. 

The whole to conclude by the Exhibition of a Comedy and Farce, 
for the Benefit of the Academy. The Performance will begin at half 
after 7 o'clock P. M. 

By Order, G. Hill, Sec. of Board. 

Lewisburg, June 12. 

— From Raleigh Register, June 17, 1805. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMT ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 1808. 

* * * The Trustees would inform the Public, that the Academy 
is still to continue under the direction of Mr. Dickinson, as Principal. 
The price of Tuition for the ensuing year will be Ten Dollars for Read- 
ing, Writing, Arithmetic and English Grammar; and Sixteen for the 
other branches of Education. In consequence of remissness in payments 
the present year, it is determined that future payments for Tuition shall 
be made to the Principal semi-annually in advance. 

— From the Raleigh Register, December 30, 1805. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMT EXAMINATION, JULY, 1805. 

The Trustees of the Franklin Academy, with singular satisfaction, 
announce to the public the promising situation of the Institution. On 
the 2d inst. in the presence of a most numerous assemblage of ladies 
and gentlemen, the Students were examined in the English Grammar, 
Geography, and in the Latin and French Languages. On the 3d, they 
delivered select Orations and Dialogues : and in the evening acted a 
Play, in which they were assisted by some young Gentlemen in the 
neighborhood, for the benefit of the Academy. The whole was con- 
ducted with the utmost decorum and regularity, and the performances 
of the students very far exceeded the expectations of the Trustees. They 
cannot refrain from saying, that the highest eulogium is due to the 
exertions as well as to the abilities of Mr. Dickinson, the President. 
And the Trustees, from this experience of the progress made by the 



86 Franklin County Schools. 

Students, can predict with much confidence, that the Franklin Academy 
will be among the most useful of our public institutions. 

John Haywood, Joshua Perry, Win. Lancaster, Jeremiah Perry jun., 
Geo : Tunstall, Green Hill, Wm. Green, sen. Alex : Falconer, Wm. Wil- 
liams, Jeremiah Perry, sen. Trustees. 

— Raleigh Register, July 15, 1805. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY EXAMINATION, DECEMBER, 1805. 

FKANKLIN ACADEMY. 

The Semi-annual Examination of the Students of this Academy will 
be holden on Tuesday the 3d of December next. On Wednesday the 
succeeding day, there will be an Exhibition of select Orations, Disser- 
tations and Dialogues. These Exercises are to commence at 10 o'clock, 
A. M. In the evening of the same day will be exhibited by the Students, 
a Comedy and Farce for the Benefit of the Academy. 

G. Hill, Jun. Sec. 

jJ=3F°It is expected that all Persons having Sons or Wards at this 
Academy, and being yet in Arrears, will pay the sums due for their 
Tuition, at or before the Exhibition. 

Lewisburg, Nov. 16, 1805. 

— From Raleigh Register, November 25, 1805. 

ACCOUNT OF FRANKLIN ACADEMY EXAMINATION, DECEMBER, 1806. 

The Trustees of the Franklin Academy are happy in being able to 
announce to the Public the present flourishing situation of this institu- 
tion, and the fair prospect of its rising to a much higher degree of 
eminence. 

On Tuesday the 3rd inst. in the presence of the Trustees and many 
other spectators, the Students were examined in the English Grammar 
and Geography, in the Latin, Greek and French languages, and in Alge- 
bra, Geometry, Trigonometry and Natural Philosophy. On Wednes- 
day, the succeeding day, they delivered select Orations, Dissertations, 
and Dialogues and in the Evening exhibited a Comedy and Farce, for 
the benefit of the Academy. 

At their examination the Students acquitted themselves with great 
applause. In all their performances they exceeded the most sanguine 
expectations of the Trustees. The whole was conducted with that or- 
der and regularity which characterize a well regulated institution. 

At the close of the exercises, the sentiments of the Trustees were ex- 
pressed by one of their number in the following address to the Students : 

"YOUNG GENTLEMEN, 

"I am requested, in behalf of the Trustees, to express their sentiments 
on your performances. We have great pleasure in declaring that they 
have given us much satisfaction, and equaled our fondest expectation. 

"Some of you have particularly distinguished yourselves; all of you 



Franklin County Schools. 87 

have performed your parts exceedingly well, and are entitled to our 
approbation. Your examination yesterday, and your exhibition today, 
have evinced on your part great assiduity, and on the part of your Prin- 
cipal, unwearied attention. 

"We are happy to be informed that your conduct during the Session 
has been generally exceptionable, highly honorable to yourselves, pleas- 
ing to your Teachers, and peculiarly so to us. Pursue your studies 
with the same zeal and attention that you have hitherto manifested, and 
we can confidently predict that your exertions will be crowned with 
riches and honor. 

"We now take our leave of you with an ardent wish for your future 
prosperity and happiness, of which your attention and application are a 
sure pledge." 

The Trustees would inform the Public, that the Academy is still to 
continue under the direction of Mr. DICKINSON, as Principal. The 
price of Tuition for the ensuing year will be Ten Dollars for Reading, 
Writing, Arithmetic and English Grammar; and sixteen for the other 
branches of Education. In consequence of remissness in payments the 
present year, it is determined that future payments for Tuition shall be 
made to the Principal in advance. 

William Lancaster, 
George Tunstall, 
William Green, 
Richard Fenner, 
Col. Jeremiah Perry, 
Green Hill, 
Jeremiah Perry, 
Alexander Falconer, 
Dec. 30. Trustees present at the examination. 

— Halifax Journal, January 6, 1806. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY COMMENCEMENT FOR 1807. 

The Franklin Academy will be opened on the first Monday in Janu- 
ary next for the reception of Students. The Trustees are happy in 
being able to inform the public that they have prevailed with Mr. 
Dickinson to continue as principal of this Institution for the two en- 
suing years. The terms of Tuition will be ten dollars per annum for 
Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, and English Grammar, and sixteen dol- 
lars for the other branches of Education, the money paid semi-annually 
in advance. The price of board, lodging, washing, etc. will be about 
seventy dollars per annum. * * * 

Dec. 27. G. Hill, jun'r, Secretary. 

— Raleigh Minerva, January 5, 1807. 

[Also in Raleigh Register, December 22, 1806.] 



88 Franklin County Schools. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY UNDER DICKINSON AND MAYHEW. 
FRANKLIN ACADEMY. 

The Exercises of the Academy will again commence on the first clay of 
January next, and will continue the ensuing Year under the direction 
of Mr. Dickinson as Principal. Mr. Mayhew, a Gentleman who has 
received a classical Education at Williams College in Massachusetts, has 
fortunately been procured as an Assistant Teacher. * * * 

Lewisburg, Dec. 5th, 1807. Green Hill, jun. Sec. 

— Raleigh Register, December 17, 1807. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY EXAMINATION IN DECEMBER, 1807. 

FRANKLIN" ACADEMY. 

On Monday and Tuesday last, the semi-annual examination of the 
Students of this Academy took place. They were publicly examined 
before a Board of Trustees, in Geography, and in the English, Latin, 
Greek, and French Languages. The Trustees have much pleasure in 
announcing to parents, Guardians, and others concerned, that the exam- 
ination, as heretofore, proved highly satisfactory. They cannot refrain 
from giving their particular applause and distinction to the classes in 
Greek and Geography, and to those most advanced in the Latin and 
French languages, and generally the Students acquitted themselves with 
much honor; manifesting their own application and improvement, and 
the abilities, assiduity, and unremitted attention of Mr. Dickinson, the 
principal. 

The Trustees have the further pleasure of adding, that during the 
three years that this Institution has been in operation, although at- 
tended by not less than seventy Students annually, the greatest order 
and decorum have prevailed. Jordan Hill, 

Wm, Green, 
Richard Fenner, 
J. Perry, 
George Tunstall, 
Alex Falconer, 
Charles A. Hill, 
Green Hill, 

Trustees present. 
— Raleigh Minerva, December 17, 1807. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY EXAMINATION IN JUNE, 1808, 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY. 

The annual Examination of the Students of this Seminary, com- 
menced on Monday the 6th instant, and continued three days. It was 
attended by the Trustees and a numerous and respectable assemblage 
of ladies and gentlemen from various parts. The Trustees are happy 



Fkanklin County Schools. 89 

in announcing to parents and guardians, and to the public in general, 
that in the course of the Examination, the Students acquitted them- 
selves in a manner highly respectable to the board, manifesting great 
assiduity in their literary pursuits, while at the same time, during the 
session, they have evinced a strict conformity to the laws of the insti- 
tution, and a moral deportment irreprehensible. At the close of the 
exhibition an appropriate Address in behalf of the Trustees, was 
delivered by the Rev. William Lancaster. 

The exercises of the ensuing session will commence on Monday the 
27 instant. The price of tuition, board &c. as usual. 

By order, 

Louisburg, June 20, 1808. G. Hill, jun. Secry. 

— The Minerva, Raleigh, June 23, 1808. 

LOriSBURG AND ITS ACADEMY IN 1808. 

Wedn. Nov. 30th [1808] * * * Soon after my arrival [at Louis- 
burg] I sent my name to Mr. M. Dickinson the principal of the Acad- 
emy, who graduated at Yale one year before me. Dickinson soon came, 
took tea with me at Hill's. Spent 2 or 3 hours pleasantly ; when we 
walked to his academy, a pleasant building on the hill about y± m. 
from the Village of Louisburg. We staid at his room about an hour, 
drank porter, read, talked and walked back to Hill's. L. is in a hilly 
part of the country has perhaps a dozen houses and 2 or 3 stores and 
mills on Tar river about as large as Farmington R. The shire town 
of Franklin Co. The County was named after Dr. F. and the village 
after Louis XYI at the time Dr. F. as our agent in the revolution 
went to F. and obtained supplies from the French. The river was 
thought (and is still thought by Mr. Dickinson) capable of being ren- 
dered navigable up here for boats at the time the town was built. The 
ground being hilly and the current bold, it would suit well for manu- 
factures. Neuse River which I crossed about 12 or 15 miles back is 
a much larger stream. The Tar is navigable to Tarborough 50 m. 
below this. From 10 m. beyond Raleigh and onward this way the soil 
is more stony, the roads less even and the land better, though the 
greatest part is still barren. Old worn-out fields in abundance present 
a dreary decaying aspect. Mr. D. has acquired a very decent little 
estate since he first came here 4 years ago. He thinks himself worth 
between six and seven thousand dollars. The first year he had about 
seven hundred dollars — the next, the avails of his school 1000 Dlls — 
the next they amounted to 1500 and the last year to 1200. Besides 
this too he pays an Usher (Mayhew from Wins. Col.) 300 Dlls. But 
he has improved opportunities to speculate by lending say 600 Dlls. 
cash to a young Sportsman and taking a Bond for 1000. Till lately 
he owned a house and farm of more than three hundred acres, six 
slaves, and a quantity of stock, as horses, sheep and cattle. Lately he 
sold his land for 4000 Dlls. which was one thousand more than it cost 
him. He now keeps a Gig, two horses and a servant or two and de- 



90 Franklin County Schools. 

signs in the spring to visit Conn, in this style. Dickinson says litera- 
ture is much respected in these parts and literary men reverenced. 
The first year he came when he had no property and nothing to recom- 
mend him but his books and education, he received flattering testi- 
monials of respect and was treated with equal civility as at present. 
When in Raleigh Gov. Turner sent him a polite note inviting him 
to dinner with the British Consul, the Judge of the Fed. C. and several 
characters of eminence to all of whom he was introduced and by all 
of whom treated with respect. He says men of information and liberal- 
ity respect literary men from principle and the rest of the community 
see in literary characters something so superior to themselves that they 
are impelled to homage. D. has had at times 90 students in his Acad- 
emy. 20 or 30 or more as large and as old as himself. 20 once came 
at a time from the Univ. of N. C. having conceived disgust at the 
Monitorial law, imposing an oath on all by turns to act the part of 
spies on each other's conduct. He has taught all branches taught in 
colleges, except Conick Secns. 

[The above is copied from the Diary of Edward Hooker, a native of 
Farmington, Connecticut, who graduated at Yale in 1805. Hooker 
had been a tutor in S. C. College and was on his way to Yale to accept 
a similar position in 1808. The Diary is printed in the Annual Report 
of the American Historical Association for 1896, Vol. I. C. L. C] 

I). H. MATHEW PRINCIPAL FOR 1809. 
. FRANKLIN ACADEMY. 

On Monday and Tuesday last the semi-annual examination of the 
students of this seminary took place, they were publicly examined be- 
fore the Trustees and other Gentlemen, in Geography and in the Eng- 
lish, Latin, Greek, and French Languages. The Trustees with much 
satisfaction announce to the public that the examination as usual proved 
highly satisfactory, manifesting the constant application and great im- 
provement of the students, and the abilities and attention of the in- 
structors. 

This Academy will again be opened on the first Monday in Janu- 
ary next, for the reception of students, and will the ensuing year be 
under the direction of Mr. Davis H. Mayhew, as principal. From the 
approved abilities, acquirements and moral character of this gentleman 
we think we may confidently pronounce him well qualified for the 
arduous employment of instructing youth. The ensuing year, the stu- 
dents will be instructed in the same branches of education, which have 
formerly been taught in this institution; the price of tuition as here- 
tofore will be ten dollars per ann. for Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, and 
English Grammar, and sixteen dollars for the other branches of educa- 
tion, payable semi-annually in advance, board in genteel private houses 
can be procured for about seventy dollars per annum to be paid as for 
tuition. 



Franklin County Schools. 91 

From the low price of board and tuition, the healthiness of the county 
and the character of the principal, the Trustees flatter themselves that 
this institution will continue to meet with liberal encouragement. 

Louisburg, Dec. 10, 1S0S. G. Hill, Secry. 

— The Minerva, Raleigh, December 29, 1808. 

[Matthew Dickinson severed his connection with the Franklin 
Academy at the end of the Year 1808, and entered upon the study of 
law.— C. L. C] 

DEATH OF MATTHEW DICKI>SO>. 

Died, 

In Franklin, on Sunday last, of a bilious fever which he had caught 
on a journey in the low country, Matthew Dickinson, Esq. Attorney 
at Law, formerly Principal of the Academy at Louisburg. Mr. D. was 
very highly and very deservedly respected by all who had the pleasure 
of his acquaintance. 

- — Raleigh Register, September 21, 1809. 



Died, 



In Franklin county, on the 17 instant, after a short but distressing 
illness, Mr. Matthew Dickinson, in the 28th year of his age. 

Mr. Dickinson was a native of Somers, in Connecticut, and gradu- 
ated at Yale College about 1804. He soon after came to this state 
and was placed at the head of the Franklin Academy. 

His learning, talents and industry soon acquired for the School a 
deservedly high reputation. His labours were crowned with every suc- 
cess that could be desired. While the Science and Literature of this 
state own themselves greatly his debtor, he had acquired by his meritori- 
ous exertions an estate quite sufficient to subserve the rational purposes 
of life. He had more than 12 months ago resigned his situation in the 
Academy, and was prosecuting the study of law. * * * 

In his death his friends and his country sustain no common loss. 
There are many who command our esteem and admiration, but we 
seldom meet with a Matthew Dickinson. 

— Raleigh Star, September 21, 1809. 

JAMES BOGLE PRINCIPAL FOR 1810. 

The Trustees of the Franklin Academy have the pleasure to inform 
the Parents and Guardians of Children, that they have engaged as 
Principal of this Institution, Mr. James Bogle, who will enter on 
the duties of his appointment on the first day of January next. * * * 

The Trustees have in contemplation a plan for establishing a Library 
of the most useful books immediately. * * * 

Nov. 15, 1809. Green Hill, Sec. 

— Raleigh Register, December llf, 1809. 



92 Franklin County Schools. 

EDITORIAL NOTICE OF FRANKLIN ACADEMY IN 1810. 

THE LOUISBURG ACADEMY 

Is under the direction of Mr. Bogle as Principal. He is a man of 
genius, an excellent Classical Scholar, and to a very happy talent for 
instructing unites an uncommon zeal in the cause to which he is de- 
voted. He is assisted by Mr. Crudup. The Academy has now between 
45 and 50 Students. A respectable Library has lately been established 
there. 

— Raleigh Star, March 15, 1810. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1810. 

The Examination of the Students of the Franklin Academy will com- 
mence on the 3d Monday in June, and will continue 3 days. The third 
and fourth days will be occupied by Speeches and Theatrical Exhibi- 
tions. On the evening of Thursday, will be performed, for the advan- 
tage of the Academy, that celebrated Comedy, the "Man and Wife or 
More Secrets Than One," with an appropriate Farce. 

May 10, 1810. Green Hill, Secy. 

— Raleigh Register, May 17, 1810. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY EXAMINATION, DECEMBER, 1810. 

On Monday, the 3d of December, will commence the Semi-Annual 
Examination of the Students of the Franklin Academy. 

On the evening of Tuesday, the last day, the Young Gentlemen of 
the Academy, will perform the justly celebrated Comedy, called "Cheap 
Living," for the benefit of the Library lately established at that Insti- 
tution. 

JSTov. 12. Green Hill, Jun. Secy. 

— Raleigh Register, November 15, 1810. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY UNDER MAYHEW AND HILLMAN. 

The Examination of the Students of the Franklin Academy, took 
place on Monday and Tuesday last, the 4th and 5th instant. The 
Trustees are happy to announce to Parents, Guardians, and the patrons 
of this Institution, that the students generally passed a very excellent 
examination in the branches of education usually taught in the 
Seminary. 

The exercises of this Academy will again commence on the first Mon- 
day in January next, under the direction of Mr. Davis H. Maheu, as 
principal, whose superintendence of this Academy for the year 1809, 
gave the greatest satisfaction. Mr. Maheu will be assisted by Mr. Hill- 
man, a young gentleman of talents and well qualified to teach the first 
branches of learning. 

The well known and highly approved talents of the Principal, the 



Franklin County Schools. 93 

healthiness of the place, the cheapness of board and tuition, together 
with the advantages of a handsome library recently established at this 
Seminary, it is presumed will be sufficient incentives to a liberal share 
of public patronage. 

By Order, G. Hill, Jr. Sec. 

Louisburg, Dec. 15, 1810. 

— The Star, January 3, 1811. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY EXAMINATION, DECEMBER, 1811. 
FRANKLIN ACADEMY. 

The semi-annual examination of the Students of this Institution will 
commence on Monday the 2d of December and will continue two days. 
On Tuesday evening will be exhibited the celebrated play "Who Wants 
a Guinea ?" with an appropriate afterpiece entitled "Raising the Wind." 

— Raleigh Register, November 22, 1811. 

MAYHEW AND HILLMAN PRINCIPALS FOR 1812. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY. 

The Students of this Institution were examined by the Trustees on 
Monday and Tuesday the 2nd and 3rd instant. Mr. Falconer, on their 
behalf, makes the following report : The Students in general passed 
handsome examinations — the more advanced classes distinguished 
themselves, particularly those who were examined in Virgil, Horace, 
and Cicero's Orations. All appeared to be well acquainted with the 
rudiments of the several Languages they had studied, which evinced 
the attention of Mr. Mayhew and Mr. Hillman to this essential part 
of Education. No Language can be understood or long remembered 
unless the first principles thereof are well impressed. The exercises 
of the Academy will again commence on the first Monday of January 
under the superintendence of Mr. Mayhew, the present principal. 

December 20. G. Hill, Jun. Secy. 

—The Star, January 3, 1812. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1812. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY. 

The semi-annual Examination of the Students of this Academy will 
commence the first Monday in June, and continue two days. On 
Wednesday, the 3d, there will be an Exhibition of Dialogues and select 
Orations, and on the evening of the same, will be performed that much 
and justly admired Play, "Fraternal Discord," with an appropriate 
afterpiece. G. Hill, Sec. 

May 11, 1812. 

— Raleigh Register, May 15, 1812. 



94 Franklin County Schools. 

FEMALE DEPARTMENT ADDED TO FRANKLIN ACADEMY, 1813. 

FEMALE ACADEMY. 

An Academy is opened in Lewisburg, Franklin county, where young 
ladies are instructed in Reading, Writing, English Grammar, Arithme- 
tic, Geography, Astronomy, Painting and Music; also useful and 
Ornamental Needle-Work, of almost every description. 

Terms of Tuition. — Reading, Writing, English Grammar, Arithme- 
tic and plain work, twenty dollars per annum. Reading, Writing, Eng- 
lish Grammar, Arithmetic, Geography, Astronomy and Ornamental 
Needle Work, thirty dollars per annum. Music, fifty dollars per 
annum— Painting, twenty five dollrs per annum. 

— Raleigh Register, September 10, 1813. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1814. 

The Examination of the Students of the Franklin Academy will com- 
mence the 1st Monday in June, and continue two days. On Wednesday 
the 8th, there will be an exhibition of Dilalogues and Select Orations, 
and on the evening of the same day will be performed the celebrated 
play "The Sailors' Daughter," with an appropriate afterpiece. 

May 24th, 1814. G. Hill, Secretary. 

—Raleigh Register, May 27, 181k. 

BIDS ASKED FOR FEMALE ACADEMY BUILDING, 1814. 

A House for a Female Academy, 

At Louisburg, 30 by 20 feet, two stories — 11 and 9 feet pitch — two 
rooms above, 18 by 20, and 12 by 20, feet — three six-pannelled doors — 
four 18 and four 8 light windows below, and six 15 and four 8 light 
windows above — to be built of good hard timber — with two chimneys 
of brick or hewn stone, and underpinned with the same — to be ceiled 
within, and painted without, entire, will be let by the undersigned Com- 
missioners, on Saturday the 2d day of July next, at Louisburg. Work- 
men are * * * required to complete work by the 25th of December 
next. Richard Fenner, 

Richard Inge, 
Joel King, 
Wm. Murphy, 
Green Hill, 
Louisburg, June 6th, 1814. Commissioners. 

— Raleigh Register, June 21^, 1811f. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY UNDER JOHN B. BOBBITT, 1816. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY. 

The Undersigned Committee, have great pleasure in announcing to 
the public, and the friends of this seminary, that they have engaged 
as Principal Mr. John B. Bobbitt, a gentleman who has for some years 



Franklin County Schools. 95 

superintended Literary Institutions, in which he has given very general 
satisfaction. This gentleman is a graduate of our own University, and 
is recommended as being well qualified to teach the English, Latin, 
Greek and French languages, together with the other branches of edu- 
cation usually taught in this Institution. The exercises of this Academy 
will commence on the first day of January next. 

Richard Fenner, 
Alex. Falconer, 
Joel King, 
G. Hill, Jr., 
December 21st, 1815. Committee. 

— Raleigh Star, December 29, 1815. 

MISS PARTRIDGE TAKES CHARGE OF FEMALE ACADEMY. 

LEWISBURG FEMALE ACADEMY. 

The exercises of this seminary will commence on the first day of 
January next, under the care of Miss Harriet Partridge, a lady from 
Massachusetts, eminently qualified for the important trust. * * * 
For Spelling, Reading, Writing and plain Xeedle Work, $4 per quarter 
— English Grammar, Arithmetic and Geography, $5 per do — Drawing, 
Painting and Embroidery, $6 per qr. payable in each case in advance. 
* * * Rob't A. Taylor, Secry. 

December 18, 1815. 

DEATH OF ALEXANDER FALCONER, TRUSTEE OF FRANKLIN 

ACADEMY. 

DIED, 

At the Glebe, in Franklin, on the 17th inst. Alexander Falconer, Esq. 
of a lingering illness occasioned by a stroke of the Paralysis. The de- 
ceased was a native of St. xlndrews in Scotland, in which college he 
received a liberal and a classical education. His studies while at school 
were always rewarded by the approbation of his teachers ; and the 
honorary distinctions, diplomas, etc. now in possession of his family, 
all bear testimony of the proficiency which he made in his scientific 
pursuits. 

—Raleigh Register, March 27, 1818. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1820. 

THE examination of the students of the Franklin male Academy, 
will commence on the twenty-ninth of the present month, and continue 
two days. Parents guardians, and friends to the Institution are re- 
spectfully invited to attend. 

Louisburg, May 8, 1820. Sam'l Johnson, Sec. 

—The Star, May 12, 1820. 



96 Franklin County Schools. 

NOTICE. 

THE examination of the young Ladies of the Louisburg Female 
Academy, will commence on Wednesday the 31st instant, at which 
time, parents, guardians and those friendly to said institution are ear- 
nestly solicited to attend. E. A. Taylor, Secretary. 

Louisburg, May 2. 

— The Star, May 19, 1820. 

RESULT OF EXAMINATION, FRANKLIN ACADEMY, JUNE, 1820. 
FRANKLIN ACADEMY. 

THE examination of the Students of this Institution closed on Tues- 
day 30th ult. much to the satisfaction of the Trustees and those that 
attended. The several classes were critically examined on the various 
branches of education they had pursued during the session, and gave 
convincing proofs of close application on their part, and unremitted 
attention on the part of the Principal. 

The exercises of the Academy will commence again the 19th of the 
present month. Saml. Johnson, Secy. 

Louisburg, 6th June, 1820. 

— The Star, June 9, 1820. 

ACCOUNT OF EXAMINATION OF FEMALE ACADEMY, 1820. 

LOUISBURG FEMALE ACADEMY. 

THE examination of the students of this institution closed on Thurs- 
day the 1st day of June inst. The Trustees attending this examination, 
beg leave to submit the following Report. 

1st Class — Composed of M. G. Somerville, R. A. Perceval, E. T. 
Howze and A. S. Jones, were examined on Natural Philosophy. M G 
Somerville was deemed best, E T Howze was considered next, the 
other two performed very well and were preferred in the order of their 
names. 

2nd Class — Composed of M. G. Somerville, was examined on Chymis- 
try. It would be doing injustice to Miss Somerville to withhold the 
highest meed of praise for the handsome manner in which she acquitted 
herself on this science. * 

3d Class — R A Perceval, E T Howze, examined on the History of 
Europe. These young ladies acquitted themselves very handsomely, 
and were deemed equal. 

4th Class — M G Somerville, M B Hill, J E Fox, were examined 
on the History of Greece. This Class were very perfect and were 
deemed equal. 

5th Class — M G Somerville, examined on Rhetoric and acquitted 
herself very honorably. 



Franklin County Schools. 97 

6th Class — M G Sornerville, R A Perceval, E T Howze, S L Jones, 
J E Fox, and M B Hill — examined on the history of America. M G 
Sornerville, deemed best, the rest very good and equal. 

7th Class— S L Jones, H M E Hunter, M E Long, M E A Taylor, 
A S Jones, H S King, A G Rawlings, and Perry — examined on the 
Geography of Europe. M E Long, M E A Taylor, and H S King were 
deemed best and equal, the others performed well. 

8th Class— M G Sornerville, R A Perceval, J E Fox and M B Hill 
— examined on the Geography of the World — Misses Sornerville and 
Perceval were deemed best — the others very good and equal. 

9th Class — H M E Hunter, S L Jones, E M Long, S H Jones, A S 

Jones, ME A Taylor, A Rawling and C T Sornerville examined on 

the Geography of South America — Misses S Jones, Long, Taylor and 
Rawlings, were considered best — the rest good and equal. 

10th Class — M G Sornerville, S L Jones, J A S Outterbridge, J E 
Fox and A S Jones — This class performed very well and were distin- 
guished in the order of their names. 

11th Class — M E Long, H M E Hunter, and C Perry — examined on 
the Geography of Asia, and were distinguished in the order of their 
names. 

12th Class— M E Long, M E A Taylor, S H King, and S Sills- 
examined on Arithmetic, and were considered best in the order of their 
names. 

13th Class— J A S Outterbridge, M E A Taylor, S H King, C T 
Somervell — The three first best and equal. 

14th Class — M G Sornerville, E T Howze, R A Perceval, S L Jones, 
M B Hill, and J E Fox — examined on reading, spelling, parsing, &c. 
The two first considered best in the order of their names — the others 
very good. 

15th Class — A G Rawlings, J A S Outterbridgei, H M E Hunter, 
A S Jones — examined on Grammar, Parsing, &c. The two first con- 
sidered best an equal — the others very good. 

16th Class— J A S Outterbridge, M E A Taylor, S H King, E M A 
Fox, E Yarbrough, and C T Somervell — examined on the introduction 
to Georgraphy, and of British America — The three first excelled in the 
order of their names, the others did well. 

17th Class— M E Long, M E A Taylor, S H King, E M Fox, M 
Perry, C Perry, E Yarbrough, and E T Somervell — examined on Read- 
ing, Spelling, Grammar, and Parsing — First named considered best. 
M E A Taylor, S H King, second best and equal — The others very 
good. 

18th Class— -M S Massenburg, M R Thomas, E W Longgun — exam- 
ined on Parsing, Spelling, Grammar, and Abbreviations — M R Thomas 
best — the others very good. 

19th Class— L D S Thomas, M S Fox, M A Fox, M C Taylor and 
E F Wynne. This class of small children was examined on Reading, 
7 



98 Franklin County Schools. 

Spelling, and Abbreviations. They all did very well, but L D S Thomas 
was particularly distinguished. 

On Drawing & Painting. 

E T Howze, R A Percevall, M B Hill, and Jane E Fox, exhibited 
the best specimens. M G Somervell, H M E Hunter, M E A Taylor, 
excelled in Needle Work. R A Percevall, M G Somervell gave the 
handsomest evidences of penmanship. 

It would be doing a great injustice to Mr. Lataste, who has had 
charge of the music department, to withhold that approbation, which 
his professional talents so justly merit. The young ladies under his 
care gave the most satisfactory evidences of their progress in this ele- 
gant branch of polished learning. The trustees feel it a duty which 
they owe to the friends and patrons of this Institution, and a tribute 
due from themselves, to remark that this examination throughout, gave 
the most unequivocal evidences of the qualifications, assiduity and 
attention of Mrs. Bobbett, the principal under whose auspices, the good 
morals and regular discipline of the students have been no less objects 
of attention than their literary advancement. 

The exercises of this institution will again commence on Monday the 
19th inst. under the care of Mrs. Bobbett as principal. The music will 
be superintended by Mr. Lataste. 

By Order, Rob't A. Taylor, Secy. 

5th June, 1820. 

— The Star, June 16, 1820. 

EXAMINATIONS, NOVEMBER, 1820. 
LOUISBURG FEMALE ACADEMY. 

THE semi-annual examination of the young Ladies of this institu- 
tion, will commence on Wednesday the 29th of November next, and 
close on the Thursday following, when parents, guardians, and others 
who feel an inclination to attend, are earnestly solicited to favor us 
with their Company. R. A. Taylor, Sec'y. 

Louisburg, N. C. 31st October, 1820. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY. 

THE examination of the Students of this institution, will commerce 
on Monday 27th of November next, and continue two days. Parents, 
Guardians, and friends to the Institution are respectfully invited to 
attend. Sam'l Johnson, Secy. 

29th October, 1820. 

— The Star, November 3, 1820. 

ADMINISTRATION OF MISS BENEDICT AND MR. WHEELER. 

LOUISBURG MALE AND FEMALE 

ACADEMIES. 

THE Trustees have great pleasure in announcing to the public, that 
the exercises of these institutions will commence on the 1st Monday of 



Franklin County Schools. 99 

January next ; the Female, under the superintendence of Miss Ann 
Benedict, of the genius and acquirements of this lady, the Trustees are 
enabled by the best recommendation, to speak in decisive terms ; she 
has taught with reputation, not only in Connecticut, but in the city 
of New York, which latter place, she leaves only, because of the expen- 
siveness of her situation there. As far therefore, as natural powers, 
improved by the study and practice of teaching can avail, it may be 
with confidence expected, that she will preside over the institution 
honorably to herself and profitably to the pupils. The Trustees may 
venture, on the best grounds, to assure parents that under the able 
governance of this lady, their daughters will make great progress, not 
only in those desirous studies which contribute to the dignity and use- 
fulness of life, but in those polite and elegant acquirements which con- 
stitute its ornament and grace. Mr. John La Taste, whose known and 
universally acknowledged qualifications in teaching music upon the 
Forte Piano, as well as his graceful and elegant manner of teaching 
dancing, will preside in these departments. 

In the Male Academy, the Trustees have great pleasure in announc- 
ing that they have employed Mr. Fitch Wheeler, a graduate of Yale 
College, who comes highly recommended by the President of the in- 
stitution, and they assure the public, that from the capacity and talents 
of Mr. Wheeler, every advantage may be expected which is looked for 
from an academy, k that the plan of education is calculated to prepare 
young gentlemen for the University. 

The terms of tuition in both institutions are as formerly; but board 
can be had in the most respectable families in town at reduced prices. 

December 13, 1820. Samuel Johnson, Secy. 

—The Star, December 15, 1820. 

GEORGE PERRY PRINCIPAL. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY. 

* * * The exercises of the Academy will again commence on the 
23d of June under the superintendence of Mr. George Perry as Prin- 
cipal. A play, with an appropriate afterpiece will be performed at the 
Academy on Tuesday evening the 3d of June. 

Louisburg, May 14, 1823. Sam'l Johnson, Sec. 

—Raleigh Star, May 16, 1823. 

ADDISON H. WHITE PRINCIPAL. 

FRANKLIN ACADEMY. 

The Trustees of this Institution take pleasure in announcing to the 
friends of the Institution and the public at large that they have en- 
gaged as Principal in this Academy, for the ensuing year, Mr. Addison 
H. White, a gentleman of good moral character and high literary ac- 



100 Franklin County Schools. 

quirements. Mr. White is a graduate of Yale College, and comes well 
recommended by the President of that University. * * * 

The Students will be instructed in the following branches of Educa- 
tion : to wit, Heading, Writing, Spelling, Arithmetic, English Gram- 
mar, Geography, the Latin and Greek Languages, with the pronuncia- 
tion of the French, Algebra, Geometry, Plane and Spherical Trigono- 
metry, Mensuration of Heights and Distances, Superficies and Solids, 
Navigation and Surveying, Natural and Moral Philosophy, Chymistry, 
etc. * * * Sam'l Johnson, Secy. 

Dec. 8, 1823. 

— Raleigh Star, December 12, 1823. 

MISS RAMSEY Iff CHARGE OF FEMALE ACADEMY. 

LOUISBURG FEMALE ACADEMY. 

THE Examination of the Pupils in this Institution closed on the 
2d inst. 

The Trustees cannot forbear expressing the very high gratification 
which this examination afforded them, for never in the pupils of any 
Academy did they witness a more perfect acquaintance with the various 
branches of learning usually taught in such institutions, a proficiency 
which, while it claims for the young ladies unlimited praise for their 
industry, reflects equal credit upon the skill and management of Miss 
Ramsey, their amiable Preceptress. 

The Trustees can now with confidence recommend this institution to 
the patronage of a generous public, having engaged Miss Ramsey, the 
present Preceptress for another year, a lady who unites to qualifications 
of the highest order, manners the most affable and engaging. 

The Trustees believe that taking into view the high qualifications 
of the preceptress, the healthiness of the situation, the low rate of 
board, and the advantages of regularly attending divine worship, this 
institution presents to the public claims not surpassed by any in the 
State. 

The Exercises of the Academy will be opened the 1st Monday in 
January next. William Arendell, Secy. 

Louisburg, December 20. 

1ST. B. — Board can be had with any family in town at $40 per 
session. 

— Raleigh Register, December 24, 182J+. 

LOUISBURG FEMALE ACADEMY. 

THE Examination of the Pupils in this Institution closed on the 
8th instant, entirely to the satisfaction of the Trustees and of the par- 
ents and guardians who attended the same. 

The Exercises of the School will recommence on the 1st Monday of 
January next, under the superintendence and direction of Miss Ram- 



Franklin County Schools. 101 

sey of New York, who has presided in the institution for the last two 
years, with distinguished ability, zeal and industry. 

¥m. Pluhmer, 
Secy to the Board of Trustees. 
Louisburg, 1ST. C, December 17. 
— Raleigh Register, December 30, 1825. 

E. BREWER'S ADHIXISTBATIOtf. 

THE Trustees of this Academy take pleasure in informing the 
public that they have engaged as principal in this institution for the 
ensuing year, Mr. Eliah Brewer, of Massachusetts. This gentleman 
was graduated at Yale College, in the fall of 1824, and comes well 
recommended by the President of that Institution, as a man of scien- 
tific and literary attainments, of good moral and christian character, 
and well qualified in every respect for the various departments of aca- 
demical instruction. 

The Trustees tender their warmest acknowledgements to a generous 
public, for the support heretofore given to this Institution, and can but 
indulge the pleasing hope, that from the high qualifications of the 
Teacher, the healthiness of the situation, and the low price of Board and 
Tuition, this Academy will continue to receive a liberal share of pub- 
lic patronage. Terms of Tuition will be — for Spelling, Reading, Writ- 
ing, Arithmetic, and English Grammar, $8 per session — The dead lan- 
guages and all other branches of education, $10 per session. The exer- 
cises of the Academy will commence on the first Monday in January 
next. By order, 

Dec. 24. Saml. Johnson, Sec. 

— Raleigh Register, December 30, 1825. 

ACADEMIC INSTRUCTION. 

THE next session of the Franklin Male Academy will commence on 
Monday the 26th of June. The terms of tuition will be as follows — For 
the elementary branches, Reading, Writing, and Spelling, eight dol- 
lars — for Geography, English Grammar, Arithmetic, American History, 
ten dollars, and fifteen dollars for the Latin and Greek Languages, 
Mathematics and other studies preparatory to the American Colleges, 
or pursued in them. Eliah Brewer, Preceptor. 

Louisburg, N. C, June 17. 

— Raleigh Register, June 20, 1826. 

THE EXERCISES OF THE FRANKLIN 

Male Academy, will be resumed on Monday the 18th instant. 

The Session of six months. Terms as follows : For the rudiments 
of English, as Reading, Spelling, &c. $7. Geography, Arithmetic, Gram- 
mar, &c. $10. For the Languages and higher branches of the Mathe- 
matics, $15, in advance. At the close of the session a small tax on each 



102 Franklin County Schools. 

student for the expense of fuel and contingencies. Instructors some- 
times promise, what otherwise would be equally obligatory on them, 
and be expected by every patron of their schools — an honest and faith- 
ful discharge of duty. Non premittitur inutile est. 

Louisburg, June 13. Eliah Brewer. 

— Raleigh Register, June 15, 1827. 

CHARLES A. HILL'S ADMINISTRATION. 

MALE ACADEMY, 
LOUISBURG, FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

THE subscriber having contracted with the Trustees of this Insti- 
tution, to superintend the same for the ensuing year, will give his par- 
ticular and personal attention to the instruction of such youths as may 
to intrusted to his charge. His long experience in teaching, authorizes 
him to say that there shall be no grounds for complaint of his attention, 
both to the progress of his pupils in useful knowledge and to their moral 
deportment. The terms of tuition are, 

For Reading, Writing and Arithmetic per session — $8. 

For all other branches usually taught at Academies and Colleges — 
$10. 

The subscriber would take to board with him, ten or a dozen students 
at $40 per session. 

Nov. 12, 1827. C. A. Hill, A. M. 

— Raleigh Register, January If., 1828. 



LOUISBURG MALE ACADEMY. 

THE Examination of the pupils of this Institution will take place on 
Wednesday and Thursday, the 4th and 5th of June. There will be pub- 
lic speaking at 11 o'clock on Thursday, and an Exhibition by candle 
light in the evening, by the students. 

The exercises of the Academy will be renewed on Monday, the 16th 
June, under the immediate superintendence and instruction of the sub- 
scriber, whose plan of Education accords with that at our University. 

Board, (with the subscriber) $40 per Session 

Tuition 10 do 

Both payable in advance. 
May 20, 1828. C. A. Hill, A. M. 

—Raleigh Register, May 27, 1828. 

MISS RAMSEY CONTINUES IN CHARGE OF FEMALE ACADEMY. 

LOUISBURG FEMALE ACADEMY. 

The trustees are gratified to announce to the public, that this insti- 
tution will be opened on the 1st Monday of January next, under the 
immediate superintendence of Miss Mary Ramsey, assisted in the de- 
partment of music and painting by her niece, Miss Mary Earl. 



Franklin County Schools. 103 

This Academy is situate in a healthy and pleasant country, and in the 
midst of a moral and religious society, and the terms for board being 
extremely moderate and suited to the times, the trustees confidently in- 
dulge the hope that the acknowledged talents and industry of the pre- 
ceptress and her assistant will secure to the institution a liberal share 
of public patronage. 

By order of the Board. "W. Plummer, Sec'ry. 

December 20, 1830. 

—The Star, December 23, 1830. 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN B. BOBBITT RETURN. 

Louisburg Male and Female 
ACADEMIES. 

The Trustees take great pleasure in informing the public, that they 
have engaged Mr. John B. Bobbitt and lady to take charge of these in- 
stitutions for the ensuing year. Mr. and Mrs. Bobbitt have been long 
and extensively known as teachers of youth, and in a former engagement, 
for several years in these Academies, gave entire satisfaction to the 
Trustees and to the parents and guardians of the pupils committed to 
their charge. The Academies are beautifully situated in a high and 
healthy country, and in the midst of a moral and religious society; and 
when to these considerations are added the distinguished qualifications 
of the preceptor and preceptress, and the low prices of board and tui- 
tion, the Trustees feel justified in saying that no institutions in the 
State can have higher claims to public patronage. The schools will be 
opened on the 1st day of January next. 

Nov. 25, 1831. Sam'l Johnson, Sec. 

The editor of the Tarborough Free Press will publish the above four 
weeks, and forward his account to the subscriber. S. J. 

— -The Star, Raleigh, December 2, 1831. 

EXAMINATION, NOVEMBER, 1832. 

The Examination of the Students in the Academies at Louisburg 
commenced on Monday the 26th ult. and closed on the Wednesday fol- 
lowing. In the Male Department the Examination was conducted by 
the Trustees, assisted by the Bev. J. McCutchen, of Washington College, 
Ya. whose literary acquirements both as a linguist and mathematician, 
are extensively known in the neighborhood of that Institution, and also 
of Hamden Sidney College. On the occasion, the several classes 
evinced, with some few exceptions, a share of scholarship seldom sur- 
passed in any Institution. 

In the Female Department, the young ladies were critically exam- 
ined on all the useful and ornamental branches of female education, 
and the result satisfied the Board of Trustees, and the numerous assem- 
blage of spectators from the several counties around, of universal atten- 



104 Franklin County Schools. 

tion on the part of the Preceptress and her worthy assistant, Miss Mary 
Ann Spencer, and of great industry and application on the part of every 
pupil. 

The exercises of the two Schools will commence again the first Mon- 
day in January next, under the management of the same Principals, 
whose intention it is to employ able assistants, as soon as the number 
of students exceed twenty in each Academy. In the male Academy, it 
is the wish of the Principal, as well as of the Trustees, that no young 
man enter of idle and dissipated habits. All such, after reasonable ef- 
forts to reclaim them, will be dismissed from the School. 

Board may be obtained in respectable families as low as in any other 
village in our State. Tuition in the Male Academy, which is to be 
paid in advance, is $30 for classical scholars, and $20 for English, per 
annum; and no student will be taken for a shorter time than a session, 
without a previous understanding with the Principal on the subject. 

By order, S. Johnson, 

Louisburg, N". C, Dec. 2, 1832. Secretary. 

—The Star, December 23, 1832. 

EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1834. 

LOUISBURG FEMALE ACADEMY. 

The examination of the students of this Academy closed on the 3rd 
instant. It was attended by the trustees and a large assemblage of ladies 
and gentlemen as visitors. The proficiency evinced on this occasion 
by the young ladies, the trustees take great pleasure in stating, evi- 
denced in a high degree the assiduity and superior skill for which the 
preceptress has been so long distinguished. Mrs. Bobbitt has had, with 
some intermission, the charge of the Female Institution at this place 
for many years ; and with her return to the management of the School, 
the trustees have, with the highest gratification, witnessed the success, 
and they may say, the expected success, of her eminently useful efforts; 
and this pleasure is enhanced by the prospect of durability to the insti- 
tution, which is now entertained from the circumstance that Mrs. B. 
is permanently located in Louisburg. 

The advantages now presented by this institution are such as to in- 
duce the trustees to recommend it in a high degree to public patronage. 
All the useful and ornamental branches of female education are taught 
in this Academy, and Mrs. B. is prepared to take under her immediate 
charge, as boarders, many of the young ladies. In genteel families, 
convenient to the Academy, board also may be obtained on moderate 
terms. 

The exercises of the School will be resumed on the 7th of July next, 
under the management of the same instructress, with competent assist- 
ants. 

By order of the Board, Jno. D. Hawkins, Pres't. 

Robert J. Shaw, Sec. 

June 11th, 1834. 



Franklin County Schools. 105 

After the examinations had closed, the students of each School were 
assembled in the Female Academy building, where an able address was 
made to them by Col. Henry J. G. Ruffin, who portrayed to their view, 
in very interesting colors, the advantages of education, of good deport- 
ment, and of those useful qualities, which it was expected of them to 
acquire, and to practice in after life. 

June 11, 1834. Jno. D. Hawkins, Chairman. 

—The Star, Raleigh, June 26, 183k- 



LOUISBURG MALE ACADEMY. 

The examination of the students of this Academy, which is under the 
immediate superintendence of Mr. JOHN" B. BOBBITT, closed on the 
2d instant, and was attended by the trustees and many visitors, all of 
whom witnessed, with great interest, the proficiency of the scholars in 
the various departments of Literature. 

Mr. B. has great experience as a teacher, and his success always in- 
sures him a good school ; and the trustees, under a thorough conviction 
of his great proficency as an instructor, earnestly recommend him to 
public patronage. His permanent location, also, in Louisburg, pre- 
sents the advantages of his powers and skill, in a high degree, to the 
youth who may be committed to his care. 

The course of studies in this institution embraces the Latin, Greek 
arid French Languages, and all the sciences taught in our University ; 
and to the morals and good deportment of the students committed to his 
charge, unremitted attention will be paid by the Principal. 

The Schools will commence again the first Monday in July next. 
Board may be obtained, on moderate terms, in respectable families near 
the Academy. 

By order of the Board, 

Samuel Johnson, Sec. 

—The Star, Raleigh, June 26, 183J+. 

ACCOUNT OF EXAMINATION IN NOVEMBEE, 1835. 

LOUISBURG ACADEMY. 

The Examination of the Students of the Male and Female Schools 
at this place, closed on Thursday the 29th ult. In the Male department, 
the examination was conducted by the Rev. James Wood of Prince Ed- 
ward, whose literary acquirements are extensively known, — in the fe- 
male school, Messrs. Robert Shaw, Nathaniel Patterson, and William 
Battle, Trustees, presided. In the address made by Messrs. Wood and 
Battle, to the respective Schools at the close of the examinations, was 
expressed high approbation of the performances of the Pupils. The 
next session will commence 9th January next. By order, 

Dec. 1, 1835. Jno. B. Bobbitt. 

— The Star, December 5, 1835. 



106 Franklin County Schools. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOE 1837. 
LOIIISBUKG ACADEMIES. 

The Male and Female Institutions at this place closed their Sessions 
on the 26th ult. and the exercises will be again commenced on the 2d 
day of January next, under the same Instructors. 

Board may be procured, on moderate terms, say from $40 to $55 per 
session, in the houses of Messrs. Smith Patterson, Gray Edwards, 
Thomas G. Stone, W. H. Battle, Mrs. Ann Thomas, and others. 

Tuition fees in the Male Department will be $15 per Session; in the 
Female $10 per Session, with the exception of Music, which is a sepa- 
rate charge — $20 per Session. 

The Trustees of these Schools hold out as inducements, the low price 
of Board, the known healthiness of the Village and its vicinity, the local 
situation of the Academies (being sufficiently remote from the business 
part of the town) and the orderly deportment of the Students, both 
Male and Female; not an instance of insubordination having occurred 
the present or last year, requiring the intervention of the Trustees, or a 
serious apprehension from the Principals. 

7th Dec. 1836. By Order of the Board of Trustees. 

—The Register, December 13, 1836. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1838. 

LOUISBLTKG ACADEMIES, K C. 

The Second Session in these Schools closed on the 27th ult. and the 
next Session will commence on the first day of January, under the same 
Instructors. 

The very liberal share of patronage extended to these Institutions, 
for the last several years, induces the Trustees to look for a continuance 
of the same. 

Board for young Ladies may be obtained, with the Preceptress, at 
$40 per Session, without any extra charge. Other families in the vil- 
lage and vicinity will also take males and females as boarders, at or 
about the same rates. 

Tuition in the Female Department, as follows: 

Per Session. 

For lower branches $10 

Higher branches, as Painting and Embroidery 15 

Music (a separate charge) 20 

Latin and French 15 

In the Male Department there is no variation in Tuition Fees — $15 
per Session being the regular charge for each Classical or English Stu- 
dent. By Order of the Board. 
Dec, 19, 1837. 
— Raleigh Register, December 23, 1837. 



Franklin County Schools. 107 

HICKORY GROVE SEMINARY, 1S13. 

EDUCATION. 

The Subscribers take this method to announce to the public, that the 
Exercises of the Hickory Grove Seminary in Franklin county, ten 
miles above Louisburg, will again commence on the 10th of January 
next, under the care of the former Teacher (Mr. Bobbitt,) where will 
be taught Latin, Greek, French and English in all their various 
branches. * * * Abraham McLemobe, 

Gideon Glenn, 
Robert Gill, 
John Stone, 
Wm. P. Taylor, 
James Jones. 
— Raleigh Register, December 17, 1813. 

["Mr. Bobbitt" likely means John B. Bobbitt.— C. L. C] 

MIDWAY ACADEMY, 1822. 

The Rev. C. A. Hill, A. M. having purchased a plantation with suit- 
able buildings thereon near the middle ground between Warrenton and 
Louisburg, will open a Boarding School on the first day of January 
next, at the low price of One Hundred Dollars per annum for Board 
and Tuition, and no extra charges. * * * 

October 20. 

—Raleigh Register, October 26, 1821. 

[Was at Warrenton till January, 1822.— C. L. C] 

MIDWAY ACADEMY PREPARES FOR THE UNIVERSITY. 

MIDWAY ACADEMY, 

Franklin County, Xorth Carolina. 

THE Examination will take place on Thursday and Friday the 6th 
and 7th of June. Public Speaking on Friday at 11 o'clock A. M. 
The Public are respectfully invited to attend. The Exercises of the 
School will be resumed on Monday, 17th June. 

The course of classical studies is so arranged as to constitute Midway 
Academy preparatory to our University. It is situate on the land of 
the subscriber, who is Principal. He has enlarged his buildings, so 
that he will be able to accommodate a larger number of boarders next 
session than the present. Young men will lodge in the Academy and 
small boys with the Principal and his family. This establishment is 
near the middle ground between Louisburg and Warrenton, possessing 
all the advantages of excellent water and a healthy, retired situation, 
remote from any place to invite dissipation or extravagance. 

Tuition is $10 per Session. 



108 Franklin County Schools. 

Board is $40 per Session, which includes all necessaries, except 
candles. The Principal will keep a constant supply of Books, Station- 
ary and Candles, at the Petersburg retail prices, subject to the orders 
of parents and guardians. 

May 14. Chas. A. Hill, A. M. 

—Raleigh Register, May 17, 1822. 

MIDWAY EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1822. 

MIDWAY ACADEMY, 

Franklin County, N". Carolina. 

The Examination of the Students of this Institution took place on 
Thursday and Friday the 6th and 7th instant — which closed the first 
Session. The Exercises will be resumed on Monday the 17th inst. The 
Trustees deem it sufficient to say, that under a very close examination, 
on Spelling, Beading, Arithmetic, English Grammar, Geometry and 
Algebra ; on the whole course of Latin and Greek, the young Gentle- 
men acquitted themselves with the highest credit, which is the best 
testimonial both of the assiduity of the Students and of the abilities 
of the Kev. C. A. Hill, A. M. Principal of the Academy. 

John Brodie, Prest. 
Wm. Williams, 
Francis Pugh, 
W. D. Jones, 
H. G. Williams, 
June 8, 1822. Trustees. 

— Raleigh Register, June 21, 1822. 

MIDWAY EXAMINATION, NOVEMBER, 1822. 

MIDWAY ACADEMY, 

Franklin County, 1ST. Carolina. 

THE Trustees of the Academy, Parents, Guardians, and the Public, 
are respectfully invited to attend the Examination, which will take 
place on Tuesday and Wednesday the 12th and 13th of November. 
The Exercises of the School will be resumed on the first Monday of 
January next, under the superintendence of the subscriber, at $50 per 
Session for board and tuition. 

Oct. 20, 1822. C. A. Hill, A. M., Principal. 

- — Raleigh Register, November 1, 1822. 



Fkanklin County Schools. 109 

MIDWAY ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1823. 

MIDWAY ACADEMY, 
Between Louisburg and Warrenton. 

THE Examination took place on the 12th and 15th inst., which closed 
the second Session. The exercises of the School will be resumed on 
the first Monday in January, under the superintendency of the sub- 
scriber, with suitable Assistants. The course of Education at our Uni- 
versity is strictly pursued, in preparing Students for any of the classes 
of College. 

Board including every necessary but Candles $40 per Session. Tui- 
tion $10. 

Books, Stationary, and Candles, furnished at the Petersburg retail 
prices, when requested by parents and guardians. 

Midway yields to no part of the State in point of health, having 
escaped during the present years without a single case of fever, not- 
withstanding the very general prevalence of sickness, even in the most 
healthy places. 

The subscriber pledges himself to continue that attention to the liter- 
ary proficiency and moral deportment of his pupils, which has hitherto 
given such general satisfaction to his patrons. 

Nov. 20, 1822. C. A. Hill, A. M. 

— Raleigh Register, December 6, 1822. 

MIDWAY UNDER HILL AND PERRY. 

MIDWAY ACADEMY, 

In Franklin county — 10 miles from Louisburg and 15 miles from 

Warrenton. 

THE Examination of the Students will take place on Thursday 
and Friday the 6th and 7th of November. There will be public Speak- 
ing on the last day at about 11 o'clock, A. M. The public are respect- 
fully invited to attend. 

The Exercises of the Academy will be resumed on the first Monday 
in January next, under the superintendence of the Subscriber, aided by 
Mr. George B. Perry, who has before assisted the subscriber in War- 
renton, and has had the charge of the Hilliardston and Louisburg 
Academies for the last four or five years, where he has given very 
general satisfaction. 

Prices as heretofore, viz:- 

Board with all necessaries except candles $40 per session. 

Tuition $10 per session. 

Oct. 20, 1823. C. A. Hill, A. M. 

— Raleigh Register, October 2k, 1823. 



110 Franklin County Schools. 

MIDWAY ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1824. 

MIDWAY ACADEMY, 

Franklin County — 15 miles from Warrenton and 10 miles from 

Louisburg. 

The Exercises of this Institution will be resumed on the first Monday 
in January, under the direction of the Subscribers. * * * The 
course of Education is regulated by that of our University, and candi- 
dates may be prepared to enter any class in college. * * * 

C. A. Hill, A. M. Princl. 

Dec. 8th, 1823. Geo. B. Perry. 

— Raleigh Register, December 16, 1823. 

MIDWAY ACADEMY BURNS. 

MIDWAY ACADEMY DESTEOYED BY FIRE ! 

Messrs. Gales & Son, 

As it is possible that the report of the destruction of my Academy 
by fire, may produce uneasiness and alarm with those parents and guar- 
dians of the pupils who resided in the Academy, I feel it my duty, 
through the medium of the Register, to assure them, that little or no 
loss has been sustained except the building itself. * * * 

As to a continuation of study, I procured the dwelling house of a 
near neighbor, on the next day, for a school house, and the misfortune 
produced the loss of one day only. On the second day after the fire, the 
foundation for rebuilding the Academy was laid, and I expect to re- 
sume business in the Academy on the 16th instant. 

The alarm of fire Avas given from the Academy at about 1 o'clock 
on Sunday night, the 1st of February. * * * 

Feb. 5. C. A. Hill. 

— Raleigh Register, February 10, 182J+. 

MIDWAY ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1825. 
MIDWAY ACADEMY, 

Franklin County, 1ST. C. 

THE Exercises of this Institution will be resumed, under the imme- 
diate instruction of the subscriber, on the first Monday of January 
next, at the usual price, viz. Fifty dollars per session for Board and 
Tuition, paid in advance. 

The course of studies at Midway is regulated by that of the Univer- 
sity; so that this Academy serves as preparatory to the different classes 
at College. C. A. Hill. 

Dec. 2. 

— Raleigh Register, December 10, 1821/-. 



Franklix County Schools. Ill 

MIDWAY ODER HILL AJTD HILL. 

MIDWAY ACADEMY, 

Franklin County, X. C. 

THE Exercises of this Institution will be again resumed on the first 
Monday in January next, under the immediate instruction of the Sub- 
scriber, assisted by his son DAXIEL S. HILL. The course of Studies 
will be conformable to the plan of Education as adopted at our Uni- 
versity. As the Subscriber is preparing his buildings for a permanent 
establishment, and will devote himself entirely to the duties of his 
School, parents may rest assured that every exertion shall be made to 
advance his pupils both in moral and intellectual improvement. Board 
will be $40, and tuition $10 per session, payable in advance. 

Midway is situated two miles below the main Stage Road, ten miles 
from Louisburg, sixteen miles from Warrenton & four from the Shocco 
Springs. For health, it is exceeded by no situation in the State : for I 
years, there were from forty to sixty Students, and not a case of fever 
occurred. Should, however, medical aid be required, the attention of 
Dr. John Brodie, whose skill as a physician is inferior to none in the 
State, will be at hand, as he resides within two miles of Midway. The 
Students will be barred from exposure to extravagance and dissipation, 
as there is not a store or gill-shop within five miles of the Academy. 

In the government of Midway Academy, the Principal will pursue 
that course which he would with his own children. He will advise and 
admonish; where these fail, the rod will be resorted to, but with par- 
ental prudence. When any pupil shall be deemed incorrigible in dis- 
orderly conduct, or habitually inattentive to his studies, his parent or 
guardian will be immediately informed thereof. 

Letters to the Principal or Students must be directed to Louisburg, 
X. C. Charles A. Hill. A. M. 

Xov. 6th, 1828. 

— Raleigh Register, November i-4, 1828. 

MIDWAY EXAMINATION, JOE, 1S29. 

MIDWAY ACADEMY, 
Franklin County, X. C. 

THE Examination will take place on Wednesday and Thursday, 3d 
and 4th of June ; on the latter day, a number of the Students will 
deliver select Orations. To all which, Parents, Guardians and the 
Public, are respectfully invited. 

The Second Session will commence on Monday 15th June, under the 
superintendence and instruction of the subscribers. 

Board and Tuition $50 per Session, payable in advance. 

C. A. Hill. A. M. 

May 5th, 1829. D. S. Hill. 

—Raleigh Register, May 26, 1829. 



112 Franklin County Schools. 

MIDWAY WILL HAVE HILL'S WHOLE TIME. 

MIDWAY ACADEMY, 

Franklin County, ~N. C. 

THE Subscriber avails himself of the earliest opportunity to inform 
his friends, & the public in general, that he has declined all public pur- 
suits, and will hereafter devote his attention entirely to the charge of 
this Institution. The necessity which compels him to adopt this course, 
is the surest guarantee for the faithful performance of his duty. He 
will be assisted by his son Daniel S. Hill. Here will be taught all the 
studies preparatory to any class in the University of this State. The 
exercises of the Academy will be resumed on Monday the 29th inst. at 
$40 per session for board, and $10 per session for tuition. The sub- 
scriber is prepared to accommodate the boarders, as usual, in his own 
family. As at this place, there are no temptations to extravagance, 
the students have occasion for very little pocket money; too much of 
this, always leads to idleness and dissipation. 

June 12th, 1829. C. A. Hill, A. M. 

The Editors of the Raleigh Star, the Tarboro' Eree Press, and Hali- 
fax Minerva are requested to give the above three insertions and for- 
ward their accounts to the subscriber. 

— Raleigh Register, June 23, 1829. 

MIDWAY ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1830. 
MIDWAY ACADEMY, 

Franklin County, North Carolina. 

THE Examination of the Students of this Institution, will take 
place on Wednesday and Thursday, the 9th and 10th of June. On 
Thursday at 11 o'clock, A. M. Public Speaking by the Students. Par- 
ents, Guardians and the Public are respectfully invited to attend. 

The second Session will begin on the following Monday, at the usual 
terms, viz : 

Board per Session, $40 ) . 

_. . . _ . .. , l payable in advance. 

luition per Sesison, 10 ) 

The Students must furnish their own candles and bed clothes — or 
they will be furnished by the Principal — candles at twenty cents per 
lb. and $2.50 per Session for bed clothes. The above include all neces- 
sary expenses, except books and stationary. These, where required, can 
be supplied by C. A. Hill, A. M. 

May 18, 1830. Principal 

The Star, JNTewbern Spectator, Roanoke Advocate, and Warrenton 
Reporter, will please give the above three insertions, and forward their 
accounts to the subscriber. 

— Raleigh Register, May 2k, 1830. 



Franklin County Schools. 113 

MIDWAY ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1831. 

MIDWAY ACADEMY, 

Franklin County. 

THE EXAMINATION will take place on Tuesday and Wednesday, 
the 7th and 8th of June. On the latter day, about thirty of the Stu- 
dents will deliver select Speeches. The public are respectfully invited 
to attend. 

The second Session will commence on Monday the 20th of June and 
close on Friday the 11th of November. 

Having lately enlarged his accommodations, the Subscriber will be 
prepared to receive a few more pupils than hitherto. His price for 
Board is Forty Dollars and Tuition $10, per Session, payable in ad- 
vance, and where the Students do not furnish their own bed-clothes, 
there is an additional charge of $2.50 per Session. 

The Academy is under the full control of the Subscriber, who takes 
upon himself the duties of a parent as well as of teacher. 

May 15, 1831. C. A. Hill, M. A. 

The Raleigh Star, Roanoke Advocate, and Tarborough Free Press, 
will please insert the above three times, and forward their accounts 
to the Subscriber. C. A. Hill. 

— Raleigh Register, Thursday, May 26, 1831. 

DEATH OF C. A. HILL; NEW ADMINISTRATION. 

MIDWAY ACADEMY, 

Franklin County, N. C. 

The exercises of this institution, which have been suspended for 
some time in consequence of the death of the late Principal, Rev. C. A. 
Hill, will be resumed under the superintendence of the subscriber on 
the first Monday in January next. 

The course of studies will be preparatory to college. Instruction 
will also be given to such as desire it in the French, Spanish and 
Italian languages. Prices of board and tuition as heretofore, viz. 

Tuition $10 



, per session of 5 months. 
Board 40 \ 

Mrs. Hill, who resides at the place, will be prepared to accommodate 
any number of boarders that may apply. All who board with her, 
will be under the control of the teacher, as well out of, as in school. 
Should the number of pupils render it necessary, a competent assistant 
will be employed to take charge of the English department. 

In a retired and healthy neighborhood, remote from the haunts of 
dissipation, this establishment combines every advantage that can be 
desired by parents desirous of preserving the health and guarding the 
morals of their children, while engaged in the acquisition of useful 
knowledge. 



114 Franklin County Schools. 

Having devoted himself to the arduous task of training the rising 
generation in the paths of virtue and science, the undersigned hopes, 
by assiduity and attention, to obtain a share of that patronage which 
is ever extended by an enlightened public to exertions made to promote 
liberal education. John J. Wyche, A. M. 

November 22, 1831. 

— The Star, Raleigh, December 2, 1831. 

SPRING GROVE ACADEMY BEGINS, 1827. 

SPRING GROVE ACADEMY. 

THE undersigned has employed Mr. Guernsey, a Graduate of a 
Northern College, as a Teacher, to take charge of this Academy, for 
the ensuing year, and the School will commence on the first of Janu- 
ary. Mr. Guernsey comes well recommended as a gentleman qualified 
to take charge of an Academy, and will teach the Greek, Latin and 
French Languages, and all other branches necessary to qualify a stu- 
dent to enter the University. The price of Tuition for Reading, Writ- 
ing and Arithmetic will be $8, and for all other branches usually taught 
in Academies, $10 per session. And the undersigned will receive as 
Boarders, eight or ten scholars, at $40 the session. The residence of 
the undersigned is healthy, and is cut off from all temptations to dis- 
sipation, and where, from the assiduity and abilities of Mr. Guernsey, 
and the especial superintendence of the undersigned, such students as 
may attend the Academy, it is hoped and calculated, will make great 
progress in useful knowledge. John D. Hawkins. 

Franklin County, Dec. 12, 1827. 

- — Raleigh Register, December 28, 1827. 

SPRING GROVE EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1828. 
SPRING GROVE ACADEMY. 

THE Examination at this Academy will take place on Monday, the 
16th of June; and after a recess until that time, the business of the 
School will recommence on Monday, the 23d of the same month, under 
the government of Mr. Guernsey, whose past services entitle him to 
increased patronage. Board and Tuition as heretofore. The main 
object of this School is to prepare the Scholars for the University, and 
from the efforts made, its attainment is looked for under very flatter- 
ing prospects. John D. Hawkins. 

May 24. 

—Raleigh Register, May 30, 1828. 



Franklin County Schools. 115 

SPRING GROVE UNDER EDWARD G. BENNERS. 

SPRING GROVE ACADEMY. 

The Exercises in this Institution, under the superintendence of Mr. 
Edward G. Benners, will be resumed on Monday the 19th day of Janu- 
ary next. Students may here be prepared for College, or fitted for the 
ordinary business life. Divine service is regularly performed in the 
Academy building, which is situated in a healthy and pleasant section 
of country, remote from scenes of vice ; while the pupils, constantly 
under the supervision of their teacher, will have every inducement to 
observe a correct and moral deportment. The prices of tuition vary 
according to the studies pursued, viz : 

Eor the Classics, per Session $12 50 

For English, from $5 to 10 00 

Board, per month 6 00 

Composition, Declamation, and the use of the Globes, particularly 
attended to, John D. Hawkins. 

» December 19, 1834. 

The Oxford Examiner will give the above four insertions. 

— The Standard, Raleigh, N. C, January 2, 1835. 

MOUNT WELCOME ACADEMY, 1828. 

MOUNT WELCOME ACADEMY. 

The subscriber begs leave to inform his friends and the public, that 
he will open a school, on the second Monday of January next, about 
three miles from Louisburg, on the main stage road leading to Warren- 
ton. Tuition will be as follows : For spelling, reading, writing and 
arithmetic, six dollars per session ; English Grammar and Geography, 
seven dollars; Latin, Greek and the sciences, nine dollars — payable 
in advance. A session to consist of five months. Board may be had 
with Win. J. JSTewbern, who lives in about two hundred yards of the 
institution ; also with Mrs. Sarah Fenner, Peter Foster and Capt. John 
Perry, for thirty-six dollars per session. 

Taking into consideration the healthiness and pleasantness of the 
neighborhood, the low price of tuition and board, and the experience 
which I have had in the instruction of youth, I flatter myself that 
I shall receive a liberal share of public patronage. Particular atten- 
tion will be paid to the morals of those youths confided to my care. 

Dec. 26, 1827. Thos. G. Stone. 

— The Star, January S, 1828. 

MISS BOBBITT'S SCHOOL, 1830. 

The public are informed that the subscriber will recommence the 
duties of her school on Monday next, and will be prepared to accom- 
modate young ladies, as boarders, at the moderate price of fifty dollars 
per scholastic year of ten months. Tuition for advanced students will 



116 Franklin County Schools. 

be ten dollars per session; for those in the minor branches, seven dol- 
lars and fifty cents. The course of studies in this Academy will em- 
brace spelling, reading, writing, arithmetic, grammar, geography, 
rhetoric, moral philosophy, history and painting; also plain and orna- 
mental needle work. To the moral deportment of the pupils, as well 
as to their literary acquirements, particular attention will be paid. 
For further particulars, reference may be made to those who have 
attended the different examinations of the students of this institution. 
In conclusion the subscriber would add, that the academy is situated 
in a healthy and elevated section of country; nine miles from Louis- 
burg, Franklin county, on Sims' road. This, added to an experience 
of three years devoted to the instruction of youth in Virginia, will, it 
is hoped, secure a share of patronage. Eliza W. Bobbitt. 

January 1, 1830. 

— The Star, January llf, 1830. 

MISS BOBBITT'S ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1831. 
PRIVATE FEMALE SCHOOL. 

The Second Session of Miss Eliza W. Bobbitt's School will com- 
mence on the Fourth of July, at Yarboroughsville, in the county of 
Franklin, a very healthy and pleasant place, where Board can be had 
in the neighborhood on good terms. It is presumed that Miss Bobbitt's 
qualifications are too well known to need any recommendations, as she 
has been for several years engaged in teaching Females and has given 
entire satisfaction. 

Franklin county, June 27. 

— Raleigh Register, June 30, 1831. 

HEMDON ACADEMY, 1836. 

BOARDING SCHOOL. 

In Franklin County, five miles North-west of Louisburg, the under- 
signed will open a school on Monday, the 16th of January next. The 
undersigned designs pursuing a course with his pupils, preparatory to 
an entrance into our own University, or the practical parts of an Eng- 
lish Education, as may be preferred. 

He will be prepared to accommodate a few Boarders, at Seven dol- 
lars per month ; and the neighbors will accommodate as many as may 
apply. Few neighborhoods are better suited for such a School. It has 
all the advantages of health, and good water, and good Society. The 
people are industrious, moral and intelligent ; and the undersigned feels 
assured that nothing like dissipation or idleness would be encouraged. 
A strict discipline will be kept up ; and no young man need offer him- 
self who is not willing to submit implicitly to all the rules and requisi- 
tions of the School. 



Fkanklin County Schools. 117 

Tuition, for common English Scholars, $7.50; Mathematical Scholars, 
$10; Latin, or Greek Scholars, $12.50, per Session — payable in advance. 

The undersigned promises faithfully, on his part, to do everything 
in his power for the moral and intellectual improvement of all chil- 
dren that may be committed to his care. Any person wishing to board 
with the Subscriber will please make it known to him by letter, as soon 
as convenient. 

Dec. 8, 1836. John Y. Hicks. 

— Raleigh Register, December 13, 1836. 

HEMDON ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1837. 

HEMDON ACADEMY. 

This Institution was advertised at the beginning of the year under 
the head of 'Boarding School.' The first Session will close on Wed- 
nesday the 28th of June, and the second commence on the Monday 
following, 3d of July. The undersigned would be glad to accommodate 
a few more Boarders at his established prices, viz. $7 per month, 
everything furnished except lights. The established price for tuition, 
is, for Latin or Greek, $12.50; for Mathematics, $10, and for all others, 
$7.50 per Session. 

No neighborhood is more suitable for such an Institution, than that 
wherein Hemdon Academy is located. It is about five miles northwest 
of Louisburg, and is thought to be the most elevated spot in Franklin 
county. 'Tis a neighborhood of sober, industrious and temperate peo- 
ple ; and the Subscriber confidently assures the Public that nothing 
like vice or immorality would be countenanced. The Undersigned 
being sole proprietor and instructor of the institution, promises on his 
part, faithfully to do everything in his power for the intellectual and 
moral improvement of all that may be entrusted to his care. A strict 
discipline will be kept up among all classes, and no young man will 
be taken, unless he is willing to submit implicitly to the directions of 
the Subscriber. Any person wishing to send a scholar to the Subscriber, 
will please make it known to him by letter. John Y. Hicks. 

Hemdon Academy, June 1, 1837. 

— Raleigh Register, June 13, 1837. 

HEMDON ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1838. 
HEMDON ACADEMY. 

The Exercises of this Institution will close on Friday the 8th Decem- 
ber ensuing, with a public exhibition of the students, and will be re- 
sumed again on Monday the 15th January, 1838. The undersigned, 
being Proprietor and Principal Instructor in the Institution, would 
be glad to accommodate eight or ten boarders at seven dollars a month. 



118 Franklin County Schools. 



TUITION. 



For common English, (per session,) $7 00 

For Mathematics, do 10 00 

For Latin or Greek, do 12 00 

No student will be taken for less than a session. 

The institution, though not incorporated, will hereafter be managed 
as such, a number of gentlemen having consented to act as Trustees. 
A strict and rigid discipline will be kept up. No large student will be 
received who is unwilling to submit to all the rules and requisitions 
of the school. Students boarding with the subscriber in particular will 
be required to be very orderly in their conduct. They will not be 
allowed to make a noise about the house, be out of nights or run about 
on the Sabbath. They will generally be kept at school a part of the 
day on Saturday, and on Sunday will be required to recite on Bible 
questions at the Academy. The subscriber would remark, however, 
that in answering Bible questions, everything bigotted or sectarian will 
be carefully avoided. There will be a female assistant. Little girls 
under 14 years of age will therefore be gladly received. Should any 
be entrusted to the care of the subscriber, every attention will be given 
to their morals as well as education. Adams' Latin and Valpey's Greek 
Grammar; Worcester's Geography; Emerson's Arithmetic; Murray's 
Sequal Reader and Introduction, will be used exclusively. 

All persons wishing to board with the Subscriber, will please inform 
him by letter, directed to Louisburg, 1ST. C. John Y. Hicks. 

Hemdon Academy, near Louisburg, Nov. 25, 1837. 

— Raleigh Register, December If, 1837. 

HEMDON EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1838. 

HEMDON ACADEMY. 

The Exercises of this Institution will close for the first Session by 
a Public Examination, to be held on Thursday and Friday, the 14th 
and 15th of June. Parents and friends are invited to attend. The 
second Session will commence on Monday, the 25th of June. The 
Subscriber's house will still be open for Boarders and Students, at the 
usual price of $7 a month for Board, (Students furnishing their own 
lights,). . . , Tuition $7.50, $10 and $12 the Session, according to 
the studies pursued. HEMDON is situated six miles North-West of 
Louisburg, one mile from the Stage Road. The Subscriber would pre- 
sent the following advantages of the Institution, to-wit : its healthy and 
retired situation, a neighborhood of moral and industrious people, and 
good water. John Y. Hicks. 

Hemdon, Franklin Co. May 21. 

Star and Standard, 3 times, e o w. J. Y. H. 

—Raleigh Register, May 21, 1838. 



Franklin County Schools. 119 

HEMDON ANNOUNCEMENTS FOE 1839. 
HEMDON ACADEMY. 

The second Session of this Seminary for the present year, will close 
on Friday, the 23d inst. The first Session of 1839 will commence on 
the 14th of January. The Proprietor is prepared to board eight Stu- 
dents, two occupying one room, fire-place and bed. Everything will 
be furnished except lights. The charge, including Tuition, will vary 
from $105 to $115, the scholastic year of ten months. The different 
branches of an English Education, with the Latin and Greek Languages, 
will be taught. He has a pair of Globes for the use of Students in 
Geography, and apparatus to teach surveying practically. Persons 
wishing to board with the Proprietor, will do well to make it known 
very soon. Board can be had in respectable houses in the vicinity. 

John Y. Hicks. 

Hemdom Academy, near Louisburg, November 16, 1838. 

Star and Standard 4 times, every other week. 

— Raleigh Register, November 19, 1838. 

HEMDON'S BUILDINGS AND TERMS. 

HEMDON ACADEMY. 

The first session of this Seminary will close on Friday, the 14th 
of June, by a Public Examination of the Students. Parents are in- 
vited to attend. They will be resumed again on Monday, the 1st of 
July. Encouraged by the support that he has heretofore received, the 
undersigned has built a large and convenient Academy, near his own 
Dwelling. His house will again be open for Boarders. Wishing to 
carry on a Boarding School, to be profitable to himself and beneficial 
to his Boarders, he will furnish a room, bed, and fire, to every two, 
furnishing everything except lights. The charge will vary from $47 1 /2 
to $52 % the session of five months. Young men wishing a room and 
bed to themselves can have it, by paying five dollars more. None will 
be received who are not willing to submit to all the rules and requisi- 
tions of the school. The subscriber has Globes for the use of Students 
in Geography, and apparatus to teach Surveying practically. Parker's 
Exercises in English Composition, also the delivery of Select Speeches 
kept up during the session. John Y. Hicks, 

Principal. 

Hemdon, near Louisburg, Franklin Co. May 25, 1839. 

— Raleigh Register, June 1, 1839. 



120 Fkanklin County Schools. 

HEMDON ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1840. 
HEMDON ACADEMY. 

The Exercises of this Institution will end on Friday, the 28th inst. 
and will be resumed again on Monday the 6th January, 1840. 

Tuition $7.50, $10 and $12.50 per Session, according to studies pur- 
sued. Board, with the Subscriber, $40 per session. Tuition and one- 
fourth of the board in advance. Board can be obtained also in re- 
spectable houses in the neighborhood. John Y. Hicks. 

Franklin County, K C, 'Nov. 20, 1839. 

— Raleigh Register, November 30, 1839. 



GRANVILLE COUNTY SCHOOLS 

TVILLIAMSBOROUGH ACADEMY, 1805. 
EDUCATION. 

On the 5th day of June, an Academy in Williamsborough, Granville 
county, will commence its exercises under the direction of Mr. John 
Hicks, a gentleman of approved scholarship and morals. All the 
branches of academical education will be taught on the usual terms, 
board may be obtained in several respectable families on low terms. 
From the healthiness of the place, and reputation of the teacher, the 
trustees flatter themselves with a respectable school. 

April 8th, 1805. Stephen Sneed, Seer. 

— The Halifax, N. C, Journal, April 8, 1805. 

TYILLIAMSBOROCGH ACADEMY ODER BIRCH AM) RICE. 

EDUCATION. 

On Monday the 16th of October next, I shall open a School at my 
place near William sborough, Granville county, in which will be taught 
the English, Latin and Greek Languages, together with such of the 
Sciences as are commonly studied in American Schools. 

I have engaged as an Assistant Teacher Mr. Benjamin Rice, of Vir- 
ginia, a young gentleman of unquestionable morality and of liberal 
education. 

Those who may send their children or wards to this School may 
rely on the greatest exertion of the Teachers to amend the heart as well 
as enlighten the understanding. James K. Burch. 

August 28, 1809. 

— Raleigh Star, August 31, 1809. 

WILLIAMSBOROCGH FEMALE ACADEMY, 1811. 

NOTICE. 

I wish to inform the public, that I have lately purchased the place 
where I now live, in Williamsborough, of the Rev. James K. Burch, 
which is a very healthy and private situation. I intend taking ten or 
twelve young ladies to board with me : more young ladies may be 
boarded in decent families — my price is seventy dollars for board and 
tuition. Those who may interest and encourage me in this under- 
taking, may rest assured of every attention being paid not only to the 
education, but to the morals and manners of the students — school will 
commence again on the 1st day of January. 

Dec. 3, 1810. Charlotte B. Brodie. 

— The Star, January 31, 1811. 

(121) 



122 Granville County Schools. 

WILLIAMSBOROUGH FEMALE ACADEMY FOR 1812. 

WILLIAMSBOROUGH 

Female Academy & Boarding School, will be continued the ensuing 
year under the superintendence of Mr. and Mrs. Burton, where Spelling, 
Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, English Grammar, Geography and 
Needle work will be taught. 

For board and tuition (each finding a pair of sheets, Blankets and 
Counterpanes) seventy dollars per annum, paid quarterly and in 
advance. 

The exercises of the School will commence the 1st of January, and 
end the 15th of December. The summer vacation from the 22nd of 
June to the first Monday in July. 

The pleasant and healthy situation of the place, and the proper dis- 
tance it is from the most public part of Williamsborough, being nearly 
half a mile, renders it desirable for the residence of young Ladies who 
wish to enjoy their health, and sufficient retirement for the prosecution 
of their studies. 

The greatest attention will be paid by Mrs. Burton to the young 
Ladies placed under her care. 

November 14, 1811. 

— The Star, November 22, 1811. 

WILLIAMSBOROUGH ACADEMY FOR 1812. 

The undersigned Trustees of the Williamsborough Academy inform 
the public that they have engaged Mr. Joel Strong to take charge of 
the institution for the ensuing year. They entertain a confident belief 
that the duties of a Teacher will be satisfactorily performed, and they 
pledge themselves that the utmost care and attention shall be paid by 
them to the progress and morals of the students. 

The school will commence on the first day of January and continue 
(with the usual vacations) until about the 20th of December. 

Price of Tuition: Latin and Greek Languages, Geography, English 

Grammar, Mathematics, &c. sixteen dollars. Reading, Writing, and 

Arithmetic, twelve dollars. „ 

Stephen Sneed, 

James Hamilton, 

William Robards, 

John Hake, 

Frank 1ST. W. Burton, 

Henry Lyne, 

L. Henderson. 

Williamsborough, December 17, 1811. 

— The Star, December 27, 1811. 



Granville County Schools. 123 

WILLIAMSROROUGH ACADEMY EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1812. 

WILLIAMSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The Students of this Institution were this day examined on their dif- 
ferent studies before the Trustees of the School, the Parents of the Stu- 
dents and the citizens of the place and its vicinity. 

It is with pleasure that the Trustees declare, that the great progress 
made by the students in their different studies, (to wit:) Spelling, 
Reading, Writing, English Grammar, Latin, Greek, & Mathematics, 
evinces their great assiduity, & the high qualifications of their teacher, 
Mr. L. Holbrooks. They think that they may with truth declare that 
the School has been ably conducted, the greatest care and attention paid 
to the studies and morals of the Students and that this infant institu- 
tion, although it may be equalled by many, is surpassed by none in the 
State. 

The exercises of the second Session will commence on the 16th in- 
stant. Trustees : Robert Burton, 

Leo. Henderson, 
Stephen Sneed, 
William Robards, 
John Hare, 

Williamsborough, July 1, 1812. James Hamilton. 

— The Star, July 11, ^18 12. 

WILLIAMSBOROUGH ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1813. 

WILLIAMSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The Trustees have engaged Mr. Wm. Hillman, formerly of Franklin 
Academy, for the ensuing year. The school will be opened under his 
superintendance on the first Monday of January next, where the English, 
Latin and Greek Languages, Writing and Arithmetic, will be taught. 

The moral character and qualifications of Mr. Hillman, are such as 
to give every reason to believe that the duties of his station will be faith- 
fully discharged. 

The low price of Board and Tuition ; the very healthy and pleasant 
situation of the place are further inducements to those who wish to 
place their children in a seminary of this kind. 

Board may be had for a few students in private houses in Williams- 
borough. 

— The Star, December 4, 1812. 

PROF. ANDREW RHEA IN CHARGE OF ACADEMY. 

Williamsboro' Academy — The exercises of this Institution will com- 
mence on the first day of January next, under the superintendance of 
Andrew Rhea, M.A. the present professor of languages in the University 
of North Carolina, as principal. There will be taught at this Academy, 
the Latin and Greek languages, Mathematics, the Elements of Euclid, 



124 Granville County Schools. 

Practical Geometry, Trigonometry, Surveying, Navigation, Mensura- 
tion of Heights and Distances, Superficies and Solids, Geography, Alge- 
bra, Natural and Moral Philosophy, English Grammar, Reading, Writ- 
ing and Arithmetic. — Particular attention will be paid to Composition, 
Reading and Elocution. The price of tuition, $20, payable half yearly 
in advance. Extra charges for firewood, attendants and the use of a 
Library, will be moderate and regulated by the Trustees. Board may 
be had in the private families of Stephen Sneed, Judge Henderson and 
William Robards in town, and Dr. Hare and others in the neighbor- 
hood at $60, payable half yearly in advance. * * * 

A Eemale teacher wanted. A Lady qualified to take charge of young 
females, and capable of teaching Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, English 
Grammar, Parsing and Needle Work, may be placed in a comfortable 
and permanent situation, on making immediate application to Judge 
Henderson, president of the board of trustees. 

Williamsborough, Nov. 10, 1814. Sam. Hillman, Secry. 

— Raleigh Star, January 6, 1815. 

WILLIAMSBOROUGH UNDER MR. RHEA AND MRS. STITH. 

WILLIAMSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

* * * The trustees have contracted with Mr. Rhea as principal, 
to superintend and manage the institution for a number of years. 
* * * The trustees have engaged Mrs. Stith to take charge of the 
Eemale Department. * * * Mrs. Stith was educated at Salem, a 
native of North Carolina, of engaging manners, and a mild, placid dis- 
position. * * * Wm. Robards, 

Williamsborough, Nov. 20, 1815. Secretary. 

— Raleigh Star, November 21/., 1815. 

WILLIAMSBOROUGH ACADEMY EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1815. 

The Examination of the Students of the Williamsborough Academy, 
under the management of Andrew Rhea Principal, and John W. Bur- 
ton Assistant Teacher, commenced on Monday the 5th of June, and con- 
tinued until Eriday. * * * 

Wm. Robards, Sec. L. Henderson, President. 

June 9, 1815. 

— Raleigh Star, June 23, 1815. 

ANDREW WILSON PRINCIPAL OF WILLIAMSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

WILLIAMSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The Trustees of this Institution take pleasure in announcing to the 
Public, that they have engaged Mr. Alexander Wilson, late of the 
Raleigh Academy, as Principal; a gentleman whose qualifications have 
been tested by a very successful course of teaching in that Institution 
for the two last years. 



Granville County Schools. 125 

The different branches of Education as established by the Faculty 
at the University of this State will be adopted in this Institution. 

The price of Tuition for the Languages and Sciences is $12.50 — 
Beading, Writing and Arithmetic $8 a Session. 

Board can be had in the most respectable families at $35 per Session. 
The Exercises to commence on the 2d Monday of January. 
The Trustees refer to the annexed Certificate as the best recommen- 
dation of this Institution to the public patronage. 

Leonard Henderson, 
Joseph H. Bryan, 
William Bobards, 
Thomas Turner, 
Bichard Sneed, 
January 1, 1821. Trustees. 

Mr. ALEXANDEB WILSON, late of Belfast, Ireland, has been a 
resident of this city for several years, and during the term of five Ses- 
sions has acted as first Assistant in the Male Department of the Baleigh 
Academy. 

The undersigned, regarding Mr. Wilson as a Scholar and a Gentle- 
man, do cheerfully certify, that his correct moral deportment — his tal- 
ent for school discipline & government — his literary attainments, & par- 
ticular taste for the Latin and Greek Classics, entitles him, in their 
opinion, to rank among the first Academic instructors of the State. 

W. M'Fheeters, 
Princl of R. Academy, 
J. Gales, 
Pres't Board of Trustees, 
Jas. M. Henderson, 
John Louis Taylor, 
James F. Taylor, 
Baleigh, Jan. 1, 1822. A. S. H. Burges. 

— Raleigh Register, January 11, 1822. 

TVILLIAMSBOEOLGH PEEPAEES FOE UMVEESITT. 

WILLIAMSBOBOUGH ACADEMY. 

The subscriber continues to have charge of this Institution. He 
pledges himself to make every exertion in his power for the advance- 
ment of the Young gentlemen intrusted to his care, both in morals and 
literature. * * * Students may here be prepared for the Freshman 
or Sophomore Class in the University. * * * 

Williamsboro, June 7. Alex'r Wilson. 

— Raleigh Register, June 11, 1821+. 



126 Granville County Schools. 

WILLIAMSBOROUGH ANNOUNCEMENTS FOE 1824. 
WILLIAMSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

THE Exercises of the Institution will be resumed on Monday the 
20th inst. 

The situation is well known as being as healthful as any in the State, 
and the price of board and tuition are remarkably low. 

Every attention is paid to the moral and literary improvement of the 
students. Alex. Wilson, 

June 6. Principal. 

— Raleigh Register, June 10, 1825. 

PLAN OF STUDIES IN WILLIAMSBOROUGH ACADEMY, 1825. 

WILLIAMSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

THE Examination of the Students at this Institution will commence 
on Thursday, 17th November, and close on the following Saturday. 
Parents and Guardians are requested to attend. A. Wilson. 

The department immediately under my own care, will henceforth 
be divided into four classes, preparatory to the University: 

First Class. 
Latin Grammar Historia Sacra 

Viri Romae Mair's Introduction. 

Second Class. 

Caesar's Commentaries Ovid Ed. Expurg. 

Valpy's G'k. Grammar Latin Prosody. 

Third Class. 

Virgil Greek Testament 

Graeca Minora Roman Antiquities 

Modern Geography English Grammar. 

Fourth Class. 

Sallust Cicero, 7 Orations 

Graeca Majora Algebra 

Adams' Ancient Geography & English Grammar. 
Mythology 

The time of attendance at the Academy, will be from 9 o'clock until 
three each day; so that one and a half hours will be occupied in the 
instruction of each class. 

Algebra, Arithmetic, English Grammar, and Reading, will be at- 
tended to on Fridays. 

I will always have an assistant, well qualified to attend to the Eng- 
lish Department. 



Granville County Schools. 127 

The price of Tuition will be $15 per session in the Classical Depart- 
ment, in the English, $8 and $12 1-2 

The exercises will be resumed on the first Monday of January, 1826. 
November 1. Alexander Wilson. 

— Raleigh Register, November k, 1825. 

WILLIAMSBOROUGH EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1826. 

WILLIAMSBOEOUGH ACADEMY. 

THE Semi-Annual Examination of the Students connected with this 
Institution, will commence on Monday, 5th of June, and close the even- 
ing of the following day. — Parents and Guardians are requested to 
attend. 

The Exercises will be resumed on Monday, the 26th of June. 

Granville County, May 21st, 1826. Alexander Wilson. 

— Raleigh Register, May 26, 1826. 

MRS. O'BRIEN TAKES CHARGE OF FEMALE ACADEMY, 1826. 

WILLIAMSBOEOUGH EEMALE ACADEMY. 

HAYING taken possession of the house recently occupied by Col. 
Wm. Eobards, it is proposed to open, in this place, a Seminary for the 
instruction of young ladies, which will be principally under the direc- 
tion of Mrs. Ann O'Brien. In order to require the patronage that is 
offered the school as well as from choice, I shall feel it incumbent on 
me to devote such time as I am not actually engaged in my professional 
pursuits, to the advancement of the best interests of the institution. 
Independently of this, competent additional assistance will be procured 
so soon as it shall be discovered that the number of pupils may require 
it. 

The usual branches of female education, useful and ornamental, will 
be taught. 

As it is believed, that the most that can be expected by teachers, in 
the limited time spent by children at school, is to lay the foundation for 
future attainments, our efforts will be mainly directed that way. Such 
studies, therefore, as either the present condition of society does not re- 
quire, or the successful acquisition of which may be rendered imprac- 
ticable from circumstances, will not be attempted. 

As a rapid progress of the pupils, in the number and quantity of stud- 
ies is what we design to avoid, no young lady will be advanced to a 
class, to which proficiency in her previous classes will not entitle her. 

Occasional exercises, in the intervals of study, in composition, in 
reading and commenting on the English Classics, will be resorted to, 
calculated to inspire a taste for polite Literature. 

The prices of board and tuition, including spelling, reading, writing, 
needle-work, grammar, arithmetic, geography, astronomy, mythology, 



128 Granville County Schools. 

chronology, belle-lettres, logic, and moral philosophy, will be $60 per 
session; music $25; painting and drawing $20. 

Each young lady will provide herself with a blanket, pair of sheets, 
counterpane and two towels. 

The first session will commence the 12th of June. 

Williamsboro', 1ST. C, May 25, 1826. Spencer O'Brien. 

—Raleigh Register, May 26, 1826. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS OF MRS. O'BRIEN, 1827. 
WILLIAMSBORO' FEMALE ACADEMY. 

UNDER STANDING from recent applications from a distance, that 
it is not generaly known that Mrs. O'Brien's School is in operation, we 
take this method of giving it further publicity. 

The present Session commenced the 2d Monday of the present month, 
and will close sometime in June, of which timely notice will be given. 

Parents and Guardians are apprized, that they will have to pay from 
the time of entrance only, though it is desirable for many reasons, that 
they should come in as early as possible. 

Terms. For Board and Tuition, including every branch, together 
with the Scientific studies, except Music, Painting and Drawing, $60 
per session. Music $25. Painting and Drawing $15. 

The pupils will be required to board in our family, as much useful 
information may be imparted in the intervals of study, independently 
of the care and attention due to their conversation, manners and morals, 
which are mostly attended to during those hours. 

Each young lady must be provided with a coverlet, blanket, pair of 
sheets and two towels. Spencer O'Brien. 

Williamsboro', Granville co. Jan. 22, 1827. 

The Edenton Gazette and Richmond Equirer will insert the above 3 
times weekly and forward their accounts for payment. 

— Raleigh Register, February 2, 1827. 

WILLIAMSBOROUGH EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1828. 
WILLIAMSBORO' ACADEMY. 

THE semi-annual Examination of the Students connected with this 
Institution, will commence on Wednesday the 4th June. Parents and 
Guardians are requested to attend. 

The Subscriber has had charge of the Williamsboro' Academy for 
upwards of six years, during which time, he believes entire satisfaction 
has been given to all interested. The government of this school is 
strict, but parental. Constant attention is paid, not only to the general 
improvement of the Students in useful learning, but also to the forma- 
tion of correct morals. The Exercises will be resumed on Monday, 23d 
of June. Two or three additional Students can be accommodated with 



Granville County Schools. 129 

board in the family. — Board can also be obtained in the most respect- 
able families of the village and neighborhood, on moderate terms. 

Willianisboro' has always been famed for its healthful situation, and 
its excellent water. No student has been absent from school more than 
one day ,on account of sickness for several years. References — Judge 
Henderson, of the Supreme Court ; Win. Robards, Esq. State Treas- 
urer; Rev. Dr. McPheeters, Raleigh; Mr. Theo Parker and Mr. S. D. 
Cotton, Tarboro'. Alexander Wilson. 

23d May, 1828. 

The Tarboro' Free Press and Edenton Gazette will insert the above 
three times and forward their accounts to the Seminary. 

—Raleigh Register, May 21, 1828. 

ITCLLLUISBOROUGH FEMALE ACADEMY FOR 1828. 

MRS. O'BRIEN'S SCHOOL. 

THE present Session of this Institution terminates on Friday the 
18th June. — The next wull commence on Monday week following. 
Williamsboro' May 29, 1828. 
—Raleigh Register, May 30, 1828. 

WILLIAMSBORO ACADEMY EXAMINATIONS, 1S29. 

WILLIAMSBORO' ACADEMY. 

THE semi-annual Examination of the Students connected with this 
Institution will be held on Wednesday, 3d June. Parents and Guar- 
dians are requested to attend. 

The exercises of the School will be resumed on Monday, 22d June. 

Williamsboro', May 19. A. Wilson, Principal. 

— Raleigh Register, May 22, 1829. 

WILLIAMSBORO' ACADEMY. 

THE Examination of the Students connected with this Institution 
will be held on Wednesday the 18th of November. Parents and Guar- 
dians are requested to attend. 

The Exercises of the Academy will be resumed on the 2d Monday 
of January, 1830. Alex. Wilson, Principal. 

Williamsboro' Oct. 29, 1829. 

— Raleigh Register, November 5, 1829. 

WILLIAMSBOROUGH FEMALE ACADEMY, 1831. 

WILLIAMSBORO' FEMALE ACADEMY. 

Mrs. O'Brien proposes to resume her school at this place on the 
4th Monday of the present month. The aid which she will have will 
be adequate to the calls of the seminary. The subscriber, when not on 
9 



130 Granville County Schools. 

his circuit, will feel it his duty, as it shall be his pleasure, to devote 
his leisure hours to the promotion of the best interests of the pupils, 
entrusted to our care and protection. 

Terms — For Board and tuition in the higher branches of polite 
literature and science, $60 per session of five months. 

Do. do. for the elementary branches or first rudiments, $50. Music, 
per session, $25. Spencek O'Brien. 

Williamsboro, Granville County, January 8, 1831. 

The Edenton Gazette, Tarboro' Free Press, Roanoke Advocate and 
Warrenton Reporter, will give the above three insertions in their re- 
spective papers, and forward their accounts to the above address for 
payment. 

— The Star, January 13, 1831. 

MRS. SMITH EN CHARGE OF WILLIAMSBOROUGH FEMALE ACADEMY. 

WILLIAMSBOROUGH FEMALE ACADEMY. 

This Institution will be re-opened for the reception of Boarders and 
Pupils, on Monday the 12th of January next. 

The course of Instruction will embrace Orthography, Reading, 
Arithmetic, Writing, English Grammar, Geography with the use of 
the Globes, Needle Work, Embroidery, Painting, The Elements of 
Natural Philosophy & Chemistry, Moral Philosophy, History and the 
Evidences of the Christian Religion. Mrs. Smith returns her thanks 
to a heretofore generous public, and hopes from her long experience 
in the government and instruction of Young Ladies, to merit a con- 
tinuance of their liberal patronage. Mrs. Mary Smith. 

Williamsboro', Nov. 27. 



We attended the Examination of the Young Ladies belonging to the 
Williamsborough Female Seminary, which took place on the 20th 
ultimo, according to notice — and with pleasure and gratification wit- 
nessed the successful mode of training the youthful mind in this Insti- 
tution. The different classes were rigidly examined, in the presence 
of a large collection of ladies and gentlemen. They were prompt and 
explicit in their answers, and evinced a thorough knowledge of their 
studies. The discipline enforced by Mrs. Smith is strict, but at the 
same time of the most maternal character, and we can truly say that 
she has spared neither pains nor expense to secure for her pupils every 
advantage "likely to facilitate the acquirement of a solid, useful and 



Granville County Schools. 131 

liberal Education. Regarding the locality of this Institution, it is sur- 
passed by none, and equalled by few, in point of health and good 
society. Wm. Robards, 

Rich'd Sneed, 
Wesley Young, 
John Bullock, 
A. A. Burton, 
A. Sneed, 
A. E. Henderson, 
S. E. Sneed, 
W. F. Henderson, 
Robt. Henderson, 
J. L. Henderson, 



A. H. Christian. 



— Raleigh Register, December 9, 183J+. 



WILLIAMSBOROUGH FEMALE ACADEMY, 1838. 

FEMALE SCHOOL, 

Granville county. 

The above Institution will be open for the reception of Pupils, the 
second Monday in January, under the superintendence of the same 
Teacher who has taught in my family for eighteen months, and has 
given entire satisfaction to the Parents and Guardians who have en- 
trusted their daughters to our care. I feel confident, from the prog- 
ress of the Pupils in their various studies, that she well deserves the 
high recommendation given her by Mrs. WILLARD, as being a thor- 
ough English Scholar, and well qualified to teach Music, French, &c. 
&c. The situation is in a high and healthy section of the country, 
being four miles west from Henderson Depot, and ten East from 
Oxford. 
Terms, per session (of five months,) for Board, including 

bedding, washing, candles, &c $45 00 

Tuition in the various branches, including Spelling, Reading, 
Writing, English Grammar, x\rithmetic, Geography, with 
the use of Globes, Philosophy, Chemistry, Geometry, &c. . . . 10 00 

Music, with the use of the Piano 15 00 

French 5 00 

Parents and Guardians wishing to send their daughters or wards, 
would do well to make early application. A line addressed to the sub- 
scriber (Williamsboro) will receive prompt attention. 

December 13, 1838. Wesley W. Young. 

— Raleigh Register, December 24, 1838. 



132 Granville County Schools. 

PLEASANT GROVE ACADEMY, 1812. 
EDUCATION. 

The subscriber respectfully informs the public that he intends open- 
ing a SCHOOL at Pleasant Grove, near Bullock's Store; in which will 
be taught the Latin and Greek Languages, Rhetoric, Moral Philosophy, 
Geography, English Grammar, Arithmetic, Reading, Writing, &c. 
Tuition will be Sixteen Dollars annually to be paid quarterly in ad- 
vance. Boarding may be had at respectable houses for Fifty Dollars. 

Granville, 4th Dec. 1812. Elijah Graves. 

— The Star, December 11, 1812. 

OXFORD ACADEMY, 1813. 

By Authority of the State of North Carolina. 
Scheme of the Oxford Academy Lottery. 



The drawing will commence on the first day of October next, and 
be finished without delay. Th. B. Littlejohn, 

William Robards, 
Willis Lewis, 
Thomas Hunt, 
Wm. M. Sneed. 

Managers. 

Tickets, at 5 dollars each, for sale at the Minerva Office, Raleigh. 

March 25. 

— Raleigh Register, April 2, 1813. 

OXFORD ACADEMY UNDER THOMAS H. WILIE. 

The Trustees of Oxford Academy congratulate the citizens of Gran- 
ville and the public in general, that their exertions to rear and estab- 
lish a Seminary of Learning have been crowned with success. An 
elegant two story Building, 50 feet long and 32 wide, is nearly com- 
plete, and will be ready by the second Monday of January next, at 
which time the Exercises of this Institution will commence. They have 
employed as Principal Mr. Thomas H. Wilie, a Gentleman who, by 
his sobriety, assiduity and long acquaintance with the duties of his 
profession, has acquired a character equalled by few, and surpassed 
by no person in this part of the country. This Gentleman has for 
two years last past superintended the Nutbush Mineral Springs 
Academy ; he has taught in several other parts of the State. * * * 

December 1. Wm. M. Sneed, Sec. 

— Raleigh Register, December 17, 1813. 



Granville County Schools. 133 

OXFORD ACADEMY UNDER WILLIE AND MISS McINTIRE. 

The exercises of the next Session of the Oxford Academy will com- 
mence on the 1st Monday of July next. The Male Department of 
this Institution will continue as heretofore, under the care of Mr. Thos. 
H. Willie and Mr. J. Smith. The Female Department will be opened 
under the superintendence of Miss Jane Mclntire, late of the Raleigh 
Academy. Wm. M. Sneed, Sec. 

Oxford, June 17, 1814. 

— Raleigh Register, June 2J/., 181k- 

OXFORD ACADEMY ODER THOMPSON AND WILLIE. 



It is with pleasure announced, that the Rev. James W. Thompson 
is engaged for the ensuing year as Principal. Mr. Thomas H. Willie 
will continue to have the principal share in the tuition of the Classical 
Students. If it be necessary, an Assistant will be employed. 

The Female Department is still confided to Miss Ann C. Mclntyre. 

Nov. 4th, 1815. William M. Sneed, Secy. 

— Raleigh Register, November 17, 1815. 

OXFORD ACADEMY UNDER WILLIE AND SMITH. 



The exercises of the Institution will commence on the 6th of Janu- 
ary next, as heretofore. The female department under the care of 
Miss Annie C. Mclntyre, and the male under that of Mr. Thomas H. 
Willie as Principal and Mr. John C. Smith, Assistant. 

Joseph B. Littlejohn, 
William M. Sneed, 
Thomas B. Littlejohn, 
December 3, 1814. William V. Taylor. 

— Raleigh Register, January 6, 1815. 

OXFORD ACADEMY TEACHERS IN 1818. 



The Exercises of the next Session will commence on the third Mon- 
day of June, under the direction of the present teachers, to wit, Mr. 
George W. Freeman, Principal, assisted by Mr. Levi McLane, in the 
Male Department; and Miss Arabella M. Bosworth, assisted by Mr. 
Lotan G. Watson, in the Female Department. Arrangements are 
making for the employment of a Teacher of music. * * * 

April 9. 1ST. M. Taylor, Secy. 

— Raleigh Register, May 15, 1818. 



134 Granville County Schools. 

OXFORD ACADEMY MUSIC DEPARTMENT, 1819. 

The Trustees have engaged Mr. J. D. Phmkitt to superintend the 
Musical Department of this Institution. He will also teach 10 or 12 
Students the French Language. * * * 

June 26. 

— Raleigh Register, July 2, 1819. 

OXFORD ACADEMY TEACHERS IN 1819. 



The next Session will commence on Monday the 22d of June. Miss 
Griswold will continue to superintend the Female Department, and will 
he aided by Miss Halcomb, from the Northward, who has taught in our 
Seminary a small part of the present session, and is well qualified to 
discharge the duties confided to her. 

Mr. Bugbee will continue to preside in our Academy, and will be 
assisted as heretofore by Mr. Paschal in the Male Department. 

May 10, 1819. 

—Raleigh Register, May llf., 1819. 

OXFORD ACADEMY EXAMINATIONS, 1820. 

THE semi-annual examination of the students of Oxford Academy 
will commence on Monday the 9th instant, and terminate the Saturday 
following. All patrons of this institution are respectfully invited to 
attend. Nathl. M. Taylor, Secy. 

May 4, 1820. 

— The Star, May 12, 1820. 

THE semi-annual examination of the Students of this Academy will 
commence on Monday the 13th day of November next, and end on 
the Saturday following. Parents and Guardians are respectfully in- 
vited to attend. 1ST. M. Taylor, Sec'y. 

Oxford, October 19, 1820. 

—The Star, October 21, 1820. 

OXFORD ACADEMY TEACHERS, 1821. 



Mr. Ransom Hubbill continues to preside over the Seminary — Miss 
Griswold superintends the Female Department, and Miss Mitchell has 
charge of the Department of Music. * * * 

May 10, 1821. ¥m. M. Sneed, Sec'y. 

— Raleigh Register, May 18, 1821. 



Geanville County Schools. 135 

OXFORD ACADEMY TEACHERS, 1822. 

OXFORD ACADEMY. 

The Exercises of this Institution will re-commence on the 6th day 
of January next. 

The Trustees have much pleasure in announcing the employment of 
Teachers, of the first character and talents. They have at great ex- 
pense and pains procured Mr. James D. Johnson, of Morristown, New 
Jersey, as Principal of the Male Department. 

The Female Department will be under the immediate care of Miss 
Susan Mitchell, who will be aided by the Rev. Samuel L. Graham. 

Mr. Johnson has been constantly employed in teaching for the last 
ten or twelve years, and the Trustees believe there is no man whose 
natural disposition, education, and experience, more eminently qualify 
him for that station. The following extract of a letter we trust will 
be sufficient evidence of the truth of our remarks. 

"We, the subscribers, composing the Board of Directors of the Morris 
Academy, in Morristown, New-Jersey, cheerfully give our united testi- 
mony to the excellency of Mr. James D. Johnson as a Teacher of 
Youth. Mr. Johnson is a graduate of Yale College, a man of good 
morals, and a professor of Religion. He is a native of this town, and 
well known by its inhabitants. For several years he has superintended 
the Academy in this place, and has proved himself well qualified to 
manage a Seminary, and to instruct in any department in science. 
His plan of discipline we consider excellent, and his qualifications to 
instruct not exceeded by any man of our acquaintance. We do there- 
fore most cheerfully recommend him as in all respects an excellent 
Teacher." Wm. A. McDowel, Pres't, 

Sylvester D. Russell, 
Lewis Condit, 
Stevens J. Lewis, 

Morristown, November 14, 1821. Directors. 

Mr. Johnson intends settling himself permanently with us as a 
Teacher. Miss Mitchell is a Lady who has been connected with the 
Institution for the last two years, and is well qualified to teach the 
ornamental and other branches which will come under her more imme- 
diate care. Mr. Graham is a graduate of Washington College, Vir- 
ginia, and by education, habit and disposition, is every way qualified 
for an Instructor. 

Board can be had in almost all of the respectable families in the 
place, at $35 per session. 

If talents and experience in the Teachers, a high and healthy situa- 
tion in a pleasant village, cheapness of Board and Tuition, form any 



136 Gkanville County Schools. 

inducements, and have any claim upon the public, the Trustees natter 
themselves that this Institution will receive a liberal share of its 
generous patronage. 

By order of the Board, Wm. M. Sneed, Secy. 

Oxford, Nov. 24, 1821. 

— Raleigh Register, January 11, 1822. 

OXFORD ACADEMY TEACHERS, 1823. 

The exercises of this seminary have commenced, the male department 
under the special charge of Mr. James D. Johnson, principal the last 
year; the female under the care of Miss Emma Stansbury, daughter 
of the Rev. A. Stansbury, late of Albany. 

Jan. 23. Wm. M. Sneed, Secy. 

—Raleigh Star, January 31, 1823. 

OXFORD MALE ACADEMY FOR 1824. 

The Exercises in this Institution will be resumed on the first Mon- 
day of January next, under the superintendance of Mr. Jas. D. 
Johnson. * * * 

Dec. 19. Wm. M. Sneed. 

— Raleigh Register, December 23, 1823. 

OXFORD ACADEMY EXAMINATION, 1824. 

THE Examination of the Students in the Oxford Male Academy, 
will take place on Friday the 13th of November, next, and will close 
on the following day. Parents and guardians are respectfully invited 
to attend. The first session of 1825 will commence on the first Monday 
in January, under the special care of Mr. James D. Johnson. 

Oct. 21st, 1824. Wm. M. Sneed, Secy. 

— Raleigh Register, October 26, 1821f. 

OXFORD ACADEMY LOTTERY, 1825-27. 

NORTH-CAROLINA 
LOTTERY. 

(For the benefit of the Oxford Academy.) 

THE First Class of which will be drawn at Raleigh, the 22d of 
June next, and completed in a few minutes. 

B. Yates & A. M'Intyee, Managers. 



Granville County Schools. 



137 



SCHEME. 

1 Prize of $10,000 $10,000 

6,000 6,000 

4,000 4,000 

3,000 3,000 

2,000 2,000 

1,538 1,538 

1,000 6,000 

500 3,000 

200 1,200 

24 3,744 

12 3,744 

8 3,744 

4 31,200 



1 


U I 


1 


u a 


1 


it a 


1 


u a 


1 


tt u 


6 


« a 


6 


a a 


6 


a u 


156 


a a 


312 


a a 


468 


a U 


7,800 


a u 


8,760 


Prizes . . 


15,600 


Blanks. 



$79,170 



24,360 Tickets $79,170 

This Lottery is formed by the ternary combination and permutation 
of 30 numbers. 

Prizes payable 30 days after the drawing, and subject to the usual 
deduction of 15 per cent. 

Whole Tickets, $4 00 

Half do 2 00 

Quarter do 1 00 

* * * TICKETS and SHARES, in the above Lottery, for sale 
at the office of the Catawba Journal, where adventurers are invited to 
call, and secure a chance for $10,000, at the very low price of $4. 
— Catawba Journal, May 3, 1825. 

SSIP An additional supply of TICKETS in the Oxford Academy Lot- 
tery, has been received. Those who were unable to procure them be- 
fore, by calling too late, can now obtain them, if early application be 
made. 

— Catawba Journal, May 31, 1825. 

The drawing of the First Class of the Oxford Academy Lottery, 
authorized by an Act of our last Legislature, took place in this City 
on Wednesday, under the direction of Managers appointed by Messrs. 
Yates & M'Intyre, the Proprietors. Thirty numbers were deposited 
in the wheel, and the four following, which decide the Lottery, were 
drawn out : 

15. 9. 8. 29. 

One-fourth of the highest prize $10,000 was sold at the Manager's 
Office in this City, but by whom purchased, is not yet ascertained. 

— Raleigh Register, June 2Jf, 1825. 



138 Granville County Schools. 

North-Carolina 
Lottery, 

(For the benefit of the Oxford Academy), 

Second Class, 

To be drawn positively in November next, and completed in a few 
minutes. 

B. Yates & A. M'Inryre, Managers. 



Prize of 



1 

1 

2 

2 

18 

18 

18 

186 

186 

1,488 

13,950 



15,870 Prizes . 
26,970 Blanks. 



SCHEME. 

$20,000 $20,000 

10,000 10,000 

5,000 10,000 

1,990 3,980 

1,000 18,000 

500 

100 

50 

25 

10 



9,000 

1,800 

9,300 

4,650 

14,880 

5 69,750 



$171,360 



42,840 Tickets $171,360 

This is a Lottery formed by the ternary combination and permuta- 
tion of 36 numbers. To determine the prizes therein, the 36 numbers 
will be severally placed in a wheel on the day of the drawing, and five 
of them be drawn out; and that ticket having on it the 1st, 2d and 3d 
drawn Nos. in the order in which drawn, will be entitled to the prize 
of $20,000, and those five other tickets which shall have on them the 
same N"os. in the following orders, shall be entitled to the prizes affixed 
to them, respectively, viz : 

The 1st, 3d and 2d to $10,000. 

2d, 1st and 3d to 5,000. 

2d, 3d and 1st to 5,000. 

3d, 1st and 2d to 1,990. 

3d, 2d and 1st to 1,990. 
The 18 other tickets which shall have on them three of the drawn 
numbers, and those three the 2d, 3d and 5th, the 2d, 4th and 5th, or 
the 3d, 4th and 5th, in some one of their several orders of combination 
or permutation, will each be entitled to a prize of $1,000. 



Granville County Schools. 139 

Those 18 other tickets which shall have on them three of the drawn 
numbers, and those three, the 1st, 2d and 4th, the 1st, 2d and 5th, 
or the 1st, 3d and 4th, in some one of their several orders of combina- 
tion or permutation will each be entitled to a prize of $500. 

Those 18 other tickets which shall have on them three of the drawn 
numbers, will each be entitled to a prize of $100. 

Those 186 tickets which shall have two of the drawn numbers on 
them, and those two, the 2d and 4th, in either order, will each be 
entitled to a prize of $50. 

Those 186 tickets which shall have two of the drawn numbers on 
them, and those two, the 3d and 4th, in either order, will each be 
entitled to a prize of $25. 

All others, being 1,488, having two of the drawn numbers on them, 
will each be entitled to a prize of $10. 

And all those 13,950 tickets, having but one of the drawn numbers 
on them, will each be entitled to a prize of $5. 

No ticket which shall have drawn a prize of a superior denomination, 
can be entitled to an inferior prize. 

Prizes payable 30 days after the drawing, and subject to the usual 
deduction of 15 per cent. 

Whole Tickets $5 00 

Half do 2 50 

Quarter do 1 25 

Packages of 12 tickets, embracing the 36 numbers of the Lottery, 
which must of necessity draw at least $21.25 nett, with so many chances 
for capitals ; or shares of packages may be had at the same rate, viz : 

Packages of whole $60 00 

Of halves, 30 00 

Of Quarters, 15 00 

JglT'Orders for TICKETS received at this office. 
— Catawba Journal, July 26, 1825. 

NORTH-CAROLINA 
STATE LOTTERY. 



First Class. 



{Authorised by Acts of Congress and the Legislature of North- 
Carolina.) 

Eor the benefit of Oxford Academy and "Washington Canal. 

J. B. Yates & A. McIntyre, Managers. 



To be drawn on the 15th of March, 1826, at the City of Raleigh. 



140 



Gkanvllle County Schools. 



1 


u 


1 


u 


1 


u 


2 


a 


18 


a 


36 


u 


186 


u 


372 


it 


1,302 


a 


13,950 


a 


15,870 Prizes . 


26,970 


Blanks. 



SCHEME. 

of $20,000 $20,000 

15,000 15,000 

10,000 10,000 

5,276 5,276 

5,000 10,000 

1,000 18,000 

500 18,000 

50 9,300 

25 9,300 

12 15,624 

6 83,700 



$214,200 



42,840 Tickets. PEICE OF TICKETS. 

Whole Tickets $6 00 

Half do 3 00 

Quarter do 1 50 

Eighth do 75 

Packages of 12 Tickets, embracing the 36 numbers of the Lottery, 
which must draw at least $25.50 nett, (shares in proportion) with so 
many chances for capitals, may be had at the following rates : 

Whole Packages $75 00 

Half do 36 00 

Quarter do 18 00 

Eighth do 9 00 

If preferred, certificates of Packages will be furnished at the fol- 
lowing rates : 

Whole Packages, $46.50 — Shares in proportion. 

This is a Lottery formed by the ternary combination and permuta- 
tion of 36 numbers. 

Prizes payable 40 days after the drawing and subject to the usual 
deduction of 15 per cent. 

Tickets or Shares can be had at the above rates at the Managers' 
Office, Ealeigh, or their Agent, at the Post-Office, Charlotte. 

— Catawba Journal, February 28, 1826. 

The drawing of the Lottery for the benefit of the Oxford Academy 
and the Washington Canal took place in Raleigh on the 15th instant, 
when the following numbers, which so decided the fate of all the Tick- 
ets, were drawn from the wheel, viz. 5, 4, 24, 32, 35. 

— Catawba Journal, March 28. 1826. 



Granville County Schools. 



141 



NORTH & S. CAROLINA 
LOTTERY, 

For the benefit of Oxford Academy in North-Carolina, &c. 



First Class — To he drawn 29th Nov. 1826. 



J. B. Yates & A. McIntyre, Managers. 



Scheme. 

1 Prize of $12,000 is $12,000 

6,000 
5,000 
4,000 
2,500 
1,340 
6,000 
6,000 
7,800 
7,800 
39,000 



1 


a i 


' 6,000 


1 


a i 


' 5,000 


1 


a i 


< 4,000 


1 


u t 


1 2,500 


1 


it i 


' 1,340 


6 


a ( 


' 1,000 


12 


it i 


< 500 


156 


a c 


< 50 


780 


a t 


' 10 


,800 


a t 


' 5 



8,760 Prizes 97,440 

15,600 Blanks— 24,360 Tickets. 

This is a Lottery formed by the ternary permutation of 30 numbers. 
To determine the prizes therein, the 30 numbers will be publicly placed 
in a wheel on the day of drawing, and four of them be drawn out ; and 
that ticket having on it the 1st, 2d and 3d drawn numbers, in the order 
in which drawn, will be entitled to the prize of $12,000. 

And those five other Tickets, having on them the same numbers, shall 
be entitled to the prize affixed to them respectively, viz: 

The 1st, 3d and 2d to $6,000 

The 2d, 1st and 3d to 5,000 

The 2d, 3d and 1st to 4,000 

The 3d, 1st and 2d to 2,500 

The 3d, 2d and 1st to 1,350 

The 6 tickets which shall have on them the 1st, 2d and 3d drawn num- 
bers, in some of their orders, will each be entitled to a prize of $1,000. 

The 12 tickets which shall have on them any other three of the drawn 
numbers, in any order of permutation, will each be entitled to a prize 
of $500. 

The 156 tickets which shall have two of the drawn numbers on them, 
and those two the 3d and 4th, will each be entitled to a prize of $50. 

Those 780 tickets which shall have on them some other two of the 
drawn numbers, will each be entitled to a prize of $10. 



142 Granville County Schools. 

And those 7,800 tickets, which shall have on them some of the drawn 
numbers, will each be entitled to a prize of $5. 

No ticket which shall have drawn a prize of superior denomination 
shall be entitled to an inferior prize. Prizes payable forty days after the 
drawing and subject to the usual deduction of 15 per cent. 

Tickets and Shares can be had in the above scheme at the Manager's 
Offices. 

Whole Tickets $5.00 

Halves 2.50 

Quarters 1.25 

2t51r > Tickets and Shares in the above Lottery are for sale at the office 
of the Catawba Journal. Orders by mail, enclosing the cash, will be 
promptly attended to. 

— Catawba Journal, August 1, 1826. 

DRAWING 

On the 21st of February, 1827. 

ONLY 7,980 TICKETS. 



NORTH CAROLINA LOTTERY, 

For the benefit of 

THE OXFORD ACADEMY. 

Third Class. 

To be drawn at Raleigh, on Wednesday, the 21st of February next. 

J. B. Yates & A. McIntyke, Managers. 

Scheme. 

1 Prizes of $7,000 is $ 7,000 

1 " " 5,000 " 5,000 

1 « " 2,500 " 2,500 

1 " " 1,500 " 1,500 

1 " « 1,320 " 1,320 

1 " " 1,250 " 1,250 

108 " " 40 " 4,320 

108 " " 20 " 2,160 

108 " " 10 " 1,080 

2,754 " " 5 " 13,770 

3,084 Prizes, ) 7,980 ) $39,900 

4,896 Blanks, ) Tickets, ) 

In this Scheme, composed of 21 Numbers by permutation, producing 
7,980 Tickets, and with three drawn ballots, there will be six prizes with 



Granville County Schools. 143 

three of the drawn Numbers on them; 324 with two on; and 2,754 with 
one only, of the drawn numbers on them. 

To determine the prizes, the 21 ISTos. from 1 to 21, inclusive, will be 
placed in a wheel on the day of drawing, and three of them be drawn 
out, and that ticket having on it, for its permutation numbers, the three 
numbers drawn from the wheel, in the order in which drawn, will be en- 
titled to the prize of $7,000. 

And those five other tickets having the same numbers on them in the 
following orders, shall be entitled to the prizes affixed to them respect- 
ively, viz : 

The 1st, 3d, and 2d, to $5,000 

2d, 1st, and 3d, to 2,500 

2d, 3d, and 1st, to 1,500 

3d, 1st, and 2d, to 1,320 

3d, 2d, and 1st, to 1,250 

Those 108 tickets, having two of the drawn numbers on them, and 
those two the second and third in either order, will each be entitled to a 
prize of $40. 

Those 108 tickets, having two of the drawn numbers on them, and 
those two the second and htird in either order, will each be entitled to a 
prize of $20. 

All others with two of the drawn numbers on them, being 10S, will each 
be entitled to a prize of $10. 

And those 2,754 tickets, having one only of the drawn numbers on 
them, will be entitled to a prize of $5. 

No ticket which shall have drawn a prize of a superior denomination 
can be entitled to an inferior prize. 

Prizes payable forty days after the drawing, and subject to the usual 
deduction of fifteen per cent. 

35IF 3 Tickets and Shares in the above Lottery for sale at this Office. 
Present prices of Tickets, $6; Halves $3; Quarters $1.50. 
— Catawba Journal, January 30, 1827. 

OXFORD MALE ACADEMY EXAMINATIONS, 1825. 

THE Examination this day closed. A vacation will take place until 
the 20th inst., when the exercises will be resumed as heretofore, under 
the direction of James D. Johnson. "W. M. Sneed, Sec'ry. 

June 2. 

The Editors of the Star, Petersburg Intelligencer, and Edenton 
Gazette, will insert the foregoing for three weeks, and forward their 
bills. 

— Raleigh Register, June 10, 1825. 

THE Examination of the Students in this Institution, will commence 
on Monday the 14th of November next, and the Report thereof be read 
on Wednesday the 16th. 



144 Granville County Schools. 

The first Session of 1826 will commence on the 2d Monday in Janu- 
ary, as heretofore, under the charge of Mr. James D. Johnson. 
Oct. 16. Wm. M. Sneed, Secy. 

The Editors of the Star, Western Carolinian, Edenton Gazette and 
Petersburg Intelligencer, will publish the above and forward their bills 
to Stephen K. Sneed, Treasurer. 

— Raleigh Register, November If, 1825. 

OXFORD MALE ACADEMY FOR 1826. 

THE Exercises of this school will commence on the second Monday 
in January next, under the superintendance of Mr. Jas. D. Johnson, the 
gentleman who has for several years past presided over this Institution 
with so much ability. Wm. M. Sneed, Sec'y. 

Oxford, Granville County, 1ST. C, December, 1825. 

— Raleigh Register, December 16, 1825. 

OXFORD ACADEMY TEACHERS FOR 1826. 

OXFOED MALE ACADEMY. 

THE Exercises of this Institution again open on Monday the 26th 
of June, under Mr. James D. Johnson, who has had charge of it for 
several years. 

Oxford Female Academy commences its Summer Session on the 19th 
June. The Rev. Joseph Labaree, Principal. 

June 13. 

To be published in the Edenton Gazette, Petersburg Intelligencer, and 
Lynchburg paper, for three weeks, and then send their accts. to the Post- 
master at Oxford and they will be discharged immediately. 

— Raleigh Register, June IS, 1826. 

OXFORD EXAMINATION IN JUNE, 1826. 

(Communicated. ) 
OXFORD ACADEMY. 

The examination of the Students of the Oxford Academy closed on the 
9th inst. It is but justice to state, that the high character this Insti- 
tution has held for several years, is fully sustained by the present In- 
structors. It affords particular pleasure to be able to say that the 
Female Department, under the care of Rev. Joseph Labaree, gave 
highly satisfactory proofs to all present, of the diligence and ability 
with which it has been conducted during the last session. Very little 
attention appeared to have been devoted to that kind of preparation 
for examination which is designed merely for display to captivate the 
multitude. The young ladies generally, evinced, that their own exer- 



Granville County Schools. 145 

tions had been diligently and judiciously directed by able teachers to 
the several branches of useful learning suitable to their respective ages 
and capacities. Their progress and attainments were of course re- 
spectable and of a profitable kind. The ornamental branches of needle- 
work, drawing, painting, and music, had not been neglected, and the 
specimens of skill in each were highly creditable to all concerned. 

It is believed that Parents may entrust their children to the care of 
the present instructors with a confidence that their minds, morals, and 
manners, will receive due attention. A Spectator. 

— Raleigh Register, June 16, 1826. 

OXFORD ACADEMY EXAMINATIONS, JUNE, 1827. 

OXFORD 
MALE AND FEMALE ACADEMY. 

THE Friends and Patrons of the above Seminaries are respectfully 
invited to attend the Examinations; on Monday the 4th of June, the 
Examination of the Male Academy will commence. Report to be read 
and honours to be distributed on Wednesday morning, immediately af- 
ter which the Examination of the Female Academy will commence and 
close with a Musical exhibition, &c. on Thursday evening. The sum- 
mer session of the Female Academy will open on the following Mon- 
day. Rev. Joseph Labaree Principal ; that of the Male Academy un- 
der James D. Johnson, will commence on Monday the 25th of June. 

Oxford, N. Carolina, May 5, 1827. A. Burton, Sec. 

The Petersburg Intelligencer, Edenton Gazette, Warrenton Reporter, 
Tarborough Free Press and Norfolk Herald, will publish the above ad- 
vertisement four times and forward their accounts to the Postmaster, 
Oxford. 

— Raleigh Register, May 11, 1827. 

OXFORD ACADEMIES— EXAMINATIONS, 1828. 

THE Examination of the Oxford Male Academy begins on Monday 
June 2d, and closes by reading the semi-annual Report on Wednesday 
morning; immediately after which the Examination of the Female 
Academy takes place and will be concluded on Thursday evening by an 
exhibition of Music. All that feel interested are respectfully Invited 
to attend. 

The Summer Session of these Academies opens as follows : the Fe- 
male under the care of Rev. Jos. Labaree on Monday June 16th, and 
the Male opens on Monday 23d of June, James D. Johnson, Principal 
as heretofore. Thos. B. Littlejohn, Pres. 

P. S. The Editors of the Tarboro' Press, Edenton Gazette and Nor- 
folk Herald will publish the above two weeks, and after an interval of 
10 



146 Granville County Schools. 

two weeks, continue for three weeks longer that part relating to the 
opening of the Session, and forward their accounts to the Oxford Post 
Master. 

Oxford, May 10. 

—Raleigh Register, May 16, 1828. 

All interested are invited to attend the Examination of the Male 
Academy on Monday the 10th of November. Report to be read on 
Wednesday morning; immediately after which the Examination of the 
Female Academy will commence, and conclude on Thursday evening 
with an Exhibition of Music. 

The Winter Session of these Seminaries opens on Monday, 12th 
Jan. 1829. James D. Johnson, Principal of the Male, and the Rev. 
Joseph Labaree of the Female Academy, as heretofore. 

Oxford, Oct. 20, 1828. Tho's B. Littlejohn, Prest. 

The Tarboro' Press, Edenton Gazette, and Norfolk Herald will pub- 
lish this three weeks and forward their acts, to the Oxford P. M. 
— Raleigh Register, October 28, 1828. 

OXFORD ACADEMIES— EXAMINATION, 1829. 

The Examination of the Male Students will begin on Monday, June 
1st, and close with the semi-annual Report Wednesday morning — imme- 
diately after which the Examination of the Female Academy takes 
place, and will conclude with an Exhibition of Music on Thursday even- 
in. All interested are respectfully solicited to attend. 

The Summer Session of these Academies opens as follows : The 
Female under the care of Rev. Joseph Larabee, will open on Monday, 
June 15th — The Male on Monday, June 22d, James D. Johnson, Prin- 
cipal. Tho's B. Littlejohn, Prest. 

Oxford, May 8th, 1829. 

P. S. The Tarboro' Press, the Edenton Gazette & Norfolk Herald, 
will publish the above two weeks, and then, after an interval of two 
weeks, continue for three weeks that part relating to the opening of the 
session, and forward their accounts as heretofore. 

— Raleigh Register, May 12, 1829. 

S. C. LINDSLY PRINCIPAL OF OXFORD ACADEMY, 1880. 
OXFORD MALE ACADEMY, K C. 

THE Trustees are gratified in being able to announce to the public, 
that they have employed Mr. Silas C. Lindsly, as Principal of this In- 
stitution, for the next year — an experienced Teacher of eminent quali- 
fications. Mr. Lindsly is a Graduate of Princeton College, N. J., and 
comes highly recommended by Dr. Archibald Alexander and Dr. Canar- 
han, President of that College. Under these circumstances, the Board 
natter themselves that their Academy, under the care of Mr. Lindsly, 



Granville County Schools. 147 

will continue to maintain its high standing as well as to merit and re- 
ceive a liberal patronage from an enlightened community. 

The Winter Session will commence on Monday the 11th day of Jan- 
uary, 1830. 

— Raleigh Register, January If, 1830. 

J. H. WILKES PRINCIPAL OXFORD MALE ACADEMY, 1832. 

The Trustees have engaged Mr. James H. Wilkes to take charge of 
this Seminary the ensuing year. The Winter Session will commence 
the Second Monday of January next. 

The qualifications of Mr. Wilkes are well known, and are highly 
appreciated by all who are acquainted with them. 

The course of Studies will be such as will prepare for any of our 
Colleges. 

Board in respectable families is cheap, and as Oxford is famed for 
health, morality and good society, the Trustees feel confident that their 
Academy will continue to receive as heretofore, a liberal patronage. 

The terms of Tuition will be for all English branches, $9 per ses- 
sion of 5 months, and for the Languages $12.50 — payable in advance. 

Oxford, jSTov. 14, 1832. James M. Wiggins, Secy. 

— Raleigh Register, Friday, November 23, 1832. 

A. HART PRINCIPAL OXFORD MALE ACADEMY, 1838. 

THE prominent advantages of this Institution, render it peculiarly 
deserving the notice of Parents and Guardians. 

Oxford is surpassed by no village in the South in its healthfulness, 
pleasant location, good society, and freedom from dissipation. 

The Principal, Mr. A. HART, is a gentleman of considerable attain- 
ments in classical and scientific knowledge, acquired in England, Italy 
and Erance. He is not only well versed in the Greek and Latin Clas- 
sics, but familiar with Modern Languages and all the numerous 
branches of Physical, Mathematical, Moral and Intellectual Science. 

In training the Students to respect their Teachers, their companions 
and themselves, strict regard will be had to inculcate virtuous princi- 
ples, honorable feelings and gentlemanly conduct. The government will 
be parental rather than severe ; and the Students' minds directed to 
habits of industry, accurate observation and deep enquiry. 

Mr. T. HIGGINS, a graduate of an European College, and an excel- 
lent classical scholar, is engaged for the ensuing year to instruct the 
junior classes. 

Classical Students will be prepared to enter the Freshman or Sopho- 
more class, agreeably to the course of studies prescribed by the Univer- 
sity of the State. Terms, Classical Students $15.00, English, from 
$6.00 to $15.00 per session. 

French, ) , , ( $ 7.50) 

„ . , >3 les. a week, < , nn ^Per Ses. Extra. 

Spanish, ) ( 10.00 ) 



148 Granville County Schools. 

The Tuition fees are required in advance; and the amount of half a 
session will be the smallest charge. 

The first session of 1838 will begin on the 22d of January, and the 
Examination will be on Monday and Tuesday the 18th and 19th of 
June. By Order of the Trustees. 

Oxford, N. C., Dec. 1, 1837. 

Col. James Nuttal is willing to receive a select number of Students, 
to be under the immediate care of the Principal, who will reside with 
them. Terms eight dollars per month in advance. Board can also be 
had in other respectable families for from $8 to $10 per month. 

— Raleigh Register, January 1, 1838. 

OXFORD ACADEMY UNDER D. F. ROBERTSON, 1838. 

The Trustees of this Institution feel much pleasure in informing the 
public that they have (through the agency of "The American Asso- 
ciation for the supply of Teachers," established in the city of Phila- 
delphia,) engaged the services of Mr. David F. Robertson, as Superin- 
tendent of the Male Department; and that he is now engaged in per- 
forming the duties of that station. 

Mr. Robertson comes commended to their confidence in a very sat- 
isfactory manner, "for moral and literary character, and for talents 
that will recommend him as an accomplished Instructor." He has up- 
wards of four years' experience in teaching; and has been connected, as 
an Instructor, with two very popular institutions in N~ew York. 

With respect to Mr. R's past success and popularity as a Teacher, 
we here publish the following certificate, given to him by the Trustees 
of the Albany Academy, Albany, ISTew York, viz : 

"Mr. D. F. Robertson, the bearer of this, has been tutor in the Al- 
bany Academy for the last sixteen months. He was appointed to that 
place on the strength of recommendations from his native country 
(Scotland:) from individuals in Virginia, where he had been a private 
teacher; and from the other Academy in this city (Albany.) Mr. Rob- 
ertson has proved himself able and faithful in his duties, assiduous and 
kind to the youth under his care, and we believe he will merit the con- 
fidence and approbation of his future patrons. His moral character is 
unimpeachable, and he leaves the Albany Academy, of which we are 
Trustees, on his own resignation, having obtained what he considers a 
preferable situation. (Signed) Gideon Hawley, 

J. R. Campbell, 
D. R. Beck, 

Albany, April, 1838. Fos. B. Spkague. 

The Trustees feel pleasure in offering to parents and guardians, the 
benefits of their Institution, under the superintendence of a gentleman 
thus qualified. 



Granville County Schools. 149 

The prices of tuition remain as heretofore; and board can be obtained 
in respectable families at the common prices. 

By order of the Board, Tho. B. Littlejohn, Pres't. 

James M. Wiggins, Sect'y. 

July 26, 1838. 

— Raleigh Register, July 30, 1838. 

OXFORD ACADEMY TEACHERS, 1889. 

The Exercises of this Institution closed on the 7th December, and 
will be resumed on Wednesday, the 4th January. 

The Trustees would state, in reference to Mr. D. F. Robertson, the 
Principal of the Academy, that he was first appointed to his present 
station by the Association for the Supply of Teachers in Philadelphia ; 
that the appropriate testimonials were from highly creditable and well 
known individuals in the State of jSTew York, Scotland and Philadel- 
phia; that his residence here during the last five months affords satis- 
factory evidence that his abilities were not overrated in these testi- 
monials; and that they believe his moral and intellectual attainments 
distinguish him as an able Instructor and Disciplinarian. 

The Committee of Visitation report that they were particularly 
pleased to witness the strict ORDER that pervades the various classes, 
the minuteness and accuracy of the System of Instruction adopted, and 
the correct and dignified deportment of even the smaller boys. Mr. 
Robertson acknowledges no system of Morals, or of Academical Gov- 
ernment, that is not founded on the plain teaching of Scripture, as 
commonly understood by all good men ; and the serious perusal of the 
Bible forms a part of the daily exercises of the Academy. 

The Trustees confidently offer to the public the benefits of an Eligible 
School. The prices of tuition are the same as heretofore; and Board 
can be obtained in respectable families on reasonable terms. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hughes have been employed in the Female Depart- 
ment both of whom have had considerable experience, and bring with 
them testimonials of a flattering character from gentlemen of high 
standing in Virginia, where they have been principally engaged in 
teaching. The Exercises of the School will commence on the 15th of 
January. 

Persons patronizing this School, can either board with the Prin- 
cipal, or with families in the village. 

By order of the Board, Thos. B. Littlejohn, Pres't. 

James Wiggins, Sec'y. 

Dec. 12th, 1838. 

— Raleigh Register, December 2Jf, 1838. 

FALL TERM OXFORD ACADEMY, 1839. 

This Institution (incorporated in the year 1811) occupies an eligible 
and spacious edifice, and is situated in a village proverbial for the good 
health of the inhabitants. The last Session closed, bv a Public Exam- 



150 Granville County Schools. 

ination, on the 21st inst. The next Session will commence on the first 
Monday in July, under the superintendence of Dr. D. F. Robertson, 
who has had charge of the Academy during the past year. The moral 
and Literary character of the Principal, his experience and success 
as an Instructor of youth, and the accurate proficiency in Classical 
and English studies, manifested by the Students at the late Examina- 
tion, do, in our opinion, commend this Institution to the confidence of 
the Public. 

By order of the Board, Thos. B. Littlejohn, Pres't. 

Jas. M. Wiggins, Secy. 

Oxford, June, 1839. 

— Raleigh Register, July 13, 1839. 

THOMAS H. WILLIE AGAIN PRINCIPAL. 

OXFORD MALE ACADEMY. 

The exercises of this Institution will commence the ensuing year on 
the first Monday in January, under the care of Mr. Thomas H. Willie. 
The prices of tuition will be, for 1st class (beginners) $7.50 ; 2nd Do 
including Reading, Writing and Arithmetick, $10.00 ; 3rd Do. the 
former including English Grammar and Geography $12.50; 4th Do. 
Latin and Greek Languages, Sciences etc. $15.00 per session of five 
months, and 75 cents contingent expenses. Board in respectable families 
at $8 per month. The character and qualifications of Mr. Willie, his 
experience as a teacher, the healthy and pleasant location of Oxford, 
the moral and intellectual character of the village and its vicinity, it 
is believed, will ensure to this Institution a liberal share of public 
patronage. Thos. B. Littlejohn, Presdt. 

Oxford, Nov. 26th, 1839. 

J. M. Wiggins, Secy. 

— The Raleigh Star, December 11, 1839. 

OXFORD FEMALE SEMINARY, 1822. 

WARRENTON FEMALE ACADEMY. 

Removal. 

JOSEPH ANDREWS & THOMAS P. JONES, Principals of the 
above Academy, having disposed of their interest in the Premises now 
occupied by them, will, immediately after the close of the present Ses- 
sion, remove to the healthy and pleasant village of Williamsborough, 
in Granville County, 18 miles west from Warrenton. The School will 
open on the second Monday in January, 1823. The same course of 
studies heretofore pursued, will be continued under all the same teach- 
ers, (they being members of the family.) The Pupils are instructed, 
not only in the rudiments of knowledge, but also in the highest branches 
of science ever taught in Female Seminaries, including Grammar and 
Parsing, Belles Lettres, Geography, Chemistry, Botany, Natural Phil- 



GkANVILLE COUNTY SCHOOLS. 151 

osophy, Astronomy, &c. The Principals possess a better philosophical 
apparatus than most of our colleges; and lectures are delivered on the 
different subjects, accompanied with experiments. Board and Tuition 
in all the above branches, $50 per Session. Music, Drawing and Paint- 
ing, and the Latin and Greek Languages are also taught and are 
charged as follows : Music 30 dollars, Drawing and Painting 20 dol- 
lars, and the Languages 10 dollars per Session. 

The amount for Board and Tuition is payable in advance, and each 
lady is to furnish herself with a coverlid, a pair of sheets, blankets 
and towels. 

New Pupils pay only from the part of the Session in which they are 
admitted. There are eight competent teachers, whose time is devoted 
to the business of this Institution. 

Warrenton, Oct. 29, 1822. 

— Raleigh Register, November 1, 1822. 

[This school was conducted at Williamsborough for one Year and 
then moved to Oxford. — C. L. C] 

JONES AND ANDREWS MOVE TO OXFORD. 

ANDREWS & JONES' NORTH CAROLINA FEMALE 
ACADEMY. 

This Institution, which, during the present year has been located in 
Williamsborough, will open in Oxford, on the first Monday in Febru- 
ary next. The principals have been induced to a change of residence, 
with a view to a permanent establishment where the premises will com- 
fortably accommodate their pupils; and they have altered the time of 
commencing the scholastic Year, for the convenience and at the general 
request of their patrons. 

The pupils are instructed in Needle-work, Reading, Writing, Arith- 
metic, Grammar and Parsing, Geography, Mythology, History, Belles 
Lettres, Natural Philosophy, Chymistry, Botany and Astronomy. 

The terms for board, washing and tuition, in all the above branches 
are Sixty Dollars per session payable in advance. Music, vocal and in- 
strumental, Thirty Dollars per session. Drawing and Painting, Twenty 
Dollars per session. Dancing is also taught by a competent master. 
* * * The system of education is in all the departments radical: 
by the aid of an excellent apparatus, the truths of Natural Philosophy, 
Chymistry and Astronomy, are experimentally illustrated, and are 
thus rendered objects of sense. There are six teachers constantly en- 
gaged; three excellent Piano Fortes are employed in the musical de- 
partment, and the models for Drawing and Painting, are numerous 
and good. 

No expenditures are allowed, but such as are authorized by parents 
or guardians; and the principals are determined strictly to inforce the 



152 Granville County Schools. 

rule prohibiting finery in dress; in summer, coloured cotton dresses, 
and in winter, worked stuffs, will be worn by all the young ladies. 

Joseph Andrews, 
Thomas P. Jones, 

Oxford, Granville co. Dec. 1823. Principals. 

— Raleigh Register, December 12, 1823. 

OXFORD FEMALE SEMINARY EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1824. 

EXAMINATION. 
NORTH-CAROLINA FEMALE ACADEMY. 

ANDREWS & JONES inform the friends of this Institution, that 
the semi-annual Examination of their Pupils will commence on Wed- 
nesday the 30th of June, and close on the 2d of July. GOLD MEDALS 
will be presented to those young ladies who have completed their studies. 

The Fall Session will commence on the 5th of July, there being no 
summer vacation. About twenty new pupils can be admitted. Board 
and Tuition sixty dollars per session ; Music, Drawing, and Dancing, 
if taught, are charged extra. 

Oxford, June 6. 

— Raleigh Register, June 15, 182Jf. 

JONES AND ANDREWS RETURN TO PHILADELPHIA, 1825. 

We learn that in consequence of the determination of Messrs. 
Andrews and Jones to leave the North-Carolina Female Academy, Mr. 
Jos. B. Warne, who has for seven years past been a tutor in that in- 
stitution, intends to commence a school upon the plan of that cele- 
brated establishment, which will go into operation at the beginning of 
next year. 

In this undertaking, he is to be assisted by his son-in-law Mr. Baker, 
and three other competent teachers, members of their family, includ- 
ing Miss Emma Baker who is now assistant Music Teacher in the 
Academy at Oxford. Mr. Warne and Miss Baker are the only two of 
the teachers, concerned in the present establishment who do not leave 
the Southern States, at the end of the year. They are now seeking 
an eligible situation in which to locate themselves, and when that is 
decided on, the plan, terms, &c, will be made known. 

— Raleigh Register, August 16, 1825. 

SELECT FEMALE SEMINARY, 

IN PHILADELPHIA. 

Mr. & Mrs. Andrews, and Dr. & Mrs. Jones, now of the North- 
Carolina Female Academy, are about to return to Philadelphia, where 
they propose to receive twelve pupils only, to board and educate. The 



Granville County Schools. 153 

course of instruction will embrace all the branches of English Litera- 
ture and Science, ever taught in Female Seminaries, together with the 
French Language, Music, Drawing and Lancing. In every Depart- 
ment, the most competent teachers will be employed. On Natural 
History, Botany, Natural Philosophy, Chemistry & Astronomy, the 
pupils will attend regular courses of lectures, accompanied by experi- 
mental demonstrations. 

Children will take their meals with the family, be its constant asso- 
ciates, and will be regarded with parental anxiety and tenderness : they 
will alternately visit with the members of the family, and every means 
calculated to cultivate the understanding and polish the manners will 
be carefully pursued. 

Books, Music, Instruments, and every other article necessary for the 
instruction and comfort of the pupils (wearing apparel excepted) will 
be supplied by the principals, and the whole included in one general 
charge of $450 for the scholastic year, so that parents and guardians 
will know the exact amount to be paid. When the smallness of the 
number of pupils, the talents employed, and the advantages offered are 
considered, the terms will not appear high. It is intended to open 
the Seminary on the 1st of April, 1826. 

Persons wishing for further information, respecting the plan, may 
obtain it, together with the most satisfactory references, as regards 
the standing, character and abilities of the principals, by addressing 
a letter (post paid) to Andrews and Jones, Oxford, 1ST. C. An early 
application is desired. 

Oxford, Sept. 1, 1825. 

— Raleigh Register, September 2, 1825. 

We have received the Prospectus of a new paper to be printed 
weekly, at Philadelphia, under the title of the "Franklin Journal and 
Mechanic's Magazine." It is to be under the patronage of the Frank- 
lin Institute of Pennsylvania, and is to be edited by Dr. Thos. P. Jones, 
at present one of the Principals in the Oxford Female Academy, and 
who is appointed Professor of Mechanics in the Institute. The object 
of this publication will be to diffuse information on every subject con- 
nected with the useful arts, but is particularly intended for the benefit 
of those engaged in Mechanical pursuits. Our acquaintance with the 
Editor, warrants us in recommending his proposed Journal to the 
patronage of the public, confident that his abilities and resources are 
such as will render it interesting and valuable. 

Subscriptions received at this office. Terms, $3.50 a year, paid in 
advance. 

We take pleasure in stating that Dr. Thomas P. Jones of Philadel- 
phia, late of Oxford, in this State, is appointed by the Secretary of 
State to succeed Dr. Thornton, as Superintendent of the Patent Office, 
at Washington. The Franklin Journal, which has given so much celeb- 
rity to Dr. Jones as its Editor, will be continued, it is presumed, by 



154 Gkanville County Schools. 

him. His acquirements in practical science and chemistry, and his 
great knowledge of Mechanics, has procured him the most honorable 
distinction in the estimation of scientific and literary men. 
— Raleigh Register, April 25, 1828. 

Dr. Thomas P. Jones, formerly of Granville County, in this State, 
and late a Professor of the Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, is ap- 
pointed Professor of Chemistry in the Medical Department of the 
Columbian College. This appointment will not interfere with his 
duties as Superintendent of the Patent Office. 

— Raleigh Register, June 3, 1828. 

JOSEPH LABARRE SUCCEEDS JONES AND ANDREWS, 1826. 

EXAMINATION. 

NORTH-CAROLINA FEMALE ACADEMY. 

THE Examination of the pupils in this Institution, will commence 
on Monday the 28th of November, and continue for three days, when 
Gold Medals will be publicly presented to several young ladies. 

The exercises of the Academy will be resumed on the 2d Monday in 
January, under the care of the Rev. Joseph Labarre, from New York, 
who has engaged able assistants, and is determined to preserve the 
reputation of the establishment. 

Oxford, October, 1825. 

— Raleigh Register, November 1, 1825. 

LAST EXAMINATION AT JONES AND ANDREWS' SCHOOL. 

EXAMINATION AND BALL. 

THE subscriber returns thanks to his friends and the public for the 
very liberal patronage heretofore extended to his house of PUBLIC 
ENTERTAINMENT; and he takes this method thus publicly to in- 
form them, that the examination of the pupils of Messrs. Andrews and 
Jones will take place on the 28 th of November next, and that on the 
29th, he will furnish a Ball to the Visitors. As this will be the last 
exhibition those gentlemen will have in this State, it is expected that 
the company will be numerous and fashionable. 

Oct. 15, 1825. David Mitchell. 

— Raleigh Register, November 8, 1825. 

OXFORD FEMALE SEMINARY TEACHERS FOR 1826. 

NORTH CAROLINA FEMALE ACADEMY. 

THIS Institution, which for several years past, has been conducted 
by Messrs Andrews and Jones, will in future be superintended by 
Revd. Joseph Labaree, assisted by Revd. Thomas Skelton and wife, 
from Massachusetts, Miss Hannah Kennedy, who for several years 



Granville County Schools. 155 

past has taught Painting and Drawing, in the school of Messrs. 
Andrews and Jones, and three other able and experienced teachers. 
The plan of instruction in the institution, 'will be the same as that 
heretofore pursued. 

Except when parents or guardians have near relatives in town, the 
pupils will board with the principal, will take their rneals at the same 
table with his family, and in all respects be treated as his own children. 

Board and tuition, in all the branches of English study, and needle- 
work, will be charged at only sixty dollars per session. Music at 
thirty, Painting and Drawing at twenty. The foreign and dead lan- 
guages, if required, will be taught by competent instructors. The 
school will be a cheap one. The principal is determined that there 
shall be no cause of complaint in future of extra and unexpected 
charges. JNTo charges will be allowed except such as are particularly 
required by the parent or guardian. The government of the school 
will be strictly parental — the government of kindness and of reason. 

The principal will feel himself responsible for the morals and man- 
ners of his pupils, and while everything sectarian on the subject of 
religion will wholly be avoided, he will do all in his power to give 
them genteel manners, and to imbue their minds with those moral 
truths, which elevate the views, ennoble the feelings, and give some 
just notions of the real dignity of our nature. 

The first session will commence on the 2d Monday of January next. 
Each pupil will be required to furnish her own sheets, blankets and 
counterpane. 

— Raleigh Register, December 16, 1825. 

EXAMINATIONS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS, 1S28. 

THE Summer Examination of the Oxford Female Academy, will 
commence on Wednesday the 7th of June next. Parents and Guar- 
dians, and those friendly to Female Education, are invited to attend. 

The Second Session of the Institution will commence on the 19th 
of June. Joseph Labarre, 

Oxford, May 23d, 1826. Principal. 

—Raleigh Register, May 26, 1826. 

THE Fall examination of this Institution will commence on 
"Wednesday the 8th of November next, and close on the Friday evening 
following. The first session of the next year will commence on the 
2nd Monday of January. The very liberal patronage which has been 
given to the Seminary the past year has encouraged the Principal to 
increase the number of Teachers, and to make some important additions 
to the course of studies heretofore pursued. He has engaged a Gentle- 
man and Lady for the ensuing year, who have had a long and success- 
ful experience in teaching in some of the first Academies in our 
Country. 



156 Granville County Schools. 

A Cabinet of Minerals, a Chymical and Philosophical Apparatus will 
be added before the commencement of the next session, and every 
recitation in Chymistry, Natural Philosophy, Astronomy and Miner- 
alogy will be accompanied with a Lecture, and the principles in those 
Sciences illustrated by appropriate experiments. 

Particular attention will be paid to plain and ornamental penman- 
ship, to the projection and drawing of Maps, and to plain and orna- 
mental Needle-work. A stated Lecture will be given to the two higher 
classes, on Moral Philosophy, able and experienced instructors will 
be engaged in the departments of Music, Drawing and Painting. The 
Seminary is well furnished with Maps, Globes, &c. 

No alteration to be made in the price of board and tuition. 

Oxford, Sept. 21st, 1826. Joseph Labaree. 

— Raleigh Register, September 26, 1826. 

COURSE OF STUDY OXFORD FEMALE SEMINARY, 1827. 

OXFORD FEMALE ACADEMY. 

SEVERAL Gentlemen from a distance, having requested informa- 
tion respecting the course of Studies pursued in this Institution, the 
manner of teaching, price of board, tuition, &c. we embrace the present 
opportunity of making a public statement on those subjects. 

The following branches are taught, .viz. Reading, Spelling, Plain 
and Ornamental Penmanship, Arithmetic, English Grammar, Geogra- 
phy with the use of the Globes, Projecting and Drawing Maps, Biog- 
raphy, Belles Lettres, Grecian, Roman and Jewish Antiquities, Botany, 
Mineralogy, Chemistry, Natural Philosophy, Astronomy, Philosophy 
of the Mind, and Plain and Ornamental Needle- work. 

The price of Board and Tuition in the above Branches, is $60 per 
session of 5 months. Music thirty — Painting and Drawing twenty — 
Latin Language ten — Erench ten dollars. 

With regard to the manner of Teaching, the Instructors keep one 
object constantly in view, viz. to bring the understanding into exer- 
cise without burdening the memory. We do not think we have accom- 
plished great things, simply because we can persuade a child to repeat 
a long lesson from the book. It is our object to fix the attention on 
particular facts and to get the pupil to understand the nature of those 
facts; and this not only in the higher branches, but in the first ele- 
ments. In simple Arithmetic and English Grammar, we commence 
in this way; and by this method, we gain not only much more rapid 
progress in the first stages, but what in our opinion is of vastly greater 
importance, we get the pupil, almost without exception, to be fond of 
the study in which she is engaged. Study is then not an odious task, 
but a delightful employment. Nothing is more pleasing to youth than 
to discover the strength of their own powers of understanding. This 
discovery we endeavor to get them to make, and when this is accom- 
plished we have no fears, but corresponding efforts will be made to 



Granville County Schools. 157 

bring these powers into exercise. Since the commencement of the 
Session, we have received a Chemical and Philosophical Apparatus; 
and now, each recitation in Chemistry, Philosophy and Astronomy, is 
accompanied with a Lecture and Experiments illustrating the princi- 
ples of these sciences. 

A close and parental watchfulness is exercised over the young ladies 
who board with the Principal, and while every necessary indulgence 
for exercise and recreation will be allowed them, nothing inconsistent 
with strict decorum <& genteel manners will be permitted. 

The local situation of this Institution is peculiarly propitious. The 
healthfulness of the place is extraordinary. ISTot an instance of serious 
illness has ever been known among the pupils, since a boarding school 
had been established here; and since the commencement of the last 
summer session, they have enjoyed uninterrupted health. The moral 
character of the society of Oxford and the vicinity, needs not our com- 
mendation ; and what we consider equally favorable for the institution 
is, that a lively interest is manifested for its prosperity, and our first 
families pay every attention to the young ladies from abroad, consist- 
ent with the attainment of the object for which they were sent here 
by their Parents and Guardians. The Principal has four Assistants, 
three ladies and one gentleman, all constantly engaged — and we take 
this opportunity of assuring the public, that no exertions or expense 
within their power shall be wanting to make the Institution what it 
ought to be. Joseph Labaree. 

Oxford, March 17. 

— Raleigh Register, March 23, 1827. 

JOSEPH LABAREE MOTES TO OHIO, 1829. 

On the 19th of November, the Rev. J. Labaree, was released from 
the Pastoral charge of the Church of Oxford, and dismissed, at his 
request, and recommended to the Presbytery of Columbus, Ohio. The 
Church of Oxford is now vacant. 

— Raleigh Register, January 11+, 1830. 

E. HOLLISTER, PRINCIPAL OF OXFORD FE3IALE SEMINARY, 1830. 

SOUTHERN FEMALE CLASSICAL SEMINARY. 

MR. & MRS. HOLLISTER have removed their Seminary for Young 
Ladies to Oxford, N. C. and, have engaged the assistance of Miss E. 
Humphreys, in the Department of Music. Of the qualifications of 
Miss Humphreys, the public need no better proof than the high repu- 
tation which she has maintained during the two last years as a Teacher 
of Music in Oxford, and the fact that previous to her coming to this 
place she was the principal Teacher of Music in the celebrated Mora- 
vian School at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 

This Seminary, which has been in operation in Mecklenburg, Va. 
for two years past, has received unequivocal proofs of the approbation 



158 Granville County Schools. 

of an enlightened public. The plans employed for promoting habits 
of diligence and correct deportment, are, for the most part original, 
and very powerful in their influence. 

The next Session will commence on Monday the 11th of January 
next. For further particulars, enquiries may be addressed to Rev. E. 
Hollister, Oxford, N". C. 

Dec. 1829. 

— Raleigh Register, December 21, 1829. 

EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1830. 

SOUTHERN FEMALE CLASSICAL SEMINARY, 
OXFORD, N. C. 

The Semi-annual Examination at this Seminary will take place on 
the 9th and 10th of June. On the evening of the 10th, there will be 
a Musical Entertainment; at the close of which the reports of recita- 
tions, &c. will be read, and honours and premiums awarded. 

The next Session will commence on Wednesday, the 16th of June. 

May 20, 1830. E. Hollistek. 

— The Star, May 27, 1830. 

HOLLISTER'S ANNOUNCEMENTS FOE 1831. 

SOUTHERN FEMALE CLASSICAL SEMINARY, 

Oxford, N. C. 

The next session will commence on Monday the 10th of January 
next. The School will continue to be conducted by Mr. & Mrs. Hollis- 
ter, to be assisted by a young lady well qualified for the business and 
acquainted with their plan of instruction. Miss Huntley, whose supe- 
rior qualifications are well known, will continue to instruct in Music. 
She will bring with her on her return from Philadelphia, an additional 
Piano, so that the pupils in Music will have the use of two good Pianos. 

The course of instruction is more extensive than in most female 
academies, calculated to improve the judgment and the reasoning pow- 
ers, as well as the memory of the pupils, and adapted to their moral as 
well as intellectual nature. 

The pupils who reside with the instructors, are under a parental 
care, and have the advantage of a genteel and intelligent society in a 
circle where their moral feelings as well as manners may be improved. 

The terms for board and tuition in the branches comprised in the 
course of study, are $55 per session ; Music $25 ; Drawing and Paint- 
ing $10 ; French or Latin $10, payable in advance. No other extra 
charges are made. Books and stationary are furnished, if desired, at 
the New York prices. Scholars are received at any time, and charged 
only from the time of their entrance. Application for admission of 
scholars may be made to the Rev. E. H. Hollister, Oxford, N. C. 

Dec. 14, 1830. 

— Star and North Carolina Gazette, Thursday, December 30, 1830. 



Granville County Schools. 159 

ANNOUNCEMENTS AND TEACHEES FOR 1832. 

SOUTHERN" FEMALE CLASSICAL SEMINARY, 

Oxford, N. C. 

The next session will commence on Monday the 9th of January. 
The school will continue to be conducted by Mr. & Mrs. Hollister, 
assisted by Miss A. M. Norment. Music will continue to be taught 
by Miss Humphreys. 

TERMS. — Board and tuition, 55 dollars per session ; lessons on the 
piano, $25 ; drawing and painting, $10 ; languages, $10 — payable in 
advance. No other extra charges are made. Application for admis- 
sion of scholars may be made to Rev. E. Hollister, Oxford. For in- 
formation respecting the school, the public are referred to the follow- 
ing gentlemen : Geist. Jos. H. Bryan-, Oxford, 

Rev. Dr. McBheeters, Raleigh, 
Rev. D. Gould, Statesville, 
Dr. S. Graham, Duplin, 
R. Washington, Esq. Waynesborough, 
November 1831. Wm. B. Wright, Esq. Fayetteville. 

— The Star, December 9, 1831. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1833. 

SOUTHERN FEMALE CLASSICAL SEMINARY, 
Oxford, N. C. 

This Seminary is designed as a High School, affording all the ad- 
vantages of such Schools at the North, and at a moderate expense. 
It is furnished with a Philosophical and Chemical Apparatus, a Col- 
lection of Minerals and a Botanical Collection. The Languages and 
Ornamental Branches are taught when desired. The School is still 
under the direction of Mr. & Mrs. Hollister, who expect to obtain from 
the North a Teacher of Music of the highest qualifications. There are 
ample accommodations for boarders with the Teachers, who occupy the 
spacious boarding-house adjoining the Academy. Young Ladies com- 
mitted to them, enjoy the advantages of good society, and are under 
a parental care as to health, manners and morals. The next Session 
will commence on Monday, January 14. 

Dec. 12. 

— Raleigh Register, December llf, 1832. 

JESSE RANKIN, PRINCIPAL OF OXFORD FEMALE SEMINARY, 1835. 

SOUTHERN FEMALE CLASSICAL SEMINARY, 

Oxford, N. C. 

THE EXERCISES of this Institution will be commenced on the 
Second Monday of January, under the direction of the Subscriber, 
assisted by his wife, and other competent persons as their aid may 



160 Granville County Schools. 

become necessary. The Subscriber proposes to conduct the School on 
the same general plan pursued by his predecessor, under whom it has 
become so extensively and so favorably known. The prices will be 
continued, in all respects, as heretofore. 

The School is furnished with Globes, Maps and Pianos, a collection 
of Geological Specimens, and a Chemical Apparatus. 

The health of the place, the moral and literary character of the 
society, and the cheapness of board and tuition, present inducements 
of no small importance to parents wishing to place their daughters 
in a Boarding School. 

A number of Young Ladies can be accommodated with boarding 
in the family of the Subscriber, where a parental care will be extended 
to them. We are so extensively known, and Mrs. Rankin, especially, 
in the character of a Teacher, that special reference is deemed un- 
necessary. 

MRS. O'BRIEIST, who has so satisfactorily taught Music, will be 
continued in that Department. Jesse Rankin. 

Nov. 20. 

— Raleigh Register, Tuesday, December 2, 183Jf. 

OXFORD FEMALE SEMINARY HAS NO PRINCIPAL, 1838. 

OXFORD FEMALE ACADEMY. 

The Trustees of this Institution wish to procure the services of a 
competent Teacher for the ensuing year. Heretofore, the School has 
been well sustained — and to persons wishing a permanent situation, 
but few places offer as many advantages. Oxford is a handsome 
Village, and has always been remarkable for health. The buildings 
attached to the Academy consist of the Principal's house, and all neces- 
sary out houses for the accommodation of a large family. 

As heretofore, the undertaker will be inquired to rent the Principal's 
house, and to take the School upon his own responsibility. 

Letters upon the subject, "POST PAID," addressed to THO. B. 
LITTLEJOHN, Esq. President of the Board, will be promptly 
attended to. James M. Wiggins, Secy. 

Oxford, K C. Oct. 1838. 

The National Intelligencer will publish the above, twice a week, 
for four weeks, and forward their account to Tho. H. Willie, Treas- 
urer, for payment. J. M. W. 

— Raleigh Register, October 8, 1888. 

A. G. HUGHES PRINCIPAL OF OXFORD FEMALE SEMINARY, 1839, 

OXFORD FEMALE ACADEMY. 

Instruction will be given in all the branches taught in the best 
Female Schools in the country. The recitations will be accompanied 
with suitable explanations and illustrations from the Teachers; so as 
to give the Scholars a thorough and practical knowledge of their 
studies. 



Granville County Schools. 161 

The government of the School will be strictly parental, uniting 
affection with firmness and efficiency. The unreserved confidence of 
the Scholars will be encouraged, and a deep interest felt in their wel- 
fare. Such attention will be paid to young ladies from abroad, as 
will render their connection with the School agreeable and satisfactory. 

The Music room is well furnished with Pianos, and it is designed 
soon to have a Chemical and Philosophical Apparatus, suited to all 
the purposes of the School, and every exertion will be made to render 
this what a good Female School should be. Dr. JAMES YOUXG, in 
whose family the Principals reside, has charge of the Boarding 
Establishment. 

Terms per session of 5 months : 

Board from $40 to 45 00 

Rudiments of English Education 7 50 

Reading, Writing, Elements of Geography, and Arithmetic. . 10 00 
English Grammar, History, Philosophy, Chemistry, Botany, 

Mineralogy, Geology, Languages, &c 12 50 

Music 20 00 

Contingencies 75 

The next Session will commence July 1st. 

Anderson G. Hughes, 
Anne E. Hughes, 

Principals. 

"The exercises of the first session of the Oxford Female Academy 
for the year 1839 closed by a Public Examination on the 14th inst. 
The Trustees in attendance take much pleasure in offering their testi- 
mony as to the satisfactory manner in which the duties of the School 
have been performed during the first Session. Mr. & Mrs. Hughes 
have laboured assiduously in cultivating the mind and manners of their 
Pupils, and their exertions have been rewarded with a degree of suc- 
cess as honourable to them as it is gratifying to the friends and patrons 
of the Institution. The Musical Department under the care of Mrs. 
O'Brien has likewise been conducted with great skill and success, and 
furnishes continued evidence of the diligence and ability of the In- 
structress." 

"The Trustees confidently recommend this Institution as eminently 
deserving a continuance of that patronage, which it has received from 
the public f6r years past." 

The Standard, ISTewbern Spectator and Edenton Gazette will please 
publish the above for two weeks, and send their accounts to this Office 
for collection. 

— Raleigh Register, June 22, 1839. 

11 



162 Granville County Schools. 

A. G. HUGHES CONTINUES AT OXFORD FEMALE SEMINARY, 1840. 

OXFOKD FEMALE ACADEMY. 

The exercises of this Institution will be resumed on the 15th of 
January under the direction of its former principals, who occupy the 
commodious boarding house connected with the Academy, and who 
will be prepared to receive young ladies from a distance as boarders. 
Board can also be had in the best private families, on good terms. 
The course of study, and terms per session of 5 months, payable in 
advance, are as follows: 

For those in the Rudiments of English Education $7 50 

For those in Reading, Writing, Grammar, etc 10 00 

For those pursuing any or all the following, viz. Natural or 
Moral Philosophy, Chemistry, History, Rhetoric, Logic, 

Astronomy, Botany, Algebra, Geometry, etc 12 50 

Music, with use of Piano 20 00 

Board 40 00 

Contingencies 50 

Ornamental Needle work, Painting, Languages, etc. also taught if 
desired. Anderson G. Hughes, A. M., 

Annie E. Hughes, 
Miss Jane L. Hughes, Assistant. Principals. 

Mrs. Anne O'Brien, Instructress in Music. 
— The Raleigh Star, December 11, 1839. 

GRASSY CREEK PRIVATE ACADEMY. 

The Exercises of this Institution will commence on the 13th of 
January, under the direction of Thos. II. Willie. The prices for tui- 
tion will be, for Reading, Writing, Arithmetic and English Grammar 
$7.50 per Session ; Geography $10 ; Latin, Greek and the Sciences 
$12.50 per Session. * * * 

This Institution is situate four miles north of Oxford. 

Benj. Hillyard, 
Joseph Taylor, Sen. 

Granville, 12th Jan. 1823. Thomas B. Lewis. 

— Raleigh Register, January 21/., 1823. 

HENDERSON'S LAW SCHOOL, 1826. 
LAW SCHOOL. 

I have four offices for the reception of Law Students, and shall have 
a fifth prepared in a short time. 

I shall not deliver formal lectures, but will give explanations when- 
ever requested, examinations will be frequent, & conversations held on 



Granville County Schools. 163 

law topics connected therewith occasionally, most usually at table after 
meals. Instruction and boarding, exclusive of washing and candles, 
at $225 a year. L. Henderson. 

Near to Willianisborough, Granville Co. Feb. 25, 1826. 

—-Raleigh Register, March 7, 1826. 

HENDERSON CONTINUES HIS SCHOOL, 1828. 

LAW SCHOOL. 

MY LAW OFFICES continue open for the reception of Students. 
I shall occasionally deliver Lectures, but at no stated time; and will at 
all times give explanations, as far as I am able ; and will indulge in 
and invite free discussion and interchange of opinion upon legal subjects. 

It is not required that any thing should be paid in advance. 

Near Williamsboro', Feb. 1828. L. Henderson. 

— Raleigh Register, March k, 1828. 

SHILOH CLASSICAL SCHOOL, 1827. 

SHILO CLASSICAL SCHOOL, 

Granville County, N". C. 
January 10, 1827. 

THIS is to inform the Public, with a view of making this School 
preparatory to a College course as far as circumstances will permit, we 
have engaged Mr. Robert Tinnin, a young gentleman of excellent classi- 
cal attainments, and from our knowledge of his talents as an instruc- 
tor of youth, we have the fullest confidence that he will most faith- 
fully devote himself to the instruction of his pupils, as a disciplinarian, 
he will be impartial and efficient, and as a teacher eminently successful. 
From full opportunity of judging, we believe his method of Teaching 
is well suited to make thorough scholars, and that no parent or Guar- 
dian, who may commit youth to his care, will have any reasonable hopes 
of their progress in learning disappointed. — The school will commence 
the 3d Monday in January inst. — -Board can be obtained in respectable 
families of the neighborhood, and at moderate prices. — The price of tui- 
tion for the languages is $12.50 per session. 

Thos. H. Reed, 
Alexander Smith, 
Henry L. Graves, 

January 31. Charles L. Reed. 

— Raleigh Register, February 2, 1827. 

TV. C. SUTTON PRINCIPAL OF SHILOH, 1839. 

The second Session of the Shiloh Classical School will commence on 
the 15th of July. The school is under the care of Mr. William C. 
Sutton, whose success as a teacher, during the past session is such, as 



164 Granville County Schools. 

fully to meet the recommendations of his friends, and establish him- 
self in the confidence of his patrons. The situation is healthy, and 
boarding may be had on moderate terms, with the most respectable 
families of the neighborhood. 

Terms. 

Latin and Greek, per session $15.00 

English, Geography, and Arithmetic 12.50 

Beginners in English 10.00 

Robert K. Clark. 
References. 

Rev. Alexander Wilson, D.D., Caldwell Institute, Greensboro', 1ST. C. 

W. J. Bingham, Hillsborough, "N. C. 

Rev. P. D. McCuenn, Shiloh. 

A. W. Venable, Esq. \ 

S. S. Downey, Esq. / Granville 

J. J. Speed, Esq. ) County 

Col. J. Amis, \ K C. 

F. M. Clark, Esq. / 

Brownsville, Granville, North Carolina, June 22, 1839. 

— Raleigh Register, July 6, 1839. 

C01YCORD ACADEMY, 1834. 

The subscriber would inform the public, that he continues the school, 
which was commenced by him last summer, at Concord schoolhouse, 
in Granville county. It is in the immediate neighborhood of John 
"Wesley Whitfield, and about two miles from Samuel Young's, where 
the Raleigh and Oxford stage stops to dine. The rates of tuition are as 
follows : Reading, Writing and Arithmetic, 5 dollars per session. 
English Grammar, Geography, History and Rhetoric, 6 dollars. The 
Latin Language, Algebra, Surveying, Natural Philosophy, Chemistry, 
Book Keeping, &c. 7 dollars. The next session will commence the first 
Monday in the present month, and continue five months. Board can 
be had in the neighborhood at 4 dollars per month. Persons at a dis- 
tance, wishing any additional information, can address the subscriber 
at Lemay's Cross Roads, Granville county, 1ST. C. 

Jan. 3, 1834. J. H. Perry. 

— The Star, January 10, 1831f. 

UlVIOtf ACADEMY, 1837. 

The exercises of this institution will commence the 30th instant, un- 
der the direction of Mr. Richard N". Bennett, who comes highly recom- 
mended as an English and Latin Teacher. 

The prices of instruction will be 10 dollars for 10 months, for all the 
branches usually taught in an English school, and for Latin an addi- 



Granville County Schools. 165 

tional charge of five dollars ; board can be had in the neighborhood for 
6 or 7 dollars per month. 

This Academy is situated in the county of Granville, about one mile 
South West of Lemay's X Roads, as healthy a neighborhood as any 
in the country; every attention will be paid to the moral deportment of 
the students, and the Trustees flatter themselves that general satisfac- 
tion will be given. 

—The Star, January 26, 1837. 

FORD CREEK ACADEMY, 1837. 

I take pleasure in announcing to the public that the exercises of this 
institution will re-commence on Monday the 24th of July, and terminate 
on the 20th of December. Tuition will be as follows, per session : 
Spelling, Reading, Writing, Grammar, Geography, Arithmetic, 

and History $6.00 

Latin and Greek Languages 12.50 

% % % % 

Robert S. Anderson. 

Address, at Ford Creek, Granville County, ~N. Carolina. 
— The Star, July 5, 1837. 

FORD CREEK ACADEMY FOR 1S39. 

FORD CREEK MALE ACADEMY. 

The Exercises of this School, located near Banks' Chapel, Granville 
County, will re-commence the first of February, under the control of 
an experienced Instructor. The Scholastic year will consist of two 
Sessions of five months each. Tuition, from 12 to $25. 

Those who fail to pay for the first Session, at the expiration thereof, 
will be bound for the whole Scholastic year. Day Scholars are ex- 
cluded. Board may be had near the Academy on accommodating terms. 
The patronage of Parents and Guardians is respectfully solicited. 

January 14, 1839. Board of Trustees. 

— Raleigh Register, January 21, 1839. 

FORD CREEK ACADEMY FOR 1840. 

The Exercises of this School, located in Granville County, twelve 
miles South of Oxford, will be resumed on the Second Monday in Janu- 
ary next, by Wm. P. Forrest, who has, by his close attention and skill in 
teaching, given entire satisfaction, the present year. 

Board can be obtained at low rates, either with the Principal, or other 
respectable families in the neighborhood. 



166 Granville County Schools. 

Terms of Tuition, per Session of five months : 

Latin and Greek $12.50 

English Grammar & Geography 7.50 

Lower Branches of English 6.00 

Jas. ¥yche, 
W. Cannaday, 
P. Floyd, 

Trustees. 

Day Scholars are excluded, and no Student will be taken for a less 
time than one session. 

December 7, 1839. W. P. Forrest. 

— Raleigh Register, December 14, 1839. 



GREENE COUNTY SCHOOLS 

GREENE ACADEMY NEEDS A PRINCIPAL, 1807. 

GKEENE ACADEMY. 

The Trustees are happy to announce to the Public their satisfaction 
at the progress of the Institution under their former Teacher, Mr. A. 
M. Eogers. In consequence of their being without a Principal Teacher 
at this time, they are desirous to contract with some Gentleman to take 
charge of said School. Any person that wishes to be employed as 
above, that can come well recommended, will receive liberal encourage- 
ment, etc. By Order of the Board, 

Greene County, Feb. 20, 1807. J. Lassiter, Sec. 

— Raleigh Register, March 16, 1807. 

HOOKERTON ACADEMY REVIVED, 1818. 

HOOKEKTON ACADEMY. 

The Exercises of this Institution will commence on the first Monday in 
May, under the superintendance of Mr. Austin A. Hersey. Mr. Hersey 
is a graduate of Dartmouth University, and has the most ample testi- 
monials of fair moral character. 

Hs * * * * * * 

Students of this Academy will have it in their power to obtain the 
privilege of reading the Books of the Pithoian Library, which already 
contains about two hundred volumes, for twenty-five cents a quarter. 

It is deeply to be regretted, that this Institution has been so long 
suffered to languish ; but it is sanguinely hoped, that its resuscitation 
is at hand, and that its future condition will be flourishing. * * * 

Wm. Pope, 
P. J. Powell, 
Wm. Hooker, 
Charles Edwards, 
J. B. Hooker, 
J. M. Patrick, 
Hookerton, Greene county, April 27th, 1818. Trustees. 

— Raleigh Register, May 15, 1818. 



(167) 



GUILFORD COUNTY SCHOOLS 

GREENSBORO ACADEMY, 1806. 

The Guilford Academy will again commence on the 1st of May, 
under the direction of John W. Caldwell; where will be taught the Latin 
and Greek Languages and the Sciences. Boarding can be procured on 
low Terms. Tuition will be 16 Dollars per Annum. 

April 4th, 1806. 

— Raleigh Register, April 28, 1806. 

GREENSBORO ACADEMY UNDER N. H. HARRIS. 

The Trustees beg leave to inform the Public, that the Exercises of 
this Institution commenced on Monday the 4th inst. under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Nathaniel H. Harris, and is now open for the reception of 
Students. * * * * John M. Dick, Secretary. 

January 9, 1818. 

— Raleigh Register, January 16, 1818. 

GREENSBORO ACADEMY UNDER HARRIS AND KERR. 

* * * The exercises of the 2nd Session will commence on Monday 
the 6th of July next, under the direction of Mr. Nathaniel Harris, 
assisted by Mr. James Kerr. * * * Jno. M. Dick, Sec'ry. 

June 3. 

— Raleigh Register, June 12, 1818. 

GREENSBORO ACADEMY UNDER WILLIAM PAISLEY. 

The exercises of this Institution will commence on the first Monday 
January next, under the care of the Rev. William Paisley, late of Or- 
ange County, IsT. C. * * * The Trustees have also the pleasure of 
announcing to the public that a Female Academy will be opened in 
Greensboro on the 1st of Jan'y next by Miss Polly Paisley, daughter 
of the Rev. ¥m. Paisley. Miss Paisley is well qualified to teach all 
the useful and ornamental branches of Science usually taught in Female 
Academies in this State, Music excepted. * * * 

By order of the Board, 

Greensboro, Guilford County, Dec. 5. A. Geren, Sec'y. 

— Raleigh Register, December 17, 1819. 

GREENSBORO ACADEMY UNDER I. L. BROOKS. 

* * * rp ne -Qgxt session will commence on Monday the 5th of July 
next, under the superintendence of Mr. Iveson L. Brooks, who Gradu- 
ated at the University of this State a few days ago. * * * 

June 2. By order of the Board of Trustees. 

— Raleigh Register, June 11, 1819. 

(168) 



Guilfoed County Schools. 169 

GREENSBORO ACADEMY TEACHERS, 1821. 

The Exercises of the Academy will be resumed on the first Monday 
of January next, under the care of the Rev. Wm. D. Paisley in the 
Male, and Miss Polly Paisley in the Female Department. Both will 
be ably assisted. By order of the Board, 

jSTov. 8. A. Geren, Secy. 

— Raleigh Register, November 17, 1820. 

GREENSBORO ACADEMY AGAIN UNDER J. W. CALDWELL. 

In consequence of the resignation of the Rev. Wm. D. Paisley as 
Principal of this Institution, the Managers have employed John W. 
Caldwell, Esq. for the next year, who will teach English Grammar, 
Geography, with the use of the Globes, Latin and Greek Languages, 
Natural and Moral Philosophy, and the Mathematics. * * * 

The Eemale Department as usual will be conducted by Miss Paisley. 
Mr. Paisley's leisure hours will also be devoted to it. * * * 

Greensboro, Nov. 21, 1821. A. Geren, Secy. 

— Raleigh Register, November 30, 1821. 

PAISLEY AGAIN PRINCIPAL OF GREENSBORO ACADEMY. 

* * * The Exercises of this Academy will be resumed on the 1st 
day of January next, under the care of the Eev. William D. Paisley 
in the Male, and Miss Polly Paisley in the Female Department. The 
Students in this Institution will have the advantage of a good Library. 

Nov. 3. A. Geren, Secy. 

— Raleigh Register, November 9, 1821. 

GREENSBOROUGH ACADEMY COURSE OF STUDY, 1821. 

The Exercises of this Institution commenced on the first Monday of 
January last, under the superintendance of the Rev. Wm. D. Paisley; 
but as the English Language has heretofore been only partially taught, 
the Trustees think it necessary to announce to the public that they have 
employed Mr. Jonathan Worth, as an Assistant Teacher. ]STo Young 
gentleman, we believe, sustains a fairer character than Mr. Worth ; and 
we can confidently pronounce him well qualified to discharge the duties 
of his station. 

The Female Department will as usual be conducted by Miss Paisley, 
under the superintendance of the Principal of the Male Department, 
and the Managers. * * * 

Male Department. 

1st. Spelling, Reading and Writing, $5.00 and 50 cents for contin- 
gent fund per session. 

2d. Arithmetic, Grammar, Geography, with the use of the Globes, 
Moral Philosophy, Rhetoric and Logic $9.00 and 50 cents for contin- 
gent fund. 



170 Guilford County Schools. 

3d. Latin and Greek Languages $10.50 and 50 cents for contingent 
fund. 

4th. Natural Philosophy, Astronomy and Mathematics $12 and 50 
cents for contingent fund. 

Female Department. 

1st. Spelling, Reading and Writing $5.00 and 50 cents for contin- 
gent fund. 

2d. Grammar, Geography, with the use of the Globes, and Natural 
Philosophy $6.50 and 50 cents for contingent fund. 

3d. Moral Philosophy, Rhetoric, Ancient and Modern History, 
Arithmetic, Chemistry, Needle- Work, Painting, etc. $9.00. * * * 

Donald Stewart, 
John D. Caldwell, 
Justin Pield, 
C. Mooring, 
John M. Dick, 
John W. Dick, 
Lotan G. Watson, 

Managers. 
Greensboro, Guilford County, February 1st, 1821. 
— Raleigh Register, February 9, 1821. 

GREENSBORO ACADEMY TEACHERS, 1822. 

GREENSBORO ACADEMY. 

THE Exercises of this Institution will be resumed on the Second 
Monday of July next, under the care of the Rev. William D. Paisley 
in the Male, and Miss Paisley in the Female Department. 

Greensboro, N. C, June 21. Lotan G. Watson, 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees. 

— Raleigh Register, June 28, 1822. 

GREENSBORO ACADEMY UNDER JOHN D. CLANCY, 1828. 

MARRIED. 

At Greensborough, on Thursday evening last, Mr. John D. Clancy, 
principal of the Greensborough Male Academy, to Miss Laura A. Lind- 
say. 

— Raleigh Register, March 25, 1828. 

JAMESTOWN FEMALE SEMINARY, 1815. 

Judith Mendenhall, Jun. has opened a Boarding School, near James- 
town, Guilford county, N. C, in which Girls at any age over five years, 
and Boys between five and fifteen Years, will be instructed in Reading, 
Writing, Arithmetic, English Grammar, Geography, the Use of the 
Globes, Needle-Work, and Painting. Tuition, without Boarding, may 
be had on reasonable terms. — 



Guilford County Schools. 171 

1ST. B. The School-Room is furnished with a pair of Carey's Globes, 
a complete set of large Maps and one of the United States six feet 
square. 

11th month, 27th day, 1815. 

— Raleigh Register, December 1, 1815. 

JAMESTOWN FEMALE SEMINAEY, 1818. 

All persons who are desirous to initiate Pupils at this Institution, are 
informed that letters directed to the Subscribers (post paid) will be 
promptly attended to. Richard Mendenhall. 

Jamestown, JN". C, July 7. David Lindsay. 

— Raleigh Register, July 17, 1818. 

JAMESTOWN FEMALE ACADEMY EXAMINATION, 1819. 

An examination took place at this Seminary on Saturday, July 30, 
1819, from which the Committee produce the following. 

REPORT. 
[The * * indicate names of pupils omitted.] 

Spelling by Rote. 

* * were examined on spelling in two syllables, and articulated dis- 
tinctly. 

Introduction. 

* * were examined on Reading in Murray's Introduction, and pro- 
nounced with correctness. 

English Reader. 

* * were examined on reading in Murray's English Reader, and per- 
formed in an accurate manner, with due attention to punctuation, and 
with a suitable and proper variation of voice. * * * 

Sequel. 

* * were examined on Reading in Murray's Sequel, Prose and Verse, 
both in concert, which they performed with great exactness. * * * 

Writing. 

Several specimens of writing were exhibited, some of which were very 
elegant. * * * 

Arithmetic. 

* * were examined on Arithmetic. * * * 

Grammar. 

* * were received on English Grammar, and for the time they have 
been engaged in this study have made considerable progress. 



172 Guilford County Schools. 

Geography. 

* * were examined on Geography, on the Map of the World and of 
the United States, and were found to answer with readiness * * * 

Painting and Needle Worh. 

Some specimens of Fruit and Flower Painting were exhibited, and 
some pieces of white Needle Work, and five pieces of Embroidery. Some 
of these pieces were elegant, and displayed a degree of natural imita- 
tion, brilliancy and taste. * * * 

By order of the Committee, 

August 6. David Lindsay. 

— Raleigh Register, August 13, 1819, 

SHIELDS' LANCASTER SCHOOL, 1820. 

A School on the Lancastrian plan is established in Greensborough in 
this state, The Teacher Mr. WILLIAM W. SHIELDS, we are in- 
formed, is a gentleman well qualified, as the examination of his stu- 
dents of only a few months standing will amply prove. 

Young men disposed to qualify themselves to teach on this plan, and 
who have become pretty well acquainted with the English Language, 
can do so at the expense of about sixty dollars, including board. We 
hope many will embrace the opportunity. 

— The Star, June 23, 1820. 

UNION ACADEMY, 1821. 

In Guilford County 
Five Miles South of Greensborough. 

The Trustees have to inform the public that they have employed Dr. 
Simon Landreth as Principal of this Institution, whose abilities as a 
Scholar, are not surpassed by any teacher in the State, in the Greek, 
Latin and English Language and Sciences. * * * 

Nov. 26, 1821. The Trustees. 

— Raleigh Register, December 7, 1821. 

CALDWELL INSTITUTE, 1837. 

This Institution, located at Greensboro', Guilford County, North 
Carolina, will resume its Exercises on the first Monday in November. 

The Trustees, believing that this School is now so far organized as to 
accomplish, in a great degree, the design contemplated in its establish- 
ment, would more particularly call the attention of Parents, especially 
Christian Parents, to it. This design, as has been already stated to the 
public, is to rear up a Seminary, which shall not only afford the means 
of thorough instruction in all the necessary branches of a liberal Edu- 



Guilford County Schools. 173 

cation, but in which, also, the Bible will occupy its proper place, and 
the paramount claims of a Christian Education be duly and fully recog- 
nized. 

The Ancient Classics, in connection with the pure and mixed Mathe- 
matics, forming, it is believed, the only sure basis of solid learning, will 
occupy chiefly the attention of Students. The Classical department is 
under the direction of Rev. A. Wilson, Principal, and S. C. Lindsley, 
A. M. ; and the Mathematical, (which embraces a popular course of 
Natural Philosophy) under that of Rev. John A. Gretter. 

All the Students are required to attend Public Worship on the Sab- 
bath, and to spend a portion of the afternoon in the recitation of por- 
tions of the Bible and Westminster Catachism. 

Expenses. 

Tuition, per session of 5 months $15.00 $15.00 

Board, (everything provided) from 30.00 to 50.00 

Contingent Fund, 00.50 00.50 

Total from $45.50 to $65.50 

Besides these expenses, there are others incurred for Books, which are 
trivial. 

Students may enter at any period in the session, and will be charged 
only from the time of entrance ; but no deduction will be made after en- 
trance, except in cases of sickness. Tuition must, in all cases, be paid 
in advance. 

There are two vacations in the year, of one month each — in April 
and October; and a Public Examination at the close of each session. 

By order of the Board, 

Greensboro', Oct. 16, 1837. E. W. Caruthers, Secy. 

—Raleigh Register, October 23, 1837. 

THE CALDWELL INSTITUTE, 1838. 

THIS Institution has been in successful operation for two years. A 
suitable building has been erected in an eligible and elevated part of the 
town of Greensboro' in Worth Carolina about half a mile south of the 
Court House. 

The plan of Education is thorough and extensive embracing 

1st. A complete course of English Instruction. 

2nd. The Greek and Roman Classics, and Antiquities, Ancient Geog- 
raphy, Mythology and History. 

3rd. The Mathematical and Natural Sciences. 

The great object in establishing this Institution, was to afford to par- 
ents and guardians the opportunity of educating their sons and wards 
thoroughly, and under christian influence, on as moderate terms as pos- 
sible. In accordance with the views of some of the most distinguished 
men of the country, it has appeared advisable that the students should 



174 Guilford County Schools. 

board in private families, and thus be subject to family restraints rather 
than be grouped together in one large building. This plan has been 
pursued hitherto with success. A considerable number of respectable 
families is now prepared for the accommodation of students. 

The Classical and English department is under the direction of the 
Eev. A. Wilson, A. M., and Mr. S. C. Lindsay, A. M., and the Mathe- 
matical under that of the Rev. Jno. A. Gretter, a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Virginia. Instructions in the French Language will also be 
afforded to such as desire it. 

Tuition $15 per session of five months, and every student must pro- 
duce a certificate from the Treasurer before admitted to recitation. 

The price of board varies from $7 to $9 per month. The next ses- 
sion will commence on the 7th May next. 

Greensboro' April 6, 1838. 

— Raleigh Register, April 23, 1838. 



HALIFAX COUNTY SCHOOLS 

BE<YSO?TS ENGLISH SCHOOL, 1806. 

ENGLISH SCHOOL. 

I will commence teaching an English School at my former place of 
residence in the town of Halifax, on Monday the 6th instant. My 
prices for teaching will be 12 dollars per learner, a year — and quarterly 
payments in advance. I will board four orderly well bred boys, in the 
most ample and genteel manner. My ability and attention will be united 
to merit the approbation of such gentlemen as may think proper to give 
me encouragement. James B. Benson. 

Halifax, October 1, 1806. 

— Halifax Journal, October 6, 1806. 

HALIFAX CLASSICAL SCHOOL, 1807. 

A SCHOOL 

Will be opened on Monday 12th instant in the town of Halifax, for 
the reception of Students, where will be taught the Latin & English 
grammatically, together with writing, arithmetic, the mathematics, 
geography, and the use of the Globes. Board on moderate terms may be 
had in genteel families, for any number of Scholars, from the country. 
All persons desirous of promoting a good school in this neighborhood, 
are requested to meet at Mr. Hopkins's Tavern on the 24th instant, in 
order to appoint managers to superintend this institution, and to settle 
on the terms of tuition, &c. Robert Fenner. 

Richard H. Loxg. 

January 10, 1S07. W. W. Jones. 

— Halifax Journal, January 12, 1807. 

VD<E HILL ACADE3IY, 1811. 

EDUCATION. 

The Trustees of the Vine-Hill Academy have great pleasure in an- 
nouncing to the Public, that they have engaged as Principal of that In- 
stitution, Mr. DANIEL ADAMS who has long devoted himself to the 
instruction of youth, and for the last two years has been the Principal 
of a very respectable Academy at Stratford, in Connecticut. Mr. 
Adams will teach the learned Languages and the various branches of 
sciences preparatory to a College Education; and from the great respec- 
tability of his character, (Which is personally known to one of the 
Trustees) his experience and success, it is hoped this institution will re- 
ceive the patronage and support its infant state so much requires. 

(175) 



176 Halifax County Schools. 

The English Department will be under the superintendance of Mr. 
Hawkins, whose great attention to his school the present year, and con- 
duct generally has been highly satisfactory. The Trustees are candid 
when they declare, for the satisfaction of Parents, their belief that 
the site of Vine-Hill Academy and its vicinity, is excelled by few in 
the state for its salubriety. The school will commence the first of Jan- 
uary next. A boarding-house will be kept at the Academy by Maj. Also- 
brook, which will be under the particular superintendance and control 
of the Trustees : Price of board 50 dollars per annum. — Board may 
also be obtained in respectable houses in the neighborhood for any num- 
ber of students. It is expected a quarter both for board and tuition will 
be paid in advance. 

Scotland Neck, Nov. 24, 1810. 

— The Star, January 3, 1811. 

VINE HILL ACADEMY NEEDS AH ENGLISH TEACHER. 
VINE HILL ACADEMY. 

The Trustees of the Vine Hill Academy, wish to employ a Teacher, 
for the English Department. Any person wishing such employment 
will please apply to David Clark and P. R. Tunstall, near the Academy. 

The Lottery authorized for the Academy above mentioned will not be 
drawn. Those that purchased Tickets will apply for their money, to 
those of whom they purchased David Clakk. 

— The Star, April 3, 1812. 

VINE HILL ACADEMY HAS NEW PRINCIPAL. 

VINE HILL ACADEMY. 

The Trustees of Vine Hill Academy have employed Mr. Jones, of 
Connecticut, as Teacher the ensuing year, under whose direction the 
exercises of said Academy will commence on the first Monday in Jan- 
uary next. 

Tuition. 

Reading, Writing and Arithmetic $12 per annum. 

Grammar 15 

The Languages, Geography per 25 

Payable quarterly in advance. 
November 10, 1812. 
— The Star, November 20, 1812. 

VINE HILL ACADEMY TEACHERS AND COURSE OF STUDY, 1837. 

The Trustees of this Institution, take pleasure in announcing to the 
public, that they have procured competent Teachers, under whose direc- 
tion the school will commence on Monday the 17th July next. The 



Halifax County Schools. 177 

male department will be under the charge of Dr. William Flint, who 
brings the most satisfactory testimonials of his moral worth, scholar- 
ship and practical experience as a teacher. 

The Female department will be conducted by Miss Matilda B. Rowan, 
who comes highly recommended by the Principal of the Female Semi- 
nary of Schenectady, and the Professors of Marion College and others 
as a Young Lady of finished education, and possessing that amiability of 
disposition and discipline of mind, which admirably qualify her for the 
duties of an instructress. 

In the male department the tuition for a session of five months will be 
as follows: 

Spelling, Reading, Writing, Grammar, Geography, Par- 
ley's history and Arithmetic $ 8.00 

Latin and Greek Languages, Rhetoric, Logic, Algebra, 

Geometry, Navigation and Surveying 12.50 

French 12.50 

In the female department — 1st Division. 

Spelling, Reading, Writing, Grammar, Elementary Geog- 
raphy, Parley's History, and Arithmetic per session. . .$ 8.00 

2d Division. 

Ancient and Modern History, Universal Geography, 
American History, Rhetoric, Logic, Natural Philoso- 
phy, Chemistry, Astronomy, Moral and Intellectual 
Philosophy, Natural Theology, Elements of Criticism, 

per session 10.00 

French 12.50 

Botany 3.00 

Drawing 8.00 

Flower Painting 10.00 

Oil Painting 10.00 

Board can be had at the Academy, and in the most respectable fami- 
lies in the neighborhood at $7 per month. 

Simmons J. Baker, 
Collin M. Clark, 
Wm. R. Smith, Jr., 
Wm. R. Smith, Sen'r., 
James L. G. Baker, 
Whitmell J. Hill, 
Charles Shield, 

Trustees. 
May 10th, 1837. Charles Shield, Sect'y. 

^-The Star, May 11, 1837. 
12 



178 Halifax County Schools. 

UNION ACADEMY, 1815. 

The Trustees of the Union Academy, in the county of Halifax, re- 
spectfully inform the Public, that the Institution is now in full and 
complete operation, the Exercises having commenced on the second in- 
stant, under the direction of William E. Webb, formerly Professor of 
Languages in the University of this State. The Plan of Education will 
be such at least as to qualify young gentlemen to enter with credit and 
propriety on the establishment of any College or University of this 
country. For the present however, the following scheme hath been 
adopted, according as the several forms or classes can be arranged, viz: 
I. Rudiments of the Latin, Greek and Erench Languages. 
II. Geography, including the nature and use of the Globes, with their 
application to the solution of Geographical and Astronomical 
Problems. 

III. Mathematics, viz : 

The higher branches of Arithmetic. 
Surveying on the most recent and approved plans. 
Euclid's Elements. 

Plain and Spherical Trigonometry and Geometry, with their ap- 
plication to the purposes of Astronomy and Navigation. 
The mensuration of Heights, Distances, Surfaces and Solids. 

IV. Natural or Experimental Philosophy including Astronomy. 
V. Chronology and General History. 

VI. English Grammar, Rhetoric and Belles-Lettres. 

* * * 

Tuition will be Ten Dollars per session paid in advance. 

* * * Jesse N. Faulcon, 
February 10, 1915. President of the Board. 

Attached to the Academy is an English School, under the direction of 
a gentleman well qualified for the duties of his profession. 
- — Raleigh Register, February 17, 1815. 

UNION ACADEMY IN 1818. 

UNION ACADEMY— HALIFAX, N. C. 

The Exercises of this Institution will commence on the first Mon- 
day in January next, under the superintendance of William E. Webb, 
A. M. as Principal. The course of Instruction will comprise the Rudi- 
ments of the Latin, Greek and French Languages; Geography and the 
Use of the Globe ; the Mathematics ; Natural and Experimental Philoso- 
phy ; English Grammar, Rhetoric and Belles Letters. 

Those who intend that their children or wards shall complete their 
education in N. C, will do well, it is presumed, by availing themselves 
of this opportunity — the Preceptor having been educated at the Univer- 



Halifax County Schools. 179 

sity and acted for some time therein as a Tutor and Professor. He has 
also a competent Knowledge of the plans of education at Princeton and 
Yale. * * * Jesse "N. Faulcon, 

President of the Board of Trustees. 

Attached to the Academy it is in contemplation to establish a Pre- 
paratory School, under the care of a Gentleman well qualified to teach 
Reading, Writing and Arithmetic. 

— Raleigh Register, January 2, 1818. 

UNIOtf ACADEMY Itf 1821. 

* * * The Exercises will be resumed on the first Monday in Janu- 
ary following. * * * J. Voorheis, Precpt. 
Nov. 17. 
— Raleigh Register, November 30, 1821. 

FARMWELL GROVE ACADEMY, 1820. 

EDUCATION. 

THE Trustees of the Earmwell-Grove Academy in the upper end of 
Halifax County, takes pleasure in informing the public that they have 
employed Mr. Levi H. McLean, of Guilford county, to take charge of 
the said institution, who comes well recommended for morals, scholar- 
ship and good school discipline. Board in genteel families can be had at 
6 dollars per month. The terms of Tuition are, for the Latin and Greek 
Languages, and the branches of science taught in such seminaries $20 
per annum; for the English Language $16. The Trustees flatter them- 
selves that the great assiduity and attention given by Mr. McLean, where 
he has been teaching — the healthiness of the place, and the deserved 
celebrity of Mrs. Hines' Eemale School at the same place, will entitle 
them to a liberal share of public patronage. The school will commence 
the second Monday in January next — the early attention of Guardians 
and Parents is invited. James Grant, Sec'y. 

December 5, 1820. 

— The Star, December 8, 1820. 

FARMWELL GROVE ACADEMY IN 1824. 

THE Trustees of Earmwell Grove Academy having employed Mr. 
Bragg, a graduate of our University, to take charge of the Institution, 
the exercises of the school will be resumed on the 2d Monday in Janu- 
ary next. The terms of Board and Tuition are still continued at the 
same low rates as heretofore. J. Grant. 

— Raleigh Register, December 3, 182J+. 

FARMWELL GROVE ACADEMY Ltf 1826. 

AN Examination of the Students of Farmville Grove Academy, under 
the superintendence of Mr. John J. Wyche, the Principal of said Insti- 
tution, will take place on Thursday and Eriday, the first and second 



180 Halifax County Schools. 

day of June next. Select Orations will be delivered on Evenings of said 
days. Parents, Guardians and others are invited to attend. 

May 20, 1826. James Grant. 

—Raleigh Register, May 26, 1826. 

FARMWELL GROVE ACADEMY IN 1837. 

For the Star. 

Mr. Editor: Having, on the 9th inst., attended an examination of 
the Earmwell Grove Academy, I cannot forbear offering you, for publica- 
tion, a brief notice of the same, or of my favorable impressions from the 
result. Suffice to say of the examination, that, being conducted by sev- 
eral well educated gentlemen, before a numerous and highly respectable 
assembly, but one impression could not but be made on the minds of all, 
as to the handsome qualifications and untiring industry of Mr. J. Judge 
the principal, and the assiduous application of the students during the 
past session. The dialogues and single pieces appeared to be well se- 
lected, and calculated as well to instruct, as to amuse and entertain. 

The exhibition was closed by a highly appropriate and well delivered 
address, by the Rev. S. J. Harris. From the mouth of the speaker 
alone could be had a correct impression of the merits of this address. 
But it may be remarked here, that, the all important point enforced was 
the moral necessity of uniting religion and literature in order to ensure 
the grand result of usefulness and happiness. And the students were 
emphatically warned against three most potent enemies of such result, 
viz : idleness, intemperance and infidelity. 

The writer is one no otherwise interested in the Earmwell Grove Acad- 
emy, or those taking a part in its late exercises, than by philanthropy 
and love of education, and therefore signs himself 

A Spectator. 

—The Star, June 21, 1887. 

ENFIELD ACADEMY, 1823. 

The exercises of this School in the male department of this institution, 
will recommence the first Monday in January next, under the direction 
of Mr. Philip B. Wiley of Newbern. * * * 

Enfield, N. C. Dec. 1823. ¥m. Bradford, Secry. 

— Raleigh Register, December 30, 1823. 

ENFIELD ACADEMY UNDER THOMAS RAGSDALE, 1828. 

ENFIELD ACADEMY. 

The exercises of this seminary will be resumed the first day of Jan. 
under the continued superintendence of Thos. L. Ragsdale, a gentleman 
of acknowledged capacity and correct moral deportment, who possesses 
the rare faculty of imparting his knowledge to his pupils with much 
facility. 



Halifax County Schools. 181 

The course of studies will be preparatory to the classes of the Univer- 
sity. 

Tuition to be paid in advance. 

For Spelling, Reading and Writing, $10.00 per Session. 

Arithmetic, English Grammar and Parsing, Geography, with the con- 
struction of Maps, $12.50. 

Latin and Greek Languages, $12.50. 

Ehetoric, Logic, Natural and Moral Philosophy, $15.00. 

Geometry, including plane and Spherical Trigonometry, Surveying, 
Levelling, &c. $20.00. 

Bookkeeping, by single and double entry, $20.00. 

A student of a higher class may prosecute any study of an inferior 
class, without any additional tuition fee. 

Board can be had at 5 dollars per month in families convenient to the 
Academy. A public examination in June, of which timely notice will 
be given. 

The Academy occupies a high and healthful site, remote from all 
scenes of dissipation. 

The strictest attention will be paid to impressing upon the students, 
the necessity of a gentlemanly deportment, both in and out of school. 

Letters (postpaid) directed to the principal, will be promptly noticed. 

Board of Trustees, 
By John Branch. 

The Editor of the Edenton Gazette will please insert the above until 
forbid. 

— The Star, December 4, 1828. 

HYDE PARK ACADEMY, 1828. 

HYDE PARK, HALIFAX, K C. 
ACADEMY FOR YOUNG LADIES. 

MRS. PHILLIPS announces to the public, that the first session of 
her Academy for young ladies closed on the 2d instant, by an examina- 
tion, which was attended by a numerous assemblage of the ladies and 
gentlemen of the vicinity. It becomes her not publicly to express an 
opinion relative to the attainments or merits of her pupils; but from 
the annexed certificate, she flatters herself that they acquitted them- 
selves with credit & propriety, and to the satisfaction of all who were 
present. The second session will commence on the first Monday in 
January, 1829, and close by a public examination on the first Tuesday 
in June. 

Having had the benefit of an experience of sixteen years in different 
parts of the United States, Mrs. Phillips professes to teach all the 
branches of education usually taught in the best Female Seminaries, 
viz. Orthography, Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, English Grammar, 
Ancient and Modern Geography with the use of the Globes, Ancient 



182 Halifax County Schools. 

and Modern History, Rhetoric, Natural Philosophy and Astronomy; 
Chemistry and Botany, Composition, Needle "Work and Embroidery, 
Drawing, Painting and Music on the Piano. Arrangements have also 
been made with an accomplished Lady of New York, who, should neces- 
sity require, will come on immediately as an Assistant. 

The prices of Tuition by the Academical year of ten months, and to 
be paid half yearly in advance, will be as follows, viz : 

For the ordinary branches of English Education $20.00 

Needle Work and Embroidery 10.00 

Drawing and Painting 10.00 

Music on the Piano 40.00 

The situation of the Academy unites advantages, excelled, perhaps, 
by no place in the State. It is 14 miles westward of Halifax, on the 
direct road to Warrenton ; is remote from all scenes of extravagance and 
dissipation, has pure air and water, and a neighborhood society, who, 
for urbanity of manners, are inferior to none in the country. 

Mr. and Mrs. Webb, who reside at Hyde Park, will be prepared to 
receive young ladies as boarders in their private family, at the rate 
of eighty dollars for the scholastic year of ten months. No contingen- 
cies. They pledge themselves to afford them ample and wholesome diet, 
to take particular care of their apparel, and in all respects to contribute 
to their comfort and convenience. 

December 10th, 1828. 

CERTIFICATE. 

Hyde Park, N. C, Dec. 2, 1828. 

The undersigned, who, by invitation, attended the examination of the 
pupils of Mrs. Phillips, would feel themselves wanting in respect for 
her well known ability and exertions, were they not publicly to express 
their unanimous approbation of the accuracy and manner, in which all 
the young ladies went through their various exercises. We believe, that 
if rapidity in their progress, fair and correct writing, and elegant speci- 
mens of painting and needle work, can entitle any female students to 
commendation, these are entitled to the highest. We also cannot refrain 
from expressing our opinion, that if diligence and capacity, combined 
with strict and uniform attention to the health, the improvement, the 
morals and general deportment of those who may be committed to her 
care, can entitle the lady who presides in this institution, to a share 
of the public patronage, the expectations and hopes of parents and 
guardians, will not be disappointed. 

(Signed) Jno. Alston, 

Marion Sanders, 
Tippoo S. Brownlow, 
M. A. Willcox, 
John Carter. 
— The Star, December 25, 1828. 



Halifax County Schools. 183 

SCOTLAND NECK FEMALE SEMINARY. 

SCOTLAND NECK 
FEMALE SEMINARY. 

The public are most respectfully informed that the examination of 
the above named Seminary will take place on Friday, 16th inst., at 
the residence of the subscriber; at which time the Parents and Guar- 
dians are particularly invited to attend. 

The exercises of the Institution will recommence on Monday the 16th 
of January next, under the direction, as heretofore, of Miss Rowan, of 
New York. Miss Hanks, of New York, will superintend the Music 
Department. 

The following will be the course of studies : Reading, Writing, Geog- 
raphy, Grammar, Spelling, Composition, Arithmetic, Ancient and 
Modern History, History of the United States, Rhetoric, Logic, Natural 
Philosophy, Astronomy, Moral and Intellectual Philosophy, Natural 
Theology, Elements of Criticism, Chemistry and Botany. 

For the above branches per session of 5 months, $10. 

Latin $5.00 

Drawing 5.00 

Flower Painting 5.00 

Painting in Oil Colors 10.00 

French 10.00 

Music 15.00 

Board $7 per month. Lem. L. Parker. 

Dec. 9th, 1836. 

— The Star, January 12, 1837. 

SCOTLAND NECK FEMALE SEMINARY. 

The examination of the pupils of this Institution will take place on 
Friday the 16th instant. Parents and Guardians of young Ladies are 
particularly and most respectfully invited to attend. 

The Scotland Neck Female Seminary will re-open on the second 
Monday in July next, under the care and instruction of Miss Eugenia 
Hanks, of Troy, N. Y. Miss Hanks, has heretofore had charge of the 
Music Department. The entire control of this Seminary will hereafter 
be entrusted to her care, and the subscriber takes much pleasure in 
assuring the public and his friends that her qualifications are believed 
to be of the first order, having finished her education at Mrs. Willard's 
celebrated school. 

Every attention to the morals, health and comfort of young ladies 
will be paid by Mrs. P. and himself. The following will be the course 
of studies: Spelling, Reading, Writing, Grammar, Composition, Geog- 
raphy, Parley's History, Arithmetic, Ancient and Modern History, 
United States History, Rhetoric, Logic, Natural Philosophy, Chemis- 



184 Halifax County Schools. 

try, Astronomy, Moral and Intellectual Philosophy, Natural Theology, 
and Karnes Elements of Criticism. For the above branches per session 
of five months, $10. 

Botany $3.00 

Drawing 5.00 

Music 15.00 

It is believed there is not a healthier situation in the county of Hali- 
fax, and certainly very few in the Eastern part of the State. 
Board $7 per month. 

June 6th, 1837. Lem. L. Parker. 

— The Star, June 21, 1831. 

LA YALLEE FEMALE SEMINARY, 1837. 

The exercises of the above Institution will recommence on the third 
Monday (16th) of January — the subscriber with much pleasure informs 
his friends that Mrs. Emma McElvie continues Principal in the 
Seminary. 

The following will be the course of studies : Beading, Writing, Spell- 
ing, Composition, Grammar, Elementary Geography, United States 
History, Arithmetic, Ancient and Modern History, Universal Geog- 
raphy, including Ancient Geography, American History, Bhetoric, 
Logic, Natural Philosophy, Euclid, Algebra, Astronomy, Moral and 
Intellectual Philosophy, Natural Theology, Elements of Criticism, 
Chemistry and Botany, for the above branches per session of five 
months, $10. 

Latin $5.00 

French 7.50 

Drawing 5.00 

Painting in Oil Colors 10.00 

Music on the Piano Forte 15.00 

Music on Guitar 10.00 

Board 40.00 

Half the board in advance. 
• Halifax Co., N. C, Dec. 7, 1836. Tippoo S. Brownlow. 

—The Star, January 12, 1887 '. 

LA YALLEE FEMALE SEMINARY, 1838. 

The above Institution will be open for the reception of pupils on 
the first Monday in January, under the care of two northern ladies of 
the first qualifications — a full advertisement in due time. 

Halifax co., N. C, Nov. 6, 1838. Tippoo S. Brownlow. 

— The Star, December 26, 1838. 



Halifax County Schools. 185 

LA YALLEE FEMALE SEMINARY COURSE OF STUDY, 1839. 

Situated in Halifax county (equidistant) 20 miles between the towns 
of Halifax and Warrenton. The subscriber respectfully notifies his 
friends and the public generally, that the above institution will be open 
for the reception of pupils on Monday the 7th of January. The insti- 
tution will be under the care of two Ladies from the aSTorth, who bring 
with them the highest recommendations from gentlemen of the first 
standing, of their moral and literary attainments. 

Thankful for the very liberal patronage hitherto received, he flatters 
himself that with all advantages in point of healthy location, ample 
accommodations of buildings and instructions of the highest grade, the 
school will rise still higher in merit and public estimation. 

The following branches will be taught in the above institution : — 
Eeading, Writing, Spelling, Grammar, Elementary Geography, United 
States History, and Arithmetic; Geology, Ancient and Modern History, 
Universal Geography, American History, Rhetorick, Logic, Natural 
Philosophy, Comstocks; Arnott's Physics, Geometry, Algebra, Astron- 
omy, Moral and Intellectual Philosophy, Physiology, Elements of 
Criticism, Chemistry and Botany. 

Eor the above branches per session of five months $10.00 

French per session of five months 7.50 

Latin do do 5.00 

Music on the Piano Forte 15.00 

Music on the Harp 30.00 

Music on the Guitar 10.00 

Drawing and Painting in "Water Colors 5.00 

Mezzotinting, wax flowers and fruit together 15.00 

When taken separately, each 8.00 

Board, one half in advance 40.00 

Halifax co., K C, Dec. 20. 1838. Tippoo S. Beownlow. 

David Outlaw, Bertie, 
Samuel Arrington, Wash, 
J. E. J. Daniel, Ealeigh, 
Isaac Hilliakd, ^ 
Eev. S. Weller, V Halifax, 
Mason L. Wiggins, J 

Trustees. 

—The Star, January 9, 1839. 

GRANT'S FEMALE BOARDING SCHOOL, 1837. 

MES. E. C. GRANT'S FEMALE BOARDING SCHOOL 

Will recommence on the third Monday in January, 1838. Every 
attention will be paid to the health, morals, and literary advancement 
of the pupils under her care. 



186 Halifax County Schools. 

Terms. 

Board and tuition, including all the English branches, per ses- 
sion of five months $55.00 

Latin and French, each 5.00 

Music on the Piano Forte 15.00 

Near Enfield, Halifax county, JST. C, November, 1837. 
— Raleigh Register, December 1^, 1831. 



IREDELL COUNTY SCHOOLS 

STATESVILLE ACADEMY, 1815. 

The Trustees of Statesville Academy inform the public that the Rev- 
erend John Mushatt has commenced teaching in that institution. The 
Latin, Greek and Hebrew Languages, English Grammar, Geography, 
Euclid's Elements, Natural and Moral Philosophy, Rhetoric and Logic, 
will be taught. * * * B. Worke, Sec. 

9th Dec. 1815. 

— The Star, December 29, 1815. 

MUSHAT CONTINUES STATESVILLE ACADEMY, 1820. 

EDUCATION 

The connexion formerly existing between the Trustees of Statesville 
Academy and the subscriber as Teacher having dissolved, Parents and 
Guardians are hereby informed, that the different branches heretofore 
taught in this academy, he will still continue to teach in a suitable 
house prepared for this purpose. The satisfaction which the discharge 
of his office has given during the term of five years, and the respectable 
standing of his students in the different higher seminaries which they 
have entered, afford a well grounded hope that the usual liberal support 
and encouragement will be continued. Parents and Guardians may rest 
assured, that every necessary attention shall be paid to the deportment, 
the progress and accuracy of pupils. 

The School will commence on the first of January next. To accom- 
modate the people of South Carolina, there will be but one vacation 
in the year, to commence on the 16th of November, 1821. 

Boarding can be had, as usual, at the houses of Messrs. Work, Hart, 
and McKnight, &c. 

Statesville, Nov. 24, 1820. John Mtjshat, V. D. M. 

— Western Carolinian, December 5, 1820. 

[On January 30, 1821, the above with the following note to adver- 
tisement of Statesville Academy appeared :] 

N. B. — Erom the inexperience of youth, it often happens they are 
too easily led into habits of extravagance. In these they too success- 
fully indulge, notwithstanding the care and vigilance of the trustees. 
The teacher, especially, suffers the blame, although errors of this kind 
are committed without his knowledge and permission. Aware of this, 
and at the same time desirous to afford every security to parents and 
guardians, the following rules will be strictly attended to : 

Every student shall be confined to one particular store for the pur- 
chase of those articles of which he may stand in need; his account 
in said store to be carefully examined once in every month. 

(187) 



188 Iredell County Schools. 

ISTo student shall be permitted to play at unlawful games, nor in- 
dulge in the use of ardent spirits; and to prevent these evils their 
accounts in taverns shall be examined and a report obtained from the 
owners of boarding houses respecting the conduct of their boarders, 
once in every month. 

These and the other regulations of the school will be carried into 
execution by the following gentlemen : Col. Richard Allison, Dr. Joseph 
Guy, Rev. Dr. McRee, Robert Worke, Esq., Wm. McKnight, Esq., Gen. 
George L. Davidson, John Huggins, Esq., Capt. Alexander Dunlap, 
Thomas Allison. J. M. 

— Western Carolinian, January 30, 1821. 

MR. MUSHAT LEAVES STATESVILLE, 1825. 

EDUCATION. 

Through the solicitation of his friends and employers, the subscriber 
has agreed to continue the usual course of his academical instructions 
at Fort Defiance, near Statesville, Iredell County, N. C, during the 
ensuing year. The terms are as follows : Every young man will be 
required to produce satisfactory testimonials of his sobriety and tem- 
perance. No young man will be admitted who has been expelled or 
suspended from any similar institution. No student will be admitted 
for a term less than two sessions; the first to commence on the 2d of 
January and end on the 7th of June; the second to commence on the 
8th of June and end on the 16th of November. The price of tuition 
will be $10 per session, to be paid at the close of each session. The 
price of boarding, including washing, firewood and candles, will be 
$7 per month, to be paid at the end of each session. 

Nov. 18, 1825. John Mushat. 

- — Catawba Journal, November 29, 1825. 

GARDEN'S LANCASTER SCHOOL, 1822. 

A Real 

Lancasterian School, 

Is now, for the first time, introduced in this county, for both sexes, 
attended by male and female ushers, under the superintendence of 
Alexander Garden, from the Spratt's Ville Lancasterian School, where 
he studied this new and expeditious system with great success, under 
Mr. Peter Ulrick, who has recently arrived from Philadelphia with 
the latest improvements, &c. and possesses certificates of that fact. 

The branches taught in his school are such as are comprised in an 
English education, &c. Parents and Guardians, who may feel disposed 
to place their children under his care, may depend that nothing on his 
part shall be wanting to expedite their progress in learning, and to 
instill moral principles into their minds; and will, he trusts, be able 
to satisfy every reasonable expectation. 



Ikedell County Schools. 189 

The object of these schools is to lessen the load, of human misery; 
and to better the religious, moral, and social condition of society, by 
teaching those who attend not only to read and write, &c. but what is 
infinitely of more moment, the fear of the Lord, veneration for his holy 
word — for the ordinances of the Lord's house, and a due observance of 
the Lord's day. 

The permanent institutions of this happy country, render it a proper 
theatre for the display of all the numerous blessings which flow from 
its general introduction, as this system has done more to civilize the 
barbarian, enlighten the ignorant, and inculcate the principles of virtue, 
than any scheme of reformation of human origin ever presented to the 
world. 

The public are earnestly invited to visit the school, every Friday 
afternoon, when they may fully satisfy themselves with the propriety 
of the system; where seats are prepared for them, and they can enter 
and retire at pleasure, without interrupting the school. 

Centre, Iredell Co. Nov. 8, 1822. Alexander Garden. 



THE LANCASTERIAlSr SYSTEM. 

To the Public. 

Having, with many others, attended the examination of Mr. Alexan- 
der Garden as a Lancasterian teacher, by Mr. Peter Ulrick, we embrace 
this early opportunity to testify the satisfaction we derived from the 
spectacle ; and do not hesitate to declare that we deem this system as 
important to the morals and religion, as to the literature of the rising 
race. We are happy to find that the Lancasterian system, as now eluci- 
dated, incorporates the rudiments of religion with the rudiments of 
language ; and we cannot too warmly recommend it to the patronage 
of our fellow-citizens. We think it no more than an act of justice to 
declare, that though Mr. Ulrick proposed many hundred questions, and 
required Mr. Garden to go through a great quantity of detail, which 
lasted several hours, yet Mr. Garden answered with great expertness, 
and practiced with dexterity with a number of his scholars. We are 
decidedly of opinion, that if all public teachers were subjected to such 
severe and public examination, so much quackery in education would 
not be practiced as has been. 

In short, we are firmly of opinion, that the Lancasterian system, as 
now practised by Mr. Ulrick, embraces advantages unknown to any 
other. 

Jas. Spratt, President; J. Dinkins, Thos. Greer, A. H. Erwin, S. W. 
Fox, J. D. Boyd, Jno. Barnett, Thos. Spratt, Thos. Boyd. 



United States of America, State of North Carolina, Mecklenburg 

County. 

Certificate of a real Lancasterian Teacher, which system can only 
be learnt by personal application and study in a well organized school. 



190 Iredell County Schools. 

I, PETER ULRICK, (who learnt the system of the original school 
in Philadelphia, under the direction of Edward Baker, a pupil of 
JOSEPH LANCASTER, the inventor, and having practised it for a 
considerable time with numbers of children with all the improvements 
since its first introduction, and possess a regular certificate of the fact,) 
do hereby certify, that Alexander Garden has practised and studied in 
Spratt's Ville Model School, under my direction; and that having un- 
dergone a public examination, I do believe him qualified to teach one 
hundred children the elements of a common education by this system, 
and to apply the same principles in teaching several other branches of 
knowledge. 

In testimony whereof, I have subscribed my name and affixed the 
seal of St. Peter's Model School, this 15th day of October, 1822. 

Peter Ulrick. 

At the above examination made as above stated, present, Thos. Spratt, 
A. EL Erwin, J. D. Boyd, William Flaniken, Thos. Boyd, John McDow- 
ell, Jno. Barnett, Hugh McDowell, Alex. Porter, J. Dinkins, S. W.Eox, 
Thos. Greer, J. Smith. 

I, as President, testify to the fact of such meeting and examination. 

Jas. Spratt, Pres'dt. 

— Western Carolinian, November 12, 1822. 

EBENEZER ACADEMY, 1823. 

This institution was incorporated during the session of the General 
Assembly in 1822. It is now open to all who wish either to pursue a 
course of liberal education, or study English Grammar and Geography. 
All branches of education required for admission into college, will here 
be taught. We are happy in stating to the public, that a new and com- 
modious Academy will be completed in a few days, * * *. The 
Academy is in a rural situation, six miles from Statesville, so that 
students will be measurably free from temptations to vice. It is con- 
venient to church, where there is preaching statedly. * * * 

Iredell County, 1ST. C, Nov. 1823. Wm. A. Hall. 

— Western Carolinian, December 9, 1823. 

EBENEZER ACADEMY PREPARES FOR THE UNIVERSITY, 1829. 

This institution, under the superintendence of the subscriber, is now 
open for the reception of students. A course of studies is here pursued 
preparatory to admission into the University of this State. In addi- 
tion to this, instruction will be given in all the branches of an English 
education. 

The healthy situation of this Academy, the good state of morals in the 
neighborhood, and the advantages of an enlightened ministry, which the 
students can always enjoy, are objects worthy the attention of those 



Ikedell County Schools. 191 

wishing to educate their sons. Board can be had in respectable families. 
at one dollar per week. Tuition proportionably low. 

H. R. Hall. 

Bethany Church, Iredell county, H". C, July 7, 1829. 

— Yadkin & Catawba Journal, July 1%., 1829. 

CHAPMAN'S CLASSICAL SCHOOL, 1828. 

A CLASSICAL SCHOOL, 

FOR both sexes, is now taught by the subscriber and a female assist- 
ant, at Centre Meeting House in Iredell county, 25 miles west of 
Salisbury, 22 north of Charlotte, and 18 south of Statesville. The 
place is remarkably healthy, and retired from the noise and bustle of 
the world. Youth may here be prepared for entering any of the classes 
of college, or they may be conducted through the whole course of a 
collegiate education. 

Females will be taught the different branches of useful science, needle- 
work, painting on velvet, and the French Language. The object of the 
Teachers in this Seminary will be not merely to exercise the memory, 
but to inform the judgment, improve the understanding and lead their 
pupils to a practical acquaintance with Science. Particular attention 
will be paid to the morals of youth, and the whole course conducted in 
the fear of God and with reference to the virtue of the Gospel. 

The prices of tuition are $2.50 a quarter, for reading, writing, arith- 
metic; $3.75 for English Grammar and Geography; $5 for Mathematics, 
Painting, the higher branches of science and Latin, Greek and French 
languages. Boarding may be obtained in the family of the subscriber, 
and in reputable families in the neighborhood, at the moderate price 
of $1.50 a week, payable quarterly. 

Mount Mourne, Feb. 4, 1828. Robert H. Chapman - . 

— Catawba Journal, February 12, 1828. 



JOHNSTON COUNTY SCHOOLS 

AVERASBOROUGH ACADEMY, 1804. 

On the 23d Day of June next, at Averasborough, will be let to the low- 
est Bidder, the Building of a framed House in said Town, thirty-six 
by twenty Feet and twenty Feet Pitch, for a Seminary of Learning. 
Materials are now on the Spot. Further Particulars will be exhibited 
on the day by the Commissioners. Isaac Williams, 

Robert Draughon, 
Gerard Banks. 

Commissioners. 
— Raleigh Register, June 11, 1801/-. 

SMITHFIELD ACADEMY, 1812. 

TO CARPENTERS. 

Will be let to the lowest bidder, in the Town of Smithfield, Johnston 
County, on Monday the 10th day of August next, the building of an 
Academy in said Town. The dimensions will be 22 feet, by 40 feet, two 
stories high, with such conveniences as is necessary for an Academy. 
This undertaking will be well worth the attention of Workmen. The 
terms of pay will be made known on the above day. Bond and approved 
securities for the faithful performance of the contract, will be required 
by Commissioners: Daniel Boon, 

David Turner, 
William Sasser, 
W. W. Hopkins, 
Robert H. Helme, 
Henry Gut, 
Ellick Sanders, 
W. W. Bryan, 
Samuel Mitchnor. 

Smithfield, Johnston County, BT. C, July 21, 1812. 
— The Star, July 31, 1812. 

SMITHFIELD ACADEMY U1VDER DR. WHITE, 1813. 

The Exercises of the Smithfield Academy, 

Will commence on Monday the 11th day of October next under the 
direction of Dr. Willie "N. White. — Board can be had at four or five 
dollars a month at convenient and respectable houses. 

Oct. 7, 1813. William Sasser, Secy. 

—The Star, October 8, 1813. 

(192) 



1,400 Tickets at $5 are $7, 

1 Prize of $1,000 

2 500 


5 


It 


" 100 


15 


it 


50 


30 


a 


20 


165 


a 


" 10 


250 


u 


" 6 



Johnston County Schools. 193 

SMITHFIELD ACADEMY LOTTERY, 1820. 

LOTTEKY. 

For the benefit of the Smithfield Academy. 

THE subscribers having been appointed by an act of the Legislature 
of the State of North Carolina, managers of the above lottery; and 
having entered into bond for the faithful performance of duties; and 
the payment of all prizes according to law, now offer the public the 
following 

SCHEME. 

000. 

of $1,000 is $1,000 

1,000 

500 

750 

600 

1,650 

1,500 

468 7,000 

Subject to a deduction of 15 per cent, and not two blanks to a prize. 

The managers trusting to the public spirit, which has hitherto and 
still ought to animate every town in support of education, upon which 
more than anything else, our national honor and independence depends, 
confidently hope that the patronage of enlightened individuals and the 
public at large will soon enable them to complete the sale of tickets, 
and the drawing of the Lottery. 

The present scheme does not embrace the capital for which the man- 
agers have given bond, nor does it contemplate to raise the sum author- 
ized by law ; yet as the experiment is untried, they have thought proper 
to propose the first class on as small a scale as possible, reserving to 
themselves the right of proceeding in future to one or two additional 
classes. 

As soon as a sufficient number of tickets are disposed of, the draw- 
ing will commence, and the public will be notified through the medium 
of papers when the drawing has closed. 

The prizes will be paid in sixty days after the drawing, and all prizes 
not demanded within one year from the drawing will be considered as 
forfeited for the benefit of the institution. Sam'l Mitchneb 

Thomas Rice, 
M. Lloyd Hill, 

Smithfield, Johnston Co. N". Carolina. Managers. 

ZsT. B. — If no drawing takes place within twelve months of the first 
day of March next, the purchase money is to be refunded for all tickets 
bought, when demanded. 

— The Star, January 28, 1820. 
13 



194 Johnston County Schools. 

SMITIIFIELD ACADEMY UNDER ROBERT POOR, 1820. 

SMITHFIELD ACADEMY. 

THE exercises of this institution will commence on the first Monday 
in March next, under the superintendence of Mr. Robert Brevard Poor, 
A. B. Mr. Poor graduated at Cambridge (Mass.) last August, with 
the distinguished honor of that University, and comes recommended to 
us in the most nattering terms. 

By order of the Trustees, M. Lloyd Hill, Secy. 

February 21, 1820. 

— The Star, February 25, 1820. 

SMITHFIELD ACADEMY UNDER A. W. GAY, 1827. 

SMITHFIELD ACADEMY. 

THE Public are informed, that the exercises of this Institution are 
in successful operation, under the immediate superintendence of Rev. 
A. W. Gay. The Trustees can with pleasure state, that their expecta- 
tions concerning this gentleman, have been more than realized since 
witnessing his superior management in the business of instruction. 
The school year, in this Academy, is divided into two sessions, of 5 
months each ; provides for two examinations, a private and public, and 
but one vacation, to continue from the middle of August until the middle 
of October, allowing the scholars the privilege of being at home two 
months in the fall. Students may here prepare themselves for either 
of the classes in the University. 

S. Mitchenok, Pres't. 

— Raleigh Register, March 9, 1821. 

TEACHERS IN SMITHFIELD ACADEMY., 1827. 
SMITHFIELD MALE AND FEMALE ACADEMY. 

THE third quarter of this Institution will commence on Monday the 
15th of October next. 

The subscriber is happy to be able to inform the public that he has 
employed Miss A. D. Salmon of Fayetteville, to take charge of the 
Female Department. 

Instruction will be given in all branches usually taught in Academies. 

A. W. Gay, Principal. 

The Editors of the ISTewbern Sentinal will please insert the above 
once a week for 3 weeks. 
Sept. 17. 
— Raleigh Register, September 28, 1827. 



Johnston County Schools. 195 

SMITHEIELD ACADEMY UNDER J. WABffOCK, 182S. 

SMITHFIELD ACADEMY. 

THIS Institution will be opened after the Christmas vacation on the 
1st January, 1828, under the superintendence of Rev. J. Warnock, as 
Principal. Mr. W. is a graduate of Glasgow University, from his 
testimonials, which are numerous and satisfactory, from his ex- 
perience and success in teaching during the last six years in this coun- 
try, the Trustees feel confident in saying that the advantages of this 
Academy will equal any in the State. The classical course will be 
adapted to that observed at Chapel Hill. From the unremitting atten- 
tion which will be paid to the morals and improvement of Students 
sent to this Academy, the Trustees expect that it shall receive a liberal 
share of public support. 

Six or eight Students can be accommodated with Boarding in the 
family of the Principal. 

By order of the Board of Trustees. Sam'l Mitchnee, Pres't. 

Smithfield, Dec. 20. 

— Raleigh Register, December 28, 1827. 

SMITHFIELD ACADEMY UNDER 1YM. BROOME, 1835. 

SMITHFIELD ACADEMY. 

The exercises of this Institution are now in operation, under the 
superintendence of the subscriber. Having for some years been engaged 
in School Teaching, he flatters himself that he will be able to render 
general satisfaction. Eight or ten Boarders can be conveniently accom- 
modated in the family of the subscriber. Payments to be made quar- 
terly, for Board and Tuition. Terms of tuition : 

Spelling, Reading and Writing, pr. session $6.00 

Arithmetic 8.00 

English Grammar and Geography 18.00 

The art of Surveying 10.00 

"Wm. Broome. 
Smithfield, Johnston county, February 19th, 1835. 
— The Standard, Raleigh, February 27, 1835. 



LINCOLN COUNTY SCHOOLS 

PLEASANT RETREAT ACADEMY, 1820. 

LINCOLNTON ACADEMY. 

THE Trustees have lately succeeded in engaging the Rev. Joseph E. 
Bell, late of Union Seminary, in Tennessee, as principal teacher. They 
have good reason to believe that Mr. Bell is eminently qualified to teach 
the Latin and Greek languages, and the various branches of English 
education, which will be taught at this academy. 

The situation of the Academy, the trustees consider advantageous in 
every point of view; it is well known to be healthy, and pleasant. The 
country adjacent, is fertile, and the inhabitants both of the neighbor- 
hood around it, are remarkable for their frugal and steady habits, 
morality and industry. Boarding may be obtained in the village and 
its vicinity for from thirty-seven to fifty dollars per session. 

The exercises of this institution will commence on the first day of 
February; and the first session will end on the 20th day of June. The 
second session will commence the 11th day of July, and expire the 22d 
day of December following. 

The price of tuition for the first class, consisting of Reading, Writing 
and Arithmetic, five dollars per session — the second class to include the 
arts and sciences, the Latin and Greek languages, ten dollars per session. 
The strictest attention will be paid to the morals of the students, by 
the principal teacher. D. Reinhakdt, Secretary 

Lincolnton, 1ST. C. Jan. 24, 1820. to the Board of Trustees. 

— The Star, February J/., 1820. 

ACT OF INCORPORATION', 1821. 

Posted here Eeby 6th, 1875, D. Schenck. 

An Act to Incorporate the Lincolnton Female Academy Dec. 27, 1821. 

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina, 
and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That James 
Bivings, Vardry McBee, Daniel Hoke, James Hill, John Mushatt, 
Joseph E. Bell, and Joseph Morris be, and they are hereby declared to 
be a body politic and corporate, to be known and distinguished by the 
name of the Trustees of Lincolnton Female Academy, and by that name 
shall have perpetual succession and a common seal, and that they, the 
said Trustees, and their successors, by the name aforesaid, or a majority 
of them, shall be able and capable in law to take, demand, receive, and 
possess all monies, goods and chattels that shall be given to them for 
the use of said Academy, and the same shall apply according to the will 
of the donor; and, by gift, purchase, or devise, to take, have, receive, 

(196) 



Lincoln County Schools. 197 

possess, enjoy and retain to them and their successors forever any lands, 
rents, tenements, hereditaments of what kind, nature or quality soever 
the same may be in trust and confidence, that the same or the profits 
thereof shall be applied to and for the use and purposes of establishing 
and endowing the said Institution. 

II. And be it further enacted, That the said Trustees and their suc- 
cessors, or a majority of them, by the name aforesaid, shall be able and 
capable in law to bargain, sell, grant, alien, or dispose of and convey 
and assure to the purchaser or purchasers such lands, rents, tenements 
and hereditaments aforesaid, when the conditions of the grant to them, 
or the will of the devisor does not forbid it, and that the said Trustees 
and their successors, or a majority of them, shall be able and capable in 
law by the name aforesaid, to sue and be sued, plead and be impleaded, 
in any court within this State, and to do and perform all such acts 
and things as are incident to, or usually exercised by, bodies politic 
and corporate, not inconsistent with the law of this State, touching 
the object of their incorporation. 

III. Be it further enacted, That this act shall be in force from its 
ratification. (This act is dated Dec. 27th, 1821. D. Schenck.) 

[On first page of record book David Schenck copied the above. — 
C. L. C] 

PLEASANT RETREAT ACADEMY IX 1822. 

EXAMINATION. 

The second semi-annual examination of the Pleasant Retreat Acad- 
emy, under the direction of the Rev. John Mushat and Mr. Nathaniel 
N. Smith, commenced on Monday, the 11th of the present instant, and 
closed on the succeeding Wednesday. 

The trustees are again, from a sense of the duty they owe to the 
teachers, to the public and themselves, obliged to express their high 
satisfaction in relation to the accuracy and progress of the students. 
Not to find one individual among a number of students, amounting to 
about eighty, who did not afford satisfactory evidence of the care and 
ability of the instructors and of the improvement of the students them- 
selves, was calculated to excite a pleasure and present prospects more 
easily conceived than described. This, and the good order of the stu- 
dents, show in a clear point of view the happy effects that result from 
the combined operation of talents and faithfulness in those to whom 
the education of youth is entrusted. 

The exercises of the academy will again commence on the first of 
January next, under the direction of the same gentlemen who have 
conducted it during the last year. Boarding, including fire wood, lodg- 
ing, washing and candles, can be had at the usual price of $7.50 per 
month. 

To accommodate parents and guardians, who live more southwardly, 
and whose patronage has been liberal, there will be but one vacation 



198 Lincoln County Schools. 

in the year, which will commence about the middle of November; 
although the term of teaching will be considered as divided into two 
sessions, the first commencing in January, and the second in the month 
of June. D. Reinhardt, Secretary. 

Lincolnton, Nov. 16, 1822. 

— Western Carolinian, November 26, 1822. 

EXAMINATION. 

And Exhibition, Pleasant Retreat Academy, in Lincolnton, N. C. 

The Examination of the students in the Lincolnton Male Academy, 
will commence on the 2nd July, and end on the 3d. The succeeding 
day the students will have an exhibition, which, it is hoped, will be 
highly entertaining, as it will consist of a number of select speeches 
and interesting dramatic performances. 

Parents and Guardians, and friends to literature, are requested to 
attend. D. Reinhaedt, Sec'ry. 

May 25, 1822. 

— Western Carolinian, June 11, 1822. 

PLEASANT RETEEAT EXAMINATION, JULY, 1822. 
LINCOLNTON ACADEMY. 

The Examination of the students of Pleasant Retreat Academy, at 
Lincolnton, N. C, commenced on Monday morning, the 1st of July, 
and closed on the evening of the succeeding Wednesday. The different 
classes were examined on the following branches of study : 

First Class — Webster's Spelling Book. — Thos. H. Bevens, Alfred 
Bevens, George L. Davidson, George W. Henderson, John L. Ramsour. 

Second Class — do. — William W. Mushat, Washington Roderick, 
Daniel Ramsour, Robert Williamson, Rufus Williamson. 

Reading — New Testament. — George W. Henderson, John L. Ram- 
sour, George L. Davidson, Alfred Bevens, Thos. H. Bevens. 

Reading and Definitions — Columbian Orator. — John F. Burton, Hugh 
L. Henderson, Luther M. M'Bee, William Williamson, John Motz, 
George W. Motz. 

Spelling — Walker's Dictionary. — Luther M. M'Bee, Hugh L. Hen- 
derson, John F. Burton, William Williamson, James Denson, James P. 
Henderson, Robert A. Allison, John Motz, George W. Motz. 

The Child's Catechism. — Daniel Ramsour, George W. Henderson, 
George L. Davidson, Thomas H. Bevens, Alfred Bevens. 

The Shorter Catechism. — Robert A. Allison, John F. Burton, Hugh 
L. Henderson, George L. Davidson, Luther M. M'Bee, William William- 
son, John Motz, George W. Motz. 

Blair's Catechism. — Hugh L. Henderson, John F. Burton, George W. 
Henderson, Luther M. M'Bee, William Williamson, Thos. H. Bevens, 
Alfred Bevens, John Motz, George W. Motz, George L. Davidson. 



Lincoln County Schools. 199 

Pike's Arithmetic. — James Denson, Robert A. Allison, James P. 
Henderson. 

Murray's English Grammar, as far as Syntax. — Eli M'Ree, James P. 
Henderson, Robert A. Allison. 

Murray's English Grammar and Exercises. — James Benson, Irby 
Wells. 

Bonnycastle's Algebra, through Irrational Quantities. — Washington 
Ballard, Robert Ballard, Richard Brumby, Theodorus W. Brevard, 
William Davidson, James Harbison, Thomas Lee, William Worke. 

Hutton's Algebra, through Quadratic Equations. — Thomas Dews, 
Charles C. Henderson, Henry Fullenwider. 

Latin Grammar, Corderius, and Selectae veteri. — Henry Fernandes, 
Samuel Abernathy, William Adamson, Benjamin Morris, Green F. 
M'Aphee, Marcus W. Reinhardt, John Ballard, John Grier — ex S. V. — 
Robert Beatie — ex C. and S. V. — Robert Keils. 

Mair's Introduction. — A. C. M'Donald, James Boyd, William Boyd, 
Silas MBee, Sidney Johnson, James Johnson, John Hugging, Thomas 
Williams. 

First Virgil Class. — Samuel Connor, James Connor, Reuben Gerald, 
Ranson Hunly, Michael Hoke, Jacob Ramsour, Richard ISTorris, Frank- 
lin Henderson, John Williamson, Moses White, John Lowry, James 
Abernathy. 

Second Yirgil Class. — James Boyd, William Boyd, John Huggins, 
Osmyn B. Irvine, Silas M'Bee, A." C. M'Donald, William Telliller, 
Thomas Williamson. 

Cicero's Orations, Horace's Odes, and Art of Poetry. — Washington 
Ballard, Richard Burmby, Henry Canty, John Hoke, George Hoke, 
William Coppedge, William Jones, William Worke, James Rudisil, 
Alphonzo Worke, William Thomas, Washington Williams, Thomas 
Dews, Thomas Lee, William Davidson. 

Greek Grammar. — Samuel Connor, James Connor, Henry Canty, 
George Hoke, John Hoke, Michael Hoke, Franklin Henderson, Ranson 
Hunly, William Jones, Reuben Gerald, John Lowry, Richard ISTorris, 
Jacob Ramsour, James Rudisil, William F; Thomas, John Williamson, 
Alphonzo Worke, Moses White. 

Greek Testament. — Samuel Connor, James Connor, William A. 
Coppedge, John Hoke, George Hoke, Michael Hoke. Franklin Hender- 
son, John Lowry, Richard ISTorris, Jacob Ramsour, James Rudisil, Wil- 
liam F. Thomas, Alphonzo Worke, John Williamson. 

Xenophon's Cyropasdia. — William Worke, James Harbison, Wash- 
ington Ballard, Richard Brumby, Thomas Lee, Thomas Dews, Washing- 
ton Williams. 

Watts' Logic and Blair's Lectures. — Charles C. Henderson, Robert 
Ballard, Henry Fullenwider, Thomas Dews. 

With respect to the examination of the above classes, the Trustees 
have deemed it the most expedient to make no distinction ; being con- 
vinced that it is impossible for those, who peruse the columns of a news- 



200 Lincoln County Schools. 

paper containing an account of the examination of the students of an 
Academy, to draw any correct conclusion relative to their progress and 
accuracy. And at the same time, sensible of the duty they owe to 
society, they only observe, that the above examination reflected high 
honor upon the industry and talents of the students, and afforded the 
most satisfactory evidence of the care, diligence and abilities of the 
teachers. 

The exercises of the Academy are still continued under the superin- 
tendence of the Rev. John Mushat and Nathaniel N. Smith. 

It is, likewise, with pleasure the Trustees mention the orderly con- 
duct of the students, the friendly disposition of the citizens toward the 
institution, and the zeal they manifest in promoting its interest. 

These circumstances, while they excite gratitude to Him, who is the 
"giver of every good and perfect gift," cannot but strengthen the confi- 
dence of society, and interest them in promoting the prosperity of an 
institution, which bids fair to promote science and virtue. 

D. Reinhardt, Secry. 

— Western Carolinian, July 16, 1822. 

PLEASANT RETREAT ACADEMY TEACHERS, 1823. 

* * * The exercises of the Academy will again commence on the 
16th of the present inst. under the direction of the Rev. John Mushat, 
and Mr. James J. Watson. In this gentleman, Mr. Mushat, from his 
experience, is warranted to place the highest confidence ; and has no 
doubt but he will prove himself worthy of the patronage of his employers. 

Lincolnton, June 12, 1823. Jacob Forney, Secy. 

— Western Carolinian, June 2!+, 1823. 

PLEASANT RETREAT ACADEMY TEACHERS, 1824. 

EDUCATION. 

The trustees of the Pleasant Retreat Academy, in Lincolnton, 1ST. C, 
have succeeded in procuring another Principal Teacher to supply the 
place of the Rev. John Mushat, viz. : Mr. Allen D. Metcalf, a graduate 
of Hamden Sydney College, Va., who is recommended by Dr. Gushing, 
the President of said College, as a man of unexceptionable moral char- 
acter, and eminently qualified to teach in our best public schools, and 
under whom the exercises of said Academy have commenced. * * * 

Jacob Forney, Sec'y. 

— Western Carolinian, January 20, 1821/.. 

PLEASANT RETREAT TEACHERS, 1825. 
EDUCATION". 

THE Trustees of the Pleasant Retreat Academy, of Lincolnton, N. 
C, have contracted with Samuel P. Simpson and Nathaniel N. Smith, 
to take charge of this institution the ensuing session, which will com- 



Lincoln County Schools. 201 

mence on the first Monday in November next, and which, is to be car- 
ried on permanently under the care of Doctor S. P. Simpson. The 
testimonials which he has produced (from highly respectable authority) 
of his irreproachable moral character and his qualifications to teach, 
and the well known and established moral character and tried abilities 
of Nathaniel 1ST. Smith in the instruction of youth, have impressed 
the Trustees of this Academy with the highest confidence, that the great- 
est attention will be paid, not only to the correct instruction of the 
students in the Languages and Sciences, but likewise to their morals. 
Froni these considerations, together with the healthful situation of the 
Academy, and the low price of boarding, it is confidently expected they 
will receive due encouragement from a liberal and enlightened public. 

Dr. Simpson expects to continue the practice of physic, as usual; 
and having four students of medicine under his care, some of whom 
have been with him for some length of time, and who can assist him 
in his professional duties, he expects to be able to attend to the Academy 
without loss of time. 

By order of the Board of Trustees. Henry Fttlenwider, Secy. 

— Catawba Journal, June 22, 1825. 

RECORD OF THE TRUSTEES OF LOCOLMOX FEMALE AC ADE3TY. 

1. Monday 24th May, 1824. At V. McBee's. Trustees met. Present 
— James Bivings, Vardry McBee, Joseph E. Bell, Jacob Forney, Charles 
E. Reinhardt, and John Zimmerman. Dr. Bivings in the chair. The 
question "Shall, The Academy House be long or square?" was decided 
thus. 

Tor a long house Tor a square house 

J. Forney V. McBee 

C. E. Reinhardt 
J. Zimmennan 
J. E. Bell 

2. The question "Shall we have a bell for the academy?" was unani- 
mously decided in the affirmative. 

3. Shall we build a portico to the academy? 

Yeas Nays 

J. Forney V. McBee 

C. E. Reinhardt J. E. Bell 
J. Zimmerman 

4. Resolved unanimously that the building be brick. Length 40 feet, 
breadth 25 feet; height, 2 stories; 11 feet below; 2 brick thick; 10 feet 
above; 1% brick thick. 

5. On motion of Vardry McBee, James Bivings and John Zimmer- 
man were appointed a committee to draft a plan for the house, and 
to make a bill for the rock, timber, lime, etc., and report the same to 
the Secretary against the 29th Inst. 



202 Lincoln County Schools. 

6. Ordered that the Secretary publish by advertisement at several 
places, that on Saturday the 5th of June, next, the Trustees will attend 
at the Court House in Lincolnton, from 12 till 4 o'clock; for the pur- 
pose of making contracts for the materials, and the work necessary for 
the erection and completion of the Female Academy. 

Adjourned. Joseph E. Bell, Secretary. 

Saturday 5th June, 1824. Trustees met according to the adjourn- 
ment of the Secretary. Present : — Dr. James Bivings, Joseph E. Bell, 
Charles E. Bernhardt, John Zimmerman and Jacob Forney. Dr. Biv- 
ings in the chair. The committee appointed to assist Mrs. Matthews 
to form rules, etc., discharged their duty. 

The Secretary discharged his duty contained in the 6 Besolution of 
the last meeting. 

Bills were handed in by the several carpenters, but as they did not 
contain the same specifications, 

1. Ordered that Dr. James Bivings make out a specific bill with the 
prices blank, and furnish each carpenter with a true copy that they 
may fill the blanks with their own prices and hand them to the Trustees 
on the 19th Inst, between 1 and three o'clock, P. M. 

Mr. Thomas Webster and Mr. Lemuel Moorman handed in bills for 
the brickwork, &c. Laid upon the table for consideration. 

Samuel Yount is to deliver 3500 feet of flooring plank 1% inches 
thick, and 3000 feet of % ceiling, and 1000 feet inch plank, all well 
seasoned against the 1st day of March next for which he is to receive 
$1.25 cts per hundred. 

Phillip Hines is to deliver 4000 feet of inch plank and 500 feet of 
inch and half, well seasoned, against the 1st day of March, next, at 
$1.25 cts pr. hundred. 

Michal Reinhardt is to deliver 75,000 brick all hard burnt, fit to 
lay to the weather, against the 1st day of November next, at $6.50 cts 
pr. thousand. Bonds to be executed the 19th Inst, for the performance 
of contracts. 

Messrs. Webster and Moorman lifted their bills, retired, and handed 
in others, which were higher than the former ones. 

2. Whereupon, resolved, that the board make no engagements with 
them, because of their alterations above stated : and that the contracts 
for the said work be postponed ad indefmitum. 

Adjourned till the 19th Inst, at 1 o'clock P. M. 

Joseph E. Bell, Secry. 

Saturday 19th June, 1824. Trustees met according to adjournment. 
Present — Dr. James Bivings, Daniel Hoke, Joseph E. Bell, Yardry 
McBee, John Zimmerman and Jacob Forney. Dr. Bivings in the chair. 

1. The trustees unanimously agreed that, as the expense of portico 
will be considerable, they will not have one to the Academy. 

Samuel Yundt, Philip Hines, Michael Reinhardt, John Williams, 



Lincoln County Schools. 203 

and Lemuel Moorman executed bonds to the trustees. So did Andrew 
Ramseur and . See Bonds. 

Philip Hines is to furnish all the scantling at $1.69 pr hundred feet. 
See bond. 

Daniel Hoke is to furnish all the hewn timber for $35. 

Thomas Webster is to furnish all the window sills of good soapstone 
at 62 1 /-) cents per foot, and door sills of granite at $1 per foot, neatly 
hewn, &c. 

Adjourned Sine Die. Joseph E. Bell, Secretary. 

Trustees met at V. McBee's, 16th Oct'r. 1824. Present— V. McBee, 
Joseph E. Bell, Jacob Forney, Charles E. Beinhardt, and John Zimmer- 
man. V. McBee was chosen chairman of the board. 

Resolved that John Zimmerman make a contract for scantling to 
make lintels for the doors and windows of the Academy house, which 
scantling is to be well seasoned. 

A letter from Colo. Michael Reinhardt dated October 8th, 1824, was 
laid before the board, in which letter Mr. Reinhardt requests a longer 
time to perform his contract. The board are of the opinion that as 
other contracts depend upon Mr. Reinhardt's, they cannot, at present, 
indulge him. Vardry McBee is requested to write to Mr. Reinhardt, 
and inform him of the opinion of the board, and to urge him to be ready 
if possible, against the time specified in his contract. Adjorned Sine 
Die. Joseph E. Bell, Secretary. 

November 5, 1824. Trustees met at Yardry McBee's. Present : — 
V. McBee, John Zimmerman, Joseph E. Bell, Dr. James Bivings, and 
Jacob Forney. James Bivings in the chair. 

Resolved that the board give Lemuel Moorman and Andrew Ram- 
seur, one month longer to perform their contract, than is specified in 
their bonds. And that Michael Reinhardt have three months in like 
manner. 

Resolved that John Zimmerman be appointed to receive and take 
care of all the materials for building the female Academy. And that he 
superintend the finishing of the same ; and that the board allow him a 
compensation for his services. 

Resolved that Jacob Forney be treasurer of the Board. 

Adjourned Sine Die. Jos. E. Bell, Secretary. 

At a Call Meeting at V. McBee's, Esq., 21st March, 1S25. Present— 
Dr. James Bivings in the chair — Jacob Forney, Charles E. Reinhardt, 
John Zimmerman, Yardry McBee and Daniel Hoke. 

Resolved that the seasoned plank now at the Academy site be hauled 
to the shop of Andrew Ramsour at the expense of the Board, That, if 
necessary John Zimmerman purchase plank for the scaffolds for the 
carpenters. 



204 Lincoln County Schools. 

Resolved that the Secretary furnish Col. Daniel Hoke with a bill of 
the hewn timber for the Academy. 

Resolved that the Secretary publish that a contract will be let for 
furnishing doors, &c, window sills, for the Academy, on the second Sat- 
urday in April next. In the meantime John Zimmerman & James Biv- 
ings (or either of them) are authorised to make a private contract for 
them. Jacob Forney is authorised to contract for the delivery of four 
hundred and fifty bushels of lime, at the Academy as soon as possible; 
and the Secretary is requested to notify Mr. Forney of this resolution. 
Adjourned. 

N. B. Vardry McBee was Secretary pro tern. 

July 23rd, 1825. At V. McBee's. Trustees met. Present:— V. Mc- 
Bee, Jos. E. Bell, Jacob Forney, John Zimmerman and Charles E. Bern- 
hardt. V. McBee in the chair. 

Whereas it appears to the board, that there is a sufficient quantity 
of brick at the Academy to finish the building, therefore, resolved that 
the secretary request Col. Michael Bernhardt to deliver no more brick 
at the Academy. J. E. Bell, Secretary. 

Saturday, October 22nd, 1825. The Trustees met at V. McBee's. 
Present : — V. McBee in the chair — J. E. Bell, J. Forney, John Zimmer- 
man and James Bivings. 

The board took into consideration the propriety of procuring some 
lady to take charge of the female Academy. 

Proposals from Miss Harriet Allen were laid before the Board; and 
after mature deliberation the board resolved, that a subscription paper 
be drawn, and presented to the people, that the board may know what 
amount to offer a preceptress for an annual salary. And likewise 

resolved that the Secretary write to Mr. and inform him 

that a subscription paper is in circulation, and that as soon as possible, 
the Board will inform him of the result. 

Adjourned to meet at this place on Monday next at 6 o'clock P. M. 

Jos. E. Bell, Secretary. 

To the Honorable the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina: 
The Petition of the Subscribers, Inhabitants of Lincoln County in 
the State aforesaid, humbly sheweth to your honorable body that some 
years ago, an act of Assembly was passed authorizing the laying off and 
selling in lots a part of the Town Commons of Lincolnton for the pur- 
pose of raising a fund to erect a Male Academy house in said Town, To 
procure a Fire Engine, etc., and by virtue of said act, the commission- 
ers appointed, proceeded to sell said lots, and out of money arising from 
said sale they have erected an Academy house, and procured a Fire En- 
gine, etc. as directed by said law, and there still remains in the hands 
of Jacob Ramsour, Esq., not appropriated to any specific purpose, and 
whereas, repairs of said Academy house are frequently needed, your Pe- 



Lincoln County Schools. 205 

titioners pray that the balance of money so remaining in the hands of 
the said Jacob Ramsour, may be directed to be appropriated for the 
purpose of repairing said Academy house, from time to time as the 
Trustees thereof may deem necessary, and your Petitioners will ever 
pray, ¥m, Henderson, 

Jacob Ramsour, 
Robert Williamson, 
G. McCulloh, 
Vardrt McBee. 

In House of Commons, ISTov. 29, 1825 : Read and referred to to Com. 
on Propositions and Grievances. 1 

JSTovember 19th, 1825. The Trustees met at V. McBee's. Dr. Biv- 
ings in the chair. Present : — J. E. Bell, V. McBee, J. Zimmerman, J. 
Forney. 

Agreed with Mr. Lemuel Moorman to plaster the Academy with 
three coats of plaster, to be executed in a workmanlike manner & to 
furnish everything (together with the attendance and boarding) except 
the lime and plaster of paris, for seventy dollars. 

Jacob Forney was authorized to send for a barrel of plaster of paris. 

John Zimmerman was authorized to contract for writing tables and 
seats for the Academy and to have three other tables made, one three 
feet square, and the other six feet long and four feet wide. Also to get 
stone steps for the Academy doors. 

Agreed to give Rev. Joseph E. Bell five dollars for his extra services 
in writing bonds, Bill &c, for the Board of Trustees. 

Joseph E. Bell, Secretary. 

Saturday, December the 31st, A. D. 1825, at Jacob Forney's. The 
Trustees met. Present : — John Zimmerman, Joseph E. Bell, James 
Bivings, and Vardry McBee. Dr. James Bivings in the chair. 

A communication from Mrs. Lucretia Matthews was laid before the 
Board by Dr. Bivings. (See said communication filed with the Secre- 
tary.) After deliberation the Board Resolved, that, as the substance 
of Mrs. Matthews' communication is a subject of importance; and as 
three of the Trustees are absent, therefore it be postponed until all the 
Trustees can be assembled. 

Adjourned to meet at this place on Tuesday the 3rd day of January 
next, at 6 o'clock, P. M. Joseph E. Bell, Secretary. 

Tuesday, January 3rd, 1825. Trustees met according to adjourn- 
ment. Present Joseph E. Bell, Charles E. Reinhardt, Daniel Hoke, 
Vardry McBee, James Bivings and John Zimmerman. Dr. Bivings 
in the chair. Mrs. Matthews letter was read. 

Whereupon Col. Daniel Hoke moved that the Board should deter- 

iUnpublished Legislative Documents. 



206 Lincoln County Schools. 

mine whether they would employ Mrs. Matthews as Tutress of the 
Female Academy or not? This motion was seconded by Col. John 
Zimmerman. After discussion upon the motion, it was decided in the 
affirmative, viz : — 

Yeas. Nays. 

C. E. Bernhardt 2. John Zimmerman 2. 

Daniel Hoke 1. Joseph E. Bell 1. 
Y. McBee 3. 

It was resolved that Mrs. Lucretia Matthews be tutress of the Female 
Academy of Lincolnton until the Board can procure another Tutress, 
and no longer. And as soon as the Board can procure another Tutress 
Mrs. Matthews shall give up the Academy and the pupils. 

Joseph E. Bell, Secretary. 

July 13th, 1826. The Trustees met at the Court House. Present: — 
Yardry McBee, Esq., Col. Daniel Hoke, Charles E. Bernhardt, Esq., 
and Joseph E. Bell. Col. Daniel Hoke in the chair. 

The design of this meeting was to consult the citizens of the Town 
and vicinity upon the expediency of procuring a suitable person to take 
charge of the Female Academy. A few of the citizens assembled and the 
subject was amicably discussed. 

Besolved that the Secretary write to Miss Mariah Allen and inform 
her, that if she will engage to teach all the branches that are required 
to be taught in the Lincolnton Female Academy, the Trustees will en- 
gage to pay her the sum of $400.00 per annum; with the profits arising 
from tuition to the sum of $500.00. And the Secretary is requested to 
write to & inquire of Miss Allen, whether she will teach for us upon 
these conditions, and at what time she could commence. 

Besolved, further, that a subscription paper be circulated among the 
citizens for the purpose of ascertaining the number of scholars that can 
be raised. 

Adjourned Sine Die. Joseph E. Bell, Secretary. 

August 11th, 1826. The Trustees met at Y. McBee's. Present:— 
Daniel Hoke, Charles E. Bernhardt, Jacob Forney, Joseph E. Bell, Yar- 
dry McBee, and John Zimmerman. V. McBee in the chair. 

The Board took into consideration the compensation of Col. John 
Zimmerman, who was appointed to superintend the building of the Fe- 
male Academy, for his services in attending to said building. 

Ordered that the Treasurer pay John Zimmerman $50.00 for his 
services aforesaid. And that the Secretary issue an order in favor of 
the said Zimmerman to the Treasurer for the said sum; which order 
shall be a sufficient voucher for the Treasurer in his settlement Avith the 
Board. 



Lincoln County Schools. 207 

Ordered that the Trustees or any two of them settle with the Treas- 
urer, at next Court, and report to the Board. 

Joseph E. Bell, Secretary. 

December 8th, 1826. Trustees met at David Reinhardt's. Present: — 
Col. Daniel Hoke, Col. John Zimmerman, Charles E. Bernhardt, Esq., 
James Bivings and Joseph E. Bell. Col. D. Hoke in the chair. 

Resolved that Miss Mariah Allyn be and she is hereby appointed 
Principal Tutress of the Lincolnton Female Academy, with all the 
rights, powers and privileges pertaining to the said office. And that she 
commence the exercises of tuition on the 11th Inst. 

Resolved further, that the first session end on the 25th day of May, 
next; and that the second session commence on the 25th day of June, 
1827, and expire on the 7th of December following. 

Ordered that the Secretary cause it to be published in the Western 
Carolinian for three weeks that tuition will commence in the Lincolnton 
Female Academy on the 11th Inst, under the care of Miss Allyn, prin- 
cipal of the institution. 

Ordered that Charles E. Reinhardt, Vardry McBee and Dr. James 
Bivings be a committee to settle with the Treasurer and report to the 
Board. 

Agreed that if the stove in the Old Academy be unfit to put in the 
new academy, it will be sold and the money be put in the Treasury. 

Adjourned to meet at the Academy on Monday next at 9 o'clock, 
A. M. J. E. Bell, Secretary. 

Female Academy, Dec. 11th, 1826. Trustees met. Present: — 
Charles E. Reinhardt, Dr. James Bivings, Col. John Zimmerman and 
Joseph E. Bell. 

Miss Maria Allyn was presented to the young ladies as principal 
Tutress ; — the roll was given to her and branches composing the differ- 
ent classes with a brief address to her and her pupils. The school was 
then opened with prayer and tuition commenced. 

Adjourned Sine Die. Jos. E. Bell, Secretary. 

David Reinhardt's. January 15th, 1S27. Trustees met. Present — 
Daniel Hoke, John Zimmerman, Charles E. Reinhardt, and Joseph E. 
Bell. Daniel Hoke in the chair. 

Resolved that the following be the established prices of tuition in 
the Female Academy, viz : 

Lower Class — Spelling, Reading, Writing, Definition, Arithmetic, 
Marking, and Plain Sewing, $5.00 per session. On English Grammar 
studied by this class, an extra charge of $1.00 per session (Amended 
July Sth, 1827.) 

Higher Class — History, Geography, Chemistry, Moral and Natural 
Philosophy, Rhetoric, Logic and English Grammar, $10.00 per session. 



208 Lincoln County Schools. 

On Drawing, Painting and Embroidery or Fancy Needle Work, studied 
by either class an extra charge of $2.00 per session. 

The Tutress laid before the Board some general rules of government, 
which were examined, approved and returned. 

Jacob Forney laid before the Board his resignation as trustee of the 
institution, which was received and filed with the secretary. Mr. For- 
ney also verbally resigned as Treasurer of the Board. Vouchers punched 
and filed. 

Resolved that John Zimmerman have shutters made and hung to the 
windows in the lower story of the house, and have the windows in which 
the glass is broken, neatly glazed, and cause the same to be paid for out 
of the funds of the institution. Jos. E. Bell, Secretary. 

February 12th, 1827. At Yardry McBee's. Trustees met. Present : 
— Yardry McBee, John Zimmerman, Charles E. Bernhardt, Joseph E. 
Bell and James Bivings. Dr. Bivings in the chair. 

Resolved that the shutters to the windows of the Academy House be 
baton, dove-tailed, and strong, and that John Zimmerman, who was 
appointed at a former meeting, cause this resolution to be executed, 
as soon as possible. 

Joseph E. Bell resigned as Secretary of the Board after this even- 
ing. John D. Hoke was elected as a trustee in the place of Jacob 
Forney resigned, and was also elected secretary of the board in the place 
of Joseph E. Bell, resigned. 

Joseph E. Bell was elected Treasurer of the Board and ordered to 
take charge of all monies, etc., belonging to the Board; to receive the 
money due to the Board for tuition, and to pay the tutress half the 
amount of the first session, if he receive so much, or as much as he may 
receive, and to keep the accounts between the subscribers, the tutress 
and the Board. 

Adjourned. Joseph E. Bell, Secretary. 

Thursday Evening, May 17th, 1827. A majority of the Board met 
according to previous notice. Dr. James Bivings in the chair. Present 
— J. E. Bell, Col. Zimmerman, Charles E. Bernhardt, Esq. and John 
D. Hoke. 

Mr. Bell tendered his resignation as Treasurer of the Board and it 
was accepted. 

In settlement with the Board Mr. Bell, former treasurer paid one 
hundred, thirty-nine dollars 13% cents amount in his hands. 

And also the amount of his own subscription to Miss Allen, two 
dollars and fifty cents, making the aggregate paid to the board one 
hundred, forty-one and sixty-three & % cents. 

Resolved that Dr. Bivings request Miss Allen to notify each employer 
through the scholars to send 12% cents each for fire wood. 

The business finished the Board adjourned. 

John D. Hoke, Secr'y. 



Lincoln County Schools. 209 

FEMALE ACADEMY, MAY 2 1ST, 1827. 

Thursday Morning the Board met. Dr. James Bivings, V. McBee, 
Mr. Bernhardt, Mr. Bell, Col. John Zimmerman, & J. D. Hoke. The 
examination of students under the care of Miss Allen commenced. 

First Class — Beading Tytler's History. — Sarah Williamson, Elizabeth 
Norris, Anne Hoke, Catherine Schenck, Nancy Bivings, Emiline Bern- 
hardt, Eliza Bamseur, Jane Caldwell, Mary Henderson, Jane Bern- 
hardt, Jane Johnson, Bebecca A. H. Bell. Approved. 

Second Class — Beading Murray's Beader. — Adeline Bamsour, Eliza- 
beth Bamsour, Clarissa Zimmerman, Elizabeth Motz, Eliza Hoke, Har- 
riet Bamsour, ISTancy Moorman, Mary Zimmerman, Sarah Darr, Batsy 
McBee, Bernhardt, Sarah Hoke, Amelia Beinhardt. 

This class of little girls read very correctly. Clarissa Zimmerman, 
Eliza Hoke, & Nancy Moorman are declared the best and equal. 

Third Class — Walker's Dictionary, Spelling and Definition. — Con- 
sisting of the same as the second. Highly approved. 

Fourth Class — Murray's English Grammar through Syntax. Pars- 
ing Murray's Exercises. — Sarah Williamson, Elizabeth Norris, Ann 
Hoke, Catherine Schenck, ISTancy Bivings, Emaline Beinhardt, Eliza 
Bamseur, Jane Caldwell, Nancy Easier, Anne Zimmerman, Mary Hen- 
derson, Jane Beinhardt, Jane Johnson, Adaline Bamsour, Elizabeth 
Motz, Harriet Bamsour. This class generally displayed a correct knowl- 
edge of the principles of English Grammar. If any distinction it is 
awarded to Miss Sarah Williamson, Miss Nancy Bamsour and Miss 
Emaline Beinhardt. 

Fifth Class — Catechism. — Sarah Hoke, Mary Zimmerman, Batsy 
McBee. Approved and equal. 

Sixth Class — Catechism. — Sarah Darr. Approved. 

Seventh Class — Catechism. — Elizabeth Bamseur, Eliza Hoke. Ap- 
proved and equal. 

Eighth Class — Bules of Arithmetic, through Beduction. — Emaline 
Beinhardt, Jane Caldwell, Jane Beinhardt, Eliza Bamseur, Nancy 
Kistler, Anne Zimmerman, Mary Henderson, Jane Johnston, Bebecca 
A. H. Bell, Clarissa Zimmerman. Approved and equal. 

Ninth Class — On the Multiplication Table. — Consisting of some 
little girls of the second and third classes. Highly approved. 

Afternoon — Trustees met. All present. Col. John Hoke was unani- 
mously elected Treasurer for the Board of Trustees, and accepts the 
appointment. Examinations continued. 

Tenth Class — Beading History. — Same as the first. Approved. 

Eleventh Class — Geography. — Miss Jane Johnston. Approved. 

Twelfth Class — Ancient Geography. — Sarah Williamson. Highly 
approved. 

Thirteenth Class — Modern Geography. — Elizabeth Norris, Anne 

14 



210 Lincoln County Schools. 

Hoke, Katherine Schenck, Nancy Bivings, Emaline Reinhardt, Eliza 
Ramseur, Anne Zimmerman, Jane Reinhardt. All approved. 

Fourteenth Class — Questions on (Ty tier's) History. — Catherine 
Schenck, Emaline Reinhardt, Eliza Ramseur, Jane Caldwell, Jane 
Reinhardt. All highly approved. Emaline Reinhardt is believed to 
be the best. 

Fifteenth Class — Natural Philosophy. — Catherine Schenck, Nancy 
Bivings, Emaline Reinhardt. Very good and equal. 

Sixteenth Class — Blair's Rhetoric. — Sarah Williamson, Catherine 
Schenck. Very good. Approved and equal. 

Seventeenth Class — Original Composition. — Sarah Williamson, Anne 
Hoke, Catherine Schenck, Nancy Bivings, Emaline Reinhardt, Eliza 
Ramseur, Jane Reinhardt, Jane Johnston. 

After which an interesting variety of painting, needle work, penman- 
ship, etc., was displayed, and the examination closed by the recitation 
of two short poems by Elizabeth Ramseur and Eliza Hoke. 

The Board adjourned. John D. Hoke, Secretary. 

July 8th, 1827. The Board met at Mr. McBee's office for the pur- 
pose of settling with Mr. Burton respecting the building of the Female 
Academy, &c. It appeared that the amount paid into his hands, aris- 
ing from sale of lots, was two thousand, eight hundred and one dollars 
and sixty seven cents, against which amount he produced the following 
vouchers, amounting to $2,718.98, leaving a balance due in his hands 
of $82.69. To-wit. : 

Dr. Cr. 

Amount of sale of lots $2,801 67 

By amount paid to J. Forney $2,622 73 

By amount paid to H. Cansler for surveying, etc 33 25 

By amount paid to B. S. Johnson, crying sale 4 00 

By amount paid to Jacob Reinhardt for work 2 00 

By amount paid for taxes in 1823 and 1824 1 00 

By amount paid for printing advertisements 100 

Commissions allowed to Mr. Burton 55 00 

$2,718 98 

Note on Michael Schenck $63 69 

Cash 19 00 

82 69 



$2,801 67 



After which settlement there was a balance as stated above in Mr. 
Burton's hands of $82.69, to-wit: A note on Michael Schenck, amount 



Lincoln County Schools. 211 

due, $63.69; and cash, $19.00; which amount was paid over by Mr. 
Burton to Major Henderson, to be accounted for in his settlement be- 
tween the Trustees of the male and female academies. 

After the above settlement was completed the trustees passed the 
following resolution. Resolved that those students who belong to the 
lower class, according to the regulations of tuition are only allowed 
in the study of grammar to memorize and recite the rules, &c, and the 
exercises of parsing and the like are considered as higher class branches. 

The board adjourned. John D. Hoke, Secretary. 

Wednesday Evening, July 18th, 1827. Trustees met. Present — 
Vardry McBee, Charles E. Bernhardt, John Zimmerman and John D. 
Hoke. V. McBee in the chair. 

Resolved, That the window shutters be painted and fastenings be 
procured for the shutters and a lock be placed on the table drawer, and 
that Col. Zimmerman carry the resolution into effect, and that he issue 
orders on the Treasurer for the amount of the same, and also for the 
making of the shutters. 

The business finished, the Board adjourned. 

John D. Hoke, Secretary. 

Thursday Evening, 15th Nov., 1827. The Trustees of the Female 
Academy met at David Reinhardt's. Present : — Dr. James Bivings, 
Daniel Hoke, John Zimmerman, Charles E. Reinhardt and V. McBee. 

It was agreed that John Zimmerman and Vardry McBee be appointed 
to purchase a sufficient quantity of calico to make a curtain in the 
Academy for the exhibition at the ensuing examination, which is to 
be paid for out of the funds belonging to the institution, and that they 
superintend the fixing and hanging of the same. It was further agreed 
that Col. Daniel Hoke furnish fire wood for the use of the Academy 
for the ensuing winter at the price of $1.00 per load. 

On motion it was resolved that the students that have attained to the 
stand in which they are required to write and show compositions that 
if they fail to do so hereafter they are to be reported by the tutress 
to the trustees for such neglect, and that they would be excluded from 
any marks of distinction or honors at the examination unless they 
should render satisfactory excuses for such delinquency. 

Recorded by V. McBee, Secretary Pro Tern. 

SECOND SEMI-ANNUAL EXAMINATION, 1827. 

Monday Morning, Dec, 17th. The second semi-annual examination 
of the pupils of the Female Academy under the care of Miss Maria 
Allyn, opened with prayer by Rev. Patrick Sparrow. 
The examination was conducted in the following order : 
First Class. — Reading Murray's Reader. — Harriet C. Reinhardt, 
Amelia Reinhardt. Approved and equal. 



212 Lincoln County Schools. 

Second Class — Spelling Two Syllables. — Harriet C. Reinhardt, 
Amelia Bernhardt, Mary Dews. All performed and well. 

Third Class — Reading Murray's English Reader and Spelling and 
Definition in Walker's Dictionary. — Eliza Hoke, Margaret Moore, 
Elizabeth Ramsour, Adaline Reinhardt, Nancy Moorman, Mary Zim- 
merman, Harriet Ramsour, Elizabeth Motz, Patsy McBee, Adaline 
Ramsour, Barbara Schenck, Eliza Burton, Sarah Hoke, Rebecca 
Rudisill, Elizabeth Brem, Mary Dews, Julia Dews. All highly 
approved; the distinction is in the order of the names. 

Fourth Class — Reading. — Sarah Williamson, Catharine Shenck, 
Nancy Bivings, Emaline Reinhardt, Rosanna Reinhardt, Lavenia 
Schenck, Ann Zimmerman, Mary Burton, Jane Reinhardt, Mary 
Henderson, Catherine Bivings. This class of young ladies read very 
correctly and distinctly and were all highly approved and equal. 

Fifth Class — Catechism. — Eliza Burton. Performance good. 

Sixth Class — On Shorter Catechism. — Mary Henderson, Margaret 
Moore, Eliza Brem, Julia Dews, Mary Dews. Performed well and 
equal. 

Seventh Class — On Murray's English Grammar through Syntax. — 
Adaline Ramsour, Elizabeth Motz, Julia Dews, Harriet Ramsour, 
Sarah Hoke, Barbara Schenck, Mary Zimmerman, JSTancy Moorman, 
Elizabeth Bivings, Eliza Burton, Patsy McBee. Adaline Ramsour, 
Elizabeth Motz, Julia Dews and Harriet Ramsour are pronounced the 
best, the others very good and equal. 

Eighth Class — On the Rules of Arithmetic. — Anne Zimmerman, 
Mary Burton, Catherine Bivings, Rosanna Reinhardt, Mary Hender- 
son. Mary Burton, Catherine Bivings and Ann Zimmerman are best. 

Ninth Class — Questions on Modern History. — Sarah Williamson, 
Emaline Reinhardt, Ann Zimmerman. Very highly approved. 

Tenth Class — Geography. — Catherine Bivings. Approved. 

Tuesday evening before the opening of the examination the Trustees 
met. A majority present. Jacob Ramsour was proposed and unani- 
mously elected a Trustee to supply the vacancy of J. E. Bell, resigned. 

EXAMINATIONS CONTINUED TUESDAY. 

First Class — Arithmetic- — Elizabeth Motz, Adaline Ramsour, Julia 
Dews, Eliza Burton, Harriet Ramsour, Barbara Schenck, Adaline 
Reinhardt, Nancy Moorman, Patsy McBee. All approved. 

Second Class — On Memorizing English Grammar. — Eliza Hoke, 
Elizabeth Ramsour. Both approved. 

Third Class — Parsing. — Sarah Williamson, Catherine Schenck, 
Nancy Bivings, Emaline Reinhardt, Lavenia Schenck, Anne Zimmer- 
man, Mary Burton, Catherine Bivings. Approved without distinction. 

Fourth Class — Geography. — Catherine Schenck, Nancy Bivings, 
Lavenia Schenck, Ann Zimmerman, Jane Reinhardt, Mary Burton. 



Lincoln County Schools. 213 

All approved and equal. Miss Mary Burton was also separately exam- 
ined on the Geography of the United States and gave general satis- 
faction. 

Fifth Class — Ancient Geography. — Emaline Reinhardt. Highly 
approved. 

Sixth Class — Rhetoric. — Emaline Reinhardt, Nancy Bivings. Young 
ladies underwent a strict and satisfactorv examination. 

Seventh Class — Natural Philosophy.- — Emaline Reinhardt, Catherine 
Schenck, JSTancy Bivings, Lavinia Schenck. All very good and equal. 

Eighth Class — Chemistry. — Catherine Schenck. Emaline Reinhardt, 
Nancy Bivings. Approved and equal. 

After which several very interesting original compositions were read 
by the young ladies, displaying a very eorrect taste, and a variety of 
neat paintings and pieces of embroidery were exhibited, and the exam- 
ination closed with an address and Approbatory Resolutions in favor 
of the students and preceptress. 

EXAMINATION MONDAY MORNING, JUNE 23RD, 1828. 

The Trustees met in the Academy. A majority present. The Rev. 
Patrick J. Sparrow addressed the Throne of God in a feeling prayer, 
when the examination commenced and was conducted in the following 
order : 

First Class — Reading and Spelling. — Catherine Hoke, Caroline 
Reinhardt. 

Second Class — Reading in the Testament. — Julia A. Fisher, Ann 
Phifer. 

Third Class — Reading English Reader; Spelling Five Syllables. — 
Charlotte McCulloh, Mary Dews, Jane Kerr, Amanda Reinhardt, Mary 
Quin, Elizabeth Zimmerman, Eliza Hoke, Elizabeth Ramsour, Amelia 
Reinhardt, Adeline Clyne, Harriet Reinhardt, Ann Butts. 

Fourth Class — Catechism, Historical. — Jane Kerr, Mary Quin, 
Amanda Reinhardt, Elizabeth Zimmerman, Ann Butts, Adaline Clyne, 
Harriet Reinhardt. 

Fifth Class — English Grammar through Etymology. — Clarissa Zim- 
merman, Charlotte McCulloh, Mary Dews, Rebecca Rudisill, Amelia 
Reinhardt. 

Sixth Class — Parsing; Prose in English Reader. — Eliza Hoke, 
Elizabeth Motz, Elizabeth Ramsour, Adaline Ramsour, Mary Zimmer- 
man, Mary Henderson, Jane Johnson, Sarah Hoke, Harriet Ramsour, 
Patsy McBee. 

Seventh Class — Reciting Rules of Arithmetic. — Edelda Quin. Emily 
Quin, Mary Henderson, Elizabeth Motz, Adaline Ramsour, Clarissa 
Zimmerman, Patsy McBee. 

Tuesday Morning. The examinations opened with prayer by Rev. 
P. J. Sparrow, and was continued in the following order : 



214 Lincoln County Schools. 

EXAMINATION'S CONTINUED, JUNE, 1828. 

First Class — Tytler's History. — Lavenia Schenck, Anne Hoke, Edelda 
Quin, Eliza Graham, Emily Quin, Jane Johnson, Anne Zimmerman, 
Mary Henderson, Jane Bernhardt, Clarissa Zimmerman, Catherine 
Bivings, Elizabeth Motz, Sarah Hoke, Harriet Ramsour, Martha 
McBee, Adaline Ramsour, Rebecca Rudisill, Mary Zimmerman. 

Second Class — Parsing Poetry. — Anne Hoke, Lavenia Schenck, Jane 
Reinhardt, Ann Zimmerman, Catherine Bivings. 

Third Class — Geography. — Martha McBee, Eliza Hoke, Elizabeth 
Ramsour, Mary Henderson, Jane Johnson, Adaline Ramsour, Elizabeth 
Motz, Sarah Hoke, Harriet Ramsour, Mary Zimmerman. 

Fourth Class — Geography of South America. — Ann Hoke, Ann 
Zimmerman, Jane Reinhardt, Catherine Bivings. 

Fifth Class — Tytler's History. — Anne Hoke, Anne Zimmerman, 
Jane Reinhardt, Jane Johnson. 

Sixth Class — Natural Philosophy. — Luvenia Schenck, Anne Hoke, 
Anne Zimmerman, Jane Reinhardt, Catherine Bivings. 

Seventh Class — Chemistry. — Lavenia Schenck, Jane Reinhardt. 

Ordered by the Board that the Secretary issue an order to the Treas- 
urer in favor of Daniel Shuford, for the amount of his bill for erecting 
a stage in the Female Academy. 

Ordered by the Board that publication of the commencement of the 
next session be made in some of the papers which may be deemed most 
expedient. 

By order John D. Hoke, Secretary. 

NOVEMBER 26TH, 1828. 

At a call meeting of the Trustees of the Female Academy at the 
House of David Reinhardt, Esq. 

Present Dr. James Bivings, Chairman; Charles E. Reinhardt, John 
Zimmerman, and Vardry McBee, who was appointed Secretary pro tern. 

Resolved unanimously that each student of the last and present ses- 
sion be charged with 12% cents to defray the expenses of fire wood 
and likewise with 121/2 cents at the commencement of the next session. 
The Secretary to notify the Treasurer of this resolution, whose duty 
it shall be to make this additional charge at the time he collects the 
tuition money. 

It was further ordered that Col. John Zimmerman and Jacob Ram- 
sour be appointed to settle all the accounts owing, and ascertain what 
monies will be divided between the Male and Female Academies, to 
settle with the Trustees of the Male Academy or any Committee ap- 
pointed by them for that purpose. 

It was further resolved that Dr. James Bivings, John Zimmerman 
and Vardry McBee be a committee to view the writing desks, and if 
they deem it expedient to have them altered, make a contract to have 



Lincoln County Schools. 215 

them altered and call upon Daniel Shuford, who made them, if they 
are to be altered. 

That John D. Hoke have the windows in the female academy re- 
painted and render his account to the Treasurer for payment. 

V. McBee, Pro Tern. 

Eecorded by order of John D. Hoke, Secretary. 

EXAMINATIONS, DECEMBER, 1828. 
Thursday Evening, December 18th, 1828. 

The Trustees met at the Academy for the purpose of examining 
classes on the various branches studied during the past session. 

The exercises commenced after an address to the Throne of God by 
Mr. C. E. Reinhardt. 

ORDER OF EXAMINATION. 

First Class — Spelling. — Mary Ramsour. Approved. 

Second Class — Reading Testament and Spelling. — Catherine Hoke, 
Catherine Reinhardt. 

Fourth Class — Reading Murray's Introduction. — Adaline Cline, 
Elizabeth Zimmerman, Agnes Fisher, Amelia Reinhardt, Ann Butts, 
Harriet Reinhardt, Ann Phifer. 

Fifth Class — Spelling. — Same as in the fourth, with Catharine Hoke, 
Caroline Reinhardt. 

Sixth Class Grammar, through Syntax (memorized). — Elizabeth 
Shuford, Adaline Reinhardt, Ann Derr, Elmira Hoyle, Amelia Rein- 
hardt, Rebecca Forney, Elizabeth Zimmerman. 

Seventh Class — Multiplication Table. — Adaline Cline, Ann Butts, 
Agnes Fisher, Harriet Reinhardt. 

Eighth Class — Rules of Arithmetic. — Harriet Ramsour, Adaline 
Ramsour, Martha McBee, Nancy Moorman, Mary Henderson, Jane 
Reinhardt, Barbara Schenck, Adaline Reinhardt, Folly Zimmerman, 
Sally Hoke, Jane Kerr. 

Ninth Class — Polite Learning. — Eliza Hoke, Elizabeth Ramsour. 

Tenth Class — Parsing. — Lavenia Schenck, Elizabeth Ramsour, Eliza 
Hoke, Jane Reinhardt, Elizabeth Fulenweider, Adaline Ramsour, Har- 
riet Ramsour, Mary Henderson, Adaline Reinhardt, Mary Zimmerman, 
Barbara Schenck, Sarah Hoke, Martha McBee, Nancy Moorman. 

Eleventh Class — Geography. — Amelia Reinhardt. 

Twelfth Class — Geography. — Barbara Schenck, Julia Dews, Nancy 
Moorman, Adaline Reinhardt. 



216 Lincoln County Schools. 

Friday, December 19th— Examination Continued. 

Opened by prayer by the Rev. P. J. Sparrow. 

Thirteenth Class — Reading Titler's History. Lavenia Schenck, Ema- 
line Reinhardt, Elizabeth Fullenweider, Mary Henderson, Jane Rein- 
hardt, Sophia Graham, Julia Dews, Elizabeth Shuford, Nancy Moor- 
man, Adaline Ramsour, Sally Hoke. 

The examination closed on Tuesday. Only two of the Trustees pres- 
ent, viz : John Zimmerman and V. McBee, who concurred in their 
opinions that the students not only displayed the Vigilance of their 
Trust, but that ■ — than ordinary application. 

On Thursday evening, October 15th, 1829 the Trustees met. Present 
— Doctor Bivings, Col. Zimmerman, Jacob Ramsour, and John D. 
Hoke, after a social interchange of opinions upon the concerns of the 
Academy, it was agreed that Doctor Bivings, Vardry McBee, Esq., and 
John D. Hoke be a committee to devise some suitable plan of Education 
and prices of tuition to the various branches, and report the same. 
The meeting adjourned. J. D. Hoke, Secy. 

At Mr. McBee's Office. 

Friday Evening, October 23rd, 1829. 

The Trustees of the Female Academy met. Present — Dr. James 
Bivings, Chairman; Vardry McBee, Jacob Ramsour, and John D. 
Hoke. The Committee appointed at the last meeting reported. Which 
report was accepted, whereupon 

Resolved unanimously, That the extra charge of one dollar per 
session in the Lower Class in Grammar henceforth be taken away and 
the regulation heretofore on that charge be repealed. 

Resolved, That children only reading History, memorizing English 
Grammar and Geography, be considered as belonging to the lower class. 

Resolved unanimously, That we employ Miss Mariah Alyn as Tutress 
of the Female Academy for the next session commencing on the 1st 
Monday in November, and as a compensation for her services that she 
be allowed the profits of the school agreeably to the prices of tuition 
as heretofore laid down. 

Resolved, That the Secretary inform her of this resolution and also 
furnish a copy of the studies and prices of tuition as regulated for the 
institution. 

The Board adjourned sine die. John D. Hoke, Secy. 

February 9th 1830. The Trustees of the Female Academy met. 
Present — Dr. James Bivings, Chairman; V. McBee, J. Ramsour, John 
Zimmerman and John D. Hoke. 

Ordered by the Board that a committee of two with -the Treasurer 
make a settlement with Mrs. Reinhardt, formerly tutress of the female 



Lincoln County Schools. 217 

academy, observing the contract entered, into between the Trustees and 
tutress, and that they report at the next meeting. 

The chairman appointed Jacob Ramsour and John D. Hoke the 
committee. John D. Hoke, Secy. 

EXAMINATION APRIL 15TH, 1S30. 

The examination of the students of the female academy under Miss 
Harriet Alyn opened and was conducted in the following order. 

[Record of examination was not entered in the record book. — 
C. L. C] 

Monday Evening, November 22nd, 1830. 

The Trustees met at Mr. McBee's office. Present — Doct. Bivings, 
Mr. McBee, Col. Zimmerman and John D. Hoke, to take into con- 
sideration a letter received from Miss Harriet Allyn enquiring whether 
she is to take charge of the Academy next Session. 

It was unanimously Resolved that the Secretary inform Miss Allyn, 
that they have been satisfied with her management of the Academy 
and that she may take charge of it again commencing on the 1st Mon- 
day in January next five V2 months thereafter, that she have the profits 
of the school at the usual rate of tuition. 

Resolved that the Academy be repaired and put in good order and 
that the teachers in future be required to return it in alike good order. 

Resolved that the Secretary make publication that the Academy will 
be vacant and that a tutress or tutresses will be wanted to supply it, 
qualified to teach the usual branches together with musick and the 
ornamental branches. 

Ordered that the publication be made in the Raleigh Star and a 
New York paper, and that the Secretary call on the Treasurer for 
the money to pay the expenses. 

At Mr. McBee's office, on the evening of the 20th April the Trustees 
of the Female Academy met. Present — Doct James Bivings, V. McBee, 
Jacob Ramsour, Charles E. Reinhardt, and John D. Hoke. 

Resolved that Jacob Ramsour have the shutters repaired and such 
other repairs as may be necessary. 

On motion of John D. Hoke, Peter Summy was unanimously elected 
a trustee to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Col. Zimmerman. 

It was suggested that Mrs. Horton wished the privilege of teaching 
her school in the Academy. The trustees were unanimously disposed 
to accommodate her but fearing the precedent might place them in a 
delicate situation in future, hoped she would withdraw her application. 

Resolved that the publication ordered at last meeting be made. 



218 Lincoln County Schools. 

AN ELIGIBLE SITUATION 

For one or two young ladies qualified to teach the various branches 
of female education, viz. : Literary, Ornamental, and Music on the 
Piano Forte, can be procured upon application to the trustees of the 
Female Academy in Lincolnton, N. C. 

This academy is a commodious brick building, pleasantly situated 
in one of the healthiest and handsomest villages in the Southern States. 

Applications, addressed to the trustees or the subscriber, will meet 
their earliest attention, and any further information given that may 
be required. 

By order of the Board. Jno. D. Hoke, Secretary. 

Lincolnton, N. C., April 20, 1831. 

Price adv. $1. 

— The Star, May 5, 1831. 

AT JACOB BAMSOUB'S. 

The Trustees met at Jacob Bamsour's, Novr. 2nd 1831. Present — 
Jacob Bamsour, Daniel Hoke, Peter Summy Vardry McBee and John 
D. Hoke. 

The resignation of Dr. James Bivings was read and accepted. John 
D. Hoke nominated Carlos Leonard and Jacob Bamsour nominated 
C. C. Henderson to fill the vacancy. Mr. Leonard was elected. 

Besolved that the contract entered into by Mr. J. Bamsour with Miss 
Thompson be sanctioned by and binding on the board of Trustees. 

EXAMINATION SEPTEMBEB, 1832. 

A publication of the Scholars of the Female Academy, under charge 
of Miss Amelia Thompson commenced on Tuesday, 25th September, 
and ended the next day in the following order : 

[No record entered. — C. L. C] 

At a meeting of the Trustees at Mr. McBee's Office Septr. 25th, 1832. 
Present — V. McBee, Charles E. Bernhardt, Jacob Bamsour, Peter 
Summy, Carlos Leonard and J. D. Hoke. 

Besolved that the Treasurer pay Jacob Bamsour $100 and interest 
from the 5th Septr 1831 until paid and that he pay Miss Thompson 
$500, inclusive of what he has heretofore advanced her. 

Besolved that the Treasurer pay Jacob Bamsour for the Piano pur- 
chased by him for the Academy with interest out of the fund belong- 
ing to the Academy. 

Besolved that the Treasurer pay out of the funds of the Academy 
the amount of Mr. McBee's account for fire wood. 

Besolved that the trustees being well pleased with Miss Amelia 
Thompson's management of the school they will obligate themselves 



Lincoln County Schools. 219 

to pay her $300 for teaching the next Session in the same manner as 
heretofore. 

Wednesday Evening, June 19th, 1833. 

The Trustees met at Mr. McBee's Office, previous notice having been 
given to each. Present — Vardry McBee, Jacob Ramsour, Peter Summy, 
Carlos Leonard and John D. Hoke. 

After interchanging opinions relative to the school it was Resolved 
that the Secretary write to Miss Amelia Thompson informing her that 
the Trustees wish again to employ her to take charge of the Academy 
by renewing the former contract and that they will allow her to engage 
an assistant to teach music, etc., giving her the proceeds of the School, 
and that they would be pleased to hear from her and know that she 
would be willing on her part. 

No other business being proposed the meeting adjourned. 

John D. Hoke, Secy. 

Monday Evening, July 1st, 1833. 

Pursuant to previous notice the Trustees met at Mr. McBee's office. 
Present — All the Trustees. 

On motion of Jacob Ramsour, ordered that the Treasurer pay the 
amount of Daniel Shuford's bill for repairs done to the Academy. 

Resolved that the Treasurer pay Mr. McBee his bill for fire wood. 

John D. Hoke, Secy. 

Monday Evening, July 28th, 1834. 

The Trustees met. Present — Jacob Ramsour, Vardry McBee, Carlos 
Leonard and John D. Hoke. 

Resolved unanimously that Miss Amelia Thompson have the Acad- 
emy next year with all the profits arising from the school. 

The resignation of Charles E. Reinhardt was accepted and on motion 
of John D. Hoke, Jacob A. Ramsour was unanimously elected to fill 
the vacancy. John D. Hoke, Secretary. 

Monday Morning, January 4th, 1838. 

The Trustees met at Jacob Ramsour's. Present — Vardry McBee, 
Jacob Ramsour, Carlos Leonard and J. A. Ramsour. On motion of 
Vardry McBee, J. A. Ramsour was appointed Secretary and Jacob 
Ramsour was appointed Chairman. Mr. Jacob Ramsour exhibited the 
Resignation of Peter Summy, which was accepted, and also in conse- 
quence of the Removal of Col. Daniel Hoke and John D. Hoke the 
following persons were nominated and unanimously appointed in their 
places, viz : Michael Hoke, David Reinhardt and Perry Roberts. 



220 Lincoln County Schools. 

Resolved that the Secretary apprise the above named persons of their 
appointment as trustees. 

Adjourned. J. A. Ramsour, Secretary. 

LINCOLJSTTON ACADEMY (MALE). 

The Examination of the students under the care of George "W. Mor- 
row, will commence the 26th inst. and terminate the day following. 
Parents and Guardians are particularly requested to attend. The Ex- 
ercises will be resumed on the first Monday in January. 

Geo. W. Morrow. 

"N. B. The price of Tuition per Session (in advance) for the Lan- 
guages and Mathematics $12.50 cts; for English Grammar, Geogra- 
phy and Arithmetic $8. 

Nov. 18, 1834. 

— Raleigh Register, Tuesday, December 2, 1831).. 

Friday evening, January 8th, 1836. 

The Trustees met at Jacob Ramsour's. Present: — Vardry McBee, 
Jacob Ramsour, Carlos Leonard, Perry Roberts, Michael Hoke & J. A. 
Ramsour. Jacob Ramsour in the Chair. Jacob Ramsour gave his res- 
ignation which was accepted, and B. S. Johnston was appointed to fill 
his vacancy. 

It was unanimously agreed by the Trustees that Miss Amelia Thomp- 
son have charge of the Academy for the next Session & it was farther 
agreed that the Secretary apprise her of this — & learn from her whether 
she would wish to teach longer than the next session. 

Adjourned. J. A. Ramsour {Secy.). 

Monday evening, August 15th, 1836. 

The Trustees met at the house of J. A. Ramsour. Present : — David 
Reinhardt, Carlos Leonard, B. S. Johnston & J. A. Ramsour. B. S. 
Johnston was appointed Treasurer of Board of Trustees. He reported 
on hand $158.23. Presented a bill for tuning & repairing the piano 
for $8.00, which was accepted leaving a balance of $150.23. It was 
resolved by the trustees that Mr. Johnston, Mr. Reinhardt & Mr. Leon- 
ard make arrangements for having the academy repaired. It was like- 
wise resolved by the Trustees that Mr. Johnston procure for the Acad- 
emy a pair of good globes when he visits the North. J. A. Ramsour 
was appointed Secretary of the board of trustees. 

It was likewise agreed by the trustees present — that provided that 
Miss Smith does not take charge of the academy until the 1st January 
next — that Miss Wood have the profits of the school from the time she 
commences until Miss Smith comes. J. A. Ramsour, Sect. 



Lincoln County Schools. 221 

Monday Evening, January 2nd, 1837. 
The Trustees met at the house of J. A. Ramsour's. Present D. 
Bernhardt, C. Leonard, B. S. Johnston, P. Roberts, J. A. Ramsour. 
David Reinhardt was called to the chair. On motion of B. S. Johnston 
C. C. Henderson was nominated as trustee in the place of Yardry McBee 
removed — & unanimously accepted. B. S. Johnston, C. C. Henderson 
& J. A. Ramsour were appointed a committe to receive the several bills 
for repairs &c. done to the Academy & make settlement. 

J. A. Ramsour, Secy. 

Tuesday Jan. 3rd, 1837. 
B. S. Johnston, C. C. Henderson & J. A. Ramsour the committee ap- 
pointed to make settlement met at the office of Mr. Johnston — & after 
receiving the several bills, found a deficiency in the hands of the Treas- 
urer. The committee thought it the most advisable to scale the several 
different bills to the amount of money in the hands of the treasurer & 
give the several persons credit on their several bills of the amount paid 
to them by the Treasurer annexed on the amount of the several bills pre- 
sented with them respect in credit. 

At a meeting of Trustees. It was agreed that a tax of twenty five 
cents be laid on every Scholar for each session for the purpose of rais- 
ing a fund for the use of the Academy. It was also agreed that a sub- 
scription be raised for the purpose of raising funds for enclosing the 
academy lot & building a small house — which was done. 

Trustees present C. C. Henderson 
D. Reinhardt 
C. Leonard 
B. S. Johnston 
M. Hoke 
J. A. Ramsour 

August 10th, 183S. 

The Trustees met & agreed that the sum of forty three dollars be paid 
to John McGill for work done by him to Academy lot. 

At this same time James R. Dodge was proposed as a trustee in place 
of P. G. Roberts deed & elected. 

paid the above amounts — by B. S. S. 

Lincolnton 30th June 1841. 

The Board of Trustees met at C. Leonard's Esq. 

J. A. Ramsour offered his resignation which was accepted. 

H. W. Guion was proposed to supply the vacancy, which was unani- 
mously agreed. 

B. S. Johnston the Treasurer to the Board has Rec'd of J. A. Ram- 
sour $21. and of C. C. Henderson $2. and paid C. C. Henderson for 
purchase a Bill $15. 

T. R. Shuford for repairing stove 50 cents. 



222 Lincoln County Schools. 

Lincolnton, Feby 3rd 1841. 

The Board met at H. W. Guions. Present C. Leonard, C. C. Hen- 
derson, S. P. Simpson, J. P. Dodge and H. W. Guion. 

On motion of J. R. Dodge the following Pates of Tuition were consid- 
ered and submitted to the citizens of the town on the next evening in a 
meeting. 

Rudiments of reading, & writing, and Parley's or similar rudiments of 
Arithmetic & Geography $5 per Sch. 

Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, English Grammar, Geography 7 pr. do. 
Philosophy, Astronomy, Arithmetic. 

Botany, History, Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, Geography, &c. $10. 

Plain needle work no additional charge in any class. 

Ornamental Needle Work, Painting, Music, &c, charged in addition. 

S. P. Simpson proposed that, hereafter an instructress of the Acad- 
emy be paid a stipulated sum per annum, & that the tuition in all the 
above branches, be the same as then fixed & the proceeds thereof be put 
into the treasury. 

The meeting adjourned to the fifth month with the view of submit- 
ting Rates of Tuition to the Citizens. H. W. Guion, Secy. 

February 5, 1841. 

The Board met at C. Leonard's. Present C. Leonard, C. C. Hender- 
son, S. P. Simpson, J. R. Dodge and H. W. Guion. The citizens having 
met & approved of the rates proposed at the last meeting. On motion 
made & seconded — they were adopted unanimously — As the Rates of the 
Female Academy. 

On motion made & seconded it was 

Resolved that the Trustees procure the Services of some competent 
lady as Instructress of the Academy & for such services bind the Cor- 
poration to pay to such Instructress not more than Five hundred dol- 
lars for the first year. It was further resolved that James R. Dodge and 
C. C. Henderson write to their respective friends at the North, to point 
out & name persons competent, & willing to serve under the terms pro- 
posed. H. W. Guion, Secy. 

April 10th, 1841. 

The Board met pursuant to a Call of the President at Guion's office. 
Present — C. C. Henderson, Carlos Leonard, Benjamin S. Johnston, 
Sam'l P. Simpson and H. W. Guion. C. C. Henderson, esq., laid 
before the Board a letter addressed to him by Miss Anna M. Rogers 
of the City of New York, requiring the voice of the Board as to certain 
queries therein Contained. After considerable consideration the follow- 
ing resolution was, on motion, adopted. 

"Resolved that H. W. Guion, the Secretary, answer the letter of 
Miss Anna M. Rogers & that he be authorized to say to her that the 
Trustees have agreed to bind the Institution under their charge, to pay 
annually the sum of Four hundred & Fifty dollars as a Salary to the In- 



Lincoln County Schools. 223 

structress called by them to superintend the duties of education & that 
he he further authorized to say that at the expiration of the first session 
or the first year the Instructress so employed, may at her option take 
the school & the profits thereof, to herself & discontinue her salary — or 
may continue to receive her salary as her only compensation that in 
either event the Price established by the Trustees on the 3rd of February 
ratified on the 5th be adhered to." 

It was further ordered that the answer of H. W. Guion be laid before 
a Meeting of the Board to be held on Monday evening the 12th instant. 

H. W. Guioisr, Secy. 

April 12 th, 1841. 

The Trustees met pursuant to adjournment. Present C. C. Leon- 
ard, B. S. Johnson, L. P. Simpson, C. C. Henderson & H. W. Guion. 

The letter prepared by the Secretary as a reply to the one received 
from Miss Anna M. Rogers was presented by H. W. Guion Ordered to 
be read — and was duly considered — The same was amended by respect- 
fully requesting, the usual references from Miss Pogers in case she might 
feel disposed to accede to the terms proposed. The wbole letter was 
read and unanimously approved. Ordered that a copy of the same be 
filed. H. W. Guion, Secy. 

Lincolnton, July 13th, 1841. 

Pursuant to a call of the President a special meeting was held at the 
house of C. C. Henderson. Present C. Leonard, B. S. Johnson, C. C. 
Henderson, L. P. Simpson, James P. Bodge, & H. W. Guion. 

C. C. Henderson made known to the Board that in a day or two he 
should make a visit to the North, and whilst there he would cheerfully 
undertake the execution of any authority or commission the Board might 
confer upon him, especially in procuring a suitable Instructress for the 
Institution. Whereupon after considerable consultation, the following 
resolution was on motion adopted. 

Resolved that C. C. Henderson be authorized and empowered, dur- 
ing his visit to the North, to enquire for and if possible engage the ser- 
vices of a suitable & competent Instructress for Lincolnton Female 
Academy ; upon the terms that she will individually undertake the charge 
of the school with all the profits & thereof, at the rates estab- 
lished by the board ; or that she will undertake the charge thereof, at 
a stated salary to be allowed & paid by the Trustees of and sum not 
exceeding five hundred dollars; which sum the said C. C. Henderson 
is authorized to fix & establish for one year, provided it be necessary 
to the procurement of a competent Instructress. 

The meeting then adjourned Sine die. H. TV. Guion, Secy. 

Lincolnton, September 20, 1841. 
Pursuant to a call of the President, a special meeting of the Board 
was held in the house of C. C. Henderson. Present C. Leonard, L. 
P. Simpson, C. C. Henderson, and H. "W. Guion. 



224 Lincoln County Schools. 

C. C. Henderson stated to the Board that he had made an engagement 
with Miss Abigail Mason of Pennsylvania at a stated salary of $450. 
per year with permission to her to take charge of the school & receive 
the profits thereof instead of her salary either during the first session 
of the first year. Mr. Henderson further stated that Miss Mason would 
arrive in all probability by the middle of October. 

Whereupon it was resolved, that the Exercises of the Academy would 
be resumed on or about the middle of October & that publication be 
made in the Republican. 

Col. James R. Dodge at this meeting sent in his Resignation as a 
Trustee. Whereupon after deliberation Thomas R. Shuford was elected 
to fill the vacancy & H. W. Guion deputed to inform Mr. Shuford of his 
election. 

The meeting then adjourned. H. W. Guion, Sec. 

CATAWBA SCHOOL, 1823. 

The first semi-annual examination of the students of the institution, 
took place on Thursday, the 20th inst. 

The different classes were examined on the following studies, viz : 
Homer's Iliad, 4 books; Lucian's Dialogues, the Odes of Horace, Vir- 
gil's Bucolicks, Nixon's Latin Prosody, together with scanning the dif- 
ferent measures of Horace, Corderius, and the Latin Grammar, Arith- 
metick, Algebra and Geometry in Hutton's course of Mathematicks, 
Pike's Arithmetic, Willett and Adams' Geography, Pickett and Mur- 
ray's English Grammar, reading and synonomising in Pickett's Ex- 
positor, spelling in Walker's Dictionary and Webster's Spelling Book, 
the shorter and child's catechism; also on reading, writing and com- 
position. 

The subscribers having had the experience of Nathaniel JST. Smith for 
the last session, feel a confidence in recommending him as a Teacher 
qualified and disposed to discharge his duty. Under his instruction, 
young gentlemen can be prepared for entering any college in our country. 

While due attention is paid to the classicks, particular pains will be 
taken in teaching the English language critically, penmanship, arith- 
metic, geography, history and composition. Students, for the future, 
will be required to attend school on Saturday forenoon, for the purpose 
of reciting English Grammar, reading, parsing, composition, declama- 
tion, etc. It often happens that boys who have neglected those previous 
studies, enter college, and graduate, without being able to write a tol- 
erable letter, much less to arrange their thoughts in a clear, pure and 
eloquent style. The reason of the above regulation is to obviate this 
fault. * * * Robert Johnston, 

Henry Connor, 

Lincoln County, Nov. 20, 1823. John Hayes. 

— Western Carolinian, December 2, 1823. 



Lincoln County Schools. 225 

CATAWBA SCHOOL COURSE, 1824. 

The subscriber, induced by the encouragement heretofore received, 
and by the growing prospects of the Catawba School, has consented to 
extend his engagements with the managers of this institution. In this 
school the course of instruction is such as to qualify students for admis- 
sion into the University of this State, or to prepare them for the useful 
discharge of the duties of active life. 

To attain these objects, the course of instruction will embrace the 
English, Latin and Greek languages; the elements of abstract and prac- 
tical Mathematics, Geography, History and Astronomy. In the English 
language, no pains will be spared in instructing students in reading, 
orthography, etymology and syntax; and those lower branches of an 
English education, too much neglected in our public schools, but abso- 
lutely necessary in the ordinary concerns of life, shall be strictly at- 
tended to. 

In the study of the ancient languages, particular attention will be 
paid to analysis, prosody, mythology, and composition; while the beau- 
ties of the classics will be, at the same time, carefully explained. 

In the mathematics, the course of study will include arithmetic, use 
and construction of Logarithms. Algebra, Geometry, Trigometry, with 
their application to surveying, Navigation, etc. * * * 

Also, the second semi-annual examination of the students of this 
School will commence on the 17th and end on the 20th of May, On the 
17th, the English department will be examined; on the 18th, the classi- 
cal; on the 20th, there will be a public exhibition, in which will be de- 
livered several original and select orations, together with dialogues and 
dramatic pieces. Parents, Guardians and friends of literature, in gen- 
eral, are respectfully invited to attend. 

Lincoln County, April 20, 1824. N. X. Smith, Rector. 

— Western Carolinian, April 27, 182 1^. 

EXAMINATION CATAWBA SCHOOL, 1824. 
EXAMINATION. 

THE examination of the Catawba School commenced on the 17th 
and ended on the 20th inst. And we, the undersigned, feel a pleasure 
in announcing, that the specimens of improvement exhibited by the 
students, in each department, were such as realized our most sanguine 
expectations; and that there was not an individual who did not give 
satisfactory evidence of diligence and application on the part of the 
pupil, and of the ability and attention of the Instructor. 

This school will commence its operation on the 7th of June, under 
the entire superintendence of Mr. Nathaniel N. Smith. The institution 
is intended to afford such course of study as will comprise the various 
branches requisite to perfect a young gentleman for entering the most 

15 



226 Lincoln County Schools. 

respectable Colleges in our country, or to qualify him for the discharge 
of the duties of active life. 

Boarding, with good accommodations, including washing, candles, 
fuel, &c. can be had at the rate of $65 per annum, to be punctually dis- 
charged at, or before, the close of each session. 

Robert Johnston, 

Lincoln County, May 22, 1824. Henry Conner. 

— Western Carolinian, May 25, 182^. 

O'BEILLY'S SCHOOL, 1826. 
EDUCx\TION. 

The subscribers having engaged Mr. M. O'Reilly to take charge of 
a School, beg leave to inform those who may be disposed to educate 
their children, that a school will be opened on the first of March ; board- 
ing can be had on reasonable terms, and a few scholars taken in. Mr. 
O'Reilly is highly recommended for moral character, and as being well 
qualified to teach the English, Latin and Greek languages ; and we feel 
confident will give satisfaction to such as may entrust their children 
to his charge. The situation is healthy, being within one mile and a 
half of Beattie's Ford, and within three miles of the Catawba Springs 
in Lincoln County. Robert Abernathy, 

Alfred M. Burton, 

Feb. 1, 1826. Robert H. Burton. 

—Catawba Journal, February 7, 1826. 

BUFFALO ACADEMY, 1827. 

THE Examination of the students of Buffalo Academy, in Lincoln 
County, under the care of P. J. Sparrow, was held on the 22d inst. 
The subscribers having attended it, they think it a duty which they 
owe to the teacher and students of this institution to say, that the 
students gave evidence of their having been assiduously and correctly 
taught in the different branches of education, and that they appear to 
possess that laudable ambition to excel, which is the life of such institu- 
tions. The classes examined in the English language, consisted in 
Spelling, Reading, Writing, Arithmetic^ Grammar, Definition of Words 
and Geography; and in the dead languages, one class on the Latin Gram- 
mar, one on Virgil's Bucolics, one on Virgil's Eneid, Horace's Art of 
Poetry, and the Greek Testament ; and another on Graeca Minora. The 
examination was conducted with the utmost propriety and decorum, 
before a number of respectable visitors, who attended on the occasion, 
and who appeared to be highly gratified. After a short vacation, the 
exercises of this institution will again commence, under the care of 
Mr. Sparrow, whom we would recommend as worthy of public patron- 



Lincoln County Schools. 227 

age. This Academy is situated in a healthy place, about 17 miles to 
the southwest of Lincolnton, in a respectable and plentiful neighborhood, 
where boarding can be had on ready terms. 

Lawson Henderson, 
— Cataivba Journal, January 2, 1827. David Kiddoe. 

BUFFALO SHOAL SCHOOL, 1829. 

AN enfeebled constitution, renders it impossible for me to take an 
extensive circuit in the practice of my profession as a Lawyer ; and 
I therefore propose, assisted by my brother, to open a School at my 
house in Lincoln County, on the Catawba River, nine miles from States- 
ville, and twenty-four miles from Lincolnton, on the first Monday in 
March next ; by which time my buildings will be completed. My house 
is large and roomy; and I have begun to erect small but comfortable 
cabins, similar to those at the Winnsborough and Piatt Spring Acad- 
emies of South Carolina. The situation is a handsome one — is known 
to be perfectly healthy, and has the advantage of being entirely removed 
from all places of dissipation. No scholar will be taken who cannot 
board with me as a member of my family. 

I will teach the Latin and Greek Languages, the Mathematics, and 
the Elements of the other Sciences ; and also, if required by parents 
or guardians, I will teach with great care the elementary branches of 
an English education. Tuition and boarding, including candles, wash- 
ing, &c. &c. will be furnished for one hundred dollars per annum, 
twenty-five of which must be paid in advance. ISTo scholar will be taken 
for a less term than one quarter ; but entrances may be had for one or 
more quarters at any time after the opening of the school. 

I now have one Law Student, and am anxious to get a few more; to 
whose examination and instruction I would devote a sufficient portion 
of time to enable them to proceed with much greater ease than they 
generally do in lawyers' offices, in acquiring a knowledge of their pro- 
fession ; for it is a notorious fact, that practicing lawyers have neither 
time nor inclination to direct the studies of their students, and that 
they do not examine them as often as once a month. Under such cir- 
cumstances a young man must pursue his studies to great disadvantage ; 
and often license to practice without a competent fund of practical in- 
formation. I do not propose to deliver law lectures; but I will point 
out the authors, or the parts of them, which ought to be read ; examine 
the young men daily upon them, converse with them upon the changes 
which have been made in the English law by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, the Constitution and laws of this State, and 
by the decisions of the Supreme Court. I have a very good library 
of elementary law books ; for the use of which, for instruction, and for 
boarding, including candles and washing, I will charge each student one 
hundred dollars per annum, twenty-five of which must be paid in 
advance. 



228 Lincoln County Schools. 

All applications must be made to me in person, or by letter, directed 
to Thomas' Terry, Iredell County, or to Statesville. 

For particulars as to my qualifications, I refer to Judge Badger of 
Raleigh, or to Mayor Henderson of Lincolnton. 

Dec. 11, 1829. Richard T. Brumby. 

— Raleigh Register, December 1J/., 1829. 



MECKLENBURG COUNTY SCHOOLS 

MES. MILLIGRAM'S SCHOOL, 1807. 
LADIES SCHOOL. 

Mrs. Milligan respectfully informs the Public that she has opened 
School in Charlotte, N". C, on the 25th of May, for the purpose of 
teaching Young Ladies Reading, Writing, English Grammar, Geog- 
raphy, and all kinds of Needle-Work. She promises particular attention 
to the manners and conduct of the Ladies immediately under her inspec- 
tion, and hopes to give ample satisfaction to Parents, having taught 
with success for many years in Charleston, and in several families of 
the highest standing in S. Carolina being able to produce Certifi- 
cates of her Abilities in Teaching and also of her Character, from 
Gentlemen whose Children she has taught. Terms, five dollars for each 
Scholar for every three months from the above date. 

t=gp Several respectable private Families will accommodate Young 
Ladies with Board on moderate terms. 

Charlotte, June 9, 1807. 

— From Raleigh Register, July 9, 1807. 

DEATH OF BEY. JOSEPH ALEXANDER, 1809. 
DIED, 

On the 29th ult. in York District, S. C, the Rev. Joseph Alexander, 
D.D., Minister of the Presbyterian Church, approaching to 80 years of 
age. He was a native of Pennsylvania, and graduated at Princeton 
College in 1760. He came to Carolina soon after the Peace of 1763, 
and was eminently instrumental in planting Churches both in North 
and South Carolina, at that early period of the settlement of the back 
country, when both states were in a very destitute condition with re- 
spect to religious instruction. He was an excellent classical scholar, and 
one of the fathers of learning in the Western Woods of Carolina. 

— Raleigh Register, August 21+, 1809. 

MBS. BEVELS' SCHOOL, 1812. 

LADIES BOARDING SCHOOL, 

At Charlotte, N. C. 

On Monday the 25th inst. the Subscriber will open a School for 
Young Ladies, in which will be taught those branches of Female Educa- 
tion usually taught .in similar institutions. Those Parents or Guardians 

(229) 



230 Mecklenburg County Schools. 

who may entrust their Children or Wards to her care, may depend on 
the strictest attention heing paid to their morals and improvement. 

The price of Boarding will be 75 dollars per annum — Tuition, 5 
dollars per quarter. Mrs. E. Bevens. 

Charlotte, May 7, 1812. 

— Raleigh Register, May 22, 1812. 

HOPEWELL ACADEMY, 1821. 
HOPEWELL ACADEMY. 

This Institution, situated in a quiet country seat, remote from any 
town or village, enjoying the superior advantages of a remarkably 
healthy situation, and near the center of an improved, moral, and re- 
ligious society, is now about to commence its literary course, under the 
immediate superintendence of the Rev. John Williamson. Good board- 
ing is fixed at $65 per annum, and tuition at $20. 

This institution is fixed near the road from Charlotte to Beattie's 
ford, (about 10 miles south-east of said ford,) in Mecklenburg county, 
MT. C. 

The patronage of a grateful and generous public is solicited, and 
every exertion to merit their approbation will be made by the superin- 
tendent, and by Robert Davidson, 

John Davidson, 
William J. Wilson, 

Feb. 20, 1821. James G. Ferrence. 

—Western Carolinian, March 20, 1821. 

CHARLOTTE ACADEMY, 1822. 

CHARLOTTE FEMALE ACADEMY. 

The Examination in this infant institution took place on Wednesday 
last. There being but one day set apart for the purpose, business was 
too much hurried to do justice either to the tutoress or her pupils. 
Spelling, reading, writing, English grammar, geography, and needle- 
work, together with Bible Questions (Sabbath exercises) were all on the 
carpet. There was too little difference in classes, owing, in a great 
measure, to their prudential arrangement, that no particular distinctions 
was thought necessary or right. We do not hesitate to say that all 
acquitted themselves with much honor ; and that those who were exam- 
ined on geography and grammar, perhaps, have not been excelled by 
any. Some who began to memorize grammar since the commencement 
of the session, parsed blank verse with uncommon ease and propriety. 
Were we even to attempt to do justice to Miss Leavenworth's character 
as our tutoress, by many, no doubt, we would be accused of exaggera- 
tion; suffice it therefore to observe, that her piety is exemplary, and the 



Mecklenburg County Schools. 231 

advancement of her pupils satisfactorily proves her capability of per- 
forming the duties assigned her, and discharging the trust reposed in 
her. D. R. Dunlap, 

June 22, 1822. In behalf of the Trustees. 

—Western Carolinian, July 9, 1822. 

CHARLOTTE ACADEMY UNDER MISS LEAVENWORTH. 

CHARLOTTE FEMALE ACADEMY. 

The second session of this institution has just commenced under the 
management of Miss Leavenworth, who superintended the last session 
with the highest approbation. All the branches usually studied by 
young ladies (music excepted) are taught in this institution. The Trus- 
tees natter themselves, from the talents of Miss Leavenworth as a 
tutoress, and their attention to the exercises of the school, that very 
general satisfaction will be given. 

Tuition from six to eleven dollars per semi-annual session, with two 
dollars additional for fine needle work. Genteel boarding at from 
twenty-five to forty dollars per session. A few more scholars will be 
received before the school is closed. John Iewin, Treasurer. 

— Western Carolinian, September 3, 1822. 

CHARLOTTE ACADEMY BUILDINGS, 1824. 

CHARLOTTE MALE AKD FEMALE ACADEMIES. 

The undersigned are authorized to contract for building two Acad- 
emies in Charlotte, of brick, fifty feet long by thirty feet wide, or there- 
abouts ; two stories high, on a stone foundation, with two partition walls 
in each, and basement story for cellar, etc. under the female depart- 
ment. Doors and windows proportioned in size and number to the size 
of the building. 

Proposals will be received by either of the subscribers, until the first 
of March next, for the mason and carpenter's work separately, but all 
to go on at the same time. Painting and plastering will be distinct jobs, 
to be contracted for hereafter. Contractors must furnish all the mate- 
rials, except the brick. J. Iewin, 

David R. Dunlap, 

February 2, 1824. William Davidson. 

— Western Carolinian, February 10, 182!±. 

THE TRUSTEES. 

Of the Charlotte Male and Female Academy, are requested to attend 
at the Court House, in Charlotte, on Monday, the 22d inst. precisely 
at 10 o'clock. Robert J. Dinkins, Secy. 

Nov. 13, 1824. 

— Cataivaba Journal, November 23, 1821f. 



232 Mecklenburg County Schools. 

CHARLOTTE ACADEMY UNDER THE COTTRELLS, 1825. 

The Trustees of the Charlotte Female Academy have the pleasure of 
announcing to the public, that the exercises of this Institution will 
commence on the first Monday in January next, under the superintend- 
ence of the Rev. Thomas Cottrell and Lady. A large and convenient 
brick building, located in one of the most healthy situations in this 
village, has been erected, which will be occupied by the Rev. T. Cottrell 
and family. Ample funds for the support of this Institution, have been 
placed in the hands of the Trustees by the liberal donations of the citi- 
zens of Charlotte and its immediate vicinity, who stand pledged, as well 
as the Trustees, for its respectability. The Trustees feel assured, from 
the high recommendations of Mr. and Mrs. Cottrell, with which they 
have been furnished from the most unquestionable sources, and from 
their long experience in the management of Institutions of this kind, 
that those who feel a lively interest in the success of this Academy will 
not be disappointed. The various branches of Female Education, both 
literary and ornamental, will be taught; and the most unremitting at- 
tention is pledged to the manners and morals of the pupils. Boys, not 
exceeding ten years old, will be admitted. The first session will close 
on the fifteenth of June, and the next session commence on the next 
day and close on the 15th of November. Boarding can be had in 
respectable families in town, at forty dollars per session. Terms of 
tuition, in the literary branches, per session, $10. The ornamental 
branches will be taught on the following terms, viz : 

Muslin Work and Marking, pr. Session $5.00 

Embroidery and Marking, pr. Session 10.00 

Drawing and Painting on Paper, per Session 10.00 

Drawing and Painting on Velvet, pr. Session 10.00 

Music on the Piano, pr. Session 20.00 

Each payable in advance. 

1ST. B. — A few pupils can be accommodated with board at the 
Academy. David R. Dunlap, 

John Irwin, 
Wm. J. Alexander, 

Committee. 



'The editors of the Camden Chronicle and the Western Carolinian, 
will give the above advertisement four insertions in their respective 
papers, and forward their accounts for payment. 

[jglr'A meeting of the Trustees of the Charlotte Academy will be held 
at the Court-House in this place on Saturday, the 31st of December 
instant. A general attendance is requested. 

— Catawba Journal, December 13, 1825. 



Mecklenburg County Schools. 233 

CHAELOTTE MALE ACADEMY, 1826. 

EDUCATION. 

The Trustees of the Academy in Charlotte have the pleasure to an- 
nounce, that a Classical School, taught by the Rev. Allen D. Metcalf, 
A. B., will be opened in this place on the 23d of January, 1S26. In 
this school "will be taught, in the most approved manner, the Latin and 
Greek languages, together with all other branches which enter into the 
foundation of a thorough and liberal education, viz : Mathematics, 
pure and practical, English Grammar, Geography, &c. &c. 

From their knowledge of Mr. Metcalf's character, as well as from 
the respectable references he makes, the Trustees do not hesitate to 
place their entire confidence in him; and all who are disposed to pat- 
ronize the school, are respectfully invited to do so immediately. Should 
it be necessary, students in the common branches of English can be 
admitted. 

The session will commence on the 23d January and end on the 23d 
June. 

Prices — For Latin and Greek, Mathematics and Sciences, $12 per 
session. 

For English Grammar and Geography, $10 per session. All payable 
at the end of the term. By order of the Board, 

Robt. J. Dinkins, Secry. 

— Catawba Journal, January 17, 1826. 

CHAELOTTE FEMALE ACADEMY EXAMINATIONS, 1826. 

CHARLOTTE FEMALE ACADEMY. 

June 1, 1826. 

THE semi-annual examination of the students of this Institution will 
take place on Thursday and Friday, the 15th and 16th instant, which 
will close the first Session. It is hoped the patrons and friends of this 
infant Seminary will countenance it by their attendance; — the public 
are respectfully invited. 

The second Session will commence on the Monday following. 

Teems of Tuition. 

For literature, for each student, per Session $10.00 

Ornamental, including drawing, painting, and needle-work, 

per do 10.00 

Music on the Piano, per do 20.00 

"We are authorised to state that 8 or 10 young ladies can be boarded 
in the Academy at $50 per session, under the immediate care of the 
Tutor and Tutoress, they furnishing their bed clothing and hand towels. 
In every instance the money will be payable in advance. 

By order of the Board, R. J. Dinkins, Secry. 

— Cat aw aba Journal, June 6, 1826. 



234 Mecklenburg County Schools. 

CHARLOTTE FEMALE ACADEMY. 

The Examination in this infant Institution took place on Thursday, 
the 15th of June, in presence of a respectable number of the trustees 
and citizens from the town and country; and we are happy to have 
it in our power to state, that our highest expectations were more than 
realized on the occasion. The classes were so judiciously arranged, 
and such equality existed, that no attempt was made to signalize in- 
dividuals ; the trustees believing that honors could not be conferred on 
some, without doing injustice to others. A considerable number of 
very small scholars, most of whom commenced in the alphabet, were 
examined in spelling from 2 to 5 syllables, to the admiration of all. 
Those who were examined in reading manifested the strictest attention 
to punctuation and emphasis. The different classes in Grammar, Pars- 
ing, Geography, Painting, &c. have probably not been excelled by any 
in the same time. 

The Rev. Thomas Cottrell and lady were accompanied to this place 
with various letters of recommendation from the most intelligent and 
respectable sources in Warren county, where they formerly taught; and 
such has been the almost unexampled progress of the pupils under their 
care during the first session, that we feel no hesitation in recommending 
our Institution to the attention and patronage of the public in general, 
under the firm persuasion, that the various branches of the female edu- 
cation will be taught as radically as in any other part of the State. 

By order of the Board of Trustees. R. J. Dinkins, Secretary. 

1ST. B. — In this Academy, all the branches usually attended to in 
female academies, are thoroughly taught ; and three teachers constantly 
employed. The prices of tuition are as follows : 

Literature, $10 per Session. 

Drawing, Painting and JSTeedle-work, $10 do. 

Music on the Piano, $20 do. 

All payable in advance. 

The editors of the Cheraw Gazette and Camden Journal, will give 
the above three insertions in their respective papers, and forward their 
accounts for payment. 

— Cataivba Journal, July If, 1826. 

FOK THE CATAWBA JOURNAL. 

Mr. Bingham : I attended, on Saturday last, an examination and 
concert of the young ladies of the Charlotte Female Academy, under 
the immediate superintendence and direction of Eev. Thomas Cottrell, 
his Son, and their two Ladies. The exercises of the respective classes 
were such as to do honor to the amiable and respectable persons who 
are at the head of the Institution, as well as to give entire satisfaction 



Mecklenburg County Schools. 235 

to the parents and guardians who attended on the occasion. It is at 
all times gratifying to the friends of literature, and ever must be so, 
to the admirers of beauty and female worth, to see the minds of the 
fair sex cultivated and embellished in such a manner, as to make woman 
not only the wife of man, but his intelligent friend and amiable com- 
panion. The land of Lafayette affords innumerable instances, to what 
an elevation the female mind can attain by a correct and well regulated 
education. " 'Tis true, and pity 'tis, 'tis true," that in our coun- 
try, with all our boasted freedom, stars of this description have never 
shown in the literary firmament. None will pretend to assert, that it 
has been owing to a want of genius in the American ladies ; for in this 
respect, we can vie with the proudest kingdom of Europe. To what, 
then, is it owing, but to a neglect of a proper direction being given to 
the minds of our fair daughters — to the intellectual attainments of 
those who, at an after period, are to become mothers to the heroes, 
statesmen and warriors of our country? 

From the acknowledged talents of the persons who are at the head 
of this infant institution, and from the admirable specimen they have 
given of their method of teaching, I hazard nothing in recommending 
the Institution to the liberal patronage of the public. 

— Catawba Journal, September 19, 1826. Madame de Stael. 

The semi-annual Examination of the students in the Academy at this 
place will commence on the 22d instant, and will probably continue two 
days. Parents and guardians, and all indeed, who feel an interest in 
this institution, will, it is hoped, attend and judge for themselves of 
its claims to their confidence and support. 

The next session, we are requested to mention, will commence on 
Monday, the 2d day of January next. 

— Catawba Journal, November 7, 1826. 

FOK THE CATAWBA JOUKSAL. 

The annual examination of the students of the Charlotte Female 
Academy commenced on the 22d ult. and ended on the evening of the 
23d, in presence of a respectable number of citizens from the town and 
country. Classes of almost every grade, from the Spelling Book up to 
Natural Philosophy and Astronomy, throughout the examination, gave 
such evidence of a thorough understanding of all the fundamental prin- 
ciples, as far as they had advanced, as to excite the admiration of all 
present. Several gentlemen of liberal education, and who have been 
conversant with such scenes, perhaps all their lives, declared, they never 
had heard students undergo a more satisfactory examination. Without 
any disposition to puff, we feel it an imperious duty we owe to the 
teachers in this Institution, to declare to the public, that they possess 
an art of adapting instruction to the understanding of Children, which, 
we believe, is seldom equalled, and perhaps never surpassed. As evi- 



236 Mecklenburg County Schools. 

dence of this declaration, we state, that children of not exceeding 9 or 
10 years of age, who have spent but one session in attention to English 
Grammar, and who had, during that time, attended to various other 
branches, proved to our satisfaction, a thorough knowledge of the con- 
struction of sentences, by parsing the most difficult word selected by 
any present, without a moment's hesitation. We also had satisfactory 
evidence, that the abstruse principles of Natural Philosophy and As- 
tronomy were fully comprehended and understood by those who are 
yet but children. We verily believe, that the fundamental principles of 
literature and some of the fine arts are as radically taught here as any 
other place in the Union. To say less, would be doing injustice to our 
teachers, the institution and our own candor. Very few personal dis- 
tinctions could be made justly, had the Trustees been so disposed; be- 
cause the invariable rule of the institution is, to suffer no scholar to 
progress faster than they learn thoroughly. During the fall season, 
some sickness prevailed for a time in the village, which was much 
exaggerated abroad : the whooping cough was prevalent and considerably 
retarded the business of the Academy: but few, perhaps not more than 
3 or 4 were affected with fever — Charlotte is certainly, naturally, a 
healthy and pleasant Village as any other in the up country, and the 
fevers which we have occasionally experienced have unquestionably 
arisen from local causes, which the Commissioners of the town assure 
us will be removed before the next session. We invite the attention of 
the public and solicit that patronage which we think our infant institu- 
tion really merits. The Exercises of the Academy will be resumed on 
the first Monday in January, 1827. The course of instruction will 
embrace spelling, reading, writing, arithmetic, English Grammar, Geog- 
raphy, Astronomy, Natural Philosophy, Rhetoric, Chemistry, Ethics, 
History, plain and ornamental needle-work, Drawing, Painting on 
Paper and Velvet, and music on the Piano Forte. 

Price of tuition, exclusive of ornamental branches and music, for 
each Student per Session, $10. 

Drawing, Painting, and Needle Work $10.00 

Music 20.00 

Wm. Davidson, 
Wm. Smith, 
G. Kendrick, 
J. M. Hutchinson, 
John Irwin, 
D. P. Dunlap, 
Joab Alexander, 
Samuel M'Comb, 
N. W. Alexander, 
Thos. B. Smartt, 
Adam Cooper. 



Mecklenburg County Schools. 237 

EglPA meeting of the Trustees will be held at the Court-House on 
Wednesday, the loth instant. As business of importance will come 
before the meeting, it is hoped a punctual attendance will be given. 

— Catawba Journal, December 5, 1826. 

CHARLOTTE FEMALE ACADEMY TEACHERS, 1S27. 

CHAELOTTE FEMALE ACADEMY. 

THE Exercises of this Academy, under the superintendence of the 
Rev. Thomas Cottrell, his son, and their ladies, will be resumed on the 
1st Monday in January, 1827. The course of instruction will embrace 
spelling, reading, writing, arithmetic, English Grammar, Geography, 
Astronomy, Natural Philosophy, Rhetoric, Chemistry, Ethics, History, 
Plain and Ornamental Needle Work, Drawing, Painting on Velvet, and 
Music on the Piano Forte. 

Price of tuition, exclusive of ornamental branches and music, for each 
Student per Session, $10. 

Drawing, Painting and Needle Work $10.00 

Music 20.00 

Boarding can be had on moderate terms, either at the Academy, or 
at respectable private houses in town. 

— Catawba Journal, December 12, 1826. 

CHARLOTTE ACADEMY EXAMINATIONS, 1827. 

The semi-annual examination of the students of the Charlotte Acad- 
emy, will be held on the 5th and 6th of June. Parents and Guardians, 
and all who feel an interest in the prosperity of the institution, are 
requested to attend, and judge for themselves of its claims to continued 
patronage. 

— Catawba Journal, May 29, 1827. 

The examination of the students of the Charlotte Academy took place 
on the 5th and 6th instants, in the presence of a respectable number of 
citizens from the town and country. The proficiency of the students 
gave great satisfaction and bore ample testimony to the superior qualifi- 
cations of those who have charge of the institution. We express it as 
our firm belief, that there is not an Academy in the State, where the 
pupils are more thoroughly instructed, and more fully understand what 
they are taught; than in the institution in this town; and we trust its 
merits will be so appreciated by the community as to insure it such 
support as will render it permanent. 

The exercises of the Academy, we are requested to state, will be re- 
sumed on Monday, the 18th instant. 

— Catawba Journal, June 12, 1827. 



238 Mecklenburg County Schools. 

CHARLOTTE FEMALE ACADEMY. 

THE young ladies and little misses of this Institution will be exam- 
ined on Thursday, 22d instant. Parents, patrons, and friends, are re- 
quested to attend. 

The exercises of the school will be resumed on the 1st of January, 
1828, and continue until the last of July, including a term of seven 
months. Terms as heretofore, in proportion to the time. 

— Catawba Journal, November 13, 1827. P. J. Dinkins. 

CHARLOTTE FEMALE ACADEMY FOR 1828. 

THE subscriber respectfully informs the public, that the exercises 
of this Institution, under the direction of his lady, with suitable assist- 
ance, will be resumed on the first day of January, 1828, and continue 
until the 1st of August, including a term of seven months. 

He flatters himself that the long experience of Mrs. Cottrell in the 
teaching and management of young ladies, and the general satisfaction 
she has given, will continue to her a liberal share of public patronage. 

Prices of Tuition. 

Literature, for the above mentioned term $14.00 

Ornamental Branches 14.00 

Music, on the Piano Forte 28.00 

One half payable in advance, the balance at the end of the session. 

One dollar deposit money will be required of each student, to defray 
the expense of fire-wood for the use of the school and to keep the win- 
dows, &c. in repair. 

A few young ladies can be boarded at the Acadamy, on reasonable 
terms; and merchantable produce, at current prices, will be received in 
payment for boarding. Trios. Cottrell. 

— Catawba Journal, December If, 1827. 

CHARLOTTE FEMALE ACADEMY EXAMINATIONS, JULY, 1828. 

AN examination of the students of this institution, will commence 
on Wednesday, 30th inst. and continue from day to day until com- 
pleted ; which will close the present session of seven months. The 
ensuing session of three months, will commence on the 1st Monday in 
September. Terms as heretofore. 

July 10, 1828. Thos. Cottrell. 

— Yadkin and Catawba Journal, July 15, 1828. 

CHARLOTTE FEMALE ACADEMY ANNOUNCEMENTS, 1828. 

CHARLOTTE FEMALE ACADEMY. 

THE exercises of this institution will be resumed on the first day of 
October, under the direction of the undersigned and his lady. The 



Mecklenburg County Schools. 239 

course of education will embrace Spelling, Heading, Writing, Arith- 
metic, English Grammar, Geography, Astronomy, Natural Philosophy, 
Chemistry, Rhetoric, Logic, Ethics and History; Drawing, Painting, 
Music, Plain and Ornamental Needlework. 

To give tone and energy to the minds of their pupils, by pursuing 
such a method of instruction as will insure a radical and thorough 
knowledge of the sciences they may study, will be the object of the 
teachers. Lectures on the higher branches will be frequently delivered 
to the classes after recitation. Strict attention will be paid to the man- 
ners and morals as well as the literary advancement of all who may 
be intrusted to their care. 

Price of tuition per Session, {five months) $10.50. 

Drawing and Painting, per Session $10.00 

Needlework, per Session 5.00 

Music 20.00 

Payable in advance. Benjamin Cottrell. 

N. B. — Board can be obtained in the best families at seven dollars 
per month : — six or eight young ladies can be accommodated in the 
Academy. 

The editor of the Camden Journal and Yorkville Pioneer will insert 
the above three times, and forward their accounts for payment. 

— Yadkin & Cataivba Journal, August 26, 1828. 

CHARLOTTE ACADEMY EXAMINATIONS, 1829. 
CHARLOTTE EEMALE ACADEMY. 

THE examination will commence on the 27th and close on the even- 
ing of the 28th, when the present session will have ended. The attend- 
ance of the friends of literature is respectfully requested. The exercises 
will be resumed on Monday, the 2d of March, and continued until the 
1st of August. Benjamin Cottrell, Principal. 

— Yadkin & Catawba Journal, February 10, 1829. 

THE EXAMINATION 

Of the students in the Charlotte Female Academy, will take place on 
Thursday and Friday, the 30th and 31st. The friends and patrons of 
the Institution are requested to attend. 

July 9, 1829. Benjamin Cottrell, Principal. 

— Yadkin & Catawba Journal, July llf., 1829. 

COURSE OF STUDY CHARLOTTE ACADE3IY, 1829. 

CHARLOTTE FEMALE ACADEMY. 

THE exercises of this institution will be resumed on the first of 
October. The course of instruction includes Spelling and Reading. 



240 Mecklenburg County Schools. 

with particular attention to Orthoepy and Orthography; "Writing, 
Arithmetic, English Grammar, Geography, Astronomy, Natural Phil- 
osophy, Chemistry, History, Ehetoric, Logic and Ethics; Drawing, 
Painting, Needlework and Music. 

The price of tuition per session, (five months) payable in advance, is 

$10. 

Contingent expenses $0.50 

Drawing and Painting 10.00 

Music 20.00 

Board can be obtained in the best families in town at $7 per month. 
Six or eight young ladies can be boarded in the Academy. 

Benjamin Cottrell, Principal. 
— Yadkin & Catawba Journal, August 11, 1829. 

SFBATTSVILLE LANCASTRIAN SCHOOL, 1822. 

SPRATTSVILLE LANCASTRIAN 

School for both sexes, six miles south of Charlotte, on the Old Nation 

road. 

THE trustees of this institution have the pleasure to inform its 
friends, and the public generally, that their school-house is elegantly 
fitted up, and is now open for the reception of scholars, and still con- 
tinues under the management of Mr. Ulrick, who has pursued this 
admirable system with much ability and energy, to the credit of the 
institution and the great improvement of his pupils. The trustees con- 
sider it a duty they owe to Mr. Ulrick, to thus publicly acknowledge, 
that too much cannot be said in his favor, as regards his particular 
attention to his pupils, and his ability to perform the duty committed 
to his charge. All those who may feel disposed to patronize this school, 
may depend upon having every reasonable expectation satisfied. The 
branches taught are such as are comprised in a complete English edu- 
cation. Tuition from seven to nine dollars per session, and the follow- 
ing articles are found, without any extra charge, viz : quills, ink, 
slates, pencils, books for the junior classes, mathematical instruments, 
maps of the United States and of the world, together with the use of 
an elegant pair of globes. Early application will be necessary, as the 
number of scholars is limited. Genteel boarding can be had at the 
school-house, or within one quarter of a mile of the same, at from 
twenty to thirty dollars per session. The public are earnestly invited 
to pay this institution a visit, and satisfy themselves with the propriety 
of the system, and success of the school. 

Signed by order of the board, J. Smith, Sec'ry. 

Mecklenburg County, N. C, Dec. 14, 1822. 

— Western Carolinian, December 21+, 1822. 



Mecklenburg County Schools. 241 

SUGAK CHEEK ACADEMY, 1827. 

TO THE PUBLIC. 

The school at Sugar Creek Church, superintended by the Eev. Sam- 
uel C. Caldwell, deceased, will be continued by the subscriber. Young 
men wishing to study Geography or Astronomy, can enjoy the benefits 
of a set of Globes. Board can be had in the neighborhood for sixty or 
sixty-five dollars per annum, the student finding his own candles. Tui- 
tion, twenty dollars per annum. The subscriber hopes to merit the lib- 
eral patronage of an enlightened public, by his punctuality and fidelity 
in the discharge of the duties of a preceptor. The patronage of the pub- 
lic will be kindly received and thankfully acknowledged by 

January 30, 1S27. Walter S. Pharr. 

—Catawba Journal, February 13, 1827. 

MBS. CUSHMAN'S SCHOOL, 1828. 

EDUCATION. 

THE subscribers, five miles south of Charlotte, having built a com- 
modious house, have employed Mrs. Jane Cushman as Teacher. The 
situation is as healthy as any in Mecklenburg. Mrs. Cushman will 
teach Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, English Grammar, Geography, 
Drawing and ISTeedle Work, or any part, as may be wished; or suit the 
student. 

Boarding may be had at either of the subscribers, or at Dr. Joseph W. 
Ross, (the farthest not more than three-quarters of a mile from the 
school,) at sixty dollars, including tuition, per year. 

William P. Springs. 
Andrew Springs. 

— Catawba Journal, May 20, 1828. 



16 



MILITARY SCHOOLS 

DAVIE FAVORS MILITARY INSTRUCTION AT UNIVERSITY, 1795. 

During the last year military schools were taught in several counties 
of this state by two gentlemen from Virginia. The very liberal encour- 
agement they met with * * * has, we hope, still retained the em- 
ployment of their valuable services, and, we could wish, had also excited 
the enterprise of others. A Mr. Archibald Murphy, who had schools in 
Stokes and adjacent counties, received about 1,500 dollars a year for his 
services; and a Mr. Wren, who taught in Northampton, was very liber- 
ally compensated. These, we believe, were the only attempts ever made 
to establish military schools in this state. * * * 

General Davie, on the first establishment of the University, endeav- 
ored, unsuccessfully, to introduce military exercises among the students ; 
and more lately, a gentleman, who, without any pretensions either to 
the General's talents or influence, yet emulous of tracing at a distance 
the footsteps of so great an example, also submitted a proposition to that 
effect to the Trustees. No order, we believe, was taken upon it by the 
Board, but as we have a copy of the letter containing the proposition 
we will publish it, in the hope that it may yet produce some effect, either 
on the minds of the Trustees of the University, or of some of our Ac- 
ademies, or the patrons and teachers of common Schools. 

To the Board of Trustees of the University of N. C. 

Gentlemen- — I am informed that a highly respectable member of 
your Board some years ago proposed the introduction of military exer- 
cises among the students of the University, but that circumstances 
existed in the then infant state of the institution which prevented his 
proposition being acceded to. 

Salzmann, a German authour, in a celebrated treatise on Education, 
has recommended these exercises as of the highest importance to pre- 
serve the health of the studious, and to give energy to the faculties of 
the mind. 

In many of the northern Schools and Colleges they have been intro- 
duced with all the advantages that they had been taught by theorists to 
expect from them. 

The adoption of a measure of this kind in North Carolina, I think 
peculiarly desirable. The discipline of our militia requires a radical re- 
form; and by laying the foundation of the future soldier in the accom- 
plished scholar, we shall derive an important advantage in addition to 
those mentioned by Salzmann. 

If the Trustees should at this time think proper to require or recom- 
mend these exercises to be performed by the Students of the University, 

(242) 



Military Schools. 243 

I will present to the Institution an elegant Stand of Colours, a Drum 
and Fife, and a model for such a Gun as will be suitable for the use of 
the students. 

In order to ensure the success of this design, if adopted, I will pub- 
lish and give to each student, "A Manual of Military Discipline/' which 
I have already composed for my own use. I will submit this Manual to 
the inspection of some military man of talents and experience for correc- 
tion, and will then publish it, at my own expence, if the Trustees approve 
of my design, and by a resolution of their Board will authorize me to 
do so. 

However strong might have been my conviction of the utility of a 
measure of this kind, I should never have hazarded this expression of the 
sentiment if I had not been preceded by the example of the high au- 
thorities I have mentioned. They confirm what I had before learned 
from my own experience; and I have entire confidence that the same 
patriotism which has uniformly vindicated the rights of the University, 
and been assiduous in the promotion of useful science, will be extended 
to patronize this design, if the Trustees shall believe it will add to 

the value of the institution, or be productive of benefits to the state. 
% ?ji $ 

— Editorial, Raleigh Star, May 3, 1810. 

MURPHEY'S MILITARY SCHOOLS. 

MILITARY SCHOOLS. 

The Subscriber, having met with considerable encouragement in his 
line, intends teaching the Military Discipline at the following places 
during the ensuing summer, viz., at Hillsborough, Chapel Hill. Raleigh, 
Louisburg, Warrenton, Granville, Chatham, and Rockingham. He will 
commence at Chapel Hill, on Monday 18th inst. at Hillsborough, on 
the 17th of June, at Raleigh, the 20th of July, and at Louisburg. on the 
23rd of July. — Arrangements have not yet been made at the other places 
mentioned. It is hoped that the Militia generally, and the young men 
in particular, will avail themselves of this opportunity of acquiring a 
correct knowledge of the modern and established system of Military 
Discipline in the United States. A. Murphet. 

May 15, 1812. 

— The Star, May 15, 1812. 

LEXOIR COOT! MILITARY SCHOOL, 1S13. 

Education. — A Society has been recently established in Lenoir county, 
of which Col. Simon Bruton is president, for the purpose of promoting 
military knowledge. It is understood that a school for youth will be 
established at Kinston, under the patronage of this Society, to embrace 
at the same time, literature and military tactics. 

A handsome building for an academy has just been completed at 



244 Military Schools. 

Sniithfield, 26 miles to the eastward of this, and the business of tuition 
is expected to commence in a month or two. 

An academy is in progress at Tarborough. — We indulge the proud 
hope that the time is not far distant when every county in the State will 
have an Academy and Public Library. 

— Editorial, Raleigh Star, September 3, 1813. 

BINGHAM'S MILITARY SCHOOL, 1826. 

New Military Academy. — We understand that a gentleman, at pres- 
ent in this city, has it in contemplation to establish a Military and 
Scientific Academy at Williamsborough, in this State, on the plan of 
that conducted by Capt. Partridge in Connecticut. We are informed 
that he has been an officer in the French Army for several years, and is, 
in every respect, well qualified for the undertaking ; and that the Teach- 
ers who will be associated with him, will be of the first standing and 
talents. 

The want of such an institution in the Southern States must be ap- 
parent to all, when the difficulty of obtaining admission into the Acad- 
emy at West Point, from the number of its Students being restricted, 
and the distance of that in Connecticut, are taken into consideration. 
We shall be able, in a short time, to lay the plan of the proposed School 
before the public, and therefore, deem it unnecessary to say anything 
further on the subject at present. 

— The Star, August If, 1826. 

Military School. — We understand, that the gentleman who proposes 
the establishment of a Scientific and Military Academy in this State, 
has purchased a house and lot in Williamsborough, where it is to be 
located — the former large and commodious, situated on an eminence, 
the latter admirably adapted for a parade ground, being finely shaded 
with trees of native growth. We have seen an outline of the general 
plan of Institution, the operations of which are to commence on the 
first day of January ensuing. It appears, that the course of education 
at this Seminary, will be very comprehensive, embracing the following 
branches of Literature, Science and practical Instruction, viz. the 
Latin, Greek, French, Spanish and English Languages; Arithmetic, 
the instruction and use of Logarithms, Algebra, Geometry, Plane and 
Spherical Trigonometry, Planometry, Stereonometry, Mensuration of 
heights and distances by Trigonometry, also Geometrically, practical 
Geometry generally, including particularly, Surveying and Leveling, 
Astronomy, Navigation, Geography, including the use of Maps and 
Globes, Composition, Logic, History, Military Law, permanent and 
Field Fortifications, Artillery and Field Engineering generally, with 
a complete view of Military Tactics. The rules and regulations for 
the government of the School, will be on the plan of the West Point 
Seminary and of Capt. Partridge's Academy. 

— Raleigh Register, August 22, 1826. 



Military Schools. 245 

TO FAEMEES AND WEAVEES. 

IT is desirable to find a person who may be willing to undertake to 
furnish the Southern Military School, at Williamsboro' in Granville 
Co. with all the Homespun Cloth necessary to make the undress Uni- 
form of the Cadets of that Institution. The said cloth to be of a dark 
grey color, and corresponding in every respect with a pattern which will 
be left at the Register Office for the inspection of the applicant. It is 
necessary that application be made before the 15th of September next. 
A pattern is also left at the store of Messrs. Hamilton in Williamsboro'. 

Raleigh, August 22. 

— Raleigh Register, August 25, 1826. 

PLAN AM) COUESE OF STUDY OF BINGHAM'S SCHOOL. 

ROANOKE INSTITUTION 

For Practical Scientific Instruction. 

THE Course of Education at this Institution will embrace the fol- 
lowing Departments : 

I. Classical. — -This Department will include the Greek, Latin, 
French and Spanish Languages. 

II. The Mathematical will embrace Arithmetic, Algebra, Logarith- 
ems, Geometry, Trigonometry, Mensuration, Surveying, Conic Sections, 
Natural Philosophy, Astronomy and Navigation, and the Natural 
Sciences, as Botany, Mineralogy and Natural History. 

Particular attention will be paid at this Institution to Practical Ed- 
ucation. Classes in Mathematics will be practically taught the appli- 
cation of Trignometry to Heights and Distances ; Triangular Survey- 
ing; Levelling and Engineering; Gradation of Roads and Streets, the 
use of the Barometer, when applied to taking the altitude of mountains 
and other eminences. They will frequently be taken out to practice 
with the Compass and Chain, Theodolite and Levelling Rods, and ac- 
companied by their instructors, will occasionally take excursions for 
the purpose of making observations in Botany and Mineralogy. 

III. English. — This Department will include English Grammar, 
Penmanship, Book-keeping, Public Reading and Declamation, Ancient 
and Modern Geography with the use of the Maps and Globes, Ancient 
and Modern History, Rhetoric, Composition, Criticism, Logic and 
Moral Philosophy, Construction of Maps with the principles of Pro- 
jection. 

The rudiments of Education, as Reading, Spelling, Penmanship, &c. 
will be thoroughly taught, and the Junior Classes will in this respect, 
receive particular attention. 

Physical Education. — For the improvement of the health and the de- 
velopment of the Physical as well as mental energies of the cadets, 
they will be required to practice daily and regularly, Military Exer- 



246 Military Schools. 

cises. These having for their main object the preservation of health, 
will be pursued so far only as may be requisite for this purpose ; in no 
instance will they be permitted to interfere with other pursuits — but 
will occupy those hours in the day, that would otherwise be devoted to 
useless and frivolous amusement. — They will consist of the Elementary 
schools of the Soldier, Company and Battalion Evolutions, Light In- 
fantry and Rifle Drills — formation of regular Military Parades — Guard 
Duty — the duty of officers of the Guard and of the Day — the Broad 
Sword Exercise. 

Uniform Drill. — The dress worn at the Institution will consist of a 
dark blue Coatee, single breasted and standing collar. Blue cloth Yest 
and Pantaloons for winter, and white domestic cotton for summer, 
leather Caps with appropriate trimmings, black silk or leather Stocks. 
An undress will be worn in summer, consisting of a cotton striped 
Roundabout, single breasted and standing collar. 

As the coat cannot be made elsewhere than at the Institution, a more 
particular description of it is omitted. Each member of the Institution 
will want the following articles, viz : one single mattress either of hair 
or straw, pillow, two pillow cases, four sheets, two yards in length and 
one in breadth, one pair of blankets, two towels, four shirts, four pair 
of white cotton pantaloons, four white vests for summer and one blue 
cloth for winter single breasted, six pair of cotton and four pair of 
woolen socks, draws and waistcoats if worn, two pair of thin and one 
pair of thick shoes, at least two pocket handkerchiefs, tooth brush, pen- 
knife, quills, wafers, &c. Parents can furnish their sons with such 
articles of clothing of the above description as they may have, if they 
prefer it : or they may be supplied at the Institution on the most rea- 
sonable terms. The above quantity of clothing is deemed sufficient to 
answer a cadet one year — should he leave the Institution at the expira- 
tion of that time, such articles as the cap, bed and bedding, if furnished 
at the Institution and well taken care of, will be received back at a fair 
price. Each cadet must have his name marked in full, on every article 
of his clothing. 

Qualification, Admission, &c. — No candidate will be admitted into 
this Institution, who is under ten years of age, who cannot read and 
spell, and who is not of good moral character. It is deemed advisable 
to admit none for a less term than one year, as the expense for a less 
period would be proportionably greater, and the advantages to be de- 
rived proportionably less. 

Expenses. — The cadets will be divided into two Departments. Those 
under fourteen years of age will constitute the Junior, and those over, 
the Senior. The whole expense per Academic year, will be for the 
Junior $160, and for the Senior $175, payable $100 on admission and 
the remainder at the expiration of six months. This expense will in- 
clude every charge for Board, Tuition, Euel, Lights, Washing, Public 
Lectures, use of Arms and Accoutrements, Room Rent, and in short 



Military Schools. 247 

every expense except Clothing and Books. The academic year will 
consist of 46 weeks, and will be divided into two sessions. 

Board. — The cadets will board in the same family with their instruc- 
tors, some one or more of whom will be at all times in company with 
them, paternally to direct them both in their studies and amusements, 
and to assist in forming a courteous, moral and gentlemanly deport- 
ment. Instructors and instructed shall mingle together as members of 
the same family, and pursue towards each other, that familiar and re- 
spectful course, calculated to inspire the pupil with a manly confidence 
and zeal, and the instructor with emotions of pleasure. 

Examinations. — There will be two public Examinations in each year. 
The first to commence on the Monday nearest the 10th of December 
and the second on the first Monday in June, to continue each, one week. 
There will be private examinations of the Classes every Saturday, on 
the studies of the preceding week. 

Vacations. — There will be two vacations, the first immediately after 
the December examination, and will continue until the second Monday 
in January ; the next at the close of the June examination, and will 
continue two weeks. JSTo leave of absence will be granted in term time, 
except in cases of urgent necesity. 

Catalogue of Books. 

Latin. — Adams' Latin Grammar, (Gould's Edition,) Historise Sacra?, 
Yirii Roma?, Cassar's Commentaries, Sallust, Virgil, Cicero's Select 
Orations, De Oratore, De Amicitia, De Senectute, Livy, Tacitus, five 
first books of each, Ainsworth's Dictionary. 

Greek. — Goodrich's Greek Grammar, Jacob's Greek Reader, ISTeil- 
son's Exercises, Valpy's Delectus, Grseca Majora, Xenophon's Anabasis, 
Homer's Iliad, six first books. 

Mathematics, &c. — Tyler's Arithmetic, Hutton's Mathematics, Bow- 
ditch's Navigation, Simpson's Conic Sections, Enfield's Natural Phil- 
osophy, Sganzin's Civil Engineering, Woodbridge and Williard's Geog- 
raphy, (last edition) Tytler's Elements of History, Hale's History of 
the United States, Murray's Grammar and Exercises, Blair's Rhetorick, 
Hedge's Logic, Paley's Moral Philosophy, Constitution of the United 
States and States severally. 

Those intending to join the Institution are advised to bring any of 
the above mentioned books they may have in their possession, any 
Mathematical Instruments or Works, also any Historical or Literary 
Works. 

Supplies. — Arrangements will be made at the Institution to supply 
the cadets with the necessary Books, Stationary and Clothing, if it is 
preferred, at cost, provided payment is made down ; if not, and a credit 
of four months is given, an advance of ten per cent, will be charged 
on the original cost, which will be the longest indulgence. Every cadet 
will be required to have a pass book, in which will be registered every 



248 Militaey Schools. 

article of clothing, books, &c. that may be necessary for his comfort 
or improvement. The object being more to accommodate the cadets 
than to make a profit out of them. 

THE KOANOKE INSTITUTION is located at Littleton, Warren 
County, State of Worth Carolina, in a delightful and healthy part of 
the country; it is situated between Warrenton and Halifax, sixteen 
miles from the former and twenty-one miles from the latter, surrounded 
by a beautiful country and in the neighborhood of a refined and polished 
society. Isolated as this Institution is, no opportunity will be afforded 
to the pupils to contract habits of vice and dissipation; the temptations 
held out by our towns and villages will here be removed and their con- 
taminating influence avoided. Every attention will be paid to the 
health, manners, morals and improvements of the cadets ; and it is be- 
lieved that under the discipline that will be pursued in the Institution, 
aided by the superior natural advantages of its situation, youths may 
be trained up to habits of temperance, perseverance, industry and moral- 
ity without the danger of corruption. The object of this Institution 
will be to give a youth a good practical scientific education, to prepare 
him for the correct and efficient discharge of the duties of any situation 
in life, in which fortune or inclination may place him; to rear up a 
sound mind in a sound body; to qualify him to enter the world with a 
head to conceive and an arm to execute, to teach him habits of perse- 
verance, industry and economy, and to cherish those manly, noble and 
independent sentiments which should form the character of a good citi- 
zen. Youths may here be prepared for admission into any of our Col- 
leges or Universities, either one or two years in advance ; for admission 
to the Military Academy at West Point or the Navy; or they will be 
carefully instructed in the various branches necessary to a finished edu- 
cation. The Institution will be under the general direction of Capt. 
Partridge, and under the immediate superintendence and control of 
Mr. I). H. Bingham, who will be assisted by the requisite number of 
well qualified instructors, to whom applications for admission into the 
Institution, or for further information can be made. 

Parents will please to signify to what branches they wish their sons 
to attend, upon entering them. The Institution is now in operation, 
and students will be admitted at any time. 

Littleton, K C, June Sth, 1829. 

Mr. B. has been favored with the following testimonial by his friends 
in Maryland. 

Frederick City, Md., April 28, 1829. 

Mr. D. II. Bingham being about to remove to North-Carolina for the 
purpose of engaging in a Classical and Military Institution, to be un- 
der the general direction of Capt. Partridge, the undersigned take 
pleasure in offering him a testimonial, to which his character and gen- 
tlemanly deportment fully entitle him. Mr. Bingham has resided some 
years in this city, and has been engaged in a Seminary similar in its 



Military Schools. 249 

character to that contemplated in Xorth Carolina. We have thus had 
an opportunity to judge of his qualifications ; but on that point we deem 
it unnecessary for us to offer any recommendation in aid of the circum- 
stance, that he has been selected for the station by so distinguished a 
professor as Capt. Partridge, from amongst his very numerous and well 
informed pupils. We may observe however that he has distinguished 
himself here by a degree of diligence, perseverance and regularity, calcu- 
lated to insure him, anywhere that success which we hope will reward 
his present undertaking. 

Signed, Hon. Jno. Nelson, 

Hon. Henry B. "Warfield, 
Hon. Thos. C. "Worthington, 
Dr. W. Bradley Tyler, 
Benj. Price, Esq. 
J as. M. Palmer, Esq. 
Singleton Dtjvall, Esq. 
Stuart Gaither, Esq. 
— Raleigh Register, June 29, 1829. 

BINGHAM MOTES HIS SCHOOL TO OXFORD, 1829. 

Roanoke Literary and Scientific Institution. 

THE location of this Institution has been changed from Littleton to 
Oxford, 1ST. C. In announcing this change to the public, some remarks 
in relation to the causes which induced it, may be necessary. The ob- 
ject is to establish in the State of North-Carolina, the institution upon 
a premanent basis. At Littleton, although it possesses the advantages 
of health and retirement in a eminent degree, it was found, that the 
conveniences and opportunities for carrying it on, would be incommen- 
surate with the object in view, particularly since the death of the late 
proprietor of that place. In selecting a new location, regard has been 
paid to public opinion ; and so far as it could be ascertained, the feeling 
of the public has centered upon Oxford as the most suitable location in 
the State. 

Oxford has long been known as a place of flourishing and well con- 
ducted schools. For its health, its moral and refined society, it stands 
pre-eminent. The site selected for the Institution is pleasant and re- 
tired, the buildings and grounds are spacious ; and such measures will 
be adopted in the government of the institution as will prevent the 
students from any unseasonable communication with the village. The 
plan heretofore laid before the public will still be pursued. 

In further information in relation to the institution, may be had on 
application to the subscriber. 

Sept. 30, 1829. P. H. Bingham, Supt. 

— Raleigh Register, October 15, 1829. 



250 Military Schools. 

TEACKEBS IN BINGHAM'S SCHOOL, 1830. 

North Carolina Literary, Scientific and Military Institution. — The 
exercises of this institution commenced at Oxford on Monday last, un- 
der the superintendence and control of Capt. D. H. Bingham. The 
following is the division of the departments of instruction : Mathe- 
matics and Natural Philosophy — D. IT. Bingham. 2. Practical Math- 
ematics and Civil Engineering — J. H. Tracy. 3. Latin and Greek 
Languages, Literature and Belles Lettres — Wm. J. Nevins, A.B. 4. 
Ancient and Modern Geography, English and Belles Lettres — J. XL 

Tracy. 5. Modern European Languages, and Literature * 

6. Natural Sciences — Chemistry, Botany, Mineralogy and Geology — 
.* 7. Orthography, Reading, Penmanship, English Gram- 
mar, Elements of Geography, &c. eve. &c. .* 8. Military 

Science, Tactics and Physical Exercises — D. H. Bingham and J. H. 
Tracy. 

*These departments will soon be filled — until then, the present in- 
structors will officiate in them. 

We are authorized to state that Capt. Partridge does not intend to 
establish a Military School in Fayetteville. 

— Star, January, 1830. 

BRANCH SCHOOL AT FAYETTEVILLE. 

We stated a week or two ago, on the authority of a gentleman con- 
nected with Capt. Partridge in conducting his Military and Scientific 
institutions, that Capt. P. had no intention of establishing a Military 
School at Fayetteville. Since that time we have noticed in the North 
Carolina Journal, published at Fayetteville, the following article ; from 
which it appears that there must exist some misunderstanding on the 
subject, between Capt. P. and the gentleman to whom we allude. It is 
probable that the Captain formed his design to establish a school at 
Fayetteville when he passed through that place on his recent tour to the 
south, and has not yet communicated such intention to this gentleman ; 
which may account for the contradictory statements : 

"We are authorized to say that Capt. Partridge intends establishing 
a branch of his Military and Scientific Academy in this place about the 
1st of April next. The commissioners of the town have granted him 
the use of the Academy buildings for that purpose." 

— The Star, January 21, 1830. 

EXAMINATION AT BINGHAM'S SCHOOL, JUNE, 1830. 

N. C. L. S. & MILITARY INSTITUTION. 

The semi-annual examination of the Cadets attached to the above 
Institution will commence on Monday the 7th of June next, and con- 



Military Schools. 251 

tirme till the Friday following. The friends of the institution, and of 
education generally, are respectfully invited to attend. 

Oxford, X. C, May 15, 1830. D. H. Bingham, Supt. 

—The Star, May 20, 1SS0. 

Oxford Military Academy. — The following gentlemen have heen in- 
vited to constitute the board of visitors at the examination of the cadets 
of this institution, which will commence on Monday next : Hon. Dun- 
can Cameron, Hon. John Hall, Hon. Leonard Henderson, Rev. Thomas 
P. Hunt, Col. "William Robards, Gen. Joseph H. Bryan, Col. Thomas 
Turner, Col. William Hunt, Col. Cadwallader Jones, Maj. John R. 
Eaton, Dr. J. Jones, Dr. William V. Taylor, Dr. James Young, Col. E. 
A. Rhodes, James S. Jones, Esq., Thomas Burgess, Esq., James Somer- 
ville, Esq., John D. Hawkins, Esq., William M. Sneed, Esq., John D. 
Amis, Esq., Robert G. Gilliam, Esq., T. B. Ransom, Esq. 

— The Star, June 3, 1830. 

We are informed by a gentleman who was present at the recent exam- 
ination of the Cadets attached to the Military Institution at Oxford, 
under the superintendance of D. H. Bingham, that they acquitted them- 
selves with great credit in their literary exercises. Our informant adds, 
that their appearance is neat and soldier-like, and that their evolutions 
exhibit a degree of precision which would do honor to any Corps. The 
number of Cadets, at present, is thirty-seven. 

— Raleigh Register, June 17, 1830. 

NORTH CAROLINA LITERARY, SCIENTIFIC AND MILITARY 
INSTITUTION. 

Visitors' Report. 

The undersigned, being tbat part of the Committee of Visitors, whose 
convenience enabled them to attend the recent Examination of the Ca- 
dets in the North Carolina Literary, Scientific and Military Institution, 
think it due to Captain Bingham, the Superintendent, and to the pub- 
lic, to make the following Report : 

The examination commenced on Monday the 7th of June, and con- 
tinued from day to day. until the Friday following; during which time 
the Cadets underwent an accurate and thorough examination in the 
English. French, Latin k Greek languages, and in the various branches 
of the Mathematics. In all these studies, they manifested a proficiency 
and readiness, to be acquired only by constant application, under the 
most judicious instruction, and acquitted themselves in a manner that 
reflected great credit, both on Pupils and Instructors. Notwithstand- 
ing the difficulties incident to the commencement of every Institution 
they have attained a method and system in their operations, seldom ob- 
served in older Establishments. The evening and morning of each 
day were devoted to Military Exercises, consisting of the Elementary 



252 Military Schools. 

School of the Soldier, Company and Battalion Evolutions, in which 
they moved with a degree of exactness and regularity, seldom to be seen 
among the most accomplished and well drilled soldiers. These exer- 
cises are well calculated to promote health and strength, and occupy 
only such hours of the day as are generally devoted to useless and friv- 
olous amusements. Their happy effect upon the appearance of the 
young men is very perceptible. 

The Committee noticed with great pleasure the general demeanor of 
the Cadets, as marked by a rigid observance of order and regularity, 
almost without a parallel in Academical institutions. A portion of the 
Board residing in the immediate vicinity, have had ample opportunity 
of witnessing their deportment during the session in private times, and 
in the absence of any unusual incentive to propriety of behavior, and 
they have never heard of the smallest interruption of harmony amongst 
the students themselves, nor in their intercourse with the citizens of the 
village. No kind of dissipation has been known to exist among them, 
nor have they been seen frequenting, or even visiting places, where dis- 
sipation or any other species of immorality is practiced. These are 
facts that speak for themselves and need no comment. 

The location of the North Carolina Literary, Scientific and Military 
Institution in this place, the first of the kind established in the State, 
is an experiment in which all classes of Society are deeply interested. 
The Committee have taken much pains to make themselves acquainted 
with the plan of instruction pursued here, and to ascertain the success 
which has attended its incipiant operations, — The result of their obser- 
vations and inquiries, has been such as to satisfy them that the great 
ends of Education— the developing and invigorating the mental and 
bodily faculties, and preparing youth for future usefulness, are here 
judiciously and industriously pursued. 

They, therefore, take pleasure in recommendinng it to the patronage 
of the public. Wm. Bobakds, 

Jos. H. Bryan, 
Wm. V. Taylor, 
Wm. M. Sneed, 
Jas. Young, 
Ro. B. Gilliam, 

Oxford, June 19, 1830. Committee of Visitation. 

—The Star, July 1, 1830. 

EXAMINATION AT BINGHAM'S SCHOOL, NOVEMBER, 1830. 

THE EXAMINATION 

Of the Cadets attached to the North Carolina Literary, Scientific and 
Military Institution, will commence on Monday the 15th of November 
next, and continue from day to day till the Friday following. Literary 



Military Schools. 253 

and Scientific gentlemen and the friends of Education generally, are 
respectfully invited to attend. 

The next Term will commence on the 2d Monday in January. 

October 23. D. H. Bingham, Supt. 

—The Star, November 4, 1830. 

NORTH CAROLINA SCIENTIFIC AND MILITARY SCHOOLS. 

There have been in successful operation for the past year, in this 
State, two institutions of the above description — one at Oxford, under 
the superintendence of Capt. Bingham, the other at Fayetteville, at 
the head of which is Capt. Ransom. * * * 

— Raleigh Register, December 2, 1830. 

OXFORD AND FAYETTEVILLE CADETS YISIT RALEIGH. 

Fayetteville and Oxford Literary, Scientific and Military Academy. 
— On Thursday morning last Capt. Bingham, Principal of the L. S. & 
M. Academy at Oxford, with about twenty of his Cadets, (who had 
arrived on the preceding evening,) marched about three miles upon 
the southern road, when he was met by Capt. Ransom, Principal of 
the Institution at Fayetteville, with about forty of the Cadets attached 
to his Academy. Both parties then took up the line of march for this 
city, where they arrived about 2 o'clock, and pitched their tents. In 
the evening they were accommodated with quarters by our citizens, and 
their situation, during their sojourn among us, was rendered as com- 
fortable as circumstances would permit during a session of the Legisla- 
ture, when our houses are necessarily crowded, and the attention of the 
inhabitants much devoted to their respective vocations. 

The appearance of these young soldiers was quite military, and the 
regularity of their movements and the precision with which they exe- 
cuted their various evolutions would not have dishonoured regular 
troops. The display which they made afforded much satisfaction to the 
members of the Legislature and our citizens generally. All* seemed 
astonished that such perfection in the Tactics could be attained in so 
short a period, and all appeared willing to award to their skillful officers 
the credit which they justly merit. — It is no more than justice to state, 
also, that the orderly and correct deportment of our visitors was such 
as to meet universal approbation. 

On Friday, the Cadets marched to the Governor's House, where they 
passed in review before the Governor, and partook of refreshments. 

On Monday, those attached to Capt. Ransom's Academy left the city 
on their return to Fayetteville. They were escorted by the City Guards 
to Walnut creek, distant two miles from the city, where Capt. R. made 
a neat and appropriate address to the Guards, in which he returned 
his thanks to them for their attention, and, thro' them, tendered his 
acknowledgements to the citizens of Raleigh for their politeness and 



254 Military Schools. 

hospitality towards himself and Cadets. The two corps then, after an 
exchange of the usual military honors, took an affectionate farewell of 
each other, and separated with three hearty cheers. 

It being the time of vacation at the Oxford Academy, the Cadets of 
that institution left us on Saturday for their respective homes. 

— The Star, December- 2, 1830. 

For the Star. 
A CARD. 

The Cadets of the Institutions of Fayetteville and Oxford tender 
their cordial thanks to the citizens of Raleigh, to the Governor and 
members of the General Assembly, individually, for the very nattering 
and generous attentions shown them during their recent visit to the 
capital of the State. Those, whose hospitality was so frankly offered, 
and so freely shared, are entitled to the richest tribute of grateful feel- 
ing. To those persons, also, whose doors were opened, and whose tables 
were spread, for their accommodation, on the excursion and return, 
the cadets take this method of expressing their grateful acknowledg- 
ments. As a body, they will ever hold those demonstrations of respect 
in honorable remembrance — as individuals, they will treasure them up 
amongst the most choice and cherished memories of the heart. 

In behalf of the Cadets. S. R. Blake, 

"W. H. Washington, 
J. G. Slocttmb, 

J. MURCHISON", 

Committee of the Fayetteville Cadets. 

R. Haywood, 
J. E. Ridley, 

Fayetteville, Dec. 8, 1830. Committee of the Oxford Cadets. 

—The Star, December 16, 1830. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOE 1831. 

NORTH CAROLINA LITERARY AND MILITARY INSTI- 
TUTION. 

Capt. BINGHAM respectfully informs the citizens of North Caro- 
lina, that the duties of the above institution will be resumed on Mon- 
day, the 10th of January next. The course of education at this insti- 
tution, it is believed, is so well understood, that a particular exposition 
at this time is unnecessary. The experience and observations of the 
past year have suggested some improvements in the discipline of the 
institution, that will receive immediate attention upon its re-opening. 
In relation to the expenses of young gentlemen, I would observe that 
hereafter they must be under my immediate supervision; and that no 



Military Schools. 255 

cadet will be permitted to purchase any article or contract any accounts 
"without permission. All accounts must be kept in my name, for which 
I will be responsible; and parents and guardians are particularly re- 
quested not to pay any account that is not approved and endorsed by 
me. All necessary expenses will be approved ; those that are not, will 
receive no countenance. The amount of pocket money which students 
require, will necessarily be very little. 

The Cadets will board in commons, and will be under the immediate 
supervision of the Superintendent and officers of the institution, who 
will bestow upon them every necessary care. 

And further information can be had on application to the Superin- 
tendent. 

Terms. — For those over 14 years of age, $175 per annum. Those 
under 14, $160 per annum. No extra charges except for clothing and 
books. 

Oxford, N. Carolina, Dec. 22, 1830. 

The Halifax Advocate, Newbern Spectator and Western Carolinian, 
will insert the above three times, and forward their accounts to Capt. B. 
—The Star, December 23, 1830. 

EEDUCED COST OF TUITIOX AJTD BOARD, 1831. 

A CARD. 

NORTH-CAROLINA LITERARY, SCIENTIFIC, AND MILI- 
TARY INSTITUTION. 

The public attention is requested to the following exposition in rela- 
tion to the Institution in this place, under my direction. When the 
duties of the school were commenced, an estimate of the expenses neces- 
sary to carry on the establishment, was made, and it was concluded 
that in order to idemnify ourselves (as we had no other resources to 
call to our aid but the proceeds of students) to put the expenses at $160 
and $175. — These terms included all charges, except clothing and books, 
incident to the student, for the year. But it is ascertained that only 
two items in this account are considered, to-wit : Board and Tuition. 
No allowance is made for the use of rooms, the expense of fuel, lights, 
washing and mending, the use of arms and accoutrements, the expense 
of music and various other expenses not incidental to other schools. It 
was preferred to put the terms in the aggregate, rather than to charge 
for the several items which made up these amounts, knowing, as we 
did, the great aversion of the public to a long list of extras in the 
expenses of youths when at school, while the nominal charges were 
apparently low. 

The experience of the past year, together with the impression of the 
public that our terms are now too high, induces us to put the terms 



256 Military Schools. 

down to $150. This charge will include all expenses incidental to the 
academic course, except clothing, books and bed. 

When it is understood that our buildings have and will cost us at 
least $5,000, that we employ an Instructor at a salary higher than that 
of most of the principals of the county academies in the State, for 
every twenty students, that the expense for mathematical and other in- 
struments will be 4 or $500, this charge cannot be considered too high. 

In relation to the expense of students for clothing and books, I am 
not able to say anything definitely. The expense of clothing will depend 
in a great measure upon the indulgence of parents and guardians; but 
that for books should not exceed $15, for those in the higher depart- 
ments of study, and the necessary clothing for a year should not exceed 
$30. In relation to pocket money, students will require but very little. 
So sure as they have it, just so sure will the most of them spend it; 
and it will be better, as their wants will all be supplied, that they have 
but little. Those young gentlemen who made the best progress in their 
studies the last year, and there were several who completed a full course 
of Hutton's Mathematics, from the beginning regularly through to 
Conic Sections, including Gibson's Surveying, combining these with a 
very large amount of practice — who read the whole of Virgil and Sal- 
lust, a portion of Greek, and were enabled to read and translate the 
French with fluency, besides attending to Geography and the incidental 
duties of the school, such as Declamation and Composition — I know 
did not spend $10, while others, who were furnished with the sums of 
$75, $100 and upwards, made but little progress, and indulged in ex- 
travagances which do not belong to the school. 

These instances have not exceeded half a dozen, and would not be 
here mentioned, had I not been informed, that censure was cast upon 
me for tolerating these expenditures, when the fact is, that I was never 
aware until the close of the last year, of the amount of pocket money 
that had been furnished. 

I have only to say in addition, that I will attend to the accounts of 
the students who are placed under my care once a month; they shall 
be inspected, and if contracted, agreeable to the regulations of the In- 
stitution, it will be approved and transmitted to parents and guardians, 
who may be assured that I will approve or countenance no amount that 
is unnecessary or extravagant. Under this regulation parents and guar- 
dians will have the opportunity of knowing the monthly expenses of 
their sons and wards. I have to request that no student shall be fur- 
nished with more than 10 dollars pocket money for the year. 

Every student will be supplied with everything necessary to his health, 
comfort and progress — more than this he will not want. 

Oxford, Jan. 13, 1831. D. H. Bingham. 

— The Star, January 20, 1831. 



Military Schools. 257 

CRITICISM OF BINGHAM'S SCHOOL BY GASCA. 

For the Star. 

Military, Literary and Scientific Institution. 

All that glitters is not gold — 

Often have you heard that told. — Shakespeare. 

The people of JNorth Carolina, at least those who are friendly to the 
interests of education and a judicious instruction of the youth of the 
State, must lament the establishment of the above mentioned schools 
among us. These institutions seem intended to give our young men a 
complete and classical education, and to dispense with the necessity of 
a regular course at the University. Every person acquainted with their 
character, must perceive that they are entirely unfit for these purposes, 
and are inadequate for the accomplishment of the objects they profess 
to have in view. It is perfectly idle to expect that they can confer the 
advantages of a polished education, or that superior scholars will be 
turned out from their walls. The writer of these fugitive remarks is 
uninfluenced by personal prejudices or private animosities. His heart 
is devoid of any feeling of hostility towards the gentlemen concerned 
in the management of these institutions. He would scorn himself were 
he capable of groundlessly and wantonly inflicting a wound on the sensi- 
bilities of any one; but his regard to the interests of his native State, is 
greater than his regard for them ; and that public spirit which he be- 
lieves he cherishes in his bosom, induce him to endeavor to undeceive 
the public mind in relation to these seminaries. Parents may thereby 
be prevented from mis-spending their money, and young men from mis- 
employing their time and forfeiting the inestimable advantages of a 
good education. The school at Oxford has been more under the imme- 
diate observation of the author. To that, therefore, his strictures, shall 
be principally directed. Is there one single requisite, that a good semi- 
nary for the instruction of youth ought to have, which, this institution 
possesses? Has it funds or capital of any description? Has it spacious 
buildings for the accommodation of the Cadets? Has it numerous and 
well selected books, unfolding their treasures to the youthful aspirant 
after knowledge, or instruments for teaching philosophy and the sciences ? 
Is it placed under the superintendence of men distinguished for their 
scholarship and Literary and Scientific attainments — men of mature age r 
advanced experience, and well qualified for the instruction and manage- 
ment of youth? Let those who are disposed to recommend this school to 
the patronage of ]STorth Carolina, answer these questions. Let its warm- 
est admirers point out the advantages it holds forth, and say in what 
its merits consist ! What earthly pretense has it to the support and 
patronage of the public. The Oxford Academy is unquestionably des- 
titute of all those opportunities and advantages indispensable to afford 
a good education. As regards resources, it is not worth one single cent 
17 



258 Military Schools. 

beyond the proceeds of the Cadets. It has no libraries, scarcely any ap- 
paratus and not sufficient buildings for the comfortable accommodation 
of a large number of persons. The connection of Captain Partridge 
(their Magnus Appollo) with this school is merely nominal. He per- 
haps makes a flying visit to Oxford once a year, and the Cadets are 
scarcely warmed by a solitary ray from this sun of science. The insti- 
tution is under the immediate and personal supervision of four other 
individuals. One of these is a gentleman of middle age; the others 
somewhat younger. From their immature age, they cannot attract a 
great degree of reverence from their pupils, and from their inexperience, 
cannot be profoundly conversant with those branches of science which 
it is their object to teach. It is an undeniable truth that a teacher needs 
as thorough a preparation for his practice, as a mechanic for his trade, 
or a divine, lawyer or physician for their respective professions. Young 
men, mere novices, are unfit to fill the higher chairs in any seminary that 
pretends to confer the advantages of an accomplished education. The 
relation of tutor and pupil is one of the most important in life, certainly, 
next to that of parent and child. Of the utmost consequence, then, it 
must be, that those, whose object it is to open the buds and develope the 
rising capacities and powers of the youthful intellect, and more espe- 
cially to form the youthful character, should be qualified for the delicate 
task they undertake. The earliest impressions are apt to be lasting.' 
The heads of an institution should be men venerated for their age, their 
virtue, their knowledge and attainments. They should be calculated to 
inspire reverence and respect in the minds of their pupils, and be looked 
to as bright exemplars for their imitation. They should have some su- 
periority of understanding and dignity of deportment. Without these 
qualifications on the part of its principal conductors, it is idle to expect 
much from any literary institution. Its alumni will neither be men of 
merit nor superior scholarship. Do the gentlemen who have charge of 
the Academy at Oxford possess these desirable qualities, which we have 
eudeavored succinctly to describe? Most of them they certainly do not! 
Let any candid and discerning man say if he thinks it possible that these 
men, with the few facilities they possess, are prepared to give to the 
youths of the State such an education as they ought to have, and such a 
one as is indispensable to their future usefulness. Is this seminary fit 
for the nursery of the youthful genius of the State? and must North 
Carolina look here for the germs of her public councils and private cir- 
cles? Must her posts of distinction, responsibility and trust be filled 
from the walls of this institution ? and shall she look here for those whose 
intelligence and virtues may grace the walks of private life, and who 
may be the greatest blessings and brightest ornaments of society? Is 
she to expect from this place good scholars — men thoroughly acquainted 
with Science and Literature — men of information, who may diffuse 
around them the mild radiance of their virtues and usefulness, and be 
her ornament, her pride and support? Sorry would be the writer of 



Military Schools. 259 

these remarks, if the sons of Carolina, who ought to be her jewels, are to 
be prepared and. receive their only education at the Oxford school ! 
Were this the case, he would hang down his head in sorrow over the fate 
of North Carolina. She would then truly be the land where "genius 
sickens, and where fancy dies." 

Most of our observations are applicable to the institution at Fayette- 
ville. That school is also entirely unfit for the education of youth, and 
equally destitute of every desirable facility and advantage. 

In conclusion, the author most decidedly disavows any malicious or 
unworthy motive in publishing the foregoing reflections. The individuals 
to whom allusion has been made in a manner as respectful as the nature 
of the subject would allow,- are, perhaps, amiable and deserving men. 
He has not made, nor intended any allusion to them only in the capacity 
of perceptors of youth. If they should complain that they or their 
institution is made the subject of strictures in the columns of a newspa- 
per, the writer has only to tell them that when they solicit the people's 
encouragement and even ask of the Legislature funds from the Treas- 
ury of the State, to be applied to the support of their school, its merits 
ought to be strictly examined and thoroughly made known. 

Surely the people of JSTorth Carolina ought to know whether any part 
of the public revenue, the fruit of their labor and toils, the source to 
which they have fondly looked as the means of elevating the character of 
the State, developing its resources and improving the intellects and mor- 
als of its citizens by a system of free schools, ought to be diverted from 
its legitimate objects to such purposes as these. 

Jan. 8, 1831. Gasca. 

— The Star, February 11, 1831. 

BINGHAM MOVES HIS SCHOOL TO RALEIGH, 1831. 

A CARD. 

The duties of the Institution, which has been under my direction at 
Oxford for the last eighteen months, will be resumed in the City of 
Raleigh on Monday the 20th instant, at the residence of the late Chief- 
Justice Taylor. This change of location is made with a view to the 
permanent establishment of the School in this place. 

Every attention will be paid to the advancement of the Pupils placed 
under my care, and the arrangement of duties will be such as to afford 
very nearly the same advantages to the Student that the School at Ox- 
ford afforded last year. 

The Session will be continued until the 13th of December, for which, 
such charges will be made as will be perfectly satisfactory to those who 
may extend their patronage. Those who may wish to place their sons 
or wards at the School, are respectfully invited to do so. 

June 6, 1831. D. H. Bingham. 

— Raleigh Register, Thursday, June 9, 1831. 



260 Military Schools. 

FURTHER ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

NOTICE. 

The duties of the Institution under my direction, commenced on the 
27th instant. The present term will continue till the 15th December. 
The Charge for tuition will be $15, and an extra charge of $2 for 
House rent and other contingencies. Students will be instructed in the 
Languages and Mathematics, combining with the latter, a thorough 
course of practice. The usual Branches of an English Education will be 
also taught. 

Further notice of the mode of Instruction and of the advantages of 
the system of Education, will hereafter be given. Any who may wish 
to avail themselves of the opportunity of placing their sons or wards at 
the School, are respectfully invited to do so. 

Board can be had in private families for $7 per month exclusive of 
washing. D. H. Bingham. 

Raleigh June 29. 

— Raleigh Register, Thursday, June 30th, 1831. 

EXAMINATION AT BINGHAM'S SCHOOL, DECEMBER, 1831. 

NOTICE. 

The examination of the young gentlemen attached to my school, which 
commences on Monday next, will be held in the Session-House adjacent 
to the Presbyterian Church, and will be continued from day to day till 
the Friday following. Parents and others, interested in the educa- 
tion of youth, are respectfully invited to attend. 

D. H. Bingham. 

—The Star, December 9, 1831. 

BINGHAM'S ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1832. 

LITEEARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTION. 

The duties of this institution will be resumed on the 1st Monday in 
January next. The course of education will be the same as heretofore 
pursued in the school, and every attention will be paid to the health, 
manners, morals and improvement of the students. The subject of prac- 
tical instruction will receive particular attention; and those young gen- 
tlemen whose advancement in their studies will admit of it, will be regu- 
larly exercised in the mensuration of heights and distances; trigonomet- 
rical and tuiler surveying and levelling ; and made familiar with the use 
of the various instruments used for these purposes. Young gentlemen 
may here be prepared for admission to college, either one or two years in 
advance; and it is believed, would derive peculiar advantage from the 
thorough course of mathematical and practical instruction pursued in 



Military Schools. 261 

the school. The term or session will continue till the 15th December, 
and the expense for tuition (for eleven and a half months), will be $10. 
This will include the charge for tuition and room rent. Board may be 
had on reasonable terms. D. H. Bixghaai:. 

Baleigh, Dec. 21, 1831. 

— The Star, December 23, 1831. 

BI>GHAM 310 YES TO ALABAMA, 1S33. 

"We learn that Capt. D. H. Bingham, of this city, has been appointed 
Engineer on the Dale Town, Woodville and Greensborough Bail Boad, 
in Alabama, and has entered on the duties of his office. 

— The Star, Raleigh, Xovember 1, 1833. 

CARTER JOES' MILITARY SCHOOLS, 1888. 

MILITABY SCHOOL AT EALEIGH. 

Col. Carter Jones, having already received a sufficient number of 
Subscribers to authorize a beginning, will commence a SCHOOL, in 
the City of Baleigh, on the first and second day of May next, for the 
purpose of instructing those who may feel disposed to attend, in the 
Infantry and Light Infantry Tactics, together with the Broad Sword 
Exercises and Cavalry movements to Troopers. The School will con- 
tinue throughout the year, and will be visited by Col. Jones once in ev- 
ery eight weeks, with a very superior Band of Music, when he will de- 
vote two days to the Exercises of the School. 

Afilitia Officers and others who feel an interest in the subject, will 
please attend at Ealeigh on the days above specified, when they will 
have an opportunity of judging more satisfactorily of the character of 
the School. In the mean time, those who are desirous of patronizing 
the undertaking, can leave their names at the Star or Register Office. 

March 11, 1833. 

—The Register, Raleigh, X. C, March 12, 1833. 

THE MILITAEY SCHOOL recently instituted in this City by the 
Subscriber, has undergone some modification, which he thinks it proper 
to make known. Instead of meeting two days for drill, in every eight 
weeks, as proposed, attendance will hereafter be given by him only on 
one day, and the price of instruction reduced in proportion. The School, 
though now large, is still open for the entrance of members. The next 
drill will take place in Baleigh, on Thursday the 27th of June, to com- 
mence at 10 o'clock A. M. Carter Joxes. 

May 6, 1833. 

Col. Jones will attend at Bolesville, on \Vednesday the 26th of June, 
in order to organize a School there. 

—The Register, Raleigh, X. C, May 7, 1833. 



262 Military Schools. 

JONES' MILITAKY SCHOOL AT WILMINGTON, 1836. 

The subscriber intends opening in this place on Monday the 21st. a 
Military School, in which will be taught, Infantry and Light Infantry, 
Tactics, according to the plan laid down in "Scott's discipline", viz — The 
School of the Soldier. The School of the Company — The School of the 
Battalion. Posts and duty of Officers, &c. together with the Broad Sword 
Exercise for Troopers. The School will be opened for two days in every 
fourth week, for four times. 

Terms — Five Dollars, to be paid one half at the conclusion of each 
four day's drill. The undersigned furnishing music at his own expense. 

Persons wishing to become proficient in Military Science will please 
call on Col. L. H. Marsteller, and enroll their names as members of the 
school. 

Each day's drill will occupy from 4 to 5 hours, 2 hours in the fore- 
noon, and from 2 to 3 in the afternoon. Carter Jones. 

Wilmington, March 4, 1836. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, March 11, 1836. 



NASH COUNTY SCHOOLS 

WESTRAYVILLE ACADEMY, 1809. 
AN ENGLISH AND LATIN SCHOOL 

Will commence at Westraysville, in Nash county, the first day of Jan- 
uary next, under the superintendance of Mr. John Bobbitt, who will 
teach the English Language in all its various branches, with the Latin, 
Greek and French. The Subscriber has erected a large two-story house 
for that purpose on the road leading from Tarborough to Louisburg, five 
miles from Nash Court House. * * * 

Nov. 14, 1809. Samuel Westray. 

—Raleigh Star, November 23, 1809. 

EDITORIAL NOTICE, 1810. 

WESTRAYVILLE ACADEMY 

In Nash County, under the direction of Mr. John Bobbitt. Of the 
merits of this Institution we know nothing. No small recommendation 
of its Teacher is that he is a graduate of the University of North Caro- 
lina : We cannot therefore doubt his fitness for his vocation. Mr. S. 
Westray and Dr. T. Jones are patrons of the Institution, and they are 
Gentlemen in whom the public will willingly confide. 

— Raleigh Star, March 15, 1810. 

WESTRAYVILLE ACADEMY, 1811. 

The exercises of the "Westrayville Academy will again commence on 
the first day of January next, under the direction of Mr. John B. Bob- 
bett, who taught at the same place last year. The Latin, Greek, French 
and English Languages will be correctly taught. Board may be had 
for sixty dollars, (perhaps less) tuition the same as last year. 

Nash County, Dec. 1, 1810. Samuel Westray. 

— The Star, Raleigh, January 3, 1811. 

TVESTRAYYILLE ACADEMY EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1811. 

The Examination of the Students of the Westrayville Academy was 
closed on Wednesday, the 18th inst. The Subscribers have great pleas- 
ure in announcing to the persons concerned in this Institution, that in 
the English, French, Latin and Greek Languages, the Students, gener- 
ally, passed a very satisfactory Examination, and discovered great 
progress and proficiency in all their Studies. Indeed, when we take into 
consideration the infancy of this Seminary, and that most of the Students 

(263) 



264 ISTash County Schools. 

began their classical pursuits under the direction of Mr. Bobbitt (the 
present Teacher) we cannot too much applaud their application and his 
attention and assiduity. Alex'r Falconer, 

James W. Clark, 
George Boddie, 
Rob't C. Hilliard. 

On Wednesday the 19th inst. the Students delivered select Speeches, 
Orations and Dialogues to a crowded and respectable audience: after 
which Mr. James W. Clark, in behalf of the Trustees, addressed the 
Students in a very handsome and appropriate manner. 

The exercises of the Academy will commence again on Monday the 
8th of July. A. Griffin, Secy. 

June 19, 1811. 

— Raleigh Register, June 28, 1811. 

HILLIARDSTON ACADEMY, 1820. 

THE examination of this institution will commence Thursday the 8th 
June next. On Friday the 9th will be an exhibition— Parents and guar- 
dians are requested to attend. The second session will commence on 
Monday, the 26th June. Wi. Burt, Secy. 

May 20, 1820. 

— The Star, May 26, 1820. 

HILLIAKDSTON EXAMINATIONS, 1820. 
HILLIAKDSTON ACADEMY. 

THE Trustees of this Academy, who attended the late semi-annual 
examination, feel it their duty to declare to the public their very high 
satisfaction, with which they marked on that occasion, the unexampled 
progress, the accuracy and singular decorum, evinced by the students ; 
by which they gained for themselves and Mr. Stone their tutor, most un- 
qualified applause. 

The pupils were exercised critically on the several subjects annexed 
to their respective classes, among which, no distinction of individuals is 
now made. 1st class, composed of two small boys, examined on spelling ; 
2nd class, was examined on spelling; 3rd a numerous class on reading 
and spelling by rote ; 4th Beading ; 5th Arithmetic to reduction ; 6th 
Beading, Grammar and Arithmetic ; 7th A large class on Arithmetic, to 
single rule of three in vulgar fractions ; 8th a class on English Grammar 
and Parsing; 9th Arithmetic from single rule of three to the cube root; 
10th Algebra to the twenty-sixth problem ; 11th a class on Selectae e Ve- 
tere ten chapters ; 12th English Grammar, Parsing, 1st chapt. Gospel 
according to St. John ; 13th Ovid's Metamorphis ; 14th Cicero ; Oration 
agt. Caecilius; 15th Xenophon's Cyropaedia. 



Nash County Schools. 265 

The visit of the Trustees, to the Academy, was closed, on the second 
day, after delivery, by a number of the students of select orations, and 
the representation of many humorous dialogues, to a crowded and re- 
spectable assembly. 

Hilliardston School has a pleasant and elevated situation in the coun- 
try; above the falls of the rivers and within that range of hills, which 
traverses our country in a line with the sea coast, distinctly making the 
boundary of the low lands. 

The plan of the School contemplates an union of the several advan- 
tages of public and of private Education, while it secures youth from the 
evils of both. The student may feel here that emulation, which public 
schools are said to inspire, may fairly measure his capacity with that of 
others, learning, thereby, duly to appreciate his own powers, may collect 
from intercourse and experience a knowledge of the motives, whether 
noble or debased, that regulate human action, and thus enter on life, not 
entirely in his novitiate as to the true nature of man. Whilst the evils 
of private tuition have been thus removed, it has been much our care to 
avoid those, with some far greater, that are necessarily incident to situa- 
tions public and exposed. A display of objects, that attract the gaze and 
divide the attention of unstaid youth, that call forth and seduce their 
passions ; dissolute company, to which, when exposed they have so great a 
proneness, and from which, after initiations, it is so difficult for them to 
escape, are objects that have prevailed with many, particularly the No- 
bles of Europe, and have lead them, who can afford it, to select private 
tutors, to direct the earlier part of a son's education. These objects and 
these seducements, from our very situation are entirely precluded. 

The Academy will be re-opened on the last Monday in June, and the 
session will expire with the first or second week of December. Mr. Stone, 
who has presided for the last six months, will conduct the school. The 
prices of tuition per session, will be, for Languages and Sciences, ten 
dollars ; for all other branches, eight dollars. Board, the most approved, 
may be had in sight of the Academy, for six dollars per month. 

Nash, June 12. Wm. Burt, Secretary. 

—The Star, June 30, 1820. 

HILLIARDSTON ACADEMY. 

THE examination of this institution will commence on Thursday, the 
7th of December and close on Friday evening the 8th. 

Parents and Guardians are requested to attend. 

THE exercises of this institution will commence the first day of Jan- 
uary next under the direction and superintendence of Mr. THO. G. 
STONE. 

Hilliardston, Nov. 6th, 1820. 

— The Star, November 10, 1820. 



266 Nash County Schools. 

HILLIABDSTON ACADEMY, 1824. 

The Examination of the Students of this Institution will commence on 
Wednesday the 9th of June and be closed on the evening of the 10th 
with select Orations and appropriate Dialogues. * * * 

The second Session will begin on Monday the 28th of June. * * * 

Nash county, May 25. Wm. Burt, Secy. 

— Raleigh, Register, May 28, 1824.. 

HILLIARBSTON ACADEMY TEACHERS FOR 1826. 
HILLIARDSTON ACADEMIES. 

MR. THOMAS G. STONE, having resigned his charge as Superin- 
tendent in the Male Department, the exercises of the same will be con- 
tinued under the direction of Mr. John N. Bennett who is of exemplary 
morals, and well qualified to discharge the duties required in this insti- 
tution. The exercises of which will recommence on Monday the 16th 
of January next. 

The Exercises in the Eemale Department will recommence the first 
Monday in January, under the superintendence of Miss Maria Harriss, 
who has taught two years in Granville County and her services highly 
approved. She will teach the following branches, viz. Spelling, Read- 
ing, Writing, Arithmetic, English Grammar, Geography, Drawing and 
Painting on Paper, and Plain and Ornamental Needle- Work. 

Prices of tuition as heretofore in each department, viz. for Spelling, 
Reading, Writing and Arithmetic, eight dollars, and the other branches 
ten dollars per session. 

Board may be had with James Hilliard and Wm. Burt, at thirty-three 
dollars per session. 

By order. Wm. Burt, Secy. 

Hilliardston, Nash County, N. C. December 1. 

— Raleigh Register, December 2, 1825. 

NASHVILLE MALE ACADEMY, 1827. 

The Trustees of the Nashville Male Academy, take pleasure in inform- 
ing the public, that they have at length succeeded in employing the Rev. 
John Armstrong, as Principal in this Institution. This Gentleman pro- 
duces the most satisfactory testimonials of his pre-eminent qualifications 
as a Gentleman, a Divine and a Teacher. He is a graduate of distinc- 
tion in the Columbian College, D. C. from which, besides his Diploma, he 
brings the most flattering testimonials of character and acquirements, 
from the Revd. Doctor Staughton, President of the College, the Revd. O. 
B. Brown, President of the Board of Trustees, besides the highest recom- 
mendation from the Rev. E. Baptist, of Virginia, and very many other 
distinguished names equally satisfactory. 

Mr. Armstrong has taught the present year in the Cartersville Acad- 



Nash County Schools. 267 

emy, Va. Dr. Wharton and Dr. James, of Va. and others, afford the 
most ample testimonals of his success in Teaching. To all of which the 
Trustees would superadd, that in an interview with Mr. Armstrong, and 
an examination of his credentials, and method of Teaching, they are 
abundantly satisfied, and can with pleasure and confidence, recommend 
him to the public. 

The School will go into operation on the 8th day of January next. 
The price of Tuition will be $8 per session for Reading, Writing and 
Arithmetic — $10 for English Grammar, Geography, History, &c. — $12 
for Latin, Greek, French, Astronomy, Natural and Moral Philosophy, 
Mathematics, and all of the higher branches of Arts and Sciences, to be 
paid in advance. The Trustees have obtained from Chapel Hill, the Sys- 
tem of Studies taught there, and the Course of Studies in this Academy, 
will be precisely such as to prepare Students from this School to enter 
with ease the Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, or even Senior Class of our 
University. 

The Trustees are well aware of the inconvenience a young man labors 
under, who enters College, having pursued a course of studies different 
from that taught in the University, and they are determined to have an 
eye to it. 

Board can be had in respectable houses in the Village at $37.50 per 
session. 

The character of Nashville is so well established for health, that it is 
deemed unnecessary to say anything here. There are several never- 
failing Springs of excellent water near the Academy. 

The Trustees are convinced that no Academy ever commenced under 
more favorable auspices. Indeed, if a distinguished Teacher, healthi- 
ness of situation, cheapness of terms, and vigilance in the guardians of 
the school, can recommend it to a generous public, we are assured that 
this Institution will be very liberally encouraged. 

By order of the Board, H. Blount, Sec'y. 

Nashville, Nash county, N. C. Nov. 25, 1826. 

— The Star, January 12, 1827. 

NASHVILLE ACADEMY FOE 1832. 

The Winter Session of this institution will commence on Monday, the 
2d of January, under John Y. Hicks, late Principal of the Louisburg 
Academy. The course of studies pursued here will be such as to pre- 
pare for any of our American colleges. 

Nashville, Dec. 19, 1831. The Trustees. 

— The Star, December 23, 1831. 

PEACH TKEE ACADEMY, 1S34. 

THE Subscriber, having several years experience as a Teacher in the 
southern country, and given general satisfaction, intends opening a pri- 
vate Boarding School for males, on the first Monday in January next, at 



268 JNash County Schools. 

his residence in the upper part of JSTash county, two miles north of Peach 
Tree Church. The situation is in a high, pleasant and healthy neighbor- 
hood, ten miles above Nashville, and twelve from Louisburg, and several 
from any public road; which makes its locality as suitable for a school 
as any in the country. The advantages of such a situation for an aca- 
demical institution, are too evident to need comment. The first session 
will close the first of June, with a vacation of two weeks; and the last 
session the middle of November, making each session five months. 

He will at all times conceive it to be his duty, both in and out of the 
Academy, to attend strictly to the moral deportment of his pupils, and 
use every effort in his power to excite in them a laudable degree of emu- 
lation. He hopes from strict attention to those entrusted to his care, 
to merit a share of patronage from the public. 

Tekms : 

For Spelling, Reading & Writing, $ 8 00 pr. ses. 

For Arithmetic, English Grammar, Geography, Geom- 
etry, and the higher branches of Mathematics, Compo- 
sition and Declamation, 10 00 do. 

For Latin & Greek, 12 50 do. 

Eight or ten boarders can be accommodated in my family on moder- 
ate terms, and within one mile of the Academy. Board can also be ob- 
tained with Mr. Azariah King and Mrs. Temperance Alston. 

Dec. 15, 1834. Willis W. Alston. 

— The Standard, December 26, 1834. 

STONY HILL ACADEMY, 1887. 

The Examination of the Students at this Institution, will take place 
on Thursday and Friday, 15th and 16th June; at which time Parents 
and Guardians are particularly invited to attend. 

The Exercises will re-commence on Monday, 3rd July, and terminate 
1st December, at usual prices, for Board, etc. 40 dollars. Tuition will 
vary from 10 to 15 dollars, with a small tax of 50 cents for privileges 
of Students' Library. 

The students of this school are treated as members of a family, and 
while their intellectual improvement is strictly attended to, a parental 
watchfulness is kept over them, to guard them against the now too preva- 
lent vices of dissipation, extravagance and idleness, and at the same 
time to early impress on their minds the importance as well as the con- 
stant practice of virtue. The better to effect this object, the number 
of students will again be strictly limited, and none (if possible) received, 
who cannot submit to an easy, mild and parental, but a strict, firm and 
prompt discipline, under which the school at this place has prospered 
even beyond my expectations, and has suffered but few and short incon- 
veniences from bad associations and immoral influences. 



ISTash County Schools. 269 

The situation of the school is one combining all the advantages of 
health and retirement, with not a Gill Shop within five miles. 

M. R. Garrett. 
Address, at Ransom's Bridge, Xash county, 1ST. Carolina. 
— Raleigh Star, May 31, 1837. 

STOXY HILL ACADEMY FOE 1838. 

The exercises will commence again at this school 2nd Monday in Jan- 
uary, and terminate about loth June. The entire expenses, for Board, 
Tuition, etc. will be $50 per session. Books and Candles, when fur- 
nished, will constitute the only extra charge. In this Institution are 
taught the Latin and Greek Languages, with the various branches of a 
Mathematical and English Education. Those who intend a course at 
college, will invariably use such authors as are recommended by the Fac- 
ulty of our University. 

Stony Hill is well situated, and has many advantages for the studious. 
It is retired, in a healthy country: free from the noise and bustling of 
town and village distractions ; a sufficiency of comfortable and conven- 
ient rooms ; a well selected and growing library, belonging to and under 
the direction of the students ; a well conducted debating society, under 
their own regulations, from which all political and religious discussions 
are excluded. It also has many advantages to the satisfaction and in- 
terest of Parents : their sons are treated with kindness and mildness, at 
the same time they are made to behave themselves. 

Their health and comfort, as well as education and deportment, are 
attended to ; no idling, contracting debts, nor vicious indulgences. Thus, 
whilst the studious and thoughtful find many things to interest them, 
and render their situation agreeable and comfortable ; whilst they enjoy 
themselves, and are happy in the prosecution of their studies; the idle 
and vicious become restive, long to be free from proper restraint, and, by 
artifice, frequently impose on their credulous and unsuspecting parents ; 
thereby leaving the studious in the full enjoyment of their quiet, and the 
possession of these advantages which none but the studious care for or 
know how to appreciate. 

Parents are requested to visit the school frequently. 

Address at Ransom's Bridge, N". C. 

Dec. 2, 1837. M. R. Garrett. 

— The Raleigh Star, December 6, 1837. 



NEW HANOVER COUNTY SCHOOLS 

WILMINGTON ACADEMY, 1812. 

WILMINGTON ACADEMY. 

An examination of the pupils on this establishment, commenced on 
Thursday last, and closed in the afternoon of the ensuing day. A num- 
erous assemblage witnessed this exhibition, which throughout was highly 
gratifying. We congratulate our town on the successful commencement 
of an institution, which, though too long delayed in its operation, prom- 
ises to produce an abundant harvest of good to the rising generation. 
Praise is due to all the Teachers; And were we to speak as we feel our 
approbation of the Principal, his real merit might in the opinion of 
some be distinguished by the warmth of the eulogium we should pro- 
nounce. — Gazette. 

— The Star, May 15, 1812. 

JEWETT'S SCHOOL, 1835. 

Male and Female School, 

Will be opened at Smithville, on Monday the 18th inst. by Mr. and Mrs. 
Jewett. 

May 13, 1835. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, May 20, 1835. 

Mrs. Jewett, will resume her school for Young Ladies in Wilmington 
on Thursday the 15th of October. 

— Wilmington Weekly Chronicle, October 21, 181^0. 

HALSLEY'S SCHOOL, 1886. 

The subscriber will open a school at his plantation, on the sound, 
eight miles from Wilmington, formerly the property of Alex. Peden, 
deceased, on the 23rd May, ensuing, where scholars of either sex will 
be instructed in the different English branches. Eight or ten boarders 
can be accommodated at four dollars per month, each boarder will fur- 
nish his own bedding. Application can be made to the editor of this 
paper, previous to the above specified time or to the subscriber. 

Terms. 

Reading, Writing and Arithmetic, $3.00 per quarter. 

English Grammar, History and Geography, $4.00 per quarter. 

B. W. Halsley. 
— Wilmington Advertiser, May 6, 1836. 

(270) 



New Hanover County Schools. 271 

COKBIN'S SCHOOL, 1S36. 

A CARD. 

Mrs. Sarah Jane Corbin, respectfully informs her friends and the 
Public, that she intends re-opening her school on the 1st of November. 

Terms Per Quarter. 

Spelling, Reading, "Writing & Arithmetic $4.00 

The above, with Grammar, including Parsing & 

Exercise 5.00 

The above, with Geography, History, Rhetorick, Phil- 
osophy & Mythology 6.00 

For Fuel 121/2 cents per month. 

Also Lessons in Practical Writing and Stenography will be given to 
Young Ladies between the hours of 12 M. and 2 P. M. having qualified 
herself for that purpose. 

Wilmington, Oct. 28, 1836. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, December 16, 1836. 

CORBIiV'S SCHOOL, 1837. 

MRS. SARAH JANE CORBIN'S SCHOOL. 
TERMS PER QUARTER. 

Spelling, Reading, & Arithmetic $4.00 

The above, with Geography, Writing, and Grammar, 

including Parsing & Exercises 5.00 

The above with History, Rhetoric, Philosophy & 

Mythology 6.00 

Separate Lessons in Practical Writing & Stenography, to Young 
Ladies. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, November 17, 1837. 

STAIVLIFT'S WRITEYG SCHOOL, 1836. 
A CARD. 

Mr. J. W. STANLIFT having completed his first course of lessons in 
writing, from the solicitations of many of the citizens of the town, has 
been induced to open his school for a second course. 

His school room, is in the second story of one of the Buildings on 
Second Street, a few doors North of Mr. E. P. Hall's residence. 

Lessons at private houses, will be given if requested. 

N. B. — -He again states, that should he not succeed in giving entire 
satisfaction to such as will properly apply themselves, no remuneration 
will be asked. 

Wilmington, Dec. 9th, 1836. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, December 16, 1836. 



272 New Hanover County Schools. 

BYCKMAN'S SCHOOL, 1836. 
A CAED. 

Miss Byckman respectfully informs the inhabitants of Wilmington 
and its vicinity, that she intends opening a school on the 1st of Novem- 
ber next for young Ladies. The pupils will be taught Orthography, 
Beading, Writing, Arithmetic (mental and practical) Grammar, Geog- 
raphy, History, The Elements of Natural Philosophy, Astronomy, 
Chemistry, and Botany. Plain and Ornamental Needle-work together 
with the Spanish Language. Great attention will be given to the reli- 
gious and moral advancement of the scholars. 

Particulars with regards to Terms &c. will be made known on appli- 
cation to Doctor Thomas H. Wright. 

Wilmington, Oct. 21st, 1836. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, December 16, 1836. 

MISS BYCKMAN'S SCHOOL POP YOUNG LADIES. 

Miss Byckman respectfully informs her friends and the inhabitants 
of Wilmington generally, that she intends re-opening her school on the 
first of November. 

The branches taught therein comprise a complete course of English, 
together with plain and ornamental needle-work, and the Spanish Lan- 
guage. Great attention will be given to the religious and moral ad- 
vancement of the Young Ladies committed to her care. For terms, etc., 
apply to Dr. Thomas H. Wright. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, September 22, 1837. 

SPENCER'S ACADEMY, 1836. 
ACADEMICK SCHOOL. 

This School will commence on Monday the 28th inst. in the Wilming- 
ton Academy, under the care of Mr. E. M. S. SPENCEB. 

Branches taught — English Grammar, Geography, Arithmetick, Bead- 
ing and Writing, History, ancient and modern, Natural Philosophy, 
Astronomy, Bhetorick, Belles-Lettres, Declamation, Composition, and 
the Latin and Greek Languages. 

Young Gentlemen wishing to prepare for College, or for any business 
in life, can receive private lessons, at the "Clarendon House" between 
the hours of 6 and 9 P. M. 

Payment for Tuition in all cases in advance — First quarter to consist 
of 12 weeks. For Terms and Tickets of admission, apply to Mr. James 
Dickson. 

Wilmington, Nov. 25, 1836. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, December 16, 1836. 



Xew Haxover County Schools. 273 

An Evening School will commence on Tuesday of next week, at the 
Academy, for those Young Gentlemen who may desire to attend ; to be 
conducted under the care of Mr. E. M. S. Spencer. Schools every Tues- 
day, Thursday and Friday evening, from 7 to 9 o'clock. 

Terms. 

For English Branches $3.00 

For Languages 5. GO 

"Wilmington, March 24th, 1837. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, April llf., 1837. 

CKOOK'S GEA3I3IAK SCHOOL, 1837. 
GBAMMAB SCHOOL. 

The Rev. Mr. Crook intends opening a school in the Wilmington 
Academy during the first week in January next. Mr. Crook will thor- 
oughly instruct in all the elementary branches of an English education, 
and he hopes by a conscientious discharge of the important duties 
of a teacher of youth, to afford satisfaction to patrons & pupils. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, December 22, 1837. 

Mr. & Mrs. Crook will open a school at Smithville, between the 20th 
and last of June, In addition to all the branches of a correct English 
Education, Mr. Crook will teach the rudiments of the Greek & Latin 
tongues. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, June 8, 1838. 

MULOCK'S ENGLISH SCHOOL, 1S38. 

ENGLISH SCHOOL— ME. J. MULOCK, 

Having removed his school to the house one door north of the store 
of Mr. J. M. Cazaux, in the town of Wilmington, will commence the 
first regular term on Monday the 5th of Xovember next. In this school, 
designed for males, will be taught the elementary and higher branches 
of English education, viz : Orthography, Heading, Writing, Geography, 
Grammar, Arithmetic, History, Philosophy, Chemistry, Rhetoric, Com- 
position, Algebra, Geometry, Mensuration, Surveying, & Astronomy. 

Terms of tuition for the first seven branches in the above order, 
$6.50 per quarter of twelve weeks. An extra charge of $1 is made for 
each of the other higher branches. 

As the number of pupils is limited, early application is desirable. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, October 26, 1838. 



18 



274 New Hanover County Schools. 

SIMPSON'S SCHOOL, 1839. 

Miss Jessie B. Simpson respectfully informs the inhabitants of Wil- 
mington and its vicinity that on Monday next she intends opening a 

School for Young Ladies, 
in which will be taught 

English in all its branches, 

French Language, 

Music, Drawing & painting, 

Fancy work & Waxwork. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, January 1/., 1839. 

A CARD. 

Miss Jessie B. Simpson respectfully informs the inhabitants of Wil- 
mington, that she will reopen her school for Young Ladies, about the 
middle of October. She will give instruction in all the higher branches 
of the English; also in French, Music, , Waxwork & Embroidery. 

— Wilmington Advertiser, October ]+, 1839. 

LLOYD AND BAILEY'S SCHOOL, 1840. 

FEMALE SCHOOL. 

Mrs. Lloyd & Miss Bailey propose to open a school for young Ladies 
in Wilmington in October next. They will give a thorough course of 
instruction in the various branches of Literature & Science, usually 
taught in the Higher Schools, including the Higher Mathematics and 
the Natural Sciences; also the French & Latin Languages, Music on 
the Piano Forte and Guitar, accompanied by the voice. Further par- 
ticulars will be given hereafter. They have had experience in teaching, 
and are permitted to refer to the Rev. Messrs. Drane & Eeles of Wil- 
mington, Dr. S. B. Everett of Smithville, and Rev. Messrs. Colton & 
Bailey of Fayetteville. 

— Wilmington Weekly Chronicle, June 10, 1840. 

REPITON'S SCHOOL, 1840. 

The subscriber will open a school the 14th of September, for the 
instruction of the youth of this place, and the surrounding country. 
The branches of education which will be taught, and the prices charged 
per quarter, will be as follows, without any deduction except in cases 
of protracted illness. 

Reading, Writing and Geography $5.00 

Arithmetic, English Grammar, History, etc 6.25 

Latin & Greek 8.00 

Composition once in two weeks. 
Declamation " " " " . 
— Wilmington Weekly Chronicle, September 16, 18J+0. 



NORTHAMPTON COUNTY SCHOOLS 

J>ORTKAMPTO> ACADEMY, 1835. 

NORTHAMPTON SCHOOL. 

(Jackson, Northampton, C. H. No. Carolina.) 

The exercises of this School will be resumed, on Monday, 6th of July, 
under the direction of the subscriber. 

MALE DEPARTMENT. In this division of the School, the course 
of studies is designed, either to prepare boys for any of our colleges, 
or to complete the education of those young gentlemen, whose time or 
means may be insufficient to afford them collegiate advantages. For the 
benefit of the latter, the studies will be more varied and extended. 

Satisfied, both by observation and an experience of six years in his 
profession, that the mode, common with some teachers in our primary 
schools, of hurrying students through their preparatory course, with 
only a smattering, or, at best, an imperfect knowledge of their studies, 
strikes at the very root of sound education, the subscriber is resolved to 
continue that system of instruction, heretofore pursued by him, the 
beneficial results of which, he is proud to say, have been acknowledged 
by many of the most competent judges in our State. This method is 
opposed as well to the crowding of too many studies upon the mind at 
the same time, as to the assigning too great a quantity to each recitation, 
without regard to the accuracy with which the student receives it. 

FEMALE DEPARTMENT. A lady, who from testimonials re- 
ceived, of her character, qualifications, • and experience, is fully compe- 
tent to teach the ordinary solid and ornamental branches of female 
education, (Music and French included,) will take charge of this de- 
partment, which, however, will be under the superintendence and con- 
trol of the subscriber, so that the same mode of instruction, that has 
been pursued in the Male, will be introduced into the Female School. 

Board, for ten or twelve students, may be had in the family of the 
subscriber, at six dollars per month, or in private families on the same 
terms — no contingent charge will be made. The Terms of Tuition are 
the same as heretofore, viz : 

For lower branches of English, per session $8.00 

For higher do do do 10.00 

For Greek, Latin and French 12.50 

For Music (in addition) 15.00 

The session will terminate with a public examination on the first 
Thursday and Friday in December. 

By order of the Trustees, Robt. A. Ezzell, Principal. 

(275) 



276 Northampton County Schools. 

The editors of the Petersburg Intelligencer, Halifax Advocate and 
Edenton Gazette will please give the above three insertions, and for- 
ward their accounts to the subscriber. R. A. E. 

— The Star, June 23, 1835. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1836. 
THE NORTHAMPTON SCHOOL. 

The exercises of this School closed, with public examination, on 
Thursday and Friday, the 3d and 4th instant. 

The duties of the school will be resumed on the first Monday in 
January next. The Female department will be under the direction of 
an approved Tutoress. Terms as heretofore, viz. 

For the Languages $12 50 per Session 

For the Higher Branches of English .... 10 00 

For the lower do do .... 8 

For Music in addition 15 

Board may be had in the family of the subscriber, or in the neigh- 
borhood, at six dollars per month. No charge for wood or contingencies. 
Jackson, N. C, Dec. 3, 1835. Robt. A. Ezzell, Principal. 

—The Star, Raleigh, N. C, December 11, 1835. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1837. 
NORTHAMPTON ACADEMY. 

The exercises of both departments of this Institution will be resumed 
on Monday the 17th of July next, under the direction and superintend- 
ence of Mr. Robert A. Ezell, as principal. 

By order of the Trustees. Matt. Calvert, Secy. 

Jackson, June 20, 1837. 

— The Raleigh Star, June 28, 1837. 

THE EXAMINATION of the Students in the above Institution 
will take place on Monday and Tuesday, the 18th and 19th of December. 

The Exercises of the School will be resumed on the 15th of January 
next, under the government, as heretofore, of the Subscriber, as Prin- 
cipal. The following Departments embrace the Course of Studies pur- 
sued in this Institution : 

I. The English Department, comprising the various branches of a 
thorough and extensive English Education ; 

II. The Classical Department, comprising the Latin and Greek Lan- 
guages and Literature; 

III. The Mathematical and Philosophical Department, comprising 
Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Natural Philosophy and Chemistry. 

With boys who design to enter College, the Preparatory Course of 



Northampton County Schools. 277 

Studies and the standard authors adopted by the Faculty of our own 
excellent University at Chapel Hill, will be, henceforth, invariably 
adhered to. 

With a view of enlarging the School, the Trustees are at this time 
engaged in raising funds for the purpose of erecting a large and com- 
modious building, which, it is hoped, will be completed early in the 
ensuing year. 

The situation in the Village (Jackson) in which the Academy is 
located, is elevated and healthy. Indeed, when we consider the length 
of time the School has been in operation, the large number of Students 
it has uniformly had, and the almost uninterrupted health they have 
enjoyed, we are forced to the conclusion, that the situation is one of 
the healthiest in the Eastern part of the State. 

No boy of disorderly conduct will be admitted into the Institution, 
or, if admitted, will be suffered to remain after he is found to be in- 
corrigible. This excellent regulation was adopted by the Trustees at 
the commencement of the present scholastic year, and its salutary effects 
have been evinced, throughout the year by a uniformly good demeanor 
on the part of the Students. In the face of this fact, however, (for the 
truth of which I confidently appeal not only to the Trustees of the 
Institution, but to the inhabitants of the place and of its vicinity gener- 
ally, of any respectability or standing,) a rumor has been set afloat 
and circulated, with a zeal worthy of a good cause, injurious as well 
to the moral character of the place, as to the standing of the Institu- 
tion. The assertion may be safely made, that no Court-house village 
within the range of my acquaintance, is at this time, more uniformly 
free from temptations to vice or dissipation, than the one in which this 
Seminary is located. 

An able, competent Assistant Teacher will be employed, whose ser- 
vices will be devoted to the 3d Department of Studies, in which he will 
have the aid of an entirely new Mathematical and Philosophical 
Apparatus. 

Particulars setting forth the price of Board, &c. will be given here- 
after. Robt. A. Ezell, Principal. 

Jackson, Oct. 20, 1837. 

Star and Standard, till forbid. R. A. E. 

—Raleigh Register, October 30, 1837. 

NORTHAMPTON ACADEMY, 1838. 

NORTHAMPTON FEMALE ACADEMY, 

Jackson, N. C. 

The exercises of the above institution were resumed on Monday the 
15th inst. under the immediate management and direction of Miss 
HARRIET A. DELLAY, who was recommended to the Trustees by 
Mrs. Emma Willard, of the distinguished Female Seminary at Troy, 



278 Northampton County Schools. 

N. Y. Miss Dellay has been connected with the Northampton Academy 
for the last 12 months, and her extensive and thorough knowledge of 
the various sciences belonging to a perfect female education, her admir- 
able method of imparting instruction, her untiring industry in the 
performance of the duties appertaining to her station, and her mild 
and amiable demeanor, have already secured for her the universal 
approbation of not only the patrons of the institution, but of the Trus- 
tees and of all who are acquainted with her both as a lady and a teacher. 

The Musical Department is intrusted to a lady admirably qualified 
to give instruction in that branch. 

Students will be charged only from the time of entrance to the ter- 
mination of the session. 

Board may be had in respectable families in the village, at $7% to 
$8 per month. 

The terms of instruction for the session of five months, are as follows : 

For the ordinary branches of English learning $10 

" the higher do do 12 

" French and Mathematics 15 

" Music 15 

Jackson, Jan. 29, 1838. Matt Calvert, Sec'y, B. T. 

The Richmond "Whig and Raleigh Register, will copy the above four 
weeks, and forward their accounts to M. C. 

—Raleigh Register, March 12, 1838. 

WOOD'S FEMALE ACADEMY, 1838. 

SCHOOL. 

A Female School will be opened at my house in Northampton county, 
twelve miles west of Murfreesboro, N. C. the 2d Monday in January 
next, under the control of Miss Louisa Mooar a Lady from the North, 
who comes well recommended, having been educated for the purpose 
of teaching. She will teach all the English branches usually taught in 
Academies, together with French, if required. 

Terms of Tuition. 

Reading and Spelling, $8.00 per session of 5 months. Other branches 
$10.00. 

Board can be had in my family at thirty dollars per Session of five 
months. Strict attention will be paid to the comfort of the Boarders. 

Northampton Co. N. C. Oct. 25, 1837. Jas. H. Wood. 

—The Raleigh Star, November 8, 1837. 



XORTHAMPTOX COUNTY SCHOOLS. 279 

WOOD'S FEMALE ACADEMY, 1S39. 

Having procured, at great pains and expense, a Lady from the well 
known and highly approved Seminary of Mrs. Willardj at Troy, X. Y., 
I beg leave to inform the public that a Female School will be opened at 
my House, situate in Northampton county, X. C, 12 miles west of 
Murfreesboro, commencing on the 2nd Monday of January next. In 
regard to the qualifications of the Instructress, I deem it necessary 
only to employ the identical language used by Mrs. AVillard herself in 
recommending her to my favorable consideration. "She is a Lady of 
most exemplary character, and amiable disposition, qualified to in- 
struct in all the English branches, French, Musick, Drawing and 
Painting. 

Terms Pee Sessiox of Five Months. 

Board and Tuition in all the English Branches $40.00 

The same with the addition of French 45.00 

Music (a separate charge) 15.00 

Drawing and Painting (Do) 3.00 

The Pupils will be charged from the time of entering the school to 
the termination of the Session, and no deduction will be made for 
absence unless in case of sickness, and not in that event, unless each 
case of sickness shall exceed two weeks in duration. 

As the number of Students is limited, Parents and Guardians who 
design to patronize the School, would do well to make immediate appli- 
cation, if by letter, to my address at Margarettsville, Xorthampton 
county, X. C. Jas. H. "Wood. 

Xorthampton County, Dec. 6, 1838. 

— Raleigh Star, December 26, 1838. 



ORANGE COUNTY SCHOOLS 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY, 1801 

The undersigned, Trustees of the Hillsborough Academy, respectfully 
inform the Public, that it is now opened upon a more extensive Plan 
(than formerly) for the Reception of Youth of both Sexes, under the 
Management of the Rev. Mr. Andrew Flinn, A. B., who with a proper 
Assistant employed for that purpose, will teach the Latin, Greek and 
English Languages, Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, Geography, and the 
plainer Branches of Mathematics. The Prices of Tuition are, for the 
Latin and Greek Languages, Geography, or Mathematics, 16 Dollars 
per Annum; for Reading, Writing, Arithmetic and Book-Keeping, 12 
Dollars per Annum, paid quarterly in Advance. — Board may be had in 
private Families on very reasonable Terms, and an Expectation is enter- 
tained that a House will shortly be opened to be appropriated exclu- 
sively for the Accommodation of Young Ladies who may be sent to 
the Academy. 

The Healthiness of the Situation, the Plentifulness of Provisions 
which generally prevails in the Neighborhood, and the consequent Cheap- 
ness of Board, and the acknowledged Ability of the principal Teacher, 
create a Belief that Parents and Guardians will find this Academy an 
eligible Place for the Education of their Children and Wards, to whose 
Morals, and Welfare in general, the most unremitting Attention will 
be paid. Walter Alves, 

Wm. Kirkland, 
Wm. Whitted, 
Wm. Cain, 
Dttn. Cameron, 

Hillsboro', Oct. 16, 1801. Trustees. 

— Raleigh Register, November 10, 1801. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY UNDER GEORGE JOHNSTON. 

The Trustees of Hillsboro' Academy respectfully inform the Public, 
that it will be again opened on the first Monday of January, for the 
Reception of Youth of both Sexes, under the Direction of George John- 
ston, A. M. lately from Edinburgh, who will teach the Greek, Latin, 
French and English Languages, with the plainer Branches of the 
Mathematics, Natural and Moral Philosophy, Arithmetic and Writing. 
The Price of Tuition will be the same as last year. * * * 

Walter Alves, 
Wm. Kirkland, 
Wm. Whitted, 
Wm. Cain, 
Hillsborough, Jan. 1. Dun. Cameron. 

— Raleigh Register, January 3, 1803. 

(280) 



Oraxge County Schools. 281 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY ODER THOMAS BARON. 

The Trustees of this Academy having formed an Engagement with 
Mr. George Johnston, of Petersburg, relied on his taking Charge of it 
on the first day of January last, and under the Expectation that he 
would honorably fulfil an Engagement solemnly and deliberately entered 
into, the Trustees informed the Public, that the Academy would be 
opened on that Day for the Tuition of Youth. In this Expectation, 
however, they were much disappointed. * * * 

It is with pleasure that they now inform Parents and Guardians of 
Youth that they have engaged Mr. Thomas Baron, A. M. from the 
University of Cambridge in Massachusetts, to teach and superintend 
the teaching of the Languages, Arithmetic, Geography, and the Mathe- 
matics; and under his Direction the Business of the Academy is now 
progressing much to their satisfaction. * * * 

"Walter Alves, 
Wm. Kirklaxd, 
Wm. Wrttted, 
Wm. Calx, 
Dux. Cameron, 
Hillsborough, March 18, 1803. Trustees. 

— Raleigh Register, April Jf, 1803. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY ODER RICHARD HENDERSON. 

AN ACADEMY 

Will be opened in Hillsborough, on the 1st of January, 1805, under 
the care of Pichard Henderson, Esq., late Professor in the University 
of North Carolina. James Webb, 

Dec. 10. Acting Trustee. 

— Raleigh Register, December 13, 180k- 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY ODER WILLIAM BINGHAM. 

The Reverend William Bingham having undertaken the charge of 
the Hillsborough Academy, the public are informed that the exercises 
of the institution will commence on the 3d day of February ensuing. 
Miss Elizabeth Russell, is engaged to superintend the female depart- 
ment. The branches of learning which will be taught are Reading and 
Writing, English Grammar. Arithmetic, Geography, the Latin and 
Greek Languages, and the Mathematics, at the rates following: $12 
for reading and writing, and $16 dollars for Geography, Latin and 
Greek, etc. In the Town board may be procured upon cheap and rea- 
sonable terms. The abilities of the Rev. Mr. Bingham, as a teacher, 
are too well known to require an ulogium. and it is believed there are 
few places possessed of the advantages, salubriety of climate and cheap- 
ness of living in a degree superior to Hillsborough. The Trustees 



282 Orange County Schools. 

natter themselves that in these circumstances parents will find induce- 
ments sufficiently strong to place their children in the Hillsborough 
Academy, and that their Seminary will receive a patronage proportion- 
ate to the advantages it will possess and the benefits it will be calculated 
to confer. D. Yarbrough, Sec. 

1ST. B.— Miss Russell engages to teach Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, 
Geography, JSTeedle Work, Painting and Drawing in the Female 
Department. 

January 1, 1812. 

—The Star, March 6, 1812. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY TEACHERS, 1815. 

It is with pleasure that the Trustees of the Hillsborough Academy, 
announce to the public, that the exercises in this seminary of learning, 
has been opened for the present year under the superintendence of Mr. 
Graham, assisted by Miss Farly in the Female Department. The Eng- 
lish, Latin and Greek Languages are taught by Mr. Graham, and the 
English Grammar, Reading, Writing and Embroidery, etc. are taught 
by Miss Farly. * * * James Webb, for the Trustees. 

January 9, 1815. 

— Raleigh Star, January 13, 181-5. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY UNDER J. WITHERSP001V. 

The Exercises in this Institution will recommence on the first Mon- 
day in January. 

Dec. 4. J. Witherspoon,* Princl. 

- — Raleigh Register, January 9, 1818. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY RULES, 1818. 

The exercises of this Institution closed on the 20th ult. and will be 
resumed on the first Monday in January next. A few pupils in addi- 
tion to the number engaged may be accommodated with Board in the 
subscriber's family. Every attention will be paid to the discipline, 
Classical, and Religious instruction of Youth, sent to this Institution. 
In order that Parents and Guardians at a distance may learn the Prin- 
ciples upon which this Institution is conducted, the following Rules are 
subjoined. 

1. Each Scholar must be present at morning and evening Worship, 
at the opening and close of the exercises of the day. 

2. ]STo profane, abusive or indecent language shall be permitted 
among the pupils — but each conduct himself with propriety and de- 
corum on all occasions. 

*Rev. J. Witherspoon, a Presbyterian minister, preached at dedication of Presbyterian Church, in 
Raleigh, February 8, 1818. See Raleigh Register, February 18, 1818. 



Orange County Schools. 283 

3. The use of ardent Spirits is strictly forbidden, unless as a medi- 
cine, and the severest discipline will be used when such cases occur. 

4. ISTo Scholar shall be permitted to lounge about any Store or 
Tavern, or the public streets, nor play therein. 

5. Every Student is required to pay strict regard to the Lord's Day, 
attending regularly public Worship, refraining from ordinary studies, 
and every kind of amusement, as riding, walking, visiting and the like. 

6. Every Student shall attend such recitations from the Scriptures 
on the Sabbath as shall be prescribed. 

7. Should any Member of the School continue to use profane, inde- 
cent or licentious language, or be guilty of any immoral course of con- 
duct, so as to render him an improper and dangerous companion for his 
fellow students, he shall (after due discipline being exercised) be dis- 
missed from the Institution. 

Dec. 11. Johx Witiierspoox, Princ'l. 

— Raleigh Register, December 11, 1818. 

HILLSBOKOUGH ACADEMY BUILDING, 1S21. 

COXTEACTOES WANTED. 

The Committee appointed for the purpose are desirous to contract 
with a proper person or persons for the building of an Academy in the 
town of Hillsborough. The house will be of brick, and large enough 
to contain about 150 students. Proposals will be received until the first 
Monday in December next. * * * 

Oct. 31, 1821. Jas. A. Woods, Secy. 

— Raleigh Register, November 16, 1821. 

HILLSBOKOUGH ACADEMY ODER JOH> T RODGERS. 

THE Exercises of this Institution will be resumed on the first Mon- 
day in January. In addition to the studies already pursued as prepara- 
tory to admission into the University, an extensive English course will 
be commenced, which is designed to facilitate the subsequent studies of 
those who may be admitted. The French language will also be taught 
without any additional charge. Parents and Guardians who may wish 
to obtain further information respecting this School, with regard to 
the terms of tuition, rules, plan of studies, &c. shall have it on appli- 
cation to the subscriber. Johix Eodgers, Principal, 

Who will also receive a few students as boarders. 

— Raleigh Register, December 6, 1822. 

HILLSBOROUGH PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 

The subscriber having been appointed Principal of this Institution, 
respectfully solicits the patronage of Parents and Guardians who wish 
to have their sons or wards prepared for the Freshman, Sophomore 



284 Orange County Schools. 

or Junior Classes in the University. The various branches of an Eng- 
lish education will also he taught in this Academy. Of the system of 
studies, rates of tuition, rules of government, &c. printed statements 
will he furnished, on application to the subscriber. 

Hillsboro, 1ST. C, June 25, 1822. John Rogers. 

The Fall Session will commence on the first Monday after the fourth 
of July, and terminate on the fourth Saturday in November. J. R. 
— Raleigh Register, June 28, 1822. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

For the very extensive patronage with which this School has been 
favored, the Subscriber is sincerely grateful — he will still continue to 
labor faithfully in the instruction of those who may be committed to 
his care. 

The Exercises will be resumed on the 1st Monday in January. 

Hillsboro' Dec. 8. John Rogers, Princ'l. 

— From Raleigh Register, December 12, 1823. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

AT the late Examination of the Students of the Hillsborough Acad- 
emy, held in presence of the Faculty of the University of this State, 
fifteen young Gentlemen were approved on the studies preparatory to 
the Freshman Class, and six for the Sophomore. 

The Exercises of the Academy will be resumed on the last Monday 
in the present month. 

The subscriber has engaged the assistance of a Gentleman, who has 
taught for several years in one of the most distinguished classical 
seminaries in Maryland. 

Idle, dissolute, and profane young men, who may think of resorting 
to this Institution, are hereby forewarned, that neither at the Academy, 
nor in the town, will immorality meet with the least countenance. 

Exclusive of the time allotted for recitation, regular hours for study- 
ing at the Academy, under the inspection of the Teachers, are pre- 
scribed, morning and evening; so that the time usually mis-spent by 
Students at their lodgings will be here usefully employed. 

June 16. John Rogers, Principal. 

— Raleigh Register, June 20, 1823. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The next Session will commence on the third Monday in June. Stu- 
dents are prepared at this Institution for the Freshman and Sophomore 
Classes in the University. The various branches of a complete English 
Education are also taught. 

Hillsborough, May 31. John Rogers, Prest. 

— -Raleigh Register, June 1/., 1821+. 



Okahge County Schools. 285 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY USDER ROGERS AMD HOOPER. 

CLASSICAL SCHOOL 

In Hillsborough, X. C. 

THE Rev. William Hooper, respectfully informs the public, that he 
has associated himself with Mr. John Rogers, who has been for several 
years Principal of the Hillsboro' Academy, in the future conduct of this 
institution. 

The undersigned having been appointed ,by the Trustees to the joint 
care of the Hillsborough Academy, announce to Parents and Guardians, 
that they will exert themselves to make thorough Scholars of those who 
may be committed to their care. The School will be conducted on the 
plan of the most approved Classical Schools in our country, of which 
the subscribers have taken pains to obtain particular information. 
Youth will be prepared for the Sophomore Class in the University. 
The School will be divided into four or five Classes, and none will be 
admitted but those who become members of one of the regular classes ; 
this school being intended for those whose object is to obtain a com- 
plete and liberal education. 

Tuition, Thirty Dollars per annum, or Fifteen per session, to be 
paid always in advance. Eoard may be had at Ten Dollars per month. 
The exercises of the ensuing session will commence on the first Monday 
in July. Johx Rogers, 

June 15th. William Hooper. 

The Editors of the Newbern, Wilmington, Fayetteville (Observer), 
Salisbury and Cheraw papers will give the above three insertions, and 
forward their accounts to this office. 
• — Raleigh Register, June 21, 1825. 

TO PARENTS AND GUARDIANS. 

THE subscriber having been unexpectedly appointed a Professor in 
the University, finds it necessary to make some alteration in his adver- 
tisement to the public. — Though he will be unable to take any share 
in the teaching of the pupils, yet the Trustees have continued him in 
the office of joint Manager of the school with Mr. Rogers. He will 
therefore still hold himself responsible for the qualifications of the per- 
son who may act in his place, and by the vicinity of the Academy to 
the University, will be enabled to lend his advice and assistance in the 
adopting and maintaining of such a system of studies and discipline, 
as will fulfill the expectations of parents. The increased requisitions 
for entering College, make it more than ever necessary that all our 
Grammar Schools should be put on the best possible footing for secur- 
ing correctness and soundness of scholarship. 

Hillsborough, July 2. W. Hooper. 

— Raleigh Register, July 12, 1825. 



286 Orange County Schools. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

BOYS commencing the Latin Grammar will be received, the next 
session, but no one to study English exclusively. Those who are ad- 
vanced in the Languages, will, after a strict examination, be classed 
according to their Scholarship. We decline admitting students who are, 
at this time, qualified to enter the Ereshman Class in the University 
of North Carolina as our scheme of studies extends no further than 
to a thorough preparation of our pupils for admission into this Class, 
at the opening of the session in January. The school will go into 
operation again on the 16th of January. 

Dec. 26th. John Rogers, Princ'l. 

The editors of the Carolina Observer are requested to publish the 
above advertisement four times. J. R. 

— Raleigh Register, December 27, 1825. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY UNDER W. J. BINGHAM. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

THE Examination will commence on the 29th of November and close 
on the evening of the next day. Parents, Guardians and the public 
generally, are respectfully invited to attend. John Rogers. 

Dr. Rogers having resigned the charge of the Hillsborough Academy, 
the exercises will be resumed on the first Monday of January under 
the direction of 

November 4th. W. J. Bingham. 

— Raleigh Register, November 10, 1826. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

THE undersigned, Trustees of the Hillsborough Academy, having 
engaged William J. Bingham as Principal of this institution, take 
great pleasure in recommending the school to the patronage of the pub- 
lic. This they do with the more confidence, as Mr. Bingham is per- 
sonally known to each of them. He is already a teacher of some experi- 
ence and note, and unites to sound learning and the most exemplary 
character, a happy talent for preserving strict and wholesome discipline. 

The Trustees pledge themselves to the public, to be the active and 
regular guardians of the institution ; they will see that a becoming con- 
duct and deportment shall be observed on the part of the students at 
all times and places. And no boarding house, where proper authority 
is not maintained over the boys, will be tolerated. 

Should any further recommendation of Mr. Bingham, as an in- 



Orange County Schools. 287 

structor of youth be required, application may be made to the Rev. 
Dr. Caldwell, and to Professors Andrews, Hooper and Mitchell at the 
University. Wm. Norwood, 

E. Nash, 
David Yarborough, 

Wm. KlRKLAND, 

Francis L. Hawks, 
James Webb, 
John Taylor, 
A. B. Bruce, 

Dec. 5. James Phillips. 

— Raleigh Register, December 12, 1826. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

THE Examination will commence on Monday the 2d of June, and 
conclude on the evening of the following day. The exercises will be 
resumed on the 2d Thursday in July. 

W. J. Bingham, Principal. 

P. S. — As the classes commence in January, beginners cannot be re- 
ceived the ensuing session. Boys who have studied the Latin Grammar, 
or are in any higher stage of advancement will be admitted. 

May 28. W. J. B. 

— Raleigh Register, May 30, 1828. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

THE Examination will commence on Monday the 1st of December, 
and conclude on the evening of the following day. The Exercises will 
be resumed on the fLst Monday in January. 

W. J. Bingham, Principal. 

ALSO, a very general assortment of SCHOOL and CHILDREN'S 
BOOKS and STATIONARY ARTICLES. 

Nov. 20, 1828. 

— Raleigh Register, November 28, 1828. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

THE Examination will take place on Monday and Tuesday the 1st 
and 2d days of June. — The Exercises will be resumed on Thursday 
the 16th of July. 

May 28. "Wm. J. Bingham. Principal. 

— Raleigh Register, June 2, 1829. 



288 Orange County Schools. 

HILLSBOEOUGH ACADEMY. 

HAVING obtained a competent assistant, I will receive a Latin 
Grammar class at the commencement of the next Session. — Also a few 
English Scholars. 

The Session will commence on the 16th of July. 

Hillsboro', June 17. W. J. Bingham, Principal. 

— Raleigh Register, June 23, 1829. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

THE Examination will be on Monday & Tuesday, the 7th and 8th of 
December. The exercises will be resumed on Monday, the 11th of Jan- 
uary. 

Mr. Edward Smith, formerly of Petersburg (Va.) Academy, a teacher 
of long experience, and highly distinguished for classical and scientific 
attainments, will be associated in the labors of the Academy. 

The system of studies is, in general, preparatory to our University. 
The common English branches — Spelling, Beading, Writing, Geography, 
Arithmetic and English Grammar, are interspersed throughout the 
course. Tuition in the higher branches of education will be given to 
such as desire it. 

Regular tuition, $15 per session. W. J. Bingham, Principal. 

P. S. — Board in the most genteel families $10 per month, including 
bed, washing, firewood, and candles. 
Hillsboro' Nov. 24. 
— Raleigh Register, December 3, 1829. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

THE SUMMER SESSION, will commence on Thursday the 15th 
of July. Such as desire their sons to begin their Classical Course with 
us, are reminded, that this is the commencement of the Academic Year. 

We shall have a class preparing for the Sophomore. 

June 8. W. J. Bingham, Principal. 

— Raleigh Register, June llf, 1830. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The Winter Session will commence on the 1st Monday in January. 
Dec. 13, 1830. W. J. Bingham, Prin. 

—Star & N. C. Gazette, December 30, 1830. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The next session will commence on Monday the 11th of July. 
May 30th, 1831. W. J. Bingham, Principal. 

- — Raleigh Register, Thursday, June 2, 1831. 



Orange County Schools. 289 

THE HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY 

Will be opened on Thursday, the 12th of January. The sessions and 
vacations will be regulated hereafter by those of the University. 

December 7, 1831. W. J. Bingham, Principal. 

—The Star, December 16, 1831 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

A Gentleman from the Andover (Mass.) 'Seminary for Teachers' has 
been employed to conduct the English Department, and a few English 
Scholars will be received. 

Jan. 1, 1833. W. J. Bingham, Princ'l. 

— The Register, Friday, January )±, 1833. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The Fall Session will end on the 18th of December. The Spring Ses- 
sion will commence on the 16th of January. 

The English branches receive the entire attention of one teacher. 

Mr. Phillips, next neighbor to the Principal, will have excellent ac- 
commodations for a considerable number of boarders, at $8 per month. — 
Proximity of residence, and liberty of access at all hours, will place 
them under the supervision of the Principal almost as much as if they 
were under his own roof. 

Mr. P's house is in a retired situation, remote from the business part 
of the town, and convenient to the Academy. 

December 3. W. J. Bingham, Principal. 

— The Star, Raleigh, December 13, 1833. 

THE HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY 

Will be opened on Eriday, the 11th of January. 

The principal is in correspondence with Mr. Hall, principal of the 
Andover (Mass.) "Seminary for Teachers," and hopes to procure a gen- 
tleman from that institution, to conduct the English Department. On 
the importance of this department in our classical schools, and the diffi- 
culty, not to say the impracticability in a large school, of giving to it a 
due share of attention, without an appropriate instructor, he thinks it 
needless to remark ; and he presumes an additional charge of one dollar 
and fifty cents a session for tuition in English, will be cheerfully met by 
the community. In the event of procuring an English teacher, notice 
will be given, and a few English scholars will be received. 

December 15, 1832. Wm. J. Bingham, Principal. 

—The Star, December 23, 1832. 



19 



290 Orange County Schools. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The Trustees of the Hillsborough Male Academy give notice that the 
exercises of this institution will commence its fall session on the 8th 
day of August next, under the superintendence of Mr. W. J. BINGHAM, 
A. M. whose well known reputation as a classical scholar and peculiar 
tact of imparting instruction, has given reputation to this School, which 
is second to none in the southern States. 

The healthy situation of Hillsborough, the polished, moral and relig- 
ious society, give it strong claims to public patronage. 

The English department will be taught by Mr. J. C. NORWOOD 
whose qualifications, both moral and literary, are of the first order. 

Board can be had in private families at $8 per month. 

No student will be received that does not board in a private house. 

By order of the Board. J. Taylor, Secy. 

June 24, 1834. 

— The Star, Raleigh, July 3, 183 k- 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

THE Examination will be on the 22d & 23d instant. The next Ses- 
sion will commence on the first Thursday in August. 

MR. LINDSAY, heretofore Teacher of the Commissioners' School, 
will conduct the English Department. 

June 10. Vm. J. Bingham, Principal. 

— Raleigh Register, June 28, 1835. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The Fall Session will end on the 15th instant. The Spring Session 
will begin on the 26th of January. 

The Principal, convinced of the impossibility of doing justice to his 
School without a third Teacher, has engaged the services of Mr. JOHN 
A. BINGHAM, whose previous training in this Academy and subse- 
quent experience in teaching, peculiarly qualify him for the station. — 
Such of his patrons as admit the economy of giving a higher price for 
better work, will, he is assured, cheerfully meet the necessary advance 
in the price of classical tuition. 

Tuition in the Classical Department $21 a Session. 

In the English Department $13. 

No extra charges. 

Dec. 8. "W. J. Bingham, Principal. 

— The Register, December 20, 1836. 



Orange County Schools. 291 

HILLSBORO' ACADEMY. 

The Fall Session will commence on the 4th of August. 

June 29. W. J. Bingham, 

Principal. 
The Raleigh papers will insert the above three times. 
— Raleigh Register, July 17, 1837. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

THE Spring Session will commence on the 15th of January. 

English Department committed to Mr. W. C. Sutton, under the general 
supervision of the Principal. 

French taught to such as desire it, by a native of France, at $3 a 
month. W. J. Bingham, Principal. 

Dec. 7. 

— Raleigh Register, December 11, 1837. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The Fall Session will commence on the 9th of August. 
Classical Department ^ W. J. Bingham, 

Tuition $21 per session, ( John A. Bingham, 
English Department ( W. C. Sutton, 

Tuition $13 per session, ( John McAllister, 

French Department, ) 

rp ... <fr ,, r Jean Edendh'al. 

luition $3 per month, ) 

The Students in the Classical department receive regular instruction 
in Spelling, Reading, "Writing, Arithmetic, English Grammar, Geogra- 
phy, Composition and Declamation without extra charge. 

June 14. 

— Raleigh Register, June 18, 1838. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The Spring Session will commence on Monday the 14th January. 

_ . , _ (¥. J. Bingham, ) _ . 

Classical Dep. i_ , -„. , - $21 per Session. 

(J no. A. Bingham, ) L 

English Dep. John Hough, A, B. $15 " 

French Dep. Jean Odend'hal, $15 " 

The Scholars in the Classical Department take regular lessons in all 
the common branches of English, without extra charge. 
December 6. 
— Raleigh Register, December 17, 1838. 



292 Orange County Schools. 



HILLSBOKOUGH ACADEMY. 



We have received a catalogue of the Trustees, Teachers and Students 
of this Institution, and are glad to he thus informed of its healthful 
condition, and widening prospects of usefulness. Its Students now 
number 99, among whom are several from other States. We make the 
following extract from the Prospectus of the School : 

The Hillsborough Academy has been under the charge of Mr. Wm. 
J. Bingham, A. M., the present Principal, for the last twelve years, and 
its patronage has greatly increased during that whole period. Several 
causes have concurred in producing this result the chief of which are — 
the thorough mode of teaching, and the consequent scholarship of the 
pupils; the mild, yet strict, energetic and uniform discipline of the 
school; the regular and close supervision of the moral deportment of 
the scholars as well out of, as in school ; the extraordinary healthiness of 
the town, and the high moral character of the citizens. 

Neither labor nor expense has been spared to make the school worthy 
of confidence and patronage. The Principal, and three Assistants of 
his own previous training, men of tried scholarship, or experience, in- 
dustry and tact in teaching, devote their whole time to it. 

The English department is under the superintendence of the Princi- 
pal, and to it one Teacher devotes the whole, and another the greater 
part of his time. Its object is to prepare boys well, either for the Classi- 
cal department, or for the ordinary business of practical life. The 
Academy building is handsomely situated on a hill remote from the 
business of the town, and contains four spacious rooms, one of which is 
appropriated to the English department. 

The Classical scholars receive regular instruction in all the branches 
of common English Education, four afternoons in the week, and Sat- 
urday forenoon is exclusively devoted to this object. In each depart- 
ment there are five classes; and with such a corps of teachers, and such 
classification as is rigidly adhered to, any probable number of scholars 
can receive ample and efficient attention. 

The arrangement of classes contemplate four years from the begin- 
ning of Latin Grammar, as the period of preparation for College. Some, 
however, are prepared in much less, while others require still more time, 
the more intelligent and industrious being promoted to higher, while the 
more indolent and dull fall into lower classes. The rate of progress de- 
pends on the age, intellect and application of each individual. The 
more active are not retarded ; nor are the slowpaced dragged over books 
without understanding them. That it is better to have a perfect knowl- 
edge of a few books, than a mere superficial acquaintance with many, is 
a cardinal maxim of the school. Solidity should not be sacrificed to 
despatch. A fine superstructure should rest on a solid foundation; it 
can rest on no other. It is believed that boys of ordinary capacity 
cannot be properly prepared for College in less than four years. In ed- 
ucation, as in other things, those who profess to despatch work on the 



Orange County Schools. 293 

shortest order, generally execute it in the worst manner. The careless- 
ness and inaccuracy engendered in the boy by hasty and superficial hab- 
its of study, are deeply felt and deplored, but seldom corrected by the 
future man. 

— The Register, June 15, 1839. 

HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY. 

The Fall Session will begin on Thursday the Sth of August. Such is 
the arrangement of classes, that any probable number of scholars can 
receive immediate and efficient attention. 

Classical Dept. (W.J.Bingham, 

m ■ ■ «,n • i < >). A. Bingham, 

1 union $21 in advance. I \ tt -d 

English Dep. ( A. H. Ray, 

Tuition $15 in advance. ( S. W. Hughes. 
June 19, 1839. 
— Raleigh Register, June 29, 1839. 

For the Register. 
"HILLSBOROUGH ACADEMY." 

This Institution has, for years, been growing on the public confidence. 
Its able and indefatigable Principal, Mr. BINGHAM, has preferred 
that it should win its way to fame, rather by the proficiency of the pu- 
pils, than by the adventitious aids so often resorted to, by the friends 
of other Academies. Though urged by Parents & Guardians to give 
to the public his system of School government and studies, he has hith- 
erto declined to go beyond the ordinary advertisement, of the time at 
which the school exercises commence. Very recently, however, the 
Trustees of the Academy have issued a small Pamphlet, containing some 
outlines of the system of discipline adopted by Mr. B., together with 
a list of the Students and calculated, we trust, to place the claims of this 
School on such ground as fully to justify its extensive patronage. By 
that publication it will appear that both the Classical and English De- 
partments are filled ; that the location of the School is in a healthful 
region and in a community unsurpassed for morality, but what is of in- 
finitely more importance even than these advantages, is, that the disci- 
pline combines energy with mildness and that it is not confined to the 
Academic hours, but extends to those of relaxation. The pupil is thus 
led to acquire consistency of character and insensibly to cultivate proper 
self-respect. It is common to hear American scholarship depreciated, 
and perhaps when contrasted with European, it may not be without 
truth, but there is abundant reason to account for it. The time di- 
rected to Classical studies and the thorough elementary instruction in 
Europe, has long been regarded as among the prominent causes of this 



294 Orange County Schools. 

superiority ; Experience has taught that there is no sound learning in the 
higher branches, without a perfect mastery of the primary studies. 
More good minds have been wrecked, by attempting a north-west passage 
to learning, than ever failed to arrive at it by the old route. The impa- 
tience of this age, and particularly of this country, have become pro- 
verbial, and in nothing is this more seen than in the discoveries of short 
systems of Education ; a species of quackery, which panders to the pub- 
lic appetite. 

Without recurring particularly to the many errors in the organiza- 
tion of Grammar Schools, the writer thinks there is one common defect 
in the mode of getting up such Schools. If a young gentleman is liber- 
ally educated, as it is called, and should be seized with the mania for 
professional fame, without the means of pursuing his studies, he forth- 
with "urged by poverty and requests of friends" issues proposals for 
opening "a Classical Seminary" not to build up an honest name as 
an Instructor, not to extend the blessings of sound learning to others, 
but to sustain himself while preparing for the practice of a far different 
profession, that of Divinity, Law, or Medicine. ISTow, we do not cen- 
sure many of these good men, for if they faithfully discharge their duty 
to their pupils they deserve applause. All we mean to say is, that it is 
not probable we should find them as devoted to this temporary calling, 
as if it were to be the business of their lives — that men do not usually 
take as much pains with the scaffolding, as with the building for which 
it is used. 

So well has Mr. B. been aware of this, that he has refused to receive 
any Assistant who has not, like himself, devoted his life to the business 
of Instruction : and the consequences are already manifest in the in- 
creased and increasing reputation of the School. He has retained As- 
sistants at very high salaries, in the hope of elevating the character of 
the Academy and enlarging the sphere of its usefulness, and we are well 
assured that any increase of expense incurred for this purpose, will be 
amply repaid by increased patronage. 

The writer is not in any manner connected either with the Academy 
or the Instructors, and hopes that his motives will not suffer from mis- 
construction. As a Eather and a friend of learning, he offers his humble 
tribute of applause to an Institution, which has been furnished to our 
University the first Classical Scholars, and in which we see a pledge of 
future and continued usefulness. Attictjs. 

— Raleigh Register, August 10, 1839. 



Orahge Coua t ty Schools. 295 

HILLSBOEOUGH ACADEMY. 

The Fall Session will end on the 6th of December. The Spring Ses- 
sion will begin on Monday the 6th of January. Tuition as heretofore. 

;W. J. Bingham, "| 
J. A. Bingham, > Principals. 
A. H. Ray. J 

t? r -u -n / S. W. Hughes. 
English Dep. j ^ R Ra * 

Hillsboro', N. C. Nov. 13. 

— -Raleigh Register, November 23, 1839. 

GREGORY'S BOARDING SCHOOL, 1808. 

Mrs. Gregory, late from Danville, Virginia, who comes well recom- 
mended, will commence on the 1st of January next, boarding and teach- 
ing young Ladies the following Arts and Sciences, and at the prices 
affixed per year : 

Reading, Writing, Arithmetic and Grammar, $12, with the addition 
of plain Sewing and Sampler, $20, with the further addition of Em- 
broidery, Lace-work, fine .Needle-work, Fillegree, Artificial and Scrap 
Work, $30, Geography $8, Wax-work $8, Drawing and Painting, $10, 
Music $40. 

Board, Washing, and Tuition of every description, Music excepted, 
$100. 

To be paid quarterly in advance. 

Hillsboro. 

— Raleigh Register, January 7, 1808. 

HAWFIELD ACADEMY, 1808. 

A Grammar School will be opened in Orange County, about ten miles 
west of Hillsboro', on the first Monday in January next, for the recep- 
tion of Students under the Superintendence of the Rev. Wm. Paisley, 
in which will be taught the Latin and Greek Languages, Geography, 
Natural and Moral Philosophy, etc., etc. The terms of Tuition will be 
sixteen dollars per annum, to be paid at the end of the year. The price 
of Board, Lodging, Washing, etc. will be about fifty dollars per annum. 
Mr. James Mason, living near to the School-house, expects to have it in 
his power to board ten or twelve Students ; and Boarding may also be 
obtained in several other respectable families in the neighborhood. 

It is supposed, on account of the healthful situation of this part of 
the Country, the low price of Board and Tuition, together with the tried 
and approved abilities of the Teacher, * * * that this School will 
meet with the encouragement of the Friends of Science. * * * 

Nov. IS. 

— Raleigh Register, November 21f, 1808. 



296 Okange County Schools. 

HAWFIELD ACADEMY UNDER J. H. PICKARD. 

The Subscriber intends opening a School in the neighborhood of the 
Rev'd Paisley and James Mebane, Esq. on the first Monday in January 
next; where will be taught, Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, English 
Grammar, the Latin and Greek Languages, Philosophy, etc. * * * 

Orange, Nov. 26. John H. Pickard. 

— Raleigh Register, December 11, 1812. 

HAWFIELD ACADEMY. 

The subscribed being about to leave the Hillsborough Academy, will 
again open a Grammar School, at the Hawfield Academy, on the first 
Monday in January next. The Latin and Greek Languages, English 
Grammar, and the usual branches of Academical Study, will be taught. 
Boarding can be had in good houses, it is presumed, for $50 a year. 
Great attention will be given as well to the morals as to the literary 
Education of youth. 

Poplar Spring, Orange, ]STov. 17. John H. Pickard. 

— Raleigh Register, November 25, 181k- 

MT. REPOSE SCHOOL UNDER WI. BINGHAM, 1818. 

THE EXERCISES 

Of the Academy under the superintendence of the Subscriber will be 
resumed on the first Monday of January next, in the dwelling house of 
the late Mrs. Hargrave, on Back Creek, about 10 miles north west of 
Hillsborough. The situation is healthy, the house large and convenient, 
and the neighborhood very eligible for a school. Board in respectable 
families may be procured on reasonable terms. Due attention shall be 
paid to the moral as well as literary proficiency of his pupils. Terms of 
tuition : for the Latin and Greek Languages, Geography, etc. $18 ; 
English Grammar $16 ; Reading, Writing and Arithmetic $8 a year. 
Payment quarterly in advance. Wm. Bingham. 

Mount Repose, Dec. 15. 

— Raleigh Register, January 2, 1818. 

THE EXERCISES 

Of the Academy under the superintendence of the Rev. Wm. Bingham 
will be resumed on the first Monday of January. * * * 

The Academy is about 10 miles northwest of Hillsborough. 

Mount Repose, Dec. 15. 

— Raleigh Register, December 21f, 1818. 



Orange Couxty Schools. 297 

THE EXERCISES 

Of the School under the direction of the Rev. Wm. Bingham will be 
resumed on the 1st Monday of January next. * * * 

Mount Repose, Orange County. Dec. 4, 1S19. 

— Raleigh Register, December 10, 1819. 

THE EXERCISES 

Of the Academy under the direction of the Rev. Wm. Bingham will 
be resumed on the first of January next. Board may be procured in 
respectable families in the vicinity. 

Mount Repose, Orange county, 
December 18. 

— Raleigh Register, December 29, 1820. 

EXAMIXATIOX. 

The semi-annual Examination of the students under the care of the 
Rev. Wm. Bingham, will commence on the 10th of December, and end 
on the 12th. — The exercises of the Academy will be resumed on the 1st 
Monday of January. — Tuition for the Latin and Greek Languages. 
English Grammar and Geography, twenty dollars per annum, payable 
quarterly in advance. * * * 

Xov. 8. 

— Raleigh Register, November 16. 1821. 

MOOT EEPOSE SCHOOL ODER W. J. BINGHAM. 

THE exercises of the Academy heretofore under the superintendence 
of the Rev. Wm. Bingham, will be continued by Wm. J. Bingham. The 
system of studies will be the same. W. J. Bingham. 

Mount Repose, Orange County. 
February 9, 1826. 

— Raleigh Register, February 11±, 18.26. 

MT. REPOSE SCHOOL ODER W. P. FORREST. 

MOUNT REPOSE. 

PRIVATE BOARDIXG SCHOOL. 

THE subscriber proposes to open a Private Boarding School, on the 
third Monday in January, at the late residence of Rev. "Wm. Bingham, 
deceased. The terms of tuition will be. 

For Spelling, Reading. Writing and Arithmetic, per ) 

session, 84.00 v payable in 

The Latin Language, 6.00 \ advance. 

English Grammar, Geography and Astronomy. 8.00 



298 Orange County Schools. 

A deduction will be made to those who enter after the session com- 
mences. 

There will be two sessions in the year, of five months each. 

Price of board, six dollars per month. 

The moderation of the terms, the healthiness and pleasantness of the 
situation, and the morality of the neighborhood, are considerations which 
it is hoped will procure for this establishment a share of public patron- 
age. Wm, P. Forkest. 

Orange county, December 30. 

— The Star, January 8, 1829. 

UNION SCHOOL, 1818. 

THE PROSPECT COMPANY, 

Has erected a Boarding House near Union School House, about one 
mile south of Woody's Ferry on Haw-River, Orange County, in which 
will be admitted 10 or 12 Boarders ; who may be taught in Union 
School, the following branches of Literature : 

Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, English Grammar, with the Art of 
Scanning Poetry, Geography, Drawing, Painting, Embroidery, and 
otber kinds of Needle- Work. 

Mary Mendenhall, the present Tutoress, has taught some years, — 
and is well recommended for her competency and qualifications as a 
tutoress. She will reside at the Boarding House. * * * 

Boys will not be permitted to continue in the Boarding House after 
they are fifteen years of age. 

Terms, $16.50, for Board and Tuition a Quarter, which sum must 
be paid in advance. For further information, enquire of Thomas 
Newlin. Isaac Sugart, President. 

5th mo. 1st day, 1818. 

— Raleigh Register, June 5, 1818. 

GRATES' FEMALE SCHOOL, 1819. 

The Exercises of the Female School at Long Meadows, will be re- 
sumed on the last Monday in January next, under the direction of 
Mrs. Graves. In this Institution are taught Grammar, Geography, 
Moral and Natural Philosophy, Astronomy, Logic, Rhetoric and His- 
tory; also Needle Work, Drawing and Music. Boarding and Tuition 
will be Fifty-five Dollars a Session in advance, except Music and 
Drawing, for which there will be an extra charge. 

The greatest attention will be paid to the morals and religious in- 
struction of pupils put under our care. 

Elijah Graves, Principal. 

Orange 6 miles North West of Hillsboro. 

December 17, 1819. 

— Raleigh Register, December 2J±, 1819. 



Orange County Schools. 299 

GRAVES' SCHOOL AT WALNUT GROYE, 1828. 
FEMALE EDUCATION. 

A FEMALE SCHOOL, is proposed to be open on the first Monday 
in January next, under the superintendence of Rev. Elijah Graves, 
at Walnut Grove, twelve miles from Hillsborough, near the road lead- 
ing from that place to Pittsborough. In this school will be taught 
every necessary and useful branch of literature, and some of the orna- 
mental, such as needle work, drawing and painting. The very moder- 
ate price of six dollars a month will be charged for board, and the 
price of tuition will vary from six to twelve and a half dollars. The 
situation of this school is extremely healthy, and the government of it 
will be entirely parental. 

Orange county, Dec. 11. 

— The Star, January 3, 1828. 

CHAPEL HILL ACADEMY, 1820. 

CHAPEL HILL ACADEMY. 

THE exercises of this institution will commence on the twentieth of 
June next, under the superintendence of the undersigned. The course 
of studies in this Academy will be (as usual) so arranged as to render 
it in every respect preparatory to the University. Elocution, pronun- 
ciation according to the rules of Prosody, Scanning and the derivation 
and composition of words will receive particular attention. Due regard 
will also be paid to those pursuing the lower branches of Education, 
and every exertion used to stimulate them to emulation. The moral 
conduct and good deportment of the pupils will receive special 
attention. 

The local situation of the Academy must also afford advantages to 
those preparing for the University. The terms of Tuition will be as 
usual. The sessions and vacations will be regulated by those of the 
University. 

Chapel-Hill, May 1st, 1820. James A. Craig. 

fglPJ. A. Craig will keep on hand a supply of School Books. 

—The Star, May 26, 1820. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1821. 

CHAPEL-HILL ACADEMY. 

THE exercises of this Institution will again be resumed on the 5th 
of January next. The course of studies in this Academy is as usual, 
so arranged as to render it preparatory to the University. The exam- 
inations will be immediately previous to those in the University, and 
under the direction of the Faculty. At each public examination of 



300 Orange County Schools. 

the School the Senior Class will be considered as candidates for the 
then ensuing Freshman Class in College, and examined as such. The 
sessions and vacations will be regulated by those of the University. 

Raleigh, Dec. 14th, 1820. J. A. Craig, Principal. 

—The Star, December 15, 1820. 

HILLSBOROUGH FEMALE SEMINARY, 1825. 

THE Exercises of this Institution will commence on the first day of 
August, under the immediate care of Miss Lavinia Brainerd, and 
under the inspection and superintendence of Eev. William M. Green. 

The course of instruction in this seminary will be carried on in a reg- 
ular continued system of Academic studies, embracing all the sceientific 
and ornamental branches necessary to complete the female education. 

Pupils from abroad can be accommodated with board in the most 
respectable families of the place, at the rate of ten dollars per month. 
Arrangements, however, are now making, by which it is intended to in- 
struct the more advanced pupils in house-wifery and in all the various 
branches of domestic economy. Whilst all due attention will be paid 
to the ordinary and the ornamental branches of education, the instruct- 
ors will deem it their imperious duty to pay especial regard to the 
morals & manners of the young ladies committed to their care. 

There will be a select committee of literary ladies and gentlemen 
to attend the semi-annual examinations, to decide on the merits and 
progress of the pupils, and to place them in the several classes. 

Those pupils who shall have completed their course of studies with 
acceptance, will receive a Diploma with the signatures of their in- 
structors and of the examining committee, and under the seal of the 
seminary. 

The studies of the several classes will be arranged in the following 
order : 

First Class. — Reading, Writing, Orthography, Arithmetic, English 
Grammar, Modern Geography, Elements of Composition. 

Second Class. — Ancient, Modern & Sacred Geography, Use of the 
Globes, Map-drawing, Natural History, History of the United States. 

Third Class. — Algebra, Elements of Euclid, Tytler's History, Rhetoric, 
Elements of Criticism, Astronomy, Chronology, and Natural Philosophy. 

Fourth Class. — Moral Philosophy, Evidences of Christianity, Natural 
Theology, Chemistry, Botany, Mineralogy and Logic. 

In addition to the above, lessons will be given in Music, Drawing 
and Painting in all its styles, in plain and ornamental Needle-work, 
and in making Fruit and Flowers in Wax. 

There will be two vacations in the year; one of six weeks during the 
winter, the other of a fortnight during the summer. The first session 
will end about the middle of November next; and a proportionable 
deduction be made in the price of tuition on account of the shortness 
of the session. 



Orange County Schools. 301 

PRICES OF TUITION. 

For First Class, per session $10.00 

For Second Class, per session 12.50 

For Third and Fourth Classes, per session 15.00 

All the ornamental branches taught at the usual prices. 

Hillsboro', July 9. 

The Editors of the Raleigh Star, Carolina Observer, Cape Fear 
Recorder, Newbern Sentinel, Edenton Gazette and Western Carolinian, 
are requested to give the above three insertions, and forward their 
accounts to the Editor of the Hillsborough Recorder for payment. 

— Raleigh Register, July 15, 1825. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1826. 

HILLSBOROUGH FEMALE SEMINARY. 

THE First Session of this Institution closed on the 17th ult. — at 
which time an approved Examination of the pupils was sustained in 
the presence of the School Committee. The exercises of this Seminary 
will be resumed on Thursday the 12th of January next. Competent 
Instructors will be in readiness at that time to meet the wishes of those 
Parents and Guardians who may commit their Children to our care, 
with a view to their instruction, in either the useful or ornamental 
branches of Female Education. The Superintendent, deeply impressed 
with the importance of rightly training those who are now the daugh- 
ters, but are shortly to be the wives and mothers of the community, 
pledges himself, as before, to exercise parental watchfulness over his 
pupils, and to give such direction to the instructions of the Seminary, 
as shall adapt them to the eternal as well as temporal interests of those 
committed to his care. 

Everything taught shall be taught thoroughly and with a view to 
practical life. — And although the lighter gratifications of female educa- 
tion, usually called "accomplishments" shall be attended to in their 
proper place and measure, yet the chief aim of the Instructor shall be 
to fit their pupils for usefulness, by inculcating, both by precept and 
example, moderation, forbearance, good temper, self-control, and the 
morality of the Gospel. 

To Parents and Guardians at a distance, who may commend their 
children to his attention, the Superintendent engages to provide them 
with board, in families convenient to the Academy, and where all due 
attention will be paid to their morals, their manners, and their comfort. 

Terms of Tuition at the usual rates. — Board can be obtained in the 
most respectable families at $10 per month, including wood, washing, 
candles, &c. W. M. Green, Superintendent. 

Hillsborough, Dec. 1st, 1825. 



302 Orange County Schools. 

The Editors of the Kaleigh Star, JNTewbern Sentinel, Edenton Gazette, 
Fayetteville Observer, Cape Fear Recorder, and Western Carolinian, 
are requested to publish the above for three successive weeks, and for- 
ward their accounts to the office of the Hillsborough Recorder for 
payment. 

— Raleigh Register, December 20, 1825. 

THE second session of this Institution commenced on the 12th inst. 
and the superintendent takes pleasure in informing Parents & Guar- 
dians at a distance, that he is at present assisted by a Gentleman and 
Lady of the most undoubted qualifications. He can, therefore, with 
confidence, recommend the school to the attention of the public, and 
engage that no exertion shall be spared to give to it a permanent and 
useful character. Wm. M. Green, Superintendent. 

Jan. 25th, 1826. 

The Editors of the Star, Carolina Observer, "Western Carolinian, 
Cape Fear Recorder, JNTewbern Sentinel and Edenton Gazette, will 
publish the above for four successive weeks, and forward their accounts 
to the office of the Hillsborough Recorder. W. M. G. 

— Raleigh Register, January 31, 1826. 

HILLSBOROUGH FEMALE SEMINARY, 1827. 

THE Exercises of this Institution will be resumed on the 12th in- 
stant. The facilities for instruction afforded by the number of Teach- 
ers, and the possession of an excellent Philosophical and Chemical 
Apparatus and Mineralogical Cabinet, united to the known healthiness 
of the place, and the moderate terms of tuition, present no ordinary 
claims to the notice of the parents and guardians of our community. 

PRICES AS BEFORE. 

Ordinary Tuition per Session. 

Fourth Class $10.00 

Third Class 12.50 

Second Class 12.50 

First Class 15.00 

Music (per session) 24.00 

Painting & Drawing 10.00 

Needle Work 1.00 

Contingent expenses 50 

Board $10 per month. 

Hillsboro', July 2. Wm. M. Green, Superintendent. 

—Raleigh Register, July 13, 1827. 



Orange County Schools. 303 

HILLSBORO' FEMALE SEMINARY, 1828. 

The Summer Session of this Institution will commence on the 10th 
of July. 

LITERARY TUITION. 

First Class, per session $15.00 

Second and Third Classes, per session 12.50 

Fourth Class, per session 10.00 

Contingent Expenses 50 

ORNAMENTAL DEPARTMENT. 

Music, per session $24.00 

Drawing & Painting 10.00 

Needle Work 1.00 

Board can be obtained in the most respectable families of the place 
at $10 per month, including washing, wood, candles, &c. A few young 
ladies will be received as boarders in the family of the instructresses. 
July 3. W. M. Green, Superintendent. 

- — Raleigh Register, July 1/., 1828. 

HILLSBORO' FEMALE SEMINARY, 1829. 

THE Summer Session of this Institution will commence on the 9th 
day of July. Terms as heretofore. 

ORDINARY TUITION. 

Fourth Class, per session $10.00 

Second and Third Classes, per session 12.50 

First Class, per session 15.00 

Contingent Expenses 50 

ORNAMENTAL BRANCHES. 

Music, per session $24.00 

Lace Needlework, per session 3.00 

Muslin Needlework, per session 2.00 

Drawing & Painting, per session 10.00 

Board from $8 to $10 per month. 

June, 1829. W. M. Green, Superintendent. 

— Raleigh Register, July 9, 1829. 



304 Orange County Schools. 

THE Winter Examination of the Institution ended on the 8th in- 
stant. The next Session will commence on the 28th January next. 

Eirst Class, per session $15.00 

Second and Third Classes, per session 12.50 

Fourth Class, per session 10.00 

Contingent Expenses 50 

Music, per session 24.00 

Drawing & Painting 10.00 

Needle Work $1.00 to 3.00 

Board, including Wood, Washing, Candles, &c. in the most respect- 
able families, for $10 per month. 

Dec. 19. W. M. Green, Superintendent. 

The Raleigh Star, Western Carolinian, Ereeman's Echo, Halifax 
Minerva, and Eayetteville Observer, will publish the above 4 times, 
and forward their accounts to J. P. Sneed, Esq., Treasurer of the Hills- 
boro' Female Seminary. 

— Raleigh Register, December 21, 1829. 

HILLSBOBO' FEMALE SEMIlfABY, 1830. 

THE Summer Examination of this Institution closed on the 22d inst. 
The next Session will commence on Thursday, the 8th of July. — An 
early attendance of the Scholars is desired. Terms as heretofore, viz : 

FOE ORDINARY TUITION. 

First Class, per session $15.00 

Second and Third Classes, per session 12.50 

Fourth Class, per session 10.00 

Contingent Expenses 50 

ORNAMENTAL BRANCHES. 

Music, per session 24.00 

Drawing & Painting 10.00 

Needle Work $1.00 to 3.00 

Board can be obtained in the most respectable families of the place, 
at from $9 to $10 per month, including Wood, Washing, Candles, &c. 
Hillsboro', June 24, 1830. W. M. Green, Superintendent. 

The Editors of the Star, N. C. Journal, Newbern Spectator, Roanoke 
Advocate and Edenton Gazette, will please give the above three inser- 
tions and forward their accounts to the Treasurer of the H. F. S. 

— Raleigh Register, July 5, 1830. 



Orange County Schools. 305 

The Winter Examination ended on the 7th inst. The next Session 
will commence on Thursday, the 20th of January, 1831. 

This institution has now been in successful operation five years, and 
continues, notwithstanding the pecuniary straitness of the times, to 
receive a full share of public patronage. The course of studies though 
liberal, is yet so regulated as to give no undue precedence to the orna- 
mental branches of Education, and to allow of no intrusion upon the 
regular school hours. 

A neat and well selected Apparatus, together with a handsome Cab- 
inet of Minerals, facilitate the task of instruction in the several studies 
of Chemistry, Natural Philosophy, and Mineralogy. * * * 

Dec. 8th, 1830. Wm. M. Green, Superintendent. 

— Raleigh Register, December 16, 1830. 

HILLSBOROUGH FEMALE SEMINARY, 1833, 

The Winter Examinations of this Institution took place on the 3d 
inst. The next Session will commence on the 11th January, 1833. 

The true test of character of all Schools is the proficiency of their 
pupils in sound and useful learning, and not in the number and titles 
of the names by which they are recommended. — As the above Institu- 
tion has now been more than seven years in successful operation, its 
Instructors would fearlessly, though modestly appeal to the fruits of 
their past labors in proof of the honesty and ability with which they 
have hitherto fulfilled their trust, and as the surest pledge of their 
fidelity for the time to come. Their pupils are now scattered in every 
section of the State, and of their profiency generally an enlightened 
public can judge for themselves. 

The health of the Superintendent being restored, he will again take 
part in the instruction of the higher classes, as well as exercise a gen- 
eral control over the whole School. 

Board may be obtained in the most respectable families of the place 
at from $8 to $10 per month. Tuition from $10 to $15 per Session. 
Music, $24. Drawing and Painting, $10. Needle-work, from $1 to $3. 

Hillsborough, Dec. 1832. W. M. Green, Superintendent. 

— Raleigh Register, Friday, December 11+, 1832. 

HILLSBOROUGH FEMALE SEMINARY, 1835. 

The Subscriber having resumed the superintendence of this Insti- 
tution, pledges himself to watch with fidelity over its interests, and to 
devote to it as much of his time and attention as may be necessary 
to promote good order, and ensure a proper regard to the morals and 
scholarship of its pupils. The character which this School has long 
sustained before the public, renders unnecessary any of the usual appeals 
to attract attention and procure patronage. The same experienced 
Instructress will continue her labors, assisted by such other Teachers 
as the wants of the School may require. 
20 



306 Orange County Schools. 

The next Session will commence on Thursday the 8th inst. Price 
of Tuition, $10.50 to $16.50, per Session. Music, $24. Drawing and 
Painting, $10. Board from $8 to $9 per month. 

January, 1835. William M. Green, Superintendent. 

— Raleigh Register, January 20, 1835. 

HILLSBORO' FEMALE ACADEMY, 1837. 

The Second Session of this Institution will commence on Thursday, 
the 20th of July. 

TERMS OF TUITION. 

First Class $17.00 

Second Class 15.00 

Third Class 12.00 

Instruction on the Piano 25.00 

Instruction on the Guitar 25.00 

Instruction in Drawing & Painting 12.00 

Instruction in Needle Work 3.00 

Hillsboro', June 27. Wm. M. Green, Superintendent. 

— Raleigh Register, Monday, July 3, 1837. 

HILLSBORO' FEMALE ACADEMY, 1838. 
The Spring session of this Institution will open on the 25th inst. 

TERMS OF TUITION. 

First Class $17.00 

Second, Third and Fourth Classes 15.00 

Music 25.00 

Drawing and Painting 12.00 

Needle Work 3.00 

Lessons in French will be given by a native of France at $3.00 per 
month. Board may be had in some of the most respectable families of 
the place at $10 per month. 

Jan. 8, 1838. Wm. M. Green, Superintendent. 

— Raleigh Register, January 15, 1838. 

The Subscriber takes this method of giving notice to Parents and 
Guardians, that he has again taken this Institution under his immedi- 
ate instruction and control. Instead of the mere general Superintend- 
ence which he has exercised for some years past, he will henceforth 
take part in the instruction of the higher Classes, as well as give to 
every department of the School a constant personal Supervision. The 
same teachers, who have, in times past given such general satisfaction 
to the Public, will continue their faithful labors. 

The first Principle of the School shall be, as it has always been, to 
give to the Pupils an understanding knowledge of what they are taught 
— to proportion their studies to their respective capacities — to estab- 
lish a habit of close and correct thinking — to illustrate, as far as may 



Okange County Schools. 307 

be, each lesson by example and experiment, and to give to the whole 
system of instruction a practical, rather than a theoretical cast. No 
pains shall be spared to give to the Institution a character for con- 
scientious, unsparing devotion to the best interests of its Pupils. 

Lessons in Music and Painting are given by a competent and ap- 
proved Instructress. The FRENCH LANGUAGE will be taught by 
a native of France, a gentleman every way qualified. 

The Subscriber will cheerfully take charge of such Pupils as may 
be committed to his personal care ; and will place them in such families 
as will secure them attention to their comfort and moral culture. A few 
boarders will be received on early application, into his own family. 

TERMS OF TUITION. 

Literary Branches. 

First Class, per session $17.00 

Second and Third Classes, per session 15.00 

Fourth Class, per session 12.50 

Instruction on either Piano or Guitar 25.00 

Drawing and Painting 10.00 

Ornamental Needle Work (Muslin) 3.00 

Ornamental Needle Work (Crewel) 5.00 

French Language 15.00 

Board may be obtained in respectable families at $9 or $10 per 
month. The present Session commenced on the 25th ult. 

Hillsboro', Feb. 1838. Wm. M. Green, Sup. 

Star and Standard, each 4 weeks. 

— Raleigh Register, February 26, 1838. 

TO PARENTS AND GUARDIANS. 

The Subscriber having lately given notice that he had again taken 
the 

HILLSBORO' FEMALE SEMINARY 

under his immediate instruction and control, deems it due to the public 
now to state, that since the date of that advertisement, he has deter- 
mined to remove from Hillsboro', and that his connection with this 
institution is consequently dissolved. 

He trusts, however, that his separation from this School will not 
injuriously affect its interests. The Ladies in whose charge it remains, 
are well known and approved Instructresses. Their past diligence and 
success afford the surest pledge for the conscientious discharge of their 
future labors. No better evidence can be given of the correct and criti- 
cal mode of instruction pursued in this institution than the well known 
fact that its pupils are eagerly sought after, and highly approved as 
Instructresses in other schools. It has been a leading principle with 



308 Orange County Schools. 

the teachers to give to their pupils an understanding knowledge of 
what they are taught — to proportion the studies to their respective 
capacities — to establish a habit of close and correct thinking — to illus- 
trate, as far as possible, each lesson by example & experiment, and to 
give to the whole system of instruction a practical character. 

At the request of the Teachers, the following statement of terms, &c. 
is here added : 

Literary Branches. 

First Class, per session $17.00 

Second and Third Classes, per session 15.00 

Fourth Class, per session 12.50 

Instruction on either Piano or Guitar 25.00 

Drawing and Painting 10.00 

Ornamental Needle Work (Muslin) 3.00 

Ornamental Needle Work (Crewel) 5.00 

French Language 15.00 

Payable in advance. 

Lessons in Music and Painting are given by a competent and ap- 
proved Instructress. The French Language is taught by a native of 
France — a gentleman every way qualified. 

Board may be had in respectable families, at nine or ten dollars per 
month. A few boarders will be received, on early application, into the 
family of the principal Instructress. 

Hillsboro', March 2, 1838. Wm. M. Gkeen. 

— Raleigh Register, March 12, 1838. 

HILLSBOEOUGH FEMALE ACADEMY, 1839. 

The undersigned Trustees of the Hillsborough Female Academy, have 
the pleasure to announce to Parents and Guardians, that the Exercises 
of this Institution commenced on the 24th January, for the present 
session, under the charge of its efficient and accomplished Principal, 
Miss Maria L. Spear. The services of this lady, for several years past, 
have been such as to meet the highest expectations of the Trustees, and 
to deserve for this Academy as great a portion of public patronage 
as has been extended to any similar Institution in the State. 

Miss Spear has associated with herself in the task of instruction, 
her sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Smith, whose talents and skill in the depart- 
ments of Music, Drawing and Painting, have been fully tested and 
are of the highest order. 

A gentleman, who is a native of France and in every way qualified, 
will give lessons in the French Language to such as may desire it. 

The Trustees can with confidence recommend this Seminary to all 
who wish their daughters and wards to become scholars, and to have 
their morals anxiously guarded, and their manners properly formed; 
the personal accomplishments and moral culture of the students being 



Orastge Couxty Schools. 309 

no less objects of attention on the part of the Teachers, than their im- 
provement in Literature. 

The Studies of each class are as follows, viz : Spelling, Reading, 
"Writing, Chemistry, Arithmetic, Grammar, Geography, History, 
Natural Philosophy, Mythology, Botany, Rhetoric, Astronomy, Dicta- 
tion and Composition, constitute the studies of the first and second 
classes : the same branches of learning, with the exception of the five 
last named, form the studies of the third class, and the fourth class, 
which is the lowest in the School, study Spelling, Reading, Writing 
and the Tables in Arithmetic, as the progress of the scholar justifies. 

TERMS OF TUITION. 

First Class $17.50 

Second Class 15.00 

Third Class 15.00 

Fourth Class 12.50 

Music on the Piano or Guitar 25.00 

Drawing and Painting 12.00 

French 15.00 

Working on Canvass 5.00 

Working on Muslin 3.00 

James S. Smith, 
William Calx, 
Cad Joxes, Sex'r, 
P. H. Max-gum, 
Hugh Waddell, 
Nathan" Hooker, 
Stephen Moore, 

February 13. Trustees. 

— Raleigh Register, February 25, 1839. 

HILLSBOEOUGH FEMALE ACADEMY COrRSE OF STUDY, 1S39. 

The Trustees of this Institution take pleasure in announcing that it 
still continues under the care of its former efficient and accomplished 
Instructresses. No pains have been spared to place it in the highest 
rank of Female Academies. The Spring Session will commence on the 
17th of January. Parents and Guardians are particularly requested to 
bring their daughters or wards in time to be in readiness for the open- 
ing of the School, as it is important that the pupils of each class should 
enter upon their studies at the same time. The modes of instruction, 
as well as the text books adopted, are, as far as practicable, those 
recommended by the American Common School Union. 

Of the First Class. — Spelling, Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, Gram- 
mar, Geography, with the use of the Globes, History, Natural Philoso- 
phy, Chemistry, Mythology, Botany, Rhetoric, Astronomy, Geology, 
Political Economy, Dictation and Composition. 



310 Orange County Schools. 

Of the Second Class. — Spelling, Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, Gram- 
mar, Geography, with the use of the Globes, History, Natural Philoso- 
phy, Chemistry, Dictation and Composition. 

Of the Third Class. — Spelling, Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, Gram- 
mar and Geography. 

Of the Fourth Class. — Spelling, Reading, Writing, and the Tables in 
Arithmetic. 

Terms of tuition, payable in advance. 

First Class $17.00 

Second Class 15.00 

Third Class 15.00 

Fourth Class 12.00 

Music on Piano or Guitar 25.00 

Drawing and Painting 12.00 

French and Latin 15.00 

Working on Canvass 5.00 

Working on Muslin 5.00 

James S. Smith, 
Cad Jones, Sen., 
William Cain, 
H. Waddell, 
Stephen Moore, 
Nathan Hooker, 
P. H. Mangum, 

December 12. Trustees. 

— Raleigh Register, December 21, 1839. 

TYITHERSPOON'S PRIVATE BOARDING SCHOOL, 1826. 

THE subscriber will open a private Boarding School at his residence 
within a mile and a half of Hillsborough, NT. C. on the 2d Monday 
in July next. He will receive 22 pupils and no more. These will be 
divided into two classes. The first to be composed of those half ad- 
vanced in their Latin course; the second of those just commencing. 
Particular attention will be paid to Reading, Writing, Arithmetic and 
Geography, during the prosecution of the classical course. 

The situation is healthy and pleasant, commanding the convenience 
both of the town and country. 

Parents and guardians who shall commit their children and wards to 
his care, may be assured that a careful attention will be given to their 
moral and religious instruction. — Board and tuition, $65 per session, 
to be paid in advance. Letters addressed to him on this subject (or in 
his absence to the Hon. F. Nash) will receive prompt attention. 

May 15. John Witherspoon. 

—Raleigh Register, May 19, 1826. 



Orange County Schools. 311 

PRIVATE BOARDING SCHOOL, 1S27. 

THE subscriber having commenced in July last a private boarding 
school, at his residence within a mile and a half of Hillsborough, will 
receive eight or ten more pupils, should they apply. His number of 
pupils is limited to twenty-two. The course of instruction, preparatory 
to the University. A careful attention will be paid to Reading, "Writ- 
ing, Arithmetic and Geography, during the classical course. 

Board and Tuition $65 per session, or $130 per annum. Parents and 
guardians who may intrust their youth to his care, may be assured 
that every attention will be given to their moral and religious instruc- 
tion. The exercises having closed the first Monday in December ; will 
be resumed on the first Monday in January. 

Dec. 5. J. TTitherspoon. 

— Raleigh Register, December 12, 1826. 

THE REY. J. AVITHERSPOOX, 

In consequence of the loss of his house in the country, has opened 
his Private Boarding School in town, where he is prepared to accom- 
modate, the number of pupils he proposed to receive under his care. 

Hillsborough, Jan. 10. 

— Raleigh Register, February 2, 1827. 

Rev. John Witherspoon, of Hillsboro', has been unanimously elected 
to the Pastoral Office, by the Presbyterian Church in the vicinity of 
Hampden Sydney College. 

— Raleigh Register, May 30, 1828. 

HILLSBOROUGH PRIVATE BOARDING SCHOOL, 1S28. 

THE Exercises in the School of the undersigned closed on the 30th 
of May, and will be resumed on the 2d Monday in July. Six or eight 
more Pupils can be received at the commencement of the Session. Board 
and tuition sixty-five dollars per session, paid in advance. 

June 3. J. "Witherspoon. 

— Raleigh Register, June 10, 1828. 

PRIVATE BOARDING SCHOOL, 1S29. 

THE Exercises in the Subscriber's School, will close on Friday the 
oth of June, and be resumed on the second Monday in August. 

There will be public speaking by his pupils, on Thursday night the 
4th of June, in the Masonic Hall. The citizens of the town are re- 
spectfully invited to attend. J. "Witherspoon. 

!N\ B. — Terms of his School, $65 per session, for Board and Tuition,, 
paid in advance. 

Hillsborough, May 19. 

—Raleigh Register, May 26, 1829. 



312 Orange County Schools. 

PRIVATE BOARDING SCHOOL, 1830. 

THE Exercises in the Subscriber's School, within a mile and a half 
of Hillsborough, will terminate on Thursday the 3d of June, and be 
resumed on Thursday the 8th of July next. Eight or ten more pupils 
would be received. — Terms $65 per session, paid in advance. 

June 1. J. Witherspoon. 

— Raleigh Register, June 7, 1830. 

BETHLEHEM SCHOOL, 1829. 

The subscriber proposes opening a MALE SCHOOL, at Bethlehem, 
On Cain Creek, twelve miles from Hillsborough, on the 12th of Janu- 
ary, in which will be taught all the studies preparatory to college. The 
price of tuition for the Languages, $12.50 per session; English Gram- 
mar, Geography, and Arithmetic, $10, to be paid in advance. This 
school will be in a good moral neighborhood. 

Boarding can be had in respectable families at six dollars per month. 

Dec. 16. George W. Morrow. 

— The Star, January 8, 1829. 

ANDERSON'S FEMALE BOARDING SCHOOL, 1830. 

The next session of the Subscriber's Private School for Young Ladies, 
within one mile of Hillsboro, will commence on the first Monday in 
January, 1831, and continue five months. Terms for Board, Tuition, 
Books and Stationary of every kind, $75. 

Instruction in Painting and Music will be provided for such as desire 
it at the usual extra charges. 

Hillsboro, Nov. 30. W. Anderson. 

— Raleigh Register, December 30, 1830. 

ANDERSON'S SCHOOL, 1831. 

THE NEXT SESSION of the subscriber's private Female School, 
will commence on the first Monday of July, and continue five months. 
Board, tuition, books, and stationary, $75 in advance. An early appli- 
cation from such as desire to enter Pupils is desirable. 

Hillsboro', May 28th, 1831. W. Anderson. 

— Raleigh Register, June 2, 1831. 

FEMALE BOARDING SCHOOL, 1833. 

The Seminary for Young Ladies, reeently under the Superintendence 
of Mr. Walker Anderson, in the vicinity of Hillsborough, will, in 
future, be continued on the same principles, under the direction of the 
Subscribers. 

Instruction in the Ornamental Branches of Female Education, par- 
ticularly Music and Drawing, will be given by the same experienced 



Orange County Schools. 313 

and well-qualified Teachers who have formerly had charge of that 
Department. 

The Session will commence on the 15th of January, 1834. 

William E. Anderson, 

October 14. Samuel J. Johnstone. 

- — Raleigh Register, October 15, 1833. 

FEMALE BOARDING SCHOOL, 1834. 

The next session of the School, in the immediate vicinity of Hills- 
borough, under the direction of the subscriber, will commence on the 
first day of July. 

The terms are $75 per session of five months, including Board, Tui- 
tion, Books and Stationary. Well qualified instructors will give les- 
sons in Music and Painting, at the customary charges. 

Hillsboro', June 2, 1834. Will E. Anderson. 

— The Star, Raleigh, June 5, 183 1^. 

FEMALE BOARDING SCHOOL, 1835. 

The next session of the subscriber's school will commence on the 
15th of January, 1835. 

It has been the object of the subscriber to render his school as much 
as possible a 

FAMILY INSTITUTION, 

in which his pupils meet, in every respect, with the same treatment 
to which they have been accustomed at home, so far as consistent with 
a strict though mild discipline. To this end the number of pupils is 
limited. 

The system of studies pursued, comprises every branch of Female 
Education taught in the best Seminaries ; and a solid and thorough 
acquaintance with each, rather than a rapid progress through the whole, 
is aimed at. The small number of our pupils enables us to instruct 
each one separately, adapting the appointed course of studies to their 
respective advancement and ability, in preference to placing them in 
a few large classes, where some must necessarily be superficially taught. 
The higher branches are practically and experimentally illustrated. 

While a close and devoted attention is paid to the cultivation of the 
mind, no less is given to the improvement of the moral and religious 
character, and of manners and deportment. — The system of rewards 
and punishments adopted, is one which excludes every feeling of jeol- 
ousy and rivalry among our pupils, and at the same time, acts as a 
powerful stimulus to exertion, by making the standard of excellence in 
scholarship and deportment, a fixed and certain one which all may 
attain by proper effort, and not dependent on comparative merit, where 
some must necessarily fail. 

The school is situated about a mile from Hillsborough, in a country 



314 Orange County Schools. 

remarkable for health, and ample time is allowed for exercise and 

recreation. The terms are $75 per session of five months, including 
Board, Tuition, Books and Stationary. 

Hillsborough, Nov. 8, 1834. Will E. Anderson. 

N". B. — Instruction in Music and Painting given by experienced and 
competent teachers at the customary prices. 
— The Star, November 13, 183Jf. 

FEMALE BOARDING SCHOOL, 1836. 

The duties of the School at Lochiel near Hillsborough, will be re- 
sumed on the 23d January. The Subscriber intends affording to his 
Pupils every facility of acquiring an Education of the highest char- 
acter, both solid and useful, as well as ornamental. The better to ac- 
complish this object, his number will be strictly limited; and he also 
designs procuring the services of an able female Assistant from the 
North. 

The Pupils of the School are treated in every respect as members 
of a private family, and while their intellectual improvement is sedul- 
ously attended to, a high regard is paid to the cultivation of their 
morals and their manners. Having now had some years experience in 
Teaching, the Subscriber feels confident of being able to place his 
School on a footing with the best Institutions for Female Education in 
the country. The situation of the School, a mile from Hillsborough, 
is one combining every advantage of retirement and health. 

TERMS are $85 per Session; which includes Board, Tuition and 
Books. Music and Painting are separate charges. 

Hillsboro', Dec. 1, 1836. 

The Star and Standard will publish the foregoing, until counter- 
manded ; and the following papers will insert it for 6 weeks each ; viz : 
Newbern Spectator, Fayetteville Observer, Tarboro' Press, Edenton 
Gazette, Warrenton Reporter, and Carolina Watchman. Bills to be 
sent to this Office. William E. Anderson. 

— Raleigh Register, December 27, 1836. 

MURPHY'S LAW SCHOOL, 1831. 

Study of the Law, 

In Hillsborough. 

A. D. Murphy having settled himself in Hillsborough, will receive a 
few Law Students. 
Dec. 10, 1831. 
— The Star, December 16, 1831. 

PHILLIPS' FEMALE SCHOOL, 1838. 

The Subscriber offers to receive into his family, on the 16th of Janu- 
ary, 1837, a limited number of Young Ladies, for the purpose of afford- 



Orange County Schools. 315 

ing them the advantages of a really solid, as well as a useful and orna- 
mental Education. 

The Ladies will be under the personal superintendence of Mrs. PHIL- 
LIPS, assisted by a lady from Mrs. WILLARD'S Seminary at Troy, 
who is recommended as well qualified, both by Education and Expe- 
rience, to teach the English, Latin and French Languages, Arithmetic, 
Euclid, the various branches of Natural Philosophy, Music and Draw- 
ing. 

The number of Pupils is not to exceed twelve. They will board with 
the Subscriber, and be considered as a part of his own family, & their 
conduct, conversation, habits and associates, moral and intellectual na- 
tures, will be carefully watched over, and their best interests promoted 
with the wakeful solicitude of a Parent and the conscientious integrity 
of a Christian. 

It is believed, that the situation of Chapel Hill is amongst the health- 
iest in the State, and that the opportunity now presented of acquiring a 
thorough Education, has claims on the attention of the Parents which 
are not often surpassed. 

The Terms are, two hundred and twenty-five dollars a year, payable in 
advance. As no extra charges, either for Books or anything taught 
at the School, will be made; and as the plan of Education is comprehen- 
sive and one which, in its execution, involves considerable personal sac- 
rifice, it is obvious that but a very moderate compensation is required. 

Further particulars may be made known by making application, either 
personally or by letter, postage paid, to 

Chapel Hill, Nov. 1836. James Phillips. 

—The Register, November 22, 1836. 

MRS. PHILLIPS'S FEMALE SEMINARY, AT CHAPEL HILL. 

The design of this institution, which has been in operation during the 
past year only, is to afford young Ladies all the advantages of a thorough, 
solid, & useful Education. 

Teems. 

Pupils will be received at an early age, and taught for $65 per session, 
in advance. The elementary branches, comprehending Reading, Writ- 
ing, Spelling, etc, with Board, $75, in advance. The same with His- 
tory, Rhetoric, Natural, Moral, & intellectual philosophy, Astronomy, 
Chemistry, Natural History, Geometry, Algebra, and Latin, $85 per 
session. 

French, Drawing & Painting, $20 per session. Music on the Piano 
and Guitar, with the use of the instrument, $25 per session. 

Books and stationary furnished at the store prices. 



316 Orange County Schools. 

The privilege of attending the lectures of the Professors of Natural 
Philosophy, and Chemistry, will be granted to those who are sufficiently 
advanced to be benefitted by them. Landscape Painting and French, 
By Mr. Marey, a French gentleman, at $3 per month. 

James Phillips, 
Pro. Math. & Nat. Phil. 
— Wilmington Advertiser, January 5, 1838. 

PKIVATE FEMALE BOAKDING SCHOOL 

In the Family of Prof. Phillips, 

Oho.pel Hill. 

This School has now been in operation eighteen months, and has suf- 
ficiently proved to its friends the groundlessness of their fears respect- 
ing its location. The many oportunities for mental improvement, af- 
forded by the Libraries, Apparatus and Public Lectures of the Univer- 
sity, present a strong claim to the attention of enlightened Parents and 
Guardians. 

The next Session commences the 16th inst. and will continue five 
months. The price of board and literary instruction, varies from 75 to 
85 dollars per Session. Music and other ornamental branches at the 
usual prices. The French language will be taught orally by Mons. 
Maret, an accomplished French gentleman, who will also give lessons in 
Drawing and Painting. 

Payments, in all cases, to be made in advance. 

Chapel Hill, July 7, 1838. Julia Phillips, Principal. 

— Raleigh Register, July 9, 1838. 

THE YOUNG LADIES' SCHOOL in the family of Professor Phil- 
lips at Chapel Hill, will resume its exercises on the 15th of January, 
1839. The former assurances of unremitting and affectionate endeav- 
ors to promote the moral, intellectual and physical welfare of the Pupils, 
is here repeated. Board, and elementary branches taught for $75 per 
session ; the ornamental, at the usual prices. French and Drawing are 
taught in the most approved manner, by Professor Maray. 

Chapel Hill, Dec. 22. J. Phillips. 

— Raleigh Register, Raleigh, N. C, December 21^, 1838. 

YOUNG LADIES' 

BOABDING SCHOOL, 

At 

CHAPEL HILL. 

The Female School in the family of Professor PHILLIPS will re- 
commence on Monday, the 15th of July. 



Okange County Schools. 317 

The means for affording a thorough education in Literature and 
Science are ample, and the unwearying efforts of the Principal will be 
directed to the promotion of the best interests of her Pupils. 

Music and French taught on the usual terms. 

July 3, 1S39. 

— Raleigh Register, July 6, 1839. 

YOUNG LADIES SCHOOL 
AT CHAPEL HILL. 

The duties of this School will be resumed on Monday, the 6th day 
of January, 1S40. 

The Young Ladies will be thoroughly instructed in the English, 
Latin, Greek and Trench Languages, Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry and 
Natural Philosophy, Natural History, Music (Piano and Guitar,) 
Drawing and Needlework. 

The Young Ladies will be received into the family of the Principal, 
and treated in all respect as daughters, and their intellectual and moral 
natures cultivated with the anxiety, devotedness and affection of a 
Parent. 

The business of the School will be conducted under the superintend- 
ence of the Principal, assisted by competent Instructresses, and no pains 
will be spared to promote the interests of the Pupils. The expense of the 
entire course is $85 per session, exclusive of Music and Drawing, for 
which the usual charges will be made. Those who may wish the English 
course alone will be charged $85 per session. It is requested of those, 
who intend patronizing the School, to make their intentions known as 
soon as possible, that suitable arrangements may be made. 

November 1, 1839. J. Phillips. 

— Raleigh Register, November 2, 1839. 

MOOT PLEASANT ACADEMY, 1837. 

The Spring Session of this institution will commence on the 15th of 
January, 1837. This Academy, situated in the county of Orange twelve 
miles north west of Hillsborough, six miles north of Mason Hall, and 
six miles west of Prospect Hill in Caswell county, offers every facility 
for a complete academical course of education and upon as reasonable 
terms as the high prices of the times will possibly justify. There will be 
two full sessions of five months each in the year. 

The prices for instruction in the first class are five dollars per session, 
and in the second class ten dollars per session. 

The first class among other things comprises the following branches, 
viz. Penmanship, Arithmetic, English Grammar, Geography with the 
use of the Maps, etc. : History, Philosophy, Logic, Astronomy. The 
branches taught in the second class are the Latin, Greek and French 
Languages. 



CIS Orange County Schools. 

At the expiration of the first session there will be a public examina- 
tion, and a vacation of two weeks. The very nattering manner in 
which this institution has been patronized by a generous public lays the 
subscriber under many strong obligations, and produces in him a deter- 
mination neither to spare expenses, pains, nor labour, to render this in- 
stitution in every respect inferior to none of the kind in the State. 

The subscriber is prepared to accommodate twelve or fifteen students 
with board at six dollars per month. Board can be had convenient to 
the academy for any amount of students. 

If any person should wish to correspond with the subscriber upon the 
subject of the Academy, he will please direct to Pleasant Grove post 
office. Daniel W. Kerr. 

Pleasant Grove, Orange, Dec. 1. 

— Raleigh Star, January 12, 1837. 

MOUNT PLEASANT ACADEMY, 1887. 

THE Exercises of this Academy will be renewed again on the 15th of 
January, under the care and supervision of the Subscriber as Princi- 
pal. — The course of Instruction, as heretofore, will embrace all the 
branches usually taught in institutions of this kind. Its location in one 
of the most healthy and moral sections of Orange county, renders it one 
of the most desirable situations for the education of youth. The disci- 
pline exercised is wholly of the parental kind, mild and gentle, though 
strict and careful. Great attention will be paid to the morals of the 
Students committed to the care of the Subscriber. Those gentlemen who 
wish to place their sons or wards in a situation of health, and in one re- 
mote from scenes of dissipation, will find this well suited to their wishes. 

Having procured the services of a competent Assistant for the ensu- 
ing year, the subscriber has been compelled to advance the price of Tui- 
tion, in a small degree in some branches. The following may be re- 
garded as the established prices of the Institution : 

1st Class. Reading, Orthography, Penmanship, Arithmetic, per 
Session $ 5 00 

2nd Class. English Grammar, Geography, History, Philosophy, 

Logic, Astronomy, Chemistry and Rhetoric $ 8 00 

3d Class. The Latin and Greek Languages, Geometry, Algebra, 
&c $12 50 

Each Session, as formerly, will contain five months, at the expiration 
of which there will be a vacation of one month. Board can be had in 
good families, convenient to the Academy, at six dollars per month, each 
student furnishing his own candles. The Subscriber is prepared to ac- 
commodate eight or ten Students with Board. 

Students having gone through a course of studies in this Institution, 
will be prepared for any of our Universities. 

December 12. Daniel W. Kerr, Principal. 

— Raleigh Register, December 18, 1837. 



Orange County Schools. 319 

JUXTO ACADEMY, 183S. 

The Fall Session of the Junto Academy, (formerly Mount Pleasant) 
will close on the 15th of this month. 

The Spring Session will commence on the 15th January next. 
December 6. D. W. Kerr, Principal. 

— Raleigh Register, December 17, 1838. 

JUNTO ACADEMY, 1839. 

This institution, 12 miles northwest from Hillsborough, Orange 
county, 1ST. C, and 6 miles south of Mason Hall, enjoys a location in 
the midst of an agreeable neighborhood, surrounded by a pleasant coun- 
try, which an exceedingly pure and salubrious atmosphere, a peaceful 
seclusion and other important advantages, combine to render peculiarly 
eligible and inviting. Here the student is invited by the prospect of 
study, uninterrupted by ill health, and those other causes which fre- 
quently so much retard the progress of youth. Here the path to virtue 
and honorable distinction lies before him, with few but rural allure- 
ments, to withdraw him from the pursuit, with comparatively few 
temptations to lead him astray. 

The student who comes here is forthwith incorporated into a family, 
which, hitherto, has been a contented and happy one ; over whom a 
parental government is exercised, and a vigilant eye kept. He immedi- 
ately becomes the subject of all a father's solicitude, exertions and 
anxieties. 

As it is designed that this institution shall be a classical school of the 
highest grade, classical literature constitutes a distinct department, 
under the immediate and particular supervision of the Principal him- 
self. Ample provisions are made to prepare students for any of the 
Universities of the country, or to impart to those who design only to 
take an academical course, a thorough acquaintance with classical 
literature. 

The English department, which is separate and distinct, is under the 
direction of an efficient and competent instructor; so that all requisite 
facilities are afforded for the prosecution of such English studies as are 
generally prosecuted in Academies of the highest grade. 

The Principal is now making extensive additions to his accommoda- 
tions for boarders; so that in a short time rooms will be open for 18 
or 20 boarders. Good board can also be procured in the neighborhood. 

Tuition in the Classical Department, per session of 5 months, $12.50. 

English Department, $8 per session. Board per month, exclusive of 
lights, $7.50. The present session will end on the 15th June next. 

Those who may wish to correspond with the Principal of this Acad- 
emy, will please to address him or Postmaster at Junto. 

March 9, 1839. D. W. Kerr. 

—Raleigh Star, March 20, 1839. 



320 Orange County Schools. 

The Fall Session of the Junto Academy will close on the 13th of 
December. 

The Spring Session will commence on the first of February. 

The Classical and English Departments will be kept separate, as here- 
tofore, and the tuition will be the same. 

November 26. Daniel W. Kekk. 

— Raleigh Register, November 30, 1839. 

BURWELL'S FEMALE SCHOOL, 1837. 
FEMALE SCHOOL IN HILLSBOROUGH. 

Mrs. Burwell proposes to open on the 17th of July, a Female School, 
in which she will teach the usual branches of English education. 

For young ladies wishing instruction in music, the services of an 
experienced and well qualified instructress can be procured. Board 
can be had in some of the most respectable families in this place. 

The year will be divided into two sessions, vacations corresponding 
with those in the male academy. 

Drawing and Fainting, $10.00. Payment in advance. 

■ — The Wilmington Advertiser, June 30, 1831. 

FEMALE SCHOOL IN HILLSBOROUGH, 1888. 

The Fall Session of Mrs. BurwelFs School will commence on Monday 
the 16th of July. 

TERMS. 

English Studies $17.50 

French (taught by a native) 15.00 

Music 25.00 

Drawing & Painting 10.00 

REFERENCES. 

Hon. F. Nash, Hillsborough. 

Dr. J. Webb, Hillsborough. 

Rev. F. Nash, Lincoln, N. C. 

Rev. Vm. S. Pltjmer, Richmond, Va. 

Rev. W. M. Atkinson, Petersburg, Va. 

June 14. 

— Raleigh Register, June 18, 1838. 

The Spring Session of the Female School in Hillsborough, under the 
direction of Mr. & Mrs. Burwell, will commence on the 15th January. 

TERMS. 

English Studies $17.50 

Latin 10.00 

French, (taught by a native,) 15.00 

Music 25.00 



Orange County Schools. 321 

Persons wishing further information respecting the school, are 
referred to 

J. W. Norwood, j 

Dr. James "Webb, J- Hillsborough. 

Hon. F. Nash, ) 

Rev. Drury Lacy, Raleigh, 

Dec. 6. 

— Raleigh Register, December 17, 1838. 

FEMALE SCHOOL IX HILLSBOROUGH, 1839. 

The School under the direction of Mr. and Mrs. Burwell, commenced 
its Spring Session, on the 15th inst. No pains or expense will be spared 
to impart thorough instruction in all the branches usually taught in 
Female Schools. The terms per session are, 

English Studies and Latin $17.50 

French, by a native 15.00 

Music . . 25.00 

Drawing 10.00 

The services of Mr. EGIDIUS WINHLER, a native of Germany, 
have been secured, who will give instruction in Music and Drawing. 
Mr. "Winhler's qualifications are of the first order, and Parents may be 
assured that Music and Drawing will be taught thoroughly. A first rate 
Piano has been purchased for the use of the School. 

Persons wishing further information are referred to the following 
gentlemen, most of whom have children or Wards at this School. 

Judge Nash, 
Dr. James "Webb, 
William Cain, Sen'r, 
J. W. Norwood, Esq'r, 
Judge Mangum, Orange. 
Rev. D. Lacy, Raleigh. 
Rev. F. Nash, Lincoln. 
Jan. 20, 1839. 

NeAvbern Spectator and Wilmington Advertiser, will insert the above 
three times, and forward their accounts to Hillsboro'. 
— Raleigh Register, February J h 1839. 

FEMALE SCHOOL IN HILLSBOROUGH. 

The Fall Session of Mr. & Mrs. Burwell's School will commence on 
the first Monday in August. 

English Studies $17.50 

Music 25.00 

Drawing 10.00 

French 15.00 

21 



Hillsboroueh. 



322 Orange County Schools. 

Those desiring more information, are referred to the following gen- 
tlemen, most of whom have children or wards at this School: 

Hon. F. Nash, J 

Dr. James Webb, ( „.,, , , 

T -rrr tv-t -n , / Hillsborougli. • 

J. W. Norwood, Esq'r, I 

W. Cain, sen. Esq. / 

Judge Mangum, Orange. 

Kev. D. Lacy, Ealeigh. 

Kev. F. Nash, Lincoln. 

— Raleigh, Register, June 29, 1839. 

The Spring Session of Mr. and Mrs. Burwell's School for Young 
Ladies, will open on Monday, the 6th of January. 

The Course of Study embraces all the branches of a good English 
Education, the Latin and French Languages. 

Parents and Guardians are referred for particulars to either of the 
following gentlemen : 

Hon. E. Nash, "} 

Dr. James Webb, V Hillsborough. 

Jno. W. Norwood, J 

Hon. W. P. Mangum, Orange. 

Rev. D. Lacy, Raleigh. 

Rev. F. Nash, Lincoln. 

Board can be had in the most respectable Families, and Parents wish- 
ing to place their daughters at School, can hear of Boarding House on 
application to me. 

Music, Drawing and Painting will be taught by a well qualified and 
experienced Teacher. 

Terms as heretofore, 

English Studies $17.50 

Latin 10.00 

French 15.00 

Music 25.00 

Drawing and Painting 15.00 

Nov. 26, 1839. 

— Raleigh Register, November 30, 1839. 

HOLDER'S ENGLISH SCHOOL, 1838. 

The Subscriber intends opening, near his residence, in Orange county, 
on the 15th January next, an 

ENGLISH SCHOOL, 

under his own superintendance. Board and Tuition will not exceed 
$36 per session of 5 months. 



Orange County Schools. 323 

Particular attention will be given to the morals of those who may be 
committed to his care. 

Dec. IS, 183S. Tho. W. Holder. 

— The Raleigh Star, December 26, 1838. 

FAIRFIELD SCHOOL, 1839. 

The Subscriber respectfully informs the Public, that he has taken 
charge of a School at Fairfield, six miles Xorth West of Hillsboro'. 

The first Session will commence on Monday, the sixth of January 
next. 

No pains will be spared to give satisfaction to Parents and Guardians 
who may commit children to his charge. 

TERMS. 

Spelling, Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic, $5 per Session. English 
Grammar and Geography, $7.50 per Session; Ancient Languages, $12.50 
per Session. James P. Clakke. 



WE, the undersigned, as Trustees of the School at Fairfield, deem it 
a duty we owe to the School and the Public, to say that the favorable- 
ness of the situation, as regards health and morals, is surpassed by few, 
if any, in the State. From our personal acquaintance with Mr. Clark, 
and the certificates in his possession, obtained from literary men by 
whom, for several years, he was employed as tutor of their children, 
we consider him worthy of the confidence and patronage of the public. 
Board can be had in the neighborhood in respectable families from 
$6 to $7.50 per month. Ira Ellis, 

David Tinnin, 
0.0. Tnnrar, 
John Bane, 
John Wilkerson, 
Allen Brown, 
Nov. 26. A. Armstrong. 

— Raleigh Register, November 30, 1839. 

UNIOJf ACADEMY, 1839. 

Under the above title, the Subscriber will commence the second ses- 
sion of this School, in the western part of Orange County, on the 15th 
January. 

He has obtained several good Boarding Houses in the neighborhood, 
at which any number of young gentlemen can find accommodation for 
six dollars per month. The Subscriber will board a few himself, at 
this price; exclusive of lights, of course. 



324 Obange County Schools. 

The price for tuition, as heretofore : 

Classical Department, per session $12.50 

English Department, per session 7.50 

The whole under the supervision of the subscriber. 

Dec. 12. John K. Holt. 

— Raleigh Register, December 28, 1889. 



OTHER COUNTY SCHOOLS 

BERTIE UMO> ACADEMY, 1825. 
BERTIE UNION ACADEMY, N. C. 

THE semi-annual examination of the above Institution, took place on 
Thursday and Friday, the 16th and 17th June, in the following order: 

3d Spelling Class, consisting of 3 members. 

2d do do 3 

1st do do 9 

On Walker's Dictionary, 10 

3d Reading Class, 3 

2d do Murray's Introduction, 8 

1st do English Reader, 11 

2d Class on Blair's Catechism, S 

1st do do 8 

2d Class English Grammar, 3 

1st do on Grammar and Xotes, 7 

3d Parsing Class, 7 

2d do do 3 

1st do do 4 

2d Arithmetic Class, 4 

1st do do 6 

2d Geography, 7 

1st do 2 

Latin. Historian Sacrae 2 

Caesar's Commentaries, 2 

Virgil's Aeneid, 2 

do Georgics 1 

Greek. 6 Chapter of the Gospel by St. John, 2 

Acts of the Apostles, 1 

This Institution being in its infancy and no distinctions made, the 
names of the students are not given. The Trustees were highly gratified 
with the performances of the school in general, and cannot refrain from 
expressing their particular approbation of the young Gentlemen com- 
posing the Caesar and Yirgil classes and the Greek classes : they have 
done credit to themselves, and to the unremitted attention of their 
Teacher. 

The Trustees take this opportunity to express their unqualified appro- 
bation of their Teacher, Mr. John D. Tate, a young gentleman, whose 
moral deportment, talents and acquirements, eminently fit him for the 
instruction of youth, and would do credit to any institution. 

( 325 ) 



326 Other County Schools. 

The exercises of the Academy will re-commence on Monday 3d July 
next. Board can be obtained in respectable private houses, at Thirty 
Dollars the Session; Tuition Eight Dollars for the lower branches, and 
Ten for the higher. 

Published by order of the Board, Simon Turner, 

June 25. Sec. pro tern. 

— Raleigh Register, July 8, 1825. 

EDENTON ACADEMY, 1805. 
TO THE PUBLIC. . 

The Trustees of the Edenton Academy, ever mindful of their first 
pledge to the public, that on their part no exertion to render the institu- 
tion valuable service should be spared, have endeavored unremittingly 
to procure such a number of respectable teachers as would insure proper 
attention to the improvement of the youth committed to their charge, are 
now highly gratified at having it in their power to announce, that from 
the quarter commencing on the first day of April, the Academy will be 
under the direction of Doctor Ereeman, assisted by Mr. Hilliard and 
Mr. Nye, who will teach the Greek, Latin, and Erench Languages, Math- 
ematics, Geography, English Grammar, Reading, Writing, and Arith- 
metic. 

The Trustees in their engagements with the teachers, have been gov- 
erned by the confident hope of receiving that share of public patronage, 
to which the superior advantages of the institution entitle it ; the sala- 
ries of Doctor Ereeman, Mr. Hilliard, and Mr. Nye, make an annual 
sum of sixteen hundred dollars, besides the incidental expenses of fire 
wood, repairs, etc., for which the Trustees are bound. 

The advantages upon which the Trustees so confidently rest their 
hopes of public patronage in the first place are, the number and respecta- 
bility of the teachers. Of Doctor Ereeman, it will be sufficient to say, 
his conduct for upwards of two years that he has been in the Academy, 
has entitled him to the warmest approbation and esteem of the Trustees, 
and so far as within their knowledge, given general satisfaction. Of Mr. 
Hilliard and Mr. Nye, they can only say, that these gentlemen have been 
selected by Doctor Freeman, not only from his own personal knowledge 
of their merit, but from the recommendation of a number of respectable 
characters in the towns of Cambridge and Falmouth, in Massachusetts. 

Secondly, the attention which will be paid to the morals and health 
of the youth; seven of the Trustees residing in the town annually form 
a committee, who are appointed to assist the teachers in the government 
of the school, and attend to the accommodation, health, and morals, of 
the students. 

Thirdly, The excellence of the building, so well adapted to the accom- 
modation and comfort of the different classes of students ; its high, dry, 



Other County Schools. 327 

airy situation, and convenience to good water, with a large yard well 
inclosed and shaded. 

Lastly, Experience justifies them in saying the healthiness of the 
town : Of four hundred and sixty students and two who have been at the 
Academy in the four years ending the thirty first day of last December, 
but four deaths have come to the knowledge of the Trustees, and but one 
of these can be attributed to the air of Edenton. The healthy appear- 
ance of the students at the annual examination late in August, has af- 
forded general satisfaction. 

With respect to board, the Trustees recommended it to parents and 
guardians, to board their children and wards, in private families, so 
that they may not be crowded. 

Should the institution be likely to meet proper encouragement and 
any difficulty occur in procuring board, the Trustees are determined to 
commence the next year with sufficient houses to board and lodge com- 
fortably all the students coming from abroad. 

The prices of tuition as heretofore. 

— Halifax Journal, May 13, 1805. 

EUPHKONIAN ACADEMY, 1812. 

The subscriber informs the public that the building of this Academy 
is finished and will be opened for the reception of students on the second 
Monday of next month. The Eev. M. M'Millan is appointed principal 
teacher : a gentleman whose learning and piety ; whose suavity of man- 
ners and correctness of deportment, eminently qualify him for the dis- 
charge of the duties of his appointment. He is an experienced and ap- 
proved instructor of youth. This Academy is situated in the county of 
Moore on the south side of Deep river about one mile from M'Kenzie's 
Store. iSTo situation can be more healthful. At the base of the emi- 
nence on which it stands issues from among the rocks, a pure and 
never failing stream. 

The price of tuition, to be paid in advance, will be, for spelling, read- 
ing, writing and arithmetic, $2.50 per quarter. For English Grammar, 
Latin, Greek, Geography, Natural and Moral Philosophy $4 per quarter. 
Board can be had in genteel and respectable families in the neighborhood, 
including firewood, candles, washing, &c. for $60 per annum or $15 per 
quarter. Those who may think proper to entrust the education of their 
children to the guardians of this Seminary are assured that the utmost 
care will be taken of their morals. 

The abilities and experience of the Principal of the Academy; the 
healthiness of its situation, and the low prices of board and tuition, pre- 
sent the most flattering prospects of success to the friends and patrons of 
this infant institution. Thomas Tyson, 

March 28, 1812. President of the Board of Trustees. 

—The Star, April 11, 1812. 



328 Other County Schools. 

HERTFORD ACADEMY, 1811. 

A Seminary of learning has lately been opened at Murfreesboro called 
the "Hertford Academy" under the superintendance of Doctor Jonathan 
Otis Freeman, a man of learning, and of approved talents as a teacher. 

— Raleigh Star, April 5, 1811. 

LAWBENCEYILLE ACADEMY, 1821. 

The Trustees of the Academy have the pleasure of informing the 
public, that the Academy will be opened on the first day of January, un- 
der the care of a Gentleman from the North, whose name we have not 
yet learned from our agent. Tuition will be at the rate of twenty dol- 
lars per year. They have also the satisfaction of informing the public, 
that the Female Department of the Academy will be opened on the same 
day, under the care of Mrs. Terrell, late of Connecticut. English Gram- 
mar, Geography, Astronomy, Philosophy, use of the Globes, Needle- 
work, and Painting, will be taught at the low price of twenty dollars per 
year. Boarding may be had in the village for seventy-five dollars per 
year. 

By order of the Board. Jno. Christian, Secretary. 

Lawrenceville, Montgomery Co. N. C, December 14th, 1820. 

— Western Carolinian, January 2, 1821. 

LEXINGTON ACADEMY, 1828. 
EXAMINATION. 

THE Examination of the students in Lexington Academy will com- 
mence at 9 o'clock, A. M. on the 31st December. Parents and friends to 
literature are requested to attend. 

December 18, 1828. Absalom K. Barr. 

— Yadkin & Catawba Journal, December 23, 1828. 

MONTPELIEB ACADEMY, 1818. 

The Examination of this Institution took place on Monday the 22d. 
and terminated on Wednesday the 24th instant, under the directions of 
Mr. Mins N. Hope. * * * 

- — Raleigh Register, July 3, 1818. 

MXONTON ACADEMY, 1809. 

DIED, 

On the 10th inst. at Nixonton, Mr. J. Lockwood, the Teacher of the 
Academy. 

— Raleigh Register, September 28, 1809. 



Other County Schools. 320 

ROCKY RIVER ACADEMY, 1827. 
EDUCATION. 

THE old. Rocky River Academy is revived, and opened for the recep- 
tion of classical and. scientific students. It is superintended by the sub- 
scriber, and taught immediately by his son, who has lately finished a reg- 
ular collegiate course. Boarding can be had in respectable families at 
$70 a year, including every appendage, candles excepted. 

June 7th, 1827. J. M. Wilson. 

— Catawba Journal, June 19, 1827. 

SCHOOLS OF ROBINSON AND TYELSON. 

Died, 

At the house of Doctor L. Les Delley, in the town of Havana, in the 
island of Cuba, on the 24th of April, 1823, Doctor Wallace Alexander 
Henderson, eldest son of Maj. Lawson Henderson, of Lincoln county, 
N. C. who was bom in said county on the 2d December, 1799. At the 
age of ten years, Dr. Henderson commenced, reading the Latin Language 
with the Rev. John Robinson, of Cabarrus county ; and finished, reading 
the Latin and Greek languages with the Rev. John M. Wilson, of Meck- 
lenburg county. From thence he was removed to Greenville College, in 
Tennessee, where he obtained a diploma at the age of nineteen. Shortly 
after leaving college, he returned to Lincoln, and commenced the study 
of physic with Dr. William McClean; which he continued afterwards 
with Dr. McKenzie, of Charlotte. After finishing his course, he went 
to the city of New York to attend medical lectures ; where, in the winter 
of 1821-1822, from the severity of that climate, he contracted pulmonary 
consumption. * * * 

— Western Carolinian, June 17, 1823. 

TRENTON FEMALE ACADEMY, 1838. 

The Trustees of this academy would respectfully inform its patrons 
and. the public generally, that the First Session will close on the 15th 
of Dec. next. They would also announce to the public that they have 
engaged, the services of Miss Parker for the ensuing year ; and the sec- 
ond session will commence on the first Monday of January, 1838, and 
close on the 15th of June, ensuing. From the rapid increase of the 
school (numbering about 40 pupils) parents and guardians would do 
well to enter their children and wards early. Board in the families at 
Trenton, at $6 per month. 

Tuition — six, eight, and twelve dollars per session. 

Trustees Hardy Bryan, 

Chas. Gerock, 
J as. C. Bryan, 

F. DtJ-VAL, 

Wm. Htjggins. 

— Wilmington Advertiser. January 5, 1838. 



330 Other County Schools. 

WASHINGTON ACADEMY, 1810. 

We are much gratified at the opportunity which we have of making 
known to the Parents and Guardians of Children, that we have engaged 
the Eev'd James Thompson from Virginia, as Principal Teacher in the 
Washington Academy. * * The next session will commence on the 
1st of October. * * Slade Pearce. 

Sept, 20, 1810. 

— Raleigh Register, October 4, 1810. 

WILLIAMSTON MALE AND FEMALE ACADEMY, 1831. 

Wm. A. Walker respectfully informs the inhabitants of Martin and 
adjoining counties, that the above Institution is now open for the recep- 
tion of pupils. 

Terms. 

Pr. qtr. of 12 weeks. 
Greek, Latin, and sub. branches, $6 00 

English Department, 4 00 

Fuel furnished by Teacher. 
August 15. 
— Raleigh Register, August 25, 1881. 



PERSON COUNTY SCHOOLS 

AKCADIA ACADEMY, 1833. 

ARCADIA SEMINARY 
FOR YOUNG MEN AND BOYS, 

Person County, N. C. 

The exercises of this institution will be resumed on the eighth day of 
January next, under the sole superintendence of the subscriber. The 
course of studies embraces the English, Latin and Greek Languages, An- 
cient and Modern Geography, Mathematics, Natural and Moral Philoso- 
phy, Rhetorick and Logic. Arcadia is sixteen miles west of Oxford, and 
twenty three miles north east of Hillsborough, in an elevated, healthy 
and beautiful part of the country. The situation is retired and rural, 
affording ample room for the innocent and healthful exercise and recrea- 
tion of students ; and the recent establishment of a Post-Office, in connec- 
tion with Warrenton and Danville mail, (which passes regularly six 
times a week,) furnishes every desirable facility for communication by 
letter. The government is mild and parental ; the morals and manners 
of the students are objects of the subscriber's constant attention, and no 
pains are spared to render their situation in his family agreeable and 
comfortable. The price of board and tuition is forty dollars for the 
session of five months, which must be paid in advance. Clothing, books 
and stationery are furnished, if required, at the usual rates. For infor- 
mation in regard to his qualifications, the subscriber refers to the sub- 
joined certificates of Professors Hooper and Mitchell. 

Further particulars may be obtained, on application by letter directed 
to this place. Bex Sumner. 

Arcadia, Person co. N. C. Dec. 10, 1833. 

Chapel Hill, May 21, 1833. 
I hereby certify that Mr. Benjamin Sumner, was distinguished, while 
at College, for his superior scholarship and good conduct ; and that I be- 
lieve, from my recollection of his performance, while at college, and 
from his present character, that he is remarkably well qualified for dis- 
charging the office of teacher of an Academy. 

W. Hooper, Prof. Lang. 
in the University of N. C. 

Mr. Benjamin Sumner, of Person county, N. Carolina, a graduate 
some years since of the University of North Carolina, was pronounced 
by the Faculty the first scholar in the class of which he was a member, 
having been highly successful in the prosecution of his studies in all the 
different branches of learning. He is believed by me to be eminently 

(331) 



332 Person County Schools. 

qualified by his natural talents and disposition, his habits and acquire- 
ments, for the business (the instruction of youth) in which he is at this 
time engaged. E. Mitchell, Prof. 

University of 1ST. C. 31st July, 1833. Chem. Min. and Geology. 

—The Star, December 13, 1833. 

ARCADIA ACADEMY, 

Person County, North Carolina. 

The second session of this Seminary for the present year, will com- 
mence on the 21st day of July next, under the continued supervision of 
the subscriber. The branches of education taught in this institution are, 
the English, Latin and Greek Languages, Geography, Mathematicks, 
Philosophy, Rhetorick, and Logick. Young gentlemen may be prepared 
here for admission into any of our Colleges. The expenses of Board 
and Tuition for the session, (five months), does not exceed Forty-two 
dollars and a half, which must be paid in advance. 

Arcadia, June 14, 1834. Ben Sumner. 

—The Star, June 26, 183k- 

ARCADIA ACADEMY, 

Person County, N . Carolina. 

The First Session of this School for the next Year, will commence on 
the fourth Monday (25th day) of January. The course of Studies em- 
brace those branches of Education which are usually taught in our Acad- 
emies. Boys will be prepared for admission into any College that may 
be desired. ISTo more Students are received into the School than the 
Subscriber himself can superintend and instruct. The situation is a re- 
tired one, and is remarkable for its healthiness, and its exemption from 
the ordinary allurements of dissipation, idleness, and extravagance. The 
charge for Board and Tuition, the next Session, will not exceed Fifty- 
two dollars and a half, which will be required to be paid in advance. 

Arcadia, 20th Dec. 1836. Ben Sumner. 

— The Register, December 27, 1836. 

ARCADIA ACADEMY. 

Person County, North Carolina. 

The second Session of this School for the present year, will commence 
on Monday the 10th day of July next. The price of Board and Tui- 
tion, together, does not exceed Fifty-two dollars and a half per Session, 
payable at the time of admission. 

Arcadia, 12th June, 1837. Ben Sumner. 

—The Register, June 19, 1837. 



Person County Schools. 333 

ARCADIA ACADEMY. 

Person County, N. C. 

The First Session of the above School, for the next year, will begin 
on Monday, 22d day of January. 

The course of Instruction embraces the English, Latin and Greek 
Languages, Ancient and Modern Geography, Mathematics, Philosophy, 
Chemistry and Rhetoric. Young gentlemen will be prepared for admis- 
sion into the Freshman or Sophomore Class of any College in the coun- 
try, which it may be desired they should enter. The boarding scholars 
are limited in number ; they all live with the Subscriber ; and are under 
his sole management and instruction. The highest price for board and 
tuition is fifty-two dollars and a half per session (five months) which 
must be paid in advance. The situation is decidedly healthy, and re- 
markably free from all corrupting influences. 

Arcadia, Dec. 11, 1837. Benj. Sumner. 

— Raleigh Register, December 18, 1887. 

ARCADIA ACADEMY, 

Person County, N. Carolina. 

The Exercises of this School, for the second Session of the present 
year, will commence on Monday, the 9th of July. 

The Course of Studies is usually preparatory to admission into our 
University, but is varied whenever it is desired. 

The price for Board and Tuition, in no case, will exceed FIFTY- 
TWO DOLLARS PER SESSION". 

Arcadia, June 22, 1838. Benj. Sumner. 

Star, two insertions. 

— Raleigh Register, June 25, 1838. 



PITT COUNTY SCHOOLS 

PITT ACADEMY, 1828. 

THE Exercises of this Institution will again commence on the 8th 
of Sept. under the superintendence of Mr. George Stokes. From the 
many testimonials procured by Mr. Stokes, from Trinity College, Dub- 
lin, and from distinguished citizens both of Ireland and of the United 
States; but more especially from an acquaintance with his school, and 
method of teaching for the session past, and the highly pleasing exami- 
nation of his pupils, the Trustees recommend the Institution with the 
utmost confidence to all parents and guardians who are desirous of 
educating their children and wards; and with the highest pleasure as- 
sure them, that in this Institution the common error, (the consequences 
of which are felt through life) of hastening children too rapidly in 
their studies, before they have laid a sufficient foundation in the rudi- 
ments of education, will be carefully avoided. The moral and reli- 
gious uprightness of the Instructor, furnishes the surest pledge for the 
morality of his pupils, at least so far as the influence of example ex- 
tends. 

The terms of admission into the Academy are as follows : 

Children commencing, $3 per quarter; 

Pupils reading, writing, cyphering, with English Grammar and Ge- 
ography, $4; ^ 

Pupils receiving a classical education, $7. 

Board can be procured in town for $5 per month, and cheaper in 
the country. 

By order of the Board. Eichard Evans, 

Greeneville, Aug. 29. Sec. fro tern. 

— Raleigh Register, September 16, 1828. 

GREENVILLE ACADEMY, 1831. 

MALE AND FEMALE ACADEMY, 

Greenville. 

Wm. A. Walker respectfully informs the inhabitants of Pitt & the 
adjacent Counties, that his School is now open for the reception of 

Pupils - Tekms. 

Greek, Latin and the subordinate branches per quarter of 12 

weeks, $7 00 

Geography, English Grammar, Composition, &c, &c, 4 00 

Reading, Writing and Arithmetic, 3 00 

Greenville, June 10, 1831. 
— -Raleigh Register, July 7, 1831. 

( 334 ) 



Pitt County Schools. 335 

FEMALE SEMINARY, 1S85. 

FEMALE SEMINARY, 

Conducted bt Mrs. Saffery, 

In Greenville, N. C. 

Who has adopted for her model, the justly esteemed and much celebrated 
system of Mrs. Willard, the Superior of an establishment for education 
at Troy; varying nevertheless in a few unimportant particulars: and 
while directing her attention to the fundamental studies, she will not 
leave the graces of Refinement disregarded. Mrs. Saffery having re- 
sided nine years in Paris, and its vicinity, can confidently assert, that 
under her tuition, the purest accentuation of French may be obtained, 
and also of Italian: that the cultivation of the Polite Arts, viz., Music. 
Dancing, and Drawing, will form a prominent feature in the school, and 
will each be taught in the highest perfection. 

Terms. 

Day Scholars : — For the introductory or first Class of English studies, 
$9 per term: including Reading, Orthography, Elements of Arithmetic, 
and Writing : should the pupil be old enough for the latter. 

For second Class, $11 — including, with the above, Arithmetic, Gram- 
mar, Writing, and Dictation. 

For third Class, $14 — including Geology, Geography, and History, 
with the above. 

For fourth Class, $16 — including, with the above, use of the Globes, 
Composition, Rhetoric, Logic, Geography of the Heavens, and Euclid's 
Geometry. 

Extra Charges. 

Piano Forte, $15 — use of Piano, $3; Instruction on the Harp, $25 — 
use of Harp, $5; Singing Lessons, $12; Music on the Guitar, $12 — 
use of Guitar, $2 ; French, $10 ; Italian, $10 ; Latin Grammar, $6 ; Danc- 
ing, including Calisthentics, $12 ; Drawing, &c. $8 — use of Patterns, 
$1 50; Lectures on various subjects, $3 per course. 

As early tuition is absolutely necessary to attain a good pronunciation 
in French, young children will pay only five dollars per quarter, for 
instruction in that language: and as some parents object to the practice 
of Dancing, Mrs. Saffrey teaches for six dollars per quarter, a course 
of Calisthentics, calculated to promote a graceful carriage, a good 
walk, and a genteel address. 

Books and Stationary furnished on reasonable terms ; or, if parents 
prefer a stipulated sum, the charge will be $5 50, per term. 

Half a quarter paid in advance ; and interest charged where payments 
are not duly made. 

Pupils are received but with an understanding, that they are to at- 
tend the Examination at the close of the term on which thev enter, and 



336 Pitt County Schools. 

to remain until it be closed ; which will be at the completion of 22 weeks 
from the beginning of the Term. 

The school year, exclusive of vacations, consists of 44 weeks; a Term 
of half the year, or 22 weeks; a quarter of one fourth, or 11 weeks. 

The first Term commences the 3d Wednesday in September next, and 
continues 22 weeks; when after a vacation of two weeks, the second Term 
commences the first week in March, and continues 22 weeks, after which 
there is a vacation of six weeks. 

References to the Trustees of the Greenville Seminary, Reading S. 
Blount, Esq. J. C. Gorham, M. D. G. Stokes, M. D. 

Board may be had on moderate terms, in the most respectable families. 

Greenville, Pitt Co. N. C. Feb. 14, 1835. 

■ — Raleigh Register, April 28, 1835. 



RANDOLPH COUNTY SCHOOLS 

EVANS' SCHOOL, 1S22. 

The subscriber having agreed "with Gen. Gray, Win. Hogan, Esq. and 
other gentlemen of their neighborhood, to teach a School, for one year, 
at a stated salary, with the privilege of taking in eight pupils on his 
own account, would be thankful to any gentlemen who may wish to 
have their sons or wards educated in the Latin or Greek language, for 
their patronage. The price of tuition will be $18 per annum. Board 
may be had at $52. The Seminary will commence about the second 
Monday in December. L. Evans. 

Randolph County, Not. 17, 1822. 

— Western Carolinian, November 26, 1822. 

TROY'S SCHOOL, 1S37. 

NOTICE. 

THE Subscriber has employed a Gentleman of complete qualifica- 
tions, to teach an English School in the neighborhood, twelve months 
from the first Monday in August next — a few boys or young men of 
good character, would be received as Scholars from a distance, and 
board can be had in the neighborhood upon reasonable terms. 

July 8th, 1837. John B. Troy. 

— Southern Citizen, August 8, 1837. 

RANDOLPH FEMALE ACADEMY, 1839. 

RANDOLPH FEMALE ACADEMY. 

THE friends of female education (and we hope they are many) in 
this section of country will be gratified to learn that the citizens of 
Asheboro have agreed and pledged themselves to erect a female Acad- 
emy at this place. A suitable building for the purpose is to be com- 
menced forthwith. As the benefit to be derived from the institution 
will extend through a section of country heretofore destitute, and con- 
sidering that we are mostly mechanics and merchants of moderate capi- 
tal and limited income — consequently not well prepared to raise funds 
for public enterprise, it is confidently hoped and believed that our fellow- 
citizens in this and the neighboring counties will be pleased to extend 
to us such aid as may be within their power. 

A. H. Marsh, Jonathan Worth, George Hoover, Hugh M'Cain, & J. 

M. A. Drake are commissioners for the purpose of raising the necessary 

funds by subscription. The amount of three or four hundred dollars is 

already subscribed by the citizens of this place, which it is thought will 

22 (337) 



338 Randolph County Schools. 

be more than half enough to complete the building. Any person dis- 
posed to contribute can have an opportunity of subscribing by calling on 
any of the above named commissioners. Subscriptions will be required 
to be paid in by instalments, from time, to time, as the money may be 
needed in the progress of the work. 

Asheboro' K C. Nov. 2d, 1838. 

— Southern Citizen, February 8, 1839. 

ASHEBOROUGH FEMALE ACADEMY BEGINS, 1839. 
ASHEBOROtlGH FEMALE ACADEMY. 

We invite public attention to the advertisement of this institution, 
which appears in another column. Great pains have been taken to lay 
the foundation of our Seminary on a firm and durable basis; and it is 
hoped and believed that it will be permanent, and extensively useful, 
not only to the inhabitants of our county and immediate vicinity, but 
also to youth at a distance; particularly in a Southern Direction. Our 
village is situated in a high, hilly, and particularly healthy section of 
country — near to the Back creek and Caraway mountains ; and this 
being a fine grazing country, with good outlet for range of cattle and 
other live stock, our provisions are mostly of the domestic kind — plenty 
of cheese, Butter and Milk, fresh from the cool Recesses of the Dairy. 

— Southern Citizen, June 11/., 1839. 

ASHEBOROUGH FEMALE ACADEMY. 

THE Exercises of the Female Academy at this place will commence 
on Monday the 17th day of June, instant, under the direction of 

MISS ELIZA RAE, 

of Boston. The Trustees believe, from the testimonials she brings with 
her, that she is eminently qualified by her experience, her education and 
in every other respect, to take charge, of such an institution. 

The prices of tuition for a session of five months will be $6 for Spell- 
ing and Reading; $8 for Grammar, Geography and Arithmetic; and 
$10 for Philosophy, Rhetoric, Needlework, &c; and $20 for Music on 
the Piano. Particular attention will be paid throughout to Spelling, 
Reading and Writing. 

This place is believed to be as healthy as any other in the United 
States, and board may be had in any private family in the place at $6 
per month. 

It is intended to give a thorough course of instruction in this institu- 
tion, and to qualify the pupils in every respect to take their places in 
society. 

The Trustees flatter themselves that the distinguished qualifications 



Randolph County Schools. 339 

of the lady who they have engaged to take charge of the School, the 

health of the place, and the low price the inhabitants have consented to 

charge for board, will attract to the institution a liberal share of public 

patronage. J. Worth, 

Hugh McCain, 

„ ,, ) 1 rustees. 

A. H. Marsh, 

June 14, 1839. George Hoover, 

The Cher aw Gazette and Fayetteville Observer will insert 3 times. 
— Southern Citizen, June 1J±, 1839. 

DESCRIPTION OF THE ASHEBOKOUGH ACADEMY. 

We know not the writer of the following communication but we feel 
well assured that it does no more than justice to the merits of our 
worthy Tutoress. And we hope and believe that the appeal which it 
makes in behalf of the institution is well merited and well timed. 

THE ASHEBORO' ACADEMY. 

Mr. Editor: — The writer, on a recent visit to the Female Academy at 
Asheboro', was astonished to find so respectable an institution here. I 
had perceived by some articles in your paper that the inhabitants had 
built a house, and employed a Lady to take charge of the school; but 
knowing that there was no great wealth in the village, and having un- 
derstood that the people of the country had extended little assistance, 
I supposed it must necessarily be rather a patched up concern, and that 
the newspaper account was only the usual puff which is given to newly 
opened Schools. But I was surprised and astonished to find a House 
large enough to accommodate 60 Scholars, built and completely finished 
off, (with the exception of painting,) with 12 large glass windows, and 
every part of the materials of the best quality; and the workmanship 
of the finest order and latest style : and furnished too with the necessary 
seats, tables, and a fine Piano. There is a seat for every two Scholars, 
and a table in front so that every Scholar has her place both for writing 
and her other studies. About $100 more would paint the house and 
provide some other conveniences ; and I was truly gratified to learn that 
the spirited inhabitants of the village were determined to complete the 
undertaking according to the original design, whether they get the as- 
sistance from the country which is usually extended elsewhere, or not. 

The Trustees have been as careful and as liberal in procuring a 
Teacher as they have been in building and providing the house. They 
have employed a Lady from Boston of first rate qualifications. I had 
the pleasure of hearing her exercise some of her classes — and was de- 
lighted to perceive that she is fully competent. The first class she ex- 
amined consisted of some small ones who had commenced 4 months ago 
in the Alphabet. They could read, and read correctly. They spoke 



340 Randolph County Schools. 

loud, pronounced each word with distinctness, and after they had con- 
cluded the reading of their lesson, the tutoress gave out to them some 
of the most difficult words in the lesson, and they spelled them cor- 
rectly — giving a distinct articulation to each letter and syllable. I 
never saw little children so correctly taught. 

The next class examined were some young Ladies who were studying 
Arithmetic. They performed well. This branch I am told is particu- 
larly attended to. Emerson's Arithmetic is used. They are taught the 
four principal divisions of Arithmetic Orally before they make use of 
a slate. This is a delightful and interesting study as taught in this 
School. I understand that great pains is taken by the tutoress to make 
the pupils understand the principles and reasons of their operations. 
They are not permitted to pore over a question they can't understand, 
for an hour or two together. A question is performed by the tutoress 
whenever they commence a new rule; and the principles Orally ex- 
plained and illustrated. When the question is correctly performed on 
Slate, she is not content simply to say, "It is right." She makes the 
pupil explain the reason of each operation occasionally, and thereby 
ascertains whether they performed the operation themselves or procured 
the assistance of those further advanced. She does not use the black 
board, teaching Arithmetic ; the only material defect I observed or heard 
of in the management of the School. It is much the best method of 
teaching Arithmetic. 

I did not hear her examine her classes on Grammar, Philosophy and 
the higher branches; but understand that she is equally careful that 
they thoroughly understand everything they pass over. She is not con- 
tent that a pupil can answer a question in the identical words of the 
book: by oral illustration and conversation she satisfies herself that the 
pupil understands the principles correctly. 

It is of vastly greater consequence that the Scholar understands the 
principle and reasons of any scientific rule, than that she should be able 
to repeat the rule verbatim et literatim. In the former case the under- 
standing is enlightened ; in the latter, the memory only is exercised. In 
the Musical Department Miss Rea, I am told, takes much pains, and is 
bringing forward the young Ladies very rapidly. 

On the whole, this School is particularly deserving public patronage. 
It is a remarkably healthy, orderly village, and board can be had in 
any of the Families at $6 per month. The people of the village take 
great interest in their School, and some of them pay much attention 
to the Scholars, and encourage them in their studies. It is to be hoped 
that the people of the country will assist the citizens of Asheboro' in 
completing their laudable design. A Visitor. 

— Southern Citizen, November 1, 1839. 



Randolph County Schools. 341 

ASHEBOKOUGH ACADEMY EXAMINATION, 1S39. 

The first Session of this Institution closes the present week. The 
public examination of the pupils is going on while our paper goes to 
press. We shall notice the Examination next week. We would also 
invite the Communications of all Visitors whose attendance on the Ex- 
amination may enable them and incline them to remark on the occasion. 

The Exercises will be suspended for a few weeks, we know not at pres- 
ent how long, — to give Miss Rea an opportunity of a brief visit to her 
friends in Boston. 

— Southern Citizen, November 15, 1839. 

ASHEBORO' ACADEMY. 

The exercises in this Institution, so highly satisfactory to those inter- 
ested in the first Session, which closed as we noticed week before last, — 
will be resumed on the first of January next. Terms of Tuition and 
Board will be, we suppose, the same, or very nearly so, as heretofore. 

• — Southern Citizen, November 29, 1839. 

ASHEBOROCGH ACADEMY ANNOUNCEMENTS, 1840. 

ASHEBORO 

Female Academy. 

The exercises of this institution will commence on the 8th of January 
1840, under the direction of 

Miss Eliza Bea. 

The prices of Tuition for a Session of five months will be for Spell- 
ing and Reading $6 ; for the first part of Arithmetic and History, either 
or both including the foregoing, $7 ; For Grammar, Geography and 
Arithmetic $8 ; for Philosophy, History, &c, $10 ; Music on the Piano, 
$20 ; for Wax Flower Work $7 ; Wax Fruit $6 ; the learner to be entitled 
to six pieces of each. 

Boarding including Washing, Candles, Fuel &c, can be had at the 
Rev. Jesse Lawrence's Where Miss Rea boards, or in most of the other 
families of the place, at 6 ; per month. 

The Trustees, during the first Session, could only speak of the quali- 
fications of Miss Rea from recommendations which she brought with 
her from the North ; They can now add, from their own observation of 
the management of the School heretofore, that she will use every exer- 
tion for the advancement of her pupils. 

The Trustees hope that the remarkable healthiness of the place, the 
established reputation of the lady who has charge of the Institution, and 



342 Randolph County Schools. 

the low price of board, constitute sufficient inducements for parents and 
guardians to send to our school. J. M. A. Drake, Sec'y. 

By order of the Trustees, 

January, 1840. 

1ST. B. The prospects of this Institution are such, that an assistant 
Teacher will shortly be bro't on from the North. 
^^TFayetteville Observer insert 4 weeks. 
— Southern Citizen, January 17, 181+0. 



ROBESON COUNTY SCHOOLS 

MOOJT CLIO ACADEMY, 1807. 

The Trustees of Mount Clio Academy beg leave to inform the public, 
that this seminary will be open for the reception of students on Monday 
the 21st day of September next, under the superintendance of Mr. Jacob 
Nelson as principal teacher. The celebrity which Mr. Nelson has justly 
acquired through a long course of experience as a teacher, and his well 
known literary attainments, induces the trustees to hope this institution 
will meet with a sufficient share of public patronage. The situation is 
extremely healthy. 

The rates of tuition will be, five dollars per quarter for the Latin and 
Greek languages, together with the sciences; and four dollars per quar- 
ter for English Grammar. Boarding may be had in decent families in 
the neighborhood at the moderate rate of forty dollars per annum. 

By order of the Board, 

Robeson county, August 28, 1807. James McQueen, Sec'ry. 

— N. C. Intelligencer and Fayetteville Gazette, Friday Oct. 16, 1807. 

IAUEEL HILL ACADEMY, 1810. 

The Trustees of said Academy are happy to inform the Parents and 
Guardians of children that it is now opened for the reception of Students 
under the principal care of Murdoch McLean, a young gentleman of 
character and talents, who is in every way qualified to instruct as a 
Teacher of the Latin and Greek Languages and the Sciences. * * * 
The price of Tuition is $4 per Quarter and $15 per Annum. Boarding 
may be had in very decent families for $35 per year, or $9 per quarter. 

January 10, 1810. John MacFarland, Secy. 

— Raleigh Star, January 18, 1810. 

LAUREL HILL ACADEMY FOR 1813. 

The Trustees feel a pleasure in being able to announce to the public, 
that Mr. McLean, an experienced Teacher, and a young man of integ- 
rity and talents, a Graduate of the University of North Carolina, has 
undertaken the charge for the present year, where Students may be pre- 
pared for any Class in the University. The price of Tuition is $17 per 
annum, if paid in advance, otherwise $20 and Boarding may be had in 
decent families at the moderate rate of $10 per quarter. * * * 

The situation is handsome, and esteemed as healthy as any part of the 
State, affording the earliest opportunity of receiving the public papers 
and other communications by the Mail Stage of the U. States passing 
every other day in the week. 

Jan. 1, 1813. 

— Raleigh Register, January 8, 1813. 

(343) 



344 Robeson County Schools. 

LAUREL HILL ACADEMY FOR 1815. 

The Trustees have the pleasure to announce that that eminent Teacher, 
D. McLaurin, late from South Carolina, did on the 18th instant under- 
take the management of the aforesaid Academy, where the English 
sciences and Classical authors will be taught, and Students prepared for 
any grade in the University at the moderate price of $4 per quarter or 
$15 per annum. * * 1ST. L. MacFarland, Sec'ry. 

Laurel Hill, K C. June 1, 1815. 

— Raleigh Star, June 9, 1815. 



ROCKINGHAM COUNTY SCHOOLS 

LEAKSVILLE ACADEMY, 1S2S. 

THE public are informed that the operations of this institution has 
now commenced; in which are taught the sciences, the Latin and Greek 
languages, and English Grammar at thirty dollars per annum. The 
buildings are spacious and convenient. To this institution is connected 
an English School, in which are taught Reading, Writing, Arithmetic 
and the branches usually taught in English Schools, at twenty dollars 
per annum, payable semi-annually in advance. This Academy is situ- 
ated in a high, healthy, and fertile part of the country, and exempt 
from the diseases incident to most sections of it. Board may be had in 
the most genteel families at from 8 to 12 dollars per month — The sub- 
scriber flatters himself that he will meet with further encouragement, as 
he intends to discharge as faithfully as he can the duties of the institu- 
tion to which he has been called — It may not be improper here to state 
for the information of the young men who may think proper to resort 
to this institution, that there is a debating society composed of the 
young men of this place and its vicinity, which has for its object the 
improvement of the mind; and the collection of a library of valuable 
books. John Sillimax. 

December 1819. 

— The Star, January 28, 1820. 

MADISON ACADEMY, 1820. 

The Trustees of Madison Academy are happy to inform the Public, 
that they have engaged Mr. James Franklin Martin, a late Graduate 
of the University of Xorth Carolina, to take charge of said Academy as 
a teacher. This Academy is situated in the west end of Rockingham 
county, X. C. The Trustees can assure Parents and Guardians that 
Board can be had in good families at $30 per Session. The School will 
commence on the 4th day of July next. 

June 15. Duke Scales, Secretary. 

— Ealeigh Register, June 23, 1820. 



(345) 



ROWAN COUNTY SCHOOLS 

SALISBURY ACADEMY, 1807. 

It is with pleasure that the Trustees of the Salisbury Academy an- 
nounce to the piiblic the revival of a Literary Institution in the town of 
Salisbury. They have procured for the accommodation of the Students 
in a retired part of the town, a large and convenient pile of buildings, 
containing twelve rooms, of which nine are furnished with fire places. 
The Latin and Greek languages, and such branches of science as are 
usually studied in Academies in this country, will be taught here by the 
Rev. John Brown, who has for some Years past been highly and justly 
distinguished for his success as a Teacher in a similar institution at 
Wadesborough. The education of Young ladies in those parts of useful 
learning commonly taught in boarding schools, will also receive that 
attention which is due to its importance. * * In both the Male and 
female departments, particular attention will be paid to the grammati- 
cal construction of the English language, to reading and spelling it cor- 
rectly, and to writing a fair hand. We Trustees are under a strong im- 
pression that however desirable it may be to understand the dead lan- 
guages, a knowledge of our own language should be first principally at- 
tended to, as it constitutes an essential part of polite and useful educa- 
tion. * * The Trustees wish to employ a lady who can be well rec- 
ommended, and no other need apply, to take charge of the female de- 
partment under the superintendance of Mr. Brown. * * 

Salisbury, May 13. Maxwell Chambers. 

—Raleigh Minerva, May 21, 1807. 

SALISBURY ACADEMY EXAMINATION, DECEMBER, 1807. 

The Examination of the Students in the Salisbury Academy, com- 
menced on Thursday the 10th of December, 1807, and closed on the 
Evening of the 11th. 

Richard Smith was examined on the Latin Classics, Greek Testament, 
Criticism, Logic, reading and parsing the English Language, and in 
all these branches of education he was highly approved. In the Latin 
Classics he was singularly correct. 

James Legrand who was a member of this class, was absent with 
leave. 

ON" THE ECLOGUES OF VIRGIL: Win. E. Poe and Thomas 
Ellerbe were examined and much approved. Daniel Barringer a mem- 
ber of this class, was absent on account of sickness. 

ON" 1STEPOS : Johnson Pinkstone, James Torrence, and Alfred 
Macay performed to the perfect satisfaction of the Trustees. 

ON" ERASMUS : William Stewart, John L. Beard, John Beard, and 
Hugh M. Stokes were greatly approved. 

(346) 



Rowan County Schools. 347 

ON MORSE'S GEOGRAPHY: Charles Fisher, Otho Chambers, 
Michael Brown, and James Cowan displayed uncommon proficiency for 
the time they have been engaged in this study. Were any distinction 
made, it ought to be in favor of Charles Fisher. 

ON GUTHRIE'^ GEOGRAPHY: Hugh Torrence was examined 
alone and approved. 

ON READING AND PARSING THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE : 
Hugh Torrence, "William Stewart, William E. Poe and Thomas Ellerbe, 
were all much approved. 

SECOND CLASS ON THE SAME : Charles Fisher, Otho Cham- 
bers, Andrew Springs, James Cowan, Michael Brown, and Zachariah 
Ellerbe gave the trustees perfect satisfaction. 

THIRD CLASS ON THE SAME: Johnstone Pinkstone, James 
Torrence, Alfred Macay, John L. Beard, John Beard, and Hugh M. 
Stokes did themselves much credit. 

ON RECITING ENGLISH GRAMMAR : Hugh Torrence, William 
Stewart, Andrew Springs, Michael Brown, Otho Chambers, Charles 
Fisher, and James Cowan, were all very correct. Hugh Torrence ap- 
peared, however, superior. 

SECOND CLASS ON THE SAME : William Poe, Zachariah El- 
lerbe, Thomas Ellerbe, Alfred Macay, and James Torrence, were all re- 
markably prompt and accurate. 

THIRD CLASS ON THE SAME: Johnston Pinkstone, John L. 
Beard, John Beard, and Hugh M. Stokes were perfectly correct. 

ON ASSEMBLY CATECHISM: Andrew Springs, Wm. Stewart, 
Hugh Torrence, James Torrence, James Cowan, Otho Chambers, and 
Johnston Pinkstone discovered much skill and promptitude. 

ON CHURCH CATECHISM: Charles Fisher, Michael Brown, 
John L. Beard, John Beard, and Hugh M. Stokes, were very accurate. 

ON ARITHMETIC: Andrew Springs, William Stewart, Charles 
Fisher, James Cowan and Zachariah Ellerbe, were all correct. Andrew 
Springs was distinguished. 

IN WRITING AND COMPOSITION: All the young gentlemen 
exhibited samples of their performance. In most of them, the trustees 
perceiving germs of opening genius and eloquence, which, they fondly 
hope, will in due time adorn and enrich our land with the noblest fruits 
of virtue and learning. 

This closed the examination of the young gentlemen, and the trustees 
then proceeded to that of the young ladies. 

ON ARITHMETIC : Sarah J. Alexander, Mary E. Trotter, Clem- 
entina M. Brown, and Fanny M. Alexander were examined and highly 
approved. 

The same young Ladies with the addition of Eliza Steele and Polly 
Castillo, were examined on English Grammar, Reading, Spelling and 
Parsing, the English language and Catechism, and acquitted themselves 
in a manner that did them the highest honor. 



348 Rowan County Schools. 

Elizabeth Torrence and Jane Brown were examined on Reading, 
Spelling and Catechism and were highly approved. 

All the young Ladies of the Academy furnishing the Trustees with 
specimens of their writing and composition in the form of letters. They 
displayed a neatness and beauty of hand-writing, an ease and grace of 
narration, and an elegance and correctness of style that were really cap- 
tivating. Indeed, without assuming the Language of undeserved com- 
pliment, the Trustees must declare the young Ladies shone in all their 
studies with peculiar lustre. 

The Trustees cannot close this report without expressing their high- 
est approbation of the conduct of the Reverend Mr. Brown. To the 
zeal, fidelity and ability with which he has managed and superintended 
the Academy, they are indebted for the proficiency of the students, and 
for that love of order and good morals which mark their conduct. The 
vacation which is about to take place, will last to the first Monday in 
January. The Trustees beg leave to assure the public that no exertion 
shall be wanting in them to make the Academy over which they preside 
as flourishing as possible. It shall be their anxious and persevering 
endeavor to render it a nursery of genius, of eloquence and virtue. 

—The Raleigh Minerva, December 2Jf, 1807. 

SALISBURY ACADEMY LOTTERY, 1814. 

(By act of the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina) 
Scheme of the Salisbury Academy Lottery. 

% % i'fi % % . i'fi Hs 

The Legislature have placed the management of it in the hands of the 
"Salisbury Thespian Society," who conformable to the act of Assembly, 
have executed bond for the faithful payment of all prizes, and for the 
appropriation of the profits accruing, to the contemplated purpose. 
* * * Moses A. Locke, 

Charles Fisher, 
Aex. Graham, } Managers. 
S. L. Ferrand, 
Salisbury, Sept. 23, 1814. Tho. L. Cowan, 

— Raleigh, Register, October 21, 1811/.. 

SALISBURY ACADEMY WANTS A TEACHER, 1814. 

A TEACHER WANTED 
IN THE SALISBURY ACADEMY. 

The main Building of the Salisbury Academy will be completed, and 
ready for the reception of a school by the 1st of January. In the in- 
terim, the Society, under whose direction the Institution is, are desirous 
of engaging a Person properly qualified to take charge of the Academy; 



Rowan County Schools. 349 

and also as a Preacher of the Gospel, to attend, to an adjacent Congre- 
gation. * * * John Fulton, 

¥m. C. Love, 

Dec. 10. Chs. Fisher. 

— Raleigh Register, December 23, 1811+. 

LADY TEACHERS OF SALISBURY ACADEMY, 1818. 

SALISBUKY FEMALE ACADEMY. 

On the first Monday in January next, the exercises of this Institu- 
tion will commence under the superintendance of Miss Slater and Miss 
Mitchell, two young ladies who have been procured from New York. 
The Trustees can say with truth, that those two Young ladies are emi- 
nently qualified to teach the various literary and ornamental branches 
of female education. Thos. L. Cowan, Sec'y. 

December, 1817. 

— The Star, and N. C. State Gazette, January 16, 1818. 

THE SALISBUEY ACADEMY. 

* * * Besides the large and elegant building on Academy Square, 
provided for the Males, a very convenient House has been prepared for 
the Young Ladies. The Male Department is at this time without a 
Teacher; a liberal Salary would therefore be given to a person to take 
charge of it, that was well qualified and well recommended. 

In the Female Department, the Exercises are now commenced. The 
Ladies who have the superintendance of it are from the City of New 
York. To the care of Miss Slater, are intrusted the following branches 
of Education, to wit : Reading, Writing, English Grammar, Geogra- 
phy and the Use of the Globes ; Belles Lettres and History. To the di- 
rection of Miss Mitchell, are confided the ornamental parts of Educa- 
tion, to wit : Drawing, the higher kinds of Needle-Work, Painting, and 
Music. * * * T. L. Cowan, Secy. 

— Raleigh Register, April 10, 1818. 

SALISBURY ACADEMY ODER R. L. EDMONDS. 

The Exercises of the male Department of this Institution will com- 
mence on the 6th of July next, under the superintendance of Robt. L. 
Edmonds, A. M. Mr. E. was educated in the University of Glasgow, 
Scotland — he will teach all the branches of English, Classical, Mathe- 
matical and Philosophical Literature which are taught in Universities, 
together with the French language, if required. He has for several 
years past had charge of the Academy at Norfolk. * * * 

Salisbury, June 16. Thos. L. Cowan, Sec'ry. 

— Raleigh Register, June 26, 1818. 



350 Rowan County Schools. 

EDUCATION 

* * * The Subscriber (being resolved to leave Salisbury at the 
termination of the present Session) wishes to obtain a situation as Prin- 
cipal of a Seminary for the ensuing Year. As Mrs. Edmonds super- 
intended the Female Department in the Norfolk Academy for five years, 
a Male and Female Seminary connected, would be preferred. 

The Subscriber received his Education in the University of Glasgow, 
Scotland, attended Trinity College, Dublin, one year, and has for the 
last twelve years, been engaged in teaching all the branches of a Classi- 
cal, Mathematical and Philosophical Education which are taught in 
College. Robert L. Edmonds, A. M. U. D. N. 

Salisbury, Nov. 9, 1819. 

— Raleigh Register, November 19, 1819. 

EDUCATION. 

The subscriber respectfully informs the Citizens of Salisbury and the 
the adjacent country, that he will open a private Seminary, in this place, 
on Tuesday the 6th instant. Young Gentlemen will be carefully taught 
the Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and French Languages; together with Pros- 
ody, History, Geography, and Antiquities, connected with the Classics — 
Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, Book-Keeping (according to the true 
Italian method) English Grammar, Composition, Geography, with the 
Use of the Globes and Maps, Elocution, Elementary and Practical parts 
of Mathematics, Rhetoric, Belles Letters, Moral and Natural Phil- 
osophy, Astronomy, etc. 

Persons intending to place Children in this Seminary, will greatly 
facilitate their progress, by sending them early in the session. 

Salisbury, July 5. Robert L. Edmonds, A. M. 

— Raleigh Register, July 16, 1819. 

SALISBURY ACADEMY EXAMINATION, 1819. 

REPORT OF THE EXAMINATION OF THE SALISBURY FE- 
MALE ACADEMY, SECOND SESSION, 1819. 

THE examination commenced on Wednesday the first, and closed on 
Friday, the third of December. The students, generally, manifested 
such accuracy and readiness in the course of a very strict and impartial 
examination, conducted by the ladies who had them in charge, in the 
presence of the Board of Trustees and a large and respectable audience. 
The Board were satisfied that the exhibition was not conducted upon 
any previous selection of particular passages of pupil's studies, upon 
which their skill was tried, but promiscuously through the various 
branches on which they had been taught during the season. 

The fifth, or lowest Class, were examined on spelling in two syllables, 
and reading from the spelling-book. 



How an County Schools. 351 

The fourth, on reading from Goldsmith's History of England, on 
Murry's abridgment of the English Grammar, and Willet's abridgment 
of the Geography of the United States. 

The third class appeared on English Grammar, parsing, reading from 
Goldsmith's History of Rome, Willet's abridged Geography of Asia and 
Africa, and on the map of the World. 

The second Class read from Thompson's Seasons ; were examined on 
English Grammar, parsing, correcting instances of false Grammar, Ge- 
ography, the use of the Globes, and elements of Astronomy. 

The first Class read and parsed from Cooper's Task; shewed speci- 
mens of writing; were examined on the rules of perspicuity and preci- 
sion in composition, and the exercises corresponding with them; 
Cumming's abridgment of the Geography of Europe; the maps of Eu- 
rope, Asia, Africa, and America, together with the map of the World, 
by Arrowsmith ; on the use of the Globes ; Elements of Astronomy, Rhet- 
oric and Moral Philosophy, and on Arithmetic, 

There were produced various elegant and tasteful specimens of Draw- 
ing, Painting, Embroidery, Fancy and Needle Work; and a variety of 
pleasing exhibitions upon the Piano Forte. 

The Board again repeat to Miss Eliza Slater and to Miss Mary Ann 
Slater, the increased obligations they are under to them for the ability, 
faithfulness and care with which they have presided over the learned 
and useful branches of education submitted to them. 

They reiterated to Miss Mitchell, likewise, their increased obligation 
to her for her eminent skill and zealous attention in the conduct of the 
ornamental branches. 

The next session commences on the first of January. The course of 
studies will be the same as heretofore taught in the school, which is still 
under the conduct of the same ladies. The Trustees take a pleasure in 
recommending to the public this Institution, for the great accuracy 
which the students are taught. It is not to read, but to understand what 
is read, which forms the great disideratum of education. To attain 
this object, constitutes the leading feature in their plan. They expected 
that the Male Academy would have been opened on the first of January 
likewise, and that the reverend gentleman would have occasionally vis- 
ited the Female School; but owing to a disappointment, this plan, so 
desirable to the Trustees, cannot be effected before the end of the pres- 
ent quarter. Thomas L. Cowan, Secy. 
—The Star, February 18, 1820. 

SALISBURY ACADEMY EXAMINATION, 1S20. 

SALISBURY ACADEMY. 

THE semi annual examination of the Students of the Male and Fe- 
male Academies will commence on Tuesday, the 13th of June next, and 
close on the Friday following. Parents and guardians are respectfully 
invited to attend. 



352 Rowan County Schools. 

The exercises will re-commence on the 5th of July. All the branches 
usually taught in Academies, are attended to in these. 

In the Female Department, Miss Mitchell continues to superintend 
the ornamental, and the Misses Slaters the literary branches. 

Mr. Munro remains at the head of the Male Department. 

Salisbury, N. C. May 12, 1820. Thos. L. Cowan, Beefy. 

—The Star, May 26, 1820. 

SALISBURY ACADEMIES. 

The Examination of the pupils of these Institutions commences this 
day, and will close on Friday evening, the 17th. instant. 
June 13, 1820. 
— Western Carolinian, June 13, 1820. 

THE EXAMINATION 

Of the students of the Academies in this place, terminated on Thursday 
evening last. We had not ourselves an opportunity of attending it ; but 
we learn from those who were present during each day that the pupils 
of both institutions acquitted themselves in a manner highly creditable 
to their teachers, to their own progress, and to the entire satisfaction 
of the Board of Trustees. The report of the examination was publicly 
read on Friday, and is now published in this day's paper. 

On Thursday evening, the young gentlemen of the town performed in 
a very handsome style, the comedy of "A cure for the heart ache," and 
the afterpiece, "Fortune's Frolic." The proceeds of the night, as usual, 
go to the benefit of the Academies. They were assisted in the perform- 
ance by Mr. and Mrs. Hannam, from the north, who very obligingly 
offered their services on that occasion. 

The exercises of the Academies will be resumed on Monday, the 6th 
of July. 

— Western Carolinian, June 20, 1820. 

REPORT 

Of the Examination of the Pupils of the Salisbury Academies. 
Female Department. 

1st Class — Composed of Eliza Dews, Catharine Chambers, Ellen 
Chambers, Margaret Krider, Catharine Huie, Betsey Frohock, Sally 
Baily, Mary Ann Verble, Charlotte Cowan. This class was examined 
on reading, and on spelling from the book words of two and three sylla- 
bles. Eliza Dews is considered rather the best; but the whole of the 
class acquitted themselves in a very handsome manner. It is due to 
Charlotte Cowan to mention, that she has been at school less time than 
either of the other members of this class. 

2d. Class — Consisting of Laura Troy, Rebecca Wood, Harriot Long, 



Rowan County Schools. 353 

Nancy Chambers, Martha Dews, Mary Polk, Crissy Mull, Mary Hamp- 
ton. This class was examined on reading in Murray's English Reader, 
and on spelling from the book. It is considered that Rebecca Wood 
and Harriot Long are rather the best. We could also mention Mary 
Polk and Laura Troy; but the whole of this class performed their exer- 
cises in a manner quite to the satisfaction of the Trustees. 

3rd. Class — Composed of (1st. Division) Elizabeth Martin, Catharine 
Devanport, Susan Hughes, Letitia Lindsay, Sarah Causey, Letitia Wil- 
son, Eliza Miller, Mary Trent, Mary A. McConnaughey, Antoinette 
Huie, — (2nd. Division) E. A. Braicy, Margaret James, Mary A. Mc- 
Cracken, Eliza Home, Mary James, Beatrice Mathew, Elizabeth Jem- 
meson. Both divisions of this class were examined together, on read- 
ing in the History of England, and on Willet's abridged Geography, 
except Mary Jemmeson, who appeared on reading only ; and the 1st. 
division was farther examined on the Geography of Asia, Murray's 
English Grammar, parsing, and correcting false syntax. In reading, 
Susan Hughes and Mary Trent are considered the most correct, and 
Beatrice Mathews but little inferior. In Geography Catharine Devan- 
port and Letitia Wilson appeared most acquainted. In Grammar, 
Eliza Miller is entitled to the first notice. The whole of this class 
evinced great proficiency in the various branches of their studies, and 
merit the warmest approval of the Trustees. 

4th. Class — Consisting of Ann Lindsay, Mary G. Allen, Rebecca Ful- 
ton, Ann E. Lindsay, Ellen Fulton, Carolina Johnston. This class was 
examined on reading in the History of America, parsing, and correct- 
ing false sentences under notes of syntax: On Cumming's Geography 
of North-America and the United States, with the history of our gov- 
ernment: On the use of the Globes, and the Elements of Astronomy, 
except Caroline Johnston, who was absent on account of indisposition. 
Ann E. Lindsay and Ellen Fulton are considered the most correct and 
graceful readers. On all their other studies, their examination was 
highly pleasing to the Trustees, and so nearly equal to each other, as 
to make it difficult to draw distinctions — they are all declared equal. 

A class, composed of Mary Trent, Eliza Miller, Ellen Fulton, and 
Susan Hughes, was examined on a Compend of Universal History, and 
acquitted themselves with great credit, and are highly approved. Mary 
Trent is considered a little the best. 

5th. Class — Consisting of Margaret Moore, Mary Frohock, Eliza 
Hall, Dovy Johnston. These young ladies were examined on reading 
in the History of America ; rules of punctuation and versification ; the 
Geography of Europe ; Questions on Government, Religion, and the 
most remarkable Empires that have existed. — The Trustees attended to 
the performance of this class with particular gratification. They 
were ready and accurate on each branch of their studies, and so nearly 
equal that the Trustees forbear to make any kind of distinction ; if any 
should be made, Eliza Hall is entitled to it, on reading. 
23 



354 Rowan County Schools. 

6th. Class — Susan Fulton, Susan Giles, Jane Henderson, Eliza Har- 
ris, Martha Trent. These young ladies were examined on reading on 
the History of Greece ; on Ancient Geography, Moral Philosophy, and 
the first volume of Karnes' Elements of Criticism, and on the Globes, 
except Martha Trent, who did appear on the Elements of Criticism. 
The Trustees take particular pleasure in mentioning the progress and 
proficiency of these young ladies on all the branches of their studies. 
The extent and accuracy of their acquirements are highly creditable 
to themselves, and do great honor to the attention and qualifications 
of their instructress. They are so nearly equal, as to make it not only 
difficult, but invidious to point out distinctions. 

Arithmetic. — The following young ladies : Ann Lindsay, Eliza Hall, 
Ann E. Lindsay, Ann McConnaughey, Dovy Johnston, Margaret Moore, 
Letitia Lindsay, Sarah Causy, Rebecca Eulton, Catharine Devanport, 
Mary G. Allen, Caroline Johnston, Letitia Wilson, Elizabeth Martin, 
were examined by a committee of the Trustees on Saturday, the 10th. 
inst. on Arithmetic; and much to the gratification of the committee, 
discovered that they had made considerable progress in this useful and 
indispensable branch of education. No distinction is made, but all ap- 
proved. 

Music. — Susan Hughes, Ann E. Lindsay, Margaret Moore, E. A. 
Braicy, Eliza Harris, Mary G. Allen, Letitia Wilson, Elizabeth Mar- 
tin, Jane Henderson. These young ladies performed a number of 
pieces, some of them very difficult, -en the- Piano Porte. They displayed 
considerable proficiency in the rudiments of this elegant and pleasing 
science. They all executed their pieces in a style that was very cred- 
itable to their tastes and skill, and equally flattering to the feelings 
of the Trustees. Where all did so well, the Board are unwilling to 
draw shades of distinction, which it would be difficult to do, when it is 
considered that some of these young ladies have been engaged in this 
branch for a greater length of time than others. 

Painting. — Miss Elizabeth Harris ; one colored landscape, part of 
another, and painted cape. Martha Trent ; a colored landscape. Cath- 
arine Devanport; one colored landscape, and two shaded with Indian 
ink. — Eliza Lindsay; two landscapes shaded with Indian ink, a large 
one drawn, and a painted trimming. Mary G. Allen; a colored land- 
scape, two shaded with Indian ink, a painted trimming and work-bag. 
Letitia Wilson, a bunch of flowers, two landscapes shaded with Indian 
ink, a painted trimming. Rebecca Pulton; a colored landscape, and 
four shaded with Indian ink. Ann Lindsay; two landscapes shaded 
with Indian ink and one colored one, two painted trimmings. Ann 
McConnaughey; two landscapes. Sarah Causey; two landscapes shaded 
with Indian ink, a flower piece, and painted trimming. Letitia Lind- 
say ; four landscapes shaded with Indian ink. 

Embroidery and Fancy Work. — Miss Susan Giles: 1 piece of em- 
broidery. Eliza Lindsay: 1 do. Susan Fulton: 1 do. Jane Henderson: 



Rowan County Schools. 355 

a shell work temple, a pair of card racks. Catharine Devanport ; a 
work-box frame, a temple unfinished. Letitia AVilson: a temple un- 
finished. Caroline Johnston : a pocket-book and work-box. Dovy 
Johnston : a pocket-book and work-box. Eliza Hall : a pocket- 
book and work-box. The Trustees are unwilling to draw nice and 
critical distinctions between the merits of the respective pieces of 
Painting, Embroidery, and Fancy Work that have been exhibited for 
examination. There is little necessity for this, since the pieces them- 
selves were arranged in the ornamental department, during several days, 
for the inspection of parents and guardians, and all others whose taste 
or curiosity might lead them to the Hall. The task of discrimination 
becomes still more difficult, when the ages and opportunities of the sev- 
eral young ladies are considered ; some of them having been a much 
longer time than others engaged in these branches of ornamental edu- 
cation. The Trustees take great great pleasure in saying, that all the 
young ladies of this department have done much credit to themselves, 
and by their progress have reflected particular honor on the accom- 
plished young lady who directs their studies. The Board of Trustees 
cannot close this report, without the particular expression of their ap- 
probation for the able and assiduous manner in which the Misses Sla- 
ters and Miss Mitchel have conducted the concerns of this Institution. 
Their care to improve the minds, to preserve the morals, and to refine 
the manners of their pupils, entitle them to the warmest thanks of the 
Trustees, and merit the grateful reward of the parents and guardians 
of their tender charges. 

Male Department. 

1st. Class. — John Murphy, James Huie, Tobias Lemley. This class 
of small boys was examined in spelling, from Webster's spelling-book, 
and did very well. 

2nd. Class. — Warren Huie, Archibald Henderson, Henry A. Lemley, 
John Stirewalt. This class was examined on spelling, from Walker's 
dictionary, and was much approved. To this class belong Robert Huie 
and Alfred Huie, who were absent from indisposition. Henry Earn- 
hart, a member of this class, was absent without permission. 

3rd. Class. — Archibald Henderson, David Kerr, Warren Huie, Henry 
Lemley, Leonard Henderson, Gustavus Miller. This class was exam- 
ined on spelling, from Walker's dictionary, and on reading from Mur- 
ray's English Reader, except Leonard Henderson, Gustavus Miller, and 
William Murphy, who did not spell with this class : Warren Huie is 
thought the best speller, Murphy and Miller the first readers : the rest 
are much approved. 

4th. Class. — William Murphy, Pleasant Huie, Thomas Frohock, Milo 
A. Giles, Richard Long, Tho. Dews, Lewis G. Slaughter, Leonard Hen- 
derson, David Kern, James Beckwith. This class was examined in 
spelling, from Walker's dictionary, and on reading from the History 
of Rome, except Murphy, Henderson and Kern, who did not read with 



356 Rowan County Schools. 

this class. These boys acquitted themselves in a manner highly honor- 
able to the class. 

5th. Class. — Thomas Frohock, Gustavus Miller, Leonard Henderson. 
This class was examined on parsing, from the History of Rome. The 
committee was much pleased with their promptness and accuracy. 

6th. Class. — Leonard Henderson, Gustavus Miller, Thomas Dews, 
Richard Long. This class was examined on Corderii, Erasmus, and 
Selectee e Veteri, except Henderson and Miller, who appeared on Cor- 
derii only. This is a good class, and so nearly equal, the committee for- 
bear to make any distinction. 

7th. Class. — James Beckwith, Milo A. Giles, Lewis G. Slaughter. 
This class was examined on Caesar's Commentaries, Bucolicks, and 1st. 
^Eniad of Virgil. This class, for the time they have been engaged, 
gave proofs of industry and attention : they receive the warm approba- 
tion of the Trustees. They are declared equal. The Trustees take 
pleasure in acknowledging the care and attention of Mr. Monroe, in ad- 
vancing his scholars in their various studies. He deserves much credit, 
and receives the thanks of the Board. 

The exercises of the Academies will be resumed on the first Monday 
in July ensuing: the literary branches under the care of Misses Eliza 
and Mary Ann Slaters, and the ornamental department under the super- 
intendence of Miss Mitchel. Mr. Monroe will continue in charge of the 
male department. Thomas L. Cowan, 

June 17th, 1820. Secretary of the Board of Trustees. 

— Western Carolinian, June 20, 1820. 

SALISBURY FEMALE ACADEMY. 

Messrs. Krider & Bingham — I last week attended at the examination 
of our Female Academy ; and were I to give vent to the exhuberance 
of my feelings at beholding the girls exhibit such proofs of advance- 
ment in literature, in the useful acquirements of domestic life, and in 
the elegant accomplishments of refined society, I should involuntarily ex- 
claim to them, individually, with the poet, 

"Though your body be confined, 
And soft love a prisoner bound, 
Yet the beauty of your mind 

Neither check nor chain hath found." 

The exercises were such as to reflect a high degree of commendation 
on the industry and application of the pupils, and the highest credit on 
the Instructresses, for the faithfulness and ability with which they have 
conducted the school. I think that the evidence of improvement ex- 
hibited by the young ladies on their examination, could not fail to real- 
ize the fondest anticipations of their relatives. 

Are there any parents, who viewed the progress of their daughters in 
the accomplishments and elegancies of life ; bidding fair to reward them 



Eowaist County Schools. 357 

for all the paternal care and solicitude with which they have watched 
over them from their cradles — to prove an ornament to their families, 
and a solace and a blessing to their old age, without their hearts swell- 
ing with a native pride and an inward exultation ? Are there any 
young ladies, not belonging to the Academy, who attended at the exami- 
nation, who did not feel a spirit of emulation involuntarily rise, and an 
honest pride actuate them, at beholding the truly noble performance of 
their sex? And are there any young gentlemen who witnessed the ex- 
amination, whose hearts were not transported with esteem and respect, 
and who were not ready to exclaim : 

"Better sex ! yours was the noble birth ; 
"For you of man were made — man but of earth. 
"Best work of the creation ! brutes should do 
"Homage to man; but man shall bow to you" 

And were there any present, whose hearts are either by nature cal- 
lous, or which have been rendered so by disappointment; whose dispo- 
sitions have been soured by celibacy, and who are ever ready to under- 
rate the capacity of the female mind, with respect to literary acquire- 
ments? If there were, let them "come unto me," and I will pledge 
myself to eradicate that spirit of envy and detraction which rankles in 
their breasts. I will show them from history, that women have at- 
tained to the highest celebrity in literary acquirements. I will show 
them, that, in the 13th. century, a young lady of Italy made such prog- 
ress in her studies, that at the age of 23 she pronounced a funeral ora- 
tion in Latin, in the great church of Bologna; at the age of 26, she 
took the degree of Doctor of Laws, and began publicly to expound the 
Institutions of Justinian ; and at the age of 30, her great reputation 
raised her to a chair, where she taught the law to a prodigious con- 
course of scholars from all nations ; but such was the power of her elo- 
quence, that her beauty was only admired when her tongue was silent. 
There have been many other illustrious women in Italy. And in Spain, 
Isabella of Bosea preached in the great church of Barcelona ; went to 
Borne, and converted even the Jews by her eloquence. The brilliancy 
of the thrones of Bussia, Spain and England have been heightened by 
illustrious women who sat upon them. There are instances of great 
and expanded minds among the women of our own country : Miss Bam- 
say, (daughter of the late Dr. Bamsay,) of Charleston, S. C. assumed 
the practice of medicine, after the decease of her father, and has been 
extensively useful in some branches of practice ; by means of which she 
contributes largely to the maintenance of the family — the Dr. having 
been rather embarassed in his pecuniary concerns at his demise. And 
I will, moreover, show them, if they are not so wilfully blind as to re- 
fuse to see, though it should be reflected in their faces like the reful- 
gent beams of the Sun of Heaven, that woman was not made solely for 
man's use — as a mere plaything, or a pretty piece of furniture. 

You may suppose, Messrs. Editors, from my zeal in their cause, that 



358 Rowan County Schools. 

I am some love-enraptured devotee to the female sex. But I am no 
such thing — and perhaps I shall, some day, convince you of it. No — 
I only wish to show the utility, and, as I verily believe, the necessity of 
giving our young females a general education, adapted to all the con- 
cerns and vicissitudes of human life — that we may see rise up from 
among them intelligent, virtuous, accomplished, and amiable women, at 
once the ornament and honor of an elightened society. 

Believing the Salisbury Female Academy, from the skilful and ju- 
dicous manner in which it is conducted, to be eminently calculated to 
give a young lady a finished education, I would heartily recommend it 
to those parents and guardians, of this and the adjoining sections of 
country, who have the care of the education of young females. The 
new building, which is now erecting, will add much to the pleasantness 
and convenience of the school. Alfred. 

Salisbury, June 19, 1820. 

[A pencil note says this article was written by Philo White.] 
— Western Carolinian, June 27, 1820. 

For the Western Carolinian. 
Female Academy Again. 

Messrs. Krider & Bingham : The favorable reception you gave my 
first communication, has encouraged me to send another, by way of an 
afterpiece, or as a kind of relish to the former. 

I may be supposed, by some, to have fairly volunteered as a champion 
of the fair sex. Very well — I am disposed to admit it, in a qualified 
sense : But I disclaim all pretensions of being actuated by such a chiv- 
alrous spirit as inspired the gallant King James IV. of Scotland; who, 
it is said, publicly professed himself to Queen Anne of France : The 
declaration having reached the Queen's ears, she summoned him to 
prove himself her true and valorous champion, by taking the field in her 
defence, against his brother-in-law, Henry VIII. of England. He 
obeyed the romantic mandate; and the two nations fought and bled, to 
feed the vanity of a proud woman, and to gratify the caprice of a 
princely coxcomb. From possessing such a spirit, or rather evil genius 
of gallantry, I beg to be excused. It perverts all those lovely qualities 
which excite esteem and affection for woman, and renders her subser- 
vient to very iniquitous ends. — The lively imagination of woman re- 
sembles a mirror, which reflects everything, but creates nothing: hence 
the necessity of holding up to the view, when they are young, and sus- 
ceptible of yielding to the impression of the moment, (which with 
them is very strong,) patterns of virtue, purity of manners, and con- 
stancy of love. — Whatever they ask, or whatever they have an inclina- 
tion to do, if innocently trifling, let them be indulged in : for it is bet- 
ter to yield small sacrifices, than to brave the fury of a temper that has 
been vexatiously provoked from its infancy, and thus rendered liable 



Rowan County Schools. 359 

to be exasperated by jealousy, or some other frivilous cause. For with 
all the tenderness of disposition with which nature has endowed woman, 
when once she is roused to express the transports of her troubled soul, 
she joins frenzy to love — which is sometimes impetuous, sometimes 
tender — which now is softened, and then bursts forth afresh, with re- 
doubled fury. As a lamentable instance of this, I recollect of some- 
where reading, that, little more than a century ago, the Marquis D'As- 
trogas, of Spain, having been captivated by the charms of a beautiful 
young woman, he lost no convenient opportunity of rendering homage 
to her: The Marchionness, his wife, hearing of the illicit gallantry of 
her husband, went secretly to the young woman's lodging, and assassi- 
nated her ; tore out her heart, carried it home, with her own hands made 
a ragout of it, and presented the dish to the Marquis. He ate of the 
precious morsel, — "It is exceedingly good," said he. "Xo wonder," she 
answered, "since it was made of the heart of that creature you so much 
doated on." And, not to "leave a thread whereon to hang a doubt" in 
his mind as to the truth of what she said, she immediately drew forth 
from under a napkin the bloody head of the hapless victim, and rolled it 
on the floor ; her eyes sparkling, all the while, with a mixture of pleas- 
ure and infernal fury. 

If such, then, have been the unhappy effects arising from the ungov- 
ernable temper and sensitive spirit of a woman of another century, let 
us suppose that such a disposition is still inherent in female nature; 
that, though we have not, in the present age, witnessed such fatal exer- 
cises of it, an unenlightened mind in this day needs only sufficient ex- 
citement to break forth in all the frantic fury of ancient times. To 
counteract the consequences of any such unruly inherent principle of 
human nature, early education is the most potent means. I must, there- 
fore, beg pardon of the Instructresses of the Salisbury Femade Acad- 
emy, while I suggest to them (for I have too exalted an opinion of their 
abilities, and of the goodness of their dispositions, to address them in 
dictatorial language) the magnitude of their charge — that they are acting 
as pioneers to the rising generation — that, in fact, it is in their power to 
give our rising female society a decided character either unaf- 
fectedly amiable and virtuous, or tinged with prudish vanity. 

It is almost universally asserted on the one hand, and but seemingly 
denied on the other, that females possess, and exercise too, the Gift of 
Gab in a much more bountiful degree than the other sex. It is a pe- 
culiar inheritance from their mother Eve : For it is established, on the 
stubborn authority of a fable of the Jewish doctors, that while our 
primitive parents were yet in the Garden of Eden, blooming stark fresh 
in all the simplicity of nature, there fell from Heaven nine baskets of 
Chit-Chat ; that the woman picked up six of them, while the man was 
clumsily gathering up the other three. This accounts for the great 
volubility of the ladies. It is supposed that, from this circumstance 
alone, Eve was enabled to persuade Adam to eat of that forbidden fruit 
which has entailed such a heavy curse upon all the human species — a 



360 Rowan County Schools. 

sinful nature. Well, then, if women must talk so much, it is of vast 
moment that their talk should be employed to some useful purpose. 
Here is another important duty devolving upon Instructors. Let 
young females be taught to converse, as well as to act, in a pure, unaf- 
fected and chaste style : Let them, inculcate principles of religion and 
morality, and they will not only give to the female circle in which they 
move a polish and refinement of manners — a modest benignity of de- 
portment ; but will, also, have an important influence in checking the 
licentiousness of the other sex. They will shrink from the embrace of 
the sons of dissipation : they will spurn their approach as they would 
that of the loathsome reptile which hisses beneath their feet : yea, they 
will shun the very atmosphere that has been tainted by licentious revelry. 
Young gentlemen — fellow-associates ! Do you wish to be debarred 
the smiles of the fair? And do you wish to meet, on approaching them, 
instead of smiles, indignant frowns, and a cold repulse more chilling 
than the frigid blast of a wintry wind ? O fly, then, fly from intemper- 
ance, as you would fly from a pestilential disease ; and no longer let your 
motto be "wine and women" — the watch-word of the Syren, which 
charms and allures only to destroy — but let it be "virtue and morality," 
and resolve rigidly to live up to it, and you cannot fail to taste the 
sweetest of temporal luxuries, and enjoy a bright prospect of Heaven's 
choicest blessings. Alfred. 

[A pencil-note says this article was written by Philo White.] 
— Western Carolinian, July 11, 1820. 

DESCRIPTION OF SALISBURY ACADEMIES, 1820. 

SALISBURY ACADEMIES. 

The exercises of these institutions are regulated in the following man- 
ner: This year is divided into two sessions, and each session into two 
quarters. At the beginning of each quarter, a committee of three of 
the Trustees is appointed, whose business it is weekly to visit the Acade- 
mies, to attend to their general concerns and to the progress of the 
scholars. At the end of each quarter, another committee is appointed, 
to conduct what is called "the quarterly examination." This committee 
take up the two last days of the quarter in examining the classes upon 
their various studies : this examination, though very strict, is not made 
public, being principally intended for the purpose of inciting industry 
and emulation among the scholars, and that the Trustees may judge of 
the improvements they make in their studies. 

At the end of each session, a public examination takes place, and the 
report of the Trustees is published in the papers. 

The examination of the last quarter took place a few days ago, and 
the committee who attended it were well satisfied with the progress of 
the pupils, of both the male and female departments. 

In a short time, the larsre and commodious house intended for the 



Rowan County Schools. 361 

male department, will be finished; when it may, without hazard, be 
said, that there is no Academy in the State where the pupils will be bet- 
ter accommodated than in the institution in this town. The houses are 
large, (being two story buildings, in size about 40 or 50 feet,) situated 
upon handsome sites and surrounded with pleasant groves of native 
growth. Every care is taken to render the situation of the Academies 
comfortable and pleasant, both in winter and summer; and indeed, the 
Trustees have spared neither pains nor expense to deserve public patron- 
age, and make their institution a place where the useful and ornamental 
branches of education may be acquired, not in a superficial, but in a 
solid and beneficial manner. G. 

— Western Carolinian, September 19, 1820. 

THE MISSES SLATER SOT TO LEAVE SALISBURY. 

SALISBURY FEMALE ACADEMY. 

A report having insiduously crept into circulation, that the Misses 
Slaters were soon to resign the charge of the Salisbury Eemale Acad- 
emy, we are authorized to state, for the information of those who feel 
an interest in the welfare of the Academy, that these worthy young La- 
dies have no intention of leaving us ; nor, to our knowledge, have they 
ever harbored such a thought. The Academy is continually increasing 
in reputation under theirs and Miss Mitchill's instruction. It is with 
peculiar satisfaction we are enabled to state, that, while sickness has 
been prevalent in many towns to the north and south of us, we have had 
scarcely an instance of it here; the pupils in the Academy, especially, 
have been very healthy. 

— Western Carolinian, October 3, 1820. 

EXAMINATION, DECEMBER, 1820. 

SALISBURY ACADEMIES. 

The semi-annual examination of the pupils will commence on Mon- 
day, the 4th, and close on Thursday, the 7th of December next. Par- 
ents and guardians are respectfully requested to attend. 

The exercises will recommence on the first Monday of January next. 

In the female department are taught reading, writing, English Gram- 
mar, arithmetic, geography, the use of the globes, belles lettres, history, 
drawing, painting, music, and needle-work. 

In the male department are taught th ; - usual branches of literature. 

Tho. L. Cowan, Secretary. 

— Western Carolinian, November 7, 1820. 

REPORT OF THE EXAMINATION, DECEMBER 7, 1820. 

The committee appointed to superintend the examination, submit to 
the Trustees the following report : In the distribution of the honors, 



362 Rowan County Schools. 

respect was had as well to the tickets weekly given by the tutoresses to 
the pupils for their good conduct, as to the accuracy in their studies. 
The classes were respectively examined by their instructresses, and then 
by the committee, in the following order : 

1st Class — Consisting of Mary Ann Verble, Charlotte Cowan, Marga- 
ret Ann Beckwith, Margaret Allemong, Margaret Gibson, Maria Satter- 
white, — was examined on spelling and reading in the spelling book. 
Maria Satterwhite is the best reader; Mary Ann Verble spelt the best; 
and Charlotte Cowan and Mary Ann Verble received the greatest num- 
ber of weekly tickets. 

2d Class — Consisting of Catharine Chambers, Eliza M. Frohock, 
Eleanor Chambers, Catharine Huie, — was examined on spelling, and 
on reading from the Introduction to the English Reader. This class 
was highly approved. Eliza M. Frohock is the best reader; the Misses 
Chambers have received the greatest number of weekly tickets, in the 
course of the session. 

3d Class — Consisting of Harriet B. Long, Laura M. Troy, Nancy C. 
Chambers, Rebecca Wood, Christiana Mull, Mary Ann Hampton, — 
was examined on spelling from Walker's Dictionary, reading from the 
English Reader, on Murray's English Grammar, and on writing. This 
is a very fine class. Laura M. Troy excelled; the next are Rebecca 
Wood and Harriet B. Long, who are equal; the rest are highly ap- 
proved. The greatest number of weekly tickets belongs to Laura M. 
Troy, Harriet B. Long, Nancy C. Chambers and Rebecca Wood. 

4th Class, 1st Division — Consisting of Ann Robinson, Margaret E. 
James, Mary E. James. This division was examined on reading from 
the Lady's Preceptor, on English Grammar, and parsing. The young 
ladies also exhibited specimens of writing. Ann Robinson is entitled to 
the honor in this divison. 

2d Division of the 4th Class — Consisting of Mary Ann McCracken, 
Mary M. Yarbrough, Eugenia A. Bracy, Beatrix Mathieu, Mary Kerr, 
Margaret E. James, Mary J. James. This division was examined on 
the first branches above mentioned, and on Geography, correcting false 
syntax, and on the maps of the world and Europe, except Margaret E. 
James, and Mary J. James, who appeared with this division on geog- 
raphy only. This division gave very entire satisfaction. Mary Ann 
McCracken excelled in reading; Mary M. Yarbrough on English Gram- 
mar; and Eugenia A. Bracy and Mary Ann McCracken were superior 
in geography ; Beatrix Mathieu was well prepared ; and Mary Kerr had 
been advanced from a lower class to this one, in the course of the ses- 
sion; she stood an excellent examination. 

5th Class — Consisting of Antoinette Huie, Catharine Devenport, 
Susan Hughes, Mary Trent, Letitia Wilson. This class was examined 
on reading from the History of Greece, parsing of poetry, correcting 
false syntax, on Cummings' Geography, and the United States ; in read- 
ing, Mary Trent, Antoinette Huie, and Susan Hughes, are noticed in 



Rowan County Schools. 363 

the order of their names ; in geography, the whole class stood a very 
fine examination; all were prompt and accurate in their answers; Cath- 
arine Devenport has the greatest number of the tickets. 

6th Class— Consisting of Mary M. Frohock, Ann E. Lindsey, Mary 
G. Allen, Rebecca L. Fulton, was examined on prosody, rules of punctu- 
ation, the geography of Asia and Africa, reading and parsing Cowper's 
Task, chronology, and rhetoric ; Mary M. Frohock also appeared on 
Ancient Geography. In this class Mary M. Frohock is the best reader ; 
in parsing, Ann E. Lindsey appeared to the most advantage. The class 
in general merits much praise. Misses Lindsey and Fulton have the 
greatest number of weekly tickets. 

Arithmetic— 1st Class : Consisting of Mary Trent, Susan Hughes, 
Antoinette Huie. This class was examined as far as Division : Mary 
Trent is the best. 

2d Class — Consisting of Catharine Devenport, Eugenia A. Bracy, 
Beatrix Mathieu ; was examined as far as Reduction. These young la- 
dies passed a good examination : Catharine Devenport is the most 
correct. 

Miss Elizabeth T. Harris was examined on the whole of English 
grammar, parsing, correcting false syntax, rules of punctuation, per- 
spicuity, &c. ; on ancient and modern geography, the elements of general 
history and chronology, rhetoric and belles-lettres, moral philosophy, 
the elements of criticism, and on arithmetic ; and she exhibited several 
specimens of composition. This was a very interesting examination; 
and Miss Harris, by her accuracy and readiness, gave very general sat- 
isfaction. The committee recommend that Miss Harris receive the 
honors of the Institution. 

In the Ornamental Department, the following young ladies exhibited 
each several large and highly finished colored landscapes, together with 
a number of small pieces : Elizabeth T. Harris, Ann E. Lindsey, Re- 
becca L. Fulton, Mary G. Allen, Mary M. Yarbrough, Catharine Dev- 
enport, Mary Ann Mc'Cracken, Mary Kerr. — Among this collection, the 
best was executed by Miss Harris ; the next in point of accuracy, rich- 
ness of coloring, and truth in shading and perspective, belonged to 
Misses Lindsey, Fulton, and Allen ; the others were not greatly inferior, 
and were much admired. Miss Letitia Wilson presented a large painted 
screen, and several chimney-pieces, ornaments finished in a style of neat- 
ness and elegance highly gratifying to those whose taste enables them 
to appreciate such productions. Miss Fulton showed a piece of em- 
broidery, and Miss Devenport some fancy work. 

Music. — Misses Elizabeth Giles, Eugenia A. Bracy, Margaret Moore, 
Mary M. Yarbrough, Letitia Wilson, Elizabeth T. Harris, Susan 
Hughes, Ann E. Lindsey. — These young ladies were examined upon 
the elements of music, as adapted to the piano forte ; and after showing 
much proficiency in the principles of the science, they performed each 
several pieces of music, as sacred music, marches, duettes, songs, &c. &c. 
with much taste and accuracy. Miss Wilson was considered the best 



364 Rowan County Schools. 

performer, and Miss Hughes the next. The others, for the time they 
had been engaged in this agreeable pursuit, gave much satisfaction. 

In behalf of the Trustees, the committee feel great pleasure in pre- 
senting to Miss Eliza Slater, to Miss Mary Ann Slater, and to Miss 
Cornelia C. Mitchel, the great obligation they are under to them for 
their exemplary care and attention to the interests of the Academy. 
Under their tutelage this seminary was first brought into notice, and by 
their talents and assiduity it continues to prosper. 

Male Department. 

1st Class, 1st Division — Consisting of John Murphy, Hugh Horah, 
James Huie, Tobias Lemley, "Willie Bird; was examined on spelling 
from Webster, in three, four, and five syllables. Murphy and Horah 
are considered the best spellers. 

2d Division of 1st Class — Consisting of William Allemong, William 
Locke, John Frohock, Thomas Beckwith, John Murphy, Hugh Horah : 
This division was examined on Webster throughout : Allemong, Locke, 
and Frohock are the most correct spellers. 

2d Class, 1st Division — Consisting of William Murphy, Warren 
Huie, Gustavus A. Miller, David Kern, Robert Huie, Henry Lemley, 
William Allemong, William Locke, Henry Krider, Thomas Mull, 
Thomas Beckwith, Archibald Henderson, John Frohock ; was examined 
on spelling from Walker's Dictionary; Murphy, Huie, Miller and Kern, 
are distinguished. 

2d Division of the 2d Class — Consisting of Archibald Henderson, 
Henry Krider, Robert Huie, Thomas Mull, William Murphy, Henry 
Lemley: This class was examined on reading from the English Reader; 
Huie, Murphy, and Lemley, are the first. 

3d Class, 1st Division — Consisting of Thomas Mull, Thomas Fro- 
hock, Robert C. Huie ; appeared on arithmetic, and was much approved. 

2d Division of the 3d Class— Consisting of James L. Beckwith, Pleas- 
ant M. Huie, Lewis Slaughter, Richard W. Long, David Fulton, Thomas 
Frohock, Gustavus A. Miller, Warren Huie, David Kerr, William Mur- 
phy ; was examined on reading, from the History of Rome ; James 
Beckwith, Pleasant M. Huie, David Fulton, Thomas Frohock, and 
Richard W. Long, are distinguished; the rest approved. 

4th Class, 1st Division — Consisting of Warren Huie, David Kern, 
Gustavus A. Miller; was examined on Corderi, and approved. Miller 
was further examined on Erasmus and Selecta e Veteri, and evidenced 
much progress and industry. 

2d Division of the 4th Class — Consisting of Pleasant M. Huie, Rich- 
ard Long, David Fulton ; was examined on Caesar's Commentaries, and 
the Bucolicks of Virgil ; no distinction is made in this class ; if any, 
Huie merits it. 

5th Class — Consisting of Lewis Slaughter, James Beckwith, Pleasant 
M. Huie, Richard W. Long, David Fulton ; was examined on the yEneids 



Rowan County Schools. 365 

of Virgil, the Greek Testament, and on correcting false grammar from 
Mair's Introduction, except Huie, Long, and Fulton, who were exam- 
ined on Mair's Introduction only. This class merits the entire appro- 
bation of the committee, the members are so nearly equal, no distinction 
is made. 

The committee tender to Mr. John C. Monroe, their thanks for his 
assiduity, and for the accuracy and correctness with which he has dis- 
charged the duties of the superintendent of the male department. 



Miss Elizabeth T. Harris, (of Cabarrus County, ISTorth-Carolina,) 
having completed, with success and reputation, the course of education 
prescribed in the Female Department, was presented with a Certificate 
and Golden Medal, the honors of this Institution. Miss Harris then 
read a handsome and appropriate valedictory. 

The exercises of the Academy will recommence on the first Monday 
of January next. 

By order of the Board. Thomas L. Cowan, 

December 7, 1820. Secretary. 

— Western Carolinian, December 19, 1820. 

FULTON'S ACADEMY BOARDING HOUSE, 1821. 

NOTICE. 

The subscriber is now finishing a large and commodious house in this 
place, on the western side of the town, situate between the Male and 
Female Academies, which he intends as a boarding house for young 
ladies. He will furnish them with good board, washing, and lodging, 
for seventy-five dollars, for this year. He pledges himself that nothing 
will be wanting, on his part, to render satisfaction to those who may 
favor him with their custom. 

As parents and guardians are desirous that their children's expenses 
may be so managed, as if the money had actually all passed through 
their own hands, he therefore considers the following method of keeping 
their accounts will answer the purpose : 

Those who come to this place well provided with clothes, will not re- 
quire any additional ones for some time. However, when they write 
home, it is very easy to let their parents know what they require, and an 
answer to said letter will contain an order for said articles, if their 
parents think it necessary. 

The next time they write home, they will mention what such articles 
cost, which will enable their parents not only to know what articles 
their children get, but what they cost them. It will, at the same time, 
with the assistance of the Tutoress, habituate the children to keeping 
their own accounts, which will be very essential to them during life, and 
the improvement they may make in this little business, will be very 
gratifying to their parents. 



366 Rowan County Schools. 

It is unnecessary for the young ladies to trouble their parents with 
the purchase of books, quills, ink, paper, &c. as what the Academy exer- 
cises require must be had. It is only necessary to include them with 
the cost of other articles, so that they be acquainted with every expense. 

He recollects, some years ago, of having two young ladies at the 
Salem Academy; at that time Mr. Kramer attended it; he wrote to the 
subscriber frequently, and each letter contained a statement of the 
young ladies' accounts, with what additional articles they might have 
had since he wrote the last : Therefore, by having reference to his last 
letter, a view was had of their accounts to that time. This led the sub- 
scriber to the above method, with what he considers a little amendment. 

Those little attentions, although apparently of but little importance, 
when carefully attended to may prove to be of considerable advantage 
to the young ladies, and to the welfare of the Academy. 

The Trustees are nicely attentive to the choice of their Tutoresses, 
and as nicely attentive to the care of the young ladies ; and in order that 
the business of the Academy may go on with success, they must be as 
attentive to the young ladies' expenses, which it is believed the above 
method will regulate. John Fulton. 

Salisbury, Jan. 1, 1821. 

— Western Carolinian, January 2, 1821. 

SALISBURY ACADEMY UNDER J. 0. FREEMAN, 1821. 

The Trustees are gratified by having it in their power to inform the 
public, that they have succeeded in forming a permanent engagement 
with the Rev. Jonathan O. Freeman, to take charge of the Male, and 
to superintend the Female Department of this Institution. The long 
experience in teaching, and the established character of Mr. Freeman, 
enable the Trustees to recommend the school with confidence to the at- 
tention of parents and guardians. Miss Slater and Miss Mitchel con- 
tinue, with their usual distinguished success, to teach in the Female De- 
partment. Every possible attention will be paid to the religious and 
moral instruction, as well as to the general deportment of the pupils. 
The buildings are large and airy, and situated in fine native groves, in 
different sections of the town. Board may be had in genteel families at 
a reasonable rate. 

1ST. B. The second quarter in the female school commences on Mon- 
day, the 19th March; the male school will open on the 1st of April. 

By order of the Board. Thos. L. Cowan, Secretary. 

Salisbury, March 12, 1821. 

— Western Carolinian, March 13, 1821. 

It is with pleasure we are enabled to announce to our fellow-citizens 
at large the re-commencement of this Institution under the most prom- 
ising auspices. The Trustees have been so fortunate as to engage the 
Rev. JONATHAN O. FREEMAN, late of Newbern, in this state, to 



Rowan County Schools. 367 

take charge of the Male, and superintend the Female department, as 
well as to preach to the citizens of Salisbury. 

Dr. Freeman's qualifications as a teacher and preacher, are spoken 
of in the highest terms of commendation by all who have had an op- 
23ortunitY of knowing them. 

The exercises of the School commenced on yesterday; and it would 
be desirable for parents and guardians, who feel disposed to avail them- 
selves of the opportunity, to send their children at as early a day as 
possible. 

— Western Carolinian, April 17, 1821. 

FKEEMAN'S QUALIFICATIONS AND METHODS. 

SALISBURY ACADEMY. 

On the 16th of April the exercises of the male department of this 
Institution commenced, under the care of Rev. Dr. Freeman, who will 
also superintend the education of the females. During upwards of 
twenty years Dr. Freeman has resided, principally, over the flourishing 
academies of Edenton and Xewbern of this State ; from which institu- 
tions he received the most honorable testimonies of his superior talents 
as a teacher and his uncommon success in the difficult task of uniting 
gentleness with a due regard to discipline, in the government of his pu- 
pils. The best evidences which can be given of the qualifications of Dr. 
Freeman, may be derived from the facts, that during this whole period, 
the institutions over which he has presided have flourished beyond any 
former example. For the satisfaction of those, who may not be ac- 
quainted with the character of Dr. Freeman, we would subjoin the fol- 
lowing extracts, from a "voluntary tribute of thanks" communicated by 
the Trustees of JSTewbern Academy, on his retiring from their service ; 
among whom we notice some of the most distinguished names our state 
can boast : — "This Seminary, under his direction, has flourished beyond 
all former experience. Ei school discipline, in the various qualifica- 
tions of a teacher, in success in advancing the progress of his pupil and 
in unwearied diligence and zeal, Dr. Freeman has always been consid- 
ered by the Trustees as unrivaled, and entitled to their undivided ac- 
knowledgments : and the Trustees would avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunity to tender their testimony in the highest commendation of his 
social, moral, and religious deportment." 

The following branches of education are taught : English — Reading, 
"Writing, Spelling, Arithmetic, Geography, and use of the Globe?. Xat- 
ural and Moral Ehilosophy, Rhetoric, Logic, Composition and Declama- 
tion. 

In Latin — Ruddiman's and Adam's Grammar, Corderiaa, Historic 
Sacra;, Yiri Romas, books of Caesar, Ovid Expurgata, Virgil, Cicero's 
Select Orations, Sallust's wars with Catiline and Jugurtha, Horace 
throughout, Mair's Introduction, Prosodv. 



368 Rowan County Schools. 

In Greek — Valpy's or Wettenhall's Grammar, Greek Testament, 
Evangelists and Acts of the Apostles, Grseca Minora, Grseca Majora, 
Xenopkon, Homer, Neilson's Exercises and Prosody. 

In the Eemale Department, Dr. Freeman will be assisted by Miss 
Slater, in the literary and classical branches, while Miss Mitchel will 
continue to conduct the ornamental. Of the talents and qualifications 
of these ladies, to improve the minds, and polish the manners of their 
pupils, the Trustees, from ample experience, can give the most decided 
approbation. 

Under such auspices, the Trustees feel assured this Institution must 
flourish. To render it a nursery of all the polite and useful branches of 
education, as well as of correct moral and religious principles and feel- 
ings, will be their unremitting aim ; and they feel confidence in saying, 
that no similar institution in the State can now claim superior advan- 
tages. 

In this department the studies, and books used, will be — Reading, 
"Writing, Spelling, English Grammar, Pike's, or Walsh's Arithmetic, 
Geography, and the use of the Globes, Whelpley's and Tyler's Histories, 
Blair's Rhetoric, Conversations on Natural Philosophy, Moral Philoso- 
phy, Astronomy, Andrew's Logic, Chemistry, Euclid, Composition; and, 
if required, Algebra, and the Languages. 

As it is the natural disposition of youth, when unrestrained, to run 
into extravagances, the trustees earnestly desire, that parents or guar- 
dians bringing scholars to this academy, should place them under the 
special care of some judicious person, with instructions to attend to 
their wants, and regulate their purchases of necessary articles out of the 
stores. The importance of this requisition must be apparent to every 
person of reflection and experience. The trustees have no other inter- 
est in the success of these Institutions, than to furnish to the rising 
generation opportunities of education. To accomplish this object, they 
have devoted much of their time and attention, and have gone to very 
considerable expense in erecting two large and commodious edifices, in 
procuring maps, and other indispensable articles for the schools. Be- 
sides these disbursements, the current expenses of the Institution, for 
salaries to the teachers, and other purposes, amount to about $3,000 
per year. 

It is therefore indispensable, that parents and guardians should be 
punctual in paying the tuition charges ; and to avoid the uncertainty 
and trouble of after collection, it is positively required, that the tuition 
money in all cases, shall be paid when the certificate of admission is 
taken out. 

By order of the Board, Thos. L. Cowan, 

Salisbury, May 1, 1821. Secretary. 

['ggr'Boarding may be. had in respectable families for 75 to 80 dollars 
the year. 

— Western Carolinian, May 8, 1821. 



Rowan County Schools. 369 

EXAMINATION, 1821. 

SALISBURY ACADEMY. 

The semi-annual EXAMINATION' of the pupils of this institution 
will commence on the 5th of June, and close on the 8th. Parents and 
guardians are respectfully invited to attend. The next session begins 
on the first Monday in July next. By order. 

May 11, 1821. ' T. L. Cowan, Secy. 

— Western Carolinian, May 15, 1821. 

EXAMINATION, 1S22. 

The semi-annual examination of the male and female students of this 
institution commenced on Tuesday, the 11th. inst. and closed on Fri- 
day, the 14th. In the female department it was, as usual, interesting 
and satisfactory, in both the literary and ornamental branches. In 
the male, a large number of students were examined on reading, writing, 
arithmetic, English grammar, geography, the Latin and Greek lan- 
guages, mathematics, &c. &c. Their accuracy and proficiency were 
unexampled in this institution. 

Miss Mitchel and Miss Slater being about to return to the north, 
both departments will hereafter come under the immediate manage- 
ment of the Rev. Dr. Freeman, aided by a suitable usher. 

In taking leave of these ladies, the Trustees return them their 
warmest thanks for the assiduous attention they have bestowed upon 
the interests of the pupils entrusted to their care, and acknowedge the 
high estimation in which they hold their qualifications and uniformly 
correct and exemplary deportment. It would be superfluous, at this 
period, to speak of the established reputation of Dr. Freeman, as a 
scholar and a gentleman. 

The next Session will commence on the 2d Monday in July. 

Salisbury, June 13, 1822. T. L. Cowan, Secretary. 

|=gPTlie above notice was received too late for last week's paper. 
— Western Carolinian, June 25, 1822. 

FKEEMAN IN SOLE CHAEGE OF ACADEMY, 1823. 

SALISBURY ACADEMY. 

THE subscriber having made an arrangement with the proprietor of 
this institution, the management of it, with its avails, has become his 
individual concern. To his friends, and the public, he looks with con- 
fidence for a portion of their patronage. In this interesting, and im- 
portant employment, he ventures to promise the industrious applica- 
tion of more than twenty years' experience; united with a zeal, excited 
by a conviction of its importance, and strengthened by habit. To 
parents and guardians, who may be disposed to place their children and 
24 



370 Rowan County Schools. 

wards under his care, he would remark, that his object has ever been, 
with the languages and higher branches of education, to unite a thor- 
ough knowledge of reading, writing, English grammar, arithmetic and 
geography. In addition to these things, the useful and practical parts 
of Mathematics, Natural and Moral Philosophy, Astronomy, Logic, 
Rhetoric, History and Chemistry, when required, will be attended to. 
In the instruction of females, a regular system will be adopted. The 
object will be, to render them rational and interesting companions; and 
in their education, as well as in that of the other sex, those branches, 
which are of the greatest utility in the progress of life, will receive a 
superior degree of attention. One object will ever be kept in view — 
to inspire his pupils with a due degree of self-respect, to establish cor- 
rect moral and religious views and conduct, and, with parental solici- 
tude, to correct all immoral, indecorous, and licentious habits. In both 
sexes, and to pupils of every age, attention will be paid to spelling, read- 
ing, writing and composition. In fine, to prepare those committed to 
his care, in the best possible manner, for their future destination in 
life, will be his unceasing aim; and the same attention will be paid to 
the mere English scholar, as to those who are designed for higher in- 
stitutions. Justice to himself requires him to state, that, in teaching 
the Latin and Greek languages, the thorough and critical method rec- 
ommended by Messrs. de Port Royal, and so admirably pursued at our 
University, has been, for a long time, adopted. To enable him to ef- 
fect this, an extensive collection of the most approved grammars and 
lexicons, among which are the Thesaurus, of Ainsworth, the Lexicons 
of Hedericus, Parkhurst, &c. and the grammars of the Messrs. de Port 
Royal, Hackenburg, Goodrich, Moore, Valpy, &c. have been procured ; 
to which his pupils have liberty to refer. To facilitate the study of 
Geography, an excellent set of Globes, with Lavoisne's and other At- 
lases, and an extensive collection of maps, have been procured. 

The grades of tuition will be five, six, and seven dollars, paid in ad- 
vance, into the hands of Thomas L. Cowan, Esq. who has kindly con- 
sented to act as agent for the subscriber. 

Salisbury, March 31, 1823. Jonathan Otis Freeman. 

— Western Carolinian, April 1, 1823. 



Rowan County Schools. 



371 



SALISBURY ACADEMY LOTTERY, 183L 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE 
LOTTERY, 

For the Benefit of 

THE SALISBURY ACADEMY 

1st Class — High and Low System. 



To be drawn at Salisbury, on the 10th day of July. 



Capital 3,000 Dollars! 



Scheme 



1 p 


rize of 


$3,000 


LS $ 


3,000 


5 ' 


< of 


1,000 : 


s 


5,000 


4 ' 


< of 


500 ] 


s 


2,000 


5 ' 


< of 


300 ] 


s 


1,500 


10 ' 


1 of 


200 ] 


LS 


2,000 


50 ' 


of 


100 ] 


LS 


5,000 


60 ' 


' of 


50 ] 


LS 


3,000 


100 l 


' of 


20 : 


LS 


2,000 


250 ' 


of 


10 ] 


LS 


2,500 


20,000 ' 


' of 


470 ] 


S 


94,000 



20,485 Prizes, amount'g to $120,000 



More Prizes Than Blanks. 



Whole Tickets, 

Halves 

Quarters 



,$4 
. 2 
, 1 



Mode of Drawing. 

This scheme, founded on the High and Low System, has 40,000 tick- 
ets, numbered from 1 to 40,000 inclusive. On the day of the drawing 
the 40,000 numbers will be put into one wheel; and all the prizes above 
the denomination of $4 70 in another; they will be drawn out alter- 
nately, first a number and then a prize, until all the prizes are drawn. 
From 1 to 20,000, inclusive, are low; and from 20,001 to 40,000, inclu- 
sive, are high. The prizes of $4 70 are to be awarded to the high or 
low division, will be determined by that which may draw the capital 
prize of 3,000 dollars. The prizes of $4 70 will be payable in tickets in 
the next scheme — all other prizes payable in cash forty days after the 
drawing. All prizes subject to a deduction of 15 per centum. 



372 Rowan County Schools. 

Tickets, shares and packages to be had, in the greatest variety of 
numbers, at 

STEVENSON" & POINTS' OFFICE, 

(White Row, Mansion Hotel,) 
SALISBURY. 



All orders from a distance, (post paid,) enclosing the cash, will be 
thankfully received and promptly attended to, if addressed to 

Stevenson & Points, 
May 17, 1834. Managers, Salisbury, N. C. 

—The Star, June 5, 183k- 

North Carolina 
STATE LOTTERY. 

For the benefit of the Salisbury Academy, 
First Class for 1837. 

To be drawn at Fayetteville on 
Saturday, 11th of February. 

COMBINATION SYSTEM. 
75 number Lottery 12 drawn ballots. 



CAPITAL PRIZE, $13,000. 
SPLENDID SCHEME. 

1 Prize of $13,000 Dollars. 



1 


Prize of 


6,000 


do. 


1 


Prize of 


3,000 


do. 


1 


Prize of 


2,400 


do. 


1 


Prize of 


1,500 


do. 


1 


Prize of 


1,100 


do. 


20 


Prizes of 


1,000 


do. 


20 


do. of 


500 


do. 


20 


do. of 


360 


do. 


20 


do. of 


300 


do. 


20 


do. of 


200 


do. 


30 


do. of 


100 


do. 



Besides many of $80, $60, $50, $40, &c. amounting in all to 253,390 
dollars. 

Whole Tickets $5, Halves $2.50, quarters $1.25. 

A certificate for a package of 25 whole Tickets will cost only 74 dol- 



Rowan County Schools. 373 

lars. Halves and Quarters in the same proportion. To be had in the 
greatest variety of numbers at 

STEVENSON" & POINTS' OFFICE, 
— Southern Citizen, January 21, 1837. Raleigh, N. C. 

Look Here. 

$8,000 For $4 only ! ! 

NORTH CAROLINA 

STATE LOTTERY. 

Third Class for 1S37. 

For the benefit of the Salisbury Academy, 

To be drawn at ASHBORO, 

Randolph Co. N. C. 

on Saturday, 1st of April 

COMBINATION SYSTEM. 

75 number Lottery 12 drawn ballots. 



CAPITAL PRIZE, $8,000. 
Splendid Scheme. 
1 Prize of $8,000 Dollars. 



1 


Prize 


of 


4,000 


do. 


1 


Prize 


of 


2,500 


do. 


1 


Prize 


of 


2,000 


do. 


1 


Prize 


r 
01 


1,200 


do. 


10 


Prizes of 


1,000 


do. 


10 


do 


of 


500 


do. 


10 


do 


of 


200 


do. 


30 


do 


of 


100 


do. 



— ALSO, 1795 smaller Prizes — 
Amounting in all to 125,866 dollars. 

Whole Tickets $4 
Halves $2 

Quarters $1 

A Package of 22 Whole Tickets in this Lottery will cost $50.00 

Half do 25.00 

Quarter do 12.50 

Orders from a distance attended to by 

Stevenson & Points, Managers, 
— Southern Citizen, February 25, 1837. Raleigh, N. C. 



374 Rowan County Schools. 

NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE LOTTERY 

Seventh Class for 1837. 

Eor the benefit of the Salisbury Academy, 

To be drawn at Wentworth, 

Rockingham Co. 1ST. C. 
on Saturday, 6th of May. 

COMBINATION SYSTEM. 
66 number Lottery 10 drawn ballots. 

STEVENSON & POINTS, 

Managers. 



CAPITAL PRIZE $10,000 




Splendid Scheme 




1 


Prize of 10,000 Dollars. 


1 


Prize of 


4,000 


do 


1 


Prize of 


3,000 


do 


1 


Prize of 


2,320 


do 


1 


Prize of 


1,840 


do 


5 


Prizes of 


1,000 


do 


10 


do of 


400 


do 


100 


do of 


100 


do 


56 


do of 


40 


do 


56 


do of 


30 


do 


56 


do of 


20 


do 


112 


do of 


10 


do 


2,240 


Prizes of 


8 


do 


15,400 


Prizes of 


4 


do 




Whole Tickets $4 






Halves 


$2 






Quarters 


$1 




A Package of 22 Whole Tickets in 


this Lottery will cost $50.00 


Half 


do. 




25.00 


Quarter 


do. 




12.50 


Orders from a distance promptly 


■ attended to by 




Stevenson & Points, Managers, 








Raleigh, N. C. 


— Southern Citizen, April 15, 1837. 





Rowan County Schools. 375 

NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE LOTTERY. 

Twelfth Class for 1837. 

For the benefit of the Salisbury Academy, 

To be drawn at Hillsboro' N. C. 

on Saturday, 24th of June. 

75 number Lottery 11 drawn ballots. 

Stephenson & Points, 

Managers. 
Splendid Scheme. 

1 Prize of 1,000 Dollars. 
20 Prizes of 400 do 
20 do of 200 do 
45 do of 120 do 
64 do of 100 do 
&c. &c. &c. &c. 
Whole Tickets $5 
Halves $2.50 

Quarters $1.25 

A Package of 25 Whole Tickets in this Lottery will cost $76.00 

Half do 38.00 

Quarter do 19.00 

Orders from a distance promptly attended to by 

Stevenson & Points, 
—Southern Citizen, May 20, 1837. Raleigh, N. C. 

20 Prizes amounting to $40,000 1 <jy 

30 Prizes of $1,000 $30,000 J ^ 7U > UUU 

NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE LOTTERY. 

Class No. 11, for 1837. 

To be drawn at Raleigh, N. C. on 

Saturday, the 10th June, 1837. 

75 Number Lottery, 11 drawn Ballots. 

Scheme. 

20 Prizes of 2,000 Dollars. 

30 do of 1,000 do 

30 do of 400 do 

20 do of 300 do 

20 do of 200 do 

45 do of 120 do 

64 do of 100 do 

&c. &c. &c. &c. 



376 Rowan County Schools. 



Whole Tickets 


$5 




Halves " 


$2.50 




Quarters " 


$1.25 




A certificate for a Package of 






25 Whole Tickets will cost 




$76.00 


" 25 Half do. 




38.00 


" 25 Quarter do. 




19.00 



To be had in the greatest variety of numbers, either by the Package 
or single Ticket, of Stevenson & Points, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
—Southern Citizen, May 20, 1837. 

NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE LOTTERY 

Fourteenth Class to 1837. 

For benefit of the Salisbury Academy 

To be drawn at Bethania, Stokes Co. N". C. 

on Thursday, 10th August. 

74 number Lottery 14 drawn ballots. 

Stevenson & Points, 

Managers. 

Splendid Scheme. 



1 Prize ot 10,000 Dollars. 




1 Prize of 3,000 do 




1 do of 2,000 do 




6 Prizes of 1,000 do 




&c. &c. &c. &c. 




Whole Tickets $5 




Halves $2.50 




Quarters $1.25 




A package of 25 Whole Tickets in this Lottery will cost 


$50.00 


Half do 


25.00 


Quarter do 


12.50 


Orders from a distance promptly attended to by 




Stevenson 


& Points, 




Managers. 


— Southern Citizen, July 15, 1837. 





Eowax County Schools. 377 

NORTH CAEOLIXA 

STATE LOTTERY. 

Extra Class C. for 1837. 

For the benefit of the Salisbury Academy. 

To be drawn at Salisbury. X. C. 

On Thursday, 21st of September, 1837. 

71 number Lottery 14 drawn ballots. 

Stevenson & Poix'ts, 

Managers. 

Splexded Scheme. 



1 


Prize 


of 


10,000 : 


Dolh 


1 


do 


of 


4^000 


do 


1 


Prize 


of 


3,000 


do 


1 


do 


of 


2,500 


do 


1 


do 


of 


2,000 


do 


1 


do 


of 


1,500 


do 


o 
O 


Prizes of 


1,000 


do 


10 


do 


of 


500 


do 


10 


do 


of 


400 


do 


10 


do 


of 


300 


do 


10 


do 


of 


200 


do 


15 


do 


of 


100 


do 


40 


do 


of 


90 


do 


40 


do 


of 


80 


do 


60 


do 


of 


60 


do 


70 


do 


of 


50 


do 


100 


do 


of 


40 


do 


122 


do 


of 


30 


do 


122 


do 


of 


24 


do 


122 


do 


of 


16 


do 


5,1S5 


do 


of 


10 


do 


25,620 


do 


of 


5 


do 



31,535 Prizes amounting to $247,290. 
Whole Tickets $5 

Halves $2.50 

Quarters 81.25 

To be had in the greatest variety of numbers, either in the Package 
or single Ticket, of Stevexsox & Poixts, 

Raleigh. 
A package of 25 "WTiole Tickets in this Lottery will cost $65.50 

Half do 32.75 

Quarter do 16.37% 

Orders from a distance promptly attended to by 

Stevexsox & Polxts, 
— Southern Citizen, September 2, 1837. Raleigh, X. C. 



578 Rowan County Schools. 

NORTH CAROLINA 

STATE LOTTERY 

For the benefit of the Salisbury Academy, 

To be drawn at Mocksville, N. C. 

On Thursday, 19th of October, 1837. 

75 number Lottery 14 drawn ballots. 

Stevenson & Points, 

Managers. 

Splendid Scheme. 



1 


Prize 


of 


10,000 : 


Dolls 


1 


do 


of 


4,000 


do 


1 


Prize 


of 


3,000 


do 


1 


do 


of 


2,500 


do 


1 


do 


of 


2,000 


do 


1 


do 


of 


1,500 


do 


3 


Prizes of 


1,000 


do 


10 


do 


of 


500 


do 


10 


do 


of 


400 


do 



Besides many of 300, 200, 100, 90, 80, 60, 50, &c. &c. &c. 
Amounting in all to $247,290. 

Whole Tickets $5 

Halves $2.50 

Quarters $1.25 

A Package of 25 Whole Tickets in this Lottery will cost $65.50 

Half do 32.75 

Quarter do 16.37% 

To be had in the greatest variety of numbers, either by the Package 
or single Ticket, of Stevenson & Points, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
— Southern Citizen, October 7, 1837. 

NORTH CAROLINA 

STATE LOTTERY. 

For the benefit of the Salisbury Academy. 

Class No. 19 for 1837. 

To be drawn at Yanceyville, N. C. 

On Thursday, 9th of November, 1837. 

66 number Lottery 10 drawn ballots. 

Stevenson & Points, 

Managers. 



Rowan County Schools. 379 

Splendid Scheme. 



1 


Prize 


of 


10,000 


Dollars. 


1 


do 


of 


4,000 


do 


1 


Prize 


of 


3,000 


do 


1 


do 


of 


2,320 


do 


1 


do 


of 


1,810 


do 


5 


Prizes of 


1,000 


do 


10 


do 


of 


400 


do 


100 


do 


of 


100 


do 


56 


do 


of 


40 


do 


56 


do 


of 


30 


do 


56 


do 


of 


20 


do 


112 


do 


of 


10 


do 



Amounting in all to $125, 840. 

Whole Tickets $4 

Halves $2 

Quarters $1 

A Package of 25 Whole Tickets in this Lottery will cost $54.00 

Half do 27.00 

Quarter do 13.00 

To be had in the greatest variety of numbers, either by the Package 
or single Ticket, of Stevenson & Points, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
— Southern Citizen, October 21, 1837. 

NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE LOTTERY. 

For the benefit of the Salisbury Academy, 
Extra Class D. for 1837. 
To be drawn at Pittsboro, Chat- 
ham County, on Thursday, the 19th 
of November, 
1837. 
75 number Lottery 14 drawn ballots, 

Lilly & Wheeler, 

Managers. 
— Southern Citizen, November 1^, 1837. 



380 Rowan County Schools. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

STATE LOTTERY. 

For the benefit of the Salisbury Academy, 

Class No. 20, for 1837. 

To be drawn at Fayetteville, 

Cumberland County, on Thursday, 

the 7th of December, 

1837. 

75 number Lottery 14 drawn ballots. 

Lilly & "Wheeler, 

Managers. 
— Southern Citizen, November 25, 1837. 

NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE LOTTERY, 

For the benefit of the Salisbury Academy, 

Extra Class E, for 1837. 

To be drawn at Wilmington, New 

Hanover County, on Thursday, the 

14th of December, 

1837. 

75 number Lottery 14 drawn ballots. 

Lilly & "Wheeler, 

Managers. 
— Southern Citizen, December 9, 1837. 

NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE LOTTERY 

For the benefit of the Salisbury Academy. 

Extra Class F. for 1837. 

To be drawn at Newbern, Craven County, 

on Thursday, the 28th of December, 

1837. 
75 number Lottery 14 drawn ballots. 

Lilly & "Wheeler, 

Managers. 
(Signed) R. J. West, 

Ashborough, N. C. 
— Southern Citizen, December 23, 1837. 



Rowan County Schools. 381 

SALISBURY ACADEMY TEACHERS A>D COURSE OF STUDY, 1838. 

SALISBURY FEMALE ACADEMY. 

Mrs. Hutchison begs leave to inform her friends and the public 
generally, that the exercises of this Institution will, by divine permis- 
sion, recommence on the 10th of October next. 

With the hope of rendering the new Female Academy of Salisbury, 
worthy the liberality of the founders, and of North Carolina, she has 
associated with herself, teachers, in whose talents and acquirements, as 
well as dispositions and principles, she feels the highest confidence, and 
thus she is enabled to recommend them to the patronage of a deserving 
public, and to engage in her own name and theirs', that every meas- 
ure shall be pursued, and every exertion used, which promises to pro- 
mote the moral, mental and personal improvement of all who may be 
entrusted to their care. She believes the measures pursued in her 
School-Room, happily calculated to form the female character for sta- 
tions of high usefulness in society. She appeals for living examples to 
the multitude of her scholars widely scattered over the Southern and 
"Western States, who, she trusts, will be to her School a sufficient letter 
of Recommendation. 

The Literary Department will be under her own personal charge, 
the Ornamental under that of her neice, Miss SARAH LOUISA NYE, 
of New York. To Miss EMMA J. BAKER is committed the Depart- 
ment of Music. The high qualifications of this young lady, as a teacher 
on the Piano and Guitar, place her among the most successful teachers 
of the present day. To the Rev. S. FRONTIS, whose character is too 
well established to need recommendation, and whose superior talents as 
an instructor in the French language, (his native tongue,) are exten- 
sively known, will be entrusted the class in French. 

Excellent Board can be obtained for the Pupils, either at Col. Lem- 
ly's with the teachers, or in other highly respectable families, where 
every proper care will be taken to promote their improvement and con- 
duct. 

Terms of Admission. 

First Class. 

History, Botany, Arithmetic, Algebra, Multe Brun Geography, (with 
the use of the Globes,) Astronomy, Chemistry, Natural Philosophy, 
Mental and Moral Philosophy, Rhetoric, Logic, Composition, etc., etc., 
per session, $15 50 

Second Class. 

Reading, Spelling, Writing and Arithmetic, (lower Rules,) with 
Olney's Geography, per Session, $10 50 



382 Rowan County Schools. 

Extra Branches. 

Latin, per Session, $ 5 00 

French, do 10 00 

Drawing and Painting in Water Colors, 8 00 

Wax Work, per Course, 6 00 

Embroidering and Silk and Ckenile, per Course, 5 00 

Lamp Mat and Worsted work, do 5 00 

Music on Piano or Guitar, per Session, 25 00 

Scholars will be charged from the time of entering, but no deduction 
made for absence, except in case of protracted sickness. 

1ST. B. Parents and Guardians are respectfully requested to specify 
what Church they wish their children to attend. 
Salisbury, Sept, 27, 1838. 
— Raleigh Register, Monday, October 8, 1838. 

QUEEH OF MAT AT SALISBURY ACADEMY, 1839. 

Our town was enlivened on Wednesday evening last, with that 
primitive and beautiful past time, the Coronation of the Queen of May. 
This mimic scene of Royalty was enacted in a grove in the village by 
the Young Ladies of Mrs. Hutchison's School, with uncommon propriety 
and effect, Miss Mary Fisher was the very pretty representative of the 
vernal deity on the occasion, and if the youthful Queen of the English 
Realms shall always do her part on the throne with as much dignity, 
propriety and grace, as did our village maiden, her subjects will have 
cause to rejoice in her reign. The coronal wreath was placed on the 
brow of Her Majesty by the fair hand of Miss Elizabeth Paup, and a 
very touching address was delivered by Miss Martha M. Jones. Cakes, 
Candies and all kinds of Confectionary were handed round to the visi- 
tors; of whom there was a large and elegant assemblage, while Music 
lent its gladdening charm to the scene. Seldom has any pageant of 
the kind gone off better. The festivities of the evening were concluded 
with an elegant party, furnished by that spirited and accomplished 
landlord, Col. Long.- — Car. Watchman. 

— Raleigh Star, May 15, 1839. 

KILPATRICK'S SCHOOL, 1809. 

A SCHOOL 

Eor the instruction of young men in the Latin and Greek Languages, 
English Grammar, Geography, etc. will be opened on the first of March 
next, in Rowan county, about fifteen miles above Salisbury, under the 
immediate direction of the Rev. Joseph D. Kilpatrick. — The price of 
Tuition will be Twelve Dollars, and of boarding, Forty Dollars per 
year. Boarding may be had in genteel houses in the neighborhood, and 



Rowan County Schools. 383 

tolerably convenient. The utmost care will be taken to preserve the 
morals of young men who may be sent to this place for instruction. 

February 20th, 1809. 

— Raleigh Star, March 9, 1809. 

KILPATEICK'S SCHOOL IN 1820. 

LATEST SCHOOL. 

As I have been frequently solicited through the summer and autumn 
to commence again the business of teaching, I have taken this method to 
give public notice, that I design to commence with the first of the ensu- 
ing year, if the number of students who offer will justify the attempt. It 
is not my wish to attend upon a large number. Decent boarding can 
be had in the neighborhood for $65 or $70 per annum. Tuition, $16. 
I design to take a few in my own family. It is my wish that those who 
design applying or sending their sons, would communicate such inten- 
tion or wish previous to the 20th of December. 

Rowan, K C, Nov. 20, 1820. J. D. Kilpatrick. 

— Western Carolinian, November 28, 1820. 

MUMFOED'S SCHOOL, 1815. 

FEMALE EDUCATION. 

Mrs. George Mumford's recluse, and, at times, lonely situation, in- 
duced Mr. M. to suggest the Instruction of two or three young Ladies, 
as a pleasing alternative. Under this impression, Mrs. M. tenders her 
services to those who may be willing to confide to her so important a 
charge. 

In addition to the common rudiments, Mrs. Mumford will instruct 
them in History, Geography, Music, Painting, Embroidery and other 
needle work. 

Letters addressed to Geo : Mumford, Esq. Milton, Rowan County, 
shall receive prompt attention — and the terms of Tuition, etc., made 
known. 

June 6. 

— Raleigh Register, June 23, 1815. 

BAEEY'S SCHOOL, 1S28. 

MR. P. BARRY'S SCHOOL. 

We, the undersigned, who attended the examination of the Pupils of 
Mr. P. Barry, last week, in this place, consider it due to his care and 
industry to express our particular gratification at the manner in which 
his scholars acquitted themselves. They were generally small, & most 
of them new beginners ; yet the accuracy with which they answered the 
questions propounded to them in their various studies, — Geography, 



384 Rowan County Schools. 

History, &c. evidenced considerable progress, and reflected credit on 

themselves and on their indefatigable teacher. 

We were also much gratified at the handsome manner in which the 

larger boys acquitted themselves in declamation. 

R. M. Saunders, 
Chas. Fisher, 
Robert Macnamara, 
John Beard, jun. 
Junius Sneed, 
Dane. Meenan. 
— Yadkin & Catawba Journal, June 21f, 1828. 

WILLEY'S SELECT SCHOOL, 1828. 

Select School. 

In compliance with the frequent solicitations of several respectable 
families in this place, Mrs. Willey has been induced to open a Select 
School for the instruction of young ladies, in the useful and ornamental 
branches of Education. 

Her terms are as follows : 

For Reading, Spelling and Writing, $4 per quarter. 

Arithmetic, English, Grammar, Geography, History and Rhetoric,, 
together with the above, $5. 

Drawing and Painting upon Paper and Satin, theorem painting upon 
Velvet and Paper, and open and ornamental Needle Work upon Lace, 
Cambric and Muslin, $10. 

Those who feel disposed to encourage the above School, may be as- 
sured that the utmost care will be paid to the morals and manners, as 
well as the scientific pursuits of such as may be placed under her charge. 

Salisbury, Oct. 13, 1828. 

— Yadkin & Catawba Journal, October 28, 1828. 

MRS. WILLEY resumed the duties of her School on Monday last. 
Those who intend to send their daughters or wards the present session, 
are requested to do so at an early period, so that they may be properly 
arranged into classes. 

Jan. 10, 1829. 

— Yadkin & Catawba Journal, Jan. 13, 1829. 

WILLEY'S TERMS AND COURSE OF STUDY, 1829. 

FEMALE SCHOOL. 
MRS. WILLEY 

RETURNS her sincere thanks to the citizens of Salisbury and its 
vicinity, for the liberal patronage she has received in the support of her 
seminary, for the instruction of young Ladies ; and hopes, by unremit- 



Rowan County Schools. 385 

ting assiduity to the best interest of those placed under her charge, to 
merit a continuation of public favor. The next Quarter of her school 
will commence on the first Monday of April next, where young ladies 
will be instructed in all the English and Ornamental branches of 
Education usually taught in this country. 
Her terms, per quarter, are as follows : — 

1. Reading and Spelling, S3 

2. Reading, Spelling, Recitations and "Writing, 4 

3. Arithmetic, English Grammar, Geography, Reading, Spelling, 

and Writing 5 

4. Plain and Ornamental Xeedle Work, including the above branches, 6 

5. History, Composition and Rhetoric, with the above, 6 

6. Drawing and painting, 10 

7. Theorem Painting upon velvet and paper, 10 

]ST. B. Music and the French Language will be taught, in addition to 
the above branches, as soon as the School will justify the employment of 
more assistance. 

Mrs. Willey can accommodate a few young Ladies who board on rea- 
sonable terms. 

— Yadkin & Catawba Journal, March 2Jf, 1829. 

MRS. WILLEY 

Informs her friends and the public, that her School will re-commence 
on Monday, the 3d of August. 
Salisbury, July 27, 1829. 
— Yadkin & Catawba Journal, July 28, 1829. 

MRS. WILLEY, thankful for the liberal encouragement she has 
received in support of her School for the instruction of young Ladies, 
respectfully informs the citizens of Salisbury and its vicinity, that the 
next quarter will commence on the first Monday of November ensuing, 
and will certainly continue (health permitting) two quarters from that 
time; and she hopes, by the assiduous discharge of her duty to those 
who may be committed to her care, to merit a continuance of favor. 

Her terms are the same as heretofore. 

Reading and Spelling, per quarter, $ 3 

Recitation and Writing, together with the above, 4 

English Grammar, Geography, Arithmetic, Composition and Rhet- 
oric, with the above branches, 5 

Plain JSTeedle Work, marking Samplers, &c. together with any or all 

of the above branches, 6 

Plain and ornamental Needle Work, in its various branches, in- 
cluding Lace Work &c. on a new and improved method, which will 

enable a lady to execute with facility equal to the imported 10 

Drawing and Painting on Paper, also Theorem Painting upon Vel- 
vet and Paper, a new and elegant method, 10 

25 



386 Rowan County Schools. 

N". B. The present quarter of trie school will terminate on Friday, 
the 23d of October next, when there will be a vacation until the com- 
mencement of the ensuing quarter. 

— Yadkin & Catawba Journal, Sept. 22, 1829. 

HALL'S SCHOOL, 1829. 

The subscriber has resumed his school in this place, in which are 
taught the following branches of education, viz : Reading, Writing Arith- 
metic, Algebra, English Grammar, Geography, History, the Latin and 
Greek languages. He promises that every exertion will be made on his 
part, for the improvement of those children entrusted to his care. 

Salisbury, July 9, 1829. J. G. Hall. 

— Yadkin & Catawba Journal, July 11}., 1829. 



STOKES COUNTY SCHOOLS 

GERMANTON ACADEMY, 1811. 

NOTICE. (Lottery.) 

The drawing of the Germanton Academy Lottery will cornmence on 
the first Friday in April, and will be continued under the direction of 
the Managers until all the numbers are drawn. 

T. Armstrong, Sec. 
THE TRUSTEES 

Of the Germanton Academy inform the public that the Academy has 
commenced business, under the inspection of a very respectable and 
competent young man, who is well versed in the languages and other 
branches of education usually taught in Schools. The schoolhouse is in 
the neighborhood of Germanton, one of the healthiest of situations in 
the state, where board may be had for the small price of forty dollars 
per year. Every attention will be paid by the Trustees to the morals 
and improvement of the scholars. 

Dec. 26, 1810. T. Armstrong, Sec. 

— The Star, January 3, 1811. 

GERMANTON ACADEMY UNDER THOMAS ALEXANDER. 

The Trustees of the Germanton Academy have the pleasure to inform 
the public, that they have employed Mr. Thomas Alexander, of Meck- 
lenburg county as Teacher * * * The price of tuition in the 
Languages, Sciences, or any inferior branch of Education, is 15 dollars 
per annum. Boarding can be procured in the neighborhood for 40 
dollars per annum. * * 

April 2, 1811. T. Armstrong, Secy. 

— Raleigh Register, April 5, 1811. 

GERMANTON ACADEMY UNDER LINCOLN CLARK, 1826. 

Literary Notice. 

THE winter session of Germanton Academy commenced on the 2nd 
January under the care of the subscriber. 

Terms of Tuition — For Reading, Writing and Spelling, $5 per ses- 
sion; Arithmetic, Grammar and Geography, $7; Latin and Greek Lan- 
guages, together with the higher branches of Mathematics, and the 
sciences in general, $10. Five months and a half constitute a session. 
No deduction will be made for time lost by the Student after entrance. 
No exertions will be wanting on the part of the Teacher to promote the 
advancement, and to secure the best good of the pupils committed to his 
care. 

January 18, 1826. Lincoln Clark. 

— The Star, Jan. 27, 1826. 

(387) 



WAKE COUNTY SCHOOLS 

RALEIGH ACADEMY, 1800. 

A School will be opened at Raleigh on the 28th Instant, for the In- 
struction of Young Gentlemen and Ladies in the most useful and nec- 
essary Branches of Education, viz. : The Sciences, Classics, Arithmetic, 
English Grammar, Reading, Writing, Needle Work, etc. 

The Tuition of the Young Gentlemen to be conducted by Mr. German 
Guthrie ; that of the Young Ladies by Mrs. Langley. 

Terms. 

For Reading, Writing, Arithmetic and Needlework, nine Dollars per 
Annum ; or two Dollars and a Half per Quarter, for a less Period than a 
Year. 

For English Grammar, the Classics and Sciences, thirteen Dollars 
per Annum ; or three Dollars and a Half per Quarter. 

The Reputation which Mr. Guthrie has acquired as a teacher in the 
Pittsborough Academy, renders it unnecessary to say anything here in 
his Favor; and Mrs. Langley's Talents in this Line have already been 
experienced to be such as deserve Patronage. 

Mrs. Langley will receive Boarders at fifty Dollars per Annum, or 
twelve Dollars and a Half per Quarter (the Boarders finding their own 
Bedding) and to such as she may be favored with, she engages to pay 
the strictest Attention. Boarding may also be had at other Houses in 
the City. 

Applications to be made to Peter Casso, Raleigh (if by Letter, the 
Postage must be paid) of whom any further Particulars relative to the 
Establishment may be had. 

Raleigh, July 15, 1800. 

— Raleigh Register, July 15, 1800. 

FIRST ACADEMY BUILDING, 1802. 

To Builders. 

Persons inclined to undertake the erection of a suitable Frame Build- 
ing for the Raleigh Academy, of the following Description and Dimen- 
sions, are desired to deliver their Proposals in Writing, on or before 
the first Day of July next, to Nathaniel Jones, Esq. of White Plains, 
or to J. Gales, Raleigh. The Building is to be two stories high, pillared 
on Brick or Stone 2 x /2 Feet high from the Ground, 40 Feet long, 24 Feet 
wide, and 12 Feet Pitch below and 10 feet above, clear, with a Brick 
Chimney at each End, two Doors and eight Windows below, the Win- 
dows to contain 18 Lights, 12 by 10, and 10 Windows in the second 
story, 18 Lights 8 by 10; two Rooms 12 Feet square to be taken off 

(388 ) 



Wake County Schools. 389 

from one End of the upper Room: The whole to be built with good 
Timber, to be ceiled w T ith Plank throughout, painted Inside and Outside, 
and finished in a workrnanly manner. 

May 24. J. Gales, Sec'ry pro. tern. 

Raleigh Register, May 25, 1802. 

LOCATION, CONTRACTOR OF FIRST BUILDING, 1803. 

On Thursday last, the Trustees of the intended Raleigh Academy, 
fixed on the scite of the Building. It is to be erected near the center of 
Burke-Square and to have a Southern and a northern aspect. The 
house being already framed, Mr. Goodloe will immediately raise it; 
and it is supposed the Brick Work will be done in the course of the 
Summer ; especially if such of our neighboring planters, and others, as 
have not already contributed towards this excellent Institution, will 
come forward and do so, in the mean time, that the funds of the Board 
may be equal to the expence, which, at present, we are concerned to say 
is not the case. We cannot believe, that the friends of virtue and 
learning will withhold their aid, when they know it is wanted to com- 
plete this undertaking. 

Editorial, Raleigh Register, May 16. 1803. 

PROGRESS OF ACADEMY BUILDING. 

Since our last, the frame of the building for the intended Academy 
in this city, was raised on the site heretofore fixed on in Burke-square. 
The timbers are of the best kind, and we have no doubt, when the work 
is finished, it will reflect credit on the contractor, Mr. John M. Goodloe. 
May the Institution meet with that liberal support which it certainly 
deserves, and prove (as we have no doubt it will) a blessing to the 
community, and more especially to the rising generation ! 

— Editorial, Raleigh Register, June 27, 1803. 

ACADEMY BUILDING COMPLETED. 

RALEIGH ACADEMY. 

The Trustees of the above Institution are requested to meet at the 
Academy, on Saturday next, at two o'Clock, for the Purpose of receiving 
the finished Building from the Undertakers ; of looking into the State of 
their Funds; and of considering on the best Means of further accom- 
plishing the Objects of their Trust. As the Business of this Meeting 
is important, it is hoped all the Trustees will attend. 

Jan. 7. J- Gales, Sec. 

— Raleigh Register, Monday, January 9, 1804. 



390 Wake County Schools. 

TEACHERS WANTED— QUALIFICATIONS. 

The Inhabitants of Raleigh, in North Carolina, having lately erected 
a House for an Academy in one of the Squares of the City given them 
by the Legislature for the purpose, are desirous of engaging a fit person 
to superintend the Institution. If they could meet with a Clergyman of 
liberal Education and Principles, who would take charge of the Acad- 
emy and give the citizens a weekly Discourse, such an one would be 
preferred, and for such a Character, it is believed, a handsome salary 
would be provided. 

Raleigh being the seat of the State Government, and esteemed a 
healthy situation, would doubtless prove an agreeable residence for a 
person of the above description. 

An Assistant Teacher to initiate young Scholars in Reading, Writing 
and Accoumpts, is also wanted. 

Application to be made, by letter (postpaid) to J. Gales, Raleigh, 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees. 

March 10. 

— Raleigh Register, March 26, 1801/-. 

PLAT FOR BENEFIT OF SCHOOL. 

The friends of the Raleigh Academy will be pleased to learn that 
the young Gentlemen of the City are preparing a Play or two, which 
they intend to perform for the benefit of that institution in the course 
of the approaching Conference and Federal Courts. We understand 
that Monday the 18th is fixed for the first performance. 

— Editorial, Raleigh Register, June 11, 180k- 

FIRST TEACHERS AND COURSE OF STUDY. 

The Trustees of the Raleigh Academy respectfully inform the Public, 
that having engaged the Rev. Marin Detargny (late of Princeton Col- 
lege and the College of Maryland) as their Principal Teacher, and Miss 
Charlotte Brodie as Teacher of Needle Work, they propose to open the 
Academy on the 1st July next, on the following Terms, viz. 

For the Greek, Latin, Spanish, Italian or French Languages, Mathe- 
matics, with their Application to the system of the World, Astronomy, 
Navigation, etc., Five Dollars per Quarter. 

For Geography, the use of the Globes, Surveying, English Grammar, 
Book-keeping and Arithmetic, etc. Four Dollars per Quarter. 

For Reading and Writing, Three Dollars per Quarter. 

Young Ladies will be taught Needle-work without any additional 
charge. 

Students entering this Institution, as is usual in similar Establish- 
ments, will be expected to pay for one Quarter's Tuition in Advance to 
the Treasurer of the Board. 

The Trustees flatter themselves that from the Talents of their Prin- 



Wake County Schools. 391 

cipal Teacher, the extensive plan of Education proposed, and the central 
and healthy situation of Raleigh, this institution will be favoured with 
a considerable degree of public patronage. 

It is supposed that good Boarding may be had for Students at sixty 
dollars per annum. 

Mr. Detargny being a complete Stenographer, will initiate such of 
the Students as desire it, in the Art of writing short-hand, for which 
two Dollars per quarter additional will be charged. 

A good Teacher of Reading and Writing wanted. Apply to the 
Printer hereof. 

Mr. and Mrs. Detargny are desirous of meeting with Boarding in 
some regular Family in the city. 

June 23. 

— Raleigh Register, June 25, 1804-. 

ANOTHER TEACHER EMPLOYED. 

We have pleasure in announcing that the Trustees of our Academy 
have engaged Mr. Chesley Daniel, a Graduate of the University of this 
State, and late one of the Masters of the Preparatory School of that 
Institution. We trust, that being so ably provided with Teachers, our 
Academy will soon be full of students. 

— Editorial, Raleigh Register, July 9, 180Jj.. 

SOME SUBSCRIBERS TO ACADEMY F13D. 

A List of Subscribers who have not yet paid their Subscription 
Money, and which Mr. Wm. Peace is requested by the Trustees to use 
his Endeavours to collect. 

Dolls. 

Wm. Armstrong 10 

Wm. Atkins 5 

Josiah Atkins 10 

Sam Alston 10 

Jas Canon 5 

Richd. Davison 5 

Lewis Greene 20 

Osborn Hunter 10 

David Justice 10 

Jas. H. Lewis 10 

Jno. Lewis (I^ash) 5 

Late Dugald McKeithin 5 

Jno. Moore 2 

Alexr. Myatt 5 

Jno. Myatt 3 

Simon Pearson 2 

Jno. Rogers (deed.) 20. 



392 Wake County Schools. 

Dolls. 

Joseph Ross 10 

Duncan Ray 5. 

Jonathan Turner (deed.) 10 

Sterling Wheaton 10. 

Wm. Walton 10 

Archd. Wills 3 

[A Subscriber whose name cannot at present 

be deciphered] 2 



$188.50 
[The above is in the handwriting of Joseph Gales.] 
— From Pittman Papers. 

ADDITIONAL FUNDS SUBSCRIBED. 

We whose Names are hereunto subscribed, in consideration of the 
funds of the Raleigh Academy being deficient, agree to advance our 
Subscription as follows : 

August 27 1804. 

William Boylan ten Dollars 

John S. Raboteau five Dollars 

David Royster One Dollar 

Wm. Flack $2 Dollars 

Wm. Armstrong $10. 

Lewis Green 20 

Jas. H. Lewis 10. 

John Lewis (Nash) 6. 

John Myatt 3 

John Rogers (decesd) 20 

Duncan Roy 5. 

William Walton 10 

Archd. Wills 3 

Robert Cannon 5 

Burwell Perry 4. 

Allen Rogers 10. 

William Jones (Carpr.) 4 

Doctr. C. Jones 4 
—From Pittman Papers. 

A RECEIPT FOR SALARY. 

Dec. 22. 1804 

Reed, of William Peace 
eighty dollars in part payment of my salary of the last quarter. 

C. Daniel. 
—From Pittman Papers. 



Wake County Schools. 393 

A HEW ADMINISTRATION. 

On the 20th inst. An Academy in Raleigh, will commence its Exer- 
cises under the Direction of Mr. C. Daniel, assisted by Miss Charlotte 
Brodie in the Female Department. All the Branches of Male as well 
as Female Education will be taught on the usual Terms. Board may be 
obtained in several respectable Families, on very low Terms. 

Jan. 10th, 1805. 

— Raleigh Register, January IJf, 1805. 

MR. DETARGNY GOES TO CHARLESTON. 

"We find by the last Charleston papers, that the Rev. M. Detargny (for 
a short time Superintendent of the Academy in this city) is appointed 
Pastor of the French Protestant Church in Charleston, and that on 
Sunday the 19th ult. he was ordained to the ministry by the Presbytery 
of that city. 

Editorial, Raleigh Register, June 3, 1805. 

EXAMINATIONS AND ATTENDANCE. 

The Examination of the Students of this Institution under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Daniel took place on Thursday last, in the presence of the 
Trustees and a large assemblage of the Ladies and Gentlemen of the 
city and neighborhood. The performance of the scholars in general, 
was such as to reflect credit on their genius and application, and on 
the attention and assiduity of the Instructors. * * * 

The friends of Literature and of their Country, will see with pleasure 
the growing prosperity of this Institution. It now consists of about 
sixty Scholars and from the healthiness of the situation, the goodness of 
the society, and the cheapness of board we may indulge the expectation 
of its future increase. 

— Editorial, Raleigh Register, July 20, 1805. 

DONATION TO THE ACADEMY. 

On Friday last, the suit brought by the Editor of this paper against 
¥m. Boylan, the Editor of the Minerva, for an assault committed on 
his person during the last session of the General Assembly, was deter- 
mined in Hillsborough Superior Court. The evidence in support of the 
action was so positive, that it was submitted to the Jury without argu- 
ment from the counsel on either side. After a concise charge from 
Judge Locke, in which the evidence was placed in the clearest point of 
view, the Jury retired for about 10 minutes, and returned with a verdict 
of One Hundred Pounds damages. To shew that the Editor of the 
Register had no view of advantage to himself in bringing this suit, he 
declares it to be his intention to make a donation of the above sum 



394 Wake County Schools. 

(first deducting any extra expenses attending the suit) to the Raleigh 
Academy. 

— Raleigh Register of Monday, October llf, 1805. 

AN ORDER ON SALARY. 

Please to pay Mr. John Marshall three pounds and deduct the same 
from the amount of the sum due me from the treasury of the Raleigh 
Academy. C. Daniel. 

Mr. W. Peace — Treasurer of the Raleigh Academy. 

Decernr. 24th 1805 Reed, of Will. Peace Treas. of the Raleigh Acad- 
emy Six doll.s in full of the within order. J. Marshall. 

- — From Pittman Papers. 

NEW TEACHERS AND COURSE OF STUDY, 1806. 

The Place of Superintendent of the Female Department in the Ra- 
leigh Academy having become vacant by the resignation of Miss 
Brodie, the undersigned has been authorized by the Trustees to 
employ a Successor. Ladies willing to undertake the care of that De- 
partment are requested to signify the same to either of the undersigned, 
to the end that the appointment may be made in due time to meet the 
Commencement of the next Session. Candidates not personally known 
to the Trustees are requested to forward certificate of their Qualifica- 
tions. Terms, Rates of Compensation, etc., will be made known on 
application. The Trustees have the satisfaction of announcing to the 
Public that they have engaged Mr. McGready to act as Principal of the 
Raleigh Academy, whose abilities as a Teacher are known and highly 
approved of; and there is no doubt but a Female Teacher will be em- 
ployed before the announcement of next Session, which will be on the 
10th of January next. 

For instruction in Natural Philosophy, Astronomy, Mathematics and 
the Latin and Greek Languages, Five Dollars per Quarter; English 
Grammar, Oratory and Geography, Four Dollars; Reading, Writing, 
Arithmetic and ISTeedle Work, Three Dollars. Board may be had low 
in several genteel Families. Particular Attention will be paid to the 
Morals and Manners of Scholars that cannot be immediately under the 
care of their Parents and Guardians. William White, 

Robert Williams, 

Raleigh, Dec. 10. Calvin Jones, 

— Raleigh Register, January 6, 1806. Committee. 

MISS BRODIE RECONSIDERS. 

The Exercises of the Raleigh Academy, under the direction of Mr. 
Aaron F. McGready as principal, commenced on Monday last. Miss 
Brodie, we understand, has consented again to superintend the Female 
department, until another Female Teacher is procured. 

— Raleigh Register, January 20, 1806. 



Wake County Schools. 395 

PRINCIPAL'S ORDER FOR SALARY. 

Mr. Peace, Please to let Mr. Marshall have 15$ as soon as I can have 
an opportunity, I will promise a draft from the President of which this 
will be considered part A F McGready 

April 1 1806 

— From Pitt-man Papers. 

A SCHOOL EXHIBITION. 

A Public Exhibition and Examination of the Students of the Raleigh 
Academy will take place on Monday and Tuesday the 23d and 24th 
June. Besides the usual Exercises there will be performed on the 
Evening of one of the above clays by the Members of the Thespian 
Society and the Students of the Academy, for the Benefit of the Insti- 
tution, the celebrated Comedy of The Way to Get Married, and the ad- 
mired Farce of Raising the Wind, together with some humorous Songs 
and Recitations. 

— Raleigh Register, June 2, 1806. 

TEACHERS AND PUPILS PRAISED. 

* * * Of the Students of the Academy in general, it gives the 
Trustees the highest pleasure to say, that their conduct has been almost 
uniformly correct — their diligence highly commendable, and their prog- 
ress great. Of the Teachers, the Trustees beg leave to express their 
warmest approbation. Their zeal and talents have been employed in a 
manner, and with a degree of success, equally honorable to themselves 
and advantageous to the institution of which they have the charge. 

The Trustees have the satisfaction of informing the public that Mr. 
McGready, whose talents as a teacher are well known, still continues to 
preside over the institution. 

Mr. Charles R. Kennon, a Young Gentleman of classic education, 

has lately been employed as assistant teacher. 

Miss Brodie still continues to superintend the female department. 
* * * 

— Raleigh Register, June 30, 1806. 

DEATH OF PRINCIPAL TEACHER. 

Died, 

In this city, on Saturday last, after an illness of six weeks, Mr. Aaron 
McGready, the principal Teacher of our Academy — A Young man uni- 
versally respected for his talents and virtues. 

— Raleigh Register, Monday September 15, 1806. 



396 Wake County Schools. 

A NEW PRINCIPAL CHOSEN. 

We have pleasure in announcing to the public, that Rev. W. L. Tur- 
ner, late Professor of Languages in the Washington Academy at Lexing- 
ton in Virginia, a gentleman of high character and attainments, is en- 
gaged as Superintendent of our Academy, and Pastor of the City. He 
is expected to enter on his duties about the 1st of November. In the 
meantime, Mr Atlas Jones, late the Professor of Languages at our Uni- 
versity, has very obligingly taken charge of the Academy, so that the 
business of the Institution will suffer no derangement from the death of 
Mr. McGready, its late teacher. 

— Raleigh Register, October 6, 1806. 

NEW PRINCIPAL ARRIVES. 

We have the pleasure to state, that the Rev. Wm. L. Turner, from 
Lexington, (Virginia) who, since the death of the late Mr. McGready, 
has been engaged as Principal of our Academy, and Pastor of the City, 
is arrived, and will forth with undertake these important charges. 

— Raleigh Register, November 10, 1806. 

CLASSES AND SUBJECTS TAUGHT, 1806. 

[ Stars indicate names of persons who were distinguished in classes. ] 

The semi-annual Examination of the Students of the Raleigh Acad- 
emy took place on the 19th and 20th inst. and proved highly satisfactory 
to the Trustees. * * * 

A Class in Virgil, * * * ; Latin Grammar, * * * ; Selectae 
Veteri, * * * ; Geography Class, * * * ; English Grammar, 
* * * ; Arithmetic, * * *. 

Female Department. 

Geography Class, * * * ; English Grammar, * * * ; Eirst 
Arithmetic Class, * * * ; Second Arithmetic Class, * * * ; 
NeedleWork, * * *. 

Of the deportment and attention of all the Teachers in the Academy, 
the Trustees are happy to pronounce their entire approbation. The tal- 
ents of the Rev. Wm. L. Turner, who has lately been employed as prin- 
cipal Teacher, the salubrity of the place and the cheapness of board, 
afford flattering pressages of the increasing prosperity of the Institution. 

— Raleigh Register, December 29, 1806. 

ACADEMY PROSPECTUS— NEW TEACHERS, ETC. 

The Trustees have now the satisfaction to state that this Institution 
has at length arisen to that high degree of respectability, and usefulness 
which has ever been expected to result from their exertions — the abil- 
ity of the Teachers, the many advantages of its local situation, and the 
favor of a generous and enlightened Public. 



"Wake County Schools. 397 

The benefits expected from the zeal and talents of the Rev. Mr. Tur- 
ner, Principal of the Institution, have been abundantly realized ; and 
the increasing favour of the Public have enabled the Trustees to em- 
ploy as Preceptress in the Female Department, Mrs. Bowen, of Fayette- 
ville, a Lady eminently distinguished for correctness of manners, and a 
knowledge of Literature and the elegant Arts, and who has for many 
years procured for the Academy at Fayetteville, the merited reputation 
of being the best in the State for the Education of Young Ladies; and 
it is hoped and expected that her removal to Raleigh will not diminish 
her sphere of usefulness. 

Mr. James Burch, of Virginia, has also been employed as Assistant 
Teacher. His moral character is unexceptionable — his attainments in 
Literature and Science are various and extensive, equal to the duties of 
his appointment, and worthy of his associate Teachers. Mr. Burch is 
already in the Academy — Mrs. Bowen will arrive on the first of April. 

In the Male Department will be taught the Languages, Arts and 
Sciences, usually taught in the American Colleges and Academies. And 
in the Female Department, English Grammar, Geography, the use of 
the Globes, Needle Work, Painting, Embroidery, Belle Lettres, History, 
and the Rudiments of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy. Terms of 
Tuition are three and four Dollars a quarter for the lower and middle 
Classes and five Dollars for the highest branches of the Sciences. 

Board can be had in most of the Public Houses and in many genteel 
private Families at 60 Dollars a Year, Washing, Bedding and Fire- 
wood included. 

The Year is divided into two Sessions. The first commences on the 
first day of January, and ends the Saturday immediately preceding the 
last Monday in May. The second Session begins on the first Monday 
in June, and ends the Saturday immediately preceding the third Mon- 
day in November, which is the day of the meeting of the General As- 
sembly. Each Session is divided into two Quarters. At the end of 
each Session there is a public Examination and Exhibition of the 
Students, and at the end of each quarter a private one. 

The Building of the Academy is spacious and convenient, situated 
near an excellent Spring, and in a part of the town wholly inhabited by 
private families. The superior healthiness of Raleigh is too well known 
to require being mentioned here. * * * 

Signed by order and in behalf of the Board, 

Raleigh, February 10, 1807. William White, Sec. 

— Raleigh Register, February 16, 1807. 

SUBSCRIBERS TO FEMALE ACADEMY BUILDING. 

Raleigh, February 1S07. 

We the Subscribers promise to pay to the Treasurer of the Raleigh 
Academy, the sums against our names respectively subscribed, for the 



398 Wake County Schools. 

purpose of erecting a Building for the Female Department in the Ra- 
leigh Academy. 

William White $50. 

S. Haywood 25. 

Jos. Gales 25. 

Simon Turner 25. 

Robert Williams 25. 

William Boylan 25. 

William L. Turner 25. 

John Haywood 25. 

William Shaw 25. 

John S. Raboteau 10. 

William Hill 10. 

H. Potter 10. 

H. H. Cooke 10. 

William Peace 100. 

J. Hinton 25. 

Calvin Jones 25. 

Theophilus Hunter 25. 

Wm. H. Haywood 10. 

R. Sanders $25. 

W. Rand 5. 

P. D. Burch 25. 

Henry Seawell 50. 

William Jones 50. 
— From Pittman Papers. 

THESPIANS AID ACADEMY. 

This evening will be performed by the Thespian Society, a favourite 
Play, called the Deserter, or the School for Soldiers, with the Farce of 
the Lying Yalet, for the benefit of the Academy. The laudable exer- 
tions of the Society to promote the interest of this valuable institution, 
deserves Approbation, and we hope will meet with encouragement from 
the citizens of the town and neighbourhood. 

—Raleigh Register, March 30, 1807. 

ACADEMY DUE BILLS. 

! I i • l - 1 * 

Such of the merchants of this city as have been in the habit of issuing 
small Due Bills, for the convenience of Change, have resolved to with- 
draw them from circulation, in order to give place to a new emission 
which the Trustees of the Raleigh Academy are^about to ma'ke. The In- 
habitants have also generally determined not to receive in their dealings 
any Bank Notes of a less value than one dollar. 

— Raleigh Register, April 13, 1S07. 



Wake County Schools. 399 

BLAtfK FORM OF DUE BILL. 

No. 

The Trustees of the Raleigh 

Academy, at the Office of 

Treasurer, promise to pay the bearer 

on demand, Ten Cents 
April 25, 1807. 
— Pittman Papers. President. 

CLASSES AXD STUDIES IX 1807. 

PUBLIC EXAMINATION" 

Of the Students of the Raleigh Academy, May 28, 29, and 30, 1807. 

Male Depar