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Full text of "North Dakota history and people; outlines of American history"

NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 



3 3433 08044152 4 






Uo unSbeTX^I 



NORTH DAKOTA 



HISTORY AND PEOPLE 

OUTLINES OF AMERICAN 
HISTORY 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



CHICAGO 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1917 



99230n 

A.'.r:::, li;::u.\ amp 

TlLUtN liUL.NUAlJU.NS 




WrnUAM H. \VinTE 



Biographical 



WILLIAM H. WHITE. 

When death called William H. White on the -1th of September, 1916, no resident of North 
Dakota had been continuously engaged in business within the borders of the state for a longer 
period than he and none enjoyed a more unassailable reputation for business integrity or had 
a more creditable record for enterprise. He was the founder and promoter of the William H. 
White Lumber Company, which owned twenty-four diii'erent yards in North Dakota and 
Minnesota, but business constituted but one phase of his activity. He never neglected the 
higher, holier duties of life and became one of the charter members of the First Methodist 
church, the first church established in the state, remaining therafter one of Its most helpful 
representatives. His religious belief guided him in everj' relation of life and found expression 
in his conduct at all times. Thus it is that his memory is enshrined in the halo of a gracious 
presence and of the highest principles and remains as a blessed benediction to all who knew 
him. 

Mr. White was born in Whiting, Vermont, July 31, 1851, a son of Lyman P. and Phoebe 
(Keeler) White, who were also natives of the Green Mountain state and representatives of old 
New England families. His paternal grandfather, Elijah White, a native of Massachusetts, 
served as a commissioned officer in the Revolutionary war and later removed to Vermont. The 
father was at one time president of the Rutland & Burlington Railroad and subsequently 
became chief fuel agent for the Chicago & Northwestern Railway Company, witli headquarters 
in Chicago. In 1869 he removed to Brainerd, Minnesota, where he continued his residence until 
his death several years ago. 

The boyhood and youth of William H. White were spent in Vermont and Wisconsin, his 
education being completed at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin. At one time he 
was a resident of Chicago, where his father was engaged in the lumber business. In October, 
1871, when a young man of twenty years, he reached Brainerd, Minnesota, and on the 1st of 
May, l'872, arrived at Moorhead, Minnesota, with the timber for the approaches of the North- 
ern Pacific railroad bridge, which made possible the laying of the tracks into what is now the 
state of North Dakota and provided the highwaj' for the advent of civilization into the then 
wild western territory, there being no railroads or bridges built in the state previous to that 
time. In 1872 Mr. White took lumber by fiatboats down the Red river, supplying the first 
lumber for the cities of Grand Forks, Elm River, Pembina and Emerson. In 1873 he shipped 
lumber to Sixteenth Siding, or Steele, thirty miles east of Bismarck, and thence forwarded 
it to Bismarck to be used in the construction of the first houses builded in that city. It was 
at that time that he became acquainted with Colonel C. A. Lounsberry, to whom he furnished 
lumber to build the first newspaper plant in what is now North Dakota. After remaining in 
the lumber trade at Bismarck for a year he returned to Moorhead and in 1874 he operated flat- 
boats on the Red river. It was in that year that Mr. White became a resident of Fargo and 
began the development of the extensive lumber business in which he was for so many years 
continuously engaged. In fact he was connected with the lumber trade of the state from 1872 
and was sole owner of twenty-four lumber yards in North Dakota and Minnesota, with head- 
quarters in Fargo. His business was developed along substantial lines. He readily discrimi- 
nated between the essential and the non-essential and his utilization of advantages which 



6 HISTORY OF xXORTH DAKOTA 

came to him brought liim success, while his even paced energy and unremitting industry carried 
him into important trade relations. In no small measure he contributed to material progress, 
for he was one of the founders and directors of the First National Bank of Fargo, the oldest 
banking institution in the state, and he organized and set in motion the clerical work of the 
city auditor's and treasurer's offices in Fargo. 

ilr. White was also intimately identified with nearly every early enterprise for the 
upbuilding of the state and had the unique and unusual reputation of having refused practi- 
cally every political oilice within the gift of the people of North Dakota, being absolutely 
averse to accepting any political preferment. Moreover, he had the distinction of being the 
first and oldest church member representing any denomination in the state and he devoted 
much time to the promotion and development of religious and educational institutions, being 
especially interested in the work of advancing the well-being and care of aged ministers and 
teachers who wore themselves out in the early service during the formative period of North 
Dakota's history. He took a most helpful part in upbuilding the first Methodist Episcopal 
congregation of North Dakota. The little society built its first house of worship in 1874 
and a portion of that building is still standing, being now a part of the large frame structure 
at the corner of Eighth street and First avenue. South, in Fargo. He was a prominent factor 
in the building of the four houses of worship of the First Methodist Episcopal church which 
have occupied the original site and he purchased and placed in the belfry of the first church 
the first bell which proclaimed that Christianity had been established in North Dakota — a bell 
that is still in use. For several years he was president of the board of trustees of the North 
Dakota Conference of the Methodist Episcopal church, was for forty years president of the 
board of trustees of the Methodist Episcopal church of Fargo, was at one time president of the 
board of trustees of the Methodist Episcopal University at Wahpetou, which is now Wesley 
College and is located at Grand Forks, and was also at one time a member of the board of 
trustees of Hamline University at St. Paul. In many ways he contributed to educational 
progress and his inlluence along many lines was at all times beneficial and resultant. In all 
of his church work he had the assistance and encouragement of his devoted wife, whom he 
wedded in Philadelphia, July 20, 1876, and who in her maidenhood was Miss Anna M. Wil- 
liams, a native of that city. 

In the field of philanthropy Mr. White was most active, but withal most modest, ever 
endeavoring to follow the biblical injunction not to let the left hand know what the right 
hand doeth. He never sought recognition of his charity or spoke of the good acts which he 
performed, but it is well known that he and his wife went about doing good deeds and acts 
of kindness and that there are many who have reason to bless and cherish his memory for his 
timely assistance. He became one of the organizers of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion of Fargo and served on its board of trustees. For many years he was president of the Old 
Settlers Association of North Dakota and for many years was associated with Colonel Louns- 
berry in the work of the State Historical Society, of which he was a charter and life member 
and a director. He was connected with the various Masonic bodies of Fargo, having attained 
the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Kite, and in fact there has been no element of public 
progress or improvement or of humanitarian work in Fargo that has not found in him an 
important factor. Public honors would have been multiplied unto him had not his wish been 
otherwise, for he shunned every phase of public preferment and modestly kept in the back- 
ground, but the public recognized the worth of the man, ever regarding William II. White as 
one of the foremost citizens of Fargo and of North Dakota. In his later years he and his 
wife traveled extensively and it is said that there is not a country on the face of the globe 
that he did not visit. At a meeting of the quarterly conference of the First Methodist Epis- 
copal church subsequent to his death the following resolutions were adopted: 

"A brother, counsellor and friend has gone to his reward. Whether in matters of church, 
city or state, he was always a safe leader. 

"Successful in business, his prosperity was never gained by the slightest im worthy act or 
deed. Generous in the extreme, he sought to help where help was most needed. Probably the 
hour never passed when the thought of aiding the poor and unfortunate did not possess his 
soul. 

"Naturally of a religious nature, his life developed equally in matters spiritual and 
temporal. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 7 

"The good, brave wife who has walked by his side in adversity as well as prosperity, now 
survives, possessed of the glad knowledge tliat it was hers to be the companion and adviser 
of a brave and truly noble man. 

"To him the church of his choice took first place as an institution for the promotion of 
good. 

"He was probably the oldest Methodist in Korth Dakota in point of continuous member- 
ship. He was indeed the founder of Methodism in northern Dakota territory and the state 
of North Dakota. 

"For over forty years he was a member of the official board of this church and chairman 
of its board of trustees. He gave his time lavishlj' to further the interests of Christ's king- 
dom in our midst. 

"His last conversation was in his office with our district superintendent, concerning the 
interests of our local church. 

"Therefore, as members of the official board of the First Methodist Episcopal church, 
now assembled as a quarterly conference, we here record our appreciation of the high cliaraeter 
and sterling worth of our departed brother, William H. White, and place these few feeble 
words upon our records as a slight token of our love and unalloyed afl'ection for a worthy 
brother this day gone to his home on high." In an editorial which appeared in the Daily 
Courier-News it was said: 

"A prince and a mighty man has gone down like a great tree suddenlj' felled by the wood- 
man's axe, leaving a lonesome place against the sky. 

"The title of Walt Whitman's famous poem rings in the ear as we think of this tall, clear 
eyed, stanch man: 'Pioneers, oh Pioneers' — for the men who first carved the path for hunter 
and for husbandman are fast passing away. These come first to mind, not onl}' because he was 
one prominent among them, but because Mr. Wliite gave first place in his affections to those 
hardy adventurers who were with him in the early days at 'the crossing,' and its vicinity. 
They were creative spirits, and among them he was a chief. 

"The business life of North Dakota felt his creative hand through all its plastic years, and 
the network of his business interests interlaces a lai'ge territory, wherein he was respected 
and honored. He lived too largely to be confined in business, and a great deal of his energy 
and ability was expended in religious work. Superintendent of the first Sunday school in the 
state, he remained a member of it until his death, and saw a large religious denomination 
grow out of the first little 'class.' as the Methodists then called it, of which he was a member, 
when Fargo was just beginning. 

"To him religion was not a mere profession, for the first comment made by many upon 
his life, was the significant statement: 'He was a just man.' His attorney who cared for his 
large and vexatious interests in the days following Fargo's collapsed boom, states that his 
habit was to bring the papers which required legal attention to him and give him the instruc- 
tion: 'Do what is just; nothing else.' and that freely, when not required by the letter of the 
law, Mr. AVhite did justice, and more. Lifelong associates apply the words of the ancient 
prophet to him: he 'dealt justly, loved mercy (kindness) and walked humbly with his God.' 
Every honor in the great Methodist denomination which is accessible to a layman was con- 
ferred upon him by the volition of his fellow churchmen, and unsought upon his part, for he 
was modest as well as capable. 

"He was broader than to be a mere chvuchman. ^lis sympathies were so catholic that he 
frequently mingled with other church gatherings than his own and enjoyed them, even those 
frequently considered heterodox, and his expressions of religious conviction made in the times 
when he laid aside his reserve and spoke of them, were generous and appreciative of the good 
wherever found. This breadth of mind was found in his ordinary relations with his fellowmen, 
wherein he differed. He held to principles tenaciously, but never allowed differences to sever 
friendship. 

"He lived largely and well, and was a fine type of the true manhood which is the founda- 
tion of the commonwealth. It was fitting that he should pass without long, lingering illness 
or pitiful weakness. His last words showed the tender solicitude always felt for the wife who 
had walked by his side through the long, golden years, and whose terrible shock at his sudden 
passing is the chief regret concerning the manner of it. 



8 IIISTURV OF XORTH DAKOTA 

".Mr. White lived largely, wrought strongly in business and social life; leaves a good 
record behind him and will not be forgotten by the community in which he spent all of his 
life, but his extreme youth." 

Tlie following tributes were paid ilr. \Vhite at the time of his death. 

Like the quick vanishing of a light, leaving impenetrable darkness; like gray clouds 
obscuring a clear .sky; like glad joy converted into sadful sorrow, was the effect of the 
startling announcement that the soul of our dear brother, William H. White, had suddenly 
withdrawn from the earthly life to the eternal. 

The ladies of the Pastor's Aid Society of the First Methodist Episcopal Cliurch, of Fargo, 
North Dakota, would pay a last tribute of respect and appreciation to the memory of a 
good and true man. 

He was friend, adviser, brother. Every appeal for assistance met favorable response. 
Intense interest in all plans \vas manifested. The fine compliment of being financially 
responsible was frequently accorded us. We will miss his cheery presence, his courteous 
kindness, his valuable counsel, his ready helpfulness. 

His manifold beneficences are his enduring inonumiiit. Let us place thereon wreaths 
woven from the blossoms of love and benevolence, wliii-h he so generously planted and whose 
exhalations will be grateful and everlasting. 

May his life be an example and inspiration in devotion and philanthropy. May we 
keep the faith as he did, so that when our summons comes to join the innumerable caravan, 
we may wrap the drapery of our couch about us and lie down to pleasant dreams. 

To his wife our dear sister, we oU'er our consolation without reserve. We share her 
grief. Our sympathies encircle her. With bowed heads we commend her to the Heavenly 
Fathei-, Who will answer sometime, somewhere, all our questionings of why and wherefore. 

Pastor's Aid Society. 

Mrs. E. F. Moore (Secy.). 
Fargo, North Dakota. 
Sept. 12, 191C. 

Sometimes in consiilering the born leaders of a country 1 am reminded of that great 
wheel in a large factory through which power is distributed to the various machines, large 
and small, assembled to do the tasks of that factory. 

An examination of the wheel will show it to contain innumerable cogs, so arranged, 
that in turning, they fit into the cogs of other wheels, whicli themselves are used in the 
vast work of distributing power. 

Into such wheels the master builder intends to place only the very best material. But 
the jar, the necessary friction produced by constant motion, the loss of power occasioned 
from other inaccurate wheels and machines, frequently render impossible the highest per- 
fection of operation. Even in the master wheel, by reason of some latent and unknown 
defect in itself, more often, perhaps, because of the necessary and constant contact with its 
environment, is found an imperfect or broken cog, which render operation difficult, followed 
by a necessarily heavy strain upon the perfect cogs to keep in motion the mighty factory 
so dependent upon the larger wheel, for constant and perfect action. 

■Judged, however, from results,— the only accurate measurement,— there is accorded to 
the products of that factory the highest degree of perfection. 

So in this great world of ours. Providence places human machines, not perfect, nor 
yet fiee from error, into their respective spheres of action. To some He gives great ability 
coupled witli large responsibilities; to others less power, but consequently with less expec- 
tancy of return. The old illustration of what is given and what is required taken from 
the parable of the talents, tells the story of God's demands made of the men an<l women, 
with wliom He has peopled this great world in which we live. 

Jfeasured by these standards, William H. White— in Northern Dakota Territory and 
the State of North Dakota, was a master wheel,— a mighty leader in the development of 
what is destined to become one of the greatest States (if this Union. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 9 

Fortunate indeed, that so early in the life of the Territory and State, this man of God 
came to establish his home, he possessed the inspirational and educational instinct, and in all 
he did, tempered his movements, keeping in mind the spiritual, intellectual and physical 
development of the people, with whom he was destined to grow, increase and become a 
leader. 

He was a business man of the very highest type. Before going upon the bench, for 
over fifteen years, I was honored by being his confidential legal adviser. It Was during the 
earlier portions of that career, while the boom days were on in this country, we first met. 
It was at that period when Rum was King, when he sat upon the throne of power on these 
fertile prairies; when to speak in opposition to his unreasonable yet incessant demands, 
often meant serious business complications and dire disaster; in a word, "the days that 
tried men's souls," then it was that the sturdy Cliristian character of the man, whose 
memory we now honor, sparkled with the greatest brilliancy. 

Justice and righteousness were his watchwords. Often times, after the boom burst, 
when fortunes were melting away like snow under the summer sun, Bro. White would stand 
amid the wreck and ruin about him, while his small earthly belongings were being fast 
depleted by the universal decline about him, and say to his counsellor, when advising con- 
cerning obligations long since past due, "Give them time if necessary, take no penny not 
absolutely mine, but above all you be a judge as well as a lawyer, and do justice between 
us both." I remember upon one occasion he lost $8,000.00 because he would not do an act 
which might be construed in a wrong light by a former benefactor and friend, when I 
advised him that he was legally entitled to every dollar of that amount. 

For such clients all lawyers ought daily to be thankful. When their number increases 
there will be a corresponding decrease in what many call the "Crooked lawyers." Lawyers 
rise, in the discharge of private and public duty, little above the general level of the capa- 
bility and desires of the clients for whom they woik. The greater and nobler the client — 
the better and the more conscientious the attorney. 

But I must not dwell too long upon the business side of Bro. White's career, however 
interesting and delightful it was, because in fact he was not only a successful business man 
but also a religious leader in this great State of ours. 

W'hile he was broad and liberal in his religious convictions, and had the warmest 
respect for and gave liberally to aid other denominations, he was essentially a Methodist. 
Indeed, I believe there is justly accorded to him, by every one, the position he so uniquely 
filled, that of The Pioneer— the First Methodist of Northern Dakota Territory and the 
State of North Dakota. Influenced in early life by the homes of such Methodists as Bishop 
Simpson and Alpha J. Kynette, little wonder he sought to plant some of their Methodist 
influence and inspiration to the virgin soil of this new Territory. 

He was successful. This Conference tells the story. Upon your minutes appear the 
tables which show in members and property the development of the seed thus early sown 
by the hardy hand of the pioneers who peopled this State. 

Like Daniel Webster, who in that famous speech in opposition to the admitting to pro- 
bate of the Girard will in the Courts of Philadelphia, Bro. White took the ground — that 
Christianity was in fact a part of the Common law of the land, and that the Clergy were 
the representatives of that religion here below — that a strike at the Minister of the Gospel 
such as was found in the will was a blow at the Gospel itself. No wonder then that in 
the heart of Brother White was found a warm place for the ministry, not only of his own, 
but of all Churches, those who were true heralds of the Christian religion he so devoutly 
espoused. 

The "William H. White Superannuate fund' which belongs to you, not only evidences 
his financial wisdom but also bears testimony to his devotion to that great body of men 
who have labored and served in this part of the moral vineyard. 

Perhaps I ought to close with this brief description of what should be termed his 
public life, but a true representation of a great career would be incomplete, did it fail to 
point to what might be called his private life. 



10 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

In the sacred precincts of the home and tlie church, he met as friend to friend all those 
who crossed the threshold of either, with that manly interest and those kindly greetings 
which could only emanate from the large and affectionate nature, he so richly possessed. 

And here too, I am halted by those delicate relations which ought not to be exposed to 
public view. At this place and at this moment I stand with uncovered head, bowed with 
grief over the loss of a friend, whose companionship began over 35 years ago and con- 
tinued unremittingly until his pure white soul winged its way to "that city not built with 
hands eternal in the heavens." What blessed years of association. To this occasion, and 
as it were beside his bier, I bring these few paltry words, attempting to do honor to his 
memory, conscious of the poverty of language to express our real thought and lay them, 
where, he had survived me, I know he would have said and laid the simple words which 
tell of a profound respect and an ever abiding affection. 

The home life of Brother White, fortunately presided over by one whose womanly 
instinct was capable of thoroughly understanding the depths of his nature, was all that 
could be desired. For health and other reasons Mr. and Mrs. White traveled far and wide. 
They were thus enabled to see all countries of the globe. It would be interesting indeed to read 
at length "The tale of the two travelers," as it could be developed by a description of their 
journeys around the world. Suffice it to say, they would furnish a medium through which 
could be contemplated the sources of the accumulated wisdom concerning world wide affairs, 
with which he was so familiar. 

Brother White was a keen observer of men and things. He possessed also a rare 
literary discernment, which, aided by what he saw and heard made him a profound student 
and lover of the best literature of the day. In his home library, in the daily companion- 
ship of his books and his wife, he spent most of his spare moments. Thus it was that all 
the resources, he so richly possessed were accumulated and apparently husbanded to aid 
him in becoming a useful citizen. 

It is of such a character we speak at this moment; for such a life we utter a tribute 
of esteem; to such a religious leader, we add words of respect; for such a husband and 
friend we pause to give merited praise. Methodism moui-ns this day the loss of a great 
leader; t\u; State a princely citizen and the wife and friend a real companion — gone on a 
little before — to prepare the way for those who will follow. As he would wish so we say 
"Tliough the workmen fall the work goes on." 



OLUF NELSON. 



Oluf Nelson is conducting a blacksmith and repair .shop at Clifford and has been very 
successful in that connection, building up a large and profitable patronage. His birth 
occurred near Bergen, Norway, April 26, 1864. and he is a son of Nels and Helga (Oleson) 
Nelson, the former of whom is still living in Norway, while the latter passed away in 
that country. 

Oluf Nelson, who is one of seven living children of a family of fifteen, was reared 
and educated in Norway, where he remained until he was about twenty-three years of age. 
He emigrated to America in 1887 and, making his way at once to the northwest, located , 
in Traill county, North Dakota. He learned the blacksmith's trade while in Norway and 
after arriving here established a shop in Clifford. He does all kinds of blacksmithing and 
his shop is well equipped for general repair work. He is a very skillful artisan and is well 
patronized by the people of Clifford and the surrounding country. He not only does 
general machine repairing but has specialized to some extent in automobile repairing. He 
owns stock in the Farmers Elevator Company and in the Traill County Telephone Company 
and is in very comfortable circumstances. 

In 1902 Mr. Nelson was united in marriage to Miss Mary Erickson, also a native of 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 11 

Norway, by whom lie had live children, Hilda, Xoimaii, Otto, Mabel and Olga. The wife 
and mother passed away in 1911 and was laid to rest in the Norman cemetery. 

Mr. Xelson endorses the principles of the republican party and is now serving as one 
of the supervisors of Norman township. His religious faith is that of the Lutheran church 
and its teachings guide his life. His success is doubly creditable in that it is due entirely to 
his own efforts and although he has given the greater part of his time and attention to the 
building up of his business interests he has found opportunity to cooperate with move- 
ments seeking the general welfare and is recognized as a man of public spirit. 



RUSH S. ADAMS. 



Rush S. Adams, president of the First National Bank of Lisbon and president of the 
Adams & Frees Company, a landholding company, ranks with the foremost business men 
of his part of the state. He is the oldest bank president of southern North Dakota and his 
activities along this and other lines have proven a potent element in advancing the material 
progress of the section in which he lives. He was born near Union Grove, Kenosha county, 
Wisconsin, on tlic 18th of November, 1854, a son of Homer and Philinda (Cadwell) Adams, 
both of whom were natives of the state of New York, whence they removed with their 
respective parents to Wisconsin in the year 1846. There they were subsequently married 
and the father for many years followed farming in that locality but afterward retired 
and took up his abode in Union Grove, where he passed away. 

Rush S. Adams was a pupil in the district schools of his native county and afterward 
attended the preparatory department of Beloit College. He next entered the employ of the 
firm of J. Miller & Company, boot and shoe manufacturers of Racine, Wisconsin, in the 
capacity of bookkeeper. In 1875 he became a member of the firm, with which he was actively 
associated until 1883, when he sold his interest in the business and came to North Dakota, 
settling in Lisbon, where, in company with B. M. Frees, of Chicago, and H. K. Adams, of 
Racine, he organized the Ransom County Bank under the firm style of Adams & Frees. He 
became president of the institution, with Mr. Frees as the vice president and H. K. Adams 
as the cashier. In 1887 the bank was nationalized with the same officers and there was no 
change in the personnel from 1883 until 1915. On the 1st of January of the latter year 
H. K. Adams retired and his son, AV. S. Adams, succeeded him in the position of cashier. Mr. 
Frees, who resides in San Diego, California, is still vice president of the bank, with Rush S. 
Adams as the president and chief executive officer. For a third of a century he has now been 
active in control of the institution and has made it one of the safe financial concerns of the 
state, its business maintaining ever an even balance between conservatism and progressiveness. 

In 1876 Mr. Adams was married to Miss Susan W. Sage, of Racine, Wisconsin, and to 
them were born six children, of whom three are living: Sidney D., a prominent attorney, 
who is practicing as a member of the firm of Rourke, Kvello & Adams in Lisbon; Gertrude L., 
the wife of Dr. John B. Kinne, of Aberdeen, Washington; and Marie, who is connected with 
the Associated Charities of Chicago. Mrs. Adams died in New Orleans in December, 1911, 
and in March, 1914, Mr. Adams was married to Miss Alma Whitman, of Boston, Massachusetts. 

In his political views Mr. Adams is a republican and for six years he served as a member 
of the state board of pardons, while for many years he has been treasurer of the State 
Soldiers' Home. He was mayor of Lisbon for one year and served for several years as a 
member of the board of education, of which for tw'o years he was president. He. has ever 
maintained a most progressive attitude in public affairs, standing loyally for those forces 
which are of greatest value to the community and the commonwealth at large. He belongs 
to Sheyenne Valley Lodge, No. 12, F. & A. M.; Lisbon Chapter, No. 7, R. A. M.; and to Ivanhoe 
Commandery, No. 8, K. T., and has made his life an expression of Masonic teachings and 
purposes. He also belongs to Lisbon Lodge, No. 63, A. 0. U. W. He has been grand receiver 
of the Grand Lodge of North Dakota since July, 1895. During this time he has paid out to 
the widows and orphans over two million dollars. He is also chairman of the investment 
committee, which has over a million and a half of invested funds. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church and they are continually reaching out a helping hand to 



12 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

those less fortunate. Tluir woik lias been a potent force for public benefit and for the 
support of high standards and wherever they are known they are spoken of in terms of 
highest respect and regard. Their genuine worth entitles thein to mention as representative 
citi/.ens of this great state, tlieir work along many lines being of value in promoting the 
material, intellectual, social, politiial and nioial progress of Ndrtli Dakota. 



0. J. OLSOX. 



0. .J. Olson, of Wahpeton, is now serving a third term as register of deeds of Richland 
county, and is very enTicient in the discharge, of his duties in that capacity, and he is also 
president of the Commercial Club. He is a native son of the county and was born on Sep- 
tember 24. 1S85, of the marriage of Chris and Lena (Olson) Olson. The father was born in 
Denmark and the mother in Mower county, Minnesota, and their marriage occurred in Adams, 
that state. About 1882 they came to North Dakota and settled at Dwiglit, where the father 
«as engaged in the grain, machinery and farm implement business for a number of years. 
Having accumulated a competence, he is living retired in Galchutt. He is a republican in 
politics and fraternally is a Woodman, while his religious faith is that of the Lutheran 
church. To him and his wife were born seven children, namely: George, who is engaged in 
the lumber business in Canada; O. J.; Mrs. Johnson, of Galchutt, whose husband is a general 
merchant there; Clara, at home; Mrs. Sch>iltz, of Minot, this state, whose husband is man- 
ager of a hardware store; Cora, who is a teacher and resides at home; and Clarence, also at 
home. The paternal grandparents passed their entire lives in Denmark. 

O. J. Olson received his education through attending the common schools and the Ked 
River Valley University at Wahpeton, from which he was graduated in 1904. Thereafter ho 
remained at home for a short time and then became a collector and salesman for the Henne- 
pin Lumber Company, leaving their employ to accept a position as clerk in the office of register 
of deeds. In 1907 he was appointed deputy and three years later was elected register of 
deeds. His previous experience in the office well qualified him for the position and he has 
made such an excellent record that he has been twice re-elected and is still serving in that 
capacity. He is systematic, prompt and accurate and there has never been the slightest 
question as to his integrity. 

On the 29th of April, 1914, Mr. Olson was married to Jliss Susie Rettig, a native of 
Wahpeton. Both are members of the Lutheran church, in the work of which they take a 
commendable interest. He is active in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is now 
trustee of the home fund board of the state. His political beliefs are in accord with the 
principles of the republican party, which he supports loyally. He is president of the Com- 
mercial Club and under his leadership that organization has accomplished much for the 
civic and business expansion of the town and he hopes for still greater achievement. 



HKNRY fflLDRETH. 



Among the substantial citizens of Argusville is Henry llildreth, who became identified 
with the agricultural development of Cass county in pioneer times and for a considerable 
period carried on general farming. He afterward became connected with business affairs in 
Argusville and at the present time is living retired, his labors having been crowned with a 
measure of success that permits him to enjoy well earned rest. He was born in Wisconsin, 
January 15, 1852. a son of Henry and Sarah 0. (Perkins) llildreth. both of whom were 
natives of New York. Coming to the west in 1850, they settled on a farm in the Badger 
state and there lived until called to the home beyond. 

They had two children but Henry llildreth is the only member of the family now living. 
He was reared and educated in Wisconsin, remaining in that state until he attained his 
majority. In March, 1873, he went to Nebraska, but returned to Wisconsin in A\igust of the 
same year. In 1878 he removed to Cass county, North Dakota, establishing his home in 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 13 

Berlin township. He secured a claim and at once began to break the sod and till the fields, 
residing thereon until 1883. His first dwelling was a sod house and he made other primitive 
improvements, but in the year last mentioned he returned to Wisconsin, where he worked 
in a lumber mill for three years and afterward farmed the old homestead for five years. In 
1891 he again came to Xorth Dakota and settled upon his farm, which he occupied and 
further improved until 1894. In that year he removed to Argusville, where he established 
a store and also conducted a hotel, continuing in the business for four years. In 1913 he 
became one of the organizers of the Argusville State Bank, of which he is yet one of the 
directors, although at the present time he is practically retired from active business connec- 
tions. He was also one of the organizers of the Argusville Farmers Elevator Company and 
is now president of its board of directors, owning one-fifth of the stock of that company. 
This was the second farmers' elevator in the state. In addition to this he and his wife still 
own one hundred and sixty acres of land at Gardner, now included within the corporation 
limits of that village. 

Mr. Hildreth has been married twice. In 1879 he wedded Miss .Josephine Krom, a native of 
New York and a daughter of Hiram and Rebecca (Depew) Krom. By this union there were 
four children, as follows: Edna A. and Sarah B.. both of whom reside in Portland, Oregon; 
Mary, who is the wife of Charles Abernathy and lives in Oregon; and Hiram G., who makes 
his home at Argusville, North Dakota. The wife and mother died on the 4th of December, 
1901, and her remains were interred in the Harwood cemetery. In 1904 Mr. Hildreth was 
again married, his second union being with Miss Ella S. Buckland, a native of Wisconsin and 
-a daughter of German and JMary Buckland, both of whom were born in Vermont. They 
removed to Wisconsin in the year 1848 and in that state the father passed away, but the 
•mother still survives at the age of eighty-two. 

Mr. Hildreth votes with the republican party, which finds in bim a strong and stalwart 
advocate. He served on the township board for two terras and has also been town assessor. 
For twelve years he was a member of the school board and the cause of education found in 
him a stalwart champion. His wife is a member of the Congregational church and both are 
highly esteemed, enjoying the goodwill and confidence of friends and neighbors. Mr. Hildreth 
deserves much credit for what he has accomplished, as he started out in life empty handed 
and today is the possessor of a comfortable competence, which is the legitimate reward of 
well directed energy and thrift. 



CLARENCE R. BIERLY. 



Clarence R. Bierly, president of the Minot Realty Company, has thus been engaged in 
business since July, 1906, and is thoroughly acquainted with every phase of the work which 
claims his attention and which is bringing to him substantial success because of capable 
management, keen discrimination and unfaltering enterprise. They conduct a real estate and 
loan business and their clientage has reached gratifying proportions. 

Mr. Bierly was born at Williamsport, Pennsylvania, September 29, 1875, a son of 
Willis R. and Sarah L. (Bosard) Bierly, who were also natives of the Keystone state, born 
July 30, 1847, and July 28, 1853, respectively. The father was an attorney and newspaper 
writer who continued his residence in the east until 1883, when he removed to Texas. There 
he continued in the practice of law and acted as attorney for a number of companies in 
northwestern Texas. He left that state to take the position of managing editor of the 
Orand Forks Herald, arriving in North Dakota on the 1st of January, 1884. For twelve years 
he maintained his abode there but in 1896 returned to Pennsylvania and since that time has 
been engaged in revising and codifying the laws of that state, making his home at Rebers- 
burg. Ih the year 1906 Sirs. Bierly went to Canada and there passed away in February, 1907. 

Clarence R. Bierly is the eldest of a family of seven children. He attended school in 
Crand Forks. North Dakota, and was graduated from the high school with the class of 1893. 
When his father left North Dakota in 1896, because of impaired health, he engaged in the 
fire insurance business at Grand Forks in connection with W. A. Gordon for eighteen months 
and on the expiration of that period accepted the position of bookkeeper with the Barnes 



1^ HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Grocery Company. After a short timo, liowevor. lie was offered a position at Larimore, 
Xortli Dakota, in the land and loan business with J. B. Streeter, Jr., Company, one of the 
largest companies operating in land in the state at that time. He occupied a position of 
responsibility and trust with Mr. Streeter for about eight years and then resigned to enter 
business in Minot. In July, 1906, he organized tlie Minot Realty Company, at which time he 
became president and so continues. This is a close corporation capitalized for twenty 
thousand dollars, owning and operating about eighteen hundred acres of land besides con- 
ducting a general loan and insurance business. Mr. Bierly devotes his entire time to the 
realty company and the operation of its properties and is thoroughly acquainted with 
conditions of the real estate market, knows the property that is for sale and is an expert 
valuator. Another point in his business career worthy of mention is that during the first 
three months of the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893 he was engaged in 
decorative art work in connection with the North Dakota and other state exhibits. 

On the 15th of July, 190.3, occurred the marriage of Mr. Bierly and Mrs. Edith R. Mory, 
a daughter of Albert C. and Sarah E. (McNeill) .Johnson. She was born in Jloulton, Iowa! 
and her parents were also natives of that state. They removed to Kansas and in 1893 came 
to North Dakota, whence they made their way to California in 1901, their home being now 
in Sonora, that state. Mrs. Bierly first married Edward R. Mory, who was a druggist of 
Larimore, North Dakota. To Mr. and Mrs. Bierly have been born two children, namely: 
Sydney H., whose birth occurred at Larimore, North Dakota, July 25, 1904; and Reed, born 
in Minot, October 9, 1908. 

In his political views Mr. Bierly is a democrat. He is a special assessment commissioner, 
in which capacity he has acted for three years. The members of this commission are 
appointed by the city commissioners, the city being under a commission government. When 
he took charge of the work he organized a system similar to the one in use in Minneapolis, 
whereby each piece of property has a complete record which can be digested at a glance. 
This system, although expensive to install, will save the taxpayers a gi-eat deal of money 
as the old system was so unwieldy that a great many assessments were overlooked. He is 
ambitious, energetic and persistent, qualities which are indispensable elements in the attain- 
ment of business prosperity. At the same time he is thoroughly reliable and trustworthy 
and his integrity as well as his activity has placed him among the leading and substantial 
business men of Minot. 



JUDGE LEO J. PALDA. 



Judge Leo J. Palda, who is engaged in the jiractice of law at Minot as the senior j.artner 
in the firm of Palda & Aaker. and who has also served on the district bench, was born in 
Cleveland, Ohio, March 4, 1873, his parents being Leo and Theresa (Sladky) Palda, both of 
whom were natives of Bohemia Init were married in the new world. The father engaged in 
newspaper work in early life and about the year 18fi.> crossed the Atlantic, establisliing his 
home in the state of New York, where he engaged in the newspajier business. He was married 
in New York and afterward continued connection with newspaper publication in New York, 
Oiicago, Cleveland and in Cedar Rapids. Iowa, publishing Bohemian papers. Both he and his 
wife spent their remaining days in Cedar Rapids and he was a man of wide influence among 
people of his nationality. He never aspired to office, although he held some local positions 
and was regarded as a valued citizen of the community in which he made his home. 

Judge Palda, the only living child of Leo Palda, was reared in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where 
he largely pursued his education, his public school course there, however, being supplemented 
by study in the State University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. At the age of fifteen vears he 
began dealing in cigars and newspapers at Cedar Rapids and continued activelv in tliat line 
until he reached the age of eighteen years. He thi-n entered the Michigan University from 
which he was graduated in .Tunc. 1893. He then engaged in law practice at Cedar Rapids, 
where he remained for about a year, after which he removed to Elgin, Iowa, where he fol- 
lowed his profession for about five years. In 1900 he arrived in North Dakota, settling at 
Kenmare. Ward cmmty, where he continued for three years. On the expiration of that pe'riod 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 15 

he removed to Minot, having been appointed to serve on the district bencli while practicing 
at Kenmare. He remained upon the bench for two years, making a creditable record in 
office. He then formed a partnership with John E. Burke, which association was main- 
tained until 1908, when he became the senior member of the law firm of Palda & Aaker and 
in that connection has since engaged in the general practice of law. He is recognized as a 
man of pronounced ability in his chosen field. His efforts have been attended with success, 
for he is a clear and logical reasoncr and his study of his cases is thorough and exhaustive. 
He presents a situation with great clearness and the logic of his arguments is one of the 
strong and abiding elements in his practice. He is also a landowner in North Dakota and 
personally operates a part of his farm property. 

In January, 1898, Judge Palda was married to Miss Mae G. Lyon, a native of Fayette 
county, Iowa, and a daughter of Willis and Mary (Randall) Lyon, both of whom were born 
in the eastern part of the United States. Willis Lyon, an agriculturist by occupation, died 
almost immediately after the Civil war as the result of diseases contracted in service at the 
front. He was a member of an Iowa regiment. Mr. and Mrs. Palda have two children, 
namely: Charles H., born December 19, 1898; and Robert W., whose natal day was July 22, 
1900. 

Politically Judge Palda is a republican and aside from serving as district judge he has 
filled various local offices, including that of mayor of Kenmare, being the first incumbent in 
the position. Fraternally he is connected with the Masonic lodge at Minot, with the Elks 
and with the Knights of Pythias, also the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Modern 
Woodmen of America. In the Elks organization he has held both local and state offices. 
Through the steps of an orderly progression Judge Palda has steadily advanced and his 
position is one which is accorded him by the consensus of public opinion in recognition of 
Ills ability and his devotion to the highest standards of the profession. 



HON. JOHN W. HANSEL. 



Hon. John W. Hansel, president of Fargo College and an honored resident of Fargo, is 
regarded as one of the able educators of North Dakota, holding to the highest standards 
and ever recognizing the fact that physical, intellectual and moral progress go hand in hand. 
A native of Peoria, Illinois, he was born March 6, 1853, a son of John W. and Mary A. 
(Little) Hansel, who were natives of Ohio and were married in Newark, that state. The 
father was a cabinetmaker by trade and at the time of the gold excitement in California 
crossed the plains to that state in 1849 with a mule team. After spending three years in 
the gold fields, where he met with moderate success, he returned by way of the Isthmus of 
Panama to the middle west, settling in Peoria, Illinois, where for many years he was 
engaged in the hardware business. Subsequently he turned his attention to the manufacture 
of his own patents, for he possessed inventive genius and gave to the world several 
valuable devices. He died in Indianapolis, Indiana, at the very venerable age of eighty-seven 
years, while his wife passed away in Oak Park, Illinois, at the age of seventy-eight. 

President John W. Hansel spent his youthful days in the home of his parents at Peoria, 
where he acquired a public school education, after which he was variously employed, begin- 
ning life's work in a machine shop as an engineer. Eventually he became associated with a 
wholesale drug firm of Peoria and continued successfully in that business until 1883. In the 
meantime he had become actively interested in the work of the Young Men's Christian 
Association and in 1882 he accepted the position of general secretary of the association at 
St. Joseph, Missouri, where he was instrumental in erecting the first association building 
west of the Mississippi river, securing funds sufficient to make all payments upon this build- 
ing, which was erected at a cost of one hundred thousand dollars. Mr. Hansel remained for 
five years at St. Joseph and then went to Kansas Cit.y, where he remained for three years, 
during which time he was instrumental in raising the funds and building the superstructure 
of the Young Men's Cliristian Association building, already begun, the cost of which was 
two hundred and ten thousand dollars. When he undertook the work conditions seemed 
very unfavorable, for finances were at a low ebb and the outlook was discouraging, but he 



IG HISTORY OF NORTPI DAKOTA 

fired the workers with his own zeal and courage and the task was carried forward to 
successful completion. Mr. Hansel afterward cooperated with some of the association 
secretaries and laymen of the west in the organization of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation College at Chicago with summer schools at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Upon the 
completion of the organization of the college he was chosen its first general secretary and 
later its president and continued in that capacity for fifteen years, when he was compelled 
to resign on account of his healtli. He was instrumental in making the school one of the 
two great institutions of its kind in the world. lie cooperated in organizing tlie Lake 
Geneva Student Conference, wliieli has since become famous throughout the world. After 
severing his connection with the Chicago school Ur. Hansel spent three years on the Gulf 
coast and in September, 1913, accepted a call to the presidency of Fargo College, in which 
capacity he is now serving. This institution offers one of the strongest four year liberal 
arts courses in the northwest. It has had two Rhodes scholarships in the last four years 
and all of the work of the college receives full credit recognition in the eastern universities. 

In 1875 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Hansel and Miss Christina Watson Mowat, 
of Peoria, and they have become the parents of seven children, of whom three are living: 
Agnes Mowat, tlie wife of Lloyd E. Harter, sales-manager for Hales & Edwards Grain Com- 
pany of Chicago; :Mary Anna, the wife of Professor Fred C. Brown, of the Bradley Polytechnic 
Institute of Peoria, Illinois; and John Washington, advertising manager in the middle west 
for the Good Housekeeping magazine. Mr. and Mrs. Hansel are members of the Congrega- 
tional church. She is a lady of broad and liberal culture and has been of great assistance to 
her husband. 

In his political views Mr. Hansel has always been an earnest republican and progressive 
and his opinions are the result of close study of the questions of the day. He participated in 
the progressive convention which nominated Theodore Roosevelt in 1912. One of the Fargo 
papers said of him: "Mr. Hansel's services to Fargo College already command the gratitude 
of every friend of the institution and of education. He has laid the foundation for a sound 
business procedure adequate to the large growth and coming needs; he has gone far to 
correct the prejudices that have handicapped the college hitherto; he has helped largely in 
freeing the college from a burden of debt; he has won a sympathetic hearing out of the 
state; he has won the confidence of us all by his candor, his kindly manner, his business-like 
methods and by his large faith and optimism." 



ARTHUR M. THOMPSON'. 



Arthur M. Thompson, member of the state legislature for the third term and a prominent 
member of the North Dakota bar, practicing at Minot, is leaving the impress of his individu- 
ality upon the history of the state both as a lawyer and law maker. He was born in 
Chicago, Illinois, December 11, 1877, a son of Charles and Antoinette (Sakrison) Thompson, 
both of whom were natives of Norway, born in 1850 and 1852 respectively. Jn 1866 when a 
youth of sixteen years. Charles Thompson crossed the Atlantic to the new world and settled 
in Gjicago, where he became a builder and contractor. There he resided until 1879, when he 
removed to Deer Park. Wisconsin, .ind continued in the same line of business. In early 
manhood he wedded Antoinette Sakrison but both are now deceased. Mr. Thompson held 
various local offices and was postmaster at Deer Park at the time of his death. 

Arthur M. Thompson was the third in order of birth in a family of nine children. He 
attended the Kiver Falls Normal School and the University of Minnesota, pursuing a two 
years' course in special work in the academic department, and later entering vipon the study 
of law, which he completed by graduation with the class of 1905. Long before this, however, he 
had started out in the business world. At the age of sixteen years he secured a clerkship 
in a store at Deer Park, with which he was connected for two and a half years. He after- 
ward taught school for a year and later spent a year and a half as a clerk at Bruce, 
Wisconsin. For three or four years he was upon the road during vacation periods while he 
was pursuing his normal school and university courses. He completed his education in 1905 
but practiced little before coming to Minot in the early part of 1906. Here he has since 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 17 

remained in general practice and his ability has brought him prominently to the front in the 
successful conduct of important litigation. The thoroughness and care with which he pre- 
pares his cases is one of the strong elements in his growing success. His arguments are logical, 
his reasoning sound and his deductions clear and forceful. In addition to his practice he has 
business interests as the owner of considerable farm land both improved and unimproved in 
this state and much of this he has now rented. 

On the 4th of August, 1909, Mr. Thompson married Miss Eleanor R. McElfresli, who was 
born in Emporia, Kansas, a daughter of Dr. John McElfresh, a native of Maryland, who 
has now passed away. They have become parents of one son, named for her father, John 
McElfresh, born August 19, 1913. 

Fraternally Mr. Thompson is connected with the Elks lodge at Minot, in which he has 
filled most of the offices, being next in line for exalted ruler. He holds membership with the 
Modern Woodmen of America and the Knights of Pythias and he gives his political allegiance 
to the republican party, being a recognized leader in its ranks in his part of the state. 
Well fitted for leadership, he has been called upon for legislative duty and is now serving for 
the third term as a member of the general assembh'. giving careful consideration to all 
questions which come up for settlement. 



GEORGE CARLSON. 



George Carlson, cashier of the Farmers Bank at Gwinner, Sargent county, was born in 
Renville county, Minnesota, September 17, 1887, a son of K. and Stina (Johnson) Carlson, who 
were natives of Norway. The father was born in 1853 and became an early resident of 
]\Iinnesota, whence he removed to North Dakota in 1888. In this state he secured a home- 
stead claim situated on section 34, township 133, range 54, Sargent county, and thereon he 
remained until 1903, at which time he removed to Milnor, where he is now living retired. He 
was prominently connected with the agricultural development of his county for many years 
and contributed in substantial measure to the advancement of the interests of that district. 
His wife was bom in Norway in 1849 and both she and her husband came to the United 
States with their respective parents when quite young, both families settling in Minnesota. 
Mr. and Mrs. Carlson are now living in Milnor, Sargent county. 

George Carlson is the youngest in a family of seven children, all of whom are yet living. 
In the acquirement of his education he passed through consecutive grades in the public 
schools and after completing the high school course at Milnor he devoted two years to study in 
the North Dakota State Normal and Industrial School at Ellendale. Still later he pursued a 
business course in Fargo and in 1907 he entered the First National Bank of Milnor, in which 
institution he held the position of assistant cashier, remaining in that connection for four 
years. During the succeeding four years, or until 1915, he was vice president of the First 
National Bank of Milnor. In October, 1915, the Farmers Bank of Gwinner was organized 
by Mr. Carlson and two business associates, C. Cooper and R. P. Johnson. Mr. Cooper is now 
president of the bank, with Mr. Johnson as vice president and Mr. Carlson as cashier. The 
company has recently erected a modern bank building thoroughly equipped, furnishing an 
attractive home for the bank, which is being developed along substantial lines, displaying 
nothing that partakes of frenzied finance but on the contrary carefully safeguarding the 
interests of depositors as well as protecting the interests of the institution. Mr. Carlson not 
only is active in managing and controlling the bank but is also the owner of farm property 
in Sargent county, situated on section 38, township 133, range 56. He also has an attractive 
residence in Gwinner which he has recently completed and which is supplied with all modern 
conveniences and accessories. 

In 1913 Mr. Carlson was united in marriage to Miss Liffie Intlehouse, who was born in 
Richland county, this state, in 1888 and is a daughter of Peter and Guri Intlehouse, both of 
whom were old residents of this state. The father was a butcher by trade, following that 
pursuit until his death, which occurred in 1903. The mother is now making her home with 
her daughter, Mrs. Carlson, who is the youngest of a family of five children, four of whom 
survive. Mr. and Mrs. Carlson have one child, Wanda, born August 15, 1913. Both are 



18 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

members of the Lutlieiaii tliurch and Mr. Carlson gives his political allegiance to the 
republican party. Praiticiilly his entire life has been spent in Sargent county and with its 
substantial development he has been closely associated, while in its business conditions he 
has found the opportunity for the attainment of substantial success. 



JAMES JOHNSON. 



The life record of James Johnson is another proof of the fact that the accident of birth 
does not determine the position of the individual in the business world but that success 
depends upon utilization of opportunity. Laudable ambition has carried James Johnson 
steadily forward and the position which he occupies in business circles of Minot and Ward 
county is one of prominence and inlluence. He was born at Viele, Denmark, on the 1st of 
Vlay, 1850, a son of James and Katherine (Paulson) Johnson, who were also natives of 
Denmark, in which country they spent their entire lives, the father there following the occu- 
pation of farming. Their son James attended school in his native counti-y, pursuing a 
course in the Wibij Military School in Copenhagen. When a mere lad he worked for others 
and has since been dependent upon his own resources. He went to sea, sailing for about 
four years, and afterward served for two years in the Danish navy. 

In 1873 he arrived in America, landing at New York. He had learned some English and 
this aided him in a measure in making a start in the new world. He did not tarry on the 
Atlantic coast but proceeded w^estward until he reached the Red river. He settled in Otter- 
tail county, Minnesota, where he secured a claim and engaged in farming for nine years. He 
then removed to Burlington, North Dakota. At that period the town of Minot was not in 
existence. He engaged in the stock business to some extent and still resides upon his place, 
continuing his interests in live stock. In the meantime he had furthered his education by 
study in the State University of Minnesota, in which he pursued a law course, and for a 
number of years he practiced law but at present he devotes his entire time to looking after 
his individual interests. He is one of the stockholders and president of the First State Bank 
at Burlington and the chairman of the board of directors of the Second National Bank at 
Minot and has extensive ))ro])erty holdings in both towns. In fact his business interests are 
important and in their control he displays sound judgment, keen enterprise and careful 
management. Success is following his undertakings and his reliability and trustworthiness 
have insured to him the confidence and goodwill of his fellow citizens. 

In 1879 Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss Ada J. Colton, a native of Colton, 
St. Lawrence county, New York, and a daughter of Joseph L. and Diana (Robinson) Colton, 
both of whom are deceased. The Coltons are of English lineage and the first of the name 
who came from England to the new world was married' in Massachusetts in 1644. Mrs. 
Johnson's father was a capitalist, real estate dealer, merchant and prominent business man. 
In 1872 he removed westward to Minnesota and afterward came to North Dakota, where 
he founded the city of Lisbon, there remaining for a number of years. He afterward removed 
to Burlington, where both lie and his wife jiassed away. He was a soldier of the Civil war 
and his wife served for three years as a nurse in the field hospital. Mr. Colton was a member 
of the One Hundred and Forty-seventh New York Volunteer Regiment and participated in a 
number of hotly contested engagements, being wounded in the third year of his service. He 
was promoted to the rank of lieutenant and returned to his home with a most creditable 
military record. To Mr. and Mrs. .Johnson have been born nine children, as follows: Arthur 
De Forest, who is deceased; Carrie, the wife of Henry Kluver, who is cashier of the First 
State Bank of Burlington; Harvey, an agriculturist residing in Burlington; Kflie, the wife of 
Daniel Connan, of Sannix, who is engaged in business as a contractor; Rollie, who is engaged 
in the lumber business at Burlington; George, who lives on the home ranch and is engaged 
in the stock business; Grace, at home; Loyal, who is attending school and lives in Burlington; 
and one who died in infancy. 

Mr. Johnson is well known in Masonic circles, being a charter member of Minot Lodge, 
F. & A. M., and having taken various higher degrees of Masonry. He has passed the chairs 
in the difTcrent branches of the order and is a member of the Jlystic Shrine. His religious 




JAMES JOHNSON 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA . 21 

faith is that of the Lutheran church and his political belief that of the republican party. 
In territorial days he served as clerk of the court for four years or until North Dakota was 
admitted to statehood; for two years, 1889-1890, he was probate judge and in 1891 and 1892 
he was state senator. At the end of that time he was elected state's attorney and held 
that office for twelve years, during which period and afterward he was chairman of the 
county republican central committee. Later he was chairman of the state central committee. 
As a true American citizen should do, he keeps well informed on the questions and issues 
of the day and has cooperated in many plans and projects to promote the welfare and good 
of the community in which he lives. Wherever known he is held in the highest esteem and 
most of all where he is best known. He deserves much credit for what he has accomplished, 
for he has been dependent upon his own resources from early boyhood. At a youthful age 
he recognized those things which are of real value and worth — industry, integrity, perse- 
verance and sterling character — and his course has utilized these with the passing years, 
making him a citizen of worth in the community in which he makes his home. 



ANDREW KNUDSON. 



Andrew Knudson, who is making an excellent record as cashier of the Galesburg State 
Bank of Galesburg, Traill county, is a native of Norway and displays the excellent qualities 
characteristic of his race. He was born on the 28th of March, 1860, a son of Knud and 
Barbara Knudson, the former of whom died in that country, while the latter is still living 
there. They were the parents of twelve children, of whom four are deceased. 

Andrew Knudson attended the common schools in the acquirement of an education and 
remained at home until he was nineteen years of age, when, having heard much concerning 
the unusual opportunities offered to a young man in the United States, he emigrated to this 
country. He first located in Wisconsin and remained there for about two years, working 
during the summers and attending school during the winters, thus perfecting his knowledge of 
English. At the end of that time he went to Minnesota, where he spent a year, but in 
1881 he came to Traill county. North Dakota, where he has since lived. He homesteaded land 
on section 20, Galesburg township, and concentrated his energies upon its improvement and 
cultivation until 1902, when he removed to Galesburg. In 1901 he had aided in organizing the 
Galesburg State Bank, of which he became a director. In 1905 the bank was sold and in 1907 
he was made cashier, in which capacity he has since served. He has been judicious in the 
management of its affairs, following a progressive policy tempered by a conservatism that 
safeguards the interests of depositors and stockholders. He also finds time to supervise the 
operation of his fine farm of four hundred acres, from which he derives a gratifying addition 
to his income. He is also a stockholder in the Farmers Elevator and in the Traill County 
Telephone Company, of which he is a director. 

Mr. Knudson was married in 1906 to Miss Christine Agotness, who was born in Norway 
but was brought to America when but four years of age. They both hold membership in the 
Lutheran church and he is connected with the Sons of Norway. His political allegiance is 
given to the republican party and he has served as assessor and as treasurer of Galesburg 
township. He has been a resident of Traill county for thirty-five years and during that time 
has done all in his power to further the advancement of the community along not only 
material but also moral and civic lines. 



HANS LARSON. 



Hans Larson, who owns more than eight hundred acres of land and is now living retired 
in Harwood township, Cass county, was one of the early settlers of the county and has from 
his arrival in the state had firm faith in the greatness of its future although in the early days 
such faith required unusual farsightedness as North Dakota was then a wild and forbidding 



Vol. n— 2 



22 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

region. He was born on the island of Laaland, Denmark, October 1, 1850, a son of Lars 
Ili'ndrickson, who died when his son Hans was thirteen years of age. 

Tlie latter continued to reside in his native country until he was seventeen years ohi, 
when in company with liis mother he came to the United States. For two years they 
resided at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, but at tlie end of that time he and his brother Henry 
removed to Dakota territory in 1870. After spending one year at Fort Kandall, in what is 
now South Dakota, tliey came to the present state of North Dakota. For a short time 
they worked on the construction of tlie Northern Pacific Railroad but as expenses were 
high and wages low they made their way to what is now Cass county and took upi 
squatters' claims, on which Hans Larson filed in 1S73. He worked for the Northern Pacific for 
thirteen months, thus meeting his living expenses. He first entered bis quarter section as a 
preemption claim but as money was bard to obtain he commuted on eighty acres, which he 
took up as a homestead. Later he filed on a quarter section under tlie timber act, which 
he later commuted and scripped and paid for in subsequent years. He was a very practical 
and eilicient farmer and his land yielded large crops, the sale of which netted him a good profit. 
From time to time he invested in more land and now owns eight hundred and twenty-nine 
acres. lie resided upon his original homestead for forty-three years, or until March, 1914, 
when he retired from active work, renting his farm to others and taking up his abode on the 
Nicholas A. Peterson farm, on section 14, Harwood township. He is financially independent 
and the period of leisure which he is now enjoying is the deserved reward of many years 
of well directed labor. 

On the 11th of January, 1882, Mr. Larson was united in marriage to Miss Julia 
Harrison, of Arena, Wisconsin, who, however, was born in Norway. Three of their six 
children survive, namely: Josephine, the wife of M. C. Smith, of Cloverdale, British Columbia; 
William H., at home; and Lulu M., the wife of George Ostby. of Cass county. 

Mr. Larson is a stanch republican but has never taken a very active part in politics 
although he has held a number of minor offices and has served as chairman of the township 
board for ten years. Fraternally he belongs to Sliiloh Lodge, No. 1, A. F. & A. M.; Key- 
stone Chapter, No. 5, R. A. M.; Auvergne Commandery, No. 2, K. T.; and El Zagal Temple, 
A. A. 0. N. M. S. Mr. Larson is progressive and up-to-date and has been a factor not only 
in the agricultural development of his county but also in its advancement along other lines. 
He is widely and favorably known and those who have been intimately associated witli him 
hold him in warm personal regard. 



LAWRENCE P. VOISIN. 



Lawrence P. Voisin, president of the Citizens State Bank of Lisbon, is a farsighted, 
energetic business man and banker and in addition to his control of financial alVairs be is 
serving as a member of the board of directors of the Equity Elevator Company, having 
retired from the presidency after five year^' service, in June, 1915. He was born in 
Bruce county, Ontario, Canada, on the 21st of February, 1873, his parents being Jacob and 
Rose (Schuett) Voisin, the former of French descent, while the latter was of German lineage. 
Both, however, were born in Canada, where the father followed the occuiiation of farming 
up to the time of his death in 1885. His widow still occupies the old home place there. 

Lawrence P. Voisin was educated in the common schools and in St. Jerome's College 
at Berlin. Ontario, where he completed a three years' course, which he supplemented by a 
course in the Northern Business College at Owen Sound, Ontario. On the completion of his 
studies in that institution in 1891 he came west to seek a fortune and for two months 
remained in Duluth, where he was employed in various w'ays. He then made Iiis way to 
Sheldon, North Dakota, and in that locality secured employment as a farm hand, remaining 
for seven years in the employ of one man. He married his employer's sister. Miss Mathilda 
Kaspari, on the 5th of April, 1900. Two years before, or in the summer of 1898, he engaged 
in the grain buying business in Venlo, North Dakota, and devoted the greater part of his 
attention to that work for three years. In 1900 he purchased a farm of three hundred and 
twenty acres six miles cast of Lisbon and turned his attention to general agricultural 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 23 

pursuits, altliough he continued also to buy grain for another year. At the end of that 
period he devoted his entire attention to the tilling of he soil. In the early days farming 
in the state was an uncertain quantity and through several winters he was compelled to go to 
the Minnesota woods and work in the lumber camps in order to keep the wolf from the 
door, but his perseverance and determination at length brought to him their legitimate 
reward. The tide turned in his favor and he acquired two sections of land and also an 
equity in two other farms. At length he sold five quarter sections of his land and in the 
spring of 1916 he left his farm and established his home in Lisbon. In the meantime, or 
in 1910, he had purchased an interest in the Citizens State Bank of Lisbon and a year 
later he was elected to the presidency of that institution, in which connection he has since 
continued, directing its policy along well defined lines that lead to growth and success. 
He is also a member of the board of directors of the Equity Elevator Company and proved 
most capable during his five j'ears' presidency, from which he retired in June, 1915. 

Mr. and Mrs. Voisin are members of tlie Catliolic cliurch and he belongs also to the 
Knights of Columbus. He is regarded as one of the influential residents of Lisbon, belonging 
to that class of men who have not only built up their own fortunes but at the same time 
have been active in advancing the welfare and promoting the progress of the district in 
which they live. He has stood shoulder to shoulder with those who have struggled on to 
make this a habitable region, in which business activity is a synonym for material advance- 
ment and prosperity. 



HON. 0. H. DE S. IRGENS. 



Hon. 0. H. de S. Irgons, county judge of Barnes county, residing at Valley City, was 
born in Chicago, Illinois, June 8, 1855, a son of John S. Irgens, a native of Norway, who at 
the age of seventeen years came to America, attracted by the fact that he had an uncle 
living in New York. It was his intention to study civil engineering and then return to 
Norway, where tlie family is an old and prominent one, having records which date back in 
an unbroken line to 1657. Previous to the fatlier his ancestors had been representatives of 
the professions, being clergymen, doctors, etc. The grandfather was graduated as a 
theological student but did not follow the ministry, becoming a mining engineer and 
manager. In the late '50s the father removed to St. Ansgar, Iowa, where he remained for a 
year and then journeyed by team to Minnesota. He secured a claim in Adams. Mower 
county, where he remained until the early '70s, devoting his attention to the development and 
cultivation of his farm. He was then elected' county treasurer, which position he filled for 
a number of years, and he was also elected to represent his district in the state legislature, 
while still higher honors came to him in his election as secretary of state. He retired from 
office on the 1st of .January, 1879, and then removed to a claim which he had entered in the 
fall of 1878 two miles southwest' of '^''alley City. Several years later he sold his farm 
and removed to Norfolk, Virginia, where he spent five years engaged in farming. Returning 
to North Dakota, he settled west of Ellendale, where he and his sons engaged in stock 
raising for five years, and on the expiration of that period he sold out and went to Valley 
City, where for four years he acted as deputy county treasurer. On his retirement from 
office he established his home at San Diego, California, where he remained until his death 
in 1902. His widow still enjoys good health a^t the age of eighty-nine years. In his youth 
the father had been liberally educated in both German and Norwegian by private tutors and 
was a man of marked ability, possessing splendid natural gifts which he used to excellent 
advantage, not only for the benefit of his own interests but also for the state. 

Judge Irgens, the eldest of the family of four sons and a daughter, acquired his early 
education in the primitive schools of Mower county, Minnesota, where in pioneer days a 
teacher would give instruction to the children of the neighborhood in one of the liomes of 
the locality. Later a log schoolhouse was built and after mastering the preliminary 
branches of learning under such conditions .Tudge Irgens attended the public schools of 
Austin, Minnesota, where he passed through consecutive grades until he completed a high 
school course, wlien lie returned to the farm. At the age of nineteen years he went to 



24 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Lyic, Minnesota, where he was employed iu a general store for four years, and in November, 
1878, he became a clerk in the store of J. S. Weiser, a pioneer merchant of Valley City, with 
wliom he remained for two years. He was next employed by W. F. Jones, a lumber merchant, 
and after two years spent in that connection he was appointed deputy county treasurer 
under C. A. Uenson. and occupied the office for four years, when he became the candidate 
for and was elected county treasurer, in which oHice he was continue<l by reelection for 
foiu- years, making an excellent record by the prompt and cai)able manner in which he dis- 
charged his duties. He and his brother, Lewis C. Irgens, then bought ovit a drug business, 
which they conducted for ten years, meeting with fair success. The brother, however, took 
up tlie study of dentistry and after winning his degi-ee removed to Oakland, California. 
Judge Irgens continued to conduct the drug store for two years thereafter and then sold 
out, turning his attention to the abstract business, also conducting a general store at 
Roger, Barnes county. In the fall of in04 he was elected county judge and so fair and 
impartial were liis decisions wliile on the bench that lie has been reelected at each biennial 
electi(m since that time, so that lie has already been upon the bench for twelve years, while 
his present term will continue until 1917. Since liis first election there lias been no 
contest for the position, which has come to him by acclamation. 

On the 18tli of .lanuary, 1878, Judge Irgens was married to Miss Annie M. Wilson, 
of Blooming Prairie, Minnesota, a daughter of M. 0. Wilson, and their children are: Lillian 
Mabel, now the wife of G. H. Getchell; Henrietta A., who is a clerk in the bank at Williston, 
North Dakota: Clara Belle, the wife of T. Piatt Williams, of Pocatellii, Idaho: Flora F., at 
home: and Kdwin A. R.. also under the parental roof. 

The parents are members of All Saints Kpiscopal church. ,Iudge Irgens' record is 
certainly one of which he has every reason to be proud, as public opinion has placed its stamp 
of approval upon his record at seven different elections. In politics he is a republican. He is 
a member of the Masonic order, having taken the blue lodge, chapter and commandery 
degrees, and he is also a member of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is recorder in the 
commandery and secretary of the chapter and blue lodge. He is also a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has held some offices in this society. Abraham Lincoln 
said: "You can fool some of the people all of the time and all of the people some of the 
time, but you can't fool all of the people all of the time," and the career of Judge Irgens 
with his six reelections indicates clearly that his course has justified public confidence and 
that he has stood for the highest standards of law and order, not forgetting that the 
purpose of the law is not only to protect the law-abiding citizen but to reclaim the erring 
one as well as to punish him, and thus he always tempers justice with mercy, making a 
strong appeal to the best instincts of the individual. 



PETER MADISON. 



Peter Madison, wiio is residing on section 22, Harwood township, has gained a gratifying 
measure of success as a farmer. He wiis born in Sweden on the 22d of May, 1850, a son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Matthias Madison, but his mother died when he was an infant, and he has 
no recollection of her. In 1873 he came to the United States as he had heard much con- 
cerning the unusually good opportunities which this country offers to an energetic and 
industrious young man. He located in Diiluth. Minnesota, where he worked on lake boats 
for a time and later was emploj-ed at ofT-bearing for brick and stone masons. In 1874, 
however, he came to Dakota territory, settling at Fargo, and for seven years he was 
employed there at plastering and building. He then turned his attention to farming and 
worked for S. V. Hoag for one year, after which he took up as a homestead the farm on 
which he still lives. Subsequently he bought eighty acres of land and liis holdings now 
total two hundred and forty acres, all of which is well improved. Through the intervening 
years he has worked diligently and as he has followed up-to-date methods and has managed 
his affair.i well his resources have constantly increased. He owns stock in the Fartners 
Elevator Company and in the Independent Harvester Company. 

In 1881 ilr. Madison was united in marriage to Miss Mary ilarguerite Peterson, also a 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA _ 25 

native of Sweden, t^-Iio came to this country in 1880. They have become the parents of 
eight children: Albin, a rancher of Montana; Nellie, the wife of A. T. Ostrom, also a resident 
of that state; Emil and Ralph, at home; Lillian, who is employed by the Ford Motor Com- 
pany at Fargo; and Estelle, Myrtle and Walter, all at home. 

Mr. Madison is an adherent of the republican party and for several years served as a 
member of the school board. Both he and his wife are affiliated with the Swedish Baptist 
church and in their religious faith is found the guiding force of their lives. When 
Mr. Madison came to the United States he was without money, but he possessed ambition, 
enterprise and sound judgment and the exercise of these qualities has enabled him to gain 
a gratifying measure of success. 



FRANIC W. ROACH. 



Frank W. Roach, vice president of the Second National Bank of Minot. is one of the 
coterie of enterprising and substantial men who are officers of the bank and have made it 
one of the strong moneyed institutions of that part of the state. He was born at Castle 
Rock, Minnesota, March 19, 1871, a son of Joseph and Eleanor S. (Clague) Roach, repre- 
sented elsewhere in this work. 

Frank W. Roach attended the public schools of Northfield, Minnesota, and afterward 
continued his education in the Shattuck Military Academy at Faribault, Minnesota. When 
twenty years of age he engaged in the grain business at Castle Rock and there remained 
for two years, on the expiration of which period he removed to Minot, where for three years 
he was an active representative of the grain trade. He then became associated with his 
father in the live stock business, in which he continued until 1908, when he entered the 
Second National Bank as teller. He has since concentrated his energies upon the banking 
business and in .January, 1914, was elected vice president and a director, in which capacities 
he is now serving. He is a man of marked business ability and enterprise and in addition 
to his other interests is connected with the Denbigh Brick Company, of Denbigh, North 
Dakota, as a director and is also the owner of considerable land in this state. 

On the 19th of February, 1907, Mr. Roach was married to Miss Florence E. Waggoner, 
who was bom at Dubuque, Iowa, a daughter of Henry H. and Eleanor (Forney) Waggoner. 
Her father was born in the east and following his removal to the west engaged in farming 
and merchandising and in the undertaking business. Both he and his wife have now 
passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Roach have become the parents of a son, Frank Waggoner, who 
was born in August, 1911. 

Fraternally Mr. Roach is well known as a representative of Masonry. He belongs to 
the lodge at Minot, also to the chapter and commandery there, and to the Mystic Shrine at 
Grand Forks. His fraternal connections extend to the Elks and the Knights of Pythias lodges 
of Minot. His religious faith is that of the Episcopal church and his political belief that of 
the republican party, but he does not desire nor seek office, as he has ever felt the pursuits 
of private life in themselves abundantly worthy of his best efforts. Concentration of 
purpose, close application and indefatigable energy have been the salient features in his 
growing success, enabling him to advance from point to point in his business career until he 
is now numbered among the substantial citizens of Minot. 



AUGUST BERGMAN. 



August Bergman, of Wahpeton, who has made such an excellent record as clerk of the 
courts that he Las been three times reelected to that office, in which he is now serving, was 
born on the 31st of December, 1874. His parents, Herman and Anna (HoefTken) Bergman, 
were both natives of Germany, the former born in 1831 and the latter in 1836. The paternal 
grandfather died when his son Herman was but a small boy, but the maternal grandfather, 
Gerhard Hoeffken. also a native of Germany, came to the United States and located at 



26 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Norwood, Minnesota, wlicie lie engaged in fiuniing. Tlic parents of our subject were 
married in Germany and in tlie same month emigrated to the United States, making their 
way to Norwood, Minnesota, wliere tliey lived until called to their final rest. The father 
homesteaded land, which he farmed for many 'years, but eventually, having accumulated a 
competence, he retired. In early manhood he voted the republican ticket, but later became a 
democrat. His religious faith was that of the Evangelical chuich. When he came to this 
country he had no capital, but his energy and sound judgment enabled him to win success, 
lie passed away in 1911 and was suiVived by his wife for but a year. They were the 
parents of eight children: Herman, who conducts a lumberyard in Kulm, North Dakota; 
Gerhard, a grain buyer at Hankinson, North Dakota; Henry, who is a flour, feed and grain 
buyer at Norwood, Minnesota; Fred, who is foreman in a linseed oil mill of Minneapolis; 
"William, a truck farmer living near Minneapolis; Jacob, of Glencoe, Minnesota, who is now 
serving as county treasurer; Lizzie, the wife of Peter Plankers, who is foreman in the 
Ornamental Iron Works at Minneapolis; and August. 

The last named was reared at home and attended the public schools of Norwood and 
■(ilencoe, Jlinnesota. During the summer uuinths he worked upon the home farm and after 
leaving school continued to follow agric\iltural pursuits until he was sixteen years of age, 
when he removed to Stiles, North Dakota, and found employment as clerk in a store. He 
remained connected with mercantile pursuits for many years, but in 1910 was elected 
clerk of the courts, in which office he is still serving by reelection. He is systematic 
and accurate in his work and his record is one of which he has just cause to be proud. 

On the 23d of November, 1894, Mr. Bergman was united in maniage to Miss Mary 
.Tereszek, a native of Winona, Minnesota, by whom he has two children, William Kdward 
and Lillian Anna, both of whom are teaching. 

Mr. Bergman holds membership in the Catholic church and in the Woodmen of the 
World and in Fergus Falls Lodge, No. 1093, B. P. 0. E., of Fergus Falls. Ho is an 
adherent of the democratic party and since becoming of age has taken" an active part 
in politics. He is widely known and highly respected throughout the county. 



ALEXANDER McDONALD. 



Ah'.xander McDonald was connected with agricultural interests in Cass county for a 
considerable period but is now operating the oil station in the village of Gardner. He was 
born in Canada, August 19, 1855, and is a son of John and Margaret (Sterling) McDonald, 
both of whom were natives of Scotland. They came to Canada about 1823 and there lived 
throughout their remaining days, rearing their family of eleven children, eight of whom 
survive. 

Alexander McDonald spent his ynutliful days in his native country and is indebted to 
the public school system for the educational opportunities which he enjoyed. He remained in 
Canada to the age of twenty-four years and in 18T9 made his way from that country to 
North Dakota, at which time he took up his abode upon the farm in Cass county that h" 
still owns, comprising three hundred and twenty acres of land on section 10, Gardner town- 
ship. This was then a pioneer region and there was little evidence that the work of iniprove- 
ment and progress had been begun. With characteristic energy he began to till the soil and 
develop his fields and as time passed he added many improvements to the property, which 
he converted into a productive and valuable farm. Year after year he carried on the task 
of plowing, planting and harvesting and gathered rich crops, but at length he put aside the 
work of the field and removed to Gardner, where for one year he engaged in merchandising. 
.•\t the end of that time he took the oil station which ho has since operated and has built 
up a good b\isiness in this connection. 

In 1SS3 Mr. McDonald was united in marriage to Miss Kate Curry, a native of Canada 
and a daughter of John and Margaret Curry. To them have been born two children, namely: 
William .J., who lives on the homestead place; and Margaret May, who is still with her 
parents. 

Mr. McDonald is a republican in his political views and that he is a loyal, faithful and 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 27 

capable officer is indicated in the fact tliat he has served as supervisor for twenty years. 
He has also been a member of the school board and is a warm friend of the cause of education. 
He belongs to the Yeomen lodge and the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and in both has 
filled all of the chairs. He has never had occasion to regret leaving his native country and 
seeking the opportunities offered in the growing northwest, for here he found good business 
chances and in their utilization has worked his way steadily upward. 



EDWARD S. PERSON. 



The financial interests which center at Minot are carefully guarded by men who 
recognize their responsibilities and are well qualified for the discharge of their duties. 
Amojig this number is Edward S. Person, the president of the Union National Bank and 
as its executive head he is directing its policy so as to most carefully safeguard the interests 
of depositors and at the same time promote the success of the institution. A native of 
Minnesota, he was born at Zumbrota, March 7, 1873, his parents being George and Mary 
(Boyles) Person. The father's birth occurred in the state of Vermont, December B, 1833, 
and the mother was born in Maine, March 6, 1S36. In early manhood Mr. Person engaged 
in the hardware business and devoted the greater part of his after life to that trade. In 
1857 he became a resident of Minnesota, which was then a frontier state. In the spring 
of that year the town of Zumbrota started and he cast in his lot with its first settlers, 
<;ontinuing his residence there until his death, which occurred in the year 1907. Mrs. Person 
passed away in Minot November 30, 1915, and was interred in Zumbrota cemetery. 

Edward S. Person, the second in order of birth in a family of three children, pursued 
his education in the public schools of Zumbrota and when he reached the age of eighteen 
years started out in the banking business as a clerk, securing a position in October, 1890, 
in the old Bank of Zumbrota, with which he was connected for three years. He was after- 
ward elected assistant cashier of the First State Bank of Zumbrota and in 1900 was advanced 
to the position of cashier, continuing in that position until January, 1907. At that date 
he arrived in Minot and accepted the position of cashier in the Union National Bank, which 
position he filled for two years, or until 1009, when he was chosen vice president of the 
institution. Later he was elected to the presidency and has since continued in that 
capacity. During the nine years of his connection with this bank his labors have been an 
element in its growing success and in the establisliment of its well deserved reputation as 
one of the substantial and reliable moneyed institutions of the state. Mr. Person also 
owns considerable land in North Dakota and is operating a farm near Minot, on which 
he resides through the summer months. He is there engaged in breeding registered 
Belgian horses and Guernsey cattle, keeping a number of pure bred stock, owning at the 
present time the champion cow of the state, Lura Bettina, which produced six hundred 
and twenty-three pounds of butter fat in 1914 by the official test as put forth by the 
Agricultural College of North Dakota. The following year she made the remarkable 
record of fourteen thousand, two and two-hundredths pounds of milk and seven hundred and 
thirty-nine and fifty-eight hundredths pounds of butter fat. 

On the 2d of April. 1903, Mr. Person was married to Miss Stella H. Holland, who was 
born on a farm near Zumbrota, a daughter- of Stanford and Julia (Allen) Holland, who 
were also early settlers of Minnesota, natives of New York and New Hampshire respec- 
tively. The father was a farmer by occupation, but at the time of the Civil war put 
aside all personal interests and considerations to join the army, becoming a private in the 
Seventh Minnesota Volunteer Regiment. He returned home uninjured and Iiis remaining 
days were spent at Zumbrota. His widow still survives and is now living at Long Prairie, 
Minnesota. Mr. and Mrs. Person have one child, Elizabeth Stella, born September 30, 1911. 

Mr. Person is a prominent representative of the Masonic fraternity. He is a past 
master of his lodge, is the present eminent commander of the Knights Templar commandery 
at Minot and is a member of Kem Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S., at Grand Forks. He also has 
an interesting military chapter in his life record. In November, 1887, he enlisted in the 
National Guard of Minnesota as a member of Company D of the Third Regiment and 



28 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

was advanced through various grades and was elected captain in 1893. Five years after- 
ward he was promoted to the rank of major. In 1898 lie was mustered into the United 
States service as a major of tlie Fourteentli Minnesota Infantry during the Spanish- 
American war, being stationed at Cliiclianiauga, Georgia, and at Knoxville, Tennessee, 
until mustered out in November of tlio same year. In 1907 when he moved to North Dakota 
lie retired from the Minnesota National Guard, but is still on the list of its retired 
officers. It was in August, 1908. that lie enlisted as a private of Company D of the First 
North Dakota Regiment, was elected captain of the company in February, 1909, and was 
transferred to the supernumerary list in 1912. In his political views Mr. Person has 
always been a republican, believing that the adoption of the principles of that party 
Avould insure safety and permanency in public affairs. He was the first president of the 
Minot Association of Commerce and is now a director thereof. No duty or obligation 
resting upon him has been neglected in the slightest degree and whether in public service 
or in private life ho stands for all that is most worth while in his city and state. 



NEWTON K. HUBBARD. 



It is not difficult to speak of the late Newton K. Hubbard, of Fargo, for his life and 
his character were as clear as the sunlight. No man came in contact with him but speedily 
appreciated liini at his true worth and knew ho was a man who not only cherished a high 
ideal of duty, but who lived up to it. He constantly labored for the right and from his 
earliest youth devoted a large portion of his time to the service of others. He became a 
pioneer settler of North Dakota and was closely associated with many movements which 
led to the rapid and substantial growth and development of the state. He knew the experi- 
ences of pioneer life and he lived to enjoy the fruits of settlement and. civilization when 
North Dakota was transformed from a wilderness into a great commonwealth. His busi- 
ness activities were put forth along various lines, his political work was effective and his 
influence on the side of righteousness, justice and truth counted for much. 

Mr. Hubbard was a native of Massachusetts, his birth having occurred at Agawam, 
Hanipilcn county, on the 17th of December, 1839. He lacked but one day of reaching the 
Psalmist's allotted span of three score years and ten when deatli claimed him on the IGth 
of December, 1909. His parents were George J. and Marian (Adams) Hubbard, natives of 
Massachusetts and Connecticut, respective!}'. It is said that his father, who was a pros- 
perous and well-known farmer of Agawam, was noted for his business ability and his force 
of character. He passed his entire life in New England and was a typical citizen of that 
region. His grandfather. Captain George Hubbard, who was born in Middletown, Conecti- 
cut, served with the Connecticut line in the Revolutionary war and thereby won his title. 

After mastering the braiiclios of learning taught in the common schools of Massachusetts, 
Newton K. Hubbard continued his education in the Providence Conference College of East 
Greenwich, Rhode Island, and when his textbooks were put aside he went to Painesville, Ohio, 
where he was teaching a district scluinl when the excitement in the Pcnnsjlvania oil fields 
attracted his attention. He wrote to his father that he believed he might make profitable 
investment in oil if the father would send him a thousand dollars, but before the check reached 
him, as it did later, the Civil war had been inaugurated and Newton Hubbard felt that his first 
duty was to his country. He therefore returned his father's check, stating at the same time 
that on the 22d of April, 1861. he had responded to the call for troops to aid in the defense 
of the Union and had cnli.sted at Painesville, Ohio, as a private, for three months' service 
with Company D, Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry. On the 19th of .Tune following he reen- 
listed for three years' service and was promoted to the rank of corporal. On the 26th of 
August, 1861, he was captured at the battle of Cross Lanes, Virginia, together with two 
oiriecrs and one hundred and fifteen enlisted men and for nine months and six days was 
lield as a prisoner of war, being incarcerated for different periods at Richmond, Virginia, 
New Orleans, Louisiana, and Salisbury, North Carolina, so that he had all of the hard and 
bitter experiences of the southern prison pens. In January, 1863, he was exchanged and 
rejoining bis regiment participated in the battles of Cliancellorsville, Virginia; Gettysburg, 




NKWTON K. HUBBARD 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 31 

Pennsylvania; Lookout Mountain, Tennessee; Missionary Ridge, Tennessee; Ringgold, Dalton, 
Rocky Face Ridge and Dallas, Georgia. 

At the close of his three years' term Mr. Hubbard was mustered out on the 6th of 
July, 1864, with the rank of sergeant major of his regiment. He was appointed purveyor 
of General Casements' brigade and thereafter remained in Raleigh, North Carolina, until 
hostilities had ceased. He opened the first store in Raleigh after the Union troops were 
sent to that city but a few months later sold out, for the sectional feeling was so great 
as not only to render his stay unpleasant, but also to place his life in jeopardy. 

Returning to Ohio, Mr. Hubbard opened a store in Geneva, which he profitably conducted 
until the spring of 1870, when he disposed of his stock there and became identified with 
the development of the northwest, proceeding first to Duluth, Minnesota. The Northern 
Pacific Railroad was then being built and its construction meant the opening of the great 
territory to the west. Mr. Hubbard possessed the pioneer spirit and felt that here was 
the chance for wise and judicious investment. He went to Georgetown, Minnesota, accom- 
panied by L. H. Tennj^ making the trip on horseback from St. Cloud. It had been inti- 
mated that Georgetown would probably be the place where the Northern Pacific road would 
cross the Red river. During the summer Mr. Hubbard received a dispatch from Pitt Cooke, 
brother of Jay Cooke, that the Northern Pacific crossing of the Red river would be at the 
mouth of Elm river, about twenty miles north of Georgetown. Therefore, with several 
companions who had been waiting for this information, he went immediately to Elm river, 
where he and the others took government claims and built log cabins. On returning to the 
claim after a two months' trip in the east he found that it had been jumped. There was 
a man occupying the cabin who demanded six hundred dollars before he would give posses- 
sion. Mr. Hubbard replied that he could keep the claim, for in the meantime he had learned 
that the railroad crossing would be moved twenty-seven miles south to what is now Moor- 
head, Minnesota. Elm river was therefore abandoned and the prospectors made their way 
to Moorhead. securing such land as they could in that vicinity. 

Mr. Hubbard embraced every opportunity for business development that was offered 
by the conditions of the west. In the spring of 1871 he opened a store in a tent at Oak 
Lake, now Lake Park, Minnesota, and there with a stock of general merchandise he fur- 
nished supplies to the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, having hauled his goods by ox 
teams from St. Cloud. As the railroad was extended he followed the line and under the 
firm name of Hubbard & Raymond successfully carried on business at Brainerd, Glyndon, 
Moorhead and .Jamestown. After two years the partnership was dissolved, while Mr. Hub- 
bard concentrated his interests at Moorhead. The Indian land located on the west side of the 
river at Fargo was not open for actual settlement until 1873, at which time Mr. Hubbard 
became purchaser of the first two business lots sold in the city and after disposing of his 
store in Moorhead took up his permanent abode in Fargo, where he embarked in merchan- 
dising, admitting his former bookkeeper, E. S. Tyler, to a partnership. From that time 
forward he was a most active, prominent and influential factor in the upbuilding and develop- 
ment of the city. In the spring of 1874 the firm purchased the furniture of the Headquar- 
ters Hotel, which had been begun by the railroad company in 1871 and was completed the 
following year. W. A. Carson was placed in charge of the hotel, which, however, was destroyed 
by fire three months later. The failure of Jay Cooke in 1873 brought temporary embarrass- 
ment to railroad operations in the west and caused business to be slack in many lines, but 
after getting the concessions asked for, the firm of Hubbard & Tyler rebuilt the hotel in 
sixty days at a cost of twenty thousand dollars. Its reopening was the occasion of great 
festivity, and for years afterward it remained the social center of the town and surrounding 
country. 

Into other fields of activity Hubbard & Tyler extended their efforts. In the back part 
of their store they conducted the banking business of the town and cared for the express 
business, and when in 1878 capitalists from Racine, Wisconsin, visited Fargo, Mr. Hubbard 
joined them in organizing and establishing the First National Bank, of which he became the 
first vice president, remaining as one of its directors from the beginning until failing health 
compelled him to withdraw twenty years later. It was characteristic of him that he never 
hesitated to take a forward step when the way was open and he readily recognized and util- 
ized opportunities that others passed heedlessly by. When financial resources permitted he 



52 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

opened a store in Casselton in the early '80s and erected several brick business blocks there, 
also becoming a director of the Cass County National Bank at Casselton, in which connec- 
tion he continued until his demise. The town of Hunter sprang into existence as the result 
of his enterprising spirit and business ability, for he bought and platted the townsite on 
the Great Northern Railroad and he became the proprietor of the first stores in Blancliard 
and Mayville, North Dakota, shipping the lumber for the buildings on the first flat car 
that entered the towns. In 1881 he organized and became president of the Goose River 
Bank of Mayville, a private banking institution, conducted under the name of N. K. Hub- 
bard & Company. This was successfully conducted by him for ten yours, when ill health 
forced him to sell out. The bank, however, remains as one of the substantial financial insti- 
tutions of the state. In addition to all of liis other interests Mr. Hubbard became an investor 
in lands, making extensive purchases of choice farm projjerty in Minneosta and North 
Dakota. As the cultivation of wheat increased he entered the grain trade as a member Of 
the firm of Hubbard & Gibbs, with headquarters at Fargo, and he also gave much time 
to his real-estate operations, handling, however, only his own property. His keen sagacity 
enabled him to recognize every advantage of the state and he became one of the organizers 
and the first president of the Fargo vSouthern Railroad Company, which is now the brancli 
line of the Chicago, Jlilwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, extending to the capital. 

In 1876 Jlr. Hubbard was married to Miss Elizabeth Clayton, daughter of David B. and 
Mary A. (Hitchcock) Clayton, of Painesville, Ohio. One daughter, Mabel Louise, was born 
to them. She was married July 10, 1912, to Lieutenant Walter W. Lorshbough of tlie 
United States navy. 

In his political views Mr. Hubbard was long a stalwart republican and in 1894 was 
prominently mentioned in connection with the candidacy for governor of his state, but his ill 
health would not allow him to entertain the idea. He was a political leader but never an 
office seeker. He fearlessly spoke his views and his position was never an equivocal one. 
He was one of the four delegates from Dakotr. to the Chicago convention, which nominateu 
Benjamin Harrison for tlie presidency, and for eight years he served on the board of direc- 
tors of the State Asylum for the Insane. No one doubted his position on the temperance 
question. He frankly and fearlessly advocated the cause and he stood for reform and improve- 
ment in politics, in governmental affairs and in all those things which touch the general 
interests of society and affect the welfare of mankind. Of him a contemporary biographer 
Tias written: "In all his dealings Mr. Hubbard was noted for his fairness as well as for 
his splendid business ability. He was a man of ripe judgment, strict integrity and displayed a 
fearlessness in doing right that won for him the confidence of all his associates. • • • 
He was a good soldier to the last, fighting a good fight, enduring his physical limitations 
and almost constant pain and weariness with the same gixjd cheer, patience and heroic 
optimism that was his chief characteristic." While he was at the head of large business 
interests which he managed successfully, yet it was his rule to set apart some time each 
day for the labors of love to which he was so devoted. His friends miss him, but the memory 
of his sweet and beautiful life, of his sincerity and simplicity, will not be forgotten. He 
laid down his task in the twilight of the day, when all that he had to do had been nobly, 
beautifully and fully completed. 



GEORGE R. COOK. 



In every comnmnity and in every phase of activity there arc a few men who stand 
■out as leaders and by general consent George R. Cook is one of the foremost business 
men of Gardner and of Cass county. He owns a large general store, is president of the 
Gardner State Rank and also holds title to valuable real estate. His birth occurred in 
Portage, Wisconsin, on the 18th of .lannary, 1855, and he is a son of Sanuiel and Mary 
(Williams) Cook, both natives of England. They were reared in tliat country and there 
their marriage occurred, but in 1815 they emigrated to the United States and settled 
in Portage, Wisconsin. Although the f.ather was a wagon maker by trade, after his re- 
moval to this country he devoted his attention mainly to farming. In 1802 he removed 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 33 

with his family to the vicinity of Rochester, Minnesota, where he lived until his demise 
in December, 1914, at the venerable age of ninety-four years and six months. His wife 
is still living and has also reached a notable old age, as she is now in her ninetieth year. 

George R. Cook grew to manhood under the parental roof and received his education 
in the district schools of Minnesota. In 1880, the year following his marriage, he came to 
what is now the state of North Dakota and took up a homestead in Wiser township, Cass 
county, on which he resided for twelve years. In December, 1892, he removed to Gardner, 
where lie had conducted a butcher shop for some time previously, killing his meat on the 
farm and marketing it in Gardner. Later he entered the drug business and some time 
afterward, recognizing an excellent business opportunity, he added a stock of general mer- 
chandise and has since conducted a general store. In 1909 his building was destroyed 
by fire, but in the following jear he rebuilt and his store is not only one of the largest, 
but also one of the most up-to-date and completely equipped one in Gardner township. 
In 1908 he organized the State Bank of Gardner, of which he has continuously served as 
president, and the gratifying growth of the business of the institution has been in a large 
measure due to his ability and to the care which he has given to the conduct of the bank. 
In addition to the important interests which have already been mentioned he owns the 
townsite of Gardner, comprising eighty acres; Six hundred and forty acres of excellent 
farm land in Gardner township; and a section of land in eastern Colorado. It is needless 
to say that he is a man of independent means and an important factor in the business 
and commercial life of his county. 

Mr. Cook was married in Minnesota in 1S79 to Miss Evelyn Mitchell, and to them 
were born seven children, six of whom survive: Claude John, who owns the garage and 
blacksmith shop in Gardner; Erma Ann, the wife of John A. McDonald, of Wheatland, 
Wyoming; Roy Gould, who is an owner of Porterfield & Company, an incorporated drug 
company of Fargo; Maidie Blanch, the wife of Karl L. Hjort, an attorney of Hillsboro, this 
state; Glenn Mitchell who is manager of his father's store and is also serving as post- 
master of Gardner and who married Miss Beulah Buckholtz; and Tedd William, at home. • 

Mr. Cook is a stalwart republican and is the present efficient clerk of the town board. 
For seventeen years he was postmaster of Gardner and in all of his official capacities he 
has manifested the same good judgment and enterprise which have characterized him in the 
conduct of his private business affairs. His wife is a member of the Congregational church, 
which Mr. Cook attends and to the support of which he contributes generousl}'. In attain- 
ing success he has scrupulously lived up to high standards of commercial ethics, and his 
integrity and probitj' have gained him the sincere respect of all who have come in contact 
with him. 



SOREN J. RASMUSSEN. 



Soren J. Rasmussen has been manager of the loan department of the Second National 
Bank of Minot since 1913 and his business affairs are wisely and capably conducted, con- 
tributing much to the success of the institution, of which he is now a representative. 
He was born in Bergen, Norway, January 13, 1866, a son of N. C. and Johanna (Johnson) 
Rasmussen, who were likewise natives of the land of the midnight sun. In early man- 
hood the father engaged in the hat business and continued active therein, occupying the 
same building until a recent date, when he retired from business. He started upon his 
biisiness career as a barefoot boy and through his own labor, diligence and determination 
worked his way upward until he became one of the prosperous merchants and leading 
business men of his city. He also held various local offices and contributed in large 
measure to the material, municipal and political progress of his city. 

Soren J. Rasmussen was the eldest of a family of fifteen children. He pursued his 
education in the schools of Bergen, Norway, and after completing his course there studied 
for a year in Hamburg, Germany. He was a youth of eighteen years, when in 1884 he 
bade adieu to friends and native land and sailed for America, arriving in Chicago in 1884. 
There he remained for a few months, after which he removed to River Falls, Wisconsin, 



34 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

where lie was employed in a store for three years. In 1887 he returned to Norway on a 
visit and when he again came to the new world he made his way to River Falls, where he 
secured employment in a bank as bookkeeper and teller. Later he became director and 
assistant cashier and there continued until 1898, when he removed to Starbuck, Minne- 
sota, and became actively interested in the banking business there as president and 
manager of the Bank of Starbuck. For six years he directed the policy of that bank, but 
in 1904 sold out and purchased a controlling interest in the First National Bank at 
Perhani. Minnesota. Not liking conditions there he afterwards disposed of his stock 
and in 1905 removed to North Dakota, settling at Carpio, where he became president of 
the First National Bank of that city. He there spent six years and he still retains his in- 
terest in the business as a large stockholder and as president of the bank, but in the fall 
of 1911 he removed to Minot and became connected with the Second National Bank, acting 
as manager of its loan department since 1913. He has had extensive and varied experi- 
ence in the banking business and is familiar with every phase thereof. He readily and 
successfully solves intricate financial problems and his success is the result of a ready 
discrimination between the essential and the non-essential. He has become an extensive 
land owner of the state, but has his land rented, while he devotes his entire time to 
his interests at Minot and Caq)io. • 

On the 7th of April, 1895, Mr. Rasmusscn was united in marriage to Miss Lu Gibbs, 
who was born at River Falls, Wisconsin, a daughter of Moses and Mary (McGow) Gibbs, 
both now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Rasmussen have become parents of two children: John, 
who is attending the University of North Dakota; and Mary, who is a pupil in the high 
school at Minot. 

Fraternally Mr. Rasmussen is connected with the Masons, holding membership with the 
lodge and the chapter at River Falls. He is also identified with the Modern Woodmen of 
America. His political allegiance is given to the republican party but he has never sought 
nor filled political offices. He has served, however, as president of the school board at 
Carpio and that he is interested in the moral progress of the community is indicated in the 
fact that he is a member of the Lutheran church. He has never regretted his determination 
to seek his fortune in the new world, for in this country he found good business opportunities 
and in their utilization has worked his way steadily upward. He early realized that in 
America labor is king and that the enviable title which this king bestows is that of "self- 
made man." 



GUNDER HOWARD. 



Gunder Howard has built up a large business as a dealer in agricultural implements in 
Hillsboro and is also one of the most extensive landowners of the county, owning sixteen 
hundred acres of fine land in North Dakota and Minnesota. He has not only been con- 
nected with the agricultural and business interests of his locality, but he has also taken 
an active part in public affairs, having represented his district in the state legislature. 

Mr. Howard was born in Fyrisdal, Norway, on the 28th of August, 1855, a son of 
Gunderson and Anna (Bcndikson) Howard. The father passed away in his native land 
but the mother emigrated to the United States with her four sons in 1872. She located 
on a preemption claim in Clay county, Minnesota, near Moorhead, where she remained 
until 1882, when she came to Hillsboro. She is still living here and is held in the highest 
esteem by all who knew her. Three of her sons are also living, namely: Gunder; Ole, 
who is associated with our subject in business; and Jorgen, a resident of Kildeer, North 
Dakota. 

Gunder Howard received the greater part of his education in Norway, attending the 
7)iiblic and high schools there. After coming to the United States he only attended 
school for eighteen days. Soon after his arrival in Minnesota he squatted on a claim ad- 
joining that of his mother and later proved up on that place as a preemption. Until 1875 
he divided his time between farming and steamboating, being employed on boats running 
between Moorhead and Winnipeg. In the fall of 1875 he entered the employ of Barrett & 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 35 

Company of Fargo as a salesman of farm implements and remained witli them until the 
tall of 1880. During that time he had become thoroughly familiar with the implement 
business and decided to establish a store of his own. He came to Hillsboro and founded 
liis present business, wliich has developed into one of the leading commercial enterprises 
of Traill county. He carries a large stock of the best farm machinery made, understands 
the points of superiority of each line liandled and is able to assist his patrons in choosing 
the implements best fitted for their purposes. He recognizes tlie fact that real estate 
is an excellent investment and that as the public land has been largely taken up realty 
values are certain to increase and he has invested lieavily in land both in tliis state and in 
Minnesota, owning in all sixteen lamdred acres. 

In 1899 Mr. Howard was united in marriage to Miss Andrea Treet, wlio was born in 
Norway but came to this country with her parents when five or six years of age, the 
family home being established atvMoorhead, Minnesota. Mr. and Mrs. Howard have four 
chiidren, Ellen, Ruth, Bernice and Gertrude. 

Mr. Howard supports the republican party and is recognized as a leader in local 
political circles. In 1897 and 1898 he represented his district in the state legislature and 
his record as a member of that body was highly creditable to his insight into public affairs 
and his devotion to the general good. He has also served in local offices, having been an 
alderman of Hillsboro for several terms and having served as president of the school board 
for years. He has had much to do in promoting the advancement of his community along 
material and also along civic lines, and he holds the high esteem and the warm regard of 
all who have been closely associated with him. 



HENRY LARSON. 



Henrj' Larson, residing on section 12, Gardner township, is one of those who since 
pioneer times have contributed much toward the development of Cass county and who have 
also gained individual success. He owns eight hundred acres of excellent land and is one 
of the foremost citizens of his township. A native of Denmark, he was born on the 5th 
of April, 1845, a son of Lars and Maren Cliristina (Hanson) Hendrickson. The father 
died in Denmark in 1863, and five years later the mother came to the United States and 
during the remainder of her life made her home with her two sons, Henry and Hans. She 
passed away at tlie home of our subject in April. 1888, at the advanced age of eighty- 
three years. 

Henry Larson was educated in tlie public schools of Denmark and remained in that 
country until 1866, when, as a young man of twenty-one years, he emigrated to the 
United States, coming by way of Quebec and New York city. He continued his journey 
westward and settled at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Not long afterward he spent some time in 
Kansas and Missouri, but returned to Oshkosh in the summer of 1867. He was variously 
employed there, sailing on Lake Winnebago and working in the lime kilns, in the lumber 
and shingle mills and in the gas works until May. 1870, wlien he came to Dakota territory. 
From Sioux City, Iowa, he made his way on foot through Vermilion and Yankton to Fort 
Randall. There they were rebuilding the fort and on his applying for work he was asked 
if he could burn lime. He replied that he had just come from the lime kilns and was 
immediately given work. Not having a kiln, he dug a hole in the ground and burned about 
eight hundred barrels at a cost of sixty cents a barrel. The contractor who was furnishing 
the lime brought it from Sioux City and had the contract at six dollars per barrel. 

In the spring of 1871 Mr. Larson went to Yankton and purchased a team of mules, 
with which he started for what is now North Dakota on the 6th of April, arriving on the 
Sheyenne river in what is now Cass county in the latter part of that month. He took up a 
squatter's claim, the present southwest quarter of section 10, Harwood township, and he 
made his home upon that place for a number of years. The country was at that time 
sparsely settled conditions of life were in all respects those of a frontier region. His 
wife missed the comforts and conveniences of an older settled district and returned to 
Oshkosh, where our subject, joined her in the fall of 1873. He remained there for about a 



36 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

year, when he again came to North Dakota, driving through with a four horse team, and 
not long afterward his family followed him. When the land was formally opened for 
settlement ilr. Larson filed soldier's additional rights on his claim and in 1878 took up a tree 
claim which is liis present home farm. In the following year he filed on a homestead, 
upon which he lived until he had secured his iiatent thereto, when he removed to the tree 
claim, which is nearer town and which alforded his children better school advantages. In 
the intervening years he has bought three hundred and twenty acres and his present 
holdings total eight hundred acres, a quarter section in Wiser township, a quarter section 
in Harwood township and three-quarter sections in Gardner township. He also owns stock 
in the Tarmers Cooperative Store of Gardner and in the Independent Harvester Company. 

In 1868 Mr. Larson was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Connors, a native of Ireland, 
and they became the parents of a son, Arthur, who is now farming in Clay county, Jlinne- 
sota. The wife and mother died in 18!)5 and in 1897 Mr. Larson married Miss Carrie 
Kishcrt. a native of Norway, and they have become the parents of six children, namely. 
Frank, at home; Charles, who is farming his father's place in Harwood township; ami 
Albert, Mary, William and John, at home. 

Mr. Larson supports the measures and candidates of the republican |)aity at the 
polls and for twenty-eiglit years served as a member of the board of township trustees, 
his long retention i)roving the acceptability of his services. He is at present a member 
of the Cass county drainage board. Fraternally he is identified with the American Yeomen, 
and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. His religious faith is that of the Lutheran 
cliurch, and he assisted in the building of the Norwegian Lutheran church in Wiser, which 
he and his wife attend. He also gave generously to the building fund of the Congregational 
church in Gardner, as he recognizes the fact that all denominations have the same aims 
and work in behalf of the same cause. 



WILLIS S. ADAMS. 



Willis S. Adams, cashier of thct First National Bank of Lisbon, is well known to his 
fellow townsmen, for his entire life has been passed in that city, his birth having there 
occurred April 27, 1887. His parents are Henry K. and Frances (Sage) Adams. His 
father was born on a farm near Union Grove, Wisconsin, and was the son of a physician, 
who wlien Henry K. Adams was two years of age removed with his family to the city of 
Union Grove, where the boy was reared and there remained until he entered Beloit 
College, from which he was subsequently graduated. He accepted a position as book- 
keeper in the Manufacturers Bank of Racine and through close attention to duty and 
marked capability be worked his way upward to the position of assistant cashier. The 
opportunities of the northwest attracted him and in 1883 he removed to Lisbon, North 
Dakota, where, in company with his cousin, R. S. Adams, he organized the Ransom County 
State Bank, which was nationalized about three years later under the name of the First 
National Bank. From the beginning Henry K. Adams served as cashier until he retired in 
1914 on account of ill health, which was brought on by an automobile accident which he 
sustained in 1908, causing the loss of one of his legs. He now resides in Minneapolis and 
has regained his health. 

Willis S. Adams was educated in tlic Lisbon high school and in the University of 
Chicago, from which he was gradiuited with the degree Ph. D. as a member of the class 
of 1909. Following his graduation he was employed by the firm of Collier & Sons, pub- 
lishers, for about eighteen months and then returned to Lisbon, where he entered the First 
National Bank as assistant cashier, and after his father's retirement he was elected lashicr on 
the 1st of .Tanuary. 1015, and is now acting in that capacity. He is a courteous and 
obliging ollicial, carefully safegimrding the interests of the bank and at the same time 
putting forth every possible effort to favor and assist its patrons. 

In June, 1912, Mr. Adams was married to Miss Gladys Taylor, a daughter of A. B. 
Taylor, assistant cashier of the Fargo National Bank, of Fargo, North Dakota. They have 
two children, Bruce Kirk and Dean Taylor. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 37 

In politics Mr. Adams is a republican, stanch in liis support of the party principlea 
but not an aspirant for office. He belongs to the Commercial Club and is a past master of 
Slieyenne Valley Lodge, No. 13, F. & A. M., a member of Lisbon Chapter, No. 6, R. A. M., 
Ivanlioe Commandery, No. S. K. T., and El Zagal Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S. He is likewise 
a member of the State Panaletic Societj' and of the Sons of the American Revolution, 
being eligible through the paternal line. He holds membership in the Presbyterian church, 
while his wife is an Episcopalian. They are highly esteemed in Lisbon, where they reside, 
and their own home is celebrated for the warm-hearted hospitality that is cordially 
extended to their many friends. 



JOHN J. LEE. 



John J. Lee was formerly busily and actively engaged in general farming in Ward 
county, but is now living retired in Jlinot. He was born in Norway near Stavanger, 
December 35, 1874, his parents being John and Gertie (Sarhus) Lee, who were likewise 
natives of Norway, where they yet retain there residence. The father has devoted his 
life to the occupation of farming save for the period when he served in the regular army. 

John J. Lee is the third in order of birth in a family of seven children. He attended 
school in Norway and continued his education in Illinois and in the Valparaiso (Indiana) 
Normal School, in which he remained through one term. He crossed the Atlantic to 
America when but fifteen years of age, bringing with him a younger brother, then eleven 
years of age. They made their way direct to Illinois, remaining for a time in Livingston 
county, where John J. Lee secured employment as a farm hand. He could not speak 
English then and he had little business experience or training to qualify him for the heavy 
responsibilities which he assumed in providing for his own support and the care of his 
brother. He continued a resident of Illinois until about 1897, when he removed to Texas, 
settling west of Houston, where he operated a farm for a cousin through a period of two 
years. On the expiration of that period he arrived in North Dakota and filed on a home- 
stead until he proved upon the property. He afterward entered the employ of a lumber 
company, with which lie remained until he was elected sheriff. In 1903 he built the 
telephone line from Carpio to Mohall and has done much to further material progress and 
upbuilding in this part of the state. He disposed of his business interests when 
elected to the office of sheriff, at which time he became a resident of Minot. He occupied 
that position for four years and made an excellent record in oflB.ce through his promptness, 
efficiency and fidelity. Later he made a visit to Norway, spending the summer of 1909 
in his native land. Upon his return he concentrated his attention and energies upon 
farming and stock raising and continued the cultivation of eight hundred acres of land 
about eight miles southwest of Minot until the year 1915, when he rented the property. In 
the fall of 1909 he erected his present residence at No. 424 First street, Northeast, in 
Minot and this he now occupies, enjoying the fruits of his former toil, which enables him 
to rest from further labor and vet have all the comforts and some of the luxuries of 
life. 

On the 8th of April, 1905, Mr. Lee was united in marriage to Miss Clara Foss, who was 
born in Traill county. North Dakota, a daughter of Olaf and Ellen (Asheim) Foss who were 
natives of Norway. Coming to America in early life they settled near Ossian. Iowa, and about 
1875 removed to North Dakota, casting in their lot with the early settlers of Traill county, 
where they still occupy the old homestead farm. The father has held various local offices 
in that locality. Mr. and Mrs Lee have five children: Julfa Gertrude, Olive Ellen, Rakkel, 
John Clarence and Irvin Arthur. 

Mr. Lee is a worthy member of the blue lodge and chapter of Masonry in Minot. He 
also belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Sons of Norway and is 
the president of the Sons of Norway Building Assocation. He holds membership in the 
Lutheran church and his political allegiance is given to the republican party. For four 
years he served as sherifl" of Ward county, was elected a member of the state legislature 
in 1911 and served for one term and is at present a member of the city street commission. 



38 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

His activities liavo boon a iliiott force in iutlioiiii^i |)iil>lio progress aloii^ matriial, intellec- 
tual, political, social and moral lines and his worth to his community is widely recognized by 
all who know aught of his career. 



KNUTK H. BRUNSDALE. 

Knute H. Brunsdalc, one of the prominent figures in the development of North Dakota, 
was born in Iowa county, Wisconsin, Jlay 1, 1855, and passed away January 16, 1899. 
Although his life record was of comparatively short duration, covering a little less than 
forty-four years, he accomplished much in the attainment of success and in his contribution 
to the world's work. He was a son of Knute Halverson Brunsdale, who took his family 
name from the place of his birtli, the latter syllal)le signifying "dalen" or dale and the first 
syllable meaning ''brun" or well. The name, however, has been anglicized in its present 
form. The father was born in Norway about 1820 and came to the United States in 1840. 
About tlie same time Miss Gunild Olson Veglie crossed the Atlantic and they were subse- 
quently married. Representatives of the Brunsdale family in the United States were of 
sturdy stock and were fairly well educated and thrifty people. They gave their children all 
the advantages of the common schools and as Knute H. Brunsdale was a studious youth he 
made the most of his educational privileges. He was also a diligent student of the Bible 
and acquired a broad fund of information on scriptural subjects. After completing liis com- 
mon school studies he took a business course in a commercial college at La Crosse, Wisconsin, 
and in 1882 he came to the territory of Dakota, acquiring land in Steele county. There he 
began the work of reclaiming the land from the prairie and met all of the hardships and 
privations incident to residence on the frontier, but his labors were wisely, carefully and 
systematically directed and brought splendid resvilts as the years went on. 

In 18SG Mr. Brunsdale was elected county treasurer of Steele county by a very large 
majority and was twice reelected to the office. His efficiency in business methods demon- 
strated itself in his organization of the financial system of the county, which was long 
remembered by his fellow citizens. He retired from office to resume the pursuits of agricul- 
tural life and became one of the foremost farmers of the county, acquiring one and a half 
sections of land nine miles west of Hatton. upon which farm he resided until his death, 
devoting his time to the further development and improvement of his land, which he con- 
verted into a valuable farm property. He was also one of the pioneers in I)anking circles 
in North Dakota and in teaching the public those lessons of finance which have made his part 
of the state unusually prosperous. He became a leader in local banking circles, figuring 
actively in the successful conduct of a number of banking institutions. He was president 
of the State Bank of Portland, president of the State Bank of Finley and vice president of 
the Goose River Bank, and his sound judgment was a feature in their suceesstyl manage- 
ment and control. 

At Dccorah, Iowa, on the 29th of May, 1888. ;Mr. Brunsdale was married to Miss Mar- 
garet Nordgaard, a daughter of Ncls and Kline Nordgaard. She was born in Norway, June 
5, 18G0, a year before her parents came to tlie United States, at which time they made 
settlement in Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Brunsdale became the parents of seven children, of whom 
two are deceased. Those who survive are George Elmer. Clarence Norman. Kristian Edward, 
Anna Elizabeth and Karl Henry. 

The death of the husband and father occurred January 16, 1899, subsequent to which 
time Mrs. Brunsdale took charge of the large estate and her administration thereof has 
been charaeterized by marked business ability. It is said that the property under her man- 
agement has been increased many times in value. She is the presiding genius and active 
business manager of the estate, which comprises a very large area of fertile and valuable 
farm lands in Steele and Traill counties, besides many other important interests and invest- 
ments, over which she holds the stewardship. She was a worthy helpmate to her husband 
during his lifetime and has been a capable successor to him in the management of the 
business affairs which he left. Mrs. Brunsdale and her family are members of the Eutheran 
church and her children have been educated at the Luthpran College. Mr. Brunsdale was 




KNUTE H. BRUNSDALE 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 41 

always a firm believer in the cause of education and it was his desire that his children should 
have excellent advantages along that' line. For several years and up to the time of his 
death he was a member of the board of trustees of the State Normal School and an eloquent 
tribute was paid his memory by resolutions that were passed by the Normal School board 
on the day following his demise. He was a very strong advocate of prohibition and gave 
of his time and money in order that North Dakota might enter the Union as a prohibition 
state. Everywhere he was known he was spoken of in terms of the highest regard. His 
ability brought him prominently before the public in his business relations and his life 
record indicated what might be accomplished when determination and energy lead the way. 
The integiity of his business methods was unassailable and his life history proved that 
success and an honored name may be won simultaneously. 



A. G. DIVET. 



A. G. Divet, who is a member of the firm of Purcell & Divet. the leading law firm 
of Wahpeton, is one of the well known residents of that city. In addition to law practice 
he Is serving as a member of the state legislature. A native of Minnesota, he was born 
in Byron, Olmsted county, on the 10th of January, 1870, a son of Daniel and Harriet L. 
(Sykes) Divet. The father was born in Pennsylvania in 1835 and is still living, but the 
mother, whose blith occurred in Canada in 1S45, died in 1906. The paternal grandfather 
was Michael Divet, a native of Ireland, who on emigrating to the United States settled first 
in Pennsylvania and later in Wisconsin. He was a pioneer of the latter state and there 
engaged in farming for many years. His religious faith was that of the Catholic church. 
The maternal grandfather, Victor Sykes, was born in Canada but in the early history 
of Wisconsin became a resident of that state and there he passed the remainder of his life. 
The parents of our subject were married in Minnesota, the father having moved there 
from Dane county, Wisconsin, in 1860. In 1879 he and his family came to North Dakota, 
settling in Richland county. He engaged in agricultural pursuits and met with gratifying 
success in his chosen occupation. In early manhood he went to California and later to 
Colorado, where he mined for gold, but later he concentrated his efltorts upon farming. On 
removing to this state he took up a homestead and tree claim and later he traded for other 
land in this state, becoming in time the owner of two thousand acres of excellent land. 
He now resides with a daughter in Morton county at an advanced age, but is still alert 
and interested in the happenings of the day. He is unusually well read and during his 
active life was a power in his community. In politics he is a stalwart republican. To him 
and his wife were born seven children, five of whom are still living, namely: A. G.; Eunice, 
the widow of Joseph Glyn, of Morton county, who was a successful farmer; Lorena, who 
resides upon the homestead in Morton county; Sykes, who is farming near Hutchinson, 
Minnesota; and Walter, of Lisbon, who is court stenographer for his district. 

A. G. Divet received his early education in the common schools of Minnesota and North 
Dakota and lat^i attended the academy at Madison, AVisconsin. for about two years, after 
which he studied law in connection with the discharge of his duties as court reporter, 
which office he held for six years. After being admitted to the bar he located at Forman, 
this state, for practice, but two years later returned to Wahpeton and become associated in 
piactiee with Senator William E. Purcell. As time has passed they have gained prominence 
at the bar of the state and the firm of Purcell & Divet is recognized as the leading one in 
the city of Wahpeton and the second one in the state. They engage in general practice, 
have not only a large but also an important clientage and are known in adjoining states 
as well as throughout North Dakota. They are also heavily interested in farming, own- 
ing a large ranch near Wahpeton, and it is characteristic of their enterprise and progres- 
siveness that they were the first successful alfalfa growers in the state. They carry 
on diversified farming, raising corn, oats, wheat, cattle and hogs. They have all the latest 
equipment for scientific farming and in their methods utilize the discoveries of investigators 
along various phases of farming. In the seven years that they have owned the farm they 
have expended thirty-five thousand dollars in improving it, and it is now one of the show 
Vol. n— 3 



42 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

places ol Kichlaiid county. They manage the farm well and derive a handsome income 
therefrom. 

Mr. Divet was married in 1S95 to Miss Xora Russell, who was born in Goodhue county, 
Minnesota, a daughter of Elijah Russell, a successful merchant. Mr. and Mrs. Divet have 
two children; Donovan, who has completed two years of the academic course in the State 
University of Minncosta and is now a freshnum in the school of law; and Rushby, who is 
sixteen years of age and is in high school. 

Mr. and Mrs. Divet belong to the Congregational church, in the work of which they 
take an active part. Mr. Divet has been chairman of the board of trustees for many years 
and at times has filled pulpits in this section of the state. He is identified with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and with the Knights of Pythias, and in the latter organi- 
zation has passed through all the chairs. His political allegiance is given to the republican 
party and he is recognized as a leader in public alTairs. He is now serving his second term 
as a member of the state legislature and is making a creditable record in that capacity, 
proving not only public-spirited but also discriminating in his support of or opposition to 
various measures. He is not only respected for his ability and esteemed because of his 
unquestioned integrity but he is also held in warm personal regard by those who have been 
intimately associated with liira. 



JAMES FERGUSON. 



James Ferguson, of Grandin. is one of the well known elevator men and grain dealers 
in his part of the state and is also a member of the firm of O. L. Ferguson & Company, 
general merchants. He was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, on the 10th of .January, 1S51, 
a son of George and Ann (Hall) Ferguson, both natives of Ireland, where they were reared 
and married and whence in 1S45 they came to the United States. They located first in Lan- 
caster, Pennsylvania, where the father was employed in iron furnaces for a time, but at 
length they removed to Henry county, Illinois, where he engaged in farming and where 
both he and his wife passed away. 

James Ferguson was about four years of age when his parents removed to Henry 
county and there he received his education, which was limited, however, as he was never 
able to attend school for more than three months during the year after he was put to work 
at the plow at the age of nine years. He became thoroughly familiar with agricultural 
pursuits and the training which he received inculcated in him industry, self-control and 
reliability. 

Following his marriage Mr. Ferguson purchased eighty acres of land in Henry county, 
Illinois, where he resided until the spring of 1883, when he came to North Dakota, settling 
first at Larimore, where, however, he remained but a short time, after which he removed 
to Towner county and took up a homestead twelve miles east of Cando. After proving up 
on his claim he returned to Larimore and engaged in farming in that vicinity until IS'OO, 
when he removed to Grandin and became the manager of the elevator owned by the North- 
western Elevator Company. He held that position for twenty-three years and during 
that time never lost a day's work — a truly remarkable record. During part of that time 
he was also engaged in business for himself, handling the Dcering line of farm machinery, 
but for the past ten years he has been associated with his son. Otto L. Ferguson, in the 
implement and general merchandising business under the firm name of O. L. Ferguson & 
Company. They not only handle all kinds of farm implements but also carry a complete 
line of general merchandise and they have gained a gratifying and well deserved patron- 
age. For the past two years the subject of this review has had charge of the grain 
elevator owned by the JTonarch Elevator Company and his long connection with the grain 
trade has made him woU known in business circles of this part of the state. 

Tn 1875 Mr. Ferguson married !Miss Hattie A. Totman, of Henry county, Illinois, and 
they have become the parents of three children: Otto L.; Lela Estelle, the wife of Ed C. 
.\nderson, a real estate agent of Fargo; and Edward M., who is employed in the store of 
O. L. Ferguson & Company. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 43 

The republican party has in Mr. Ferguson a stalwart adherent, and fraternally he 
belongs to Hillsboro Lodge, No. 511, A. F. & A. M., and to the Independent Order of 
Foresters. Both he and his wife attend the Presbyterian church and seek to conform their 
lives to the teachings of Christianity. Mr. Ferguson is recognized as a man of excellent 
judgment and of accurate knowledge of business conditions, and the success which he has 
gained is well deserved. 



NELS SWENSON. 



Norway has furnished a full quota of citizens to North Dakota and they have contrib- 
uted in large measure to the development of the state, especially along agricultural lines. 
A representative of this class is Nels Swenson, who is engaged in general farming on section 
2, Wiser township, Cass county, where he now owns a well improved property of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres. He was born in Norway March 6, 1870, a son of Swen and Johanna 
Swenson who were likewise natives of the same land. The father died there, but the mother 
still makes her home in Norway. Their family numbered but two children, both sons, Nels 
and John, who are now residents of Cass county. 

Spending his youthful days in his native land, Nels Swenson pursued his education 
in the schools of Norway and in 1888, when a youth of eighteen years, sailed for the United 
States, for the reports which had reached him concerning the opportunities of the new world 
were irresistibly attractive. He journeyed across the country to North Dakota and settled 
in Cass county, where for eight years he worked as a farm hand. During that period he 
carefully saved his earnings until economy and industry had brought him capital sufficient 
to enable him to purchase land and he became owner of one hundred and sixty acres on 
section 2, Wiser township. He took up his abode thereon and has since added many improve- 
ments. Good machinery facilitates the work of the fields and the farm is in every way 
modern in its equipment, while he follows the most progressive methods in the conduct of 
the work of the fields. He also owns and operates a tlireshing outfit and thereby is adding 
lo his annual income. 

In April, 1895, Mr. Swenson was united in marriage to Miss Carrie Berg, who is a 
native of Norway and was brought to the United States when but one year old. Her parents 
are both deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Swenson have seven children, namely: Oliver, John, Min- 
nie, Clarence, Lillie, Stella and Frances. 

The parents are members of the Lutheran church and Mr. Swenson gives his political 
allegiance to the republican party. He is now serving as one of the school directors and 
he is actively and helpfully interested in all plans and projects for the upbuilding of the dis- 
trict and for furthering the welfare of the community. His life indicates what may be accom- 
plished when perseverance and energy lead the way and his example, if followed, will bring 
the individual to the goal of success. 



E. H. MYHRA. 



E. H. Myhra, cashier of the Farmers & Merchants State Bank of Wahpeton, is a 
native of Eishland county and was bom on the 9th of December, 1873. His parents, H. C. Nj 
and Elise (Eriekson) Myhra, were both born in Kongsberg, Norway, the former in 1843 
and the latter in 1846. They were married in their native land, vwhere they resided until they 
emigi-ated to the United States, making their way to Eushford, Minnesota. In 18T1, how- 
ever, they removed to Richland county. North Dakota, where the father homesteaded 
land, which he has since improved until it is now one of the well developed farms of the 
locality. H. C. N. Myhra has added to his holding and now owns four hundred acres, on 
wliich he does general farming. His wife is also still living. He is a republican in politics 
and for three terms served efliicicntly as clerk of the court. He has always taken a deep 
interest in public affairs and keeps well informed on all of the questions and issues of the 



44 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

day. He is liighly educated and speaks and writes German, Norwegian and Englisli. His 
religious faith is that of tlie Norwegian Lutheran church, to the support of which he con- 
tributes. To him and his wife were born eight children, seven of whom are living, namely: 
Mrs. K. llausken, wliose husband is engaged in the clothing business in Wahpeton; Mrs. 
Ed Wilson, of Moorhead, Minnesota, whose husband is now living retired; E. H.; Nellie; 
George, who is assisting in the operation of the home farm; Mrs. F. A. Magnusson, whose 
husband is clerk in a store in Moorhead, Minnesota; and Agnes, at home. 

E. H. Myhra attended the public schools of Kichland county and continued his studies 
at Moorhead, IMinnesota, thus securing a good education. During the summer months he 
assisted in the work of the home farm and became familiar with the value of energy and 
of concentration upon the task at hand. On leaving school he entered a drug store, where 
he learned pharmacy, and for fourteen years he engaged in tlie drag business in Wahpeton. 
In 1904, however, he was appointed postmaster and received two re-appointments, serving 
in that capacity until March, 191G. In 1914 he became cashier of the Farmers & Merchants 
State Bank, which was established in December, 1914, with a capital of twenty thousand 
dollars and which has already built up a good business, the average deposits being eighty 
thousand dollars. 

Mr. Myhra was married in 1898 to Miss May Dahl, who was born in Sweden but was 
brought to this country by her parents wlien but three years of age. To them have been 
born two children: Lucile, born in 1903; and Harold, born in 1904. 

, Mr. Myhra is a republican in politics and for eight years served as chairman of the 
county committee, doing much during that time to strengthen the party throughout 
the county. His wife belongs to the Christian Science church and he is identified with the 
Masonic blue lodge, the Royal Arch Chapter, the Knights Templar Commandery and 
the Mystic Shrine, and likewise with the Workmen, the Yeomen and the Knights of Pythiaa, 
in which he is past chancellor. His life has been one of well directed activity and his labors 
have contributed not only to his individual prosperity but also to the development of hia 
community. The high esteem in which he is generally held is well deserved and there are 
many who are his warm personal friends. 



C. S. COLLINS. 



C. S. Collins, residing on section 15, Hunter township, Cass countj', has been actively 
engaged in farming in this state for the past thirty-two years and is now the owner of 
six hundred and forty acres of valuable land. His birth occurred in New York on the 2d 
day of August, 1800, his parents being Stowell and Louisa (Wilcox) Collins, who are also 
natives of the Empire state. In 1873 they removed to Cliisago county, Minnesota, locating 
in the town of Sunrise, where thej' still reside at the ages of eight-five and eighty-two years 
respectively. By trade the father is a blacksmith. 

C. S. Collins attended the public schools in the acquirement of an education but as 
early as his fifteenth year became a wage earner, entering the employ of Samuel McClure, 
a lumberman. He worked for liim in the woods and remained with this employer for about 
fifteen years in various capacities, superintending a Noitli Dakota farm for liim tlirougli 
a period of twelve years. It was in May, 1883, that he came to this state, continuing 
with Mr. McClure until 1890. In that year, in association witli Ing Jlocn, he purchased a 
section of land from his em])loy('r and tliis he cultivated in partnership for two years, on 
the expiration of wliich period lie sold his interest to Mr. Moen. He now owns six hundred 
and forty acres of land wliich he bought at dill'ercnt times, his first purchase being made in 
1885 and embracing one hundred and sixty acres. Gratifying success has attended his 
undertakings as an agriculturist and he is widely recognized as one of the prosperous 
and leading citizens of his community. He is a stockholder and vice president of the 
Farmers & Jferchants Bank of Hunter and a stocklioldcr in tlic First National Hank of 
Hunter and the Farmers Elevator Company of Hunter. 

Mr. Collins has been twice married. In 1887 he wedded Miss Ro.sa Russell, of llimter, 
North Dakota, who passed away in 1902, leaving the following children: Stowell, engaged 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 45 

in farming in Giinkle township, Cass county, tliis state: Lloyd, the cashier of the Farmers 
& Merchants Bank of Hunter; and Charles, Dellis and Gladys, at home. In July, 1905, Jlr. 
Collins was again married, his second union being with Miss Percie Jackson, of North- 
field, Minnesota. To them have been born three children, namely: Edwin, Nathan and 
Louise. 

In politics Mr. Collins is independent, supporting men and measures rather than party. 
He is a member of the township board of trustees, on which lie has served for many years, 
while for about twentj' years he has been a member of the scliool board, the cause of 
education ever finding in him a stanch champion. Fraternally he is identified with the 
following organizations: Hunter Lodge, No. 63, A. F. & A. M. ; Casselton Chapter, No. 2, 
R. A. M.; Auvergne Commandery, No. 1, K. T.; El Zagal Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S.; 
Hunter Lodge, No. 25, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; and Hunter Lodge, No. 42, 
Knights of Pythias. His wife is a devoted and consistent member of the Presbyterian 
church. His has been an active, useful and honorable life crowned not only by success 
but by the goodwill, confidence and high regard of his fellowmen, who have at all times 
found him trustworthy, laboring for the interests of tlie community, placing patriotism 
before partisanship and never sacrificing loyalty in citizenship to personal ends. 



ALBERT N. CARLBLOM. 



Albert N. Carlblom, prominently identified with the interests of Gwinner as postmaster, 
banker and merchant, Avas born in Sweden, December 17, 1863, and of that country his 
parents, John G. and Elizabetli (Anderson) Carlblom, were also natives. The father was 
born in Sweden in 1835 and came to the United States in 1866, settling in Minnesota, where 
he remained until 1882. In tliat year lie arrived in North Dakota, establishing his home 
near the present town site of Gwinner. He entered a claim on section 26, White Stone 
Hill township, and remained thereon until his death, which occurred :May 18, 1900, his 
entire life having been devoted to the occupation of farming. It was in 1848 that he wedded 
Elizabeth Anderson, who was also born in Sweden in 1825 and who passed away in May, 
1899. They were the parents of nine children, of whom six are yet living. 

Albert N. Carlblom was tlie youngest of that family and was but two years of age 
when taken to Minnesota. He acquired liis education in the common schools of Cokato 
and in the Gustavus Adolphus College at St. Peter, ^Minnesota, from which he was grad- 
uated witli the class of 1886. He then tiu-ned his attention to the profession of teaching, 
which he followed for four years in Minnesota and North Dakota, and later he engaged 
in clerking in general stores in Milnor and in Lisbon, devoting two years to that work. He 
was appointed deputy county treasurer- of Sargent county in 1889 and served for one year, 
after which he received the appointment of deputy county auditor, in wliich capacity he 
continued for two years. In 1893 he was elected county auditor for Sargent county 
and held tliat position for a iperiod of six years. In 1898 he was chosen state auditor, 
occupying the office for four years, and thus he advanced to high political office, in which 
connection he discharged his duties with marked capability and fidelity and wore his 
honors with becoming modesty. He continued to fill the position of state auditor until 
1901, at which time he established a general mercantile store in Gwinner and is still con- 
ducting business there, enjoying a liberal patronage. In 1904 he joined T. F. Marshall, of 
Oakes, George W. McWilliams, of Milwaukee and F. W. Vail, of Milnor in organizing the 
State Bank of Gwinner, of which he became the vice president. In 1907 he purchased 
the interests of the other stockholders and reorganized the bank, of which he became the 
president, and since that time he has directed its policy and managed its interests, making 
it one of the strong financial concerns of the county. He is also interested in fanning, 
owning property in Wliite Stone Hill township. It was Mr. Carlblom who erected the first 
building in the town of Gwinner, tliis being the building w^iich he now occupies with his 
stock of general merchandise. 

On the 37th of March, 1898, Mr. Carlblom was married to Miss Josephine Peterson, 
■who was born in Cottonwood county, Minnesota, .January 27, 1874, a daughter of Ole and 



46 , HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Alette Peterson, wlio wcio fiirly residents of Minnesota, where they l)ecame farming people. 
Both have now passed away. Of tlieir family of seven children Mrs. Carlblom was the 
fourth in order of birth, and by her marriage she has become the mother of three children: 
Vera Lenore, born March 11, 1809; Kdna Treno, FelMiiary. 11. 1001: imd Albert K, Novem- 
ber 7. 1911. 

In cominiinity affairs Mr. Carlblom has always been active and is the present post- 
master of Gwinncr, while his wife previously acted as postmistress for fourteen years. Mr. 
Carlblom is also president of the school board and there is no movement or measure insti- 
tuted for the upbuilding and benefit of his community or for the advancement of the wel- 
fare of the state that does not receive his strong endorsement, approval and support. He 
holds membership in the Swedish Lutheran church and fraternally he is a thirty-second 
degree Mason, prominent in the order. Ho is a past master of the blue lodge at Forman, 
North Dakota, and he holds membership with the Consistory and with the Shrine at Fargo. 
His prominence in political circles as well as the importance of his business interests has 
made him widelv known and Ninth Dakota ininibers him among her representative men. 



MORRIS E. PORTER. 



ilorris R. Porter, who since October, 1911, has been cashier and manager of the Scandi- 
navian American Bank of Minot, was born near Blue Grass, Iowa, September 18, 1873, a 
son of Samuel and Euphemia L. (Watts) Porter. The father, who was born in Ohio, Feb- 
ruary 1, 1850, was an attorney by profession and about 1800 removed to Iowa, being admitted 
to the bar in that state, after which he practiced law continuously until his death June 26, 
1893. His wife, who was born in Iowa, May 10, 1850, passed away September 22, 1915. 
They had a family of three children, of whom Morris R. is the eldest. 

After attending the common schools in his home county in Iowa, Morris R. Porter con- 
tinued his studies in the high school at Guthrie Center, Iowa, and when a youth of fourteen 
he began providing for his own support by working as a farm hand for others through the 
summer months, whih? in the winter seasons he continued his education, spending his time 
in that way for about three years. He afterward entered the law, loan and abstract ollice 
of John W. Foster, of Guthrie Center, Iowa, in the capacity of stenographer and remained 
with him for eleven years. In 1S95 he became cashier of the Citizens Investment Bank at 
Guthrie Center while still connected with Mr. Foster and served in that capacity until 1902. 
when he purchased an interest and took over the management of the First National Bank 
at Stuart, Iowa. A year later, however, he sold his holdings in that institution and returned 
to Guthrie Center, wlienee in 1904 he removed to Fargo, North Dakota, where he purchased 
the business of the Cass County Abstract Company, which he consolidated with that of the 
Northern Ab.stract Company, operating under the name of the latter. Mr. Porter was iden- 
tified therewith until 1906, when in connection with others he iiurchased the Forest River 
State Bank, of which he assumed the management, carrying on the business until 1908. In 
that year he went to Colorado on account of impaired health, remaining for a year. In June, 
1909, he returned to North Dakota and established his home at Minot, where he engaged 
in the farm loan and real estate business and also had a contract for transcribing tlie records 
of Burke, Renville and Divide counties. In October, 1911, he purchased the Scandinavian 
American Bank of Minot, of which he became the cashier and general manager and has so 
continued to the present time, thus entering upon important relations in connection with 
the financial interests of the western part of the state. He is also a landowner of North 
Dakota but devotes the greater part of his attention to his banking business. He is also a 
stockholder and director of the Hartland State Bank at Hartland, North Dakota. 

On the 12th of June, 1895, Mr. Porter was united in marriage to Miss Sarah C. Kel- 
logg, who was born in Iowa, her parents being Henry \V. and Margaret (Guthrie) Kellogg, 
the latter a native of Illinois. The father, a native of New York, is now engaged in the 
banking business at Menlo, Iowa. The daughter, Mrs. Porter, passed away in February, 1913, 
leaving three children, as follows: Hubert K., who was horn (Jctober 17, 1897; Evelyn F., 
whose natal day was February 17, 1900; and Frances Louise, born February 25, 1912. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 47 

Mr. Porter is an independent republican nor has he ever aspired to political office. He 
belongs to the Masonic lodge and in his life exemplifies the beneficent spirit of the craft. 
Since starting out in business life as a farm hand, working by the month in the summer 
seasons in order to continue his education in the winter, he has made steady progress and 
is today occupying a prominent and enviable position in banking circles. He has had broad 
and varied experience and at all times has thoroughly learned life's lessons. His work has 
wrought for individual advancement and also for the prosperity of the community in which 
he has lived, and he now occupies an enviable position in the business circles of Minot. 



GUSTAV SCHULER. 



Colonel Gustav Schuler, a successful lawyer of Wahpeton. Richland county, was born in 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on the 25th of October, 1862, a son of Douiinic and Catherine (Heil- 
man) Schuler, both natives of Germany, the former bom in Gabsheim, in the grand duchy 
of Hesse-Darmstadt in 1829, the latter in northern Germany. The father came to the 
United States in the latter part of 1848, seeking political freedom here, as owing to the 
insurrection in Germany in 1848 he was compelled to leave his native land. He first went 
to Switzerland with others connected with that uprising and thereafter came to this country, 
settling in New York city, whence he came to Milwaukee, where he made his home. In 
Milwaukee he engaged in the contracting business for a number of years, after which he 
entered the emploj' of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway Company, with which 
he remained until he retired. At the time of the Civil war he enlisted in Battery B of 
the Wisconsin Heavy Artillery and was at the front with his command during the entire 
enlistment or until the close of the Civil war, tnus proving his loyalty to his adopted 
country. After becoming naturalized, he supported the democratic party but steadfastly 
refused public office. 

He passed away in 1911 and there were many who sincerely mourned his demise, as his 
salient characteristics were such as to win confidence, esteem and regard. He was married 
in New York city to Miss Catherine Heilman, who passed to her reward shortly after his 
demise. She was a woman of remarkable character and had through her own efforts placed 
herself in an enviable intellectual position, and was the friend and benefactor of all wlm 
needed sj-mpathy and assistance. They were the parents of five children, four of whom 
are still living, namely: Professor D. H., a graduate of the University of Wisconsin, who is 
engaged in educational work in that state; Eugene, an architect; Gustav, the subject of this 
sketch; and Miss Katherine, a teacher in the Milwaukee schools. The paternal grandfather 
was Johann Adam Schuler, a highly intellectual man, who was an educator in Germany. 

Colonel Schuler attended the public schools in Milwaukee and took up the study of 
law under Judge W. H. Timlin, now of the supreme court of Wisconsin. In 1887 he was 
admitted to tlie bar, and began the practice of his chosen profession at Kewaunee, Wisconsin, 
where he remained in practice until the year 1890, when he removed to Wahpeton, North 
Dakota, where he is still actively engaged in tlie practice of law. He has a large and rep- 
resentative clientage, which comes nbt only from this state but also from adjoining states, 
and he has the confidence and respect of his brother attorneys. He has given especial atten- 
tion to probate law and is recognized as an authority in that field. In addition to his pro- 
fessional interests he is the owner of considerable land within this state and valuable 
business property in Wahpeton. 

Mr. Schuler is married and his family consists of one daughter living, Mrs. Mable 
Kachelhofl'er, whose husband is a practicing attorney at law at Wahpeton, North Dakota, 
and two granddaughters, Mable and -Julia Zellhoofer, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the daughters 
of liis deceased daughter Grace. 

Mr. Schuler is a democrat and takes a prominent part in public affairs. When living 
in Wisconsin he served as municipal justice of the city of Kewaunee for several terms 
knd has held the office of states attorney in his county here for three terms. He has also 
taken care of the affairs of the city of Wahpeton, as its city attorney, for three terms. 

He is well known in the Sons of Veterans and in 1892 was appointed as provisional 



48 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

colonel of that order, and served as such officer for several years. He manifests his deep 
loyalty to the best interests of his country in the conscientious discharge of his duties when 
in public office and in a willingness to subordinate personal interests to the general welfare 
at all times. Although the success which he has gained financially and professionally is very 
creditable, it is doubly so, in consideration of tlie fact that after he reached the age of 
thirteen years he was wholl.y dependent upon his own resources in the obtainment of his 
professional education. Tlie ambition, enterprise and determination which enabled him 
to secure his education have since been im])ortant factors in his career, and it can be truly 
said of him that he is a self-made man. 



A. J. SCHUR. 



A. J. Schur, one of the. substantial agriculturists of Arthur township, living on section 
27, has been a resident of Xorth Dakota for the jiast thirty-eight years and is now the owner 
of four hundred and eighty acres of land comprising one of the valuable and well improved 
farms of Cass county. His birth occurred in Germany on the 1st of November, 1856, his 
parents being Martin and Minnie (Welke) Schur, who emigrated to the United States in 
1873 and established their home in Dodge county, Wisconsin. In 1879 they followed our 
subject to Xorth Dakota, locating in Amenia township, Cass county, where they spent the 
remainder of their lives. Martin Schur passed away in 1897, while his wife was called to 
her final rest in 1903, the comniunit_y thus losing two of its respected early settlers. 

A. J. Schur obtained a district school education and as early as his sixteentli year 
become a wage earner, working as a farm liand. In the spring of 1878, shortly after attain- 
ing his majority, he came to North Dakota and preempted a quarter section of land in 
Amenia township, Cass county. He proved up on his claim and in 1887 bought a relinquish- 
ment on a tree claim in section 28, Arthur township. In 1902 he sold his preemption and 
purchased a farm of three hundred and twenty acres adjoining his tree claim, to which he 
removed and on which he has since resided. His present place of four hundred and eighty 
acres is one of the most jjroductive and attractive farms of Cass county, annually yielding 
rich harvests which find a ready sale on the market. He is a stockholder in the Farmers 
Elevator Company of Arthur and enjoys an enviable reputation as an enterprising and 
representative citizen of his community. 

In 1880 Mr. Schur was joined in wedlock to ;Miss ^Mary Aberthroth. who is a native of 
Germany and came to the United States in 1877. To them have been born ten children, nine 
of whom survive, as follows: Louis, a rural mail carrier residing in Arthur, North Dakota; 
Elma, who is the wife of John Butchcn, of Arthur; Lena, twin sister of Elma, who gave her 
hand in marriage to Isaac Roberts, an elevator man of .\rthur; Arthur, at home; Olga, 
who is the wife of Gordon Burgum. the manager of tlie Northwestern elevator at .\rthur. 
North Dakota; and .John, Edward, JIamie and KUa, all at home. 

Politically ^Mr. Schur is a stanch republican and a member of the present board of 
township trustees, while for several years he has also served on the school board. His 
religious faith is indicated by his membership in the German Lutheran church, to which his 
wife and children also belong. During his long period of residence in Cass county he has 
made many friends and his well known integrity and honesty of purpose have made him 
popular and esteemed in the district. 



HON. CHARLKS. A. TUBES. 



Prominent among the enterprising, progressive and successful business men of Hunter 
is the Hon. Cliarles A. Tubbs, now manager of the grain interests of the Cargill Elevator 
Company, Basing his success upon industry, perseverance and enterprise, he has steadily 
■worked his way upward in business connections and is now prominently and favorably 
known in his part of the state. He was born in River Falls, Wisconsin, .Inly 12, 1858, a 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 49 

son of Erasmus P. and Lydia (Guertin) Tubbs, the father a native of Vermont and the 
motlier of Canada. Tliey were married in the Green ilountain state and soon afterward, 
or about the year 1854, removed to River Falls, Wisconsin, where Mr. Tubbs engaged in 
farming. He continued in that state until 1880, when he went to Traverse county, Minnesota, 
where both he and his wife spent their remaining days. 

Charles A. Tubbs spent his youthful days under the parental roof and acquired his 
education in the public schools. In young manhood he learned the trade of a brick and stone 
mason, at which he worked for seven years, and in 1887 he came to North Dakota, where 
he entered into active connection with the grain business. In 1893 he engaged in merchan- 
dising and was prominently identified with that line of commercial activity for twelve years. 
At the same time he continued in the grain trade as manager for the Cargill Elevator Com- 
pany and in 1904 and 1905 he had charge of the Farmers Elevator at Galesburg, North 
Dakota. At the end of that period he again took charge of the Cargill elevator at Hunter 
and has since been active in this field of business. He is regarded as one of the ablest and 
most capable grain merchants of his part of the state and annually controls an extensive 
business. 

In 1893 Mr. Tubbs was united in marriage to Miss Cora L. Hunter, of Viroqua, Wiscon- 
sin, by whom he has two children. McKinley D., who graduated from the Hunter high school 
in 1914 and then spent a year in the University of North Dakota, is now employed in the 
head office of the Cargill Elevator Company at Minneapolis. Doris C. completed a course 
in the Hunter high school by graduation with the class of 1915. 

Mr. Tubbs exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the 
republican party and is a recognized leader in its ranks. Upon its ticket he was elected 
to the state legislature for the years 1901 and 1903 and made a creditable record in that 
position, carefully considering all the important questions which came up for settlement and 
casting his vote according to the dictates of his judgment, which easily recognized the value 
of various important measures. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to 
the following organizations: Hunter Lodge, No. 63, A. F. & A. M.; Casselton Chapter, No. 2, 
R. A. M. ; and Auvergne Commandery, No. 1, K. T., of Fargo. He is likewise a member of 
the Masonic Veteran Association. In his life Mr. Tubbs exemplifies the beneficent spirit 
of the craft and conforms his actions to its teachings. He is popular among his brethren 
of the fraternity and has the social qualities which render him popular wherever he is known. 
His business enterprise, too, has carried him steadily forward and he is now regarded as one 
of the foremost citizens of Hunter and his part of the state. 



WILLIAM DUNNELL. 



Various important business interests at Minot have felt the stimulus of the activity 
and cooperation of William Dunnell, who is the vice president and general manager of the 
Minot Flour Mill Company, Incorporated, and also of the Western Elevator Company, Incor- 
porated. He was born at St. Mary's, Oxford county, Ontario, Canada, August 15, 1870, a 
son of Alfred and Sarah (Robinson) Duiuiell, who were also natives of that place. There 
the father is still active, having devoted his life to farming. For manj^ years he has served 
as a member of the board of education there and is a stalwart champion of the public 
schools. His wife died in June, 1910. 

In their family were twelve children, of whom William Dunnell is the eldest. He 
attended school in Harrington, Ontario, and at the age of si.xteen years began work as a farm 
hand, being thus employed for two years. He afterward began learning the milling trade 
in St. Mary's, serving a three years' apprenticeship, and in 1890 he removed to Millwood, 
Manitoba, where as head miller he operated a mill for a year. In the spring of 1891 he 
made his way to Elk River, Minnesota, where for eight years he acted as head miller and 
on the expiration of that period became a resident of Stillwater Minnesota, where in con- 
nection with others he organized the Minnesota Flour Mill Company, of which he became 
manager, and thus controlled the business until 1906. He still retains his interest in that 
enterprise but for the past ten years has resided in Minot and with others he purchased 



50 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

the .Miiiot Flour .Mill Company, liu-oiporated, of which he is the vice president and general 
manager. In the summer of 1915 he organized the Western Elevator Company, Incorporated, 
of which he is also the vice president and general manager. He is likewise a landowner, 
having a farm three miles south of Miuot, but he devotes the greater part of his attention 
to the milling and grain business. The Western Elevator Company operates a line of ele- 
vators in North Dakota and the Minot Milling Company makes shipments to all the largei 
markets throughout the United States. This company manufactures flour of superior excel- 
lence, known as the Snow White, and the mill is completely equipped with the most modern 
machinery and employs the latest processes. Steadily the trade has grown until it has now 
assumed extensive proportions and the success of the two undertakings is attributable in 
no small measure to the efforts and business ability of Mr. Bunnell. 

In June 1893, Mr. Bunnell was united in marriage to Miss Eosenna Vice, a native of 
Ontario, Canada, and a daughter of George and Emily (Goulden) Vice, both of whom were 
born in England. The father, a foundryman and merchant, is still actively engaged in 
business in Ontario, but the mother passed away in the year 1890. To Mr. and Mrs. Bun- 
nell have been born eight children, as follows: Florence J., who is supervisor of music in 
the schools of Portal, North Bakota; Edith Grace, a student in the State Normal School 
at Minot: William Harold, a sophomore in the Minot high school; Myron Goulden, a si.xth 
grade public school student; Irwin Robinson, a fifth grade pupil; and Howard, Wilbur and 
Claire, all at home. 

Mr. Bunnell is prominently known in fraternal circles, holding membership with the 
JNIasonic lodge, the Knights of Pythias, the Foresters and the United Commercial Travelers. 
His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he has served on the board of 
aldermen of Minot. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church and in its teachings 
is found the guiding spirit of his life, which conforms thereto in all of its relations. He is 
found thoroughly reliable as well as enterprising in business and progressive and trustworthy 
in citizenship, while the qualities he displays in private life have won him warm and endur- 
ing friendships. 



JOHN BARRETT FOLSOM. 



Wlien Fargo was entering upon an era of rapid development and progress John Barrett 
Folsom became identified with that section of the state and remained to the time of his 
death a prominent figure in the business and social life of his community. If the historian 
were, without preliminary effort, to set forth his achievements in a single sentence it would 
perhaps best be done in the words, the splendid success of an honest man in whose life 
business ability and humanitarianisui were well balanced forces. 

Mr. Folsom was born in Ohio in 1837 and spent his boyhood in the southern part of 
that state. He attended the public school of Ironton until his thirteenth year and was said 
to be the brightest boy that ever attended that school, but on entering his teens he was 
forced to put aside his textbooks in order to provide for his own support and began earning 
his living as a clerk in a country store. From that time until his death on the 6th of 
August, 1912, he scarcely passed an idle day. In 18G3 he accepted a position at an iron 
furnace and was connected with the iron industiy at dillerent periods in Ohio. Kentucky, 
Tennessee, Missouri and Michigan, thoroughly acquainting himself with every detail of the 
business and continuing his activity along tluit line until he yielded to the lure of Bakota. 

In 1882 Mr. Folsom sold his interests in iron furnaces and came to Fargo, which was 
then in the midst of a boom. He there purchased property and immediately opened a real 
estate and loan office, meeting with success in the business from the beginning. He soon 
mastered all of the details of real estate transactions and activity aa thoroughly as he 
had the details of the iron business. Mr. Folsom had the same kind of a mental picture of 
a quarter section of land in the region within one hundred or more miles of Fargo that a 
wide-awake, enterprising real estate broker in the city has of its blocks and streets. He 
did not have to refer to maps or notes when a farm or an undeveloped piece of land was 
TOentioned; the legal description of it immediately suggested a mental plituiv to liiin. If 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 51 

it wpic improved property lie knew precisely how many buildings there were and what 
kind of a well there was on it, also the character and quality of the soil. To the day of his 
death he was a man of extraordinary mental and physical activity but as simple, as gentle 
and as kindly in his nature as a girl. Mr. Folr^om had no enemies; there was nothing in his 
nature or his actions to inspire enmity. By hi honesty, his kindliness, his helpfulness and 
unselfish attention to their interests he endeared himself to all of his business clients and 
associates and there is no man in all of the young state of North Dakota who has helped 
more worthy homesteaders to overcome hardships and difficulties occasioned by bad crops 
and keep possession of their farms than did Mr. Folsom. 

In 1863 occurred the marriage of Mr. Folsom and Miss Lavisa C. Forsythe, of southern 
Ohio, and when death called him he was survived by his widow and a daughter, the latter 
being the wife of Major Matthew F. Steele, of the United States Army, who after serving for 
thirty years as a cavalry officer retired from active military duty in order to take charge 
of Mr. Folsom's business and estate. 

Mr. Folsom was one of Fargo's most public-spirited men and was always ready to 
give personal and financial aid to whatever was done for the betterment of business or 
social conditions of the town. He stood at all times for advancement and improvement 
and heartily cooperated in those measures which were a matter of civic virtue and civic 
pride. Of his many good qualities not the least was his capacity for strong friendships. 
The simplicity and beauty of his daily life as seen in his home and family relations consti- 
tuted an even balance to his splendid business ability. The high ideals which he cherished 
found embodiment in practical effort for their adoption and because of the innate refine- 
ment of his nature he rejected everything opposed to good taste. 



HON. FRANK V. ALLEN. 



Hon. Frank P. Allen, judge of tlie fourth district court of North Dakota and a resident 
of Lisbon, was born in New York city on the 19th of December, 1859, his parents being 
Frank S. and Hannah E. (Benedict) Allen, both of whom were natives of New York city 
and descended from old colonial families connected with Revolutionary war liistory, so that 
Judge Allen is eligible to membership through both the paternal and maternal lines with 
the Sons of the American Revolution. In early life his father became a New York banker 
but for several years has lived retired and he and his wife, at the ages of eighty-five and 
eighty-four years respectively, are now residents of New York -city. 

•fudge Allen was educated in the schools of his native city, of Connecticut and of New 
Jersey and ifterward went with his parents to Germany, where he studied for three years. 
Later he continued his studies in Paris until the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian war, 
when he returned to this country. He subsequently entered Princeton University and was 
graduated with the class of 1881. winning the civil engineer's degree. 

It was in the summer of 1883 that Judge Allen first visited Dakota. After reaching tlie 
territory he readily recognized the advantages which the new country offered to a young 
man and which made strong appeal to him. He determined to remain and after traveling 
over the state in search of a favorable location settled at Lisbon, where he has since made 
his home. Subsequently he took up the study of law and was admitted to practice in 1886. 
For some years he practiced independently and then entered into partnership with Hon. P. H. 
Rourke. with whom he was associated for some time. In 1886 he was elected probate judge 
and served for two or three terras and at a later date he became county judge with increased 
jurisdiction, remaining upon the bench of that court for a number of terms. He has filled 
various minor offices but his activities have usually been put forth along the line of his pro- 
fession and in 1904 he was elected judge of the fourth district court and through the inter- 
vening period of twelve years has remained upon the bench, widely recognized as one of 
the most capable and distinguished district judges of the state. Devotedly attached to his 
profession, systematic and methodical in habit, sober and discreet in judgment, calm in 
temper, diligent in research, conscientious in the discharge of every duty, courteous and 
kind in demeanor and inflexibly just on all occasions, these qualities have enabled him to 



52 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

take liist rank among those who have held high judicial office in North Dakota and made 
him the conservator of that justice wherein is the safeguard of individual liberty and hap- 
piness and the defense of our national institutions. Aside from his judicial service Judge 
Allen has been a member of the State Normal School board for several years and has put 
forth eli'ective and earnest cfTort for advancing the interests of those institutions. 

On the 1st of .September, I.SSG, .Judge Allen was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary L. 
Taft, of Ballston Spa, Saratoga county. New York, by whom he lias a son and two daugli- 
ters, namely: Grace, who is a graduate of the State Normal School at Valley City and is 
now a teacher in the Fargo city schools; Kathoryn, a graduate of the North Dakota State 
University at Fargo and now a teacher in the public schools; and Frank Taft, a soplioniore 
in the University of North Dakota at Grand Forks. 

In his political belief .Judge Allen has ever been a stalwart republican but partisanship 
is never allowed to interfere with the faithful performance of his judicial duties. In religious 
belief he is a Baptist, while his wife is an Episcopalian. Fraternallj' he is connected with 
Sheyenne Valley Lodge, No. 12, A. F. & A. M. ; Lisbon Chapter, R. A. M. ; and Ivanohe Cora- 
mandery, K. T. His life is an exemplification of the high principles and purposes of Masonry. 
Earnest efi'ort. close application and the exercise of his native talents have won Judge 
Allen prestige as a lawyer and jurist, a fact which is highly complimentary, for the state 
bar has numbered many eminent and prominent men. 



HON. E. H. IIOLTE. 



Hon. E. II. Holte, a resident of Noble township, Cass county, is a public spirited and 
progressive citizen who has been called upon to fill various ofl!ices of honor and trust, the 
duties of which he has discharged in a most capable and satisfactory manner. He deserves 
to be classed with those self-made men to whom opportunity has been the road to success. 
Opportunity lies before all but it taimtingly plays before the dreamer and surrenders only 
to the man of resolute will and well clclincd ])urpose. These qualities Mr. Holte possesses in 
large measure. 

A native of Norway, he was born March 2'^, ISfiO, a son of Hans 0. and Elcne (Bjerke) 
Holte, who were also natives of that country, whence they came to America in ISO".), mak- 
ing their way to Wilmington, Houston county, Minnesota. There they resided until 1878, 
in which year they became pioneer settlers of Noble township, Cass county. North Dakota, 
purchasing the farm u])on which their son E. H. Holte now resides. Subsequently the 
fatlier took up his abode in Fargo, where he passed away in 1909, while his widow still 
survives at the advanced age of eighty-five years. In their family were eight children and 
theirs is a remarkable record, for none have passed away. 

E. H. Holte was a little lad of nine summers when he accompiinied his parents to the 
new world and his boyhood and yoiith were afterward i)assed in Minnesota and in North 
Dakota, his experiences in early life being those which usually fall to the farm lad who 
assists in the work of the fields and divides his time between that and the duties of the 
school room. He accpiircd a high-school education and afterward gave his undivided atten- 
tion to farm work until 1891, when he started out in life for himself. He has since car- 
ried on general agricultural pursuits ami is now the owner of four hundred and twenty- 
two acres of valuable and productive land on sections 26, .35 and 3G, Noble township, Cass 
county. He is regarded as one of the enterprising, progressive agriculturists of this part 
of the state, having highly cultivated his fields, while to his farm he has added many fine 
buildings and other modern improvements. In addition to tilling the soil he raises stock 
and both branches of his business are proving profitable, for his interests are systemat- 
ically and wisely conducted. He is also one of the directors of the First State Bank at 
Perley, Minnesota, and is jiresidcnt of the Farmers Elevator there. 

Mr. Holte was married December 9, 1891. to Miss Alma Schow, a native of Norway and 
a daughter of Martin and Dorothea (IJjerke) Schow, who were likewise natives of Nor- 
way. In 1867 they emigrated to America and first located in Fillmore county, Minnesota. 
In 1870 they took up their abode upon a farm on section 24, Noble township, Cass county, 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 53 

whereon the father erected a log cabin. Both spent their remaining days here, the father 
passing away in 190G, while the mother, surviving for a few years, departed this life in 
1914. Their family ■ numbered nine children, of whom seven survive. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Holte have been born a son and daughter: Melvin H., who is a graduate of the college at 
Moorhead, Minnesota, and is at home; and Delia Esther Mathilde, who is also with her 
parents. 

The parents are members of the Lutheran church, in the work of which they are 
actively and helpfully interested and Mr. Holte is serving as chairman of the board of 
trustees. In his political views he is an earnest republican and has been called upon to 
fill various offices. He served for one term as county assessor, has been a member of the 
board of supervisors for many years and has also been justice of the peace, in which con- 
nection he rendered decisions that were strictly fair and impartial. For twenty years he has 
served on the school board and is a strong champion of the cause of education, believing 
the common school system to be one of the bulwarks of the nation. In 1903 he was elected 
register of deeds and by reelection was continued in office for three successive terms, 
making a most creditable record. In 1890 he was elected to the state legislature, where he 
served most acceptably, giving careful consideration to all questions which came up for 
settlement. He has ever regarded a public office as a public trust and it is well known 
that no trust reposed in Mr. Holte has ever been betrayed in the slightest degree. In a 
word he stands as one of the leading and valued citizens of Cass county, his personal char- 
acteristics winning him popularity, his friends in this part of the state being almost as 
numerous as his acquaintances. He has lived in the county since 1878 and has therefore 
long been a witness of its growth and progress, taking a deep interest in all that pertains 
to the general good. 



ORRIN M. PIERCE. 



Orrin M. Pierce, treasurer of the jSIinot Grocery Company, conducting a wholesale busi- 
ness, is one of the executive committee at Minot of the World's Permanent Peace Association 
and is thus active in C9ncerns which have to do with the welfare not only of city and state 
but of the world at large. He was born at Rock Island, Illinois, October 20, 1875, a son of 
Orrin S. and Belle (Milligan) Pierce, who were natives of Illinois, the former born at 
Elizabeth, September 6, 1847. He engaged in the steamboat business on the lower Missis- 
sippi river in early life and afterward became connected with the grain trade. He removed 
from Rock Island, Illinois, to La Crosse, Wisconsin, afterward to Winona, Minnesota, and 
still later to Minneapolis, where he now resides, being associated at the present time with 
the Atlas Elevator Company. He is a veteran of the Civil war, having enlisted when 
about seventeen years of age at Springfield, Illinois, in an Illinois regiment, with which he 
served for eighteen months. He was corporal of tlic guard which placed the guards around 
Lincoln's tomb. He was never wounded nor did illness confine him in the hospital. His 
wife, who was born November 29, 1850, passed away March 22, 1899. 

When fourteen years of age Orrin M. Pierce took his initial step in the business world, 
securing employment in the Second National Bank at Winona, Minnesota, in which institu- 
tion he advanced from the position of office boy to paying teller, there remaining for eleven 
years. He was afterward discount clerk at the First National Bank at Crookston, Minne- 
sota, for two years and later came to Minot, where he secured the position of credit mana- 
ger with the Minot Grocery Company and .still continues in that capacity. He has also 
become treasurer of the company, which controls one of the foremost commercial enterprises 
in this part of the state. Mr. Pierce has become financially interested in the business, which 
includes sixty wholesale houses in various parts of the country. The firm at Minot does a 
general jobbing business in groceries and fruits and employs a force of thirty people. Mr. 
Pierce is likewise an extensive landowner in North Dakota and his realty holdings include 
residence property in Minot. 

Mr. Pierce is a veteran of the Spanish-American war. He enlisted April 20, 1898, in the 
Twelfth Minnesota Infantry as a member of Company C, went to St. Paul and thence to 



;-)4 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Cliickuniuuga and was later detailed to the band. He was niusteied out November 0, 189S, 
and received an honorable discharge. 

On the 22d of December, 1904, Mr. Pierce was united in marriage to Miss Editha Babcock 
Payne, a native of Winona, Minnesota, and a daughter of George W. and Sophronia (Babcock) 
Payne, the former born in Virginia in February, 1842, and the latter at Homer, New Yorlc, 
in February, 1844. George W. Payne, who was successfully engaged in business as an 
implement dealer, passed away in Winona, Minnesota, while tlie demise of his wife occurred 
while she was visiting our subject in Minot. 

Mr. Pierce was reared in the Presbyterian church but attends tlie Episcopal church and 
in politics ho is an independent rep\iblican. He has never held a political ofTice, never solic- 
ited or asked for office nor entered politics. Fraternally he is connected with the Elks lodge 
at Minot, of which he has served as esquire. He also belongs to Harmony Council, No. 15, 
of the Modern Samaritans at Winona, Minnesota, and to the United Commercial Travelers 
No. 277, at Minot, of which he is an ex-guide. The interests of Mr. Pierce are broad and 
varied and his activities have been of a nature which have furthered the public welfare 
along many lines and the town of Orrin in Pierce county was named in his honor. Inter- 
ested in the great international problems which are before the world today, he has become 
a strong advocate of the peace movement and is now serving as one of the executive com- 
mittee of the World's Permanent Peace Association at Minot. He is now taking a most 
helpful part in the plan of educating the masses as to the futility of war. This association 
had its origin in Minot, with Mr. Pierce as one of the founders, and the movement is extend- 
ing largely. At the same time ^Ir. Pierce is one of the representative business men of his 
community, alert, enterprising and progressive, and in a word he carries forward to success- 
ful completion whatever he undertakes. 



WALTER R. REED. 



Several important corporate interests feel the stimulus and profit by the enterprise 
and business ability of Walter R. Reed, who is at once a man forceful and resourceful, 
recognizing and utilizing opportunities that others pass heedlessly by. Industry, close ap- 
plication and determination have brought him Into prominent connections and he is now 
known as an executive officer in various companies, including the Amenia & Sharon 
Land Company, of which he has boon president and general manager since 1912. 

A native of New England, Mr. Reed was born in Litchfield county, Connecticut, .July 2, 
1871, a son of John H. and Florence (Chaffee) Reed, both of whom were representatives of 
old New England families which were represented in the Revolutionary war. Walter K. 
Reed is a great-grandson of Eliakim Reed, one of the signers of the "Association," and a 
great-grandson of Simeon Edgerton, a captain of the Revolutionary war in the Connecticut 
line. The grandmother of Mr. Reed in the paternal line was of Knickerbocker Dutch stock 
and her emigrant ancestor was treasurer of New Amsterdam under Peter Stuyvcsant. tlie 
first Dutch governor of New York, and he owned a peach orchard where lower Broadway 
of New York city is now located. John H. Reed was a native of the Empire state, while 
his wife was born in Connecticut. She died when her son Walter was but nine years of 
age and three years later the father with his three children came west to North Dakota, 
settling at Amenia, where his father-in-law, Ebcn W. Chafi'ee. was the pioneer resident, 
arriving there in 1875. He became one of the founders of the Amenia & Sharon Land 
Company, of which he was made manager, continuing in that position until about the time 
of his death, which occurred in 1893. He had much to do with shaping the development and 
activities of this section of the state and was a most prominent and influential citizen. 
Following the arrival of Jolin H. Reed at Amenia he, too, became actively associated with 
the Amenia & Sharon Land Company, with which he continued until 1910 and since that 
time he has lived retired, residing with his daughter, Mrs. W. W. Brown, in Amenia town- 
ship, Cass county. He is classed with the representative and valued citizens of the district. 

Walter R. Reed was reared at home, acquiring his education in the public schools and 
also under private tutors in Connecticut. He afterward had the advantage of pursuing a 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 55 

I 

course in Obeilin College at Obeilin, Ohio, for three years, and when his studies were com- 
pleted he returned to Amenia and became actively associated with the Amenia & Sharon 
Land Company, of which he was made treasurer in 1892. He then bent his energies to 
administrative direction and executive control and in 1912 he was elected president and 
general manager of the company. He has since directed its policy and his enterprising 
efforts, keen business sagacity and sound judgment have been salient features in the 
success which has attended the undertaking that was established by his grandfather more 
than forty years ago. The company was organized by bond holders of the Union Pacific 
Railroad Company in 1875 and E. W. Chaflfee and Edward Gridley were sent to Cass county 
to locate lands. They selected all the railroad land in Amenia township and in Walburg 
township and six sections in Gill township. The name of the company was taken from the 
towns of Amenia, New York, and Sharon, Connecticut, where the original stockholders 
resided, and the company operates grain elevators at Amenia, Cliaffee, Mason, Newman 
and Ripon. In 1911 the company was reorganized under the laws of North Dakota and in 
1913 Mr. Reed succeeded to the presidency upon the death of H. F. Chaffee, who was one 
of the victims of the Titanic disaster. He is also the president of the Miller-Chaffee-Reed 
Company, holding and dealing in farm lands, the two companies controlling about forty 
thousand acres. His business activity also extends to other undertakings which are valuable 
assets in the development of this part of the state. He is president of the Amenia Elevator 
Company, operating twenty-five elevators in different parts of the country, and he is the 
president of the John Miller Company, a grain commission firm at Duluth and Minneapolis, 
which was established by ex-Governor John Miller, H. F. Cliaffee and Walter R. Reed. 
All these interests show Mr. Reed to be a man of resourceful business ability, possessing sound 
judgment and unfaltering enterprise and carrying forward to successful completion what- 
ever he undertakes. He ever recognizes the fact that when one avenue of opportunity 
seems closed he can carve out another path that will lead to the desired goal. 

In 1898 Mr. Reed was married to Miss Inetta Gowland, of Amenia. This union has been 
blessed with two daughters, Eleanor P. and Elizabeth. Mr. Reed gives his political allegiance 
to the republican party and as every true American citizen should do, keeps well informed on 
the questions and issues of the day, so that he is ready to support his position by intelligent 
argument. In fraternal circles he is well known, holding membership with Casselton Lodge, 
No. 3, A. F. & A. M.; Casselton Cliapter, No. 2, R. A. M.; Fargo Council, No. 1, R. & S. M.; 
Auvergne Commandery, No. 2, K. T.; Dakota Consistory, No. 1, A. & A. S. R. ; and El Zagal 
Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. He is likewise an Odd Fellow, belonging to Colfax Lodge, No. 7, 
at Casselton. Mr. Reed is also a member of the Sons of the American Revolution and he 
and his wife hold membership in the Congi'egational church, guiding their lives according 
to its teachings and at all times measuring up to high standards. They occupy a pleasant 
home in Amenia, which is attractive by reason of its warm hearted hospitality and good 
cheer and their circle of friends is almost coextensive with the circle of their acquaintance. 
Mr. Reed belongs to that class of men who have done much to further public progress, 
for in advancing individual interests he also promotes public prosperity. 



IRA D. WIGHT. 



Ira D. Wight, who is making an excellent record as branch house manager for the 
Stone-Ordean-Wells Company at Minot, was born in Ithaca, Michigan, on the 25th of 
May, 1878. His parents, William R. and Frances (Dean) Wight, were born respectively in 
Ohio in 1856 and in Benton county, Michigan, in 1857. The father engaged in farming 
during his early life but later removed to Chicago, where he turned his attention to printing, 
with which business he is at present connected in Rogers Park. He takes the interest of 
a good citizen in public affairs but has never aspired to office. 

Ira D. Wight, who is the elder of two children, attended school at Ithaca, Michigan, 
and at Cliicago and when sixteen years of age entered the employ of Wells & Company, 
wholesale dealers in shoes, with whom he remained for three years, after which he became 
connected with Swift & Company, of Chicago, for a year. He then went to Hancock, 



56 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Miohigaii, where lie was in tlic employ of E. M. Lieblein, a wholesale grocer, from 1900 
until 1908. In the latter yciir he became a representative of the Stone-Ordcan-Wells 
Company, dealers in wholesale groceries, and continued at Hancock for two years longer, 
after which, in September, 1910, he removed to Minot, North Dakota. He is now branch 
house nuinager for the Stone-Ordean-Wclls Company and his thorough knowledge of the 
business, combined with his natural ability, makes him very elKcient in that capacity. 
He has become recognized as a factor in the business development of the town and is num- 
bered among its valued citizens. 

Mr. Wight was married on the 20th of August, 1898, to Miss Frances Fletcher, who 
was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and is a daughter of James J. and Caroline (Kandall) 
Fletcher, both natives of Woodstock, Ontario, Canada. About 1875 they removed to the 
States and located in Iowa, where the father was engaged as a machinist for many years. 
Subsequently he removed to Rogers Pajk, Chicago, where he died in 1913. His wife passed 
away in 1908. Mr. and Mrs. Wight have three children. Florence Mildred, born .June 9, 1903; 
Ira D., Jr., born May 26, 1907; and William Reuben, born December 29, 1910, all at home. 

Mr. Wight is an independent republican but has never taken a very active part in 
politics. Fraternally he is connected with Minot Lodge, No. 1081, B. P. 0. E., with the 
Knights of Pythias and with the Ancient Order of United Workmen, all of Minot. He 
devotes his entire time to the management of the interests intrusted to his care and has 
increased substantially the business of the branch house of which he is manager. He is 
president and a director of the Minot Association of Commerce. 



HON. PATRICK H. ROURKE. 

Hon. Patrick H. Rourke, one of the foremost attorneys of North Dakota, Residing in 
Lisbon, was born in Norristown, Pennsylvania, October 28, 1854, and is a son of William 
and Mary (Curran) Rourke, who were natives of Queens county, Ireland, and of Pennsylvania 
respectively. When a young man the father came to the United States, settling in Penn- 
sylvania in 1842. Subsequently he married there and in 1856 removed with his wife and 
five children to Petersburg, Menard county, Illinois, where he resided until the spring of 
1870. In that year he became a resident of Logan county, where he passed away in 1879. 
His widow survives at the age of eighty-six years and makes her home in Lincoln, Illinois. 
She reared a family of thirteen children and she still does the cooking for the members of 
her household, being a remarkably well preserved woman. Mr. Rourke was an iron worker 
in Pennsylvania and after his removal to Illinois followed the occupation of farming. 

Hon. Patrick If. Rourke supplemented his district school education by a year's study in 
the Valparaiso (Ind.) Normal School. He remained upon the home farm until March 30, 1880, 
when he took up the study of law in the office of R. N. Stevens at Petersburg, Illinois. He 
was admitted to the bar on the 20th of !March. 1882, in Chicago aiul subsequent to that date 
became a law partner of his former preceptor, but on the 17th of May, 18S2, removed to 
Lisbon, North Dakota, where he opened a branch office for the firm, his partner, Mr. Stevens, 
remaining in the Petersburg office. After two years, however, or in 1884, he also went 
to Lisbon and the firm won prominence in professional circles. Mr. Stevens was a member 
of the constitutional eonventiim in 1SS9 and was subsequently elected a member of the 
first state legislature. 

The firm dissolved partnership in 1880. after which Mr. Roinke practiced independently 
for three years. In 1889 he entered into ])artneishi]) with the present district judge. F. P. 
Allen, which association was severed in 1891, after which !Mr. Rourke jiracticed independently 
for about ten years. In 1900 he formed a partnership with A, JI. Kvello and eight years 
later Sidney D. Adams was admitted to the firm and remained a member thereof for three 
years, at the end of which time he withdrew and went to Florida. Later, however, he 
returned to Lisbon and again became a member of the firm under the style of Rourke, Kvello 
Si Adams. They arc accorded a liberal and distinctively representative clientage and a 
thorough preparation of cases combined with an iiitinuitc knowledge of legal principles has 




HOX. PATRiav H. ROURKE 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 59 

biouglit Mr. Rouike notable success at a bar which has numbered many distinguished 
members. 

Mr. Eourke lias been married three times, his first wife being Mary Harter. For his 
second wife he cliose Rose Gardner and to them were born three children, Curran G., Grattan 
L. and Mary, all at home. In May, 1915, Mr. Rourke wedded Mrs. Fred Rimmerman, who 
in her maidenhood was Miss Betty Talbott, of Lincoln, Illinois. 

Mr. Rourke is identified with Sheyenne Valley Lodge, No. 13, F. & A. M.; with 
Lisbon Chapter, No. 7, R. A. M.; with Ivanhoe Commandery, K. T. ; and with the consistory 
and the Mystic Shrine at Fargo. He was made a Mason in Illinois, in the same lodge in 
which Abraham Lincoln was initiated into the order. Mrs. Rourke is a member of the 
Episcopal church. Mr. Rourke gives his political allegiance to the republican party and was 
the first city attorney of Lisbon, filling that office in the years' 1883 and 1884. He was 
elected county attorney and served for eight years and was next elected state senator, 
serving for four years. Prior to the expiration of his term he was appointed United States 
district attorney, in which important capacity he continued for sixteen years. He was 
mayor of Lisbon, county attorney, state senator and United States district attorney all at 
the same time. He understood fully the duties of each office and thoroughly met every 
requirement, making a most excellent record as a public official. For a third of a century 
his name has stood as a synonym of the progressive element in his community and his work 
has at all times been a beneficial element in the state. 



JUDGE KALITA ELTON LEIGHTON. 

Judge Kalita Elton Leighton, who since January, 1911, has served upon the bench of 
the eighth judicial district, is accounted one of the foremost jurists of the state. His com- 
prehensive knowledge of the law was manifest in private practice and his ability in that 
direction led to his selection for judicial honors. He was born in Putnam county, Mis- 
souri, September 13, 1871, a son of Jacob and Laura (Anderson) Leighton. The father 
was born in Illinois, in 1830, and the mother in Lee county, Iowa, December 3, 1847. 
Throughout his entire life Mr. Leighton followed the occupation of farming and in 
1877 removed to Iowa, where he continued to reside until his death in 1898. In the 
year 1901 the mother became a resident of Minot, North Dakota, where she still makes her 
home. During the early period of his residence in Iowa, Mr. Leighton served as county 
commissioner and at the time of the Civil war his loyalty to his country was manifest by 
his enlistment as a private of Company I, Sixteenth Iowa Regiment, which was attached to 
Crocker's Iowa Brigade. He served during the last year of the war and sufifered largely 
from diseases common abong the soldiers. He went with Sherman on the celebrated march 
to the sea and took part in several important engagements. 

Judge Leighton was an only child. He attended school at Allerton, Iowa, and for two 
years was a student in the Highland Park Normal College at Des Moines, after which he 
entered the law department of the University of Iowa, from which he was graduated in 
1896. He had resided at home until twenty years of age, after which he was away attend- 
ing school for two years, then taught school for one winter and in 1894 entered the Uni- 
versity, in which he prepared for the legal profession. A year after his graduation he 
began practice at Allerton and subsequently followed his profession at Mystic, Iowa, for 
two years. He then came to Minot, where he opened an office and continued in the general 
practice of law with growing success. Few lawyers have made a more lasting impression 
upon the bar of the state both for legal ability of a high order and for the individuality 
of a personal character which impresses itself upon a community. The zeal with which he 
devoted his energies to his profession, the careful regard evinced for the interests of his 
clients and an assiduous and unrelaxing attention to all the details of his cases brought 
him a large business and made him very successful in its conduct. He was then chosen for 
judicial iionors, being elected to the bench of the eighth judicial district, assuming the 
duties of the office in .January, 1911. His course as a judge has been in harmony with his 
record as a man and a lawyer, distinguished by a masterful grasp of every problem pre- 



60 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

sented for solution and by the spii-it of unfaltering fidelity to duty. The only other office 
that he has held is that of member of the city council of Minot for a short time, for he has 
had no ambition in the line of office seeking outside the strict path of his profession. 

On the 25th of December, 1901, Judge Leighton was united in marriage to Miss Belle 
Lockman, a native of Drakcsville, Iowa, and a daughter of William and AUie (Scantling) 
Lockman, who were also born in the Hawkeye state. The father, who was engaged in 
business as a merchant, passed away in Iowa in 1898, but the mother still survives and now 
makes her home in Jlinot. Judge and Mrs. Leighton have four children, as follows: Roy, 
whose birth occurred October 19, 1902; Will, born October 15, 1905; Inez, whose natal day 
was June 12, 1908; and Barbara, who was born December 2, 1911. 

Judge Leighton holds membership with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks 
at Minot and with the Modern Woodmen of America. In politics he is an independent re- 
publican, well versed on the questions and issues of the day, stanch in his advocacy of 
principles that he believes to be factors in good government and just as stronglj- opposed 
to any movement which he deems inimical to the public welfare. He holds to high profes- 
sional standards and ever endeavors to serve the ends of justice, his decisions bting marked 
by a strict impartiality and freedom from personal prejudice. 



JUDGE WILLIAM MURRAY. 

Judge Willfam Murray, of Minot, who is occupying the bench of Ward county, lias an 
excellent record as a jurist, being not only well informed as to the law but also possessing 
the necessary qualities of an impartial and an unbiased mind. His birth occurred in Locker- 
bie, Dumfriesshire, Scotland, on the 22d of December, 1853, and he is a son of James and 
Jennie Johnstone (Barber) Murray, both of whom are also natives of that place, where they 
passed their entire lives. The father was a woolen manufacturer and was held in high 
esteem in his community. They were the parents of four children, of whom our subject is 
the eldest. 

William Murraj' received his education in the schools of his native town but when sixteen 
years of age became apprenticed to a joiner. After completing his apprenticeship of five years 
he worked as a foreman joiner for twelve years, after which, in 1886, he removed to Winni- 
peg, Canada, where he followed his trade until the 8th of August, 1887, when he came to 
North Dakota and settled at Minot. At that time there were no houses there, only tents, and 
all around stretched the unbroken prairie. He became car carpenter for the Great Northern 
Railroad and remained with that company for eighteen years and four months, during whicii 
time he held the position of car foreman. While engaged in railroad work he devoted hia 
leisure time to the study of law in the office of James Johnson and in 190C passed the re- 
quired examination at Grand Forks and was admitted to the bar of the state. He at once 
began the practice of law and in time gained a good clientage. While still connected with 
the railroad he served as police magistrate for twenty -two years and as county judge for 
twelve years. In 1912, when reelected county judge, he resigned as magistrate in order to 
give his entire attention to his duties as judge. In the trial of cases he seeks to ascertain all 
of the facts on both sides and in his decisions is guided solely by the law applicable to the 
cases in question, allowing no personal considerations to influence him. His course has 
gained him the commendation of the bar and of the general public alike, and his decisions 
have seldom been reversed by the appellate courts. 

Judge Murray is a republican and believes firmly in the wisdom of the policies of that 
party. For five years he was a member of the board of education and for four years he held 
the office of city assessor, while prior to his reelection as county judge he was county justice 
for two years. His service as police magistrate covered twenty-two years and nine months, 
his long retention in that office indicating his efficiency and fairness. For eighteen years he 
served on the insanity board of Ward county, for ten years was a member of the board of 
health and for four years was visitor to the county farm, and there is no phase of public 
affairs in which he does not take a keen hitfiest. He is connected with the Masonic lodge 
and chapter and the Eastern .Star at Minot, and he has served in all of the chairs of the 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 61 

lodge and as secretary of the chapter for two years. He is also connected with the Elks, 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he has held office; the Knights of Pythias; 
the Eagles; and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is one of the oldest members 
of the Knights of Pythias lodge, has held all of the chairs and in 1898 was representative to 
the Grand Lodge of North Dakota. He was the first president of the aerie of the Eagles,' 
which office he held for four years, was for one year deputy grand president for the state of 
North Dakota and for three years was representative to the Grand Aerie. He is also 
prominent in the Ancient Order of United Workmen, being the first master workman and 
liaving served in 1908 as representative to the Grand Lodge. He is well known in fraternal 
circles throughout the state and in his life exemplifies the principle of brotherhood, which is 
at the basis of all of the above organizations. During the many years of his residence in 
Jlinot he has witnessed a great transformation as the little settlement of the early days 
has given place to the busy and growing city of today, and he takes justifiable pride in the 
fact that he has been a factor in bringing about the development of the town. 

Judge Murray was united in marriage on the 17th of July, 1877, to Jliss Sarah Cowan, 
who was born at Lockerbie, Dumfriesshire, Scotland, and is a daughter of Archibald and 
I'jlizabeth (Saunders) Cowan, likewise natives of that place, where both passed their entire 
lives. Judge and Mrs. Murray have become the parents of six children, namely: Elizabeth 
C, who is deputy county clerk ; Jennie .Johnstone, the wife of William J. Norbert, a traveling 
salesman for Foley Brothers & Kelley; Sarah, who became the wife of Fred Herrick, of the 
Minot Grocery, and who died May 30, 1908; James A., who was the youngest locomotive 
engineer in the United States and is now an automobile expert and who married Miss Jennie 
Hanson; Agnes, who died in Scotland at the age of three years; and William, who died in 
infancy in Minot. 



HENRY L. HANSON. 



One of the enterprising citizens of Prosper is Henry L. Hanson, who is there engaged in 
merchandising and is also filling the position of postmaster. He possesses a resolute spirit 
and unfaltering energy and carries forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes, 
so that his identification with a movement is an indication of its prosperous outcome. Mr. 
Hanson is a representative citizen of the northwest and Cass countj' numbers him among her 
native sons, his birth having occurred in Berlin township, that county, on the lltli of August, 
1886. His parents were Lars and Sena (Hanson) Hanson, both of whom were natives of 
Norway and as children were brought by their respective parents to the new world about 
1868. Lars Hanson became a resident of Wisconsin and afterward removed to North Dakota, 
where the family cast in their lot with the early pioneer settlers of Cass county. Following; 
liis marriage to Sena Hanson they settled upon a farm in Berlin township and later removed 
to Harwood township, where Mr. Hanson continued to engage in general agricultural pursuits 
until his death, which occurred February 5, 1893. His widow afterward removed to Harwood 
and in connection with her son Henry established a small store there. Later they were joined 
by Mr. Solmonson and purchased the business of M. Carmine, the enterprise being then con- 
ducted under the firm style of Hanson & Solmonson. That relation was maintained until 
January 1, 1912, when the store at Harwood was sold and the firm established their present 
business in Prosper, where they have since enjoyed a large and growing patronage. 

Henry L. Hanson was educated in the common schools of Cass county and his early 
training developed in him those traits of character which have constituted important features 
in his growing prosperity. He was only eighteen years of age when he became connected 
with merchandising as a partner of his mother and with the business he has since been identi- 
fied, as previously indicated. The firm has the only general store at Prosper, carrying an 
extensive and attractive line of goods neatly and tastefully arranged so as to attract the 
attention of their patrons. Their business methods will bear the closest investigation and 
scrutiny and their success is founded upon integrity as well as industry'. While living at 
Harwood Mr. Hanson served as postmaster for three years and has been postmaster at 
Prosper since taking up his abode in that town. The firm of which he is a member erected 



62 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

the first building in Prosper save a warehouse, and their mercantile interests have constituted 
an important feature in the jirowtli or" the town. In addition to his other interests Mr. Hanson 
is a stockholder in and secretary of the Equity Klevator & Trading Company of Prosper. 

Mr. Hanson was married March 15, 191(i, to Miss Xettie .lolmson, of Harwood, Cass 
county, North Dakota, a dauf.'htcr of C. A. .Tohnson, wlio was a i)rominent farmer and an old 
pioneer in Kayniond township, Cass county, Mr. .Johnson died in the spring of 1914. 

In his political views Mr. Hanson is a republican, giving earnest support to the party 
yet never seeking or desiring oilice. He belongs to the lodge of American Yeomen. His 
activities, however, have been largely confined to his business interests, which have won him 
place with the representative men of the community. Close application and energj" have 
guided him in his various lelations and the success whicli lie has achieved is the merited 
reward of his elVorts. 



MA.IOR M. L. EXGLE. 



Major M. L. Engle, farmer, real estate dealer, merchant and statesman, ranked with 
Xorth Dakota's foremost citizens and his demise removed from Xorth Dakota one whose 
value was widely recognized. He was born in Allegany county, New York, in 1843 and 
came of (ierniau ancestry. He supplemented a common scliool education with an aca- 
demic course and about the time that he leached young manhood the Civil war began and 
he became coniu'cted with tlie commissary of tlie Union army. After spending two years 
in that way he entered tlie odice of the American Express Company at Auburn, Xew 
York, and remained in that connection for several years. In 1875 he tumed his attention 
to merchandising and money loaning at Fricndsliip, Xew York, where he successfully 
conducted business for five years. 

In 1881 Major Engle came to Xorth Dakota, settling at Lisbon, at wliicli time there 
were not more than twenty buildings of any d(scripti(m in tl'.e town. The beauty of the 
location ajipealed to liim. however, and his unfailing business judgment foretold the future 
development of the rich agricultural section surr()un<ling the city. He invested in land 
soon after his arrival, being associated in the undertaking witli a brother-in-law. George 
\V. Robinson, now a jirominent real estate dealer of Bufi'alo, Xew York. They secured two 
sections near the present site of Englevale, twelve miles southwest of Lisbon, and they 
subsequently increased their holdings to two thousand acres. Mr. Engle became an exten- 
sive wheat grower, cultivating from seven hundred to one thousand acres of wheat, and 
notable success attended his <'ll'orts in this direction. Extending his labors into other fields, 
he became one of the organizers of the State Bank of Lisbon and was made a member of 
its board of directors, his o]>inions carrying weight in its councils and jiroving an clcnu'iit 
in the successful nmnagement of the bank. 

Major Engle"s sympathies were always witli the democratic jiarty but liis rare busi- 
ness judgment caused him to vote for the man best qualified for office rather than to guide 
his franchise through party alliliation. In 1883 he was elected to the board of county 
commissioners for a three years' term and in 1886 was reelected to that office, serving as 
chairman of the board for five years, during which period his marked business ability was 
manifest as largely in behalf of the county's interests as in the control of his private busi- 
ness affairs. A prominent citizen of Ransom county, speaking of him later, said: "Xo 
scheme brought before that board while lie was one of the members ever prospcreil if it 
had not the i-lenients of fair dealing for all the co\inty, and if it was a job got up to benefit 
some individual or clique at the expense of the community at large he killed it as dead as 
a mackerel no matter who was behind it. He was fearless and outspoken and as true as 
steel." In 1890 Major Engle was elected a member of the state senate for a four years' 
term and it was he who secured the passage of the bill giving the first and second appropria- 
tions of ten thousand dollars each for the erection of the Soldiers Home at Lisbon. He 
offered to put up a bond of fifty thousand dollars for the furnishing of a site, and his 
labors were directly resultant in establishing and promoting the .Soldiers Home in Lisbon. 
His popularity will be better understood when mention is made of the fact that he received 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 63 

the vote of liis party foi- United States senator in the famous senatorial contest of 1891. 
He was always recognized as a stanch and true friend and a generous enemy. The spirit of 
the man is indicated in the following incident. Once,' feeling himself deeply wronged by a 
man, and being told of an opportunity to retaliate, he said: "No, that would place me on 
his level." Such was his standard of character throughout life. 

Soon after becoming a resident of Lisbon Major Engle took active part in organizing 
the Masonic lodge of that place and assisted in naming it Sheyenne Valley Lodge. He 
became one of its charter members, transferring his membership from Allegany Lodge, 
No. 235, F. & A. M., at Friendship, New York. He was also a member of the chapter and 
commandery and was ever active in Masonic work. 

It was in 1874 that Major Engle was united in maniage to Miss Winifred Robinson, 
who has been equally active with her husband in the public life of the community, although 
naturally along different lines. She is very prominent in club circles and was one of the 
charter members and prime movers in the organization of the Woman's Club of Lisbon, 
which was formed in 1892 and which joined the State Federation in 1897. It was organized 
with a membership of thirty, of whom only three are now members. Mrs. Engle served as 
president of the club for two terms and has been vice president of her district of the state 
organization. She is also a member of the Civic League and on the advisory board. She 
belongs as well to the Suffrage League, of which she is secretary, and she has membership 
in Minerva Chapter, No. 63, 0. E. S., and with the Pythian Sisters and the Brotherhood of 
American Yoemen. Her religious faith is indicated in her membership in the Holy Trinity 
Episcopal church and her influence has been of far-reaching effect, characterized by help- 
fulness and uplift at every point. The married life of Major and Mrs. Engle was most 
harmonious in its purpose and intent, in its interests and accomplishment, and death sep- 
arated them on the 25th of April, 1908, when Major Engle passed to the home beyond. He 
was buried with Masonic honors, the interment being made at his old home at Angelica, 
New York. In his passing Lisbon lost one of its most public-spirited and beloved citizens 
and so highly was he esteemed and honored in his community and in his state that the 
news of his demise brought a sense of personal bereavement to all who knew him. 



THEODORE KYLLO. 



Theodore Kyllo, who is engaged in general farming on section 13, Raymond township, 
has a well developed and well improved property, owning and cultivating three hundred 
and twenty acres of land and for the past twelve years operating a threshing outfit. He 
is a native of Waupaca county, Wisconsin, born October 21, 1867, and comes of Norwegian 
ancestry. His parents, Peter and Gunald Kyllo, were both natives of Norway and came 
to the United States immediately following the Civil war, crossing the ocean on a sailing 
vessel which was five weeks in completing the voyage. They took up their abode in Wau- 
paca, Wisconsin, but afterward removed to Pope county, Minnesota, where they settled 
upon a farm. In 1871 they arrived in North Dakota, being among the earliest of the 
pioneer residents in the state. There were no railroads in this district at the time of their 
arrival and all around them could be seen the rolling prairies, giving little evidence of the 
handiwork of man. On his arrival Mr. Kyllo homesteaded eighty acres in Reed township, 
Cass county, at which time there were but three or four other settlers in the township. A 
little later he purchased eighty acres of land adjoining the home place and subsequently 
took up one hundred and sixty acres as a tree claim. To this he afterward added forty 
acres by purchase, so that his holdings embraced three hundred and sixty acres. With 
characteristic energy he began to till and improve his farm, which his labors soon converted 
into rich and productive fields. He lived upon that place until the death of his wife in 1896, 
after which he disposed of his holdings and subsequently made his home with his sons, 
passing away in 1907. 

Theodore Kyllo was reared under the parental roof, spending his youthful days in the 
usual manner of farm lads, his time being divided between the acquirement of an educa- 
tion in the district schools and work on the home farm. He was but nine years of age, 



64 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

however, when he began to assist iu the labors of the fields, plowing with a yoke of oxoii. 
He continued on the old home place until a year after his mother's death and while there 
residing he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land, which he afterward traded for 
the tree claim that had been taken up by his father. He never lived upon the tree claim but 
cultivated it and in addition rented three hundred and twenty acres. His life has been a 
busy and useful one and his work as an agriculturist has brought good results. In 1900 he 
located upon his present farm, which he had purchased the year before. He now owns 
three hundred and twenty acres of excellent land and is numbered among the substantial 
farmers of Cass county. 

Mr. Kyllo has been married twice. In 1899 he wedded Miss Olina Waugh, of Keed 
township, her father being Torger Waugh. one of the early pioneers of that township. She 
passed away in 1903, leaving one child, Richard L. In 1905 Mr. Kyllo was again married, 
his second union being with Miss Minnie Halverson, of Iowa, by whom he had five children, 
four of whom still survive, namely: Gilbert T., Archie M., Ethel L. and Pearl M. 

Mr. Kyllo exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the 
republican party and is somewhat active along that line. He is serving at the present time 
as a member of the board of township trustees and is also a member of the school board. 
He holds membership with the Sons of Norway and he and his wife are members of the 
Norwegian Lutheran church, to the teachings of which they are most loyal. They are well 
known in Cass ccmnty and the circle of their friends is constantly growing as the circle of 
their acquaintance widens. 



GODFREY H. KNIGHT. 



Godfrey H. Knight is one of the extensive land owners of Cass county, his possessions 
aggregating fourteen hundred and forty- acres. He was born in Columbia county, Michigan. 
August 20, 1839, and the intervening years have marked a life of notable industry, perse- 
verance, diligence and business integrity. These qualities have brought him substantial 
success, so that he is now classed with the men of aft'luence in his part of the state. He 
is of English lineage, his parents being Thomas and Ann (Wass) Knight, both of whom 
were natives of England, whence the}- came to the new world about 1829, settling in 
Michigan, where they took up their abode upon a farm that continued to be their home 
throughout their remaining days. In their family were ten children, six of whom are living. 

Godfrey H. Knight spent the period of his minority under the parental roof and after- 
ward worked for his father as a farm hand for a year. He had been well trained in tne 
methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops and in the public schools of the neigh- 
borhood had acquired his education. In 1863 he left his native state and went to Idaho 
looking for gold, spending seven years there. At the end of that time he returned to his 
old home in Michigan and in 1870 removed to Niles, that state, where he established a 
farm implement business, which he conducted for two years. On selling out he purchased 
a farm in Calhoun county, Michigan, where he carried on general agricultural pursuits for a 
decade. AL the end of that time he disposed of his farm and removed to Cass county-. North 
Dakota, purchasing land on section 23, Bell township. To this he has added from time to 
time as his financial resources have increased and favorable opportunity has been presented 
and he now owns fourteen hundred and forty acres, being one of the extensive land owners 
of the county. His farm is splendidly improved. The raw prairie has been converted into 
rich and productive fields which anmially yield golden harvests and his knowledge of con- 
ditions of the soil, the needs of various crops and the most scientific methods of farm work 
have resulted in making his labors a source of gratifying success. He is engaged in raising 
shorthorn cattle and Percheron horses and his live stock interests arc an important feature 
of his business. 

In 1874 Mr. Knight was married to Miss Lorisa Sutherland, who was born in New 
York in 1854, a daughter of Jarvis and Emily (Northriip) Sutherland, who were likewise 
natives of the Empire state but removed to Michigan at an early day. Later he took up 
his abode in North Dakota and passed away at the home of his son-in-law, Mr. Knight. To 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 65 

Mr. and Mrs. Knight has been born a daughter, Emily Ann, the wife of Shepard L. Slieldon, 
a resident of Fargo. 

Mr. Knight exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the 
republican party, of which he is a stalwart advocate. He has served on the town board of 
supervisors for a number of years, yet cannot be said to be a politician in the sense of office 
seeking, for he prefers to concentrate his energies upon his business aiTairs rather than fill 
public office. Fraternally he is connected with the Masons and has advanced high in 
Masonry, being now a noble of the Mystic Shrine. His life exemplifies the beneficent 
spirit of the craft which is based upon mutual helpfulness and brotherly kindness and he 
is prominent and popular among his associates in the fraternity. In fact he is held in high 
esteem wherever known and most of all where he is best known, for his record will bear 
close investigation and scrutiny. 



LYLE .T. THOMPSON. 

Lyle J. Thompson, the present efficient auditor of Ward county and one of the early 
residents of Minot, was born at Britt, Iowa, August 25, 18S6, and is a son of J. W. and 
Kate (Kimball) Thompson, also natives of Iowa. The father farmed in early manhood but 
subsequently removed to Britt, Iowa, where he engaged in the general implement and 
hardware business until 1901, when he removed to North Dakota and purchased land nine 
and a half miles southwest of Sawyer. He concentrated his energies from that time until 
his demise in 1908 on agricultural pursuits and gained a gratifying measure of success in 
that connection. He gave his political allegiance to the republican party and while living 
in Iowa was nominated for sheriff and defeated by less than fifty votes. His widow is 
still living and makes her home in Minot. To them were born five children, three of whom 
are living and of whom our subject is the third in order of birth. 

Lyle J. Thompson attended the common schools in Britt, Iowa, and high school and a 
business college in Minot, thus receiving a thorough practical education. When about 
eighteen years of age he entered the office of the superintendent of schools as a stenogra- 
pher and remained there for the greater part of a year, after which he became a stenogra- 
pher in the office of the board of county commissioners. After filling that position for about 
two years he became stenographer and bookkeeper in the Second National Bank, where he 
remained for about fifteen months. At the end of that time he accepted the position of 
clerk and stenographer in the county auditor's ofiice, in which capacity he served until 
1909, when he was ajipointed city auditor. He held that office for four years, making so 
excellent a record that at the end of that time he was elected county auditor, in which 
capacity he is now serving by reelection. He devotes his entire time to the discharge of his 
official duties and to the supervision of his mother's landed interests. His experience as 
deputy county auditor and as city auditor made him unusually well qualified for filling the 
office of county auditor and he has proved a systematic and capable official. 

Mr. Thompson is a stalwart republican and does all in his power to promote the suc- 
cess of that party at the polls. He is secretary -treasurer of the Minot Volunteer Fire Com- 
pany and is secretary of the Humane Society. Fraternally he is associated with Lodge 
No. 1080. B. P. 0. E., at Minot and has many friends both within and without that organi- 
zation. He is one of the energetic, efficient and public-spirited young men of !Minot. and 
his friends predict for him continued success. 



WILLIAM F. ECKES. 



William F. Eckes, cashier of the National Bank of Wahpeton. is a native of that city 
and has there spent the greater part of his life. He was born on the 7th of Jtine, 1886, a 
son of W. F. and Mary K. (Braun) Eckes, natives of Germany and Stearns county. Minne- 
sota. They were married in Stearns county but subsequently removed to Wisconsin, where 



66 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

they reniaiiied for a short time, after which tliey came to Noitli Dakota, being among the 
pioneer settlers of the state. Altliough the father was a poor man when he came to this 
state, he gained financial independence and at the time of his death was one of the wealth- 
iest men of his county. He engaged in merchandising and also owned a large amount of 
valuable farm land and in addition was the proprietor of a mill. His political allegiance 
ivas given to the democratic party and he was quite active in public affairs. His religious 
faith was that of the Catholic church. He jjassed away in 1890 at the comparatively early 
age of forty-two years, as he was born in 1854. His wife survives and makes her home at 
Wahpetoii. To them were born four children, three of whom are still living: William F. ; 
Alvina, who teaches music in a conservatory at St. I'aul; and Amalia, who is taking voice 
culture in Chicago. 

William F. Eckes was educated in the St. Francis School at St. Francis, Wisconsin, 
and in a business college at Wahpeton. When but seventeen years of age he became book- 
keeper of the Merchants State Bank at Breckenridge, where he remained until he accepted a 
similar position in the National Bank of Wahpeton. He filled that office until 1913; when 
he was made cashier. The bank is capitalized at fifty thousand dollars, has a surplus of ten 
thousand dollars and average deposits of three hundred and fifty thousand dollars, which 
indicates the place it holds in the confidence of the general public. Mr. Eckes is at once 
prudent and aggressive and so directs the policy of the bank as to promote the legitimate 
business expansion of the community and at the same time amply safeguard the interests 
of the stockholders and depositors. 

In 1908 occurred the marriage of Mr. Eckes and iliss Magdaline Pahl, a native of Min- 
nesota, by whom he has the following children: Kenneth, Lester, JNIagdaline and Marguerite. 

Mr. Eckes is a democrat in politics and has served as a member of the city council and 
as school treasurer and city treasurer. His religious faith is that of the Roman Catholic 
church and fraternally he is identified with, tlie Catholic Order of Foresters and the Knights 
of Columbus. He is a director of the Wahpeton Conservator}' of Music and of the Com- 
mercial Club and can always be depended upon to give of his time and energy to the pro- 
motion of projects for the comnuinity advancement. Although he is a young man and has 
depended solely upon his own rcsoiiicis, he has g;iined a measure of success which many 
of his seniors might well envv. 



WII.T.l.Ail R. LEMONNIER. 



William R. Lemonnier, who is engaged in the real estate and insurance business in 
Minot under the name of the Minot Cooperative Realty Company, was born in Carroll 
count}', Iowa, August 30, 1875, a son of Millard Fillmore and Anna (Goodaire) Lemonnier, 
natives respectively of the state of New York and of England. The father was a cooper by 
trade and for a number of years was employed in that capacity in the Standard Oil Works 
at Cleveland. Oliio. On removing to Iowa he engaged in farming, which occupation he has 
since followed. He is now. however, a resident of southern Minnesota. He has held a 
number of school offices but has never sought political office. His wife passed away in 
Iowa in 1884, when about thirty years of age. 

William R. Lemonnier, who is the elder of a family of two children, attended soliool 
in Cleveland, Ohio, for one year but received the rest of his education in Iowa. When 
eighteen years of age he engaged in farming in Minnesota and so continued for five years, 
after which he became an engineer, following that occupation for eight years. and during 
that time holding positions both as a stationary and as a traction engineer. In May, 1900, 
he came to North Dakota and took up a claim four miles south of Douglas. In about two 
years he received title to his land and then removed to Minot, where he was employed w ith 
the Russell Miller Milling Company for one year and with the Minot Milling Company for 
four years. At the >ond of that time he entered the real estate and insurance business, 
establishing the Minot Cooperative Realty Company, which is now one of the important 
concerns in its field in Minot. He devotes his entire time to the business and handles much 




WILLIAM R. LEMONNIER 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 69 

valuable realty and writes many insurance policies. He owns a number of good residence 
properties in the city and is one of its well-to-do citizens. 

Mr. Lemonnier was united in marriage on the 30th of December, 1898, to Miss Anna 
Green, who was born in Cottonwood county, Minnesota, and is a daughter of John 0. and 
Anna (Bjorley) Green, natives respectively of Sweden and Norway. The mother died in 
Minnesota in 1901 and subsequently the father came to North Dakota, where he passed 
away in 1913, not long after his arrival in this state. He was a public-spirited citizen but 
never aspired to office. Mr. and Mrs. Lemonnier have three children: Lind AVilliam, who 
was born September 26, 1900; Vera Anna, born September 10, 1904; and John Fillmore, 
born September 19, 1909. 

Mr. Lemonnier is independent in politics and has never sought office. His fraternal 
affiliation is with the Modern Brotherhood of America and he has many friends both within 
and without that order. His sound business judgment, combined with his energy, has enabled 
him to win a creditable measure of success in his chosen line of business. 



GEORGE WAKREN HANNA. 

George Warren Hanna, superintendent of schools at Valley City, was born in Jasper 
county, Iowa, July 30, 1873, a son of James Steele and Hattie L. (Hunt) Hanna, the for- 
mer a native of Ashland, Ohio, and the latter of Boston, Massachusetts. George W. Hanna, 
the youngest of a family of five children, attended the public schools and afterward grad- 
uated from Highland Park College at Des Moines, Iowa. He then took up the profession 
of teaching in that state and afterward spent three years as a teacher in South Dakota 
but later returned to Des Moines and became superintendent of the Oak Park school, so 
continuing for a year. In August, 1899, he accepted the superintendency of the public 
schools of Valley City, North Dakota, and since that time the schools have grown and 
developed in every possible way. At the time of his arrival there were but twelve teach- 
ers, while today he has thirty-five assistants and all of the school buildings now in exist- 
ence have been erected during his regime. At the time he assumed charge he had but one 
assistant in the high school, while today there are fourteen teachers in the high school, which 
ranks among the best in the northwest, its curriculum embracing forty subjects. Under 
the direction of Professor Hanna the work has been carried on most successfully. 

On the 20th of July, 1897, Professor Hanna was married to Miss Mabel Way, of Hli- 
nois, a daughter of L. A. Wa}'. She was educated in the Woodbine Normal School in west- 
ern Iowa and afterward taught in the public schools of Defiance, Iowa. The children of 
this marriage are: Warren L., now a student in the University of North Dakota, having 
previously graduated from the high school at Valley City and studied in the State Normal 
there; and Glenn A., also in school. 

Mrs. Hanna shares with her husband in his deep interest in the educational problems 
of Valley City and rapid strides have indeed been made since the first school was established 
in 1878 in a little log building, for the school buildings here would be a credit to a city of 
much large size and the standard of instruction is second to none in the state. They are 
also interested in other lines of development and improvement here, their influence being 
always on the side of right, truth and advancement. 



AV. J. ROBINSON. 



W. J. Robinson, who is conducting a lumber and coal yard in Wahpeton and who also 
has other business interests, was born in Ontario, Canada, September 5, 1856. His parents, 
John and Susanna (Wyley) Robinson, were both born in Ireland, the former in 1823 and 
the latter in 1837. The paternal grandfather, .John Robinson, removed to Ontario from 
Ireland and lived retired in that province until his demise. The parents of our subject 
went to Ontario in their youth and were there married. The father engaged in contracting 



70 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

and gained a gratifying measure of success in business. He passed away in Ontario in 
1802," but was survived by liis wife until 1910. He was an adherent of the conservative 
party in politics and his religious faith was that of the Methodist Episcopal church. To 
him "and his wife were born nine children, five of whom are still living: W. J.; Mrs. S. M. 
Gowland, of Fargo, this state; Mrs. A. F. Stewart, of Los Angeles; Mrs. F. R. Barnes, of Fargo ; 
and George A., who is living retired in Huron, South Dakota. 

W. J. Robinson was reared at home and gained his education through attending the 
common schools. He subsequently was associated with his father in the contracting business 
until 1879, when he removed to Fargo, North Dakota, where he engaged in that line of work 
for a year. He then entered the employ of William AVhite, a lumberman, and remained 
in that connection for several years, after which he turned his attention to farming in 
Lamoure county, North Dakota, where he remained for ten years. He took up land there 
and was successful as an agriculturist, but at length again turned his attention to business 
pursuits, conducting a lumber yard at Reynolds for three years. He then located in the 
town of La Moure, where he managed a lumberyard for three years, after which he became 
a member of the company for which he had been working. In 1900 he purchased an interest 
in the lumberyard at Wahpeton, where he is still living. The McCulloch-Robinson Lumber 
Company was incorporated in 1915 with a capital of fifty thousand dollars and with the fol- 
lowing officers: W. J. Robinson, president and treasurer; C. P. Robinson, secretary; John 
McCulloch, vice president. They operate a coal business in connection with their lumberyard 
at Wahpeton and also own a lumberyard at Colfax, in addition to which they own a hard- 
ware store there. All of their business interests are well managed and return thera a good 
profit. They have gained an enviable reputation for reasonable prices and fair dealing 
and are prominent in the business circles of their community. 

In March, 1880, Mr. Robinson was united in marriage to Miss Arabella Robertson, like- 
wise a native of Ontario, by whom he has four children: Charles Percy, who is connects 
with his father's hardware store at Colfax; Earl W., who graduated from the Annapolis 
Naval Academy in 1909 and is serving in the United States navy; Lillian, the wife ol 
Ernest Corchran, who is in the general merchandise business at Colfax; and Clarence, who is 
attending school. 

Mr. Robinson is a republican and has been called to office by his fellow citizens, 
having served for five or six years as alderman of Wahpeton and for seven years as county 
commissioner, within which time he served on the building committee that erected the 
courthouse at a cost of one hundred and forty-five thousand dollars. He is one of the 
leaders on the board of commissioners and has been instrumental in securing a number 
of improvements in the county. Fraternally he is well known, belonging to the Masonic 
blue lodge, in which he served as treasurer for fourteen years, to the Royal Arch 
Chapter, the Knights Templar Commandery, the consistory and the Shrine, and being also 
identified with Fergus Falls Lodge, No. 109:!, B. P. 0. E., of Fergus Falls, Minnesota, and 
with the Independent Order of Odd F'ellows, in which he is past noble grand. His religious 
faith is indicated by his membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. When he came to 
this state in early manhood his capital consisted of but fifteen dollars, but he was enter- 
prising and determined and believed that in this new state he would find opportunities the 
utilization of which would enable him to gain success. His hope lias been realized and 
he is now one of the substantial men of his communitv. 



OLE MALEN. 



One of the substantial citizens that Norway has furnished to Cass county is Ole Malen, 
who was born in the land of the midnight sun, .January 27, 18GR, his parents being Nela 
and Christina Malcn, also natives of that country, where they spent their entire lives and 
there rear(^d their family of nine children, ci'.dit of whom are yet living, four iu)W being 
residents of the United States. 

Ole Malcn was roared and educated in his native land to the age of sixteen years, wlicn 
in 1882 he bade adieu to friends and fiimilv and sailed for the new world, niakiu'' liis wa> 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 71 

to Ottertail county, Minnesota, where he resided for seven years. He tlien went to George- 
town, Minnesota, wliere he was employed as section boss by the Great Northern Railroad 
Company for eight years. He had come empty handed to the new world but he carefully 
saved his earnings until industry and economy had brought him sufficient capital to enable 
him to purchase a farm, at which time he made investment in land near Argusville, North 
Dakota. Through the succeeding six years his time and attention were devoted to its develop- 
ment and improvement, after which he sold that property and rented a farm in Noble town- 
ship, Cass county, upon which he lived for eight years. At the end of that period lie pur- 
chased the farm upon which he now resides on section 24, Noble township, comprising one 
hundred and thirty-nine acres, lying along the great Red River of the North. He has since 
devoted his attention to the cultivation and improvement of this property and his labors 
have brought good results. 

Mr. Malen has been twice married. He was first married in 1896 to Miss Christina 
Ohnstad, who was born in Norway and by her marriage became the mother of five children, 
Nora Matilda, Clara Annetta, Gina, Mable, deceased, and Estella. In June, 1906, the wifi' 
and mother was called to her final rest, her remains being interred in the Lutheran church 
cemetery in Noble township. On the 22d of October, 1907, Mr. Malen was again married, 
this union being with Miss Breta Berge, who was likewise a native of Norway but emigrated 
to the new world in 1903. Of the second marriage there are also five children, Anna, Oscar, 
Harold, Sigurd and Arthur. 

Mr. and Mrs. Malen hold membership in the Lutheran church and guide their lives ac- 
cording to its teachings. He votes with the republican party but has never sought nor 
desired office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon liis business affairs. His life has 
been active and well spent and his indefatigable energy and perseverance have been the 
foundation upon which he has builded his present success. 



ROBERT B. REED. 



One of the most important corporations that has contributed to the development and 
upbuilding of Cass county and this section of North Dakota is the Amenia & Sharon Land 
Company, of which Robert B. Reed is the treasurer. He is an enterprising, forceful and 
resourceful business man whose training and experience have qualified him to meet any 
emergency, wliile his energy and enterprise lead him to put forth efforts along lines that are 
directly resultant and beneficial to the company which he represents and to the district at 
large. He is a descendant of one of the old New England families, his birth having occurred 
in Ellsworth, Connecticut, July 23, 1874, his parents being John H. and Florence (Chaffee) 
Reed, who are mentioned in connection with the sketch of his brother, Walter R. Reed, on 
another page of this work. He began his education in the public schools of his native state 
and afterward continued his studies in scliools of North Dakota, eventually becoming a pupil 
in the State Agricultural College at Fargo, from which he was graduated with the class 
of 1895. He has the distinction of having received the first diploma ever issued by that 
college. 

Following his graduation Mr. Reed became actively identified with the Amenia & 
Sliaron Land Company, in which connection he worked his way upward. He was eventually 
appointed secretary and still later became secretary and treasurer and at the present time 
is filling the responsible position of treasurer of a company which is one of the oldest 
established corporations in this part of the state, beginning operations in 1875. since which 
time it has contributed much to the settlement, development and progress of North Dakota. 

In 1899 Mr. Reed was united in marriage to Miss Edith M. Varnum, of Sykeston, 
North Dakota, by whom he has three children, namely: Florence; M., Althea V. and 
Clarence R. In his political views Mr. Reed has always been an earnest republican and keeps 
well informed on the issues and questions of the day, but does not seek nor desire public 
office. He and his wife are members of the Congregational church and guide their lives 
according to its teachings. They display many sterling traits of character and to them is 
freely accorded the hospitality of the best homes of this section. In liis btisiness career 



72 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Mr. KoccI lias ever readily recognized opportunity, and while lie docs not possess that un- 
curbed ambition which often brings about erratic movements in business, lie has never 
feared to venture where favoring opportunity has led the way and his diligence and sagacity 
have been strong jioints in gaining for him success. 



KDCAR AIXEN PRAY, il. D. 

Dr. Edgar Allen Pray, phy.sician and surgeon of Valley City, was born in Afton, Washing- 
ton county, Minnesota, February 20, 186S, a son of Russell N. and Lydia P. (Van Slyke) Pray, 
the former a native of Esse.x and the latter of Herkimer county, New York. The paternal 
grandfather, Arba Pray, was also a native of the Empire state and was descended from 
English ancestors who came to America in colonial days. In the maternal line the Van 
Slykes are of the original Dutch stock that settled in Herkimer county, New York. Rus- 
sell N. Pray removed westward to Minnesota in 1855 and there followed the trade of car- 
penter and builder. He offered his services to the government at the time of the Civil 
war, but his health was such that he was rejected. After some years' residence in Minne- 
sota ho removed to Fargo, North Dakota, in 1877 and there remained until 1883, when he 
became a resident of Barnes county, settling on a farm in the outskirts of Valley City, where 
he remained until his death, which occurred in 1904, when he was seventy-two years of age. 
His widow is still a resident of Valley City. 

Dr. Pray was the eldest of their four children and his public school training was sup- 
plemented by a course in Carleton College at Northfield, Minnesota, after which he matricu- 
lated in the University of Pennsylvania and was graduated on the completion of the medical 
course with the class of 1894, winning his professional degree. After a year spent in St. 
Luke's Hospital at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, during which he gained the benefit of that 
broad and diversified practice which hospital experience brings he returned to North Dakota 
and has since been engaged in active and successful practice in Valley City. He has taken 
the degrees of Scottish Rite masonry, is a member of the Mystic Shrine and is also identified 
with the Knights of Pythias. 

In June, 1895, Dr. Pray was married to j\Iiss Frances A. Peake, of Faribault, Minnesota, 
a daughter of the Rev. E. S. Peake, a pioneer missionary of the Episcopal church in the 
northwest, and a sister of General A. P. Peake. The children of this marriage are: Ralph 
E., a graduate of the Shattuck Military Academy; Russell H.; Fiances E.; Lawrence G.; 
Margaret; and Dorothy E. 



AVILLIAM IWEN. 



William Iwen, an agriculturist residing on section C, Puish River township, Cass county 
is the owner of a valuable farm of three hundred and twenty acres, which he has operated 
continuously and successfully for the past twonty-four years. His birth occurred in Ger- 
many, on the 15th of December, 18C3, his jiarents being Fred and Caroline Iwen, who emi- 
grated to the l?nitcd States in 18G4 and located in Winona county, Minnesota. There the 
father passed away in 1873 and the mother afterward married .John Schlaet, a sketch of 
whom appears on another page of this work. 

In 1880, when in his seventeenth year, William Iwen came to North Dakota with his 
mother and stepfather and ten years later began farming on his own account as a renter. 
In 1892 he purchased three hundred and twenty acres of land on section 6, Rush River 
township, which he has cultivated continuously to the present time, the well tilled fields 
annually yielding golden harvests as a reward for the care and labor which he bestows 
upon them. He is a member of the board of directors and one of the stockholders of the 
Farmers Elevator Company at Arthur. 

In 1890 Mr. Iwen was united in marriage to Miss Martha Sommcrfeld, who is a sister 
of Julius E. Sommcrfeld, a prosperous agriculturist of Arthur township, Cass county, whose 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 73 

record is given on another page of this vohime. To our subject and his wife have been 
born five diildren. three of whom survive, namely: Edwin, William, Jr., and Elizabeth. 
All are still at home. 

Politically Mr. Iwen is a stanch republican and he is now ably serving in the capacity 
of school treasurer, while for about ten j'cars he was a member of the board of township 
trustees. His religious faith is indicated by his membersliip in the German Lutheran church, 
to which his wife and diildren also belong. He has always shown great interest in all that 
pertains to the general welfare and has been known as a public-spirited man who lias ever 
found time and inclination to cooperate in the movements for the public good. In all the 
relations of life he has been hon^yrable and straightforward, and his example is well worthy 
of emulation. 



PETER O. INGEBRIKTSON. 



The agricultural interests of Cass county tind a worth}' representative in Peter 0. 
Ingebriktson, who resides on section 5, Reed township. Moreover, he deserves prominent 
mention as one of the earliest pioneers of Xorth Dakota, settling in the territory when the 
work of progress and development seemed scarcely begun. He was born in Xorway on the 
12th of February, 1847, his parents being Ingebrikt and Carrie (Johnson) Lowek, both of 
whom died in Norway. 

Tlieir son Peter had spent his youthful days under the parental roof and had acquired 
a public school education in his native country. Favorable reports reached him concern- 
ing the opportunities of the new world and at length he decided to try his fortune on this 
side of the Atlantic. Accordingly in 1869 he bade adieu to friends and native country and 
sailed for Quebec, whence he made his way to Detroit in a box car. He proceeded from 
that city to Chicago and three weeks later went to Albert Lea. Minnesota, where he secured 
a position as clerk in a drug store. There he worked for about a year and in 1870 he ob- 
tained employment on the construction of the Northern Pacific Railway, the laborers being 
largely Norwegians. Mr. Ingebriktson, who had secured a fair education, was made fore- 
man of a crew and continued work in connection with the construction of the road into 
Moorhead, where he arrived on the 11th day of November, 1871. After the completion of the 
line to that point he obtained a position as clerk with the firm of Hubbard, Raymond & 
Allen, general merchants of Moorhead, Avith whom he continued as a trusted employe for 
four years or more. In 1878 he preempted one hundred and sixty acres on section 6, Reed 
township, on which he built a small franu' house and there began farming. After two 
years he bought sixty-eight acres lying between his place and the river and afterward added 
forty acres more, making his present farm one of two lumdrcd and sixty-eight acres. This 
tract he has converted into well tilled fields and his energy and industry have been rewarded 
with substantial crops which bring to him a gratifying annual income. In addition to 
his farming interests Mr. Ingebriktson lias been prominent and active along other lines. 
He was one of seven men who organized the Farmers Elevator at Harwood and for several 
years was a member of its board of directors. He is also a stockholder in the Fargo Ice 
Cream Company. 

Mr. Ingebriktson has been married twice. In 1874 lie wedded Miss Anna Hanson, of 
Calmar, Iowa, by whom he had two children, namely: Emil, who is emploj'ed as clerk in a 
general store at Prosper, North Dakota : and Carl, who is engaged in farming in Reed 
township. The wife and mother passed away in 1890 and two years later Mr. Ingebriktson 
was again married, his second union being with Mrs. Mary Christensen, of Fargo, North 
Dakota. Her father, Hand Palmer, emigrated to the United States in 1872 and located in 
Clay county, Minnesota, five miles from Moorhead. Mrs. Ingebriktson has one daughter 
by her former marriage, Ida, who is the wife of John Storley, of Reed township, Cass 
county. North Dakota. 

Politically a republican, Mr. Ingebriktson was the first county treasurer of Traill 
county but has declined other public offices, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his 
business affairs, which have brought him substantial return. However, he has not been 



74 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

iiniiiiiulful of tlie duties of citizeiisliip and lias cooperated in many iilaiis and movements 
for tlic general good. He is also a stockholder in St. Luke's Hospital of Fargo. He has 
manifested in his career nianj' sterling traits and is accounted a progressive and public- 
spirited citizen, well informed and one vhose life record is an indication of the fact that 
success may be won when there is a will to dare and to do. 



ROBERT E. HUELY. 



Uobcit K. Iluily, proprietor of a general store at Forman and also interested in tlie 
grain trade, in banking and in farming, was born at Benton Harbor, Michigan, July 14, 
]880. a son of William and Ella B. (Brown) Hurly, both of whom were early residents of 
Michigan. The father was editor of a newspaper throughout practically his entire life and 
in 1888 he established the Forman Independent, which he published for a long period. He 
passed away in March, 1913, and is still survived by his widow, who yet lives in Forman. 
In their family were nine children. 

Robert E. Hurly, the second in order of birth, was but a child when his parents re- 
moved to Forman, .'^o that his education was acquired in its public schools. He -worked in 
his father's printing office for five years and when twenty-one years of age he bought out 
the stock of S. F. Mullin, a grocer of Forman, and to that line he added a stock of general 
iiicicliandise and has since carried on the business with growing success. He now has a 
well appointed store, successfully managed and attractively arranged. His prosperity is 
attributable entirely to his determination, his enterprise and his reliable methods. He 
employs two clerks in his store and his trade is gratifying. He is also interested in farm 
lands, owning acreage property on section 31. Dunbar township, and on section 2S, AVilley 
townsliip. in Sargent eoiinty. He is likewise a stocklioldcr in tlie National Bank of Forman 
and in tlie Farmers Elevator of Forman. 

In 1907 Mr. Hurly was married to Jliss Bertha M. Dysto, a daughter of M. H. and 
Hannah Dysto, her father a Forman merdiaiit. In their family were nine children, of 
whom Mrs. Hurly is the eldest. 

In his political views Mr. Hurly is a republican and has served on both the town board 
and the school board. He belongs to the Knights of Pythias, tlie Modern Woodmen, the 
Yeomen and the Ancient Order of United Workmen, all of Forman. Whatever he under- 
takes he carries forward to successful completion and he is never afraid to venture where 
favoring opportunity points out the way. His ambition and energy have carried him into 
important business relations. 



T. F. CLAPP. 



T. F. Clap'p is one of the iiitc ipri.'^ing merchants of Grandin. concentrating his efforts 
upon the development of his business which has now reached substantial jiroportions. He was 
born in Ohio, on the 14th day of March, IS;", and is a son of Maurice and Laura (Greeley) 
aapp, the latter a niece of Horace Greeley. Botli the father and mother were natives of Oliio 
and there continued their residence throughout their entire lives. They had a family of three 
children, one of whom has now passed awav. 

T. F. Clapp was reared and ediicated in Ohio, sjjending his youthful days in the home 
of his parents, and after attaining his majority started out in life on his own account. He 
spent three years as a farmer in his native state, after which he sought the opportunities 
of the rapidly growing and developing northwest, coming to North Dakota in I8,S3. He took 
up hi.s abode in Cass county, locating on ii farm on section 30, Kenyon township, which lie 
purchased. He then bent every energy to the further development and improvement of the 
property and there lived for twenty-one years, his labors producing excellent results, as is 
seen in the highly cultivated fields and the substantial buildings which he added to his place. 
He still owns that farm and from it derives a gratifying annual income, although at the 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 75 

present time be makes his home in Grandin, where he is engaged in merchandising. On his 
removal to the town he opened a confectionery store, whicli he conducted for two years and 
at the end of that period he turned liis attention to the hardware trade. Still later he ex- 
tended the scope of his activities by adding a line of groceries and has been in this business 
continually ever since, dealing in both liardware and groceries. His store contains a good 
line of both hardware and groceries and his honorable business methods and earnest desire 
to please commend him to the confidence and support of the public. 

On the 18th of September, 1878, Mr. Clapp was married to Miss Cora A. Payne, who was 
born in Ohio, and is a daughter of Charles and Angeline (Strong) Payne, both of whom were 
natives of the Buckeye state and tliere both passed away. Mrs. Clapp is one of a family ol 
tliree children, all of whom survive. 

In his political opinions Mr. Clapp is an earnest republican, believing firmly in the prin- 
ciples of the party, although he is not active as an office seeker. He has served, however, 
as town supervisor and has been a member of the school board. He belongs to Yeoman 
Lodge, No. 290, in which he has filled some of the chairs. He does all in his power to further 
the moral progress and development of the community in w'hich he makes his home and has 
guided his life according to high ethical standards. His career is characterized by integrity 
and honor, winning for him the liigh remird of his fellowmen. 



HENRY BEAL. 



Henry Beal, living retired at Valley City, was born in Guilford, Maine, September 14, 
1843, the youngest in a family of eight children whose parents were Samuel and Esther 
(Herring) Beal, who were also natives of the Pine Tree state. Following their marriage they 
settled in Piscataquis county, being among its first settlers, and there the father cleared a 
farm and also followed fishing and other seafaring interests. He died at an early age and 
his widow continued on the farm, afterward becoming the wife of Hiram Stacey, who lived 
in the village of Foxcroft in the same county. She i cached the advanced age of eighty- 
two years. 

At the time of his father's death Henry Beal, owing to the burden that devolved upon 
his mother to support her family of small children, went to live with his aunt, Mrs. Lydia 
Peters, his mother's sister, at Pelhani. New Hampshire, there remaining to the age of eleven 
years, when he went to Lawrence. Massachusetts, and learned the painter's trade, which he 
followed until the outbreak of the war. When in answer to President Lincoln's first call for 
troops he enlisted on the 15th of April, 1S61, he had already had military training, having 
been a member of the militia. He was mustered in at Boston and with his command pro- 
ceeded to Washington, where the troops Avere sworn in for three months' service, Mr. Beal 
being a member of Company F, Sixth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, under Colonel Edwin 
P. Jones. They were quartered in the senate chambers in Washington until the arrival of 
other troops. This was the first regiment to reach the capital and at Baltimore they were 
mobbed on the 19th of April, 1861, four of the men being killed. For two weeks they re- 
mained in Washington and were then sent to the relay house to guard the junction of the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad where it branches off to go to Harpers Ferry. Later they were 
sent to Baltimore to take charge of the arsenal located there and a few days later after 
obtaining possession at that point, they were again sent to the relay house and shortly 
afterward were returned to Washington to do guard duty. On the 22d of July, 1861, the 
United States congress passed a vote of thanks to the regiment for the alacrity with which 
the men had responded and the patriotism and bravery which they had displaj'ed. They were 
returned to Boston on the expiration of their three months' term and honorably discharged 
August 2, 1861. Mr. Beal then went back to Maine and attended school during the winter, 
but still the war continued, and on the 1.3th of January, 1862, he reenlistcd, becoming a 
member of Company G. Second Regiment of Infantry, of the District of Columbia. He was 
sent on to Washington, where the regiment was held as a patrol guard, and there he served 
until honorably discharged owing to injuries which he had received in the performance of 
duty in the capital on the 10th of May, 1862. He then went down with the Sixth Maine 



76 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Iiifantiy in the employ of a sutler, and so continued until July, 1802, when he bccamo ill 
with malarial fever and was sent north. After six weeks spent in a hospital at I'liiladeliiliia 
he returned to Haine, where he recuperated. His brother, Melvin Beal, was a second lieutenant 
of Company F, Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, following his enlistment in response to tht 
first call for troops. Reenlisting, he bccamo a lieutenant colonel and afterward a colonel, and 
when the w'ar ended he returned to Lawrence, :Massachusctts. where he lived for sixty years. 
Ill the winter of 3 802-3 Henry Beal removed to Wisconsin, becoming a pioneer of New Rich- 
mond, 8t. Croix county, where he engaged in clerking. 

In September, 1863, Mr. Beal was married to Miss Emily Payne, the daughter of liis em- 
|)loyer, and to them were born three children: Angle A., now Mrs. \V. S. Emory, of Barnes 
in 1901 and on the 15th of August, 1908. Mr. Beal wedded Jliss Hattie Young, of Budds 
Lake, New Jersey. 

After his first marriage Mr. Beal continued in Wisconsin for two years and then returned 
count}-. North Dakota; Martha B.; and Esther, deceased. The wife and mother passed away 
to Lawrence, Massachusetts, where ho and his brother. Colonel Beal. formed a partnership and 
engaged in the painting business lor four years. At the end of that time he went to Maiiu'. 
where he embarked in the lumber business in partnership with his brother, remaining at that 
point for two years or more. He lu'xt establislied liis home at East Golden, Micliigan, where 
he once more conducted a lumber business and also spent some time as foreman of a large 
mill. Later he was in Wisconsin, where he engaged in lumbering, and in September, 1879, 
he arrived in Valley City, North Dakota, after which he homesteaded and engaged in farming 
for a few years. He then returned to Wisconsin, where lie took up mill work once more, 
but sufl'erod very heavy losses from a cyclone. Going again to Valley City, he has since 
made his home there and is now living retired. 

While in Wisconsin Mr. Beal was aiijioinled ])ostmaster of Haywood by President Harri- 
son and served for four years and was also city auditor in \'alley City for two years. He 
lias always given loyal support to the republican party and he stands for clean politics and 
good government. Kraternally he is connected with several organizations and is now com- 
mander of the Graiul Army of the Republic for the Department of North Dakota with the 
rank of general, an honor which he greatly appreciates, coming to him from his old comrade 
who were the "boys in blue" of ISCl to 180."). He has in his possession the Massachusetts 
modal which was given to each of the original ninety day men who enlisted from that state. 
In Masonic circles he has taken tlie degrees of the lodge, chapter and commanilerv and he 
belongs also to the Independent Order of Odd Follows and the Kniglits of Pythias. His fellow 
townsmen instinctively respect and honor him because of his upright life, his high ideals and 
his sterling worth, manifest in every relation. 



B. G. TKNNESOX. 



B. G. Tenneson, of Pierce, Tenneson & Cupli'r, the leading firm of attorcnys of Fargo, 
posaesBes in strong measure the analytical mind and keen disccrnnunt of the able lawyer and 
his progress at the bar has been contijiuous since he made his initial step in the profession. 
He has been connected with the practice of law in Fargo since 1896, the year following the 
completion of his university course. He was then a young man of thirty years, his birth 
having occurred on the 15th of February, 1865, in Trempelea\i county, Wisconsin. His 
parents, Peder an<l Dorothea (Gulbrandson) Tenneson, were natives of Norway, but were 
married in the United States. Emigrating to the new world, the father became a AVisconsin 
farmer and continued to reside in that state until liis death in 1884. He was married twice, 
Mrs. Dorotliea Tenneson being his second wife. She survives him at the advanced age of 
eighty-nine years and makes her home with her son in Fargo. 

Spending his youthful days in the home of his parents, B. G. Tenneson supplemented 
a common school education by study in the Curtiss Business College and in the Minneapolis 
Academy, where he completed a course in 1888. He afterward entered upon the study of 
law in the University of Minnesota at Jlinneapolis, completing his course with the graduat- 
ing class of 1895. The same year he was admitted to the Minnesota state bar and the 




B. G. TENNESON 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 79 

following year passed the required state board examination of North Dakota and was 
admitted to practice in this state. He remained for a year in Minneapolis and in 1896 came 
to Fargo, where he entered the law ofBce of Newman, Spalding & Phelps, with whom he was 
associated for two years. Leaving their employ, he next became associated with Edmund 
Pierce, of Sheldon, North Dakota, with whom he remained for five years, at the end of 
which time, or in 1903, the firm of Pierce & Tenneson was formed. They removed their 
headquarters to Fargo and on the 1st of January, 1908, they were joined by a third partner, 
A. W. Cupler, under the present firm style of Pierce, Tenneson & Cupler. They rank among 
the foremost attorneys in corporation law not only in the city but in the state and represent 
about twelve, of the leading corporations of Fargo. They also make a specialty of examining 
and perfecting titles and at the same time continue in the general practice of law. 
Mr. Tenneson and his partners are well versed in all branches of practice and they have won 
many notable cases. Mr. Tenneson enjoys well merited distinction as an able lawyer and 
at the same time he is a prominent figure, in financial circles as the vice president of the 
Northern Trust Company of Fargo and a director of the Scandinavian-American Bank. He 
is also a heavy investor in Cass county farm lands and holds valuable property interests. 

On the 1st of August, 1893, Mr. Tenneson was married to Miss Hilda Keeland, a 
native of Norway, and to them have been born three children, Clarence P., Norman G. and 
Agnes L. The parents are members of the Scandinavian Lutheran church and Mr. Tenneson 
is also a member of the Norse Society of Fargo and of the Sons of Norway. Fraternally he 
is identified with Mizpah Lodge, No. 39, F. & A. M., of Sheldon; Dakota Consistory, No. 1, 
A. & A. S: K; and El Zagal Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S., of Fargo He is likewise a member 
of the Knights of Pythias lodge of Fargo, while his political allegiance is given to the 
republican party He belongs to the Fargo Commercial Club and is interested in all of its 
plans and projects for the development and upbuilding of the city, giving hearty cooperation 
wherever aid is needed for the furtherance of the welfare of city or state. He is ever 
to be found where intelligent men are met in the discussion of vital problems and he is justly 
regarded as one of the foremost representatives of the legal profession in Fargo. 



GLUF KYIXO. 



Oluf Kyllo, who follows farming on section 31, Eeed township, Cass county, is of Nor- 
wegian birth but from the age of two years has made his home in the new world and from 
early boj'hood has been actively identified with agricultural interests, being now the owner 
of an excellent -farm property equipped with all of the conveniences and accessories of a 
model farm of the twentieth century. His birth occurred in Norway on the 13th of June, 
1864, his parents being Mr. and Mrs. Peter Kyllo, mentioned elsewhere in this work in con- 
nection with the sketch of Theodore Kyllo. They came to the United States when their son 
Oluf was but two years of age, so that his education was acquired in the district schools of 
this land, but his opportunities for educational training were limited, as his services were 
early required upon the home farm. When a youth of but fourteen years he made a hanc^ 
in the harvest field at a time when grain was bound by the workmen, as invention had not 
yet brought forth the machine to do this task. The haluts of industry which he formed in 
the early days have remained with him throughout the intervening years. He worked upon 
the old homestead until he could purchase a farm of his own, buying his first land in 1895, 
at which time he became owner of a tract of two hundred and eighty acres situated on sec- 
tion 31, Keed township, Cass county. He then bent his energies to the development of thi 
property and today has one of the best improved farms of the county. The place is well 
fenced and divided into fields of convenient size which return a gratifying annual income. He 
has erected good buildings and the latest improved farm machinery is used to facilitate the 
cultivation and care of the crops. 

In 1897 Mr. Kyllo was xmited in marriage to Miss Oleana Knudson, hy whom he had 
six children, five of whom .still survive, namely: Gorda S., Clara G., Helen A., Olga 0. and 
H. Lillian. Mr. Kyllo votes with the republican party and is now serving on the board of 
township trustees. He is much interested in the cause of education and is acting as a mem- 

Vol. II— 5 



50 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

the Minot Flout- ilill Company, rncorpoiated, of which he is the vice president and general 
manager. In the summer of 1915 he organized tlie Western Elevator Company, Incorporated, 
of which he is also the vice president and general manager. He is likewise a landowner, 
having a farm three miles south of Minot, but he devotes tlie greater part of his attention 
to the milling and grain business. The Western Elevator Company operates a line of ele- 
vators in North Dakota and the Minot Milling Company makes shipments to all the larger 
markets throughout the United States. This company manufactures flour of superior excel- 
lence, known as the Snow White, and the mill is completely equipped witli the most modern 
machinery and employs the latest processes. Steadily the trade has grown until it has now 
assumed extensive proportions and the success of the two undertakings is attributable in 
no small measure to the efforts and business ability of Mr. Bunnell. 

In June 1S93, Mr. Bunnell was united in marriage to Miss Rosenna Vice, a native of 
Ontario, Canada, and a daughter of George and Emily (Goulden) Vice, both of whom were 
born in England. The father, a foundryman and merchant, is still actively engaged in 
business in Ontario, but the mother passed away in the year 1890. To Mr. and Mrs. Bun- 
nell have been born eight children, as follows: Florence J., who is supervisor of music in 
the Bchoola of Portal, North Bakota; Edith Grace, a student in the State Normal School 
at Minot: William Harold, a sophomore in tlic Minot high scliool; Myron Goulden, a sixth 
grade public school student; Irwin Robinson, a fiftli grade pupil; and Howard, Wilbur and 
Claire, all at home. 

Mr. Bunnell is prominently known in fraternal circles, holding membership with the 
Masonic lodge, the Knights of Pythias, the Foresters and the United Commercial Travelers. 
His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he has served on the board of 
aldermen of Minot. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church and in its teachings 
is found the guiding spirit of his life, which conforms thereto in all of its relations. He is 
found thoroughly reliable as well as enterprising in business and progressive and trustworthy 
in citizenship, while the qualities lie displays in private life have won him warm and endur- 
ing friendships. 



JOHN BARRETT FOLSOJl. 



Wlien Fargo was entering upon an era of rapid development and progress John Barrett 
Folsom became identified with that section of the state and remained to tlie time of his 
death a prominent figure in the business and social life of his community. If the historian 
were, without preliminary effort, to set forth his achievements in a single sentence it would 
perhaps best be done in the words, the splendid success of an honest man in whose life 
business ability and humanitarianism were well balanced forces. 

Mr. Folsom was born in Ohio in 1837 and spent his boyhood in the southern part of 
that state. He attended the public school of Ironton until his thirteentli year and was said 
to be the brightest boy that ever attended tliat school, but on entering'his teens he was 
forced to put aside his textbooks in order to provide for his own support and began earning 
his living as a clerk in a country store. From that time until his death on the 6tli of 
August, 1912, he scarcely passed an idle day. In 1863 he accepted a position at an iron 
furnace and was connected with the iron industiy at different periods in Ohio, Kentucky, 
Tennessee, Missouri and Michigan, thoroughly acquainting himself with every detail of the 
business and continuing his activity along that line until he yielded to the lure of Bakota. 

In 1882 Mr. Folsom sold his interests in iron furnaces and came to Fargo, which was 
then in the midst of a boom. He there purchased property and immediately opened a real 
estate and loan office, meeting witli success in the business from the beginning. He soon 
mastered all of the details of real estate transactions and activity as thoroughly as he 
had the details of the iron business. Jlr. Folsom had the same kind of a mental picture of 
a quarter section of land in the region within one hundred or more miles of Fargo that a 
wideawake, enterprising real estate broker in the city has of its blocks and streets. He 
did not have to refer to maps or notes when a farm or an undeveloped piece of land was 
mentioned; the legal description of it immediately suggested a mental picture to tiim. If 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 51 

it were inipioveJ property he knew precisely how many buildings there were and what 
kind of a well there was on it, also the character and quality of the soil. To the day of his 
death he was a man of extraordinary mental and physical activity but as simple, as gentle 
and as kindly in his nature as a girl. Mr. Folc-om had no enemies; there was nothing in his 
nature or his actions to inspire enmity. By hi honesty, his kindliness, his helpfulness and 
unselfish attention to their interests he endeared himself to all of his business clients and 
associates and there is no man in all of the young state of North Dakota who has helped 
more worthy homesteaders to overcome hardships and difliculties occasioned by bad crops 
and keep possession of their farms than did Mr. Folsoni. 

In 1863 occurred the marriage of Mr. Folsom and iliss Lavisa C. Forsythe, of southern 
Oliio, and when death called him he was survived by his widow and a daughter, the latter 
being the wife of Major Matthew F. Steele, of the United States Army, who after serving for 
thirty years as a cavalry officer retired from active military duty in order to take charge 
of Mr. Folsom's business and estate. 

Mr. Folsom was one of Fargo's most public-spirited men and was always ready to 
give personal and financial aid to whatever was done for the betterment of business or 
social conditions of the town. He stood at all times for advancement and improvement 
and heartilv cooperated in those measures which were a matter of civic virtue and civic 
pride. Of his many good qualities not the least was his capacity for strong friendships. 
The simplicity and beauty of his daily life as seen in his home and family relations consti- 
tuted an even balance to his splendid business ability. The high ideals which he cherished 
found embodiment in practical effort for their adoption and because of the innate refine- 
ment of his nature he rejected everything opposed to good taste. 



HON. FRANK P. ALLEN. 



Hon. Frank P. Allen, judge of the fomth district court of North Dakota and a resident 
of Lisbon, was born in New York city on the 19th of December, 1859, his parents being 
Frank S. and Hannah E. (Benedict) Allen, both of whom were natives of New York city 
and descended from old colonial families connected with Revolutionary war history, so that 
Judge Allen is eligible to membership through both the paternal and maternal lines with 
the Sons of the American Revolution. In early life his father became a New York banker 
but for several years has lived retired and he and his wife, at the ages of eighty-five and 
eighty- four years respectively, are now residents of New York <;ity. 

•Tudge Allen was educated in the schools of his native city, of Connecticut and of New 
Jersey and afterward went with his parents to Germany, where he studied for three years. 
Later he continued his studies in Paris until the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian war, 
when he returned to this country. He subsequently entered Princeton Universit}- and was 
graduated with the class of 1881. winning the civil engineer's degree. 

It was in the summer of 1882 that Judge Allen first visited Dakota. After reaching the 
territory he readily recognized the advantages which the new country offered to a young 
man and which made strong appeal to hira. He determined to remain and after traveling 
over the state in search of a favorable location settled at Lisbon, where he has since made 
his home. Subsequently he took up the study of law and was admitted to practice in 1886. 
For some years he practiced independently and then entered into partnership with Hon. P. H. 
Rourke. with whom he was associated for some time. In 1886 he was elected probate judge 
and served for two or three terms and at a later date he became county judge with increased 
jurisdiction, remaining upon the bench of that court for a number of terms. He has filled 
various minor offices but his activities have usually been put forth along the line of his pro- 
fession and in 1904 he was elected judge of the fourth district court and through the inter- 
vening period of twelve years has remained upon the bench, widely recognized as one of 
the most capable and distinguished district judges of the state. Devotedly attached to his 
profession, systematic and methodical in habit, sober and discreet in judgment, calm in 
temper, diligent in research, conscientious in the discharge of every duty, courteous and 
kind in demeanor and inflexibly just on all occasions, these qualities have enabled him to 



82 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

ford as vice president and Mrs. Granger as secretary and treasurer, while all his sons arp 
members of the company. He first came to Valley City through the recommendation of 
"Uncle John" Russell, whose two sisters were aunts of Mr. Granger. His first year vra> 
spent in the employ of Dr. S. B. Coe, at that time proprietor and publisher of the Northern 
Pacific Times. In the years which have since elapsed sound judgment has characterized his 
business dealings, his enterprise has been guided by a progressive spirit and in all that he 
has undertaken he has won success. 

In August, 1891, Ml-. Granger was united in marriage to Miss Ella M. Gibson, of Che- 
nango county. New York, a daughter of Jacob Gibson, and their children are: Cliliord, 
who is a graduate of the Valley City State Normal and is now at home; Glenn, who is also 
a graduate of the Normal and is now in the real estate business with his father; Allan, who 
is being similarly educated and who has developed considerable talent as a musical com- 
poser, giving great promise along that line; Irwin, a student in the State Normal; and 
Florence and Leslie, also in school. 

The parents are members of the Methodist chui-ch and Jlr. Granger has served on the 
school board but has never had desire for public office. He is notwithstanding a good citizen, 
loyal to every public interest that promises for the welfare and upbuilding of the community. 
He manifests the same progressive spirit in relation to the general good that he does in his 
private business aflairs. 



FRED L. WICKS, PH. G., M. D. 

Dr. Fred L. Wicks, a most progressive physician specializing in his practice in the 
treatment of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, has been located in Valley City 
since 1909 and has an office splendidly equipped for the conduct of the most delicate work 
connected with his specialty. He was born in Albert Lea, Minnesota, March 2, 1885, a son 
of Edwin and Ida May (Harrison) Wicks, the former a native of La Salle county, Illinois, 
and the latter of Cincinnati, Ohio. The great-grandfather in the Wicks line was of Nor- 
wegian stock, while the Harrisons are an old colonial family, coming from the same 
ancestry as the Harrison branch which has furnished two presidents to the United States. 
Through the Doctor's aunt the family became connected with the Grant family of which 
U. S. Grant was a representative. 

Edwin Wicks was reared in Freeborn county, Minnesota, to which locality the family 
removed from Illinois. When a young man he went to Alberta Lea, Mirthesota, and there 
learned the general merchandise business. Later he turned his attention to the lumber 
trade in Dakota and is still in active business at Canton, South Dakota, being now sixty- 
two years of age. He has never been remiss in duties of citizenship but has borne his 
share in promoting interests of public moment and at the same time he has been a helpful 
member and generous supporter of the church. To him and his wife were born a daxightcr 
who died in infancy and two sons, the elder being Jesse Harrison Wicks, a pharmacist 
who conducts a drug store at Denton, Montana. 

The younger brother. Dr. Wicks, of Valley City, acquired his elementary education in 
the public schools of Salem, South Dakota, and afterward attended the high school at 
Windom. He next entered Redfield College at Redfield, South Dakota, and afterward 
became a student in the department of pharmacy of Highland Park College at Des Jloines, 
Iowa, where he won his Ph. G. degree in 1903. He regarded this merely as an initial step 
to other professional activity, for he then entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
of Keokuk, Iowa, and was graduated with the M. D. degree in 1906. Going to Chicago, be 
took post graduate Avork in the Chicago Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat College, after which 
he came to North Dakota and for three years was engaged in general practice in the 
northern part of the state, but in 1909 opened an office in Valley City, where he has since 
concentrated his energies upon the treatment of the eye, ear, nose and throat and along 
his special field has built up an extensive practice. He has a fine modern office thoroughly 
equipped for his work and he is in close touch with all the latest scientific researches and 
discovcriee. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 83 

On the 30tli of August, 1913, occurred the marriage of Dr. Wicks and Miss Maud Yost, 
ji Somerset, Ohio, a daughter of Owen Yost, an attorney of that place. They have one son, 
Edwin Owen. Mrs. Wiclis is a member of the Congregational church and he is identified 
with the Brotherhood of that organization. He takes a special interest in athletics for the 
young members. He has always been much interested in athletics, playing on the base 
ball and football teams when in college and still keeping up his interest, so that he is well 
qualified to advise and assist the younger element in their games. He knows that it is 
just as important to play well as to work well and that the balanced character is that in 
which recreation and work are given a due proportion of interest. Along the line of his 
profession his membership extends to the Shej-enne Valley Medical Association, the North 
Dakota State Medical Association and the American Medical Association. His own life 
constitutes an example and makes an appeal for strong, clean, honorable, energetic manhood 
and proves what can be accomplished when there is no waste of time or opportunity. 



JOHN J. COYLE. 



Among the successful attorneys of Minot is John J. Coyle, who was born in Forreston, 
Illinois, August 17, 1877, the youngest of a family of seven children born to the union of 
Bernard and Ellen (Mathews) Coyle. The father is a native of County Cavan and the mother 
was born in County Limerick, Ireland, but they were married in America, the father having 
emigrated here in 1851 and the mother in the following year. Mr. Coyle was engaged in 
railroad contract work in Freeport, Illinois, for a considerable period and also followed agri- 
cultural pursuits for some time. He has now reached the venerable age of ninety-four and 
is living in Freeport. In his early manhood he held a number of local offices and proved 
conscientious and capable in the discharge of his duties. He has at all times conformed his 
life to the highest standards of morality and has never smoked nor chewed nor used intoxi- 
cating liquors. He is a devout member of the Roman Catholic church and for fifty years 
has taken the collection every Sunday. His wife passed away in 1905. 

John J. Coyle attended the countrj' schools and the Freeport high school and then, at 
the age of eighteen years, became stenographer for the station agent at Freeport, holding 
that position for about two years. During that time he carefully saved his money, as he 
had determined to prepare for the practice of law, and when he felt that he was in a financial 
position to carry out his plans he entered the law department of the University of Wisconsin. 
While a student there he served as secretary to the dean of the law school and thus helped 
pay his expenses. He was graduated in 1900 and not long afterward became connected 
with the legal department of the Deering Harvester Company at Chicago, Illinois. After a 
year, however, he removed to Minot and entered upon the independent practice of his pro- 
fession, forming a partnership with George A. McGee under the firm name of McGee & Coyle 
on the 1st of November, 1901. After about three years this partnership was dissolved and 
Mr. Coyle was then alone in practice until 1912, when he took in 0. B. Herigstad as a partner. 
This connection was maintained until the 1st of March, 1915, when Mr. Herigstad was 
appointed assistant states attorney, and since that time Mr. Coyle has practiced alone. He 
has gained a large and representative clientage and is recognized as an able attorney. He 
adds to a comprehensive knowledge of the law a keen insight into human natirre, a logical 
mind and the power of convincing argument. He owns stock in a number of business enter- 
prises in Minot and holds title to two thousand acres of good farm land which he rents and 
from which he derives a substantial addition to his income. 

Mr. Coyle was married on the 29th of July, 1903, to Miss Gertrude M. Loos, a native 
of Freeport, Illinois, and a daughter of N. B. and Katherine (Ryan) Loos, who were born 
respectively in Germany and in New York. The father engaged in the manufacture of 
saddles in his early manhood but is now deceased. He served as alderman and as city 
treasurer and also held other offices and was highly esteemed in his community. His wife 
survives. Mr. and Mrs. Coyle are the parents of a son and daughter: Helen Lois, who was 
born on the 12th day of July, 1908; and Bernard John, whose birth occurred on the 9th of 
August, 1913. 



84 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Mr. Coyle is a republican and has held the oiEce of public administrator and of states 
attorney of Ward county. He is now serving as a member of the insanity commission of 
Ward county and in all his official capacities he has given the same care and thought to the 
discharge of his duties as he gives to the conduct of his cases in his private practice. His 
military record covers service as a member of Governor Sarles' staff with the rank of colonel. 
The principles which govern his conduct arc indicated by his membership in the Koman Cath- 
olic church. He is a charter member of Minot Lodge, No. 10S9, B. P. 0. E., and is an olTiccr 
in the Grand Lodge of Xorth Dakota of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is an 
advocate of Minot Council, No. 1150, K. C, in which he has taken the fourth degree. He is 
recognized not only as an able attorney but also as a public-spirited citizen and a man of 
sterling worth, and his personal friends are many. 



MAKTIN J. ENGESETH. 



Martin J. Engeseth, the popular and capable register of deeds of Ward county, is one 
of the valued citizens of Minot. A native of Wisconsin, his birth occurred in De Forest, Dane 
county, on the 37th of January, 1875. He is a son of John and Betsy (Grinde) Engeseth. 
both of whom were born in Norway. They came to the United States in their youth and were 
married here. The father continued to farm in Dane county, Wisconsin, until his demise in 
1909, and the mother died there in 1910. 

JIartin J. Engeseth attended the public and high schools of his native town and subse- 
quently entered Valparaiso University at Valparaiso, Indiana, where he was graduated from 
the business department in 189S. He remained at home until about twenty years of age and 
when not attending school devoted his time to assisting his father. In 1902 he arrived in 
Minot, North Dakota, and entered the employ of the Scofield Implement Company as book- 
keeper. He held that position continuously until elected to the office of register of deeds. 
He is prompt and accurate in his work, and his efficiency, combined with his courtesy, has 
gained him tlie commendation of all who have had dealings with the register's oflBce. He 
concentrates his attention upon liis ollicial duties but is also connected with the business 
life of Minot. as he is interested financially in the Lidstrom Furniture Company. 

On the 7th of June, 1900, Mr. Engeseth was united in rriarviage to !Miss Gertrude .John- 
son, also a native of Dane county, Wisconsin, her birthplace being within four miles of that 
of Mr. Engeseth. Her parents, Nels and Johanna Johnson, were born respectively in Norway 
and in Wisconsin, and are both deceased. 

Mr. Engeseth is a stalwart republican in politics, and his religious faith is that of the 
Lutheran church. Fraternally he is well known, belonging to the Masonic blue lodge, the 
chapter and commandery, to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias 
and the Elks, all of Minot. In the commandery he has served as secretary, and he is much 
interested in the work of all of the orders to which he belongs. He conforms his life to 
high standards, and the esteem in which he is generally held is well deserved. 



FRANK H. FARMER, V. S. 



Dr. Frank H. Farmer, who is successfully engaged in the practice of veterinary medicine 
*nd surgery in Wahpeton, is also serving as assistant state veterinarian. A native of Ire- 
land, his birth occurred on the 4th of October, 1864, and he is a son of William and Alice 
(Soughan) Farmer, both natives of the Emerald isle. In 1871 they came with their family 
to the United States and settled in Cambridgeport, Massachusetts, where they remained for 
eight or ten years. They then went to Ontario, Canada, where the father passed away in 
1912 at the age of seventy-nine years, as he was born in 1833. He was a carpenter and con 
tractor by occupation. In his early manhood he served in the Crimean war and he remained 
in the army until his emigration to the new world. For a number of years he held the ofTice 
of paymaster and at all times he was faithful and efficient in the performance of his duty. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 85 

Wliile at the front he was twice wounded. His religious faith was that of the Episcopal 
church, to the support of whicli he contributed. The mother, who was born in 1840, is still 
living. To them were born three children: John, a musician who lives near Niagara Falls; 
Frank H. ; and Mrs. R. H. Sawdon, of Spencerville, Ontario, whose husband is a farmer. The 
paternal grandfather, Frank Farmer, passed his entire life in County Cork, Ireland. 

Frank H. Farmer attended the common schools in Ontario and the United States, tl'.u 
acquiring a good education. In 1885, when a young man of twenty-one years, he came to 
North Dakota and settled in Grand Forks county, where he worked at anything that he could 
find to do. In 1889, however, he entered a veterinary school in Chicago, from which he 
was graduated in 1893. The following year he located in Wahpeton for the practice of his 
profession. Almost from the start he has been well patronized and he has gained an enviable 
reputation for the successful treatment of the diseases of animals. He devotes his entire time 
to his practice and to the discharge of his duties as assistant state venterinarian under the 
live stock board. He has also served as a member of the state board of examiners, having 
been elected to that position in 1895 and again in 1910, holding that office until 1913, and he 
is well known and highly esteemed in professional circles throughout the state. 

Mr. Farmer is a republican in politics but, although he loyally supports that party at the 
polls, he has never had time to take an active part in public affairs, as his large practice has 
demanded his undivided time and attention. He has not only gained a gratifying measure 
of success professionally, but has also won tlie personal goodwill and regard of those with 
whom he has been brought into contact. 



B. C. ANDERSON. 



The activity of many energetic, enterprising men has made North Dakota a gi-eat agri- 
cultural state. Cass county contains rich fanning land owned and occupied by various 
progressive agriculturists, among which number is B. C. Anderson, who lives on section 6, 
Pleasant township. He was born in Norway on the 19th of May, 1846, a son of Anders and 
ICaru (Anderson) Anderson. The maternal grandfather lived to the very remarkable old 
age of one hundred and three years. The parents of B. C. Anderson came to the United 
States a year or two after his arrival and about a twelvemonth later the father passed 
away, after which the mother made her home with her son. 

At the usual age B. C. Anderson began his education in the public schools of Norway, 
continuing his studies until he liad mastered tlie high school course, and while in his native 
land he acquainted himself to a slight degree with the English language. Attracted by the 
favorable reports which he heard concerning business conditions and opportunities in the 
new world, he sailed for America in 1866, when a young man of twenty years, and after 
landing on the eastern seaeoast crossed the country to St. Paul, Minnesota, where he hired 
out to a Methodist minister who was the owner of a farm. His first wage was fifteen 
dollars per month, with the privilege of attending school during the winter months. Mr. 
Anderson remained in the employ of the minister for a year, after which he secured a posi- 
tion with W. L. Benning, president of the first railroad built from St. Paul to Duluth. He 
worked around the house, took care of the team and drove the surrey for the family. After 
the completion of the railroad he was given a position in the engineering corps and served 
in that capacity until the construction of the Northern Pacific Railroad was begun toward 
Red river in 1869. 

At that time or about 1870, B. C. Anderson and his brother Andrew came to the west 
in advance of the railroad to look over the country, having heard much talk to the effect 
that "whereever the Northern Pacific crossed the Red river would be built another Chicago." 
In 1871 their brother John came to Cass county and worked on the steam boat Salt Creek, 
Captain Griggs, on the Red river. He was accidently drowned near Pemberton, North 
Dakota, and his body was never found. B. C. and Andrew Anderson were probably the 
first white men in Cass county. After their visit here they returned to St. Paul and B. C. 
Anderson worked on the same railroad on which he had previouslj' been employed. On the 
13th of April, 1870, however, he took up his abode upon his present farm and afterward 



86 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

filed oil a quarter section as a preemption. He was the first man in tlie townsliip to break 
five acres of land. He early became familiar with every phase of pioneer life and with 
every kind of work incident to the development of a new farm. He afterward bought 
school lands and railroads lands until his holdings aggregated five hundred and sixty acres, 
and he has resided upon his farm continuously for forty-six years. Great indeed have been 
the changes which have occurred during this period. At the time of his arrival one could 
look abroad over the country for miles. There were rolling prairies stretching far and wide, 
with little token of the plow, and with no barrier fences, spangled in June with a million 
flowers and in December covered with an unbroken sheet of dazzling snow. Today the 
countryside has been divided into farms which are the homes of a contented and prosperous 
people and the land has been made to yield richly, for the soil is naturally productive and 
responds readily to the care and labor bestowed upon it. 

In 1874 or 1875 Mr. Anderson was united in marriage to Miss Carrie Nilson, a native 
of Norway who came to the United States in 1868. Prior to her marriage she worked at 
Fort Aborcrombie for General Crittenden. Mr. Anderson was well acquainted with General 
Crittenden and his son, who were killed by the Indians at the Custer massacre. Our sub- 
ject and his wife have seven children, as follows: Albert, who cultivates a portion of the 
home farm; Petra, who is the widow of T. H. S. Egge and makes her home in ^Moorhead, 
Minnesota; Nellie, the wife of J. P. Larson, of Clyde, North Dakota; Laura, who gave her 
hand in marriage to John B.. Bye, of Greenbush, Minnesota; William, who cultivates part 
of the home farm; Henry, who lives at home and is engaged in farming in association with 
his two brothers; and Milla, also at home. 

In his political opinions Mr. Anderson has always been a republican and has closely 
adhered to the principles of the party. He has served as school treasurer for sixteen years 
and the cause of education finds in him a stalwart champion. He and his wife are members 
of the Norwegian Lutheran church and he was one of the prominent factors in the building 
of the church, which was erected upon his farm and which is the oldest west of Willmar, 
Minnesota. In other ways he has contributed to the material, intellectual and moral prog- 
ress of the community and no history of Cass county would be complete without mention 
of this honored pioneer, who has done so much to further the upbuilding of the county 
and who stood in the front rank in the vanguard of the civilization of this part of the state. 



ANGUS Mcdonald. 



Angus McDonald, the proprietor of the Dacotah Hotel at Minot, is one of the pioneers 
of the city, having arrived there when its population consisted of a few families. His birth 
occurred in Nova Scotia, Canada, May 7, 1865, and he is a son of William and Katherine 
(McCloud) McDonald, both likewise born in that province. The father was a farmer and 
was well known in his community. Although he took the interest of a good citizen in 
public afTairs, he never aspired to ofTice. He passed away in Nova Scotia in 1002, as did 
his wife, her demise occurring the day after he was buried. 

Angus McDonald received his education in his native land and remained at home until 
1882, when, at the age of seventeen years, he came to North Dakota and located at Fargo, 
where he worked at blacksmithing, which trade he had previously learned. After about a 
year he went to Lisbon, where he was similarly employed until 1884. He then removed 
to Minot and for about twelve years worked at his trade, after which he turned his atten- 
tion to other pursuits, engaging in coal mining at Burlington for about eighteen months. 
At the end of that time he became connected with the hotel business in ISIinot and in the 
fall of 1899 opened the Dacotah Hotel, erecting the present building at that time. For 
about seven years he rented the property to others but since the expiration of that period 
he has personally conducted the hotel. He understands the business thoroughly and spares 
no effort in providing for the comfort and convenience of his guests. As the prices are 
reasonable and the service excellent, the hotel has gained an excellent reputation and is 
well patronized. 

Mr. McDonald was married in March, 1888, to Miss Belle Currie, a native of Toronto, 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 87 

Canada, and a daughter of Malcolm and Katherine Cunie. both of whom passed their entire 
lives in that city. To this union has been born a daughter, Sibyl K., who is a graduate of the 
Chicago Musical College at Chicago. 

Mr. McDonald is a republican and in pioneer days served as deputy sheriff, discharging 
in an able manner the duties devolving upon him. He was also for a number of years a 
member of the Minot city council. He was reared in the Presbyterian church and frater- 
nally he is identified with the Knights of Pythias, in which he has passed through all the 
chairs. These associations indicate the principles which have governed his life and which 
have gained him the respect of all who have come in contact with him. He is popular 
personally and is recognized as a factor in the business growth of Minot. 



HON. JOHN E. PAULSON. 



Hon. John E. Paulson, senator from Traill county and one of its foremost business 
men, has been connected wifli commercial interests in Hillsboro since 1880. His activities 
have been an element in the material development of the city and a factor in promoting 
public progress and prosperity. He was born in Carver county, Minnesota, March 3, 185G, 
a son of Henry and Johanna (Person) Paulson, the former a native of Grue, Norway, and 
the latter of Skane, Sweden. It was in the year 1850 that the father crossed the Atlantic 
and two years afterward the mother made the voyage. They were pioneer farming people 
of Minnesota. Mr. Paulson took up his abode at Carver when he arrived in the new world, 
but his wife became a resident of St. Paul. They were married in 1854 and settled on a farm 
in Carver county, where he resided for almost three decades or until 1883, when he came to 
North Dakota, establishing his home in Eldorado township, Traill county. There he resided 
up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1899, and in the interim success attended 
his efforts in large measure and he became the owner of eight hundred acres of rich and 
valuable land. He had long survived his wife, who passed away in Minnesota in 1874. 

John E. Paulson was reared under the parental roof and supplemented his public 
school education by study in the Gustavus Adolphus College, then located at Carver, Minne- 
sota, but now at St. Peter, Minnesota. In 1877 he came to North Dakota, reaching Traill 
county on the 9th of August. He became a resident of Caledonia, then the only town of 
any consequence in the county, and secured a position in a mercantile and implement house 
as a clerk. A year later he embarked in merchandising on his own account at Caledonia 
and afterward extended the scope of his business to include implements. In the fall of 
1880 he removed his stock to Hillsboro, where the business has been developed into one of 
the most important commercial enterprises of Traill county. In 1891 he erected one of the 
largest business blocks in the city and he carries a very extensive line of goods, so that 
lie is able to meet the varied demands of the public. He has ever recognized that satisfied 
customers are the best advertisement and his energy, close application and reliable dealing 
have ever been recognized as salient features in his growing success. He has also become a 
stockholder and is one of the board of directors of the First National Bank of Hillsboro, 
with which he has been identified from its organization. 

In January, 1881, Mr. Paulson was united in marriage to Miss Mabel D. King, her 
father being James S. King, a retired farmer residing in Hillsboro. To them have been 
born three children, two of whom survive, namely: Agnes H., the wife of R. G. Grant, of 
Hillsboro; and Herbert H., who is employed in his father's store. 

Fraternally Mr. Paulson is connected with Hillsboro Lodge, No. 10, F. & A. M., and 
has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Eite in Dakota Consistory, No. 1, S. 
P. R. S., of Fargo. He is likewise a member of El Zagal Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S., and in 
October, 1915, the honorary thirty-third degree was confen-ed upon him in Fargo. His 
wife is a member of the Congregational chiirch and socially they are prominent, having 
an extensive circle of friends not only in Traill county, but also elsewhere in the state. In 
his political views Mr. Paulson has ever been a republican, has served as chairman of the 
republican central committee of Traill county for several years and is a member of the 
state central committee. He filled the office of city alderman for several terms and was 



88 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

for three terms maj-or of Hillsboro, giving to the city a businesslike, progressive and 
public spirited administration. Still higher political honors awaited him, however, for in 
1914 he was chosen senator from his district and is now connected with the upper house 
of the legislative body of North Dakota, where he is serving on a number of important 
committees. He has been connected with considerable important legislation and his cITorta 
are of value in furthering the best interests of the commonwealth. 



WILLIAM Mcdonald. 



William McDonald, who carries on general farming, makes his home on section 10, 
Gardner township, Cass county, where he has valuable and attractive property that includes 
all the accessories and equipments of the model farm of the twentieth century. A native 
of Canada, he was born September 22, 1853. and is a brother of Alexander McDonald, in 
connection with whose sketch on another page of this work mention is made of the family. 
At the usual age he began his education in the schools of Canada and when his textbooks 
were put aside he turned his attention to the carpenter's trade, which he followed until he 
came to North Dakota in 1879. He was then a young man of twenty-six years. He took 
up a homestead claim, for Cass county was then upon the western frontier and much of 
the land was still in possession of the government. The tract which he secured was situated 
on section 10, Gardner township, and not a furrow had been turned nor an improvement 
made upon the place, but with characteristic energy he began its development and after 
breaking the sod planted the fields and in due time gathered good crops. As the years 
have passed he has erected substantial buildings and has also planted a fine growth of 
trees which constitutes an important and attractive feature of his place. As his financial 
resources have increased he has added to his property from time to time by further pur- 
chase and now owns six hundred and fifty acres of land constituting one of the fine farms 
of this part of the state. Everything about the place is indicative of hi.s earnest care, 
capable management and practical and progressive methods. In addition to his other 
interests he is a stockholder in the Farmers Elevator Company at Gardner. 

In 1880 Mr. McDonald was united in marriage to Miss Amanda Caldwell, a native of 
Canada, by whom he has two sons: .John A., who married Miss Irma Cook and has one 
child and who is now a resident of Wyoming; and Frank A., at home. Mrs. McDonald 
passed away in 1887 and in the spring of 1893 Mr. McDonald married Jane Porter, of 
Canada. 

Mr. and Mrs. McDonald hold membership in the Congregational church, in which he ia 
serving as one of the deacons. He takes a helpful part in the work of the church and con- 
tributes liberally to its support. Politically he is a republican and for more than twenty 
years has filled the office of assessor, while for over thirty years he has been on the school 
board in his district. His interest centers in all those things which tend to advance the 
welfare and promote the growth and prosperity of the community in which he lives. He 
is indeed a public-spirited and progressive citizen and his worth is widely acknowledged 
throughout Cass county. 



JOHN J. NEDRELOE. 



John J. Nedreloe, who took office as sheriff of Ward county in January. 1915, has 
gained the commendation of all law-abiding citizens because of the capable and fearless 
manner in which he has discharged his duties. He has resided in this county since 1904, 
making his home in Kenmare until he removed to Minot. His birth occurred in Crawford 
county, Wisconsin, on the 27th of December, 1875, and he is a son of Jens and Rangnild 
(Olson) Nedreloe, both of whom were born in the vicinity of Bergen. Norway. In 1865 
they emigrated to the United States and for tliiee years resided in Iowa, after which they 
removed to Wisconsin, where the father passed away in May, 1913. He was a farmer 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 89 

by occupation, gained a gratifying measure of success, was well known in his community 
and held a number of township offices. His wife, who survives, still lives in Crawford 
county, Wisconsin. 

John J. Nedreloe, who is ninth in order of birth in a family of ten children, attended 
the public schools, was later a student in the normal school at Decorah, Iowa, and after- 
wards took a course in a business college at that place. When twenty years of age he 
left home and went to North Dakota, remaining three years, then returned to Mount Ster- 
ling, AVisconsin, where he became connected with a store. Four years later, or in 1901, he 
removed to South Dakota, remained there for several months and then located in Courtenay, 
North Dakota, later settling in Kenmare, Ward county. He engaged in the livery business 
there until he was elected to the office of sheriff, in which capacity he has served since 
January 4, 1915. He discharges his duties faithfully and holds the respect of all who have 
come in contact with his office. AVhile he enforces the law strictly, he treats the prisoners 
in the jail fairly and is in all respects an excellent sheriff. He has great faith in the future 
of North Dakota and has invested in valuable farm land in the state. 

Mr. Nedreloe was married on the 21st of August, 1915, to Miss Helen Anderson, who 
was born in Christiania, Norway. She lost her father when but eight years of age, but 
her mother is still living and still resides in that country. Mrs. Nedreloe emigrated to the 
United States in 1907, but in 1914 returned to her native land on a visit. Mr. and Mrs. 
Nedreloe have one child, Catharine, born May 19, 1916. 

Mr. Nedreloe is a stalwart republican in politics and believes that its policies are 
based upon sound principles of government. He is a member of the First Lutheran church 
and in all relations of life seeks to conform his conduct to the highest standards of ethics. 



EDWARD D. KELLEY. 



Edward D. Kelley, now engaged in the ice business and in farming, is one of the well 
known citizens of Minot and was formerly sheriff of Ward county. During his incumbency 
in tliat office labor troubles occurred in Minot which tested severely his soundness of judg- 
ment and his fairness, but he proved himself equal to the task of restoring order. A native 
of Wisconsin, he was born in Winnebago county on the 4th of October, 1864, the tenth 
child in a family of twelve children, whose parents were Richard and Ann (Norent) Kelley. 
The father was born on Prince Edward Island. Canada, but the mother was a native of 
Ireland. He was a farmer and followed that occupation in W^isconsin, where he passed away 
in 1872. Eleven years later his wife removed to this state and located at Larimore, North 
Dakota, where she resided until her demise, which occurred in 1910. 

Edward D. Kelley left home when eleven years of age and worked for his board and 
the privilege of attending school during the winters, while the summer months were 
devoted entirely to farm work. After passing about three years in this manner he went 
into the lumber woods of Wisconsin and while there was employed for some time as a log 
driver on the Flambeau river. Upon leaving the Badger state in the fall of 1883 he removed 
to Larimore, North Dakota, where he engaged in farming for a short time, but in 1886 he 
came to Minot, buying buffalo bones on the way. After his arrival in Minot he engaged in 
the retail liquor business for three or four years and during that time he purchased farm 
land and also dealt in cattle to some extent. At length he disposed of the liquor business 
and turned his attention to general merchandising, with wliich he was connected for about 
four years, but in 1892 ho bought the business of the Minot Ice Company, which he still 
owns and conducts. He has always given some attention to farming since his removal to 
this state and in 1915 raised five hundred acres of wheat and oats. The oversight of the 
operation of his farm and the management of his ice business demand his entire time and 
attention and he derives a giatifying income from these interests. He is also a stockholder 
in the Union National Bank. 

Mr. Kelley was married April 24, 1894. to Miss Elizabeth Martin, who was born in 
Waushara county, Wisconsin, near Poy Sippi, and is a daughter of Patrick and Ellen 
(ilahoney) Martin. The father engaged in farming and continued to reside in Wisconsin 



90 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

until his demise. Jlr. and Mis. Kclley liave tliroe children: Marie Ellen and Genevieve, 
both at home; and Thomas X., who is attending the local schools. 

Mr. Kellcj" gives his political allegicnce to the republican party and served for four years 
as sheriir of Ward county, his term expiring on the )st of January, I'JIS. He held that 
office at the time of the trouble with the Industrial Workers of the World at Minot and 
while restoring order was in constant communication with the governor, who approved his 
every move. By his course he won the hearty commendation of all law-abiding citizens and 
proved himself both capable and fearless. He was a member of the first city council and 
has served on that body several times since, in which capacity he has always done all in 
his power to promote the general welfare. He belongs to the Elks and the Knights of 
Pythias and has many friends both within and without those organizations. His religious 
faith is that of the Roman Catholic church, wliose work he furthers in every way possible. 



GILBERT E. EAMSTAD. 



One of the enterprising and prosperous farmers of Pleasant township, Cass county, is 
Gilbert L. Ramstad, who is living on section 10, and who belongs to that class of substantial 
citizens that Korwaj^ has furnished to the new world and to whom is largely due the 
development and upbuilding of Jlinnesota and the Dakotas. He was born in Korway on 
the 21st of February, 1856, and is a brother of A. L. Ramstad, in whose sketch on another 
page of this work is given an account of their parents. He was a little lad of twelve years 
when the family crossed the Atlantic to the United States, making the voyage in 1869. He 
had previously attended school in Norway and after coming to the new world he worked on 
a farm in Houston county, Minnesota, until ho reached his twenty-first year. In 1877 he 
arrived in North Dakota and took up his abode upon his present farm, where he has now 
lived for thirty-nine years, entering his land as a homestead claim. To his original holdings 
he has added until he now owns two hundred acres, constituting a rich and productive farm 
from which he annually gathers substantial harvests. He has added to his place all the 
modern improvements and equipments of the model farm property and in conducting the 
work of the place follows mo.st progressive methods. He is also a stockholder in the Farm- 
ers Elevator at Hickson. 

In 1882 Mr. Ramstad was united in marriage to Miss Mina Hanson, a native of Norway, 
who became his wife about six months after her emigration to the United States. To them 
have been born nine children, as follows: Louisa; Hattie, the wife of Oscar Larson, of Bel- 
trami, Minnesota; Nora, a teacher by profession; Ella, who is employed as a stenographer 
at Fargo; Gerhardt; Anna, who is engaged in teaching; Jlinnie, who is preparing herself 
for the work of a trained nurse; Victor; and Arthur. 

In his political views Mr. Ramstad is a democrat and for several j'cars he served as a 
member of the school board, but has never sought nor desired political office, preferring to 
concentrate his energies upon his business affairs and other interests and duties. He and his 
family are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and their influence is always given 
on the side of right, progress, truth, justice and improvement. 



WILLIAM T>. HENRY. 



William D. Henry, president of the Peoples State Bank of Wahpcton, Richland county, 
is recognized as one of the most able bankers of the state and is a leader in the financial 
circles of his town and county. A native of Ohio, he was bom at Wooster. a son of William 
and Mary A. (Dwire) Henry, both of whom were natives of that place. The father was a 
well-to-do merchant, manufacturer and coal operator and was widely known and highly 
esteemed in his locality. His political allegiance was given to the republican party, frater- 
nally he was a Mason and both he and his w-ife attended the Episcopal church. They were 
the parents of three children, two of whom are now living, the brother of our subject being 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 91 

Charles D. Henry, who is engaged in the banking business in Monterey, California. The 
paternal grandfather, William Henry, removed from Pennsylvania to Ohio in an early day 
in the history of the latter state and in 180S located in the town of Wooster, where he 
resided during the remainder of his life. He was a man of independent means and engaged 
in banking and in the land business. The maternal grandfather, Shafet Dwire, was bom 
in JIaryland, but was an early settler of Ohio. 

William D. Henry received his education in the public schools of Wooster and after 
putting aside his textbooks in 1871 went to Waterloo, Iowa, where he became a clerk in a 
bank. In 1880 he arrived in Wahpeton, North Dakota, and accepted a position as book- 
keeper and assistant cashier in the Peoples Bank there, of which he became cashier in 1887, 
a position which he held for fourteen years. His business acumen and executive ability 
■were still further recognized in 1901, when he was made president of the institution, in 
which capacity he is still serving. The bank was established by F. L. French, a prominent 
business man and banker of Wahpeton, who remained as its chief executive until his 
demise in 1900. The bank was then reorganized as the Peoples State Bank, by which name 
it is still known. It is capitahzed for twenty thousand dollars, has a surplus and undivided 
profits of twenty thousand dollars and average deposits of two hundred and fifty thousand 
dollars. The stock is held by a small number of people and its value as an investment is 
indicated by the fact that not a single share has been transferred since its organization. It 
has prospered from its organization and the wise policy instituted by its founders has 
been carried on by Mr. Heniy, who is not only thoroughly familiar with the routine of 
banking practice, but also understands the principles of finance underlying all banking pro- 
cedure and keeps in touch with local business conditions. 

Mr. Henry casts his ballot in support of the republican party, but has never had time 
to take an active part in politics as his business interests have required his entire atten- 
tion. He is identified with the Masonic blue lodge, the Koyal Arch chapter, the Knights 
Templar commandcry, the Scottish Rite bodies and the Mystic Shrine and seeks to exem- 
plify in his life the beneficent teachings of the craft. He is at present serving as captain 
general of the Grand Commandery of North Dakota. His enterprise and business ability 
have enabled him to gain financial independence and his public spirit and integrity have 
won for him the esteem of those who have been associated w-ith him. 



WILLIAM A. PECK. 



One of the important factors in the nation-wide movement to make farming more effi- 
cient and to make the conditions of farm, life more attractive is the county agricultural 
agent, whose business it is to keep the farmers in his county informed as to the advance- 
ment that is being made in all lines that touch upon farm life and to work with them in 
bringing about feasible improvements. William A. Peck, the county agent of Ward county, 
is residing in Minofr and has proved very efficient in the discharge of his varied duties. 

He was born at Acton, Indiana, the eldest of a family of four children born to the 
union of U. A. and Emma (Anderson) Peck. Tlie father's birth occurred in Ohio in 1848 
and the mother's in Indiana in 1858. In his early manhood U. A. Peck engaged in news- 
paper work and also studied law. He was admitted to the bar and practiced to some extent 
but for a considerable period has devoted his attention to farming. About 1883 he removed 
to St. Paul, Minnesota, where he worked on newspapers until his health b^an to fail and 
he turned his attention to farming. He is now living upon a ranch in Montana, which he 
owns although he leaves the actual work of its operation to others. During the Civil war 
he served as a private in Company B, Third Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, remaining at the front 
for two years. Although he was never wounded he was confined in a hospital for some 
time because of illness. 

William A. Peck attended the graded schools in the Twin Cities and high ^hool in 
Indiana, and subsequently entered the University of Minnesota, from which he was grad- 
uated with the class of 1906, with degree of Bachelor of Science. When twelve years of 
.age he began to pay his own expenses, earning money by selling papers and by doing other 



92 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

things suited to bis age. When nineteen years old he went to Minneapolis and worked his 
way through the University of Minnesota, thus displaying the qualities of enterprise and 
determination which have been such important factors in his subsequent success. Follow- 
ing his graduation from the university he became connected with the department of agri- 
culture at Washington, in the capacity of agriculturist in charge of the section of farm 
economics, remaining there for four years. At the end of that time he became interested in 
Montana land and engaged in ranching there for about three years, after which, in the 
spring of 1912, he came to North Dakota. He was made agricultural agent of Ward county 
and took up his residence in llinot, where he has since lived. The office is supported jointly 
by the federal government, the state and the county, the latter assessing a tax on all 
property for that purpose. He keeps the farmers in touch with all of the work done by 
the United States department of agriculture that would be of value to them and is active 
in various farmers' organizations. He gives careful study to the problems of marketing 
crops as well as to those that concern their production and seeks to cooperate with the 
farmers in every way possible. Not only is he interested in the scientific and business 
phases of farm life but also in the work of the rural schools, in the upbuilding of the 
country churches and increasing the attractiveness of farm homes. He still owns land in 
Montana and also holds title to land in North Dakota, but he rents his farms to others, 
devoting his entire attention to the work of his office. 

Jlr. Peck was married on the 14th of October. 1908, to Miss Anna Adel Thompson, who 
was born in Cottage Grove, Minnesota, and is a daughter of Peter and Gertrude (Wilkins) 
Thompson, natives respectively of Denmark and of Cottage Grove, Minnesota. The father 
is still engaged in farming in that state. Mr. and Mrs. Peck are the parents of three chil- 
dren: Wendell Thompson, whose birth occurred February 16, 1910; Helen Spurier, born 
February 24, 1912; and William, Jr., February 2, 1915. 

Mr. Peck is independent in politics, voting according to the dictates of his judgment 
rather than according to the commands of a party leader. Fraternally he is associated with 
the Masonic blue lodge at Minot and is an e.xemplary member of the craft. He is a member 
of the Sigma Xi, an honorary society for the advancement of science; the Minot Association 
of Commerce; and the National Farm Management Association. He takes the greatest 
interest in his work, is well liked thioughout the county and with the cooperation of the 
farmers has accomplished a great deal along the line of agricultural advancement. 



HON. WILLI AJI P. PORTEKFIELD. 

Hon. William P. Porterfield is a member of the state senate and also of the board of 
park commissioners of Fargo and his public service has been an effective force in promoting 
public progress. He figured, too, for an extended period as a leading factor in commercial 
circles of Fargo, where for thirty years he was a member of the firm of Font & Porterfield, 
well known druggists, but at the present time he is living retired from business. He was 
born in Martinsl)urg, W^est Virginia, December 20, 1856, a son of William R. and Ellen 
(O'Npal) Porterfield. The father's birth occurred in what was then Jhirtinsburg, Virginia, 
now West Virginia, while the mother was born across the Potomac river in Maryland. The 
former lived and died at the place of liis nativity after devoting the years of his active 
life to agricultural pursuits. 

William P. Porterfield acquired his education at home under the direction of a private 
tutor, supplemented by a course in Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, from which institution 
he was graduated in the class of 1879. He afterward clerked for three years as a phar- 
macist and in 1882 came to Dakota territory, where with others he founded the town of 
Davenport, Cass county. For ten years he was prominently identified with the business 
interests of the town, conducting a drug store, but in 1892 disposed of the store and for 
two years traveled. In ^March, 1894, he removed to Fargo, where in company with Henry 
M. Font he purchased the drug business of M. D. Fleming and organized the firm of Fout & 
Porterfield, a relation that was maintained for a decade. At the end of that time he acquired 
his partner's interest and for ten years conducted the business independently, although 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 93 

retaining the original firm name. On the 1st of December, 1913, he disposed of his store in 
order to give his attention to his investments. He now owns three hundred and twenty 
acres of land near Fargo, the cultivation of which he personally supervises, and also con- 
trols sixteen hundred acres of land, being guardian for the owners, so that he is now actively 
engaged in farming nineteen hundred and twenty acres. He is also a director in the Mer- 
chants National Bank and his cooperation with any movement constitutes an element in its 
success, his activities serving as a stimulus for accomplishment. 

In politics Mr. Porterfield has long been an earnest democrat, recognized as a party 
leader in his state, and in November, 1912, he was elected to the state senate notwithstand- 
ing the fact that the usual republican majority is about three to one. He was the first 
democrat ever honored with election to the senate from his .district, a fact indicative of 
his personal popularity and the confidence reposed in him. In 1910 upon the organization 
of the park system of Fargo, he was elected a member of the park board and at the expira- 
tion of his first term of office in 1915 was reelected and for two years has acted as president 
of the board. He is also serving on the state board of pharmacy and is a member of the 
executive committee of the national board of pharmacists — an honor of which North Dakota 
has reason to be proud, as there are but five members of this board selected from thirty- 
four active states in the association. Mr. Porterfield holds membership in the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks and he attends and contributes to the support of the Episcopal 
church. He has ever been a man of resolute spirit, prompt, energetic and notably reliable 
and he has in large measure the genius for devising and executing the right thing at the 
right time. 



JOHN E. HUDSON. 



John E. Hudson, of Forman, who is filling the office of register of deeds in Sargent 
coimty, was born in the state of New York, December 10, 1862. His father, George W. 
Hudson, a native of England, came to America when a youth of thirteen years and settled 
in Cayuga county. New York. He learned and followed the carpenter's trade and continued 
to make his home in the Empire state until called to his final rest in 1883. He wedded Emily 
J. Emrick, who was born in Cayuga county,- New York, and they had a family of seven 
children, of whom John E. is the third in order of birth, and six of the number are yet 
living. The mother passed away in July, 1915. 

John E. Hudson pursued his education in the district and village schools of New York 
and in March, 1884, when a young man of twenty-two years, arrived in North Dakota, 
establishing his home in Kingston township, Sargent county. There he remained until 1900, 
at which time he removed to Havana, where he entered the grain business ,continuing there 
until he came to Forman in 1913. He still remains a stockholder of the Havana Elevator 
Company but his time and attention are mainly given to the faithful discharge of the duties 
of the office which he now holds. He has always been a republican in his political views and 
on that ticket was elected to the office of register of deeds in January, 1913. In 1914 he 
was reelected to the position, which he is now filling in a most satisfactory manner. He 
has also served as supervisor of Kingston township and as president of the village board 
of Havana and in the discharge of his official duties has ever been most capable, prompt and 
faithful. 

Mr. Hudson was married in 1898 to Miss Mary Herring, who was born in Illinois in 
1868, a daughter of John E. and Nancy G. Herring, who removed to North Dakota in the 
spring of 1882, settling near the town of Ransom. Mr. Herring was one of the first three 
commissioners appointed by the governor and the first meeting of the board was held at 
his home. His wife was the first superintendent of schools to be appointed in the county, 
and in many other ways they took an active part in shaping the material, cultural! and 
political development of the locality. Both are now deceased. In their family were five 
children, of whom Mrs. Hudson is the fourth, and three of the number are yet living. By 
her marriage she has become the mother of three children: Harriet, born August 9, 1899; 
Harlow, May 5, 1906; and Ruth, July 17, 1908. 



94 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

From early manliood Mr. Hudson has continuously made Ids liome in North Dakota, 
Iccenly alive to the possibilities of its development and sharing in all of the work that has 
contributed to the advancement and upbuilding of the district in which he lives. 



HON. ELMORE YOCUM SARLES. 

Hon. Elmore Yocum Sarles was the ninth governor of North Dakota and has long been 
recognized as a leader of public thought and action in this state. Moreover, he belongs to 
the little group of distinctively representative business men who have been the pioneers 
in inaugurating and building up the chief industries of this section of the country. He early 
had the sagacity and prescience to discern tlie eminence which the future had in store for 
this great and arrowing country and, acting in accordance with the dictates of his judgment, 
he has garnered in the fullness of time the generous harvest which is the just recompense 
of indomitable industry, spotless integrity and marvelous enterprise. 

He comes of an ancestry distinctly American in both the lineal and collateral lines, 
being represented in the new world from early colonial days. His father, the Eev. Jesse D. 
Sarles, was born in Dutchess county, New York, and became a distinguished representative 
of the Methodist ministry, devoting his entire life to that holy calling. In 1842 lit became 
a resident of Racine, Wisconsin, and in that state reared his family, two of his sons having 
since become prominent in connection with the history of North Dakota. 

A native of Wisconsin, Elmore Y. Sarles was born at Wonewoc, on the lath of January, 
1859, and after mastering the branches of learning taught in the public schools, attended 
the Galesville University. The year 1881 witnessed his arrival in North Dakota, at which 
time he made his way to Traill county, then an undeveloped and unimproved district. His 
keen business "sagacity has found justification in the later progress of that part of the state. 
He believed there was a bright future before it and, acting in accordance with the dictates 
of his faith and judgment, he became identified with business interests there, and entered 
upon a notably successful career. He recognized the fact the great need of the coiintry was 
money with which to develop its resources and accordingly he organized the Traill C(mnty 
Bank at Hillsboro, undertaking to furnish money to the settlers and thus aid in the improve- 
ment of the district. In 1885 that institution was converted into the First National Bank. 
Success attended the venture from the beginning, its patronage steadily growing. He followed 
a liberal polioy, doing everything in his power to aid early settlers that did not jeopardize 
the interests of depositors or stockholders. From time to time he extended the scope of his 
activities and became interested in enterprises which had much to do with the progress and 
development of the country. He became one of the organizers of the Valley Lumber Com- 
pany, which soon built up a large business in the rapidly developing country, its sales 
extending all over Traill and adjoining counties. The name of E. Y. and 0. C. Sarles became 
most widely known in connection with the business of upbuilding North Dakota and in all 
their activities they anticipated the needs of a growing country. More than two million 
dollars were brought in and devoted to the needs of the bank and it is indicative of the 
character of Mr. Sarles, of his lenient policy and his keen sagacity in judging human nature 
that he never had to foreclose a first mortgage. He was a leader in all those activities which 
led to the substantial growth and improvement of the state. He looked beyond the exigen- 
cies of the moment to the possibilities of the future and became a most conspicuous figure 
in financial circles. Banks were established or acquired at Caledonia and Grandin, North 
Dakota, and at Shelly, ^Minnesota, and the First National Bank of Northwood was purchased 
in after years, also the F'irst State Bank of Blanchard, and Mr. Sarles became one of the 
organizers and vice president of the Northwestern Trust Company of Grand F'orks. He was 
ever one of the foremost figures in the development of the Red river valley and his extensive 
and important business afi'airs brought him such a wide acquaintance and gained him such 
a recognition of his business ability that he was brought into public life by an cfi'ort on the 
part of his friends who desired hira to become a candidate for governor. 

While appreciative of the honor they would have conferred upon him, he had no special 
ambition to become prominent in public alTairs and took no active part in securing the noml- 




HON. ELMORE Y. SARLES 



TJl. 
* 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 97 

nation, which went to Governor White. He was at that time, as he had been for years, 
engrossed in business affairs of moment, and he considered the pursuits of private life 
abundantly worthy his best efforts. He had, however, been an ardent republican from the 
time that age conferred upon him the right of franchise and he had served as mayor of 
Hillsboro and as a member of the state normal school board. His public service as well 
as his private business interests made him widely known far beyond the borders of his state 
as a typical resident of Dakota. People came to recognize in him one who was capable of 
handling extensive and important interests, who brought to the solution of vital problems 
sound judgment, clear discrimination and public spirit and when in 1904 the republicans of 
the state sought a candidate for the office of governor the choice of the party fell upon him 
and at the ensuing election he was chosen for office by the largest majority any governor 
of North Dakota ever received before or since. In the' discharge of his onerous and respon- 
sible duties he brought to bear the same keen judgment that he had displayed in the man- 
agement of his private business interests. He was indeed an executive and he studied every 
question from the standpoint of public utility and merit. In spite of the fact that during 
his administration there was expended a quarter million dollars made necessary by law there 
was left a surplus of two hundred thousand dollars in the treasury. In retiring from the 
office of chief executive he carried with him the loj'e and confidence and the high esteem of 
the people throughout the state. 

On the 10th of January, 1886, Governor Sarles was married to Miss Anna York, of 
Prescott, Wisconsin. To them have been born four children: Earle, who is cashier of the 
First National Bank of Hillsboro, North Dakota; Duane and Doris, twins; and Eleanor. 

Governor Sarles is a very prominent llason. having received the honorary thirty-third 
degree and having served as potentate of El Zagal Temple, A. A. 0. U. M. S., of Fargo. He 
also belongs to the Knights of Pythias and was formerly exalted ruler of the Grand Forks 
lodge of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. The specific and distinctive office of 
biography is not to give voice to a man's modest estimate of himself and his accomplish- 
ments, but rather to leave the perpetual record establishing his character by the consensus 
of opinion on the part of his fellowmen. Throughout North Dakota Mr. Sarles is spoken 
of in terms of admiration and respect. His life has been so varied in its activities, so hon- 
orable in its purposes, so far-reaching and beneficial in its effects that it has become an 
integral part of the history of the state. 



FEED WILLIAMS. 



Opportunity ever eludes the grasp of the man who shirks his duties and his responsi- 
bilities and it tauntingly plays before the dreamer but surrenders to the man of resolute 
purpose and determination, yielding its reward in substantial and honorable success. Fred 
Williams of Cass county is one who has ever recognized and utilized his opportunities to the 
fullest extent and he is now a prominent figure in the business circles of his part of the 
state, being identified with both commercial and financial interests at Arthur. He was 
bom in New York, .June 2fi, 1866, and is a son of James and Bessie Williams, who were 
likewise natives of the Empire state, in which they remained throughout their entire lives. 
Their family numbered eight children, six of whom survive. 

In his youthful days Fred Williams largely devoted his attention to the acquirement 
of an education in the public schools of New York and there remained until he reached 
the age of twenty, when he determined to test the truth of the reports concerning the 
business conditions and opportunities of the west. The year 1886 witnessed his arrival in 
North Dakota, at which time he took up his abode at Hunter and entered the employ of 
J. H. Gale, recognized as the leading business man of the district. He remained with Mr. 
Gale for five years at Hunter and in 1891 came to Arthur, where as a partner of Mr. Gale 
he embarked in general merchandising and in the hardware business. Here he has since 
remained, conducting their interests, and has built up a trade of large and gratifying pro- 
portions. He carries an excellent stock of general merchandise and of hardware and in 
both lines his business has grown in a most substantial manner. "He also figures promi- 

Vol. II— 6 



98 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

iicntly in banking circles as the president of the First State Bank of Arthur and he is a 
stockliolder in the Farmers Klevator of the town. He has likewise utilized his chance of 
making judicious investment in property and is now the owner of seven sections of land in 
Cass county, all in the vicinity of Artliur, and in addition lie owns a half interest in six 
sections of land, in wliich he is a partner of Mr. Gale. 

Mr. Williams belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has taken the degrees of 
the lodge and chapter and also of the Scottish Kite and he likewise belongs to the Mystic 
Shrine. His life measures up to the high standards of manhood set by this order. In politics 
he is a republican and for sixteen years he filled the ofTice of postmaster at Arthur, making 
a most creditable record in that connection. Mr. Williams deserves much credit for what he 
has accomplished, his success being the result of ability, determination, persistency of pur- 
pose and laudable ambition. That he proved himself most trustworthy is indicated by the 
fact that his employer admitted him to a partnership and together they have advanced, the 
careful management of their common interests bringing prosperity to both. 



REV. E. .J. WISNAES. 



Rev. R. J. Wisnaes is a well known minister of the Norwegian Lutheran church, whose 
labors are proving a most potent element in promoting moral progress in Cass county, where 
he has charge of three different congregations, tlie North Pleasant, the South Pleasant and 
the Lower Wild Rice and Red River. He makes his home on section 37, Pleasant township, 
in which locality the North Pleasant congregation erected the North Pleasant church. He is 
one of the county's honored pioneer settlers and highly esteemed citizens. He was born in 
Norway, January 4, 1852, a son of John R. and Eli R. (Augsburg) Wisnaes, both of whom 
spent their entire lives in the land of the midnight sun. 

Rev. R. J. Wisnaes remained under the parental roof until he attained his thirteenth 
year and received a thorough educational training in the public schools, after which he left 
home to make his living and in 1S71 sailed for the United States. He reached Wells, Min- 
nesota,' on the 4th of July of that year and there took up his abode. He had borrowed 
fifty-five dollars for passage money and on reaching AVells was practically penniless. He 
possessed energy and determination, however, and almost immediately secured work on a 
farm, spending the succeeding two years in farm labor and also at carrying brick in the 
brickyards of the district, working in that way before the harvest season began. During 
all this time ho entertained the purpose of preparing himself for the ministry and utilized 
every opportunity to secure means to further his plans. In January, 1873, he entered Luther 
College, at Decorah, Iowa, and there attended school until 1ST6, spending the vacation periods 
in farm work in order to enable him to pay his way through college. In the fall of 1876 
he became a student in the Luther Seminary at Madison, Wisconsin, and from that institu- 
tion received his theological degree in the spring of 1879. On the 31st of August of the 
same year he was ordained to the ministry at Northfield, Minnesota, and on the 9th of 
September following came to North Dakota. Through the intervening period of thirty- 
seven years he has devoted his time to church work in Richland and Cass counties and 
throughout the entire period, save for a year and a half, has resided in the latter county. 
Hi.s present charge covers the North Pleasant and South Pleasant congregation!^ and the 
Lower Wild Rice and Red River congregation. The South Pleasant congregation i- in Rich- 
land county. He has exerted a strong inlluence for good among the people of this part of 
the state. He is an earnest and ofttimes eloquent preacher and his utterances ring with the 
logic of truth. 

On the 6th of January, 1880, Rev. Wisnaes was married to Miss Amelia Bredensen, the 
ceremony being performed at Perry, Wisconsin. Mrs. Wisnaes was bom in Wisconsin, and 
by her marriage became the mother of three children. Klida Marie, John Carlot and Agnes 
Benedicta. Mrs. Wisnaes passed away in .Tune, 1892, and on the 3l8t of October, 1893, he 
was married to Miss Mina Bergith Stensrud, who was likewise born in Wisconsin but emi- 
grated to Dakota territory in 1871. This union has been blessed with six children: Kmilie 
Miranda, Ruth Inaiida, Jimma Victoria, Esther Monica, Ingvar William and Oscar Ferdinand. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 99 

Rev. Wisnaes owns and occupies a farm of eighty acres on' section 14, Pleasant town- 
ship, Cass county, which he took up as a tree claim soon after arriving in this state. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party and he is not neglectful of the duties of 
citizenship but keeps well informed on the issues of the day and advocates high standards 
in relation to tlie public welfare. He is continually studying and reading along lines that 
render his work more effective and moreover, he is not only a man of broad scholarly attain- 
ments but also a man of deep human sympathy, which constitutes one of the elements of 
his successful Christian work. 



SIMON OVERGARD, M. D. 



Dr. Simon Overgard, a representative physician and surgeon of Minot. is a Norwegian 
by birth and manifests the sterling qualities of liis race. He was born about eighty miles 
north of Christiania March 4, 1874, a son of Ingmar and Theodora (Mohr) Overgard. The 
father, who is a native of the same place as his son Simon, is a farmer by occupation, but 
is now living retired in Norway. The mother was likewise born in Norway, although her 
father's birth occurred in . Germany. 

Dr. Simon Overgard, who is the oldest in a farailj- of four children, attended school in 
Christiania and after completing his general education entered the universitj' of Cliristiania, 
from which he was graduated in 1902. Since coming to this countrj' he has taken post 
graduate courses at the Chicago Policlinic and is constantly increasing his knowledge by 
study and reading. When about twenty-seven years of age he became an assistant to the 
staif of physicians in a hospital in Norway and was connected with different hospitals in 
that country until May, 1906, when he came to the United States. He traveled over the 
country for a few months, as he desired to learn something of various sections before 
, locating permanently. In August of that year, he opened an office for practice in Enderlin, 
Ransom county, and remained there until 1913, since which year he has resided in Minot. 
He has gained a large and representative general practice and is held in high esteem by his 
colleagues. Natural ability and thorough training have well fitted him for his chosen pro- 
fession and his gratifying success is well deserved. He has demonstrated his faith in the 
future of North Dakota by investing in a half section of land west of Minot, from which 
lie derives a good financial return. 

Dr. Overgard was married in October, 1909, to Miss Ena Johnson, a native of Sweden. 
Her father passed away in that country, but her mother is still living there. Dr. Overgard 
has supported the democratic party since becoming a naturalized citizen of the United States 
and while living in Enderlin served as county physician of Ransom county. He is a member 
of the Northwestern Medical Association and the North Dakota Medical Society and is a 
fellow of the American Association and finds the proceedings of these organizations of 
value in keeping in touch with the advanced thought and practice of the profession. He is 
also a member of the Medical Association of Christiania, Norway. He is well known in 
Minot and Ward county and has gained the warm personal regard of many. 



JAMES A. DWYER. 

James A. Dwyer, a well known attorney residing in Hankinson, Richland county, was 
born in Akron, Ohio, on the 1st of May, 1861, a son of Andrew and Catherine (Dwyer) 
Dwyer. The father, who was born in Ireland in 1828, died in November, 1898, and the 
mother, whose birth occurred in 1835, passed away in October, 1902. They were married 
in Ohio, where the father had removed as a young man. On beginning his independent 
career he went to Australia from Ireland and for a time he worked on a ship. He then 
came to America and was foreman in the building of the old Erie Railroad and subsequently 
entered the employ of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, being one of the first 
agents of that road in Wisconsin. He also followed agricultural pursuits in that state. He 

992301] 



100 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

served in the Union army in tlio latter jjiirt of tlie Civil war and pavticii}atcd in the second 
battle of Nashville. In politics he was a democrat and he served as county treasurer and 
county commissioner of Sauk county, Wisconsin. His religious faith was that of the Cath- 
olic church. To him and his wife wei'e born eleven children, six of whom are still living, 
namely: James A.; William, a prosperous farmer living in Loretta, Wisconsin; Thomas, a 
lumber cruiser of northern Minnesota; Andrew, who lives in Bear Valley, Wisconsin, and 
has gained gratifying success as a general merchant and implement dealer; Maria, the wife 
of James P. Smitli, a rethcd farmer, who is now in the meat business at Madison, Wiscon- 
sin: and Mary, the wife of M. J. Griffin, a traveling man of Baraboo, Wisconsin. The 
paternal grandfather died in Ireland, and the grandmother passed away in AustraMa. 

James A. Dwycr received an excellent education, attending the schools at Pewaukeo, 
Wisconsin, and the University of Wisconsin for one year, beginning his law studies at the 
latter institution. He then went to Milwaukee and learned telegraphy, which he foUowoti 
for eleven years, during which time he continued his preparation for the practice of law. 
He was admitted to the bar of North Dakota on the 29th of March, 1898, but had practiced 
his profession for two years previously. Since his admission to the bar he has practiced 
in Ilankinson and has met with a gratifying measure of success, his clients coming from 
all parts of this section and from Minnesota. He has also served as attorney for the Soo 
Line since 1900, and it is well recognized by his colleagues and by the general public that 
he is well versed in the law and that he is convincing in his presentation of his cause in the 
court. He owns lands in McLean county and AVilliams county. North Dakota. 

On the 26th of April, 1890, Mr. Dwyer married Miss Lillian D. Pettit, a native of Syra- 
cuse, New York, who came to North Dakota with her sister about 1888. Mr. Dwyer is inde- 
pendent in politics, believing that the welfare of the country can best be served by voting 
for the best man irrespective of party. His religious faith is that of the Roman Catholic 
church, whose teachings have guided him throughout life. He is not only respected for his 
professional attainments but is also held in high esteem because of his integrity and probity. 



JOHN SCHLAET. 



John Schlaet is one of the venerable citizens ;nid honored pioneer settlers of North 
• Dakota, having made his home in Cass county since 1880. He has witnessed many changes 
during the intervening years as the work of development and progress has been carried 
forward, converting the county from a wild frontier district into one of the populous and 
prosperous counties of this part cf the state. Moreover, his life record proves what can be 
accomplished when determination and energy lead the way and may well serve as an 
example to others who wish to attain honorable success. 

Mr. Schlaet was born in Germany, March 22, 1837, a son of Christ J. and Dorothea J. 
Schlaet, who were likewise natives of the same country and never left that land. They had 
a family of two sons, the elder being Fred, now a resident of Minnesota. 

The younger, John Schlaet, was reared and educated in Germany and in 1SG8, when 
thirty-oni' years of age, came to the new world, hoping to find better business conditions 
than he could secure in his native land. He first made his way to Minnesota, but before 
coming to America he had followed the sea for two years, making several trips across the 
Atlantic. On reaching Minnesota he took up his abode upon a farm and spent about six 
years in that state, devoting his time to general agricultural pursuits. While there he lost 
his left arm in a threshing machine and was thus handicapped, but has never allowed this 
misfortune to discourage or dishearten him. In ISSO he arrived in North Dakota, settling 
upon a farm on section 1, Amenia township. He immediately set to work to develop and 
improve the property and has added to it many substantial buildings, good fences and the 
latest improved machinery. To his original purchase he has added from time to time until 
he is now the owner of four hundred and eighty acres of rich and productive land and has 
also given a farm to each of his stepsons. At the present time he is living retired in Arthur 
and is reaping the benefits of his earnest and persistent toil. 

In 1873 Mr. Schlaet was married to Carolina Goda, a native of Germany, and they 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 101 

became the parents of three children : Anna, who is now married and lives in California; 
Emma, the wife of R. Siebert; and one who is deceased. Mrs. Schlaet had been previously- 
married and by her iirst union had the following children: William, Fred, Gustav, Herman, 
John, one who died in Minnesota and two who died in Germany. 

Mr. and Mrs. Schlaet are members of the German Lutheran church and have ever been 
faithful to its teachings. In politics he is a republican and has served as road supervisor 
but has never been a politician in the usually accepted sense of office seeking. He and his 
wife liave made all they have since coming to the new world and they deserve much credit 
for their progress and advancement. Earnest, persistent labor has been the foundation of 
their prosperity, which has increased with the passing years until they are now enabled to 
live retired, occupying a pleasant home in Arthur, while their income is sufficient to bring 
them the comforts of life. 



ANDREW SANDAGER. 



Andrew Sandager, an active representative of Lisbon's business interests, his attention 
being given to the conduct of a general mercantile establishment, was born in Decorah, 
Iowa, on the 31st of August, 1862, a son of Endre and Randhild (House) Sandager, both of 
whom were natives of Norway, whence they came to the United States in young manhood 
and womanhood. They became residents of Winneshiek county, Iowa, where they were 
married and established their home, continuing their residence there until called to their 
final rest. The father was a very successful and prosperous farmer and acquired more than 
nine hundred acres of valuable farming land in that state. 

Andrew Sandager was educated in the common schools of Iowa and afterward took up 
the study of pharmacy in a drug store in Decorah, where he thoroughly acquainted himself 
with the business. In 1882 he came to North Dakota, settling in Grafton, where he entered 
the employ of the firm of Sandager & Burger, general merchants, the senior partner being 
liis brother. On the 16th of February, 1884, he removed to Lisbon, where he organized 
the mercantile firm of Sandager & Haugen, which firm continued in existence until 1913, in 
which year Mr. Haugen passed away. In February, 1914, the business was incorporated 
as the Chiacgo Store, with Mr. Sandager as vice president and general manager. For almost 
a third of a century he has been continuously associated with mercantile interests in Lisbon 
and has made his establishment an expression of the ^progressiveness which has marked the 
development of the city. Broadening the scope of his activities, Mr. Sandager was for many 
years a most active factor in banking circles, having in 1893 purchased an interest in the 
State Bank of Lisbon, of which institution he remained. the president for eighteen years. 
His fellow townsmen have learned to rely upon his judgment, to sanction the wisdom of his 
course and at all times the reliability of his methods has commended him to the confidence 
and goodwill of those with whom he has been associated. 

In 1895 Mr. Sandager was united in marriage to Miss Carrie Jensen, a native of Nor- 
way, by whom he has a son, Harold W., whose birth occurred June 19, 1896, and who is now 
secretary of the Chicago Store. Fraternally Mr. Sandager is identified with the following 
organizations: Sheyenne Valley Lodge, No. 12, A. F. & A. M.; Lisbon Chapter, No. 7, R. 
A. M.; Ivanhoe Commandery, K. T.; El Zagal Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S., of Fargo; the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen; the Independent Order of Foresters; the Order of Ameri- 
can Yeomen; the subordinate lodge and encampment of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows; Fargo Lodge, No. 13, B. P. 0. E.; and the Knights of Pythias lodge at Lisbon, of 
whicli he is a life member. Both Mr. and Mrs. Sandager are members of the Norwegian 
Lutheran church, which they assisted in organizing and which they have always generously 
supported. Extensive and important as are his business and fraternal connections, 'Mr. 
Sandager is also recognized as a leader in political circles. He has been a lifelong republican 
and was a member of the constitutional convention of North Dakota which aided in frarn- 
ing the organic law of the state. He was also a member of the first state senate and for 
sixteen years he was chairman of the county republican central committee, wliile in 1912 
he was a delegate to the national convention which nominated William Howard Taft. In 



102 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA' 

that year lie took the First Regiment Band to Minot, North Dakota, to the convention 
held for the election of delegates to the national convention. He has served in various local 
offices and Ransom county numbers him among her most prominent and valued citizens — a 
man whom she is proud to name as a representative of her progressiveness and as a type 
of her citizenship. 



HON. SVEN E. LXSAKER. 



Important interests have been furthered and promoted through the efforts and ability 
of Hon. Sven E. Ulsaker, a representative agriculturist of Cass county and one who has 
represented his district in the state legislature. He now makes his home on section 3.5, 
Normanna township, where he has excellent farm property. He was born at Hemsedal, 
Norway, on the 3d of June, 1853, and is a son of Andrew and Margaret Ulsaker, both of 
whom died in Norway. His education was acquired in the public schools of his native coun- 
try, where he remained until he attained his majority, when in 1S74 he completed arrange- 
ments to come to the new world. Crossing the Atlantic he took up his abode at Kenyon, 
Goodhue county, Minnesota, where he worked through tlie summer on a farm and during 
the winter attended school, doing chores on the farm for his board. In the spring of 1875 
he arrived in Cass county, North Dakota, and on the 23d of June of that year filed on his 
present home farm of one hundred and sixty acres, which he secured under the preemption 
right. All about Lim was the broad undeveloped prairie, covered with its native grasses 
and showing no trace of any plow. He built a small log cabin twelve by twelve feet, with 
a sod roof and board floor and in that primitive home began life in the west in true pioneer 
style, meeting with many hardships, privations and dlfticulties during the early days. He 
subsequently purchased other lands and now owns four hundred acres, constituting a very 
valuable and productive farm. He is also a stockholder in the Farmers Elevator Company 
at Kindred and is a stockholder in the Farmers Cooperative Cicamery Company of that place. 

In 1882 Mr. Ulsaker was united in marriage to Miss Ingeborg Brujord, of Norway. 
She emigrated to this country in 1881. To this union ha.ve been born six children: Ada 
Mathilda, Andrew, Anna, Oscar, Mabel and Selma. The daughter Mabel is engaged in teach- 
ing school and all the children are still under the parental roof. 

Mr. Ulsaker and his family are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and are 
highly esteemed in the community where they reside and where their circle of friends is 
almost coextensive with the circle of their acquaintances. Mr. Ulsaker is a republican in 
his political views, active as a party worker, and again and again he has been called to 
local office. For. a quarter of a century or more he has been a member of the school board 
and the cause of education finds in him a stalwart champion. For twenty years he has 
served as a member of the township board and in 1911 he was elected to represent liis 
district in the state legislature, whore he made a creditable record. He has always been 
loyal to the best interests of his community and the state and though born across the water, 
he is thoroughly American in thought, spirit and interests. 



LOUIS HENRY KERMOTT, M. D. 

Dr. Louis Henry Kermott, a popular and successful physician of Minot, Avas born in 
Bowmanvillp. Ontario, Canada, on the 5th of June, 1870, the youngest of the seven children 
born to Charles and Hannah (Dixon) Kermott, natives of Manchester, England, and London, 
Ontario, Canada, respectively. The father received his education at the Toronto Medical 
Collcce and practiced as a physician nnd surgeon in Ontario until ISSO, when he removed 
■with his family to the United States, settling at St. Thomas, North Dakota. There he con- 
tinued his proii'.-^sional labors for about ten years, after which he practiced in La Moure, 
North Dakota, for five years. He then entered the government service at Fort Totten and 
remained there until his demise in 1001. He was a good citizen, shirking none of his duties 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 103 

to his city, state or nation, but he nevev desired to hold office. His widow divides her time 
between Minot and Palacios, Texas, where a daughter resides. 

Dr. Louis Henry Kermott attended Hamline University at St. Paul, Minnesota, and 
after taking a literary course entered the medical school of that university, from which he 
was graduated with the class of 1904. Before this, however, he had begun his independent 
career for in 1901 he found employment in a drug store, where he began the study of 
medicine. After his graduation he served for a year as interne at St. Barnabas Hospital in 
Minneapolis, after which lie practiced for six months in Towner, North Dakota. At the 
expu'ation of that period he removed to Minot, where he has since engaged in general prac- 
tice. His office is thoroughly and modernly equipped and in his work he keeps abreast of 
the latest improvements in the practice of medicine and surgery. He is now serving as 
surgeon for the Great Northern Railroad Company and holds the confidence of the general 
public and of his professional brethren alike. 

Dr. Kermott was married on the 12th of September, 1904, to Miss Louise Feagles, a 
native of Knoxville, Tennessee, and a daughter of Robert and Mary (Allen) Feagles, both 
of whom were born in Orange, New Jersey. The father, who was a Presbyterian minister, 
removed with his family to Minneapolis and subsequentlj' went to Seattle, Washington. 
He passed away in 1912 but his widow is still living in the last named city. Dr. and Mrs. 
Kermott have a son, Louis Henry, .Jr., whose birth occurred April 19, 1908. 

Dr. Kermott is a republican in his political belief but has never been very active in 
public affairs. His religious affiliation is with the Baptist church and in all relations of life 
he strives to conform to high standards of morals. He is connected with a number of fra- 
ternal organizations, belonging to the Modern Woodmen of America, the Elks and the Masonic 
order, in which he holds membership in the blue lodge and the bodies of the Scottish Rite 
at Minot and in Kem Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Grand Forks. Along professional lines 
he is connected with the Northwestern District Medical Society, of whicli he is president, 
and the American Medical Association. Since removing to Minot he has gained the friend- 
ship of many and holds the respect and goodwill of all who have been brought in contact 
with him. 



JOHN CARMODY. 



John Carmody, an ex-member of the supreme court of North Dakota and for thirty 
years a prominent representative of the bar of Hillsboro, has carved his name high on the 
kej'stone of the legal arch of the state, being prominently connected with a profession 
which has important bearing upon the progress and stable prosperity of any section or 
community and one which has long been considered as conserving the public welfare by 
furthering the ends of justice and maintaining individual rights. A native of Wisconsin, 
he was born at Granville, Milwaukee county, January 6, 1854, a son of John and Mary 
(Purcell) Carmody, natives of Ireland, who came to the new world with their respective 
parents, the two families being established in Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Carmody removed 
to Waseca county, Minnesota, in 1868, and upon the farm which the father secured in that 
year he is still living at the remarkable old age of ninety-six years. 

Judge Carmody spent his youthful days under the parental roof and supplemented his 
district school training by a term's study in the high school. He afterward engaged in 
teaching for twelve terms in the country schools and utilized the summer months in farm 
work, spending seven summer seasons in the employ of one man. It was his purpose and 
desire, however, to turn his attention to a professional career and in 1878 he took up the 
study of law in the office of Hon. James E. Child, of Waseca, Minnesota, who directed his 
reading until his admission to the bar in 1880. He then entered upon the practice of his 
profession in Waseca, where he remained until 1885. In the summer of 1884 he visited Dakota 
territory in search of a location and the following year removed to Hillsboro, where he has 
now been engaged in the active practice of law for three decades. In 1909 he was elevated 
to the bench, being appointed by Governor Burke a member of the state supreme court, 
in which connection he served for two years. He had previously been city justice of the 



104 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

peace and municipal judge of Waseca, Minnesota, and in Hillsboro has filled the offices of 
city attorney and mayor. He has likewise been states attorney of Traill count}', has been 
a member of the state board of control of penal and charitable institutions, has been assist- 
ant attorney general and at the present writing is tilling the office of assistant United States 
district attorney. His public service has been of the utmost benefit and value to the state, 
as in all his duties he has been actuated by a public-spirited rlf;votion to the general good. 

On the 12th of July, 1886, Mr. Carmody was united in marriage to Miss Anna JIadden, 
of Waseca, Minnesota, by whom he has three children, namely: Winifred Mary, a Dominican 
Sister located at Sinsinawa, Wisconsin; Irene Frances, the wife of J. G. McClintock, of 
Rugby, North Dakota; and George Christie, who is a teacher in the College of St. Thomas 
at St. Paul, is pursuing the night law course and reports the St. Thomas athletics for the 
Pioneer Press. He also played on tlie St. Thomas football team for three years, during 
which time the -team never lost a game in which he participated. 

Judge Carmod}' and his family are all members of the Catholic church and tlie .ludge 
belongs to Grand Forks Lodge, No. 255, B. P. O. E. He is likewise a member of the Knights 
of Columbus, of which he served as state advocate for three years, and of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, of which he has been grand master workman for the state and a member of 
the board of directors for eleven years. He also has membership with the Degree of Honor, the 
Independent Order of Foresters and the American Yeomen. He has been the president and 
the vice president of the Volunteer Firemen's Association and he has served as president of 
the State Bar Association. He ranks with the distinguished and eminent jnembcrs of the 
North Dakota bar, his ability bringing him prominently to the front in the trial of important 
cases before the courts. His interests and activities are many and have been of a far- 
reaching and beneficial character, but most of all he is known in his profession and is regarded 
as a distinguished and able lawyer by his colleagues and contemporaries. 



PROFESSOR GUY ELROY BEMIS. 

Professor Guy Elroy Bemis, of Jlinot, prominent in educational circles, was born at 
Roscoe Center, Minnesota, July 16, ISSO, a son of George W. and Lois Arabella (Waldo) 
Bemis. The latter was a representative of one of the old pioneer families of Minnesota, her 
father having built the first frame house in Dodge county. She was born in New Hampsliire, 
while George W. Bemis was a native of Ohio. In early life he became a farmer in Minnesota 
and also engaged in teaching. Subsequently he took up the profession of dentistry and is 
now practicing in Thompson, Montana. His wife passed away about 1900. 

In their family of eight children Professor Guy E. Bemis was the fourth in order of 
birth, lie attended country schools in Minnesota and also the Litclifield high school and 
the Wisconsin Business College at Racine, Wisconsin, completing his course there with tlie 
class of 1902. When but eleven years of age he began working for others, entering the 
employ of Mr. Hackney, now an extensive landowner of North Dakota, for whom he herded 
cattle. Since that time he has practically supported himself. He worked for others as 
opportunity offered until he completed his education. He had no assistance from anyone 
and ]irnvided the means which enabled him to meet liis expenses during liis school days. 
Taking up the profession of teaching, he was connected with a business college at Watertown, 
Wisconsin, for a year, after which lie was transferred to Fond du Lac, wlicre he had charge 
of a school from August, 1904, until July, 1906. At the latter date lie went to Bismarck, 
establisliing the Bismarck Business College, which he conducted until September 18, 1911, 
wlien he sold out and came to Minot. Here he purchased the equipment of a school which 
had been closed and using its furniture, he was in a short time conducting a successful 
school, which has since been continuously growing. The equipment today is very complete, 
including adding machines, letter presses, typewriters and everything necessary for tlie 
conduct of such a school and the enrollment today is about one hundred students annnally. 
He devotes his entire time to the college and the methods of instruction arc most thorough, 
well qualifying the pupils for onerous and responsible duties. He arrived in Minot on Sat- 




PROFESSOR GUY E. BEMIS 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 107 

urday, opened his school on Monday and throughout the intervening period has been regarded 
as an important acquisition to the educational interests of the city. 

On the 12th of October, 1915, Professor Bemis was married to Miss Florence Mae 
Wilson, a native of Minot and a daughter of George and Clara (Corbett) Wilson, now residing 
at Stanley. Professor and Mrs. Bemis attend the Presbyterian church and in politics he 
is an independent republican, voting as his judgment dictates, yet supporting the principles 
of the republican party. Fraternally he is connected with the Elks lodge at Minot and has 
many friends both within and without that organization. He certainly is deserving of 
much credit for what he has accomplished. There are few boys who start out in life for 
themselves at the age of eleven years who manifest such determination and ambition in 
securing an education. He realized how valuable this is as a foundation for later success 
and in his thorough training he found the basis of his own life work. He has made the 
school a credit to the city in whicli it is located and it draws to Minot many students from 
elsewhere. 



OLE HJ5RBRANS0N. 



Ole Herbranson, the period of whose residence in Cass county, North Dakota, covers 
forty-three years, is well known as a successful and enterprising agriculturist, owning an 
excellent farm of two hundred and forty acres on section 14, Normanna township. His 
birtli occurred in Houston county, Minnesota, on the 28th of October, 1859, his parents 
being Ole and Carrie (Vinnord) Herbranson, who emigrated to the United States some time 
in tlie '50s and located in Minnesota, where they were married. In 1872 they came to Cass 
county, North Dakota, and took up their abode on the farm which is now in possession of 
our subject, the father purchasing one hundred and sixty acres of land from a half breed for 
one hundred dollars. This he cultivated successfully during the remainder of his active busi- 
ness career as well as an adjoining tract of eighty acres which he purchased. He passed 
away in 1914, at the age of ninety-five years, and the community mourned the loss of one of 
its honored pioneer agi-iculturists and esteemed citizens. 

Ole Herbranson, who eame to this state with his parents, in boyhood acquired his 
education in the district schools and after attaining his majority continued to work with 
his father on the home farm, gradually assuming its management. About 1900 he bought 
the home place of two hundred and forty acres in Normanna township and it is now a well 
improved and productive property, in the operation of which he has won a gratifying annual 
income. 

In 1885 Mr. Herbranson was united in marriage to Miss Gunild Hoflfen, a native of 
Norwaj', by whom he has five children, as follows: Caroline, who is the wife of Pete Reisley, 
of Kindred, North Dakota; Olava and Ole, both at home; Mathilda, who gave her hand in 
marriage to Hilmer Bratwold, of Kindred; and Gilbert, at home. 

Politically Mr. Herbranson is a stanch republican, while his religious faith is indicated 
by his membership in the Norwegian Lutheran church, to which his wife and children also 
belong. In matters of citizenship his influence and support are given on the side of advance- 
ment and progress and he holds to high standards in man's personal relations witli his 
fellowmen. 



HELMER M. HABBERSTAD. 

Helmer H. Habberstad, wlio is devoting his time and energies to general farming on 
section 11, Normanna township, Cass county, was born November 20, 1875, on the farm 
where he now makes his home and has therefore for forty years been a witness of the 
growth and development of this section of the state. His parents were Martin and Mary 
(Tostorud) Habberstad, both of whom were natives of Norway. It was in the year 1869 
that the father came to the United States and in 1871 his wife crossed the Atlantic. They 



108 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

became residents of Houston county, Minnesotii. wlieie they were married and establislied 
tlieir liomc, residing there until 1875. The year previous the father came to Cass county, 
North Ualvota, looking for a favorable homestead site auu' selected the farm upon which his 
son now resides. The following yeai he took up his abode upon tlie pro|)erty. purchasing 
railroad land. As the years passed on he carefully tilled the soil and developeil liis crops 
and as his financial resources increased he added to his holdings until he became the owner 
of five hundred and ten acres of the best land of this part of the state. He still lives on the 
old homestead with his son and is one of the highly respected pioneer residents of North 
Dakota. 

Helmcr JI. Habberstad spent his youtlil\iI days umler the parental roof, having tlie 
usual experiences that fall to the lot of the farm lad. The public schools alVordcd him his 
educational opportunities and later he had the advantage of a course in the Decorah Insti- 
tute at Decorah, Iowa, and at Vahlers lousiness College, also of Decorah. He then returiu>d 
home to resume the work of the farm and in 190G acquired title to the property, purchas- 
ing his father's interest in the old homestead. He is therefore now the owner of valuable 
holdings, having one of the fine farms of Cass county, highly cultivated and splendidly 
improved. In addition to devoting his attention to the further development of his farm he 
is connected with the Farmers Klevator Company of Kindred as a stockholder and is also a 
stockholder of the Ecpiity Exchange of St. Pa\il. 

In JIarch, 1902, Mr. Habberstad was united in marriage to Miss Emma Stenbjem. of 
Spring Grove, Minnesota. Mr. Habberstad gives his political endorsement to the repub- 
lican party, feeling that its principles contain the best elements of good government. He 
was elected a member of the board of supervisors and in 1901 was appointed to the position 
of engrossing and enrolling clerk in the state legislature. He belongs to the Norwegian 
Lutheran church and guides his life according to its teachings. Those who know him class 
him with the representative farmers of Cass county. Among his many acquaintances he 
is very popular, being esteemed highly for his sterling worth and his many admirable traits 
of character. 



JOSEPH T. NE\\TX)VE, M. D. 

Dr. Joseph T. Newlove, who is practicing his profession in Minot, was born in Macville, 
Ontario, Canada, December 16, 1867, and is the son of James H. and Hannah (Whitlam) 
Newlove. Both parents were born in Canada, of English descent, and the father's natal day 
was July 14, 1836, while the mother was born some years later. She died in 1875, but Mr. 
Newlove is still engaged in farming in Ontario. 

Joseph T. Newlove was a student in the Detroit College of Medicine and Surgery, of 
Detroit. ^Michigan, from which he was graduated with the class of 1896. After completing 
his medical course he removed to Towner, North Dakota, and practiced there until 1902, 
since which time he has resided in Minot. He soon demonstrated his cajiability and has 
built up a large and profitable practice. Although he devotes almost his entire time to his 
professional work he is connected with business circles as a stockholder and director of the 
Pioneer Life Insurance Company. 

Dr. Newlove was married .January 25, 1899, to Miss Hattie C. Frisby, who was born 
near Morris, Jlinnesota, and is a daughter of Philip and Salina (Stutts) Frisby, natives of 
Pennsylvania, who settled in Minnesota in jiionecr times. They experienced Indian raids and, 
in fact, all the dangers and hardships of frontier life. About 1888 they located at Towner, 
North Dakota, where the father engaged in ranching for a number of years. He is now 
deceased, but his wife survives and is living in Washington. Dr. and Mrs. Newlove have 
had two children: Beulah E., who was born on the 13th of October, 1901, and who died 
March 6, 1914; and James Philip, born December 7, 1906. 

Dr. Newlove is a republican and has held numerous local offices of tnist. He holds 
mcmber.ship in the Masonic blue lodge at Minot, has taken the degrees of both the York and 
Scottish Bites and belongs to the Mystic Shrine at Fargo. Along strictly professional lines 
he is identified with the Northwestern District Medical Society, the North Dakota State 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 109 

Medical Society and is a fellow of the American Medical Association. He finds these organi- 
zations of great value as they enable him to keep in touch with the work of other pro- 
gressive physicians. In the business and social relations he has won the respect which 
genuine merit always commands. 



NELS OLSON. 



Nels Olson, a well known and enterprising farmer of Reedj township, Cass county, 
owns and cultivates two hundred and sixty-eight acres of rich and productive land. His 
farm, in its well kept appearance, presents a marked contrast to its condition in early days 
when he lived in a log cabin with a sod roof and had comparatively few of the comforts of 
life. He was born in Sweden, May 7, 1845, a son of Ole and Elnora Olson, who were natives 
of that country, where they spent their entire lives, rearing their family of six children there. 

Nels Olson is the only one of the family now living. His education was acquired in 
the schools of his native country and he was a young man of twenty-five years when, in 
1870, he sailed for the new world, making his way to Minnesota, where he spent the first 
winter. In the spring of 1871 he arrived in Cass county, North Dakota, and took up his 
abode upon his farm on section 8, Reed township, where he has now remained for forty- 
five years. Not a furrow had been turned nor an improvement made when the tract came 
into his possession, but with characteristic energy iie began to develop it and in course of 
time once wild prairie was bringing forth good crops. He built a log cabin which he covered 
with a sod roof and occupied that home for some years, after which it was replaced by a 
more commodious and modern dwelling. He now owns two hundred and sixteen acres of 
arable land, which he has improved with good buildings, and his farm has been converted 
into very desirable property. 

In Sweden in 1869 Mr. Olson was married to Miss Hannah Sanberg, a native of that 
coimtry, and they became the parents of seven children: Anna, the wife of August Nolin; 
Edward, at home; Samuel; Albert; Selma, the wife of Peter Westling. of Moorhead. Min- 
nesota; and two who have passed away. The wife and mother died in 1908 and many 
friends as well as her immediate family were left to mourn her loss. She was a consistent 
member of the Lutheran church, to which Mr. Olson also belongs. 

His political support is given to the republican party and, while he has never sought 
public office, he has served for several years as a member of the school board. His has been 
an active and well spent life, bringing to him a substantial measure of success so that he 
has been able to provide a comfortable home for his family and lay up a tidy sum for the 
proverbial rainy day. He has never had occasion to regret his determination to come to the 
new world, for he found here the opportunities wliich he sought and in their utilization has 
gained a place among the well-to-do citizens of Cass county. 



WILLIAM C. FORMAN, JR. 



William C. Forman, Jr., of Hankinson, Richland county, is well known in his section 
of the state as the editor of the Hankinson News. A native of Michigan, he was born in 
Lake county on the 2d of August, 1875, and is a son of William C. and Debbie H. (Hurly) 
Forman. The paternal grandfather, James Forman, was born in Canada, whither the family 
had removed from the United States. They were Tories during the Revolutionary war. The 
maternal grandfather was born in Ireland, where he passed away, but his widow removed 
with her children to Canada. The father of our subject was born in Ontario in 1839, and 
the mother was born in Ireland in 1847. They were married in St. Joseph, Michigan, whence 
they came to North Dakota in 1884, settling in Sargent county. The town of Forman was 
named for a brother of William C. Forman, Sr., and the latter still lives there. For a 
number of years he resided on his farm which he homesteaded. He is a carpenter by trade 
and followed that occupation in Michigan. Many years ago he made the long trip to Call- 



110 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

loriiia by way of the Isthmus of Panama and tells many interesting stories of his experi- 
ences on that occasion. For about twelve years he was in the employ of the Union Pacifio 
Railroad. He is a stalwart democrat in politics and served efl"ciently as postmaster of For- 
man during President Cleveland's second administration. He is now (illing the ollice of 
deputy clerk of the courts. The mother of our subject died in 1903 in the faith of the 
Episcopal church, lier demise being deeply regretted by her many friends. She was the 
mother of two children, a son and a daughter, the sister of our subject being Mrs. R. B. Lowry, 
a resident of Baker, Montana. 

William C. Fornian, Jr., received his education in the common schools and when but 
eight years of age began work in a printing office, so that during practically his entire life 
he has been connected with the printing business. For four years, however, he was employed 
in a bank. In 1899 he arrived in Hankinson, Richland county, and purchased the Ilankin- 
son News, which he has successfully conducted during the intervening sixteen years. The 
paper has a circulation of twelve hundred and is well jMtronized as an advertising medium. 
He also does a good job printing business, as he has an up-to-date plant and is straightfor- 
ward in his business methods. He understands all phases of the printing business and is 
recognized as an efliciciit and progressive newspaper man. In April, 1912, he was appointed 
postmaster of Hankinson and discharged the duties of his office with accuracy and in a 
systematic manner, serving until 191G, when he was succeeded by F. 0. Hunger. 

On the 11th of August, 1897, occurred the marriage of Mr. Forman and Miss Carrie J. 
Tisdel, who was born in northern Iowa and by whom he has three sons: William C, George 
H. and JIarshall L. Mrs. Forman is a devout communicant of the Lutheran church and the 
high principles which govern the conduct of Mr. Forman are indicated by the fact that he 
liolds membership in the Jlasonic blue lodge and chapter. He has served as worshipful 
master of his lodge. In politics he is a republican and no matter of public concern fails 
to secure his careful attention. He has become widely known and has made his paper a 
factor in community advancement. 



HARBO SORENSOX. 



Ilarbo Sorenson is a farmer living on section 2, Normanna township, where he oper- 
ates five lumdred and sixty acres of rich and productive land belonging to his wife and her 
family. He also owns personally three hundred and twenty acres of land on section 27, 
Warren township, and he is accounted one of the representative agriculturists of this part 
of the state. Like the majority of the substantial and worthy citizens of Cass county, he 
is of Norwegian birth, his natal day being September 23, 1859. His father, Soren Halverson, 
followed his sons to the United States about the year 1893 and is now making his home 
with a son in Lake county. Minnesota. 

Harbo Sorenson spent the days of his boyhood and youth in the land of the midnight 
sun and was a young man of twenty-two years when in 1881 he bade adieu to friends and 
native land and sailed for the United States. He at once made his w^ay to North Dakota 
and took >ip his abode on section 27, Warren township. Cass county, where he purcliased 
railroad land, becoming owner of a tract of one hundred and sixty acres. Later he extended 
the boundaries of his property by the purchase of an additional quarter section, so that he 
now owns three hundred and twenty acres constituting one of the excellent farms of the 
community. However, he is residing upon a farm of five hundred and six-ty acres owned 
by his wife and her family and is busily engaged in its operation, further development and 
improvement. He is one of the extensive farmers of his township and is a most progressive, 
active and enterprising business man. He carefully studies the needs and conditions of the 
soil and plants his crops accordingly, rotating them from season to season in order to keep 
the soil in excellent condition. His labors are attended with a gratifying measure of suc- 
cess and he is classed with the prosperous and representative agriculturists of the district. 
He is also a stockholder in the Farmers Elevator Company of Warren. 

In 1884 Mr. Sorenson was united in marriage to Miss Olea Tuskind, a native of Nor- 
way. She, however, came with her parents to the United States in 1871. To Mr. and Mrs. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 111 

Sorenson have been born four children: Albert, who operates the home farm; Henry, who 
operates his father's threshing machine; Olga; and Clarence. The family are all members 
of the Norwegian Lutheran church and in his political views Mr. Sorenson is a republican, 
giving stanch and stalwart support to the party, for he believes that its platform contains 
the best elements of good government. He served for several years as a member of the 
board of townsliip trustees and has ever been actively interested in plans and projects for 
the benefit and improvement of township and county. He is a member of the school board 
and the cause of education finds in Iiim a stalwart champion. A self-made man, he deserves 
much credit for what he has accomplished. He came to the country a poor boy without cap- 
ital but possessed energy and determination and upon those substantial qualities has 
builded his success, his life record demonstrating what may be accomplished when energy 
and ambition point out the way. Moreover, his life record is an indication that success and 
an honored name may be won simultaneously, notwithstanding the fact that many feel that 
business and honorable jjrinciples are not harmonious elements. , 



JOHN E. PENCE, M. D. 



Among the progressive and efficient physicians and surgeons of Jlinot is Dr. John K. 
Pence, who was born at Baldwin, Iowa, on the 26th of October, 1884, the fifth in order of 
birth of a family of seven children. His parents, William T. and Mary A. (Campbell) 
Pence, are both natives of Ibwa and their natal years were 1845 and 1849 respectively. 
They now live in Maquoketa, Iowa. 

John R. Pence attended the high school at Maquoketa and subsequentl}' was for two 
years a student in the University of Iowa and spent a similar period in Northwestern 
University, which conferred upon him the M. D. degree in 1909. In June immediately fol- 
lowing his graduation he came to Minot and during the intervening seven years he has 
engaged in the general practice of rnedicine and surgery. In making a diagnosis he is 
careful to take into account every condition affecting the case, gives his patients the best of 
care and in his treatment utilizes the latest discoveries in the field of medicine and surgery. 
He has been accorded an excellent patronage and has gained a high standing in his profession. 

Dr. Pence was united in marriage on the 22d of April. 1914, to Miss Florence Stenersen, 
a native of Minnesota and a daughter of John H. and Abbie (Person) Stenersen. The 
father, who is of Norwegian birth, is now engaged in the lumber business in Port Arthur, 
Canada. His wife is also still living. Dr. and Mrs. Pence have a daughter, Mary, whose 
birth occurred on the 17th of March, 1915. 

The Doctor is a republican and is now serving his fifth year as city health officer, in 
which capacity he has done work of great value to the city. He is a member of Star in 
the West Lodge, No. 33, A. F. & A. M., of Minot; of Minot Lodge, No. 6, K. P.; and Minot 
Lodge, No. 1089, B. P. 0. E., of which ho is now serving as exalted ruler. Through his 
membership in the Northwestern District Medical Society and the North Dakota State 
Medical Society and through wide reading along professional lines he keeps informed as to 
the latest discoveries in his profession and this progressive spirit is one of the factors in 
his success as a phvsician. 



WILLIAJI DOMIER. 



The business interests of Clifford find a worthy representative in William Domier, 
who is a dealer in agricultural implements and has various other active connections with 
business affairs. In fact his interests are so broad in their scope and important in their 
nature as to furtlier in large measure the material development of the community. Mr. 
Domier was born in Norway, .January 23, 1859, a son of Henry and Carrie (Running) 
Domier. who came to the United States in 1866 and settled in Goodhue county, Minnesota, 
where they spent fifteen years. In 1881 they arrived in North Dakota, taking up their 



112 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

abode in Rosoville towiishii>, Traill county, wliere Mr. Domier secured a homestead claim on 
whicli he resided until his death in 1902. His widow survived him for seven ytars, passing 
away in 1909. » 

William Domier pursued his education in the district schools of Minnesota, being but 
a lad of seven years when the family crossed the Atlantic. At a very early age, liowcver, 
he became a wage earner, working as cliore boy for neighboring farmers and doing general 
farm work as early as his nintli or tentli year. He is truly a self-made man, for from that 
time forward he has depended solely upon his own resources. In 1882 he began farming 
on his own account, homesteading one hundred and sixty acres on section 20, Roseville 
township. Traill county. There lie resided for three years, after which he sold that prop- 
erty and went to Nelson county, where he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land, 
there carrying on general farming for eleven years. He next took up his abode in Steele 
county, where he purchased one hundred and sixty acres and for nine years he resided in 
that coiyity, carrying on general agricultural piusuits. In 1905 he removed to ClilTord to 
become manager for the Goose River Implement Company, in which connection he has since 
continued. He still owns his farm in Steele county, located eight miles west of Clifford. 
He is regarded as one of the substantial residents of the town in which he resides, for 
aside from his farming and mercantile interests he is a stockliolder in the Farmers Elevator 
Company and in the Traill County Telephone Company. His business connections are of 
an important character and have won him place among the representative and valued 
residents of this part of the state. 

In 1881 Mr. Domier was married to Jliss Josephine Quelle, a native of Norway, who 
died November 29, 1911. Mr. Domier is a member of the Norwegian Lutheran church. His 
political allegiance has always been given to the republican party since age brought him 
the right of franchise. He has served as a member of the town board and for many years 
he was chairman of the board, while living in Steele county. He takes a deep and helpful 
interest in community affairs, casting his influence always on the side of progress and 
improvement and his clforts in behalf of public welfare have been productive of" excellent 
results. 



OLK K. l-LSAKER. 



The real estate dealers of any coniunniity arc factors of no small importance in its 
upbuilding as they are instrumental in bringing in new residents and in securing improve- 
ments. Ole K. Ulsaker, who is the oldest real estate dealer in Wahpeton in point of years 
of connection with the business, has aided in many ways in the development of the city 
and has also gained financial independence. He was born in Norway on the 1st of December, 
1850, a son of Knute K. and Margaret (Finseth) Ulsaker, likewise natives of that country,' 
the former born in 1806 and the latter in 1811. The father was a son of Ingvald Ulsaker] 
a lifelong resident of the Land of the Jlidnight Sun. and he also passed his entire life there.' 
He died in 1876 and was survived for a number of years by his wife, who died in .January, 
1901. Both were members of the Lutheran church, the teachings of which guided their 
lives. To them were born eight children, four of whom are still living, namely: Knute K., 
a farmer of Richland county, Ole K.; Thrond K.. a fruit farmer in California; aiTd Swen, a 
mini.ster of the Lutlicran church in Wahpeton. 

Ole K. Ulsaker attended the public schools of Norway and after emigrating to this 
country continued his education in St. Olaf College at Northfleld, Minnesota. Subsequently 
he attended Luther College at Decorah, Iowa, whence he came to North Dakota, settling 
first at Kindred. After remaining there for three years he took up his residence in Walipe"- 
ton in 1881, having been elected county treasurer in fall of 1880, which office he held for 
ten }-ears, or five terms, his efficiency leading to his continued reelection. In 1891 he turned 
his attention to the real estate business, in which he has since engaged. He buys and sells 
land outright, and as he is always well informed as to what is on the market and is an 
excellent judge of realty values his transactions have been very profitable and he is now a 
man of independent means. He owns five excellent farms, all of which are well improved 



. HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 113 

and from which he derives a gratifying addition to his income. He is likewise a director 
and vice president of the National Bank of Wahpeton and also owns considerable city 
property. 

In 1885 Mr. TJlsaker was united in marriage to Miss Cecil Huss, a native of Nicollet 
county, Minnesota, by whom he has five children: Oscar, who is engaged in the practice of 
law at Moore, Montana; Althea, the wife of Oscar Erickson, superintendent of schools at 
Hatton, this state; Carl, a graduate of the high school and of the State School of Science 
and first lieutenant of Company I, North Dakota National Guard, now stationed at Mercedes, 
Texas; Walter, who is attending high school; and Lawrence, who is ten years of age. 

Mr. Ulsaker is a republican in politics but has never been able to spare the time to 
take an active part in public afl:airs although he is not remiss in any of the duties of a 
good citizen. His religious faith is that of the Lutheran church, to which he belongs and 
the influence of which he seeks to extend. The success which he has gained is due solely 
to his own energy and ability as he began his career as a poor boy. 



GEORGE W. BOWEN. 



George W. Bowen, agent for the Soo line at Valley City, was born in St. Thomas, 
Ontario, Canada, April 5, 1866, a son of Henry and Nancy (Bolton) Bowen, who were also 
natives of Ontario. The father always made his home at St. Thomas, where he was engaged 
in milling. 

After his school days were over George W. Bowen took up the study of telegraphy and 
became an operator on the Canadian Pacific Railroad, while later he was employed by the 
Michigan Central Railway Compan}', and in 1888 he joined the forces of the Northern Pacific, 
being stationed along the Missouri division. He so continued until 1889, when he became a 
representative of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railroad at St. Paul and was 
in the general offices at St. Paul until May, 1893, when he joined the Soo line and was sent 
to Valley City, since which time he has been agent at that point. 

On the 4tli of August, 1890, Mr. Bowen was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Deuer, 
a native of Illinois, and they have become the parents of eight children: Lawrence D., who 
after leaving high school became a member of the firm of Bowen & Hollingshead at Valley 
City; William H., who is engaged in clerking in Valley City; Grace, at home; and Fred, 
Arthur, Florence, Marjorie and Margaret, all in school. 

Mr. Bowen is identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Knights 
of Pj'thias and is loyal to the teachings of both organizations. He is regarded as an efficient 
agent by the road which he represents, as a substantial and upright citizen by his fellow 
townsmen and In business he has won success, making judicious investments in land, his 
holdings in Colorado farm lands amounting to six hundred and forty acres. 



JACOB L. SKRR^^ETH. 



Jacob L. Skrivseth, who has been connected with the photographer's art and business 
for thirty-nine years, owns and conducts a studio in Minot and receives an excellent patronage 
from the city and surrounding territory. His birth occurred in the district of Nordmore 
on the west coast of Norway on the 26th of December, 1853. His parents, Lars and Mollie 
(Aasprong) Skrivseth, were also* born in Norway and came with their family to the new 
world in 1869. After farming for some time in Freeborn county, Minnesota, they removed 
to Traill county, North Dakota, whence they went to Crookston, Minnesota, where they 
passed away, both being buried in the Crookston cemetery. 

Jacob L. Skrivseth, who is the third in order of birth in a family of seven children, 
attended the public schools of Norway and after the family home was established in 
Minnesota continued his education there. He was seventeen years of age when he began 
working for others, finding employment in a store and later in a hotel. In early manhood 



114 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

he took up photography at Albert Lea, Minnesota, and after learning the business went to 
Faribault, J[innesota, wiionce he removed to Fargo, North Dakota, in the latter '80s, opening 
the first studio in that place thirty-seven years ago. 'He remained there until he located 
in Moorhead, Minnesota, as a partner of O. E. Flaten, and on leaving that place he removed 
to Traill county, this state, where he liad farming interests, and also engaged in business 
in Hillsboro, that county. He was later successively in Mayville and in Crookston, Minnesota, 
but in 1905 became a resident of Minot, North Dakota. He has since resided there, save for 
a short period spent on the Pacific coast, and during the greater part of the time has followed 
his profession as a photographer. In the year of the Alaska- Yukon-Pacific Exposition he went 
to Seattle and for a little while engaged in business there, but the greater part of the time 
devoted his attention solely to sight seeing. He then returned to Minot and opened a studio 
over the First National Eank. He now has a large and profitable patronage not only from 
.Minot but also from the surrounding country. He does all kinds of photographic work and 
holds to a high standard of artistic excellence. He is also a good business man and as the 
years have passed he has prospered financially. For a number of years he owned the 
"skrivseth block, which he erected but which he sold when he went to Seattle, and he has 
also disposed of his stock in the Union National Bank. He is now interested Hn farming 
in Montana. 

Mr. Skrivseth was married ISSO to Miss Bertha Christenson, who was born near 
Nordfjord, Bergen, Norway, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Knute Christenson. Her father died 
in Minnesota, but her mother passed away in Norway. Mr. and Mrs. Skrivseth have three 
children: Henning D., of ilinot, who is assisting his father and who married Miss Nellie Best; 
Margaret, the wife of 0. C. Anderson, of Fargo, who is engaged in the monument business 
with an uncle; and Jay B. L., who is still at home and who is in the employ of the Great 
Northern Railway Company. 

Mr. Skrivseth is a progressive in politics and in the 1912 campaign served as chairman 
of the county central committee. In the early days of the organization of Traill county he 
served as town clerk in what is now Void, but was then a part of Norway, later Logan 
township. He was elected to the ofiices of alderman and mayor of Hillsboro, this state, and 
in all of his otlicial capacities he has performed his duties with regard solely to the welfare 
of the public. Religiously he is a member of the Free Lutheran church and fraternally he is 
a member of the Knights of Pythias of Minot, in which he has passed through all the chairs 
and which he has represented in the grand lodges of the states of North Dakota and Minnesota. 
He was also a grand officer of the Minnesota Knights of Pythias. He is likewise a member 
and an ex-president of the Sons of Norway and is a stockholder in the fraternal homes of 
the orders. He has devoted his entire life to one business and this concentration of his 
energies has enabled him to become an expert in that line and to win an enviable and well 
deserved success. Moreover, his personal characteristics are such that he has gained the 
sincere respect and the warm goodwill of those who have been associated with him. 



HALVOR ,1. IIAGEN. 



Amon" the prominent, energetic and progressive business men of Fargo is Halvor J. 
Hagen, president of the Seandiuavian-Ameriean Bank. He is honored and respected by all 
not" alone by reason of the success which he has achieved, but also owing to the straight- 
forward business policy which he has followed, and his efl'orts have ever been of a character 
that has contributed to public prosperity as well as to. individual success. A native of 
Norwav, he was born in Trondjhem on the 1st of September, 18G0, a son of Jens and Gunliild 
Hagen,' who came to the United States in 1870, settling in Menomonie, Wisconsin. In 1873 
they arrived in the Red River valley of North Dakota, establishing their home in Richland 
county, near Fort Abercrombie, where the father secured a homestead, whereon he remained 
until his death in October, 1913. For about five years he survived his wife, who passed away 
in 1908. In (he meantime he had become one of the large landowners of Richland county, 
making extensive investments in property, which advanced in value through the improve- 
ments which he placed upon his land and also owing to the rapid settlement of the district. 




HALVOR J. HAGEN 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 117 

Halvor J. Hagen pursued his education at Willmar Seminary at Willmar, Minnesota, and 
then turned liis attention to larming near Abererombie, being thus identified with agricul- 
tural interests for a number of years. In 1802, however, he turned his attention to banking 
becoming connected with the National Bank of Wahpeton, and with its officers he organized 
the First State Bank of Abererombie, of wliicli lie became the president and financial manager. 
In 1910 he organized the Scandinavian-American Bank of Fargo, of which he became the 
president, and to this institution he has since given his personal attention, beinding his 
energies to administrative direction and executive control. Under his guidance the bank has 
made steady progress and is now recognized as one of the strong financial institutions of 
the northwest. He is still a member of the board of directors of the First State Bank of 
Abererombie and is also identified financially and officially with other banking institutions 
of the state. 

On the 4th of July, 1894, Mr. Hagen was married to Miss Amy Wood, of Sauk Center, 
Minnesota, and they have become the parents of three children: Allen, who is employed in 
the Scandian National Bank of Minneapolis; Horace; and Naomi. 

The parents hold membership in tlie United Lutheran church and :Mr. Hagen is identified 
with various social, fraternal and civic organizations. In fact, his interests are most varied 
and indicate him to be a man of well rounded character, alive to the questions and conditions 
of the day. He is an active, cooperant factor in the Fargo Commercial Club, being in hearty 
sympathy with every movement to promote the welfare and upbuilding of the city. He 
belongs to the United Lutheran church and is a member of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion, which indicates his activity in behalf of moral development. That he is interested in 
the home of his ancestors and the welfare of liis fellow countrymen is manifest in his member- 
ship in the Norse Society and the Scandinavian Working Men's Association. He is also presi- 
dent of the Per Hjelm Hansen Memorial Society of Fargo and of the Sons of Norway. Mr. 
Hagen is a thirty-second degree Scottish Eite Mason and a member of El Zagal Temple of 
the Mystic Shrine. That he stands for those things which have marked cultural value is in- 
dicated in his membership in the Scandinavian Fine Arts Society of Minneapolis. His interest 
in the events which have formed the history of the state is manifest in the fact that he is a 
member of the board of directors of the State Historical Society, is secretary of the Red 
River Valley Old Settlers' Association and was one of tlie founders of the liistorical park 
at Abererombie, of which he is the present custodian. When president of tlie Red River 
Valley Old Settlers' Association, on the occasion of its twelfth annual meeting at Wahpeton, 
he delivered a most interesting address, which is here given in part. He said: "It becomes 
my pleasant duty to respond to this most generous welcome. We thank you most graciously. 
And when I look over the program and see what good things are in store for us at this meet- 
ing, the many good speeches that you will hear, the many happy reminiscences that will be 
told, the sumptuous feast that will be spread — when I see those things, I am reminded of 
tlie story of the young man «'ho had a bicycle for two, with his best girl on in front; he 
said he apprecia ed the situation because he had something pleasant to look forward to. Wo 
have something pleasant to look forward to here on this occasion. Our sojourn here shall 
be pleasant — for this spot was the great gateway through which so many passed to enter 
the promised land. I think I see them now in imagination — that great army, grim and deter- 
mined men — westward bound — lialt on the brink of the Red River of the north — and I seem 
to hear God whisper into their ears: 'Tliis land will I give you and your children.' And, I 
am grateful, gentlemen of this association, from whom I have received so many courtesies, 
for allowing me to crown my almost one-third of a century of pioneer life by giving me the 
chief official position in j'our association. I am gratified that this honor has come to me at 
Wahpeton — the spot where twenty-nine j'ears ago last month I crossed the ferry to help begin 
the empire building of the Red River valley. I wish to acknowledge, at this time, on behalf 
of the association, the liberality of the people of Richmond county, as expressed through their 
county commissioners, and of the hospitable citizens of Wahpeton, as shown through the 
honorable city council and by the complete preparations here in evidence for our entertain- 
ment. I would also acknowledge the cordiality of our reception by the Wahpeton Board of 
Trade, and the untiring labors in our behalf by Colonel John W. Woodhull, the efficient secre- 
tary of that body. . . And now let me speak in brief of the Red River valley — this vast, 
noble domain, every foot of which is made sacred by the toil of pioneer hands. We love its 
Vol. n— 7 



118 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

very soil; for it ise consecreatcd by the toil of that great army, so many of whom are now 
laying down their burdens and cares and passing to niing'e their heroic dust with tlie soil, to 
make it still more sacred. We have in this spot a spU'iidid inheritance. It is the last spot 
God made in this part of the world; tlie swift-Mowing .-ilrianis at the close of the ice age and 
the settling of Lake Agassiz left it a soil jialpitating with fertility — inexhaustible in pro 
ductiveness. He .seems to have poured into this valley all the wealth of soil He had left 
after fasliioning tlie remainder of the universe. And so it comes that we have great stores 
of fertile soil, beautiful rivers, sunlit prairies, and woods wreathing bank and valley. Add 
to this a glorious climate — sudden at times, perhaps, but bracing — befitting atmosphere for 
the strenuous builders of an empire — and we have a new paradise framed by God as His last 
and noblest achievement. Into this realm came the sifted population of the best countries 
of Kurope — the stoutest and the bravest, the sturdiest and tlie fittest — for none but brave 
and stanch will undertake to break the way for civilization. On they came, to wring from 
savagery a civilization by founding liomcs and building cities. The inhospitable wilderness 
was here in all its wild abandon. Here the black bear lumbered lazily in the forest fast- 
nesses; here the wolf howled, the buffalo roamed. Here superstition worshipped and sac- 
rificed its bloody victims upon the altar of its savage faith. Here tepee and trail told of the 
restless, roaming instinct that beat in the wild breast. Upon this scene the sturdy German, 
the passionate Irishman, the resolute Xorwegian, the practical Scot, the ingenious Saxon, 
the patient Swede, the rugged Bohemian came, full of industry, full of devotion, full of 
faith. All the quarter they ever asked for was a strong arm and a long day in which to 
work. We have seen the result. We see it today — this valley made glorious with their 
achievements, amply provided — a happy people in all its wide domain, beautiful homes, 
noble churches, numberless school buildings, a place designated in the geographies of the 
earth as the 'granary of the world.' And speaking of this state as the granary of the w'orld, 
reminds us of the fact that there has been one plant that has been to the pioneer a friend 
indeed — a plant the most royal in the world. It is a tyrant and causes us to lose niucih 
sleep. It w^orks us to death half the year and makes us vagrants the other half. To adopt 
from the oratory on cotton, one might say: What a royal plant it is. The world waits in 
attendance on its growth. Empires and republics, kings and ])otcntates, rich and poor, black 
and white, all bow before it. The showers that fall wdiispering on its tender leaves are 
heard around the woild. The sun that shines upon it is tempered by the praj-ers of all 
the people. The frost that chills it and the dews that descend from the stars are noted, and 
the trespass of a little bug on its stem is more to England than the advance of the Bussian 
army on her Asian outposts. It is gold from the instant it puts forth its tiny shoot. Its 
kernel is current in every bank, and when heading out to meet the all-maturing sun. it 
nods a head of gold that brings a smile of hope from the farmer. The farmer is thus 
marshaled under a flag that commands the allegiance of the world, and can wring a subsidy 
from every nation on earth. So, industry and a handful of wheat and a willing soil have 
created a transformation that surpasses the flight of the imagination. Instead of the Indian 
wigwam we have the palatial home; instead of the broncho and his trail, the iron horse 
thunders across its track of steel; instead of the waving grass, the waving grain; where 
the altar of superstition once stood, there now rises into view the dome of the church 
and the schoolhouse. Industry smiles at the changes she has wrought, and the pioneers — 
many crowned with the frosts of age — live to enjoy it in its hap|)y consummation. Thirty 
years have passed, beginning with no government, no cultivated fields, no civilization — today 
the greatest tract of territory in point of productiveness of any equal area on the face of 
the earth. I say greatest because it produces more of the material absolutely necessary to 
human existence than any other territory of equal area on all the earth; for its size, it pro- 
duces more bread and material for better bread material than any other region in the world. 
And, greater than all, it contains more citizens who work for themselves; who own the 
lands they till, and who dwell beneath the shadows of their own rooftree; more citizens 
who love God; who love their country and their tUig. than in all the rest of the worlds 
The land is valuable; the assessed valuation has in these forty years passed from a few 
dollars towards the hundred millions. Nor has tliis wealth been dug out of Klondike's 
mines or the diamond fields of South Africa; nor has it been won in the gambling dens of 
Wall street. Every dollar of it is a created wealth — wrung from the reluctant soil by the 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 119 

brawny hand of toil. And there is not only productivity in her soil, but there is beauty in 
her domain. The natural beauties of North Dakota, though not those of destruction and 
desolation, exceed tlie far-famed grandeur of Italy. True, no Alps nor Appenines burst from 
her broad bosom and rear their cold, dead peaks mile upon mile into heaven's mighty vault; 
no Vesuvius belches angry flame at the stars; no Xiagara churns its green waters into a 
rainbow-tinted foam, nor do we hear the savage roar of the avalanche. But here we have 
sun-kissed prairies, the purple tints of the lotus eater's land; the pastoral beauties of Tempe's 
delightful home; suns set and suns rise, whose gleaming gold might ransom a universe of 
kings. This valley of ours is a noble heritage. And today it stands in its multitudinous 
forms of industiy and civilization as an enduring monument to the forethought, enterprise 
and devotion of those who founded and wrought. And as the dark locks whiten, as steps 
totter, as eyes grow dimmed let it be to the satisfaction of the pioneer to know today and 
the remaining days that the pioneer's battle has been a hard-fought one, but nobly won." 



CHAELES H. MAKTIX, D. V. S. 

Dr. Charles H. Martin, engaged in the practice of veterinary surgery at Valley City, 
was born in Ottawa, Illinois, in December, 1869, a son of Phillip R. and Sarah (Berry) 
Martin, both of whom were natives of England. The father, who was born in Devonshire, 
died in 1912, when seventy years of age. The paternal grandfather came to America in the 
late '50s and after a period spent in Michigan removed to Illinois, where he followed farming. 
In 1879 Phillip R. Martin removed from Illinois to North Dakota, establishing his home near 
Buffalo, Cass county, where he secured a homestead, preemption and tree claim. The re- 
mainder of his active business life was spent upon this farm and when he retired he removed 
to Powers Lake, where he continued to make his home until called to his final rest. He 
took great interest in local affairs and was a worthy citizen of the community. 

Of a family of five children Charles H. Martin was the eldest and after mastering the 
branches of learning taught in the public schools he attended the commercial college at 
Valparaiso, Indiana, and still later entered the Ontario (Canada) Veterinary College, from 
which he was graduated with the class of 1894. He then located for practice at Buffalo, Cass 
county, North Dakota, where he remained until 1903, when he came to Valley City, where 
he has since continued and in the intervening years he has won a good practice. 

In 1896 Dr. Martin was united in marriage to Miss Harriet S. Richie, a daughter of 
W. T. Richie, who came to this state in 1879. Mrs. Martin was bom at Mapleton, North 
Dakota, and passed away at Valley City, in July, 1914, leaving seven children: Zella, at 
home; Douglas, Phillip and Howard, all in school; Dorothy; Madge; and Mary. 

Fraternally Dr. Martin is connected with the Kniglits of Pythias and with the Loyal 
Order of Moose and along professional lines his membership is in the North Dakota Veterinary 
Association, of which he served as secretary for several years. He has filled the office of 
district veterinarian and assistant state veterinarian for a number of years and holds high 
rank as one possessing marked skill in his chosen calling. For thirty-seven years Dr. Martin 
has been a resident of this state, having remained in Illinois only until ten years of age, 
and he has therefore been a witness of much of the growth and development of North Dakota. 
At all times he has been interested in its progress and has borne his share in the work of 
public improvement, giving loyal support at all times to those measures and movements 
which he deems of practical value in promoting the best interests of the community. 



J. S. JOHNSON. 



J. S. .Tohnson, president of the Christine State Bank and a well known dealer in lumber 
and farm implements, has not only been connected with the business development of Christine 
but has also been active in public affairs, having held a number of offices, including that of 
state representative. He was born in Norway on the 6th of June, 1854, a son of Lara ant' 



120 . HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Carrie (Tliompsen) Johnson, botli likewise natives of that country, the former horn in 1824 
and the latter in 1827. The mother passed away in hev native country in 1808 but in 1881 
the father emigrated to the United States and purchased a farm in Jlinnesota. He was also 
a landowner in Norway and cnirafjed in farmin<; throughout his entire active life. His demise 
occurred in 1911, when he had reached tlie advanced age of 87 years. His political allegiance 
was given to the republican party after becoming a naturalized citizen of the United .States 
and his religious faith was that of the Lutheran church. To him and his wife were born 
throe children: H. A., who is farming in Meeker county, Minnesota, and who is a machinist 
by trade; J. S.; and Isabelle, the wife of John Holt, a farmer of Wilkins county, Minne- 
sota, and chairman of the board of county commissioners. The paternal grandfather reached 
the advanced age of one hundred and two years and passed his entire life in Norway, as 
did the maternal grandfather, who was a farmer by occupation. 

J. S. Johnson received his education in his native country and remained there for sev- 
eral years after attaining his majority. In ISSO he crossed the Atlantic to the United 
States and made his way to Minnesota, where he engaged in carpentering and farming for 
three years, after which he removed to Christine, North Dakota. In 188S he took a commer- 
cial course in the Curtiss Business College at Jlinncapolis. In 1886 he established a lumber 
business, which he has since successfully conducted and to which he has added a line of 
farm inii)lements. As the years have passed his trade has grown and he is now one of the 
leading business men of Iris town. He also has other interests, being president of 
the Christine State Bank, which he established in 1889 and which has the confidence of the 
community as it has always been nuinaged in accordance with principles of sound finance. 
He also owns considerable land in western North Dakota and he formerly had an interest 
in the Christine Mercantile Company, which he recently sold. 

In 1883 Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss Anna Olson, a native of Norway, 
who passed away three years after her marriage. In 1902 he was again married, Miss 
Albertina R. Lukason, likewise a native of Norway, becoming his wife. Two children have 
been born to this union, Agnes R. and James A. 

Mr. Johnson is a republican and has considerable inlluence in political circles in his 
part of the state. Since attaining his majority he has taken part in public affairs and has 
served as town treasurer and as school treasurer and in 1896 and again in 1898 was honored 
by election to the state legislature, proving a, public-spirited and able law maker. His 
religious faith is indicated by the fact that he holds membership in the Lutheran church 
and fraternally he is connected Avith the Masons and the Woodmen. He is one of the sub- 
stantial men of his community and can always be depcndeil upon to aid in jironioting the 
general welfare. 



J. B. RADFORD. 



J. B. Radford, one of the leading citizens and inosperous agriculturists of Cass county, 
came to this state thirty-seven years ago and in the careful conduct of his agricultural 
interests has won gratifying success, for he is now the owner of six hundred acres of rich 
and productive land in Warren township, residing on section 34. His birth occurred in Fond 
du Lac county. Wisconsin, on the 14tli of February, 1859, his parents being Joseph and 
Frances (Taylor) Radford, both of whom were natives of iMigland. They were married in 
Wisconsin and resided in that state during the remainder of their lives, passing away in 
Fond du Lac. By trade the father was a nuison and plasterer. 

J. B. Radford was reared under the pan^ntal roof and obtaini'd his education in the 
graded and high schools of Fond du Lac. It was in June, 1878, when he was a young man 
of nineteen years, that he came to North Dakota. He had learned the trade of mason under 
his father and after his arrival here worked for one year in Fargo, assisting in the erection 
of some of the first brick buildings in the town. In February, 1879, he took up his present 
home farm as a preemption and subsequently changed this to a homestead. The same 
year he acquired a tree claim on which he proved up and in later years he has purchaed two 
other quarter sections, his landed holdings now embracing six hundred acres in Warren 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 121 

township. He also owns a city residence in Faigo and during the past twenty-three or 
twenty-four years has spent the winter seasons there. 

In October, 1882, Mr. Radford was united in marriage to iliss Sarah Wold, of Cass 
county, who is a native of Norway. To them liave been born four children, as follows: 
Frances, who is deceased; Joseph T., who follows farming in partnership with his father; 
Amy, who has passed away; and Grace U., at home. 

Politically Mr. Radford is an independent republican and for the past twenty years has 
served as county chairman of his party. He has also made an excellent record as a member 
of the township board of trustees, having thus served for about twenty-five years, while 
for four years he was a member of the board of trustees of the State Agricultural College 
under Governor Burke. Fraternally he is identified with the Knights of Pythias. By his 
enterprise and energy along political lines and by his scientific and modern methods of 
agriculture Mr. Radford has earned the high esteem of his fellow citizens and the place in 
the communitv to wliieli he is entitled has never been denied him. 



JOHN E. hol:\i. 



Modern scientific farming finds expression in the work of John K. Holm, who is today 
the owner of three thousand acres of land in Barnes county and with the aid of his sons 
is cultivating altogether forty-two hundred acres. His broad fields of grain look like a 
great billowy sea. stretching on and on as far as the eye can reach, and in addition to con- 
trolling and managing this great property he is also engaged in general merchandising at 
Cuba. His birth occurred in Carver count}', Minnesota, October 12, 1857, a son of Jlr. and 
Mrs. Andrew E. Holm, who were born, reared and married in Sweden. In 1855 they arrived 
in Minnesota and cast in their lot with the pioneer settlers of Carver county at a period 
when the Indians were all around them. At the time of the Sioux Indian war of 1862 
Andrew E. Holm was one of the first drafted to fight the red men and walked to St. Paul, 
a distance of forty miles, for equipment, but owing to rheumatism he was released and 
returned home. He thereafter continued firming througliout his remaining days, passing 
away at an advanced age. He met all of the hardships and privations of frontier life and 
lived to enjoy the success and prosperity which changing conditions and his own industry 
brought about. His family numbered two sons and two daughters. 

The second in order of birth was John Holm, who spent his boj-hood in his native 
county, having the usual experiences that fall to the farm bred lad. In 1879 he married 
Annie Ranft, a native of Pennsylvania, and they have become parents of seven children: 
John, now farming in Barnes county; George, Henry Albert and Powell Edward, all assist- 
ing their father in his extensive farming operations; Anna, the wife of Henry Dill, living 
near Minneapolis, Minnesota; Katie Matilda, at home; and Herman Fritz. 

Following his marriage in 1879 Mr. Holm started out in business life on his own 
account but did not meet with the success he had anticipated when in Minnesota. Accord- 
ingly in 1885 he sought opportunities elsewhere and removed to Barnes county. North 
Dakota, where he cultivated rented land for a number of years. He then returned to 
Minnesota, intending to remain, but found that he had become imbued with a love of North 
-Dakota and in 1891 returned. He here bought a quarter section of land on crop payments 
and began farming, since which time he has added steadily to his holdings until he is now 
the owner of about three thousand acres of land, which he and his sons are cultivating, and 
in addition he rents twelve himdred acres, so that they are now engaged in farming alto- 
gether forty-two hundred acres. The major part of the land is devoted to the growing of 
small grain and he also raises alfalfa and timothy as feed for his stock, having upon his 
place a herd of one hundred head of Red Polled cattle. He also bought out the general 
merchandise store at Cuba, which had been conducted as a farmers' cooperative store, and 
has since carried on a successful general mercantile business. He has his own threshing 
outfit and all modern farm machinery, and there are few in the United States who are 
carrying on agricultural pursuits on a more extensive scale. He is likewise serving as 



122 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

postmaster at Cuba and is closely identified with evpjy interest of tlio iiniimiinity wliicli 
lias to do with the general welfare. 

Mr. Holm is justly regarded as a most sagacious and farsightcd business man, wide- 
awake, alert and enterprising. His phenomenal success is due to his judicious selection in 
buying farm lands and to his wise control and management of his farming operations. 
Altlioiigli in his sixtieth year, in appearance and nuncmcnts he would be readily taken for 
a man of forty. Industry, enterprise and good judgment have characterized him at every 
point in his career. He possesses an optimistic nature and is not afraid to venture wljere 
favoring opportunity points out the way. While he came to North Dakota without a 
dollar and has had to suffer many hard knocks at the hand of fate, he has persevered and 
has found that opportunity, which slips away from the sluggard and tauntingly jilays 
before the dreamer, yields its rich rewards to the man of energy and determination. 



KLIAS BOWMAN. 



Klias Bowman is a representative of one of tlie pioneer families of Cass county. For 
almost forty years he has been a witness of the growth and development of this part of tlie 
state and has aided largely in promoting its progress, particularly along agricultural lines. 
He is still busily engaged in farming and is accounted one of the wide-awake and ]irogres- 
sive farmers in his district. He was horn in Sweden, December 6, 1853, a son of Carl and 
Fredericka (.Johnson) Bowman, both of whom were natives of that country. The father 
there passed away, after which the mother with her three sons came to America in 1876, 
settling in Reed township, Cass county, North Dakota, where she spent her remaining days. 

Klias Bowman was a young man of twenty-three years when he crossed tlu' Atlantic 
to the new^ world with his mother and came to this state. He afterward worked for eleven 
years for his brother, F. Boman, and then took up his abode upon the farm where he now 
resides in Raymond township. In the intervening years he has made a marked change in 
the appearance of the place, converting its wild land into prod\ictive fields, from which ho 
annually gathers rich harvests, while to his farm he has added many improvenuMits tliat 
show him to be a progressive man and one whose efforts are entirely practical. He has 
planted a line grove and now has one of the good farms of his part of the county. 

In 18S8 Mr. Bowman was united in marriage to Miss JIargaret .Johnson, a native of 
Sweden and a daughter of Nels and Helena .Johnson, also natives of that country. The 
father is still living in Sweden, but the mother has passed away. To Mr. and Mrs. Bowman 
have been born four children: Ida E., at home; Helen W.. tlic wife of A. N. Lindsay: and 
Carl .J. and Esther M.. both at home. The wife and mother passed away in 1901, leaving a 
husband and four children to mourn her loss. Her death was a matter of deep regret to many 
friends, for she had gained the good will and kindly regard of all who knew licr. ^Ir. 
Bownnin is a self-nmde man who has gained all that he possesses since coming tu tlu' new- 
world. He has worked persistently and energetically as the years have gone liy, realizing 
tliat industry is the basis of all honorable advancement. He s\ipports the republican party 
at the polls and for two terms has served as a member of the school board and has made a 
highly creditable record in that capacity. Although his private affairs make heavy demands 
upon his time and attention, he always finds opportunity to cooperate in movements seeking 
the general welfare. 



RUDOLPH HERDINA. 



Rudolph Herdina, who has gained a gratifying success as a farmer, is residing on 
section 29, Dwight township, Richland county. A native of Bohemia, he was born on the 
31st of March, 1873, of the marriage of Frank and I'hilomena (Schubert) Herdina, both of 
whom were born in Austria, the former in 18.52 and the latter In IS.'iO. In 187.'j they crossed 
the ocean to the United States and. making their way westward, settled in Minnesota, where 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 123 

the father turned hia attention to farming. Subsequently he removed to North Dakota, 
vvliere he resided for fourteen years, after \vlii?li he returned to Minnesota and he and Ids 
wife are now living at Blooming Prairie, that state. He is a democrat in politics and his 
religious faith is that of the Catholic church. When he came to this country he was a 
poor man but through industry and good management he has now acquired a competence. 
To him and his wife were born twelve children, all of whom are now living and of whom 
our subject is the eldest. The paternal grandfather, Frank Herdina, also emigrated to the 
United States and made his way to North Dakota, where he homesteaded land, although he 
passed away in South Dakota at the home of a son. 

Rudolph Herdina received his education In the public schools of North Dakota and 
remained here when his parents returned to Minnesota. He was early trained in practical 
farming and has followed the occupation to which he was reared. When twenty-two 
years of age he began his independent career and that he has been successful is indicated 
in the fact that he now owns three hundred acres of fertile and well improved land on 
section 39, Dwight township, Richland county. He follows general farming and is enter- 
prising and progressive in his work, cultivating his crops carefully and using the latest 
machinery. He is a director in the Farmers & Merchants Bank at Wahpeton. 

In .1899 Mr. Herdina was united in marriage to Miss Lydia Chezik, a daughter of 
Joseph and Rose Chezik, early settlers of this state, the father taking a homestead claim in 
Richland county, which he farmed until he retired from active life. In his early manhood 
he followed blacksmithing and for some time was in the employ of the government. He 
was in this state during pioneer times and recounts many interesting frontier experiences. 
Mr. and Mrs. Herdina have five children, all of whom are at home, namely: Viola, Phillip, 
Marwil, Chester and Valerian. 

Mr. Herdina casts his ballot in support of the men and measures of the democratic 
party and in religious faith is a Roman Catholic. He began his career as a poor boy and 
has at all times depended solely upon his own resources and can truly be termed a self- 
made man. Although he has given the closest attention to his business affairs he has not 
neglected his duties as a citizen and has always been willing to cooperate in movements 
seeking the public welfare and advancement. During the thirty-three years that he has 
resided in this state he has witnessed a remarkable change and takes justifiable pride in 
the fact that he has had a part in bringing about the transformation. 



MARTIN 0. THOMPSON. 



Martin O. Thompson, an attorney of Lisbon, was born in Meeker county, Minnesota, 
March 5, 1882, and with his parents came to North Dakota in the spring of 1884, the 
family settling on a homestead near Fort Ransom, in Ransom county. He is a son of 
Andrew and Inger (Hendrickson) Thompson, who were born, reared and married in Nor- 
way and came to the new world in the late 'TOs, making their way to Minnesota, where 
they remained for only a short period and then came to North Dakota, as previously 
stated. They had a family of six children: Hannah, Thomas and Dora, all residents of 
Fort Ransom; Martin 0.; Elbert, also of Fort Ransom; and Lena, living at Bemidji, Min- 
nesota. The father died June 2, 1902. 

Martin 0. Thompson obtained his early education in the common schools of Fort 
Ransom and afterward spent two years in the Minnesota Normal & Business College, which 
institution has since passed out of existence. For a year he was a student in the North 
Dakota State Agricultural College and for a year in the college at Fargo. He subsequently 
attended the State University for two years as a law student, there winning the B. L. 
degree. For a period of one year thereafter he was employed as a law clerk in the office 
of M. C. Lasell, of La Moure, and in 1912 he went to Lisbon after spending the summer of 
1911 in looking about for a favorable location in which to practice his profession. He 
opened an office in the Hamilton Bank block, where he has since remained, and in the inter- 
vening period his practice has steadily grown in volume and importance. In the election 



124 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

of November, lUl-1, lie was made state's attorney, having been tlie candidate on the demo- 
cratic ticket, and is now the incumbent in the ottiee. 

On tlie 5th of May, 1915, Mr. Tliompson was married to Miss Nettie Martin, wlio was 
born in Mimay county, Minnesota, May 7, 1890, a daughter of Amond and Lena (Evanson) 
Martin, botli of whom were natives of Wisconsin, wlience tliey removed to Jlinnesota, their 
liome at present being in Fergus Falls, that state. The father was formerly identified with 
merchandising but now gives his attention to farming. To him and his wife have been 
born twelve children and theirs is a notable record, for the family circle yet remains 
unbroken by the hand of death. 

Fraternally Mr. Thompson is connected with Mystic Lodge. No. 14, I. 0. 0. F., at Lisbon 
and also with the Ancient Order of L'nited Workmen. At one period in his career he devoted 
about a year to the study of art, specializing in sculpture, and he takes keen pleasure in 
fine works of art but he now concentrates his attention upon his professional duties, whicli 
are bringing him into close connection with tlie most important work of the courts in his 
district. 



HENRY 0. GARDNER. 



Henry 0. Gardner, a retired farmer living in Forman, was born at Toten, Norway, 
September 17, 1S59. His father, Ole Gaardlos, was also a native of Norway, where he spent 
his entire life. He alwijys engaged in farming and specialized in dairying and the raising 
of clover. He died in April, 1902, while his wife, who bore the maiden name of Helen 
Baomerud, passed away in June, 1902. She was born in the same locality as her husband 
and they were married in 1845. They became the parents of eleven children, of wliom 
Henry 0. is the fourth, and three of that family are still living. 

Henry 0. Gardner was educated in the schools of Norway and afterward worked with 
his father upon the home farm until April 1, 1878, when he resolved to try his fortune in 
the new world and crossed the Atlantic to America. He settled in Jlinneupolis and as the 
city was then somewhat involved in a financial panic he was forced to go out into the country 
to obtain employment. He secured work on the farm of Charley Porter, in Redwood county, 
Minnesota, with whom he remained for three months, after which he engaged in railroading, 
in work in the harvest fields and in elerkhig in a general sture for a perind of four years. 
At the end of. that time, or in 1S83, he removed to Jlontana, where he engaged in prospecting, 
and he also worked for the government, assisting to build Fort MeGinnis. He was thus 
engaged for about four years and in the fall of 1885 he returned to Norway. 

There on the 10th of ^March, 1880, Jlr. Gardner was married to ^Miss Kirstine Dyste, 
who was born March 8, 1859, ill lliirdalen, Nonvay, a diiughter of .John E. and Anna 
(Volengcn) Dyste. Her father, who was born in 1814, passed away in 187:i, while her 
mother, who was born in 1832, died in 1911. Tlieir family numbered nine children, of wlimn 
:Mrs. Gardner is the seventh. Mr. and itrs. Gardner arc the only representatives of their 
respective families in America. Following their marriage their bridiil trip consisted of a 
voyage to the new world and a trip across the country to the North Dakota home. They 
settled on a claim situated on section 32, l^utland township, Sargent county, and later 
Mr. (iardner took up a tree claim located on section 31 in the same township. He afterward 
added a third quarter section and engaged in farming his tract of four hundred and eighty 
acres for seventeen years, during which time he made a specialty of raising stock. His 
business affairs were carefully and wisely managed and his enteriirise imd sound judgment 
were manifest in the success which attended his efforts. He is luiw liailiiig a retired life 
and from his farm derives a good rental. 

In his political views Mr. Gardner is a republican and has filled a imiiilicr of local olFiees, 
serving on the township board of siijiervisors, also as treasurer, justice of the ])eacc and many 
times as a member of the school board. Fraternally he is a JIason, belonging to Blue Lodge, 
No. 5, at Forman, to the chapter at Lidgerwood, the commandery at Lisbon and El Zagal 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Fargo. He and his wife are members of the Norwegian 
Lutheran church. He has never had occasion to regret his detci inination to come to the 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 125 

now world, for lie liere found tiie oppoitiinitii'S which he sought and in their employment 
has worked his way steadily upward. His has been an active and well spent life in which 
labor lias been crowned with success, the fitting reward of earnest, persistent eflort. 



HARRY W. JIONTGOilERY. 



Harry W. Montgomery, who is secretary and manager of the Jlinot Insurance Company 
and to whom the success of that concern is largely due, was born at Grundy Center, Iowa, 
September 20, 1884. His parents, Frank F. and Laura (Shaw) Jlontgomery, were natives 
respectively of Brooklyn, Kew York, and Xenia, Ohio. After removing to Xorth Dakota in 
the spring of 1889 the father engaged in the furniture business at Jamestown until 1898, 
when he went on the road as a traveling salesman for Siegel Brothers, of Chicago. In 1907 
he removed to that city, where he passed awaj- on Thanksgiving day. 1U14. His wife is 
still living and makes her home in Chicago. 

Harry W. Montgomery, an only child, attended school at Jamestown and was gradu- 
ated from the high school there in 1903. He remained under the parental roof until 1907 
although before that time he had begun to work for others. In April of that year he 
removed to Minot and organized the Minot Insurance Company with R. E. Barron as presi- 
dent and Mr. Montgomery as secretary and manager. The company is incorporated and 
has fine offices in the new Jacobson block. It does a general insurance business and as it 
represents a number of tlie best companies and as the men who are directing its affairs 
are well informed as to ail kinds of insurance and are energetic and reliable it is but 
natural that it should be accorded a large and representative patronage. In addition to 
his responsible duties as manager he gives some time to the adjusting of claims. 

Mr. Jlontgomery w-as married in August, 1907, to Miss Sarali ilorris, who w-as born 
in Wisconsin and is a daughter of M. P. and Sarah Morris, who were early pioneers of 
Grand Forks, Xorth Dakota. The father was connected with the Grand Forks Herald for 
some time but subsequently worked on the Jamestown Alert for about seven years and is 
now the publisher of the Stutsman County Democrat. He is also filling the office of post- 
master of Jamestown and for about ten years he was on the county central committee. 
His wife died in 1908. Mr. and Jlrs. Montgomery have three children: Harold, born June 
17, 1908; Margaret, born June 3, 1912; and Ilraa, whose birth occurred November 12, 1914. 

Mr. Montgoraerj- gives liis political support to the republican party but has never 
aspired to ollice. He is a prominent member of the Elks lodge and is now serving as trustee 
and as chairman of the Elks committee. He is likewise identified with the Sons of the 
American Revolution. Although he has resided in JMinot for only eight years he has already 
gained a recognized place as a factor in business circles and personally he has made many 
sincere friends. 



EIXAR MUUS. 



Einar Muus gives a great deal of Ids time and attention to looking after the interests 
of the Great X'orthern Lumber Company, Incorporated, of Minot, of which he is secretary 
and treasurer, but also has other important business connections. He was born in Vestre 
Toten, Norway, on the 1st of June, 1881, a son of Jacob and Julianna (Tetrud) Muus, also 
natives of that place. The father was a farmer and foUow-ed that occupation until his 
demise, which occurred in his native land. In 1910 the mother came to the United States 
and is now living in Velva, Xorth Dakota. 

Einar Muus, who is the sixth in order of birth in a family of eight children, received 
the greater part of his education in X'orway, but following his removal to this country 
attended Concordia College at Moorhead, IMinncsota, for nine months. He was sixteen 
years of age when he crossed the Atlantic to the United States and he at once made his 
way to Minot, North Dakota, where he worked for others for some time. For a while he 



126 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

was in the employ of the Great Xortliein Railroad a..J later became connected with the 
Kulaas Lumber Company, with which he remained for three years. In 1904 he engaged in 
the lumber business independently and in 1905 he organized the Great Northern Lumber 
Company, Incorporated, of which he is secretary and treasurer. The concern does a gen- 
eral lumber business and deals in builders' supplies of all kinds, and the promptness with 
which it tills orders, the high quality of the lumber sold and the straightforward methods 
followed have combined to build up a large and prolitable patronage. Much of the success 
of the company is due to the enterprise and the sound judgment of Mr. iluus, who is recog- 
nized as one of the successful business men of his city. He is also president of the Balfour 
Lumber Company and owns considerable land in the state which he rents. He is a director 
of the Masonic Temple Building Association and of the Sons of Norway Building Association 
and his advice and business c.\perienee have been of great value to those organizations. 

Mr. Muus was married on tlie 23d of June, 1909, to Miss Nella Haugen, who was born 
in Biri, Norway. Her parents, Martin and Christina (Haugen) Haugen, are both natives of 
that country and are still living there. Her fatlier is a farmer and has met with success in 
his chosen occupation. Mr. and .Mrs. iluus have three children: Erling, whose birth occurred 
on the 9th of June, 1910; Julianna, born April 23, 1912; and Nora, whose birth occurred on 
the 2Gtli of November, 1913. 

Mr. .Muus endorses the national policies of the republican party but at local elections 
casts an independent ballot. He has been called to public office and for two years has 
served as a member of the city council of Minot and for a similar period as clerk of the 
board of education. He belongs to the Masonic blue lodge, the chapter and commandery at 
Minot, and to Kem Temple of the Mystic Hlirine at Grand Forks, and for one term he held 
the office of secretary of the lodge. He is also identified with the Sons of Norway, in which 
he has held all of the offices. Among the qualities which have enabled him to win success 
are industry, determination and readiness to utilize opportunities, characteristics which 
never fail to win respect and esteem as well as material reward. 



JACOB OMDAHL. 



Jacob Omdahl. filling the position of postmaster at Galesburg, was born in Norway 
on the 18th of June, 1860, a son of Anders an<l Karen (Alfson) Omdahl, both of whom 
spent their entire lives in Norway. No event of unusual importance occurred to vary the 
routine of life for Jacob Omdahl in his boyhood, his time largely being devoted to the 
acquirement of an education in the public schools. In 1879 he came to the United States, 
settling in (loodhne county, Minnesota, where he secured employment as a farm hand. 
He afterward worked in the same cajiacity in various counties of that state luitil 1885, 
when he came to North Dakota, recognizing the ojiportunities here oll'ered. He took up a 
homestead in Steele county and proving up the property and securing title thereto he 
began adding to his land, purchasing another (piarter section adjoining the home place. He 
then developed and cultivated a tract of three hundred and twenty acres until 190fi, when 
he left the farm and removed to Galesburg, where he has since resided. He still owns the 
property and derives therefrom a substantial annual income. In December, 1913, he was 
appointed postmaster of his town, in which capacity he is now serving, making an excellent 
record through the capable and reliable manner in which he administers the affairs of the 
office. He also conducts a confectionery store and is meeting with good success in that 
undertaking. 

On the nth of J\ine, 1889, occurred the marriage of Mr. Omdahl and Miss Ellen Wilson, 
of Minneapidis. Minnesota, and a native of Norway. To this union six children have been 
born: Arthur \V., who is identified with the Board of Trade in Minneapolis: Ksther Nora, who 
is studying to be a trained nurse in the Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis; Alary E., 
who is teaching in the schools at Devils Lake, North Dakota; Clarence E., who is pursuing 
a course in Akers Business College at Fargo; Alfred M., who is a high school student; and 
Ruth .1.. who is attending the graded schools. 

In polities Mr. Omdahl is independent, voting according to the dictates of his judgment. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 127 

His fellow townsmen, appreciative of his worth and ability have at various times called 
him to public ofEce. He has served as a member of the town board and also as township 
assessor and as a member of the school boaid. He has long been regarded as one of the 
leading men of his township and in 1910 he was appointed to the office of census enumer- 
ator. He and his wife are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and they display 
many sterling qualities which have gained them the warm regard of all with whom they 
have been associated. Mr. Omdahl has never regretted his determination to come to the 
new world. The opportunities which he here sought he found were to be secured and he 
learned that industry in this country wins its reward. Gradually he worked his way upward 
and his life record indicates what may be accomplished when one has the will to dare and to 
do. 



WALTER GREEN. 



Walter Green, living in Diirbin township, Cass county, is the owner of valuable farm 
property comprising five hundred and sixty acres, to the fui'ther development and cultivation 
of which he gives his undivided attention. He was born in Michigan, January 2, 1S57, and 
is a son of Eli and Esther (Gard) Green, both of whom were natives of that state. There 
they were reared and married and after living for many years in Michigan they came to 
North Dakota in 1880, settling upon a farm in Cass county. There they spent their remain- 
ing days and the father became recognized as one of the leading farmers of the county, add- 
ing to his possessions from time to time until his extensive land holdings embraced thirty-five 
hundred acres, all of which was well improved. Much of this property has been sold bj- his 
son. He was a progressive and enterprising man, accomplishing whatever he undertook, and 
the methods which he followed commended him to the confidence and goodwill of all. In 
the family were two children and the younger son, Frank, is now deceased. 

Walter Green, the surviving member of the family, has always remained with his father 
and he is still the owner of five hundred and sixty acres of land, which his father entered 
and which constitutes a valuable farm property, to the care and supervision of which he 
directs his activities, thus leading a useful, busy and active life. He has a wide acquaintance 
in this part of the state and is spoken of in terms of high respect as a progressive and capable 
business man. 



L. N. ABBOTT. 



L. N. Abbott, the efficient manager of the real estate business of Crandall, Flynn & 
Tuttle, of Fairmount, is a man of marked public spirit and takes a great interest in every- 
thing tending to promote the community welfare. He was born in West Cambridge, NeAV 
York. .June 11, 1873, a son of E. B. and Elizabeth T). (Dennis) Abbott, natives respectively 
of Saratoga county. New York, and of Washington county, that state. The father, who was 
born in 1845. is still living but has retired, making his home in New York. The mother, 
whose birth occurred in 1850, died in 1900. They were married in the Empire state and con- 
tinued to live there until 1879, when they removed to ^Michigan. The father met with grati- 
fying success as a stockman and farmer. In politics, he is a republican and has held a 
number of town offices, and he belongs to the Presbyterian church, as did his wife. To them 
were born four children, of whom two are living, the brother of our subject being Clarence, 
who is engaged in the automobile business in Breedsville. Michigan. 

L. N. Abbott received his education in the public schools of Breedsville, ilichigan, and 
on beginning his independent career went to Kalamazoo, where he became connected with the 
Michigan State Hospital. He remained there for six years and rose from an attendant to 
assistant supervisor. He has resided in North Dakota since 1901 and in the intervening 
fifteen years has gained a reputation in Fairmount and Richland county as an excellent 
business man. Not long after his arrival in Fairmount he became connected with the real 
estate business conducted by Charles A. Tuttle and now is manager of the Crandall, Flynn 



128 TTTSTORV OF NORTH DAKOTA 

& Tultle Land Company, wliicli buys anil ;«'lls land in \oitli and South Dakota. Hi- is an 
oxc'clk'nt judge of land values and as he keeps in close touch with the real estate market his 
operations in that field have been very prolltabU'. 

In 1902 occurred the marriage of Mr. Abbott and Miss Pearl E. Tuttle, a daughter of 
Albert H. Tuttle, a prominent attorney of Hartford, Slichigan. To this union have been 
born three children: Maxine, eight years of age; and Dale and Donald, twins, five years old. 

Mr. Abbott is a stanch republican and is active in party work, lie is at present serving 
as mayor and has nuide an excellent record in that capacity, conducting muTiicipal all'airs in 
a business-like manner. He is also on the school board. He was identilied with the Xatioiuil 
Guard for several years and during the Spanish-American was was a member of the Thirty- 
second Jlichigan Infantry, his military experience covering in all six years. During the war 
he was in Sliafter's brigade, but saw no active service. Fraternally he belongs to the Knights 
of Pythias, in the state organization of which he is now grand outer guard, and to the 
Masonic blue lodge, in which he is junior warden. He is always willing to give of his time, 
energy and thought to the development of Fairnu)unt and has done a great deal to promote 
the community advancement not only as an individual but also as a member of the com- 
mercial Club. 



n. II. THIK 



H. H. Thue is a well known, i]opular and pros|)orous nu'rchant and business man of 
Horace, where he has made his home since 1890. Notably prompt, energetic and reliable, 
'he so directs his elVorts that substantial results accrue and at the same time his eftorts are 
a factor in promoting jmblic prosperity. He was born in Norway, March 14, 1802, a son of 
Mr. and Mrs. li. li. Thue, both of whom passed away in that land. He had the benefit of 
instruction in the iniblic and normal schools of his native country and in 1881 when a youth 
of nineteen years sailed for the new world, thinking to lind better business conditions anil 
opportunities on this side of the Atlantic, whore many uf liis fellow countrymen had pre- 
ceded him. A large number had settled in Minnesota and to that state Mr. Thue made his 
way, going first to Byron, Olmsted county. He had studied the English langiuigc in Norway 
and was therefore more or less conversant with the speech of the jjeojile among whom he 
cast his lot. He first secured employment at farm labor, which he followed tluougli the 
summer months, while in the winter seasons he attended school and for a short period he 
taught in the schools among the people who spoke the Norwegian tongue. The year 1SS:{ 
witnessed his arrival in North Dakota, at which tinu' he nuide his way to Norman, where 
he worked through the harvest season. In the succeeding winter he returned to Minnesota 
and again attended school, thus continuing his education thro\igh three winter terms. In 
1884 he took >ip the homestead in Polk county, Minnesota, and although he lived tliereon for 
a time he did not prove up. The same year he located in Crookston and secured a clerkship 
in a general store, remaining in that position for two years. He spent the succeeding two 
Vfars in Hatton, North Dakota, where he took np the juofession of teaching and was also 
employed in various other ways. 

The year 1890 witnessed Mr. Time's arrival in lloraie. North Dakota, and throni;li the 
succeeding summer he worked as a farm hand, while in the following fall he embarked in 
nierchanilising at Horace, in which business he has since been engaged, having been jironii- 
nently indentilied with commercial interests at this point for the past twenty-five years. 
He carries a laige and carefully selected line of goods, puts forth every endeavor to meet 
the wants of his customers and in all his dealings is thoroughly reliable and trustworthy. 
In fact he is one of the best known, most popular and highly esteemed country merchants 
of Cass county and he well merits the success that has come to him in the conduct of his 
mercantile interests. 

Mr. Thue was married in Horace, in 1890, to Miss Caroline I'.rink. a daughter of C. f). 
Brink, a pioneer of Cass county. To Mr. and Mrs. Thue have been born eight children, 
Christian H., Selma, Florence, Orla, Theresa, Edna. Norma and Horace W., all of whom are 
with their parents. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 129 

Mr. Time and his family are all members of the jSTorwegian Lutheran church and its 
teachings lind exemijlilieation in their lives. Mr. Thue is a reimblican in his political views 
and has served as ijostmaster of Horace and for some years as justice of the peace, discharg- 
ing his duties at all times with promptness and fidelity. In the latter office he rendered 
decisions which were fair and impartial and which won for him golden opinions from all 
sorts of people. Fraternally he is connected with the Modem Woodman of America. In 
every relation his life measures up to high standards and those who know him entertain 
for him the warm regard which is ever given in recognition of sterling personal worth. In 
manner he is social and genial, is always courteous and obliging in business and as the years 
have gone on he has gained a wide circle of \varm friends who speak of him in terms of the 
higliest regard. 



JOHN F. McGUIRE. 



John F. McGuire is one of the leading representatives of electrical interests in Minot 
and has proved very capable as the local manager of the H. M. Byllesby Company of Chicago, 
electrical engineers. He was born in that city on the 16ih of April, 18S0, of the marriage 
of Patrick and Catherine (Herley) McGuire, the former of whom was born in Ireland and the 
latter in St. Lawrence, New York. The father removed to Chicago in early manhood and 
resided there for forty-four years, passing away on the 15th of September, 1914. He was a 
blacksmith by trade. The mother died on the 21st of July, 1908. 

John F. McGuire, who is the third in a family of nine children, received his education in 
the public schools of his native city and in the commercial department of De Paul Univer- 
sity. When seventeen years of age he began learning the electrical business and when 
about twenty years old entered the employ of the Commonwealth Edison Company of 
Chicago. He remained with that concern for about four years and worked his waj"^ upward 
through all of the departments until he became connected with the contracting work of the 
concern. In October. 1909, he removed to Minot, North Dakota, and became associated 
with the Consumers Power Company as the representative of the H. M. Byllesby Company 
of Chicago, electrical engineers, and since 1913 has been in full charge of the business of 
that company in Minot. He devotes his entire time to the interests entrusted to his care 
and his work has been very satisfactory to the company. He not only thoroughly under- 
stands the electrical business, but he also possesses sound judgment and executive ability 
and is a valued factor in the industrial circles of Minot. 

Mr. McGuire was married on the 19th of April, 1911, to Miss Eleanor Halla, whose 
parents, John and Sage (Quirk) Halla, were early settlers of Chicago. The father is 
deceased, but the mother is still living in that city. Mr. and Mrs. McGuire liave a son, 
John Halla, whose birth occurred on the 21st of April, 1914. 

Mr. McGuire is independent in politics and has never been an ofBce seeker. His religious 
faith is indicated by the fact that he is a communicant of the Roman Catholic church, and 
fraternally he belongs to the Elks. His interest in the growth and development of Minot 
finds expression in his membership in the Commercial Club, and he is active in carrying out 
the projects of that body. He is progressive and up-to-date and keeps in touch with 
advancement in the electrical field tiirough reading along technical lines and through his 
membership in the Order of Jovians, an electrical association, and in the National Electric 
Light Association. 



PETER G. SWENSON. 



Among the prominent citizens of Hillsboro, North Dakota, is Peter G. Swenson. who 
has been engaged in the practice of law there since 1893 and served as state's attorney 
of Traill county for four years. His birth occurred at Trondhjem, Norway, on the 23d of 
December, 1866, but he was brought to this co\intry by his parents in boyhood and received 



130 HISTORY OF \ORTH DAKOTA 

his education in the Decorali Institute at Docoiali, Io"a, and in tlie law deifartmcnt of the 
University of Jlinnesota, from wliich he was graduated with his professional degree in 18U3. 

The following year ilr. Swenson located for the practice of his profession in Hillsboro, 
North Dakota, where he has since remained and during the intervening period of twenty- 
three years has built up a large and representative clientage. He studies his eases carefully, 
taking into account every point that might possibly have a bearing upon the outcome of 
the trial. In liis arguments before the court he is lucid and convincing, and the records 
sliow that he has won a large portion of the cases in which he has appeared as counsel. In 
1894 he was elected to the office of states attorney of Traill county and lilled that position 
for four years, making a highly creditable record. He is a director of the Hillsboro National 
Bank. 

In 1895 Mr. Swenson was united in marriage to Miss Sofie Olson, and they have four 
children, a son and three daughters. He takes the interest of a good citizen in political 
affairs, but has held no important office outside of the strict path of his profession, 
preferring to concentrate his energies upon the practice of law. He has, however, served 
as a member of the board of education. He not only occupies a high position at the bar of 
Traill county but is also popular personall.y. Fraternally Mr. Swenson belongs to Hills- 
boro Lodge, No. 10, A. F. & A. M; Fargo Consistory; and El Zagal Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine. He is also a member of Hillsboro Lodge, No. 30, K. P. 



JOHN HENRY WORST. 



John Henry Worst has devoted his life quite generally to educational work and for 
twenty-one years was president of the North Dakota State Agricultural College at Fargo. 
He has made that institution one of tlie most important factors in the advancement of 
agricultural interests in the state and believes firmly that the farmers of the country 
should cooperate to a greater extent than they have so far done and is convinced that if 
they exerted a larger influence in affairs of government politics would be materially purilied 
and the government would be strengthened. 

Mr. Worst was born in Ashland county, Ohio, on the 23d of December, 1850, a son of 
George and Margaret AVorst. His parents began their married life in that county at a 
time when the Western Reserve was still covered with forest and their home was a primitive 
log cabin. The father was a Gennan Baptist minister who farmed during the week and 
preached on Sunday, as was at that time the custom in his denomination. Our subject 
attended the common schools in his early boyhood and subsequently was a student in the 
Smithville (Ohio) Academy, and in Salem College at Bourbon; Indiana, which has long 
since passed out of existence. Still later he continued his education in Ashland College at 
Ashland, Ohio, but did not complete his course there. Later, however, tliat institution con- 
ferred upon him the degree LL. D. in recognition of his excellent woik as an educator, 
especially as president of the North Dakota Agricultural College. 

In early manhood .Mr. Worst began teaching in the rural schools and during the 
summers followed agricultural pursuits but at length, on account of im])aired health, turm^l 
his attention to merchandising, with which he was connected for two years. At another 
time he was for two years editor of the Fairfield County (Ohio) Republican, but in 1883 he 
came to North Dakota and took up a homestead in Emmons county. He resided there for 
twelve years and during that time endured the hardships and privations incident to pioneer 
life in the northwest. This experience of actual conditions was of great benefit to him 
in his later work as head of the Agricultural College, enabling him to understand the needs 
of the farmers of the state from a practical as well as from a theoretical viewpoint. While 
engaged in proving up and farming his homestead he also held a number of offices. In the 
fall of 1883 he was ajipointed county siiperintendent of schools and was later elected to 
that office, serving therein until 1889, when he was chosen .state senator from the twenty- 
sixth legislative district. He filled that jiosition of honor until 1894, when he was elected 
lieutenant governor and during the winter of 1895 he presided with dignity and impartiality 
over the deliberations of the state senate. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 131 

In the winter of 1895 Mr. Worst was made president of the North Dakota State Agri- 
cultural College and director of the government experiment station connected with the 
college, but resigned the latter position in 1913.. He kept in close touch with the work 
being done in similar schools in other states, constantly seeking to make the Xorth Dakota 
State Agricultural College of greater service to the farmers of the state and to promote in 
every way possible the agricultural interests of the commonwealth. He manifested a high 
order of executive ability, securing the hearty cooperation of the faculty and the student 
body, and was recognized as one of the leading educators in his special field in the country. On 
the 28th of February, 1916, he was removed from the presidency of the college, no cause 
for such removal being assigned. Mr. Worst is now managing editor of the North Dakota 
Farmer and also of the New Rockford Daily State's Center. 

Mr. Worst was united in marriage in Congress. Ohio, on the 10th of October, 1872, 
to Miss Susan Wohlgamuth, a daughter of Jacob and Barbara Wohlganuith. She was born 
near Massillon, Ohio, where her father was engaged in farming. Mr. and Mrs. Worst have 
become the parents of the following children: Olive Jeanette, who married Dr. Guy F. Rogers; 
Clayton Leroy; and Lloyd Warner. 

Mr. Worst is a stanch republican and previous to becoming president of the State 
Agricultural College took an active part in politics, making many campaign addresses and 
gaining an enviable reputation as a political speaker. In 1914, at the earnest solicitation 
of his friends, he became a candidate for nomination for United States senator, but did not 
make a personal campaign and was defeated at the primaries. He is well known frater- 
nally, being a thirty-tliird degi'ee Mason and having served for twenty years as wise master 
of Pelican Chapter, Rose Croix, and having also taken the York Kite degrees and being 
past chancellor commander of the Knights of Pythias and a member of the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks. 

His interest in the commercial and civic advancement of the city is indicated by the 
fact that he belongs to the Fargo Commercial Club and heartily supports its various proj- 
ects for the general welfare. During the past seventeen years he has served either as 
president or secretary of the Tri-State Grain and Stockgrowers Association, a body of 
some eight thousand farmers who meet in Fargo annually for the discussion of subjects of 
interest to farmers and the agricultural development of the three states. North Dakota, 
Minnesota and South Dakota. He has also maintained a progressive attitude toward social, 
business and political problems and has sought through careful study to do his share toward 
reaching their correct solution. During the thirty-three years of his residence in the state 
and especially during the twenty-one years that he was president of the North Dakota 
State Agricultural College he has endeavored as an oflficial, writer and lecturer to serve the 
common people and most of all to dignify the profession of agriculture. It is his firm belief 
that if the farmers were educated in agricultural statesmanship so that they could officially 
represent the forty billion dollars invested in the farming indiistry and could share in the 
federal and state governments in proportion to their numerical strength that politics would 
be raised to a higher plane and that the government would be more efficiently and more 
democratically administered. The farmers of the nation produce a great part of the 
national wealth, bear the national burden and cast a majority of the votes and he believes 
they should exert a much larger influence in governmental affairs than they do at present. 

In advocating advanced movements which he believes to be for the good of the state 
and nation he is but manifesting the spirit of initiative and faith in the future which has 
been one of the strongest characteristics of the Worst family as for generations they have 
been pioneers, removing from the older civilization to the newer so as to take advantage 
of its unusual opportunities and to have a part in its development. Our subject's great- 
grandfather emigrated from Holland to the United States when only twelve years of 
age and became one of the early settlers of Pennsylvania, clearing and bringing to a high 
state of cultivation a tract of timber land. He was a man of fine character and great deter- 
mination and was highly esteemed in his community. He reached the remarkable age of one 
hundred and six years. His son, the grandfather of President Worst, cleared and partly 
developed two farms in Pennsylvania and later located in Ashland county, Ohio, where he 
also cleared a farm. He, too, reached an advanced age, dying when ninety-seven years 
old. His son, George Worst, continued the family tradition and settling on the Western 



132 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Reserve in northern Ohio during its pioneer days, b«)Ught a tract of wild land under cultiva- 
tion. He died when seventy-four years old. Our subject was a pioneer of North Dakota 
and both of his sons Avere located for a time in Alaska. It is to such men as these that 
the nuuvelous development of this country has been chielly due. 



KEV. jnCHAEL SCH.MITT. 



Rev. Michael Schmitt, pastor of St. derome's Catholic church at llohall, was born at 
Harper, Keokuk county, Iowa, JIarch 23, 1884, a son of Frank and Margaret (AVehr) 
Schmitt, both of whom were natives of Germany. Coming to America in the '60s, they settled 
in Iowa, the father purchasing land in Keokuk county, where he carried on farming for many 
years. He eventually retired from active business but continued to reside upon his farm until 
he passed away in February, 1910. l-'ur about eight years he had survived his wife, who died 
in July, 1902. 

Their son, Michael Schmitt, was reared and educated in the public and parochial schools 
of Keokuk county, Iowa, and at the age of seventeen years began studying for the priest- 
hood, spending five years as a pupil in St. Francis' Seminary at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He 
was afterward for two years a student in St. Ambrose's College at Davenport, Iowa, and for 
one year in the Kenrick Seminary at St. Louis, Missouri. He completed his studies in the 
Seminary of St. Paul in St. Paul, Minnesota, in the year 1912 and immediately afterward 
came to Mohall, having been appointed to the pastorate of St. Jerome's church, with which he 
has since been connected, building up the church here in a most satisfactory manner. He 
also has charge of St. James' church at Sherwood, St. Philomena's church at (ilenburn and 
Holy Family cfiurch at Deering. He is now erecting a fine church edifice at Sherwood at a 
cost of fifteen thousand dollars and is building a parochial residence at Jlohall at a cost of 
five thousand dollars. He is likewise building a cluuch at Deering and thus the work is 
being steadily carried forward. He belongs to the Knights of Columbus and he concentrates 
his entire eil'ort upon the cause to which he has consecrated his life. 



i5i:AnLi:v \v. clabaugh. 



Bradley W. Clabaugh, the owner and editor of tlie l";iii mount News, is one of tlie well 
known, inlluential citizens of Richland county. He was l)iirn i]i Frederick, Maryland, Jan- 
uary 12, 18C7, of the marriage of Norman U. and Margaret (Font) Clabaugh. both natives 
of that state, the former born on tlie :ilst of August, 1818. and tlic hitter in ls21. The 
Clabaugh family is of Scotch descent but has V)een established in tlie Cnited States for 
many years. The parents of our subject were married in Jlarylaiid and passed away in that 
state, the father in 1892 and the mother in 1887. The former was a millwright and inventor 
and was a man of good business judgment. In politics he sujiported the democratic party 
and for one term he served as sherill of his county. His religious faith was that of the 
Lutheran church. To him and his wife were born ten children; G. M. D.. who is a coach 
trimmer residing in Frederick, Maryland; Mary, the wife of William Scachrist, a dairyman 
living in Maryland; Bruce, who is deceased; Cliarles B.. an engineer living in Frederick; 
William F., who owns a lime kiln in Keller, West Virginia; Susie, the wife of Fitzhugh Hauer, 
a painter of Frederick. Maryland; Addie W., who is living in Washington, 1). C; Bradley 
W.; R. L., a barber living in Washington. D. C; and Alvah, a resident of Baltimore. 

Bradley W. Clabaugh was reared under the jiarental roof and received his education in 
the schools of Frederick. In 1884. when seventeen years of age, he entered a newspaper 
office and learned the printer's trade, with which he has since been connected. After a time 
he went to Butte, Montana, and while there worked on the leading papers of the state, thus 
gaining valuable experience. In 1888 he joined the Typographical Union at Baltimore. In 
1896 he removed to Fairmount, South Dakota, and established the Fairmount News, which 
he has since conducted and which has a circulation of twelve hundred. The paper gives the 




REV. ^nCHAEL SCHMITT 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 135 

local news and also brief accounts of happenings of general interest and it has gained an 
enviable reputation for reliability. Mr. Clabaugh also does considerable job printing, for 
which his office is well equipped. 

In 1S95 occurred the marriage of Mr. Clabaugh and Miss Wilhelmina Wiedeman, a 
native of Wisconsin, and they have two children: Vera M., who was graduated from the 
high school at Fairmount, and also from the Valley City Normal School and is now acting 
as assistant postmistress at Fairmount under her mother, the present postmistress; and Del- 
win B., who is attending school. 

Mr. Clabaugh is a democrat in politics and his advice is often sought in party councils. 
He belongs to the Masonic order and the Knights of Pythias, and his wife is a member of the 
Eastern Star, in which she has served as worthy matron for a number of years. She is also 
a member of the Federated AVomen's Clubs, and her religious faith is indicated by the fact 
that she is a member of the Congregational church. Mr. Clabaugh devotes his time and energy 
almost exclusively to his newspaper and printing business and the success which he has 
gained is largely attributable to the fact that he has continued to engage in the same busi- 
ness which he entered as a young man. 



PETER FUGELSO. 



Peter Fugelso was one of the first settlers in Ward county and has continued to identify 
himself with the interests of the county since his arrival there. He is one of the proprietors 
of a hardware store in Minot and carries the most complete stock of any hardware dealer in 
the county and as large a stock as anyone in the state. He was born in Trondhjem, Norway, 
on the 28th of March, 1862, a son of Peter and Gurine Fugelso, both of whom were born in 
that country. He is the youngest of a family of ten children and lost his father when but 
three weeks old. In the spring of 1887 the mother came to America, where several of her 
children were living, and settled at Foxholm, Ward county. North Dakota. She resided there 
until 1908, when she died at the venerable age of ninety years. 

Peter Fugelso received the greater part of his education in the common schools of 
Norway, but after his emigration to the United States attended school for a short time in 
Yellow Medicine county, Minnesota. As his father had passed away he was compelled to 
earn his living when but six years old and he worked for others in his native land until he 
was a young man of nineteen years, when he crossed the Atlantic to America. He landed 
at Quebec, Canada, on the day that President Garfield was shot and continued his journey to 
Canby, Minnesota, where he worked for several years. In 1886 he made his way up the 
Mouse river from Fargo, North Dakota, with ox teams and took up a homestead in Ward 
county, which had been organized only a short time before. His land was situated on the 
present site of Foxholm, and he remained there until 1898, when he removed to Minot. For 
some time he was employed in the store of Martin Jacobson as bookkeeper and clerk, but in 
1901 he was appointed postmaster, which office he held for five years. He then accepted 
a position with his old employer, Martin Jacobson, but on the 1st of Januaiy, 1907, he with 
D. R. Jacobson purchased the hardware business of Martin Jacobson. They deal in shelf and 
heavy hardware and handle a very complete line of goods. Their patronage is deservedly 
large and their liberal business policy and unquestioned integrity have gained them high 
standing in business circles. Their store is recognized as one of the leading mercantile 
establishments of Minot and is a factor of no small importance in the commercial develop- 
ment of the city. Although he still owns his homestead and also holds title to other land 
in the state Mr. Fugelso devotes his entire time to the hardware business. 

On the 2d of March 1899, occurred the marriage of ilr. Fugelso and Miss Sigrid Larsen, 
whose birth occurred in Norway and who is a daughter of Guneris and Louisa Larsen, who 
passed their entire lives in that country. Mrs. Fugelso accompanied her brother to this 
country when eighteen years of age. By her marriage she has become the mother of six 
children, Gerda Louise, Ralph Peter, Alph Severin, Leif Erick, Erling Sverre and Norman Carl. 

Mr. Fugelso is a stanch republican and in addition to serving as postmaster of Minot 
for five years was district assessor for two terms. He takes a commendable interest in public 
Vol. n— 8 



136 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

affairs and is never remiss in any of the duties oi-« good citizen. His religious faith is 
that of the Norwegian Free Lutheran church and the sincerity of his belief is manifest in 
the upriglitness of his daily life. Fraternally he belongs to the Maccabees and the Sons of 
Norway and he is also a member of the Old Settlers Association, of Ward county of which 
he is secretary. When he located in that county the town of Minot had not yet corae into 
existence and Burlington was the county seat of the newly organized county. As the years 
have passed he has not only witnessed the transformation of the county from a wild and 
unsettled district to a region of well cultivated farms and prosperous towns but has 
also done his part in bringing about the change. He is justly held in high esteem by all who 
have come in contact with him. 



JOSEPPI J. JIcINTYEE. 



Joseph J. Mclntyre, carrying on general farming and stock raising, is one of the extensive 
landowners of Cass county, his difl'crent purchases of property aggregating nine hundred and 
sixty acres, all in llapleton township. Mr. Mclntyre is of Canadian birth, tlie place of his 
nativity being Welland county, Ontario, and the date May 24, 1847. His parents were 
Malcolm and Hulda (Doane) Mclntyre, the former a native of Scotland and the latter of 
Canada. Coming to the new world, Malcolm Mclntyre was married in Canada and there 
he and his wife spent their remaining days, rearing their family of seven children, of whom 
four are yet living. 

Joseph J. Mclntyre spent his youth in his native country and pursued liis education in 
the public schools there. He was twenty-nine years of age when he arrived in Cass county 
in 1S7C, at which time he took up his abode in the village of Mapleton, where he conducted 
an implement store for several years. In 1880, however, he removed to the farm which he 
now occupies and from time to time he has extended its boundaries until the place comprises 
today nine hundred and sixty acres of valuable land, much of which he has brought to a 
high state of cultivation, so that the fields return to him a gratifying annual income as the 
result of the golden liarvests which he annually gathers. He makes stock raising a feature 
of his farm as well as the production of grain and his business is carefully, systematically 
and successfully managed. 

In 1879 ilr. Mclntyre was married in Canada to Miss Henrietta Sherk, a native of that 
country and a daughter of Peter and Drucilla (Boogner) Sherk, who spent their entire lives 
in Canada. William F. Mclntyre, son of Joseph J. and Henrietta Mclntyre, operates the 
home farm and is also one of the directors of the Mapleton State Bank and a stockholder 
in the Farmers Elevator. He is a Avorthy exemplar of the Masonic fraternity, has taken 
all the degrees of the order and belongs to the Mystic Shrine. His political allegiance is 
given to the democracy and he has ably served as clerk of the school board. 

Mr. Mclntyre is a member of the Odd Fellows lodge and his wife holds membership in 
the United Brethren church. In politics he is a democrat and has served on the township 
board and also as school director for a number of years. His interest in community affairs 
is deep and sincere and he cooperates heartily in all those movements which relate to the 
public welfare and further the general good. He has never had occasion to regret his 
determination to come to the United States, for in Cass county he has found business 
conditions which have brought to him substantial success as the years have gone on. 



CARL T. JACOBSEN. 



Carl T. .Jacobsen, who laid out Jacobsen's addition to Minot and who has been identified 
with various business activities, was born in Denmark, April 28, 1847, the family home being 
at Bristrop near the ocean. His parents were Jacob and Maren Jacobsen, also natives of 
Denmark, where they spent their entire lives. When but ten years of age Carl T. Jacobsen 
began working for others in Denmark at herding cattle and was thus employed until 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 137 

eighteen years of age, \v]ien lie entered the regular arm}-, with which he served until Octo- 
ber 32, 1871. He was then married, after which he was employed in a brewery in Denmark 
for four years. Later lie secured a situation in a salt factory in Denmark, in which he 
remained for two years, and at the end of that time he secured a situation as driver on a 
beer wagon, making trips from city to city. He spent eleven and one-half years in that 
way and in 1891 consummated his plans for coming to America. He landed at Quebec on 
the 4th of May, 1891, and thence made his way direct to St. Paul. For two months he was 
employed in railroad work at Sandstone, after which he came to Minot and occupied a 
similar position for nine years, never losing a single day while in the employ of the Great 
Northern Railroad Company at Minot. At the end of nine years he secured a homestead ten 
miles west of Minot, near Burlington, where for seven j'ears he engaged in farming and 
stock raising, carefully and wisely directing his interests. He then sold the property and 
returned to Minot. where he now resides. He purchased two acres of land and later added 
another acre, after which he engaged in the raising of garden products. In 1906, however, 
he platted the land and has since sold off a large portion of it in town lots, the tract being 
known as Jacobsen's addition. He also engaged in speculative building, erecting a number 
of houses on the lots, and then disposing of the property. At the present time, however, he 
is practically living retired, enjoying a rest which he has truly earned and richly deserves. 

On the 27th of October, 1872, Mr. .Jacobsen was united in marriage to Miss Anna K. 
Jacobsen, who was born February 27, 1848, and whose parents both passed away in their 
home across the ocean before she became the wife of our_ subject. Mrs. Jacobsen passed 
away April 12, 1911. She had become the mother of ten children, as follows: Andrew, an 
agriculturist residing at Burlington; Martin, who is a general merchant and banker of Cut 
Bank, Montana; Daniel R., who is a member of the Minot hardware firm conducting business 
under the name of Jacobsen & Fugelso; Erik, who conducts an elevator and is also engaged 
in the hardware business at Eolla, North Dakota; Henry, who is engaged in ranching near 
Sweetgrass, Montana; Anton, also a rancher of Sweetgrass, Montana; Bertel, who lives in 
Minot and is employed as a clerk by the firm of Jacobsen and Fugelso; Carl A., who is at 
liome and is also employed as a clerk by Jacobsen & Fugelso; and two who are deceased. 

Mr. .Jacobsen nor none of his sons have ever used tobacco in any form. In his political 
views Mr. Jacobsen is a republican but tlie honors and emoluments of oflice have had no 
attraction for him. He gave his undivided attention to his business affairs until he retired 
and he is now enjoying a well earned rest, his former toil bringing to him the competence 
that enables him to enjoy all of life's comforts and some of its luxuries. 



LEWIS E. GEORGE. 



Lewis E. George, a well known newspaper man, who since .June 1, 1911. has been editor 
and publisher of the Hillsboro Banner, was born February 9, 1867, in Cannon Falls, Minne- 
sota, his parents being Moses and Lucretia (Lewis) George. He completed his education in 
the high school at Dodge Center, Minnesota, and when twenty years of age began publishing 
a newspaper there. He has since been identified with newspaper publication at Ada, Minne- 
sota, at Olivia and Fertile, that state, and on the 1st of June, 1911, he came to Hillsboro 
and began the publication of the Banner, which he has since owned and edited, making it 
an attractive journal, widely read. It is given to the dissemination of local and general 
news and its free discussion of the significant problems of the day constitutes an interesting 
feature of the paper. Mr. George has been continuously connected with the printing busi- 
ness from the age of thirteen years, for even while attending school he worked at the trade 
after school hours and during vacation periods. He made his initial independent step, as 
stated, when twenty years of age, when he began to publish a weekly paper called the 
Dodge Center Times. After two years' connection therewith he sold out and removed to Ada, 
Minnesota, where he published the Ada Herald for a year and then removed to Fertile, 
where he published the Fertile Journal for twenty years with the exception of one year 
spent in publishing the Olivia (Minn.) Press. On the expiration of that period he returned 
to Fertile and repurchased the .Journal, continuing its publication until 1910, when he sold 



138 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

out. It was ill June of the following year tliat Tic fnireliased the Ilillsboro Baniu'r and 
through the intervening period of five years he has been closely associated with the inter- 
ests of the city in which he makes his home. 

!Mr. George was married to Miss Constance Johnson, a daughter of W. P. Johnson, of 
Crookston, Minnesota, and their children are Carl, George, Vila, Rai, Lyle and Dona. In his 
fraternal connections Mr. George is a Mason, a Knight of Pythias and an Odd Fellow. His 
political indorsement has ever been given to the republican party, in the interests of which he 
issues his ]>aper, and upon the party ticket he has been called to several local oflijces. For six- 
teen years he served as city recorder of Fertile and in March, 1915, he was elected a member 
of the city commission of Ilillsboro for a term of four years, being therefore the present 
incumbent in the oflice. 



DANIEL R. JACOBSON. 



Daniel R. Jacobson is the senior partner in (lie hardware firm of Jacobson & Fugelso, of 
Minot, and belongs to that class of representative and valued citizens that Denmark has 
furnished to North Dakota. He was born in that country October 5, 1877, a son of Carl T. 
Jacobsen, who homesteaded in Ward county and is now living retired in Minot. Daniel R. 
Jacobson began his education in the schools of his native country and after tlie family came 
to the new world continued his education in the Minot high school. He was a youth of 
fifteen years when he began working for others in Denmark and the following year he 
accompanied his parents to America. He afterward worked on the range as a cowboy for 
a number of years in the northwestern part of this state and at the end of that time secured 
a homestead upon which he farmed and raised stock, carefully, systematically and success- 
fully conducting tlie business for tliree years, but in 190,3 he removed to Minot. He then 
engaged in teaming for about eiglitecn months and later became a member of the lirm of 
Jacobson & Fugelso. owning and conducting a hardware store. Theirs is a well appointed 
establishment and they enjoy a substantial trade. They have founded their success upon 
thoroughly reliable business methods and have ever realized the fact that satisfied customers 
are the best advertisement. Mr. Jacobson also still owns farm lands in North Dakota which 
he rents. 

On the 20th of Maj', 1903, Mr. Jacobson was united in marriage to Miss KIUmi Kittleson, 
who was born near Ridgeway, Iowa, a daughter of Albert Kittleson, a native of Christiania, 
Norway. He became an early settler of Iowa and had the privilege of securing a claim 
where the city of St. Paul now stands but did not like the location and established his 
home in the Hawkeye state. He devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits 
throughout his active business career and following the demise of his wife in Iowa came 
to North Dakota with his children, settling in Minot, where he continued to reside until 
called to his final rest in 190G. He met with a gratifying measure of success in his farming 
operations and spent the evening of his life in honorable retirement. Mrs. Jacobson is the 
youngest in a family of four children and by her marriage has become the mother of two 
children, Henrietta I'herilda and Almira Viola, both at home. 

Mr. Jacobson holds membership with the Modern "Woodmen of America, gives his 
political allegiance to the republican party and indicates his religious faith by his member- 
ship in the Lutheran church. His has been a well spent life actuated by honorable inuposcs 
and characterized by the adoption of high ideals. 



ASHER A. DmNE. 



A.sher A. Divine is one of the well known and prominent stock raisers of Cass county, 
living on section 8, Mapleton township, where he has a valuable and highly improved farm 
of tliree hundred and twenty acres, on which he is making a specialty of the raising of 
Holstein cattle, Yorkshire hogs and Percheron horses. His farm is thoroughly equijiped 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 139 

for this purpose and his business places him among the leaders in this line in the eastern 
part of the state. Mr. Divine is a native of Michigan, born October 26, 1856, his parents 
being Westbrock and Elizabeth E. (Eossa) Divine, both of whom were natives of New York. 
In early life, however, they became residents of Michigan and were married in the latter 
state, where Mr. Divine took up the occupation of farming, following that pursuit in order 
to provide for his family, numbering a wife and five children, two of whom are now living. 

Asher A. Divine spent the days of his youth in his native state and its public school 
system afforded him his educational privileges. He worked in the fields through the sum- 
mer months and studied through the winter seasons and when his textbooks were put aside 
he concentrated his energies upon the labors of the fields. In 1879 he went to South Dakota 
and established a hotel at Doland, Spink county, where he remained for three years. On 
the expiration of that period he began farming in that state but in 1894 came to North 
Dakota, establisliing his home in Cass county. For eight years he filled the important posi- 
tion of foreman on the Smith farm and later was for two years superintendent of the 
Blanchard farm, owned by J. L. Grandin. While thus engaged he carefully saved his earn- 
ings and at the end of that time purchased the farm on which he now resides, on section 8, 
Mapleton township. His farm comprises three hundred and twenty acres of rich and pro- 
ductive land, which he has improved with excellent buildings. He has two large silos upon 
the place, substantial barns and sheds and a pleasant and comfortable residence. He makes 
a specialty of raising stock. He has done much to improve the grade of stock raised in this 
section of the state and has thus advanced public prosperity. 

Mr. Divine has been married twice. In 1880 he wedded Miss Sabrina Curtis and to 
them were born two sons: Glenn, who is married and lives in South Dakota; and Harry, 
now a partner of his father in the operation of the home farm. The wife and motlier 
passed away in 1905, and in 1906 Sir. Divine married Mrs. Frances (Geary) Heapes a 
daughter of Colonel E. C. and Amelia (Wells) Geary, both of whom were natives of New 
York, where they remained until 1866 and then removed westward to Minnesota. In the 
'80s they came to North Dakota, settling at Fargo, where the father served as registrar and 
receiver of the land office and there made his home until his death, which occurred in 1913. 
His widow still survives. In their family were six children, five of whom are living. By her 
former marriage Mrs. Divine had one son, Francis G. Heapes, a member of Company B, 
North Dakota National Guard, who accompanied his regiment to Mexico. 

Mr. Divine is a prominent Mason, belonging to the lodge at Fargo. He has taken all 
the degrees of the York Rite, including that of Knight Templar, and has also become a 
member of the Mystic Shrine. He is likewise connected with the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. In his political views he is a republican and has served as a member of the 
school board and in some of the township offices. His wife belongs to the Eastern Star and 
in religious faith is a Christian Scientist. Both Mr. and Mrs. Divine have a wide acquaint- 
ance in Cass county and their salient traits of character are of such sterling worth that 
they enjoy the highest regard, confidence and goodwill of all with whom they have been 
associated. In business Mr. Divine has displayed untiring activity, keen sagacity and enter- 
prise, and the careful management of his interests has brought him to a position among the 
most progressive agriculturists of Cass county. 



FREDERICK A. BURTON. 



Frederick A. Burton, of Wahpeton, who is serving in his fourth continuous term as 
county auditor, was born in Cranston, Rhode Island, on the 1st of June, 1851. His parents, 
William and Marcella (Nicholas) Burton, were likewise natives of that state, where they 
were reared and married. The father, who was a farmer by occupation, removed westward 
in 1854 and settled on a farm in Allamakee county, Iowa. He resided there for a number 
of years and passed away at Waukon, that state. He was a republican in politics and took 
a keen interest in public affairs. To him and his wife were born four children, two of whom 
are living. The brother of our subject, Lewis Burton, resides at McNeal, Arizona. He 
homesteaded land there a few years ago and is now engaged in farming and in merchandis- 



140 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

ing. The paternal grandfatlier, George Burton, wns also born in Rhode Island and the 
great-grandfather served in the Revolutionary war and eventually died from the ettccts of 
the hardships which he endured while at the front. The Burton family was established in 
America long before that conflict by tv.o brothers, who emigrated to the new world from 
Wales. The maternal grandfather, William Nicholas, was likewise a native of Rhode 
Island. 

Frederick A. Burton was but three years of age when taken by his parents to Allamakee 
county, Iowa, and there he grew to manhood. After attending the common schools he 
entered the Waukon high school and upon finishing his education he engaged in teaching 
for three years. He then became a grain buyer in Iowa, continuing in that occupation there 
until his removal to Preston, Minnesota. In 1888 he became a resident of Wild Rice, Cass 
county. North Dakota, where he engaged in the grain business for a number of years, but 
at length removed to Abercrombie in 1893. In 1901 he was appointed deputy county 
auditor of Richland county and removed to Wahpeton, the county seat, where he served in 
that capacity for six years. In 1908 he was elected auditor. He has since been reelected 
three times and is still serving in that office. He is systematic and accurate in carrying 
on his work and is recognized as one of the best officials that the county has had. 

On the 2Tth of August, 1884, Mr. Burton was married to Miss Ida Bigelow, a native of 
Ohio, who removed to Iowa with her mother but subsequently went to Preston, Minnesota. 
Six children have been born of this union, of whom five are living, namely: Edwin W,, a 
resident of Wahpeton; Vixtor E.. who works for the Ottertail Power Company; Blanche E., 
a trained nurse living in Fargo; and Cora E. and Gertrude M. M., both at home. 

Mr. Burton is a I'cpublican in politics and in addition to th^ offices which he has held 
in Richland county he served as alderman at Preston, Minnesota. Fraternally he is con- 
nected with the JIasonic blue lodge and with the Modern Woodmen. He is highly esteemed 
not only because of his ability but also because of his integrity and his agreeable personal 
qualities. 



REV. LAURENCE G. MOULTRIE. 

Rev. Laurence G. Moultrie, a clergyman of the Episcopal church, now acting as rector 
at Valley City, was born in Devonshire, England, in 1SG6, a son of tlie Rev. Gerard Moultrie 
and a grandson of John Moultrie, both natives of "the merrie isle." The last named was at 
one time head master at Rugby, which position established him as an eminent educator, and 
he was also widely known through his poetic w-ritings. His son, Gerard Moultrie, became a 
minister of the Episcopal church and spent his entire life in England, where he passed away in 
1885. He married Elizabeth Anstej', also a native of that country, and they became parents 
of five sons and four daughters, of whom Laurence G. was the seventh in order of birth. 

After pursuing his classical course at St. Edwards school. Oxford, Rev. Laurence ('•. Moul- 
trie became a student in the theological seminary at Faril)ault, Minnesota. He came to the 
United States in 1887 with the intention of farming, whidi occupation he followed for four 
years, but in that time ho became convinced that he would find a broader field of xisefulness 
in the ministry and entered upon preparation thereof. He was ordained in 1895 and after- 
ward spent three years in pastoral work at Detroit, Minnesota, while later he was located 
for a time in Kansas City. In 1899 he was appointed to All Saints church at Valley City, 
North Dakota, where for seventeon years he has now remained, cloing splendid work for the 
upbuilding of the church and the extension of its influence. He is an earnest, convincing 
speaker and a broad-minded, public-spirited man. thoroughly interested in the questions that 
affect the sociological, economic and political conditions of the country. 

On the 2.'5d of October, 1895, Rev. Moultrie was married to Miss Caroline Isabelle Dane, 
a native of Minnesota and a daughter of Brewster and Lavina Dane, wlio were pioneer 
settlers of Minnesota, Mrs, Moultrie, who always took a deep interest in church work and 
greatly aided her husband in his pastoral duties, died in December, 1913, leaving a son, 
Gerard Earlc. who was graduated from the Shattuck Militarj' Academy at Faribault, Minne- 
sota, in 1916. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 141 

Rev. Moultrie gives bis political allegiance to tlie republican party and is now serving 
as alderman of his city. He is very prominent in Masonic circles, belonging to the blue 
lodge, chapter, council, commandery, Scottish Rite and Mystic Shrine. He is grand orator 
of the Grand Lodge of North Dakota, grand high priest of the Grand Chapter and grand 
chaplain of the Grand Council, while of the Grand Commandery he is a grand prelate. For 
a number of years he has served as secretary of both the lodge and chapter at Valley City. He 
is also chaplain of the First North Dakota Infantry now serving at Mercedes, Texas. He is 
much interested in local affairs, serving as superintendent of the cemetery, as a director of the 
Chautauqua at Valley City and as editor of the North Dakota Sheaf, the district cliureh 
paper. His influence is always on the side of advancement and improvement and progress 
has ever been his watchword. 



JOHN B. JOHNSON. 



Norway has furnished a large percentage of substantial citizens to North Dakota, men 
who have brought with them the enterprise, perseverance and industry which characterize 
the people of the land of the midnight sun. John B. Johnson was born in Hardanger, Nor- 
way, in 1859. His father, Brigt Johnson Ryklcen, was born in Norway in 1831 and became 
both a farmer and sailor of that country. He crossed the Atlantic to the United States in 
1866, settling in Winona county. Minnesota, after which he removed to Chippewa count \-, 
that state, where he remained until 1878, when he established his home in Sheyenne town- 
ship. Richland county. North Dakota, there continuing until 1885, which year witnessed 
his arrival in Sargent county, North Dakota. He settled on a farm about a mile from 
De Lamere, although the town was not created until the following year, at which time it 
consisted of a general merchantile store, established by John 0. Rustad, of Kindred. Cass 
county, and a postoffice. The town was named for a Mr. De Lamere, who was one of the 
officials of the Northern Pacific Railroad and whose two sons served in the Spanish- American 
war. The father of John B. Johnson settled on the northeast quarter of section 7, Hall 
township, Sargent county, which he purchased, and there he carried on general farming, 
contributing to the agricultural development of the district until his death, which occurred 
in 1908. He was a republican in his political views. In 1855 he wedded Christie Olson Moe, 
who was born in Norway in 1833 and is now living with her son John in De Lamere at the 
age of eighty-three years, being still very active and well preserved. By her marriage she 
became the mother of ten children, of whom John B. is the second, and six of the number 
are yet living. Four of the children were born in Norway and accompanied their parents 
on their removal to the new world. 

John B. Johnson was a little lad of seven summers at the time he came with his father 
and mother to the United States, after which he pursued his education in the district schools 
and later continued his studies in the Lutheran College at Decorali, Iowa. He was after- 
ward employed in a general store at Montevideo, Minnesota, devoting three years to that 
occupation. In 1878 he accompanied his father to North Dakota and homesteaded a claim 
constituting the northeast quarter of section 8, Hall township, Sargent county. He took up 
his abode thereon and with characteristic energy began its development, continuing its culti- 
vation until 1892, at which time he removed to Jtilnor, where he engaged in the hardware 
trade in connection with his brother-in-law, Ole Hanson, with whom he remained for a year. 
In 1893 he established his home in De Lamere and entered into partnership with Carl Dahlen, 
of Hall township, and Erick Sovde, of Milnor township, forming a company for the conduct 
of a general mercantile business. Theirs was the second general store in De Lamere. On the 
3d of March, 1893, he sold the first pair of shoes from the new store, which was the first bit 
of merchandise to leave the establishment. During this time Mr. Johnson and the two 
owners of the former town site, Ole Larson and John Rustad, became involved in a contro- 
versy in regard to the distribution of the town property. The two former owners made an 
effort to keep all of the town property in their own names, refusing to sell or to lease any 
of the lands. This metliod did not strike Mr. Johnson as fair and consequently he proceeded 
to have the town moved farther west, with the aid and influence of M. M. Johnson, a promi- 



142 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

nent North Dakota politician of tliat day, and after a hard struggle John B. Johnson was 
able to move the town to its present location. He was made the lirst postmaster after the 
removal. Since the removal to the new site the town has flourished and lilr. Johnson has 
been one of the most active |)roinoters of its growth and development. After a time lie pur- 
chased the interest of liis partner and became sole owner of the general store which he con- 
ducted for six years. In 189S he embarked in the hardware and implement business, in wliicli 
he continued until 1910, when, owing to ill health, he traded his business for a three hunilred 
and twenty acre farm located in Sargent county. He still makes his home in De Lamere. 

On the 24th of March, 1884, Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss Anna M. Han- 
son, who was born in Crawford county, Wisconsin, in 1867, a daughter of Morris and Kari 
Hanson, who were natives of Sogn, Korway, and on emigrating to the United States settled 
in Wisconsin. They drove from Milwaukee to their farm, situated near De Soto, Wisconsin, 
making the trip with a team of oxen. Both parents are now deceased and Anna M. John- 
son was the youngest of their family of six children. To Mr. and Mrs. Johnson were born 
six children: Bernliard who was born in 1885 and died in 1907; Clarinda, born in 1887; 
Christina, in 1899; Albert, in 1891; Christian, who was born in 1893 and died in 1894; and 
Julia, who was born in 1894 and died in infancy. The wife and mother passed away 
November 24, 1895, and her death was the occasion of deep and widespread regret among 
those who knew her. Albert Johnson, the fourth child of the family, is a progressive young 
lawyer, who will graduate from the University of Chicago with the class of 1917 and who 
seems to have a bright future before him. 

Politically John B. Johnson is a republican and for fifteen years he acceptably filled the 
office of justice of the peace. He has also been school clerk and is secretary of the drainage 
board of Sargent county. He has been a delegate to many of the state conventions of the 
republican party and he has served as chairman of tlie republican county central committee, 
of which he is still a member. At one time he was survey clerk and helped to lay out 
practically all of the roads in his township. A spirit of progress and advancement has 
actuated him at all times. He was one of the promoters of the telephone service now 
enjoyed by the people of De Lamere and vicinity and he has been actively connected with 
the educational interests of his locality. He taught school for years in Richland county and 
in the town of De Lamere, in fact was the first man to teach in the town schools. He is 
likewise connected with the moral progress of the community, being an active and faithful 
member of the Lutheran church, of which he is the secretary. His inlluence is always on the 
side of progress, reform and improvement, of truth and right, and his work has been of a. 
practical character that accomplishes substantial and far-reaching results. 



JAMES HOLES. 



Wlien death called James Holes on the 2d day of June, 1916, there passed from this life 
one who up to that time was the earliest of the living settlers of Fargo. He had for 
many years figured as a well known and progressive farmer and business man of Fargo 
township, Cass county, where he settled ere tlie city of Fargo was established, and with 
every phase of pioneer development and later progress in the district he was closely identified. 
He was born in Bradford county, Pennsylvania, January 29, 1845, his parents being James 
and Mary (Hibbert) Holes, who were natives of Derbyshire, England, and came to the United 
States in 1832, settling near Ithaca, New York, the father assisting in making the rock cuts 
south of that city. He subsequently removed to a farm five miles from Ithaca and later 
establislied his home in Bradford county, Pennsylvania, where he settled upon a tract of 
land in the midst of a forest, there hewing out a farm. In the spring of 1850 he removed 
to a farm near Oswego, New York, where James Holes spent sixteen years of his boyhood 
and youth, his education being acquired in the common schools near the family home. The 
father died when his son was a lad of fifteen years and the care of the home farm then 
fell upon the young shoulders of the son and upon his mother. He remained with her to 
assist her in every possible way until he reached his twenty-first year, when he followed 
the advice of Horace Greelev and came to the west. At that time he had saved from hi» 




JAMES HOLES 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 145 

earnings about one thousand dollars and he received an additional eight hundred and fifty 
dollars from his father's estate. It had been a long cherished ambition prior to his removal 
to the west that he might one day own one thousand acres of land and with his capital of 
eighteen hundred and fifty dollars he made his way to St. Cloud, Minnesota, and soon there- 
after began investing. Two years later, when he had reached the age of twenty-three, he 
was the owner of thirteen hundred acres on which there was no indebtedness. 

Subsequently Jlr. Holes disposed of portions of his property from time to time and 
in July, 1871, he came to Dakota territory, camping the first night — the 4th of July — four 
blocks west of where the present postoffice of Fargo now stands. The town, however, had 
not been platted at that time. His object in coming was to hold the land for the Puget 
Soimd Company, which company knew of the intention to build a town upon the site. 
Mr. Holes was to receive one thousand dollars a year with the privilege of conducting a 
supply store at the same time and was to be paid extra for any work he did in the way of 
development. Upon his arrival, however, he found that the company had made other 
arrangements and he purchased a claim from Ole Hansen, who formed one of the Scandi- 
navian colony that left Goodhue county, Minnesota, in May, 1871, and at Gerogetown crossed 
the Red river into Dakota territory, from which point they came north, fording the 
Sheyenne river and arriving on the present site of the city of Fargo on the 17th of May, 
1871. They were the first settlers upon the town site and their claim extended to both 
sides of what are now the corporation limits. These settlers were bought out by the 
Puget Sound Company. The quarter section of land which Mr. Holes purchased from 
Mr. Hansen remained his place of residence and he owned one hundred and eighty acres 
adjoining the corporation limits of Fargo and also seventeen hundred and forty acres near 
Hunter, in Cass county. In all the intervening years to the time of his death he was a 
well known and valued resident of that district, carrying on agricultural pursuits for an 
extended period. For six years prior to his demise he had the state agency for North 
Dakota and Montana for the Emerson Wild Oats Separator Company and during the j^ear 
1914 did a business of forty-five thousand dollars. At a meeting of the Washington Club 
held a short time prior to his death he was called upon to give an account of early conditions 
in Cass county and on that occasion said: 

"During the summer of 1868 and 1869 I made several trips to Fort Abercrombie, where 
the village of Abercrombie now is, so when I came to the Red River valley on July 18, 1871, 
I was not an entire stranger to the conditions that prevailed here at that time. I came 
alone with a pair of horses, covered wagon and tent, driving from St. Cloud, Minnesota, to 
what is now Fargo. The first persons I met were Jacob Lowell and Henry S. Black. I met 
them about two miles south of where Moorhead is now, and they directed me to a feiTy near 
where the new filtration plant now stands. This ferry was so small we had to cross the 
horses first and then the wagon afterward. W^hen I got to the west side of the river the 
first thing that attracted my attention was a tent and a man sitting in the shade playing 
a waltz on a violin. Soon a woman came out and waltzed to the tune he was playing. This 
was Captain George Egbert and wife. As I got on higher ground I saw a little north and 
west a board house near the slough. This belonged to Henry Fuller and was the first board 
house built in Fargo. In the western part of Fargo Andrew Holes and his wife were camped, 
Mrs. Holes, who now lives in Moorhead, being the first white woman who lived in Fargo. 
I drove to where they were camped and camped with them. Two months prior to this, on 
May 17, 1871, the first settlement of Fargo was made by a party of Scandinavians from 
Goodhue county, Minnesota, who had crossed the Red river at Georgetown, Minnesota, and 
come up the west side of the river and settled just north of Fargo and south of where 
Peter P. Goodman and Jacob P. Metzger settled in December, 1870. They consisted of 
young men bachelors and a few married men. All their wives were left behind at Fergus 
Falls, that being the nearest white settlement. These parties were nearly all bought out 
by the Puget Sound Company, Ole Jansen Lee, Lars Martin, the Johnson Brothers, and one 
or two others remaining. Ole Hansen settled where James Holes now lives, but on the 
river. Mr. Peterson settled in Oak Grove. Mr. Johnson settled where the Washington 
school now stands. There was another settler in the northeast part of the city who built 
a log cabin near the lagoon or old river bed. At that house the directors of the Northern 
Pacific Railroad were entertained by Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Holes on several occasions. South 



146 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

of Fargo, Ole Jansen Lee, Ole Matlierson, Lars Martin, Easton and Jens Johnson, brothers, 
settled. This constitutes all or nearly all of the colony who settled here May 17, 1871. These 
people, constructed primitive cabins of logs wjth bark roofs, the bark being covered with 
sod, making a cool roof in summer and a warm roof in winter. None of these houses had 
either doors or windows; such lu.xuries were not yet indulged in. About the first of July 
other Settlers began to arrive, Mr. Andrew McHench and wife, Henry Fuller, whose wife was 
at that time in the state of Maine, Charles Roberts and wife, Jacob Lowell, Ilenry S. Black, 
James Holes and others. The country was entirely wild. Countless millions of grasshojipers 
swarmed everywhere. The woods were full of great owls and prairie wolves were sneaking 
around the prairies. The hooting owls and barking wolves broke the monotony of the 
nights. The mosquitoes in summer and blizzards in winter did much to make life miserable, 
but notwithstanding we managed to get enough out of life so none of the first settlers com- 
mitted suicide and all those who stuck to the Ked River valley and did what they could 
have prospered financially. As to the city of Fargo, I have not been disappointed. It has 
become about such a city as I expected it would, fortj' years ago, as it is well situated and 
should become a large citj'." 

In June, 1889, Mr. Holes was united in marriage to Miss Rlioda Harrison, a native of 
Wisconsin, who passed away in 1908, and they became the parents of three children: James 
H., who was a resident of Foster, California, but who has returned to Fargo and will take 
charge of and manage the Holes estate; Bernard R., of Fargo, who is in the employ of the 
Ford Automobile Company; and Marguerite V., who acted as private secretary to her father 
and will assist her brother in the management of the estate. The Holes home is one of the 
most beautiful residences in the state and is presided over by Miss Marguerite Holes in a 
most gracious manner. She had the careful rearing of her mother, who was a beautiful and 
intellectual lady and who possessed exceptional ability as an artist, which fact is demonstrated 
by the many attractive canvases painted by her which adorn the walls of the home. The 
daughter has the motlier's artistic temperanumt as is shown by the exterior embellishments 
and the interior decorations of the home, over which she has now presided for eight years. 

Mrs. Holes was a great worker in the cause of charity and the poor of the city have 
reason to remember her kindliness and helpfulness on many occasions. Mr. Holes, too, was 
a generous contributor to charitable organizations, giving freely where aid was needed. His 
activities extended into various fields. He was a member of the American Equity Society 
and was its president for a number of years. He was also a member and director of the 
Farmers Mutual Society, of which he served as vice president for several years. In his 
political views Mr. Holes was a progressive republican and for nine years served as county 
commissioner and for a number of years was a member of the township school board, of 
which he was treasurer. His interest in the public welfare was of a most substantial 
character and his labors contributed to the material development and progress of his section 
of the state, where for a number of years he was the oldest living settler. When death 
called him the funeral services were held at his residence on Korth Broadway and were 
so largely attended that the liouse could by no means accommodate the concourse of 
people who gathered. The worth of his work as a pioneer settler and ])rogressive citizen 
can scarcely be overestimated and his name will long be honored and his memory cherished 
in the community in wliich lie lived. 



E. J. HURLEY. 



E. J. Hurley is engaged in the real estate business at Fairmount and also has important 
farming interests. He was born in Pierce county, Wisconsin, on the Sth of September, 1838, 
a son of Thomas and Catherine (Welch) Hurley, both born in Ireland in IS.'IO. The paternal 
grandfather, James Hurley, emigrated with his family to the United States in 1847 and 
passed away in Galena. Illinois. He was a cabinetmaker by trade. The maternal grand- 
father, Michael Welch, became a resident of El Paso. Wisconsin, many years ago and there 
his demise occurred. The parents of our subject were married in Janesville, Wisconsin, in 
June, 1855. The mother came to the United States in 1845 and the father in 1847. The 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 147 

Hurley family first settled in Massachusetts, but removed successively to New Hampshire, 
New York, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. Thomas Hurley, father of our subject, died in El 
Paso, Wisconsin, but the mother died in Ellsworth, that state. He was a communicant of 
the Catholic church and gave his political allegiance to the democratic party. He held a 
number of township offices and took an active part in public affairs, wielding a large 
influence in his community. He was not only a fine business man and a very successful 
farmer, but he was also an excellent mathematician. To liim and his wife were born five 
children, four of whom are living, namely: James, who formerly engaged in farming, but 
is now working in a store in Ellsworth, Wisconsin; E. J.; Mrs. Mary Ann Hawkins, whose 
husband is farming near Hammond, Wisconsin; and Thomas, rural mail carrier of Wlieaton, 
Minnesota. 

E. J. Hurley received his education in the common schools and early in life became 
familiar with agricultural work. Previous to coming to Dakota territory in 1880 he worked 
on a farm in Minnesota and after living in this state for a time returned to Minnesota, 
where he resided until the fall of 1901. He then removed to Fairmount, Richland county, 
this state, and opened a real estate office. He has since devoted a great deal of his time and 
attention to the real estate business, buying and selling outriglit and on commission, and 
his accurate knowledge of what constitutes a good farm has enabled him to deal in farm 
lands to a good advantage. He still owns land in Minnesota and his farming interests 
return to him a good income. 

On the 14th of February, 1891, Mr. Hurley married Miss Susie J. Hopkins, who Avas 
born in Virginia, but became a resident of Graceville, Minnesota, in 1880. Her father, 
Stephen Hopkins, devoted his life to agricultural pursuits. To Mr. and Mrs. Hurley have 
been born five children: Stephen E., who is a young man of twenty-two years, is an attor- 
ney of unusual promise and has won considerable note as a lecturer and as a literary man. 
He is a graduate of the law school of the Georgetown University and of the Catholic Univer- 
sity of America, both at Washington, D. C. Catherine, Josephine, Marcella M. and Susie 
R. are all at home. 

Mr. Hurley is a stanch adherent of the democratic party and has served ably as justice 
of the peace for a number of years. His religious faith is that of the Catholic church, to 
the teachings of which he is most loyal. Fraternally he holds membership in tlie Knights 
of Columbus and the Catholic Order of Foresters. He was one of the trustees of the School 
of Science at Wahpeton and is always ready to give of his time and thought to the promo- 
tion of the general welfare. His business interests are ably managed and he has met with 
a gratifying and well deserved measure of success. 



W. M. WAGNER. 



Among those men who have contributed in large measure to the commercial growth 
and expansion of Wahpeton is W. M. Wagner, president of the Wagner Candy Company. 
He was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on the 25th of August, 1856, a son of John and 
Amelia Wagner, both natives of Germany. They became residents of Milwaukee in 1854, 
and the father engaged in blacksmithing there for some time, subsequently removing to 
southern Minnesota, where his demise occurred. His wife passed away in North Dakota. 
His religious faith was that of the Lutheran church, and his political allegiance was given 
to the democratic party. He and his wife were the parents of eight children, namely: John, 
a retired farmer living in Grand Meadow, Minnesota; Mrs. Krouse, whose husband is also a 
retired farmer of Grand Meadow; W. M. of this review; H. J., a confectioner of Arthur, 
this state; Frank, a resident of Grand Meadow, Minnesota; Mrs. Fox, who died in Marion, 
Wisconsin, in 1909; Albert, who is farming in Minnesota; and Mrs. Anna Jancj', the wife 
of a farmer of Nelson, Wiconsin. The paternal grandfather, John Wagner, was a lifelong 
resident of German}'. 

W. M. Wagner received his education in his native state and remained at home until 
1879, when he went to Grand Meadow, Minnesota. He worked as a farm hand in that 
localit}' for two summers, after which he came to North Dakota, where he followed the car- 



148 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

peiitei's trade for a time. Subsequently he went to Citsselton, where he engaged in harness- 
making until 1882, when he went into business for himself at Ai-thur. In 1889, after 
remaining there for seven years, he removed to Wahpeton and established a furniture store, 
which he conducted for nearly eight years. At the end of that time he sold out and went 
into the retail confectionery business, in which he continued until 1910, when he organized 
the Wagner Candy Company, Inc., which is capitalized for fifty thousand dollars and which 
sells at wholesale candy, tobacco and cigars. The business is represented by frvvo men on the 
road and its products have already gained an enviable reputation for purity and high quality. 
In addition to his manufacturing interests Mr. Wagner owns valuable land in Canada and 
fruit land in ilontana. He has prospered in all that he has undertaken and is justified in 
taking pride in his success as he has at all times depended solely upon his own eilorts. 

On the 7th of April, 1894, occurred the marriage of Mr. Wagner and Miss Mary J. 
McKinnon, who was born in Canada and by whom he has two children: Arthur J., who 
travels for the Wagner Candy Company; and Hattie May, a high school graduate. The son 
and daughter are both members of the Episcopal church, but the parents attend the Methodist 
church. 

Mr. Wagner is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he has 
passed through all of the chairs, and with the Yeomen. His political support is given the 
republican party, and he served acceptably as alderman of Wahpeton for four years. He is 
interested not only in the material advancement of his community, but also in its progress 
along other lines and is recognized as a man of marked public spirit. He is widely known 
and highly esteemed. 



ALEXANDER A. WALIOIR, V. S. 

Dr. Alexander A. Walker, of Casselton, Cass county, who has the distiction of being 
the oldest veterinarian in the state, devotes practically his entire time to his practice, which 
is extensive and profitable. He was born in Ontario, Canada, on the 18th of December, 1846, 
a son of James and Ann (McKee) Walker. The father was born in County Armagh, Ireland, 
and passed away in 1898, and the mother was born on the Atlantic ocean, while her parents 
were on their way to America from Ireland. Her father, Alexander McKee, was born 
in County Monaghan, Ireland, and his last days were passed in Ontario, Canada. 
The mother of our subject died in 1907. She became the wife of James Walker in Ontario, 
to which country he had removed from Ireland with his father, James Walker, 8r, James 
Walker, Jr,, followed farming throughout his active life and gained a gratifying measure 
of success. He was an advocate of reform in politics, and his religious faith was that of the 
Presbyterian church. To him and his wife were born eleven children, of whom nine are liv- 
ing, the subject of this review being the second in order of birth. 

Alexander A. Walker attended the common schools of Ontario and still further pursued 
his education in a normal school. Subsequently he prepared for his chosen profession by 
study in the Ontario Veterinary College at Toronto, from which he was graduated in 1S82 
with the degree of V. S. He had previously practiced as a veterinarian for two months in 
Toronto and for some time in Casselton. North Dakota, In 1881 lie returned to Toronto 
and completed his professional studies there. He again located in Casselton, where he has 
since remained. He has built up a large practice as he has been very successful in his 
profession and he has not only gained a high standing as a veterinarian, but has also accu- 
mulated a competence. Although he is sixty-nine years of age he is still active and keeps 
informed as to the discoveries in veterinary science. 

In 1872 Dr. Walker was married, in Ontario, Canada, to Miss Mary Haines, a luitive of 
that province, and they had five children: Mary Ann, deceased; Matilda, who is living in the 
state of Washington; Isabelle, a resident of Oakland, California; James Alexander, a resi- 
dent of Fargo; and Ruth, who is living in the state of Washington. The wife and mother 
died in 1890, in the faith of the Baptist churcli, and her demise was deeply regretted bv all 
who had come in contact with her. In 1901 Dr. Walker married Miss Jennie Hocking, a 
native of Michigan. 

The Doctor is a republican and for the past eleven years has served as county justice 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 149 

of the peace. He is also police magistrate of Casselton and in both capacities has won an 
enviable reputation for fairness and impartiality. Both he and his wife are members of the 
Christian churcli, in the work of which they take an active interest. He is identified with 
the Yeomen and the Orangemen. He has lived in Casselton for many years and the high 
esteem in which he is held is an indication of his genuine worth. 



HANS JOHNSON. 



Hans Johnson, a hardware merchant of Milnor, was born in Norway in 1874, his parents 
being John and Bertha (Larson) Johnson, who were likewise natives of the land of the raid- 
night sun. It was in the year 1882 that the father brought his family to the United States 
and for a short time they resided in Minnesota, but in 1883 removed to Sargent county, 
North Dakota, where he made permanent settlement. TJiere he entered land from the govern- 
ment in what is now Shuman township. Tlie entire district was then wild and undeveloped 
and he took an active part in promoting the pioneer progress of the locality. He converted 
his land into rich and productive fields and remained thereon until his death, which occurred 
in 1913. He had for fifteen years survived his wife, who passed away in 1898. 

Hans Johnson is the third in order of birth in a family of nine children, all of wliom are 
living. He spent the first seven years of his life in his native country and then accompanied 
his parents to the new world, after which he pursued his education in the schools of Sargent 
county. North Dakota. When his textbooks were put aside he took up the occupation of farm- 
ing, working first as a farm hand but later purchasing land as soon as he had saved a sufficient 
sum from his earnings to enable him to acquire property. He became the owner of a tract in 
Shuman township and there carried on general agricultural pursuits until 1905. 

In 1902 Mr. Johnson was married to Miss Bertina Olness, wlio was born in Grant county, 
Minnesota, in 1883 a daughter of Anfin and Sarah Olness, who were natives of Norway and 
became pioneer residents of Minnesota. There they reared their family of eight children, 
including Mrs. Johnson, who was their third child and died in the year 1905, leaving a 
daughter, Selma B., who was born in 1904. 

The following year Mr. Johnson left the farm and removed to Milnor, where he entered 
the hardware business, buj'ing the store of A. H. Anderson and also the stock of H. K. 
Pennington, those two liaving conducted business under the firm style of the Milnor Hard- 
ware Company. Mr. .Johnson has met with success from the beginning and now has the 
leading store of the kind in the town. His business methods are such as will bear the closest 
investigation and scrutiny, for at all times he is tlioroughly reliable and progressive and has 
won his success through constructive methods. 

In his political views Mr. Johnson is a stalwart republican and has held some local offices, 
including that of supervisor of Shuman township, Sargent county, while at the present time 
he is one of the aldermen of Milnor. He belongs to the Masonic lodge at Milnor and is a 
member of the Lutheran church, associations which indicate much of the nature of his 
interests and the rules which govern his conduct. His life has ever been guided by high and 
lionorable purpose and through his close application to business and unremitting energy lie 
has gained a creditable position among the substantial business men of his section of the 
state. 



HON. J. F. TREAT. 



Hon. J. F. Treat, manager at Fargo for the Germania Life Insurance Company, has been 
identified with this line of business since 1890 and is today one of the leading figures in 
insurance circles in this state, acquainted with every phase of the business and actuated in 
all that he does by a spirit of continuous progress. He was born in Geauga county, Ohio, 
September 11, 1861, a son of John F. and Ruth A. (Brewer) Treat, the former a native of 
Maine and the latter of Ohio. In early manhood John F. Treat adopted the seafaring life 



150 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

and during the Civil war commanded the gunboat ^larirron, dying on board that boat in 1863. 
His widow long surviving him. passed away in Columbus, Ohio, in 1893. 

J. F. Treat was reared at home, acquiring his education in the Grand Eiver Institute 
in Austinburg. Ohio, and following the completion of his studies he came to North Dakota in 
1883, settling in Barnes county. There he took up a claim and broke prairie, devoting his 
attention to farming for five years. On the expiration of that period he engaged in the grain 
business and in the sale of farm implements, remaining active along those lines for five years. 
His entrance into the field of insurance was made in the year 1890, when he became associ- 
ated with the Equitable Life Insurance Company of New York. In 1895 he became a repre- 
sentative of the Germania Life Insurance Company, being made manager of this business in 
North Dakota. For twenty years he has continued in that business, directing the interests 
for the company in this line and his efforts and control liave been important factors in build- 
ing up a business of large proportions. 

In 1882 Mr. Treat was married to Miss Eva L. Kiser, of Geauga county, Ohio, and to this 
marriage have been born a son and a daughter: Walter E., who is associated with his father 
in the insurance business; and Frances L. 

Mr. Treat is a very prominent Mason, belonging to Shiloh Lodge, No. 1, F. & A. M.; 
Keystone Chapter, No. 5, E. A. JI. ; Auvergne Commandery, No. 2, K. T.; Fargo Council, No. 
1, R. & S. M.; Dakota Consistory, No. 1, A. & A. S. K.; El Zagal Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S.; 
and also St. George's Conclave, No. 6, Red Cross of Constantine at Duluth, Minnesota. For 
eleven years he was potentate of El Zagal Temple and in 1902 was also an officer of the 
Imperial Council of the Mystic Shrine of North America. In fact he has occupied all of the 
chairs of the .Shrine and in 1911 at Rochester, New York, was elected imperial potentate. 
He is likewise a member of Fargo Lodge, No. 260, B. P. 0. E. Politically Mr. Treat is a 
republican and is now serving as president of the Fargo park commission. In 1905 he became 
a member of the state legislature, in which he served for two terms. His interest in public 
affairs has always been that of a public-spirited citizen who recognizes the duties as well as 
the privileges and opportunities of citizenship. He is actuated in all that he does by a spirit 
of progress and the opinion of his fellow citizens establishes him as one of Fargo's leading 
residents. 



CHARLES HANSON. 



Charles Hanson, of Wahpcton. who is making an excellent record as superintendent of 
the schools of Richland county, was born in Green county, Wisconsin, on the 24th of May, 
1866. His parents, N. T. and Mary Jane (Smith) Hanson, were born respectively in Maine 
in 1822 and in Pennsylvania in 1831. The maternal ancestors were members of the Friends' 
church. The father came to Wisconsin as a young man- and there his marriage occurred. He 
bought land and devoted a number of years to fiirming, after which he went east and at the 
time of his demise, in 1890, he was living in Connecticut. His wife preceded him in death, 
passing away in 1881. To him and his wife were born seven children: Emma, a resident of 
Monroe, Wisconsin; Pauline, who is living in North Dakota; John, a retired farmer residing 
in Monroe, Wisconsin; Charles; Ruth, deceased; George, a farmer of North Dakota; and 
Edw-ard, a publisher living in Oiicago. 

Charles Hanson received his early education in the country schools of Wisconsin and 
later entered the high school of Monroe, that state, from which he was graduated in 1889. 
After teaching for a time he became a student in the State Normal School at Whitewater, 
Wisconsin, completing the course in 1895. He has since engaged in educational work with 
the exception of one year, which he spent in the University of Wisconsin, thus fitting himself 
for still more efficient work in his chosen profession. In 1903 he came to North Dakota and 
for a time he taught near Buffalo, this state, but in 1905 he removed to Richland county, 
having been elected principal of the Walcott school, which position he held until 1912. He 
proved so efficient in that capacity that in 1914 he was elected county superintendent of 
schools and since taking office he has succeeded in advancing the standards of school work 
throughout the county. His long experience as an instructor has made him thoroughly 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 151 

familiar with the problems that confront the teacher and this knowledge, together with his 
resourcefulness, enables him to in most cases find a way out of difliculties. He also has 
executive ability and the faculty of securing the cooperation of those under him. 

In 1913 Mr. Hanson was united in marriage to Miss Lena Lium, a native of Wisconsin. 
She is a communicant of the Lutheran church and he is identified with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, the Knights of the Maccabees and the Woodmen. His political allegiance is 
given to the democratic party and his election to the ofti<"e of county superintendent is a 
tribute to his personal popularity and ability as the county is republican by a large majority. 
At a previous election he was a candidate for the office, but was defeated by only forty-four 
votes. He has no outside interests, devoting his entire time and attention to the duties of his 
office, and the excellent record which he is making is no doubt due in part to this concentra- 
tion of his energies. 



JULIUS FAUCHALD. 



Norway has furnished a substantial percentage of citizens to North Dakota, among 
which number is .Julius Fauchald, of Minot, who was born in the land of the midnight sun, 
September 12, 1866, a son of Nels and Marie iHovelsen) Fauchald, who were also natives 
of the same country, the former born January 9, 1826, and the latter May 16, 1829. The 
father was a farmer and land owner in Norway, where he passed away in 1908. his wife 
surviving until 1912. 

In their family of seven children Julius Fauchald was the sixth in order of birth. From 
the age of fifteen years he has depended upon his own resources in a business way, for at 
that time lie secured a clerk.ship in a store, in which he was employed for six years, a fact 
indicative of his faithfulness and capability. In 1887 he crossed the Atlantic and on the 7th 
of April of the following year arrived in Minot, where he entered the employ of Strain 
Brothers, spending two years as a clerk in their store. He was afterward employed by 
Peter Lee for two years and later purchased Mr. Jacobson's interest in the New York Store, 
becoming a partner of G. 0. Frank, after which the business was conducted under the firm 
style of Frank & Fauchald, that relationship being maintained for a number of years and the 
business proving profitable. In 1901 Mr. Fauchald established a store at White Earth, 
seventy-three milos west of Minot, and in 1906 he and his brother Morris purchased the 
mercantile establishment of P. P. Lee. In 1903 he bought the interest of Mr. Frank in the 
New York Store, which was added to the Lee establishment and Mr. Fauchald became sole 
owner of the business in January, 1909. He stills conducts his mercantile interests under 
the style of the New York Department Store and has an extensive establishment which is 
liberally patronized, for his honorable business methods and his enterprise find favor with 
the public. In 1908 he opened the five and ten cent store in the Mansfield building of Minot, 
which he also conducts, and he is likewise proprietor of the New York Furniture and Hard- 
ware Store. He is thus conducting extensive and important business interests. He has a 
good trade in the five and ten cent store and he is enjoying a large patronage in his dry 
goods, clothing and men's furnishings store. He recently sold his grocery business at Minot, 
which is now being operated by the Shirley Company. From time to time he has extended 
his eflTorts into other localities and is now operating a five and ten cent store at Devils Lake. 
He also recently sold a store at Jamestown, but is still conducting business in various 
other places In fact his name is a very prominent and familiar one in the commercial 
circles of the state and he stands as one of North Dakota's foremost merchants. He is 
director of the Union National Bank with which he has been identified for a number of 
years, and is a director of the Second National Bank of Minot. His business affairs have 
been of constantly broadening scope and have been a strong element in the development of 
the material resources of North Dakota. He also owns property in Christiania, Norway, 
and maintains a summer home in that country which is but thirty minutes' ride from the 
city and within a stone's throw of the ocean. His property interests likewise include exten- 
sive tracts of land in North Dakota and in Oregon and he maintains his residence in Minot. 

In early manhood Mr. Fauchald wedded Miss Enga Nerseth, who was born near his 



152 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

own bii'tliplace in Norway, her parents being Johannes and JIaline Xerseth, who spent their 
entire lives in tliat country. The father devoted his attention to general agricultural pur- 
suits throughout his active business career. Mr. and Mrs. Fauchald are the parents of seven 
children, as follows: JIalvin, who is now associated in business with his father; Marie; Kora, 
who is pursuing her education in New York city; and Burghild, Jalmer, Axel and Ncls, all 
of whom are attending school in New York. Most liberal educational advantages have been 
accorded the children, who have received instruction in the schools of this country and of Nor- 
way. After a residence of two years in Europe the family returned to New Y'^ork in 1914, 
establishing their home at Sunset Park, in Brooklyn, but in 1U16 they expect to remove to 
Minot. The elder son was graduated from the Red Wing University and also from Luther 
College of Decorah, Iowa, and the elder daughter has attended Red Wing Seminary and is 
now in New York City. 

In politics Mr. Fauchald is a republican, but has never sought nor desired oflice. He 
belongs to tlic Synod church. When he came to the new world he could not speak the Eng- 
lish language and his cash capital consisted of but thirty-five cents when he came to Jliniit. 
The years have chronicled for him notable success. He possessed energy and determination 
and he resolved to win advancement if it could be gained by honorable methods. Step by 
step he has progressed until he is today one of the foremost business men and citizens of 
North Dakota. While he has attempted important things and has accomplished what he 
attempted, his success has never represented another's losses but has resulted from effort 
intelligently applied, and the generous use which he has made of his means in assisting others 
marks him as a man of kindly spirit who recognizes the obligations and responsibilities of 
wealth. In all of his business affairs he has been considerate of others. His has never been 
the command of the tyrant to go. but tlie call of the leader to come, and he possesses many 
traits admirable and worthy of all praise. 



HON. OLE T. TOFSRUD. 



Hon. Ole T. Tofsrud has been prominently identified with the interests of North Dakota. 
Three times he has been a member of the general assembly, active in framing constructive 
legislation, and with commercial and financial interests he has also been jirominently asso- 
ciated, being now president of the Security Bank of Rugby. The student of history cannot 
carry his investigaticms far into the annals of North Dakota without learning how valuable 
has been the contribution of Norwegian citizenship to the upbuilding of the commonwealth. 
Mr. Tofsrud is among those who have had their nativity or trace their ancestry to the land 
of the midnight sun. He was born in Norway, November 24, 1864, a son of Torgus and 
Barbro (Hagen) Tofsrud, who were also natives of that country, whence in the spring of 
1883 they sailed for the new world, establishing their home in Portland, North Dakota. 
After a year they removed to Church's F'erry in Benson county, where the father filed on a 
homestead on which he still resides. 

Ole T. Tofsrud pursued his educaticin in tlie public schools of his native laml and after 
coming to the United States he served as janitor of a school of Portland and also continued 
his studies at the same time. Ambitious to make progress along intellectual lines, he after- 
ward matriculated in the seminary at Willmar, Minnesota, and also became a student at the 
Bruflat Academy at Portland. He was eighteen years of age when he came to the new 
world, his uncle. Tore Peterson, of Portland, sending him sixty-four dollars with which to 
pay his passage. This he repaid the first year, earning the money by work as a farm 
hand and as a thresher. In 1885, after attaining his majority, he filed on a preemption of 
one hundred and sixty acres in Pierce county. He and Torger Gronvold were the first men 
to file on land in what is now Barton towiisliip. that county, Mr. Tofsrud securing the 
southeast quarter of section 13. He lived upon his claim for three years and two years of 
that time there were crop failures. He then went west, securing the position of time- 
keeper on the construction of the Great Northern Railway. He was thus employed in con- 
nection with the building of the road from the western slope of the Rocky Mountains to 
the Columbia river. Later he returned to Pierce, North Dakota, having in the meantime 




HON. OLE T. TOFSRUD 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 155 

saved from his earnings about a tliousand dollars. He was next employed for a time 
as second man in an elevator at Barton and in 1893 the county, appreciative of his worth 
and ability, elected him to the office of county treasurer and he removed to Rugby to there 
discharge his duties. He had served for only one term when he was nominated and elected 
a member of the state legislature and he was reelected in 1895. In 1907 he was once 
more chosen for the office, so that his service in the general assembly has covered three 
terms. While in that body he very carefully studied the questions which came up for 
consideration and gave his support to those bills which he believed would prove efficacious 
laws if put upon the statute books of the state. In 1895 he opened a general merchandise 
store in Rugby, where he conducted business for eight years, and for the past twenty-five 
years he has also been engaged in farming. He owns seven hundred and twenty acres 
of land in Pierce county and from his property derives a substantial annual income. In 
1909 he became one of the dominant factors in the organization of the Security Bank of 
Rugby and was made president of that institution, which position he now fills. He is also 
president of the Walhalla Building Association and he is connected with several organiza- 
tions of a semi-public character. 

In 1898 Mr. Tofsrud was united in marriage to Miss Rodna Hiller of Pierce county, 
who is a native of Norway. To them have been born four children, namely: Bertha, Tilda, 
Rachael and Lillian. Mr. Tofsrud and his family are members of the Lutheran Free 
church and his political allegiance has always been unfalteringly given to the republican 
party, for he believes that its principles contain the best elements of good government. He 
is now serving as president of the school board of Rugby and as president of the Pierce 
County Agricultural Association. He is a member of the Sons of Norway and has always 
been willing to do everything in his power to aid his fellow countrymen. He possesses the 
characteristic industry, reliability and progressiveness which have ever marked the sons 
of Norway and through his determination and force of character he has worked his way 
upward from a humble position in the business world to a place of affluence. 



ANDREW H. CLEMENSON. 



Andrew H. Clemenson, who is successfully engaged in farming on section 35, Warren 
township, Cass county, is one of the excellent citizens of North Dakota, who claim Norway 
as their native land. He was born on the 18th of September, 1858, and is a son of Henry 
and Bertha (Arves) Clemenson, who in 1870 emigrated with their family to the United 
States, settling in Faribault, Minnesota, where the father followed his trade, that of shoe- 
making, until June, 1871, when the family came to the Red River valley in North Dakota, 
being among the first to settle in that region. He located on section 30, Stanley township, 
Cass county, on land which he entered as a homestead claim as soon as the homestead law 
went into effect. At that time eighty acres was the most which could be taken up as a 
homestead but he subsequently filed on a quarter section as a preemption and a number of 
years later bought another quarter section, becoming the owner of four hundred acres in all. 
The first home of the family in this state was a log cabin, which was covered with a sod 
roof, and there were the usual hardships of pioneer life to be endured, but as the years 
passed conditions improved and land constantly increased in value. The father died on the 
11th of November, 1904, but the mother is still living and makes her home with the subject of 
this review. 

Andrew H. Clemenson attended the common schools of Norway until he accompanied 
his parents on their removal to this country at the age of twelve years and he continued his 
education in the public schools of Minnesota and North Dakota. He aided his father in the 
arduous task of developing a farm from the wild prairie and in so doing gained much valu- 
able knowledge of agricultural methods. In 1883 he purchased eighty acres of land, upon 
which he has since resided and upon which he has made many excellent improvements. For 
a number of years he cultivated rented land in addition to his own farm and for the past 
three years he has divided his attention between the operation of his farm and the opera- 
Voi. n— 9 



156 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

tion of tlio pumping station south of tlie Noitlu-rn Pacific Railroad at Horace, which is 
located within a short distance of hi3 home. 

In 1879 occurred the marriage of Mr. Clemonson and Miss Mattie Olson, also a native 
of Norway, who came to this country in the sjjring prior to her marriage. To them have 
been born eleven children, eight of whom are still living, namely: Martha, the wife of 
William Qualloy, a farmer of Manitoba, Canada; Olga, who married Harry Christcnson, of 
Horace. North Dakota; Betsy, the wife of August Halvorson, a railroad man living in Gantz. 
^[innesota ; Bertha, at home; Samuel, who is engaged in farming; Mary, who is teaching in 
Billiold, North Dakota; Oscar, an employe of the Northern I'acilic Railroad; and -Arthur, at 
home. 

Mr. Clemenson gives his political allegiance to the republican party and for twelve years 
served as road overseer and for twenty-one years as a member of the school board, his long 
retention in those offices being evidence of the ability which he displayed in the discharge 
of his duties. He belongs to the Jungraan Lodge and has many friends both within and 
without that organization as he is thoroughly reliable in all the relations of life and as his 
personal qualities are agreeable. 



THEODORE KALDOR. 



Theodore Kaldor, of Hillsboro, a prominent representative of the legal profession in 
Traill county, where he has practiced continuously since admitted to the bar in 1901. His 
ability is evidenced by the large clientage accorded him. Moreover, his life record stands 
in contradistinction to the old adage that a prophet is not without honor save in his own 
country, for Mr. Kaldor is a native of Traill county, his birth having occurred on his father's 
farm in Norway township. August 8. 1875. His parents, Cliristian 0. and Ragnhild Kaldor. 
were both natives of Oier, Gudbrandsdal, Norway, and both came to the United States in 
1868. They were married in Freeborn county, Minnesota, where the father followed farm- 
ing for two years, and on the 22d of June, 1871, came to Traill county, where he was among 
the first to take up a homestead. He continued to reside thereon, his attention being 
given to its further development and improvement imtil his death, which occurred in 1909. 
His widow still resides upon that place. 

After mastering the branches of learning taught in the common schools Theodore 
Kaldor attended Concordia College at Moorliead, Minnesota, and in 1896 was graduated 
from the Mayville State Normal School. He continued his education at the University of 
Minnesota, where he completed a course in the law department with the class of 1901. at 
which time the EL. B. degree was conferred upon him. During vacation periods up to that 
time he had worked upon his father's farm and in outdoor life gained that vigor and 
strength which has constituted a basic element of his professional success. After thorough 
training for the bar he at once opened an office in Hillsboro. where he has since reniaineil. 
and while advancement at the bar is jiroverbially slow, he has nevertheless made steady 
progress and his ability has gained him distinction, for in the trial of various important 
cases he has given proof of his rcsourcefulni^ss, his comprehensive knowledge of the law and 
his ready and almost intuitive understanding of the workings of justice. Aside from his 
law practice he is interested in farming and banking, being connected with two banks and 
owning eight hundred acres of farm lands in this state. mo.st of which is near his home 
town. 

On the 27th of June, 1905. Mr. Kaldor was united in marriage to Miss Nettie Lar.son. 
a daughter of Necoli and Christine Larson, pioneer settlers of Traill county. Mr. and ]\Irs. 
Kaldor are the parents of two children. Cliaunoey Theodore and Harvey Nathaniel, aged 
respectively seven and five years. 

Mr. Kaldor and his wife are members of the Lutheran church and he is identified with 
the Masonic fraternity and the Sons of Norway. In politics he has always been a republican 
and on various occasions his fellow citizens have manifested their confidence in his trust- 
worthiness and ability by electing him to public office. For six years, from 1904 until 
1910, he was states attorney of Traill county, and during the past five years he has been a 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 157 

member of the board of education of Hillsboro and has also been a member of the board of 
park commissioners since the creation of the park district four years ago, being president 
of the park board during the last two years. He was likewise city attorney for two years. 
Jlr. Kaldor labors earnestly and effectively as an official and as a private citizen to further 
the best interests of the community in which he resides. 



LOUIS FLIGEL5IAN. 



Louis Fligelman, the popular and able mayor of Wahpeton and also a well known 
dealer in farm lands, was born in Berlad, Roumania, on the 10th of May, 1869. His parents, 
Joseph and Theresa (Epstien) Fligelman, were lifelong residents of that country. The 
father, who was engaged in the leather business, was very successful, gaining financial 
independence. He was a member of the Jewish Synagogue. There were seven children in 
the family, namely: John, a merchant of Minneapolis; Herman, who is engaged in the dry 
goods business in Helena, Montana; Jacob, also a merchant of Helena; Fred A., a merchant 
of Great Falls, Montana; Louis; Jessie, the wife of David Fichman, a traveling man of 
New York city; and Dora, Avho married S. S. Singer, a merchant of Great Falls, Montana. 

Louis Fligelman received his education in the schools of his native land but in 18S5 
came to Minneapolis with his brothers and sisters when they emigrated to the TJnited 
States. In 1889 he removed to Wahpeton, Korth Dakota, and engaged in the land business, 
along which line he has gained enviable prosperity. He buys and sells land outright and has 
handled many valuable tracts, owning at the present time a large amount of land in Rich- 
land county. He also deals in loans and his natural business acumen and good judgment, 
combined with his thorough knowledge of business conditions, has made him one of the suc- 
cessful men of his city. 

In 1895 occurred the marriage of Jlr. Fligelman and Miss Helena Bessie, a daughter of 
Adolph Bessie and a native of New York city. Mr. and Mrs. Fligelman have become the 
parents of three daughters, Rosa, Henrietta and Jessica, all of whom are now attending 
school. 

Mr. Fligelman is an adherent of the democratic party where national issues are at 
stake but at local elections is independent. In 1913 he was elected mayor as the choice of 
the people rather than as the candidate of any particular party and he has since held the 
office of chief executive of Wahpeton. He gives the same careful study and thought to the 
solution of the problems that come up in connection with the administration of the city's 
business that he gives to the management of his private affairs and his course in office has 
won the commendation of his fellow citizens. Fraternally he is a member of the Masonic 
order, the beneficent principles of which guide his life. He is held in the highest esteem and 
his personal friends are many. 



CHRISTIAN A. SUNDET. 



Christian A. Sundet devotes his time and attention to the operation of his excellent 
farm of two hundred and forty acres in Pleasant township, Cass county. His birth occurred 
in Norway on the 14th of Jul}', 1855, and he is a son of Asle and Ora Sundet, also natives 
of that country. About 1855 they removed with their family to the United States and, 
making their way to the middle west, located in Houston county, Minnesota, where the 
father engaged in farming until his demise. The mother also died there. They were the 
parents of eight children, all of whom are living save one. 

Christian A. Sundet attended the common schools of Minnesota and during the period of 
his boyhood and youth also devoted much time to helping his father. By the time he had 
reached man's estate he was well qualified to engage in farming independently and following 
his marriage in 1879 he removed to Cass county, North Dakota, and located on his present 
farm on section 26, Pleasant township. The place was unimproved when it came into his 



158 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

possession and his first home was a small shanty. As the years have passed he has erected 
fine buildings, has fenced his land and has brouglit it to a high state of cultivation, and he 
also lias a grove which he planted and which is now an excellent windbreak. As he is 
industrious and also plans his work well he receives a gratifying financial return from his 
land and his capital is constantly increasing. 

In 1879 occurred the marriage of Mr. Sundct and Miss Kathcrine Katin, who was also 
born in Norway and is a daughter of S. and .Martha Ratin, likewise natives of that country, 
who, however, emigrated to America with their family many years ago and resided here 
until called to their final rest. Mr. and Mrs. Sundet have eight children: Mary, the wife 
of Oscar Eude and a resident of Richland county. North Dakota; Sophia, who married 
Gilmore Dockan. of Benson county; Cornelia, the wife of Henry Johnston; Albert, who 
lives in Perley, Minnesota; Grant, at home; Alida, who is a graduate of the Park Region 
Lutheran College at Fergus Falls, Jlinnesota, and who is engaged in teaching; Viola, who 
is attending college; and Nina, at home. 

Mr. .Sundet votes the republican ticket and for a number of years served in the office 
of school director. Both he and his wife hold membership in the Lutheran church and take 
an active and helpful interest in its work. When he came to North Dakota he was without 
capital but he took advantage of the opportunities offered and persevered in spite of the 
difficulties incident to the settlement of a new country and is now reaping the reward of 
his labor and determination as he is one of the substantial men of his township. 



KARL H. THOMTE. 



Karl H. Thomte. a well known representative of mercantile interests in Lisbon, where 
he is conducting business as a dealer in men's clothing and furnishings, was born in Lansing, 
Iowa, September 25, 1875, a son of Hans and Kerrie (Hanson) Thomte, both of whom were 
natives of Norway, whence they emigrated to the United States in the latter part of the 
'608. They first settled in Iowa but afterward homesteaded in southern Minnesota in 1878, 
becoming pioneer settlers of that state and experiencing all of the hardships and privations 
incident to life on the frontier. The father was a tailor by trade and worked along that 
line in a little Minnesota town while his wife and children occupied and developed the home- 
stead. Her death occurred in the spring of 1S97 but Mr. Thomte is still living. They were 
the parents of ten children, of whom nine survive. The father is a republican in his political 
views and in fraternal circles is well known as a Knight Templar. 

Karl H. Thomte pursued his education in the schools of Luverne, Minnesota. He then 
went abroad, visiting various European points, and following his return in 1902 he and his 
brother, .John Thomte, on the 2d of November of that year purchased the established busi- 
ness of Sandagcr & Haugen, clothing merchants and pioneer business men of Lisbon. The 
store has since been conducted under the name of Thomte Brothers and they carry a large 
and complete line of men's and boys' clothing and furnishings. Their stock is attractive, 
ranging from low to high priced goods, and shows all that the market affords in style and 
workmanship. Karl Thomte is also interested in farming, having purchased seventy acres 
of land at Island Park, Ransom county, which he intends to devote to dairying and to the 
raising of chickens. His is a busy and useful life fraught with good results. He has other 
interests, being a director of the Lisbon Building & Loan Association and one of the pro- 
moters of the Sheyenne Valley Canning Company of Lisbon. 

On the 20th of June, 1904, Jlr. Thomte was married to Miss Minnie Backlund, who was 
born in Lisbon, North Dakota, December 6, 1884, a daughter of Xels and Louise (Anderson) 
Backlund, both of whom were natives of Sweden, but became residents of Lisbon in the early 
'70s. Mr. and Mrs. Thomte have a family of four children: Luvern, wlio died in childhood; 
Karl, born February 28, 1909; Philip, September 5, 1910; and Mary Louise, August 9, 1915. 

In his political views Mr. Thomte is an earnest republican and from 1912 until 1914 
served as a member of the city council of Lisbon. In May of the latter year he was elected 
mayor of the city and when in office his energies were directed to beautifying and improving 
Lisbon and its roads. He held the ofllice for two years, refusing to become a candidate for a 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 159 

second term as he felt that his entire time and attention were needed in connection with 
his growing and important business affairs. He was also president of the Lisbon Commercial 
Club during the years 1912 and 1914. He has taken a most active and helpful interest in 
every plan and project for the improvement and benefit of the city and was the promoter of the 
Ransom County Commercial Carnival, which was held in Lisbon in 1911, 1912 and 1913 and 
did much toward aiding in developing this section of the state. Fraternally Mr. Thomte is 
connected with the Masons as a member of lodge, chapter and commandery and he has 
filled all of the ofTices in the last two branches. He is a member and receiver of the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen at Lisbon and is a member and trustee of the Presbyterian church, 
to which his wife and two oldest children also belong. He stands for those things which 
are most worth while for the individual and for the community and his influence is always 
given for the advancement of the material, intellectual, social, political and moral progress 
of his city. 



CHARLES A. GROW. 



Charles A. Grow has assisted in every public enterprise for the upbuilding of Minot 
during the years of his residence there. He was impressed with the city and its opportunities 
upon his first visit to Minot m 1890 and following his return to become a permanent resident 
he has borne active part in its development and improvement. A native of Pennsylvania, 
he was born in Lewistown, November 2, 1867, a son of William and Sarah (Willhide) Grow, 
both of whom were also natives of Lewistown. The father was a farmer by occupation and 
in 1869 removed with his family to Ohio, where he became a landowner and carried on agri- 
cultural pursuits for a number of years. He is now living retired in Cleveland. He served 
as a soldier of the Civil war in a Pennsylvania regiment, enlisting in 1863 and continuing at 
the front until the close of hostilities. In tracing the ancestral history of the family it is 
found that they are of German lineage and that the family was founded in America in the 
seventeenth century. 

Charles A. Grow, who was the second in order of birth in a family of eight children, 
seven of whom are now living, attended school at Youngstown, Ohio, and pursued a three 
years' course in a business college there. At the age of fourteen years he began earning his 
living and gradually worked his way upward in business circles until at the age of sixteen 
years he was made manager of a clothing store in East Liverpool, Ohio, where he remained 
for three years. He then went to Cleveland and was employed by the J. L. Hudson Clothing 
Company for about two years. Later he went to Chicago and occupied a position in a cloth- 
ing store of that city for a year. In September, 1889. he arrived in North Dakota and 
accepted a position with the Apple Clothing Company at Grand Forks, acting as manager 
there until 1899, and in the meantime acquiring an interest in the business. He then sold 
out and in 1900 established a clothing store at Cando, North Dakota, where he remained 
for two and one-half years. In the spring of 1903 he arrived in Minot, where he opened a 
clothing store, dealing in men's and boys' furnishing goods. For thirty-three years he has 
continuously engaged in this line of business, selling out in February, 1916, to M. G. Olson 
& Company, of Grand Forks. He carried a full stock of boys' and men's clothing and 
shoes and his well appointed store secured for him a liberal patronage because of his hon- 
orable business methods and wise management. He is a stockholder in various other busi- 
ness enterprises of Minot and is the owner of city property and lands in Ward county. 
He operates a portion of his land himself and rents the remainder, some of which pays him 
a dividend of twenty dollars, basing the land upon a value of one hundred dollars per acre. 
In former j-ears the greater part of his attention was given to the clothing business and 
he ranked with the foremost merchants of the city but he is now giving his entire time 
to his real estate operations. His present success places him in a position far removed from 
that in which he was found in his boyhood days when as a lad of nine years he was selling 
newspapers in order to provide for his own support. Not only has he advanced materially 
along business lines but has also assisted in caring for his parents. There were six children 
younger than himself in the family and because of straitened financial conditions it was 



160 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

necessary that he early start out to earn his own living. Laudable ambition has prompted 
him at every step in liis career and gradually he has worked his way upward. 

On the 25th of November, 1896, Mr. Grow was united in marriage to Miss Anna 
Sullivan, a native of Fargo, North Dakota, and a daughter of Timothy and Katharine 
Sullivan, both of whom were born in Ii eland. Emigrating to the United States, they took 
up tlicir abode among the pioneer settlers of North Dakota and Mr. Sullivan assisted in the 
construction of the Northern Pacific Railroad from Fargo to Bismarck. Subsequently he 
removed to Jliiuiesota and turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, being now a land- 
owner and farmer of Wildrose, this state. 

Fraternally Mr. Grow is connected with the Knights of Pythias at Miimt. also the 
Masonic lodge and the Elks lodge at Minot, in which he has passed through all of tlie 
chairs. In 191.5 he was a delegate to the grand lodge of Elks at Los Angeles. He has also 
been prominent in the Knights of Pythias and was grand chancellor of the domain of North 
Dakota for the years 1905 and 1906. He organized the old Commercial Club and at all 
times he has been actively and helpfully interested in every movement for the public 
good. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he has done much to mold 
political action in this community. He served as a member of the city council of Minot and 
in 1915 was representative of the twentj'-ninth legislative district in the general assembly 
in the fourteenth session. He also served with the rank of colonel on the staff of Governor 
Sarles in 1906 and he is now president of the board of highway commissioners through 
appointment of Governor Hanna. His opinions have long carried weight in the councils of 
his party and it is a recognized fact that he is a most public-spirited citizen, his eflorts 
being a potent force in advancing the general welfare and in promoting movements which 
have had direct bearing upon the public good. On the whole, his is a notable and most 
creditable record. He has succeeded where thousands of others would have failed, for he 
lias faced diflicult conditions. He has never had anyone to confer with, obtained his edu- 
cation largely by attending night school while working in the daytime and by using every 
opportunity has gradually progressed. When employed as clerk, many times he had to 
work until three o'clock in the morning, putting the stock in order and also trimming win- 
dows at night. He possesses in marked degree the commercial sense, seeming especially 
fitted for business of this character. Moreover, he carries forward to successful completion 
whatever he undertakes and in his vocabulary there is no such word as fail. When lie sets 
out toward a goal he reaches it, and as the years have gone on his powers have grown 
througli the exercise of effort, each day finding him able to cope with more intricate 
business problems and accomplish greater results. 



ANDREW QUINNILD. 



Andrew Quinnild, who was a .successful and well liked farmer residing in Pleasant town- 
ship, Cass county, passed away on June 17, 1901. He was born on the 22d of November, 1847. 
of the marriage of Peter and Betsy Quinnild, natives of Norway, who spent their entire lives 
in that eoiintiy. Our subject was reared and educated in his native land and remained there 
until ho was about twenty-four years of age. In 1871 he emigrated to the United States and 
settled in Minnesota, whence in 1875 he came to North Dakota. He took up a homestead on 
section 34, Pleasant township, Cass county, and at once began to break the prairie sod and 
improve his farm. The first building which he erected was a log cabin with a roof covered with 
fir branches. For a number of years this remained the family residence, but at length he had 
acquired sufficient means to enable him to erect a fine frame dwelling and he also put up 
excellent barns and outbuildings. His place comjirised two hundred and forty acres and as he 
brought his land to a high state of cultivation and was both energetic and practical in the 
operation of the farm he gained more than a competence. 

Mr. Quinnild was married in ^linnesota to Miss Helen Olson, likewise a native of Norway, 
who came to the United States in 1857. They became the parents of twelve children, namely: 
Peter, deceased; Die, who is living in Hickson, North Dakota; Gustave and Bertha, both 
deceased; Gustave, second of the name, who is now living in Minnesota; Hannah and Peter, 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 161 

deceased; Helen and Peter, botli at home; Henry, who is operating the homestead; and Betsy 
and Alvin, at home. 

ilr. Quinnild supported the republican party after becoming a naturalized citizen of the 
United States, but never sought public oiBce. He was a communicant of the Lutheran church, 
as is his wife, and the sincerity of his faith was manifest in the integrity of his daily life. 
His sterling qualities commended him to the esteem and warm regard of his fellowmen and 
there was much sincere grief when he was called from this life. His widow survives and 
resides on the homestead of one hundred and sixty acres, which she owns. She is well known 
and has many warm friends. 



L. J. JOHNSON. 



AS the raising of grain is the most important industry in North Dakota the elevators 
of the district are among the chief factors in its development and their annual business is 
of large volume. The Farmers elevator at Horace is one of the leading business undertak- 
ings of that town and its manager, L. J. Johnson, is recognized as a man of energy, initiative 
and sound judgment. He was born in Sweden on the 25th of March, 1864. and is a son of 
John and Mary (Larson) Johnson, the latter of whom died in that country. In 1883 the 
father came to the United States with two of his children and a year later our subject and 
a brother and sister joined the others of the family here. The father took up his residence 
in Grant county, Minnesota, where he lived until his deatli. 

L. J. Johnson came to North Dakota on his arrival in this country in 1883 and located at 
Horace, where an uncle, P. J. Frykland, was living. At that time Mr. .Johnson was in such 
straitened financial circumstances that he had to borrow ten cents from his uncle to buy 
paper and stamps in order to write home and he W'as in debt sixty-eight dollars for his 
passage mone}^. He found work as a farm hand as soon as possible and after discharging 
his obligations began saving his money with the end in view of eventually purchasing land. 
For a number of years he farmed as a renter, but about 1905 he bought two hundred and 
iifty acres on sections 17 and 18, Stanley township, adjoining Horace, and has since resided 
upon his farm, which is all under cultivation. In addition to his activity as an agriculturist 
he has been engaged in buying grain for twenty-two years, devoting a great deal of his time 
to that work. He represented the Andrews Grain Company of Minneapolis at Horace for 
twenty years, while since 1914 he has been manager of the Farmers Elevator Company, which 
bought out the interests of the ilinneapolis company at Horace. He understands the grain 
business thoroughly and as he keeps a close watch on all of the details of the business the 
enterprise has proved very successful. 

In 1893 Mr. Johnson was married to Miss Bertha Olson, a native of Houston county, 
Minnesota, by whom he has six children, Ethel, Martha, Walter, Elder, Lillian and Raymond, 
all at home. 

The political views of Mr. Johnson coincide with the principles of the republican party, 
which he supports at the polls, and for fifteen years he has served as township clerk and for 
many years as school treasurer, proving vei'y efficient in those capacities. He and his family 
hold membership in the Norwegian Lutheran church and seek to extend its influence in 
every way possible. Mr. .Johnson is not only a successful farmer and business man, but is 
also a public-spirited citizen and in all relations of life has proved upright and honorable, 
thus gaining the sincere respect of all who have come in contact with him. 



GILBERT J. JOHNSON. 



Gilbert J. .Johnson, one of the extensive real estate dealers of Wahpeton, Richland county, 
was born in Bristol, England, on the 8th of .July, 1875, a son of David and Caroline E. 
(Brain) .Johnson, both likewise natives of that city, the former born in 1841 and the latter 
in 1843. They were married there and continued to reside in England until 1881, when with 



162 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

their family, they came to the United States. The father, who was a decorator, followed 
his trade for many years and for ten years resided in Wahpeton. He is now living retired 
in St. Louis. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he is now a mem- 
ber of the Episcopal church, althougli while living in England he was for some time a 
preacher in the Wesloyan Methodist church. 

Gilbert J. Johnson received his education in Birmingham, Alabama, and in AVahpcton, 
North Dakota, and after leaving school engaged in farming for some time, taking up a 
homestead in Richland county. He was later engaged in the hardware business at auistine 
and Wahpeton, continuing along that line until 1905, when he turned his attention to the 
real estate business, in which field he is still active. He buys and sells outright and has 
handled a great deal of valuable farm land. He owns large tracts of land in Richland county 
and also holds title to several thousand acres of Minnesota land. In addition to his real 
estate operations he is a director in the National Bank of Wahpeton and is interested 
financially in several other banks and in other business enterprises. Since completing his 
education he has been dependent upon his ow^n resources and tlic enviable measure of success 
which he has gained is proof of his aggressiveness and his sound judgment. 

On the 6th of April, 1904, occurred the marriage of Mr. Johnson and Miss Emma E. 
Clemmons of Barron, Wisconsin, and a daughter of A. N. Clemmons, an early veterinarian 
of that town. Three children have been born to this union: Donald, Fred and Arthur, aged 
respectively ten, eight, and three years. 

Mr. Johnson is an adherent of the republican paity and takes the interest of a good 
citizen in public atfairs. althought not an ofiice seeker. He is well known fraternally, belong- 
ing to the Masonic blue lodge, the Royal Arch Chapter, the Knights Templar Commandery 
and the Shrine. He is recognized as an able and reliable business man luid his personal 
qualities are such that he has won the warm regard of many. 



GILBERT H. CLEMENSON. 



Gilbert H. Clemenson, who owns an excolhnt farm on section 30, Stanley township, 
Cass county, has resided in that county since pioneer times and has not only Avitnessed, but 
has been a factor in the development of the district. His birth occurred in Norway on the 
2Gth of May, 1868, but when he was a little more than a year old he was brought by his 
parents, Henry and Bertha (Arvcs) Clemenson. to the United States, the family home being 
established in Faribault, Minnesota. The father, ^vho was a shoemaker, followed his trade 
there for one year, but in 1870 made his way to Cass county. North Dakota, and located on 
land now comprised in our subject's farm. He took it up on a squatter's- right, but in 1873, 
after the homestead law went into effect, filed on it as a homestead. Almost immediately 
after his arrival in Cass county he erected a log cabin, carrying the logs on his shoulder from 
the timber where they were cut to the cabin site. In 1871 his family joined him in this 
state and he continued to reside on his farm until his demise in 1904. While living in Nor- 
way he served in the army for fifteen or twenty years. His wife is still living and resides 
with her son Andrew. 

Gilbert H. Clemenson received his education in the pioneer schools of Cass county and as, 
like everything else in the state, the school system was in the early stages of development, 
his education was necessarily limited. Through assisting his father in transforming the 
wild prairie into a cultivated and well improved farm he not only learned much concerning 
agricultural methods, but also gained valuable training in industry and in the determination 
that surmounts all obstacles. In 1891 he began farming for himself, buying one hundred 
and si.\ty acres on time from Addison Leech. During the following three years, however, the 
crops throughout his part of the state were failures and as he was unable to make the pay- 
ments on his land he sold his tract and for the next three years rented the home farm. In 
1896 he purchased that place, which comprises two hundred and forty-three acres and which 
is one of the most valuable farms of the county. He keeps everything in excellent condition 
and as he uses up-to-date methods and employs modern machinery in his i work, his labors 
are rewarded by excellent crops which seldom fail to bring a high price upon the market. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 163 

He also owns stock in the Farmers elevator at Horace and is one oi' the substantial men of 
his township. 

In 1891 Jlr. Clemenson was united in marriage to Miss Augusta Hermanson, a native of 
Sweden, and they have become the parents of twelve children, seven of whom survive, as 
follows: Adolph; Robert, who married Ella Johnson; Mabel, the wife of Alfred Johnson, 
who is a brother of Ella Johnson and is farming in Stanley township; Agnes; Lillian; Hed- 
weg; and Florence. All of the children save Mabel are at home. 

The family belong to the Norwegian Lutheran church and conform their lives to its 
teachings. Mr. Clemenson is a republican in politics, but has been too busy with his private 
interests to take an active part in public affairs. He is widely known throughout the county 
and liis personal characteristics are such that his circle of friends is practically coextensive 
with his circle of acquaintances. 



JESSE D. VAN FLEET. 



Jesse D. Van Fleet, a resident of Minot, is engaged in the undertaking business. He 
was born in Wayne county, New York, April 6, 1858, a son of Peter B. and Rachel M. (Devoe) 
Van Fleet, who were also natives of "Wayne county, New York, The father was a contractor 
and builder who died about 1910, when eighty-two years of age. His wife passed away in 
1907, when about seventy-eight 3'ears of age. Their family numbered five children, of whom 
Jesse D. was the third in order of birth. Having acquired a high school education at Fair 
Haven, New York, he attended the seminary at Red Creek, New Y'ork, but left school at the 
age of seventeen years and obtained employment in a sash and door factory, spending about 
four years in thoroughly learning and mastering the business. Later he was emploj-ed for 
about two years in a store and then went to Portland, Oregon. He became foreman in a 
large sash and door factory in that city, where he remained for three years, after which he 
returned to New York and purchased an interest in the store in which he had previously been 
employed, spending three years in that connection. He next went to St. Paul, Minnesota, 
where he purchased an interest in the Jackson Street Fish Company, continuing in the busi- 
ness for three years. 

It was then that Mr. Van Fleet came to North Dakota, making his way to Larimore, 
where for ten years he was in the employ of Warner & Stoltz, lumber merchants. He 
then engaged in the lumber and fuel business in Larimore and also conducted an under- 
taking establishment. Later lie turned his attention to the real estate business, in which he 
remained until his removal to Minot in 1908. For three years, or until April, 1911, he con- 
ducted a real estate office in Minot and then purchased the C. J. Wegan undertaking busi- 
ness, which he has carried on successfully since. He also ow-ns a fine farm of five hundred 
acres at Larimore and its rental brings to him a substantial income. He is likewise a stock- 
holder in the Thompson Malted Food Company at Waukesha, Wisconsin, but devotes the 
greater part of his time to his undertaking business and to care of his lands. He is a mem- 
ber of the Undertakers' Association of North Dakota and is now serving a second term as 
vice president of the state board of embalmers, having been appointed by Governor Hanna, 
July 10, 1916, for a second four years term. 

In 1878 Mr. Van Fleet married Miss Jennie Case, who was born near Auburn, Caj'uga 
county. New York. Their children were: Ralph, who was born in 1887 and died at Larimore, 
North Dakota, in 1895; Frank, who is assistant cashier of the National Bank of Larimore; 
Clifford, who died in 1883, at the age of fourteen months, while the family were living at 
Portland, Oregon; Kitty, the wife of A. F. McLean, general agent in North Dakota for the 
National Life Insurance Company and a resident of Minot; and Peter B., who died in 1907 at 
the age of seventeen years. The wife and mother passed away April 21, 1892, and on the 
38th day of June, 1894, Mr. Van Fleet wedded Mrs. John Stevens, who was born at Chatfield, 
Minnesota, and became one .of the early residents of North Dakota. She was the widow of 
John Stevens, by whom she had a son, J. Floyd, who was educated at Cornell University and 
is now a professor in the State University at Grand Forks. 

Mr. Van Fleet holds membership in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he 



164 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

lias passed tlirough all the chairs. His political faith is that of the progressive republicans. 
He takes a most active part in the work of the Presbyterian church, in which he has served 
as an elder for a quarter of a century. For a number of years he has been at the head of 
the home missionary department of his church and is looking after the funds coming to the 
board for supplying new churches. In fact he takes a most deep interest in all dei)artments 
of the church work and docs everything in his power to further moral progress. He has 
always felt with Lincoln that "there is something better than making a living — making a 
life." 



NILS 0. BRAKKE. 



Among the e-xcellent citizens whom Norway has given to North Dakota is Nils O. 
Brakke, one of the extensive landowners of Normanna township, Cass county. He has not 
only been prominent in the agricultural development of his county, but has also been active 
in public affairs, having served acceptably as a member of the state legislature. His birth 
occurred on the 12tli of September, 1845, and his parents were Ole N. and Berget S. (Swen- 
son) Brakke, both of whom were also natives of Norway, where their entire lives were spent. 
Six of the eight children born to their union are still living. 

Nils 0. Brakke was reared at home and received his education in the public schools of 
his native land. In 1869, when about twenty-four years of age, he determined to try his 
fortune in the United States and became a resident of Houston county, Minnesota. After 
working as a farm hand there for three years he removed to Cass county, North Dakota, in 
1873 and located upon his present home farm on section 26, Normanna township. From time 
to time he has invested in more land and now holds title to nine hundred acres, all of wliich 
is well improved and productive. Although he is now one of the wealthy men of his section 
of the state he was without capital when he came to this country and for several years had 
to practice close economy. His first home in North Dakota was a log cabin, and he resided 
therein until 1906, when he erected a fine modern residence. He gives careful attention to 
the management of his extensive farming interes-ts and receives a handsome financial return 
from his land. He also owns stock in the Farmers elevator at Kindred, of which he is a 
director. 

In 1809 Mr. Brakke was married in jMinnesota to Miss Liv Olson, who was also born in 
Norway and who crossed to the I'nitcd States on the same ship as her future husband. They 
have eight children, Bergert, Olaf, Olena, Oscar. Carrie, Engebert, Nels and Selma. 

Mr. Brakke is a stanch adherent of the rei)ublican party, in whose principles he lirinly 
believes, and he was elected as a state representative in 190S on that ticket. He is especially 
interested in the welfare of the public schools and for thirty years has been a member of 
the school board, doing much in that time to promote educational jirogress in the county. 
Both he and his wife are communicants of the Ijutheran church, the teachings of which govern 
their conduct in all relations of life. He has a wide acquaintanceship throughout his section 
of the state and is recognized as a leading citizen of his countv. 



GEORGE D. WOOD. 



George D. Wood is agent for the Minnesota. St. Paul & Sault Ste. JIarie Railroad at 
Burlington and is making a creditable record in that connection, gaining the commendation 
of his superiors because of his edicient discharge of his duties. He was born in Egg Harbor, 
Wisconsin, April 2.5, 1886, a son of Joseph and Anna (Phillips) Wood, the former born in 
Buckinghamshire, England, and the latter in New York state. The father emigrated to the 
United States in young manhood and eventually removed to Rapid River, Jliehigan. where 
the mother died in 1908. He passed away in Biirlington in 1912 and both are buried at 
Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin. 

George D. Wood, who is an only child, attended school at Rapid River, Michigan, com- 
pleting the high school course. He remaineil at home until 1004. when he entered the employ 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 165 

of the Soo Line at Rapid River as assistant agent, in which capacity he continued for a year. 
He then learned telegraphy and in 1905 accepted a position as operator at Courtenay, North 
Dakota, where he remained until 1906, when he was made agent at Ambrose, this state. At 
the end of eight months he was transferred to Lintonville, Minnesota, as relief agent and 
two months later was stationed at Watkins, that state, where he remained for a year. At 
the end of that time in 1908 he was made agent at Burlington and has since held that posi- 
tion. He is always courteous in his dealings with the patrons of the road and manages wisely 
the interests intrusted to him. 

• On the 7th of January, 1908, Mr. Wood was married to Miss Louise Greenwood, who 
was born in Minnesota, of the marriage of Frank and Roselina (Carroll) Greenwood, both 
natives of Missouri. The father removed with his family to Watkins, Minnesota, where he 
engaged in farming for a number of years. He was also city marshal and was well known 
and highly esteemed in tlie community. He is now residing in Harvey, North Dakota, and 
is in the employ of the Soo Line. Mr. and Mrs. Wood have three children: Joseph Harland, 
four years of age; George Frank; and JIarian.' 

Mr. Wood gives his political allegiance to the republican party, but has never sought 
office, his railroad duties having required his undivided time and attention. The principles 
which guide his life are found in the teachings of the Congregational church, to which he 
belongs, and his fraternal connection is with the Order of Railroad Telegraphers. His life 
has been one of continued and useful activity and his enterprise and good judgment insure 
still greater success in the future. 



HARRY STEPHEN OLIVER. 

On the list of Lisbon's honored dead appears the name of Harry Stephen Oliver, who 
was born at Mayville. New York, July 37, 1855, and died May 20, 1909. In the early 'SOs 
he had removed to Ransom county, becoming a resident of Lisbon and a farmer on the 
fertile prairies of that district. His intense activity and his inborn love of labor soon made 
him a foremost promoter of the development and improvement of the county and his fellow 
townsmen, appreciating his worth and ability, conferred upon him various honors which he 
well merited and which he wore with becoming modesty. He was elected a member of the 
territorial legislature of Dakota as well as of the state legislature following the division and 
he wielded a powerful influence in the politics of the fourth judicial district. In 1897 he was 
appointed postmaster of Lisbon and made a creditable record in that position. He was an 
active leader in civic afl'airs and at all times stood for those things which are a matter of 
civic virtue and civic pride. For a considerable period he served on the board of education 
and instituted various progressive movements and reforms along educational and other lines. 
He was also a member and president of the Oakwood Cemetery Association and did much to 
beautify and adorn the city of the dead. Every phase of his character served to establish 
him in high regard and endear him to those with whom he was closely associated. 

On the 25th of .June, 1879, Mr. Oliver was married to Miss Florence Waterhouse, who 
was born at Exeter, Maine, January 24, 1856, a daughter of Dr. A. and Sarah (Alden) Water- 
house, both of whom were born and reared in Maine. In 1859 they removed with their 
family to Portland, Maine, where the father engaged in the active practice of his profession 
until the outbreak of the Civil war, when he became chief surgeon with the division under 
General George H. Thomas and remained in that connection until the close of hostilities. 
When the war ended he went to Jamestown, New York, where he continued in the active 
practice of medicine until his death, which occurred January 3, 1893. His wife. Mrs. Sarah 
(Alden) Waterhouse, was a descendant of the famous John Alden who figured so prominently 
in the early history of Massachusetts. She died .June 17, 1889. In their family of three 
children Sirs. Oliver was the second and by her marriage she became the mother of three 
children: Katherine, who was born April 7, 1881, and died in 1883; Frederick A., who was 
born November 13, 1884, and is a graduate of the Dakota State College, now practicing law 
at Lisbon and living with his mother; and Harry W., who was born May 24, 1886. He was 



166 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

graduated June 7, 1915, from the George Washington University of Washington, D. C, with 
the M. D. degree and died in January, 1916. 

It was on the 20th of May, 1909, in Lisbon, that the husband and father, ILarry S. 
Oliver, passed away and in his death Lisbon lost one of its most vaUied citizens, liis associ- 
ates a faithful friend and his family a devoted husband and father. He was of a genial and 
joyous nature, being loved by all who came in contact with him. and his memory is enshrined 
in the hearts of all who knew him. He enjoyed in fullest measure the confidence and love 
of his JIasonic brethren. He was made a Jlason in Mount Moriah Lodge of Jamestown, 
New York, September 15, 1876, and became a charter member of Sheyenne Valley lodge of 
Lisbon. He was exalted in Valley Point Chapter, R. A. M., at Cuba, New York, becoming a 
charter member of the Lisbon chapter and its high priest in 1894. He was knighted in St. 
Elmo Commandery at Valley City, North Dakota, and became a charter member of Ivanhoe 
Commandery, K. T., of Lisbon, of which he was eminent commander for five years. He was 
also eminent grand commander of North Dakota during 1906. He was an early member of 
the Lisbon Lodge of Perfection, A. & A. S. R.. which found in him an active worker, and in 
1898 he became a member of the Mystic Shrine at Fargo. He also belonged to the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen and the Modern Woodmen of America and in the latter was one 
of the most prominent of the state oflicers and also a member of the sovereign body, while 
of the insurance commission of that order he was a member. His nature was largely 
expressed in his love of dumb animals and of flowers. Strong and forceful, he was at the 
same time gentle, courteous and kindly, and the beauty and simplicity of his daily life won 
for him the high honor and lasting regard of all. 

Mrs. Oliver still makes her home in Lisbon and, like her husband, has exerted a widely 
felt influence over public thought and action. She was state president of the Woman's Fed- 
eration of Clubs from 1902 until 190C and fed<'ration secretary from 1906 until 1910. She 
is likewise a member of Minerva Chapter, No. 63, 0. E. S., in which she has held several 
offices. She is now the secretary of the Lisbon public library, is a member of the Civic 
League of the city and of the First Presbyterian church of Lisbon, in which she is secretary 
of the board of trustees. She takes an active and helpful interest in all branches of church 
work and in all those forces which work for the uplift and betterment of the individual. 



SANDER E. LEE. 



Sander E. Lee, cashier and one of the directors of the Owinner State Bank at Gwinner, 
Sargent county, was born at Gol Hallingdal, Norway, on the 8th of November, 1875. His 
education was partly acquired in his native country where he remained until he reached the 
age of seventeen years and then sailed from Cliristiania for the United States, landing at 
New York. He did not tarry on the Atlantic coast, but at once made his way across the 
country to Iowa and established his home near Sioux Rapids owing to the fact that he had 
relatives living in that locality. He there obtained his English education and remained in 
that locality for about eleven years. During that period he had engaged to some extent in 
farming, part of the time on his own account, and he there also learned the creamery business 
and conducted a creamery in that district. For one year he was connected with a general 
merchandising store at Wyndmere, North Dakota, to which place he removed in 190-4. 
After living there for a year he organized the Wyndmere Creamery Company of which he 
was made manager for two years, but at the end of that time he turned his attention to the 
banking business, becoming assistant cashier of the Bank of Wyndmere, in which connection 
he continued for nine months. 

At the end of that period Jfr. Lee removed to Gwinner in November, 1907, and took 
charge of the Gwinner State Bank as cashier. This bank was organized in 1904 with a 
capital stock of $10,000.00, its first officers beiny T. F. IMarshall. president; A. N. Carlblom, 
vice president: .1. E. Boundy, cashier, with F. W. Vail and H. C. McCarthy also on the board 
of directors. The present officers are A. N. Carlblom, president; H. H. Berg, of Jlilnor, vice 
president; S. E. Lee, cashier, and E. O. Johnson, assistant cashier. The capital stock of the 
company was increased to $20,000,00 in 1912 and the surplus and undivided profits now 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 167 

aggregate $4,000.00. Moreover, in 1911 they built a new bank building at a cost of 
$8,500.00 which is very complete in its equipment. In addition to his bank interests Mr. Lee 
is connected vvitli farming and now cultivates a half section of land of which one hundred 
and sixty acres are in White Stone Hill township, Sargent county, and the other tract of one 
hundred and sixty acres is in Roseau county, Minnesota. He wisely and carefully directs 
his business interests and is winning therefrom a substantial measure of success. 

On the 7th of May, 1908, Mr. Lee was married in Sioux Rapids, Iowa, to Miss Lyda 
Anderson, who was born near that city March 16, 1884. They have become the parents of 
three children, Emmet, Sylvan and Margaret. The parents are members of the Lutheran 
church and are mucli esteemed by reason of their sterling worth throughout the community 
in which they live. In his political views Mr. Lee is an earnest republican and active in 
township and county affairs, having filled a number of offices the duties of which he has dis- 
charged with promptness and fidelity. He is regarded as a valuable addition to the business 
circles of Sargent county for he is active with those men whose efforts are constituting a 
strengthening force in the development and upbuilding of the district. 



SAM HANSON. 



Sam Hanson, manager of the Great Western elevator at Horace, North Dakota, is a repre- 
sentative business man of the town and under his management the interests of the elevator 
company have been carefully safeguarded. He was born in Norway on the 6th of January, 
1869, a son of Hans Jacobson, who passed his entire life in that country. 

Sam Hanson was reared under the parental roof and attended the public schools of Nor- 
way in the pursuit of an education. In 1886, however, when seventeen years of age, he left 
his native land and crossed the Atlantic to the United States, subsequently continuing his 
journey westward to North Dakota. He located at Horace and for a number of years worked 
as a farm hand but at length purchased a threshing outfit, which he operated for five or six 
years. In 1897 he began his career as a grain buyer and for five years represented the 
Monarch Elevator Company at Horace, but in 1902 assumed charge of the business of the 
Great Western Elevator Company at Warren. The following year, however, he was trans- 
ferred to Horace and for the past twelve years has had charge of the Great Western elevator 
there. As he understands every phase of the grain business and as he gives the closest 
attention to the management of the elevator, the volume of its trade has grown and it has 
returned good dividends to its owners. 

In 1896 occurred the marriage of Mr. Hanson and Miss Albertina Jenson, also a native 
of Norway, and they have had six children, but two are deceased, those surviving being: K. 
Cecelia, Adelia H., Reynold S., and Hedwig. 

Mr. Hanson is a republican in politics and for four years has served as justice of the 
peace. He is also president of the school board, proving capable and conscientious in the 
discharge of his duties in those capacities. Fraternally he is identified with the Modern 
Woodmen of America, in which he holds the office of clerk. He and his family hold member- 
ship in the Norwegian Lutheran church and the sincerity of their religious faith is indicated 
in the uprightness of their daily lives. Mr. Hanson takes a commendable interest in matters 
pertaining to the advancement of liis community, and his public spirit is one of his strongest 
characteristics. 



JOHN D. GRAY. 



John D. Gray, who has contributed to the development of commercial interests at Valley 
City as secretary and general manager of the .John D. Gray Company, retail merchants, is 
actuated in all that he does by a spirit of enterprise that never recognizes the possibility of 
failure or defeat. Persistency of purpose has enabled him to overcome all obstacles and diflS- 
culties and through orderly progression he has advanced steadily to success. He was born 



168 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

iit ISoscobel, Wisconsin, on tlie I'Jth of Augvist, 1874, a son of Jonatlian and Susan (Bowles) 
Uiay, the former a native of Oliio and the latter of England. When a young man Jonatlian 
Ciray removed to Wisconsin, where he followed farming in the vicinity of Boscobel, meeting 
with substantial success in his undertakings. To him and liis wife were born eight thildren, 
of whom John D. was the youngest. The father was called to his final rest in I'Jll when 
seventy-eight years of age. 

John D. (Jray accompanied the family on their removal from Wisconsin to Iowa in 1SS2, 
at which time the father purchased a farm which he cultivated and developed until ISUO and 
then sold that property, removing to St. I'aul, Minnesota, in 1S93. John U. Gray was at that 
time eighteen jears of age. After mastering the branches of learning taught in the public 
schools he started out in the business world as a clerk in a grocery store. He entered the 
employ of Ycrxa Brothers, with whom he continued for two years, after which he was for 
thirteen years witli the wholesale grocery house conducted under the name of the P. H. Kelly 
Company, which he represented as a clerk and afterward upon the road as a traveling sales- 
man. Ambitious to engage in business for himself, he carefully saved his earnings until his 
capital was sullicient to enable him in 1905 to embark in the grocery trade on his own account 
at Valley Citj-. He entered into partnership with H. M. X'elzey, with whom he continued for 
about two years, and when Jlr. Velzey witlidrew Jlr. Gray organized the John D. Gray Com- 
pany, the first president being G. L. Famliam, who later was succeeded by General A. P. 
Peakc. Mr. Gray became secretary and general manager of the organization and has so con- 
tinued. The building which the company occupies was erected for it by George M. Young 
and is leased by the John D. Gray Company. It has a frontage of seventy-five feet on Fifth 
avenue and a depth of one hundred feet, with a basement under the entire building. The 
upper story is now leased for ofHces. Originally the company handled only groceries, but has 
added a stock of dry goods and theirs is one of the important retail houses in the south- 
eastern part of the state. 

On the 7th of January, 1903, Mr. Gray was married to Miss Cora Dwight, daughter of 
Charles A. and Sybil Dwight, of Benson, Minnesota They had two children, but both died in 
infancy. Jlr. and Jlrs. Gra3' are members of the Congregational church and he is a Koyal 
Arch Mason and also a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is a clean- 
cut, enterprising business man, genial and courteous in manner, obliging in disposition, at 
all times reliable and at all times alert to the opportunities for the attainment of success. 
He carries a full line of high class groceries and dry goods, his store is characterized by 
scrupulous cleanliness and the goods are systematically and tastefully arranged. Laudable 
ambition has carried Mr. Gray into imjjortant relations and one of the strong elements of his 
success is the fact that he has always continued in the business in which he embarked as a 
j-oung salesman. 



EDWARD HUNGER. 



Ivlward Hunger, who was president of tlie Citizens National Bank of llaiikinson, was 
also a largo landowner in Richland county and was recognized as one of its leading business 
men. He was born in Rosenau, Germany, on the l.ltli of March, 181,'5, a son of Carl and 
Carolina Hunger, both of whom died when he was but a child. He received his education 
in the common schools and in his young manhood emigrated to the I'nited States and made 
his way to Richland county. North Dakota, where he took up a homestead. At that time 
settlers were few and far between and the work of development had scarcely been begun. 
He brought his land under cultivation and made a number of improvements upon his home- 
stead and subsequently took \ip a tree claim, which he held for nine years. In 1S8S he 
removed to Hankinson and after spending a year in travel he engaged in merchandising, 
which occupied his time and attention for eighteen years. In 1900 he established the Citizens 
National Bank, of which he remained the head until his death. The institution is capitalized 
for thirty thousand dollars, has a surphis of ten thousand dollars and average deposits of 
one hundred and eighty thousand dollars. Its rapid and substantial growth was due in 
large measure to the sagacity and b\isiness acumen of its president. He was also one of the 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA . 169 

largest landowners in Richland county, owning many farms, comprising over fifteen liundred 
acres of excellent land. 

Mr. Hunger was married in 1868 to Miss Anna Hochheusler, a native of Germany, who 
died in 1893, leaving a son, F. 0., who is now postmaster at Hankinson. In 1895 Mr. Hunger 
waS married a second time. Miss Anna Johnson becoming his wife. She was born in Nor- 
way, but came to this state from Fergus Falls, Minnesota. 

Mr. Hunger was an adherent of the republican party and for fourteen years served on 
the city council, while for some time he was a member of the school board, proving in both 
capacities able and conscientious. His widow belongs to the Congregational church and takes 
an active interest in its work. The principles which governed his conduct may be gathered 
from the fact that he was a member of the Masonic order. He began to provide for his own 
support when still a boy and thereafter depended upon his own resources and the financial 
independence which he gained was proof of his energy and wise management. His honor and 
reputation were beyond reproach, and his word was as good as his bond. He was honored 
and respected by all who knew him and in his death, which occurred July 20, 1916, the com- 
munity lost one of its most prominent and best known citizens. 



EMIL EMANL'EL. 



Emil Emanuel, one of the leading business men of Berthold, is conducting a hardware and 
furniture store and is also engaged in the undertaking business. He was born in Germany 
on the 2d of July, 1867, a son of Charles and Elenore (Aker) Emanuel, the former born in 
1833 and the latter ten years later. The father served the required time in the German 
army and was for a number of years overseer of a large estate in the fatherland. In 1867 he 
emigrated with his family to the United States and settled in Princeton, Wisconsin, whence 
he removed to Augusta, that state, where he passed away in 1906. His wife survives and 
still resides there. 

Emil Emanuel, who was the fourth in order of birth in a family of eight children, 
attended tlie grammar and high schools in Augusta, Wisconsin, and when sixteen years of 
ao-e began working for his brother, who was engaged in the furniture and undertaking busi- 
ness in Milbank, South Dakota. After remaining there for seven years he returned to Wis- 
consin and for eight years conducted a wholesale liquor business. Later for three years he 
and his brother operated a meat market in Augusta, but in 1906 he came to Berthold, North 
Dakota, where he has since resided. For two years he followed agricultural pursuits and 
then purchased the hardware, furniture and undertaking business which he has since con- 
ducted. He understands the problems that confront the retail merchant, follows up-to-date 
methods and carries a large stock and as a result his patronage is large and profitable. He 
has disposed of his farm and concentrates his energies upon the development of his mercan- 
tile interests. 

Mr. Emanuel was married on the 25th of September, 1885, to Miss Rose Berger, of 
Augusta. Wisconsin, a daughter of August and Eve Berger, natives of Germany, where the 
father passed away. He followed the occupation of farming and in young manhood served 
the required time in the German army. The mother removed to Augusta, Wisconsin, in 1888 
and died there in 1914. To Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel have been born six children. Herman A., 
who owns a meat market in Berthold, was married in December, 1915, to Miss Freda Hogan- 
son, of Hingham, Montana. Emil A., who is assisting his father, was married in 1913 to 
Miss Kate Whitman, of Berthold. Delia M. is the wife of Arthur Washburn, a telegraph 
operator on tha Great Northern Railway. Harvey W. follows the tinner's trade and- also 
assists in his father's store. He married Mildred Fredrickson and has two children, Verna 
and Bruce. Arthur F. is likewise associated with his father in business. Eva is a graduate 
of the Berthold grammar and high schools and is at home. 

Mr. Emanuel supjiorts the candidates and measures of the democratic party at the 
polls, and in religious faith is a German Lutheran. He is well known fraternally belonging 
to Lodge No. 1089, B. P. 0. E.,.of Minot, Lodge No. 6, K. P., of Minot, the Modern Brother- 
hood of America, of Berthold and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of Berthold, in 



170 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

wliich lie 1ms passed throiisli all the chairs. He is energetic, progressive and sound of judg- 
ment, wliicli qualities have enabled him to gain a gratifying measure of prosperity, and his 
genuine worth is acknowledged by all who know him. , 



THOMAS riTZMAURICE. 



Thomas Fitziiuuiriec, an agricultural implement dealer of Mohall, and a representative 
farmer and pioneer citizen of Renville county, was born in Braccbridge, Ontario, Canada, on 
the 5th of January, 1870, and is a son of Edward and Frances (Stokes) Fitzmaurice, who are 
mentioned elsewhere in this work in eoiuicction with tlie sketch of their son, Ur. F. S. Fitz- 
maurice. 

When a lad of ten years Thomas Fitzmaurice accompanied his parents on their removal 
from Canada to the United States, at which time a location was made in Pembina. On 
reaching manhood he bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres adjoining the old home- 
stead but for Some years thereafter continued to cooperate with his father in the development 
of his farming enterprises. In 1901 Thomas F'itzniaurice homesteaded in what is now Renville 
county, four miles north of Jlohall. and upon the property which he thus secured he con- 
tinued to reside until 190.S. During the intervening period he bouglit more land, adding other 
tracts adjoining his original holdings until 1908, at which time he was the owner of six 
quarter sections in one body, or nine hundred and sixty; acres. Since then he has added 
another quarter section to his holdings and is today one of the extensive landowners of his 
part of the state. In the fall of 1908 he took up his abode in Mohall and established an 
agricultural implement business. In the intervening period of eight years he has built up 
an extensive trade and his patronage is now very large and gratifying, so that his annual 
sales reach a profitable figure. During a portion of this time he continued to operate his 
farm lands but has rccentlj' placed a tenant on his holdings. 

In 1905 Mr. Fitzmaurice was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary Clifford, of Mohall, who 
was born in Iowa, and they have one son, Thomas C. Mr. Fitzmaurice votes with the 
democratic party but has never been an aspirant for public office. He has membership with 
the Knights of Columbus and he and his wife are communicants of the Catholic faith. They 
are greatly esteemed by reason of their genuine worth and Mr. Fitzmaurice has won a most 
creditable position in business circles, steadily working his way upward through ability and 
energy and winning that prosperity which is the merited reward of persistent and honorable 
labor. 



HAAKEN HAAKKNSON. 



Among the many self-made men who have found in North Dakota opportunity for gain- 
ing success is Haaken Haakenson, who owns an excellent farm on section 2. Normanna town- 
ship, Cass county. A native of Norway, his birth occurred in Endresong on the 23d of 
November, 1842. His father, Haaken Johnson, died in the land of the midnight sun. 

Haaken Haakenson was educated in the common schools of his native country and con- 
tinued to reside there until 18G9, in which year he crossed the Atlantic to the United States. 
For three months he remained in Rock Prairie, Wisconsin, and then went to Mitchell county, 
Iowa, where he lived for six years, working during that time as a farm hand. He practiced 
the strictest economy and was able to save enough money to buy a yoke of oxen, with which 
he dcove through to North Dakota in 1875. He was seven weeks in making tlfe trip and went 
as far as Goose river, but not finding any desirable land in that part of the state, he retiirned 
to Cass county, arriving in Fargo in July. At that time his sole capital was five dollars and 
he not only had to support himself, but to provide for a wife and three children. He located 
on eighty acres of his present farm, which he filed on as a preemption claim, but as he w^as 
unable to make the payments thereon he later changed it to a homestead. In the meantime 
a law had been passed permitting a person to file on one hundred and sixty acres as a home- 
stead and he accordingly took up another eighty acres, making his farm a quarter section. 




THOMAS FITZilAURICE 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 173 

The first residence of the family in this state was a log cabin fourteen by sixteen feet, with 
a sod roof, and later when his mother came from Norway to make her home with him he 
built an addition eight by twelve feet. After living in that cabin for fifteen years Mr. 
Haakenson erected his present substantial and commodious residence. He added two hundred 
acres to his holdings, but has since sold forty acres, his present farm comprising three hun- 
dred and twenty acres. The land is all in a high state of cultivation and yields good crops 
annually, which find a ready sale on the market. 

Mr. Haakenson was married in Norway, the spring before emigrating to this country, 
to Miss Carrie Knudson. Ten children have been born to this union, but two are now 
deceased, those surviving being: Caroline, the wife of Henry Huseby, of Normanna town- 
ship, this county ; Osta, the wife of Martin Stenberg, also a resident of Normanna township ; 
Anna, who married Andrew J. B.jerke, a lumber dealer of Sharon, this state; Knute, at home; 
Christine, the wife of John Stenberg, who is engaged in the butcher business in Fargo; Hilda 
J., the wife of Oscar Tostrud, of Fargo; Carl, also residing in Fargo; and Henry, who with 
his brother Knute is operating tlie home fann. The two brothers are also stockholders in 
the Farmers Elevator Company of Horace and in St. Luke's Hospital of Fargo. 

The family belong to the Norwegian Lutheran church, the work of which they further 
in every way possible, and their lives are guided by its teachings. In developing and improv- 
ing his farm Mr. Haakenson has contributed to the agricultural development of his county 
as well as to his individual success and he is justly considered one of its valued citizens. 



DAVID ARTHUR DINNIF. 



David Arthur Dinnie is a prominent contractor who has erected most of the larger 
buildings at Minot. In this connection he has gained a prominent place in business circles, 
but his name has become perhaps even more widely known throughout tlie country as the 
owner of pacing horses with world records. He was born in Ontario, Canada, August 1, 1865, 
a son of John and Mary (Gow) Dinnie, who were natives of Edinburg, Scotland, in which 
country they were reared and married. Crossing the Atlantic about 1840, they settled in 
Canada, where the father, who made farming his life occupation, died in 1900. He had long 
survived his wife, who passed away in 1868. They were the parents of fourteen children, 
twelve of whom reached adult age. 

David Arthur Dinnie, the youngest of the family, practically had no educational oppor- 
tunities and he has learned his life's lessons in the school of experience. He left his father's 
home in April before attaining his tenth year and was employed on farms until fourteen 
years of age. On the 3d of April, 1893, he made his way to Grand Forks, North Dakota, and 
in that locality was employed at farm labor for two years. He afterward began learning 
the brick maker's trade with his brothers and in 1899 he took up the work of general con- 
tracting at Grand Forks, continuing in the business there until January 24, 1901, when he 
removed to Minot and disposed of his interests at Grand Forks, where he had owned the land 
that now constitutes the fair grounds at that place and which he sold to the fair association. 
He removed to Minot because of the promising outlook of the town and at once established 
business as a contractor. He has erected practically all of the larger buildings that have 
been put up in the city since that time and he has acquired a large amount of IMinot real 
estate, including both residence and business property. The important nature of his work 
is indicated in the fact that he was awarded the contract for the erection of the State Normal 
School, the International Harvester Company building, the high school and other prominent 
structures and is now engaged in the building of the Parker Hotel. In 1906 he became inter- 
ested in fine driving stock and at this time owns the champion father and daughter of the 
world, Don Densmore, with a record of 3:02 1-4, and Sayde Densraore, with a record of 2:02. 
He has altogether about thirty head of fine draft horses and other splendid stock, including 
fourteen liead of standard bred horses. He came to North Dakota with less than a dollar 
and he is now one of the prosperous and substantial citizens of the western part of the state. 
His property interests in Minot include the Dinnie flats and also ground one hundred by one 
hundred and forty feet on which his stables have been built. He trains and develops his 

Vol. n— 10 



174 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

horses in Minot and he may be justly proud of tlic fact that two of his animals have made 
world records in pacing. His racing interests, however, are merely a diversion with him, 
although he is a tliorough horseman and splendid judge of horse flesh. He keeps his stock 
merely for pastime and pleasure. 

On the 1st of February, 1893, Mr. Dinnie was married to Miss Elizabeth Delaney, who 
was born at Henderson, Minnesota, a daughter of Timothy and Margaret Uelaney, who in 
1883 took up their abode upon a farm south of Arvilla, North Dakota, where the fatlier still 
resides, but the mother jiassed away in 1912. 

In politics Mr. Dinnie is a republican, but is without aspiration for office. He belongs 
to the Elks lodge and also to the Knights of Pythias lodge at Minot. He has a wide and 
favorable acquaintance in this part of the state and he is most highly esteemed where best 
known. He certainly deserves much credit for what he has accomplished and his life record 
proves what maj- be done by an individual of resolute will and purpose who is not afraid of 
hard work. 



HARRY C. EDBLOM. 



Harry C. Edblom, publisher of the Prairie Press at Gwjnner, was born in Litchfield, 
Minnesota, May 27, 1890, a son of Charles and Hanna (Johnson) Edblom, who reside in the 
vicinity of Litchfield. For a long period the father was engaged in the real estate business 
but is now living retired, enjoying a rest which he has truly earned and richly deserves. 

Harry C. Edblom obtained his education in the schools of Litchfield and there resided 
until 1908, when he left home and went to Frazee, Minnesota. He had previously learned 
the printer's trade and when eighteen years of age he accepted the position of foreman on 
the Free Press of Frazee. remaining in that connection for a year and a half. He was next 
employed in the office of the Headliglit at Staples, where he remained for a year and a half, 
and on the expiration of that period came to Gwinner, North Dakota, where lie worked on 
the Prairie Press for a time. He afterward purchased the paper, put in new equipment and 
now has the best equipped printing office in Sargent county and the only full page press in 
the county. He is making good here, giving to the public an attractive news sheet, and his 
circulation and advertising patronage are constantly increasing. In addition to his journa- 
listic connections Mr. Edblom is interested in insurance and ether lines of business. He makes 
his n('wspa])er publication, however, his foremost interest and has the record of having issued 
the largest paper in the state of North Dakota, The Prairie Press was organized June 20, 
1908, at Ciete. and was printed at Wahpcton, North Dakota, its owner being Edward W. 
Spencer, who conducted it for a year and a half. He then removed to Gwinner, where he 
established a small newspaper plant, conducting the business until he sold out to Mr. Edblom 
on the Ist of March, 1913. The new equipm?nt that has been added by Mr. Edblom cost 
about thirty-five hundred dollars and there is no phase of the business that does not indicate 
his progressive spirit and enterprise. 

In his political views Mr. Edblom is a republican and his religious faith is that of the 
Episcopal church. He is a very progressive business man, alert, wide-awake and enterpris- 
ing, and his interests are of a character tliat contribute to public progress as well as to 
individual success. 



^VILLIAM J. CARROLL. 



William J. Carroll is the owner of Minot property and farm lands and his life record is 
indicative of the opportunities offered in this state, for his success has all practically been 
attained since he took up his abode within its borders. He was born at Inverness, Canada, 
February 10, 1862, a son of James and Mary (Rady) Carroll. The mother's birth occurred 
at New Ireland, Canada, while the father's birth occurred in the country of Ireland, whence 
he came to the new world when seven years of age. He made farming his life work and died 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 175 

in Canada about 1900. His widow still resides in that country. They had a family of fifteen 
children, of whom William J. is the eldest. 

After attending the public schools of Canada, William J. Carroll left home when a youth 
of seventeen and began workfng for others in the woods and in sawmills in Vermont and New 
Hampshire. He arrived in North Dakota in 18S3 and was employed on a farm near Mayville 
until he became engaged in business at that place. In February, 1887, he removed to Minot, 
where he purchased property and established a bakery, but on the same day his establishment 
was destroyed by fire, causing him a loss of two thousand dollars. He then went overland to 
Williston, where he took a steamboat and returned to Fort Benton, driving from there to 
Great F'alls. In the fall of 1887 he again arrived at Minot, where in connection with E. K. 
Sykes he engaged in business, which claimed his time and energies for ten years. On the expi- 
ration of that period he turned his attention to the business of shipping cattle and horses to 
eastern markets and is still active in that field of labor. In 1899 he purchased a ranch on the 
Knife river, where he engaged in the stock business for a number of years, having at times as 
many as two thousand head of stock on his place. He discontinued the conduct of his ranch, 
however, about 1905, although he continued to deal in range horses until 1915, when the range 
was opened to settlement. He is the owner of business and residence property in Minot 
and in 1909 he built the Carroll flats, which are unfurnished apartments. He also has other 
property and is still the owner of farm lands in this state. His business afl'airs have 
steadily grown in volume and importance and he is accounted one of the leading and repre- 
sentative business men of his city. 

On the 13th of January, 1893, Mr. Carroll was united in marriage to Miss Stella Hopper, 
a native of Green Island, Iowa, and a daughter of James J. and Julia (Elder) Hopper, who 
were born in Indiana and Iowa respectively. Mr. Hopper engaged in merchandising and also 
in the live stock business. His wife died during the infancy of their daughter and by the 
father's death she was left an orphan when twelve years of age. She attended the high 
school at Maquoketa, Iowa, and was one of the first school teachers of Ward county, teach- 
ing in a little log schoolhouse into whicli the gophers would frequently creep, sitting up on 
the floors and benches as though listening to the proceedings of the pupils. When the school 
grew large enough to require the services of two teachers, Mrs. Carroll and Mr. C. A. 
.Johnson, now editor of the Optic-Eeporter, were in charge. Mrs. Carroll is a lady of broad 
mind, liberal views and marked culture and has done much to mold the high intellectual and 
social standards of the community. By her marriage she has become the mother of two 
children, namely: Ruth, who is a graduate of the Minot high school, attended the State 
University of North Dakota at Grand Forks for two years and is now a student in the 
University of Minnesota; and William Glenn, who has attended the College of St. Thomas 
at St. Paul and Shattuck Military School at Faribault, Minnesota. He is now at the Mexi- 
can border with the First North Dakota regiment. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Carroll hold membershiii in the Episcopal church. The former is a 
life member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles at Minot and also belongs to the Knights of 
Pythias and to Lodge No. 1089 of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks at Minot, being 
the third to join the organization at Grand Forks and becoming one of the first Elks in the 
state. Mrs. Carroll belongs to the Ladies Relief Corps, the Pythian Sisters and the Musical 
Club, the last named being a woman's organization at Minot. In politics Mr. Carroll is a 
stalwart republican and for four years, from 1898 until 1902, served as sherift' of the county. 
He and his family are most widely and favorably known in Minot and that part of the state 
and are accounted among its most valued residents. 



OLE A. KALDOR. 



Ole A. Kaldor, the present efficient and popular county treasurer of Traill county, is one 
of the best known residents of Hillsboro. His birth occurred in Norway on the 8th of May, 
1873, and he is a son of Anders and Anna KalJor, also natives of that country. The family 
removed to America in 1873 and coming at once to the northwest, located on a homestead 
in Traill county. North Dakota. The father devoted his time to the improvement and oper- 



176 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

ation of that place until I'JIO, whun he removed to lliUsburo, where both he and liis wife 
are now living, enjoying a period of leisure made possible by their former efficient labor. 
Four of their seven children survive and all are residents of Traill county. 

()le A. Kaldor attended the common schools in the acquircniMit of his early education 
and was later a student in a business college at Minneapolis, lie remained on the home farm 
until ho became of age and then went to Ward county, this state, where he liled on a 
homestead. Through assisting his father witli the work of the home farm he became thor- 
oughly familiar with agricultural pursuits and was very successful in the cultivation of 
his land. At the end of eight years he sold that place and, returning to Traill county, pur- 
chased the Kaldor homestead on section 20, Norw'ay township, which comprises two hundred 
and forty acres of splendidly improved land. After living there for three years he removed 
to Hillsboro, where he has since resided. He is now filling the office of countj' treasurer and 
is making an excellent record in that capacity, being systematic, prompt and accvirate in the 
discharge of his duties. His integrity has always been above question, and the confidence 
which his constituents have placed in him is w'cU deserved. 

In 1901 occurred the marriage of Jlr. Kaldor and Miss Lena Veikley, who was also born 
in Norway. They are the parents of three children. May Adelia. Archie J. and Floyd O. 
Mr. Kaldor is a stanch adherent of llie republican party and has served on the school board 
and has held other township olfices. Both he and his wife hold membership in the Lutheran 
Free church, and their influence is invariably given on the side of right and progress. Both 
have a wide acquaintance and their genuine worth is attested by the fact that those who 
have been the most intimately associated with them are their warmest friends. 



PETER VANDENOEVER. 



Peter Vandenoever is engaged in tlie real estate business ami in speculative building 
at Minot and his efforts along business lines have been an important element in the develop- 
ment and improvement of the city. He was born in Alto township, Wisconsin, May 4, 1836, 
his parents being Richard and Harriet (Van Mauerick) Vandenoever, both of whom were 
natives of Holland, in which country they were reared and married. They had a family of 
eight children, of whom Peter was the seventh in order of birth. In the year 1852 they 
crossed the Atlantic to the new world and took up their abode at Grand Island, New York, 
near Niagara Falls, remaining tliere for about two years. At the expiration of that period 
they removed to Alto townshi]), Wisconsin, where the father engaged in farming \intil 1860, 
when he removed with his familj' to Mower county, Minnesota. He died in 1893, when on 
his way back to his home from a visit in the old country. His death occurred in Boston 
and he had there been buried when his son Peter learned of it and removed the body to 
Dexter, Minnesota. His military record covered six years' service in the regular army in 
Holland. His widow survived him and passed away in Dexter. ]\Iinncsota, in 1904. 

Peter Vandenoever attended school in Minnesota and made his home with his parents 
until twenty-four years of age. after which he began working for others as a farm hand, 
Ijeing thus employed until a year after his marriage. On the 1st of June, 1882, he wedded 
Miss Charlotte Funderhido, who was born on Greenwood Prairie, thirteen miles northeast of 
Rochester, Minnesota, her parents being John and Amelia (Delozier) Funderhide, natives of 
Maryland and Pennsylvania .respectively. They became early settlers of Minnesota, in 
which state the father followed farming until his demise in 1883. The mother still survives 
at the age of eighty-seven years and makes her home at Elkton, South Dakota. They 
became the parents of eight children, Mrs. Vandenoever being the fifth in order of birth. 
She acquired her education in the district schools of Minnesota. 

A year after his marriage Mr. Vandenoever became ])roprietor of a hotel in Dexter, 
Minnesota, which he conducted for about two years. He afterward dealt in grain and was 
manager of a lumber yard for one and one-half years and was also active in the real estate 
field, handled machinery and twine and had still other business interests at that place for 
fifteen years. During that period he purchased fifty acres of land adjoining the town and 
laid out two additions, known as Vandenocvor's first and second additions to Dexter. He 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 177 

also engaged in buying stock and continued Ids residence at tliat place until the fall of 
1901, when he filed on a claim near Surrey, Ward county. On the 17th of April, 1903, he 
removed his family to Minot and relinquished the claim. In this part of the state, however, 
he purchased a large amount of land and engaged in buying and selling land and city prop- 
erty. He has since been engaged in the real estate business and he now has ten houses and 
lots in Minot and is building more, being successfully engaged in speculative building as 
well as in the real estate business at the present time. He now owns about eight hundred 
■ acres of farm land in this county which he rents, while he concentrates his energies upon the 
management of his real estate interests and his cily properties. At one time he was a stock- 
holder in the Union National Bank but has withdrawn from that organization. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vandenoever have nine children, as follows: Maud Agnes, the wife of 
George Vermilya, who is engaged in the abstract business at Towner, North Dakota; 
Clarence Peter, residing at home, who acts as deputy sheriff of Ward county; Chester Ter- 
renes, who resides at Great Falls, Montana, is engaged in the milling business, is a stock- 
holder in the Royal Milling Company and wedded Miss Lillian Stewart, of Everett, Wash- 
ington; Josephine Mary, at home; Justin Francis, e.xpert driver of an auto truck in the 
Minot fire department; Florence Amelia, at home; and Genevieve Charlotte, Enid Cecelia and 
Cornelia Meredith, who are also yet under the parental roof. 

Mr. Vandenoever holds membership with the Yeomen, as does his wife, and he belongs 
also to the Modern Woodmen of America, while Mrs. Vandenoever is connected with the 
Daughters of Isabella. Their religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church and in 
politics Mr. Vandenoever is a stalwart republican. He is the present commissioner from the 
first district of Ward county, serving for the third year, and he was on the city board for 
six years as alderman and commissioner. As a member of the board of aldermen he served 
on the finance committee and on the committee on streets and bridges. He was clerk of 
the school board af Dexter, Minnesota, and was constable of his township at the same time. 
He was administrator of his father's estate, has also been chosen to administer other estates 
and is now acting as guardian of the children of five families. He is also serving as humane 
oflftcer in Minot and he has made a most excellent record in every relation of life, holding to 
high standards of manhood and of citizenship. 



HON. ELLING SEVERSON. 



Hon. Elling Severson has served as a member of the state legislature for three terms 
and has gained a prominent place in agricultural and business circles of Cass county. He is 
now president of the Farmers elevator at Kindred and owns seven hundred and twenty acres 
of excellent land in Normanna township. His birth occurred in Dane county, Wisconsin, on 
the 29th of October, 1853, and he is a son of Andrew and Martha (Flatland) Severson, natives 
of Norway, who emigrated to the United States in 1844 and located in Wisconsin. Subse- 
quently they removed to Goodhue county, Minnesota, wliere they lived until called by death. 
Eight of the ten children born to them are still living. 

Elling Severson received a common school education and remained at home until 1880, 
when he removed to North Dakota and located upon his present home farm on section 3, 
Normanna township, Cass county. As soon as possible he brought his land under cultivation 
and as the years have passed he has made many excellent improvements thereon, as that place 
is now one of the valuable and attractive farm properties of the locality. He has bought land 
from time to time and now owns seven hundred and twenty acres, from which he receives 
a good income. He is also president of the Farmers Elevator Company at Kindred, and 
the success of that enterprise is due in no small measure to his energy and good judgment. 

On the 3d of February, 1880, occurred the marriage of Mr. Severson and Miss Gertrude 
Lee. She is a native of Norway and a daughter of Nels and Ambier Lee, both of whom are 
deceased. By her marriage she has become the mother of the following children: Emma; 
Nellie; Martina, who is now teaching school; Cora, also a teacher by profession; Geneva, 
who is attending high school; Martius; Elmer; and four deceased. 

Mr. Severson has supported the republican party since age conferred upon him the 



178 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

right of franchise. He has long been recognized as a leader in politics and for three terms 
he served ably as a member of the state legislature. He has also been on the school board 
and for several years was chairman of the board of supervisors. His success is proof of his 
foresight and enterprise, as when lie came to this state he was without capital and witliout 
inlluential friends and as through all tlie intervening years he has relied ujiou his own 
resources. He is widely and favorably known througliout the county, and his personal 
friends are many. 



JOHN GREEN. 



Much of the progress of a communit\' is due to its business men and John Green, wlio 
is engaged in the hardware business in Hankinson, has contributed to tlie development of 
that town as well as gained individual success. He was born in Carver county, Minnesota, 
on the 9th of November, 1865, a son of John and Maggie Green, natives of Wurtemberg, 
German^'. He came to the United States when a young man of twenty-eight years and slie 
emigrated to this country in her girlhood. They were married in Baltimore and for a time 
lived in the east, where the father worked as a laborer. Subsequently they removed to Jlin- 
nesota and at the outbreak of the Oil war Mr. Green entered the Union army, with which 
he served for three years. At the close of hostilities he returned to Minnesota and from 
that time until his death in 1895 concentrated his energies upon farming, in which he met 
with gratifying success. Politically he was an adherent of the democratic party and his 
religious faith was that of the Catholic church. He was a quiet, unassuming man and his 
genuine worth gained liim the friendship of those who knew him intimately. To him and 
liis wife were born eight children, of whom our subject is the third in order of birth. 

John Green was educated in the common schools of his native county and subsequently 
learned the harness maker's trade, which he followed from his seventeenth year until 1898, 
•when he removed to Hankinson, this state. He engaged in the furniture business there on 
a small scale and also continued to work at his trade and as the years passed he gained 
prosperity. He now owns a large hardware store and as he keeps a well selected line of 
goods of high quality and follows a liberal business policy his patronage has grown steadily 
and is now of gratifying proportions. He also owns a store at New Eftington, South Dakota. 
His business interests are conducted under the style of Green & Son and the lirm is recog- 
nized as a factor in the commercial expansion of tlie town. 

In 1887 occurred the marriage of Mr. Green and Miss Sarah A. Poppler, also a native 
of Carver county, Minnesota, and tliey have ten children, seven sons and three daughters: 
E. L., a druggist of Hankinson; R. C, who is in business with his father; F. W., a druggist 
of New Elfington, i^jouth Dakota; Evangeline, who is studying music and art; Edwin \V., 
who is associated with his fatlier in business; Katlierine, a high school graduate; and 
Walden, Lowell, Evcretta and Koswyn. all iif whom are at home. 

Mr. Green votes the democratic ticket and takes a commendable interest in public 
affairs. For nine years he served on the school board and for twelve years has been a mem- 
ber of the city council. Fraternally he belongs to the Foresters, in which he has passed 
through all of the chairs and to the Knights of Columbus, while his religious faith is that 
of the Roman Catholic church. He has gained the respect and confidence of his fellow citizens 
and there are many who hold him in warm personal regard. 



JAY H. MAT.TBY. 



Jay H. Maltby. owner and publisher of the Forman Independent News, has been identi- 
fied with that paper for about thirteen years and his work in that connection has resulted 
iu giving to tlie community a newspaper of interest and value to its readers. He was born 
in the state of New York and there resided during his early boyhood, after which he 
:accorapanied his parents on their removal westward to Detroit, Minnesota, where he became 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 179 

foreman of a newspaper known as the Detroit Record, continuing in that position for several 
years. When quite young he spent two years with the Bottineau Pioneer of North Dakota. 
In 1892 he became connected with the Milnor Teller, which he continued to publish for nine 
years, at the end of which time he sold the paper and removed to Bufl'alo, North Dakota, 
where he published the Buffalo Express. There he continued for six months, when he went 
to Davenport and published the Davenport News for two j'ears. In July, 1903, he moved 
liis plant to Forman and began the publication of the Forman News, the first issue being 
brought from the press on the 31st of July, 1903. He continued the publication of that 
paper until 1911 and on the '30th of October of that 3'ear he purchased the Sargent County 
Independent, which had been established in May, 1888. He then consolidated the two papers, 
bringing out the first issue of the Forman Independent News on the 20th of October, 1911. 
This he still publishes and has made it an attractive journal for the people of the district, 
being given to the dissemination of local as well as general news. Through the columns of 
the paper he enters upon a frank and free discussion of many important public problems 
and his articles are most interestmg and readable and the political complexion of the paper 
reflects his belief in the efficacy and value of republican principles. 

Mr. JMaltby was married in Minneapolis, ilinnesota, to Miss Alice Hostettor, who was 
born in southern Minnesota and there continued to make her home up to the time of her 
marriage. They ha've a family of seven children : Allan J., who is now assistant editor of 
the paper; and Violet, Belva, George D., Floy, Francis V. and Anna, all at home. 

Mr. Maltby belongs to the Masonic lodge at Milnor, of which he is a past master, and 
he also has membership with the Yeomen at • Mapleton and with the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen at Forman. His political allegiance has always been given to the repub- 
lican party and foj- four years he filled the office of justice of the peace at Forman, making 
a creditable record by the fair and impartial manner in which he discharged his duties and 
rendered his decisions. He now concentrates his entire interest in the paper and has a sub- 
stantial plant, well equipped with modern machinery and presses. He is a well known 
newspaper man of his section of the state, his record being at all times an expression of the 
highest standards in newspaper publication. 



JOHN W. SAMUELSON. 



.John W. Samuelson, who established the first exclusive shoe store in Minot, in which 
business he is still engaged, is also identified with other commercial enterprises of the city, 
being the majority stockholder in the Ledstrom Furniture Company. He was likewise the 
builder of the Samuelson block and in many ways has contributed to the substantial improve- 
ment of the city in which he makes his home. A native of Sweden, Mr. Samuelson was born 
in Halmstad, July 21, 1879, a son of Samuel and Mary Anderson, who are also natives of 
Sweden, in which country they are still living, the father there devoting his attention to 
farming. 

John W. Samuelson is the youngest of their four children. He attended school in 
Sweden but before reaching the age of seventeen years left home and crossed the Atlantic to 
America. He located at Merrill, Lincoln county, Wisconsin, and was employed in a shoe 
store for about a year. In 1897 he arrived in Minot and for two years spent his time in the 
employ of the Great Northern Railroad Company or on a farm. In the spring of 1899 he 
established the first exclusive shoe store in the city and has carried on the business since 
that time, enjoying a constantly increasing trade proportionate to the growth of the city's 
population. In 1903 he erected the Samuelson block, his store occupying the lower floor, 
with the Independent office in the basement, while the upper floors are rented for office 
purposes. Broadening the scope of his business connections in 1915, he organized the Led- 
strom Furniture Company, which is also one of the profitable commercial undertakings of 
the city. 

On August 2, 1902, Mr. Samuelson was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary .Johnson, a native 
of Lyle, Minnesota, and a daughter of Hans and Andria .Johnson, both of whom were born 
in Norway. Thej' came to Minot in 1887 and the father has since been identified with agri- 



180 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

cultural pursuits in tliis state, rosiding on his farm in the summer months and in the town 
of Jlinot tIuuuj;liout the winter season. Jlr. and Mrs. 8amuelson liave four eliihlren, namely: 
Harlow \\'alfrid, Knsel Samuel, Alice Jlarie and Carl Arnold. 

Fraternally Mr. Samuelson is a prominent Mason, holding membcrshii) in the lodge, 
chapter and commandcry at Minot and in the Mystic Shrine at Grand Forks. He is also 
identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and his religious faith is indicated 
by his membership in the Lutheran church. In politics he is a republican, somewhat inde- 
pendent, for while he believes in the principles of the party, he often votes regardless of party 
ties at local elections where no national issue is involved. He has never desired office, having 
always concentrated his attention upon his business interests, and along the line of earnest 
effort intelligently directed he has won the success which is now his, making him one of tlio 
most substantial citizens of ilinot. He has never allowed obstacles or dilliculties to deter 
him and when one avenue of oiiportunity has seemed closed he has sought out otlier paths 
leading to the desired goal. 



willia:m abial scott. 



William Abial Scott, the president of the Pioneer Life Insurance Company of North 
Dakota, and a well-known resident of Fargo, is a man who at all times is notably prompt, 
energetic and reliable in business connections. His plans are ever well defined and carefully 
executed, and while not all dajs in his career have been equally bright, the trend of his busi- 
ness life has been along the line of progress and advancement and he has won for himself 
a place among the substantial residents of his adopted city and state. 

Mr. Scott, seventh generation in New England, is a native of Peterboro, New Hamp- 
shire. He was born December 8. 1856, of the marriage of Albert S. and Anna (Sawyer) 
(daughter of Abial and Sybil Buss Sawyer) Scott. Albert S., the son of William and 
Phylinda Crossfield Scott, was a lawyer by profession and spent bis entire life in Peter- 
boro, distinguished in his day and generation. Anna Sawyer was of the fourth generation 
of tlie Sawyer family in the adjacent village of .Sharon, New Hampshire. 

Three generations of the Scott family, father, son and grandson, saw service in the 
Revolutionary war. The founder of the family in America was Alexander Scott, who was 
born in Derry county, Ireland, and came to the new world with his wife Margaret and family 
in the year 1734. He settled in Lancaster, Massachusetts. Later his son, Alexander, and 
a brother (another son), William Scott, and Alexander's father-in-law, William Robb, were 
three of the five men who founded, from 1735 to 1750, the town of Peterboro, New Hamp- 
shire, Alexander Scott conducting the first hotel in that place. Major William Scott, son of 
the before named Alexander Scott, and Margaret Robb, was a native of Townsend, Massa- 
chusetts, and he, having seen service in the French war, and two of his sons, saw twenty- 
eight years' service with the Colonial army in the war which brought independence to the 
nation, one son being John Scott, the great-grandfather of William A. Scott, through his 
son William by his first wife Bethiah Ames. Major William Scott married Phebe Woods, 
daughter of Jonathan and Mary (Page) Woods, and through these marriages Mr. Scott traces 
his ancestry to the Stevens, Show, Dempster, Minot, Adams and other families interwoven 
in New England affairs from the beginning. 

No event of special importance occurred to vary the routine of life for William A. Scott 
in his boyhood days, spent in Peterboro, his time being largely passed in the attainment 
of a public school education until he graduated from the Peterboro high school with the class 
of 1874. He, just as his father before him and his son since, entered the Phillips Exeter 
Academy. He was a member of the class of 1877 and there continued his studies for one 
year, at the end of which time he became a student in the law office and under the direction 
of his father. He next entered Dartmouth College, as his father had done, becoming a 
member of the class of 1880, and there completed the work of the freshman year. Upon 
his father's death, in August, 1877, however, he left college and removed west, settling in 
Manhattan, Kansas. 

It was his intention to engage in the cattle business, hut not receiving the financial 




WILLIAM A. SCOTT 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 183 

assistance he expected, in tlie spring of 1878 he went to Topelia, Kansas, and continued 
reading law in the offices of G. C. Clemens and John G. Searles, being admitted to the bar 
on tlie 8th of February, 1879. At that time he located for practice in Russell, Kansas, 
but the following year returned to Manhattan, where he became a member of the firm 
of Sawyer & Scott in the conduct of a law, loan and insurance business. During his resi- 
dence there Mr. Scott was elected to the ofBce of city attorney and was chairman of the 
republican county central committee of Riley county. 

In January, 1881, Mr. Scott visited his home folks and wedded Miss Mary Ellen Wright, 
of Walthara, Massachusetts, to whom he was engaged before coming west. She was born 
in Clinton, that state, a daughter of William and Agnes (Lyon) Wright, natives of Paisley, 
Scotland, where they were reared and married. They came to America about 1850 and 
settled in Clinton, JIassachusetts. Mr. Wright was a weaver and assisted in setting up 
some of the first looms in the United States. His grandfather, .James Tytler, a contem- 
porary of Robert Burns, was a writer and pamphleteer and on account of his writings was 
forced to leave Scotland. Coming to America he settled at Salem, Massachusetts, and was 
engaged at Salem in newspaper work, prior to the Revolutionary war. He left the family 
of his first marriage, including Mr. Wright's mother, in Scotland and afterward married a 
second time in Salem, Massachusetts. It will be seen that Mrs. Scott is also descended from 
an old and prominent Kew England family. She has ever been a most exemplary wife and 
mother and a true helpmate to her husband in every way, in fact, Mr. Scott attributes much 
of his success in life to her. 

Following his marriage Jlr. Scott returned with his bride to Manhattan, Kansas. In 
1882 he accepted a position in the local paying pension office in Topeka, where he was employed 
for two and a half years and then formed a paitnership with H. E. Ball in organizing the 
Kansas Investment Company, with which he was identified from 1884 imtil 1886. At that 
date he went to work for the New Hampshire Trust Company of Manchester, New Hamp- 
shire, making loans for that corporation, with office in Topeka. In 1888 he returned to the 
east and arranged with the trust company to lemove his office to Fort Scott, Kansas, but 
after remaining at that place for only three months he was sent to Fargo to take charge of 
the company's office at that place. He continued to serve until the failure of the trust 
company, which occurred during the widespread financial panic of 1893. Mr. Scott was 
then employed to look after the business of the defunct company in this section of the 
country, a work which occupied his attention until about 1905, when the business was closed up. 
He afterward became associated with Governor L. B. Hanna and J. W. Smith in the comple- 
tion of the Fargo Street Railway, the promoters of the road having failed. When this task 
was accomplished Mr. Scott was made vice president of the road, with which he was associated 
until 1907, when he sold his interests. Two years before, or in 1905, the state legislature 
had established the state fair at Fargo and Jlr. Scott was made its first president, continu- 
ing in that connection from 1905 until 1909 inclusive.' He was again president in 1911 and 
once more in 1913 and 1914 and was recognized as one of the leading figures in the building 
and improvement of the fair ground. He was the architect and builder of the only hog 
building on a fair ground in the United States in which fair visitors eat their lunches, this 
being in a sort of open gallery of the building. He still remains one of the directors of the fair 
board. 

Mr. Scott's public work has often been of a most important and valuable character and 
has been of far-reaching effect and benefit. He was one of the dominant factors in the 
building of the Masonic Temple at Fargo and devised the plan whereby bonds of one 
hundred dollars were sold bearing three per cent interest, the bonds to be paid to the estate 
after the death of the member or holder. In 1908 jMr. Scott was elected secretary of the 
Pioneer Life Insurance Company of North Dakota, organized In 1907, and in 1909, when 
Governor L. B. Hanna resigned as president, Mr. Scott was elected his successor and has 
since served in that capacity, directing the interests and activities of the business, the 
company being now recognized as one of the strong and reliable corporations of this char- 
acter in the United States. Its ninth semi-annual statement, issued December 3, 1915, 
indicates the company to be in an excellent condition and that its business is steadily grow- 
ing. Its total resources in 1907 were one hundred and forty-four thousand, four hundred 
and twenty-five dollars and in 1916 were eight hundred and sixty-five thousand, seven hun- 



184 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

«liod and eighty-five dollars and eighty-four ci'iits. Its insurance in 1907 was one liuiidrcd 
and six thousand dollars and in I'JIS, fourteen million, four hundred and thirteen thousand, 
four hundred and thirty -six dollars and forty cents. His name is also a familiar one in 
financial circles aside from his insurance interests, for he was for fifteen years a director 
of the First National Bank of Fargo, the oldest banking institution of the state, and is now 
director of the Northern Savings Bank of Fargo and of tlie First National Bank at Moore, 
Montana. In 1890 Mr. Scott began buying farm lands and owns several farms in both 
North Dakota and Minnesota, while since 1892 he lias been engaged in the breeding of 
shorthorn cattle. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Scott have been born four children, as follows: Agnes Anna, who 
became the wife of Dr. P. H. Burton and died, leaving two children, Dorothy and William 
Burton; Albert Daniel, the president of the First National Bank of Moore, Montana; William 
Wright, who is the assistant treasurer of the I'ioneer Life Insurance Company; and 
Clement A., who died in infancy. Mr. Scott is a prominent Mason, being a grand cross thirty- 
second degree Mason, of which there are only twelve in the United States. He is also presi- 
dent of the board of trustees of the Scottish Rite bodies of the state. He is identified with 
the Fargo Commercial Club and with the New England Society. He advances the new 
interpretation or philosophy: "God creates all," "and man husbands and fashions God's 
•creations." Man, He created with equal food capacity (not equal as usually given) or rather 
food assimilation to produce human energy, and food has been and is the universal medium 
of exchange, the real necessity, its scarcitj' or plenty having fixed the permanent locations of 
peoples over the earth's surface. All other material things and the fashioning thereof 
to human uses are the conveyances moving about the earth's food supply to all the peoples 
of the world, and man with his brains to act, fashion and devise, is the supervisor, each in 
his own generation, an energizing force while he lives, bringing to earth no material resource 
when he comes and removing none when he folds his shroud about him and should lie down 
to pleasant dreams. 

Mr. Scott's interests are broad and varied and have brought him proniini'ntly to the 
front in many connections. He is regarded as a thoroughly reliable and enterprising business 
num, possessed of sound judgment, keen discrimination and indefatigable energy. 



HANS E. BJERKE. 



Hans E. Bjerke was living retired at Kindred, Cass county, North Dakota, when he 
passed away March 24, 1916. He was a factor of no small importance in the agricultural 
development of his section and owned eleven hundred acres of excellent liiiid. lie was born 
in Norway on the 14th of November, 1840, a son of Even and Martha (Knaterud) Bjerke, 
both natives of that country. The mother died there, but in 1870 the father emigrated to 
the United States, where he passed away. To them were born nine children but only three 
are now living. 

Hans E. Bjerke attended school in Norway and continued to reside there until 1802, 
when he crossed the Atlantic to the United States. After living in Wisconsin for a year he 
was a resident of Chicago for a similar period and then went to Houston county, Minnesota, 
where he remained until 1872. In that year he removed to Cass county. North Dakota, and 
located upon land on section 14, Normanna township, which was then a tract of wild prairie. 
As soon as possible he erected a log cabin covered with a sod roof and there he resided for a 
number of years. At length, however, he replaced this primitive structure with a huge and 
ripto-date residence and he also erected excellent barns and o\ithuildings. He numifested 
his firm faith in the value of Dakota land as an investment by buying farms from time to 
time until he owned eleven hundred acres, which is in a high state of cultivation and is well 
improved. He gained financial independence because he was quick to recognize and prompt to 
utilize opportunities and he managed his affairs in accordance with sound business principles. 
He believed in the value of organization and cooperated efTort and was a stockholder in the 
Farmers ele-i>tor at Kindred. 

In 1869 Mr. Bjerke was united in marriage to Miss Martha Stenhjem, who was horn in 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 185 

Wisconsin, and tliey became the parents of nine childien, namely: Maria, Andrew, Hannah, 
Emma, Edward, Oscar, Selma, Hjalmar and Ella. 

Jlr. Bjerke gave his political allegiance to the republican party. He held membership 
in the Lutheran church, to which his wife belongs, and furthered its work along various 
lines. He was recognized as a factor in the moral advancement of the community and his 
many admirable qualities gained him high place in the regard of those who were associated 
with him. The marked success which Mr. Bjerke won as a farmer is all the more notable in 
that he was dependent upon his own resources and was what in this country we term, a 
self-made man. 



MICHAEL J. McMAHON. 



Michael J. McMahon, a successful farmer of Barnes township, Cass county, is also 
engaged in the dairy business and has won a gratifying measure of success in both lines of 
activity. He was born in County Clare, Ireland, August 3, 1855, of the marriage of Jerry and 
Bridget (O'Connor) McMahon, who in 1870 came to the United States. For three years they 
resided in St. Paul, Minnesota, but at the end of that time came to North Dakota, where a 
son Patrick was living. He had accompanied General Rosser on his exploring expedition 
througli the state and subsequently located in Cass county. His father made his home with 
him for a while, but later homesteaded eighty acres of land. 

Michael J. McJIalion homesteaded an eighty acre tract adjoining his father's farm in 
1877 and subsequently purchased railroad land, his holdings now totaling two hundred and 
eighty acres. In early manhood he followed railroading for four or five years and ran into 
Bismarck on the first train into that city. For many years, however, he has devoted his 
Attention to farming and has brought his place to a high state of development. For some 
time he lias engaged extensively in the dairy business and is now milking twenty-two cows. 
He finds a ready sale for the milk and receives a gratifying profit from his dairy interests. 

Mr. IiIcMahon was married in 1880 to Miss Hannah Paulson, a native of Minnesota, 
whose parents came to this country from Norway. To Mr. and Mrs. Mcilahon have been born 
*ight children, seven of whom are still living, namely: Frank H. and Daniel, at home; Edward, 
who is in the employ of the Northern Pacific Railroad and is living at Livingston, Montana; 
Theodore, who is also a railroad man and is on a run between Barnesville and Crookston; 
Alice, who is teaching in the schools of Barnesville, Minnesota; and Walter and Richard, 
both of whom are at home. 

Mr. McMahon casts his ballot in support of the democratic party and for twenty-six or 
twenty-seven years has served continuously as township assessor, his retention in the office 
being evidence of the ability with which he discharges his duties. He is a communicant of 
the Roman Catholic church, but his wife is a member of the German Lutheran church. Both 
may be depended upon to further movements seeking the moral advance of their community 
and during the years of their residence in Cass county they have gained the sincere respect 
iind goodwill of their fellow citizens. 



LEMUEL BEATON. 



Lemuel Beaton, who is successfully engaged in agricultural pursuits on section 17, 
Barnes township, Cass county, was born in Prince Edward Island, April 2, 1846, a son of Jolm 
and Ann (McAdam) Beaton, also natives of that province, where their entire lives were 
spent. The father was a farmer by occupation. 

Lemuel Beaton was reared under the parental roof and attended the local schools, his edu- 
cational opportunities being somewhat limited, however, as all of the schools at that day 
were subscription schools. When fourteen years of age he went to work in a shipyard and 
there learned the shi])builder's trade, at which he worked for about twenty years. On leaving 
Prince Edward Island in the fall of 1867 he went to Calais, Maine, where he worked in the 



186 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

shipyards. In 180U lie removed to Cliioago and continued to follow Iiia trade there until the 
spring of 1871, when lie went to Duhitli, Minnesota. The following fall he joined the bridge 
building gang of the Northern I'acific Kailway, which w^as then building in Fargo, and worked 
on the bridge across the Red river between iloorhcad and Fargo. He was employed on the 
construction of the Northern Pacific for about a year and a half, following which he engaged 
in boat building on the Red river. In March, 1873, he filed on a preemption claim on section 
10, Barnes township, Cass county, but did not locate on his land at that time, as he continued 
to work at his trade until 1877. He then took up his residence upon his claim where he lived 
for fifteen years, after which he sold that place and bought his present home farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres on section 18, Barnes township. His sons now own a half section, and 
they and our subject are farming in partnership. They follow improved methods and use up- 
to-date machinery in their work, and the sale of their crops yields them a good profit. 

Mr. Beaton was married in 1873 to Miss Mary Lyons, of Mirmisih. New Brunswick, 
Canada, by whom he has eleven children, James, Frank, John, Charlie, Joseph, Daniel, Mary, 
Theresa, Alice, Anna and Walter. 

The republican party has a stanch adherent in Mr. Beaton and for a number of years 
he has served as a member of the board of township trustees and. as a member of the school 
board, proving capable and conscientious in the discharge of his duties. Both he and his 
wife are communicants of the Roman Catholio church, being members of the cathedral at 
Fargo, to the support of which they contribute. Mr. Beaton has resided in the northwest 
for many years and is entitled to honor as one of the pioneers of North Dakota whose labors 
have made possible the present prosperity of the state. 



ALFRED JOSEPH HENRY. 



Alfred Joseph Henry is now living retired at Valley City, although for more than a third 
of a century he was connected with the First National Bank there and his loyalty to the 
institution and his splendid business record well entitle him to the rest which he is now 
enjoying. He is surrounded by many of the comforts of life and has leisure to enjoy those 
things which are of most interest to him. He was born in New York city, July 20, 1843, a 
son of aiarles and Frances (Selmea) Henry, the former a native of Portugal and the latter 
of England. The property of the paternal grandfather was destroyed and when a young man 
the father went to England. He was educated in Spanish, Portuguese and English, his liberal 
education proving a substantial capital when necessity forced hira to enter business life 
dependent \ipon his own resources and exertions. Crossing the Atlantic to New York city, 
lie was there married and he became connected with the ollices of the Journal of Commerce, 
having charge of their foreign business, his linguistic powers enabling him to meet the 
demands in this connection. He died, however, at the comparatively early age of thirty- 
eight years, while his widow spent her remaining years in Brooklyn, New York. 

Alfred Joseph Henry was the eldest of their five children, of whom three are now living. 
After acquiring a public school education in Brooklyn he made his way westward to Hanni- 
bal, Missouri, in company with his uncle, Tilden R. Selmes, who is mentioned in the writings 
of Mark Twain. Hannibal's most noted author. Mr. Selmes was several times mayor of that 
city and a man of |)rominence in the state. He also became well known in connection with a 
duel in which he was one of the participants. 

On the 24th of May, 1861, Mr. Henry, responding to the country's call for military aid, 
enlisted as a member of Company B, Sixteenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, at Quincy, Illi- 
nois, under Captain Wells and Colonel Smith, The command was shortly afterward sent to 
Hannibal, Missouri, where it was equipped and the troops first met the enemy at IMonroe 
Station on the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad, being stationed for some time between that 
point and St. Joseph, Missouri, where more than once they encountered the Confederates. 
They afterward went south and were on duty in Tennessee under General Pope. With his 
command Mr. Henry participated in a number of hotly contested engagements, including the 
battles of New Madrid and Corinth. At the latter place he was taken ill and sent to the 
Benton Barracks Hospital in St. Louis. After about a month he rejoined his regiment, which 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 187 

was sent from point to point and participated in a number of battles and skirmishes. On 
the expiration of his first term he reenlisted and continued with the same regiment until the 
close of his service on the 20th of March, 1865, on which date he was wounded in the battle 
of Bentonville, where occurred a three days' fight. He was then sent to Newbern, North 
Carolina, and was in the hospital at that place when he heard of Lincoln's assassination. He 
was afterward transferred to Fort Schuyler, New York, and was honorably discharged in 
June, 1865, as a private. His commission as second lieutenant was on the way to him when 
he was wounded, but he did not receive it until the summer. He was at Atlanta from May 
until September 1, 1864, being present at the fall of that city, and he also participated in 
the march to the sea under Sherman and in the northward movement of the army through 
North Carolina, leading up to the engagment at Bentonville, where he was wounded. 

At the close of the war Mr. Henry went to Brooklyn, New York, where he pursued a 
commercial course and then secured a position in a wholesale boot and shoe house of New 
Y'ork, continuing in that line of business until 1880, when he came west, settling first at 
Brainerd, Minnesota. In October of the same year he removed to Valley City, North Dakota, 
where he was employed by C. F. Kindred for about a month. He then returned and passed 
the winter at Brainerd, but in the following spring again made his way to Valley City, where 
he entered the First National Bank, which was a private bank until July 15, 1881, he having 
become an employe there in April of that year. He remained in active connection with the 
bank until April, 1915, when after a service of thirty-four years he retired. That his work 
was appreciated by the president and directors of the institution is indicated in the fact that 
his name is still retained on the pay roll. 

In 1873 Mr. Henry was man-ied to Miss Georgiana Vallad, of New Y'ork, and their children 
are: Russell C, of Duluth, Minnesota; May L., at home; Frank S., land commissioner at Bis- 
marck; Theresa; T. S.; Belle; Alfred; and Georgina. 

Throughout all the years of his residence in Valley City Mr. Henry has been a stalwart 
advocate and supporter of the plans and measures for the general good. He served as clerk of 
the court for several years and as school treasurer of the first district for a number of years. 
He holds to high civic ideals, is a member of the Grand Army of the Kepublic and is as true 
and loyal to his country as when he followed the stars and stripes on southern battlefields. 
No higher testimonial of his capability and fidelity in business could be given than the mere 
statement of the fact that for thirty-four years he remained with the First National Bank, 
but if one wanted further proof he need but ask tlie officers of the bank, all of whom speak of 
him in terms of the highest friendship, respect and regard. 



ALBERT EDWARD BOYXTON. 

Albert Edward Boynton established and conducts the Jlinot Dental Laboratory, in which 
connection he has developed a business of large and gratifying proportions. He is also engaged 
in the tire business, being the distributor for Goodj-ear tires covering Northwest North Dakota 
and eastern Montana and as success has crowned his efforts he has placed some of his capital 
in the safest of all investments — real estate. A native of Geneva, Nebraska, he was born 
December 3, 1882, a son of H. E. and Eliza (Reynolds) Boynton. The father was born at 
Berlin, Wisconsin, March 19, 1857, and the mother's birth occurred in Mattoon, Illinois, on 
the 31st of May, 1856. H. E. Boynton devoted his early life to farming, but afterward in 
order to give his children good educational privileges, removed to Oshkosh, Wisconsin, where 
he conducted a transfer business. He still makes his home in Oshkosh, although at the 
present time he is in North Dakota, where he has business interests. 

Albert E. Bo.ynton began his education in the schools of Geneva, Nebraska, having the 
advantages offered the other members of the family, which numbered seven children, of whom 
he is the second in order of birth. Later he continued his education at Savannah, Missouri, 
and afterward at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and prepared for the practice of dentistry as a student 
in Haskell's School of Dentistry at Chicago, Illinois. His education, however, had not been 
continuous, for in the meantime he had entered business circles and had provided for his own 
support. When a lad of fifteen years he began learning the machinist's trade in Oshkosh, 



188 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

serving a regular apprenticeship of three years. About that time tlie macliinists went upon 
a strike and Mr. Boynton left home, going to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, wher^ he remained until 
after he reached the age of twenty-two years, lie was for two years employed by the Bucyrus 
Steam Shovel Works at South Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and for about eight months he waa 
emjiloved by the Nordberg Manufacturing Company, continuing with them until the follow- 
ing fall, wlien he took up his course in tlie Haskell School of Dentistry. Later he was 
em])loyed for six months in a dental laboratory in Chicago and on the 7th of September, 
lUOO, he arrived in Minot, North Dakota. There he established the Minot Dental Laboratory 
for the manufacture of teeth for the supply of dentists. His trade covers North Dakota and 
eastern Montana and he also manufactures those things which are needed in crown and bridge 
work, made from impressions taken by the dentist. His thorough training along this line 
and his experience have enabled him to turn out most excellent work and his patronage is 
growing steadily. In addition to his other interests he is a landowner in North Dakota and 
Oregon, owning also residence property in Minot. He devotes most of his time to the labora- 
tory business, however, and in that connection is gaining a patronage of gratifying propor- 
tions. 

On the 27th of June, 1909, Mr. Boynton was united in marriage to Miss Lydia M. 
Fischer, who was born in or near Milwaukee, Wisconsin, her parents being W. M. and Anna, 
Fischer. The father is a retired agriculturist and makes his home in South Milwaukee. Mr. 
and Mrs. Boynton have two children. Esther June and Irene Ruth. 

Mr. Boynton exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the 
republican party, but is independent at local elections, supporting policies and men rather 
tluin party. He holds membersliii) witli the Methodist Episcopal church and his aid and 
inlluence are always given on the side of progress, reform and improvement. His life has 
been one of untiring activity and his industry is the measure of his success, for he has had 
no outside assistance, having from the age of fifteen years depended entirely upon his own 
resources for his advancement and his prosperity. 



ALBERT B. DILL. 



Albert B. Dill is engaged in the insurance and real estate business at Minot and is also 
filling the office of justice of the peace in Ward county. A young man, he has already 
attained a position which many wlio are his seniors might well envy. He was born at Belvi- 
dere, Nebraska, February 23, 1884, a son of John aiul Mary (Wilson) Dill. The father was 
born at Logansport, Indiana, March 0, 1.S48, and the mother was born at Zanesville, Ohio, 
January 11, 1864. In early life John Dill settled in Nebraska, becoming a resident of that 
state in 1877, after which he engaged in farming and stock buying. He still retains his 
residence in Nebraska, making his honu; at Belvidere, but is now practically living retired. 
He has refused to become a candidate for the legislature, having no political aspirations, but 
has always been accounted one of the representative and valued residents of the district in 
whicli he makes hi.s home, standing at all times for those measures and movements wliich 
are of greatest worth in the upbuilding of a community. 

Albert B. Dill is the only son and the eldest of a family of six children. He attended 
school in Belvidere until he was graduated from the high school with the class of 1902. He 
afterward graduated from the Lincoln high school with the class of 1905 and completed a 
course in a business college at Sioux City, Iowa, in 1906. He remained at home until he 
reached the age of eighteen yeai's, after which he engaged in teaching for one term. It was 
svibsequent to that time that he studied in Lincoln, attending high school there for two 
years. He made his way through business college unaided, providing for the expenses of the 
course, after which he entered the employ of tlie Great Nortliern Express Company in Sioux 
City, remaining with that corporation for two years. Later he went to Williston, North 
Dakota, in September, 1908. as agent for the Great Northern Express Company and a year 
later was transferred to Anaconda, Montana, where he continued for a year. He was after- 
ward in the superintendent's office at St. Paul for three months and in November, 1910, was 
assigned to the position of agent at Minot, continuing in that position until 1912, when he 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 189 

resigned and began dealing in coal and oilier fuel. He remained in that business for two 
and one-lialf years, after which he sold out and on the 1st of April, 1915, he was appointed 
justice of the peace for Ward county. He lias since served in that capacity and has been 
nominated for election to that office in November, 1916. He is also engaged in the real estate, 
rental, collection and insurance business and is secretary of the Merchants Association. He 
concentrates his energies upon liis business affairs and his official duties and his is a busy, 
active and useful life. 

On the 6th of March, 1911, at Minot, North Dakota, Mr. Dill was married to Miss Julia 
Daniel and they have one child, Helen Emily. In his fraternal relations Mr. Dill is a Mason, 
belonging to the lodge at Sioux City, Iowa. He is also connected with the Knights of Pythias 
at Minot and he attends the Presbyterian church. His acquaintance is wide and his sub- 
stantial qualities have gained for him the warm regard of those with whom he has been 
brought in contact. 



MONS BERDAL. 



Mons Berdal, deceased, was a well known farmer residing on section 34, Barnes town- 
ship, Cass county. He was born in Norway on the 15th of April, 1848, a son of Engebrit 
Berdal, who passed his entire life in that country. Our subject was reared at home, 
received his education in the public schools and continued to reside in Norway for a number 
of years after reaching maturity. In 1878 he came to the United States with his wife and 
three children, making his way direct to Cass county, North Dakota, where his sister, Mrs. 
Ole Headland, liad resided for three years. He purchased a quarter section of land, which 
became his home farm and on which he lived continuously until his death January 27, 1916. 
He at once began the work of its development and as the years passed made many improve- 
ments thereon, at the same time carefully conserving the fertility of the soil. He added one 
hundred and sixty acres to his holdings, becoming the owner of three hundred and twenty 
acres, and his labor was rewarded with bountiful crops, the sale of which yielded him a good 
income. He also owned stock in the Farmers elevator of Sanders and in the Sanders Tele- 
phone Company. 

In 1872, in Norway, occurred the marriage of Mr. Berdal and Miss Synneve Headland, 
who died in 1900. To them were born seven cliildren, Andrew, Albert, Gertrude, Ella, Mary, 
Clara, and John, deceased. The three elder children were born in Norway and the four 
younger in this country. Andrew is now administrator of the estate left by his father, 
while Albert acts as manager and Gertrude as housekeeper. 

Sir. Berdal was a republican in politics but never took an active part in pul)lic affairs, 
altliough he was never remiss in any of the duties of citizenship. He was a communicant of 
the Norwegian Lutheran chinch, whose influence he sought to extend and whose teachings 
guided his life. 



DUGALD J. McKENZIE. 



Dugald .1. McKenzie, member of the firm of McKenzie & Leslie, of Forman, was born 
near Inverness, in the province of Quebec, Canada, November 12, 1853, a son of John and 
Katherine (Brodie) McKenzie, who throughout their entire lives remained in eastern 
Canada. 

Their son, Dugald J. McKenzie, pursued his education in the public schools of his home 
locality until he reached the age of sixteen years, when he crossed the border into the United 
States and for two years was a resident of St. Johnsbury, Vermont. He then went to 
Lowell. Massachusetts, where he learned and followed the carpenter's trade and was fore- 
man of construction work at that point until about twenty-five years of age. He then 
returned to his old home in Canada in order to supplement his early schooling by further 
intellectual training, and for one year was a student in a normal school, after which he 



190 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

wont tlirougli the Inverness high school, froui wliioh lie was graduated. He afterwards 
went upon the lecture platform as a representative of the Independent Order of Good Temp- 
lars and was largely instrumental in establishing the Scott act, a temperance or local option 
measure. He did everything in his power to promote temperance sentiment and place limita- 
tions upon the liquor traffic. Two years were devoted to that work, in which he covered 
the country very thoroughly. He afterward traveled for a year as a representative of the 
firm of Parker, Fry & Cory, of Littleton, New Hampshire, devoting a year to patent rights 
work. 

It was about that time, or on the 24th of December, 1884, that Mr. McKcnzie was 
marriid to Miss Jarthat McKca, a native of Picton, Nova Scotia, the marriage being cele- 
brated at Lowell, Massachusetts. Mrs. McKenzie passed away at Rutland, Sargent county. 
North Dakota, July 10, 1890, and her death was the occasion of widespread regret, for she 
had won many friends In the community. 

On the 23th of September, 1887, Mr. JIcKenzie brought his family to North Dakota, 
settling at Miluor, and was pastor of the Presbyterian church at that place, doing good 
work for the moral development of the community. However, he abandoned the work of the 
ministry and on the 17th of June, IS'JO, was elected superintendent of schools of Sargent 
county and remained in that position for four years, his labors being effective in the exten- 
sion and improvement of the school system. In October, 1894, he entered into partnership 
with E. W. Thorp under the firm style of Thorp & McKenzie and opened a law office and loan, 
collection and real estate agency. This relation was maintained until August 1, 1897, when 
Mr. McKenzie entered into partnership with J. E. Bishop and A. M. Groner under the firm style 
of Bishop, Groner & McKenzie. In 1908 Mr. Groner died, at which time the firm was reorgan- 
ized under the style of Bishop &. McKenzie. That partnership was discontinued in July, 1911, 
after which Mr. McKenzie was joined by A. Leslie in organizing the firm of ilcKenzie & Leslie 
for the further conduct of a law, loan, collection and real estate business. In 1901 ho organ- 
ized tlie Sargent County Abstract & Title Guarantee Company and is still conducting business 
under tliat name, having the only undertaking of the kind in Sargent county. 

In 1904 ilr. McKenzie was again married, his second union being with Eva Walker, 
who died in 1911. There were two children by his first marriage: Marion, now the wife of 
A. Leslie; and Helen, who married M. B. Lyken. 

In his political views Mr. McKenzie is a reiniblican and for many years has served as 
a member of the village board, doing everything in his ])ower to further public progress in 
the community in which he lives. In 1908 he became a candidate for state treasurer, but 
was defeated. His position on the ])arty ticket, however, indicates his prominonce in politi- 
cal circles as ho received the strength of the ])arty vote. His activities have always had to 
do with those things which touch tlio general interests of society and his inlluence and 
labors have been along the lines of uplift and improvement. 



JUDGE .L A. COFFEY. 



Judge J. A. Coffey since his elevation to the bench in 1911 has gained a place among 
the most able and most impartial judges of the state and holds the confidence of the bar 
and the general public alike. His official duties make the first demand upon his time 
and attention but he takes a great deal of interest in farming and in all movements that 
tend toward making it more scientific and efiicient. He holds title to a large amount of 
land and personally supervises the operation of two excellent farms. 

Judge Coffey is a native of North Carolina and was born on the 4tli of July, 1872. 
His parents were Patterson V. and Martitia (Estes) Coffey, the former of whom died in 
Eugene, Oregon, in 1911 and the latter in 1910. The father was a successful farmer and 
was highly esteemed in his community. In 1SS8 he removed with his family to the Pacific 
coast. To him and his wife were born six children, two sons and four daughters, the 
brother of our subject being Dr. R. C. Coffey, of Portland. Oregon, who served at one time 
as vice president of the American Medical Association, and is one of the leading surgeons 
of the United States. 




JUDGE J. A. OOFFEY 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 193 

Judge Coffey was educated in the public scliools, at Williamette University, of Salem, 
Oregon, where he took his preparatory work, and at the University of Idaho, graduating 
from the classical department thereof in 1897. Subsequently he went to St. Paul, Minne- 
sota, where he took a course in stenography and typewriting, and still later took up the 
study of law in the night school of the University of Minnesota, continuing his work 
therein for three years. During the daytime he worked in law offices and in the loan 
department of the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company of Milwaukee, thus 
gaining practical experience that was of great value to him wheri he began the independent 
practice of his profession. Following his gradiiation in law in 1900 he remained with the 
insurance company for two years, after which he engaged in inspecting lands with the 
view of determining their fitness as security for loans, and he also devoted considerable 
time to the examination of titles. In July, 1903, he removed to Wahpeton, North Dakota, 
where he engaged in the practice of law in partnership with F. B. Lambert, of Minot. 
In November, 1902, he removed to Stutsman county and established an office in Courte- 
nay, where he continued to practice law until appointed judge of the fifth judicial district 
by Governor Burke. He removed to Jamestown in 1913, and was chosen by the people 
for a term of four years in that year and in 1916 for another term of four years. His 
thorough knowledge of the principles of jurisprudence, of statute law and of precedent, 
combined with his natural fairness and openness of mind, fit him admirably for his 
duties as judge and his record on the bench is a most creditable one. 

Judge Cotl'ey is a firm believer in the possibilities of North Dakota as an agricultural 
state and in connection with others owns five thousand acres of land and he oversees the 
renting of this tract. He also supervises the operation of two farms which he owns 
individually and which are among the best improved places in his section of the state. All 
the buildings are of the most modern design and construction and he has a number of 
silos as he believes in the value of ensilage of stock food. He grows alfalfa, sweet clover, 
blue grass, wheat grass and timothy and raises stock extensively, specializing in short- 
horns and Red Polled cattle and in Duroc-Jersey and Poland China hogs. He also has a 
fine young orchard and makes the development of his farm his recreation, sparing no labor 
nor expense in bringing it to the greatest degi-ee of perfection possible. He has demonstrated 
that North Dakota is adapted to the successful raising of field crops and his example has 
been a factor in the promoting of scientific farming in his district. 

On the 30th of December, 1903, Judge Coffey was united in marriage to Miss Josephine 
Andrews, of Faribault, Minnesota, and their children are two in number, Robert and 
Eleanor. 

The Judge is a democrat in politics but never allows partisan considerations to 
influence his conduct on the bench. He is an elder in the Presbyterian church, to the sup- 
port of which he contributes generously, and his influence can always be counted upon to 
further the right. He is also a trustee of Jamestown College, located at Jamestown, 
North Dakota. He is identified with the Young Men's Christian Association, believing that 
it is one of the most efficient organizations in the building of strong, upright manhood. 
He also cooperates with the projects of the Commercial Club, of which he is a member, 
and has proved himself a broad-minded and public-spirited citizen. 



OLE P. HOLMEN. 



Many of the excellent citizens and successful farmers of North Dakota were born in 
Norway and among the number is Ole P. Holmen. Avho owns and opreates a fine farm in 
Stanley township, Cass county. His birth occurred on the Sth of April, 1843. and he is a 
son of Peter and Mary (Lewis) Holmen, the former of wliom died in Norway, while the latter 
joined her children in the United States in 1870 and made her home with them until her 
demise. 

Ole P. Holmen was reared in his native land and continued to reside there for a number 
of years after attaining his majority. In 1868, however, he came to America and located in 
Rice county, Minnesota, where he worked as a farm hand for some time, and also for a 
Vol. n— 11 



194 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

period of time worked on a railroad. In 1871 lie removed to Fargo, North Dakota, and pur- 
chased eighty acres of land on section 19, Stanley townsliip, Cass county, lie later pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres of his present farm on the same section and not long 
afterward preempted a similar tract on section 20, Stanley township. He also owns other 
land, his holdings comprising five hundred and thirty-three acres, and he is one of the well- 
to-do men of his locality. His success is the direct result of his industry and the wise 
management of his affairs, as dining his entire career he has depended soUly upon hi"; own 
efforts. 

In 1872 Mr. Holmcn was married to Miss Marj' ."inder-son, a native of Norway, wlio came 
to the United States in 1868 in early womanhood. To them have been born three children, 
one of whom is deceased, the others being: Helmer, who is farming land belonging to his 
father; and Samuel, at home. 

Mr. Holmen votes the republican ticket and for four year has been a member of the 
board of trustees, his record in tliat capacity being a very creditable one, as he has sought 
in every way possible to advance the general welfare. He and his family hold membership 
in the Norwegian Lutheran church, and the genuineness of their faith is evidenced by the 
uprightness of their lives. 



CLARENCE C. WYSONG. 



Clarence C. Wysong, attorney at law practicing at the bar of !Minot, was born near 
Greencastle, Indiana, on the 24th of November, 1SS6, a son of John and Marj- (Nugent) 
Wysong. Both parents are natives of Putnam county, Indiana. The father is a farmer and 
stock raiser and is still actively engaged in general agricultural pursuits at Greencastle, 
Putnam county. 

Clarence C. Wysong is the eldest of three children. He attended the high school at Green- 
castle, Indiana, and was graduated with the class of 1904. He afterward spent two years 
as a student in De Pauw University at Greencastle and then entered the University of 
Indiana, from which he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1910. while in 
1911 he won the LL. B. degree from the same institution. He has since devoted his atten- 
tion to the practice of law, but in the meantime he had started out in the business world 
in connection with other activities. He finished his course in high school when a youth of 
sixteen, after which he was employed as fireman on the railroad and as timekeeper by a 
construction company. He utilized every available opportunity to gain a living through 
employment in the summer months until he had completed his university course. In July, 
1911, he left Indiana and made his way direct to Minot, where he secured a situation in the 
law office of Palda, Aaker & Green. He continued with that firm for about two years and 
then formed a partnership with Halvor L. Halvorson in the practice of law. That connec- 
tion Avas maintained for a year, since which time Jfr. Wysong has practiced alone, devoting 
liis entire time to his professional duties. He recognizes the force of industry and thorough 
preparation and enters the courtroom well prepared to present his cause in the strong, 
clear light of reason. His arguments are sound, his deductions logical and he has won many 
verdicts favorable to his clients. 

On the 29th of January, 1914, Mr. Wysong was united in marriage to Miss Harriett E. 
Lane, a native of Indiana and a niece of Henry S. Lane, the first republican governor of 
Indiana. Her parents are Oscar F. and Mary (Wendling) Lane, natives of Putnam county, 
Indiana, and Shelby county, Illinois, respectively. Rev. Oscar F. Lane, a minister of the 
Christian clinrcli, is now living retired in Putnam county, Indiana. His wife was a sister 
of the noted lecturer, George F. Wendling, who has recently passed away. Mr. and Mrs. 
Wysong have one child, Elizabeth, who was born August 8, 191.5. 

Mr. Wysong behmgs to Morton Lodge, No. 409. F. & A. M., which is the strongest inland 
lodge in this state. He is also identified with the Elks and for three years was secretary of 
the local organization with which he is connected. He belongs to the Knights of Pythias, 
the Modern Woodmen of America, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Sons of 
Veterans, of which he is secretary and treasurer. He is a member of the Alinot Association 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 195 

of Commerce and he is deputy state oil inspector. In politics he is an unswerving republican, 
believing firmly in tlie principles of the party and never faltering in his allegiance thereto. 
While he is undoubtedly not without that laudable ambition which is so great an incentive to 
loyalty in public office, he yet regards the pursuits of private life as in themselves abundantly 
worthy of his best eiTorts and in the practice of law is gaining a place among the representative 
members of the profession. 



C. C. FURNBEEG. 



C. C. Furnberg. who is farming on section 32, Barnes township, Cass county, is also 
engaged in merchandising at Osgood, that township, and has met with success in botii under- 
takings. He was born in Dakota county, Minnesota, on the 11th of July, 1869, a son of 
Cliristian and Anna (Olson) Furnberg, both natives of Norway, whence they emigrated to 
the United States in 1868 in young manhood and womanhood. In that year they were 
married in Dakota county, Minnesota, where both had located, and there the father passed 
away the year following when our subject was but two weeks old. In 1871 the mother came 
to North Dakota with her son and after making her home in Reed township for three years 
homesteaded the farm on which our subject now lives. In 1886 she was again married, 
becoming the wife of L. P. Jensen, who passed away in 1909, while she survived until 1911. 

C. C. Furnberg was educated in the district schools and on reaching manhood cooperated 
with his stepfather in the operation of the home farm. In 1895 he entered the mercantile 
field in Osgood, where he has since conducted a store. He carries a well selected line of 
goods of high quality and is accorded a gratifying patronage. Following his mother's death 
he inherited the home farm of four hundred acres, three hundred and twenty acres of which 
he rents, operating only eighty acres. He has managed his affairs well and as the years 
have passed his financial resources have increased. 

In 1895 Mr. Furnbcig was married to Mis Hannah Korum, of Brandon, Minnesota, and 
they have become the parents of six children: Agnes, the wife of A. 0. Grimstvedt, of Fargo; 
Alice, who is attending the Dakota Business College at Fargo; and Roy. Carl, Oscar and 
Myrtle, all at home. 

The political allegiance of Mr. Furnberg is given to the republican party and both he 
and his wife arc members of the Horace Congregational church, the teachings of which are 
exemplified in their lives. Mr. Furnberg has resided in this state during practically his 
entire life and has thoroughly identified his interests with those of the commonwealth, 
cooperating heartily in all movements seeking the general welfare. 



W. I. IRVINE. 



W. I. Irvine is successfully engaged in the practice of law in Lidgerwood, Richland 
county, and is also the owner and editor of the Monitor, an excellent and well patronized 
weekly newspaper. He was born in Danville, Illinois, on the 21st of April, 1862, and his 
parents, James and Mary (Paddock) Irvine, were born respectively in Pennsylvania in 1833 
and in Massachusetts in 1841. The paternal grandfather, Thomas Irvine, was a native of 
County Antrim, Ireland. He emigrated to the United States and settled in Pennsylvania, where 
he engaged in merchandising, selling goods to the laborers and railroad men that built the Erie 
canal. He passed away in the Keystone state. The parents of our subject were married in 
western Pennsylvania in October, 1860, and not long afterward removed to Danville, Illinois, 
where the father farmed, although he had been a contractor and builder in the east. At length 
he returned to Pennsylvania and after remaining there for a number of years became a resident 
of Lincoln, Nebraska, where he passed away in 1893. He was a democrat in politics and 
took an active interest in all public affairs. He was a man of good education and was well 
informed on all questions and issues of the day. He and his wife belonged to the Presby- 
terian church. She is still living and makes her home in Lincoln, Nebraska. 



196 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

W. I. Irvine, who is the eldest in a family of seven children, received his education in 
the common schools of Pennsylvania and in an academy at White Bluff, Tennessee. On 
beginning his business career he became connected witli the Daily News of Youngstown, 
Ohio, in 1881, but subsequently removed to Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he took up the 
study of law. In 1887 he was admitted to the bar at St. Paul and continued to reside in 
Minneapolis for a year but in 1888 became a resident of Lidgerwood, North Dakota. He 
has since engaged in the practice of law; trying cases not only in this state but also in 
South Dakota, and on a number of occasions appearing before the federal court. He under- 
stands the underlying principles of jurisprudence, is well versed in statute law and prece- 
dent and this knowledge, combined with his analytical mind and habit of careful prepara- 
tion of his cases, enables him to win a favorable verdict in most instances. In lUOO he pur- 
chased the Monitor and has since conducted that paper in addition to practicing law. The 
Jlonitor has a circulation of seven hundred and is well patronized by the local business men 
as an advertising medium. He also does a good job printing business, for which his plant 
is well equipped. 

In 1887 Mr. Irvine was united in marriage, in Brown county, Wisconsin, to Miss Ida 
Dolbear, who was born in Vermont. They have four children: Perry, who assists his father 
with the publication of the Monitor; Jessie and Inez, who are teaching; and Helen, who 
graduated from the high school with the class of 1915 and is now attending the Valley City 
^Normal School. 

Mr. Irvine is a stalwart democrat and both in his capacity as editor and as a private 
citizen does all in his power to secure the victory of that party at the polls. Fraternally 
he belongs to Harmony Lodge, No. 53, A. F. & A. M., in which he has served as master for 
years; to the Royal Arch Cliapter, in which he was high priest for six years and in which 
he is again filling that office; and to the Mystic Shrine. His wife is a communicant of the 
Protestant Episcopal church and both support heartily all efforts to further the moral 
advancement of their community. Mr. Irvine is entitled to the honor that Americans pay 
to self-made men as he began without capital or the aid of influential friends and through 
his own efforts has gained a position of honor in his community and a gratifying measure of 
financial success. 



WILLIAM CULLEN. 



William CuUen, who owns six hundred and forty acres of fine land in Normana town- 
ship, Cass county, is now devoting his attention exclusively to farm work, but for a num- 
ber of years also engaged in blacksmithing. He was born in Canada on the 12th of Novem- 
ber, 1860, a son of Robert and Margaret (Linton) CuUen, both of whom were natives of 
Scotland and in the '40s emigrated to America, settling in Canada, where they passed the 
remainder of their lives. They were the parents of fourteen children, six of whom have now 
passed away. 

William Cullen was reared and educated in the Dominion, but in the fall of 1880, when 
about twenty years of age, came to North Dakota. He worked at the blacksmith's trade 
in Fargo until 1889, when he removed to his present home farm on section 5. Normana 
township, Cass county. He has erected fine buildings upon his place and otherwise made 
many improvements so that his farm is today attractive and well developed. Since taking 
up his residence there in 1889 he has lived upon his farm continuously save for three years 
which he spent in Fargo. He has invested in more land from time to time and now owns 
six hundred and forty acres, all of which is improved and from which he receives a hand- 
some income. For fourteen years he engaged in blacksmithing more or less, but is not 
now active in that line. He owns stock in the Farmers elevator at Warren and is recognized as 
an excellent business man. 

On the 1st of April, 1885, Mr. CuUen was united in marriage to Miss Mary Augedahl, 
who was born in Norway and is a daughter of John and Carrie (Oleson) Augedahl, Her 
mother is deceased, but her father is now living in Davenport, North Dakota. Mr. and Mis. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 197 

Cullen are the parents of a daughter, Minnie, who is a graduate of the local schools, and 
they have also reared as their son a boy by the name of Ernest Brown. 

Mr. Cullen votes for the candidates of the republican party, but has never desired office 
as a reward for his loyalty. He and his family attend the Presbyterian church and can be 
counted upon to support all woi'thy causes. 



J. VAN HOUTEN^, M. D. 



Dr. J. Van Houten, who for thirteen years has been actively engaged in medical practice 
in Valley City, was born in Waupon, Wisconsin, on the ISth of December, 1876. His father, 
Jacob Van Houten, a native of Amsterdam, Holland, came to America when a young man, 
settling at Albany, New York, where he married. Subsequently he removed to Wisconsin, 
where he engaged in the contracting business, and in that state he spent his remaining 
days, passing away in 1911 at the age of seventy-four. 

Dr. Van Houten was the youngest in a family of two sons and two daughters and after 
mastering the branches of learning taught in, the public schools of his native city he became 
a student in the Northwestern University at Chicago. Hlinois, and after four years devoted 
to the study of medicine was graduated with the class of 1903, receiving his professional 
degree at that time. He then came to Valley City and for three years was associated in 
practice with Dr. L. S. Platou. but since then has been alone. His ability has brought him 
prominently to the front and his studious habits have kept him in touch with the onward 
march of the profession as scientific investigation has 'brought to light many new tinrths. 

In August, 1905, Dr. Van Houten was united in marriage to Miss Florence Whitfield 
Hallock, of Faribault, Minnesota, a daughter of Cliarles A. Hallock. They have three 
children, Delphine, Charlotte and Hallock. 

Dr. Van Houten belongs to the Masonic lodge and to the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks. In hi^ college days he took an active part in athletics and college games and today 
outdoor sports is his chief diversion from the onerous cares of his profession. His time 
and attention, however, are mostly given to his home and to his practice although he recog- 
nizes and fully meets the obligations and duties of citizenship. Along professional lines he 
is connected with the Sheyenne Valley Medical Society, the North Dakota State Medical 
Society and the American Medical Association. 



ISAAC P. CLAPP. 



Isaac P. Clapp is one of the best known and most esteemed citizens of Fargo, where 
he has lived since pioneer times. His attention is now largely given to his extensive real 
estate holdings, for with the passing years he has made judicious investments in farm lands 
and other property and at all times has displayed keen discrimination and sound judgment. 
He was born in Dutchess county. New York, on the 4th of March, 1839, a son of Peter B. 
and Sarah E. (Pells) Clapp, who were also natives of Dutchess county, where they spent 
their entire lives, remaining always in one township, where the father followed the occupa- 
tion of farming. 

Isaac P. Clapp acquired a district school education and made his way to the west in 
early manhood, attracted by the fact that he had an uncle living in Kenosha, Wisconsin, 
with whom he made his home for a time. Subsequently he became owner of two planta- 
tions in central Texas and operated one of them for thirty-five years, raising cotton. On 
the 14th of October, 1880, he arrived in North Dakota, settling in Fargo, where in company 
with Miller W. McCraw he opened the Cass County Bank, the third bank of the city. For 
four years he was identified with that institution and then, owing to the fact that his part- 
ner was an invalid, they closed out the bank and Mr. Clapp turned his attention to the real 
estate business and to farming, becoming an extensive owner of farm lands in North Dakota. 
At one time he owned between three and four thousand acres, but has sold much of this in 



19S HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

ri'oont years. He still gives his attention, however, to the management of his agricultural 
interests, whieli are yet extensive and return to him a gratifying annual income. 

On the 7th of June, 1882, Mr. Clapp was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Sleight, of 
Kenosha, Wisconsin. They have one son, Edwin G., who was educated in the University of 
Minnesota and is now assistant cashier of the l-'irst National Bank of Fargo. Mr. Clapp is a 
republican in politics, but has never been an aspirant for public preferment. Fraternally he is 
i<li'iitiliiHl with the Masonic order, belonging to Sliiloli Lodge, No. 1, A. F. & A. ^I.; Key- 
stone Chapter, No. 5, R. A. M.; Fargo Council, No. 1, R. & S. M.; Auburn Commandery. No. 
2, K. T.; Dakota Consistory, No. 1, A. & A. S. R.; and El Zagal Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S. 
About 1900 the thirty-third degree was conferred upon him — an honor given only in recog- 
nition of splendid service rendered to the organization. For twelve years he was the treas- 
urer of tlie blue lodge, the chapter, the consistory, the Shrine and the Club and has been a 
member of the board of trustees of the Temple since its building. He and his wife arc 
members of the Episcopal church, to the support of which he has been a generous contribu- 
tor. He belongs also to the Fargo Commercial Club and is interested in all of its well for- 
mulated plans for the improvement of the city and the extension of its trade connections. 
He has never had occasion to regret his determination to come to North Dakota, for in the 
business conditions which met him here he found the oppoiiunities which he sought and in 
their utilization has worked his way steadily upward, becoming in the course of years one 
of the prosperous residents of Cass county. He deserves much credit for what he has accomp- 
lished, as his success has been won entirely through persistent, earnest effort guided by the 
spirit of enterprise and of business integrity. 



JAMES C. SMALLWOOD. 



.lames 0. Smallwood, a prominent man and manager of the Smallwood Sanitary Gro- 
cery Company in connection with which he has built up an extensive busine^ in Minot, was 
born in Newcastle, New Brunswick, January 21, 1867, a son of William F. and Caroline 
(Barnes) Smallwood. The latter was a granddaughter of one of the governors of New- 
foundland. The father was born at Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. By trade William 
F. Smallwood was a shipbuilder, but later in life filled the oflice of justice of the peace and 
was known by the title of squire. Both he and his wife made their home in Newcastle 
and the former passed away in 189.'! and the latter in 1000. 

.James C. Smallwood was the youngest of thirteen children ;in(l in tlie scliools of New- 
castle, New Brunswick, pursin^d his education. As a lad of thirteen years he was bound out 
to a grocer for four years apprenticeship. He. received four dollars per month for the first 
two years, after which he was employed two years in a wholesale grocery establishment at 
Newcastle. He then left home, going to Marinette, Wisconsin, where he worked in a gro- 
cery store for two years and then r<'turncd to Newcastle where he was again connected 
with the wholesale lunise in which he had previously been employed and where he spent two 
more years. In the meantinu! he liad married and at the end of that period he left Canada 
for the United States, going to St. Paul where he remained for a short time. He then 
removed to Brainerd, Minnesota, and for one year was in the Northern Pacific shops after 
which he spent about four years as an employee in the grocery store of A. J. Brockway. 
During that period he carefully saved his earnings and at the end of that time established 
a grocery store in Brainerd which he conducted for two years. After closing out the busi- 
ness he was employed by the firm of Abbott & Wilkins in Brainerd for about six years, at 
the end of which time he opened and Viocauie manager of the grocery department in the 
store of H. 1. Cohen, with whom he continued for two years. After Mr. Cohen sold out 
Mr. Sniallwood continued to manage the grocery de|)artment for his successor for si.\ months 
and thin went to Havre, IMontana. to take charge of the grocery department of the Havre 
Commercial Comi)any with which he continued for eighteen months. In May. 1904, he 
came to Minot and opened the Smallwood Grocery. Three years later he purchased another 
store, which he also conducted for abo\it three years, and then consolidated the two estab- 
lishments under the name of the Smallwood Sanitary Grocery. He has since conducted the 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 199 

business in this way, carrying a complete line of staple and fancy groceries, having an 
establishment which would be a credit to a city of much larger size. The store is most 
tastefully and attractively arranged and the stock is extensive and of high quality. Mr. 
Smallwood is also a stockholder in the Union National Bank and has extensive land interests 
in Ward county, North Dakota, operating three quarter sections of land, or four hundred 
and eighty acres. He likewise owns a fine residence in Minot and a number of city lots and 
his business and real estate interests are evidences of his life of well directed energy and 
thrift. 

On June 7tli, 1890, Mr. Smallwood was married to Miss Rachel Elliott, who, like her 
Imsband, was the youngest of thirteen children. Her parents were AValter and Mary 
(Vaughn) Elliott, the former a native of Newfoundland and the latter of New Brunswick. 
The father was a shoemaker which business he followed for many years. Neither he nor 
his wife ever became residents of the United States and both have now passed away. Mr. 
and Mrs. Smallwood have become the parents of six children: James F., who is associated 
with his father in business; Pearl M., who is bookkeeper in the business; Lulu, who is a 
stenographer with the firm of Stone, Ordean & Wells, wholesale merchants having a branch 
house at Minot; Berton G., who is assistant manual training teacher in the Minot high 
school and who married Miss Winifred Churchill; Walter, who has recently completed the 
high school course; and Vaughn, who is attending school. 

It was soon after his marriage that Mr. Smallwood left Marinette, Wisconsin, and went 
to Hinckley, Minnesota, where he was employed by Foley Brothers & Guthrie, railroad 
contractors, taking goods from freight cars to their camps on the Kittle river. He con- 
tinued with them until the job was completed, after which he returned to his native city. 
Mr. Smallwood is identified with several fraternal organizations, belonging to the Elks, 
Knights of Pythias, Odd Fellows and Maccabees lodges in Minot and the Modern Woodmen 
Camp at Brainerd. He has filled all the chairs in the last three organizations and he is also 
one of the directors of the Minot Curling and Skiing Association. While his life has been 
an extremely busy one he has realized the fact that the well balanced character is that 
which grows in strength not only from business activity, but from recreation as well and 
thus he has given a due proportion of his time to those things which are a matter of pleas- 
urable interest to him. He served for several years as a member of the school board of 
Minot and during most of that time was chairman of the teachers' committee. He is also 
a, member of the public library board. In his business career the steps in his progress are 
easily discernible. He has worked along well based and liberal lines, his push and persis- 
tent energy and honorable dealings have brought him success while the methods which he 
has followed have gained him distinction as a representative resident of his adopted city. 



JOHN W. JOHNSON. 



John W. Johnson, the owner of the Holy Cross farm, on section 18, Stanley township, 
is one of the leading agriculturists of Cass county and is widely and favorably known. A 
native of Urasa, Sweden, his birth occurred on the 3d of July, 1869, and he is a son of .Johan 
and Johanna Maria Magnuson, both of whom spent their entire lives in that country. In 
1887, when seventeen years of age, our subject left Ins native land and crossed the Atlantic 
to the United States, making his way to Stillwater, Minnesota. After working on the 
river for some time he was employed as a carpenter in Minneapolis and St. Paul and in 1888 
came to North Dakota and worked in the harvest fields until the close of the season, when 
lie returned to Minnesota, where he spent the following winter in tlie lumber woods. In 
1889 he settled permanently in this state and worked as a farm hand on the place which 
he now owns. Subsequently he was made foreman of the farm and later rented the place, 
operating it under a lease for a number of years. He carefully saved his money and in 
1904 had accumulated sufficient capital to purchase the farm, which comprises four hun- 
dred and twelve acres of fine land. For the past ten years he has been making a specialty 
of raising seed potatoes, principally Early Ohios, for the Kansas, Texas and Oklahoma 
markets and has succeeded beyond his expectations in that undertaking. In 1914, in associ- 



200 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

ation with Albert Brakkc, he built a potato storage house with a capacity of twenty-five 
thousand bushels. He is also a stockholder in the Farmers elevator at Wild Rice, the Far- 
mers elevator at Sanders and the River Line Telephone Company. 

The Holy Cross farm is one of the points of historic interest in the county as it was 
located by the first white settler in this stiite witli the exception of the French Canadians 
who settled at Pembina. In ISo'J Father Genin, a French Catholic priest, came to what is 
now Cass county, Korth Dakota, and built a church and erected a cross, which is to this day 
known as the Holj' Cross. He had received from the government a grant of land on which 
to establish a mission, which was known as the Holy Cross Mission, but subsequently 
returned to France and also spent some time in Rome before again coming to North Dakota. 
On his arrival at the site of his mission he found that six French Canadians had squatted 
on the land, but he forbore to contest their claim. This was in 1870. The French Canadians 
thought that thirty or forty acres apiece was all the land that they wanted but later found 
that inadequate and sold out, removing westward. The old mission ground, which is now in 
possession of llr. Johnson, is still known as the Holj' Cross farm. 

In 1893 Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Peterson, of Xorman 
county, Minnesota, and they have become the parents of seven children: George A., mana- 
ger of the W. H. White lumberyard at Wild Rice; and Richard W., Albert T., Ima M., 
Myrtle, Anna and John W., Jr., all at home. 

Mr. Johnson is independent in politics, following the lead of his judgment rather than 
the dictates of a party leader. He holds membership in the Modern Woodmen, and his religious 
faith is that of the United Lutheran church. His has been an active, useful life, and his 
industry has been rewarded with gratifying success. He has also gained the sincere respect 
and the warm regard of those with whom he has been brought in contact, for his salient 
characteristics are those of the highest type of manhood. 



CHARLES A. ANDERSON, D. V. S. 

Dr. Charles A. Anderson, a veterinary surgeon practicing at Valley City, was born at 
Stevens Point, Wisconsin, February 11, 1864. His father, A. T. Anderson, a native of Nor- 
way, came to America when a young man, settling in Wisconsin, where he maiTied and 
reared his family, there residing until 1880, when he removed to Barnes county and took up 
his abode in Ashtabula, where he continued to make his home until 1906, when he removed 
to Valley City, where he was residing when death called him September 6, 1914, at the 
age of eighty-eight years. He was a blacksmith by trade and a man of marked energy and 
business ability. After becoming identified with agricultural interests in North Dakota 
he gave much attention to stock raising, largely handling cattle that were a cross between 
Durham and Holsteins and proved splendid milkers. 

Charles A. Anderson was one of a family of six children born of his father's second mar- 
riage. His youthful days were spent in Wisconsin and his educational opportunities were 
those provided in a log schoolhouse, for the family were pioneers of that state as well as of 
North Dakota. After removing to Barnes county he continued to attend school as opportunity 
offered and later he worked upon the homestead farm of four hundred and eighty acres, 
which included also a tree claim and preemption claim. There he remained until 1886, 
when at the age of twenty-two years he turned his attention to the livery business and 
this led to his interest in the profession to which he now devotes his time and energies. 
In preparation for practice he entered the Chicago Veterinary College and later opened 
an ofTice at Valley City, where he has since continued. For three years he was associated 
with Dr. .J. W. Poole, a graduate of the Ontario Veterinary College, and later entered into 
partnership with Dr. C. H. Martin, the partnership continuing for six years. Since that 
time Dr. Anderson has practiced alone. In 1902 he built a hospital and stable on Front 
street, which he uses exclusively in his business, the hospital being splendidly equipped 
for all kinds of veterinary work. He keeps in touch with the latest scientific methods and 
his services, by reason of his skill and ability, are in constant demand, his practice now 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 201 

being very extensive. He is also the owner of some fine stock and a splendid Percberou 
stallion weighing over two thousand pounds heads his stud. 

In 1890 Dr. Anderson was married to Miss Stella M. Wylie, a native of Wisconsin 
and a daughter of Edgar L. Wylie, a North Dakota pioneer. They have two children: 
Viola, who attended the Valley City Normal School and has taken up the study of music; 
and Charles R., now in school. Dr. Anderson is a member of the Knights of Pythias and 
in that organization and also outside of its ranks he has many warm friends. His profes- 
sional connection is with the State Veterinary Association and he is a man of acknowledged 
prominence in his chosen calling. 



LARS OLSEN. 



Lars Olsen, who is engaged in farming on section 33, Warren township, Cass county, 
lias also served as postmaster of the town of AVarren for twenty-three years. His birth 
occurred in Norwaj- on the lltli of March, 1849. and he is a son of Ole and Margaret Olsen, 
who were lifelong residents of that country. They were the parents of six sons, of whom 
four are still living, and all reside in America. 

Lars Olsen was reared in his native land and acquired his education in the public 
schools there but in 1870, when about twenty-one years of age, came to the United States. 
He lived in St. Paul until 1876 and was there employed as a laborer. His next removal 
was to Thompson, Minnesota, whence in July, 1878, he made his waj- to Cass county. North 
Dakota, and located on his present home farm on section 33, Warren township. He erected 
a log cabin with a bark and sod roof, which was the first house on the prairie in his part 
of the county, and for six years that remained his residence. At the end of that time, 
however, he built a better dwelling and as the years have passed he has made other improve- 
ments upon his place. He has planted a fine grove, which serves as a windbreak and also 
adds to the beauty of the farm. He owns one hundred and sixty acres, from the cultivation 
of which he derives a good incoihe, and in addition to growing grain he raises considerable 
stock. For twenty-two j-ears he also engaged in buying grain but lias now discontinued 
that business. 

Mr. Olsen was married in 1876 at St. Paul, Minnesota, to Miss Carrie Eriekson, who 
died in 1887. She was the mother of sis children, of whom four survive, Ole, Alfred, Carl 
and Hilbert. In 1891 Mr. Olsen was again married, Miss Sophia Sontroll becoming his 
wife. To them have been born ten children, Mabel, Alice, Melvin, Lydia, Cecelia, Reuben, 
Bernice, Lenora, Arnold, and one who is deceased. 

Mr. Olsen is an adherent of the democratic party and for the past twenty-three years 
has served eflSciently as postmaster of the town of Warren, which is located on land which 
he once owned. Since 1S81 he has been school director, for fifteen years he has served as 
treasurer of his township, and he was formerly township assessor and has at all times 
proved conscientious and capable in the discharge of the duties devolving upon him. Both 
he and his wife are communicants of the Lutiieran church, in whose teachings are found 
the principles which govern their conduct. 



GEORGE E. McCLURE. 



Tlie natural resources of the country surrounding Minot have offered splendid oppor- 
tunities for the acquirement of wealth, for the district is rich in its mineral deposits, in 
Its agricultural possibilities and in its chances for commercial development consequent upon 
the other two. George E. McClure is operating profitably in the coal fields of the state 
as treasurer and general manager of the McClure Coal Company, miners and wholesale and 
retail dealers in coal. He was born in Chisago county, Minnesota, May 5, 1877, a son 
of Samuel and Eleanor (Warner) McClure, the former bom in the north of Ireland, while 
the latter was a native of the state of New York. The father, who was a lumberman, went 



202 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

to Minnesota at a very early day, establishing his home there before the city of Minneapolis 
was founded. He continued to engage in tlie lumber business there until his death, which 
occurred in 1911. He had long survived his wife, who died in 1889. 

George E. McClure was the fourth in their family of five children and in the high 
school at Stillwater, Minnesota, he completed his education. When about eighteen years 
of age, or in 1895, he entered the employ of an insurance firm in Minneapolis, with which 
he continued for about eighteen months, when he became an employe of the Foley-Beau 
Lumber Company, accepting a situation in the yards. He gradually worked his way 
upward in that connection, being advanced to the position of general manager and salesman. 
For seven years he continued with the company and in 1903 removed westward to Minot, 
being here emploj-ed as a salesman by the Vanderwalker Coal Company for about nine 
months. At the end of that time he was made assistant manager of the company's business 
and a year later the firm was reorganized under the name of the McClure Coal Company, 
at which time Mr. McClure became manager and one of the stockholders. He is now 
treasurer and general manager of the company, which is engaged in the wholesale and retail 
coal trade and owns abo\it one thousand acres of land in this state, operating a mine twelve 
miles west of Minot. The company also ow-ns valuable timber lands in British Columbia, 
Oregon and Washington, also a mine at Sandcoulee, Jlontana, operating under the name of 
the Nelson Coal Company. The McClure Company also operates a thousand acre farm near 
Minot where the mining interests are being developed and likewise owns lands in California, 
Oregon. Washington, North and South Dakota and Minnesota. Mr. McClure is also a stock- 
holder and director in the Union National Bank of Minot, in the elevators at Devils Lake 
and Lone Tree and in a mercantile business at Tasker, North Dakota. 

In Novonber. 1901, Mr. McClure was married to Miss Anna L. Aldridge, who was born 
in Minneapolis, a daughter of George A. and Adelia (Strong) Aldridge, the former a native 
of Canada and the latter of Maine. The father was a millwright and engaged in the sawmill 
business. He now makes his home in St. Paul, where he is employed by one of the large 
lumber comiianies of Minneapolis. To Mr. and Mrs. McClure have been born two children: 
Samuel A., who was born in July, 1902; and Gertrude Elliott, born in July, 1905. 

Fraternally Mr. McClure is a Mason, belonging to the blue lodge at Milaca, Minnesota, 
and is identified with the Elks lodge at Minot, and with the United Commercial Travelers 
at Minot. His religious faith is that of the Episcopal church and politically he is an 
independent democrat. He served as city clerk in Minnesota and he is the present ch.air- 
man of the democratic committee of Minot. He puts forth earnest and cll'ective efiort for 
advancing the interests of the party and stands for all that is progressive in citizenship. 
His labors have been an important element in furthering the development of the section 
of the state in which he lives, for the company of which he is a member is operating 
extensively in utilizing the natural resources here afforded and has reached out through its 
ramifying trade relations and business connections into various sections of the northwest. 
At all points in his career Mr. McClure has been guided by the spirit of unfaltering enterprise 
and, knowing no such word as fail, he has accomplished what he has undertaken. 



.loIlX 1IAL\ lOUSON. 



John Ilalverson, a furniture dealer of Valley City, who is winning advancement through 
close application and a discriminating study of popular taste in the line of house furnish- 
ings, was born in Hurdahl, Norway, on the 21st of February, 1854, representing a family 
connected with farming interests in that land. He attended school in his native coiintry 
and at the age of fifteen years came to America, infiuenced to this step by the fact that 
liis older brother Peter came to the new world in 1869. Making his way across the country 
to l^Iinnesota, ,Tohn Ilalverson spent the fir.st summer at Bloomfiidd and Dien went to 
Albert Lea, where he attended school for two years, realizing that further educational 
training would prepare him to cope much bettor with intricate problems and conditions 
of business life. He then went to Preston. Minnesota, where he entered upon an apprentice- 
ship to the drug trade, at which he worked for nine years, becoming acting manager of 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 203 

the business at Fountain, Minnesota, and also the postmaster of the town, receiving 
appointment to the office fn 1875, when he was twenty-one years of age. A the end of 
five years' service as postmaster he removed to Twin Valley, where he was employed in a 
general store for four years. In 188S he arrived in Valley Citj^ and secured a position in a 
general store, in which he occupied a clerkship until 1900. In that year he was elected 
register of deeds and his faithfulness and capability in office led to his reelection in 1902 
and in 1904, followed by his retirement to private life in 1906. He then turned his attention 
to the furniture business, buying out the store of his son-in-law, who owing to ill health 
was obliged to remove to the west. He was first located on Fifth avenue but disposed of 
his interest there in 1908 and is now conducting business on Main street, where he has a 
large and well appointed establishment, carrying an excellent line of furniture of various 
grades to meet the diversified tastes of his patrons. In addition he conducts an under- 
taking establishment, having modern undertaking parlors on West Main street, and both 
branches of liis business are growing and profitable. 

Mr. Halverson was married to Miss Pauline Frederickson. a native of Norway and a 
representative of a pioneer family of* North Dakota. She died in 1895, leaving six children: 
Qara, the wife of E. S. Dobbin, of Hood River, Oregon; Henry, who for four years was 
county treasurer and is now cashier of the Marion State Bank of Marion, North Dakota; 
Minnie, a stenographer with a law firm at Hood River, Oregon; Adolph, an employee of the 
Great Northern Railroad Company, with headquarters at Glacier Park; Louise E., a ba,nk 
clerk at Hood River, Oregon; and Victor, who died in 1914, at the age of twenty-one years. 
AH of the children, after attending the public schools of Valley City, became students in 
the State Normal there. In 1900 Mr. Halverson was married again, his second union 
being with Miss Tillic Hoel, a native of Norway, whose people also settled in North Dakota 
in the period of its pioneer development. The children of the second marriage are Eugene 
and Alice, both attending the Valley Cit\- State Normal. 

Mr. Halverson is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of EUcs and the Modern Woodmen of America and he not only ranks 
as a progressive and representative merchant of Valley City but also as a substantial 
citizen, for he has ever supported and endorsed those measures which are a matter of civic 
interest and civic pride, seeking to promote the substantial growth and improvement of 
his city and to uphold its standards of municipal integrity. 



MARTIN G. MYHRE. 



Martin G. Myhre, cashier of the First State Bank of W'alcott, is an important factor 
in financial circles in that town and under his direction the business of the bank has 
grown steadily. He has also represented his district in the state legislature. His birth 
occurred in Winona county, Minnesota, January 30, 1874, and he is a son of Gilbert and 
Malena (Torgerson) Myhre, both of whom were born in Norway, the former in 1846 and 
the latter in 1849. Both the paternal and maternal grandfathers. Christian Hanson and 
Hans Torgerson, died in Norway. The parents were married in that country but in 1869 
emigrated to America and settled in Winona county, Minnesota, where the father purchased 
land. He cultivated his farm there until 1878, when he removed to Dakota territory and 
took up a homestead in what is now Richland county. North Dakota. He became the owner 
of a section of land and also held title to other property. He passed away upon the 
liomcstead in 1910 and his wife died there in 1915. They were Lutherans in religious 
faith and the father was one of the organizers of the local church of that denomination. 
He took a very active part in church work and his influence was always on the side of 
right and justice. He cast his ballot in support of the candidates of the republican party 
and was honored by election to a number of local offices. To him and his wife were born 
eleven children, of whom eight are living and of whom our subject is the sixth in order 
of birth. 

Martin G. Myhre attended the country schools in the acquirement of his early education 
and later attended the University of Minnesota, there pursuing a law course. He completed 



204 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

his legal study at Columbian University, now George Washington University, in Washing- 
ton, D. C, and in 1900 was admitted to the bar. He took the law course at Columbian 
University at night as he was employed in the civil service at Washington during the day. 
He practiced law for a few years but in 1907 returned to Walcott and engaged in banking, 
entering the First State Bank as cashier, a position wliich he has since held. The 
institution is capitalized for fifteen thousand dollars, has a surplus and undivided profits 
of five thousand dollars and its deposits average one hundred and eighty thousand dollars. 
Mr. Myhre has a detailed knowledge of banking and as he adds to this an understanding 
of the principles of finance which underlie all banking practice, ho is a very efliicient 
cashier, so directing the policy of the bank that it holds the confidence of the public and 
at the same time returns good dividends to its stockholders, lie has prospered financially 
and owns a large farm and also has other real estate interests. He began his independent 
career without capital and the prosperity which he now enjoys is the direct result of liis 
enterprise and business ability. 

In March, 1904, Mr. Myhre was married to Miss Julia Fossum, a daughter of Andrew 
Fossum, who came to Dakota in 1871. He located upen a farm and is still engaged in its 
operation. He is also president of the First State Bank. Mr. and Mrs. Myhre have two 
children: Gladys, who is nine years of age; and Arnold, six years old. 

Mr. Myhre is a republican and has taken an active part in politics. He has not only 
held a number of local offices but in 1914 and 1915 represented his district in the state 
legislature, proving an able working member of that body. He is identified with the 
Lutheran church and fraternally is connected with the Masons and the Jlodern Woodmen. 
He is widely known throughout Richland county and is highly esteemed and respected. 



JUDGE N. C. YOUNG. 



Judge N. C. Young, practicing at the bar of Fargo as a member of the firm of of Watson 
& Young, has won recognition as one of the. leading attorneys of the state. He also has 
other important business connections and is accounted a forceful and resourceful man. He 
was born January 28, 1862, in Jlount Pleasant, Iowa, a son of Charles S. and Joanna E. 
(Williams) Young, both of wliom were natives of Ohio, where they were reared and married. 
Soon afterward they removed to Henry county, Iowa, traveling through Chicago with an 
ox team and proceeding across the Illinois prairies until they reached their destination. 
Mr. Young purchased land in Henry county and there engaged in farming for a long period 
but later in life retired and removed to Tabor, Iowa, where he passed away in the year 1910. 
His widow survives and yet makes her home in Tabor. Mr. Young was at one time mayor 
of the city and was very prominent in the community in which he resided. 

Judge Young, reared in Iowa, pursued his education in Tabor College, in Iowa City 
Academy, and in the Iowa State University, in which he pursued a classical course and was 
graduated in law in 1887, winning the degiees during his student days of Bachelor of Arts, 
Master of Arts and Bachelor of Laws. 

On the day following his graduation Judge Young was married to Miss Ida B. Clarke, of 
Iowa City, who was also graduated from the State University in that year and won the 
degrees of Master of Arts and Bachelor of Philosophy. She had three sisters who were 
alumnae of the State University, two of whom gained valedictorian honors, while all three 
were members of the Phi Beta Kappa. Mrs. Young has been a frequent contributor to the 
literature of North Dakota, writing a number of poems and songs. Slie is one of the state's 
most able, cultured and accomplished women. She served for two terms as president of the 
State Federation of Women's Clubs and is now president of the "North Dakota Association 
Opposed to Suffrage." 

Following tlieir marriage Judge and Jlrs. Young estublishcd their home at Bathgate, 
Xorth Dakota, where he entered upon the practice of law, remaining in that city for eleven 
years. In August, 1898, he was appointed to succeed Judge Corliss on the supreme bench and 
in November of that year was regularly elected supreme court judge for a term of six 
jears. In 1904 he was reelected without opposition for a six years' term but resigned his 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 205 

office to enter upon the private practice of liis profession on tlie 15th of August, 1906. He 
also served as state's attorney of Pembina county from 1S91 until 1895. Following his 
elevation to the bench he removed his family to l-'argo in 1S9S in order that his children 
might have the educational advantages to be secured in that city. Upon resigning from the 
supreme court he entered into a law partnership with J. S. Watson and has since been his 
associate in active practice. He stands as one of the foremost members of the North Dakota 
bar and his practice is now extensive and of an important character. He is remarkable 
among lawyers for the wide research and provident care with which he prepares his cases 
and upon the bench he proved himself the peer of the ablest members of the court of last 
resort. His decisions indicate strong mentality, careful analysis, a thorough knowledge and 
an unbiased judgment. Aside from his professionel connections he has important banking 
interests in the western part of the state, being president of one bank and vice president of 
two others. 

Judge and Mrs. Young have become the parents of three children, Laura B., who was 
graduated from the University of Iowa with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, is now the wife 
of C. W. Spaulding, cashier of the Citizens State Bank at Streeter, North Dakota. Horace 
C, who won the B. A. degree upon graduation from the University of Iowa and took a partial 
law course there, spent some time in his father's law office, was admitted to the North 
Dakota bar in 1914, and is now located at Bowman, North Dakota, as a member of the firm 
of Scow &, Young. Dorothea is a graduate of the Newton School for Girls at Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, and also of the New England Conservatory of Music at Boston and is now engaged 
in professional concert work. 

After resigning from the supreme bench, Judge Young was appointed president of the 
board of regents of the North Dakota State Universit}' and so continued until 1914. In 1907 
he was elected to the presidency of the university but declined the honor. He has always 
figured prominently in support of educational work and for years served as a member of the 
school board of Fargo. He also seeks the progress of his community and state and he and 
his family hold membership and take an active interest in the Congregational church. Fra- 
ternally he belongs to Bathgate Lodge, F. & A. M., and has attained the thirty-second degree 
of the Scottish Rite in Dakota Consistory. He is also a member of the Country Club and of 
the Commercial Club of Fargo. His interests are broad and varied, touching many of the 
activities which affect the welfare of the community and of the commonwealth. His influ- 
ence has been a potent force in upholding the political and legal status of the state and in 
advancing its material, intellectual and moral progress. 



PETER WESTLUND. 



Peter Westlund, of Stanley township, Cass county, who owns five hundred and fifty 
acres of excellent land, was born in Sweden on the 15th of November, 1846, a son of Peter 
and Mary (Ingebretson) Westlund, who were lifelong residents of that country. They were 
the parents of five children, all of whom are living. 

Peter Westlund passed the days of his boyhood and youth under the parental roof 
and received his education in the public schools. In 1869, in early manhood, he came to 
America and made his way to St. Paul, Minnesota, where he worked for the Great 
Northern Railroad Company on a gi-avel train. Later he became a brakeman on the 
Northern Pacific Railroad and was in time promoted to conductor. He remained with that 
company for ten years, but in 1879 he removed to Cass county, North Dakota, and located 
upon his present home farm, which is situated on section 5, Stanley township. He has 
erected fine buildings upon the place and otherwise improved it. He has invested in 
additional land, his holdings comprising five hundred and fifty acres, from which he 
receives a good income. He also owns stock in the Farmers elevator at Horace and in the 
creamery at Fargo. 

In 1881 Mr. Westlund was united in marriage to Miss Enga Niquist, also a native 
of Sweden. She passed away in February, 1907, and was laid to rest in the Horace cemetery. 
She was the mother of five children, as follows: Emma, deceased; Hilma, at home; 



206 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Ephraim and Oscar R., both of whom arc college graduates; and Agnes, who is attending 
normal school. 

Mr. Westlund is a republican in liis jjolitieal belief and lias served as school director 
for si.\teen years, doing much in that time to advance the interests of the public schools. 
He came to this country a poor young man but through taking advantage of the opportunities 
here oll'ered he has gained financial independence and is recognized as one of the substantial 
and valued citizens of Cass county. 



KEV. WILLIAM C. HUNTER. 

Rev. William C. Hunter, of Minot, has entered upon a period of rest after long years 
devoted to the work of the Presbyterian ministry. He was born at Woodburn, in County 
Antrim, Ireland, March 27, 1850, a son of Alexander and Mary (Einlay) Hunter, who were 
also natives of that localitj-, where the father followed the occupation of farming. Both 
passed away in Belfast, Ireland. 

In a family of eight children Rev. Hunter is the fifth in order of birth. He attended 
school at Carrick, Fergus and Glasgow, Scotland, pursuing the arts course in Glasgow Univer- 
sity. He prepared for the ministry by a three years' course in the Chicago Theological 
University, which confened upon him the degree of Bachelor of Divinity. Long before he 
prepared for the ministry, however, he had started out in the business world to provide for 
his own support. At the age of si.xteen he was an assistant in a grocery store and was thus 
employed until he entered college at the age of twenty-two years. Following his three years' 
college course he engaged in the grocery business in Glasgow as a commission merchant for 
about eight years and it was on the expiration of that period that he crossed the Atlantic 
and located in Toronto, Canada, after visiting his brother in Scotland, Canada, for a short 
time. In the former city he entered the employ of James Barton's Sons and a year later he 
went to Chicago, where he entered upon his theological course, having determined to devote 
his life to the ministry. Following the completion of his studies he was ordained in the First 
Congregational church of Ch:* igo, of which the distinguished divine, Dr. Goodwin, was then 
pastor. Having thus qualified for the ministry Rev. Hunter went to Garden Bay, in the 
upper peninsula of Jlichigan, and engaged in preaching in tliat locality for more than two 
years, during which period he assisted in organizing three churclics there and was also instru- 
mental in building a manse. He afterward returned with his family to Illinois, where he 
took charge of two churches, one at Brighton and another at Kemper. He also supplied 
the Greenville church for a time, residing there for about two years, and on the 7th of Feb- 
ruary, 1891, he came to North Dakota, settling at Sanborn, where he engaged in preaching, 
also having charge of two out stations for two years. He next removed to Wheatland, North 
Dakota, and accepted the pastorate of the Presbyterian church at that point, continuing his 
labors there for more than three years, at the end of which time he removd to Minot in IS'IG, 
having received a call from the Presbyterian church of the latter city. About the same time 
he received calls from the churches at Bottineau and Dickinson, but decided to make Minot 
his home and for more than six years continued his pastoral labors at Minot, Burlington and 
Logan. In 1902 he resigned his charge in Minot, but continued his work at Burlington, at 
Logan and at other points, doing general missionary work. He organized churches at Surrey, 
Burlington and Bowbells and assisted also in organizing a church at Logan. To that depart- 
ment of ministerial work he directed his energies imtil 1900, when he went to Montana to 
accept the pastorate of a church at Terry, the county seat of Custer county. While thus 
engaged he assisted in organizing a chiirch at Mildred, Montana, and one at Fallon. His 
residence in Montana covered a period of three years, at the end of which time he returned 
to his home in Minot in 1912 and since then has lived practically retired from the ministry. 
His home is a beautiful commodious residence, which he erected, and he also owns a quarter 
section of land near Minot and a half section in Montana which he has rented. 

On the 25th of September, 1879, Eev. Hunter was united in marriage to Miss Helen 
Galloway, who was born at Kilmarnoch, Ayrshire, Scotland, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Michael Galloway, who were also natives of Ayrshire, whence they removed to Glasgow, 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA , 207 

wlieie they reared their family. The father there engaged in business as a boot and shoe- 
maker and was also a salesman, selling the product of his own factory. He developed a 
business of large proportions, conducting four stoves in Glasgow, his enterprise and diligence 
winning him a place among the foremost merchants of that city. Both he and his wife are 
now deceased. Mrs. Hunter was one of the eldest in a large family and was educated at 
Glasgow. By her marriage she has become the mother of four children. Jennie M. is the 
wife of Harold Lamming, a mail clerk, who has charge of a car on the Great Northern Kail- 
road and resides at Grand Forks, North Dakota. Mr. and Mrs. Lamming have become the 
parents of four children: Edith, Dorothy and Jean, all at home; and Dora, who died in 
infancy. Edith Ann, the second daughter of the Hunter family, is the wife of Reno L. Hay- 
ford, editor of the Minneapolis Tribune, and they have one child, Helen Louise. Ernest M. 
G. is an assistant in the hospital at Medical Lake, Spokane, Washington. Mabel, the youngest 
of the family, is the wife of F. L. Wetch, a bookkeeper in the Northern Telephone oflice and a 
resident of Minot. 

Rev. Hunter gives his political support to the republican party, but has never been an 
aspirant for office. He has long been an active member of the Masonic fraternity and was 
the first master of Terry Lodge, No. 74, F. & A. M., at Terry, Montana. He is now affiliated 
with Minot Lodge, of which he was secretary for one term, and with the Royal Arch 
chapter, in which he was high priest for a year. At the present time he is worthy patron of 
the Eastern Star, to which Mrs. Hunter also belongs, and he was formerly identified with 
the Woodmen of the World and with the Yeomen. Mr. and Mrs. Hunter still hold member- 
ship in the Pre-sbyterian church and Mrs. Hunter is a member of the Ladies' Aid Society. 
Even in his youth Rev. Hunter never lightly regarded the duties and obligations which 
devolved upon him, but conscientiously performed every task assigned him and as the years 
advanced he thoughtfully considered and studied the questions of life. It was this that 
helped him to take up the work of the ministry, wherein his labors have been of far-reaching 
eflFect, for his influence proved an uplifting force in the lives of many and his teachings 
carried home to the minds of his hearers the basic principles of the gospel. 



MATHEW LYNCH. 

Mathew Lynch, of Lidgerwood, has played an important part in the business and agri- 
cultural development of Richland county and has also been a leader in political affairs, having 
represented his district in the state legislature. He is president of the Farmers National 
Bank and is the owner of a great deal of valuable farm land. A native of Wisconsin, he was 
born near Berlin on the 26th of November, 1S57, and is a son of James and Adeline (Perkins) 
Lynch. The father, who was born in Ireland, came to the United States in early manhood 
and after his removal to Wisconsin followed farming, although he had been a wagon maker 
in Ireland. He purchased government land, which he developed and improved and which he 
still owned at the time of his death. He was a democrat in politics and was a communicant 
of the Roman Catholic church. His mother also came to this country, emigrating after her 
husband's demise. The mother of our subject, who was born in Germany, came to the United 
States in girlhood and her marriage occurred in New England. She became the mother of 
seven children, of whom six are living and of whom our subject is the fifth in order of birth. 

Mathew Lynch received his education in the common schools of Wisconsin, but left 
home when still a boy, as his mother had died. In 1ST9 he became a resident of Richland 
county, North Dakota, and took up a homestead and tree claim, proving up on both. While 
living in Wisconsin he had worked as a farm hand and had thus gained valuable knowledge 
concerning agricultural work which enabled. him to operate his own farms successfully. After 
cultivating his land in Liberty Grove township for a number of years he removed to Wynd- 
mere in the spring of 1886 and there engaged in general merchandising in partnership with 
W. H. Morgan. The firm subsequently started a branch store in Lidgerwood and successfully 
conducted both enterprises. In 1888 Mr. Lynch bought out the interest of Mr. Morgan and 
he and Mr. Rickert continued as partners until 1893, when our subject purchased Mr. 
Rickert's interest and continued the business until 1908, when he sold out, but again pur- 



208 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

chased the business, January 1, 1913, and still conducts the same. He organized the Lidger- 
wood State Bank, which was later known as the Lidgcrwood National Bank and which sub- 
sequentl}' bought out the Farmers Bank, and it is now conducted under the name of Farmers 
National Bank. Ho is president of the institution, which is capitalized at lifty tliousand 
dollars, has a surplus of ten thousand dollars, and average deposits of three hundred and 
nine thousand dollars. The bank holds the confidence of the public and its business has 
grown steadily. Jlr. Lynch keeps in close touch with all of the departments of the bank 
and the success of the institution is in no small measure due to his excellent judgment and 
knowledge of business conditions. He owns seven quarter sections of land in Richland and 
adjoining counties, from which he derives a handsome income. He is now a man of independ- 
ent means, but he had no property save his team and prairie schooner when he drove here 
from Berlin, Wisconsin. 

On the 30th of August, ISSS, at Sibley, Iowa, !Mr. Lynch was married to Jliss Mary 
Maher, a native of Wisconsin. They have four children. Francis Leo is living on a claim in 
Canada and is engaged in the machinery and land business. Fraternally he is a member of 
the Knights of Columbus. .James William is also living on a claim in Canada. Mathew 
Hoyt, who graduated from St. Thomas College of St. Paul and who devoted one year to the 
study of law, is now employed in the Farmers National Bank at Lidgcrwood. He is likewise 
a member of the Knights of Columbus. Mary Irene is still in school. 

Jlr. Lynch is a republican and casts his ballot in support of the candidates and measures 
of that party. He has taken an active part in politics, and was appointed postmaster of Lid- 
gcrwood, February 1, 1890, serving four years. He was elected to the state legislature in 
November, 1898, and after serving one term was appointed postmaster by President Mc- 
Kinley, February 1, 1900. After serving four years he was reappointed by President Roose- 
velt in 1904 and again in 1908; and by President Taft in 1912, serving until May 15, 1916. 
He is a consistent member of the Catholic church and is also identified with the Catholic 
Order of Foresters. All who know him respect him for his fine qualities of manhood, and 
his personal friends are many. 



MARTIN JACOBSON. 



The history of Minot would be incomplete were there failure to make reference to 
Martin Jacobson, and in its unfolding his history will present many points of interest and 
many lessons worthy of emulation. He was born at Ridgeway, Iowa, November 17, 1863, 
the son of Jacob and Esther (Hanson) Knudson, both of whom were natives of Norway. 
In early life, however, they came to the new world and were married in Iowa where for 
many years the father engaged in farming and both he and his wife died and were buried 
on the old homestead in that state. The father died in 1903 when he was eighty years of 
age and the mother passed away in 1912 at the age of eighty-seven. 

Martin .Jacobson was the sixth in order of birth in their family of seven children. 
He was reared in Iowa when the district was a pioneer locality and he pursued his edu- 
cation in a log school house near his father's place. But his opportunities in that 
direction were somewhat limited and he has had to depend upon the school of experience 
for many of the lessons which he has learned. He early began work in the fields and 
continued to assist in the cultivation of the old home place until he was eighteen years of 
age when his father sold the farm to Mr. Jacobson's brother. At that time Martin 
Jacobson came direct to North Dakota, arriving in the year 1882. He worked one sum- 
mer for .John ililler, who was the first governor of the state, and later he returned to Iowa 
and rented a half section of land near Ridgeway, carrying on farming on his own account 
although but nineteen years of age. He continued to develop that place for about four years 
and when twenty-two years of age he loaded five horses in an emigration car and again 
came to North Dakota. He unloaded the car at Buckston and drove two hundred and fifty 
miles to his present homestead, eight miles west of Minot. Settling thereon he took the 
preliminary steps toward developing the place. The following winter he returned to Iowa, 
married and then brought his bride to his home. Five children were born on that ranch 




MARTIN JACOBSON 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 211 

where the family resided for eleven years, the father devoting his energies to general 
farming. On the expiration of that period he removed to Minot, but still continued the 
operation and supervision of his ranch and is now farming sixteen hundred acres devoted 
to the raising of small grain. In the season of 191.5 he threshed twenty-seven thousand 
bushels of gi-ain. He is one of the most extensive farmers of his part of the state and 
one of the most ])rogressive business men. He has about seventy-five head of Short- 
horn cattle; sixty head of horses; three hundred head of hogs; and three hundred full 
blooded, Partridge Wyandotte chickens. 

On removing to the city Mr. Jacobson engaged in the hardware business and enjoyed 
a large trade for four years; Almost from the beginning such was the volume of his 
business that he employed more than twenty people and in 1905 he had an entire traiij- 
load of hardware and machinery billed for Minot with instructions from the Great 
Northern Railroad Company to operate the train as he wished. In 1906 he received an 
entire carload of strap hinges. His' business brought him very gratifying profit but 
eventually he sold out to two of his employees who formed the firm of Fugelso & Jacob- 
son. In 1902 he built the opera house, a modern structure the front of which is occupied 
by the Union National Bank. He continued in the machine business until 1914 and he 
assisted in organizing the Union National Bank of which he was the first vice president. 
He has now disposed of most of his interest in that bank but still has important commer- 
cial interests in the city. His labors have been most valuable and effective in promoting 
the upbuilding of the town, his work being attended by far-reaching and beneficial results. 

On the 1st of January, 1887, Mr. Jacobson was married to Miss Annie Kittelson 
who was born at Ridgeway, Iowa, on the same day as her husband and they were baptized 
together, attended sdiool together and on the fiftieth anniversary of their birth each 
weighed one hundred and seventy-one pounds. Her parents were Albert and Aagaat 
(Mogen) Kittelson who were born in the same place in Norway. Both Mr. and Mrs. Jacob- 
son's parents were children together and came to America about the same time, the 
two families living about three-quarters of a mile apart. Mrs. Kittelson died when her 
daughter w-as about six months old. Her father was never active in politics but did much to 
further religious work, holding office jn the church and acting as trustee at the time the 
Augsburg Seminary in Minneapolis was built. 

To 3Ir. and Mrs. Jacobson have been born six children. Karl II., born October 19, 
1887, married Luella Henry and resides in Opheini. ilontana, where he is engaged in the 
lumber business and operates an electric light plant fifty-five miles from the raib-oad. 
Chester J., born in February, 1889, is now at home. He attended Shattuck Military Acad- 
emy and as a member of the football team won the championship for Minnesota. Alletie 
Christina was graduated in both vocal and instrumental music from the Minneapolis 
School of Music with the class of 1913. Mildred Almira, who was graduated from the State 
Normal School of Minot in 1914; is. now a teacher in the Minot school and is a great favorite 
in social circles. Alton Leroy is taking a high school course and is a member of both the 
basket ball and football teams. A'ernon Malcolm is also a high school pupil in Minot. 

Mr. Jacobson is iirominent in Masonic circles, belonging to the blue lodge, chapter 
and commandery of Minot. to the consistory at Grand Forks and to the Slystic Shrine. 
He is also active in the Sons of Norway. He belongs to the Norwegian Free church, and he 
it was who planned the jnesent church edifice in Minot. He has been the prime mover 
in its improvements and has had charge of the annual lutfisk supper for several years. 
In politics he is a republican and when but twenty-five years of age was elected county 
commissioner, being the youngest' ever chosen for that position in his county. For more 
than twenty years he has served on school boards, first at Burlington and afterward at 
Minot, and acted as chairman of the teachers committee. He is chairman of the build- 
ing committee of the new high school at Minot, which is to cost three hundred tliousand 
dollars. The plans are an embodiment of Mr. Jacobson's ideas, his broad experience and 
natural ability being of great value. For four years he was a member of the state senate 
and he left the impress of his individuality upon the legislation enacted during that 
period. For two years he was a member of the state normal school board and the normal 
buildings in Minot were erected largely after his plans. At the present time he is a 
member of the library board and for many years he has been a trustee of the church. 



212 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

His own educational advantages were extremely limited and recognizing the value of an 
educational training he has taken an active and lielpful part in the development of all 
educational institutions and interests of this part of the state. In fact there are few 
public movements for the benefit and upbuilding of community or commonwealth with 
which he has not been allied and his labors have been most helpful. 

In 1904 Mr. Jacobson built his present residence which is one of the most commodious 
and modern in Minot. Among the homes more recently built in the city there are none 
that will rank higher in equipment or in finish. The halls are finished in quarter-sawed 
oak wliile tlie interior of every room is finished in bird's-eye maple of fine quality. The 
kitchen and pantries are commodious and the dining room is not onlj' beautiful but very 
extensive in size. The rooms are so constructed tliat covers may be laid for very large 
parties such as frequent tlie Jacobson home, for the members of the family are social 
leaders. Mr. Jacobson's first interest is always his family and their happiness, money 
being a secondary consideration. In 1907 Mr. Jacobson issued a calendar made from a 
picture of himself, his wife and six children mounted on eight of his fine, highbred race 
horses, expending the sum of three hundred and fifty dollars to have this calendar made. 
Many of these pictures are to be found in various parts of the United States in the homes 
of their friends expensively framed. Mr. Jacobson sent one of these calendars to Presi- 
dent Eoosevelt and challenged the president with a wager of one thousand dollars to race 
one mile family against family. He received a personal letter from the president express- 
ing his appreciation of the calendar but the challenge was not accepted. There is no 
phase of public progress with which Mr. Jacobson has not been connected, from making 
the plans for the state normal school and public library buildings to shaping the legisla- 
tion affecting the welfare of the commonwealth. In all things he has been actuated by the 
spirit of enterprise and progress and guided by sound common sense, a quality which is 
too often lacking. Both he and his wife are in splendid health, being remarkably young 
in appearance which they attribute to the fact that for ten years they have slept on a 
splendid open sleeping porch which is one of the adjuncts to their home. They believe that 
fresh air has been tlie tonic that has warded oflT the burden of years. Mr. Jacobson has 
many enthusiastic admirers, his friends and contemporaries in business recognizing his 
worth, and the course that he has pursued should serve as a stimulus to tliose who may 
have to depend upon their own resources for advancement and success. 



JUDGE HERODOTUS H. TAVLOK. 

Judge Herodotus H. Taylor, judge of the county couit of Sargent county, was born in 
Troy, Spencer county, Indiana, November 35, 1856, a son of Green B. and Christine (Fisher) 
Taylor. The father was a river man and in 1870 removed to Evansville, Indiana, where he 
operated a line of steamboats on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers for many years. In 1883 he 
came with his son, Judge Taylor, to North Dakota, settling in Sargent county, in that sec- 
tion which became Taylor township, being named in honor of the father. He secured a 
quarter section of government land, upon which he resided until his death in 1900, after which 
his remains were taken to Evansville for interment. His political allegiance was given to 
the republican jiarty and in matters of citizenship liis attitude was ever one of loyalty and 
progressivcness. His wife died during tlie boyhood of flieir son Herodotus, who was one of a 
family of eight cliildren: Alice, James, Elizabeth and Timo\ir T., all now deceased; Herodotus 
H.; Lola and Homer, wlio have also passed away; and Green B., living in Taylor township, 
Sargent county, whither he removed with his father and brother. 

In early boyhood Herodotus H. Taylor entered the public schools of Evansville, passing 
through consecutive grades to his graduation from the high scIlooI. Subseqiiently he was 
employed in a commission house for two years and for three years he was engaged in farm- 
ing, two years of that time being spent in Kentucky and one year in Indiana. As previously 
stated, he came to North Dakota in 1883 and secured a quarter section of land in Taylor 
township, Sargent county. Tlie journey was made to Lisbon by rail, from wliicli [loint he had 
to take his things by wagon freight to his farm, a distance of fifty miles, for no railroad had 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 213 

been built into Sargent county at that time. Not a furrow had been turned nor an improve- 
ment made upon his place, but with characteristic energy he began the development of his 
property and for sixteen years was engaged in the cultivation of about a section of land. 
He afterward disposed of his farm and removed to Forman, where he retired from active 
business cares. He had won a substantial measure of success through his well directed 
efi'orts, but he could not be content without some occupation or pursuit, for indolence and 
idleness are utterly foreign to his nature. After serving in the oilice of register of deeds for 
six years he established a bank at Cogswell in 1904, calling it the Sargent County State 
Bank, of which he became the cashier and one of the directors, so continuing for about eight 
years. He then went to Oakes, where he was connected for a time with the First National 
Bank and in the meantime sold his interest in the bank at Cogswell. In his business affairs 
he has enjoyed an unsullied reputation for reliability as W'ell as determination and enterprise. 

On the 20th of January, 1895, Judge Taylor was married to Jliss Minnie L. Burns, a 
native of Michigan, born near Six Lakes. Removing to North Dakota, she was married in 
this state, and they have become the parents of three children : Mildred, a graduate of the 
high school; and Vivian and Florence, who are attending school. 

Judge Taylor belongs to Golden Fleece Lodge, No. 31, A. F. & A. M., of Forman, and 
Ivanhoe Cammandery, of Lisbon. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party and 
in 1S98 was elected on that ticket register of deeds of Sargent county, at which time he took 
up his abode in F'orman, where he now makes his home. He retired from that office after an 
incumbency of six years with the goodwill and conlidence of all concerned and in 1914 he was 
elected to the office of judge of the county court and in 1916 again became a candidate with- 
out opposition, a fact which indicates how excellent was the record wliich he made during his 
first term in office. His course upon the bench has been in harmony with his record as a man 
and citizen, characterized by thoroughness, by devotion to duty and by the utmost loyalty 
to the trusts given to his care. 



JAMES W. STITELER. 



James W. Stitelcr, who is serving efficiently as cashier of the Farmers National Bank 
of Lidgerwood, was born in Pennsylvania on the 20th of March, 1876. His parents, John C. 
and Francis M. (Stewart) Stiteler, were born respectively in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, 
on the 3d of April, 1846, and in Jefferson county, that state, on the 18th of April, 1848. The 
paternal grandfather, William Stiteler, passed his entire life in Pennsylvania and the mater- 
nal grandfather, James Stewart, died there. The parents of our subject were married in 
Pennsylvania in 1875 and in April of the following year removed to Pcjiin county, Wisconsin, 
wliere they remained until the spring of 1881, when they came to North Dakota and settled 
on a claim near Fairmount, on which the father had filed in April, 1880. In 1883 he took up 
a tree claim near Lidgerwood, to which he removed in 1887. He is a republican and takes 
the interest of a good citizen in public affairs. He is a member of Lodge, No. 1093, B. P. O. 
E., at Fergus Falls and also belongs to the Masonic order. He was a poor man when he came 
to this state, but now owns a half section of excellent land and also holds title to valuable 
town property. His wife passed away on the 25th of September, 1914, in the faith of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, to which he also belongs. Our subject is their only child, but 
they adopted a daughter, Lucille Anderson, who is married and is keeping house for her foster 
father. 

James W. Stiteler received a good education, attending the common schools and the 
Lidgerwood higli school and thus preparing iiimself for the responsibilities and duties of 
mature life. On beginning his independent career he worked as a farm hand for some time,but 
subsequently built the Farmers Elevator at Lidgerwood, of which he assumed charge in July, 
1906, and which he conducted for four years. He then resigned that position and entered the 
Lidgerwood National Bank as bookkeeper, remaining there until January 10, 1911, when he 
became cashier of the Farmers Bank, now known as the Farmers National Bank. The insti- 
tution has a capital and surplus of sixty thousand dollars and its average deposits are three 
hundred thousand dollars. He thoroughly understands the routine of banking practice and 



214 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

displays sound judgment in deciding questions of policy that arise from time to time. He 
lias so directed the allairs of the bank that it has gained the coniidencc of the public and 
has paid good dividends to its stockholders. 

In November, 1903, Mr. Stiteler was married to Jliss Christine M. ilurray, a native of 
Pictou county, Kova Scotia, and they liave become tlio parents of four children: Frances 
Kvelyn, John E. and Marion ,1., all of whom are in school; and Margaret L. 

Mr. Stiteler casts his ballot in sui)port of the republican party and is at present serving 
as a member of the city council. He is well known fraternally, belonging to Lodge No. 1093, 
B. P. O. K., at Fergus Falls and to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in the subordinate 
lodge of which he has passed tinough all of the chairs and the grand lodge of which he has 
attended as a delegate five times. His religious faith is that of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, of which he is a member, and his life is guided by high standards of ethics. 



JOHN M. HOLMEN. 



John il. Holmcn is operating the old family homestead in Warren township, Cass county, 
and is ranked among the progressive farmers of his locality. He was born on that farm, 
September 2, 1878, of the marriage of J. J. and Martha Holmcn, both natives of Norway. 
They came to the United States in the latter '60s and after residing in Minnesota for a few 
years removed to Cass county, North Dakota, and located on the farm on section 24, Warren 
township, where our subject now lives. The father erected a log cabin, which remained the 
family residence for a number of years, but later he built an excellent farm dwelling. He 
made many other improvements upon the place and brought his land to a high state of culti- 
vation. He passed awaj' upon the homestead in 1910, but his wife is still living tlierc at the 
age of seventy-six years. Three of their four children are living. 

John M. Holmen was educated in the common schools and has always livid on the lionie 
farm. He assisted bis father w-ith its operation until the latter's demise, since whicli time he 
has had charge of the farm work. Tlie family owns three hundred and forty acres, which 
our subject cultivates, and lie iiersonally holds title to one hundred and sixty acres on section 
9, Stanley township. He follows modern methods of agriculture and his woU directed labor 
is rewarded by excellent crops. He also raises high grade stock. In adililion to his~farni inter- 
ests he is a stockholder in the Farmers elevator at Horace. 

Mr. Holmen is a republican in politics, but has never sought nor desired ofliee. His entire 
life has been spent in Cass county, and he is widely known and has many sincere friends, as he 
possesses those traits of character which invariably command respect and win regard. 



CARROLD L. BUTTLES. 



Carroll! J,. I'littles, superintendent of the Riverside ccmeterj' at Fargo. North Dakota, 
was born in Rochester, Minnesota, on the 10th of July, 1873, a son of Grin F. and Elizabeth 
(Wright) Buttles, the former a native of New York state and the latter of Nebraska. The 
father, who was a carpenter by trade, removed to Iowa in pioneer days and at the time of 
the Civil war enlisted in an Iowa regiment, remaining at the front for four years. He was 
maj-ried in that state and subsequently removed to Minnesota, whence in 1880 he came to 
North Dakota, locating at Fargo. There he w'as in the employ of the Haines & Magill Eleva- 
tor Company until his demise, wliidi occurred in 1884. 

Carrold L. Muttles was reared under the parental roof and attended the public schools 
in the acquirement of an eilucation until he reached the age of sixteen years. He then 
became a wage earner, securing em|>loyment as a clerk in a grocery store. For liKccii 
or si.xteen years he worked for T. E. Yerxa but subseiiuently engaged in farming for about 
seven years. Since 1911 he has lieeii superintendent of the Riverside cemetery at Fargo 
and has concentrated his energies upon the discharge of his duties in that capacity. 

In 1897 Mr. Buttles was united in marriage to Jliss Ida Reed, of Jamestown, this 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 215 

state, by wlioiu lio has two eliildreii: Geoi'ge, who is attending the Fargo high school; and 
Frances, a grammar scliool student. 

Mr. Buttles is a stanch adherent of the republican party, believing in the wisdom of 
its policies. Fraternally he is identified with the ilodern Woodmen and the Royal Arcanum, 
and both he and his wife hold membership in the Broadway Jlethodist Episcopal church. 



IV AR SEIM. 



Ivar Seim, who is part owner of and conducts the Blanchard Mercantile Company at 
Blanehard, Traill county, was born in Norway, on the 3d of March, 1870, a son of Eric and 
Elizabeth (Hamre) Seim, both natives of that country, where they still make their home. 
To them have been born twelve children, all of whom are living, four residing in America 
and eight in Norway. 

Ivar Seim was reai-ed in his native land and attended the public schools in the acquire- 
ment of his education but in 1888, when a youth of eighteen years, emigrated to America 
and, making his way to North Dakota, located in Traill county. He worked as a farm hand 
for some time, but in 1896 came to Blanchard and established what is known as the Blan- 
chard Mercantile Company, of which he is part owner and which he manages. He under- 
stands the business thoroughly and has built up a large and profitable patronage. The 
excellence of the goods carried and the reasonableness of his prices have commended him to 
the public and his business is one of the prosperous concerns of the town. He also owns 
two hundred acres of land on section 13, Blanchard township, which is well improved and 
which yields him a good return. 



JOHN McGUIGAN. 



John McGuigan, who is manager of the elevator at Chaflfce, owned by the Amenia & 
Sharon Land Company, has had long experience in grain buying and is very efficient in his 
chosen work. He was born in Ireland on the 1st of October, 1865, a son of Bernard and Susan 
(Allister) McGuigan, the former of whom died in Ireland, while the latter is still living there 
at the age of eighty-five years. 

The subject of this review was reared under the parental roof and attended the schools 
of his native country in the pursuit of an education. In the spring of 1886 he decided to try 
his fortune in the United States and after reaching this country continued his journey west- 
ward to Casselton, North Dakota. For a short time he worked as a farm hand, hut sub- 
sequently farmed in partnership with his brother William, who had preceded him to the 
United States three years. In 1895 John McGuigan became connected with the grain busi- 
ness and was placed in charge of the Anderson & Gage elevator at Woods, Cass county. He 
remained in the employ of that firm until they disposed of their elevator at Woods, after 
which he became manager of the Farmers elevator at that place. Two years later he was 
offered a position with the Amenia Elevator Company and for six months had the manage- 
ment of their elevator at Langdon. In 1909 he was transferred to their elevator at Chaffee, 
which is one of the most important elevators owned by the company. A great deal of grain 
is handled there annually and the successful management of the business requires a thorough 
knowledge of grain buying and sound judgment, qualifications wliicli Mr. McGuigan possesses 
in an unusual degree. He and his wife own a half section of good land in Gill township and 
he and his brother James hold title to another half section in that township, and his holdings 
return him a substantial addition to his income. 

In August, 1896, Mr. McGuigan was married to Miss Rebecca Smyth, of Lamour county, 
North Dakota, and they have become the parents of two children, Mary and Ethel. Mr. Mc- 
Guigan is connected with Casselton Lodge, No. 3, A. F. & A. M. ; Dakota Consistory, A. &. A. 
S. R. ; and El Zagal Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S. Both he and his wife attend the Presbyterian 
church, to the support of which they contribute. As manager of the elevator Mr. McGuigan 



216 IIISTOKY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

is a factor in the commercial expansion of Chaffee, as the grain business is of great importance 
throughout the state, and he seeks to promote the general welfare as well as to safeguard the 
interests of the owners of the elevator. 



OLE M. LIAN. 



Olc il. Lian, a successful farmer of IJarnes township, Cass county, is one of the excellent 
citizens whom Norway has given to the northwest. He was born on the 4th of May, 1864, a 
son of Martin and Enger Lian, the former of whom is still living in tliat country, while the 
latter has passed away. 

Ole M. Lian is one of a family of five children, of whom four survive, and the days of 
his boyhood and youth were passed in liis native country. In 1S83 he emigrated to the 
United States and made his way direct to Kargo, Cass county, North Dakota, where lie worked 
as a laborer for ten years. At the end of that time he rented six hundred and forty acres 
of land, which he has since cultivated. He is energetic and practical and his labors yield liim 
a good return. 

In 1890 Mr. Lian was married to Jliss Beintina Moe, of Missouri, by whom he has two 
children, Enger and Martin, both at home. Mr. Lian is a republican, but confinea his polit- 
ical activity to the exercise of his riglit of franchise. He has been dependent upon his own 
resources and the prosperity w'hich lie has gained is evidence of his enterprise and good 
management. He is a member of the Lutheran church. 



WILLIAM S. YOUNG. 



William S. Young, actively identified with banking interests, was one of the organizers 
of the First State Bank of Surrey in 1907 and has continuously been its cashier. Through 
this and other business connections he has become widely known and is regarded as a valued 
and representative resident of the northern part of the state. He was born in Leeds county, 
Ontario, Canada, March 16, 1S68, and is a son of Eansom P. and Charlotte E. (Hales) Young, 
who were also natives of the same locality, both born in 1844. The father nuide farming liis 
life work and in the year 1880 crossed the border into the United States, settling near Grand 
Forks, Nortli Dakota, where he continued to engage in general agricultural pursuits for a 
number of years. He took up the study of veterinary surgery and began the practice of that 
profession. He now spends the winter months in California and maintains his homo through 
the summer seasons in Fargo, where he and his wife are now widely and favorably known. 

William S. Young, the second in a family of seven children, began his education in the 
schools of Canada, while later he continued his studies in Grand Forks and other towns of 
North Dakota. At the age of fifteen years he began working for otlu>rs although he con- 
tinued to live at home until he reached the age of twenty, when he accepted the position of 
clerk in a hotel. Subsequently lie engaged in the hotel business on his own account, at Fargo, 
North Dakota, continuing active along that line for five years. He next engaged in the pro- 
duce commission business in connection with F. W. Peterson, of Fargo, with whom he remained 
for six months, and during the succeeding year he conducted a real estate ofhce in Fargo. A 
further progressive step brought him into the field of banking and in 1905 he organized and 
opened the Farmers State Bank at Upham, North Dakota, which was later consolidated with 
the Security State Bank of that place, Mr. Young acting in the capacity of cashier until 1906, 
when he retired from that position to become one of the organizers and promoters of a bank 
at Napoleon. He was active in the management and conduct of that institution for a year, 
at the end of which time he wintlulrcw and became one of the foremost factors in the organi- 
zation of the First State Bank at Surrey in 1907. He was chosen cashier of that institution 
and has continuously served in that capacity to the present time. He is a stockholder, secre- 
tary and trea.surcr of the Farmers Grain Association of Surrey and is interested in the Bond 
Lumber Company of Minot, which operates eight yards in the state. He is likewise a 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 217 

■director of the First State Bank of Bowbells and he is quite an extensive landowner, having 
considerable farm land in North Dakota, giving his personal attention to the operation of a 
farm near Surrey. His business interests have thus constantly broadened out and have 
become of an important character, so that he is now one of the foremost merchants and 
financiers of his part of the state. He is also a partner of L. C. Eby in the Eby &, Voung 
Automobile Agency at Minot, North Dakota, whicli has the Buick agency for Northwest 
North Dakota. He does everything in his power to advance public interests along the lines 
of material development and intellectual and moral progress. 

On the 7th of August, 1895, Mr. Young was married to Miss Jessie McBain, who was 
born in Quebec, Canada, a daughter of David G. McBain, who was also a native of that place, 
whence he removed to Winnipeg, where he engaged in general merchandising. He died in the 
spring of 1897, having for several years survived his wife, who passed away in 1890. He 
served as a member of the city council of Winnipeg although he was never ambitious to hold 
public office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his private business allairs. Mrs. 
Young was the second in her father's family of six children and by her marriage has become 
the mother of six children, Tessie May, Enid C, Norma Earl, Meredith McBain, Kayle M. 
and William Gordon. 

Jlr. Young is identified with several fraternal organizations, including the Masons, the 
Knights of Pythias, the Foresters and the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and while at 
Grand Forks he served as chancellor commander of the Knights of Pythias lodge. He belongs 
to the Presbyterian church and politically is a republican, but prefers that his public service 
shall be done as a private citizen rather than as an office seeker. He has, however, been town- 
ship treasurer and is now a member of the board of education at Surrey and has served as 
president of the board for several years. 

In the work of the church he has been quite active, serving as trustee and treasurer, 
and he was also treasurer of the fire department. That he is a man worthy of trust and enjoys 
the confidence of the public is indicated in the fact that he has several times been called upon 
to administer estates. Prompt, energetic and reliable, he possesses in large measure a fund 
of common sense and keen business sagacity and through the exercise of these qualities has 
been able to overcome all difficulties and obstacles which barred his path to success and along 
the line of earnest, persistent labor he has gained the goal of prosperity. 



ERNEST G. SASSE, M. D. 



Dr. Ernest G. Sasse has gained a large and representative practice in Lidgerwood, Rich- 
land county, and is one of the most up-to-date and progressive physicians in his part of the 
state. He has never ceased to be a student of bis profession and through post-graduate work 
and wide reading keeps in touch with the latest developments in medical science. He waa 
born in St. Charles, Minnesota, on the 14th of November, 1869, a son of Gustav and Caroline 
(Fitzner) Sasse, the former of whom was born in Landsberg-on-the-Warthe, Germany, in 1843 
and the latter in Pilgrims Heim near Breslau, in 1841. John Sasse, the paternal grandfather, 
was also born in Landsberg-on-the-Warthe, Germany, but in 1845 came to the United States 
and settled upon a farm near Gloversvllle, New York. Subsequently he removed westward and 
his demise occurred at St. Charles, Minnesota, in 1907. The maternal grandfather, Carl Fitz- 
ner, was born in Pilgrims Heim, near Breslau, Germany, but became a resident of the United 
States in 1849. He settled in Wisconsin and engaged in merchandising in West Bend, meet- 
ing with gratifying success in business. He passed away in the Badger state in 1882. 

Gustav Sasse was but a boy when he accompanied his parents to the United States and 
he finished his education in this country. For a number of years he engaged in farming, but 
later conducted a general store at Vienna, South Dakota, and, having accumulated a compe- 
tence, he retired and moved to Eevillo, that state, where Mrs. Sasse passed away July 5, 
1916. At the time of the Civil war he served in a Wisconsin regiment for three years, thus 
aiding in the preservation of the Union. His religious faith is that of, the German Evangelical 
church, and fraternally he is connected with the Ancient Order of United Workmen, while in 
politics he is a stanch republican. To him and nis wife were born seven children: Caroline, 



218 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

the will.' of Mi'lvin P. Xoble, of Revillo, wlio inns a diay line and conducts a coal business at 
tliat place; Kincst G. ; Henry A., who is a druggist of Henry, South Dakota; Carl A., an 
attorney and editor of the Veblin Advance at X'tblin, Soutli Dakota; Edward L., a druggist 
of Vienna, South Dakota; Edith, wlio married James F. Ashbaugh, a bank cashier of Mur- 
dock, ilinnesota; and Esther, the wife of Edward A. Wing, of Brookings, South Dakota, wlio 
is a traveling salesman for the C. G. Kice Coal Company. 

Ernest G. Sasse attended the public schools of Minnesota and of Henry, South Dakota, 
and took his preparatory work in the high school at St. Charles, Minnesota. Subsequently 
he completed a four j'ear's course in the State College at Brookings, South Dakota, which 
institution conferred upon him the degree of Bachelor of Scifnce in 1896. Having determined 
upon the practice of medicine as a life work, he entered the Medical College of Hamline Uni- 
versity at Minneapolis, from which he was graduated with the M. D. degree in 1SU9. He first 
located at Revillo, South Dakota, where he inacticed for four years, but in 1904 he removed to 
Lidgerwood, North Dakota, where he reniained a similar length of time. He then went to 
Montana and practiced at Bridger and Bearcreek, that state. In the spring of 1913 he 
returned to Lidgerwood, where he has since remained and where he has gained an enviable 
reputation as a capable and conscientious physician. Dr. Sasse also owns and operates the 
Lidgex-wood Hospital, which is equipped with all modern appliances. He has taken post- 
graduate work at London, England; Berlin, Gennanj'; and Vienna, Austria, studying abroad 
during the greater part of the year of 1908, and he has also taken advanced work at San 
Francisco and Chicago. He finds membership in medical societies of great benefit in keeping 
in touch with the trend of medical thought and practice and is identified with the county and 
state medical societies and the American iledical Association. 

Dr. Sasse was married on the 10th of February, 1913, to Miss Sophia Pearson, who was 
born in Lanarkshire, Scotland. They have become the parents of two children: Bruce, who 
was born May 26, 1914; and Douglas, whose birth occurred July 11, 1915. 

Dr. Sasse Is a republican in politics, but although he takes the interest of a good citizen 
in public affairs he has never been an office seeker, his professional duties requiring his undi- 
vided attention. Fraternally he belongs to the ^Masonic blue lodge and the Royal Areli chap- 
ter and to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and in bis life exemplifies the principles of 
fraternity at the basis of those organizations. He also holds membership in the Mitliodist 
Eiiiseopal church, to the support of which he contributes and whose wo'k he furthers in every 
way possible. He has not only gained recognition professionally, "but has also won the per- 
sonal regard of those who have come in close contact with him, his salient characteristics 
being such as invariably command respect and esteem. 



E. D. ANGELL. 



E. D. Angell, engaged in tlie real estate and investment business, has been a resident 
of Fargo since August, 1881, and in the interim has taken a deep interest in the develop- 
ment of the state. His business affairs have been conducted along large and growing lines 
and he is now operating e.\tensively in real estate in Canada. 

Mr. Angell is a native of Xew York, his birth having occurred in Lnpeer. Cortland 
county, December 30, 1855, his parents being Erasmus D. and Sarah (Lake) Angell. both of 
whom were natives of New York, where they spent their entire lives, the fatlur there 
following the occupation of farming. 

E. D. Angell is indebted to the public school sy.stem of tlic lOmpire state for the early 
educational advantages which he enjoyed. He afterward attended the State Normal and 
Training School at Cortland, the Cazenovia Siniinarv and the Syracuse University and was 
graduated from the last named institution with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the class 
of 1880. He afterward taught for a year in the Soldiers Orphanage School in JIansfield, 
Pennsylvania, and in 1881 sought the opportunities of the new and developing northwest, 
making his way to Fargo, where he arrived in August. He spent a short time with a 
threshing crew and subse(]neiit!y accepted a clerkship in the general store of Hubbard 
& Parlin of Casselton, remaining with them, however, for only about a month. He next 




E. D. ANGELL 



L 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 221 

went upon tlie road as collector for N. K. Hubbard, driving over Cass and Richland counties 
when there were only trails through the country, roads having not yet been laid out. In 
December of the same year he located permanently in Fargo and has since been engaged in 
the real estate business. He has acquired extensive farm lands in both North Dakota and 
in Canada, his larger operations in recent years having been in Canada. He is one of tlie 
oldest real estate dealers in years of continuous connection with the business in Fargo and 
in all that he does displays a spirit of enterprise that has carried him into important relations. 
He has negotiated many extensive realty transfers and has gained a large clientage. 

In 1889 Mr. Angell was united in marriage to Miss Jennie C. Burns, of Phelps, New 
York, who was a university classmate. They had one son, who is deceased. Mr. Angell 
gives his political allegiance to the republican party, while his religious faith is indicated by 
his membership in the First Methodist church, in which he is serving on the board of 
trustees and to which his wife also belongs. His business activity, his public-spirited citizen- 
ship and his devotion to the general welfare combine to make Mi'. Angell one of the repre- 
sentative and loading residents of Fargo. He has been associated closely with the city's 
interests for a third of a century, his memory forming a connecting link between the primitive 
past and the progressive present. 



CHRIST PAULSON. 



Christ Paulson, who is successfully engaged in farming and stock raising in Warren 
townsliip, Cass county, is a native of Norway. His birth occurred November 12, 1848, and 
he is a son of Paul and Carrie Paulson, both of whom have passed their entire lives in that 
country. Two of their four children survive. 

ChrLst Paulson received his education in Norway and remained there until 1877, when 
he emigrated to the United States. For a year he resided in Houston county, Minnesota, but 
in 1878 came to North Dakota and settled on his present farm on section 34, Warren township, 
Cass county. In the years that have since intervened he has brought his place to a high state 
of development and made many fine improvements thereon. Although he raises considerable 
grain, he makes a specialty of stock raising and derives therefrom a good income. He has 
purchased additional land from time to time and now owns four hundred and eighty acres. 

In 1883 Mr. Paulson was married to Miss Eline Graalum, likewise a native of Norway, 
and to their union have been born ten children: Nettie, who is at home'; Andrew M.; Aaguth, 
the wife of Carl Olson; Otelia C. ; Oscar; Joseph, who is working at Cleveland, North Dakota 
as operator; .Tarl, who is a clerk in Fargo; Louise; Richard; and Martha. 

Mr. Paulson gives his political allegiance to the republican party and both he and his 
wife are communicants of the Lutheran church. When he came to this country he was a 
poor man, but he possessed energy and good judgment and by taking advantage of the 
opportunities here offered he has gained financial independence. 



FRED IvLINGER. 



Fred Klinger, of Hill township, who has gained gratifying prosperity as a farmer, was 
born in Germany on the 15th of June, 1850, a son of Frederick William and Beattie (Krue- 
ger) Klinger, both of whom i)assed away in the fatherland. Our subject was reared at home 
and acquired his education in the common schools. After his removal to the United States 
in 1867 he spent about four months in the vicinity of Chicago, after which he removed to 
Winnebago county, Wisconsin, where he remained for about twelve years, working as a farm 
hand, after which he came to North Dakota, where he has since resided. For a year he 
worked for a blacksmith in Buffalo, Cass county, but in 1880 he bought a relinquishment on 
a homestead on section 4, Hill township, his present home farm. He has since purchased 
additional land and nov ;wns three hundred and twenty acres, from which he derives a good 



222 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

income, lie has made many excellent improvements upon his place and in 1903 he erected a 
modern residence, which is one of the most attractive farm homes of the county. 

In ISSS Mr. Klinger was married to Miss JCliza Berry, a native of Minnesota, and they 
have become tlie parents of nine cliildren, of whom eiglit survive, Laura, Clara, Maria, Jlary, 
Elizabeth, Anna, Adeline and Fred. 

Jlr. IClinger is a liberal democrat in politics and when he deems that he can best serve 
the public interests by so doing he votes independently. For about fifteen years he has served 
as a member of the school board and during that time has been instrumental in advancing 
the interests of the public schools. He belongs to tlie Modern Woodmen of America and his 
religious faith is that of the Lutheran church, with which his family is also identified. When 
he came to tliis country he liad no capital, but he was quick to see and take advantage of tlie 
opportunities here oU'ered to tlie ambitious young man and as the years have passed his 
resources have increased until he is now one of the substantial residents of his townsliip. 



FRANIC W. PEARSON. 



Frank W. Pearson, district agent at Fargo for the New York Life Insurance Company, 
is a prominent representative of life insurance interests in his part of the state, is thoroughly 
acquainted with every phase of tlie business and under his direction the interests of the com- 
pany have been largely promoted. He has never allowed business cares, however, to prevent 
his activity along the lines which lead to the uplift of the individual and the betterment of 
the community and has long been regarded as one of the foremost members of the First Con- 
gregational church and a factor in the moral progress of his community. 

His life record had its beginning in Manchester, New Hampshire, on the 27th of July, 1856, 
his parents being William S. and Sarah B. (Paige) Pearson, both natives of the Granite state 
and representatives of old New England families. The ancestral line on the paternal side 
can be traced back to England, whence a representative of the name came to the new world, 
settling in Rowley, Massachusetts, in 1643. This was John Pearson, who established the first 
cotton mill built on the western hemisphere. The corner post of the building was still stand- 
ing in 1800, according to the New England ilagazine, when it was taken up and made into 
foot rules. Timothy Jlorse Pearson, the great-grandfather of Frank W. Pearson, was a 
soldier of the Revolutionary war, while William S. Pearson participated in the Civil war as a 
Union soldier. Prior to becoming connected with the army he was foreman in the Stark cotton 
mills at Manchester, New Hampshire, and after the cessation of hostilities he removed to 
Detroit, Michigan, and became identified with the Detroit Safe Company as manager of one of 
its departments, remaining in active connection with the business until 1884, when his 
health failed and at the invitation of his son Frank he came to Fargo, making his home with 
his son until his death in 1885. His wife survived him until 1000 and both were laid to rest 
in Riverside cemetery at Fargo. In the maternal line the ancestry is traced back to Eng- 
land and the first member of the family in the new world, John Paige, arrived in 1G38. 

Frank W. Pearson acquired a common school education at Manchester, New Hampshire, 
and at Detroit, Michigan. His father early decided that the son should be a mechanic and at 
the age of sixteen years he was put to work at the plant of the Detroit Safe Company, in 
the employ of which concern he remained for eight years. In 1880 he came to the west, arriv- 
ing at Fargo on the 22d of June, bringing with him an introduction to J, B. Hall, the editor of 
the Fargo Weekly Republican. Through the assistance of Mr. TIall he secured a position as 
bookkeeper with the hardware firm of Stevens & Rolph, after which he was employed as book- 
keeper by three different firms until the mid-winter of 1880-1, when he was made agent for 
the Detroit Safe Company, which he thus represented for a number of year* in connection with 
other work. In the summer of 1881 the Fargo Daily Republican was started and Mr. Pearson 
was asked to take charge of the circulation department. Incidentally he was in the office 
when the first edition of the paper was published and he bought the first copy that was sold. 
This he subsequently presented to the State Historical Society. He continued with the 
Republican in various capacities until 1892, at which time he resigned his position as city 
editor and in June of that year became special agent at Fargo for the New York Life Insur- 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA ' 223 

aiice Company. In ISflo he was made general agent of the company and has since retained his 
connection with the company. One of the most interesting experiences that came to him dur- 
ing his association with the Fargo Daily Republican was in representing that paper at Bis- 
marck during the last territorial legislature, at which time he was thrown into daily personal 
contact with Colonel C. A. Lounsberry, who was representing the Bismarck Tribune. The 
Fargo Daily Republican was the first newspaper outside of Bismarck that received the first 
routine report of the proceedings of the legislature and probably the personnel of that legis- 
ture made it the strongest ever assembled at Bismarck. 

In July, 1887, Mr. Pearson was united in marriage to Miss Emma Spotts, of Fargo, who 
at that time was a teacher of music in the Fargo public schools. To them have been born 
five children, as follows : Lillian M., the wife of Ralph Beard, who is a professor in the Oregon 
State Agricultural College at Corvallis; and Alice G., Mildred, Glenna P. and William S., all 
at home. 

In his political views Mr. Pearson has always been an earnest republican, conversant with 
the questions and issues of the day and studying the vital problems which continually confront 
the country. His chief activity outside of business, however, has been along the line of church 
work. He has been called the resident father of Congregationalism in North Dakota. Mr. 
Pearson, and E. W. Judd now of Washington state, were the pioneers in founding the first 
Congregational church in Fargo, which was the first church of that denomination in the state. 
Mr. Pearson has ever since been associated therewith and is now a deacon in the church. He 
was also the president of the Brotherhood of the church and in all lines of the church work 
has been very active and helpful. Fraternally he is a Mason, belonging to the lodge, chapter 
and commandery. In 1896 he was chancellor commander of the Knights of Pythias lodge and 
was very active in the work of that organization during the '90s but has demitted. For 
several years he was quite active in the Old Settlers Association work and served as secre- 
tary under the presidencies of William H. White, Colonel W. F. Ball and Judge Charles A. 
Pollock. With every phase of the pioneer development of the state Mr. Pearson is familiar 
and has not only been an interested witness, but also an active cooperant in many of the 
plans and measures which have had direct bearing upon the state's history. Although of 
New England birth he is passionately in love with that part of the union "out where West 
begins, where men make friends without half trying." 



AUGUST NELSON. 



August Nelson, who is recognized as a leading merchant of Harwood, Cass county, has 
not only gained individual success, but has also contributed in no small measure to the com- 
mercial growth and expansion of his town. He understands thoroughly the problems that 
confront the retail merchant and has systematized the work of his store, securing the great- 
est efllciency in its operation, and his policy of giving full value for the money received has 
enabled him to retain custom once gained. He was born in Sweden, October 7, 1855, a son of 
Nels and Maria Nelson, both of whom died in Sweden. 

The subject of this review was reared and educated in Sweden, remaining in that country 
until 1876, when as a young man of twenty-one years he emigrated to the United States, 
having heard much concerning the favorable conditions here. He made his way to Vermilion, 
South Dakota, and remained in that locality for about eight months, working as a farm hand 
during that time. In the spring of 1877 he came to North Dakota and for seven years worked 
on farms in Cass county, carefully saving his money with the purpose of buying land. He 
became the owner of one hundred and sixty acres in Raymond township, that county, on which 
he resided until 1907. when he turned his attention from agricultural pursuits to other lines 
of activity. He removed to Harwood and bought a hotel, which he conducted for six years, 
in the meantime establishing his present business, which he has made the leading mercantile 
enterprise of Harwood. He buys his stock with the preferences of his customers in mind 
and has made unfailing courtesy a part of the service which his store gives its patrons. He 
still owns one hundred and sixty acres of excellent land in Raymond township and also has 
stock in the Farmers Elevator Company of Harwood. 



224 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

ill-. Nelson was married in 1884 to Miss Ida C. Wakeland, of Rayiiimul township, who, 
however, was born in Sweden. Two children have been born to tliis marriage: Kniil, wlio is 
manager of his father's store; and Jlinnie Christina, at home. 

Mr. Xelson gives his political allegiance to the republican Jiarty, but has never had the 
time nor inclination to take an active part in public affairs. He and his family are attiliated 
with the Swedish Lutheran church, the work of which they aid in every way possible, and 
their lives measure up to high standards of ethics, ilr. Xelson is known throughout Cass 
county and all who have come in contact with him, whetln'r in business or social relations, 
esteem him highly. 



L. X:. WALLA. 



L. C. Walla, who is one of the leading business men of Horace, Cass county, is a native 
of Norway, born on the 19th of April, 1878. His parents, L. P. N. and Lottie (.Jensen) Walla, 
were also natives of Norway, where they lived and died. Five of their si.v children survive. 

L. C. Walla was reared in Norway and attended the common schools there. In 1898, when 
twenty years of age, he came to the United States and made his way to North Dakota. For 
five years he worked as a farm hand in Cass county during the summers, while the winters 
were spent in attending college in Fargo. At the end of that time he became a clerk in a 
store in Horace and was so emplo3'ed for five years, after which he went to McKenzie county, 
this state, and took up a homestead, on which he resided for fourteen months. He now owns 
four hundred acres of land in that county, all of which is improved. In 1908 he returned to 
Horace and established a general store and also engaged in the lumber business, both of 
which undertakings he is still conducting. He is thoroughly reliable and his business policy 
has gained him a good custom. He is also agent for the Norwegian American Steamsliip line 
and owns stock in the F'armers elevator at Horace. 

In 1908 Mr. Walla was united in marriage to Miss Anna Olson, who was born in Norway, 
a daughter of Hans and Martha Olson. The father is deceased but the mother is still living. 
Mr. and ilrs. Walla have two cliililrcn, Angell and Martha. 

Mr. Walla is a democrat but his business interests have left him no time to take a very 
active part in public affairs. Both he and his wife are communicants of the Lutheran church, 
the teachings of which arc the guiding principles of their lives. When he came to the United 
States Mr. Walla had no capital but through industry and good management he has become 
one of the substantial men of his town. 



ELLEF IvNTJDSON MYHRE. 



One of the leading mercantile enterprises of Valley City is the projierty of Ellef Knudson 
Myhre, a self-made man whose well diiected energies have enabled him to advance steadily 
toward the goal of success. A native of Norway, he was born at Hallingdal in October, 1856. 
His father, Knute Storlie, also a native of that place, had various business connections and 
held several local offices, serving for some time in a position similar to that of judge of the 
probate court. 

His son, F.llef Knudson Myhrc, the third in a family of nine children, spent his school 
days in Norway and in 1873 came to America, being then a youth of seventeen years. He was 
the second of the family to cross the .\tlantic, having been preceded by his brother, Ole K. 
Myhre, who settled in Minnesota in 1872 and is now living at Nome, Barnes county. North 
Dakota. On coming to the new world E. K. Myhre made his way direct to Minnesota, where 
he devoted a year to farming and then began work at the painter's trade, which he had pre- 
viously learned in his native land. He was thus employed until March, 1879, when he removed 
to Fargo and in July of the same year came to Valley City, where he again followed his 
trade until 1885. in which year he opened a store that he conducted until 1894. He then 
turned his attention to the real estate and insurance business, which he followed until 1900, 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 225 

when he was appointed postmaster and after four years' service was reappointed, so tliat he 
occupied the position until 1908. He then again entered the real estate and insurance field 
and was so engaged until July, 1911, when he organized the Farmers Mercantile Company, 
Incorporated, of which he became secretary, treasurer and general manager. This is a gen- 
eral store and the business has steadily increased, a liberal patronge being now accorded. In 
1908 Mr. Myhre erected the building which is now utilized by the Farmers Mercantile Com- 
pany, a two story and basement structure, twenty-five by one hundred feet, at the corner of 
Main street and Third avenue. 

In March, 1884, Mr. Myhre was married to Miss Ogot Mortrude, of Norway, whose 
parents were Wisconsin pioneers. Their children are: Alma Malvena, the wife of Vern Gale, 
connected with the postoffice at Valley City; Carl Albert, city engineer of Valley City; Clara 
B., wife of Roger E. Lloyd; Ernest Oliver, who is car clerk with the Xorthern Pacific Rail- 
road Company; Ruth Alvera, a teacher of domestic science in St. Cloud, Minnesota; and 
Walter Howard, who is with his father in tlie store. The family is one of prominence in the 
community, enjoying the high regard and friendship of many with whom they have come in 
contact. 

Mr. Myhre is identified with the Sons of Norway, the Modern Woodmen of America and 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen. His political endorsement is given to the republican 
party and his fellow townsmen, appreciating his worth and ability, have several times called 
him to public oflice. He served for two terms as a member of the city council and three 
times was elected county commissioner but at length resigned that position to accept the 
postmastership. He has ever regarded a public oflice as a public tnist — and it is well known 
that no trust reposed in E. K. Myhre is ever betrayed. He is always loyal to the cause which 
he espouses, reliable in business, loyal in citizenship and straightforward in every relation 
of life. 



HENRY A. KLUVER. 



Henry A. Kluver is well known in financial circles of Ward county by reason of his active 
connection with the banking interests of Burlington, where he organized the First State Bank 
in 1909 and has since served as cashier. He was born in Butler county, Iowa, November S, 
1878, a son of Charles and Dora Kluver, both of whom were natives of Heidelberg, Germany. 
They were married in that country and on coming to the new world settled in Butler county, 
Iowa, at which time Cedar Falls was tiieir nearest market. They were pioneers of that 
locality and experienced all of the hardships and privations incident to life on the frontier, 
but lived to see many changes and a marked difference in conditions in that state, Avhere 
both Mr. and Mrs. Kluver continued their residence imtil called to their final rest. While in 
Germany Mr. Kluver served as a soldier in the Franco-Prussian war. 

Henry A. Kluver was reared in a household numbering nine children, of whom he was the 
youngest. He attended school in Iowa and was also a student at the Wesleyan University of 
Lincoln, Nebraska, and at the Capital City Commercial College of Des Moines, Iowa, his 
thorough training there received well qualifying him for his later duties in financial circles. 
He was about sixteen years of age when he began providing for his own support. He worked 
his way tlirough school and when he finished his high school education pursued a commercial 
course. He afterward went to Butte. Montana, where he was employed by others, and later 
he lemoved to University Place, Nebraska, where he worked his way througli the university by 
tutoring. He was also employed in a clothing house on Saturdays. In the spring of 1906 
he came to North Dakota and settled on a homestead in McKenzie county more to obtain a 
needed rest than otherwise. In the fall of 1908 he removed to Burlington and in the spring 
of 1909 organized the First State Bank, of which he became the first cashier. He is still l 
serving in that capacity and the success of the institution is largely attributable to his close 
application and sound judgment. He is likewise one of the partners in the .lohn son -Kluver 
Lumber Company and is a stockholder in a number of outside corporations, while ids real 
estate holdings include land in North Dakota and city property in Lincoln. He has rented 
his farms in this state and devotes practically all his time to the banking business. 



226 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

On the 28th of October, 1914, Mr. Kluver was united in marriage to Carrie Wallace 
Johnson, a daugliter of James and Ida J. (Colton) Johnson, mentioned elsewhere in this work. 
!Mr. and Jlrs. Kluver are members of tlie Presbyterian churcli and in polities Mr. Kluver is a 
republican. He served on the board of education at Burlington for a number of years, a part 
of the time as president, and his fraternal relations cover connection with tlie Masonic lodge 
at Alinot. He has largelj' concentrated his time and eflorts upon his business allairs and his 
sound judgment and enterprise are evidenced in his success. He is a self-made man and is 
highly esteemed and respected in the city in which he makes his home. 



NILS N. WALLA. 



Nils X. Walla, who owned four hundred and forty acres of excellent land in Stanley 
township, Cass county, was born in Norway, December 9, 1826, a son of Nils I. and Pernielia 
(Christianson) Walla. His parents were also natives of Norway, where they passed their 
entire lives. In their family were thirteen children but only two are now living. 

Nils N. Walla was reared under the parental roof and attended the public schools of 
Norway in the acquirement of his education. He continued to reside in that country until 
1807, in which year he came to the United States. He first settled in Fillmore county, Minne- 
sota, wliere he remained until 1874, when he removed to Cass county, this state. He settled 
on<he land which is still owned by the family and at once began to improve his place, which 
was then but a tract of raw prairie. His fii'st residence was a log cabin b\it a number of years 
later he erected a good frame dwelling and he also made many other improvements upon 
the place. The land is now under cultivation and the family derive therefrom a good income. 
Mr. Walla owned four hundred and forty acres on sections 19, 20 and 30, Stanley township, 
and gained financial independence. 

In 1868 Mr. Walla was united in marriage, in Minnesota, to Miss Anna Johnson, who 
was born in Norway, a daughter of Jolin and Karen (Christopherson) Johnson, who were 
lifelong residents of Norway. Mr. and Mrs. Walla became the parents of twelve children, 
five of whom are living, John, Anna, Karen, Benjamin and Nora. 

Mr. Walla was a republican and for years served acceptably as school director and as 
school treasurer. He was a member of the Lutheran church, to which his widow also belongs, 
and his influence was always on the side of right and progress. He was over eighty-nine years 
of ago when he passed away January 7, 1916, and he had the satisfaction of knowing that 
his life was well spent, as he not only prospered financially but was also a factor in the 
development of his community along lines of moral and educational advancement. 



HANS T. HOGY. 



Hans T. Hogy is a well known representative of the grain trade in Ward county, having 
in 1905 established a grain elevator in Burlington, while at the same time he is proprietor of 
a second elevator at Deslacs. His spirit of progress is manifest in an unceasing activity that 
results in success. A native of Wisconsin, he was born at Viroqua, August 20, 1870, his par- 
ents being Foster and Christie (Lermo) Hogy, both of whom were natives of Norway, where 
tbev were reared and married. They came to America abo\it 1807, settling at Viroqua. and 
in that locality the father engaged in farming. Subseqiiontly he removed to Cyrus, Minne- 
sota, and continued to engage in agricultural pursuits until his death in October, 1912. His 
widow survived for only a few months, passing away in March, 1913. 

Hans T. Hogy pursued his education in the district schools of his native county and in 
the public schools at Cyrus, Minnesota, having removed to the latter state with his parents, 
with whom he remained until he reached the age of twenty-two years, when his father gave 
him eighty acres of land, also telling him to go to the barn and select the horse which he 
wanted. Thus he started upon an independent business career and for seven years was 
engaged in farming in ^Minnesota, after which he turned his attention to the grain business,. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 227 

which he followed in that state until 1905. Arriving in Burlington, North Dakota, in that 
year, he became identified with the grain business there and is now operating the Farmers 
Elevator. He has extended the scope of his business by taking over the elevator at Deslacs. 
He is also engaged in the live stock business, having on hand two hundred and fifty head of 
cattle. While he owns considerable land in North Dakota, he devotes the greater part of his 
time to the grain trade, yet he feeds cattle extensively each year, employiaig men to cultivate 
his land. He readily recognizes the salient points in a business transaction and so directs 
his efforts that energy and determination have brought to him success. 

In June, 1896, Mr. Hogy was united in marriage to Miss Indiana Lybeck, who was born 
in Christiania, Norway, and during her early girlhood was brought to America by her parents. 
She died in February, 1915, leaving two daughters: Myrtle, who is attending the State Normal 
School in Minot; and Hazel, who is a pupil in the Burlington schools. 

Mr. Hogy is identified with the Modern Woodmen camp at Burlington and with the Elks 
lodge at Minot and his religious faith is evidenced in his membership in the Lutheran church. 
His political allegiance is given to the republican party and his fellow townsmen have called 
him to some local offices although he has never aspired to political preferment. He has 
worked diligently to attain his present success and business standing, both of which have 
been creditably won and place him with the leading citizens of Ward county. 



A. F. BONZEE. 



A. F. Bonzer, of the firm of Bonzer & Mathews of Lidgerwood, is not only a factor in 
the business development of his town and county but is also very active in politics and in 
public afl'airs generally. He was born in Clayton county, Iowa, November 30, 1863, of the 
marriage of Joseph and Catherine (Blaha) Bonzer, both natives of Bohemia. The father 
was born in 1813 and although Bohemian by birth spent thirteen years in Vienna, where he 
received an excellent education. He was able to speak and write German, Bohemian and 
English and was well informed on all subjects of general interest. In his youth he came 
to the United States with his parents, both of whom died in this country. Follow^ing his 
marriage he located in Clayton county, Iowa, where he purchased land from the government, 
which he cultivated until 1883. In that j'ear he became a resident of Brown county. South 
Dakota, and at once took up a homestead, upon which he resided for twelve years. He then 
again removed westward, making his way to Oregon, where he remained for a year, after 
which he located in Idaho. Still later he came to North Dakota and passed away in this state 
in 1903. He was a democrat in politics, and his religious faith was that of the Catholic 
church. He was successful financially and also gained the warm regard and the sincere 
respect of all who came in contact with him, for his life measured up to high standards. To 
him and his wife were born six children, five of whom are still living, namely: Mrs. Lizzie 
Johnson, a resident of Cresco, Iowa; John, a retired farmer residing in Hecla, South Dakota; 
Henry, who is engaged in the hardware business in Hettinger, North Dakota; A. F.; and 0. W., 
who is manager of a hardware store in Lidgerwood. 

A. F. Bonzer received his education in the common schools of Iowa and during his boy- 
hood and youth devoted much time to assisting his father with the farm work. He engaged 
in farming independently in Iowa and South Dakota but in 1893 he removed to Lidgerwood, 
North Dakota, and established a meat market. For ten years following this he also bought 
and shipped cattle, becoming one of the large stock dealers of the county, but at the end of 
that time he sold out and erected a large brick building, in which he engaged in the mer- 
cantile business, conducting a general store successfully for five years. On disposing of that 
business he entered the real-estate field but for six years divided his attention between a 
number of business interests. Since 1908, however, he has devoted practically his entire 
time to the land and loan business as a member of the firm of Bonzer & Mathews. They buy 
and sell land outright, operating chiefly in the southern part of North Dakota, and they 
have gained a gratifying measure of success. Mr. Bonzer owns a great deal of valuable farm 
and city property and is also a director in the Farmers National Bank of Lidgerwood and the 
Farmers State Bank of Mantador, this state. 



228 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Mr. Bonzer was married in 1887 to Jliss Haiinali Dinger, wlio was born in Indiana and 
is a (laughter of Polycarp Dinger, who removed his family to South Dakota in 1882. For 
a number of years he was actively engaged in farming but is now living in Lidgerwood. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bonzer have five children : Cora, the wife of Walter Truax, cashier of the Genesee 
State Bank of Geiieseo, this state; Clarence, who is assisting his father; Mamie, the wife of 
Adolph Kotehan, cashier of the State Bank of Kermit, North Dakota; Arthur, residing in 
Genesee; and Archie, who is attending St. John's school at CoUegcville, Minnesota. 

The parents attend the Baptist church, but the children are members of the Methodist 
Episco])al church. Mr. Bonzer is well known fraternally, belonging to Lodge No. 1093, B. P. 
O. E., at Fergus Falls; the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he has passed through 
all of the chairs; and to the Masons. In politics he is a stalwart democrat and is recognized as 
one of the leaders of his party in southeastern North Dakota. He has been called to a num- 
ber of positions of trust and honor and has at all times discharged his official duties with 
ability and conscientiousness. For seventeen years he served on the school beard and for 
eighteen years he has been a member of the city council, of which he is now president, and 
for six years, beginning with 1901, he was county commissioner. Still higliiM- honor came to 
him when in 1912 he was elected to the state senate, defeating a strong republican candidate, 
although the republican majority is normally three or four hundred. His has been a life 
of intense activity, and his achievements are the more commendable in that he has depended 
solely u))on his own resources since boyhood. 



HAROLD THORSON. 



A superficial view of the life record of Harold Thorson makes one feel that his career 
is almost magical, but careful analysis of the course that he has followed shows that his 
splendid success is but the direct, logical and merited reward of persistent, earnest labor, 
keen discernment, judicious investment and unabating energy — qualities which in time have 
made him one of the foremost bankers in the two states of North Dakota and Jlinneseta, 
while he pays the largest income tax in the former state. Back of this is an interesting story 
— the story of a youth of foreign birth who sought the ojiportunities of the new world and 
started out in business circles on this side the Atlantic with a caj)ital of good health, vigor, 
determination and ambition. He was born on the Dovre farm in Nordre Aurdal Brcstegjeld, 
Valdrcs, Norway, November 16, 1841, and when a youth of sixteen he bade adieu to friends 
and native land and started for the new world, believing that he might have better business 
opportunities on this side the Atlantic. On his waj' to this countrj' he was temporarily 
struck snowblind while crossing Filefjeld to Laerdal. As a passenger on the sailing vessel 
Gauge Rolv, which weighed anchor at Bergen, he spent five weeks before landing at Quebec. 
From that point he made his way to Manitowoc, Wisconsin, and in a land unhampered by 
cast or class he put forth his initial effort toward attaining success. Realizing the value of 
education as a business asset, he spent three years as a high school pupil in Manitowoc and 
for four years he was employeil as a cli'rk. thus gaining mercantile experience and at the same 
time adding largely to his knowledge of the Knglish language and of American methods and 
customs. During that period he practiced the strictest economy until his savings amounted 
to a sum sullicient to enable him to embark in business on his own account. 

Mr. Thorson chose Jlinnesota as the field of his labors and in 1865 opened a store at 
Northfield. All through the period of his connection with trade interests there he was study- 
ing business conditions and opportunities in this state, watching the trend of development 
and progress, and in 1889 he gave demonstration of his notable prescience and foresight in the 
purchase of a large tract of land at Klbow Lake. It was this that caused him to transfer his 
business activities to northwestern Minnesota and North Dakota. Dr. .1. Paul (loode of the 
University of C'liicago, economist, whose study of the resources of the country has perhaps 
been as comprehensive as that of any other man, says that the best possible investment is rn 
farm land, and so it proved in the case of Mr. Thorson, who began cultivating his land on 
an extensive scale, bringing the tract to a high state of improvement and thus greatly 
enhancing its market value. It was also a logical step to real estate dealing and further- 




HAROLD THORSON 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 231 

more he became a factor in financial circles by identifying himself with banking. From point 
to point in that field he lias extended his efforts until he is now president of a large number 
of banks throughout the northwest. He pays the largest income tax in North Dakota. 
After residing at Elbow Lake for a long period Jlr. Thorson went to St. Paul, where he 
lived retired for three or four years, but idleness is utterly foreign to his nature and 
this life of inactivity did not please him. In 1906, therefore, he removed to Drake, North 
Dakota, where he purchased the Merchants State Bank. He today controls twenty-five dif- 
ferent banks in North Dakota and Minnesota, of most of which he is the president, and 
lie is regarded as one of the foremost representatives of banking interests in tlie two states. 
He is a stockholder in the American National Bank and the Northern Savings Bank, both of 
St. Paul, being a director in the former and vice president of the latter. His holdings of farm 
lands are also extensive and he likewise has large investments in city property in St. Paul 
and elsewhere. 

On November 22, 1864, Mr. Thorson was united in marriage to Miss Karen Lajord, by 
whom he had eight children, four of wliom still survive, as follows: Thor D., bank examiner 
for his father; Clara J., who is the wife of L. H. Ickler, vice president of the American 
National Bank of St. Paul; Cecil Lenor, at home; and Henry Lewis, who is employed in the 
Merchants State Bank of Drake. The wife and mother passed away in 1913. 

Mr. Thorson has been a generous contributor to church and charitable work and he was 
one of the incorporators and one of the largest contributors to the support of St. Olaf College 
at Northfield, Minnesota, during tlie days when it was struggling for existence. To secure 
tlie location of the scliool at Northfield he made a personal contribution of two thousand 
dollars and assisted in raising six thousand more among tlie influential men of the city. He 
procured tlie old public school buildings and lots in tlie town for twenty-five hundred dollars 
and he picked out the present beautiful site on Manitou Heights as a place for the permanent 
home of the institution. He was the principal member of the building committee at the 
time of the erection of the main building and he bore the expense of tearing down the old 
buildings on the original site and removing the materials and putting them into what is 
known as the old Ladies' Hall on the hill. He contributed ten thousand dollars toward the 
erection of Mohn Hall and has never ceased his active interest in the school. He has been 
equally generous in support of various other beneficient projects. His friends regard him as 
a commercial genius. He himself modestly disclaims this, but it is a self-evident fact that his 
ability has brought him to a position far in advance of the great majority of his fellowmen. 
One of the secrets of his success is that he has noted and utilized opportunities that others 
have passed heedlessly by. Another element in his progress has been his untiring diligence 
guided by sound judgment and expressed in honorable business methods. He is a great man 
not because he has attained wealth but because he has maintained that even balance which 
enables him while conducting mammoth business interests to recognize and meet Ins duties 
and obligations in other connections, judging life from a sane, practical standpoint and making 
the most of his opportunities not only for tlie benefit of himself but also for the benefit of the 
northwest. 



PETER JOHNSON. 



As North Dakota is primarily an agricultural state its wealth and development are due 
chiefly to the labor of its progressive and enterprising farmers, among whom is numbered 
Peter Johnson, who owns and operates three hundred and twenty acres of excellent land in 
Raymond township, Cass county. He was born in Sweden on the 24th of May, 1860, of the 
marriage of John F. and Margaret (Hendrickson) Johnson, both of whom died in their native 
country. 

Peter .Johnson was reared at home and in the acquirement of his education attended the 
common schools of Sweden. In 1882, when a young man of about twenty-two years, he 
determined to try his fortune in the United States and accordingly made his way to North 
Dakota, where he was employed during the summer as a farm hand. The following winter 
he went to Duluth, Minnesota, and did teaming and worked in the woods until spring, when 



232 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

he returned to this state. A year later he bought a relinquishment on a tree claim in Steele 
county, which he sold three years later. He then returned to Sweden and for a year and 
a hall' remained there but at the end of that time came again to the United States and pur- 
chased his present home farm, which comprises one hundred and sixty acres on section 10, 
Raymond township, Cass county. He also owns one hundred and sixty acres on section 11 
and cultivates the entire three hundred and twenty acres, his labors being rewarded by large 
crops, tlie sale of which yields him a good profit. Although he is now one of the substantial 
citizens of his township he not only had no capital when he came to North Dakota in 1882 
but was in debt for his passage money. He worked to such good purpose and managed hia 
affairs so well that on his return to Sweden five years later he had sixteen hundred dollars 
saved. In addition to his valuable farm he owns stock in the Farmers elevator at Ilarwood 
and the Farmers elevator at Prosper. 

In 1888 Mr. Johnson was married in Sweden to Miss Margaret Peterson, by whom he had 
four children, two of whom are living, John and Peter E., both at home. The wife and 
mother died in 1894 and six years later Mr. Johnson married Miss Edla Sandstrom. who 
was born in Sweden, a daughter of Lars and Johanna (Peterson) Sandstrom. Her father is 
still living in Sweden but her mother has passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have become 
the parents of three children, Herbert, Sigma and Fern. 

Mr. Johnson is a stalwart republican and for a number of years was constable and for 
several terms was a member of the school board, his services proving very satisfactory in 
those capacities. He is identified with the American Yeomen and the Scandinavian lodge, 
and both he and his wife are communicants of the Swedish Lutheran church, which indicates- 
the principles which govern their conduct. 



PETER S. GOLBERG. 



Peter S. Golberg, a farmer residing in Stanley township, Cass county, has manifested 
those qualities of energy and faith in the future which are characteristic of the west. He 
was born in Wisconsin on the 12th of May, 1852, a son of Svcnd and Segri (GoUings) Gol- 
berg, both of whom were born in Norway. In 1847 they emigrated to the United States and 
for five years they made their home in Wisconsin, but in the latter part of 1S32 they ri'rnoved 
to Fillmore county, Minnesota. 

Peter S. Golberg, the eldest in a family of thirteen children, was educated in Minnesota 
and grew to manhood in that state. In 1877 he came to North Dakota and located upon a 
farm on section 8, Stanley township, Cass county, where he is still living. He is a stock- 
holder in the Farmers Elevator at Horace. 

In 1881 occurred the marriage of Mr. Golberg and Miss Hannah Olson, who has lived in 
Cass county since she was seven years of age. Mr. Golberg is a stalwart democrat and has 
taken quite an active part in polities. For one term he served as county auditor and for one 
term as county commissioner, proving an able and conscientious official. He is at present a 
member of the township board. Fraternally he is connected with the Modern Woodmen of 
America and both he and his wife are communicants of the Lutheran church. His salient 
characteristics are such as have always won respect and esteem and he has many warm per- 
sonal friends. 



AUSTIN GRAY. 



Austin Graj-, who was connected with business interests in a niiniber of North Dakota 
towns, was especially well known as a hotel man and won a competence which enabled him 
to build in 1905 a commodious home at Leeds and to retire from active life. However, he 
was not long permitted to enjoy his leisure as his death occurred on the 10th of April, 1906. 
He was born in De Kalb county, Illinois, November 30, 1846, of the marriage of Norman and' 
Anne (Ledden) Gray. The father was probably born in Vermont and the mother was a native- 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA ' ■ 233 

of Ireland. He devoted his life to farming and never removed farther we,st than Illinois 
although he visited his son Austin in North Dakota. 

Austin Gray, who was the eldest of a family of six children, attended school in De Kalb 
count}', Illinois, and completed the work of the grammar grades. He remained at home until 
twenty-one years of age and in the meantime learned the blacksmith's trade. On attaining 
his majority he went to Georgetown, Colorado, where he remained for a number of years, after 
which he removed to Chicago. He was employed in machine shops there for a considerable 
period but about 1880 removed to North Dakota and located in Dickey county, eight miles 
northeast of Oakes. He resided upon his farm until after his marriage, when he engaged in 
the hotel business at Leeds, this state, at the request of his wife, who had for a number of 
years conducted a hotel at Oakes. They remained the proprietors of the hotel at Leeds for 
twelve yeiirs and at length, at the solicitation of traveling men, changed the name from the 
Commercial Hotel to the Hotel Gray. On selling out their interests there they removed to 
the site of Ryder and, purchasing a tract of land, founded the town. Mr. Gray engaged in 
the general mercantile business there, conducted a hotel and was also the first postmaster of 
the town. He played an important part in the development of Ryder along material and civic 
lines and was one of its most influential citizens. After remaining there for two and a half 
years he returned to Leeds, where he erected a fine residence and retired from the cares of 
business. He retained title to the hotel at Ryder and he and his wife also purchased a hotel 
at White Earth and Mrs. Gray is still interested in both properties. He passed away April 
10, 1906, and his demise was widely regretted, for he had a host of warm friends. 

Mr. Gray was married on the 13th of January, 1893, to Mrs. Anne (Barrett) Galvin. She 
was born in New York harbor on a sailing vessel on which her parents, Daniel and Mary 
(Barrett) Barrett, natives of County Clare, had crossed from Ireland to the United States. 
On removing to this country in 1853, they located in Pennsylvania but subsequently removed 
to New York, where the father engaged in construction work as a contractor on the New York 
& Erie Railroad from Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, to Clean, New York. Later he removed with 
his family to Rochester, Minnesota, and for eighteen years engaged in farming in that 
locality. On the expiration of that period he removed to North Dakota and after living for 
a time on the present site of Wimbledon, went to .Jamestown, where he passed his last days, 
dying in 1899. His wife was called bj' death in 1891. They were the parents of fourteen 
children, of whom Mrs. Gray is the fifth in order of birth. In 1866 she was married to Michael 
Galvin, a native of Ireland, whom she met in New York state. He engaged in railroad work 
there for some time but on the outbreak of the Civil war enlisted in Company D, One Hun- 
dred and Fifth New York Volunteer Infantry, for six months. On the expiration of his term 
of service he reenlisted for three years and served with his command until he was taken 
prisoner at the battle of Shiloh. He was confined in Andersonville prison for six months but 
was released at the close of the war. He then went to Salamanca, New York, but later 
removed to Rochester, Minnesota, where he remained utnil his death on the 10th of April, 
1883. To him and his wife were born seven children, namely: William Henry, deceased; 
Mary Elizabeth, the wife of John Boyle, a railroad man living in .Jamestown; Daniel, who 
died when nine years old; Ann, the widow of F. E. Wood, of Leeds, this state; Grace L., the 
deceased wife of H. A. Jones, of Minnewaukon, North Dakota; and .John N. and Michael B., 
both of whom have passed away. 

Mr. Gray was a stanch advocate of the democratic party and served as a member of the 
board of education of Leeds for many years. Fraternally he belonged to the Workmen and 
Woodmen. He was a communicant of the Roman Catholic church but did not confine his 
interest in moral and religious effort to his own denomination, for he did more than any 
other resident of Leeds for the advancement of the Protestant churches of the town. His 
broadmindedness and generosity found expression in many ways and there was no project 
calculated to promote the public welfare that did not receive his heartiest support and coop- 
eration. He was a man of sterling integrity, of unusual business ability and of marked 
determination and those who were closely associated with him held him in the highest regard. 
There were many who profited by his help and who owe their success to his timely and 
unostentatious aid. His demise was indeed a loss not only to his family and intimate 
friends but also to his community. 

Mrs. Gray stills owns the hotel at Ryder and has an interest in the hotel at White 



234 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Earth and in 1907 removed to licrtliold, wlioro she erected tlie Hotel WiiUher, whicli she 
owns and conducts. The hotel building is a two story modern brick structure which is 
equipped for the comfortable aeconuuodation of sixty guests. It is considered one of the 
best hostelries between Minot and Williston and is up-to-date in every respect. Mrs. Gray 
gives the closest personal attention to the conduct of the business and neglects nothing 
afFccting the comfort of her guests. She has built up a large patronage and is an important 
factor in the business life of her community. She is characterized by enterprise, sound judg- 
ment and public spirit and holds a high place in the esteem of all who know her. 



GUST NYSTROM. 



Gust Nystrom is widely known and highly respected throughout Cass county, to the 
agricultural development of which he has contributed not a little. He owns four hundred 
and eighty acres of well improved and highly cultivated land and he was the organizer and 
is the president of the Farmers Elevator at Horace. A native of Sweden, his birth occurred 
on the 4th of January, 1858, and his parents were Peter and Nettie Nystrom, wlio were life- 
long residents of that country. They were the parents of six children, four of whom are 
still living. 

Gust Nystrom was reared at home and acquired his education in tlie jtublic schools of 
Sweden, where he remained until 1882. In that year he came to America and, making his 
way to the west, found employment as a carpenter in St. Paul. After a year he came to 
North Dakota and took up land in Richland county, where he resided for seven years, after 
which he sold that place and purchased his present home farm on section 24, Warren 
township, Cass county. He has improved the place with fine buildings and has made it one 
of the best developed farms in his township. He has also purchased additional land and now 
owns four hundred and eighty acres, all of wliich is improved. He was the organizer and is 
the president of the Farmers Elevator at Horace, a progressive and prosperous concern. 

In 1885 Mr. Nystrom was united in marriage to Miss Amelia .Jensen, a native of Norway, 
who came to America in 1881. She passed away in 1913 and was laid to rest in the 
Horace cemetery. She was the mother of ten children, namely: Alma, the wife of Elmer 
Holman; Ida; Adolph; Amelia, who is teaching school; Jane, who is a graduate of the 
Aakers Business College at Fargo and who is now a bookkoopor in the Scandinavian Bank 
of that city; George; Lydia; Walter; Robert; and Ernest. 

Mr. Nystrom is a stanch republican and docs all in his power to secure the victory of 
that party at the polls. He has served on the town and school boards, discharging the duties 
devolving upon him in a capable manner. He is a member of the Lutheran church, of which 
he is one of the trustees, and for ten years he has served as superintendent of the Sunday 
school. He is one of the leaders in all movements seeking the moral advancement of his 
community and is likewise interested in everything that tends to promote its material 
development. 



AXEL TRANGSRUD. 



Axel Trangsrud is a retired farmer residing at No. 91.') Tenth avenue. North, in Fargo, 
and the record of his life indicates what may be accomplished when determination and energy 
are utilized as the basis of success. He was born in Norway on the Snth of October, 1859, 
and is a son of Hans and Bertha (Torderud) Trangsrud, who came to the United States in 
1870 and after a year spent in Mitchell county, Iowa, removed to North Dakota, where they 
secured a squatter's claim on the eastern side of the Sheyenne river on section 14, Normanna 
township, Cass county. This the father afterward homesteaded when the homestead law 
went into effect and there he and his wife continued to reside throughout their remaining 
days, his atterttion being given to the further development and improvement of the farm. 

Axel Trangsrud was reared on the old homestead and acquired a district school educa- 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 233 

tion. His opportunities in youth, however, were limited but he received ample training in 
farm work, early becoming familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring 
for the crops. After reaching man's estate he remained at home for a number of years, 
givuig his attention to the operation of the home farm, and in 1895 he turned his attention 
to merchandising in Davenport, Cass county, where he remained until 1899, when he sold his 
interests there and returned home. In 1901 he purchased a half section of land in Pleasant 
township but never lived upon that farm, renting it to a tenant for eight years, after which he 
disposed of the property. About 1907 he came into possession of the old homestead compris- 
ing two hundred acres of rich and productive land and a year before he had acquired one 
hundred and sixty acres from a brother's estate, which farm cornered on the home place. 
Thus Mr. Trangsrud came into possession of three hundred and sixty acres of valuable farm 
property and bent his energies to its further development and improvement, bringing his 
fields to a high state of cultivation and annually gathering therefrom rich crops. He resided 
upon this property until January 34, 1913, when he retired from active farm life and removed 
to Fargo, where he now makes his home. He still remains a stockholder in the Farmers 
Elevator Company at Kindred, is a stockholder in the Scandinavian American Bank of Fargo 
and in the Kindred State Bank and from his investments derives a gi-atifying annual income. 
As a companion and helpmate on the journey of life Mr. Trangsrud chose Miss Meta 
Olson, a native of North Dakota, by whom he has two children, Howard and Alpha. He gives 
his political allegiance to the republican party and for two terms has ably served as assessor 
of Normanna township. Mr. Trangsrud is a member of the Sons of Norway and is one of the 
well known pioneers of Cass county, to which he came in 1871. In the forty-five years which 
have since elapsed he has witnessed many notable changes whereby a wild frontier district 
has been converted into a populous and prosperous commonwealth. In keeping with the 
onward march of progress he has so conducted his business affairs that success in substantial 
measure has come to him. 



HON. KNUTE S. EAMSETT. 



Hon. Knute S. Eamsett, who has been active in framing state legislation as a member 
of both the house of representatives and state senate and who still continues a leading 
factor in political circles, is known in business connections as a most enterprising mer- 
chant of Fingal and also as vice president of the Merchants State Bank. He was bom 
near Madison, Wisconsin, April 29, 1854, and is a son of Siver K. and Britha (Johnson) 
Eamsett. The father, who was born at Hedemarken, Norway, lived to the advanced age 
of eighty-six years but the mother passed a-\vay at the age of fifty-five. Siver K. Eamsett 
was a cabinetmaker by trade and in 1S48 crossed the Atlantic to the new world, settling 
first near Madison, Wisconsin, where he worked at eabinctmaking and also at carpentering 
and building. Later he went to Vernon county, Wisconsin, where he took up the occupation 
of farming and there made his home throughout his remaining days. 

Knute S. Eamsett was the second in order of birth in a family of eight children. He 
mastered the elementary branches of learning in the district schools of Vernon county and 
afterward graduated from the high school at Viroqua, AVisconsin, and attended the Wisconsin 
State University at Madison and the C. C. Curtis Business College at St. Paul. His residence 
in North Dakota dates from 1882, in which year he arrived in Bismarck and engaged in the 
mercantile business as a clerk. Later he removed to Washburn, where he conducted a general 
store and also filled the office of postmaster. He there continued until 1892, when he dis- 
posed of his store at that point and removed to Fingal, where he established a general store 
and has since carried on a business of creditable and gratifying proportions. He is likewise 
the vice president of the Merchants State Bank and owns several business buildings as well 
as residences and lots in the town of Fingal in addition to his own fine modern residence. 

On the 35th day of July, 1888, Mr. Eamsett was united in marriage to Miss Bertha M. 
Cumberland and their children are: Maurice S., a high school pupil; and Howell Le Eoy. 

Mr. Eamsett gives his political allegiance to the republican party and his opinions carry 
weight in political circles in this state. His fellow townsmen, appreciative of his ability and 



236 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

liis public spirit, elected him their representative to the state legislature in I'JDU and in lUOO 
he was elected a member of the state senate. In both houses he gave earnest consideration 
to the vital questions which came up for settlement and supported various legislative meas- 
ures which have become laws. In 1914 he was elected a member of the state central com- 
mittee and still retains his membership therein. Fraternally he is a Knight Templar Mason 
and also belongs to several other secret orders. He is a member of the Lutheran church and 
is a man of high moral worth. He is of a genial and pleasing personality, is a man of ability 
and has won substantial success. At the same time he has proven his capability and effi- 
ciency in public ollice and he never allows private affairs to so monopolize his attention that 
they exclude the faithful performance of his public duties. " 



GUSTAVE W. NACK. 



Gustave W. Nack, who is engaged in merchandizing in Embden, Cass county, is recog- 
nized as an excellent business man and has built up a large and profitable custom. He was 
born in Germany on the 20th of June, 1ST9, a son of Albert and Alvina (Bast) Xack, both 
natives of that country, where they remained until 1886, when they brought their family to 
the United States. They settled on a farm in Cass county, Xorth Dakota, where the father 
passed away, but the mother is still living and now resides at Casselton. 

Gustave W. Nack remained under the parental roof until he became of age and then 
began farming on his own account. He was practical and progressive and his well diiected 
labors were rewarded by fine crops, the sale of which yielded him a good income. He con- 
tinued to farm until 1911, when he removed to Embden and entered the mercantile field, in 
which he also succeeded. He carries a good stock of goods, selected with reference to the 
needs of his community, and as his business methods are thoroughly reliable his trade has 
grown steadily. * 

In 1909 occurred the marriage of Mr. Nack and Miss Martlia Krucger, a native of Cass 
county and a daughter of William and Barbara Krueger, pioneers of that county who came 
to this state from Germany. Two children have been born to this union, Evelyne M. and 
Murl G. 

The republican party has a stanch adherent in Jlr. Xack and he takes a keen interest 
in public affairs. He is now serving as postmaster of Embden and has demonstrated his fit- 
ness for the office, discharging his duties with efficiencj'. He belongs to Casselton Lodge, 
No. 3, A. F. & A. M., and is a Mason in deed as well as in name, exemplifying in his life the 
beneficent spirit of the craft. He has resided in Cass county during the greater part of his 
life and those who have known him since boyhood are his stanchest friends, a fact which 
indicates his sterling worth. 



ARTHUR L. PARSONS. 



Arthur L. Parsons, an attorney of Lidgerwood, is recognized as one of the able mem- 
bers of the bar of Richland county and has gained a good clientage. He was born in St. 
Paul, Minnesota, on the 25th of August, 1873, a son of J. S. and Louise (Folsom) Parsons, 
both of whom were natives of Maine. The father, whose birth occurred in 1840, died in 1915. 
The mother, who was born in 1845, passed away in 1913. They were married in the Pine 
Tree state, but in the '60s emigrated westward and located in Illinois, whence in 1870 they 
removed to St. Paul, Minnesota, where the father engaged in the machine business. In 1899 
they came to North Dakota and he took up land in Richland county. ITo met with gratify- 
ing success and from time to time acquired title to additional land until at one time he 
owned sixteen hundred acres. In 1903 he sold out and during the remainder of his life lived 
retired. In politics he was a stanch republican and he took a keen interest in public affairs, 
being especially concerned for the welfare of the school system, serving for some time upon 
the school board. He was a man of liberal education, a graduate of Bates College of Lewis- 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 237 

ton, Maine, and his wide knowledge and sound judgment gave bim a position of leadership 
in his community. To him and his wife were born six children, namely: Ottie, the wife of 
W. J. Medland, a banker of Park River, this state; Arthur L.; Cleve M., an attorney of 
Hettinger, North Dakota; Eoy, who is farming near Chinook, Montana; Stella, who is now 
Mrs. Downing, residing near Velva, this state; and Ralph I., a wheat buyer living in Canada. 
The Parsons family is of English descent but has been established in this country for a 
number of generations. A great-great-grandfather of our subject participated in the Revo- 
lutionary war. 

Arthur L. Parsons received his elementary and secondary education in the schools of 
•Geneseo, Illinois, graduating from the high school in 1891. He subsequently entered the 
College of Law of the Minnesota State University, which conferred upon him the degree 
■of LL. B. in 1896. He was admitted to the bar in Minnesota and also in North Dakota and in 
the year of his graduation began the active practice of his profession at Lidgerwood, where 
he has since remained with the exception of two j'cars, during which he was connected with 
Emerson H. Smith at Fargo. He returned to Lidgerwood in 1907 and the confidence which 
the general public has in his ability is evidenced by the large and profitable patronage which 
he enjoys. He prepares his cases carefully and is convincing in the presentation of his argu- 
ment before the court with the result that he hag gained a favorable verdict in most 
instances. He practices in all the courts and stands high among his professional brethren. 
In connection with his law practice he conducts an insurance business and writes many 
policies annually. 

In 1900 occurred the marriage of Mr. Parsons and Jliss Floy Goss, of Durand, Wiscon- 
sin, by whom he has three children, Ruth, Dorothy and Arthur D. 

Mr. Parsons is an adherent of the republican party and for two years was maj'or of 
Lidgerwood, giving the municipality an efficient and businesslike administration. He has 
been clerk of the school board during the entire period of his residence in Lidgerwood and has 
also served as city attorney for several terms. His religious faith is that of the Baptist 
ehurch, and fraternally he is connected with the Masons and the Woodmen, these associa- 
tions indicating the rules which govern his conduct. He is not only a successful attorney, 
but is also a public-spirited citizen and a man of unquestioned integrity, and all who have 
come in contact with him hold him in the highest esteem. 



FHANK M. JOHNSON. 



Frank M. Johnson, one of the leading business men of Alice, North Dakota, is now 
engaged in general merchandising but formerly devoted his time and attention to agricul- 
tural pursuits, in which he was also successful. He was born in Iowa county, Iowa, on the 
3d of .Tune, 1866, a son of Alexander P. and 5Iary (Wade) .Johnson, both natives of Peoria 
county, Illinois, where they were reared and married. In 1853 they removed to Iowa county, 
Iowa, becoming pioneer settlers of that part of the state. At the time of the Civil war the 
father enlisted in the Union army, becoming a member of the Eleventh Illinois Cavalry, 
under the command of Colonel Robert IngersoU. After the close of the war he returned to 
Iowa and farmed there xuitil 1888, when he removed to South Dakota. Five years later he 
came to North Dakota, locating in Sargent county, where he passed his last years. His 
wife is still living and makes her home with her two sons, Frank M. and Thomas F. 

Frank M. .Johnson attended the public schools in the pursuit of an education and during 
his boyhood and youth gained valuable training in farming through assisting his father. On 
reaching manhood he decided to follow the occupation to which he had been reared and for a 
number of years was successfully engaged in farming in Sargent county. In 1913, however, 
he came to Cass county and in partnership with his brother, Thomas F., is now engaged in 
the mercantile business in Alice. They carry a well selected stock and have built up a large 
and lucrative patronage, their reliable business methods commending them to the confidence 
of the general public. They still retain their land holdings, owning seven hundred and twenty 
acres in Sargent county. 

Frank M. .Johnson casts his ballot in support of the democratic party, but has never 



238 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

been an aspirant for office, finding that his private affairs require his entire time and atten- 
tion, rte belongs to the Masonic order and in all relations of life strives to live up to the 
high moral teachings of the craft, lie has not only won the respect of all who have come in 
contact with him, but has also gained the warm personal regard of many. 



P. J. ENGESETH. 



P. J. Engeseth, engaged in the general practice of law at Minot, was born in Dane 
county, Wisconsin, August 23, 1873, a son of John Engeseth, of whom mention is made 
elsewhere in this work. He continued his education after leaving the common schools in the 
Luther College at Decorah, Iowa, and in the University of South Dakota, in which he p>ir- 
sued his law course, graduating in the class of 1904. He was reared to farm life and during 
vacation periods throughout his college days he worked at farm labor in Wisconsin, thus 
providing for the expenses of his university work. In 1901 he came to the northwest, settling 
at Dell Rapids, South Dakota, where he remained until in the spring of 190S he came to 
Minot. Here he entered upon the practice of law and with the exception of a year spent 
in California has since continued an active member of the Minot bar, devoting his attention 
to general practice and also making a specialty of collections and mortgage foreclosures. He 
devotes his entire time to his professional duties and has made steady advancement in his 
chosen field of labor. 

On the 12tli of August, 1915, Sir. Engeseth was united in marriage to Miss Mabel 
Johnson, a native of Painted Woods, North Dakota, and a daughter of .John A. .Johnson, who 
is an agriculturist now residing in Painted Woods. In his political views Mr. Engeseth is 
independent nor has he ever aspired to office holding. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Elks Lodge, No. 10S9, of Minot, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of 
Pythias. His attention, however, has always been largely concentrated uiioii his professional 
duties and he early recognized the fact that industry is just as essential in law practice as 
in any other field of labor. He has therefore closely applied himself to the work of preparing 
his cases and does not enter the courts until well qualified to present his cause in the strong, 
clear light of common sense and of sound reasoning. 



JOHN I^. JONES. 



Tlie life record of .John R. .Jones, of Hankinson, Richland county, should serve to spur the 
ambition of those who are beginning their independent career, for from a poor boy he has 
worked his way upward until he is now one of the leading capitalists of this section of 
North Dakota. He is the largest land owner in Richland county, is president of the Farmers 
& Merchants Bank of Hankinson, of the First State Bank of Rutland, the First National 
Bank of Wyndmere, and of the Security State Bank of Jlclntosh, South Dakota, and is a 
stockholder in many other banks in North and South Dakota, and also has many other 
important business interests. Although the greater part of his time has been given to his 
business affairs, he has not failed to cooperate with movements seeking the advancement 
of his community along lines of moral and civic progress, and he is recognized as one of the 
foremost citizens of his county. 

Mr. Jones was bom in Winnebago, Wisconsin, on the 12th of August. IS.'jO, a son of 
Evan and Margaret (Roberts) Jones. The father was born in Wales, but came to the 
United States in his young manhood, locating in Wisconsin, where he was married to Miss 
Roberts, also a native of Wales. He purchased land from the government as the section 
where he settled was then largely undeveloped, and he devoted the remainder of his life to 
operating his homestead. He was a republican in politics, and for years served as marshal 
of Neenah, Wisconsin, making an excellent record in that office. His religious faith was that 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. To him and his wife were born eleven children, of whom 
our subject is the eldest and of whom ten survive. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 239 

John R. Jones received excellent educational opportunities and was graduated from 
Ripen College, at Ripon, Wisconsin, in 1882. For some time he worked in lumber yards and 
was subsequently superintendent of various mills in northern Wisconsin, but in 1886 he 
removed to Hankinson, North Dakota, where he was connected with a corporation engaged 
in the lumber and machinery business. At length he bought out the concern and has since 
continued independently In those lines of business. He has succeeded beyond his greatest 
expectations, and his annual business has reached a large figure, and in addition to his 
business at Hankinson he has lumber yards at Rutland, North Dakota, and at New Effing- 
ton and Hammer, South Dakota. 

In 1886 Mr. Jones was married, in northern ilichigan, to Jliss Victoria Hamilton, and to 
this union was born a daughter, who is now a missionary in Canton, China. The wife and 
mother died on the 18th of March, 1887. Jlr. Jones was later married to Mary E. Stilwell, 
of Ripon, Wisconsin, and to them have been born five children: John S. and Iferold M., 
both attending college; and Edith Belle; Daniel L. and Mary Carol, all at home. 

Mr. Jones easts his ballot in support of the measures and candidates of the republican 
party, but has never taken an active part in politics. He and his family are all devout 
members of the Congregational church at Hankinson, in which Mr. Jones is very much 
interested, being an active church member and very liberal in his contributions toward the 
support of the church. He is widely known throughout the state and all wlio have been 
brought in contact with him hold him in high esteem, and lie has many warm personal friends 
among his business associates and neighbors. 



ARNE 0. TUSIvIND. 



Arne 0. Tuskind, of Davenport, has varied business interests in Cass county. He is 
engaged in merchandising in Davenport, is president of the Farmers State Bank of that town 
and also has an interest in a valuable farm. He was born in Norway on the 31st of January, 
1863, and his parents were Ole and Carrie (Bratforl Tuskind, both of whom were born in 
the land of the midnight sun. In 1871 the family crossed the Atlantic to the United States 
and, making their way to the middle west, settled in Iowa, where they lived for one year. 
In 1872 they removed to Cass county, North Dakota, and took up their abode on a farm on 
the Sheyenne river, where the parents spent the remainder of their lives. The place was a 
tract of wild prairie when it came into the possession of the family and the first residence 
was a log cabin with a sod roof, which remained the family home for ten years. In time, 
however, excellent improvements were made on the farm. Five of the nine children are still 
living. 

Arne O. Tuskind received his education in the common schools and remained at home 
until he was twenty-five years of age, when he obtained employment as a clerk in a store at 
Davenport. He worked in that capacity for seven years and then engaged in general mer- 
chandising on his own account. He has an excellent store in Davenport and has gained a 
gratifying patronage. He is also president of the Farmers State Bank of that town and was 
one of the organizers of the institution, which holds the entire confidence of the community. 
He is likewise treasurer of the local telephone company and he still owns an interest in the 
old homestead, which comprises five hundred and fifty acres of improved land. 

Mr. Tuskind was married in 1890 to Miss Josie Johnson, a native of Norway, who came 
to the United States in her girlhood. They have become the parents of five children: Carl, 
who was employed as a bookkeeper in the Moore building in Fargo and who is deceased ; 
Clarence, at home; Stella, who is attending high school at Fargo; and Eugene and Arnold. 

Mr. Tuskind is a democrat and has taken much interest in public affairs. He has served 
as president of the village board, of which he is now treasurer, and for ten years he was 
president of the board of education, doing much in that time to advance the interests of 
the public schools. He holds membership in Lodge No. 29, K. P., in which he has held all 
of the chairs, and he has served as a delegate to the Grand Lodge of North Dakota. He is 
likewise identified with Modern Woodmen, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, the 
Modern Brotherhood of America and the Yeomen. Both he and his wife are members of 



2-10 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

the Lutheran church, and he is serving as secretary thereof. His is a well rounded character, 
and in his life he has combined business activity with public service and with work along the 
lines of moral advancement and development. All who have been brought in contact with 
him hold him in high esteem, and his personal friends are many. 



B. H. SCHNEIDER. 



B. H. Schneider is the efficient and popular cashier of the Farmers State Bank of Daven- 
port, Cass county, and is also a landowner. He was born in that county on the 3d of Sep- 
tember, 1S82, a son of Louis and Johanna Schneider. His parents, who were natives of 
Wisconsin, removed to this state in 1879 and located upon a farm four miles north of Daven- 
port, where the father passed away in 1909 and where the mother still makes her home. 
They became the parents of nine children, seven of whom are still living. 

B. H. Schneider remained at home until he attained his majority and acquired his edu- 
cation in the public schools and in a business college at Fargo. On completing his course 
there he accepted a position as bookkeeper at Valley City, where he remained for a year, 
after which he became assistant cashier in the Sawyer State Bank, which office he filled for 
two years. At the end of that time his father died and he returned home to take charge 
of the farm, which he operated for six years. He then aided in organizing the Farmers State 
Bank at Davenport, of which he has since served as cashier. He understands business con- 
ditions, manifests e.vcellent judgment in deciding various questions of policy, and under 
his direction the bank has prospered. He also owns one hundred and sixty acres of land 
and has an interest in the homestead. 

On the 24th of December, 1914, Mr. Schneider was married to Jliss Mary Liechty. who 
was born in Indiana and is a daughter of C. S. and Mary (Witmer) Liechty, both of wliom 
are living in this county. 

Mr. Schneider votes the republican ticket and has served as township clerk and is now 
filling the office of village clerk. Both he and his wife are members of the Evangelical church 
and take an active interest in the spread of its influence. Mr. Schneider is a }'Oung man 
of marked energy and ability, and his continued success seems assured. 



LEWIS H. PAIGE. 



Lewis H. Paige, an attorney practicing at Berthold. was born in Oronoco, Minnesota, 
May 4, 1860, a son of Foster A. and Clara M. (Beals) Paige, both of whom are natives of 
the state of Vermont. The father was a farmer and in 1858 left New England, removing 
westward to Minnesota, at which time he settled near Oronoco, but after about three years 
returned to Vermont, where he remained until 1881. He then became a resident of Glendon, 
Minnesota, where he engaged in merchandising for seven years. On the expiration of tliat 
period he removed to Fargo and for about eighteen years acceptably filled the responsible 
position of bookkeeper with the Fargo Loan Agency. His death there occurred in August, 
1909, and his widow now resides with her son Lewis in Berthold. The father was born in 
1832, so that he was seventy-seven years of age at the time of his demise. To him and 
his wife were born five children: Julia, deceased; Lewis IL: Foster, w-ho is manager of a 
large farm near Fargo and is also a large landowner; Nathaniel, who died in childhood; and 
Marie, a violinist residing in Portland, Oregon. 

Taken by his parents to New England in his early childhood, Lewis H. Paige attended 
school at St. Albans, Vermont, and afterward pursued a special course in chemistry at 
Fargo. Later he studied law with W. C. Dodge, of Fargo, and when twenty-three years of 
age he accepted the position of bookkeeper in the oflTices connected with the elevator of the 
Northern Pacific Company at Fargo. Two years later he entered the employ of the New 
Hampshire Trust Company, for which he traveled in western Minnesota and South Dakota 
until 1886, when he accepted the position of manager with the W. B. Clark Investment Com- 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 241 

pany at Fargo, remaining there until 1891. In the meantime he read law with Mr. Dodge 
for about four or five years and in the fall of 1891 entered the office of that attorney, with 
whom he remained until the fall of 1893, having been admitted to the bar on the 4th of 
October, 1889. In the fall of 1893 he went to the Pacific coast with the intention of locat- 
ing in that section of the country, but after spending about a year in Portland, Seattle and 
Tacoma he returned to Fargo, where he entered the employ of the Fargo Loan Agency, with 
which he continued until the fall of 1904. He was afterward employed by the firm of Wells 
& Dickey until 1906, when he removed to Berthold and opened a law office, since which time 
he has there engaged in the practice of law and in the real estate and loan business. He 
purchased the town site and he has since made two additions to Berthold and he now owns 
three business properties and an attractive residence in the town. He is also an extensive 
owner of North Dakota farm lands, but the greater part of his attention is given to the 
practice of law. 

In May, 1893, Mr. Paige was married to Miss Estelle W. Power, who was born in Worces- 
ter, Massachusetts, a daughter of William A. and May (Walter) Power, natives of Pitts- 
field, Massachusetts, and Elmira, New York, respectively. The father served in the Civil 
war as a member of the Ninth Illinois Cavalry for four years, was twice wounded in battle 
and was promoted to the rank of adjutant. At the close of his military service he returned 
to New York, where he engaged in railroad work until May, 1880, when he came to the west, 
settling in what is now Leonard, North Dakota. There he engaged in stock farming and 
breeding, continuing at that point until 1893, when his health failed and he went to the 
Milwaukee Soldiers' Home, where he is now located. His wife is living with her daughter, 
Mrs. Paige, at the age of sixty-five years, while Mr. Power has reached the age of seventy- 
four years. Mrs. Paige is the only child and was educated in the schools of Fargo, com- 
pleting a high school course. 

In his political views Mr. Paige is a democrat, but has never sought nor desired public 
office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs. Almost his entire 
attention is given to his law practice and his ability in that line has brought him a good 
clientage. 



CHARLES ELMER BATCHELLER. 

Charles Elmer Batcheller, cashier of the First National Bank of Fingal and proprietor 
of the Poplar Grove Jersey Farm, which adjoins the town, was born at Stockton. New Y'ork, 
October 10, 1863, a son of George Stillman and Eliza Ann (Lamphear) Batcheller. The 
genealogy of the Batcheller family in America was compiled and published in a volume of 
six hundred pages March 21, 1898, by Frederick C. Pierce, of Chicago, the ancestry being 
traced back to the beginning of the seventeenth century in England, at which time members 
of the family figured prominently in public affairs. The Rev. Stephen Batcheller, "Puritan 
Emigrant," was among the first to come to America, while others were William, Joseph and 
Alexander Batcheller. Three hundred representatives of the family took part in the Revo- 
lutionary war, as recorded in the genealogical volume, and twenty of the name received pen- 
sions. Many of the descendants have been and are prominent in the learned professions and 
in various walks of life. Different branches of the family have spelled the name in various 
ways. Captain Joseph Batcheller, grandfather of Charles E. Batcheller, was born in Wor- 
cester, Massachusetts, June 3, 1778, and died in 1870. He was married .January 18, 1810, in 
Smithfield, New York, to Dorothy Needham. who was born April 32, 1789. and passed away 
February 20, 1865. Their son, George Stillman Batcheller, was born at Pomfret, New York, 
July 5, 1825, and wedded Eliza Ann Lamphear, who was born November 18, 1834, and passed 
away March 9, 1881. Of their family of six children five were daughters. 

The only son, Charles E. Batcheller, attended the district schools and the State Normal 
at Fredonia, New Y'ork, and afterward took up railroad work as station agent and operator 
on the New York Central, continuing in that connection for six years. Coming to North 
Dakota in 1892, he was afterward connected with the Northern Pacific Railway Company 
for eighteen months and then accepted the position of assistant cashier in the First National 



242 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Bunk at Bullulo, North Dakota, witli wliich lie remained for five years. In 1899 he removed 
to Fingal, where he organized the State Bank of Fingal, wliich is 1904 was merged into 
the First National Bank. In 1900 the company erected the present bank bnilding, which is 
splendidly equipped for the conduct of the hiisiness. Since the establishment of the bank Mr. 
Batcheller has continuously filled the position of cashier. There has been nothing spectacular 
in its history but a steady, continuous growth that is most gratifying. The bank has a 
paid in capital .stock of twenty-five thousand dollars and a surplus of five thousand dollars. 
Its total demand deposits amount to fifty-seven thousand three hundred and sixty-seven 
dollars and its total time deposits to ninety-four thousand eight hundred and forty-eight 
dollars. ]\Ir. Batcheller also owns a valuable farm of three hundred acres adjoining the town of 
Fingal, of which he has two hundred acres under cultivation, while the balance is devoted 
to pasture and the raising of alfalfa. The place is well fenced and there is good water, 
while the residence, barns and outbuildings are all commodious and siibstantial. Here Mr. 
Batcheller is engaged in the raising of thoroughbred stock, making a specialty of Jersey 
cattle, which he has exhibited at the county and state fairs, and at the state fairs of 1910, 
1911 and 1912 he carried oif all the first prizes. He now has over seventy head of Jersey 
cattle on his place and finds a ready market for all the increase. 

On the 28th of June, 1899, Mr. Batcheller was united in marriage to Miss Laura Dona- 
hoe, of Huron county, Ontario, a daughter of Peter Donahoe, who was born near Toronto, 
Ontario, 'and Eliza (Kenny) Donahoe, also of Ontario. The grandfather, Brian Donahoe, 
was a native of Ireland and his father removed to Canada with his seven sons, most of whom 
emigrated to the United States. 

Fraternally Mr. Batcheller is connected with the Masons as a member of lodge, chapter, 
commandery and Mystic Shrine. He is also identified with the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks. At the present time he is serving on the governor's staff and he visited the Panama- 
Pacific Exposition in San Francisco as one of Governor Hanna's aids. His standing in 
financial circles is indicated by the fact that he has been honored with the presidency of the 
North Dakota Bankers' Association, succeeding J. L. Caskcl, of Grafton, who in turn suc- 
ceeded Governor L. B. Ilanna. Mr. Batcheller is vice president of the State Society of the 
Sons of American Revolution. He belongs to the Congregational church and is a past presi- 
dent of the North Dakota Christian Endeavor Union. His wife is a lady of much more than 
average ability and has been a valuable assistant to her husband through the excellent 
advice which she has given liim in relation to his banking and stock raising interests. 



WILLIAM 1). W ILSON. 



William D. Wilson, of Minot, who has farming interests in Ward county, was born in 
Ontario, Canada, July 3, 1877, a son of William and Isabella (Caithness) Wilson, natives 
of Canada and Scotland respectively. The father, who was a contractor and builder, came 
to the United States in 1891, settling in Fargo where he engaged in business until he retired. 
He afterward removed to Minot, where he passed away in 1907, while his widow still makes 
her home in that city. Their family numbered eight children, of whmn William D. Wilson 
is the fifth in order of birth. 

In a high school in Canada William 1). Wilson completed his education and when a youth 
of sixteen entered a telegraph office at Fargo as an apprentice. He continued there as an 
operator until 1S97 and afterward spent a year in Grand Forks in the same capacity and a 
similar period at Moorhead, Minnesota. In 1899 he arrived in Minot as manager for the 
Western Union and Great Northern Companies, occupying that position for six years. In 
1900 however, he filed on land in Ward county and when he left the telegraph office took 
up his abode upon the farm, which is situated ten miles from !Minot. With characteristic 
diligence and determination he bent his energies to the development, cultivation and improv- 
ment of his place and resided thereon until the fall of 1912, when he established his home 
in the city of Minot in order to afford his children better educational opportunities. He 
is the present manager and secretary of the ^linot Dairy Company, of which he is one of the 
stockholders, and he still gives his attention to the further development of three hundred 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 243 

and sixty acres of excellent farm land, devoting the greater part of his time to his agricul- 
tural interests. 

In January, 1900, Mr. Wilson was united in marriage to Miss Edith Blom, who was 
born in Ortonville, Minnesota, a daughter of Paidolph and Caroline (Johnson) Blom, both of 
whom were natives of Stockholm, Sweden, whence the mother came to the United States at 
the age of sixteen years. The father was about twenty j-ears of age when he crossed the 
Atlantic, settling in Minnesota. The Johnson family established their home near Chicago, 
and Mr. Blom engaged in general merchandising for some time and eventually removed to 
Minot after residing in Fargo for a number of years. He retired from business in that city 
and is now enjoying a well earned rest, but his wife passed away in Minot in 1913. Mr. 
and Mrs. Wilson have become the parents of three children: Lucile B.ernice, a high school 
pupil in Minot; Helen Mae, also attending school; and Woodrow Donald, three years of age. 

Mr. Wilson is a prominent member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, having 
filled all of the offices in the local lodge and representing the organization in the Grand 
Lodge, in which he has likewise been called to official position. He is now master Woodman 
at Minot. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he served on the 
township school board for four years. His religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church, 
the teachings of which have been a dominant force in his life, guiding him in all of his 
relations with his fellowmen. He seeks those things which are most worth while not only 
for himself, but for the community', working for the intellectual and moral progress as well 
as for the material development of the district. 



JOHN G. BOATMAN. 



John G. Boatman, postmaster at Milnor, was born in Sedalia, Missouri, July 7, 1860, 
a son of Thornton and Rebecca (Brownfield) Boatman. The father was a native of Ken- 
tucky and of Scotch descent, while the mother's birth occurred in Virginia. In early life 
they removed to Missouri with their respective families and near Sedalia, that state, were 
married, establishing their home there and continuing their residence near that city until 
called to their final rest. The father was a miller by trade and became the owner of a large 
mill, but at the time of the Civil war this was burned to the ground by the soldiers. He 
then turned his attention to farming and continued in active connection with business pur- 
suits until he retired from business life, spending the last ten years in the enjoyment of a 
well earned rest in Sedalia. He died in 1901, having for more than a quarter of a century 
survived his wife, who passed away in 1875. In their family were eight children and all 
are yet living. 

John G. Boatman, the third in order of birth, obtained his education in the schools of 
Sedalia, which he attended until he reached the age of fourteen years and then at his 
mother's death Ijegan to earn his own living. He was employed in difl'erent ways at Sedalia 
until seventeen years of age, when he began freighting by team to the mining camps out of 
Denver, Colorado Springs and Pueblo. For three months he freighted express for the state 
penitentiary at Canon City and spent about a year in that city, but in 1879 returned to 
Missouri, where he invested his earnings in a farm of two hundred acres near Sedalia. He 
then began farming on his own account and the result of his labors was soon seen in highly 
cultivated fields. 

As a companion and helpmate on life's journey Mr. Boatman chose Miss Maggie Hamil- 
ton, whom he wedded in 1883, while she was visiting in Sedalia. They have become the 
parents of four children: Charlie and Price engaged in farming; Boy, employed in a lumber 
yard at Milnor, and Leila, the wife of Franz Gustavson. 

Following their marriage Mr. Boatman and his wife remained in Missouri until 1885, 
when he disposed of his property interests there and purchased a farm in Woodbury county, 
Iowa, comprising two hundred and forty acres of rich and productive land. He lived thereon 
for about seventeen years, when he disposed of that property and in 1902 went to Sargent 
county. North Dakota, where he invested in three hundred and twenty acres of land in Mil- 
nor township, adjoining the corporation limits of the town of Milnor. Since that time he has 



244 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

further extended the boundaries of his farm by the purchase of a quarter section and he 
also rents four hundred acres adjoining, so that hu now farms about eight hundred acres, 
being one of the extensive agriculturists of the community, llis business allairs are wisely 
directed and are bringing to him substantial and gratifying success. 

Mr. Boatman is the oldest member of Anchor Lodge, Ko. 25, F. & A. M., at Jliliior and 
is a most loyal and exemplary representative of the craft. His religious faith is that of the 
Presbyterian church and his political belief that of the democratic party. In 1913 he 
received the appointment to the position of postmaster of Milnor under President Wilson 
and still serves in that capacity, making as excellent a record in office as he had previously 
done as a private citizen and as a business man. He has never been afraid of hard work and 
seems always to have realized the full force of the old Greek adage: "Earn thy reward; the 
gods give naught to sloth." 



H. G. BROTEN. 



H. G. Broten, who is serving as postmaster of Davenport, and is also engaged in mer- 
chandising there, is a native of Cass county, born on the 29th of Jlay, 1884. His parents, 
Ole A. and Lena (Brink) Broten, were both natives of Norway, where they remained until 
1865, in which year they emigrated to the United States. After residing for about fifteen 
years in Minnesota they removed to Cass county. North Dakota, and took up their residence 
on a farm. The father passed away in 1909, but the mother is still living. Our subject's 
paternal grandfather also survives and has reached the advanced age of ninety-five years. 

H. G. Broten is one of a family of four children, all of whom are living and all are 
married. He passed the days of his boyhood and youth under the parental roof and attended 
the common schools in the acquirement of an education. On beginning his business career 
he became a clerk in a store at Davenport, in which connection he continued for two years. 
He was then assistant station agent at that "place for a time, after which he was a brake- 
man on the Great Northern Kailroad for two years. He next engaged in the flour and feed 
business at Davenport, with which he is still connected. In 1911 he established a newspaper, 
known as the Davenport News, which he conducted for a time. He now holds the oflice of 
postmaster and is sj-stematic and accurate in the discharge of his duties. He also conducts 
a store in connection with the postoffice and owns a good business block in Davenport. 
Although comparatively a young man he has gained a measure of success that many of 
his seniors might well envy. 

Mr. Broten was married in 1911 to Miss Edna Zimmerman, who was born in Canada of 
the marriage of Jacob and Elizabeth (Brill) Zimmerman. Her parents are still living and 
reside upon a farm in Cass county, this state. 

Mr. Broten is a republican and takes a keen interest in everything that affects the 
general welfare. He is now serving as chairman of the village board and manifests the 
same care and thought in directing the affairs of the municipality as he does in managing 
his private business interests. Fraternally he is identified with the Modern Woodmen of 
America and has many friends in that order and in the community at large. 



ABRAM S. TAYLOR. 



Abram S. Taylor, a grocer at Sheldon, was bom in Schoharie county, New York, Aug- 
ust 11, 1845. His father, William Taylor, one of the early residents of the Empire state, 
removed westward to Wisconsin and thence went to Elgin, Illinois, where he spent his 
remaining days. He was a lawyer by profession and while in Wisconsin engaged also in the 
real estate business. After his removal to Illinois he purchased what was known as the 
Banner farm of that state, situated forty miles out of Chicago and four miles from Elgin 
and comprising a half section of land. He then turned his attention to general agricultural 
pursuits and continued the further development and improvement of his notably fine place 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 245 

up to the time of his death, whiclx occurred in 1S67. A number of years before he had 
wedded Margaret Shutts, a native of Xew York, who died in 1S48. Mr. Taylor, the father, 
was married three times. 

Abram S. Taylor began his education in the schools of the Empire state, continued his 
studies in Sheboygan and also attended an academy at Elgin, Illinois. It was while he was 
a student there that the Civil war began and he volunteered for service in the Union army, 
joining the Seventeenth Illinois Cavalry on the 25th of December, 1863, and remaining with 
his command until the Christmas season of 1865. Later he engaged in farming in Illinois 
and in 1876 removed to Sauk Eapids, Minnesota. While there making his home he trav- 
eled for a hardware house, devoting six years to that business. Later he went to South 
Dakota, where he secured a squatter's claim, and as soon as possible he filed on his land, 
giving his attention to farming there for eighteen years, his labors resulting in bringing 
about a marked transformation in the appearance of his place. When the work of the 
farm was put. aside he removed to Shelbj', South Dakota, where he engaged in the lumber 
business for a year and a half. In 1903, however, he came to North Dakota and established 
a lumber yard in Glenburn, where he continued for a year, hauling his lumber from Minot to 
Glenburn, a distance of twenty-two miles, up to the time when the railroad was put through. 
In 1904 he removed to Sheldon, where he opened a hardware store which he owned and 
managed for eight years, and on selling out in that line he established a grocery business, 
which he is now conducting. He has gradually worked his way upward and is enjoying a 
profitable trade. 

In 1867 Mr. Taylor was married to Miss Clara Bradley, who was born in Vermont, Sep- 
tember 30, 1850, her parents being old residents of that state. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor have 
had five children, namely: Eveline, who was born May 16, 1869, and passed away in 1895; 
Cora, whose natal day was May 16, 1870; Lisle, born in 1877; Charlie, bom in 1879; and 
Blanch", whose birth occurred in 1898. 

In his politcal views Mr. Taylor is a democrat and while living in Walworth county, 
South Dakota, served as registrar of deeds and as county commissioner. At the time he 
was chosen for the first named office he was the only democrat elected on the ticket, having 
a majority of one hundred and fifty over his opponent — a fact which indicated his personal 
popularity and the confidence reposed in him. At the close of his first term he was again 
nominated and won the election by a majority of two hundred and fifty notwithstanding 
Walworth is a strong republican county. He is a member of the Fraternal Bankers Society, 
as is his wife. They attend the Presbyterian church but Mrs. Taj'lor is an Episcopalian in 
religious faith. Well known in Sheldon, they are highly esteemed because of the possession 
of traits of character which have kept them in line with all those interests and movements 
which work for the uplift of the individual and the benefit of the community. 



CHARLES L. STEVENSON. 



Charles L. Stevenson, who for fourteen years has been actively connected with the State 
Bank of Berthold, of which he was one of the founders and of which he is now the president, 
came to his present position well qualified by previous experience in the l^anking business 
at Minto and before that time in other places. Practically his entire life has been passed 
in North Dakota, although he was born in Kingston, Canada, August 4, 1875, a son of 
James and Louisa (Jacobi) Stevenson, the former a native of the north of Ireland, while 
the latter was born in Germany. In the fall of 1876 they arrived in this state and settled 
on the Turtle river near Grand Forks, where Mr. Stevenson secured and developed a home- 
stead which he continued to cultivate until 1914, when he disposed of that property and 
now makes his home in California. His wife passed away in 1913. He has never been 
active in politics but was always loyal to the best interests of his community and during 
his residence in this state served on the local board of education. 

Of a family of eight children Charles L. Stevenson was the third. His educational 
opportunities were very limited, as he did not get to attend school after reaching the age 
of twelve years, at which time he entered a bank in the employ of his uncle at Ardoch, 



246 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

North Dakota. He was a little barefooted ureliin clad in jeans trousers, and no one would 
have predicted that he would some day be at the head of a banking institution himself. 
The diligence, determination and industry which have been his salient features were early 
manifest and there were times when he would be left for two or three days alone in the 
bank. He received twenty-five dollars for seven months' work and at the end of that time 
he pursued a three months' course in a business college in Minneapolis. He then returned 
home and acted as bookkeeper and also as postmaster for a cousin who was employed in a 
general store. He severed that business connection when sixteen years of age and went 
into the Bank of Minto at Jlinto, this state, in the position of assistant cashier, there 
remaining for about nine years, although in the meantime he was advanced to the position 
of cashier. He resigned in 1902 and came to Berthold, where he purchased lots and erected 
the present bank building, founding the State Bank of Berthold, which institution he entered 
as it first cashier. Five years later he purchased the interests of other stockholders and 
became president of the institution, in which connection he still continues. He is cngsiged 
in the general banking business and his wise direction of the interests of the bank, manifest 
in a progressiveness that is tempered by safe conservatism, has brought well merited success 
to the institution. He is also a director of the Fanners Elevator Company and the owner 
of considerable farm land and in 1914 cultivated fifteen hundred acres, while in 1915 he 
gave personal supervision to the tilling of seven hundred and forty acres. He was at one 
time proprietor of a drug store in Berthold but has recently disposed of that business to 
his brother and now largely concentrates his attention upon his banking business. 

On the 23d of June, 1902, Mr. Stevenson was married to Miss Laura Hughes, a native 
of North Dakota and a daughter of John and Sarah Hughes. Her father, a farmer by 
occupation, became one of the early residents of this state and is now living retired in 
Minto. To Mr. and Mrs. Stevenson have been born two children: Frances, born June 24, 
1903; and Jack L., July 31, 1909. In his political views Mr. Stevenson is a democrat but 
has never aspired to office. Fraternally he is connected with the Modern Woodmen of 
America, of which he was formerly treasurer, and with the Elks lodge at ]\Iinot. His long 
connection with the business interests of Berthold has made him widely known in Ward 
county and his part of the state, and the substantial and reliable qualities which he has 
displayed have gained for him the goodwill and confidence of colleagues and contemporaries. 



rilATtLF.S F. TRUAX. 



Charles F. Truax is a well known representative of the printing business and also of 
the cattle industry in western Nortli Dakota. He is the owner of a large and well equipped 
printing establishment at Minot and in that connection is conducting a constantly increasing 
business. He is a western man by birth, training and preference. He was born at Sauk 
Center, Minnesota, October 19, 1869, a son of James Wright and Chloe Anna (Wheeler) 
Truax. The father was born in Ogdensburg, New York, in 1833, and the mother's birth 
occurred on Barnharts Island, Canada, in January, 1842. In early life Mr. Truax engaged in 
railroad work and after the outbreak of the Civil war he enlisted as a member of Company A, 
Second Wisconsin Cavalry, with which he served for full four years. He was wounded in 
battle and for a time was conlined in the hospital by his injuries. After his recovery he 
continued to work in the hospital until the war closed. Later he engaged in driving a Red 
River cart until 187.5, when he began railroad work, in which he continued actively until 
1900. lie was then elected county judge at Williston, North Dakota, where he served until 
two years prior to his death. He had also become a landowner of the state, securing a 
claim under a soldier's right, his place being located two miles north of Williston. His widow 
now resides in St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Charles F. Truax is the youngest in a family of six children, of whom three are yet 
living. He attended the public schools of Hastings, Minnesota, completing the work of the 
eighth grade, after which he entered the newspaper office of Dan Chamberlain, who was 
conducting a daily paper and with whom he remained for about two years. He then went 
into the Gazette office of Irving Todd & Son in Hastings, Minnesota, continuing there for 




CHARLES F. TRUAX 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 249 

seven or eight years, after which he engaged in raihoad work with his father until 1902. 
On the 39th of March, 1889, he arrived in Minot and when he withdrew from active connection 
with railroad work he established the Ward County Independent. A year later he formed a 
partnership with G. D. Colcord for the publication of a weekly paper and they have an 
office equipped for all kinds of commercial and law printing and job work. He is likewise 
engaged in the cattle business. Indefatigable industry has been the salient factor in his 
growing success, winning him a place among the substantial business men of Minot. His 
investments in real estate include farm lands in Mountrail county, which he has rented and 
which brings to him a good financial return. 

On the 28th of June, 1901, Mr. Truax was united in marriage to Jliss JIartha Dalziel 
Gibb, a native of London, Ontario, Canada, and a daughter of William and Katie (Carter) 
Glbb, both of whom were born in Scotland. Emigrating to the United States, they located 
first in New .Jersey, subsequently removed to Lake Park, Minnesota, and in, 1886 came to 
Minot, North Dakota. Here ilr. Gibb began ranching, raising cattle and horses, and now 
carries on his operations in Mountrail county, on the Missouri river. He is at present serving 
as postmaster of Brookbank, North Dakota. Mr. and Mrs. Truax have three children, 
namely: Cliarles Abraham, who was born in 1903; William Raymond, whose natal year was 
1905; and Theodore Gibb, whose birtli occurred in 1907. 

Mr. Truax and his family are members of the Presbyterian church and fraternally he 
is connected with the Masons. He has passed through all of the chairs of the blue lodge and 
of the Royal Arch chapter and served as senior warden and captain general and is now serving 
as generalissimo in the Knights Templar commandery and Is a charter member of Kem 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Grand Forks. In politics he is a republican but has had no 
aspiration for political office. He has served, however, as a member of the board of 
education for seven years and at this writing is its president. The cause of education finds 
in him indeed a stalwart champion and one whose efforts have been directly beneficial in 
promoting the interests of the schools. What he has accomplished represents the fit utiliza- 
tion of the innate powers and talents which are his and his advancement has resulted largely 
from close application and determination to accomplish what he undertakes. 



WALTER E. KRICK. 



Walter E. Krick, owner and publisher of the Berthold Tribune of Berthold, Ward 
county, was born in Caledonia, Minnesota, Februarj' 23, 1873, a son of Theobald and Isabel 
(Holden) Krick. The father was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 1832, and the Mother's 
birth occurred in Trondhjem, Norway. In early life Theobald Ivrick became a shoe manu- 
facturer and in the year 1850 he left his native land for the United States, landing at New 
York, where he worked for others for a time. He then went to Canada and was associated 
in business with two brothers for a year or two. He afterward removed to Caledonia, 
Minnesota, where he engaged in the shoe business, continuing in that city until his death 
in 1898. His wife, who was born in 1843, is still a resident of Caledonia. 

Walter E. Krick, the eldest of their four children, pursued his education in the schools of 
Caledonia, which lie attended to the age of fifteen, when he secured a position in a printing 
office at a salary of fifty cents per week. He remained in that establishment imtil he was 
the owner of a half interest in the business, having gradually worked his way upward, 
thoroughly acquainting himself with every phase of the trade. In 1902 he sold out and in 
August, 1903, went to Berthold, North Dakota, where he purchased the Tribune, a weekly 
paper, which he has since published. His office is thoroughly equipped for all commercial 
work and his entire attention is devoted to his printing interests. Since the paper was 
founded its name has never been changed and under the direction of Mr. Krick the Tribune 
has become a most interesting journal, devoted to community aff'airs and to the dissemina- 
tion of general news. 

In May. 1901, occurred the marriage of Mr. Krick and Miss Anstis Lucille Harries, a 
native of Caledonia, Minnesota, and a daughter of Captain W. H. and Anna (Dunbar) Harries, 
who were early settlers of that place. Her father served as a member of congress from the 

Vol. 11—14 



250 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

first district of Minnesota in 1893 and was revenue collector in Minnesota under the Cleve- 
land administration. He was also county attorney of Houston county and is the present 
commandant of the Soldiers' Home of Minnesota. At the time of the Civil war he served 
with the First Wisconsin Regiment throughout the entire period of hostilities, was wounded 
in buttle and was confined to a hospital for a long period. He still carries the bullet over 
his heart, it being so near the vital organ that it cannot be removed. His wife passed away 
about 1883. To Mr. and Mrs. Krick have been born three children, Estelle Isabel, Alice 
Beatrice and Robert Walter. 

Mr. Iviick is the present secretary of the Jlasonic lodge at Berthold and belongs also to 
the Odd Fellows lodge, the Woodmen camp and the Modern Brotherhood of America at 
Berthold and to the Elks lodge at Minot. In politics he is a stalwart republican and is now 
serving as president of his village. He was tlie first postmaster of Berthold under Presi- 
dent Taft and he has been a member of the board of education, maintaining at all times a 
deep and helpful interest in public affairs relating to the public welfare and the upbuilding 
of the locality in wliicli he makes his home. 



A. L. BAYLEY. 



A. L. Bayley was born in Dodge county, Wisconsin, June 10, 1874, the son of S. E. and 
Melissa (Sanford) Bayley, tlie former a native of Vermont and the latter of Wisconsin. 
His parents were married in Wisconsin, whither the father had gone as a young man, and 
where they continued to live until the year 1880, wlien they joined the pioneers then emi- 
grating to Dakota territory, settling on a government homestead in Cornell township, Cass 
county, near Buffalo, which the father proved up and operated for more tlian two decades. 
The mother passed away in 1890, and some years later the father went to live with his 
son, R. E. Bayley, with whom he still makes his home. 

A. L. Bayley attended the public schools and supplemented the education so acquired 
by taking a business course and a year's preparatory course in Fargo College and by study 
in the State Agricultural College. He left the latter institution in the year ISOS, when in 
his sophomore year, and accepted a position with S. G. More of Buffalo, Jvortli Dakota, as 
assistant cashier of the Bank of Buffalo, which bank was later nationalized, becoming the 
First National Bank of Buffalo. In the year 1903 Mr. Bayley severed his connection with the 
First National Bank of Buffalo to accept the cashiership of the then newly organized State 
Bank of Alice and as such officer has since assisted in directing the financial policies of tliat 
institution until it has grown to be one of the sound and prosperous banks of the state. He 
is also interested in agricultvirc as he owns two hundred and forty acres of good land near 
Alice. 

On .June 8, 1007, Mr. Bayley was married to Jliss Maud A. Dickinson, a daugliter of 
Hon. and Mrs. F. H. Dickinson of Ayr, North Dakota. Ilcr father served two terms in the 
state legislature and is at present residing with his wife on a fine farm near Ayr, North 
T)akota. To Mr. and Mrs. Bayley have been born four children, three of whom are living, 
namely: Howard E., Douglas D. and Edgar L. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Bayley are members of the Moravian clnncli of Alice and of Aurora 
Chapter, No. 59, 0. E. S. of Buffalo, North Dakota. Mr. Bayley also holds membership in 
the Ancient Order of X'nited Workmen; the Modern Woodmen of America; Buffalo Lodge, 
No. 77, A. F. & A. M.; and Endcrlin Chapter, No. 19, R. A. M. 



CHART>ES J. BUCK. 



Charles J. Buck, the popular and efficient young cashier of the Embdcn State Bank, has 
been connected with banking since beginning his career and has advanced steadily in his 
chosen work. He was born in ChafTee, Cass county, April 13, 1883, of the marriage of Fred 
and Dorothea (Thcile) Buck, both natives of Germany, where they resided until 1875. In 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 251 

that 3'ear they emigi-ated to the United States and, making their way to the middle west, 
settled in Dearborn, Michigan, which is now within the city limits of Detroit. After remain- 
ing there for two years they removed to Fargo, Xorth Dakota, which was then about as 
large as the village of Embden is at the present time. The father was made section boss on 
the Northern Pacific Railroad, with which he was connected for five years, after which he 
took up a homestead in Walburg township and turned his attention to farming. He bought 
other land and his holdings in time totaled six hundred and forty acres. In 1898, however, 
he removed to North Carolina and made investments in land there, which proved unfortunate, 
as he met with financial reverses. He then returned to North Dakota and bought a half 
section of land in Gill township, Cass county, which he still owns. For the last five years he 
has lived retired in Fargo. 

Charles J. Buck was reared at home and acquired his education in the public schools 
and in the Dakota Business College at Fargo, where he took a business course, graduating 
from that institution with the class of 1905. He then secured a position as assistant 
cashier in the Medina State Bank at Medina, North Dakota, remaining with that institution 
for one and a half years, after which he became cashier of a bank at Chafl'ee which was 
owned by the same people as the Medina State Bank. Nine months later, however, the 
bank at Cliaffee was sold to a number of the leading farmers of the district and Mr. Buck, 
in February, 1908, removed to Embden, becoming assistant cashier of the State Bank at 
that place which had been established the previous September. As the cashier, C. A. Wheel- 
ock, was a non-resident, Mr. Buck assumed the duties of that office and directed the policies 
of the institution, discharging his important duties with discretion. In 1912 the bank 
was bought by the local farmers and Mr. Buck was formally elected cashier. He makes the 
safeguarding of the interests of the depositors and stockholders his first concern, but also 
promotes the legitimate trade expansion of the community by a judicious extension of 
credit. 

Mr. Buck was married on the 11th of October, 1910, to Miss Nora Corcoran, of Chaffee, 
by whom he has a son, Vincent J. He is identified with the Modern Woodmen and with 
Jamestown Lodge No. 995, B. P. 0. E. In politics he is a stalwart republican, but although 
he takes a praiseworthy interest in public affairs, he has never sought official preferment. 
He has concentrated his energies upon his banking business and has gained recognition as 
one of the leaders in local financial circles. 



RICHARD N. LEE. 



Richard N. Lee, the editor of the Walcott Reporter of Walcott, Richland county, is well 
known in his section of the state and his paper is recognized as an excellent weekly. He 
was born in Grant county, Minnesota, on the 14th of August, 1879, the oldest child of Ole 
and Carrie (Hanger) Lee, both natives of Norway, the former born in 1845 and the latter 
in 1855. They came to the United States with their respective parents, grew to manhood 
and womanhood in this country, and were married in Red Wing, Minnesota. The father 
farmed during the greater part of his active life, but was for a time a hotel keeper in Red 
Wing and also served on the police force there. Subsequently he took up a claim in Grant 
county, Jlinnesota, and still later removed to the vicinity of Mcintosh, where he purchased 
land. The town was platted on his land and in addition to farming he conducted a butcher 
shop in Mcintosh for some time. In 1900 he removed to North Dakota and settled on a farm 
in Viking township, Richland county, which he operated until he retired. At that time he 
sold his farm and he has since resided in Walcott, where he owns a good residence. He is a 
democrat and while living in Grant county, Minnesota, served as supervisor of Gorton town- 
ship. He and his wife are both identified with the Norwegian Lutheran church, in the work 
of which they have always taken a deep interest. Six of their eight children survive. 

Richard N. Lee was educated in the country schools and in the high school at Mcintosh, 
Minnesota. In his youth he learned the printer's trade and in 1902 entered the employ of 
George Van Arman the proprietor of the Walcott Reporter. Five years later Mr. Lee pur- 
chased the paper, which he has since successfully conducted. It has a circulation of sis 



252 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

luindrod and is well pntroni/cd liy tlic local inercliants as an advertising medium. He also 
has a well equipped job printing plant and does considerable work of that character. He 
owns the fine cement block building in which his plant is located and also holds title to his 
comfortable residence. He is recognized as an able newspaper man and has also gained a 
gratifying financial success. 

In March, 1906, Mr. Lee was united in marriage to Miss Virginia Van Arman, a daugh- 
ter of George and Nettie (Heath) Van Arman, and they have become parents of three 
children, two of whom are living, Ramona and Grace. He is independent in polities and 
fraternally is connected with tlie Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen. His wife is a 
consistent member of the Congregational church and takes an active interest in its work. 
Mr. Lee devotes his entire time to his business, which is one secret of his success. He has 
made the Reporter not only an up-to-date and reliable disseminator of news, but also an 
important factor in the formation of public opinion and in the promcitiun of ]irojects for the 
general good. 



FRED 0. FOLDEX. 



Fred 0. Folden, who owns and conducts a drug store at ClifTord, Traill county, was 
born in Norway, September 11, 1864, of the marriage of Ole and Serine Folden, both also 
natives of that country. The father passed away there and subsequently, in 1879, the 
mother came to America, locating in Minnesota. Later she removed to Traill county, North 
Dakota, where she passed away. 

Fred O. Folden is one of a family of eight children, of whom five are living. He received 
his education in Norway, where he remained until 1879, in which year he came to America 
with his mother. After living for a time in Fillmore county, Minnesota, where he worked 
as a farm hand, he decided to try his fortunes in North Dakota and located in Griggs 
county. He remained there for two years but in 188S came to Traill county and two years 
later purchased a drug store at ClifTord and has gained recognition as one of the up-to-date 
and reliable merchants of the town. He carries a good stock, his prices are reasonable, he 
lias gained an enviable reputation for fair dealing and as the years have passed his 
patronage has shown a steady growth. He also owns stock in the Farmers Elevator and 
in the Traill Coiinty Telephone Company, both prosperous local enterprises. 

In 1904 occurred the marriage of Mr. Folden and Miss Ingeborg .lacobson and tliey 
have two sons, Oscar E. and Ernest 0. Mr. Folden is a republican in his political belief 
and for nine years served as clerk of the school board. In 1896, under JIcKinlcy's adminis- 
tration, he was appointed postmaster of ClifTord and was continued in that office until 
1915, making an unusual record not only as to the length of his service but also as regards 
the ability with which he discharged his duties. He holds membership in the Modern 
Woodmen of America and he and his family attend the Lutheran church. He is entitled to 
the credit which is given to a self-made man, for he came to this country a poor boy and 
through his own eflorts has gained a competence and has also won a high place in the 
esteem of his fellow citizens. 



TVER A. CASPERSON. 



Tver A. Casperson, who is successfully engageil in merchandising in Walcott, Richland 
county, was born in Norway, March 27, 1864, a son of Casper and Ingeborg (Peterson) 
Olsen. The father, who was born in 1823, died in 1913, but the mother, whose birth occurred 
in 1827, is still living and makes her home with the subject of this review. They were 
married in Norway in 1848 and remained in that country until 1882 when they emigrated 
to the United States and located in Walcott, North Dakota. The father spent the rest 
of his life in honorable retirement, having accumulated a competence. He was a very active 
member of the Lutheran church and in his daily life exemplified the teachings of Oiristian- 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 253 

ity. To him and his wife were born four children, namely: Mrs. Anna Farup, who died in 
1914; Mrs. M. N. Wigtil, a widow residing in Walcott; 0. C, who is farming three hundred 
and twenty acres of land three miles from Walcott; and Iver A. 

Iver A. Casperson was reared upon a farm and early became accustomed to agricultural 
work. On beginning his independent career he worked as a farm hand and when he had 
acquired sufficient capital he invested in land, which he cultivated for a time. He then 
supplemented the education which he had previously acquired by attending school at Will- 
more Seminary, after which he engaged in teaching in Englisli schools for ten years. In 
1895 he entered the business world, becoming clerk in a store, in which capacity he worked 
for six years. At the end of that time he purchased an interest in a mercantile establish- 
ment and is now a large stockholder in the Walcott Mercantile Company, which owns a 
large store and which has built up an extensive and profitable patronage. They carry a 
well selected stock of general merchandise and spare no pains to satisfy the wants of their 
customers. 

In 1897 Mr. Casperson was united in marriage to Miss Anna Anderson, a daughter of 
Carl Anderson, an early settler of North Dakota and a successful farmer. Mr. and Mrs. 
Casperson have »ix children: Mabel and Charles, who are attending high school; Aleta 
and Inga, who are in school; Elmer; and Mildred. 

Mr. Casperson casts his ballot in siipport of the candidates and measures of the repub- 
lican party and for fifteen years served as township school treasurer, while for eight years 
he was clerk of Walcott. He holds membership in the Lutheran church and in all the rela- 
tions of life he measures up to high standards of manhood. He is considered one of the 
valuable citizens of Walcott and his personal friends are many. 



JOHN OLSON. 



John Olson, who is residing on section 30, Hill township, and owns thirteen hundred 
and sixty acres of excellent land in Cass county, is now one of the wealthiest men in his 
township but when he came to this state he was without capital other than his enterprise, 
his sound judgment and his determination to win prosperity in this new country. He was 
born in Sweden on the 2d of February, 1859, a son of Olof and Johanna Olson, both of whom 
lived and died in that country. 

The subject of this review remained at home during the period of his boyhood and 
youth and attended the common schools in the acquirement of an education. He continued 
to reside in his native country for a number of years after reaching his majority but in 
1886 crossed the Atlantic to the United States and made his way direct to North Dakota, 
arriving in Cass county on the last of June. When he reached New York city he had but 
ten dollars in money and when he arrived in North Dakota he had not even a dollar. It was 
imperative that he obtain work at once and he hired out as a farm hand, working in that 
capacity for two or three years. He carefully saved his money and in 1888 purchased a 
relinquishment on a homestead — his present home farm — on which he located in the fol- 
lowing spring. He at once began the cultivation and improvement of his land, which he 
has brought to a high state of development. He proved very successful as a farmer from 
the start and from time to time has bought additional land, now owning thirteen hundred 
and sixty acres of the finest land in Cass county. He is practical and progressive in car- 
rying on his farm work, being ready to substitute a new method for an old if it promises 
to be more efficient, and in managing the business phase of farming he displays sound judg- 
ment. He has firm faith in the future of the state and is contributing in no small measure to 
the agricultural development of his section. In addition to his large land holdings he owns 
stock in tlie Farmers Elevator Company at Alice. 

On the 38th of December, 1887, Mr. Olson was married to Miss Mathilda Jensen, a 
native of Denmark, who came to America on the same ship as her husband. They have 
become the parents of five children: Oscar, at home; Minnie, a public school teacher; 
Amelia, who is also teaching school; Herman, at home; and Clara, who is likewise a 
teacher. The three daughters are all graduates of the State Normal School at Valley City. 



254 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Mr. Olson studies public questions carefully and casts an indciicndcnt ballot, lie lias 
served as a member of the township board of trustees for the last fifteen years and for 
many years has been school treasurer and a member of the school board. He has given 
the same care and thought to the discharge of his ollicial duties that he gives to the con- 
duct of his business Interests and has made an excellent record in office, liotli lie and his 
wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal church and at all times tliey seek to exemplify the 
teachings of that organization in their daily lives. He is one of the foremost residents of 
Cass county and not only holds the respect but also the warm regard of those who have 
been associated with him. 



S. WESTLAND. 



S. Westland, one of the prosperous farmers of Reed township, Cass county, was born 
in Sweden, September 19, 1850, a son of Peter and Mary Westland, further mention of 
whom appears elsewhere in this work. He was reared in his native land and there attended 
the common schools. In 1883, when about thirty-two years of age, he came to America 
and made his way to Cass county. North Dakota, where he cultivated a rented farm for 
three years. At the expiration of that period he removed to Dickey county, this state, 
where he took up a homestead, upon which he lived for six years. He then sold that place 
and purchased his present home farm of two hundred and twenty-one acres on sections 
1 and 36, Reed township, Cass county. He has erected excellent buildings and made other 
improvements upon his place and in his work uses improved machinery and up-to-date 
methods. When lie came to this country he had no capital, but his energy and good man- 
agement have enabled him to accumulate a competence. 

In 1873 Mr. Westland was united in marriage to Miss Mary Jensen and they have 
nine children : Mary, at home ; Carrie, the wife of Louis Holmquist, a resident of Jlinnesota ; 
Katie, who is at home; Ottilia, who is teaching school; John S., at home; Hannah, also a 
teacher by profession; Paul E., who is at home; Victor, who is attending normal school at 
Moorhead, Minnesota; and Goodwin F., who is in college at Fargo. 

Mr. Westland is a republican in politics but has never desired to hold office. He and 
his family belong to the Lutheran church and further its advancement in every way possible. 
He is recognized as a good citizen and a man of unswerving integrity and there are many 
who hold him in warm personal regard. 



JENS PEDERSEN. 



Jens Pederaen, a pioneer merchant of Milnor and one of the substantial citizens that 
Denmark has furnished to Sargent county, was born on the island of Falster, oil the Danish 
coast, June 19, 1855, a son of Pcder and Marie (Rasniussen) Paulson. The father, who was 
a wagon maker by trade, died when his son Jens was but seven years of age. Following the 
death of her husband Mrs. Paulson was married again, becoming the wife of Rasmus Chris- 
tofferson, who came with his family to the new world in 1873 and settled in Michigan. 

Jens Pedersen did not remain there but continued on to St. Paul and soon aftcrwiird 
went to work in Minneapolis. He had previously learned the blacksmith's trade and he secured 
employment in a carriage shop in Minneapolis, in which he remained for four and a half 
years. He then removed to Renville county, Minnesota, where he embarked in business inde- 
pendently, opening a blacksmith shop which he carefully and successfully conducted. He also 
purchased one hvmdred and twenty-seven acres of land, which he cultivated in connection with 
his other interests, and subsequently a further purchase added one hundivd and sixty acres 
to his holdings. 

Wliile residing upon his farm Mr. Pedersen was married in 1S7S to Mi>s Marie IIolT. who 
was born in Norway, near Drammen, but came to the United States with her parents, Chris- 
tian and Turina (Olsen) HofT, who settled in Cottonwood county, Jlinnesota. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 255 

For three years Mr. Pedersen resided in Renville county and afterward removed to Rich- 
land county, North Dakota, in 1882, after having disposed of the interests which he had 
previonsly held. He settled three miles east of McLeod, in Richland county, and as land 
in that locality was still in the possession of the government, he homesteaded one hundred 
and sixty acres, on which he built a log house. In the spring of 1883, however, he left that 
place and went to Sargent county, opening a blacksmith shop in the town of Linton, two 
and a half miles east of Milnor. He continued to engage in blacksmithing there until the 
latter part of August, 1883, when he bought city lots in the new town of Milnor, which was 
opened up by the railroad on the 14th of August, 1883. He built a shop and also a dwelling, 
the shop being jusi across the street from the site of bis present store. All of the buildings 
in the town of Linton were then removed to Milnor but Mr. Pedersen built a home in the 
west part of the village, three blocks from the main street. His was the first building 
erected in the village and he continued to engage in blacksmithing there until 1889. In the 
meantime he purchased a half section of land in Milnor township adjoining the town site and 
this he developed and cultivated, while engaging at the same time in blacksmithing. In 1889 
he established a store for the sale of farm implements in the next block south of his black- 
smith shop, purchasing property there for the purpose. He continued in that business until 
the fall of 1898, when he sold the building for a creamery, having assisted in organizing the 
Milnor Creamery Company, a cooperative creamery. The enterprise, however, did not prove 
profitable and was discontinued. Mr. Pedersen later purchased the Helgcrson-Skjenstad- 
Burch general store, which had been established and conducted at Linton by Nathan Linton 
and had been removed to Milnor when the town was changed. This was practically the 
first store in the county. Mr. Pedersen carried on business in the same location until 1905, 
when a fire occurred, destroying the building, although he saved much of the stock. He after- 
ward erected a cement and brick building nearly fireproof and in the meantime he has largely 
increased his stock and has won a growing trade. The store was called the Pioneer Store 
by Mr. Linton and is still conducted under that name. In 1913 Mr. Pedersen erected a solid 
concrete warehouse adjoining his store. In 1903 he disposed of his farm lands and is now 
engaged in general merchandise business and is a stockholder in the Milnor National Bank 
and a stockholder and the vice president of the Farmers Mill and Grain Company and one of 
its directors. 

Mr. Pedersen has one of the fine homes of his town and also has five acres across the 
street, extending down to the lake. In politics he is a democrat and in 1885 and 1886 served 
as county commissioner. He is a member of the executive committee of the democratic state 
central committee and is one of the recognized leaders of his party in the southeastern section 
of North Dakota. He has been a delegate to the national convention and he does everything 
in his power to promote the growth and ensure the success of the party. F'raternally he is 
connected with the Modern Woodmen of America, while his religious faith is indicated by 
his membership in the Lutheran church at Milnor. His life has ever been characterized by 
strong purpose and close application, and progressiveness and even-paced energy have car- 
ried him into important commercial and busines relations. At the same time his interesta 
have been of public benefit, for in all that he has done his work has contributed to general 
progress and improvement. 



CORNELIUS RUST. 



Among the many Norwegians who have become valued citizens of the northwest is 
Cornelius Rust, of Raymond township, Cass county, who owns eight hundred and fifty acres 
of good land and also has other business interests. He was born in Norway on the 15th of 
August, 1851, of the marriage of Elias and Cliristina Rust, both natives of that country. The 
father died there, and the mother subsequently emigrated to the United States, her demise 
occurring in Minnesota. Seven of their twelve children are living. 

Cornelius Rust received his education in his native land but when about twenty years of 
age came to the United States and going to the middle west, located in Goodhue county, 
Minnesota, where he lived for eight years. In 1879 he removed to Cass county. North Dakota, 



256 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

and took up his residence on section 3, Raymond township. Upon his farm he built a small 
house, twelve by fourteen feet, and that remained his residence for three years, lie has 
since erected a large and well designed dwelling and has made other improvements upon his 
farm, which is now one of the valuable places of the county. Its value is increased by a fine 
grove which he planted, and he also has all kinds of fruit upon the farm. In addition to his 
home place he owns other land, his total holdings being eight hundred and fifty acres, all of 
which is improved. He owns stock in throe farmers' elevators and is a director in the one at 
Prosper. 

In 1882 Mr. Rust was married to Miss Betsy Kyllo, who was born in Norway and by 
whom he has seven children: Emma, at home; Herman P., who is farming in this county; 
Charles; Josephine, the wife of Oscar Peterson, of Prosper; and Edward, George and Clarence, 
all at home. 

Mr. Rust is a republican and has served on the school board for several terms. Both 
he and his wife hold membership in the Lutheran church, the teachings of which govern their 
conduct. They have made many warm friends in the county, where both are well known, 
and he is recognized as one of the most substantial men of his locality. When he came to this 
country, however, he was without capital, and his success is due entirely to his enterprise and 
wise management. 



.JOHN F. ROTZIEN. 



John F. Rotzien is well known in Cass county and is the efficient manager of the Farmers- 
elevator at Addison, which does a large and profitable business. He was born in Fond du 
Lac, Wisconsin, on the 29th of April, 1878, a son of John and Falava (Mayer) Rotzien, both 
natives of Germany, whence they were brought to this country by their respective parents 
when children. Thej' were married in Wisconsin and took up their abode upon a farm near 
Fond du Lac, where they resided until 1887, when they went to McLeod county, Minnesota, 
where the father is still living. 

John F. Rotzien was reared at home and received his education in the public schools. 
However, his opportunities along that line were very limited as he did not attend school after 
nis mother's death, which occurred when he was but nine years of age. He received valuable 
training in farm work, assisting his father from early boyhood until he was twenty-five years 
of age. For the last seven years of that time he was also engaged in the live stock business, 
buying the first carload of stock when he was but eighteen years old. He continued to buy 
and ship stock for a number of years and in 190.3 he also turned his attention to the lumber 
business in Price county, Wisconsin. He continued active in that field nutil 1910 and was 
subsequently for two years engaged in the ditching business in ^Minnesota. In 1912, how- 
ever, he came to North Dakota and became manager of the Reliance Company's elevator at 
Linton, remaining there until 1914, when he was given charge of the Farmers elevator at Ad- 
dison, the business of which he has since directed. 

In 1907 Mr. Rotzien was married to Miss Irene Whiting, of Clitherall, Minnesota, by 
whom he has two children, Courtney K. and Doris Irene. Mr. Rotzien casts his ballot in sup- 
port of the men and measures of the republican party but has not taken an active part in 
politics. Both he and his wife hold membership in the Latter Day Saints church, to the sup- 
port of which they contribute. He is a successful business man. a good citizen and a loyal 
friend, and all who have come in contact with him hold him in high esteem. 



ATLEY A. PETERSON. 



One of the leading business enterprises in Clifford is the general store owned by Peterson, 
Rygg & Company and the establishment and building up of this business has been due in 
large measure to Alley A. Peterson, the senior member of the firm. He is energetic and far- 
sighted in the management of his affairs and has been one of the most important factors iiu 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 257 

promoting the commercial growth of Clifford. He was born in Wisconsin September 19, 1873, 
and is a son of Peter N. and Inga (Senesson) Peterson, who were born in Norway but emi- 
grated to America in 1854. They located upon a farm in Wisconsin and the father concen- 
trated his attention upon agricultural pursuits until the Civil war, when he enlisted in the 
Union army, in which he served until the close of hostilities. He received a slight wound in 
tlie arm but was fortunate in escaping other injury. Both he and his wife still reside upou 
the homestead. To them were born fourteen children, of whom eleven are still living. 

Atley A. Peterson was reared under the parental roof and at the usual age entered the 
public schools, to which he is indebted for his early education. After completing the course 
there ofl'ered he attended Valparaiso Cbllege in Indiana, thus still further preparing himself 
for the responsibilities of life. In 1894, when a young man of about twenty-two years, he 
came to Traill county, Xorth Dakota, and began clerking in a store at Clifford. He worked 
in the employ of others for twelve years and during two j'ears of that time was a traveling 
salesman, thus securing valuable information in regard to business conditions and methods 
in various places. In 1906 he went into business for himself, becoming a member of Peter- 
son, Rygg & Company, which has since conducted a general store. During the ten years that 
the concern has been in existence its business has grown rapidly and has now reached grati- 
fying proportions. Practically all lines of goods are carried and as the owners of the store 
are painstaking in their endeavor to meet the peculiar needs of their community they are 
able to turn over their capital rapidly and this insures them of increased profits. They use 
up-to-date merchandising methods and their progressiveness and reliability have gained 
them the patronage of the representative people of the community. Mr. Peterson gives the 
most careful attention to the management of the store and much of the success of the busi- 
ness has been due to his sound judgment and enterprise. The firm also holds stock in the 
Farmers Elevator at Clifford. 

On the 6th of September, 1897, Mr. Peterson was united in marriage to Miss Clara 
Oswald, who was born in Wisconsin and is a daughter of Christian and Elena Oswald, the 
former of whom is deceased, while the latter survives. Mr. and Mrs. Peterson have five 
children, namely: Viola, who was born June 26, 1899, and is now attending normal school at 
Mayville, North Dakota; Isadora, who was born September 29, 1901; Clifford, whose birth 
occurred on the 20tli of July, 1904; At!e}% born April 11, 1909; and Carl, born October 
10, 1915. 

Mr. Peterson supports the democratic party at the polls and has taken quite an active 
part in public affairs. For eight years he served as treasurer of his township and proved 
capable and conscientious in the discharge of his duties. Fraternally he belongs to the 
Modern Woodmen of America. His religious faith is indicated by the fact that he is a 
member of the Lutheran church, to which his wife also belongs. He is enthusiastic over the 
opportunities offered by North Dakota and has great faith in its future. When he removed 
here he had no capital but he was not afraid of work and was quick to recognize and 
utilize chances for advancement and is now financially independent. 



OAISTER TREE. 



Caister Tree is one of the well known residents of Wheatland and has gained gratif.ying 
success as the proprietor of a meat market there. He also has other business interests and 
owns considerable land. A native of Canada, he was born in Woodstock, .January 19, 1875, 
a son of Horace and Louisa (Caister) Tree, both of whom were also natives of the Dominion. 
In 1881 they removed with their familj' to Cass county. North Dakota, and became residents 
of Casselton, where the father passed away. Subsequently the mother returned to Canada 
and there spent her last years. They were the parents of six children but one is now 
deceased. 

Caister Tree remained at home until he became of age and his education was acquired 
in the common schools. On beginning his independent career he engaged in the butcher busi- 
ness in Wheatland and has since continued in that connection. He has one of the best meat 
markets in the town and has built up a large and profitable trade. He also buys and sells 



258 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

stock and in addition to tlie interests already mentioned conducts a dray line. He has 
demonstrated his faith in the future of the state by investing in land, owning a quarter 
section in McUenry county and also holding title to other property there. He owns the 
building in which his meat market is located and his commodious and comfortable residence. 

Mr. Tree was married in 1900 to Miss iHnnie Brintnell, who was born in Canada, a 
daughter of J. C. and Johann Brintnell. Her father served in the United States army for 
three years, but his demise occurred in Canada. The mother is still living and makes her 
home in Canada. To them were born six children, of whom five are living. Mr. and Mrs. 
Tree have two children. Merle B. and Lyle C. 

Mr. Tree gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is now serving 
acceptably as a member of the school board. Fraternally he is identified with Casselton 
Lodge, No. 3, A. V. & A. M., at Casselton, and his religious faith is that of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, to which his wife also belongs. They can be depended upon to further 
the cause of right and justice in every way possible, and their sterling qualities of character 
have gained them the sincere respect of their fellow citizens. 



EDWARD ARNOLD. 



Edw-ard Arnold, manager of the Northwestern Elevator Company's elevator at Everest, 
is also engaged in merchandising there and is well known throughout Cass county. He was 
born at Lockport, New York, on the 18th of March, 1874, a son of George P. and Kate 
(Hilderman) Arnold, both of whom were natives of New York state. The father learned the 
hatter's and furrier's trades in his youth and devoted a number of years to work along those 
lines. In 1883, however, he came to North Dakota and took up a homestead and a preemp- 
tion claim of one hundred and sixty acres each in Moraine township. Grand Forks county. 
In due time he proved up on his land and continued to reside there, devoting his attention to 
farming until 1910, when he sold out and removed to Larimore, where he engaged in the fur 
business for several years. Previous to taking up his residence in Larimore he had spent a 
number of winters there working at his trade. 

Edward Arnold was educated in the common schools and passed the days of his boy- 
hood and youth under the parental roof. When twenty-one years old he apprenticed himself 
to the miller's trade, at which he worked for five years, but in 1900 he became identified 
with the grain business, becoming second man in the Northwestern elevator at Larimore, 
and in the intervening years has gained an enviable reputation as an enterprising and astute 
business man. Since 1914 he has engaged in the merchandising business in Everest on his 
own account and that undertaking has |)roved profitable. 

On the 14th of June, 1909, ilr. Arnold was married to Miss Theresa Tritchlcr. of Cassel- 
ton, by whom he has tw'o children, Elwood G. and Ralph. 

Mr. Arnold is a republican but has never been an office seeker. He is identified with 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Y'eomen. Both he and his wife belong to 
the Catholic church, the influence of which they seek to extend in all possible ways. They 
have gained many warm personal friends and are held in high esteem because of the integrity 
of their lives. 



A. H. MERRHX. 



A. H. Merrill, manager of the White Lumber Company's branch at Mooreton, has been 
engaged in the lumber business for many years and understands it thoroughly. A native of 
Maine, he was born November 4, 18.53, and is a son of Adolphiis and Susan P. (Perkins) 
Merrill, also natives of the Pine Tree state, the former born in IS.'iO and the latter in 1827. 
The paternal grandfather was A. H. IVTerrill. who owned the state quarries in Brownville, 
l\faine. and who was a man of wealth, his estate being valued at three hundred thousand 
dollars. In his early life he resided in JIassachusctts but was for many years a resident of 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 259 

Maine. The maternal grandfather was Joseph Perkins a representative of a well known 
New England familj'. Adolphus Merrill worked in the quarries all of his life and passed 
away in Maine in 1908. He was a republican in politics and was a member of the Congre- 
gational church, to whicli his wife also belonged. They were married in Maine on the 26th 
of June, 1851, and became the parents of twelve children, of whom the subject of this review 
is the eldest and of whom ten are living. 

A. H. Merrill received his general education in the common and high schools and subse- 
quently attended the Bangor Theological Seminar}', from which he was graduated in 1886. 
He then went to Utah, where he did missionary work for the Congregational church for a 
time, but on the 5th of December, 1887, he removed to North Dakota and for ten years en- 
gaged in teaching school. In 1899 he took charge of a lumberyard, which he conducted until 
1909, and during that time also published a newspaper. He is now manager of the White 
Lumber Companj^'s branch at Mooreton and is I'ecognized as one of the most able representa- 
tives of that concern, with which he has been connected for a number of years. 

In 1876 Mr. Merrill was married to, Miss Augusta Sampson, also a native of Maine. Both 
belong to the Congregational church, in the work of wliich they take an active interest. Mr. 
Merrill casts his ballot in support of the prohibition party as he believes that many of the 
problems which confront the country will be solved when the liquor traffic is done away with. 
He has served as clerk of the school board and is deeply interested in everything that 
promotes the mora! and intellectual advancement of his community. He devotes practically 
his entire time to his business and the responsible duties devolving upon him are discharged 
to the satisfaction of all concerned. 



ANDREW 0. HEADLAND. 



Andrew 0. Headland possesses the spirit of enterprise which is rapidly working a 
marked transformation in North Dakota, developing the state along lines of substantial 
progress and improvement. He has won success as a farmer of Stanley township, Cass 
county, and is also president of the Farmers Elevator at Sanders. He was born in Norway, 
March 10, 1874. His parents, 0. E. and Bertha Headland, were likewise natives of that 
country but in June, 1875, emigrated to the United States. They located upon a farm in 
Cass county. North Dakota, where both passed away. To them were born ten children, one 
of whom is deceased. 

Andrew 0. Headland remained at home until he became of age and then purchased the 
farm where he now lives, on section 2, Stanley township. The place comprises a half section 
of excellent land and he also has holdings in Minnesota farm lands. In the development of 
his place he follows the most progressive methods, carefully rotating his crops, studying the 
needs of the soil and procuring the best seed. He also utilizes the latest improved farm 
machinery in facilitating the work of the fields and caring for the harvests, and his efforts 
are attended with excellent results. He is president of and a large stockholder in the 
Farmers Elevator at Sanders and is also vice president of the River Line Telephone Com- 
pany. All this indicates his progressive spirit, showing him to be a man who never neglects 
his opportunities but wisely uses his chances for the attainment of individual success, while 
at the same time he contributes to public progress. 

Mr. Headland was married in 1908 to Miss Clara C. Gallagher, a native of St. Paul, 
Minnesota, by whom he has three children: Bcrnice Selina. Andrew Oliver and Adele Gurina. 
Mrs. Headland had never lived upon a farm up to the time of her marriage but adapted 
herself very readily to farm life and takes a deep interest in all that pertains to the benefit 
and improvement of the farm and the advancement of agriculturists as a class. She is an 
ardent believer in the Non-Partisan League, regarding it as the means by which the farmers 
will become organized into a compact body, and instead of being merely producers and 
tillers of the soil, will also have voice in the government and in the management of public 
affairs. She believes that the women of the farm should have the most modern equipment 
to aid them in their housework and she is a believer in the conservation of forces that the 
best results may be secured. While not taking an active part in the work for woman suf- 



260 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

frage, she is a firm advocate of tlie cause and feels that woman, having proven lierself the 
equal of man in intelligence and capacity, should have equal voice with him in the manage- 
ment of the allairs which so closely affect her life, for every public question bears strongly 
upon the home. 

Mr. Headland is a republican and is now serving as chairman of Stanley township, 
while for twenty years he was a member of the school board. Fiaternally he is a thirty- 
second degree Mason and in his daily life exemplifies the beneficent spirit and teachings of 
the craft. He has a wide acquaintance in this part of the state and the many substantial 
and admirable qualities which he has displayed have gained for him the warm and enduring 
regard of his many friends. 



1. M. BUXN. 



I. M. Bunn, who owns and operates an elevator at Bufl'alo, is well known throughout 
that section of the state as an expert grain buyer and excellent business man. A native 
of Minnesota, he was born in Goodliue county on the 25th of September, 1862, of the 
marriage of Isaac M. and Cynthia (Cryle) Bunn, both natives of Tennsylvania, where they 
grew to maturity and where their marriage occurred. They continued to reside there until 
the '50s, when, with their three children, they removed to Goodhue county, Minnesota, and 
located upon a farm, where they resided until called by death. 

I. M. Bunn passed the days of his boyhood and youth under the parental roof and at- 
tended the common schools in the acquirement of an education. He also learned the car- 
penter's trade and after removing to Mayville, Traill county, North Dakota, he engaged in 
carpentering independently. On the 2d of January, 1890, he went to Lake Superior, Wis- 
consin, where he followed his trade for two years, after which he returned to Xorth Dakota 
and identified himself with the grain business, entering the employ of the Anienia & Sharon 
Land Company. Ue was given charge of their elevator at Amenia, where he remained for 
ten years, but in 1900 he went to Ward county and homesteaded one hundred and sixty 
acres of land ten miles north of Minot. He proved up on this farm but in 1903 sold it and 
returned to Cass county, again engaging in the grain business. He was manager of 
Armour's elevator at Page until 1904, when he took charge of the Farmers elevator at 
Chaffee. On the 1st of July, 1916, he resigned that position and purchased an elevator at 
Buflfalo, Xorth Dakota, where he is now engaged in business. He is an excellent judge of 
grain and keeps in close touch with the market, and has therefore steadily prospered. 

In 1883 Mr. Bunn was married at Larimore, North Dakota, to Miss Nellie StuU, by 
whom he had four children. Three of the number survive: Maud, the wife of S. T. Son- 
sterud, of Grand Forks, this state; George B., who is manager of a grain elevator at Myra, 
Cass county; and Iva, a stenographer at Fargo. The wife and mother passed away in 
1900, and two years later Mr. Bunn was united in marriage to Miss Daisy Carroll, of 
Goodhue county, Minnesota. 

Mr. Bunn is a democrat in politics, but although he takes the interest of a good citizen 
in public affairs, he has never sought nor desired office, his business interests requiring his 
undivided time and attention. In all relati<ins of life he conforms to high ethical standards, 
and he is not only respected as a man of ability but is also highly esteemed because of his 
integrity and his pleasing personal qualities. 



MORGAN J. FORD 



Morgan J. Ford, cashier of the Farmers Bank of ^Vheatland, is recognized as a leader in 
financial and business circles of Cass county. His birth occurred in Huron. Ontario, Canada, 
April 11, 18G9, and his parents were Dennis and Bridget (King) Ford, both natives of 
Ireland. The father, who was born in 1832, died in 1888. but the mother, whose natal year 
was 1833, survived hira for over two decades, dying in 1909. They were married in Canada, 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 261 

to which country the fatlier had removed when a youth of eighteen years, and there they 
continued to live until 1878, when they came to North Dakota and settled in Gill township, 
Cass county. The father took up a homestead and tree claim, on both of which he proved 
up, and he continued to reside upon his land until called by death. He was a devout member 
of the Roman Catholic church, the teachings of which guided his life. To him and his wife 
were born eleven children, seven of whom are still living. 

Morgan .T. Ford attended the common schools in the acquirement of his earl}' education 
and subsequently was for one year a student in the University of ilinnesota. His boyhood 
and youth were passed upon the home farm, and he early became familiar with practical 
methods of agiiculture, which knowledge proved of gieat value to him when he began farm- 
ing independent!}'. In 1912, however, he turned his attention to another field of activity, 
removing to Casselton and working for the Frank Lynch Company for two years, after 
which he took up his residence in \\lieatland and accepted the position of cashier of the 
Farmers Bank. He has since held that office and in the management of the affairs of the 
bank has manifested sound judgment and an understanding of the basic principles of finance 
that underlie banking procedure. He owns nine hundred and sixty acres of fine land, and 
the financial independence which he has gained is all the more notable in tliat he is a self- 
made man. 

In 1902 occurred the marriage of Jlr. Ford and Miss Mary Langer, who was born in 
North Dakota and is a daughter of Frank J. Langer, an early settler of Cass county. Mr. 
and Jlrs. Ford are the parents of four children: .John and Weldon, both of whom are in 
school; and Morgan Dennis and Mary Evelyn, twins. 

The republican party has in Mr. Ford a stanch adherent, but his business interests 
leave him no time to take an active part in politics. His religious faith is that of the 
Catholic chiu'ch, the work of which he furthers in every way possible. He is recognized as 
a valued citizen, and his personal friends are many as his predominant characteristics are 
such as invariably inspire confidence and regard. 



WILLIAil JIcCOSH. 



William McCosh, a general merchant of Ayr. North Dakota, was born in Ontario. Can- 
ada, March 3, 18T3, and is a son of William and Elizabeth (Cullen) McCosh, the former a 
native of Ayrshire, Scotland, and the latter of Nova Scotia. In his young manhood the 
father emigrated to Ontario, where his marriage occurred and where he successfully engaged 
in farming until he retired from active life, spending his last years in the enjoyment of a 
period of rest in Kincardine. He died in 1913, but his wife is still living and makes her home 
with a daughter in Saskatchewan. 

William McCosh passed the days of his boyhood and youth at home and received the 
greater part of his education in the public schools. In 1894 he came to North Dakota 
and during the following winter was a student at the Agricultural College at Fargo. In the 
spring, however, he began to work at bridge building, but after two months entered the 
employ of Park, Grant & Morris, wholesale grocers of Fargo, with whom he remained for a 
year. He then became connected with the whoesale grocery house of Lewis, Vidger & Com- 
pany, remaining with that firm for about eight months, after which he accepted a position 
with T. E. Yerxa, a grocer of Fargo. He remained in that employ for about seven years, 
but in November, 1903, entered business for himself, becoming a member of the Ayr Store 
Company, an incorporated concern, which conducts one of the leading general stores of Cass 
county. From time to time he has bought more stock in the company, now owning more 
than one-half, and since 1905 he has served as manager of the concern. His long connection 
with various phases of merchandising well qualifies him for this responsible position, and 
under his direction the store has proved a very profitable concern. He not only under- 
stands how to buy to advantage, but has also made the sales department very eSicient and 
his policy of giving full value for money received has commended the store to the patronage 
of the public. In addition to general merchandise good lines of hardware and farm 
machinery are handled, and the company also has the agency for the Overland automobile. 



262 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

In 1905 Mr. ilcCosh was married to Miss Catherine Chapman, of Ayr, North Dakota, 
and they have become the parents of four cliildren, Frances, Jessie, Edwin and Catherine, 
ilr. McCosh is a standi republican and for many years served as town clerk, while at present 
he holds the olliee of school director. Fraternally he is well known, belonging to the 
Modern Woodmen; Hiram Lodge, No. 20, A. F. & A. M., at Page, also the chapter, R. A. M., 
and Dakota Consistory. His religious faith is indicated by the fact that he is a member of 
the Presbyterian church, to which his wife also belongs, and in business as in other phases 
of life he guides his conduct by the teachings of Christianity. He possesses sound judg- 
ment and foresight and the determination necessary to carry his projects to successful 
completion. He is justly considered one of the important factors in the commercial life of 
the city of Ayr. 



CARL 0. STROM. 



Carl 0. Strom, cashier of the Bank of Berthold, was born at Madelia, Minnesota, Jan- 
uary 24, 1890, a son of Peter and Thora (Helickson) Strom, both of whom are natives of 
Norway. The father came to the new world when a young man of twenty-three years and 
the mother was brought to America by her parents when a little maiden of seven summers. 
Peter Strom directed his attention to farming and has continuously reside<l in Watonwan 
county, Minnesota, yet occupying the old homestead, to the cultivation of which he has 
devoted so many years of his life. He has served as township assessor for thirty-one years, 
called again and again to that office by the vote of his fellow citizens, who appreciate his 
fairness and faithfulness in the discharge of his duties. His family numbered seven chil- 
dren. 

Carl O. Strom, the youngest, attended the high school at Jladelia and afterward the 
Mankato (Minn.) College, being graduated from both schools. He remained at home until 
nineteen years of age and the summer months were devoted to farm work. He then left 
Minnesota and for one year engaged in teaching school in Idaho, after which he was employed 
at farm labor through the summer season and attended school in the winter months for 
about two years, realizing that a broader education would enable him to better cope with 
the conditions of business life. He then opened a real estate office in Madelia, where he 
remained for about six months, after which he became interested in the banking business at 
Kensington, Minnesota, in the capacity of bookkeeper. Three months later he went to Drake, 
North Dakota, and later to Fessenden, this state, where he was employed as bookkeeper 
until he came to Berthold in April, 1913. He entered the bank here as bookkeeper, but 
after a short time was promoted to the position of assistant cashier and has since been made 
cashier continuing in this connection for two years, his entire time and attention being 
devoted to the interests of the bank. 

In politics Mr. Strom is a republican, but has never sought nor desired oflicc. Frater- 
nally he is connected with the Odd Fellows Lodge at Berthold and in that organization has 
many warm friends. He is yet a young man, but has already gained a creditable position, 
and many a man his senior might well envy the success which he has already achieved. 



FRED A. IRISH. 



Through the successive steps of an orderly progression Fred A. Irish has reached th'_ 
responsible and important position of vice president of the First National Bank of Fargo 
and is accounted one of the prominent figures in financial circles in this state. He was born 
at Taylors Falls, Minnesota, on the 29th of September, 1870, and was but nine years of age 
when he went to Moorhead, Minnesota, in company with his parents, John S. and Emma 
J. Irish. The father was a boat builder and contractor and led an active, busy and useful 

life. 

Fred A. Irish with the glowing enthusiasm of youth, entered upon the inirsuit of an 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 263 

education and received liberal training in' that direction. Moreover, throughout his life he 
has been a reader and a student of human nature and in the school of experience he has 
learned many valuable lessons. When his text books were put aside he turned to the 
banking business, securing a position in the First National Bank at Moorhead, Minnesota, 
where he remained as assistant cashier until 1903. In that year he removed to Fargo and 
was appointed to the position of assistant cashier in the Red River Valley National Bank, 
with which he remained for about four years. On the 1st of January, 1906, he was elected 
cashier of the First National Bank of Fargo and acted in that capacity until he was chosen 
vice president of the same institution. He recognizes the fact that the bank which most 
carefully safeguards the interests of its depositors is most worthy of public trust and he 
has ever in its conduct adhered to a progressive policy that is tempered by conservatism. 

In 1904 Mr. Irish was united in marriage to Miss Mila Brown, of Aberdeen, South 
Dakota. In politics he is a republican, stalwart in support of the party, but has never 
been an office seeker. Fraternally he is connected with the Masons and he also belongs to 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. The community 
knows him as a public-spirited citizen, one whose interest in the general welfare is deep and 
sincere, finding expression in many tangible efforts to promote the public good. He has 
always lived in the west and the spirit of enterprise which has been the dominant factor in 
the upbuilding of this section of the country has found exemplification in his business 
career. 



H. E. SIEVERT. 



H. E. Sievert, the owner and publisher of the Wyndmere Pioneer, one of the excellent 
weekly papers of that section of the state, was born in Calumet county, Wisconsin, March 
9, 1889, a son of E. C. and Helena (Bettner) Sievert, born respectively in Calumet county, 
Wisconsin, in 1S63 and in New Richland, Minnesota, in 1870. They were married in the 
Badger state and resided there for eight years thereafter. At the end of that time they 
removed to Minnesota and they are now residing at New Richland, that state. The father 
has a machine, wagon and blacksmith shop and is quite successful in business. In politics 
he is a republican, while his religious faith is that of the Congregational church. To him 
and his wife have been born four children: A. F., a druggist of Great Bend, this state; H. 
E.; H. W., who is engaged in the lumber business at Freeborn, Minnesota; and Nita Fern, at 
home. 

H. E. Sievert was educated in the New Richland high school, from which he was gi-ad- 
uated in 1908. and subsequently he clerked in a store for a year and a half. At the end of 
that time he entered the newspaper business at New Richland and for two years served as 
foreman of an office there. In 1913 he removed to Wyndmere, North Dakota, and purchased 
the Wyndmere Pioneer, which has a circulation of seven hundred. Its news columns are 
up-to-date and reliable and its editorials are forceful and concise. Mr. Sievert also does job 
printing and has gained a gratifying patronage along that line. He is a republican and con- 
ducts the Pioneer as a republican newspaper. Since becoming a resident of Wyndmere he 
has gained many personal friends and his ability as a newspaper man is generally recog- 
nized. 



RICHARD C. HOCKING. 



Richard C. Hocking is a member of the firm of Coil, Hocking & Company and is man- 
ager of their store, which is one of the best in Wheatland. He is well known in Cass 
county, where he has spent the greater part of his life, his birth there occurring on the 
12th of January, 1879. His parents, John S. and Mary J. (Matters) Hocking, were both 
born in England and emigrated to the United States in their youth. They were married 
in Michigan, where they remained until 1877, when they removed to Cass county. North 
Dakota, taking up a homestead and tree claim. The father was a poor man when he came 



264 HISTORY OF XORTIT DAKOTA 

to tliis state but lias gained a gratifying measure of success and is now well-to-do. He and 
his wife are still living upon the home farm. To them were born eleven children, of whom 
nine survive. 

Richard C. Hocking was educated in the common schools of Cass county, and also in 
Macalester College at St. Taul, which he attended for three years, and in a business college 
at Minneapolis. On finishing his schooling he became bookkeeper for a cold storage com- 
pany of Minneapolis, where he remained for three years. He was subsequently bookkeojier 
for the Twin City Rapid Transit Company for nineteen months but in 1904 returned to 
Cass county, North Dakota, and engaged in merchandising under the style of Coil, Hocking 
& Company, which firm carries a well selected line of goods and is well patronized, its lib- 
eral business policy enabling it to retain custom once gained. 

In I'JOl Mr. Hocking was married to Miss Catherine S. Hawley, who was born in 
Canada and by whom he has two children, Catherine E. and Richard Wendell. 

Mr. Hocking gives his political allegiance to the republican party but has never been 
an aspirant for office. Fraternally he is connected with the Masonic blue lodge and Royal 
Arch chapter and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he has filled all of the 
chairs. His business ability and enterprise are generally acknowledged, and he is also recog- 
nized as a public-spirited citizen and as a man of sterling qualities. 



LE\T RICE. 

Among the pioneers who, in spite of obstacles and privations, established their homes 
in Cass county in the early days of its history and who, as the years passed, developed the 
prairie into well improved farms, is numbered Levi Rice, who is now living retired in Tower 
City, enjoying a richly deserved period of rest and leisure. His birth oce\u-red in Xova 
Scotia on the 23d of August, 1840, and he is a son of Levi and JIargaret (Robison) Rice, 
natives of Annapolis county, Nova Scotia, where their entire lives were passed. The father 
devoted his time and energy to agricultural pursuits. 

Levi Rice was reared under the parental roof and attended the public schools in the 
pursuit of an education. When seventeen years of age he went to Bigby, Nova Scotia, where 
he apprenticed himself to the carpenter's trade under his brother Abner. He worked at 
carpentering in Bigby for twenty-three years, gaining an enviable reputation as an expert 
and conscientious workman, but in 1880 he decided to try his fortune in North Dakota, 
which he believed offered unusual oi)portunities to the man who was not afraid of hard work 
and was determined to succeed. lie located in Cass county and homesteaded eighty acres 
on section 32, Cornell township, which he soon brought under cultivation, and later, from 
time to time he bought other land, becoming the owner oi live hundred and eighty acres in 
all. He concentrated his energies upon the operatinn of liis farm, and his industry and 
efficient methods resulted in the production of good ii-o|is whiili lirouiilit a high prirc on thr 
market. In 1902, feeling that he had accumulated a competence, lie gave up the work of 
the farm and removed to Tower City, where he has since lived retired. He owns stock in the 
Farmers elevator at Power City. 

Mr. Rice is one of the substantial uu'n of his county and his resilience is coiufortalile 
and commodious, but during the first winter that he resided in this state he lived in an 
eight foot square shanty, where he kept bachelor's hall. The following year, however, his 
wife and his son Francis joined him and he built a shed addition to his shack which served 
as the family residence for two years. At the end of that time he was able to erect a good 
dwelling. 

On the 3(1 of February, 1867, Mr. Rice was \inited in marriage to Miss Cassandra 
Hawkswortli, a daughter of Joshua and Jfary (McCormack) Hawksworth and a native of 
Bigby. Nova Scotia, in which country her jiarents spent their entire lives. Mr. and Mrs. 
Rice have one son, Francis T., a lumlier merchant of Tower City, who married Katherine 
Wasam and has two children, Clifford and Jfarjory. 

Mr. Rice supports the republican party at the imlls. being cnTivuiii'il tliat (he ailii|i(i(in 
of its policies would make for [irosperity and the sobitiipii of many iirolih'ins of the day, 



f 1 




I.i;\l KICK 




MKS. LEVI RICE 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 269 

and he manifests a eomniendable interest in everything that affects the general welfare. 
He has served for a number of years as a member of the school board, proving capable and 
conscientious in the discharge of liis duties. Both lie and his wife are members of tlie 
Federated cliurch and no good cause appeals to them in vain. 



LARS OLSGARD. 



Lars Olsgard, vice president of the Bank of Wyndmere, was born in Richland county, 
North Dakota, November 21, 1879, and is a son of Ola and Guri (Sorbel) Olsgard, both 
natives of Norway, the former born on the 13th of May, 1845, and the latter in 1855. The 
father emigrated to the United States in young manhood and settled in Richland county. 
North Dakota, in 1871, being one of the early pioneers of the county. He took up land and 
now owns three liundred and eighty acres, from which he derives a substantial income. 
When he came to this state he was in straitened circumstances, but lie was energetic and 
possessed good judgment and in time gained iinancial independence. He is an active mem- 
ber of the Lutheran church which he aided in organizing, and his political belief is that of 
the republican party. He is a well educated man and keeps informed on all questions of 
public interest. He was married in Richland coimty to Miss Guri Sorbel, who died on the 
7th of April, 1911. They were the parents of three children: Sophia, the wife of Gustav 
G. Mellem, a hardware merchant of Wyndmere; Nels, who is living on the old home farm; 
and Lars. Both of the grandfatliers of our subject died in Norway. 

Lars Olsgard received an excellent education, graduating from Concordia College at 
Moorliead, Minnesota, in 1897. In 1900 he engaged in the hardware business in Wyndmere 
and so continued for three years, after whicli he entered the First National Bank as assistant 
cashier. After being connected with that bank for four years he was made vice president of 
the Bank of Wyndmere, in which capacity he is still serving. The institution is capitalized 
at ten thousand dollars, has a surplus of five thousand dollars and its average deposits are 
two hundred thousand dollars. Mr. Olsgard devotes practically his entire time to his duties 
in connection with tlie bank and his detailed knowledge of the business and his good judg- 
ment are important factors in tlie success of the institution. He began liis career without 
•capital but has gained a gratifying measure of success and now owns considerable hind in tlie 
county. 

On the 9th of .Juno, 1907, Mr. Olsgard was united in marriage to Miss Freda Franz, a 
native of St. Paul, Minnesota, and they have three children, Pearl, Evelyn and Viola. He is 
a republican but does not take an active part in politics. Fraternally he is well known, 
belonging to the Masonic blue lodge, the coinraandery and Shrine and to the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. He takes a commendable interest in the advancement of his community 
along moral, civic and commercial lines and is recognized as a valuable citizen. 



S. F. SHERMAN. 



As cashier of the First National Bank of Tower City, S. F. Sherman has demonstrated 
his business acumen and sound judgment and his advice is often sought on matters of invest- 
ment. He was born in the city which is still his home on the 6tli of December, 1881, a son 
of R. P. and Sarah E. (Philips) Sherman, the former of whom was born in New York and 
tlie latter in Michigan. They were married in the Wolverine state, which remained their 
home until 1880, when they became settlers of Cass county, North Dakota. The father 
established a bank at Tower City, which he conducted for thirty years and which was known 
as the Tower City Bank. In 1911 he retired from business, having accumulated a competence, 
and removed to California, where he and his wife are still living. All of their four children 
survive. 

S. F. Sherman was reared under the parental roof and received his early education in 
the public schools of Tower City. Upon completing his preparatory work he attended the 

Vol. 11—15 



270 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

University of ilichigaii. Subsequently he entered his fatlier's bank as assistant cashier, wliiili 
office he held until 1903, when a reorganization was effected, the institution becoming known 
as the First National Bank, of which he became cashier. He has ably managed the affairs of 
the bank, and the volume of its business has grown steadily from j'ear to year. He makes 
the safeguarding of the interests of depositors and stockholders his first concern and yet 
has been able to promote the financial and commercial e.xpansion of the community by judi- 
ciously extended credit. In addition to his banking interests he is an extensive landowner. 

In 1905 Jlr. .Sherman was married to Miss Gertrude E. Smith, also a native of Tower 
City and a daughter of Henrj' V. and Louisa (Chapman) Smith, natives of Minnesota. Her 
father is deceased, but her mother is still living. Mr. and ilrs. Sherman have two sons, 
Richard Henry and l''rederick Smith. 

Mr. Sherman casts his ballot in support of the candidates and measures of the republican 
party and has taken an active interest in affairs of local government. He has served capably 
as mayor and for the past fourteen years has been clerk of the board of education, doing 
much in that time to promote the advancement of the public schools. His fraternal aflilia- 
tions are with Cereal Lodge, Xo. 9, A. F. & A. M., in which he has tilled all of the chairs; 
Tower City Lodge, No. 83, I. 0. O. F.; and Valley City Lodge, No. 1110, B. P. 0. E. Both 
he and his wife attend the Federated church, and they at all times stand for righteousness 
and moral advancement. They are widely known, and the circle of their friends is an exten- 
sive one. 



O. B. (iRAY. 



Agricultural interests in North Dakota find a prominent representative in 0. B. Cray, 
one of the large landowners of Cass county, operating one thousand acres in Rochester town- 
ship, three miles from Page. He is also identified with the business interests of the town as 
a dealer in agricultural implements and has built up a large trade in that connection. Mr. 
Gray is a native of Wisconsin. He was born in Boseobel, March 5, 1865, a son of Joseph W. 
and Emeline (Stone) Gray, both of whom were natives of the state of New York, where they 
were reared and nuirried. About 1852 they migrated to Wisconsin, where the father acquired 
a farm of three hundred and five acres near Boseobel, remaining thereon until 1880, when he 
came to North Dakota an<l liome.steaded one hundred and sixty acres. He also secured an 
additional tract of one hundred and sixty acres in Colgate township. Cass county, as a tree 
claim and devoted his energies to the cultivation and improvement of his land until the 
ileath of his wife about- 1903. He afterward made his home among his children but continued 
to operate his farm, the boundaries of which he had extended until it comprised four hun- 
dred and eighty acres. He was busily engaged in the cultivation and supervision of that 
jilace U]! to the time of his death, which occurred in ^[anli, I'.ii:;. in politics lu' was a 
republican but never an office seeker. 

0. B. Gray spent his youthful days under the parental roof and acquired his education 
in the public schools. He was Iwent.v-one years of age when he became a wage earner, .secur- 
ing employment at farm labor. In 1888 he arrived in Page and engaged in the meat and live 
stock business, operating along those lines for nineteen years. Later he purchased the con- 
trolling interest in the Ayr State Bank, with whicli he was identified for about a j'ear and 
a half, and in 1909 he established his present imi)lement business. He nuide his first invest- 
ment in land in 1895, when he jiurchased a ipuirter section, but since that time he has made 
other investments at various intervals until his holdings embraced one thousand acres, all 
(if which is operated iinder his imnu'diate supervision. His is one of those fine and splendidly 
developed farms which have made the state fanunis. He employs the most progressive 
methods in the operation of his fields and in the conduct of every phase of the business and 
his success is the logical, legitimate and well merited results of his efforts. 

On the 8th of May, 1892, Mr. Gray was united in marriage to Miss Kate Ilanlcy, of 
North Freedom, Wisconsin, by whom he had seven children, six of whom still survive, as 
follows: Clarence, who works in his father's store: Edith, a student in the State Normal 
School at Mawille, North Dakota; and Lewis, Inez, Merrill and .Tames, all at home. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 271 

Mr. Gray gives his political allegiance to the republican party and fraternally is indenti- 
fied with the following organizations: Hiram Lodge, No. 30, A. F. & A. M., of Page; Dakota 
Consistory, No. 1, A. & A. S. R.; El Zagal Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S.; Fargo Lodge, No. 260, 
B. P. 0. E.; the Ancient Order of United Workmen; and the Modern Woodmen of America 
at Page. He has ever maintained an even balance in his life by his activities outside of the 
pale of business and yet he never allows other things to interfere with the capabale manage- 
ment of his commercial and agricultural interests. He is justly accounted one of the fore- 
most business men of Cass county and is a representative of that class of men who have 
made North Dakota one of the great agricultural states of the Union. 



W. H. BARNETT. 



Among the practitioners at the bar of Fargo, W. H. Barnett is well known and con- 
temporaries and colleagues accord him a prominent and enviable position in the profession. 
He has been a resident of the capital since 1880 and. in the intervening years has practiced 
law, his ability bringing him ])rominently to the front in a calling where advancement is 
secured only through individual merit. He was born in Wisconsin on the 23d of July, 1856, 
and is a son of William D. and Julia A. (Huntley) Barnett, both of whom were natives of 
the state of New York. The father went to Wisconsin in 1846 and there passed away in the 
year 1868. His widow still survives and makes her home with her son, W. H. Barnett, in 
the eighty-sixth year of her age. Although she has now advanced far on life's journey she 
is still enjoying excellent health. She was the mother of three children, two of whom sur- 
vive. 

W. H. Barnett was reared and educated in Wisconsin and supplemented his public school 
course by a course in the law department of the State University at Madison, from which 
he was graduated with the class of 1880. He then sought a favorable field for practice and 
came to Fargo, where he opened a law office and has since followed his profession. He 
served as assistant states attorney for two years and was then elected states attorney, which 
position he occupied for four years. He also filled the office of assistant United States attor- 
ney by appointment for a term of five years. Through all the intervening period since his 
arrival in Fargo his practice has been extensive and of an important character. Along with 
those qualities found indispensable to the lawyer — a keen, rapid, logical mind, plus the busi- 
ness sense and a capacity for hard work — he brought to the starting point of his legal career 
certain rare gifts — eloquent language and a strong personalit}-. An elegant presence, an ear- 
nest, dignified manner, marked strength of character, a thorough grasp of the law and 
the ability to correctly apply its principles, are features in his effectiveness as an advocate. 

In 1883 Mr. Barnett wedded Miss Lelah Tillotson, and in the city of their residence they 
are widely and favorably known, occupying a prominent position in social circles. Mr. Bar- 
nett is an earnest republican and has served as police magistrate of Fargo for eleven years. 
His interests, however, chiefly center in his profession and his devotion to his clients' interests 
has become proverbial. He has been retained in connection with much of the most important 
litigation tried in the courts at Fargo and the records bear testimony to his ability and 
success. 



GEORGE \V. KELLEY. 



George W. Kelley is one of those who have contributed to the business growth and 
expansion of Tower City and who aided in organizing the Farmers Elevator Company there, 
of which he has since served as manager. He owns eight hundred acres of land and is one of 
the well-to-do residents of Cass county. A native of Minnesota, his birth occurred on the 16th 
of Februar}-, 1859, and his parents were John and Jane (Hammel) Kelley, both of whom 
were born in Ireland. In 1850 they emigrated to America and after residing in New Jersey 
for four years removed to Minnesota, where they lived on a farm until 1880. In that year 



272 HISTORY OF XORTH DAKOTA 

they arrived in Cass county, North Dakota, and then^ they spent their remaining years. Two 
of their three children are still living. 

George W. Kelley was educated in the common schools of Jlinnesota and remained under 
the parental roof until he reached man's estate. In 187Q he came to North Dakota and took 
up land on section 8 Cornell township, Cass county, which he at once began to bring under 
cultivation. He devoted twenty-five years to farming and from time to time bought addi- 
tional land, acquiring in all eight hundred acres, all of which is improved. On leaving the 
farm he removed to Tower City and helped to organize the Farmers elevator there, of which he 
has since served as manager. He is an accmate judge of the quality of grain, keeps in close 
touch with the markets and possesses sound judgment, and has proved very successful as 
manager of the elevator, which does a large business. He is also vice president of the First 
National Bank of Tower City and is treasurer and secretary of the local telephone company. 
his sagacity and enterprise being factors in the advancement of the interests of those con- 
cerns. 

Mr. Kelley was married in 1894 to Miss Myrtle Beil, a native of Indiana, by whom he 
has had eight children: George R., Vera. .John, Myrtle, Muriel, Helen and Roy, all of whom 
are at home; and Frederick, who is deceased. Mr. Kelley is a stanch adherent of the repub- 
lican party and for four years served as county commissioner, while for a number of years 
he held the office of school director. He is a member of Tower City Lodge, No. 83, I. O. 0. F., 
and the teachings of the order are exemplified in his conduct. When he began his independent 
career he had no capital and he has at all times depended upon his own resources. The grati- 
fying measure of success which he has gained is therefore evidence of his ability. 



GEORGE C. OTTIS. 



George C. Ottis, the proprietor of the leading store in Wyndmere, also has a number 
of other important business connections and has been a leading factor in the development of 
his town and county. He was born in Cass county, North Dakota. September 17, 187.'), a son 
of Samuel and Carrie (Eikery) Ottis, the former of whom was born in Denmark in 1841 
and the latter in Wisconsin in 1847. The father served in the Danish army during the war 
between Germany and Denmark, but in 1864 he emigrated to the United States and made 
his way to Minnesota, where he farmed for a few years. In 1871 he came to Dakota terri- 
tory and took up a homestead, which he developed into a well improved farm. He has been 
very successful in business and still owns two sections of land after giving land to his chil- 
dren. He also owns his residence at Kindred, where he is living retired. His political sup- 
port is given the republican party, and he is a member of the Lutheran church. He was 
married in Fillmore county, Minnesota, to Miss Carrie Kikery. who died in 1891. Of their 
children four sons are living, namely: Louis, who is residing on the old homestead: George 
C; Bernhard, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work: and John, cashier of the 
bank at Kindred. 

George C. Ottis attended the public schools and was later for two years a student in 
the Concordia College at Moorhead, Jlinnesota, where he completed the commercial course. 
Subsequently he engaged in merchandising in Kindred for two years, after which, in 1900. 
he removed to Wyndmere, where he has since remained. He began business on a small scale 
but his store is now the largest in the town and the volume of his trade is growing steadily. 
He has prospered from the beginning as he has always adhered closely to the strictest com- 
mercial ethics and as he has spared no pains to supply the wants of his customers. In addi- 
tion to his store he is financially interested in the Noonan Security Bank, the Davenport 
Bank and the First State Bank at Opheim. ifontana, of which he is a director. He also 
owns stock in a number of enterprises, including an elevator and a creamery, and he holds 
title to a section of good land. He is one of the most successful men of Richland county, and 
his record is the more creditable in that he has always depended entirely iijion his own 

efforts. 

Mr. Ottis was married in 1903 to ;Miss Clara llollingby. a native of Osage. Iowa, by 
whom he has a daughter, Irene. He votes the republican ticket but is not otherwise active in 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 273 

politics. Fraternally he is connected with the ilasonie blue lodge, conimandery and Shrine, 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Woodmen. He holds membership in the 
Lutheran church and its teachings have guided his life. He is not only widely known and 
highly respected throughout the county but there are many who are his warm personal 
friends. 



L. H. STINE. 



L. H. Stine, of Tower City, is one of those men who, having gained a competence through 
the cultivation of the soil, have now retired and are enjoying a well deserved period of rest 
and leisure. He was born in Hungary on the 3d of December, 1870, a son of Frank and 
Rosa Stine, also natives of that country. The father died in Hungary, but in 1884 the 
mother came to America and passed her last years in this country, dying in Jlinnesota 
in 1889. 

L. H. Stine, who is the only child born to his parents, came to the United States when 
but twelve years of age and resided in Minnesota until 1893, in which year he came to North 
Dakota and settled upon a farm in Barnes county. He devoted his time and energy to agri- 
cultural pursuits and as the years passed his resources increased steadily, for he was practical 
and progressive in his methods and managed his business affairs well. In 1915 he sold his 
farm and removed to Tower City, where he is now practically living retired. In partnership 
with another gentleman, Mr. Stine purchased the store of W. W. Kueg & Company at 
Tower City in the early summer of 1916, and they now carry a stock valued at about 
twenty-five thousand dollars. Although he does not give his personal attention to the 
business, his son George is assisting in the management of the store. Mr. Stine also recently 
purchased one of the most modern residences of the city and there he_ and his family are 
now living. 

Mr. Stine was married in 1894 to Miss Lenna F. Felstad, a native of Norway, who, 
however, was brought to this country by lier parents when but five years old. To this unit)n 
have been born four children: George, who attended college at Fargo and is now connected 
with his father's store; Gertrude, a college student; Louis, a high-school student; and Walter. 

Mr. Stine votes the republican ticket and he is now serving as a member of the school 
board, while he was formerly on the township board. He is identified with Lodge No. 8.3, 
I. 0. O. F., with the Masons, the Workmen and the Yeomen and is well known in local 
fraternal circles. Both he and his wife attend the Federated church, to the advancement 
of whose work they give freely of time and money. Mr. Stine came to this country without 
resources other than his strength, energy and sound judgment, and the success which he 
has gained is due entirely to his own etforts. Those who know him, and he has a wide 
acquaintance, hold him in high esteem and warm regard. 



NELS K. NELSON. 



Among those who have contributed in no small measure to tlie agricultural develop- 
ment of the southeastern part of North Dakota is Nels K. Nelson, who resides on section C, 
Empire township, Cass county, and who owns nine quarter sections of good land in that 
county. A native of Norway, he was born on the 17th of July, 1874, a son of Karolius and 
Olianna (Arnson) Nelson, who in 1884 emigrated to the United States with their family. 
The father took up a homestead near Milnor, Sargent county, North Dakota, and also pre- 
empted one himdred and sixty acres, which he subsequently sold. He has become the owner 
of other land, however, holding title to three hundred and twenty acres near Milnor, and is 
now living retired at that place. 

Nels K. Nelson accompanied his parents to this country when he was ten years of age 
and continued to reside under the parental roof until he reached man's estate. He attended 
the common schools and thus gained a good education. After he became of age he bought 



274 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

oiu' Iniiuln'il and sixty ucrcs of lund and a year later purcliased a. socund i|uartiT section, 
liis labors as a larnier being from the lirst rewarded with excellent crops. As the years 
have passed he has added to his holding's from time to time and they now comprise nine 
ijuarter sections, or toiirteen hundred and forty acres, of as tine land as tliere is in Cass 
county, lie has depended upon his own etVorts, and the fact that he is now a man of 
independent means is evidence of his energy, his knowledge of the best methods of agricul 
ture anil the wise management of his business aflairs. He owns stock in the Ayr State 
Hank and in the Ayr Farmers Elevator, in which he is a member of the board of directors, 
and is recognized as one of the leading citizens of his county. 

Jn I'.IOO occurred the marriage of Jlr. Nelson and Miss Xellir .M. I.iiidstroni. of Krie 
township, Cass county, and they have become tlu' parents of six diildnii. of whom tliree 
are still living, Anna S., Gordon A. and Elmer. 

.Mr. Nelson is a republican in politics but has never had the tinu' nor inclination to 
take an active part in public aftairs. Fraternally he belongs to the Ancient Ordi'r of Inited 
Workmen, and both he and his wife are identified with the Presbyterian (•liur<h. During 
the three decades that he has resided in this stats he has witnessed a remarkable trans- 
formation, for when he arrived here it was still largely a frontier region and the most 
farsighted could not have pridictcd its present high state of development. 



DAVin M. JIALLOUGH. 



Daviil .\I. ilallough is engaged in farming on sections 24 and 25, Howe township, Cass 
county, w lieie he owns three hundred and twenty acres of land, and since 1907 lias also owned 
an elevator at Embden with a capacity of twenty-five thousand bushels. A native of Canada. 
he was born on the 18th of April, 1S79, and is a son of Joseph and Christina (Smith) Mal- 
lough. the former of whom was born in Ireland and the latter in Scotland. Koth removed to 
Canada in their youth, but in 1880 they took up their residence in Cass county. North Dakota. 
The father homesteaded land there and continued to cultivate it until his demise. His wife 
also passed away in that county. All but one of their ten children are still living. 

David M. Mallough remained at home until he became of age and divided his time between 
attending school and assisting his father with the farm work. Beginning his independent 
career, he determined to follow the occupation to which he had been reared, jmrchased land and 
began to cultivate it on his own account. After following agricultural pursuits for seven 
years on section 14, Howe township, h.' renu)ved to his present farm, which cominises three 
hundred and twenty acres on sections 24 and 2."j, that township. He raises both grain and 
stock and as he is at once eiu?rgetic and |nactical his activities yield him a good financial 
return. In 1907 he entered the grain business and now owns a large elevator at Embden which 
yields him a good profit. 

In 1901 Jlr. Mallough was married to Miss Anna Mc( onncll, a daughter of John Mc- 
f onnell, a retired farmer living in Embden, He was born in Canada on the 17th of October. 
1849, and his parents were David and Anna (Hamilton) JlcConnell, the former a native of 
Canada and the latter of Scotland. Tlie mother removed to the Dominion, however, in her 
youth and there her marriage occurred. Both ilr. and :\[rs. David McConnell resided in the 
Dominion until called to their reward. They had eight children but live are now deceased. 

.lidin .McConnell remained at home until he was twenty-three years old, when he began 
farming on his own account in his native country. Later he removed to Cass county. North 
Dakota, but a short time later went to the vicinity of Aberdeen, South Dakota, where he 
took up a claim and built a small shanty, in which he lived for six months. He then returned 
to Cass county, this state, and bought a farm, to the cultivation of which he devoted his 
time and energies until 191.'!. when, having accumulated a competcnc<>, he retired from active 
life and removed to Embden, where he is now living. He is a republican in politics, but has 
never sought ollicc and fraternally is a nuMuber of the Modern Woodnu-n of America. When 
he came to North Dakota he had no money, but he possesseil energy and souml judgment and 
he has gained a place among the substantial men of his county. He is an (dder of the Presby- 
terian church, to which his wife also belongs. She was in her maidenhoood Miss Jane 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 275 

Armour and was born in Canada. Tliey were married in 1877 in that country and they have 
become tlie parents of five children, namely : Anna, now Mrs. Mallough ; Minnie, tlie wife of 
Albert Hilkey; John; Ida, who is a graduate of the State Normal School at Valley City and 
is now teaching; and William, at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mallough are the parents of two children, Lloyd C. and Lila Maj'. Mr. Mal- 
lough is an adherent of the republican party and has served his district acceptably as school 
director, but has never sought to figure prominently in politics. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Masonic blue lodge at Cassclton and with the American' Yeomen at Casselton. Both 
he and his wife hold membership in the Presbyterian church, the work of which they seek 
to further, and the sincerity of their faith is evidenced in the rectitude of their daily lives. 
He is recognized as a man of foresight, energy and business acumen and has been a factor in 
the commercial advancement of Embden as well as in the agricultural development of his 
township. 



HON. FRANK H. DICKINSON. 

Hon. Frank H. Dickinson, formerly a member of the North Dakota legistature and an 
active representative of farming interests on section 10, Ayr township, Cass county, was born 
in Battle Cieek, Michigan, December 12, 1858, a son of .lohn W. and CVnthia Ann (Stiles) 
Dickinson, both of whom were natives of New York. They were married in Michigan and 
located on a farm four miles from Battle Creek, where they resided up to the time of Mr. 
Dickinson's death. 

The usual experiences of the farm lad were those that came to Frank H. Dickinson in 
his boyhood and youth. He was educated in the district schools and at the Indiana Normal 
School at Valparaiso. He taught for two winter terms in Michigan and in the spring of 1880 
he arrived in North Dakota. During the first year of his residence in this state he was 
employed as a clerk in a mercantile establishment at Fargo. In 1881 lie returned to Michigan 
for his biide and when he returned to North Dakota following his marriage he located in 
Tower City, where he began dealing in fruit. In 1883 he went to Ayr, becoming one of the 
founders of the town, which he named. There he engaged in the mercantile business and 
was the first postmaster of the town, holding the office for twenty years. He was also the 
first station agent of Ajt and occupied that position for five years. He operated the first grain 
elevator and he continued to engage in merchandising for twenty-one years. In the early 
'90s he organized and incorporated the Ayr Stores Company, one of the important mercantile 
enterprises of Cass county, but after eft'ecting its organization he sold his interest and has 
since given his attention to the management and direction of his extensive land holdings, 
owning at one time an equity in twenty-six quarter sections of land. He has been one of the 
largest dealers in North Dakota farm lands, selling sixty-seven quarter sections in one sea- 
son, which land was a part of the estate of ex-Governor Smith of Vermont. Mr. Dickinson 
has engaged in farming since 1886, cultivating from ten to fifteen hundred acres, and he now 
owns thirteen quarter sections or two thousand eighty acres. His jjossessions make him one 
of the large landowners of the state and his agricultural interests are conducted along the 
most progressive lines, embodying all the advanced methods of farming and the utilization 
of the latest improved machinerj'. 

As a companion and helpmate on the journey of life Mr. Dickinson chose Miss Ida V. 
Cliilson, of Battle Cr.eek, Michigan, by whom he has three children, namely: Maud A., who is 
the wife of A. L. Bayley, a banker of Alice. North Dakota ; Vern C. deputy sheriff of Cass 
county, North Dakota; and Dean D., at home. 

A republican in politics, for years Mr. Dickinson was an incumbent in various township 
offices. , He was the first township clerk after the organization of his township and in 1902 
he was chosen to represent his district in the state legislature. On the expiration of his 
term he was renominated by acclamation in the republican contention and was elected and 
served for a second term. He gave careful consideration to each question which came up for 
settlement, studied closely the vital political problems of the day and his support of measures 
resulted from a belief in their efficacy as factors in the welfare of the commonwealth. Frater- 



276 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

nallj' he is identified with the Masons, belonging to the following branches: Iliiam Lodge, No. 
'20, A. F. & A. il., of Page; Casselton Chapter, R. A. M.; Auburn Conimandery, K. T., of 
Fargo; and El Zagal Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S., of Fargo. His wife belongs to the Order of 
the Eastern Star. Both are well known in Cass county and other parts of the state and Mr. 
Dickinson is accorded a very prominent position in political and agricultural circles. 



JIELVIN N. MALLORY. 



Melvin N. Mallory, cashier of the First National Bank of Page, Cas.s county, has been 
connected with this institution since 1912. His residence in the state, however, covers the 
intervening years from 1903. He was born in Plainview, Minnesota, November 10, 1877, a 
son of Julius W. and Ellen E. (Wedge) Mallory. The father was born in St. Lawrence 
county. New York, and the mother's birthplace was probably Waupun, Wisconsin, where 
they were married. In 1864 they removed to Plainview, Minnesota, and Mr. JIallory was 
engaged in farming for a number of years, his life's labors being ended in death in 1902. His 
widow is still residing in Plainview. 

Melvin N. Mallory was reared under tlir parental roof mid acquired his education in 
the Plainview high school. He also attended Hamline University at St. Paul, Minnesota, 
from which institution he was graduated with the class of 1900, winning the degree of Ph. B. 
In 1903 he arrived in North Dakota and engaged in the drug business, with which he was 
identified in Plainview, Lisbon and Hope until the spring of 1912, when he removed to Page 
and entered the First National Bank as assistant cashier. In the spring of 1914 he was 
advanced to the position of cashier and is now serving in tliat capacity, making an excellent 
record through his capability, lojalty and enterprise. He is a stockholder in tlie institution 
and is a member of its board of directors. 

In 1908 Mr. Mallorj- was united in marriage to Miss Violet Morrisli, of .Mayvillc, North 
Dakota, by whom he has a son, Howard Byron. The parents are members of the Jlethodist 
Episcopal church and are interested in all that pertains to the welfare and upbuilding of 
the city in which they make their home. In politics Mr. Mallory is a republican and fra- 
ternally is connected with Occidental Lodge, F. & A. M., of Hope, North Dakota. He has 
made continuous progress since starting out in the business world on his own account and 
each forward step has brought him a broa<lcr outlook and wider opportunities. There has 
been nothing spectacular in his career and nothing esoteric. lie has worked on along the 
well defined lines of labor and his close application, perseverance and enterprise' liave been 
the means of winning for him advancement. 



RICHARD S. TVLKR. 



Richard S. Tyler, who died on the Stli of .lanuary, 1903, was one of thi- leading and 
dominant figures in the upbuilding of Fargo and eastern North Dakota. He was born In 
Tompkins county, New York, on the 3d of December. 1848, the youngest son of Oliver and 
Harriet (l>ampman) Tyler, who were natives of the Empire state and descendants of old 
New England families. The mother was of Huguenot ancestry, while several members of 
the Tyler family served in the Revolutionary war both as private aiul officer. Oliver Tyler, 
the father, was a farmer by occupation and during the boyhood of his son Richard moved, 
with his family, to Sterling, Illinois, wlicre there seemed a fine prospect in the then rapidly 
developing state of Illinois. Richard, the son, was too young to apjireciate the conditions 
and opportunitii's, and not liking the new country returned to his native county of Tomp- 
kins and secured a clerkship in a general store, at Drydeii. New York, .\fter several years 
of clerkship there, he beeanu' connect<'d with a wholesale grocery housi' in .'Syracuse, New 
York, and later still with a larger one in the same line in New York city. 

From the latter Mr. Tyler came to Fargo during what was known as the "Boom Days" 
of 1881 and took up his residence here. From the first he foresaw the developments of the 




RICHARD S. TYLER 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 279 

state, and believed in the future of his newly adopted city. He became a heavy investor 
in botli business and residence property, platted the addition to the city northwest of town 
known as Tyler's addition and occupied himself in buying and selling real estate. Later 
he became interested in. and was one of the promoters of the Fargo Southern Railroad, now 
merged into the Milwaukee Railroad, and acquired extensive holdings in lands and town 
sites along the route of the new railroad, from Fargo, to Ortonville, Minnesota. In Wahpeton, 
North Dakota, he platted an addition of his holdings under the name of the R. S. Tyler 
Addition, and also joined the late N. K. Hubbard, who was interested with him there in 
another large tract in the platting of the Hubbard and Tyler Addition to the southern por- 
tion of that city. 

His great activities were, however, expended in the development and upbuilding of 
Fargo, where he has left the impress of his individuality upon many lines of activity which 
have contributed toward its progress and welfare. He became one of the chief factors in 
the organization of the Fargo Commercial Club and was its first president. As such he 
did much to secure favorable freight rates to the end of making Fargo a wholesale center 
and distributing point for the state, a position which he hoped to see her occupy. In every 
movement for the advancement and upbuilding of the city he was a conspicuous figure and his 
labors were directly beneficial and resultant. After the fire of 1893 which swept away the 
business portion of the town Jlr. Tyler erected the present Tyler building at 21 Broadway, 
in which he established the oflice of R. S. Tyler & Company. Here he conducted successfully 
the mortgage and loan, as well as real estate business which is still continued by his Avidow 
under the firm name of R. S. Tyler Company, Incorporated. 

In 1887 Mr. Tyler married Miss Annie A. Dwight, daughter of Jeremiah W. and Rebecca 
A. (Cady) Dwight. She is descended in the paternal line from an old Massachusetts family, 
which, as well as the Cadys, came from England and did active service in colonial times. 
Mrs. Tyler's father came in 1879 to North Dakota seeking investments, purchased large 
tracts of farm lands in Richland and Steele counties and organized, under the laws of the 
State of Xew York the Dwight Farm & Land Company of North Dakota. In this company 
^Ir. Tyler was a stockholder and director up to the time of his death, and assisted in its 
management by bis wise counsel and sound judgment. 

In 1893 Mr. Tyler was appointed a world's fair commissioner from this state but resigned, 
owing to a pressure of private business which made it impossible for him to give the work 
due attention. He was a Mason of high rank, iiaving attained the thirty-second degree of 
the Scottish Rite, and his life was an exemplification of the basic principles of that fraternity. 
His career was characterized by farsighted judgment, integrity of purpose, judgment and 
honest dealings, great enterprise and unrelaxing efl'ort. A man of well balanced powers and 
capacities in business afi'airs, his was the record of a strenuous life and of a strong individu- 
ality, sure of itself, stable in purpose, quick and keen in perception, swift in decision, energetic 
and persistent in action, upright, honest, honorable and loyal in all relations, a prominent 
figure and factor in tlie early development of both city and state. , 



WILLIAM HALTER. 



William Halter is an independent grain dealer owning and operating a grain elevator at 
Ayr. He was born in Sheldon, Iowa, January 31, 1886, a son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Kanes) 
Halter, who were natives of France and Germany respectively. They came to the United 
States with their parents, who were pioneer settlers of the state of Iowa, and it was at 
Sheldon, Iowa, that Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Halter were married. In 1896 they removed to 
Moody county. South Dakota, where they still reside. 

William Halter was reared under the parental roof and the common .schools aff'orded him 
his educational privileges. At the age of nineteen years he became connected with the grain 
trade, entering the employ of Frank Mead of Flandreau, South Dakota, with whom he re- 
mained for three and one-half years, during which time he gained broad experience in the 
business. He next took charge of an elevator at Bryant, South Dakota, in the employ of 
F. C. Smith, with whom he was thus connected for two years. He afterward entered the 



280 HISTORY OF XORIII DAKO'IA 

employ uf tlic ISemu'tt liraiii Cimi|)iiMy uf Flanilrrau. Soiitli Dakota, and I'm iiuc i ith was 

at EdKciton. Minnesota, after wliich he took eliar{;e of an elevator for the lirni at Airlie, 
Minnesota. A year later, or in 1911, he came to North Dakota and took ehar^e of the ele- 
vator at Flasher for the Oeeidental Elevator t'oni])any. with wliieh he was thus eonneited 
until ]!)13. At that date he organized the Flaslier Urain Company, of which he was made 
manager, secretary and treasurer. When a year had passed that elevator was sold to farmers 
of the vicinity and Mr. Halter removed to Almont, North Dakota, where he had charge of an 
elevator for tlie Farmers Union Mercantile Company. On the lOtli of .Inly. I'.llj, he pur- 
chased tlie elevator of the Winter, Truesdell & Ames Company at Ayr and is now operating 
the business indei)endently. His long experience in connection with the grain trade has well 
(pialified liiui for his undertaking. He is familiar with every jihase of the grain business 
and his interests are wisely and cajjably directed, bringing to him success. In addition to his 
other interests lie owns an eipiity in a tract of land tif one linmlri'd and si.\ty acres near 
Flasher. 

On the 1st of February, 1913, Mr. Halter was united in marriage to Miss Maud Leonard, 
of Flasher. F'raternally he is indentified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, be- 
longing to .Mandan Lodge No. 1256. Located during his business career at various points, he 
lias become one of the well known grain buyers of Nortli Dakota and has gained higli respect 
by reason of the integrity and enterprise of his methods. 



WILLIAM LKLCK DUL'GLAS. 

The specific and distinctive office of biography is not to give voice to a man's modest 
estimate of himself and his accomplishments, but rather to leave the perpetual record estab- 
lishing his character by the consensus of opinion on the part of his fellowmen. Throughout 
F'argo and wherever known in North Dakota, Mi-. Douglas was spoken of in terms of admira- 
tion and respect. His life was so thorough in its activit.v, so honorable in its piuposcs, so 
far-reaching and beneficial in its effects that it became an integral part of the history of the 
city of Fargo. In no sense a man in public life, he nevertheless exerted an immeasurable 
influence on the place of his residence because of his professional ability and his public spirit 
and when he passed away his death was the occasion of deep and wide spread regret. 

Mr. Douglas was born at Lockport, New York, on the 29th of .lune, 1849, the only child 
of Asa and Mary (Bruce) Douglas, who spent their entire lives in the Empire state. He was 
a lineal descendant of Robert Bruce, the noted Scottish chief, and was justly proud of his 
noble line of ancestry. He displayed many of the sterling traits which characterize the 
people of the land of hills and heather. He began his education in the common schools of 
New York and afterward became a student in Dartmouth College, from which in due course 
of time he was graduated. He began operations in the west, when in 1881 he made his way 
to Fargo and from that time until his demise he was one of its most prominent citizens, 
contributing in very largo and substantial measure to tlu' dcxclnpTucnt and upbuilding of 
the city. He entered at once ujion the active practice of law as well as upon real estate 
operations and he had large farming interests in Cass county and other ])arts of the state, 
lie proved his faith in the future of I'argo by erecting twenty-one houses on what is now- 
known as Douglas Terrace. This was a large tract of land adjoining the city which he ]datted 
as one of the sub-divisions of Fargo. Into still another field he extended his labors, organiz- 
ing the Northwestern Mutual Savings and Loan Association, of which he remained the attor- 
ney imtil his death. 

In 1878 Mr. Douglas was united in marriage to Miss Flora R. Newhall, a native of Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin, and a daughter of Daniel and Malissa (Tenny) Newhall, who were natives 
of Massachusetts and Vermont respectively. In early life they removed to the luidille west, 
settling in Wisconsin, where their remaining days «-ere passed. Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Ix-came 
parents of one child, a daughter. Maic Bruci-, who was born March 0, 18T9, and in January, 
100.1. became the wife of Dr. J. H. Rindlaub, by whom she has three sons, Bruce Douglas, 
.John Douglas and Newhall Douglas. 

It was on the ,10th of January, l!ii:;. tlmt William Itni.c Douglas was called to his final 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 281 

rest, after wliieli his remains were interred in Riverside cemetery. There was a deep feeling 
of regret throughout the eomnuinity when the news of his demisje was circulated for he had 
become firmly entrenched in public regard. He was a prominent and well known Mason, 
retaining his membership in the York and Scottish Rite bodies in Lockport, Xcw York, while 
of Kl Zagal Temple, A. A. O. X. M. S. of Fargo he was a member. He also belonged to the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and he lived up to the teachings of both societies. He was 
a colonel in the Xew York State National Guard and held membership in the Sons of the 
American Revol;ition, being a lineal descendant of Captain William Douglas who fought in 
the battle of Bennington. The fraternal spirit was strong within him and he had great 
appri'ciation for the social amenities of life. Moreover, he was known as a farsighted, saga- 
cious and enterprising business man and his activities were ever of a character that contri- 
buted to public progress and prosperity as well as to individual success. He came to Fargo 
in the early days of the city's development and remained one of its valued and honored resi- 
dents until his life's labors were ended. 



AUGirST SJOQUIST. 



August Sjoijuist, a successful merchant of Dwight, was born in Sweden on the yth of 
Alay. 1ST2, a son of Carl and ilary Sjoquist, also natives of that country, who later followed 
him here. In 1802 he emigrated to the United States and. making his way to Richland county, 
Xortli Dakota, settled in Dwight township. 

He received his education in the public schools of Dwight, which he attended during the 
winter months, and during the summer vacations worked on farms. He took up a quarter 
section as a homestead in what is now Ibson township, but in 1902 sold that place. He had 
previously engaged in the mercantile business in Dwight in connection with his brother. Oscar 
Sjoquist, under the style of Sjoquist Brothers. In 1904 he bought the interest of his brother 
and has since been sole proprietor of the business. He has erected a large brick business 
block, in wliich his store is located and which would be a credit to a town much larger than 
Dwight. He began as a poor boy, but through industry and good management has built up a 
large and profitable business. He carries an excellent and varied stock of general merchan- 
dise, including seeds, and his reasonable prices and fair dealing commend him to the continued 
patronage of the public. Being interested in the welfare of the community he is an avowed 
advocate of diversified farming and improvements of farming facilities. 

In Ma\'. 1902, ilr. Sjoquist was united in marriage to Miss Gena Carlson, who was born 
in Dwight and is a daughter of Clement Carlson, of Danish descent, an early farmer of Rich- 
land county. To this union have been born three children: Evelyn, Carleton and Grace. 
Carleton died at the age of ten years, February 7, 1916. from malignant heart disease and 
his death is deeply mourned by his parents. 

Mr. Sjoquist is a republican and takes a keen interest in the aflFairs of local government. 
He has served as postmaster of Dwight since 1906 and has discharged his duties in that 
capacity with accuracy and dispatch. Fraternally he is connected with the Woodmen. He 
devotes the greater part of his time to his mercantile business