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Full text of "North Dakota history and people; outlines of American history"

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NORTH DAKOTA 



HISTORY AND PEOPLE 

OUTLINES OF AMERICAN 
HISTORY 



ILLUSTRATED 




VOLUME III 



CHICAGO 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1917 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

99231R 

ASTOR, LENOX AND 

TILDEN fOUNUAIIONS 

B lil4X U 



n 




1 



HON. LOUIS B. HANNA 



Biographical 



HON. LOUIS B. HANNA. 

A prominent figure in tlio banlcing iinil political circles of North Dakota is Hon. Louis 
B. Hanna, the honored chief executive of the state, to which position he was called in 1913. 
This followed years of efficient service in the legislative halls of the state and nation and 
his political activity was based not only upon comprehensive study of the vital questions 
and issues of the day but also upon broad experience in the business world. A native of 
Pennsylvania, he was born at New Brighton, August 9, 1861, a son of Captain .Jason R. 
and Margaret A. (Lewis) Hanna, the former winning his title as commander of Company 
C of the Sixty-third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry during the Civil war. 

In his youthful days Louis B. Hanna attended the schools of New York city and of 
Cleveland, Ohio, and in recognition of his pronounced ability the LL. D. degree was conferred 
upon him by Fargo College of Fargo, North Dakota, in .June, 1915. Throughout the entire 
period of his business career his attention has been given to the lumber trade and to banking 
and his course, characterized by steady progress resulting from close application, broadening 
experience and steadily developing powers, has brought him to the front in the banking 
circles of his adopted state, so that he is now president of the First National Bank at Page, 
North Dakota, president of the State Bank at Erie, president of the State Bank at Pillsbury 
and a director of the Federal Reserve Bank of the ninth district. 

In Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1884, Louis B. Hanna was married to Miss Lottie L. 
Thatcher and to them have been born three daughters and a son: Margaret E., deceased; 
Jean E., the wife of Edwin J. Clapp; Dorothy L. ; and Robert L. The family hold member- 
ship in the Baptist church and Governor Hanna is also a member of the Masonic fraternity, 
in which he has attained the Knights Templar degree, while upon him has also been con- 
ferred the honorary thirty-third degree of the Scottish Rite, a recognition of valuable service 
rendered to the order. He has also become a member of the Mystic Shrine and of the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and he has membership in the Masonic Club of Fargo 
and in the Country Club of Bismarck. He is perhaps best known as one of the political leaders 
of the northwest, for he has left the impress of his individuality and ability in large measure 
upon the history of his state. In 1895 he was selected to represent his district in the general 
assembly and at the close of his term was chosen a member of the state senate, serving from 
1897 until 1901. After an interval of four years he was again elected to the upper house, 
of which he continued a member from 1905 until 1909. In the latter year he was sent to 
congress and reelection continued him in the national halls of legislation for four years, on 
the expiration of which period he was chosen North Dakota's chief executive and will so- 
continue by virtue of his election until 1917. His administration is characterized by a pro- 
gressiveness that takes into consideration the salient questions and conditions of the state 
with a view to enlarging the scope of its activities and interests and upholding the high 



«. HISTORY OF xNORTH DAKOTA 

standards that have won for Nortli Dakota its fair name. An incident in his life of which 
lie has every reason to be proud is tliat lie was given the Cross of St. Olaf by Haakon VI, 
king of Norway, in September, 1915. 



JAMES B. SWANICK. 



James B. Swanick, a well known merchant of JNIcKenzie, was born in Toronto, Canada, 
in 1878, and is the seventh in order of birth in a family of ten children, seven of whom are 
still living. His parents were John and Mary (Merrick) Swanick, natives of Scotland and 
Ireland respectively. When a young man the father came to the United States and located 
at Saratoga Springs, New York, but afterward removed to Toronto, Canada, where he spent 
the remainder of his life, his time and attention being devoted to general farming. He 
died in 1882, and his wife, long surviving him, passed away in 1915. 

During his boyhood James B. Swanick attended the public schools of Toronto and after 
completing his education came to the United States, fhst locating in Chicago, Illinois, where 
he was in the employ of James Wild & Son, merchants, for a period of four years. Following 
this he went to Buffalo, New York, where he engaged in clerking in a mercantile establish- 
ment for a similar period. It was in 1902 that he came to North Dakota, and for two j'ears 
was employed in a lumberyard at Grafton, since which time he has been a resident of 
McKenzie. On his arrival here he accepted a position with Mr. Goddard, who was engaged 
in general merchandising under the firm style of the McKenzie Mercantile Company, and 
Mr. Swanick remained with him about four years. On leaving him he established a store 
of his own, which he still conducts. He not only carries a large line of general merchandise 
but also handles meats, hartware and farm implements. He has built up an excellent trade, 
which is constantly increasing owing to his fair dealing and courteous treatment of his 
customers. He gives employment to three clerks and is the owner of the store building 
which he occupies, it being one hundred and thirty-two by forty feet in dimensions. 

On the 31st of September, 191Q, Mr. Swanick was united in marriage to Miss Ethel 
Crum, who was born about five miles from McKenzie, North Dakota, her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Crum, being early settlers of this state. They are still living. Mr. and Mrs. 
Swanick have three children: .James C, Delvin T. and Russell. 

The family attend the Methodist church and Mr. Swanick is an Odd Fellow, belonging 
to the lodge at Sterling and having filled all the chairs in that organization. He is a 
republican but is not a politician in the sense of office seeking, preferring to devote his 
undivided attention to his business interests. 



GAIL P. SHEPARD, M. D. 



Dr. Gail P. Shepard, of Jamestown, has rcalizi-d that this is the age of specialization 
and has given particular attention to diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, in the 
treatment of which he has become very proficient. He was born in Princeton, Illinois, May 
13, 1876, a son of Curtis and Ordella (Harrington) Shepard. The father removed to this 
state in 1882 and two years later his family joined him. Ho engaged in buying grain and 
also dealt quite extensively in Chester White hogs, both branches of his business proving 
profitable. 

Gail P. Shepard attended the public schools as a boy and youth and later entered 
Fargo College, from which he was graduated in 1903 with the degree of B. S. He began his 
professional study in the Northwestern Medical College at Chicago, which he entered in the 
year 1903, and in which he remained for two years. He then matriculated in Bush Medical 
College, where he pursued his studies for three years, graduating in 1908. The following 
year he practiced his profession in Chicago and at the end of that time returned to this 
state and located in Gackle, where he remained until the spring of 1910. He then removed 
to Courtenay and continued there for about four years, after which he returned to Cliicago 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 7 

and took postgraduate work. On resuming practice he located in Jamestown, Stutsman 
county, where he has since remained. His practice is increasing month by month and he has 
already built up an enviable reputation as an eye, ear, nose and throat specialist. He is 
constantly broadening his knowledge by study and thus keeps in touch with the new 
developments in medical science, and he is an active -member of the county and state 
medical societies and of the American Medical Association. 

On the 6th of March, 1907, Dr. Shepard was united in marriage to Miss Clara M. Eddy, of 
Rice Lake, a daughter of George J. Eddy, of Utica, New York. Dr. Shepard is a democrat 
in politics and takes the interest of a good citizen in public affairs, although he has never 
been an office seeker. He belongs to the three branches of the Odd Fellows, has taken 
the third degree in the Masonic order and is also a member of the Sportsman's Chib. 
He is likewise identified with the Commercial Club, which indicates his willingness to aid in 
movements seeking the development and advancement of his community. He finds great 
pleasure in hunting and fishing and, in fact, in all outdoor sports, which he values not only 
because of the pleasure which they afford but also because of the fact they promote physical 
vigor. In May, 1898, he enlisted as a member of Company B, First North Dakota Regiment, 
but was soon transferred from the ranks to the Hospital Corps. He was with the army in 
the Philippines and was present at the capture of Manila. The spirit of patriotism which 
he manifested by joining the army he has since displayed in times of peace, subordinating 
his personal interests to those of his city and state. 



RICHARD MERRILL DE PUY. 

In the position of cashier Richard Merrill De Puy is active in the management of the 
Eldridge State Bank, which is one of the branches of the syndicate banking interests 
conducted under the name of the James River National Bank, which corporation has its 
headquarters at .Jamestown. Mr. De Puy is numbered among the native sons of the state, 
his birth having occurred in Bismarck in 1891. His father, William Otis De Puy, was born 
in Ann Arbor, Michigan, in 1862, and the mother, who bore the maiden name of Helen I. Joslin, 
was born in Ohio, in the same year. The father became a dentist and practiced at Jamestown 
and at Bismarck for a period of eight years, but at length was obliged to abandon his 
profession on account of trouble with his eyes. He afterward spent a year at Bismarck 
as deputy secretary of state and later he entered the drug business in that city as a 
partner of a Mr. Beardsley, which connection was continued until 1898, at which time he 
removed to Rolla, North Dakota, where he conducted a drug business under a partnership 
relation until 1913. At that date he removed to Jamestown, where he embarked in the 
automobile business, in which he is still engaged under the name of the Jamestown Motor 
Company. He has secured a large patronage in that connection, annually selling many cars, 
and his capable management of his interests is bringing to him gratifying success. 

Richard M. De Puy, the only son of the family, pursued his education in the common 
and high schools of Eolla, North Dakota, and in the Principia College and Military 
Academy of St. Louis, from which he was graduated with the class of 1910. He next 
entered the Citizens National Bank of Jamestown, North Dakota, in the capacity of 
bookkeeper and tliere continued until 1915, at which time he was offered and accepted a 
position in the .James River Bank, which is the parent organization of the Eldridge State 
Bank, being the leading bank in the syndicate which owns a number of banks in this part 
of the state. The Eldridge State Bank was organized September 1, 1915, and from the 
beginning Mr. De Puy has continuously served as cashier, his efforts in that connection 
being most acceptable to the other officers and stockholders. He is thoroughly acquainted 
with every phase of the hanking business, and though young in years his experience has 
been thorough, his training broad, and his powers are accordingly well developed. In 
addition to his banking interests he holds stock in the Provident Insurance Company of 
Bismarck. 

On the 16tli of August, 1916. Mr. De Puy was married to Jliss rtuth M. Tweed, who 
was born at Jamestown, this state, in 1801, a daughter of Mrs. .T. yj. Rowe. Her father 



8 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

is deceased. Both of her parents were natives of Pennsylvania, but, removed to the west 
in pioneer times. In religous faith Mr. De Puy is a Christian Scientist and fraternally 
he is connected with the Jamestown Lodge, No. 995, B. P. 0. E. His political views accord 
with the principles of the republican party and he is now serving as justice of the peace 
at Eldridge, where he has made an excellent record by the fairness and impartiality of his 
decisions. 



JAMES NELSON KELLY. 



James Nelson Kelly is a Virginian by birth and his early education was obtained in 
public and private schools and at Emory and Henry College in the state of Virginia. He 
was born at Emory, Virginia, April 9, 1859, the son of James and Mahala (Helton) Kelly. 
His boyhood was spent on the farm and after passing through the public schools he matricu- 
lated at the historic old Emory and Henry College, from which he graduated in 1879 and 
from which he later received the degree of Master of Arts. After spending some years in 
Illinois he entered and graduated from Lake Forest University, which school gave him his 
LL. B. degree. Before coming to North Dakota Mr. Kelly was superintendent of schools at 
Brighton, Woodstock and Hillsdale, in the state of Illinois. For the past twenty-three years 
he has been superintendent of the Grand Forks city schools. 

Mr. Kelly was married July 2, 1896, to Eleanor G. Murphy, daughter of John J. 
and Elizabeth A. (Donnely) Murphy, of Woodstock, Ilhnois. They have five eliildren, Eliza- 
beth Virginia, John J., Eleanor G., James N. and Evelyn C. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kelly have a pleasant home in the city of Grand Forks where the latch 
string is always out to their friends. Mr. Kelly has always taken a keen interest in the 
welfare of his city. He has been interested not only in educational matters but has been 
anxious to lend a helping hand in every good work. He is largely interested in agricul- 
tural afl'airs and owns some of tlie finest farms in the state. 



PAUL J. N0RDBER6. 



Paul J. Nordberg, cashier of the State Bank of Newburg at Newburg, Bottineau 
county, was born in Norway, October 23, 1878. a son of John and Hansina (Bruem) Nord- 
berg, who came to the United States in 1884, settling in Pope county, Minnesota, adjoining 
the town of Starbuck, where they purchased a farm. The father at once bent his energies 
to the further development and improvement of that place, whereon he spent his remaining 
days, his death occurring in 1901. His widow is still living and resides in Starbuck. 

Paul J. Nordberg was educated in the public and high schools of Starbuck to the age 
of fourteen years, when he started out in the business world and has since provided for 
his own support. He entered upon an apprenticeship to the harness making trade in a 
shop at Starbuck, and after completing his term of indenture worked at his trade for 
twelve years. In 1899 he came to North Dakota and through the succeeding four years 
was employed in that line in Bottineau. In 1903 he went to the old town of Richburg, 
Bottineau county, before the building of the railroad, and there established a harness store, 
but soon thereafter removed his building to Westhope. This was thirty days before the 
railroad was built into the town. In the fall of 1906 he disposed of his business there and 
in the spring of 1907 went to Newburg, where he opened a harness shop. In July of the 
same year he was offered the assistant cashiership of the State Bank of Newburg, and, 
disposing of his business, thus entered upon his career as a banker. He served as assistant 
cashier until January 1, 1910, when he was elected cashier of the institution and has since 
served in that connection, largely controlling the interests and establishing the policy of 
the bank. His work has been highly satisfactory to all stockholders, for he has placed the 
bank upon a safe, reliable basis and has conducted its business according to the latest 
methods of banking. He has also become the owner of two farms of one hundred and sixty 
acres each near the town and carefully directs and manages his property interests. For 




JAMES NELSON KELLY 



1 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 11 

some years he lias engaged in tlie real estate business and has handled considerable prop- 
erty, negotiating various transfers which have led to the settlement and upbuilding of 
this section. 

In 1904 lilr. Nordberg was united in marriage to Miss Minnie C. Peterson, of Lowry, 
Minnesota, by whom he has five children, two daughters and three sons, namely: Wallace, 
Pauline, Chester, Vernon and Doris. Politically Mr. Nordberg is a republican with prohi- 
bition tendencies. He has served as village treasurer and as treasurer of the school board 
for several years, but has refused other oflices, preferring to concentrate his attention and 
efforts upon individual interests. He and his wife are members of the Lutheran church 
and are highly esteemed by all who know them. In his business career Mr. Nordberg has 
steadily advanced step by step and each advance has brought him a broader outlook and 
wider opportunities. His plans are well devised and carefully executed, and embrace not 
only an effort for the attainment of individual success but also the earnest purpose of 
promoting the public welfare. 



HENRY BOEHNKE. 



Henry Boehnke, who is now successfully engaged in the agricultural implement business 
in Kramer, was born on the 6th of September, 1866, in Bohn, Germany, but was only seven 
years of age when brought to this country in 1873 by his parents, Michael and Carolina 
Boehnke, also natives of the fatherland. The family located near Yankton, South Dakota, 
where the father secured a homestead and engaged in its operation for thirteen years. He 
then sold that place and settled fifty miles west of Aberdeen, where he made his home 
until his removal to Bottineau county, North Dakota, in 1896. He has since resided in 
Bottineau and has now reached the ripe old age of eighty-eight years, honored and respected 
by all wlio know him. His wife passed away on the 15th of August, 1910. 

During his boyhood Henry Boehnke attended the public schools of South Dakota and 
remained under the parental roof until he attained his majority. He then took a preemption 
and engaged in the improvement and cyltivation of his land for three years, at the end of 
which time he removed to Eureka, South Dakota, and served as chief of police for five 
years. It was in 1895 that he came to Bottineau county. North Dakota, and took up a 
homestead in the Turtle mountains, where he spent three years. In 1898 he became a 
resident of Bottineau and was engaged in the implement business there until 1905, since 
which time he has made his home in Kramer. He served as manager of the Kramer Imple- 
ment Company until the spring of 1913 and has since engaged in the same business on hia 
own account, building up a good trade. In 1908 his wife was appointed postmistress of 
Kramer and has since filled that position in a most satisfactory manner. 

Mr. Boehnke was married in 1890 to Miss Mary Klamisky, and to them were born four 
children : Albert A., Edwin G., Walter W. and Matilda M. The wife and mother died on the 
22d of May, 1903, and in .June, 1909, Mr. Boehnke married Miss Lizzie Jorgenson. By the 
second union one child was born, but it died in infancy December 25, 1911. 

In religious faith Mr. Boehnke is a Methodist, and in politics he is a republican, taking 
an active and commendable interest in public affairs. He served as deputy sheriff of Bot- 
tineau county one term and has also served as one of the trustees of the village board of 
Kramer. He has always been found true to any trust reposed in him whether of a public 
or private nature, and is numbered among the valued citizens of his community. 



J. IRA SPAULDING. 



J. Ira Spaulding, president of the Farmers & Merchants State Bank at Sherwood, was 
born at Minnewaukan, Benson county, February 20, 1884, a son of Martin J. and Lura 
(Howery) Spaulding, both of whom were natives of Wisconsin. The father was a farmer 
by occupation and continued the cultivation of his land in Wisconsin until 1882, when he 



12 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

removed to Benson county, North Dakota, and filed on land, which he improved and developed 
until 1891. In that year he took up his abode at Leeds, North Dakota, where he carried on 
farming and also conducted a general store and lumber business for twelve years. In 1903 
he removed to Sherwood, North Dakota, where he opened a general store in connection 
with his son, J. Ira Spaulding.' This they conducted until May, 1915, when they sold out 
and the father returned to Leeds, where he and his wife are now residing. 

J. Ira Spaulding was largely reared at Leeds, where he pursued his education, completing 
his course in Graceland College. He then went into the store at Sherwood with his father 
and success attended their efl'orts in that connection. When they sold out J. Ira Spaulding 
turned his attention to the banking business, purchasing an interest in the Farmers &, 
Merchants State Bank, of which he is now the president, with F. J. Harris as vice president. 
Perry Brown as cashier and H. 0. Kiel as assistant cashier. The bank is capitalized for 
ten thousand dollars and its deposits amount to one hundred and ninety thousand dollars. 
The bank was organized in October, 1904, and entered at once upon a prosperous existence 
that has made it one of the strong financial concerns of Renville county. In addition to his 
banking interests Mr. Spaulding owns a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Ward 
county. 

In December, 190S, occurred the marriage of Mr. Spaulding and Miss Louise Sherritt, and 
to them have been born four children: John Clayton, born February 5, 1910; Payson, born 
August 35, 1912; Teddy, born September 17, 1914; and Maxine lone, born December 17, 1915. 

The parents attend the Methodist Episcopal church and Mr. Spaulding is a republican 
in his political views. He filled the office of city treasurer of Sherwood for one year, was a 
member of the town council for six years and is the present mayor of the town, in which 
connection he is giving Sherwood a businesslike and progressive administration characterized 
by many measures of practical improvement and progress. His life has been well spent and 
his activities in the business world have been resultant, bringing him a sul)stantial measure 
of prosperity. 



PATRICK ilORRISSEY. 



1 



Patrick Morrissey, who is one of the most prosperous and substantial citizens of Ber- 
wick, was born on the 9th of March, 1864, near Oshkosh, in Winnebago county, Wisconsin, 
and is a son of Michael and Katherine (Burrc) Jlorrisscy, natives of Ireland, who came 
with their respective parents to America during childhood. They became residents of New 
York, in which state the father engaged in railroad work after reaching man's estate. He 
subsetjuently removed to Wisconsin and purchased land in Winnebago county, where he 
followed farming for several years. At length he became a resident of South Dakota, where 
he bought a relinquishment, and devoted the remainder of his life to the improvement and 
cultivation of that farm. He died in Huron in 1902, and there his widow still resides. 

Patrick Morrissey attended the public schools of Wisconsin during his boyhood and also 
assisted his father in the operation of the home farm, thus early becoming familiar with 
all the duties which fall to the lot of the agriculturist. On leaving home he worked as a 
farm hand in his native state for two years, but in 1885 went to South Dakota, where he 
was similarly employed for one summer. The following winter was spent in a lumber 
camp in Wisconsin and in the spring of 1887 he went to Cass county. North Dakota, where 
he worked as a farm hand for eight years. At the end of that time he took up a home- 
stead in Bottineau county, on which he lived until 1900. He still owns that place, but now 
rents it. On leaving the farm he entered the service of the St. Anthony & Dakota Elevator 
Company, as manager of their elevator at Omeraee, North Dakota, for eight months, after 
which he had charge of the Stewart elevator at Berwick, INIcHenry county, for two years. 
He then erected an elevator of his own in Berwick, and has since operated the same with 
most excellent success, while his wife conducts a general store at the same place. 

It was in September, 1901. that Mr. Morrissey was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Baldwin. They have two children, namely: Charles P., born September 21, 1902; and Mary 
P., born ,July 19, 1906. They are members of the Catholic church, and Mr. Morrissey is a 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 13 

dcmoorat in politics. He has scrvod as justice of the peace in Berwick, but prefers to 
devote his attention to his business interests, which are extensive, as lie is now the owner 
of three quarter sections of land besides his town property, llis success in life is due to 
his own unaided efforts, as he started out for himself empty handed, and his prosperity 
is the result of his industry, enterprise and sound business judgment. 



A. M. TREAT, M. D. 



Dr. A. M. Treat, one of the progressive and capable physicians and surgeons of Stutsman 
county, is the only representative of his profession in Pingiee and serves a territory with a 
radius of twenty miles. He leads a very busy life as there are many calls for his professional 
services. He was born in Blooming Prairie, Minnesota, on the 23d of January, 1887, a son 
of C. W. and Ann (Miller) Treat, both of whom are still living. The father is an up-to- 
date and etticient farmer. 

A. M. Treat attended the public and high schools of his native town and subsequently 
spent a year in the academic department of the University of Minnesota, after which he 
entered the medical department of that institution, in which he remained for three years. 
He then became a student in the .Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, from w-hich he 
was graduated in 1910. He removed to the Pacific coast and practised in the state of 
Washington for two years but at the end of that time, or in 1912, came to Pingree, North 
Dakota, where he has since remained. He is the only physician in the town and has a large 
practice not only in Pingree but throughout the surrounding country for a radius of twenty 
miles. He keeps in touch with the advancement that is cimstantly being made in medical 
science and has been very successful in the treatment of disease. 

Dr. Treat was married on the 25th of August, 1912, to Miss Maude Hosfelt, a daughter 
of J. B. Hosfelt. a resident of Bickleton, Washington. The Doctor supports the republican 
party but confines his political activity to the exercise of his right of franchise as his pro- 
fessional work demands his undivided attention. He holds membership in the Congregational 
church and seeks to promote the spread of its influence and the principles which govern his 
life are still further indicated by the fact that he is a third degree Mason. He finds much 
pleasure in hunting and motoring and recognizes the importance of recreation. He is highly 
respected both as a man and as a physician and personally has many friends. 



CHARLES ALLEN. 



Charles Allen, deputy county treasurer of Grand Forks county, was born May 31. 1859, in 
County Longford, Ireland. His father, Joseph Allen, spent his entire life in that country, 
where he died December 25, 1883, at the age of sixty-eight years. He was a stock raiser 
and farmer and was quite successful in the conduct of his business affairs. In politics he 
was active and cooperated in many practical and beneficial projects for civic improvement. 
He became the first president of the local Land League and he was an active and earnest 
supporter of the cause of education, building the first schoolhouse under the national board 
of education. His religious faith was that of the Presbyterian church. He married Elizabeth 
Murphy, also a native of Ireland, and her death occurred in County Longford when she had 
attained the notable old age of ninety-two years. 

Charles Allen was the tenth in order of birth in a family of twelve children and was 
educated in the national schools of Longford county and also studied under private tutors. 
His early life was spent upon his father's farm and at the age of nineteen years he started 
out to earn his own living, being first employed as timekeeper and bookkeeper by a bobbin 
manufacturing concern in his native county. He served in that capacity for six years and 
also represented the company as buyer. His employers were M. McXeill & Son, who had 
one of the largest concerns of the kind in that section of Ireland. Attracted by the oppor- 
tunities of the new world, Mr. Allen came to America in 1884 and made his wav direct to 



14 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Grand Forks, Avhere he arrived an utter stranger save that he had a slight acquaintance with 
George C. Dixon, who had come from a neighboring town in Ireland. Mr. Allen took up 
government land in the Turtle mountains and followed farming there for several years. He 
then made a trip back to Ireland, where he spent the winter of 1888-9, when he again came 
to North Dakota. In the spring of the latter year he secured a position under W. C. Ander- 
son then county auditor. He was connected with the office for sixteen years as clerk and 
deputy and as assistant auditor under William Ackerman. He also spent some time m the 
employ of M. F. Murphy, a real estate dealer, and for three years was with the Northern 
State Bank of Grand Forks in the capacity of bookkeeper. He then entered the county 
treasurer's office under H. A. Shaw, with whom he continued to the end of his term, after 
which John Bridston. the present county treasurer, appointed Mr. Allen as deputy and he 
is now acting in that capacity. In politics he is a republican and from the time he secured 
his naturalization papers he has been an active worker in the ranks of the party. 

Jlr. Allen was united in marriage in August, 1897, to Jliss Sarah Margaretta Carothers, 
who was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a sister of the late R. M. Carothers. county judge 
and an old settler of Grand Forks. Five children have been born to :\Ir. and Mrs. Allen, 
four sons and a daughter, JIary, Frederick Wallace, Joseph Carothers, Robert and James 

Rentoul. 

Mr. Allen was made a Mason in the spring of 1889 in his home town and since that time 
has always taken a very active part in the work of the order. His brother-in-law, George 
Henry Miller, was at the time master of the lodge in which he was initiated and prior to his 
death Mr. Miller had become high sheriff of County Longford and land commissioner of 
Wexford and Longford counties. For many years he was deputy grand master of the 
Masons in the province of Meath and in Masonic circles was well known and highly 
esteemed. At the time of his death he resided at Mill View, Edgeworth. and is survived by 
his wife, Mrs. Kathryn Miller, a sister of Mrs. Charles Allen. In :\Iasonry Mi: Allen has 
steadily advanced, taking all of the degrees of the York and Scottish Rites and thus becoming 
a Knight Templar and a thirty-second degree Mason. He is now secretary of the Royal Arch 
chapter at Grand Forks and also of the Scottish Rite bodies and he belongs to the Brother- 
hood of American Yeomen. His religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. Those 
who know him, and he has a wide acquaintance, esteem him highly as a man of genume 
personal worth who holds to exalted ideals and at all times endeavors to make them 
effective in his life. ' . 



MATT JOHNSON. 



Throughout his business career Matt Johnson has been identified with newspaper work 
and is now editor and proprietor of the Omemee Herald, published at Omemee, Bottineau 
county. He has also taken a very prominent part in local politics and has been calleil upon 
to fill public positions of honor and trust. 

Mr. Johnson was born in Northwood, Worth county. Iowa, February 1, 1872, and is a 
son of Knute W. and Mathia (Amundson) Johnson, natives of Norway. The mother was 
onfy three years of age on her arrival in this country. The father came to the new world 
during the administration of President Pierce and at the time of the Civil -war enlisted 
in Company B, Seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and remained in the service until hostilities 
ceased. 

Matt Johnson was about seven years of age when the family came to North Dakota, 
and he was educated in the public schools of Traill county. At the age of thirteen he began 
learning the printer's trade, at which he served a five years' apprenticeship, and has since 
devoted the gieater part of his time and attention to newspaper work. At the age of 
eighteen he began the publication of a paper at Caledonia and was later similarly employed 
at Shelly and Halstad, Minnesota. In 1901 he came to Bottineau county. North Dakota, 
and took up a homestead, \vhicli he sold three years later. He has been connected with two 
different papers in Bottineau and in 1905 purchased the Omemee Herald, which he has since 
conducted with most gratifying success. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 15 

Mr. Johnson is a member of the Masonic fraternity and politically is identified with 
the republican party. His fellow citizens, recognizing his worth and ability, elected him 
to the state legislature in 1909, and he has also served as village clerk of Omemee and 
clerk of the district court from 1911 to 1915. He is public-spirited and progressive and 
never withholds his support from any worthy enterprise. 



J. E. HALSTEAD. 



J. E. Halstead, wliu owns tlie Jamestown Steaiu Laundry, was born in Indiana on the 
18th of November, 1863, and is a son of John and Sarah (Martin) Halstead. The father was 
a farmer by occupation and as the years passed accumulated a competence. Both he and 
his wife are now deceased. To them were born three sons: J. E., A. M., and A. P. 

J. E. Halstead received his education in the public schools and after putting aside his 
textbooks became connected with the drug business, continuing in that line for two years. 
At the end of that time he made his way to North Dakota and for seven years he was in 
the employ of a Mr. Lutz, who was engaged in the lumber business. In 1897 he purchased 
the laundry at Jamestow-n, which he has since thoroughly modernized, installing the most 
improved machinery. He gives steady employment to nine people and collects and delivers 
■work by wagon. His reasonable prices and the high quality of the work done have enabled 
him to build un a large and lucrative patronage. In addition to his laundry he has other 
interests, owning stock in the Zimmerman store, the Citizens National Bank, and the 
Cleveland First State Bank. 

Mr. Halstead was married in 18S3 to Miss Ella Butcher, a daughter of William Butcher, 
and they have become the parents of a son and daughter, Ethel and Albert. Mi-. Halstead 
is a republican and has served the people as alderman, promoting in every way possible 
the interests of good government. In religous faith he is a Presbyterian, and fraternally he 
belongs to the Masons, to the Mystic Shrine and to the Elks. His association with the 
Commercial Club indicates his interest in his town and his public spirit also extends to the 
state of North Dakota, which he believes has a great future in store for it. He greatly 
enjoys hunting and motoring, which afford him needed recreation. 



EJIIL J. HEADLAND. 



Emil J. Headland, who is successfully engaged in farming in Stanley township, Cass 
county, is a native of that county, born on the 23d of June, 1876. His parents, John E. 
and Solveig (Palmer) Headland, were born in Norway, where they remained until 1869, 
when they came to the United States. They first located in Rice county, Minnesota, but in 
1871 removed to Cass county, North Dakota. They took up their residence upon a farm, 
where they lived until 1907, in which year they retired and went to Fargo, where they still 
reside. All their six children are living. 

Emil J. Headland was reared in this county and in his childhood met with the usual 
experiences of the hoy raised upon the frontier. The family residence was for several years 
a log cabin covered with sod and the nearest neighbors were a number of miles away. 
He assisted his father in the development of the farm as soon as he became old enough, 
and attended the common schools in the acquirement of an education. Subsequently he 
took a business course in Fargo. When but fifteen years of age he took charge of the 
operation of the home farm and a number of years later he purchased the place, which is 
located on section 1, Stanley township. He has added to his holdings, which now comprise 
three hundred and seventy acres in this state and eighty-four acres in Minnesota, all of 
which is well improved. He derives a good income from his land and he also has other 
interests, being a stockholder and the secretary of the Farmers Elevator Company, a 
stockholder and a director of the Scandinavian Bank at Fargo, and secretary and treasurer 
of the River Line Telephone Company. 



IG HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Mr. Headland was married on New Year's Day, 1910, to Miss Oline Dalil, wlio was 
born in Minnesota, a daughter of Ole and Rebecca Dahl, the former of whom is deceased, 
wliile tlie latter is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Headland have three children, Mildred Rebecca, 
Solveig Oline and Emil Johan. 

Mr. Headland supports the republican party at the polls and has served as assessor 
of his township. Fraternally he is a thirty-second degree Mason and he is also a member 
of the Sons of Norway. He possesses those sterling qualities characteristic of his race 
and has not only gained financial independence but has also won the sincere respect 
of all with whom he has come in contact. 



FRED GORDON. 



Fred Gordon, a farmer and stockman living at Tioga, was born at Danville, in the 
province of Quebec, Canada, June 35, 1834, and has therefore passed the eighty-second 
milestone on life's journey. His parents were John and Rhoda (Pope) Gordon. The father, 
a native of Scotland, acquired his education in the schools of that country and on coming 
to the new world with his brother settled at Kingston, Canada, where he worked at the 
baker's trade, having previously served a seven years' apprenticeship in Scotland. He after- 
ward removed to Shipton, Canada, where he carried on farming, purchasing two hundred 
acres of land, which he successfully developed and improved. He was one of the pioneer 
settlers of that district and died in Shipton at the advanced age of eighty-eight years. His 
wife, who was born in Wheelock, Vermont, spent her girlhood upon a farm in the Green 
Jloinitain state but was married in Canada, where she went with her father, who there 
followed the millwright's trade. Mrs. Gordon reached an advanced age and passed away 
at Shipton. 

Fred Gordon met the usual experiences that fall to the lot of the farm bred boy 
while spending his youthful days on the old homestead at Shipton. The farm was situ- 
ated three miles from Danville. He had but little opportunity to attend school and when 
comparatively young began work as a farm hand. Going to Vermont in early manhood, 
he was employed at farm labor there at a salary of twelve dollars per month, which was 
the highest wage paid for such work at that time. All farm work was done by hand as 
the modern farm machinery had not then been invented or introduced. In 1863 he removed 
to Wells River, New Hampshire, and purchased a farm near Woodville, having acquired the 
capital wherewith to make the purchase through his economy while working for others at 
twelve dollars per month. For some time he cultivated his original farm and then sold out, 
after which he bought land at Swift River, New Hampshire. There he engaged in farm- 
ing and also carried on logging at Bungie, New Hampshire. The logging firm with which 
he wns employed purchased seven thousand acres of land in Minnesota and sent Mr. Gordon 
to buy two hundred calves to stock this ranch. He then sold his New Hampshire farm and 
purchased the calves, which he took to the Minnesota ranch, one hundred horses having been 
sent out the year before. He took back two carloads of horses in the cars that the calves 
had been shipped in. Since that period he has been continuously identified with the devel- 
opment of the northwest. In 1882 lie removed to Niagara, Grand Forks county, and pur- 
chased eighty acres of land adjoining the town of Niagara for twelve hundred dollars. He 
next bought four hundred acres from George R. Baker, the arrangement being that he was 
to pay fourteen thousand bushels of wheat, giving Mr. Baker such an amount each year 
as he could to apply upon the indebtedness. In three years he had discharged his financial 
obligation. He continued to engage in farming and stock raising near Niagara from 1882 
until 1908, or for a period of twenty-six years, at the end of which time he sold out and 
removed to Tioga, where he purchased a relin<iuishment of one hundred and sixty acres. 
From time to time he has added to his holdings until he is now the owner of over one 
thousand acres of valuable land in Williams county, his home being situated on his farm 
a half mile w^est of the town of Tioga. In making his purchases he has displayed sound 
judgment and his property interests now return to him a very gratifying annual income. 
He also owns town property in Tioga in addition to a large number of farms. He owns the 




FRED flORDOX 



-1 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 19 

Gordon Hotel in Tioga; a poolroom in Temple and another in Guthrie, North Dakota. He 
lias always been a great trader and buys, sells and trades farms and city property. To 
Mr. Gordon was awarded the contract for paving the streets of Larimore, North Dakota, 
and he also had a subcontract to grade a part of the right of way for the Great Nortlurn 
Railroad from Devils Lake to Fort Benttm, North Dakota. 

In February, 1873, Mr. Gordon was united in marriage to Miss Helen A. Andrews, who 
was born at Shipton, in the province of Quebec, Canada, a daughter of Horatio and Khoda 
(Aldney) Andrews, who were natives of Claremont, New Hampshire. Mrs. Gordon com- 
pleted her education by graduation from the high school at Danville, Canada, and she passed 
away in March, 1916, while on a visit to the home of her son in Alberta. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Gordon were born nine children, of whom six survive, Kenneth McC, George, Fred M., 
Valmer, William C. and Emma R. 

In his political views Mr. Gordon is an earnest democrat and his religious faith is that 
of the Episcopal church. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and both within 
and without that organization has many warm friends. With every phase of pioneer life 
in North Dakota he is familiar and his memory forms a connecting link between the primi- 
tive past of territorial days and the progressive present. He has done much for the upbuild- 
ing of the state through the conduct of his business affairs and his keen, quick judgment 
in trading on a big scale has brought him notable and well deserved prosperity. While 
about eighty-three years of age he is as active as a man of fifty and looks no older. His life 
record would put to shame many a man of less resolute spirit, who, gi-own weary of the 
burdens resting upon him, would relegate his duties to others. Still hale and hearty, his 
mind alert and his faculties unimpaired, he is today one of the most active, successful and 
honored business men of Williams county. 



C; A. MENGE. 



C. A. Menge, a hardware merchant and one of the prominent business men of Mylo, 
was born in Germany on the 9th of February, 1872, a son of August and F'rederika (Malak- 
owski) Menge, both of whom were natives of Germany. They came to the United .States in 
1878, and first settled in Goodhue county, Minnesota, but in 1881 moved to Norman county 
and homesteaded. 

In the public schools of that state C. A. Menge pursued his early education, supple- 
mented by a course in a business college in St. Paul. As early as his twelfth year, how- 
ever, he became a wage earner, working for neighboring farmers, and when a youth of 
eighteen he took charge of his father's farm, which he cultivated and further developed, 
contiiuiing active in that way for three j'eara. Later he rented other land and engaged 
in farming independently. His initial training in the hardware trade was received in 1901, 
when he entered a store in Lockhart, Minnesota, where he was employed for three years. 
In 1905 he came to North Dakota and after four months spent in Bisbee, where he had 
charge of a lumberyard until it was sold, he removed to Mylo on the 7th of July, 1905, 
four days before the sale of town lots was held. There he was placed in charge of the 
business of the Rogers Lumber Company and at the same time entered into partnership 
with Charles Stenson, establishing a hardware and implement business under the lirm 
style of Menge & Stenson. They erected a store building and opened the first business 
house in the new town. During the first year of his connection with Mr. Stenson, Mr. Mengo 
lived in the back part of the store and had charge of the hardware department, while 
Mr. Stenson took charge of the sale of farm implements. On the 1st of January, J 907, they 
dissolved partnership and Mr. Jlenge continued in the hardware trade independently. He 
now has an excellent store, carrying a large and carefully selected line of both shelf and heavy 
hardware, and his sales have reached a gratifying annual figure. In addition he owns a 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres near Mylo, and his spirit of enterprise and progressive- 
ness constitutes him one of the leading business men of his locality. 

In 1897 Mr. Menge was united in marriage to Miss Ida R. Hagenston, of Ada, Min- 
nesota, and to them have been born four children: Alma F., who is attending the Valley City 



20 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Normal School; Verna, a pupil in the Bisbee high school; Arnold, also in school; and 
Marjorie, who has not yet reached school age. 

Mr. Menge belongs to the Methodist church, while his wife is of the Lutheran faith, 
but in the absence of churches to their respective denominations in Mylo they attend the 
Presbyterian church. Fraternally Mr. Menge is connected with tlie Jiodern Woodmen of 
America. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he was nominated at 
the primaries in the summer of 1916 for the office of state legislator, his friends recognizing 
that he possesses the qualities which would make a safe counselor in matters of signitlcance 
to the commonwealth. He is a public-spirited citizen, loyal to the best interests of his 
community, and his efforts in behalf of public progress have resulted most beneficially in 
his district. 



RUSSELL D. CHASE. 



Kussell D. Chase, an able lawyer of Jamestown, is a member of the well known 
firm of Thorp & Chase and since 1913 has served as states attorney. He was born 
in Carrington, North Dakota, on the 14th of April, 1888, a son of Ed M. and Kate A. Chase. 
The father, who settled in this state in 1883, devoted his life to merchandising. He 
passed away in 1904 but is survived by his widow. 

Russell D. Chase attended the public and high schools and then entered the University 
of North Dakota, graduating from the College of Law in 1909. He immediately located 
at .Jamestown and engaged with George W. Thorp in the practice of law under the style 
of Thorp & Chase. They have a good clientage and are recognized as able members of 
the bar. In 1913 Mr. Chase was elected states attorney on the republican ticket and has 
since given much of his time to the discharge of his official duties. He has made an 
excellent record, having proved both efficient and conscientious. 

Mr. Chase is a Protestant in religious faith and fraternally is a Knight Templar 
Mason and an Elk. He is one of the progressive and public-spirited young men of 
Jamestown and has gained the respect of the community. 



JESSE J. TAYLOR. 



Jesse J. Taylor, cashier of the State Bank of Oriska at Oriska, Barnes county, waa 
born at Oak Center, Wisconsin, .January 29, 1876, and is a representative of one of the 
old pioneer families of that state. In the period of Wisconsin's early development his 
grandfatlier removed thither with his family, settling at Oak Center, where he engaged 
in farming, and his activity and enterprise contributed to the upbuilding of the district. 
His son, Lewis Taylor, a native of Byron, New York, was reared in Wisconsin and in 1881 
removed to Brownton, Minnesota, where he resided for three or four years. He then 
went to Long Lake, where he remained until the spring of 1889, when lie came to North 
Dakota, settling first at Tower City, Cass county, where he resided for three years. 
He then established his home eleven miles north of Oriska, where he engaged in farming 
until 1914. In Wisconsin he wedded Henrietta Young, a native of Schenectady, New Y^ork, 
and upon her death in 1914 he retired from active business life and his son Herbert, 
who has an adjoining farm, now operates the old homestead, cultivating an entire section 
of land. The family n\imbered seven children, of whom three have passed away. 

Jesse .J. Taylor, the eldest of the four surviving members of the family, attended the 
public schools in the various localities in which the family lived and afterward took up 
the profession of teaching, which he followed for three years. He afterward entered 
the employ of Nicholas Gauche, a pioneer merchant of Oriska, with whom he remained for 
two years and then in order to better qualify himself for business life he attended 
Dixon College at Dixon, Illinois, studying there for two years. On returning to Oriska 
he secured a position in the State Bank, which was organized in April, 1903, and opened 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 21 

its doois fur business on the 3rd of August of that year with ili-. Taylor as cashier — • 
a position which he has since continuously occupied. The other oiJScers of the bank are 
George 0. Goulet, president; Wesley Van Steenburgh, vice president; and Ethel J. Gamble, 
assistant cashier. The bank was capitalized for ten thousand dollars and the success of the 
institution is indicated in the fact that the capital stock has been raised to twenty 
thousand dollars and there is a surplus fund of five thousand doUais, with undivided 
profits of thirteen hundred dollars. Its deposits amount to about two hundred and fifteen 
thousand dollars and its loans and discounts to two hundred and ten thousand dollars. 
The business is conducted along the most modern methods of general banking and the 
policy pursued is a safe, conservative one, meriting the confidence and support of the 
public. On the 1st of July, 1916, they opened a savings department, accepting accounts 
from one dollar upward, and this is also proving successful. In the first two months 
five hundred dollars was deposited in small sums, so that the bank will prove a help to 
the community as well as a source of individual profit, enabling the small wage earner 
to save money. 

On the 11th of May, 1904, Jlr. Taylor was married to Miss Florence Rice, of Dunlap, 
Illinois, a daughter of Elisha Rice, a pioneer settler of Illinois and successful farmer there. 
Mr. and Mrs. Taylor have one child, Geneva, now in school. The parents are members of 
the Congregational church and occupy an enviable position in the warm regard of their 
fellow townsmen. Mr. Taylor also belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and the 
Masonic order. He has been successful, is a popular and efficient bank officer and a genial, 
courteous gentleman whose circle of friends is almost coextensive wtih the circle of his 
acquaintance. 



ROBERT B. GRIFnTH. 



Robert B. Griffith, president of the Robert B. Griffith Company, has throughout his 
business career displayed a spirit of initiative that has resulted in steady progress, bringing 
him into close and prominent connection with some of the most important commercial, 
industrial and financial interests of Grand Forks and of the state. He was born in Welland 
county. Ontario, Canada. December 24, 1856, a son of .James and Ellen (Randall) Griffith. 
The father, a native of Ontario, resided in Canada until 1885, when he removed with his 
family to North Dakota, establishing his home in Grand Forks, where he engaged in business 
with his son. He afterward removed to Pasadena, California, and there retired from active 
business life, making his home in that city of flowers and sunshine until death called him in 
1911, when he was eighty-one years of age. His wife had passed away in 1909 at the age 
of seventy-two years. Tliey were the parents of twelve children, of whom five died in 
infancy. 

Robert B. Griffith, the second in order of birth, spent his early life in Ontario, where he 
attended the public schools, and after leaving high school he turned his attention to mercan- 
tile pursuits, with which he was connected in Ontario for a decade. On the expiration of 
that period lie came to Xorth Dakota and established his present business in Grand Forks 
on the 2d of Xovember, 1881. His business has enjoyed a remarkable growth. He had but 
one clerk in the beginning and at present his employes number about one hundred. He has 
always conducted a department store, carrying a large general line of goods, and his estab- 
lishment is thoroughly modern in its equipment and in the character of the stock handled. 
His progressivcness, his initiative and his enterprise have made his establishment a standard 
of commercial activity in Xorth Dakota. His business interests, however, cover a still 
broader scope, for he has become an official factor in the development and control of many 
interests of importance. He is now president of the Grand Forks Street Railway Company 
and a director of the First X^ational Bank. He is also interested in the agricultural develop- 
ment of the state and is the owner of much valuable farming property. 

Even these are but phases of his activity, for along many lines which have contributed 
to the material expansion and moral development of the community he has been equally 
active. He is a director of the Commercial Club, of which he wns formerly president, and 



22 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

at unc tiiiiu he was alderman of Grand Korks but could never be induced to accept other 
I)ublic oliice. He has, however, studied tlie questions which are to the statesman and man 
of allairs of the greatest import and signilicance and has cooperated heartily in many well 
delined projects to improve economic and sociological conditions. For many years he has 
been the president of the North Dakota Enforcement League. He is a most active worker 
in the Baptist church and for the past thirty years has been superintendent of the Sunday 
school. He is likewise the president of the North Dakota Baptist state convention and still 
his interests broaden into other lines, for he is a member of the Fortnightly Club, a literary 
organization, and of the Franklin Club, a social organization. 

In September, 1885, Mr. Griffith married Minnie C. Webster, of Grand Forks, and they 
had four children. Paul B., a graduate of the University of North Dakota and now in business 
with his father, married Maude Begg and they have a son, Robert B. Marion died at the age 
of nine months, Earl Webster at the age of three years and Margaret Pearl when six years 
of age. Later they adopted a daughter. Faith, who is now attending school. 

F'rom a comparatively humble position in the business world Robert B. Griffith has 
steadily worked his way upward through his own efl'orts and is today not only one of the 
best known and leading merchants of Grand Forks but one of the most prominent business 
men of the state. Wealth has come to him but its attainment has been by no means the 
end and aim of his life. While interested in most of the important business enterprises of 
Grand Forks, in which he has official control, he has regarded this as but one phase of exist- 
ence, never excluding his active participation in and support of the other vital interests 
which are of significant value to society at the present time. The subjective and objective 
forces of lite are in him well balanced, making him cognizant of his own capabilities and 
powers, while at the same time he thoroughly understands his duties and his obligations. 



CHARLES A. KLAUS. 



Charles A. Klaus, who is known to the traveling public of the whole northwest as the 
proprietor of the Gladstone Hotel at Jamestown, one of the best hostleries in the state, was 
born in Green Bay, Wisconsin, on the 28th of July, 1863. His parents, Charles and Annie 
(Lenz) Klaus, were both of German birth. Until thirteen years of age our subject attended the 
parochial schools of Green Bay and thus acquired his education. He then went to work in a 
grocery store, where he remained until 1883, when as a young man of nineteen years he came 
to Dakota territory. He joined an uncle, Anton Klaus, who was in the real estate business 
at Jamestown, and continued with him for three years, after which he was appointed assist- 
ant postmaster, in which capacity he served until 1890, when he was made postmaster. He 
filled that office acceptably until 1894, when he accepted the position of manager of the 
Gladstone Hotel, of which 'he became sole owner in 1897. The hotel has developed with the 
development of this section of the state and the small wooden building which it occupied 
at first has given place to a large modern structure, which is one of the finest hotel build- 
ings in the state. The furnishings and appointments of the hotel are up-to-date and no 
expense has been spared in providing for the comfort of the guests. Moreover, the value 
of courtesy and willing service has been impressed upon all the employes. In addition to 
owning this hotel, which is one of the most profitable hostleries in the state, Mr. Klaus has 
large holdings in farm lands. 

In April, 1887, Mr. Klaus was united in marriage to Miss Anna Bosche, a native of 
Green Bay, Wisconsin, by whom he has a daughter, Katherine. He is a stanch democrat 
and has been prominent in state political affairs, serving as a delegate to a numbei of state 
conventions. He has also been active in local affairs and from 1896 to 1902 was a member 
of the Jamestown city council. His religious faith is that of the Catholic church and fra- 
ternally he is connected with the Catholic order of Foresters, the Knights of Columbus and 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His military record covers six years' service as a 
member of Company H, North Dakota National Guard, and when he retired he held the 
rank of first sergeant. From 1903 until 1904 he served as president of the Jamestown 
Commercial Club and in that capacity was instrumental in carrying to successful completion 




CHARLES A. KLAUS 



THE jy£w rOHK 

PUBLIC LIBRA My 

•tlLOSH ^p-v ^^ 

M. 



-)■ 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 25 

a number of projects for the advancement of the city. He can always be counted upon to 
give time and energy as well as money to the promotion of movements for the general wel- 
fare and is recognized as one of the foremost citizens of Jamestown. He is also popular 
personally and has many warm friends. 



HENRY W. F. LAW, M. D. 



Dr. Henry W. F. Law, physician and surgeon of Grand Forks, was born at Uxbridge, 
Ontario, Canada, January 13, 1871, his parents being Frank and Alice (Blanchard) Law, who 
were also natives of that province. Their ancestors came from England at an early period 
in the development of Canada. The grandfather, William Law, was born in Cumberland, 
England, but in early life emigrated to the new world and engaged in business as a wagon 
manufacturer. In 1866 he removed to Cedar Falls, Iowa, where his remaining days were 
passed. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Harriet Bradley, was born in Yorkshire, 
England, was married in Ontario and like her husband spent her last days in Cedar Falls, 
Iowa. The maternal grandparents of Dr. Law were James and Harriet Hannah (Burton) 
Blanchard. The grandfather became one of the pioneer settlers of Canada, where he remained 
until his demise. His wife, a native of Middlesex, England, also passed away in Ontario, Can- 
ada. The father of Dr. Law spent his early life as a farmer in Ontario and in 1901 removed to 
Hannah, Xorth Dakota, where he passed away in 1915 at the age of seventy-one years. His 
widow still survives and is now living in Grand Forks at the age of seventy years. Their 
family numbered seven children, five sons and two daughters. 

Dr. Law, the third in order of birth, attended the common schools of Ontario and 
afterward pursued a high school course at I^ngdon and at Hannah, North Dakota. In 
preparation for a professional career he entered the Detroit College of Medicine at Detroit, 
Michigan, from which he was graduated in 1904. He then returned to Hannah, North Dakota, 
where he opened an office and remained in active practice until 1913, when he sought a 
broader field in a larger city and removed to Grand Forks. 

On the 1st of October, 1901, in Hannah, North Dakota, Dr. Law was married to Miss 
Alice M. Byers, a daughter of Mr. and Jlrs. James Byers, of a well known family of Pem- 
bina county, North Dakota. The two children of this marriage are: Frank, who was born 
in Hannah in October, 1906, and is now attending school in Grand Forks; and Goldie, who 
was born in Hannah in 1911. 

The parents are members of the Presbyterian church and fraternally Dr. Law is a 
prominent Scottish Rite Mason and member of the Mystic Shrine. He also belongs to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, while his 
religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. While residing in Cavalier county, North 
Dakota, he served as county physician and throughout the jears of his practice he has done 
much general hospital work. He belongs to the Grand Forks County Medical Society, the 
North Dakota State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. 



HON. B. A. HALL. 



Hon. B. A. Hall, of Lakota, probate judge of Nelson county serving for the second term, 
was born in Biddeford. Maine, December 5. 1833, a son of A. L. and Avis R. (White) Hall. 
The father was a native of Vermont and the mother of Bangor, Maine, and in 1S55 they 
removed with their family to Wisconsin, where they spent several years. Afterward they 
became residents of Glencoe, McLeod county, Minnesota, where they cast in their lot with 
the pioneer settlers. The father possessed considerable skill as a machinist and for many 
years was connected with the Singer Sewing Machine Company. He was also a prominent 
Mason and enjoyed the confidence and goodwill of all with whom he came in contact. He 
died in 1902, at the advanced age of eighty-six years, having long survived his wife, who 
passed away in 1891, at the age of sixty years. In their family were four ohildren, of 
Vol. m— 2 



26 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

whom Judge Hall was the second. Tlie otlier surviving member of tlie family is Charles T. 
Hall, now living at Brownton, Minnesota. 

Judge Hall was less than two years of age when the removal was made to Wisconsin and 
in the common schools of Fond du Lac, that state, he pursued his education, after which 
he learned the i)rinter's trade there. Subsequently he removed to Minnesota and was con- 
nected with the printing business in Glencoe for sixteen years. In 1904 he arrived in North 
Dakota, settling first at Fargo, where he worked on the Fargo Journal for a short time. He 
afterward removed to Hope and later to Petersburg, where he published the Petersburg 
Record for nine years. On the expiration of that period he removed to Lakota and in 1912 
was elected probate judge, now serving for the second term. 

On the 3d of October, 1893, Mr. Hall was married in Long Prairie, Minnesota, to Miss 
Marie Theresa Marz, a daughter of Phillip and Mary Marz, the former now deceased. Her 
parents were pioneer settlers of Minnesota. By her marriage Mrs. Hall has become the 
mother of two sons: Harold R., who was born at Long Prairie in March, 1895, and is now 
manager of the Tolna Tribune; and Harlan Leroy, who was born in Petersburg, North 
Dakota, July 30, 190S, and is attending school here. The elder -son was married in September, 
1914. 

Judge Hall is a Master Mason and also a member of the Modern Woodmen of America 
and exemplifies in his life the beneficent spirit underlying those orders. His political allegiance 
is given to the republican party and his capability in office is indicated by the fact that in 
election in the fall of 1916 he, as a candidate for the position for the third term, received the 
highest vote of any of the republican nominees on the county ticket in his home city, Mr. 
Frazier candidate for governor being the only man having more votes than he. His ability 
and the wise use which he has made of his opportunities constitute the measure of his progress 
and success and he is accoimted one of the valued citizens of Lakota and Nelson county. 



HON. ROLLIN C. COOPER. 



Hon. Rollin C. Cooper, who has represented his district in the house of representatives 
and in the state senate and who lias for more than a third of a century been closely and 
prominently associated with the agricultural development of Griggs count}', his home being 
now at Cooperstown, was born September 30, 1845, in Washtenaw county, Michigan, a son 
of Thomas and Caroline Cooper, wdio Avere natives of Vermont. Their marriage was celebrated 
in the Green Mountain state and in 1832 they removed westward to Michigan, casting in their 
lot with the pioneer settlers, after which the father devoted his attention to farming for many 
years, contributing in substantial measure to the development of his district. There he 
reared his family of eleven children. 

Rollin C. Cooper, the ninth in order of birth, was a lad of thirteen years when he went 
to Minnesota, in which state he resided for a few years, but removed to Colorado in 1861. 
There he engaged in mining and also was successful as an agriculturist. In 1880 he arrived 
in Griggs county, North Dakota, and the following year settled upon the present site of 
Cooperstown, which he platted and which was named in honor of himself and his brother, 
T. J. Cooper. On removing to Griggs county Rollin C. Cooper at once began farming and 
grain buying and as his intelligently directed labors brought to him success he added to his 
acreage until he became one of the most extensive landowners and grain buyers of the 
state, having in all fourteen thousand acres, of which nine thousand acres were under culti- 
vation, mostly devoted to the production of wheat. 

In Colorado, in 1870, Mr. Cooper was married to Miss Emma C. IJutchins. a native of Ohio 
and a daughter of Henry and Ella Hutchins. They had two children who died in infancy 
and they adopted a daughter, Florence, who passed away at the age of twenty-seven years. 

Mr. Cooper is an exemplary member of the Masonic fraternity and has taken the 
degrees of the Lodge of Perfection of the Scottish Rite. During territorial days he was 
appointed by Governor Ordway a member of the board of county commissioners of Griggs 
county and so continued to serve by successive reelections until 1898, doing splendid work 
in tliat connection. It is well known that he stood by the state most loyally in the ilarkest 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 27 

liovirs of its history, assisting tlio eommoinvoalth in passing over a period which threatened 
bankruptcy. He never lost faitli, liowever, and he passed by no opportunity that would 
enable him to further the best interests of North Dakota. He is an extremely modest man, 
entirely free from ostentation and display, but the specific office of biography is not to give 
voice to a man's modest estimate of himself and his accomplishments but rather to leave a 
perpetual record establishing his position by the consensus of public opinion on the part of his 
fellows. This o])inion was expressed in 1S<)4, when Mr. Cooper was chosen to represent his 
district in the state legislature, and again four years later, when he was elected a member of 
the state senate. In the house he was a member of the committee on railroads and several 
other important committees. His colleagues at that period and his acquaintances through 
all the long years of his residence in the state have nothing but good to say of Rollin C. 
CVioper. 



!•:. .J. LANDER & COMPANY. 

Among the business enterprises of Grand Forks that have contributed in substantial 
measure to the upbuilding, development and jnogress of that section of the state is E. J. 
Lander & Company. The firm was organized in Grand Forks in August, 1883, as a partnership 
concern but the business progiessed and developed to such an extent that it was deemed 
advisable to incorporate and accordingly, in 1897, this was done. Mr. Lander, who organized 
the business, became its first president and remains the president and active manager of 
tne corporation today. The company engages in the business of loaning money on first mort- 
gages and negotiating investment securities. Its charter also permits the company to act as 
administrator, executor or trustee of estates, as guardian of minors or as assignee or receiver 
of individuals, firms or corporations. The reliable business methods of the firm are indicated 
in the fact that many of its patrons have remained with it throughout the entire jieriod of 
its existence or for over thirty years, and never has an investor lost a dollar of principal 
or interest through any investment made for him by this company, which bears a well 
established reputation for conservative and thoroughly reliable methods, conducting its 
interests along safe, legitimate lines. Farm mortgages properly and conservatively made 
are recognized as sound security and every banker of North Dakota deals in and with these 
securities with the same degree of confidence in their soundness and intrinsic value that 
eastern bankers deal in government bonds. Watchfulness and carefulness have been adopted 
as the slogans of the company and they enjoy an unassailable reputation for reliability and 
enterprise. They may well be proud of the fact that during the entire existence of the 
company no title upon which they have passed has ever been successfully attacked. 



GUV W. RUNCORN. 



Guy W. Runcorn, who is effieiently filling the position of cashier of the Bank of York 
at York, North Dakota, has passed his entire life in the west and possesses in large measure 
the enterprise characteristic of this section of the country. He was born in Plainfield, Wis- 
consin, .Taiuiary 5, 1882, and his parents are William B. and Etta E. (McFarland) Runcorn, 
also natives of that town. They resided there until 1886, when with their family they 
located on a homestead sixteen miles east of Cando, North Dakota. The father operated 
tliat place until 1894, when he returned to Plainfield, Wisconsin, residing there about two 
am! one-half years. At the end of that time he again came with his family to North 
Dakota, locating upon a farm in Pierce county, ten miles north of York. Aljout a decade 
later, in 1907, he removed to York where he is still living. His wife had died Alay 1, 1905. 

Guy W. Runcorn acquired his educaticm in the public schools and in the Northwestern 
Business College at Grand Forks, North Dakota. On the 5th of July, 190;i. he entered the 
York State Bank as bookkeeper, and two years later he was promoted to assistant cashier and 
in 1908 was made cashier. In Tune, 1911, he severed his connection with that institvltion, 



28 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

iuid purchased an interest in tlie Bank of York, of wliicli lie lias since been cashier. Since 
.Seiiteniber, 1915, iiis father has been president of the bank, in which the two men own the 
controlling interest. The management of the institution is left largely to our subject, and 
his intimate knowledge of banking practice, his understanding of the basic principles of 
finance and his familiarity with local business conditions have enabled him to so direct its 
affairs tliat it has paid a good dividend and at the same time been a factor in the business 
development of the community. 

On the 16th of .June, 1915, occuneil the marriage of Mi". Runcorn and Miss Nancy J.' 
Fossum. He supports the republican Jiarty at the polls and keeps well informed on the 
issues of the day. He belongs to Leeds Lodge, No. 67, A. F. & A. M.; Grand Forks Con- 
sistory, No. 31, A. & A. S. R.; Kem Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S., of Grand Forks; York Lodge, 
No. 08, L 0.0. F. ; the Modern Woodmen of America and the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. He and his wife belong to the Rebekahs and she is also affiliated with the 
Order of the Eastern Star. He is one of the prominent men of Benson county and his 
])ersonal friends are many. 



REV. OTTO WOLPERS. 



Rev. Otto Wolpers, a Catholic priest officiating at St. .John's church in Beach, is 
doing much to further the interests of the organization. He was born in German}- in 
1870 and in 1884, when a youth of fourteen years, came to the United States, after 
which he was employed on a farm in Minnesot,a. He attended college at Riehardton, 
North Dakota, and was ordained to the priesthood at Oakes on the 8th of June, 1909, by 
the Rt. Rev. John Shanley, bishop of Fargo, after which he was sent to Mandan to take 
temporary charge of the work at that place. There he remained from October, 1909, 
until July, 1910, when he was transferred to Beach, where he has since remained. 

St. John's church at Beach was established in 1906 as a mission attended from Dickinson 
by the Rev. John Digman, who officiated until Father A. J. Van Den Heuvel took charge. 
He was the first resident priest and took up the work in Beach aftout 1908. There he 
continued until 1909, when Father Carl Hierlmeier was appointed priest. He continued until 
1910, when Father Wolpers was assigned to St. .John's where he has since labored. The first 
house of worship was built in 1906 by Father John Digman, the congregation consisting 
of but eleven families, but in 1910, following the arrival of Father Wolpers, he recognized 
the need of a new church for at that time there were one hundred families in the parish. 
E. J. Donahue, of St. Paul, drew the plans for the new church and the contract for the 
outside work was let to Peter J. Nasvik, of St. Paul, for twenty thousand si.K hundred 
dollars. The work was started in the middle of August, 1913, and the church w-as com- 
pleted and opened for service on Easter Sunday of 1914. The cornerstone was laid 
September 21, 1913, by the Rt. Rev. Bishop Vincent Wehrle, 0. S. B., of Bismarck, and the 
church was dedicated by him June 31, 1914. The church and fixtures cost about twenty- 
eight thousand dollars. 

Father Wolpers has done excellent work since taking charge of St. John's and in 
addition he has in charge the Church of St. Michael at Sentinel Butte, the Sacred Heart 
church at Sledora and St. Elizabeth's church at Trotters. He has the love and confidence 
of his people and therefore has secured their heai"ty coopei'ation in the well defined plans 
which he lias put forth for the upbuilding of the organization. 



JOHN ARTHUR JOHNSON. 



.John Arthur -Johnson, sheriff of Rolette county, making his home in RoUa, the county 
seat, was born in Allamakee count}', Iowa, October 12, 1874, a son of Gilbert and Ellen 
(Gilbert) Johnson, the former a native of Norway and the latter of Wisconsin. The 
father came to America in 1866 and settled in Caledonia, Minnesota. He was a tailor 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 29 

by trade and followed tliat pursuit in Minnesota for several years but in 18T2 opened a 
hotel at New Albion, Iowa, where h(^ carried on business for a decade. In 1883 he 
returned to Caledonia, Minnesota, whore lie resided until 1893, when he removed to 
Rolette county, North Dakota, and filed on land near the village of Eolette. He later 
bought other land, which he has since cultivated. He is now living at the age of seventy- 
one years, while his wife has reached the age of seventy years. 

John Arthur Johnson was reared and educated in Caledonia, Minnesota, and remained 
under the parental roof until he had attained his majority. In 1896 he filed on land 
adjoining liis father's and has since devoted much of his time and attention to the further 
development and improvement of the place. He now owns four hundred and eighty acres 
in the farm on wliicli he resides and in addition to cultivating the cereals best adapted to 
soil and climate he makes a specialty of raising Belgian horses. 

In January, 1903, Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss Lena Jackson and to them 
have been born five children: Cecil L., Ellen, Pearl, Louisa and William. The family attend 
the Episcopal church, in which the parents hold membership and Mr. .Johnson is also 
a member of the Masonic lodge, the chapter at Rugby and the commandery at Bottineau. 
His political endorsement is given to the republican party and in 1907 he was elected 
to the office of county commissioner, in which position he served until 1914, when he was 
elected sheriff of Eolette county and has since served In that capacity. The family came 
to North Dakota without a dollar but they have steadily worked their way upward, 
proving what may be accomplished in tliis land of opportunity where energy and ambition 
point out the way. 



JUDGE AUGUSTUS P. FOLSOM. 

.Judge Augustus P. Folsom, the present county and city justice of Dickinson and 
Stark county, was born in Marshfield, Washington county, Vermont, September 11. 1843, 
a son of .John and Philena (Young) Folsom. The father was born at Stanstead, in the 
province of Quebec, Canada, February 9, 1819, and in 1838 removed to Vermont, locating 
at Marshfield. In 1845 he went to Wheelock, where he remained until 18,'j9, when he 
removed to Greensboro, there following the occupation of farming until July, 18G2. In 
response to the country's call for troops he enlisted as a member of Company A, Tenth 
Vermont Volunteer Infantry, remaining in active service in Virginia under McClellan with the 
Army of the Potomac until death claimed him on the 31st of October, 1863, his life being one 
of the sacrifices demanded to preserve the L'nion. His wife was born in Claremont, New 
Hampshire, February 28, 1821, and she reached the age of seventy-six years, passing away in 
1897. Her last days were spent at Stannard, Caledonia county, Vermont. In the family 
were five children: Celinda, who became the wife of J. 0. Griffin, a farmer living at 
Greenfield, Massachusetts; Augustus P.; Jane, who became the wife of .1. H. Clark, a farmer 
of Stannard, Vermont, and died in 1915; Joseph B., who passed away in 1873; and Etta, 
who died in 1915. 

Judge F'olsom pursued his early education in the district schools of Wheelock, Caledonia 
county, Vermont, and afterward attended high school at Glover, Orleans county, Vermont. 
The same spirit of patriotism which prompted his father's enlistment for service in the 
Civil war was manifest in his case, for in 1863 he joined the armj- as a member of Company 
D, Sixth Vermont Infantry, with which he served in the Array of the Potomac until the 
close of the war. He took part in the Battle of the Wilderness and other important en- 
gagements and in the Battle of the Wilderness was wounded in the throat. He was 
afterward attached to the hospital corps until the cessation of hostilities and was ward 
master of the United States General Hospital of Vermont, which was situated near his 
birthplace. 

Leaving the service, .Judge Folsom returned to Greensboro, Vermont, where he engaged in 
the lumber business and in milling for a few years. At the end of that time he purchased 
the Greensboro Bend Hotel at Greensboro Bend and was its proprietor for eight years. 
On the IStli of September, 1866, he married Pliilinda Daniels, a native of Barnston, Quebec, 



30 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Canada, born June 9, 1847. In her girlliood days she became a resident of Vermont and 
four children were born of this marriage: Lillian, deceased; Ethel, the wife of Charles 
Pendergast, who is farming at Hettinger, North Dakota; L. Everett, who is railioading 
and makes his home at Newport, Vermont; and Mabel, the wife of H. F. Beidler, who is 
engaged in the lumber business in Dickinson. The wife and mother passed away in 1905, 
at the age of fifty-eight years. In June, 1914, Judge Folsom was again married, his second 
union being with Mrs. Agnes Beidler, a native of St. Cloud, Minnesota, who died in June, 
1915. 

It was in 1884 that Mr. Folsom left the Atlantic coast for the middle west. Making 
his way to Minneapolis, Minnesota, he there remained for about a year and in April, 1885, 
became a resident of Loyalton, Edmunds county. South Dakota, then Dakota territory. 
He there took up a homestead and tree claim and also bought a lumber business, remaining 
there for three and one-half years. He next removed to New England, North Dakota, 
where he opened a general store which he conducted and at the same time served as post- 
master for four years. In the spring of 1893 he established his home in Dickins-on and 
soon afterward was appointed justice of the peace, in which position he has served almost 
continuously since, acting as justice for both city and county. He has also been engaged 
in the land business and that has constituted an important source of his revenue. His 
oilicial record is indeed creditable. Before coming to the west he had served for nineteen 
years as a justice in Vermont and he has occupied the office for twenty-two years in 
Dakota. To some extent he has engaged in farming and has a tract of ninety acres Avithin 
the city limits of Dickinson. 

In polities Judge Folsom is a republican, active in support of his party, which has 
almost continuously kept him in public office since he attained his majority. Fraternally 
he is a prominent Mason. He joined the order in Vermont in 1865 and now 
belongs to the lodge, chapter and commandery at Dickinson and the council at Fargo. 
He is a past master of the lodge and has been its secretary for seven years. He has 
been secrctarj' of the chapter since its organization nineteen years ago — the only one that has 
ever filled this position. He is likewise connected with the Eastern Star and he became a 
member of the Grand Army of the Kepublic at Loyalton, South Dakota. His religious 
faith is that of the Methodist Episcopal church and he is serving onnfche board of stewards 
in the Dickinson church. The official record of no other resident of Stark county has 
extended o\'cr a longer period and none has been more faultless in honor, fearless in conduct 
or stainless in reputation. 



WILLARD BELA OVERSON. 



Willard Bela Overson, state senator from Williams county since 1908 and throughout 
the entire period a member of the judiciary committee, has since October, 1899, actively 
engaged in the practice of law in Williston. Free from ostentation and display, he is 
fortunate in possessing character and ability that inspire confidence in others, and the 
simple weight of his character and ability has carried him into important relations. He 
was born in Cambridge, Wisconsin, November 28, 1872, a son of Thomas and Marion (Allen) 
Overson. The father, a native of Teleniarken. Norway, came witli his parents to the 
United States when ten years of age, the family home being established in Racine county, 
Wisconsin, where he acquired a liberal education. He afterward engaged in merchandising 
in Cambridge, that state, where his death occurred in 1901. His wife, who was born, 
reared and educated in Utica, New York, was an accomplished musician and. before her 
marriage engaged in teaching. She passed away in Cambridge, Wisconsin, in 1891. 

At the usual age Willard B. Overson became a pupil in the public schools of his native 
town, passing through consecutive grades to his graduation from the high school, while 
subsequently he won the Bachelor of Arts degree upon graduating from the University of 
Wisconsin. Determining upon the practice of law as a life work, he then matriculated as 
a law student in the State University and won his professional degree in 1896. After 
practicing for a few years at Racine, Wisconsin, he removed to Williston, Xortli Dakota, 




WILLAED B. OVERSON 



1 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 33 

in October, 1899, and tliroiigliout the inteivening years has been engaged in the practice 
of hiw and in newspaper work. For a time lie was lialf owner and associate editor of 
the Williston Grapliic but sold his interest in that paper some time ago. He also organ- 
ized the Williston Land Company, of which he was president for ten years and the lirst 
abstiaet company in the count}'. His attention is now chielly concentrated upon the private 
practice of law and his devotion to his clients' interests is proverbial. I'or the past 
fourteen years he has been attorney for the Great Northern Railroad Company. In the 
work of the courts he is most thorough and painstaking, preparing his eases with great care 
and precision, while his presentation of a cause always indicates careful analysis and his 
reasoning is thoroughly logical. 

On the 20th of June, 1906, at Sterling, Hlinois, Mr. Overson was married to Miss Alice 
Dillon, who was there born and reared. After attending the high school she was graduated 
from Waterbury Hall, a private school for girls at Sycamore, Illinois. She is a daughter of 
Colonel iloses and Emma (Golder) Dillon. Her father was a native of Youngstown, Ohio, 
and at the time of the Civil war enlisted from Illinois. In business connections he was 
well known as a successful lumberman and continued his residence in Sterling until his death. 

Fraternally Mr. Overson is connected with Williston Lodge, F. & A. M., of which he is 
a past master, while at Fargo he has attained the thirtj-second degree in the Scottish Rite 
and also holds membership in El Zagal Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S. He is likewise a charter 
member of Williston Lodge, No. 1214, B. P. 0. E., and a member of the Knights of Pythias 
and Odd Fellows lodges of that place. He holds membership with the Sons of the American 
Revolution and his religious faith is indicated in his membership in the Episcopal church. 
In politics he is a republican and in 1900 was elected states attorney of Williams county, 
which position he filled for two terms or until 1905. In 1908 he was elected state senator 
and endorsement of his first term's service came to him in reelection in 1913. During the 
past two sessions he has been chairman of the judiciary committee and has done much 
toward shaping important legislation in the state. A man of quiet reserve and dignity 
but of splendid intellectual attainments, he is regarded as one of the leading citizens of 
Williston, enjoying the confidence, respect and honor of his fellow citizens to 'an unusual 
degree. 



JOHN W. DUNGAN. 



.Tohu W. Dungan, county treasurer of Towner county, his home being at Cando, was 
chosen to this position in 1913 and has been a most faithful custodian of the public funds 
throughout the period of his connection with the office. He was born in Marion county, 
Iowa. .Inly 17. 1871, a son of Samuel H. and Sarah J. (Payton) Dungan, natives of Indiana. 
The father was a farmer by occupation and in early life removed to Marion county, Iowa, 
where he purchased land and began the development and improvement of a farm. Some 
time afterward he removed to Kansas, where he carried on farming for three years and later 
he established his home in Nebraska, where he conducted a farm for twelve years. In 1893 
he went to Towner county. North Dakota, where he filed on land and improved a farm, making 
it his place of abode throughout his remaining days. He died on the 23d of January, 1907, 
while his widow yet survives. 

.Tiihii W. Dungan spent the period of his minority in the states of Nebraska and Kansas, 
reuiaining under the parental roof until he reached adult age. He then took up land in 
Towner county. North Dakota, and this he improved, continuing its further cultivation and 
development to the present time save for the period of his incumbency in office. He rented 
the farm in 1912, when he was elected county treasurer of Towner count}', but he intends 
to return to the farm in the spring of 1917 following his retirement from office. He owns 
six quarter sections, or nine hundred and sixty acres of land, and his careful management 
of his property interests has brought to him a substantial measure of prosperity. 

On the 18th of November. 1890. Mr. Dungan was united in marriage to Miss Ethel M. 
Chapman and they have become the parents of four children: Clyde C, Merle W., Fern L. 
and Kva E. ,Mr. Dungan has always given his political allegiance to the republican party 



34 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

since a^e conferred upon him the right of franchise. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Odd Fellows and the Kebekahs, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Degree of 
Honor. His has been an active and well spent life, and his fellow townsmen recognize in 
him a representative business man, substantial citizen and capable oflicial. 



TRACY R. BANGS. 



Tracy E. Bangs, member of the law firm of Bangs, Hamilton & Bangs, is the Nestor 
of the Grand Forks bar and is today the oldest practicing attorney of the city. He 
there began practice in 1886 but even prior to that time the name of Bangs was 
associated with the legal history of Grand Forks, for his father was an active member of 
the profession at that point. 

Tracy R. Bangs was born in Le Sueur, Minnesota, on the 39th of April, 1863, a son 
of Alfred W. Bangs, a native of Pennsylvania and a descendant of an old Massachusetts fam- 
ily, the ancestors having come to America from England in 1623. The founder of the 
American branch of the family was Edward Bangs and he became the founder of the town 
of Eastham, Massachusetts, where he resided from 1633 until 1667. In August, 1916, 
a tablet was there erected to his memory and the president of the Colonial Society of 
Massachusetts delivered an address on that occasion. Early ancestors of the family par- 
ticipated in the Revolutionary war. Alfred W. Bangs practiced law at Scranton, Penn- 
sylvania, for a short time, but, moving west in 1860, became a pioneer of Minnesota and 
afterward aa early settler of Grand Forks, where he established his home in 1881. Subse- 
quently he removed to Rapid City, South Dakota, where he passed away in 1905 at thfr 
age of seventy-five years. During his residence in both North and South Dakota he 
served as county attorney and he was chaiiinan of the last democratic territorial com- 
'mittee. He was at one time state senator from Pennington county. South Dakota, and he 
was a delegate to the national convention of his party at St. Louis which nominated 
Grover Cleveland for the presidency. He took a most prominent part in promoting the 
interests of his party and was a very active worker in its ranks. Hg was also a leading 
member of the Masonic fraternity and he left the impress of his individuality in many ways. 
upon the public life of his state. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Alena Baker, was 
a native of Pennsylvania and a representative of an old Presbyterian family of Scotch- 
Irish descent. She died in Minnesota in 1865, leaving a son and daughter, but the latter 
is now deceased. In the fall of 1866 A. W. Bangs was married to Sara D. Plowman,, 
she being the mother of George A. Bangs, who is referred to elsewhere in this history. 

The son, Tracy R. Bangs, was educated in the public schools of his native town and 
at the age of fifteen began to earn his own livelihood. He was first employed as clerk 
in an abstract office and subsequently occupied a position in the auditor's oflSce in LeSueur 
county, Minnesota. Before leaving the public schools he began the study of law under the 
direction of his father and after removing to Grand Forks in the winter of 1881-3 he- 
secured employment in the United States land office, with which he was connected for two 
years. He afterward became bookkeeper in the Grand F'orks National Bank. Continuing 
the study of law as opportunity offered, he was admitted to practice in 1886 and became 
the associate of his father under the firm name of Bangs & Bangs. A. W. Bangs, moving to 
Rapid City, South Dakota, in the spring of 1889, Tracy R. formed a partnership with 
Charles J. Fisk, now chief justice, which continued until after Mr. Bangs' appointment as 
United States District Attorney. He has been city attorney and in 1893 he was elected 
states attorney, while in 1894 he received the appointment of United States attorney, occupying 
that position for four years, after which he retired and resumed the private practice of 
law. For several years he was alone, after which he entered into partnership with Charles- 
M. Cooley, now serving on the district bench. Later they were joined in a partnership 
relation by Helen M. Hamilton under the firm style of Bangs, Cooley & Hamilton, and 
afterward Arthur L. Netcher succeeded Judge Cooley in the firm. In 1915 Mr. Netcher with- 
drew and on the 1st of September of that year Philip R. Bangs, son of Tracy R. Bangs and 
a graduate of the law school of the University of North Dakota, became a member of the 
firm, which is now known as Bangs, Hamilton & Bangs. No other lawyer has practiced 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 35 

as long in Grand Forks as has tlie senior partner. The firm continues in the general 
practice of law and has perhaps the most extensive and important clientage of any firm 
in the city. Jlr. Bangs is recognized as a lawj'er of pronounced ability. His mind is 
analytical, logical and inductive and his reasoning is clear and his deductions sound. He 
has ever made it his purpose to carefully prepare his cases and is therefore never surprised 
by an unexpected attack of an adversary. His standing among his professional brethren 
is indicated in the fact that he has been honored with the presidency of the County Bar 
Association, which position he has occupied for several years. He was the third president 
of the association, which his father assisted in organizing and of which he became the 
first president. Aside from his connection with the bar Mr. Bangs is a director of the 
Northwest Trust Company, of the Scandinavian-American Bank and of the Northern 
Telephone Company of Grand Forks. 

On the 15th of June, 1887, Mr. Bangs was married at Grand Forks to iOss Jessie L. 
Caughell, a native of Canada and a daughter of Charles Caughell, of Vienna, Ontario. 
They have become the parents of two sons: Felix F., now a practicing attorney of Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota; and Philip R., who is associated with his father. 

The family are identified with the Episcopal church and something of the nature of 
Mr. Bangs' recreation is indicated in the fact that he belongs to the Golf Club and to 
the Grand Forks Curling Club. He is also a member of the Minneapolis Club and he has 
membership in the Commercial Club of Grand Forks. Fraternally he is a Knight Templar 
Mason and is potentate of Kem Temple, A. A. 0. N. M S. In fact he has been very active 
and prominent in Masonic circles and since 1885 he has been a member of the Knights of 
Pj'thias and also has membership with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. Since 
1890 he has been a member of the supreme legislative body in the Knights of Pythias and 
from 1902 until 1904 was supreme chancellor of the order. He became a charter member 
of the Elks lodge of Grand Forks and was its third exalted ruler. His political allegiance 
has always been given to the democratic party and he has done efl'ective work in its behalf. 
Like his honored father before him he has ever recognized the duties and obligations as 
well as the privileges of citizenship and has ever been ready to respond when a call has 
been made for aid in behalf of any project or movement tending to further the public good. 
For several }-ears he has been a member and is now the president of the board of trustees 
of the University of North Dakota and he has also served for a number of years on the 
school board of Grand Forks. He is numbered among those who have molded public 
thought and action in his city and his entire career has reflected credit and honor upon 
the city which honors him. 



HENRY EDWIN NELSON. 



Henry Edwin Nelson of Valley City, who is filling the office of deputy treasurer of 
Barnes county and will take office as treasurer May 1, 1917, came to this state from Minne- 
sota, his birth having occurred at Amherst, Fillmore county, on the 5th of July, 1877, a 
son of Andrew and Christi (Ellingson) Nelson, both of whom were natives of Norway. The 
paternal grandfather came to America about 1848 and settled in Fillmore county, Minnesota, 
where his remaining days were passed. Brought to America when a young lad, Andrew 
Nelson was reared in Minnesota and in early manhood enlisted for service in the Union 
army as a member of a ilinnesota regiment when eighteen years of age, continuing with 
that command until honorably discharged at the close of the war. He returned home with 
a most creditable military record after participating in a number of hotly contested engage- 
ments. He afterward turned his attention to farming, which he followed in Minnesota 
until June, 1879, when he removed to Barnes county and took up a homestead, preemption 
and- tree claim about thirteen miles south of Valley City. There he made his home through- 
out the residue of his daj-s and was successfully engaged in developing and cultivating his 
four hundred and eighty acre farm, which is now owned and operated by his youngest son, 
.■\ndrcw Nelson. Of his family of eight children two sons and four daughters are now 
living. 



36 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Heiuy E. Nelson, v\lio was the fifth in order of birth, after mastering the branches of 
learning;- taught in the public schools attended the Valley City Normal School and also 
pursued a commercial course in the Sioux Falls Business College at Sioux Falls, South 
Dakota. Taking up the profession of teaching, he followed it for five years, after which 
he engaged in farming, having purchased three hundred and tvienty acres of land north 
of the original family homestead. This he cultivated for two years, at the end of which 
time he returned to Valley City and was employed as clerk in the county 'auditor's office for 
four years. He ne.xt became deputy county treasurer and made an excellent record in that 
office by his efficiency and fidelity, his work being carefully systematized and promptly 
executed at all times. At the primary election held in .lune, 1916, he received the nomina- 
tion for countj' treasurer and was duly elected in November of the same year, his term 
of office beginning May 1, 1917. Mr. Nelson still owns his farm but has leased his land, 
tlie rental therefrom adding materially to his income. 

On the 28th of November, 190G, was celebrated the marriage of ilr. Nelson and Miss 
Dorothy Marsli, of ^'allej' City, North Dakota, a daughter of R. W. Marsh, deceased, ot 
Winona, Minnesota, hhe has lived here since early childhood, coming to North Dakota in 
1890. Mr. Nelson belongs to the Knights of Pythias and he and his wife hold membership 
in the Congregational church. Practically his entire life has been spent in Barnes county 
and that the record which he has made is an enviable one is indicated in the fact that his 
stanehcst friends are those who have known him from his boyhood to the present. 



HON. HENRY A. ARMSTRONG. 

Hon. Henry A. Armstrong, an attorney of law of Hazelton, prepared for his profession 
as a student in the State University of Michigan and since his graduation has continu- 
ously resided in Emmons county. North Dakota, being among those early settlers A\ho re- 
claimed the wild land and converted it into productive farms. He was also called to 
public office and likewise engaged in the general practice of law. in which connection he 
is now enjoying a good clientage. He was born in Elkton, Ohio, A^ril 20, 1856, a son of 
Andrew and Elizabeth (Bowman) Armstrong, both of whom were born in Columbiana 
county, Ohio. In that county they spent their_ entire lives, thq father following the 
occupation of farming as a life work. His political support was given to the republican 
party and he was prominent as one of its local leaders, serving for six years as county 
commissioner, and in other offices. 

After mastering the branches of learning taught in the common schools of his native 
county Henry A. Armstrong continued his education in the Paola (Kas.) Normal School, 
having become a resident of that state in 1879. When nineteen years of age he entered 
upon the profession of teaching in Ohio and he afterward taught for one term at Enterprise, 
Kansas, following the completion of his normal school course. In 1881 he returned to his 
native state, spending that summer on the home farm, and in the following fall he en- 
tered upon the study of law in the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, from which 
institution he was graduated in the spring of 1883. He was then admitted to practice at 
the Michigan bar and in the following .June came to Dakota territory, settling in Emmons 
county. He took up a homestead near the old town of Williamsport, then the county seat, 
and proved up on his claim, at the same time practicing law. He served as states attorney 
for sevei-al terms and was called to other public office by the vote of his fellow townsmen, 
who elected him county auditor and afterward register of deeds. He also served as deputy 
treasurer for several years under different administrations and in 1894 he was chosen to 
represent his district in the state legislature, his fellow townsmen being willing to entrust 
their interests to his hands, for he had given full evidence of his public spirit and devo- 
tion to the general welfare. 

In 1906 Mr. Armstrong removed from his homestead to his present farm of four hun- 
dred and eighty acres, which adjoins Hazelton, and thereon he has since resided. He con- 
tinues actively in the practice of law as senior member of the firm of Armstrong & Cameron, 
maintaining law offices in both Linton and Hazelton. Without invidious distinction this' 




HON. HEXKY A. AEilSTROXG 



PUB Lie 



-) 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 39 

may well be tciiuod the leading law firm of Emmons count}', for tlieir practice is very exten- 
sive and of a most important cliaracter, connecting tliem with tlie leading litigation of the 
district. Mr. Armstrong is felicitous and clear in argument, strong in debate and logical 
in his deductions and is seldom if ever at fault in the application of legal principles. At 
the same time he prepares his cases with great thoroughness and care and he enjoys, more- 
over, the respect of his professional colleagues. He has been an extensive buyer and seller 
of farm lands and now owns eleven hundred and forty-two acres. He is a stockholder in 
the Farmers State Bank of Hazelton and is its attorney. 

On the 15th of March, 1880, Mr. Armstrong was united in marriage to Miss Libbie A 
Kurtz, of Emmons county, and to them has been born a daughter, Edna L., the wife ol 
O. M. Garber, of Ashland, Ohio. 

Mr. Armstrong is well known in lodge circles, holding membership in Hazelton Lodge, 
No. 64, K. P., Hazelton Lodge, No. 135, I. 0. 0. F., and the Modern Woodmen of America. 
For a third of a centuiy he has been a resident of Emmons county and from the beginning 
has been accorded a position of leadership, his activities contributing in large measure to its 
material development and to the upholding of its legal and political status. 



FBANK G. JENNINGS. 



Frank G. .Jennings, publisher of the Pettibone Spectator at Pettibone, Kidder county, 
was born in Casey, Illinois, March 32, 1895, a son of Louis F. and Anna Jennings. The 
father, who was a merchant, continued to reside in Illinois until called to his final rest. 
The son supplemented his district school education by study in the high school at St. 
Louis, Missouri, and when his textbooks were put aside he went to Ranger, Texas, where 
he learned the printer's trade, spending about a year as an employe on the Ranger Record. 
He afterward removed to Greenup, Illinois, and worked on the Greenup Press as general 
man, spending about a year in that connection. He was afterward employed in a clothing 
store for about a year, on the expiration of which period he came to North Dakota, settling 
at Pettibone in 1914. He worked on the. Spectator for nine months or until .luly, 1915, 
when he purchased the paper, which he still owns and publishes. It is the leading paper of 
Kidder county, has a good circulation and is also an excellent advertising medium. 

In April, 1914, Mr. Jennings was married to Miss Bonnie T. Templeton, of Greenup, 
Illinois, and they have a son, Louis Frank. In politics Mr. Jennings is a democrat but con- 
ducts his paper as an independent journal. He has served as clerk of Pettibone township but 
is not an ollice seeker although interested in the success of his party. He belongs to the 
Modern Woodmen camp of Pettibone and is a leading and influential citizen of his community, 
easting his inlhience on the side of progress and improvement at all times. 



HENRY W. AAILLIS. 



Henry W. Willis, ]iostmaster at Lansford and one of the representative citizens of 
Hottineau county, lias through the period of his residence in that part of the state taken 
an active and helpful interest in promoting the work of progress and improvement. He 
was born in East Tennessee, within four miles of the home of Andrew .Tohnson, December 
."). 1855. a son of David and Elizabeth (Lintz) Willis, who were also natives of that state. 
The father followed farming in Tennessee until 1880, when he went to Arkansas, where he 
livi'il for a finv years and then removed to Cherokee county, Kansas, where his remaining 
(Imvs were spent, liis death occurring in 1903, when he had reached the age of seventy-five 
years. His widow still survives and is now eighty-six years of age. 

Henry \V. Willis pursued his early education in subscription schools nf his native state 
,ind remained with his parents upon the home farm imtil he attained his majority, after 
wl.ich he began working on a tobacco plantation, renuiining in the employ of one man for 
eiL;liteen months, but was beaten out of his nionej'. He afterward served as farm foreman 



40 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 



for a year, in which connection he superintended the labors of fourteen men employed under 
him. He then went to Illinois, where he worked by the month as a farm hand, but desirous 
that his labors should more directly benefit himself, he then rented land which he continued 
to cultivate for some time. Later he, too, went to Cherokee county, Kansas, where he pur- 
chased land and carried on farming on his own account. Afterward he became a resident 
of the Indian Territory and leased five hundred acres of land which he fenced and improved, 
continuing its cultivation for three years. He then traded his lease and returned to Kansas, 
where he sold his farm. He next went to northern Missouri, where he carried on the work 
of tilling the soil for seven years, and in 1901 he arrived in Bottineau county. North Dakota, 
taking up a homestead near Lansford, after which he improved and developed that place 
for five years. He bouglit more land from time to time until he owned an entire section, 
which he sold in 1905. He then went to Washington looking for a location but did not like 
the country and in consequence returned to North Dakota, after which he purchased another 
section of land in Bottineau county, three miles from Lansford. To that place he has added 
modern equipments and improvements and he now has the farm rented to good advantage. 
In the fall of 1905 he removed -to Lansford and erected a fine home. He also installed a 
telephone exchange in Glenburn and bought an elevator here which he operated for two 
years. Extending his business in connection with the establishment of telephone systems, 
he put in exchanges in several places and continued active along that line until 1909, when 
he again went back to the farm for a time. On account of illness, however, he returned to 
Lansford and in April, 1914, was appointed postmaster of the town, in which capacity he has 
.since continued. He is also engaged in the automobile business, handling the Ford, Max- 
well and Chalmers cars, for which he has found a ready sale, his business reaching extensive 
proportions. 

In November, 1878, Mr. Willis was married to Miss Lydia C. Couch at Whitesburg, 
Tennessee, and to them were born four children, but two died in infancy and Lillian 
passed away in January, 1911, leaving Mabel C. as the only survivor. For his second wife 
Mr. Willis chose Emma J. Campbell of Guilford, Missouri, whom he married in Carthage, 
Missouri, in 1890. 

Their religious faith is that of the Methodist church and fraternally Jlr. \\'illis is con- 
nected with the Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America, ^is political allegiance 
is given the democratic party and he has served for two terms as a member of the city 
council of Lansford and as justice of the peace, discharging the duties of these positions 
in a most creditable, prompt and faithful manner. He has also been president of the school 
board and the cause of education finds in him a stalwart champion. In fact he is a man of 
most progressive spirit and his energy and enterprise have carried him into important business 
and public relations, in all of which he has enjoyed and deserved the confidence, goodwill and 
hi};h regard of his fellow townsmen. 



OLGER B. BURTNESS. 



Olger B. Burtness, states attorney of Grand Forks, well versed in his professifm and 
recognized throughout the community as an able lawyer, was born at Mekinock, in Grand 
Forks county, March 14, 1884, a son of 0. 0. and Mary (Anderson) Burtness. The father, 
a native of Norway, came to America in 1865 and cast in his lot with the pioneer settlers 
of Wisconsin, in which state his wife was born. In 1879 Mr. Burtness came to North 
Dakota and filed on a homestead near Grand Forks, whereon he engaged in farming for many 
years. With the agricultural development of the district he has been closely associated 
.md has lived to witness a marked transtormation in the appearance of his section of the 
state. He has now reached the age of sixty-four years, while his wife is sixty-five years 
of age. In their family were five children: Emory 0., who is engaged in business at 
Mekinock; Harvey S., a farmer of Grand Forks county; Mrs. L. P. Norby, living at Morris, 
Minnesota; Olger B.; and Gaylor H., who follows farming at Mekinock, North Dakota. 

In his youthful days Olger B. Burtness attended the public schools of Grand Forks county 
and pursued his more specifically literary course as a student in the arts department of the 



HISTORY OF XORTH DAKOTA 41 

University of Noitli Dakota, from wliicli lie was graduated with tlie A. B. degree in 1906. 
He also studied law there and won his professional degree in 1907. He then opened an 
odice in Grand Forks, where lie has since engaged in practice, and he now enjoys a large 
and important clientage, his name figuring in much of the notable litigation heard in the 
courts of his district. In 1910 he was elected to the office of states attorney and by reelection 
has been continued in that position to the present time, making a most creditable record 
in ollice. Uis mind is analytical, logical and inductive in its trend and his thoroughness 
in preparing his cases is one of the strong elements in his success before the bar, where his 
keen reasoning and carefully presented evidence never fail to impress court or jury. 

On the 8th of September, 1909. Mr. Burtness was married to Miss Zoe Ensign, of 
Detroit, Minnesota, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. D. Ensign. Mr. Burtness is a director 
of the Young Men's Christian Association and is a Mason of high standing, connected with 
the Scottish Rite and the Mystic Shrine. He is also identified with the Yeomen and the 
Sons of Xorway. He belongs to the County, State and American Bar Associations and 
he stands very high in professional circles. He gives to his clients a service of great talent, 
unwearied industry and broad learning and at the same time never forgets that there are 
certain things due to the court, to his own respect and above all to justice and the righteous 
administration of the law which neither the zeal of the advocate nor the pleasure of success 
permit him to disregard. In a word he is an able, faithful and conscientious minister in the 
temple of justice. 



AMUX SI. TOl THAGEX. 



Amun il. Tofthagen, president of the Lakota Mercantile Company, has throughout his 
life since attaining his majority, been connected with commercial pursuits. He was born 
at Hundorp, Norway, November 12. 1858. His father, Andrew Tofthagen, also a native of 
that country, came to America i^ the fall of 1869 and cast in his lot with the early settlers 
of Black River Falls, Wisconsin, and vicinity, becoming one of the successful farmers of that 
district. In the fall of 1872 he filed on a homestead in Jackson county. AYisconsin, where 
he resided until his death which occurred April 1, 1903, when he was seventy-two years 
of age for he was born in the fall of 1830. His wife, Mary Simonson Tofthagen, also a 
native of Norway, came to America with the family in the spring of 1871 and her death 
occurred September 10, 1913, when she was eighty-three years of age. In the family were 
seven children of whom four are living: Amun; Simon, a resident of Alberta. Canada; Gilbert, 
living at Black River Falls, Wisconsin; and Mary, the widow of Hans C. Troen of Wisconsin. 

Amun M. Tofthagen was raised upon the home farm to the age of fifteen and one-half 
years when he started out to earn his own living. He had attended the public schools of 
Black River Falls, becoming a high school pupil and spending the summer months on the 
home farm, while the winter seasons were devoted to the acquirement of an education. When 
he left home he was employed at farm labor and on attaining his majority became connected 
with mercantile interests as a clerk for the firm of S. P. and E. C. Jones, proprietors of 
the largest dr}' goods store at Black River Falls. He continued in that connection for 
three years when he made arrangements with a former townsman of Black River Falls who 
had become a pioneer mercliant of Grand Forks, to take charge of the dry goods department 
of his general store in the latter place. Accordingly he arrived in Grand Forks, March 4, 
1882, and for a year remained with A. Abrahamsen, but before the end of that time filed 
on a homestead. After proving up on the land he returned to the employ of Mr. Abrahamsen 
and in the spring of 1885 was appointed the first auditor of Nelson county. In 1886 he was 
elected to the office without opposition and so continued until 1888 when he was elected 
register of deeds. In 1890 he was reelected on the republican ticket and filled that position 
until the close of the term when he retired from office as he had entered it — with the con- 
fidence and good will of all concerned. In the summer of 1893 he took an extended trip 
through Europe and Asia including Palestine, and also went to Egypt, remaining abroad 
for nine months. On his return he removed to Hillsboro, where he remained for a year 
representing the firm of Graves & Vinton, bankers and financiers, in placing their farm 



42 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

loans. In the summer of 1895 lie organized the Lakota Mercantile Company of which he 
became the president and has since remained in that connection. Theirs is today the 
lar-est enterprise of the kind in the county, their business amounting to more than one 
hundied anrl thirty thousand dollars annually. They began in a small way but along the 
legitimate lines of trade have continually increased their business until they now employ 
ten people on an average. Mr. Tofthagen is also a stockholder in the National Bank of 
Lakota, of which his partner, Jacob Thai, is president. 

Mr. Tofthagen is a stalwart republican and a very active party worker. In 1000 he 
was one of the three presidential electors from North Dakota. He was on the board of 
directors of tlie Agricultural College under Governor Andrew Burke. He is a very prominent 
Mason belonging to both the York and Scottish Kites, also to the Mystic Shrine and the 
Order of the Eastern Star, and the honorary thirty-third degree has been conferred upon him. 
Since being initiated into the order in Lakota in 1886 he has filled all of the chairs and has 
several times been master of his lodge. He belongs to the Masonic Club at Fargo and to 
the Lakota Commercial Club. He has travelled extensively in all parts of the world includ- 
ing Alaska, and three times visited South America and has made one trip around the workl. 
He has been in every metropolis on the face of the globe and he has the finest private col- 
lection of art treasures and curios in the entire northwest. He also has an extensive library 
containing fifteen hundred volumes, many of them being of rare and costly editions. His 
early years were fraught with struggles to obtain a footing in business and he has come in 
his later life to enjoy that rest which enables one to cultivate a love of art and those things 
which bring a broad view and contribute to intellectual enjoyment. Every day with him 
marks a full faithed attempt to know more and to grow more and his success is the 
culmination of a life of well directed energy, whether expressed in an effort to attain wealth 
or to attain wisdom. 



ROBERT M. CALDERWOOD. 

Robert M. Calderwood, president of the Williston Land Compaii^, was born near Fox 
Lake, Dodge county, Wisconsin, March 15, 1859, a son of John and Emily B. (Greenlief) 
Calderwood. The father, a native of Scotland, came to America \yith his parents when 
four years of age, the family home being established near West Galway, New York, where 
the grandfather engaged in the milling business and also operated a tannery for a number 
of years. John Calderwood was there reared and after attending the public schools was 
graduated from an agricultural college and also completed a theological course, subsequent 
to which time he followed farming in New Y'ork. Later he removed to Dodge count}', Wiscon- 
sin, and took up a homestead claim near F'ox Lake, where he engaged in farming. He 
was also active as a minister of the Wesleyan Methodist church, as an abolitionist and as 
an advocate of the temperance cause. In a word, he stood for reform and progress, working 
ever toward higher ideals for the individual and for the community. In 186" he went 
to Cerro Gordo county, Iowa, purchased land and engaged in farming near Rock Falls. 
After retiring from farm work he served as minister in various churches in Iowa, for a 
time being located at Blairsburg. He always retained his landed interests and from his 
property derived a good income. He died at the home of his daughter near Battle Creek, 
Michigan, in 1900, when eighty-four years of age. His wife, who spent her girlliood days 
in New York, went to Dodge county, Wisconsin, where she met and married Mr. Calderwood. 
In early womanhood she engaged in teaching. Her demise occurred in Ramsey county. 
North Dakota, prior to the death of her husband. She was descended from an old Vermont 
family and her brother was one of the "Green Mountain boys" in the Civil war. 

Robert M. Calderwood was but eight years of age when the family boms was estab- 
lished in Cerro Gordo county and in the district schools near his father's farm he pursued 
his education, after which he assisted in the cultivation of the fields. He later taught 
school in Hamilton county, Iowa, and afterward engaged in farming on his own account 
on his father's place in that state. In 1882 he removed to North Dakota and did carpenter 
work for the Great Northern Railroad Company in Grand Forks count}' near where he 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA ' 43 

pii'i'iiipti'd one Imndrpd and sixty acres of land not far from Larimore. In 188;i ho removed 
to IX'vils Lake and took up a tree claim, continuing to engage in farming in that locality 
on an extensive scale until 1901, when lie sold his interests there. At that date he was 
appointed I'nitcd States commissioner for the district of North IJakota, with headquarters 
at Williston, and occupied that position for a term of six years or until 1907. Upon 
removing to Williston he embarked in the land business, in which he is still engaged and now 
handles real estate and makes loans, being today president of the Williston Land Company. 
He also organized the Missouri River Bridge Company of Williston for the purpose of 
building a pontoon bridge across the Missouri river to join Williams and McKenzie counties, 
and of this company he is president and general manager. This bridge was constructed 
at a cost of ten thousand dollars and has facilitated traffic from McKenzie county, bringmg 
trade to Williston. He is the president and principal stockholder of the Williston Land 
Company and liis business in that connection has now reached extensive and profitable 
proportions. 

On the 3d of December, 1901, at Devils Lake, Mr. Calderwood was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary Boothroyd, who was born near Alexandria, Minnesota, a daughter of Richard and 
Eliza Boothroyd. She taught school in that state and in 1898 came to North Dakota as 
a school teacher. She died at Williston in the fall of 1905 and on the 8th of September, 
1908, Jlr. Calderwood was again married, his second union being with Miss Ruth M. Wolcott, 
of Spokane. She was born in Wrightstown, Minnesota, and at the age of fifteen years 
accompanied her parents on their removal to a farm in Ramsey county, North Dakota. 

In politics Mr. Calderwod is a strong proliibitioni.st and in addition to filling the office 
of United States commissioner he was elected and served for two terms as justice of the 
peace in Ramsey county and was also road supervisor. He was likewise appointed police 
magistrate in Williston, holding the office for a part of a term. He is a director of the 
W'illiams County Fair Association and a member of the Williston Commercial Club. He 
belongs to the Congregational church, of which he is one of the leading and active workers, 
serving at the present time as president of the board of trustees. His wife is in full accord 
and S3'mpathy with him in his efforts in the church and is now superintendent of the junior 
department of the Sunday school. Mr. Calderwood throws the weight of his inlluence to 
every movement that tends to promote the material, intellectual, social and moral progress 
of his community. His life is actuated b^' high ideals and is the expression of manly pur- 
pose, his entire career being an exemplification of the fact that success and an honored name 
may be won simultaneously. 



JOHN J. BAUMGARTNER. 



Each community has its enterprising citizens, men who are leaders in the upbuilding 
of the towns and surrounding country districts and whose activities constitute a substantial 
feature in permanent development. Such a one is John J. Baumgartner, president of the 
Security State Bank and manager of the Strasburg Bazaar, the leading mercantile institution 
of the town. These interests and other activities place him among the foremost business 
men of Emmons county. He was born in Stra.sburg, Russia, of German parentage, on the 
1st of January, 1877. a son of Johannas and Margaret (Brannagel) Baumgartner, both of 
whom were natives of Russia, to which country their parents had removed from Germany, 
In May, 18S9, they came to the United States and established their home in Emmons 
county. North Dakota, taking up a claim near the present site of Strasburg. Upon the 
farm which the father there developed they resided for twenty years and upon his retire- 
ment from active business life they took up their abode in Strasburg, where they now 
make their home. 

John J. Baumgartner spent tlie first twelve years of his life in the land of the czar 
and then came with his parents to the new world, supplementing his early education, acquired 
in the schools of Russia, by study in the district schools of North Dakota. In pioneer 
times, however, the school system had been but inadequately developed and his opportu- 
nities in that direction were therefore somewhat limited, but in the school of exi)erience he 



44 • HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

has learned many valuable lessons. He was but nineteen years of age when, on the 20th of 
October, 1896, he married Miss Elizabeth Schneider, also a native of Russia, who came to 
the United States on the same ship with her future husband. In the year of his marriage 
Mr. Baumgartner filed on a homestead near Strasburg and there the young couple began 
their domestic life, continuing to live there until 1902, when they became the first res- 
idents of the town of Strasburg, and there Mr. Baumgartner established the first store 
with his brother Mike, E. Keller and Jacob Feist as partners, conducting the business 
under the firm style of the Strasburg Bazaar. There have been some changes in the 
ownership in the intervening years, the present members of the firm being John J. Baumgart- 
ner, who is general manager, M. J. Fischer and D. Lauinger. In the fall of 1913 Mr. 
Baumgartner also became identified with the banking business by the purchase of the 
Security State Bank and has since been president of the institution. He has further ex- 
tended his efi'orts along business linos, having in February, 1913, in association with others, 
puichased the Korth Star Lumber Company, after which he reorganized the business under 
the style of the Strasburg Lumber Company. In this connection he has developed one of the 
leading lumberyards of the county, his business having reached most extensive and grati- 
fying proportions. He remains one of the board of directors of the company and thus 
has active voice in its management. He is also extensively engaged in the buying and sell- 
ing of farm lands and at the present time is the owner of six hundred and forty acres in 
Emmons county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Baumgartner have become the parents of six children, of whom three, 
Helen, John and Otillia, are yet living. The parents are members of the Catholic church 
and in politics Mr. Baumgartner is a democrat who for several years has served as 
treasurer of the school board but otherwise lias not been active as an office holder. His 
business interests, varied, extensive and important, class him with the representative men 
of Emmons county. 



HON. WESLEY C. McDOWELL. 

Hon. Wesley C. McDowell, president of the First National Bank of Marion, was born 
in Rockford, Illinois, August 26, 1870, a son of Samuel McDowell, who is a native of Scar- 
borough, Ontario, and in 1869 removed to Illinois, where he remained for two years. He 
then returned to Canada and was a resident of Blenheim, Ontario, until 1886, when he 
removed to North Dakota, establishing his home on a farm in Eddy county, wliere he is 
still living. 

Wesley C. McDowell attended the collegiate institute at Blenheim, Ontario, and in 
1896 was graduated from the Minnesota State Normal School at Moorhead, after which 
he devoted two years to teaching in the country schools but regarded that merely as an 
initial step to other interests. For one year he attended law school and through the suc- 
ceeding four years he was upon the road as traveling representative for a machine com- 
pany. In 1902 he arrived in Marion, where he organized the First State Bank, of which 
he was made cashier. Success attended the undertakings from the beginning and in 1909 
the bank was converted into the First National Bank, of which Mr. McDowell remained as 
cashier until 1914, when he was elected to the presidency and is now at the head of the 
institiition, bending his efforts to administrative direction and executive control. A hand- 
some brick building has been erected as a home for the bank and is thoroughly equipped in 
such a manner as to facilitate the conduct of the business and the careful safeguarding of 
the interests of depositors. He is an enthusiastic agriculturist and very practical in liis 
methods of farming, owning fifteen hundred acres of valuable farm land in the immediate 
vicinity of Marion, from which he derives a most gratifying and substantial annual income. 

On Christmas Day of 1899 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. ilcDowell and Miss Myrtle 
Pushor, of Morris, Minnesota, and they have become parents of four daughters: Florence, 
Maud, Helen and Jean, all yet at home. In politics Mr. McDowell is a democrat and In 
1910 was elected to represent his district in the state senate, in which he served for four 
years, giving careful and thoughtful consideration to the various important questions which 




HON. WESLEY C. MCDOWELL 



"> 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 47 

came up for discussion jind settlement, actuated at all times by a desire to advance the inter- 
ests of the eummonwealth. His standing in business circles is indicated by the fact that 
he was honored with the presidency of the .State Bankers Association, being called to that 
office in 1910. Fraternally he is connected with Harmony Lodge, No. 53, F. & A. M., of 
Lidgervvood, with Dakota Consistory, Xo. 1, A. & A. S. R., with the Brotherhood of Ameri- 
.•an Yeomen and the Modern Woodmen of America. For fourteen years he has lived at 
Marion, closely connected with its business development and progress, and his interests, 
llnancial and agricultural, have added much to the upbuilding of the district. In many 
other ways the town has reason to be proud of him as a citizen, for he is a broad-minded 
man who considers deeply and intelligently the questions of interest to city and state 
and is a most earnest and convincing speaker, with a pleasing delivery and a distinctive 
cliarm that arises from his personality and his belief in the subject which he is presenting. 



NELS L. JOHNSON. 



Nels L. Johnson is cashier of the York State Bank at Y'ork, Benson county, and is one 
of the progressive, young business men of his part of the state. In fact he displays the 
spirit of enterprise which has characterized the upbuilding of North Dakota, within the 
borders of which he was born on the 12th of March, 1891, the place of his nativity being 
Grand Forks. His parents were Lewis and Mary (Johnson) Johnson, both of whom were 
natives of Norway, whence in early life they came to the new world, settling in Minne- 
sota, where they resided for a year. They afterward removed to Grand Forks county, 
where the father filed on land which he transformed from a tract of wild western prairie 
into richly cultivated fields, continuing the operation and further improvement of that 
property to the present time, he and his wife still making their home thereon. 

Nels L. .Johnson was reared and educated in Grand F'orks and when his textbooks 
were put aside he secured employment in the Farmers & Merchants Bank at Granville, 
North Dakota, as assistant cashier. He continued to occupy that position for four years 
and later spent three months in a bank at Wolf Point. Un the 6th of May, 1916, he arrived 
in York to become cashier of the State Bank, of which D. A. McLarty is the president and G. 
C. Van Slyke the vice president. The deposits of this bank amount to over one hundred 
and fifty-two thousand dollars. It was organized in 1901 and has a capital stock of ten 
thousand dollars with a surplus of five thousand dollars. A fine bank building was erected 
in 1914 and the bank is in a very substantial and healthy condition. 

On the 21st of June, 1915, Mr. Johnson was married to Miss Bessie Foss and they now 
have a little daughter, Loraine Lois, born June 2, 1916. Mr. and Mrs. .Johnson are con- 
sistent members of the Lutheran church and he is equally loyal as a member of Ashley Lodge, 
No. 69, F. & A. M. His political endorsement is given to the republican party, for he is 
a firm believer in the efficacy of its principles as factors in good government. 



ADOLPH E. KASTIEN. 



.Aildlpli K. Kastien. mayor of Beach, in which capacity he is proving an excellent execu- 
tive officer, exercising wise control over municipal affairs, was born at Bunker Hill. Illinois, 
in 1868. a son of William Kastien. who was of German birth. He came to the L^nited States 
in tlie '50s, settling in St. Louis, Missouri, and during the Civil war he served for about four 
years with a Missouri regiment in the Union army. In 1865 he became a resident of Bunkei 
Hill. Illinois, and took up the occupation of farming there. He has since continued his 
residence in that locality, where he settled in pioneer times, and he has now reached the a^e 
of eighty-four years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Hannah Ellabrake, was also 
a native of Germany and in childhood accompanied her parents to the new world. She died 
in 1877 at the age of forty-three years. 

Adiiliih F. Kastien was one of a family of seven children, all of whom are vet livin". The 
Vol. ni-3 



48 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

public schools of Illinois afforded him his educational opportunities, yet his advantages in 
that direction were limited as his services were needed upon the farm and many of his most 
valuable lessons of life have been gained in the school of experience. He remained upon 
the home farm until nineteen years of age, at which time he went to Chicago, 
working in different shops, learning the machinist's and boiler maker's trades. Later 
he returned to Bunker Hill, where he established a machine shop and conducted 
the business for a period of eleven years. On the expiration of that period he 
sold out and accepted the position of superintendent of the plant of the Colean Manu- 
facturing Company of Peoria, Illinois. He built the company's first tractor and two threshers. 
He also drew up part of the plans for this machinery. He proved a most capable super- 
intendent of the factory through the sjstem in which he liandled the men, directing their 
efforts and securing their cooperation. For a period of three years he held that position, 
but the reports which he had heard from the machine experts concerning North Dakota 
caused him to make his way to this state and in 1908 he arrived in Beach. Here he and hi& 
son established the A. E. Kastien Machine Shop, which was completed in 1908. It was a 
little structure twenty by thirty-two feet and was occupied by them until the fall of 1910, 
at which time a new shop sixty by one hundred and thirty feet was erected at a cost of 
six thousand dollars. From the beginning his work in Beach has been notably successful 
and profitable, his trade covering a radius of one hundred miles. He is recognized as the 
most expert machinist in this part of the country, and his j-early average of business amounted 
to forty-five thousand dollars from the time he took up his abode in his new headquarters. 
He remained in that business until December 1, 1915, at which time he sold out. It is his 
purpose to turn his attention in other directions. He owns a section of North Dakota land 
located near Beach and is entering upon the work of cattle raising, handling registered 
stock. He has always been enthusiastic in the line of his trade, in which he gained expert 
efficiency, and it was only ill health that caused him to retire from that field. 

In November, 1890, Mr. Kastien was married to Miss Lizzie Campbell, a native of 
Ireland, who in her childhood came to the LTnited States. Her parents had previously passed 
away on the Emerald isle. Mr. and Mrs. Kastien have become the parents of two sons, 
Robert and Harry, aged respectively twenty-three and twenty-one years. They have an 
adopted daughter, Florence, who is ten years of age. 

In politics Mr. Kastien is a republican, having supported the party since age conferred 
upon him the right of franchise. He was tax collector in Bunker Hill township when resid- 
ing in Macoupin county, Illinois, and he served for two years as a member of the city council 
in East Peoria, Illinois. Since establishing his home in Beach he has been a member of the 
city council for four years and was largely instrumental in installing the city waterworks- 
and establishing the sewer system. In March, 1916, he was elected mayor of the city by a 
handsome majorit}'. He is a clean politician and his previous record as councilman led to 
the large vote which was given him when he was the mayoralty candidate. He is proving^ 
an excellent official giving to the city a progressive administration characterized by needed 
reforms and improvements which work for the further upbuilding of Beach. Fraternally 
he is connected with the Masonic lodge at Beach, of which he served as master in 1913, 
and he is president of the building association that is erecting the new Jlasonic Temple 
in Beach. His life exemplifies the beneficent spirit and the high standards of the craft and 
throughout the city in which he makes his home he is regarded as a man whom to know 
is to respect and honor. 



GUSTAVE GOLSETH, M. D. 



Dr. Gustave Golseth, of .Jamestown, one of the leading eye, ear, nose and throat 
specialists of the state, has prepared himself thoroughly for his chosen work and has gained 
an enviable and well deserved patronage. He was born in Ashby, Minnesota, on the 22d of 
July, 1876, a son of Haldor and Sigri Golseth. The father, who is deceased, was a veteran 
of the Civil war. 

Dr. <;olseth received a liberal general education, graduating from the academic depart- 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 49 

ment of the University of Minnesota in 1901, ami the training and Icnowledge which he so 
gained proved an excellent foundation for liis professional study in the Chicago Medical 
College. He was graduated therefrom in 1904 and continued his preparation for independent 
practice by serving as an interne in the Sorenson Hospital at Calumet, Michigan, for a 
year. He then located in Minnesota and for three years engaged in general practice. During 
that time he did postgraduate work in Cliicago and New York on eye, ear, nose and 
throat and in the fall of 1907 went tp Europe and studied at London, Berlin and Vienna 
for a year. Since returning to this country he has devoted his attention entirely to the 
treatment of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat and has built up a large and repre- 
sentative practice. He holds membership in the county and state medical societies and in the 
American Medical Association and is secretary of the county society and a state councilor. 

Dr. Golseth was married on the 14th of June, 1910, to Miss Florence Pugh, a daughter of 
Robert I'ugh, and their children are Ralph and .James. 

Dr. Golseth gives his political allegiance to the republican party and his religious faith 
is tliat of the Lutheran church. Fraternally he is well known, belonging to the Masons, 
the ilystic Shrine, the Elks and the Yeomen. He is not only a leader in his chosen profession 
but he is also a public-spirited citizen and a man of sterling wortli and all who have been 
brought in contact with him hold him in high regard. 



JAMES A. DINNIE. 



■Tames A. Dinnie, mayor of Grand Forks and also one of the most prominent, enter- 
prising and active business men of the city, being president and general manager of the 
contracting firm of Dinnie & Company, was born in Dundas county, Ontario, Canada, near 
Morrisburg, on the 7th of February, 1863. His father, John Dinnie, a native of Edinburgh, 
Scotland, settled in Dundas county, Ontario, in 1851, and became a successful farmer there. 
He was very active in the government party and he remained a resident of Canada until 
his death, which occurred in 1904, when he was seventy-five years of age. In early manhood 
he wedded Jlary Gow, a native of Scotland, who was born, reared and married in Edinburgh 
and accompanied her husband to Canada, where she passed away in 1S6S at the age of forty- 
eight years. By her marriage she became the mother of nine children, of whom James A. 
Dinnie was the eighth in order of birth. 

In the country schools of his native county James A. Dinnie pursued his education to 
the age of ten and a half years. After that his time and attention were concentrated upon 
farm work until he reached the age of sixteen, when he was apprenticed to learn the brick- 
layer's trade. After being employed at his trade in Canada for a year he removed to Minne- 
sota and for the succeeding two years worked on a farm in Polk county, that state. He 
next became a resident of Grand Forks, where he completed his trade. After spendin" a 
year as a journeyman he entered upon the contracting and building business, forming a 
partncrsliip with the late .John Dinnie, an older brother, under the firm name of Dinnie 
Brothers. They began business on a small scale but their interests developed until theirs 
became the largest contracting business in the city and state. Their interests were carried 
on under partnership relations until 1909, when John Dinnie withdrew on account of illness 
and the business was then incorporated under the same name, John Dinnie being succeeded 
in the company by his son, A. S. Dinnie. Andrew and Henry Johnson have since become 
members of the firm. James A. Dinnie has always been the president and general manager, 
while Henry Johnson is now vice president and Andrew .Johnson secretary and treasurer. 
The firm has erected many of the best buildings in Grand Forks, including the Masonic 
Temple, which is one of the finest Masonic temples in the northwest. They were also the 
contractors and builders of Hotel Dakota, tlie First National Bank Building, the Young 
Men's Christian Association building, the Cliff'ord block, the First Presbyterian church, the 
Columbia Hotel and in fact over sixty per cent of the brick buildings in this citj'. Since 
1903 the firm has done a general contracting business, extending its operations all over the 
state, and has erected the largest and most prominent buildings in Fargo, Devils Lake, Hills- 
boro, Valley City and in fact every city in the northern part of North Dakota. Mr. Dinnifr 



50 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

also has laige interests in many other enterprises in Grand Forks. He is a director and the 
treasurer of the Red Kiver Valley Brick Company and prior to his connection therewith 
operated and conducted the brick manufacturing establishment of Dinnie Brothers, which 
was later consolidated with the Red River Valley Company, of which he is one of the 
principal stockholders. He is likewise a director in the Scandinavian-American Bank of 
Grand Forks, a stockholder in the First National Bank, the Times-Herald Publishing 
Company and in the Korthwest Trust Company of Grand Forks and he is the president 
of the Hoople (N. D.) State Bank. He is likewise a stockholder in the Heborn Brick Com- 
pany and his sound judgment and enterprise constitute an important factor in the successful 
direction of the interests of these institutions. 

Aside from business Mr. Dinnie takes an active part in many movements relating to 
the "welfare and progress of his city. In politics he is a republican but not until a few 
years ago did he take an active part in political work. In 1913 he was chosen alderman of 
Grand Forks and the following j'ear was elected mayor of the city, being the present chief 
executive, in which connection he is wisely controlling municipal affairs. He has long been 
an active member of the Commercial Club, and for the past eight years has been a director. 
He was likewise a member of the school board for one term and there is no interest of 
vital importance to the community that does not claim his attention and receive his support. 

On the 1st of May, 1889, in Grand Forks, Mr. Dinnie was married to Miss Nettie 
Cooper, a native of Canada. They have become the parents of a daughter, Vivian Nettie, 
now the wife of R. S. Danforth, of Chicago. 

The parents are members of the Presbyterian church and Mr. Dinnie belongs to the 
Minneapolis Athletic Club, while with many fraternal and social organizations of Grand 
Forks he is connected. He belongs to all the Masonic bodies, having taken the degrees of 
both the York and Scottish Rites, and he became a member of the Elks lodge of Grand Forks 
soon after its organization. He is prominent in the Knights of Pythias and at one time 
was grand chancellor of the state, while formerly he was district deputy of the Elks of 
North Dakota. He passed all the chairs in the local lodge of Elks and was the first president 
of the state organization. Formerly he was identified with the Loyal Americans and with the 
United Workmen and he is still a member of the Loyal Order of ilaose. He finds rest and 
recreation through his connection with the Grand Forks Curling Club and the Grand Forks 
Golf Chib. Mr. Dinnie certainly deserves great credit for what he has accomplished, for 
he started out to earn his living at a salary of four dollars per month and board on a farm 
and he also received a similar salary when he learned his trade as a bricklayer. From that 
point, however, he has steadily worked his way upward and each forward step in his career 
has brought him a broader outlook and wider opportunities. He is connected in every way 
with the upbuilding of city and state and has a large number of friends throughout North 
Dakota, being recognized as one of its most substantial and patriotic citizens. 



H. J. BLANCHARD, Jr. 



H. J. Blanchard, Jr., who is now so acceptably serving as city attorney of Dickinson, 
North Dakota, was born on the 15th of April, 1883, in Colby, Wisconsin, and is a son of H. J. 
and Emma (Brinker) Blanchard, both of whom are still living. During the dark days of the 
Civil war the father fought for the preservation of the Union and he has always taken 
quite an active and prominent part in politics. 

During his boyhood and youth H. J. Blanchard, .Ir., pursued his studies in the public and 
high schools of his native state and also attended the University of Wisconsin and the 
University of North Dakota, graduating from the latter institution in 1910. He 
made thorough preparation to enter the legal profession and after his admission 
to the bar opened an office in Dickinson in 1910. In the si.x years that have since 
passed he has succeeded in building up a good private practice and has served as city 
attorney a part of that time. 

On the 31st of December, 1904, Mr. Blanchard was united in marriage to Miss Angelia 
La Budde, also a native of Wisconsin, and they have one child, Marion. In religious faith 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 51 

they are Protestants and in politics Mr. Blanehard is an ardent republican, taking a com- 
mendable interest in public affairs. On liis party ticket he was elected to represent Stark 
county in the state legislature in 1914 for a term of two years and ably filled that position. 
He is exalted ruler of the Klks lodge of Dickinson and is also a Royal Arch Mason. As a 
public-spirited and progressive citizen, he never withholds his support from any enterprise 
calculated to advance tlie interests of his county, state or nation. 



0. YOUNG. 

Among the leading business men of Grand Forks who have done much toward promoting 
the early growth and development and later progress of that beautiful city and who have 
by honest methods and fair dealing combined with enterprise built up a notable business 
are Orison and Owen Young, under the firm name of 0. Young. 

On the 1st day of April, 1885, the}' embarked in the furniture and piano business 
and through all the intervening years their trade has constantly grown until it has now 
assumed large ])roportions. During this period a large and attractive line of goods has been 
carried, and their reasonable prices and honorable dealing have given their House the 
credit of being "The oldest and most reliable piano and music house in North Dakota." 

In 1913 they decided to discontinue the furniture department in order to devote more 
space to their rapidly growing piano and music business, which is one of the most impor- 
tant of the commercial activities of the city. Their other interests cover a wide field. 

They are highly esteemed wherever known and most of all where they are best known, 
and their contribution to the material and political development of the city has been large 
and valuable. In all that they undertake they are actuated by a spirit of enterprise and 
progressiveness that o'erleaps obstacles and difficulties and reaches the desired goal. 



ERNEST L. PETERSON. 



Ernest L. Peterson, publisher of the Press at Dickinson, was born in Sweden in 1S86, 
a son of August and Sophia Peterson, of Donaldson, Minnesota, where the father for many 
years has followed the occupation of farming and where he and his wife still reside. 

Ernest L. Peterson, an only child, was educated in the Stephen and Hallock, Minnesota, 
schools and in the Minnesota University. Throughout his entire business career he has en- 
gaged in newspaper publication. Leaving school, he established the Easton Leader at Easton, 
Minnesota, when seventeen years of age. He published that paper for about a year. He 
was afterward connected with the Ainsworth Star-.Iournal at Ainsworth, Nebraska, and 
the Northwest Farm and Home Magazine of North Yakima, Washington, until 1907, when he 
went to Carrington. North Dakota, after which he was connected with the Independent and 
also with the Devils Lake .Journal, spending two years on these papers. He afterward 
removed to Lisbon and was manager of the Lisbon Free Press for two years. In 1911 he 
purchased the Milton Globe, a Cavalier county paper, which he published until December 
25, 1915, and which he still owns. Removing to Dickinson in 1915, he purchased the Dickinson 
Press, which he is now publishing and which is recognized as one of the best journals in 
the state. It has a circulation of thirty-five hundred, covering the whole of the Missouri 
slope. His plant is splendidly equipped according to modern ideas of newspaper publication 
and is ho\ised in one of the best buildings of the city. In fact his is one of the fine ni'wspaper 
ofiices of the .state and the paper is one of the largest weeklies circulafed in North Dakota. 
It was established in 188.3 and has since been in continuous existence. Mr. Peterson has 
infused into his work all the ideas of modern journalism and his success is the merited 
reward of persistent, earnest and intelligently directed effort. In addition to his newspaper 
business he is interested in farm lands in both North Dakota and Minnesota. 

In 1909, at Carrington, North Dakota, Mr. Peterson was married to Miss Janet Farrell, 



52 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

a native of this state and a dauglitcr of Mr. and Mis, William Farrell, who were pioneers 
of Carrington and of Barlow. The father died in 190T. 

In his political views Mi'. Peterson is an earnest republican. He was formerly district 
game warden covering the northern part of the state, holding the office for two years. 
Fraternally he is connected with the Masonic lodge cf Uickinson, in which order he has 
lilled all of the chairs save that of master, and he is identified with the Scottish Rite bodies 
at Langdon. He also has membership with the Elks of Dickinson and the Odd Fellows of 
Milton, North Dakota, and in the latter organization he has filled all of the offices of the 
lodge. He is a very prominent, active and honored member of the North Dakota Press 
Association, of which he has served as executive committeeman, and he is also a member or 
the executive council of the National Editorial Association, with which organization he 
makes an annual tour, covering the country from Alaska to Mexico and from coast to coast. 
His travels have also embraced South America and Panama. He has comprehensive knowl- 
edge of the United States and in fact of all the western hemisphere, for he has been in 
practically every state in the Union as well as in other countries of the globe. He possesses 
an observing eye and retentive memory and is constantly storing up knowledge from which 
he draws in writing his editorials or in discussing public questions. Forceful and re- 
sourceful, he is one of the honored and representative citizens of the state, wielding a 
wide inlluence through the columns of the Press. 



HON. IRA A. BARNES. 



Hon. Ira A. Barnes, of Ellendale, state senator and leading business man, prominently 
connected with agricultural interests in Dickey counter, was born in Markville, New York, 
April 6, 1855, a son of Hiram and Laura (Bishop) Barnes, who were also natives of the 
Empire state, where they were reared and married. In early life the father engaged in the 
lumber business but in later years gave his attention to farming. From his fourth year 
he was a resident of Cayuga county. New York, and there his death occurred about 1902, 
while his wife survived until 1909. 

Ira A. Barnes is indebted to the public school system of New York for his educational 
opportunities. He was the eldest of three sons and remained at home until his twenty- 
fifth year, assisting his father in the further development and cultivation of the home farm. 
He then entered the employ of the government in connection with lighthouse work on Lake 
Ontario, spending three years In that connection, and in March, 1883, he came to North 
Dakota, settling in Dickey county, where for a third of a century he has now been connected 
with agricultural interests. He preempted one hundred and sixty acres of land and also 
entered , a tree claim, while subsequently he homesteaded another quarter section, proving 
up on the three claims. He lived on his homestead until 1908, when he removed to Ellen- 
dale in order to give his children the advantages of education there to be secured. He still 
retains the ownership of nine hundred and sixty acres of valuable farm land in Dickey 
county and is one of its most substantial and progressive agriculturists, having developed 
his lands according to the most modern and progressive methods of scientific agriculture. 
He was also one of thij organizers of the Dickey County Mutual Insurance Companj-, of 
which he is a director and a member of the executive board. 

In 1886 Mr. Barnes was married to Miss Agnes McFadden, of Sterling, New Y'ork, 
and to them have been born eight children: Laura, who is the wife of George Johnson, a 
ranchman of eastern Montana Basil B., a mining man of Montana; Maud, who is the wife 
of Fred Bloomer, Jr., of Ellendale; Howard, a Montana agriculturist; Barbara, who is em- 
ployed as stenographer by the Fisk Rubber Company of Fargo; Bertha and Belva, who 
attend the State Normal and Industrial School at Ellendale; and Ralph Sterling, who died 
when five months old. All of the older children are graduates of the State Normal School 
of Ellendale and the family is one of which the parents have every reason to be proud. 
Mr. Barnes has ever been a stalwart champion of the cause of education and believes that 
public instruction is one of the bulwarks of the nation. Mrs. Barnes is a member of the 
rre.sbytcrian church and the family is prominent socially. 





HON. IKA A. BARNES 



"> 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 55 

In politics Mr. Barnes is a democrat where national issues are involved but at local 
elections casta an independent ballot. He is interested in community affairs from the stand- 
point of a public-spirited citizen and for six years he served as a member of the city council, 
exercising his oflicial prerogatives in support of many matters of municipal legislation that 
have had direct bearing upon the welfare and upbuilding of the city. While living on the 
farm he served for years on the township board and on the school board. He was a delegate 
to the first democratic state convention and was chosen its permanent secretary. In 1913 
he was elected to the state senate on the democratic ticket in a district where the republican 
vote is normally about three to one, and his election is certainly an indication of his per- 
sonal popularity and the confidence reposed in him by his fellow townsmen. He is making 
an excellent record in office, subordinating partisanship to the public welfare and personal 
aggrandizement to the general good. He studies closelj- the questions and issues of the day, 
his opinions are clear and definite and his position never an equivocal one. 



NOKJIAX BALFOUR, il. D. 



Dr. Norman Balfour, engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery at Rock Lake, 
was born in Canada in January, 1882, a son of James and Elizabeth (Basingthwaite) 
Balfour, who are also natives of Canada. The father there followed the occupation of farm- 
ing for many j-ears but at an early period in the development and settlement of North 
Dakota came to this state, where he filed on land which he has since owned and cultivated. 
He is also engaged in the grain business And is one of the representative and progressive 
residents of Hannah, North Dakota. 

Dr. Balfour was reared and educated at Langdon, North Dakota, having been but a 
young lad at the time of the removal of his parents to this state. In preparation for a 
professional career he entered the Detroit College of ISIedicine at Detroit, Michigan, and was 
graduated therefrom with the class of 1905. He then returned to North Dakota and located 
for practice at Sarles, where he remained for a year. In 1906 he opened an office at Rock 
Lake, where he has since remained and a liberal practice has been accorded him. He has 
also been owner of a drug store there for some time and his commercial pursuits are 
likewise bringing to him a substantial return. 

In November, 1911, Dr. Balfour was united in marriage to iNIiss Genevieve Mooney. Mrs. 
Balfour is a member of the Catholic church. The Doctor holds membership in the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and in polities maintains an independent course, voting 
according to the dictates of his judgment in support of the men whom he regards as best 
aualilied for office. He is conscientious in the performance of all his professional 
duties and keeps in touch with the trend of modern thought and scientific investigation 
through broad reading and study. 



ROBERT W. KERR. 



Robert W. Kerr, erfgaged in general merchandising at Fryburg, Billings county, was 
born February 26, 1872, in Michigan, a son of Robert and Sarah (Wilson) Kerr. The 
mother died in that state and in 1874 the father removed to Wingham, Ontario, Canada, 
where he remained until 1884, when he became a resident of Wheatland, North Dakota, 
continuing to make his home at that place until his death, which occurred in 1895. 

Robert W. Kerr, was a lad of twelve years when he became a resident of \\Tieatland, 
where he pursued his education, after which he began work as a farm hand. Later he 
took up blacksmithing, serving a three years' apprenticeship at Erie, North Dakota. After- 
ward he went to Hannaford, where he opened a shop which he conducted for three years. 
At the end of that time he horaesteaded near Portal, North Dakota, and proved up on the 
property, after which he purchased an adjoining quarter section and thereon engaged in 
farming until 1913. He also devoted considerable time to the raising of graded stock. 



56 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

hotli cattlo and lior&es. After selling his farm in 1913 he took a trip through the country 
which finally took him to Fryburg in the spring of 1914. There he started a general store, 
of which he is still proprietor, and in the year 1915 his business was doubled. He enjoys 
a very extensive and gra.tifying patronage and his methods are at all times progressive 
and enterprising. After a time he purchased the building in which he is carrying on business 
and he also owns other property in the village. 

On the 23d of November, 1898, Mr. Kerr was married to Miss Emma Hay, who was born 
in Seaforth, Ontario, Canada, November 9, 1875, a daughter of John and Jennie (Boyd) 
Hay, the former a native of Scotland and the latter of Canada. The father was a mason by 
trade and followed that pursuit throughout his entire life. In 1879 he arrived in North 
Dakota and for a few years engaged in farming near Buffalo. Both he and his wife are now 
livin" in Absaraka, North Dakota. Their family numbered five children, of whom two are 
now deceased. Those still living are: Emma; John H., a resident of Absaraka; and Clarence 

B., of Fargo. 

Mr. Kerr is an independent democrat in politics and is now serving as postmaster of 
Fryburg, to which position he was appointed on the 1st of November, 1915. He belongs 
to the Ancient Order of United Workmen at Portal and is a member of the Presbyterian 
ehxuch. He is interested in all that pertains to the welfare and progress of his community 
and in business circles he displays a spirit of marked enterprise that has wrought for 
success and made him one of the prosperous merchants of Billings county. 



MINOR SKIFF WILLIAMS. 



Minor Skiff Williams, one of- the representative citizens and prominent business men 
of Williston, wliere he is now actively engaged in the milling business, was born on the 
12th of August, 1853, in Saxeville township, Waushara county, Wisconsin, a son of John 
A. and Laura (Skiff) Williams. The birth of the father occurred near Meadville in Craw- 
ford county, Pennsylvania, where he was reared and educated, and throughout his business 
life he followed farming and merchandising and also owned and operated flour mills. In 
1850 he removed to Waushara county, Wisconsin, traveling by boat to :\lilwaukee. On 
reaching his destination, he took up a homestead and in connection with farming also 
engaged in milling for many years, owning the Pine River Flour Mill and also the Saxeville 
Flour Mill. Later he established the Waushara Argus, the first newspaper in Waushara county, 
and it is still in existence. Mr. Williams took a prominent part in public affairs and was 
called upon to serve as county treasurer. He died at Pine River in 1886 and was laid to rest 
there. In early manhood he married Miss Laura Skiff, who was born in Genesee county. 
New York, but spent the gi-eater part of her girlhood in IMeadville, Pennsylvania, where 
their marriage was celebrated. After the death of her husband she came to North Dakota 
with our subject in 1887. She passed away in 1889 in Towner county, and was interred in 
the Pine River, Wisconsin, Cemetery. 

In the county of his nativity Elinor S. Williams grew to manhood, attending the country 
schools of Saxeville township, tlie city schools of Pine River and the Waushara County 
Normal. While assisting his father in the mill, he early became familiar with the business 
which he now follows. In 1887 he rernoved to Pierce county,' North Dakota, locating just 
over the Towner county line, twelve miles north of Leeds. He preempted a claim near 
Hurricane lake and engaged in farming there for five years, making a specialty of raising 
cattle and sheep. On selling that place he removed to Ward county and settled on the 
White Earth river, nearly six miles from White Earth, where he homesteaded a tract and 
also bought a large amount of land, operating a cow ranch there on an extensive scale until 
1900, when he was elected county treasurer of Ward county and removed to Minot to assume 
the duties of that office. So satisfactory were his services that he was reelected in 1902 
and filled the position for four years. During that time he continued to run. the ranch with 
the assistance of a foreman, and in the meantime established an abstract business in Minot, 
whicli he conducted until 1907, when he sold it. 

In 1909 Mr. Williams was appointed by President Taft as receiver at the L'Uited States 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 57 

land ollicc in Williston and removed to that place, where he liad charge of affairs for four 
ytars and seven months or until tlie 1st of October, 1913. The following year he eatab- 
lislied the Whole Wheat Jlilling Company and erected a modern Hour mill at Williston with 
a capacity of thirty-live barrels per day. The company is incorporated and all of the stock 
is owned by the Williams family, our subject serving as president and manager since its 
organization. He also operates the Independent elevator near his mill and in 1915 organized 
the Havre Mill Company at Havre, Montana, of which he is vice president, and built the 
mill in April, 1916. It is now in successful operation. In 1916 he organized a company 
which jjurchased the Wild Rose F'lour Mill in Williams county on the Stanley branch. Mr. 
Williams still owns his cattle ranch on White Earth Kivcr, known as Hillside Home, and 
his son is now running it. 

On the 8th of August, 1875, Mr. Williams was married in Saxeville township, Waushara 
county, Wisconsin, to Miss Ella O'Cain, who was reared there although she w-as born in 
Sheboygan, Wisconsin, a daughter of Isaac and Cynthia (Smith) O'Cain. They were born 
near Ithaca, New York, and were early settlers of Wisconsin. Prior to her marriage Mrs. 
Williams engaged in teaching for some time in and around Pine River. She has become the 
mother of three children, all born in Saxeville, Wisconsin, namely: Myrtle K., who married 
John A. Corbett, a newspaper man of Williston, North Dakota, and died in October, 1911; 
Frances Ada, the wife of E. R. Brownson, of Williston; and Charles Minor, who is conducting 
his father's ranch on White Earth river. 

Mr. AVilliams is an ardent republican and besides serving as county treasurer was county 
commissioner in Ward county from 1894 to 1900. He is a member of the Masonic lodge of 
Minot. In business affairs he has met with enviable success due to his wise judgment, good 
management and untiring industry, and he rajiks today among the leading citizens of his 
community, having the respect and confidence of all who know him. 



BENJAJHX TUFTE. 



Benjamin Tufte, states attorney at Cooperstown, was born at Siign, Norway, August 
23, 1801, and is a representative of a family long connected with farming interests in that 
locality. His father, Ole Tufte. born in Siign in 1809, reached the advanced age of eighty- 
eight years, passing away in 1897. He was one of the students to receive the benefit of 
normal school instruction in that country and became a teacher in Norway, where he spent 
his life, retiring alter forty years devoted to teaching. 

Benjamin Tufte was the third in a family of five children and when he had completed 
his ])ul)lic school course was admitted to the University of Christiania in 1SS4. In 1887 he 
came to the United States, making his way to Minnesota, where he was employed for five 
years, and then resumed his interrupted education bj' matriculating in the University of 
Minnesota in 1892. He was graduated therefrom on the completion of the law course in 
1895 and the same year was admitted to the bar. For two years he practiced his profession 
in Minneapolis and in 1897 went to Cooperstown, North Dakota, where he entered upon the 
work of his profession. In 1898 he was elected states attorney and was reelected in 1900 
and in 1902. On the close of his third term he left the office and in 1904 made a trip to 
Europe. In 1906 he was reelected states attorney and has been continued in the position 
to the present time, so that he has served for eight terms and the probability is that he 
will be continued in that position, for the public has come to feel that there is no one so 
well qualified for the ofiico or who will prove more loyal and capable in the discharge of 
the duties of that position. He owns farm land, which he rents, giving his undivided 
attention to his professional and official interests. His position as a lawyer is established 
by the attitude of his fellow townsmen, who have attested their approval of his ability by 
again and again electing him states attorney. 

On the 5th of .Tanuary, 1907. Mr. Tufte was married to Miss Clara Feiring, a native 
of Wisconsin, who was graduated from the North Dakota State University at Grand Forks and 
for six years was superintendent of education in Griggs county. They have one child, 
Oswald. 



58 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Mr. Tufte belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and to the Sons of Norway and 
the Modern Woodmen of America and he has social qualities which render him popular 
in those organizations and throughout the community in which he resides. 



LEO E. BEHAN. 



Leo E. Behan, postmaster at Mohall, was born in Sheldon, Iowa, May 2, 1886, a son of 
Daniel and Ellen (Carberry) Behan, both natives of Canada. At an early day his parents 
went to Iowa, securing a homestead claim in O'Brien county upon which they established 
their home, the father devoting many years to the cultivation and improvement of that 
property. In 190C, however, he sold his farm there and settled in Renville county, near 
Mohall, where he invested in one hundred and sixty acres of land a mile and a half from 
the town. He is now engaged in market gardening and his business is returning to him a 
good income. 

Leo E. Behan was reared in the usual manner of farm bred boys, in O'Brien county, Iowa, 
dividing his time between the duties of the schoolroom, the pleasures of the pla5'ground and 
the work of the fields. He continued to assist his father on the farm until he attained hia 
majority, when he began working for his brother in an implement business at Mohall. He 
afterward operated a dray line in that town for three years and in 1910 he vrent to Montana, 
where he proved up a homestead, which he still owns and which is now rented. In May, 
1915, he was temporarily appointed to the position of postmaster at Mohall and on the 17th 
of December following received the appointment to that office for four years. lie ia now 
capably filling that position, discharging his duties with promptness and fidelity. 

In October, 1908, Mr. Behan was married to Jliss Sabina ilullen, a daughter of John 
and Catherine (Donovan) Mullen, of Buffalo, Minnesota, the former of whom died in Novem- 
ber, 1914, and the latter in December, 1910. Mr. and Mrs. Behan have become the parents 
of three children but lost two, Cecil passing away in July, 1911, and Catherine in May, 
1914. The little son, Vincent, was born September 39, 1915. Mr. and Mrs. Behan are mem- 
bers of the Catholic church and in politics he is a democrat, giving stalwart support to the 
party. He is widely and favorably known in the community in which he resides and has 
a large circle of warm friends. 



EMIL I. PYES. 



Emil I. ryes, manager of the Grand Forks Fish Company, has been a resident of Grand 
Forks since the fall of 1891. He was a youth of about fourteen years at the time of his 
arrival, his birth having occurred in South Russia, October 15, 1877. his parents being Harry 
and Etta (Rathnian) Pyes. The father came to America with his family in September, 1891, 
and established his home in Grand Forks, where he engaged in merchandising and in the fish 
business, establishing the Grand Forks Fish Company. He continued active in that line for 
twenty years or until September 21, 1911, when death called him when he had reached the 
age of fifty-five years. His widow is still living in Grand Forks. 

Emil I. Pyes was the oldest in a family of sLx children. He began his education in the 
schools of his native country and after coming to the new world he assisted his father in 
business and upon the latter's death took over the business of the Grand Forks Fish Com- 
pany. In this connection he is still active and his enterprise and energy have brought to 
him substantial and growing success. He is a man of firm purpose, carrying forward to 
successful completion whatever he undertakes. 

On the 27th of May, 1906, in Minneapolis. Minnesota, Mr. Pves was united in marriage 
to Miss Celia Brahl, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hugo Brahl, of Minneapolis. They now have 
two sons: Richard Saul, who was born in Grand Forks in 1907: and Hugo Hiisch. whose 
birth occurred at Grand Forks. April 6, 1916. The elder is now attending school. 

In politics Mr. Pyes is a republican and for the past three years has served as a member 




LEO E. BEHAN 



r 



AS. 
1X1. ~ 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 61 

of the board of aldermen from the second ward, in which connection lie labors earnestly to 
secure the best interests of the city ahmg lines of civic development and improvement. lie 
belongs to the Independent Order of Birth of Abraham, in which he has been district deputy 
and also president of the state body. He is likewise connected with the Knights of Pythias. 
He holds to the faith of his fathers, belonging to the congregation of the Children of Israel, 
and is president of the church. He is a member of the Jewish school board, the people of 
his faith maintaining a private school in Grand Forks, and he is also president of the Jewish 
Cemeterj- Association. His life has been one of diligence and enterprise and he deserves 
much credit for what he has accomi)lished, his life proving what can be done through earnest, 
persistent etl'ort intelligently directed. 



A. D. COCHRANK. 



A. D. Cochrane, postmaster at York, Benson county, was born in Benton county. Iowa, 
November 3, 1872, a son of William W. and ilarian (Cleland) Cochrane, the former a native 
of (Scotland, while the latter was born in New York of Scotch ]>arentage. In young manhood 
the father came to the United States, in 1866, and was married in New Y'ork in 1870. Prior 
to that time, however, he made a trip to low'a and filed on a homestead to which he after- 
ward brought his bride. They continued their residence there until the mother's death in 
May, 1897, and in 1901 Jlr. Cochrane removed to North Dakota to live with his daughter, 
Mrs. A. L. Obert, and with his son, A. D. Cochrane, both of Y'ork. There he passed away in 
1907. at the age of sixty-eight years. 

A. D. Cochrane acquired his education in the public schools of Dysart, Iowa, and Ewing, 
Nebraska, and in the Fremont (Neb.) Normal School. When twenty-one years of age he 
took up the profession of teaching and for twelve years was engaged in educational work. 
In 1901 he arrived in North Dakota and filed on a homestead in McHenry county, fifteen 
miles northwest of Towner, the county seat. In the spring of 1902 he took up his permanent 
abode in this state, settling on his homestead, and there he remained for sixteen months. 
In the meantime he taught a term of school in Knox and in tlie spring of 1903 he put in a 
crop on his farm. On the 1st of October of that year he took charge of the postoifice at 
York under George A. Binckley, who at that time held the appointment of postmaster. On 
the 19th of Februar}', 1904, Mr. Cochrane was appointed to the oliice, which position he has 
filled continuously since, serving under Presidents Taft, Roosevelt and Wilson, a fact which 
indicates his popularity and efficiency. He is also the owner of a farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres adjoining Y'ork and to the cultivation of this property gives his personal super- 
vision. 

In 1898 Mr. Cochrane was united in marriage to Miss Emma P. Delanoy, of Clearwater, 
Nebraska, by whom he lias five children, namely: Cleland D., Fern H., Margaret M., Evelyn 
J. and James W. Fraternally Mr. Cochrane is connected with Leeds Lodge, No. 67, A. F. & 
A. M.; Dakota Consistory, No. 1, A & A. S. R.; Kem Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S., of Grand 
Forks; Y'ork Lodge, No 68, I. 0. 0. F. ; the Modern Woodmen of America: and the Ancient 
Order of I'nited Workmen. Both he and his wife are members of the Order of the Eastern 
Star and of the Rebekahs, the ladies' auxiliaries of the Masonic and Odd Fellows fraternities 
respectively. They are both widely and favorably known in the locality where they reside 
and where they have many friends who entertain for them kindly regard. 



WILLIAM MARKS WEMETT. 

William Marks Wemett. professor of history in the State Normal School at Valley City 
and recognized as an able educator, was born at Hemlock Lake, New Y'ork. on the 10th of 
February. 1SS4. the youngi'st in a family of four sons and two daughters whose parents 
were Henry and Mary (Knapp) Wemett, who were also natives of the Empire state. The pater- 
nal grandfather, .losepli Wemett, was born near Montreal and accompanied his parents when 



62 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

with their family they crossed the border into the United States, settling in Livingston 
county, New York. He devoted his life to the occupation of farming and lived to be more 
than eighty years of age. Henry Wemett was born in Livingston county and was educated 
in New York, completing a course in the old Lima College at Lima, New York, by graduation. 
When a young man he removed to Kirksville, Missouri, where he purchased a farm that is 
now the property of the Kirksville Normal School. After devoting a few years to the cul- 
tivation of that land ho removed to Litchfield, Michigan, where he occupied the position of 
superintendent of schools. Subsequently he returned to New Y"ork and has since made his 
home in Livingston county, where for a number of years he served as county superintendent 
of schools. Later he organized the Dewey Transfer Company and in this connection con- 
ducted a line of steamboats on the lakes in western New Y'ork. Of his children, Frank L. 
is now pastor of the First Methodist churcli at Idaho Falls, Idaho, Harry is manager of the 
Diekbelt Belting Company of Chicago and Robert is on the old homestead in New York. 

William M. Wemett in the acquirement of his education passed through consecutive 
grades to the high school of Rochester, New Y'ork, and later entered the Syracuse University, 
in which he won the Bachelor of Arts degree upon graduation with the class of 1907. The 
following year the degrees of M. A. and P. E. D. were conferred upon him. For two years 
lie was the leader of the debating society at the university and he won valedictorian honors 
in his class. He afterward taught in the high school at Albion, New York, for a year and 
then spent three months in Jacksonville, Illinois. Later he accepted the position of pro- 
fessor of history in the Valley City State Normal School, which position he is capably filling, 
having won recognition as an able educator who imparts clearl}- and readily to others the 
knowledge that he has acquired and in his methods of instruction holds to high standards. 

In September, 1911, Professor Wemett was married to Miss Fern Stevenson, a native 
of Livingston county. New York, and a representative of an old family of that state. They 
liave become the parents of two children, Lynn Llewellyn and William Marks. 

Professor Wemett has been a close and discriminating student of many vital and sig- 
nilicant problems of the age and his position upon a question that has been engaging public 
thought and attention is indicated by the fact that he is the president of the North Dakota 
School Peace League, of which he was the organizer in 1914. He'Bas taken an active part 
in the peace movement and has lectured in various parts of North Dakota and Montana upon 
the subject. He is a fluent, forcible speaker, earnest in manner and of pleasing delivery. He 
does everything in his power to promote education, not only the instruction in the school 
room, but that broader education which has to do directly with the general interests of 
society. One is therefore not surprised to find that he is secretary and manager of the Valley 
City Lecture Association which has a course of eight numbers each winter and which has 
made an enviable reputation during the twenty-three years of its existence. Both he and 
his wife are consistent members of the Methodist church and Professor Wemett is serving 
on its ollicial board. 



GEORGE A. SOULE. 



Cteorge A. Soule, cashier of the Towner Merchants Bank at Towner, North Dakota, is 
a native son of the city in which he resides, his birth having there occurred December 25, 
1892. His parents, George H. and Annetta (Mitchell) Soule, were natives of Alburg Center, 
Vermont, and Blake, Ontario, Canada, respectively. In the early '80s the father arrived in 
North Dakota and became cashier of the McHenry County Bank at Towner, which position 
he filled until 1895, when the bank was discontinued. He had also purchased land in the 
county eight miles north of Tow-ner and this he developed and improved, continuing its 
cultivation throughout his remaining days. Adding- to his holdings from time to time as 
his financial resources increased, he became the owner of over one thousand acres which 
is still in the possession of the family. He was recognized as one of the prominent and 
influential residents of the northern part of the state and his fellow townsmen, appreciative 
of hia worth and ability, called him to the office of county treasurer, while subsequent to 
his retirement from the banking business he served as United States commissioner for ten 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 63 

years. He was also mayor of the city of Towner for two terms of two years each. At 
leii;;tli lie [lut aside all business an<l oflic-ial cares and made his home in Towner throughout 
his remaining days, enjoying a rest which he had truly earned and richly deserved. At 
the time of the Civil war he enlisted in response to the country's call for aid as a member 
of the First Vermont Artillery, in which he became first lieutenant. He participated in a 
number of hotly contested battles and on one occasion was captured, after which he was 
incarcerated in Libby prison for six or seven months. He continued to serve until the close 
of the war and returned home with a most creditable military record. After a year's 
illness ho passed away in Towner, March 5, 1911, and is still survived by his widow, who 
became a resident of Grandin, North Dakota, in 1884, removed to Grand Forks in 1886 
and to Towner in 1889. She is a daughter of Allan and Mary Ann Mitchell, the former of 
whom is now conducting a ladies' furnishing store at Towner. 

George A. Soule has spent his entire life in Towner and he supplemented his public 
school training by a year's study in the State University, where he was a member of the 
law class. Upon his return home he accepted the position of assistant cashier in the 
Towner Merchants Bank, a state bank, and on the 1st of January, 1913, he was advanced to 
the position of cashier, in which capacity he has since continued. The other officers are: 
Andrew Cilbcrtson, president, and J. J. Egge, vice president. The bank is capitalized for 
ten thousand dollars and its deposits amount to one hundred and eight}' thousand dollars. 
This bank was organized May 1, 1893, and has enjoyed a profitable existence from the 
beginning. 

In his political views Mr. Soule is an earnest republican and has occupied the position 
of city treasurer since July 1, 1912. Fraternally he is connected with the Masons as a 
member of the blue lodge and chapter at Towner and Lebanon Council, R. & S. M., at Rugby. 
He attends the Episcopal church and his entire life has been actuated by laudable ambition 
and by high and honorable principles manifest in every relation. 



■WT^LLIAM V. O'CONNOR. 



^Yilliam V. O'Connor, treasurer of the Farmers & Mechanics Savings Bank at Grand 
Forks, was born at Lanark, Ontario, Canada, June 24, 1879, and was the fourth in order of 
birth in a family of eight children whose parents were Edward and Nora (Lane) O'Connor, 
both of whom were natives of Ireland. In the early '60s the father crossed the Atlantic 
and became a resident of Lanark, Ontario. For a considerable period he successfully engaged 
in the implement business and in the conduct of a hotel in Canada. During the late '80s 
he removed to Xortli Dakota, settling in Grand Forks, where he engaged in farming. He 
was active in jiolitics as a stanch supporter of the democratic party and he exerted con- 
siderable influence in local political circles. His death occurred in Grand Forks in 1903, when 
he was fifty years of age, and his widow, who became a resident of Canada in her girlhood 
days, passed away in Grand Forks in 1906, at the age of sixty years. 

William V. O'Connor pursued his early education in St. Bernard's Academy and afterward 
attended the University of Nortji Dakota, from which he was graduated in 1911 with the 
Bachelor of Arts degree. His youthful days were largely spent upon the home farm and 
after he completed his university course he accepted the position of assistant superintendent 
of schools in Grand Forks county. After retiring from that position he spent two years 
as city auditor of Grand Forks and then entered the implement business on his own account, 
and also engaged in farming. Later he began dealing in farm lands and making loans 
and in that undertaking prospered owing to his judicious investments, unfaltering enterprise 
and keen business discernment. In 1911 he was again called to office, being elected to 
represent his district in the state legislature, and he also became a member of the board 
of managers at the Cowen disbarment proceedings. During his second term as a member 
of the general assembly he was the recognized leader of the house and he left the impress 
of his individuality and ability upon important legislation enacted during that period. 

Mr. O'Connor next became interested in the banking business and was one of the 
organizers of the Farmers & Jlechanies Savings Bank of Grand Forks, which was established 



64 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

in December, 1912. He became the bank's first secietary and nlled that office for a year, 
at the end of which time he was made treasurer, in which capacity he has since continued, 
largely controlling the interests of the bank in this connection. He is also extensively 
interested in farming and in the land business, conducting his real estate operations as a 
member of the ium of O'Connor Brothers. He displays unfaltering enterprise, carrying 
forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes, and his wisely directed interests 
have made him one of the prosperous citizens of Grand Forks. 

It was in that city, on the 10th of October, 1908, that Mr. O'Connor was united in 
marriage to Miss Etta O'Hara, a native of Grand Forks and a daughter of Arthur O'Hara, 
who was one of the early settlers there. The father is now deceased, while the mother 
resides in Superior, Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. O'Connor have become parents of two 
children: Edward, who ^yas born in Grand Forks, August 15, 1909; and William V., born 
June 15, 1911. The parents are members of the Roman Catholic church and Mr. O'Connor is 
identified with the Knights of Columbus. In politics he has always been an active partisan 
democrat, putting forth earnest effort to secure the success of his party. He belongs to 
the Grand Forks Commercial Club and the Grand Forks Golf Chib and he is popular' in those 
organizations. He possesses a social, genial nature that has gained for him many friends, 
and he is widely and favorably known in the city of his adoption. 



VICTOR HUGO STICKNEY, U. D. 

Dr. Victor Hugo Stickney, a retired physician residing in Dickinson, was born in Ply- 
mouth, Vermont, April 13, 1855, a son of John W. and Anna (Pinney) Stickney, both of 
whom were of English descent and always lived in New England. 

Dr. Stickney continued a resident of Plymouth, Vermont, until 1883, and was graduated 
from the New Hampshire College in 1881, and from the Dartmouth Jledical College at 
Hanover, New Hampshire, in 1883. He received the Bachelor of Science degree from New 
Hampshire College and his professional degree from the other inftitution. Having com- 
pleted his preparation for the practice of medicine, and believing that the west would 
furnish better opportunities for a young physician, he made his way direct to Dickinson, 
North Dakota, where he opened an office and immediately began practice. It was in the 
same year that the railroad was completed to the town, which at that time was a pioneer 
settlement. Throughout all the intervening years Dr. Stickney has remained in Dickinson 
and for many years was most actively engaged in professional work. In 1889 he went to 
Philaclelphia, where he pursued a course in medicine in the private school of Dr. McClellan, 
making a specialty of the study of anatomy and surgery. He then returned to Dickinson, 
but each two years after that went to some eastern city for post graduate work, tlms 
keeping in close touch with the most advanced scientific methods of medical and surgical 
practice. His pronounced ability won for him a very liberal patronage and he continued 
in active practice until 1914, when he retired. At one time Dr. Stickney was extensively 
engaged in stock raising and shipped stock in considerable numbers, but he has also cut 
down his activities in that direction to a considerable extent. He has been interested in 
the First National Bank since its organization and is its vice president. He also has real 
estate holdings in Dickinson and his investments have ever been judiciously made. While 
active in his profession he was railroad surgeon for twenty-six years for the Northern Pacific, 
and when he retired from the position was the oldest surgeon in the service. 

It was in Dickinson, in 1885, that Dr. Stickney was united in marriage to Miss Marg- 
aret Hayes, a native of Plymouth, Vermont, where she resided until her marriage. They 
have become the parents of two children: Marjory A., who is the wife of A. P. Neehtwey, 
a physician of Dickinson; and Dorothy H., at home. 

In his political views Dr. Stickney has ever been a republican since age conferred upon 
him the right of franchise. He has served as county superintendent of schools and he is 
well known in Masonic circles, belonging to the lodge, chapter and eommandery at Dickin- 
son and the Scottish Rite bodies at Fargo. He was the first master of the blue lodge in 
Dickinson and is a past eminent commander of the eommandery. He is likewise connected 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 65 

with the Elks lodge at Dickinson. He has long held membership in the County and State 
Medical Societies and in tlie latter was honored with the presidency. He also is a member 
ot the American Medical Association. When he (irst came to Korth Dakota he had to cover 
in his practice a territory as large as the New England states and had to make all trips 
on horseback, traveling up to one hundred and fifty miles in relays. The life was indeed 
hard, involving many sacrifices and personal discomforts as he rode through winter's storms 
or summer's heat, but he never failed to respond to the call of need if it was possible 
in any way to do so. With him duty was ever first, and he became the loved family phy- 
sician in many a household. Gradually as the country became more thickly settled his 
practice was narrowed in its scope of territory, but not in volume, for his business grew 
steadily year by year, his marked ability gaining him precedence as one of the most eminent 
and capable physicians of his section of the state. 



C. F. NELSON. 



Towner county probably has no more enterprising citizen than C. F. Nelson, president 
of the Citizens State Bank of Bisbee and one of the leading business men of that town. 
He was born in Goldfield, Iowa, March 4, 1876, his parents being Lewis H. and Hannah 
(Madson) Nelson, who were natives of Denmark and were brought to the United States by 
their respective parents, the former at the age of nineteen years and tlie latter at the age 
of thirteen. They located in Goldfield, Iowa, where they were subsequently married, and 
for forty-eight years they lived on a farm near that city. The father died on the 21st of 
December, 1914, at the age of sixty-five years, and the mother passed away December 
28, 1915, at the age of sixty. In the early days Mr. Nelson paid five dollars per acre 
for his first tract of land. He steadily prospered in his farming operations and added to 
his property from time to time until he owned about one thousand acres of very valuable 
and productive land, worth two hundred dollars per acre. 

C. F. Nelson was given good educational advantages during his youth, attending the 
Evergreen high school, the State Normal School at Cedar Falls, Iowa, and the Agricultural 
College at Ames, that state. He also took a business and typewriting course at the 
Metropolitan Business College of Chicago, Illinois, from which he was graduated in 1901, 
and was thus well equipped for a business career on starting out in life for himself. Fol- 
lowing his graduation he went to Parker, South Dakota, where he began dealing in real 
estate, but in 1903 he removed to Cooperstown, Griggs county. North Dakota, where in 
connection with W. T. Munn, now of Westhope, he established the Iowa &. North Dakota 
Land Company. Within three months they sold over twelve thousand acres of land around 
Cooperstown and later Mr. Nelson was referred to as the man who made Griggs county. 
In 1906 he went to Davidson, Saskatchewan. Canada, where he again turned his attention 
to the real estate business in partnership with Elmer G. Opper, but after spending a year 
and a half in that locality Mr. Nelson decided that North Dakota was the only place to 
live and became a resident of Bisbee, where he organized the Citizens State Bank, becoming 
cashier of the institution when it was opened for business September 1, 1907. In 1913 a 
new bank building was erected, it being one of the finest in a town of the size of Bisbee in 
North Dakota. Mr. Nelson was elected president of the bank on the 1st of January, 1916, 
and is now serving in that capacity. On coming to this state his capital consisted of seven 
hundred and seventy-five dollars and Mr. Munn had but thirty-five dollars when they 
began business in Cooperstown. but toilay !Mr. Nelson ranks among the substantial men 
of North Dakota. He is not only president of the Citizens State Bank of Bisbee but is 
also president of the Hanson Ellington Hardware Company and of the Nelson Investment 
Company, two important concerns. 

On the 28th of December, 1904, Mr. Nelson was united in marriage to Miss Harriet E. 
McCurry, of Eagle Grove, Iowa, and to them have been born three children, Cosette lone, 
Fahe Elizabeth and Ehea Ethlyn. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson are members of the Presbyterian 
church, and he also belongs to Cando Lodge, No. 40, A. F. &A. M.; Cando Chapter, No. 17, 
R. A. jr.; the Modern Woodmen of America; and the Danish Brotherhood of America. The 



66 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

republican party finds in liim a stanch supporter of its principles and in 1912 he was a 
candidate for state representative, but in the republican defeat of that year he lost, though 
by only twenty-five votes. He is now serving as president of the village council, also of 
the Bisbee fire department and of the Parents & Teachers Association of Bisbee. He is 
public-spirited and progressive, taking a commendable interest in all measures calculated 
to promote the moral, educational or material welfare of his community, and he never 
withholds his support from any worthy enterprise. In business circles he occupies an 
enviable position, and the success that has come to hira is but the just reward of his own 
industry, good management and fair dealing. 



FREDERICK W. PEGLOW. 



Frederick W. Peglow, a pioneer business man and prominent citizen of Glenburn, 
North Dakota, was born in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, on the 15th of July, 1872, his 
parents being Frederick and Margaret (Steiner) Peglow, the former a native of Germany 
and the latter of Wisconsin, though of German parentage. Wlien a young man the father 
came to the United States and located in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. He had previously 
learned the miller's trade and after his emigration to America became associated with the 
pioneer millers of Prairie du Chien, their mill being one of the first mills in the city. Mr. 
Peglow died in 1883 at the age of forty-two years after many years identification with the 
milling industry. His wife died in 1905 at the age of sixty-five years. 

Frederick W. Peglow, of this review, attended the public and high schools of Prairie 
du Chien but at the early age of fourteen began earning iiis own livelihood by working 
as a farm hand. He was thus employed for two years and then went to St. Paul, where 
he had his first lessons in the mercantile business. During the following fourteen years 
he was connected with various leading mercantile houses in that city. In 1903 he 
removed to Glenburn, North Dakota, in advance of the railroad and became one of the 
pioneer builders of the town. He erected a building whie^ he stocked with general 
merchandise and has since engaged in business there, now enjoying an extensive trade. His 
was the first business house in the town and during the thirteen years of its existence he 
has won a reputation for fair and honorable dealing. 

In 1907 Mr. Peglow married Miss Bertha Buchelt, of St. Paul, Minnesota, and to them 
have been born thiee children: Clarence F., Irving L. and Roselyn. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Peglow hold membership in the Lutheran church;- and he is also identiiied with Minot 
Lodge, No. 1089, B. P. 0. E. As a republican h§ has- taken an active and prominent part 
in local politics. He has served several terms as a member of the village board and is 
now chairman of the same. He has also been treasurer of the school board since the dis- 
trict was organized and has filled the office of village treasurer. He is always foremost in 
any movement for the advancement of the town's interests and is a very public-spirited and 
progressive citizen. Besides his town property he owns a farm of three hundred and 
twenty acres near Glenburn and what he possesses has come to him as the result of his own 
industry and good management. 



OLAF J. BOSTEOM. 



Olaf J. Bostrom, proprietor of the Grand Forks Bottling Works, is one of the enter- 
prising young men that Sweden has furnished to this state. He was born in that country, 
June 21, 1862, a son of John and Annie (Johnson) Bostrom, who were natives of Sweden 
and in 1887 came to America, settling in Minnesota. The father engaged in farming in 
Douglas county, that state, for a time, and in 1891 removed to Roberts county. South Dakota, 
while later he removed to Grand Forks, where he continued to make his home until his 
death, which occurred in 1913 when he was seventy-two years of age. His widow is still 
living in Grand Forks at the age of eighty-four years. In their family were six" children: 




FREDERICK W. PEGLOW 



1- 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 69 

Olaf J.; John E., a resident of Grand Forks; Andrew, living in Minneapolis; Oscar, Magnus 
and Peter, all residents of Max, North Dakota. 

In his early boyhood days Olaf J. Bostrom attended school in Sweden and when his 
textbooks were put aside engaged in farm work, but, attracted by the opportunities of the 
new world, he bade adieu to friends and native land on attaining his majority and came 
to America. He made his way to Minnesota, where he was employed at farm work for two 
years, and in 1888 he arrived in Grand Forks. There he began work at the bricklayer's trade 
and was engaged in that line six years, his ability being manifest in the construction of 
many of the leading business blocks of Grand Forks. He afterward became connected with 
the Grand Forks Soda Bottling Works, and in 1903 he bought out the business which he has 
since conducted. Under his direction the trade has steadily grown and he now has one 
of the best equipped plants of that kind in his part of the state. In the manufacture of 
his products he maintains a high standard, and the excellence of his goods, combined with 
his reasonable prices and fair dealing is bringing to him substantial success. 

In 1893 Mr. Bostrom was married to Miss Nellie Botton, who died in Grand Forks in 
1898, leaving a son, Edwin, who was born in Grand Forks in 1894 and is now employed by 
the F. S. Seargent Company of Grand Forks. In November 1902, Mr. Bostrom was again 
married, his second union being with Miss Augusta Swenson, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Swen Johnson, residents of Sweden. There are three children by the second marriage: 
George Elmer, who was born in Grand Forks in 1903; Irene, born in 1905; and Albert, 
born in 1914. The first two are attending school. 

The parents are members of the Lutheran church and are loyal to its teachings. Mr. 
Bostrom is a self-made man and as the architect of his own fortunes he builded wisely and 
well. Through industry and perseverance he has worked his way upward and is today one 
of the leading manufacturers of Grand Forks. 



EJNAR LOHBBAUER, M. D. 

Dr. Ejnar Lohrbauer. mayor of Lakota, where lie is also actively engaged in the 
practice of medicine and surgery, being recognized as an able representative of the profession, 
was born in Christiania, Norway, January 4, 1866. His parents, .John and Patrina (Boedtker) 
Lohrbauer, were also natives of that country. The father became a cotton manufacturer 
and the owner of cotton mills, in which connection he conducted an extensive and profitable 
business. He held many positions of importance and responsibility in his native country 
and there passed away in 1906, at the age of seventy-three years. His widow survived 
until 1908 and was sixty-eight years at the time of her demise. In the family were seven 
children. 

Dr. Lohrliaucr. tlie tliird in order of birth, attended school in his native city and won the 
Bachelor of Arts <h'gree upon graduation from the T.'niversity of Christiania with the class 
of 1883. Thinking to find better opportunities in America, he crossed the Atlantic in 1884 
and made his way to (irand Forks, where he became engaged in the drug bvisiness in con- 
nection with Dr. Kutledge. After four years he retired from that partnership, selling his 
interest in the business, for it was then his purpose to prepare for the practice of medicine, 
toward which his experience in the drug business seemed an initial step. He entered the 
medical department of the University of Minnesota, from which he was graduated in 1902, 
after which he opened an office in Lakota, where he has since been actively and successfully 
engaged in practice. The people recognize his ability and his practice is therefore extensive. 
For the past eight years he has been a member of the county board of health and he 
belongs to the Nelson County Medical Society, the North Dakota Medical Association and 
the American Medical Association. 

On the 8th of August, 1890, Dr. Lohrliaucr was united in marriage to Miss Gertrude 
Hendricks, of Northwood, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. Henry Hendricks and a repre- 
sentative of a well known family of that section of the state. They have two children: Louise, 
who was born in Hillsboro in 1893 and is a high school graduate; and Leif who Avas born in 
^linneapolis in 1900 and is attending high school. 
Vol. ni— 4 



70 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Frateinally Dr. Lohrbauer is connected with the Modern Woodmen of America. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party, of which he is a stalwart champion, 
having firm faith in its principles. In 1915 he was elected mayor of Lakota and as chief 
executive is givino- to the city a businesslike and progressive administration in which he 
seeks to uphold and promote high civic standards. 



GUSTAVE BAQUOL METZGER. 

Gustave Baquol Metzger is now living retired but for many years was actively connected 
with the business and public interests of \^'illiston. where for almost a quarter of a century 
he tilled the office of postmaster, twenty years of this time being a continuous service. His 
business activities were also an element in the substantial growth of the community and 
his rest is well deserved. He was born upon a farm near Wittersheim, Alsace-Lorraine, 
France, February 10, 1855, a son of Ira and Brunnette (Baquol) IMetzger. The father's 
birth occurred in the same house as his son Gustave's. His ancestors in direct line for 
two hundred years had been born in that house and the dwelling and the land upon which 
it is located are still in possession of the family, being owned by a brother of Gustave B. 
Metzger. The father acquired his education in his native province and became a large 
landowner and dealer in mortgages and loans. His entire life was spent near Wittersheim, 
where he passed away in 1886, at the advanced age of eighty-six years. His wife was 
born in the academy at Metz, the capital city of Lorraine, and was a daughter of Emoire 
Baauol, who was president of the academy, a famous institution of learning. Moreover, he 
was the author of the world famous Baquol Dictionary. His daughter, Mrs. Metzger, was 
reared and educated at Metz and following her marriage lived at Wittersheim until her 
death, which occurred in 1867, when she was forty-eight years of age. 

G. B. Metzger spent his youthful days in his native city and was educated under the 
private tutorage of Professor Dufifner of Hostad, in Alsace-Lorraine, and also attended the 
Lycee Imperial, which is the University of Alsace-Lorraine at Sn-assbourg. There lie was 
graduated in 1873. He afterward taught school at St. Dizier on the Marne, in France, ami 
then went to Paris, where he engaged in the commission business for two years. In 1876 
he crossed the Atlantic to New York city, where he was employed as bookkeeper in a 
wholesale slaughter house, and in 1885 he entered into a contract which took him to Mon- 
tana, there to take charge of a sheep ranch owned by eastern people. On reaching his 
destination, Glendive, Montana, however, he found that the other party did not intend to 
live up to his contract, so that he sought other employment, becoming hotel clerk and man- 
ager of the Yellowstone Hotel at Glendive. After a year he decided to engage in business 
for himself and in 1886 purchased a stock of groceries and provisions from a house in St. 
Paul, ^Minnesota. He then started overland for the hamlet known as Little Muddy, now 
Williston. His goods were shipped by rail to Bismarck and by boat to Little Muddy, where 
they were thrown off on the bank of the Missouri river. 'Mi. Metzger set up two tents, one 
of which he used as a store and the other as his home, and this was the beginning of the 
now thriving city of Williston. For six months he occupied the tent and then built a store 
building. He prospered as time went on and later the town was laid out, after which 
his general merchandise business grew accordingly. He had developed an extensive trade 
ere he closed out his stock in 1896 and retired from commercial pursuits. In the meantime 
he established a sawmill and brickyard, both of which he conducted successfully, and during 
many years he also engaged in raising cattle and ranching. His business developed in 
most gratifying measure and success attended the intelligent direction of his efforts. 

In 1886 Mr. Metzger was appointed postmaster of Williston and occupied that position 
until 1892. He was then out of office for four years or until August 21, 1896, when he 
was again appointed and so served until April 16, 1915, holding that office for a period 
of twenty-four years in all. During that time, owing to the development of the town, the 
business of the office grew so much that it was necessary for him to devote his entire 
attention to the duties of his position and accordingly he retired from commercial pursuits. 
He may well be proud of the fact that he served as postmaster for twenty-four years, for 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 71 

this indicates unmistakably liis tliorougli reliabilitj- and faithfulness. He with two other 
men established the first school in Williston and furnished the funds for the first term of 
six months and he has been a director of the Williston school board since 1907 and was 
president in 1915. He still owns a large amount of farm lands and now devotes his time 
to the supervision of his agricultural interests, although he makes his liome in Williston, 
where he owns a fine residence. 

I )n the 13th of March, 1882, Mr. Metzger was married to Miss Margaret Le Dosquet, 
in Brooklyn, New York. She was educated in New York city and in Glendive, Montana. 
Her parents were John and Magdalena (Walters) Le Dosquet, who were born at Coblenz on 
the Rhine. They were educated in Germany and on coming to America settled in New 
York, where they were married. Both were descended from French Huguenot ancestors who 
were driven out of France through religious persecution and took refuge in Germany, pre- 
ferring banishment from their native country to the abandonment of their religious con- 
victions. To Mr. and Mrs. Metzger have been born seven children, of whom three are living: 
Mabel Brunnette, who is a graduate of the University of North Dakota and has served as 
assistant postmaster at Williston since 1908; Ivan Victor, who is also a graduate of the 
State University and now an attorney at law of Williston; and Herbert A., likewise a 
member of the Williston bar. All three are graduates of the State University and the 
family is one of wliieh the parents have every reason to be proud. 

Mr. Metzger belongs to the Congregational church, while his wife is a Christian Scientist. 
Fraternally he is connected with ilount iloriah Lodge, F. & A. iL, of Williston, of which 
he became one of the organizers and charter members and in which he has passed all the 
chairs. He likewise organized Williston Chapter, R. A. M., of which -he is high priest, 
and he has been a member of the grand lodge of the state. He is the oldest member of 
the Odd Fellows lodge at Williston, in which he has filled all of the offices, and he has 
likewise been a member of tlie grand lodge. He has traveled considerabh', gaining that 
broad and liberal culture wliich is obtained in no other way. In politics he is a stalwart 
republican and is thoroughly patriotic and American in spirit and interests. His two sons 
are now on the border with the North Dakota National Guard, one of them holding the 
rank of lieutenant and the other that of first sergeant. JIi-. Metzger has ever shown a 
most thorough appreciation of all that is truly democratic in this country and he has 
ever held to high ideals of citizenship, doing everj'thing in his power to promote the nation's 
good as well as the local interests of the communitv in which he resides. 



JOHN H. GAMES. 



John H. Gambs. general merchant and postmaster of Pettibone, was born in Smithland, 
Iowa, in 1882. His father, Peter Gambs, a native of Germany was born in 1843 and wedded 
Agnes Loueks whose birth occurred in Michigan in 1850. When a young man Peter Gambs 
had come to the United States with his parents, who settled in Ohio. He took up the 
occupation of farming but at the time of the Civil war put aside all personal and business 
considerations and responded to the country's call for troops. After the close of hostilities 
he removed to Iowa and continued to engage in farming in that state until he retired from 
active business. Ho and his wife now make their home in Smithland. 

John H. Gambs was the fifth in order of birth in a family of six children, all of whom 
are yet living. He pursued his education in the schools of Smithland, passing through 
consecutive grades until graduated from the high school in the spring of 1899. He after- 
ward devoted his time to farming upon the old homestead and in the spring of 1903 he 
came to North Dakota, settling first in Burleigh county, where he took up a homestead, 
securing title to the property in 1907. During the intervening period of four years he 
carefully and systematically carried on general farming and at the end of that period he 
removed to Kidder county. 

Mr. Gambs married Miss Emma E. DethlofT, who was born in Wisconsin in 1881 and 
who came to North Dakota with her parents about 1883, the family home being established 
in Wells county. Some years afterward she took up a claim in Kidder county and thereon 



72 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Mr. and Mi's. Gambs began tlicir domestic life following their marriage. Her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. F. T. Dethloff, were early settlers of Kidder county, where the father con- 
tinued to make his home until called to his final rest in the spring of 1916. The mother 
survives and is now living in Pettibone. 

Mr. Gambs remained on the Kidder county homestead until the fall of 1910, at which 
time he removed to Pettibone and opened a general store. In 1909 he had been made 
postmaster of Gerber and the following year the office was removed to Pettibone, since 
which time he has continued to serve as postmaster. In his business he has been successful 
from the start and now has an excellent general merchandise establishment, employing a 
number of clerks. A liberal patronage is accorded him and investigation into his methods 
shows that he is thoroughly reliable as well as enterprising. Since coming to Pettibone 
the homestead farm has been rented. He is also the possessor of twenty acres of land on 
the edge of the town and he is now developing that place as a chicken farm, raising thereon 
high grade poultry. 

Mr. and Mj-s. Gambs have become the parents of two children: Elizabeth, born in 
1908; and Walter Richard, born in 1910. Throughout the community in which they reside 
the parents occupy an enviable position in public regard by reason of the fact that they 
hold to high standards of living and their inlluence is always cast on the side of right, 
progress and improvement. 



JOHN L. ANDRUS. 



•John L. Andrus is numbered among the pioneer residents of Giand Forks countv and 
is classed with its most substantial and respected citizens. He was born in Brown county. 
New York, October 11, 1855, a son of Reuben Andrus, who was also born in the Empire 
state and was descended from an old New York family of Scotch origin. He successfully 
engaged in farming in the east until 1863 when he removed tCLLee county, Illinois, where 
he resided until 1866 and then went with his family to .Jackson county, Wisconsin, wliere 
his remaining days- were passed, his death occurring when he was seventy years of age. In 
early manhood he had wedded Louisa Hines, a native of New York and a representative 
of an old New York family of Scotch lineage. She died in 1876. There were three children 
in the family, the two daughters being: Edith, who died in girlhood; and Flora, the wife 
of Warren (ioucher, deceased. 

.John L. Andrus was educated in the public schools of Wisconsin and spent his early 
life upon the home farm. At the age of eighteen he started out to earn his living by 
work as a farm haml in Wisconsin and later he began farming on his own account in North 
Dakota. It was on the 19th of May, 1881, that he arrived in Grand Forks county, where 
he secured a government claim of one hundred and sixty acres in Michigan township. For 
eight years thereafter he successfully cultivated that tract but has since sold this farm. In 
1889 he located at Thompson, Grand Forks county, and secured employment with .Jolm 
Bjorgo, a pioneer merchant, with whom he remained for seven years or until 1896. Mr. 
Bjorgo passed away and Mr. Andrus continued the business as administrator of the estate 
for two years, after which he purchased the store in partnership with T. F. McJIillnn and 
this they have successfully conducted through the intervening period under the name of 
Andrus & McMillan. Theirs is today the oldest business of the kind in the city and its 
methods have ever been such as would bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. 

Mr. Andrus was married in Langdon, in 1897, to Miss Signora Carpenter, a native of 
Michigan and a daughter of the late Hope Carpenter and Melvina Carpenter, the latter now 
a resident of Langdon. Mr. and Mrs. Andrus became parents of three children: George, 
who was born at Thompson and is now a resident of Spokane, Washington; Ferron; and 
Malon. 

Politically Mr. Andrus is a republican and for eighteen years has served continuously 
as treasurer of his township. Fraternally he is connected with the Independent Order of 
Foresters and is now treasurer of the local lodge. His religious faith is that of the 
Methodist church. His life has been well spent and at all points has been honorable and 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 73 

upright, winning for him the confidence and high regard of those with whom he has been 
brouglit in contact. He is now one of the representative merchants of Thompson and his 
business interests iiave been an eU-meut of public progi-ess as well as of individual success. 



JOHN REUTER, Jr. 



.Joliii Keuter lias for over nine years made las home in Dickinson and is now elliciently 
serving as county treasurer of Stark county. He is a native of Illinois, his birth occurring 
at Blue Island, a suburb of Chicago, September 6, 1888, and is a son of John and Augusta 
Renter, who are now residents of the Prairie state although for five years they made their 
home in Dickinson, North Dakota, whither our subject has preceded them. He attended 
the public and high schools of Blue Island and also pursued a course in the Chicago Business 
College, from which he was graduated. 

For about four years after leaving school Jlr. Reuter was connected with golf in a 
professional way. In 1907 he became a resident of Dickinson, North Dakota, and has since 
taken quite an active and prominent part in public affairs. He served as deputy county 
treasurer for five years, after which he engaged in farming for four years, and in 1914 was 
elected treasurer of Stark county, in which capacity he is now serving with credit to himself 
and to the entire satisfaction of his constituents. He was the only democrat elected at that 
time and in 1916 was reelected, again being the only democrat elected on the local ticket. 
He is still interested in farming. 

On the 1.5th of September, 1909, was celebrated the marriage of 5Ir. Reuter and Miss 
Elizabeth Blank, and to them have been born two children, Orville E. and Lawrence. The 
family are communicants of the Catholic church and Jlr. Reuter is also a member of the 
Knights of Columbus. He is a prominent member and stockholder in the Town and Country 
Club of Dickinson and has twice won the state championship in golf — in 1915 and 1916. He 
is very fond of outdoor sports, especially golf, and his reputation along that line is most 
enviable. He takes a deep interest in the welfare of his adopted state and does all in his 
power to promote her prosperity. 



RODOLPH RAV RICHARD. 



Rodolph Ray Richard, publisher of the Golden Valley Progress of Beach, was born at 
Little Falls, Minnesota, April 12, 1888 a son of Theodore Richard whose birth occurred in 
St. Johns, province of Quebec, whence he came to the L'nited States the family home being 
established near Little Falls Minnesota, where they cast in their lot with the pioneer 
settlers. Theodore Richard became chief clerk of the Richard Brothers Mercantile C'oni])any 
of Little Falls, one of the first stores of the town. He married Vetaline Lord, of Canadian 
birth, and both are still living. Theirs is a notable record, for among their eight cliildren 
no death has occurred. 

Rodolph R. Richard pursued his education in the public schools of Little Falls and in 
the Little Falls Business College, after which he entered the office of the Little Falls Herald, 
where he learned the printer's trade, spending a period of six years in connection with that 
paper. He then went to Glendive, Montana, where he became manager of the Dawson 
County Review for .Tames A. Metcalf, remaining as manager there for il little more than a 
year, when the paper was sold. Mr. Richard then became connecti'd with the Olendive 
Independent but after a short time removed to Miles City, Montana, where he became 
circulation manager and business solicitor for the Miles City Star and the Miles City 
Independent. His connection with these two papers covered about six months, at the end 
of which time he was transferred to the Yellowstone Journal, a stock growers journal, for 
which he was reporter and solicitor for a period of six months. He next became connected 
with the Picket at Red Lodge, Montana, in the same capacity, spending three months in 
connection with that journal. On the 15th of May, 1904, he arrived in Beach and [lurchased 



74 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

the (ioldeii \';illey Progress, which he )ias since edited and ]]ublislied. It is owned by 
Mr. Ricliard and liis brother, Harvey, and the paper has a circulation of twelve hundred, 
covoring a territory of which Beach is the center of a fifty mile radius. The circulation 
of the ])aper is larger than tliat of any other journal in the county and the office is equipped 
in a most modern manner, having a linotype machine, a modern two revolution rotary 
press and all other equipment found in a first class printing office. His brother Harvey is 
the linotype operator and in addition they employ two others in the office. Jlr. Richard 
has devoted practically his entire life to the printing business although for a brief period in 
early manhood he was employed in the mercantile establishment of an uncle at Little Falls 
and also as a drug clerk. He found the printing business congenial and in that line has 
steadily w-orked his way upward, being now at the head of a growing and profitable business. 
In politics Mr. Richard is an independent republican and his religious faith is evidenced 
in his membership in the Catholic church of Beach. His attention, however, is chiefly con- 
centrated upon his pa])er and he has made it an excellent journal — a credit to the community 
in which it is gladly received. 



R. E. WENZEL. 



R. E. Wonzel, one of the able attorneys of Pierce county, residing at Rugby, was born 
In Berlin, Germany, May 37, 1883, a son of Gottlieb and Ernestine (Silz) Wenzel, both of 
whom were natives of Germany. The father died in Berlin when his son, R. E. Wenzel, 
was but a year old. He was a shoemaker by trade and he became a member of the army, 
being commissioned lieutenant of his company after four years' service. Following the 
demise of her husband Mrs. Wenzel came to the United States in 1892 and established her 
home at Edgeley, Lamoure county. North Dakota. In 1896 she became the wife of Phillip 
Zoerb and removed to Callaway, Nebraska, where she now resides. 

R. E. AVenzel was a lad of nine summers when he accomprtjiied his mother to the new 
world and following her second marriage he remained in Edgeley, where he served an 
apprenticeship at the printer's trade, since which time he has made his own way 
in the world and has also provided for his own education. He attended the State Normal 
and Industrial School at Ellendale and subsequently entered the Univ^ersity of North Dakota 
at Grand Forks. While a pupil there he played professional ball for two summers, also 
worked. in the harvest fields and for one year worked as night man on the Grand Forks 
Herald, thus providing the funds necessary to meet his tuition and other expenses of his 
college course. In his senior year he edited The Student, the university paper, and in 
1909 he was graduated from tiie university, having completed the literary and law 
courses, so tha't the B. A. and B. L. degrees were both conferred upon him. In 1909 he 
won the interstate oratorical contest, which was the first time it had been won by a 
North Dakota student for twelve years. He was also elected to membership in the Phi 
Beta Kappa and the Delta Sigma Rho fraternities. He was also a member of the univer- 
sity baseball team, six members of which with other recruits made a tour through to the 
Pacific coast, playing twenty-three games, of which they won seventeen. Mr. Wenzel had 
planned to enter Yale but on his return from the coast stopped at Rugby and, finding a 
good opening, for a location, he entered upon the practice of law there and has since actively 
and successfully followed his profession. 

In 1910 Mr. Wenzel was nnited in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Coger, her father being 
George Coger, a retired agriculturist of Grand Forks. Mrs. Wenzel was graduated from 
the University of North Dakota with the class of 1908 and by her marriage has become 
the mother of two children, Ralph and Wilma. 

Mr. Wenzel is a stalwart champion of the I'epublican party and is prominent in 
Masonic circles, belonging to Rugby Lodge, No. 65, F. & A. M., of wliicji lie is past master; 
Damascus Chapter, No. 21, R. A. M., of which he is high priest : and Lebanon Council, 
No. 2, R. & S. M., being at the present time grand treasurer of the grand council of the 
state. Mr. Wenzel possesses considerable musical talent, and utilizing his gifts in this 
direction, he organized a band at the State Normal and Industrial School in Ellendale, also 




R. E. WENZEL 



o 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 77 

a band at the State University and the Rugby Band, all of which he served for a time 
as leader. He is interested in all those forcis which work for cultural development and 
progress and the varied nature of his activities has brought him prominence in many fields. 



FRANK RAFF. 



Frank Rati', jiroprietor and editor of the Nelson County Observer, published at Lakota, 
was born in Polk county, Minnesota, July 13, 1885, a son of Erik and Anna (Olson) Raff, both 
of whom were natives of Sweden. Coming to America in 1880, they settled in Minnesota, 
where the father engaged in farming to the time of his death, vifhich occurred in 1906, when 
lie had reached the age of seventy-two years. His widow survives at the age of sixty years. 

Frank Ratf, who was the sixth in order of birth in a family of seven children, actjuired 
his early education in the public schools of Polk county and afterward attended Crookston 
College of Ci'ookston. Jlinnesota, from which he was graduated in 1908. He then turned 
to newspaper work in 1909, becoming connected with the Fertile Journal, with which paper 
ho was associated for three years. On the expiration of that period he removed to Lakota 
and purchased the Nelson County Observer, which he has since owned and published. It 
has a wide circulation, twelve hundred copies being issued for Nelson county readers alone, 
and it is regarded as the official organ of the county. In his newspaper work Mr. RaflF has 
always noted and followed the trend of modern journalism and the Observer is an attractive 
sheet, presenting to its readers everything of local interest, while its discussion of modern 
questions, and issues shows deep thought and earnest consideration. 

On the 30th of December, 1909, Mr. Raff was married to Miss Josephine Rude, a daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Rude and a representative of a well known and prominent family of 
Gary, Minnesota. To them have been born three children, as follows: Edgar Leroy, whose 
natal year was 1911; Alton Elbert, whose birth occurred in October, 1912; and Evelyn 
Annabel, who was born in 1915. All are natives of Fertile, Minnesota. Mr. Raff exercises 
his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the republican party and 
champions the principles of the party through the columns of the press. He is a man of 
consulerable influence in Lakota and Nelson county, being widely known and popular, and 
warm regard is entertained for him bv all with whom he has been associated. 



HECTOR H. PERRY. 



One of the foremost representatives of democratic politics in North Dakota is Hector 
H. Perry, an attorney at law of EUendale, now a member of the democratic national com- 
mittee. Bom in New London, Wisconsin, on the 20th of August, 1876, he is a son of 
Ebenezer and Caroline (Krause) Perry, the former a native of New York and the latter 
of Germany. They were married, however, in Wisconsin and in 1882 came to North Dakota, 
settling in EUendale among the pioneer families of that place. The father was a lawyer 
and practiced his profession in EUendale to the time of his death, becoming also one of 
the leading and influential citizens of that place, taking active, helpful and beneficial part in 
all public affairs. For fourteen years he also conducted the North Dakota Record, one of 
the leading newspapers of Dickey county, and he was an active and prominent member of 
the Masonic fraternity. He passed away in 1904, while his widow survived until 1915. 

Spending his youthful days in his native city. Hector H. Perry mastered the branches 
of learning taught in the public and high schools there and from his earliest youth spent 
much time in his father's law office, so that he became imbued with the desire to enter upon 
active connection with the profession to which his father had devoted his life. Under 
paternal guidance he took up the study of law and in 1902 was admitted to the bar, at 
which time he entered into partnership with his father, the business relation contirTuing 
between them until the father's death. Hector H. Perry then formed a partnership with 
D. T. Youker, under the firm style of Youker & Perry, and in the practice of his pro- 



78 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

fession lie has demonstrated his ability to cope with many intricate and involved legal 
problems and find ready and correct solutions therefor. In addition to his law practice he 
has become a heavy holder of Dickey county farm lands, his investments being judiciously 
made and bringing to him substantial financial return. 

Mr. Perry early manifested a deep interest in politics and since attaining his majority 
has been active in support of the principles which he endorses. In 1898 he was elected 
clerk of the courts of Dickey county and in 1900 he was reelected to the position, serving 
in all for four years. In 1914 he was chosen chairman of the state democratic committee 
and in 1916 was elected a member of the democratic national committee, so that he is in 
close touch with the political situation of the hour and is active in guiding the interests 
of his party in both state and nation. 

In 1897 Mr. Perry was united in marriage to Miss Jennie H. Monty, of Ellendale, and 
theirs is one of the attractive homes of the city, its hospitality being accounted one of its 
most pleasing features. Fraternally Mr. Perry is connected with Ellendale Lodge, No. 13, 
F. & A. M.; Ellendale Lodge, I. O. O. F.; Ellendale Lodge, K. P.; and Aberdeen Lodge, No. 
1046, B. P. 0. E., of Aberdeen, South Dakota. In community affairs he is deeply interested, 
and manifests a public-spirited devotion to all those plans and movements which work 
for the best interests of the community and which look beyond the exigencies of the 
present to the future. A strong advocate at the bar and a wise counselor, an astute 
political leader and a gentleman of high personal worth, he is popular in the various circles- 
in which he moves and in which his influence has been strongly felt. 



HENRY O'KEEFE, M. D. 



Dr. Henry O'Keefe, engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery at Grand F'orks,. 
was born at Lindsay, Ontario, Canada, March 16, 1858, a son of William and Bridget (Fee) 
O'Keefe, both of whom were natives of Ontario, where they resided until 1881 and then 
removed to North Dakota, becoming early settlers of Walsh county, where the father acquired 
large land holdings and became a prosperous farmer. His last days were spent in this county, 
where lie passed away in 1912, at the age of eighty-two years. His wife was reared, 
educated and married in Ontario and died in 1900, at the age of seventy. In their family 
were ten children, of whom Dr. O'Keefe was the third in order of birth. 

Through the period of his boyhood and youth Dr. O'Keefe largely devoted his time and 
attention to the acquirement of an education, supplementing his early training by a high 
school course at Lindsay, while for one year he was a student in the University of Laval 
at Queliec. He next entered McGill University at Montreal, Canada, where he pursued his 
medical course and was graduated in 1883. On the 9th of April of that year he arrived 
in Minto, Walsh county, North Dakota, where he engaged in practice for twenty-four years, 
at the end of which time he sought the broader field of labor offered in Grand Forks. There 
he took up his abode in September, 1906, and during the intervening period has engaged! 
successfully in the practice of medicine and surgery, building up an extensive and gratiify- 
ing practice. 

On the 5th of June, 1883, Dr. O'Keefe was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Connolly,, 
of Lindsa}', Ontario, her parents being Mr. and Mrs. John Connolly, both of whom are 
deceased. The Doctor and his wife have nine children, all born in Minto, as follows: 
Henry, who was born in 1889 and was graduated from Yale University in 1911; Mary, 
who is a graduate of the State Normal School at St. Cloud, Minnesota, and St. Joseph' 
Academy at St. Paul and is now engaged in teaching school at Malta, Montana; Cj'ril F., 
who is now a general merchant of Keota, Oklahoma; Charles J., who is engaged in the 
practice of dentistry at Saco, Montana; Genevieve, a graduate of the high school and of 
the University of North Dakota, and now employed in a local banking institution ; Muriel, 
who is now attending the University of North Dakota; Gladys, who is a senior student 
in the high school; William, who is In his first year at the high school; and Emmet, who 
is an eighth grade student. 

The family are communicants of the Roman Catholic church and Dr. O'Keefe also- 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 79 

belongs to the Knights of Columbus. He is will knuwii in fraternal circles as a member of 
tlie Foresters, the Yeomen, the Ancient Order of I uitej Workmen and the Modern Woodmen 
of America. His professional connections are with the Grand Forks District Medical Society, 
the North Dakota State Medical Association and the American Medical Association. He 
has worked his way upward tluough his own efl'orts, wisely using his time and talents in 
preparatiou for his i;rofession and in discliarging the duties connected with his growing 
jiractice. He is now one of the leading physiciuns of the state, his ability being widely 
acknowledged by his colleagues and contemporaries as well as by the general public. 



REINTIART GILBERTSEN. 



Reinhart Gilbertsen, postmaster of Glcnburn and owner and editor of the Glenburn 
.Advance, was born in Avoca. Wisconsin, March 11, 1S79, a son of Erick and Mary (Everson) 
Gilbertsen who were natives of Norway. They came to America in early life with their 
respective parents and tlie father learned and followed the blacksmith'.s trade devoting many 
years to that pursuit in Wisconsin. He died in ilarcli, 188S, and his widow is now a resident 
of San Francisco, California. 

The family removed to Estherville, Iowa, during the boyhood of Reinhart Gilbertsen and 
he was there reared and educated, learning the printer's trade after his textbooks were 
put aside. He worked at the case in Estherville and Des Moines for eight years and in 
1901 made his way northward to Kottiiieau county. North Dakota, where he filed on a 
homestead, to wliich he later secured title, having met all the requirements that brought 
to him the ownership of the land. He worked in a printing olTice for a time in that county 
and in 1904 he removed to Glenburn, Renville eountj', where he purchased the Glenburn 
Advance, of which he has since been owner and editor. He has a thoroughly equipped 
]ihuit and is publishing an attractive weekly jiaper devoted to the dissemination of local 
and general news. 

In April, 1903, Mr. Gilbertsen was united in marriage to Miss Matilda Holmquist and 
they have become the parents of two children: Cecil, born March 10, 1905; and Alice, 
born November 23, 1909. The parents hold membership in the Presbyterian church and 
-Mr. Gilbertsen is also identified with the Masonic fraternity and the Modern Woodmen of 
America. His political endorsement is given the republican party and since 1904 he has 
continuously served as postmaster of the town, while for ten years he has been a member 
of the school board. He is interested in all that pertains to the public life of the community 
:ind his aid and influence are always given on the side of progress and improvement, his 
efforts being an element in promoting the general welfare. 



DONALD Mcdonald. 



Donald ^McDonald, grand secretary of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows in North 
Dakota and treasurer of the Great Northern Life Insurance Company, was born in Dundas 
countj-, Ontario, Canada, June 29, 1850, and is of Scotch lineage. His parents, Duncan and 
Janet (Mcintosh) McDonald, were both natives of Scotland, the former arriving in Canada 
in 183.3 and the latter in the '40s. The father was a pioneer settler of Dundas county, 
where for many years he successfully engaged in agricultural pursuits. In the spring of 
1851 he became a resident of Dubuque, Iowa, and there passed away in 1858 at the age of 
fifty years. His widow long survived and died in Iowa in 1897 at the age of seventy-eight 
years. In their family were four children : Elizabeth, the wife of .1. H. Hickle, of Clarks- 
ville, Iowa; Donald; Margaret, who is living in Providence, Rhode Island; and Gordon, who 
died in Louisiana in 1907. 

Donald McDonald was but an infant when his parents went to Iowa and in that state 
he was reared, acquiring his education in the public schools. His early life to the age of 
fourteen years was spent upon the home farm, after which he took his initial step in 



80 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

commercial lines by securing employment as clerk in a general store at Shell Rock, Iowa. 
Later he followed farming and otlier work and also taught school in Iowa, wliere he con- 
tinued to make his home until 1873, when he arrived in Dakota Territory, being then a 
young man of twenty-three years. He settled first near Vermillion, Clay county, and in 
1878 removed to Grand Forks, then a western frontier village, and began the publication 
of a newspaper called the Plain Dealer which was one of the first papers published in the 
state. This he conducted for two years. He served as postmaster of Grand Forks for nine 
years, or from 1879 until 1888, when he engaged in the furniture and undertaking business, 
conducting a store for nineteen years. At the end of that period he \yas elected county 
treasurer of Grand Forks county, which office he filled for four years, and tluis in many ways 
he was closely, actively and lielpfully connected with the interests and with the upbuilding 
of Grand Forks. In 1895 he was chosen grand secretary of the Grand Lodge of Odd Fellows 
and has since occupied that position, which claims much of his time and attention. He 
was also one of the organizers of the Great Northern Life Insurance Company, of which 
he was president froAi~1910 until January 1, 1916, when he became treasurer. For nineteen 
years he served as a member of the board of education of Grand Forks and for a number 
of j-ears he has been the president of the Grand Forks library board. In the fall of 1916, 
he was elected to the office of register of deeds on the republican ticket. He has always 
taken a deep interest in political affairs and has been a stalwart supporter of those inter- 
ests which are a matter of civic virtue and of civic pride. His activities have covered a 
wide scope, connecting him with commercial, 'financial and official interests in Grand Forks, and 
the worth of his work is widely acknowledged. He is accounted one of the foremost resi- 
dents of his city, honored and respected by young and old, rich and poor. 

On the 10th of December, 1876, in Clarksville, Iowa. Jlr. McDonald was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Addie Leete, a native of Wisconsin and a daughter of the late A. N. Leete 
and his wife, Abbie (Button) Leete, both of whom were natives of New York and of English 
descent. The Leete family was established in America in early colonial days. One of Mrs. 
McDonald's great-uncles in the maternal line was a colonial governor of Connecticut. Mrs. 
McDonald passed away in Grand Forks, September 30, 190$, at the age of forty-eight 
years, leaving two sons: Archibald L., born in Grand Forks, April 25, 1879, and now a 
practicing physician of Duluth, Minnesota; and D. Bruce, who was born in Grand Forks, 
June 2, 1891, and is now cashier of the State Bank at Hansboro, North Dakota. In 1909 
Mr. McDonald was married to Mrs. J. Addie Nasli. 

In his fraternal connections Mr. McDonald is not only widely known as a jirorainent 
Odd Fellow but is also a Mason, belonging to Acacia Lodge, No. 4, F. & A. M., of Grand 
Forks. He is likewise a member of the Curling Club, which indicates the nature of his 
recreation; he is a member of the Commercial Club and supports progressive meas\n'es for 
the advancement and upbuilding of the cit}-; and he is identified with the First Presbyterian 
church, in which he is an elder and an active worker, doing all in his power to further the 
moral progress of the community. His life has ever been upright and honorable, winning 
for him the respect, goodwill and confidence of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



GUNERIUS GUNDEESON. 



Gunerius Gunderson, a dealer in grain and coal at Mohall, has been a resident of the 
town since 1903 and throughout the entire period has been connected with the grain trade, 
in which he has built up a business of substantial proportions. He was born in Norway, 
October 8, 1873, a son of Gunder and Pemille (Olson) Gunderson, who were also natives of 
that country, where the father followed farming throughout his entire life. He passed away 
in 1879, while his wife died in 1881. 

Mr. Gunderson whose name introduces this review was reared and educated in Norway 
to the age of fifteen years, when in 1888 he bade adieu to friends and native land and 
sailed for the new world, making his way to Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he learned the 
cigar maker's trade. He was thus employed for two years and then in 1891 removed to 
Traill county. North Dakota, where he worked for two years. He next took up his abode 



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HISTORY OF XORTII DAKOTA 83 

in Bottineau county, wliere he filed on land in 1894 and with characteristic energy began 
to develop and improve that property, continuing its cultivation for six years. At the end 
of that period he secured a situation in a grain elevator at Bottineau, working in that way 
for a year and a half, and in 1903 he arrived in Mohall, where he was employed in an elevator 
for about five years. On the expiration of that period he engaged in the grain business on 
his own account and in 1907 built an elevator, while in 1916 he erected a second and much 
larger one. He is today the leading grain merchant in Mohall, conducting the largest 
business done at any of the five elevators of the city. He buys and sells extensively and his 
success has come to him as the result of close application, unabating energy and sound 
business judgment. He also handles coal, in which he enjoys a good trade, and he is still 
the owner of the homestead property in Bottineau county. 

On the 1st of January, 1905, Mr. Gunderson was married to Miss Marie C. Mattson and 
they have become the parents of four daughters. Hazel M., Ellen D., Thelma L. C, and 
Alida M. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Lutheran church, while in his political 
belief Mr. Gunderson is a republican. He has served as a member of the town council of 
Mohall for four years, also as justice of the peace for four years, and as a member of the 
board of education for three years, and in each connection has discharged his duties promptly 
and capably. He is identified with the Masonic Scottish Rite Lodge, No. 2, at Grand Forks 
and has become a Noble of the Mystic Shrine. Although he came to the United States a 
j'oung lad, empty handed, he has never had occasion to regret his determination to try 
his fortune in the new world, for here he has steadily worked his way upward and is now 
numbered among the substantial citizens and progressive business men of Mohall, enjoying 
the respect and goodwill of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



PETER J. IVERSON. 



Peter J. Iverson, county superintendent of schools of Nelson county and a resident of 
Lakota, was born in Christiania, Norway, June 17, 1880. His father Amund Iverson, also 
born in Norway, came to America in 1882 and settled in Decorah, Iowa, where he engaged in 
farming, there I'emaining until 1894 at which time he passed away in Decorah at the age of 
forty-three years. In politics he was a republican and an active worker in local ranks. He 
served for one term as township assessor. A consistent Christian man he held member- 
ship in the Lutheran church and guided his life according to its teachings. He married Marcn 
Sorlio, also a native of Norway, and she is now living at Red Lake county, ^Minnesota. She 
became the mother of eight children, seven of whom survive. 

Peter J. Iverson attended the public schools of Iowa and Minnesota, the high school at 
Park Regent and the college at Fergus Falls, Minnesota, from which he was graduated with 
the class of 1903. He was graduated from the State Normal School at Mayville, North 
Dakota, in 1906, and in 1910 won the Bachelor of Arts degree upon graduation from Luther 
College at Decorah, Iowa. He also spent one year in post graduate woik in the L'niversity 
of Wisconsin and another year in the North Dakota University, winning the Master of 
Arts degree. His early life was devoted to farm work which he followed fnr two years 
after the death of his father. When his education was completed he took up the profession 
of teaching, becoming thus connected with the country schools of Polk county. North 
Diikota. He was afterward principal of the schools of Maddock, this state, for a year and 
principal at Towner, after which he served for two years as instructor in Luther College at 
Decorah in the high school department. It was in this way that he met the expenses of 
his own college course. He afterward located at Michigan, Nelson county. North Dakota, 
where ];e was superintendent of schools for three years and on the expiration of that period 
he was elected county superintendent of schools in the fall of 1912. He is now entering on 
the third term in that position, having twice been elected without opposition, a fact which 
indicates that he is eminently qualified for the ])osition and tliat his work is highly satisfac- 
tory to the public at large. Under his guidance siibstantial advancement has been made in 
the schools and the standards of instruction and of seholarshi|i have been greatly raised. 



84 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

On June 12, 1912, Professor Iverson was married at Lakota to Miss Mary Wolford, a 
native of Akron, Indiana, and a daughter of John and Lydia (Waechter) Wolford, representa- 
tives of pioneer families of Indiana of German descent. Professor, and Mrs. Iverson have 
two children: Dale, born June 10, 1913; and Lucile, born January 6, 1915. 

Politically Mr. Iverson is a republican, and fraternally he is connected with the Masons, 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Sons of Norway. He also belongs to the 
Commercial Club and is interested in its projects for the upbuilding of the city and the 
Lutlieran church llnds in him an active member. In a word he seeks in every way the 
further linancial and moral progi'ess of the individual and the community and his efforts 
have been of far reaching and beneficial effect. 



'^•. JAMES TAYLOR. 

.James Taylor, sheriff of Towner county and a resident of Cando, was born February 
28, 1874, in Kansas, his parents being .Job and Sarah (Grimes) Taj'lor who were natives of 
Missouri. The father was a farmer and in an early day in the development of Kansas 
removed to that state, where he followed farming for twelve years, after which he returned 
to Missouri, where he carried on general agricultural pursuits until 1888. .That year wit- 
nessed his arrival in Towner county. North Dakota, where he filed on land which he culti- 
vated and improved until 1905, when he retired and went to California, where he made his 
home until his death. He passed away in 1906,maving long survived his wife, who died in 
August, 1877. 

James Taylor was reared and educated in Missouri and North Dakota, being fourteen 
years of age when his parents came to this state. He remained under the parental roof until 
he attained his majority and then filed on land which he developed and cultivated until 
December, 1902, when he rented his farm. He still owns the original homestead, however, 
and has also added to his landed possessions until they now enibrace eleven hundred and 
twenty acres in Towner county. From this property he derives a very substantial annual 
income. 

On tlie 25th of December, 1906, Mr. Taylor >v'as united in marriage to Miss Carrie 
Quick and to them were born two children. James Roscoe and Mabel Genevieve. The 
religious faith of the family is that of the Methodist church and fraternally Mr. Taylor 
is a Mason, a Knight of Pythias and a United Workmen. His political allegiance is given 
to the republican party and in 1903 he was appointed postmaster of Perth, which position 
he filled until January, 1906. In January, 1907, he became sheriff of Towner county, serving 
for four years, and then for a period of about four years was engaged in bu.ying grain at 
Perth and Cando. In 1914 and again in 1916 he was reelected to the position of sheriff and 
is now the incumbent in that office, the duties of which he discharges in a prompt, fearless 
and faithful manner, his reelection being evidence of the confidence reposed in him by his 
fellow citizens. From territorial days he has lived in North Dakota and throughout the 
intervening period lias been an interested witness of the changes which have occurred, while 
at all times he lias taken a helpful part in promoting the work of general progress and 
improvement. 



HENRY H. HAND. 



A well known figure in insurance circles in North Dakota is Henry H. Hand, the secre- 
tary of the Northern Fire and Marine Insurance Company of Grand Forks. He was born 
in Lenawee county, Michigan, Marcli 8, 1869, a son of Henry H. and Betsy Ann (Smiths 
Hand, the former a native of New York and the latter of Germany. In young womanhood 
Mrs. Hand came to the new world and was married in Michigan. They removed from New 
York to Michigan and Henry H. Hand. Sr., there engaged in millwrighting during his 
early life and continued his residence in Michigan until 1868, when he passed away at the 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 85 

age of sixty-four years. His widow died in Portland, Oregon, in 1SS5 at the age of 
fifty-nine years. In the family were three c-liildren: Mrs. Nona Ji. ClKipman, living at 
Humboldt, Sa.skatcOii'wan, Canada; Jlrs. Mary II. Hunt, a resident of Camas, Washington; 
and Henry H. 

The last named having become a resident of Portland, Oregon, in early childhood, was 
there reared from the age of nine years and after attending the public schools of that city 
became a student in the Columbia Commercial College there. He started out in the business 
world in the insurance field at Sherwood, Oregon, where he remained until 1894, when he 
removed to Bisbee, Xorth Dakota, where he S])ent the succeeding decade. In 1904 he became a 
resident of Devils Lake, North Dakota, where he conducted an insurance office until 1909, when 
he arrived in Grand Forks and organized the Northern Fire and Jlarine Insurance Company, 
which is one of the largest and most substantial insurance companies of the state. Its 
present officers are: Charles K. Bradley, president; Ale.xander Mitchell, vice president; Carl 
Fischer, treasurer; and Henry H. Hand, secretary. The last named' is also a director of the 
Northwestern Underwriters' Association. The business has been developed according to the 
last word in insurance organization and management and the success of the corporation is 
evidenced in the continued growth of its patronage. 

On the 4th of August 1903, Mr. Hand was married to Miss Edna L. Gray, wlio was 
born in North East, Pennsylvania, a daughter of ilr, and Mrs. James il. Gray. The father 
is now living but the mother is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Hand have become the parents of 
three children: Howard H. who was born at Dex-ils Lake in 1904: .Jeannette. born in Grand 
Forks in 1910; and Donald, born in Grand Forks in 1913. 

ilr. Hand is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and he and his 
family are identified with the Congregational church. He is a western man by birth, 
training and spirit and western progress and enterprise finds exemplification in his career. 
The call of opportunity has ever been to him a call to action and his efforts, intelligently 
directed, have brought substantial results. 



jud(;e will h. carleton. 

A most creditable record in connection with the judicial history of North Dakota is 
that of Judge Will H. Carleton, of Cooperstown, who has been eight times elected county 
judge of Griggs county, a record which proves his capability and his fidelity to the high 
purposes and standards of the office which he occupies. He was born in St. Clair county. 
Michigan, December 16, 1853, a son of Moses F. and Mary (Latham) Carleton, the former 
born in New Hampshire in 1831, while the latter was a native of New York. The grand- 
father William H. Carleton. was a representative of an old colonial family and on leaving 
the cast he removed to Michigan, settling on the present site of St. Clair, in which vicinity 
a number of his relatives took up their abode about 1831, thus aiding in reclaiming that 
region for the purposes of civilization. One of the thoroughfares of St. Clair still retains 
the name of Yankee street, which was given to it by these early settlers. They took up land 
and engaged in farming and Moses F. Carleton long occujiied the original homestead of the 
family there. Prominent in the public life of the community, he was elected county clerk 
and occupied that position for six years, while for four years he was deputy county 
treasurer and made his home in Port Huron, Jlichigan. In 1864, at the time of the Civil 
war. he enlisted as a member of Company I. Fourth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, serving 
in eastern Tennessee and northern Alabama, while later he was sent with his regiment to 
Texas, where they were held on guard duty until 1866. He had first joined the Thirtieth 
Michigan Regiment, which had been recruited but was then divided, part of the troops 
being assigned to the Fourth Regiment and part to the Third Regiment of Michigan Volun- 
teers which were being organized. He entered the service as first sergeant and was mustered 
out as second lieutenant, receiving his honorable discharge at Detroit. He passed away in 
1903 at the age of seventy-four years. 

The family of Mr. and Mrs. Moses F. Carleton numbered two daui^liters and Judge 
Carleton is the onlv son. He began his education in the district schools and afterward 



86 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

attended the high school at St. Clair. He acted as deputy vhile his father filled the office 
of county clerk, and later he took up the study of law but owing to impaired health was 
obli"'ed to return to the farm, whereon he remained for two years, although he had been 
adnmted to the bar. In 1883 he made his way to the present site of Cooperstown, North 
Dakota, and took up a preemption and later a homestead claim in Cooperstown township. 
He then turned his attention to farming, concentrating his efforts upon the development and 
improvement of his land until 1888, when he established his home in Cooperstown. He 
was employed by the Gull River Lumber Company, being connected for a number of years 
with a lumberj'ard owned by them. He also practiced law and in 1889 his fellow towns- 
men elected him states attorney of Griggs county, which position he filled for two years. 
He then entered upon the active work of his profession in private practice and so continued 
until 1899. when he was appointed county judge to fill out an unexpired term and at each 
successive election since that time, eight in all, he has been chosen by popular suffrage 
for the office and since the first two terms has had no opposition. 

In 1879 Judge Carleton was married to Miss Eliza Davis, who was born in St. Clair 
county, Michigan, a daughter of William H. and Mary Ann Davis. She passed away in 
1904 and in 1910 .Judge Carleton wedded Daisy A. Sraithers, a native of England, who 
was engaged in teaching. 

The Judge is a Mason and is also connected with the Modern Woodmen of America, 
but he concentrates his energies almost entirely upon his official duties and his marked 
ability, fairness and impartiality are indicated by his long retention in an office to which 
lite and liberty, truth and justice must look for protection. He has ever been interested 
in the matter of family history and compiled a genealogy of the Carletons, tracing the 
line back to Baldwin de Carleton, A. D. 1066, who was the founder of the Carletons of 
Cumberland county, England. The prefix de was continued for thirteen generations. Edward 
Carleton settled in Massachusetts in 1638, becoming the founder of the family in the new 
world. Among the names of prominence figuring on the pages of the familj' history several 
have been knighted. Sir William Carleton was of the seventeenth generation of the 
Carletons of Carleton Hall, Cumberland, England, and Sir Walter de Carleton was of the 
branch that settled in Oxfordshire, while Sir Dudley Carleton, Viscount Dorchester, was also 
of the Oxfordshire branch. Will M. Carleton, the famous Amei'ican poet, was of the same 
parent stock as Moses F. Carleton, whose records of the family are complete from the 
year 1066 to the present generation. 



B. C. PHIPPS. 



North Dakota being an agricultural state, the grain trade has become one of the most 
prominent industries and among those who have become important factors in its develop- 
ment are the men composing the firm of Phipps & Keen of Dunning. The former is B. C. 
Phipps, who was born in Paynesville. Minnesota, October 18. 1872, and is a son of John 
and Martha (Darnell) Phipps, both natives of Indiana. Throughout his active business life 
the father followed farming and mercantile pursuits. In 1859 he removed to Wright county, 
Minnesota, where he resided until locating in Paynesville, that state, in 1861. There he 
took up land and began its -development but was driven out by the Indians during one of 
their uprisings and returned to Indiana, where he spent one year. At the end of that time 
he returned to Minnesota and was making his home in St. Cloud when he joined Company 
I, First Minnesota Infantry, with which he served for one year and three months dining 
the Civil war. After his discharge from the army he again became a resident of Paynes- 
ville, Minnesota, where he was engaged in the mercantile business for several years, but 
spent his last days upon his farm in that locality, where he passed away in 1906. He had 
survived his wife for several years, as she died in May. 1895. 

B. C. Phipps attended the public schools of Pajaiesville in the acquirement of an edu- 
cation and remained under the parental roof until reaching manhood. After leaving home 
he worked for the Northwestern Elevator Company at several places as relief agent, con- 
tinuing with them from 1893 until 1901, when he formed a partnership with Lyman M. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 87 

Keen, under tlie name of Phipps & Keen, and engaged in business at Hanley Falls, Minne- 
sota, as grain dealers. In 1905 tliej- removed to Westhope, Bottineau county, Xortli Dakota, 
where they bought grain for two years, and then went to Dunning, wlicre they erected an 
elevator and have since engaged in business with good success. 

( )n the 28th of December, 1896, Mr. Phipps was united in marriage to Miss Elbe Keen, 
a daugliter of Lyman M. and Almina (Storer) Keen, a sketch of whom appears below. To 
Mr. and Jlrs. Phipps was born one child, Claude, who died March 17, 1898. In politics 
Mr. Phipps is a republican and in religious faith he is a Methodist. He is a prominent 
Mason and Shriner and also belongs to the Jlodern Woodmen of America. For two years 
he served as game warden at Dunning and has also been clerk of the school board for five 
years, while during his residence in Westhope he was a member of the town council. In 
business circles he occupies an em ial)le position and is held in high regard wherever known. 



LYMAN M. KEEN. 



Lynuin .M. Keen, of the llrni of Phipps & Keen, was born in Livermore, Maine, on the 
16th of May, lS4o, and was reared and educated in the old Pine Tree state where he was living 
at the outbreak of the Civil war. For ten months he was numbered among the boys in 
blue, having enlisted in September, 1864, as a member of the Fifth Maine Battery. In 1866 
he went to Minnesota and jjurchased land in Yellow Medicine county, which he developed 
and improved, following farming there for eighteen years. At length he removed to Hanley 
Falls, Minnesota, and embarked in the grain business with his son-in-law, B. C. Phipps, 
under tlie firm style of Phipps & Keen. From 1905 to 1907 they carried on business in 
Westhope, Bottineau county, North Dakota, and from there removed to Dunning, where 
they now own and operate an elevator. Mr. Keen filed on land in Williams county, this 
.state, and proved up on the same, but has since rented his farm. 

On the 14th of February, 1867, he married Miss Almina Storer, who is also a native 
of Maine, born in Weld, February 28, 1847, and they became the parents of two children: 
Sarah, who married .J. H. Emerson and died in June, 1907; and Effie, the wife of B. C. 
Phipps. Besides their grain interests both Mr. Keen and ilr. Phipps own residence property 
in Westhope and Dunning. The former served as county supervisor in Williams county, 
North Dakota, and is an ardent supporter of the republican party. Both he and his wife 
liold membership in the Methodist church, and he also belongs to the Grand Army of the 
Republic and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. They are widely and favorably known 
and their circle of friends is almost co-extensive with their circle of acquaintances. 



HENRY W. DEZOTELL. 



Henry W. Dezotell, a partner in the firm of H. Dezotell & Son, general merchants of 
Grand Forks, and also extensively engaged in farming, was born in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, 
November 5, 1857. a son of Stephen and Caroline (Getman) Dezotell, both of whom were 
natives of .Jefferson county. New York, where they were reared, educated and married. In 
the early '50s they removed to Wisconsin, where the father became a well known and 
]n-ominent pioneer farmer. He died in the state of his adoption in 1872, at the age of 
forty-five years, while his- widow, surviving for many years, passed away in Chicago in 
1915, at the age of seventy-seven. 

Henry W. Dezotell, the second of four children, attended the public schools of Wisconsin, 
iiursuing a high school course in Monroe county. Later he removed to Brown Valley, Minne- 
sota, where he became connected with the lumber industry and there remained in business 
until 1900, when he sold out and removed to ^NOnncapolis. In that city he established 
a wholesale grain business which he carried on for nine years, and in 1909 he removed to 
North Dakota to engage in the real estate business. In that connection he traveled Tiack 
and forth between North Dakota and the twin cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, inter- 



88 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

esting prospective farmers and settlers in this state with its wonderful productiveness and 
limitless possibilities. While engaged in the real estate business he brought many people 
to North Dakota who might otherwise never have come and yet who, like Mr. Dezotell, have 
won prosperitj' during the period of their residence in this state. He personally became 
interested in agriculture and at the present time owns farm lands aggregating thirty-six 
hundred acres under cultivation, utilized for the production of grain. On each of his farms 
he has erected substantial buildings for housing his vast crops and he also utilizes the 
most modern and improved machinery for planting, cultivating and harvesting. In the 
harvest season he employs hundreds of extra hands to gather and thresh the new crop and 
his farms are indeed places where the hum of industry is continually heard. In 1913 Mr. 
Dezotell established a department store at Grand Forks which is one of the leading mer- 
cantile establishments of the city, being now carried on by his son under the firm style of H. 
Dezotell & Son, while the father largely gives his attention to the supervision of his agri- 
cultural interests. 

In June, 1879, Mr. Dezotell was united in marriage to Miss Ada L. Bigelow, of Tomah, 
Wisconsin, by whom he has a son, Claude E., who was born at Brown Valley, Minnesota, in 
18S1, is now married and acts as manager of the firm of H. Dezotell & Son at Grand Forks. 

Fraternally Mr. Dezotell is a Royal Arch Mason. He belongs to the Commercial Club 
and he gives his political support to the republican party. Since his fifteenth year he has 
worked his way upward unaided and is now one of the popular and prosperous citizens of 
Grand Forks, having important business connections which contribute to the general welfare 
and upbuilding of the district as well as to individual success. He early had the prescience 
to discern something of what the future had in store for this great and growing western 
country and, acting according to the dictates of his faith and judgment, he has lived to 
garner in the fullness of time the results of his labors and his sagacity. 



.JOHN C. ARDUSER. -^ 



For almost a quarter of a century John C. Arduser has been closely associated with 
the agricultural development of Lamoure county, having arrived there in 1892. His 
holdings of farm property are now extensive and he is accounted one of the most pro- 
gressive agriculturists of his district, his home being on section 2, Saratoga township. 
He was horn in Buffalo county, Wisconsin, in June, 1871, a son of Leonard and Celia (Christ) 
Arduser, who were natives of Switzerland and in 1866 made the voyage to the new 
world, establisiiing their home in Wisconsin, where for many years the father engaged 
in farming. In 1894 he removed to Stutsman county. North Dakota, where he purchased 
land and carried on general agricultural pursuits until 1901, when he retired, now making 
his home with a daughter in Wisconsin. His wife passed away in November, 1912, at the 
age of seventy-five years. 

Reared on a Wisconsin farm, John C. Arduser attended district school near his 
father's place and through the summer months worked in the fields. He thus early became 
familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops and he continued 
with his father until he reached his majority, coming to North Dakota in 1892. Making 
his way to Lamoure county, he purchased his present farm and is today one of the exten- 
sive landowners of his part of the state, owning one and a half sections in Lamoure county, 
a half section in Stutsman county and three-quarters of a section in Barnes county, all 
in one tract, his home being upon section 2, Saratoga township. He has made many 
improvements, having three sets of farm buildings, while the land has been brought to a 
high state of cultivation and annually returns excellent harvests for the care and labor 
bestowed upon it. The buildings are substantial and commodious and the equipments of 
the farm in the way of machinery and agricultural implements are thoroughly modern 
and up-to-date, so that the work is accomplished with facility and with a comparative 
measure of ease. In addition to his farming interests he is a stockholder in the Farmers 
Elevator Company of Dickc.y and also in the Farmers Elevator Company of Marion. 
He makes a specialty of raising Red Polled cattle and Poland China hogs and his live- 




JOHN C. ARDUSER 



THE :^ 

PUB:-'' I '^ 



A919K !.I^ 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 91 

stock interests are an important and profitable branch of liis business. He is also well 
known in banking circles as president of tlie State Bank of Adrian, in which his son is cashier. 

In I'cbruary, 1893, Mr. Arduser was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Crist and they 
liave licconie the parents of nine children, Conrad, Anna, Celia, Margaret, Stella, Albie, 
Luella, Leonard and Verna. 

The family attend the Evangelical church, to which Mr. and Mrs. Arduser belong, 
and he also has membership with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Royal 
Neighbors. He exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the 
republican party and has served as school clerk and school treasurer and also as a 
member of the town board. He does not seek nor desire office, preferring to give his 
undivided attention to his business affairs, which, capably diiected, have won him place 
with the leading agriculturists and financiers of his part of Lamoure county. His 
success is attributable entirely to his own efforts. Brooking no obstacles that could be 
overcome by persistent, earnest and honorable purpose, he has steadily advanced and the 
rewards of untiring labor are now his. 



JOHN ORCHARD. 



John Orchard, engaged in the real estate business in Dickinson, spent his early life 
near London, England. He was the fourth in order of birth in a family of seven children 
whose parents were Thomas and Mary Orchard. The father was a lumber merchant of 
Exeter. England, and he and his wife spent their entire lives in that country. In fact .John 
Ordiard is the only representative of the family who came to America. He acquired a 
common school education at E.xeter, England, and afterward completed the course, at the 
same college, from which he was graduated in 1873 on the completion of a literary course. He 
crossed the Atlantic when twenty-two j-ears of age and became a commissariat officer of 
the Canadian Pacific Railroad. He was also a member of the surveying staff' of the railroad, 
which blazed the trail of that road from coast to coast. The section surveyed by his party 
was to Fort Gary, Winnipeg, and west to what is now known as Moose .Jaw. That work 
consumed a period of two years and after completing the survey Mr. Orchard walked with 
other members of the staff from Fort Gary, Winnipeg, to St. Paul, a distance of five hundred 
miles, whicli they covered in thirty days. 

When that work was completed Mr. Orchard went to Toronto, Canada, where he wedded 
Miss Isabella Clark, a resident of that city and a daughter of Mrs. Ann Clark, the widow 
of a pioneer of that locality. Seven children have been born of this marriage: Ernest R., 
state bank examiner for North Dakota; Norris Grey, a practicing physician of Rochester, 
New York, who is specializing in the treatment of diseases of children; Mrs. W'elton 
McDonald, a resident of Dickinson; Welland .John, who is proprietor of a drug store in 
Dickinson; and Winifred, Norris and Chudleigh, all of whom died in infancy. The surviving 
members of the family have all been given good educational privileges and are graduates 
of the college of Fargo. Mrs. Orchard was born in Stirling Castle of Scotland whiU' her 
fiither was acting as bandmaster of the Stirling Guards. Later he went to Canada as 
bandmaster of the Ottawa Guards, which position he filled to the time of his death in 1854. 
He was one of the pioneers of Canada. In the spring of 1915 Mr. Orchard was called upon 
to mourn the loss of his wife, who passed away in April of that year. 

Mr. Orchard was at one time interested in business at St. Catherines, Canada, but his 
health failed and he returned to England on a visit. He there entered the Young Men's 
Christian Association work in London in the capacity of secretary and remained in that 
country for a period of ten years. He has in his possession the only Y. M. C. A. ineniber- 
sliip card in the United States which was signed by Sir George Williams, the founder of 
the association. On returning to this country Mr. Orchard settled in Dickinson, North 
Dakota, in July, 1892, and was the pioneer pastor of the Congregational church. In 1895 
he removed to Fargo, where he was pastor of the Plymouth Congregational church and was 
also secretary of the Young Men's Cliristian Association of Fargo at the same time. After 
retiring from the pastorate he spent fourteen years as international state Sunday school 
Vol. in— 8 



92 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

secretary of Minnesota, North Dakota and Montana and when ho resigned that position he 
was presented with a beautiful watch as a token of tlie appreciation of liis fellowmcn for the 
splendid service which he had performed in that connection. In 1910 he returned to Dickinson 
and opened a real estate and loan office, since which time he has carried on business along 
that line. 

Mr. Orchard has ever given his aid and. influence on the side of progress, upbuilding 
and improvement and for five years he was secretary of the Commercial Club of Dickinson. 
He was also associated with Fred Turner in the promotion of the National Highway Asso- 
ciation, now known as the Eed Trail. This association was organized by the Commercial 
Club of Dickinson, of which Mayor White was then president and Mr. Orchard secretary. 
Twenty thousand dollars was raised by voluntary subscription for the building of the 
famous Medora bridge, now a prominent link in the Red Trail. Mr. Orchard is also well 
known in Masonic circles. He Is a representative of a family whose ancestry can be traced 
through many centuries and one of his ancestors was Helliwell Orchard, a prominent early 
figure in Masonry, the writer of the Helliwell poem, which is a recognized authority on 
Masonry. This dates back to the thirteenth century, It was in 1893 that Mr. Orchard of 
this review became a member of Dickinson Lodge, No. 33, F. & A. M. He has since taken 
advanced degrees in the order and is now prelate of Temple Commandery, No. 13, K. T., 
of Dickinson. Mr. Orchard has traveled extensively, gaining that broad and liberal culture 
which only travel can bring. He has visited France, Germany, Holland, Belgium, Switzerland, 
Spain, Italy and Portugal as well as many sections of the United States and has done 
most important work in the field of educational and Christian organization. The greater 
part of his life has been devoted to activities of that character and his chief ambition and 
purpose has been to aid as far as in his power in the mental and spiritual development of 
the race. His ideals of life are high and his efforts have been practical and resultant. For 
about four years he was a contributor to the Cook Publishing Company periodicals. It 
would be tautological in this connection to enter into any series of statements showing him 
to be a man of broad scholarly attainments, for this has been shadowed forth between the 
lines of this review, but it is just to say in a work that will descend to future generations 
that he is also a man of wide sympathy whose study of human nature has led to most 
earnest and effective results for the benefit of his fellowmen. 



HANS OPPEGARD. 



The prevalence of Norwegian names on the roster of North Dakota's citizens indicates 
how largely the state is indebted to the land of the midnight sun for its settlement, devel- 
opment and improvement. Actively identified with farming in Barnes county, near Dazey, and 
with other business interests is Hans Oppegard, who was born at Loiten, Norway, December 
16, 1853. His ancestors were farming people and in a family of seven sons and three 
daughters he was the second in order of birth. The period of his minority was spent in 
his native land, but attracted by the opportunities of the new world, he came to America 
in 1878. After a year spent in Minneapolis he arrived in Barnes county, North Dakota, in 
1879, when the work of progress and improvement had scarcely been begun within its 
borders, much of the land being still in possession of the government. He secured a home- 
stead claim adjoining the present town site of Dazey and also took a tree claim. At that 
time his nearest neighbor was fifteen miles distant. He began the arduous task of developing 
a farm and, believing in the future of the state, in 1880 he induced a few others to locate 
In the district, while in 1883 and 1883 a large number came. Through his letters and 
reports to Norway he was instrumental in having many of his fellow countrymen come, 
including five of his brothers and two of his sisters, while one brother and one sister died in 
Norway. His brother Nels became register of deeds in Winona county, Minnesota, and 
occupied that position for a number of years, while at the present time he is serving as 
postmaster at Galesville, Wisconsin. He is a man of scholarly attainments, who before 
leaving Norway acquired a knowledge of French, German and English as well as his native 
tongue. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 93 

As opportunity has offered Hans Oppegard has added to his original land holdings until 
he today has sixteen hundred acres near Uazey and in partnership with his son an addi- 
tional four hundred and sixty acre tract. Of late years he has been leasing his land to 
renters ami now makes his home in Dazey, but for a long jieriod he was actively engaged 
in tilling the soil and his efforts constituted a most important element in the reclamation 
of a wild district tdr tlic purposes of civilization. 

Mr. Oppegard was appointed county commissioner in territorial days in the year 1885 
and afterward was elected for two terms of three years each, while in 1902 he was chosen 
by popular suffrage for the office of sheriff' of Barnes county, to which position he waa 
reelected in 1904, serving in all for four years, his record being characterized by prompt 
and fearless performance of his duties, notwithstanding the fact that he had some rough 
jobs to perform. Blind pigs were plentiful and on one occasion he had twenty-four culprits 
in jail, of whom fifteen were bootleggers and owners of blind pigs. Many tough cliaracters 
were in the county at tliat day or passed through it en route to other districts, and it 
required a man of stout heart and unllincliing courage to fill the office, in which Mr. Oppe- 
gard made a most creditable record. 

On the 17th of March, 1871, Mr. Oppegard wedded Lorenzo Nikelb}', a native of Loiten, 
Norway, whose father was a farmer and landowner there. Seven children have been born 
of this marriage: Carrie, the wife of Benjamin Elstead, of Minnesota; Elmer, a merchant 
of Dazey; Julia, the wife of Ole Michaelson, of Valley City; Ole, who is in partnership with 
his father in the implement business in Dazey, where he began business in 1903; Palmer, 
deceased; John, who is cultivating his father's home farm; and Marie, at home. Two of 
the sons, Ole and Palmer, were graduated from the State Agricultural College, while Marie 
pursued a course in the Valley City State Normal. The son Palmer, who was killed by a 
train at Fargo in 1902, had made an excellent record and was a young man of great promise 
and exemplary habits. It was his intention to become a railway engineer but death inter- 
vened, his loss being deeply regretted by a very extensive circle of friends as well as by his 
immediate family. 

ill'. Oppegard has made several visits back to his old home in Norway and maintains 
a love for his native land while displaying the utmost devotion to the country of his adoption. 
He holds membership in the organization known as the Sons of Norway and he belongs 
also to the Modern Woodmen of America. There is no phase of pioneer life in Barnes county 
with which he is not familiar, for, arriving here at an early day, he passed through all 
of the experiences and hardships incident to settlement on the frontier. He remembers 
well when deer and antelope were luimerous and w lien an occasional buffalo would be seen. One 
could ride for miles over the prairie without coming to a house or fence to impede his 
progress, and the most farsighted could scarcely have imagined that man would bring about 
such wonderful changes within a few decades. Mr. Oppegard himself has induced many to 
settle in the county and has contributed his full share to the work of public progress and 
improvement. 



AXEL EGELAND. 



Axel Egeland is president of the First National Bank of Bisbee and has been prominently 
connected with affairs of importance in the community and in the state, his efforts along 
various lines constituting a force in the development and upbuilding of North Dakota. A 
native of Norway, he was born June 9, 1875, of the marriage of Christian and Valborg 
(Nannestad) Egeland, who were also natives of the land of the midnight sun. The father 
was a Lutheran minister and engaged in preaching the gospel in Norway throughout his 
entire life. Tliere he passed away in October, 1900, having for a considerable period sur- 
vived his wife, who died in January, 1886. 

Axel Egeland was reared in Norway to the age of seventeen years, when in 1893 he 
bade adieu to friends and native land and sailed for America. He made his way to Adrian, 
Minnesota, where he remained for three years and then removed to Wilder, Minnesota, 
where he attended a business college. He afterward taught in the business college for four 



94 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

years and later beeaine a resident of \Mndoni, Minnesota, wliere lie was employed by a real 
estate iirni until I'JOl. He then embarked in the real estate business on his own aecount 
but after two years disposed of his interests in Minnesota and came to North Dakota in 
1903, settling at Bisbee, Towner county. There he organized the First National Bank, 
of which he acted as cashier until 1907, when he became vice president and in 1909 he was 
elected to the presidency. The other officers are: C. H. Olson and John Kelly, who are 
vice presidents, and C. J. Ness, cashier. The capital stock of the bank is twenty-five 
thousand dollars, while its surplus has reached five thousand dollars and its deposits three 
hundred and fifty thousand dollars. This is a strong, safe and reliable bank, the business 
poliej' being such as will bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. In 1903 they erected 
a modern bank building on Main street, so that the institution is now well housed. Mr. 
Egeland is also the president of the Fir.st National Bank at Rolette and of the First State 
Bank at Mylo, North Dakota. He is likewise joint owner of the Bisbee Gazette and in con- 
nection with others he owns and operates four thousand acres of land and is the secretary 
and treasurer of the Towner County Land & Investment Company. 

In JIareh. 1904, Mr. Egeland was married to Miss Ida St. Clair Colles and to them were 
born two daughters: Bessie V., born August 8, 1908; and Edith V., March 24, 1910. 

In politics Mr. Egeland is a republican and was elected to the office of county surveyor 
but did not qualify. The town of Egeland in Towner county was named in his honor. 
He has served as president of the village council of Bisbee for several terms and he cooper- 
ates heartily in all plans and measures to promote the upbuilding and progress of his 
community. He belongs to the Masonic order, in which he has attained high rank, as is 
indicated in the fact that he is connected with the Mj'stic Shrine. He is also a member of 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Modern 
Woodmen of America, the Yeomen and the Royal Neighbors. His religious faith is that 
of the Episcopal church. Throughout the period of his residence in North Dakota he has 
ever been deeplj' interested in the work of progi'css and improvement and his cooperation 
has been an important factor in promoting the welfare of hislcommunity in many ways. 
He was also a member of the Panama-Pacific commission from North Dakota which went to 
San Francisco and selected a site for the erection of the North Dakota building, which they 
dedicated. In a word Mr. Egeland is a forceful and resourceful man and what he has 
accomplished represents the fit utilization of his innate powers and talents. He has used 
his time and opportunities well and his life should serve to inspire and encourage others, 
showing what may be accomplished and indicating also that success and an honored name 
may be won simultaneously. , 



ENOCH A. HOFF. 



Enoch A. Hoff'. cashier of the Farmers Bank at Ypsilanti, is a representative of that 
substantial class of citizens who have left Minnesota to aid in the settlement, development 
and progress of North Dakota. He was born in Ottertail county, Minnesota, November 12, 
1881, a son of Andrew- T. and Anna (Hille) Hoff, natives of Norway. Crossing the Atlantic, 
they settled in Ottertail county about 1872 and there the father engaged in general farming. 
The mother died in the spring of 1888 and the father afterward married again, his second 
union being with Isabelle Johnson. He is now living in Grant county, Minnesota, where 
he is still actively engaged in farming. By his first marriage he had four children, of whom 
Enoch A. is the second, and by his second marriage there were born eight children. 

Enoch A. Hoff, reared in the usual manner of the farmbred boy, began his education in 
the common schools of Minnesota and afterward pursued his studies at the Park Region 
College of Fergus Falls, Minnesota. Still later he entered the State University of Minne- 
sota, where he pursued a course in law and won the Bachelor of Laws degree upon gradua- 
tion in the spring of 1905. After leaving school he went to Evansville, Minnesota, where he 
engaged in law practice for a year and a half, and later followed his profession at Ray, 
North Dakota, for one year. He then removed to Ypsilanti in 1909 and in connection with 
M. O. Ruud, of Jamestown, Amos Jacobson, of Y'psilanti, and several Minnesota people he 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 95 

organizoil the Farmers Bank, of which lie became cashier, and in that capacity has since 
miiiiaged and controlled the interests of the institution, which has had a successful existence, 
its business steadily growing as the years have gone by. Aside from his banking interests 
he owns considerable property, including farm lands in Ypsilanti township, Stutsman county, 
also land in Lamoure and Burleigh counties. North Dakota, and in Ottcrtail county, 
Alinnesota. 

On the ITtli of necember, lillS, Mr. Tlcilf was married to Miss Elsie Vogel, who was born 
at Arcadia, Wisconsin, October 2, 1888, a daughter of William and Maria (Clark) Vogel who 
are now residents of Arcadia, where they have spent the greater part of their lives. The 
father was for many years actively engaged in farming but is now living retired. Their 
daughter, Jlrs. Hoff, was the ninth in order of birth in their family of ten children and by 
her marriage slie has become the mother. of a little daughter, Marie, born February 23, 1915. 

In his political views Mr. Hoff is a republican and has held the office of treasurer in 
Vpsilanti townsliip and also has been school treasurer. He is a member of the Norwegian 
Lutheran church of Ypsilanti and his life is guided by high and honorable principles which 
find their exjiression in straightforward business methods and in recognition of his duties 
and obligations to his fellowmen at all times. 



MICHAEL BREEN. 



Michael Breen, editor of the Wolford Mirror, published at W'olford, Pierce county, was 
born at Mount Forest, Ontario, Canada, in February, 1871. His parents, Michael and Nora 
(Mahany) Breen, were natives of Ireland. It was in the year 1837 that the father bade adieu 
to friends and native land and sailed for Canada, where he engaged in the manufacture of 
potash, residing at ilount Forest, Ontario, throughout his remaining days. He was acci- 
dentally killed while engaged in a i^iece of contract work in the year 1873 and his widow, 
surviving for a third of a century, passed away in 190G. 

Michael Breen was reared and educated in Mount Forest and after his textbooks were 
put aside began learning the printer's trade, which pursuit he has followed continuously 
since. In 1905 he arrived in Wolford, North Dakota, and removed his newspaper plant to 
that place, issuing the first number of the Wolford Mirror on the 28th of September of that 
year. He has since conducted the paper and has made it an influential factor in the upbuild- 
ing of the town, which was started in 1905, Mr. Breen being one of the first settlers there. 
He is also secretary of the Farmers Elevator Company and his business interests are ever 
wisely and carefully conducted. He has one of the excellent printing plants of the state 
equipped with a linotype machine and all modern facilities for newspaper publication and 
job work. His patronage has steadily grown and by reason of its large circulation the 
paper has become an excellent advertising medium. 

In February, 1900, Mr. Breen was united in marriage to Miss Thomascene C. Hendrie. 
They are members of the Catholic church and Mr. Breen belongs to the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, the ilodern \V'oodmen of America and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. Politically he is a republican and while serving as justice of the peace performed 
the first marriage ceremony in Wolford. In a word he has been actively connected with the 
development of his town, doing much for its upbuilding and progress along many lines of 
public benefit. 



OEOROE W^ GETTS. 



George W. Getts, a dealer in pianos and other musical instruments in Grand Forks, 
is actuated by a spirit of business enterprise and progress that has made his establishment 
one of the leading musical houses in the state. He was born in La Crosse, Wisconsin, 
Sejtember 30, 1871, a son of Albert and Sarah (Gurr) Getts, The father, also a native of 
W'isconsin, was a representative of one of the pioneer families of that state, of German 



96 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

descent. The founder of the American branch of the family settled at Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. In early life Albert Getts successfully engaged in hotel-keeping at La Ciosse, 
Wisconsin, and in his later years turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. Coining to 
North Dakota, he cast in his lot with the pioneer settlers of Ramsey county in 1892 and there 
engaged in farming for a considerable period but is now living retired in Alberta, Canada. 
He is a Civil war veteran, having served as a member of an infantry regiment of Wis- 
consin volunteers, for about three years, during which period he rendered valiant aid to the 
country in her effort to preserve the Union. His wife was born in Illinois and belonged to 
one of the old families of that state, her father, William Gurr, having taken up his abode 
in Cook county at a very early day, owning land that is now included within the corpora- 
tion limits of Chicago. Both Mr. and Mrs. Getts are members of the Presbyterian church. 
His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he still maintains membership 
in the Grand Army of the Republic. To him and his wife have been born four children, 
George W., Edith, Gardo and Irwin. 

(Jeorge W. Getts began his education in the public schools of Minneapolis, to which 
city his parents removed during his early boyhood, and later he studied at Devils Lake, 
North Dakota, being there graduated from the high school with the class of 1891. His 
early life was spent upon the home farm and at the age of twenty years he started out to 
earn his livelihood, becoming connected with the music trade when he bought out the D. G. 
Wright Music Company at Devils Lake. He began business there in a comparatively small 
way, his cash capital consisting of but three hundred dollars. For twelve years he remained 
at Devils Lake and during that period developed his trade to extensive proportions, becoming 
the head of one of the leading music houses of the city. In 1903 he removed his business 
to Grand Forks, \\-here he has remained continuously since engaged in the sale of pianos, 
organs and general musical instruments and supplies, at No. 23 South Third street. The 
business has been incorporated under the name of the Getts Company and is capitalized 
for two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. Mr. Getts is the president with Mrs. Pearl A. 
Getts as the vice president and H. B. King as secretary and treasurer. 

On the 1st of June, 1901, in irinneapolis, Minnesota, Mr. Getts was married to Miss 
Pearl A. Roe, a native of Iowa, and they now have four children, George W., Madeline. Dorothj- 
and Charles Roe, all natives of Grand Forks, living with their parents at No. 885 Belmont 
street, which is one of the most attractive residence districts of the city. 

Mr. Getts exercises his right of franchise in support of the principles and candidates 
of the republican party and he is a member of the Commercial Club, being in hearty sym- 
pathy with its purposes and plans for the upbuilding of the city and the extension of its 
trade relations. Fraternally he is connected with the Masons and has taken the degiees of 
the York Rite and the Mystic Shrine. He belongs to the First Presbyterian church and 
stands for those things which are most worth while to the individual and to the community. 



FRED ROBLE. 



Fred Roble, editor of the Dcering Enterprise and postmaster of Deering, McHenry 
county, was born at Cannon Falls, Minnesota, on the 4th of October, 1883, a son of Ignatius 
and Louise S. (Warnemunde) Roble, the latter a native of Germany. The father, a native 
of Vienna, Austria, came to the United States when a youth of seventeen years, while the 
mother was brought to the United States during her childhood by her parents, who settled 
in Illinois Imt afterward removed to the vicinity of St. Peter, Minnesota, where her father 
homesteaded and engaged in farming for a number of years, at the end of which time he 
took up his abode in St. Peter. Ignatius Roble was a millwright by trade and on coming 
to the new world established his home in Minnesota, where he was employed at his trade 
for several years. Later on account of his health he turned his attention to carpentering 
and contracting. He died at Austin, Minnesota, December 3, 1893, while his widqw, sur- 
viving for twenty-one years, passed away in the same town in January, 1915. 

Fred Roble attended the public schools of Austin and as early as his eleventh year 
began learning the printer's trade in the office of his brother, Frank J. Roble, who was 




F'RED ROBLE 



n 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 99 

publishing the Austin Weekly and Daily Herald. He served as a newsboy for his brother 
and afterward entered the ollice as printer's devil. He completed his apprenticeship at the 
trade and acquainted himself with every phase of the business. In 1898 his brother Frank 
sold his interest in the Herald and removed to Devils Lake, North Dakota, where he took 
charge of the Devils Lake News in the absence of the editor, Phil Short, who had gone with 
his regiment to the Philippines. In 1839 Fied Roble went to Devils Lake and for the 
following two years was employed in the office of the News, but in February, 1901, 
returned to Austin, Minnesota. In August of the same year, however, he once more came 
to North Dakota and worked for his brother Frank on a farm which the latter had taken 
up as a homestead claim in McHenry county. Fred Roble was thus engaged in farming 
until 190C, when he once more entered the newspaper field as an employe of the two 
Granville papers, the Record and the Herald. He was thus engaged until the fall of 1907, 
when he was called to ISIohall to take charge of the Mohall News, which he managed for 
about a year. In 1908 he secured a homestead in McHenry county six miles north of 
Deering and in April, 1909, he bought the plant of the Enterprise, which he has since 
published, making it an attractive and readable journal which has a wide circulation and 
therefore proves a good advertising medium, in which connection the paper has secured 
a gratifying patronage. In F'ebruary, 1915, Mr. Roble was appointed postmaster of Deer- 
ing and is now filling that position. 

On the 21st of March, 1908, occurred the marriage of Mr. Roble and Miss Amand^i 
Wallin, of Fergus Falls, Minnesota. He belongs to Deering Lodge, No. 140, I. 0. 0. F., and 
Pratt Camp, M. W. A., and his political endorsement is given to the republican party. 
He has led an active life, endeavoring at all times to win advancement in the business 
world, and through untiring effort and industry he has reached a creditable place among 
the representative business men of his town and county. 



ARTHUR C. WEHE. 



Arthur C. Wche, engaged in the real estate and investment business at Lakota, has with 
enthusiasm undertaken this work and has become the possessor of expert knowledge con- 
cerning realty values. He is a product of the University of North Dakota and with thorough 
collegiate training he resolutely took up the duties of practical business life. He was born 
in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, August 3, 1867, a son of Charles L. Wehe, who was a native of 
Portage, New York. The grandfather, John Peter Wehe of (ierman birth, came to America 
in 1839, settling at Portage, whence in 1840 he removed to Milwaukee, there conducting a 
farm, his land covering the district that is now in the heart of the city. His son, Charles 
L. Wehe. was educated in Milwaukee, attending German and public schools, and as a young 
man he engaged in the boot and shoe business in that city. In 1868 he became a shoe 
merchant of Chicago, where he built up an extensive trade and at the time of the great 
fire of October, 1871, was proprietor of two large stores in that city. In 1882 he removed 
with his family to North Dakota, settling at Grand Forks in June of that year. In thS 
following autumn he preempted a homestead, securing four hundred and eighty acres of 
land in Illinois township, to which he devoted his attention for a number of years but at 
at length he retired from agricultural pursuits and has since been upon the road as a 
traveling salesman, representing eastern shoe manufacturers. He makes his home in Grand 
Forks. He is a Civil war veteran, having served with the Twenty-fourth Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry from 1862 until he was captured. For more than a year he was held as a prisoner 
of war and endured all manner of hardships and privations. He is now a member of Gordon 
Post, G. A. R., of Grand Forks, and in politics he has always been a republican, supporting 
the party which was the defense of the Union during the dark days of the Civil war and 
which has always been the party of reform and progress. He has never sought nor desired 
political preferment and has never consented to serve save in some township offices. In 
early manhood he wedded Paulina Dolch, a native of Saxony, Germany, who was brought 
to America by her parents when nine years of age, the family settling just outside of 



99231« 



100 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where Iier father took up land. Mrs. Weho passed away in Grand 
Forks, October 13, 1914, at the age of seventy-one years. 

Arthur C. Wche was the eldest in a family of ten cliildren and supplemented his early 
education, acquired in the schools of Chicago, by four years' study in the University of 
North Dakota. He remained upon the homo farm to the age of twenty-four year.s and he 
became familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. At the 
age of eighteen years he took charge of the home farm, his father being upon the road 
as a shoe salesman, and managed the property thereafter for six years. In 1888 Arthur 
C. Wehe took up a claim of one hundred and sixty acres, which he continued to farm until 
1890. He then pursued a Course in the School of Law at Detroit, Michigan, after which 
he turned his attention to the real estate, loan and insurance business at Lakota, in which 
line he has since been active, success attending his well directed efforts. He lias the largest 
farm insurance business in the county and the number of his clients is steadily groAving, 
business enterprise and perseverance winning for liira notable and well merited success. 

On the 14th of November, 1894, Mr. Wehe was married at Niagara, North Dakota, to 
Miss Delia E. Folger, who was born near Topeka, Kansas, a daughter of Daniel and Cynthia 
Folger and a representative of an old family of Lockport, New York, of English descent. 
Her mother is now deceased. By her marriage Mrs. Wehe has become the mother of two 
cliildren: Roy A., who was born September 28, 1895, and is now a junior in the State 
University; and Blanche L., who was born in October, 1898, and is now a senior in the high 
school at Lakota. 

Mr. Wehe is a stalwart republican and has filled various township odices, while for 
three terms he has been a member of the Lakota city council. He has always taken a most 
active part in politics and served on the executive committee under the old convention system 
and was also chairman of the republican central committee of Nelson county. He has 
connection with various fraternal organizations, including the Odd Fellows, the Knights of 
Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Owls. He belongs to the Commercial 
Club and to the Methodist church and he is interested in all those factors which feature in 
the material, intellectual, social, political and moral develojiment and progress of the 
community. 



PETER W. CLAUSEN. 



Peter W. Clausen, vice president of the Bank of York, was born in Brown county, 
Minnesota, May 37. 1884, and belongs to that class of representative young business men 
who recognize that the west holds limitless opportunities and who are playing an important 
part in the upbuilding of this state. Mr. Clausen's parents were Hans A. and Mary 
(Cliristonson) Clausen, who were natives of Denmark and in early life they came to America, 
settling in Michigan. After two years they removed to Brown county, Minnesota, where 
Mr. Clausen piuchased land and began the development of a farm, which he continuously 
and successfully owned, cultivated and improved until 1913. He then retired from active 
business life and now he and his wife reside at Sleepy Eye, Minnesota, in a comfortable 
home made possible tlirough the years of their former labor and activity. 

Peter W. Clausen was reared and educated in his native county, supplementing his 
public school course by study in a commercial college at Mankato, Minnesota, from which 
he was graduated with the class of 1907. He afterward spent about two years in the employ 
of his father, at the end of which time he removed to Minnewaukan, Benson county. North 
Dakota, and secured a position as bookkeeper in a bank, acting in that capacity for two 
years. He next went to York to accept the position of cashier of the Bank of York and 
after acting in that capacity for four years was chosen vice president. This bank was 
organized in 1906 and its present officers are: W. B. Runcorn, president: Peter W. Clausen, 
vice president; and G. W. Runcorn, cashier. The bank has a capital stock of ten thousand 
dollars and its deposits amount to one hundred and sixteen thousand dollars. Its business 
has steadily grown and the development of its interests is attributable in no small measure 
to the efforts of Mr. Clausen. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 101 

111 August, 1911, Ml-. Clausen was married to Miss Effie Onion, and to them have been 
lioiii two ehildren: Kutli IC, born October 1, 1912; and Doiifjlas William, born October 
34, 111 1 4. 

.Mr. Clausen is a member (jf tlu' I.utheran elinrcli, while his wife belonjis to the Pres- 
byterian chincli. Ill the community where they reside they enjoy the goodwill and friendly 
regard of all wlio know them and their home is justly celebrated for its warm-hearted 
hospitality. He is interested in the cause of education and is serving as school treasurer. 
Politically he is a republican and keeps in touch with the trend of modern political thought 
but iicitlier seeks nor desires office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business 
ali'airs. 



HON. WIUJA.M G. OWENS. 



Hon. William G. Owens, of Williston, who is HUing the office of states attorney of 
Williams county and who represented the forty-first district in the general assembly of North 
Dakota in 1913, was born in Blown county, Minnesota, near Sleepy Eye, on Lake Hanska', 
July 7, 1S77. His father, Owen I. Owens, w'as a native of Wales and was there reared 
to the age of seventeen years when he came to- the new world, settling near Wild Rose, 
Wisconsin, where he followed mechanical pursuits. At the time of the Civil war he enlisted 
in Company K of the Third Wisconsin Infantry, with which he served for eighteen months. 
After the war he engaged in fanning near Wild Rose and later removed to Brown county, 
Minnesota, where he homesteaded and also taught school. Upon the farm which he there 
develo|)ed and improved he reared his family of nine children and in order to provide them 
with better educational facilities he took up his abode in the town of Sleepy Eye, -ivhere 
he is now living retired. For several years he filled the office of municipal judge there and 
for many years he served in township offices and as a member of the school board, being 
ever a public-spirited citizen devoted to the general good. He holds membership in the 
Congregational church and his life has ever been upright and honorable. He married Mary 
Angcline Williams, a native of Wales, who came with her jiarents to America when seven 
years of age, the family home being established in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The education 
which she acquired in the public schools there was supplemented bj- study in Ripon College 
at Kipon, Wisconsin, from which she was gi-aduated. She passed away October 10, 1915, 
and was laid to rest at Sleepy Eye, Minnesota. In the family were nine children, five of 
whom are living. 

William G. Owens, the fifth in order of birth, attended the city schools of Sleepy Eye 
until graduated from the high school with the class of 1895. He afterward pursued a special 
course in the academic department of the State University and also a law course, being 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Laws with the class of 1900. For six months he 
was editor of the Sleepy Ej-e Herald and later engaged in the practice of law at Walnut 
Grove, Minnesota, where he remained for six years. He was then elected county attorney 
of Redwood county, Minnesota, and removed to Redwood Falls, the county seat, occupj'ing 
that position through reelection for two terms. He resigned six months before the close 
of the second term in order to remove to Williston, where he continued in the private 
practice of law from March, 1910, until 1914, when he was elected states attorney of 
Williams county and is now occupying that position. In 1913 he had been elected to repre- 
sent the forty-first district in the state legislature, in which he served for one term, and he 
has the credit of being the father of the state inheritance tax law, from which the state 
derives a large share of its income. He is likewise much interested in farming and .stock 
raising and is a firm believer in the agricultural possibilities of the state. 

On the 29th of June, 1904, Mr. Owens was united in marriage to Miss Winifred Cheshire 
at Walnut Grove, Minnesota. The lady was born upon a farm near that place and was 
graduated from the teachers' training department of the State Normal School at Mankato, 
Minnesota. Her parents are John U. and ilyra B. (Page) Clicshire, the former a native of 
Toronto, Canada, and the latter of Minnesota. Her father was one of the first settlers 
of Walnut Grove and there he and his wife still make their home. To Mr. and Mrs. Owens 
have been born two children: \\ilfred C, born in Walnut Grove in December, 190G; and 



102 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Jeancttc, born at Redwood Falls, Minnesota, August 27, 1909. Mrs. Owens is a most 
devoted wife and mother, concentrating her attention and interests upon her home and 
the rearing of her children. She has many admirable qualities which have won for her the 
friendship of all with whom she has come in contact. 

In politics Mr. Owens is a republican and his religious faith is that of the Congrega- 
tional church. In fraternal circles he is widely and prominently known, belonging to the 
Elks lodge at Williston, of which he is past exalted ruler, the Odd Fellows lodge, of which 
he is a past grand, while he has also served as a delegate to the grand lodge of both 
North Dakota and Minnesota, having become a member of the order in Walnut Grove, 
Minnesota, where he passed through all the chairs. He likewise has membership with the 
Modern Woodmen of America and the Knights of Pythias. Mrs. Owens is a member of the 
Eastern Star and like her husband is active in church work, being particularly helpful as a 
member of the Ladies' Aid Society. Both Mr. and Mrs. Owens are widely and favorably 
known, their circle of friends being almost coextensive with the circle of their acquaintances. 
Mr. Owens is a member of the executive committee of the North Dakota State Bar Associa- 
tion and was president of the Williston Commercial Club in 1912. He has risen rapidly to 
prominence in North Dakota, having been a resident of this state for only three years 
when he became a member of the general assembly, after which he was chosen to the office 
of states attorney, in which he is now so acceptably serving that his party has renominated 
him for a second term. 



CARL B. SWANSON. 



Carl B. Swanson, president of the Minot Implement Company, was born in Kristian- 
stad, Sweden, May 3, 1871, and there attended school for six years, which together with 
fifteen weeks spent at a business college in Minneapolis, Minnesota, formed the nucleus of 
hia education. At the age of thirteen, he enlisted in the Swedish navy at the Karls- 
krona Naval Station and left hia home to start to manage his own affairs, and has since 
been dependent entirely on his own resources. He remained in the navy until twenty-two 
years of age, but after having passed all the required examinations, at the age of twenty he 
decided to take a leave of absence to travel on merchant ships. At the expiration of his 
leave, he happened to be in Chicago, and deciding to remain in America, he applied for and 
received his honorable discharge from the Swedish navy. 

In this country, Mr. Swanson was first employed by Charles T. Yerkes of the North 
Chicago Street Railway Company, and was afterward with the Brunswick-Balke-Collender 
Company of Chicago in the Wickes refrigerator department, assisting in some work on 
their cold storage plant at the Chicago World's Fair during 1893. Removing to Minne- 
sota in 1894, Mr. Swanson was employed by the Ward Machine Company at Fairmont, 
Minnesota, for four years, and the following seven years he was with the Deere & Webber 
Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota, as their traveling representative through the western 
half of North Dakota. In 190,5 he resigned and became interested in the Westegaard 
Machinery Company of Valley City, North Dakota, but when a year had passed, he sold 
his interest in that business and organized the Gilbertson & Swanson Company corpora- 
tion, and started an implement business at Velva, North Dakota, where he remained until 
the fall of 1912. Still retaining his interest in that business, he removed to Minot, North 
Dakota, in December, 1912, and organized the Minot Implement Company, Inc., of which 
he has been the president from the beginning. This firm does a general retail business 
in all kinds of tools, and equipments for farmers and regular transfer business for those 
wholesale houses whose lines they represent. The Minot Implement Company erected its 
present building in 1912 and now has a total floor space of seventeeen thousand, three 
hundred feet. Their business has grown steadily and is today one of the important com- 
mercial undertakings of Minot. Being a stanch believer in the future of North Dakota, 
he has from time to time invested considerable in North Dakota farming lands, having 
one six hundred and forty acre grain and stock farm in the Red river valley, one of three 




CARL, B. SWANSON 



n 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 105 

liiiiuli'pd and sixty acres southeast of Velva, and another of a quarter section southwest of 
Velva, together with other tracts. 

In 1004 Mr. Swanson was united in marriage to Miss Ksther A. Larson, a native of 
DunnoU, Minnesota, and to them was born a son, Carl Everett, who is now attending 
school. The wife and mother passed away February 14, 1906, and on the 16th of July, 
1908, Mr. Swanson married Miss Signe M. Larson, a sister of his first wife and a daughter of 
L. M. Larson. There is one child of this second marriage, Willis Roy, at home. 

Mr. Swanson was confirmed in 18S4 in the Lutheran church in the city where he was 
born, and he and his family now belong to the First Swedish Lutheran church at Minot. 
In politics Mr. Swanson has always maintained an independent course, never aspiring to 
public office. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and in 1902 he became a Noble of 
tlie Kl Zagal Mystic Shrine at Fargo, North Dakota, and also belongs to the Elks Lodge, 
No. 1089, at Minot. 

On the 17th of March, 1901, he was in the city of Gibraltar, Spain, when the English 
Anchor Line steamer, Utopia, was wrecked, and on that occasion he received from the 
Italian government a medal for saving lives from drowning and a Diploma from the 
English Eoyal Humane Society. He has had many varied and interesting experiences, 
especially during his service in the navy and in the merchant marine, having visited the 
most important sea ports in every section on the globe, and he has learned many lessons 
which liave been enlightening, while his constantly expanding efforts have enabled him 
to reach out along broad lines with indirect effect and benefit upon the welfare of th<» 
community in which he now lives. 



JOHN SYVERSON. 



John Syverson. merchant, banker and prominent business man, whose intense and 
intelligently directed activity lias contributed much to the upbuilding of Cooperstown and 
the development of Griggs county, was born in Vaage, Norway, March 17. 1849, a son of Syver 
Bergum, who was a shoemaker b}- trade and also had a small farm in Norway. He died in 
Polk county, Minnesota, at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. Of his family of six 
children, three sons and three daughters, John was the fifth. He was a young man of twenty 
years when in 1869 he left the land of the midnight sun and sought the opportunities 
offered in the new world to the foreign born man of enterprise and ambition. Making his 
way to Mankato, Minnesota, he was employed on a railroad for two years and then went 
to St. James, Minnesota, where he devoted five years to clerking. He afterward spent five 
years as an employe in a general merchandise store at Nevada, Iowa, and returning to St. 
James, spent three years on a farm. 

In the spring of 1883 Mr. Syverson arrived in Cooperstown, North Dakota, which at 
that time was a tiny hamlet containing a few frame buildings. He entered the employ 
of Thompson & Odegard and the following year bought out the interests of the senior part- 
ner, while later he purchased the interest of Mr. Odegard and became sole proprietor of the 
business, which he lias since conducted. In 1903 he incorporated his mercantile interests 
under the style of John Syverson & Sons, giving his two sons an interest in the business. 
Their store buikling. seventy-five by one hundred and forty feet, is a brick and stone 
structure thoroughly modern and up-to-date in its equipment and appointment. It was 
built in 1894. The store fixtures are such as well display the goods and the arrangement 
of the stock is attractive, while the business methods of the house commend the firm to 
the patronage and support of the public. They have ever recognized the fact that satisfied 
patrons are the best advertisement and in all their dealings have conformed their business 
to the highest commercial standards of integrity and enterprise. 

Mr. Syverson, liowever. has not confined his attention solely to mercliandising but has 
extended his efforts over a broad field, his labors being at all times of a character that con- 
tributes to public progress and prosperity as well as to individual success. He was one of 
the organizers of the State Bank of Cooperstown, which has enjoyed a steady and healthful 
growth from the beginning and from the first he has been its president. He is also the 



106 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

owner of the two story bank building, which is so arranged as to facilitate the conduct of 
the business. Mr. Syverson was also one of the organizer.s and first stockholders of the State 
Bank at Finley, North Dakota, of which he is now vice president. He is also a stockholder 
and the president of the State Bank of Binford, North Dakota, is a stockholder and the 
vice president of the Griggs County Telephone Company and a stockholder and director of 
the Crane-Johnson Lumber Company, having yards in ten different towns and cities in 
North Dakota. Ho also owns a number of farms which are cultivated by renters. He is 
likewise the president of the board of trustees of the Northern Light Masonic Temple 
Association, Inc., which is now building a thirty-five thousand dollar brick structure which 
is to be used exclusively for Masonic purposes and includes well appointed club rooms. 

In 1877 Mr. Syverson was married to Annie T. Odegard, a native of Norway', whose 
family came to North Dakota among the early settlers of the state. They have two sons 
and a daughter. Theodore Sigwald is a worthy successor of his father in the business 
circles of Griggs county. He was born in Cooperstown, February 14, 1886, and after attend- 
ing the public schools there was graduated from the Shattuck Military Academy at Faribault, 
Minnesota, in 1904. He completed a course in mining engineering in Columbia University 
of New Vork in 1909 and upon his return home became a partner of his father in the firm 
of .John Syverson & Sons. On the 9th of October, 1909, he married Marie Joan Hermes, a 
native of Berlin, Germany, and they have one son, John. T. S. Syverson is prominent in 
Masonic circles, being a past master of the blue lodge and venerable master of the Lodge 
of Perfection, and he also belongs to the Theta XI, a fraternity of Columbia University. 
Tne second son, John A. Syverson, after leaving the high school at Cooperstown attended 
the Shattuck Military Academy at Faribault, Minnesota, and afterward became a law 
student in the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. Gertrude, a graduate of St. Mary's 
Ar'i'lemy at Faribault, Minnesota, continued her education in Smith College at Northani])ton, 
J[:isr.achusetts. 

It has been said that each individual has some hobby and if this is true one may say 
that Mr. Syverson's is the beautifying of his town, where he has had planted many of the 
tre; s which help to make Cooperstown one of the most beautiful places in the entire 
state. This is, however, but one feature of his public spirit, for when the days were 
darkest and the times hardest in North Dakota he did much toward carrying others 
Uuough and lifting the financial burden resting upon the state. Of a studious nature, he 
])osaesses a fine private library, representing the best authors of the world, with which he 
and liis wife are largely familiar. He also has a small experimental orchard, to which 
he devotes much time, and thus his hours which are free from business cares are filled 
with interests of an important and beneficial character and Mr. Syverson, although extremely 
modest and retiring, is ranked with the most prominent, representative and valued citizens 
or" Griggs county. 



FRANK B. LODGE, M. D. 



Dr. Frank B. Lodge, engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery at Steele, where 
he is also filling the position of county coroner, was born at Newton, Iowa, May .'51. 1868, 
a son of Joseph Lodge, who was a miller by trade and became the proprietor of tlie 
Stuart Roller Mills at Stuart, Iowa. 

Dr. Lodge pursued his public school education in his native city and prepared for a profes- 
sional career in the American Medical College of St. Louis, from which he was graduated in 
1897. He afterward did post graduate work in Chicago in 1898. Before entering upon 
the study of medicine, however, he spent five years as a telegrapher in the employ of the 
Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Compaiiy in Iowa. Following his post graduate course 
in Chicago he located for practice at Meservey, Iowa, where he remained until 1909, when 
he removed to Steele, North Dakota, and opened an office. He is now the only physician 
practicing in this locality but for three years was in partnership with Dr. Dewitt Baer, this 
association being discontiniied in 1912. In addition to his professional duties Dr. Lodge 
is interested in farming, owning land near Steele. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 107 

In 1897, at Meservey, Iowa, occurred the marriage of Dr. Lodge and Miss Lyda Barney, 
a native of tliat state. He has taken high rank in Masonic circles, belonging to the lodge 
at Steele, of which he is a past master, the Royal Arch chapter at Mason City, Iowa, the 
consistory at Des Moines and the Mystic Shrine at Cedar Rapids. He also has member- 
ship in the Knights of Pythias lodge at Steele and with the American Yeomen. His 
political views are in acjcord with the principles of the republican party and he has been 
superintendent of the board of health, while for six years he has filled the position of 
county coroner, in which he still continues. Broad reading keeps him in touch with the 
trend of modern thought and progress along the lines of his profession and his labors are 
attended with e.vccllent results. 



PAUL GIRARD. 



The jewelry house of Paul (Jirard & Son is one of the leading establishments of that 
character in Grand Forks and in the conduct of the business the partners display a spirit 
of unfaltering enterprise as well as comprehensive knowledge of the ti'ade. The father 
was born in Paris, France, in October, 1862, and therefore comes of a country where expert 
knowledge of the jewelry business seems almost intuitive. His parents spent their entire 
lives in France, where the father passed away in 1886, at the age of sixty-four years, while 
the mother reached the age of but thirty years, dying in 1871. They were the parents 
of five children, of whom Paul Girard is the eldest. 

In early life Paul Girard attended the schools of Paris and afterward became connected 
with the jewelry trade, which he thoroughly mastered in principle and detail. He was 
a man of thirty years when in 1893 he crossed the Atlantic, making his way to Chicago, 
and in 1900 he arrived in Grand Forks, where he was employed in the jewelry line by others 
for three years. He established a store in East Grand Forks and later removed his business 
to (Jrand Forks, where he has remained to the present time, owning today one of the 
leading establishments of that character in the city. He carries a very large and carefully 
selected line of jewelry of American and foreign manufacture and his annual sales have 
now reached a most satisfactory figure, his business methods commending him to tlie sup- 
port of the public, so that his trade is now extensive. 

In May, 1888, in Paris, France, Mr. Girard was united in marriage to Miss Emilie 
Pecher. Mr. and Mrs. Girard have one son, Maurice, who was born in Paris, France, in 
November, 1889, and wedded Miss Eva Anderson, in Bismarck, North Dakota. He was 
on the Mexican border with the United States troops in 1916. Mr. Girard adheres to no 
set political faith but maintains an independent course in his voting. Fraternally he is 
connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. A resident of the city for sixteen 
years, he is now well known and prominent and has become one of the leading merchants 
of his part of the state. 



HON. EDWARD HOVERSON. 

Hon. Edward Hoverson. member of the state senate and proprietor of a hardware 
and furniture store at Beach, was born in Norway, September 10, 1867, and in 1869 was 
brought to America by his father. Hovel Syverson, who was also of Norwegian birth and on 
crossing the Atlantic made his way to Wisconsin. After remaining in that state for about 
a year he removed to Minnesota, where he continued to reside until called to his final rest, 
devoting his time and attention to farming and stock raising. He married Thora Anderson, 
v.lio has also passed away. 

Edward Hoverson was the ninth in order of birth in a family of ten children, five of 
whom are yet living. He acquired his education in the public schools of Minnesota and 
afterward took up the profession of teaching, which he followed in that state for five 
years. He entered commercial circles as an employe of the Robertson Lumber Company 



108 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

of Grafton, with whom he remained in the position of boolckeeper for eight years. He 
then returned to Haneocl:, Minnesota, where he entered the liardvvare store of Jolin Erickson, 
by whom he was employed for six years, after which he was admitted to a partnership 
in the business, this connection being continued for a year. At the end of that time he 
sold out and again became a resident of Grafton, North Dakota, where he once more entered 
the lumberj'ard, spending a year in that connection. He first came to this state in 1891. 
In January, 1906, he removed to Beach and established a hardware, furniture and under- 
taking business, which he has since owned and conducted, building up a good trade in this 
connection. He carries a large and carefully selected line of goods and his enterprising 
methods, thorough reliabilit.y and earnest effort to please his customers have brought to him 
a liberal patronage. He erected a business block twenty-four by sixty feet which was after- 
ward enlarged to fifty by one hundred and thirty-two feet and his store also includes 
another building twenty-four by one hundred feet which is used as the undertaking parlor. 
He further extended the scope of his activities along commercial lines by establishing in 
1910 a hardware, furniture and undertaking business at Sentinel Butte, where he is still 
actively engaged. In the Beach store he employs five people and at Sentinel Butte has 
two clerks. He also took up a homestead six miles northeast of Beach and proved up on 
the property in fourteen months. 

In 1891 Mr. Hoverson was united in marriage to Miss Ragnhild Anderson, who was 
born In Minnesota, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Anders Anderson, who were natives of 
Norway and came to the United States about 1870, settling first in Wisconsin, while later 
they became residents of Minnesota, where both passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Hoverson 
have become the parents of eleven children, Alvin, Clarence, Evelyn, Thora, Carl, Edwin, 
Julius, Mary, John, Helen and Andrew. There has been no break in the family circle and 
all are yet enjoying good health. 

In politics Mr. Hoverson is a republican. He has served as a member of the city 
council and on the school board of Beach and in 1912 was elected a member of the state 
senate. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, the Yeomen and<the Woodmen of the World. 
He is also actively interested in church work, being identified with the Norwegian organiza- 
tion, while at the present time he is serving as one of the church trustees. As a member 
of the school board he was instrumental in making the Beach high school one of the five 
agricultural high schools of the state. He is interested in farm lands and keenly alive to 
the agricultural possibilities of North Dakota yet his attention is most largely concentrated 
upon his agi'icultural interests. However, he cooperates in every movement to promote the 
development and progress of the state in the utilization of its natural resources and his 
worth as a citizen is widely acknowledged. His fellow townsmen have demonstrated their 
faitli in his ability by choosing him their representative in the legislative halls of North 
Dakota and as a member of the senate he is doing excellent work along the lines of pro- 
gressive legislation. 



JOHN BISCHOF. 



One of the representative bankers of Mcintosh county, is .John Bischof, now serving 
as cashier of the Zeeland State Bank. Like many of the leading citizens of that part of 
the state he is of German lineage but was born in Russia. However, during his residence 
in the United States he has become thoroughly identified with American institutions and 
interests. He was born in the southern part of Russia, December 3, 1883, and is a son of 
John and Anna (Kraus) Bischof, who were lifelong residents of that country. The father, 
who was a farmer by occupation, died in October, 1909, and the mother passed away in 
July, 1903. 

In his native land John Bischof, Jr., grew to manhood, attending school and assisting 
in the farm work during early life. In 1905 he crossed the Atlantic and became a resident 
of Ashley, North Dakota, but after spending two months there he entered the Dakota Business 
College at Fargo, from which he was graduated in 1906. Returning to Ashley he accepted 
a position as bookkeeper in the First State Bank of Ashley, later becoming assistant cashier 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 109 

of that institution, with which he continued for one year and ten months. He then removed 
to Zeeliuul and took charge of the ZeeUind State Banlv. After serving as assistant cashier 
for ten months he became cashier and a director of the bank, which under his able man- 
agement has steadily prospered. In 1913 the company erected one of the most modern bank 
buildings in the state and it is up-to-date in all its equipments. The bank is capitalized 
for twenty thousand dollars, has a surplus of five thousand dollars and its deposits now 
amount to three hundred and fifty thousand dollars. Its officers are J. M. Hammond, presi- 
dent; John J. Giedt, vice president; and .John Bischof, cashier. It is the largest bank in 
that part of the state and at its head are men of recognized ability, upright and honorable 
in all transactions. 

In September. I'.lll. Mr. Bischof married Miss Cliristina Mindt, and to them were born 
two children but Oertrude. whose birth occurred .January 18, 1914, died April 10, 1914. The 
one now living is Albert T., born July 3, 1915. Politically Mr. Bischof is identified with 
the republican party and at present is chairman of the republican county central committee 
of Mcintosh county. His religious belief is indicated by his membership in the German 
Reformed church. For several years he served as deputy state oil inspector and has also 
been a member of the town board of Zeeland and president of the same. In addition to 
his banking interests in that place he is also serving as vice president of the First State 
Bank of Lehr and of the First State Bank of Ashley. In business affairs he has always 
been found prompt, progressive and thoroughly reliable and he well merits the success that 
has come to him since becoming a resident of North Dakota. 



THOMAS OLIVER CHANTLAND. 

Thomas Oliver Gliantland is a successful self-maile man who as cashier of the 
Scandinavian-American Bank is closely associated with the business development of Grafton 
and throughout his life has displayed the spirit of enterprise which has been the dominant 
factor in the upbuilding of this state. He is a native son of North Dakota, his birth having 
occurred at Mayville. Traill county. October 30. 1883, a son of Iver W. and Lena (Berg) 
Chantland. The father, a native of Norway, was brought to America by his parents in 
1852, when but four years of age. His father, Thomas T. Chantland, became a pioneer of 
Iowa after living for some time in Wisconsin, and throughout his life he engaged in farm- 
ing. Iver W. Chantland was reared and educated in Iowa and in 1879 came to the territory 
of Dakota, settling at Mayville, where he engaged in general merchandising, becoming one 
of the pioneers of that section of the state. In 1901 he removed to Northwood, where he 
embarked in the lumber business, continuing his residence there imtil 1910, when he went 
to Jleagher county, Jlontana. There he took up a homestead upon which he continued to 
live until his life's labors were ended in death on the 5th of May, 1913. He passed away 
at the age of si.\ty-six years. His wife, who was born near Albert Lea, Minnesota, was a 
daughter of Ole 0. Berg, a native of Norway, who died when Mrs. Chantland was quite 
young. She was then adopted by Jlr. and Mrs. Jeremiah Arneson, who removed with their 
family to Traill county, settling on Goose river, near Mayville, where they have continuously 
resided since 1874. There Mrs. Chantland was reared and educated and she is now a resi- 
dent of Larimore. By her marriage she became the mother of four children: Ellen J., the 
wife of Cliarles C. Eastgate, living in Larimore; Thomas Oliver, of this review; Gunhild J., 
the wife of H. A. Cherry, of Montana; and Peter W., a resident of Cando, North Dakota. 

At the usual age Thomas 0. Chantland became a pupil in the public schools of Mayville, 
passing through consecutive grades until he reached the high school, but ere his course was 
completed he put aside his textbooks at the age of fifteen in order to earn his own livelihood. 
He was first employed as a clerk in a general merchandise store at Mayville and followed 
that business for four years. He next secured a position in the Finley State Bank, serving 
first as bookkeeper but working his way upward to the position of assistant cashier. In 
1907 he was chosen cashier of the Citizens State Bank at Sharon and there remained until 
1913. He afterward became cashier of the Scandinavian-American Bank at Grafton and still 
acts in that capacity, which he has filled most creditably since 1914. His activity in banking 



110 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

circles has brought him a wiilc acquaintance ani.1 today as cashier he is active in the manage- 
ment and control of the Scandinavian-American Bank, which has a paid-up capital stock 
of lifty thousand dollars, check deposits of over sixty thousand dollars, time certificates of 
deposit amounting to more than one hundred thousand dollars and savings deposits of more 
than ninety thousand dollars. Its loans and discounts amount to two hundred and twenty- 
four thousand dollars. The bank's statement shows the institution to be in an excellent finan- 
cial condition. 

Mr. Chantland was married at Finley, July 6, 1910, to Miss Florence M. Taisey, a 
native of Mayville and a daughter of Elmer E. and Bessie (Wilson) Taisey. Her father was 
a pioneer of Finley and an early settler of Mayville and belonged to one of the prominent 
and inlluential families of the state, occupying a leading position in banking circles. Mr. 
and Mrs. Chantland have become parents of two children: Donald T., born in Sharon, October 
35, 1912, and Philip R., born in Fargo, July 16, 1914. 

Mr. Chantland is a Master Mason, belonging to the lodge at Grafton. He is also identified 
with the Lutheran church and he has membership in the Commercial Club. He exercises his 
right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the republican party and has made 
a creditable record as a citizen by reason of his stalwart support of the best interests of 
the comnuuiitv in which he resides. 



CLARENCE A. HALE. 



Clarence A. Hale, who has been a resident of Grand Forks since 1883 and for thirty 
years has been manager for North Dakota of the Equitable Life Insurance Company, has 
left the impress of his individuality upon the development of this state in many ways and 
at all times has been active in pushing forward the wheels of progiess. A native of 
Wisconsin, he was born at Bfadtville, Grant county, August 10, 1859, a son of John C. Hale, 
a native of New York and a descendant of an old family of that state, of English origin. 
Later representatives of the name became pioneer settlers of Wisconsin. .John C. Hale was 
born in Allegany county New York, August 16, 1830, and was a son of Aaron and Angoline 
Hale. He became a skilled mechanic and wagon manufacturer and also devoted part of his 
time to farming. In 1879 he removed from Wisconsin to Y'ankton, South Dakota, where 
he east in his lot with the early settlers who were aiding in the subjugation of the western 
wilderness for the purposes of civilization, and in 1881 he became a resident of Mason City, 
Iowa, where he resided to the time of his death, which occurred March 13, 1901, when he 
had reached the age of seventy-one years. In early manhood he wedded Cynthia M. Rowley, 
who was born at t^nadilla. New York, December 37, 1834, and was a daughter of Seth George 
Salisbm-y and Abigail (Le Sueur) Rowley. It was on the 15th of March, 1854, that John C. 
Hale and Cynthia M. Rowley were married at Bolivar, New Y'ork. They became the parents 
of seven children: Alice Gertrude, who was born April 16, 1855, and is the deceased wife 
of L. L. Tyler, of Y'ankton, South Dakota; Jennie Geraldine, the widow of S. N. Folger, of 
lola, Kansas; Fred Alfred, a farmer living at Kuna, Idaho; Clara Adele the wife of Charles 
Cosgrove, of Minneapolis; Clarence A., the twin brother of Clara; William Egbert, who is 
engaged in the newspaper advertising business in Chicago; and Nellie Belle, the wife of 
Edward J. Fleming, of Chicago. 

Clarence A. Hale w-as educated in the public schools of Bradtville. Wisconsin, and in an 
academy at Patch Grove, Wisconsin, before entering the Indiana Normal School at Valparaiso, 
from which he was graduated in 1883. For a short time he devoted his attention to book- 
keeping and then entered the insurance field, in which he has since been active. Gradually 
he has worked his way upward and for the past thirty years has been connected with the 
Equitable Life Insurance Company, of which he is now agency manager for the state of 
North Dakota. He came to Grand Forks in April. 1882, and through the intervening period 
has been connected with the insurance business, his success being attributable to his close 
application and untiring effort. He is familiar with every phase of pioneer development 
and later progress in North Dakota. In the spring of 1S79 he rode from Yankton to his 
native city in Wisconsin on an Indian pony and took with him seven other ponies which he 



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^^^^^^^M 



CLARENCE A. HALE 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 113 

sold on his arrival. The trip consumed several weeks and for many miles he rode over the 
bleak prairies of Dakota and western Iowa, enduring many discomforts but meeting with 
no unusual experiences. Reared upon his father's farm, he had there remained to the age 
of seventeen years, when he started out to earn his own livelihood, and from that time 
forward has depended entirely upon his own efforts. 

On the 13th of January, 1886, at Maine Prairie, Minnesota, Mr. Hale was united in 
marriage to Miss Ada Jane Spaulding, a native of that state and a representative of one of 
its pioneer families. She was born at Maine Prairie, April 16, 1866, a daughter of Willard 
and Ellen (McCoUum) Spaulding, the latter of Scotch descent and the former of English 
lineage. Mr. and Mrs. Hale have become the parents of five children: Chester Erwin, John, 
Lucille Gertrude. Alice and Clara Luvenia. 

The family reside at No. 413 South Sixth street. Mr. Hale erected this residence prior 
to his marriage and to it brought ilrs. Hale as a bride. He and his wdfe are members of 
the First Presbyterian church of Grand Forks. His political allegiance is given to the 
republican party and he has always been active in its support. He became city auditor of 
Grand Forks in 1894, serving for two terms under Mayor L. B. Richardson, and in 1897 he 
was elected to represent his district in the state legislature, where he became the father 
of the present game law. He has always been interested in the welfare of city and state 
and his cooperation has been a resultant element in promoting public progress. He was one 
of the organizers of the Territorial Fair Association, formed in 1888, and was its secretary. 
He became one of the founders of the Pioneer Club of Grand Forks, which was organized 
in 1883 but has long since been discontinued. In 1882 he was one of the organizers and 
members of the Grand Forks Volunteer Fire Department and in 1887 was president of the 
North Dakota State Society of Volunteer Firemen. His recreation has come to him largely 
through his membership in the Grand Forks Gun Club and he was one of the organizers of 
the North Dakota Sportsmen's Association. He likewise belongs to the Commercial Club of 
Grand Forks. 

Fraternally Mr. Hale is identified with the Elks but outside of business is perhaps 
more active in Masonic circles than in any other connection. He has taken all of the degrees 
in Masonry, including the honorary thirtj'-third degree, and has been made a member of 
various shrines outside of the state. When endorsing him for office in the Imperial Council 
of the Mystic Shrine his fellow members of Kem Temple of Grand Forks spoke of him as 
one whose "ability and sterling qualities, coupled with his long and valuable service in all 
branches of Masonry entitle him to wider fields of activity," and one who "by nature, educa- 
tion and experience is eminently qualified to occupy any position on the Imperial Divan." 
He is a past master, past high priest and past eminent commander of the local bodies at 
Grand Forks, is a past grand high priest of the Royal Arch Masons, a past grand commander 
of the Knights Templar and master of Kadosh in Jared Consistory. No. 2, A. & A. S. R. It 
was largely due to his efforts that Kem Temple. A. A. O. N. M. S., was organized June 9, 1909 
— an organization now having a membership of more than a thousand. He was its first poten- 
tate and since that time has been continuously its representative in the Imperial Council. 
He is also the secretary of the Masonic Building Corporation, which erected the Masonic 
Temple in Grand Forks, one of the finest in the northwest. His devotion to Masonry is 
one of the unquestioned facts in his career and the ability which he displays in other con- 
nections also indicates his power to capably serve his fellow members of the craft. His 
life has been one of far-reaching effect and influence in many connections and his efforts 
have ever been put forth on the side of progress and improvement, resulting in notable 
benefit for city and state. 



E. C. RUDE. 



E. C. Rude, a general merchant of York and one of the foremost business men of Benson 
county, was born in Norway on the 27th of October, 1873, a son of Christopher and Christie 
Rude, both of whom spent their entire lives in the land of the midnight sun. 

E. C. Rude was reared and educated in his native coimtry, completing his studies with 



Vol. Ill— 6 



114 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

a high school course. The favorable reports which reached him concerning the opportunities 
of the new world led him to cross the Atlantic in 1893, when he was twenty years of 
age. He made his way at once to Churchs Ferry, North Dakota, and in that vicinity was 
employed at farm labor for several years. In 1899 he removed to York and there received 
his initial training along mercantile lines as a clerk in the general store of Solberg & 
Studness, who carried on business in the same store building in which Mr. Rude is now 
located. On the 1st of January, 1915, in connection with Mr. Studness, he purchased the 
interest of J\Ir. Solberg and the business was reorganized under the name of the E. C. 
Rude Company, with Mr. Rude, C. T. Studness and J. 0. Gullickson as the members of 
the iirm. Mr. Rude was made general manager of the business and along well defined lines 
ot activity and enterprise is meeting with substantial success in the control of one of the 
leading mercantile interests of York. 

In 1905 Mr. Rude was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Gullickson, by whom he has 
four children, namely: lona C, Clarence K., Alice J. and Lillian M. Politically Mr. Rude 
is a republican, giving stalwart support to the principles of the party. Fraternally he is 
connected with York Lodge, No. 68, I. 0. 0. F., and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. 
He and iiis wife are members of the Lutheran church and high esteem is entertained for 
them by all who know them by reason of their well spent lives and many excellent traits 
of heart and mind. 



0. A. RUUD. 



Among the leading citizens of Stutsman county is 0. A. Ruud. tlie proprietor of the 
Pingiee Patriot, a well edited and well managed weekly publication. A native of Minnesota, 
his birth occurred on the 28th of Marcli, 1883, and his parents are 0. M. and Olive (Peterson) 
Ruud, both of whom are still living in the Gopher state. The father is a hotel pro])rietor 
and is meeting with gratifying success in business. 

0. A. Ruud attended the public schools of his native state and the Valder Normal and 
Business College at Decorah, Iowa, from which he was graduated in 1899. In 1907 he came 
to North Dakota and for two years thereafter was manager of a lumberyard at Ypsilanti. 
Later he bought grain for the Andrews Grain Company at Eckelson for one season and 
then removed to Pingree, where he had charge of a lumberyard for two years. Having 
decided to go into business on his own account, he purchased the Pingi-ee Patriot in 1912 
and has since published the paper, which has about five hundred subscribers. Both its cir- 
culation and its advertising patronage have shown a steady growth and it has gained an 
enviable reputation for progressiveness, for reliability and for enterprise. 

Mr. Ruud is an advocate of republican principles and loyally supports the candidates 
of that party at the polls. He is a Lutheran in religious faith, and fraternally is connected 
with tlie Elks at .lamestown. He has served as clerk of the township board and as treasurer 
of the school district and can be depended upon at all times to further the public welfare 
both as a private citizen and as an editor. He finds great pleasure in hunting and other 
outdoor sports and through such recreation keeps in fine physical trim. He has great 
faith in the future of North Dakota and has identified his interests with those of the state, 
supporting all movements calculated to advance the welfare of the commonwealth. 



FRANK E. FEE. 



Tlie commercial interests of Towner county have a worthy representative in Frank E. 
Fee, who is not only engaged in general merchandising at Olmstead but is also proprietor 
of the F. E. Fee elevator at that place. He is a native of Wisconsin, born in Adams county. 
March 22, 1865, and is a son of William F. and Johanna (Le Marchant) Fee. The father 
was born in Syracuse, New York, but the birth of the mother occurred in Maryland. By 
trade William F. Fee was a carpenter and millwright but during the Civil war ho laid aside 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 115 

all personal interests and went to the front as a member of a Wisconsin regiment. He 
was wounded in the buttle of Baton Rouge and wlien hostilities ceased and his services were 
no longer needed he returned to his home in Wisconsin, where he again worked at his trade 
for two or tliree years. At the end of that time lie removed to Iowa, where he followed 
farming for some years, but is now living retired at Nora Springs, that state. 

Frank E. Fee was a very small child wlien he accompanied his parents on their removal 
to Iowa and in that state he received a good common school education. At the age of nine- 
teen years lie left home and began his business career husking corn at one dollar per day. 
During the following season he was witli a threshing outfit and earned three dollars per 
day. In 1887 he apprenticed himself to the jeweler's trade in Hartley, Iowa, becoming asso- 
ciated with W. H. Barker, and ho subsequently attended the jewelers school of Thomas Jusek 
at Klgin, Illinois, for one year. Sliortly afterward he purchased Mr. Barker's interest in 
the business at Hartley and continued to conduct a jewelry store at that place for nineteen 
years. 

It was in lODfi that Mr. Fee removed to Towner county. North Dakota, and erected 
the first building in Olmstead, this being an elevator, and in tlie fall of the same year he 
also built a store. Since that time he has been engaged in general merchandising and in the 
grain trade, his patronage being quite extensive. In 1907 he was appointed postmaster of 
Olmstead and has served continuously in that capacity. Besides his property in the village 
he owns four hundred acres of land in Towner county and a quarter section in Manitoba, 
Canada. 

In 1891 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Fee and Miss Katie S. Guenthcr, of O'Brien 
county, Iowa, and they have a son, Ennis F., born February 18, 1896. He was educated 
in tlie Egeland high school and at the Nora Springs (Iowa) Seminary. 

In politics Jlr. Fee is a republican, and in his social relations is identified witli Beacon 
Lodge, No. 495, A. F. & A. M., of Hartley, Iowa; and Samara Chapter, No. 105, R. A. M., of 
Primgliar, Iowa. He is one of the foremost business men of Towner county being wide- 
awake, enterprising and progressive, and he usually carries forward to successful completion 
whatever he undertakes. 



RICHARD H. .JOHNSON. 



Richard H. .Johnson, vice president of the First National Bank and accounted one of 
the valued, representative and honored citizens of Dickinson, was born at Eastford, Con- 
necticut, in 1855. His father, Samuel A. .Johnson, a native of Massachusetts, became a 
resident of Minnesota in 1856 and cast in his lot with the pioneer settlers of the St. Charles 
district, where he began farming. Subsequently he turned his attention to the hardware 
business, in which he was actively engaged to the time of his death, which occurred in 1910. 
His wife, who bore the maiden name of Mary Cemantha Carpenter and is a native of 
Connecticut, is now living in St. Charles, Minnesota, at tlic> advanced age of eighty-seven 
years. 

Richard H. .Johnson was the second in order of birth in their family of six children, five 
of whom are yet living, one having died in childhtjod. He pursued his education in the 
public schools of Minnesota, and subsequently was graduated from the State University of 
Minnesota in the class of 1882, with the degree of B. S. Still later he entered the University 
of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he completed a course in 1884. winning the LL. B. degree. 
. In the spring of that year he removed to Bismarck. He had first come to North Dakota in 
1878, at which time he settled on land near Jamestown, and through the capable manage- 
ment of his business affairs he earned the money that enabled him to make his wav through 
college. He worked on the farm through the summer months and continued his education 
through the winter seasons. When he had prepared for the bar he opened an office at 
Bismarck, where he remained in active practice until 1889. In that year he arrived in 
Dickinson, where he now makes his home, and accepted the cashiership of the Stark County 
Bank, which had been established in 1886. In 1890 he became associated with A. Hilliard 
in organizing the First National Bank of Dickinson, which was capitalized at fifty thousand 



116 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

dollars. This was the second bank in the state west of the Missouri river. In 1905 the 
capital stock was increased to one hundred thousand dollars with a surplus of fifty thousand 
dollars. From the organization until 1914 Mr. Johnson continued to occupy the position of 
cashier and was then elected vice president. The success of this institution is attributable 
in substantial measure to his enterprising efforts. Thoroughly conversant with every depart- 
ment of banking, he has always recognized the fact that the bank is most worthy of sup- 
port that most carefully safeguards the interests of its depositors. In tlie conduct of the 
bank conservatism and progressivcness are evenly balanced factors and that the institution 
receives as well as merits public confidence and support is indicated in the continuous growth 
of its business, necessitating an increase in its capital stock. Mr. Johnson is also interested 
in farm lands and at an early period was extensively engaged in raising sheep and cattle 
when the free range was a feature of North Dakota. 

In 1889 was celebrated the marriage of Richard H. Johnson and Miss Mary M. Poole, 
a native of Wisconsin and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Poole, who removed from 
Minnesota to Wisconsin and later to North Dakota, where their remaining days were spent, 
both passing away in Dickinson. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have become the parents of five 
children: Hartwell P., who is employed in the First National Bank of Dickinson; LMary M., 
at home; liichard Watt, a mining engineer, who is a graduate of tlie State University at 
Grand Forks, while from the Idaho University he received his Master's degree; Beth C, who 
is attending the university at Grand Forks; and Ward K., a student at the Dickinson high 
school. 

In politics Mr. Johnson is an earnest republican and for two terms he was mayor of 
Dickinson, giving to the city a businesslike and progressive administration characterized by 
reform and progress. He has also been a member of the school board and of the library 
board and he was a delegate to the republican national convention which nominated Taft. 
Fraternally he is connected with the Elks lodge of Dickinson and he is a Mason of high 
standing, belonging to the lodge, chapter and commandery in Dickinson and to El Zagal 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Fargo. He has passed through all the chairs in the York 
Rite bodies in Dickinson and has also been an officer in the Elks lodge. Such in brief is 
the life history of Mr. Johnson, who may wfiU be called a self-educated and self-made man, 
his record being such as an American citizen holds in the highest honor. His ability and 
the strength of his character have placed him in the creditable place which he now occupies 
in business circles and in public regard. , 



JOHN E. BRYANS. 



John E. Bryans, of Mohall, a well known representative of the Renville county bar, 
was born in London, England, in August, 1882, a son of Edward and Esther (Earl) Bryans, 
the former a native of Ireland and the latter of England. In 1880 the father came to the 
new world, but returned to England in 1881. In the spring of 1882 he again crossed the 
Atlantic and for five years remained in Canada, where he worked on a railroad. In 1885 
he arrived in Ward county, North Dakota, and squatted on some land in that section of 
the county that is now Renville county. In order to provide for his immediate necessities 
he accepted a position on a ranch and took cattle for his wages. Ten years later the land 
was surveyed and he filed on his claim and in time secured title to the property, compris- 
ing one hundred and sixty acres. That constituted but the nucleus of his present extensive 
possessions, for he has added to his holdings by further purchase from time to time until 
he is now the owner of six thousand acres. In the fall of 1915 he incorporated his exten- 
sive business interests under the style of the Edward Bryans, Sr., & Sons Mouse River 
Horse & Cattle Company and gave to each of his twelve children a share. The place is 
now stocked with six hundred head of cattle and he raises one hundred and fifty calves 
annually. He has also been largely engaged in sheep raising and in 1907 sold ten thousand 
head. His ranch is today the largest in the state and the life record of Mr. Bryans stands 
as a splendid example of what can be accomplished through enterprise, diligence and judicious 
investment and, moreover, indicates that success and an honored name may be won simul- 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 117 

tancously. lie lias now reached tlie age of fifty-nine years and svicli is liis prosperity tliat 
he is able to spend the winter seasons in California, while in tlie suninier months he returns 
to supervise his extensive interests in Kenville county. 

John E. Bryans, whose name introduces this review, was. reared and educated in North 
Dakota and Minnesota. Liberal school privileges were accorded him, his studies being com- 
pleted with a law course in the State University of North Dakota, from which he was 
graduated Avith the class of 190S. He then began practice in Grano and Lansford, North 
Dakota, remaining in active professional connection with those towns for two years. In 
I'jll he removed to Mohall, the county seat of Kenville county, where he has since followed 
his profession, and his developing powers in law practice have gained for him an extensive 
and distinctively representative clientage. In 1916 he was nominated for the position of 
states attorney on the republican ticket. In 1911 he entered into partnership with R. H. 
Grace and the firm has since occupied a commanding position at the bar but has recently 
been dissolved owing to the fact that the senior partner has been nominated for the supreme 
bench. Mr. Bryans possesses one of the largest law libraries in the northwestern part of 
the state and is a constant student of the principles of jurisprudence, his comprehensive 
knowledge of the law enabling him to ably meet the attack of the opposing council. For 
eight months he filled the office of assistant states attorney. Aside from his active connec- 
tion with the bar he is a stockholder in the Mohall State Bank. 

In March, 1909, Mr. Bryans was united in marriage to Miss Mercy Hayes and they 
have become the parents of four children, Merrett, George, John E. and Emery, ilr. and 
Mrs. Bryans are consistent members of the aiethodist church and he belongs to the Modern 
Woodmen of America and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He served several years 
as a member of the school board and is now mayor, his terra expiring March 31, 1917. 
Under liis able administration the city is installing a sewer system and waterworks and 
making many other improvements, such as grading streets, extending sidewalks and doing 
drainage work. He is a representative of one of the most prominent and honored families 
of the northwest and individual merit and ability have gained him a high position in the 
public regard. 



JOSEPH MAHOWALD. 



Joseph Mahowald, harness manufacturer of Grand Forks and owner of one of the 
important productive industries of the city, was born in New Market, Minnesota, November 
26, 1874, a son of .John and Catherine (Sauber) Mahowald, who were natives of Luxemburg, 
German}'. The father arrived in Minnesota in 1853 an<l he settled on a farm in Scott county, 
but at the time the tract came into his possession it was covered with forest trees. He 
and his children cleared the land and later cultivated it, transforming it into a splendidly 
improved farm. Thereon the father spent his remaining days, his death occurring in 1901, 
when he was seventy-four years of age. It was about 1862 that Mrs. Mahowald crossed the 
Atlantic to the new world and she, too, became a resident of Minnesota, where she met 
Mr. Mahowald, becoming his wife at New Trier, that state. Their wedding journey was 
made with an ox team. Mrs. Mahowald survived her husband for about four years, passing 
away in 1905 at the age of si.xty-four. In their family were ten children, six sons and 
four daughters. 

Joseph Mahowald. the seventh in order of birth, attended the schools of Scott county, 
Minnesota, through eight winter seasons and remained with his father upon the home farm 
until he reached the age of twenty-three years, early becoming familiar with the best 
methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. He next went to work for his brother 
in the harness making business at Bird Island, Minnesota, and there learned the trade. In 
1901 he established a harness manufactory at Hector, Minnesota, where he remained in 
business until the 1st of September, 1906, when he sought a broader field of labor in the 
larger city of Grand Forks. There he bought out T. .J. McMullen and has now been engaged 
in the harness manufacturing business at Grand Forks through all the intervening period. 
His predecessor had conducted the shop for twenty-six years and since assuming control 



118 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Mr. Mahowald lias developed the business along substantial lines resulting in the large 
increase of tlie trade. He remained in the McMullen building until 3 914, when he erected 
his present business block, a fireproof structure seventy-six by ninety-two and one-half feet. 
It has a full basement and one story above the street and contains three stores, one of 
which is utilized by Mr. Mahowald, while one is in use as a clothing store and the third as 
a restaurant. During the first year of his connection with the harness trade in Grand 
Forks his business amounted to twelve thousand dollars and in 1915 his sales reached 
thirty-three thousand dollars. He believes in extensive and judicious advertising and issues 
catalogues and seasonable price lists which are mailed to farmers. In fact his business is 
conducted along the most progressive lines and he is now carrying on a wholesale and 
retail harness manufacturing business, having the largest and most complete saddlery house 
in the state of North Dakota. He carries everything in the line of horse furnishing goods 
and emidoys only skilled mechanics in the manufacturing department. In addition to selling 
harness and saddlery he carries a complete stock of trunks and traveling bags and has built 
up a legitimate business along the lines of honest and honorable dealing. 

On the 18th of .June, 1901, at Bird Island, Minnesota, Mr. Mahowald was married to 
Miss Katherine Leach, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nick Leach, who were pioneers of that ■ 
place, where they still reside. Mr. and Mrs. Mahowald have become parents of seven 
children: Agnes M., who was born at Hector, Minnesota, January 3.9, 1903; Florence M.-, 
born in Hector, August 30, 1905; Alfred M., born at Bii'd Island, October 10, 1906; Ralph E. M., 
born at Grand Forks, March 1, 1911; Katherine M., born in Grand Forks in 1913; Magdalene 
M., born in 1915; and Bernardine M. born in 1916. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Roman Catholic church and' Mr. Mahowald 
belongs to the Knights of Columbus and the Catholic Order of Foresters. He is also con- 
nected with the Yeomen, while in politics he maintains an independent course. He has never 
sought ollice, preferring to concentrate his efi'orts upon his business, and the thoroughness 
with which he mastered his trade and has conducted his interests has made him one of the 
substantial, progi-essive and successful merchants of Grand Forks. 



J. BYRON VAIL. 



.J. Byron Vail, the well known and popular countv treasurer of McHenry county, 
residing in Towner, was born in Ontario, Canada, June 17, 1855, and is a son of George W. 
and Hannah (Gunn) Vail, also natives of Canada. Coming to the United States the father 
located in Michigan, where he spent the remainder of his life, dying there in September, 
1904. He was engaged in business as a general merchant throughout the greater part of 
his career. His wife survived him about a year and died in August, 1905. 

It was during the boyhood of J. Byron Vail that the family removed to Michigan, 
in which state he was practically reared. There he attended school but completed his educa- 
tion in Ontario, Canada, and Poughkeepsie, New York, taking a business course at the 
latter place. F'or sixteen years he conducted a general store in Port Huron, Michigan, 
prior to coming to North Dakota in 1899. He located in Balfour, McHenry county, where 
he engaged in the implement business until 1908 and for the following four years dealt in 
real estate. In 1913 he removed to Towner, the county seat, and assumed charge of the 
county treasurer's office. A year later he was elected county treasurer and has since filled 
that position in a most creditable and satisfactory manner. He owns four hundred and 
eighty acres of land in the state, which he rents. 

Mr. Vail was married in August, 1884, to Miss Mahetta Holden, a daughter of Moses 
and Betsey (Eastman) Holden, who were natives of Canada and pioneers of Michigan. 
They returned to Canada, however, and both died there, tlic mother in 1887 and the father 
in 1901. 

Mr. Vail is a Methodist but as there is no church of that di'iumiination in Towner 
he attends the Presbyterian church, in which he is an elder, and lie is likewise director of 
music in the Sunday school and the teacher of the Bible class. He takes a great deal of 
interest in everything relating to the community welfare and is president of the Towner 




J. BYRON VAIL 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 121 

Chamber of Commerce and secretary and treasurer of the Library Association. In poli- 
tics he is an ardent supporter of the republican party. He has been called upon to serve 
in several local offices, including that of school director, justice of the peace and treasurer 
of the villa'ge of Balfour. Being a public-spirited citizen he has discharged his official 
duties in a capable manner, never shirking any obligation that has devolved upon him. 



WILLIAJI A. APPLEDOORN. 

William A. Appk-doorn, who is cngagi'd in conducting a blacksmith shop and is also 
proprietor of a hardware and implement business at Zenith, Stark county, was born in 
Bemmel, Holland, May 20, 1888. His father was a farmer in Holland but is now deceased. 
The mother is still living and is conducting a general store at Bemmel. In their family 
were five children, William A., Benjamin, Annie, Carrie and Dreke. 

It was in Holland that William A. Appledoorn was reared and educated, supplementing 
his early education by college training. He learned the blacksmith's ti-ade in his native 
country, spending two years in learning how to make horseshoes and shoe horses, such 
being the thoroughness of his preparation. He had to pay his own expenses while thus 
engaged. He followed his trade in Holland until he came to the United States, sailing from 
Rotterdam on the 4th of March, 1910, and landing at New York. Making his way westward 
to North Dakota, he settled first at Belfield but a week later removed to Zenith, where he 
conducted a blacksmith shop for the Holland-Dakota Land Company for ten months. At 
the end of that time he purchased the business and conducted the shop for four years. In 
1915 he erected a store building and added to his smithy a stock of farm machinery and 
hardware. He is an enterprising merchant, alert and watchful of every opportunity pointing 
to success. He has a good line of hardware and handles much machinery, including engines, 
threshing machines, etc. A motor furnishes the power for his blacksmith shop and he lias 
all the work that he can do. In order to further qvuilify for the conduct of his business he 
attended a commercial college in Fargo in the winter of 1915-16. He is very thorough in 
everything that he undertakes and his energy and ability are pronounced. 



JOHN H. SHAW. 



John H. Shaw, vice president of the First National Bank of Williston, is a native of 
Franklin, Venango county, Pennsylvania. He was born September 1, 1874, of the marriage 
of W. H. and Sarah (JtcKenzie) Shaw. The father was a farmer of Franklin, Fennsylvania, 
through much of his life. However, he spent the year 1861 in Illinois and Iowa but following 
the discovery of oil he made the rush to the oil fields and soon afterward returned to 
Franklin, where both he and his wife passed away. 

■lohn H. Shaw acquired his education in the Cooperstown high school and Grove City 
College at Grove City, Pennsylvania, and afterward engaged in farming for his father until 
he reached the age of nineteen years. Seeking the opportunities ofl'ered in the west, he 
made his way to Cave Hills. South Dakota, in 1893 and engaged in ranching with his brother, 
W. A. Shaw, remaining there for seven years. He later started a ranch on the Little 
Missouri river in McKenzie county North Dakota. His landed possessions were extensive 
and he carried on his business affairs on a large scale. He now has a big ranch on the Fort 
Berthold Indian reservation and is one of the leading cattle men of North Dakota, having 
important business interests in that connection. When the First National Bank of Williston 
was consolidated with the Citizens National Bank on the 9th of May, 1913, under the former 
name, he became one of the directors of the new organization and in 1915 Avas chosen vice 
president of the First National, which position he is now filling. He also still manages his 
ranch, which he has placed in charge of a foreman. He is now deeply interested in both 
banking and stock raising and his well directed labors are bringing to him success. In 
addition to his connection with the First National Bank he is president of the Alexandria 



122 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

State Bank of Alexandria, president of the Citizens State Bank of Stanley, North Dakota, 
and a stockholder in still other banks. 

On the 10th of October, 1906, at Cochranton, Pennsylvania, Mr. Shaw wedded Miss Artie 
Cargo, who was born in Pennsylvania and there lived to the time of her marriage. She ia 
a daughter of Hugh and Mary Cargo, natives of the. Keystone state, the former now 
deceased, while the latter is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Shaw have two children, Martha W. 
and Eleanor, both born in Williston, the former October 1, 1907, and the latter September 
28, 1913. 

In politics Mr. Shaw is a republican and when McKenzie county was organized he was 
appointed by Governor Sarles to the position of county commissioner, which office he filled 
for two terms. He belongs to the Congi-egational church, is a member of the Masonic lodge- 
of Williston, in which he has been junior deacon, the Scottish rite bodies of Grand Forks 
and Kem Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of Grand Forks. Mr. Shaw is one of the old-time 
ranchmen of the state, having become identified with cattle interests at a day when there 
was a wide, open range and the cowboy was a picturesque figure as he rode over the plains. 
Mr. Shaw has long controlled extensive interests in cattle and is still the owner of a valuable 
ranch property situated on the Little Missouri river. Extending his efforts, he has become 
one of the leading bankers in his part of the state, a strong force in financial circles, while 
the record that he has made is an indication of the fact that success and an honored name 
may be won simultaneously. 



GEORGE L. RYERSON. 



George L. Ryerson, an attorney of Mohall, was born in Waushara county, Wisconsin,- 
January 8, 1869, his parents being Gustav and Gumborg (Anderson) Ryerson. The mother 
was born in Xorway and with her parents removed to Wisconsin when three years of age. 
The father was also born in Xorway and with his parents came to America about the year 
1850 at the age of fourteen, and for a few years was a resident of Chicago but afterward 
removed to Wisconsin, where he was employed in lumber camps and in rafting lumber 
down the Wisconsin and Mississippi rivers to St, Louis, He also engaged in manufacturing 
shingles at a time when they were made by hand. He also turned his attention to farming 
and homesteaded land in Waushara county, Wisconsin, the patent thereto being issued to 
him February 19, 1857. W'ith characteristic energy he began to develop and improve this 
raw tract, which he transformed into productive fields and which he continued to cultivate 
for many years, but he is now living retired in Wautoma, Wisconsin, at the advanced age 
of seventy-nine. His wife passed away in 1879. She was of the third generation of the- 
family residing in Wisconsin. 

George L. Ryerson was reared and educated in W'isconsin, remaining under the parental 
roof until he reached the age of seventeen years, when he started out in the world to win 
a fortune. He went first to Stevens Point, Wisconsin, where he learned the printer's trade, 
being employed on the Stevens Point Journal for three and a half years. In 1890 he removed 
to Grand Forks, North Dakota, and for a year was employed on the Herald and Plaindealer, 
but, ambitious to engage in business on his own account, he then established the Reynolds- 
Enterprise at Reynolds. North Dakota, publishing the first issue of that paper on October 2, 
1891," For twelve years he remained editor and proprietor of that journal and during that 
period he was elected clerk of the district court of Grand Forks county in 1898. He became- 
a prominent figure in political circles early in life and was secretary of the republican 
central committee of Grand Forks county during the McKinley-Bryan campaign of 1896. 
He continued to serve for four years in the position of clerk of the district court and was 
renominated for a third term in 1902 but withdrew before the election. During the period' 
in which he held the office of clerk he had devoted his leisure time during the day and 
his evenings at home to the study of law and was admitted to the bar in 1901. After 
retiring from office he entered into the active practice of law at Reynolds. In 1904 he 
removed to Mohall, where in partnership with W. A. Guilfoyle he opened a law office and' 
continued in the practice of law as a member of that firm until 1906, when he formed a. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 123 

paitiiersliip with Robert H. Bosard, niaintaiiiing offices at both Mohall and Minot. This 
relation between them continued until the fall of 1908, when Mr. Ryerson sold out and 
established his home in Minot, where he entered into partnership with Dudley L. Nash, who 
was that year elected states attorney of Ward county (then comprising what is now the 
counties of Ward, Mountrail, Burke and Renville), the firm name being Ryerson & Nash. 
Mr. Ryerson acted as assistant states attorney and the partnership was maintained until 
1911. In the meantime Jlr. Ryerson had established a bank at Medicine Lake, Montana, 
and in 1910 went there to take charge of the bank, acting as cashier of that institution, 
which was known as Security State Bank of Medicine Lake, until 1915. He is still one 
of its stockholders and directors. Extending the scope of his activities in banking circles, 
in 1911 he and others organized the First State Bank of Froid, Montana, of which he has 
since been the vice president, and in the fall of 1913, Mr. Ryerson and associates established 
the Security State Bank of Flaxville, Montana, which in February, 1915, was consolidated 
with the State Bank of Flaxville, and in that institution he Is still a stockholder. In 1915 
he returned to Mohall, where he opened a law office and resumed active practice, in which 
he has since continued. The same year he was appointed assistant states attorney and still 
occupies that position. Upon coming to Mohall he also bought stock in the First National 
Bank of Jlohall and is now chairman of its board of directors. His business interests and 
activities are thus extensive and important and in addition he has farming interests in the 
vicinit}' of Mohall. 

On the 8th of August. 1S92, Mr. Ryerson was married to Miss Tina Brathovde and to 
them were born two children: Glenn Jay, who died in January, 1905; and Reuben Alvin. 
The wife and mother passed away in September, 1896, and on the 30th of December, 1897, 
Mr. Ryerson wedded -Julia Sergeant, a native of Zumbrota, Minnesota, by whom he has three 
children, Thomas Lincoln, Edith Glenna and George Sergeant. 

Mr. Ryerson was brought up a Liithcran and his wife in the Congregational church. 
In politics Mr. Ryerson has always been a republican. In 1901 he was honored with election 
to the position of secretary-treasurer of the North Dakota Press Association, and again 
elected to the same office in 1902, the latter election taking place on board Captain Heerman's 
steamer "Minnie H." during an excursion of the association across Devils Lake to Fort 
Totten. He belongs to the Masons, the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Modern 
Woodmen, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Independent Order of Foresters. 
His good qualities are many and all who know him speak of him in terms of high regard; his 
business ability is pronounced and has carried him into important relations; his professional 
powers, too, have gained him place with the leading lawyers of the western part of the 
state, and in matters of citizenship no one questions his capability, fidelity, or loyalty. 



N. H. STORY. 



N. H. Story, cashier of the First National Bank of Leeds, is a native of Iowa, his birth 
having occurred in Worth county in October, 1881. His father, Severn Story, was born in 
Norway and in the year 1868 crossed the Atlantic to the new world, making his way to 
Minnesota, where he afterward met and married Gunhild Narveson, who was born in that 
state. In 1871 they removed to Worth county, Iowa, where Mr. Story purchased land and 
engaged in farming throughout his remaining days, becoming one of the substantial citizens 
of his community. He died in .June. 1890. while his widow still survives. 

N. H. Story spent his early youth in Worth county, Iowa. He attended school in Albert 
Lea. Minnesota, and Worth county. Iowa, and completed his education in the Luther College 
at Decorah Iowa. His identification with the banking interests of North Dakota dates from 
1904, at which time he accepted the position of assistant cashier in the bank at Maddock, 
where he remained for four years. He was also engaged in banking in South Dakota for 
four years, after which he returned to Maddock and was again assistant cashier there for 
three years. In 1915 he removed to Leeds to accept the position elf cashier of the First 
National Bank, in which 0. I. Hegge is president and G. W. C. Ross vice president. This 
bank is capitalized for twenty-five thousand dollars and its deposits amount to two 



124 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars. In 1914 they erected a modern bank building, 
so that the institution is now well housed. The bank was converted from a state bank 
into the First Kational Bank in 1903 and Mr. Story is now one of the stockholders and 
directors. He also owns an eighty-acre tract of improved land near Leeds. 

In June, 1909, Mr. Story wedded Miss Hulda Lungren and they have become parents 
of four children, namely: Norma, Niel, Maurice and Ruth. Fraternally Mr. Story is connected 
with the Knights of Pythias and the Ancient Order of United Workmen, while his religious 
faith is that of the Lutheran church. He votes with the republican party and keeps well 
informed on the questions and issues of the day but does not seek nor desire public office, 
preferring to give undivided attention to his business affairs. He has capably directed his 
interests and has won that success which follows earnest, persistent labor and close appli- 
cation. 



HON. JOHN H. WISHEK. 



Among the prominent and influential citizens of Mcintosh county none stand higher 
in public esteem than John H. Wishek, who has taken a very im])ortant part in the 
development of that section of the state. He now makes his home in Ashley and is not 
only interested in business enterprises in that city but in many others throughout North 
Dakota. It was largely through his influence that the Soo Railroad was extended west 
from Kulm, he securing the right of way and making possible the building of the road. 
He is still the owner of five town sites and is the father of the town of Wishek. 

Mr. Wishek was born in Warren, Pennsylvania, on the 17th of April, 1855, and is a 
son of Charles and Barbara (Solethe) Wishek, the former born near Lake Constance, 
Baden, Germany, and the latter near Strasburg, in the province of Lorraine, Germany. 
On the paternal side he is descended from the Russian nobility but during an uprising in 
Russia his greatgrandfather was exiled and settled on Lake Constance in Baden, (Jermanj-, 
where the grandfather of our subject was born. He became one of the judges of Baden 
and was a man of prominence in his community. Two of his daughters married into the Von 
Langsdorf family, the husband of one being a general and the other a colonel in the (jerman 
army. Both were exiled during the German insurrection of 1848 and came to the United 
States. They were accompanied by Charles Wishek, the father of, our subject, who first 
located in Warren, Pennsylvania, but afterwaid removed to Sharon Center, Medina county, 
Ohio. 

John H. Wishek was a child of five years when the family removed to Ohio and in 
the public schools of that .state he began his education. After attending high school he 
was for two years a student in the academy at Lodi, Ohio, following which he entered 
the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he was graduated from the law depart- 
ment in the class of 18~8. He first opened an office in a small town in Marion county, 
Ohio, where he engaged in the practice of law for live years and also took an active part 
in local affairs, serving as mayor of the town. 

It was in 1884 that Mr. Wishek came to North Dakota and located in what is now 
Mcintosh county, at once becoming actively identified with its development and upbuilding. 
He and George W. Lilly, Charles C. Morrell and C. C. Basey were the first county com- 
missioners and he was appointed by the board as county clerk and register of deeds. In 
addition to. serving in those capacities he performed the duties of states attorney free of 
charge as it was impossible to hold the three offices. Subsequently he wag regularly 
elected register of deeds and county clerk, serving as such for eight years. In 1893 he 
was sent to the state legislature and after filling that position for one term was elected 
to the state senate for one term. 

Since that time Mr. Wishek has devoted his attention to his extensive business 
interests and the practice of law, in which he has won prominence. His real estate interests 
are very large and he buys and sells much property. Farming and banking have also 
claimed a large share'of his attention. He is a heavy holder of North Dakota farm lands, 
owning a few thousand acres, and is engaged in the lumber and grain business, owning five 
or six elevators and lumberyards in different places. In 1898 he established the First 




HOX. .TOHX H. WISHEK 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 127 

State Bank of Wishek, of which he has since served as president; in 1901 he founded the 
Ashley State Bank of Ashley, of which he is also president, these being the first two banks 
organized in Mcintosh county. Mr. Wishek also founded the Pollock State Bank in 1901 
and the First State Bank of Reader, North Dakota, in 1907, and has been president of both 
institutions since their organization. He is also interested in several other small banks 
of the state and is regarded as one of the ablest financiers of North Dakota. He is a con- 
servative, yet progressive business man, and has wisely safeguarded the institutions with 
which he is connected, his policj' winning for them the confidence and support of the public. 

In 1891 Mr. Wishek married Miss Nina Farley, of Ashley, who is a representative of 
an old New England family, the Farleys having settled in Connecticut prior to the Kevolu- 
tionary war, in which some of them took part as Minutemen. To Mr. and Mrs. Wishek 
have been born eight children: Esther, Anna and Carl, who are now attending college; John 
and Max, who are in the high school; and Jean, Homer and Joseph, who are in the graded 
schools of Ashley. 

Mr. Wishek is a staunch advocate of the principles of the republican party and in 
1914 was a candidate for nomination as governor on a personal liberty platform but 
although he received fourteen thousand votes he failed of nomination. Fraternally he is a 
member of Eureka Lodge, A. F. & A. il. at Eureka; Marion Chapter, No. 36, R. A. M.; 
Marion Commandery K. T., of Marion, Ohio; Dakota Consistory, No. 1, A. & A. S. R. ; and 
EI Zagal Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S. He also belongs to Bismarck Lodge, No. 1199, B. P. 
0. E., and to the Knights of Pythias, while his w'ife holds membership in the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Mr. Wishek is justly counted as one of the builders of the state and it 
is to such wide-awake, enterprising business men that the commonwealth owes its pros- 
perity. He never withholds his support from any object calculated to benefit the com- 
munity and he has exerted a beneficial influence on many public enterprises, never 
allowing his personal interests to interfere with his duties of citizenship. 



GEORGE I. ELLIOTT. 



The grain interests of Golden Valley county have a worthy representative in George 
I. Elliott, who as a member of the firm of Elliott & Back is operating an elevator at 
Beach. He is a native of Kansas, born in Round Springs, Mitchell county, in March, 1876, 
but when only four years of age accompanied his parents, Thomas D. and Martha M. 
(Corser) Elliott, on their removal to Minnesota. They first located in Breckenridge but 
afterward removed to Ilcnning, traveling across the country by wagon. At the latter place 
the father purchased a quarter section of railroad land and to its cultivation and improvement 
devoted his energies throughout the remainder of his life. The mother also died on the 
old homestead at Ilenniiig, Minnesota. 

Upon the home farm George I. Elliott grew to manhood, remaining under the parental 
roof until his marriage. It was in 1900 that he wedded Miss Charlotte M. Nelson, 
a native of Sweden, who came to this country alone at the age of fifteen years and 
located at Henning. To this union has been born eight children, namely: Beatrice, 
Lynnfred, Stanley, Kenneth, Lucile, Russell, Franklin and Marion. 

After his marriage Mr. Elliott removed to .Jessie, North Dakota, and entered the 
employ of the Great Western Elevator Company, taking charge of their elevator at that 
place, where he remained about seven years. In May, 1907, he went to Bowman county 
and took a homestead near Rhame, proving up on the same. On the 8th of July, 
1908, he again entered the service of the Great Western Elevator Company, this time at 
Tower City, but only remained there about three months. Since November, 1908, he has 
made his home in Beach, where in connection with E. E. Lloyd he conducted the elevator 
which belonged to the Golden Valley Grain Company and which was built by the Chase 
Lumber Company in 1906. When it came into possession of the former company in the 
fall of 1908 Mr. Elliott was made manager and continued in that position after it was 
purchased by (). D. Brault in 1912 until July, 1915. On the 20th of that month he 
formed a copartnership with 0. E. Back and under the name of Elliott & Back they have 



128 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

since operated the elevator, our subject serving as manager. The elevator has a capacity 
of forty thousand bushels and in the past year they have handled about two hundred thousand 
bushels, having secured a liberal share of the public patronage. In their business dealings 
they are upright and honorable, and the success that has come to them is certainly well 

deserved. 

Mr. Elliott and his family are connected with the Congi-egational church of Beach, and 
he is also a member of the Masonic fraternity and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
at that place and the Modern Woodmen of America at Fergus -Falls, Minnesota. By his 
ballot he supports the men and measures of the republican party, and he has been called 
upon to serve as a member of the city council of Beach. He is a man in whom the public 
has the utmost confidence and he stands high both in business and social circles. 



WARREN A. ODELL. 



Warren A. Odell, secretary, treasurer and manager of the Odell Dry Goods Company of 
Grand Forks, was born in Owatonna, Minnesota, April 20, 1873, a son of Othniel H. Odell, 
who is a native of Wisconsin and a descendant of an old pioneer family of that state of 
English lineage. He followed farming during the greater part of his life and also engaged 
in merchandising to a considerable extent. When quite young he went to Minnesota with 
his parents and not only was a prominent figure in business circles there but also was active 
in local political circles, doing much to further civic progress. He served as a member of 
the city council an4 as a member of school boards and his worth was widely acknowledged 
by his fellow townsmen. Death called him in February, 1913, and in his passing the com- 
munity lost a representative citizen. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Mary Warren 
Merrick, is a native of New York and a representative of an old family of that state. She 
is now living in Minnesota, where she and her husband long since took up their abode. 
By her marriage she became the mother of three children : Warren A. ; Chester L., a traveling 
man residing in Owatonna, Minnesota; and Arthur 0., a merchant of Williston, North 
Dakota. All three brothers have become connected with commercial interests. 

Warren A. Odell was educated in the public schools of Owatonna and in the Pillsbury 
Academy at that place. He spent his life to the age of twenty-one years upon the home 
farm and, taking up the profession of teaching, became connected with the public schools 
at Beaver Lake. He devoted two years to educational work and then entered mercantile 
circles, becoming a partner in the firm of Odell & Mann, dealers in groceries and crockery 
at Owatonna. There he continued in business for three years, after which he sold his interest 
and became a stockholder in the Hawley Mercantile Company at Hawley, Minnesota, where 
he operated quite successfully for six years. He then retired from that company and pur- 
chased the clothing store of the Shea Company at Owatonna, where he remained in business 
for a year and a half, after which he removed to Grand Forks, where he accepted the position 
of assistant manager of the dry goods department in the Ontario department store, remain- 
ing in that connection for two years. He next took charge of the dry goods store of F. C. 
Zuelsdorf Company, in which Robert B. Griffith, president of the Ontario store, had an inter- 
est. Mr. Odell acted as manager of that business for five years, at the end of which time 
he was one of the organizers of the Odell Company, Incorporated. On the 5th of March, 
1914, he purchased the Zuelsdorf interests, since which time he has largely increased and 
developed his business and is today at the head of the third largest commercial establishment 
in the city. The officers of the Odell Company are: T. C. Griffith, president; Warren A. 
Odell, secretary, treasurer and manager; and George Fitzgerald, vice president. The store 
contains an area of seventy-five thousand square feet and in the establishment is carried 
a full line of goods as is usually found in the first-class department store. He employs 
on an average of sixteen salespeople throughout the year and his business is steadily grow- 
ing, having already reached extensive and gratifying proportions. His career is an embodi- 
ment of modern ideals in commercial life and the enterprise and determination which he has 
displayed have carried him into important business relations. 

At Owatonna, on the 4th of September, 1899, Mr. Odell was united in marriage to Miss 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 129 

Myrtle Evelyn Bariihart, a native of Minnesota and a (laughter of the late Peter and Almeda 
(Sheldon) Barnhart, who were early settlers of Minnesota. Her father is now deceased, 
while her mother survives. Mr. and Mrs. Odcll bccanua parents of three children: Estelle 
Evelyn, w^ho was born at llawley, Minnesota, June 35, 1901, and passed away in Grand Forks 
in December 1U15; -Mildred Han-iet, born in Hawley in November, 1902; and Gertrude Laurine, 
born in Owatonna, Minnesota, in April, 1905. 

In addition to his commercial and property interests in Grand Forks, Mr. Odell is the 
owner of farm lands in Minnesota and North Dakota and is a firm believer in the future of 
the north%yest. He has won his success since starting out in life on his own account and 
his advancement is attributable entirelj' to his own efforts and perseverance. Those who 
know him esteem liim as a man of marked personal worth and regard him as a most pro- 
gressive merchant, alert and enterprising. His business methods will bear the closest investi- 
gation and scrutiny and Grand Forks is proud to number him among the representatives of 
her commercial interests. In politics he is independent, with republican proclivities, easting 
his vote with regard to the capability of a candidate rather than party affiliation. He 
belongs to the First Baptist church, is librarian of the Sunday school and takes an active 
part in church work, while his interest in the commercial development of his city is indi- 
cated in his membership in the Merchants Association and the Commercial Club. 



CURTIS J. LORD. 



Curtis .J. Lord, whose indefatigable effort has won for him a substantial and honored 
position in business circles in Towner county, is now president of the First National Bank 
of Cando. Through the steps of an orderly progression he has advanced to his present 
place of prominence and responsibility and his labors have at all times been of a character 
that has contributed to public progress as well as to individual success. He was born 
in Shakopee. Minnesota, January 23, 1862. a son of Charles and Julia O. (Buffum) Lord, 
who w-ere natives of New Hampshire. In the paternal line the ancestry can be traced 
back to the very beginning of England's history, while in the maternal line Mr. Lord is a 
direct descendant of the Whites, who were among the Puritans that settled in the Massa- 
chusetts Bay colony in 1638, while some of the family came with the original Mayflower 
colonists in 1620 and landed at Plymouth. His ancestors were prominent during the 
colonial period in New England and many of them served in the early Indian and colonial 
wars as well as in the war of the Revolution. The father was a physician and on removing 
to the west in 1854 settled at Shakopee, Minnesota, where he practiced medicine and also 
engaged in farming for six years. During his remaining days he concentrated his efforts 
upon his professional interests. Prior to his removal to the west he had engaged in medical 
practice in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He always kept in touch with general progress along 
professional lines and was conscientious in the performance of all of his professional duties. 
He died in April, 1881, while his widow survived until April, 1898. 

Curtis J. Lord was reared and educated in Shakopee and made his initial step in the 
business world as an employe of his brother in a drug store. He also worked in the post- 
office, which was located in the store. In 1882 he was registered as a pharmacist and in 
1885 removed to Devils Lake, North Dakota, where he occupied the position of assistant 
postmaster and subsequently became assistant cashier of a bank, in which capacity he 
continued until 1887. He then removed to Churchs Ferry and took charge of what is now 
the First National Bank, as cashier. In 1888 he became one of the organizers of the Towner 
County Bank at Cando, of which H. L. Whithead was elected president and Mr. Lord cashier. 
Later they were joined by his brother. Harry Lord, who purchased an interest in the bank 
and, associated with Curtis J. Lord, converted this into the First National Bank with Curtis 
J. Lord as the president, F. L. Thompson, vice president, and Harry Lord as cashier. The 
bank was capitalized for twenty-five thousand dollars and has a surplus of thirty-five 
thousand dollars with undivided profits of more than three thousand dollars. Their deposits 
amount to more than five hundred and twelve thousand dollars and the institution is 
regarded as one of the strongest banks in North Dakota. Its business policy has always 



130 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

maintained an even balance between piogressiveness and conservatism, carefully protecting 
the interests of depositors and yet carrying on the business in accordance with the demands 
of a commercial age. They erected a fine modern bank building on the principal corner of 
the town in 1906 and it is splendidly equipped for the conduct of the business. In addition 
to his banking interests Mr. Lord is president of the Cando Mill and Elevator Company and 
vice president of the Thompson Realty Company and he likewise has large farming interests 
in Towner and Rolette counties. 

In August, 1890, ilx. Lord was united in marriage to Miss Jennie B. Mcintosh, a 
daughter of David and Jane Mcintosh, pioneer settlers of North Dakota. The father was at 
one time a steamboat captain on the great lakes and sailed for many years, being widely 
known by the older residents of Chicago as Captain Mcintosh. On removing to Korth Dakota 
he homesteaded in Towner county, where he spent his remaining days. To Mr. and Mrs. Lord 
has been born a son. Vine D., whose natal day was August 37, 1893, and who was graduated 
from the University of Wisconsin in June, 1916. 

The parents are members of the Congregational church and Mi'. Lord is identified with 
the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, while in Masonry he has taken all the degrees up to the thirty-second degree of 
the Scottish Rite. His political endorsement is given to the republican party and from 1900 
until 1904 he served as railroad commissioner of the state. He has also been president of 
the town council of Cando and is a leading figure in many movements for the benefit of the 
city and the upbuilding of his section of the state. 



JOHN YEGEN. 



Among the pioneers of the state who have lived to reap the reward of their early 
labor and their perseverance in the face of hardships, is John Yegen, of Bismarck, who is now 
enjoying a period of well deserved leisure. He was born in Switzerland on the 18th of 
January, 1844, a son of Conradin and Emmrita Yegen, the former a school teacher by 
profession. Both are now deceased. 

John Yegen received his education in the common schools of his native country and 
then went to Germany, where he became ajiprenticed to the confectionery and pastry trade. 
After serving his three years' term of apprenticeship he went to Liege, Belgium, where he 
remained for a year, after which he returned to Switzerland and remained with his parents 
for a year. In 1866, however, he emigrated to the United States and first settled on 
Division street. New York, where he was located for a year. He then removed westward 
to La Crosse, Wisconsin, which was then the terminus of the railroad. Later he divided 
his time between Sioux City, Iowa, and various points in Minnesota, engaging in business in 
those places in a tent. In 1873 he took a boat bound from Sioux City to Bismarck, but 
when they had gone but a short distance a terrible storm overtook thom and it was impossible 
for the boat to go on for a time. Mr. Yegen went ashore to look for game and get some 
exercise and while he was gone the boat started on and he was compelled to walk to 
Vermillion and then from Vermillion to Yankton, a distance of twenty-eight miles. During 
all the time that he was making his way along the road and on foot the storm continued and 
the snow was very deep, so that it was very hard traveling. He eventually arrived at 
Yankton after enduring a great deal of fatigue and suffering, and his face was badly 
swollen from the cold. Although he had had a long and weary trip he reached Yankton eight 
hours ahead of the boat. He continued his journey by boat to Bismarck, arriving there 
on the 1st of May, 1873. He had his tent with him and as soon as possible pitched It, 
setting it up on the present site of the McKenzie Hotel. He gained a good patronage and 
continued to engage in the confectionery and bakery business in Bismarck until two years 
ago, being one of the reliable and successful business men of the city. In 1913 he sold the 
lot where his store stood for so many years and removed to the present location of the 
business. He is now living retired, but the business which he founded is conducted by a 
son and his partner under the name of Yegen & Snyder. Mr. Yegen of this review has 
large and valuable land holdings in the state and has an irrigation system upon his place, 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 131 

eight liviiulicil acres being under ditch. He has utilized well the opportunities which he 
found and luis gained financial independence and also the esteem and respect of all who have 
been associated with him. 

ilr. Yegen married Miss Annie Petersoii anil he has nine children, four sons and live 
daugliters. His religious faith is tliat of the ( hrislian Science ciinrcli, and in politics he is a 
non-partisan. From 1888 to 1892 he served ably as a member of the state legislature and he 
has also held the office of city assessor. He has witnessed the growth and development of 
the state from early pioneer times and is confident that there is still greater advancement 
in store for it in the future. 



CYRILLUS N. SWANSON. 



Cyrillus N. Swanson. conducting a large general merchandise establishment at Larimore, 
was born in Skfma, Sweden, July 9, 1870, a son of Swan Nelson, a native of that country, 
where he still resides. He has been quite successful in the conduct of a merchant tailoring 
business in the province of Skana. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Carrie Olson, 
was also born in Sweden and is yet living. 

Cyrillus X, Swanson was the eldest of their family of eleven children and in the 
common schools of his native country acquired his education but started out to earn his 
own living when only ten years of age. He was first employed as a sheep herder, which 
occupation he followed for two years and was then apprenticed to learn the trade of market 
gardening. He served the full apprenticeship and followed that pursuit to the age of 
seventeen years, when he crossed the Atlantic to America. Soon after his arrival on the 
shores of the new world he made his way to Minnesota and next went to Bowesmont, North 
Dakota, where he arrived an entire stranger unacquainted with the English language. He 
reached this state on the 12th of August, 1888, and during the first year after his arrival 
'.vas employed as a farm hand in Pembina county, during which time he improved his oppor- 
tunities by attending night school, thus acquainting himself with the language of the people 
and with American history and conditions. He afterward secured a clerkship in the store of 
V. S. Waldo, of Bowesmont, in whose employ he remained for four years, gaining a 
tliorough understanding of modern commercial methods and of the general merchandise 
business in all its departments. With the money which he saved from his earnings he 
embarked in business on his own account, beginning with a cash capital of three 
hundred and fifty dollars, a part of which was applied on the purchase price of the 
building in which he launched his undertaking. He opened his store on the 17th of 
September. 189.3, dealing in groceries and general merchandise, and from a humble beginning 
he has built up his present extensive business. ' He continued at Bowesmont until May, 
1912, and then removed his stock to Larimore, adding it to the stock of S. Strandness, a 
pioneer merchant, which he purchased. He has today a thoroughly modern and up-to-date 
store, having developed an excellent business as the years have gone on. In the winter of 
1914-15 he purchased a lot fifty by one hundred and forty feet on Towner avenue, the 
principal business thoroughfare of Larimore, and thereon he erected a substantial and 
beautiful business block with a fioor space of fifty by one hundred feet. He carries a very 
extensive and carefully selected line of goods, having a first class department store, in 
which he employs from five to nine clerks according to the season. 

In 1901, at Bowesmont, Mr. Swanson was married to Miss Myrtle Lyons, who was born 
at Ardock, North Dakota, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Lyons, who were pioneer settlers 
of this state and are still living. Three children have been born to this union: Mirabel, 
born April 22, 1902; Velva. June 4, 1904; and Cyrillus, June 7, 1915. 

Politically Mr. Swanson is an active republican, giving stalwart aid to the jinrty, 
and is now serving as city alderman, in which connection he exercises his ofilcial |>rerogatives 
in support of every measure and movement which he believes will be of public benefit. He 
was made a Mason in Larimore and he is also an exemplary member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, the Yeomen and the -Modern 
Woodmen of America. He is likewise a member and one of the trustees of the first Methodist 



132 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

church. He belongs to the Commercial Club, of which he is serving as a director, and he 
cooperates in every movement put forth by that organization for the benefit of the city. 
When he came to America he incurred an indebtedness which it took him two years to 
discharge, but he practiced the closest economy as well as industry and as the result of his 
frugal living and his untiring labor he soon gained a substantial basis on which to build 
his later success. Gradually he has worked his way upward, his trade growing year by 
year until he is now at the head of a large and profitable business, and he has never seen 
occasion to regret liis determination to come to the new world. 



D. RAY GREGG. 



North Dakota's banking interests in the northern tier of counties find a prominent 
representative in D. Ray Gregg, the vice president of the First International Bank of Sher- 
wood, the president of the Security State Bank of Medicine Lake, Montana, and the presi- 
dent of the First State Bank of Froid, Montana. Recognizing the opportunity for the 
extension of his activities in that field, he has become an important factor in business 
progress and development, which are always consequent in large measure upon the estab- 
lishment and successful management of banking institutions. Mr. Gregg is a native of 
Traer, Iowa. He was born June 22, 1881, of the marriage of William H. and Alice (Neal) 
Gregg, the former a native of Vermont and the latter of Ohio. They were married in 
Tama county, Iowa, the former having located there in early manhood immediately after 
the Civil war, while Mrs. Gregg had gone to that district as a school teacher in early 
womanhood. ^Ir. Gregg purchased land across the line in Black Hawk county, Iowa, and for 
some j'cars was engaged in farming. Subsequently he concentrated his efforts and atten- 
tion upon the live stock business, in which he operated very prominently and profitably for 
a number of years but is now living retired in Traer. 

D. Ray Gregg supplemented his public school training by a course in Oberlin College 
at Oberlin, Ohio, where he won the Bachelor of Arts degree as a member of the class 
of 1903. Subsequently he spent five months in the employ of the Equitable Life Assurance 
Society in New York, working in New Y'ork city and Cleveland, Ohio. Later he accepted 
a position as bookkeeper with the Wade-Park Banking Company of Cleveland, which con- 
stituted his initial training in the banking business. A year later that bank was merged 
into the Cleveland Trust and Mr. Gregg went with the latter institution, with which he 
was associated until the summer of 1905. In November of that year he arrived in 
Sherwood, North Dalcota, to accept the position of assistant cashier of the First Inter- 
national Bank. Two years later, in .June, 1907, he was made cashier of the bank and in 
June, 1914, he was elected vice president of the institution. When he accepted the cashier- 
ship the deposits of the bank amounted to about thirty thousand dollars and today the 
institution has deposits of two hundred and twentjf thousand dollars, doing the largest 
business of any bank in Renville county. This is attributable in large measure to the 
enterprising efforts and progressive spirit of Mr. Gregg, whose long experience in the field 
of banking has constituted the foundation upon which to build the success of the 
institution. Moreover, he closely studies every phase of the banking business and the 
progressive methods which have been introduced in the past few years, and the policy 
which he has pursued is such as commands the unfaltering confidence and support of the 
public. His plans are well devised and earefullj' executed and his business has ever been 
conducted with a recognition of the fact that the bank which most carefully safeguards 
the interests of its depositors is the one most worthy of support. He is also interested 
in three other banks, being president of the Security State Bank of Medicine Lake. Montana, 
having been the dominant factor in its organization in 1910; president of the First State 
Bank of Froid, Montana; and a stockholder in the Security State Bank of Flaxville, 
Montana. In addition to his banking interests he is the owner of nine hundred and sixty 
acres of land across the boundary line in Saskatchewan, Canada, and three hundred and 
ninety acres in Renville county. 

On the 31st of December, 1910, Mr. Gregg was united in marriage to ]\Iiss Eleanor 




D. RAY GREGG 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 135 

Stanton Ihiniilton, of Borlin, Wisconsin, by whom he lias two sons, David Hamilton and 
Donald Neal. Politically Mr. Gregg is an earnest republican and has served as a member 
of the city council of Sherwood and also as clerk of the school board. Fraternally he is 
connected with Tyrian Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Sherwood; Sherwood Lodge, No. 95, I. O. 
0. F.; and Minot Lodge, No. 1089, B. P. 0. E., while both he and his wife are consistent 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. While his business interests are extensive 
and important, he has ever found time to cooperate in matters of general good and 
lias been a generous contributor to etTorts for the moral progress as well as the material 
U]ibuilding oi his community. He is a representative of that class of men of liberal educa- 
tion and broad business training to whom the opportunities of the west are a call to 
action, and he is playing an important part in the development of a great state, utilizing 
its natural resources and the business conditions which are evolved through its settlement. 



MANSER D. WAGNESS. 



Manser D. Wagness, who is at the head of tlie Wagness Automobile Company of 
Lakota, in which business he has been engaged since 1909, has been a lifelong resident 
of this state, his birth having occurred in Ottofy, March 31, 1889. He is the only child 
of Sever and Mary (Osby) Wagness, botli of whom were natives of Minnesota, whence they 
removed to this state at an early period in its development, settling at Ottofy, where for 
a long period Mr. W'agness filled the position of postmaster. He also engaged for a time 
. in merchandising and was an active and representative citizen of his community. He died 
in North Dakota in 1891, when In the thirties. His widow survived until 1895 and was but 
thirty-five years of age at the time of her demise. 

Manser D. Wagness was but six years old when left an orphan and wni taken into the 
home of his aunt, Mrs. Gronna, of Lakota, where he attended school, passing through con- 
secutixe grades until graduated from the high school. He made his initial step in the 
business world by securing a clerkship in a hardware store but was ambitious to eng.ige 
in business on his own account and carefully saved his earnings until his industry and 
economy had brought him sufficient capital to enable him to establish the Wagness Auto- 
mobile Company in 1909. He then opened a garage and through his able management has 
developed a business that is today one of the leading enterprises of this character in Lakota 
and Nelson county. He does all kinds of repair work as well as handling all kinds of 
automobile supplies, and his trade has steadily grown. 

<Jn the 12th of August. 1913, Mr. Wagness wedded Miss Jlyrtle Jelhim, a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Freguard Jellum, who are still residents of Lakota. One child has been born 
of this marriage, Marian, born in 1914. 

The parents are members of the Lutheran church, while in politics Mr. Wagness main- 
tains an independent course, voting for men and measures rather than party. He is yet 
a young man but has already made for himself a creditable position in business circles 
and it is not difficult to predict that his future will be a progressive one, knowing the 
qualities which have thus far dominated his career. 



FEED W. HTLDRETH. 



Fred W. Hildreth, a well known ranchman now residing in Williston. was born on the 
20th of October, 1857, in St. Anthony, now Minneapolis, Minnesota, and is a son of Benjamin 
Franklin and Margaret E. (Farnham) Hildreth, both natives of Maine. The father was 
born and reared in Milford and in early life became a lumberman, working in the woods 
of the old Pine Tree state. In 1849 he went to Minnesota and settled at St. Anthony, where 
he engaged in logging on his own account for many years. He subsequently removed to 
Elk River. Minnesota, where he died in 1896, and where his wife passed away in 1900. She 



136 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

•was born in Calais, Maine, and accompanied her parents on their removal to St. Anthony, 
Minnesota, wliere she married Mr. Hildreth. 

Fred W. Hildreth was eight years of age when the family became residents of Elk 
River, Minnesota, where he grew to manhood, and he remained with his father until he 
attained his majority. On starting out in life for himself he turned his attention to the 
cattle and horse business. In 1878 he first came to North Dakota on a prospecting tour and 
in 1884 he stocked a cattle ranch near Mingerville, now Wibaux, Montana, for the firm of 
Koe Washburn & Parker. The following year he stocked a cow ranch for Chase-Gilmore 
& Company south of Schafer in McKenzie county, and in 1886 put in stock for himself in 
that county on Cherry creek. He continued to make his headquarters at Elk River, 
Minnesota, until 1904, when he removed to Williston, North Dakota, where he now resides. 
He bu^s and sells cattle and horses and is the owner of a fine ranch twelve miles southeast 
of Williston, which is operated by his partner, Frank Poe, who is one of the best known 
cow men in North Dakota. 

At Elk River, Minnesota, November 14, 1882, was celebrated the marriage of ili-. 
Hildreth and Miss Rose Harper, a native of that place and a daughter of John and Sarah 
(Spokesfield) Harper, who were early settlers of Minnesota. Her father was born In Oxford, 
En"-land, and on coming to America when a young man first located in Massachusetts. Her 
mother was born in Lowell, Slassachusetts. Mr. and Mrs. Hildreth have one child, Lucile, 
who was born in Elk River, Minnesota, and is now the wife of Joseph Cutting, a druggist 
of Williston, North Dakota. 

Mr. Hildreth supports the republican party at the polls but has never cared for political 
honors, preferring to devote his time and energies to his business interests. He is a member 
of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers Association, being eligible from the fact that he was 
born in that state during territorial days. Fraternally he is identified with the Knights of 
Pythias lodge of Williston, and with the Masonic lodge, the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Ancient Order of United Workmen, all 
of Elk River, Minnesota. He took a prominent part in the work of some of these organiza- 
tions and served as treasurer of the Odd Fellows lodge for ten years. He has traveled 
extensively over the west and southwest and now spends his winters in California. 



NATHAN P. LOUCKS. 



Nathan P. Loucks, manager and one of the stockholders of the Kermit Farmers 
Cooperative Mercantile Company at Kermit, Divide county, was born in Smith Falls, Ontario, 
Canada, August 12, 1S85, a son of J. H. and Mary E. (Van Dusen) Loucks. The father, 
a native of Smith Falls, was a son of .John Loucks. one of the pioneer settlers of that 
place, who was born at Cornwall, Ontario, while his father was one of the earliest of the 
pioneers of Ontario and an Indian fighter in the days when the white race had to establish 
their supremacy by the test of arms. J. H. Loucks was reared and educated at Smith 
Falls and took up the occupation of farming. In early life he also conducted a hotel and 
afterward successfully cultivated his father's farm. In 1898 he removed to Fisher, Minnesota, 
where he carried on agricultural pursuits until 1900, when he went to Grand Forks, where- 
he followed farming until 1913. In that year he became a resident of Kermit and now 
lives retired from active business cares, he and his wife being among the respected and 
worthy citizens of the town. 

After attending the city schools of Smith Falls, Ontario, Nathan P. Loucks continued 
his education in Grand Forks, North Dakota. In 1906 he arrived in Williams county, this 
state, and honiesteaded near Fortuna, which was in that section of Williams county that 
afterward became Divide county. His place was sixty-five miles from a railroad and 
Williston was the nearest town. For two years he lived upon this land, securing title- 
thereto, after which he established his home in Kermit, where he became buyer for the 
Atlantic Elevator Company, which he thus represented until 1910. He then established 
the Kermit Farmers Cooperative Mercantile Compaiiy, of which he has since been one of 
the stockholders and the manager. In this connection he is conducting a growing and sue- 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 137 

cessful business and is a popular, progressive, alert and wide-awake business man. He still 
owns his homestead property, which he rents, and he is one of the officers and a large 
stockholder in the Dooley Implement Company at Dooley, Montana. 

On the 29th of December, 1909, Mr. Ivoucks was married to Miss Ethel May McGillivray, 
of (iraiiil Forks, who was born in that city, was educated there and afterward engaged in 
teaching in (irand Forks and in Ward, Williams and McLean counties. She is a graduate 
of the sdiools of Gilby, North Dakota. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Loucks hold nu'mbership in the Methodist Episcopal church and 
guide their lives by its teachings, while his career further exemplifies the beneficent spirit 
of ilasonrj'. He belongs to G-osby Lodge, No. 108, A. F. & A. M., has taken the Scottish 
Kite degrees in Grand Forks and also belongs to Kem Temple of the Mystic Shrine. His 
political endorsement is given to the republican party and for several years he was a director 
on the town board of Kermit. He is interested in all that pertains to public progress and 
improvement and his cooperation can always be counted upon to further movements for 
the general good. 



CHARLES H. McMANUS. 



Charles H. McManus, manager at Grand Forks for tlic International Harvester Company, 
was born at Perth, Ontario, .June 13, 1865, a son of John and Mary (Ralston) McManus, 
both of whom were natives of Scotland. In early life they crossed the Atlantic to Ontario, 
Canada, where the father engaged in the lumber business, there passing away in 1874. To 
him and his wife were born four children. The youngest, Allan McManus, is now residing 
on a farm of thirty-si-ii; hundred acres in Grand Forks county, in which his brothers, 
Charles and William McManus, are interested and on which many thousands of bushels of 
grain are raised every year. Their farm is one of the finest and best equipped in the state. 
The oldest son, William McManus, is now living retired in Seattle save for the interest he 
has in the farm property in North Dakota. Margaret makes her home with her mother in 
Seattle, Washington. Mrs. McManus is now eighty years of age. Her sons have provided 
her with a splendid home on Queen Anno Hill, the most beautiful residential district of 
Seattle, and there she has every wish fulfilled. Her husband died when their children were 
quite young and the mother reared and cared for her sons and daughter until they were 
able to start out in business life for themselves. They now requite her maternal care and 
love with the utmost filial respect and devotion, surrounding her with every comfort that 
can be given her in the evening of life. 

Charles H. McJIanus, who was the second child of the family, was a youth of fifteen 
years when on the 17th of April, 1880, Mrs. McManus and her children came to North 
Dakota, settling at Grand Forks. She took up a homestead in Grand Forks county and 
Cliarles H. McManus had the opportunity of attending the public schools and also of 
pursuing a commercial comse in a business college at Grand Forks. After completing his 
course in the latter he entered the employ of the McCormick Machine Company at Grand 
Foi'ks, North Dakota, in the capacity of cashier and when that company was merged into 
the International Harvester Company he was commissioned to select and buy a site for the 
building at Grand Forks. He made a choice of the present site on which the company's 
magnificent building in this city now stands. He also bought the site and superintended 
the erection of the company's building at Minot, which is also a model structure of its 
kind. Before the building of the plant at Grand Forks was begun he was called to Kansas 
City and was made manager of the Kansas City branch of the business, which position he 
continued to fill for ten years. He was then returned to Grand Forks and has since been 
the manager of this large branch. He is thoroughly capable of managing the extensive 
interests under his control and understands every department of the farm machinery business 
both in principle and in detail. His wise management has resulted in accumulating thousands 
of dollars for the company which he represents. At the same time by his honorable 
methods and helpful spirit he has made many loyal friends among the farmers of this 



138 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

state and of Jlontana. His labors have brought a substantial reward and at all times he has 
displayed a spirit of initiative and enterprise that produces good results. 

On the 16th of May, 1893, Jlr. McManus was united in marriage to Miss Anna T. 
Parker, of Grand Forks, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Parker, who were natives of 
New Bedford, Massachusetts. In politics Mr. McManus is a stalwart democrat but has never 
been an active party worker. He belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen, and in Masonic circles has attained high rank, being 
now a member of the Mystic Shrine. He was for six years secretary of Acacia lodge. His 
business ability, his patriotic citizenship, his loyalty in friendship and his unfeigned cordiality 
nave gained him personal popularity and he is today accounted one of the valued citizens of 
Grand Forks. 



WALLACE HENRY. 



Wallace Henry, of the Henry Motor Company of Grand Forks, was born in Walsh 
county. North Dakota, March 1, 1890, a son of W. J. and Anna (Hughes) Henry, who were 
natives of eastern Canada. At an early period in the development of this state the father 
came to Noi-th Dakota, settling in Walsh county, where lie engaged in farming. He is a 
resident of Park River and has reached the age of fifty-si.x years, while his wife is now 
fifty-two years of age. 

Wallace Henry, was the second of their four children. In earlj' boyhood he attended 
the schools of his native county and later made his initial step in the business world by 
working as a farm hand on his father's farm. He was thus employed until he removed 
to Grand Forks, where he sought employment, being connected with various lines of work 
until 1913, when he was appointed agent for the Oakland automobile. Since that time he 
has sold many cars to people in Grand Forks county and throughout the state and his 
business has reached extensive and profitable proportions. He is also a large land holder 
and owns and operates extensive farming properties in Pembina, Grand Forks and Walsh 
counties and he likewise has a large farm in Alberta, Canada, and another in Minnesota. 
Having been reared to farm life, he thoroughly understands crop production and he keeps 
in touch with the latest methods of farming, bringing his fields to ' a very high state of 
cultivation. His farms are splendidly equipped and his position as an agriculturist is among 
the foremost in the state. In fact agricultural interests rather than his automobile business 
constitute the main interest in his business life. 

At Crookston, Minnesota, on the 22d of .January, 1912, Mr. Henry was united in 
marriage to Miss Lillian Porter, of Crystal, Pembina county. To them has been born a 
daughter, lilaine, whose birth occurred in Grand Forks in 1915. Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal church and fraternally he is connected with 
the Elks lodge of Grand Forks. In politics he is independent. He enjoys hunting and 
kindred sports and finds his pastime in all phases of outdoor life. He maintains an even 
balance between such interests and his business activities, giving to each its due measure of 
time and attention, and that sound judgment has characterized his efl'orts in every relation 
is indicated in his continuous success. 



WILLIAM HENRY WELCH, M. D. 

William Henry Welch, engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery at Larimore, 
was born in Boston, Massachusetts, June 30, 1855, a son of Hosea Welch, whose birth 
occurred in Caledonia county, Vermont, August 14, 1824, and who is a reprcs<'ntative of 
one of the oldest families of the Green Mountain state. His father, who was a planter, 
lived to the very advanced age of ninety-six years. He was of Welsh descent and the 
family was founded in America at an early period. Hosea Welch became a successful 
farmer and followed that occupation until he retired from active life. He is still living 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 139 

and a hale and hearty man at the age of ninety-two years, and he has long been a devout 
member of the Baptist church. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Harriett Darling, 
was a daughter of iloses Darling, of an old Vermont family of Scotch descent. Mrs. Welch 
passed away in 1904 at the age of eighty-two years. 

Dr. Welch was the third in order of birth in a family of seven children. His youthful 
days were spent upon the home farm in Vermont to the age of seventeen years, when he 
started out in life on his own account. It was his desire to provide means to pay his 
tuition in tlic> Caledonia County Academy, and when he had earned a sufficient sum he entered 
that institution, from which he was giaduated with the class of 1877. He afterward taught 
school in liis native county and while thus engaged devoted his spare time to the study 
of medicine. Later he entered the University of Vermont as a medical student and was 
graduated therefrom in 18S0 with the M. D. degree. He immediately began the practice 
of his profession at Union, Vermont, remaining at that village until the fall of 1883. In 
the spring of 1884 he removed westward to Polk county, Jlinnesota, where he continued 
until 1887. He then removed to Renville county, where he continued in active practice until 
the fall of 1889, when he removed to Larimore, there taking up his abode on the 4th of 
December. He has since been engaged in active practice there and is the oldest physician 
in years of continuous connection with the town. He engages in the general practice of 
both medicine and surgery, and his ability is widely recognized. His entire attention is 
devoted to his professional work, and the public acknowledges his ability by according him 
a liberal patronage. 

On .January 1.3. 1882. Jlr. Welch was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Morrison, 
a native of Vermont and a daughter of William and Hannah (Osmore) Morrison, both now 
deceased. Doctor Welch is a thirty-second degice Mason and a member of the Mystic Shrine. 
He joined the order in Larimore and has since been a faithful representative of the craft. 
He is also connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of 
America, and the Yeomen, and his religious faith is evidenced by his membership in the 
First Methodist Episcopal church of Larimore, of which he is a trustee. Along strictly 
professional lines he has connection with the Grand Forks Medical Society, the North 
Dakota State Medical Society and the American Medical Association, and through their 
proceedings, as well as by private study and reading, keeps in touch with the latest scientific 
discoveries of the medical profession. 



A. C. STRINGER. 



A. C. Stringer, cashier of the First State Bank of Kief, was born in Mitchell county, 
Iowa, May 3, 1889, a son of Carl B. and Cora (Griffith) Stringer, natives of Illinois and 
Iowa respectively, the mother's parents having been pioneer settlers of the Hawkeye state, 
to which they removed from Germany. The progenitors of the Stringer family were English 
and at an early day the grandparents of our subject settled in Illinois. When a young 
man Carl B. Stringer removed from that state to Iowa, establishing his home in Decorah, 
and later he became a resident of Mitchell coiinty, where he was married and for fifteen 
years engaged in farming. Eventually he removed to Osage, Iowa, where he became identified 
with the banking business, remaining for many years president of the Home Trust & 
Savings Bank, which he developed into one of the strong financial institutions of that 
part of the country. In recent years he has been living retired from active business 
management l)ut for twenty years or more he was heavily interested in North Dakota 
farm lands and in Canada lands but at a recent date disposed of his land holdings. In 
May, 1914, he purchased the First State Bank of Kief, North Dakota, and [ilaced his son, 
A. C. Stringer, in charge of that institution. 

In the schools of Osage A. ('. Stringer passed through consecutive grades to the high 
school and was graduated with the class of 1909. He afterward attended the Iowa State 
Agricultural College and also the Globe Business College of St. Paul, Minnesota, from which 
he was graduated in 1911. In the summer of that year he was connected with the First 
State Bank of Kief and in the autumn went to Lakeville, Minnesota, where he accepted the 



140 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

position of assistant casliier in tlie Decorah State Bank, there remaining for a year and a 
half. In 1913 he removed to Minneapolis and assisted Mr. Samuels, ^is former employer, 
to organize the Citizens State Bank, in which he remained for almost a year after it opened 
its doors for business. The following spring he came to North Dakota in search of a 
favorable location for the establishment of 'a bank and the present banking institution was 
purchased. The old cashier was retained, while Mr. Stringer became vice president of the 
institution and his father the president. In May, 1915, Kdward Simbalenko, a prominent 
business man of Kief, was made vice-president of the bank, while A. C. Stringer succeeded 
to the cashiership and is now the active manager of the bank, which in the intervening period 
has enjoyed steady growth in the conduct of a general banking business. 

On the 16th of January, 1914, Mr. Stringer was united in marriage to Miss Mazie 
Hansen, of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Fraternally he is connected with Osage Lodge, No. 102, 
F. & A. M. Politically he is a republican and is now serving as township treasurer and 
as school treasurer. He is at all times willing to aid in well advised and carefully executed 
plans for the benefit and improvement of his community. Kief recognizes him as a foremost 
citizen. In his business affairs he has prospered and is today the owner of two residence 
properties in Kief together with two hundred and forty acres of farm land in Sheridan 
county. 



GUY S. BURTCH. 



Guy S. Burtch, manager of the Acme elevator at Deering, is one of those who have 
been identified with substantial development in the northwestern part of the state, 
for he was a homesteader of Ward county, thus aiding in reclaiming wild land for the 
purposes of civilization. He was born in Winnebago, Minnesota, June 2, 1879, a son of 
Levi and Jane (Henton) Burtch, natives of Woodstock, Canada, and of Erie, Pennsyl- 
vania, respectively. They were married at Waushara county, Wisconsin, and settled in 
La Crosse, that state, where they lived for five years, when they became residents of 
Cerro Gordo county, Iowa. Four years later they established their home in Minnesota and 
some time afterward the father filed on a homestead near Winnebago, on which he 
resided until 1903, carefully, persistently and successfully cultivating his farm during 
that period. For six years thereafter he was a resident of Westbourne, Manitoba, and in 
1908 he came to North Dakota, settling at Deering, where he now resides. Mr. and Mrs. 
Burtch have traveled life's journey together as man and wife for sixty years and have 
now reached the ages of eighty-two and seventy-nine years respectively. 

Guy S. Burtch was educated in the public schools and at Parker College in Winnebago. 
He spent eight years of study in that institution of learning and won a teacher's diploma 
in 1900. After completing his school work he was married on the 20th of .lune, 1900, 
to Jliss Ethel Wells, of Huntley, Minnesota, and immediately afterward came to North 
Dakota with his bride. He filed on a homestead comprising the southeast quarter of section 
9, Margaret township. Ward county, five miles northwest of Deering, and resided upon that 
place for two years, when he preempted his claim. In 1902 he took up his abode in the 
town of Deering and assumed the management of the Acme elevator, of which he has now 
had control for fourteen years, becoming one of the best known grain buyers in his 
section of the state. He is thoroughly acquainted with every phase of the grain trade 
and has done excellent work in this connection, making the undertaking one of profit to the 
owners. He has also wisely invested in real estate and is now the owner of an entire 
section of land which he farms. At other times his holdings have been more extensive but he 
has bought and sold from time to time as he has seen opportunity for judicious invest- 
ment and profitable sales, winning a substantial measure of success through his land 
operations. 

Mr. and Mrs. Burtch have become the parents of four children, but the first born, 
Mabel is deceased. The others are Merrill W., Muriel M. and Howard G. Politically Mr. 
Burtch is a republican and while not an office seeker keeps well informed on the questions 
and issues of the day, so that he is able to support his position by intelligent argument. 




GUY S. BrRTCH 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 143 

Hfi. served on the board of the Thursby Butte school district for seven years and five 
years was its president. Fraternally he is connected with Deering Camp, No. 141, I. O. 0. F., 
and Deering Lodge, No. 2944, M. W. A., serving for the past seven years as clerk in the 
latter. He and his wife attend the Congregational church and they are highly respected 
residents of the community in which they make their home, their sterling worth ensuring 
them a warm-hearted welcome in the best homes of the city and county. 



WILLIAM E. PAULSON. 



William E. Paulson, county auditor of Benson county and a resident of Minnewaukan, 
was born in Swift county, Minnesota, on the 11th of November, 1876, a son of Isaac and 
Mette (Berge) Paulson, who are natives of Norway, where they were reared and married. 
In 1870 they came to the United States, settling in Benson, Minn., in which locality the 
father took up a homestead. He was thereafter actively engaged in farming in Swift county 
for forty-four years, and he is now living retired in Benson, enjoying the fruits of his 
former toil. 

William E. Paulson obtained his early education in district schools and afterward 
attended the graded schools of Benson and Willmar Seminary. When he had attained adult 
age he began farming on his own account in Swift county, owning a tract of land adjoining 
his father's place, and thereon he resided until 1904, when he came to North Dakota. 
Settling in Minnewaukan, he spent the following winter as a clerk in the office of the 
county register of deeds and in the summer of 1905 was appointed deputy county auditor, in 
which capacity he continued until the fall election of 1910. He was then cliosen county 
auditor, was again elected in 1912 and 1914 and for the fourth time is a candidate for 
the office without opposition. No higher testimonial of his capability and fidelity could 
be given than the fact that he has thus received the endorsement of the entire county. 

In 1908 Mr. Paulson was united in marriage to Miss Alice Wilcox, of Benson, Minnesota, 
by whom he has a son, Lyle W. Mr. Paulson belongs to the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen and is master workman of his lodge. He is also connected with the Homesteaders 
and is serving as secretary of the local organization. He and his wife are devoted members 
of the Presbyterian church and he is serving on its board of trustees, while to the support 
of the church he is a liberal donor and in the various departments of its work takes an 
active interest. His political allegiance has always been given to the republican party and 
throughout the entire period of his residence in Benson county he has been connected with 
public office, making an excellent record by reason of his unfaltering fidelity and capability. 



DUNCAN WILLIAM McKENZIE. 

Duncan William McKenzie, a dealer in farm machinery at Dickinson, has throughout his 
entire business career made steady advance by reason of his persistency of purpose, his 
energy and laudable ambition. He was born in Pictou county. Nova Scotia, October 7, 
1859, and in that country his parents spent their entire lives. The son there remained 
until tlie fall of 18S0 and was engaged in farming in his native country. On attaining his 
majority he came to the United States, settling in Wausau, Wisconsin, but in 1881 came 
to North Dakota, making his way first to Gladstone and afterward to Dickinson, wliile later 
he went to Glendive, ilontana. He was employed as a fireman on the Northern Pacific until 
injured in a wreck on the 22d of July, 1883. For nine months he was incapacitated for 
duty. He went back to Nova Scotia but after recovering returned to Dickinson, while 
later he spent another winter in Canada. He next went to Anthracite, Alberta, where he 
operated a stationary engine for some months. In July, 1886 he again became a resident 
of Dickinson, where he has now made his home for thirty years. For six years he had 
charge of a bridge crew for the Northern Pacific, after which he purchased a machinery 
and flour and feed store in partnership with Edward L. Jones of Wisconsin. This partner- 



144 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

ship was maintained until the death of Mr. Jones in February, 1909, after which Mr. 
MeKenzie bought out the interest of his partner and became sole proprietor. In 1913 he 
befan the erection of a new business block and now has a fine brick building in which he 
carries an extensive stock of farm machinery, including the manufactured product of the 
Moline and International Harvester Companies. His annual sales have reached a gratifying 
figure and his business has become one of the important commercial interests of Dickinson. 
He is also a stockholder in a bank and in an elevator and in business affairs he displays 
sound judgment and keen discrimination. 

In 1893 Mr. MeKenzie was married to Miss Louise Dittberner, who was born in Berlin, 
Germany, but came to the United States in her early girlhood, her home being two miles 
south of Kichardton, Stark county, North Dakota. To Mr. and Mrs. MeKenzie have been 
born eight children but three died in infancy. The others are: Herbert, who was born 
in 1896 and is now attending the State University at Grand Forks; Florence, who was born 
in 1898 and is a student in the Dakota Business College of Fargo; Eleanor, born in 1900; 
Duncan, in 1901, and George, in 1907. 

Mr. MeKenzie holds membership with the Elks lodge at Dickinson, witli the Knights 
of Pythias lodge, in which he is a past chancellor, with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
of which he is a past grand, and with the Independent Order of Foresters of Toronto, 
Canada. His political allegiance is given the republican party and for four ■ years he 
has served as county commissioner and for seven years as a member of the city council. 
He is a very prominent and active worker in the Commercial Club, doing everything 
in his power to promote tlie interests of Dickinson through the organized effort of that 
institntion. 



OLAF A. ENGEMOEN. 



Olaf A. Engemoen, actively identified with the banking business as assistant cashier 
of the Farmers & Merchants Bank at Steele, was born in Norway in 1877, a son of A. O. 
and Martha (Mortenson) Engemoen, who are also natives of the land of the midnight sun. 
It was in the spring of 1881 that the father brought his family to the United States and 
settled about ten miles north of Fargo, North Dakota, where he remained for several years. 
In 1884 he removed to Minnesota and took up a homestead claim upon which he still resides. 
He has converted the land into rich and productive fields and is now carrying on general 
farming and dairying, being numbered among the wide-awake and progressive agriculturists 
of that district. Upon his farm he and his wife have reared a family of five children, and 
while the parents are both living, two of the children have passed away. 

Olaf A. Engemoen, who was the second in order of birth, began his education in the 
district school near his father's farm, upon which he was reared, early becoming familiar 
with all the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist. He afterward con- 
tinued his studies in Concordia College of Moorhead, Minnesota, and was graduated from 
that institution in the spring of 1905. He continued to assist his father until he reached 
the age of eighteen years and then came to North Dakota in 1896. Here he was employed 
as a farm hand and he also spent a year in survey work with the Soo Railroad Company. 
Following the completion of his course of study at Moorhead he entered the First National 
Bank of Mayville and eventually removed to Sawyer, North Dakota, where he filled the 
position of assistant cashier in the Sawyer State Bank. He remained there for a period of 
about two years and in the spring of 1907 removed to Steele, where he has since made 
his home. At the time of the organization of the Farmers and Merchants Bank he was made 
assistant cashier and in this undertaking was associated with M. T. Weum and 0. J. 
Mortenson of Moorhead. The bank was founded in 1907 and capitalized for ten thousand 
dollars. The scope of the bank has been extended to include a farm lands department and 
the company also owns a warehouse in Steele and deals in real estate and handles insurance. 
The various branches of the business are carefully and wisely managed and are bringing 
substantial success. 

In the fall of 1908 Mr. Engemoen was united in marriage to Miss Esther De .Shon, a 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 145 

native of Cliicago, who was reared, however, in North Dakota. There was but one ehild 
of this marriage, Marguerite, who was born in 1909. The wife and mother passed away 
in tlie fall of 1910 and in the summer of 1913 Mr. Engemoen was again married, his second 
union being with Carrie Schoeny, who was born at Freeport, Illinois, a daughter of Charles 
and Caroline Schoeny, wlio were early residents of Freeport. Of the second marriage there 
lias been born a son, Kobort, whose birth occurred in 1914. 

'Sir. Kngemoen exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures 
that he deems of greatest worth, usually voting with the republican party. He previously 
served as township treasurer, as city treasurer and as clerk of the school district and at 
the present time he is public administrator, clerk of the school district and township 
treasurer. No public trust reposed in him has ever been betrayed in the slightest degree, 
a fact which is indicative of his faithfulness to duty under all circumstances. Fraternally 
he is a Mason, belonging to Steele Lodge, No. 102, F. & A. M., and he is also identified 
with the Yeomen Camp, No. 1374, and is correspondent of the Yeomen. He has many 
pleasing and attractive traits of character and those who know him speak of him in terms 
of warm regard, recognizing his sterling worth and the fidelity which he has displayed in 
all of life's relations. 



C. L. LINDSTROM. 



C. L. Lindstrom. general manager of the ilutual Land Company of Grand Forks, first 
visited North Dakota in 1879 and is consequently acquainted with its pioneer development, 
his activities having been of a character that have contributed to public progress and 
improvement as well as individual success. He was born at Cannon Falls, Minnesota, 
September 12, 1861, a son of Andrew and Ingeborg (Christopherson) Lindstrom, the former 
a native of Sweden and the latter of Norway. Making his way to Minnesota in 1848 the 
father settled at Cannon Falls and engaged in farming, filing on a claim during the admin- 
istration of President Buchanan. He married in ^Minnesota and spent his remaining days 
there, passing away in 1908 at the age of eighty years. His wife survived until 1910 and 
was seventy-nine years of age at the time of her demise. In the family were the following 
children: Andrew, living at Lakota; A. E.; Anthony, a resident of California; L. W., a 
resident of Ortonville, ilinnesota ; and Josephine, the wife of Dr. Robert Stickeberger, of 
Oberon, North Dakota. 

After attending public school and spending a short period at Ailolphus College at St. Peter, 
Minnesota, C. L. Lindstrom followed various occupations in that state until 1879 when he 
removed to North Dakota. Later he went to Montana and assisted in building Fort 
Assiniboine. Returning to this state he located at Larimore, Grand Forks county, and in 
1883 removed to Benson county where he resided until 1910. He was engaged in farming 
until he removed to Grand Forks and became receiver in the land office. He afterward 
entered upon the practice of law in Minnewaukan, having been admitted to the bar in 1900, 
and there continued until 1910 when he accepted the position of general manager of the 
Mutual Land Company of North Dakota of which .John I. Larum, of Buxton is president, 
C. H. Opsal, vice president, 0. L. Lindstrom, secretary and A. L. Lindstrom, assistant 
secretary. In this connection he is contributing in substantial measure to the upbuilding 
and di'vcloj)ment of the business which has attained extensive and gratifying proportions. 

On the 25th of February, 1887, Mr. Lindstrom was married to Miss Mary Mathison of 
Wahpeton. North Dakota, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Mathison. They are parents 
of three children: Mrs. Effie Burke, who was born at Oberon, February 17, 1889, and is a 
graduate of the art department of the University of North Dakota, while she is now the 
wife of T. H. Burke, of Minnewaukan, North Dakota, where he is states attorney; Albert L., 
who was born at Oboron, November 16, 1892, and is a graduate of the State University; 
and Harold, who was born July 35, 1902, and is now attending high school. 

Mr. Lindstrom gives his political allegiance to the republican party and was the first 
county commissioner of Benson county, serving from 1888 until 1891. He was connected 
with the Indian service at Fort Totten under President Harrison, and for two terms, from 



146 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

1894 until 1898 was a member of the state legislature. In 1898 he was appointed receiver 
of the United States land office for a four year term and in 1893 he was elected states 
attorney of Benson county, which office he held for two terms. He has been a member and 
chairman of the county seat committee for a number of years and he is a most active party 
worker, doing all in his power to promote the gi-owth of his party and win for it success, 
his opinions carrying weight in its councils. Fraternally he is a thirty-second degree Mason 
and a member of the Mystic Shrine and also belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks. He has attained high rank as a citizen and public official and the positions of 
trust to which he has been called have come to him in recognition of his ability and trust- 
worthiness. His official duties as well as his private business affairs have brought him a 
wide acquaintance and those who know him entertain for him a warm regard. 



VALENTINE KOCH. 



Amono- the prominent and representative citizens of Dickinson is numbered Valentine 
Koch who is now filling the office of clerk of the court to the entire satisfaction of all 
concerned. His early home was on the other side of the Atlantic, for he was born in 
Russia, July 24, 1889, his parents being Joseph and Frances Koch. In 1896 they brought 
their family to America and located in Dickinson, North Dakota, where they still reside. 
By occupation the father is a mason. 

Valentine Koch was a little lad of seven years on the emigration of the family to the 
United States and in Dickinson he grew to manhood, obtaining his education in the common 
and high schools of that city. After laying aside his textbooks he engaged in newspaper 
work in the employ of others until 1908, when he established the North Dakota Herald, a 
German paper, which he published until the spring of 1911, when he sold out. He continued 
in press work, however, until elected clerk of the court in 1912. So efficiently did he fill that 
position that he was reelected in 1914 and was elected without opposition in 1916. 

On the 3d of May, 1910, Mr. Koch married Miss Barbara Fischer, by whom he has three 
children, namely: Jerome John, Theodore and Leo Frank. He and his wife are members 
of tlic Catholic church and he is also connected with the local council of the Knights of 
Columbus and the Yeomen, being foreman of the latter lodge at the present time. The 
republican party has always found in him a stanch supporter of its principles and he has 
become a recognized leader in political affairs. He is preeminently public-spirited and pro- 
gressive and has always been found true to any trust reposed in him. 



E. EUGENE GOWELL. 



E. Eugene Cowell, who is now the owner and publisher of the Dogden News of 
Dogden, McLean county, has the distinction of having established a larger number of 
newspapers in North Dakota and Minnesota than any other man and furthermore has made 
every paper with which he has been connected a force in behalf of good government. A 
great deal of his energy has been expended in effective work for clean polities and he is 
widely known in that connection throughout the two states. He was born in Hazelton 
township, Buchanan county, Iowa, August 12, 1862, a son of J. E. and Marcia (Morse) 
Cowell, both of whom were born in the east but removed to Buchanan county in 1861. 
The father was & farmer and carpenter by occupation. His death occurred in 1895 and his 
wife passed away February 28, 1868. To them were born three childi-en, two of whom are 
living and of whom E. Eugene is the eldest. 

The Iowa schools afforded E. Eugene Cowell his educational opportunities and after 
attending the high school at Independence he came to North Dakota in 1883 and secured a 
position with the Larimore Pioneer, edited by Scott & Church. He received a salary of 
twelve dollars a week and made it a point to save ten dollars of that amount, keeping his 
expenses down by living in a shack and doing his own cooking. Later with his savings 




E. EUGENE COWELL 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 149 

he purchased the Niagara Times, which ho edited for a short period. Subsequently he 
returned to Minnesota and at one time owned ten papers in Washington county, that state. 
While living there the question came up and a law was passed defining a legal newspaper 
and it was he who worded the section which contains the legal standard for a newspaper. 
During the si.xteen years that he was in Minnesota he established and for a time edited 
fourteen different papers and was very active in politics, doing all in his power to secure 
clean government. He was the leader in a movement in Stillwater which succeeded in 
effecting radical and beneficial changes in the city government. In 1900 he came again 
to North Dakota and first established the Balfour Statesman, later founding eleven other 
papers in the state. It is generally stated that Mr. De Lacy of Minnesota established more 
papers than any other man, but Mr. Cowell's record exceeds his as the number of papers 
established by Mr. De Lacy was only twenty-one, while Mr. Cowell has founded twenty- 
six, as follows: St. Paul Times, 1885; St. Paul Park Times, 1887; Newport News, 1890; 
South St. Paul Telegram, 1890; North St. Paul Enterprise, 1890; Stillwater American, 
1892; Stillwater Daily Times, 1898; South Stillwater Lumberman, 1893; Lakeland Review, 
1892; Afton Ideal, 1892; Cottage Grove Herald, 1892; Forest Lake Gem, 1893; Wildwood 
Outing, 1892; Northern Light (Marine), 1892, all in ilinnesota; Bartlett Courier, 1884; 
Balfour Statesman, 1900; Granville Times, 1900; Voltaire Critic, 1901; Drake Observer, 
1902; Carpeo Herald, 1901; Dogden Observer, 1907; Max Phonogram; Drake Telegram; 
Bergen Sentinel; Progressive West (Plaza) 1908; and Euso Record, 1916, ail published in 
North Dakota. In 1912 he took up his residence in Dogden and purchased the Dogden 
News, which he has since edited and published. It has a circulation of three hundred and 
is in every respect a high class country paper. The plant is equipped with eleven presses of 
modern design and stands for twenty-five printers. Mr. Cowell owns property in both 
Iowa and North Dakota and has accumulated a competence, although his chief aim has 
not been to make money but to serve the various communities with which he has been 
connected. 

On the 15th of September, 1886, Mr. Cowell was married to Miss Mary C. Schabacker 
at Newport, Minnesota, and to them have been born three children; Grace E., now employed 
on the Glasgow Democrat, at Glasgow ilontana; Clarence C, who is editing a newspaper 
at Max, North Dakota; and Pearl C. 

Mr. Cowell is a strong republican but has never held office although he has been a 
leader in political circles wherever he has lived. The guiding principle of his life is found 
in his religious belief and he is an active and influential member of the Baptist church. 
He is a close friend of Colonel Lounsberry, the editor of this history, and is personally 
known to many other prominent citizens of this state. One of his hobbies is the study 
of genealogy, to which he has devoted much of his spare time. To his friends he is 
familiarly known as "the Bishop" and the warm regard in which he is held by those who 
know him best is proof of his agreeable personal qualities. His record as a newspaper 
man and political leader is one of which he has every reason to be proud, and he is justly 
ranked as a leading citizen of Dogden. 



HAVELOCK BENNETT. 



Havelock Bennett, an implement dealer of Larimore. has been identified witli tlie devel- 
opment of the town since 1882. He has always lived in the middle west, his birth having 
occurred in Marquette county, Wisconsin, November 6, 1859. His father, Benjamin Bennett, 
a native of the north of England, came to America in 1849, settling in Wisconsin among its 
pioneer residents, and there he successfully followed farming at an early day. About the 
time of the close of the Civil war he removed to Bremer county, Iowa, where he resided for 
more than thirty years, and his last days were spent in Spokane, Washington, where he died 
in 1912 at the age of seventy-nine years. His wife, who bore tlie maiden name of Elizabeth ■ 
Slater, was a native of England and came to America in 1847 with her parents, who were 
pioneers of Wisconsin. She was reared and married in that state and became the mother 



150 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

ot' fourteen cliildren. Slie, too, passed away in Spokane in 1914, when seventy-seven yeai's 
of age. 

.The tliird member of tlie family was Havelock Bennett, who is indebted to the county 
school system of Iowa for the educational privileges whicli he enjoyed. He early became 
familiar with the best metliods of tilling the soil and earing for the crops, and spent his 
youth upon the farm until he reached the age of twenty-one, when he started out on his 
own account. He was first engaged by J. C. Garner, an implement dealer of Waverly, Iowa, 
and in 1883 came to North Dakota with the firm of Hunt, Holt & Garner, implement dealers 
who established business at Larimore. He was associated with that firm as a salesman and 
afterward was a salesman with 0. H. Phillips of Larimore, a pioneer implement dealer, for 
ten years, and on the expiration of that period entered business on his own account. _He has 
since been conducting his store and is today one of the leading and prosperous implement 
dealers of Larimore and Grand Forks county, his trade having assumed extensive propor- 
tions. He also conducts large farming interests, having twelve hundred and forty acres of 
land, all in Grand Forks county. 

In 1904 in Grand Forks, Mr. Bennett was married to Mis. Sabena (Schaefer) Valerius, 
a native of Germany and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Schaefer, who became early 
residents of ^^'abasha county, Minnesota, but are now deceased. Mr. Bennett is a Consistory 
Mason and a member of the Mystic Shrine, and he also belongs to the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. In politics he is a republican and has served for two terms as a member of 
the city council of Larimore, in which connection he has done excellent work to uphold and 
advance civic standards. For more than a third of a century he has lived in Larimore and is 
today one of its best known and most highly esteemed citizens, his personal record as well 
as his business career making for him a creditable position in public regard. 



MANVILLE A. JOHNSON. 



Manville A. .Johnson, socretar3' and manager of the Michigan Mercantile Company at 
Michigan, Nelson countj^ was born April 13, 1889, in New London, Minnesota. His father, 
John A. Johnson, a native of Sweden, came to America in 1865 and settled in New London, 
where he engaged in general merchandising and in farming, being quite successful in the 
management of his business affairs. During the Indian wars in Minnesota he served as a 
member of the Home Guards of the state. His political allegiance was given to the repub- 
lican party and locally he. was quite active, filling various public positions of honor and 
trust. He passed away in New London in 1890, at the age of forty-flve years. His widow, 
who bore the maiden name of Christina Teigland, was born in Norway and in early girlhood 
came with her parents to the United States, the family home being established in Minne- 
sota, where she met and married Mi-. Johnson. She is now a resident of Mayville, North 
Dakota. The four children of her marriage are: Anna, the wife of 0. N. Larson, of May- 
ville; Sadie, the wife of C. E. Funk, of Carver, Minnesota; Martha, who died in Mayville in 
1913; and Manville A. 

The last named was educated in the country schools of Minnesota and in the Mayville 
Normal School and in his youthful days he early became familiar with farm work in all 
of its departments. When a youth of fifteen he started out to earn his own living and 
secured employment as a faim hand in North Dakota, devoting two years to that occupation, 
during which time he also attended school through the winter seasons. In 1907 he secured 
a position as delivery boy and clerk with the Michigan Mercantile Company and from that 
luimble position has worked his way steadily upward step by step until lie has become one 
of the large stockholders in the undertaking and is the secretary and general manager of 
the company, having occupied this dual position since 1913. This is an incorporated com- 
pany and today controls the largest commercial enterprise of Nelson county, employing on 
an average of eight people. The store has a floor space of forty by one hundred feet and 
the stock carried is valued at about thirty thousand dollars. The present officers are : Marcus 
Johnson, president: N. J. Walen, vice president; and Manville A. .Johnson, secretary; with 
Lawrence Krostue on the board of directors in addition to the officers. Manville A. Johnson 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 151 

is also ciigai,'('(l in fanning, owning and cviltivating one luindied and sixty acres of land in 
Michigan townsliip. 

Politically Mr. Johnson exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and meas- 
ures of the democratic party. Kraternally he is connected with the Odd Fellows lodge at 
Slichigan, of which he is a past grand, and he belongs to the Commercial Club and to the 
Lutheran church— associations which indicate much of the natui'e of his interests and the 
rules which govern his conduct. He stands for progress in all things leading to the material, 
intellectual, social, political and moral development of his community and the progressive 
spirit which he has manifested throughout his entire life constitutes the measure of his 
substantial success. 



AXEL W. SWENSON. JI. D. 



J)r. Axel W. Swenson, engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in liisbee, is one 
of the substantial citizens that Norway has furnished to Towner county. His birth occurred 
in %'adso, Norway, .June IT, 1870, his parents being Sven and Mary Swenson, who were also 
natives of the same country. The father was a fisherman and followed that pursuit until 
1882, when he came to America, making his way to Wisconsin, where he purchased land and 
engaged in general farming until 1901. He then came to North Dakota and resided with 
his children until called to his final rest, his death occurring in April, 1913. He had long 
survived his wife, who died in 1880. 

Doctor Swenson was a little lad of but six jears when tlie family home was established 
in the new world. His education was largely acquired in Minneapolis, his preliminary studies 
being supplemented by a course in Hamline University, from which he was gi-aduated with 
the M. D. degree as a member of the class of 1901. He then located for practice at Jlad- 
dock, where he followed his profession for two years and then removed to Bisbee, where he 
has remained continuously since 1903 or for thirteen years. His pronounced ability has 
won recognition in a large and growing practice. He is local surgeon for the Soo Railroad 
Company. He belongs to the Devils Lake District Medical Society, which honored him with 
election to the presidency, and he also has membership in the North Dakota State Medical 
Society and the American Medical Association. He filed on land in Bottineau county. North 
Dakota, in 1899 and his real estate possessions now include two farms of three hundred and 
twenty acres each, one in Towner county and the otlier in Rolette county. He also owns 
and conducts a drug store at Bisbee whicli he purchased in 1911. His business affairs are 
thus wide and important and successful management is bringing to him gratifying prosperity. 

In 1901 Doctor Swen.son was married to Miss Adeline Evenson and they have become par- 
ents of four children: Helen, Adeline, Fritjof and Dorothea. Politically Doctor Swenson is a 
republican, but while at all times a loyal and public-spirited citizen, never seeks or desires 
office. He is an exemplary representative of the Masonic order, being connected with lodge, 
chapter, commandery and Mystic Shrine, and he also belongs to the Modern Woodmen of 
America and the Royal Neighbors. His religious belief is evidenced by his membership in 
the Lutheran church and at all times finds expression in his relations of a public and pri- 
vate nature. 



THEODORE G. THOMPSON. 



Theodore G. Thompson, of Cooperstown, operating extensively in the field of real estate 
and senior partner in the-Thompson-McDermot Company, which is engaged in merchandising, 
was born at Herring Lake, .Jackson county. Minnesota, in October, 1877, a son of Knute 
Thompson. Ho was the eldest of four children and was but five years of age when brought 
to Cooperstown, where he pursued his education in the public schools, afterward continuing 
his studies in the University of North Dakota. In 1S97 he opened a general store in Finley, 
where he rciiiaineil until I'.Ml.J. wlien he disposed of his interest in that place and entered 



152 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

busimss circles in Cooperstown in partnership witli his brother, T. A. Thompson, who later 
took up tlie profession of law and is now district judge at Kalispell, Montana. The brothers 
conducted their mercantile interests under the firm style of Tliompson Brothers and the 
partnership was maintained until 190G, when T. A. Thompson was succeeded by J. H. 
McDermot and George K. Houghton under the firm style of the Thompson-McDermot Com- 
pany. Their store, which would be a credit to a city of much larger size than Cooperstown, 
is at the corner of Burrell and Ninth streets, in the center of the business district. Their 
building is fifty by one hundred feet. They carry a complete and well selected line of 
"cneral mercluuidise, for which they find a ready sale. They are most careful in the per- 
sonnel of the house, in the line of goods carried and in tlie treatment accorded patrons and 
their stoclc displays many of the most attractive features oli'ered by domestic and foreign 
markets. In January, 1915, Mr. Thompson joined H. S. Halverson, H. V. Hammer and G. 
H. Condy in organizing the Thompson-Halverson Land Company and to the conduct of 
tlieir real estate business Mr. Thompson is now largely devoting his time and energies, 
handling an extensive amount of land belonging to the company and to its individual mem- 
bers. This company has been instrumental in bringing in many new settlers and locating 
them under favorable conditions. Personally Mr. Thompson has valuable farm holdings 
which are operated by renters. He is also the vice president of the Sutton Mercantile Com- 
pany at Sutton, iSTorth Dakota. 

On the 6th of JiiYie, 1906, Mr. Thompson was married to Miss Helga M. Hammer, a 
daughter of H. P. Hammer, a leading business man of Cooperstown, mentioned elsewhere in 
this work. Their children are Kenneth Howard, Mary Helen and Eleanor. 

Mr. Thompson is a prominent Mason, belonging to the blue lodge, the Scottish Kite and 
the Mystic Shrine, and he is a trustee of the Northern Light Masonic Temple Association 
which is erecting in Cooperstown a thirty-five thousand dollar building for Masonic uses 
exclusively. He is also a member of the Sons of Norway and he possesses many of the 
sterling traits for which the citizens who have come from the land of the midnight sun are 
justly famous. Diligence and determination are accounted among his salient characteristics 
and have enabled him to accomplish liis purposes, wliicli have ever had their root in laudable 
ambition tliat has been a spur to honorable endeavor. 



G. MARSHALL FOSTER, D. D. S. 

One of the most prominent dentists of the western part of North Dakota is Dr. G. 
Marsliall Foster, who is successfully engaged in the practice of his chosen profession at Beach. 
He was born on the 14th of September, 1878, in Albion. Michigan, of which state his parents, 
Cliarles M. and Minnie G. (Orr) Foster, were residents for many years though natives of 
New England. In 1881 the family came to North Dakota and located near .Jamestown, where 
the father took up a homestead. 

There Doctor Foster was reared, his early education being obtained in the public schools 
of Eldridge. and he later attended the high school of Jamestown. In 1901 he was made 
commissary agent for the State Hospital for the Insane at the latter place and was con- 
nected with the financial department of that institution, looking after and distributing sup- 
plies. For six years he efficiently filled that position but preferring a professional career 
he then entered the Cliicago College of Dental Surgery, from which he was graduated in 
1910. He at once opened an office in Beach and here he has since practiced with marked 
success, his patronage coming from the best people of the town and surrounding country. 

On the 35th of December, 1910, Doctor Foster was united in marriage to Miss Daisy R. 
Hom, a native of Wisconsin, who became a trained nurse and practiced in North Dakota 
prior to lier marriage. The Doctor and his wife now have three sons: Ray M., Rex M. and 
Reese. 

By his ballot Doctor Foster supports the men and mea.sures of the republican party but 
has little time for politics, preferring to devote his attention to his business interests. He 
is a member of Sunset Lodge, No. 88, A. F. & A. M., of Beach, and in professional circles 
he stands high, being a prominent member of the North Dakota State Dental Association 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 153 

and the National Dental Association. He also belongs to the Delta Sigma Delta, a dental 
fraternity, and the Kortli Dakota Automolnle Association. He is an active supporter in all 
measures calculated to promote the interests of dentistry, has attended and given clinics 
throughout the state, and by giving free lectures is trying to educate school children in 
the care of their teeth. The Doctor is a member of the executive committee building the 
new Masonic Temple at Beach and never withholds his support from any enterprise calcu- 
lated to promote the moral and material welfare of his community. 



JOHN CHAKLES FIELD. 



John Giarlcs Field has for tlie past si.xteen years served as county surveyor of Williams 
county and as one of its pioneer settlers has been prominently identified with the develop- 
ment of the county. Since 1887 he has made his home in VVilliston and has always been 
regarded as one of its leading citizens. 

Mr. Field was born in Pittsfield, Hlinois, November 28, 1862, and is a son of Julius B. 
and Mary A. (St. Ives) Field, natives of Connecticut, where they continued to reside until 
after their marriage. In 1855 they became residents of Pittsfield, Illinois, where the father 
taught school for a time and later engaged in contracting. Both lie and his wife died there. 
She was born in Saugatuck, Connecticut, and also engaged in teaching school in early life, 
being well educated. 

John Charles Field attended the public and high schools of Pittsfield and later entered 
Illinois College at Jacksonville, Illinois, where he was a classmate of William Jennings 
Bryan. For a few years after his graduation he traveled as a musician with a minstrel 
show throughout the west, but subsequently took a course in civil engineering at Valparaiso 
Universit}', Valparaiso, Indiana, and a post graduate course at Gustavus Adolphus College, 
St. Peter, Minnesota, where the degree of C. E. was conferred upon him. 

For two years Mr. Field taught school in Minnesota, and then entered the service of 
the Great Northern Railroad as a civil engineer, working with a construction crew from 
Devils Lake, North Dakota, to the state of Washington. This was from 1886 to 1888 inclu- 
sive. He was next a contractor for the United States government at Fort Buford, North 
Dakota, erecting new buildings at the army post, where he remained until 1893, during 
which time he became well acquainted with the officers there. From 1893 to 1895 he was in 
charge of construction of irrigation work for tlie United State government on the F'ort Peck 
Indian reservation in Montana. 

In 1887 Mr. Field moved his family to Little Muddy, now Williston, where he has since 
made his headquarters. He assisted in organizing Williams countj' in 1892 and has held some 
county office ever since. He has filled the position of county surveyor since 1900, being 
reelected every two years ; was the first justice of the peaeo of Williston ; and has served as 
clerk of the district court. 

On the 8th of March, 1884, at St. Peter, Minnesota, Mr. Field was united in marriage to 
Miss Bertha Olive Dunn, who was born at Lake Emily, Lesueur county Minnesota, wliich 
place was named for her aunt, Emily Pettis. There Mrs. Field was reared and after attend- 
ing the local schools entered the Minnesota State Normal at Mankato, from which she was 
graduated. By her marriage to our subject she has become the mother of seven children, 
of whom four are living, namely; Ethel Agnes, who was born in Kasota, Minnesota, and 
is now the wife of Norman Dickey, a contractor of \V'illiston. North Dakota; Elsie Leali, 
who was born at Fort Buford, North Dakota, and is the wife of Noah Pranger, teller in a 
bank of Williston; Herbert Francis, who was born in Kasota, Minnesota, and is conducting 
a garage in Williston; and Esther Lena, who was born at Fort Peck, Montana, and is tlie 
wife of Leo Knboske, also interested in a garage in Williston. 

The republican party finds in Mr. Field a stanch supporter of its principles, and both 
he and his wife are members of the Christian church. He is quite prominent in fraiernq,iS 
organizations, being a charter member of the Odd Fellows lodge of Williston, which was 
moved there from Fort Buford, where it was originally organized. He is past noble grand 
of that lodge and past commander of the canton of North Dakota and past state commander 



154 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

of North Dakota. He has filled all the offices in both the Grand Lodge and the (jrand 
£ncampment and is a member of all the ladies' auxiliaries of the order. He also belongs 
to the Knights of Pythias lodge of Williston, and is "a charter member of both the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen and the Modern Woodmen of America at that place. He has 
always been found true to any trust reposed in him whether public or private and no man. 
in the community stands higher in the esteem of his fellow citizens than .John C. Field. 



JEREMIAH D. BACON. 



Jeremiah 1). Bacon, a capitalist of Grand Forks, whose business career has been char- 
acterized b}' unfaltering enterprise and keen sagacity, was born in Waverly, Iowa, June 34, 
1865, a son of Elijah F. and Sylvia Adelaide (Barker) Bacon, the former a native of the state 
of New York and the latter of Indiana. With their respective parents tlioy removed to 
Wisconsin.. The paternal grandfather, Noah Brockway Bacon, lived to the notable old age 
of one hundred and three years and passed away m Des Moines, Iowa, in 1902, while his 
wife, Mrs. York Bacon, died in Wisconsin, in 1888, at the age of seventy years. The maternal 
grandfather William Barker, removed from Indiana to Wisconsin, where his wife passed 
away about 1875, and later he became a resident of Waverly, Iowa, afterward moving to 
Rndd, Iowa, where he died in 1884, when more than eighty years of age. Elijah F. Bacon 
became a prominent business man of Waverly, where he carried on general merchandising 
and the grain business, afterward becoming interested in banking and farming. Later in 
life he removed to Grand Forks, where he died in April, 1915, at the age of eighty-four 
years. His widow is still living in Grand Forks and is enjoying excellent healtli at the age 
of eighty. In their family were eight children, of whom seven are yet living: William F., 
engaged in the machinery business at C'ando, North Dakota; F. C., a traveling salesman rcsiil- 
ing at Grand Forks; J. F., manager of the Grand Forks Herald; Mrs. J. E. Drake, of D.s 
Jloines, who is now deceased; Mrs. M. H. Allen, of Grand Forks; Mrs. C. L. Van Alstein, of 
Grand Forks; Mrs. S. X. Way, of Watertown, South Dakota; and J. D., who was the fifth in 
order of birth. 

The last named attended school in Waverly, Iowa, and on leaving the high school took 
up the occupation of farming, engaging cjuite extensively in dealing in horses and cattle, 
which he shipped from Iowa to North Dakota. In 1883 he removed to Grand Forks, where 
he began buying and selling horses and later he entered the livery business, at tlie same 
time continuing as a dealer in horses. He has been continuously engaged in that line since 
1887, and at Grand Forks erected the largest livery barn in the state. He also built the 
largest hotel. The Dacotah, in the state in 1897 and still conducts it, making it, by reason 
of his careful management and high standards of hotel service, one of the leading hostelries 
of the northwest. He also has extensive farming interests and personally superintends the 
cultivation of a large tract of land. He is a director in the Street Railway Company of 
Grand Forks and of the Northern Packing Company, is president of the Times-Herald Pub- 
lishing Company and a director of the Nelson Grain Sower Company. His activities have 
been a most important element in the substantial development and upbuilding of Grand 
F'orks along business lines. He is today a director of many of the most important industries 
and leading corporations not only of Grand Forks but of the entire state. In the conduct 
of his business he has always followed constructive methods, never building up his own 
interests at the sacrifice of the business of others. His connections now cover a broad scops 
and in the conduct of his affairs he has displaj'ed notable foresight and keen sagacity com- 
bined with marked persistency of purpose. He owns much valuable property in Cirand Forks 
and is the proprietor of the Lilac Hedge Farm of Grand Forks county, which is one of the 
finest farms in the state, supplied with every modern improvement in the way of buildings 
and machinery. The fame of this farm has been perpetuated by a local quartette of sing- 
ers, one of whom, Hiram Gibbs, a resident of Grand Forks since boyhood, w-as the composer 
of a song which is a description of the Lilac Hedge Farm and which is sung to the tune 
"Where the River Shannon Flows." It is as follows: 




JEREMIAH D. BACOX 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 157 

"There's a spot in Xoitli Dakota 
Where the English Coulee flows, 
Where they breed the jnire Ked Duroc 
And the sweet alfalla grows 
Where the Holsteius roam and Uourish, 
And the liorses keep on edge 
Where the Brundage family did their part 
To make the farm called Lilac Hedge. 

There's a S[)ot in North Dakota 
Where the poultry are well fed, 
\\"here they raise the fat bronze turkey 
And the big Khode Island Ked, 
Where the Pekin honk and wander 
Down by the water's edge, 
And they all know Roy the foreman, 
On the farm called Lilae Hedge. 

There's a spot in North Dakota, 
Where they raise the best of corn, 
And they feed it from the silo 
At su])per, noon and morn, 
Where the golden wheat and barley 
Fill the granaries to the ledge, 
'Tis the pride of Jerry Bacon 
That farm called Lilac Hedge. 

So we'll get up and holler 
For this ideal farm. 
Where they have a lot of fruit trees 
And the lilacs add their charm, 
There is not a place can beat it. 
And that's the toast we pledge, 
If you want to see a real farm 
Take a trip to Lilac Hedge." 

On December 1, 1886, Air. Bacon was married to Miss Calista Louise Brundage of Rudd, 
Iowa, a daughter of G. W. and ilaria Brundage. Mr. and Mrs. Bacon have become parents 
of three children: Myron, who spent two years at the Northwestern Military Acadi'my 
and later graduated from the high school at Grand Forks, after which he attended the 
University of North Dakota for two years; Keith, who is attending Northwestern Military 
Aca<lemy; and Newell, who died while visiting in Iowa when three years of age. 

Mr. Bacon is a prominent Mason, having attained the thirty-second degree of the 
Scottish Rite. He also belongs to the Elks lodge of Grand Forks, in which he has filled all 
of the chairs, to the Modern Woodmen of America and the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and his ability naturally 
renders him a leader in political circles as well as in other connections. For eight years he 
was a member of the city council of Grand Forks, and for four years represented his district 
in the house of representatives, while for a similar period he was a member of the state 
senate and left the impress of his idividuality upon the legislation enacted during tliose 
periods. For twenty consecutive years he has been a member of the school board and the 
cause of education indeed finds in him a stanch champion. "There are indeed few phases 
of public life in which he is not deeply and helpfully interested. He was chairman of the 
committee for raising fifty thousand dollars for the purpose of building an addition to the 
Young Men's Christian Association building and he was largely instrumental in securing 
that amount within a few days. From a comparatively humble position .Jeremiah D. Bacon 
has worked his way steadily upward to a place of marked prominence, being today regarded 
Vol. HI— 8 



158 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

as one of the leading and honored residents of Grand Forks, standing high in connection 
with the public life of the state, and one who has been a leading factor in its growth and 
development. On removing to Grand Forks he displayed remarkable prescience in perceiving 
the Towth and progress of the state. He built what is known as the Dacotah Hotel, at that 
time the largest in the state and still considered one of the best, remaining the leading 
liotel of Grand Forks, among its guests having been some of the most notable men of the 
country. He has also erected a number of the most prominent buildings of the city, and 
among the structures he has erected in the last few years are the Bacon flats. He stands 
as one of the prominent representatives of agiicultural life In North Dakota. His is one of 
the model farms of the country and all who visit that section of the state and are interested 
in farming go to see it. He is not only the owner of a model property but he thoroughly 
understands the work of scientific farming in principal and detail and is equally well 
acquainted with every practical phase of the work. He has delivered many public addresses 
upon questions of farming and with others traveled in 1915 in many states, speaking upon 
the question of diversified farming, one of which lectures was given at the capitol building 
in Madison, Wisconsin. In his addresses he never fails to speak a good word for North 
Dakota and its possibilities. In fact he has done much to advertise the state and its 
natural resources and climate, and his words have been productive of good results in its 
upbuilding. Mr. Bacon believes that the bracing air of North Dakota makes bigger and 
broader men, more hospitable and better citizens. In December, 1916, it is his intention to 
be one of a party of about four hundred North Dakotans to take a special train to Cliicago 
to attend the Fat Stock Show and boost the state. He is a director and treasurer of the 
Elks Building Society of Grand Forks; also a director of the State and County Fair Board, 
of the Grand Forks Street Railway Company, the Grand Forks Oratoric' Society, the Nelson 
Grain Sower Company, the Patent Cement Concrete Company; and a stockholder of the 
Great Northern Life Insurance Company and the Scandinavian American Bank. He enjoys 
hunting and kindred sports and wisely gives to recreation a sufficient amount of time that 
enables him to maintain his best balance in all of his life work. What he has accomplished 
represents the wise use of his native talents and his time, showing him to be a strong and 
resourceful man, ready to meet any emergency with the confidence that comes from per- 
sonal strength and a correct conception and acknowledgment of the rights of others. North 
Dakota has reason to feel thankful to him for what he has accomplished in making its 
resources and advantages known, for he has done splendid work in exploiting the state and 
its possibilities and his labors have been attended by most excellent results. 



A. L. OBERT. 



Business enterprise finds a substantial representative in A. L. Obert, a most successful 
lumber dealer of York, whose well defined plans are based upon sound judgment and whose 
prosperity is the result of persistent and earnest effort. He was born in Pennsylvania, 
February 11, 1S57, a son of Orange N. and Lois (Robinson) Obert, who were natives of New 
York. The father was a carpenter by trade and spent his early life in the Empire state, 
after which he removed to Ohio and later to Pennsylvania. Eventually he established his 
home west of the Mississippi river, becoming a resident of Howard county, Iowa, in 1860. 
There he resided throughout his remaining days, passing away February 14, 1891. He had 
survived his wife for exactly four years, her death having occurred February 14, 1887. 

The boyhood and youth of A. L. Obert were passed at Chester, Iowa, and its schools 
afi'orded him his educational opportunities. He started out to earn his living as a farm 
hand and was thus employed for six years, after which he took charge of his father's farm, 
which he cultivated for nine years. Upon the death of his parents he purchased the interests 
of the other heirs in the property and rented it for several years but ultimately sold. 

It was in 1891 that Mr. Obert arrived in North Dakota, making his way to Traill 
county, where he operated an elevator for the St. Anthony & Dakota Grain Company for 
two years. He next removed to York to become manager for the same com])any of the 
elevator at that point, having charge from 1893 until 1899. As a side line he put in a 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 159 

lumberyard in 1893 and has since been active in connection with tlie lumber trade, con- 
stantly broadening his efforts in that direction. He purchased a second lumberyard and is 
today the only lumber dealer of the town, having a business of extensive and gratifying 
proportions. He has also made judicious investment in real estate and is the owner of 
fourteen quarter sections of land, while his wife owns three quarter sections, making their 
total holdings thirteen hundjed and sixty acres. 

- In .January, l'J13, Mr. Obert was united in marriage to Miss Agnes W. Cochrane, a 
daughter of Willliam Cochrane, whose birth occurred in Leith, Scotland. His early life was 
devoted to farming. In ISOO he came to the United States and in 1869 removed to Iowa, 
settling at Dysart, Tama county, where he became a warm personal friend of Jim Wilson. 
He purchased land a mile from Dysart at five dollars per acre and there engaged in farming 
for a considerable period. In 1881 he removed to Clarion, Wright county, and purchased 
land at ten dollars per acre. In April, 1885, he became a resident of Antelope county, 
Xebraska. where he took up a homestead, which he cultivated and improved for a consider- 
able period. He next turned his attention to merchandising opening a general store at 
Orchard, Xebra.ska, where he remained for twenty years. On the 27th of May, 1871, he was 
united in marriage to Miss Marion M. Cleland, a native of Edwards, New York, and she 
passed away in Orchard, Nebraska, May 18, 1894, at the age of fifty-four years. In 1901 
Jlr. Cochrane removed to York, North Dakota, after which he made his home with his 
children throughout his remaining days, his death occurring February 27, 1906, at the age 
of sixty-nine years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Obert are Presbyterians in religious faith and fraternally he is connected 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His political opinions accord with the prin- 
ciples of the republican party and he keeps thoroughly informed concerning the questions 
and issues of the day. His interest, however, chielly centers in his growing business affairs 
and the extent and importance of his business connections make him one of the representative 
and substantial citizens of Benson county. 



J. W. \^aDUIFIELD. 

Diligence and determination, salient points in the business career of J. W. Widdifield, 
brought him in time to rank among those extensively and successfully engaged in farming 
in Barnes county. To the original claims which he entered from the government he added 
until his landed possessions comprised nearly one thousand acres and he still gives his 
thought, time and energies to agricultural pursuits. He was born in York, Ontario, Canada, 
.January 16, 1851, a son of Obed and Emeline (Hambleton) Widdifield, the former a native 
of the state of New Y'ork and the latter of U.xbridge, Ontario. The paternal giandfather, 
William Widdifield, was born in Pennsylvania and the maternal grandfather, John Hambleton, 
was a native of New York, his family being the importers and breeders of the famous 
Hambletoiiian trotting stock. Both grandfathers of J. W. Widdifield removed to Ontario, 
Canada, a large number emigrating from the States about that time. Both engaged in 
farming and both reached an advanced age, Mr. Widdifield being eighty-eight years of age 
at the time of his demise. The family was noted for longevity, one of his brothers reaching 
the extreme old age of ninety-nine years and nine months, while another lived to be ninety- 
seven and a sister ninety-si.x. A member of this family was the distinguished Dr. Widdifield, 
who represented North York in the Ontario provincial legislature and was sheriff of York 
county until his death. Olx'd Widdifield devoted his active life to farming and is now livin"- 
retired at the age of eighty-eight, enjoying good health. 

His .son, .1. W. Widdifield. the eldest in a family of four sons and two daughters, spent 
his boyhood days vipon the old home farm, dividing his time between the work of the fields 
and attendance at the public school near his father's home in York county, Ontario. When 
twenty-two years of age he began farming on his own account and so continued until 1891. 
His father was a carpenter and J. W. Widdifield learned the trade with him. both combining 
carpentering and farming as their life work. In the year mentioned J. W. Widdifield left 
Canada and made his way to Leal, North Dakota. He homesteaded a quarter section and 



160 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

also purchased a tree claim right and from time to time as his financial resources increased 
he added to his possessions until he was the owner of nearly one thousand acres of land. He 
engaged in general agricultural pmsuits and also to some extent in cattle raising. While 
he is not actively engaged in farming he still gives personal supervision to his interests, 
deriving a substantial income from his land. 

In 1S79 Mr. Widdifield was united in marriage to Miss E. C. Hilborn, who was born at 
Oxbridge, Ontario, February 28, 1855, and departed this life December 6, 1914. Scarcely 
has a death in this part of the state occasioned deeper or more widespread i egret. Jlrs. 
Widdifield had always taken a most active and helpful interest in church work and other 
agencies for the moral uplift and benefit of humanity. She was evangelistic superintendent 
of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union for the state for a number of years and was 
holding that office at the time of her death. While she belonged to the Friends' church she 
did not hold, herself aloof from other denominations but worked in perfect accord and 
sympathy with all who were seeking to benefit mankind. Hers was a most noble Christian 
character, her influence being ever a potent force for good, while she shed around her much 
of tlie sunshine of life. Many who knew her spoke of her as one of the most beautiful 
characters they had ever known. Kindly in spirit, generous in her acts, ever ready to 
extend a helping hand or speak a word of encouragement, she was indeed dear to the 
hearts of young and old, rich and poor, in the community in which she lived. "Not from 
great deeds do the blessings of life chiefly come, but from the little ministries which fill 
the long years," and day after day she spoke an encouraging or inspiring word or did good 
deeds that called forth the best in others. She cultivated good because she believed that 
the divine spark was in every individual, and the memory of her beautiful life and giacious 
presence yet remains as a blessed benediction to all who knew her. In relation to her one 
might well quote the lines of James Whitcomli Riley witli slight change: 

"I cannot say and I will not say 
That she is dead — she has passed away! 
With a cheery smile and a wave of the hand 
She has wandered into another land 
And left ns dreaming how very fair 
It needs must be since she lingers there." 

In all of her good work for the church and for the temperance cause Mrs. Widdifield 
found an able assistant in her husband, whose deep interest in matters of public concern is 
actuated by high ideals of citizenship. For the past eleven years he has been superintendent 
of the temperance department of the State Sunday School Association and has always taken 
an active part in church and Sunday School work, while his sterling traits of character 
find recognition in the high regard which is entertained for him by all who know him. 



JAMES ALFRED HOWELL WINSLOE, D. V. S. 

Dr. James Alfred Howell Winsloe, engaged in the practice of veterinary surgery at 
Cooperstown, was born in Liverpool, England, .June 22, 1874, a son of .lames Arnold and 
Rebecca (Howell), Winsloe. Among the ancestors of the family in England were several 
who became prominent representatives of the British navy including Sir Alfred A\'insloe, 
now rear admiral in the British navy, his father having been the eldest brother of James 
Arnold Winsloe. The last named came to the United States in 1879 and purchased land 
in Jlar^iand but afterward removed to Illinois and in 1881 became a resident of Xorth 
Dakota. For a time he was employed in a bank at Buffalo, this state, and subsequently 
founded the American Exchange State Bank of Buffalo, which he conducted for a few 
years. He afterward went to Ocean Springs, Mississippi, where he superintended a large 
poultry ranch, but ultimately he returned to Maryland, his home being now at Pasadena, 
fourteen miles from Baltimore. 

Dr. W'insloe, the eldest of a familj- of four children, began his education in liis native 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 161 

city anil ((iiitiiiuril liis studies in London. Knjjiand, New York city. New Haven, Illinois, and 
Hiiiralo, Xoitli Dakota, as the family lemoved from point to point. Eventually he entered 
the Ontario Veterinary College at Toronto. Canada, and was there graduated on the 20tli 
of March, 1897. After investigating various places in search of a favorable location he 
decided upon Cooperstown, where he has since successfully practiced. He has fine barns, 
furnishing ample accommodation for professional care and treatment, and he keeps in close 
touch with the latest discoveries of the profession and the latest appliances having to do 
with horse surger}', while his hosjiital is supplied with operating tables and every equipment 
to facilitate his work. In 1911 he extended the scope of his business to include the raising 
of Shetland ponies, of which he now has a large number of imported stock with Billy Puck, 
weight three hundred pounds, as leader. The ponies number altogether thirty-seven at the 
present time. Tliese are to bo found on his farm of twenty-five acres adjoining Cooperstown 
on the southwest. 

Dr. Winsloe was married on the 23d of JIa}', 1900, to iliss Anna Donesla, who was 
born in Austria, and they have two children, Edith and Olive both in school. Fraternally 
the Doctor is connected with the Masonic lodge, the Elks and the Knights of Pythias. He 
has ever taken an interest in the Griggs County Fair, of which he has been secretary for 
several years, and he has done much to further its interests. He holds membership in the 
Xorth Dakota and American Veterinary Associations and ranks among the most pro- 
gressive and successful members of his profession in the state. 



WILSON L. RICHARDS. 



Wilson L. Richards, of Dickinson, actively connected with banking and ranching interests 
in Stark county, is a native of Alabama. He was born in 1862, a son of Thomas S. and 
Mary .J. (Lawson) Richards. The father, a native of Georgia, followed various business 
pursuits, becoming at different times a merchant, stockman and hotel proprietor. His wife 
was a native of Mississippi. In 1867 they removed to Texas, where the father spent his 
remaining days, his death occurring Marcli 14, 1915. His widow survives and is yet a 
resident of Texas. 

\Vilson L. Richards remained at home until he attained his majority and for a short 
time was employed as a cow puncher in Texas. In 1885 he came with a herd of steers 
from Texas to North Dakota a distance of fourteen hundred miles, the journey consuming 
a long period. He settled near the Little Missouri river about seventy-five miles from 
Dickinson and remained on this McKenzie county ranch for four years. In 1889 he 
assumed the management of a ranch belonging to W. L. Crosby, of La Crosse, Wisconsin, 
and acted in that capacity until 1897. During that period he also engaged in raising cattle 
indejiendently and in the year mentioned he purchased the old Crosby ranch, which is 
still in his possession. The same year he took up his abode in Dickinson and has since 
made that city his home. In 1898, however, he went to Alaska in the hope of making 
profitable investments but his efforts there terminated in failure. The same year he 
returned to Dickinson and again became actively engaged in the live stock business, in 
which field his efforts were crowned with well merited success. In 1900 he organized the 
Dakota State Bank, which was later converted into the Dakota National Bank. In 1908 
he sold his interest in that institution and iK'came a stockholder in the Merchants National 
Bank of Dickinson, of which he was elected president in 1910, since which time he has 
been the chief executive officer and directing head. He is still largely interested in stock 
raising, having about five thousand head of cattle among which are two herds of two 
hundred and fifty heads eSch, all registered full blooded stock. His landed possessions 
embrace sixty-five hundred acres in Texas and twelve thousand six himdred acres in North 
Dakota, so that he is one of the largest landowners of this state. He has also broadened 
the scope of his activities in the field of banking, being interested in six banks and president 
of three. 

In 189,3 Mr. Richards was united in marriage to Miss Mabel Smith, a native of New 



162 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

York who came to North Dakota in 1884 with her parents, JIi'. and Mrs. Fayette Smith. 
Mr. and Mrs. Richards have three children, Wilson C, Thomas F. and Dorothy. 

Ml". Richards is familiar with every phase of pioneer life in North Dakota. He has 
spent twenty-five j'ears in the saddle in Texas and North Dakota, taking part in all of 
the rounduj>s covering the entire country west of the Missouri. He has seen the changes 
which have resulted in the development of a gi'eat commonwealth here since the days when 
he rode the open range and herded his cattle upon the wild prairies. The Diamond C ranch, 
which is -the old Crosby ranch now belonging to Mr. Richards, was the. battle gi-ound of 
General Sully, whose two thousand troops met six hundred Sioux Indians shortly after 
the New Ulm massacre. This is the last of the old-time ranches that is kept up. Probably 
no man in North Dakota has put more money into circulation than has Mr. Richards 
through his extensive and varied investments. At one time he was an equal partner in 
the purchase of thirty-seven thousand acres of railroad land in North Dakota. His efforts 
have always been an element of public prosperity as well as of Individual success and his 
effective labors have made him one of the most valued and representative citizens of the 
state. Mr. Richards is a well known Mason, belonging to the lodge, chapter, commandery 
and Eastern Star in Dickinson and to El Zagal Tem])le of the Mystic Shrine in Fargo. 
He is a representative of the Grand Commandery of Texas to the Grand Commandery of 
North Dakota and he has passed through all of the chairs of the lodge, chapter and com- 
mandery. Hale and hearty at the age of fifty-four years, lie seems hardly yet beyond the 
zenith of his powers. Ability, energy and ambition have carried him forward and the 
utilization of opportunities has followed his ready recognition of the chances presented. 



WILLIAM F. JOHNSON. 



William F. .Johnson, a druggist of Bremen, was born in Waseca, Minnesota, in 1873 and 
is the eldest of the three children of James and Eliza (.James) Johnson. The father was 
a pioneer resident of Waseca and in that localitj- engaged in general farming and stock 
raising. His wife also belonged to one of the pioneer families of Minnesota and both are 
now deceased but their children are all living. 

William F. Johnson largely acquired his education in the schools of Mapleton, Min- 
nesota. His father died when the son was in his fifth year, and the mother when he w-as 
a lad of fourteen, so that he was early left an orphan. He afterward became a member 
of a theatrical company and subsequently engaged in the amusement business independently, 
devoting a period of thirteen years to the conduct of a dramatic company. He then turned 
his attention to the drug business at Eden Valley, North Dakota, where he thoroughly 
acquainted himself with the trade, spending four years at that place. Later he removed 
to New Rockford, North Dakota, where he was employed as a drug clerk for a period of 
four years, and in 1910 he became a resident of Bremen, where lie now makes his home. 
He erected his present store, which was the first store in Bremen, and stocked it with 
general merchandise and drugs. The venture has proven successful and he is now enjoying 
an excellent trade, carrying a very complete line of general merchandise, drugs and con- 
fectionery. He was also appointed postmaster on the 27th of May, 1910, and has since 
occupied that position and he is the owner of Wisconsin farm lands. He is likewise a 
stockholder in the Mother Lode Copper Jline of Alaska and in the National Briquetting 
Company of Kenmare, North Dakota. In his investments he shows keen sagacity and sound 
business judgment and his energy and enterprise have carried him into important business 
connections which are now bringing to him a 'substantial reward for his intelligently 
directed labor. 

In 1908 Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss Sarah E. Weeks, who was born 
in Floyd county, Virginia, in 1890, a daughter of Mont and Sarah Weeks, who were old- 
time residents of Floyd. The father is now deceased, while the mother makes her home 
at New Rockford, North Dakota. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have become the parents of twn 
children: Ralph, who was born June 26, 1909, and died .January 31, 1910; and Jlarlyss, 
born August 5, 1912. 




WILLIAM F. JOHNSON 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 165 

Mr. .Iiilinsiiii exercises his right of fraiiohise in support of the men and measures of the 
republican l)arty and is a lirm believer in the eliicacy of its principles as factors in good 
j.'uverliment. llis religious faith is that of the Methodist church and he is interested 
in all those forces which are working for the betterment of the individual and of the 
community, giving active aid and cooperation to all well devised plans for the improvement 
and upbuilding of the district in which he resides. 



GEORGE D. RICHARDS. 



George D. Richards, cashier of the Kirst State Bank of Crystal Springs, was hoin at 
Langford, South Dakota, November 17, 1893. His parents, Clarence and Jennie (Davison) 
Richards, are natives of Pepin, Wisconsin, and of Reeds Landing, Minnesota, respectively. 
(In removing to South Dakota at an early period in its development they settled near Lang- 
ford where they still make their home, and the father is there engaged in business as a 
lumber dealer. 

George D. Richards was educated in the sdiools of Langford, passing through consecu- 
tive grades to his graduation from the high school, after which he engaged in teaching for 
six months. Later he went to Pierpont, where he was employed by the Dakota Lumber 
Company for five months, when he entered the Minnesota School of Business at Minneapolis, 
in which he pursued a commercial course. On the completion of his studies he secured the 
position of bookkeeper in the First National Bank of Steele and there remained until 
October 14, 1914, when he was transferred to Crystal Springs as cashier of the First State 
Bank, of which he is a stockholder and director. He has also made investment in farm lands 
in Kidder county and is a stockholder and the secretary of the Crystal Springs Farmers 
Elevator Company. 

On the 20tli of July, 1916, Mr. Richards was married to Miss Hazel Pool, a native of 
Minnesota, who for eight jears prior to her marriage was a resident of Steele, North Dakota. 
Politically Mr. Richards is a republican and fratornallj' is connected with the Masonic lodge 
at Steele. Interested in the welfare of his community, he does everything in his power to 
advance its upbuilding and has served as school treasurer and town treasurer. The greater 
|)art of his attention, however, is given to his banking interests and in this connection he is 
associated with Dr. T. S. Pryse, who is president of the bank, and F'. I. Kaufmann, who is 
vice president. 



HERBERT B. GRAY. 



Among the men promincntl}- identilicd witli financial interests in Towner County is 
numbered Herbert B. Gray, who is now serving as cashier of the new organized Rock Lake 
State Bank at Rock Lake, North Dakota. He was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, 
December 12, 1879, a son of Edward B. and Rachel A. (John) Gray, who were also natives of 
the Keystone state and representatives of honored old Pennsylvania families. For many years 
the father was engaged in the coal and feed business at Whitford, Chester County, and at 
the same time served as postmaster and ticket agent for the Pennsylvania Railroad at tliat 
place. He passed away in the spring of 1913, and the mother died the following fall. 

Ilorliert B. Gray obtained his early education in the district schools near his boyhooil 
home and this was supplemented by a course at Westchester high school, from which 
he was graduated in the class of 1899. In September of the same year he came west and 
located at Linton, Emmons county. North Dakota, where he taught school that fall. In 
the following spring he accepted a position in the ofUce of the register of deeds, but in 
April, 1900, went to Bismarck, where he obtained liis first experience in the banking business 
as an employe in the First National Bank under the preceptorsliip of Pye & Little, two of the 
ablest bankers of the west. This firm also o])erated branch banks and lumberyards at 
(lillerent points throughout the state and after about a year spent in the First National 



166 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Bank at Bismarck they appointed Mr. (Jray as local agent for their lumberyard at that 
place. Occasionally he also served as relief man for their branch banks and lumberjards 
and he remained with them until 1904. The following year he was in the employ of the 
Mandan Mercantile Company as bookkeeper at Mannhaven, Mercer count}', North Dakota^ 
but on the founding of tlie town of Rock Lake in 1905 lie removed to tiiat place and became 
local manager of the lumberyard of the John D. Grulier Company, serving in that capacity 
up to the fall of I'OOS, when he was otl'ered and accepted the cashiership of the Farmers State 
Bank of Eock Lake. In 1911 that bank absorbed the First National Bank and on their 
consolidation under that name of the First National Bank Mr. Gray continued as cashier up 
to the 1st of May, 1916, when he resigned that position to accept the cashiership of the 
newly organized Eock Lake State Bank, the officers of which are all local business men of 
known reliability. Iowa capital has been invested in the enterprise and the capital 
stock is twenty thousand dollars. Since the opening of the bank for business on the 1st of 
July, 1916, the deposits have reached forty thousand dollars in three months, and loans 
and discounts amount to thirty-five thousand dollars. 

In February, 1910, Mr. Gray was united in marriage to Miss Stella M. Balfour, of Hannah, 
North Dakota, and to them have been born two children, Catherine Elizabeth and .James 
Edward. Fraternally Mr. Gray is a member of the Devils Lake Lodge, No. 1216, B. P. 0. E.; 
and Eock Lake Lodge, No. 145, I. 0. O. F. ; and politically he is identified with the republican 
party. For several years he has served as treasurer of the special school district of Eock 
Lake and he is also filling the position of treasurer of the village. He is one of the well 
known bankers of the northern part of the state and occupies an enviable position in 
business circles as a man of unquestioned integrity, sound judgment and good executive 
ability. 



WILLIAM A. VENNUM. 



William A. Vennum, a farmer living on section 1, Grand Vallej' township, Dickey 
county, has been identified with tliat county from carlj^ pioneer times and has contributed 
much to its development, especially along agricultural lines. He was born in Whiteside 
county, Illinois, October 25, 1844, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Venniim, who died during 
the smallpox scourge that swept over the country in 1847. Their son, William A., was then 
reared in the home of Moses A. Green. At an early age he began working as a farm hand 
for others, but before a year had passed the Civil war was inaugurated and, prompted by 
a spirit of loyalty and patriotism, Mr. Vennum responded to the country's call for aid,^ 
enlisting in August, 1861, as a member of Company C, Sixty-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry,. 
with which regiment he continued until the close of hostilities. He was mustered out of 
service in July, 1865, with a most creditable military record, having participated in a 
number of hotly contested engagements. 

After being honorably discharged Mr. Vennum returned to Illinois and for four or five 
years continued to work as a farm hand, after which he began farming for himself on 
rented land. On January 28, 1874, he was united in marriage to Miss Jane Green, of 
Carroll county, Illinois, and later they removed westward to North Dakota, casting in their 
lot with the pioneer settlers of Dickey county, where they arrived on the Ttli of April, 
1882. Immediately afterward Mr. Vennum took up a preemption of one hundred and 
sixty acres and in the summer of 1883 secured a homestead claim, while a few years 
later he bought a relinquishment on a tree claim. He has made some changes in his. 
land holdings during the intervening years but still owns three quarter sections and is one 
of the substantial farmers and sterling citizens of Dickey county. His entire life has been 
devoted to agricultural pursuits and he has won through earnest, honest labor a substantial 
measure of success. 

To Mr. and Mrs. \'cnnum have been born a son and six daughters: Martin, at home; 
Delia, the wife of Carl Woodard, of Forbes, North Dakota; Celia, the wife of Bert Hilton, 
a fruit grower of California; Maud, the deceased wife of Ethan O. Gordon; Ada S., the wife of 
Fred J. Tomlin, a resident of Illinois; and Ida and Laura, both at home. The two youngest 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 167 

daughters arc firaduati's of tlic Kmtli Dukuta State Xoriiuil ami liiilustrial Scliool of Ellfiiilale 
and are now capable and successful teachers. 

In politics Mr. N'ennum is a democrat and has served as townsliip assessor l)ut iias 
never been a seeker for political ollice. For many years he lias been a member of tlie school 
board and the cause of public education receives his strong endorsement and earnest support. 
In fact he stands for all those measures which tend to promote the substantial devi'lopnicnt of 
his community, and in days of peace he is as loyal to his country as when he followed the 
stars and stripes on the battlefields of the south. 



HERMAN J. BERGETH. 

lI'Minan J. Bcrgctli, assistant cashier of the Farmers Bank of Newbury, North Dakota, 
is a native of this state, his birth occurring in Penn, Ramsey county, on the 15th of June, 
1890, and is a son of John and Nellie (Stoe) Bergeth, both natives of Norway. On coming 
to America about 1878 the father located in Minnesota, where he took up a preemption and 
engaged in farming until 1883, when he removed to Ramsey county. North Dakota. There lie 
secured a homestead, which he has improved with good and substantial buildings and which 
he has since operated. His wife is also living. 

On the home farm in Ramsey county, Herman J. Bergeth grew to manhood, attcniling 
first the district schools and later the high school at Penn and a business college at Grand 
Forks. He was thus well fitted for life's practical duties and accepted the position of assistant 
cashier of the Farmers Bank of Newburg, Bottineau county, in which capacity he is now 
serving. The bank has a capital of ten thousand dollars and its deposits amount to forty- 
five thousand dollars. Its officers are J. L. Page, of Westhope, president; Martin Teigen, 
vice president; and John T. Page, cashier. Mr. Bergeth is a Lutheran in religious faith, and 
in politics he is a prohibitionist, believing the liquor traffic to be one of the most important 
issues before the people. He is one of the sterling young men of the community and has 
a host of warm friends. 



OSCAR T. PETERSON, M. D. 

Dr. Oscar T. Peterson, physician and surgeon of Northwood, was born at Sassja, Sweden, 
March 20, 1866. His parents, August and Clara Peterson, also natives of that country, 
brought their family to America in 1868, settling in Sibley county, Minnesota, when it was 
a pioneer district. The tract of land upon which they first located is now in the town site 
of Gibbon. There for many years the father successfully engaged in farming and in 1010 
was called to his final rest at the age of seventy-eight years. His Avidow still survives and 
yet occupies the old homestead pro|>erty at Gibbon. 

In a family of eight children Dr. Peterson was the third. After mastering the branches 
of learning taught in the public schools of Gibbon he continued his education in the Gustavus 
Adolphus College at St. Peter, Minnesota. His early life to the age of twenty-six years 
was spent upon the home farm, after which he entered what is now the medical department 
of the State University of Illinois and was graduated therefrom with the class of 189.5. He 
afterward spent six months as interne in the Bethesda Hospital at St. Paul, Minnesota, and 
on the expiration of that period entered upon the private practice of his profession in 
Northwood on the 2d of November. 1895. There he remained for three and one-half years, 
after which he went abroad for post graduate study and work in Berlin, where he continued 
for three and one-half years, receiving instruction from some of the most eminent physicians 
and surgeons of the old world. On the 1st of October, 1902, he again opened an oflRce in 
Northwood. where he has since continuously and successfully engaged in the general practice 
of medicine and surgery. His ability in that connection is pronounced, being based upon a 
coniprohensivc knowledge of the most scientific principles, and his judgment is seldom, if 
ever, at fault in the diagnosis of a ease. His use of remedial agencies brings desired results 



168 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

and his practice is now extensive and important. For a number of j'ears he has served as 
}iealth officer at Nortliwood. 

On the 37th of June, 1907, Dr. Peterson was married to Mi.ss Odina Haraldson, a native 
of Iowa whose parents located tliere in pioneer times. The father is now deceased, but the 
mother is yet living. Dr. and Mrs. Peterson have become parents of two daughters: Ethel, 
who was born in Northwood, March 24, 1911; and Solveg, born December 21, 1915. 

Dr. Peterson follows an independent political course, voting according to the exigencies 
of the case and the capability of the candidates. He belongs to the Lutheran church and 
also has membership with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen. His interest in community affairs is evidenced by his membership in the 
Commercial Club and along strictly professional lines he has member.ship in the Grand Forks 
Medical Society the North Dakota State Medical Association and the American Medical 
Association. The elemental strength of his character was shown in his determination to 
secure professional training and he largely provided for the expenses of his college course, 
after which he entered upon active work in a profession where advancement depends entirely 
upon individual merit and ability. He has ever fully recognized the responsibility that rests 
upon him and all of his professional services are performed with a sense of conscientious 
obligation. 



ANDREW PEDERSON. 



Andrew Pedorson, president of the Dakota Plumbing & Heating Company of Grand 
Forks, was born in Molde, Norway, September 18, 1867. His grandfather, Peter Pederson, 
was a man of marked intellectual attainments and became an educator of world-wide 
fame. He was a veteran of the War of 1812, serving as an officer in the army. Andrew 
Pederson, father of Andrew Pederson of this review, was a shoemaker by trade and spent 
his entire life in Norway, meeting with considerable success in his business career. He 
ivorked his way upward and for years conducted a shoe manufacturing establishment near 
Molde. He married Gertie Anna Pederson, a native of Norway, and both passed away 
in 1893, the former at the age of sixty years and the latter at the age of fifty. They 
were the parents of three children, two of whom are living, the daughter being Selma, 
the wife of Marcus Suthcleff, now a resident of Grand Forks, North Dakota. 

The son, Andrew Pederson, was educated in the schools of his native country and 
when thirteen years of age started out to earn his own livelihood. He began to learn the 
tailor's trade and also the butchering business but found neither of these pursuits con- 
genial and went to sea, spending five years as a sailor. In 1892 he crossed the Atlantic 
to the new world, making his way direct to Grand Forks, where he arrived an utter 
stranger, having neither friends nor relatives here. His financial condition rendered It 
imperative that he immediately obtain employment, and starting out on a search for 
work, he entered the empkiy of the Grand Forks Electric Light & Gas Company, with which 
he was connected until 1909, and working his way steadily upward, he served for a number 
of years as its general foreman. In February, 1909, he organized and established the 
Dakota Plumbing and Heating Company, a corporation of which he is the president. This 
company is engaged in the general plumbing and heating business and is rated as the 
largest and most substantial in that part of the state. The other officers are: Peter 
Braseth, vice president; and Hans C. Nelson, secretary and treasurer. The firm employs on 
an average of sixteen people and at times as high as twenty-five men. Its business extends 
throughout the entire state and into northern Jlinnesota, much of their work being done 
under contract. 

On the 15th of May, 1895, Mr. Pederson was united in marriage in Grand Forks to 
Miss Carrie Pederson, a native of Norway and a daughter of Peter Pederson. Seven 
children have been born of this union: Anna, Gunder, Alpha, Ruby, Alice, Ancor and Ellen. 
The parents are loyal members of the Zion Lutheran church, of which Mr. Pederson is 
secretary. In politics he is a republican, active in support of the party, and he is now 
serving as alderman from the seventh ward. He holds membership with the Brotherhood of 




AXllRKW PEOERSOX 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 171 

American Yeomen, witli the Sons of Norway and with tlie Commercial Club of Grand 
Forks. He came to America a poor boy but actuated by laudable ambition to attain 
success. He carried with him no false hope of rapidly attaining wealth but realized that 
advancement in this country, as elsewhere, must be obtained by persistent, earnest effort and 
capability. Gradually, therefore, he has worked his way upward and what he has 
accomplished is the result of individual worth and merit. He may well be proud of what 
he has accomplished, being today at the head of a firm which occupies a commanding posi- 
tion in his chosen field of labor. 



JOHN A. COEBETT. 



.John A. Corbett, editor of the Williston Graphic, was born in Ontario, Canada, March 
19, 1877, a son of John C. and Margery (Good) Corbett. The father was born, reared and 
educated in Ontario and became a railroad man in Canada. He moved to the United 
States in 1887 and followed railroading on the Great Northern at Fort Assinniboine, 
Montana, and Williston and Minot, North Dakota. He and his wife are now residents of 
Stanley, North Dakota. 

John A. Corbett was educated in the schools of North Dakota and Illinois. He spent 
some time as a pupil in the ilinot high school, from wliich he was graduated and after- 
ward became a student in the North Dakota Agiicultural College at Fargo. Returning to 
Minot, he engaged in newspapef w'Ork and in 190B removed to Williston, where he purchased 
the Graphic, of which he is now the owner and editor. This paper has a good circulation 
and is one of the bright and attractive journals published in that section of the state. 

Ml'. Corbett has been married twice and he has three children. His political endorsement 
is given to' the republican party and at one time he served as a member of the Williston 
school board but has never been a politician in the sense of office seeking although he 
keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day. Fraternally he is connected 
with Williston Lodge. I. 0. 0. F.. of which he is a past noble grand, with the Elks lodge 
and with the Modern Woodmen camp of Williston. 



CHARLES J. HOOF. 



Charles J. Hoof, who is engaged in general farming on section 30. Bryant township, 
Logan county, was born in Nova Scotia on the 12th of January, 1861, and is a son of Julius 
H. and Lucy J. (Veit) Hoof, natives of Prussia and of Quebec, Canada, respectively. They 
were married in Nova Scotia, to which country they had removed in their youth. The 
father was a painter and cabinetmaker and engiaver and devoted several years of his life 
to the art of engraving. In 1878 he and his son Charles came to North Dakota, settling in 
Traill county where he homesteaded eighty acres, residing thereon for six years. In 1885 
he went to Logan county and a short time afterward homesteaded eighty acres, upon which 
he lived until compliance with the law- concerning length of residence and improvements 
gave him title to the pioperty. Subsequent to that he and his w-ife made their home with 
their son Cliarles. In community affairs Julius H. Hoof took an active part, serving for 
two terms as county clerk and for two terms as judge of the county court. For many 
years he also occupied the position of justice of the peace and upon both the justice and 
the county benches he rendered decisions which were strictly fair and impartial, his opinions 
being based upon the law and the equity in the case. 

Charles J. Hoof pursued a district school education and on the 4th of .June, 1884. home- 
steaded a quarter section of land on section 20, Bryant township, upon which he still resides. 
This, how-ever, constituted but the nucleus of his present holdings, for he has added to his 
farm from time to time until he is now the owner of three hundred and twenty acres of 
as valuable land as can be found in Logan county. The old homestead property is one of 
the well improved farms of that part of the state, for his labors have converted it from 



172 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

a tract of wild land into rich and productive fields, and while he has thus furthered his 
business interests he has also been foremost in any movement for the upbuilding of his home 
county. 

In 1S89 Mr. Hoof was married to Miss Theresa B. Steidl, of Logan county, North 
Dakota, who was born in Austria. They have become the parents of seven children: Anna, 
the wife of Earl Janes, of Kidder county, North Dakota; Charles V., at home; Alice A., 
the wife of M. B. Fallgatter, a business man of Kintyre, North Dakota; Jessie, the wife of 
Peter Nord, of Logan county; and Mabel, Joseph and Maud, all at home. 

In his political views Mr. Hoof is an ardent republican but has never been an office 
seeker. He belongs to the Brotherhood of American Yeomen and in his religious faith is 
a Piesbyterian, while his wife is a member of the Catholic church. Diligence and determina- 
tion liave been the crowning points in his career and have enabled him to advance from a 
humble financial position to one of affluence. 



HENTIY G. LYKKEN. 



Henry G. Lykkcn. a civil engineer of Grand Forks, was born December 9, 1880, in 
Dakota county, JMinncsota, a son of Gilman H. and Ella (Thoreson) Lykken. The father, 
a native of Norway, came alone to America when a youth of fifteen years and settled in 
Minnesota but in 1879 removed to the territory of Dakota, establishing his home in Walsh 
county, where he engaged in farming and where he is still living at the age of sixty-four 
years. His wife, a native of Minnesota, was born in 1860. 

Henry G. Lykken was the eldest of their family of nine children. In his youthful days 
he attended the public schools of Auburn and afterward became a student in the University 
of North Dakota, from which he was graduated in 1905 with the Bachelor of Arts degree. 
He later pursued a course in mining engineering and won the M. E. degree in 1906. He 
entered upon the practice of Municipal Engineering at Grand Forks in the same year and 
has since done much engineering work in that city and in other parts of the state. In 
1910 he became city engineer and so continued until 1914. In the line of his profession he 
has connection with the American Society of Municipal Improvement. While city engineer 
he instituted much of the splendid system of paving, of which Grand Forks is justly proud 
and he was connected with other important improvements. 

In December, 1911, Mr. Lykken was married to Miss Frances Hamilton, of Deer Lodge, 
Montana, a daughter of William H. and Frances Hamilton, of Frankfort, Kentucky. They 
have become the parents of three children: Margaret who was born in Grand Forks in 
1912; Henry G., born in 1913; and William, in 1915. The parents are members of the 
Lutheran church and Mr. Lykken is a well known and popular citizen and his professional 
ability has enabled him to make a steady advance in his chosen field of labor. 



THOMAS E. HAYWARD. 



Thomas E. Hayward, cashier of the Golden Valley State Bank at Beach, was born in 
Cambridge, Maryland, in 1879, a son of Charles E. and Emily (Eccleston) Hayward. who 
were also natives of Maryland. The father, an attorney by profession, spent his entire life 
in his native state, practicing at Cambridge. At the time of the Civil war he responded 
to the call of the Confederacy and served for four years in the Twenty-first Virginia and 
the Second Florida regiments with the rank of lieutenant. Both he and his wife are now 
deceased. They had a family of four children, all of whom are living. 

Thomas E. Hayward, who was the j'oungest, piirsued his education in the graded 
schools of Cambridge and in Kenyon College at Gambler, Ohio. He afterward engaged in 
teaching school at Decatiu'. Illinois, for three years and subsequently was employed as a 
teacher of history in the high school of Aurora, Illinois, there spending two years. He next 
went to Minneapolis, where he remained for five years, engaged in teaching throughout that 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 173 

period, He became assistant principal of the West liigh school, in wliich connection he 
remained for a period of three years. Later he entered the Soutli Side State Bank of 
Minneapolis but after a brief period left tliat institution to accept a position with H. R. 
Lyon, who was the principal stockholder in a company owning a line of banks through 
North Dakota. Mr. Hayward became auditor of the company and entered the state in that 
capacity in 1910. In December, 1915, he went to Beach and purchased an interest in the 
Golden Valley State Bank, of which he became ca.shier and so serves. This bank is capitalized 
at twenty-live thousand dollars and has a surplus of equal amount. The institution was 
organized in ]!IO,"i by F. E. N'ear and from the beginning has enjoyed a continuous growth. 
Mr. Hayward is proving a most competent ollieial whose courteous and obliging manner has 
won him popularity with the patrons of the bank, while his loyalty to the interests of the 
institution has gained for him the confidence and high regard of his fellow officials and 
associates in the bank. 

In 1909 Mr. Hayward was united in marriage to Miss Marjorie Farnum. a native of 
Colorado who became a resident of Montana. Her father, Vinson Farnum, was a prominent 
real estate num. He has passed away, but her mother, who is now Mrs. Joseph A. Baker, 
i.s living in Jlontana. Mr. and Mrs. Hayward have become parents of a little daughter, 
Sarah Elizabeth. 

In religious faith Mr. Hayward is a Christian Scientist, belonging to the mother church 
at Boston, Massachusetts. While in Aurora, Illinois, he became a member of the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks and now has membership in the Elks lodge at Mandan. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party, but while he exercises his right of 
franchise in support of its men and measures, he does not seek nor desire office. While 
engaged in teaching he displayed notable ability as an educator, imparting clearly and 
readily to others the knowledge that he had acquired, and since entering the field of banking 
he has made equal progress, being actuated at all times by a spirit of unfaltering determina- 
tion and enterprise. 



BERT G. Mcelroy. 



Bert G. McElroy, publisher of the Dawson Press, issued at Dawson. Kidder county, 
and accorded a liberal jiatronage, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1875, a son of 
Thomas H, and Ellen F. (Hawkins) McElroy, the former a native of Xew Briinswick and 
tlie latter of Providence, Rhode Island. The father was a newspaper man and inaugurated 
the first two-cent newspaper of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He established the sheet known 
as the Milwaukee Evening Chronicle in 1879 and continued its publication for a period of 
three years. He was afterward associated with Mr. Peek, at one time governor of the 
state, as typesetter in his office. In early life he removed to Iowa, where the became the 
owner and editor of the Waukon Democrat. He was thus connected with newspaper publica- 
tion in Iowa until 18G1, at which time he returned to Wisconsin and enlisted for senice 
with the Twenty-fourth Wisconsin Regiment of Volunteers. He served until the close of 
the war. making a creditable military record through the loyalty and bravery which he 
had displayed on the field of battle. Eventually he returned to Milwaukee, where he accepted 
the position of foreman in the ofiice of the Milwaukee Sentinel and in that connection he 
continued until 1886, when he went to ShuUsburg, Wisconsin, establishing the South- 
western Local, a paper which he published until 1895. In that year he removed to Iron 
Mountain, Michigan, where he began the i)ublication of the first daily to be established 
in that town and for five years he continued in that business and made the paper an attractive 
and growing one. He afterward removed to Wausaukee, Wisconsin, afterward to New 
Holstein and later to Cudahy, Wisconsin. He was engaged in the newspaper business at 
all three of these points and it was while at CMdahy that he retired from active life. 
passing away in May, 1915. His widow still survives. The father died at the age of 
seventy-seven years, while the mother has reached the age of seventy.-eight years. 

Bert G. McElroy was the youngest of their five children, four of whom are now living. 



174 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

William H., a brother, is connected with the editorial department of the New York Sun and 
Sheridan V. is local editor of the Grand Rapids Leader of Grand Rapids, Wisconsin. 

Bert G. JIcElroy was educated in the schools of Milwaukee and of ShuUsburg, Wisconsin, 
being graduated from the high school in the latter place. He afterward learned the printing 
trade there in the office of his father and afterward was associated with his father in different 
printing offices. For a time they were connected in the publication of the Iron Mountain 
Daily and following the retirement of the father Bert G. McElroy worked for three years 
at Jlihvaukee. In 1902 he came to North Dakota and secured employment in the office of 
the Bismarck Tribune, with which he was associated for a period of a year. After leaving 
the office of the Tribune he managed a paper, the Linton Advocate, owned by C. A. Patterson, 
who was a prominent man of that time. He continued to manage the business for a year, 
after which he removed to Braddock and purchased the Braddock News, which he published 
for three years. After disposing of that sheet he took charge of the Napoleon Homestead 
of Napoleon, North Dakota, which was one of the oldest newspapers of the state. He 
continued to acceptably fill that position until December, 1915, at which time he removed 
to Dawson and purchased the Dawson Press, which has a circulation of more than six hundred. 

In 1896 Mr.. McElroy was united in marriage to Miss Mary L. Jetty, was was born in 
Montreal, • Canada, a daughter of Leon and Matilda (Laramee) Jetty, both residents of 
Canada. Mr. and Mrs. JIcElroy have become parents of three children: Donald H., who 
was born in December, 1898, and is now employed on the Bismarck Tribune; Mildred, born 
in 1900; and Luttie, born in 1901. 

Mr. and Mrs. McElroy attend the Presbyterian church. In politics he is a republican 
aiul iiublishes his paper in the interest of that party. His attention largely centers upon 
his newspaper work and he keeps in touch with the trend of modern journalism. 



C. E. FULLER, D. V. S. 



Dr. C. E. Fuller, engaged in the practice of veterinary surgery at Beach, was born in 
South Dakota in 188fi. His father, C. S. G. Fuller, a native of Bath, England, came to the 
United States when fifteen years of age, settling at Syracuse, New York, w'here he remained 
until he attained his majority. He then went to Chicago and was employed by the 
jewelrj' firm of Otto Young & Company, in which business he eventually purchased an 
interest. He was also employed at difl'erent periods by Marshall Field & Company and at 
the Fair. The period spent in these connections covered twelve years, at the end of which 
time he established Iiis home in Brookings, South Dakota, and there entered the hardware 
business in partnership with a ilr. Dox. Later he established a store at De Smet, South 
Dakota, and assumed the management of the business after retiring from the Brookings 
partnership, selling his interest to his partner. Later he admitted his brother, G. C. R. Fuller, 
to an interest in the De Smet store and that relation was maintained until 1891. To his 
stock of hardware he added general merchandise and the establishment became famous 
for miles around because of the quality and variety of the goods carried. He also took 
up stock raising as a side line, dealing in horses and cattle, and was thus a most active 
and enterprising business man up to the time of his death, which occurred March 20, 1905. 
His wife, who bore the maiden name of C. T. Dow and was a native of Portage, Wisconsin, 
died in September, 1916. 

Dr. Fuller, who was the second in order of birth in a family of four children, tliree 
of whom are living, pursued his education in the public schools of De Smet, in the South 
Dakota Agricultural College at Brookings and in the Chicago Veterinary College, from which 
he was graduated with the class of 1908. He then went to Bellevue, Iowa, where he began 
practice, there remaining until .January 7, 1911, after which he returned to De Smet and later 
practiced for a time at Isabel, South Dakota, where he also took up a homestead, to which 
he secured his title by complying with the laws regarding occupancy and improvement. 
On the 21st of February, 1913, Dr. Fuller arrived in Beach and in the intervening period 
has built up a very extensive practice, being regarded as one of the most capable veterinarians 
of his section of the state. He always keeps in touch with the latest experiments and 



HISTORY OF XORTII DAKOTA IT.j 

discoveries of a professional chanieter ami his labors Iiave been atteink-il witli notable 
results. 

On the 23(1 of December, 1914, Dr. Fuller was married to Miss Evangelyn Butterfiehl, 
of Sparta, Wisconsin, a daughter of Mr. and llrs. .lell'erson Butterfield. early residents 
of Wisconsin. To Dr. and Jlrs. Fuller has been hciiii a dauj;hter, Mereditli, wliose natal 
day was January 10, 1916. 

Dr. Fuller is a Mason belonging to the lodge at Bellevue, Iowa. His political allegiance 
is given to the republican party and in 1914 he was appointed to the position of assistant 
state veterinarian, in which capacity he is now serving, performing the duties of that office 
in addition to an extensive jirivate jiiactice. 



JAMES P. CAIN. 



•Tames P. Cain, a memlier of the North Dakota bar practicing at Dickinson, is a native 
of Iowa, his birth having occurred at Clare in 1882. His parents, Patrick and Marj' Cain, 
are natives of Ohio and Iowa respectively and are now living in the latter state, where the 
father follows the occupation of farming. 

James P. Cain, the eldest in a family of eleven children, pursued his education in 
Cieighton University of Omaha and in Georgetown University of Washington. D. C. where 
he matriculated as a law student and won his LL. B. degiee upon graduation with the 
class of IDOO. He then removed to St. Paul, Minnesota, where he opened an office and 
practiced law for a j'ear and a half, but in Maj', 1911, came to North Dakota and established 
an office in Dickinson. Here he has since followed his profession and is now accorded a 
good clientage. He is also connected with a land business, being treasurer of the Western 
Land Company of Dickinson, which was organized by .John Jloes, H. L. Eeichert and .Tames 
P. Cain in 1915. 

In 1915 ilr. Cain was married to Miss Mary JIcGinley. a representative of one of the 
pioneer families of North Dakota. They hold membership in the Catholic church of Dickinson 
and Jlr. Cain is also a member of the Knights of Columbus, in which he has filled all of the 
offices and has become district deputy of the state. He also belongs to the Elks lodge of 
Dickinson. His political allegiance is given to the democratic party and he was made its 
candidate for the office of state's attorney in 1916. His course in his chosen profession 
has been marked by steady progression since his arrival in Dickinson and his ability has 
won for him a liberal clientage. 



HUGH CASEMENT. 



Hugh Casement, dealer in farm machinery at Inkster, was born June 16. 1856, at 
I/akefield. Ontario. His father, Thomas Casement, however, was a native of Ireland and 
about 1832 crossed the Atlantic to Canada, becoming a pioneer settler of Lakefield, where 
he engaged in business as a baker, having served a seven years' apprenticeship at the trade 
in Belfast. Ireland. His work in that connection was of a high standard and he conducted 
a profitable bakery business for some time. Later he successfully followed agricultural 
pursuits and was thus engaged to the time of his death, which occurred in March, 1897, 
when he was seventy-si.x years of age. In early manhood he wedded Sarah Nelson, a native 
of Canada and a representative of one of the pioneer families of that country. By her 
marriage she became the mother of ten children, of whom Hugh was the second. She 
survived her husband for more than a decade, passing away in July, 1908, at the age of 
eighty-two years. In tracing the ancestral line of Hugh Casement it is learned that his 
great-grandfather was the richest landowner of Ireland but through the rebellion lost his 
entire estate. His grandfather. Philip Casement, served as a colonel in the English army 
for twenty-one years and took part in all the wars in West India. His uncle. Robert Case- 
ment, became the first postmaster of Lakefield, Canada, and was also a prominent merchant 



176 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

of that town. Some member of the family since that day, covering a period of almost one 
hundri'd years, has occupied the position of postmaster, W. H. Casement, an elder brother 
of Hugh Casement, having served in that position for the past forty-three years. 

Hugh Casement pursued his education in the public schools of Lakefield, Ontario, and 
in early life was busily employed at farm work assisting in clearing one hundred acres 
of land. His youth was fraught with many trying experiences and was a period of earnest, 
unremitting toil. On the 1st of July, 1884, he arrived at Inkster and purchased a farm 
covering four hundred and sixty acres of land in Wheatfield township, Grand Forks county. 
This he still owns and for many years personally carried on the work of cultivating and 
develoj)ing that property but in recent years has rented it to others. In 1904 he left the 
farm and took up his abode in Inkster, where he began dealing in farm machinery and in this 
business is still engaged, having one of the largest establishments of that kind in Grand 
Forks and Walsh counties. He deals in all kinds of farm machinery, including the John 
Deere plows and manure spreaders, the McCormick binders and mowers and the R & V 
gasoline engines. His trade has now assumed extensive proportions and he also conducts a 
branch store at Fordville, Walsh county. 

In November, 1887, at Inkster, Mr. Casement was married to Miss Emma Brodie, a 
native of Canada and of Scotch descent. Her father. Dr. Brodie, became a prominent 
physician of Millbrook. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Casement, of whom 
two are deceased: one who died in infancy; and Watson, who died when six years old. 
The surviving son is Thomas Henry Hulbert, whose birth occurred in Wheatfield township, 
Grand Forks county, and who married Hazeltine Currier, a native of Inkster and a daughter 
of Mrs. Hattie Currier, one of the first settlers of Inkster. There is one child of this 
marriage, .Jean Casement, born in 1914, at Fordville, where the father is manager of his 
father's business. 

Politically Mr. Casement is a stalwart republican, taking an active interest in the party. 
His worth and ability have been widely recognized and he was made the first treasurer 
of Wheatfield township, which position he filled until 1904. He is now serving for the second 
term as mayor of Inkster, his incumbency in the office covering four years. Fraternally 
he is connected with the Independent Order of Foresters and the Modern Woodmen of 
America. He also belongs to the First Presbyterian church, of which he is a trustee. He 
likewise has membership in the Commercial C'liib, which further indicates his interest in 
community affairs and his devotion to the general good. His has been an active and well 
spent life, his labors bringing their just reward in a most substantial success. 



W. A. HUGHES. 



W. A. Hughes, a well known merchant of Deering, McHenry county, was born on the 
Mason and Dixon line at Cardifl', Maryland, April 23, 187G, a son of Hugh E. and Isabelle 
(De JIoss) Hughes, both of whom were natives of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. The 
father was an expert slate miner and followed that occupation throughout his entire life save 
for the period of his service in the Civil war. He enlisted with a New York regiment and 
after his first term had expired he rejoined the array as a member of a Pennsylvania regi- 
ment. For nine months of the time he was held as a prisoner of war in Libby prison, 
meeting all the hardships of such an experience. He died in October, 1912, while his wife 
survived only until 1913. 

W. A. Hughes spent his youthful days in Pennsylvania and early began working in 
the slate mines, being thus employed until eighteen years of age. Thinking to find other 
pursuits more congenial and profitable, he then accepted a clerkship and was tlnis engaged 
until 1903, when he left the east and came to North Dakota, settling at Deering, JIcHenry 
county. There he again engaged in clerking until 1912, when he purchased an interest in 
the store in which he was employed and has since been one of the proprietors. The 
business is now carried on under the firm style of W. A. Hughes & Company and they 
have an extensive stock of general merchandise, carefully selected to meet the varied 
demands of the public. Their business methods are such as will bear the closest investiga- 




W. A. HUGHES 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 179 

tion and scrutiny and their enterprise is the basic element in their growing success. Mr. 
Hughes is also secretary and treasurer of the Farmers Elevator Company. 

In January, 1906, occurred the marriage of Mr. Hughes and Miss Ethel Staples, 
a daughter of Almon and Fidelia (Dunnell) Staples. Her iather was a native of Maine but 
at an early day removed to Owatonna, Jlinuesota, and there engaged in merchandising 
until his death in 1880, while his wife passed away in 1878. Mrs. Hughes is one of the pioneer 
womi'ii of North Dakota and at an early day taught school for several years in McHenry 
county and also in Willow City. She entered a homestead claim in McHenry county in 1900, 
iniinuved the property and is still the owner thereof, deriving from the place a good rental, 
while Mr. Hughes is the owner of one hundred and sixty acres near the town of Decring. He 
is a member of the Presbyterian church and she is an Episcopalian. Mr. Hughes belongs to 
the Masonic fraternity and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His political allegiance is 
given to the republican party. He was elected a member of the first town board and was 
elected mayor of Deering the second year after the incorporation of the town, while for 
some time he has served on the school board. He is deeply interested in everything per- 
taining to the welfare and progress of the district in which he resides and his aid and coop- 
eration can be counted upon to further any measure or plan for the public good. 



EDWIN F. HUGHES. 



Edwin F. Hughes, of Lakota, was born in Gloucestershire, England, .July 15, 1871, 
a son of Alfred and Harriet (Paley) Hughes, both of whom were natives of England, where 
the father has spent his entire life. He is now engaged in the giain and milling business 
at the age of seventy-three years, but in 1S87 was called upon to mourn the loss of his 
wife, who passed away at the age of forty-six. Their family numbered eight children, 
of whom Edwin F. Hughes was the fifth in order of birth. 

After mastering the branches of learning taught in the schools of Gloucester, England, 
Edwin F. Hughes continued his education in Wickliflfe College. Attracted by the opportunities 
which he believed he might secure in the new world, he then crossed the Atlantic and 
in 1895 removed to Lakota, North Dakota. His business affairs have been systematically 
and wisely conducted and the spirit of enteri)rise which has actuated him at every point in 
his career has brought him substantial and growing success. He has handled considerable 
valuable property, negotiating important realty transfers, and he is also interested in 
farming. 

In July, 1902, was celebrated the marriage of Edwin F. Hughes and Miss Clara Bakley, 
a daugliter of the Rev. Bakley, of Neenah, Wisconsin, and they have become parents of 
three children: Edwin Paley, who was born in Lakota in 1903; Edith, in 1906; and 
Winifred, in 1913. 

The parents are members of the Episcopal church and ^Ir. Hughes is an exemplary 
representative of the Masonic lodge, in which he has filled all of the chairs. His political 
allegiance is given to the republican party and he has filled the office of city auditor and 
has also been president of the school board. He is interested in all measures pertaining 
to general progress and improvement in his community and the weight of his inffuenee 
is always given on the side of development and advancement. 



JAMES M. CUBBISON. 



.Tamos M. Cubbison was one of tlie earliest residents of Minnewaukan, where he still 
makes his home, having arrived there prior to the buililing of the railroad and before a house 
had been erected in the town. In point of length of residence he is the oldest citizen there. 
He was born in New Castle, Pennsylvania, September 7, 1846, his parents being Uriah and 
Susan (Ritchie) Cubbison, both natives of the Keystone state, the former born in Lawrence 
county and the latter in Butler county. Following their marriage they resided in Lawrence 

Vol I1I-9 



180 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

county, where the father worked at the millwright's trade, which he followed throughout 
his active business career. 

James M. Cubbison obtained his education in the public schools of New Castle and in 
the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, from which he was graduated with the class of 1S67. 
He began his preparation for the drug business as an employe in a drug store in Pittsburg 
and then decided that college training should further qualify him for work of that character. 
In 1864 he left the drug store where he was employed to enlist as a member of Company 
H, Eighty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantrj', and was assigned to duty as a hospital 
steward, in which connection lie continued until the close of the war. He then returned 
home and it was subsequent to that time that he attended the college of pharmacy. In 
1866 he secured a clerkship in a drug store in Oil City, Pennsylvania, and for two years 
thereafter was a pharmacist of Akron, Ohio. He then returned to his old home in the 
Keystone state and from 1868 until 1883 was engaged in the drug business on his own 
account in !^ew- Castle, Pennsylvania. 

The year 1883 witnessed the arrival of Mr. Cubbison in North Dakota, at which time 
he took up his abode in Minnew'aukan. On the 4th of June, 1884, the count}' was organized 
and he was appointed the first county register of deeds, to which office he was afterward 
regularly elected until he had occupied that position for ten consecutive years. In 18'J4 he 
engaged in the drug business, which he conducted for fifteen j-ears, selling out his store 
in 1909. In the meantime, or in 1897, he had been appointed postmaster of Minnewaukan and 
occupied that position continuously until 1914, when he was removed to make way for the only 
democrat in the town. 

In 1887 Mr. Cubbison was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary Holland, of New Castle, 
J'ennsj'lvania, by whom he has one daughter, Susan, the wife of H. H. Hurning, of Jamestown, 
North Dakota, and the mother of a son, Harry. Mrs. Cubbison is a member of the Catholic 
church. 

Fraternally Mr. Cubbison is a Mason, belonging to Minnewaukan Lodge, No. 46, A. F. & 
A. M. ; Leeds Chapter, No. 20 R. A. M. ; Cyrene Commandery, No. 7, K. T. He is also a 
member of Jamestown Lodge, No. 995, B. P. 0. E.; the Ancient Order of United Workmen; 
and J. J. Crittenden Post, No. 31, G. A. R. Through his connection with the last named 
organization he maintains pleasant relations with his old army comrades and delights in 
meeting with the "boys in blue." He has always been interested in the cause of education and 
for several years served as a member of the school board of Miijnewaukan. His long 
residence in Benson county and his active connection with public affairs have brought him a 
wide acquaintance and the sterling traits which he has displayed in every relation of life 
have firmly established him in the goodwill and confidence of his fellowmen. 



J. DWIGHT HARGREAVES. 



J. Dwight Hargreaves, owner and editor of the Dunseith Magnet, published at Dunseith, 
Rolette county, has in this connection a finely equipped printing oflice and is issuing a paper 
that would be a credit to a place of much larger size. Mr. Hargi-eaves was born in Houston 
county, Minnesota, February 5, 1870, and is a son of Mark and Elizabeth (Ostrander) 
Hargreaves, who were natives of England and New York respectively. In 1846 tlie father 
removed to Houston county, Minnesota, in company with his parents, when a little lad of but 
seven years. He afterward worked as a farm hand and also took up a homestead, which he 
cultivated and improved until after the outbreak of the Civil war. He then put aside all 
business and personal considerations and enlisted in response .to the call of the Union as a 
member of the First Wisconsin Battery of Light Artillery. With that command he 
served for four years and then returned to his home in Houston county, Minnesota, after 
which he engaged in farming until 1872. In that year he was elected county slieriff and 
occupied the position for six years, being reelected as the result of the capable and faithful 
manner in which he discharged his duties. He then returned to Hokah, Minnesota, where 
lie was justice of the peace, and in 1886 he established the Hokah Sun, a weekly paper 
which he continued to publish until 1903. He then retired from active business life and 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 181 

spent his remaining days in well earned rest, passing away in July, 1914, while his wife 
died in 1900. Htlr. Hargreaves' grandfather on his mother's side, Hiram Ostrandcr, was 
also in the newspaper business and at one time was associated with his brother-in-law, 
Thurlow Weed, in the publication of the Albany (N. Y.) Journal, but in 1S56 moved to the 
then frontier town of La Ciosse, Wisconsin, where lie was interested in a paper. In 1858 
lie moved to Hokali, Jliiniesota, and established tlio Hokah Chief, which he continued to 
publish till after the close of the war. 

J. Ihvight Hargreaves was reared at Hokah, Jlinuesota, and in the public schools there 
obtained his education, after which he learned the printing trade in his fathers oHice. He 
was, as it were, "to the manner born," being connected with the business through environment 
and training from early boyhood. He was employed at different times as a printer in 
Chicago, St. Louis, Denver and Des Moines, spending ten years in the last mentioned city. 
Ht then purchased a newspaper plant at Colo, Iowa, which he conducted for three years, 
and in 1913 he removed to Spooner, Wisconsin, where he established the Washburn County 
Republican, which he conducted for a year. He next removed to St. John, North Dakota, 
and for a year and a half was engaged in the publication of the St. John Leader, wliich 
he established in 191o. In September, 1915, he went to Dunseith and purchased the 
Dunseith Magnet, which he has since owned and edited. He now has a splendidly equipped 
newspaper plant supplied with a linotype machine which is the only one in Rolette county, 
and he does excellent job work as well as newspaper printing. 

On the 25th of June, 1904, Mr. Hargreaves was married to Miss Mary Forney and they 
liave become parents of three children, namely: Donald, who was born December 35, 1905; 
Elizabeth, whose natal day was January 11, 1911; and Helen whose birth occurred May 24, 
1912. Mr. and Mrs. Hargreaves attend the Methodist church and take an active interest in 
its work. Politically he is a republican and at the present time is filling the office of justice 
of the peace, in which connection he renders decisions that are strictly fair and impartial, 
basing his judgment upon the law and tlie equity in the case. 



OLE HOFF. 

Ole HolT, proprietor of a photographic gallery in Grand Forks, in connection with which 
he displays much artistic ability, received his initial training along that line in his native 
country of Norway. He was born at Solor, Norway, .January 3, 1886, a son of Christian and 
Maren (Sletten) Hoff, who were also natives of that country, where they still reside at the 
ages of sixty-six and si.xty-five years respectively. The father has always followed farming 
as a life work. In their family were four children: Thorwald, a resident of British Columbia; 
Olea, who is with her parents; Ole; and Karen, a resident of Christiania, Norway. 

In his youthful days Ole Hoff attended the public schools of his native country and 
afterward entered upon an apprenticeship to a photograplier of Christiania. After completing 
his term of indenture he worked at his trade in Norway until 1906, when he came to the 
new world and made his way to Minneapolis, where he was employed in the line of his 
chosen art for two years. In 1908 he came to Grand Forks, where he was employed in a 
photographic gallery for two years. In 1911 he opened his present studio and from the 
beginning the business has enjoyed a steady and continuous growth, so that he has today 
one of the leading photographic establishments in his section of the state. He does 
excellent work, recognizing the value of light and shade and of posing. He has the 
reputation of taking pictures which are most natural and lifelike and his excellent work 
has brcniglit him a liberal patronage. 

On the 25th of June, 1908, Mr. HofI was united in marriage to Miss Thora Olsen, of 
Minneapolis, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Olsen, who became residents of Wilton, 
North Dakota, but the father is now in Alaska. Mr. and Mrs. Hofl' have two children: 
Elsa, who was born in Minneapolis, July 29, 1909; and Thora, who was born in Grand 
Forks, May 25, 1911. Both are attending school. 

The parents are members of the Lutheran church and Mr. HofT also has membership wilhi 
the Sons of Norway and with the Knights of Pythias. 1 1 politics he maintains an independent 



182 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

course and he coneentiates his energies upon business ail'airs, the honors and emoluments of 
public oilice having no attraction for him. He is in sympathy, however, with all progressive 
movements for the public good. His energy and diligence have brought him advancement in 
business and he keeps in close touch with the latest and most improved photographic 
processes. 



BERT A. BEESEE. 



B. A. Bresee, engaged in the undertaking business in Grand Forks, was born in Sac 
countj', Iowa, October 31, 1887, a son of Albert and Henrietta (Pierce) Bresee, both of whom 
were natives of the state of New York but in early life became residents of Iowa. The 
father removed to that state after living for a time in Illinois, where for many years he 
has engaged in the contracting business. He is now si.xty-eight years old while his wife 
has reached the age of fifty-six years. In their family were five children, of whom B. A. 
is the youngest. Two of the number have passed away and the others are: VV. Bresee, of 
Illinois; and D. Bresee, living in Missouri. 

In his youthful days Mr. Bresee attended scliool in Iowa and in Illinois and continued 
his education in the Sac County Institute. He nest started out in the business world in 
connection with the furniture and undertaking business at Sac City, Iowa, where he 
remained for a short period. He then went to Des Moines, Iowa, where he pursued post 
graduate work in undertaking and embalming, and later removed to Lincoln, Kansas, 
where he conducted an undertaking establishment until 1908. The succeeding two years 
were spent at Britton, South Dakota, and in 1910 he arrived in Grand Forks, where he 
o])ened an undertaking establishment that is today one of the leading business interests of 
the kind in his section of the state. He is now vice president of the North Dakota State 
Funeral Directors Association and is chairman of its legislative committee. 

On the 20th of October, 1910, Mr. Bresee was married at Britton, South Dakota, to Miss 
Sadie S. Jones, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. 0. Jones, of Britton. Fraternally he is 
connected with the Knights of Pythias and with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks 
and his political allegiance is given to the republican party. He is very popular, having a 
host of warm friends throughout both North and South Dakota, and in Grand F'orks, where 
he is particularly well known, he is spoken of in terms of high regard. 



HERMAN RABE. 



Herman Ealie, proprietor of the Dickinson Bottling Works at Dickinson. Stark county, 
was born in Germany in 1869. the seventh in order of birth in a family of eiglit children, 
although only two are now living. His parents were Fred and Charlotte Rahe. both natives 
of Germany, whence they came to the United States in 1874, settling at Howard Lake, 
Minnesota, where they cast in their lot with the pioneer residents. The fathci-, who 
had been a merchant of Germany, took up the occupation of farming in Minnesota and 
in that state his death occurred. His widow afterward removed to Dickinson, North 
Dakota, where her last days were spent. 

Herman Eabe was a little lad of but five years when lie left the fatherland. In the 
schools of Minnesota he acquired his education and upon his father's farm in that state he 
remained imtil he attained his majority. In April, 1904, he arrived in Dickinson, where 
he purchased the bottlinf; works which he has since owned and managed, building up a 
business of substantial and gratifying proportions. This is the only enterprise of the kind 
west of the Missouri river in North Dakota and his trade now covers a wide territory. 
He has been engaged in this business for the past twelve years and his extensive patronage 
makes the undertaking a profitable concern. He is also interested to some extent in real 
estate. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 183 

In 1897 Mr. Eabe was united in marriage to Miss Adina Uecker, who was born in 
Jlinnosota, a daughter of Mr. and Jlrs. Otto Uecker, who were natives of Germany but 
became early residents of IMinnesota, where they still make their home. Mr. and Mrs. Babe 
have become the parents of six children, Willie, Lydia, Albert, Hugo, Walter and Arthur. 

In politics Jlr. Rabe maintains an independent attitude, voting according to the dictates 
of his judgment. He has served as alderman of the fourth ward of Dickinson and he is 
always interested in affairs relating to the welfare and progress of tlie community. He 
belongs to both the Masonic and Elks lodges of Dickinson and is a member of the Lxitheran 
churcli. Practically all of his life has been spent in the west and the spirit of western 
enterprise and progress has actuated him at every point in his career and enabled him to 
gain the present creditable position which he now occupies as a leading business man of 
Stark county. 



THOMAS SEABORN, Jr. 



Thomas Seaborn, Jr., is proprietor of one of the mercantile establishments of Wood- 
worth, conducting a general store in which he carries a good line and puts forth every 
effort to please his patrons. A native of Illinois, he was born at Virden in 1873, a son 
of Thomas and Emma (Worthington) Seaborn, both of whom are natives of Hereford, 
England. They were there reared and following their marriage they came to the new 
world, crossing the Atlantic in 1870, which year witnessed their arrival at Virden. In 
that locality the father engaged in raising and feeding cattle, becoming recognized as 
an autliority upon various subjects connected with the business. His interests were most 
carefully and wisely managed and thereby he won a large fortune. He and his wife 
are now living at Farmersville, Illinois, and he has retired from active business, enjoying in 
well earned rest the fruits of his former toil. 

Thomas Seaborn, the second of a family of seven children, six of whom survive, 
entered the public schools of Virden, Illinois, at the usual age and was qualified for life's 
practical and responsible duties by his thorough training there. He early became familiar 
with the various branches of farm work and continued to give his attention to general 
agricultural pursuits until he was twenty-eight years of age, but in the meantime he had 
learned the blacksmith's trade and when in 1900 he came to North Dakota he established a 
bla.ksmith shop at Seaborn, which he conducted in connection with ranching and cattle 
raising. Later he established a general store and began dealing in real estate, at the 
same time continuing in the cattle industry, while a portion of his attention was still 
directed to general merchandising and blacksmitliing. He freighted all of his supplies and 
stock from Edmunds and Carrington. His nearest neighbor at that time was four miles 
distant and those who lived closest to him were ranchers and cattle men. He became an 
extensive cattle dealer of Stutsman county, building up the business to enormous proportions. 
Various interests and occupations continued to claim the attention of Mr. Seaborn until 1914 
and in the conduct of his real estate affairs he acquired property until he was the owner 
of three sections of land, but gi'adually he disposed of that and invested his money in his 
mercantile stock and in other ways. 

In 1911. after disposing of his interests at Seaborn. Jlr. Seaborn removed to Woodwortli, 
where he established a store, carrying a complete line of general merchandise, including 
furniture. In connection therewith he handles implements, having the agency for the 
International Harvester Company, and keeping on hand at all times a complete line of 
farm machinery. He likewise deals in hardware and he handles automobiles, having the 
agency for the Ford and Studebaker cars and wagons. In a word, he is ready to supply the 
needs and demands of the community along many lines and his business interests arc most 
wisely and honorably conducted. He has ever recognized the fact thAt satisfied patrons 
are the best advertisement and he has endeavored to please, his reasonable prices, courteous 
treatment and enterprising methods securing for him a business which is now large and grati- 
fying. In fact he has one of the most extensive general stores of the county, his sales 
amounting to about fifty thousand dollars per year — a fact which needs no comment, 
as it speaks for itself. 



184 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

In 1895 Mr. Seaborn was married to Miss Clara Case, who was born at Thomasville, 
Illinois, in 1S74, a daughter of Loren and Mary Case, both of whom are now deceased. 
Mr. and Mrs. Seaborn have become parents of four children : Howard, wlio was born in 
1897; Irene, born in 1899; Clarence, in 1901; and Thomas, in 1905. 

Mr. Seaborn gives his political support to the republican party. His religious faith 
is that of the Episcopal church, while his wife holds membership in the Baptist church. He 
is identified with the Masons and also with the Woodmen and his interest in the cause of 
public education Avas manifest in his service as school director. He stands for those 
things which are most worth while in the life of the community and in matters of civic 
welfare is never content to choose the second best. He does not seek office, for he feels that 
his time is fully taken up by his business affairs and in a short space of time he has 
developed a notably successful commercial enterprise. He has a fine store and it is to such 
men as Mr. Seaborn that the state owes its rapid development, his course being at all 
times such as commends him to the conBdence and goodwill of the general public. 



W. L. WILDER. 



W. L. Wilder was born in St. Taul, Minnesota, in June, 1858, a son of S. and Emma 
(Howe) Wilder, natives of Massachusetts and of Maine respectively. In 1850 the father 
removed to the west, settling at St. Paul, where he became an accountant. He afterward 
abandoned that profession, however, and engaged in farming near St. Paul. Subsequently 
he removed to California and passed away in San Francisco in 1910, the death of his v.ife 
occurring in the same year. 



HARRY McPHERSON. 



Important business interests are conducted by Harry McPherson, whose success is 
the legitimate and logical outcome of earnest purpose intelligently directed. He makes 
his home at St. John, Rolette county, and has been a very active factor in the business 
development of that section of the state. He was born at Norham, in eastern Canada, 
February 2, 1865, a son of Joseph and Ann Jane (Galbraith) McPherson, who were natives 
of Canada and of Ireland respectively. The father's parents were old empire loyalists. 
Joseph McPherson learned the carriage maker's trade, which he followed in Canada for 
many years. Ultimately he retired from business and in 1911 removed to Langdon, North 
Dakota, where he spent his remaining days, there passing away in September, 1913. 
He had long survived his wife, who died in 1876. 

Harry McPherson was reared and educated in Canada and on starting out in life 
secured a clerkship in a general store. For five years he was employed in one establish- 
ment, a fact indicative of his faithfulness and capability. On the expiration of that 
period he removed to Michigan, where he worked for a short time and then removed to 
Canada. A year later, however, he became a resident of Langdon, North Dakota, where 
he resided for three years and then went to St. Paul, where he conducted a confectionery 
business for six months. Later he again went to Langdon and filed on land two and a half 
miles southwest of the town. With characteristic energy he bega,n the development and 
cultivation of the place and continued to operate the farm for seven years, at the end of 
which time he sold out. He then again took up his abode in Langdon, where he built a 
home and for a time engaged in handling horses. In 1905 he removed to St. John, Rolette 
county, where he' established a general merchandise store, since which time he has 
conducted the business, enjoying a liberal patronage and making his store one of the lead- 
ing commercial enterprises of the county. He also handles horses, which constitutes an 
important branch of his business, and he likewise deals in real estate. He owns seven 
hundred and sixteen acres of land in Rolette county, which he operated as a stock ranch 
until the fall of 1916, when he rented the place. He is a stockholder in the Home Oil 




HARRY MCPHERSON 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 187 

Company of Devils Lake and St. John. He also owns considerable town property and 
scarcely a day goes by that he does not make some kind of a land deal. The extent and 
importance of his business interests make him one of the foremost citizens of the county. 

On the 14th of August, 1895, Mr. McPherson was united in marriage to Miss Ella 
Gibson, a daughter of Thomas and Mary Jane (Brown) Gibson, who were natives of 
Canada. The father followed farming in that country until 1884, when he removed to 
Pembina county, North Dakota, where he took up a homestead which he improved and 
developed, residing thereon until the death of his wife in 1887. He then retired from farm- 
ing and returned to Canada, where he spent his remaining days, passing away in 1910. 
To Mr. and Mrs. McPherson have been born three children: Ethel Edna, who was born in 
1896 and is now attending school at Valley City, North Dakota; Stella May, born in July, 
1898; and Jennie Louise, born in June, 1904. 

In politics Mr. McPherson maintains an independent course, voting according to the 
capability of the candidates. He has served as chairman of the town board of St. John 
and also as chairman of the school board. His wife's religious faith is that of the Metho- 
dist church. His life has ever been guided by high and honorable principles, his many 
substantial qualities being of a pronounced character. 



JOHN F. McPIKE. 



.John F. McPike, postmaster of Cando, to which position he was appointed in the 
spring of 1916, was born in Mapes, Nelson county. North Dakota, in October, 18S5, a son 
of .J. H. and Ada L. (Briggs) McPike, both of whom were natives of Missouri. Coming to 
North Dakota, they settled in Nelson county in 1883 and for two years the father engaged 
in farming there. He next became a resident of Towner count}-, where he filed on land 
and developed and improved a farm. To his original holdings he added from time to time, 
making judicious investments in property until he is now the owner of nine quarter sections. 
He hires men to farm the land while he lives in Cando, merely giving his supervision to his 
property, while he enjoys a rest that he has truly earned and richly deserves. 

■John F. McPike was reared and educated in Towner county and remained with his 
parents until he reached the age of twenty-three years. After pursuing a commercial 
course in the Gem City Business College at Quincy, Illinois, he engaged in keeping books 
for a time and then began farming on his own account on rented land, which he operated 
for eight years. In the spring of 1916 he was appointed postmaster of Cando, in which 
capacity he is now serving. In 1914 he was the candidate on the democratic ticket for the 
ortice of county register of deeds but was defeated. 

In January, 1909, Mr. McPike was united in marriage to Miss Bessie Mulheim, of 
Bowling Green, Missouri, and to them has been bom a son. Jack V., whose birth occurred 
in June, 1912. Mr. McPike is a worthy representative of the Masonic fraternity and also 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, while his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian 
church. Practically his entire life has been passed in Towner county and tliat his career 
has ever been an honorable and upright one is indicated in the fact that many of his 
stanchest friends are those who have known him from his boyhood to the present. 



ROBERT WAAG. 



Robert Waag. president of the Farmers State Bank of Petersburg, belongs to that class of 
industrious, enterprising citizens that Norway has furnished to North Dakota. He was 
born October 12, 1865, in Aalesund, Norway, and his father, Nels Waag, is still living in that 
locality, where for many years he carried on farming, his labors resulting in the attainment of 
profits that now enable him to live retired. He married Berte Ous, who was born in that 
country and died in 1910, at the age of eighty-six years. 

Through the period of his minority Robert Waag remained a resident of his native 



188 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

country but in 1887, when in liis twentj'-second year, came to the United States with the 
territory of Dakota as his destination. He made his way direct to Petersburg, becoming 
one of the first settlers of that place, and for about five years thereafter engaged in farming 
in the employ of others. During that time he also improved his opportunities to further 
his education and from 1893 until 1897 attended the Aaberg Academy at Devils Lake and 
the Minnesota Normal and Business College at Minneapolis. When his textbooks were 
put aside he entered upon the field of education as a teacher. Returning to Nelson county, 
he taught school for five years and displayed marked talent in imparting clearly and 
readily to others the knowledge that he had acquired. He then took up farming en his own 
own account and devoted his undivided attention to general agricultural pursuits for five 
years. In the fall of 1907 he became interested in the Farmers State Bank, was chosen to 
the presidency of that institution and has since been active in directing its upbuilding and 
development. It is conducted according to thoroughly modern banking methods and every- 
thing possible is done to accommodate patrons in extending liberal credit, yet never to the 
point of jeopardizing the interests of depositors. 

On the 26th of January, 1910, at Petersburg, North Dakota, Mi-. Waag was married 
to Miss Christina Reiten, a native of Norway and a daughter of Knuto and Ane Reiten, 
the father now deceased, while the mother is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Waag have two 
children: Agnes, born in Petersburg, March 25, 1911; and Norman B., born January 30, 1913. 

In politics Mr. Waag is independent, voting according to the dictates of his judgment 
with little regard for party ties. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Sons of Norway and to the Commercial Club, and the rules which govern his conduct are 
further indicated in his membership in the Lutheran church. North Dakota has always 
received his stalwart allegiance since he became a resident of the state, and with the passing 
years he has contributed in substantial measure to the development and upbuilding of 
the district in whicli he makes his home. 



JOHN F. ROBINSON. 



John F. Robiuson, president of the First National Bank at Steele, which institution 
has made an excellent showing by reason of the safe conservative business policy inaugurated 
and maintained, was born in Lansing, Minnesota, January 16, 1875, his parents being J. 
E. and Elizabeth Robinson. With the removal of the family to Austin, Jlinnesota, he 
pursued liis education in the public schools there, passing through consecutive grades 
to his graduation from the high school. He started out in the business world in connection 
with banking, securing the position of messenger in the Austin National Bank, with which 
he was connected for eight years, having been advanced to the position of teller ere he left 
that institution. He then removed to Steele in 1898 and organized the Kidder County 
State Bank with a capital stock of five thousand dollars. He became cashier of the new 
institution, with Dr. A. M. Lewis, of Austin, Minnesota, as president, and his father, 
J. E. Robinson, as vice president. In 1902 John F. Robinson purchased the interest of 
Dr. Lewis and became president, while F. D. Jones was made cashier. In the meantime 
the capital stock of the bank had been increased to ten thousand dollars and in 1907 the 
institution was converted into the First National Bank of Steele, while the capital stock was 
increased to twenty-five thousand dollars. Upon the reorganization John F. Robinson became 
president, John C. Taylor vice president and F. D. Jones cashier, all of whom continue in 
their respective offices and, together with L. Dornacker and A. R. Robinson, constitute the 
board of directors. The bank's statement shows the business to be in excellent condition. 
It has a surplus of fifteen thousand dollars, while its deposits amount to more than two 
hundred thousand dollars and its loans and discounts to about one hundred and seventy-five 
thousand dollars. A general banking business is conducted and the methods of the house 
ensure its continued safe existence, for its progressiveness is wisely tempered by conservatism. 
Mr. Robinson is also interested in farming in Kidder county, but the greater part of his 
attention is given to the bank, the subsidiary interests of which are the First State Bank 
of Tuttle, established in 1912, and the Farmers State Bank of Dawson, established in 1916. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 189 

In 1899 l[r. Robinson was married to Miss Althea R. Richards, who was born near 
Pepin, Wisconsin, and they have two children, Isabelle and Lyman, both at home. Mr. 
Robinson is an exemplary representative of the ilasonic fraternity, his membership being 
in the lodge at Steele, and he also belongs to the Knights of Pythias lodge at Steele, of which 
he is a past chancellor, and to the Elks lodge at .Jamestown. He exercises his right of 
franchise in support of the men and measures of the republican party but has had neither the 
time nor the inclination to seek public office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon 
his developing business interests, which have brought him to a creditable position in the 
financial circles of his county. 



BRIDGEMAN-RUSSELL COMPANY. 

The Bridgeman-Russell Company, butter and ice cream manufacturers of Duluth, Minne- 
sota, established a branch at Grand Forks April 1, 1916, with Roy F. Bridgeman in charge 
of the business, which has steadily grown and prospered. He was born at Duluth in April, 
1S90, a son of Henry and Charlotte (Medin) Bridgeman, both of whom were natives of Canada 
but in early life became residents of Minnesota. Recognizing the need for the manufacture 
of butter for the trade, Henry Bridgeman became one of the pioneers in the -creamery 
business and entered into a partnership under the firm style of the Bridgeman-Russell 
Company at Duluth, which is the home of the Primus butter and Velvet ice cream. Since 
establishing the business they have opened branch houses at Crookston, Minnesota, Sioux 
Falls, South Dakota, Hancock, Michigan, and Grand Forks, North Dakota. The business has 
steadily developed under the able guidance of the partners. Henry Bridgeman is living 
in Duluth and remains active in the business, which has developed into one of the leading 
industries of this great agricultural and cattle raising section, furnishing a splendid 
market for the dairymen. 

The company at Duluth, with notable prescience and foresight, recognized the advisability 
of locating one of their plants in North Dakota. The partners in the company carefully 
studied the question of location and decided to open a large output plant at Grand Forks. 
They bought a site admirably adapted to their needs and began the erection of a modern 
creamery, which is a model of its kind, every precaution being taken to make the establish- 
ment measure up to the highest standards. The site chosen was at Ninth and University 
streets on the direct line of the Great Northern Railroad, which company ran a track 
to the jilant so as to afford every facility for the easy handling of the product in shipment. 
The Bridgeman-Russell Company erected a two story building of buff brick fifty by one 
luindri'd feet. The work was begun in 191.5 and was completed early in 1916. Thoroughly 
modern machinery was installed, consisting of two large rotary churns and separators and 
also the latest improved machinery for the manufacture of ice cream. In connection a cold 
storage plant is maintained and on the second floor there are attractive offices. The question 
of sanitation was made a matter of the utmost importance in building and equipping the 
plant and upon its completion everything was inspected by the state sanitary department, 
which pronounced it one of the most modern and perfect plants of the kind in the state. 
Operations were begun on the 1st of April. 1916, and the plant has been worked to its 
capacity ever since, manufacturing twenty thousand pounds of the finest butter daily beside 
two thousand gallons of ice cream. Eggs and poultry are also shipped daily to eastern 
markets and there is a growing demand for home consumption. This company turns out 
what is known to the trade as Primus butter and Velvet ice cream and both names have 
become a synonym for excellence in their particular line wherever the product has been 
once used. In the Grand Forks plant are found thirty-five employes, -K'ith an office force 
of ten expert stcnogiaphers and clerks. Men of broad experience are employed for the 
manufacture of butter and ice cream and two automobile trucks are used for delivery in 
'Jrand Forks and vicinity. The remainder of the product is immediately transferred to 
waiting cars and shipped to eastern consimiers. When it is rememborpd that this plant has 
been in existence for only a few montlis its progress has been most notable. Its splendid 
location, easy of access, its sanitary conditions and the careful handling of the product have 



190 HISTORY OF XORTH DAKOTA 

contl-ibuted to its substantial growth and the business is today a prosperous productive 
industry of Grand Forks. The growth of the trade at this point is largely due to the efforts 
and careful management of Eoy F. Bridgeman, who is justly accounted one of the most 
popular of the young business men of the city. 



JOHN J. NIERLING. 

John J. Nierling, the organizer of the Citizens National Bank of Jamestown and its 
president from the beginning, and also president of the First State Bank of Cleveland, 
North Dakota, is a resourceful business man ready to meet any emergency and at all 
times following constructive methods in the conduct of his interests. For thirty-eight years 
he has resided in Jamestown and the upbuilding of his section of the state is attributable in 
large measure to his well defined purpose and unremitting energy. He was born in Lansing, 
Iowa, July 23, 1856, and is a son of Anton and Mary (Buck) Nierling. He obtained a public 
school education in Iowa and was graduated on the completion of a commercial course 
from the Bayless College at Dubuque, Iowa, in 1876. His early experiences were those of 
the farm, for he was reared as a farm lad. However, he early became connected with bank- 
ing, spending three years iii a clerical position in a bank. He was a young man of 
twenty-two years when on the 13th of December, 1878, he removed to Jamestown, North 
Dakota, where he has since resided. With the passing years he has become actively 
and prominently connected with business affairs as a dealer in lands and through connec- 
tion with banking and gas companies. In 1905 he organized the Citizens National Bank 
and has continuously served as its president, shaping its policy and promoting its business. 
He is also president of the First State Bank at Cleveland, president of the Jamestown Gas 
Company and a director of the Midland Continental Railroad Company. 

On" the 1st of January, 1880, at Waukon, Iowa, Mr. Nierling was united in marriage 
to Miss Lilian Spence, a daughter of George AV. Spence. She passed away in January, 
1896, leaving the following children: Harry J.; George A.; B. V., who wedded Anna De 
Puy; J. J., Jr., who married Miss Lucile Corwin; and Bessie G. 

In his political views Mr. Nierling is an earnest republican and his fellow townsmen 
have called him to office. He served at various times between 1881 and 1900 as register of 
deeds, as county auditor and as county treasurer of Stutsman county and in 1895 he 
became a member of the house of representatives for a two year term. He carefully 
considers all vital questions and his influence is on the side of progress, reform and 
improvement. Fraternally he is also in a position of recognized leadership. He was 
grand master of the state in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows in 1898 and through 
the succeeding two years was grand representative to the sovereign grand lodge. In 
Masonry he has attained high rank and is a Shriner, while with the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks he likewise holds membership. His religious faith is that of the Presby- 
terian church. His enviable standing in business circles is indicated by the fact that he 
was chosen for the presidency of the North Dakota Bankers' Association in 1914-15. Thus 
Istep by step along many lines he has progressed and as he has passed has left the 
impress of his individuality and ability upon the financial and political history of his state. 



ABRAHAM KASSIS. 



Abraham Kassis, who is now successfully engaged in the confectionery business in 
Williston and also deals in real estate to some extent, was born December 33, 1873, in 
Zahleh, district of Mount Lebanon, Syria, of which country his parents. George and 
Eegina (Jaha) Kassis, were also natives. The father was engaged in business as a merchant 
in Zahleh, where his death occurred. In 1891 the mother brought her children to America 
and first located in Fargo, North Dakota, but later removed to Williston, where she passed 
away in October, 1913. 




JOHN J. ^aERLING 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 193 

Abraham Kassis spent the first seventeen years of his life in his native land and gained 
his early business experience as a clerk in his father's store in Zahleh. During his residence 
in Fargo he was similarly employed for a time and also worked as a farm hand. In 1893 
he returned to Syria, where he remained until after his marriage, but again became a resident 
of Fargo, North Dakota, in 1896. He did farm work until the spring of 1897, when he 
secured a homestead near Rugby in Pierce county, and engaged in its operation until 
1903, when he established a general store on his farm and turned his attention to merchandise. 
Later in the same year he sold his place and removed to Williston, where he purchased a 
general store, which he conducted until 1904. On disposing of that he and his family 
went to the Holy Land and remained abroad for one year. In 1906 vre again find him in 
Williston, North Dakota, wheie he engaged in general merchandising until 1908, when he 
established the Paris Confectionery Store, which is an up-to-date candy store, modern in all 
its appointments. He is the owner of a large amount of city property in Williston, upon 
which he erects liouses and then sells, and he has a fine farm in Williams county, which he 
rents. 

After his return to Syria, Mr. Kassis was married in Zahleh, July 20, 1895, to Miss 
Freda Shikany, a native of Bukfeiya, Syria, which was also the birth place of her parents, 
Tamer and Techela Shikany. There her father engaged in business as a tobacco merchant 
and manufacturer of cigarettes for some years, but he and his wife are now living in 
Alexandria, Egypt. Of the ten children born to Mr. and Mrs. Kassis, eight are living, 
namely: .Julia, Mary, Edna and Victoria, all born in Eugby, North Dakota; Blanche, born 
in Alexandria, Egypt; and Thoiiias, George and Monaca, born in Williston, North Dakota. 

The family are communicants of the Roman Catholic church, and Mr. Kassis is a 
member of Lodge No. 1214, B. P. 0. E., of Williston. and a charter member of Williston 
Council, No. 1798, Knights of Columbus. He also belongs to the Williston Commercial 
Club. Although he came to this country empty handed he has steadily worked his way 
upward to success and is now in comfortable circumstances, due entirely to his own industry, 
good management and enterprise. He merits the high esteem in which he is held and he is 
regarded as one of the leading business men of Williston. 



JAMES L. .JOHNSON. 



•Tames L. .Johnson a merchant of York, was born in West Virginia, September 10. 
1860, a son of Andrew .Jackson and Elizabeth (Stump) Johnson, the former a native of 
West Virginia and the latter of Germany. The father took up the occupation of farming 
as a life work and was engaged in general agricultural pursuits in W>st Virginia during 
the greater part of his life. He passed away in 1S74. while his wife survived until 1887. 

.Tames L. .Johnson, whose name introduces this review, spent his boyhood and youth 
in his native state, pursuing a public school education and remaining with his parents until he 
attained his majority. In early life he learned the blacksmith's trade, which lie followed in 
West Virginia until 1884, but believing that the district beyond the Mississippi would 
furnish better opportunities to an ambitious young man, he made his way to Kansas when 
twenty-four years of age. There he worked at his trade from 1884 until 1887 and in the latter 
year arrived in Benson county. North Dakota, where he filed on land a mile from York, spend- 
ing three years in the development, cultivation and improvement of that property. The town 
of York was established just before his arrival. Not only did he concentrate his energies upon 
farming but also upon blacksmithing. conducting a shop at York until 1892. when he withdrew 
from industrial lines to concentrate his efforts upon commercial pursuits. He opened a 
general store in York which he has since conducted and he today has the largest stock of 
goods in the town, while his trade has reached gratifying proportions. In October, 1913, 
he suffered losses through fire but in the spring of 1914 he erected a modern store building 
fifty by sixty feet, in which he now carries a very attractive line of goods. He has ever 
recognized the fact that satisfied patrons are the best advertisement and his efforts to please 
his customers have resulted in the growth of his trade. He also owns a nicely improved 
farm of four hundred acres four miles southwest of York. 



194 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

In July, 1886, 'Mr. Jolinson w;is united in marriage to Miss Florence Bunker and to them 
have been born eight children: Thomas E., who is now manager of his father's store; 
Myrtle, who is a twin to Thomas and is the wife of E. P. Bretsch, a resident of York; 
William J., who is employed by his father in the store; Lilly and Fanny, both at home; 
Gretta, the wife of Clarence Fullman, a farmer of Pierce county; George, who is in the 
store; and Jay, at homo. 

Mr. Johnson was reared in the Baptist faith, but there is no church of that denomination 
in York, so that he attends and supports other denominations in the town. He is well _ 
known througli his fraternal relations, being a Scottish Rite Mason and member of the 
Mystic Shrine, an Odd Fellow and member of the Eebckahs and also a member of the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Modern Woodmen of America. Politically he 
is a democrat and for four years he filled the office of county assessor. He has also filled 
other local positions, such as town treasurer and member of the schoolboard and he is 
helpfully interested in all that pertains to the work of progress and improvement, doing 
everything in his power to advance the general good in his community. 



HUGH EGAN. 



Occupying a prominent position among the foremost business men of Beach is Hugh 
Egan, president of the Beach State Bank and also identified with other financial institutions 
in tliis state. He was born in Springfiuld, Slinnesota, on the 22d of April. 1883, and is a 
son of John and .Jolianna (Callahan) Egan, both natives of County Tipperary, Ireland, 
though they came separately to America and were married in New York. For some time 
they made their home in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, and while there the father enlisted in the 
Union army during the Civil war, becoming a member of the Twelfth Wisconsin Volunteer 
Infantry. He was with General Sherman on his drive to the sea, starting at Cairo, Illinois, 
and participating in the siege of Jacksonville, Mississippi. When hostilities ceased and 
his services were no longer needed he returned to his home in Wisconsin but in 1865 moved 
farther west, taking up government land near Springfield, Minnesota, where he lived for 
many years. There his wife died in 1888 and he continued there until two years prior to his 
death, when he came to Beach, North Dakota, and passed away at the home of our subject 
in 1913. In his family were nine children: Mary, now the wife of Thomas Kane, of 
Pocatello, Idaho; Agnes, the widow of Edward Gee and a resident of Beach, North Dakota; 
Emeline, the wife of John Sifert living on a farm near Beach; Edward, on a farm near 
Golva, Golden Valley county; Martin, Howard, JI. C. and Hugh, all residents of Beach, 
North Dakota; and Pierce E., of Flaxville, Montana. 

Hugh Egan began his education in the district schools near Springfield, Minnesota, 
and later attended high school in Sisseton, South Dakota, where after leaving school he 
worked until 1904. He then took up a homestead near Tagus in Ward county, North 
Dakota, where he lived until 1010. In the meantime he and his brother M. C. Egan started 
the Citizens State Bank of Tagus, of which the latter became president, while our subject 
served as vice president. In connection with banking they also engaged in the real estate 
business and in farming there until 1910, when they sold out and removed to Beach. That 
year they organized the Beach State Bank with a capital of fifteen thousand dollars and 
from its establishment the oflicers have been Hugh Egan. president: Louis Harth. vice 
president; Martin Egan, cashier; and John McCarthy, assistant cashier. There is now a 
surplus and undivided profits amounting to ten thousand dollars, and the deposits are 
about one hundred and seventy-five thousand dollars. At the beginning a small bank building 
was erected of brick and in 1912 an addition was made, the whole structure having cost 
sixteen thousand dollars. It is modern in equipment and is well fitted for the purpose for 
whicli it is intended. In connection with a general banking business the firm handles real 
estate and loans, making a specialty of farm loans, in which they have built up an extensive 
business. In 1914 Mr. Egan of this review went to Golva and established the Security 
State Bank, with a capital of ten thousand dollars, since serving as its president. He is 



HISTORY OF XORTII DAKOTA 195 

also inteiested in farm lands in Golden Valley county and is numbered among the most 
substantial business men of his section of the state. 

In religious faith Mr. Egan is a Catholic, belonging to St. John's church of Beach 
and the Knights of Columbus at Dickinson. He is a prominent member and a director of the 
Commercial Club of Beach, cooperating with others in promoting J;he welfare of the town 
along various lines. He is public-spirited and progi'essive to a marked degree and never 
withholds his support from any worthy enterprise for the advancement of his town and 
county. The position he now occupies in business circles is an enviable one, and his success 
is attributable to his own industry and good management. 



LAURENCE ALFRED WARNER. 

Laurence Alfred Warner, publisher of the Billings County Herald at Medora, was born 
at Hope, Steele county, North Dakota, January 7, 1890, a son of James Alfred and Eva 
(Ellsbury) Warner. The father was born in Piper City, Illinois, and the mother in St. 
Charles, Minnesota. In early life they became residents of Hope and were married there. 
For a considerable period Mr. Warner devoted his attention to newspaper publication but 
is now engaged in the real estate and insurance business in Jamestown. In the meantime, 
however, he was the owner of a line of elevators and while connected with the grain trade 
made his headquarters at Vienna, South Dakota. To him and his wife there have bcpu 
born two children, the elder being Gordon Earl, who resides at Sentinel Butte, Billings 
county. North Dakota, where he is serving as assistant postmaster. 

Lam-ence A. Warner is indebted to the public school system of North Dakota for the 
educational opportunities which he enjoyed. He attended high school at Dickey and at 
Marion, Lamoure county, and afterward matriculated in the State Agricultural College at 
Fargo. When eighteen years of age he began the publication of a paper at Hazel, South 
Dakota, and following the completion of his education he entered the employ of Walker 
Brothers of Fargo, spending three years in the composing room. He next went to Dickey, 
where he purchased the Dickey Reporter, which he published for about seven months. He 
then sold that paper and removed to Tuttle, where he established the Tuttle Reporter. Later 
he spent a brief period at Bozeman, Montana, but soon returned to North Dakota and on the 
6th of ilareh, 1916, purchased the Billings County Herald, which he is now publishing. This 
paper was established in 1906 by George L. Nelson, who continued its publication until 1909, 
when he sold out to George W. Clemens, from whom Mr. Warner purchased the jilant. 
He has a well equipped office and is doing a good business. The patronage of the paper 
has increased since he took charge both in its circulsition and advertising departments. 

On the 1st of June, 1912, Mr. Warner was married to Miss Ruby C. Walker, a native 
of Coshocton, Ohio, who became a resident of St. Paul and there resided until the time of 
her marriage. They now have one son, .lames DeWitt. In his political views Mr. Warner 
is a republican who stanchly upholds the principles of the party but does not seek nor 
desire public office, preferring to concentrate his undivided attention upon his newspaper 
work. 



D. F. MCLAUGHI.IN. 



D. F. ilcLaughlin. one of the foremost bankers of North Dakota, occupying the ]iositi(m 
of cashier in the Cando National Bank of Cando, Towner county, was born in the province of 
Ontario, near Toronto, December 27, 1861, his parents being Philip B, and Ellen (Herring) 
McLaughlin. The father's birth occurred at Mona JFills, Ontario, while the mother was born 
in Toronto. He turned his attention to merchandising at Mona Jlills and there continued 
actively in business until 1870, when he removed to the United States, settling first at Lyle, 
Minnesota, where he engaged in the grain business, being identified with that trade until his 
death. He passed away in Austin, Minnesota, in 1898, while his wife's death occurred there 



196 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

in 1906. Politically he was a democrat and was much interested in civic affairs. For 
several years he served as mayor of Lyle and also held other local offices, discharging his 
duties with a sense of conscientious obligation and a recognition of public needs that made 
him a capable incumbent in office. 

Spending his youthful days in his parents' home, D. F. McLaughlin attended the 
public schools of Lyle and afterward continued his studies in tlie Breckenridge Institute at 
Decorah, Iowa. In September, 1883, he arrived in North Dakota, then a part of Dakota 
territory, first establishing his home at Auburn, Walsh county, where he represented 
the J. H. Townsend Mill Company of Stillwater, Minnesota, as a grain buyer. Subsequently 
that business was absorbed by the Red River Valley Elevator Company, with which Mi-. 
McLaughlin continued until 1892 and within that period was advanced to the position of 
general superintendent of that company, which owned a line of elevators. In 1894 he 
embarked in tlie grain business on his own account, first establishing an elevator at Ada, 
Minnesota. That undertaking proved profitable and he extended his efforts by the 
establishment of another elevator at Argyle, Minnesota, after which he continued to build 
other elevators at difl'erent points until his line of elevators numbered fourteen and his 
business took on extensive proportions. In 1899 he became identified with banking through 
the organization of the State Bank of Cando, of which he became the cashier. In 1904 
that institution was nationalized, becoming the Cando National Bank, and Mr. McLaughlin 
remained as cashier. In 1909 he purchased the controlling interest in the First National 
Bank of Egeland, of which he is now president, and he has further extended his operations 
in the field of banking by becoming the vice president of the Bank of Hansboro and vice 
president of the F'armers & Merchants Bank of Sarles. He is also a director in the State 
Bank of Russell. He still operates two elevators, one at Cando and one at Starkweather, 
and he has extensive holdings in farm lands, owning some fifteen thousand acres in North 
Dakota, all of which, with the exception of one of the farms, is operated by tenants. He was 
also the founder and became the president of the McLaughlin Loan Company, an incorporated 
company with a capital stock of one hundred thousand dollars. His business connections, 
important and extensive, rank him with the leading business men and financiers of the 
state. 

Fraternally Mr. JIcLaughlin is connected with the Jlodern Woodmen of America, while 
his political allegiance is given to the democratic party. Both he and his wife are members 
of the Catholic church and he is a generous contributor to various movements which are 
projected for the public good. He concentrates the major portion of his attention, however, 
upon his business affairs and is notably prompt, energetic and reliable. By perseverance, 
determination and honorable effort he has overthrown the obstacles which have barred his 
path to success and has reached the goal of prosperity, while his genuine worth, broad 
mind and public spirit have made him a director of public thought and action. 



GUNDER 0. CHRISTIANSON. 

Gunder O. Christianson, proprietor of a garage and superintendent and manager of the 
lighting system at Reynolds, was born in Norwaj', August 18, 1878, a son of Julius and 
Scgried (Hansen) Christianson, who were also natives of Norway, wiiere they spent their 
entire lives. The father engaged in business as a mechanical engineer and became overseer of 
the government railway service, in which responsible position he continued for many years. 
He died in 1909, while his widow yet survives and is a resident of Kongsvinger, Norway. 

Gunder 0. Cliristianson was the ninth in a family of thirteen children and after acquir- 
ing his education in the schools of his native country he entered upon an apprenticeship 
to the machinist's trade when but twelve years of age. He completed the term of his 
indenture and then continued to work at his trade in Norway until 1894, when at the age 
of sixteen years he crossed the Atlantic and made his way to Reynolds, North Dakota. 
There he followed his trade and also spent one summer at work in the country districts, 
running a thresher engine. He afterward returned to Grand Forks county and established 
the Reynolds Garage, while later he inaugurated the electric lighting system and became 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 197 

supi^iintcndent and general manager of the plant, in wliich connection lie still continues. He 
also carries on his garage and both branches of his business are proving profitable owing to 
his capable management and unfaltering enterprise. 

On the 8th of October, 1898, at Grand Forks, ilr. Christiansen was married lo Miss 
Ragnhild Servesen and to them have been born eight children: James, born in 1899; Sydney, 
in 1901; Milton, in 1903; Victor, in 1905; Arnold, in 1907; Roy, in 1909; Alpha, in 1911; 
and Joyce, in 1913. Most of the children are now in school. 

Mr. and Mrs. Christiansen hold membership in the Lutheran church and Mr. Christianson 
is also identified with the Modern Woodmen of America. In politics he maintains an 
independent course but is never remiss in the duties of citizenship, holding to those interests 
which he believes will be of most permanent benefit to the district in which he lives. He lias 
always possessed musical taste and talent and is now leader of the Reynolds Concert Band, 
a cornet band of twenty-six pieces, their work being of high standard. Laudable ambition 
brought Mr. Christianson to the new world and he has since made wise use of his time and 
opportunities, standing today among the successful business men of the district in which he 
located more than two decades ago. 



BJARNE 0. THORKELSON. 



lijarne O. Thorkelson, cashier of the First State Bank at South Heart, Stark county, 
was born in Valley City, North Dakota, March 35, 1888, a son of Thorkel A. and Bertha 
C. Thorkelson. The father, a native of Norway, settled in Faribault, Minnesota, on coming 
to the United States but afterward removed to Valley City, North Dakota, where he was 
married. Ho engaged in merchandising there for a time but afterward became a resident 
of Fingal, twenty-five miles south of Valley City, where he owned and conducted a general 
store. Later, however, he returned to Valley City, where he opened a land and insurance 
office, continuing actively in that business until his death, wliich occuned October B, 1913. 
His widow survives and is now living at Fergus Falls, Minnesota. 

Bjarne 0. Thorkelson was the second in order of birth in a family of seven children, six 
of whom are yet living. His education was largely acquired in Fingal, where he became a 
high school pupil. Later he was graduated on the completion of a commercial course in 
a business college of Fargo and when his textbooks were put aside he returned to Fingal, 
where he worked in the First National Bank for two years, occupying the position of 
bookkeeper. He next removed to Mott, North Dakota, where for a short time he was in 
the employ of the Brown Company, land agents. He afterward went to Regent, where 
he accepted the position of assistant cashier in the Citizens State Bank, there continuing for 
a year. Returning to Mott, he was employed in the First State Bank of that place until 
March, 1913, when he went to South Heart and organized the First State Bank, of which 
he has since been the cashier and a most active factor in controlling the interests and 
shaping the policy of the institution. The other ofScers are: Frank Krueger, president; 
and Lewis Kudrua, vice president. At the time of the organization, however, A. G. Anderson, 
of Fergus Falls, became president and E. A. Huff, of Ypsilanti, North Dakota, became vice 
president. The bank is capitalized at ten thousand dollars and has a surplus and undivided 
profits of fifteen hundred dollars. The bank owns its own building and has a most attractive 
home. Mr. Thorkelson is also interested in farm lands, having about seven sections located 
near South Heart, and he carries on a real estate business in connection with banking. 
He is one of the most progressive, alert and wide-awake business men of Stark county. 

On the 14th of June, 1910, at Enderlin, North Dakota, occurred the marriage of Mr. 
Thorkelson and Miss Florence Crowell, a native of Minneapolis, Minnesota, and a graduate 
of the State Normal School at Valley City. On the completion of her course there she 
engaged in teaching at Fingal and at Anamoose, North Dakota, By her marriage she 
has become the mother of two children, Dorothea Earle and Daphne Dale. 

Mr, Thorkelson is deeply interested in everything pertaining to the welfare and (irogrcss 
of his community. He is now serving as president of the school board of South Heart and he 
was largely instrumental in bringing about the erection of a new twenty ttfisand dollar 



198 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

school building, a beautiful strueUu-e, wliieli affords accommodation for the grades and for 
the high school. He doe^ much to promote the interests of his own town and his efforts 
are practical and resiiltant. 



A. H. LEAN. 



A. H. Lean, manager for the Cando Mill & Elevator Company at Caiido, Towner countj', 
is a man of enterprising and progressive spirit, recognized as a valuable addition to the 
business circles of his community. He was born in Wisconsin, July 19, 1857, and is a son 
of Edwin and Emma (Barber) Lean, who were natives' of England. In _early manliood the 
father came to the new world and settled in Wisconsin, where he purchased land wliich 
he improved and developed, giving his attention to its further cultivation to the time of 
liis death, which occurred in 1901. He had long survived his wife, who passed away in 1873. 

A. H. Lean was reared and educated in Wisconsin, spending his youthful days in his 
parents' home, and on attaining his majority became a resident of Minnesota. Tliere he 
worked as a farm hand for a few years and about 1884 removed to Lakota, Nelson county, 
Xortli Bakota. He filed on land, taking up a tree claim, and while complying, with the laws 
that brought him title to his property he also worked in that locality as a grain buyer for 
four years. He next turned his attention to the hardware business, in which he engaged for 
two years, when he sold his store and removed to Cando, where he took charge of the plant 
of the North Dakota Milling Company. He represented that firiir for five years, at the end 
of which time a company was organized under the name of the Cando Mill & Elevator 
Company, of which Mr. Lean has since been manager. The other officers are: C. J. Lord, 
ju-esident; F. L. Thompson, vice president; and R. F. Powell, secretary and treasurer. Mr. 
Lean is not only manager but also one of the stockholders and a director of the company 
and under his guidance the business has become one of the profitable commercial concerns of 
the town. He also owns a hardware store at Rocklake, North Dakot.i, and formerly owned a 
homestead property but after proving up on it sold. 

In 1880 ocpurred the marriage of Mr. Lean and Miss Lizzie Deal, by whom he had one 
child, A. Roy, who is engaged in the implement business at Rocklake and is manager of his 
father's hardware store there. The wife and mother passed away in 1893 and in the fall 
of 1900 Mr. Lean was again married, his second union being with Anna Krause, by whom he 
has one child, Helen, born in 1902. 

Mr. Lean exercises his right of franchise in support of the principles and candidates of 
tlie republican party and fraternally lie is connected with the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men. His religious belief is that of the Congregational church and both he and his wife are 
highly esteemed in the community where they make their home and where he has won an 
enviable position as a substantial and representative business man. 



CHARLES S. MARSDEN, M. D. 

Dr. Charles S. Marsden, oculist and aurist, whose thorough preliminary preparation and 
subsequent study have made him one of the able representatives of his profession, was 
born in Middlesex county, Ontario, Canada, March 30, 1873, a son of J. W. and Anne 
(Summers) Marsden. The father, a native of England, went to Canada when quite young 
with his father who was the founder of the Canadian branch of the family, becoming a 
pioneer settler of Middlesex county. In early manhood J. W. Marsden engaged in business 
as a railroad contractor but devoted his later years to agricultural pursuits. In 1888 he 
came to North Dakota, settling in Pembina eo>inty. His wife, a native of Canada and of 
English ffescont. died in Emerson, Canada, in July, 1883, at the age of thirty years. 

Dr. Marsden the eldest of their four children, began his education in the schools of 
his native country and of North Dakota and afterward attended the University of Michi- 
gan at Ann Arbor, in which he pursued a medical course, winning his professional degree 




DR. CHARLES S. JIARSDEN 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 201 

upon giadiiation with the class of 1903. For five years following his graduation he 
practiced at Carrington, North Dakota, and then took up the study of diseases of the 
eye, ear, nose and throat, pursuing post graduate work along those lines in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, under private instruction. In 1908 he established an office in Grand Forks, 
where he has since remained, concentrating his energies upon his specialty. Here he was 
first associated with Dr. Andrew Ekern but for some time has been alone and in point of 
practice is the leading oculist and aurist of Grand Forks. He keeps in touch with the latest 
scientific researches and discoveries and thus is able to give his patients the benefit of 
broad knowledge and experience. He belongs to the Grand Forks County Medical Society, 
the North Dakota State Medical Society and the American Medical Association and for 
the past five years has been treasurer of the Grand Forks District Medical Society. 

On the 27th of June, 190G, Dr. Marsden was united in marriage to Miss Jessie Mitchell, 
of Crystal, North Dakota, a daughter of William E. Mitchell, a North Dakota pioneer. 
Dr. and Mrs. Marsden have become the parents of two sons: Charles S., who was born 
in Grand Forks, February 7, 1910; and Wendell, born March 4, 1912. Dr. and Mrs. 
Marsden attend the Methodist church, in the work of which Mrs. Marsden is helpfully 
interested. 

The Doctor belongs to the Golf Club, which affords him recreation from arduous pro- 
fessional cares. He is likewise identified with the Commercial Club. He is a Royal Arch 
chapter and thirty-second degree Mason and has been master of Acacia Lodge, No. 4, A. F. & 
A. jr., of Grand Forks. He has likewise crossed the sands of the desert with the Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. He worked his own way through the university and from the outset 
of his business career has been dependent upon his own resources. Prompted at all times 
by laudable ambition, he has advanced step by step, making his work of worth to the 
community, and his increasing ability now gives him position among the ablest oculists and 
aurists of the northwest. 



THEODORE N. HARTUNG. 



Theodore N. Hartung. .a prominent citizen and one of the leading business mentor 
Dickinson, was born in Melbourne, Australia, January 23, 1870, and is of German parentage, 
being a son of Nicholas and Elizabeth (Kenesse) Hartung, who went to Australia in 1850 
during the gold exeitment in that country and there spent the remainder of their lives. 
Our subject was educated in a Church of England grammar school in his native land and on 
the completion of his education served a three years' apprenticeship to the machinist's trade. 
He then accompanied his brother. Henry Hartung. into the interior of Australia, where 
he spent two years in surveying. 

It was in 1892 that Mr. Hartung came to the United States and located in Richardton, 
Stark county. North Dakota, where he made his home for about thirteen years. He was 
elected sheriff of the county in 1904 and removed to Dickinson in order to assume the 
duties of that office, which he filled for two consecutive terms at that time. In 1916 he was 
again reelected to the office of sheriff. 

In the meantime he has been engaged in business as a dealer in real estate and has 
also handled loans and insurance. He is a director of the Dickinson Abstract Company and 
is vice president of the North Dakota Pressed Brick Company. His varied busines.? interests 
have been most capably managed and success has attended his well directed efforts. 

Mr. Hartung was married in January, 1896, to Miss Myrtle V. Greenbaum and they 
have two children, Herman and Vera. In religious faith the family are Episcopalians, and 
in his fraternal relations Mr. Hartung is a Royal Arch Mason and a member of the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of 
Pythias, the Woodmen of the World and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He casts 
his ballot in support of the men and measures of the republican party and takes an active 
interest in political affairs. For three years he served as alderman of Dickinson from the 
third ward and has also been game warden of his district. He is a member of the 
Dickinson Auto and Commercial Club and does all in his power to promote the interests 

Vol. Ill— 10 



202 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

of his town and county, being especially active in promoting the good roads movement. 
No trust reposed in hini has ever been betra3'ed and he is today recognized as one of the 
leading and representative citizens of Stark county. 



CHARLES F. "S' ARTY. 



Charles F. Varty, owner and editor of The Bantry Advocate, published at Bantr.v, 
McHenry county, was born in Durham, Iilngland, in March, 1879, a son of John and Harriett 
(Sutherst) Varty, who were natives of England. The father was foreman of a coke 
burning plant of that country and in I88.3 crossed the Atlantic to the new world, settling 
in Monroe, Iowa, where he was interested in coal mines for several years. He then removed 
to Numa, Iowa, where he resided until 1900, when he became a resident of Ward county. 
North Dakota, and took up a homestead claim, which he developed and improved, continuing 
its cultivation for some time. Eventually lie sold that property and bought anotlier 
farm, which he has since cultivated, being still busily engaged in agricultural pursuits. 
His wife passed away in February, 1908. 

Charles F. Varty spent the first four years of his life in his native land and was then 
brought by his parents to the new world. He was reared and educated in Iowa to the 
age of fourteen years, when he returned to England, where he learned the printer's trade, 
following that pursuit in his native country for fourteen years. On the expiration of that 
period he again came to the United States and worked for nine months on his father's 
farm. He then removed to Palermo, thence to Stanley, North Dakota, where he was 
employed at the printing trade for about a year, and in 1910 he removed to Bantry, 
McHenry county, where after working as a printer for eighteen months he purchased The 
Bantry Advocate, which he has since owned and published. He has a well equipjjed newspaper 
plant and, in addition to publishing The Advocate, does all kinds of job work in a highly 
satisfactory manner. The paper has a subscription list of over six liundred and is 
recognized as the official organ of the county. 

In July, 1912, Mr. Varty was married to Miss Martha M. Templin. a native of Berlin, 
Germany. She is a member of the Lutheran church, and both are highly esteemed in the 
community where they reside. Mr. Varty belongs to the Brotherhood of American Yeomen 
and the Knights of Pythias. Politically he is a republican and is now filling the office of 
justice of the peace, in which connection he renders decisions that are strictly fair and 
impartial. 



SAMUEL J. RADCLIFFE. 



Samuel J. Radcliffe, engaged in the practice of law at Larimore, was born in S.yracuse, 
New York, September 16, 1873, a son of Robert and Linda (Sears) Radcliffe. The father, 
who was born on the Isle of Man, crossed the Atlantic to the Empire state when a young 
man and after remaining there for a number of years removed to North Dakota in 1880, 
at which time he settled in Grand Forks. Later he became a resident of Larimore, where 
he has since remained. In the early period of his residence here he engaged in carpentering 
but is now carrying on farming and is an active, enterprising man of sixty-nine years. His 
wife, who was born in New York, passed away in Larimore in 1888, at the age of forty-two 
years. Their family numbered two sons, Samuel J. and Thomas .1. 

The former was a little lad of less than seven years when the family home was 
established in North Dakota and his youthful days were devoted to the acquirement of an 
education. After attending the high school of Larimore, from wliich he was graduated with 
the class of 1891, he entered the University of North Dakota and gained his Bachelor of Arts 
degree upon graduation in 1895. He then took up the profession of teaching at Neche, 
North Dakota, and afterward became a law student in the LTniversity of Minnesota, where 
he won the LL, B. degree. He was admitted to the bar in 1899 and it was after that 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 203 

time that he secured his professional degree in tlic JMiiinesota university, winning it in 1908. 
He entered ujiou practice at Uirimore, wlierc he has since remained, and lie has always held 
to the highest professional standards, while his ability is manifest in the favorable verdicts 
whicli he has won for his clients in much notable litigation. 

On the 29th of September, 1899, Mr. lladclillo was united in marriage to Miss Margaret 
Askew, of Grand Forks, a daughter of William and Elizabeth Askew, who became residents 
of Neche, North Dakota, and are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Radcliffe have a daughter, 
Margaret, who was born in Larimore in 1904 and is now in school. 

Mr. RadcliU'e is a member of the various Masonic bodies, having attained the thirty- 
second degree of the Scottish Rite, and is also connected with the Yeomen. His religious 
faith is evidenced in his membership in the Presbvterian church, of which he is an elder. 
His interest in the intellectual progress of his community is show'n in the fact tliat he is 
now ably serving as president of the board of education of Larimore. He belongs to the 
Delta Sigma Rho, a fraternity of the University of North Dakota, and along strictly 
professional lines has connection with the State and National Bar Associations. He has ever 
been of a studious nature and this is manifest in the thoroughness with which he prepares 
bis cases before entering the; courts. He has made for himself a creditable place amimg 
the able lawyers of his district and is now accorded an extensive clientage. 



C. H. SHELDON. 



C. H. Sheldon, a grain buyer operating an elevator at Minnewaukan, where he makes 
his home, and also an elevator at Maddock, is a native of the neighboring state of Minnesota, 
his birth havipg occurred at Excelsior, December 18, 1858. His parents, Charles B. and Mary 
K. (Prentice) Sheldon, were natives of Massachusetts and Connecticut respectively and both 
were representatives of old New England families. The father prepared for the ministry 
at Williams College in Massachusetts and afterward attended the theological seminary at 
Oberlin, Ohio. For many years he filled pulpits in different parts of the country. He was 
stationed at Excelsior, Minnesota, for several years and thence removed to southern Cali- 
fornia, wliere his last days were passed, his death occurring when he had reached the age of 
seventy-four. 

C. H. Sheldon piusued his education in the public schools of Excelsior and in the 
University of Minnesota and in 1879 he began his education as a grain buyer by assuming 
the management of an elevator at Dalton, Minnesota. In 1880 he came to this state as 
grain buyer for the Northern Pacific Elevator Company at Buffalo and in 1883 lie became 
associated with his brother-in-law, Frank Thoms, in establishing a grain business at Hamil- 
ton, North Dakota. A year later, however, they sold out and Mr. Sheldon returned to his 
old position with the Northern Pacific Elevator Company at Buffalo, in which connection 
he remained until 1891. He then resigned and spent a year in southern California. In the 
fall of 1893 he returned to North Dakota and was made manager of the elevator at Min- 
newaukan owned by the Northern Pacific Elevator Compan}'. He remained in that position 
until the failure of the company two or three years later. He was continued as manager 
by the Powers Elevator Company, who leased the Minnewaukan elevator, but about 1S95 
Mr. Sheldon embarked in the grain business on his own account. For a year he bought 
on the track, following which he leased the William Plummer elevators at JDnnewaukan 
and Maddock and has since operated at both places, being today one of the well known 
grain buyers of the northern part of the state. Long experience in this connection has made 
liiiii well qualified for the successful management of the interests which are now under his 
control and his business has assumed extensive and gratifying proportions. He is also the 
owner of six hundred and forty acres of land in Colorado and has valuable orange orchard 
holdings in southern California. 

In 1880 Mr. Sheldon was joined in wedlock to "Miss ^Nfary E. Snowden, of Salem. New 
York, by whom he has four children, as follows: Isabella Jf.. the wife of Torger Sinness, 
of .Minnewaukan, North Dakota, who is the leading attorney at Benson county; Mary E., 
at home; Anna, the wife of Fred Pierson. who is manager of a line of banks in Montana, 



204 HISTORY OF x\ORTIi DAKOTA 

with headquarters at Great Inills; and Ethel I'., a high school student. The three elder 
daughters are all graduates of Carlton College. 

Mr. Sheldon is a republican in politics and for several years served as a member of the 
board of aldermen of Minnewaukan, while for a long period he has been a member of the 
school board. He takes an active and helpful interest in civic affairs and does all in his 
power to uphold municipal standards. Fraternally he is identified with the following 
organizations: Minnewaukan Lodge, No. 46, A. F. & A. M.; the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen; the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; and the American Yeomen. Mr. Sheldon 
and his family are members of the Episcopal church, in which he is now serving as warden. 
Genial and social by nature, he wins friends wherever he goes. In his business career he has 
made steady advancement by reason of close application and indefatigable energy and is 
today regarded as one of the substantial business men of his section of the state. 



DANA D. FOFT. 



Dana D. Foft, manager of the George Heaton Lumber Company of Belfield, was born 
at State Center, Iowa, December 18, 1885,- a son of Samuel and Laura Foft, who are now 
residents of Waukee, Iowa, where the father is cashier of the Bank of Waukee. His wife 
has passed away. They were the parents of six children : Florence ; Dana D. ; Wilf ord, wlio 
is living in Douglas, Wyoming; Earl, a resident of Rockwell City, Iowa; and Lela and 
Pauline, both at home. 

In the pursuit of his education Dana D. Foft became a high school pupil at Perry, Iowa, 
and afterward made his initial step in the business world in connection with the lumber trade 
by entering the employ of the Brenton Brothers Lumber Company, by wiiom he was employed 
in the local yards at Waukee for live years. He afterward spent two j'ears elsewhere in the 
employ of that company and then settled at Creston, Iowa, where he became bookkeeper for 
the Green Bay Lumber Company, with which he continued for a year. In March, 1910, he 
arrived in North Dakota and took charge of the Belffeld branch of the George Heaton Lum- 
ber Company, of which he is still manager, and at this point he has built up a good business 
for the corporation wliieh he represents, his fidelity and capability being widely recognized 
by the company. He is also interested in farming, having land near, the village. 

In .June, 1912, Mr. Foft was married to Miss Lula May Trent, a native of Braincrd, 
Minnesota, and thej^ have many warm friends in the locality in which they reside. Mr. Foft 
is a most public-spirited citizen, doing everything in his power to promote the welfare and 
upbuilding of the town. He has been a member of the Commercial Club since taking up 
liis residence in Belfield and in 1916 was elected its president. He was very active in secur- 
ing a lyceum course for the city, a course which has brought to Belfield many notable attrac- 
tions. For a year he was president of the Belfield city board, having previously served for 
a year as alderman. When president of the village he was instrumental in having many 
sidewalks laid and an electric light plant established. In 1910 he was appointed chief of the 
fire department and still occupies that position. In ])olitics iie is an independent republican, 
while fraternally he is identified with the Odd Fellows, being a past noble grand of Belfield 
lodge and the present district deputy grand master in the organization. He lias many 
substantial and admirable qualities, not the least of which is his devotion to the general 
good, manifest in many tangible ways for the town's improvement. 



ROBERT A. YEATER. 



Robert A. Y'eater. postmaster of Wing, North Dakota, claims Ohio as his native state, 
his birth occurring in Ashland in 1873. His father, Samuel Ycater, was born in Pennsylvania 
of German ancestry and spent most of his life in the Keystone state, though he died in 
Ohio about 1876. As an occupation he followed general farming. He married Maria H. 
Bushey, also a native of Pennsylvania, who is still living at the extreme old age of ninety- 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 205 

four years and now makes her home in Missouri. Eobert A. is the youngest of tlieir eleven 
iliildien, five of whom are still living. 

Keared to manhood in Ohio, Kobert A. Yeater attended the public schools and college of 
.\shland and obtained a good education, which well fitted him for teaching. About 1890 he 
removed to Emmons county, North Dakota, and there taught school for a period of three 
years, after which he located in Burleigh county, where he followed the same profession for 
two years while making his home in Bismarck. He was next in tlie employ of the Wood 
JIachine Company, a New York lirni, for about a year, and subsequently entered the service 
of W. ]). Washburn as a wheat liuyer. He also served as postmaster at Arnold for a period 
of eight years and for five years was engaged in the grain business. During that time he 
also followed farming, to which occupation he has devoted considerable attention since. For 
a year or two lie was an employe in the North Dakota penitentiary and subsequently filed on 
a claim a short distance from Arena in Burleigh county, locating thereon in 1910 and proving 
up on the same. There he engaged in general farming with good success. In December, 191^^, 
he was appointed postmaster of Wing and is now filling that position. He is also interested 
in the real estate business, handling both farm and town property. 

In 1898 Mr. Yeatej- married Miss Emma W. Peterson, a resident of Burleigh county and 
a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Swan Peterson, who located there at an early day. Her motlier 
is deceased, but her father is still living at the age of eighty-four years. Mr. and Mrs. Yeater 
have become the parents of six children, namely: Jessie M., Paul, Nettie, Douglas, Marion 
and Audrey. 

Mr. Yeater is a member of Wing Camp, No. 63, Woodmen of the World, and is a charter 
member of the Congregational church of Wing, of which he is now a trustee. His life has 
been guided by his religious belief and his fellow citizens have the utmost confidence in him. 
In politics he is a democrat. In 1910 he was appointed notary public by Governor Burke 
and reappointed by Governor Hanna, still holding his commission. At one time he was 
engaged in general mercantile business at Arnold and also dealt in real estate ,at the same 
time. His life has been a very active and busy one and at all times has been above reproach, 
winning him the high regard of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



F. J. ROBERTS, M. D. 



Dr. F. J. Roberts, the foremost physician of Towner county, located at Cando, was 
born in Rockford, Minnesota, on the 14th of July, 1876, a son of Albert and Melissa 
(MeKinley) Roberts. The father is a native of Maine and the mother of Pennsylvania and 
they were married in Minnesota, to which state Albert Roberts removed following the close 
of the Civil war, in which he had served as a member of the Twentieth Regiment of Maine 
Volunteer Infantry, thus rendering valuable aid in defense of the Union. His wife went to 
Jlinnesota in her girlhood days with her parents. It was in that state that Mr. Roberts 
was engaged in farming for many years and he became one of the foremost figures in his 
locality. He served as a member of the state legislature from Wright county and his 
fitness for leadership made him a leading figure in the public life of the community. In 
the fall of 1882 he came to North Dakota and homesteaded a quarter section of land a 
half mile north of the present city limits of Devils Lake, which property he still owns. 
In 1884 the family took up their abode upon the homestead and there remained until 1890. 
Albert Roberts was also one of the earliest business men of Fargo. He there established 
himself in the implement business, but the failure in crops during the following two years, 
which precluded the possibility of the sale of agricultural implements, led to his failure 
in that undertaking. In 1882 he went to Ramsey county and homesteaded at Creel City. 
For the jiast eight years he has resided at Devils Lake and during that period has lived 
retired, merely giving his attention to the supervision of his property interests and 
investments. 

Dr. Roberts was educated in the Devils Lake high school, from which he was -Taduated 
with the class of 189.5. The following fall he took up the study of medicine, "which he 
rend niirlci the preccptorship of Dr. W. E. Swanston of Devils T^ke. In the same fall he 



206 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Minneapolis, Minnesota, which was the 
oldest medical school in the state, and from that institution was graduated in the class of 
1899. Following his graduation he served an interneship in the city and county hospital of 
St. Paul covering one year and in that manner gained broad and valuable practical experi- 
ence in connection with hospital work. In the autumn of 1900 he returned to North Dakota 
and accepted a government appointment as physician to the Indian agency at Turtle 
Mountains, where the people were suffering from a virulent epidemic of smallpox. Out of 
one hundred and twenty cases Dr. Roberts lost but one and that death was occasioned 
through com'plications with pneumonia. 

In Novernber, 1900, Dr. Roberts removed to Cando, where he opened an office and has 
since been engaged in active practice. In the intervening sixteen years he has won liberal 
public support in the line of his profession, his practice being now extensive and of a most 
important character. His efficient work is promoted through wide study, which keeps him 
in close touch with modern scientific thought and investigation along the lines of medical 
and surgical practice. In addition to his interests of that character he is extensively 
interested in farm lands, owning eleven hundred and twenty acres in Towner county. 

In 1903 Dr. Roberts was united in marriage to Miss Ruby Rutledge, of Grand Forks, 
Xorth Dakota. Her father, Dr. S. P. Rutledge, a well known practitioner of Grand Forks, 
is now deceased. Dr. and Mrs. Roberts have a daughter, Margaret Melissa. Dr. Roberts 
is a prominent Mason, belonging to Cando Lodge, No. 40, A. F. & A. M. ; Cando Cliapter, 
No. 18, R. A. M.; C. J. Atkins Commandery, No. 14. K. T.; and Kern Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S., 
of Grand Forks. He is also identified with the Ancient Order of United Workmen, the 
Modern Woodmen of America and the American Yeomen. His professional connections are 
with the Devils Lake District Medical Society, the North Dakota State Medical Association 
and the American Medical Association and. he utilizes every possible means of keeping in 
close touch with the advancement being continuously made by the leading physicians and 
surgeons of the country. 



ANDERS ALFRED ROLF. 



Anders Alfred Rolf, engaged in merchant tailoring in Gi-and Forks, was born at 
SnSrestad, Sweden, July 3, 1873. a son of John and Elsa (Johnson) Rolf, who were also 
natives of that country. Coming to America in the early '.90s, they settled in Forest City, 
Iowa, and afterward removed to North Mankato, Minnesota, where the father passed 
away in 1911 at the age of sixty years, while the mother now resides at the old home- 
stead in North Mankato. Mr. Rolf was a merchant tailor and conducted a successful 
business along that line. His religious faith was that of the Lutheran church and his poli- 
tical belief that of the republican party. For many years he served as a member of the 
school board at North Mankato and was a prominent and influential citizen as well as a 
leading business man of that locality. 

Anders A. Rolf, the eldest of a family of eight children, pursued his education in the 
schools of his native country and afterward attended the Mankato Business College, in 
which he completed a course when fifteen years of age. He afterward entered the employ 
of his father and learned the merchant tailor's trade, after which he was his father's 
associate and assistant in business for nine years. On leaving home he went to Sioux City, 
Iowa, where he remained for a brief period, and later was successively at Oshkosh and 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and St. Paul, Minnesota, being employed in leading tailoring estab- 
lishments of those cities. In 1906 he arrived in Grand Forks and became a traveling sales- 
man for Hagstraum Brothers, wholesale merchant tailors of St. Paul, making Grand Forks 
liis headquarters. In 1909 he entered the merchant tailoring business on his own account 
under the firm name of Rolf Brothers, his business associate being Gotfried Rolf, who 
remained associated with him in the business until 1913, since which time Mr. Rolf of 
this review has been alone. He has today the leading tailoring establishment in the city, 
having among his patrons the most prominent residents of Grand Forks and vicinity. He 
keeps thoroughly abreast with the latest materials and styles and the products of his 




ANDERS A. ROLF 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 209 

establislinu'iit would be a credit to any merehant tailoring establishment in any American 
metropolis. 

On the 15th of May, 1913, Jlr. Rolf was married to Miss Hilda Sophia Shawstad, a 
native of Norway and a daughter of John and Gunild Shawstad, the latter now a resident 
of Minnesota, while the former is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Rolf have become the parents 
of two children, Irene Eunice and Kenneth Wilford, both born in Grand Forks. The 
family resides at No. 718 South Third street. 

Politically Mr. Rolf is a republican where national issues are involved but casts an 
independent local ballot, on which occasions he supports the man rather than the party. 
Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias and he belongs to the Com- 
mercial Club, being in hearty sympathy with every practical plan and measure for the 
upbuilding of Grand Forks, believing that the city has before it a great future. He is 
thoroughly satisfied with the city as a place of residence and is putting forth every 
possible effort to aid in the vfork of progress and development there. 



CHARLES E. BLACT?:WELL. 



Charles E. Blackwell, a lumber dealer of Cooperstown, was born in Waukesha, Wisconsin, 
in November, 1849. His father. Charles Blackwell, a native of New York, removed to 
Wisconsin in the early '40s and there married Miss .Jane Moon. He followed the wheel- 
wright's trade until the 1st of May, 1864, when he enlisted for service in the Civil war, 
becoming first lieutenant of Company B, Thirty-ninth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. With 
his command he went south and died while engaged in active duty in the following August. 

Charles E. Blackwell, the eldest in a family of four children, acquired his early 
education in the public schools of Waukon, Wisconsin, and on the 1st of May, 1S64, when a 
youth of less than fifteen years, he, too, ofl'ered his services to his country, joining the same 
regiment to which his father belonged, as a drummer. He was m\istered in at Milwaukee 
and was sent to Memphis, Tennessee, where the regiment under command of Colonel 
Butterick remained until the fall, when the troops were returned to Wisconsin and Mr. 
Blackwell was honorably discharged at Milwaukee on the 1st of September. His father 
had been one of the organizers of the regiment and Mr. Blackwell was anxious to become 
a soldier, having played the drum at war meetings where recruiting was going on. He 
established a boys' band of four drums and one of his companions enlisted at the same 
time as Mr. Blackwell, who at that date was a youth of but fourteen years and five months. 

In November, 18T3, Mr. Blackwell was married to Miss Carolyn Ross, a native of 
Wisconsin and a davighter of H. J. Ross. Their children are: Charles H., now a resident 
of Seattle, Washington; Ada, the wife of Alexander S. .4nderson, of Chicago; and Hiram M., 
a lumber merchant of Broadville, Montana. 

Mr. Blackwell is identified with the Grand Army of the Republic and there are few men 
of his years who have the right to wear the little bronze button that proclaims service in 
defense of the Union. He is both a York and Scottish Rite Mason, having been identified 
with the order for forty-three years, while for forty-two years he has been a Knight 
Temjilar. He has always been much interested in the cause of Masonry, exemplifying in 
his life the beneficent spirit and purpose of the craft. 



JOHN SHIKANY. 



flicupying a foremost place among the leading business men and prominent citizens of 
Williston is John Shikany, a native of Syria, born in Zahleh, district of Lebanon, December 
28, 1S6T. His parents. Will and Mary (Sawaya) Shikany, spent their entire lives in that 
country, the father being a merchant of Zahleh. There .John Shikany grew to manhood and 
after completing his education learned the stone mason's trade, which he followed in Syria 
until 1S91. 



210 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

That 3'ear witnessed his arrival in tlie United States and after spending six montlis 
in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he worked as a stone cutter, he came to North Dakota and 
settled in Fargo, where he was also employed as a stone cutter and laborer. In 1893 
Mr. Shrkany returned to Syria, where he followed his trade for three years, and then again 
came to America, this time taking up a homestead near Rugby in Pierce county, North 
Dakota. He was engaged in farming there until 1901, when he sold his place and the 
following year established a general store in Williston, where he is stil! carrying on business. 
He opened his first stock of goods in a log house but now lias an up-to-date store witli a 
patronage which is large and substantial. He has made a specialty of buying and selling 
bankrupt stocks and has steadily prospered in his undertakings until he is now one of the 
well-to-do citizens of the town. He has erected a beautiful residence, which is considered 
the best in Williston, and this his family now occupy. He has also put up other buildings 
which he has sold and is still the owner of some valuable real estate in the city besides three 
fine farms in Williams county under cultivation, which he rents. 

At Fargo, North Dakota, Mr. Shikany was married December 24, 1893, to Miss Fanny 
Kassis, also a native of Zahleh, Syria, and a daughter of George and Regina Kassis, who are 
mentioned in the sketch of Abraham Kassis on another page of this history. By this union 
the following children have been born : Blanche, who was born at sea while her parents were 
returning to Syria; .Jacob, born in Zahleh, Syria, who is on the border with Company E, First 
Infantry, North Dakota; Walter Joseph, who is associated in business with his father; and 
Michael and Joseph, at school, all three born near Rugby, North Dakota; and George and 
Bertha, at school, both born in Williston. 

The family are members of the Roman Catholic church and Mr. Shikany is also con- 
nected with the Knights of Columbus, being a charter member of the lodge at Williston. 
He votes with the republican party and takes a commendable interest in public affairs. 
He was the first of the Syrian colony to locate in North Dakota and is recognized as its 
leader, being man of power and influence among the people from his native land. He has 
never regretted his emigration to America for here he has prospered as the years have gone 
by until he is now quite wealthy and the success that has come to him is due entirely to hia 
own unaided efforts and sound judgment. 



GEORGE S. CRANNA. 



George S. Cranna is the vice president of the firm of Goldaramer, Cranna & Weaver, 
outfitters, merchant tailors and general dry goods merchants of Lakota, at which point they 
are conducting a business of growing importance and volume. Mr. Cranna is of Scotch birth. 
He was born in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, January 7, 1885, a son of John and Mary (Scott) 
Cranna, who have spent their entire lives in the land of hills and heather, where the father 
is now engaged in the contracting business, to which lie has devoted many years. He lias 
reached the age of seventy-two, while his wife is now sixty-eight j'ears of age. They reared 
a family of ten sons and a daughter, of whom George S. Cranna is the seventh in order of 
birth. 

Through the period of his earl3- youth George S. Cranna attended the parish school and 
afterward continued his education in the Latin high school. Later he served an apprenticeship 
at the tailoring trade, covering a period of four years; and afterward worked for two years 
as a journeyman tailor in London. Hoping to find better business opportunities on this 
side the Atlantic, he then came to America in the fall of 1008 and made his way at once 
across the country to Lakota, where he established a tailoring business, in which he has 
since been engaged. The general mercantile firm of Goldammer, Cranna & Weaver was 
formed on the Sth of .June, 1916, and they have one of the leading establishments in tlieir 
line in the county. They carry a large stock of dry goods and are outfitters handling men's, 
women's and children's ready-to-wear clothing, having a business that is constantly growing. 
The men at the head of the firm are all clear-sighted, broad-minded, intelligent and enter- 
prising business men and there is every reason to predict for them a successful future. 
Mr. Goldammer is a pioneer implement merchant of Lakota, with long experience in commercial 



HISTORY OF XORTH DAKOTA 211 

lines. Mr. Ciaima, the vice piesident, wliile still a young man, has displayed his sterling 
worth ill many ways both as a busiiii^ss man and citizen of Nelson county and Korth 
Dakota. .Mr. Weaver is also a young man, ambitions and energetic. Already they have 
instituted resultant plans for winning trade and they lully realize that satisfied customers are 
the best advertisement. Therefore they are putting forth every ellort to please their 
patrons and their honorable dealing and reasonable prices commend thein to public patronage. 
In politics Jlr. Cranna maintains an independent coui'se. l-raternally he is connected with 
the Masons, being senior warden in his lodge, while in the Knights of Pythias he has been 
a member of the grand lodge. He belongs to the Commercial Club, which indicates his 
deep interest in community affairs, and his sense of moral obligation is seen in his identi- 
fication with the Congregational cliurch. In a word, his has been a well spent life in 
which he has recognized his obligations and responsibilities as well as his privileges and 
opportunities. 



HOX. GEORGE H. LAW. 



George H. Law, successfully engaged in farming about four miles from Leal, in Barnes 
county, was born at Stanford, Niagara Falls, Ontario, November 27, 1S62, a son of James 
and Alvina (Beamsley) Law, the former a native of Dundee, Scotland, and the latter of 
Canada. In the maternal line the ancestry is English, the grandfather being Eden Beamsley, 
of Oxfordshire, England. The paternal grandfather, John Law, a native of Scotland, emi- 
grated to Canada with his family of three sons and two daughters: George, James, John, 
Mary and Maggie. Mr. Law of this review now has in his possession the dress in which 
all of these children were christened. It displays elegant handwork and was made by the 
mother of the family. Taking up land in Canada, John Law continued farming and there 
died at the age of eighty-two years. His wife passed away before the birth of her grand- 
son, George H. James Law was reared to the occupation of farming, which he followed 
until he met death by drowning at the age of forty-two years. 

George H. Law, an only child, continued at Niagara Falls until 1882, when he went to 
Winnipeg, there remaining for two years as an employe of the Canadian Pacific Railroad. 
He worked along the line of that road to Calgary and was engaged in locating lumber yards 
at the various division points. In 1886 he arrived in Barnes county. North Dakota, and 
for the first year was employed on the Boardman farm. He was then advanced to the 
jKJsition of foreman and so continued for eleven yea,rs, at the end of which time he pur- 
chased his present farm property four miles south of Leal and has since devoted his time 
and energies to the cultivation and development of his own land. He is a very active, 
enterprising and successful agiiculturist and his fields, including forty acres planted to 
corn, wheat and oats and one hundred acres to timothy, present a most attractive appearance. 
In addition to cultivating his fields he is engaged in operating a steam threshing outfit. 

Mr. Law was imited in marriage to Miss Annie E. Scelig, who was born in Winona 
county, Minnesota, February 3, 187.3, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Seelig, who were 
natives of Germany. Following their marriage they crossed the Atlantic to the new world 
about 1870 and resided in Winona county, Minnesota, until they removed to Cass county. 
North Dakota, where they arrived on the 16th of April, 1879. There the father engaged in 
farming until his death, which occurred when he was sixty-seven years of age. while his 
wife reached the age of sixty-:eight years. To Mr. and Mrs. Law have been born four 
children, namely: Ollie and Elsie, who are high school students; Harold; and George. 

Mr. Law is w'ell known in fraternal circles, being a Royal Arch Mason, an Elk, a Modern 
Woodmen of America and an Odd Fellow. His political endorsement is given to the 
republican party and he has been somewhat prominent and active in political circles. He 
has been chairman of the town board of Anderson township since its organization, has been 
a director and clerk of the school district and his fellow townsmen, appreciative of his 
worth and ability, called hira to serve them in the state legislature in 1907. .So excellent 
was his record during his first term that he was reelected in 1909 and again in 1911 and 
for three terms remained a member of the house, leaving the impress of his individuality 



212- . HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

upon the legislation- enacted during that period, for it is characteristic of Mr. Law that 
he stands loyally in support of every measure which he believes to be for the benelit of the 
.state and is equally stalwart in his opposition to proposed legislation that he believes 
will be inimical to the best interests of the commonwealth. His political integrity is just 
as pronounced as his reliability in business afl'airs and it is well known that he is a man 
in whom to have confidence. 



OLAF G. STORAKEE. 



Olaf G. Storaker, a clothing merchant of Larimore, was born at Montevideo, Minnesota, 
September 20, 1885, a son of N. P. and Margaret Storaker, who are natives of Norway, from 
which country they came to America soon after their marriage. In later life the father took 
up the business of contracting and he and his wife are still living in Montevideo, the former 
at the age of sixty years and the latter sixty-two years of age. Their family numbered 
six children, of whom Olaf G. is the second in order of -birth. 

At the usual age O. G. Storaker became a pupil in the public schools of Montevideo and the 
thorough educational training which he there received fitted him for life's practical and 
responsible duties. He afterward became connected with the clothing trade in his native 
city and there resided until 1907, when he removed to Grand Forks, Nortli Dakota, where he 
again became connected with the clothing business, entering the employ of M. G. Olsen, with 
whom he remained until I'JIO. In that year he removed to Nortliwood, where he embarked 
in the clothing business on his own account, and after a year he became a resident of 
Larimore, where on the 30th of May, 1911, he established his present business, start- 
ing with a full line of all kinds of men's clothing. He today has the leading establishment 
of this character in the city, carrying a large and well selected stock which meets the 
demands of the purchasing public. His business methods, too, are an expression of enter- 
prise and commercial integrity and have won for him the entire respect and confidence of 
the public. 

On the 23d of June, 1909, in Aneta, North Dakota, Mr. Storaker was married to Miss 
Maude G. Magoris, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Magoris, of Larimore, who were 
pioneers of that section of the state and are still residents of Larimore. Mr. and Mrs. 
Storaker have one child, James M., who was born in Northwood, April 12, 1910, and is 
now attending school. Mr. Storaker possesses much musical talent and became the organizer 
of the Larimore Hussar Band of twenty pieces, which is now the leading musical organization 
of that section. In politics he maintains an independent course. Fraternally he is 
connected with the Master Masons and he also has membership in the Commercial Club, 
an organization that has done much to further the best interests of the city, displaying 
a spirit of initiative that has placed Larimore in a position of leadership in connection 
with many public movements. 



SANFORD HARRIS ASHLEY. 

Sanford Harris Ashley, an undertaker and embalmer of Grand Forks, was born in 
Milton, Vermont. December 13, 1880. His father, Charles S. Ashley, also a native of the 
Green Mountain state, was a representative of one of the old Vermont families of English 
descent which was founded in America by one of the passengers from the Mayflower. 
Charles S. Ashley took up the business of undertaking and spent his entire life in Ver- 
mont, where he passed awaj' in 1913. at the age of sixty-three years. His political support 
was given to the republican party and he took an active interest in politics, while his fellow 
townsmen, recognizing his ability, called him to various public oflSces, including that of state 
senator. He had a wide acquaintance and wherever known was spoken of in terms of the 
.highest regard because of his sterling qualities of manhood and citizeilship. His wife, 
who bore the maiden name of Cora Isabelle Harris, was born in Vermont and also 




SANFORD H. ASffLEY 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 215 

■belonged to one of tlic old families of that state, her father beinf; Lucius Harris, a large 
landowner, representing one of the wealthy Vermont families at Castleton. Jlrs. Ashley- 
still survives and makes her home at Milton. In the family were but two children, 
one of whom died at the age of three years. 

Sanford H. Ashley after attending the public schools of Milton continued his educa- 
tion in Norwich University at Northfield, Vermont, from which he was graduated in 1900 
with the degree of civil engineer. He started out to provide for his own support when a 
youth of fifteen and since that time has been dependent upon his own resources. He first 
worked along the line of civil engineering and it was this which aroused his ambition to 
secure a university education in that field. Following his graduation he devoted his attention 
to professional interests, being at different periods construction engineer with the Chicago 
& Alton and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroads in construction and location work 
on their lines between Old Monroe and Mexico, Missouri, and was engaged in construction 
work on the South & Western Railroad in North and South Carolina. He was also 
associated with various other important engineering projects and enterprises until 1907, 
when he went to Grand Forks. There he purchased an undertaking business that had been 
established in 1883 by Don JIcDonald, a pioneer business man of this city. Mr. Ashley 
has since successfully conducted the business and is accorded a most liberal patronage. 
In addition to carrying a large line of undertaking supplies he has in connection with his 
establishment a commodious chapel in which funeral services may be held. 

On the 25th of December, 1905. at Greenfield, Massachusetts, Mr. Ashley was united 
in marriage to Miss Josephine Caroline Strecker, a native of that state and a daughter of 
Edward and Josepliine Strecker, the former now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Ashley have 
two children: Ruth Isabelle, who was born December 20, 1911; and Esther May, born 
April 26, 1914. The family occupy an attractive residence at No. 504 Belmont street, which 
property is owned by Mr. Ashley. 

In politics he is a republican wliere national issues are involved but at local elections 
votes independently. In Masonry he has attained high rank, having taken the degrees 
of the Scottish Rite and also belonging to the Mystic Shrine. He is also connected with the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles and the Eastern Star. During his college days he received military train- 
ing and on the return of Admiral Dewey from the Philippines he had charge of a detach- 
ment of his bodyguard and traveled all over the United States with him. Ability has 
brought Mr. Ashley to the front in business connections and enabled him to advance from a 
humble starting point to a place of prominence and affluence. 



GEORGE B, EVERSON. 



George B. Everson, now serving as assistant cashier of the AVilliams County State 
Bank at Williston, was born near Mona, Mitchell county, Iowa, .January 12, 1874, his 
parents being Peter K. and Sorina (Thompson) Everson. The father was a native of 
Norway but was only two years of age when brought to this country by his parents, the 
family locating in Mitchell county, Iowa, where he was reared and educated. In early 
life he engaged in farming but later conducted a general store in Mona and subsequently 
became a dealer in hardware and machinery at Lyle, Minnesota. He finally retired from 
business and returned to the old home farm near Mona, Iowa, where his death occurred. 
His widow came to North Dakota with her children and died at Tioga, Williams countv. 
She was born in Illinois but reared in Iowa, having accompanied her parents to ilitchell 
county in childhood. They were farming people. 

In his native county George B. Everson grew to manhood, attending first the country 
schools and later the schools of Mona. He also pursued a course at Valder Business College 
in Decorah, Iowa, from which he was graduated, and subsequently was associated in business 
with his father at Lyle, Minnesota. On the 28th of March, 190.3, he became a resident of 
Bottineau county. North Dakota, and there served as deputy countv treasurer for a vear 
5>nd a half, after wliich he lilled tlie position of assistant cashier in tlio liotfineau National 



216 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Bank. In March, 1912, he removed to Williston and accepted a similar position in the 
Williams County State Bank, in whicli capacity he is still serving, being also a stockholder 
and director of the bank. He is the owner of a good farm in Williams county, which he 
rents, and also has a nice residence in Williston. 

Mr. Everson was married in Kenyon, Minnesota, March 12, 1901, to Miss Gurine Jeglum, 
a native of that place, where she spent her early life. She was given good educational 
advantages, being a graduate of St. Olaf College at Northfield, Minnesota, and she taught 
music at Kenyon for some time. Her father, L. O. .Jeglum, was born in Norway and 
was an early settler of Goodhue county, Minnesota, where he followed farming for many 
years, hut both he and his wife are now deceased. Mr. and Sirs. Everson have four children: 
Lloyd Parker, born in Mona, Iowa, May 27, 1902; Selina Irene, born in Bottineau, North 
Dakota, .June 28, 1904; Viola Evelyn, born in the same place. May 8, 1907; and Kenneth 
Wesley, also born in Bottineau, May 4, 1910. 

By his ballot Mr. Everson supports the men and measures of the republican party. 
He joined the Knights of Pythias at Lyle, Minnesota and there served as keeper of records 
and seals, but is now connected with the lodge of that organization at Williston. Both 
he and his wife are prominent members of the United Norwegian Lutheran church, in the 
work of which they take an active interest. Mrs. Everson is president of the Ladies 
Aid Society, and she is also a member of the Book and Thimble Club of Williston. 



JOSEPH B. MALONE. 



Joseph B. Malone, postmaster of South Heart, where he is also engaged in merchandising 
as a dealer in hardware and implements, was born in Minneota, Minnesota, in 1883. His 
father, Patrick Malone, a native of Ireland, came to the United States soon after his 
marriage, being accompanied by his wife, who bore the maiden name of Jane Hughes, and 
their only child. They settled first at Eockford, Illinois, where the father engaged in 
railroading. After remaining in that state for five years he removed to Minneota, Minnesota, 
in 1883 and took up a claim, turning his attention to general agricultural pursuits, in which 
he engaged up to the time of his retirement from active business life. In 1912 he arrived in 
Page, North Dakota, and later became a resident of South Heart, where both he and 
his wife are now living. 

Their family numbered eight children, two of whom have passed away. The fifth in 
order of birth was .Joseph B. Malone, who at the usual age became a pupil in the public 
schools of Minneota, and when his textbooks were put aside he concentrated his efforts 
upon the work of the home farm, running a tractor for a period of ten years. In 1908 he 
came to North Dakota and homesteaded in the vicinity of South Heart. Complying with the 
law regarding occupancy and improvement, he secured title to the property after spending 
four years in its cultivation. During the winter seasons while proving up on his claim 
he managed the Gunderson & Adair Elevator at South Heart for two seasons. After leaving 
his farm he took up his abode in South Heart and opened his present implement and hard- 
ware store in 1913. In the intervening period of three years he has built up a substantial 
business along that line. He now carries a good stock and in March, 1916, he admitted his 
brother, John Malone, to a partnership. Success has attended him in the conduct of this 
enterprise, the business having now reached gratifying proportions. He is also interested 
in farm lands, consisting of a half section adjoining South Heart. In February, 1912. he 
was appointed postmaster of the town and has since occupied that position. 

In 1911 Mr. Malone was married to Miss Mary Kennedy, a native of South Heart, who 
was reared in that town and taught in the South Heart school for a period of about eight 
years. She is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Kennedy, who were early settlers there. 
Going to Stark county in pioneer times, Mr. Kennedy met all of the hai'dships and privations 
incident to frontier life and gradually worked his way upward through the utilization of 
the opportunities which came to him. Mr. and Mrs. Malone have become the parents of 
two children. Margaret and William P. J. 

In politics Mr. Malone is a stalwart democrat and is now serving as township treasurer. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 217 

He was also at one time school clerk. He belongs to the South Heart Catholic church and 

to Dickinson Council, No. 1515, K. C. Now numbered among the substantial residents of 

Stark county, his creditable business position is due to his unfaltering industry and 
determination. 



HENRY HAWICINSON. 



Henry Hawkinson, who is engaged in merchandising at Crocus, Towner county, was 
born in Sweden in May, 1869, a son of Jons and Bengta (Hanson) Hawkinson, who were 
also natives of that country. The father devoted his life to farming in Sweden and never 
crossed the Atlantic, passing away in his native land in March, 1912, while his wife survived 
only until August, 1913. 

Henry Hawkinson was reared and educated in Sweden and in ilinnesota, having come 
to America when a youth of seventeen years, at which time he located in Litchfield, 
Minnesota. He had previously learned the carpenter's trade and on coming to the new 
worUl he secured employment along that line. Later he embarked in the contracting business 
on his own account and continued in active identification with the building intere.sts of 
Litchfield for an extended period, making his home in that city for twenty-two years. In 
1905 he removed to Rocklake, North Dakota, and for three years was employed by Nela 
Hawkinson, his cousin. In 1908 he arrived in Crocus, where he embarked in general mer- 
chandising and has since continued in that line of business, in connection with which he 
has been accorded a liberal patronage. He erected a modern store building and carries an 
enormous stock, enjoying a large trade, which he has built up through thoroughly reliable 
methods and unfaltering enterprise. He is also a stockholder, director and the vice president 
of the Crocus State Bank and he also has valuable property holdings, including an improved 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres, while he also has a fourth interest in another tract 
of improved land of four hundred and eighty acres. 

On the 30th of September, 1895, Mr. Hawkinson was united in marriage to Miss Annie 
Fridholm and to them have been born three children, William, Clarence and Esther. The 
family adhere to the faith of the Lutheran church and Mr. Hawkinson also holds membership 
with the Modern Brotherhood of America. Politically he is a republican and has filled a 
number of local offices, serving as village clerk and treasurer, while in March, 1909, he was 
appointed postmaster of Crocus, which position he yet fills. His official and commercial 
activities thus rank him with the representative men of his town. He deserves much 
credit for what he has accomplished as he has worked his way steadily upward through his 
own efforts, having come to America empty-handed. As the architect of his own fortunes 
he has builded wisely and well and his record proves what may be accomplished when 
ambition and determination point out the way. 



ADOLPHUS W. GUEST. M. D. 

Dr. Adolphus W. Guest is engaged in the general practice of medicine at Jamestown 
but has specialized to a considerable extent in nervous diseases and has gained a wide repu- 
tation as an alienist. He was born in London. Ontario, Canada, on the 6th of July, 1S69, of 
the marriage of Richard W. and Margaret (Fitzgerald) Guest, both natives of Canada, born 
respectively in 1832 and in 1830. The father is the youngest son of William Guest, a native 
of Ireland. Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Guest are the parents of seven children, of whom 
our subject is the sixth in order of birth. Their son. Major Frederick Guest, is now serving 
as a surgeon with the Canadian Expeditionary forces who took part in the Dardanelles 
campaign. 

Dr. Adolphus W. Guest received his early education in the country schools and later 
attended the high school at London, after which he entered the Western University, from 
which he was graduated with the degree of M. D. in April, 1897. He located for practice 



218 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

in Erie. Cass county, North Dakota, where he remained for five years and was then 
appointed assistant superintendent of tlie insane hospital at Jamestown, which office he held 
until 1905, when he resumed private practice. He has the confidence of both the general 
public and his professional brethren and is up-to-date and progressive in his methods, as he 
is constantly studying along medical lines. He has given especial attention to nervous 
diseases and is known as one of the best alienists in the southern part of the state. He 
holds membership in the Stutsman County Medical Society, of which he has served as 
president for two terms, in the North Dakota Medical Society and in the American Medical 
Association. In addition to his lucrative practice he has other interests, owning valuable 
land in this state. 

Dr. Guest was married on the 88tli of December, 1900, to Miss Marjorie Baker, a 
daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Hill) Baker, pioneers of Bufi'alo, this state. One son, 
Adolphus Richard, has been born to this union. 

Dr. Guest easts his ballot in favor of the candidates and measures of the republican 
party and for eight years served acceptably as county coroner. He is prominent in local 
fraternal circles, belonging to the Masons, the Mystic Shrine, the Woodmen, the Workmen, 
and the Elks. He finds much pleasure in all outdoor sports and spends much of his leisure 
time in Imnting, fishing and motoring. From boyhood he has been dependent upon his own 
resources and paid his own way through college, earning the necessary money by different 
kinds of work. He gives his closest attention to his practice but also finds time to 
cooperate in projects for the public good. He is recognized as an excellent citizen as well 
as a successful physician. 



CHARLES I. COOK. 



Charles I. Cook, editor and owner of the Beach Advance and also engaged in farming 
in the vicinity of Beach, in Golden Valley county, was born at Anoka, Minnesota, January 17, 
1865, a son of William Henry and Mary A. (Webber) Cook, both of whom were natives 
of Ohio. About 1858 they removed to Minnesota, settling at Anoka. The father was a 
carpenter and cabinet maker by trade and followed those pursuits throughout his entire 
life. He resided in Anoka until about 1890, when he went to Florida and subsequently 
removed to California, where his death oceur'red. His widow is now living with her 
daughter. Mis. W. A. Sprague, in Beach. In the family were seven children: Addle, the 
wife of George Epps, of Anoka; Effie Isabclle. the wife of W. A. Sprague, of Beach; Fred M., 
who resides on a ranch in Oregon: Cliarles I.; Herbert G., of Jlinneapolis; John, who is 
engaged in railroad work at St. Paul; and one who died in infancy. 

Cliarles I. Cook passed through consecutive grades to the high school of Anoka and 
afterward entered the office of the Anoka Union, there learning the printer's trade. He 
then pursued a night school course in order to supplement his previous education and all 
through his life he has been a student of events and has kept in close touch with the trend 
of modern thought and progress. For a time he was employed on the Anoka Herald and 
was advanced to the position of foreman, while subsequentl}' he became assistant manager. 
Later he bought the paper and devoted about three j^ears to its publication, after wliich 
he sold out and removed to Huron, South Dakota, where he purchased an interest in the 
Journal-World. For six months he was connected with that paper and then disposed of 
his interest, after which he joined AV. F. Hollister in the establishment of the Morning 
Herald, which was the first daily paper of Huron. After publishing that paper for some 
time Mr. Cook sold out to his partner and on the 8th of April, 1908, arrived in Beach, 
beginning tlie publication of the Beach Advance on the 1st of May of that year. Mr. Cook 
remained as sole proprietor until April 6, 1912, when he sold out to M. C. Egan, who formed 
a stock company under the name of the Advance Publishing Company with Mr. Noonaii, of 
Omaha, as manager, while Pierce Egan was made editor. It is still conducted under the 
same name but in 1916 ISIr. Cook took over the management of the paper, which is published 
weekly. The plant is well equipped and under the control of Mr. Cook the business lias 
been largely developed. Mr. Cook took up a homestead just across the line in Montana. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 219 

proved up on the same and afterward bought a half section. Still later his investment 
made him the owner of several sections of land and subsequently he sold all but the original 
three quarters, which he is now farming in addition to the publication of the paper. 

On the 21st of August, 1885, Mr. Cook was married to Miss Harriet M. Stewart, a 
native of New Hampshire, born in June, 1867. For a considerable period she lived in Iowa 
but in 1882 removed to Anoka, Minnesota, where she was married. They became the parents 
of three children, but one died at the age of three years, the others being B. Frances and 
Cecile I., both at home. 

The parents are members of the Congiegational church and Mr. Cook belongs to Beach 
Lodge, No. 88, F. & A. M., to the Yeomen at Anoka and to the Woodmen of the World 
at Beach. In polities he is a republican and while living in Minnesota served for two 
terms as alderman of Anoka. He has always preferred to concentrate his energies, however, 
upon his private business interests and do his political work as a private citizen rather 
than as an ofiice holder. He is public spirited in a marked degree and does everything in 
his power to advance the best interests of his locality. 



0. M. WESTLEY. 



O. M. Westley, assistant cashier of the Farmers State Bank of Hannaford, was born 
in Norway, April 18, 1863. His father, Ole H. Westley, was born, reared and married in 
that country and in 1881 brought his family to North Dakota, settling in Griggs county, 
where he homesteaded and engaged in farming, eventually adding another quarter section 
to his original one hundred and sixty acres, situated five miles southeast of Cooperstown. 
Year after year he carefully and systematically developed the fields and cultivated the 
soil but is now enjoying a well earned rest at the age of eighty-three years. 

O. M. Westley, the eldest of a family of eight children, spent his school days in Norway 
and was a youth of eighteen when he came to the new world. He assisted in the arduous 
task of developing a new farm and continued upon the old home place until 1885, when he 
homesteaded land for himself and engaged in farming. He also purchased a relinquishment 
and a tree claim and he continued upon his place until 1905, carefully and systematically 
developing the fields and converting his land into a well improved farm. He was then 
elected register of deeds and occupied the position for two terms, or for four years. On 
the 3d of May, 1909, he accepted the position of assistant cashier of the Farmers State 
Bank and is now acting in that capaeity. He still owns his farm land, which he rents. 

On the 18th of May, 1886, Mr. Westley was married to Miss Malina Jenson, a native 
of Norway and a daughter of Jens Bull, who became a pioneer resident of North Dakota. 
The children of this marriage are: Olive, now the wife of B. M. Lunde, of Hannaford; 
Martin, who is connected with the United States mail department; Oscar and .Jeanette. both 
at home; Julius, who is in a mercantile establishment at Hannaford; and William, Harry 
and Myrtle, all at home. 

Mr. We.stl^y is a self-made man. having been dependent upon his ow-n resources since 
he started out in life on his own account. He resolved to win success if it could be done 
by persistent, honorable effort and he has already gained a place among the substantial 
residents of Griggs county. 



JOHNT A. KIBLINGER. 



John A. Kiblinger, an auctioneer and farmer of Benson countj', who is also filling the 
office of deputy^ county sheriff', was born near Springfield, Ohio, on the 4th of March, 1880, 
and is a son of Sylvanus and Katorah (Kizer) Kiblinger, both of whom were natives of 
Springfield, Ohio, as were their respective parents. The father followed the occupation of 
farming in the Buckeye state during the greater part of his life and is still living there 



220 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

but is now retired, enjoying the fruits of his former toil. He has for almost a third of 
a century survived his wife, who passed away in 1884. 

John A. Kiblinger was reared and educated in Springfield, Ohio, but his opportunities 
for attending school were somewhat limited as he has made his own way in the world 
from the age of fourteen years. For three years he worked in a foundry and afterward 
was employed as a farm hand for two years. In 1899 he removed to Canton, South Dakota, 
where he was employed for five years, and then became a resident of Dickey county. North 
Dakota, where he spent one year. In the fall of 1904 he was fortunate in drawing No. 60 
at the time of the allotment of lands in the Indian reservation at Devils Lake and he 
filed on land three miles from Oberon. This he improved and has since cultivated, his home 
being still upon that place, to which he expects to return on the 1st of January, 1917. 
He owns two hundred and forty acres, constituting a valuable property, and he also leases 
land from the Indians. He is a very capable and successful auctioneer, being a graduate 
of the .Jones National School of Auctioneering at Chicago, while ten years' experience in 
crying Dakota farm lands has made him thoroughly qualified in that direction. He now 
does a large business in auctioneering, his work in that line being constantly sought. He 
makes a business of raising graded shorthorn cattle upon his farm and he intends in the 
future to concentrate more and more of his attention upon his agricultural and stock 
raising interests. 

On the 1st of January, 1902, Mr. Kiblinger was united in marriage to Miss Mamie 
Parcells and to them have been born four children, Millie B.. Lelah K., Mary and Laura E. 

Mr. Kiblinger belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Felows, the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Modern Woodmen 
of America. He votes with the republican party and for eight years he served as constable 
at Oberon, while for three years he was a member of the school board. In January, 1913, 
he was appointed deputy sheriff of Benson county and is now active in that capacity, his 
terra of office to extend until January, 1917. He has always been loyal and faithful in 
the discharge of public duties and his record in office is a creditable one. 



HON. W. A. SMALL. 



Hon. W. A. Small is extensively engaged in farming in Rolette county, where he is 
cultivating nine hundred and sixty acres of rich land. He makes his home in Mylo and his 
farm property adjoins the town on two sides. A native of La Crosse, Wisconsin, he was 
born August 3, 1S68, a son of Alfred and Nora (Welch) Small, the former a native of 
Maine and the latter of Ireland. Mrs. Small came with her parents to the United States 
when a little maiden of sixteen summers, about the year 1858. the family home being 
established near Lake City, Minnesota, where the daughter remained until she reached 
womanhood and was married. During his boyhood days Alfred Small removed with his 
parents to Illinois and at the time of the' Civil war enlisted in an Illinois regiment, with 
which he served throughout the period of hostilities. After the close of the confiict he 
removed to Minnesota, where he was married and filed on a homestead near Worthington. 
In 1881 he arrived in Fargo, North Dakota, where he spent the following five years and 
in 1886 formed one of the vanguard of immigration into the territory, making his way to 
Churchs Ferry, where he settled and opened a butcher shop. He also engaged in farming 
and for seven years was variously employed. He afterward removed to West Superior, 
Wisconsin, and later to Milwaukee, where his death occurred May 2, 1916. The mother 
of Hon. W. A. Small passed away in 1872 and subsequently the father wedded Nellie 
Chapel. 

W. A. Small was educated in the public schools of Minnesota and Fargo and on 
Teaching young manhood began work as a farm hand. Later he was employed in a 
number of ways prior to 1897, when he became a resident of Mylo, in which year he 
filed on a homestead now within the corporation limits of the town. He has since resided 
thereon and from time to time as the years have passed and his financial resources have 
permitted he has made further investment in property until he now owns six quarter sec- 




imS. W. A. SMALL 




HOX. W. A. SjrALL 



THE NEW YOhf; 
PUBLIC LIPRARY 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 225 

tion8 and is rated as one of the most piospcious farnieis of his section. His farming 
interests are carefully managed and directed and practical, progressive methods are 
utilized in the cultivation and development of his fields, thus converting his land into 
vahiahle farming ])ropi'rly. 

On the 28th of October, 190:i, Mr. Small v.-as united in marriage to Miss Anna Pearl 
Bock, of Mylo, and they have become the parents of three children, Ross 0., Frank R. and 
Elsie Marie. 

Mr. Small votes with the republican i>arty and ever keeps well informed on the 
questions and issues of the day, thus being able to support his position by intelligent 
argument. In 1912 he was chosen to represent his district in the thirteenth general 
assembly and proved a helpful legislator, stanchly supporting various measures for the 
public good. Fraternally he is connected with Rolette Lodge, No. 166, F. & A. M., and 
with Devils Lake Lodge, No. 1216, B. P. 0. E. He holds membership with the Methodist 
church, while his wife is a member of the Presbyterian church. They are highly esteemed in 
the community where they live, having a circle of friends almost coextensive with the 
circle of their acquaintance. Substantial qualities have won for them high regard, for 
their many good traits are appreciated by those with whom they have been brought in 
contiTct. 



TUNIS 0. BRANDENBURG, D. V. S. 

Dr. Tunis O. Brandenburg, engaged in the practice of veterinary surgery in Lakota, 
was born in Michigan, this state, August 16, 1890, and is a son of C. P. and Jennie 
(Carpenter) Brandenburg, the former a native of Maryland and the latter of Illinois. From 
the place of his nativity the father removed to Ohio and afterward became a resident of 
North Dakota, settling near Michigan in 1890. He homesteaded and is still living on his 
land, devoting his time and energies in capable manner to farm work. He was born in 
1861 and has therefore passed the fifty-fifth milestone on life's journey. His w-ife was 
born in 1862 and by her marriage has become the mother of four children: Mrs. A. Lamont, 
living at Dunseith, North Dakota; Tunis 0., of this review; Howard and Vernon, residents 
of Michigan. 

In his early j-outh Tunis 0. Brandenburg attended the public schools of ^Michigan, 
passing through consecutive grades to the high school, from which he was graduated with 
the class of 1907. Later he became a student in the agricultural college at Fargo and in 
1913 he was graduated from Cornell University on the completion of a course in veterinary 
medicine and surgery. He then returned to Lakota, where he has since been engaged in 
active practice, and his ability is widely recognized, as is indicated by the liberal patronage 
now accorded him. He belongs to the North Dakota State Veterinary Medical Association, 
and the American Veterinary Medical Association. He also became a member of the Society 
of Comparative Medicine and while at Cornell L^niversity joined the Omega Tau Sigma, a 
college fraternity. 

In addition to his practice Dr. Brandenburg is interested in farming and displays 
careful management in controlling his agricultural interests. Politically he is a republican 
but does not seek nor desire office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his pro- 
fessional interests, which are constantly growing. 



GUY B. SQUIRES. 



Guy B. Squires is acting as postmaster at Crystal Springs and at the same time is 
conducting a general store, in which connection he carefully studies the public wishes and 
demands, and through his wise selection of goods is able to make large and profitable sales, 
drawing his trade from a wide territory. Born in Wisconsin, he is a son of Cliarles and 
Emma (Darrah) Squires, both of whom were natives of the state of New York. The 
father followed general farming and also specialized in stock raising. In the fall of 1908 
Vol. m— 11 



226 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

he came to North Dakota and established his home on section 30, Crystal Springs township, 
Kidder county, where he is still active at the age of seventy-four years. At the time of 
the Civil war he went to the front with a New York regiment, with which he remained 
for three years. For a time he was incarcerated in a southern military prison ajid he 
also encountered the hardships and privations incident to pioneer life. To him and his 
wife were born four children, all of whom are living, but the mother passed away in 1914. 

Guy B. Squires, the third in order of birth, largely acquired his education at Blue 
Earth, Minnesota, and was giaduated from the high school there. He afterward took up 
the profession of teaching, which he followed for three years in Minnesota, and in 1907 he 
came to this state, after which he entered a homestead three miles south of Crystal Springs. 
Not a furrow had been turned nor an improvement made upon the place w-hen it came into 
his possession, but with characteristic energy he began the development of the fields and 
also engaged in stock raising. While devoting the summer seasons to farming he taught 
school during the winter months. He was one of the pioneers of the district and aided in 
laying broad and deep the foundation upon which has been built the later progress and 
prosperity of the county. He assisted in organizing the township of Crystal Springs in 
1909 and has since been its clerk. In 1914 he secured title to his claim and in December, 
1915, he removed to the village of Crystal Springs, where he purchased the general store 
of Ealph Miller and has since been engaged in merchandising. He carries a large line of 
general merchandise and of hardware and has increased his stock four fold since taking 
over the store. He also conducts a restaurant and soda fountain in connection with his 
business and he has met with very substantial success through the wise conduct of his 
interests and the careful direction of his labors. He is also still engaged in stock raising, 
having si.xty-five head of cattle on his place, and he is yet the owner of the homestead 
property on which he made his start as a business man of Kidder county. In this connection 
he operates a cream station, buying and shipping cream. In a word, he is ever watchful 
of opportunities pointing to success and utilizes every means at hand to win honorable 
advancement. 

In 1899 Mr. Squires was united in marriage to Miss Dollah Wakcman, who was born 
in Wisconsin in 18G7, a daughter of Orlando and Cecelia Wakeman, who were early residents 
of Jlinnesota but have now passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Squires have become the parents 
of seven children: Cecelia, born in 1901; Percy, born in March, 1903; Glenn, born in July, 
1904; Melva, born in 1905; Charles, whose birth occurred in November, 1906; Gerald, born 
in August, 1908; and Fayette, born in October, 1910. 

In politics Mr. Squires is a republican but has never been a politician in the sense of 
office seeking although he is now filling the position of postmaster, to which he was appointed 
in 1916. He has also had official connection with the schools and he is secretary and 
treasurer of the Farmers Local Union, occupying that position since its organization in 
1912. He is likewise secretary of the Farmers Elevator Company. He belongs to the 
Presbyterian church and is active in support of those forces which work for the moral 
progress of the community. When he came to Kidder county the town of Ciystal Springs 
had not yet come into existence and Tappen was the nearest market. He underwent many 
of the hardships and privations of frontier life and has borne his part in the work of 
development and improvement. He was in limited financial circumstances when he located 
in Kidder county but by persistent energy, intelligently directed, he has worked his way 
upward and he has made the obstacles and difficulties which have seemed to bar his path 
serve as an impetus for renewed effort on his part. 



HARRY DENCE. 



Harry Dence, editor and proprietor of the Belfield Times, one of the leading news- 
papers of Stark county, was born on the 27th of March, 1883. in Morrisburg, Ontario, Canada, 
and is a son of Alfred and Mary (Smith) Dence, the latter also of Canadian birth. The 
father, however, was a native of Kent county, England. For many years he was engaged 
in business as a produce merchant at Morrisburg, Ontario, Canada, where he died on the 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 227 

22(1 of January, 1901. He survived his wife only a short time as she passed away 
October 21, 1900, and two of their four children are also deceased. 

Harry Dence was reared and educated in Canada, finishing school at the Collegiate 
Institute of Morrisburg. He was practically reared in a print shop and after leaving school 
at the age of eighteen years worked as a journeyman printer in various parts of the 
United States. In December, 1906, he came to Nortli Dakota and was employed at his 
trade in Wahpeton, Leeds, Bowbells, Beach and Belfield. In January, 1913, he purchased 
the Belfield Times, wliich he has since published, and now has a modernly equipped office. 
Tile circulation of the paper has been increased to one thousand, its subscriptions coming 
from a radius of thirty miles around Belfield. It is republican in politics, is a bright newsy 
sheet, well edited and well printed. 

On tlie 8th of October, 1911, Mr. Dence was united in marriage to Miss Abbie G. 
Hennessy, a native of Aitken, Minnesota, and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Hennessy, 
who were born in Maine. Her mother died in 1887, and her fatlier passed away in 1914. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dence have one child, Joan. 

Mr. Dence casts an independent ballot, preferring to support the men whom lie believes 
best calculated to fill the offices regardless of party ties. He was one of the few to agitate 
the raising of Belfield from a village to a city and was instrumental in accomplishing that 
object. While a resident of Beach he managed the editorial department of the Golden 
Valley Chronicle for a period of two years and has done much to promote the newspaper 
interests of this state. Mr. Dence was confirmed in the Episcopal church, and is a member 
of the Masonic lodge of Belfield and the Belfield Commercial Club. He takes an active 
interest in public aS'airs and has borne an important part in the development of his city. 



ANDREW FOLEY. 



Andrew Foley, cashier of the First National Bank at Rock Lake, was born in New 
Hope, Missouri, January 11, 1876, a son of D. F. and Flora (Hunter) Foley, botli of whom 
were natives of Missouri. The father followed merchandising and when he left his native 
state in 1889 removed to Towner county, North Dakota, filing on land near Cando. There 
he carried on general agricultural pursuits for a considerable period or until his wife's 
death, after which he returned to Slissouri. where he again engaged in farming for a period. 
Later ho again took up his abode in Rock Lake, where his remaining days were spent. His 
wife died in May, 1895, and he survived until November, 1912. 

Andrew Foley was reared and educated in Elsberry, Missouri, and remained with his 
parents until he attained his majority. He began farming in North Dakota, devoting his 
energies to that occupation until he reached the age of eighteen, when he returned to 
Missouri, where he spent three years in farming. He next entered a business college at 
Quincy, Illinois, and subsequently removed to St. Louis, where he accepted a position with 
a wholesale house. After a year spent in that connection he returned to Elsberry, Missouri, 
and was appointed assistant cashier in a bank with which he was associated for two years. 
In December. 1906. he arrived at Rock Lake, Towner county, and entered the employ of 
the N. W. Hawkinson Lumber Company as head bookkeeper, acting in that capacity until 
July, 1909, at which time he entered the Farmers State Bank as assistant cashier. That 
position he held until 1911, at which time the Farmers Bank purchased the First National 
Bank and he remained as assistant cashier in the latter institution iintil May 1, 1916, when 
he was promoted to the position of cashier. The other officers are: W. .T. Lichty, president; 
and N. W, Hawkinson, vice president. Tliis bank is capitalized for twenty-five thousand 
dollars and has a surplus of ten thousand dollars, while its deposits amount to one hundred 
and twenty-three thousand dollars. Mr. Foley is also one of the stockholders and directors 
of the bank and as its cashier is active in its management and control. He is recognized 
as a courteous and obliging official, doing everything in his power to further the interests 
of the patrons to a point that will not jeopardize the stability of the institution. In 1907 
they erected a fine modern bank building whicli is thoroughly equipped. Mr. Foley is also 
a stockholder and the vice president of the Lichty Mercantile Company, which is now engaged 



228 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

in the grain trade in Rock Lake, and lie likewise has large farm interests in Towner county, 
owning four hundred and eighty acres of splendidly improved land near Rock Lake. 

In July, 1914, Mr. Foley was united in marriage to Miss Anna Wagle, by whom he has 
a daughter, Emily, born September 21, 1915. Mr. Foley belongs to the Masonic fraternity 
and to the Baptist church — associations which indicate much of the nature of his interests 
and the rules that govern his conduct. His political allegiance is given to the democratic 
party and in all matters of citizenship he stands for those things which are progressive 
and beneficial. Along the line of intelligently directed effort he has made his advance in 
the business world and the success which he has achieved is creditable. 



WILHELM C. NOREM. 



Wilhelm C. Norem, cashier of the Woodworth State Bank, is a native of Rochelle, 
Illinois, and as the family name indicates, comes of Norwegian ancestry, his parents, C. A. 
and Christina (Rudd) Norem, having both been natives of Norway. Upon coming to the 
United States the father made his way at once across the country to Illinois and in the 
vicinity of Rochelle took up the occupation of farming. In the fall of 1887 he removed to 
Iowa, where he continued to reside until called to his final rest in November, 1915. The 
mother still makes her home in that state. 

In the family were seven children, of whom Wilhelm C, who was born in 1873, was 
the fourth in order of birth. At the usual age he entered the public schools, mastering the 
preliminary branches of learning in Illinois and afterward continuing his studies in Minne- 
apolis. After leaving school he became traveling representative for the Acme Harvester 
Company, which he represented in the capacity of collector. Previously he had secured a claim 
in Pierce county, North Dakota, upon which he remained for a short time, and he also 
taught school in Pierce and Wells counties for a period of two years before entering upon 
the work of collector. He continued with the Acme C-ompany until 1906, at which time 
be removed to Edmunds, where in connection with .John McC'arty and W. C. Wescom he 
organized the Edmimds Bank, with the management of which he was directly associated, 
first as cashier and later as president for a period of seven years. In the fall of 1911 he 
established the bank of Woodworth, its organizers being Mr. Noreiii, Ed Alfsen and A. G. 
Dunlop, the first named being now cashier. He has further extended his efforts in banking 
circles, having in 1915 opened the State Bank at Goldwin, North Dakota, of which he is 
likewise cashier and which w^as formed by the same men who organized the Woodw-orth 
bank. In addition to managing financial interests which come under their control the 
bank conducts a successful real estate department, handling both city property and farm 
lands, and also writes insurance, representing some of the strongest companies of the 
country. Mr. Norem is a republican and keeps well informed on the questions and issues 
of the day but does not desire nor seek public offi.ce, feeling that he prefers to do his 
public duty as a private citizen. 



J. J. KEHOE. 



J. .J. Kehoe, present states attorney of Towner county and a leading member of the 
bar, was born in Delaware county, Iowa, November 5, 1872, his parents being Patrick and 
Catherine (Hogan) Kehoe, who were natives of Ireland. In boyhood and girlhood they 
came to the United States, the former making the trip with his mother, while Mrs. Kehoe 
crossed the Atlantic with her father. They became residents of Cincinnati, Ohio, wJiere they 
were married, and in 1842 they cast in their lot with the pioneer settlers of Iowa, establish- 
ing their home in Delaware county when the work of progress and development seemed 
scarcely begun there. The father purchased land from the government and developed an 
excellent farm upon which he resided to the time of his death in 1907. He passed away 



HISTORY OF XORTTI DAKOTA 229 

at the very notable old age of ninety-seven years, while his wife was killed in a runaway- 
accident in 1889. 

After attending the public schools J. J. Kehoe became a student in St. Joseph's College 
at Dubuque, Iowa, and later attended the Iowa State University, from which he won his 
LL. B. degree in the class of 1897. He then located for practice at Charles City, Iowa, 
where he was associated with J. C. Canii)bcll in the work of the profession. At length he 
removed to Cando, North Dakota, where he formed a partnership with James B. Brook, 
the jiresent county judge of Towner county. The business relation between them was 
maintained until 1U08 and during the four succeeding years Mr. Kehoe practiced independently 
but in 1912 admitted W. T. Moseley to a partnership under the firm style of Kehoe & 
Moseley. Their patronage has been extensive and of an important character and Mr. Kehoe's 
standing as an able lawyer is further indicated in the fact that in 1906 he was elected to 
the office of states attorney and has been four times reelected, serving in all for ten con- 
secutive years. He had also been elected city attorney of Charles City, Iowa, in 1898 and 
occupied that position for three years. Soon after his arrival in Cando he was there elected 
city attorney and served for two years in that position. His knowledge of the law is 
comprehensive and exact and his mind is analytical, logical and inductive. His reasoning 
is clear and deductions sound, while the logic of his arguments never fails to impress 
court 6r jury and seldom fails to win the verdict which he desires. 

Aside from his professional interests Mr. Kehoe has important property, being a large 
holder of farm lands, owning independently twelve hundred and eighty acres in Towner 
county, together with a half interest in four hundred and eighty acres in the county and 
a third equity in eighteen hundred and eighty acres in Ramsey county. 

ilr. Kehoe exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the 
republican party and fraternally he is identified with Charles City Lodge, No. 418, B. P. 0. E. 
He and his wife are members of the Catholic church. Mr. Kehoe is widely known as a 
business man, as an able lawyer and as a progressive citizen. He has wisely used his time, 
talents and opportunities and his life record should serve to inspire and encourage others, 
showing what may be accomplished through individual effort. 



PAUL C. JOHNSON. 



Paul C. .Johnson, a well known general merchant of Northwood, Crand Forks county, 
was born in Norway, February 16, 1848, a son of Cliristian and Gunhild Paulsen, who were 
also natives of the land of the midnight sun. Coming to the new world, they settled in 
Houston county, Minnesota, and their last days Avere spent in Roseau county where 
the father died at the age of eighty-six years. The mother lived for a time with 
her son, Paul C. .Johnson, and afterward with his sister, Mrs. Ida .Johnson, at whose home 
she passed away in 1900, at the age of seventy years. In the family were five children, of 
whom Paul C. is the eldest. 

In his early youth Paul C. Johnson attended school for a week. He afterward received 
instruction from his gi-andmothcr and for twenty-nine days attended school in this country, 
which comprised the full extent of his educational opportunities. However, he possesses 
an observing eye and retentive memory and he has continually added to his fund of 
knowledge, becoming a well informed and practical business man. In 1870 he arrived 
in Northwood, Iowa, and for three years thereafter was employed at farm labor. At the end 
of that time he walked to Freeborn eoimty, Minnesota, where he was married and renuiined 
for a year. On the expiration of that period he removed to Northwood, North Dakota, in 
1875 and on the 2d of July of that year took up his abode on a farm in that locality. 
With characteristic energy he began its development and improvement and converted it 
into a highly cultivated tract of land upon which he resided for seventeen years or until 
1892, when he established a dry goods .store in Northwood which he has since conducted, 
having now a large and well appointed store in which he carries an extensive line of goods 
that meets the varied demands of the purchasing public. When he started from Freeborn 
county, Minnesota, he had little idea as to where he would eventually settle. He made 



230 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

the trip by wagon, carrying with him all his worldly possessions and accompanied by his 
wife and child. They journeyed thus for a month before reaching what is now Northwood. 
Soon after arriving at that point Mr. Johnson filed on land near the river and built a log 
cabin thirteen by eleven feet, having no assistance in the work save that which his wife 
could render. After its completion they occupied that primitive home in contentment for 
several years. Mr. Johnson had to travel to Fargo for supplies, a distance of more than 
a hundred miles, which he covered with ox teams, the journey requiring a week. He would 
return with supplies to last for several months. He at once began to break the sod and his 
first crop was harvested from twenty acres. From that point forward he continued to 
develop his fields until he had the entire one hundred and sixty acres under cultivation 
and found that the rich soil produces splendid returns. Though he started in business life 
with almost nothing, he is today one of the prosperous citizens and honored pioneer settlers 
of Grand Forks county. 

He was also the first postmaster of Northwood, being appointed in 1879, and the first 
money which lie received for his services during a quarter was forty cents. He held that 
position for five years or until the town was started. For eight years he was mayor 
of Northwood and his administration was characterized by progressiveness and substantial 
municipal improvement. He has also been a member of the city council, has been school 
director and for many years school treasurer of Northwood. In politics he has always 
maintained an independent course, holding himself free to exercise liis right of franchise 
according to the dictates of his judgment. 

In June, 1874, !Mr. Johnson was married to Miss Sophia Hansen, of Freeborn county, 
Minnesota, who passed away in the spring of 1899 at the age of forty-four years. Seven 
children were born to them: Mrs. Clara Erickson, who was born in Freeborn county and is 
now living in Lind township, Grand Forks county. North Dakota; Bernhard, who was born 
in Grand Forks county and is married and now resides on a farm in Northwood township 
of the same county; Gilman, who is married and resides in Northwood; Mrs. Ida Saugstad, 
also living in Northwood; Mary, at home; Hans, who is married and resides in Northwood; 
and Stella, who was married November 16, 1916, to Henry A. Haga, of Northwood. With 
the exception of the first named, all were born in Grand Forks county. In February, 
1900, Mr. Johnson was again married, his second union being with Miss Andrea Sagen, of 
Grand Forks. Their only child died in infancy. As a pioneer citizen, as a representative 
business man and as a capable official in public office, Mr. .lohnson stands high in the regard 
of his fellow townsmen and he certainly deserves much credit for what he has accomplished. 



JAMES TWAMLEY. 



No history of North Dakota would be complete without extended reference to James 
Twamley, of Grand Forks, whose name is inseparably interwoven with the business 
development and with the intellectual and moral progress of the community — in fact with all 
those things which have made history in this state. He was born in County Carlow, 
Ireland, November 5, 1843. His father, Peter Twamley, also a native of that country, 
located in New York city on coming to America in 1844 and there continued to reside 
until his death, which occurred in 1896, when he had reached the advanced age of eighty- 
nine years. He was an accountant by profession and thus provided for his family. At 
the time of the Civil war he and two of his sons responded to the country's call for aid 
in preserving the Union, the father becoming a member of the Twenty-second New York 
Infantry. He married Elizabeth Abbott, also a native of the green isle of Erin, and her 
death occurred in 1881, when she was sixty-seven years of age. There were six children 
in the family: Henrietta, who became the wife of James McKenell but both are now deceased; 
Joseph, who served in the Civil war and died in 1882; Elizabeth Ann, the wife of John 
Pullman, of Brooklyn, New York; Peter, who was a member of the Forty-eighth New 
York Volunteer Cavalry during the Civil war and for twenty years was president of the 
Forty-eighth Veteran Association, dying July 30, 1916, his remains being interred in Green- 




JAMES TWAMLEY 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 233 

wood eometcry at Brooklyn; Jennie, the deceased wife of John Bolton, ah importer of 
New York city; and James of this review. 

The last named was educated in the public schools of New York and in the College of 
the City of New York and when seventeen years of age started out in the business world 
as an employe in the wliolesale dry goods house of De Forest, Armstrong & Company. 
Later he was with John V. Farwell, of Chicago, and subsequently embarked in business on 
his own account as a member of the firm of Seymour, Carter & Twamley, but in the big 
Chicago fire of 1871 their establishment was destroyed and Mr. Twamley lost the greater 
part of his fortune at that time. He then returned to New York city and entered into 
partnership with George B. Gurley under the firm name of Gurley & Twamley, dealers in 
dry goods, at No. 327 Broadwa}'. That association was maintained for six years, at the 
end of which time Mr. Twamley removed to St. Paul and for eight years was buyer for 
the Auerbach-Finch-Sheffer Company and also a member of the firm, having a financial 
interest in the business. On account of ill health, however, he left St. Paul and removed 
to Grand Forks, North Dakota, and has resided in this state ever since. Soon after his 
arrival he entered the wholesale and retail grocery business, forming a partnership with 
Frank Viets after which they purchased the Metlar stock, then located at the corner of 
Third and Dc Mers streets, where the present Ontario department store now stands. This 
was the first wholesale grocery establishment within the territorj' now embraced in 
North Dakota. Mr. Twamley personally purchased the site of the store, which is today the 
most valuable corner in the city of Grand Forks, its estimated worth being one hundred 
thousand dollars. Something of the rise in real estate values in Grand Forks resulting 
from the growth and development of the city is indicated in the fact that Mr. Twamley 
made the purchase of that property for seven tliousand dollars and after owning it for 
twelve years he sold it for twenty-two thousand dollars, while in the meantime he had 
received twenty thousand dollars in rental. The firm of Twamley &. Viets existed for 
a year, at the end of which time the latter retired and returned to Ohio, being succeeded in 
the business by John A. Grove under the firm style of Twamley & Grove. That firm 
successfully carried on the business for two years, at the end of which time Mr. Twamley 
went to Minto, North Dakota, where he was joined by Mr. Viets, his former partner, in 
the establishment of a wholesale grocery business. They also erected a mill, which they 
operated for six years but on account of poor railroad facilities sold the business and 
Mr. Twamley returned to Grand Forks, since which time he has practically lived retired. 
During twelve years of this period, however, he has acted as public administrator of 
Grand Forks county and for the past fifteen years has been state agent for the Detroit 
Heating & Lighting Company, manufacturers of gas plants for public and domestic use. 
Mr. Twamley maintains his interest in that business merely to be occupied, for indolence 
and idleness are utterly foi-eign to his nature and he cannot content himself without the 
supervision of some business interests to occupy his attention. Through all of his business 
career he has studied closeh' the questions affecting liis interests and his sound judgment 
has been displayed in the success that has attended his efforts. 

On the .'Jth of September, 1S66, Mr. Twamley was married in Newburgh, New York, 
to Miss Elizabeth Hawkins, a native of Orange county. New York, and a daughter of 
Lewis and Mary (Blake) Hawkins, early residents of Orange county and of Scotch-Irish 
descent. Mr. and Mrs. Twamley have two children: Frederick, who was born in New- 
burgh, New York, in 1868 and is now a resident of New York city; and Edna, who is a 
teacher in the University of North Dakota. 

In politics Mr. Twamley is a republican and has always been interested in political 
and civic questions, giving active support to many measures for the general good. He was 
appointed the first regent of the State T'niversity of North Dakota and was largely instru- 
mental in inducing Governor Ordway. then chief executive of Dakota territory, to locate 
the University at Grand Forks. Believing firmly in republican principles, he has done 
everything in his power to promote the success and ensure the growth of the party in the 
districts in which he has lived. He is the oldest Scottish Rite Mason in North Dakota and 
is the oldest thirty-third degree Mason. While he has never filled a chair in the order 
he has always been a most earnest worker in support of the craft. He joined Gramercy 
Lodge, No. 537, F. & A. M., in New Y'ork city in 1805, two years after its organization, and 



234 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

he is today tlie oldest living representative of that lodge. He likewise belongs to the 
Independent and the United Orders of Foresters and during the years when proliibition was an 
• issue he was one of the workers that secured the adoption of the prohibition plank and 
during that period he served as grand chief templar of the state. He organized the 
Commercial Club of Grand Forks, was its first member and its first president, occupying 
that position for many years, during which time he instituted many plans that resulted 
beneficially in the upbuilding of the city along many lines. He belongs to the Congre- 
gational church, of which he was formerly a trustee, serving as such until 1915, when 
he resigned. He aided in organizing the church and has ever been most active in its work, 
doing everything in his power to promote the moral as well as the material and political 
progress of his community. The cause of education has found in him a stalwart champion 
and for many years he served on the school board, being the oldest representative of the 
board of Grand Forks. In a word there is practically no phase of development and 
progress in Grand Forks with which Mr. Twamley has not been connected. He was the 
organizer of the movement and was instrumental in having the city park board commis- 
sioners of Grand Forks donate a two-acre tract for the erection of a building in which 
to preserve historic relics and he contemplates raising funds for the erection of a building 
to be used as a meeting place for the old settlers and also as a museum. Personally 
lie has a large collection of relics of pioneer days which he will donate to the museum 
and wiiich includes the first oxcart that came into the state. To this cart he will add 
a mounted ox, showing to later generations the primitive methods used by the pioneer. 
A sod house will also be one of the features of the museum. Mr. Twamley has every 
reason to be proud of the part which he has played in the development and upbuilding 
of his city aiid state and the work of perhaps no other has been more effective in advancing 
the interests of Grand Forks and of North Dakota. He is truly a self-made man, for he has 
been both the architect and builder of his own fortunes. The first salary which he earned 
was fifty dollars per year and out of that sum he had to pay his living expenses. Tlie 
second year he received one hundred and fifty dollars and the third year two hundred and 
fifty dollars. During the fourth year of his employment the company with which he was 
connected failed on account of the Civil war, for they were the owners of one hundred 
stores in the south. That he advanced from the beginning is indicated in that record and 
his progress was continuous until he retired from active business. 



PROFESSOR ROBERT B. MURPHY. 

Professor Robert B. Murphy, superintendent of schools in Michigan and recognized 
as one of the able educators of the eastern part of the state, was born on Prince Edward 
Island, February 20, 1880. His parents, James and Alice (Donnelly) Murphy, are also 
natives of that locality and there the father became engaged in farming and has also 
been connected with the fishing industry. He was born in 1849, and his wife in 1847, and both 
are still living. 

Professor Murphy was the fourth in order of birth in their family of five cliildren, and 
after attending the public schools on Prince Edward Island he continued his education in the 
Prince of Wales College, from which he was graduated in 1896, winning the literary 
degree. He afterward attended the Mayville Normal School, where he pursued a professional 
course and was graduated in 190.5. In the interval, however, he took up the profession of 
teaching on liis native island and was made principal of the Fanning high school at 
Malpeque, there remaining for four years. It was in 1904 that he entered the normal school 
at Mayville, North Dakota, from which he was graduated the following year. He was then 
elected superintendent of schools at Tower City, Cass county, where he continued for eight 
years or until 1913, and while there located he took out his naturalization papers in 1911. 
Two years later he went to Michigan and has since been superintendent of the schools of 
that city. He has completed the work for the Bachelor of Arts degree at tlie University of 
North Dakota and he has taught in the summer sessions of tlie State University, also of the 
Mayville Normal School and at Minot. He imparts clearly and readily to others the 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 235 

kiKiwlcdge that lie has acquired and he is eonstantly seeking out new metliods that will render 
jiis work more eiTective. He disjdays great zeal aiul interest in his professional duties and 
lias tile ability to win the cooperation of teachers and pujiils. 

On the 14tli of August, 1898. Professor ilurphy was married to Miss Beatrice McLeod, who 
was born on Prince Kdward Island, a daughter of Captain and Mrs. George JIcLeod. The 
father was a well known sea captain and commanded a number of sailing vessels. At the 
time of his demise he was in charge of a government steamer sailing betw-een Prince Edward 
Island and the mainland and he was most widely and favorably known in that district. 
Professor and Mrs. Murpliy have become parents of three children, as follows: Rita 
Alice, who was born on Prince Edward Island, January 16, 1900, and is now a senior in 
the high school at Michigan; Everett Bruce, who was born on Prince Edward Island, 
January 1.3, 1905, and is a seventh grade student; and Lloyd Geoige, whose natal day 
was July 21, 1914. 

Professor Murphy has various fraternal connections. He belongs to the Masonic 
lodge of Tower City and to Michigan City Lodge, I. 0. 0. F., and is most loyal to the 
purposes of those organizations. His political allegiance is given the democratic party and he 
is now serving as city treasurer. He belongs to the Commercial Club of Michigan and is 
active in furthering its purposes while ])romoting the growth and upholding the standards 
of the city, but his attention is chielly directed in the line of his profession and he has 
made marked progress in that field. In 1915 he w-as elected president of the department 
of secondary education of the North Dakota Education Association and is now filling that 
position. 



HARVE ROBINSON. 



Harve Robinson, a banker of Sentinel Butte, was born at Rensselaer, Indiana, in 1867, 
his parents being Thomas and ilargaret (Parkinson) Robinson, who were natives of Ohio. 
Their family numbered eleven children, of whom Mr. Robinson of this review was the tenth in 
order of birth. In early life the father and mother removed to Indiana and there spent 
their remaining days, Mr. Robinson following the occupation of farming and stock raising 
as a life work. 

Harve Robinson acquired his education in the schools of Rensselaer, Indiana, and in 
Purdue L'niversity, which he attended for a year. In 1891 he arrived in Miles City, Montana, 
and took up the work of cow punching, continuing in that employment for eight years, 
'on the expiration of which period he engaged in the cattle business on his own account. 
He afterward went into the western part of North Dakota and settled on a ranch thirty-five 
miles south of Sentinel Butte, whereon he had about five hundred head of cattle. He 
continued actively in the live stock business until 1914 and was one of the prominent and 
successful ranchmen of his district. His fellow citizens, appreciating his worth and 
ability, called him to public office in 1899 by electing him county treasurer of Billings 
county, which position he filled for two terms. In 1903 he removed to Sentinel Butte, in 
which year he entered the Interstate Bank of Sentinel Butte as assistant cashier. The 
bank was established in that year by Messrs. Cranford, Martin, Simpson, Hunter and 
McGillivray and the last named sold his stock to Mi\ Robinson. After serving for a time as 
assistant cashier Mr. Robinson was elected to the presidency of the bank but sold his 
interest therein in 1909. He then organized the Stockmen's State Bank at Medora, of which 
he is the president. In the meantime, or in 1905, he organized the State Bank at Terry, 
Montana, but sold his interest therein in 1910. In 1906 he became one of the organizers 
of the First National Bank of Wibaux, Montana, and in 1911 he organized the Glendive 
State Bank. In the last two named he is still interested. He has done much to further 
banking in his section of the state and his operations along that line have constituted a 
source of vast benefit to the communities in which he has established and promoted banks. 
In the early days he homesteaded a quarter section which is now within the limits of 
the town site of Sentinel Britte. 

In 1889 Mr. Robinson was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Gilbert, who was born 



236 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

at Sentinel Butte, where her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Gilbert, located in pioneer 
times. Mrs. Robinson passed away in 1908, leaving three children, Addison, Dorothy and 
Jennie. For his second wife Mr. Robinson chose Miss Nellie Elliot, a daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas Elliot, of Minnesota, and to them has been born a son. Harvard Kenton, 
who was named in honor of Simon Kenton, the famous Indian fighter, who was a great- 
grandfatlier of MJ-. Robinson. 

Fraternally Mr. Robinson is connected with the Masons and the Elks of Dickinson, 
becomino- a charter and a life member of the latter organization. His political allegiance is 
o-iven to the republican party and in 1911 he was elected to represent his district in the 
state leo-islature. Realizing the possibilities and opportunities of this country, he has worked 
his way steadily upward and his intelligently directed industry has been an element in the 
growth and improvement of the districts in which he has operated. His plans have 
always been well formulated and carefully executed and thus he has carried forward to 
successful completion whatever he has undertaken. 



JOHN NEAL BLACK. 



John Neal Black, engaged in the manufacture of candy and ice cream at Grand Forks 
and thus prominently connected with the commercial interests of the city, was born at 
Boston, Massachusetts, January 26, 1873. His father, William Black, a native of that state, 
was a representative of an old Massachusetts family of Scotch descent that was founded 
in America prior to the Revolutionary war. Through various generations down to and 
including William Black representatives of the family were florists and horticulturists. 
William Black passed away in Boston in 18S0 at the age of twenty-nine years, having 
spent his entire life in that city. In business he had been very successful. His wife, 
who bore the maiden name of Elizabeth Adderly, was a native of England and in young 
womanhood came to the new world, making her way to Boston, where she met and 
married Mr. Black. She is now living at Atlanta, Georgia. In the family were three 
children, the two daughters being: Eliza, the wife of .J. L. Kelly, of Chattanooga, Tennessee; 
and Caroline, who died at the age of nine years. 

John N. Black was educated in the common schools of Boston to the age of eleven 
years and then started out to earn his living, being first employed by J. T. Garland, a candy 
manufacturer at Minneapolis, Minnesota, with whom he learned the confectioner's trade, 
remaining in Mr. Garland's service for ten years. He was first employed at a salary of four 
dollars per week but gradually worked his way upward. It was after the death of his 
father that his mother and the family removed to Minneapolis and with the business 
interests of that city John N. Black was connected for a considerable period. After 
leaving the service of Mr. Garland he was employed by other leading candy manufacturers 
in difl'erent parts of the country, spending some time at Cliattanooga, Tennessee, and at 
Cincinnati, Ohio. Eventually he came to North Dakota, settling at Grand Forks in 1902 
upon removal from Lima, Ohio. There he entered the employ of H. K. Geist. one of the 
leading candy manufacturers of the city, with whom he continued for four years. In 
November, 1907, he embarked in business on his own account, opening a candy depart- 
ment in the George Wilder grocery store, where he leased a small space. Gradually the 
business grew and developed until his became the leading establishment of the kind in 
Grand Forks. He is now extensively engaged in the manufacture of confectionery and ice 
cream and he maintains two retail stores, one at No. 10 North Third street, while the main 
store is in the Scandinavian-American Bank building. These are both splendidly and 
attractively equipped and bring to him a liberal patronage. He also conducts a factory 
at East Grand Forks, Minnesota, where he manufactures all kinds of candies and ice 
cream. He is the sole owner of the business and his ice cream trade is particularly exten- 
sive, for he makes large shipments all over North Dakota and to nearby states. His 
business has been developed along legitimate and substantial lines and he employs in the 
factory and his stores thirty people on an average. He has always concentrated his efforts 
along this single line, has studied the wishes of the people and has manifested a spirit 




JOHN N. BLACK 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 239 

of initiative in bringing forth now products both in ice cream and in confectionery. All of 
his goods are standard products and his success is indeed well merited, being. the logical 
and legitimate reward of his earnest, persistent effort. 

On the 13th of. June, 1904, in Grank Forks, 5Ir. Black was married to Miss Christina 
Kimble who was born at East Grand Forks, a daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth Kimble, 
the former- now deceased, while the latter is living. Her father was one of the first 
settlers of East Grand Forks and had his farm directly on the boundary line of the city. 
He became a very prominent, progressive and successful man and was, moreover, honored 
as a pioneer settler. He took quite an active interest in local politics and in civic matters 
and filled various positions of honor and trust, including that of alderman and member 
of the school board of East Grand Forks. Mr. and Mrs. Black have become the parents of 
six children, Gladys, Emmett, William, Madeline, Norma and Donald, but the second 
named has passed away. 

Mr. Black gives his political allegiance to the republican party and his religious faith 
is evidenced in his membership in the Episcopal church. He belongs to the Commercial 
Club and is in hearty sympathy with its purposes to upbviild Grand Forks, extend its 
trade relations and establish higher civic standards. He has always cooperated in move- 
ments for the general good and at the same time he has carefully and wisely directed his 
business affairs along lines leading to continued growth, resulting in very substantial 
success. 



GUSTAVE M. HEDDERICH. 

Gustave M. Hedderich, deceased, was one of the honored citizens and prominent business 
men of Williston for several years and took an important part in the upbuilding of the city. 
He was born in Evansville, Indiana, on the 11th of October, 1860, and was a son of 
Christian and Magdalena (Muntzer) Hedderich, both natives of Germany. The father was 
only five years of age when he came to America and settled in Evansville, Indiana, where after 
reaching manhood he engaged in the hotel business, conducting the Washington House for 
many years. He died in that city in 1885 and there his wife also passed away. Her birth 
occurred in Lyons. New York, her parents having crossed the Atlantic to the United States. 
She was reared and educated in Lyons and from there removed to Evansville, Indiana, 
where .she was married. 

During his boj'hood Gustave M. Hedderich attended the grammar and high schools 
of Evansville and subsequently took up the study of law for a time. At an early day 
he made his way to Fort Buford, North Dakota, and to Woody Mountain, Canada, when 
this region was mainly inhabited by the Indians, and he became a personal friend of Sitting 
Bull and many of the Sioux chiefs. In fact he taught Sitting Bull to write his name in 
English — an accomplishment of which the Indian was very proud. Mr. Hedderich was con- 
nected with the post traders store at Poplar, Montana, when that town was an Indian 
trading post, and remained there until his brother George died at Fort Buford, North Dakota, 
when he went to the latter place. He and his brother Oint then bought out the firm of 
Leigliton, .lordan & Hedderich and conducted the store at Fort Buford until the government 
abandoned the old military post there in 1895, when they moved the business to Williston, 
which was then a town of only three hundred inhabitants. Having faith in its future develop- 
ment, however, they erected a large brick store building and were not long in securing a good 
trade, which steadily increased as the country became more thickly settled. He also took iin 
active part in everything pertaining to the welfare of the community, becoming associated with 
many movements for the public good. He built the first irrigation ]dant in the northwestern 
part of the state, near Williston, and his success in that undertaking constituted an initial 
step which was later followed by the government, which promoted and established the large 
irrigation project that now furnishes water to that section. In addition to his other 
interests Mr. Hedderich became extensively and successfully engaged in the raising of polled 
Angus cattle, being the first man in his section of the state to own a fine herd of these cows. 

On the 5th of April, 1888, Mr. Hedderich was married to Miss Grace Dustin, a daughter 



240 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

of Jesse S. and Lorana (Carter) Dustin, the former a native of Vermont and the latter of 
Virginia. The death of Mr. Hedderieh occurred April 29, 1906, and was a matter of the 
keenest regret to all who knew him. His circle of friends was coextensive with the circle 
of his acquaintance. He manifested the utmost loyalty to his neighbors and because of 
tlie soundness of his judgment his advice was often sought by them. He left to his family 
a comfortable competence, the reward of his years of earnest, persistent and intelligently 
directed toil. The firm of G. M. Hedderieh & Company is still doing a fine business and 
today has one of the largest general stores in northwestern North Dakota. He was a 
charter member of the Royal Arcanum of Helena, Montana. Mrs. Hedderieh lives in Williston 
and is prominent in social circles there. They had a wide acquaintance among army officers 
who were at old Fort Buford and Mr. Hedderieh had the happy faculty of winning friends 
wherever he went. His life was ever an upright, honorable one, winning for him the 
goodwill, confidence and high regard of all witli whom he came in contact, and to his family 
he left not only a substantial competence but also the priceless heritage of an untarnished 
name. 



JOHN E. MLARTIN. 



.John E. Martin, attorney at law with offices at Maxbass, was born in Minneapolis, 
Minnesota, .July 1, 1884, a son of Ole and Ella (Stensby) Martin, who were natives of Norway. 
The mother is now deceased, but the father survives and makes his home in Minneapolis. 

John E. Martin acquired his education in the graded schools of Minneapolis and in the 
North high school, after which he attended the University of Minnesota, completing a course 
in the law department and graduating as a member of the class of 1910. Immediately 
afterward he came to North Dakota and settled at Plaza, Mountrail county, where he entered 
upon the practice of his profession. There he remained for six months, when his mother's 
death occurred and he returned to Minneapolis. After a brief period he located in Minot 
with George A. McGee, with whom he was associated in practice for ten months. In 
October, 1912, he came to Maxbass, where he has since successfully followed his profession, 
being now accorded a large and gratifying clientage that connects him with much important 
litigation tried in the courts of Bottineau county. He prepares his cases with thoroughness, 
is logical in his reasoning and clear in his deductions. 

On the 18th of November, 1914, Mr. Martin was united in marriage to Miss Kathryne 
Louise Vye, of Plaza, North Dakota, and to them has been born a daughter, Kathryne 
Gwenith. 

Mr. Martin is a member of Minot Lodge, No. 1089, B. P. 0. E., and in religious faith 
his wife is a Congiegationalist. Politically he is a republican and at the spring primary 
of 1916 received the nomination for judge of the county court and that fall was elected. 
He never regards lightly the duties that devolve upon him in a professional capacity and 
his ability is widely recognized. He is the present mayor of Maxbass, having served in that 
capacit}' for the past three years, and is also a member of the school board. 



JOHAN JULIUS HANSON. 



Johan Julius Hanson, a representative of the farming interests of Lamoure county, 
his home being on section 27, Black Loam township, was born in Norway, September 10, 
1859, a son of Olaves and Stina Hanson, who arrived in the United States in June. 1865, 
accompanied by their family and settled in Meeker county, Minnesota, where the father 
took up a homestead of seventy-two acres. He lived upon this farm until 1890, when 
he removed to Grove City, Minnesota, and in 1906 came to North Dakota, after which he went 
to live with his son, H. J. Hanson, in Litchville, there remaining up to the time of his 
death, which occurred in 1908. For more than a quarter of a century he had survived his 
wife, who died in this state in 1882. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 241 

JoliiUi J. Hanson was not yet six years of age when liis parents panic to the new world. 
He acqnireil a common school education in Minnesota, his boyhood days being passed witliout 
any incident of special importance. In the spring of 1882 he came to North I>akota and 
started to earn his living at farm life. He filed on a homestead claim constituting tha 
southeast quarter of section 6, Litchville township, and with characteristic energy began to 
develop and cultivate that property, there remaining until 1888, when he returned to 
Minnesota. Kor three years thereafter he lived in Cirove City, where he carried on general 
merchandising, but in 1891 he again came to Xortli Dakota and opened a mercantile store in 
Litchville. For three years he was again identitied with mercantile interests and in the 
spring of 1895 he removed to Verona, Lamoure county, where he engaged in business 
and also occupied the position of postmaster for three years. In the fall of 1898 he sold 
out his stock of goods and purchased one hundred and si.xty acres of land on section 36, Black 
Loam township, after which he removed to his farm and thereon continued to make his home 
until the fall of 1915, when he moved across the road and established his residence on 
section 27. He has bought land from time to time and is now the owner of nine hundred and 
twenty acres in Black Loam township and a quarter section in Litchville township. Much 
of the land was totally unimproved or but slightly improved when it came into his 
possession, but with characteristic energy he began its development and converted it into 
productive fields from which he annually gathers good harvests. 

In 1881 ilr. Hanson was married to Miss Carrie Bjorke, of Meeker county, Minnesota, 
a native of Norway, who came with her parents to this country in 1867. The two children 
born of this marriage are: Ludwig, living at Eudyard, Montana; and Alfred, who remains 
at home and cultivates a part of his father's land. The wife and mother passed away in 
December, 1884, and in 1885 Mr. Hanson was united in marriage to Miss Oliana Kulsath, 
of Prairie township, Lamoure county, but a native of Norway. She came to the United 
States with her parents in 1870 and has since remained on this side of the Atlantic. The 
children of this marriage are nine in number, of whom seven are living: Harry and Olaf, 
both at home; Mabel, who has taken up a homestead claim in Montana; and Josie, Walter, 
William and Laura, all of whom are under the parental roof. 

Mr. Hanson and his family are members of the Lutheran church and he is interested in 
all that pertains to the moral progress and uplift of the community. His political views are 
in accord with the principles of tlie republican party, but while he keeps well informed on 
the questions and issues of the day, he does not seek nor desire office, preferring to give 
his undivided attention to his business affairs. 



W. T. MOSELEY. 



W. T. Moseley is a well known representative of a profession wliich lias important 
bearing upon the progress and stable prosperity of every community, being now actively 
engaged in law practice as a member of the firm of Kehoe & Moseley of Cando. A native 
of Wisconsin, he was born in Sparta, March 6, 1877, his parents being Dr. William H. and 
Sarah B. (McKenzie) Moseley, the former born in Franklinville, New York, and the latter 
in Middlebury, Vermont. They came west with their respective parents in childhood, 
arriving in Wisconsin in the early '50s, at wliich time they took up their abode among the 
pioneer settlers of Monroe county. On reaching manhood the father prepared for the practice 
of medicine and for many years was a well known, prominent and successful physician of 
Sparta. In 1896 he removed to Madison, Wisconsin, where his remaining days were jiassed, 
his death there occurring in .June, 1911. His widow still resides in that city. 

Liberal educational opjiortunities were accorded W. T. Moseley. He completed his 
studies in the University of Wisconsin, whicli conferred upon him the Bachelor of letters 
degree in 1900 and in 1903 his LL. B. degree. His first two years as a law student were 
spent at Georgetown University in Washington, D. C, where he was also employed as 
special agent in the United States census bureau, to which position he was appointed in 
June, 1900. During his service in that connection he was placed in charge of agriculture 
on the Indian reservations of the United States, over which he had jurisdiction for two years 



242 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

and during that time lie attended Georgetown University, in wliicli lie pursued liis 
preparation for the bar. Following his graduation from the law school of the University 
of Wisconsin he came direct to North Dakota in 1903 and lor two years was employed in 
the collection department of the J. I. Case Threshing Machine Company, with headquarters 
at Fargo. From 1905 until 1907 he was traveling auditor fur F. FI. Stoltzo, who at that time 
operated a line of thirty lumberyards in Kortli Dakota, and while thus engaged he gained a 
broad acquaintance throughout the state. In August, 1907, he arrived in Cando, where he 
formed a law partnership with Charles C. Converse under the firm name of Converse &, 
Moseley. That partnership continued until May, 1908, when Mr. Converse removed to 
McKenzie county, and during the succeeding four years Mr. Moseley practiced independently. 
On the 1st of Jul}', 1912, he joined J. J. Kehoe in forming the present partnership under 
the firm style of Kehoe & Moseley, which constitutes today one of the strong law firms 
of their part of the state. They have a large practice and are verj' successful in its 
conduct. Mr. Jloseley has comprehensive knowledge of the principles of jurisprudence and 
his abilitj' in analyzing a case and arriving at the strong points in its evidence is marked. 
In association with Mr. Kehoe he owns four hundred and eighty acres of land in Towner 
county. 

On the 24th of September, 1907, Mr. Moseley was united in marriage to Miss Josephine 
A. Wells, of Portage, Wisconsin, a classmate in the University of Wisconsin in which she was 
the honor student in the class of 1903, in which year the degree of B. L. was conferred 
upon her. She was also made a member of the Plii Beta Kappa fraternity and belonged to 
the Pi Beta Phi sorority. Mr. and ^Mrs. Moseley have two children, Forrest M. and 
Marion W. 

ill'. Moseley is a republican in politics and m 1910 was appointed to the ollice of 
city attorney of Cando, in which position he has served continuously, while in the fall 
of 1916 he was elected to the oflice of states attorney. He belongs to Cando Lodge, No. 40, 
F. & A. M., and Cando Chapter, No. IS, E. A. M., and he is also identified with Harlan Chapter 
of the Phi Delta Phi, a college fraternity. Both he and his wife are members of the 
Congregational church and Mrs. !JIoseley is very active in church and club circles, belonging to 
the Fleur de Lis Club of Cando. Theirs is an enviable social position and the hospitality 
of the best homes of Cando is cordiallj' extended them. Nature endowed Mr. Moseley 
witli strong intellect and he has used his talents wisely and well, concentrating his efforts 
upon a profession in which merit and ability are the only factors that win advancement. 
His knowledge of the law is comprehensive and exact and he is seldom, if ever, at fault in 
the application of a legal principle. 



GEORGE E. BURGESS. 



One of the foremost business men and prominent citizens of Billings county is George E. 
Burgess, who is now serving as cashier of the Stockmen's State Bank of Mcdora and is also 
extensively engaged in the cattle business. He was born in Wisconsin in 1865 and is one 
of a family of seven children, his parents being .John and Rachel Burgess, who were pioneer 
settlers of western Wisconsin, where they located in the early '50s. The mother is still 
living but the father is deceased. 

George E. Burgess spent his boyhood and youth in the state of his nativity and is 
indebted to its public schools for the education he obtained. On starting out in life for 
liiinself he turned his attention to railroading, being employed as engineer and surveyor by 
the Cliippewa Valley & Northern Pacific Railroad from 18S7 to 1897. He made his home 
with his parents until his removal to North Dakota in 1890. On severing his connection 
with the railroad he turned his attention to ranching about four miles north of Medora in 
Billings county and has since engaged in the stock business on an extensive scale. He raises 
on an average of from three to four hundred head of cattle annually and as his stock ia 
of good grade he commands the highest price on the market. At the present time, however, 
his cattle interests are confined mostly to Montana. In 1909 he assisted in organizing the 
Stockmen's State Bank of Medora, being connected in this enterprise with C. Peterson 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 243 

Haive Robinson, G. H. Parker and J. T. Johnson. The bank has a capital of fifteen tliousanil 
dollars and a surplus of like amount, and Mr. IJurgess has efficiently served as its cashier 
since its incorporation. 

In IS'JS he was united in marriage to Miss Nettie Strom, a native of Iowa, tliough her 
parents, who are now deceased, W'ere pioneers of Bismarck, North Dakota. Mr. and Mrs. 
Burgess have three eliildren namely: Ethel, Erma and Helen. 

Mr. Burgess afliliates with the republican party and from 1903 to 1915 filled the oflice of 
register of deeds in Billings county. He is a Royal Arch Mason, belonging to the bhie 
lodge and chapter at Dickinson, and he is also a member of the Elks lodge at that place. 
He is a man of excellent business and executive ability, possessing sound judgment and 
keen ihsiglit, and to these characteristics may be attributed his success in life, for on starting 
out for hinisclt he was witliout capital and his success is due to his own unaided efforts. 



J. F. GARDNER. 



J. F. Gardner, cashier of the Farmers State Bank of Belfield, was born in Wisconsin, 
of which state his parents, John \V. and Dorothy E. (Springstend) Gardner, are also natives 
and wliere they still continue to reside. There he attended the public schools and completed 
his education at a business college in the Twin Cities, where he pursued a course in book- 
keei)ing. ]"or a time he was in the employ of the firm of Whipple & Malstedt at Minneapolis 
and then entered the Elk Valley Bank at Larimore, Nortli Dakota, as a bookkeeper, remaining 
tliere for a period of two years from 1900. He next held tlie position of receiving teller 
in the Second National Bank of Minot until 1008, when he returned to Jlinneapolis and 
accepted a position with the Gold-Stabeck Loan & Credit Company, his work being confined 
mostly to Nortli Dakota. 

On leaving that firm Mr. Gardner located in Belfield on the 1st of August, 1915, and 
became cashier of the Farmers State Bank, which was organized on the 1st of September, that 
year, by W. S. Richards, Mr. Eyer and Mr. Gardner. It is capitalized at fifteen thousand 
dollars and has already built up a good business, though now only a year old. 

By his ballot Mr. Gardner supports the men and measures of the republican party 
but has never cared for political honors. He is now serving as an ofiicer in the recently 
organized Masonic lodge of Belfield and is also a member of the Knights of Pythias lodge at 
Minot. He is one of the representative business men of Belfield and is held in high esteem 
wlierever known. 



DAVID KALIL. 



David Kalil, engaged in merchandising at Williston, is a member of the firm of Kali! 
Brothers, who since 1907 have dealt in groceries, meats, farm machinery and implements 
in the town, where they are still conducting a profitable enterprise. David Kalil was born 
at Turbol, Syria, July 4, 1882, a son of Kalil and Mary (Farage) Mussaaid, who are also 
of Syrian birth. The father has devoted his life to farming and both he and his wife are 
still residents of Syria. 

It was after coming to America that David Kalil changed his name to its present form, 
for in his native land he was Kalil Mussaaid. He acquired his education in the schools 
of his native city and became a farmer and tobacco raiser of Syria, wlicre lie remained until 
1899, when at the age of seventeen years he crossed the Atlantic and started in business life 
in the new world as a factory hand in Lawrence. JIassachusetts. He afterward worked in 
a brick manufacturing plant at Fishkill-on-the-Hudson in New York for about three years 
and during that period carefully saved his earnings until industry and economy had brought 
him sufficient capital to enable him to embark in business on his own account. Removing 
to the west, he established a grocery store at Duluth. Minnesota, where he carried on business 
for two years, and in 1903 he went to Williston, North Dakota, and homesteaded land in 



244 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

that vipinity. After devoting four years to the development and improvement of his property 
he again engaged in merchandising, becoming a member of tlie tirm of Knlil Brotliers in 
1907. His partner is his brother Jim, who married ilamie Zine, of Forzol, Syria. In the 
intervening period, covering a decade, they have built up a good business, handling groceries, 
meats, farm niacliinery and implements, and their trade is now large and gratifying, bringing 
to them a good financial return. David Kalil also owns farm land in Williams county, 
covering the quarter section which he homesteaded,. and' he has another quarter section in 
Montana. He also has considerable city property, including his residence and store building, 
both of which he erected. 

On the 14th of August, 1904, at Duluth, Minnesota, Mr. Kalil was married to Miss 
Sadie Homeid, a native of Syria who in early girlhood came to America, making her way 
to Duluth. Four children have been born of this marriage: Wilbur, Rosaline, Edward and 
Solomon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kalil hold membership in the Roman Catholic church. His political 
allegiance is given to the republican party and fraternally he is connected with the Moose. 
He is yet a young man but has already made for himself a most substantial position in 
business circles and his career since coming to tlfe new world has been characterized by 
steady progress. He certainly deserves much credit for what he has accomplished, as his 
efforts have been intelligently directed and he has readily adapted himself to changed 
conditions and different business methods. 



JOHN SAD. 

John Sad. a lawyer practicing at Hannaford since his admission to the bar in 1914, 
was born at Hardanger, Xorway. .July 24, 1S88. His father, Asbjorni B. Sad, also a native 
of Hardanger, came to North Dakota with his family in 1889, settling first at Valley City 
but after two years removing to Fargo. Later he returned to Valley City, where he 
remained until 1904, employed at the trade of merchant tailoring. He then purchased a 
farm east of Dazey, upon which he still resides. 

John Sad was the eldest in a family of six children and was only about a year old 
when brought to the new world, so that practically his entire life has been spent in this 
state. He attended the public schools and later became a student in the North Dakota 
State University, where he pursued a course in law that qualified him for admission to the 
bar in 1914. After receiving his license to practice he located in Hannaford, where he has 
since remained and in the intervening period he has gained a good clientage which many an 
older practitioner might well envy. He displays energy and ability, is a fluent, forceful 
speaker and readily recognizes the relation of points in law to the facts in the case. At 
the present time he is the republican nominee for states attorney in Griggs county and receives 
strong endorsement from fellow members oi the bar. 

On the 27th of November, 1913, Mi-. Sad was united in marriage to Miss May Stee, 
who was born near Dazey, a daughter of Thomas Stee, a pioneer of Barnes county. They 
have a circle of warm friends at Hannaford and in this part of the state and Mr. Sad is 
a representative member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. His chief interest, 
however, is his law practice and he gives undivided attention to the interests entrusted to 
his care. 



OSCAR M. NESS. 



Oscar M. Ness, cashier of the First State Bank of Mylo, Rolette county, is a native of 
the neighboring state of Minnesota, his birth having occurred in Cottonwood county, 
December 14, 1885. His parents are John H. and Carrie Ness, the former a native of 
Norway and the latter of Iowa. When but six years of age the father accomjianied his 
parents to the new world, the family home being established in Minnesota, where he was 
reared and educated. He took up the occupation of farming as a life work and followed 




OSCAR M. NESS 



f - 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 247 

that pursuit in Cottonwood county for many years but is now living retired, ho and his 
wife making their home in Windom, Minnesota. 

Oscar M. Ness was reared at Windom and is indebted to its public schools for his 
educational opportunities. He remained with his parents until he attained his majority 
and then started out in the business world bj' securing a situation in a bank at Mankato, 
Minnesota, where he served for two or three years as bookkeeper. He then went to 
Bisbee in 1908 and accepted the position of assistant cashier in the First National Bank, 
which office he filled until January, 1916. He then removed to Mylo, Rolette county, to 
become cashier of the First State Bank, of which Axel Egeland is the president and 
E. J. Honeyford vice president. Mr. Ness is one of the stockholders and directors of this 
bank, which is capitalized for ten thousand dollars and has a surplus of two thousand 
dollars, while their deposits amount to one hundred and forty thousand dollars. Mr. Ness 
is also a stockholder and one of the directors of the First National Bank of Bisbee and his 
real estate investments cover six hundred and forty acres of land in Rolette county. He 
buys and sells land, this constituting an important branch of his business, and he is 
thoroughly informed concerning property values. 

On the 4th of June, 1913, Mr. Ness was married to Miss Isabelle Gerrard. They are 
members of the Lutheran church and in social circles in their community occupy an 
enviable position. Mr. Ness belongs to the Masonic fraternity and to the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, while his political allegiance is given to the republican party. He 
served on the school board while at Bisbee but has never sought or desired political office, 
feeling that the pursuits of private life are in themselves abundantly worthy of his best 
eft'orts. He has based his hope upon diligence and determination as factors iii success 
and through the utilization of those qualities has worked his way steadily upward, being 
now numbered among the men of affluence in his community. 



OLE TORGERSEN. 



Ole Torgersen, a lumber dealer of Berwick, was born in Norway, Februarj- 24, 1861, 
and was a little lad of eight years when in 1869 he was brought to America by his parents, 
Torger and Nettie (Larscn) Torgersen, who settled in Mitchell county, Iowa. After nine 
years they removed/ to Yellow Medicine county, Minnesota, where the father filed on a 
homestead on which he resided for a number of years. Later he took up his abode at 
Canby, where his remaining days were passed, his death there occurring in March. 1914. 
His widow still survives and has now reached the advanced age of eight.y-six years. Her 
home is still in Canby. 

Ole Torgersen pursued a district school education in Iowa and through the period of 
his boyhood and youth, when not occupied by the duties of the schoolroom, aided in the 
work of the home farm. He remained with his father until he reached his twenty-fifth year 
and then turned from agricultural to commercial pursuits, securing a position in a lumber 
yard in Toronto, South Dakota, where he was employed for five years. 

In 1890 Mr. Torgersen was united in marriage to Miss Hulda .Johnson, then of Toronto 
but a native of Rushford, Minnesota, and of Norwegian parentage. Following his marriage 
he embarked in the lumber business on his own account, becoming a partner in the Winnor- 
Torgersen Lumber Company, with yards at various points in South Dakota. Subsequently 
they disposed of their interests in that state and bought other luml>er yards in North 
Dakota, carrying on a profitable and growing business until 1912, when Mr. Torgersen 
severed his connection with his firm, buying from the Winnor-Torgerscn Lumber Company 
their yards at Berwick and Willow City. Later he also acquired a yard at Balta and 
another at Orrin and he now operates the four yards, being thus extensively engaged in the 
lumber trade, in which long experience, close application and unfaltering energy are bringing 
to him substantial and well merited success. He possesses marked energy, and closely 
studying every phase of the lumber trade and the market, he has been able to purchase 
judiciously and to win a fair profit on his investment. He also owns a farm of one hundred 
and si.xty acres in Ransom county and an entire section of land in Greeley county, Kansas. 



248 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Jlr. and Jlrs. Torgersen have no children of their own, but have reared and educated 
three girls, two half sisters of his wife — ^Louise, now the wife of Dr. 6. H. Walker, of 
Fairfax, Minnesota; and Augusta, the wife of N. M. Tweet, a merchant of Berwick, North 
Dakota; and a niece, Jessie Torgersen, who is now attending the State University at Grand 
Forks, North Dakota. Mr. and Mi'S. Torgersen are members of the Lutheran church and 
he belongs also to Canby Lodge, No. 147, F. & A. M., and has attained the thirty-second 
degiee of the Scottish Rite in South Dakota Consistory, No. 4, S. P. E. S., of Aberdeen. 
His political allegiance is given_ to the republican party and he is now a member of the 
town board. He maintains a helpful attitude toward any movement calculated to benefit 
the district or state in which he lives and he is a representative of that class of progressive 
men who are doing much to further the upbuilding of North Dakota. Starting out in life 
empty handed, he has worked his way upward through persistent and honorable effort and 
is now one of the well known lumber merchants of his section of the state. 



DANIEL W. FRAKER. 



Since the spring of 1S9S Daniel W. Frakcr has been a resident of Towner county and 
has been actively identified with its development and prosperity. For several years he was 
engaged in agi'icultural piu-suits and was also identified with educational interests for a 
time but is now serving as register of deeds and makes his home in Cando. He was born 
on the 24th of February, 1876, in Pennsylvania, of which state his parents, Dyson F. and 
Sarah (Ci-omer) Fraker, were lifelong residents. By trade the father was a niolder but 
he also followed the occupation of farming. When the country became involved in Civil 
war he put aside all personal interests, enlisting February 19, 1S64, in Company L, Twenty- 
first Pennsylvania Cavalrj-, with which he served until July 9, 1865, where he was mustered 
out. For more than forty years he was a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and died in that faith at Fort Littleton, Pennsylvania, December 29, 1915, at the age of 
sixty-nine years, three months and twenty-two days. He had survived his wife for eight 
years, as she passed away October 4, 1907, at the age of sixty-one. 

In the home of this worthy couple Daniel W. Fraker grew to manhood, surrounded by 
good Christian influence, and in the local schools he obtained his education. At the age of 
nineteen years he left the parental roof and went to Story county, Iowa, where he worked 
as a farm hand for one year. The following two years were spent in Ohio, and in the spring 
of 1898 he came to North Dakota, his destination being Cando, Towner county, where he 
filed on land, which he operated for a number of years. He then rented his land and removed 
to Egeland, where he taught school from 1904 to 1914. In 1914 he was elected register 
of deeds of Towner county and removed to Cando to assume the duties of that ofiice, which 
he has since most faithfully discharged. He is now the republican candidate for reelection, 
having always affiliated with that party. He is a man who commands the respect and 
confidence of all with whom he is brought in contact. 



GEORGE DUNCAN. 



George Duncan, clerk of the courts of Benson county and a resident of Minnewaukan, 
is a native of Scotland, his birth having occurred at Euthven, Aberdeenshire, on the 15th of 
June. 1S60. He is a son of .James and Janet (Wilson) Duncan, who were also natives of 
Scotland, the former born in Aberdeen county and the latter in the county of Banff. The 
father carried on farming in the land of hills and heather throughout his entire life and 
there passed away in 1889, having for a long period survived his wife, who died in 1871. 

George Duncan supplemented his public school education, acquired in Scotland, by study 
in ilinnesota. He came to America in .June, 1882, and for three years was a resident, of 
Minnesota, after which he removed to Grand Forks county. North Dakota, where he resided 
for two years. He next made his way to ilinnewaukan, Benson county, and filed on land 



HISTORY OF XORTII DAKOTA 249 

wliich he has ciiltivatcil to a greater or less extent for twenty years In April, 1897, he was 
aippointed clerk of the courts of Benson county and at the next election was regularly 
chosen by popular suffrage for that position, in which he has since been continued by 
reelection, covering a period of almost twenty years. This is a notable record of faith- 
fulness and capability and all who know aught of his service speak of him in terms of high 
regard. He also deals in land and has quite extensive farming interests, his business affairs 
in that connection being wisely and profitably managed. 

On the 13th of May, 1894, Mi'. Duncan was united in marriage to Miss Tillie Pierson 
and to them have been born six children: Walter, who died August 22, 1912, at the age 
of seventeen years; and George, Mabel, Don, Dorothy and Fred, all at home. Among the 
living children all are yet in school save the eldest, who is now working in the office of 
clerk of the courts under his father. The family reside on forty acres of land just outside 
the village, in West Bay township, Benson county, and Mr. Duncan is treasurer of that 
township, which was organized in 1908. 

In his political views Mr. Duncan is an earnest republican but not a politician in the 
usually accepted sense of office seeking. He has been long in a position of public trust 
and it has come to him as the recognition of fidelity on his part and capability in the 
discharge of his duties. Fraternally he is connected with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Ancient Older of United Workmen, while the religious faith of the family 
IS that of the Presbyterian church. 



HENRY A. SORENSON. 



Among the representative business men of Belfield is numbered Henry A. Sorenson, 
a dealer in hardware, furniture and farm implements. He was born in Minnesota in 1879 
and is a son of Cliris and Matilda Sorenson. For many years the father was engaged in 
the implement business in Appleton. ilinnesota, and he continued to reside in that state until 
his death. 

During his boyhood and youth Henry A. Sorenson attended the public schools of Minne- 
sota, and he remained on the home farm until twenty-eight years of age, giving his father 
the benefit of his labors. On coming to Xorth Dakota in 1909, he located in Belfield, where 
he and his brother, J. S. Sorenson, started in the hardware, furniture and implement business. 
He is still interested in that enterprise and todaj- has one of the leading establishments of 
the kind in Stark county. 

In the fall of 1911, Mr. Sorenson was united in marriage to Miss Mary Amundson, also 
a native of Minnesota, and to them have been born two children. Marvel and Lucille. They 
are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church of Belfield, of which Mr. Sorenson is one of 
the trustees. Politically he affiliates with the republican party. He is a prominent and 
influential member of the Belfield Commercial Club, which he served as vice president in 
1915, and is at present treasurer of the club. On starting out in life for himself he was 
in limited circumstances but through industry, perseverance and good judgment he has worked 
his way steadily upward until he now ranks among the substantial citizens of the com- 
munity. Besides his business in Belfield he is now interested in farm lands to some extent 
and whatever he undertakes ho generally carries forward to successful completion. 



THOMAS JERMANUS. 



Syria's contribution to the citizenship of North Dakota includes Thomas Jermanus, a 
merchant of Williston, who was born at Maalackat, Syria, February 14, 1873. His parents, 
Kalil and Xijmeli (Oassien) Jermanus, were also natives of that country, where they spent 
their entire lives, the father always devoting his attention to merchandising at Maalackat- 
Zahleh. 

It was there that Thomas Jermanus acquired his education and afterward learned the 



250 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

trade of shoemaking. The opportunities of tlie new world attracted him and at the age 
of seventeen lie bade adieu to friends and native land and sailed for America, arriving 
in Cliicago in 1890. There he engaged in shoemaking until 1893. Then he became a clerk 
in a dry goods store in St. Paul, Minnesota, where he spent the succeeding decade. In 1903 
he arrived in Williston and homesteaded, after which he farmed his place until he proved 
up and won his title. In 1905 he established a general store at Williston and in 1907 
admitted his brother-in-law to a partnership under the firm name of Jermanus &, Bousliman. 
That connection was continued imtil 1911, when he purchased the interest of Mr. Bousliman 
and lias since carried on the business alone under the name of the National store. He has 
gained a good patronage by enterprise and reliable methods, his success being the direct 
result of persistent, earnest labor. 

On the 15th of February, 1903, Mi\ Jermanus was married to Miss Julia Bousliman, of 
St. Paul, who was born in Zahleh, Syria. She is a daughter of Moses and Sanura Bousliman, 
who were also natives of Syria, where the father followed the business of a tinner until 
his death. The mother is now living with Mrs. Jermanus. To Jlr. and Mrs. Jermanus 
have been born four children: George, born in St. Paul; and Charles, John and Nijmeh, all 
born in Williston. 

Since becoming a naturalized citizen Mr. .Jermanus has exercised his right of franchise 
in support of the men and measures of the republican party. His religious faith is that of 
the Roman Catliolic church and fraternally he is connected with Williston Lodge, No. 1214, 
B. P. 0. E., and with the Moose. He still owns his homestead property, which he now 
rents, and he also has valuable real estate in Williston, where he is recognized as one of the 
leading citizens of Syrian birth. 



J. R. WATERS. 



The city of Beach, North Dakota, probably has no more wide-awake or enterprising 
citizen than J. R. Waters, who is engaged in the loan and real estate business and also 
follows farming on an extensive scale. He was born in Warren, Ohio, on the 18th of 
December, 1867, and was about five or six years of age, when he accompanied his parents, 
George and Ellen W^aters, on their removal to Montezuma, Iowa, where botli the father and 
mother died. There J. R. Waters grew to manhood, receiving the usual instruction in the 
public schools, and after his graduation from the high school of Montezuma entered the 
Agricultural College at Ames, Iowa, from which he was later graduated. 

Mr. Waters began his business career as a railroad man. being employed as train dis- 
patcher by the Iowa Central, Santa Fe, Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul, the Soo line and 
the Great Northern Railroads until 1901, since which time he has given his attention to the 
real estate business. He first entered the service of the C. C. Samson Land Company of St. 
Paul and in 1902 became a member of the firm with headquarters at Grand Forks, North 
Dakota. In 1908 he severed his connection with that company and removed to Minot, where 
he organized the Security Loan Company, but remained there only one j^ear. It was in Feb- 
ruary, 1909, that he arrived in Beach and embarked in the loan business. This he has since 
made his principal business, though lie handles real estate to some extent and is farming a 
vast acreage of upward of two thousand acres. He is gradually working into the cattle 
business, which he has found quite profitable, and is now raising Holstein and shorthorn 
cattle quite extensively. He is also interested in thoroughbred horses, making a specialty 
of racers, and owns some fast stock. His home is a fine residence on the north side of the 
town of Beach and has just been completed. It is modern and thoroughly up-to-date in its 
appointments. 

Since coming to Beach, Mr. Waters has taken an active interest in the Commercial 
Club, serving as its first president, and he has been instrumental in advancing the welfare 
of the city along various lines. He never allows his personal aff'airs to interfere with his 
duties as a citizen, and his cooperation can be depended upon to further all worthy objects 
for the public good. He is a prominent Mason, belonging to Lafayette Lodge, No. 52, A. F 
& A. M., of Montezuma, Iowa; to Dakota Consistory, No. 1, at Fargo; and to El Zagal 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 251 

Temple of the ilystic Shrine at Fargo. He is also a member of the Elks lodge at Dickinson 
and other organizations. It is as a business man, however, that he is most widely known. 
Prosperity has attended his well directed efforts and he today ranks with the most sub- 
stantial citizens of Golden Valley county. His executive ability is beyond question and in 
business affairs he is enterprising, progressive and reliable. 



C. E. WARD. 



The educational interests of North Dakota have a worthy representative in C. E. Ward, 
the present efficient superintendent of schools for Stark county. He was born in Boulder, 
Clinton county, Illinois, April 25, 1884, his parents being Jasper and Mary A. (Moore) Ward, 
who are now residents of Missouri. By occupation the father is a farmer. 

In the state of his nativity C. E. Ward began his education in the public schools but when 
he was twelve years of age the family removed to Irwin, low'a, where he continued to 
attend school for some time, completing a high school course. Coming to North Dakota 
in 1906 he secured a homestead south of Belfield in Stark county and while proving up on 
his claim engaged in teaching school, continuing to successfully follow that profession until 
elected county superintendent, at which time he was serving as principal of the Belfield 
high school. So acceptably did he fill the office of superintendent that he was reelected at the 
end of his two years' terra in 1914 and was again the candidate of the republican party for 
that position in the fall of 1916. 

Mr. Ward was married on the 5th of August, 1909, to Miss Emma Kemble, and they 
have become the parents of two children: Dorothea and Charles H. In religious faith 
they are Protestants and Mr. Ward is a Royal Arch Mason and also a member of the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He was 
a leader in the campaign for the twenty thousand dollar school building erected In Belfield 
in 1914 and has been instrumental in promoting the Normal School for Dickinson and 
many other worthy enterprises since becoming a resident of that city. The good roads 
movement receives his earnest support and Stark county probably has no more enterprising 
or progressive citizen than C. E. Ward. 



OSCAR GREENLAND. 



Oscar Greenland, cashier of the First National Bank of Binford, Griggs county, was 
born on the 18th of July, 1873, in Fillmore county, Minnesota, and is the oldest in a family 
of six children, four of whom are still living. His parents, Frithiof and Nathalia (Evenrud) 
Greenland, were born, reared and married in Norway, whence they came to the United 
States in 1871 and located in Minnesota, making their home there until their removal to 
Griggs county. North Dakota, in 1881. Here the father took up a homestead and a tree 
claim, upon which he continued to reside until 1902, when he left the farm to the operation 
of his youngest son and removed to Cooperstown, where he has since engaged in the 
machine business. He has taken a very prominent and influential part in public aff'airs and 
has been called upon to fill positions of honor and trust. He was elected county assessor, 
in which capacitj' he served for two years, and was then elected sherifif of Griggs county. 
So acceptably did he fill that position that he was reelected, serving for four years. 

Oscar Greenland was about eight years of age when he accompanied his parents on. 
their removal to North Dakota. He obtained his education in the district schools and in 
1892 began his business career as a clerk in the hardware store of Peter E. Nelson at 
Cooperstown, where he remained for four years. He was next with the firm of Berg Brothers 
& Company until 1899, when he formed a partnership with his employers and started a 
hardware and general mercantile business at Binford, which town had just been established, 
theirs being the second store to open there. Mr. Greenland is still interested in that 
business, which is now conducted under the style of -Greenland- Pritz & Company, Inc. 



252 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

In 1906 he was one of the organizers of the First National Bank of Binford and has since 
been a member of its board of directors. Thej' immediately erected a good substantial 
building, well equipped for its purpose, and from the first have received a. liberal share of 
the public patronage. The bank has a capital of twenty-five thousand dollars and a surplus 
of ten thousand dollars, while its deposits at the present time amount to one hundred and 
seventy thousand dollars. In 1908 Mr. Greenland became cashier of the bank, in which 
capacity he is still serving, the other officers being Lewis Berg, president; Joseph Buchheit, 
vice president; and N. E. Greenland, assistant cashier. 

On the 19th of April, 1900, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Greenland and Miss 
Bertha Lier, a native of Wisconsin and a daughter of Mathias C. Lier, who was born in 
Norway and brought his family to North Dakota in 1899. To this union have been born the 
following cliildren: Inez Caroline, Florence Mercedes, Blanche Ovidia, Thelma, Beatrice 
Marjory and Bernice Muriel. 

Mr. Greenland is president of the local lodge of Sons of Norway and is a democrat 
in politics. He is one of the leading representatives of his party in his district and has 
twice been a candidate for the state legislature but was defeated as the republican party 
is in the majority there. He takes a commendable interest in public aflairs and is a 
liberal supporter of all enterprises calculated to benefit his town, county or state. 



JOHN DUNCAN TAYLOK, M. D. 

Dr. John Duncan Taylor, a distinguished physician and former member of the state 
senate, has throughout the period of his connection with North Dakota contributed to its 
growth and development. Arriving in the state when a youth of but nineteen years, 
he has since cooperated in many plans and movements which have resulted directly in the 
upbuilding of his district, meeting the hardships and privations of pioneer life and also 
living to witness the remarkable changes which have brought North Dakota to its present 
condition of high civilization. He was born in Ontario, Canada, May 16, 1859, a son of 
Charles B. and Mary (Lockhart) Taylor, both of whom were natives of Scotland but in 
early life became residents of Canada. They remained in Ontario, however, for only a 
short time. The father removed to Detroit, Michigan, in 1868 and there engaged in the 
dry goods business, maintaining his residence in that city up to the time of his death, which 
occurred in 1903, when he had reached the age of sixty-nine years. His wife died in 
Ontario in 1863, when but twenty-eight years of age. They had a family of two children, 
the daughter being Mrs. Marion Van .Sycle, of Grand Forks. 

Dr. Taylor pursued his primary studies in the schools of Detroit, A\here he continued 
his education to the age of fifteen. He then put aside his textbooks and for a time sold 
papers in that city, later becoming a pharmacist. At nineteen years of age he removed 
westward to North Dakota and established a drug store at Grandin, while later he 
became a resident of Churchs Ferry. There he carried on business for a period but after- 
ward sold out preparatory to entering upon the study of medicine, which he pursued in the 
Detroit College of Medicine. After graduating from that institution with the class of 
1891 he entered the Rush Medical College of Chicago, whore he won his M. D. degree as a 
member of the class of 1893. Returning to North Dakota, he opened an office at Churchs 
Ferry but the same year removed to Grand Forks, where he has since practiced. His ability 
has "brought him prominently before the public in a ].rofessional capacity. He studies 
broadly, thinks deeplv and keeps in touch with the trend of scientific investigation and 
research, being at all times deeply interested in anything which tends to brmg to man 
the key to the complex mystery which we call life. Dr. Taylor belongs to the Grand 
Forks District Medical Societv, of which he was the first president, and he also has 
membership in the North Dakota State Medical Association and the American Medical 

Association. • i i i 

Dr Taylor holds membership in the Presbyterian church, while in Masonic circles he has 
attained high rank, having become a Knight Templar and a member of the Mystic Shrine. 
He is a charter member of the Country and Golf Clubs of Grand Forks and finds therein 




PR. JOIIX I). TAYLOR 



n 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 255 

needed rest and recreation, llis political allegiance is given to the republican party and 
from 1900 until 1908 he was a member of the state senate from the seventh senatorial 
district, which he represented in the upper house for two terms. During that period he 
gave most thoughtful and earnest consideration to the questions which came up for 
settlement and supported all those measures which he deemed beneficial to the common- 
wealth and as earnestly opposed those which he considered inimical to the best develop- 
ment of the state. While serving as senator he had established the public health laboratory 
at the University of North Dakota. In 1908 he was elected mayor of Grand Forks 
and remained as chief executive of the city for two years, after vifhich he traveled 
extensively in all parts of Europe, for a year doing post graduate work. Following his 
return to Grand Forks he was appointed a member of the board of regents for the state 
of North Dakota for a term of four years and is now acting in that capacity. His work 
in public connections as well as in professional circles has been far-reaching and bene- 
ficial and tlie value of his service to the state is widely acknowledged. 



DAVID D. McKEE. 



David D. McKee, cashier of the Tappen State Bank at Tappen, Kidder county, is a 
native of Querida, Colorado, born .January 36, 1884, his parents being David William and 
Anna (Ryan) ilcKeo, wlm arc also natives of that state. Removing northward to 
Minnesota, the3' settled in Kennedy, where they still reside. 

David D. McKee was but an infant at the time of the removal to that place, where 
he was reared. He attended the graded schools and when he started out to earn his 
own living secured work as a farm hand by tlie month in that vicinity. There he remained 
until 1904, when he removed to Sharon, North Dakota, where he conducted a lumberyard 
for the St. Anthony Dakota Elevator Company of Minneapolis, of which he had charge foi- 
seven years. Since 1911 he has lived in Tappen, where he assisted in organizing the Tappen 
State Bank, its charter being received on the 4th of Jurie, 1910. The officers are: 0. N. 
(Jrafshein, president; Alexander Curry, vice president; and David D. McKee, cashier. 
These oflicers have occupied their respective positions from the beginning. The bank is 
capitalized for ten thousand dollars and now has a surplus of ten thousand dollars. The 
company owns the bank building and conducts both a general banking and real estate 
business. In 1912 the Tappen State Bank purchased the Pettibone State Bank, which the 
company still conducts. Mr. JIcKee was the real promoter of the Tappen Bank and has been 
the moving spirit in its conduct and successful management. He is likewise half owner 
of a large sheep ranch, on which are about twenty-five thousand head of Shropshire and 
Merino sheep. He is likewise interested in farming and has an entire section of land 
under cultivation. 

In 1905 Mr. McKee was married to Miss Eva Long, a native of Sharon, North Dakota, 
and they have two children, Owen and Walter, born respectively in 1908 and 1913. The 
religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic church and in his political belief 
Jlr. McKee is a democrat. His interest, however, centers upon his business, although he is not 
remiss in the duties of citizensliip. and his close application, unfaltering perseverance and 
intelligently directed energy are the salient features in his advancement toward financial 
independence. 



CHARLES S. MOORES. 



The business interests of Steele coiuity have a worthy representative in Charles S. 
Moores, who has been prominently identified with the development of Hope and has 
materially aided in its upbuilding and prosperity. He has assisted in establishing various 
enterprises and is today serving as vice president of the Hope National Bank, of which 
he was one of the organizers. 



256 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Mr. Moores was born on the 12th of Augnst, 1864, in Etstigouche, New Brnnswick, 
Canada, of which place his parents, Alex and Levina (Allan) Moores, were also natives. 
His paternal grandfather, David Moores, was also born in New Brunswick, but the family 
came originally from Scotland and for several generations they were identitied with the 
lumber business. In 1868 the father removed to Minnesota, where his family joined him the 
following year and where he continued in the lumber business until accident ly killed by a 
log rolling upon him when thirty-six years of age. 

Charles S. Moores is the older of the two children of the family and was about 
five years of age when he became a resident of Minnesota, his boyhood being spent at 
Elk Kiver, where he attended school. At the age of eighteen he started out in life for 
himself and for three years engaged in lumbering. In 1885 he came to North Dakota and 
took up a homestead in Kichland county. When the Great Northern and Soo Railroads were 
built across his land, they erected a station in 1886, to which thej- gave the name of Stiles, 
and he opened a general store at that place, which he conducted with success until 1894. 
He then sold out and purchased the Hope Roller Jlill at Hope, Steele county, which he 
operated until 1913. In the meantime he had become interested in other enterprises in 
that city. In 1907 he built the light plant and engaged in its operation until 1912, when 
he sold it to the Frank E. Corson Company, who now conduct it. Although he has 
recently disposed of some of his property, Mr. Moores is still the owner of two sections of 
land in Steele county and has three sections of farm land in Montana. In 1900, ht was one 
of the organizers and promoters of the Hope State Bank, which changed its name six 
years later to the Hope National Bank. Its capital and surplus now amount to over 
sixty thousand dollars and a large amount of business is transacted over its counters. On 
its organization the present modern bank building was erected and its equipment is 
substantial and up-to-date. From the beginning Mr. Moores has served as its vice president, 
the other officers being Ole Arnegard, president and George A. Warner, cashier. 

In October, 1888, Mr. Moores was united in marriage to Miss Celia Stiles, who died in 
May, 1898. Her father, Ezra Stiles, was a prominent farmer of Richland county and it was 
in his honor the town of Stiles was named. The children born of this union are: Winnifred, 
who attended the Hope high school and also the Minnesota Business College at Minneapolis 
and is now in the employ of the Hope National Bank; Harold, who also attended high school 
and is now conducting one of his father's farms; and Zelma, who completed her education 
in the Valley City State Normal and is now engaged in teaching. Mr. Moores was again 
married in 1901, his second wife being Miss Augusta Link, of New York state, by whom 
he has two children, Charles and Richard, both in school. 

Mr. Moores is a Knights Templar Mason and a member of the Mystic Shrine. He 
has taken an active interest in educational affairs and has been a member of the school 
board for a number of years. He has never cared for political honors, however, preferring 
to give his undivided attention to his extensive business interests, which have been so 
managed that he is now numbered among the prosperous and substantial citizens of his 
community. 



N. J. STEFFEN. 



N. J. Steffen, of Belfield, is prominently connected with farming interests and with the 
grain trade in Stark county and that section of the state. He was born in Hastings, 
Minnesota, August 16, 1877, a son of Bathazer and Josephine (Swartz) Steffen. He was 
reared in his native city and when a youth of but fourteen years became connected with 
the grain trade as a buyer. He also long served in public office, acting as deputy in every 
office in the courthouse. When twenty-one years of age he went to Holland, Minnesota, 
where he bought grain for the Minnesota & Western Grain Company for three years. He 
then removed to Ortonville, where lie established an elevator, but soon afterward sold out 
to the Farmers Grain Company and went to Appleton. where he bought grain for a year 
for the Interstate Grain Company. In 1909 he arrived in Buffalo, North Dakota, and entered 
the employ of the Great Western Elevator Company, with which he remained for a year. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 257 

In 1909 he arrived in Belfield and took charge of the new Farmers Blevator, of which he 
is still manager and one of the liuavy stockliolders. On tlie 5th of November, 1915, be bought 
a line of elevators, including one at Belfield, also at South Heart, at Beach and at Medora 
and in addition to managing his individual interests he is still manager of the farmers 
Elevator of Belfield. His activities are wisely directed and sound judgment characterizes 
all of his business allairs. He has farm property in Stark county and real estate in 
Bellield. deriving a good rental from his town luddings. He also has the agency for the 
King and Buick automobiles. 

In 1899 Sir. .Steffen was united in marriage to Miss Stelle Thompson, a native of 
Hastings, Jlinnesota, and a daughter of J). L. Thompson. They now have a son, Hugh T., 
who is attending school in Lewiston, Montana. 

In politics Jlr. Steffen is a stalwart democrat and has filled various city offices. He 
is treasurer of the Commercial Club of Belfield, and he belongs to the Elks lodge of 
Dickinson and to the Minneapolis Athletic Club. He also holds membership in the 
Catholic church, while his wife and son are members of the Presbyterian church. Opportunity 
is ever to him a call to action. He recognizes the fact tliat ojiportunity tauntingly plays 
before the dreamer, slips away from the sluggard but yields its rewards to the man of 
persistent, earnest and intelligently directed effort. He has therefore wisely used the 
chances that have come to him and his entire career has been marked by an orderly 
progression, while each forward step has brought him a broader outlook and wider 
opportunities. 



OLE ELLESTGSON. 



Ole Ellingson, a leading merchant and pioneer of Epping, was born in Hoi, Hallingdal, 
Norway, February 12, 1867, a son of Filing Swenson Rodning and Gunhild Vebjornsdatter, 
who were also natives of Norway, where they spent their entire lives, the father passing 
away in 1886 and the mother in 1867. 

Reared in his native country, Ole Ellingson completed his education in the high 
school at Hoi, Hallingdal, and in 1886, when nineteen years of age, crossed the Atlantic 
to the new world. Making his way to North Dakota, he settled at Reynolds in 1888 and 
in 1892 he supplemented his education previously acquired by study in the Northwestern 
Business College at Grand Forks. He began earning his living on this side the Atlantic 
as clerk in a general store at Reynolds and later went to Mcintosh, Minnesota, where he 
was employed as clerk in a general store for six years. He afterward engaged in business 
on his own account there until 1906, when he removed to Epping when the town site was 
laid out — ^just a spot on the prairie, no houses having as yet been built. He put up a tent 
and therein opened the first store in the town. As soon as he could get lumber shipped he 
erected a frame building for use as a store and he still has the largest merchandise 
establishment of the town, having been very successful in the development and conduct 
of his business. He also assisted in organizing the Citizens State Bank of Eppin" but is 
not connected with it at the present time. He homesteaded in Williams county and now 
owns and cultivates eight quarter sections of land near Epping, from which he has sold as 
high as ten thousand bushels of wheat at threshing time. He is also engaged in the real estate 
business and deals in farm lands extensively. In all his business affairs he has displayed 
sound judgment, unfaltering enterprise and persistency of purpose and his name is moreover 
recognized as a synonym of business integrity by those who have had dealings with him. 

On the 12th of May, 1898, Mr. Ellingson was married at Grand Forks to Miss Maggie 
Olson, who was born in Norway, a daughter of Andrew and Berget (Wiken) Olson, who 
were also natives of that country, whence they came to America when their daughter, 
Mrs. Ellingson, was but seven years of age. They settled at Winger, Minnesota, where 
Mr. Olson passed away, while his widow still occupies the old home place there. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Ellingson have been bom seven children, namely: Arnold, who is deseased; 
Elmer; Blanche; Christine; Olga; Alf; and Loraine. 

Politically Mr. Ellingson is a progressive and has always been a staunch advocate 



258 . HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

of prohibition principles, doing everything in his power to advance the cause of temperance 
and secure the abolishment not only of the use but the manufacture of alcoholic beverages. 
His fellow townsmen, appreciative of his wortli and ability, have called him to various 
public offices. He aided in organizing the village of Epping, served as a member of the 
sc-liool board and is now town treasurer. His interest in beluilf of temperance is inilie;ited 
in his membership in the Independent Order of Good Templars, of which he was grand 
treasurer for four years, and for eiglit years he represented Mcintosh Lodge, I. O. G. T., 
in the grand lodge, of which he is still a member. He has closely studied the question 
of tem]ierance in all of its various phases and his efforts have been far-reaching and beneficial 
along lines that curb the drink habit. He is a charter member of the Odd Fello^\■s loiljje at 
Epping, in which he has filled all of the chairs. His religious faith is that of the United 
Lutheran church and he is a director of the Wittenberg Hospital at Williston. He belongs to 
the Sons of Norway and was active in the movement wliicli in 191i was started by American 
citizens of Norwegian birth who were boin in the ilistrict of Hoi, Hallingdal, for raising money 
to send to the people of their district in Norway as a jiresent from their former fellow 
countrymen now in America upon the occasion of the celebration at Hoi, Hallingdal, of the 
one hundredth anniversary of. Norwegian independence. Representatives of all these men 
met at Fargo in 1914 and selected Mr. Ellingson as chairman of the committee to go to 
Norway and present the gift. He was also delegated by Governor Hanna of North Dakota 
to convey to the people of Norway a message and greeting from him and to act as his 
representative at the celebration. Mr. Ellingson is one of the leading citizens of Norwegian 
birth in the northwestern part of the state, a big-minded, liberal man of lofty principles 
and high character. His work along many lines has been of benefit in upbuilding the material, 
intellectual, social and moral welfare of the community but in none have his efforts been 
more strongly exerted than in support of the temperance cause, and he is today recognized 
as one of the strongest advocates of prohibition in his section of North Dakota. 



J. 6. MUNDY. 



J. G. Mundy, proprietor of an independent grain elevator at Mylo and also of branch 
elevators at Ina and at Agate, in Rolette county, is thus prominently connected with the 
grain trade in his section of the state. He was born in Ontario, Canada, on the 18th of 
April, 1SS2, a son of Mark and Jane (Gemmell) Mundy, the former a native of England 
and the latter of Ontario. The father was but four years of age when taken by his 
parents to Canada and on attaining his majoritj' he began farming as a renter in Ontario. 
In 1886 he came to North Dakota, settling in Rolette county, where he filed on a pre- 
emption, which he later filed and proved up as a homestead, the place being situated about 
two and a half miles east of the present town site of Rolla. He was one of the first settlers 
in that section of the country and his nearest market was Devils Lake, one hundred miles 
distant. From that point all of his supplies had to be hauled by team, while the products 
of his 'farm were taken there for sale. He built a log cabin, which constituted his home 
for ten years, and in the early days he met all the hardships and experiences of pioneer 
life. Subsequently he purchased a farm a mile from Rolla, on wliich he erected a modern 
residence, and there he still makes his home. 

J. G. Mundy was educated in the public schools of Rolla and in the North Dakota 
Agricultural College at Fargo. When he reached man's estate he rented the home farm 
and thus became actively identified ■with agricultural pursuits. A year later he had his 
initial experience as a grain buyer in connection with an elevator at Rolla, where he 
was employed for two years. He then went to Williams county and filed on a homestead 
seven miles west of Williston. The same year he returned to Rolette county and again 
became associated with the grain business, being made manager of the Farmers Elevator 
at Mylo, in which connection he remained for five years. In 1910 he purchased his pres'int 
elevator at Mylo and began business independently. In 1916 he bought an elevator at Ina 
and another at Agate and is now operating the three elevators in the conduct of a grow- 
ing and successful grain business. His activities are wisely and intelligently direct*-! and 




J. G. MUNDY 



Tl 
PUELi 



AT 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 261 

success is attending his eflforts in a substantial degree. He is also a member of the iirm 
of Mundy & Grassman, implement dealers of Mylo, and in that connection enjoys a 
liberal patronage. 

On the 3d of January, 1905, Mr. Slundy was 'married to Miss May P. Cooper, of 
Rolette county, and they have become the parents of five children, Gladys E., Mark A., Robert 
J., Marian L., and Mildred E. 

Mr. Mundy gives his political allegiance to the republican party and fraternally is 
connected with Rolla Lodge, No. 60, F. & A. M. He is likewise a member of the Grand 
Forks Consistory, No. 2, A. &, A. S. R., and Kem Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Grand 
Forks. He also belongs to Devils Lake Lodge, No. 1316, B. P. 0. E. He and his wife 
are members of the Jlethodist churcli and tliey are well known and highly respected resi- 
dents of Rolette county, where Mr. Mundy occupies a prominent position among the busi- 
ness men of the community. 



JTDGE FREDERICTv MASER. 

Frederick Masci', who is now so ably serving as county judge of Stark county, luis 
been a resident of Dickinson since 1904 and has since taken an active and prominent 
part in the development of this section of the state. He was born in Germany on the 33d of 
August, 1864, and is a son of George and Rosina Maser, both now deceased. He is indebted 
to tlie public schools of his native land, for the early educational privileges he enjoyed. In 
1881 he emigrated to America, locating in Baltimore and remaining there until 1887, when lie 
entered a college and seminary at Afton, Minnesota, graduating in 1890. He then located 
in Belle Plaine, Minnesota, were he made his home until his removal to Dickinson, North 
Dakota, in 1904. He served as secretary and manager of the Rainy-Butte Land Company 
until 1913, when he was elected county judge of Stark county and has since filled that 
position in a most creditable manner. He was interested in colonization schemes and has 
been instrumental in locating people on farms in this state, colonies having been formed for 
tliat purpose in Illinois, Iowa, Ohio, Minnesota and Wisconsin. 

On the 24th of November, 1891, .ludge Maser was united in marriage to Jliss Lydia 
Dreher, and to them have been born six children, namely: Viola; Fred, who is now a 
druggist; Victor, who is interested in banking; Walter, a midshipman at Annapolis; Ruth; 
and Albert. 

Judge Maser is a member of the Lutlieran church and his political alliliaticn is with 
the republican party. In November, 1916, he was reelected to the office of county judge, 
a position he has filled for tlie past four years most efficiently. He is vice president of the 
Dickinson Building & Loan Association and also of the Dickinson Commercial Club. He 
has worked hard for the promotion of dry farming in this state and no project calculated 
to advance the interests of the community seeks his aid in vain. His course in life has ever 
been such as to commend him to the confidence and regard of all witli whom lie has been 
brought in contact. 



WILLTA:M D. HUGHES. 



William D. Hughes, a conductor on the Northern Pacific living at Jamestown, was born 
in Leavenworth, Kansas, December 13, 1869, a son of Thomas and Ellen (Sheehan) Hughes, 
the former a native of Wales and the latter of Ireland. \Vlicn a young man the father 
came to America and at the time of the Civil war responded to the call of his adopted 
country for aid, becoming a recruiting officer at Ellsworth, Kansas. He died during the 
infancy of his son William, after which Iiis widow became associated witii the Seventh 
Regiment ami was in South Carolina in the reconstruction period. .She afterward made her 
way by rail to Yankton and thence up the Missouri river on the steamer Western to Fort 
Rice. Three daughters and two sons accompanied her, while the eldest son. Frank, remained 



262 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

in Leavenworth, Kansas. William D. Hughes' earliest memories are connected with Fort 
Rice. The family there remained until the spring of 1874, when they were transferred with 
the Seventh Rfgimont to Fort Lincoln, and William D. Hughes saw the troops startin'sr out 
for the Black Hills, also when they went up the Yellowstone and again when tliey started 
on the trip which terminated in the Custer massacre. In 1874 his elder brother, Frank 
Hughes, came to the territory witli a wagon train and accompanied the expedition to tlie 
Yellowstone as a teamster in that year, also went on the expedition to the Black Hills 
in 1875 as a herder and in 1876 became a soldier of Company L, under General Custer, and 
was one of the brave boys in blue whose lives were sacrificed to Indian cruelty and treachery. 
Mr. Hughes remembers distinctly when the news of the massacre was brought to Bismarck 
and the wounded were conveyed to that city on the steamer Far West. His brother's widow 
was living with them at that time. The family afterward removed to Fort Lincoln, where 
they remained until the fort was abandoned and then went to Bismarck, where they resided 
for a year, during which period the two eldest sisters were married. 

\\'illiam D. Hughes remained in Bismarck until 1893, when he took up railroading in the 
employ of the Northern Pacific. He was advanced to the position of conductor in 1903 and 
is now a passenger conductor on that road, having been retained in its service for more than 
twenty-three years. He is considered a courteous and obliging official by the patrons of the 
road, while his thorough trustworthiness and fidelity are recognized by the company. 

In September, 1S94, William D. Hughes was united in marriage to Miss Agnes Roberts, 
of Sauk Center, Minnesota, where her father, a veteran of the Civil war, settled in pioneer days. 
Fraternally Mr. Hughes is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the 
Order of Railway Conductors. Tliere are few residents of Dakota who have more intimate 
knowledge of the early history of the state than Mr. Hughes, whose boyhood was spent at 
the forts on the western frontier and who is acquainted with all those movements which 
were made by the pioneers and bj' the government to protect the early settlers and make 
it possible to plant the seeds of civilization in what was then the far west. He well remem- 
bers the leading Indian chiefs of that ))eriod and has heard .John Grass and Chief Gane speak 
in ]iublic. He has watched the supplanting of the red men by tlie white race, the Indian 
tepee by the pioneer's cabin and has lived to see the remarkable changes whicli have since 
been carried forward, introducing into what was once a wild western wilderness all the 
advantages and opportunities of civilization. He has a wide acquaintance among the pioneers 
and later residents of the state and is highly esteemed by all who know him. 



ank:er b. steen. 



Anker B. Steen, of Reynolds, Grand Forks county, was born at Rochester, Minnesota, 
March 38, 1862, a son of the Rev. L. and Carrie (Eriekson) Steen, natives of Norway. The 
father, a clergyman of the Lutheran church, was graduated from the University of Christiania 
in 1856 and won the degree of Doctor of Divinity. He came to America in 1859, settling at 
Rochester, Minnesota, in order to do missionary work among the early settlers and the 
Indians. He was a man of most liberal education, speaking several modern languages as well 
as Greek and Hebrew. His entire life was devoted to the ministry, in which connection he 
did a most important work, his labors not being denied their full harvest nor the aftermath. 
He became a resident of North Dakota in 1881 and thereafter lived retired until called to his 
final rest in 1907 at the age of eighty-nine j^ears. For about two years he had survived 
his wife, who passed away in Portland, North Dakota, at the age of sixty-eight years, while 
his death occurred in Page. In the family were six children. Anker B. being the third in 
order of birth. 

After passing through consecutive grades in the public schools of Benson until graduated 
from the high school there Anker B. Steen started out to make his own way when a youth 
of seventeen years. He was first connected with mercantile pursuits, entering into partner- 
ship with John Steen in the establishment and conduct of a general merchandise store at 
Benson in the year 1881. Afterward the brothers removed their stock and business to 
Portland, North Dakota, where they remained for three years, but there met with financial 



HISTORY 'OF NORTH DAKOTA 263 

reverses. Anker B. Steeii there learned tlie barber's trade and engiii^cd in that lino of business 
as journeyman and proprietor of a shop for sixteen years. In IDOG he located at Reynolds 
and for the first year was connected with the State Bank of Reynolds, having charge of 
the eolloi'tions. He then established liis present business as a dealer in groceries, fruit, 
confectionery and men's furnishings and in the intervening period he has developed a 
substantial and profitable trade, having now a very liberal share of the public patronage. 

On the 23th of .July, 1891, Mr. Steen was united in marriage in Hillsboro, North Dakota, 
to Miss Florence L. Bannester, a native of Vermont and a daughter of William Bannesier, 
a representative of an old Vermont family and a Civil war veteran. He married Sarah 
Cowles, also descended from an old Vermont family, and she Is now living with Mr. and Mrs. 
Steen, who have a family of five children: Maude Louella, the wife of Edward Curn, living 
at Kalamazoo, Michigan: Blanche, tlie wife of Patrick Gerry, of Grand Forks; and Esther, 
Percy and Doris, all at home. 

In politics Mr. .'^teen is a stalwart republican and during the past thirty-two years 
he has spent thirty years in public life, filling various positions of trust and responsibility 
in the township and county. Fraternally he is connected with the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, the Modern Woodmen of America and the American Brotherhood. His religious 
belief is that of the Lutheran church, to the teachings of which he loyally adheres, conforming 
his life at all times to the principles therein inculcated. 



ANDREW K. REITEN. 



A spirit of enterprise and laudable ambition led Andrew K. Reiten to seek a home in 
the new world, where he hoped that he might win success along legitimate business lines. 
Acting in accordance with his faith and judgment, he became a resident of North Dakota 
and is now, as the result of his close application and industry, one of the successful merchants 
of Petersburg, where he is dealing in farm im|)lements. He was born in Harham Aalesund, 
Norway, June 13, 1866, a son of Knute and Anna (Reiten) Reiten, who were also natives 
of that country, where the father engaged in farming throughout his entire life. He died 
in 1881, at the age of sixty years, and is still survived by his widow, who has now reached 
the age of eighty-four years. In their family were six children, four sons and two daughters, 
as follows: Ola K., who is a resident of Petersburg; Nels K., also living in Petersburg; 
Andrew K., of this review; Peter, who yet makes his home in Norway; Mrs. Anna Reiten, a 
resident of Alvcstad. Norway; and Mrs. Christina Woog, of Petersburg. 

In the public schools of his native country Andrew K. Reiten pursued his education and 
engaged in farming on his father's land until he reached his twenty-first year. On the 30th 
of Jlay, 1887, he sailed for the new world and made his way at once to Michigan, North 
Dakota, then the territory of Dakota. For four years thereafter he engaged in farming 
and then established a mercantile business in connection with Martin Ekram. For ten 
years he has been actively connected with mercantile interests in Petersburg, where he is 
dealing in farm machinery, building up a large trade along that line and winning for himself 
a prominent position in commercial circles of his town. 

On the 3d of March, 1896, Mr. Reiten was united in marriage to Miss Laura Larsen. of 
Petersburg, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Oiarles Larsen, of Nelson county, where they settled 
in pioneer times and still make their home. Mr. and Mrs. Reiten have become parents of 
eight children, namely: Arnold, who was born in Petersburg in 1897 and is a senior in the 
high school: Conrad and Connance, twins, who were born in 1899. at Petersburg, and now 
attend the high school there; Lawrence, whose birth occurred in Petersburg in 1904, and who 
is an eighth grade student; Thelma, Robert and Andrew, who were born in Petersburg in 
the years 1907, 1908 and 1910 respectively and are all attending school: and Amelia, born 
at Petersburg in 1914. 

Mr. Reiten belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of 
America and the Sons of Norway. His political support is given the democratic party and 
he has held various village and township offices. He has been both councilman and mayor 
of Petersburg and for six years was a member of the board of county commissioners. He is 



264 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

ever loyal to the best interests of the community and his cooperation can always be counted 
upon to further progiessive public measures that result in the benefit and upbuilding of his 
district. He has never had occasion to regret his determination to come to the new world, 
for in this land he found the opportunities which he sought and. working his way steadilv 
upward along legitimate business lines, is today one of the substantial citizens of Nelson 
county. 



A. H. MOVIUS, M. D. 



Dr. A. H. Movius, who is senior partner in the firm of Movius & Wood of Jamestown, 
Stutsman county, is recognized as one of the able and progressive physicians of the county! 
He is a native of North Dakota, his birth having occurred in Fargo on the 25th of April, 
1883. His parents are Ernest F. and Marie (Rosenkranz) Movius, the former a minister 
of the German Evangelical church and a pioneer of North Dakota. The paternal grand- 
parents -were among the first settlers of Dakota territory, locating at Big Stone lake" while 
the Indians were in camp there. Kev. Ernest F. Jlovius was for twenty years a presiding 
elder but is now living retired. 

A. H. Movius attended the public and high schools in Fargo and subsequently took a 
course in the School of Pharmacy of Valparaiso University at Valparaiso, Indiana, from 
which he was graduated. After working as a pharmacist for a few years he entered the 
Physicians and Surgeons College of Chicago, now known as the School of Medicine of the 
University of Illinois, and was graduated from that institution in 1906. For a year and a 
half he served as interne in the Lakeside Hospital at Chicago, thus gaining practical 
knowledge that fitted him to begin the independent practice of his profession. In 1907 
he located in Flandreau, South Dakota, where he remained until March, 1909, when he 
removed to .Jamestown, North Dakota. In the intervening seven years he has built up a large 
and profitable practice. He has never ceased to be a student of his profession and each year 
spends some time in post graduate work, thus increasing his efficiency and keeping in touch 
with the latest developments in the theory and practice of medicine. He is also a member 
of the county and state medical societies and of the American Medical Association. Aside 
from his private practice, in which he is associated with Dr. Wood, he is chief surgeon for the 
Midland Continental Railroad Company. 

On the 3d of October, 1907, Dr. Movius was married to Miss Helen M. Shepard, a 
daughter of Cliarles F. Shepard, of Cleveland. Ohio, and Chicago, Illinois. To this union has 
been born a son, Alfred H. The Doctor is quite prominent fraternally, belonging to both 
the Scottish and York Rites in the Masonic order, in the latter of which he has attained 
the Knights Templar degree, to the Mystic Shrine, to the Odd Fellows, to the Elks and to the 
Workmen. He is a Protestant in religious faith. He is a republican in politics and takes 
an active interest in public affairs. He is serving as alderman of .Jamestown and is 
also superintendent of the county board of health. He is fond of all outdoor sports and 
whenever possible indulges in hunting and fishing. He is not only an excellent physician and 
surgeon but is also a public-spirited citizen who is at all times willing to further in any 
way possible the advancement of his community and state, and he is highly esteemed 
and respected. 



JAMES Mcintosh. 



Throughout the existence of Cando, .lames Mcintosh has been identified with its develop- 
ment and he had previously farmed the land on which the town was established. In fact 
he was plowing there when the men came to lay out the village. He has done everything 
within his power to promote its interests and is today numbered among its leading citizens. 

Mr. Mcintosh was born in Cliicago, Illinois, August 14, 1846, and is a son of David 
and .Jane (Sonimers) JMntosh. The mother was born at Watkins Glen, New York, but 
the birth of the father occurred at Little York, Ontario, now the city of Toronto, Canada. 




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HISTORY OF XORTII DAKOTA 267 

He bi'cunie a captain on steamboats on the Great Lakes, sailing out of Cliicago from 1835 
to 1876. In 1864 he established his home at Niles, Michigan, but subsequently returned to 
Chicago, where he continued to reside for five years. He then removed to Fulton, Missouri, 
whicli was his home until April 28, 1886 — the date of his arrival in Devils Lake, North 
Dakota. He filed on land in Towner county and spent the remainder of his life in Cando. 
He died on the 11th of November, 1896, honored and respected by all who knew him, and 
his wile passed away in June, 1906. 

Ill his native city James Mcintosh passed the days of his boyhood and youth, attending 
the public and high schools of Cliicago, and after the completion of his education was 
employed as bookkeeper by different firms in that city for many years, most of the time 
being with D. Cole & Son in the real estate and loan business. In 1886 he accompanied his 
parents on their removal to North Dakota, bringing with them a carload of goods, which 
were liauled across the country from Devils Lake to Towner county. Mi-. Mcintosh took up 
a homestead adjoining his father's place and during the first six months spent there only 
two people passed his house. He improved and operated his land for eight years but sold 
the place at the end of that time and removed to Cando in 1894. 

Mr. Mcintosh has been a stanch supporter of the republican party since casting his first 
presidential vote. The family has always been a loyal and patriotic one and five boys of 
his father's family were killed in battle during the Civil war. Seven of the family now 
rest in Rose Hill cemetery, Chicago. Soon after his arrival in Cando in 1894 Mr. Mcintosh 
was elected justice of the peace and has efficiently served in that capacity ever since. He has 
also served as deputy register of deeds of Towner county for twenty years and has been 
deputy in other county offices. No trust reposed in him has ever been betrayed in the slightest 
degree and lie has always discharged his official duties in a prompt and capable manner. 
His office is in the First National Bank building. He is one of the representative citizens of 
Canilo and an honored pioneer of Towner county. 



HON. DUANE ERWLN' GEER. 

Ever strong and resourceful in business, watchful of opportunities and of all indica- 
tions pointing to success, Hon. Duane E. Geer has made steady progress in business since 
he first cast in his lot with the citizens of North Dakota. He was born in Chenango county, 
New York, May 29, 1858, a son of Dwight and Mary (Healey) Geer, both of whom were 
natives of Connecticut and representatives of old colonial families. They were married in 
the Charter Oak state and about two years later removed to New York. The father, who 
was a miller by trade, operated a mill in Chenango county, New Y'ork, for a number of 
years but at the time of the Civil war his business interests were laid aside and he joined 
the army as a member of Company I, One Hundred and Fourteenth New Y'ork Regiment of 
Volunteer Infantry, with which he served throughout the entire period of hostilities. He 
passed away in De Ruyter, New York, where he had resided for more than sixty years. 

D. E. Geer. after attending public schools, continued his education in the Cincinnatus 
Academy at Cincinnatus, New Y'ork, from which he was graduated with the class of 1877. 
Wlien his textbooks were put aside he took up the profession of teaching, which he followed 
for three years, although this was not his initial effort along that line, as he had taught 
prior to pursuing his academic course. He began teaching when but seventeen years of age 
and while engaged in that work during the winter seasons he devoted the summer months to 
farm labor. In fact he was continuously connected with farming in the east until 1880, 
when he removed westward to Y'ankton, South Dakota, and began work in connection 
witli the government survey, being thus employed for two years. His duties took him 
northward to Dickey county. North Dakota, and in 1882 he established his home in Ellen- 
dale, where he has since resided. On his arrival there he opened a real estate, loan and 
insurance office and through the intervening period has built up and conducted an extensive, 
growing and profitable business. He has brought into this immediate section millions 
of dollars which he has loaned for the development of the farming districts. His sales of 
farm lands have been enormous. Some of his sales have covered as much as seventy-one 



268 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

quarter sections of land. In addition to his operations in the field of real estate Mr. Geer 
himself has become the owner of extensive landed interests in Dickey county and from his 
property derives a most gratifying g/nd substantial income annually. 

In 1890 Mr. Geer was united in marriage to Miss Etta Denio, of EUendale, North 
Dakota, by whom he has three children, namely: Mabel B., the wife of Dwight Crabtree, 
who is associated with his father-in-law in the real estate business; Clayton Duane, a 
student in the State Normal and Industrial School at EUendale; and Doris Emma, who is 
attending St. Mary's Hall at Faribault, Minnesota. 

Politically Mr. Geer is a republican and keeps well informed on the questions and issues of 
the day. In 1900 he was elected to the state senate, serving during the sessions of 1901 and 
1903. He gave careful study to the vital and significant questions which came up for settle- 
ment and left the impress of his individuality upon legislation enacted at that period. In many 
connections he has rendered valuable service to the public. He was a member of the board of 
trustees of the State Normal and Industrial School of EUendale for two years and he served for 
several years as a member of the board of education at EUendale. He has ever been deeply 
interested in the cause of public instruction, lending the weight of his influence for the benefit 
of the schools and the adoption of higher educational standards. Fraternally he is connected 
with EUendale Lodge, No. 13, F. & A. M., and has become a life member of Dakota Consistory, 
No. 1, A. A. S. R. He is also identified with the Ancient Order of United Workmen. Neither 
does he neglect the higher, holier duties of life. He has always been one of the leaders in church 
building and is active in any movement tending to advance the welfare of the district in which 
he lives. His life has been varied in its activity, honorable in its purpose, far-reaching and 
beneficial in its effects and thus has become an integral part of the history of Dickey county and 
the southeastern section of the state. He is a man of keen discrimination and sound judgment 
and his executive ability and excellent management have brought to the enterprises with 
which he is connected a large measure of success. The same qualities which have worked 
for advancement in his private business interests have been manifest in his official 
service and thus it is North Dakota accounts him one of her leading and honored residents. 



JOSEPH BUCHHEIT. 



The business interests of Binford have a worthy representative in .Joseph Buchheit, 
who is at the head of one of the leading mercantile establishments of Griggs county and 
is also vice president of the First National Bank of Binford. He was born in Waterloo, 
Ontario, Canada, May 2, 1854, and is a son of Jacob and Mary (Buchheit) Buchheit, who 
were natives of Bavaria, Germany, and although of the same name were not related. It was 
about 1831 that the father crossed the Atlantic and settled in Ontario, Canada, becoming 
one of the pioneers of Waterloo, where in the midst of the wilderness he developed and 
improved a farm. About 1862 he removed to St. Joseph county, Indiana, and purchased a 
farm near South Bend, which had been partially improved and to its further development and 
cultivation he devoted his energies for many years. He cleared away the timber and converted 
the land into productive fields. He was over eighty-four years of age at the time of his 
death, and his wife died at the age of sixty-eight years. 

In the family of this worthy couple were thirteen children, eight of whom reached 
maturity, and Joseph Buchheit of this review is the eighth in order of birth. He was about 
eight years of age when taken by his parents to Indiana, where he attended the district 
schools. In 1870 he began clerking in a store at Misliawaka, Indiana, and continued 
to follow that occupation for six years, at the end of wliich time he located upon a farm 
which his father had purchased in addition to the original tract. 

In 1880 Mr. Buchlieit came to North Dakota and after spending a short time in Cass 
county, located in Griggs county in the fall of 1882. He went to that county with R. C. 
Cooper and preempted a quarter section of land, but the following winter returned home 
on account of the death of his mother. In the spring of 1883 he located on his claim in 
Griggs county, becoming one of its earliest settlers, and he continued to follow farming 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 269 

until iyo3, wlieii he remuved to Biiifoid. lie became the owner of sixteen hundred acres 
of valualile land and is still interested in farming to some extent although he does not 
actively engage in that occupation at the present time. He is a member of the Buchheit, 
Bakken Company, conducting a large general store at Binford and as previously stated 
is also serving as vice president of the First National Bank. 

On the 9th of July, 1887, Mr. Buchheit was united in marriage to Miss Bella M. Minnick, 
of South Bend, Indiana, of which state her father, Jacob Minnick, was an early settler. 
Mr. and ilrs. Buchheit have spent much time in travel over this country, have visited the 
West Indies and now spend their winters either in California or Florida. Mr. Buchheit has 
taken a prominent part in local politics and at an early day was elected county commissioner 
in Griggs county, in which capacity he served so acceptably that he was retained in ollice for a 
quarter of a century. He was a well informed man, a student of men and affairs and has 
that broad general knowledge which only travel can bring. 



AlsTDREW ENGEBRETSON. 



Andrew Engebretson dates his residence in Benson county from 1900, in which year 
he came to the new world from Xorway, his native land. He was born in July, 1S70, 
a son of Engebret and Karen (Amundsen) Johnson, who were also natives of Norway. The 
father followed farming throughout his entire life in his native country and never came to 
the new world. He passed away in 1894, while his wife died in 1876. 

The youthful days of Andrew Engebretson were spent in Norway and he there learned 
the shoemaker's trade, which he afterward followed in his native country until 1900. 
Attracted by the opportunities of the new world, he crossed the Atlantic when thirty years of 
age and made his way at once to Minnewaukan, Benson county. North Dakota, where he 
worked for others for four years. He then established a harness and shoe business on his 
own account and has since continued active along that line. He carries a large stock of 
goods and enjoys a liberal patronage. 

Mr. Engebretson was married in May, 1916, to Miss Carrie Hanson and they have 
a large circle of warm friends in Minnewaukan, where he has now lived for sixteen years. 
Since becoming a naturalized American citizen he has voted with the republican party and his 
religious faith is that of the Lutheran church. He has never had occasion to regret his 
determination to come to the new world, for here he has found favorable business opportunities 
and in their utilization has steadily worked his way toward the goal of success. 



J. W. SCHULENBERG. 



J. W. Schulenberg, the well known and popular postmaster of Bisbee and one of the 
honored pioneers of Towner county, was born on the 2d of November, 1853, in Thieusville, 
Wisconsin, and is a son of John and Margaret (Bruns) Schulenberg, who were natives of 
Germany and came to this country with their respective parents in early life. They 
located in Wisconsin, where they were subsequently married. Learning the miller's trade, 
the father followed that occupation for some years in the employ of others and later built 
a mill in Franklin, Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, which he operated until called from this 
life at the age of forty-eight years. 

During his boyhood and youth J. W. Schulenberg attended the public and high schools of 

Sheboygan and under the able direction of his father learned the miller's trade, at which 

he worked for about fourteen years in different parts of Wisconsin and Minnesota. In 

1888 he came to North Dakota and filed on a homestead in Towner county, a mile and a half 

southeast of the present town of Bisbee. To the improvement and cultivation of that 

place he devoted his energies until 1903. when he removed to Bisbee with the coming of the 

Soo railroad. He was identified with tlw implement business for six years but in August, 19Ki, 

was appointed postmaster of Bisbee and has since discharged the duties of that position with 
Vol. m— 13 



270 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

credit to himself and to the entire satisfaction of the general public. He still owns his 
homestead and has various town properties. 

In 1876 Mr. Schulenberg was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Graf, of Misha Mokwa, 
Wisconsin, and to them have been born six children, namely: Edmund, cashier of the 
First National Bank of Streeter, North Dakota; Amelia, wife of Frank Walsh, a farmer 
of Towner county; Laura, wife of J. E. Shier, also a farmer of Towner county; Emma, the 
wife of Henry Meyer, a farmer of Rolette county; Richard, who is conducting an automobile 
garage in Stanley, North Dakota; and Agues, who is serving as assistant postmaster of 
Bisbee. 

The family are of the Catholic faith and Mr. Schulenberg is a democrat in politics. He 
is one of the well known citizens of Towner county and is held in the highest esteem, having 
a host of warm friends who appreciate his worth and ability. 



.J0R6EN M. VATSVOG. 



With the history of pioneer development in North Dakota Jorgen M. Vatsvog is familiar 
by reason of experience in all those elements which feature most largely in pioneer life. 
He was born in Stavanger, Norway, September T, 186S, and is a son of ilarcus G. and Martha 
(Gunderson) Vatsvog, who were also natives of that country and there spent their entire 
lives. The father was a fisherman and died in December, 1911, while his widow survived 
until 1913. 

Jorgen M. Vatsvog was reared and educated in Norway and he, too, took uj) the 
work of fishing in order to provide for his own support. He was thus engaged until 1SS6, 
when he came to America, making his way at once to North Dakota. For several years 
he was employed as a farm hand in Traill county and in 1893 removed to JIcHenry county, 
where his wife took up a homestead claim, devoting two j^ears to its cultivation and 
improvement. In 1895 Mr. Vatsvog filed on a homestead two miles north of Upham and 
has since devoted his time and energies to its cultivation, converting the land into rich 
and productive fields. This has not covered the scope of his activities, however, for on the 
12th of June, 1905, he removed to Upham and engaged in the implement business, which 
he has since carried on, becoming one of the enterprising and progressive merchants of the 
town. 

In 1898 Mr. Vatsvog was united in marriage to Miss Louisa Sondrael and they have 
become the parents of nine children: Clara, John, Annie, Lousia, Esther and Morris, all ot 
whom are yet living; and Martha, Martin and Martha, now deceased. 

Mr. Vatsvog is a member of the Sons of Norway. In politics he has always been an 
earnest and stalwart republican. In 1914 he was a candidate for state senator in the 
thirty-fourth district but was defeated together with the others on the ticket. He has 
filled the office of mayor of Upham and president of the school board and his progressive spirit 
has been an element in furthering municipal interests and in supporting those measures whicli 
are a matter of civic virtue and of civic pride. He has never had occasion to regret his 
determination to come to the new world. Arriving in this country when a youth of eighteen 
years, he has made good use of his time and o'pportunities and has gradually worked his 
way upward to a substantial place in business circles, while as a man and citizen ho is 
highly esteemed. 



HARRY ALBERT GEMBERLING. 

Harry Albert Gemberling, engaged in the farm implement and machinery business 
at Epping as senior partner in the firm of Gemberling & Bjella, was born near Salem, 
Snyder county, Pennsylvania, October 16, 1879, a son of Charles L. and Ellen J. (Erdly) 
Gemberling, who are also natives of Snyder county, where the father worked as a laborer 
until 1902, when with his wife and three sons he removed westward to North Dakota. He 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 271 

then took up a homestead in Williams eounty, being one of the liist to homestead in that 
locality among the cow men. He continued to farm his place until 1914, when he letired 
and removed to Epping, erecting there a nice residence. He is today in comfortable 
circumstances and he and his wife arc there residing, enjoying well earned rest, their 
former labors supplying them with all of the necessities and some of the luxuries of life. 
They were the parents of three children, all born in Snyder county, Pennsylvania, namely: 
Harry A.; Frederick Cromwell, who died on the old homestead near Epping in the spring 
of lUOT and was buried at Williston; and Arthur Uavid, who came with the family to 
Xortli Dakota in 1902 and took up a homestead in Williams county in 1913. He now 
cultivates all of the farm land belonging to the family and he married Miss Edna Crawford, 
of Kay, North Dakota, who is a sister of Mrs. Harry A. Gemberling. The family is now 
well known and prominent in this section of the state and they have contributed in substantial 
measure to the development of this section. 

Reared and educated in his native county, Harry A. Gemberling was employed as a farm 
hand in Pennsylvania until 1902, when removal was made to North Dakota. He was then 
twenty-tiuee years of age and he took up a homestead near Epping, after which he worked 
for the Great Northern Railroad Company as brukcman and freight conductor, residing, 
however, upon the homestead. He engaged in railroading until the spring of 190T and 
remained upon the homestead until 1911. In that year he embarked in business on his own 
account by forming the firm of Gemberling & Bjella for the conduct of a farm implement 
and machinery business at Epping. There he is now enjoying a good trade, the business 
having steadily grown in the intervening period of six years. 

On the 3d of September, 1911, Mr. Gemberling was united in marriage to Miss Gertrude 
Crawford, of Ray, North Dakota, who was born at Hallock, Minnesota, a daugliter of 
George and Carrie Crawford of that place. The father died at Hallock, after which his 
widow and daughter removed to North Dakota, Mrs. Crawford taking up a homestead in 
Williams county, near Ray, where she now resides. Jlrs. Gemberling pursued her education 
in the schools of Stephen, Minnesota, and the high school at Duluth, Minnesota, and for 
four terms successfully engaged in teaching in Williams county. North Dakota. By her 
marriage she has become the mother of a son, Merrill Albert, born in Epping, July 12, 1912. 

In his political views Mr. Gemberling is independent, considering the capability of the 
candidate rather than his .party affiliations. He belongs to the German Lutheran church and 
his has been an active and well spent life. Whatever success he has achieved is due 
entirely to his own efforts and he has made for himself a creditable position in the 
commercial circles of his adopted county. 



.JOHN A. JOHNSON, M. D. 



Dr. .John A. Johnson, engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery at Larimore, was 
born in the southern part of Iceland on the 24th of Ma}', 1877, a son of Arni and Steinun 
Johnson, both of whom were natives of the same country. In early life the father engaged 
in farming there and in 1883 crossed the Atlantic to Canada, while in 1897 he became a 
resident of the L'nited States. At the present time, however, he is living in Manitoba at the 
age of sixty-six years. His wife passed away in Milton, North Dakota, at the age of fifty 
years. 

Dr. .Johnson was the eldest of their three children, the others being Valdimar L., a 
resident of Saskatchewan, Canada; and T. A. Johnson, of Bottineau, North Dakota. 
Through the period of his boyhood and youth Dr. Johnson attended the graded schools of 
Canada and the Valley City Normal School of North Dakota. He then took up the profession 
of teaching, which he followed in this state for a year, and later he matriculated in the 
medical department of the L'niversity of North Dakota, while later he continued his medical 
studies at the University of Illinois. Still later he entered the Chicago ilcdical College, 
from which he was graduated with the class of 1910. He returned to ^^lountain, North 
Dakota, for practice and in 1913 removed to Petersburg but is now living in Larimore 



272 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Gi-iind Forks county, where he is accorded a large and lucrative practice which is indicative of 
tlie confidence and trust reposed in him by his fellow townsmen. 

On the 12th of June, 1912, Dr. Johnson wedded Miss Inga Knutson, of Dazey, a daughter 
of Ole and Andriiie Knutson, who were pioneers of this state. Mrs. Johnson is a graduate of 
the Valley City Normal School and completed the literary course in the University of North 
Dakota with the class of 1912. Prior to her marriage she also successfully engaged in 
teaching. She has become the mother of one child, Harald, who was born at ilountain in 
June, 1913. 

Dr. and Mrs. Johnson hold membership in the Lutheran church and the Doctor is very 
prominent in fraternal circles. He is a thirty-second degree Mason and member of the 
Mystic Shrine, a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Yeomen. 
His political support is given to the democratic party, which finds in him a stalwart champion. 
Along strictly professional lines his connection is with the Nelson County Medical Association, 
the North Dakota Medical Association and the American Medical Association, and through the 
proceedings of those bodies he keeps in touch with the trend of modern thought and 
scientific research bearing upon his chosen life work. 



THOMAS J. SMITH. 



Thomas .J. Smith, conducting important commercial interests under the name of the 
Grand Forks Seed & Implement Company and also figuring in traction and financial circles 
of the city and state, has through his various activities contributed in substantial measure 
to the upbuilding and progress of the community and commonwealth. He was born in 
Winona, Minnesota, December 23, 1859, a son of Frank Smith, a native of Germany, who in 
1850 crossed the Atlantic to America and settled in Pennsylvania. He removed to Winona, 
Minnesota, during an early period in its development and there followed the blacksmith's 
trade until his death, which occurred in 1871. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Mar- 
garet Butler, was born in Ireland and came alone to America in 1855. After remaining for 
a brief period in New York city she, too, went to Winona, where she met and married Frank 
Smith. 

Their only child, Thomas J. Smith, was educated in the public schools of St. Charles, 
Minnesota, but when a lad of only ten years began earning his living and has been self-sup- 
porting from that age. His youthful days were spent at farm work, but hoping to find other 
labor more profitable, he came to North Dakota, then Dakota territorj-, in 1879, settling at 
Bismarck, where he secured employment on a steamboat that made trips between Y'ankton 
and Fort Benton, Montana. He was also employed at farm labor. In 1882 he removed to 
Grand Forks, becoming one of its pioneer settlers, and for the first five years of his residence 
there served as assistant postmaster. In 1887 he accepted the position of bookkeeper and 
collector with the McCormick Harvester Company, with which he remained for four years, 
when he removed to Reynolds, North Dakota, where he embarked in the implement business 
on his own account. He operated there successfully for twelve years, at the end of which 
time he disposed of his interests in Reynolds and returned to Grand Forks, where he estab- 
lished his present business under the name of the Grand Forks Seed & Implement Company, 
of which he is sole proprietor. In addition to handling a vast amount of seeds annually he 
is also conducting an extensive trade in farm implements, handling the products of the 
John Deere and International Harvester Companies. This is by far the largest business of 
the kind in Grand Forks and, built up through the efforts of Mr. Smith, constitutes a tangible 
proof of his enterprise and ability. Extending his efforts into other fields, he is now a 
director of the Grand Forks Street Railway Company and is likewise well known in banking 
circles, being a director of the Scandinavian-American Bank, a director of the Mekinock 
State Bank and president of the First State Bank of Regent, North Dakota. His fellow 
townsmen, recognizing the wisdom of his business judgment, have thus sought his coopera- 
tion in various fields. 

On the 1st of December, 1887, in Grand Forks, occurred the marriage of Mr. Smith and 
Miss Emma R. Parker, a native of Canada and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Parker, 




THOMAS J. SJIITH 



1 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 275 

the former now deceased, while the latter is living. Five children have been born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Smith: Alta, the wife of Dr. Donald K. Woods, of Great Falls, Montana; Vincent, 
of Regent, North Dakota; and Frank, Harold and Thomas, all at home. The family residence, 
a beantiful home at No. 891 Belmont street, is owned by Mr. Smith. 

He and his family are members of the First Presbyterian church and he belongs to 
the local organizations of the Odd Fellows, Foresters, Yeomen and Modern Woodmen of 
America. He is also a member of the Commercial Club of Grand Forks. In politics he is a 
very active and influential republican and at this writing, in 1916, is president of the city 
council. He has studied closely those questions which are of vital importance in municipal 
affairs and is as well a student of the great political, sociological and economic problems 
of the country. In a word he stands as a high type of American manhood and chivalry and 
is a representative of that class of American citizens who through inherent force of char- 
acter have won prominence and success. Starting out in life on his own account when a 
little lad of but ten years, he has since depended upon his own resources and efforts and his 
ability and intelligently directed eifort have brought him to the front until he now stands 
not only as a representative and successful business man of Grand Forks but also as one 
who wields a wide influence in public affairs. 



WILBUR NORMAN ALLEN. 



Wilbur Norman Allen, proprietor of a general merchandise store at Tappen, was born in 
Mobile, Alabama, February 29, 1888, a son of Wilbur and Josephine Allen. He pursued his 
education there until graduated from the high school and afterward he attended the Cin- 
cinnati University, where he completed a course with the class of 1910. He afterward 
made a trip through Europe and was present at the coronation of King Edward. In 1913 he 
returned to the United States and went to Dawson, North Dakota, where he was employed 
in the general mercantile store of Peterson & Company, with whom he remained for a few 
months. He was then given charge of their branch store at Tappen and continued in that 
connection until December, 1915. On the 22d of July, 1916, he opened a general store of his 
own, which he is conducting on a strictly cash basis. His previous experience has well qualified 
him for the conduct of a business of this character and his trade is steadily growing. He 
carries a line of groceries, shoes, dry goods and notions and he also runs a cream station in 
connection. In addition to his other interests Mr. Allen is engaged in farming and all his 
business affairs are carefully and wisely directed. 

In November, 1915, Mr. Allen was married to Miss Blanch McQueen, a native of 
Poynette, Wisconsin, born September 17, 1893. She was formerly engaged in teaching school 
near Tappen. Mr. and Mrs. Allen have a wide circle of friends in their locality and their 
own liome is justly celebrated for its warm-hearted hospitality. They belong to the Pres- 
byterian church and Mr. Allen votes with the democratic party, while fraternally he is 
connected with the Yeomen and with the Knights of Pythias. 



ANDREW R. SWENDSEID. 



Norway has contributed many substantial citizens to North Dakota, among whom is 
numbered Andrew R. Swendseid, a general merchant of Petersburg. He was born at Tele- 
marken, Norway, February 7, 1857, a son of RoUef and Anna (Tofsdotter) Swendseid, both 
of whom were natives of Norway. Coming to America in 1867, they settled in southern 
Minnesota, where the father engaged in farming until 1886, when he removed to Nelson 
county. North Dakota, and secured farm lands. His remaining days were devoted to the 
development and improvement of his farm, which he converted into a valuable property. 
He died in 1904, at the age of sixty-seven years, while Mrs. .'-iwendseid is still living at the 
age of eighty-three years; In their family were the following children: Andrew E., of 



276 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

this review; Tove, of Petersburg; Ole, a resident of Williston; Peter, living in Petersburg: 
Carl, who also makes his home in Petersburg; and Mrs. Dora Venberg. living in California. 

Brought to America when a lad of ten years, Andrew R. Swendseid attended the public 
schools of Fillmore county, Minnesota, and afterward became a student in Luther College 
at Decorah, Iowa. Subsequently he taught school for a short time in the former state and 
in 1883 came to North Dakota, where he entered land and began farming, devoting twelve 
years to general agricultural pursuits. He then established his present mercantile business 
in Petersburg, where he has since remained an active factor in commercial circles for almost 
a quarter of a century. He conducts a good business, having a well appointed store, and 
his honorable methods have gained him a liberal patronage. He is also a director of the 
Farmers Lumber Company and the Petersburg Electric Company. His judgment in business 
affairs is sound and his discrimination keen. 

Mr. Swendseid has been married twice. In .June, 1878, he wedded Miss Caroline Larsen, 
of Fillmore county, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lars Larsen. She died in December, 1892, 
leaving three children: Ralph, who was born in Fillmore county in 1883 and now resides 
in Sanish, North Dakota; Anthony, who was born in 1885 and is in Petersburg; and Theodore, 
who was born in Petersburg in 1887 and is now living in Marmarth, North Dakota. In June, 
1895, Mr. Swendseid was again married, his second union being with Miss Mary Wangen, a 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hans Wangen. of Gudbrandsdalen, Norway. There are three 
children of this marriage: Clarence, who was born in 1896 and is attending University 
of Minnesota at Jlinneapolis; Irene, who was born in 1897 and is a high school pupil in 
Petersburg; and Harold, who was born in 1905 and is also attending school. 

Mr. and Mrs. Swendseid hold membership in the Lutheran church and guide their lives 
according to its teachings. Mr. Swendseid also belongs to the Sons of Norway. His 
political support is given to the republican party and he has filled various local offices, 
including that of president of the village board and president of the board of education, 
while for two terms he represented his district in the state legislature and during his con- 
nection with the house of representatives most carefully considered all of the vital questions 
which came up for settlement, lending the weight of his influence in support of all those 
measures which he deemed of greatest value and worth in promoting the welfare of the state. 



WINFIELD F. WARE. 



Winfield F. Ware, secretary and treasurer of the Brosnahan & Olson Hardware & 
Implement Company of Grafton, comes from the neighboring state of Minnesota, his birth 
liaving occurred in Winnebago, January 11, 1872. His ancestral line .can be traced back 
to England but the family has been distinctively American in its lineal and collateral lines 
for several generations, as the first representative of the family came to the new world 
prior to the Revolutionary war, settling in Massachusetts. In that state occurred the 
birth of Daniel N. Ware, father of Winfield P. Ware. He became a prosperous lumber 
merchant and a pioneer settler of Minnesota, where he took up his abode about 1868, He 
married Grabilla Fuller, a native of Massachusetts and a representative of one of its old 
families, her ancestors having come to the new world on the Mayflower. To Mr. and 
^Irs. Ware were born two sons, the elder being Frank, a resident of Los Angeles, California. 
The father died in Winnebago in 1892, at the age of si.xty-five years, while the mother 
had reached the advanced age of eighty-four years when called to her final rest in 1907. 
She, too, maintained her residence at Winnebago until she passed away. 

Winfield F. Ware was educated in the public schools of his native city and in the 
Cedar Rapids (la.) Business College, from which he was graduated in 1892. From the age 
of nineteen years he has been dependent entirely upon his own resources, taking his initial 
step in the business world as an employe of the Colman Lumber Company of La Crosse. 
He was associated with that firm for eight years, during which period he gained broad 
practical e.xperience and comprehensive knowledge of commycial methods. He next entered 
the hardware and implement business at Amboy, Minnesota, as an employe of the Amboy 
Hardware & Implement Company, with which he continued for six years. He was afterward 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 277 

the representative of various binder companies as a traveling salesman and in 1904 he 
removed to Grafton, where he secured employment in the implement department of the 
Hrosnahan & Olson Hardware & Implement Company, with which he was associated as an 
employe for nine years. He then became a member of the lirm, of which he is now secretary 
and treasurer. The business was organized and incorporated in 1902 and theirs is today 
the largest hardware and implement trade in Walsh county. They represent the leading 
manufacturers of the country in the line of goods which they carry and their business 
methods at all times measure up to the highest standards. 

On the 9th of January, 1908, at Drayton, North Dakota, Mr. Ware w-edded Miss Nellie 
Stewart, a native of Canada and a daughter of Alexander Stewart. They have one son, 
Winfield A., born in Grafton, March 13, 1909. 

ilr. and Mrs. \\'are are members of the First Presbyterian church and are interested 
in all those forces which work for the betterment and upbuilding of the district in which 
they live. Fraternally Mr. Ware is connected with the Odd Fellows. His interest in 
community affairs is shown by his membership in the Commercial Club and his political 
views are in accord with the principles of the republican party. His entire life has been 
actuated by a spirit of progress that has been manifest in his business career and also in 
his devotion to the general good. There are no spectacular or unusual chapters in his life 
history, but earnestness and persistency of purpose have led to his steady advancement 
along well defined lines of labor until his position in mercantile circles and in public regard 
in his community is enviable. 



MARTIN E. UGGEN. 



Martin E. Uggen, president of the Citizens Bank of Epping, is among those who have 
recognized the opportunities of the west and in their utilization have sought success. He 
was born near Dundas, in Rice county, Minnesota, January 5, 1882, a son of A. F. and 
Oline (Juvrud) Uggen. The father was born, reared and educated in Norway and in 1871 
crossed the Atlantic to America, after which he took up his abode on a farm in Rice county, 
Minnesota, where he still resides. His wife was the first white child born in Forest town- 
ship. Rice county, and her entire life was there passed, during which period she witnessed 
remarkable changes as the county was transformed from a pioneer district into a place 
of highly developed civilization. 

Martin E. Uggen attended district schools in Rice county and business college at 
Faribault, after which he continued his education in the Southern Minnesota Normal College 
at Austin, Minnesota. In 1903 he removed to Williams county. North Dakota, and filed 
on a homestead on which now stands the town of Epping, In 1907 he organized the Uggen 
Realty Company for the conduct of a real estate business of which he has continuously been 
the manager and directing head, and as the years have passed he has negotiated many 
important and profitable realty transfers. In 1910 he organized the Citizens State Bank 
of Epping and has since been actively engaged in the banking business as president of 
the institution as well as president of the realty company. It was Mr. Uggen who laid 
out and owned the town site of Epping. where he still holds many valuable town lots, and 
the development of the place is largely attributable to his efforts and enterprise. 

On the 4th of September. 1907, at Freeborn, Minnesota. Mr. Uggen was married to 
Miss Inez Peterson, a native of Freeborn county who there acquired her early education, 
which was supplemented by further study in the Southern Minnesota Normal College at 
Austin, Minnesota. Mr. and Mrs. Uggen have four children, namely: Mildred Irene, Glenn 
Austin, Andrew Kenneth and Hazel Oline. all born in Epping, North Dakota. 

Politically Mr. Uggen is a democrat and is now serving as president of the village 
board of trustees, while his wisely directed efforts led to the incorporation of the town. 
He has always taken an active part in school work, has served on the board as director and 
clerk and is now clerk of the board of education of the newly organized Epping special 
school district. His religious faith is that of the Lutheran church, while fraternally he is 
connected with the Independent ()rder of Odd Fellows, being a charter member of the lodo-e 



278 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

at Epping, in which he has passed all the chairs and is now secretary. He is also a charter 
member and the secretary of the Sons of Norway. Epping regards him as a most pro- 
gressive and leading citizen and his work in public connections has been widely and bene- 
ficially resultant, while his labors along business lines have brought him most substantial 
and well merited returns. 



WALTER A. SHEAR. 



Walter A. Shear, editor and proprietor of the Sentinel Butte Republican, was born in 
Villard, Pope county, Minnesota, on the 16th of August, 1881, his parents being D. W. and 
Artimissa (Workman) Shear, both natives of New York. They came west in pioneer times 
and settled at Villard, Minnesota, where they still continue to reside. For about four years 
the father published the Villard Enterprise but since that time has devoted his attention to 
the real estate and loan business. 

In his native county Walter A. Shear grew to manhood and he completed his education 
in the high schools there. On starting out in life for himself he turned his attention to 
newspaper wofk and became a compositor in the office of the Villard Call. Subsequently 
he and his fathej started the Villard Enterprise, which they conducted for four years, our 
subject having cli^arge of the mechanical department. Before leaving there he was married 
in June, 1903, to Miss Mamie Kane, also a native of Villard, and to them has been born 
a daughter, Thelma, now attending school. 

In 1903 Mr. Shear Removed to Sauk Center, Minnesota, and for a year was in the employ 
of the Sauk Center Herald. At the end of that time he removed to Sentinel Butte, 
North Dakota, and took up a homestead twenty miles south of that place at Burkey. This he 
subsequently sold and purchased a farm near Sentinel Butte, upon which he is now engaged 
in raising small grains. Upon his removal to Sentinel Butte he became identified with 
newspaper publication there, becoming editor of what was then known as the Billings 
County Republican. This paper was established on the 28th of April, 1904, but after the 
division of Billings and Golden Valley counties the name was changed to the Sentinel Butte 
Republican, under which it is still published. It was the first newspaper to come into 
existence in the southwestern part of the state after the Bad Lands Cowboy. 

Mr. Shear has a well appointed office and his paper is a bright, newsy sheet, thoroughly 
up-to-date. In politics he is a stanch republican and through his paper does much to promote 
the interests of that party. From 1909 to 1915 he served as postmaster of Sentinel Butte, 
and as a public-spirited and progressive citizen does all within his power to advance the 
interests of his town and county. He is a member of the Elks lodge in Dickinson and is 
a man highly esteemed wherever known. 



EDWARD J. HUGHES. 



Edward J. Hughes, receiver at the United States land office at Dickinson, was born in 
Osage, Iowa, November 9, 1876, a son of Andrew C. and Mary (MeCarty) Hughes, who were 
of American birth. Becoming residents of Iowa, they made their home at Osage until 
1887, when they removed to North Dakota. Making their way to Fargo, they soon after- 
ward settled upon a farm near Clifi'ord and in time the father became one of the most 
prominent agriculturists of his part of the state, adding to his holdings until he was the 
owner of between eight and ten sections. In the winter months he took his teams to the 
lumber woods of Wisconsin and on one of these trips he passed away. His wife died upon 
the North Dakota farm. 

Edward J. Hughes completed his education in the Mayville Normal, at which time he was 
a schoolmate of Lynn J. Frazier, now candidate for governor. Later Mr. Hughes engaged in 
teaching in Traill and Steele counties for about four years. In 1898 he went to Fargo and 
spent three years with the Luger Furniture Company and three years with the Wasem & Gaard 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 279 

Furniture Company. He then removed to Barnesvillc, Minnesota, where he opened a furni- 
ture store, of which he was sole proprietor for about two years, and at tlie end of tliat 
time was joined by his brother-in-law, John V. Boulger. At the end of two years in that 
partnership relation Mr. Hughes sold his stock of goods and removed to Dickinson in the 
spring of 1905. There he established business under the name of the Dickinson Steam 
Laundry and conducted the enterprise for five years. On selling out he purchased a furniture 
store and the firm of Boulger & Hughes continued active in that field until 1915, when the 
stock of furniture was sold. With the furniture business, however, Mr. Hughes had always 
conducted an undertaking business and in this he still continues, with picture framing as 
another feature of his trade. He is still interested financially in these lines but is not 
active in the management of the business. However, his work has been a feature in the 
commercial upbuilding of Dickinson, which he is now serving as receiver of the United States 
land office, having been the presidential appointee to that position on the 6th of April, 1914. 
He is also interested in farm lands near Dickinson and from that property derives a sub- 
stantial annual income. 

On the 30th of June, 1903, Mr. Hughes was married to Miss Nellie T. Boulger, a native 
of Fargo. Mr. and Mrs. Hughes are members of St. Patrick's Catholic church at Dickinson 
and he holds membership with the Knights of Columbus. He is very prominent in the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks at Dickinson, was exalted ruler of the lodge there for 
two terms and was largely instrumental in securing the erection of their new clubhouse. 
In the Knights of Columbus he is a past grand knight and has also been trustee. His political 
opinions accord with the principles of the democratic party, to which he gives stalwart 
allegiance. 



ALFRED 0. MADLAND 



Alfred 0. Madland, the efficient and popular assistant cashier of the First National Bank 
of Sentinel Butte, North Dakota, has also other business interests, for he is developing a coal 
mine in the vicinity of the town and is' also a member of a real estate firm. He was born 
in Stavanger, in southwest Norway, .January 5. 1888, a son of Ole A. and Kathryn Madland. 

Alfred 0. Madland attended the common schools of Norway but when fifteen years of age 
came to the United States and located in Centerville. Soutli Dakota. He worked on farms for 
a time and during the winter months attended school, thus completing his education. He 
later taught school near Centerville and remained in that locality until 1909. In that 
year he removed to Sentinel Butte, North Dakota, where he has since remained. After 
farming for three years on a tract of land two miles west of the town he entered the 
Sentinel Butte State Bank as bookkeeper and made so excellent a record that in six months 
he was promoted to assistant cashier, which position he is still filling. The bank was 
established in 1910 with a capital stock of fifteen thousand dollars, which was increased 
to twenty-five thousand dollars at the time of its reorganization as thfl First National Bank 
in 1915. Its affairs are in a very satisfactory condition and its surplus and undivided 
profits total ten thousand dollars. In 1910 the institution erected a substantial and attrac- 
tive frame buihiing, which still remains its home. The officers are: E. J. Curtin, president; 
W. A. Hart, vice president; W. C. Stuhr, cashier; and A. 0. Madland, assistant cashier. 

During the four years that Mr. Madland has been connected with the bank, in which 
he is a stockholder, he has gained a thorough knowledge of the business and his judgment 
and advice have pro%'ed sound and discriminating. He gives the greater part of his time and 
attention to his official duties. Mr. Madland is likewise developing a lignite coal mine which 
he owns, four miles from the city, and there is every prospect of the business reaching 
extensive proportions. The vein of coal is from seventeen to twenty-four feet in depth 
and underlies a quarter section of land, and thus an abundant supply is assured. He hauls 
tlie coal to Sentinel Butte and expects to develope tlie mine more during the winter of 
1916-17 than he has ever before done. 

Mr. Madland is a republican in his political belief and for two years he has served as 
alderman in Sentinel Butte. He belongs to the Woodmen of the World and is also a member 



280 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

of the Lutheran church, in tlie teachings of which are found the principles which have governed 
his life. Altliough a young man he has accomplished more than many of his seniors and 
there is no doubt that he will achieve still greater success in the future. 



W. W. WOOD, M. D. 

Dr. W. VV. Wood, who is successfully engaged in the practice of his profession at James- 
town, Stutsman county, was born at Chicago, Illinois, on the 28th of April, 1880, a son of 
James and Janet (Allen) Wood, both now deceased. The father, who was born in Scot- 
land, was a contractor by occupation. 

The subject of this review attended tlie public schools and high school in Chicago 
and for four j'ears taught in the schools of that city. Having decided upon the practice of 
medicine as his life work, he entered the Medical College of the University of Illinois, from 
which he was graduated in 1906. For fourteen months he was an interne in the Lakeside 
Hospital and for ten months served in a similar capacity in the St. Mary of Nazareth Hos- 
pital, thus gaining practical knowledge of the treatment of various diseases. On begin- 
ning his independent practice he located in Jasper, Minnesota, where he remained for six 
months, but on the 1st of June, 1909, he removed to Jamestown, North Dakota, and formed 
a partnership with Dr. Movius, a classmate. The two doctors were also internes together 
and their present association has been mutually congenial and also profitable. They are 
surgeons for the Midland Railroad and have gained a representative private practice. Dr. 
Wood also does considerable work at the local hospital. 

On the 16th of October, 1908, occurred the marriage of Dr. Wood and Miss Mollie Han- 
sen, a native of Denmark, by whom he has a son, Walter William. 

Dr. Wood casts his ballot in support of the republican party but has never taken an 
active part in politics. However, he is now serving as city health officer and in that capacity 
is doing much to safeguard the public health. He holds membership in the county and 
state medical societies and in the American Medical Association and thus keeps in touch with 
the trend of medical practice. Fraternally he is identified with the Masonic order, includ- 
ing the Mystic Shrine, and with the Elks, while in religion he is a Protestant. He finds 
needed recreation in hunting and fishing and enjoj'S all outdoor sports. He is much inter- 
ested in public advancement and is an active member of the Commercial Club, cooperating 
in its project for the growth and advancement of Jamestown and Stutsman county. 



LEVI C. WIXGATE. 



Levi C. Wingate, vice president of the Williams County State Bank at Williston, was 
born July 19, 1882, at Soldier, Monona county, Iowa, a son of Andrew L. and Carrie Wingate. 
The father, a native of Norway, was educated in that countrj- to the age of fourteen years 
and then came with his parents to the new world, the family home being established in Rock- 
ford, Illinois, whence he afterward went to Iowa. There he engaged in farming for a consid- 
erable period and in 1894 took up his abode upon a farm near Hartington, Nebraska, where 
his death occurred in 1908. His wife, a native of Norway, remained in that country to the 
age of nineteen years and then became a resident of Eockford, Illinois, where she gave her 
hand in marriage to Andrew L. Wingate. She, too, passed away near Hartington, Nebraska. 

Levi C. Wingate acquired his preliminary education in district schools near Soldier, Iowa, 
and afterward attended the normal school at Castana, Iowa, and Drake University at Des 
Moines, where he pursued various courses, including that of law. He afterward became pro- 
fessor of mathematics in Parker College at Winnebago, Minnesota, and a year later became a 
teacher in the coraiuerical department of the National Business College at Sioux City, Iowa. 
He next accepted the position of secretary of a land company at Minneapolis, handling lands 
and investments, and when he removed to North Dakota he became cashier of the First State 
Bank at Ray, where he resided for five years. On the expiration of that period he accepted 




DE. W. W. WOOD 



HISTORY OF XOkTH DAKOTA 283 

the caslueislii[i in the Williams County Slate Bank at Williston and after three and one-half 
years he was eleeted vice president, in which oljiee he is now active, practically having charge 
of the bank. He is putting forth every ellort to develop the institution along lines of sub- 
stantial growth and progress an<l he and his fellow ollieers havi; made it one of the strong 
moneyed institutions of the county. Mr. Wingate is the owner of eight hundred acres of 
land in the lowei- Yellowstone valley of Montaiui, lying in the irrigated district, and is much 
interested in agiiculture. 

On the 10th of April, 1906, in Winnebago, Minnesota, Mr. Wingate was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Carrie L. Waldren, who was there born, a daughter of W. L. and Lettie Waldren. 
Her father was at that time a farmer and stockman but is now engaged in the real estate 
busine^s in Winnebago. Mr. and Mrs. Wingate luive two children, Florence and Angoline, 
both Imni in Kay, North Dakota. 

ill-. Wingate has erected a pleasant residence in Williston and his success enables him 
to provide for his family all the comforts and some of the luxuries of life. In politics he 
is a republican and is a progressive citizen but has had neither time nor inclination to seek 
public office. He belongs to the Lutheran church, to the Odd Fellows lodge of Williston, 
of which he is treasurer, to the Modern Woodmen camp and to the Elks Lodge, No. 1214, of 
Williston. His life has practically been devoted entirely to the land and banking business 
and in all business matters he displays sound judgment and discrimination as well as unfal- 
tei ing enterprise and persistency of purpose. 



W ILLIAM Jl. UIXON. 



William H. Di.xon, a lumber merchant of Tioga, was born November 8, 1871, at Frank- 
ton, Indiana, his parents being Oliver H. and Mary (Ferguson) Dixon, natives of Virginia 
and Indiana respectively. In the latter state both were reared and there Mr. Dixon took 
up the occujiation of farming, which he followed throughout his entire business career in the 
vicinity of Frankton, Indiana, where both he and his wife passed away. 

William H. Dixon spent his youthful days to the age of eighteen years on the farm near 
Frankton and supplemented his district school training by study in the city schools. In 
1S9J he removed to Wild Rice, Cass county. North Dakota, where he became agent for the 
Chicago, Jlilwaukee & St. Paul Railroad Company, spending six months at that point, while 
the succeeding ten years were devoted to similar service at various points in the state. On 
the 28th of August, 1902, he arrived in the new town of Tioga, where he opened a lumber- 
yard, the first one in the town. At that time Tioga contained a section house but nothing 
else. It is today a village with a jiopulation of seven hundred and contains good business 
houses and industrial enterprises and is constantly growing In 1910 Mr. Di.von incorporated 
his interests under the name of the W. II. Dixon Lumber Company, of which he is the presi- 
di'nt and general manager. His yard is in the center of the town and he carries a large 
amount of lumber and builders' supplies. His activities have ever been carefully and wisely 
directed and success is attending his efforts. He is also engaged quite largely in farming 
in Williams county and in connection therewith makes a specialty of handling Poland China 
and Duroc-Jcrsey hogs. He also assisted in organizing the electric light company and the 
telephone company of Tioga and otherwise has been prominently identified with the busi- 
ness development of his district. His lumber traile has reached extensive proportions and 
within a period of fifteen years he lias become one of the prosperous citizens of his section 
of the state. 

On the a?th of ilay, 1914, Mr. Dixon was united in marriage to Miss Cordelia Davis, 
of Fairmount, Indiana, where she was born, reared and educated. After attending Fairmount 
Academy she taught music and drawing in the arts department of that institution and is a 
most intelligent and accomplished lady, being a recognized leader in the social life of Tioga. 
Her parents, William F. and Elizabeth Davis, were natives of Indiana and the father is now 
engaged in farming at Fairmount, which pursuit he lias made his life work. 

In his political views Mr. Dixon is independent and fraternally is connected with the 
Elks lodge, No. 1214. at ^\'illist(ln. of wliicli he is a charter member. His has been a well 



284 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

spent and active life and proves what may be accomplished when laudable ambition points 
out the way. Persistent purpose has enabled him to press iorward to the goal of success 
and while promoting his individual interests he has at the same time cooperated in move- 
ments that have been of direct and far-reaching benefit to the community in which he lives. 



GEORGE D. JOHNSON. 



Among those who have been active in the upbuilding of Watford City through the estab- 
lishment and conduct of growing commercial interests is George D. Johnson, a progressive 
and enterprising young business man. He was born in Neenah, Winnebago county, Wisconsin, 
September 22, 1883, a son of Ingolf E. and Carrie (Omit) Johnson. The father, a native 
of Christiania, Norway, was a child when his parents crossed the Atlantic and settled among 
the pioneer residents of Winnebago county, Wisconsin, his father taking up the occupation 
of farming near Neenah. There Ingolf E. Johnson was reared and eventually became a 
machinist of Neenah, where he has conducted his business successfully for more than forty 
years. His wife was born and reared in Winnebago county, where she still resides. 

George D. Johnson, spending his j-outhful days in his native city, acquired his educa- 
tion in the public schools and then obtained a clerkship in a clothing store. Later he was 
employed in a grocery store and in 1908 he sought the opportunities of the growing west by 
removing to Williston, North Dakota, where he spent a year as a salesman in a clothing 
store. In 1909 he became a resident of McKenzie county and took up a homestead near the 
present site of Watford City. He proved up on that property and was also manager of a 
general store at the old Farland postoflBce. When Watford City was established he went 
to that place and became manager of the Walla & Vildma general store. In the spring of 
191G he embarked in business on his own account and now carries a large stock of general 
merchandise, for which he finds a ready sale. His methods are most progressive and his 
energy and determination enable him to overcome all difficulties and obstacles in his path. 
He has a large trade, accorded him by the surrounding rural community, and it is known, 
that fair treatment will ever be received at his hands. 

In politics Mr. Johnson is a republican and he was elected chairman of the first village 
board of Watford City and was mayor in 1914-1915, making an excellent record as chief 
executive. Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias at Neenah, Wisconsin. 
He has always preferred, however, to concentrate his efforts upon his business interests, know- 
ing that success is the legitimate outcome of persistent effort, energy and determination. 
His long experience in merchandising has been one of the strong elements of his growing 
success and he is familiar with every phase of the trade and with commercial conditions in 
general. He is popular as a business man and as a public official and as mayor of Watford 
City is doing much to advance civic improvements, looking ever beyond the exigencies of 
the moment to the opportunities and possibilities of the future. 



CARL A. IvRAUSE. 



Carl A. Krause, secretary and manager of the Neche Mercantile Company of Neche, Pem- 
bina county, was born January 30, 1878, in Schonsee, Germany, and was the second of a 
family of seven children whose parents were Anthony and Mary (Schultz) Krause, who were 
also natives of that eovmtry. They remained residents of Germany until 1893, when they 
crossed the Atlantic to the new world and cast in their lot with the early settlers of Gretna, 
Manitoba. The father is a harness maker by trade and is still actively engaged in that 
business, which he has successfully followed, winning a substantial measure of prosperity as 
the years have gone by. 

Carl A. Krause was a youth of fifteen when the family came to the American continent 
and he continued his education for a brief period in the public schools of Gretna but soon 
afterward started out to earn his livelihood and whatever success he has since achieved is 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 285 

attributable to liis earnest labor. His first position was that of clerk in the store of E. 
Penner & Company at Gretna, with which firm he was connected for ten years, during which 
time he gained an intimate knowledge of mercantile methods and gradually worked his way 
upward. At length he resigned his position to become a member of and manager for. the 
Neche Mercantile Company, which lias the second largest mercantile interests in that section. 
This is au incorporated company which was formed iu 1913, its ollJcers being: F. P. Holmes, 
president; C. X. Murphy, vice president; Carl A. Krause, secretaiy; and F. C. Holmes, treas- 
urer. They have built up a business of extensive proportions and they carry a very attractive 
line of goods. Moreover, the neat and tasteful arrangement of the store and the honorable 
methods followed constitute important factors in the growing success of the institution. 
For fourteen years Mr. Krause has been connected with the business and his efforts have been 
a most important contributing factor to its continued growth and prosperity. The business 
was instituted under the direction of Murphy, Holmes & Company and following the death 
of the senior partner the firm name was changed to Holmes, Briden & St. Amour. The busi- 
ness was carried on under the firm style of Holmes & Briden at the time Jlr. Krause became 
manager and since 1915 he has been a member and secretary of the firm. 

On the 7th of January, 1909, at Flensburg, Jlinnesota, occurred the marriage of Mr. 
Krause and Miss Blanche Wotzka, a native of Minnesota and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Bartholomew Wotzka, who were pioneer residents of that state. Mr. and Mrs. ICrause have 
become the parents of four children, Vincent, Marcus, Carl and Lucien. All were born in 
Neche. 

In politics Mr. Krause has pursued an independent course. He has never sought or filled 
public office but gives stalwart support to the principles in which he believes. He holds 
membership in the Koman Catholic church and with the Knights of Columbus. There is no 
phase of commercial development in Neche with which he is not familiar owing to his long 
connection with the business in which he is now a partner. Ability and determination have 
enabled him to gradually work his way upward In commercial circles and he is today num- 
bered among those who are upbuilding the state along lines of substantial progress. 



WnXIAM A. LANTERMAN. 

Business activity in Mandan finds a worthy representative in William A. Lanterman, 
■who has been president of the State Bank since 1893 and who, carefully directing its 
interests, has made this a strong and reliable institution. He was born in Blairstown, New 
Jersey, November 24, 1854, a son of Abraham and Jane (La Eue) Lanterman, also natives 
of that state. Both have now passed away, the father having died in the year 1877, while 
the mother's death occurred in 1904. 

William A. Lanterman completed his education in the Blairstown Academy, from which 
he was graduated, and in 1875 he arrived in North Dakota, becoming one of the pioneer 
residents of Grand Forks. For a time he engaged in business at Hillsboro, this state, and 
in 1883 removed to Mandan, where he was engaged in the stock business until 1900. In the 
meantime he had become actively identified with banking interests, having in 1892 been 
elected to the presidency of the State Bank of Mandan, in which connection he has since 
given his attention to administrative direction and executive control. He thoroughly under- 
stands every phase of the banking business and recognizes the fact that the bank which 
most carefully safeguards the interests of its depositors is the one most worthy of public 
confidence and support. Aside from his interests in the State Bank he is the president 
of the Mandan Loan & Investment Company, is vice president of the First National Bank 
at New Salem, North Dakota, and has other connections with financial institutions. 

On the 22d of March. 1886, in Racine, Wisconsin. Mr. Lanterman was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Harriet M. Shaw, by whom he has three children, as follows: Bessie, who is 
now the wife of E. A. Ripley, of Mandan, North Dakota; Eunice, who gave her hand in 
marriage to William Ordway, of Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Horace W., a resident of 
Mandan, North Dakota. 

Fraternallv Mr. Lanterman is a Master Mason, while his religious faith is that of 



286 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

the rn'sbyteiiau chuich. His political support is given the democratic party and he has 
held municipal offices in Mandan, where his public spirit has been manifest in his faith- 
fulness to duty. He has steadily advanced in those walks of life demanding intellectuality, 
business ability and fidelity and today commands the respect and esteem not only of his 
community but of the people throughout the state. He is modest and unostentatious in 
manner but all speak of him in terms of high praise. 



COLONEL CLEMENT A. LOUNSBERRY. 

Colonel Clement A. Lounsberry, a Civil war veteran, public official and one who has 
done much in framing the history of the state and contributing to the development of North 
Dakota, is a native of Indiana. He was born in Dekalb county on the 27th of March, 1843, 
and represents one of the old New York families founded prior to 1660 by ancestors who 
settled on the Hudson. Richard Lounsberry was one of those who established the town of 
White Plains, New York, whence he afterward removed to Stamford, Connecticut, and in 
that state representatives of the name have become distinguished in manufacturing, banking 
and educational circles, while two of the number have served as governor of Connecticut. 
In the maternal line Colonel Lounsberry traces his ancestry back to one who came from 
England in 1635, and the family is connected with the Lockwoods, the Benedicts, the 
Whitneys and other people of prominence in the east. His maternal grandmother was a 
Benedict and his paternal grandmother was a Wliitney of the Eli ^'V^litney family. His 
mother, who bore the maiden name of Sarah Weeks, was descended from Jonathan Weeks, 
whose four sons were killed by the Indians in the massacre at Wyoming. 

Left an orphan during his childhood days. Colonel Lounsberry went to Michigan when 
a youth of fourteen and during the summer months worked at farm labor, while in the 
winter seasons he attended the district schools. He had previously been a pupil in the 
schools of Hicksville, Ohio, where his early youth was passed. With the outbreak of the 
Civil war he responded to the country's call for troops, enlisting in Calhoun county, Michigan, 
and his loyalty and capability in service are indicated in the fact that he was advanced 
to the command of his regiment some time before the close of the war. General Byron M. 
Cutcheon, under whom he served, said of him: "Colonel Lounsberry served under me as a 
private, sergeant, second lieutenant, first lieutenant, captain, and assistant adjutant general 
and chief of my staff, and succeeded me as colonel of his regiment, and I must say that 
he was the bravest soldier that I ever knew." His military record has been given by a 
contemporary historian as follows: "Register of military service: Entered the service as 
a private in the Marshall Light Guards, April 31, 1S61. Mustered into United States service, 
Company I, First Michigan, three months. May 1, 1861; discharged July 6, 1863, on return 
from Libby prison. Reenlisted August 9, 1862. Mustered into service as first sergeant 
Company I, Twentieth Michigan, August 19, 1862. Second lieutenant, Company K, Feb- 
ruary 1, 1863; first lieutenant, Company H, .January 31, 1864; captain, Company A, June 23, 
1864; brevet major 'for gallant and meritorious services in the present campaign in front 
of Richmond.' December 3, 1864; lieutenant colonel, December 20, 1864 (mustered April 29, 
1865), and colonel, March 11, 1865. Mustered out lieutenant colonel commanding regiment, 
May 30, 1865. First lieutenant's commission dated November 19, 1863, and captain's, 
June 23, 1864. 

"History of service: First Bull Run, .July 21, 1861, Wilcox Brigade, Heintzelman's 
Division, wounded, prisoner of war until June 25, 1862. First Brigade, First Division, Ninth 
Army Corps. September 22. 1862, Noland's Ford, October 14; White Sulphur Springs, Novem- 
ber 14; Fredericksburg, December 13, 13, 14, 1862; Horse Shoe Bend, Kentucky, May 9, 1863, 
wounded and prisoner three weeks; Blue Springs, Tennessee, October 10, 1863; Loudon, 
Tennessee, November 14, 1863; Lenoir Station, November 15; Campbell Station. Novem- 
ber 16; Siege of Knoxville, November 17 to December 5; Fort Sanders, November 29. 1863; 
Hurby's Ford, December 15, 1863; Strawberry Plains, January 33. 1864; Turkey Bend, March 
14, 1864; The Wilderness, May 5, 6, 7, 1864; Ny River, May 9; Spottsylvania, May 10, 11, 
12, 1864; Hatcher's Run, October 27 and 28, 1864; Siege of Petersburg from October 5, 1864, 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 287 

to April 3, 1863; Fort Stoadman, March 25, 1865. Adjutant General, Ely's Brigade, and 
assumed command First Michigan, S. S., and Second Michigan Infantry, and conducted these 
rciraents into Petersburg, receiving the surrender of that city from two of the three parties 
authorized to surrender the city by the common council, April 3, 1865, and planted the flag 
on the custom house and courthouse before other troops entered the city. Ely's Brigade 
was Second Brigade, First Division, Ninth Army Corps." 

While in front of St. Petersburg, Colonel Lounsberry had filed on a homestead at 
Fairmont, Martin county, Minnesota, making the affidavit before his commanding officer. 
With the close of hostilities he purchased sheep, which he drove from Michigan to his home- 
.stead, and since that time lie has been closely identified with the development of the 
west. Almost immediately following the establishment of his home in Minnesota he became 
prominently connected with public affairs in his community. In the summer of 1866 he 
was appointed county auditor of Martin county and later was elected and reelected to the 
position, being nominated by both republicans and democrats in 1868. He declined the 
democratic nomination but received practically the entire vote of the county. He was 
connected with General B. M. Ciitcheon, Eev. S. S. Hunting, Cliaplain Joseph Jones and 
Dr. O. P. Cliubb, previous army comrades, in the purchase and development of the town site 
of Fairmont, and it was as representative of his partners that he came to the west. In the 
summer of 1868 he began the publication of the Martin County Atlas and when the railroad 
was completed to Wells, Minnesota, in the spring of 1870 he removed his paper to that 
place and resigned his position as auditor of Martin county. In 1872, after leasing his 
paper, he became editorially connected with the Minneapolis Tribune and from July, 1873, 
until 1884 published the Bismarck Tribune, of which he was the promoter. In February, 1876, 
he was made postmaster of Bismarck and continued in that office until 1885, when he 
resigned. A history of Martin county, Minnesota, in writing of him, said: "Fairmont 
sustained quite a loss in the removal of Colonel Lounsberry, who was a public-spirited, 
energetic worker, and who did all he could to assist in building up the town and county. 
He was interested in a number of schemes for the advancement of this place. His news- 
paper not receiving the support he thought it entitled to and having an offer from the 
citizens of Wells, which was then the terminus of the railway, he moved there. Colonel 
C. A. Lounsberry was a man of more than ordinary ability, and since his removal from 
here has occupied prominent positions. ... As a newspaper writer he has few equals 
in the northwest." 

When countj- auditor at Fairmont, Colonel Lounsberry was annoyed by the faulty 
newspaper reports of legislative proceedings and declared that if he ever had an opportunity 
he would report the legislative proceedings in a way that would give information to those 
interested in public affairs. His opportunity came in the winter of 1872-3, when he reported 
the Minnesota legislature for the Minneapolis Tribune and the St. Paul Dispatch, completely 
revolutionizing the system of legislative reporting, so far as the Twin Cities were con- 
cerned. Even after establishing the Tribune at Bismarck he returned two winters and 
reported the Minnesota legislature for the Minneapolis Tribune and the St. Paul Dispatch. 
and has several winters been employed by the Associated Press to report the North Dakota 
legislature for the St. Paul, Minneapolis, Fargo and Grand Forks dailies, and for the 
Bismarck Tribune. 

There is one feature in the constitution of the state, put there through the persistent 
effort of Colonel Lounsberry. It had been the custom to introduce bills and have them 
read by title and referred directly to the committee. There was no opportunity to know 
what was in the bill, unless the member chose to give it; on being interviewed, or the com- 
mittee head could be found and an opportunity given to examine the bill. Through the 
eflTorts of the Colonel, and in the interest of publicity, it was provided in the constitution 
that every bill must be read in full at the time of its introduction and upon its final 
passage. This gives an opportunity to hear and examine it. 

In many ways Colonel Lounsberry has left the impress of his individuality upon the 
public life of the various communitifs in which he lived. In 1895 Colonel Lounsberry estab- 
lished the Record at Fargo, a monthly, his object being to gather material for a history 
of the state. The publication was continued until 1905, when it was suspended on account 
of his transfer to the general land office at Washington. In March, 1889, he was appointed 



288 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

special agent of the general land office and as such agent has conducted more than five 
thousand investigations for the government, appearing for the government in some five 
hundred hearings. His work covered not only Minnesota and the two Dakotas, but Nebraska, 
Wyomin", New Mexico, Colorado, Washington and Montana. From his long residence in 
the public land regions and his familiarity with conditions and with the laws, he was par- 
tieiilarlv well adapted to this class of work, and was finally transferred to the general 
office at his own request, in August, 1905. He was originally appointed a special agent of 
the General land ofiice upon recommendation of General Cutcheon and was removed during 
the Cleveland administration but was immediately reinstated under the Harrison admin- 
istration. In 1889 he was admitted to practice law in Cass county, North Dakota, and on 
the 37th of March, 1904, was licensed to practice before the supreme court of the state. As 
a member of the penitentiary board he was associated with John A. McLean in the work 
of supervising the construction of the penitentiary at Bismarck, and later he was again 
made a member of the board. 

Colonel Lounsberry was married in 1864 to Miss Lucretia V. Hoskins and his family 
numbers four sons and a daughter, the latter, Hattie A., being now the wife of Charles 
E. V. Draper, of Mandan. The eldest son, George H., is an architect and builder of Duluth; 
Wells is owner of a fruit farm at Medford, Oregon; and Fred and William are in the 
job printing business In Duluth. For his present wife Colonel Lounsberry married Mrs. Sarah 
Jane (Mason) Brownson, widow of Colonel Harry Brownson. 

Fraternally Colonel Lounsberry is connected with the Masonic lodge, chapter and com- 
mandery and he belongs also to the Grand Army of the Republic and the Loyal Legion. 
He has long been a communicant of the Episcopal church and his life has been guided by 
his belief. He has ever been a man loyal to his honest convictions, fearless in defense of 
what he believes to be right, and he has done much to mold public thought and opinion in 
his state and thus shape its history. 



PETER 0. THORSON. 



Peter 0. Thorson, publisher of the Normanden, has been a representative of journalistic 
interests in Grand Forks since 1893, then a young man of twenty-six years. He was 
born in Waupaca county, Wisconsin, August 2, 1867, a son of Die and Anna (Iverson) 
Thorson, who were natives of Norway. Emigrating to America in 1861 they settled in 
Wisconsin where tlie father engaged in farming, and there he resided until his death which 
occurred in 1907 when he had reached the age of eighty years. His wife survived him until 
1913, and passed away in Grand Forks at the age of seventy-eight years. 

Peter 0. Thorson was the fourth in order of birth in a family of nine children. At the 
usual age he became a pupil in the public schools of Wisconsin, and after attending high 
school completed his education in a business college. He afterward engaged in the stationery 
and book business with F. W. Eddings & Company from 1888 until 1891, and in the latter 
year became connected with the Grand Forks Herald on which he worked until 1893. At 
that time he purchased an interest in the Normanden Publishing Company, which was then 
issuing a weekly paper which was afterward converted into a semi-weekly. It today has a 
circulation of nine thousand seven hundred copies and is one of the leading papers of the 
state, being widely circulated among the people of Norwegian birth and education. It is 
published according to the most progressive ideas of modern journalism, and its success is 
attributable in large measure to the eflforts of Mr. Thorson who has been identified with the 
paper for twenty-three years. In August, 1916, he took over the Progressive Observer, a 
weekly paper, which has been published in Grand Forks for seven years. He is also a 
director of the Western Realty Comnanv of Farco and the success which he has attained in 
business is the direct result of his energy and ability. He possesses marked energy and 
determination and carries forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes. 

On the 19th of December, 1895, in Grand Forks, Mr. Thorson was united in marriage to 
Miss Eliza Brathovde, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Brathovde of New Hope, Wisconsin. 
Five children have been born of this marriage: Thelma, born in 1896 and a graduate of 




PETER 0. THORSON 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 291 

till' liigli sc-liQol of Grand Forks; Alvin, born in IS'JS; Uarold, in 1902; I'aul in 1906; and 
Genevieve, in 1910. All are natives of Grand Forks and the younger children a.re yet in 
school. Fraternally Mr. Thorson is connected with the Knights of Pythias and the Yeomen. 
He belongs also £o the Sons of Norway and to the Norwegian Press Association of America. 
His deep interest in the welfare of his fellowmen and desire for higher standards of living 
is indicated by his membership in the Young Jlcn's Christian Association. He is president 
of the board of education of Grand Forks, and has labored most earnestly in advancing the 
interests of the schools. Partially tlirough his efforts the present high school building is 
being erected, and when completed will be tlio finest in the state. He works for all those 
forces which are factors in civic betterment, and holds to high standards in manhood and 
citizenship. 



PAUL MANN. 



Paul Mann, cashier of the Merchants State Bank, is thus actively identified with the 
financial interests of Hebron and Morton county. He was born in New Salem, North 
Dakota, February 26, 1889, a son of William Henry and Anna (Lange) Mann, who were 
natives of Germany. Coming to the new world, they settled in Chicago in 1881 and there 
resided for about two years. The father was a cabinet maker and followed his trade in 
Chicago until 1883, when he sought the opportunities offered in the northwest, making his 
way to the territory of Dakota. He located at New Salem, in what is now North Dakota, 
and in that locality took up land from the government. Not a furrow had been turned 
nor an improvement made upon the place but with characteristic energy he began its culti- 
vation and remained thereon for about five years. He then returned to New Salem, where 
in 1889 he established a general store under a partnership relation. He afterward bought 
out his partner's interest in the business, of which he still remains sole proprietor. He is 
today one of the oldest merchants of the place, having for nearly thirty years been actively 
connected with the commercial interests of New Salem. He has likewise extended his 
cfTorts into other fields and is now vice president of the Merchants State Bank of Hebron 
and a director of the Farmers & Merchants State Bank of New Salem. In piiblic affairs 
he has also been prominent and active and for the past eight years has been a member of 
the railroad commission of the state. 

Paul Mann acquired his early educ;iti(in in the schools of New Salem and afterward 
continued his studies at Valparaiso, Indiana, where he completed both a commercial and 
an academic course. He was there graduated in 1906, after which he returned to his 
native city and for a year was his father's assistant in the store. In 1907 he removed to 
Hebron and entered the Merchants State Bank in the capacity of bookkeeper. The follomng 
year he was advanced to the position of assistant cashier and occupied that office until 1910, 
when he was promoted to the cashierahip. He is also a stockholder and a director of this 
bank, which was organized in October, 1906, and capitalized for ten thousand dollars, its 
officers being: F. Schweigert. president; Fred Dichtenmueller, vice president; and E. H. 
Mann, cashier. About 1908 C. F. Ewald was made president and so continued for about 
two years, when he was succeeded by Jacob Schmalenberger. At that date W. H. Mann 
became the vice president. F. H. Mann continued as cashier until 1910, when he was 
succeeded by Paul Mann, who is still filling the position, with C. H. Oellerman as assistant 
cashier. The bank has a surplus and imdivided profits of twelve thousand five hundred 
dollars. .A fine building of brick construction was erected in 1907 and its equipment is 
thoroughly modern. There are large safety deposit vaults and every accessory to protect 
the interests of the patrons of the bank. The liabilities of the institution are about two 
hundred and fifty thousand dollars and the business of the bank has steadily grown from 
• lie beginning. In addition to the general banking business which is carried on the company 
conducts a real estate, loan and insurance department and receives a liberal patronage 
along those lines. 

In October, 1911, Mr. Mann was unitcrl in marriage to Miss Henrietta K. Urban, who 



292 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

was born in Hebron, Xorth Dakota, in September, 1891, and they have two sons, Kenneth 
and Frederick. 

Mr. Mann votes with the republican party, which he has supported since age conferred 
upon him tlie right of franchise. For five years he has been treasurer of the village and 
is numbered among those who have taken a leading part in community affairs, doing every- 
thing in his power to uphold the business interests of the town. His religious faith is 
evidenced by his membership in the German Evangelical church and he actively supports all 
movements for the moral progress of the district. 



FEANIC G. ORE. 



The financial interests of North Dakota have a worthy representative in Frank G. Orr, 
who has been identified with several banks in this state and is now serving as vice presi- 
dent of the First State Bank of Mott. in which city he makes his home. He was born in 
Victory, Wisconsin, August 23, 18T2, and is a son of Thomas G. and Emma (Newell) Orr, the 
former a native of Marietta, Ohio, and the latter of Waukon, Iowa. His paternal grand- 
father spent his entire life in Ohio, of which state the family were pioneers, and there he 
died in the prime of life. He was a physician by profession. 

In early life Thomas G. Orr went to Iowa and at the age of thirteen years he enlisted 
as a drummer in the Fifth Iowa Volunteer Infantry at the beginning of the Civil war. After 
serving in that capacity for two years, he became a private in the infantry and served as 
such until the end of his three years' enlistment. Later he joined the cavalry and altogether 
was with the army for four years and a half, taking part in many important engagements. 
^\^len hostilities ceased he was honorably discharged from the service. Subsequent!}- he took 
a business course in a commercial college at Chicago, Illinois, and then became an express 
messenger. He continued to fill that position until 1870, when he removed to Lansing, Iowa, 
and began dealing in wheat. F'rom there he moved across the Mississippi river to Victory, 
Wisconsin, and about 1877 became a resident of \ iroqua, that state, where he conducted 
an elevator and also engaged in the machinery business until 1883. In the latter year Mr. 
Orr went to South Dakota and took up a homestead and tree claim near Mobridge. After 
following farming for a year he was elected register of deeds and auditor of Walworth county 
and was subsequently reelected, serving in all eight years. During that time he attended 
the territorial legislature at Bismarck and for two sessions served as chief clerk. He was a 
member of the constitutional convention and has always taken an active part In public affairs. 
He has been chairman of the republican state central committee and for a number of years 
has been president of the South Dakota Old Settlers Association, which has annual home 
comings alternating between Aberdeen and Sioux Falls. Mr. Orr has been particularly active 
in the Grand Army of the Republic and for tlie past six years has been commandant of the 
Soldiers Home at Hot Springs, South Dakota, while his wife has served as matron. He has 
been very successful in its management and is regarded as one of the most public-spirited 
and progressive citizens of his community. At one time he was in charge of a delegation of 
members of the territorial legislature of Dakota to the Montana legislature at the invita- 
tion of its members. In his family were two sons and one daughter, but the eldest, Charles, 
died at the age of eight years, and Angle, who became the wife of George Opie. died when 
twenty-one years of age. 

Frank G. Orr, the only survivor, began his elementary education in the schools of Wis- 
consin and continued his studies after the removal of the family to Dakota. During the first 
year of their residence in the territory they had to haul all their goods from Aberdeen, a 
distance of one hundred miles, and on their way to that city collected buffalo bones, which 
they disposed of there. Mr. Orr sometimes accompanied his fatlier on these trips. In 1893 
he began a five years' course at the South Dakota State College at Brookings, and on its 
completion was elected secretary and treasurer of the college, serving in that capacity and 
at the same time conducting classes until 1904. He then resigned and went to Aberdeen, 
where he became identified with the newspaper business on the Dakota Farmer. Later he 
was for line year foreign news editor of the Daily American. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 293 

On the 1st ol' .Tainiaiy. 1U06, .Mr. Oir acef|>ti'd the position of assistant cashier of tlie 
Citizens State Banlc at Kussell, North Dakota, where he remained nntil l'J09, when lie sold 
his interest in that concern and removed to Mott, which has since been his home. He organ- 
ized the First State Bank, of wliich he became cashier, but has served as vice president since 
1913. In 1909 he also organized the Galloway & Orr Abstract Company, and tiie senior mem- 
ber of the firm is now^ cashier of the Farmers State Bank of Bentley, North Dakota. They 
purchased two banks at Bentley, which they consolidated, and the institution is now in a 
llourishinj; condition. At one time Mr. Orr owned an interest in the State Bank of New Eng- 
land and tlie Citizens State Bank at Kegeiit but has sold that property. In addition to his 
other business interests, he also deals extensively in real estate. 

On the oth of .luly, lUUO, Jlr. Orr was united in nnirriage to Miss Lulu Cornell, a native 
of Winnepeg, Canada, and a daughter of William H. Cornell, who was a pioneer of Dakota, 
having located in Sioux I'alis in 1875. Mrs. Orr was educated at the Brookings high school 
and the South Dakota Normal at Madison, after which she taught school for some time prior 
to her marriage. She has become the mother of two children: Harry (i. and Fred K. Mr. 
Orr is a member of the Masonic fraternity and was the first master of the lodge at Russell 
and also the lodge at Mott, with which he is now coiuiected. He is one of the leading business 
men of Hettinger county as well as one of its representative citizens and occui)ie.s an enviable 
jjosition in financial circles. 



JOHN S. CONYERS. 



John S. Conyers, of the firm of Conyers & Son, lumber dealers of Cando. North Dakota, 
was one of the first settlers of Towner county and has therefore witnessed its entire 
development, in the work of which he has taken a very active and prominent part. He was 
born in Paris, Missouri, on the 37th of November, 1858, and is a son of William S. and 
Ann E. (Parsons) Conyers, also natives of that state, the former born in ^Monroe county 
and the latter in Pike county. The father, who w'as a farmer and stock raiser by occupa- 
tion, made his home in Missouri until his death. 

There John S. Conyers was reared and educated in much the usual manner of boys 
at that time. In 1883 he made his way to this state, reaching Larimore on the 1st of 
March, which town was then the western terminus of the railroad. There he rented four 
hundred and eighty acres of land and after putting in his crop started west with a team 
of horses and the running gear of a wagon to look for a suitable location. At Bartlett he 
met some half breed Indians who told him of the beautiful countrj' in what is now Towner 
county and later he met Frank Blair, who had visited this section, and he told Mr. Conyers 
it was the prettiest country he had ever seen, advising him to locate here. Our subject 
then loaded some board on his wagon at Bartlett and started across the country. On 
reaching Coulee, four miles south of the present city of Cando, he unloaded and built the 
frame for his shack, which he covered with sod. He then returned to Larimore and harvested 
his crop, coming to Towner county again that fall after his work was done and spending 
the winter here. The following year he filed on a preemption and also a tree claim. He 
was one of eight men who wintered in Towner ccmnty in 1883-4 and among them they were 
able to have this section surveyed. As was the custom at that time, Mr. Conyers plowed 
a furrow around the section he wished to reserve, and as his brother Thomas W., then on 
a cattle ranch in Nevada, had promised to join him. he included in his furrow some eight 
hundred acres of land. After the survey had been made Imth filed on this tract and the 
original claims are still in the possession of the family. 

On coming to Towner county. John S. Conyers was without capital and for some years 
lie made his living by hauling lumber fur the settlers who followed him into the country. 
In 1884 he was one of three county commissioners appointed by the governor to locate the 
county seat, the others being Captain P. P. Parker, now of Phoenix, Arizona; and H. C. 
!)avis. now living in Michigan. There was nnich contention over the selection of the site, 
many of the settlers wanting it located at their nearest settlement or on their own land 
lint the committee looked ahead to the futiue dcvelopnu'nt of fhe country north of them 



294 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

and, desiring to make tlie location a permanent one, chose the present site. There was 
strong objection to this decision in the meeting called for that purpose but the spokesman 
of the committee said: "Gentlemen, we were appointed to this committee to decide this 
location and in virtue of our authority we select this location and name the town Cando 
to show you that we can do it." 

Mr. Conyers continued to follow farming until 1888, when the railroad was built into 
Cando and he moved to the town, where he opened a lumberyard. The first train entering 
the town, which was a construction train, brought him two carloads of lumber. His brother 
Thomas W. was associated witli him in business until the latter's death in the fall of 1911, 
when our subject bought his interest and admitted his son Robert T. to partnership. Under 
the firm name of Conyers & Son the business is now carried on and they enjoy an excellent 
trade. Mr. Conyers is a director of the First National Bank of Cando and is the owner of eight 
hundred acres of valuable farming land in Towner county. 

In December, 1888, he was united in marriage to Mrs. Rachel E. (Canfield) Judd, of 
Danbury, Connecticut, and of the four children born to them three survive, namely: Edna S., 
who is a graduate of Stanley Hall, at Minneapolis; Robert T., who is a graduate of Culver 
Military Academy, at Culver, Indiana, and is now in business with his father; and Jane S., 
who was educated at Graham Hall, at Minneapolis, and is now the wife of E. F. Bacon of 
Cando, North Dakota. 

The family attend the Congregational church and Jfr. Conyers is a prominent Mason, 
belonging to Cando Lodge, No. 40, A. F. & A. M.; Cando Chapter, No. 18, R. A. M.; C. J. 
Atkins Commandery, No. 14, K. T., of Cando; Dakota Consistory, No. 1, A. & A. S. R. ; and 
Kem Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S., of Grand Forks. He is one of the representative citizens 
of his town and is deserving of honorable mention in this volume on account of the 
important part he has taken in the development of Towner county. 



JOHN A HAIG. 



John A. Haig, county superintendent of schools of Ramsey county and a resident of 
Devils Lake, was accorded liberal educational opportunities and in their improvement he 
c]ualified for the important work which he has since done in the educational field. He was 
born in Potsdam, New York, October 30. 1848, and is a son of John and Helen (Aitchison) 
Haig, both of whom have now passed away, the father having reached the venerable age 
of ninety-three years ere he was called to the home beyond. 

After attending the public schools of his native city John A. Haig continued his studies 
in the Potsdam Academy and in the Middlebury College at Middlebury, Vermont, from 
which he was graduated with the class of 1873. He then became the first teacher in the 
I'nion Free school at Madrid, New York, where he remained for two years, after which 
he went to Massena as superintendent of the Union Free School and Academy, remaining 
in that connection for five years. He afterward spent a brief period as a law clork in 
Madrid but later resumed school work there and recognition of his ability led to his election 
to the office of county superintendent, in which position he served for nine years. He came 
to North Dakota in 1894 to accept the position of principal of the city schools of Devils 
Lake and remained at the head for seven years. He afterward spent two years as super- 
intendent of schools at Rolla and in 1904 took up farming in connection with teaching. 
He organized the Consolidated school at Webster, where he taught for two years, and in 
1908 he was elected county superintendent of schools, which position he is now filling for 
the eighth year. Recognizing the great value to be secured through concentrating effort, 
money, time and attention on school work, he has promoted the consolidation of schools and 
has brought about the consolidation of seventeen out of thirty-nine. Throughout his pro- 
fessional career he has sought to introduce higher standards of teaching and has been 
able to inspire the teachers and pupils under him with much of his own zeal and interest 
in the work. His labors have been productive of excellent results, the far-reaching eflFects 
of which will be felt for all time to come. 

On the 13tli of July, 1876, Professor Haig was married to Miss Mary A. Hawley and 



HISTORY OF XORTII DAKOTA 295 

to them have been l)orn four children, Alan V., Myron J.. Helen E. and Ernest H., but the 
last named died at the age of thirty-two years. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Presbyterian church and in his political 
belief Professor Haig is a republican, but while he keeps well informed on the questions 
and issues of the day and is able to support his position by intelligent argument he has 
never sought nor desired political proferment outside the strict path of his profession. Steady 
advancement in the field of his chosen labor has brought him prominence among the 
educators of his part of the state. 



A. B. DORAN. 



A. B. Doran, a hardware merchant of Taylor, is numbered among those who through 
well directed business activity are contributing to the substantial upbuilding of Stark 
county. He was born at Waddington, St. Lawrence county. New York, March 11, 1877. a 
son of Samuel B. and ,Tane (Behan) Doran, both of whom were natives of the Empire state, 
where the father spent his entire life and where the mother still makes her home. 

A. B. Doran, their eldest son, was reared in New York and after passing through the 
various grades of the public schools continued his education in the College of Montreal, 
after which he returned home, remaining a resident of New York for several years. While 
in the east he joined the army, with which he served for seven months. The year 1907 
witnessed his arrival in North Dakota, at which time he settled in Grand Forks and entered 
the wholesale grocery house of Nash Brothers, by which he was employed for about a year. 
He afterward removed to Bismarck, where he entered the service of the International 
Harvester Company, with which he continued for three years as a traveling salesman, 
during which period he made his headquarters at Bismarck. He next became a resident of 
Taylor, where he engaged in the implement business in partnership with Cornelius Williams 
under the firm name of Williams & Doran. That connection was continued until 1914, 
when Mr. Doran sold out and opened a hardware store in Taylor, carrying a full line of 
shelf hardware and enjoying a good business, which he conducts under the name of the 
Taylor Hardware Company. He has built up his trade along substantial lines, ever recogniz- 
ing the fact that satisfied customers are the best advertisement. In 1914 he erected a fine 
brick store building which is one of the substantial commercial features of the town. 

In 1909 Jlr. Doran was married at Detroit, Minnesota, to Miss Margaret Oedbaucr of 
that place, and they have become parents of two daughters, Margaret and Cliarlotte. The 
parents are members of the Catholic church and Mr. Doran is connected with the Knights 
of Columbus at Rutland, Vermont. He was clerk of the school board of Taylor during 
1915-16 and served on the village board of trustees during the first year after its incorpora- 
tion in 1912. He is interested in community aff'airs to the extent of giving hearty coopera- 
tion to well defined plans and measures for the general good. 



HON. CHRISTIAN GANSSLE. 

Hon. Christian (Janssle, formerly a member of the state senate and now actively engaged 
in merchandising at St. Thomas, was born May 20, 1866, in Waldorf, Germany. The father, 
John Ganssle, also a native of Germany, learned and followed the baker's trade, winning 
substantial success through his business activity. He wedded Marie Buetler, also a native 
of Germany. Mr. Ganssle died in that country in 1871. when his son Cliristian was but 
five years of age, and in 1876 the mother, accompanied by her family of nine children,- 
of wliom Cliristian was the seventh, crossed the Atlantic to Canada, settling in Bismark. 
Ontario. Her choice of a destination was influenced by the fact that she had friends 
formerly from Germany, who were there residing. 

Cliristian Ganssle, then a lad of ten years, acquired his education in the schools of 
Bismark, Canada, and of St. Thomas, North Dakota, the family having removed to this 



296 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

state in 1882. They were among the first settlers of St. Thomas and after completing 
his education ilr. Ganssle entered a homestead claim of one hundred and sixty acres in 
St. Thomas township, Pembina county. This he cultivated for fifteen years and still owns 
that tract. In 1901 he turned his attention to the drug business, which he has since suc- 
cessfully carried on. • While inexperienced in pharmaceutical lines, he has had from the 
beginning A. C. Grant, a registered pharmacist, as a partner. The firm is Ganssle, Campbell & 
Grant and in addition to the drug business they conduct a large department store in 
St. Thomas, having a very liberal patronage which makes theirs a profitable concern. 

• On the 33d of January, 1900, Mr. Ganssle was married to Miss Lena Morrison, a native 
of Canada and of Irish descent, the parents being JNIr. and Mrs. Thompson Morrison, who 
were pioneer residents of Pembina county. The father is now deceased, while the mother 
makes her home with Mrs. Ganssle. 

The religious faith of Mr. and Mrs. Ganssle is that of the Lutheran church and he is 
identified also with the Commercial Club, cooperating heartily with its efforts to upbuild 
the city and extend its trade relations. His political allegiance has always been given to 
the republican party since age conferred upon him the right of franchise and for the past 
twenty years he has been active in promoting its welfare. He is now mayor of St. Thomas, 
which position he is filling for the fourth term or eight years, and he was also alderman 
of the city for six years. He has served in both the house of representatives and the 
state senate, being elected to the former for three terms, and thus he has left the impress 
of his individuality upon much important legislation. He has a record second to none of 
the state's lawmakers, for while in the general assembly he carefully studied the questions 
which came up for consideration and viewed each important problem from the standpoint 
of a broad-minded, public-spirited man who recognized not only existing conditions but 
looked beyond the exigencies of the moment to the possibilities and opportunities of the 
future. While he has won substantial and notable success in business, his fellow citizens 
have reason to honor him for what he has accomplished for the city and for the state, 
and liigh on the roll of North Dakota's most valued residents appears the name of 
Hon. Christian Ganssle. 



CHARLES EVERETT HUNT, B. A., M. D. , 

Dr. Charles Everett Hunt, engaged in medical practice at Valley City, his studious habits 
keeping him in close connection with the advance that is constantly being made along 
professional lines, was born in Lamoure county, North Dakota, August 10, 1887, a son of 
Everett H. and Ella (Seekins) Hunt, natives of Leon, Cattaraugus county, New York. The 
paternal grandfather. Major Hunt, went into the Civil war as captain of a company which 
he organized and served throughout the period of hostilities, being promoted to the rank 
of major. He was a representative of an old colonial family. 

Everett H. Hunt, leaving the east, became a resident of North Dakota in 1882 and took 
up a homestead in Lamoure county, after which he was joined bj' his parents and his 
wife's parents and two sons, all of whom secured land contiguous and formed quite a set- 
tlement. For ten years Everett H. Hunt devoted his- attention to the development of hia 
claim and afterward removed to Jamestown, North Dakota, where he established a truck 
garden, shipping large quantities of vegetables. Later he went into the bakery and restau- 
rant business, which he conducted for some time, but in 1905 he removed to Manitoba, 
where he remained for a year and a half, carrying on a bakery and confectionery store. 
He tlien located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, where he now resides. 

In a family of two sons and three daughters Dr. Hunt was the youngest and after 
mastering the branches of learning taught in the public and high scliools of Jamestown he 
entered the State University at Grand Forks and won his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1911. 
He took up the study of medicine during tlie last two years and afterward entered North- 
western University of Chicago, there winning his M. D. degree in 1913. Having been suc- 
cessful in a competitive examination, he spent one year as house physician and surgeon in 
the Minneapolis City Hospital, where he gained that broad and valuable experience which 



^ 



"*%*. 









it'f 



DR. CHARLES E. HUNT 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 299 

can never be secured as quickly and tlioroughly in any other way as in liospital practice. 
At the end of a year he came to Valley City, where he opened an office, and in the interim 
he has built up a large and increasing practice. 

On the 14th of September, 1911, Dr. Hunt was married to Miss Lois Robertson, a native 
of Minnesota, and a daughter of Dr. E. P. Robertson, president of Wesley College of North 
Dakota. Dr. and Mrs. Hunt have two daughters. 

Dr. Hunt is a Royal Arch Mason, belong.s to the Order of the Eastern Star and is also 
connected with the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Moose 
anil the JIaccabees. He is likewise a member of the Barnes County Pioneer Club. Along 
strictly professional lines he has membership with the Cheyenne Valley Medical Society 
and the North Dakota State Medical Society. He is a man of scholarly tastes and habits 
who throughout his life has been a student not only along the lines connected with his pro- 
fession but also of the best literature, reading broadly and thinking deeply in connection 
with many questions which are engaging public thought and attention. 



A. L. JOHNSON. 



A. L. .loluison, president of the city board of Devils Lake and one of the proprietors of 
the Devils Lake Steam Laundry, was born in Riceville, Iowa, November U. 187S, a son of 
Barnabas M. and Fidelia (Woolworth) .Johnson, the former now deceased, while the latter is 
living upon a homestead claim in Montana. 

Following the removal of the family to Lyle, Minnesota, A. L. Johnson was educated in 
the schools of that place and in Highland Park College at Des Moines, Iowa, from which he 
was graduated witli the class of 1899. Taking up the work of a druggist, he devoted seven 
years to the business in Lyle, Minnesota, and in Hope, North Dakota, and in 1906 removed to 
Devils Lake. The following year, in connection with E. M. Ostrander, he established the 
laundry which they have since conducted under the name of the Devils Lake Steam Laundry. 
They also have a dry cleaning department in connection therewith and something of the 
volume of their business is indicated in the fact that they have eighteen employes. Their 
business is conducted according to the most modern processes and methods and success in 
substantial measure is attending them, for they are both men of ability and their close 
ajipliiation and unremitting energy are bringing substantial rewards. Mr. Johnson has also 
taken a prominent part in public affairs. In 1913 he was elected president of the city board 
and during liis term in office has installed a municipal garbage plant, established a system 
of meat inspection and is ever looking toward tliose interests and projects which pertain to 
the public healtli. The city has also been placed upon a substantial footing and in a word 
he has displayed a most progressive spirit in conducting municipal afl'airs, bringing to bear 
the same sound judgment, keen insight and systematic methods which have characterized 
tiie conduct of his private business interests. 

In July, 1904, Mr. Johnson was married to Miss Bessie Ostrander and to them have been 
horn two sons and two daughters, namely: Leonora M., B. Marion, C. Byron and Harriett P. 

In politics Mr. .Johnson is a progressive republican. In all of his public service he has 
subordinated self-aggrandizement to the general good and partisanship to the public welfare 
and his course in ollicc lia.; r?ceived the highest (■(iinnieiiil;:tion iiiul emlorsi-miMit 



FRANK A. KELLOGG. 



Tlie Conrti nav Farmers Cooperative Association of Courtenay is abiy managed by Frank 
A. Kellogg, an enterprising and progressive business man, who in the conduct of the interests 
intrusted to his eare is ever watchful of every opportunity pointing to success, and he has 
made the undertaking one of worth to the community as well as a source of profit to the 
stockholders. He was born in Fillmore county, Minnesota, September 1. ISfifi, and is a son 
of E. D. Kellogg, who was born in New Vnrk and at the age of twenty-two years removed 



300 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

westwai-a to Fillmore oouiity, Minnesota, where he resided fifty-six years, devoting his time 
and energies to general farming. He married Elizabeth Crowel, a native of Ohio and her 
death occurred in 1911, while Mr. Kellogg passed away in 1913. 

Of their family of eight children Frank A. Kellogg was the third in order of birth. 
Spending his boyhood days upon the home farm, he divided his time between the district 
schools and the work of the fields and when his textbooks were put aside he concentrated 
his entire attention upon the task of assisting his father until he reached the age of twenty- 
two years, when lie left home. For some time thereafter he traveled and gained much knowl- 
edge in that way. He spent a year at Spokane Falls, a year in Moscow, Idaho, and six 
months in Kentucky and Tennessee, where he was engaged in shipping horses and stock. He 
then came to North Dakota and entered a claim near Fairmount in 1892. He proved up on 
that property and at the end of four years went to Todd county, Minnesota, where in 1898 
he purchased one hundred and twenty acres of land, which he at once began to cultivate and 
improve, remaining thereon for eight months. He next established his home in Courtenay, 
where he entered the grain business as an employe of the Royal Elevator Company, wdth 
which he continued until 1909. In that year he entered the employ of the Homestead & 
Dodge Elevator Gomapny, with which he continued for a period of two years. In 1911 the 
Courtenaj- Farmers Co-operative Association was organized and Jlr. Kellogg was made man- 
ager, which position he has filled from the beginning. He aided in its organization and tliat 
he is most capa.ble in his present position is shown by the large dividends that have been 
declared on the pro rata plan. There are seventy-si.x stockholders in the organization and 
from the beginning the business has been a success owing to the careful management and 
unfaltering enterprise of Mr. Kellogg. He is likewise interested in farm lands, having six 
hundred and forty acres in Stutsman county and three hundred and twenty acres in Foster 
county near Glenfield, North Dakota. He also owns one tenth interest in the Farmers & 
Merchants Bank, of Clementsville, North Dakota, and is a director in same. 

In 1901 Mr. Kellogg was married to Miss Ethel Stevens, who was born in Yorkshire, 
England, and came to the United States with her sister in 1896. Her parents have both 
passed away. Mrs. Kellogg was one of a family of nine children and by her marriage has 
become the mother of two children: Russell, born in October, 1905; and Minnie, born on tlie 
1st of July, 1909. 

Mr. Kellogg is an independent voter, preferring not to bind himself by party ties. He 
has served as a member of the town board but has never been ambitious in the field of office 
seeking. He belongs to Liberty Lodge, No. 65, I. O. 0. F., of Courtenay, in which he has 
jiassed through all the chairs, and he is a consistent and faithful member of the Courtenay 
Presbyterian church, in which he is acting as a trustee. He does all in his power to further 
its work and extend its influence and his aid and cooperation are always given on the side of 
advancement, reform and improvement. 



JACOB SCHMALENBERGER. 

Business enterprise in Hebron finds a worthy representative in Jacob Schmalenberger, 
the president of the Merchants State Bank and a man of notable business ability. His plans 
are always well defined and promptly executed and through his own labors he has worked 
his way upward to success. A native of Illinois, he was born at Millstadt, St. Clair county, 
about eight miles southeast of St. Louis, on the 19th of August, 1853, his parents being 
Jacob and Sophia Schmalen,berger, who were natives of Germany and after coming to the 
new world in 18.'!4 settled in Illinois, always remaining in that state. 

Jacob Schmalenberger of this review, spending his youthful days under the parental 
roof, attended the graded and high schools of Millstadt and afterward entered a college at 
Warrenton, Missom-i. When his textbooks were put aside he returned home and began 
farming in connection with his father, spending his time in that way until his marriage on 
the 36th of April, 1880, when Miss Minnie Albert became his wife. She was born in St. 
Louis and her parents removed to a farm in the same neighborhood where the Schmalen- 
berger family resided and there she was reared. They have become the parents of four 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 301 

i-liiUlren: Lena, wlio is now tho wife of Ludwig Reliiu, a resident of Hebron; Fred, wlio is 
operating his father's farm; Katie, the wife of George Pratzel, proprietor of a general store 
at Hebron; and Albert, at home. 

At the time of his marriage Mr. Sthnialenberger rented a farm in St. Clair count}', Illi- 
nois, and there carried on general agricultural pursuits for about five years. In 1885 he came 
to North Dakota and settled six miles northwest of Hebron, where he took up a govern- 
ment claim of one hundred and si.xty acres. He proved up on that property, which he still 
owns, and since then he has purchased more land, all in the same section of the state. His 
holdings are very extensive and he is now farming about thirty-one hundred acres. His 
interests are conducted along mammoth lines and he is one of the foremost agriculturists 
of his part of the state. He is now raising blooded Hereford shorthorn cattle, having about 
two hundred and fifty head, and he was formerly quite actively connected with the sheeji 
industry. He has built one of the largest barns in his part of tho state, its dimensions being 
forty-eight by eighty feet and forty-eight feet in height. This is a bank barn. In addition 
he has a large sheep barn which is one hundred feet in length. Much of his land is devoted 
to the cultivation of grain and he is one of the most progressive, wide-awake, alert and 
enterprising farmers of North Dakota. He still gives active management to his agricul- 
tural interests although in lUlO he left the farm and removed to Hebron, where he has 
since maintained his residence. In 1906 he became interested in the Merchants State Bank 
and in 1910 was elected to the presidencj', in which position he still continues. He believes 
in maintaining a standard of service in banking that will never jeopardize public confidence 
and in the conduct of the bank tempers progressiveness by a safe conservatism. He is like- 
wise a stockholder in the Bismarck Providence Life Insurance Company of Bismarck, North 
Dakota. 

Mr. Schmalenberger gives his political allegiance to the republican party, which he has 
supported since age conferred upon liim the right of franchise. He belongs to the German 
Evangelical church of Hebron, of which he has been one of the directors since its organiza- 
tion and chairman of its board for man}' years. He believes thoroughly in advancement 
' and works as earnestly for the upbuilding of town, county and state as he does to promote 
his individual business interests, his patriotic spirit tlius taking tangible form in efforts for 
the general good. 



JUDGE FRED S. DEWEY. 



Fre<l S. Dewey, Avho is now so efficiently serving as county judge of Hettinger county. 
North Dakota, and is a resident of Mott, was born on the 24th of September, 1864, in Poy 
Sippi, Waushara county, Wisconsin, and is descended from an old and honored New England 
family, his parents being Frederick and Lucy A. (Bond) Dewey. The Dewey family was 
founded in America by three brothers, one of whom settled in Massachusetts, another in 
New Hampshire and the third in Vermont, and it is from the last that Admiral Dewey was 
descended, while Nelson A. Dewey, territorial governor of Wisconsin, was descended from 
the one who settled in New Hampshire. The -Judge, however, belongs to the Massachusetts 
branch of the family. His father was born in Westfield, that state, and was a son of 
Cliarlps Dewey, whose father was one of the three brothers who came to this country. The 
.Tudge's father removed to Wisconsin during pioneer days and was accompanied by several of 
his brothers, one of whom, Charles Dewey, erected the first brick building in Milwaukee. 
From that city Frederick Dewey drove across the country to Waushara county, where he 
took up a tract of government land. Although he passed through a fine prairie country he 
was looking for timber land in order that he might have an abundance of fire wood and 
building material. He cleared and improved his homestead and bought more land adjoining, 
which remained in the family until 1911. He died upon that place at the age of sevent.v- 
five years, and his wife, who was a native of Chardon, Ohio, passed away in .January, 1904, 
at tlie age of seventy-four years. 

In the family of this worthy couple were seven cliildien, of whom Judge Dewey is the 
youngest. He spent his school days in Wisconsin and remained on the home farm until 



302 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

1897, wliuii he turned his attention to genei-al mereliandising, but after the death of his 
partner in 1899 he closed out the business and took up insurance. During this time lie lived 
with his mother but shortly after her death in 1904 he came to North Dakota, being induced 
by the ^V'. H. Brown Company to come to this state and look the country over. He was 
well pleased with prospects here and on his return homo persuaded his brother H. A. Dewey 
and J. R. Chalmers to accompany him on his removal to North Dakota. They all home- 
steaded four miles south of JMott in Hettinger county, the Judge locating upon his place in 
November, 1904, and to its development and cultivation he devoted his energies for two 
years. In the winter of 1906-7 he took an active part in organizing the county and at that 
time was appointed county judge, in which capacity he has since served, having been elected 
and reelected at each succeeding election. He is still the owner of a good farm of three 
hundred and twenty acres but since 1910 has resided in Mott and still owns his city prop- 
erty there. He has seen Mott grow from a piece of raw prairie with one little frame build- 
ing, forty miles from a railroad, to a flourishing little city with two railroads. 

On the 4th of December, 1908, Judge Dewey was united in marriage to Miss Abbie J. 
Contanche, a native of Wisconsin and a daughter of John Contanche, who was one of the 
early settlers of that state. After a short married life of three years Mrs. Dewey passed 
away in November, 1911, leaving many friends as well as her husband to mourn her loss. 
The Judge is a Master Mason and as a public official he well merits the confidence and trust 
reposed in him, for his duties have all been most faithfully and conscientiously discharged, 
his decisions being fair and unbiased. A genial, courteous gentleman, he has made a host 
of warm friends during his residence in Hettinger county and wherever known is held in 
tlie highest esteem. 



THOMAS FLEMING McMILLAN. 

Thomas Fleming McJMillan, member of the general mercantile firm of Andrus &' 
McMillan at Thompson, Grand Forks county, was born September 25, 1856, in Butler county, 
Pennsylvania, a son of Thomas Simpson McMillan, who was born in Belfast, in the north of 
Ireland on the 1st of February, 1831, a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Nieols) McMillan. 
It was in 1845 that Thomas Simpson McMillan came to the United States, settling first in 
Philadelphia, while later he located in Butler county, Pennsylvania, where he married 
Miss Mary Jane Boyd, who was born in the Keystone state but was of Irish descent, her 
parents being Samuel and Mary J. (Stevenson) Boyd. For some years Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
McMillan lived in Butler count}-, Pennsylvania, and the mother there passed away in 1868 
at the age of forty-three years. In the spring of 1871 the father removed to Franklin county, 
Kansas, casting in his lot with its early settlers. In the fall of 1875 he went with his family 
to Pierce county, Wisconsin, where he carried on general agricultural pursuits until his 
death, which occurred at River Falls, Wisconsin, September 2, 1907, when he had reached the 
age of eighty-six years, seven months and one day. In the family were nine children, of 
whom two passed away in infancy. 

Thomas F. JlciUUan, the third in order of birth, was educated in the public schools of 
Pennsylvania, Kansas and Wisconsin, to which states he accompanied his father on his 
various removals. His early training was that of the farm bred boy and he continued to 
assist his father in the cultivation of the fields until he reached the age of eighteen years. 
He then started out to earn his own living and was first employed as a farm hand. Later 
he took up the occupation of carpentering and served for three years at his trade. Before 
engaging in carpentering, however, he removed from Wisconsin to North Dakota on the 21st 
of May, 1880, and homcsteaded one hundred and fifty-eight and two-thirds acres of land in 
Michigan township. Grand Forks county, three miles from the town of Thompson. He 
proved up on that place and continued to cultivate it for three years, retaining the ownership 
thereof for a number of years, although be has now sold that property. After leaving the 
farm he turned his attention to mercantile pursuits, becoming a clerk in the employ of 
John Bjorgo, a pioneer merchant and lumber dealer, with whom he remained for two 
years. He then joined J. L. Andrus in 1898 in forming the present firm of Andrus & McJIillan 




THOMAS F. McMillan 



HISTORY OF NOR 11 1 DAKOTA 305 

lor tlie conduct of a general merchandise store and in tlie intervening period they have 
developed a business of extensive and gratifying projjortions. They also have various other 
interests, being stocliholders in other business concerns. 

Fraternally Mr. JlcMillan is a member of the Independent Order of Foresters and is 
the present court deputy. His religious faith is that of the Methodist church and he is an 
active and earnest worker in that organization, serving as secretary-treasurer of the church 
and as one of its trustees. In politics he is a prohibitionist where national issues are 
involved but at local elections casts an independent ballot. He deserves classification witli 
the self-made men of his district for, starting out in life at the age of eighteen, he has 
steadily worked his way upward, his prosperity being due to his energy and ability. 



JAjVIES L. BOUCHER. 



The banking interests of Burleigli county have a worthy representative in James L. 
Boucher, the w-ell known and popular cashier of the DriscoU State Bank of UriscoU, North 
Dakota. He was born in Waseca, Minnesota, .January 9, 1892, his parents being Thomas 
and Mary (Bowe) Boucher, who are natives of Pennsylvania and Wisconsin respectively. 
At. an early day they removed to Jlinnesota and located in Waseca, but subsequently came 
to North Dakota. After living in Fargo for a time they took up their residence in Valley 
City, where they now make theii' home. 

James L. Boucher accompanied his parents on their removal to this state. During his 
boyhood and youth he acquired a good practical education, attending school in Aberdeen, 
South Dakota, for a time. Later he was a pupil at the Valley City Normal and also pur- 
sued a course in the Minneapolis Business College. On starting out in life for himself he 
secured a position in the postoffice at Aberdeen and was in the employ of the government 
for three years. He was next with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad as an 
employe in the superintendent's office at Aberdeen for a few years and then removed to 
Driscoll, entering the DriscoU State Bank as bookkeeper. After holding that position for 
one year he was made assistant cashier, in which capacity he also served for a year, but 
since 1914 has been cashier, filling that office with credit to himself and to the entire satis- 
faction of all concerned. The Driscoll State Bank was organized in 1908 with a capital of 
ten thousand dollars and its first officers wei-e George H. Niles, president; S. J. Simonson, 
vice president; and George V. Cunningham, cashier. Mi-. Niles is still the chief executive, 
while the other olTicers at the present time are George V. Cunningham, vice president; and 
•James L. Boucher, cashier. The capital stock has been increased to fifteen thousand dollars 
and there is a surplus of five thousand dollars. A new bank building of stone was erected 
in 1908 and it is modern and up-to-date in its appointments. There are a large number 
of safety deposit boxes and the deposits of the bank now amount to seventy-five thousand 
dollars. The bank takes both checking and saving accounts and business is conducted 
on a safe basis which commends it to the public. 

In addition to his banking business Mr. Boucher has become interested in other enter- 
prises and is now dealing in automobiles, being a distributor for the Chevrolet, Oldsmobile 
and Hudson cars. He is a member of the Catholic church and also of the Knights of 
Ciilumbus lodge at Bismarck. Although still a young man he has already met with excellent 
success in life and today ranks with the leading business men of his community. 



GEORGK IIKXKV .MOKIJ.RING. 

George Henry Moellring, a lawyer practicing at the bar of Ray. Williams county, was 
born near (Juincy, Adams county, Illinois, November 14. 1879. His father, Daniel C. Moellrin", 
whose birth occurred near Hanover. (Jermany. was tliere reared to the age of twenty-five 
years, when in 1859 he crossed the Atlantic and settled in Adams county, Illinois, where he 
carried on farming until his death. It was there that he wedded Christina Peters, a native 



306 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

of Lorraine, France, who in childhood accompanied her parents to New Orleans, Louisiana, 
where she was educated. She also died on the old home place in Adams county, Illinois. 

It was in his native county that George H. Moellring was reared and educated, sup- 
plementing his district school training by study in the Qiaddock College at Quincy. For 
professional training he entered the Highland Park College at Des Moines, Iowa, where 
he pursued his law course and was then admitted to the Iowa bar in 1901. He afterward 
practiced law in Mason City, Iowa, for a year and then came to North Dakota, settling at 
Lano'don, the county seat of Cavalier county, where he remained in active practice from 
1903 until 1905 and during that period homesteaded. In the latter year he removed to 
Ray, where he oi)ened a law office and has since engaged in practice, being now accorded 
a large and important clientage. His knowledge of the principles of jurisprudence is com- 
prehensive and exact and the thoroughness with which he prepares his cases is one of the 
elements of his success. He owns farm lands in North Dakota, beside his residence, and 
business property in Ray. 

On the 2Sth of June, 1905, at Meltonville, Iowa, Mr. Moellring was married to Miss 
Nellie Wiley, who was there born and reared. She is a graduate of the Iowa Normal 
School at Cedar Falls and taught school in that state prior to her marriage. She is a 
'laughter of Harrison and Ellen Wiley, the former a native of New York and the latter of 
Wisconsin, but now residents of Meltonville, where they settled at an early day. Mr. and 
Mrs. Moellring have three children, as follows: Vivian Marceille, who was born October 18, 
1910; Genevieve Leone, whose birth occurred July 1, 1913; and Lela Lorraine, whose natal 
day was November 14, 1915. All were born in Ray. 

Politically Mr. Moellring is a democrat and has been an active worker in the party. 
He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church and is a charter member of the Odd Fellows 
lodge at Ray, of which he has been noble grand and for six years a delegate to the grand 
lodge. He is also a past chancellor commander of the Knights of Pythias lodge at Ray and 
lie has passed all the chairs in the Modern Woodmen camp in Illinois, of which he was a 
member. He is the author if a volume entitled "The Neutral's Portion," a book of wide . 
circulation which he published under the nom de plume of Elwin Lorraine and which deals 
with the problem of the Americans supplying munitions to the warring nations in Europe. 
It is written in the form of a romance but surrounds the question indicated. It was brought 
out by a New York publisher and has already been widely read. It displays marked literary 
talent as well as careful and comprehensive handling of the question discussed. The pub- 
lishers of the book claim for it the distinction that it is the first and only novel at present 
written around the theme that it presents. 



B. .J. SCHOREGGE. 



There is probably no resident of Williston who takes a more active interest in her 
upbuilding and prosperity than B. J. Schoregge, cashier of the Williams County State Bank. 
He is untiring in his efforts to promote the development of the city and never withholds his 
support from any worthy enterprise for the public good. He was born in Mankato, Min- 
nesota, June 6, 1875, a son of John J. and Mary (Lang) Schoregge. His father was a native 
of Germany but was brought to America by his parents in childhood, the family locating in 
Boston, Massachusetts, where he attended the grammar and high schools. Having decided 
to adopt the legal profession, he also attended law school and for a time engaged in practice 
in Boston and later in Olivia, Minnesota, where he located in the early '70s. He died in 
that state in 1913 and his wife is also deceased. She was born, reared and educated in 
Wisconsin. 

B. J. Schoregge passed the days of bis boyhood and youth in Glencoe, McLeod county, 
Minnesota, and is indebted to the schools of that city for the education he acquired. He early 
became identified with the banking business for as a boy he was employed in a bank for 
some time. In 1902 he went to Rolla, North Dakota, and served as cashier of the State Bank 
of Rolla, later holding a similar position in the First State Bank of Balfour, this state. 
In 1904 he became assistant cashier of the First National Bank of Williston, in which capacity 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 307 

lie served until the fall of 1905, when he was promoted to cashier, and filled that position 
until 1909. For a short time he was then connected with the First National Bank of Leeds, 
North Dakota, but in July, 1909, he was appointed dejjuty state bank examiner and entered 
upon the duties of that position, which he filled until August, 1914, when he became vice 
president of the Williams County State Bank at Williston and was later made cashier. In 
that capacity he is still serving and he occupies an enviable position in banking circles of the 
state. 

On the Sth of August, 1909, llr. Schoregge was married in. Williston to Miss Nell Hitt, 
who was born in Saline county, Missouri, and remained there until removing to Williston in 
1906. In that city they have a fine home and Mrs. Schoregge owns farm property in this 
state. He is a member of the Episcopal church and his wife belongs to the Methodist church, 
and both occupy an enviable position in social circles. Fraternally he belongs to Mount 
Moriah Lodge, A. F. & A. M.; Mount Moriah Chapter, R. A. M.; and also to the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen, all of Williston. His political support is given the democratic 
party. 

Mr. Schoregge has an interesting military chapter in his history. Before coming to 
North Dakota he served for eight years in the Minnesota National Guard at Olivia, becoming 
first sergeant of Company H, Third Regiment. At Williston he joined Company E, First North 
Dakota National Guard and was made first lieutenant, being afterward promoted to captain 
of the company, in which capacity he served until the spring of 1913. He was at that time 
appointed deputy state bank examiner and as his duties in that connection kept him upon 
the road he resigned from the company and is now captain of the North Dakota National 
Guard on supernumerai-y list. Outside of his business he is now principally interested in 
advancing the welfare of his adopted city and is everywhere recognized as one of its most 
public-spirited and progressive citizens. 



CHARLES P. CARPENTER. 



Charles P. Carpenter, of Grafton, treasurer of Walsh county, was born March 19, 1881, 
near Forest River, in Grand Forks county. His father, John A. Carpenter, a native of New 
York and a descendant of an old family of that state, came of English ancestry, being a 
grandson of Henry Carpenter, a native of England, who became the founder of the family 
in the new world. His son, James Carpenter, was both a farmer and carpenter, learning 
the trade in early life. He became a pioneer settler of Missouri and on removing to the 
territory of Dakota homesteaded at Forest River, where he resided to the time of his 
death, which occurred in 1908, when he had reached the advanced age of eighty-seven years. 
He was a Civil war veteran, serving with a New York regiment, and ere the close of hos- 
tilities had reached the rank of captain. 

.John A. Carpenter devoted his life to general farming and to the sale of farm imple- 
ments. In the spring of 1879 he removed from central Missouri in a prairie schooner to 
Forest River, North Dakota. He had been reared and educated in the Empire state but 
soon after the close of the war had removed to Missouri. His political allegiance is given 
the republican party and his religious faith is that of the Methodist church. He is now living 
retired from active business and makes his home in California. He married Elizabeth Cook, 
a native of London. England, and a daughter of Philip Cook, who became a resident of 
Illinois when Mrs. Carpenter was but two years of ago. He was afterward numbered among 
the early settlers of Grand Forks county. North Dakota, where he homesteaded alxiut 1879 
and there resided until 191.!. when he removed with his daughter and son-in-law to California, 
where he is now living at the notable age of ninety-six years. His wife passed away at 
Forest River in 1905, at the age of seventy-seven years. It was in Jlissouri that Mr. and 
Mrs. .lohn A. Carpenter were married and to them were born two children, the daughter 
being Nettie, now the wife of Thomas Greene, of Montana. The wife and mother passed 
away December 23, 1913. 

After attending public schools of Forest River. Charles P. Carpenter continued his educa- 
tion in the University of North Dakota. To the age of ten years he remained upon the 



308 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

home farm and wlien twenty-two years of age started out to earn his own living, being first 
employed as a clerk in a general merchandise store at Forest River. He spent two years 
in that connection and in the spring of 1903 entered the office of the treasurer of Walsh 
r'ounty in the position of deputy. In 1913 he was elected county treasurer and received 
endorsement of his first term's service in a reelection in 1914. He has made an excellent 
record in that position, proving a faithful custodian of the public funds, his duties being 
discharged most capably and systematically. 

On the 2d of August, 1905, Mr. Carpenter was married in Grafton to iliss Edna Hamel. 
a native of Minnesota and a daughter of Joseph and Mary (Greenagel) Hamel. They have 
two children: Ralph, born in Grafton, June 24, 1906; and Gordon, Januai-y 14, 1908. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter are members of the First Presbyterian church and Mr. Carpenter 
is also an exemplary representative of the Masonic fi'aternity. He was made a Mason in 
Grafton in 1908 and has been secretary of his lodge for five years and of the Royal Arch 
cliapter for two years, serving in the latter position at the present time. He also has 
i-.iembership with the Jlodern Woodmen of America, the Commercial Club and the Grafton 
Curling Club. Politically he exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and 
measures of the republican party and in its work takes an active and helpful interest, doing 
all in his power to promote its growth and insure its success by reason of his firm belief 
in the principles of the party. He is indeed a public-spirited citizen and one whose efforts 
luT'e boen a potent force in upholding high standards in public service. 



JOHN O. MILSTEN. 



John 0. Milsten is cashier of the First National Bank of Belfield, one of the strong 
financial institutions of Stark county. He was born in Sacred Heart, Minnesota, July 21, 
1881, a son of Lars and Ingeborg (Snelling) Milsten. He entered upon his banking career 
on attaining his majority, at which time be secured a position as bookkeeper in tlie First 
National Bank at Benson, Miiniesota, where he remained for a year. He then returned to 
Sacred Heart and engaged in farming in that locality in connection with his brother, Hernum 
Milsten, being actively identified with agricultural pursuits for about two years. In 1906 
he removed to Belfield and was made cashier of the Belfield State Bank. That bank ^^as 
organized in March, 1906, and capitalized for ten thousand dollars. Its oflScers were: H. R. 
Lyon, president; R. C. Davis, vice president; and Cliarles F. Picker, cashier. Mi\ Lyon was 
succeeded by Ed O'Connor, while Mr. Milsten became cashier. The control was purchased in 
1910 by the Holland-Dakota Land Company, which held it for a little more than a year, 
when R. C. Davis and .J. 0. Milsten became the controlling factors in the institution, follow- 
ing the purchase of the majority of stock. In September, 1909, the bank was reorganizeil, 
becoming a national bank, and the capital stock was increased to twenty-five thousand dol- 
lars. Mr. Milsten continued as cashier, which office he occupied until March, 1911, when he 
sold his interest in that institution. He then joined R. C. Davis and Anton Anderson in 
organizing the Merchants State Bank of Belfield, of which Mr. Davis became the president, 
Mr. Anderson vice president and Mr. Milsten cashier, with C. M. Barton as assistant casliicr. 
In April, 1910, the Merchants State Bank and the First National Bank were consolidated, 
becoming the First National Bank, which is today capitalized for twenty-five thousand dollars 
and has a surjdus of an equal amount. The bank is in excellent condition, their statement 
of September 12, 1916. showing resources amounting to three hundred fifteen thousand and 
forty-two dollars, which shows a marked increase in the business. At the end of the 
first year theii- dejiosits amounted to one hundred and fifty-nine thousand dollars. The bank 
owns its own building and the business is conducted along safe conservative lines that win 
public confidence and support. It makes real estate loans and also handles insurance, while 
its banking methods are most sound. Mr. Milsten is also interested in farm lands in North 
Dakota and Minnesota and is himself farming about six hundred and forty acres. He has 
oi)erated quite extensively^ in land and the real estate dciiartmciit of tlic liaiik is an impor- 
tant one. 

In Slay. 1912, ilr. Milsten was married to Miss .Jennie Belle Wellmaii. of Anoka. Minne- 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 309 

sot.ii, ii ilaiiyliti'i- of A. K. W'L'llmaii, ami lluy have two thihiri'ii, -laiiet May and .Johil 
Wellman. llr. Milsten is a member of the Lutlieran ehureh of Sacred Heart and fraternally 
lie is conni'oted with the Odd Fellows lodge at Belfield and the Elks lodge at Dickinson. In 
politics he is a stalwart republican and served as village treasurer before the town was 
incorporated. He has since been a member of the city council and for ten jears has been 
clerk of the scIkjoI board. He is a member of the ("onimercial Club and is actively and 
liclprnlly interested in everytliing peitaining to tlic ])iiblic welfare. 



FRED R. STEVENS. 



Fred R. Stevens, a member of tin- Ramsey county bar and a resident of Crary, was born 
in Humbird, Wisconsin, on the 9th of July, 1869, a son of Alfred and Frances (Wilder) 
Stevens. The father, a. farmer by occupation, left Wisconsin in 1880 and removed to North 
Dakota, making the journey westward with team and wagon. He homesteaded in Ramsey 
county, after which he engaged successfully in farming for a number of years but is now 
living retired, enjoying a rest which he has truly earned and richly deserves. His wife has 
passed away. 

Fred R. Stevens was educated in the public schools of Wisconsin to the age of sixteen 
years, after which lie joined his parents to North Dakota. They were among the pioneer 
settlers of Ramsey county, so that he early became inured to the hardships, privations and 
experiences of frontier life. He early aided in the arduous task of develoj)ing a now farm 
and later he engaged in farming on his own account until 1896, when he turned his atten- 
tion to the implement business, w'hich he carried on for eight j'ears. He also spent ten 
years in the real estate business and while thus occupied devoted his leisure hours to the 
study of law. He afterward took special law work in the University of North Dakota and 
was admitted to the bar in June, 1914. He has since engaged in active practice and is 
making steady advance along professional lines, for he has already demonstrated his ability 
to cope with intricate and complex legal problems. He also continues active in the real 
estate business. 

On the 7th of October, 1901, Mr. Stevens was united in marriage to Miss Rose Southam 
and to them was born one child, Donovan A. Jlrs. Stevens died July 24, 1903, and on the 
1st of May, I'JOG, Jlr. Stevens wedded Miss Edith Foster. They are members of the Con- 
gregational church and he is a Mason of high rank and belongs to the Mystic Shrine. In 
politics he is a democrat and in the fall of lOlfi was a candidate in Ramsey county for the 
ofiice of states attorney. He is connected with the school board of the Crary School for the 
Deaf and Dumb at Devils Lake and he is interested in many public questions and measures, 
giving active support to various projects that have for their object the welfare and upbuild- 
ing of city, county and state. 



JAMES J. SiUTH. 



•Tames J. Smith, city engineer of Grand Forks, was born in Pakenli.im, Ontario, April 
4, 186.S. and was the second of the six children whose parents were Daniel M. and Mary 
(Mantle) Smith. The father, a native of County Cavan, Ireland, accompanied his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Smith, on their emigration to Canada when a youth of thirteen years, 
the family becoming pioneer residents of Ontario. The grandfather was a trustee of an 
estate in Ireland which was owned by an Englisli bisliop and looked after the private inter- 
ests of the ])relate. Daniel M. Smith became a merchant, nu'cting with fair success in busi- 
ness for about thirty years but during a widespread financial panic he lost much of the 
fortune that he had acquired. About 1884 he removed to JFcPherson county. North Dakota, 
where he engaged in farming throughout his remaining days. He died about 1888, at the 
age of sixty-five years, while his father reached the notable old age of one himdred j-ears, 
passing away in Canada. The mother of .Tames J. Smith Avas born in Canada and was a 



310 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

(laughter of James Mantle, a Canadian ijioueer of Irish birth born in the south of Ireland, 
while the Smith family came from the north of Ireland. Mrs. Daniel M. Smith died in her 
native country about 1873, when thirty-three years of age. 

James J. Smith was educated in the schools of Ontario and of Michigan. When seven- 
teen years of age he started out in life on his own account and for two years engaged in 
teaching in his native country. He was also employed for a similar period in Iosco county, 
Michigan. He next entered the employ of the Seattle & West Coast Railway Company in 
Washington territory, being engaged in preliminary construction work, and in that con- 
nection he became familiar with the profession of civil engineering. He spent seven years in 
railroad work and three years in mining engineering work at Cripple Creek, Colorado. In 
February, 1897, he arrived in Grand Forks, North Dakota, and was employed by W. S. Russell 
in architectural and engineering lines, remaining with him until the fall of 1898, when he 
became a city employe in the capacity of assistant city engineer. In 1900, on the death 
of Aleck Oldham, then city engineer, he was appointed to fill the vacancy and so continued 
until the' spring of 1909. During the succeeding four years he was in Nevada. Oregon and 
California engaged in railroad and mining work. On returning to Grand Forks in 1913 he 
was reappointed city engineer and has continuously occupied the position to the present 
time. In point of length of service and improvement of sewers, paving, water works and 
other large projects he has done more than any of his predecessors in office ajid hence it is 
that his official career has been strongly endorsed. He also had charge of all the big county 
ditches built in Grand Forks county. In previous years lie worked on the Busk-Ivanhoe 
railroad tunnel of Colorado for two years and he has been identified with various important 
engineering projects. At Cripple Creek he surveyed more claims for United States patent 
and did more underground surveying than any other engineer in the Cripple Creek mining 
district during the length of time in whicli he maintained his residence there. His broad 
e.xperiences liave given him comprehensive knowledge concerning the country and its resources. 

At Grand Forks, February 2, 1903, Mr. Smith was married to Miss Mary Taylor, a native 
of Canada. They have become parents of five children: Daniel, Mary Catherine, Emmett, 
Margaret and Bernard. All were born in Grand Forks save the last named, who is a native • 
of Reno, Nevada. 

The family reside at No. 437 Maple street, where Mr. Smith owns a pleasant home. In 
politics he maintains an independent course, voting without regard to the political affiliation 
of the candidates. His religious faith is that of the Roman Catholic church. Fraternally 
he is connected with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and he also has memliership in 
the Municipal Society of Engineers. Experience has been his teacher and under that guidance 
he has mastered valuable lessons which have enabled him to work his way steadily upward in 
a business way. 



JERRY HAYES. 



Jerry Hayes, actively connected with ranching interests in Stark county, his home 
being in Dickinson, was born in Vermont in 18.54. a son of Daniel and Mary Hayes, both of 
whom were of Irish birth and when young came to the United States, settling in the Green 
Mountain state, where their remaining days were passed. The father devoted his life to the 
occupation of farming. 

Jerry Hayes, the third in a family of nine children, was educated in the schools of 
Vermont and was about thirty-four years of age when he came to North Dakota. In the 
meantime he had learned and followed the blacksmith's trade in New England. He arrived 
in the northwest practically penniless, but after working for a brief time at odd jobs he 
established a blacksmith shop and conducted business on his own account for five years. 
In 1887 he was elected sheriff under territorial rule and served for two terms, after which he 
occupied the position for six j'ears following the admission of the state into the Union. He 
was a brave, loyal and fearless officer and retired from the position as he had entered it, 
with the confidence and goodwill of all law-abiding citizens. His service in office is perhaps 
best remembered by his success in capturing two train robbers. The Northern Pacific was 




JKINt'i IIAVKS 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA • 313 

held up at New Salem and the robbers were able to get away with considerable loot. 
Mr. Hayes was notified of the holdup and by special train made his way from Dickinson 
to New Salem. Arriving on the scene of the robbery, he learned everything possible con- 
cerning the affair and his efforts finally resulted in the capture of the pair together with all 
the stolen property. The capture involved much hardship and danger on his part and was 
rewarded by a gift of one thousand dollars from the United States government mail officials. 
He traced the robbers to the Standing Rock Indian reservation, where the capture was made. 
He next went to Alaska, wliere he spent two years prospecting for coal and also engaged in 
frtighting and blacksmithing, making Dawson his headquarters. He did not meet with 
success as a prospector but his efforts in freighting and blacksmithing brought to him a 
considerable sum. In 1899 Mr. Hayes returned to North Dakota and he is now engaged in 
ranching in Stark county, having important interests of that character. He devotes 
considerable attention to the raising of horses and raises on an average four hundred and 
fifty head, which he ships to Europe for war purposes. 

At the age of twenty-two years Mr. Hayes was married in Brandon, Vermont, to 
Miss Bridget Tully, a native of that state and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Tully, who 
spent their entire lives in Vermont. JJ-"'. and Mrs. Haj-es have become the parents of three 
children: Victor and Raymond, who are engaged in ranching and cattle raising in McKenzie 
county: and Mis. Maye Cain whose husband is also a cattleman of McKenzie county. 

At one time Mr. Hayes held the New England record for endurance runs. Fraternally 
he is a Mason and an Odd Fellow. He belongs to lodge, chapter and commandery at Dickinson 
and both he and his wife are connected with the Eastern Star. He also belongs to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and both are connected with the Rebekah degree. In 
politics he has always been a stalwart democrat and is now alderman of the fourth ward in 
Dickinson. He has served as a delegate to the democratic state convention at Grand Forks 
on two different occasions and his opinions carry weight in the councils of his party in North 
Dakota. Arriving empty handed in the northwest, he has steadily worked his way upward 
and through the intervening period his labors have been so intelligently directed and his 
industry has been so unfaltering that he has gained a place among the prosperous and 
representative ranchmen of the northwest. 



SAMUEL ALWIN ZIMMERMAN, M. D. 

Dr. Samuel Alwin Zimmerman, engaged in general practice at Valley City but s[)eeializ- 
ing more and more in surgery and gynecology, has devoted his attention to professional 
labors since 1907, in which year he completed a course in the medical department of North- 
western University at Cliicago. He was born in Elizabeth, Minnesota, July 4, 1ST7, a sou 
of Abraham and Marie Zimmerman, the former a Civil war veteran now living at Blackduck, 
Minnesota. 

Dr. Zimmerman supplemented his public school training by study in the State Normal 
School at St. Cloud, Minnesota, from which he was giaduated with the class of 1897. He 
won his Ph. B. degiee in Hamline University with the class of 1903 and then spent four 
years in preparation for the practice of medicine and surgery as a student in the North- 
western University at Cliicago, being numbered among its alumni of 1907. In the previous 
year he was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha, an honorary fraternity. He at once entered 
upon active practice, to which he has since devoted his time, thought and purpose at Vallev 
City. At his graduation, in a competitive examination for an intcrneship in St. Luke's 
Hospital of Cliicago, he was awarded first place and in his hospital practice ^aiiii'd that 
broad, valuable experience which is never as quickly acquired in any other way as in hospital 
work. From 1909 until 1911 he was county physician of Barnes county and in 1914 was 
elected secretary of the Sheyenne Valley Medical Society, his term of office to continue until 
1917. In 1915 he was made secretary of the county board of health of Barnes county for 
a two years' term. His practice from the beginning has constantly grown in volume and 
importance and he is gradually devoting more and more time to surgery and synecoloey. 
specializing in his reading and in his study along those lines. 



314 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

On the 3d of June, 1908, in Drayton, North Dakota, Dr. Zimmerman was united in 
marriage to Miss Lulu Wylie, a daughter of Joseph M. Wylie. They have one son, Bruce 
Wylie Zimmerman, born July 18, 1913. The parents are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and Dr. Zimmerman holds membership with the Masons and the Knights 
of Pythiiis. His political allegiance is given to the republican party but he has never 
sought nor desired office outside the strict path of his profession, preferring to concentrate 
his energies upon the important duties which devolve upon him in his professional capacity. 
He has ever been most conscientious in the discharge of his duties and holds to the highest 
professional standards. 



LYMAJSr N. GARY. 



Lj-man N. Gary has been a resident of Mandan since 1881 and was formerly engaged in 
the practice of civil engineering but is now concentrating his efl'orts upon the real estate 
business, of which he is a prominent representative. He was born in Hoboken, Kew Jersey, 
May 5, 1856, and comes of English ancestry, the lineage being traced back to .John Gary, 
who left England in the year 1630 and became the founder of the family in the new world. 
His parents, William S. and Phoebe (Northrup) Gary, were natives of New Jersey and there 
spent their entire lives, the father passing away in 1907, after long surviving his wife, who 
died in the year 1864. 

Lyman N. Gary acquired his early education in the schools of liis native state and con- 
tinued his studies at Troy, New York, where he specialized in the civil engineering course in 
the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He left that school in 1874 and entered Golumbia 
College of New York city, in which he took a speical course in civil engineering. In 18S1 he 
arrived in North Dakota and for a time followed his profession, after which he turned his 
attention to the real estate business, in which he has continuously engaged to the present 
time. He knows every phase of the business, is conversant with the property that is upon 
tlie market and is thus able to assist his clients in making judicious purchases and profitable 
sales. He is accorded a liberal patronage in this field of activity and is regarded as a man 
thoroughly reliable as well as enterprising in all that he undertakes. In addition to his 
rea'l estate activity he is identified with various other institutions of Mandan. 

On the 12th of December, 1894, in Mandan, Mr. Gary was married to Miss Anne Alison 
Glark, and this union has been blessed with a daughter and three sons, Ethelind, William S., 
Alison and Colin. Mr. Gary is a Mason, having taken the degrees of the lodge and chap- 
ter and his loyalty to the craft is evidenced in the fidelity with which he adheres to its teach- 
ings concerning mutual helpfulness and brotherly kindness. In politics he is a republican but 
has never been an office seeker. The family belong to the Presbyterian church and Mr. Gary 
is one of the directors of the Mandan hospital. The consensus of public opinion establishes 
his reputation as that of a man who in every relation of life is thoroughly reliable and 
trustworthy. He ranks high in business circles and is esteemed equally well in social rela- 
tions. In a word his sterling traits of character have gained for him the high and enduring 
regard of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



ROBERT McBRIDE. 



Robert McBride, president of the Merchants & Farmers Bank at Cavalier, was born in 
western Ontario, Canada, October 1, 1856, a son of William and Mary (Castle) McBride. The 
father, a native of the north of Irelind, became a resident of Canada when a youth of twelve 
years and was there educated. He wedded Mary Castle, a native of Canada, and for many 
years he was engaged in farming in that country. He passed away there in 1906 at the age 
of eighty years, while his wife died in 1894 at the age of sixty-five years. In their family 
were seven children. John McBride, who was a member of the first constitutional con- 
vention of North Dakota and of the first state senate, passed away at Milton, December 29, 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 315 

I'JIO, having left the impress of his individuality for good upon the development of the 
state. William McBride resides in Niles, Machigan. Mrs. Margaret Muir is a resident of 
Gowanda, New York. Mrs. Jane Turner resides in Courtney, North Dakota. Mrs. Isabelle 
Galbraith i_s a resident of Ontario and James B. McBride is living on the old homestead in 
Canada. 

The other member of the family, Robert jrcBride, was the third in order of birth. In 
his youthful days he attended the Canadian schools, after which he took up the profession 
of teaching, which he followed for several years in Canada and in Pembina and Cavalier 
counties, North Dakota. He was later made deputy county treasurer of Pembina county, 
which position he filled from 1893 until 1899, and was then elected county treasurer, serving 
for the succeeding three years. He removed to Cavalier in 1905 and entered the banking 
business as the organizer and promoter of the Merchants & Farmers Bank, of which he has 
since been the head. 

On the 37th of January, 1893, Mr. McBride was married in Pembina county to Miss 
Madge Scott, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Scott. They have become the parents of 
two children: Dora I., who was born in Pembina in 1S93 and is a graduate of the high 
school of Cavalier and of the State University, in which she completed the arts course, is 
now teaching in the high school at Glen UUen, North Dakota. William Scott, born in 1895, 
■was graduated from the high school of Cavalier and is now a sophomore in the State 
University. 

Fraternally Mr. McBride is well known in Masonic circles and is a member of the 
Eastern Star and of the Masonic Veterans' Association. He also has membership with the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen and the United Order of Foresters. His wife is widely 
known throughout the state in connection with her work in the Eastern Star, of which 
she has been grand matron. She is also very prominent in club circles and is now cor- 
responding secretary of the State Federation of Woman's Clubs of North Dakota. For ten 
years Mr. McBride has been a member of the city council of Cavalier and has exercised his 
official prerogatives in support of various plans and measures for the general good. He 
is a most highly respected citizen of his county. He came to North Dakota in April, 1883, 
and without assistance or help from anyone he has worked his way upward and stands 
very high in public regard and in business circles. 



FRED L. ROQUETTE. 



Fred L. Roquette, president of the Roquette Department Store Company of Dickinson, 
has been closely identified with this enterprise since 1893 and throughout the intervening 
period, covering a quarter of a century, has ranked with the leading merchants of his city, 
his career at all times being actuated by a spirit of enterprise and progress. He was born 
in Fremont. Iowa, .July 31, 1869, a son of Philip and Elizabeth (Mader) Roquette. His 
mother came to North Dakota with her son Fred and passed away in Dickinson in 1901. In 
her family were four children: J. F., F. A. and G. W., all of whom are farmincr near 
Dickinson: and Fred L., who was the third in order of birth. 

Reared and educated in Iowa, Fred L. Roquette first came to North Dakota in 1S91 and 
settled on Crooked creek, thirty miles north of Dickinson, where he engaged in ranching, his 
time being there devoted to cattle raising for ten years. He then disposed of his ranch and 
stock and took up his abode in Dickinson, since which time he has concentrated his efforts 
upon commercial pursuits. The Roquette Department Store was established in 1888 by 
.1. J. Freeman, under the firm style of Freeman & Company. In 1892 the business was 
purchased by Roquette Brothers and at that time only a line of dry goods was handled. 
Their location was on Villard street, between Sims and First avenue. West, where the Green 
drug store now stands. They removed to their present location in 1915. Fred L. Roquette 
purchased the interest of his brother, F. A. Roquette, and incorporated the business under 
the firm style of the F. L. Roquette Company. He has since been president of the company,, 
with W. F. Sommers, of Dickinson, as vice president, and his son, H. L. Roquette, as secre- 
tary and treasurer. At the time of the incorporation they added a stock of queensware and 



316 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

groceries and now have a large department store, carrying a complete and well selected 
line of general merchandise. Mr. Eoquette also owns a branch store at OUie, ilontana, which 
he established in 1916. He is regarded as one of the progressive merchants of the city, 
active and energetic and watchful at all times of opportunities pointing to success. 

On the 16th of May, 1895, Mr. Roquette was married in Dickinson to Miss Mabel V. 
Klinefelter, a native of Bigstone, Minnesota, who, however, became a resident of Dickinson 
prior to her marriage. Thej' have three children: H. L., who is now connected with the 
store; La Verne, who is a second-year student in the Northwestern Conservatory at 
Minneapolis; and Oral Florence, attending the Dickinson high school. 

Ml-. Roquette is a chapter Mason, while his son, H. L., belongs to the blue lodge. The 
father is also identified with the EUcs at Dickinson. In politics he is a democrat and in 
1910 was elected to represent his district in the state legislature. For six years he has 
been a member of the city council of Dickinson, ever exercising his official prerogatives ifl 
support of the measures that he believes will benefit the city and uphold in any way its 
civic standards. His lias been a well spent life fruitful of good results. 



COLONEL J. M. PATCH. 



Colonel J. M. Patch, one of the best known pioneers of Eddy county, residing at New 
Rockford, was born in Summit county, Ohio, near Akron, May 6, 1840, a son of Horace D. 
and Cynthia A. (Cliapman) Patch, both of whom were natives of New York. After their 
marriage they removed to Ohio, where the father engaged in merchandising until 1844. when 
he went with his family to Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, and there entered upon the practice 
of law, having previously been admitted to the bar. He became an active factor in public 
affairs in Wisconsin during the formative period in the state's history and was a member 
of the convention that framed the constitution of the state, while subsequently he served 
<is a member of the state legislature. During his first term in the general assembly he 
framed and became the stalwart champion of a bill which was to be drafted into the con- 
elitution, giving the wife equal rights in her husband's property. He was ridiculed for this, 
however, and the bill was defeated. The following term he stood for reelection, was returned 
to tlie legislature and during his second term made such a strenuous fight for the bill timt 
he succeeded in having the measure adopted. A historian of Wisconsin speaks of him as 
one of the "fathers of the state." It is well known that his influence was a potent factor 
in shaping the public interests of Wisconsin in a large measure and in laying broad and 
deep the foundation upon which has been built much of the present progress and prosperity 
of the state. He was a member of the National Guard in Ohio and on the outbreak of the 
Civil war immediately raised a company which became Company C of the Sixteenth Wis- 
consin Infantry. He was elected its captain, went to the front and at Pittsburg Landing 
sustained wounds from wihch he died two or three weeks later at Shiloh. where he had 
been taken with his regiment. 

Colonel Patch, whose name introduces this record, was educated in the high school at 
Beaver Dam, \\'isconsin, and had prepared to enter the State University at the time when 
the Civil war broke out. His plans were then changed, however, for he immediately enlisted 
at the first call for troops, becoming a member of Company A, Second Wisconsin Infantry 
Regiment, with which he took part in the battle of Bull Run. He was subsequently promoted 
to the rank of first sergeant and he served for two years and nine months, being honorably 
discharged in February, 1864. He had been wounded at the battle of Fredericksburg and 
was confined in the hospital at Alexandria, Virginia, after which he was sent home on a 
furlough and later was honorably discharged. On reaching Wisconsin he found that his 
mother had been obliged to mortgage her home, upon which there rested an indebtedness 
of eighteen hundred dollars. Colonel Patch returned to the front and met Colonel 0. B. 
Knowles of the Twenty-first Pennsylvania Cavalry, whom he told that he wished to act 
as sutler for his regiment, explaining that it was his purpose, if possible, to raise the 
money to pay off the mortgage on his mother's home. He met the regiment in front of 
Petersburg and was installed as sutler. He had no money, but his purpose, becoming 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 317 

known, secured him all the goods that he wanted on credit, and two months later he was 
able to send his mother two thousand dollars to pay off the mortgage. During the following 
few montlis prior to the close of the war he sent his mother twelve thousand dollars in 
government bonds. 

Following the close of hostilities Colonel Patch went to Owatonna, Minnesota, in October, 
1S66, and there was associated with others in the manufacture of farm machinery and 
broadcast seeders. Eventually he sold his interest in that business and for five or six years 
was identified with the sale of machinery. Later he engaged in scientific farming and in 
that connection lost heavily owing to successive crop failures. In May, 1883, he arrived in 
North Dakota and settled on a homestead two and one-half miles north of the present city 
of Xew Rofkford. He at once began the arduous task of breaking the prairie and proved 
up on his land. That fall the railroad was built in the county and New Rockford was 
laid out, after which Colonel Patch took up his abode in the town and erected a hotel 
building which he opened for business on the last day of January, 1884. He then success- 
fully conducted that hostelry until it was destroyed by fire on the 1st of September, 1892." 
Since then he has given his attention to the supervision of his property interests, for as 
the years went on he made judicious investments and is now the owner of valuable farm 
lands in his section of the state. 

In 1867 Colonel Patch was united in marriage to Miss Gertrude L. Hough, of Lowville, 
New York, by whom he had five children, three of whom survive, namely: May H., the wife 
of .John A. Rush, of Minneapolis, Minnesota; Gertrude M., who gave her hand in marriage 
to Martin L. Maddox, of Cincinnati, Ohio; and Harriet D., the wife of John A. La Rue, of 
Indianapolis, Indiana. In 1893 Colonel Patch removed to Indianapolis, Indiana, where he 
resided for twenty years. His wife passed away there in 1901, and his mother in 1908, 
at the notable old age of ninety-six years. While he made his home in Indianapolis through 
two decades, much of his time throughout that entire period was passed in New Rockford, 
where his property interests were located, and when the two decades had passed he returned 
ti) make his home in Eddy county. 

In politics Colonel Patch is a democrat and in 1890 was elected to the North Dakota 
state senate, the only representative of his party ever sent to the senate from this district. 
Fraternally he is connected with Century Lodge, No. 60, F. & A. M. His has been an active, 
upright and honorable life actuated by a spirit of progress in business, by loyalty in citizenship 
and by fidelity in friendships, and his genuine worth has made him honored and respected 
wherever he is known. 



JOSEPH C. SUTER, M. D. 



Dr. .Joseph C. Suter, engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in Grafton, where 
he has remained since 1907, was born in Lanark county, Canada, October 5, 1864, a son of 
Thomas and Isabelle (Calvert) Suter, both of whom were natives of Ireland and in early 
life became residents of Canada. There the father took up the occupation of farming, 
which he carefully, systematically and profitably followed. In later life he removed to 
North Dakota and spent his last days in the home of his son .Joseph in Grafton, passing 
away in 1901, at the age of seventy-five. His widow survived until 1907 and died in 
Grafton at the age of seventy-seven years. 

Dr. Suter was the third in order of birth in a family of five children. In early life he 
attended the Canadian schools, after which he took up the profession of teaching in Ontario 
and still later entered Queens College. Ho also studied at Trinity College in Toronto, 
pursuing the medical course which won him his professional degree in 1891. The same year he 
located for practice at Crystal, North Dakota, where he remained for sixteen years, and in the 
latter part of 1907 he removed to Grafton, where he has since engaged in practice, meeting 
witli notable success. His patronage is now large and the importance of his practice is 
widely acknowledged. He has done post graduate work in both Chicago and Xew York and 
he belongs to the AValsh County, the North Dakota State and the American Medical Associa- 



318 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

tions, thus keeping in touch with the trend of modern thought and scientific investigation 
bearing upon the practice of medicine and surgery. 

On the 3d of July, 1895, in Ontario, Canada, Dr. Suter was married to Miss Carrie B. 
Smith, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Smith, the latter now deceased, while the former 
is yet living at Perth, Ontario. Dr. and Mrs. Suter have three children: Isabelle, who was 
bom at Crystal, North Dakota, in 1897 was graduated from the high school, while at the 
present time she is attending the State University; Evelyn, who was born at Crystal in 
1903 and is now a high school pupil at Grafton; and Joy, who was born in Crystal in 1906 
and is a junior in the high school. 

The family have an attractive home in Grafton, in addition to which Mr. Suter owns 
and cultivates farm lands in his section of the state. Whatever success he has achieved 
is attributable entirely to his own eflforts. He has worked his way upward through sheer 
force of character and ability and in his vocabulary there has been no such word as fail. 
He is connected with various fraternities, being a Chapter Mason, an Odd Fellow, a Knight 
of Pythias, a Forester and a Modern Woodman of America. His political endorsement is 
given to the republican party and he lends active aid in all matters of progressive citizenship 
but allows nothing to interfere with the faithful and conscientious performance of his 
professional duties. 



CARL ERICKSON. 



Carl Erickson, the present efficient sheriff of Williams county, now living in Williston, 
was born December 37, 1870, on a farm three miles southeast of Osage in Mitchell county, 
Iowa, and is a son of Claus and .Julia (Inglebritson) Erickson, both natives of Christiansand, 
Norway. There the father worked as a lumber jack after his education was completed until 
he came to the new world at the age of twenty-four years. After spending a year and a 
half at 'Wliitewater, Wisconsin, he removed to Mitchell county, Iowa, and purchased land 
near Osage, where he engaged in farming until 1898, which year witnessed his arrival in 
Moody county. South Dakota. There he is still engaged in agricultural pursuits. Not long 
after coming to America he sent for his sweetheart back in Norway and they were married 
in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She died on the home farm near Osage, Iowa. 

Carl Erickson attended the district schools near his boyhood home and remained with 
his father until twenty-one years of age, early becoming familiar with the work of the 
farm. After leaving the parental roof he was emploj'ed as a farm hand near Osage until 
March 1, 1896. when he went to Ledyard, Kossuth county, Iowa, and purchased a quarter 
section of land, on which he engaged in farming on his own account for six years. On 
selling that place he removed to Williams county, North Dakota, June 26, 1902, and 
secured a homestead near Spring Brook, where he farmed until entering upon the duties of 
sheriff, being elected to that office November S, 1912. He then rented his farm and removed 
to Williston. He was reelected sheriff in 1914 but cannot fill the office more than two terms, 
after which he intends to return to his farm, which is one of the largest and best in 
Williams county, comprising seven hundred and twenty acres near Spring Brook. He has 
been an auctioneer for many years and has operated threshing machines for the past 
twenty-seven years. 

At Osage, Iowa, November 16, 1S93, Mr. Erickson was united in marriage to Miss 
Martha Larson, who was born at Holland near Christiansand, Norway, where she spent the 
first fifteen years of her life, and then lived in Christiansand for six years. At the end of 
that time she came to the United States, joining a brother in Osage, Iowa. Her mother is 
still living in Christiansand, Norway, at the advanced age of ninety-six years. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Erickson have been born six children, namely: Clifford B., who was born in Osage, Iowa, 
and died at the age of eighteen months; Lloyd, who was bom in Ledyard, Iowa, in 1896, and 
was accidentally killed at Spring Brook, North Dakota, September 12, 1913; Katie B., born 
in Ledyard, Iowa, in 1S9S: Melvin, born in the same place. 1901; Charles, born in Ledyard in 
November, 1902 ; and Howard, born in Spring Brook, North Dakota, September 7, 1906. 

In politics Mr. Erickson is a socialist and is one of two socialists elected to the oflSce of 




CARL KRICKSnX 



r 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 321 

sherifl' in the United States in 1912. He has served as school director both at Ledyard, Iowa, 
and Spring Brook, North Dakota, and assisted in organizing Spring Brook township, wiiere 
his farm is located. It is one of the best improved places of the locality and upon it he is 
extensively engaged in raising registered stock, making a specialty of Percheron horses, 
Poland China hogs and Hereford cattle. In religious faith he is a Lutheran. He has a host 
of warm friends throughout the county and is affectionately known as Sod Buster Erickson 
or Carl Erickson, the Sod Buster. He is widely and favorably known and has the confidence 
and high regard of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



GILBERT C. GUNDERSON. 



Gilbert C. Gunderson, the woU Uiiouii ;uid ]i()|>ul:ir cashier of the Scandinavian-American 
Bank at Alexander, North Dakota, was born on the 1st of June, 1887, in Ridgeway, Winne- 
shiek county, Iowa, and is a son of Evan and Elise (Hovden) Gunderson, also natives of that 
county. In 1888 the family removed to Rugby, North Dakota, and the father is -still engaged 
in farming in Pierce county, where he and his wife reside. 

In that locality Gilbert C. Gunderson grew to manhood, and his early education, acquired 
in the district schools of Pierce county, was supplemented by a three years' course at the 
University of North Dakota. On starting out in life for himself he engaged in general mer- 
chandising, handling bankrupt stocks in various parts of the state, and for three years 
he served as assistant cashier of the Merchants Bank of Rugby. In May, 1913, he was 
appointed chief clerk in the office of the state treasurer at Bismarck and filled that position 
for one year. It was on the 10th of March, 1914, that he was elected cashier of the Scandi- 
navian-American Bank at Alexander, McKenzie county, and has since served in that capacity 
with credit to liimself and to the entire satisfaction of all concerned. He is also secretary 
and treasurer of the Gunder Olson Grain Company, owning and operating elevators at Alex- 
ander and Rawson, and is vice president of the First State Bank of Killdeer, Dunn county, 
North Dakota, of which his brother is cashier. Besides the enterprises already mentioned 
Mr. Gunderson is largely interested in farming and in all his undertakings he is meeting with 
well merited success. 

Since attaining his majority he has alBliated with the republican party. Fraternally 
Mr. Gunderson is prominently identified with a number of organizations. He is a charter 
member of Yellowstone Lodge, No. 110, A. F. & A. M., of Alexander, of which he has served 
as secretary, and he was also secretary of the Masonic lodge at Rugby. He belongs to 
Damascus Chapter, R. A. M., of Rugby; Loraine Commandery, K. T., of Bottineau; Kern 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine and the York Rite bodies at Grand Forks. He is also a member 
of the Knights of Pythias lodge at Bismarck; the Elks lodge. No. 1214, at Williston; and 
the Odd Fellows lodge at Alexander. In business affairs he has steadily prospered until he 
has become one of the substantial men of his community as well as one of its representative 
citizens. 



OLAF M. MUUS. 



Olaf M. Muus, proprietor of a store at White Earth, was born in Toten, Norway, April 
23, 1876, and is a brother of Enair Muus of Minot, in connection with whose sketch on 
another page of this work mention is made of the family. His education was acquired 
in the common schools of his native country and through the period of his boyhood and 
youth he was more or less actively engaged in farm work. He had reached the age of 
twenty when in 1896 he came to the new world, making his way to Minot. There he 
secured employment as a section hand on the Great Northern Railroad and later went 
to Concordia College at Moorhead, Minnesota, through the winter months, realizing the 
need of further education and its value as a force in business life. In the summer he would 
return to North Dakota and engage in laying steel for the new branch road of the Great 



322 HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

Northern. AA'ben winter came again he would resume his studies and through his own 
efforts he jjrovided for the expenses of liis college course. He entered commercial circles 
as clerk in the general store of Lee Larson at Minot. In 1901 he removed to White Earth 
Mountrail county, to establish a general store for Julius Fauchold of Jlinot and he continued 
as its manager and also bought out the lumberyard at White Earth, which he conducted 
until 1905. He then sold that business and opened the general store which is now conducted 
under the name of the Olaf M. Muns Company. He has the largest trade of the town and the 
enterprise has proven successful from the beginning, for his business methods measure up 
to high commeicial and modern standards. He also had a dry goods and clothing store 
at Jloorhead, Minnesota, which he conducted for four years while carrying on business at 
White Earth but eventually sold his Minnesota establishment and now concentrates his 
entire energies upon the business at ^Miite Earth. In addition to his other activities he 
is vice president of the First State Bank of Wliite Earth. 

On the 39th of August, 1900, at Minot, North Dakota, Mr. Muus was united in marriage 
to his Norway sweetheart. Miss Helga Lundby, a native of Toten, Norway, and a daughter 
of Ole and Helena Lundby, who were also born in that country and still reside there, the 
father being- a country storekeeper. Mrs. Muus crossed the Atlantic to the United States in 
1897, making her way first to Chicago, Illinois, and subsequently to Minot, North Dakota, 
where she was married. Mr. and Mrs. JIuus now have three children, namely: Jalmer, 
who was born at White Earth, North Dakota, on the 12th of July, 1901; Harold, born at 
White Earth, May 9, 1905; and Meyer, whose birth occurred at Wliite Earth on the 18th 
of October, 1909. 

Politically Mr. iluus is a republican and has been active in community affairs, serving as 
president of the village council and also as one of the county commissioners of Mountrail 
county. He is now president of the school board. In religious faith he is connected with 
the Lutheran church and is very active in its work, serving as one of its trustees and 
doing all in his power to further its cause. His wife is also active in the church and has 
been president of the Ladies Aid Society, of which she is now secretary. Mr. Muus is a 
charter member of White Earth Lodge, F. & A. M., of which he is now senior warden, and 
he belongs to Fargo Lodge, No. 260, B. P, 0. E. Mr. Muus is an entei prising citizen, 
thoroughly progressive in his methods. He started out as a section hand but ambition 
prompted him to attend school in the winter while working on the railroad in the summer. 
Step by step he has advanced and is now one of the prosperous and leading merchants of 
Mountrail county — an excellent example of what can be accomplished when ambition and 
enterprise point out the way. His life record should serve to inspire and encourage others 
and is an example well worthy of emulation. 



GEOKGE McCULLOUGH WILLIAMSON, M, D, 

Dr. George McCullough Williamson, devoting his time, thought and energies to the 
practice of medicine and surgery, his efforts being attended with excellent results, was 
born in Picton, Ontario, Canada, May 21, 1867, a son- of Robert Williamson and a gi-andson 
of Richard Williamson, who became the founder of the family in America. He was a native 
of Ireland and there remained until after the birth of Robert Williamson, whose natal 
year was 1830. It was in 1835 that the grandparents crossed the Atlantic, settling in 
Prince Edward county, Ontario. Robert Williamson became a successful agiiculturist there, 
spending his entire life in Prince Edward county, his labors being terminated in death in 
1888, when he was fifty-eight years of age. In political affairs he was active and filled 
various offices, giving his support to the conservative party. His wife, who bore the 
maiden name of Rachel Jane Carr, is a native of Canada and a daughter of Peter and 
Mary Ann (Smith) Carr, who were pioneer settlers of Prince Edward county, the Carr 
family having come from Scotland, while in the maternal line Mrs. Williamson is of 
Hanoverian stock. She is still living and is now making her home with her son. Dr. 
George M. Williamson, in Grand Forks, being now in the eighty-second year of her age, 
her birth having occurred August 25, 1835. She became the mother of eight children. 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 323 

])r. Williamson, who was the sixth in order of birth, acquired his early education in 
the public schools of Picton and afterward attended the Pieton Collegiate Institute, from 
which he was gi'aduated in 1887. He afterward taught school for a period of five years 
in Prince Edward county and brought the institution of which he had charge up to a high 
rank. In the fall of 1890 he removed to Winnipeg and entered the Jlanitoba Medical 
Cdllegc. a department of the University of JIanitoba, from which he was graduated in 1S95 
with the degree of M. D., C. M. He later removed to Ardoch, North Dakota, and became 
associated in practice with I>i-. John Jlontgoincry, wliich partnership existed for two years. 
In 1897 he bought out his partner and continued successfully in practice alone until 1906 
when he went abroad for post graduate work in Edinburgh, Scotland, attending there the 
Royal College of Physicians & Surgeons. On completing his studies he took the examination of 
the Royal College of Physicians & Surgeons, Edinburgh, and the Faculty of Physicians & 
Surgeons, (flasgow, the examination being known as the triple qualification, and received 
the degrees of h. R. C. P. & S., Edinburgh, and L. F. P. & S., Glasgow. Later he entered 
upon special work at London, England, and remained for some months devoting his 
time to the study of diseases of children in the Hospital for Sick Cliildren, Great Ormonde 
street. After completing this work he went to Dublin, Ireland, where he entered the 
celebrated Rotunda Hospital and took up the special study of obstretrics and gynecology. 
Thus splendidly qualified by broad training for important professional duties, he returned 
to the United States, settling at Grand Forks, North Dakota, w-here he entered into partner- 
ship with Drs. H. M. ^Vlieeler and R. D. Campbell. Since that time he has been continuously 
engaged in practice, making a specialty of obstetrics and the diseases of children, in which 
lines he displays eminent ability and skill. His studies have covered a wide range and have 
been most thoroughly conducted under the direction of some of the most eminent phj'sicians 
of the new and old world. He is now surgeon for the Great Northern Railway Company and 
the Northern Pacific Railway Company and is examiner for many old line insurance com- 
panies. Dr. Williamson has always been active in promoting the interests of his profession. 
He is a charter member of the Grand Forks District Medical Society and was its second 
president. He is active in the work of the state association, at this writing — in 1916 — 
occupying the office of vice president of the North Dakota State Medical Society. He was 
largely instrumental in securing the . passage of the present state medical practice act 
and is at present a member of the state board of medical examiners, being secretary and 
executive oflfieer of the board. The present high standing of the examinations conducted 
by this board is chiefly due to his efforts, which have been recognized by the Federation of 
State Medical Examining Boards — a national organization — in his appointments to important 
committees in this body. He enjoys the confidence and goodwill of the profession throughout 
the state and counts his medical friends by the hundreds. 

In Minneapolis, Minnesota, on the 2d of November, 1898, Dr. Williamson was married 
to Miss Emma A. Holstrom, a native of Minnesota and a daughter of Peter Holstrom. Dr. 
and Mrs. Williamson own an attractive residence at No. 860 Belmont street, which is in the 
finest residence district of the city. Mrs. Williamson belongs to the exclusive Franklin 
CTub and is also prominent and active in charitable organizations. She is a member of the 
Presbyterian church and is a social favorite, but with all of her activities she is first of 
all a home maker, her interests centering at her own fireside. 

Dr. Williamson is a prominent Mason. He joined the order in Prince Edward Lodge, 
No. 18, G. R. C, at Picton, Ontario, his application being before the lodge three days after his 
twenty-first birthday. He is a member of Corinthian Cliapter, No. 3, R. A. M., and St. 
Aldemar Cumuiandcry, No. 3, K. T., of Grand Forks. He is also a member of Kem 
Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., while in the Scottish Rite he has taken the foiirteenth degree, 
being a member of the Carmel Lodge of Perfection. In civic organizations he is active, 
being a director in the Grand Forks Commercial Club and the Associated Charities. In the 
latter he is very active in promoting its organization and is deeply interested in all work that 
tends to make men better. He belongs to the Curling and Golf Clubs. Of the former 
he was the organizer and introduced the game to the Grand Forks public. He is one of the 
directors of the North Dakota Curling Association, of which he is the president. He finds 
his chief diversion through that sport, which affords him needed rest and recreation. After 
spending his early youth upon the home farm to the age of seventeen years he started out in 



324 HISTORY OF XORTH DAKOTA 

the world independently, worked his own way through the university and by reason of 
his inherent force of character and the development of his native talents he has gained 
a position among the eminent physicians and surgeons of his adopted state. 



WILLIAM R. JAav. 



William K. Jack, proprietor of the Jack Monumental Works and thus actively con- 
nected with industrial interests of Grand Forks, was born in Alcona county, Michigan, October 
8, 1872, a son of George and Margaret (Scarlett) Jack, the former a native of Scotland and 
the latter of Gray county, Ontario, Canada. When in his first year George Jack was taken 
to Canada by his parents, Mr. and ]\tis. William Jack, and the former there engaged in 
farming at an early day, continuing his residence in that country until his death. George 
Jack was reared, educated and married in Ontario and afterward removed to Alcona county, 
Jlichigan, where he engaged in farming, becoming one of the first settlers of that locality. 
He is still living at the age of sixty-six years but his wife died when their son William was 
but four years of age, passing away while on a visit in Gray county, Ontario. They had three 
children, one of whom is now deceased, while George S., the brother of William R. Jack, now 
resides at Minot, North Dakota. 

In early life William R. Jack attended the public schools of Michigan and after putting 
aside his textbooks engaged in lumbering and in surveying. At the age of twenty years he 
removed from IMichigan to Ada, Minnesota, and there resided for several years, taking up 
liis abode in Crookston in 1896. There he became a salesman in connection with a marble 
house and was upon the road for two and a half years. From 1898 until 1903 he was 
identified with that business at Crookston, being connected with important interests in that 
line, and in 1904 he established a similar entei-prise of his own. In 1907 he removed to Grand 
Forks, North Dakota, and erected a modem business block, in which he opened a roller 
skating rink and also established marble works, which in the intervening period have grown 
to large proportions. He still owns this building and still conducts the rink as well as his 
monument works. 

On the 1st of September, 1899, Mr. Jack was united in marriage to Miss Alvina May 
Kresia, of Emerson, Manitoba, a daughter of Carl and Marie Kresia, who were residents of 
Manitoba and are now deceased. The daughters of the household are: Hazel Mildred, whose 
birth occurred at CYookston, April 1, 1905, and who is now attending the graded schools of 
Grand Forks; Myrtle Rose, who was born in Cavalier, February 28, 1895, and is a high school 
and college graduate; and Olive, who was born at Emerson, Manitoba, May 10, 1901, and is 
now attending school. 

In politics Mr. Jack is independent, voting according to the dictates of his judgment 
and not by reason of party ties. Fraternally he is connected with the Yeomen. As the 
architect of his own fortunes he has builded wisely and well, developing interests of 
importance, which return to him a substantial measure of prosperity and which constitute 
important features in the business activity of Grand Forks. 



ERNEST R. BROWNSON. 



Ernest R. Brownson, actively engaged in the real estate business in Williston, was born 
in Otsego, Allegan county. Michigan, May 3, 1870, his parents being Alfred and Adelaide 
M. (McRay) Brownson. The father was a native of Williston, Vermont, and was but four 
years of age when his parents removed with then- family to Michigan. The gi-andfather, 
.Toel Brownson, was also born in the Green Mountain state and there remained until after 
his marriage, devoting his time to farming and shoemaking. In early manhood, however, 
he determined to try his fortime in the west and with his wife and children crossed Lake 
Qiamplain and Lake George, proceeded by boat down the canal and also en route was a 
passenger over the third railroad built in the United States. From the end of the rail route 




WILLIAM R. JACK 



HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 327 

Ik- jMococded overland by wagon to Michigan and finally arrived at Wayland, a small 
si'ttlcnicnt midway between Kalamazoo and Grand Rapids. There he bought government 
land in the heart of the wilderness and cleared it of timber. He cut down the trees 
with which to build a log cabin and gradually cleared the land, making it ready for 
the plow. Thereon he continued to engage in farming until 1867, when he sold that place. 
He then resided with his son, Alfred, at Otsego, until he moved to Macon, Jlissourl, to 
li\e with his daughter, Mrs. Evelyn Gage. There he died at the age of eighty-six years. 

His son, Alfred Brownson, was reared in the Michigan wilderness upon his father's farm 
near \Vayland. He received a common school education and subsequently taught for a 
number of years during the winters, while the summer months, were devoted to farming. 
In early manliood he married and settled upon a farm about eight miles from Plainwell, 
Michigan, remaining there for about five years. At the end of that time practically all his 
household cfl'ects were destroyed by fire and he purchased a one hundred and sixty acre tract 
near Otsego, iMichigan, where he carried on general farming until 1883. He then decided 
to go west and after disposing of his Michigan property came to Dakota territory, making a 
part of the journey by wagon. He homesteaded in Dickey county, within four miles of 
Cakes, although the town had not been established at that time and his place was forty 
miles from a railroad. Upon the farm which he there developed he reared his family 
and witnessed the entire growth and upbuilding of the district. At length he sold out 
and spent his time with his son in Williston for several years but eventually removed to 
Helena. Montana, where he passed away in 1908, at the age of seventy-six years, his remains 
being interred in the Odd Fellows cemetery in that city. His wife was born near Tecumseh, 
Michigan, and in early womanhood taught school in that state. Her death occurred in 
Williston, Xorth Dakota, when she had reached the age of seventy-six years. She was a 
daughter of Oliver and Sallie (Ferris) McRay, the former a pioneer woodsman and farmer 
of Michigan who lived for a time at Tecumseh. that state, and afterward made an overland 
trip to Plainwell, Michigan, settling first on a farm eight miles from town and later on one 
two miles out. After retiring from farm life he went to Canon City, Colorado, where his 
sons had located some years before. He passed away there at a ripe old age. His wife 
died on the old home place while they were preparing to go west and was laid to rest 
in the village cemetery at Otsego, Michigan. Ernest R. Brownson was reared on the old 
homestead farm near Otsego, Michigan, and attended the district schools to the age of 
fourteen years, when he joined his parents at Oakes, Dickey county. North Dakota. He 
continued his education in the district schools there, in the Oakes high school, in Macalester 
College at St. Paul, Minnesota, and in the North Dakota Normal School at Valley City. 
He was graduated from the last named in 1897 and soon afterward was elected superintendent 
of schools at Williston. At that time there were but three rooms in the school and the 
town had a population of two hundred and sixty. With marked enthusiasm and energy 
he began the upbuilding of the educational interests of the town and laid the foundation 
for future development along that line. 'When he closed his school work in Williston six 
years later there were ten rooms in the school and it was during his tenure of office 
that the modern Central school building was erected. In 1903 he was called to larger fields 
of efl'ort by election to the oflice of county superintendent of schools for Williams county, 
which position he occupied for two years, being elected on the democratic ticket though the 
county was overwhelmingly republican. During this period he reorganized the county school 
districts. At the time he took charge there were four districts and thirty schools. By 
redistricting and in other ways he succeeded in placing the schools upon a modern basis, 
resulting in excellent work. While superintendent of schools in 1903 he became interested in 
the land business and he was also appointed United States commissioner. At one time 
he liuniesteaded in Mountrail county, near the town of White Earth, and after proving 
up on that property sold it. He now devotes his entire attention to his land and loan business 
in Williston and to farming and ranching on a large scale. He has eighteen hundred acres 
of ranch land, on which he raises shorthorn cattle, and is also engaged in the cultivation of 
grain. He likewise owns considerable town property. 

On the 27th of December. 1S98, Mr. Brownson was married to Miss Frances Ada Williams 
at White Earth, North Dakota. She was born in Saxeville, Wisconsin, a daughter of 
Miner S. and Eleanor (Ocain) Williams, with whom she came to North Dakota in her 



328 ■ HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 

girlhood, the family home being established near Hurricane Lake, Pierce county, where the 
father engaged in farming. Mrs. Brownson attended the district schools of Pierce county 
and the Valley City Normal School. She afterward became a teacher in Williston and 
here became the wife of Mr. Brownson, whose acquaintance she had formed while both 
were stiulents in the Valley City Normal. Mr. and Mrs. Brownson have one child, Ada 
Claire, who was born in Williston, March 33, 1900, and is now a junior in the high school. 

Mr. Brownson gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and in community 
affairs he takes a deep interest. For nine years he served as clerk of the school board and 
has been president of the library board of Williston for the past five years. He served as 
a member of the board of regents for four years under appointment by Governor Burke. He 
is a stanch advocate of temperance principles and has always abstained from the use of all 
intoxicants. Both he and his wife are active members of the Congregational church and 
for thirteen consecutive years he was superintendent of the Sundaj' school. His wife is a 
helpful member of the Ladies Aid Society and does her full share in other church activities. 
In 1905 she became a charter member of the Book & Thimble Club of Williston and she is 
well known in literary circles of the city. Mi-. Brownson is a charter member of the Modern 
Woodmen camp and the Modern Brotherhood of America, both of Williston, and belongs also 
to the Masonic order. He has always chosen those things which make for better citizenship 
and higher standards of manhood. He has worked for interests whose object has been the 
upbuilding of the community and he has labored untiringly to advance all those interests 
which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride. His fellow townsmen speak of him in 
terms of warm regard, recognizing the worth of his character. 



FRANK D. WOODWORTH. 



Frank T>. Woodworth. a well known real estate dealer of Driscoll, is a native of 
Wisconsin, his birth occurring in Kenosha, August 2, 1854. He is a representative of an old 
colonial family of English origin, which was founded in Massachusetts in 1631, and his 
ancestors participated in the Revolutionary war and also in the War of 1813. His parents, 
Elias and Helen M. (Van Wie) Woodworth, were born in the Empire state but in early life 
removed to Wisconsin, where they were married. Subsequently they became residents of 
Minnesota and from that state came to North Dakota in 1882. For twelve years they made 
their home in Walsh county, after which they returned to Minnesota, where the mother 
died in January, 1905, and the father on the 17th of March, 1907. 

At the age of ten years Frank D. Woodworth was taken by his parents to