(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "North Carolina tobacco report [serial]"

North Carolina 



TOBACCO REPORT 

1 973-7-* 




North Carolina Department of Agriculture 



James A. Graham, Commissioner 
Number 215, May 1974 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 
Fo r wa rd 3 

1973 Flue-Cured Market Provokes Demand 4 

for Changes 

New Record — 1973 5 

Criminal Penalties for Charging 7 

Unauthorized Tobacco Warehouses Fees 

State Market Summary 1973-74 8 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouse Sales 12 

Report for Season — 1973 
Summary of N. C. Dealer and Warehouse 14 

Resales — 1973 
Producer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cured 14 

Tobacco by States — 1973 

Flue-Cured Movement In and Out of 15 

North Carolina 

Burley Movement In and Out of 15 

North Carolina 
Flue-Cured Stabilization Receipts 16 

by Types and States — 1973 
Burley Stabilization Receipts for 16 

N. C. and Total U. S. 1973-74 

N. C. Burley Tobacco Allotments — 1974 17 

N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments — 1974 18 

North Carolina Burley Crops 1928-1973 20 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops 1920-1973 21 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and 22 

Operators by Belts and Markets 1973 
Cigarette Excise Taxes Compared 29 

to Growers' Gross Receipts 

State Board of Agriculture 31 

Domestic Tax Paid Cigarette Consumption 32 

by Kinds 1973 



For free distribution by the Field Crops Section, 

Division of Markets, North Carolina Department 

of Agriculture, Raleigh, N. C. 

Curtis F. Tarleton, Director, Division of Markets 

J. H. Cyrus, Chief, Field Crops Section 

J. T. Bunn, Tobacco Marketing Specialist 



Foreword 




The twenty-fifth annual issue of the 
North Carolina Tobacco Report was 
compiled and assembled under the 
direction of J. H. Cyrus, Chief of the 
Field Crops Section, and J. T. Bunn, 
Tobacco Marketing Specialist, Division 
of Markets, North Carolina Department 
of Agriculture. 

During the quarter of a century 
spanned by the North Carolina Tobacco 
Report, all segments of the tobacco in- 
dustry have faced serious crises. Each 
time, however, the tobacco industry lea- 
dership has been successful in resolving 

their problems, and each time the whole industry has emerged 
from the crisis with renewed strength. 

At the present time all segments of the tobacco industry are 
undergoing a crisis that climaxed during the 1973 season be- 
cause of inequities among growers in the opportunity of market- 
ing their crops. Here again, all of the leadership from all seg- 
ments of the tobacco industry have put their heads together and 
have come forth with concrete plans that will give all growers in 
all production areas equal opportunity in marketing their tobacco. 
While these revolutionary changes in the tobacco auction system 
will require patiences and adjustments by growers, warehouse- 
men and buying companies, it appears that once again the tobac- 
co industry will emerge with a stronger auction system that will 
provide more equity and efficiency for all segments of the great 
tobacco industry. 

Recognition is given the following agencies for their coopera- 
tion in making data available for this publication: The Coopera- 
tive Crop Reporting Service; Agricultural Stabilization Conserva- 
tion Service; Agricultural Marketing Service, U. S. Department of 
Agriculture; and the Flue-Cured Tobacco Cooperative Stabiliza- 
tion Corporation. 




£%a+jl< 



Commissioner of Agriculture 



1973-74 Flue-Cured Market 
Provokes Demand For Changes 



Although the 1973 flue-cured market set new records in aver- 
age prices and in gross returns paid growers, the difficulty that 
many farmers experience in trying to get their tobacco sold 
brought on an explosive situation, in which growers almost un- 
animously called for a restructure in the method of allocating 
sales opportunity to markets. 

Market Restructure 

Generally, the restructure of the auction market for 1974 pro- 
vides for the following broad changes to give all growers a 
more equal opportunity in the market: 

(1) Growers must designate the warehouse or warehouses 
within a limited area in which they plan to sell their quota, 
in order to be eligible for price support. 

(2) Market opening in all areas will be related to the maturity 
of the crop and the readiness of the crop to start moving to 
market. 

(3) Markets will be grouped and buyers and graders will be 
assigned and rotated between markets so as to provide the 
necessary marketing services in each market according to 
grower designations of tobacco to the market. 

The details of implementing the plan will be worked out by the 
Industry-Wide Flue-Cured Marketing Committee, which will be- 
come a Federal Advisory Committee to the Secretary of Agri- 
culture under the new plan. Thus, it appears that 1974 will see the 
launching of a new era for the tobacco auction system. 



New Record-! 973 



Amidst all of the confusion and complaints of the 1973 tobacco 
marketing season, Tarheel flue cured and burley growers re- 
ceived a new record high average price and gross income from 
the sale of their 1973 crops. However, there were only moderate 
increases in growers' net income due to the substantial increase 
in cost of production which was also at a record high level in 
1973. 

North Carolina flue-cured growers received a record $701 mil- 
lion from the sale of 795 million pounds of tobacco. These sales 
amounted to slightly more than 100% of the effective quota and 
included several million pounds of old crop tobacco brought over 
from the 1972 crop. This pushed the season average to a new 
record of $88.20 per hundred pounds. These new records gave 
North Carolina flue cured growers an increase of $131 million 
in gross income compared to the previous year, with an increase 
in average price of $2.60 above the 1972 season average. 

North Carolina burley tobacco growers also received a record 
of $17 million from the sale of 18.1 million pounds, which pushed 
their average to an all-time record of $91.70 per hundred pounds. 
In fact, this is the highest average price ever recorded in the Tar- 
heel State for any crop of tobacco, flue cured or burley. Burley 
growers marketed only 74% of all their effective quota in 1973. 
The unused poundage will be added to their 1974 quotas. 

Outlook For Record 1974 

For tobacco growers, the market outlook for 1974, as it relates 
to supply and demand, is probably the best that it has been since 
the late forties. It is the first time in more than twenty-five years 
that flue cured growers have gone into a new market year without 
a surplus hanging over their heads. 

The carryover stocks of flue cured tobacco on July 1, 1974, 
estimated to be about 1.6 billion pounds, will be the lowest since 
1951. Also, the carryover Stocks at the beginning of the new bur- 
ley year on Oct. 1, 1974, estimated at about 1.0 billion pounds, will 
be the smallest since 1952. 

A substantial increase in both domestic and export demand 
during the latter part of 1973 and early 1974 was responsible for 



the drain on the stocks. In other words, during the 1973-74 market 
year, buying companies bought more than 1,300 million pounds 
of flue-cured tobacco from both the warehouse floor and from 
Flue-Cured Stabilization stocks. Of this amount only 1,158 million 
pounds was marketed from the 1973 United States flue-cured 
crop. 

This supply situation points to the critical demand on flue-cured 
growers to produce a substantially larger crop in 1974. For in- 
stance, based on the 1973-74 demand, United States flue-cured 
growers need to market approximately 1,300 million pounds in 
order to supply the market demand and maintain a normal re- 
serve stock of around 2.4 years supply. 

The increase in demand for burley tobacco in both the domestic 
and export market paralleled the increases for flue-cured during 
the 1973-74 year. This rise in demand plus a short crop of burley 
in 1973 will result in the smallest carryover stock of burley tobac- 
co on October 1, 1974 in 22 years. 

Thus, based on the current supply and demand situation, the 
outlook points to a strong market demand in 1974 for both flue- 
cured and burley tobacco. The price support on flue-cured and 
burley tobacco for 1974 is up 8.7 percent above 1973. This pushes 
the average flue-cured price support for 1974 to 83.3 cent per 
pound and burley to 85.8 cent. Therefore, it is very likely that 
both flue-cured and burley growers will receive average prices in 
the 90's for their 1974 tobacco crops. However, because of the 
tremendous increase in the cost of producing the 1974 crops, 
growers must concentrate on producing and offering to the mar- 
ket mature, ripe tobacco of reasonably good quality. The key 
to the highest prices and greatest net returns in 1974 will 
be found in the production ripe tobacco of medium to heavy body 
with true color. Improving quality is the growers best alternative 
in coping with the record high cost of production. 



Criminal Penalties For Charging 
Unauthorized Tobacco Warehouse 

Fees 



During the 1974 Session of the General Assembly, the Ware- 
house Penalty Act in General Statute 106-454 was rewritten to 
make it a criminal offense for tobacco auction warehouse oper- 
ators or employees to charge any fees related to the sale of tob- 
acco at auction, except those authorized in G. S. 106.452. 

Authorized fees and charges are as followers: "For auction 
fees, fifteen cents on all piles of one hundred pounds or less, and 
twenty-five cents on all piles over one hundred pounds; for 
weighing and handling, ten cents per pile for all piles less than 
one hundred pounds, for all piles over one hundred pounds at the 
rate of ten cents per hundred pounds; for commissions on the 
gross sales of leaf tobacco in said warehouse, not to exceed two 
and one-half per centum; provided that tobacco warehouses sel- 
ling burley tobacco only may charge commissions on the gross 
sales of burley leaf tobacco not to exceed three and one-half per 
centum, and there may also be a basket fee of twenty-five cents 
per basket on all burley leaf tobacco sold in such warehouse." 

The provisions and penalties of this amended act is as follows: 
"The owner, operator, or person in charge of each warehouse 
shall render to each seller of tobacco at the warehouse a bill 
plainly stating the amount charged for weighing and handling, 
the amount charged for auction fees, and the commission 
charged on such sale, and it shall be unlawful for any other char- 
ges or fees to be made or accepted. Any person, firm, corporation, 
or any employee thereof, violating the provisions of this section 
shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and fined not less than one hun- 
dred dollars ($100.00) nor more than two hundred and fifty dollars 
($250.00) and / or imprisoned not to exceed 30 days for the 
first offense, and for the second or additional offenses fined not 
less than five hundred dollars ($500.00) nor more than one thou- 
sand dollars ($1,000) or imprisoned for not less than 30 days or 
more than six months, or both fined and imprisoned, in the dis- 
cretion of the court." 



State Market Summary 1973-74 



The failure of the 1973 flue-cured marketing system to provide 
sales opportunity where the tobacco was produced and when the 
crop was ready for sale resulted in a season of frustration and 
discontent among tobacco growers. The untendable situations 
that were manifested by the inequities of the marketing sched- 
ule provoked farmers to demand major changes in the tobacco 
marketing program. Even before the close of the 1973 season, 
policy changes were executed that permitted Border Belt farmers, 
that had not been able to sell their crop before buyers were with- 
drawn from the area, to place all their remaining tobacco under 
loan with stabilization at support price level, provided the tobacco 
was eligible for price support. If the auction system is to survive, 
more major changes must occur in the near future to give 
North Carolina farmers a more equitable opportunity to market 
their tobacco. 

Flue-cured average price for North Carolina markets reached a 
new record high of $88.37 per hundred pounds, up $2.54 per 
hundred pounds from the 1972 record average. Value of the 1973 
crop sold in North Carolina markets was $649,652,913 an in- 
crease of $116,245,425 from the 1972 crop sales. Volume also 
increased to 735,182,978 pounds, up 113,688,441 pounds from 
1972 sales. 

Burley farmers had a fantastic marketing year. The season av- 
erage price reached $91.62 per hundred pounds for tobacco sold 
at North Carolina markets. 

Type 13. Border Belt markets began the 1973 selling season on 
July 24 and remained open for 53 sale days with final sales held 
on November 1. 

Quality was down slightly from the previous year's sales with 
a noticeable drop in the quality of good leaf grades offered for 
sale. 

Grade price averages were up $1.00-$7.00 per hundred pounds 
for most offerings with the greatest increases going to leaf 
grades. Nondescript and unripe lug grades were down $1.00-$5.00 
per hundred pounds. Border Belt markets established a new re- 
cord of $87.09 per hundred pounds, up $1.71 per hundred pounds 
from the 1972 record average. 

8 



Producer sales for 1973 increased to 119,020,272 pounds and 
sold for $103,655,142. In 1972, producers sold 107,710,183 pounds 
for $91,966,941. Stabilization receipts were exceptionally small in 
Border Belt markets. Only 1,065,791 pounds went under loan, a- 
mounting to 0.09 percent of producer sales. In 1972, Stabilization 
received 623,101 pounds or 0.6 percent of producer sales. 

TYPE 12. Eastern Belt markets began sales July 31 on a lim- 
ited basis, with all markets being in operation by August 28. 
Markets operated over a period of 64 sale days with final sales 
occurring on December 3. 

Quality of offerings was unusually good with an increase in the 
volume of mature lemon and orange grades being sold and a 
decrease in the volume of variegated tobacco. 

Grade price averages increased $1.00-$14.00 per hundred 
pounds for most grades and the strongest demand being for 
heavy bodied leaf. Some of the primings, lugs, and cutters were 
down $1.00-$3.00 per hundred pounds. Eastern Belt markets av- 
eraged $89.00 per hundred pounds, a record high for flue-cured 
belts, up $1.66 per hundred pounds from the 1972 average. 

Producer sales for 1973 increased substantially to 379,505,519 
pounds, returning farmers $337,751,016. In 1972, producers sold 
316,441,050 pounds for $276,394,101. 

Stabilization receipts amounted to 17,101,561 pounds or 4.51 
percent of producer sales, an increase from 1972 receipts when 
8,206,770 pounds or 2.6 percent of producer sales went under 
loan. 

TYPE 11B. Middle Belt markets opened on September 4 and 
continued operating for 43 sale days. Final sales were held on 
November 20. 

Quality improved considerably over the previous year's crop 
with larger amounts of mature ripe leaf being offered for sale and 
less unripe variegated tobacco being sold. 

Grade price averages were up $1.00-$17.00 per hundred 
pounds for most grades, with heavy bodied tobacco being in 
strong demand throughout the season. However, low quality lugs 
and primings and thin nondescript were off $1.00-$9.00 per hun- 
dred pounds. Middle Belt markets averaged $88.17 per hundred 
pounds, a new record high, up $3.21 per hundred pounds from 
the 1972 average. 

Producer sales increased in 1973 to 120,816,592 pounds and 
sold for $106,528,148. In 1972, producers sold 104,963,197 pounds 



for $89,176,792. 

Stabilization receipts were 4,273,657 pounds or 3.54 percent of 
producer sales. In 1972, Stabilization received 3,123,560 pounds 
or 3.0 percent of producer sales. 

TYPE 11A. Old Belt markets held limited openings on Septem- 
ber 4 and all markets began operating on September 17. North 
Carolina markets operated for 48 sale days and concluded the 
flue-cured season on November 29. 

Quality increased favorably with more good ripe leaf grades be- 
ing marketed and a noticeable decline in the amount of unripe 
and immature offerings. 

Grade price average increased $1.00-$23.00 per hundred 
pounds with the greatest advance going to leaf grades. Some 
primings and nondescript dropped $1.00-$10.00 per hundred 
pounds. North Carolina Old Belt markets averaged a new record 
high of $87.81 per hundred pounds, up $3.21 per hundred pounds 
from the 1972 average. 

Producer sales advanced to 115,840,595 pounds and returned 
farmers $101,718,607. In 1972, producers sold $92,380,107 pounds 
for $75,869,654. 

Stabilization received 3,355,988 pounds or 2.9 percent of pro- 
ducer sales. In 1972, Stabilization receipts amounted to 6,048,814 
pounds or 6.6 percent of producer sales. 

TYPE 31. Burley markets opened November 26 and operated 
for 18 sale days. Final sales for North Carolina's season were held 
on January 10. 

Quality was very acceptable as all grades were in strong de- 
mand. The volume of mixed grade did increase during 1973. 

Grade price averages were up $10.00-$15.00 per hundred 
pounds and most grades averaged above $90.00 per hundred 
pounds. North Carolina markets averaged $91.62 for the season, 
an increase of $14.09 per hundred pounds over the previous sea- 
son's average and a new record for the State. 

Producers sold 16,654,550 pounds for a value of $15,258,630 
on North Carolina markets. In 1972-73, producers sold 17,092,489 
pounds for $13,251,867. 

Burley Stabilization receipts were very small, only 4,804 
pounds or 0.03 percent of producer sales went under loan. In 
1972-73, 236,976 pounds or 1.3 percent of producer sales went 
to the burley pool. 

10 



<v 



CO 



CO 
o 






J5 ^H 



o 

■<»■ 


HcoH 


=K= 


==•— = 



00 
CO 


KLJi 


1454 







1368 



CO 
E 
o 
CO 

E 
o 

-Q <* 

"O oo 

"o5 w 



CO 



CO 
CO 




m 
co 




1393 



co 


EH 1 


1489 



CO 

_*: 
o 

o 

-»— » 

CO 

M— 

03 
0) 



£ 

5 


M2M 




1591 




■«*■ 






k 






o 












CO 






K 






O 












CM 


-C 




N. 


o> 




o 


0) 






(A 

e 










K 










ft 






E 

u 




O 


1 




h* 


1 




o 


</> 






c 

3 




a 


I 




>0 


^_ 




o 


o 






c 
o 




00 


— 




<o 


E 




o 








UJ 
X 


K 






O 




-1 


O* 










IT 

< 

u. 


*0 




o 


O 




K 


o 




UJ 



11 





cu 




co cn cu 


c 


«1 « o 


() 


O H -rl 


to 


m a) u 


rd 


O > a< 


ID 


< 


0) 




ro 




t~ 




eg 




r^ 


CO 


cn 


05 U) X) 


rH 


01 1) C 

H 3 






M rd 




CJ CO Qh 




0) 




co cr> 0) 




Dl It u 




(H -H 




M Q) H 




O > Ph 




rt! 




CO 




Ul CO x) 




CO CU C 

oh 3 




h « o 




CJ W Pn 




cu 




CO CO 




P cu 




rH 




.c io 




CU CO 




u cu 




re b; 


c 


s 


(J 




CO 




rd 




OJ 




w 


CO CO 




U <D 


■^r 


CU rH 


r^ 


rH (d 


i 


<d CO 


co 


cu cu 


r» 


Q a; 


cn 




rH 






CO 




>H CU 




CU C7> CU 




O (0 o 




P u -H 




73 0) rl 




> CM 




rl < 




Cn 




CO 




H 




CU CO CO 




U CU T) 




P rH C 

t) nj 3 






o co o 




^ cn 




cn 




V) 




+J 




cu 




.* 




u 




s* \ 



12 



o 


CM 

rH 


ro 

i-H 




r~ 

cn 


ro 


cn 


in 
IT) 


CO 

to 


in 
03 


in 

CO 


in 

CO 


If) 
CO 


CO 


in 

00 


ID 

CO 


in 

CO 


m 

CO 



CD 


O 


r> 


o-i 


CN 


CO 


r~ 


CM 


ro 


en 


a) 


cu 


in 


^r 


^r 


■-i 


rH 


<* 


r- 


CN 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


ro 


10 


cn 


ro 


en 


CM 


m 


in 


ro 


*T 


>.o 


in 


vo 


in 


ro 


rH 


m 


cn 


«J> 


oo 


in 


CO 


in 


en 


in 


en 


cO 


en 


CO 


vo 


VD 


o 
co 


VD 


CO 
(N 


UJ 


CN 

CM 


o 

rH 



CO 

in 


rH 


in 

en 


VO 

o 


in 


eD 


in 

CO 


r-i 
r- 


ID 

o 


r> 

CO 


CD 

00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eD 
CO 


CO 


co 


r- 

00 



CN 


ro 


CM 


t 


co 


rH 


o 


m 


O 


in 


rH 


r^ 


10 


r» 


CN 


r- 


rH 


on 


01 


o 


CO 


en 


CO 


CM 


0~i 


rH 


en 


rH 


r> 


en 


CN 


^r 


m 


ro 


ro 


cm 


^r 


r») 


in 


O 


CO 


«* 


rH 


CO 


IN 


IM 


CN 


<n 


(') 


CD 


*T 


Lfl 


ro 


O 


r> 


r^ 


r-» 


ro 

ro 


VD 


r> 

CM 


r- 


in 

CM 


CM 
CN 

rH 



CM 


CM 


in 


en 


CO 


r-i 


10 


ro 


co 


el) 


m 


rH 


i Y ) 


en 


0\ 


< i 


m 


in 


el) 


•-{ 


CM 


CM 


IX) 


en 


rH 


CO 


en 


O 


in 


^r 


r-t 


ro 


rH 


rH 


"* 


CN 


•* 


in 


CN 


vo 


m 


( ) 


ro 


cn 


CM 


rH 


•-{ 


rH 


01 




in 


CM 


ro 


vO 

CM 



Eh 




rj 




w 




a 


CO 00 CO CO CO 




r- •** cn cn o 



I ro rH ro o CN I vO 



rH 

eD 


M 1 

rH 


in 
en 


CM 

rH 


CM 
CO 


vO 
vO 


r-i 

en 




en 
o 


r> 

CO 


CO 


r- 

00 


r- 

CD 


CO 


vO 
CO 


00 


r- 

CO 


00 



o 


ro 


en 


r^ 


r^ 


"* 


^f 


(TO 


CN 


o-> 


a) 


o 


cn 


^r 


CN 


Ki> 


in 


r^ 


CM 


■^ 


in 


ro 


rH 


o 


CO 


in 


CN 


rH 


"3 1 


in 


O 


o 


m 


CN 


<-> 


O 


CJ> 


sr 


ro 


o 


•-t 


r- 


CO 


r~ 


CN 


r-t 


o 


rH 


CN 


i/i 


CO 


CN 


CD 


O 


r» 


r-- 


r- 


CN 
ro 


eD 


U3 
CN 


r- 


CN 


en 
<-{ 




o 

CO 


en 


o 

ro 


in 
in 


CN 

in 


en 
e£) 


CO 


co 

CM 


rH 

o 


ID 
CO 


CD 

en 


rH 


CD 
ro 


o 


e£) 


00 

o 


ro 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


ecj 
CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eD 
CO 


•VD 

CO 


eo 

CO 


CD 


co 

CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 



^o 


CO 


ro 


<* 


CD 


efl 


CO 


in 


10 


CO 


in 


•-i 


ro 


ro 


n 




m 




O 


CO 


O 


O 


in 


CO 


<» 


T 


CM 


CN 


r-» 


VO 


m 










el) 


rH 


U) 


r-i 


O-i 


^-\ 


t-- 


eiJ 


ei) 


CO 


CN 


ro 


m 


ro 


^r 


en 


m 


en 


o 


in 


o 


o 


r-{ 


i-( 


O 


0) 


r-t 


^ji 


en 


CN 










VU 




IM 


co 


r^ 


CN 


r-- 


r» 


r-i 


r-> 


no 


CD 










IN 




•-< 


CO 


CN 


co 


O 


CD 


H 


in 


eO 


m 


i£> 


^r 


ro 


ro 


iX) 


cn 


cn 


cn 


O 
CN 


o 

rH 


VO 


ro 


00 


o 


en 

rH 


CO 


CD 


CD 


en 


en 


CO 

m 


co 



ro 

rH 


in 
m 




o 

ro 


co 
ST 


in 

CO 


ro 

o 




co 


ro 


CO 


o 


e£> 


CO 


CM 

m 




01 

IN 


CO 
CO 


CO 

co 


CO 
CO 


en 

CD 


en 

CD 


CO 
CO 


m 

CO 


CO 
CO 


CO 
CD 


CO 
CD 


CD 

co 


CO 
CO 


cn 

CO 


CO 

co 


CO 
CO 


en 

CO 


en 
CO 



CO 


IN 


r-t 


r^ 


in 


o 


CN 


»J 


IN 


e0 


e0 


<tf 


r* 


o 


^T 


CN 


J^ 


t*» 


t-» 


■V 


U) 


ei) 


m 


[*• 


IN 


a) 


ro 


■^ 


>* 


VO 


cn 


r~ 


(-> 


r^ 


w 


o 


IN 


el) 


ro 


o 


■* 


CN 


el) 


ro 


O 


ro 


o 


<n 


^-\ 


CN 


o 


in 


rH 


r^ 


O 


e£) 


eO 


r> 


CO 


ID 


r~ 


r> 


in 


^r 


ro 


CN 


in 


r~ 


IN 


a) 


^r 


r-t 


a) 


CN 


r^ 


IN 


a) 


cn 


in 


CN 


t 


en 


O 


en 


a 


^r 


CI 


CD 


a-\ 


ei) 


■g* 


el) 


•-< 


el) 


<* 


ro 


<-i 


ro 


ro 


[^ 


CN 


CO 


o 


■-t 


O 


ro 


IN 


e0 


eD 


O 


r» 


CM 


rH 


CN 


O 


n 


^-\ 


CO 


O 


^-{ 


■-< 


•-< 


IN 


rH 


in 


^r 


^ 


^r 


CM 


r-\ 


i-t 


■-t 


rH 


rH 


VO 


rH 



10 


■5T 


CD 


in 


ro 


ID 


CN 


ro 


in 


m 


CN 


rH 


ID 


o 


VO 


e0 


f 


CJ 


^r 


ro 


ro 


T 


CN 


rH 


a) 


e ) 


r» 


ro 


M" 


e0 


<* 


ro 


O 




in 


CN 


r~- 


r-i 


O 


O 


r- 


cn 


r-~ 


CO 


03 


r> 


ro 


•=!• 


[^ 


>* 


o 


CD 


r- 


ro 


r- 


O 


O 


m 


ro 


rH 


<tf 


r-i 


CO 


rH 


vO 


in 


cn 


m 


T 


r~ 


r-i 


rH 


O 


r» 


CJ 


el) 


cn 


r^ 


rH 


T 


rH 


r> 


r- 


ro 


rH 


rH 




r-i 


rH 


rH 


CD 


en 


r-{ 


■^ 


■q- 


CM 




rH 


rH 




co 


H 



vOvDCNrHTTO O^CN 

r^p-m^rvor- roror~ 

O I s CM ri efl ^f I rocNro 

Ifi CO MO rl o nr- 

VO CN r» r-t r-i r-t CO 



<* 

r-{ 


eD 

in 


en 


co 


ro 
in 


ro 

en 


o 


r- 
in 


in 
in 




rH 

CN 


o 

rH 


in 


eD 

en 


CO 

in 


r-i 
CO 


r^ c 

ro C 


CO 
CO 


CO 
CO 


CO 
CO 


en 

CO 


en 

CO 


CD 
CO 


en 

CO 


CD 
CO 


CO 
CO 


00 
00 


CO 
CO 


CD 
CO 


en 

CD 


CO 
00 


CD 
CD 


cn 
co 


cn a 
co a 



CM 


CD 


ro 


V0 


eO 


O 


cn 


r^ 


r^ 


r^ 


■"tf 


cn 


o 


o 


CN 


cn 


rH 


r^ 


CN 


O 


■<!• 


T 


r-i 


rH 


i-~ 


o 


m 


no 


V0 


ro 


■=r 


CN 


a 


o 


r-i 


T 


in 


<? 


in 


CO 


>* 


in 


in 


en 


no 


CI 


ro 


m 


CO 


00 


•* 


r~ 


ro 


ro 


r- 


r^ 


no 


eD 


o 


VD 


CN 


■^ 


o 


in 


r^ 


r-i 


CN 


00 


r- 


o 


ro 


CN 


in 


r- 


in 


in 


U) 


rH 


■vr 


a) 


^ 


rH 


CN 


ai 


CN 


CN 


ro 


en 


r- 


in 


in 


O 


CD 


o 


o 


rH 


o 


rH 


CN 


eD 


r-i 


rH 


O 


rH 


O 


ro 


CN 


m 


VO 


cn 


r» 


IN 


rH 


CN 


o 


o 


rH 


in 


O 


rH 


r-i 


r-i 


CN 


r-i 


in 


•^T 




•<T 


CN 


r-i 


r-i 


rH 


rH 


rH 


CD 


rH 




4=rH3nJQM-HqoSfdrcJca 






-4- 


00 


0> 

ON 


nD 

H 


en 

nO 


o 

CM 


rH 


o 
~3- 


st 
en 


en 

CO 


Ci 

CO 


~3- 
00 


•* 

CO 


CO 


st 

CO 


in 

CO 


m 

CO 


m 

oo 


en 

00 


nO 

CO 


en 
00 


st 

00 



o 

o 


NO 


nO 
CM 


ON 
ON 




m 
on 


-T 
rH 


o 
en 


St 


00 


in 

rH 


en 


en 

CO 


rH 
00 


CM 

00 


m 

00 


H 
00 


CM 
00 


en 

00 


en 

00 


CO 


o 

00 


CM 
00 


00 



on 


CO 


f^ 


st 


CM 


\0 


UD 


h 


CJN 


r~. 


CO 


^H 


hO 


^H 


on 


O 


m 


vO 


00 


O 


CM 


cn 


m 


m 


1"- 


■H 


nD 


r*. 


CO 


on 


p*. 


H 


o 


r^ 


rH 


m 


nO 


rH 


LO 


nO 


rH 


p*» 


ON 


-* 


on 


r~- 


nO 


CM 


rH 


cn 


m 


St 


C 3 


sr 


m 


r- 


O 


•St 


cn 


CO 


m 


r^ 


m 


o 


r~- 


o 


m 


nO 


CM 
CM 


<r 


H 


-d- 


hs 


nD 

rH 


r*- 


vO 


a* 
o 

H 



r-» 


CM 




o 


in 


nO 


o 


CM 


CM 


CM 


H 


CM 








fM 




ro 


rH 




sr 


nO 


CM 


CM 






r- 


CO 


CM 


p- 


on 


H 


o 


CO 


00 


00 


-a- 


m 


<N 


O 


00 


r^ 


st 


0> 


CM 


p>. 


CM 


ro 




cm 


CM 


ro 


rH 


iH 


^o 


st 


r~. 


CO 


rH 






CO 


vD 


O 


in 


m 


-3- 


■*» 


p- 


p— 


On 


iH 


VD 


m 


nO 


in 


r~« 


00 


^ 


p* 


nO 

ro 


in 




H 
st 



ON 

o 


CO 


m 

CO 


CM 


rH 


o 

rH 


rH 

CO 


rH 


NO 
ro 


ro 

.-H 


CO 
rH 


r^ 
CO 


CO 
CO 


P- 

CO 


MO 
00 


co 
co 


C3> 
00 


ON 

CO 


CO 
CO 


CO 
CO 


00 


CO 
CO 



rH 
CO 


CO 


CM. 


ro 

o 


cn 
O 


ro 
uo 


M2 

ON 


CO 

co 


oo 
CM 


00 


no 
p*. 


rH 
ro 


00 


CO 


on 

00 


00 


p- 

00 


CO 
CO 


NO 
CO 


r^ 

00 


CO 

00 


m 

oo 


00 


00 
00 



o 


rH 


cm 


UO 


CM 


O 


CM 


rH 


co 


ro 


st 


St 


m 


rH 


o 




r-~ 


ro 


m 


CO 


Csl 


CO 


r^ 


nO 


OO 


^H 


ro 


no 


no 


CO 


U0 


r- 


M0 


nO 


cn 


o 


m 


ON 


St 


on 


o 


r-^ 


on 


ro 


H 


rH 


r\l 


nO 


r^ 


ON 


oo 


CM 


LO 


<r 


rH 


ro 


nO 


CM 


r^ 


ro 


<r 


O 


nO 


CO 


rH 


UO 


00 


P-. 


st 

CM 


-X) 


rH 


no 

rH 


ON 


r-~ 
H 


r^ 


co 


ro 

CM 



UO 


on 


m 


r^. 


i~- 


o> 


CM 


ro 


ON 


00 


ro 


<T 


ro 


st 


ro 


UD 


r-{ 


o 


ro 


ON 


OO 


O 


ro 


O 


CO 


o 


H 


r- 


00 


r^ 


u"i 


O 


CM 


00 


O 


<r 


on 


St 


nO 


H 


vO 


CM 


^-1 


St 


St 


<t 


m 


ro 


st 




ON 


m 


r~- 


CM 


r-» 


St 


rH 


St 


oo 


o 


ro 


oo 


C3N 


m 


st 


ON 


rM 


>-D 


r~. 


cn 


O 


kO 


p^ 


ufl 


P-« 


CO 


O 


o 


CO 


O 


O 


r~- 


ON 


ON 










rH 


rH 




rH 


<r 




rH 


St 



<r r- n 
vc o >x> 
oo oo CM 



o 

CM 

UO 


CO 
M3 
CM 


ro 

M3 

O 


on 
rsi 


CM 
O 
rH 


co 

rH 


co 

UO 

uo 


oo 

rH 
ON 


MD 

uO 
St 


CM 

ro 

ON 


CM 
CM 


o 
o 

rH 


ro 


CM 

UO 

r-~ 


CM 

CO 


ro 

ON 


rH 

o 

CM 


rH 


co 

rH 
CM 


St 

UO 


m 

uO 
CM 


M3 
CO 

CM 



O 


uo 


CO 

rH 


o 


NO 


00 
rH 

v£3 


NO 
NO 
CM 


NO 

uO 

rH 


cm sr 
m sr 
no cn 


ro 
uo 
nO 


co 

CO 


CM 


co 
H 

rH 


o 

CO 
CM 


CO 

ro 


-3- 
CM 
CM 


O 

00 


rH 
ON 


uo 

O 

CM 


cm en 

00 00 

NO 
rH 


r— 

ON 
CM 


NO 
CM 
CM 

CM 



uo oo cn 
oo o NO 
cn cm en 



oo en oo oo no 
o on en sr no 

MTJ 00 rH NO rH 



o 


o 


on 


CM 


o 


o 


CM 


oo m 


uO 


00 


rH 


St 


uO 


rH 


St 


00 


rH 


NO NO 


00 


uo 


CO 


H 


NO 


CO 


nD 


NO 


ON 


m m 


r~» 


uo 


NO 


NO 


O-v 




CM 


r— 


NO 


O NO 


NO 


CO 










00 


ro 




m no 

CM 


St 


ON 



rH 
rH 


00 
CO 


NO 
CO 


ON 

CO 


sr 


rH 
rH 


co 


UO 
CM 


oo 
CO 


CM 




oo 


oo 

00 


00 


NO 
CO 


00 

co 


ON 

00 


ON 

co 


00 
CO 


CO 

oo 


oo 


oo 

00 



oo 


co 


CO 


uO 

o 


CM 
CM 


uo 


rH 

o 


St 

o 


CM 

ro 


ON 


rH 

CO 


CO 


oo 


nO 

co 


ON 

co 


co 


CO 


oo 
oo 


[-■« 

oo 


oo 
oo 


CO 

oo 


in 

oo 


00 


CO 

co 



CM 


uO 


rH 


H 


St 


NO 


<T 


CO 


CM 


ON 


CM 


rH 


CO 


rH 


NO 


o 


CO 


r~- 


o 


en 


-H 


ON 


NO 


uO 


NO 


rH 


rH 


uo 


O 


ON 


rH 


ON 


uo 


ON 


^-1 


NO 


CM 


00 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


o 


vO 


O 


UO 


O 


NO 


O 


ON 


rH 


r^ 


o 


ON 


rH 


CM 


sr 


St 


UO 


oo 


CM 


o 


CO 


oo 


00 


00 


00 


r~- 


en 

CM 


nO 


nO 

rH 


NO 


ON 




r— 


r^- 


o 

CM 
H 



UO 


St 


St 


ON 


CO 


rH 


St 


p- 


ON 


ON 


UO 


00 


CO 


ro 


NO 


r^ 


NT) 


rH 


m 


CO 


^3 


ON 


ON 


r^ 


00 


ro 


r^ 


ro 


U0 


St 


CO 


ON 


o 


co 


uo 


ON 


ON 


ON 


uo 


ro 


ON 


St 


ro 


CO 


rH 


<r 


o 


CM 


ON 


on 


uO 


r-\ 


vO 


o 


t>. 


CO 


o 


ON 


<J- 


00 


CM 


NO 


r^ 


uO 


rH 


co 


rH 


St 


CO 


rH 


co 


rH 


r^ 


NO 


r-^ 


CO 


o 


O 


on 


o 


oo 


r-« 


uO 


UO 










rH 


H 




rH 


ro 




rH 
rH 


CO 



00 nO vO 

en oo cm 

CO r- ON 

in oo oo 

in oo on 

■H m oo 



1) 


00 




01 


1 


CO 


3 




-o 


1) 


ctl 




XI 


>. 


u 


XI 


XI 


t-i 


X) 


£ 




u 


eej 


<u 


CO 


In 


O 


l-c 


4-1 


fi 


0) 


3 


T3 


•H 


O 


UH 


0) 


u 


u 


rH 


cr 


a 


3 


UH 


c 


J3 


n) 


D 


<-* 


3 


id 





X 


« 


< 


O 


P 


w 


Ph 


P3 


-J 


O 


cy: 



u O 






00 JD 


C 




a co 


O 


01 


•H c 


CO 


Ci 


rH 01 


■H 


ert 


IH 0) 


T) 


XI 


3 u 
pq O 


s 


01 

S 



U -H O -H C > iH 

•H > u > o C <S 

<! CO O 01 4-> tH 4J 

xi Xi c to ^i o 

■ i-i x o e xi h 

AJ 0) O 4-1 iH CO 



13 



SUMMARY OF N. C. DEALER AND 
WAREHOUSE RESALES - 197 3 



Percentage 
Belt Pounds Dollars Resale 



Border Belt 
Dealer 
Warehouse 

Eastern Belt 
Dealer 
Warehouse 

Middle Belt 
Dealer 
Warehouse 

Old Belt 

Dealer 
Warehouse 

Total Flue-Cured Resales 

Burley Eelt 
Dealer 
Warehouse 

Total Burley Resales 



PRODUCER AND GROSS SALES OF FLUE-CURED 
TOBACCO BY STATES - 1975 



379,752 


$ 313,581 


0.31 


2,622,956 


2,254,907 


2.15 


1,037,171 


855,335 


0.27 


4,439,017 


3,823,772 


1.15 


329,850 


274,543 


0.27 


2,367,242 


2,048,209 


1.92 


446,785 


359,547 


0.38 


2,797,653 


2,427,347 


2.35 


14,420,426 


12,357,241 


1.92 


322,844 


304,891 


1.80 


958,193 


889,604 


5.34 


1,281,037 


1,194,495 


7.14 





Producer 


Sales 


Cross Sa 


les 


State 


Pounds 


Average 


Founds 


Average 


N. C. 


735,182,978 


88.37 


749,603,404 


88.31 


Va. 


128,136,651 


88.76 


150,278,518 


88.69 


S. C. 


144,201,107 


86.61 


148,084,006 


86.59 


Ca. 


123,921,027 


87.64 


129,144,891 


87.60 


Fla. 


23,459,084 


88.32 


24,113,809 


88.28 


Total 


1,154,900,847 


88.11 


1,181,224,628 


88.06 



14 



FLUE-CURED MOVEMENT IN AND OUT 
OF NORTH CAROLINA 



N. C. Tobacco Sold Out of State Out of State Tobacco Sold in N. C. 

(Pounds) (Pounds) 

State 1973 1972 1973 1972 



Va. 


24,849,000 


20,850,000 


7 


489,000 


6,383,000 


S. C. 


23,777,000 


15,234,000 


11 


462,000 


7,845,000 


Ga. 


23,182,000 


18,685,000 




70,000 


16,000 


Fla. 


4,863,000 


5,461,000 




3,000 





Ala. 










25,000 





Total 


76,671,000 


60,230,000 


19 


049,000 


14,244,000 



BURLEY TOBACCO MOVEMENT IN AND OUT 
OF NORTH CAROLINA 



N. C. Tobacco Sold Out of State Out of State Tobacco Sold in N. C. 





(Pound 


s) 






(Pounds) 


State 


1973 




1972 


1973 


1972 


Tenn. 


3,163,749 


3 


334,308 


477,771 


523,875 


Va. 


844 




2,342 


1,170,780 


1,178,309 


W. Va. 










40,236 


32,306 


Ga. 










25,856 


38,719 


S. C. 










968 


2,146 


Total 


3,164,593 


3 


336,650 


1,715,611 


1,775,355 



15 



FLUE-CURED STABILIZATION RECEIPTS 
BY TYPES AND STATES - 1973 



Producer Stabilization Percentage 
State Type Sales (lbs.) Receipts (lbs.) Stab. Received 



Va. Total 


11A 


128,136,651 


4,013,126 


3.31 


N. 


C. 


11A 


115,840,595 


3,355,988 


2.90 


N. 


C. 


11B 


120,816,592 


4,273,657 


3.54 


N. 


C. 


12 


379,505,519 


17,101,561 


4.51 


N. 


c. 


13 


119,020,272 


1,065,791 


0.90 


N. C. 


Total 


11-13 


735,182,978 


25,796,997 


3.51 


S. C. 


Total 


13 


144,201,107 


816,803 


0.57 


Ga. Total 


14 


123,921,027 


123,032 


0.10 


Fla. 


Total 
All Types 


14 


23,459,084 


28,318 


0.12 


Total 


11-14 


1,154,900,847 


30,778,276 


2.67 



Burley Stabilization Receipts 
For N. C and Total U. S. - 1973-74 



Producer Stabilization Percentage 
State Type Sales (lbs.) Receipts (lbs.) Stab. Received 



N. C. 31 16,654,554 4,804 0.03 

U. S. Total 31 450,957,067 663,391 0.15 



16 



C. BURLEY TOBACCO ALLOTMENTS* 
1974 





Number 


Base 


Effective 




County 


Farms 


Poundage 


Poundage 


Rank 


Alleghany 


570 


645,398 


719,542 


9 


Ashe 


2,660 


2,662,601 


3,200,476 


4 


Avery 


248 


294,128 


375,489 


10 


Brunswick 


1 


190 


366 


31 


Buncombe 


2,986 


3,293,189 


4,128,054 


2 


Burke 


17 


8,604 


14,593 


21 


Caldwell 


20 


12,293 


21,432 


20 


Cherokee 


195 


151,414 


247,342 


14 


Clay 


230 


179,908 


272,840 


12 


Cleveland 


8 


5,243 


7,906 


22 


Davidson 


2 


1,555 


1,650 


27 


Gaston 


1 


792 


1,525 


28 


Graham 


692 


684,816 


938,070 


8 


Granville 


1 


286 


551 


30 


Haywood 


1,937 


2,085,066 


2,676,369 


5 


Henderson 


120 


88,356 


152,985 


16 


Iredell 


3 


3,137 


6,042 


24 


Jackson 


280 


232,907 


396,678 


11 


McDowell 


73 


53,906 


87,448 


17 


Macon 


246 


166,480 


274,277 


13 


Madison 


2,929 


5,042,495 


5,686,853 


1 


Mitchell 


967 


1,260,264 


1,593,158 


7 


Polk 


4 


2,252 


4,336 


26 


Rutherford 


54 


32,672 


57,854 


19 


Stokes 


2 


648 


1,132 


29 


Surry 


7 


2,764 


3,621 


25 


Swain 


207 


146,068 


255,022 


15 


Transylvania 


71 


52,541 


84,192 


18 


Watauga 


1,709 


1,891,119 


2,383,677 


6 


Wilkes 


6 


3,712 


4,594 


23 


Yancey 


1,854 


2,670,637 


3,234,798 


3 


TOTAL 


18,100 


21,675,441 


26,832,872 


1-31 



♦Source: USDA Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service. 

17 



(11 


n) 


> 


a 


•H 


crt 


u 


T) 





c 


0) 


d 


14-1 





1+-I 


P-. 


w 





•u to 


00 


rN om om 00 


ai 


CM 


m win cm 


a) i-j 


OS 


m<ro^ 



a) oo 
en co 
co cu 



NN^HniD*NvDnstNOininvC(NNNaiN^OO-jniA\DOOMO 
NHNN\OCO<fnN~ctHinHinirirNCM-JvONvOrv(JlNvDOinOvOCOO\ 
nMAin\OC1^CO PI«OH»*>*NrlvOCIOHNNMn(M') O.H 1^ N 



HCION. 
MO MO OM OM 

fN iH ai in' 



rH O IN VO O CM rH 



ITlNOMTiCMHHH 
CO rH rH O rH 



HHf 


H in cm cm 


r-~ lti O 


in 


r^ cm n 


CTi ffi O 


MO CT\ 


<r <r cm 


<r a\ 00 



mvoco^Hmco-a-ioN* 

<r <r cm 

cm o mo ao 



rH cm O O iH 00 in 

O 00 rH CT> 



m o co vo 



VD H vO (O O C\ CO 



<s-rHOoorNCMrN<j-mOMO<)- 
OrlN<OHHv0r|iO4rs<4 < 



i-H Om sf 00 CM 



CCOMAOaOl ON d cniO^NNO^fOON 

n co 1- 1 o iH in m o o 00 m in 01 00 vo in >o m m so \e 
cm co cm in mo a> in 



cm co en o m 00 



<r 1-1 <r -<(• o m o 



co o o m co' 



coNHcMwoiomnmNcn^cncocoNHiHcooMOHHcjiO 
NCMronooHcomHcncnvovOincoincooiMJOcoMOcricovo 
mmcM(^<finhai rNcorNrNoocMcr\LnaMcOMO <r 00 * n n 



coHOMnM5-jio-j 
\omooo-si-i-ivo' 

HCOOlHCM-JUllS' 



O CO CO CM 
CO IN CM CO 

m o -* m 



rv 00 co 
m as 

CM OS 



s£> o MO 



HOMIKtCOO 

oi cm cm as m co mo 

COM5CM H H H in 



MO O CO MO 



m-<i-a\ 0-1— loomcMiNOM 



•J N OS st n r| 

h en vj o co 

CM CM rH rH CM 



rHOCOsf*CONvDrHnNH 
OCMOcoOmDInomOCM-3- 



miomffiHoo 
in o mo m 1— 1 ctv as 
m co co cm mo iH iH 

■st rH cr> m IN CO 



OOOOCOCNsOr-li-HiH 



rN co co <r cm 
as co cn co 
cm as mo m 



(nHNO»HinsrHiOO>HOSN 
MO In as rH rH CTM 

cm o in 00 tN ,-i! 
coiHincoiHsTrH coi-Hoom<r' 



MMNincMUDOHHsfCOHCO-JiOiOmO-JH 

m moom oorN cmmoin cnNcOH nh-j 

CM COOO OM rH OOmOCM CO CO O Ol sf N vO 



ri -j o o m in' 
H h m cn co 00 

rH rH CM CM CO CO 






T1 


C 


c 


m 


m 


H 


X 


co 


CD 



C 4-1 -H CD CO 0IJ-1& 

O 3-UTJ G ^4 cfl xl 

C0cflt-icd3(-i^3iH 

HH fi CJ QJrHtJ p cfl CO 



OJ iH co B n) d rH 

lilllfihH^illfiH^CK 



cu 


ai 


cu 


rs 


T) 


u 


P5 


cn 


P, 


U 


cn 


■u 


cfl 


cfl 


to 


CO 



*J s > 



OJ OJ 

> 

CO 



CJ -H -H rH 



X X rH O U 



^^^pQpqpqpqpquUCJiOUOOCiUUUU 







xi a 






rH 




TJ 








e x -h 






rH 




rJ X 


■u 


c 


H 


O *-> rH 


c 




•H 


<U 


cd 


•U 


H 


crt 


O >,^i 





en 


> 


C 


<4H 14H 


0) 


rH 


X 


OJ 05 C 


■u 


cu 


a 


(1J 


rH -H 


CI 


Cu 


M 


00 r-l CO 


cn 


4-1 


Cfl 


CU 


•H rH 


r- 


3 


n 


•OOP 


cn 


crt 


r-l 


rJ 


3 CO 


ct 


Q 





W fn pn 


O 


O 


O 


O 


rn 


K 



18 



ivDtocNnoooot-»in^ono\HtMsj-OHHmoon\o<tONtsiaiooooin-a-vDoo 
- <r m nnHN m n vd 10 m <r in -j n -a- o- h * m h hm mm 



jvoinoNr^o^vo^cNjin^Lor^oorHtHc^jt^^oooino^roinc^i-i-^LorOi-t-ci-csiovor-- 
«csiin<fiH<^ovoroiHr^in~d-CNicTicyiO<l-rnooincNioovoinLno>^or-^^Dr^cNi^(^Hoo 

)fn\ONcooominHcMinH\cin~jinOvt>JOriocoin*OHoo<j\-jcnoinin*^ 

iinmfovOvo<j\tv<rinNo\Mno\H-jcnaiinN(nNtninHN<fNinffiai-jin-ftn 

1in000Nv0O<fl T l00N-Jv0(NNNO<Jv0NNtslv0tninvBHr--0\000\HNv01*lOin 

■nnH(no\Nvoa\inmkD<fooo<tN»o>cncn<fooin .-ir-irooo-iO'i-Hinr^oooo-j 



•><rcNCN00r~vOmiHQ0CNI 



00NOiO(N40>HNNrtsr 



jin-jncoooNOooooiNinaiNHfnioaiHNa)^ 



-3- o mo m co 
<r ~a- o r^ <■ o 
r-icsicMi— lOOOoowflNiOvO 



f)tMHH<r-*(nrsrH<t* 



inmHmtTiN^csoNfn 



~d- i— l cs i-H r-~ o~i m 



n r-l LO oo 



*<fHHNOmo\McnoOMnOHvococ<iMin(»HinHconco*vD 
no^ln^no^fOO^o^oN^£lc^lnoM^-*<ffllOc»lco^(]^o^^Olnl , ^ 
HNinncointsi-jinooiOHcooovocovo>ounoNHininH-jNHOc> 



•^ h <■ i^ * m 
I s * 00 O O -d- r-~ 

HH<fO(M» 



o-d-mcTiinnr-^fioo 

ItM-JinffiNVDHO 

'n<fH-cfO\rvcor^Hco<t 



Oi-H>— l<ro>r^r--r^ 



in oo H 
oo in r-l 

m <r oo 



(nNvoo\aiOmcsia\>OHO(n\B-j 

n-JNvOHH»-J-OlMnHNN00 

r-~ m mcriO(MNNNin»ocnooN 



omrHmvor^~d-rn,HrH 



OAHcoo><n<ro>HcT\cMmrn 



sooo\4N»oooooofONinN 
soMjovocoaim-j-JM^ocotn 

0<fHrnH»Ofl!MNkO(N^O 



NCOCM\OOOI^I^O-cf 
(NNcnvONOvOCNN 

m rimH o n* cr* 



vOvDr^rHrOrHOrHrnO 

ffiMnntnnoomnoi 

CMvOOlOlCTlCriH-JvOCO 



.-OCMrHCSIinrOO-00 



vOrOrHClCi^J-cncNOCM 



-JHHOMDin 



<r i-H ^ r~~ 



H<f\oi^nN-j<rooin(ncriinin(ynonooN4H 
-jr-ioocrivooomoocNior-^cT^or^mi^fOintTii— i 
eoNcotncoMco^-tninai rnr^criromr-^minCT^ 



NCOmOvDvO*lN<tvOOOO\Nin 
NHHM<tO>0>\DinvDCsl(JlOcn 

cri Oinooomr-~r--cNOoor-ioo 



unit] fi 1) 

; U ^ 0) XI C 

■ <D O V-i O O 

IS Bfl M r-, r-. 



o> c 

hJ rJ 



O -M W U Xi 



U C O CO s 

o o ni a) 



■u 












X 


-a 




ccj 
XI 




-o 










6 




o 








a, 


c 


c 


611 




c c 










cri 


& 


01 o 


U 


C 




rH 





o 


C 




O cO 


en 








x 


o 


60 -H 


CU 







O 


J! 


to 


•H 


c 


CO r-l 


OJ 


>. 


cu 




■u 


H 


C rH 


T1 


en 


u 


•n 


Q> 


^1 


Hi 


CX J-J 


M 


M 


CJ 


CU 


m 


en 


ra g 


c 


u 


■u 


C 


o 


XI 


CJ 


& 


6 o 





M 


a 


.*! 


o 


c 


S-i n) 


a) 


OJ 


•H 


ca 


■H 


o 





O 


CO o 


■u 


3 


d 


CO 



0) -H <L> 0) O *H 



iwi \_j vy vjv i_r y_, iM '-U 'X* ^ i-i vu -n u \j \^i \\j \j +-* _> iy iy \y \.y 

SS2ZZOOfi<PnCnCncc!rtBia!ctloiu3W[n>SSS 



C ^! 

P^rH 

cfl -H 
3 3 



19 



North Carolina Burley Crops 
1928-1973* 







Yield Per 








Year 


No Acres 


Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 






(Pounds) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1928 


3,600 


650 


2,340 


S 690 


S29.50 


1929 


5,500 


730 


4,015 


863 


21.50 


1930 


7,200 


750 


5,400 


853 


15.80 


1931 


7,100 


710 


5,041 


464 


9.20 


1932 


6,500 


735 


4,778 


726 


15.20 


1933 


9,200 


785 


7,222 


715 


9.90 


1934 


5,500 


870 


4,785 


809 


17.50 


1935 


5,200 


925 


4,810 


1,025 


21.30 


1936 


6,000 


900 


5,400 


2,095 


38.80 


1937 


9,000 


975 


8,775 


1,787 


21.40 


1938 


8,600 


900 


7,740 


1,308 


16.90 


1939 


8,100 


1,070 


8,667 


1,447 


16.70 


1940 


6,500 


1,050 


6,825 


1,242 


18.20 


1941 


6,200 


1,075 


6,665 


2,093 


31.40 


1942 


6,600 


1,150 


7,590 


3,211 


42.30 


1943 


8,500 


1,225 


10,412 


5,102 


49.00 


1944 


12,000 


1,390 


16,680 


8,157 


48.90 


1945 


13,000 


1,500 


19,500 


7,568 


38.30 


1946 


9,800 


1,475 


14,455 


5,999 


41.50 


1947 


9,600 


1,560 


14,976 


6,335 


42.30 


1948 


10,300 


1,680 


17,304 


8,012 


46.30 


1949 


10,800 


1,440 


15,552 


6,750 


43.40 


1950 


10,500 


1,700 


17,850 


9,175 


51.40 


1951 


12,200 


1,750 


21,350 


11,572 


54.20 


1952 


12,000 


1,680 


20,160 


9,818 


48.70 


1953 


11,400 


1,800 


20,520 


11,019 


53.70 


1954 


12,700 


1,920 


24,384 


12,680 


52.00 


1955 


9,800 


1,900 


18,620 


10,651 


57.20 


1956 


9,400 


1,850 


17,390 


10,747 


61.80 


1957 


9,600 


1,975 


18,960 


11,073 


58.40 


1958 


9,300 


2,000 


18,600 


11,978 


64.40 


1959 


9,800 


2,060 


20,188 


11,426 


56.60 


1960 


9,500 


1,940 


18,430 


12,016 


65.20 


1961 


10,400 


2,090 


21,736 


14,346 


66.00 


1962 


11,000 


2,185 


24,035 


14,421 


60.00 


1963 


11,000 


2,285 


25,135 


13,573 


54.00 


1964 


9,700 


2,165 


21,000 


12,054 


57.40 


1965 


8,900 


2,030 


18,067 


12,159 


67.30 


1966 


7,900 


2,320 


18,328 


12,371 


67.50 


1967 


7,800 


2,010 


15,678 


11,037 


70.40 


1968 


7,900 


2,385 


18,842 


13,868 


73.60 


1969 


7,900 


2,570 


20,303 


13,928 


68.60 


1970 


7,300 


2,545 


18,579 


13,544 


72.90 


1971 


7,000 


2,065 


14,455 


11,535 


79.80 


1972 


7,700 


2,450 


18,865 


14,658 


77.70 


1973 * * 


7,800 


2,400 


18,720 


17,222 


92.00 



* Source: N. C. and USDA Crop Reporting Service. 
** Preliminary for 1973. 

Note: Since 1972, production is pounds produced and does not reflect pounds 
not sold or pounds carried forward to the next season. 

20 



North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops 
1920-1973* 







Yield Per 








Year 


No. Acres 


Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 






(Pounds) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


(1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1920 


621,900 


681 


423,703 


88,271 


20.80 


1921 


414,900 


594 


246,540 


60,402 


24.50 


1922 


444,000 


611 


271,170 


74,572 


27.50 


1923 


544,300 


728 


396,354 


81,998 


20.70 


1924 


473,500 


585 


276,819 


62,597 


22.60 


1925 


536,200 


696 


373,352 


83,756 


22.40 


1926 


546,700 


69? 


378,274 


96,762 


25.60 


1927 


639,600 


755 


482,982 


100,414 


20.80 


1928 


712,400 


69? 


493,132 


93,450 


19.00 


1929 


729,300 


665 


484,630 


89,470 


18.50 


1930 


768,000 


757 


581,200 


74,733 


12.90 


1931 


688,500 


69? 


476,382 


42,024 


8.80 


1932 


462,500 


624 


288,750 


34,949 


12.10 


1933 


667,800 


794 


530,133 


85,530 


16.10 


1934 


486,500 


847 


412,055 


117,999 


28.60 


1935 


612,500 


635 


572,625 


116,418 


20.30 


1936 


591,000 


765 


451,975 


101,856 


22.50 


1937 


675,000 


883 


595,815 


143,058 


24.00 


1938 


603,500 


844 


509,470 


115,428 


22.70 


1939 


843,000 


964 


812,540 


123,893 


15.20 


1940 


498,000 


1,038 


516,835 


85,792 


16.60 


1941 


488,000 


928 


452,825 


132,291 


29.20 


1942 


539,000 


1,052 


566,810 


221,538 


39.10 


1943 


580,000 


935 


542,200 


219,074 


40.40 


1944 


684,000 


1,077 


736,990 


317,628 


43.10 


1945 


722,000 


1,100 


794,310 


349,148 


44.00 


1946 


802,000 


1,138 


912,970 


451,639 


49.50 


1947 


783,000 


1,139 


892,205 


374,513 


42.00 


1948 


594,000 


1,239 


739,380 


368,040 


49.80 


1949 


621,000 


1,178 


731,530 


352,508 


48.20 


1950 


640,000 


1,441 


858,140 


477,508 


55.60 


1951 


735,000 


1,331 


978,375 


523,358 


53.50 


1952 


735,000 


1,222 


898,090 


448,582 


49.90 


1953 


674,000 


1,235 


832,305 


447,076 


53.70 


1954 


686,000 


1,204 


889,490 


483,003 


54.30 


1955 


653,000 


1,499 


978,775 


520,845 


53.20 


1956 


579,000 


1,661 


961,495 


496,324 


51.60 


1957 


443,000 


1,469 


650,780 


358,442 


55.10 


1958 


429,000 


1,718 


736,855 


427,307 


58.00 


1959 


458,500 


1,533 


702,942 


407,055 


57.90 


1960 


457,500 


1,836 


839,870 


512,731 


61.10 


1961 


463,000 


1,797 


832,215 


541,468 


65.10 


1962 


483,000 


1,890 


912,810 


549,594 


60.20 


1963 


460,500 


1,999 


920,660 


535,622 


58.18 


1964 


416,000 


2,282 


949,450 


549,875 


57.90 


1965 


375,000 


1,840 


690,050 


442,796 


64.20 


1966 


409,500 


1,859 


761,360 


506,605 


66.50 


1967 


395,400 


2,071 


818,997 


523,809 


64.00 


1968 


350,500 


1,850 


648,533 


430,613 


66.45 


1969 


378,500 


1,838 


695,665 


502,305 


72.20 


1970 


383,800 


2,076 


796,941 


571,211 


71.70 


1971 


339,000 


2,102 


712,960 


552,544 


77.50 


1972 


332,000 


1,993 


661,520 


566,267 


85.60 


1973 * * 


376,000 


2,113 


794,515 


699,506 


88.10 



* Source: N. C. and USDA Crop Reporting Service. 
** Preliminary for 1973. 

Note: Since 1965, production is pounds produced and does not reflect pounds 2"j 
not sold or pounds carried forward to the next season. 



North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and Operators 
By Belts and Markets - 1973 



BORDER BELT 



Chadbourn (one set buyes) 

Jimmy Green Whse. - Jimmy Green 
Producers — Jack W. Garrett, Cricket Garrett 

Clarkton (one set buyers) 

New Clarkton — Maynard Talley, Cecil Hartley, W. W. Marlowe 
Bright Leaf — Jimmy Green 

Fair Bluff (one set buyers) 

Powell — B. A. Powell, Albert H. Powell 

Planters — Randolph Currine, B. W. Currin, C. W. Shaw, S. Lawrence, 
H. E. Dunn, H. B. Dunn 

Fair Bluff Whse., Inc. — J. G. McNeill, Gen Mgr. 

Fairmont (four sets buyers) 

Big Brick-Carolina — A. W. McDaniel, A. D. Lewis, Jr. 

Liberty-Twin States — Lynn Floyd, Hoke Smith, Jr., Clarence Joyce Estate 

Holliday-Frye — E. H. Frye, J. W. Holliday, J. M. Holliday 

Square Deal — Mrs. W. G. Bassett, C. L. Smith 

Planters-Mitchell — Harry Mitchell, Morris Daniel 

Fayetteville (one set buyers) 

Big Farmers — P. L. Campbell, A. R. Talley, Jr., Dan Talley 
Planters — J. C. Adams, Billy Adams, Jimmy Adams 

Lumberton (three sets buyers) 

Carolina — J. L. Townsend, Sr. & Jr., J. E. Johnson, Jr., Sam Dunn 

Smith-Dixie — Jack Pait 

Hedgpeth — E. H. Collins, Albert Thornton, Jr. 

Liberty — H. D. Goode, R. H. Livermore 

Star — D. T. Stephenson, Hogan Teater, Russell Teater 

Cooperative — Mrs. V. H. McLaurin, L. D. West 

Tabor City (one set buyers) 

R. C. Coleman Co. — R. C. Coleman, Sr. & Jr., Joe Coleman, Joey 

Coleman, Ricy Coleman 
Planters — Don Watson, Mgr. 



22 



Whiteville (three sets buyers) 

Gray & Neal — A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 
Crutchfield — G. E. Crutchfleld, Jimmy Dale Smith 
Lea's Big Dixie — William Townes Lea, Louis Love 
Liberty — J. W. Hooks, C. B. Barefoot 
Moore's — C. C. Mason, C. E. Jeffcoat 
Nelson's — Jim Smith, Lennox Long, Milton Gore 
Planters — A. O. King, Jr., Cliff Stephens 
Smith's — Ernest Smith, Joe T. Smith 



EASTERN BELT 

Ahoskie (one set buyer) 

Basnight No. 1-2-3 — L. L. Wilkins, Jr., H. G. Veazey, H. Jenkins 
Farmers 1 & 2 — W. M. Odom, S. S. Pierce, J. L. Morris 

Clinton (one set buyers) 

Carolina — L. D. Herring, C. J. Strickland, N. L. Daughtry, L. D. Starling, 

J. P. Gore, Mrs. M. L. Bethune 
Ross — Clarence Kirvin, Jr. 

Dunn (one set buyers) 

Lee's Planters, Inc. — Leland Lee 

Big Four Whse. — Jack Calhoun, John Calhoun, Cleo Jones 

Farmville (two sets buyers) 

Bell's — R. A. Bell & Bros. 

Fountain & Monk — John F. Fountain, J. I. Oakley, Robert Pierce 

Planters — Chester Worthington, W. O. Newell, B. S. Correll, David Jones, 

Mark Mozingo 
New Blue — W. A. Allen 

Goldsboro (one set buyers) 

Carolina — Guy Best, D. M. Price 

Farmers — Rudy Hill 

Big Brick — J. R. Musgrave, Sr. & Jr., Helen Musgrave 

Victory — Richard Gray 

Greenville (five sets buyers) 

Cannon's — W. T. Cannon, Carlton Dail 

Farmers — W. Arthur Tripp, T. P. Thompson, Harold Watson, Jack Warren 

Star-Planters — B. B. Suggs, Harding Sugg 

Kell — J. A. Worthington, J. B. Worthington, Fenner Allen 

23 



New Independent — T. W. Pruitt, W. A. Pruitt, James Belcher, W. E. Pruitt 
Raynor-Forbes-Clark — Noah Raynor, A. A. Forbes, Billy Clark, Betty Casey 
New Carolina — Laddie Avery, Larry Hudson 

Kinston (four sets buyers) 

Knott's 1 & 2 — Graham Knott, Billy Brewer 
Farmers-New Dixie — John Jenkins, Sr. & Jr., Lee Jenkins 
New Central — W. I. Herring, Billy King 
H & H — Dempsey Hodges, Virgil Harper 
Central — W. I. Herring, Bill King 

Robersonville (one set buyers) 

Grays-Red Front-Central — J. H. Gray, Jack Sharp, James E. Gray 
Hardee Whse., Inc. — Edwin Lee 

Rocky Mount (four sets buyers) 

Cobb & Carlton — W. E. Cobb, Jr., J. C. Carlton 

Mangum, Inc. — W. H. Phipps, General Manager 

Planters — S. S. Edmondson, Sr. & Jr. 

Smith's James D. Smith, Sr. & Jr. 

Works — R. J. Works, Jr., A. B. Raynor 

Peoples — Guy Barnes, Gene Simmons, James Walker 

Farmers — Joe W. Coleman, Allen C. Cooper 

Fenners — J. B. Fenner 

Smithfield (two sets buyers) 

Farmers — N. Leo Daughtry, Bill Kennedy 

Planters-Riverside — Joe Stephenson, Jerry Stephenson, Gilbert Stephenson 

Gold Leaf — R. A. Pearce, Sr. & Jr. 

Wallace — Bobby Wallace, Larry Wallace 

Tarboro (one set buyers) 

Clark 1 & 2 — J. F. Wilson, Jr., George L. Proctor 

Farmers No. 1 & 2 — Walter Walker, W. G. Maples, Fred Walston 

Victory — W. V. Leggett, C H. Leggett 

Wallace (one set buyers) 

Blanchard & Farrior — O. C. Blanchard, Sr. & Jr., W. H. Farrior, R. H. Lanier 

Hussey — Joe Bryant 

Sheffield's — Homer M. Boney, Jr. 

Farmers — H. G. Perry 

Washington (one set buyers) 

Sermon's — W. J. Sermon, Harry L. Roberts 
Talley — W. G. Talley 
Hassell — Malcolm P. Hassell 

24 



Wendell (one set buyers) 

Liberty — H. H. Eddins, Berdon Eddins 

Northside — Graham Dean, Bill Sanders 

Farmers — Carson Jones, Mgr. 

Growers — Clyde Holmes, C. M. Pate, W. H. Richards 

Williamston (one set buyers) 

Rogers — Urbin Rogers, H. L. Barnhill, Rossell Rogers 
New Dixie — C. Fisher Harris, J. Elmo Lilley 

Wilson (five sets buyers) 

Big Dixie — W. Cecil Thompson, W. C. Edmondson 
Centre-Brick — S. M. Cozart, U. H. Cozart, III, Fred Eagles 
Bob's and Clark's — C. R. Clark 
Growers — Clifford Aycock, Mgr. 

Liberty — J. T. Worthington, W. Cecil Moore, Robert D. Oldham 
Nichols & Scott — A. B. Nichols, Clay Scott 
Smith-Planter — S. Grady Deans, John F. Deans 
Wainwright's — George L. Wainwrlght, Sr. & Jr. 

Windsor (one set buyers) 

Planters No. 1 & 2 — C. B. Griffin, B. U. Griffin, Dave Newson 

Farmers — Bill Davis, Norman Swain 

Center Whse. — Jerry Shackelford, J. R. Freshwater, R. H. Morton 



MIDDLE BELT 

Aberdeen (one set buyers) 

Planters — W. Fentress Phillips 
Hardee's — Hugh T. Hardee 

Carthage (one set buyers) 

McConnells — E. C. Layton, Earl J. Ennis, George W. Mabe 
Victory — E. C. Layton, Earl J. Ennis 
Farmers — Bill Carter, Sr. & Jr. 

Durham (three sets buyers) 

Liberty — Walker Stone, Sr. & Jr., K. O. Bishop 
Roycroft-Currin-Mangum — Randolph Currin, J. K. Roycroft, Estate 
Star Brick 1 & 2 — W. W. Cozart, W. L. Currin, A. L. Carver 
Farmers-Planters — J. M. Talley, Bob Dale, Sam Mangum 

Ellerbe (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Cecil Moore, Bobby Oldham, Ralph Duncan 
Richmond County — Ashton Richardson, R. P. Brim, Jr. 



25 



Fuquay-Varina (two set buyers) 

New Deal — Dan Talley, Dan Brisson 

Gold Leaf — J. W. Dale 

Carolina — E. E. Clayton, Larry C. Knott 

Roberts — Joe Roberts 

Five Points — Billy Adams 



Henderson (two sets buyers) 

Jeff's Big Banner — C. E. Jeffcoat 
Farmers — W. J. Alston, Jr. 

High Price — C. B. Turner, R. E. Tanner, R. E. Fleming 
S. P. Fleming, J. K. Parks, M. D. Abbott 
Dixie — C. B. Turner, R. E. Tanner, R. E. Fleming, S. P. Fleming, J. K. 

Parks, M. D. Abbott 
Liberty-1 & 2 — George T. Robertson, S. E. Southerland, John Wilson 
Ellington — F. H. Ellington, John Ellington 
Alston's — W. J. Alston, Jr. 
Big Dollar — M. L. Hight, James H. O'Brien 



Louisburg (one set buyers) 

Big Franklin — S. T. Cottrell, James B. Cottrell, L. D. Cottrel 
Ford's — Charlie Ford 

Star — James Speed, Gus McGhee, Clemmon Pearce 
Foster — John Foster, S. E. Southerland 



Oxford (two sets buyers) 

Banner-Mitchell — David Mitchell 

Fleming — F. O. Finch, D. T. Currin, Jr. 

Johnson-High Price-Owen — C. R. Watkins, Jr., John S. Watkins, Jr. 

T. J. Currin, Joe Hamme, C. B. Wilkins 
Yeargin-Granville — R. W. Crews, W. W. Yeargln 



Sanford (one set buyers) 

Twin City — W. M. Carter, T. W. Mansfield 
Morgan's — Jimmy Morgan 



Warrenton (one set buyers) 

Centre — M. P. Carroll, E. W. Radford, E. M. Moody 
Farmers — E. G. Tarwater 

Thompson — C. E. Thompson, M. P. Edwards, Jr. 
Currin's — D. G. Currin, Jr., David Tillotson, B. W. Currin 

26 



OLD BELT 



Burlington (one set buyers) 



Carolina — C. R. McCauley 

Newman & Robertson — N. C. Newman, Joe Robertson 

Farmers — Bill McCauley, Alpha McCray 

Greensboro (one set buyers) 

Greensboro — R. C. Coleman, Jr., Mgr. 

Guilford — J. R. Pell, H. P. Smothers, W. B. Hull, J. E. Pell 

Madison (one set buyers) 

New Brick — Mrs. Lloyd Webster, Ray White 
Carolina — Lee McCollum, Ray White, Mrs. Lloyd Webster 
Sharpe & Smith-Farmers — W. S. Smith, George Denham, Jr. 

F. S. Williams, S. H. Price, Jr. 

Mebane (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Jule Allen, Bill Allen 

Piedmont — Billy Hopkins, Jimmy Hopkins 

Mt. Airy (one set buyers) 

Dixie — Tom Jones, Boyd Cain, F. V. Dearmin, Jr. 

H. Y. Hodges, Fred Chilton 
New Farmers — Tom Jones, Boyd Cain, F. V. Dearmin, Jr., 

H. Y. Hodges, Fred E. Chilton 
Hunters — Mrs. Ola S. Hunter 



Reidsviile (one set buyers) 

New Farmers — G. E. Smith, Steve Smith, P. D. McMichael, Phillip Carter 
Smothers-Watts-Leader — A. P. Sands, Larry Sands, Tom Kimbro, 
T. Garland Smothers 



Roxboro (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Lindsay Wagstaff, Kenneth Wagstaff, R. A. Hester, 

Larry C. Hester 
Hyco — F. J. Hester, H. J. Hester, III 
Foacre — H. W. Winstead, Jr., Pres. 
Planters — T. O. Pass, Sr. & Jr. 
Growers 1 & 2 — Elmo Mitchell, Roy Carver 

Stoneville (one set buyers) 

Joyce's — O. P. Joyce, Sr. & Jr., W. R. Joyce 

Farmers-Piedmont — R. N. Linville, Clarence Peeples, W. Q. Chilton, 
Robert Rakestraw, Garland Rakestraw 

27 



Winston-Salem (four sets buyers) 

Carolina-Star — Ken Chilton 

Growers — R. J. Harris, J. T. Harris, Paul Draughn, Roger Nichols 

Peppers — C. F. Hutchins, Dan Hutchins 

Taylor — L. E. Pope 

Big Winston — Taylor Carter, Jack Carter 

Cook's — Claude Strickland, Jr., P. Thomas, Doug Cook 

Yadkinville (one set buyers) 

Northwest N. C. Farmers — R. A. Owen 

BigYadkin — Cecil E. Humphries 

Millers — J. A. Miller, Sr. & Jr., J. W. Flinchum, Bill Wall 

Liberty — J. W. Flinchum, Bill Wall 

Courtney — J. W. Flinchum, Bill Wall, Howard Pegram 



BURLEY BELT 



Asheville (two sets buyers) 

Dixie-Burley — R. A. Owens 
Planters — J. W. Stewart 
Day's — Charlie Day 

Boone (one set buyers) 

Mountain Burley — Joe Coleman, Joey Coleman, Ricky Coleman, Lavelle 
Coleman 

West Jefferson (one set buyers) 

Tri-State Burley — Rex Taylor 
Farmers Burley — Mrs. Tom Fulkner 



28 



Cigarette Excise Taxes Compared to Growers' 
Gross Receipts 

As indicated on the accompaning chart, the three levels of 
government exacting revenues from cigarettes through taxes are 
currently collecting $5.5 billion annually. These taxes represent 
nearly six times the gross receipts of farmers for the tobacco leaf 
used in the manufacture of domestically consumed cigarettes. 
The overall taxes imposed at the three levels of government oper- 
ates to double the price of cigarettes. 

The federal tax on a package of cigarettes is currently 8 cents. 
This tax grossed a total of $2,221,019,000 for the fiscal year end- 
ing June 30, 1973. 

The states impose taxes at rates ranging from 2 cents per pack- 
age in North Carolina to 21 cents in Connecticut, giving an aver- 
age cigarette tax imposed by the states of 12 cents per package. 
This yielded the states a total revenue of $3,171,091,000 during 
the 1972-73 fiscal year. 

There are 370 cities, towns and counties in ten states that im- 
pose additional local cigarette taxes, ranging from 1 cent to 10 
cents per package. These Municipal taxes grossed $116.4 mil- 
lion during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1973. 

The magnitude of the burden of cigarette taxes causes grave 
concern regarding their effect upon the economy of the tobacco 
grower, the manufacturer and the allied industries. While it is 
true that these excise taxes are passed on to the consumer, it 
follows that the market for cigarettes depends upon the price the 
consumer is willing to pay for his smoking pleasure. 



29 




30 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

James A. Graham, Commissioner, 
Ex-Officio Chairman 



Evelyn M. Hill Edneyville 

Donald R. Kincaid Lenoir 

George P. Kittrell Corapeake 

Charles F. Phillips Thomasville 

J. H. Poole West End 

Henry Gray Shelton Speed 

James D. Speed Louisburg 

James L. Sutherland Laurinburg 

Windell L. Talley Stanfield 

Sherrill Williams Newton Grove 



31 



DOMESTIC TAX PAID CIGARETTE CONSUMPTION 
BY KINDS - 1973 




Total Domestic Consumption 
588 Billion Cigarettes