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Full text of "Northwest Books"

016.810 156 1522017 




This Volume is for 
REFERENCE USE ONLY 






REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE 
ON BOOKS OF THE INLAND EMPIRE 
COUNCIL OF TEACHERS OF ENGLISH, 

1942 

REVIEW OF OVER 1 100 BOOKS 
SELECTED MAGAZINE BIBLIOGRAPHY 



Who are the Northwest 

What are the Northwest books? 

What books are recommended for 

schools, libraries and the general public? 




DY THE PACIFIC 

Binfords & Mort, Publishers, Portland, Ore. 



COPYRIGHT, 1942, BY BINFORDS & MORT 



Printed in the United States of America by Metropolitan Press 



IN EXPLANATION^ 

What is Northwest Books? 

This is the second edition of Northwest Books. As it first appeared in 
1933 it was a mimeographed booklet of some seventy pages, sponsored 
by the Inland Empire Council of Teachers of English under the general 
direction of Dr. H. G. Merriam, head of the English Department, Mon 
tana State University. The encouraging reception accorded this brief 
bibliography and the requests for an extensive revision account for the 
present work, which, owing to many additions, constitutes practically a 
new collection. To the summaries in the former edition, many new ones 
have been added, in many cases two or more for each book; also the 
material has been brought down to 1941, with selected magazine lists 
and other new features. 

Why is a second edition advisable? 

The Pacific Northwest is becoming conscious not only of its resources 
in minerals, oil, wheat, and water power, but of its literary products. 
Each of the four states represented has its own small but active group of 
writers, some of whom have already won national recognition. In 1935 
H. L. Davis's Honey in the Horn won the Harper prize for fiction; in 
*939 Vardis Fisher's Children of God received similar recognition; in 
1940 Mrs. Riasanovsky's (Nina Federova) Family was declared winner 
of the Atlantic Monthly prize. Surely a fine record. Contributors like 
Ernest Haycox or Ethel Romig Fuller (to mention only two) are 
known to an increasing number of magazine readers. To stimulate such 
appreciation Northwest Books stands dedicated. But one must be on 
guard against easy optimism. A large proportion of Northwest writing 
continues to remain on the level of pulp magazines. The home-boy- 
makes-good attitude still blinds many to genuine literary values. A liter 
ary product should be commended only to the degree that its quality 
warrants; otherwise regionalism sinks to the level of sectionalism. Our 
critic readers have been asked to keep this fact in mind when evaluating ' 
books. 

What is the scope of Northwest Books? 

This edition is chiefly a reference volume of Northwest authors, not 
necessarily of Northwest writing. The single exception to this statement 
is the selected list of books about the Northwest. Such restriction should 
mean something to Northwest publishers as well as to Northwest 
authors. Then, too, Northwest Books is chiefly a literary bibliography. 
Text books and those specializing in non-literary fields are, for the most 
part, excluded. 

How was Northwest Books prepared? 

The general editor chose four state chairmen, who, in turn, selected four 
groups of critic readers, numbering from fifteen to forty-eight members. 
These reviewers not only represented diverse interests, such as teaching, 

3,* I'^O .':' APR 101950 



,>i|t, resided in diverse localities. Each reviewei 
* was asted to : reatf seVeriFKocSks and send in brief summaries, with recom 
mendations er dijf erent levels of reading interest. After checking these 
reports, the i$i4chairman sent on this mass of material to the genera 
editor, whose* duty* it was to arrange it for publication. The state chair 
men were likewise responsible for the additional book and library list 
indicated in the table of contents. 

What should the reader keep in mind? 

This is a collaborative effort and, as such, is certain to be uneven ir 
quality. Books will be left out which perhaps should have been included 
others included which, doubtless, should have been passed by. The editor 
in consequence, welcomes suggestions looking toward future improve 
ments. For he hopes that in a few years a third edition may be called for 
This whole project is a labor of love on the part of a few enthusiast 
who believe in the Northwest and in the value of its literary products 
In a reference of this nature, where much of the typing and collatini 
must be left to N.Y.A. students, numerous errors creep in. It is, how 
ever, hoped that their count has been kept down to a reasonable number 
In the contributions of Oregon and Washington, omissions will be espe 
dally noticeable. These two states are the most productive in the North 
west, and a complete representation of their literary work has at thi: 
time been impossible. 

Whom should the editor thank? 

This is the most pleasant duty of the whole project and yet one of th< 
most difficult, since there are more than a hundred individuals conoerne< 
directly or indirectly with Northwest Books. Bulking largely is a con 
siderable group of publishers who have been most considerate in thei 
gift or loan of books for review purposes. Among this list are the regiona 
publishers, The C ax ton Printers of Caldwell, Idaho, and Bin fords am 
Mori of Portland, Oregon. 

The state chairmen (identified in a following list) come next in re 
ward of merit. All have been splendidly cooperative, spending generousl; 
from their own purses in the purchase of incidentals, and, in addition, 
what is far more important giving abundantly of time and energy* 

A similar word of thanks goes to the many critic readers some o 
whom, in an effort to hasten this project, have reviewed far and abov 
their quota of books. Special recognition also goes to Miss Kathleei 
Campbell, Montana State University librarian, who has furnished book 
for the critic readers, and to Miss Katherine White, reference librarian 
who has given unstintingly of her time in checking lists and making valu 
able suggestions. Mrs. Vande Bogart of Havre and Mr. Alexande 
Leggat of Butte have likewise offered timely help. Dr. Merriam has ii 
numerous ways sought to lighten the load of work both by helpful conn 
sel and by granting to the editor as much free time as he could from 
heavily crowded schedule. RUFUS A. COLEMAN. 



NOTES 

1. In the book summaries after the author's name appear his state and whether 
he belongs to that state by birth, former residence, or present residence. Then 
follow the title of the book, the name of the publisher, and the date of first 
publication. In some instances, where the death of the author is substantiated, 
the word "deceased" appears after the name. 

2. A book that is not recommended generally carries its lack of recommendation 
in the unfavorable criticism; a book that is recommended carries a definite 
statement. Recommendation is designated by "rec". Other abbreviations are 
generally self-explanatory, such as "Jr. H." for junior high school; "Sr. H." 
for senior high school; "Jr. C." for junior college; "Sr. C." for senior college; 
"Gen. R." for general reader and "Sp. R." for special reader. Cross references 
are indicated when two or more authors or editors are responsible for a book. 

3. The comment reveals whether or not the book is one of essays, verse, fiction, 
or drama. 

4. In the list of titles grouped according to locale only those books which empha 
size setting or which give some information about locality are included. Some 
of these books are historical in nature, presenting a locale which, though no 
longer existing, carries with it both an interest and a historical value. 

5. The selected author-title list of representative magazine contribution is in 
tended merely as a tentative effort. The prefatory note heading the list indi 
cates its purpose sufficiently. 

6. The list of public and private libraries is another new feature, which should 
be extended if a later edition of Northwest Books is ever called for. This is 
especially true regarding private libraries. In many instances owners were too; 
modest. Some did not reply to our letter of inquiry. Additional names with 
descriptions of the owners' libraries should be sent to the editor. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS First Edition 1933 



General Editor: DR. H. G. MERRIAM 

Montana State University 



Idaho Committee; 
Chairman : 
Critic-Readers : 



Miss Agnes Mae Brown, Coeur d 1 Alene 
Mrs. Robert Elder, Coeur d' Alene 
Mr. E. R. Erickson, Idaho Falls 
Mrs. J. V. Hawkins, Coeur d* Alene 
Miss Mildred Laney, Coeur d' Alene 
Miss Mary Marshall, Coeur d' Alene 
Mrs. J. L. McClear, Coeur d' Alene 
Miss Lena V. Moulthrop, Emmett 
Mrs. W. K. Stacy, Coeur d' Alene 
Mr. George C. Young, Coeur d' Alene 

Montana Committee; 

Chairman: Mrs. Edith M. Duncan, Alberton 



Critic-Readers : 



Oregon Committee; 
Chairmen : 

Critic-Readers : 



Miss Mary Brennan, Savage 

Mrs. S. D. Black, Dillon 

Judge L. J. Calloway, Helena 

Mrs. C. H. Clapp, Missoula 

Mrs. Grace Stone Coates, Martinsdale 

Dr. Rufus A. Coleman, Missoula 

Miss Harriette E. Cushinan, Bozeman 

Professor 'Bert Hansen, Bozeman 

Miss Mary Meek, Billings 

Dr. Emmanuel E. Sternheim, Butte 

Mr. Laurence L. Pratt, Portland 
Miss Frances B. Huston, Portland 
Mr. Verne Bright, Beaverton 
Miss Ruth Hall, Portland 
Mrs. Mabel Holmes Parsons, Portland 
Miss Ruth Pringle, Portland 

Washington Committee: 

Chairman: Miss Susannah McMurphy, Tacoma 

Critic-Readers: Miss Katherine A. Bailey, Seattle 
Miss Clio Blair, Seattle 
Mr. E. H. Butler, Tacoma 
Miss Miriam E. Cole, Seattle 
Miss Carlotta Collins, Spokane 
Miss Isabel Cooper, Tacoma 
Miss Bernice Dahl, Seattle 
Miss Evelyn Dahlgreen, Orting 
Miss lone Grundrod, Seattle 
Miss Harriet R, Johnstone, Seattle 
Miss Christine McRae, Spokane 
Mr. Earl A. Pfaff, Seattle 
Miss L. L, Tucker, Seattle 
Miss Anna Tuell, Seattle 



NORTHWEST BOOKS Second Edition 1941 



General Editor: DR. RUFUS A, COLEMAN 

Montana State University 
Idaho Committee: 

Chairman: 

Critic-Readers : 



Montana Committee: 
Chairmen : 

Critic-Readers : 



Miss Agnes Mae Brown, Coeur d 3 Alene 

Miss C. E. Alison, Coeur d' Alene 

Mrs. John I. Aram, Lewiston 

Miss Florence H. Bailey, Boise 

Miss Lorene Bixby, Pocatello 

Miss Agnes Mae Brown, Coeur d' Alene 

Miss Frances Cope, Coeur d' Alene 

Mrs. Gertrude Dittemore, Coeur d' Alene 

Mrs. Robert H. Elder, Coeur d' Alene 

Mrs. E. H. Fraser, Coeur d* Alene 

Miss Harriett J. Frizelle, Coeur d' Alene 

Mr. C. R. Galloway, Pocatello 

Mrs. Ardie G. Gustafson, Lewiston 

Professor Ada Y. Hatch, Boise 

Mrs. J. V. Hawkins, Coeur d' Alene 

Dr. M. I. Higgens, Coeur d' Alene 

Mr. George C. Hobson, Boise 

Dr. Charlton G. Laird, Pocatello 

Miss Elsie McMillin, Coeur d* Alene 

Miss Minnie Mitchell, Coeur d' Alene 

Mrs. R. E. Olsen, Coeur d* Alene 

Mrs. W. A. Olson, Coeur d' Alene 

Miss Agnes Peterson, Moscow 

Mrs. W. M. Stacy, Coeur d' Alene 

Miss Grace Wicks, Pocatello 

Mr. George C. Young, Coeur d' Alene 

Mrs. C. F. Biehl, Missoula 

Mrs. Charles Buls, Missoula 

Dr. E. E. Bennett, Missoula 

Mrs. C. F. Biehl, Missoula 

Professor Henry Jason Bolles, Boxeman 

Miss Mary E. Brennan, Missoula 

Mrs. Charles Buls, Missoula 

Miss Loretta Buss, Dillon 

Judge L. J. Calloway, Helena 

Mrs. Mary Brennan Clapp, Missoula 

Mrs. Lena Quails Clarke, Missoula 

Mrs. Grace Stone Coates, Martinsdale 

Dr. Rufus A. Coleman, Missoula 

Mrs. Neal F. Dpubleday, Missoula (formerly) 

Miss Ruth A. Eismann, Havre 

Miss Nina M. Ford, Missoula 

Professor E. L. Freeman, Missoula 

Miss Margaret Fulmer, Billings 

Mr. Alphin Gould, Great Falls 

Miss Margaret Gould, Great Falls 

Professor Bert B. Hansen, Bozeman 

Miss Bess Van B. Hanson, Superior 

Miss Ruth Harris, Missoula 

Dr. Baxter Hathaway, Missoula 

Miss Dorothy Huston, Billings 

Mrs. H. G. Merriam, Missoula 



Oregon Committee; 
Chairman: 
Critic-Readers: 



Dr. H. G. Merriam, Missoula 
Professor Ralph A. Micken, Butte 
Dr. Lucia Mirrielees, Missoula 
Mrs. Guy Piatt, Butte 
Miss Eleanor Ropes, Helena 
Miss Dorothy F. Rusk, Butte 
Miss Virginia Sanders, Billings 
Professor Walter Scott, Butte 
Miss Gladys Sibbert, Billings 
Miss Virginia Smith, Missoula 
Miss Anne Sussex, Havre 
Mrs. L. F, Sussex, Havre 
Mr. R. T. Struckman, Great Falls 
Miss Evelyn Swant, Missoula 
Mrs. G. H. Vande Bogart, Havre 
Miss Emma L. Williamson, Butte 

Miss Elizabeth Findly, Eugene 

Dean Eric W. Allen, Eugene 

Mrs. Sally Allen, Eugene 

Miss Byrna Barrett, Eugene 

Miss Josephine Baumgartner, Salem 

Mr. R. F. Baxter, Bend 

Mrs. Mirpah Blair, Salem 

Dr. V. V. Boyer, Eugene 

Mrs. Ruth Burgh, Salem 

Dr. V. L. 0. Chittick, Portland 

Mr. Howard McKinley Corning, Portland 

Mrs. Dora Costello, Corvallis 

Miss Faye Crawford, Bend 

Miss Katherine Dunlop, Eugene 

Mr. Chester Anders Fee, Eugene 

Mr. Oliver Thoburn Field, Eugene 

Dr. Andrew Fish, Eugene 

Miss Loretta Fisher, Corvallis 

Mrs. Robert C. Hall, Eugene 

Mr. G. 0. Haugen, Eugene 

Miss Ada Hastings Hedges, Portland 

Dr. Robert D. Horn, Eugene 

Miss Katherine Hughes, Corvallis 

Mr. J. G. Jones, Bend 

Miss Mary E. Kent, Eugene 

Miss Constance Lewis, Eugene 

Mr. R. V. Mills, Eugene 

Professor E. G. Moll, Eugene 

Miss Thelma Neaville, Eugene 

Mrs. Margaret Otto, Eugene 

Mrs. Mabel Holmes Parsons, Multnomah 

Mr. J. Hugh Pruett, Eugene 

Miss Bernice Rise, Eugene 

Miss Hendrine Rozendal, Corvallis 

Professor Edwin A. Sanders, Newburg 

Miss Ethel R, Sawyer, Eugene 

Mrs. L, K. Shumaker, Eugene 

Professor L. K. Shumaker, Eugene 

Miss Mildred Steinmetz, Portland 

Mrs. James C. Stovall, Eugene 

Dr. Albert R. Sweetser, Eugene 



JVIiss M!argaret Taylor, Salem 
Professor Oeorge TTurnbull, Eugene 
Mrs. Dorothy Vincent, Eugene 
Miss Pauline Walton, Eugene 
Miss Harriett \Varner, Corvallis 
Mr. "Willis C. Warren, Eugene 
Miss Doris Winters, Eugene 
Dr. I-. O, Wright, Eugene 

Washington Gom-mittee; 

Chairmen: Miss Sarah A. Roberts, Seattle 

Professor O. B. Sperlin, Seattle 

Critic-Readers: Miss Dorothy Alvord, Bellingham 
Miss Delia Baker, Seattle 
Mrs. Clara Nye Busby, Colfax 
Mr. E, H. Butler, Xacoma 
Mr. Charles E. Canup, Spokane 
Miss Emma E. Clarke, Spokane 
Miss MCabel CoflEman, Bellingham 
Professor Dorothy Dakin, Pullman 
Miss Xx>is Ov^in, Aberdeen 
Mrs. Pearl F. Hallett, Bellinghana 
Mr. Joseph Hazard, Seattle 
Dr. P. J. Jackson, Walla Walla 
Miss Velerie Massard, Seattle 
Miss Sara A. Roberts, Seattle 
Professor O. B. Sperlin, Seattle 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PART I 

PAGE 



1. Author List -----.-. 

2. Title Index ......... 232 

3. Special Indexes ...... --251 

(a) Title index according to locale 

Idaho - - - - - - - - 251 

Montana - - - - - - . 251 

Oregon ........ 252 

Washington - ..... . 254 

Pacific Northwest including Alaska - - 256 

The Southwest including California - - 256 
United States: East, Middle West, South, Island 

Possessions - - - - - - 257 

Foreign countries ..... - 357 

(b) Author index according to residence 

Idaho ----.-. 259 

Montana ----... 259 

Oregon - ....... 260 

Washington ...... 262 

PART II 

Special lists of books relating to the Northwest not entered 
in Part I. 

1. Selected author-title list of magazine or periodical contribu 

tions by Northwest authors ..... 266 

2. Selected descriptive list of books about the Northwest by 

non-native or non-resident authors - 347 

Selected descriptive list of important public and private libraries 

of the Northwest ...... 35! 



NORTHWEST BOOKS Part 1 

"There is no frigate like a book 
To take us leagues away." 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 

ABBOTT, EDWARD CHARLES (Montana; fr. res.): 

We Pointed Them North; Farrar and Rinehart, Inc., 1939 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen, Gr. 
Gen R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. We Pointed Them North is a vivid portrayal of the Montana of 
limitless ranges, of cattleman and cowboy. The book is valuable for the very 
real picture it gives of early days in Montana. Miss Smith has given us the 
story in Teddy Blue's own colorful language. 

2. Good, salty memoirs of "Teddy Blue" Abbott in the central Montana 
cattle country from 1884 to 1939. He trailed herds of Texas cattle up from 
San Antonio early. Illustrations by Ross Santee, and some photographs. 

3. Abbott told his story to Helena Huntington Smith, who recorded it 
in his own words. There is no better account of cowboy life, but it is too 
frank for use in schools, although colleges should have copies of it. 

4. About cattle in early Montana and bringing them up from Texas, 
also about early stock associations, Granville Stewart and his family. Remi 
niscences mostly, told with sincerity. Seems absolutely genuine nothing in it 
that does not ring true. 

ABBOTT, NEWTON CARL (Montana; pr. res.): 

Montana in the Making; Gazette Printing Co., Billings, Mont., 1931 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Written primarily to interest students and adults in the history 
of the state of Montana, this book gives the reader a view of Montana from 
its early beginnings down to the present time. Its information is authentic. 
Many illustrations. 

2. A history of Montana designed for use in the schools, from the sev 
enth grade up, supplied with maps and effective illustrations, and with ques 
tions for thought and study and projects and problems. A valuable book for 
the family library. 
ADAMS, LETO ZOE (Washington; pr. res.): 

Island of the Red God; Rand McNally Co., 1939 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Americans living on a lonely, rough fox island. The heroine 
slides down a cliff. The hero rescues her. Then hires himself to her family, 
but is capable of going away from whatever he should be doing, and make 
whatever he does make sense. The island of the Red God is near. He visits 
it and gets what he went to Alaska for and gets away just before the island 
is destroyed by an earthquake. Geography, science, pirates help make an inter 
esting story. 

2. A story of the lives of people who inhabit the island west of Alaska 
and try to operate four farms. It is well written. Has suspense, animation, 
probability. It also gives something of the mysterious, the intangible that 
seems to surround Alaska. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 



ADAMS, LET A 2OE (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Mirror Murder; Phoenix Press (New York), 1937 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: An interesting mystery story of the murder variety. It is well written, 
has plenty of suspense until the very end. Characters are well drawn, plot 
worked out in excellent fashion, and story moves along in smooth well-de 
signed cadences. 
ALEXANDER, CHARLES (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Robbie, A Great Collie; Dodd, Mead and Co., 1926 
Rec. Jr. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: An imaginative, but conservative, reconstruction of a marvelous hom 
ing feat performed by a lost dog who made his way three thousand miles 
to find his master. Clearly written and worth reading, though without good 
style. 
ALEXANDER, CHARLES (Oregon; fr. res.): 

The Fang in the Forest; Dodd, Mead and Co., 1923 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: The story of a huge dog that went atavistic, becoming wolf, in the 
Yachats Country of Oregon. Conflict and animal savagery in the forest, re 
lieved by the wolf-dog's innate love for, and faithfulness to, any man who 
will give him a ghost of a chance. 
ALEXANDER, CHARLES (Oregon; fr. res.): 

The Splendid Summits; Dodd, Mead and Co., 1925 
Rec. No 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. Adventure in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon. The incidents 
and characters are so false that the book has only the value of very light 
entertainment. The prose is somewhat brittle and unpleasant. 

2. While this book is in the so-called popular class, the characterization 
is distinctive and well above the average, and the style is a uniquely cultured 
medium. As a story, it hardly achieves its possibilities. Deserves attention. 
ALLEN, EDWARD WEBER (Washington; pr. res.): 

North Pacific; Professional and Technical Press, New York, 1937 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The subject matter is the journey to, the industries in, and the 
interrelations among the countries bordering the North Pacific Rim* The 
problems are stated as the author sees them, on one trip around. The book 
should help preserve peace. It is good narrative with excellent pictures, 

2. A thread of narrative binds these thirty-five chapters together, but 
their primary purposes are descriptive, political economics. Mr. Allen writes 
very entertainingly; his view-point is very critical, and he offers many 
constructive suggestions. He has had abundant opportunities to know Alaska 
first hand. 
ALLEN, ELEANOR (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Seeds of Earth; Binfords and Mort, 1933 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Comment: i. Lyrics of faith in the bravery of youth, in seeds that, may 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 17 

grow into "gray birch trees that sway against the rough kiss of the winds" 
or jostle "one another in the warm, deep soil." Here is a poignant sense of 
beauty to be found in the joy of living and in the sensuous charm of its 
symbols and features, as presented by a poet of fine perception and gifted 
expression. Among the poems the following are especially memorable: 
"October Hymn", "Landscape", "Night", "Springtime" (series of four son 
nets), and "The Little Pool". 

2. This is a collection of verse treating largely of nature themes that are 
handled objectively and written in the freer forms. A number of songs in 
traditional patterns, over which the poet has a better command both emo 
tionally and rhythmically, are also included. The imagery is not striking 
nor always direct, yet the verse though slight has a certain vitality, sim 
plicity and sincerity that lift it above mediocrity. The poet expresses an 
eager awareness of the world of sense and a strong realization of beauty 
brightly if not significantly. The poetry is colorful, lyrical and joyous and 
should appeal to young readers. 

^ 3. Eleanor Allen is a gifted and different sort of poet. Seeds of Earth, 
like her own reflected personality, has distinguished freshness upon it cleanly 
sprung from delicate and elusive springs that are also deeply fired and as 
natural in lyrical utterance as shadow that speaks wistfully to bright winds. 
Miss Allen's is unique and sincere song. 
ALLRED, A. HARVEY (Idaho; pr. res.): 

A Leaf in Review; The C ax ton Printers, Ltd., 1933 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen, Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This seemed to be a Mormon treatise and as such was too 
deep for me. I feel incompetent to probe God's plans and question others* 
authority to do the same. The book was abtruse and dull. 

2. A book on Mormonism sincerely putting forth what the author really 
believes through teachings of the Mormon religion and teachings of Joseph 
Smith written by a man with plural wives. Imagine Mormons are only ones 
who will read and believe. 
ANDERSON, ADA WOODRUFF (Washington; pr. res.): 

Heart of the Red Firs; Little, Brown and Co., 1908 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Setting, Puget Sound forest country. Atmosphere and color of the 
region well achieved, and for this reason of some value for persons of this 
locality. Story fairly interesting, but not strong. Treatment of characters 
amateurish. 
ANDERSON, ADA WOODRUFF (Washington; pr. res.): 

Rim .of the Desert; Little, Brown and Co., 1915 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Setting is desert lands of Columbia River basin, Washington, and 
Puget Sound. Metropolitan atmosphere of Seattle sadly exaggerated for that 
period. Characterizations lack distinction. Plot mediocre. Value lies entirely 
in vivid reproduction of the local scene. 
ANDERSON, ADA WOODRUFF (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Strain of White; Little, Brown and Co., 1909 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: A romantic novel portraying the struggle of an unusually attractive 
and intelligent half -breed ^ Indian (Yakima) girl experienced in her attempt 
to follow her inherent desire to be white, and yet remain loyal to her Indian 
ancestry. The reader learns not only how she courageously faced life, and 
how unfair the whites were in their treatment of the Indians and how 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 



treacherous they were, but also it contains much of interest concerning his 
torical persons, places and events and a good picture of conditions in the 
Pacific Northwest in the fifties. 
ANDERSON, C. ABRAHAM (Idaho; deceased): 

Trails of Early Idaho; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1940 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Written from material supplied by the veteran himself before 
his death. In the life of George W, Goodhart, who came to the Boise Valley 
in 1860, is to be found the very earliest history of the white man's experience 
in what was then the unorganized territory of the old Oregon Country. 

2. On the basis of talks with Mr. Anderson before his death, I should 
expect that this book would be principally useful as a document and as 
source material. It will probably contain, also, considerable historical com 
mentary, for which the author had only modest qualifications. 
ANDERSON, EVA GREENSLIT (Washington; pr. res.): 

A Child's Story of Washington; The University Publishing Co., 

(Chicago), 1938 
Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Jr. H. 7,8,9 

Comment; i. Stories from the history of the State of Washington, tpld very 
briefly, sketchily. There are a few inaccuracies and several statements are 
misleading. The style is adequate but not appealing to children. The illustra 
tions have good ideas, but the ideas are not always effectively "put over." 

2. An excellent child's history of basic facts concerning the earliest and 
latest periods of the state. Simply written, has a definite appeal to children. 
ANDERSON, EVA GREENSLIT (Washington; pr. res.): 

Dog Team Doctor; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1940 
Rec. Sr. T. n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. An interesting account of the actual experiences of Dr. Romig, 
for a long time a missionary physician near the Yukon River Valley. The 
material taken from reliable sources presents a series of incidents rather 
than a long connected story. Much valuable authentic information on life on 
the frozen tundra is given here. 

2. Interestingly written, valuable picture of primitive life. Dr. Joseph 
Rornig, a medical missionary, becomes a "Yung-cha-wista," "great spirit" to 
the natives. So much is well told in these three hundred pages that most 
readers want to know more about the "most widely known man in Alaska," 

3. This life-story, made from Dr. Romig's diaries, is extremely well 
written, with many thrills and much good humor. This missionary doctor 
represents the best that the white race has done for the natives of Alaska. 

ANDERSON, FLORENCE BENNETT (MRS. L. F. ANDERSON) (Wash- 

ington; pr. res.) : 

A Grandfather for Benjamin Franklin; Meador Publishing Co., 1940 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men. Women 
Sp. R. 

Comment: i. The historical story of Nantucket from first to last is faith 

fully set down. Most interesting is the personal story of Peter Folger, Benja 

min Franklin's grandfather, who set the pace on Nantucket and was gen* 

erally as great a man as was his grandson. 

2. A detailed, historical, documental account of the settling of Nan- 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 19 

tucket in early colonial days, and of the life of Peter Folger, who was 
Benjamin Franklin's maternal grandfather. Chiefly for the historically- 
minded who are interested in the history of Nantucket or the neighboring 
colonies in the lyth century. 

ANDERSON, FLORENCE BENNETT (MRS. L. F. ANDERSON) (Wash 
ington; pr. res.) : 

Through the Hawse- Hole; The Macmillan Co., 1932 
Rec. 

Gen. R. Men. Women Sp. R. 

Comment: The true story of Seth Pinkham, a Nantucket whaling captain 
in the first half of the nineteenth century. It is a documented period-study, 
nostalgic and sentimental, in a style restrained and not without charm. It 
has a delicate flavor of cultured New England, not of blood and thunder on 
the quarterdeck. 
ANDREWS, CLARENCE LEROY (Washington; fr. res.) : 

The Eskimo and his Reindeer in Alaska; The C ax ton Printers, Ltd., 

1939 

Rec. Sr. H. xo, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, women 

Comment: i. The style is not particularly literary. The material is of prac 
tical use and human interest. The glimpse into this part of our country is 
revealing and refreshing. 

2. The subject is the Eskimo of Northwest Alaska reindeer breeding 
there. We have a clear idea of the nature an dthe needs of the people, what 
friendly humans they are, what problems they have and how they solve them. 
Carefully compiled. The student of composition can get fine points on de 
veloping a topic, and beginning and ending a paragraph. Pictures fine. 
Vocabulary picturesque. 

ANDREWS, CLARENCE LEROY (Washington; fr. res.) : 
The Story of Alaska; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1938 

Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. 
Sr. H. 12 

Comment: i. This is an excellent history of Alaska from its discovery to 
the present It is of the story-textbook variety. It is excellently written by 
one who knows. It also contains expository material concerning the resources 
of Alaska leading into future possibilities. "Alaska has room for millions." 
2. A well written, well illustrated history of Alaska, with a valuable 
summary^ of the Territory today and its future possibilities. The author 
knows his subject, first through long and varied service in Alaska, and 
second, through long and fruitful study. 

ARCHIBALD, NORMAN (Washington; pr res.). 

Heaven High, Hell Deep; Albert and Charles Boni, Inc., 1935 
Rec. Sr. H. xx, xa 
Jr. C. Fr, Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: x. The author relates his experiences as an American aviator in 
France, telling of his capture, life in German prisons, and the Armistice. 
He presents a vivid portrayal of war in the air and shows the patriotic 
courage of the flier as well as the degradation of war and the feeling of 
futility when peace comes. 

a. Having flown in the first American aviation group in France, this 
World War lieutenant tells of his thrilling yet horror-filled experiences in 
the Air Corps. Of questionable literary value, the book is lifted from medi 
ocrity by its pulse-stirring situations and fast-moving narrative. 



20 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

ARNOLD, B. ROSS and ARNOLD, ELTA M. (Idaho; pr. res.) : 

Outlines of the Constitution of the United States, of the State of 
Idaho, and of History of Idaho; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1928 

Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr, C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Jr. H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, 11, 12. Sp. R, 

Comment: The culmination of many years' practical work in the schools, 
condensed to aid the pupil to meet the present requirements of the Idaho 
State Course of Study. 
ARNOLD, B. ROSS (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Indian Wars of Idaho; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1932 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. All important military operations concerning the Indian wars 
fought in Idaho are here graphically described in the telling of one of the 
most thrilling chapters in the history of the Pacific Northwest. 

2. History clearly told ; gives readers a good idea of the different Indian 
wars, their location in the state, and the characteristics of the different 
tribes. Interestingly written ; the stones of the heroes are dramatically told ; 
the one of Bayfoot is outstanding. Very valuable to students. 

3. Records five leading campaigns of federal troops against Indians of 
Idaho, with many vivid pictures of Indian life, and characters, also glimpses 
of early life of Northwest pioneers. Style and handling of material better 
adapted to use as reference than textbook. Illustrations excellent, but his 
torical map hard to follow. 

ASHTON, JAMES M. (Washington; pr. res.): 

Ice-Bound; G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1928 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: A Tacoma lawyer recounts his experiences on a trading vessel in 
the Siberian Arctic. In addition to adventures he describes the Chug-Chees, 
Deerman, and Eskimos, as well as Russians and other white men found 
there. Fairly well written. 
ATWATER, MARY MEIGS, Editor (Montana; pr. res.): 

Guild, 1925 

A Book of Patterns for Weaving by John Landes; Shuttle-Craft 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 
Sp. R. 

Comment: i. After many months of painstaking research work The John 
Landes Book was given to the weaving world. The original in the Pennsyl 
vania Museum is one of pictures only. It remained for Mrs, Atwater to 
supply drafts and weaving instructions of her own to make available these 
beautiful, original patterns a priceless contribution to weaving. 

2. A careful piece of research work in which the author took a group 
of pictures and drawings from the Pennsylvania Museum and made them 
usable to modern weavers. The original drawings were the work of John 
Landes, an itinerant weaver, who used them to get orders for his coverlets, 
etc. 
ATWATER, MARY MEIGS, Editor (Montana; pr. res.): 

The Shuttle-Craft Book of American Hand-Weaving; Macmillan 

Co., 1928 

Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Gen. R. Men, Women, Sp. R. 

Comment: i. A textbook on the art of hand-weaving, a carefully prepared 
account of, its American History, and a deeply felt exposition of its influence 
and values. It is the most widely used text on the subject, but it is a great 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 21 

deal more than that. Interesting to anybody who cares for hand-weaving. 

2. The Shuttle-Craft Book of American Hand-Weaving was the first to 
give clear and concise directions for weaving so that the amateur could set 
up a loom and produce a creditable material. It presents many patterns, and 
a comprehensive history of hand weaving in the United States, Alluring, 
informative, it appeals to anyone interested in American ARTS and 
CRAFTS. 

ATWATER, MARY ME1GS (Montana, pr. res.) : 

The Shuttle-Craft Guild Recipe Book; Mary M. Meigs (Private) 

Rec. Jr. Sen. Gr.; Sr. C. 

Men, Women; Gen. R. 
Sp. R. 

Comment: i. A collection of recipes, most of them original with the author, 
to guide hand-weavers in making specified articles. It is of great value to 
the hand-weaver, especially in a school, but of little general reading interest. 
2. The Recipe Book is unique in that it is the only one of its kind and is 
just what its name implies a collection of choice recipes for weaving of 
Mrs. Atwater's own, together with those of many other sources a veritable 
treasure-trove which one interested in weaving can ill afford to be without. 

ATWATER, MONTGOMERY M. (Montana, pr. res.) : 
Flaming Forest; Little, Brown, 1941 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: i. Chiefly interesting as a description of fire-fighting as carried 
on by the U. S. Fosestry Service. It describes clearly and well the organiza 
tion of the Forest Service for fire-fighting and discipline, the technique of 
fire-fighting and various types of fires. A thread of fiction holds the book 
together and adds excitement and suspense. 

2. Definite human appeal to young readers who know the West, 
because of the boy Hank. Informational to those who do not understand 
Forest Service. The literary quality is not distinguished, but the story is 
well plotted and character inter-action interesting. Good gift book for recre 
ational reading for boys and girls in Junior High. Locale: three rivers 
district of Montana. 

ATWATER, MONTGOMERY M. (Montana, pr. res.): 
Government Hunter; Macmillan, 1940 

Rec. Gr. 4, 5, 6 
Jr.H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, u, 12 

Comment: i. The adventures of a young "dude" working with a govern 
ment hunter of predatory animals. There is plenty of excitement, and a good 
description of the workings of one of the less widely known government 
services. A good book for boys of eight to fourteen. 

2. Well-written story for boys of activities of government varmint- 
hunter, and fire fighters. Gangsters are somewhat dragged in by their ears, 
but right triumphs in the end. Nice feeling for the country, wooded and 
burned-over. 

ATWOOD, REV. A. (Oregon, fr. res.) : 

The Conquerors; Jennings & Graham, Tacoma, 1907 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 

Comment: A history of the American discovery and development of the 
Oregon country with major emphasis on the work of the missions. Jason 
Lee's life and work are outstanding in the history. It provides interesting 
and informative reading. 



22 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

AUSTIN, MARGOT (Oregon, pr. res.): 

Moxie and Hanty and Bunty; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1939 

Rec. Pre-school 
Gr. i, 2, 3 

Comment: i. Introducing the three children whose names are in the title, 
and whose little adventures form the gist of the book. The author has illus 
trated it with gay humorous drawings, quite in key with the wholesome 
simplicity and charm of the story, 

2. Delightful adventures of three small children in their every-day exper 
iences with their cat, Sox, and their dog, Jerry. Taken from the author's 
childhood and illustrated by her. 
AUSTIN, MARGOT (Oregon, pr. res.): 

Once Upon a Springtime; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1940 
Rec. Pre-school 

Gr, i, 2, 3 

Comment: i. Further adventures of Moxie, Hanty and Bunty and their pets, 
in which they acquire a rabbit, some guinea pigs, a goat, and some kids. 
They hunt Easter eggs, build homes for their new pets, and have many 
ordinary experiences which are told and illustrated delightfully. 

2. A perfectly charming story for little folks, about an Oregon farm and 
the amusing family of children who live on it. It is delightfully illustrated 
with quaint and droll pictures of the children and their animal pets. 
AUSTIN, MARGOT (Oregon, pr. res.): 

Tumble Bear; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1940 
Rec. Gr. i, 2, 3 

Comment: Tumble Bear has a holiday at the seashore but finds that he can't 
swim or even wade. Then he finds two children who let him use their pink 
water wings and then he can swim. Charming pictures by the author and 
delightful story. 
AXTEL, HELEN (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Lost Valley; Binfords and Mort, 1939 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: A collection of verse descriptive of Lost Valley and its people, 
somewhat in the manner of Masters' Spoon River Anthology. Each character 
tells his own story and the portrayal is given with economy, humor, and 
irony. Hidden sources of sorrow and weakness are shown in contrast to 
surface serenity. The volume has little literary value. 
BABSON, NAOMI LANE (Montana; pr, res.): 

All The Tomorrows; Reynal & Hitchcock, 1939 
Rec. Sr. H, 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Novel deals with changing social economic, and national con 
ditions in China between 1862 and 1938. Action centers around wealthy 
merchant family, with characters of all classes swarming down the pages. 
Rebellion against tradition shown chiefly by women characters. Well written. 
Characters life-like. Book romantic rather than too realistic. 

2. Story of a Chinese family early in the 1900*8 and how the civilization 
of the Chinese was affected by American customs. It is of interest as to how 
the family tradition as a whole and also one becomes interested in its mem 
bers as individuals. Events concerning the conflicts with the Young Patriots 
depicted. A book one wants to finish. 

3. A fine, moving story of the invaded China, revolving around the 
wealthy,^ aristocratic Chinese family. The Lo family runs the gamut from 
communists to Buddha worshippers. No sentimentality but good, sympathetic 
understanding. A grand book. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 23 

BAGLEY, CLARENCE BOOTH (Washington; pr. res.): 

Indian Myths of the Northwest; Low man & Hanford, Seattle, 1930 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: Myths of Northwest Indians. More than fifty of them. Like the 

legends of other peoples these folklore tales show the efforts of these Indians 

to interpret the things that were happening about them. Stories as fine as 

those of any mythology. Beautifully told. Entertaining. Fitting vocabulary. 

BAILEY, ROBERT G. (Idaho; pr. res.): 

River of No Return; Bailey-Blake Printing Co., Lewiston, Ida., 1935 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Early history and development. Indian wars, customs, and 
legends; contemporary history, adventures, and progress; and life in the 
Salmon river country as the author knew it from the main divisions of the 
book. The author has made this as accurate as possible. Interesting back 
ground for Idaho residents. 

2. Valuable contribution to Northwest history, particularly mining and 
frontier life. Appropriately dedicated to Sacajawea, the Boat Launcher, 
rather than the Bird Woman. Profusely illustrated. Excellent data on Indian 
wars, customs, and legends. Influence of the meadows of blue camas on 
Indians and whites interestingly given. 
BAIRD, JESSE H. (Idaho; fr. res.): 

God's Law of Life; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1931 
Rec. Jr. H. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A book of thirteen dynamic sermons which were first delivered 
over Radio Station KSL, Salt Lake City, Utah, and which were published 
by popular request. 

2. Dr. Baird in thirteen sermons seems fully able to reconcile science 
and scientific facts interpreting them as compatible with religion but not 
going so far as religion goes. He maintains religion goes beyond scientific 
realms. 
BAKER, DOROTHY (Montana; fr. res.) : 

young Man with a Horn; Houghton Mifflin Company, 1938 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R, Men, Women 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. High u, 12 

Comment: i. This is a modern novel dealing with the age-old problem of 
the artistic temperament and its inability to cope with the realities of life; 
however, the treatment of this problem is extremely interesting. Told in a 
casual manner, much like ordinary conversation, sophisticated, off-hand. 
Centers around a fictitious world-famous trumpeter. 

2. The story deals with the life and death of a young American swing 
band trumpeter, Rick Martin, who thought good jazz was the beginning 
and end of everything. Rick learned to play the piano in a Salvation Army 
room and later earned enough money for a trumpet by working in a bowling 
alley. His marriage was a failure and he turned to drink with tragic re 
sults. Readers interested in music will especially enjoy this book. 

3. A. H. M. fellowship novel; erstwhile best-seller. Based loosely on the 
life of Bix Beiderbeck. A good, moving story of the rise and sudden and 
early fall of a hot trumpet man. Good on the psychology of the swing musi 
cian. Rick was an artist in his obscure soul, and was recognized as such by 
the inner circle of hot players. 



24 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

BALCH, FREDERIC HOMER (Oregon; deceased): 

The Bridge of the Gods; A. C. McChurg & Co., 1890; Binfords & 
Mort, Portland, Ore. 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A book of the Willamette Valley Indians, written with under 
standing. Much beauty growing out of a sympathetic attitude toward ^ the 
New England missionary, the Oriental half-breed girl, and the various 
Indian personalities. Dignified, convincing, and entertaining. 

2. Romance of early Indian life. The bridge was a natural bridge over 
the Columbia River, the fall of which presaged the fall of the Willamettes. 
Interwoven is the story of the hopeless love of a Puritan Missionary and 
Multnomah's half-white daughter. Fairly well written. 

3. This is a reprint of the novel, as the older publication is not available. 
A very romantic story, highly popular in its day, and still a favorite of 
many readers. The author was fairly capable, but his work was greatly 
overpraised. 

BALCH, FREDERIC HOMER (Oregon; deceased): 

Genevieve: A Tale of Oregon; Metropoliton Press (Binfords & 
Mort), 1932 

Rec. Sr. H. S. 

Comment: i. A tale of a half-breed and a white girl. Excellent stuff^ good 
suspense, and for the greatest part very convincing. Oregon and Washington 
in the eighties with a good deal of the social background of the times. In 
part the book is autobiographical ; he writes best of what he knows best. 

BALCH, FREDERIC HOMER (Oregon; deceased): 

Memaloose; Binfords <Sc Mort, 1934 
Rec. Sr. H. S. 

Comment: i. Contains a brief prose sketch of the author's visit to Memaloose 
island, Indian burial grounds in the Columbia river. Charming style, poetic 
in tone. Contains three of author's poems. Introduction by Alfred Powers. 
Small general appeal. Suitable for special reading. 

BALL, JOHN (Oregon; deceased): 

The Autobiography of John Ball Compiled by his Daughters, Kate 
Ball Powers , Flora Ball Hapkins, and Lucy Ball; The Dean Ricks 
Company, Grand Rapids, Mich, 1925 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr, Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: The complete story of the life and times of John Ball, the first 
school teacher in the wide Oregon country. Informative and highly inter 
esting. 

BANKS, LOUIS ALBERT (Oregon; fr. res.): 

An Oregon Boyhood; Lee and Shepard (Boston), 189S 
Rec. Jr. H. 
Sr. H. 

Comment: Here is an authentic and entertaining picture of boyhood in fron 
tier Oregon of the 50' s, 6o's, yo's, with the experiences and observations of 
youth retold in a simple but pleasingly picturesque manner. Treats of natural 
history and describes the land, home life, and frontier-day activities. Choice 
writing. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 25 

BANKSON, RUSSEL A. (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Klondike Nugget; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1935 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A biographical history of the Klondike region during the years 
from about 1897-1900. It deals with an outstanding character, Eugene C. 
Allen, and the establishment of the first newspaper in Dawson, The Klon 
dike Nugget. Characters are well drawn from real life. Real situations are 
portrayed for the readers. Simple narrative, fairly well-written. 

2. The fevered experiences of gold rushers in general with the experi 
ences of one rusher in particular, the sustaining thread holding the whole 
together! Prospectors, miners, stampeders, nugget parties, sluice boxes, thaw 
ing machines, dog teams, a success dream with failure for awakening and 
so off to name. 

BARBER, CHARLES E. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Our Garden: and Glimpses Through its Secret Gate; Binfords & 
Mort, Portland, Ore. 

Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Through the author's noted delphinium garden, a vista is opened 
to another plane of existence. This volume contains the psychic investiga 
tions recorded in a large accumulation of careful notes made over a period 
of twenty-five years, and is the result of a business man's excursions across 
the frontiers of the mind. 

BARBER, ARTHUR W. (Idaho; pr. res.): 

The Light From Sealonia; The Four Seas Co. (Boston), 1927 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: Imaginative story of a balloon flight to another planet in which 
the hero not only finds something of a Utopia, but covers himself with glory 
in defending his adopted country from the rogues or villains of a neighbor 
ing state. The hero finally marries the queen and he himself is crowned 
king. The story is not well written. It carries the stamp of an amateur 
struggling with his first story. 

2. A modern romance indeed, dealing with an imaginary country, peopled 
by beings with pink or green eyes, but acting much as earthly persons do. 

BARNES, J. C. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Jobs, Currency, a Minimum Wage; Medford Mail Tribune, 1934 

Rec. No 

Comment: The author attempts to explain the operation of our economy by 
resorting to description of an isolated island. A labor theory of value under 
lies his analysis in which he concludes that a minimum wage for all and 
completely nationalized banking systems and fiat currencies can solve the 
world's economic ills. The book gives evidence of wide reading and careful 
thought on the part of the author, but his faulty conception of value and his 
lack of a complete understanding of money make the book of little real worth. 

BARNETT, DONALD R. (Montana; pr. res.): 
A Cross of Gold; Dorrance and Co., 1939 

Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This exciting novel is full of thrills and action as it depicts 
life in Montana during the gold 1 rush days. Although purely fictional in 
content, it is rich in vivid pictures of the days when the Vigilantes brought 
law and order by rope and guns to the land rich in placer claims. 

2. A love and adventure story placed in the Virginia City of the road 
agents and Vigilantes. Plenty of exciting events and authentic background. 



26 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

The writing is varying in quality, sometimes vivid, sometimes lacking real 
ity. Entertaining to read for those who like stories of the Old West 
BARNETT, GRACE TRELEVEN and BARNETT, OLIVE ELIZABETH 

(Montana; pr. res.): 

Beaded Buckskin; Oxford University Press, 1940 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 
Jr.H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: i. Gives picture of Montana ranch life (cattle ranch) about 
1898. Story of boy and girl and their adventures. Plenty of thrills and excit 
ing cattle-ranch experiences are woven into a detective story plot. Well 
written. Displays good understanding of youngsters. Attractive book in every 
respect. 

2. A grand children's mystery story. Two youngsters, 12 and 14, find an 
oddly marked piece of buckskin which leads them to treasure. Also good 
story of ranch days in early IQOO'S. 
BARNETT, GRACE TRELEVEN and BARNETT, OLIVE ELIZABETH 

(Montana; pr. res.): 
The Cock That Crowed at Two; Lothrop, Lee, and Shepherd Co., 

1937 

JR.ec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Comment: i. A book for young readers telling the story of Casper the 
C&Qk, who, in his determination to beat Randy Rooster to the morning crow, 
wokevthe whole town several times. He finally wins justification and the 
story nds happily. It is simple, entertaining and easily read. The illustra 
tions ae grand. 

2. Am amusing account of the difficulties caused by Casper, who in his 

efforts to be the first rooster to crow at daylight, keeps the entire village 

awake n^'ght after night. Casper redeems himself by routing a burglar in the 

mayor's cellar. Good illustrations by the authors. 

BARNETT* GRACE TRELEVEN and BARNETT, OLIVE ELIZABETH 

(Montana; pr. res.) : 

Grasshopper Gold; Oxford University Press, 1939 
Rec. grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5 
^/Jr. H. 7, 8 

Comment: i. A picture of pioneer life in Bannock, Montana, during the 
gold rush days of the i86o's forms the background for the story of the 
twins, Emma and Jon, who make the long trip up the Missouri river with 
their parents to meet Uncle David. Suspense in the plot is well handled, 
and the ^discovery of enough gold to start a ranch is one of a number of 
exciting incidents, 

2. Best work yet of the Barnett Sisters. Pleasing illustrations in black 
and white. Travels of a St. Louis family by boat to Fort Benton ; encounters 
with hostile and with friendly Indians; covered wagon trip to Bannock* 
Suspense sustained to surprise ending. "As good as a movie," say young 
readers. 
BARNETT, GRACE TRELEVEN and BARNETT, OLIVE ELIZABETH 

(Montana; pr. res.): 

Homesteaders' Horses / Oxford University Press, 1941 
Rec. Grades 5, 6 

Jr.H. 7,8,9 

Comment: i. An exciting story of the three young Blackburns who suspect 
their father's missing horses to be stolen. They finish their investigation in 
a blaze of glory, rounding up a gang of thieves and receiving a good re 
ward for their brave work. Their chores and experiences around the home 
stead are interesting and colorful. 
2. Exciting tale of Rebecca, her younger brothers, and their mother hold- 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 27 

ing a homestead near Glendive, Montana, while the father works in Chi 
cago. ^Eleven-year-olds like it, and older readers admire the youngest boy's 
ingenious trailing of horse-thieves. Effective illustrations by the authors of a 
lengthening list of Western fiction. 
BARNETT, GRACE TRELEVEN and BARNETT, OLIVE ELIZABETH 

(Montana; pr. res.): 

Silver in the Teapot; Lothrop, Lee and Shepard Company, 1938 
Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Comment: i. The authors' attractive drawings add much to this story of 
the little old lady who is perplexed to find her teapot of silver pieces almo'st 
empty. On the advice of her neighbor, she plants a field of hay. Then, in 
the repetitious pattern that appeals to small children, she trades hay for a 
cow, milk for a pig, and so^on uritil she has silver for her teapot. 

2. Ingenious story of simple economics, for children, charmingly illus 
trated by the authors. Little old lady with hardly any money, on a little 
farm among other little farms in a fertile district learns to "live off the 
land" by trading what she does not need for what her neighbors do not need, 
BARNETT, GRACE TRELEVEN and BARNETT, OLIVE ELIZABETH 

(Montana; pr. res.): 
They Hunted High and Low 
Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5 

Comment: i. Grandma, grandpa and Lucy, and finally the whole village, 
are bewildered by the squeaks and voices of the "spook." The mystery is 
solved at the village picnic instead of a "spook" it is a big black crow. 
Many gay illustrations by the authors enliven the story. 

2. ^ Clever illustrations in black and white. Mild mystery interest in voice 
speaking out of the air. Whole village upset in search for speaker. Over 
whelmed to find it only a big black crow. Attractive gift for children. 
BARR, HY MAX 

Redskin and Pioneer* See Barry, J. Neilson 
BARROWS, JOHN R. (Montana; deceased): 

Ubet; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1934 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Tells of young John's coming from Wisconsin with his folks 
in 1880. By steamer to Fort Benton, overland to the Judith basin, where his 
father founded a stage station at Ubet. Good background on the cattle 
country and practicing cowboys. Illustrated by R. H. Hall. 

2. In the words of the author: "six or seven years of colorful experiences 
on the Montana frontier." Lively, humorous reminiscences of the i88o's, de 
scribing especially life in the sheep and cow camp. Interesting anecdotes. 
Passing reference to such men as Charley Russell, "Liver-eating" Johnson, 
and Granville Stuart. Several chapters on the vigilantes. 

3. This is a cow-country story of the early eighties, The author worked 
for Granville Stuart and met Russell. But these men do not stand out as 
individuals. The style is good but lacks the pith of "Trails Plowed Under" 
while failing to reach the philisophical import of Webb's "The Great 
Plains." The author describes himself on page 115: "I had opened the great 
book of the frontier, but was still absorbed in the pictures without finding 
time for the reading of the text." 

BARRY, J. NEILSON and BARR, HY MAX (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Redskin and Pioneer; Rand McNally & Co., 1932 
Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 
Jr-H. 7,8,9 



28 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Comment: One of the American Life Series of books for juveniles, this volume 
of Northwest pioneer day stories offers splendid supplement to grade school 
history classes. Also, possibly of some interest to junior high grades. Appeal 
principally to boys. 
BARRY, J. NEILSON (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The French Canadian Pioneers *of the Willamette Valley; Privately 

printed, 1933 
Rec. Sp. R. 

Comment: A selection of tersely assembled data on the causes for settlement 
and progress of pioneering in early-day Willamette Valley, with special 
reference paid French Canadian influences. Includes many quotes from other 
established historical sources. Author attempts to clear up some controversial 
issues. Of reference value only. A brochure of 14 pages. Ordinary factual 
style. 
BASHFORD, HERBERT (Washington; deceased): 

Beyond the Gates of Care; Whitaker and Ray Co., San Francisco, 

1901 
Rec. Sr. H. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Sr. C. Jr. Soph. 

Comment: Second-rate poetry with flashes of real descriptive beauty of the 

Puget Sound scenery. 
BASS, SOPHIE FRYE (Washington; pr. res.): 

Pigtail Days in Old Seattle; Binfords & Mort, 1937 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 
Comment: i. Personal reminiscences color this delightful story of Seattle's 

Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 Gen. R. Men, Women 

early history. As the naming of Seattle's streets is explained, the reader is 
enchanted by views of Arthur Denny's granddaughter in pigtails playing, 
with other primary children, "Pussy wants a corner" about the belfrey of 
the University at Fourth Street. 

2. The granddaughter of the founder of Seattle tells of life in the settle 
ment in the very early pioneer days. Interesting incidents of pioneer life are 
brought to the reader through the eyes of a child who experienced them. 
These incidents are united by weaving them in with the history of the main 
Seattle streets. 

BATES, ERNEST SUTHERLAND (Oregon; fr. res.): 
This Land of Liberty; Harper and Brothers, 1930 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. 

Comment: Criticism of illiberality of law and public opinion in the United 
States. Keen, ironic style. Passionate sincerity. An excellent book to irritate 
a person into thinking. 
SEAL, SAMUEL At (Idaho; fr. res.): 

The Snake River Fork Country; The Rexburg Journal. Rexburiy, 
Idaho, 1935 ' *' 

Rec. Sp. R. 

Comment: i. This is an excellent and accurate history of the Snake River 
Fork Country from the earliest settlements in 1860. Besides being scholarly, 
the book is very interesting. It has much human and literary value. It is 
well illustrated. The book is the work of a real scholar. 

2. A brief but factual history of the development of the upper Snake 
River Valley. The brochure is well illustrated, and a bibliography is pro 
vided, p. 57. The development of the Church of the Latter Day Saints in 
the area is given special attention. 
BECHDQLT, FREDERICK R. (Washington; fr. res.): 

Tales of the Old- Timers; Century Publishing Company, 1924 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 29 

Comment: As informal and discoursive as though the author were telling 
tales around the campfire, these twelve tales bring us the valiant pioneers 
in Texas, and eastern New Mexico. Outlaws, cowboys, Indians and horse 
thieves, as well as the "men who brought the law" fill the pages with fight 
ing and bloodshed. 
BECHDOLT, FREDERICK R. (Washington; fr. res.): 

When the West Was Young; Century Publishing Co., 1922 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: Eleven tales of bold men, good and bad, who made things lively 
in the early days in Arizona and New Mexico. Informally told, with little 
attention to technical forms. Action. Material gathered from old-timers and 
authenticated by research. 
BENDON, DOROTHE (Montana; fr. Jres.): 

Mirror Images; Horace Liveright, Inc., 1931 
Rec. No 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Verse full of beautiful images but abstruse in meaning, and 
difficult. 

2. The work of the author is delicately correct as to poetic form. Possibly 
open to criticism on the ground that its imagery is lacking utterly in im 
portance, aesthetical or spiritual. I find it an almost incredible performance 
coming from a Montanan devoid of the grand sweep one associates with 
this area, but a dainty little piece of bric-a-brac in its chosen field. 

3. Stimulating, sincere lyrics, some less well executed than others. All 
musical. Word pictures clear as in a mirror. A sort of fourth dimension 
effect in the ideas and feelings evoked. Good form. Poetic representation 
based on keen analysis of emotional experiences the thoughtful reader will 
recognize. 

4. Highly pictorial verse of many things. Nature is one inspiration that 
is deeply responded to. There is a lot of color, imagery in her sensitive 
reactions; some are rather obscure because of this. But mostly beautiful, 
light little poems. 

BENHAM, ALLEN ROGERS (Washington; pr. res.): 

Clio and Mr. Groce; University of Washington Book Store, 1928 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Sp. R. 

Comment: Really an exposition and a criticism of Bendetto Groce's main 
thesis in his book History; its Theory and Practice. Well written but re 
quires much background. 

BENNETT, FLORENCE MARY (Mrs. L. F. Anderson) (Washington; 
pr. res.): 

Spindrift; The Mesher Press, Portland, Maine, 1930 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Author is a student of Greek; many poems modeled on Greek 
forms; some are translations. Severity, restraint, and fidelity of phrasing 
mark these lyrics, which deal with the sea, Greek memories, Greek transla 
tions, "the Fourth Dimension," and occasional pieces. Not all are thought 
and music married, but some have an austere and haunting beauty. 
BENNETT, RICHARD (Washington; pr. res.): 

Hannah Marie; Douhleday, Doran and Co., 1939 
Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Comment: i. This story, simply told, is well illustrated by the author, who 
is better known as an illustrator than as a writer. He here shows the result 
of his long visit to the country of his ancestors. Locale, Ireland. 

2. A story of three children and their efforts to celebrate the one-hun 
dredth birthday of their great grandmother. One of Mr. Bennett's best 
stories, and some of his best illustrations. 



3Q NORTHWEST BOOKS 

BENNETT, RICHARD (Washington; pr. res.): 

Mister Ole; Double day, Do ran and Co., 1940 

Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Comment: i. An Irish family, with two boys, on a clearing in the forest, 
are made happy by an old Swede, a sailor, and former circus employee, and 
his two monkeys. The illustrations by the author are numerous and amusing. 
2. The Irish and a Swede are thrown together in a pioneer clearing. 
Interest centers primarily in the two boys in the Irish family, and such con 
comitants as Indians, monkeys, and the inevitable dog. 
BENNETT, RICHARD (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Shawneen and the Gander; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1937 
Rec. Grades 2, 3, 4 

Comment: i. Short child's story almost fairy-like of a boy and a fairy and 
an egg which grew into an unusual gander. Locale Ireland. 

2. Shawneen, a little Irish boy, wanted a bugle more than any other 
thing in the world. The story is told in an appealing way, and the attractive 
illustrations help to give it the humor, suspense, magic, and other lasting 
qualities characteristic of an Irish folk tale. 
BENNETT, RICHARD (Washington; pr. res.): 

Skookum and Sandy; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1935 
Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Comment: i. Keen observation of animal and child life told in simple story. 
Illustrations numerous and of excellent quality. The story element is subordi 
nate to the graphic art, but supplements it well. Locale, an Indian village in 
the Olympic peninsula coast in Washington. 

2. A child's story of a naughty goat which turned out to be a hero. 
Well written. Profusely illustrated. 
BIBB, THOMAS W. 

History of Education in Washington. See Bolton, Frederick E. 
BINNS, ARCHIE (Washington; fr. res.): 

The Land is Bright; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1939 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C, Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A romantic story of typical members of a wagon train journey 
ing from the Missouri River to Oregon. Realistically and abundantly de 
tailed, it emphasizes the pioneers' constant vision of the Promised Land 
ahead. It is entertaining primarily as romantic adventure and by its con 
vincing details. 

2. The novel deals with the journey of one wagon train to the Pacific 
Coast in the 1850*8 over the Oregon Trail. It is a well written, entertaining 
story of the great migration "to the country always green where there is 
enough land for everyone." 
BINNS, ARCHIE (Washington; fr. res.)i 

The Laurels are Cut Down; Literary Guild of America, Ryal & 

Hitchcock, New York, 1937 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Many true and moving pictures of pioneer life and, later, 
World War times and social conditions. Interesting, but marred somewhat 
by straining for stylistic effects through sentence fragments. The slight plot 
gets somewhat ost at times. The life of General Pickett's son by an In A an 
wife forms an interesting historical background for more recent scenes 
TTT 2 " v- mterestm j ? stor y Q f pioneer and semi-pioneer days in Western 
Washington, extending to the second and third generations. It is weH wit- 
ten, but marred by a few unecessary blasphemies and references to ittjl 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 31 

moral behavior. In spite of these things, however, I believe it is worthwhile 
at least for adults. Also deals largely with World War conditions, especially 
in Russia. 

3. Two brothers reared on Puget Sound in a pioneer environment, enter 
the World War in Siberia. One is killed; the other returns to find himself 
labeled a Communist, because he finds little to condemn in Russian peasants. 
Vivid pictures of early pioneers and of experiences of American soldiers 
among war-crazed peoples in Russian Siberia during the World War. 
BINNS, ARCHIE (Washington; fr. res.) : 

Lightship; Reynal and Hitchcock, 1934 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C, Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Through the compassionate eyes of Ben, the fireman, the 
reader learns to know the nine men of the lightship crew who "during long 
monotonous hours little by little reveal something of their past histories and 
their views on philosophy and religion, women and love." An intensely 
human book, unforgettable in its presentation of this motley crew, common 
place, heroic, laughable and tragic. Locale, Northwest Washington. 

2. Although called a novel by the publishers, this is rather a collection 
of related experiences and sketches that can roughly be called stories. Most 
chapters deal with rough life, authentic but often coarse. The style is con 
vincing, sometimes deeply so. There are moments of striking contrast. Locale, 
Washington Coast, Puget Sound, Columbia River. 
BINNS, ARCHIE (Washington; fr. res.): 

Mighty Mountain; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1940 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C, Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Mighty Mountain is a vivid presentation of the turmoil of our 
only Indian war period, 1855-57. The author is at his best creatively, but 
many will wish^that he had possessed a more authentic historical basis. The 
characters are vivid ; the action is strong. The story is realistic ; the handling 
of nature is rather romantic. 

2. Authentic story of 1854, true to locale and people. The writer favors 
the "Meeker" side in the local Indian controversy; criticizes Stevens for 
treating with the Blackfeet in spite of the fact that their hostilities kept the 
Flatheads and Nez Perce out of winter meat. His beautiful chapter on the 
Land Office is a complete vignette, like his "Backwater Voyage" and the trip 
through the Bering Sea as set down in The Laurels. Locale: Upper Puget 
Sound. 
BINNS, ARCHIE (Washington; fr. res.) 5 

Northwest Gateways the story of the Port of Seattle; Douhleday, 

Doran and Co., 1941 
Rec, Jr. H. 7, *, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Highly readable but not always accurate. In spite of the title, 
not much is said about the Port of Seattle; the book is mostly about Seattle 
in its territorial days ; very little about the fifty years of statehood. 

2. Three-fourths of this well and interestingly written book deals with 
the personalities and more dramatic episodes of Seattle history up to the 
Alaska gold rush. Not a history although it is accurate, but a portrait of 
the pioneer town done in the popularly accepted colors. In a sense it sum- 



32 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

marizes in superior style and effect most of the pioneer reminiscences from 
which it largely derives. 
BIRD, ANNIE LAURIE (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Boise, the Peace Valley; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1934 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Jr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R, Men, Women 

Comment: i. The story of one hundred years of progress in Boise Valley, 
with special emphasis on the gold rush, the life in the Basin, and its per 
manent results, told in an authoritative style. 

2. A most complete history of Boise Valley. A bit too long written 
however in an interesting way. Shows plenty of research work and much 
study. Must be read slowly to be appreciated thoroughly but very worth 
while. 

3. One of the few pieces of soundly written and carefully documented 
Idaho local history available. The Boise Basin is treated from the earliest 
times to the present, but the richest detail is provided for the period 1860- 
1890, treating of the mining days, the early settlement, and the coming of 
the railroad. Boise is given major attention, but there are sizable sketches of 
Caldwell, Nampa, and neighboring villages. The treatment is rich in human 
material, particularly from contemporary newspaper accounts. 

BIRKELAND, JORAN (Montana; fr. res.): 

Birchland; E. P. Dutton and Co., Inc., 1939 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Sr. C, Jr, Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. After being reared on a dry Montana ranch, the author goes 
home to Norway to find her roots. With her mother's people she learned of 
her cultural background in which the Montana farm has no part. Good 
picture of Norwegian home life and family ties* Interesting, but not enter 
taining. 

2. A fine nostalgic book about the author's trip back to the land of her 
father and mother. She strays with aunts and uncles, learns the family his 
tory, and finds her real roots in the buildings and country. 

3. An American born Norwegian girl goes to Norway to assuage a 
spiritual longing for "home." She finds herself at home among her relatives, 
and the story of her visit conveys much information about Norway, of espe 
cial interest to Americans in Norwegian communities. A fine book for 
country teachers to read to children of almost any age. 

BISSETT, CLARK PRESCOTT (Washington; pr. res.): 

Abraham Lincoln, A Universal Man; John Howell Co., San Fran 
cisco, 1924 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph, Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Very interesting and scholarly picture of Lincoln as the per 
sonification of the "broad spirit of human love and brotherhood." The book 
invites in the reader a feeling of loyalty to the Union and to one's fellow 
men. 
BLACK, JESSE R. (Idaho; pr. res.): 

History of Custer County f Idaho; probably Challis Messenger, 

ca., 1930 

Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The material largely taken from the Challis Messenger, has 
the vividness of a contemporary account, rather than the perspective and 
authority of a mature work. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 33 

2. This Is a very interesting history of the early settlement and develop 
ment of Custer County. Indian fights are well characterized. The information 
is complete and accurate. The pamphlet, though short, has much human 
and literary value. 
BLAIR, WALTER and MEINE, FRANKLIN J. (Washington; fr. res.): 

Mike Fink; Henry Holt and Co., 1933 
Rec. Sr. H. u, ia 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R, Men, Women 

Comment: i. This book retells the most important yarns about Mike Fink, 
ranger, boatman, and trapper of the American frontier. Some of these yarns 
are authentic, some are created around a campfire; yet they are valuable in 
offering hints about the thoughts and dreams of the American folk who 
created them. 

^ 2. Story is founded on legendary material carefully prepared from re 
liable sources concerning the hero Mike Fink, who operated along the Mis 
sissippi and Missouri Rivers. The local coloring in vocabulary and events 
is thoroughly portrayed. The epilogue is especially well written. It would 
interest Midwestern people more than Northwestern boys and girls. 
BLAIR, WALTER (Washington;, fr. res.) : 

Native American Humor; American Book Co., 1937 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Concerned with the development of humor in nineteenth cen 
tury America, this scholarly work differentiates between "Down East" and 
"Old Southwest" humor, literary comedians, and local colorists. The second 
half of the book contains generous samplings illustrating the works of both 
major and minor ^authors significant in the history of American humor. 

a. In ^ a pleasing style the author traces the development of humorous 
writing in America from 1800-1900. In the second half of the book he gives 
selections of this humor under Down East, Old Southwest, Literary Come 
dians, Local ^Colorists, and Mark Twain. An excellent bibliography divides 
the two sections, and there is a scholarly critical history of humor in the 
introduction. 
BLANKENSHIP, RUSSELL (Washington; pr. res.): 

American Literature as an Expression of the National Mind: Henry 

Holt and Co., 1931 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. Like Mr. Parrington before him, Mr. Blankenship likes to 
present American literature through its social, political, and cultural aspects. 
This book covers three centuries of American literary development clearly 
and concisely, but necessarily inadequately, as the material is confined to the 
covers of one volume. 

2. A widely accepted text book written in an attractive style. It is com 
prehensive and emphasizes the social forces of which our literature is an 
expression. 
BLANKENSHIP, RUSSELL; LYMAN, ROLLO LaVERNE, and HILL, 

HOWARD COPELAND (Washington; pr. res.): 
American Literature; Our Literary Heritage; Charles Scribner's 

Sons, 1937 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Changing America is interpreted through its literature. Amer 
ica's growth, work, idealism, humor, and imagination, and desires for the 



34 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

future are presented through prose and poetry of its writers. Splendid intro 
ductions to the many divisions, exercises for class activities, and reading lists 
make it a fine book for literary study. 

2. A mixed anthology justly representing American literature, edited with 
brilliant essays by Professor Blankenship ; essays that give background and 
help with interpretation. Selections are widely representative of shorter 
poems, stories, and drama, but not of the longer prose fiction. 

2. This anthology of contemporary literature is skillfully chosen from 
various types of prose and poetry grouped according to ideas and interests, 
each group introduced by an essay of the author's, enlightening, stimulating, 
and guiding the reader. 

BLANKENSHIP, RUSSELL; W. H. NASH and PAULINE WARNER 
Contemporary Literature; Our Literary Heritage; Charles Scrib- 

ner's Sons, 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The book contains an excellent selection of various types of 
literature by modern British and American authors. The two hundred pieces 
are all modern in treatment and subject matter. It would be valuable in 
classroom and in library. 

BLANKENSHIP, RUSSELL; LYMAN, ROLLO LaVERNE, and HILL, 
HOWARD COPELAND (Washington; pr. res.): 
(Washington; pr,. res.): 
Literature We Appreciate; Our Literary Heritage; Charles Scrib- 

ner's Sons, 1940 
Rec. Jr, H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This anthology, the last in a series of four, contains a wealth 
of valuable material from all periods of literature, but the contemporary 
and the early twentieth century are most fully represented. The editor has 
written excellent essays to introduce the units, arranged according to ideas. 

2. A compilation of very interesting literary material which will give 
the reader a broad acquaintance with the best that has been written in an 
earlier time and in our modern day. The authors have made an excellent 
selection of short stories, poetry, essays, and other forms from the works of 
well-known writers. 

3. Although designed for senior high school use as a text, this book, in 
its introductory essays by the editor and its valuable selection, makes a wide 
appeal and guides to a fuller appreciation of all of the better known types 
of literature. 

BLANKENSHIP, RUSSELL, and WINIFRED H. NASH (Washington; pr. 

res.) : 

Literature We Like; Our Literary Heritage; Charles Scribner's 
Sons, 1939 

Rec. Jr. H. 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: ^ i. Like Contemporary Literature, this anthology is a valuable 
contribution.^ The selections, prose and poetry, are well chosen, and convey 
an appreciation of forces producing American culture. 

2.^ This mixed anthology is strong and vital, growing out of our asso 
ciations and activities. The variety is remarkable, but gained partly because 
no selection of long sustained human activity is included. Introductory essays 
by the editors are in good style and are illuminating. Locale, varied. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 35 

BLUMENTHAL, ALBERT (Montana; fr. re*.): 

Small Town Stuff; University of Chicago Press, 1932 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A sociological study of the town of Phillipsburg, Montana 
produces a composite picture of the elements of small town life emphasizes 
the close personal knowledge and relationships that enter into every activity 
of small town life and make it different from larger cities, and the contacts 
with the same sources of knowledge as those cities radios, magazines, 
movies that make it improvincial Not written with literary qualities. 

2. ^This is a sociological study of a small western Montana town. De 
scription of Mineville is presented vividly and in much detail. While in 
tended primarily for the student, the book offers information of value to 
anyone interested in American small-town life. 

BOGSTAD, VALBORG C. (Oregon; pr. res.): 
The Scarlet Strain; Dorrance and Co., 1938 

Rec. No. 

Comment: Old or young can read this without having their conscience shocked 
with modern sensationalism. The purpose is to show where Christian faith 
and spirit can circumvent and counteract the evils fostered by modern sen 
sationalism as depicted in the floods of modern literature. Sincere but not 
too good. 

BOLTON, FREDERICK* E., and BIBB, THOMAS W. (Washington; pr. 

res.): 

History of Education in Washington; U. S. Government Printing 
Office, 1935 

Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Gen. R. Men, Women. Sp. R. 

Comment: i. This history resulted from many years of research by the 
authors and by graduate students. It tells a clear, strong story of progress 
in education, and incidentally gives much collateral history. It is authorita 
tive and valuable for reading as well as reference. 

2. There is much history of discovery, exploration, and colonization before 
the establishment of pioneer schools. From the first school laws of the Ter 
ritory to the school code of today, the story is fully told. All auxiliary 
agencies are included. 

BOTTOLFSEN, C. A. (Idaho; pr. re*.): 

Little Bits of Lost River History; Arco Advertiser, Arco, Idaho, 1926 

Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This is a brief chronology of events from 1877-1901, first pub 
lished under the enticing titles, "Do You Remember When?" in the Arco 
Advertiser. These are highly entertaining stories of events in the pioneer 
days, vividly described. The pioneers are characterized well, and the events 
are realistic. 

2. These little sketches, written by a governor of the State, were taken 
from the Arco Advertiser when Governor Bottolf sen was editor of that paper. 
They are told with vigor and some charm. 
BOWDEN, ANGIE BURT (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Early Schools of Washington Territory; Lowman & Hanford Co 

1935 

Rec. Sr. C. Gr. Sen Gr. 

Comment: A compilation of information regarding the early schools of the 
Territory, from records in histories of the schools of the counties and a 
variety of other pertinent sources. Informally written and relying too fre 
quently on hearsay and opinion, it nevertheless fills an obvious need. 



36 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

BOWER, B. M. Pseud. (Mrs. Bertha Muzzey Sinclair-Cowan) (Montana; 

fr. res.): 
Big Book of Western Stories; Grosset andl Dunlap, New York, 1904 

Rec, Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr, H. 10, u, 12 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Four short novels of the better type of western story. The 
stories are all clean, interesting, and exciting. The writing is above average 
for this type of story. All the novels are located on cattle ranches in the 
eastern part of Montana, time not important but around 1900-1915. 

2. This is a series of light humorous stories about the early West, deal 
ing particularly with the cattle industry in Montana at the turn of the 
century. The setting is the Flying U Ranch and the cowboys employed there 
are known as the Happy Family, 
BOWER, B. M. Pseud. (Mrs. Bertha Muzzey Sinclair-Cowan) (Montana; 

fr. res.) : 

The Flying U Omnibus, Grosset and Dunlap, New York, 1906 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Three novels about B. M. Bower's best loved characters, The 
Happy Family. They are laid in Eastern Montana in the cattle country be 
tween 1905 and 1920. The last one deals with the ranchman's problem of 
incoming settlers. They are well written on the whole, clean and exciting 
and cheerful. 

2. This collection of realistic stories depicting the problems of the early 

Montana rancher is a continuation of the narrative presented in the Big 

Book of Western Stories. Again we meet The Happy Family on the Flying 

U Ranch and are impressed by their loyalty to the ranch and to each other. 

BOWMAN, EARL WAYLAND (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Arrowrock Songs and Stories of a Prodigal; The Caxton Printers, 

1931 

Rec. Sr. H. 

Comment: i. These tales picture men in action, rough and ready to ride, in 
poems of varied meter and form. They breathe of the great open spaces and 
of the challenge of nature to man. The themes are both light and pathetic, 
interwoven with touches of humor, wholesome common sense, and philosophy. 

2. To use the vigorous, primitive language of the author, "this book is 
lousy." I suppose it is quite harmless for any student who might be beguiled 
by the life story of the steer (for instance), a heart-racking tale of love, 
passion and intrigue. 

3. A collection of the author's best-loved short stories and poems, begin 
ning with the title poem, "Arrowrock." This volume includes more than one 
hundred poems and seven short stories. 

BOYER, CLARENCE V. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Villain as Hero in Elizabethan Drama; E. P. Dutton & Co.. 

1914 

Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Sp. R. 

Comment: This essay was presented as a scholarship thesis for the doctorate 
at Princeton University. A studious, capable inquiry into the role of the 
villain in Shakespeare's plays. Recommended as supplementary reading. 
BRADLEY, HENRY C. (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Flying Chips; Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1929 
Rec. No 

Comment: Poems dealing with a variety of subjects. Nature poems prominent 
The poetic style is not consistent. Continuity of thought within a poem not 
always present. Nothing beautiful in the "picturized" thoughts, 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 37 

BRADLEY, JOHN HODGDON, JR. (Montana; fr. res.): 

Parade of the Living; Coward-McCaim, 1930 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: A series of entertaining sketches on various phases of paleontology, 
some of which appeared originally in well-known magazines. A few chapter 
headings indicated the trend of discussion. "Children of the sun," "A Ghost 
walks," "When the back of the camel broke," "Saga of the dinosaurs," 
"Hobgoblins of the flesh/' and "Highway to the moon." This delightful 
book won the science book of the month award for 1930. The author, for 
merly on the staff of Montana State University and the University of South 
ern California, now devotes his time to free-lance writing. 

2. This book is a rare combination of popularized scientific writing and 
sound scholarship. Opening with a few chapters on the origin and structure 
of the earth, the author then parades before us the long procession of living 
forms from the earliest known remains of life to man himself. He likens this 
to a dramatic spectacle in which man is not so important as his egoism might 
indicate, but must recognize the fundamental truth of ". . . the kinship 
of all who walk in the flesh ..." A most readable and stimulating book, 
BRALEY, BERTON (Montana; fr. res.): 

Pegasus Pulls A Hack; Minton, Balch & Company, 1934 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A pretty smug story of the author's success who is pretty well 
convinced of it. His message: the spark of genius is over-rated; work and 
technique are what count. He recalls interesting days as a struggling reporter 
in Butte, Montana. He talks of famous people and events throughout. Rather 
humorously done in places, always interesting. 

2. Life of a well-known journalist, including experiences in Madison, 
Butte, and New York City. Braley was reporter on Heinze's Evening News 
from 1901 to 1905 and likes Butte with gusto. Discussions of verse technique, 
commercialism in art, and many anecdotes of the great and near-great. Full 
of prejudices in a colloquial style. 
BRALEY, BERTON (Montana; fr. res.) : 

The Sheriff of Silver Bow; A. L. Burt Co., 1921 
Rec. No 

Comment: The book is attributed to Braley the evidence is clear on that 
point but one can scarcely believe it upon perusal. I believe it is the most 
amateurish novel, the poorest on all counts, that I have ever seen. It is simply 
another of the long list of sins committed against Butte, Montana, in print. 
The naivette, stupidity and lack of taste it demands of its readers are with 
out limit. There is no generous criticism honestly possible. 
BRALEY, BERTON (Montana; fr. res.): 

Songs .of the Workaday World; George H. Doran Co., 1915 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A collection of verses glorifying the common man, and al 
though there are a few poems of worth, the majority are ballad-type jingles 
which have no claim to poetry. The philosophy of all the songs is the same, 
a common kind of optimism and appreciation of the plights of the common 
man. 

2. Verse with much the same subject matter and style as Kipling but 
without his mastery of words. They have life and movement; one or two 
are really fine. They will appeal to people who like life and swing in 
poetry, rather than fine technique. 



38 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

BRANCH, E. DOUGLAS (Montana; fr. res.): 

The Cowboy and His Interpreters; Appleton and Co., 1926 

Rec. Sr. H. xo, xx, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Beginning with the story of the historical background of the 
cow-west, smacking strongly of source material, the author gets to the^ only 
unique portion of the book. He explains why the cowboy is pictured in litera 
ture so differently by authors who look at the West with varying viewpoints 
from the sentimental to the absurd. This last is done with good under 
standing and discrimination. 

2. An inclusive review of the literature, good and bad, that uses the 
cowboy, his background, or his way of living, as central material. Branch\s 
method is to adduce representative material rather than to generalize. The 
book is illustrated by C. M. Russell, Will James, and Joe de Young. There 
is a long bibliography. 

3. The Cowboy and His Interpreters is a tale of cowboys famous and 
otherwise from Mexico to Montana and the people who have written about 
them. Glamour laid aside, one learns much, about the cowboy. It is nicely 
illustrated and there is a world of bibliography. 

BRANCH, E. DOUGLAS (Montana; fr. res.): 

The Hunting of the Buffalo; D. Appleton & Co., 1929 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The Hunting of the Buffalo is a mighty epic of the American 
plains, the finding and inhuman slaughter of the buffalo, a historical and 
colorful story full of excitement that leaves one breathless to the end. Its 
chief value is historical as this is a phase of the West that has never before 
so completely and vividly been recorded. Illustrated with quaint old draw 
ings and photographs. 

2. The story of the slaughter of the American bison as traced through 
literature- and historical records. Very extensive research yields a chronicle 
told in lively style. Illustrated with many reproductions of old prints and 
engravings. Footnotes and index, but no bibliography. 
BRANCH, E. DOUGLAS (Montana; fr. res.): 

The Sentimental Years; D. Appleton & Co., 1934 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, women. Sp. R. 

Comment: i. The Sentimental Years is an excellent history and criticism of 
the domestic, cultural, and business world of 1836-1860. Its description of 
the people, their life, attitudes, and art of living clarifies and gives sig 
nificance to a heretofore rather dull and neglected period of our history. 

2. History of American middle class in the twenty-five years preceding 
Civil War, their progress in literature, fine arts, religion, inventions, politics, 
.science, benevolent associations, education, and slavery. Very well written 
shows endless use of source material dealing with these years, 1836-1860. 
Makes readily available much information otherwise impossible for general 
reader. 
BRANCH, E. DOUGLAS (Montana; fr. res.): 

Westward: The Romance of the American Frontier: D. Appleton 

Co., 1938 
Rec. Sr, H. 10, xx, 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This is a vitalizing kind of history that puts new emphasis on 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 39 

the pioneer because it stresses the importance of the man in the westward 
movement. Vigorous style and enthusiasm of the author make this new kind 
of exposition. 

2. The story of the westward movement of the American people from 
the Atlantic coast to the Pacific. An ambitious, substantial account of the 
frontier, as it rolled across the continent. Full of brilliant detail, and offering 
more generalization than Branch's earlier work. Contains maps, a section of 
notes, and an index. 

3. This book begins with the early days of the colonies and brings it 
down to the disappearance of the last frontier at the end of the last century. 
Too much cannot be said in its praise. It is a human story based on the 
best sources of historical facts, full of adventure, hardihood and courage, 
interesting wood cuts and maps. Many notes. 

BRAND, CHARLES A. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Horse and Buggy Essays; Binfords & Mort, 1940 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Light, humorous essays on a variety of topics varying generally 
from Brand's experience in running a roadside restaurant and in printing a 
newspaper on a boy-made press to vivid, inspiring description of the Chelsea 
fire. Brand recaptures in some essays the charm and bucolic calm of farm 
life forty years ago. 
BRIER, HOWARD M. (Washington; pr. res.): 

Sky cruiser; Random House, 1939 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7,8,9 

Comment: i. Barry Martin, just out of flying school, finally becomes a test 
pilot for a large airplane factory in Seattle. The story has all the excite 
ment, mystery, and thrills, which are common in flying, and are especially 
appealing to boys. It is very well written, and the technical information 
given is apparently authentic. 

2. The up-to-the-minute consideration of an absorbing industry (airplane 
manufacturing) makes this an absorbing story for young readers. The 
English is appropriate to the purpose. Characterization is not strong, and the 
plot doesn't develop sufficient opposition for such a lucky hero to overcome. 
Locale, Western Washington. 
BRIER, HOWARD M. (Washington; pr. res.): 

Smoke Eater; Random House, 1941 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: i. The author is still making great progress in both plot and 
characterization. Even more than previously, he shows himself master of his 
field, in this case fire-fighting in a large city department The book has 
won highest praise from critics, adoption for Junior Guild, and a large 
number of older readers. 

2. Here is a story of big city fire-fighting and of the men, rookies as well 
as seasoned veterans, who risk their lives every day. It is the story especially 
of Stan Parker, a young student in chemical engineering who discovers that 
he has fire-fighting blood and becomes a "rookie." The story is well de 
veloped and the material has been approved for its technical accuracy by 
the fire department of New York City. 
BRIER, HOWARD M. (Washington; pr. res.): 

Waterfront Beat; Random House, 1937 
Rec. Gr. 5, 6 

Jr. H, 7, 8, 9 Sr. H* 10, n 

Comment: i. Here is a tale of a copy boy in a small town newspaper. It is 



40 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

the favorite theme of many ages hard work brings success. Mr* Brier makes 
the hero's work interesting. The book's story rings true. The author served 
the apprenticeship of his principal character. 

2. The events are chosen from a newspaper reporter's experiences. The 
story is of considerable interest to youngsters inclined to this rather ^eventful 
vocation. The author writes partly from his own experience; still, some 
turns in the story are not made to seem probable. Locale, Puget Sound, mostly 
Everett. 
BRIER, ROYCE (Washington; fr. res.) : 

Reach for the Moon; D. Appleton Co., 1934 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i, A rather vivid story of the life of a star reporter in San 
Francisco in the early i9oo's. The plot is sordid in parts and the characters 
are not always convincing, but the story holds the interest of the reader and 
is well expressed. The description of the earthquake is especially well done. 
2. This is the story of Harper Poole, lonely and unhappy, and his love 
for Cyr, a neglected wife. Impending disaster finally overtakes the lovers as 
the city is destroyed by earthquake. Particularly valuable is the revelation 
of the temper of the people, dully watching the city's destruction while in 
wardly longing to save an era that was over. Locale, San Francisco, 1905- 
1906. 
BRINIG, MYRON (Montana; fr. res.): 

All of Their Lives; Farrar and Rinehart, 1941 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A clever and subtle presentation of the old comparison of the 
nun and the passion-flower; a study likewise of the changes in manners 
and thought structures in the lifetime of two women born in the 1880'$. If 
the plot is trite, much of the incidental comment is shrewd and biting. 

2. Two girls of the Middle West lead contrasted, intermingled lives. 
Dora, mouse-like, repressed, conventional, finds outlet eventually in social 
service; Florence, flamboyant, undisciplined, uninhibited, fulfills her urges 
in sexual conquest. While there are melodrama and over-simplification here, 
there are likewise considerable power and insight, and, as is to be expected 
from Mr. Brinig, continuous excitement. For adults and adult-minded only. 
BRINIG, MYRON (Montana; fr. res.): 

Anne Minion's Life; Farrar and Rinehart, Inc., 1939 
Rec, Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Anne Minton stands for hours on a hotel window ledge, con 
sidering suicide, not knowing whether or not she wants to die. The story is 
largely the effect of her act on individuals and groups in the watching 
crowd ; in all cases this influence is for the good. 

2. An interesting story of a psychopathic girl who spends the day on a 
i5th^ story ledge deciding to commit suicide. She relives her life and its 
tragic circumstances in memory. Her situation influences many lives who 
observe her decision. Not a deep study but interestingly done. 
BRINIG, MYRON (Montana; fr. res.): 

May Flavin; Farrar and Rinehart, Inc., 1938 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr, Soph. 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph, 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R, Men, Women 

Comment: i. May Flavin, the daughter of an Irish policeman killed in line 
of duty, lives a tumultuous life. Brought up in Chicago, she moves to New 
York and courageously in the face of poverty and violence brings up her 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 41 

six children. She's rather a splendid person in spite of almost constant 
profanity. 

2. This is a warm and appealing story of a young Irish girl who has all 
the traditional Irish characteristics, charm, temper, personality, and of the 
girl's life-long love for the man she shared her whole life with. Good but not 
great fiction. 

3. Life story of an Irish girl, who developed genuine character by rear 
ing a family in city slums. If the reader can forgive vulgarity, some bits of 
poor writing, lack of depth in character study, this book is worth the time 
spent on it. 

BRINIG, MYRON (Montana; fr. res.): 

Singermann; Farrar and Rinehart, Inc., 1929 

Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. An absorbing character study of an immigrant Jewish family 
struggling for existence in Silver Bow, Montana. Rebecca and Moses Singer 
mann and their seven children are portrayed separately in integrated pictures 
producing a vivid story of their varying desires, ambitions, and degrees of 
adjustment to a new, raw, growing, western community. The author's prose 
is lucid and often poetic in expression. 

2. Fictionized story of the collateral relatives of the author, involving the 
fortunes of an immigrant Jew and his children, through the second genera 
tion. Human values high, the work of a born user of words. 

3. A magnificent book for those who want humanity, depicting Butte 
in its big days. Well written, sometimes beautifully written, yet with horrible 
ulcer-spots such as Butte had. Not without bravado from the writer prob 
ably reflecting youth and lack of adjustment to cultures prevalent in America. 

BRINIG, MYRON (Montana; fr. res.): 

The Sisters; Farrar and Rinehart, Inc., 1937 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R, Men, Women 

Comment: i. Life story of three daughters of an old-fashioned but lovable 
Butte druggist. Besides Butte, scene includes the San Francisco earthquake, 
and the Saratoga race track. The regimented plot not so fresh and effective 
as that of the earlier Singermann. Competent and interesting, however. Im 
moralities may bother some readers. 

2. Marriage experiences of three sisters who win wealth. Older residents 
of Butte readily identify the setting and, perhaps, the people depicted. Some 
good contrasts. Some good and more poor statements. No real depth of char 
acterization nor understanding and interpretation of Butte. Depends on 
"modern vulgar frankness" to gain interest. 
BRINIG, MYRON (Montana; fr. res.): 

The Sun Sets in the West; Farrar and Rinehart, Inc., 1935 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The scene of this novel is a town in the Montana mining 
country. There are many and diverse characters including a Jewish merchant, 
his flamboyant wife and a dreamy, book-loving son; the town's richest 
citizen and his family; a communist who is a first-class painter; and many 
others. 

2. A story of many characters (not deeply developed) interrelated only 
by the common influence of the mines in their lives. Tragedy hits the high 
and the low in time of strike with the same reaction of the futility of life 
in a vulgar mining town. The author tries to do too much. 



42 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

BRINIG, MYRON (Montana; fr. yes.)-. 

This Man is My Brother; Farrar and Rinehart, Inc., 1932 

Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Sequel to Slngermann not so heroic in aspect but still con 
vincing. Has a decadent flavor. Jew in defeat; purity polluted by Butte of 
today, because of trends of present-day civilization. Surely not a pleasant 
narrative; sometimes crude with callous viewpoints and emphasis of youth; 
again most artistic. Belongs to the new analytic novels understood by the 
few. 

2. Subject matter: The ordeal of Judaism in a changing world; the diffi 
culties of second generation Jews among Gentiles; substance, the problems 
of sexual inversion. Human values high, raw material still somewhat raw 
that is, the material is not fully assimilated to art. Less finished than 
Singermann. 
BRINIG, MYRON (Montana; fr. res.) : 

Wide Open Town; Farrar and Rinefaart, Inc., 1931 
Rec. No 

Comment: i. A well written story of the seamy side of a miner's life in 
Butte, hard work, whore houses, women; labor troubles; Jews on the extreme 
edge of Jewry. Apparently by an author impelled to write and compelled 
to sell ; a salable picture but not a convincing one. 

2. Chiefly the story of Rodney Cornet and his nephew, John Donnelly. 
Rodney possesses a magnificent voice which he uses for advertising wares 
on the streets. Through drink and careless habits, he loses his voice tem 
porarily to regain it later, however, in a moment of great emotion. John's 
wife is Zola, a girl from "down the line." Their life is tempestuous, ending 
in tragedy for the girl. Brinig hates hypocrisy and meanness. In consequence, 
some of his characterizations are caricatures, especially so in the case of 
Angelina, Rodney's daughter, and Oswald, her miserly husband. Interesting 
but not so well done as Sin#ermann, 
BRINK, CAROL RYRIE (Idaho; fr. res.): 
All Over Town! Macmillan Co., 1939 
Rec. Grades 3, 4, 5, 6 Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Ardeth and the two sons of the new minister find adventures 
"All Over Town" in this heart-warming story of the early 1900*8, The 
author is recalling her own childhood in Moscow, Idaho. This book, espe 
cially well done, appeals to adults as well as children. 

2. A splendid story of a doctor's child who has a pony and plays with 
two lively sons of the village pastor. They have adventures every day and 
bring some backsliders back into the church by their kindly, humane deeds. 
Locale, a small western town. 
BRINK, CAROL RYRIE (Idaho; fr. res.) : 

Anything Can Happen on the River; Macmillan Co., 1934 
Rec. Grades 6 

Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: i. Jacques Poiret, a fourteen-year-old French boy, finds himself 
alone in Paris with the keys which fit a canal boat that has been lost for 
thirteen years and few other worldly goods. His adventures lead him up and 
down the Seine until the lost canal boat is found and Jacques' fortune is 
restored. The characters are well portrayed and the incidents are told in an 
interesting and vivid way. 

2. A country boy, after mother's funeral, faces the world with few world 
ly possessions. He experiences vivid adventures finding his canal boat which 
was lost for 13 years. A vivid picture of life on a river where competition is 
keen and boats are stolen. His partner proves a true friend. Locale, Paris. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 43 

BRINK, CAROL RYRIE (Waho; fr. res.): 

Caddie Wood lawn; Macmillan Co., 1935 

Rec. Grades 6 

Jr. H. 7,8,9 

Comment: i, Caddie Woodlawn is the story of a pioneer American girl 
told in an easy flowing, charming manner. Caddie's adventures are interest 
ing and in the most part are told as they really happened. Caddie Woodlanun 
was awarded the Newberry Prize as being the most outstanding children's 
book published in 1935. Locale, western Wisconsin. 

2. The true adventures of the inner life of a girl named Caddie Wood- 
lawn^ Her father was disinherited when he married. After pioneering in 
America, her family and father refused to return to England for a title and 
estate. 
BRINK, CAROL RYRIE (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Mademoiselle Misfortune; Macmillan Co., 1936 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, j2 

Comment^ i, Alice Morean, 14, is the oldest daughter of a French family 
of six girls and a boy. She solves a mystery, the reward for which brings 
better days again for her family. This well-written story delightfully por 
trays French life. The book is very entertaining. Locale, Paris and Cannes. 

2. A French story of six misfortunes six daughters of aristocratic family 
that recently lost fortune. One daughter travels by car in Paris and surround 
ing ^ country as a companion to an elderly American lady, visiting all places 
of interest. Through the mysterious disappearance of an elderly lady an 
important document is found, and the daughter brings family fortune again. 

BRODERICK, THERESE (Montana; fr. res.): 

The Brand! The Alice Harriman Co., Seattle, 1909 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This is the romantic and somewhat melodramatic story of an East 
ern girl living for a time on a Montana cattle ranch. Her last minute 
escape from marriage to the villainous Indian agent and final realization of 
her love for the ranch owner, a part-Indian, provide the traditionally happy 
ending. 
BROTHER ERNEST: Boys of the Covered Wagon. See ERNEST, 

BROTHER 
BROWN, JENNIE BROUGHTON (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Fort Hall on the Oregon Trail; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1932 
Rec. Sr. H. 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C Fr. Soph. Gen. K. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A history of the Fort Hall of pioneering days: incidentally a 
history of the activities of the colorful pioneering characters who were re 
sponsible for Fort Hall and other trading posts of the early West. The book 
reflects research; appears to have the virtue of accuracy; has good organiza 
tion ; lacks the touch of the artist in the writing of it. 

a. Focusing attention upon Fort Hall, on the Old Oregon Trail, as a 
point of arrival and departure, the author marshals the whole kaleidoscopic 
procession of explorers, missionaries, emigrants, and other western characters 
who led the way into the Pacific Northwest. 

3. A scholarly historical study, portraying the panorama of life that 
swirled about Old Fort Hall near the banks of the Snake in Southeastern 
Idaho. Scenes of history, rich in adventure, are reenacted as the author 
vividly unfolds the charm of the Pacific Northwest. 

BROWNE, BELMORE (Washington; fr. res.): 

TAe Quest *>f the Golden Valley; G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1916 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 . 
Comment: A Connecticut boy lives with his uncle, an outdoor man of a wild 



44 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

section of Puget Sound. The two go to Alaska in search of a gold claim, 
which they find after many discouragements and hardships. Detailed account 
of how and why each thing is done. Style poor ; story not thrilling. 
BROWNE, BELMORE (Washington; fr. res.): 

The White Blanket; G. P. Putnam'* Sons, 1917 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 , , 

Comment: Two boys, trained in wilderness ways, straggle against the clangers 
of the winter in Alaska; cold and failing food supply not against bad men. 
A good picture of how hardships were met. Browne's best adventure story 
for boys, although not well written. 
BRUFFEY, GEORGE A. (Montana; fr. res.): 

Eighty-One Years in the West; The Butte Miner Co., Butte, Mont., 

1925 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph, 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women . 

Comment: i. Pioneer reminiscences running from 1852-1926. Coming West 
over the Oregon Trail, the author swung north toward Virginia City and 
Butte, where he later became a well-known citizen. Covering, as it does, the 
Vigilante period and the development of mining in Montana, his narrative 
of 152 pages is important social history, but of no literary merit. 

2. Experiences of a boy and man on the move westward from West 
Virginia, 1842; Missouri, 1845; The Great West, 1856; human values high; 
literary values such as inhere in sincere, straight-forward narration. 
BRYAN, ENOCH A. (Washington; pr. res.): 

Orient Meets Occident; Students Book Corp., Pullman, Wash., 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A scholarly, enthusiastic narrative of the development of trans 
continental railroads, more particularly the Union Pacific, Northern Pacific, 
Great Northern and the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific. A few 
slight errors in history can be found, but the point of view is fair and the 
narrative clear. 

2. This book is a history of the development of railways in the United 
States, especially their relation to Western expansion. It is a well-written, 
authoritative account, based upon many years of research. Because of its 
specialization, it has very little appeal to students below senior-college level 
or to the general public; but I am recommending it for the few concerned 
with this sort of research. 
BUCK, J. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Sage of Exeter; The Bruce Publishing Co., New York, 1938 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: The story of a young man's conversion to the Catholic Church. 

The story, which is very weak, is built around his conversations with a priest, 

in the course of which the fundamentals of the Church are presented with 

clarity and in readable form. Subject matter may not interest some readers. 

BUCHANAN, VICTOR (Washington; pr. res.): 

Sonnets and Other Poems; Polygon Press, Brooklyn, 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Comment: i. The two score sonnets show fine workmanship expended upon 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 



true, if not always powerful, imagination. Those dealing with a dozen of 
our American authors are of such clarity and appeal as will make them 
valuable in high-school classrooms. In the remaining poems as well, the 
poetic technique is well mastered. 

a. Poems of places and things and persons sonnets, men, times and 
abstract things. Today's youth do not read aloud, have no use for a backlog, 
never talked with the Duchess, nor are concerned about Penelope. But it 
would be fine for them to have exposure to these and others through this 
book of poems. 
BUNNELL, CLARENCE ORVEL (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Legends of the Klickitats; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 

1933 
Rec. No 

Grades 3, 4, 5, 6 

Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 J . . t 

Comment: i. These myths of the Columbia River are recounted m eight 
episodes by one who heard the legends of a vanishing race, from the time 
he was a small boy, from the lips of its ancient chiefs and squaws. They 
are told with the simplicity and directness of the primitives themselves and 
prove fascinating reading. The aboriginal account is valuable, reaching back 
as it does into prehistoric time, both from the geological and the historical 
angle. As a collection of Indian myths this volume ranks exceptionally high. 

2. These folk-tales are but few of the many that Northwest Indians told, 
in which Koyoda (Coyote), a demigod, figures. They tell of the Bridge 
of the Gods, how the salmon came, why bats must fly by night, and how 
Koyoda cleared the channel after the Bridge of the Gods fell. 

3. This book is chiefly concerned with only one legend, "The Bridge ^of 
the Gods." The episodes are not of sufficient value or interest to merit special 
publication. The book is not authoritative. 

BURGESS, F. INA (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Fallen Petals: A Collection of Verse; Privately printed, 1939 
Rec. Sr. C. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Abounding in echoes of Crapsey, Doolittle, and Dickinson, 
Fallen Petals is a collection of verse on many subjects from the title poem 
to "A Symphony in Steel," which praises the locomotive! Miss Burgess has 
a light handling of meter, interesting imagery, and often delicate music. 
The work is uneven, but with definite varieties of verse. 

2. There is apparent in several of the verses in this volume a certain 
traditionalism that reflects, though sincerely and attractively, the classroom's 
rather than personal food of thought, and this point of view occasionally 
conventionalizes feeling and ideas; also youth in the poems claims its right 
to ideas that haunt yet are not individually distinctive; but such poems as 
"Impression," "Twilight," "Fantasy," "Contribution," "The Wind is a 
Witch," and "These Shall Remain" show so much of markedly fine quality 
and lyrical beauty that one hails in this author a sensitive poet of sincere 
gift and exceptional promise. 
BURGLON, NORA (Washington; pr. res.): 

Children of the Soil; Junior Literary Guild Corp., and Doubleday 

Doran and Co., 1931 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 

Comment: i. This book deals with the life, customs, traditions of the Scandi 
navian countries. It is designed for intermediate grades, is well written, and 
has a distinct appeal to children when they reach the stage of exploring 
foreign countries. 

2. Gulklumpen, a little Swedish boy, and his sister, Nicolina, had never 



46 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

had such good fortune as they had after the little tomte came to live on their 
mother's farm. The story is written in a style appealing to children, and por 
trays the manners and customs of Swedish country life in simple language, 
BURGLON, NORA (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Cuckoo Calls; The John C. Winston Co., New York, 1940 
Rec. Grades 5, 6 

Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 Sr. H. 10 

Comment: i. If the cuckoo calls from the West, this is a sure sign of good 
luck. Good luck came to these children, but only after many vicissitudes and 
hard work, following wonderful initiative, on Community projects. A very 
satisfactory style and most timely information. 

2. A sympathetic story of Finland, interesting and appealing. A result of 
youthful life spent in Scandinavian countries. There is a pleasing variety of 
characters ; there are many thrilling events. 
BURGLON, NORA (Washington; pr. res.): 

Deep Silver; Houghton, Mifflin Co., 1938 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: i. Ewald, a young waif, has many exciting adventures and 
narrow escapes when he goes on a cod fishing trip, accompanied by his two 
strange pets, a wolf and an eagle. The suspense and mystery surrounding 
the characters and all the events of the story make it especially appealing to 
children. Locale, Norway. 

2. This story of the cod banks is full of thrilling adventure and fine 
character. It is written in the excellent style for which the author has become 
famous. 
BURGLON, NORA (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Gate Swings In; Little, Brown and Co., 1937 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 

Comment: i. The book is written in Nora Burglon's usual good humor and 
direct style. The scene is Sweden and gives a sincere and tolerant portrayal 
of ^the simple, superstitious life of the Swedish country people. The heroine, 
Minda, a poor orphan girl, is befriended by the Widow of Dalstorp. In re 
turn for her kindness Minda, with the help of pet goat, Stor Geta, and her 
good tomte man, finds the lost iron ore vein on the Dalstorp farm. 

2. Minda, the little Swedish goat-girl, discovered that Stor Geta, her 
troll-goat, would bring her luck. The story of her adventures is told in a 
clear, simple style, with many native Swedish expressions. It has that air of 
mystery and superstition, characteristic of Nora Burglon's stones, and very 
appealing to children. 
BURGLON, NORA (Washington; pr. res.): 

Ghost Ship; Little, Brown and Co., 1932 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: i. In a delightful adventure story for boys and girls, two Nor- 




used as a hoax by a village thief. Locale, Norway. 

2. Redolent with the tang of old Norwan, Sverre and Ingrid activate a 
rural setting with genuine juvenile interest. Old-country characters of school 
master, pastor, storekeeper, ship-builder vital and true. "Four Star" for kids 
from six to twelve. I like it myself. 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 
BURGLON, NORA (Washington; pr. res.): 



Sticks Across the Chimney; Holiday House Co., New York, 1938 

Comment: i. A splendid story of life, customs, tradition, and superstitions 
~ rly Denmark.^My children loved it, 

This is an imaginative and interesting story of two Danish children 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 47 

who live with their mother on a farm, near the sea. It gives a realistic pic 
ture of Danish social life, customs, and superstitions, and has an atmosphere 
of mystery and suspense that all children enjoy. 
BURKS, ARTHUR J. (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Here Are My People; Funk and Wagnalls Co., 1936 
Rec. Jr. H. 7. 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, n, i2 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Homely but vigorous life of pioneers in the Big Bend country 
is portrayed in the vernacular of those pioneers. There is narrative, but 
seemingly the story of actual events skillfully told. 

f 2. ^The purpose of the book is to "bring out the spirit of the pioneer 
times.'* It deals with the pioneering of Lewiston and its surrounding terri 
tory. Although written after the fashion of "The Spoon River Anthology," 
it is powerfully impressionistic. One feels the spirit of the early West, 
Commendable verse ; strong in character and feeling. 
BURNIE, DONALD, pseud. (Idaho; deceased): 

Tsceminicum; Harold G. Merriam, Missoula, Montana, 1930 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Jr. C, Fr. Soph. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Poems of the Snake River people preserving various types 
among the early pioneers, who, each in his characteristic way, contributed a 
bit of color to the community life. Intensely human, beautifully written. 
Book now out of print. 

^ 2. The purpose of the book is to "bring out the spirit of the pioneer 
times." It deals with the pioneering of Lewiston, Idaho, and its surrounding 
territory. Although written after the fashion of "The Spoon River Anthol 
ogy," it is powerfully impressionistic. One does feel the spirit of the early 
West. Commendable verse; strong in character and feeling. The author was 
Judge R. D. Leeper, formerly of Lewiston and Boise, Idaho. He died in 1932. 
BUSH, WiLLARD C. (Oregon; P r. res.): 

Pahang; The Macmillan Co., 1938 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The author's experiences as a rubber planter and big-game 
hunter make a very readable book. Two thousand workers, Javanese, Chi 
nese, and Bengalese work on the plantation. Quick action with insubordinate 
natives and hair-breadth escapes from jungle beasts earn for him the name 
of "Mad-Yank." Some of the descriptions of the loathsome customs of the 
natives are revolting. 

z. A tale of terror and excitement which takes place on a Malay rubber 
plantation where the author spent several years as manager. He describes 
the perils of the jungles, the inhumane methods of exploitation, and the 
customs and characteristics of the natives in a most vivid fashion. 
BUTLER, JULIA (Washington; fr. res.): 

Singing Paddles; Henry Holt and Co., 1937 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 

Jr. H. 7,8,9 

Comment: i. Chanting voyageurs and their singing paddles fascinated the 
Blair children, who had come from Kentucky to the Oregon territory. Set 
tling in Southwest Washington, this inland family grew to love the Columbia 
River with its never-ending passage of Indian paddlers, sounding their eerie 
"ki-yi-yi-yi" as they slipped along the shore line, 
2. In 1843, Sally Blair, her brother David, and Betty Reid, traveled with 



48 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

their families, in covered wagons, from Kentucky to Oregon. The story of 
their journey and of their first years in the new country, is told in an en 
thusiastic and fast-moving manner that is appealing to all children. Locale, 
Oregon, Vancouver, and Cathlamet, Washington. 
CAMP, FRANK BERNARD (Idaho; fr. res.): 

War and Peace; The Caxton Printers, 1930 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr, H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Poems on soldiers in the World War trenches and all of life 
that that implies. On the other hand, the author uses the opposite theme of 
peace and the pursuits and the charms life gives under peace, especially 
peace in the wide-open spaces of the Pacific Northwest. 

2. This verse is rhythmical and vigorous, hut rather conventional, and 
sometimes sentimental. It is wholesome in character, often racy and humor 
ous. One finds in it much of the feelings of those who went over to "hunt 
the Huns," and of those who stayed behind. Life in the Northwest is treated 
sympathetically. 

3. The author of several successful books of poetry here sings of training 
camps and trench life; then, by contrast, of the open spaces of the Pacific 
Northwest. 

CAMPBELL, AGNES DORENA (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Fragrance of Sage; John Long., Ltd., London, Eng., 1930 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, 11, 12 

Comment: An account of a young girl, child of society parents, who have 
given up their position to pioneer together in the Oregon territory. The 
girFs experiences in her early life in the desert, in her few years among her 
parent's people, and in her return to the beloved land of her youth form a 
charming, fast-moving romance. 
CANSE, JOHN MARTIN (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Pilgrim and Pioneer; The Abingdon Press, New York, 1930 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, it, 12 

Comment: The religious development of the West is depicted in this biog 
raphy of Jason Lee, the great western missionary. Includes excerpts from 
Lee's journal. Easily read and valuable from both religious and political 
standpoint. 
CANT WELL, ROBERT (Washington; fr. res.): 

The Land of Plenty; Farrar and Rinehart, 1934 
Rec, Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A vivid, realistic treatment of industrial struggle, with factory 
workers, efficiency experts, and all kinds of misunderstandings. The realism 
includes vulgarity; the style is powerful. 

2. Mr. Cantwell has written a powerful novel dealing with the lumber 
industry of the Gray's Harbor area. He successfully captures the atmosphere 
of a specific industry and makes one closely sympathetic to the problems of 
the mill workers. The book develops the various stages of a lumber strike 
and should be very enlightening to the general reader. 
CANTWELL, ROBERT (Washington; pr. res.): 

Laugh and Lie Down! Farrar and Rinehart, Inc., 1931 
Rec. No 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A first novel, this narrative relates the inhibitions of a small 
group in a Washington mill town. Successful in depiction of atmosphere and 
speech. In the main, a book for the mature reader. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 49 

2. A lugubrious monody depicting the inability of a group of young men 
and women in a coast town to come to terms with the life around them. 
Their sexual maladjustments are especially pronounced. The book would be 
better if any kind of reason were suggested for any of the events portrayed. 
Not recommended. 
CAREY, CHARLES H. (Oregon; deceased): 

Journals of Theodore Talhot 1843-1849-1852; Metropolitan Press 

(Binfords & Mort), 1931 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Author of these three journals recounts therein his journey with 
Fremont, a sailing trip around Cape Horn, and later experiences with men 
instrumental in establishing the government of Oregon. Intelligently written 
and ably edited. 
CAREY, CHARLES H. (Oregon; deceased) : 

The History of Oregon; Pioneer Historical Publishing Co., 1928 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr, C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: To date, this is the most complete and exhaustive study of Oregon 
history, with full geographical, aboriginal, and early-day pioneer back 
grounds. The outgrowth of government, with full notes on maturity of terri 
tory and statehood, is ably placed against the earlier background of sea and 
land exploration, with resultant international controversies. Full record of 
the fur trade and its influence on colonization. A large volume. For the most 
part well written. 
CAREY, CHARLES H. (Oregon; deceased): 

A General History of Oregon, Vol. 1 ; Metropolitan Press (Binfords 

& Mort), 1935 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: The book is historically accurate. Much color is added to historic 
facts of importance by an inclusion of interesting stories, mostly accurate 
accounts of experiences which add so much romance and give so much color 
to the Great Pacific Northwest. 
CAREY, CHARLES H. (Oregon; deceased): 

A General History ,of Oregon, Vol. //; Metropolitan Press (Binfords 

& Mort), 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: Historically accurate. Volume II is slower reading than Volume I. 
Still gives many interesting incidents well tied in with chronology of ma 
terial. Slightly less valuable than Volume I. 
CAREY, CHARLES H. (Oregon; deceased): 

General History of Oregon Prior to 1861; Metropolitan Press (Bin- 
fords & Mort), 1922 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr, 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Importance of book is its inclusion of all the important facts of 
Oregon history and its dependability as a work of reference. Events of Ore 
gon country are associated with those on Atlantic seaboard which is helpful 
in gaining knowledge of U. S. history as a unit, Some may disagree on a 
few points of interpretation. 



50 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

CARR, MARY JANE (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Children of the Covered Wagon; Thomas Y. Crowell Co., 1934 
Rec. Grades 5, 6, 7 

Jr. H. 7,8,9 

Comment: i. An enlivening story of Jim, Jerry and Myra, who traveled 
with their parents and two hundred other people from Independence, Mis 
souri, to Oregon's Willamette Valley, 2000 miles. Has tense moments and 
incidents, especially after the party enters the "Indian Country." Delightfully 
written. A general favorite with both juvenile and adult readers. Illustra 
tions by Esther Brann. 

2. Here is one of the better Western pioneer day juveniles. A tale of the 
continent's crossing, told from the viewpoint of young Oregon-bound emi 
grants. Telling somewhat over-cautious on the side of good taste and thereby 
not wholly honest in picture. Writing generally good. 
CARR, MARY JANE (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Peggy and Paul and Laddy; The Thomas Y. Crowell Co., 1936 
Rec, Grades 5, 6 

Comment: The adventures of two small children and their dog on the banks 
of the Willamette River, taken from the author's own childhood experiences. 
Their boat, Treasure Trove* is instrumental in saving two little boys from 
the flood; and, as a result, they are able to help Madame Mimi, their Rus 
sian friend, find her long-lost servant. Well written story, 
CARR, MARY JANE (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Young Mac of Fort Vancouver; Thomas Y. Crowell Co., 1940 
Rec. Grades 6 

Jr. H. 7, 8 

Comment: i. An eager and delightful story of young Donald MacDermott, 
whose mother was White Cloud of the Crees and who lived at Fort Van 
couver under the protection of Dr. McLoughlin through exciting, self-testing 
hours and days. A wholly charming book, in literary style, formal and the 
illustrations by Richard Holberg. 

2. Young Mac, son of Big Mac MacDermott of Scotland and White 
Cloud, a Cree Indian woman, is sent to Fort Vancouver for a year under 
McLoughlin so that he can decide whether to stay among the Indians or go 
to Scotland for an education. Vivid portrayal of fort and Indian life, good 
reading and accurate historical background combined. 
CARR, SARAH PRATT (Washington; pr. res.): 

Billy Tomorrow; A. C. McClurg and Co., 1909 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: Story of the adventures of a little boy who learned that doing a 
thing today is better than putting it off until tomorrow. The story holds the 
interest The moral is rather apparent 
CARR, SARAH PRATT (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Cost of Empire; Stuff Printing Concern, Seattle, 1912 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: Libretto for the opera "Narcissa" by Mary Carr Moore. Narcissa 
was the wife of Marcus Whitman. The scenes are laid in her New England 
home, the Walla Walla mission and the Vancouver fort of the Hudson's Bay 
Co. The opera ends with the Indian massacre. Since the words were meant 
to be sung, ^ they sound somewhat stilted when read, but the story is vivid 
and interesting and gives a fair idea of pioneer life. 
CASE, ROBERT ORMOND (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Big Timber; Macrae Smith Co., 1937 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen, R. Men, Women 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 51 

Comment: i. Portrays the evolution of logging methods in the Northwest 
in an authoritative way. It catches the spirit of the life of the men in the 
lumber camps. Sophisticated readers will not accept the Horatio Alger type 
of characterization and will find the plot overburdened with intrigue and 
lacking in action. Readers of light romantic fiction will be entertained and 
mildly stimulated. 

2. Mr. Case has proved in this story, Big Timber, that he is master of 
the action yarn. The underdog wins. College youth pits its brains and tradi 
tions against the odds of speculators and the Great Oregon Woods and wins. 
The tale is full of many technical words, but these need not interfere with 
the action of a very swiftly moving plot that holds attention page after 
page, for readers who like to have things happen swiftly. 

3. Two college boys, recalled to their homes in the Northwest by the 
deaths of their fathers in an accident, carry on the logging business in which 
their fathers had been partners. To complicate matters the boys had fallen 
in love with the same girl. The story is of the struggle which followed and 
what came of it A well written and well sustained tale. 

CASE, ROBERT ORMOND (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Golden Portage; Doubleday Do ran and Co., 1939 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. ^An action romance of the far North, well plotted and with sus 
pense maintained to a dramatic climax. The characterization is convincing 
and the romantic interest is adroitly handled. The only criticism against an 
otherwise clean story is the over-emphasis of the squaw traffic in the first 
chapters. Men who like tales of the rugged out-of-doors will enjoy this book. 
2. Mr. Case has written a yarn of the Alaskan gold country replete with 
every thriller it could hold: a remittance man, a hero unjustly charged with 
murder, 9,000 ounces of gold, a beautiful Irish girl, and plenty of bad men, 
Indians, dog sleds f n* everything. The story starts a bit slowly, but as it 
gathers momentum it reaches several melodramatic climaxes that all finally 
end in poetic justice. 
CASE, ROBERT ORMOND (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Riders of Grande Ronde; Doubleday Doran and Co., 1928 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: Ranch life is here depicted with all the problems and hardships 
and adventure that go with it. There are some very interesting descriptions 
of landscapes and the student will be able to derive a sense of beauty from 
reading this book. 
CASE, ROBERT ORMOND (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Yukon Drive; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1929 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: A story of adventure in transportation of beef on the hoof from 
the U. S. to the Yukon in the Gold Rush days of '98. Adventurous and spir 
ited, with typical backgrounds of over-fictionized nature. Capable writing, 
but lacks literary value or educational appeal. 
CASE, ROBERT ORMOND (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Whispering Valley; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1932 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Mr. Case has the gift of the raconteur who really relishes the 
true Western Story. Whispering Valley is true to the pioneer pattern of 



52 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

winning the West. It is a lively tale, full of action of the blood-and-thunder 
type, yet it has some interesting side-lights on the psychology of the men 
who settled in the box canyons east of the Cascades, 
CASE, ROBERT ORMOND (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Wings North; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, ir, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Or. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Wings North is an interesting tale of a stalwart young American 
who finally succeeds in staking out the claim that his murdered father had 
discovered ten years before. Suspense is heightened by intrigue, an airplane 
accident, and the love interest of a girl stowaway. Though the characters 
are thoroughly true to western story type, sufficient speed is injected to 
maintain a virile narrative. The novel is good reading to the devotee of 
western stories. 
CASS, FRANK HADLEY (Washington; pr. res.): 

Looking Northwest; Binfords & Mort, 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen, R. Men, Women 

Comment: x. A collection of 30 essays by different writers picturing the 
Pacific Northwest it includes legend, early history, outdoor beauty, indus 
tries, engineering projects and outdoor sports. The book provides a varied 
collection of essays of literary content as well as contemporary interest. 

2. Mr. Cass has written only three of these essays ; the others are collected 
from Northwest authors, several of whom are widely read and admired. The 
editing is not satisfactory, but the regional interest is strong. 
CHAMPNEY, MRS. ELIZABETH WILLIAMS (Washington; deceased): 

.Romance of the Italian Villas; G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1906 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: True tales of the Italian villas, occasionally with fictional ele 
ments. Interesting, characteristic of the Renaissance life ; well written. 
CHAPEL, BEATRICE SHAW (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Peggy the Nomad; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1935 
Rec. Grades 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: i. This is a story of gold-mining and pioneer adventure in Idaho, 
in 1897, as told by a little thirteen-year-old girl. It includes incidents of 
hunting, gathering blackberries, visiting an Indian camp, etc. It is whole 
some and sprightly if lacking in literary charm. The silhouettes at chapter 
headings are delightful. 

a. The ruggedly beautiful Salmon River country of Idaho is the scene 
of this delightful story of a thirteen-year-old fiirl. 
CHASE, MARY ELLEN (Montana; fr. jres.): 

Dawn in Lyonesse; The Macmillan Co., 1938 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Two humble servant girls, daughters of fishermen, are friends. 
Ane, in love, absorbs wisdom of the heart in reading and rereading the 
story of Tristram and Isolde (under the whimsical direction of an American 
anthropologist) that enables her to keep her friend after the friend has be 
trayed her with her betrothed. Human values high, literary value higher. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 53 

The central characters come shadowly to life, but the countryside lives 
entirely. 

2. The loveliest thing Mary Ellen Chase has yet done. The life of Corn 
wall fisher-folk lifted into universal significance. Truth in an old myth 
revitalized by a waitress at Tintagel, who learns through words she scarcely 
understands, the selflessness of real love. A book to treasure. 
CHASE, MARY ELLEN (Montana; fr. res.): 

The Girl from the Big Horn Country; The Page Co., Boston, 1916 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Comment: A fine story of young people, especially girls, which has all the 

romance and adventure that is necessary to hold their interest. 
CHASE, MARY ELLEN (Montana; fr. res.): 

A Goodly Fellowship; The Macmillan Company, 1939 
Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This book, a follow up of "A Goodly Heritage," tells the 
author's experiences as a teacher in a rural school in Maine, a mid-western 
boarding school, three years in Bozeman, Montana, as a graduate student 
in the University of Minnesota and finally at Smith College. It is written 
with modesty and humor that make one want to find some one with whom 
to share it. 

2. Twelve essays take author from teaching in rural school in Maine to 
boarding school in Middle West, public schools in Montana (Bozeman), 
University of Minnesota, St. Catherines, Germany, and finally Smith College. 
Style vivacious and humorous, amusing and vividly portrayed. Material 
all shows author's pride in her chosen profession, teaching. Excellent chapter 
on teaching of English. 
CHASE, MARY ELLEN (Montana; fr. res.): 

A Goodly Heritage; Henry Holt and Company, 1932 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Autobiography of Mary Ellen Chase, professor of English 
literature at Smith College, describing life in a small Maine seacoast town 
from the early nineties up to war in 1914. Author uses those aspects of her 
environment, education, and religious training. Most distinctive. Written 
with clearness, charm, humor, and discrimination, 

2. This relates the author's birth and upbringing in a Maine coast town 
during the nineties and is told with gayety, wit and modesty. 
CHASE, MARY ELLEN (Montana; fr. res.): 

Mary Peters; The Macmillan Company, 1934 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Maine's changing values under the impact of industrial 
changes, which replaced seafaring with summer guest business. A high grade 
second-rate book. The author has sure feeling for the land, her characters 
are slightly lay-figurish, and she disposes of them by death. 

2. This is a sympathetic and quiet story of Maine and the sea andjs 
especially remembered for its careful portrayal of the time and place and its 
delicate treatment of the characters. 

3. Story of experiences of Mary Peters as a child on board her father's 
vessel, the Elizabeth, and later in a Maine village, where ^ rapid changes 
were coming about with the decay of shipping and the corning of summer 
people. Characterization excellent, colorful, and very convincingly told. 



54 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

CHASE, MARY ELLEN (Montana; fr. res.): 

Silas Crockett; The MacmilSan Company, 1935 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C, Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This is a story of four generations of a New England sea 
faring family told with an understanding insight into the culture of those 
Maine people. 

2. A history of five generations of Maine sea-faring people, beginning 
with captains of clipper ships in the China trade and ending with a worker 
in a herring packing house. The people are real, and pleasant to know. The 
descriptions are nicely handled. There is a real feeling for the sea. 

CHASE, MARY ELLEN (Montana; fr. res.): 

This England; The Macmillan Company, 1936 

Rec. Sr. H. 12. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Charming essays, thirteen in number, written in vivid style, 
humorous and clever. Descriptions of English weather, English trees, food, 
spring in England, and English Sunday, English manners, and customs, the 
railway travel, and British loyalty to the throne. 

2. A series of light and at times humorous essays on life in England. 
The description is excellent, the humor kindly. It is an interesting^ study of 
another land and another way of life. Pleasant and instructive reading. 
CHITTICK, V. L. O. (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Ring-Tailed Roarers; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1941 
Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Intelligent selection and editing of the whoppers told by the 
folk (but not always) about their strong and super-able men. Abundant 
humor for readers whose imagination enjoys stretching and whose tastes are 
not finicky. Bibliographical help provided and an introductory essay that is 
enlightening about this kind of material. 

2. This collection of tall-tales of the American frontier (1830-1860) 
attempts to describe the frontier spirit by isolating the mythical type of th< 
"ring-tailed roarer," a character always spoiling for a fight and unrestrained 
by truth in relation of his exploits. A valuable contribution to our under 
standing of frontier literature. 
CHEVIGNY, HECTOR (Montana; native): 

Lost Empire; The Macmillan Company, 1937 
Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12. 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women. Sp. R. 

Comment: i. An interesting and valuable contribution to the account of 
Russia's attempt to establish colonies on the coast of Western America; and 
a biography of Rezanov, whose dream this was. Authentic narrative history 
with some elements of fiction. Slow in getting started but increasingly inter 
esting. 

a. Fascinating, colorful account of the Russian influence in the Pacific 
and North American Pacific coast. Nicely written and particularly valuable 
from the standpoint of conveying an understanding of intrigues as well as 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 55 

straightforward honesty of the development of trade and the relatively unex 
plored part of the world. 

3. "A romantic story of the life and unusual adventures of Nikolai 
Rezanov, who in 1805 left glittering St. Petersburg to exploit the Aleutian 
Islands. His fiery temperament made an impression from San Francisco to 
Siberia. Chevigny's style is flat and pedestrian, but his story is good and 
throws an ^interesting sidelight on early Pacific Coast history." 

4. A historical biography dealing with the dynamic character, Rezanov. 
He was the one who was chiefly responsible for the Russian fur trading and 
subsequent colonization of Alaska. Well written. Marred somewhat by a too 
extensive use of foreign languages. 

CHILDS, HERBERT ELLSWORTH (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Reading for Enjoyment; Oregon State College Cooperative Associa 
tion, 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr, C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: The gist of the advice is, read what interests you when you are 
interested. It is sincere, and is to be commended for the wide range of in 
terest represented in the annotated list of one hundred popular titles from 
contemporary literature. If one does not like to read, however, this brochure 
will not convert him. 

CHURCHILL, CLAIRE WARNER (Mrs.) (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Mt. Hood Timberline Lodge; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 
1936 

Rec. Sp. R. 

Comment: The story of the construction, design, craftsmanship and great 
social concept behind the creation of the Mount Hood Recreational Area and 
Timberline Lodge in particular. Effectively told in word and picture. A 
superlative limited edition of only thirty-two copies. A masterpiece of 
graphic art craftsmanship. 
CHURCHILL, CLAIRE WARNER (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Slave Wives .of Nehalem; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 

1933 
Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen.Gr. 

Comment: Well written stories with authentic background. The customs of 
the Nehalems are well portrayed. Due to the handling of marriage customs, 
etc., it is not suitable for younger readers. The book might be used in a 
sociology course. 

CHURCHILL, CLAIRE WARNER (Oregon; pr. res.): 

South of the Sunset; Junior Literary Guild and Wilson, Rufus 

Rockwell, New York, 1936 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. Sacajawea, or Canoe Launcher, led Lewis and Clark or Long 
Knife and Red Hair, as she called them, to the Pacific. Her bravery and 
devotion to Red Hair make an interesting story. Historically accurate, well- 
written and good description of Indian customs. 

2. A most readable book based on the always interesting story of the 
Lewis and Clark expedition. It gives a picture of courage and endurance 
which appeals to the reader. The characters are outstanding and interest 
follows closely the adventures of Red Hair and Beaver Girl, whom we knew 
as Wm. Clark and Sacajawea, 



$6 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

CHURCHILL, DAVID R. (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Spinnings from the Cobwebs; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1935 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. These simple poems are replete with homely philosophy: 
''Keep your eye on the goal from the beginning ; for the past to be faced is a 
tragical truth: old age seldom scores in its inning." Churchill has a natural 
swing, but there is a monotonous sameness in his rhythm. Not a great poet 
but not at all bad. 

2. The volume contains essays in poetry form on such one-word topics 
as: Nature, Mother, Honesty, Patriotism. Judging from the poems, the author 
knows the blessings of a life of work and reflects cheerful living and a 
sound, simple philosophy of life. 
CLAPP, MARY BRENNAN (Montana; pr. res.): 

And Then Remold ft; H. G. Merriam, Missoula, Montana, 1929 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen, Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Sincere verse, of a commendably high plane in subject matter; 
the best of the poems significant, thought-provoking, and well wrought In 
each there is evident that over-meaning, that secondary and greater meaning, 
that lifts verse to poetry. Mrs. Clapp writes of the intimate, personal life 
she knows, with fine humor no less than insight into life's tragic aspects. 

2. A collection of quiet and beautifully polished poems that leave the 
reader with a sense of serenity* They will be enjoyed by adults, but are a 
bit difficult for children. 
CLARK, DAN ELBERT (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The West in American History; Thomas Y. Crowell Company, 1837 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R, Men, Women 

Comment: Lucid account of the colonizing and westward movement of settle 
ment from early Spanish adventurers. Main emphasis on the shifting frontier 
populations, and their cultural character and significance. Expository rather 
than descriptive, the book provides first-rate background material for readers 
of regional fiction and historical fiction. Geographical and climatic factors, 
the distribution and displacing of Indian populations, stage-coach, govern 
mental developments, land grabbing up to the passing of the frontier, are 
presented. Maps show routes of colonization and special population. 
CLARK, ELLA ELIZABETH (Washington; pr, res.): 

Poetry; An Interpretation of Life; Farrar and Rinehart, 1935 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: The title suggests the approach made in this book. Because of the 
richness during the nineteenth century and because the expressed opinion of 
students indicate that they enjoy poetry of that period, the majority of the 
poems come from that period. Earlier and later centuries, however, have not 
been neglected. An attempt has been made to include poems not often in 
cluded in a restricted anthology such as this. 
CLARK, MARJORIE RUTH, and SIMON S. (Washington; pr. res.): 

Labor Movement in America; New York, Norton, 1938 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen, Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women. Sp. R. 

Comment: A book on the labor movement of the United States written in a 
clear, simple language. An attempt has been made to trace the labor move 
ment from a historical point of view, but falls short of being a scientific piece 
of work by the absence of any documentation or bibliography. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 57 

CLARK, ROBERT CARLTON (Oregon; deceased): 

A History of Oregon; Row, Peterson and Co., 1926 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Jr. C. Jr. Soph. 

Comment: Done in collaboration with Professors Robert H. Down and George 
V. Blue, this work is a concise one-volume summary of Oregon history and 
government. Text clear, facts chronologically given. Early chapters outline 
background of geography, Indian life, and exploration epoch. Some attention 
given agrarian and industrial development. Notes and references for addi 
tional study. Suitable as a supplementary textbook. 
CLARK, ROBERT CARLTON (Oregon; deceased): 

A History of the Willamette Valley; S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., 

1927 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: While presented as a nucleus study of the Willamette Valley, its 
indigenous factors, settlement and growth, this work presents as well a 
rather full survey of the larger historical story of the Oregon country prior 
to statehood. Later portions given over to the valley's agricultural, industrial, 
and educational growth. Adequately written. Of value as general supple 
mentary reading. Over 800 pages. 
CLARKE, S. A. (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Pioneer Days of Oregon History; J. K. Gill Company, 1905 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: A somewhat story-ized account of Oregon history, highly readable 
and for the most part authentic. Told in flowing narrative style, with many 
incidents gathered from then-living characters. Has considerable human in 
terest appeal and contains much source material. Not a textbook. Contains 
some debatable viewpoints and false glamour. 
CLEMENTS, COLIN CAMPBELL (Montana; fr. res.), and RYERSON, 

FLORENCE: 

Angels Don't Marry, and Other Plays; Samuel French, 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen, Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Seven beautifully constructed one-acts, written in collaboration 
with Florence Ryerspn, the wife of Mr. Clements. Interesting reading, suit 
able for production in small theaters or even in private drawing-rooms. Full 
of humor and pathos. Themes of adolescence, maturity, and age, of private, 
professional, and even royal circles. 

^2. Seven clear and light one-act plays that could be done nicely by either 
high school or college ages. The dialogue is quick and well done and de 
cidedly modern. Quite superior material with no particular meaning. 
CLEMENTS, COLIN CAMPBELL (Montana; fr. res.), and RYERSON, 

FLORENCE: 

Ever Since Eve; Samuel French, 1941 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Light three-act comedy especially suitable for high school. 

Plot centers about a group of students intent upon starting a school paper. 

Clever dialogue. Locale: presumably a California town but it might be a 

small town in any part of the country. 

2. Why not as well Ewer Since Adamf Delightfully funny situations in 



58 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

which parents, teachers, students, and citizens become involved. Dedicated to 
Frederick Scheuch, former acting president of Montana State University. 
Well worth the royalty of twenty-five dollars for amateur theatricals. All 
scenes in one room. Properties and costumes contemporary, easily assembled. 
CLEMENTS, COLIN CAMPBELL (Montana; fr. res.): 

Plays for a Folding Theatre; Stewart Kidd Company, 1923 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Seven one-act plays which are mostly all fantasy. They are 
easily staged and best suited to college ages. They all carry a thought but 
some are weirdly presented. They may act better than they read. 

2, Seven one-acts, five of them in tragic mood and unusual settings with 
symbolic implications. Two love idyls, also highly symbolic, relieve the 
general depressive effect. Production would entail interesting scenic experi 
ments. The reader feels that the author is more successful in his dramatiza 
tion of contemporary situations. 
COAXES, GRACE STONE (MRS. HENDERSON COATES) (Montana; 

pr. res.): 

Black Cherries; Alfred A. Knopf, 1931 
Rec. Sr. H, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Story of adolescence in rural conditions, with human discussion 
of relationship of husband, wife and second wife and attendant complica 
tions, Splendid prose style ; rather chaotic plot, but with fine description and 
moving emotional passages. Recommended highly for adults. 

2. Beautifully written. Mrs. Coates has an appreciation of words and 
knows how to use them sparingly and yet create atmosphere. It is a collec 
tion of brief sketches of pioneering life in the middle west, seen through the 
eyes of an imaginative, sensitive child. It would give the reader a good 
background idea of the conditions surrounding the struggles of early pioneers 
and also her word pictures would be splendid collateral reading for English 
students. Reminiscent of Pater. 

3. Keenly psychological stories, deeply emotional, beautifully done from 
the point of view of literary art Not popular, but of great artistic signifi 
cance and perhaps a real contribution to an understanding of the psychology 
of childhood. 

4. Remarkably limpid revelation of a child's soul and youthful percep 
tion ; keenly perceptive. Beautiful. 

COATES, GRACE STONE, Editor: Jughead* Behind the Lines, See 

NOBLE, CARL 
COATES, GRACE STONE (Montana; pr. res.)/ 

Mead and Mangel-Wurzel; The Caxton Printers, 1931 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
College 

Comment: i. Experiences of the heart, sharp, vivid, in a variety of lyrical 
forms. Mrs. Coates steers clear of sentimentality. These are poems of ma 
turity, poignant, convincing. Montana, its ranches, mountains, gleams in and 
out of the music, though never named in the words. 

2. There is less of mead than of mangel-wur2el, but the poems, which 
have a story interest underlying them, show that this road to happiness had 
to be a way of pain. The poems are reconstructed moods of the untractable, 
unsuitable, and unappeasable in femininity, ranging from sadonic facing 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 59 

of impossible situations to absolute and perfect surrender to the final worthy 
love, 

3 : Wonderful appreciation and feeling for words. But not a happy col 
lection. Her own words, "Mead was the honey-weather Gods of Olympus 
were always soused on; and mangel-wurzels are coarse beets that my Ger 
man ancestors fed their cattle on in good times, and themselves in times of 
famine/' But she hastily added that it isn't that which is honey wine and 
hunger root: it is love which "is mead when you are falling in and mangle- 
wurzel when you are falling out." 
COATES, GRACE STONE (Montana; pr. res.): 

Portulacas in the Wheat; The Caxton Printers, 1932 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph, 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. It is terse yet beautiful, this tiny book of lyric verse. Critical 
and clear eyed vision of what life brings to middle age. Many show a joyous 
understanding of Montana sources. It is not a book that youth will be eager 
about. To me not so appealing as "Mead and Mangel- Wurzel," yet very 
goodvery well done. Grace Stone Coates is only for those who are willing 
to drink a cup down to its very dregs. 

2* Strength, ^rebellion, delicate hatred, and vivid sympathy are in this 
book of intrinsically feminine poetry. There is intensity in this collection, 
and ^ a polished technique. Some of the poems, however, suffer from ob 
scurity, and many will be realized sympathetically by only a few readers. 
COATES, GRACE STONE, editor; Riding the High Country. See Tucker, 

Patrick 
COBURN, WALLACE DAVID (Montana; fr. res.): 

The Battle of the Little Bighorn; Overland-Outwest Publications, 
Los Angeles, 1936 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Eyewitness account of the field of battle after the Custer 
fight, as remembered by Major Will A. Logan in 1910, and as reported by 
Mr. Coburn in 1936. Interesting reference to Captain Keogh. Of doubtful 
value as source material. For adult readers. Illustrated with Stephenson- 
Huffman historical photographs, 

2. Apparently real source material on the Custer massacre taken from a 
word-of -mouth account by Major Logan. It throws the blame of the mas 
sacre on Custer, and shows the great hero of the battle to be Captain 
Miles Keogh. A powerful and exciting account. 
COBURN, WALLACE DAVID (Montana; fr. res.): 

Rhymes of a Round-up Camp; Gem Pub. Co. 'now Wetzel Pub. Co., 

Los Angeles, 1899 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr, Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment; i. Verses about cowboy life in Montana in the last century. 
Cowboys are naively sentimental, not highly literate these verses are the 
same. Cowboys were sometimes exuberant and colorful so are these verses. 
For any reader who, at moments, is a cowboy at heart. C. M. Russell illus 
trations. 

2. One of Montana's "Cowboy Poets" sings the life of the range as he 
knew it* The verse is not polished nor especially high in tone the poems are 
mostly ballads of the familiar cowboy type. The kind of poems cowboys 
themselves like and sing. 



60 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

COCHRANE, BEN H., and COLDIRON, WILLIAM DEAN (Washington; 

pr. res.) : 

Disillusion; Binfords & Mort, 1939 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This novel with a purpose deals with the lumber industry, 
especially in its changes from earlier periods when individuals cut their own 
and had chances at fortune, to the present situation when vast capital con 
trols vast hordes of laborers. 

2. This story of the labor struggle in Western Washington wood-working 
mills brings the story up to and includes the recent developments in plywood 
manufacture. Not strong as a novel, but of some importance in weighing 
labor problems. 
CODY, REVEREND EDMUND R., M.A. (Idaho; pr. res.): 

History of the Coeur d'Alene Mission of the Sacred Heart; The 

Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1930 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, iz 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Sp. R. 

Comment: Booklet relating the history of the "Old Mission," commonly 

known as the Cataldo mission; fundamentally a history of the "Black 

Robes" and their two-fold purpose "to bring light of the Gospel to the 

(Northwest) Indians and to teach them the much-needed lesson in industry." 

COE, URLING C. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Frontier Doctor; The Macmillan Co., 1940 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Sp. R. 

Comment: i. An account of a pioneer doctor's experiences in the days of 
the earliest boom in and around Bead, the boom being mostly in lumbering. 
Written without the least literary pretension, and never reaching a "literary" 
level, it is none the less a moving record of the hardships and heroism (and 
some humor) that went into a medical man's successful attempt to make 
good in such an environment as he depicts. Invaluable close-up of what life 
in general was like in eastern Oregon from 1905 to 1910. 

2. The author's own story of his experiences as "the doc" at Farewell 
(Bend, Oregon) between 1905 and 1911. His literary style isn't commend 
able, but that fact can be somewhat overlooked in lieu of the rousing raw 
material at hand buckaroos, Indians, horse thieves, cattle rustlers, as well 
as the professional adventures one would expect a young M.D. to find in a 
frontier town. Written for the layman. 
COKER, TRACY (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Ee-dah-how; The Caxton Printer*, Ltd., 1933 
Rec. Jr. H. 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. An historical novel dealing with the Oregon Country in the 
days before the Indian had given way to the white invader. 

2. The author's simple story of a white man's love for his half-breed 
Indian wife in a setting of the early west, is simply and beautifully told. 
The story includes a wealth of information concerning South Idaho Indian 
tribes. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 61 

3. An^ entertaining story of a Civil War veteran, relating his experiences 
in the Civil War, his pioneer days in Idaho. The Indian tribes mentioned 
lived in four western states. The Idaho descriptions are very good. Ee-dah- 
how means "Gem of the Mountains." The human values stressed are love and 
courage. 

COLDIRON, WILLIAM DEAN: Disillusion. See COCHRANE, BEN H. 
COLEMAN, RUFUS A., Editor (Montana; pr. res.) : 

Western Prose and Poetry; Harper and Brothers, 1932 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10 ,n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A collection of the best of Western prose and poetry; all of 
the selections are fairly short. Especially valuable to teachers, but fine read 
ing for anybody who loves good literature. 

2. This is a splendid type of class-room text for high schools and junior 
colleges. Vigorous, particularly rich in Western characterizations and back 
grounds challenging to young writers, and best of all, enjoyable. 
COLTER, ELI (Mrs. GLENN FAGALDE) (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Sad Man's Trail; Alfred H. King, 1931 
Rec. No 

Comment: Another Western "bad man" yarn, compounded of the tritely ro 
mantic and the daringly improbable, but of a better type than the usual 
thriller. Author writes with more accomplishment than the nature of her 
material warrants. This novel of negligent worth. 
COLTER, ELI (Mrs. GLENN FAGALDE) (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Outcast of Lazy B.; Alfred H. King, New York, 1933 
Rec. No 

Comment: A tale of the Northwest and of Karl Sand's attempt to prove 
himself innocent of the shot which blinded his father and killed his step 
mother. An exciting but highly improbable tale. 
COLTER, ELI (MRS. GLENN FAGALDE): Jungle Women. See YEA- 

GER, FRANCIS (MORDEN) 
COLTER, ELI (Mrs. GLENN FAGALDE) (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Three Killers; Alfred H. King, New York, 1932 
Rec. No 

Comment: A realistic Western yarn of the raw two-gun type, fairly well 
written for this sort of novel, but falsely conceived and overdrawn. Back 
ground that of Oregon mining town. Lacks suitability as supplementary read 
ing. Excess of shooting and drinking. 
COMER, CORNELIA ATWOOD PRATT (Washington; deceased): 

Preliminaries; Hough ton, Mifflin Co., 1912 
Rec. Sr. H. iz 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr, 

Comment: Three long short stories dealing with basic modern problems of the 
family. The point of view is New England or at least of the elder generation 
of breeding and high standards. The work is thoughtful and the style has 
distinction, and clarity. 

COMMANDER, KINGSMILL (Washington; pr. res.): 

Vikings of the Stars; Harold Vinal Co., 1928 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: Poems on aviation and aviators. Easy reading. Matter-of-fact 
rather than highly imaginative. Form fairly good throughout, although more 
studied than inspired. Some poems very good. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 



CONNER, SABRA (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Captain Redlegs; Reilly and Lee Co., Chicago, 1930 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 

Comment: An adventure story of fur trading along the Columbia. Concerns 
the adventures of a boy pirate in the time of Cromwell. A distinct improve 
ment upon the earlier book in character delineation, atmosphere and style. 
Appeals to all young lovers of adventure. 
CONNER, SABRA (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Fighting Starrs of Oregon; Reilly and Lee Co., Chicago, 1932 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: A tale of the Willamette Valley in the i84o's. Indians, fighting 
and such. Good style ; fast, clean action. Good appeal to young readers. The 
author is an English teacher in a Portland high school. 
CONNER, SABRA (Oregon; pr. res.): 

On Sweetwater Trail; Reilly and Lee Co., Chicago, 192S 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: i. The story of adventures that confront a boy who scouts with 
Kit Carson over the emigrant passes into California. Although lacking the 
zest and the art of the greatest adventure tales, it is packed with the excit 
ing incidents that all boys love. 

z. Exceptionally well-handled adventure with plenty of hair-breadth 
escapes, heroic acts and glamor. There is considerable scalping. The love 
\ story has a simple charm. Dogs, horses, and Mountain Men. 
CONNER, SABRA (Oregon; pr. res.): 

\The Quest of the Sea Otter; Reilly and Lee Co., Chicago, 1927 
Rec'v Jr. H. 7. 8, 9 

Cor*fo merit: A lively tale of the days of sailing ships that traded, perilously, 

/along the Pacific Coast in early days. Romance of the Paris-educated son of 

the ship's owner, and the tomboy daughter of the ship's captain. Good ad 

venture stuff for the very young. Prose of good fiber, but without fineness. 

C.ONNOLLY, CHRISTOPHER P. (Montana; fr. res.): 

The Devil Learns to Vote The Story of Montana; Covici-Friede 

Publishers, 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R, Men, Women 

Comment: i. The book has a special value for its human interest. The re 
miniscences of a keen living activity and in an interesting environment 
Much of the material may not be historically correct, but in spirit it surely 
must be accurate, 

2. Tells of Vigilante days in Virginia City; Clark, Daly, Heinze feud 
in Butte; and the fight to plant Clark in an unwilling Senate, Covers much 
the same ground as "War of the Copper Kings" but with more anecdotes, 
and some inside stuff that orily Connolly could know since he was a lawyer 
in Butte for some 20 years. 
COOPER, J. C. (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Yamhills: An Indian Romance; Privately printed, 1904 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: A rather lengthy legendary romance of the founding of the Yam- 
hill Indian tribe in the west-central Willamette Valley, Story both beautiful 
and tragic, possibly over-colored by author. Makes enjoyable reading. 
CORNING, HOWARD McKINLEY (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Deer foot Prints; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort) 1935 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Comment: Lyrical, imagistic verse on nature themes. Reminiscent of Ed- 



__ NORTHWEST BOOKS _ 63 

ward Arlington Robinson and Robert Frost in his lyric quality. A splendid 
text for the study of poetic rhetorical forms. Now out of print. 
CORNING, HOWARD McKINLEY (Oregon; pr. res.)-' 

The Mountain in the Sky; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort) 



Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, iz 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. As the subtitle suggests, this is to a limited extent a "book of 
Oregon poems." However, much of the local color is merely in the title. 
The book is excellent. Some of the poems are very fine. Some rather mediocre. 
However, there is sufficient excellence to recommend it to perusal of both 
high school and college students, although it is more adapted to the latter. 
The style, while not so involved and vague as in These People, is still often 
esoteric in its implications. In the main, however, the literary style is good. 
2. A distinctive volume of poetry on nature themes in an Oregon setting. 
Several historical narratives add a pioneer flavor to the subject matter. Much 
of the poetry is approached in a philosophical mood; all of it is intellectual 
rather than emotional, but lyrical notes are also heard. For readers who 
appreciate a high literary quality. 

CORNING, HOWARD McKINLEY (Oregon; pr. res.): 
These People; Harold Vinal, Ltd., 1926 

Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Cr, C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen, R. Men, Women 

Comment: A book of people. The literary style is usually of a good quality 
but often unnecessarily obscure. Most of the poems are intellectually beyond 
the grasp of the high school student. One or two of them deal with moral 
subjects that would probably exclude them from consideration as high school 
matter. However, because of the literary excellence of a few of the poems 
I recommend the book for college students. 

COTTON, SAMUEL J. (Oregon; deceased): 

Stories of Nehalem; M. A. Donahue and Co., Chicago, 1915 

Rec. Jr. H. 7,8,9 

Sr. H. 10, 1 1, 12 

Comment: The legends of Nehalem Valley such as those of Old Indian God 
and the beeswax ship, would be enjoyed by most young students and many 
others, but the accounts of early inhabitants of the Nehalem Valley would 
interest few outside the valley, except those interested in details of Oregon's 
history. 

COX, SIDNEY, and FREEMAN, EDMUND, editors, (Montana; pr. res.): 
Prose Preferences, First Series; Harper and Bothers, 1926 

Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Thirty-two varied but carefully chosen prose selections for 
students on the college level, including writing by such men as: Twain, 
Maseeld, Liam O'Flaherty, Joyce, Ellis, Santayana, D. H. Lawrence, Tho- 
reau, and Frost. The editors here present some of their favorite reading. The 
first of two collections by the same collaborators. 

2. A pertinent selection of prose that the authors themselves enjoyed and 
wish to present to young people to help them to cultivate a taste for good 
literature. Contains writers like Santayana, Flaubert, Mark Twain, Kath- 
erine Mansfield. The introductory critical sketches to each selection are de 
lightful. 



64 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

COX, SIDNEY, and FREEMAN, EDMUND, editors, (Montana; pr. res.): 

Prose Preferences, Second Series; Harper and Brothers, 1934 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. A fascinating compilation, admirably adapted to its purpose. 
2. A good selection of interesting literary material well edited, arranged 
and compiled. Most of the material, as far as I know, is not commonly found 
in other reference books. 

CRAINE, EDITH JANICE (JULISKA DARU, HARRISON BARDWELL, 
pseuds.): (Montana; pr. res.): 
Ever may Ranch; David McKay Co., Philadelphia, 1940 

Rec* Grades 6 

Jr. H. 7,3,9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. K. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A delightful story for teen-ages^ about Montana ranch life. 
Nadine Evans comes west to live with her cousins in the beautiful Bitterroot 
Valley where she meets with thrilling experiences. Her twin cousins offer 
excitement and good dialogue. The author is not technically perfect on her 
locale but close enough. 

2. Story of fifteen-year-olds in a well-to-do, cultured family of the Bitter- 
root Ranch country. Full of innocent adventure that sometimes brought dan 
gerous consequences. Emotional element furnished by joys and sorrows of 
Nadine, an orphan cousin adopted into the family. Interest sustained through 
out the very simple but engaging plot, 

CRAWFORD, HARRIET ANN (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Washington State Grange; Binfords & Mort, 1940 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen, Gr, 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This book, described by a subtitle as "A Romance in De 
mocracy" is an interesting record of the Grange movement, coequal with the 
fifty years of statehood, which has meant so much in the farmers' struggle 
for a new deal and fairer treatment. 

2. This is a valuable book to those interested in the struggle of farmers 
against various handicaps and injustices in matters of transportation, trading 
in futures, etc. There is a good picture of the Populist Revolt of the 1890*8, 
of the World War period, and of recent reconstruction* 

CRAWFORD, ML LEOLA (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Seven Weeks in Hawaii; John J. Newbegin, San Francisco, 1917 
Rec* Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: A collection of informal letters written during a trip to Hawaii. 
A most comprehensive and entertaining account of the unique features of 
those islands. 

CUNNINGHAM, ALBERT J. (Washington; fr. res.) : 

Animal Tales of the Rockies, Abingdon Press, New York, 1925 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: A group of simply-written, sympathetic, true stories of animals 
native to the Rocky Mountains, this book would appeal to most boys and 
girls. There is less emphasis upon the death of these wild creatures than is 
often found in similar accounts. The actual photographs used in illustration 
are a pleasing detail. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 6s_ 

CUNNINGHAM, BESSIE MOTHERSILL (Oregon; pr. res.): 

In the Shadow of the Mosque of Omar; The Metropolitan Pres* 
(Binfords & Mort), 1932 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: True and vivid account of the travel in Palestine experienced by a 
woman school teacher, enlivened by humorous comment in a very few para 
graphs perhaps too flippant for the young reader. Easy, conversational, 
almost journalistic style. 

DANA, MARSHALL N.I More Power to You. See LOCKLEY, FRED 
DAKE, HENRY C.; FLEENER, FRANK LESTER, and WILSON, BEN 

HUR (Oregon; pr. res.): 
Quartz Family of Minerals; a Handbook for the Mineral Collector; 

McGraw Hill Book Co., Inc., 1938 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph, 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Well written, authoritative, vocabulary sufficiently simple that a 
boy of twelve, whose hobby was minerals, read it, and used it as a reference 
book particularly of interest to Oregon residents, because so many of the 
quartz varieties noted are available in Oregon to anyone who likes to dig 
in stream beds or abandoned gravel pits, or along the shore line. 
DAKIN, DOROTHY (Washington; pr. res.): 

Talks to Beginning Teachers of English; D. C. Heath & Co., 1937 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. The author furnishes a new view of the subject matter of 
composition and literature, and gives valuable advice on such activities as 
literary societies, dramatics, debating, school newspapers and annuals. 

2. Extremely interesting and valuable for exactly the group of people 
indicated in the title. The help offered extends beyond the classroom to out 
side activities and to such personal matters as writing a letter of application. 
DAVENPORT, HOMER (Oregon; deceased): 

The Country Boy; G. W. Dillingham Co., New York, 1910 
Rec. Jr. H. 12 

Comment: With the same humorous exaggeration with which it is said Mr. 
Davenport always replied to interviewers, he here tells of his boyhood in 
Silverton, Oregon. In spite of this exaggeration, the book has autobiographi 
cal value and the humorous treatment would undoubtedly appeal to youthful 
readers. 
DAVIES, MARY CAROLYN (Oregon; fr. res.): 

The Drums in Our Street; The Macmillan Co., 1918 
Rec. No 

Comment: Poems of timely significance, written during the World War and 
published as a "timely" venture. Little of literary value except one poem, 
"Smith of the Third Oregon Dies." 
DAVIES, MARY CAROLYN (Oregon; fr. res.): 

A Little Freckled Person; Hough ton, Mifflin Co., 1919 
Rec. No 

Comment: A book of child value. The quaint and clever passages are not 
sufficient to lift the whole to the level of literature. Many of the poems are 
simply page-fillers, and others just mediocre. 
DAVIES, MARY CAROLYN (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Marriage Songs; Harold Vinal Co., 1923 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C, Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 



66 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Comment: A book of verses as the title Implies, for adult consumption. Good 

literary style. Not recommended for high school students. 
DAVIES, MARY CAROLYN (Oregon;" fr. res.): 
Skyline Trail; The Bobbs-Merrill Co., 1924 
Rec. Jr. H. 7,8,9 

Sr. H. 10, u, 12, 
Comment: Verse of the western out-of-doors. Some literary style, with several 

scattered poems of excellence. Versification varied and skillful. 
DAVIES, MARY CAROLYN (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Youth Riding; Macmlllan Co., 1919 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Comment: Verse of pleasing literary quality, several of which are excellent. 

Probably few of permanent literary value. 
DAVIS, HAROLD LENOIR (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Honey in the Horn; Harper and Brothers, 1935 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. As a Pulitzer Prize winner, this work stands by itself; it 
would anyway. Written with vigor, fine sense of flavor of human speech, 
atmosphere of period and place. There is little intention of ennobling a 
theme or setting, largely scraggly and often sordid, yet there emerges from 
the book a sense of the pains, and the cost, and the waste that lie between 
the romantic stages of first pioneering and the ultimate establishing of civil 
ized existence. While Mr. Davis deeply offended the sensibilities of the 
pioneers' offspring, he seems to relate pretty much what they say about each 
other, and his people are squatters, hop-pickers, drifters, anyway. Authentic 
value as a picture of a crabbed arid yet not entirely unlovely phase of the 
sage ^of settlement. Literary value very high, magnificent for the flavor of 
frontier lingo, wealth of observation, and capacity to tell a yarn. 

2. A tale of the "wide open spaces" of Oregon in the early twentieth 
century, robust and earthy. Characters are unappealing and we doubt wheth 
er typical of the true Oregon pioneer of 1905. The plot is rambling and 
long-drawn-out, but vitality of style, humor, and beauty of description give 
the book distinction. 

3. Davis attempts in the novel to give a fairly wide picture of the main 
types of occupations of Oregonians during 1906-08, excluding only life in 
cities and larger towns and in the more settled areas. Frank, sometimes 
strongly flavored, the novel is one of the best regional studies done recently* 

DAVIS, WILLIAM B. (Idaho; pr. res.): 

The Recent Mammals ,o/ Idaho; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1939 
Rec, Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R, Men, Women 
Sp. R. 

Comment: A complete study of the distribution, etiology, taxonomy, and con 
servation of Idaho mammals, Idaho includes an unusual number of zoological 
varieties, and the study of this single state provides the basis of study for 
much of the mammalogy of the entire West. 
DEE, MINNIE ROOF (Oregon; fr. res.) : 

From Oxcart to Airplane; Binfords & Mort, 1939 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, u, 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C* Fr. Soph. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Simply told by a personal friend, this brief biography of 
George H. Himes, Oregon pioneer printer, depicts the rapid expansion of the 
Northwest area during the life-span of one man a glimpse of the great life 
panorama so conscientiously recorded in the famous Himes diaries. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 67 

_ 2. The life story of one of the most interesting and picturesque personali 
ties of the Northwest, George H. Himes. The last survivor of the Migration 
of 1853, that crossed the Natches Pass, he became one of Oregon's pioneer 
publishers, whose books, out of print for more than half a century, are now 
priceless collectors' items. An interesting account of pioneer life, 
DEFENBACH, BYRON (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Red Heroines of the Northwest; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1929 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The lives of three Indian women who helped to make North 
west history, Sacajawea, "The Dorion Woman," and "Jane." 

2. The three greatest exploring expeditions to the Pacific Northwest are 
fascinatingly told in biographies of the Indian women, Sacajawea, The 
Dorion Woman, and Jane Silcott, one of whom accompanied each of the 
parties. 

3. The story of three Indian women who figured prominently in the dis 
covery and exploration of the Northwest country Sacajawea, the Dorion 
woman and Jane Silcott. The life story of each is romantic and as true to 
historical fact as the author was able to make it. Literary value not as im 
portant as source material. 

DEFENBACH, BYRON (Idaho; pr. res.): 

The State We Live In; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1933 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: r. An up-to-date history of Idaho, written in a manner which 
cannot fail to enlist the absorbed attention of any seventh- or eighth-grade 
child. 

2,. Not a well-organized compilation, nor a complete history of the state. 
This book must be read and studied in conjunction with the complete refer 
ences given therein. Locale, Northwestern United States, particularly Idaho. 
DE LA RHUE, TREVINO (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Spanish Trails to California; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1937 
Rec. Jr. H. 8, 9 

Sr, H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr, 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment; This Is not a novel: rather it is a series of stories of the attacks 
of the Inquisition in 16th-century Spain on liberal, freedom-loving folk. 
Thus there were forced out of Spain many of its most desirable citizens who 
fled intolerant, short-sighted policies to lands of opportunity though of great 
danger. The ship-load of freedom-seekers having been gathered by the 
author from various ports of Spain, the big comp any ^ crosses the ocean to 
Mexico, and then makes the hazardous and difficult trip north and^west to 
California to start a great hacienda in Southern California. Informing and 
entertaining, with interest sustained by description of adventures. No plot 
to hold it together. The thesis seems to be that whereas the early North 
eastern settlers came under persecution due to religious and political ideas, 
Spanish-America was populated by Europeans in search of gold and riches, 
the fact is that the early settlers of California were as much fugitives from 
intolerance in Europe as were the Pilgrims. -- * *-~ 

DE LESPINASSE, COBIE (Oregon; pr. res.); (LESPINASSE, MRS. 

The Bells of Helmus; Metropolitan Press (Binford* & Mort), 1934 

Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: The story is laid m a town of the middle west with a part of the 



68 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

action transferred to Portland, Oregon. The chief value of the narrative lies 
in the presentation of the unusual atmosphere of the Dutch community, which 
is dominated by narrow orthodox creeds, symbolized by the bells of its 
churches. The style is realistic and for the most part without distinction, 
the characterization uneven, and the story structurally weak. But as a study 
of a partly assimilated alien settlement it might prove interesting. 
DE MOSS, CATHERINE CORNWALL (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Blue Bucket Nuggets; Binfords & Mort, 1939 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: i. A tale of Oregon's Last Immigration, that followed the Meek- 
Cut-Off. The story is based on the Blue Bucket legend, that we read so much 
about in the annals of Oregon covered-wagon days. Entertaining to old and 
young. 

2. Author has taken the lost emigrant train under the leadership of 
Stephen Meek and has written an interesting story with historical accuracy. 
Teachers should find it valuable supplementary reading for courses in Ore 
gon history as the story of the fabulous Blue Bucket mine is fascinating. 
DENTON, V. L. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Far West Coast; J. M. Dent and Sons, Inc., 1924 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, o, 12 
Tr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: This book takes up the exploration and the explorers of the Pacific 
Ocean. It tells of the adventures and travels of Captain Cook, Bering, and 
Juan De Fuca. It also brings out clearly all the discussions and claims that 
resulted from these discoveries, before the different nations actually gained 
possession. The student will find a good source in this book for the study of 
exploration. 
DIETZ, FRED L. (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Martians Investigate This Crazy World!; Metropolitan Press, 1935 
Rec, No 

Comment: This book attempts to explain the workings of our economic world, 
largely by quotations from newspapers and magazines. The author's princi 
pal thesis is that cooperative production for use must replace our present 
capitalistic system. While the author's presentation is unique, he still lacks a 
complete understanding of our economy. 
DILL, CLARENCE CLEVELAND (Washington; pr. res.): 

How Congress Makes Laws; Randalls, Inc., Washington, D. C., 1936 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This book supplies a long-felt need. It is interestingly written and 
entertainingly illustrated. It is well suited to young and old alike. If you 
want a number of pertinent facts on law-making and the machinery thereof, 
this is the book. 
DIMSDALE, THOMAS JOSIAH (Montana; deceased): 

The Vigilantes of Montana, 1866; State Pub. Co. (Helena), 1915. 

3rd Ed. McKee Print. Co. (Butte), 1924; 5th Ed., paper 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr, C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A straight-forward dignified account of conditions in Montana 
from 1 8 62 to 186*, written by an Oxford University graduate who travelled 
to Virginia City to recover from tuberculosis and while there opened one of 
the first schools of Montana in 1863. Fine source material for fiction writers 
and students of pioneer history. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 69 

2. One of the earliest books to come out of Montana, this presents an 
authentic account of the capture and extermination of Henry Plummer's 
band of road agents and other desperadoes. It explains conditions which 
made ^necessary such an organization as the Vigilantes and gives an account 
of their procedure and work accomplished. 
DOBBS, MRS. CAROLINE C. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Men of Champoeg; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1932 
Rec. Jr, H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. Well written, accurate sketches of the lives of the Oregon 
pioneers "whose names appear on the monument at Champoeg as having 
voted for the provisional government." 

2. Short historical and biographical sketches of the earliest settlers in 
Oregon, most of whom participated in the meeting at Champoeg which 
decided that the country should not be British. A valuable book for school 
libraries in history courses especially. Style concise and matter of fact. 
DONALDSON, JESSIE LOUISE, Collaborator: 

Sun God's Children 
See Schultz, James Willard 
DOONE, RADKO (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Nuvat the Brave, an Eskimo Robinson Crusoe; Junior Literary 

Guild and Macrae-Smith Co., 1934 
Rec. Grades 6 

Comment: Nuvat, an Eskimo boy, branded as a coward by his tribe, sets out 
to seek food for his family with only his dog team in the midst of a blizzard. 
He is carried away by an ice-drift, wanders for two years, and finally returns 
to his tribe. Excellent well-written account of Eskimo life and hardships 
accurately portrayed. 
DOONE, RADKO (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Red Beards of the Yellow River; Macrae-Smith Co., 1939 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: Wu Chen, son of a wealthy merchant, and Joe King, an American 
boy, are captured by bandits (hung-hutzes or "Red Beards") and held for 
ransom. Their various experiences and final rescue, brought about by Wing, 
a farmer's son, make fascinating reading. Well-written, accurate description 
of Chinese life, filled with exciting drama and many tense moments, make 
this book good reading. 
DOWN, ROBERT HORACE (Oregon; deceased): 

A History of the Silverton Country ,* The Berncliff Press (Portland, 

Ore.), 1926 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: An interesting, authentic account of the settling and development 
of the Silverton Country, northeast of Salem in the Willamette Valley. Inti 
mate pictures of pioneer life, of ranching vicissitudes and Indian uprisings. 
Stresses human interest story of colonization. Colloquial in nature and infer 
ence and replete with local names and many notes. A source book of value. 
DOWNIE, RALPH ERNEST (Washington; pr. res.) : 

A Pictorial History of the State of Washington; Lowman and Han- 
ford Co., 1937 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. In a splendidly illustrated book, written in simple language for 
the young reader, the history of the settlement of the Oregon Country, and 
particularly the State of Washington, is set forth. Poorly organized and in 
adequately indexed, the book is nevertheless authoritative and useful as a 
reference book. 



7Q NORTHWEST BOOKS 

2. The information on place names, in alphabetical order, is a very useful 
feature of this book. The 48 photographs are well selected, and the range 
of historical subjects brings the book practically up to date. 
DRIGGS, HOWARD A., Collaborator: Ox-Team Days on the Oregon 

Trail. See MEEKER, EZRA 
DRIGGS, B. W, (Idaho; fr. res.): 

History of the Teton Valley; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1926 
Rec, Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, iz 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A graphic history of the country of the Tetons, with chapters 
devoted to the development of the various communities, and bibliographical 
sketches of the lives of prominent pioneers. 

a. This book provides a sketch of one of the most picturesque valleys in 
the West, from the days when it was a trappers' rendezvous, Pierre's Hole. 
Approximately the first half of the book relies on familiar accounts; the last 
half is a highly factual record of the valley since the coming of prominent 
settlers, 

DRUMHELLER, DANIEL MONTGOMERY, ("Uncle Dan") (Washing 
ton; fr. res.): 
"Uncle Dan" Drumheller Tells Thrills of Western Trails in l&B4-> 

Inland- American Printing Co., Spokane, 1925 
Rec. Sr, H. 10, 11, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. An informal account of Pony Express days, Indian wars, 
pioneer cattle raising, and prospecting. "Uncle Dan" has many interesting 
and dramatic adventures. His plain language and realism are characteristic 
of the ruggedness of the life he depicts. His narrative, which is true, is told 
without an attempt at literary style. Locale, early Nevada, Oregon, and 
Washington* 

2. A very interesting simple narrative of early days in Walla Walla and 
surrounding country. It mentions the pony express, early stage coach days, 
early attempts at mining, farming, and cattle raising; also the problem of 
transportation, both human and freight. It is not very well written, but it 
fills a place in the annals of our frontier life. 
DRURY, CLIFFORD MERRILL (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Elkanah and Mary Walker, Pioneers Among the Spohanes; The 

Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1940 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, la 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Sp. R. 

Comment: i. This is probably the most readable, and in many ways the 
most engaging of Dr. Drury's trilogy of biographies, which constitute almost 
a history of missionary efforts in the Northwest. Mary and Elkanah Walker 
did not play the great roles of Whitman and Spalding, but we see them more 
clearly through Dr. Drury's biography because he had at his disposal the 
charming and detailed journal written by_ Mary. Because of the dramatic 
events of the time, particular attention is given to the years 183 6-1848. 

2. The third of a series of studie % s of missionaries in Old Oregon, Elka 
nah Walker established his mission at Tshimakain, located about thirty-six 
miles northwest of Spokane, near the site of the present settlement of Ford, 
Washington. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 71 

DRURY, CLIFFORD MERRILL (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Henry Harmon Spalding, Pioneer of Old Oregon; The Caxton 
Printers, Ltd., 1936 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Sp. R. 

Comment: i. Dr. Drury's work, based on the unpublished diary and letters 
of Spalding, furnishes new light on a character obscured by the fame of his 
companion, Marcus Whitman, The author's style is clear and forceful, and 
the facts are woven into a strong interesting narrative, well illustrated. 

2. Careful and enthusiastic research marks this magnificent contribution 
to American biography the life of a long-neglected and important pioneer 
missionary. 
DRURY, CLIFFORD MERRILL (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Marcus Whitman, M.D.; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1937 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen, R. Men, Women 
Sp. R. 

Comment: i. The definitive biography of the great Oregon missionary by 
the man whose book, Spalding, declared his unusual talents in research and 
organization. 

z. This is a sound study of an important Northwest figure. Dr. Drury 
adds some new material to the body of Whitmanana, re-examines and re- 
evaluates that which was already known, and treats a great man with under 
standing and sympathy. As a result, Whitman appears as less of story 
book hero than he has sometimes been portrayed, but as more of a man, more 
significant of a national character, a tragic figure who steeled himself to a 
job in which he believed, but which was unpleasant for him, and for which 
he was quite probably ill-fitted. 
DUBOC, JESSIE L. (Montana; pr. res.): 

In the Days of Ichabod; Edwards Brothers, Inc., Ann Arbor, 1939 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Booklet of 69 pages by an assistant professor of Education 
at Montana State Normal College. Careful study of source material of the 
Legend of Sleepy Hollow, beautifully arranged for use by classes in high 
school or college, or by the general reader. Invaluable for classes in Ameri 
can Literature. Has real charm. 

2. A careful piece of research into the customs and general conditions in 

the town of Sleepy Hollow during the time of Ichabod Crane. It is not too 

well written, but it does give a sincere and careful presentation of ^the 

subject An excellent reference to use for classes studying Washington Irving. 

DUNBAR,RUTH (Washington; fr. res.): 

The Swallow; Boni and Liveright, 1919 

Rec. Sr. H. to, u, is . . 

Comment: "Based upon the actual experiences of one of the survivors of me 
Lafayette Escadrille," this book seems to me admirably adapted to high 
school reading. The story is clean, high-minded, moves rapidly, contains some 
humor, and of course a romance. There is considerable but not too much 
detail of the flying schools, the actual fighting, of which the hero's share is 
brief, and of the life of the wounded in hospitals. The hero is not overdrawn, 
does not in telling his tale unduly dramatize himself. The book is not pro 
found, but Is wholesome, and reasonably well written. 



72 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

DUNBAR, SEYMOUR, ED.: The Journals and Letters of John Owen. 

See OWEN, MAJOR JOHN 
DUNCAN, PHILIP (Montana; fr. res.): 

Waggery Town; Harper and Brothers, 1935 

Rec. Grades 4., 5, 6 

Comment: Waggery Town is the story of a number of dogs who become dis 
satisfied with their homes, masters, etc., and decide to start a town of their 
own. The story is weak. It seems as though the author's main interest is in 
the humor rather than in the plot. The illustrations are excellent. 
DUNHAM, WAYLAND A. (Oregon? pr. res.): 

Enchanted Corridors; Dunham Printing Co., Portland, Ore., 1939 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: An impressionist's account of a journey through the Oregon Caves 
of Josephine County. Good descriptive guide to the Caves, given as informal 
narrative by one who appreciated the beauty of the place. 
DYE, EVA EMORY (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Conquest; A. C. McCIurg and Co., 1902; Binfords & Mort, 

1936 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: An historical novel, of vital interest, dealing with national heroes, 
American pioneers, and Indians, their hardships and struggles for the future 
United States on down through the years, with the names of Lewis and Clark 
as the theme song. Highly colored; sometimes inaccurate but inspirational, 
and readable. 
DYE, EVA EMORY (Oregon; pr. res.): 

McDonald of Oregon; A. C. McCIurg and Co., 1907; Binfords & 

Mort, 1936 
Rec. J. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: The author shows a rich knowledge of Oregon history and a sin 
cere interest in her material. She fails to eliminate the less for the more im 
portant; and in the early chapters particularly she introduces too many inci 
dents and too many persons who are not vitally connected with the career of 
the hero. The narrative becomes clearer and simpler as it progresses and the 
hero's exploits in Japan are well told. The author lacks dramatic ability; 
the speech does not grow out of action, but is rather a comment after the 
deeds have taken place. The story is told from the author's rather than the 
participants' point of view. 
DYE, EVA EMORY (Oregon; pr. res.): 

McLoughlin and Old Oregon; A. C. McCIurg and Co., 1900; Bin- 
fords & Mort, 1936 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: History of the early Oregon days presented very readably, and 
from the levels of sincere, human interest on the part of the author. Personal 
and contiguous or significant matter concisely and convincingly offered. Well- 
written, in clear narrative style. 
DYE, EVA EMORY (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Soul of America; The Press of the Pioneer, New York, 1934 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 73 

Comment: i. A fictionalized chronicle, part history, part fiction. An Oregon 
story and more, it reaches back in the origins of Oregonians, and the spirit 
that brought them here. Written with freshness of style and originality; in 
spirational and useful historical sketches. 

2. A highly romanticized fictional treatment of the opening of the western 
way and^ the settlement of Oregon, by an author who knows much of the 
story intimately. Principle virtue is sincerity. Predominant faults are un 
ordered structure, ejaculatory style, and overwrought emotionality. Book has 
value for its frequent brilliant insight into the personalities of the basic his 
torical characters included. General theme: the nobility of woman's part in 
home-building. 
DYE, EVA EMORY (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Stones of Oregon; The Whittaker and Ray Co., San Francisco, 1900 

Rec. Grades 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: i. A handbook of short historical sketches presenting the figures 
of Lewis ^and Clark, John Jacob Astor, John McLoughlin, etc., to which are 
added brief stories ^of Indian life and gold rush days. Should lead scholar 
toward more extensive reading in Northwest history. 

2. Short narratives, telling simply, clearly, and vividly the stories im 
portant and interesting in the pioneer history of the state. The writer does 
not attempt to use dialogue or to enhance events by undue emphasis on sus 
pense pr climax. They are tales retold long after the events occurred by one 
who did not take part in them, but who relates them for the benefit of future 
generations. 

EASTON, T. S. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Secret of the Wallowa Cave; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & 
Mort), 1934 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: i. Through the medium of a series of recently dated letters, a 
story is told of a quest for hidden gold by a rival pair of twins in the heart 
of the Wallowa Mountains, in Northeastern Oregon. This is a well-told, 
convincing tale containing the suspense and thrills which appeal to adven 
turous youth. 

2. The story of two sets of twins, one white and one Indian, who try to 
locate some gold left in Wallowa Cave by their mutual great-grandfather. 
After being almost buried alive in the cave, they finally locate the gold. 
Interesting, accurate description of the country, well-written story and plenty 
of action. 
ELIOT, HENRIETTA R. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Unwelcome Guest; The Greenleaf Press, Portland, Ore., 1937 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: A volume of lyrics mostly reflective in tone. Some of the poems 
are well-made and musical ; all of them are restrained in feeling. Capable 
rather than great verse, but honest and sensitive verse that comes from a 
refined and cultured mind. 
ELIOT, WILLARD AYRES (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Birds of the Pacific Coast; G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1923 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Scientific work on the birds of the Northwest, with colored plates 
illustrative of species, also brief summary of habits and migration of birds. 
Brief, clear and concise. For use of young people in bird study. A standard 
text and handbook. 



74 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

ELIOT, WILLARD AYRES (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Forest Trees of the Pacific Coast; G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1938 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen, R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This is a well-organized and well-written book, not too tech 
nical for the general reader in search of accurate information about the trees 
of our forests. Besides character of the trees, the book shows their distribution 
and habitat. 

2. Not primarily a text book, it is a useful handbook for both amateurs 
and those with a professional interest in the subject but who lack botanical 
training. Simple and concise in style, profusely illustrated, and well-organ 
ized, it makes an excellent field book for Pacific Coast residents, 
ELMENDORF, MARY J. (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Two Wives and Other Narrative Poems; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 

1935 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Or. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Verses slightly reminiscent of Robinson and Masters, Brief, 
poignant, somewhat ironic narratives in which plot and characters are deftly 
realized and suspense sustained. Probably the best in the book is "Rut", 
which has not only irony but delicacy, a haunting sadness, and sustained 
musical quality. Interesting as a book of short-short stories, 

2. Fifty-two poems, narrative and lyrical, make up this small book of 
156 pages. In short, incisive lines, Mrs. Elmendorf here relates the old 
themes of heart-break and longing with remarkable poignancy. This is a 
first published volume. We hope more follows. 
ELMENDORF, MARY J., Editor, (Washington; pr. res.): 
Washington Poets; Henry Harrison, New York, 1932 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 3, 9 

Sr. H. 10, it, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: "To anyone living in the Northwest whose regional patriotism is 
great this will prove to be a precious volume. To one primarily interested in 
poetry, it has little to offer . . . tone is too sentimental, and where not 
sentimental the verse offers platitudes. . . . The volume contains many 
pleasant pieces that give promise. . . . Heartily recommended to persons 
interested in the poetry of Washington." (Quoted from a review by Sophius 
K. Winther). 
ELROD, MORTON J. (Montana; pr. res.) : 

Elrod's Guide and Book of Information of Glacier National Park; 

Morton J. Elrod, Missoula, Montana, 1924 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This standard guide for Glacier National Park, interestingly writ 
ten, contains more than one hundred maps and pictures. The author, for 
years head of the Biology Department of Montana State University, knows 
the West thoroughly. 
ERNEST, BROTHER, C. S. C. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Boys of the Covered Wagons; Bin fords & Mort, 1939 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 

Jr. H. 7, S> 9 
Comment: An adventure story told from the angle of the boys who endured 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 75 

the hardships of the Trail from the Missouri River to Oregon. The boys 
met the hazards of Indian tribes, rivers to be forded, and mountains and 
deserts to be crossed, and conquered them with courage and heroism that 
was or great assistance to the train. 
ERNST, MRS. ALICE BENSON (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Backstage in Xanadu; A Book of Plays; Binfords & Mori, 1938 
is.ec. jr. c. rr. ooph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i This volume of plays brings four contributions to the con 
struction ot that "dome in the air" which Coleridge was talking about when 
he said: 

"In Xanadu did Kubla Khan 
A stately pleasure-dome decree" . . . 

Most volumes of plays present two angles of interest the reader interest and 
tne play interest. This collection certainly possesses the former, but my guess 
is that its chief merit is a challenge to a producer with ideas and a sensi 
tivity to theatre values who can find four excellent pieces of "theatre." 

2. These four plays use such varied locales as a university campus 
(Cloistered Calm], a woodland scene where three girls encounter a charming 
combination of fancy and reality {Afternoon of a Nymph), an oriental set 
ting for love and swift death (Nightingale) and satyrical-fantasy covering 
some 2000 years to show how human is humanity, (Welcome Stranger). 
The best written and best adapted for production is Afternoon of a Nymph. 
ERNST, MRS. ALICE HENSON (Oregon; pr. res.): 

High Country; Four Plays from the Pacific Northwest," Metropoli 
tan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1935 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen". Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i, Mrs. Ernst has treated the conflict between her characters of 
the far North and the solitude of the region where you ". . . Roll yerself 
up into a^tight^ hard ball . . . and keep rollin'!" The long play Out Trail 
lacks the intensity of the other plays, but provides more satisfying character 
studies. The plays: Spring Sluicing, The Valley of Lost Men, Out Trail, 
The Wooden Wife. Locale, Pacific Northwest, especially the Yukon. 

2. A first collection of plays with a regional (Northwest) background; 
representative of the American scene. Decidedly capable work ; both readable 
and actable. Includes three one-act and one three-act plays. 
ERNST, MRS. ALICE HENSON (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Valley of Lost Men; A Play in One Act; Row, Peterson & Co., 

Evanston, 111., 1932 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr, C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment :^ An intense one-act play, set in the Yukon at the turn of the cen 
tury, brings together five men in a lonely cabin. Here in a lost valley they 
reveal that they have been trying to lose their pasts when with dramatic 
finality a snow slide buries the whole valley and with it the lives of all the 
men. 
ESTES, GEORGE (Oregon; deceased): 

Old Cedar School; Luther T. Powell, Portland, Ore., 1922 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women (with reservations) 

Comment: Partisan writing against private schools. Sanctioned and printed 
by the Ku JQux Klan. Bad style. 



76 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

ESTES, GEORGE (Oregon; deceased): 

The Rawhide Railroad; Publishing House of the Clackamas County 
News, Canby, Ore., 1916 

Rec. Jr. H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr, C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: The first railroad in Washington from Walla Walla to Wallulah. 
The tracks were wooden beams covered with rawhide. Intensely interesting 
story, whether it's history, as it is supposed to be, or merely a "tall tale." 
Amusing style. 
ESTES, GEORGE (Oregon; deceased): 

The Stagecoach; George Estes Publishers, Portland, Ore., 1925 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, ir, 12 

Comment: Historical romance of stagecoach days in Oregon. Particularly 
worthwhile for the authentic background giving the social institutions and 
customs of the day. Language frequently the crude speech of the pioneer. 
Largely childhood recollections. Style not always smooth, but not objec 
tionable. 
ESTES, GEORGE (Oregon; deceased): 

The Wayfaring Man; George Estes Publishers, Portland, Ore., 1922 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, ir, 12 

Comment: Adventure story of the days of King Solomon, with treasure ships, 
kings, princesses, etc. Style slightly stiff. Historically, I imagine that most of 
the contents is suspect, but the events move rather swiftly. The book seems 
to have Masonic connotations, but not objectionably so. 
ETHEL, GARLAND (Washington; pr. res.): 

Writing Your Novel; The Scholastic Press, Portland, Ore., 1938 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Professor Ethel presents the philosophical, scientific, rather 
mechanistic basis of narrative writing. His book is probably of more value 
to the literary critic than to the literary artist or craftsman. 

2. An original analysis of the function of the novel in the light of 

present-day culture, philosophy, and scientific knowledge. Carefully logical, 

the study of the technique of creating fiction is frequently brilliant. Its author 

views art as an activity functionally inseparable from the problems of living. 

EUNSON, DALE (Montana; fr. res.): 

Homestead ; Farrar and Rinehart, 1935 
Rec. Jr. C, Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: x. A realistic series of sequences in a dry-land farmer's life. The 
story relates vividly the futile hardships and yearly heartbreaks of unirri- 
gated crops. The characters are interesting, too, particularly the wife who 
undergoes great emotional stress in the West. 

2. A novel of dry-land farming on a homestead in Eastern Montana, with 
the difficulties of life complicated by the mother-in-law problem. A realistic, 
rather depressing picture, of the struggle of a man and his wife against the 
land. The psychology and character drawing are excellent. 
EUWER, ANTHONY (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

By Scarlet Torch and Blade; G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1923 
Rec. No 

Grades 5, 6 
Jr. H, 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 77 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. " ~""~~ 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Some of the poems are handled with a certain amount of liter 
ary skill, but not of sufficient accomplishment to recommend them for serious 
study. The verses give insight into Oregon life and background. 

2. A collection of gay verse by an interesting and unusual personality of 
many gifts as a journalist, a radio artist, a lecturer, and a philosopher. Rich 
in whimsy, humor, and every-day philosophy, these poems are set against 
Northwest nature backgrounds. Simple, and frequently narrative, they are 
excellent for reading aloud. Most distinctive of these delightful, informal, 
and vivacious verses are the tree poems. Human interest and regional appeal 
for both adult and juvenile readers. 
EUWER, ANTHONY (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Friendly Firs; The Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1931 
Rec. No 

Comment:_ Homely verse about common things, largely regional. Style dis 
tinctly journalistic. Two or three poems in the volume through a clear sim 
plicity have claim to literary value. 
EUWER, ANTHONY (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Rhymes of Our Valley; James B. Pond, New York, 1916 
Rec. No 

Comment: Homely rhymes, mostly humorous, of life in the Hood River Valley 
of Oregon. Two or three of the poems are worth while as human documents, 
but the style is of no great literary quality. 
EUWER, ANTHONY (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Wings; Mof fat, Yard and Co., New York, 1918 
Rec. No 

Comment: A product of violent prejudice growing out of war-time propa 
ganda. Facile verse of journalistic quality, without literary value. 
FARGO, LUCILE FOSTER (Washington; fr. res.): 
Come, Colors, Come; Dodd, Mead & Co., 1940 
Rec. Grades 6, 7. 8 
Jr.H. 7,8,9 

Comment: i, A story of the Coeur d'Alene mining region of the i88o's. 
Though written primarily for girls, this career story will interest boys as 
well, especially those of ages 10-15. Plenty of adventure mixed in with min 
ing information. 

2. An enticing study of early mining days. The hardships are there, 
but character overcomes them. The characters are good for young people 
to know. Action is abundant, but heroics are not overdone. 

3. Authentic. Valiant harmonious living. Wholesome work. Simple pleas 
ures. A real lady, her lovable daughter, and courageous, lovable Hilda come 
to camp. The miners make life tidy as a ship at sea. Music without an organ. 
Pies without a range. Church in a saloon. A Christmas party, a fire, wed 
ding, villain, a strike. The camp becomes a town. The girl is off to school. 

FAUBION, NINA LANE (Oregon; ) : 

Some Edible Mushrooms; Binfords & Mort, 1938 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Describes concisely and in non-scientific language, some of the safe 
and easily recognized mushrooms. The excellent drawings are by the author. 
She gained her enthusiasm and accurate knowledge from trips afield with 
her father, Dr. Harry Lane, who was one of the first to pioneer in this field 
and who contributed much to the science. There is also a chapter on the 
deadly Amanita. Many suggestions for cooking are also included. 



78 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

FEDERAL WRITERS' PROJECT (Idaho). See FISHER, VARDIS 
FEDERAL WRITERS* PROJECT (Montana) 

Montana: A State Guide Book; The Viking Press, 1939 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, 11, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A tourist would accept this book, but my students who have 
looked up their home towns report many small errors and omissions. The 
route from Great Falls to Helena does not list Wolf Creek Canyon or The 
Sleeping Giant (an interesting mountain). Carroll College is said to have a 
high school department; that is not true. On the map, Wisdom is listed as at 
C-6; it should be listed as at H-4. Wolf Creek is listed as at -4; it is at 
E-6. Although several routes go through the larger cities, in the index these 
cities are only once listed. I have used the book on trips about the state, and 
have noticed these defects. No doubt there are many others. 

2. The larger part of the book discusses tours, giving information about 
hotels, kinds of roads to be encountered, equipment needed for tourists, his 
torical points about places visited, etc. The section on the general background 
gives history, industries, the temper of the people, etc., and five cities are 
dealt with in detail. All very interesting. 

3. A book thoroughly covering information for the reader interested in 
Montana. Lots about the historical, social and economic backgrounds as well 
as today. Eighteen tours through the state are planned, giving explicit in 
formation as to what can be expected and seen. It is done very systematically 
and well. 

FEDERAL WRITERS' PROJECT (Oregon) 

Mount Hood: A Guide; Dwell, Sloan and Pearce, 1940 
Rec. Sp. R. 

For anyone interested in the material given in the book. 
Comment: Mount Hood "visible to more than one-third of the population of 
Oregon" is described historically and geographically with full information 
on eight motor tours, fifteen riding and hiking trails, the choice of eleven 
routes in ascending the peak and the various skiing areas and trails. Con 
tains a full-page map of the Mount Hood recreation area. 
FEDERAL WRITERS' PROJECT (Oregon) 

Oregon, End of the Trail; Binfords & Mort, 1940 
Rec. Jr. S. 7, 8, 8 

Sr. H. 10, 1 1, 12 
Jr. C, Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Sp. R. 

Comment: i, A fine job. Ranks well up towards the top of the volumes in 
this series. At first reading it may impress a reader with a special interest 
in some phase of state life or history that certain subjects are skimped. But 
second reading, or reading of all parts in reference to one another and to the 
task in hand, will convince anyone that the compilers had an enormous un 
dertaking in mere concentration, and that they have carried it out triumph 
antly. Good reading about practically everything that goes on or has gone on 
in Oregon, including what share nature as well as man has had in it No 
visitor who consults it need ever lose his way or fail to find any and every 
thing of interest, scenic, cultural, industrial. And the resident reader will 
feel justifiable pride in his state's endowments and achievements* Illustrations 
and a pocket map. 
2. Oregon its historical scenes, its intellectual life and its natural re- 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 79 

sources against the background of a rugged coastline, snow-capped mountain 
peaks and tall, majestic trees overlooking broad and fertile valleys makes 
this authoritative and informative guide book a storehouse of travel in 
formation for natives and tourists alike. Contains 150 photographs, city maps, 
a large four-color map insert, a calendar of events, 35 tours and well-selected 
reading list. 

3. Of the American Guide Series sponsored by the Federal Government. 
Descriptive of Oregon scenery, its historical, social, and economic back 
grounds, with a guide to Oregon highways, cities, points of interest, historical 
sites and monuments; data on geology, climate, racial elements, industries, 
folklore, recreation, and culture. Profusely illustrated. Tourists, students, and 
historians will welcome this volume; it will remain a source book of im 
portance for Oregon. 
FEDOROVA, NINA, pseud. (RIASANOVSKY, ANTONINA FEDORO- 

VA) (Oregon; pr. res.): 
The Family; Little, Brown and Co., 1940 
Rcc. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A well written story of strength, faith and excellent character 
izations in which a poverty stricken Russian family run a boarding house in 
Tientsin, China, during the harassing days of 1937. Many picturesque per 
sons come and go but the family integrity and feeling remains. Colorful but 
not fast moving. Delightful grandmother character. 

2. The moving story of a refugee Russian family in Japanese-invaded 
Tientsin, through whose house pass the varied people of many nations; writ 
ten by one with personal knowledge of these scenes and deep understanding 
of the qualities that in all times and places permit men to rise above their 
rates. Atlantic prize novel for 1940 
FEE, CHESTER ANDERS (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Chief Joseph; Wilson-Erickson, Inc., 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: A biography which is not only well written, and supported by 
sufficient background reading, but which supplies information in a field of 
special interest to students of early Oregon history. Illustrative maps and 
pictures add much to the usefulness of the book. 
FEE, CHESTER ANDERS (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Rimes O' Round-Up; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1935 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: A volume of poetry which catches the spirit of^the Old West 
pioneer, Indian, cowboy, settler. Least successful are the dialect poems; al 
though they have a lively swing and robust humor. The best are "Indian," 
and "Passing of the Indian." The volume is interesting from the standpoint 
of prosody for its conscious experiments in metrics. 

FERRIS, WARREN ANGUS (Diary and supplementary writings) (Mon 
tana; fr. res.) ; Edited by Paul C. Phillips: 

Life in the Rocky Mountains: A Diary of Wanderings on the Sources 
of the Rivers Missouri, Columbia, and Colorado, From February, 
1830, to November, 1835; The Old West Publishing Co., 1940 

Rec. Sr. C. Sen. Gr. . 

Comment: An authoritative and interesting journal written during the ney- 
day period of the fur trade. An original map of the far Northwest Fur 
Country, drawn by the author in 1836, is reproduced in full size. The Editor 
has greatly clarified the narrative by copious scholarly notes and an outline 



8o NORTHWEST BOOKS 

history of the northwestern fur trade. An excellent piece of historical re 
search. 
FIELDE, ADELE M. (Washington; fr. res.): 

Chinese Fairy Tales; G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1893 

Rec. Jr. H, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12, 

Comment: Fairy tales, illustrated by Chinese artists, told to the writer while 
she was living in China, by persons who could not read. They present 
notions, customs and conditions in China long before the Chinese mind was 
influenced by foreigners. 
FIELDE, ADELE M. (Washington; fr. res.): 

Corner of Cathay; G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1894 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 

Comment: Based on the author's residence in Southern China (Swatow) for 
a number of years, this book gives a clear idea of Chinese customs,^ mode of 
life, religion, in 1894. Probably much of it is still true. The volume is beauti 
fully illustrated with colored plates by a group of native Swatow artists. 

FINCK, HENRY T. (Oregon; fr. res.): 

My Adventures in the Golden Age of Music; Funk and Wagnall 
Co., 1926 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, o, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: The author's story of his life with emphasis upon his contacts 
with the famous musicians of the latter half of the nineteenth century. We 
see Finck as a small boy, as a youth in Harvard, and later as a musical 
journalist. Excellent style. Good humor. Interesting for everyone. 

FINLEY, WILLIAM LOVELL (Oregon; pr. res.): 

American Birds; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1907 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. Mr. Finley writes delightfully and authentically about bird life 
and habits, combining accuracy of observation with charm and simplicity of 
style. Since he is more humanist than scientist, he imparts his own love 
of birds to the reader. The book is as interesting as fiction. 

2. Mr. Finley vividly and accurately describes the life history of more 
than a score of representative birds widely known in the United States, 
though not including all bird families. Interesting personal experiences and 
many photographs add to the appeal value of the book. 

FINLEY, WILLIAM LOVELL (Oregon; pr. res.): 
Little Bird Blue; Houghton, Mifflin Co., 1915 

Rec. Grades 3 

Comment: i. Little Bird Blue is a children's book too young for high school 
students. 

2. A very delightful child's book in which the hero is a pet blue bird. 
Told in simple but excellent English, with photographs as illustrations, this 
story of a bird's natural traits and acquired habits would have a strong ap 
peal for any child. 

FINLEY, WILLIAM LOVELL, and FINLEY, IRENE (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Wild Animal Pets; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1908 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Comment: The recital of personal experiences with these wild pets convinces 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 81 

one of the truth concerning them. This fact, together with the simplicity of 
the language, make these stories popular among young readers. Such tales 
should lead to greater desire to study, and less to kill, wild animals. 

FISHER, VARDIS (Idaho; pr. res.): 

April; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1937 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A humorous and ironic novel concerning June Weeg, the 
homeliest girl in Antelope, and the way in which she went about turning her 
drab life into poetry and grace. 

2. Fanciful tale of a very homely girl, Juney Weeg, who tries to imagine 
herself beautiful and beloved by men, and in the end finds her place in the 
life of old Sol Ineham, who has always loved her but whom she had con 
sistently scorned. Excellent piece of work. literary style very fine. Locale, 
Antelope Hills, Southern Idaho. 

^ 3. This book tells of the thoughts, longings and passions of a very homely 
girl for beauty and the love of men. A very light fable (as it is called by the 
author), but it may be interesting to some readers. 

FISHER, VARDIS (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Children of Cod; Harpers and Brothers, 1939 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A fictionized history of the Mormon Church, from its founding 
by Joseph Smith to its disintegration after the death of Brigham Young. The 
story is intensely interesting, the style realistic and vivid, and the characters 
most clearly drawn. This book won the Harper Award for 1939. 

2. A history of the Mormons told with so much of the author's rugged 
realism that I wearied of the Mormons and their cause at about the fourth 
chapter. The subject matter might have been intensely interesting handled 
by someone other than Mr, Fisher. His love of the crudities of life was more 
vivid than the theme itself. 
FISHER, VARDIS (Idaho; pr. res.): 

The City of Illusion; Harper and Brothers, 1941 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr, 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The book gives a picture of bonanza life on the Comstock 
Lode, but as readers of Fisher would expect, it is a social study of boom- 
town life, not a glorification of "the good old days." It is a rapid, vigorous 
story, but it is rich, also, in psychological insight and in ironic overtones. 
Readers who found Dark Bridwell and In Tragic Life upsetting will prob 
ably call this Fisher's best novel; others may find it less significant and more 
hastily written than some of Fisher's earlier work. 

2. The book presents a vivid picture of greed and lust for wealth mixed 
with Eilley Bower's determined but frustrated gropings after culture among 
the welter of illiterates, harlots, and perverts of a hodgepodge mining com 
munity thrown together around the fabulous Comstock Lode. A gripping pic 
ture of elemental emotions, in Eilley Bower's City of Illusion, against an au 
thentic background of a typical pioneer American mining center, gives the 
book national historic significance. 



8a NORTHWEST BOOKS 

2. The brutality and ugliness of detail would limit this to adult reading. 
The end of the book is almost fine, but the first part of the book wastes itself 
on unnecessary repetition of the same ugly details over and over again. But 
it leaves you with a clear perception of the life in the early days of Corn- 
stock. 

FISHER, VARDIS (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Dark Bridwell; Houghton Mifflin Co., 1931 

Rec. No 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The author describes with appreciation Southeastern Idaho and 
its isolated ranches, but his main character, Charley Bridwell, capable of 
amazing extremes in fun, cruelty, and tenderness, sounds unconvincing, 
Revolting descriptions, not pertinent to the plot, are frequent. I see no liter 
ary value in the story. 

2. Many readers will find this the most baffling of all of Vardis Fisher's 
strange books. Charley Bridwell is a glutton and a brute and an elemental 
sort of beast, but Fisher sees in him the beauty of elemental things, and this 
beauty finds an echo in what is probably the most poetic prose Fisher has 
written. This is a beautiful and terrifying book. 

3. Story of Charley Bridwell, the strangest man in four Idaho counties. 
Jester and brigand and clown, there lies behind his gluttony and banter a 
sleeping demon. 

4. The story will entertain the average reader. The vivid dry-farm de 
scriptions are simply told ; the dialects are consistent. The unknowing ignor 
ance of the people is not exaggerated. The conflicts between Bridwell and 
the members of his family are related interestingly. 

5. Fisher is always vigorous. The mighty Snake River sweeps irresist 
ibly through these pages. There are four parts to the story, dealing with 
Charley Bridwell, his wife and his two children. The book itself is a 
strange mixture of romance and stark realism romance in general concept, 
realism in individual details. 

FISHER, VARDIS (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Forgive Us Our Virtues; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1938 
Rec. No 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R, Men, Women 

Comment: i. The whole pattern of American life forces us to be aware of 
ourselves in competition with others. This author attempts to show how 
under or over motivated persons evade their real problems and reconcile 
themselves with their self-esteem by assuming virtues which they do not 
possess. Some literary value. All general readers might profit by reading it 

2. This book upholds Fisher's reputation for frankness. His characters, 
as in others of his works, devote much time to lengthy, uninteresting con 
versations. Any literary value is very obscure. 

3. Fisher uncovers with brilliant humor a large group of characters who 
are struggling with love and marital adjustment They develop neurosis 
which lead to comic situationsand to the depths of tragedy. 

FISHER, VARDIS (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Idaho: A Guide in Word and Picture / The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 

1937 

Rec Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H, xo, n, 12 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 83 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. ~ 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. ^Prepared by the Federal Writers 1 Projects of the Works 
Progress Administration. A brilliantly written and illustrated characteriza 
tion and description of Idaho, it will remain for years to corne the authorita 
tive book on the state." 

2. This is probably the most entertaining, and the most valuable general 
reference work on Idaho. It is profusely illustrated, engagingly written, and 
packed full of fact. There are sketches of the state from various points of 
view, and eleven ^tours describing the principal points along all major high 
ways. Special points and aspects of the state; for instance, the Primitive 
Area and the ghost towns, are given individual treatment. 
FISHER, VARDIS (Idaho; pr. res.): 

The Idaho Encyclopedia; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1938 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Compiled by the Idaho Writers' Project under direction of 
V. Fisher. Copious notes on agricultural, geological, industrial, economic, 
historic, geographic, and cultural aspects of Idaho, Condensed and thorough 
ly accurate. 

a. This work surveys the state from the following points of view: physi 
cal, historical, industrial, cultural, government; it contains, also, brief de 
scriptions of all corporate units, counties and towns. It is extensively illus 
trated with maps, contains useful brief biographies, and an excellent biblio 
graphy, pp. 433-442. It contains a great body of fact, well chosen, well 
arranged, and well presented. 
FISHER, VARDIS (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Idaho Lore; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1939 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Misquoting Shakespeare: This book contains an infinite deal 
of nothing. Its reasons are as two grains of wheat hidden in two bushels of 
chafF. The wheat is noted below. 

2. A sub-title might be "tall stories in short form." Perhaps the brevity 
of the stories, few exceed one or two paragraphs in length, may be the 
reason that it fails to hold the readers' attention. However, the volume un 
doubtedly has its historical value. It deals with tales, beliefs, customs, sayings 
and songs of Idaho's early days. 

3. A compilation of the humorous and fantastic tales and incidents of 
early % Idaho, compiled by the Idaho Writers' Project under direction of 
Vardis Fisher. Appeal to general reader, student of history. Preserves the 
lore and legend of early Idaho. 

FISHER, VARDIS (Idaho; pr. res.): 

In Tragic Life; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1932 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr, Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The first of a tetralogy, terribly frank in its treatment of the 
bareness and brutality of Southern Idaho farm life, as seen through the eyes 
of a youth pathologically sensitive. A good corrective for the common senti- 



84 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

mental attitude to the frontier. For those mature in mind possessing a back 
ground of reading. 

2. A family living on an isolated farm is described, with the emotional 
reaction of the growing son to his family and surroundings given in detail. 
One sympathizes with the boy's struggle, yet many situations seem intensified 
beyond reality. The literary value is only average. 

3. This is the first book of a tetralogy. It portrays the boyhood and 
adolescence of a sensitive, imaginative youth tortured almost to insanity by 
the brutality of life. Locale, farm in Southern Idaho. 

4. Very powerful, realistic picture of a boy's outer and inner life through 
the years of childhood and adolescence in the pioneer environment of Idaho. 
Too stark, too frank in portrayal of sexual life for student perusal. Style is 
vividly simple. Magnificent character drawing and picture of physical en 
vironment. Attitude wholly sincere. 

FISHER, VARDIS (Idaho; pr. res.) : 

The Neurotic Nightingale; Casanova Press and The Caxton Printers, 

1935 

Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen, Gr. 
Gen. R, Men, Women 

Comment: i. Four essays in which the author attempts to clarify for himself 
some important attitudes on radicalism, humor, and education. One feels that 
Fisher is sincere in his views that are a result of careful observation. 

2. Mr. Fisher says that these four essays are "attempts to clarify for 
myself some important attitudes," and the reader of Mr. Fisher's novels will 
find in them an expository statement of what this novelist has tried to say 
elsewhere in dramatic form. The reader will also find them intelligent, 
learned, and salty. 

3. Mr. Fisher writes again of the hopelessness of the human race. Man, 
tortured by his frustrations, is sinking back into abyssmal slime. Is Mr. 
Fisher as neurotic as those of whom he writes or am I just dumb? 

4. These trenchant essays develop with power and clarity some important 
attitudes of Idaho's great novelist, A choice collector's item, for it will never 
be reprinted. 

FISHER, VARDIS (Idaho; pr. res,): 

No Villain Need Be; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1936 
Rec. No 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R, Men, Women 

Comment: i. The last of Fisher's tetralogy where the hero rebuilds his mind 
and life. Less sordid than other Fisher books, but far too much low talk. 
The hero^(?) goes back to his birthplace after a life of unsettled mind and 
moral strife, let us hope to peace and quiet rest. He surdy needs it. Too 
long a book and not for the ordinary reader, I would say. 

2. This book, which presents Vridar Hunter rebuilding his life after its 
great crisis, is the best of Fisher's tetralogy. Vridar develops a positive 
philosophy by which to live as he strives to understand forces that have 
made and molded his life. An intellectual novel showing brilliant narrative 
ability at times. 

3. This volume brings to a close the Vridar Hunter tetralogy. Fisher's 
achievement in his four books is giving us this great record of a man's slow 
mastery of himself. 

FISHER, VARDIS (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Odyssey of a Hero; Ritten House, Philadelphia, 1937 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph, 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 85 

Comment: i. This is a very interesting story of a World War hero who 
returned to a small town in Idaho, became unpopular when he railed against 
war, became popular as he praised war, and again unpopular when others 
were for peace. The book has much human and cultural value ; it illustrates 
mob phychology in reference to war, and it illustrates the impossibility of a 
person's pleasing everyone. 
FISHER, VARDIS (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Passions Spin the Plot; Doubleday Dor an and Co., 1934 
Rec. No 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The story of a boy from the hills of Idaho entering college in 
Utah. ^ Seems to me the boy has a warped mind dwelling on sex morbid, 
suspicious and a weakling. Think this world could get along without such 
books. Certainly for adults only, if anyone. Could not recommend it. 

2. This book continues the life story of Vridar Hunter, begun In Traffic 
Life. It portrays the college years of a sensitive boy tortured by the brutality 
of life. To me, the book accomplishes nothing, is full of sex. 

3. Second book of the Vridar Hunter tetralogy. Covers three years of the 
hero's life, detailing his first two years in college and his marriage. Locale, 
Idaho and Utah. 

FISHER, VARDIS (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Sonnets to an Imaginary Madonna; Harold Vinal, New York, 1927 

Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This is certainly the finest book of verse that has so far come 
out of Idaho. The writer shows technical capacity, command of language, 
and power of dramatic imagery that lift him above the level of local verse. 
The sonnet sequence, addresser to an imaginary madonna for whom the poet 
no longer feels any romantic love, embodies Fisher's belief that we have been 
perverted from good sense by romantic delusions, and that such delusions lie 
at the root of modern frustration. 

2. ^This collection of sonnets expresses the stern, ironical, and iconoclastic 
doctrines of the author. The sonnets are perfect in structure, beautiful, but 
the ideas expressed, would probably repel the ordinary reader, because these 
ideas are unconventional, pessimistic, and realistic. The book is magnificent 
poetry. 

FISHER, VARDIS (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Toilers of the Hills; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1928 
Rec. Sr, H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. ^ Describes the poverty and struggle of a couple in new dry- 
farming region. The author brings in bits of unlovely realism that in good 
taste should be omitted. His obviously accurate description of the dirt, lone 
liness, and its effect on the wife dispels the glamor of pioneer life. Locale, 
Southern Idaho. 

2. Dock Hunter and wife, Opal, take a homestead on the hill-lands of 
Idaho and begin their conquest of the sagebrush and the matted grass that is 
to bring them fortune. Book will endure as an epic picture of the West. 

3. ^ Ruthless struggle with the soil in Southern Idaho, where the women 
especially are borne down with child-bearing and incessant toil in an un 
lovely environment. This is the author's first book more conventional in 
treatment, yet full of promise for growth in style and characterization. 



86 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

FISHER, VARDIS (Idaho; pr. res.)-* " 

We Are Betrayed; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1935 
Rec. No 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. We Are Betrayed tells of Vridar's search in the realms of 
philosophy, metaphysics, religion and the hearts of men for the meaning of 
life. The book is full of sex and there isn't enough left that is worthwhile 
to overshadow the sexual outbursts. 

2. Third book of a tetralogy concerning the search of a disillusioned 
idealist for the meaning of life. Shows a pessimistic Freudian philosophy, 
which most people will find twisted and false. Like most of Fisher's books, 
it is dominated largely by the sex element, to the point of obscenity. Anti- 
religious. 

3. Third book of the Hunter tetralogy. Writer shows Vridar searching in 
books and in the hearts of men for the meaning of life. 

FISHER, VIVIEN EZRA (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Auto-Correctivism t The Psychology of Nervousness; The Caxton 
Printers, Ltd., 1937 

Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women Sp. R. 

Comment: i. This is a serious study by an established psychologist, an effort 
to synthesize in non-technical language the conflicting data and hypotheses 
developed during recent years by psychiatrists and clinical psychologists. 

2. The nationally known psychologist and psychotherapist, whose Abnor 
mal Psychology is widely known and used in colleges and universities, here 
advances a profound theory in interpretation of the neuroses. 

3. A very interesting book insofar as the layman can understand it Only 
the most careful reading can render it anything but abstruse, I didn't feel 
that it solved any particular problems but rather left one with the idea that 
if he became too attached to his parents he might in later life throw his 
gloves out of high windows or see white rings on his eye-glasses. 

4. Very interesting if interested in this line of reading. Brilliantly written 
but hard for the average reader to comprehend. Takes up racial or selfless 
motives and ego or selfish. His interpretation of nervous disorders is a chal 
lenge to further study on these subjects. 

FITZHUGH, EDWARD F., JR. (Idaho; pr. res.)* 

Treasures in the Earth; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. jo, n, 12 
Jr. C Fr. Soph. 
Sr, C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. An authoritative explanation, for the layman, of the science of 
mining geology, with a minimum of technical jargon and a maximum of ex 
cellent photographs. 

2 A good book for anyone curious about geology to read. Its greatest 
virtue is its simplicity of style. Anyone can understand it; there is nothing 
technical in its pages. The book is neatly illustrated, and altogether offers a 
comprehensive study of the rudiments of geology and mining. 

3. I found this a very fascinating little book a very clear treatment of 
the subject of geology for the layman or anyone interested in the subject, 
FLEENER, FRANK LESTER: Quartz Family of Minerals. See DAKE, 

HENRY C. 
FLETCHER, ROBERT H. (Montana; pr. res.): 

Corral Dust; State Publishing Co., Helena, 1934 
Rec, Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 87 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Verses for tourists and unsophisticated Westerners. Unpreten 
tious, informal, colloquial rhymes of life on the plains as viewed by cowboy, 
rancher and prospector. Very insistently Western, yet contains many passages 
of authentic flavor. Decorations by Irvin Shope. Fork your cayuse and hurl 
your twine at this one. 

2. Beautifully printed book of 88 pages with delicate and clever Western 
illustrations by Shorty Shope ; light verse with a swing and a punch, on the 
trail from Last Chance Gulch to Yellowstone and around. 

FOLGER, DORIS, and NICOL, MRS. NINA (Montana; pr. res.) : 
Rusty Pete of the Lazy AB; The Macmillan Co., 1929 

Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Comment: i. Story and description of ranch life, a rodeo and Indian dances 

near the Crow Reservation, especially featuring a cow pony and Mary Lou, 

a twelve-year-old, his rider. 

2. Loosely strung episodes tell the adventures of 12-year-old Mary Lou 
and her^ cow jpony, Rusty Pete, on the Lazy AB Ranch in Southeastern Mon 
tana, with Big Brother Al who runs the ranch. Silhouettes by Doris Folger 
make the book attractive to ten-year-old readers. 

3. The story of several horses, with Rusty Pete the hero, and children on 
a western ranch. It is quite simple with little plot. Young children can easily 
read it for themselves. The silhouette illustrations are beautiful. 

4. Rusty Pete, a cow pony, and his twelve-year-old mistress live on a 
ranch in Southeastern Montana near the Pryor Mountains. Mary Lou and her 
horse take an active part in ranch life and in the rodeo at Crow Agency. 
Treatment of the story is realistic except for the conversation of the horses. 
The many silhouette illustrations by Doris Fogler are good, but the writing 
is not exceptional. 

FOOTE, MARY HALLOCK (Idaho; fr. res.): 

The Chosen Valley; Hough ton, Miff Hit and Co. 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: Reclamation story of Idaho contrasting the European engineer 
and his deliberate thoroughness for a good job with the American engineer 
using unscientific methods and with little money doing a, bad job but making 
it pay. There is a blending of the best in the two in the European-educated 
son of the American the outstanding character. 

FOOTE, MARY HALLOCK (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Coeur d' Alene; Hough ton, MIfflin and Co., 1894 

Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Attempts to give an account of the strikes in the mines of the 
Coeur d' Alene Mountains. It is almost entirely in conversation, much of 
which is Irish dialect and, therefore, hard to understand. 

2. As with all books written several decades ago, the style today seems 
stilted, but the book contains much information concerning the labor troubles 
in the Coeur d' Alene, Idaho, mining district in 1892. It cannot help but be 
of interest to anyone delving into the history of the region. 

FOOTE, MARY HALLOCK (Idaho; fr. res.): 

The Desert and the Sown; Houghton, Mifflin and Co., 1902 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: Story of the early pioneers in and around Fort Lemhi, The book 
deals mostly with a family traveling in a cbvered wagon. The detailed de 
scriptions become monotonous at times. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 



FOOTE, MARY HALLOCK (Idaho; fr. ires.): 

Edith Bonham; Houghton, Mifflin and Co., 1917 

Rec. No 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: i. The story is well written, holding the interest of the reader to 
the end. It tells of the marriage of her close friend, who moves to Idaho to 
live. In time Edith decides to visit her. On her way she learns of Nanny's 
death. Grief-stricken, she goes on and takes over the care of Nanny's two 
children. Eventually Edith marries Nanny's husband. Locale, Boise and its 
environs. 

2. Theme . . . commonplace 
Form .... autobiographical 
Mode of expression .... constrained 
Setting .... distinguishable only by names of places. 
FOOTE, MARY HALLOCK (Idaho; fr. res.): 

In Exile, and Other Stories; Houghton, Mifflin and Co., 1894 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 

Comment: Several stories dealing with early floods, gold rushes, etc. One or 
two are especially good, haunting you with their atmosphere and color a good 
while afterwards. 
FOOTE, MARY HALLOCK (Idaho;, fr. res.) : 

John Bode win's Testimony; Houghton, Mifflin and Co., 1885 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: John Bodewin refuses to give valuable testimony in a law suit on 
account of a personal obligation. Josephine convinces him he should give it; 
he is kidnapped, estranged by complication from his friends and leaves the 
country. He finally returns and marries Josephine. The plot is ordinary; the 
story has no outstanding description or characterization. It is readable but 
has no particular merit. 
FOOTE, MARY HALLOCK (Idaho; fr. res.): 

The Last Assembly Ball; Houghton, Mifflin and Co., 1886 
Rec. With reservations 
S. H. 10, n, 12 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: The story depicts social life in a mining town in the gold-rush days 
of the early West. It particularly deals with the lives of a small group 
Eastern bred young men together in a boarding-house. The story is obviously 
taken from actual life. The material is good, but the handling of it leaves a 
weak impression. 
FOOTE, MARY HALLOCK (Idaho; fr. res.) : 

The Led-Horse Claim; Houghton, Mifflin and Co., 1904 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen, Gr. 

Comment: x. A delightful romance of man versus man, woman, and himself. 
Interesting style wording and phrasing carefully chosen and woven into 
sentences that form "pictures of admiration, pathos, regret, romance, hatred, 
and contentment." The characterizations are good. There is human appeal. 
a. The love story of an early-day mining camp; interesting picture of 
conditions. The plot is simple, the style readable and pleasing, but the char 
acters are stilted, and a sense of humor is noticeably lacking. The handling 
of the plot is awkward. 
FOOTE, MARY HALLOCK (Idaho; fr. res.) : 

The Royal Americana; Houghton, Mifflin and Co., 1910 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Or. 
Comment: A story with an historical setting (colonial days in America pre- 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 89 

vious to and during the Revolutionary War) which setting strongly controls 
both the trend of events and development of the characters. Book has no 
historical value, however, except as setting gives color and meaning to the 
story. Style not altogether smooth and method of unfolding story at times 
labored. 
FOOTE, MARY HALLOCK (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Valley Road; Houghton, Mifflin and Co., 1915 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: The story centers in the activities of a family which came to Cali 
fornia because the father and husband was an engineer, hired to develop a 
tract of land. The picture of California is not particularly clear, although 
the biographies are rather interesting, as are the reflections of the author. 
The reflections, which in their naturalness are very feminine, really give a 
touch of quality to the book. The book in the entirety, however, is little better 
than mediocre. There is in it an interesting side view of the San Francisco 
earthquake, and a couple of fairly interesting love stones. 
FORREST, ELIZABETH CHABOT (Washington; pr. res.): 

Daylight Moon; Frederick A. Stokes Co., 1937 
Rec. Sr. H. 11, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A very well-written account of three years spent in government 
service among the Eskimo of Alaska. The experiences are varied, interesting, 
and significant. There are good photographic illustrations. 

2. The story of three years spent in a government school at Wainright, 
Alaska. The author and her husband had charge of this school for Eskimos. 
The reader follows these young people, eager to help the natives, striving 
always to understand and be tolerant of their ways and shares with interest 
their life and problems. A factual story *vliich reads like a novel. 
FOSTER, MICHAEL (Washington; pr. res.): 

American Dream; William Morrow and Co., Inc., 1937 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Through ninety years, three generations of an American family 

reveal the strange contrasts of courage and cruelty, bigotry and idealism 

through which persist the spirit and dream that went into the making of 

America. Shelby Thrall's search for the meaning of this dream is warmly 

realistic in detail and dramatic in story. Locale, Kansas and New England. 

2. "A skillfully handled resume* of the forces which have molded the 

present-day average American, leaving him a puzzled but still a questing 

dreamer. Its style is precise and strong; it presents a chart rather than a 

plot; it is thoughtful and thought-provoking." 

FOSTER, MICHAEL (Washington; pr. res.): 

Forgive Adam; William Morrow and Co., Inc., 1935 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. As first novels go, Forgive Adam is a surprisingly well-written 
book. Although the novel is melodramatic and contains a rather confused 
philosophical approach to the solution of the social evils that Mr. Foster 
pictures so vividly, it should be of interest to the mature readers who know 
the Seattle area well, for many local celebrities are satirized in this novel. 



90 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

2. A story of sordid life as seen by a disillusioned young newspaper man, 
who realizes the futility of such a life, yet is unable to lift himself above it. 
In spite of unpleasant realism and tragedy, the story secures interest through 
prose that moves easily, with touches of humor, and bits of beautiful de 
scription. Locale, Pacific coast. 
FOSTER, MICHAEL (Washington; pr. res.): 

To Remember at Midnight; William Morrow and Co., Inc., 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen, Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Ann Parnet left a Montana farm with her actor father. Her 
rise through the kerosene circuits of mining towns to fame in America and 
Europe successfully interprets the glamour and realism of stage life. Jonathan 
Fraser, her husband in Aberdeen, Washington, and Jake Banion, manager, 
enrich her life and this story. 

2. A moving story of theatre life, tender in spite of roughness. 
FREEMAN, EDMUND: Prose Preferences, First Series. See COX, 

SIDNEY 
FREEMAN, EDMUND: Prose Preferences, Second Series. See COX, 

SIDNEY 
FRENCH, CHAUNCEY DEL.: Railroadman. See FRENCH, HENRY 

CLAY 
FRENCH, HENRY CLAY (Ed. Del French, Chauncey) (Oregon; pr. 

res.) : 

Railroadman; Ma cm ill an Co., 1938 
Rec. Jr. C, Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen, R. Men, Women 

Comment: The biography of Henry Clay French, an early railroadman, writ 
ten by his son. The growth of western railroads is shown, through Mr. 
French's fifty years of service in various types of railroad work, 
FROST, GEORGE EDWIN (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Planets, Stars and Atoms 
Rec. No 

Comment: Style not especially pleasing, Book full of errors. Writer not an 
astronomer. Attempts to explain things he has read elsewhere. In many cases 
clearly did not understand what he read. Since there are so many fine books 
on astronomy by real authorities, this one is not worth reading. Even mis 
leading. 
FULLENWIDER, ELMER D.: The Pacific Northwests Its Resources and 

Industries. See KING, WILLIAM A. 
FULLER, ETHEL ROMIG (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Kitchen Sonnets (and Lyrics of Domesticity); Metropolitan Press 

(Binfords & Mort), 1931 
Rec, Sr. H. 10, u, 12 

Comment: Kitchen Sonnets is a book of poems which, because of its homely 

and intimate theme, will make a strong appeal to high school students. The 

verse is charmingly written, with delightful flight of thought and turn of 

phrase. The book will be valuable in bringing student adherents to poetry. 

FULLER, ETHEL ROMIG (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

White Peaks and Green; Willett, Clark and Colby, Chicago! 1928; 

Binfords & Mort, Portland, 1933 
Rec. Sr. H, 10, n, iz 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Comment: i. The poems vary widely in subject-matter and method of ap- 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 91 

proach; however, the style is lucid and easily grasped. The subject-matter is 
common to the experience of all of us. The literary quality is excellent. 

2. A volume of brief lyrics that catch the color, sound, and feeling of a 
land bordered on one side by mountains and on the other by the ocean; 
whimsical observations of people simply but sincerely stated. Enjoyable ex 
cept when the author forces her thought into hyphenated words that obscure 
any real emotion. 

FULLER, GEORGE W. (Washington; fr. res.): 

A History of the Pacific Northwest; Alfred A. Knopf, 1931 

Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This is a scholarly and very usable history of the Pacific 
Northwest, particularly for the region known as the Inland Empire. The 
panorama of events in this "promised land" exploration, fur trade, mis 
sionary activity, early settlement and Indian wars, the diplomatic maneuvers 
by which^ the boundaries were ultimately determined, political and economic 
growth is interestingly presented. In spite of a few errors and some doubt 
ful interpretations, it is one of the best histories for this interesting section of 
the country. 

2. One ^of the very few books especially dealing with the Pacific North 
west and in consequence of value. Chapters on geology, the aborigines, the 
explorers, the fur traders, the Whitman massacre, the numerous Indian wars. 
Emphasis on the Inland Empire. A book for adults, since it posits an his 
torical background. Excellent format, maps and illustrations. 
FULTON, REED (Washington; pr. res.): 

Davy Jones's Locker; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1928 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: An adventure story of the Astorian expedition with every page 
full of breath-taking action. No literary qualities. Joseph Stevens runs away 
from a wicked uncle, who pursues him secretly and relentlessly, until good 
is rewarded and evil punished. It can be used to encourage boys who read 
very little to make a start. 
FULTON, REED (Washington; pr. res.): 

Moccasin Trail; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1929 
Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: A mildly sensational story of a plantation boy who became a 
frontiersman, following the Moccasin Trail with Kit Carson. Treacherous 
Indians, wicked white men, treasure, and brave plainsmen fill the pages with 
action piled upon action. It has little or no literary merit, but is useful in 
leading boys to read good historical fiction. 

GABRIELSON, IRA NOEL, and JEWETT, STANLEY GORDON (Ore 
gon; fr. res.): 
Birds of Oregon; O. S. C. Cooperative Association, Corvallis* Ore., 

1940 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: The first comprehensive book on Oregon birds. In addition to the 
main annotated list, special features are a brief description of federal bird 
refuges in Oregon, a history of Oregon ornithology, and bibliography of 
writings on Oregon birds. Colored illustrations and a greater number of 
illustrations would have increased its value for identification purposes, and 
have added much to its attractiveness. 



92 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

CARMAN, JOHN C. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Introductory Photography; O. S. C. Cooperative Association, Cor- 
vallis, Ore., 1937 

Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men 

Comment: John C. Garman, Professor of Physics, has quite evidently written 
his book for the amateur and beginning student. The basic rules for taking 
and developing pictures including the theory back of each step are presented 
logically and concisely. Although a primary knowledge of mathematics, 
physics, and chemistry facilitates reading, the general reader will have no 
difficulties, inasmuch as the technical discussions have been simplified when 
ever possible. 
GATLIN, GEORGE OURY (Oregon; deceased): 

Some Must Wander; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1934 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Such wanderers as the cowboy, cotton-picker, gipsy, and others 
of the "hi-road" receive a very realistic portrayal in this little book of 
poems. Each group is distinctive in atmosphere and characters. Of varying 
rhyme and rhythm, this verse dealing with lives of adventurers will appeal 
to youth. Minor literary value. 

a. These verses reflect first-hand knowledge and understanding of people 
be they northwestern loggers with their tales of Paul Bunyan, cowboys of 
the Southwest or negroes of the Deep South. The wanderings of gypsies and 
tropical tramps are portrayed as happy release from the cares of modern 
civilization. 
GEER, T. T. (Oregon; fr. res.) : 

Fifty Years in Oregon; The Neale Publishing Co., New York, 1912 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment; An extensive, storyized history of Oregon and the Geer family, 

told from a reminiscent viewpoint by an early settler and one-time governor 

of Oregon. In subject matter agricultural and political, as well as historical. 

Generally enjoyable reading with some portions rich in appeal. Style good. 

GERLINGER, MRS. IRENE (HAZARD) (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Money Raising, How to do it; Suttonhouse, Los Angeles, 1938 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: General advice to nonprofessionals concerned with the financing 
of social and other agencies, including churches, educational institutions, 
hospitals, art museums, clubhouses, community trusts and small organisations. 
The author says she has raised a million dollars for education and chanty. 
Interesting and practical. 
GETTY, AGNES K. (MRS, ROBERT HILL SLOAN) (Montana; pr. 

res.) : 

Blue Gold; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1934 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A love story involving the spoiled daughter of wealth who 
decides to discover life by teaching in a small Montana town. The hero is a 
local trapper who is well educated but bitter towards the world. The de 
scription of life in a small Montana town is well done and true in detail 

2. A very ordinary kind of romance of a smart young heiress teaching 
school in western Montana, the last frontier, where she finds not only herself 
but the answer to a maiden's prayer. Only a few good descriptions of the 
countryside. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 93 

3. A pleasant romance relating the adventures of Allie Warren, who left 
a luxurious home in Seattle to teach in the little town of Boxcar, Montana. 
Her adaptation to what at first seemed to her a frontier existence was not 
easy ; but the story reaches the traditional happy ending. 
GIBBY, GEORGE E. (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Spirit of '76: George E. Gibby's Scrapbook and Poems; The C ax ton 

Printers, Ltd., 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Gen. R. Men 

Comment: The selections are chosen from a wide area in space and time, 
from Emerson to Mussolini to encourage "a more wholesome understanding 
of the principles and forces that brought our nation into existence." The 
original verse is wholesome and homely, but scarcely inspired. 
GILKEY, HELEN MARGARET (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Handbook of Northwest Flowering Plants; Metropolitan Press 

(Binfords & Mort), 1936 
Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A handbook for identification of flowering plants of that part 
of Washington and Oregon that lies west of the Cascades from northern 
Washington to the Umpqua Divide in Oregon. The descriptions and the 
many drawings are excellent and form a handbook which is invaluable to 
western plant lovers, 

2. An excellent description of the flora of this region, illustrated with fine 
pen drawings, with analytical key and glossary of botanical terms. Usable 
alike by students and laymen interested in botany. 
GILKEY, J. A. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Heroes of the Yukon and Other Poems; Metropolitan Press 

(Binfords & Mort), 1932 
Rec. No 

Comment: Mediocre verse of the occasional type. 
GILL, LAURA FRANCES (Oregon; deceased): 

Chloe Dusts Her Mantel; Press of the Pioneers, New York, 1935 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Women 

Comment: Chloe Clarke came to the Oregon country in 1839 on the Lausanne 
as a Methodist missionary. She later married William Willson and the two 
were pioneer settlers of Salem. Sketches from her life have been woven into 
this charming little story by her granddaughter, Miss Gill. 
GILL, LAURA FRANCES (Oregon; deceased): 

The Little Days; Hough ton, Mifflin and Co., 1917 
Rec. No 
Comment: Verse for much younger children than those of high-school age, 

and of an outmoded type. 
GILL, LAURA FRANCES (Oregon; deceased): 

Windy Leaf; Macmillan Co., 1924 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: Excellent poems for children. They are not sentimental, but sincere 
expressions of childhood comment on the ice-man, flowers, worms, snakes and 
all the other things which are really important to a child. Excellent style, 
clear, unpretentious, and not "written down" to the childish level with the 
patronizing note so often found. 



94 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

GILL, JOHN (Oregon; deceased): 

Dictionary of the Chinook Language; J. K. Gill Co., 1881; Binfords 
& Mort, 1933 

Rec. Sr. H. ro, it, 12 
Jr. S. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: A compilation of Chinook jargon, with examples of use in con 
versation and notes upon other tongues. Present revised edition contains 
about three hundred words; the remainder are words used by other Coast 
Indian tribes of the Northwest. First ten pages (Introduction) give the 
philogist's views of word sources and time of origin. Differences in language 
from that of other tribes of territory is noted. Includes study of characteristic 
traits and habits of various tribes. Of high reference value. 
GIPSON, ALICE EDNA (Idaho; fr. res.): 

John Home, A Study of His Life and Works: The Caxton Printers 
Ltd., 1916 ' 

Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Home's tragedies, with special emphasis on "Douglas," are 
fully presented^ the light of their stage history. This is a learned disserta 
tion, full of biographical material and critical comment on a little-known 
dramatist and his works. Interesting to those who want to learn of a note 
worthy Scottish dramatist in middle i8th century. 

2. A complete account of the life of John Home, English 18th-century 
dramatist, and of his dramatic work, with special emphasis on his tragedv 
"Douglas." 

GIPSON, ALICE EDNA (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Silence; The Caxton Printers. Ltd., 1930 

Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i, The story of a young couple taking up a homestead in the 
Far West. Their life, together with its hardships and disappointments is 
vividly depicted. 

2. The homely tasks in burning heat, discouragements, and joys, are all 
relived in this simple but gripping story of a will that had to win. 

3. Preserves for future generations the struggles and hardships of the 
southern Idaho pioneers. The elements of love, romance, courage, depriva 
tions, sickness, distress, and death are interwoven into a beautiful and touch 
ing story of the Far West The language and style are in harmony with the 
story. 

GOFFIN, MARIE M. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Trail of the Plow; Binfords & Mort, 1940 
Rec, Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: It deals with the next epoch of Oregon history after the romantic 
reign of the cattle barons, who could not defend their kingdoms against the 
invading homesteaders. It presents the warfare of the factions who were 
caught in the overlap land controversy, concerning the military road land 
grants, the jailroad land grants, and the Government grants to the home 
steaders. Historical background and pleasing Eastern Oregon atmosphere. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 95 

GOLDENSTEIN, PAULINE GARRISON (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Home Songs; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1926 
Rec. No 

Comment: i. Familiar verses illustrated with drawings in black and white 
and colors. 

2. Simple, unpretentious verses of personal home life and children, that 
would appeal mainly to the family circle. Shows devotion to home and 
family. No literary value. 
GOLDEN WEISER, ALEXANDER A. (Oregon; deceased): 

Anthropology, An Introduction to Primitive Culture; . S. Crofts. 
Rec. Sr. C. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This is a chatty, informal volume for the mature reader of con 
siderable background^ in history, philosophy, and general culture, presenting 
much excellent material from the point of view of the anthropologist, throw 
ing light upon the cultural ways of man. 
GOLDENWEISER, ALEXANDER A. (Oregon; deceased): 

Early Civilization; Alfred A. Knopf, 1922 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Sp. R. 

Comment: Among the foremost authoritative anthropologists, Dr. Golden- 
weiser here presents a scrutinizing treatise on early man and his relation 
ships. Employs cross-section examination of five aboriginal tribes, with con 
clusions ^on same comparatively presented. Concludes with philosophic 
examinations of theoretical early mentality. A book for the advanced scholar. 
GOLDENWEISER, ALEXANDER A. (Oregon; deceased): 

History, Psychology, Culture; Alfred A. Knopf, 1933 
Rec. Sr. C. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women Sp. R. 

Comment: i. A thorough discussion of the relationship between history, 
phychology, and culture together with a detailed presentation of Totemism 
and a discussion of religion and race history. Highly technical. Suitable 
only for those interested in the field of social science. 

2. ^ This volume blends somewhat loosely, yet with considerable connection 
that is readily obvious, a number of essays and lectures dealing with the 
areas stated in the title, from the point of view of the social philosopher. It 
is quite readable, although a bit heavy in spots. 
GOODRICH, LAURENCE B. (Washington; fr. res.): 

Living With Others; American Book Co., 1939 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, iz 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A book on social conduct. Deals with substantial matter 
makes very tonic reading. Not written to reform anyone, but to suggest guid 
ance and directions, especially for youth who are anxious about how to meet 
difficulties that arise because one must perforce do at least some of his living 
with others, Far ahead of Emily Post. 

2. These essays deal with the most important of all arts, making and 
maintaining pleasant and effective human relations. Thousands of young 
people who will never have a chance to use it as a textbook will enjoy it and 
profit from it. Locale, everywhere. 
GORDON, EMANUEL TAYLOR (Montana; fr. res.): 

Born to Be; Covici-Friede Co., 1929 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i, Negro singer, whose family was the only colored family in 
White Sulphur Springs, tells what it it to be so situated, discover race 
prejudice, earn renown to be a human being, a man and a negro. Human 



96 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

values high; literary values, unique. Frontispiece an interior in color, by 
Cpvarrubias, of a parlor house of the '9o's. In this respect alone, and in one 
slight passage, strong meat for babes. 

a. The story of negro Mannie Gordon, born and raised in White Sulphur 
Springs in days when mines were still working and Ringlings were active 
thereabouts. Taylor became "Ringling's Nigger" on Ringling's private car 
in Florida and the circus road. He studied singing and found out about a 
negro's place in America. He traveled to Europe and had much success with 
his voice. He is a handsome man, with a fine voice. Illustrated by Covar- 
rubias. Introductions by Muriel Draper and Carl Van Vechten. 
GOSE, J. GORDON: West, Young Man. See JONES, NARD 
GOULD, DOROTHY FAY (Washington; pr. res.): 

Beyond the Shining Mountains; Binfords & Mort, 1938 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Thirty-six chapters of well-selected Northwest material, entire 
ly suited to the junior high school level, or even lower. Not so good, perhaps, 
as Katherine Judson's Early Days in Old Oregon. As in Judson, interesting 
treatment of vital matter compensates for careless editing. Locale, early 
Oregon. 

2, These "36 Northwest Adventures" have much in both substance and 
the story-teller's art to commend them. The illustrations are well chosen and 
well reproduced ; their contribution is integral to the stories. 
GO WEN, REVEREND HERBERT HENRY (Washington; pr. res.): 

Five Foreigners in Japan; Fleming H. Revell Co., 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen, R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Skillfully told, authentic biographies of Pinto, Saint Francis 
Xavier, Will Adams, Ranald MacDonald, and Townsend Harris; all five 
seen in relation to their sojourns in Japan over a period of nearly three 
hundred years. These stories are significant as history, but they also make 
entertaining reading. 

2. We find in this book some timely information concerning early foreign 
contacts with Japan through the adventures o Mender Pinto, the sailor; 
Xavier, the missionary; Will Adams, the pilot, and Ranald MacDonald, the 
Oregon adventurer. Both Dutch and English had trade lines and factors in 
there as early as 1614, and the Dutch were still there when MacDonald 
arrived more than 200 years later* So Perry was not pioneering in Nippon. 
Locale, Asiatic coast. 
GOWEN, REVEREND HERBERT HENRY (Washington; pr. res.): 

Hawaiian Idylls of Love and Death; Cochrane Publishing Co., New 

York, 1908 
Rec. Sr. H. u, 12 

Comment: The stories of incidents during the career of the heroic Karneha- 
meha I. The author states, "For heroism is of no one age, and of no one 
race. It commands the sympathy and respect of all, and it is the author's 
hope that these simple sketches may show that touch of Nature which makes 
the whole world kin * * * ." 
GOWEN, REVEREND HERBERT HENRY (Washington; pr. res.): 

A History of Religion; Mo rehouse Publishing Co., Milwaukee, 1934 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Sp. R. 

Comment: i. Scholarly written "unashamedly from the Christian point of 
view" and presenting primitive religions, state religions of antiquity, re- 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 97 

Hgions of the Orient, Judaism, Mohammedanism, and Christianity and their 
relations to each other. A progressive as well as broadening view of religion 
which helps one see how great and important a place it has had in the 
development of the human race. 

2. A scholarly presentation of the course of religion from primitive forms 
through Eastern religions, finally covering Christianity and the Christian 
church. Every religion has its place in the complicated story in which the 
author endeavors to trace a the vision of the divine purpose, slowly but 
surely being realized." 

GO WEN, REVEREND HERBERT HENRY (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Journal of Kenko; University of Washington Book Store 
Seattle, 1928 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Somewhat in the nature of a book review of Tsuredzure Gusa by 
Yoshidano Kaneyoshi translated by G. B. Lansom. Dr. Gowen gives short 
excerpts from the journal with a running comment which reveals vividly 
some sides of the character of Kenko. Incidentally it serves as a good intro 
duction to Oriental Life and thought. An essay originally appearing in 
The Open Court. 

GOWEN, REVEREND HERBERT HENRY (Washington; pr. res.): 

A Precursor of Perry: The Story of Takano Nagahide; University 

of Washington Book Store, Seattle, 1928 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: The story of a Japanese who in the early nineteenth century felt 
that Japan was wrong in closing her doors to all foreign culture and influ 
ence. For the sake of his country he did his best to further foreign culture 
and finally paid with his life for so doing. 
GRANNATT, HARRY SILLECK (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Pied Typer of Shrdlu Etaoin; Binfords & Mort, 1939 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Light newspaper verse on a wide variety of subjects, topical 
and universal. Amusing, human, gentle cynicism. Verses follow a pattern of 
mock seriousness with sudden turn at ending. Best summary of his attitude 
and style is his verse, "Softie," on p. 80. 

2. Extremely clever brief rhymed stanzas of comment on the world as it 
goes by, written in the Eugene Field spirit and originally published, one a 
day, on the front page of the Oregon Journal. 
GREENWOOD, ANNIE PIKE (Idaho; fr. res.): 

We Sagebrush Folks; D. Appleton-Century Co., 1934 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A most unusual and delightful autobiography of a cultured and 
educated woman who came West with her husband to settle on a farm in the 
sagebrush desert of Southern Idaho. The book gives excellent description, 
interpretation, and philosophy, as well as autobiography and history. It is 
a vivid and realistic book. 

2. The book gives a vivid picture of the trials, joys, and character of 
pioneer farmers on one of Idaho's great irrigated areas, Mrs. Greenwood 
writes authoritatively from experience, and with considerable literary charm. 



98 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

GRIFFITH, JASON (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Monkey Wrench; Stratford Co., Boston, 1933 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, iz 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph, 
Sr. C, Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Serious minded young American gets mixed up with disap 
pearance of successful inventor of synthetic rubber. Rich uncle, movie mag 
nate, to feel vicariously the thrills of unsophisticated youth, had staged the 
whole thing with Hollywood actors and nephew unconsciously playing the 
leading role. Proves to be fine fellow. Well written. 

2. This story offers a well-handled combination of mystery, romance, and 
adventure. Adequately written. Suitable entertainment, but has little real 
value. 
GRISSOM, IRENE WELCH MRS. (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Under Desert Skies; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1935 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A book which every Westerner should read and carry on his 
travels over the deserts. A book which would interest the poet, nature student, 
geologist. Outstanding little poems "vignettes of the desert/' "like fine etch 
ings" giving vivid and beautiful word pictures of the lonely loveliness and 
pathos of the desert Attractively and truthfully illustrated. Locale, South 
western United States. 

2. The writer sees beauty in the most desolate of desert wastes and has 
found the words to pass on this beauty to the readers. The accompanying 
photographs and illustrations aid ia making this an unusual volume. 

3. Poems in beautiful and sensitive interpretation of the desert landscape, 
with charming art photographs and pen-and-ink etchings. 

GRISSOM, IRENE WELCH (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Verse of the New West? The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1931 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ix, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr, C Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This verse is smooth and pleasant, full of hope and courage, 
and the love of western country and western people. It is conventional in 
form and subject matter, and gives a generalized rather than a particular 
picture of the West. 

a. Inspiring in conception and charming in its simplicity, the verse in 
this volume by Idaho's Poet Laureate is a distinct contribution to Idahoana. 
lived by western-born author. 

3. Outlook sincere; sympathetic understanding of subject matter because 
Content carefully chosen significant pictures of the life of the west, of 

Idaho; nature; personal lyrics. 

Style diction simple, sincere, generally pure; often specially fitting imag 
inative phrasing; verse movement and structure simple, varied, generally 
good. 

4. The poems are western in content There isn't any human appeal. One 
is likely not to be tempted to reread the poems. The metre is irregular, and 
the rhythm seems to have been obtained with no particular sense of careful 
selection of words. All word pictures are concrete, 

GROSE, J. GORDON: West, Young Man. See JONES, NARD 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 99 

GUBERLET, MURIEL LEWIN (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Animals of the Seashore; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 
1936 

Rec. Grades 6 

Jr. H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C, Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen, R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. An excellent handbook for the vacationer and amateur natural 
ist. The vocabulary is somewhat technical and advanced for children, but 
I am told by those who have tried it, that the content holds the interest of 
very young children when supplemented with field specimens. 

2. Animals of the Seashore is a handbook, identifying the various types 
of animal life which may be found along the seashore of the Pacific North 
west. There is a one-page description of each species with a life-like phota- 
graph directly opposite. The information is presented simply and distinctly. 
GUTHRIE, EDWIN R. (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Psychology of Human Conflict; Harper and Brothers, 1938 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: A treatise on the psychology of adjustment through an analysis of 
convicts and suggestions of effective ways of dealing with such disturbances. 
The material is very readable. The author is clear in his concepts, illuminat 
ing in his explanations, and helpful in his suggestions. The lay reader will 
find it stimulating. 
GUTHRIE, JOHN D. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Forest Fire and Other Verse; Dunham Printing Co., Portland, Ore., 

1929 
Rec. No 

Comment: An anthology of forest ranger verse. Verse of very irregular qual 
ity, most of it bad. 
GUTHRIE, JOHN D. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Forest Ranger; The Gorham Press, Boston, 1917 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: Collection of verses written by and about forest rangers and the 
forest service. The style is mediocre to poor but may be recommended as a 
picture of the forest rangers' life, which would have its value especially to 
high school students. 
HABERLY, LOYD (Oregon; fr. res.) : 

Poems; Oxford University Press, London, 1931 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: An Elizabethan transplanted to the twentieth century. Poems in an 
excellent literary style written in the manner of the Elizabethan writers. 
Pure lyrics. 
HABERLY, LOYD (Oregon; fr. res.): 

The Sacrifice of Spring A Masque of Queens; The Seven Acres 

Press, Long Crendon, Bucks, England, 1927 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: An Elizabethan-lyrical fantasia of the Greek gods, demigods, and 
Alcestis. Pure poetry, delicate and lovely. A book that is extremely difficult 
to get, but well worth while. 



IPO NORTHWEST BOOKS 

HAGEN, LOIS D. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

A Parish in the Pines; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1938 

Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Written in a quiet nostalgic prose, this book is a fine picture of 
early social conditions in the northwoods country of Minnesota during the 
'So's and '90'$. Fine descriptions and comments on the Chippewa Indians of 
the region, and on the missionary conditions. 
HAINES, FRANCES (Oregon; pr. res.) = 

Red Eagles of the Northwest; Scholastic Press, Portland, Ore., 1939 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, ir, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: A history of Chief Joseph and his people, the Nez Perce Indians. 
He traces the tribes from their first contact with a white man to the break-up 
of the reservation in 1895. The injuries inflicted on these people, an apprecia 
tion of their culture, and a recognition of both the Indian's and the white 
man's point of view is sympathetically developed. The book is authoritative 
and thoroughly documented. The studious reader from the high school level 
on will read this book with pleasure. 
HALL, GRACE E. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Homespun; Dodd, Mead and Co., 1922 
Rec. No 
Comment: Homespun verses of the eddicguest type, although of a better 

quality than ed die's. 
HALL, GRACE E. (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Patchwork; Dodd, Mead and Co., 1924 
Rec. No 
Comment: Inspirational eddieguestism. Not suitable for school use. One 

poem, "Memories," of literary quality. 
HALL, HAZEL (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Cry of Time; E. P. Dutton and Co., 1928 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: These poems attain excellent literary quality. Like Curtains and 
Walkers f the singing quality of these poems should appeal to all readers, 
old or young, but the thought content of this book is more difficult, more 
mature and, I believe, will appeal more strongly to high school and college 
students than to those of the junior high school. The subject-matter is more 
varied, more subjective than in the former books, but still concerns the 
things that take place in the outside world beyond the window of the 
shut-ins. 

HALL, HAZEL (Oregon; fr. res.): 
Curtains; John Lane Co., 1921 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, *, 9 
Sr. H. 10, n, la 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr, C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Poems of hi$h literary quality. These are the poems of a shut-in 
who saw the world from her window. The subject-matter concerns itself 
with sunlight and passers-by, twilight and April stars, and songs for dreams; 
one section is devoted to Needlework, poems ot sewing, etc. The poems of 
the book have a wide appeal. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 101 

HALL, HAZEL (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Walkers; Dodd, Mead and Co., 1923 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: The subject-matter of this book of poems by an invalid are the 
people who pass her window. A few of the titles will suggest the contents* 
"A Boy Went By," "Three Girls," "Walkers at Dusk," "These Who Pass," 
"A Whistler at Night," "Footfalls I XIV," etc. Like Curtains, this book 
has a very wide appeal. 

HALL, JOSEF WASHINGTON (UPTON CLOSE) (Washington; pr. 

res.): 
Eminent Asians; Appleton Co., 1929 

Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. History Students 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Ito, Yamagato, Stalin, Sun Yat-Sen, Gandhi are the six eminent 
Asians whom the author treats in brief biographies. Gives information that 
is at the moment desi rable. The style is not attractive, and the author does 
not succeed in making his characters live for the reader. 

HALL, JOSEF WASHINGTON (UPTON CLOSE) (Washington; pr. 

res.): 

The Revolt of Asia; G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1927 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: The AX. A. says better than I could "A study of white domina 
tion in the Far West, dramatically written in forceful journalistic style, and 
based upon long residence in China and extended travel in Asia. The author 
sounds^ a tocsin for British rule in the Far East and sees America as the 
determining factor in the impending struggle." 

HALL, OLOF, pseud. (OLOF ALFRED HALLSTOM) (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Youth North; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1936 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Donn, cultured, sensitive young European, lost in Alaskan blizzard, 
relives the years he has spent as a tramp. Rescued by dream girl, center of 
all his thoughts. Good descriptions of scenery and of hobo and itinerant 
workers' lives and adventures. Much introspective philosophizing by very 
young man. Wordy style. 

HALL, RAYMOND: Mammals of the Pocatello Region of Southeastern 
Idaho. See WHITMAN, WAYNE B. 

HAMMETT, DASHIELL (Montana; fr. res.): 
Red Harvest; Alfred A. Knopf, 1927 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A blood and thunder story of a private detective who cleans up 
a crooked town. Seventeen murders and numberless other casualties. Told in 
the popular brisk conversational style. Not one of Hammett's best, but fairly 
readable. 

2. A fictionalized story of a private detective playing factor against factor 
in^ an attempt to clean up Personville ; a rapidly moving story of a rowdy 
mining town, presumably Butte, Montana, being brought to order by killing 
off the gangsters. 



102 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

HAMOT, ALICE TURNIDGE (Oregon; deceased!)! 

The Trail Blazers; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1935 

Rec. Special reader . 

Comment: A historical and genealogical record of early pioneer families of 
Oregon, Missouri and the South. Such families as the Turnidge, Crowley, 
Parker, Munkers, Jefferson Myers, Thorp, George A. Miller, Daniel Boone, 
Pigg and Duncan families are reviewed. A prodigious amount of legal and 
genealogical documentation is presented. Twenty-two illustrations. 

HANDFORTH, THOMAS (Washington; fr. res.): 

Met Li; Doubleday, Doran Co,, 1938 
Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Comment: r. There is a captivating gaiety about this book which should go 
far toward making it a juvenile of the first rank. The quaint, forthright style 
harmonizes with the oriental atmosphere and situations. The illustrations are 
of a very high order, and one is impressed with the individuality that has 
gone into the portrayal of each face. Locale, Pekin, China. 

2. A simple story by a distinguished artist, as delicately worded as his 
art work itself is delicate; language and illustrations are equally charming. 
The illustrations and endpapers reveal how well Handforth is mastering his 
materials. Locale, North China, near the Great Wall. 
HANFORD, CORNELIUS HOLGATE (Washington; deceased): 

Genera/ Claxton; Walter Neale, New York, 1917 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, ix, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: An amateur novel. It has little character or plot that would class 
it as a work of art. The tale is, however, told in a straight-forward manner, 
with quiet and pleasing style. It contains a considerable amount of inter 
esting anecdote and reminiscence concerning early clays in Seattle, and in 
California. 
HANLEY, WILLIAM: Feelin' Fine: mil Hartley's Book. See MONROE, 

ANNE SHANNON, Compiler 
HANSON, RITA MOHLER (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Desert Road to Shani~lun; Binfords & Mort, 1939 
Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Gen. R. Women 

Comment: i. Definitely in the field of "light literature," this book would 
appeal to high school girls and to somewhat vSentirnental adults who like to 
picture romantically the teachings of Buddha. Its style is easy and pleasing, 
and its story of an American girl's adventures hold the interest of the reader, 
even though he receives no strong intellectual stimulus. Locale, China. 

2. Lynn Britten, an American girl, accepts her half-brother's invitation to 
visit him in China, not knowing that he has sold her to a Mongolian Prince 
as his bride. A long trip across the desert, numerous adventures with bandits, 
interspersed with bits of Oriental philosophy combine to make a fast-moving, 
although highly improbable, novel. 
HARGREAVES, SHEBA (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Cabin at the Trail's End; Harper and Brothers, 1928 
Rec. Jr. IL 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: Early pioneering in Oregon. Adventure occurs and action is satis- 
fyingly continuous. Attempts, with considerable success, an intimate picture 
of life in the Willamette Valley in the 1840*8. The prose style is iServiceable 
but not beautiful in any way. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 103 

HARGREAVES, SHEBA (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Heroine of the Prairies; Harper and Brothers, 1930 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: The adventures and heroism of a young girl in an emigrant train 
on the Oregon Trail and in Oregon before 1850. There are Indians and 
horse thieves. But the emphasis is upon the details of pioneer life, and upon 
the conflicting Puritan intolerance and inherent kindly spirit of Oregon 
pioneers. Informative, convincing, and interesting. Fair prose style. 
HARGREAVES, SHEBA (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Ward of the Redskins; Harper and Brothers, 1929 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: An interesting story of a young pioneer who rescues from the 
Indians of the Nehalem country a white girl captive. Much is made of the 
customs of these Indians, especially their use of magic. Informational, enter- 
taming. The prose style is readable but not artistic. 
HARPER, THEODORE ACLAND (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Allison's Girl; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1936 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. A book which is especially interesting for girls. The setting in 
Oregon, tells something of the state's fruit farming and the outdoor life of 
the young people. While not as outstanding as some of his earlier books, it is 
well written and readable. 

2. A mystery story for young readers with interesting, believable people 
m it. Problems involved concern grown-ups as much as young people. Spe 
cially to be commended for showing courtesy and understanding between 
adults and young people. Locale, Western Oregon. 

3. ^ Concerned with the mystery surrounding the life of an adopted girl 
and its final clearing up. The story contains suspense, good character presen 
tation, and bits of interest about Camp Fire organization. Its style is especial 
ly fitting for a story for girls. Locale, Western Oregon. 

HARPER, THEODORE ACLAND (Oregon; pr. res.): 
Fotgotten Gods; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1929 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 . 

Comment: Light fiction for juvenile readers, based upon adventure among the 
ruins of ^Mayan civilization in Central America. There is a touch of intrigue, 
and a bit of romance. Characters are fairly well presented, and all is pleas 
ingly told. The informative value is negligible. The prose is easy-flowing. 
HARPER, THEODORE ACLAND (Oregon; pr. res.): 

His Excellency and Peter; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1930 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: i. Siberian background, same characters as Kubrick the Outlaw. 
The outlaw's son, who wants education; as always with Harper's books, this 
one has a good style. 

2. Peter, a young Russian peasant, is taken care of by an American en 
gineer, Stephen Wild, who becomes interested in his development and educa 
tion. Through the aid of the governor, it is made possible for Peter to 
attend the government school. One becomes very much interested in young 
Peter. 
HARPER, THEODORE ACLAND (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

The Janitor's Cat; D. Appleton and Co., 1927 
Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Comment: An excellent children's story of what happens to children's books, 
in which the characters come to life before the janitor's cat. Best for younger 
children, Well written. 



iQ4 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

HARPER, THEODORE ACLAND (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Kubrick the Outlaw; Doubleday, Do ran and Co., 1928 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. This book is the first of a series telling of the adventures of an 
American engineer in Siberia, and Kubrick, a Russian who has become 
embittered as a result of Russian official abuses. A story of adventure and 
interesting characters. Appeals strongly to readers of Junior and Senior high 
school age. 

2. Adventure story in Siberia concerning a gold mine, peasant uprising 
following the Russian-Japanese War, and the outlaw gold thieves. Characters 
handled well, background authentic, very interesting story, and good style. 

3. Sequel to Siberian Gold, Written with the same effective handling of 
situations, characters, exciting and significant incidents. Here Kubrick the 
outlaw takes sides with Stephen Wild in the latter's struggle against Grubof, 
a corrupt official, who endeavors by craft and violence to lay hold upon a 
gold mine which is operated by the engineer. Kubrick shows his better na 
ture, justifies himself by defending the "foreigner and his woman." Very 
good reading. 

HARPER, THEODORE ACLAND (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

The Mushroom Boy; Penn Publishing Co., Philadelphia, 1924 
Rec. Grades 3, 4, 5, 6 

Comment: Here are 215 pages of charming fancy, told with a bright and 
concrete imagery to capture a child's interest and hold it. But, though de 
lightful, it has nothing for the student of high school or college age. 
HARPER, THEODORE ACLAND (Oregon; pr. res.): 
Red Sky; The Viking Press, 1935 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, u, 12 

Comment: i. An interesting study of the problems that confront the peasants 
in Russia. Shows the corruption of the Army and political life in Russia. It 
also shows the peasants' feeling of futility. Hopelessness, helplessness, in 
trigue, and counter-intrigue drip from its pages. 

2. Peter as a young soldier, Feenga his friend, work throughout the Revo 
lution to protect their friend, the governor, and the Wild's as they go about 
doing what they can for the future good of Russia. 
HARPER, THEODORE ACLAND (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Seventeen Chimneys f The Viking Press, 193S 
Rec, Jr. H. 8, 9 

Sr. H* 10, ii, 12 

Comment: x. Robert Cornish brought abruptly to the realization that he 
must give up Oxford and earn his much-coveted degree in engineering. Life 
proves hard but challenging, taking him from mining in New Zealand to 
the gold diggings in Arizona. Well written. 

2. Bob Cornish, because of his father's bankruptcy, goes out to prove 
himself goes to Auckland mines, becomes mining engineer, works passage 
on a freighter out to the Pacific coast and finally, after hard work, finds 
success in Arizona. There are tricksters to beat, mutiny on high seas and 
romance. Rather sentimentally conventional and not as absorbing as some 
other stories of his but acceptably well written. 
HARPER, THEODORE ACLAND (Oregon; pr, res.): 

Siberian Gold; Doubleday, Page Co., 1927 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, xx, X2 

Comment: x. Dramatic and colorful story of Stephen Wyld, a young mining 
engineer, in Siberia, Here he lives and struggles through difficulties of locale 
and climate, corrupt officials, gold thieves, the Russo-Japanese war; comes 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 105 

out victor over enemies and achieves culmination of romance in the winning 
person of Joan Fielding. Memorable characterizations of Russian mujiks, a 
village priest, young Peter, son of a gold thief, and Kubrick, the outlaw, 
as well as of Stephen and Joan. Literary style vivid, crisp, often impres 
sionistic and fine. 

2. Authentic Siberian setting and characters, providing a romantic and 
adventurous experience for an American mining engineer. Better than Mr. 
Harper's Forgotten Gods. Smooth, pleasing prose style. 

3. Written around the same characters, Stephen Wild, Kubrick and 
Peter, one learns of the influence of the Revolution of 1905 on the peasants 
of Siberia. Unfamiliar as they are with the use of electricity. Stephen Wild 
protects his mine and the peasants who have helped him. 

4. A "wild west" story of the American engineer, Stephen Wyld, who 
foils all enemies, saves his gold mines from sinister competitors, turns suspi 
cious moiyiks to friends, safeguards and wins his chief's daughter, and with 
the help of an old priest, a small boy and a mysterious outlaw, provides 
melodrama and excitement worked out against a background of cold, hard 
ships and mysterious Russia. Excellent adolescent appeal for readers from 
10 to 70. Right now, has some special value as a contrast in the social values 
of democracy and authoriatarianism. 

HARPER, THEODORE ACLAND (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Singing Feathers; The Penn Publishing Co., 1925 
Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4 

Comment: A story of the fancy, written for very small children. The style is 
good, but there is no substance for the reader older than early childhood. 
HARPER, THEODORE ACLAND (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Windy Island; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1931 
Rec. Jr. H. 7,8,9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Comment: A fictionized story of the earlier colonial days in New Zealand. 

Background and historical facts authentic. Excellent style. 
HARRISON, JOSEPH BARLOW (Washington; pr. res.): 

A Short View of Menckenism in Menchenese; University of Wash 
ington Book Store, 1927 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: A brief review of some of H. L. Mencken's ideas and sayings with 
especial reference to "The American Mercury." Mencken's language and 
general style are delightfully imitated. Clever, refreshing. 
HARRISON, JOSEPH BARLOW (Washington; pr. res.): 

Vernon Louis Parrington, American Scholar; University of Wash 
ington Book Store, 1929 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: An attempt to estimate the character and influence of Dr. Parring 
ton, who won the Pulitzer Prize in American History with his "Main Cur 
rents in American Thought," published in 1927. Well written, interesting. 
For college students, rather than high school, though the best of the seniors 
in high school would enjoy it. 
HART, ALAN (Washington; pr. res.): 

Doctor Mallory; W. W. Norton and Co., 1935 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Comment: i. A sincerely written story of a young and gifted doctor's battle 



io6 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

against ignorance, poverty, and disease. Through the long years, although 
he lost his wife, his health dream of an up-to-date hospital for this bleak 
salmon-fishing village. A bit sentimental, perhaps, but part of the great 
picture of American pioneer life. Locale, Southwestern Oregon, 

2. Young Mallory, fulfilling his ambition to become a doctor, serves an 
isolated coast community so loyally his city-bred wife soon leaves him ; at 48 
his heart fails. A good story but too typed to be a character study. A flu 
epidemic a dozen years after the war cannot be very convincing. 

3. Deals with the life of Robert Mallory from age 10, when he become 
obsessed with a passion to become a physician, until his death, age 4.6. It 
gives all the trials, tribulations, and few joys of a medical student, interne 
and physician. Characters well drawn ; plot fairly simple ; story well written 
except where it is marred by profanity. Powerful. 

4. This novel, which symbolically begins with death and ends with birth, 
presents Robert Mallory, who chose not to capitalize his brilliance but to 
remain a country doctor advocating socialized medicine, and sincerely strug 
gling against ignorance and malice in the fishing village of Siltcoos River 
in Oregon. His personality and enthusiasm sustain the interest. 

HART, ALAN (Washington; pr. res.): 

In the Lives of Men; W. W. Norton and Co., Inc., 1937 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: x. Dr. Jim Winforth practices medicine with his father in a 
Puget Sound city during its boom days with their aftermath. Follows the 
period from 1890 to 1909 with both their social and economic significance. 
Slow moving but sincere with attention for detail. 

2. ^ A novel about life in a coastal city of Northwest Washington in boom 
frontier days at the turn of the century. It is not always a pleasant narrative 
with its^ gamblers, rabble-rousers, lumberjacks, prostitutes, mill owners, rail 
road builders, social climbers and frustrated men and women ; but it is a dra 
matic and interesting study of the problems of two physicians, of those things 
"in the lives of men which are not to be spoken." Well written. 

HART, ALAN (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Undaunted; W. W. Norton and Co., Inc., 1936 
Rec. Sr, C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Dr. Richard Cameron struggles, in the face of popular and 
medical disapproval, to work out a liver "extract for the treatment of per 
nicious anemia. In style and subject matter the book reminds? the reader of 
Arrowsmith* but Hart's style is, If anything, more polished than Lewis'. It 
is nonetheless often organically crude. The medical discussion is apparently 
authentic, and will give pleasure to the reader of "medicated novels." 

^2. A fine novel dealing with medical research, this is Dr. Hart at or near 
his best. The plot is alight but the interest is absorbing* The author is a 
master of both subject matter and style. 

3. This clinical study of pernicious anemia is perhaps the best of Dr. 
Hart's novels. The locale is Seattle disguised as Seaforth, but it seems to be 
a characteristic of these medical novels that they don't assimilate much from 
geographical backgrounds, so it makes little difference. Professional men are 
hard to individualize; and the doctors of this book talk and act just as they 
do in The Eealfr, or The Magnificent Obsession, or The Citadel^ the last 
of which came after Dr. Hart's novel. 

4. Life and adventures ^ of a young research M.P. It gives a careful, 
interesting, and authentic picture of human values in the medical profession, 
The book deals with many technical situations and problems. Plot and char 
acters are both well drawn. Book well written. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 107 

HASKIN, LESLIE L. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Wild Flowers of the Pacific Coast; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & 
Mort), 1934 

Rec. Grades 3, 4, 5, 6 Jr. C. Fr, Soph, 

Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12, Gen. R.Men, Women 

Comment: i. A most interesting and informative popular flora. Although 
intended primarily for the western area, it contains descriptions of many 
plants found in other parts of the region. Illustrated by excellent photos made 
by the author and his wife and spiced with much humanistic reference to the 
habits, gathered during many years of personal observation in the field, ^ 

2. This book is an unusual contribution among wild flower books, giving 
historical sketches also in addition to the descriptions of the various flowers. 
The flora of the Northwest is handled as a unit, with a large space devoted 
to Indian plant uses and Indian myths, though only native flowers of the 
region have been described. The work is accurate and authoritative, and is 
supplemented with a glossary of botanical terms, and an index of English 
names, and 200 full-page illustrations. The latter is an exceptional feature 
of the book which will delight both flower lovers and botanists. 

HASTE, GWENDOLEN (Montana; fr f res.): 

Young Land; Coward McCann, 1930 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. Lyrics reflecting the grim side of pioneer life, and longer his 
torical poems. Historical knowledge accurate and competent, taste good, and 
form and expression suited to subject-matter. 

2. The aching, doubting, loneliness of early Montana pioneers, the majes 
tic but terrifying beauty of this unique state are here made permanent in 
verse of charm and distinction. A surprising variety of authentic types, early 
day events done with sympathy and discernment. 

3. "Localized" verses, yet many sufficient appeal to mean something to 
any general reader. The lyric quality of the verses on Montana wives is 
tender and understanding. The most noticeable quality is a richness, a "full- 
bloodedness" in all of the lines, whatever the theme, 

HATHAWAY, BAXTER (Montana; pr. res.) : 
The Stubborn Way? Macmillan Co., 1937 
Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen, R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A first novel which won the Hopwood award at the University 
of Michigan. The author, a member of the English Department of Mon 
tana State University, here sensitively portrays the longing and striving 
of a young paper mill worker for better living. Individual not class struggle 
is emphasized. This is not a proletarian novel. 

a. Here is an honest, human, often beautiful picture of man in the ma 
chine age, man yearning for beauty, love, dignity. Through the eyes of a 
gentle, artistic youth one sees the monstrous machine that dominates and 
regulates life. Convincingly pictured is the man's rebellion, attempted ad 
justments, final, almost unwilling release. 
HAVIGHURST, WALTER (Washington; fr. res.): 

Pier 17; Macmillan Co., 1935 
Rec, Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 
Comment: Centering around Pier 17, a waterfront strike in Seattle furnishes 



io8 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

the grim motif for this story of class warfare. Owners and workers alike 
fail to see through the fog of antagonisms and confusions. Only Noonan holds 
steadfast his dream of a new social order, where justice and brotherhood, 
equality and good will prevail. 
HAVIGHURST, WALTER (Washington; fr. res.): 

The Quiet Shore; Macmilian Co., 1937 
Rec. Sr. H. u, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: i. The story of an interesting family, heirs of an old homestead 
along the lake shore. The author has clearly portrayed the jealousies and 
misunderstandings of the two lines of descendants and their final harmoniz 
ing through the more tolerant attitudes of the younger generation. Not a very 
strong plot but well written. Locale, Ohio, near Sandusky. 

2. It deals largely with farm life in Northern Ohio from 1865 on. It also 
shows the gap that develops between farm and city dwellers. Characters are 
well drawn, Plot is fairly simple. Although it is largely a biographical sketch 
of Roger Bradley, it deals with the problems and their solutions of himself, 
his immediate family and grandchildren, 
HAVIGHURST, WALTER (Washington; fr. res.): 

Upper Mississippi; Farrar and RineKart, Inc., 1937 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, 11, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This second book of the historical and literary American River 
Series portrays the middle nineteenth century migration of Scandinavians led 
by Cleng Peerson to the Upper Mississippi Valley. The colorful and vital 
story of their cutting of the pine forests and their homesteading of prairie 
grasslands is re-lived through their enterprises and folktales. 
HAYCOX, ERNEST (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Border Trumpet; Little, Brown and Co., 1939 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Skillful craftsmanship in "well-made" fiction. While it has main 
eye on the market for the action-love-local color formula, Mr. Ilaycox shows 
himself to be a sincere devotee of accurate detail. Aesthetically he works in 
the Stephen Crane line of vivil impressionism with tendencies toward the 
modern fad for terse, telegraphic style. The story might be described as 
good Cosmopolitan or Colliers fiction ; but the author shows tendencies to 
ward a deeper reconstruction of frontier life and character than this might 
suggest Beautiful women do abound, and one could ask for more of the 
minds and authentic speech of the people of Indian fighting days; but of 
course this is no social or psychological novel. Its main appeal is in color 
and careful craftsmanship, even at the expense of some hasty writing. 
HAYCOX, ERNEST (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Riders West; Doubleday, Doran and Co,, 1934 
Rec. Sr. H. to, n, xa 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: A fast and breathless romance of the Montana country of thirty- 
five years ago. 
HAYCOX, ERNEST (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Rough Air; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1934 
Rec. S. H. 10, ii, t2 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Despite the generally competent and occasionally excellent writing 
and plot construction, this novel is overdrawn and lacks true significance* 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 109 

Central Oregon and Hollywood backgrounds. A modern Western with a 
sophisticated slant, offering some contrasts of old and new orders. 
HAYCOX, ERNEST (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Saddle and Ride; Little, Brown and Co., 1940 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12, 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: ^Clay Morgan, a serious sort of cowman, inclined to defend under 
dogs against such ruthless fellows as Ben Herrendon, with whom he has an 
old grudge to settle, is the hero of this story. Mr. Haycox has merit as a 
drawer of scenes of the open spaces and of character, and his restraint 
makes his work much more impressive than that of most writers of "West 
erns." 
HAYCOX, ERNEST (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Silver Desert; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1935 
Rec. No 

Comment: Written in a rather staccato style. Shows skill in plot and narra 
tive, but is hardly up to the mark of some of his earlier Western thrillers. 
HAYCOX, ERNEST (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Starlight Rider; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1933 
Rec. S. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Colorful story of ranch life adventure, with the usual thriller 
brand ^of conflict and incident. Style generally good. Recreational rather than 
educational in appeal. Author has marked talent for characterization and 
description. 
HAYCOX, ERNEST (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Sundown Jim; Little, Brown and Co., 1938 
Rec. No 

Comment: A Western story. There are some tense episodes in this tale, but on 
the whole, it is a heavy, lumbering narrative, in spite of the style which is 
rather explosive. 
HAYCOX, ERNEST (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Trail Smoke; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1935 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Trail Smoke relates a typical western story plot against the back 
ground of the terrifying sheep and cattle wars of the past century. The hero 
is the usual gentleman cowboy pitted against the controlled interests of the 
neighboring ranges. The heroine, though for once not the school teacher, is 
the usual priceless gem. The novel is purely of entertainment value. 
HAYCOX, ERNEST (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Trouble Shooter; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1937 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Both a Western and a historical novel. Frank Peace, the hero, 
is a trouble-shooter for the Union Pacific in its construction race against the 
Central Pacific to Salt Lake City. Picturesque characters and fast movement 
characterize this realistic yarn which is undoubtedly to date the author's best 
novel. It will be enjoyed by the general reader who likes fierce fighting and 
plenty of thrills. 

2. A combination Western thriller and historical novel of the time when 
the Union Pacific railroad was trying to beat the Central Pacific to Salt 
Lake City. The atmosphere of the time and scene is well conveyed and the 
delineation of a host of picturesque characters is skillfully managed. One of 
Mr. Haycox's best novels. 



no NORTHWEST BOOKS 

HAYCOX, ERNEST (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Whispering Range; Doubleday, Doran and Co,, 1931 
Rec. No 
Comment: Typical Western fiction, shooting, cowpunchers, duels, villains, 

heroine, all complete. The book could have no place on any school list. 
HAYDON, LARRAE: Modern Acting: A Manual See ROSENSTEIN, 

SOPHIE 
HAYS, ARTHUR HOMER (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Natawkah; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1932 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, u, J.2, 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. An absorbing historical novel of the Wabash country, involv 
ing French and English aspirants to territory and trade. Locale, Indiana. 

2. Story of adventure, and hidden identity. Contrast between good Indians 
and some wicked white men. The character of the hero seems overdrawn but 
that of his negro servant is worthy of admiration. 

3. Very good story period beginning 1761. Long drawn out but inter 
esting enough for youth. Story laid in Indiana, but far too many long Indian 
names could be much omitted and still have the story. ^However, it will 
appeal especially to boys of Junior High school. Locale, Indiana. 

HAZARD, JOSEPH T. (Washington; pr. res.): 

Snoiy Sentinels of the Pacific Northwest; Lowman and Hanford 

Co., Seattle, 1932 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, la 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Written by a lover of nature who is a mountain guide, this 
book is interesting in content and style and is finely illustrated from photo 
graphs. The particular "sentinels" treated are Mount Olympus, Mount 
Garibaldi, Mount Baker, Glacier Peak, Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helens, 
Mount Adams, and Mount Hood. 

2. Mr. Hazard interestingly combines history, adventure, and exploration 
in his book of the eight snow sentinels of the Pacific Northwest. For those 
who have had experiences in the mountains, it is particularly fascinating. 
The book is well written ; the details and description are exceptionally good, 
All mountain enthusiasts will want to read this excellent book, 
HAZEN, DAVID W. (Oregon? pr- res.): 

Giants and Ghosts of Central Europe; Metropolitan press (Binfords 

and Mort), 1933 
Rec. Jr. C. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, u, xa 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R, Men, Women 

Comment: i. Giants and Ghosts of Central Europe is a selection of articles 
contributed to Tht Ortgonian by Mr. Hazen while on a tour of several 
European countries. Whether in Berlin, Nuremberg, Bingen, Warsaw, Dan 
zig, Vienna, Budapest, Pilsen, or Prague never can he forget Portland, 
Oregon. Mr. Hazen's friendliness with all people gives the book a human 
warmth which after all is its greatest charm, 

2. The book is a very pleasant account of the travels of the writer in 
Europe, with a presentation of the characteristics of the people, customs, and 
changes as result of depression and the World War. Some attempt is made 
to show the degree that the different nations are attempting to re-arm and 



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also how they are attempting to solve the difficult social and economic prob 
lems that have grown out of their past history. 

HEDGES, ADA HASTINGS (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Desert Poems; Binfords & Mort (Metropolitan Press), 1930 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Mainly sonnets, and rarely accomplished in form and diction. 
The "desert wife" finds beauty and depths of understanding through isola 
tion that discovers "a rift of joy that no wild throat could keep," the 
"autumn" that "comes only to the desert skies," the "spring" that "tarries 
longer year by year because an exile with a dream was here," the "silent 
juniper" with its haunting memories, and the "desert wife" herself who, 
from day to day, views a wide dry spaciousness where 

"From age to age the waste shall brood and dream, 
Mysterious and silent and supreme." 

These are lyrics of distinguished quality and appeal. 

2. Interpretation of natural phenomena of the high desert country of 
Eastern Oregon, especially Malheur county, with the emotional reactions of 
people to this environment. Of high literary quality; style clear and concise. 

HELM, RICHARD IZER (Oregon; pr. res.) : 
Blue Waters; Binfords & Mort, 1938 

Rec. Jr. H. 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: An interesting romance located in the country surrounding Crater 
and Klamath Lakes in pre-historic days. Mr. Helm has endeavored through 
study of known Indian customs to give as accurate picture of Indian life 
as possible but much, of course, had to be drawn from imagination. It is 
convincingly told. 
HENDRICKS, ROBERT J. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Bethel and Aurora: An Experiment in Communism as Practical 

Christianity; The Press of the Pioneers, New York, 1933 
Rec. Sr. H. 11, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. A human interest rather than historical portrayal of the com 
munistic colonies of Bethel, Missouri, and Aurora, Oregon. A study of com 
munistic principles and practical Christianity successfully applied in coloni 
zation projects. Book is uneven in organization and style, and not altogether 
accurate (fictional liberties taken) despite much evident research. 

2. A significant study of a neglected phase of the social history of the 
American Westward Movement. Valuable for photos and factual material. 
Weakened by unfortunate sentimentality digressive and irrelevant material, 
and confusing treatment of scholarly methods. 
HENDRICKS, ROBERT J. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Innnnnnn Haaaaaaa! ; Robert J. Hendricks, Salem, Ore., 1937 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: A brief, sometimes over-sentimentalized, account of the Indian 
wars in Oregon in the 'so's. Takes the white point of view and treats the 
material in the "human interest" style of the journalist with touches of lush 
vocabulary. Of some literary and considerable historical value. 



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HERNDON, JAMES A. (Idaho; deceased): 

To Him That Endureth; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1929 
Rec, Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12, 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr, Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The scene of this story of love, of pioneering hardships, ex 
ploration and adventure, is laid in the Salmon River Country. Locale, Idaho. 

2. An entirely wholesome story told in a stilted and flowery style likely 
to be ridiculed by the modern youth "she leaned her lovely head upon his 
breast" etc. Locale, Salmon River Country. 

3. Story of a young lad who casts his lot in the Salmon River section of 
Idaho, maintains his ideals in the midst of outlawry and loose living and 
achieves success. Style somewhat flowery and stereotyped. Purpose to show 
value of high purpose in achieving success -too obviously to teach a moral 
lesson. 

HIGGINSON, MRS. ELLA RHOADS (Washington; pr. res.): 

From the Land of the Snow-Pearls; Macmillan Co., 1896 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, iz 

Comment: Tales of humble farm and village people, pioneers -or of pioneer 
stock. The plots are not unusual. Details of description and characterization 
very realistic; a true picture of farm life before boom days. Wholesome; 
some tales pathetic; little humor. The characters are typical and not strongly 
individualized. 
HIGGINSON, MRS. ELLA RHOADS (Washington; pr. res.): 

Marietta of OutWe$t; Macmillan Co., 1902 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 

Comment: The romance of a sensitive, passionate girl The hero and heroine 
are not especially convincing, but the village and farm characters are true 
to life. Descriptions of the settings forest, sea, boom-town are well done. 
The views of life are sound. 
HIGGINSON, MRS. ELLA RHOADS (Washington; pr. res.) : 

The Voice of April Land; Macmillan Co., 1903 
Rec. Sr. H. xo, u, 12 

Comment: Versification competent; possibly too facile for marked originality. 
About a dozen poems in the collection are significant, for distinctive descrip 
tion, thought, or feeling. The author's work is modest and sincere. 
HIGGINSON, MRS. ELLA RHOADS (Washington; pr. res.) : 

When the Birds Go North Again; Macmillan Co., 1898 
Rec. Sr. H, 10, u, 12 

Comment: i. Nature poems. The stvle is simple and of a good literary qual 
ity. One of the poems, "Four-Leaf Clover," has taken its place as a children's 
classic, having been reprinted in various anthologies of children's verse as 
well as in a number of school readers. A number of the descriptive poems 
have a local significance aside from the literary quality, such as "Rhododen 
dron Bells," "Dawn on the Willamette," 'The Grand Roncle Valley," 
"Moon rise in the Rockies," etc, 

2. Subjects largely nature pictures from vicinity of author's home in Bell- 
ingham. Sensitiveness to color and sound of winds and sea especially marked. 
Versification competent, but occasional monotonies of phrasing. At times, 
intense feeling. In general, author is modest and sincere. 
HOBSON, GEORGE C. (Idaho; pr. res.)s 

Idaho Digest and Blue Book; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1935 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: A compendium of social, industrial, financial, and governmental 
statistics, together with a "Who's Who" of Idaho people. 



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HODGES, LAWRENCE KAYE (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Twenty Eventful Years; Wilson, Erickson, Inc., New York, 1937 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. (Collected editorials (1913-1933) by chief editorial writer for 
The Portland Or eg onian). 

An authoritative, scholarly analysis and interpretation of events and 
trends, including background of nationalism and the World War, Versailles 
Treaty, World Court, Naziism, Fascism, Socialism, the financial crisis, Brit 
ish Commonwealth of Nations, Treaty of the Pacific, Pan-American relations. 
U. S. politics, with development of agriculture, water power, shipping, etc. 
2. A collection of editorials written for the Qregonian, 1913-1933. Eco 
nomic, political, diplomatic phases of the life of the period are covered with 
one eye on the Oregon Country, with frequent glances at the seething world 
overseas. Written by a meticulously accurate conservative, the collection is 
not too heavy for studious adults, in or out of college. 
HOLBROOK, STEWART HALL (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Ethan Allen; Macmillan Co., 1940 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment; Ethan Allen in this biography becomes something more than a 
myth. Mr. Holbrook has presented the life picture of an early New Eng- 
lander who was intensely interested in helping to make his section of the 
country free and patriotic. Well written, of historical interest, and with an 
adequate bibliography of source material. 
HOLBROOK, STEWART HALL (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Holy Old Mackinaw: A Natural History of the American Lumber 

jack; The Macmillan Co., 1938 
Rec. No 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: i. Written in "popular" style, the book is a general history of 
logging and a social history of the "logger" as a type : his habits, recreations, 
way of life, language, and literature. Especially well done are the chapters 
on the "Skid-Rows," "The Hinkley (Minn.) Fire," and "A Logger's Dic 
tionary." 

2. The story of logging in the United States, and the lives of the men 
who log. The author gives a bibliography of acknowledgments, but his style 
is a hodge podge of apparent truth and poor imitation of Paul Bunyan 
stories. The result is that the reader is never sure when a statement is true 
or when it is untrue. The style is loose and occasionally the author makes 
stupid repetitions. 
HOLBROOK, STEWART HALL (Oregon; fr. res.) : 

Iron Brew: A Century of American Ore and Steel; The Macmillan 

Co., 1939 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Does for the steel worker a job similar, in both style am,d con 
tent, to that done by the same author for the lumber worker in Holy Old 
Mackinaw. A series of lurid tales and close-ups of what it takes in nerve 
and brawn to mine iron ore, get it to the smelters, and through them into 
steel. Strikes and the Steel Barons receive their due share of attention. Done 
with vigor and pace, and with plenty of burly, bawdy humor. 

2. A good general treatment of the development of the mining of iron 
ore and the manufacture of steel in the United States, with emphasis on the 
more interesting and lively aspects of the subject. Rarely technical in treat 
ment. 



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HOLBROOK, STEWART HALL (Oregon; fr. res.) : 
Let Them Live; The Macmillan Co., 1939 

Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment :A book treating the development of the "Safety First" movement, 
especially in safe motoring. Weakens as the essays become less narrative and 
more emotional. Good accounts, curiously misleading in apparent purpose, 
of industrial accidents and disasters. 
HOLLIDAY, WALT (RAGS) (Montana; fr. res.): 

Mining Camp Yarns; Oates and Roberts, Butte, Montana, 1927 
Rec. Grades 5, 6 

Jr. H. 7,8,9 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This is a collection of verses almost on the ballad style which 
reflect the attitude of the average Butte miner. Full of optimism and civic 
pride as well as genuine appreciation for the underground worker. Can not 
be classified as poetry although there is much rhyme and simple rhythm. 

2. A collection of unpolished and naive poems of the mining camp and 
the life as the author saw it. Some of them have good humor, and some a 
real swing that is pleasing to the reader. Verse rather than poetry. 
HOLLIDAY, WALT (RAGS) (Montana; fr. res.): 

Mining Camp Yarns; Oates and Roberts, 1927 
Rec. Gen. R, Men, Women 

Sp. R. People interested in yarns 

Comment: i. Had these yarns been written more skilfully, they would have 
been very entertaining for many of them have a point not well developed; 
however, the author lacks ability to put a "punch" into his stories. A little 
more imagination would have saved many of them from being utterly or 
dinary. 

2, A collection of mining camp stories, some good, some bad, many 
mediocre. It is worth reading for the picture it gives the uninitiated of the 
life in and around the mines, and the type of humor that appeals to the 
miners themselves. 
HOLLIDAY, WALT (RAGS) (Montana; fr. res.): 

Radio Talks and Poems; Bessette Printing Co., Butte, Montana, pub 

lished posthumously 
Rec. Gen, R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Recommended to general reader. Verse not valuable according 
to present standards. Subject matter interesting miners and their families 
-sketches by Hall photos of Butte miners at work. Radio talks concerning 
wild animals quite informative. 

2, Poems are about the Butte miner and are popular with him. The 
sketches by Hall and the photos of miners at their work are interesting. The 
radio talks are well worth reading. 
HOLMSTROM, FRANCES (Oregon? pr. ren,) = 

Western Window*: Binfords & Mort (Metropolitan Preis), 1937 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen, Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: In the main composed of lyrics of homely features and their cling 
ing sentiment, of gentle and neighborly admonition and aphorism; through 
out, pleasurably readable and singing, But there are also contained in the 
volume some poems of individual and authentic inspiration that promise de 
velopment and deepening art; that are essentially poetry. Notably of such 
are "Shut In," "Her Flowers," "The Flame," "Some Day This Harp,' 1 and 
"Irises." 



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HORNER, JOHN B. (Oregon; deceased): 

Days and Deeds in the Oregon Country; The J. K. Gill Co., Port 
land, Ore., 1929 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: A group pf ten-minute stories concerning the history of the North 
west. Stories of Oregon's early geological history up through its development, 
and stories about the men who figured in its development. Both entertaining 
and informational. 
HORNER, JOHN B. (Oregon; deceased): 

Oregon History and Early Literature; The J. K. Gill Co., Portland, 

Ore., 1919 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12, with reservations 

Comment: A history of Oregon from its beginning until after the World War 
and a discussion of its early Indian legends and the later literature by 
Oregon authors. 
HORNER, JOHN B. (Oregon; deceased) : 

A Short History of Oregon; The J. K. Gill Co., Portland, Ore., 1924 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: A brief story of Oregon from the discovery to the present time, 
including a discussion of every phase of development during its statehood. 
It is a clear picture of the times, and the style makes it easy reading. 
HOSMER, PAUL (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Now We're Loggin' ; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1930 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Roughly humorous information concerning the various people it 
takes to run a logging camp. Very clever, but a bit too journalese. A rollick 
ing rowdy book, but one which no English teacher could sanction. 
HOWARD, DR. MINNIE F. (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Early Life and Times of the First Congregational Church of Poca- 

tello; Pocatello Trihune, 1928 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This is a very interesting account of the Congregational 
Church in Pocatello forty years of growth with the growth of Pocatello. 
The events cover the years between 1888-1928. It is very well written, has 
human as well as literary value, is accurate historically, and contains com 
plete characterizations of the different ministers and the. "pillars" of the 
church. 

2. This is a very careful and detailed account of the growth of an im 
portant, if by no means spectacular, Idaho institution. Probably no other 
Protestant church in Idaho has been so carefully and revealingly traced. The 
account has thus some value as a case description. 
HUFFMAN, BERT (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Echoes of the Grande Ronde; La Grande Printing Co., La Grande, 

Ore., 1934 

Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women, if interested in local history 
Comment: A collection of verse and short prose pieces. The verse has little 
real poetic quality but is smooth and readable ; combines sentiment with now 
and then a dash of humor. The prose, with its frequent reference to early 
local (Oregon) affairs, has value for persons interested in Oregon history. 
Both verse and prose are rich in "local color." 
HUGHES, BABETTE (Washington;, pr. res.): 

The Liar and the Unicorn; D. Appleton and Co., 1928 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: The fun of this one-act comedy lies chiefly in the erratic conversa 
tion of a shell-shocked soldier and his guest at dinner, an adoring, gullible 
young girl. A London club-room is the setting. This piece is well done, but 
its humor has a somber twist. Recommended for reading. $M., iW. 



ii6 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

HUGHES, BABETTE (Washington; pr. res.) : " 

Three Players, A Fop and a Duchess; Samuel French, 1928 

Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: A 1743 Theater Royal setting insures a picturesque stage for this 
one-act comedy of jealousy and ambition among play people for covered 
publicity. Fast action, sparkling situations, varied personalities, and an upset 
of expectations at the finish are characteristics that would make this comedy 
a diverting stage presentation. 
HUGHES, GLENN (Washington; pr, res.): 

Babbitt's Boy; Samuel French, 1931 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: A college freshman is the despair of his family until the girl next 

door pricks the bubble of his conceit. A one-act comedy of modern youth 

generally pleasing to reader and actor. Its characters are real; its situations 

laughable. A breakfast-room setting offers interesting possibilities. 2m.. 4W. 

HUGHES, GLENN (Washington; pr. res.): 

Believe h or Not; Frederick B. Ingram Publications, Rock Island, 

111., 1936 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H, xo, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr, C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. Professor Hughes in Believe // or Nof has drawn upon his 
wide experience with writers to devise an agonizingly comic picture of a 
young author's dilemma. He has sold his first true story and, in order to 
authenticate it, he must produce the characters on which the story is based. 
The characters happen to be his parents. 

2. This three-act farce has been especially successful in amateur produc 
tion. The situation is exceptionally well handled, and is easily carried. The 
characters, a diverse lot, give opportunity for several types. 
HUGHES, GLENN (Washington; pr. res.): 

Broken Lights; Washington University Press, 1920 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, *2 

Comment: Material from California, Arizona, and the Puget Sound region. 
Simplicity, sincerity, pleasing melody. Author has sincere feeling for beauty. 
His work is skillful. 
HUGHES, GLENN (Washington; pr. res.): 

Columbine Madonna; D. Appleton and Co., 1930 
Rec, Sr. H. 10, 11, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment; The finding of a babe abandoned at a theater door provides an 
unexpected climax to an impromptu Christmas Eve rehearsal and instils the 
Christmas spirit in the hearts of the five actors. This one-act harlequinade 
is cynically humorous, of literary merit, and actable. The closing incident is 
to be guarded against farcicality. 
HUGHES, GLENN (Washington; pr. res.): 

Dollars to Doughnuts; Frederick B. Ingram, Rock Island, 111., 1934 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. Audience. 

Comment: i. Dollars to Doughnuts is the satirical portrait of a family which 
must at one time appear poorer to please the suitor of one daughter and 
richer to please the suitor of another. Stable, middle-class virtues survive 
only after a severe testing. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 117 

2. Mr. Boland bets dollars to doughnuts that his family can deceive their 
two young men guests. But George and Sergei begin to suspect trickery when 
the family appears alternately rich and poor. After many hilarious incidents, 
the boys manage to outwit the Bolands and happily conclude the laugh-pro 
voking plot. Locale, country house near New York City. 
HUGHES, GLENN (Washington; pr. res.) : 

The Eve in Evelyn; D. Appleton and Co., 1928 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment :^ An eloping couple are the innocent participants in a hide-and-seek 
affair with the girl's irate parents, who arrive at the same lodge. An oblig 
ing innkeeper is a self-appointed referee. This familiar comedy theme is 
well written, realistically portrayed, and easy to produce, but it is not 
outstanding. 

HUGHES, GLENN (Washington; pr. res.): 
Green Fire; Samuel French, Inc., 1932 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C, Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A melodrama dealing with an attempt to destroy the world by 
an insane scientist in 1990. Human values triumph amid the hocus-pocus of 
pseudo-science. It is a competently written thriller. 

2. Green Fire is a mystery spectacle based on solid, scientific and social 
fact. It is 1990 and the world is at the mercy of a mad scientist. This is 
one of the few plays in the professional theatre which blends sound thinking, 
scientific fact, and stirring melodrama. 
HUGHES, GLENN (Washington; pr. res.): 

Guess Again; Row, Peterson and Co., Evanston, 111., 1935 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: i. Guess Again is an ingenious, fast-moving farce based upon 
mistaken identity. The motive of the hero is simple and understandable; he 
wants to^ get a job and a wife. Although the action is well-paced, the char 
acterization often violent, and the dialog unfailingly comic, the basis of the 
play rests on human, understandable values. 

2. The arrival of Lord Wiggleton at Edgewater Inn excites the whole 
neighborhood, but when three other men also register as Lord Wiggleton, 
tumult prevails. A health faddist, a stage-struck porter, and a young couple 
in love add to the gaiety of this laugh-provoking farce. The dialog is light- 
hearted and the situations fresh and pleasing. Locale, small hotel at a resort 
in Southern California. 
HUGHES, GLENN (Washington; pr. res.): 

Happy Days; Walter H. Baker, 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. xo, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. Happy Days is a revealing portrait of a lively, ambitious, 
typically American high school girl, who insists on creating her own destiny 
rather than have anyone create it for her. It is a warm, sympathetic, family 
play,^ full of human interest. Along with its humor, it is a revealing study 
of mid die -class psychology. 

2. A very entertaining play with humorous complications. It concerns 
many types of characters: a father absorbed in business, a mother ambitious 
for her daughter and unsympathetic with her husband, a dignified older 
daughter, a very mischievous younger daughter, and three commonplace 
characters who resort to matrimonial bureaus. No dull moments. 

3. This is a farce-comedy in three acts, full of delightful situations, with 



"8 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

good, wholesome entertainment values. The dialogue Is convincing; the 
characters are too, for the most part. The play is excellent for school pro 
duction, and almost as good for reading. 
HUGHES, GLENN (Washington; pr. res.): 

Happy-Go~Lucky; Row, Peterson and Co., Evanston. III., 1936 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: r. Happy-Go-Lucky is a knock-about farce, the complications of 
which grow out of a boy's desire to run his family and the world along his, 
rather than the more conventional, lines. His nature and impulses are fully 
understandable. Professor Hughes has made his contribution to the many 
studies of post-adolescent psychology. 

2. This three-act farce is especially suitable for amateur production. It 
is good-natured, amusing, well built. It is not diflicult to cast nor is it too 
much of a problem to stage and direct. 
HUGHES, GLENN (Washington; pr. res.): 

Imagism and Imagists; Stanford U. Press, Oxford U. Press, 1931 
Rec. Special reader. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Or. 

Comment: A delightful book, the product of a year's fellowship in Europe 
under the Guggenheim Foundation, The author covers the history of the 
imagist movement, with illustrations of its aims and accomplishments; con 
tinues with a^brief sketch and evaluation of each of seven poets. This kind 
of book is quite beyond high school and even many college students. Upper 
division college students, who are interested in the technique of poetry, should 
enjoy it. 
HUGHES, GLENN (Washington; pr. res.): 

Komachi, A Romantic Drama of Old Japan; Longmans, Green, and 

Co., 1929 

Rec. Sr. H 10, , 13 

Comment: Old Japanese ^ story of poetess, Komachi,, who spurns many but 
falls in love with Archira and requires him to come disguised to castle for 
one hundred nights. He is accused of the murder of Unoha through the 
treachery of another suitor, cleared by the cleverness of his friend, and 
marries Komachi. 
HUGHES, GLENN (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Miss Millions; Frederick B.' Ingram Publications, Rock Island, 111., 

193T 

Rec. Sr, H, 10, n, x 
Jr. C Fr. Soph, 
Sr, C Jr. Sen. Or. 

Comment: i* This is a farce in three acts. There are many likable charac 
ters; there is no villain; hut complications there are without number. The 
plot is clever; everything is up to date, The dialogue is natural. Excellent 
for both reading ^and production. Locale, Southern California. 

2, Miss Millions in a satire on the American attitude toward hcireases 
and toward the hangers-on that heiresses accumulate. The play is a mad 
scramble of plot and counter-plot with romance and mystery. Throughout 
the play there is^a satiric sharpness that gives the play social value. 

3. The complications center around a young woman worth millions who 
comes to a lake resort incognito., Newspaper ' reporters and others mistake 
another young lady to be "Miss Millions." The play is entertaining. The 
action is sufficiently swift and easy to perform, The plot is not particularly 
original but holds interest 

HUGHES, GLENN (Washington? pr. .): 

Pierrot's Mother; D. Appleton and Co,, 1923 
Rec, Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Comment: Home and a mother's understanding unite the estranged hearts of 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 1 1 9 

two little playfellows, Pierrette and Pierrot. They vow never to leave this 
lovely place; but, alas, when the gay world beckons, they slip away to sing 
and dance again, together. This is a pretty one-act fantasy. Living-room 
setting. iM., aW. 

HUGHES, GLENN (Washington; pr. res.): 
Red Carnations; Samuel French, 1925 
Rec. No 

Comment: Two Smiths, wearing carnations for identification's sake, await in 
a city park a certain stranger, Miss Smith. Each finds the presence of the 
other ^ mysterious and irritating. One Smith, the girl's father, acts the part of 
the rival at her request. This one-act comedy has professional, not amateur 
appeal. 2M., iW. 
HUGHES, GLENN (Washington; pr. res.): 

Spring Fever; Row, Peterson and Co., Evanston, III., 1937 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, 1 1, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: i. Spring Fever is one of the most popular, contemporary farces 
written for the non-professional theatre. The action grows out of the con 
fusion of commencement day at a small college. Professor Hughes has taken 
advantage of his teaching experience to show he understands the student 
mood and mind. 

2.^ A college rooming-house is the frenzied scene of this three-act farce. 
Amid general confusion, students type belated term papers, experiment with 
a substitute for dynamite, and rope a protesting parent to a hat-rack, where 
he is ^ forced to pose as an artist's model. Characterizations are realistic and 
amusing, and the situations hilarious. Locale, any small college town. 
HUGHES, GLENN (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Story of the Theatre; Samuel French, 1928 (1938) 
Rec. Sr, H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This is a history of the theatre written for both the general 
reader and the student It does not treat dramatic literature, but rather the 
arts of the theatre. The following divisions are recognized as of most im 
portance: primitive, Indian, Javanese, Chinese, Japanese, Greek, Roman, 
Medieval, Renaissance (Italy, France, Spain, England), and American. 

2. The entire development of the theatre is here brought within the single 
volume. The original edition, for lovers of theatre, was found so valuable 
that a student's edition was published ten years later. It is valuable both for 
reading and reference. 
HUGHES, GLENN (Washington; pr. res.): 

Three Women Poets of Modern Japan; University of Washington 

Book Store, 1928 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Glenn Hughes is simply the editor and translator of a series of 
poems by three women poets of Japan. The poems are the Japanese "Tanka" 
or "Hokku," exquisite pictures suggested in a line or two. An excellent in 
troduction to oriental literature. 
HULL, ALEXANDER (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Shep of the Painted Hills; Frederick A. Stokes, 1930 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women (with reservations) 
Rec. No 

Comment: A story about love and a dog whose integrity makes him the truest 
character in the book. In spite of its wholesomeness, the novel is sentimental 
and lacking in those essential qualities of style which should serve as stand 
ards to the student in his choice of reading. 



120 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

HURLEY, VICTOR (Washington; pr. res.): ~~~ 

Men in Sun Helmets; E. P. Dutton and Co., Inc., 1936 

Rec, Sr. H. 10, u, iz 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Or. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Here are sketches written by a young American who is a com 
pany manager for an export organization. Mr. Hurley has kept his eyes and 
ears open in the disease-ridden Philippines and the carefully worded stones 
he tells are exciting. At times they are a bit too photographic. 

2. After a year of jungle life Vic Hurley wanted to grow "less tropic" 
and to become "more of a frequenter of club round tables," collecting other 
men's stones. Men in Sun Helmets resulted. Colored with both humor and 
pathos^ these thoroughly interesting tales reveal incidents and adventures In 
the Philippines. 

HURLEY, VICTOR (Washington; pr. re.): 

Southeast of Zamboanga; E. P. Dutton and Co., Inc., 1935 
Rec, No 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Or. 
Gen, R. Men, Women 

Comment; i. The story of a young American's ambition to be a cocoanut 
planter and the adventures that befell him in the Philippine Islands of 
Mindanao in^his attempt to fulfill his desire, The subject matter is interest 
ing enough in itself but the author's style is monotonous to the point of 
banality. 

2. Highly interesting, probably accurate, a popularization of realism. The 
style is vigorous, but ^ in other ways somewhat unsatisfactory. If the book 
has a theme, It is the influence of the tropical jungles upon a member of the 
white race. Locale, Philippines. 
HURLEY, VICTOR (Washington; pr. res.): 

Swish of the Kris; E. P, Dutton and Co., Inc.. 1936 
Rec. Sr. C. Sen. Or. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i, A thorough treatment of the struggles of the Morns against 
the conquistadors of Spain from 1578 until the coming of Americans, and 
the conquest by our great leaders, Pershing, Wood, and others. The author 
gives first hand information of the bewildering life of the Moros. The story 
is dramatically told Locale, the Philippines, particularly Mindanao. 

2. A general history of the Moros, including their final subjugation by 
American troops. The style is journalistic, but not so extreme as in the 
author's other books, The author resided in the Philippines many years 
HUTCHINSON, ARTHUR HOWARD (Washington? pr. res.): 

little Saints Annoy the Lord; The Greenwood Pre*s Seattle, 1938 
Rec. No 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: T. This book deals with Dr. Marcus Whitman and his missionary 
work in the Northwest. The subject is worthy and the earlier chapters are 
well written and interesting. The same cannot be said about the parts of the 
book concerned primarily with the Pacific Northwest. 

2. A new treatment of Marcus Whitman, with new material about his 
early hfe. No extravagant claims are made for him, nor is this a debunking 
book. 
HUTCHINSON, PAULA (Washington,- fr. res.): 

A Hat for Harriet; Thomas Y. Crowell Co., 1937 
Rec. Grades r, a, 3, 4, 5, tf 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Comment: i. An entertaining little story for children, very attractively 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 121 

illustrated. The author has caught the spirit of childhood very well indeed 
in both her illustrations and her theme. Her descriptions of the various hats 
and the explanation of her ultimate choice are very clever. The author shows 
an interesting whimsical humor. 

An' . H * rrie t' s head was set on a n ew hat. Her family took her to get it 
All kinds, sizes, and shapes were tried with no success. While she and 
tamily were not looking, something out of her very present past attached 
itselt to her set little head in a way that brought the approval of all to a 
favorable focus. The story outpeterkins our old-time friends of Peterkins 
rapers and is quite English, don't you know. 
INGHAM, CLARA COGSWELL (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Mascot Bears; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1933 

Comment: Bad verse for very small children^ 
INGHAM, CLARA COGSWELL (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Now I Am Seventy; Clare Cogswell Ingham, 1935 

Kec. Gen. R. Men, Women (with reservations) 

Comment: Primarily a series of essays on the ways the author preserved her 
health and spirits after her 4 oth birthday. Uneven in quality, sometimes 
iMi/i^A o ?i n I'* < reatmen t 0* ills ; sometimes rich in sound common sense. 
INVERARITY, ROBERT BRUCE (Washington; pr. res.) : 

A Manual of Puppetry; Binfords & Mort, 1936 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H, 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Any adult interested in puppet plays 

Comment: i. A Manual of Puppetry is a complete and comprehensive refer 
ence book for the puppeteer. The book gives careful, simply worded and 
illustrated directions in the construction of the guignol, marionette, and 
shadow puppet. Included are suggestions for writing one's own puppet play, 
and for constructing the stage, scenery, costumes, and lighting and sound 
equipment. 

2. The author has brought together "all of the most commonly followed 
methods m use today" by puppeteers. The book is well written and carefully 
illustrated. J 

ISAACS, WALTER F. (Washington; pr. res.); 

The Painter Looks at Nature; University of Washington Book Store, 

1928 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr, 

Comment: Briefly the difference between the way the ordinary person looks 
at things and the way the painter views them. The painter sees mass, line, 
color and color contrasts, relationship of details, A clear, interesting discussion 
of some of the basic principles of art. 
JACKSON, LEROY FREEMAN (Washington; fr. res.): 

The Peter Patter Book: Rimes for Children; Rand McNally and 

Co., 1918 
Rec. Pre- school 

Grades i, a, 3, 4 

Comment: i. This is an excellent book of about 150 jingles and rimes for 
small children. It is interesting and profusely illustrated in colors. 

2, A delightful collection of 167 rhymes, this book for children deserves 
high praise. These poems were told and retold by the author to his children 
and their little friends and thus bear the stamp of child approval. Mention 



122 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

(for the sake of rhyme) is made of Kamiak, Albion, Palouse, Troy, Pendle- 
ton, Moscow, and Seattle. Locale, no place in particular. 

3. The Peter Patter Book is made up of nursery rhymes and jingles, 
about various characters whom the author knew. They are somewhat similar 
to the Mother Goose Rhymes, and are appealing to children both for their 
subject matter and rhyme, and also for the large and numerous colored illus 
trations. Locale, Pullman, Washington. 
JACKSON, LEEOY FREEMAN (Washington; fr. res.): 

Rimskittle's Book; Rand McNally and Co., 1925 
Rec. Grades i, 3, 3 

Comment: Rimskittle's ftook of rhymes is one of the series: Classics new and 
old for children. It is a book that children would enjoy in the same way 
they do The Peter Patter Book by the same author. The interesting iillustra- 
tions are by Ruth Caroline Eger. 
JACOBS, MELVIN CLAY (Wasiimgton; pr. res.): 

Winning Oregon; The Caxtosi Printers, Ltd., 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Jr. C, Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr, 
Gen. R. Men 

Comment: i. Economic, social and political forces which resulted in the 
acquisition of Oregon Territory by the United States rather than Britain, 
are related with accuracy and sympathy. The account achieves romance as 
we read how explorers, hunters, missionaries, traders, diplomats, Congress 
men, Presidents, and settlers helped to save the great Northwest 

2. This study of the westward expansionist movement is an attempt to 
rectify over-hasty conclusions and exaggerations made in the past on this 
subject by investigators with a local or religious prejudice. It furnishes some 
interpretations drawn from formerly unused sources. Contains a valuable 
bibliography. Locale, Oregon Territory. 
JAMES, WILL (WILLIAM RODERICK) (Montana; pr. res.): 

All in the Day's Riding; Charles Scrlbner's Sons, 1927 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, TI, is 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr, 
Gen. R, Men, Women 

Comment: i. "In this book is a variety of writings that tell of the cowboy's 
riggins, the cowboy today, and why the high heels, the big hat and such 
like, along with experiences in narrow escapes that's all in the day's riding." 
In addition the cowboy calendar and the rodeo have not only reader interest 
but source values. Illustrated by the author, 

2. The preface tells us that "In this book is a variety of writings that 
tell of the cowboy's riggings, the cowboy today, and why the high heels, 
the big hat, and such like, along with experiences in narrow escapes that's 
all in the clay's riding." A book of sketches better than many of this author's 
later narratives, not being so much exaggerated or over-sentimentalized* 
Fully illustrated. 
JAMES, WILL (Montana; pr. res.)-* 

Big Enough; Charles Scribxier's Son, 1931 
Rec. Jr, H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Gen, R* Men 

Comment: x. Again Will James pictures a cow-pony, but attention centers 
upon the engaging owner, Billy Roper, who refuses to be happy in any but 
a cowboy's environment He learns to read from a saddlery catalog, and Ms 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 123 

first writing is an order for a saddle. He "chucks" school and home when 
fourteen and makes good as a wrangler. Rather overdrawn but convincing. 
2. "This is the story of a cowboy and a cow horse born on the same 
day They growed up together to where they was big enough Big enough 
for most anything." The first half of the book, up to where Billy goes off 
on his own, is much better than the last half. The value in the book lies in 
the author's knowledge of horses. Illustrated by the author. 

JAMES, WILL (Montana; pr. res.): 

Cow Country; Curtis Publishing Co., 1926 

Rec. No 

Jr. H. 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Gen. R. Men 

Comment: i. "In this book I've took in a few pinnacle tips or high lights 
of the range world, it's something of nowdays, and nothing I've hunted up," 
says the author of his book in the preface. The book contains some source 
material combined with reading entertainment. It is written in cowboy 
vernacular and illustrated by the author. 

2. A group of eight sketches with the following titles which are almost 
self-explanatory: "The Wild Horse," "When in Rome," "Montey of the 
Y Bench," "Silver Mounted," "The Last Catch," "Two Old-Timers," "Com 
plete," "The Breed of 'Em" ; as usual, fully illustrated by the author. Lively 
and in the main, authentic. 

3. The book has neither human nor literary value. A group of sentimental 
stories, which are not true, I feel, either in fact or in spirit. 

JAMES, WILL (Montana; pr. res.) : 

Cowboy in the Making; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1937 

Rec. Grades 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7,. 8 t 

Comment: This is the first part of Lone Cowboy, rearranged and edited for 
young readers. Will James was born on the cow trail. When he was a few 
months old his mother died and at five years his father was killed and the 
boy was left in the care of a trapper who taught him to carry his first pack 
outfit and shoulder his first gun. At this early age young Billy did his first 
drawing. 
JAMES, WILL (Montana; pr. res.): 

Cowboys North and South; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1923 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A real cowboy's lived experiences with bucking horses, cow 
horses, wild horses, cattle, and cattle rustlers. Although much of the book 
repeats All in the Day's Riding, a better book, it will be welcomed by the 
insatiable reader of Westerns. Written in cowboy vernacular and illustrated 
by the author. 

2. One of the classics of cowboy lore, written from the author's own ex 
periences and illustrated with his drawings. The colloquail style adds a dis 
tinctive western flavor to the incidents of ranch life he describes. As usual, 
his main interest is in horses. 

3. Eight chapters dealing with cowboy life. Types of cowboys, methods 
of horse-breaking, cattle rustling, the winter cow camp, training the cow 
horse, longhorns, the capture of wild horses these are the chief topics of 
this interesting book of reminiscences. Fully illustrated by the author. Locale, 
the whole West from Arizona to the Canadian border. 



124 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

JAMES, WILL (Montana; pr. re*.): ~~~ 

The Dark Horse; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1939 

Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 

Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Two thoroughbred horses, one with a pedigree and one with 
out, were thrown together by fate when only colts and this is the story of 
their experiences in the open range country, in the rodeo and in racing. The 
author's knowledge of horses and cowboy life predominates, to which plot 
and character development are subordinate. Written in cowboy vernacular 
and illustrated by the author. 

2. Typically Will James story. It concerns two horses, a racing thorough 
bred, and a descendant of generations of wild horses. There are rodeos, horse 
races, cowboys and cowgirls. The story is told as if James were speaking 
rather than writing and it will appeal to general readers from eight on up. 

JAMES, WILL (Montana; pr. res.): 

The Drifting Cowboy; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, xx 12 
Gen. R. Men 

Comment: Stories of a cowboy who rode the range, the rodeos, and the mov 
ing picture camps written by the author out of many of his own experiences 
to show that the "cowboy is still very much alive and all cowboys the same 
as ever as he drifts and hunts for new cow countries." The author's illus 
trations are the outstanding feature of the book. 

JAMES, WILL (Montana; pr. res.): 

Flint SpearSp Cowboy Rodeo Contestant; Charles Scribner's Sons, 
1938 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr, H. 10, n, is 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: x. Flint Spears gave me an appreciation of the work of our rodeo 
artists and their contribution to American entertainment Flint embodies the 
great human virtues of honesty, fair play and self-reliance. He, unlike so 
few, had the foresight to quit "on top" and enter another phase of human 
experience. 

2, A story of the development of rodeos from its beginning on the plains 
between riders from various ranches to its present large scale contests with 
strict rules. An exciting story and one that will appeal especially to those 
who are interested in riding; and horses. The pictures are excellent. 

JAMES, WILL (Montana; pr, res,): 

Home Ranch; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1935 

Rec. Sr, H. xo, xx, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen, R. Men, Women 

Comment: x. This story is a description of a modern ranch, settled in the 
days of the open range. The business of running a large cattle ranch, espe 
cially at round-up time, is described in detail and should clear up any ques 
tions which the reader may have concerning life on the open range. 

2. This book, constructed well for an author, uneducated, gives a fas 
cinating insight into the home life and work of a western rancher. His 
hopes, desires and philosophy of life are brought out. The writer contrasts 
the aimlessness of city folk with the hard work of the rancher. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 125 

JAMES, WILL (Montana; pr. res.): 

In the Saddle with Uncle Bill; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1935 

Rec. Grades 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: r. The sequel to Uncle Bill wherein the two children again visit 
tneir^uncles ranch and learn more about western ranch life. The author's 
descriptions and illustrations of horses and riding are excellent and his man 
ner o speech gives a very clear picture of the early range riders. Especially 
good tor those who want an authentic picture of western ranches. 

2. This book, a sequel to Uncle Bill, a Tale of Two Kids, tells more 
about life on western ranches. The handling of wild horses, and the work 
of wranglers. When the two children are lost, they make use of the instruc 
tion Uncle Bill had given them to take care of themselves. 
JAMES, WILL (Montana; pr. res.): 

Lone Cowboy; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1930 
Rec. No 

Jr. H. 9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: i. The book has a high human value, yet no literary value. As a 
romantic, yet passing, phase of western life it should be in the hands of all 
American people. It would widen their outlook in life and give them a sym 
pathetic point of view toward the intelligent yet uneducated westerner. 

2. ^The book, a story of an orphan boy's life with a trapper, and his 
experiences as a horse-breaker and cowboy, leaves the impression that it 
consists more of fiction than of fact. The narrative does not keep up sus 
tained interest. Some chapters are interesting and informative. 

_ 3. An autobiography with illustrations by the author. This will be espe 
cially remembered for its simplicity in thought and language and for its 
deep pathos. 

JAMES, WILL (Montana; pr. res.): 

Look-See with Uncle Bill; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1938 

Rec. Grades 6 

Jr.H. 7,8,9 

Comment: Kip and Scottie, brother and sister, spend their summer vacations 
on Uncle Bill's Montana ranch. This is the story of a vacation's adven 
tures, much of which is spent on horseback "riding the herd." "Look-See" is 
the cowboy term for an inspection, or tour of observation. A western story 
for young readers' entertainment. Illustrated by the author. 
JAMES, WILL (Montana; pr. res.): 

Sand; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1929 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Gen. R. Men 

Comment: i. The story of a man, a tenderfoot from the city, who accidental 
ly was lost in the open range country and wandered exhausted into a cow 
camp. Through life in the camp and his ambition to win the heroine, 
daughter of a rancher, through the capture of a wild, black stallion, he be 
comes a man. The plot and the characters are thin. The author's knowledge 
of horses and range life is the chief significance of the book. Illustrated by 
the author. '**&*% 

2. Story of a ^tenderfoot who learned the ways of the cow and horse 
ranch and won his spurs and his girl by capturing and breaking in a wild 
stallion, Sand. No literary value but full of interest for youngsters. 



126 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

JAMES, WILL (Montana; pr. res.): 

Scorpion, a Good ffad Horse; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1936 
Rec. Gen. R. Men 

Comment: Scorpion is an outlaw horse who got his name because he was 
determined to kill both of his owners and finally deserted his last owner. 
A light romance accompanies this story of a horse, ranch, and cowboy 
life. Illustrated by the author. 
JAMES, WILL (Montana; pr. res.): 

Smoky f The Cowhorse; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1926 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: i. To see the well-worn volume in the high school library would 
help one to know the appeal which Smoky has to youngsters; but anyone 
with a love of horses, or respect for men with that strong, warm feeling 
will appreciate Will James and his cowboy, Clint. If occasionally the author 
slips from his vernacular and shows slightly more erudition than seems 
appropriate, he is forgiven. 

2. The author makes the life story of Smoky convincing by a wealth 
of authentic details covering every activity which the cowboy could ex 
perience. His loyalty to Clint, the cowboy, and his hatred of all other men 
lead to many actions which tax the credulity of the reader, though they 
furnish excellent reading, 

3. Moving in the atmosphere of the range, the story, written by a native 
Montanan, paints the ideal horse of which every cowboy has dreamed. 
Doubt not that this dream horse is well within the possibilities. The story 
is delightful, the author faithfully depicting with feeling for his material a 
glamorous by-gone period. Fiction again records history, 

4. Smoky is the story of a wild range horse and the cowboy who broke 
and finally trained him to be a cow horse. As it is told through the eyes of 
the horse himself, it is much more appealing. Considered one of the best 
horse stories ever written. It gives an excellent picture of range horses and 
also cowboy life. The illustrations are especially good. Newbery Medal 
Book, 1927. 

JAMES, WILL (Montana; pr. res.): 

Sun-Up I Taleig of the Cowcamps; Charles Scribn<er' Sons, 1923 
Rec. Jr. H. 8, 9 

Sr, H- 10, n, 12 
Gen, R. Men 

Comment: r. Collection of 16 short stories dealing with cowboys, horses, 
and western subjects, such as rodeos, cattle- rustling, bronco-busting, brand 
ing, horse-stealing. Written in language of the cowboy, using Western terms 
of the range, with vivid descriptions of places, characters, and events. Par 
ticularly appealing to boys in early teens. 

2. Tales from cowboy life on the range and in camp. Sketches rather 
than stories, with outlines vivid and details suggested. The author's feeling 
for and understanding of horses ia predominate. Illustrated by the author. 
JAMES, WILL (Montana; pr. res.) : 

Thre MiMstang&mrs ; Charles Schibner's Sons, 1933 

Rec. Gen. R. Men 

Comment: The experiences of three adventurous range outlaws and life on 
the western cattle ranges. "There's no more desperate or vicious thoughts 
about their outlaw doings than there would be with a fox robbing a chicken 
coop. It's the only life they know, riding is their work, and outsmarting 
stockmen and sheriffs while stealing cattle and horses is their pleasure. 11 
Much of what the author has already written is repeated in this book. The 
author's illustrations are the book's chief value. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 127 

JAMES, WILL (Montana; pr. res.): 

Uncle Bill: A Tale of Two Kids and a Cowboy; Charles Scribner's 
Sons, 1932 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, ii 

Gen. R. Women 

Comment: i. The story of two children who spend their summer vacation on 
a large western cattle ranch. They are in charge of an old cowboy who 
teaches them the elements of ranch life. For those who are unacquainted with 
ranching, this will give an excellent and authentic picture. Although the 
author's grammar is quite terrible, he 'does build up atmosphere with it and 
also presents a more realistic idea of the early cowboy. 

2. This book explains in a charming manner the horse and cattle industry 
through the medium of two city children. Aside from getting an inside 
picture of these industries, the reader is led to see the value in providing 
wholesome environment for children during vacations. 

JAMES, WILL (Montana; pr. res.) : 

Young Cowboy; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1935 

Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 

Comment: i. This is an adaptation of material and illustrations from his 
books Biff Enough and Sun-Up. Billy Roper and Big Enough, his horse, 
grow up on a Montana ranch. Cattle round-ups, branding, horse breaking 
and other aspects of ranch life are well described in the author's colloquail 
western style. An excellent picture of ranch life. 

2,. Young Cowboy is the story of a boy and his horse who grow up to 
gether on a western ranch. This story has been arranged from Big Enough 
and Sun-Up. It has all the interest and information of the longer books but 
is still simple enough for the 4th to the 5th grades. The grammar has been 
corrected and the swearing left out. 

JEWETT, STANLEY GORDON: Birds of Oregon. See GABRIELSON, 

IRA NOEL 

JOHNSON, CLAUDIUS OSBORNE (Washington; pr. res.): 
Borah of Idaho; Longmans, Green and Co., 1936 

Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr, C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A biography of the "Lion of Idaho," a man whose "chief inter 
est was in bringing the experiences of the past to help solve the problems of 
the present and the future" a fearless man of great integrity, the "most 
widely read and quoted American in Europe." An excellent picture of this 
great statesman. 

2. Because of Borah's long public service, the book may be considered 
both as biography and history; for in its account of the life of the man, the 
story of political movements is presented. The style is pleasantly individual; 
the information is accurate. It is the official life of Borah. Locale, Idaho and 
Washington, D. C. 

JOHNSON, CLAUDIUS OSBORNE (Washington; pr. res.): 

Government in the United States; Crowell Publishing Co., 1933 

Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: This book is a well-written, authoritative survey of government 
in the United States from its beginnings to the present time. Its style is ac 
curate and careful yet lightened by expressions of the author's individuality. 
In subject-matter and expressions it is mature. 



128 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

JOHNSON, JAMES W. (Idaho; pr. res7)l 

B it t err oat Trail; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1935 

Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Depicts life in mining districts in early days when the West 
was truly wild. Bob Bainbridge with a few companions attempts to run 
down a band of dangerous outlaws. And through his success sows seed for 
the development of a more stable and law-abiding community. Book has little 
literary value, but its exciting adventures would hold interest for the teen 
age boy. Locale, around Lewiston, Idaho. 

2. A story of hair-raising action and clean romantic love based on true 
historical incidents of the West. 

3. A more-interesting-than-average story of early vigilante days in Idaho. 
While a few of the characters are poorly drawn and the plot is sometimes 
melodramatic, there is an abundance of historical truth with enough excite 
ment to make the book both interesting and worthwhile to the average high 
school boy. Locale, Northern Idaho. 

JOHNSON, ROBERT C. (Oregon; deceased) : 

John McLoughlin: Patriarch of the Northwest; Metropolitan Press 

(Binfords & Mort), 1935 
Rec. Sr. H. xo, n, 12 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: A detailed account of the activities which took place in the North 
west from the establishment of the Hudson's Bay Company at Vancouver 
under Dr. McLoughlin to Oregon's annexation by the United States govern 
ment. A clear characterization of Dr. McLoughlin as a man of integrity and 
resolution. Journalistic style, marked by clarity of expression and con 
scientious attention to fact. 
JONASSON, JONAS ADALSTEINN (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Bricks Without Straw: The Story of Linfield College; The Caxton 

Printers, Ltd., 1938 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: The history of McMinnville, later called Linfield, College, its 
financial crises and endowment campaigns. Several chapters are devoted to 
internal organization, curriculum, and student life. All available source 
material has been used, to which footnote references are made. There is a 
bibliography. Well written. 
JONES, NARD (Washington; pr. res.): 

All Six Were Lovers; Dodd, Mead, and Co., 1934 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The plot revolves about six men, who have all been lovers of 
the woman for whom they are now pall-bearers. The action covers but a 
day, but the memories cover the preceding lifetimes. Strong realism, much 
of it unattractive. 

a. This novel uses the flash-back and episodic technique that can some 
times serve only to confuse and annoy the reader. Nard Jones skillfully tells 
the story of the dead woman's life by giving sketches of the lives of the six 
men who had been her lovers during her lifetime. It is somewhat melo 
dramatic. 

3. To all six of her lovers Leah was a subconscious symbol of fertility, 
a life-giving power, around whom their destinies were unwittingly shaped. 
In a somewhat sensational plot each man is made to relive his past, telling 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 129 

the whole story of Leah, who is dead as the novel opens. Locale, far western 
town in the wheat country. 
JONES, NARD (Washington; pr. res.) : 

The Case of the Hanging Lady; Dodd, Mead and Co., 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: _ A mystery story dealing with three murders and the final solution 
of the crimes. The characters are well drawn. The plot is fairly well woven. 
Suspense until the end. Interesting and life-like situations. Well-written story 
with characters stronger than plot. Depicts the trials and tribulations of the 
amateur detective. 
JONES, NARD (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Oregon Detour; Payson and Clark, New York, 1930 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Real life experience in a wheat-minded community, depicted with 
courage^ and energy. The main characters and events come alive but the 
supporting ones do not. Smartly and unevenly written. 
JONES, NARD (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Scarlet Petticoat; Dodd, Mead and Co., 1941 
Rec. Sr. H, 10, n, 12 
Jr. C Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Good yarn. Plot, characters (eight of whom actually lived at 
Fort George in 1813-14.) and background skilfully interwoven. Colorful 
presentation of fur trade during this early period. Good supplementary read 
ing in Northwest history, by the author of Swift Flows the River and Oregon 
Detour. 

z, Following a growing interest in the history of the Columbia, as was 
shown in Swift Flows the River, Mr. Jones in this his latest book, goes back 
to the earlier period of Fort George and the exploits of Alexander Henry 
and other officers of the Northwest Fur Company. The region and the period 
are vividly portrayed. Many exciting episodes keep the reader on the alert. 
Though an author's note at the end informs us that the chief characters are 
historical, the reader suspects that much of their adventure is imaginary, 
JONES, NARD (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Swift Flows the River; Dodd, Mead, and Co., 1940 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A fascinating story of the beginnings of steamboating on the 
Columbia, packed with strong climaxes and evidently written with an eye 
to the screen. It is more ambitious than this author's Oregon Detour, cruder 
than Archie Binns' The Land is Bright, which covers the same terrain ten 
years earlier. Locale, Lower Columbia and Snake Rivers, from Lewiston 
down. 

a. An excellent piece of writing very slightly marred with references to 
immoral situations (perhaps such things are virtues in disguise, but I can't 
agree). A fairly simple narration of pioneer or frontier days on the Columbia 
River from The Dalles to Lewiston. Characters finely drawn; diction, ex 
cellent; style, fascinating. 

3. This probably shows our leading novelist at his best; a historical 
novel that preserves vividly for us the pioneer life and boom days from the 



I3Q NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Indian Wars of 1855, through the gold rush era, to the appearance of rail 
roads. Realistic; coarse language in places, but not overdone. Locale, Colum 
bia and Snake Rivers, Portland to Lewiston. 
JONES, NARD, and GOSE, J. GORDON (Washington; pr. res.): **"" 

West, Young Man; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1937 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10 

Comment: i. This is a well-written and entertaining book of pioneer days 
along the Oregon Trail and the Walla Walla vicinity. There is a suggestion 
of a challenge to present social values to such a philosophy that young 
people can find no opportunities today. 

2. This is the story of Jack Carver, a youth of Rushville, New York, in 
the 1830*8, whose adventures with Marcus Whitman form a gripping tale 
of pioneers of the Pacific Northwest, particularly attractive to boys from ten 
to fifteen years of age. In the Foreword the authors say: "When you have 
read the story of Whitman, you know the essence of the pioneer's story, from 
mountain man to the covered wagon era." 
JONES, NARD (Washington; pr. res.) = 

Wheat Women f Duf field and Green, 1933 
Rec. Sr. H. xo, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Or. 

Comment: The settling of land near Walla Walla, by Jackson Lynch, the 
holding of it by his son Todd made of softer stuff, and the temporary 
abandonment of it by his college-bred son John still softer. The three 
women were: pioneer of a loving nature, ranchwoman, or strong nature, and 
adventuress. Sustained story with good sweep of interest 
JOSEPH, HORACE G. (Idaho; pr. res,): 

Bright Horizons; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1937 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A warm-hearted story of a young couple who take up a home 
stead in Colorado and face bravely into the years- rich and lean. 

2. This story is very interestingly written. It takes Abe and Molly 
Turner and baby Elaine across the plains to a Colorado homestead. It tells 
of their hardships, joys and sorrows, the interesting people who were their 
neighbors. In the end, Elaine marries the favorite neighbor boy and all are 
living in happiness. 

3. Homesteaders in Colorado. Struggles and hopes of a group of people 
determined to make a home for themselves. Very interesting reading. Char 
acters well drawn and easy to read. Well written and entertaining* 

JUDSON, KATHARINE BERRY (Washington; fr, res.): 

Myths and Legends of the Pacific Northwest; A. C. McClurg and 

Co., 1910 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr, H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr, C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. These folk tales give the naive, primitive ideas of the Indians 
concerning creation and the world in which they lived. Told in a simple 
style, as the Indians might have told them, they have both an anthropological 
and human value and should be interesting and valuable to all students of 
the Northwest 
2. The legends are connected with features of this landscape- Takhoma 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 131 

(Mt. Rainier) being the scene of one of the best tales; Loo- Wit, Klickitat, 
and Wiyeast (Mt. Adams, Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Hood) and the Bridge of 
the Gods, the Columbia, The Dalles, Falls of the Willamette, and Walla 
Walla of others. Other myths exhibit 'religious beliefs and still others are 
but humorous fables. Probably the finest are: The Story of Ashish; The 
Copper Canoe; The Miser of Takhoma; Chinook Wind. 
KAHN, STEPHEN B.: Integrity, The Life of George W. N orris. See 

NEUBERGER, RICHARD L. 
KELLEY, HALL J. (Oregon; fr. res.). Edited by Fred Wilbur Powell 

Hall J. Kelley on Oregon; Princeton University Press, 1932 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Sp.R. 

Comment: A collection of five of his published works (narratives, docu 
ments, petitions) and a number of hitherto unpublished letters. Original 
title-pages and dates. Excellent source material on Kelley's early settlement 
instigations. Vigorous, capably written and edited. Earliest geographical 
names used. Of reference value. For special research. 
KENDALL, NANCY NOON (Oregon and Washington) 
The New House; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1934 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: The originating background of this well-handled novel is early 
day Portland, Oregon, with subsequent chapters laid at Long Beach on the 
Washington coast. Principal characters American, companion characters 
Finnish. Symphathetically handled love interest, major note of which is frus 
tration, with partial solution offered. Style able but somewhat over-written. 
Not generally recommended because of sex note. 
KIMBALL, WILLIAM ALDEN (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Heathers at Home; Row, Peterson and Co., 1933 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: i. The comedy is amusing and rings true so true to the lives of 
many families that it "ought to hurt," but doesn't because it is so enjoyable. 
The troubles are quite typical of life about us. It is especially actable by 
amateurs. 

2. This three- act comedy for amateurs is one in the series of Tested 
Plays; in fact, it is among the best. Much good introductory material and 
full directions help the director and lighten the burden of staging. The 
characters and situations are realistic and comic; the dialog is well done. 
KING, STODDARD (Washington; deceased): 

The Raspberry Tree; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1930 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: A volume of very light verse "of sentiment and reflection" written 
solely for enjoyment. The poems are facetious, full of satirical good-humor, 
merriment, and sprightliness. High school students find them delightful. 
KING, STODDARD (Washington; deceased): 

What the Queen Said; George H. Doran, 1923 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: Mr. King is a deft and skillful versifier; his "facetious fragments" 
are sometimes merely nonsensical, but sometimes contain good-humored and 
yet pungent satire of a wholesome saltness. He may be said to represent the 
common-sense average against the affected high-brow and the crude low 
brow. 



132 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

KING, WILLIAM A. (Washington; pr. res.); and FULLENWIDER, EL 
MER D. 
The Pacific Northwest: Its Resources and Industries; South- Western 

Publishing Co., 1938 
Rec, Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Understanding and appreciation of the Pacific Northwest as a 
homeland are almost sure to result from reading this book; it seems of equal 
value with Northwest history. The material is clearly and adequately pre 
sented, but the style is not literary. 

2. It is a regional text, treating the resources and industries of the Pacific 
Northwest. The purpose is to show the influence of natural regions in deter 
mining where people live and how they earn their living. The book is 
divided into ten units, and has suggestive questions and projects, statistical 
appendix, illustrations, maps, and index. 
KIRKPATRICK, ORION E. (Idaho; deceased): 

History of Leesburg Pioneers; Pyramid Press, 1934 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The book contains a brief biography, and often a character 
sketch, of all of the more important pioneers in the first gold camp in Eastern 
Idaho. 

2. This book gives a brief biography of all the pioneers of Leesburg, 
Idaho, and a brief character sketch of each. Since all are described as noble, 
unselfish, and enterprising, the reader doubts the accuracy of the book, but 
it is interesting. 
KUHLMAN, DR. CHARLES (Montana; pr. res.): 

Custer and the Gall Saga (with map of operations of battle, troops 

and Indians); Charles Kuhlman, 1940 
Rec. Sp. R. 

Comment: Interesting deductions regarding the battle of the Little Big Horn 
by a trained scholar and archivist who has spent much time on the Custer 
battle field, and much study of source material, with personal interviews of 
survivors of the battle. The study clears up much that has been confused and 
disputed in the Custer story. Indispensable for librarians, historians, teachers 
and all to whom a clear understanding of the battle is essential. 
LA BARRE, JULIA (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Stories of Shakespeare's Popular Comedies Told in Rhyme; Metro 
politan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1933 
Rec. No 
Comment: Distinctly mediocre verse, If the children are too young to read 

the original, Lamb's tales are much the better, 
LAMB, FRANK HAINES (Washington; pr. res.): 

Saga of the Evergreens; W. W. Norton and Co., 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Sp. R. 

Comment: i. A story of the economic, social, and cultural contributions of 
the evergreen forests of the world. It is well written. The Sequoia, Redwood, 
Cedar, Ginkgo, White pines, and other kinds of trees are discussed here. It 
is rather top technical for the average reader but very informative for an 
arboriculturist. 

2. ^ These scenes and characterizations come wholly from the author's long 
familiarity with the forests that he describes. The book is well written and 
popular. 



__ NORTHWEST BOOKS 133 

LAMPMAN, BEN HUE (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Here Comes Somebody; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 

1 935 

Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: i. A novel and charming tale, a fantasy of fantasies, this story 
makes its appeal through the folk and fairy traditions. Rather more Irish 
than American in flavor and idiom. Timeless in appeal, rather than "placed." 
Suitable for any age. 

2. A comparison of Here Comes Somebody with the Wizard of Oz is 
inevitable. This charming story of Mary Elizabeth, Jumbles and the Dark 
Woman takes its place with the great children's stories of contemporary 
literature. Though written for Mr. Lampman's daughter, its story will appeal 
to all children, its ideas to all ages, and its lucid style to all lovers of the 
written word. Locale, "back of beyond" but it sounds like Oregon. 
LAMPMAN, BEN HUR (Oregon; pr. res.): 

How Could I be Forgetting?; Binfords & Mort, 1929 
Rec. Jr. H. 8 t 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A collection of verse and prose sketches by a versatile writer 
whose Portland Oregonian editorials of both power and charm have given 
him a wide following. His field is nature, but his interpretations are intensely 
personal, revealing the deep sympathies of the poet. This is sensitive, beauti 
ful, sincere poetry and prose that is at the same time deeply significant. 
Human interest and literary appeal. 

2. This collection of editorials, sketches and poems by a journalist on 
the staff of the Oregonian, has the charm and the whimsicality that are the 
mark of the experienced writer. Their intricacy of idea and the poetic quality 
of expression will make these sketches more appreciated by the sophisticated 
than by the casual reader. 
LAMPMAN, BEN HUR (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Tramp Printer; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1934 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: Written under a prevailing mood of nostalgia, this is a work of 
considerable implication. In general, tells the story of the old-day tramp 
printer of the Mid- West, and of his passing; in specific, portrays vividly a 
gallery of characters of "the stick." Sympathetically and beautifully told, 
though inclines to be "purple" writing. 
LAMPMAN, HERBERT SHELDON (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Northwest Nature Trails; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 

1933 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: i. Vivid descriptions and interesting stories of Oregon birds and 
animals, told in a fascinating manner by an author who apparently knows 
his subject well, make this a natural history of the first rank. It should lead 
to a greater interest in wild life, particularly that of the Northwest. 

2. Well and simply written book concerning the fauna of the Northwest 
from centipedes to Wapiti. Interesting anecdotes, authentic information. 
LANCASTER, SAMUEL CHRISTOPHER (Oregon; deceased): 

The Columbia America's Great Highway; Press of Kilkam Sta 
tionery and Printing Co., Portland, Ore., 1915 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Comment; A story of the Columbia River Highway from the Oregon Trail 



134 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

days to the present time. It includes the story of Oregon's early discovery 
and a technical description of the highway now in existence. Provides inter 
esting reading. 

LANDIS, JUDSON T.: Social Living. See LANDIS, PAUL H. 
LANDIS, PAUL H. (Washington; pr. res.): 

Social Control; J. B. Lippincott Co., 1939 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: This book, one of a series of sociology texts, is an attempt to de 
termine the "social processes by which the individual is made group respon 
sive and by which social organization is built and maintained." It discusses 
the bases of social organization and the process of social disorganization. 
The manner of presentation is clear but somewhat technical. Only persons 
with some background would benefit from the book. Like others I have 
examined, I am recommending it because it is good for its type. 
LANDIS, PAUL H. (Washington; pr. res.)? and LANDIS, JUDSON T. 

Social Living; Ginn and Co., 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. u, 12 
Sp. R. 
Jr. C. Fr. 
Sp. R. 

Comment: This book, an introduction to sociology, aims to study society 
through its normal rather than its abnormal aspects. It tries to help the 
student to see not only change, but also order and stability. In style, the book 
is clear and readable. 
LANGFORD, NATHANIEL PITT (Montana; fr. res.): 

Vigilante Days and Ways; the Pioneers of the Rockies; A. C. 

McClurg and Co., 1890 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, is 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen, Gr, 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The author, himself a member of the vigilante group and a 
well known figure in the early history of Montana, describes the stirring 
times of the gold rush in Bannock and Virginia City from 1862 to 1864, 
when the country was terrorized by the road agents. This is one of the two 
contemporary accounts of the crimes and punishment of the road agents. 

2. This is a factual record of the struggle waged in western Montana 
and adjoining territory to establish law and order against an organized band 
of criminals thought, at times, to be more numerous than those opposing 
them. The vigilantes needed no apology made for their organization and its 
activities ; and this book explains why. 

3. Truth, far stranger than fiction, is related here in Mr. Langford's 
flowing and piquant manner. Outlaws and brigands who terrorized early set 
tlers in Montana ride again across these pages upon their desperate missions, 
But "crime carries its own punishment" and they soon met their match in 
the Vigilantes, men as fearless as they in their insistence upon law and 
order. The book is a splendid portrait of pioneer days and adventurous lives. 

LAPHAM, STANLEY (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Enchanted Lake; The Statesman Publishing Co., Salem, Ore., 1931 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: The story of the formation of Crater Lake with the legends con 
cerning it and minute descriptions or its beauties constitute the greater part 
of this volume, though description of the Park as a whole and of other 
National parks, as well, are given a place. Its descriptions are excellent, but 
a considerable amount of repetition detracts somewhat from the book. 
Copies of lovely photos of the lake and of several mountain peaks of the 
Cascades add greatly to the artistic appearance of the volume. It would be 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 135 

an excellent supplementary book to use in connection with nature study or 
Oregon geography in Junior High school. 
LAUGHLIN, SCEVA BRIGHT (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Beyond Dilemmas: Quakers Look at Life; J. B. Lippincott Co., 1937 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment^ i. Beyond Dilemmas is a group of essays by prominent Quakers 
presenting their liberal views on such varied subjects as Religion, Marriage, 
Economic Life, Natural Resources, Crime, and Peace. With the belief of 
Dr. Mclaughlin that "each generation must win anew its own democracy," 
these discussions should appeal to the spirit of truth in every man and stimu 
late not only thought but action. 

2. A collection of essays written by thirteen well known leaders in the 
Society of Friends, with emphasis upon contributions toward the building of 
an ideal Christian state, their belief in the interdependency of political and 
industrial democracy, and continuing faith in the "inner light" as the one 
infallible guide in a world order in transition. 
LAURIDSEN, G. M. (Washington; pr. res.) ; and SMITH, A. A. 

The Story of Port Angeles; Low man and Hanford Co., Seattle, 1937 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A book by old-time residents of a city with a strange history. 
The authors write primarily out of their own experiences first-hand ma 
terial. 

2. The "Story" begins with a discovery, and carries through fur-trading, 
settlement, organization, "national city," the Puget Sound Co-operative 
Colony, industrial development, commerce, cultural development, and recre 
ation. 
LAY, MARIAN (MRS. H. L. DAVIS) (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Wooden Saddles; William Morrow and Co., 1939 
Rec, Grades 4, .5, 6 

Jr. H. 7 

Comment: i. Gypsies, kidnappers, vaqueros, travelling shows, gun-runners, 
perils from revolutions and alligators are all bravely and resourcefully en 
countered by a little Mexican boy. The story is engagingly told and through 
it all runs the author's evident affectionate appreciation of a country lacking 
in material comforts but rich in human kindliness and simple pleasures. 

2. An exciting adventure story in which Chucho, a Mexican boy cap 
tured by the gypsies, escapes from them and finds a place for himself in the 
world. His skill at throwing the rope brings him success with a troupe of 
travelling players, but he finally decides to make his home on the desert. 
High literary quality and excellent picture of Mexican life. 
LEEPER, MARION LE MOYNE (Montana; pr. res.): 

Once Heaven \Vas Music; Dorrance and Co., 1939 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Volume of thirty-eight poems, written in very simple language, 
each one containing a universal truth. Style straight-forward and appealing 
through its very simplicity. Sadder aspects of life and nature dwelt upon in 
almost every poem. Only long poem is "Ballad of Long George," story of a 
character notorious in Western Montana about twenty-five years ago. 
2. A small book of lyrics that range from poor to perfect. Sincere, beyond 



136 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

question, musical, poignant, full of lovely imagery, but marred here and 
there by mixed or incomplete figures which no doubt this promising young 
writer will revise before a second printing. 

3. The lyrics which compose this small, bright book will quickly find their 
way into the hearts of lovers of poetry because of their careful workmanship, 
their restraint, and their recurrent melody. Through them we glimpse the 
moods of a sensitive person keenly aware of joy and sorrow and the beauty 
of the world around her. We are caught, too, by the rollicking spirit which 
brings her from the depths to the crest of the wave. 
LEITER, WILMA (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Bursted Bubbles; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1935 

Rec. No ""v*gr{ 

Comment: Before bursting, Miss Leiter's bubbles dance on uncertain metrical 
feet. Some good touches of light humor relieve what usually is rather "col 
legiate" love poetry and philosophy. 
LENNES, NELS J. (Montana; pr. res.): 

Whither Democracy?; Harper and Brothers, 1927 
Rec. Sr. C. Sen. Gr. 

Sp. R, 

Comment: By "democracy" the author means not merely a kind ot govern 
ment, but "... a whole system of social relations in which individuals are 
given, as nearly as may be, equal opportunity and responsibilities." Such a 
system, however, which removes artificial obstacles to occupational adjust 
ment, will only hasten occupational stratification. This thesis is supported by 
personal observation and careful investigation from the writings of sociolo 
gists, and eugenists. All of which leads the author to the final conclusion: 
"In proportion as the ideals of democracy are realized in practice, in that 
proportion does society tend to become divided into occupational classes with 
hereditary membership." 

LESPINASSE, MRS. COBIE D. See DeLESPINASSE, COBIE 
LEVY, MELViN (Washington; pr. res.): 

Gold Eagle Guy; Random House, 1935 
Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr, Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: An interesting and vivid portrayal of San Francisco from about 
1855 to 1906. It pictures the ruthless ambition of Guy Button, also known as 
Gold Eagle Guy. In his drive for material success he alienates his wife and 
son, commits crimes and dies in the San Francisco earthquake while calling 
upon God to strike his son dead. 
LEVY, MELVIN (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Last Pioneers; Alfred H. King, New York, 1934 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A book that has very little to commend it The author states 
that it is fiction, so even its local color does not give it value. The practices 
of graft and vice depicted here are no doubt true of early seacoast towns. 
The style is rugged, but not literary nor attractive. 

2. The story of a Jewish immigrant who becomes a leader in finance only 
to crash in the first year of the depression. The experiences and characters 
are of infinite variety. 

LEVY, MELVIN (Washington; pr. res.): 

Matrix; Thomas Seltzer, New York, 1935 

Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 137 

Comment: A story of the life of a poetic nature forced by the relentless ma 
chine of modern civilization to become U. S. Senator and head of a great 
^vertising cor P<>ration. J t is a rapid series of vivid and compact pictures of 
childhood, university life, the business world, love, economic and social prob 
lems, war a picture of modern futility. 
LEWIS, WILLIAM S. (Editor): The Journal of John Work. See WORK, 

JOHN 
LINCOLN, ELLIOTT CURTIS (Montana; fr. res.): 

The Ranch; Houghton, Mifflin Co., 1924 
Rec. Jr. H. 7,8,9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Pleasant, straightforward verses of a young man's observa 
tion of Western^ lif e. The stanzas, orthodoxly formed, sing nicely; the view 
point is conventional. Yet many passages have an authentic lyric quality and 
reflect a keen appreciation of beauty. For adolescents, and for adults who 
like their West with cream and sugar. 

2. These poems, forty-nine in number and very similar in tone and style 
to those in the author's first volume, Rhymes of a Homesteader, appeared 
earlier in such periodicals as: The Ladies' Home Journal, The Lyric West, 
Midland, Sunset, and Contemporary Verse. Vigorous and cheerful and some 
what of the Bret Harte variety, their chief limitation is sentimentalism. They 
should be popular, however, with both old and young. 
LINCOLN, ELLIOTT CURTIS (Montana; fr. res.) : 

Rhymes of a Homesteader; Hottghton Mifflin Co., 1920 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A collection of homespun jingles of rural life in Montana. 
They suggest Edgar Guest. Young students like them. 

2. Forty-four rhymes on various western themes including such well 
known ones as "The Sheep-Herders," "Wild Geese," "The Chinook," "Old 
Trails." Lively but not distinguished in style. Montana readers will like 
especially the sonnet entitled "Montana Night." This book with its contem 
porary volume The Ranch is now difficult to get. 

3. Quiet, unostentatious verses by a young bachelor homesteadmg in cen 
tral Montana. The poems in dialect do not have quite the savor of folk 
speech. In many of these accurately-made poems there are flashes of ten 
derness, humor and lyric power. Recommended for any not-too-sophisticated 
reader. 

LINDERMAN, FRANK BIRD (Montana; deceased): 

American, The Life Story of a Great Indian; John Day Co., 1930 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. Authentic story of Chief Plenty Coups told to the author. 
Writer has unique field, works with devoted sincerity, knows his material, has 
genius in expression, with full dramatic sense. 

2. One of the finest revelations of Indian character so far achieved. Told 
to Mr. Linderman through personal conferences. A chief attraction is the 
emphasis upon Indian mysticism. To Mr. Linderman, the Medicine Man was 
by no means a charlatan; often lie had unusual powers of prophecy. 



138 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

3. In dealing with his great Indian Mr. Linderman has told the story of 
the better type of Indians as they did and do still exist. It Is real, vital and 
important. The style is interesting and simple. We can be thankful that men 
who live in the atmosphere of the Indian have talents and abilities that make 
such a record as this possible for all generations to have. 
LINDERMAN, FRANK BIRD (Montana; deceased): 

Beyond Law; The John Day Co., 1933 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12. 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C, Jr. Sen. Gr, 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: r. Carries Lige Mounts' story forward from ten years after the 
close of Morning light (Lige Mounts: Free Trapper], Has a heavier plot 
than Morning Light is a fine book. Introduces Prince Maximillian of Wied, 
tells of the ways of North American Fur Company in its dealings with the 
Indians travel on the river by steamer and canoe building a fort small 
pox epidemic. 

2. Lige Mounts, the spokesman, provides the medium through which the 
American Fur Company's dealings with the Indians are exposed. The book 
is filled with early frontier incidents on the great rivers and in the moun 
tains. Stirring action is outlined against a raw but colorful background. 
LINDERMAN, FRANK BIRD (Montana; deceased): 

Black feet Indians; Published privately, at the request of the Great 

Northern Railway Co., 1935 
Rec. Grades 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Beautiful book to look at about 50 pictures of Blackfeet In 
dians done in the brilliant colors of Winold Reiss. Lmderman's preface his 
tory of the Blackfeet gives interpretation to the paintings. Condensed bio 
graphical material on Linderman and Reiss proves their fitness for this work. 
2. A gorgeous book, primarily of the Blackfeet Indian portraits of Winold 
Reiss. There is an article on the history of the Blackfeet nation by Linder 
man, a page on Reiss by Helen Read, and one on Linderman by Grace Stone 
Coates. There are 51 large pictures. The book was issued by the railroad to 
commemorate the 25th anniversary of the founding of Glacier Park. 
LINDERMAN, FRANK BIRD (Montana; deceased): 

Bunch-Grass and Blue- Joint; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1921 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H, 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C, Jr. Sen. Gr. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Collection of 47 poems dealing with aspects of life in Montana, 

chiefly in early days: homely philosophy of cowboys, stones told by them, 

tributes, to lowly animals, nature descriptions in sympathetic mood, Indian 

tales, and author's own philosophy taught him by nature. Mellow attitude, 



into 



real insight. This book is now out of print and difficult to get. 

2. This book of verse takes on down "Dimming trails of other days" i 
the past of the romantic Old West. There is much homely philosophy and a 
nostalgia for the days when "the range spread away with the sky for a lid." 
As we read, we feel that we also would say, "If I could I'd turn the days 

Back to wilder border ways." 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 139 

LINDERMAN, FRANK BIRD (Montana; deceased): 

How It Came About Stories; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1926 
Rec. Grades 3, 4, 5 

Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: i. Stories of all the forest animals told in style of the Indian 
story-teller. Reveal habits and reasons-why of forest colonies. Delightful per 
sonal tough to all the stories. Colored illustrations by Carle Michel Boog. 

2. Illustrated in pen-and-ink and color by Carle Michel Boog, A fine 
book for youngsters all about the first-person experiences of the woods and 
mountain animals of Montana. Sort of an Indian Uncle Remus affair. 
LINDERMAN, FRANK BIRD (Montana; deceased): 

Indian Old-Man Stories! Charles Scribner's Sons, 1920 
Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Illustrated in black and white and eight colorplates by C. M. 
Russell. This is a companion book to Indian Why Stories. It is a fine book, 
recommended for young readers, but interesting as well to adults. Most of 
the stories deal with Old-Man or Nap a, an under-god of the Crees and 
Chippewas. The stories were told to Linderman by his Indian friends. There 
is an adult-level foreword on Indian customs and character. 

2. As the subtitle indicates, this is really a sequel to Indian Why Stories. 
They are related with the same sympathy and skill. Charles Marion Russell 
is again the illustrator. 

3. A continuation of the collection Indian Why Stories. The legends are 
Chippewa myths about Old-Man, a mischievous undergod whom Manitou 
entrusted with the creation of the world. 

LINDERMAN, FRANK BIRD (Montana; deceased): 

Indian Why Stories Sparks from War Eagles' Lodge-Fire; Charles 

Scribner's Sons, 1915 
Rec, Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: A fine group of Indian legends. "Old-Man" is one of the most 
peculiarly interesting of the Indian deities. Good illustrations by Charles 
Marion Russell. 

a. The author, keeping as near as possible to the Indians' style of story 
telling, gives us legends told to him by the older men of the Blackfeet, 
Chippewa, and Cree tribes. The stories are of Napa, or Old-Man, the creator, 
and of the creation. 

3. Black-and-white and eight color plates by C. M. Russell. A fine book 
for children and adults on Indian folk-tales of the plains animals, and of 
Napa or "Old-Man," an undergod of the Crees and Chippewas. As told to 
his grandson by "War Eagle." The stories are actual Indian tales heard by 
Linderman from his friends, the Indians. A sort of Indian "Uncle Remus." 
LINDERMAN, FRANK BIRD (Montana; deceased): 

Kootenai Why Stories; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1926 
Rec. Grades 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Comment: i. This collection of stories deals mainly with the animals, birds, 
and the out-of-doors. It also contains some Old-Man stories, but the Kootenai 
environment, not being the same as that of the plains Indians, they are quite 
different in flavor and setting. 

2, The Kootenai Indians, or "Flat-bow-people," lived in the mountains, 
hunted and fished for their living; these stories are full of the cleverness 
and guile of forest dwellers, telling about the coyote, the frog, the antelope, 
the grizzly bear, the deer, the rabbit the skunk. Written as nearly as possible 
in the language of the Indians translated into English. 



140 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

LINDERMAN, FRANK BIRD (Montana; deceased): ~~ 

Morning Light (First published under title: Lige Mount, Free Trap 
per, 1922) Charles Scribner's Sons, 1930 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, &, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R, Men, Women 

Comment: i. A story of fur-trade days in Montana convincingly presented 
by an author who knows the West and the Indian. Lige is made to tell in 
his own characteristic language the story of his first trip to the plains and his 
adventures as a free trapper. Beyond Law is a sequel. 

2. One of the best adventure stories I have ever read. The hero, Lige 
Mounts, comes west with the Ashley exploring party. After many exciting 
experiences he marries into the Cree tribe. Related with fine restraint and 
accurate knowledge of Indian characteristics. A re-issue of Lige Mounts: 
Free Trapper. 

3. A fine, moving story of sensitive, somewhat conscience-burdened Lige 
Mounts from his boyhood farm days east of St. Louis up to the Northwest 
plains as a trapper on the Marias. His white friends are killed or leave and 
Lige stays with the Crees, where he likes Bluebird. He leaves for home in 
the spring, but the plains are in his blood and he comes back to marry Blue 
bird. Mike Fink is shown in action. 

LINDERMAN, FRANK BIRD (Montana; deceased): 

Old Man Coyote; The John Day Co., 1931 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, it, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. Another fine group of Indian legends. This book won the 
Junior League prize for 1931 (book of the year award). The illustrations 
are in black and white by H. M. Stoops, 

2. ^Stories told directly to the writer, "fairy tales" of authentic Indian 
material, that hold children by their story content, and adult by their charac 
teristic differences from Nordic fairy stories. Wit, humor, pathos, philosophy 
are incidental to the stories. 

LINDERMAN, FRANK BIRD (Montana; deceased): 

On a Passing Frontier, Sketches of the Northwest; Charles Scrib 
ner's Sons, 1920 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, ix, 12 
Jr, C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Seventeen stories of Indians, outlaws, and cowboys, in the 
country around Malta, the Little Rockies, and the Maria's. Fine stories, anec 
dotes rather than heavily plotted ; some traditional. Contains such good ones 
as "Throw-Away Dance," "Jake Hoover's Pig/ 1 and "Cranks." 

2. Many of these anecdotes were common property on the prairies in the 
early days. Dr. Linderman has related them in a fascinating manner. Some 
would make excellent material for declamations. Mostly humorous. 
LINDERMAN, FRANK BIRD (Montana; deceased): 

Red Mot her f The John Day Co., 1932 
Rec. Grades 5, 6 
' Jr- H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, u, 12 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 141 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Thf U>; A St ry of * h l eady life of Indian woman before the coming 
the white man, as told by a medicine woman of the Crows to F. B Lin- 
n^n? ; 'FT?** ^storically, beautiful in expression, and fascinating in 
content, a book for everybody over seven or eight 

z. Red Mother is the life-story gathered first-hand from a sturdy Sioux 
^r^ n n] y ma K\ - the P re - s * ttlement d ^s. It is rich in a philosophic vein, un 
derstanding but vigorous. Particularly good as an outgrowth of environment, 
region. Uncolored yet colorful, vital as human interest document of a day 
tnat nas passed. 
LINDERMAN, FRANK BIRD (Montana; deceased): 

Stumpy; The John Day Co., 1933 
Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. An excellent first-person story of a chipmunk who lived near 
.blatnead Lake. Nice black-and-white illustrations by H. M. Stoops. Was a 
Junior Literary Guild Book-of-the-month. Not sentimentalized, and authentic 
in detail. J 

u 2 Yr A ** ei i gaging book for children of 6 to 10 years, beautifully illustrated 
by H. M. Stoops. Literary Guild choice for March, 1933. Scene is laid in 
Ooose Bay, Flathead Lake. Intimate and revealing of Montana woods and 
solitudes. Wholesome and inspiring for younger readers. 

3- The autobiography of a chipmunk called "Stumpy/ 3 because when he 
was young he had the misfortune to leave the tip of his beautiful tail in the 
paw of a bear. The book has humor, too, and adults enjoy it as much as the 
children do. 

4- The story of a chipmunk originally named Alexander, who lost his tail 
and so became "Stumpy." He tells of his friends and enemies in the forest, 
of the Cree Indians who came to camp at Goose Bay, of his wife and chil 
dren, of the various seasons and their meaning to the forest people. Written 
very cleverly. 

LINDSAY, REVEREND GORDON (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

The Blueprints of God; Cosbys Printers, Portland, Ore., 1940 

Rec. Sp. R. Those interested in the subject 

Comment: ^ The first volume of what is to be a comprehensive interpretation 
of the Bible in accord with mathematical science. Discusses the design of the 
Creative Plan, and then, through tracing the cycles in what he considers a 
divine pattern, connects current and allegedly future events such as war and 
economic trends with Biblical prophecy. Presented in a scholarly and scien 
tific manner. 

LOCKHART, AGNES RUTH (SENGSTACKEN) (Oregon; fr. res.): 

A Legend of the Coos; Philopolis Press, San Francisco. Privately 

printed, 1909 
Rec. No 
Comment: A poorly conceived and falsely written legend of the Coos Indians, 

done in brief quatrains. Without value. 
LOCKLEY, FRED (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Across the Plains in a Prairie Schooner; privately printed 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Gen. R. Men, Women (historical interest) 

Comment: A concise reviewing of early-day crossing of the plains, and of 
pioneer life. Affords clear vision, but lacks in style. Social characteristics of 
participants -well provided in the theme. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 



LOCKLEY, FRED (Oregon; pr. res.): 

History of the Columbia River Valley, From The Dalles to the Sea; 

The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., Springfield, 111., 1928 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen, R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. History of the Columbia River Valley traces the history of 
this region from the discovery of the river by Robert Gray in 1792 down to 
the building of the Columbia River Highway in 1915. Much of the story 
consists of reminiscences of pioneers which give a human interest touch for 
which Mr. Lockley is noted. Its chief fault is the too rapid changing from 
the past to the present. 

2. The book is a group of short biographies of the more important pio 
neers of the state of Oregon. The student will gain values from this book by 
getting intimate personal light on the report of pioneers who actually took 
part in the settlement of the West 
LOCKLEY, FRED (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Oregon Folks; The Knickerbocker Press, New York, 1927 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Oregon Folks consists of a number of interviews with some 
citizens of Oregon. They start with pioneer days and carry the story up to 
the time just after the World War. They are simply and entertainingly told 
and make the people of the past live again. Such characters as Joe Meek 
and Sam Jackson seem like old friends. 

2. A most interesting collection of interviews with Oregon pioneers writ 
ten by a newspaper man who gives the history of Oregon state's beginning 
by means of delightful stories. They are simply yet charmingly written. 
LOCKLEY, FRED (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Oregon Trail Blazers; The Knickerbocker Press, New York, 1929 
Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Oregon Trail Blazers gives a brief account of the coming to Ore 
gon of traders, missionaries and settlers. Starting with an account of "Ghost 
Cities of the West," he gives an especially vivid account of gold mining 
days in Jacksonville. He tells the life stories of such characters as John Jacob 
Astor, Dr, John McLoughlin, John Ball, Oregon's pioneer school teacher, 
Jedediah Smith, Jason Lee, Marcus Whitman and a number of others. They 
are clearly written accounts and he makes us feel we too lived through those 
stirring times. 
LOCKLEY, FRED (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Oregon's Yesterdays; The Knickerbocker Press, New York, 1928 
Rec. Sr. H, 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: r. Because of the theme and the authenticity that first-hand re 
citals presumably give, these stories told by Oregon pioneers, have interest 
and historical value. The simple, straight-forward speech will give them an 
appeal to young readers. Youth of the Northwest, particularly those of Ore 
gon, should read these accounts of Oregon's yesterdays. 

2. Oregon's "Yesterdays is a series of reminiscences of living pioneers in 
terviewed by Mr. Lockley, telling of events from the days of the crossing of 
the plains, life at the time the Hudson's Bay Company and life in the 1840', 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 143 

i8so's and i86o's. Also a brief history of early Oregon newspapers, and 
finally the story^of Edwin Markham's boyhood and of his philosophy of life. 
From these stories you seem to catch the spirit of courage and optimism so 
characteristic of pioneer life. 
LOCKLEY, FRED (Oregon; pr. res.); and DANA, MARSHALL N. 

More Power to You; The Oregon Journal, Portland, 1934 
Rec. ST. C. Jr. Sen. Gr, Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: More Power to 'You. The first part of the book entitled "Bonne 
ville, Its Background In History," was written by Mr. Lockley and gives an 
account of the history of the Columbia River basin and the life story of 
Captain Bonneville, whose memory the Bonneville Dam perpetuates. The 
second part of^ the book was written by Dr. Dana and is entitled "Bonne 
ville, Its Promise for the Future." It gives an account of the geologic history 
of the region, a description of the building of the dam and of its industrial 
possibilities. 

V2& KELLEY: An Army of the Aged. See NEUBERGER, RICHARD L. 
LONG, DWIGHT (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Seven Seas on a Shoestring; Harper and Brothers, 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, 11, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Dwight Long's adventuresome account of his four years' trip 
around the world in a thirty-two-foot ketch, the Idle Hour, is thrilling 
enough to quicken the pulse of any landlubber eager for the open sea. Weath 
ering hurricanes, avoiding treacherous reefs, sailing into uncharted waters 
are all a part of this sea-wanderer's story. 

2. A story of a four years' round-the-world cruise in a tiny boat, this book 
is exciting and frequently dramatic. Young Mr. Long is a good observer and 
one of those daring adventurers whose life seems to be charmed. His account 
is not always credible, but it is always good. 

3. Here is ^a detailed account of the young author's exciting and amazing 
world cruise in a small boat, many pleasant as well as unpleasant experi 
ences, and numerous escapes from death. Many aspects of life in remote 
places are interestingly shown, with some comparison with our own ways. 

4. This is the story of a twenty-one-year-old boy who sailed around the 
world in a 32-foot ketch. Descriptions of the Islands, Holy Land, and Ara 
bian pirates help make this book interesting and worthwhile. The book is 
written in an interesting and appealing style, shows contrast of Island people 
and those living on the Continents, and is up-to-date. 

LUCAS, HENRY S. (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Renaissance and the Reformation; Harper and Brothers, 1934 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. 

Sp. R. 

Comment: An extremely competent work, it analyzes the significant economic, 

social, and psychological factors which were the background of the crowded 

foreground of the Renaissance and Reformation. In some sections, it becomes 

almost the definitive text in the field. It is the work of an intelligent scholar. 

LUCE, CAPTAIN EDWARD SMITH (Montana; fr. rs*): 

Keogh, Comanche and Custer; privately printed, 1939 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr, H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C, Fr, Soph. 
Sr, C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Comment: i. Concerns Battle of the Little Big Horn and the part of Captain 



H4 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Geogh and Major General Custer in it. Another contribution to the history 
of this battle. Also includes story of Comanche, Captain Keogh's horse. Not 
of great human or any especial literary value. 

2. Covers the evolution of Cavalry, the Garry Owens everything per 
taining to Keogh's horse Comanche. Bears the same relation to an organized 
book that disjointed arms and legs do to a human body. Human values fair, 
literary values not attempted. Much interesting material from War Depart 
ment records as appendices. 
LUKENS, FRED E. (Idaho; fr. res.): 

The Idaho Citizen; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1937 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, xi, 12 
Comment: A manual which outlines the forms, functions, and practices of 

government in Idaho, 
LYMAN, HORACE S. (Oregon; deceased): 

History of Oregon, 2 vols.; The North Pacific Publishing Society 

New York, 1903 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, ir, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: These two volumes present a rather full consideration of Northwest 
history; facts generally sound but not without doubtful issues. Entertaining 
in anecdote but verbose and even careless in style. Has real value within its 
limitations. One of the early authoritative works. 
LYMAN, WILLIAM DENISON (Washington; deceased): 

The Columbia River; G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1917 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, it, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: The A.L.A, says "It deals readably with the history, exploration, 
and romance of the river and describes a journey from the Canadian Rockies 
to the Pacific." The eighty indexed illustrations, some old, some new, are 
interesting. The style is interesting, literary, and vivid; the matter is ap 
parently accurate. 
McARTHUR, LEWIS A. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Oregon Geographic Names; Koke Chapman Co., Eugene, Ore., 1928 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, xx, 12 
Jr. C, Fr, Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Sp. R. Research students 

Comment: A valuable and interesting study of Oregon place names. Not only 
gives knowledge about particular points, but tells where information was 
obtained, and where even more detailed information can be had. Shows ex 
haustive research into historical records and through personal contacts. 
Several plates and maps are included. A list of Chinook jargon names relat 
ing to Oregon is added. 
McCORMICK, DELL JEROME (Washington; pr. res.): 

Paul Bunyan Swings His Axe; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1936 
Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. TO 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. These Paul Bunyan tales are more simply told than in the 

collections by James Stevens and Dr. Esther Shephard. Some are the same 

stories, but there is also new material. These are selected for and adapted to 

children. Locale, lumber camps from Maine to California. 

z. These tales of the mighty Patjl Bunyan are so arranged as to tell the 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 145 

life story of that legendary hero. The clever illustrations add to the charm 
of the book, in which the exploits of the hero are told with great vigor. 
Locale, lumbering sections in United States. 
McCORMICK, DELL JEROME (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Tall Timber Tales; More Paul Bunyan Stories; The Caxton Printers, 

Ltd., 1939 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This is another collection of the famous Paul Bunyan tales. 
They are interestingly told in an abbreviated manner. The collection is ex 
cellent for children. 

2. Another collection of stories about the legendary super lumberjack, 
Paul Bunyan, and his big blue ox, and the men who worked with him. The 
book is illustrated. Many new stories are included, the result of logging camp 
research. Well told tales for those who like "tall" ones. Locale, chiefly Puget 
Sound. 

3. These Paul Bunyan stories are retold for children. They lose consider 
ably in the process ; even tall tales seem to be the better for much realism 
that we miss in the simplified form. There is some new material, apparently 
up to the high level of the older tales. Locale, lumber camps of the West. 

McCOWAN, HERVEY SMITH (Idaho; pr. res.) : 

Castles in the Air; The Character Building Co., Des Moines, 1930 
Rec. Grades 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Not uniform in quality, but mostly teaching courage. The first 
story of "Hannah" is a "life story" which has had a tremendous influence in 
solving family problems. Recommended for family reading. The reward will 
be laughter and tears, and cheers for undaunted spirit that refuses to be 
conquered. It teaches children to have a share in holding the family together. 
2. Stories stress advantage of higher education for young people. First 
story, "What Every Mother Wants," by far the best, is based on actual 
happenings in family of author, with own mother as heroine a gripping 
character. Other stories rather too idealistic. The characters overcome great 
obstacles and yet keep their courage. Author shows great sincerity of purpose. 
Human element is strong. Literary style not always pleasing. 
McCULLOCH, ELIZABETH (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Life's Yesterdays; Shelton-Turnbull-Fuller Co., Eugene, Ore., 1939 
Rec. No 

Comment: Thin, pleasant verses on various subjects. A lack of imagery 
hampers the poetry. The religious element is the better part of the collection. 
McCURDY, JAMES G. (Washington; pr. res.): 

By Juan de Fuca's Strait; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 

1937 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This history is written primarily from first-hand experience, in 
a definite region of the state of Washington. Every region should have such 
an able historian. From the days of exploration to the present the account is 
stimulating and in the main accurate. The author does not always recognize 
the other side on some disputed questions. 



146 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

2, Interesting local history told by one who experienced a large part. It 
is not always accurate, not always fair in its opinions, but it is a definite 
contribution to the history of a most interesting region. Locale, Puget Sound. 

McKAY, ALLIS (Washington; pr. res.): 

They Came to a River; Macmillan Co., 1941 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The author has power to create character and to see the en 
vironment through their eyes. The plot is absorbing, in spite of structural de 
fect. Both the characters and their occupation (raising apples) show region 
alism at its best. The world of nature is also sympathetically viewed. 

^. One of the more powerful historical novels of the Northwest. The lo 
cale is faithfully reproduced and the story is skillfully woven to bring to 
gether lives of typical pioneer people. The Columbia River and Chris Hal- 
lowell share equal honors as leading characters. Well written, wholesome, 
and instructive. 

MACKENZIE, CECIL W. (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Donald Mackenzie, "King of the Northwest" ; Ivan Deach, Jr., Los 
Angeles, 1937 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This is largely a compilation from printed sources, but it makes 
readily available the important matter concerning an important and vivid 
figure in early Idaho history. The author makes use of some material in the 
possession of the Mackenzie family. 

McKENZIE, VERNON (Washington; pr. res.): 

These Stories Went to Market; Robert M. McBride and Co., 1935 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, xz 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R, Men, Women 

Comment: i. A dozen short stories by nearly as many young Washington 
authors have been taken from national literary magazines. Professor Mc- 
Kenzie, from whose seminar all have come, gives the case history to accom 
pany each story. The stones are about average magazine stories. ^ 

2. Twelve stones written in his journalism classes ones which made the 
story market. Each one is accompanied by a case history. Some are entertain 
ing; some are not very much so. A practical book of more interest to those 
who are beginning their apprenticeship in short story writing. 

MacLANE, MARY (Montana; deceased): 

/, Mary Mac Lane; Frederick A. Stokes Co., 1917 
Rec. Sr. C* Jr. Sen* Gr* 

Gen. R, Men, Women 

Comment: i. The last of Mary MacLane's three books, one which brought 
her a great deal of notoriety. An interesting experiment in polyphonic prose, 
some of its chapters are very beautiful. Everything this author writes is of 
herself. A strange figure she presents, a case for the psychiatrist. Her three 
books are now items for the collector. 

2. A much more mature book than the author's two others. It is of the 
same type introspective meditation and a description of her own personality 
and thoughts. Her feeling for words is interesting, and sometimes delightful. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 147 

MacLANE, MARY (Montana; deceased): 

My Friend Annabel Lee; Herbert S. Stone and Co., Chicago, 1903 

Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Opinions, hopes, illusions through a series of imaginary con 
versations between the author and a small Japanese statue picked up in a 
shop on Bpylston Street and called Annabel Lee. In polyphonic prose at 
times anticipating that of Amy Lowell, we have impressions including such 
diverse regions as Boston, Montreal, and Butte. The second in a series of 
three books and out of print. 

2. This should be read after The Story of Mary MacLane as her books 
taken in series show an interesting development of personality. She has no 
subject but herself and her own thoughts, and as they are set down frankly 
they make an interesting psychological study. Some of the passages are beau 
tiful. 

MacLANE, MARY (Montana; deceased): 

The Story of Mary MacLane; H. S. Stone & Co., Chicago, 1902 

Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: An exceedingly frank, sometimes hysterical description of herself 
by a lonely and sensitive girl of nineteen. One of the first psychological self- 
searchings to be printed. Of interest mainly to students of psychology or the 
psychological trend of literature. 
McLEOD, GEORGE A. (Idaho; pr. res.): 

History of Alturas and Elaine Counties, Idaho; The Hailey Times, 

1930 

Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This is a very interesting account of the early history of Al 
turas and Blaine Counties; it is a very complete and accurate account for 
such a small number of pages. The industries and occupations are given the 
most attention, and these are described well. 

2. This book is discursive rather than systematic, but Mr. McLeod has 
supplemented his own memory and that of his fellow pioneers with some 
examination of local newspapers and county records. 
MacLEOD, NORMAN (Montana; fr, res.): 

You Get What You Ask For; Harrison-Hilton Books, Inc., New 

York, 1939 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. An illuminating, if an unpleasant, picture of the lives of neu 
rotic metropolitan writers in the late thirties, of the Federal Writers' Project, 
and of life in Harlem. With a plot as simple as a temperance tract, showing 
the rehabilitation of an alcoholic writer, the book interests by reason of two 
or three characters. 

z. An unpleasant story of the Hungarian Klaber family, in an insecure 
New York City life. Gordon Graham, a struggling author, experiences the 
political intrigues of the WPA Writers' Project. The influences of socialism 
and communism are clearly present. The book is written in a highly stylized 
fashion that makes comprehension difficult. 
MacLEOD, NORMAN (Montana; fr. res.): 

The Bitter Roots; Smith and Durrell, New York, 1941 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Chiefly the story of Pauly Craig, a sensitive, half-craven 
youngster of teen-age. He and his pals at the Missoula High School live 
through the confusion and adjustment following the First World War, parts 
of which relate to labor trouble in Butte. Pauly himself, inwardly, at least, 



148 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

dwells much apart both from his playmates and his parents. Despite its bril 
liant style, this book, owing to its D. H. Lawrence frankness as regards sex 
is recommended only for older readers of liberal minds. ' 

2,. Unsentimental story of about teen-age in Missoula in 1917-20. Clear, 
poetic prose, episodes full of psychological understanding and poignant with 
memory of beauty and pain. Significant modern technique; Dos-Passos-like- 
ribbon background tying into life of boys. A good book but not recommended 
to readers who seek offense. 

3- m A rather brutal portrayal of the life of boys and girls of high school 
age in^ Missoula in the period during and immediately following the World 
War. Technically interesting but probably from a biased point of view. 
McNEIL, FRED H. (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Wy'east "The Mountain." A Chronicle of Mount Hood; Metropolitan 

Press (Binfords & Mort), 1937 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: A history of Mt. Hood, with discussion of its geological history, 
first discoveries, first climbs, development of the climbing sport, origin of the 
Mazamas, opening of trails, early resorts, and general accounts. Appreciative 
natural descriptions. Carefully done throughout 
McNICKLE, D'ARCY (Montana; fr. res.)? 

The Surrounded; Dodd, Mead and Co., 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Said to be partially autobiographical. Excellent description of 
the Indian psychology and the effect of the civilization of the white man 
upon it Locale, St. Ignatius, Montana, and the Indian mission there. 

2. Indian _ superstitions are hard to erase and should be dealt with under- 
standingly, since ^ many of them possess significance as well as beauty. Often 
the Christian religion has been forced upon unwilling or unreceptive minds. 
The author in this excellent story is not unduly anti-Catholic, since he pre 
sents the sympathetic priest as well as the fanatical one. The setting is St. 
Ignatius. 

3. This is the story of Archilde, son of a Spaniard and an Indian woman 
of a western Montana tribe. The struggle in his nature between the desire 
for a wider life and the restraining customs and traditions of his tribe is 
made symbolic of the tragedy of his race. 

McRAE, JOHN, and SAVAGE, GEORGE (Washington; pr. res.): 
Cross My Heart; Row, Peterson and Co., Evanston, III., 1939 
Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: i. This comedy considers the problem of a shy daughter and a 
non-social son in two families newly brought together in business relation 
ships^ The two youngsters, overhearing their mothers bewailing their un- 
socialibity, go on a society rampage and solve the problems but create an 
other. 

2. A lively three- act farce of two families of bankers and their children 
and their clerks. Very suitable for school production, and also delightful just 
for reading. Excellent style; treatment in a light vein of adolescents. Locale 
a small western town. 

3. ^ A play especially adapted to a high school group. It concerns the man 
ner in which a shy girl and an equally shy boy show resentment at the 
interference and scheming of their parents, and overcome their own bash- 
fulness. The action and lines are not complicated. The plot holds adolescent 
interest. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 149 

McWHORTER L. V. (Washington; pr. res.), Editor 

Yellow Wolf: His Own Story; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1940 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, iz 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. One of the best accounts of the famous looo-miles of "battles 
and retreats under Chief Joseph. The story is told wholly from the Nez 
ferce point of view. It is frank, with nothing of the horrors of Indian war 
held back. 

2. Yellow Wolf, at the age of twenty-one, participated in all of the 
battles of the Chief Joseph War, 1877. His story, related over many summers 
to several interpreters and before Nez Perce witnesses, has an authentic ring. 
Mr. McWhorter (Big Foot) has done an excellent job of editing and sim 
plifying. 

MAGNUSSON, EDNA COOPER (Washington; pr. res.): 

Three Plays; Lancaster Press, Inc., Lancaster, Pa., 1928 

Rec. Sr. H. n, iz 

Comment: Simple, little comedies about ordinary people. Easy reading. The 
titles are "The Hat Shoppe," "The Week of Weeks," (Be Kind to Husbands 
Week), and "A Royal Complex," a small town woman who hears about 
overcoming inferiority complexes and aspires to entertain royalty. Medium 
literary value. 

MAIZE, LILLIAN TAFT (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Flight's End; Penn Publishing Co., Philadelphia, 1938 

Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women who like light fiction 

Comment: An entertaining, fast moving story of an American girl in an 
English setting. The story concerns Nancy, a typical American college girl 
from California, and her experiences when she accompanies the Earl and 
Lady Bryndham to their newly inherited estates in England. How Nancy 
discovers the real heir to the title, helps untangle all the complications and 
finally agrees to become the mistress of the English manor, Bryndham Court, 
form entertaining details of the romance. 
MANSFIELD, NORMA BICKNELL (Washington; pr. res.): 

Boss of the Ragged O; Farrar and Rinehart, Inc., 1935 
Rec. Grades 6 

Jr.H. 7,8,9 

Comment: i. Jan Daybright, at seventeen, assumes the management of the 
"Ragged O" and heads the valley cattle ranchers in a winning fight against 
a meat packing corporation. In a series of exciting adventures including 
round-up riding on a bucking horse, and imprisonment in a cavern following 
an earthquake, Jan proves herself a brave and spirited buckaroo. Locale, 
Western cattle ranch. 

2. A ^ girl struggles to save her grandfather's ranch, which has become 
hers by inheritance. There is an abundance of adventure and excitement; the 
style is commonplace. 

MANSFIELD, NORMA BICKNELL (Washington; pr. res.): 
Keeper of the Wolves; Farrar and Rinehart, Inc., 1933 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Comment: The story of a doctor and his sister who make good among the 

superstitious natives. The story is highly romantic, the style fast-moving. 
MANSFIELD, NORMA BICKNELL (Washington; pr. res.): 

McAllister Patrol; Farrar and Rinehart, Inc., 1936 
Rec. Grades 6 

Jr.H. 7, 8, 9 
Comment: i. Trapping a gang of thieves who were stealing gold from a 



150 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

national park was part of the day's work to Lee "Cub" McAllister. Other 
adventures, including the rescue of two lost boys, and the patrol of the 
Breaks, helped this young girl earn a ranger's assignment and badge. 

2. A new patrolman, after many ups and downs, makes good, with the 
aid of his daughter. Romantic; not very convincing. 
MARION, ELIZABETH (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Day Will Come; Crowell Publishing Co., 1939 
Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The book deals with life on a farm or wheat ranch in Eastern 
Washington. The descriptions of the Palouse Country and the wheatland are 
vivid and well done. The author falls into error when she makes Spokane 
too sophisticated and swanky. It is, however, a powerful piece of writing in 
many places, especially for a first novel. 

2. There is a good deal of adverse comment made on this book, because 
of some of the incidents portrayed, I, personally, think it a very creditable 
first novel, showing considerable strength in description, good plot workman 
ship, but weakness in characterization. It unquestionably shows promise. 
Certainly it should not be recommended unqualifiedly because of certain 
aspects of its content. 
MARKHAM, EDWIN (Oregon; deceased): 

Gates of Paradise and Other Poems; Doubleday, Page and Co., 1927 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr, C. Fr, Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: The portion containing the war poems is of course the weakest 
part. There are fewer didactic poems than usual, and some of the lyrics are 
rather pleasing. 
MARKHAM, EDWIN (Oregon; deceased): 

Lincoln and Other Poems; McClure, Phillips and Co., 1901 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: The book contains one of Markham's best poems, the title poem, 
and also some of the best lyrics that he has written. The occasional poems 
in this book are not so many nor so bad as they are in some of the others. 
MARKHAM, EDWIN (Oregon; deceased): 

The Man With the Hoe and Other Poems; Doubleday, Page and 

Co., 1899 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 

Comment: Outside of the epochal title poem, there is little of real value in the 
volume. There are a few rather nice lyrics scattered through. Everyone 
should know the title poem and the place it has held in the economic and 
social development of the century. An excellent book for coordination with 
a sociology or modern history course, 
MARKHAM, EDWIN (Oregon; deceased): 

New Poems, Eighty Songs at Eighty; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 

1932 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: More lyrical, less rhetoric and propaganda in this book than in 
the others. A good sequence of sonnets on "Love and death" in the Rossetti 
tradition, some of them surprisingly good. More mature and contained, less 
moralizing. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 151 

MARKHAM, EDWIN (Oregon; deceased): ~ 

Shoes of Happiness; Doubleday, Page, and Co., 1926 
Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii 

Comment: The most interesting portion of the book is the second section con 
taining the narrative poems with their well-conveyed moral. A good, colorful 
narrative style that would tempt a young reader. The rest of the poems are 
mediocre, with the poetic element frequently lacking. Usual Markham themes, 
MARQUIS, THOMAS, for LeFORGE, THOMAS H. (Montana; fr. res.): 

Memoirs of a White Crow Indian: The Century Co.. 1928 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This is a story told by a white man who was adopted into an 
Indian tribe because he liked their way of living. Gives descriptions of the 
starting of the Indian reservations, clarifies many of the Indian customs and 
beliefs, mentions Custer and the Sioux war, and gives the history of many 
of the early forts. 

2. The story of LeForge, as told to Marquis. LeForge lived with the 
Crow Indians, and married several squaws. His descriptions of life and cus 
toms of the Crows are interesting. His version of the Custer massacre is espe 
cially noteworthy from a historian's point of view. For adults. 
MARQUIS, THOMAS BAILEY (Montana; fr. Jres.)t 

A Warrior Who Fought Custer; The Midwest Co., Minneapolis. 

1931 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The life and experiences of one of the Cheyenne Indians who 
fought against Custer at the Battle of the Little Big Horn. Not much material 
on the battle, but what there is of it is interesting. For general readers inter 
ested in Indian customs. 

2. The story of Wooden Leg, a Cheyenne warrior who fought against 

Custer at the Little Big Horn. It is the story of his life, and does not tell a 

great deal about the battle, though what he does say is very interesting. A 

good book on Indian customs and life for high school students and adults. 

MARSHALL, EDISON (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Camp fire Courage; Harper and Brothers, 1926 

Rec. No ' "" - * 

Comment: An action juvenile with train robberies, etc. The subtitle, "The 
Woodsmoke Boys in the Canadian Rockies." characterizes the book. Nothing 
would be gained by recommending such reading. 
MARSHALL, EDISON (Oregon; fr. res.): 

The Heart of Little Shikard; Little, Brown, and Co., 1922 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: This is a group of nature and adventure stories for the young. 
Some have a jungle setting, in Burmah; but most are placed in the mountain 
country about Klamath Lake, in Southern Oregon. They are carefully writ 
ten, in a creditable style, and are interesting narratives. 
MARSHALL, EDISON (Oregon; fr. res.) : 

Land of Forgotten Men; Hough ton and Stoughton, Ltd., London, 

1923 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n 12 

Comment: An over-romanticized story of a Southern gentleman's exile to 
Onalaska for -a crime which, unknowingly, he never committed. The working 



152 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

out of the plot, together with the vivid description of the North forms an 
attractive novel for pleasure reading only. 
MARSHALL, EDISON (Oregon; fr. res.) : 

The Light in the Jungle; H- C. Kinsey and Co., New York, 1933 

Rec. No 

Comment: Not convincing enough, nor well written enough to be recommend 
ed for school reading. 
MARSHALL, EDISON (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Ocean Gold; Harper and Brothers, 1925 
Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Comment: Adventure of some boys in Alaska, hunting big game and search 
ing for hidden treasure. Good reading for boys of grammar school age, but 
not worth the time of older boys. 
MARSHALL, EDISON (Oregon; fr. res.): 
Seward's Folly; A. L. Burt Co., 1924 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: The story of a Washington diplomat's experiences in Alaska. Part 
of the story is a true presentation of Secretary of State Seward. The rest is 
purely fiction. Good for pleasure reading only, 
MARSHALL, EDISON (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Sky Line of Spruce; A. L. Burt Co., 1922 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, ir, 12 

Comment: The story of a man who committed a crime through loss of mem 
ory. Brought to the woods in Canada, he was cured and became a child of 
the forest. Highly romanticized. Suitable for pleasure reading only. 
MARSHALL, EDISON (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Sleeper of the Moonlit Ranges; Cosmopolitan Book Corporation, 

1925 
Rec. No 

Comment: Though describing Northern Alaska well, the book lacks the liter 
ary value to give it a place on a reading list above the tenth grade and is 
not of a theme to recommend it for reading below this grade. Though not 
particularly objectionable, there are too many books of greater value, for 
this to be used. 
MARSHALL, EDISON (Oregon; fr. res.): 

The Voice of the Pack; Little, Brown, and Co., 1920 
Rec. Sr. H. u, 12 

Comment: The law of "the survival of the fittest" is exemplified in this story 
in which the hero fights to live and to retain "honor" in the approved primi 
tive fashion. The trend of events in the closely-linked lives of men and ani 
mals is heralded by the voice of the pack. Well handled and written. Prob 
ably the author's most significant novel. 
MAYOL, LURLINE BOWLES (Washington; pr. res.): 
The Rig Canoe; D. Appleton Century Co., 1933 
Rec. Grades 5, 6 
Jr.H. 7,8,9 

Sr. H. 10, u, 12 Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: i. A well written series of articles and sketches and stories about 
the Haida Indians at the height of their power. Their superiority is empha 
sized. One factor making for their success was their big canoes, both for 
peaceful pursuits and for war. , 

2. Twelve authentic tales describe the daily life of the Haiclas, an Indian 
tribe who lived on Queen Charlotte Islands about a century ago. They were 
the true Vikings of the Pacific and travelled far out into the sea in their 
sturdy but graceful and beautifully carved canoes. This group of stories is 
widely read by the children of the upper intermediate grades. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 153 

3. This is an excellent book for the upper grade school age. It is inter 
estingly written deals with tte life, customs, traditions, and legends of the 
Haida Indians. The book also has a number of black and white illustrations 
designed to attract children. 
MEANY, EDMOND STEPHEN, Editor (Washington; pr. res.): 

Mount Rainier: A Record of Exploration; Macmillan Co., 1916 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: A collection of extracts giving accounts of the discovery, explora 
tion, and first ascents of the mountain. Most of the chapters are taken from 
the diaries of the original explorers. It has the easy flow of personal nar 
rative. 

MEEKER, EZRA (Washington; deceased); and DRIGGS, HOWARD R, 
Ox-Team Days on the Oregon Trail; Pioneer Life Series; World 

Book Co., 1923 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Told with a simplicity that appeals, the adventures in this 
book, put down by Meeker at the age of ninety, recreate the story of the Old 
Oregon Trail. Its pages give a glimpse (the book is short) of the kind of 
men and women who struggled out by ox-team to settle the West. 

2. This has become a new book through Professor Driggs' collaboration. 
The style is charming yet simple. To a book already valuable historically, 
the re-writing has given an appropriate, suitable form. 
MEEKER, EZRA (Washington; deceased): 

The Ox Team, or Old Oregon Trail; By author, 1907 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: An interesting, simple narration of Meeker's first trip to the Oregon 
territory by ox train in 1852-53. This is followed by his ox cart journey back 
across the trail in order to erect a series of monuments marking the trail, 
Not too well written, but somewhat vivid. 

MEINE, FRANKLIN J.: Mike Fink. See BLAIR, WALTER 
MERRIAM, HAROLD G. (Montana; pr. res.): 

Edward Moxon Publisher of Poets; Columbia University Press, 
Rec. Sr. C Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 
Sp. R. 

Comment: i. History of the career of Edward Moxon, London publisher of 
Wordsworth, Lamb, Elizabeth Barrett, Browning, Samuel Rogers, Leigh 
Hunt, Tennyson, and others. Tells of the publishing business as conducted 
by him and others during his time. Nicely written shows fine judgment of 
personalities and sources. 

2. A scholarly biography of Edward Moxon (1801-1858), famous English 
publisher. Moxon was particularly important as the publisher of Words 
worth, Leigh Hunt, Lamb, Tennyson, Coleridge, Browning, Elizabeth Bar 
rett and many other famous poets. This will interest students of nineteenth 
century poetry and of the history of publishing, as well as the general reader 
of sufficient background. 
MERRIAM, HAROLD G., Editor (Montana; pr. res.): 

Northwest Verse: An Anthology; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1931 

1939 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. A collection of 300 poems written by ninety-four contemporary 



154 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

poets of the Northwest, reflecting adequately the reaction of individuals to 
their environment, yet including much work that is universal rather than 
regional in a geographic sense. A handbook of Northwest writers. Unique 
in its field, it has met good response from critical commentators. Widely and 
very favorably reviewed. 

2. Northwest Verse is an anthology of poetry written by Washington, 
Oregon, Idaho, and Montana writers. In this fine collection are verses vividly 
and feelingly expressing the spirit of Northwest pioneers, Western life as it 
is found today. The reader of the book also feels the reaction of Northwest 
poets to this age of realism. The anthology is particularly well-suited for 
reference reading in a college course on Northwest literature. It also should 
be found on high school library shelves for assignment reading. 

3. This book, with Mr. Coleman's, offered the greatest literary treasury 
of the Northwest which has come my way. Both take permanent places in 
national literature. Northwest Verse is a collection of verse chiefly from 
newer poets. It contains verse lyrical, philosophic, narrative, but always 
original, enduring as the mountains themselves and regional. No library can 
be without this volume. The youth of the Northwest must have a chance at it. 

MILES, CHARLES: Building a State; Washington, 1889-1930. See SPER- 

LIN, O. B. 
MILLER, JOAQUIN (Oregon; aeceased): 

The Building of the City Beautiful; Whittaker and Ray Co., San 

Francisco, 1909 
Rec. Sr. H, 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: The building of an ideal state where humility, service, true belief 
in divinity regardless of creed bring about the good life and the holy life. 
Well written, idealistic. This book and Markham's social poems would make 
a good grouping. 
MILLER, JOAQUIN (Oregon; deceased): 

Overland in a Covered Wagon; D. Appleton and Co., 1930 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: The story of Miller's early life, trip to Oregon overland, and some 
of his adventures as a youth in the mines and among the Indians of Northern 
California and Southern Oregon. Adventure of a type to interest the young 
reader, and of adult interest for the reader of sources in biography. Style 
simple but of excellent quality. 
MILLER, JOAQUIN (Oregon; deceased): 

Plays; Whittaker and Ray Co., San Francisco, 1909 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr, 
Comment: Important in history of local literature. Some of the plays would 

appeal to junior high school readers, some to older readers. 
MILLER, JOAQUIN (Oregon; deceased): 

A Royal Highway of the World; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & 

Mort), 1932 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment; Description of a stage journey in 1907, from Canyon City to Burns, 
over the road which was later named the Joaquin Miller Trail. Introduction 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 155 

by Alfred Powers. Contains "Jaquin Miller Crosses the Mountains, 30 by 
Howard McKinley Corning. Limited edition. 
MILLER, JOAQUIN (Oregon; deceased): 

Songs of Italy and Others; Whittaker and Ray Co., San Francisco, 

1909 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Comment: Poems of native as well as foreign background. Some of the Indian 

poems would especially appeal to younger high school readers. 
MILLER, JOAQUIN (Oregon; deceased): 

Songs of the American Seas; Whittaker and Ray Co-, San Fran 
cisco, 1909 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Comment: Some of the last work of Miller. The first poem is rather strong 

love poetry. 
MILLER, JOAQUIN (Oregon; deceased): 

Songs of the Sierras; Whittaker and Ray Co., San Francisco, 1909 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Comment: Some of Miller's best poems. "Kit Carson's Ride" and Oregon 

poems would appeal especially to junior high school readers. 
MILLER, JOAQUIN (Oregon; deceased): 

Songs of the Sunlands; Whittaker and Ray Co., San Francisco, 1909 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Mostly long narratives containing some very good passages. Dra 
matic and eventful. 
MILLER, MARIAN, pseud. (Oregon; pr. res.), Hill, Mrs. Edith Marian 

(Knight) : 

Happy Endings; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1934 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: In answer to the question often asked of her, "And what happened 
afterwards?" Marian Miller (as she is well known by readers of the Port 
land Oreffonian and by countless local people) has in this little book human 
ly and entertainingly presented the "happy ending" of twenty-three out of 
hundreds of unhappy situations she has come upon through sad, even tragic 
appeals made to her as columnist offering comfort to many comfortless or 
desperate persons who write to her. Humor, combined with candid under 
standing and genuine sympathy. Marian Miller is here again discovered as a 
valuable person, sincere and unpretentious. 
MILLER MAX (Washington; fr. jres.): 

Fog and Men on Bering Sea; E. P. Dutton and Co., 1936 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 
Comment: High adventure on a coast guard boat to Bering Sea and the Arctic 

Ocean. The expression is at times unnecessarily vulgar. 
MILLER MAX (Washington; fr. res.): 

The Great Trek; DoublecJay, Doran and Co., 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A story of a five-year drive of a reindeer herd from Alaska 



156 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

to the east side of the Mackenzie River delta to save the Canadian Eskimos 
from starvation. Dangers of exposure, snowslides, blizzards, lost pathways, 
wolves, runaway reindeer, and semi-starvation related in a vivid and inter 
esting style which makes fascinating reading, 

2. A story of driving 3000 reindeer from Western Alaska to the Macken 
zie River delta, where they are delivered to the Canadian government. The 
"trek" took over five years. The style is good, though the narrative becomes 
a little confused. The incidents are well illustrated with reproductions of 
photographs. 
MILLER MAX (Washington; fr. res.): 

Harbor of the Sun, The Story of the Port of San Diego; Doubleday, 

Doran and Co., 1940 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, ix, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Between discovery of San Diego Bay by Cabrillo in 1542 and 
the time of / Cover the Waterfront) stretches a period of nearly four cen 
turies, making that harbor the oldest of our ports on the Pacific. After a few 
historical chapters, the author gives most of the book to presenting the San 
Diego of today. 

2. This is the first of the Seaport Series ; the next volume will deal with 
the Port of Seattle, written by Archie Binns, also a Washington author. 
There is in Max Miller's book a wealth of historical and geographical in 
formation interestingly told in approved journalistic style. 
MILLER MAX (Washington; fr. res.): 

/ Cover the Waterfront; E. P. Dutton and Co., 1932 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: x. Mostly narrative sketches about life along the waterfront in 
San Diego by a "ship news man" whimsical and touching accounts of per 
sonal experiences such as the one about the man who toured the country with 
a captive whale, the baby sea lion met alone on the beach at night, or a 
sardine fishing trip. 

2. In an easy, humorous manner, Max Miller, reporter on the San Diago 
Sun, pictured the strange and touching life he saw about him on the water 
front Among his whimsical sketches arc the unforgettable stories of the lost 
baby sea lion; the fishing trip on a sardine-boat; and the "face lifting" of 
the exhibition whale. 
MILLER MAX (Washington; fr. res.): 

Man on the Barge; E. P. Dutton and Co., 1935 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, la 

Comment: Through the eyes of Captain John we are given clean-edged and 
appreciative sketches of the odd assortment of people who use the fishing 
barge anchored off the coast of Lower California. His enjoyable observations, 
and incidents told, build an atmosphere of human kindness. The style is 
simple and clear, 
MILLER MAX (Washington; fr. res.): 

Mexico Around Me; Reynal and Hitchcock, 1937 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Max Miller had hoped to see the Mexico of today without 
paying much attention to the Mexico of yesterday, but that proved impossible, 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 157 

for he found the past closely interwoven with the present. His descriptions of 
Mexico's charm and color, and his preoccupation with General Zapata, form 
a thoroughly "readable" book. 

z. Not the usual guide book in conversational style a very readable 
account of the author's experiences and thoughts in the land of no tourists 
(the extreme south of Mexico) in days and nights spent in Mexico City, and 
with the Indian comrade of General Zapata. Some good reporting is done 
in the cockfight, visit to the hidden convent and his meeting with Zapata's 
widow. 
MILLER MAX (Washington; fr. res.): 

Second House from the Corner; E. P. Button and Co., 1934 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Autobiographical sketches written in an informal manner that 
reminds one of David Grayson with a modern air. The people and events of 
everyday life in a California beach town are treated with a humor and 
sympathy that give them real importance. 
MOLL, ERNEST GEORGE (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Appreciation of Poetry; F. S. Crofts and Co., Inc., 1933 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Here is a scholarly treatment by a poet of the avenues of 
poetic appreciation along which moves a poem's meaning (the senses, the 
imagination, the intellect) with considerable attention to more technical mat 
ters such as figures of speech, types of poetry and prosody. It is a book pri 
marily for the student of literature or any one who loves the singing word. 
^ 2. Upon the hypothesis that the average student is ill-equipped to appre 
ciate poetry, this book stresses the methods by which he can be trained to 
discriminate and evaluate. The exposition is clear and fresh. The book used 
experimentally at the University of Oregon under the auspices of the Car 
negie Corporation. 
MOLL, ERNEST GEORGE (Oregon; pr. res.) = 

Blue Interval, Poems of Crater Lake; Metropolitan Press (Binfords 

& Mort), 1935 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Verses of four lines describe Oregon's Crater Lake National 
Park region. Illustrated by Karl J. Belser, the poems of Ernest G. Moll 
picture the blue lake and rugged mountains, the eroded slopes and stalwart 
hemlocks, the days' light and nights' mystery as timeless objects untouched 
by man's mortality. 

2. These are quatrain-etchings of reflective and pictorial charm. The most 
striking of the verse-numbers are: "Wizard Island," "Tragedy," "Sublimity," 
"Color," and "Man and Beauty" these are less palpable or realistic, more 
elusive, giving distinction to the volume's delicate quality. Attractively illus 
trated by pen-and-ink drawings by K. J. Belser. 
MOLL, ERNEST GEORGE (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Campus Sonnets; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1934 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 Gen. R. Men, Women 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. In a loose sequence not too seriously done the poet presents a 



158 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

number of sonnet studies of campus and classroom types and situations. 
Style and attitude modern, pattern traditional. Entertaining rather than sig 
nificant. 

2. A collection of forty-four sonnets revealing the thoughts and feelings 
of a poet-professor in a large university. The subject matter ranges from an 
"entering college freshman" through Robinson Jeffers to virtue, man, woman, 
love, beauty, and immortality. Sometimes passionate, occasionally esoteric, 
often humorous, Mr. Moll's sonnets are always brilliant. 
MOLL, ERNEST GEORGE (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Native Moments and Other Poems; Metropolitan Press (Bmfords & 

Mort), 1931 
Rec. No 
Comment: A book of conventional verse on the old theme of romantic love. 

A pleasant style but nothing of great moment. 
MOLL, ERNEST GEORGE (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Poetry I The Problem <of Appreciation (pamphlet); University of 

Oregon Press, 1934 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Sp. R. 

Comment: Exposition of the nature of poetry (the principal elements involved 
in its making), and what a reader needs to know about it in order to ap 
preciate it. An essay for mature readers (advanced students), clearly writ 
ten with illustrative passages from well known verse. The author shows 
that he knows what he is talking about from long and loving contact with 
his subject, so that he exemplifies in his essay the sort of reader he would 
have his readers become. 
MONROE, ANNE SHANNON (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Behind the Ranges; Doubleday, Page and Co,, 1925 
Rec. Sr. H. xo, u, xa 

Comment: A novel of Eastern Oregon with much more action than Happy 
Valley, but of a more popular type. It is better than a pulp Western, but not 
really good stuff. It does, however, have a certain feel for and understanding 
of the land. 

MONROE, ANNE SHANNON (Oregon; pr. res.), compiler; WILLIAM 

HANLEY, writer 
Feelin' Fine: Bill Hanley'a Book; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1930 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 

Comment: Although the style is that of a man whose formal education has 
been mostly lacking, this should not deter even an English teacher. The 
book pictures much of the background and building of Eastern Oregon. It 
is a wise book, frequently impregnated with the spirit of poetry. It might 
even show a boy that a "he-man' 1 need not be ashamed of liking poetry. 
MONROE, ANNE SHANNON (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

God Lights a Candle; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1933 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, ia 

Comment^ Essays concerning women who have turned their talents to ac 
countin ^ canning, ^repairing old furniture, etc. Fairly good, but over- 
enthusiastic style. Might be valuable in reading on vocational guidance. 
MONROE, ANNE SHANNON (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Happy Valley; A. C. McClurg and Co., 1916 
Rec. No 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. A fictionalized account of homesteading in Eastern Oregon 
with the figure of Bill Hanley in the background. A wholesome novel, but 
not at all impressive. Easy style. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 159 

2. Through the influence of the girl Susie and the far-sighted rancher, 
John Regan, a young man with a weakness for drink, became a real man 
among the hardships of an agricultural district where irrigation was de 
veloping in Eastern Oregon. The book is not strong in plot or characteriza 
tion, although the locality touches are probably good. 
MONROE, ANNE SHANNON (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

The Hearth of Happiness; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1929 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: i. A series of clear, kindly, sympathetic, and rather wise discus 
sions of human experiences, tending toward a finer attitude of people toward 
each other in all situations. An excusable amount of sentiment is mingled 
with the dignity of these pages. 

2. A collection of informal essays on a variety of subjects, all emphasiz 
ing gracious living with others. There are no new ideas, no originality of 
expressions, but wholesome preachments, restating the time-honored funda 
mental values of life in language of everyday. The style is simple and 
easily read. 

3. The Hearth of Happiness is a group of common-sense essays which 
have no great literary merit but which have a certain inspirational value for 
students of high school age, particularly those enrolled in "social relations" 
classes. The sketches deal, sincerely, with small, everyday problems and com 
monplace but significant happenings. These the author treats with a sane and 
comforting philosophy. 

MONROE, ANNE SHANNON (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Making a Business Woman; Henry Holt and Co., 1912 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. An exuberant account of an untrained girl's entry into the 
world of business in Chicago, her vigorous training there in the advertising 
field, and her ultimate success. The writing is competent and the book is 
especially interesting as revelation of advertising as a profession in 1911. 

2. A fictionalized account of a woman's venture into business. It is valu 
able in that it gives information on various tricks of the trade. A book that 
would be valuable in any reading on the subject of vocational guidance. 
MONROE, ANNE SHANNON (Oregon; pr. res.); and WOOD, ELIZA 
BETH LAMBERT (Washington; fr. res.): 
Mansions in the Cascades; Macmillan Co., 1936 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: The story of Dr. Kenfield, who, with his wife, spends a year in 
the Cascade Mountains in an effort to regain physical and mental health. 
Descriptions of mountain scenery are fine. A philosophy of life and a new 
faith, which is of real value, are expressed. Some of the situations seem im 
possible and the book is too sentimental and romantic at times. 
MONROE, ANNE SHANNON (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Singing in the Rain; Doubleday, Page and Co., 1920 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Gen, R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. These 21 chapters were written originally for Good House 
keeping. Their value is limited by change in social outlook ; they might seem 
pretty old-fashioned to the very minds for whom they were designed. Mrs. 
Monroe shows a good deal of lively feeling for Oregon landscape and 
atmosphere, the Oregon grape, grassy knolls, tall firs, above all, the mellow 
ing effect of the rains. Her ethical teaching is a blend of Christian virtues; 



160 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

conventional morality, and contentment by adjusting to Life, looking for 
the best. It could be wished that she had spent less energy on moralizing 
anecdotes (one recognizes Oregon figures, such as the blind publisher) and 
more on actual observation of the Oregon locale. Her book has the values 
usually attaching to sentimentalism, without revealing powers of insight 
or realization beyond the sentimental. 

2. A volume of "brave front" essays in which the author discusses happy 
conduct in life. She chooses her themes from joys, sorrows, and daily occur 
rences of modern life. Her philosophy is sound, although occasionally it has 
a saccharine flavor. 

3. A group of 21 essays of the inspirational variety, aiming to encourage 
living graciously, fully, and independently, meeting all problems squarely 
and intelligently. An informal restatement of age-old truths in ^ everyday 
language, of especial value to adolescent boys and girls in this age of 
sophistication. 

MONROE, ANNE SHANNON (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Walk With Me, Lad; Doubleday, Doran, Inc., 1934 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: This book contains seventeen human interest stories built^ around 
the problems of child phychology and the quest for an adequate philosophy 
of life. The author shows a sympathetic understanding of personal relation 
ships, but inclines to over-rhapsodize and not unoccasionally to sentimentalize 
in her conclusions and encouragement. 
MONROE, ANNE SHANNON (Oregon; pr. res.); (Washington; fr. res.) = 

The World I Saw; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1928 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: From a happy family life in Yakirna and Tacoma, the author goes 
to Chicago and New York to serve her apprenticeship in the writing profes 
sion. The author tells her experiences up to the time when success is assured. 
The telling is simply done, but with an earnestness, sincerity and spirit that 
are convincing and contagious. 
MONTGOMERY, RICHARD GILL (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Pechuck; Lome Knight's Adventures in the Arctic; Dodd, Mead, and 

Co., 1932 
Rec. Grades 6 

Jr.H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. The story of Lome Knight, an Oregon boy; his sojourn for 
four years with Stefansson in the Arctic. Mr. Montgomery, using the very 
complete notes left by Knight, after his death on Wrangel Island, has made 
an extremely interesting and readable account of the mysterious Arctic and 
an indomitable explorer which will be instructive to readers of all ages. 

2. Mr. Montgomery has edited the diary of Lome Knight, an Oregonian 
born in Hillsdale, 1893, and attached to Arctic exploring expeditions with 
Stefansson, in the second of which he died. Young Knight was a true adven 
turer, eager for every chance to penetrate the physical unknown, reacting 
vigorously to everything. Interesting account of Stefansson 7 s qualities as a 
leader. Style is not literary but like a diary informal jottings, or casual 
"talk." It reveals an attractive young personality, eager yet self-disciplined, 
courageous, with a sense of humor and of good-humor. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 161 

3. Thrills in the Arctic with Stefansson playing a leading role. Knight 
is one of the four who later perished in the Wrangel Island tragedy of 1923 
a calamity sympathetically related by Stefansson in his book, The Adven 
ture on Wrangel Island. Authentic information graphically related. 

4. Lome Knight's adventures in the Arctic retold from his diaries. Clear 
style, good information, interesting incidents of special appeal to boys. Con 
vincing and not lurid. 

5. A story of adventure in the Arctic on the Polar Bear in 1914; aim: 
discovery and scientific investigation. Emphasis on study of the natives, their 
culture and civilization. Some work done in geology and animal life. An 
attempt by author to blend the known and the probable, with Lome Knight's 
journals as a basis. 

MONTGOMERY, RICHARD GILL (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The White Headed Eagle; The Macmillan Co , 1934 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Presented as an inclusive and definitive life study of Dr. John 
McLoughlin, celebrated early-day factor at Fort Vancouver, this recent ac 
count, while generally accurate and bearing new notes on his life story, infers 
some viewpoints the author is hardly able to substantiate. Somewhat prosaic 
in portions, in others over-emotionalized. Style is fair and always readable. 
MOORE, DALLAS (Oregon; native): 

Sunset Trails; New University Press, 1933 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Anthology of three hundred short lyric poems written by Oregon- 
ians. Well chosen and charming collection of poems in personal mood, with 
some showing originality. Valuable as examples of Oregon poetry as well as 
for pleasure reading. 

MOORE, WERT EMMIT (Oregon; pr. res.) : 
Home Again; Binfords & Mort, 1938 

Rec. No 

Comment: A brief sketch of an old man, dying in San Francisco after a life 
time of hard working and hard drinking. There is no plot, no character 
realization. The reader is left without any feeling concerning the book, which 
may have been written as a pamphlet against drink. The quasi-literary 
speech is out of keeping with the character portrayal. 

MOURNING DOVE (HUMISHAMA, AN INDIAN WOMAN) (Washing 
ton; pr. res.); Edited and illustrated by H. D. Fuie: 
Coyote Stories; The Caxton Printers, 1933 

Rec. Grades 3, 4, 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, ii 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. These are right out of the ancient profession of story-telling, 
preserved by an educated Okanogan Indian who heard them told in child 
hood and later preserved them in notebooks and prepared them for us. They 
are authentic and finely expressed. Locale, Plateau country, Inland Empire. 
2. A group of 27 short selections of Indian lore. The Coyote is made 
chief "actor." The stories explain Indian beliefs of how things came to pass 
"in the animal kingdom." It is interesting and not devoid of a certain kind 
of charm common to natives. Locale, Okanogan country, Eastern Washington. 



ifa NORTHWEST BOOKS 

MUNFORD, KENNETH (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

John Ledyard, an American Marco Polo; Binfords & Mort, 1939 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Life of an American who sailed with Captain Cook to the 
Northwest coast, attempted to reach Alaska by traveling across Siberia, was 
arrested by the Russians, finally released, and died as he was beginning an 
expedition into Africa. Based on the life by Jarad Sparks. Imaginary con 
versations detract from historical value. 

2. A popular account of the extraordinary career of John Ledyard, who 
in the i8th century was with James Cook when the explorer sailed along the 
west coast of Oregon, and on to Alaska. He came within 600 miles of his 
goal when he attempted to reach Alaska by crossing Europe and Siberia. He 
died at Cairo as he was about to start on an expedition into Africa. The 
author in his bright, alert style has told a story that impresses the imagina 
tion, but he has held to the facts. 

3. The life story of a man who rose from commonplace surroundings in a 
series of dramatic events to become the friend of glamorous figures of Revo 
lutionary America Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Paul Jones, 
and the Marquis de Lafayette. He sailed around the world with Captain 
Cook, and due to his explorations in the Northwest, became the inspiration 
for the Louisiana Purchase. No attempt was made, according to the author, 
to present an exhaustive or definitive biography, but he has given a fascinat 
ing account of one of the great Americans. 

MURPHY, DENNIS (Montana; fr. re*.): 

Boy with the Silver Plow; The Kaleidoscopic Publishers, Dallas, 

Texas, 1931 
Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, 11, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Personalistic verse, delicate and sincere; written with unpre 
tentious economy of expression. The lad's plowing of the earth is reflected 
on by the adult whom life has plowed. There are poems that even small chil 
dren could delight in, but the deeper meaning of most of the poems would 
be clear only to an adult. 

2. A book of poetry full of the beauty of Ozark hillsides and of the men 
and women who inhabit them, whose lives are also beautiful, if, for the most 
part, starkly and tragically. The rhythms have a sturdy ballad ring especial 
ly fitting^ to the etchings of the words. 

3. Prize-winning volume out of 176 book-length manuscripts considered 
in the 1931 Kaleidoscope Poetry Contest. Sixty-four pages of unusual lyrics 
that,_ against a background of poignant beauty, present with truthfulness, 
dignity, and startling clarity the tragic, pitiful, and dear in human life. A 
book to be read and re-read, and loved. 

MURPHY, PATRICK C. (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Behind Gray Walls; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1920 

Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 
Comment: i. The daily routine of a life prisoner striving to make something 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 163 

of the life he must live in these surroundings. Naturally, gloomy not well 
written but sincere and, I imagine, a true narrative of this life. 

2. A convict tells about his life in the penitentiary. The one surprising 
thing about the book is the man's apparent idealisms. Otherwise it has little 
value. The book is well done considering the source. 

3, The author was a prisoner in the Idaho State Penitentiary, and this 
is an intensely interesting account of his experiences during the many years 
of his incarceration. 

MURPHY, PATRICK C. (Idaho; fr. res.) : 

Shadow of the Gallows; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1928 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R, Men, Women 

Comment: i. In this book the author has added much valuable and interest 
ing material on the subject of crime and punishment to that accumulated in 
his earlier volume, Behind Gray Walls. 

2. Written in the shadows of the gallows, this book gives information on 
prisons and human nature everywhere, past, present, and future. The ma 
terial shows deep research on the author's part. Locale, Idaho State Peni 
tentiary. 

3. ^ Description of prison different types of inmates forms of punishment 
daily living influence of one prisoner on another. Good that author can 
find outlet for his thoughts in creative writing. 

NELSON, IRA STEPHENS (Montana; pr. res.): 

On Sarpy Creek; Little, Brown and Co., 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A story of interlocking lives, especially those of three rural 
families in the region of the Yellowstone River (Big Horn Country). 
Though a tale of intrigue, murder, adultery, fire, and drouth, the general 
atmosphere is strangely one of health and sanity. Its theme is well sum 
marized in the lines: "The sooner you plum realize how surprising disgust 
ing things can be mixed in with the natural goodness of a human thing, the 
sooner you will be better off." A first novel and a good one. 

2. On Sarpy Creek is a very human story of dry farming in Montana. 
The deprivation, the heartache, the joy, and the eternal hope of those who 
attempt year after year to make the land yield them a living is unfolded in 
quiet, sincere style. 
NELSON, RHODA (Washington; pr. res.): 

Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday; Binfords & Mort, 1938 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 

Comment: i. This book is a highly imaginative treatment of Coast Indian 
life, early traders, and pioneers. It will be interesting to children, but it 
would be more valuable to them if truth had not been so much abused. 

a. The book has value to a thinking child to show the slow development 
of our present civilization. Parts of the book are slow and involved reading 
but a hidden sense of humor helps to carry the theme of the story. 
NEUBERGER, RICHARD LEWIS (Oregon; pr. res.) ; and LOE, KELLEY 

An Army of the Aged; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1936 
Rec. Sr. C. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 
Sp. R. 
Comment: The authors have attempted to glean from the mass of facts and 



164 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

fictions about the Townsend Movement or the Old Age Revolving Plan 
those elements which are of material importance in estimating this phenome 
non fairly as a normal outgrowth of American life in a changing age pattern. 
NEUBERGER, RICHARD LEWIS (Oregon; pr.res.); and KAHN, 

STEPHEN B. 

Integrity, The Life of George W. N orris; The Vanguard Press, 1937 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This is a reasonably well documented biography of an energetic 
politician, Senator Norris of Nebraska, who at times in the estimation of the 
authors almost approached the stature of a true statesman. The book is filled 
with much human interest material revealing the strengths and weaknesses 
of the American Way of Life. 
NEUBERGER, RICHARD LEWIS (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Our Promised Land; The Macmillan Co., 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Liberal, vigorous, and confident in his approach, Mr. Neuberger 
focuses attention on a million minute but moving factors in the seething 
landscape of the Pacific Northwest's social, economic, and political terrains 
and arrives quite convincingly at an expanding horizon. From his lookout he 
has seen a vision he wonders! 
NICHOLS, MRS. MARIE LEONA (HOBBS) (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Joab Powell; Homespun Missionary; Metropolitan Press (Binfords 

& Mort), 1935 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: A brief story of the life of Joab Powell and his life as a mis 
sionary. Much of the material is quoted from other sources. While not par 
ticularly well organized the book does give something of the strength of the 
man, and the growth of the Baptist church in Oregon. 
NOBLE, CARL (Montana; deceased), edited by Grace Stone Coates 

Jugheads Behind the Lines; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1938 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A fairly interesting, detailed account of his time spent in 
France as a soldier, a supply officer. The reader feels the real goodness of 
the author, who was doing his best for the United States. The information 
given is not especially important. 

2. The book is the ^ actual World War experiences of an enlisted man in 
a supply company behind the lines. His story is not melodramatic but leaves 
one with the impression that a true patriot went to France, did his duty to 
his country^ to the best of his ability, and returned home August 2, 1919, 
uncomplaining and without regret. (He returned to a wheat farm at Grass 
Range, near Lewistown, Montana, married a nurse who had attended him 
in U.S.V.B. Hospital, St. Paul, in 1924. Was the father of two children. 

i,r^5 iec l* 2,^TlC e ri rJs , Day> I935j at Veteran s Hospital, Fort Harrison). 
NOEL, JACQUELINE (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Washington Authors; Washington State Federation of Women's 

Clubs, 1930 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. For reference 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 165 

Comment: Although this little pamphlet is, of course, not intended for reading 
in the ordinary sense of the term, it has proved so very helpful in the work 
of this committee that, until something more comprehensive is compiled, it 
should be mentioned as a very useful guide to those who wish to investigate 
books by Washington authors. The author is the Librarian in the Public 
Library in Tacoma. The list was intended for women's clubs wishing to deal 
with Washington authors. The list does not claim to be complete and it is 
not classified, nor is any attempt made to make it a critical piece of work. 
I have found a few, but not a great number, of other authors and pieces of 
work. 
NORTON, WILLIAM BERNARD (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Facing the Golden West; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 
1931 

Rec. No 

Comment: Poor verse of the occasional, didactic, and humorous type. 

O'CONNOR, HARVEY (Washington; fr. res.): 
The Guggenheims; Covici-Friede, 1937 

Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment :i. From peddler's pack to great riches and world power is the 
story simply but rather fully told by the author of The Guggenheim*: The 
Making of an American Dynasty. The treatment seems adequate and just. 
2. An account of the Guggenheim family from its home in Switzerland 
to its grandeur in America. The author is interesting and thorough. 
O'CONNOR, HARVEY (Washington; fr. res.): 

Steel-Dictator; The John Day Co., 1935 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Mr. O'Connor has written a worthy successor to his Mellon'* 
Millions. Here is a critical history of an industry that is king, with a fair 
consideration of labor and capital and the problems of monopoly. 

2. Much more than a history, this book is strong in economics and social 
criticism. The author is to be commended for his research and for his con 
structive proposals .for betterment of labor and industry. 
OFFORD, LENORE GLEN (Washington; fr. res.): 

Cloth of Silver; Macrae-Smith Co., 1939 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: A story with very little plot, too much rather aimless conversation. 
The characters are everyday people with quite ordinary lives. The author 
writes well and the material is free from the sensational and the bizarre so 
often found in the modern novel. It concerns the problems of a young mar 
ried couple. Locale, San Francisco. 
OFFORD, LENORE GLEN (Washington; fr. res.): 

Murder on Russian Hill; Macrae-Smith Co., 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. A very well told detective and mystery story. The characters 
are realistic and the dialogue is natural and convincing. The plot is cleverly 
worked out. The story holds one's interest. There is a quaintness about the 
manner of narration that makes the story much better than an ordinary mys 
tery story. Locale, San Francisco. 

2. A well-written and interesting mystery story based upon fictional hap 
penings in San Francisco. It has suspense until the end suspicion is directed 



1 66 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

toward every character. It meets the question of probability nicely. Plot well 
done. Characters well-drawn. 
O'NEAL, GEORGE S. (Oregon; fr. res.): 

A Wedding in June; Greenburgr Publishers, New York, 1934 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: The plot of this novel is unique and the handling well enough 
done, but the central incident, a sex episode, makes recommendation of the 
book as reading for adolescents a dubious issue. A modern day Southern 
novel by a former Portland newspaper man. 
ORR, FREDERICK W. (Washington; pr. res.): 

Essentials <of Effective Speaking; The Appleton Press, 1921 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12, 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: This book emphasizes the psychological problems of the beginning 
speaker, recognizing not primarily the results of disturbing emotional re 
actions, but rather the causes ; so that after the adjustments are made, effec 
tive creative thinking may follow. Brief and concise in presentation, its main 
value is its stimulating effect. 

OSBORN, FREDERICK A. (Washington; pr. res.): 

Physics of the Home; McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1925 

Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: A text for a course designed for women students "who want to 
know physics not for its own sake but for its real help in their daily life." 
Not largely descriptive, it gives a ground work of principles from which 
applications would come. It has been frequently revised in the light of class 
room experience. 

OSGOOD, ERNEST STAPLES (Montana; fr. res.): 

The Day of the Cattleman; The University of Minnesota Press, 
1929 

Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Sp. R. 

Comment: i. A doctor's thesis in history, this book is authentic, well anno 
tated, and very well written but rather dull and should be used mainly for 
reference work. Gives a detailed account of the beginning, rise, and final 
decline of the cattle industry from Texas to Montana. Many maps, diagrams, 
charts, and statistics. 

2. A Ph.D. thesis on the history of cattle-raising in the West. Authorita 
tive, and well illustrated with charts, tables, etc., but rather dull for the 
average reader. Excellent for a person doing research on the subject. 

OWEN, MAJOR JOHN (Montana; deceased) ; Editors, Seymour Dunbar 

and Paul C. Phillips 

The Journals and Letters of Major John Owen, Pioneer of the 
Northwest, 1850-1870. Eds. Dunbar, Seymour, and Phillips, Paul C- 

2 Volumes; Southworth Press, Portland, Ore., 1927 
Rec. Sr. C. Sen. Gr. 

Sp. R. 

Comment: These volumes, which have been transcribed and edited from the 
original manuscripts in the Montana Historical Society, give John Owen's 
story of his life and work at Fort Owen in the Bitterroot Valley and vivid 
accounts of his numerous trading journeys throughout the Northwest which 
amounted to some twenty-three thousand miles during the years from 1851 to 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 167 

1864. There are thirty illustrative plates, two maps and numerous valuable 
footnotes of a historical and biographical character. 
PARRINGTON, VERNON LOUIS (Washington; f r. res.) : 

Main Currents in American Thought, three volumes j Harcourt, 

Brace and Howe, 1927 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: This work is probably too heavy for student reading. It should not 
be beyond the occasional student of American literature in college, however. 
It is the outstanding work in its particular field. It deals with the history of 
ideas in America as recorded in works of literature and in other works not 
so strictly literary art. Although fair and judicial in its treatment, yet the 
strong convictions of the author are everywhere apparent; and his dry and 
piercing wit has free play. The books should be in every high school library 
for reference, for occasional topical readings by classes in literature and his 
tory and for the use of teachers. If only one volume can be had, the second 
should be chosen. The third, which was to have been the crown, is somewhat 
fragmentary on account of the author's untimely death. 
PARRINGTON, VERNON LOUIS (Washington; fr. res.) t 

Sinclair Lewis; Our Own Diogenes; University of Washington Book 

Store, 1927 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: An attempt to show the method and purpose of Sinclair Lewis in 
his work. The writer feels that Lewis fails to take into account some things 
but that on the whole he would join Lewis in his satirical attitude. 

PARRISH, PHILIP H. (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Before the Covered Wagon; Binfords & Mort, 1931 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This vivid and fascinating chronicle, written to vitalize early 
events of the Oregon Country, is told with historic truth and literary art. It 
deals with the period before the coming of the covered wagons when the 
Northwest Coast was wrapped in seclusion and mystery. The account begins 
when the white men's ships broke through the fogs and mist, as early as 
1543, and continues the narrative of romance and adventure to the coming 
of the first wagon on the Oregon Trail 300 years later. A literary and his 
toric contribution. 

2,. A well-written account of the explorers who ventured into the Oregon 
Territory before the coming of the wagon trains. It is fascinating as truth 
and as adventure and will appeal to all students who appreciate drama in 
history. 

PARRISH, PHILIP H. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Historic Oregon; The Mac mil Ian Co., 1937 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: As a history this book is light and interesting. The author has, 
however, included many minor details and all the high points of historic 
value, and written the book so it is very readable. Ranks high from stand 
point of human value and good from literary viewpoint. 



1 68 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

PARSONS, JOHN (Oregon? deceased): 

Beside the Beautiful Willamette; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & 

Mort), 1924 
Rec. Sp. R. 

Comment: Mostly history of the early missionary work in Oregon, thickly 
smeared with religiosity. This book would be valuable only to a person who 
was seeking definite information on the early religious history of Oregon and 
who was wise enough to disregard the hymn-singing that runs through it. 
PARSONS, MABEL HOLMES (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Listener's Room; Binfords & Mort, 1940 
Rec. Sr. C. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: A volume of significant and sensitive poetry by a mature artist, 
long associated with the literary life of the Northwest, and the English de 
partment of the University of Oregon. This poetry is characterized by intense 
spiritual moods, deep emotion, and swift, spontaneous reactions to life, finely 
restrained by a vital intellect. The poems are lyrical in feeling, personal in 
nature, and symbolic in expression. A distinctive collection of definite literary 
value. 
PARSONS, MABEL HOLMES (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Pastels and Silhouettes; The Stratford Co., 1921 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4. 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. This is the first volume of a talent still formative. Verses pleas 
ing rather than impressive. Workmanship capable. 

2. Flaccid verse on unoriginal themes unoriginally treated. One poem, 
"My Winter Garden," is good. 
PAYNE, DORIS PALMER (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Captain Jack, Modoc Renegade; Binfords & Mort, 193S 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: A sympathetic, well written account of the Modoc War of 1872 
which came from putting the Modoc tribe on the same reservation as their 
tribal enemies, the Klamaths. Guerrilla warfare, the calling in of United 
States troops, and the loss of many lives were required before its end under 
the famous Indian leader. Excellent bibliography. 
PEERY, WILSON KIMSEY (Washington; pr. res.): 

Silver Streams; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1936 
Rec. 

Grades i, 2, 3, 4. 

Comment: i. This is the story of a little Indian girl and the habits and cus 
toms of the Chinook village she lived in. It is too specialized for small 
children who would not appreciate the differences pointed out, or understand 
most of the processes explained. It is not very clearly written. 

2. Not always accurate in geography and anthropology, but probably this 
can be excused in children's fiction. There are XIV chapters of a fairly well 
knit story with emphasis upon Indian children. It is illustrated by Marion 
Ackerman. Locale, Lower Columbia River. 
PEET, CREIGHTON (Montana; fr. res.): 

Dude Ranch: The Story of a Modern Cowboy; Albert Whitman and 

Co., Chicago, 1939 
Rec. Grades 3, 4, 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7 
Gen. R. Men, Women 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 169 

Comment: i. A charming book meant for children but will also delight 
adults. It's the complete story In pictures of a dude ranch's colorful life. 
Excellent photographs of horse wrangling, saddling and branding. The little 
boy, who is interested in owning a cattle ranch someday, goes hunting for 
coyotes, mows alfalfa, and assists in roping calves. Wonderful corral scenes 
complete with all the rodeo trimmings. 

2, A story, interestingly told, of and for children, developed by means of 
many excellent photographs under which are short paragraphs relating the 
simple plot. Two small boys on a dude ranch conceive the idea of starting 
their own cattle outfit. The boys rescue the girl dudes whose horses have 
strayed away while the girls were picnicking. In return for this favor the 
girls later present each of the boys with a fine calf. Broncho-busting, roping, 
branding and many other features of the western ranch are touched upon in 
connection with the main story. 

PELLEGRINI, ANGELO M., and STIRLING, BRENTS (Washington; 

pr. res.): 
Argumentation and Public Discussion; D. C. Heath and Co., 1936 

Rec. Jr. C. Pr. Soph. 

Comment: An intelligent text for a first course in argumentation, it deals 
simply and unacademically with logic, emphasizes new forms of public dis 
cussion and the social implications of speech. Materials for thinking are 
prominent in the form of essays; there is a reduced emphasis upon public 
debate. It is free from esoteric terminology. 

PELTRET, EDOUARD: Four Hearts Doubled. See SAVAGE, GEORGE 
MILTON 

PELTRET, EDOUARD: Inside Out. See SAVAGE, GEORGE MILTON 
PELTRET, EDOUARD: The Nine Who Were Mother. See SAVAGE, 

GEORGE MILTON 

PELTRET, EDOUARD: Listen World- See SAVAGE, GEORGE MILTON 
PELTRET, EDOUARD: The Whoofenpoof. See SAVAGE, GEORGE 

MILTON 

PENROSE, STEPHEN BEASLEY LEONARD (Washington; pr. res.): 

Philosophy for Lowbrows by One of Them; Whitman Publishing 
Co., Walla Walla, Washington, 1941 

Rec. Tr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Here a well-known educator makes a plea for a greater use of 
philosophy in approaching modern problems. The term "lowbrow" he defines 
as being one, who, realizing that the world is vast, "wants to increase his 
understanding of it," Socrates is the best example of this type of mind. The 
themes in this collection of sixteen essays run the gamut from "persons and 
things" up to "God." Good counsel for the older as well as for the younger 
reader whom doubtless the writer had principally in mind. 

2. A book^of essays which serves to popularize a group of the more im 
portant historical concepts of philosophy without concerning itself too much 
with technical metaphysical, ethical, logical, or aesthetic questions. It offers 
good approach to these important problems for the mind not yet fully awake 
to them. 

3. This^ book contains essays on a practical philosophy for everyday living 
expressed in simple terms. It deals with such subjects as personality, man's 
end in life, reason and imagination, personal religion, and others. It is at 
tractively written for college students and should help them to find their 
philosophy of life. 



170 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

PENROSE, STEPHEN BEASLEY LEONARD (Washington;, pr. res.) : 
Whitman: An Unfinished Story; Whitman Publishing Co., Walla 
Walla, 1935 

Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A narrative, this book is based primarily upon personal obser 
vation and recollection since 1890 of the President Emeritus of Whitman 
College. Although primarily an account of the founding and growth of the 
college, the book traces, in its introductory chapters, in clear, readable style, 
early missionary efforts, especially of the Whitmans. 

2. A personalized narration of Whitman College from its inception to 
1934. It contains pure narration, historical sketches, expository materials, and 
brief biographies. Altogether it is a good picture of Whitman College, a 
smaller denominational school. 

3. A story of Marcus Whitman and Whitman College during the cen 
tury that has elapsed since the founding of the mission at Waiilatpu in 1836. 
It is simply told and well documented. A restrained but warm feeling is 
given to the narration by the author who was for forty years the president 
of Whitman College. 

PERKINS, PHIL H. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Gettin' Licked; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1934 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 
Comment: A volume of light verse capably done. Entertaining rather than 

significant. No literary value. Includes some religious pieces. 
PETERSON, MARTIN SEVERIN (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Joaquin Miller: Literary Frontiersman; Stanford University Press, 

1937 
Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Fact and fancy are hard to separate in the life of Joaquin Miller, 
because of the poet's numerous inconsistencies in recounting his life' sstory. 
In this volume the twisted threads are fairly well untangled. Miller emerges 
not as an eccentric but truly as a "literary frontiersman," thanks to the 
research of Martin Severin Peterson. 
PETTIBONE, ANITA (Washington; pr. res.) : 

The Bitter Country; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1925 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. Very effective tragedy, dealing with a settlement of Finnish 
lumberjacks in the big timber on the Chehalis River. It reminds one of 
Martha Ostenso and is almost as good. The dripping gloom of the country 
and the moody inhabitants grip the reader. 

2. Story of a Finnish and Scandinavian community on the Naselle River 
in Southwest Washington. The background of dark dripping forest, soil sod 
den with fogs and floods, and the sound of winds and waters dominates the 
story, which pictures well the Finns and Swedes of the district with their 
age-old race enmity, the newer feuds of lumberjacks and fishermen, gill- 
netters and trap men. The native fineness and artistic feeling and likewise 
the crudity and brutality of the life of these people is set forth. 

3. The fitter Country is a tale of a little river settlement in the Columbia 
River region, a harsh country, peopled by salmon-fishers and lumbermen, 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 171 

most of whom are Swedish and Finnish immigrants. It is a story of local 
color, told^ with sincerity and vividness. The people are real and the at 
mosphere is genuine. The plot is just fair. It is the love story of a Seattle 
teacher who finds happiness in her love for one of these stolid Finns and 
who eventually develops an understanding for the Finnish people. 
PHILLIPS, PAUL C. (Editor) : The Journal of John Work. See WORK, 

JOHN 
PHILLIPS, PAUL C. (Editor) : The Journals and Letters of John Owen. 

See OWEN, MAJOR JOHN 

PHILLIPS, PAUL C. (Editor) : Life in the Rocky Mountains. See FER 
RIS, WARREN ANGUS 
PHILLIPS, PAUL C. (Editor): Life on the Frontier (2 vols.). See 

STUART, GRANVILLE 
PHILLIPS, W. S. (Washington; fr. res.): 

Totem Tales Indian Fairy Tales; Star Publishing Co., Chicago, 

Rec. Jr. H. 7,8,9 

Comment: This ^ book of Indian myths and folk tales with a fanciful setting, 
and charming illustrations by the author, seems to me well suited to the lower 
grades of the junior high school. Much of the material is the same as that 
contained in Miss Judson's collections but the story element is more pro 
nounced, and descriptive bits about the local scene would, I think, have their 
appeal to young students. 
PILGRIM, MARIETTE SHAW (Idaho; fr. re*.): 

Alaska f The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1939 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: A concise but comprehensive history of Alaska designed particu 
larly for use in the schools of Alaska. Tells the romantic story of the develop 
ment of the Territory and outlines the living facts of its present govern 
mental and economic status. Designed for young student. 
PLOWHEAD, RUTH GIPSON (Idaho; pr. res?): 

Holidays with Betty Sue and Sally Lou; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 
Rec. Grades 3, 4, 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. Two little girls, neighbors and born on same day, go through 
year trying to decide which holidays are best and which months. A splendid 
story for children, well written and interesting. Their visits to "Grandma's" 
in the country give them wonderful times. Locale, town and country. 

2. The fun and adventures around the calendar year of two spritely 
little girls. 

3. A story of a year with Betty Sue, Sally Lou (seven-year-old girls), 
and Little Fat Grandma, trying to decide which holiday has been most en 
joyable. Each one decides differently. The illustrations by Agnes Randall 
Moore are a decided addition. Locale, indefinite. 

PLOWHEAD, RUTH GIPSON (Idaho; pr. res.) : 

Josie and Joe; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1938 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: i. Story of twins Josie and Joe. Josie, rebellious because of her 

sex, enjoys sports of all kinds: baseball, tennis, camping, Camp Fire, Boy 

Scouts. This book will be thoroughly enjoyed by children. Well written and 

entertaining. Locale, Middle West. 

2. The author of the Lucretia Ann series uses all her literary force in 



1 72 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

recounting the rollicking adventures of a tomboy girl and her brother. Junior 
Literary Guild adoption. 
PLOWHEAD, RUTH GIPSON (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Lucretia Ann in the Golden West; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1935 

Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Jr.H. 7,8,9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. A very good little book for all grades. Young children will 
enjoy having mother or the teacher read it aloud. 

2. Apparently a sequel to Lucretia Ann on the Oregon Trail, but com 
plete. An interesting tale of a nine-year-old girl and her cat, and their ad 
ventures with Indians in pioneer days. Grandmother Pettigrew's New Eng 
land philosophy permeates the book and links the East with the new West. 
Locale, Southern Idaho. m 

3. Lucretia Ann, her kitty, Benjamin, and her chum, Dimmis Greensleave, 
finally reach their land of dreams after their adventurous trip along the 
Oregon Trail. 

PLOWHEAD, RUTH GIPSON (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Lucretia Ann on the Oregon Trail; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1931 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 
Jr.H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. A story of the adventures of Lucretia Ann and her cat along 
the Oregon Trail and among Indians. Excellent juvenile, beautifully illus 
trated by Agnes Kay Randall. 

2. The adventures of a little girl and her cat crossing the plains by ox 
team to make a home in the Far West. An "Oregon Trail" book for children. 

3. The story centers around Little Miss Lucretia Ann Prence, who with 
her family and Benjamin, her cat, crossed the plains to Idaho. The hard 
ships they encountered are very well explained. One interesting incident was 
the leaving behind of Lucretia and her chum Dimmis and their experiences 
with the Indians until recovered from the desert by their parents. 

PLOWHEAD, RUTH GIPSON (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Lucretia Ann on the Sagebrush Plains; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 

1936 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 

Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. The concluding volume of the Lucretia Ann series contains a 
gold rush and an Indian scare, and is in many respects the most charming 
of all. 

2. The adventures of nine-year-old Lucretia Ann on a lonely Idaho home 
stead in pioneer days. Two half-starved prospectors stumble on her in the 
desert, bringing with them presents of gold nuggets and two burros and a 
great gold discovery. Lucretia Ann is adept at panning gold right on their 
own homestead. She is very generous with her nuggets and in a very secret 
way gets the realization of her most cherished dream. 

3. Children play a definite role in the early days and in this series of 
books, the author tells how the youngsters shared In the hardships as well as 
the joys of those who followed the Oregon Trail west. Lucretia Ann was a 
nine-year-old Idaho pioneer who did her part in bringing civilization to the 
western wilderness. 

POLLARD, LANCASTER (Washington; pr. res.): 

A History of the State of Washington; The American Historical 

Society, Inc., 1937 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Gen. R. Men, Women 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 173 

Comment: i. This history (first two volumes of the four) is excellent for 
both reading and reference. There are abundant illustrations and supporting 
tables and bibliographies. Volumes III and IV are biographical. 

2. Of the four volumes in this history, Mr. Pollard wrote Volumes I and 
II. In Volume I the history is traced in broad outline, from discovery to the 
present time. The infinite detail is interesting; even the brief explanation of 
the Chinook jargon is interesting. In Volume II the industrial and cultural 
progress are set forth in nine excellent monographs. 

POWELL, FREDERICK WILBUR: Hall J. Kelley on Oregon. See KEL- 

LEY, HALL J. 
POWERS, ALFRED (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Dr. John Mclaughlin; Oregon City Enterprise, no date 

Rec. Grades 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: A brief, simple account of the life and activities of McLoughlin, 
intended for young people. Easy reading. Notable for its clear presentation 
of the factors influencing the rise and decline of the fur trade. 

POWERS, ALFRED (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Early Printing in the Oregon Country; Portland Club of Printing 

House Craftsmen, 1933 
Rec. Sr. R. 

Comment: Only a limited edition of this was printed (500 copies). It is a 
nicely bound and beautifully printed little brochure giving a very brief 
picture of early printing in the Oregon Country. There is a very good picture 
of the^ Mission press, the first printing press brought to Oregon by the mis 
sionaries via Cape Horn. 
POWERS, ALFRED (Oregon; pr. res.): 

A History of Oregon Literature; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & 

Mort), 1935 
Rec, Jr. H. 7,8,9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Highly adaptable as a supplementary text in literature classes 
and English study groups, this survey of contemporary and Old Oregon 
literature is the most selective and comprehensive yet offered. Mature in 
viewpoint, discriminative in choice, copious in includion. Illustrative selec 
tions in both prose and poetry, with incorporated bibliography. 

2. A wide survey of literature with short selections and biographical 
notes. A weakness is the sometimes chaotic organization which does not give 
a good chronological view of the subject. At times the statements are not 
based on sound or thorough scholarly investigation. On the whole, however, 
a valuable source of information and unique in its field. 
POWERS, ALFRED (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Marooned in Crater Lake; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 

1930 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: Marooned in Crater Lake is the title story of seven tales dealing 
with the life and history that centered in the highways and old pioneer trails 
of Oregon. Since the human interest predominates over the historical, these 
stories have a special value in vitalizing and recreating Oregon's history. 



174 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

PRATT, LAURENCE (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Harp of Water; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1939 

Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: The poet of vital insight and strongly featured imagery in his 
Saga of a Paper Mill) in this new volume, Harp of Water > has 
"Let the chained heart and hope one moment go 
Crusading after beauty wander free ; 
Catch from poised stars a wide complacency 
Love's white, immutable glow." 

Lyrics of this volume are unique in idea, striking in imagery and diction, 
deep and fine. The poet reveals himself stirring and haunting the reader, 
"as the heart would," in lines such as these: 

"I seek white paths beyond the dawn, 
I build of winds my tent-house walls, 
I sleep where barren starlight falls ; 
Then speed, heart-hungry, on and on." 
Mr. Pratt is authentic in art and feeling. 
PRATT, LAURENCE (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Saga of a Paper Mill; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1935 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This is a sonnet sequence, narrating in portrait studies the charac 
ters and activity of a paper mill town in the Northwest. General quality of 
sonnets is uneven, mediocre to excellent. Subject matter significant; a genuine 
portion of the American scene, both beautiful and brutal. Possibly less suit 
able for high school use than for college. 
QUIETT, GLEN CHESNEY (Washington; fr. res.) : 

Pay Dirt; D. Appleton- Century Company, Inc., 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The whole colorful story of American gold-rushes is told in 
this chronicle of the unending search for "pay dirt." Lonely prospectors, 
hoping for a rich bonanza, wild frontier towns, fabulous strikes, gamblers, 
desperadoes, and entertainers, are all vivid details in this pageant of the 
restless gold-digger, ever searching for treasure. Locale, Western America, 
Canada, and Alaska. 

2. This is an excellent history and exposition of the discovery of gold, 
its mining operations, and life in the various mining towns. It is well writ 
ten, interesting, and apparently authentic. 
QUIETT, GLEN CHESNEY (Washington; fr. res.) : 
They Built the West; Appleton-Century, 1934 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The author presents a comprehensive survey of the building of 
the great Western railroads, their influence upon the growth of the principle 
cities, together with portraits of the farseeing men behind them. Has definite 
Northwest appeal. A large body of facts handled skillfully; presented with 
humor and vivacity in a clear narrative manner. 
2. This epic of rails and cities breathes with the turbulent power of 



NORTHWEST BOOKS I75 

frontier America. Rails pierce the mountains and river-gorges of the West 
and great cities arise, as if by magic, from the manipulations of aggressive 
buildersthe Huntingtons, Stanfords, and others. Quiett portrays the unique 
personality of each city in dynamic, journalistic style. The book is accom 
panied by extensive bibliography and index. 

3. Well written, though journalistic, interesting, sometimes entertaining. 
Not wholly free from historical error, but the spirit is right. A challenging 
introduction to local history, especially of the larger cities, to which even 
remote rural districts are tributary. Good illustrations. Locale, cities of Rocky 
Mountain and Pacific Coast states. 
RADER, MELVIN MILLER (Washington; pr. res.) : 

A Modern Book of Esthetics; Henry Holt & Company, Inc., 1935 

Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: ^ i. Mr. Rader has written a much needed anthology with an 
introduction and notes and includes excerpts from the writings of 31 writers 
on esthetics. No selection has suffered mutilation by removal from its original 
context. The book develops a basic and modern approach to the problem of 
beauty and stimulates the reader to do further reading and study on the 
subject. 

2. A^ survey of recent esthetics including no material published before 
1895, with two exceptions. All of the important contemporary esthetics are 
here discussed by those authors who gave them the clearest and most original 
expression. Some background in philosophy would be necessary for a com 
plete understanding and ease in reading such authors as Maritain and 
Bullough. 

RADER, MELVIN MILLER (Washington; pr. res.) : 

No Compromise; The Macmillan Co., 1939 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 
Sp. R. 

Comment: i. A scientific study of Fascism; its ideology, motives, and prac 
tices and describes the nature of the future clash between Fascism and 
Democracy. The book is based on the theme, "Democracy and Fascism can 
permit no^ compromise" and answers Mussolini's challenge. This book should 
have a wide range of readers for it is profound and illuminating. It is more 
than crisis literature. 

^ 2. An^ analytical study of Fascist idealogy and its inescapable implica 
tions, it is an attempt to show not only the weaknesses but also the inherent 
and positive evils behind its idealistic mask. With an acknowledged leftish 
bias, the author nevertheless presents a rational analysis leading to definite 
conclusions and pointing to future crises. 
RAK, MARY KIDDER (Montana; fr. res.): 

A Cowman's Wife; Houghton Mifflin Company, 1934 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The book is poorly written, but there is a certain charm about 
her manner that gives the mass of unorganized material an almost pica 
resque liumor. The author is an uninhibited ranch woman who has much 
of interest to relate and she writes with as little effort as she might rope a 
steer, even though she might not be an expert roper. 

2. Illustrated by the author. Long, somewhat tedious collection of anec 
dotes on the trials of cattle-raising in Arizona mountains. This, the first of 
the two books, takes the Raks from pre-model T days up to 1934. Can't see 
why a publisher should have brought out a second of these. There are no 



176 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

books more sincere, I suppose, but thousands more entertaining and moving. 
Has an element of provincial snobbishness. 
RAK, MARY KIDDER (Montana; fr. res.): 

Mountain Cattle; Houghton, Mifflin Co., 1936 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Interesting and colorful incidents of the life of a cattle-man 
and his wife. The style is not polished, but rather friendly and pleasing. 
A book for people who are interested in cattle-ranching and want to know- 
about the life at first-hand, without trimmings or exaggeration. 

2. Illustrated by Charles Owens. A long collection of anecdotes about 
cattle-ranching in Arizona in the present day. Disconnected and repetitious 
but genuine and clearly informed. The childless Raks raise cattle instead, 
apparently to no end but raising cattle and keeping a ranch together in spite 
of drought, wolves, floods, and a million other menaces and nuisances. De 
bunks the horse-opera idea of ranching. 
RAYSOR, THOMAS M. (Washington; fr. res.) : 

Coleridge's Shakespearean Scholarship} Harvard University Press, 

Cambridge, Mass., 1930 
Rec. Sr. C. Sen. Gr. 

Sp. R. 

Comment: This is a very scholarly treatise, dealing with the Shakespearean 
knowledge of Samuel Taylor Coleridge. As indicated by its content and 
approach, this book is designed for the mature scholar. In no way has it 
"popular" appeal. 
REA, ELLA M. (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Castaways of the Yukon; Meader Publishing Company, Boston, 1936 
Rec. No 

Comment: A highly colorful narrative of adventure in the North. The hero 
and right wins over adversity, nature and bad luck and marries the woman 
of his choice who is also under his guardianship. Mining and trapping con 
ditions are told of in the book. 
REA, ELLA M. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Mutiny on the Long Trail, and King Chinook; Binfords & Mort, 

1933 
Rec. No 

Comment: Both stories are highly romanticized and over-colorful. The first 
deals with a family and their hardships and experiences on the trail as 
well as when they first reach Oregon. The second is the early development 
of the adventurous salmon industry on the Columbia River. 
REBEC, MARY LOWELL (Oregon; fr. res.) : 

Poems; John Henry NasK Press, 1938 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Issued as a tribute of esteem for a truly fine personality, this 
book stands on its own as a volume full of sensitive feeling, honest percep 
tions, rich and deep living, and not a little of skillful poetic craftsmanship. 
Mrs. Rebec's lively interest in travel, art, people, ideas have enriched 150 
poems with much of genuine humanism. Her sentiments are not sentimental ; 
her emotions and her ideas are not borrowed. Themes are death, love of life, 
the earth and things growing from it, the sky, trees, people, their faces, 
voices, hopes, greatness and littleness, all seen with wise and tolerant gaze. 
The^ poet is not the victim of her own emotions nor the raw wills of others. 
While she made almost no gesture toward publication of her work, there is 
unquestionably some of the best Oregon-written poetry in the volume. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 177 

2. Vital and life-loving as she was, she had stored away in a woman's 
hiding places many delicate records of a fine spirit that saw life whole and 
steadily, and without too much resentment: its end as well as its beginning 
and its prime. Keen as was her love of nature, it was man and the works 
and tragedy of man that best aroused her power of penetration . . . the 
tradition and discipline that control the form of her writing represent some 
thing innate in her character. 

REED, DALLAS (Montana; fr. res.): 

Nor Time Nor Space; Dorrance & Company, Inc., Philadelphia, 1931 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A young architect learns the lessons of life from an old lumber- 
camp cook in Idaho who rescues him after an attempt at suicide. There is 
a lot of moralizing involved. The story is thread-bare but fairly satisfactory. 
2. This is a story of the trials of a Chicago architect who flees to the 
wilds of Idaho because of a misunderstanding in a love affair with a mar 
ried wpman.^ The highly melodramatic story, full of much easy nobility from 
a rustic philosopher, would probably interest readers of Lloyd Douglas 
and Co. 

REED, EDWIN T. (Oregon; P r. res.): 

The Open Hearth; Dorrance and Co., Philadelphia, 1927 

Rec. No 

Comment: Descriptive and inspirational verse of mediocre quality. A rather 
weak type of Rileyesque. 

REED, JOHN (Oregon; deceased): 

Insurgent Mexico; D. Appleton & Co., 1914 
Rec. Jr. H. 9 
Sr. H. xo, n, 12 

Comment: Sketches and essays vividly done of the Mexican troubles about 
1913-14. Francisco Villa and other well-known leaders move through its 
pages. It would appeal especially to older boys. 

REED, JOHN (Oregon; deceased): 

Ten Days That Shook the World; International Publishers, New 

York, 1919 
Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Oregon's contribution to the Russian Revolution. Writes the history 
of the uprising. Full documentation. Excellent source material. Most suitable 
for college readers who realize the importance of hearing both sides of the 
affair. 

REED, JOHN (Oregon; deceased): 

War in Eastern Europe; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1916 

Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: A war correspondent with an astounding capacity for adventure 
in^ Eastern Europe during the war. Theme of the book "The most important 
thing to know about the war is how the different peoples live; their environ 
ment, tradition, and the revealing things they do any say." Good, lively 
style. Good coordination with modern history course. 



178 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

REID, AGNES JUST (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Letters of Long Ago; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1923 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Gen, R, Men, Women 

Comment: i. Letters written from 1870 to 1886 by a talented English girl 
who married and settled in the Blackfoot River country of Idaho in the 

early days. .,,__,,_. j 

2. Letters written from 1870-1888 depicting the ^trials, hardships, and 
final triumphs of early pioneer settlers in Blackfoot River Country of Idaho. 
These letters are vividly drawn, full of human interest and pathos. Locale, 
Blackfoot River Country of Idaho. 

3. This book which reveals the deepest thoughts and emotions of a woman 
struggling to build a pioneer home in the Idaho desert is a poignant story 
of the early days, and Is told through letters written to her father in Eng 
land. It has a strong appeal, especially to women readers. 

REYNOLDS, HELEN MARY (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

In Our Back Yard; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1934 
Rec. Grades 2, 3, 4 

Comment: In Our Back Yard is made up of stories about the everyday hap 
penings In the lives of three small children. The stories are all very well 
written in simple, appealing language, and tell of events, close enough to a 
child's own life, that he may understand and enjoy them. Locale, any place. 
RIASANOVSKY, MRS. ANTONINA. See FEDEROVA, NINA (pseud.) 
RICHARDSON, RUTH ELLSWORTH (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Oregon History Stories; The Valley Printing Company, Eugene, 

Ore-, 1938 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 

Comment: i. This is a book of simply written stories about pioneers famous 
in the settlement of the Oregon Country. Personal incidents add interest to 
the stories of the stirring events and struggles of those early times. The first 
story is about Captain Gray; John Jacob Astor, Dr. McLpughlin, Nathaniel 
Wyeth, Grandma Brown, Dr. Marcus Whitman, Captain Bonneville and 
Jedediah Smith are some of the people described. 

2. A group of twenty-one stories about the early settlers of Oregon based 
on authentic facts. The stories are readable and would make excellent sup 
plementary material for the study of Oregon history. 
RIDDLE, GEORGE W. (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Early Days in Oregon; Privately printed, 1918 
Rec. Sr. H. 9, 10, n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: Another book on the early days in Oregon, written in a manner 
easily readable. Problems of Indians, emigrants, agricultural and Industrial 
development taken up* with emphasis placed on the pioneering spirit. 
RIPLEY, CLEMENTS (Washington; fr. res.): 

Devil Drums; Payson and Clarke, New York, 1930 
Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: An adventure story of outer Mongolia. The central figure is an 
American ex-soldier. Tale concerns intrigues of a band of Whites opposed 
to Reds and Chinese in attempt to dominate Mongolia. The chief incident is 
a treasure raid on the seat of a Chinese ruler. The action Is rapid, lively, 
and sufficiently thrilling. The description of the country and native life has 
an air of reality. The characters, with the exception of a Mongolian girl, 
the heroine, are not unusual, nor are they particularly attractive, but this is 
not essential to an adventure story. The American, who is somewhat crude 
externally, has the basic fundamentals of a gentleman. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 179 



RIPLEY, CLEMENTS (Washington; fr. res.) : 

Dust and Sun; Payson and Clarke, New York, 1929 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph, 

Comment: Good^ adventure story. The scene is laid in an imaginary Central 
or South American country. It concerns a young American college chap who 
goes out to work for his uncle's asphalt company and another American, 
World War veteran and soldier of fortune, who strongly resemble in several 
points the main character in another tale by the same author. There is also 
an engaging heroine, more engaging than the Mongolian girl in the other 
book. She is, of course, also an American. As is proper each hair-breadth 
escape leads to another, but everything turns out happily for the main char 
acters. While the frank profanity of two or three of the characters may 
perhaps^ shock the parents, and more especially grand-parents of the rising 
generation, yet I think any boy would enjoy this tale perhaps any girl and 
the basic code is sound. To me it seems superior to some of the stories we are 
now using, Beau Sabreur, for instance. 
RIPLEY, CLEMENTS (Washington; birth): 

Gold Is Where You Find It; IX Appleton-Century Co., 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Jr. C, Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A thrilling story of the California of sixty years ago, this re 
veals the struggle between miners and ranchers, between patriotic citizens 
and big-shot money-pirates. Incidentally, the development of orchards is 
shown. The story is stronger than the style in which it is told. 

2. This gives a fairly accurate and first-hand picture of life in California 
in the y yo } s and '8o's of the gigantic struggle between the miners and far 
mers in a vital phase in the early development of California. It is marred, 
however, by much swearing, cursing and references to immoral situations. 

3. A roughly told story using the language of miners and pioneers of the 
early yo's and presenting the struggles between ranchers and miners in Cali 
fornia during that period. The episodes are graphically, sometimes too 
graphically, described. The book would be of interest only to the general 
reader. 

ROBERTSON, FRANK C. (Idaho; fr. res.)t 

Clawhammer Ranch; A. L. Burt Company. New York, 1930 

Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph, 

Comment: i. Story of a young man, Ed Boyce, who struggles to retain his 
position as manager of Clawhammer Ranch against a gang of outlaws who 
wish to discredit him with the owners and gain control themselves. Much 
blood and thunder, but right prevails in the end against the lawless forces. 
2. A very readable "western" Good plot and much action, should thrill 
the youngster of high school age. 
ROBERTSON, FRANK C. (Idaho; fr. res-): 

The Pride of Pine Creek; E. P. Dutton and Co., Inc., 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A story centered around strife between cattlemen and a lumber 
company which was trying to establish itself on their range land. A good 
portrayal of the wild life of cattlemen and outlaws in the uncivilized west. 
Action high and human interest strong. 



180 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

2. This is a typical wild-west story in the traditional western manner. 
Since this story of "boy gets girl" through his efforts of discovering a valu 
able clue is clean, I would suggest it for high school readers. 
ROBERTSON, FRANK C. (Idaho; fr. res.): 

We Want that Range; A. L. Burt Company, Chicago, 1931 
Rec, Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. This is a typical wild-west story in the traditional manner. 
Since this story of boy gets girl through his efforts of discovering a valuable 
mine is clean and wholesome, I would put it on that list of books which 
youth seem to demand to satisfy that western urge. Locale, Magna, Idaho. 

2. A very fast moving narrative of the fight between the cattlemen and 
the sheepmen, with plenty of lawlessness and murders. Valuable only for 
the history of this time. 
ROCKWOOD, ELEANOR RUTH (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Books on the Pacific Northwest for Small Libraries; H. W. Wilson 

Co., 1923 
Rec. Sr. H. u, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sp. R. 

Comment: As far as this listing covers titles published to date (1923) the 
selections are commendably chosen, although somewhat restricted. Needs 
timely editing. As is, of some assistance to librarians. 
RODDY, IRVING GAINES (REV.) (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Paul Re fore Caesar from the Legal Viewpoint; The Judson Press, 

Philadelphia, 1936 
Rec. Sr. C. Gr. (Theology) 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Sp. R. 

Comment: i. This book is an account of the trials of Paul the Apostle before 
Felix, Pestus, Nero, and the Praefect of Rome. The background is legal, a 
complete explanation of Roman law being given. The religious subject, 
treated from a legal standpoint, is very interesting and illuminating to 
serious-mined adults. 

2. An ordained minister and a member of the New York bar examines 
the legal aspects of a famous case. The book is capably, but by no means 
brilliantly, written. 
ROGERS, THOMAS H. (Oregon; fr. res.) : 

Beeswax and Cold; J. K. Gill Company Portland, Ore , 1929 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: Here is the legend of the Nea-Kah-Nie and the Beeswax ship 
wrecked on the Oregon coast, retold with flavor and appropriate atmosphere. 
A mingling of history, legend, and fiction, with apparent desire for veracity. 
Very delightful reading, if occasionally faulty in diction. 
ROGERS, THOMAS H. (Oregon; fr. res.) : 

Nehalem, A Story of the Pacific, A.D. 1700; H. L. Heath, 1898 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: Another, earlier version of the Beeswax ship and the supposed 
treasure of Nea-Kah-Nie Mountain, told from the viewpoint of the hermit of 
Nehalem. Account has some flavor but not so well done as the later book. 
Probably unobtainable now. 

ROSENSTEIN, SOPHIE; HAYDON, LARRAE A.; SPARROW, WIL 
BUR (Washington; fr. res.) : 
Modern Acting: A Manual; Samuel French 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Gen. R. Men, Women 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 181 

Comment: i. This book presents a sifting and an amplifying of the out 
standing theories of Rapaport and Stanislavsky on acting. While it may 
be best used in a class with the teacher guiding, the style is so clear and the 
work exercises so usable that one working alone can also benefit from its 
study. 

2. Aside from its usefulness as a text, Modern Acting will be helpful to 
individuals who are denied the chance of high school or college. The book 
is brief, the explanation clear, and the exercises are abundant. 

ROSS, NANCY WILSON (Washington; birth): 

Take the Lightning; Harcourt, Brace & Company, 1940 

Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A psychological study of a psychologist and his wife and her 
former union without the law. The problem is solved but not proved. There 
is a wealth of highbrow debate and some fair conversation. The style (with 
so many mental cut-backs and reveries) may be confusing to some readers. 

2. Take the Lightning is a brilliant, psychological study of a modern 
woman who must choose between the past and the present, between con 
formity and non-conformity, between peace and torture. Nancy Ross draws 
widely on her knowledge of modern art, psychology, and philosophy. 

RUCKER, MAUDE A. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Oregon Trail, and some of its Blazers; Walter Neale, 1930 
Rec. Jr. H, 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, u, 12 

Comment: This is a collection of reminiscences and letters, edited by the 
granddaughter of Lisbon Applegate. Includes Jesse Applegate's "A Day with 
the Cow Column." Recommended for its human appeal and authenticity. 
Overland Trail and Willamette Valley backgrounds. 

RUSK, CLAUDE EWING (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Tales of a Western Mountaineer; Houghton, Mifflin Company, 1924 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: Ascent of the principle white peaks of Washington and Oregon 
Rainier,^ Adams, St. Helens, Hood, Jefferson, etc. was the constant objective 
of this inveterate mountain climber. A long life written in snow. Has appeal 
as a volume of reminiscences and information on mountains and mountain- 
climbing. 

RUSSELL, CHARLES M. (Montana; deceased): 

Back Trailing on the Old Frontiers} Cheely-Raban Syndicate, Great 
Falls, Mont., 1922 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. These reprinted articles have an informative value as they con 
tain sidelights on history and legend of the early west. Their value may be 
gauged by the contents: Discovery of the Rocky Mountains (La Verendryes' ) , 
Story of Fort Benton, Hugh Glass and the bear, Three Musketeers of the 
Missouri (igao's), Alexander Harvey, Kit Carson, Yellowstone Kelly, The 
Pony Express, The Fetterman Disaster, Chief Joseph's Capture, Gold Seekers, 
Texas Trail, Battles of the Crows. 
2. Like Rawhide Rawlins, very worth while. 



1 82 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

RUSSELL, CHARLES M. (Montana;, deceased): 

Good Medicine; Garden City Publishing Co., Inc., 1930 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, la 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Fine reproductions in color of Russell's illustrated letters to 
many of his friends. Introductions by Mrs. Russell and Will Rogers. Fine 
job of book-making. Shows diamond-in-the-rough character of Russell, and is 
first-hand information on the looks of the old west. 

2. A collection of many very human letters, amusingly and beautifully 
illustrated by the author, edited by his wife, Nancy Russell. Introduction by 
Will Rogers and biographical note by his wife. Russell's own spelling, punc 
tuation, and spacing have been followed as nearly as possible. Letters reveal 
man loved by all who knew him. 

3. Excellent source material for Charles Russell's character and accom 
plishments. Reproduced with misspellings and grammatical irregularities, and 
gives fine touch of local color. Part of illustrations reproduced in color. 

RUSSELL, CHARLES M. (Montana; deceased): 

More Rawhide; Montana Newspaper Association, Great Falls, Mont., 

1925 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A collection of eighteen sketches (chiefly brief anecdotes) the 
whole prepared by an informal cow man under the title of "A few words 
about myself." Some of the titles reveal the tone and contents of the collec 
tion: "Bullerd wolves," "Dog Eater," "Fashions," "Night Herd," "Ranches." 
Fully illustrated by the author in pen and ink drawings. Paper covered 
59 pages. 

1. This is a collection like "Rawhide Rawlins Stories" and follows them 
in time and fashion. It is a collection of cowboy and frontier anecdotes, 
stories, and personal reminiscences of Russell. Good rich lingo, and authentic 
in their setting, characterizations, and information. Illustrated in pen and ink 
by the author. 

RUSSELL, CHARLES M. (Montana; deceased): 

Rawhide Rawlins; Montana Newspaper Association, Great Falls, 
Mont., 1921 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This is a collection of stories, anecdotes, reminiscences, and 
expositions of cowboy lore and equipment. They are written in good rich 
lingo and are undoubtedly authentic in their information. Illustrated by 
author pen and ink. Not very well printed or bound. 

2. Interesting collection of short sketches and very interesting drawing by 
Russell. Told with his deep understanding and sympathy for the people of 
the passing "wild west." 

RUSSELL, CHARLES M. (Montana; deceased): 

Trails Plowed Under; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1928 
Rec. Jr. H. 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Gen. R. Men, Women 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 183 

Comment: i. A book of stones and anecdotes by the famous cowboy artist, 
prefaced with a fine appreciation by Will Rogers. The first sketch, The 
Story of the Co<w$uncher 3 is interesting to boys because of its discussion of the 
typical cowboy outfit. Copiously illustrated by the author. 

2. This book is Montana's own. Rollicking in the vernacular of the cow 
boy's delightful, exaggerated humor, pathos often subtly appears. Reflecting 
the frontier of the early days on the wide ranges of Montana, and illustrated 
as none but the author could do it. Intimitable picture of strong men in 
strong color. History! 

3. This is a deluxe edition of the stories and drawings published under 
titles of Rawhide Rawlins and More Rawhide, plus a few stories in the same 
vein. Introduction by Will Rogers. Illustrations in line and color by the 
author. 

RUTHERFORD, ANS WORTH (Idaho; pr. res.) : 

Bottle of Dust; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1940 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8. 9 

Sr, H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: Two boys embark on a search for a bottle of gold dust hidden 

years ago by a grandfather with a strange but wise slant on life. 
RUTHERFORD, ANSWORTH (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Hidden Island; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1937 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. A red-blooded out-of-door story of three boys who explore a 
mysterious wooded swamp and meet with strange adventures. 

2. A story of three boys' adventures in trapping and photographing wild 
creatures in their hidden island in the swamp. Interesting ways for boys to 
earn money suggested. Locale, probably eastern United States. 

3. A readable juvenile book appealing to hoys especially. Out-of-door 
story of three boys exploring wooded swamp and meeting with strange ad 
ventures. 

RUTHERFORD, ANSWORTH (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Sandlappers; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1935 
Rec. Jr. H. 7,8,9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: ^ i. In developing an irrigation project on a desert claim, two boys 
almost discover gold, become involved in a thrilling mystery and are tried 
for cattle rustling, and finally make good. 

2. A suitable story of Junior High a trifle absurd but readable. 

3. Two boys conditionally graduated from high school, must prove 
their worth before being sent to college. They do this in a first class way, of 
course, after overcoming many obstacles. Well written for youth. Locale, 
San Francisco and Northeastern California. 

RUTHERFORD, ANSWORTH (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Sguawberry Canyon; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1932 
Rec. Gr. 4, 5, 6 
Jr.H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, ii 

Comment: i. The story of two Vermont boys who have been chosen to 
accompany an archaeologist into Utah. They have many thrilling adventures 
as they clamber about some old cliff dwellings. Much excitement is caused 
when a cave crashes in upon one of the boys. They meet a kindly old pros 
pector who makes the party welcome in his old shack. 

2. A wholesome and interesting adventure story, centering around three 
typical American boys who set out to hunt Indian relics with a college pro 
fessor and a Western prospector. 



184 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

3. Three boys and a professor are pictured in a series of exciting events 
in search for relics in Squawberry Canyon. This is written in a way that 
will appeal to boys and give them some good ideas on how boys can co 
operate in an enterprize for the good of the group. 
RYAN, MARAH ELLIS (Idaho; fr. res.): 

The Bond Woman; Rand, McNally Co., 1899 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. A beautiful octoroon's work for the Union of the States 
guided by what is almost a monomania to bring justice to the negro race. A 
tender romance runs through this well-written, interesting plot with a clever 
surprise element. Locale, Paris and Southern United States. 

2. Rhode Larue, an octoroon, is sent abroad to be educated as a mistress 
for Kenneth McVeigh, to whom she belongs, She escapes, returns to the South 
during the war, as a spy. Kenneth falls in love with her and she marries him 
for revenge. This is a story of the "White" negro during slavery. It is well 
told, dramatic and very interesting. The picture of the South, the negro, the 
planter and the Northerner is good. While the relations between the slave 
and her master are plainly told, it is not as objectionable as many more 
modern books. 
RYAN, MARAH ELLIS (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Chance Child; Rand, McNally & Co., 1896 
Rec. No 

Comment: These stories are an attempt at "human interest," but the senti 
ments are false and the plots trite. The style is somewhat better than that 
usually found^ in books of this type, but otherwise there is little to recommend. 
2. Four stilted and fantastic tales of utterly unreal people. It is hard to 
believe that this writer could ever have known the reality and vigor that 
is Idaho. 
RYAN, MARAH ELLIS (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Druid Path; A. C. McCIurg Co., 1917 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 

Jr. C. Jr. Soph. 
Comment: A book of mythical short stories depicting courage, temptation, love 

of nature, etc. Only weakly recommended. 
RYAN, MARAH ELLIS (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Flute of the Gods; A. C. McCIurg & Co., 1901 
Rec. No 

Comment: A story of the early American Indians, their clans, primitive gods, 
and superstitious symbols. It contains some simple, wholesome philosophy, but 
in comparison to its length has little of human or literary value. The style 
is rambling, and the sentiment throughout tends to awaken superstitious 
feelings. 
RYAN, MARAH ELLIS (Idaho; fr. res.): 

The House of the Dawn; A. C. McCIurg & Co., 1914 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Or. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The story deals with the Catholic strictures in New Mexico at 
the time of the Spanish Inquisition. The atmosphere of the strange beauty of 
Indian tribal religions adds to a very touching romance. The severe punish 
ments of heretics and Jews contrasts with the gay dashing Spanish adven 
tures. 

2. Story deals with early Catholic missionaries in Mexico and sending 
missions north to Santa Fe. Chief characters, Tristan, Sancha and her cousin 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 185 

Juanito. Sancha came from Spain to meet her lover Marco. But going north 
to Santa Fe she became interested in the Indian worship and Tristan, their 
guide. In the end they were excommunicated and went to live with the 
Indians. 
RYAN, MARAH ELLIS (Idaho; fr. res.): 

A Pagan of the Alleghenies; Rand, McNally & Co., 1891 
Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A lofty and bombastic tale of the west suitable for high 
school students if it appeals to them, although it was obviously written for 
the more restricted youth of a past generation. 

2. The Papan, son of a highly educated father, is raised by the moun 
taineers with no education, develops the theory of the soul progressing by 
reincarnation. There is a lot of theory on this subject and good description of 
the country and people. 
RYAN, MARAH ELLIS (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Squaw Eloise; Rand, McNally & Co., 1892 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: i. A fanciful and unlikely story of an Indian woman. The style 
is somewhat bombastic, such as characterizes the author's other works. It is 
readable, and suitable for the student, though I question its probable popu 
larity. 

2. A story of the early settlements along the Columbia, tells of the effect 
the white civilization had on the Indians. The evils: drink, gambling, and 
inter-breeding, and the good influence of the priests, are brought out in 
Eloise the half-breed and her Indian mother. 
RYAN, MARAH ELLIS (Idaho; fr. res.): 

That Girl Montana; Rand, McNally & Co., 1901 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: A story with local color and a well complicated plot holding the 
interest to the end. Indians, mystery, gold rushes are all included to make 
the life of "Montana" appeal to men. 
RYAN, MARAH ELLIS (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Told in the Hills; Rand, McNally & Co., 1891 
Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. A story of frontier life and pioneering with good local color. 
Good for historical backgrounds. 

2. An entirely wholesome story of action and Indians the obvious plot 

of the gently bred girl and the rugged scout, told in the bombastic style of 

the nineties. Might be enjoyed by freshmen and sophomores if their literary 

senses were not too keen. 

RYERSON, FLORENCE: Angels Don't Marry and Other Plays. See 

CLEMENTS, COLIN 
SARETT, LEW (Montana; fr res.): 

Slow Smoke; Henry Holt and Company, 1925 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Serious, sometimes deeply feeling verses on outdoor themes. 
They reflect the author's experiences during temporary appointments as fish- 
culturist and park ranger in Montana and Wyoming. Not as good poetry as 
this writer's earlier work, but at least one poem, "Four Little Foxes," is un 
forgettable. For college students and adults. 



i86 _ NORTHWEST BOOKS 

2. Poems of the thing the author has seen and felt in his work as an 

employe of the Forest Service. The lines are well polished, but, more im 

portant, there is true feeling. This is poetry, fine poetry, for anybody who 

loves beautiful things. Winner of Poetry Society of America prize in 1925. 

SASSE, ALMA BENECKE (Washington; fr. res!) : 

The Mystery of The Chinese Box; Thomas Y. Crowell, 1939 
Rec. Gr. 6 

Jr.H. 7,8 

Comment: A story of hidden treasure. It is very light fiction designed pri 
marily for children. It is interesting, but the plot is very light and not very 
well constructed. 

SAVAGE, GEORGE: Cross My Heart. See McRAE, JOHN 
SAVAGE, GEORGE, and PELTRET,EDOUARD (Washington; pr. res.): 

Four Hearts Doubled; Penn Publishing Company, 193O 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. 

Comment: Virginia wagers her father's cashier will kiss her within thirty 
minutes. He does. Angered by his gullibility, the cashier leaves, resigning 
his position. Later, pacified by father, he and Virginia elope. Situations of 
scintillating humor and excellent character types redeem the inane moments 
in this frothy three-act comedy, sm., 4^7. One setting. 
SAVAGE GEORGE, and PELTRET, EDOUARD (Washington; pr. res.): 

inside Out; Walter H. Baker Company, 1931 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: To win favor with her fiance's family, a young heiress gains 
access to their home as maid. Her fortune surreptitiously shared creates false 
standards, which eventually give -way to conservatism. A wedding break 
fast terminates the masquerade. A living-room provides the setting for this 
wholesome but ordinary three-act comedy Am 6w 
SAVAGE, GEORGE, and PELTRET, EDOUARD (Washington; pr.res.): 

Listen World! Row, Peterson and Company, New York, 1932 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, 11, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: i. In this satire on the modern business world, Harold Howard 
becomes a financial c Boy Wonder" in order to convince his sweetheart that 
success measured only in terms of money is a grotesque mockery. Despising 
his role as a money-mad executive, he finally convinces his friends of the 
importance of the sunbeams and the rainbows. Locale, a prosperous American 

2. This three-act comedy is primarily for amateur production. In fact it 
was made by school authors for school use, and tried out and improved by 
school directors of school casts. There are full directions for actors and direc 
tor. Every phase of production is made clear 

SAVAGE GEORGE, and PELTRET, EDOUARD (Washington; pr. res.): 
YorfTl930 Mother; Row, Peterson and Company, New 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, la 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: i. Mother's supposed illness on Christmas Eve transfers the re 
sponsibility of preparing dinner to father, children and the guests. Chaos pre 
vails until mother discovering her illness is imaginary, takes charge amid 
general rejoicing This one-act farce is genuine, actable, and entertaining. 
Dmmg-room setting. 400., 4 w., i boy, i gi r f s 



tvnv ^ ] f gh * Me C ^f na i S fa r ce ' clever V Bitting on common foibles of a 
typically American middle class family. Suitable for -presentation by students. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 187 

SAVAGE, GEORGE (Washington; pr. res.): 

A Paragraph for Lunch; Row. Peterson and Company, New York, 
1933 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 

Comment: A play that could be easily acted by a high school group. There is 
but one setting and the characters would not be difficult to portray. The com 
plications concern the social ambitions of an inn hostess, the non-social host, 
and a group of artists. A rather simple plot but sufficiently active. 
SAVAGE, GEORGE (Washington; pr. res.): 

Parents and Pigtails; Row, Pterson and Company, New York, 1938 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: r. An entertaining plot presenting the trials of an everyday fam 
ily, each member of which likes to make his own plans. The complications 
arise when all of the plans are given on the same local radio program as a 
surprise to the other members of the family. The play is easily presentable. 

2. This comedy in three acts is full to the brim of hilarious situations and 
rapid action. The characters are within range of high school powers. Before 
publication the play was given performances in two high schools ; these were 
followed by revisions. 

3. A farce comedy in three acts; the story of a family with separate 
secret plans upon which the planners have set their hearts. This is a very 
actable play, up to the minute in ideas, and convincingly true. Both the 
characterization and the style are excellent. Locale, a western city. 

SAVAGE, GEORGE, and PELTRET, ED GUARD (Washington; pr. res.): 
The Whoofenpoof; Row, Peterson and Company, New York, 1931 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Comment: Wheeler Ketchell, home from college, blunderingly assumes the 
management of his father's newspaper. But Wheeler is like a Whoofenpoof 
a rare bird, songless, unamusing, government protected because it is so 
confused. After a series of laughable incidents the Whoofenpoof brings mat 
ters to a successful issue. This fast-moving comedy offers splendid oppor 
tunities for character acting. Locale, Montana. 
SAYRE, J. WILLIS (Washington; pr. res.): 

This City of Ours; Frayn Printing Co., Seattle, 1936 
Rec. Gr. 4, 5, * 
Jr.H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. ro, ii, 12 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Interesting and timely information; parts in story form, parts 
in columnist form. Newspaper style. It is of special interest to Western 
Washington, Seattle more particularly. Locale, Seattle. 

2. The birth and growth of Seattle. Of gripping interest to anyone whose 
home the city is. Should help youth be conscious of opportunities and obliga 
tions. Well written, helpful index. Pictures especially helpful in letting one 
realize the miracle that has happened here on Puget Sound. 
SCEARCE, STANLEY (Montana; pr. res.): 

Northern Lights to Fields of Gold; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1939 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men. Women 

Comment: i. An exciting and fast moving story of the Yukon gold-rush 
days. Much of the material is obviously personal experience, and carries a 



i88 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

great deal of interest and conviction. The writing is spotty sometimes tre 
mendously effective. An adventure story suited to most general readers. 

2. This is an autobiographical novel based on the author's experiences in 
Alaska at the time of the great gold rush. As a youth he left his Kentucky 
home and went north to seek his fortune. It is a narrative with little plot, 
revealing the adventure, hardship, tragedy and romance of this northern 
frontier. 
SCHAFER, JOSEPH (Oregon; fr- res.) : 

A History of the Pacific Northwest; The Macmillan Company, 1905 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: The best unified, most thorough of the briefer Northwest histories, 
this work is still a standard. Revised editions to 1926. A standard text ad 
mired by all historians. Well written. May be used with confidence in classes 
where a general summary of historical events is desired. Later development 
phases treated. 
SCHAK, AL (Montana; fr. res.): 

Soul Wounds; The Missoulian Publishing Co., Missoula, Mont., 1934 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. An attempt to show the brutalizing effect of war on a boy from 
Montana, hardly old enough to go to war. Written with sincerity and 
knowledge of the front. The characterization is weak, even of the hero, so 
the effect aimed at is really not achieved. The writing throughout is some 
what inept. 

2. A very personal account of what the World War did to a boy from 
Flathead county. It is a series of experiences and pictures, rather than a con 
tinuous story. It is very grim and even terrible in spots, and the feeling of 
truth runs through it. Not a book for children. 
SCHMOE, FLOYD WILFRED (Washington; pr. res.): 

Our Greatest Mountain; G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1925 
Rec. Sr. H. 

Comment: A complete handbook of Mount Rainier National Park written by 
the Park Naturalist at Mount Rainier. It includes descriptions of wild life 
of the region, both plant and animal, and of the natural phenomena of the 
mountain region. The book is beautifully illustrated. 
SCHMOE, FLOYD WILFRED (Washington; pr. res.): 

Wilderness Tales; University of Washington Book Store, 1930 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. These stories by a careful student and long-time dweller in 
nature's haunts are pleasantly told. The author is also the illustrator. There 
is a wide range of subject matter and a high degree of reliability. 

2. These sketches of wild life such as bears, wildcats, insects, birds, and 

sea life are appealingly told and tend toward a better understanding of, and 

more love for, animals. They show sympathy for wild life, and have a 

flowing style of presentation which would hold the interest of young readers 

SCHULTZ, JAMES WILLARD (Montana; fr. res.): 

Alder Gulch Gold; Houghton, Mifflin Company, 1931 
Rec. Grades 5, 6 
Jr.H. 7,8,9 

Comment: i. The usual encounters with Indians and desperadoes form the 
plot of this adventure story, the interest of which depends on the historical 
background of the Alder Gulch gold rush in 1863, the activities of the road 
agents and the efforts of the Vigilantes to bring about justice. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 189 

2. Adventure of a boy who accompanied his uncle from Missouri to 
Montana in 1863 and of their exciting life in a mining camp. They strike 
it rich, have a fight with hostile Indians, and robbed, have an encounter 
with road agents, and finally see justice done. Wholesome, straight-forward 
narrative. Some real characters. 
SCHULTZ, JAMES WILLARD (Montana; fr. res.): 

Bird Woman; Hough ton, Mifflin Company, 1918 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 3, 9 
Sr. H. 10, ii 

Comment: i. The story of Sacajawea as related by Hugh Monroe, early 
trader of the Hudson's Bay Company, who lived among the Blackfeet. The 
narrative begins with Sacajawea's later life and then goes back to her first 
meeting with Lewis and Clark and her subsequent journey with them. The 
style is simple but at times sentimental in tone. Illustrations by Lone Wolf, 
son of the author. 

2. I find it a favorite with junior high grades one of the best easy 
biographies dealing with Sacajawea. Popular and simple in style. Not always 
keeping the historical in mind, inclined to be a bit romantic and sentimental. 
SCHULTZ, JAMES WILLARD (Montana; fr. res.): 

Blackfeet Tales of Glacier National Park; Hough ton, Mifflin Com 
pany, 1916 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, 11, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Schultz returned to Glacier Park in 1915 after a long absence, 
saw many of his old Indian friends, heard them tell stories, retraced his 
steps over much of the park, and recalled much past history, particularly in 
connection with naming peaks and lakes, entertaining narratives, well told. 
2. Tales of all kinds, descriptive of Glacier Park and its many mountains 
and waterfalls. Many of the stories have to do with explaining the Indian 
names. Excellent photographs add to the attractiveness of the collection. 
SCHULTZ, JAMES WILLARD (Montana; fr. res.): 

Friends of My Life As An Indian; Houghton, Mif f lin Company, 1923 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A series of stories about Indian characters and Indian folklore. 
Of interest to young people and students of Indian lore. This author lived in 
close contact with the Blackfeet all his life and speaks their language. 

2. Further accounts of legends, stories and reminiscences of the Blackfeet 
Indians and their white friends whom the author knew, or heard of during 
his long association with the Indians. The book preserves the stories of the 
older generation of Indians who remember the early days of the West. Illus 
trated with photographs of the Indians. 
SCHULTZ, JAMES WILLARD (Montana; fr. res.): 
Gold Dust; Houghton, Mifflin Company, 1934 
Rec. Gr. 6 

Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Comment: i. The story of an old miner, Andy Nolan, who willed all his 



190 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

gold dust to a young boy, Dick Sargent, son of an Indian camp trader. 
Andy is murdered and Dick tracks down the murderer and recovers the gold. 
The Blackfeet Indians figure in the narrative and their life is realistically 
portrayed. 

2. Western adventure story, chiefly of interest to boys, well told, with 
plenty of local color. Time of early gold-winning days in Montana. Written 
in first person, supposedly by a boy. Some real persons introduced as charac 
ters. Episodes are realistic, not overdrawn. Slight element of mystery to add 
zest. 
SCHULTZ, JAMES WILLARD (Montana; fr. res.): 

My Life As An Indian; Houghton, Mifflin Company, 1906 
Rec. Sr. H. n, iz 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Over 400 pages of really exciting incidents that occurred to 
an Eastern youngster who came west for excitement. He actually lives with 
the Indians, learning their language and everyday lives. He has a great 
sympathy for the Indian and tells of their habits in an interesting fashion. 
Especially good for a reader interested in Montana Indians. 

2. Intimate and detailed account of the domestic life of the Blackfeet on 
the plains in the early days. Story authentic because author married into 
Blackfeet tribe and lived with them many years. Unusual understanding as 
to real nature of Indian revealed. Characters portrayed very sympathetically. 
Simple, straight-forward narrative. 
SCHULTZ, JAMES WILLARD (Montana; fr. res.): 

Signposts of Adventure; Houghton, Mifflin Company, 1926 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12. 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A list of the Indian names for the natural features of Glacier 
National Park, with short histories of the people and events for which they 
were named. An interesting book for those concerned with the history and 
lore of the Blackfeet Indians. 

2. To preserve the Blackfeet and Kootenai place names of Glacier Park, 
the author has listed them, giving the translation, origin, historical back 
ground, legends, ceremonials, biographical sketches and stories connected with 
them. Places not already named by the Indians were given names of promi 
nent Indians and their white friends. Illustrated with drawings by early 
western travelers, and photographs. Key numbers on a map of the park 
identify the locations. 
SCHULTZ, JAMES WILLARD (Montana; fr. res.): 

Sinopah, The Indian Boy; Houghton, Mifflin Company, 1913 
Rec. Gr. 5, 6 

Jr. H. 7,8,9 

Comment: i. This well written story of the boyhood of Sinopah is based 
on the early life of Chief Running Eagle, one of Schultz's Indian friends. 
It is especially interesting because it contains a great amount of authentic 
information on the daily life and customs of the Blackfeet Indians. Illustrated 
by E. Boyd Smith. 

2. Story from birth of an Indian boy in Blackfeet tribe to youth: training, 
pets, playfellows and their pleasures, escape from buffalo stampede, adven 
ture with mountain lion, finally his initiation into inner circle of the mosquito 
society, marking the end of his boyhood. Gives excellent idea of Indian do 
mestic life, customs, and legends. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 191 

SCHULTZ, JAMES WILLARD (Montana; fr. res.): 

Skull Head The Terrible; Houghton, Mifflisi Company, 1929 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. An interesting story of a young brave seeking revenge for the 
death of his father. He trails a faceless Indian through many camps and 
finally succeeds in ambushing him and avenging the chief's death. 

2. Skull Head, a Kutenai, has been horribly disfigured by a grizzly. No 
woman will have him. Embittered, he goes on frequent killing expeditions 
among the Pikuni and kindred Blackfeet tribes. The narrator is Bear Child, 
a Pikuni whose father has been killed early in the story by Skull Head. After 
much pursuit he kills the monster. Setting is Glacier Park region. 
SCHULTZ, JAMES WILLARD, and DONALDSON, JESSIE LOUISE 

(Montana fr. res-): 

Sun God's Children; Houghton, Mifflin Company, 1930 
Rec. Sr. H. 
College 

Comment: i. An authoritative account of the people of James Willard 
Schultz's adoption (the Blackfeet). The primary object of the book is to ex 
plain the religious ceremonies of the Blackfeet. To read about them is to re 
capture the days when men lived in wonder, 

2. Not a novel but a group of sketches of Indian life and customs written 
in simple, unadorned style. The most interesting part is Chapter VI with its 
description of the sacred tobacco rites. Unusually fine portraits of Indian 
chiefs by Weinold Reiss add greatly to the attractiveness of the book. 

3. Non-fiction. Colorful, intimate, authentic information concerning the 
Blackfeet Indians in the buffalo days. History, myths, rituals, and customs 
presented sympathetically without sentimentalizing. Material: first-hand 
observation, translations of stories gathered by the author from old Indians, 
and seprinted passages from rare historical journals. Winold Reiss illustra 
tions. For college students and adults. 

SCHUYLEMAN, JOHN L. (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

America, Its Destiny; Privately printed, 1935 
Rec. No 

Comment: An attempt to explain America's destiny through an interpreta 
tion of the Bible prophesies. 
SCOTT, HARVEY W. (Oregon; deceased) : 

A History .of the Oregon Country; Riverside Press, 1924 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Sp. R. 

Comment: These six volumes of Oregon history comprise material selected 
from Mr. Scott's editorials printed in the Portland Oregonian over a long 
period of years. While incidents and events are often thoroughly examined 
the assembled result is something less than an adequately chronicled account. 
Usually well written, personalized yet for the most part unprejudiced. Per 
tinent with first-hand facts and biographical sketches. 
SEELEY, VERNITA (MRS. PAUL STARK) (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Harmony In Interiors; Whittlesey House, McGraw-Hill Book Co., 

Inc., 1940 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Beautifully written, illustrated, and edited. Perhaps some ideas are 
too .expensive or elegant for the average person; but there is much that is 
practical and workable and could be used by anyone planning or furnishing 
a home. Part one deals mainly with furnishing a home ; part two with house 
plans. 



192 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

SHANNON, MONICA (Montana; fr. res.): ~~ 

Dobry; The Viking Press, Inc., 1934 

Jr.H. 7,8 
Rec. Grades 5, 6 

Comment: i. This is the story of a Bulgarian peasant boy who wanted to 
become a sculptor. With the aid of his grandfather, he was finally able to 
realize his hopes. It reveals many of the traditions, customs and folklore of 
the Bulgarian people. Miss Shannon's style is not only vivid but very color 
ful. The illustrations are beautiful. 

2. This unusual book portrays the simple daily life of Bulgarian peasants 
in a vivid and poetic style, emphasizes their customs and their closeness to 
the soil. The boy, Dobry, carries through his childhood the dream of becom 
ing a sculptor, and finally realizes ambition. Parts of the story are based on 
the experiences of Atanas Kalshamakoff, the illustrator of the book. Newberry 
medal book, 1935. 
SHELDON, HENRY D. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

History of the University of Oregon; Binfords & Mort, 1940 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Sp. R. 

Comment: i. Accurate and painstaking with occasional lively passages on 
student life. Controversial issues handled with consummate tact. Marred by 
careless proofreading. An excellent study in development of educational in 
stitutions, methods, and mores. 

2. Dr. Sheldon has written an intensely human document in his History 
of the University of Oregon. At times, to those who know some of the facts, 
Dr. Sheldon has shown remarkable powers of discrimination in presenting his 
material so that he has kept a steady, objective view unshadowed by per 
sonal bias. He might well be called a genius in achieving perspective on the 
history of the institution with which he has been so long associated. 
SHEPHARD, ESTHER (Washington; pr. res.): 

Paul Bunyan; Har court, Brace and Co., 1927 
Rec. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. Another collection of American whoppers; very few are those 
of Stevens' Paul Bunyan; some have no connection with logging but derive 
from Baron Munchausen. The author has collected them first-hand from 
loggers and relates them in the vernacular which is illiterate without being 
racy of the soil. The book lacks the humor, the extravagances and the gusto 
of Stevens' book on the same subject. 

2. These stories which center about the mythical hero, Paul Bunyan, have 
that indigenous quality which makes them authentic folklore of the North 
west. Their spontaneous, racy humor, their almost child-like simplicity and 
the swiftness of the action will make a strong appeal to high school students. 
SHEPHARD, ESTHER (Washington; pr. res.): 

Walt Whitman's Pose; Harcourt, Brace and Co., 1938 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 
Sp.R. 

Comment: i. Mrs. Shephard presents the thesis that Walt Whitman's repu 
tation as a "natural man, the working man's poet," is merely a pose, sug 
gested by a little known novel by George Sand. Although the book would, of 
course, have a very limited appeal, it should be of interest to students of 
American literature. 
2. The author has laid bare the important source of much that we have 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 193 

come to regard as distinctly Walt Whitman. She may be too severe in speak- 
ing of Whitman's pose because he did not acknowledge this source. 
SHERMAN, RICHARD (Montana; fr. res.): 

To Mary With Love; Little, Brown, and Company, 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A light book but well worth reading for the disguised acute- 
ness of observations on social changes among the rich and near rich during 
the depression, for the thread of fine idealism that runs through it, for the 
poignancy of emotion it carries, and the satisfying denouncement. 

2. A truly sweet love story told by the third side of the eternal triangle. 
The emotion is beautifully handled; the poignant longing of the author for 
Mary is nostalgic. This short book leaps the great economic change of the 
1929 crash, marking well its effect on its victims. Probably not great fiction 
but enjoyable. 
SHERRARD, DREW (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Roadside Flowers of the Pacific Northwest; Metropolitan Press 

(Binfords & Mort), 1932 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: In this small volume the wild flowers are grouped under six head 
ings: woodland flowers, meadow flowers, marsh plants, rock plants, alpine 
plants and dune plants. A distinctive feature of the book is a classification 
of the regional flora according to the highway sections of Oregon and Wash 
ington for the interest and convenience of travelers. It is written by a wild- 
flower authority in a refreshing style, with the text enhanced by four full- 
page illustrations. A book for wild-flower lovers. 
SHIELS, ARCHIBALD WILLIAM (Washington; pr. res.) : 

San Juan Islands; Empire Printing Co., Juneati, Alaska, 193S 
Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The author recounts an early attempt by the Oregon Territorial 
government to collect taxes from British subjects on San Juan Island, and 
the later "Pig Incident." Then follows a reprint of documents and letters 
exchanged between American and British representatives in the long "Oregon 
Boundary" controversy until its final settlement by arbitration. 

2. It deals with the settlement of the San Juan Islands in the early i85o's, 
their occupation, the boundary dispute between Great Britain and the United 
States and its final settlement by arbitration. Well chosen and interesting 
source material is presented in copies and copies of copies of letters (official 
and confidential), petitions, memoranda, and quotations from newspapers of 
the time. 

SICKELS, ELEANOR M. (Washington; fr. res.): 
In Calico and Crinoline; Viking Press, 1935 
Rec. Grades 6 

Jr. H. 7,8,9 

Comment: i. True stories of American women, living from 1608 to 1865 
are here given in story form. The style of writing is pleasing, and Miss 
Sickles is successful in creating the atmosphere of the period in a very satis 
factory manner. 



194 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

2. Delightful to the younger reader is this collection of biographical 
stories of pioneer women. The heroic part played by these early settlers in the 
history of our country is told of dramatically and entertainingly. The stories 
are identified in time and place by an explanatory paragraph which prefaced 
each tale. Locale, America. 
SIMON, S. F.: Labor Movement in America. See CLARK, MARJORIE 

RUTH 
SIMPSON, SAMUEL L. (Oregon; birth) : 

The Gold-Gated West; 3. B. Lippincott Co., 1910 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Of mediocre literary quality, although there are a few poems of 
good quality. One excellent lyric, "The Beautiful Willamette." 

SKIFF, FREDERICK W. (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Adventures in Americana; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 
1937 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Recollections of forty years of collecting books, china, glass, 
guns, furniture. It is a book that will delight collectors and many laymen 
because it has that rare quality of personal charm. 

2. This volume comprises a partial autobiography of the author, together 
with many adventures in the collecting of books and the buying and selling 
of rare items of Americana. Visits with authors related, affording book con 
siderable human interest appeal. Style generally fair. 

SKIFF, FREDERICK W. (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Landmarks and Literature; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 
1937 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Landmarks of Literature is a unique narrative written in the form 
of a travelogue. And it is really the author's study of the various persons 
of note, whom he met and visited with, throughout the United States. A free 
and friendly style such as we all enjoy. It is factual, picturesque, and in 
structive. 

SKILLERN, HELEN REGAN (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Flames from a Candle; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1938 
Rec. Sr. C. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men. Women 

Comment: i. Charmingly quiet and simple poetry, with a homely, popular 
appeal. 

2. Subject matter: Simple things of everyday life. Nature: home, children. 
Reveal author's idealism, faith in God, sympathy for f ellowman ; understand 
ing of suffering; appreciation of nobility of common task; love of peace, 
hatred of war. Imperfect in meter and rhyme, but poetic thoughts and well- 

. chosen words often beautiful descriptions. Book probably not outstanding. 

3. A book of pleasing little poems on various themes. Locale, Southern 
Idaho. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 195 

SLOAN, DONALD (Oregon; pr. res.): 

The Shadow Catcher} Doubleday, Dor an, 1940 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Jr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: An interesting and vividly written story telling of the natives of 
Manu's with their ways, religion, and background as well as relating much 
personal adventure of the author on the island. Title comes from his camera. 
Lived there and studied enough to make the book authoritative. 
SMITH, A. A.: The Story of Port Angeles. See LAURIDSEN, G. M. 
SMITH, BESS FOSTER (Idaho; pr. res.): 

The Checkered Tablecloth; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1937 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A wholly charming volume of the kind of poetry that has en 
deared Bess Foster Smith to her admiring readers. 

2. Poems of everyday life: home, family, friends, neighbors. Human in 
terest poems -clever, cheerful, friendly, whimsical, humorous, loving, pa 
thetic, inspirational. A book one enjoys reading, with a wholesome philosophy 
of living, love of home and friends, and a belief in today's living as the best 
preparation for life hereafter. Style and language simple and natural. Locale, 
Southern Idaho. 

3. More humor and sentiment than poetry. After perusing three volumes 
of poetry I should say that whatever Idaho has given to the nation, it isn't 
poets. 

SMITH, BESS FOSTER (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Sunlit Peaks; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1921 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. This is a collection of clever verse, although it contains little 
real poetry. Pleasant reading. It reflects the atmosphere of our scenery and 
conditions peculiar to our state in some beautiful descriptions. It is of especial 
value to the reader who loves our state and is interested in her literature 
more than in the student in school. 

2. Idaho grandeur of natural features settlers' life and experiences 
furnishes the theme for many of the poems. Many are expressed in true 
poetic style, are forceful and original. In some instances the subject matter 
is better suited to prose. Poems, on the whole, are inspirational in that they 
interpret beauty and glorify pioneer life. 

3. Ninety-eight Idaho poets, many of whom are little known, have poems 
chosen for their beauty and representativeness included in this first Idaho 
anthology. Its verse reflects the unsurpassed natural grandeurs of our state 
in exquisite pen pictures together with the staunch pioneer ideals and sound 
philosophy of life. 

4. The life and spirit of Idaho are reflected in these representative poems 
by the state's foremost lyrists. The volume contains characteristic verse of one 
hundred Idaho poets. 

5. The verse is of very uneven quality, stronger in sentiment than in 
emotion or technical excellence. It is wholesome, and inclines to conventional, 
but includes some pieces which reflect the country and the people. There are 
biographical notes, pp. 171-195. 

SMITH, GEDDES: Children of the Covered Wagon. See WARNER, 
ESTELLE FORD 

SMITH, HELENA HUNTINGTON: We Pointed Them North. See AB 
BOT, EDWARD CHARLES 



196 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

SMITH, SAMUEL STEPHENSON (Oregon; fr. res.): 

The Command of Words; Thos. Y. Crowell, 1935 
Rec. Jr. C. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This is an excellently organized, spritely book presenting the op 
portunities for enlarging the vocabulary and rendering the use of language 
more effective. 
SMITH, SAMUEL STEPHENSON (Oregon; fr. res.): 

The Craft of the Critic; Thomas Y. Crowell Co., 1931 

Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. An exceedingly readable volume, but one in which the promise 
of the title is not realized in the text. Instead of being about criticism it is 
about reviewing, a very different undertaking. It moves at a rapid pace and 
is packed full of fascinating chit-chat, comment, anecdote, generalization, 
and sound advice. As a revelation of the scintillating mind of its author it 
makes most absorbing reading. If those who read it could contrive to write 
their literary small talk (and class-room lectures) in the author's manner, 
there would be no question of their success. But Smith never gives away Ms 
secret, even though he tries honestly to tell us how a reviewer's job ought to 
be done, and illustrates what he says plentifully. I suspect that the formula 
includes natural brilliance, an all-retentative memory, the spirit of adventure, 
and the benefits of a Rhodes Scholarship in about equal proportions. 

2. The author's analysis of the psychological novel is the distinguishing 
note in this volume on creative processes in book reviewing and play review 
ing. Treatment somewhat sketchy and under-developed in parts, by reason 
of over-inclusion of subjects. Generally well written and stimulating. 

3. An exposition of critical method, written with charm and a deep 
knowledge of the art. Smith is an excellent story-teller, and part of his 
method consists in pointing through illustrative anecdotes. Some readers will 
find this method too subtle; for them, other, more pedantic, writers are to be 
suggested. 

SMITH, WALLACE (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Oregon Sketches; G. P. Putnam's Sons 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: Light human interest sketches of present-day Oregon Country types 
and characters. Depicts the wrangler, the hillsman, the coast dweller, with 
emphasis on the uncouth and unlettered. Somewhat factitiously written. 
SMITH, WARREN DUPRE and others (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Physical and Economic Geography of Oregon; Oregon State Board 

of Higher Education, 1940 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This is the most complete up-to-date compendium now available 
which covers the physical background and natural resources of the state of 
Oregon. Although it is scientific and primarily a reference book with no 
pretense at literary value, many chapters are suitable for textbook and gen 
eral reading. 
SMITH, WARREN DUPRE (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Scenic Treasure House of Oregon; Binfords &. Mort, 1940 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This book, presented in a popularly scientific manner, is easily 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 197 

assimilable for schools, chambers of commerce, tourists and all lay readers 
who wish reliable information concerning the scenic resources of the state 
and the geological background of each. Interspersed with colorfully vivid 
descriptions, it makes entertaining as well as instructive reading. 
SNELL, GEORGE DIXON (Idaho; birth): 

And If Man Triumph; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Tells of the heat, thirst, hunger, and hardships of the Bennett- 
Arcane party crossing Death Valley's trackless wasteland. The account has 
the life-like brilliantly-conceived characters ; the descriptions of the desert are 
superb; the author has given life and dramatic quality to what once was 
dry and undramatic in the original fact and form. 

2. Novel based upon the Bennett- Arcane expedition to California. Illus 
trated by Paul Clowes. 

3- .This novel is based upon the Bennett-Arcane expedition to California; 
the historical background has been developed with care, and the scenes are 
treated with a serious attempt at realism, but many readers will find that 
the character drawing is artificial. Snell is at his best when treating un 
pleasant scenes with stubborn honesty. At times this simple story of simple 
men struggling with the dangers of the frontier and the desert takes on 
almost the proportions of a saga. 
SNELL, GEORGE DIXON (Idaho; birth): 

Root, Hog, and Die; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R, Men, Women 

Comment: i. The author here tells of the fortunes of a Mormon family as 
the church gradually departs from its early principles of communism to 
capitalistic society. 

2. This is a realistic novel of some power, dealing with the story of the 
growth of the Church of the Latter Day Saints, their various settlements, and 
the decay of ^the ^Mormon people from their early principles in Utah. Consid 
erable attention is given to the problem of polygamy and the test oath, and 
the conclusion of the novel suggests that the church is no longer meeting the 
challenge of a new day. The novel is frank and many will find its realism 
unrelieved by idealism. 
SNELL, GEORGE DIXON (Idaho; hirth): 

The Great Adam; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1934 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Gripping story of Adam Bullhurst, a ruthless small town 
Western banker who rises to the heights of financial success, then is ruined 
by circumstances fostered by his own avarice. Locale, Idaho. 

2. Many would say that this is Mr. Snell's most powerful novel, as it 
was his first. It concerns the life of Adam Bullhurst, small-town banker and 
local financial bully, whose greed and lust for power ruins his own life, and 
the lives of others in a little Idaho village. The book contains a vivid picture 
of a western town and its people, and of some of the less admirable aspects 
of the social organization accompanying the Church of the Latter Day Saints. 
Devout members of that church are likely to consider it unfair; no one can 
deny that it is a powerful indictment. 



198 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

SPARROW, WILBUR: Modern Acting: A Manual See ROSENSTEIN 

SOPHIE 
SPECTOR, IVAR (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Golden Age of Russian Literature; Tke Scholastic Press, Inc., 

Los Angeles, 1939 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. This book is valuable both for reading and for reference. Be 
sides biography and criticism, there are plots of novels and plays. Some of 
the authors treated are Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, 
Tchekhov, Gorky. 

2. This book contains concise biographies, analyses, criticisms, and illus 
trations of thirteen of Russia's most outstanding writers and their works. The 
author shows the close relationship of Russian literature to her political, 
social and religious problems, the latter having been the subject matter used 
by these writers of Russia's classical age. 

SPERLIN, O. B., and MILES, CHARLES (Washington; Miles, birth; 

Sperlin, pr. res.) 

Building a State: Washington 1889-1930; Pioneer, Inc., Tacoma, 
1940 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Jr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Produced by the Washington State Historical Society to mark 
the Golden Jubilee of statehood, this authoritative volume is indispensable 
for all schools, and for libraries, public and private. A large number of ex 
perts have written with a view to serving the State, and they have in nearly 
all of the thirty-one chapters written interestingly. 

2. The history of the fifty years of statehood is told by fifty different 
contributors, most of them being specialists in their fields. They have at 
tempted to represent the State as it entered the Union, and the progress that 
has resulted in the State in 1939, as it was in the Golden Jubilee year 
SPERLIN, OTTIS BEDNEY (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Heart of the Skyloo; The Metropolitan Press (Binfords & 

Mort), 1934 
Rec, Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. In a singularly beautiful Indian romance of early Oregon, 
Wenona, lovingly called "The Heart of the Skyloo," forsakes her betrothed 
and devotes her life to administering to the innumerable wants and needs of 
her people. Inspired by the faith of David Thompson, the explorer, Wenona 
helps to bring Christianity to the wandering Skyloo. 

2. Much Indian lore and history of the coming of the white man into the 
Northwest are presented through the story medium in this tale of a Skyloo 
Indian girl, Winona, who, a convert to Christianity, gave her whole life to 
serving her people. The sympathetic style of writing is appealing. 
SPERLIN, OTTIS BEDNEY (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Studies in English-World Literature; The Century Company, 1923 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Three hundred selections, old and new, from classical literature 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 199 

comprise this slender anthology. A comprehensive survey of various types of 
literature from America, England, Canada, Ireland, Scotland, Australia, 
New Zealand, South Africa, and India, has been arranged for the pleasure 
of the general reader, or for careful study by the high school student. 

2. This anthology contains selections not only from the usual British 
sources but also from authors in other parts of the Empire: Canada, Austra 
lia, New Zealand, South Africa, and India. This fact, coupled with the con 
sidered selection of the editor, makes it an unusual anthology. Along with 
the traditional, something like one hundred modern authors are represented. 
SPLAWN, ANDREW JACKSON (Washington; fr. res.): 

Kamiakim: the Last Hera of the Yakimas; Kilham Stationery & 

Printing Co., Portland, Ore., 1927 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: The title of the book is misleading. While part of it is about the 
great Indian chief, Kamiakim, the story is really that of the experiences of 
the author in pioneer days in Washington, including his part in the Indian 
wars of the iSso's. Rather poorly written in places but nevertheless inter 
esting. 
STARBUCK, EDITH (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Crossing The Plains; Southern Publishing Association, Nashville. 

Ten., 1927 
Rec. Jr. H. 7,8,9 

Comment: A romance of old Oregon the experiences crossing the plains and 
pioneering in a new territory. A history of Oregon in story form. Good style. 
STARR, FREDERICK (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Confucianism; Convici-Friede, 1930 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: A simple presentation of the development of modern Confucianism 
The author explains how the system of ethics founded by Confucius has been 
altered to its present form by some half-dozen men. Students of philosophy 
will find this book interesting. 
STARR, FREDERICK (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Fujiyama, The Sacred Mountain of Japan; Covici-Magie Co., 1924 
Rec, Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: While the book is an account of several ascents of Mount Fuji, 
one's chief interest in it is in the poetry, religion, attitude of the Japanese 
toward their mountain, their art, and folklore associated with Fujiyama. 
STEINER, JESSE FREDERICK (Washington; pr. res.): 

Americans at Play; McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1938 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. A study of the important changes taking place in the field of 
recreational activities and their relation to the whole social and economic 
structure. It is an attempt to study the direction of this movement, and is 
largely a statistical report. 

2. Americans at Play is a monograph embodying scientific information on 
the development of recreational activities in the United States. Particular 
emphasis is placed on recent progress in recreation and on indications of 
present trends. Well documented by statistical tables and biographical notes, 
the study is comprehensive and scholarly. 
STEPHENS, LOUISE G. (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Letters From an Oregon Ranch; A. C. McClurg & Co., 1905 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, 11, iz 
Comment: Rather than ordinary letters, these chapters are a round-the-year 



200 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

description of Oregon ranching as it was at the opening of this century. 
Entertaining, easy reading, told from a woman's viewpoint. Homely, rather 
than robust. Cultural in approach, in place of indigenous. 
STEPHENSON, DELIA DEIRDRE (Washington; pr. res.): 

Dog of the Pioneer Trail; Binfords & Mort, 1937 
Rec. Grades 5, 6 

Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: In this story, we have the true and accurate account of the wagon 
train of 1842, the first of any size to cross the plains. Through its pages 
march heroic characters Dr. Ilijah White, Lansford Hastings, Thomas 
Fitzpatrick, Joe Meek, the Whitmans, the McLoughlins as seen through 
the young eyes of Abby and Abner. But from start to finish, the greatest hero 
of them all is Shep, the Collie dog. Highly entertaining yet instructive 
reading. 

STEPHENSON, DELIA DEIRDRE (MORRIS). Pseuds. RHODA MOR 
RIS, RHODA NELSON (Washington; pr. res.): 
Bad Penny; Little, Brown and Company, 1937 
Rec. Grades 5, 6 

Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 , 

Comment: i. This is an excellent book for the intermediate or upper grades, 
It deals with Indian life about 1850 in Western Washington, with the early 
life amongst the pioneer, and with their relations to each other. Bad Penny 
is a young Indian Princess who becomes the heroine or central character. 
Well Written. 

2. Bad Penny is the story of the early settlers around Seattle, and of Pine 
Lily, the daughter of an Indian Princess and a French trapper, who was 
taken in and cared for by a white family. It is very well written, and por 
trays the true feeling between the Indians and the whites. 

STEPHENSON, DELIA DEIRDRE (MORRIS). Pseuds. RHODA MOR 
RIS, RHODA NELSON (Washington; pr. res.): 
Sun Bird; Little, Brown and Company, 1936 
Rec. Grades 5, 6 

Jr. H. 7,8 

Comment: i. Sun Bird, a little white girl, is saved from freezing to death, 
and is cared for by an Eskimo boy and his sister. The plot of the story is 
very well developed, with much action, and with realistic descriptions of the 
habits, customs and superstitions of people in the frozen north. Locale, Sibe 
rian coast. 

2. Another of Miss Morris' well written books for children. It is instruc 
tive and entertaining. Chief character is Sun Bird, a white girl from the 
U. S. The book deals largely with Eskimo life, their superstitions, customs, 
etc. All of this is hung upon a skeleton story. 

STIRLING, BRENT: Argumentation and Public Discussion. See PELLE 
GRINI, ANGELO M. 
STERNBERG, CHARLES H. (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Life of a Fossil Hunter; Henry Molt & Co., 1909 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: A concise and informative story of the life and works of Charles 
H. Sternberg (Geologist), and his discoveries. A description of fields studied 
and comparisons. Illustrations of valuable specimens. Author relates diffi 
culties encountered getting public to see value of studies. Northwest back 
ground. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 201 

STEVENS, JAMES F. (Washington; fr. res.): 
Brawny man; Alfred A. Knopf, 1926 

Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Life of a migratory laborer, team-hand, teamster, lumberjack, mill- 
hand. A human, lifelike story of an illiterate, clean, wholesome, brawny 
laborer, giving a clear picture of his appetites, desires, and development. The 
ideas do not rise above the animal level, but it is a healthy animal. The 
language used is appropriate to the character portrayed. 
STEVENS, JAMES F. (Washington? fr. res.): 

Homer In the Sagebrush; Alfred A- Knopf, 1928 
Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: A book of short stories of lumberjacks, freighters, longshoremen, 
steamboat pilots, miners, cowhands, fishermen, sawmill hands, etc., with 
scenes laid in saloons, dance halls, and on the job, but most frequently at the 
bar where the drinks are being set up. The tales have to do with the fights, 
drinking, gambling and labor of these brutal, profane, hairy, vigorous, 
swearing, battling, drunken, brawny men. They have an indisputable air 
of reality and rather less of exaggeration than some of the author's other 
tales. There are also those sly touches of satire which add a gleam of humor. 
Personally I am inclined to rate this as Stevens' best piece of work. 
STEVENS, JAMES F. (Washington; fr. res.): 

Mattock; Alfred A. Knopf, 1927 
Rec. Sr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Realistic tale of life behind the lines of Private Parvin Mattock, 
Kansas farm boy, partly lout and callow boy, partly sneak, hypocrite, coward 
and cad, in short, a thoroughly cheap individual. The seamy side of life 
in barracks, and a French village is shown. There is no war glory or gla 
mour to this. As in others of the author's books, the narrator rises to elo 
quence chiefly over eating. 
STEVENS, JAMES F. (Washington; fr. res.): 

The Saginaw Paul Bunyan; Alfred A. Knopf, 1932 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. Paul Bunyan stories from the Michigan woods, told with more 
conscious literariness than his earlier tales. Good in that the imagination 
expands of itself throughout the stories. The "tallness" of the tales is prodi 
gious. In the preface, Mr. Stevens explains, defend his method of preserving 
this legendary material. 

2. Tales of the legendary hero of the logging camps, marked by extreme 
is a poetic element in some of the descriptions. The tales, which belong to 
exaggeration, a smiling humor, occasional touches of irony or satire. There 
the genus of the great American whopper, are nevertheless recounted with 
an air of naivete and earnestness, which lends charm. 
STEVENSON, ELMO N. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Nature Rambles in the Wallow as; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & 

Mort), 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. An excellent introduction for the visitor to the region. A con- 



202 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

cise account of the geology, fish, bird and animal life, and the flora of moun 
tain and plain based on the personal observations of the author^ 

2. A welcome addition to Oregoniana, clearly, appreciatively, and in- 
formingly presenting the mountain and lake district of the Wallowas, with 
enumerata of geology, fauna and flora of much interest. ^ A history in essen 
tial features of a greatly beautiful and geologically significant district writ 
ten by an author who has studied details at first hand and with personal 
enthusiasm. The book also, by way of appendix, affords valuable listings of 
Birds, Mammals, Reptiles, Flowers, Broad-leafed and Needle-bearing Trees, 
and a Key to the Common Rocks. Photographic illustrations. 
STEWART, GEORGE (Idaho; fr. res.): 

/ Met Them Once; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1940 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Comment: The reminiscences of a celebrated author whose life and travels 

brought him many strange and significant acquaintances. 
STEWART, GEORGE (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Reluctant Soil; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A novel of courageous, purposeful living the struggle of a 
young widow to provide for herself and children on an early homestead in 
Idaho's Payette Valley. 

2. This is the story of Jane's effort to wrest life and beauty from the 
soil, a story in which a section of Idaho, and a sort of Idaho people come 
vividly to life. Stewart, a former Payette rancher, knows the land and the 
people of which he writes, and treats them sympathetically if objectively. 
STIRLING, BRENTS: Argumentation and Public Discussion. See PELLE 
GRINI, ANGELO M. 
STONE, ARTHUR L. (Montana; pr. res.): 

Following Old Trails; Missoulian Publishing Co., Missoula, Mont., 

1913 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A collection of editorials that appeared in the Sunday Missou 
lian over a long period. The style is journalese rather than artistic. The 
subject matter is the old trails of the west and what you see when you follow 
them whom you meet, etc. An interesting collection of research. 

2. A journalistic review of the history of western Montana, gathered 
from some of the last pioneers. It concerns itself with fine descriptions of 
early forts and missions and missionaries as well as Indian life, early ex 
plorations, and mining activities. Our of print. 
STOWALL, DENNIS H. (Oregon; deceased): 

Heart of the Valley; Priv. Print, at Corvallis, Oregon, 1899 
Rec. No 
Comment: A slim volume of very slight stories and mediocre verses. Some 

quality in the former but the whole lacks any real value. 
STOWALL, DENNIS H. (Oregon; deceased): 

The Spell of the Shang Karribu and Other Stories; The Standard 
Publishing Company, Cincinnati, 1921 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: An excellent collection of stories for boys. Exciting adventures of 
the ranch, the trail, and the woods of early Oregon and the western country 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 203 

make up the tales. The author has also drawn upon historical material which 
is vividly retold. Character interest, swiftness of action, and a good style 
give the stories vitality. 
STOWALL, DENNIS H. (Oregon; deceased): 

Suzanne of Kerbyville; The Editor Publishing Co., New York, 1904 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: One of the most widely recognized of early Oregon novels, this 
still remains a curiosity piece of some appeal. A gold-fever Western with 
scene laid in the Illinois Valley of Southwestern Oregon, Told from a nos 
talgic removal; moral and highly romantic in treatment. Has charm despite 
its falsity of plot. Probably unobtainable. 
STRAHAN, KAY CLEAVER (Oregon; deceased): 

The Desert Lake Mystery; The Bobbs-Merrill Co., 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: An interesting mystery story written in a lightsome vein, carefully 
worked out as to motive and sequence of events. Good characterization. The 
scene of the crime (which consists of four deaths occurring in rather rapid 
succession) is well set in a private camp on the shores of a Lake Memaloose 
(meaning death) in the middle of a Nevada desert. The author has thought 
out the setting carefully and has used the chief factor, that of isolation, to 
good advantage. Would appeal most to those who like their mysteries enter 
taining rather than horrifying, who prefer action with an occasional surprise 
turn in the sequence of events rather than too much theorizing over motives 
and so forth. 
STRAHAN, KAY CLEAVER (Oregon; deceased): 

Footprints; Doubieday, Doran and Co., 1931 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This is a mystery story with an Oregon background. There is an 
attempt to make it psycho-analytical. Recommended for adults, since the plot 
and the characters have nothing inspiring or developing for younger readers. 
Has no class-work value. 
5TRAHAN, KAY CLEAVER (Oregon; deceased) : 

The Hobgoblin Murder; Bobbs-Merrill Co., 1934 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Mrs. Strahan's detective stories deal with people not merely 
pawns are ingenious in plot, fair with the reader in the matter of clues, 
well enough written. This denouement is particularly clever Try to guess it! 
STRAHAN, KAY CLEAVER (Oregon; deceased): 

The Meriwether Mystery; Doubleday, Doran Co., 1932 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: "Who stooped to kiss the dead man . . . Why was there a knife 
found in the yard if a pistol was thrown from a window . . . Why bother 
to smash a xylophone to bits?" Real characterization, clever clues, good writ 
ing (even if the beginning is a bit exasperating) deftly withheld solution. 
STRAHAN, KAY CLEAVER (Oregon; deceased): 

Oh Happy Youth; Doubleday, Doran & Co., 1931 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. The problems and good times of three girls reared by their 
grandparents, is the theme of this novel. Good story. Drags in places. Scenes 
laid in Portland. 

2. Popular type of novel. Characters apt to be caricatures no half-tones. 
No significance. 



204 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

STRAHAN, KAY CLEAVER (Oregon; deceased): 
October House; Douhleday, Doran & Co., 

Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Thrilling story of a group of people who live in an atmosphere of 
fear and discontent. One of the persons is the victim of a murder. The reader 
is very much mystified until Lynn Macdonald, a detective, solves the mystery 
and all its details. Lacks any real worth. 
STRONG, ANNA LOUISE (Washington; fr. res.): 

China's Millions; Coward, 1928 
Rec. Sr. H. 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr, C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: This is an account of the author's visit to Hankow, and surround 
ing provinces during revolutionary troubles in 1927. After a sojourn in these 
provinces, she goes westward with Borodin across the Mongolian desert and 
returns by way of Siberia to Europe. Her experiences in interior China are 
also recorded. The style of the book is journalistic. The author is strongly 
sympathetic with communist Russia and with the Chinese revolutionary 
movement. This sympathy no doubt colors her work. The work may cease 
to have any value in a few years. At the present time, however, it should be 
read with much interest by college and some high school students for the his 
torical material it contains. 
STRONG, ANNA LOUISE (Washington; fr. res.): 

The First Time in History; Boni and Liveright, 1924 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: Deals with the communistic movement in Russia from August, 
1921, to December, 1923. Enthusiasm for communist point of view, but clear 
statement of drawbacks. Various phases of economic situation dealt with, also 
that of alcohol, church, revolution, Jewish influence, education. Written in 
rather chatty, readable style. Several chapters are reprinted from Hearst's 
International Magazine, which Miss Strong represented in Russia. Literary 
value medium. 

STRONG, ANNA LOUISE (Washington; fr. res.): 
/ Change Worlds; Henry Holt and Co., 1935 
Rec. Sr. C. Sr. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A sincere account of the author's acceptance of the principles 
of Communistic Russia, this "personal history" would have only a limited 
appeal at present. Because of its merits, I am recommending it, but with my 
fingers crossed. Many communities today would object to having the book on 
the shelf of a school or perhaps even a public library. Locale, the United 
States and Russia. 

2. An objective autobiography of an American woman who has renounced 
the individualized and competitive society of capitalism for the collectivized 
and planned society of socialism. The book is written in a convincing style 
and is informative as to the economic, ethetical, and social life of the Soviet 
Union in the year of 1935. 
STRONG, ANNA LOUISE (Washington; fr. res.): 

My Native Land; The Viking Press, 1940 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: r. The author raises and discusses vital questions, inferring that 
the era of exploitation of common resources by private monopoly may not 
be over. She gives clearly drawn pictures of many States, usually not com 
plimentary. 
2. An entertaining and vigorous presentation of vital economic and politi- 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 205 

cal problems of the day. The Grand Coulee is considered, with this conclu 
sion: "Coulee is either the greatest piece of loot in American history or the 
world's greatest coming citadel of people's power." 
STRONG, ANNA LOUISE (Washington; fr. res.): 

The Road to the Grey Pamir; Little, Brown and Co., 1931 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Cr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: An account of the author's journey into the heart of the Pamir 
Mountains, bleak, desolate wastes, altitude about 13,000-14,000 feet. With 
description of the scenery and the difficulties of the journey, an account is 
given of the nomadic life of the Kirghiz tribes and of the activities of the 
Soviet Union in this remote region. 
STRONG, SYDNEY (Washington; fr. res.) : 

The Rise of American Democracy: the Records Assembled and 

Annotated; Wilson-Erickson, Inc., 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This is a new treatment of American history, an attempt to create 
an American Bible or book of American Scriptures. Its divisions are Ameri 
can Annals, Laws, Songs, Words of Wisdom, American Prophets. It is a 
compilation, but not what we usually call an anthology. Much well selected 
and well arranged material. 
STRONG, THOMAS NELSON (Oregon; deceased): 

Cathlamet on the Columbia; Holly Press, Portland, Ore., 1906; 

Binfords & Mort, 1930 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: These recollections of early pioneer and Indian life on the lower 
Columbia River by a man who knew them both intimately have the charm 
and authenticity of personal observation and knowledge. The subject-matter 
of the book will make it appealing to students of any age, who cannot fail to 
appreciate also its quiet simplicity. 
STUART, GRANVILLE (Montana; deceased): 

Forty Years on the Frontier as Seen in the Journals and Reminis 
cences of Granville Stuart t Gold-Miner, Trader, Merchant, Ranch 
er, and Politician. Ed. Paul C. Phillips; The Arthur H. Clark Com 
pany, 1925 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: These volumes give much valuable material on the early history 
of Montana. Granville Stuart was an unusual pioneer. His exceptional 
powers of observation coupled with a talent for literary expression, makes 
his Journal one of the most readable of pioneer narratives. Covers the period 
from Stuart's first arrival in Montana in 1857 to the passing of the cattle 
range about 1885. 
SUZZALLO, HENRY (Washington; fr. res.): 

Our Faith in Education; J. B. Lippincott Co., 1924 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Comment: The former president of the University of Washington deals in 



206 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

these seven essays with democracy and progress, education as a basis, the 
teacher's faith in his work, and the public's faith in common-school and 
higher education. An expansion of a Fourth of July oration given in the 
Greek Theatre at the University of California. 
SWEETMAN, LUKE D. (Washington; fr. res.): 

Gotch; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1936 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 . 

Comment: This story of a cowhorse contains much information on the life 
of cattle men and cowboys. It is well illustrated. The style is not distin 
guished. 
TALKINGTON, HENRY L. (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Heroes and Heroic deeds of the North West; The Caxton Printers, 

Ltd., 1929 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 
Jr. H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. These two books are a history of the early pioneers, trappers, 
Indians and missionaries of the Northwest, and the development of the 
resources, industries, institutions, and transportation, very interestingly^told. 
The first volume is arranged for the elementary grades, the second for higher 
grades or general reader. Valuable as reference. 

2. A comprehensive readable history of the Pacific Northwest designed 
as a textbook. Volume I for the elementary grades, Volume II for the Junior 
high school. Copiously illustrated. 

3. These two volumes are textbooks, Volume I, "The Pioneers," for ele 
mentary grades; Volume II, "Empire Builders," for the advanced grades. 
These are good source books for those interested in the Northwest. 

TEICHERT, (MRS.) MINERVA KOLHEPP (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Drowned Memories; (the author), 1926 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. These sketches, partly historical and partly appreciative, give 
a pleasant picture of a pioneer Idaho community about 1880, and provide 
some historical material. Locale, American Falls, Idaho. 

2. This is a beautifully illustrated and vivid history of the Fort Hall 
Bottoms and Snake River Bottoms before the great dam was built at Ameri 
can Falls. The interesting pioneers who once lived in this region are de 
scribed and characterized in a most entertaining manner. They actually live 
before the reader. 
TEICHERT, (MRS.) MINERVA KOLHEPP (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Romance of Old Fort Hall; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 

1932 

Rec. Sr, H. 10, n, 12 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The writer's deep love for her native state is apparent through 
out this book. Although written in a rambling manner, the story is an inter 
esting one, but undoubtedly the real value is in the historical information 
furnished. 

2. Poor construction choppy yet an interesting story of early white 
settlers and Indians. Found myself quite lost in interest and, although much 
fault could be found with the style of writing, think it is good reading for 
young people and old, too. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 207 

THAYER, CLAUDIUS (Oregon; deceased): 

Poems; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1936 
Rec. No 

Comment: These verses reflect the fine dignity of a cultured mind. It is that, 
rather than any strictly poetic quality, that gives them interest. I find little 
evidence of poetic imagination in them. 
THOMAS, EDWARD HARPER (Washington; pr. res.): 

Chinook: A History and Dictionary; Metropolitan Press (Binfords 

& Mort), 1935 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Sp. R. 

Comment: i. An excellent reference book, both for Chinook-English and 
English- Chinook. There are about a dozen chapters, interesting material, 
preceding the lexicon. 

2. Interesting research fairly well set forth. Its chief value lies in the 
help given to readers of Northwest and Alaska stories in which authors 
borrow from the Chinook jargon for local color. Locale, old Oregon. 
THOMPSON, MARGARET (Washington; pr. res.): 

High Trails of Glacier National Park; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 

1936 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The title of Mrs. Thompson's interesting and well-written book 
is indicative of the subject matter. Besides describing trails, the author in 
cludes information on flowers, animals, Indian life, and legends, as "well as 
a history of the Park's progress and growth. Excellent pictures and maps 
make the book exceptionally worth while.. 

2. Straight- forward style; subject matter interesting. Well illustrated with 
photographs, a few in color. End papers are an airplane map showing, in 
addition to Glacier, the Waterton Lakes Park in Canada. 

3. This book of travel at times becomes more of a guide book, but there 
is enough history, description, and Indian lore to make the book interesting 
even to the general reader. It will, on the whole, appeal mostly to those who 
have visited Glacier Park. 

4. History of the park and National Park Service, illustrated with color 
plates and photographs. Legends and customs of the Blackfeet Indians are 
featured. The fauna and flora of the park are skillfully described. Finally, 
the trails, themselves, make us want to hike, ski, and explore. 

TOBIAS, RUBY WEYBURN (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

The Bargain Square; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1933 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women (with reservations) 

Comment: Lyrics of home life, not greatly original, but technically adequate, 
sincere and sometimes pleasantly fresh and spirited. A book which might 
be enjoyed by readers who like the "small, familiar things" of everyday, 
tunefully expressed and who do not search for poetic subtleties. 
TOPONCE, ALEX (Montana; deceased): 

Life and Adventures of Alex Top&nce; Mrs. Katie Toponce, 1923 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. ^ Sp. R. 

Comment: i. Written in a vigorous manner, full of colloquialisms, fine sense 



208 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

of humor, interesting but incoherent. The author was gold miner, freighter, 
farmer, businessman, and cattleman. Interesting comments on Mormon re 
ligion. For adults. 

2. This book presents the genuine atmosphere of the pioneer. As the pub 
lisher says, it is "more than a biography; more than an ordinary life record 
of dates and happenings." It contains thought comment, and anecdote^ It 
gives historical data dimly known and almost lost. A valuable contribution 
to Montana history, it has now become a collector's item. 
TOWNSEND, HARVEY GATES (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Philosophical ideas in the United States; American Book Co., 1934 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: i. Dr. Townsend has presented from the historical point of view 
the pattern of American contributions to philosophical thought from the first 
manifestations in Colonial times to the current "schools" now recognized. 

2. A study of the philosophical ideas that have prevailed in the United 
States since Colonial times. Contemporary philosophers excluded unless these 
have distinction. Periods of American Philosophy. Influence of foreign philo 
sophical ideas on these various periods. Effect of philosophy on cultural life 
of people. 
TUCKER, PATRICK T. (Montana; pr. res.); Ed. Mrs. Grace Stone 

Coates 

Riding the High Country; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This is one of the very rare cowboy tales of the early days that 
gives to the reader the feeling that he is sitting with "the boys" around the 
bunkhouse stove on a long evening. Its apparent continuity makes it easy to 
read and its wealth of cowboy idiom and understatement is as near perfec 
tion as the printed page can reproduce. 

2. Memoirs of a genuine, practicing cowboy in the days of _ big round 
ups in the Judith basin. Many of his stories deal with his associations with 
Charley Russell. Pat was a small man, but a hardy one. The book moves at 
a good pace, Pat emerges as a vivid character, the background is authentic 
and full of good minor characters. 
TURNBULL, GEORGE STANLEY (Oregon; pr. res.): 

History of Oregon Newspapers; Binfords & Mort, 1939 
Rec. Sr. C. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 
Sp. R. 

Comment: i. Shows close connection between growth of political and social 
thought and the establishing and development of newspaper publication. 
Three sections: I. Introduction, II. The Pioneer Period. The Statehood 
Period, III. Journalism in the Counties. Written in an informal, informative 
style, this book makes readily accessible a mass of data on a vital aspect of 
the growth of literary culture in Oregon. Photographs show early editors and 
the "first newspaper press in the West," used on the Oregon Spectator, 1846 
now in the possession of the University of Oregon Press. 

2. Comprehensive, detailed chronicle of the development of virtually all 
Oregon newspapers from the beginning to about 1939. Rich in names, dates 
and valuable detail, obtainable only by prolonged and laborious research. 
Accurate and responsible. 
TURNER, MARJORIE SHIER (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Blessed Are They; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1936 
Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Splendid cross-section of life of a minister's family man, wife 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 209 

and daughter, written by young daughter so human so wholesome and so 
entertaining. Heartily recommended Blessed Are They. Locale, Idaho. 

2. Chance for any child to live through the days of the nineties and find 
out_ how it was in those good old days the folks talk about days when 
ladies were judged by that perfect waistline when Sunday evening sermon 
was the social event, when an Easter bonnet was a real creation. Has uni 
versal appeal, regardless of religion, age, or social position. 

3. The story is very entertaining and interesting. It deals with a small 
town preacher, his wife and daughter Marji, and their experiences as the 
child saw them. Entertaining of the Elder was very important; they were 
afraid they might do something wrong and lose their job. Marji always 
scored in each episode. 

TURNEY, IDA VIRGINIA (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Paul Bunyan comes West; University of Oregon Press, 1920 
Rec. Jr. H. 9 Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Jr. C. Jr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Pacific coast legends of Paul Bunyan, mythical lumberjack and one 
of the few folklore heroes of modern American origin. At the time this book 
was published, the author was teaching at the University of Oregon and the 
stories were collected by her students. The book was fittingly illustrated by 
many linoleum cuts made by students in design at the same institution, under 
the ^ direction of Miss Helen N. Rhodes, of the Dept. of Architecture and 
Allied Arts. This is the first book ever devoted entirely to a recounting of 
the exploits of Paul Bunyan. An edition, with some additions, was published 
in 1928 by Houghton, Mifflin Co. 

TURNEY, IDA VIRGINIA (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Paul Bunyan Marches On; Binfords & Mort. 1942 
Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C, Jr. Sen. Gr, 

Comment: This, and "Paul Bunyan, the work giant," both designed to be 
children's books, will be enjoyed by all ages, as any true myth legend, or 
folk tale, is. 

TURNEY, IDA VIRGINIA (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Paul Bunyan, the work giant; Binfords & Mort, 1941 

Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment^ Paul Bunyan symbolizes an especially American theme, the evolu 
tion of industry and the character of the American workman. Every tale has 
a symbolic meaning, as in all authentic mythology, and every character is a 
type personality except Paul himself, who is a composite of the characteristics 
of the American Workman. Only authentic tales, those vouched for as "hav 
ing sense"^ by the creators of the tales themselves, are included. The author 
has been in contact with the legends since childhood and is uniquely fitted 
to be a mouthpiece for the tales. 

TWEEDY, BENJAMIN F. (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Buck your Luck; Go r ham Press, Boston, 1925 

Rec. No 

Comment: i. These poems have only average merit for the reader who is 

left unimpressed by the general uplift theme. The poet himself is sincere in 

his writing of homely topics. 



aio NORTHWEST BOOKS 

2. Mr. Tweedy has written a group of thirty-five poems that are neither 
inspiring nor entertaining. Buck Your Luck expresses the author's idea that 
life is a struggle, a battle, and defeat unless you strive every minute for 
eternal happiness and eternal rest The poems are easy to read, but as a 
whole are quite simple. 
TWINING, FRANCES STAYER (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Bird Watching in the West; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 

1931 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n 

Comment: Information and anecdotes of western birds told sympathetically 
in good style. The writing is poised, sincere, and simple. The reader gains 
a more intimate and friendly knowledge of the everyday birds from the 
book. Charming and frequent illustrations. 
UTTER, ETHEL C. (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Public Speaking at a Glance; Reilly & Lee, Chicago, 1939 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Soul of wit is not briefer. The Glance is given in two nutshells. 
First reveals purposes of speech, materials to use, and ways to build. Second 
lists varieties of talks and finishes with personal points that no speaker can 
afford to ignore. Plan your speech or stay at home. 
WAGENKNECHT, EDWARD CHARLES (Washington; pr. res.): 

Jenny Lind; Hough ton, Mifflin Co., 1931 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: "This book is not a biography in the usual sense: it is a portrait, 
a psychograph" of a very real Jenny Lind. Through a study of the woman 
in her art life and personal life, the author finds the mainspring of her char 
acter in her religion, which led her to abandon the operatic stage at the 
height of her career. Although the book shows enormous research, it is not 
oppressively erudite. 
WAGENKNECHT, EDWARD CHARLES (Washington; pr. res.): 

Lillian Gish; an Interpretation; University of Seattle Press, 1927 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: A brief discussion of the art of Lillian Gish. The author finds her 
a great actress because she has fineness of feeling and deep understanding of 
her characters. She creates faithful, living personalities. Quite aside from 
the discussion of ^Lillian Gish, the essay suggests some of the basic principles 
of true art in acting. 
WAGENKNECHT, EDWARD CHARLES (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Man Charles Dickens; Houghton, 1929 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: A "psychograph" based on the method used by Gamaliel Bradford, 
who contributes an introduction. The book appears to be a careful, well- 
documented piece of work, lacking just that touch of genius which makes the 
subject of a biography come to life for the reader. Valuable to some college 
students. 
WAGENKNECHT, EDWARD CHARLES (Washington; pr. res.): 

Mark Twain, the man and his work; Yale University Press, 1935 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, iz 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Comment: i. This critical study brings Mark Twain back to normal. It is a 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 211 

portrait gather than a chronological biography. The humorist's beliefs, in 
terests, inconsistencies, and moments of elation and tragedy are all here. 
Each aspect has been treated with the fairness that comes from a true 
scholarly attitude. 

2. "Built ^up from a study of his writings, records of his conversations, 
and recollections of his friends," a clear picture of Mark Twain emerges 
a Mark Twain whose thoughts on vital subjects seem to reach out even to 
the questions of today. The book reads as pleasantly as fiction and "conveys 
some shrewd literary judgments." 
WAGENKNECHT, EDWARD CHARLES (Washington; pr, res.): 

Values in Literature; University of Washington Press, 1928 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This book is valuable in understanding the fundamental prin 
ciples underlying the intelligent study of literature. It is a sincere, inspiring, 
comprehensive view of the experiences and emotions of a teacher of litera 
ture, ^aiming to make us aware of critical theory and to help us in con 
structing our own literary judgments. 

2. There are certain basic standards of judgment as to what makes one 
work superior or inferior to another. What literature is, why we read it, how 
to judge a book, realism and romance, literature and morality, the building 
of a library these are among the subjects treated. 
WAGGONER, GEORGE A. (Oregon; fr. res.) : 

Stories of Old Oregon; Salem Statesman, Salem, Ore., 1905 
Rec. Jr. H. 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: A collection of stories of pioneer Oregon by an Oregon author, 
who, as a boy, had crossed the plains with his parents. An interesting account 
of this journey forms the preface of the book. The tales which follow are 
based upon events taken from his life in the new country, and are capital 
adventure stories convincingly told. The simplicity and excellence of the 
style, the historical accuracy, and the dramatic presentation make this a 
valuable collection. 
WAGNER, GLENDOLIN DAMON, and ALLEN, DR. W. A. (Montana; 

fr. res.) : 

Blankets and Moccasins; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1933 
Rec. Jr. H. 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This is a genuinely interesting book, rather loosely organized, 
but held together by the story of Plenty Coups, Crow hero. One is inevita 
bly touched at the nobility of the magnificent Crow Chief and in this volume 
he is alive as in no other narrative. Extracts from the Journal of Dr. Allen 
give added point to the story from time to time, and the relationship be 
tween the Chief and his white brother increases the strength of work. 

2. Blankets and Moccasins is a book which Montanans should find most 
interesting. It is based on Dr. Allen's journal in which he recorded informa 
tion gained through his intimate friendship with members of the Crow tribe. 
The Indian lore contained in Blankets and Moccasins is intriguing. 
WAGNER, GLENDOLIN DAMON (Montana; fr.res.): 

Old Neutriment; Ruth Hill, Publisher, Boston, 1934 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. John Burkman's story told in his own words is also the story 



212 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

of Custer and the Battle of the Little Big Horn, for Old Neutriment's life 
was centered in that of his beloved general. The book is a worthwhile con 
tribution to the literature of the Custer fight. 

2. Written mostly from dictation of Old Neutriment, a soldier in Ouster's 
army, who was not allowed to follow his General in his last battle. Appre 
ciative but highly idealistic picture of Custer as a soldier, husband, and man. 
Good description and narrative. Quotations from many of Gen. Custer's and 
Mrs. Custer's letters. 
WALGAMOTT, CHARLES SHIRLEY (Idaho; deceased): 

Reminiscences of Early Days t Vol* II; The Idaho Citizen, Twin 

Falls, Idaho, 1927 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This is a true story of life in the Snake River Valley in the 
early days. There are tales of adventures in the mining communities and 
the work of the Vigilantes in stamping out robbery. He tells how the miners 
mixed up sour dough biscuits in the flour sack. There are also a community 
fun-maker whom everyone welcomed because he could make everyone laugh. 
2. The series of anecdotes contained in this volume are related by a man 
who has spent his life in Idaho since 1875. 
WALGAMOTT, CHARLES SHIRLEY (Idaho; deceased): 

Six Decades Back; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1936 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. All of Walgamott's reminiscences and tales over a period of 
sixty years constitute a colorful and intimate history of his beloved Idaho. 

2. Much of this material has been printed in Mr. Walgamott's reminis 
cences, but what one might call his complete works is here brought together 
and illustrated. The volume is one of the richest collections of Idaho remi 
niscence available, told in vivid detail. There are Indian fights, cowboy life, 
pioneer adventure, and curious characters aplenty, but the book is character 
ized not so much by tales of romantic adventure as it is by the sense of 
simple folk living practical lives amid difficult surroundings. 
WALKER, CHARLES F. (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Now and Again; Conger Publishing Co., Portland, Ore., 1939 
Rec. No 

Comment: A collection of "occasional" verses without poetic value and tech 
nically mediocre. Suitable only for readers who care nothing about poetry but 
who like to see homely sentiments tied up in rhymes. 
WALKER, MILDRED (MRS. FERDINAND R. SCHEMM) (Montana; 

pr. res.): 

The Brewers' Big Horses; Harcourt, Brace and Co., 1940 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This novel pictures a socially prominent woman of the Vic 
torian era defying convention by marrying a man born of immigrant parents 
who lived on the "wrong side of the railroad track" and later by running his 
business, a brewery. "Woman's place" in that age and the small town are 
depicted well. 
2. Story of typical middle western family in comfortable circumstances 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 213 

from early '8o's to World War, their changing standards and development. 
Interest centers chiefly in Sara Bolster, who marries a German doctor, son 
of a^brewer, and who manages the business after her husband's death until 
prohibition comes. Well-written, interesting character portrayal, logical plot. 

WALKER, MILDRED (MRS. FERDINAND R. SCHEMM) (Montana; 

pr. res.): 
Dr. Norton's Wife; Harcourt, Brace and Co., 1938 

Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Dr. Norton is a leading member of the college medical school 
faculty. His wife becomes an invalid. The story concerns the changes in the 
life of these two; young doctors back for training after their interneship; 
other faculty members, and the wives of all. 

2. Story of incurable illness of Sue, wife of nationally known doctor, and 
effect of disease on Sue, her husband, and her sister. Way plot is handled 
is more important than subject matter. Excellent descriptions of medical 
school campus and its ideals. Sympathetic reflections on people caught by 
circumstances and finally conquering spiritually. Material authentic since 
author is doctor's wife. 

WALKER, MILDRED (MRS. FERDINAND R. SCHEMM) (Montana; 

pr. res.) : 
Fireweed; Harcourt, Brace and Co., 1934 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Deals with the plain, rather simple people who live in a 
lumber town in Michigan, their uneventful lives in which small events are 
of major importance. Excellent in that the author seems to feel vicariously 
for her characters and to sense their response to situations. There are vivid 
descriptions of the country at different seasons. Won Avery Hop wood and 
Jule Hopwood Awards Contest for 1933 at University of Michigan. 

2,. Last days and death of a lumber mill town, and Celie, who wanted to 

get away into the world. Fine story of milltown people. Winner of a prize 

in the Avery Hopwood and Jule Hopwood Awards Contest for 1933 at the 

University of Michigan. 

WALKER, MILDRED (MRS. FERDINAND R. SCHEMM) (Montana; 

pr. res.): 

Light from Arcturus; Harcourt, Brace and Co., 1935 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12, 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Julia Hauser, her husband Max, and her three girls and one 
boy. Starts with the Philadelphia exposition of 1876 the family is born in 
Halstead, Nebraska, where Max is helping the country grow. Julia moves the 
lot to Chicago to live for the Columbian exposition of 1893. Max loses his 
money, but the family grow up there. Fade-out with Fair of 1933. Good stuff 
epic in movement. 

2. Solidly written story, with excellent characterization, of a woman who 
visits the Philadelphia Centennial in 1876, the Chicago World's Fair in 1893 
and 1933. Some emphasis on changing times as seen by Julia Hauser as a 
bride, as a mother, and as a grandmother. Book not brilliant but very read 
able and pleasing. 



2i 4 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

WALKER, MILDRED (MRS. FERDINAND R. SCHEMM) (Montana; 

pr. res.): 

Unless the wind turns; Harcourt, Brace and Co., 1941 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A forest fire alters the lives and perspectives of a group of 
"dudes" on a pack trip in the Montana mountains, burning away the veneer 
and allowing them to see the stark reality about themselves. The world con 
flagration is to a certain extent symbolically presented in the shape of the 
fire, since the fire shows the American characters the state of rnind of an 
American refugee who is in the party. 

2. Entertaining, well plotted study of reaction of characters to greet peril 
of forest fire. Three Easterners, a foreign refugee scientist, and a mountain- 
born man, educated in the East, reveal themselves under the stress of danger. 
Heroism, meanness, loyalty, bewilderment keep the plot spinning. 

3. In search of new experiences (physical and spiritual), three men and 
two women undertake a pack trip into the mountains. To add to the excite 
ment, a tremendous forest fire springs up in which the men participate while 
the women wait in fear and perplexity. This crisis serves to heighten and 
resolve certain inward questionings which have harassed especially one of 
the group, John Davis, the New York banker, who is spending his vacation 
in Montana, his childhood home. This narrative is dramatic both physically 
and psychologically, compactly written, as it is, by a skilled craftsman. 

WALKINSHAW, ROBERT (Washington; pr. res.): 

On Puget Sound; G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1929 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Sketches, chiefly descriptive of the main features of Puget Sound, . 
including Mount Rainier, Mount Baker, the Olympics, Tacoma, Up Sound, 
Seattle, the San Juan Islands. The author's style, while conservative and 
modest, is colorful, sensitive, and pleasing. He exhibits a keen appreciation of 
the beauty of his surroundings, and an occasional touch of quiet humor. His 
observations are accurate ; he is recording first-hand experiences. 
WARING, GUY (Washington; fr. res.) : 

My Pioneer Past; Bruce Humphries, Inc., Boston, 1936 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: An interesting account of the hardships and inconveniences of the 
Okanogan Valley (Washington) in the early pioneer days. The venture ex 
tends from 1884 until 1888. Mr. Waring presents the picture of the early 
hardy and courageous pioneers very vividly. He holds the interest through 
out by his choice of detail and colorful anecdotes. 

WARNER, ESTELLA FORD (Oregon; pr. res.); and SMITH, GEDDES 
Children of the Covered Wagon; The Commonwealth Fund, Division 

of Publications, New York, 1930 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: The book tells of the recent child health program carried on in 
Marion County, Oregon. It is a clear and convincing account which would 
be of value in connection with a course in high school hygiene, to arouse the 
interest and cooperation of young people in bettering health conditions. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 215 

WASHINGTON WRITERS PROJECT, W.P.A. 

Washington: a guide to the Evergreen State; Binfords & Mort, 

Portland, Oregon, 1941 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. One of the last and best of the American Guide Series. Nearly 
every phase of the state's economic and cultural history is treated preliminary 
to numerous tours that are enticing to Washington citizens as well as to 
tourists. 

2. Valuable material; most parts are interestingly written. History and 
natural resources are fully covered. Excellent illustrations and reliable maps 
add to the value of this guide. Good both for reading and for reference. 
WATT, ROBERTA FRYE (Washington; pr. res.): 

Four Wagons West: The Story of Seattle; Metropolitan Press (Bin- 
fords & Mort), 1931 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This is a reprint of The Story of Seattle, It is an account of the 
founding of Seattle by the Denny-Boren-Bell group, and the fortunes of the 
little settlement for a quarter-century following. For the most part the story 
is simply and accurately told. 
WATT, ROBERTA FRYE (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Story of Seattle; Lowman and Hanford Co., Seattle, 1931 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: A vivid, interesting account of the history of Seattle from the 
landing of the first settlers to the year 1874. Since it was written by a grand 
daughter of an original settler and was compiled largely from original 
sources, it might be called a personal history of Seattle. It is primarily a 
human document. 

WEATHER WAX, CLARA (Washington; pr. res.): 
Marching! Marching!; The John Day Co., 1935 
Rec. No 

Comment: In this novel the exploited, unhappy, yet militant lumber town 
worker is sympathetically portrayed in his struggle with capitalistic greed. 
Cluttered with many incredible and confusing details, Marching! Marching! 
is definitely inferior in literary quality. The plot is melodramatic and the 
characters remain as ideas rather than as human beings. Locale, Grays 
Harbor and vicinity. 
WEBSTER, EDWARD B. (Washington; pr. res.): 

Fishing in the Olympics; Evening News, Inc., Port Angeles, Wash-, 

1923 

Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Gen. Gr. 

Comment: "This is a book of fishing stories a true record of the experiences 
of those who fish in the Olympics," told with the exaggeration necessary in 
a real fish story. The stories are amusing and are interspersed with a great 



216 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

deal of information on the kinds of fish found. Fishermen of all ages will 
enjoy this book, for its contents, not for literary worth. 
WEBSTER, EDWARD B. (Washington; pr. res.): 

The Friendly Mountain; Evening News, Inc., Port Angeles, Wash., 

1917 
Rec. No 

Comment: A brief book telling of Mt. Angeles, near Port Angeles, discussing 
the mountain and its glaciers, flowers, birds, trees, animals and trails with 
brief mention of the Klahhane Club and its lodge. The facts are there, but 
it is not especially interesting to any except the confirmed mountaineer. 
WEIR, FLORENCE RONEY (Washington; pr. res.): 

Merry Andrew; Small, Maynard and Co., 1918 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: The story of Mary Ann Drew and her struggle to make the farm 
a success and to overcome her temper. It is an ordinary story, not too well- 
written, but older girls will enjoy it for the vigorous heroine and the love 
story. 
WELLS, HARRY L. (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Multnomah; Kilham Stationery Co., Portland, Ore., 1923 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, 11, 12 

Comment: A descriptive Indian legend concerning origin of Multnomah Falls. 
Illustrated with many photographs of Oregon scenery. The 30 pages of notes 
give an account of Indian tribes mentioned, descriptions of scenic places, 
origin of names and expressions used. 
WELLS, RT. REV. LEMUEL H. (Washington; pr. res.) : 

A Pioneer Missionary; Progressive Printing Co., Seattle, 1931 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10 

Comment: The book is anecdotal in character. A good deal of interesting local 
detail and color of the life of the time can be gleaned from its pages by those 
who look for it. The author possesses both wit and humor, combined with an 
almost childlike simplicity of outlook. The book is short, an easy evening's 
reading, not beyond the understanding of even junior high school students. 
Beginning his missionary work at Walla Walla in the early seventies, Bishop 
Wells has been closely identified with the growth of the Episcopal Church 
in both Eastern and Western Washington ever since. Now a resident of 
Tacoma. 
WET JEN, ALBERT RICHARD (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Captains All; Alfred A. Knopf, 1924 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This group of short stories dealing with life at sea is as successful 
in depicting human psychology as it is in giving the moods, the influences 
and the flavor of the sea. The stories will appeal to sophisticated students 
whose naturally good tastes will incline them to the best in literature. 
iVETJEN, ALBERT RICHARD (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Fiddler's Green; Little, Brown and Co., 1931 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, *, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: Fiddler's Green is the sailor's conception of paradise. Here are 
swift story, whimsical scene, imaginative weaving of sea legend, sea ver 
nacular (thoroughly expurgated), satire and fantasy; and here are the sea 
figures JBen the Bosun, Davy Jones, Mother Carey, Casey Jones here im 
ported into sea legend. An original and entertaining book. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 217 

WETJEN, ALBERT RICHARD (Oregon; pr. res.): 
Way for a Sailor; Century Co., 1928 

Rec. Sr. H. 12 Gen. R. Men, Women 

Jr. C. Fr. Sp. R. 

Comment: A robust book; word pictures emotionally vital. The persons and 
occupations of the sea sweep by the reader in vital display. The writer is 
generously occupied with sex and celebrates the physical side of life almost 
to the exclusion of other sides. The keynote of the book is, in its words "life 
is damned interesting." 

WETJEN, ALBERT RICHARD (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Youth Walks on the Highway; Heron Press, New York, 1932 

Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Sp. R. 

Comment: The style is extremely fine but the matter is highly exotic in nature 
and so is of no value for educational purposes. A very restricted circulation, 
published by subscription at ten dollars a volume. 
WHITE, ARED (GEN. GEORGE ARED WHITE) (Oregon; deceased): 

Attack on America; Houghton, Mifflin Co., 1939 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Sp. R. 

Comment: A poorly written army novel of the future whose message is more 
important than its story, emphasizing lack of army and navy preparedness. 
European coalition powers invade the United States through Mexico with 
highly mechanized forces and gain the Pacific Coast region in this book of 
political and military intrigue. 
WHITE, ARED (GEN. GEORGE ARED WHITE) (Oregon; deceased): 

Seven Tickets to Singapore; Houghton, Mifflin Co., 1939 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: An international intrigue with a sea and oriental background with 
murders and kidnappings in which a United States secret agent prevents an 
American inventor's death-ray machine from being controlled by foreign 
powers. Full of action in running down holders of the seven tickets. Plenty of 
action but little literary value. 
WHITE, ARED (GEN. GEORGE ARED WHITE) (Oregon; deceased): 

The Spy Net; Houghton, Mifflin Co., 1931 
Rec. No 

Comment: Popular, action type of novel. Characterization nil. Unconvincing 
action. Pompous style. Deals with spy hunting in the Great War ,codes 
duels, gambling, women, et al. 
WHITLAW WAYNE B. (Idaho; fr. res.); and HALL, RAYMOND 

(Idaho; pr. res*): 
Mammals of the Pocatello Region of Southeast Idaho; University of 

California Press, 1933 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Sp. R. 

Comment: This is a technical book on Biology and Zoology, describing the 
mammals of _the Pocatello region of Southeastern Idaho. It presents informa 
tion on^ the kinds of mammals present now and within historic time ; the local 
or habitat distribution of each kind; factors governing the presence or ab 
sence of selected species ; and the habits as noted in the work. 
WHITNEY, RUTH COOPER (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Six Feet; Webster Publishing Co., San Francisco, 1939 
Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Comment: Stories of insects, perhaps accurate scientifically, but marred by a 
rather pert manner of presentation. Contains a study outline for grades one 
through six, as well as suggestions for collecting insects. 



218 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

WILBUR, EARL MORSE (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Thomas Lamb Elliot, 1841-1936; The Greenleaf Press, Portland, 
Ore., 1937 

Rec. Sp. R. 

Comment: Primarily written for members of the Eliot family, it is intimate in 
tone and will be of special interest to those who knew Dr. Eliot personally. 
Incidentally, the book is valuable for the student of the religious, cultural 
and social history of the city of Portland and of the state of Oregon. A 
worthy book on a worthy subject. 
WILKINSON, MARGUERITE (Oregon; fr. res.): 

The Dingbat of Arcady; The Macniillan Co., 1922 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: A summary of the experiences of two people on a canoe trip down 
the Columbia and in California rivers, and on a motorcycle trip through 
England. Easy reading. 
WILLIAMSON, GEORGE (Oregon; fr. res.): 

The Donne Tradition; Harvard University Press, 1930 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Sp. R. 

Comment: This critical study of English poetry from Donne to the death of 
Cowley is scholarly in workmanship, discerning in inquiry, and one of the 
most adaptable for the student of poetry. A clear- visioned and human exam 
ination into the Metaphysical poets, their accomplishments, tendencies, and 
influences. 
WILLIAMSON, GEORGE (Oregon; fr. res.): 

The Talent of T. 5. Eliot, No. 32, University of Washington chap- 
books? Glenn Hughes, 1929 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Sp. R. 

Comment: Little more than an essay, this brochure nonetheless presents a 
scholarly inquiry into the poetry of T. S. Eliot, its sources and characteristics. 
An explanatory and keynote study, for advanced students. 

WILLIAMSON, THAMES ROSS (EDWARD DRAGONET, WALDO 
FLEMING, DeWOLFE MORGAN, S. S. SMITH, GREGORY 
TRENT, pseuds.) (Idaho; fr. res.): 
The Cave Mystery; Harcourt, Brace and Co., 1935 
Rec. Jr. H. 7,8,9 

Sr. H. 10, u, 12 

Comment: i. The Cave Mystery, a boy's story of the Spanish Pyrenees, tells 
of two Spanish boys who solve a mystery in a Basque village. The story is 
most interesting and will hold any boy's attention. The scientific and linguis 
tic detail seem to be authentic, showing that the author has probably traveled 
in the country described. 

2. A boy's story of the Spanish Pyrenees. The local color as well as the 
solving of the mystery, make this interesting reading. The author writes only 
of places and types of life which he investigates personally. 
WILLIAMSON, THAMES ROSS (EDWARD DRAGONET, WALDO 
FLEMING, DeWOLFE MORGAN, S. S. SMITH, GREGORY 
TRENT, pseuds.) (Idaho; fr. res.): 
D. is for Dutch; Harcourt, Brace and Co., 1934 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 
Comment: This is a story of a Dutch community, their solid traditions con- 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 219 

toasted with their interest in "hexing," and the tragic sequel. It is a smooth- 
flowing study based upon the old jingle 

"D is for Dutch, solid and level, 
Talking God and tempting the devil." 

WIIXIAMSON THAMES ROSS (EDWARD DRAGONET, WALDO 
^*ING, DeWOLFE MORGAN, S. S. SMITH, GREGORY 
TRENT, pseuds.) (Idaho; fr. res.): 
The Earth Told Me; Simon and Schuster, 1930 
Rec. No 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A story of an Alaskan tundra. The book portrays the elemental 
passion jind brute force of a primitive people. It is a stark, gripping story of 
two natives, Taliak and Akpek, who fight for the possession of a woman. It 
has no place on a home-reading list. 

2. In this simple story the reindeer and their herdsmen are all the world, 
for the life of the herd almost absorbs the life of the herdsman, even to his 
simple Jove story. This is a novel one remembers as filled with gorgeous 
word pictures of grass, snow, freshets, and their meaning to one who lives in 
and through them. 

WILLIAMSON THAMES ROSS (EDWARD DRAGONET, WALDO 
SSSS 10 ' D WOLFE MORGAN, S. S. SMITH, GREGORY 
TRENT, pseuds.) (Idaho; fr. s-es.): 
The Falcon Mystery; Harcourt, Brace and Co., 1936 

Rec. Grades 6 

Jr. H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. An interesting story of two brothers who are involved in a 
mystery on the Great Hungarian plain. The story gives a true picture of 
Hungarian life in detail. 

2. This boys' story gives an authentic picture of two brothers who are 
horse-herders on the Great Hungarian plain. A mystery adds interest to this 
story that gives interesting local color, correct in all details. 
WILLIAMSON, THAMES ROSS (EDWARD DRAGONET, WALDO 
FLEMING, DeWOLFE MORGAN, S. S. SMITH, GREGORY 
TRENT, pseuds.) (Idaho; fr. sres.): 
The Flood-Fighters; Junior Literary Guild, 1931 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 

Comment: i. A doctor and his fifteen-year-old son of Bemidje, Minnesota, go 
as relief ^workers along the Mississippi during a flood. The method of Red 
Cross relief in all its phases is accurately described. Boys will be interested 
in Harry Stanton's adventures. 

2. A doctor and his son of fifteen, whose home is in Bemidje, Minnesota, 
act as relief workers up and down the Mississippi when the river overflows 
its banks and threatens thousands of lives. The story describes in detail the 
working of such organizations as the Red Cross in fighting the river, rescu 
ing marooned families, feeding destitute hundreds, keeping down epidemics, 
and collecting more funds from the peopel who were not directly threatened 
by the flood. 

WILLIAMSON, THAMES ROSS (EDWARD DRAGONET, WALDO 
FLEMING, DeWOLFE MORGAN, S. S. SMITH, GREGORY 
TRENT, pseuds.) (Idaho; fr. res.): 
The Glacier Mystery; Harcourt, Brace and Co., 1932 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. An accurate picture of the life of the people who live in the 



220 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

mountainous district of the Tyrolese Alps in West Austria. A splendid book 
for boys because of the local color and general interest. 

2. A professor and his son spend a summer in the Austrian Tyrol for 
reseach, and together they solve a mystery involving their native friends. As 
with other books by this author, the local color given is most interesting. 
Boys will enjoy this book. 

WILLIAMSON, THAMES ROSS (EDWARD DRAGONET, WALDO 
FLEMING, DeWOLFE MORGAN, S. S. SMITH, GREGORY 
TRENT, pseuds.) (Idaho; fr. res.) : 
Gipsy Down the Lane; Small, Maynard and Co., 1926 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: One of a series of novels intended to give a panorama of the 
United States. It deals with the lumber industry, its adventure, its glorious 
background, its problems, its injustices. 

WILLIAMSON, THAMES ROSS (EDWARD DRAGONET, WALDO 
FLEMING, DeWOLFE MORGAN, S. S. SMITH, GREGORY 
TRENT, pseuds.) (Idaho; fr. res.): 
Hunky; Coward-McCann Inc., 1929 
Rec. No 

Jr. H. 8,9 

Comment: i. A character novel of an inarticulate giant whose only means 
of expression is brute strength. The psychological portrayal of the man is 
good; otherwise the story is very ordinary. 

2. A dull and unconvincing story of an immigrant no evident literary 
value a good deal of sex dragged in with the obvious intention of pointing 
a moral, but even the sex element doesn't relieve the tedium. 

3. A story of a baker full of action, live characters and sparkling dia 
logue. A backward foreigner finds his place in life through a friend. Through 
striking, the employees maintain wage cuts. 

WILLIAMSON, THAMES ROSS (EDWARD DRAGONET, WALDO 
FLEMING, DeWOLFE MORGAN, S. S. SMITH, GREGORY 
TRENT, pseuds.) (Idaho; fr. ires.): 
The Lobster "War; Junior Literary Guild and Lothrop, Lee and 

Shepard Co., 1935 
Rec. Grades 6 

Jr. H. 7,8,9 
Sr. H. 10 

Comment: i. The story of a fisherman and his family living on the Maine 
coast, where fishing for lobsters was a highly developed industry. Sennett and 
his two young sons had to fight for their rights, but did not give up and won 
out in the end. The story is well and clearly written, especially adapted for 
young boys, I should say, but a very interesting story for any age. 

2. A story of Maine a war between lobster fishermen and particularly 
living story of the two brothers, Elmer and Tom Sennett. A very interesting 
book for juniors and very well presented one. 

WILLIAMSON, THAMES ROSS (EDWARD DRAGONET, WALDO 
FLEMING, DeWOLFE MORGAN, S. S. SMITH, GREGORY 
TRENT, pseuds.) (Idaho; fr. res.): 

The Man Who Cannot Die; Small, Maynard and Co., 1926 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: The novel uses the device of a living man representing the grow 
ing, living America. His growth is its growth, his burdens are its burdens, 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 221 

his life is not ended as its life is not ended. The novel is less vivid than 
some of Williamson's later works, but is readable and provocative, 
WILLIAMSON, THAMES ROSS (EDWARD DRAGONET, WALDO 
FLEMING, DeWOLFE MORGAN, S. S. SMITH, GREGORY 
TRENT, pseuds.) (Idaho; fr.res.): 
North After Seals} Junior Literary Guild and Houghton, Mifflin 

Co., 1934 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. A very readable book for upper grades or high school. More 
appealing to boys than girls. 

2. Purely an adventure story for young people. Laid in Newfoundland 
going after seals. Characters well drawn. Story exciting for the young and 
just the kind of hero the boys will go strong for. 

WILLIAMSON, THAMES ROSS (EDWARD DRAGONET, WALDO 
FLEMING, DeWOLFE MORGAN, S. S. SMITH, GREGORY 
TRENT, pseuds.) (Idaho ; fr. res.): 
On the Trail of the Reindeer; The Junior Literary Guild and 

Houghton, Mifflin Co., 1932 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: r. Story of two boys who spent a winter in the Alaskan hills 
herding their father's reindeer. By their courage and reliability they gained 
their father's belief in their ability and the right to enter college in the 
U. S. A well written interesting story. 

2. A good story for boys about two boys who took care of a herd of 
reindeer for their father. The story concerns itself with the superstitions of 
Eskimos, and gives a pretty good picture of roughing it in the north country. 
In that the reindeer meat industry is comparatively new, the story is in 
formative on that subject. 

WILLIAMSON, THAMES ROSS (EDWARD DRAGONET, WALDO 
FLEMING, DeWOLFE MORGAN, S. S. SMITH, GREGORY 
TRENT, pseuds.) (Idaho; fr. res.): 
Run Sheep Run; Small, Maynard and Co., 1925 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This novel deals with the sheep industry, and is one of a series of 
pictures intended to provide a panorama of American localities and Ameri 
can industries. There is keen feeling for the lonely life of the sheepherder, 
for the rich background of color in which he moves, and for what one might 
call the philosophy of sheep. 

WILLIAMSON, THAMES ROSS (EDWARD DRAGONET, WALDO 
FLEMING, DeWOLFE MORGAN, S. S. SMITH, GREGORY 
TRENT, pseuds.) (Idaho; fr. res.): 
The Spy Mystery; Harcourt, Brace and Co., 1937 
Rec. Grades 6 

Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 
Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: i. This deals with the homeless boys of Russia, giving an authen 
tic picture of their mode of living and of their country after the Revolution. 
A mystery adds suspense. It is a splendid book for boys, because of its ac 
curacy of information and general interest. Locale, Soviet Russia. 

2. The Spy Mystery gives a clear picture of life in Russia following the 
Revolution. A fine book for boys because of its authenticity. 



222 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

WILLIAMSON, THAMES ROSS (EDWARD DRAGONET, WALDO 
FLEMING, DeWOLFE MORGAN, S. S. SMITH, GREGORY 
TRENT, pseuds.) (Idaho; fir. res.) : 
Stride of Man; Coward-McCann, 1928 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12. 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A very readable story of an American boy's progress from his 
birth in a log cabin to his successful achievement as a mechanic-inventor 
a somewhat stilted style. 

2. Story of a pioneer-beginning in Oregon and following East a man of 
vision and an age of progress. The life of Daniel Patterson tinkering al 
ways on inventions, bicycles to cars. Composition not so good but interesting 
in a sense of the advancing age in machinery. 

WILLIAMSON, THAMES ROSS (EDWARD DRAGONET, WALDO 
FLEMING, DeWOLFE MORGAN, S. S. SMITH, GREGORY 
TRENT, pseuds.) (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Under the Linden Tree; Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1935 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This is a fantasy, delicate and deft, representing a canary, a cat, 
and a dog and their human counterparts. Much of the novel is highly im 
aginative, suggesting the play of character among the three creatures. 
WILLIAMSON, THAMES ROSS (EDWARD DRAGONET, WALDO 
FLEMING, DeWOLFE MORGAN, S. S. SMITH, GREGORY 
TRENT, pseuds.) (Idaho; fr. res.): 
The Woods Colt; Harcourt, Brace and Co., 1933 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This is the tale of Clint -Morgan, "kind of wild an' bred in the 
hills an' the devil be damned, somethin' that-a-way," of Nance, of a people 
rooted in the older American stock whose ways are incompatible with newer 
machine-made ways. There is great beauty in the lives of these people, and 
in the land they inhabit, and deep significance in the tragedy of "the woods 
Colt." 
WILLIS, ELIZABETH BAYLEY (Washington; pr. res.): 

Little Bay Creatures; Binfords & Mort, 1938 
Rec. Grades 4, 5, 6 

Comment: A splendidly written scientific version of "shell" life along the edge 
of the ocean. Adapted to children. Profusely illustrated with accurate draw 
ings and color plates of dozens of kinds of ocean life. Locale, Pacific Coast. 
2. The little animals found along the seashore identify themselves and 
describe their own life habits in Little Bay Creatures. It is written in clear 
and simple language, giving scientific information in the form of a story, 
which should be easily understood by a child. There are many interesting 

illustrations. 

WILSON, BEN HUR: Quartz Family of Minerals. See DAKE, HENRY C. 
WILSON, C. LEE (Oregon; pr. res.) : 

Dark World and Wide; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1937 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr, Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Rich young man, blind from birth, yearns for adventure and 
romance. Finds it through a chance encounter and in producing a play for 
three penniless young artists, making it a success with the music, composed 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 223 

through years of loneliness and longing. Marries right girl after several mis 
understandings. Wonderful companion. Well written. 

2. Saul Gordon, young and wealthy, finds adventure despite his blind 
ness. Outside his gates a malignant gambler and a mysterious girl set his 
feet on a path to suspense and danger. An exciting venture into the theater 
destroys his secluded life and brings him romance. Light but entertaining 
reading. Clear type. 
WILSON, HENRY LOVEJOY (Idaho; fr. res.): 

Of Lunar Kingdoms; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1937 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A group of informal essays in which the author creates a fan 
tastic Utopia and fits into it many much- discussed ideas and notions. 

2. Group of essays, mocking in tone, fantastic in thought, humor of a sort, 
but good clean reading. Don't think will appeal to the masses. Covers much 
territory. 

3. I found this book a ghastly bore. If it had a point I didn't discover it. 
WILSON, JOHN FLEMING (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Across the Latitudes; Little, Brown and Co., 1911 
Rec. Sr, H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: By Oregon's best fiction writer of the early part of this century, 
these fifteen maritime short stories of the Pacific and Pacific ports are decid 
edly worthy reading for adolescent and mature minds. Masterful in character 
delineation, technically able in narration and plot. Lusty, yet sympathetic. 
Possible criticism: over-emphasis on nobility of sentiment. 
WILSON, JOHN FLEMING (Oregon; fr. res.): 

The Land Claimers; Little, Brown and Co., 1911 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 

Comment: Though the setting of this story is the Siletz River in Oregon, there 
is a true and vivid portrayal of the difficult and often hopeless task of many 
who filed on timber claims throughout the Northwest. The life story of the 
characters will hold the interest of high school students. 
WILSON, JOHN FLEMING (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Somewhere at Sea and Other Tales ; E. P. Dutton and Co., 1923 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: A collection of short stories by an incomparable story-teller and 
novelist of the sea. His gift of swift action and power of dramatization are 
well exemplified in this volume. His knowledge of human nature, his famil 
iarity with the sea, and his exceptional narrative ability have produced many 
unforgettable sea stories, a number of which are included in this volume. 
WILSON, JOHN FLEMING (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Tad Sheldon, Boy Scout; The Macmillan Co., 1928 (first publica 
tion: Sturgis and Walton Co., 1913) 
Rec. Grades 6 

Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: These adventures of a group of Boy Scouts on the Oregon coast 
have long been favored reading in grade and junior high school classes. 
Intelligent, entertaining, constructive of a high degree of sportsmanship, 



224 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

despite the occasional note of the improbable not unusual in all fiction. Stories 
have both humor and pathos, and are well written. Highly recommended. 
WILSON, JOHN FLEMING (Oregon; fr. res.): 

The Voice of Authority; Crowell Publishing Co., 1010 
Rec. Jr. H. 8, 9 

Comment: An entertaining little sketch describing the influence of a stern 
religious belief on the actions of a sea captain and his helper, a missionary 
of the old school, in dealing with the crew and passengers on board a drift 
ing, rudderless ship, on the Pacific. It will lead toward better reading. 
WINES, GEORGIANA (Oregon;, pr. res.): 

Mary Lark's Nature Stories; The Christopher Publishing House, 

Boston, 1936 
Rec. Grades i, 2, 3 

Comment: A collection of fairy stories based on the various phases of Nature 
which might appeal to children. Some are "The Selfish Apple," "The Merry 
Lark," etc. The ideas are whimsical but the style lacks sparkle, is repetitious, 
and leans towards the sentimental. 
WINTER, WILLIAM (Oregon; pr. res.): 

One Bell Calls the Watch; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1940 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Mr. Winter tells his story, of life aboard ship, with active 
interest and understanding. His characters are interesting as they tell their 
yarns and discuss their various shore activities. Well told, the story holds the 
reader's interest. 

2. A pungent, sea-faring novel based upon the round trip San Francisco 
to New Zealand run of the merchant ship Terrebonne. "Slim" Midway, 
A.B., tells the story. The voyage is merely the frame for holding together the 
numerous lusty character sketches and anecdotes of the sailors aboard. Inter 
spersed with colorful descriptions of the sea in its several moods are occa 
sional dramatic bits of action. 
WINTHER, SOPHUS KEITH (Washington; pr. res.): 

Eugene O'Neill; Random House, 1934 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Sp. R. 

Comment: A well organized and thoroughly analytical study of Eugene 
O'Neill's play and his unique treatment of character. The author has empha 
sized the dramatic values of O'Neill's plot struggles between realism and 
idealism, between Christianity and Paganism, his direct dealing with the 
tragedy of life, his conflicting philosophy of determinism and fatalism. 
WINTHER, SOPHUS KEITH (Washington; pr. res.): 

Mortgage Your Heart; The Macmillan Co., 1937 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Peter and Meta and their boys find that the battle with nature 
is not enough to keep the farm, which has become part of their very hearts. 
Hans, going to the university, finds a conflicting world of emotions, finds eco 
nomic dilemmas, and new ideas. The story is deeply moving, written from 
the author's own experience. 

2. This is a continuation of Take All to Nebraska and covers the period 
between 1906-1917 as Peter Grimsen and his six sons strive to earn a living 
on a rented farm in Nebraska and the sons grow Americanized. The farm 
scenes are good, but the social history stands out more than the characters. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 233 

Beside the beautiful Willamette ; Parsons, John. 

Bethel and Aurora; Hendricks, Robert J. 

Beyond the gates of care ; Bashford, Herbert. 

Beyond dilemmas; Quakers look at life; Laughlin, Dr. Sceva Bright. 

Beyond law ; Linderman, Frank B. 

Beyond the shining mountains ; Gould, Dorothy Fay. 

Big book of western stories ; Bower, B. M. 

Big canoe; Bowles, Mayol. 

Big enough ; James, Will. 

Big timber ; Case, Robert Ormond. 

Billy tomorrow; Carr, Sarah Pratt. 

Birchlands; Birkland, Joran. 

Birds of Oregon ; Gabrielson, Ida Noel, and Jewett, Stanley Gordon. 

Birds of the Pacific Coast ; Eliot, William Ayers. 

Bird watching in the west ; Twining, Frances Staver. 

Bird woman (Sacajawea) ; Schultz, James W. 

The bitter country; Pettibone, Anita. 

The Bitterroots ; Macleod, Norman 

Bitterroot trail; Johnson, James. 

Black cherries; Coates, Grace S. 

Blackfeet Indians ; Linderman, Frank B. 

Blackf eet tales of Glacier National Park ; Schultz, James W. 

Blankets and moccasins ; Wagner, Gwendolyn. 

Blessed are they; Turner, Marjorie. 

Blue bucket nuggets; De Moss, Catherine. 

Blue gold ; Getty, Agnes K. 

Blue interval, poems of Crater Lake; Moll, Ernest G. 

The bluprints of God; Lindsay, Rev. Gordon. 

Blue waters; Helm, Richard Izer. 

Robbie, a great collie ; Alexander, Charles. 

Boise guide; Fisher, Vardis. 

Boise, the peace valley; Bird, Annie L. 

Bondwoman; Ryan, Marah. 

A book of Indian tales ; Wood, Charles Erskine Scott. 

A book of patterns for weaving by John Landes; Atwater, Mary M. (ed.). 

Books on the Pacific Northwest for small libraries ; Rockwood, Eleanor Ruth. 
Borah of Idaho ; Johnson, Claudius Osborne. 

The border trumpet; Haycox, Ernest. 

Born to be ; Taylor, Gordon. 

Boss of the Ragged ; Mansfield, Norma Bicknell. 

Bottle of dust; Rutherford, Anworth. 

Boys of the covered wagons ; Ernest, Brother, C.S.C. 

The boy with the silver plow ; Murphy, Dennis. 

The brand ; Broderick, Theresa. 

Brawneyman ; Stevens, James. 

The brewers' big horses; Walker, Mildred. 

Bricks without straw, the storv of Linfield College; Jonasson, Jonas Adalsteinn. 

The bridge of the Gods; Balch, F. H. 

Bright ambush ; Wurdeman, Audrey. 

Bright horizons; Joseph, Horace. 

Broken lights; Hughes, Glenn. 

Buck vour luck; Tweedy, Benjamin. 

Building a state: Washington, 1869-1939; Sperlin, 0. B. ? and Miles, Charles. 

The Building of the city beautiful ; Miller, Joaquin. 

Bunch grass & blue joint; Linderman, Frank B, 

Bursted bubbles; Leiter, Wilma. 



234 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

By Juan de Fuca's Strait; McCurdy, James. 
By scarlet torch and blade ; Euwer, Anthony. 

The cabin at the trail's end; Hargreaves, Sheba. 
Caddie Woodlawn ; Brink, Carol. 
Campfire courage ; Marshal, Edison. 
Campus sonnets; Moll, Ernest G. 
Captain Jack, Modoc Renegade ; Payne, Doris Dalmer. 
Captain Redlegs ; Conner, Sabra. 
Captains all ; Wet j en, Albert Richard. 
The case of the hanging lady; Jones, Nard. 
Castaways of the Yukon ; Rea, Ella M. 
Castles in the air ; McCowan, Hervey Smith. 
Cathlamet on the Columbia ; Strong, Thomas Nelson. 
Cave mystery; Williamson, Thames 
Chance child ; Ryan, Marah. 
Checkered Tablecloth; Smith, Bess. 
Chief Joseph ; Fee, Chester Anders. 
Children of God ; Fisher, Vardis. 
Children of the covered wagon ; Carr, Mary Jane. 

Children of the covered wagon; Warner, Stella Ford, and Smith, Geddes. 
Children of the Soil ; Burglon, Nora. 
Child's story of Washington; Anderson, Eva Greenslit. 
China's millions; Strong, Anna Louise. 
Chinese fairytales; Field, Adele M. 

Chinook, history and dictionary of Northwest coast trade jargon; Thomas, Ed 
ward Harper. 

Chloe dusts her mantel ; Gill, Laura Francis. 
The chosen valley ; Foote, Mary Hallock. 
The City of Illusion ; Fisher, Vardis. 
Clawhammer ranch; Robertson, Frank. 
Clio and Mr. Croce ; Benham, Allen Rogers. 
Cloth of silver; Offord, Lenore Glenn. 
The cock that crowed at two ; Barnett, G. T. and O. E. 
Coeur d'Alene; Foote, Mary Hallock. 

Coleridge's Shakespearean scholarship ; Raysor, Thomas M. 
Colored leaves; Woodward, Amy (Fisher). 

The ColumbiaAmerican greatest highway; Lancaster, Samuel Christophei 
The Columbia river; Lyman, William Denison. 
Columbine Madonna ; Hughes, Glenn. 
The command of words; Smith, Samuel Stephenson. 
Confucianism ; Starr, Frederick. 
The Conquerors; Atwood, Reverend A. 
The Conquest; Dye, Eva Emory. 

Contemporary Literature: our literary heritage; Blankenship, Russell. 
Come, colors come ; Fargo, Lucille Foster. 
Corner of Cathay; Fielde, Adele M. 
Corral dust; Fletcher, R. H, 
The cost of empire ; Carr, Sarah Pratt. 
Cougar Pass; Wood, Elizabeth Lambert Wood. 
The country boy; Davenport, Homer. 
The cowboy and his interpreters; Branch, E. Douglas, 
Cowboy in the making; James, Will. 
Cowboys north and south; James, Will. 
Cow country," James, Will. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 235 

Cowman's life ; Rak, Mary K. 

Coyote stories ; Mourning Dove. 

The craft of the critic; Smith, Samuel Stevenson. 

Crossing the plains; Starbuck, Edith. 

Cross my heart; McRae, John, and Savage, George. 

A cross of gold ; Barnett, Donald H. 

Cry of time ; Hall, Hazel. 

The cuckoo calls; Burglon, Nora. 

Curtains; Hall, Hazel. 

Custer and the Gall saga; Kuhlman, Dr. C. 

Dark B rid well ; Fisher, Vardis. 

Dark horse ; James, Will 

Dark world and wide ; Wilson, C. Lee. 

Davy Jones's Locker; Fulton, Reed. 

Dawn in Lyonesse; Chase, Mary Ellen. 

Daylight moon ; Forrest, Elizabeth Chabot. 

The day of the cattleman ; Osgood, E. S. 

Days and deeds of the Oregon Country; Horner, John. B. 

The day will come ; Marion, Elizabeth. 

Deerfoot prints; Corning, Howard McKinley. 

Descriptive geometry by the normal view method ; Gough, A. C, 

Deep silver; Burglon, Nora. 

The desert lake mystery ; Strahan, Kay Cleaver. 

Desert road to Shani-lun; Hanson, Rita Mohler. 

Devil drums ; Ripley, Clements. 

The devil learns to vote ; Connolly, C. P. 

Dictionary of the Chinook language; Gill, John. 

The Dingbat of Arcady ; Wilkinson, Marguerite. 

D is for Dutch; Williamson, Thames. 

Disillusion ; Cochrane, Ben. H., and Coldiron, William Dean. 

Dobry; Shannon, Monica. 

Doctor Mallory; Hart, Alan. 

Dog-team doctor; Anderson, Eva. 

Dollars to doughnuts ; Hughes, Glenn. 

Donald Mackenzie, "King of the Northwest" ; Mackenzie, Cecil W. 

The Donne tradition ; Williamson, George. 

Drifting cowboy; James, Will. 

Dr. John McLoughlin; Powers, Alfred. 

Dr. Norton's wife; Walker, Mildred. 

Drowned memories ; Teichert, (Mrs.) Minerva Kohlhepp. 

Druid path ; Marsh, Ellis Ryan. 

The drums in our street; Davies, Mary Carolyn. 

Dude ranch; Peet, Creighton. 

Dust and sun ; Ripley, Clements. 

Early civilization ; Goldenweiser, Alexander A. 

Early days in Oregon; Riddle, George. 

Early life and times of the first Congregational .church of Pocatello; Howard, 

Dr. Minnie F. 

Early printing in the Oregon country ; Powers, Alfred. 
Early schools of Washington territory ; Bowden, Angie Burt, 
The earth told me; Williamson, Thames. 
Echoes of the Grande Ronde ; Huffman, Bert. 
Edith Bonham ; Foote, Mary Hallock. 



236 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Edward Moxon Publisher of poets ; Merriam, Harold G. 

Ee-dah-how; Coker, Tracy. 

Eighty-one years in the west ; Bruffey, G. A. 

Elkanah and Mark Walker, Pioneers among the Spokanes ; Drury, Clifford. 
Merrill. 

Elrod's guide and book of information of Glacier National Park; Elrod, Mor 
ton J. 

Eminent Asians; Hall, Josef Washington (Upton Close). 

Enchanted corridors; Dunham, Wayland A. 

Enchanted lake ; Lapham, Stanley C. 

The Eskimo and his reindeer in Alaska ; Andrews, Clarence Leroy. 

Essentials of effective speaking ; Orr, Frederick W. 

Ethan Allen; Holbrook, Stewart H. 

Eugene O'Neill; Winther, Sophus Keith. 

The Eve in Evelvn ; Hughes, Glenn. 

Facing the Golden West ; Norton, William Bernard. 

Falcon mystery; Williamson, Thames. 

Fallen petals ; a collection of verse ; Burgess, F. Ina. 

The Family; Riasanovsky, Mrs. Antonina (pseud. Nina Federova). 

The fang in the forest ; Alexander, Charles 

The Far West coast; Denton, V. L. 

Feelin* fine: Bill Hanley's book; Monroe, Anne Shannon. 

Fiddler's green; Wetjen, Albert Richard. 

Fifty years in Oregon; Geer, T. T. 

The Fighting stars of Oregon ; Conner, Sabra. 

Fire weed; Walker, Mildred. 

First time in history ; Strong, Anna Louise. 

Fishing in the Olympics; Webster, Edward. 

Five foreigners in Japan; Gowen, H. H. 

Flame in the wind ; Workman, Rona Morris. 

Flames from a candle; Skillern, Helen. 

Flaming forest; Atwater, Montgomery. 

Flight's end; Maize, Lillian Taft. 

Flint spears; James, Will. 

Flood-fighters ; Williamson, Thames. 

Flute of the Gods ; Marah, Ellis Ryan. 

Flying chips ; Bradley, Henry Crum. 

Flying U omnibus ; Bower, B. M. 

Fog and men on Bering sea ; Miller, Max 

Following old trails ; Stone, B. A. L. 

Footprints; Strahan, Kay Cleaver. 

Forest fire and other verse ; Guthrie, John D. 

Forest trees of the Pacific coast; Eliot, Willard Ayres. 

Forgive Adam; Foster, Michael. 

Forgive us our virtues; Fisher, Vardis. 

Forgotten Gods; Harper, Theodore Acland. 

Fort Hall on the Oregon Trail ; Brown, Jennie. 

Forty years on the frontier ; Stuart, Granville. 

Four hearts doubled ; Savage, George, and Peltret, Edward. 

Four plays from the Pacific Northwest ; Ernst, Alice Henson. 

Four wagons west ; the story of Seattle ; Watt, Roberta Frye. 

Fragrance of sage ; Campbell, Agnes Dorena. 

The French Canadian pioneers of the Willamette Valley; Barry, J. Neilson. 

The friendly firs ; Euwer, Anthony. 

The friendly mountain; Webster, Edward B. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 237 

Friends of my life as an Indian ; Schultz, James W. 

From oxcart to airplane; Dee, Minnie Root. 

From the land of the Snow-Pearls ; Higginson, Mrs. Ella Rhoda. 

Frontier Doctor; Coe, Urling C. 

The frozen barrier; Browne, Belmore. 

Fujiyama, the sacred mountain of Japan ; Starr, Frederick. 

Gates of Paradise and other poems ; Markham, Edwin. 

The gate swings in ; Burglon, Nora. 

General Claxton ; Hanford, Cornelius Holgate. 

General history of Oregon (Vols. I and II) ; Carey, Charles H. 

General history of Oregon prior to 1861 (a Vols.) ; Carey, Charles Henry. 

Genevieve, A tale of Oregon ; Balch, Frederic Homer. 

Gettin' licked; Perkins, Phil H. 

Ghost ship; Burglon, Nora. 

Giants and ghosts of Central Europe ; Hazen, David W. 

Girl from Big Horn Country ; Chase, Mary Ellen. 

Glacier mystery; Williamson, Thames. 

God lights a candle; Monroe, Anne Shannon. 

God's law of life; Baird, Jesse H. 

Gold dust; Schultz, James W. 

Gold eagle guy; Levy, Melvin. 

Golden Portage ; Case, Robert Ormond. 

The gold-gated West; Simpson, Samuel. 

Gold is where you find it ; Ripley, Clements. 

Golden age of Russian literature ; Spector, Ivar. 

Goodly fellowship ; Chase, Mary Ellen. 

Goodly heritage ; Chase, Mary Ellen. 

Good medicine; Russell, C. M. 

Gotch; Sweetman, Luke D. 

Government hunter; Atwater, Montgomery. 

Government in the United States; Johnson, Claudius Osborne. 

A Grandfather for Benjamin Franklin; Anderson, Florence Bennett. 

Grasshopper gold; Barnett, G. T. and O. E. 

The Great Adam ; Snell, George Dixon. 

The great trek ; Miller, Max. 

Green fire; Hughes, Glenn. 

The grizzly bear; Wright, William Henry. 

Guess again; Hughes, Glenn. 

The Guggenheims: The making of an American Dynasty; O'Conner, Harvey. 

Gypsy down the lane ; Williamson, Thames. 

Hall J. Kelley on Oregon; Kelley, Hall J. 

Hall Young of Alaska; Young, Samuel Hall. 

Handbook of Northwest flowering plants ; Gilkey, Helen Margaret, 

Hannah Marie; Bennett, Richard. 

Happy days; Hughes, Glenn. 

Happy endings; Miller, Marian (Mrs. Edith Knight Hull). 

Happy-go-lucky; Hughes, Glenn. 

Happy valley; Monroe, Anne Shannon. 

Harbor of the Sun, the story of the port of San Diego ; Miller, Max. 

Harmony in Interiors; Seeley, Vernita (Mrs. Paul Stark). 

Harp of water ; Pratt, Laurence. 

A hat for Harriet; Hutchison, Paula. 

Hawaiian Idylls of love and death ; Gowen, Reverend Herbert H. 

The hearth of happiness; Monroe, Anne Shannon. 



238 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

The heart of the little Shikara; Marshal, Edison. 

Heart of the red firs; Anderson, Ada Woodruff. 

The Heart of the Skyloo ; Sperlin, Ottis Bedney. 

Heart of the valley; Stovall, Dennis H. 

The heathers at home ; Kimball, William Alden. 

Heaven high, hell deep ; Archibald, Norman. 

Heavenly discourse; Wood, Charles Erskine Scott. 

Henry Harmon Spalding; Drury, Clifford Merrill. 

Here are my people ; Burks, Arthur J. 

Here comes somebody; Lampman, Ben Hur. 

Heroes and heroic deeds of the Pacific Northwest; Talkington, H. L. 

The heroes of the Yukon and other poems; Gilkey, J. A. 

Heroine of the prairies ; Hargreaves, Sheba. 

Hidden Island; Rutherford, Anworth. 

High country; Ernst, Alice Henson. 

High trails of Glacier National Park; Thompson, Margaret. 

His Excellency and Peter ; Harper, Theodore Acland. 

His job; Wood, Lambert Alexander. 

Historic Oregon; Parrish, Philip H. 

History of Alturas and Blaine Counties ; McLeod, George A. 

History of Custer County, Idaho; Black, Jesse R. 

History of education in Washington ; Bolton, Frederick E, and Bibb, Thomas W. 

History of Leesburg Pioneers ; Kirkpatrick, Orion E. 

The History of Oregon ; Carey, Charles. 

A History of Oregon ; Clark, Robert Carlton. 

History of Oregon ; Lyman, Horace S. 

A History of Oregon Literature; Powers, Alfred. 

History of Oregon Newspapers ; Turnbull, George D. 

History of pharmacy in Oregon; Zietle, Adolph. 

A history of religion; Gowen, Herbert Henry. 

History of the Coeur d'Alene Mission of the Sacred Heart; Cody, Reverend 

Edmund R. 

History of the Columbia river valley, from The Dalles to the sea; Lockley, Fred. 
A History of the Oregon Country; Scott, Harvey W. 
A History of the Pacific Northwest ; Fuller, George W. 
A History of the Pacific Northwest; Schafer, Joseph. 
A History of the Silverton Country; Down, Robert Horace. 
History of the State of Washington ; Pollard, Lancaster. 
History of the Teton valley ; Driggs, B. W. 
History of the University of Oregon ; Sheldon, Henry D. 
History of the Willamette Valley ; Clark, Robert Carlton. 
History, psychology, culture; Goldenweiser, Alexander A. 
The hobgoblin murder; Strahan, Kay Cleaver. 
Holidays with Betty Sue and Sally Lou ; Plowhead, Ruth. 
Holy old mackinaw: a natural history of the American lumberjack; Holbrook, 

Stewart H. 

Home again ; Moore, Wert Emmit. 
Home ranch; James, Will. 
Homer in the sagebrush; Stevens, James. 
Home songs; Goldenstein, Pauline. 
Homespun ; Hall, Grace E. 
Homestead; Eunson, Dale. 
Honey in the horn; Davis, Harold L. 
Horse and buggy essays; Brand, Charles A. 
House of silk; Wurdeman, Audrey. 
The house of the dawn; Ryan, Marah Ellis. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 239 

How congress makes laws ; Dill, Clarence Cleveland. 
How could I be forgetting?; Lampman, Ben Hur. 
How it came about stones ; Linderman, Frank B. 
Hunky; Williamson, Thames. 
Hunting the buffalo; Branch, E. Douglas. 

Ice-bound; Ashton, James. 

I change worlds; Strong, Anna Louise. 

I cover the waterfront ; Miller, Max. 

Idaho : a guide in word and picture ; Fisher, Vardis. 

The Idaho citizen; Lukens, Fred E. 

Idaho digest and blue book ; Hobson, George C. 

The Idaho encyclopedia; Fisher, Vardis. 

Idaho lore ; Fisher, Vardis. 

Imagism and imagists ; Hughes, Glenn. 

I, Mary Maclane ; Maclane, Mary. 

I met them once ; Stewart, George. 

In calico and crinoline ; Sickels, Eleanor M. 

Indian myths of the Northwest; Bagley, Clarence Booth. 

Indian old-man stories; Linderman, Frank B. 

Indian wars of Idaho ; Arnold, R. Ross. 

Indian why stories ; Linderman, Frank B. 

In exile and other stories ; Foote, Mary Hallock. 

Innnnnnnn Haaaaaaaaa; Hendricks, Robert J. 

In our back yard ; Reynolds, Helen Mary. 

Inside out ; Savage, George, and Peltret, Edward. 

Insurgent Mexico; Reed, John. 

In the days of Ichabod ; Duboc, Jessie. 

In the lives of men ; Hart, Alan. 

In the saddle with Uncle Bill ; James, Will. 

In the shadow of the Mosque of Omar ; Cunningham, Bessie Mothersill. 

Integrity, the life of George Norris ; Neuberger, Richard, and Kahn, Stephan. 

In tragic life; Fisher, Vardis. 

The introductory chapter to the history of the trials of Moyer, Haywood, and 

Pettibone, and Harry Orchard; Wood, Fremont. 
Introductory photography; Garman, John C. 
Iron brew; Holbrook, Stewart H. 
Island of the red God ; Adams, Leta Zoe. 

The Janitor's Cat; Harper, Theodore Acland. 

Jenny Lind ; Wagenknecht, Edward. 

Joab Powell: homespun missionary; Nichols, Leona M. 

Joaquin Miller, literary frontiersman ; Peterson, Martin Severin. 

Jobs, currency, a minimum wage; Barnes, J. C. 

John Bodewin's testimony; Foote, Mary Hallock. 

John Home, a study of his life and work ; Gipson, Alice. 

John Keats and the sonnet tradition ; Zillman, Lawrence John. 

John Ledyard, an American Marco Polo; Munford, Kenneth. 

John McLoughlin : patriarch of the northwest ; Johnson, Robert C. 

Jolly jingle picture book ; Jackson, LeRoy. 

Josie and Joe ; Plowhead, Ruth. 

Journal of John Work ; Work, John. 

The Journal of Kenko ; Gowen, Herbert Henry. 

The Journals and letters of John Owen, pioneer of the northwest; Owen, Major 

John. 
Journals of Theodore Talbot; Carey, Charles H. 



24Q NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Jugheads behind the lines ; Noble, Carl. 

Jungle woman: the amazing experience of Mrs. Frances Yeager, first white 

woman to live in the Sumatra jungle; Yeager, Francis (Morden), Mrs. 

Richard, and Colter, EH (Mrs. Glenn Fa Galde). 
Just loggin' ; Workman, Rona Morris. 

Kamiakim, the last hero of the Yakimas ; Splawn, Andrew Jackson. 

Keeper of the wolves ; Mansfield, Norma Bicknell. 

Keogh, Commanche, and Custer, Luce, Cap. E. S. 

Kitchen Sonnets ; Fuller, Ethel Romig. 

The Klondike clan ; Young, Samuel Hall. 

Klondike nugget; Bankson, Russell S. 

Komache, a romantic drama of old Japan ; Hughes, Glenn. 

Kootenai why stories; Linderrnan, Frank B. 

Kubrick the outlaw ; Harper, Theodore Acland. 

Labor movement in America; Clark, Marjorie Ruth, and Simon, Fanny S. 

The land claimers ; Wilson, John Fleming. 

The land is bright; Binns, Archie. 

Landmarks and Literature; Skiff, Frederick W. 

Land of Forgotten man; Marshal, Edison. 

Land of Plenty; Cantwell, Robert. 

The last assembly ball ; Foote, Mary Hallock. 

The last pioneers ; Levy, Melvin. 

Laugh and lie down ; Cantwell, Robert. 

The laurels are cut down; Binns, Archie. 

A Leaf in review ; Allred, A. H. 

The Led-horse Claim ; Foote, Mary Hallock. 

A legend in the Coos ; Lockhart, Agnes Ruth. 

Legends of the Klickitats ; Bunnell, Clarence Orvel. 

Letters from an Oregon ranch; Stephans, Louise G. 

Letters of long ago ; Reid, Agnes. 

Let them live ; Holbrook, Stewart H. 

The Liar and the Unicorn ; Hughes, Babette. 

Life and adventure of Alex Toponce ; Toponce, Alex. 

Life in the Rocky Mountains ; Ferris, Warren Angus. 

Life of a fossil hunter; Sternberg, Charles H. 

Life's yesterdays; McCulloch, Elizabeth. 

Lige Mounts ; Linderrnan, Frank B. See Morning Light. 

Light from Arcturus; Wagner, Mildred. 

The light from Sealonia ; Barker, Arthur. 

The light in the jungle ; Marshal, Edison. 

Lightship ; Binns, Archie. 

Lilian Gish, an interpretation ; Wagenknecht, Edward. 

Lincoln and other poems; Markham, Edwin. 

Listener's room; Parsons, Mabel Holmes. 

Listen world; Savage, George Milton, and Peltret, Edouard. 

Literature we appreciate; Blankenship, Russell, and others. 

Literature we like: our Literary heritage; Blankenship, Russell, and Nash, 

Winifred H. 

Little bay creatures ; Willis, Elizabeth Bayley. 
Little Bird Blue ; Lovell, William, and Finley, Irene. 
Little bits of Lost River history ; Bottolfsen, C. A. 
The little days; Gill, Frances. 
A little freckled person ; Davies, Mary Carolyn. 
Little saints annoy the Lord ; Hutchinson, Arthur Howard. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 225 

WINTHER, SOPHUS KEITH (Washington; pr. res.): 
Take All to Nebraska; The Macmillan Co., 1936 

Rec. No 

Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The splendid courage and unquenchable hope of foreigners on 
our mid-west farm lands in 1898 and after, are simply and vividly portrayed 
in the lives of Peter Grimsen and his family as they struggle to adjust them 
selves to a new way of life among strangers speaking a strange tongue. 
Locale, Nebraska. 

2. A story of early days in Nebraska. Sadly marred with profanity and 
moral references. (Why do authors feel that they must be faithful to the 
dialogue of that community only in the profane and vulgar?) Characters 
well drawn, fairly good plot situations. Realistic. 
WINTHER, SOPHUS KEITH (Washington; pr. res.): 

This Passion Never Dies; The Macmillan Co., 1938 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Completing a trilogy of novels about a Danish immigrant 
family in Nebraska, this book convincingly and feelingly portrays the econo 
mic struggle of the mid-western farmer. Staggering under burdens too heavy 
to bear, Peter, the father, loves his land with an undying passion, and strove 
to keep his sons strong and unbroken in spirit. 

2. The third of a series of novels depicting the struggle of a family of 
Danish immigrants in Nebraska, Peter Grimsen dies as the farm is sold for 
the mortgage, but his courageous wife and son, Hans, plan to meet life anew. 
An honest picture of farm struggle in that era. 
WOLVERTON, BRUCE (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Souvenir; (Privately printed), 1929 
Rec. No 

Comment: A very small brochure. Short poems and prose excerpts from Ore 
gon's early-day writers. Significance slight. 
WOOD, CHARLES ERSKINE SCOTT (Oregon; fr. res.): 

A Book of Indian Tales; Vanguard Press, 1929 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Indian myths retold as the author heard them in the earlier days 
of Oregon. Simple, effective style. Intensely interesting to the casual reader 
and the student of ethnology. 
WOOD, CHARLES ERSKINE SCOTT (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Heavenly Discourse; Vanguard Press, 1927 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. An excellent example of good satire. A criticism of the mores 
of the day. It is good now and then "to turn a stream of fresh and free 
thought on our stock notions and habits." A book to start thinking. ^ 

2. Strikingly keen and clever satire on many of our most cherished insti 
tutions and attitudes, done in an exuberant spirit. Inevitable, the narrow- 
minded orthodox reader will be incensed at Mr. Wood for daring ^to dis 
agree with him. But the orthodox person of more liberal tendencies^ will gain 
wisdom by viewing his sacred fetishes through the eyes of this serious^ keen, 
emancipated thinker. The style is good. The material is far too sophisticated 
for consumption by high school students. 



226 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

WOOD, CHARLES ERSKINE SCOTT (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Mam; A Sonnet Sequence; F. W. Baltes, 1918 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Comment: A sequence of love poems in a very pleasing and excellent literary 

style. 
WOOD, CHARLES ERSKINE SCOTT (Oregon; fr. sres.): 

A Masque of Love; Walter M. Hill, 1904 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Comment: Literary style excellent, of a somewhat outmoded cast. A poetical 

prose interspersed with lyrics. 
WOOD, CHARLES ERSKINE SCOTT (Oregon; fr. res.): 

Poems From the Ranges; Lantern Press, 1929 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Comment: Lyrics of a free rhymed verse of a very high quality. The initial 
poem, First Snow f is in my opinion one of the finest lyrics ever written in 
America. Mired is another fine lyric. Published in a limited edition at four 
dollars a copy. 
WOOD, CHARLES ERSKINE SCOTT (Oregon; fr. res.): 

The Poet In the Desert; F. W. Baltes, 1915 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Free verse in the Whitmanesque manner. The prophecy and poetry 
of the revolution which is to bring about the chimerical paradise of philoso 
phic anarchy. Attacks on various evils of society done more subtly and beau 
tifully than Markham does them. Splendid poetry. 

WOOD, ELIZABETH LAMBERT: Mansions in the Cascades. See MON 
ROE, ANNE SHERMAN 
WOOD, ELIZABETH LAMBERT (Oregon; fr. res ) : 

Cougar Pass; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1933 
Rec. Jr. H. 7,8,9 

Comment: The adventures of three boys in the Calapooya Mountains. Good 
description of life in the mountains, but the theme is rather over-drawn. 
Simple narrative style. 
WOOD, ELIZABETH LAMBERT (Oregon; fr. res ) : 

Silver House of Klane Chuck; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & 

Mort), 1931 
Rec. Jr.H. 7,8,9 

Comment: The experiences of several children on the Oregon coast. Finding 
of beeswax and treasure from the beeswax ship wrecked there in legendary 
times. Dignified style and convincing narrative. 
WOOD, ELIZABETH LAMBERT (Oregon; fr. res ) : 

The Trail of the Bear; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1932 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: The story of adventure in the high Cascades. Story not improbable, 
in fact quite convincing. Several boys hunting bear and encountering other 
wild life of the region. Authentic nature information. Restrained style, not 
at all lurid. Good reading. 
WOOD, ELIZABETH LAMBERT (Oregon; fr. res ) : 

Wolves of the Illihee; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1934 
Rec. Jr.H. 7,8,9 
Comment: Juvenile with an Oregon wilderness background. Reasonably enter- 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 227 

taining but ordinarily told. Author understands children and knows her 
wild life. 
WOOD, FREMONT (Idaho; pr. res.): 

The Introductory Chapter to the History of the Trials of Moyer, 
Haywood, Pettibone, and Harry Orchard; The Caxton Printers, 
Ltd., 1931 
Rec. Sr. H. n, 12 

Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This is the introductory chapter to the most important Idaho 
trial, important for political, social, and economic reasons. The sketch is 
written by the judge who sat at the trial, and includes details not made pub 
lic in legal records or newspapers of the time. The remainder of the book 
was promised but not printed. 

2. This pamphlet gives the introductory chapter of the history of the trials 
of Moyer, Haywood, Pettibone, and Orchard by Judge Fremont Wood, who 
tried these men. It gives the viewpoint of the Judge, after twenty-five years, 
involving details not made public. The pamphlet makes very interesting his 
tory of labor difficulties. 
WOOD, LAMBERT ALEXANDER (Oregon; fr. res.): 

His Job; The Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1932 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: 1940 is a timely year in which to read these letters written by a 
twenty-two-year-old Lieuterant in the World War to his parents and friends 
in Oregon. A reader is refreshed, not depressed, through the glimpse in this 
intimate correspondence of the vitality and the heroic courage revealed in 
the young American across the seas. 
WOODBRIDGE, WILLIAM WITHERSPOON (Washington; pr. res.): 

That Something; Smith-Kinney, Printers, Tacoma, 1914 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: A well-written uplift story in the best manner of Success Magazine. 
It carries real inspirational value for high school boys and sounds sincere, 
although the author professes to have written it as a satire on Rotary. 
WOODWARD, AMY TEMPLE (Idaho; pr. res.): 

Colored Leaves; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1933 
Rec. Jr. H. 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. J r . Sen. Gr. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. Ninety sonnets dealing with the common things of life, by a 
new Northwest writer of promise. 

2. A splendid book of verse. Many good lessons. Much beauty and keen 
appreciation of life. Some very emotional none dull. 

3. Ninety sonnets dealing with the common things of life. The verse is 
quite good at times and the subject matter is sometimes dealt with in an un 
usual way. 

WOODWARD, MARY ALETHEA (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Songs of the Soul; Stratford Company, 1924 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: Competent, restrained lyrics with a strong and sincere religious 
cast. The book is not remarkable in any way, but it is sincere and honest 
work. 



228 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

WOOLSTON, HOWARD B. (Washington; pr. res.): 

Metropolis; A Study of Urban Communities; D. Appleton-Century 
Co., 1938 

Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 
Sp. R. 

Comment: i. "A handbook giving an account of city life during the past 
fifty years in America, it attempts particularly to evaluate the effects of mod 
ern urban economy upon the attitudes and conduct of citizens involved in 
its operation." An unusual approach, it answers many new questions; how 
ever, its mechanical organization will appeal to teachers but not to the gen 
eral reader. 

2. This book by Professor Woolston is written in his usual entertaining 
style. It is the result of many years of research and revision and lecturing. 
In addition to the more obvious divisions, all well treated, there are chapters 
on "Urban Psychology" and "Urban Trends" that are exceptionally good. 
WORK, JOHN (Montana; deceased): 

The Journal of John Work, a Chief-Trader of the Hudson's Bay 
Company , During his Expedition from Vancouver to the Flatheads 
and Blackfeet of the Pacific Northwest (Editors: William S. 
Lewis and Paul C. Phillips); Arthur H. Clark Company, 1923 
Rec. Sr. C. Gr. 

Sp. R. 

Comment: This book consists of a historical sketch of the fur trade in the 
West and Pacific Northwest, a brief biography of John Work, and his Jour 
nal of an expedition to the Snake River country in 1831-1832. Contains some 
interesting new material on the Lolo Trail across the Bitter Root Mountains 
and a part of Western Montana. 
WORKMAN, MRS. RONA MORRIS (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Flame in the Wind; Privately printed. 
Rec. No 

Comment: This verse attempts philosophical themes but succeeds only in using 
capital letters. Without literary value, and, at least for mature readers, with 
out human value. There is no touch of sharply revealed experience anywhere 
in the book. 
WORKMAN, MRS. RONA MORRIS (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Just Loggin'; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & Mort), 1936 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: Mrs. Workman's poems are devoted to life in a logging camp and 
the type of men who work in the woods. She herself lived in such camps and 
is familiar not only with the vernacular of loggers but their ways of think 
ing and living. The tone of her voice rings true. 
WRIGHT, WILLIAM HENRY (Washington; fr. res.): 

Ben The Black Bear; Scribner's Sons, 1910 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: One of the best bear stories I have read. It deals with first-hand 
observation; when the author uses other material he is careful to say that 
he did not gather it himself. The matter is authentic, but the story is as 
interesting as fiction. 
WRIGHT, WILLIAM HENRY (Washington; fr. res.): 

The Grizzly Bear; Charles Scrihner's Sons, 1910 
Rec. Sr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Comment: Well written. Restrained. Interesting, The narrative part deals 
with the author's attempts to shoot, catch, and photograph grizzlies. The 
second part deals succinctlv and interestingly with facts concerning charac 
teristics, habits and so on of the grizzly. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 229 

WURDEMAN, AUDREY (Washington; birth and r. res.): 
Bright Ambush; Reynal & Hitchcock, 1934 

Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A winner of the Pulitzer Prize for poetry. These lyrics are 
short, many of high quality. In some, facility rather than high quality is 
evident. The little poem is not so impressive as others Being Born, Text, 
Persephone! or Fiddler's Green. Locale, general. 

2. This is the author's first book of verse, and it was awarded the Pulit 
zer Prize in 1935. It contains 78 pages of poems, many of them sonnets, de 
lightful lyrics of swift and sure phrasing. Text and Only the Blackbird are 
exceptionally ne poems. 
WURDEMAN, AUDREY (Washington; birth and fr. res.): 

Splendour in the Grass; Harper & Brothers, 1936 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. These poems, largely collected by the poet after their appear 
ance in magazines, show much discrimination and vivid imagery; but often 
the thought, and almost as often the imagery, lacks clarity. 

2. These sixty-one lyric poems on man's inability to see infinity in little 
things are based particularly on nature and generally on man and man's 
philosophy. They spoil their own illusionment by twisting beauty to futility 
with nostalgic, color words and flexible syncopation. Interest, lessened by 
non-intensity, is held by craftsmanship. 
WURDEMAN, AUDREY (Washington; birth and fr. res.): 

The House of Silk; Harold Vinal, New York, 1927 
Rec. Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 

Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: This slim volume of brief lyric poems contains much that is genu 
inely poetic in quality, rhythmically presented, which would be enjoyed by 
mature students. George Sterling says of the writer, "a greatly promising 
poet; I am grateful to the alleged Fates for such talent as this. Here is 
poetry, alluring and individual." 
WURDEMAN, AUDREY (Washington; birth and fr. res.): 

The Seven Sins; Harper & Brothers, 1935 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. A narrative poem that deals with the careers and characters 
of seven sons who, upon the death of their father, set out into the world to 
satiate their individual inclinations toward evil. The book is a laudable con 
tribution to our store of contemporary poetry in that it not only reads like an 
exciting adventure story, and shows subtle mastery in the delineation of char 
acter, but that it also reveals an admirable command of poetic technique. 

2. . A poem which received the Pulitzer Prize, 1934. It contains seven 
poems, a prologue and an epilogue, depicting the lives of seven sons who 
have a heritage of hatred. Each lives according to his taste and none is 
worthy. The poems are sordid stories graphically told; powerful lessons of 
inheritance. 

3. Seven narratives of seven brothers who, upon their father's death, 



230 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

divided his money and went their separate ways. Strong, dramatic poetry. 
The poet, who won the 1934 Pulitzer Prize, shows even better as a dramatic 
narrative writer than she did as a lyric poet Locale, indefinite. 
WURDEMAN, AUDREY (Washington; birth and fr. ires.): 

Testament of Love; Harper & Brothers, 1938 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12- 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen, R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. The poet tells simply and with striking imagery the story of 
her love, using the well-known sonnet-sequence as a medium. There are 
forty-nine sonnets, some of exquisite beauty. 

2. A sonnet sequence in the author's usual artistic vein. There is evidence 
that it is a personal testament of the poet and her husband, Joseph Auslan- 
der. also a poet. 
YEAGER, FRANCIS (MORDEN) and COLTER, ELI (Oregon: Yeager, 

pr. res.; Colter, birth and pr res.) : 

Jungle Woman: The Amazing Experiences of Mrs. Frances Y eager t 
First White Woman to Live in the Sumatra Jungle; Appleton- 
Century Co., Inc., 1935 
Rec. Gen. R. Men, Women 

Sp. R. 

Comment: Incredible and horrifying reminiscences of four years in the Suma- 
tran jungle, where Mrs. Yeager joins her oil-driller husband, are told to 
Miss Colter. The jungle, its people and their ways, and the brutality of 
commercialism in its treatment of the natives all are vividly pictured. 
Perhaps some is told after being away from the scene too long. 
YOUNG, BEATRICE (Oregon; pr. res.): 

Winds, Waves and Wanders; Metropolitan Press (Binfords & 

Mort), 1937 
Rec. Grades i, 2, 3, 4 

Comment: This splendid little book contains a half dozen tales about Wind, 
Fog, Rock, etc., and another half dozen about Ants, Beavers, etc. They are 
presented simply and without sentimentality, but still entertainingly. I'm sure 
the facts are all accurate but they are not dull or stilted. The accompanying 
drawings are really descriptive as well as imaginative. 
YOUNG, SAMUEL HALL (Washington; fr. res.): 

Hall Young of Alaska; Fleming H. Revell, 1927 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, u, 12 

Comment: This autobiography of "the mushing Parson" tells his activities as 
a missionary first to the Indians of Alaska and later to the thousands of 
men who went there in the gold-rushes. An enthusiastic outdoors man, Dr. 
Young accompanied John Muir on several expeditions. The book is full of 
interest and is excellent reading. 
YOUNG, SAMUEL HALL (Washington; fr. res.)-' 

The Klondike Cltxn; Fleming H. Revell Co., 1916 
Rec. Sr. H. 10, n, 12 

Comment: This tale of the great stampede to the Klondike after gold in '98 
has an authentic background and incidents. The book has the sentimental and 
religious trend to be expected when the Parson is the hero, the characters are 
either types or ideals. The pictures of the trail and the camp are unforget 
table 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 231 

ZIETLE, ADOLPH (Oregon; pr. res.): 

History of Pharmacy In Oregon 1889-1939; Reprinted from Gol 
den Jubilee program of Oregon State Pharmaceutical Associa 
tion, 1939 
Rec. Gen. R. Men 

Sp. R. 

Comment: This 26-page summary sketches the formation of the Oregon State 
Pharmaceutical Association in 1890 ; points to the publication of the early 
history in the 1933 program of the association; then year by year from 1909 
on it recalls events by headlines from the Pacific Drug Review. Several por 
traits and a list of "Veteran Pharmacists" are included. 
YOUELL, GEORGE (Washington; pr. res.) : 

Lower Class; The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1938 
Rec. Jr. H. 7, 8, 9 

Sr. H. 10, ii, 12 
Jr. C. Fr. Soph. 
Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 
Gen. R. Men, Women 

Comment: i. This is a book full of chuckles, revealing human nature at its 
best. The style is straight-forward narrative, full of information that is 
homely but vital. Mr. Youell, an immigrant, has become a most successful 
business man of Tacoma and Seattle. Locale, England, New England, 
Tacoma. 

2. A very readable and straight-forward bit of autobiography by an Eng 
lishman of lower class who came away to the IT. S., where men are really 
no more fundamentally alike than in England, but where class lines are not 
so arbitrary. Forceful prose. Locale, England and Northsea. By peregrination 
arrives in Tacoma at bottom of page 237. 
ZILLMAN, LAWRENCE JOHN (Washington; birth and pr. res.): 

John Keats and the Sonnet Tradition; Lymanhouse, Los Angeles, 

1939 
Rec. Sr. C. Jr. Sen. Gr. 

Gen. R. Men, Women 
Sp. R. 

Comment: i. This is a readable book for anyone who has done serious work 
with the sonnet. Verse writers and advanced students of verse forms will 
find in it a wealth of basic information on the development of the quatorzain 
in English and some vital matter concerning the development of John Keats. 
It is not a book for beginners. Technical and critical. 

2,. No other poet has been so much studied in recent years as Keats. 
Professor Zillman does not claim for Keats' sonnets the significance of the 
odes. But he finds the study of the poet's verse-craft particularly fascinating 
in these "unpruned" examples; he sees the making of sonnets as a "technical 
apprenticeship" for the more enduring work. 



TITLE INDEX 

(For full information see Author List) 

Abraham Lincoln, A Universal man ; Bissett, Clark Prescott. 

Across the latitudes ; Wilson, John Fleming. 

Across the plains in a prairie schooner ; Lockley, Fred 

Adventures in Americana; Skiff, Frederick W. 

Alaska; Pilgrim, Mariette Shaw. 

Alder Gulch gold; Schultz, James W. 

All in the day's riding ; James, Will. 

Allison's girl ; Harper, Theodore Acland. 

All over town; Brink, Carol. 

All six were lovers ; Jones, Nard. 

All the tomorrows; Babson, Naomi Lane. 

America, its destiny ; Schuyleman, John L. 

American; Linderman, Frank B. 

American birds; Finley, William Lovell. 

American dream; Foster, Michael, 

American literature as an expression of the national mind ; Blankenship, Russell. 

American literature: our literary heritage; Blankenship, Russell. 

Americans at play; Steiner, Jesse Frederick. 

And if man triumph ; Snell, George Dixon. 

And then remold it ; Clapp, Mary B. 

Angels don't marry, and other one-act plays ; Ayerson, Florence, and Clements, 

Colin. 

Animals of the seashore ; Guberlet, Muriel Lewin. 
Animal tales of Rockies ; Cunningham, Albert J. 
Anne Minton's life; Brinig, Myron. 

Anthropology, an introduction to primitive culture; Goldenweiser, Alexander. 
Anything can happen on the river; Brink, Carol. 
The appreciation of poetry ; Moll, Ernest G. 
April ; Fisher, Vardis. 

Argumentation and public discussion ; Pellegrini, Angelo M., and Brents, Stirling. 
An army of the aged ; Neuberger, Richard, and Loe, Kelley. 
Arrowrock; Bowman, EarL 

Attack on America; White, Gen* George Ared (pseud. Ared White). 
Autobiography of John Ball, compiled by his daughters, The ; Ball, John. 
Auto-correctivism ; Fisher, Vivian Ezra. 

Babbitt's boy ; Hughes, Glenn. 

Backstage in Xanadu ; Ernst, Mrs. Alice Henson. 

Back trailing on the old frontier ; Russell, C. M. 

Bad man's trail ; Colter, Eli. 

Bad penny; Stephenson, Delia Morris. 

The bargain square ; Tobias, Ruby Weyburn. 

Battle of the Little Big Horn ; Coburn, Wallace. 

Beaded buckskin ; Barnett, G. T. and 0. E. 

Beeswax and gold ; Rogers, Thomas. 

Before the covered wagon ; Parrish, Philip H. 

Behind gray walls ; Murphy, P. C. 

Behind the ranges ; Monroe, Anne Shannon. 

Believe it or not ; Hughes, Glenn. 

The bells of helmus; Lespinasse, Cobie de. 

Ben, the black bear ; Wright, William Henry. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 233 

Beside the beautiful Willamette; Parsons, John. 

Bethel and Aurora ; Hendricks, Robert J. 

Beyond the gates of care ; Bashford, Herbert. 

Beyond dilemmas ; Quakers look at life ; Laughlin, Dr. Sceva Bright. 

Beyond law; Linderman, Frank B. 

Beyond the shining mountains ; Gould, Dorothy Fay. 

Big book of western stories ; Bower, B. M. 

Big canoe; Bowles, Mayol. 

Big enough ; James, Will. 

Big timber ; Case, Robert Ormond. 

Billy tomorrow ; Carr, Sarah Pratt. 

Birchlands; Birkland, Joran. 

Birds of Oregon ; Gabrielson, Ida Noel, and Jewett, Stanley Gordon. 

Birds of the Pacific Coast; Eliot, William Ayers. 

Bird watching in the west ; Twining, Frances Staver. 

Bird woman (Sacajawea) ; Schultz, James W. 

The bitter country; Pettibone, Anita. 

The Bitterroots ; Macleod, Norman 

Bitterroot trail; Johnson, James. 

Black cherries; Coates, Grace S. 

Blackfeet Indians; Linderman, Frank B. 

Blackfeet tales of Glacier National Park; Schultz, James W. 

Blankets and moccasins ; Wagner, Gwendolyn. 

Blessed are they; Turner, Marjorie. 

Blue bucket nuggets; De Moss, Catherine. 

Blue gold; Getty, Agnes K. 

Blue interval, poems of Crater Lake ; Moll, Ernest G. 

The bluprints of God; Lindsay, Rev. Gordon. 

Blue waters ; Helm, Richard Izer. 

Robbie, a great collie ; Alexander, Charles. 

Boise guide ; Fisher, Vardis. 

Boise, the peace valley; Bird, Annie L. 

Bondwoman; Ryan, Marah, 

A book of Indian tales; Wood, Charles Erskine Scott. 

A book of patterns for weaving by John Landes; Atwater, Mary M. (cd.). 

Books on the Pacific Northwest for small libraries ; Rockwood, Eleanor Ruth. 

Borah of Idaho ; Johnson, Claudius Osborne. 

The border trumpet; Haycox, Ernest. 

Born to be ; Taylor, Gordon. 

Boss of the Ragged O ; Mansfield, Norma Bicknell. 

Bottle of dust; Rutherford, Anworth. 

Boys of the covered wagons ; Ernest, Brother, C.S.C. 

The boy with the silver plow ; Murphy, Dennis. 

The brand ; Broderick, Theresa. 

Brawneyman ; Stevens, James. 

The brewers' big horses ; Walker, Mildred. 

Bricks without straw, the story of Linfield College; Jonasson, Jonas Adalsteinn. 

The bridge of the Gods ; Balch, F. H. 

Bright ambush; Wurdeman, Audrey. 

Bright horizons; Joseph, Horace. 

Broken lights; Hughes, Glenn. 

Buck vour luck; Tweedy, Benjamin. 

Building a state: Washington, 1869-1939; Sperlin, O. B., and Miles, Charles. 

The Building of the city beautiful ; Miller, Joaquin. 

Bunch grass & blue joint; Linderman, Frank B. 

Bursted bubbles; Leiter, Wilma. 



234 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

By Juan de Fuca's Strait; McCurdy, James. 
By scarlet torch and blade ; Euwer, Anthony. 

The cabin at the trail's end ; Hargreaves, Sheba. 
Caddie Woodlawn ; Brink, Carol. 
Campfire courage ; Marshal, Edison. 
Campus sonnets; Moll, Ernest G. 
Captain Jack, Modoc Renegade ; Payne, Doris D aimer. 
Captain Redlegs ; Conner, Sabra. 
Captains all ; Wetjen, Albert Richard. 
The case of the hanging lady ; Jones, Nard. 
Castaways of the Yukon; Rea, Ella M. 
Castles in the air; McCowan, Hervey Smith. 
Cathlamet on the Columbia ; Strong, Thomas Nelson. 
Cave mystery; Williamson, Thames 
Chance child ; Ryan, Marah. 
Checkered Tablecloth; Smith, Bess. 
Chief Joseph ; Fee, Chester Anders. 
Children of God ; Fisher, Vardis. 
Children of the covered wagon ; Carr, Mary Jane. 

Children of the covered wagon; Warner, Stella Ford, and Smith, Geddes. 
Children of the Soil ; Burglon, Nora. 
Child's story of Washington ; Anderson, Eva Greenslit, 
China's millions; Strong, Anna Louise. 
Chinese fairytales; Field, Adele M. 

Chinook, history and dictionary of Northwest coast trade jargon; Thomas, Ed 
ward Harper. 

Chloe dusts her mantel ; Gill, Laura Francis. 
The chosen valley; Foote, Mary Hallock. 
The City of Illusion ; Fisher, Vardis. 
Clawhammer ranch; Robertson, Frank. 
Clio and Mr. Croce ; Benham, Allen Rogers. 
Cloth of silver ; Offord, Lenore Glenn. 
The cock that crowed at two; Barnett, G. T. and O. E. 
Coeur d'Alene; Foote, Mary Hallock. 
Coleridge's Shakespearean scholarship ; Raysor, Thomas M. 
Colored leaves; Woodward, Amy (Fisher). 

The Columbia American greatest highway; Lancaster, Samuel Christopher. 
The Columbia river; Lyman, William Denison. 
Columbine Madonna ; Hughes, Glenn. 
The command of words; Smith, Samuel Stephenson. 
Confucianism; Starr, Frederick. 
The Conquerors ; Atwood, Reverend A. 
The Conquest ; Dye, Eva Emory. 

Contemporary Literature: our literary heritage; Blankenship, Russell. 
Come, colors come ; Fargo, Lucille Foster. 
Corner of Cathay; Fielde, Adele M. 
Corral dust; Fletcher, R. H. 
The cost of empire ; Carr, Sarah Pratt. 
Cougar Pass ; Wood, Elizabeth Lambert Wood. 
The country boy; Davenport, Homer. 
The cowboy and his interpreters; Branch, E. Douglas. 
Cowboy in the making ; James, Will. 
Cowboys north and south ; James, Will. 
Cow country; James, Will. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 235 

Cowman's life ; Rak, Mary K. 

Coyote stories ; Mourning Dove. 

The craft of the critic; Smith, Samuel Stevenson. 

Crossing the plains; Starbuck, Edith. 

Cross my heart ; McRae, John, and Savage, George. 

A cross of gold ; Barnett, Donald H. 

Cry of time; Hall, Hazel. 

The cuckoo calls; Burglon, Nora. 

Curtains; Hall, Hazel. 

Custer and the Gall saga ; Kuhlman, Dr. C. 

Dark Bridwell ; Fisher, Vardis. 

Dark horse ; James, Will 

Dark world and wide ; Wilson, C. Lee. 

Davy Jones's Locker ; Fulton, Reed. 

Dawn in Lyonesse ; Chase, Mary Ellen. 

Daylight moon ; Forrest, Elizabeth Chabot. 

The day of the cattleman ; Osgood, E. S. 

Days and deeds of the Oregon Country; Horner, John. B. 

The day will come ; Marion, Elizabeth. 

Deerf oot prints ; Corning, Howard McKinley. 

Descriptive geometry by the normal view method ; Gough, A. C. 

Deep silver; Burglon, Nora. 

The desert lake mystery ; Strahan, Kay Cleaver. 

Desert road to Shani-lun ; Hanson, Rita Mohler. 

Devil drums ; Ripley, Clements. 

The devil learns to vote ; Connolly, C. P. 

Dictionary of the Chinook language; Gill, John. 

The Dingbat of Arcady; Wilkinson, Marguerite. 

D is for Dutch ; Williamson, Thames. 

Disillusion ; Cochrane, Ben. H., and Coldiron, William Dean. 

Dobry; Shannon, Monica. 

Doctor Mallory; Hart, Alan. 

Dog-team doctor; Anderson, Eva. 

Dollars to doughnuts ; Hughes, Glenn. 

Donald Mackenzie, "King of the Northwest" ; Mackenzie, Cecil W. 

The Donne tradition ; Williamson, George. 

Drifting cowboy; James, Will. 

Dr. John McLoughlin; Powers, Alfred. 

Dr. Norton's wife; Walker, Mildred. 

Drowned memories; Teichert, (Mrs.) Minerva Kohlhepp. 

Druid path ; Marsh, Ellis Ryan. 

The drums in our street; Davies, Mary Carolyn. 

Dude ranch; Peet, Creighton. 

Dust and sun; Ripley, Clements. 

Early civilization; Goldenweiser, Alexander A. 

Early days in Oregon; Riddle, George. 

Early life and times of the first Congregational . church of Pocatello; Howard, 

Dr. Minnie F. 

Early printing in the Oregon country ; Powers, Alfred. 
Early schools of Washington territory ; Bowden, Angie Burt. 
The earth told me; Williamson, Thames. 
Echoes of the Grande Ronde ; Huffman, Bert 
Edith Bonham ; Foote, Mary Hallock. 



236 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Edward Moxon Publisher of poets ; Merriam, Harold G. 

Ee-dah-how; Coker, Tracy. 

Eighty-one years in the west ; Bruffey, G. A. 

Elkanah and Mark Walker, Pioneers among the Spokanes; Drury, Clifford. 
Merrill. 

Elrod's guide and book of information of Glacier National Park; Elrod, Mor 
ton J. 

Eminent Asians; Hall, Josef Washington (Upton Close). 

Enchanted corridors; Dunham, Wayland A. 

Enchanted lake ; Lapham, Stanley C. 

The Eskimo and his reindeer in Alaska ; Andrews, Clarence Leroy. 

Essentials of effective speaking ; Orr, Frederick W. 

Ethan Allen; Holbrook, Stewart H. 

Eugene O'Neill; Winther, Sophus Keith. 

The Eve in Evelvn ; Hughes, Glenn. 

Facing the Golden West; Norton, William Bernard. 

Falcon mystery; Williamson, Thames. 

Fallen petals ; a collection of verse ; Burgess, F. Ina. 

The Family; Riasanovsky, Mrs. Antonina (pseud. Nina Federova). 

The fang in the forest ; Alexander, Charles 

The Far West coast; Denton, V. L. 

Feelin* fine : Bill Hanley's book ; Monroe, Anne Shannon. 

Fiddler's green; Wetjen, Albert Richard. 

Fifty years in Oregon ; Geer, T. T. 

The Fighting stars of Oregon ; Conner, Sabra. 

Fire weed; Walker, Mildred. 

First time in history ; Strong, Anna Louise. 

Fishing in the Olympics ; Webster, Edward. 

Five foreigners in Japan ; Gowen, H. H. 

Flame in the wind; Workman, Rona Morris. 

Flames from a candle ; Skillern, Helen. 

Flaming forest; Atwater, Montgomery. 

Flight's end; Maize, Lillian Taft. 

Flint spears ; James, Will. 

Flood-fighters; Williamson, Thames. 

Flute of the Gods; Marah, Ellis Ryan. 

Flying chips ; Bradley, Henry Crum. 

Flying U omnibus ; Bower, B. M. 

Fog and men on Bering sea ; Miller, Max 

Following old trails ; Stone, D. A. L. 

Footprints; Strahan, Kay Cleaver. 

Forest fire and other verse ; Guthrie, John D. 

Forest trees of the Pacific coast ; Eliot, Willard Ayres. 

Forgive Adam; Foster, Michael. 

Forgive us our virtues; Fisher, Vardis. 

Forgotten Gods; Harper, Theodore Acland. 

Fort Hall on the Oregon Trail; Brown, Jennie. 

Forty years on the frontier ; Stuart, Granville. 

Four hearts doubled; Savage, George, and Peltret, Edward. 

Four plays from the Pacific Northwest; Ernst, Alice Henson. 

Four wagons west; the story of Seattle; Watt, Roberta Frye. 

Fragrance of sage; Campbell, Agnes Dorena. 

The French Canadian pioneers of the Willamette Valley; Barry, J. Neilson. 

The friendly firs; Euwer, Anthony. 

The friendly mountain; Webster, Edward B. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 



237 



Friends of my life as an Indian ; Schultz, James W. 

From oxcart to airplane; Dee, Minnie Root. 

From the land of the Snow-Pearls ; Higginson, Mrs. Ella Rhoda 

Frontier Doctor; Coe, Urling C. 

The frozen barrier; Browne, Belmore. 

Fujiyama, the sacred mountain of Japan ; Starr, Frederick. 

Gates of Paradise and other poems ; Markham, Edwin. 

The gate swings in ; Burglon, Nora, 

General Claxton ; Hanford, Cornelius Holgate. 

General history of Oregon (Vols. I and II) ; Carey, Charles H. 

General history of Oregon prior to 1861 (2 Vols.) ; Carey, Charles Henry, 

Genevieve, A tale of Oregon ; Balch, Frederic Homer. 

Gettin' licked; Perkins, Phil H. 

Ghost ship; Burglon, Nora. 

Giants and ghosts of Central Europe; Hazen, David W. 

Girl from Big Horn Country ; Chase, Mary Ellen. 

Glacier mystery; Williamson, Thames. 

God lights a candle; Monroe, Anne Shannon. 

God's law of life; Baird, Jesse H. 

Gold dust; Schultz, James W. 

Gold eagle guy; Levy, Melvin. 

Golden Portage; Case, Robert Ormond. 

The gold-gated West; Simpson, Samuel. 

Gold is where you find it; Ripley, Clements. 

Golden age of Russian literature ; Spector, Ivar. 

Goodly fellowship ; Chase, Mary Ellen. 

Goodly heritage ; Chase, Mary Ellen, 

Good medicine; Russell, C. M. 

Gotch; Sweetman, Luke D. 

Government hunter; Atwater, Montgomery. 

Government in the United States; Johnson, Claudius Osborne. 

A Grandfather for Benjamin Franklin; Anderson, Florence Bennett. 

Grasshopper gold ; Barnett, G. T. and O. E. 

The Great Adam ; Snell, George Dixon. 

The great trek ; Miller, Max. 

Green fire; Hughes, Glenn. 

The grizzly bear; Wright, William Henry. 

Guess again; Hughes, Glenn. 

The Guggenheims: The making of an American Dynasty; O'Conner, Harvey. 

Gypsy down the lane ; Williamson, Thames. 

Hall J. Kelley on Oregon ; Kelley, Hall J. 

Hall Young of Alaska ; Young, Samuel Hall. 

Handbook of Northwest flowering plants ; Gilkey, Helen Margaret. 

Hannah Marie; Bennett, Richard. 

Happy days; Hughes, Glenn. 

Happy endings; Miller, Marian (Mrs. Edith Knight Hull). 

Happy-go-lucky; Hughes, Glenn. 

Happy valley; Monroe, Anne Shannon. 

Harbor of the Sun, the story of the port of San Diego; Miller, Max. 

Harmony in Interiors; Seeley, Vernita (Mrs. Paul Stark). 

Harp of water ; Pratt, Laurence. 

A hat for Harriet; Hutchison, Paula. 

Hawaiian Idylls of love and death ; Gowen, Reverend Herbert H. 

The hearth of happiness; Monroe, Anne Shannon. 



238 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

The heart of the little Shikara; Marshal, Edison. 

Heart of the red firs ; Anderson, Ada Woodruff. 

The Heart of the Skyloo ; Sperlin, Ottis Bedney. 

Heart of the valley; Stovall, Dennis H. 

The heathers at home; Kirnball, William Alden. 

Heaven high, hell deep ; Archibald, Norman. 

Heavenly discourse ; Wood, Charles Erskine Scott. 

Henry Harmon Spalding; Drury, Clifford Merrill. 

Here are my people ; Burks, Arthur J. 

Here comes somebody; Lampman, Ben Hur. 

Heroes and heroic deeds of the Pacific Northwest; Talkington, H. L. 

The heroes of the Yukon and other poems; Gilkey, J. A. 

Heroine of the prairies ; Hargreaves, Sheba. 

Hidden Island; Rutherford, Anworth. 

High country; Ernst, Alice Henson. 

High trails of Glacier National Park ; Thompson, Margaret. 

His Excellency and Peter ; Harper, Theodore Acland. 

His job; Wood, Lambert Alexander. 

Historic Oregon; Parrish, Philip H. 

History of Alturas and Blaine Counties ; McLeod, George A. 

History of Custer County, Idaho; Black, Jesse R. 

History of education in Washington; Bolton, Frederick E, and Bibb, Thomas W. 

History of Leesburg Pioneers ; Kirkpatrick, Orion E. 

The History of Oregon ; Carey, Charles. 

A History of Oregon ; Clark, Robert Carlton. 

History of Oregon ; Lyman, Horace S. 

A History of Oregon Literature ; Powers, Alfred. 

History of Oregon Newspapers ; Turnbull, George D. 

History of pharmacy in Oregon; Zietle, Adolph. 

A history of religion ; Gowen, Herbert Henry. 

History of the Coeur d'Alene Mission of the Sacred Heart; Cody, Reverend 
Edmund R. 

History of the Columbia river valley, from The Dalles to the sea ; Lockley, Fred. 

A History of the Oregon Country ; Scott, Harvey W. 

A History of the Pacific Northwest ; Fuller, George W. 

A History of the Pacific Northwest; Schafer, Joseph. 

A History of the Silverton Country; Down, Robert Horace. 

History of the State of Washington ; Pollard, Lancaster. 

History of the Teton valley ; Driggs, B. W. 

History of the University of Oregon ; Sheldon, Henry D. 
History of the Willamette Valley ; Clark, Robert Carlton. 

History, psychology, culture; Goldenweiser, Alexander A. 

The hobgoblin murder; Strahan, Kay Cleaver. 

Holidays with Betty Sue and Sally Lou ; Plowhead, Ruth. 

Holy old mackinaw: a natural history of the American lumberjack; Holbrook, 

Stewart H. 

Home again ; Moore, Wert Emmit. 
Home ranch; James, Will. 
Homer in the sagebrush; Stevens, James. 
Home songs ; Goldenstein, Pauline. 
Homespun ; Hall, Grace E. 
Homestead; Eunson, Dale. 
Honey in the horn ; Davis, Harold L. 
Horse and buggy essays; Brand, Charles A. 
House of silk; Wurdeman, Audrey. 
The house of the dawn; Ryan, Marah Ellis. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 239 

How congress makes laws ; Dill, Clarence Cleveland. 
How could I be forgetting? ; Lampman, Ben Hur. 
How it came about stones ; Linderman, Frank B,. 
Hunky; Williamson, Thames. 
Hunting the buffalo; Branch, E. Douglas. 

Ice-bound; Ashton, James. 

I change worlds; Strong, Anna Louise. 

I cover the waterfront ; Miller, Max. 

Idaho: a guide in word and picture; Fisher, Vardis. 

The Idaho citizen ; Lukens, Fred E. 

Idaho digest and blue book ; Hobson, George C. 

The Idaho encyclopedia; Fisher, Vardis. 

Idaho lore; Fisher, Vardis. 

Imagism and imagists; Hughes, Glenn. 

I, Mary Maclane ; Maclane, Mary. 

I met them once ; Stewart, George. 

In calico and crinoline ; Sickels, Eleanor M. 

Indian myths of the Northwest; Bagley, Clarence Booth. 

Indian old-man stories; Linderman, Frank B. 

Indian wars of Idaho ; Arnold, R. Ross. 

Indian why stories ; Linderman, Frank B. 

In exile and other stories ; Foote, Mary Hallock. 

Innnnnnnn Haaaaaaaaa; Hendricks, Robert J. 

In pur back yard ; Reynolds, Helen Mary. 

Inside out; Savage, George, and Peltret, Edward, 

Insurgent Mexico; Reed, John. 

In the days of Ichabod ; Duboc, Jessie. 

In the lives of men ; Hart, Alan. 

In the saddle with Uncle Bill ; James, Will. 

In the shadow of the Mosque of Omar ; Cunningham, Bessie Mothersill. 

Integrity, the life of George Norris; Neuberger, Richard, and Kahn, Stephan. 

In tragic life; Fisher, Vardis. 

The introductory chapter to the history of the trials of Moyer, Haywood, and 

Pettibone, and Harry Orchard ; Wood, Fremont. 
Introductory photography; Garman, John C. 
Iron brew; Holbrook, Stewart H. 
Island of the red God ; Adams, Leta Zoe. 

The Janitor's Cat; Harper, Theodore Acland. 

Jenny Lind ; Wagenknecht, Edward. 

Joab Powell : homespun missionary ; Nichols, Leona M. 

Joaquin Miller, literary frontiersman ; Peterson, Martin Severin. 

Jobs, currency, a minimum wage ; Barnes, J. C. 

John Bodewin's testimony; Foote, Mary Hallock. 

John Home, a study of his life and work ; Gipson, Alice. 

John Keats and the sonnet tradition ; Zillman, Lawrence John. 

John Ledyard, an American Marco Polo; Munford, Kenneth. 

John McLoughlin: patriarch of the northwest; Johnson, Robert C. 

Jolly jingle picture book ; Jackson, LeRoy. 

Josie and Joe; Plowhead, Ruth. 

Journal of John Work ; Work, John. 

The Journal of Kenko ; Gowen, Herbert Henry. 

The Journals and letters of John Owen, pioneer of the northwest; Owen, Major 

John. 
Journals of Theodore Talbot; Carey, Charles H. 



24Q NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Jugheads behind the lines ; Noble, Carl. 

Jungle woman: the amazing experience of Mrs. Frances Yeager, first white 

woman to live in the Sumatra jungle; Yeager, Francis (Morden), Mrs. 

Richard, and Colter, Eli (Mrs. Glenn Fa Galde). 
Just loggin' ; Workman, Rona Morris. 

Kamiakim, the last hero of the Yakimas ; Splawn, Andrew Jackson. 

Keeper of the wolves; Mansfield, Norma Bicknell. 

Keogh, Commanche, and Custer, Luce, Cap. E. S. 

Kitchen Sonnets ; Fuller, Ethel Romig. 

The Klondike clan ; Young, Samuel Hall. 

Klondike nugget; Bankson, Russell S. 

Komache, a romantic drama of old Japan ; Hughes, Glenn, 

Kootenai why stories ; Linderman, Frank B. 

Kubrick the outlaw ; Harper, Theodore Acland. 

Labor movement in America; Clark, Marjorie Ruth, and Simon, Fanny S. 

The land clairners ; Wilson, John Fleming. 

The land is bright; Binns, Archie. 

Landmarks and Literature; Skiff, Frederick W. 

Land of Forgotten man; Marshal, Edison. 

Land of Plenty; Cantwell, Robert. 

The fast assembly ball; Foote, Mary Hallock. 

The last pioneers; Levy, Melvin. 

Laugh and lie down ; Cantwell, Robert. 

The laurels are cut down ; Binns, Archie. 

A Leaf in review ; Allred, A. H. 

The Led-horse Claim; Foote, Mary Hallock. 

A legend in the Coos ; Lockhart, Agnes Ruth. 

Legends of the Klickitats ; Bunnell, Clarence Orvel. 

Letters from an Oregon ranch; Stephans, Louise G. 

Letters of long ago ; Reid, Agnes. 

Let them live ; Holbrook, Stewart H. 

The Liar and the Unicorn ; Hughes, Babette. 

Life and adventure of Alex Toponce ; Toponce, Alex. 

Life in the Rocky Mountains ; Ferris, Warren Angus. 

Life of a fossil hunter; Sternberg, Charles H. 

Life's yesterdays; McCulloch, Elizabeth. 

Lige Mounts ; Linderman, Frank B. See Morning Light. 

Light from Arcturus; Wagner, Mildred. 

The light from Sealonia ; Barker, Arthur. 

The light in the jungle ; Marshal, Edison. 

Lightship ; Binns, Archie. 

Lilian Gish, an interpretation ; Wagenknecht, Edward. 

Lincoln and other poems; Markham, Edwin. 

Listener's room; Parsons, Mabel Holmes. 

Listen world; Savage, George Milton, and Peltret, Edouard. 

Literature we appreciate; Blankenship, Russell, and others. 

Literature we like: our Literary heritage; Blankenship, Russell, and Nash, 

Winifred H. 

Little bay creatures ; Willis, Elizabeth Bayley. 
Little Bird Blue ; Lovell, William, and Finley, Irene. 
Little bits of Lost River history ; Bottolfsen, C. A. 
The little days ; Gill, Frances. 
A little freckled person ; Davies, Mary Carolyn. 
Little saints annoy the Lord; Hutchinson, Arthur Howard. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 241 

Living with others; Goodrich, Laurence. 

Lobster war; Williamson, Thames. 

Lone cowboy; James, Will. 

Looking Northwest; Case, Frank Hadley. 

Look-see with Uncle Bill ; James, Will. 

Lost empire; Chevigny, Hector. 

Lost valley; Axtel, Helen. 

Lower class; Youell, George. 

Lucretia Ann in the Golden West ; Plowhead, Ruth. 

Lucretia Ann on the Oregon Trail ; Plowhead, Ruth. 

Lucretia Ann on the sagebrush plains ; Plowhead, Ruth. 

McAllister Patrol ; Mansfield, Norma Bicknell. 

McDonald of Oregon; Dye, Eva Emory. 

McLoughlin and old Oregon ; Dye, Eva Emory. 

Mademoiselle Misfortune; Brink, Carol. 

Maia: a sonnet sequence; Wood, Charles Erskine Scott. 

Main currents in American thought ; Parrington, Vernon Louis. 

Making a business woman ; Monroe, Anne Shannon. 

Mammals of the Pocatello region of Southeastern Idaho; Whitlow, Wayne B., 
and Hall, Raymond. 

The man Charles Dickens; Wagenknecht, Edward. 

Man on the barge; Miller, Max. 

Mansions in the Cascades; Monroe, Anne Shannon, and Wood, Elizabeth Lam 
bert. 

Manual of puppetry; Inverarity, Robert Bruce. 

The man who cannot die ; Williamson, Thames. 

The man with the hoe and other poems ; Markham, Edwin. 

Marching I Marching ! ; Weatherwax, Clara. 

Marcus Whitman, M.D. ; Drury, Clifford Merrill. 

Mariella of Out- West; Higginson, Ella Rhoda, Mrs. 

Mark Twain, the man and his work ; Wagenknecht, Edward. 

Marooned in Crater Lake ; Powers, Alfred. 

Marriage songs; Davies, Mary Carolyn. 

Martians investigate this crazy world; Deitz, Fred L. 

Mary Lark's nature stories; Wines, Georgiana. 

Mary Peters ; Chase, Mary Ellen. 

The mascot bears; Ingham, Clara Cogswell. 

A masque of love ; Wood, Charles Erskine Scott. 

Matrix; Levy, Melvin P. 

Mattock; Stevens, James. 

May Flavin ; Brinig, Myron. 

Mead & mangel-wurzel ; Coates, Grace Stone. 

Mei Li ; Handforth, Thomas. 

Memaloose ; Balch, Fredrick Homer. 

Memoirs of a white crow ; Marquis, Thomas B. 

Men in sun helmets ; Hurley, Victor. 

Men of Champoeg; Dobbs, Mrs. Caroline (Conselyea). 

The Me ri wether mystery ; Strahan, Kay Cleaver. 

Merry Andrew; Wier, Florence Roney. 

Metropolis: study of urban communities; Woolston, Howard B. 

Mexico around me ; Miller, Max. 

Mighty mountain; Binns, Archie. 

Mike Fink; Blair, Walter, and Meine, Franklin J. 

Mining camp melodies ; Holliday, Walt. 

Mining camp yarns; Holliday, Walt. 



242 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Mirror images ; Brandon, Dorthe. 

Mirror murder; Adams, Leta Zoe. 

Miss Millions; Hughes, Glenn. 

Mister Ole ; Bennett, Richard. 

Moccasin trail; Fulton, Reed. 

Modern acting: a manual; Rosenstein, Sophie; Haydon, Larrae A.; Sparrow, 

Wilbur. 

A modern book of esthetics ; Rader, Melvin Miller. 
Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday; Nelson, Rhoda. 
Money raising and how to do it; Garlinger, Mrs. Irene (Hazard). 
The monkey wrench; Griffith, Jason, 
Montana in the making ; Abbott, E. C. 
Montana, state guide book; Federal writers project. 
More power to you ; Lockley, Fred, and Dana, Marshall N. 
More Rawhides ; Russell, C. M. 
Morning Light; Linderman, Frank B. 
Mortgage your heart; Winther, Sophus Keith. 
Mountain cattle ; Rak, Mary K. 

The Mountain in the sky; Corning, Howard McKinley. 
Mount Hood: a guide; Federal Writers' project. 
Mt Hood Timberline Lodge ; Churchill, Claire Warner. 
Mount Rainier, a record of exploration ; Meany, Edward Stephen. 
Moxie and Hanty and Bunty ; Austin, Margot. 
Moxon, Publisher of poets; Merriam, H. G. 
Multnomah; Wells, Harry L. 
Murder on Russian Hill ; Offord, Lenore Blen. 
The mushroom boy; Harper, Theodore Acland. 
Mutiny on the Long Trail ; and, King Chinook ; Rae, Ella M. 
My adventures in the golden age of music ; Finck, Henry. 
My friend Annabel Lee; MacLane, Mary. 
My life as an Indian ; Schultz, James W. 
My native land ; Strong, Anna Louise. 
My pioneer past; Waring, Guy. 
Mystery of the Chinese box ; Sasse, Alma Benecke. 
Myths and legends of the Pacific Northwest; Judson, Katharine. 

Native American humor ; Blair, Walter. 

Native moments and other poems; Moll, Ernest George. 

Nature rambles in the Wallowas ; Stevenson, Elmo N. 

Nehalem, A story of the Pacific, A. D. 1700 ; Rogers, Thomas. 

Neurotic nightingale ; Fisher, Vardis. 

The new house; Kendall, Nancy Noon. 

New poems, Eighty songs at eighty; Markham, Edwin. 

The nine who were mothers ; Savage, George, and Peltret, Edouard. 

No compromise: the conflict between two worlds; Rader, Melvin Miller. 

North after seals ; Williamson, Thames. 

Northern lights to fields of gold ; Scearce, Stanley. 

North Pacific; Allen, Edward Weber. 

Northwest nature trails ; Lampman, Herbert Sheldon. 

Northwest verse; Merriam, H. G. 

Nor time nor space; Reed, Dallas. 

Notawkah; Hays, Arthur. 

No villain need be ; Fisher, Vardis. 

Now and again ; Walker, Charles F. 

Now I am seventy ; Ingham, Clara Cogswell. 

Now we're loggin* ; Hosrner, Paul. 

Nuvat the brave, an Eskimo Robinson Crusoe ; Doone, Radko, 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 243 

Ocean gold; Marshal, Edison. 

October house ; Strahan, Kay Cleaver. 

Odyssey of a hero ; Fisher, Vardis. 

Of lunar kingdoms ; Wilson, Henry Lovejoy. 

Oh happy youth ; Strahan, Kay Cleaver. 

Old cedar school; Estes, George. 

Old man coyote ; Linderman, Frank B. 

Old Neutriment; Wagner, Gwendolyn. 

On a passing frontier ; Linderman, Frank B. 

Once heaven was music; Leeper, Marion. 

Once upon a spring time ; Austin, Margot. 

One bell calls the watch ; Winter, William. 

On Puget Sound; Walkinshaw, Robert. 

On Sarpy creek; Nelson, Ira S. 

On Sweet water trail ; Conner, Sabra. 

On the trail of the reindeer ; Williamson, Thames. 

The open hearth ; Reed, Edwin T. 

An Oregon Boyhood; Banks, Louis Albert. 

Oregon detour; Jones, Nard. 

Oregon, end of the trail ; a W.P.A. writers' project volume, in the American 

Guide Series. 

Oregon folks; Lockley, Fred. 
Oregon geographic names ; McArthur, Lewis. 
Oregon history and early literature; Horner, John B. 
Oregon history stories ; Richardson, Ruth Ellsworth. 
Oregon sketches; Smith, Wallace. 

Oregon Trail and some of its blazers ; Rucker, Maude A. 
Oregon Trail blazers; Lockley, Fred. 
Oregon's yesterdays; Lockley, Fred. 
Orient meets Occident; Bryan, Enoch A. 
Our faith in education; Suzzallo, Henry. 

Our garden : and glimpses through its secret gate ; Barber, Charles F. 
Our greatest mountain and alpine regions of wonder ; Barnes, A. H. 
Our promised land; Neuberger, Richard Lewis. 
Outcast of Lazy B ; Colter, Eli. 
Outlines of the constitution of the U. S., of the state of Idaho, and of history of 

Idaho ; Arnold, R. R. and E. M. 
Overland in a covered wagon ; Miller, Joaquin. 
Ox-Team days on the Oregon Trail ; Driggs, Ezra, and Howard, R. 
Ox Team, or Old Oregon Trail ; Meeker, Ezra. 

Pacific Northwest: its resources and industries; King, William A., and FuIIen- 

wider, Elmer D. 

Pagan of the Alleghanies ; Ryan, Marah. 
Pahang; Bush, Willard C. 
The Painter looks at nature ; Isaacs, Walter F. 
A paragraph for lunch ; Savage, George Milton. 
Parents and pigtails; Savage, George. 
A parish in the pines ; Hagen, Lois D. 
Passions Spin the plot ; Fisher, Vardis. 
Pastels and silhouettes ; Parsons, Mabel Holmes. 
Patchwork; Hall, Grace E. 

Paul before Caesar from the Legal Viewpoint ; Ruddy, Rev. I. G. 
Paul Bunyan; Shephard, Esther. 
Paul Bunyan ; Stevens, James. 
Paul Bunyan came to the Oregon Country; Turney, Ida Virginia. 



244 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Paul Bunyan comes west ; Turney, Ida Virginia. 

Paul Bunyan swings his axe; McCorraick, Dell Jerome. 

Paul Bunyan, the work giant ; Turney, Ida Virginia. 

Pay Dirt; Quiett, Glenn Chesney. 

Pechuck Lome Knight's adventures in the Arctic; Montgomery, Richard. 

Pegasus pulls a hack; Braley, Berton. 

Peggy and Paul and Laddie ; Carr, Mary Jane. 

Peggy the nomad ; Chapel, Beatrice Shaw. 

The Peter Patter Book ; Jackson, Leroy F. 

Philosophical ideas in the United States ; Townsend, Harvey Gates. 

Philosophy for lowbrows by one of them ; Penrose, S. B. L. 

Physical and economic geography of Oregon ; Smith, Warren Du Pre, and others. 

Physics of the home; Osborn, Frederick A. 

A pictorial history of the State of Washington ; Downie, Ralph Ernest. 

The pied typer of Shrdlu Etaoin ; Grannatt, Harry Silleck. 

Pier 17; Havighurst, Walter. 

Pierrot's mother; Hughes, Glenn. 

Pig-tail days in old Seattle ; Bass, Sophie Frye. 

Pilgrim and pioneer; Ganse, John Martin. 

Pioneer days of Oregon history; Clark, A. S. 

Pioneer missionary; Wells, Lemuel H. 

Planets, stars and atoms; Frost, George Edwin. 

Plays; Miller, Joaquin. 

Plays for a folding theatre ; Clements, Colin Campbell. 

Poems; Haberly, Loyd. 

Poems; Thayer, Claudius, 

Poems from the ranges ; Wood, Charles Erskine Scott. 

Poems (with foreword by Eric W. Allen) ; Rebec, Mary Lowell. 

The poet in the desert ; Wood ; Charles Erskine Scott. 

Poetry, an interpretation of life ; Clark, Ella Elizabeth. 

Poetry: the problem of appreciation; Moll, Ernest G. 

Portulacas in the wheat; Coates, Grace Stone. 

A precursor of Perry; the story of Takano Nagahiae; Gowan, Herbert Henry. 

Preliminaries ; Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt. 

The pride of pine creek; Robertson, Frank C. 

Principles of inorganic and analytic chemistry; Baldwin, Ernest. 

Prose preferences I ; Cox, Sidney, and Freeman, E. L. 

Prose preferences II ; Cox, Sidney, and Freeman, E. L. 

Psychology of human conflict ; Guthrie, Edwin R. 

Public speaking at a glance ; Utter, Ethel. 

Quartz family of minerals ; a handbook for the mineral collector ; Dake, Henry C. 
The quest of the golden valley; Browne, Belmore. 
The quest of the sea otter; Conner, Sabra. 
Quiet shore; Havighurst, Walter. 

Radio talks and poems ; Holliday, Walt "Rags". 

Railroadman ; French, Harry Day. 

The Ranch ; Lincoln, Elliott C. 

The raspberry tree ; King, Stoddard. 

The rawhide railroad; Estes, George. 

Rawhide Rawlins; Russell, C. M. 

Reach for the moon ; Brier, Royce. 

Reading for enjoyment ; Childs, Herbert Ellsworth. 

The recent mammals of Idaho; Davis, William B. 

Red beards of the Yellow river ; Doone, Radko. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 245 

Red carnations; Hughes, Glenn. 

Red eagles of the Northwest; Haines, Frances. 

Red harvest; Hammett, Samuel Dashiell. 

Red heroines of the northwest ; Def enbach, Byron. 

Red mother ; Linderman, Frank B. 

Redskin and pioneer ; Barry, J. Neilson. 

Red sky; Harper, Theodore Acland. 

Reluctant soil; Stewart, George. 

Reminiscences of Alexander Toponce, pioneer, 1839-1923; Toponce, Alexander. 

Reminiscences of early days ; Walgamott, Charles. 

Renaissance and reformation ; Lucas, Henry S. 

The revolt of Asia ; Hall, Josef Washington. 

Rhymes of a homesteader ; Lincoln, Elliott C. 

Rhymes of a roundup camp ; Coburn, Wallace. 

Rhymes of our valley ; Euwer, Anthony. 

Riders of the Grande Ronde; Case, Robert Ormond. 

Riders West; Haycox, Ernest. 

Riding the high country ; Tucker, Pat T. 

Rim of the desert ; Anderson, Ada Woodruff. 

Rimes o' Round-up ; Fee, Chester Anders. 

Rimskittle's book; Jackson, Leroy F. 

Ring-tailed roavers ; Chittick, V. L. O. 

Rise of American democracy; Strong, Sydney. 

River of no return ; Bailey, Robert G. 

Roadside flowers of the Pacific Northwest ; Sherrard, Drew. 

The road of the grey pamir; Strong, Anna Louise. 

Romance of old Fort Hall ; Teichert, Minerva Kohl Lepp. 

Romance of the Italian villas ; Champrey, Elizabeth Williams. 

Root, hog, and die; Snell, George Dixon. 

Rough air; Haycox, Ernest. 

Royal highway of the world ; Miller, Joaquin. 

The Royal Americans ; Foote, Mary Hallock. 

Run sheep run; Williamson, Thames. 

Rusty Pete of the Lazy AB ; Fogler, Doris, and Nicol, Nina. 

The sacrifice of spring a Masque of the Queens ; Haberly, Loyd* 

Saddle and ride ; Haycox, Ernest. 

The saga of a paper mill; Pratt, Laurence. 

Saga of the Evergreens ; Lamb, Frank H. 

The Sage of Exeter ; Buck, J. R. 

The Saginaw Paul Bunyan ; Stevens, James. 

Sand; James, Will. 

Sandlappers; Rutherford, Anworth. 

San Juan Islands; Shiels, Archibald William. 

The scarlet strain ; Bogstad, Valborg C. 

Scarlet Petticoat ; Jones, Nard. 

Scenic treasure house of Oregon; Smith, Warren DuPre. 

Scorpion, A Good Bad Horse ; James, WilL 

Second house from the corner; Miller, Max. 

The Secret of the Wallowa Cave ; Easton, T. S. 

Seeds of earth; Allen, Eleanor. 

The sentimental years; Branch, E. Douglas. 

Seven seas on a shoestring; Long, Dwight. 

Seven sins; Wurdeman, Audrey. 

Seventeen chimneys ; Harper, Theodore Acland. 

Seven tickets to Singapore; White. Ared (Gen. George Ared White). 



246 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Seven weeks in Hawaii ; Crawford, M. Leola. 

Seward's folly; Marshal, Edison. 

The shadow catcher; Sloan, Donald. 

Shadows of the gallows ; Murphy, Patrick. 

Shawneen and the gander ; Bennett, Richard. 

Shep of the painted hills ; Hull, Alexander. 

The sheriff of Silver Bow ; Braley, Berton. 

Shoes of happiness ; Markham, Edwin. 

A short history of Oregon ; Homer, John B. 

A short view of Menckenisin in Menkenese ; Harrison, Joseph B. 

Shuttle-craft book ; Atwater, Mary M. 

Shuttle-craft recipe book ; Atwater, Mary M. 

Siberian gold ; Harper, Theodore Acland. 

Signposts of adventure ; Schultz, James W. 

Silas Crockett ; Chase, Mary Ellen. 

Silence; Gipson, Alice. 

Silver desert; Haycox, Ernest. 

Silver house of Klone Chuck ; Wood, Elizabeth Lambert. 

Silver in the teapot ; Barnett, G. T. and O. E. 

Silver streams ; Peery, Wilson Kimsey. 

Sinclair Lewis, our own Diogenes ; Parrington, Vernon Louis. 

Singermann; Brinig, Myron. 

Singing feathers ; Harper, Theodore Acland. 

Singing in the rain ; Monroe, Anne Shannon. 

Singing paddles; Butler, Julia. 

Sinopah, the Indian boy ; Schultz, James Willard. 

The Sisters; Brinig, Myron. 

Six decades back; Walgamott, Charles S. 

Six feet; Whitney, Ruth Cooper. 

Skookum and Sandy; Bennett, Richard. 

Skullhead the terrible ; Schultz, James Willard. 

Skycruiser ; Brier, Howard M. 

Skyline of spruce; Marshal, Edison. 

Skyline trail ; Davies, Marq Carlyn. 

Slave wives of Nehalem ; Churchill, Claire Warner. 

Sleeper of the moonlit ranges ; Marshal, Edison. 

Slow smoke; Sarett, Lew. 

Small town stuff; Blumenthal, Albert. 

Smoky; James, Will. 

The Snake river fork country ; Beal, Samuel L. 

Snow sentinels of the Pacific Northwest ; Hazard, Joseph T. 

Social control ; Landis, Paul. 

Social living; Landis, Paul and Judson. 

Some edible mushrooms ; Faubion, Nina Lane. 

Some must wander; Gatlin, George. 

Somewhere at sea and other tales ; Wilson, John Fleming. 

Songs of Italy and others ; Miller, Joaquin. 

Songs of the American seas ; Miller, Joaquin. 

Songs of the Sierras ; Miller, Joaquin. 

Songs of the soul ; Woodward, Mary Alethea. 

Sons of the sunlands; Miller, Joaquin. 

Songs of the workaday world; Braley, Berton. 

Sonnets and other poems ; Buchanan, Victor A. 

Sonnets to an imaginary madonna ; Fisher, Vardis. 

The soul of America; Dye, Eva Emory. 

Soul wounds; Schak, Al. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 247 

South of the sunset ; Churchill, Claire Warner. 

Southeast of Zamboanga ; Hurley, Vic. 

Souvenir; Wolverton, Bruce. 

Spanish trails to California ; De La Rhue, Trevino. 

The spell of the Shang Kambu and other stories ; Stovall, Dennis H, 

Spindrift; Bennett, Florence Mary. 

Spinnings from the cobwebs ; Churchill, David R. 

Spirit of '76: George E. Gibby's Scrapbook and poems; Gibby, George E. 

The splendid summits; Alexander, Charles. 

Splendor in the grass; Wurdeman, Audrey (Mrs. Joseph Auslander). 

Spring fever; Hughes, Glenn. 

Spy mystery ; Williamson, Thames. 

The spy net; White, Ared. 

Squawberry canyon ; Rutherford, An worth. 

Squaw Eloise; Ryan, Marah Ellis. 

The stagecoach; Estes, George. 

Starlight rider ;. Haycox, Ernest. 

State we live in ; Defenbach, Byron. 

Steel-dictator; O'Connor, Harvey. 

Sticks across the chimney; Burglon, Nora. 

Stories of Nehalem; Cotton, Samuel J. 

Stories of Old Oregon ; Waggoner, George A. 

Stories of Oregon ; Dye, Eva Emory. 

Stories of Shakespeare's popular comedies told in rhyme; Barre, Julia. 

Story of Alaska ; Andrews, C. L. 

The story of Mary Maclane; Maclane, Mary. 

The Story of Port Angeles ; Laundsen, G. M., and Smith, S. A. 

Story of Seattle, The; Watt, Roberta Frye (also appears as a reprint under the 

title, Four wagons west; the story of Seattle}. 
The story of the theatre ; Hughes, Glenn. 
The strain of white; Anderson, Ada Woodruff. 
Stride of man ; Williamson, Thames. 
The stubborn way; Hathaway, Baxter. 
Studies in English- World literature ; Sperlin, Ottis Bedney. 
Stumpy ; Linderman, Frank B. 
Sun Bird; Stephenson, Delia. 
Sundown; Jim; Haycox, Ernest. 

Sun God's children ; Schultz, J. W., and Donaldson, J. L. 
Sunlit peaks, an anthology of Idaho verse ; Smith, Bess. 
Sun sets in the west ; Brinig, Myron. 
Sunset trails ; Moore, Dallas. 
Sun-ups; James, Will. 
Suzanne of Kerbyville ; Stovall, Dennis H. 
The surrounded; McNickle, D'Arcy. 
Swallow, The ; Dunbar, Ruth. 
Swift flows the river; Jones, Nard. 
Swish of the kris; Hurley, Vic. 

Tad Sheldon, Boy Scout; Wilson, John Fleming. 
Take all to Nebraska ; Winther, Sophus Keith. 
Take the lightning; Ross, Nancy Wilson. 
The talent of T. S. Eliot; Williamson, George. 
Tales of the old timers ; Bechdolt, Frederick R. 
Tales of the western mountaineer ; Rusk, Claude Ewing. 
Talks to beginning teachers of English ; Dakin, Dorothy. 
Tall timber tales ; McCormick, Dell J. 



248 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Ten days that shook the world ; Reed, John. 

Testament of love; Wurdeman, Audrey. 

That girl Montana ; Ryan, Marah Ellis. 

That something; Woodbridge, William Witherspoon. 

These people; Corning, Howard McKinley. 

These stories went to market ; McKenzie, Vernon. 

They built the west ; an epic of rails and cities ; Quiett, Glenn Chesney. 

They hunted high and low ; Barnett, G. T. and O. E. 

This city of ours ; Sayre, J. Willis. 

This England ; Chase, Mary Ellen. 

This land of liberty; Bates, Ernest Sutherland. 

This man is my brother; Brinig, Myron. 

This passion never dies ; Winther, Sophus Keith. 

Thomas Lamb Eliot, 1841-1936; Wilbur, Earl Morse. 

Three killers; Colter, Eli. 

Three mustangeers; James, Will. 

Three players, a fop and a duchess ; Hughes, Babette. 

Three women poets of modern Japan ; Hughes, Glenn. 

Three plays; Magnusson, Elva Cooper. 

Through the hawse-hole; Anderson, Florence Bennett. 

To him that endureth ; Herndon, James. 

Toilers of the hills ; Fisher, Vardis. 

Told in the hills ; Ryan, Marah Ellis. 

To Mary, with Love; Sherman, Richard. 

To remember at Midnight; Foster, Michael. 

Totem tales ; Phillips, W. S. 

The trail blazers; Hamot, Alice Turnidge. 

The trail of the bear; Wood, Elizabeth Lambert. 

The trail of the plow ; GoflEn, Marie M. 

Trail smoke; Haycox, Ernest. 

Trails of early Idaho ; Anderson, Abraham C. 

Trails plowed under ; Russell, C. M. 

The tramp printer ; Lampman, Ben Hur. 

Treasures in the earth ; Fitzhugh, Edward. 

Trouble Shooter; Haycox, Ernest. 

Tsceminicum Snake river people ; Burnie, Donald. 

Tumble bear; Austin, Margot. 

Twenty eventful years ; Hodges, Lawrence Kaye. 

Two wives ; Elmendorf, Mary J. 

Ubet; Barrows, John. 

Uncle Bill ; James, Will. 

"Uncle Dan" Drumheller tells thrills of western trails in 1854; Drumheller, 

Daniel Montgomery ("Uncle Dan"). 
Undaunted; Hart, Alan. 
Under desert skies; Grissom, Irene. 
Under the linden tree; Williamson, Thames. 
Unless the wind turns ; Walker, Mildred. 
The unwelcome guest; Eliot; Henrietta R. 
Upper Mississippi ; Havighurst, Walter. 

The Valley of Lost Men ; Ernst, Alice Henson. 

Valley road ; Foote, Mary Hallock. 

Values in literature ; Wagenknecht, Edward. 

Vernon Louis Parrington, American Scholar ; Harrison, Joseph Barlow. 

Verse of the New West ; Grissom, Irene. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 249 

Vigilante days and ways; Langford, N. P. 

Vikings of the stars ; Commander, Kingsmill. 

The villain as hero in Elizabethan Drama; Boyer, Clarence. 

The voice of April land; Higginson, Ella. 

The voice of authority; Wilson, John Fleming. 

The voice of the pack ; Marshal, Edison. 

Waggery town; Duncan, Philip. 

Walkers; Hall, Hazel. 

Walk with me, Lad ; Monroe, Anne Shannon. 

Walt Whitman's pose; Shephard, Esther. 

War and peace ; Camp, Frank B. 

Ward of the redskins; Hargreaves, Sheba. 

War in Eastern Europe ; Reed, John. 

Warrior who fought Custer ; Marquis, Thomas B. 

Washington authors; Noel, Jacqueline. 

Washington poets ; Foreword by Mary J. Elmendorf . 

The Washington State Grange ; Crawford, Harriet Ann. 

Waterfront beat; Brier, Howard Maxwell. 

The way-faring man ; Estes, George. 

Way for a Sailor; Wetjen, Albert Richard. 

We are betrayed ; Fisher, Vardis. 

A wedding in June ; O'Neal, George S. 

We pointed them north ; Abbott, E. C. 

We sagebrush folks ; Greenwood, Annie Pike. 

Western prose and poetry; Coleman, Rufus A. 

Western windows ; Holmstrom, Frances. 

The West in American history ; Clark, Dan Elbert. 

Westward; Branch, E. Douglas. 

West, Young man ; Jones, Nard, and Gose, J. Gordon. 

We want that range ; Robertson, Frank. 

What the queen said ; King, Stoddard. 

Wheat woman; Jones, Nard. 

When the birds go north again ; Higginson, Mrs. Ella. 

When the West was young ; Bechdolt, Frederick R. 

Whispering range; Haycox, Ernest. 

Whispering valley; Case, Robert Ormond. 

The white blanket; Browne, Belmore. 

The white headed eagle; Montgomery, Richard Gill. 

White peaks and green ; Fuller, Ethel Romig. 

Whither democracy? ; Lennes, Nels J. 

Whitman : an unfinished story ; Penrose, Stephen B. L. 

Whoofenpoof ; Savage, George Milton, and Peltret, Edouard. 

Wide open town ; Brinig, Myron. 

Wild animal pets ; Finley, William and Irene. 

Wilderness tales; Schmoe, Floyd Wilfred. 

Wild flowers of the Pacific coast ; Haskin, Leslie L. 

Winds, Waves, and Wonders ; Young, Beatrice. 

Windy Island; Harper, Theodore Acland. 

Windy leaf ; Gill, Frances. 

Wings ; Euwer, Anthony. 

Wings north ; Case, Robert Ormond. 

Winning Oregon ; Melvin, Clay Jacobs. 

Wolves of the Illihee ; Wood, Elizabeth Lambert. 

Wooden saddles; Lay, Marian (Mrs. H. L. Davis). 

The woods colt; Williamson, Thames. 



250 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

The World I saw; Monroe, Anne Shannon. 

Writing your novel ; Garland, Ethel. 

Wy'east "The Mountain." A chronicle of Mount Hood ; McNeil, Fred H. 

Yamhills : an Indian romance ; Cooper, J. C. 

Yellow wolf: his own story; McWhorter, L. V. 

You get what you ask for ; Macleod, Norman. 

Young cowboy ; James, Will. 

Young land; Haste, Gwendolen. 

Young Mac of Fort Vancouver ; Carr, Mary Jane. 

Young man with a horn ; Baker, Dorothy. 

Young north ; Hall, Olof. 

Youth riding; Davis, Mary Carl. 

Youth walks on the highway; Wetjen, Albert Richard. 

The Yukon drive ; Case, Robert Ormond. 



TITLE INDEX ACCORDING TO LOCALE 

(For full information first consult Title and then Author Index) 



IDAHO 



All Over Town 

April "'""! 

Bitterroot Trail 

Blessed Are They 

Boise Guide 

Boise, the Peace Valley 

The checkered tablecloth 

The Chosen Valley 

Chief Joseph 

Coeur d* Alene 

Dark Bridwell 

The Desert and the Sown 

Drowned Memories 

Early Life and Times of the First Con 
gregational Church of Pocatello 

Ee-dah-how 

Edith Bonham 

Fort Hall on the Oregon trail 

The Great Adam 

Henry Harmon Sp aiding 

History of Alturas and Blaine counties 

History of Coeur d* Alene Mission of 
the Sacred Heart 

History of Custer county 

History of Leeshurg pioneers 

History of Teton Valley 

Idaho: A Guide in Word and Picture 

The Idaho Citizen 

Idaho Digest and Blue Book 

The Idaho Encyclopedia 

Idaho Lore 

Indian Wars of Idaho 

In Tragic Life 

The Introductory Chapter to the His 
tory of the Trials of Moyer f Hay- 
twood f and Harry Orchard 



A Leaf in Review 

Letters of Long ago 

Little Bits of Lost River History 

Lucretia Ann in the Golden West 

Lucretia Ann on the Sagebrush Plains 

Mammals of the Pocatello Region of 
South Eastern Idaho 

Nor Time Nor Space 

No Villain Need Be 

Odyssey of a Hero 

Outlines of the Constitution of the 
United States, of the State of Idaho 
and of the History of Idaho 

Passions Spin the Plot 

Peggy the Nomad 

The Recent Mammals of Idaho 

Red Eagles of the Northwest 

Reluctant Soil 

Reminiscences of Early Days 

River of No Return 

Romance of Old Fort Hall 

Run Sheep Run 

Six Decades Back 

The Snake River Fork Country 

The State We Live In 

Sunlit Peaks 

To Him That Endureth 

Toilers of the Hills 

Trails of Early Idaho 

Tsceminicum 

We Are Betrayed 

We Sagebrush Folks 

We Want That Range 

Yellow Wolf: His Own Story 



MONTANA 



Alder Gulch Gold 

All in the Day's Riding 

American 

Animal Tales of the Rockies 

Back Trailing on the Old Frontiers 

The Battle of the Little Bighorn 

Bearded Buckskin 

Beyond Law 

Big Book of Western Stories 

Big Enough 

Bird Woman 

Black feet Indians 



Blackfeet Tales of Glacier National 

Park 

Blankets and Moccasins 
Blue Gold 
Born To Be 

B. M. Bower's Flying U Omnibus 
The Brand 

Bunch-Grass and Blue-Joint 
Chief Joseph 
Corral Dust 

The Cowboy and His Interpreters 
Cowboy in the Making 



252 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 



A Cross of Gold 

Ouster and the Gall Saga 

Dark Horse 

The Day of the Cattleman 

The Devil Learns to Vote 

Dude Ranch 

Eighty-One Years in the West 

Elrod's guide <and Book of Information 

of Glacier National Park 
Evermay Ranch 
Following Old Trails 
Forty Years on the Frontier (Journals 

and Reminiscences of Granville 

Stuart) 

Friends of My Life as an Indian 
Gold Dust 
Good Medicine 
Gotch 

Government Hunter 
Grasshopper Gold 

High Trails of Glacier National Park 
Home Ranch 
Homestead 

Indian Old-Man Stories 
Indian Why Stories 
The Journals & Letters of John Owen 
I, Mary MacLane 
Keogh, Comanche and Custer 
Kootenai Why Stories 
Lige Mounts: free trapper (in Title 

Index. See Morning Light) 
Look-See with Uncle Bill 
Lone Cowboy 

Memoirs of ^a White Crow Indian 
Mining-Camp Melodies 
Montana: A State Guide Book 
Montana in the Making 
More Rawhides 
My Friend Annabel Lee 
My Life As An Indian 
Old Man Coyote 
Old Neutriment 
On a Passing Frontier 



On Sarpy Creek 

Pegasus Pulls a Hack 

Radio Talks and Poems 

The Ranch 

Rawhide Rawlins 

Red Harvest 

Red Mother 

Reminiscences of Alexander Toponce 

Rhymes of a Homesteader 

Rhymes of a Round-Up Camp 

Riders West 

Riding the High Country 

Rusty Pete of the Lazy A B 

Sand 

The Sheriff of Silver Bow 

Signposts of Adventure 

Singermann 

Sinopah, the Indian Boy 

The Sisters 

Skull Head the Terrible 

Slow Smoke 

Small Town Stuff 

Smoky 

The Story of Mary MacLane 

Stumpy 

Sun God's Children 

The Sun Sets in the West 

Sun Up 

The Surrounded 

This Man in My Brother 

Three Mustang eers 

Trails Plowed Under 

Viet 

Vigilante Days and Ways 

The Vigilantes of Montana 

A Warrior who Fought Custer 

We Pointed Them North 

The Whoofenpoof 

Wide Open Town 

Yellow Wolf; His Own Story 

Young Cowboy 

Young Land 



OREGON 



Allison's Girl 

The Autobiography of John Ball 

Beeswax and Gold 

Behind The Ranges 

The Bells of Helmus 

Beside the Beautiful Willamette 

Bethel and Aurora 

Beyond the Shining Mountains 

Birds of Oregon 

Blue Bucket Nuggets 

Blue Interval* Poems of Crater Lake 

Boys of the Covered Wagons 



Bricks Without Straw 
The Bridge of the Gods 
By Scarlet Torch and Blade 
The Cabin at the Trail's End 
Captain Jack, Mo doc Renegade 
Campus Sonnets 
Cathlamet on the Columbia 
Children of the Covered Wagon 
Chinook, a History and Dictionary of 

the Northwest Coast Trade Jargon 
Chloe Dusts Her Mantel 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 



253 



The Columbia America?* Great High 
way 

The Columbia River (Lyman) 

The Conquerors 

The Conquest 

Cougar Pass 

The Country Boy 

Crossing the Plains 

Cross My Heart 

Days and Deeds in the Oregon Country 

Deer foot Prints 

Desert Poems 

Dr. John McLoughlin 

Doctor Mallory 

The Drums in Our Street 

Early Days in Oregon 

Early Printing in the Oregon Country 

Echoes of the Grande Ronde 

Ee-dah-ho<w 

Enchanted Corridors 

Enchanted Lake 

The Fang in the Forest 

Feelin' Fine! Bill Hanley's Book 

Fifty Years in Oregon 

The Fighting Starrs of Oregon 

Footprints 

Fragrance of Sage 

The French Canadian Pioneers of the 
Willamette Valley 

Friendly Firs 

From Oxcart to Airplane 

Frontier Doctor 

A General History of Oregon Vol. I 

A General History of Oregon VoL II 

A General History of Oregon Prior to 
1861 

Gene<vieve> A Tale of Oregon 

The Gold-Gated West 

Hall J. Kelley on Oregon 

Happy Endings 

Happy Valley 

The Heart of Little Shikara 

The Heart of the Skyloo 

Heroine of the Prairies 

Historic Oregon 

The History of Oregon 

A History of Oregon 

History of Oregon 

A History of Oregon Literature 

History of Oregon Newspapers 

History of Pharmacy in Oregon 1889- 

1939 
History of the Columbia River Valley, 

From The Dalles to the Sea. 
A History of the Oregon Country 
A History of the Stlverton Country 



History of the University of Oregon 

History of the Willamette Valley 

Home Again 

Honey in the Horn 

Horse and Buggy Essays 

Innnnnnng Haaaaaaa! 

John McLoughlin: Patriarch of the 

Northwest 

Joab Powell; Homespun Missionary 
Joaquin Miller t Literary Frontiersman 
Journals of Theodore Talbot 
The Land Claimers 
A Legend of the Coos 
Letters From an Oregon Ranch 
McDonald of Oregon 
McLoughlin and Old Oregon 
Mansions in the Cascades 
Marooned in Crater Lake 
Memaloose 
Men of Champoeg 
More Power to You 
The Mountain in the^ Sky 
Mount Hood; A Guide 
Mt. Hood Timberltne Lodge 
Multnomah 
Mutiny on the Long Trail, and King 

Chinook 

The Mystery of The Chinese Box 
Nature Rambles in the Wallowas 
Nehalem, A Story of the Pacific, A.D. 

1700 

The New House 
Northwest Nature Trails 
Oh Happy Youth 
Once Upon a Spring Time 
An Oregon Boyhood (Live Boys in 

Oregon) 
Oregon Detour 
Oregon, End of the Trail 
Oregon Folks 

Oregon Geographic Names 
Oregon History and Early Literature 
Oregon History Stories 
Oregon Sketches 
The Oregon Trail, and Some of Its 

Blazers 

Oregon Trail Blazers 
Oregon's Yesterdays 
Overland in a Covered Wagon 
The Ox Team, or Old Oregon Trail 
Peggy and Paul and Laddy 
Physical and Economic Geography of 

Oregon 

Pilgrim and Pioneer 
Pioneer Days of Oregon History 
Poems 



254 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 



Rhymes of Our Valley 

Riders of Grande Ronde 

Rimes O* Round-Up 

Rough Air 

Scenic Treasure House of Oregon 

The Secret of the Wallowa Cave 

A Short History of Oregon 

Silver House of Klone Chuck 

Silver Streams 

Singing in the Rain 

Slave Wives of Nehalem 

The Soul of America 

Souvenir 

The Spell of the Shang Kambu and 

Other Stories 
The Splendid Summits 
The Stagecoach 
Stories of Nehalem 
Stories of Old Oregon 
Stories of Oregon 



Sunset Trails 

Suzanne of Kerbyville 

Swift Flows the River 

Tad Sheldon, Boy Scout 

Thomas Lamb Eliot, 1841-1936 

Three Killers 

The Trail Blazers 

The Trail of the Bear 

The Trail of the Plow 

The Undaunted 

Ward of the Redskins 

Western Windows 

Whispering Valley 

The White Headed Eagle 

Winds, Waves, and Wonders 

Winning Oregon 

Wolves of the Illihee 

Wy'east "The Mountain" A Chronicle 

of Mount Hood 
Yamhills: An Indian Romance 



WASHINGTON 



All Six Were Lovers 

Bad Penny 

Beyond the Gates of Care 

The Big Canoe 

Bird Watching In The West 

The Bitter Country 

Building a State: Washington 1889- 

1930 

By Juan de Fucafs Strait 
The Case of the Hanging Lady 
Chief Joseph 

A Child's Story of Washington 
This City of Ours 
Come, Colors, Come 
The Cost o/ Empire 
Coyote Stories 
The Day Will Come 
Disillusion 

Early Schools of Washington Territory 
Fishing in the Olympics 
Forgive Adam 
Four Wagons West: The Story of 

Seattle 

The Friendly Mountain 
The Gate Swings In 
General Claxton 
Heart of the Red Firs 
The Heathers at Home 
Here Are My People 
History of Education in Washington 
A History of the State of Washington 
In the Lives of Men 
Kamiakim; the Last Hero of the 

Y&kimas 



The Land of Plenty 

The Last Pioneers 

Laugh and Lie Down / 

The Laurels are Cut Down 

Legends^ of the Klickitats 

Lightship 

Lower Class 

Marching! Marching! 

Matrix 

Mighty Mountain 

Mister Ole 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday 

Mount Rainier; A Record of Explora 
tion 

My Pioneer Past 

On Puget Sound 

Our Greatest Mountain 

The Peter Patter Book; Rimes for 
Children 

A Pictorial History of the State of 
Washington 

Pier 17 

Pig-Tail Days in Old Seattle 

A Pioneer Missionary 

The Rawhide Railroad 

Rim of the Desert 

Books on the Pacific Northwest for 
Small Libraries 

Boss of the Ragged O 

Brawny man 

The Bridge of the Gods 

Broken Lights 

Bunch-Grass and Blue-Joint 

Castaways of the 'Yukon 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 



255 



Chinook: A History and Dictionary 

Clawhammer Ranch 

Cross My Heart 

Davy Jones's Locker 

Daylight Moon 

Dictionary of the Chinook Language 

D off-Team Doctor 

Donald MacKenzie, "King of the 

Northwest" 
Earth Told Me 
Elkanah and M>ary Walker, Pioneers 

Among the Spokanes 
The Eskimo and His Reindeer in 

Alaska 

Facing the Golden West 
The Far West Coast 
Fog and Men on Bering Sea 
Forest Fire and Other Verse 
Forest Trees of the Pacific Coast 
From the Land of the Snow-Pearls 
Golden Portage 
The Grizzly Bear 
Gypsy Down the Lane 
Hall 'Young of Alaska 
Handbook of Northwest Flowering 

Plants 

Happy Days 
Harp of Water 

Heroes and Heroic Deeds of the North 
west 
The Heroes of the Yukon and Other 

Poems 

High Country 
A History of the Pacific Northwest 

(Fuller) 
A History of the Pacific Northwest 

(Schaffer) 

Holy Old Mackinaw: A Natural His 
tory of the American Lumberjack 
Homer in the Sagebrush 
How It Came About Stories 
Indian Myths of the Northwest 
Island of the Red God 
The Journal of John Work, a Chief- 
Trader of the Hudson's Bay Com 
pany 

Just Loggin* 
The Klondike Clan 
The Klondike Nugget 
The Land Is Bright 
Land of Forgotten Men 
The Last Assembly Ball 
The Red-Horse Claim 
Lee) ends of th Klickttats 
Life in the Rocky Mountains; A Diary 
of Wanderings on the Sources of the 



Rivers Missouri, Columbia^ and Col 
orado 

Life of a Fossil Hunter 
Little Bay Creatures 
Looking Northwest 
Lucretia Ann on the Oregon Trail 
McAllister Patrol 
Marcus Whitman, M.D., Pioneer and 

Martyr 

Mariella of Out-West 
Merry Andrew 
My Native Land 
Myths and Legends of the Pacific 

Northwest 
North After Seals 
Northern Lights to Fields of Gold 
North Pacific: Japan, Siberia, Alaska, 

Canada 

Northwest Verse, An Anthology 
Now We're Loggin 3 
Nuvat the Bra<ve f An Eskimo Robinson 

Crusoe 
Ocean Gold 

One Bell Calls the Watch 
On the Trail of the Reindeer 
Our Promised Land 
Outcast of Lazy B 

Ox-Team Days on the Oregon Trail 
The Pacific Northwest: Its Resources 

and Industries 
Parents and Pigtails 
Paul Bunyan (Shephard) 
Paul Bunyan (Stevens) 
Paul Bunyan Swings His Axe 
Paul Bunyan, The Work Giant 
Pay Dirt 
Pechuck, Lome Knight's Adventures in 

the Arctic 
Plays 

Poems From the Ranges 
The Quest of the Golden Valley 
The Quest of the Sea Otter 
Railroadman 

Red Heroines of the Northwest 
Redskin and Pioneer 
San Juan Islands 
Singing Paddles 
Skookum and Sandy 
Skycruiser 

The Story of Port Angeles 
The Strain of White 
"Uncle Dan" Drumheller Tells Thrills 

of Western Trails 
The Undounted 
Washington Authors 
Washington Poets 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 



The Washington State Grange 
Waterfront Beat 
West, Young Man 



Wheat Women 

Whitman: An Unfinished Story 

"Young Mac of Fort Vancouver 



PACIFIC NORTHWEST INCLUDING ALASKA 



Across the Latitudes 

Across the Plains in a Prairie Schooner 

Alaska 

American Gang Lore; a New Literary 
Type 

Animals of the Seashore 

Arrowrock 

Bad Man's Trail 

Before the Covered Wagon 

Ben The Black Bear 

Beyond the Shining Mountains 

The Big Canoe 

Big Timber 

Birds of the Pacific Coast 

Roadside Flowers of the Pacific North 
west 

Joaquin Miller 

Saddle and Ride 

The Saga of a Paper Mill 

Seward's Folly 

Silence 

Singing Paddles 

Skyline Trail 

Sleeper of the Moonlit Ranges 

Some Must Wander 

Songs of the American Seas 

Songs of the Sierras 

Songs of the Sunlands 



South of the Sunset; An Interpretation 

of Sacajawea 
Snow Sentinels of the Pacific North- 

west 

Squaw Eloise 
Starlight Rider 
The Story of Alaska 
Stride of Man 
Sundown Jim 
Take the Lightning 
Tales of a Western Mountaineer 
Tall Timber Tales 
They Built the West 
Told in the Hills 
To Remember at Midnight 
Trail Smoke 
Verse of the New West 
The Voice of Authority 
War and Peace 
Western Prose and Poetry 
Westward 

When the Birds Go North Again 
Whispering Range 
The White Blanket 
Wilderness Tales 

Wild Flowers of the Pacific Coast 
Youth North 
The Yukon Drive 



THE SOUTHWEST INCLUDING CALIFORNIA 



American Dream 

And If Man Triumph 

Anne Minton's Life 

Arrowrock Songs and Stories of a 

Prodigal 

The Border Trumpet 
Bright Horizons 
Children of God 
Clawhammer Ranch 
Cloth of Silver 

The Cowboy ,and His Interpreters 
Cowboys North and South 
Cow Country 
A Cowman's Wife 
The Day of the Cattleman 
The Desert Lake Mystery 
The Drifting Cowboy 
Flint Spears, Cowboy Rodeo Contestant 
Gold Eagle Guy 
Gold Is Where You Find It 
Guess Again 



Harbor of the Sun f the Story of the 

Port of San Diego 
The House of the Dawn 
The Hunting of the Buffalo 
I Cover the Waterfront 
In the Saddle with Uncle Bill 
A Leaf in Review 
Lucretia Ann on the Oregon Trail 
Lucretia Ann on the Sagebrush Plains 
Man on the Barge 
Miss Millions 
Moccasin Trail 
Mountain Cattle 
Murder on Russian Hill 
On Streetwater Trail 
Passions Spin the Plot 
The Pride of Pine Creek 
Reach for the Moon 
Rhymes of a Roundup Camp 
Root, Hog t and Die 
Sandlappers 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 



257 



Sand 

Second House From the Corner 

Seventeen Chimneys 

Silver Desert 

The Sisters 

Smoky, the Cowhorse 

Spanish Trails to California 

Squawberry Canyon 

Sun-Up 

They Built the West 



Trouble Shooter 

Uncle Bill: A Tale of Two Kids and a 
Cowboy 

Under Desert Skies 

Valley Road 

We Pointed Them North 

Westward: The Romance of the Amer 
ican Frontier 

When the West Was Young 

Young Man With a Horn 



UNITED STATES : EAST, MIDDLE WEST, SOUTH, ISLAND POSSESSIONS 



Abraham Lincoln: A Universal Man 

American Dream 

Attack on America 

Believe It Or Not 

The Bondwoman 

Boy With the Silver Plow 

The Brewer's Big Horses 

Caddie Woodlawn 

Castles in the Air 

Chance Child 

Children of God 

Dark World and Wide 

Dr. Norton's Wife 

Dollars to Doughnuts 

Ethan Allen 

Fireweed 

The Flood-Fighters 

The Girl From the Big Horn Country 

A Goodly Fellowship 

A Goodly Heritage 

A Grandfather for Benjamin Franklin 

Happy- Go-Lucky 

Hawaiian Idylls of Love and Death 

Holy Old Mackinaw 

How Congress Makes Laws 

In Calico and Crinoline 

In the Days of Ichalod 

Iron Brew 

John Ledyardj an American Marco 

Polo 

Josie and Joe 
Light from A returns 
Little Saints Annoy the Lord 
The Lobster War 
Lost Empire 
Lower Class 
Making a Business Woman 



Mary Peters 

May Flavin 

Men in Sun Helmets 

Metropolis; A Study of Urban Com 
munities 

Mike Fink 

Mirror Murder 

Mortgage Your Heart 

Notawkah 

A Paragraph for Lunch 

A Parish in the Pines 

Pegasus Pulls a Hack 

Preliminaries 

The Quiet Shore 

The Rise of American Democracy; the 
Records Assembled and Anotated 

The Royal Americans 

The Saginaw Paul Bunyan 

The Sentimental Years 

Seven Weeks in Hawaii 

Silas Crockett 

Spindrift 

Steel-Dictator 

The Stubborn Way 

The Swallow 

Swish of the Kris 

Take All to Nebraska 

This Passion Never Dies 

Through the Hawse-Hole 

To Mary With Love 

The Tramp Printer 

Upper Mississippi 

A Wedding In June 

The Woods Colt 

The World I Saw 

You Get What You Ask For 

Young Man With a Horn 



FOREIGN COUNTRIES 



All the Tomorrows 

Anything Can Happen On the River 

Birchland 

The Bondwoman 

Campfire Courage 



Captain Redlegs 
The Cave Mystery 
Children of the Soil 
China's Millions 
Chinese Fairy Tales 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 



Corner of Cathay 

The Cuckoo Calls 

Dawn in Lyoness 

Deep Silver 

The Desert Road to Shani-lun 

Devil Drums 

The Dingbat of Arcady 

D Is for Dutch 

Dobry 

Edward Moxon Publisher of Poets 

Eminent Asians 

The Falcon Mystery 

The Family 

The First Time in History 

Five Foreigners in Japan 

Flight's End 

Forgotten Gods 

Fujiyama, The Sacred Mountain of 

Japan 

The Gate Swings In 
Ghost Ship 

Giants and Ghosts of Central Europe 
The Glacier Mystery 
The Golden Age of Russian Literature 
The Great Trek 
The Guggenheims 
Hannah Marie 
Heaven High Hell Deep 
His Excellency and Peter 
His Job 

The House of the Dawn 
Ice-Bound 
I Change Worlds 
I Met Them Once 
Insurgent Mexico 

In the Shadow of the Mosque of Omar 
Jenny Lind 
John Home } A Study of His Life and 

Works 

The Journal of Kenko 
Jugheads Behind the Lines 



Jungle Woman 

Keeper of the Wolves 

Komachi; A Romantic Drama of Old 

Japan 

Kubrick the Outlaw 
The Liar and the Unicorn 
Lost Empire 

Mademoiselle Misfortune 
Mattock 
Met Li 

Mexico Around Me 
The Monkey Wrench 
Pahang 

Red Beards of the Yellow River 
Red Sky 

The Revolt of Asia 
The Road to the Grey Pamir 
Romance of the Italian Villas 
Saga of the Evergreens 
Seven Seas on a Shoestring 
Seventeen Chimneys 
Seven Tickets to Singapore 
The Shadow Catcher 
Shawneen and the Gander 
Siberian Gold 
Songs of Italy and Others 
Sould Mounds 
Southeast of Zamboanga 
The Spy Mystery 
The Spy Net 

Sticks Across the Chimney 
Sun Bird 

Ten Days That Shook the World 
This England 
The Valley of Lost Men 
War and Peace 
War In Eastern Europe 
The Wayfaring Man 
Windy Island 
Wings North 
Wooden Saddles 



AUTHOR INDEX ACCORDING TO RESIDENCE 

(For full information consult Author List of book summaries) 



Allred, A. Harvey 

Anderson, Abraham 

Arnold, Elta M. 

Arnold, R. Ross 

Bailey, Robert G. 

Baird, Dr. Jessie H. 

Baldwin, Ednest J. 

Barker, Arthur W. 

Beal, Samuel L. 

Bird, Annie Laurie 

Black, Jessie R. 

Bottolfsen, C. A. 

Bowman, Earl Wayland 

Bradley, Henry Crum 

Brink, Carol Ryrie 

Brown, Jennie Broughton 

Burnie, Donald, pseud. (Judge R. 

Leeper) 

Camp, Frank Bernard 
Churchill, David R. 
Cody, Rev. Edmund R. 
Coker, Tracy 

Davis, William B. 
Defenbach, Byron 
Driggs, B. W. 
Drury, Clifford Merrill 
Fisher, Vardis 
Fisher, Vivian Ezra 
Fitzhugh, Edward F. Jr. 
Foote, Mary Hallock 
Gibby, George E. 
Gipson, Alice Edna 
Goldenstein, Pauline G. 
Gough, A. C. 
Greenwood, Annie Pike 



IDAHO 

Grisson, Irene Welch 
Hall, Raymond 
Hays, Arthur Homer 
Herndon, James A. 
Hobson, George C. 
Howard, Dr. Minnie F. 
Johnson, James W. 
Joseph, Horace G. 
Kirkpatrick, Orion E. 
Lukens, Fred E. 
McCowan, Hervey Smith 
Mackenzie, Cecil W. 
McLeod, George A. 
Murphy, Patrick C. 
Pilgrim, Marierte Shaw 
Plowhead, Ruth Gipson 
D. Reid, Agnes Just 

Roddy, (Rev.) Irving Gaines 

Robertson, Frank C. 

Rutherford, Anworth 

Ryan, Marah Ellis 

Skillern, Helen Regan 

Smith, Bess Foster 

Snell, George Dixon 

Stewart, George 

Talkington, Henry L. 

Teichert, (Mrs.) Minerva Kohlhepp 

Turner, Marjorie Shier 

Tweedy, Benjamin F. 

Walgamott, Charles Shirley 

Whitlaw, Wayne B. 

Williamson, Thames Ross 

Wilson, Henry Lovejoy 

Wood, Fremont 

Woodward, Amy Temple 



Abbott, Edward Charles 
Abbott, Newton Carl 
Atwater, Mary Meigs 
Atwater, Montgomery M. 
Babson, Naomi Lane (Mrs. Paul 

Grieder) 
Baker, Dorothy 
Barnett, Donald R. 
Barnett, Grace and Olive 
Barrows, John R. 
Bendon, Dorothe 
Birkeland, Joran 
Blumenthal, Albert 



MONTANA 

Bower, B. M., pseud. (Mrs. Bertha 

Muzzy Sinclair- (Ewan) 
Bradley, John Hodgdon, Jr. 
Braley, Berton 
Branch, E. Douglas 
Brinig, Myron 
Broderick, Therese 
Bruffey, George A. 
Chase, Mary Ellen 
Chevigny, Hector 
Clapp, Mary Brennan 
Clements, Colin Campbell 



260 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 



Coates, Grace Stone 
Coburn, Wallace David 
Coleman, Rufus A. 
Connolly, C. P. 
Craine, Edith Janice 
Dimsdale, Thomas J. 
Duboc, Jessie L. 
Duncan, Philip 
Elrod, Morton J. 
Eunson, Dale 
Ferris, Warren Angus 
Fletcher, Robert H. 
Folger, Doris 
Freeman, Edmund L. 
Getty, Agnes K. 
Gordon, Taylor 
Hammett, Dashiell 
Haste, Gwendolin 
Hathaway, Baxter 
Haydon, Larrae A. 
Holliday, Walt 
James, Will 
Kuhlman, Dr. Charles 
Langford, Nathaniel Pitt 
Leeper, Marion Le Mayne 
Lennes, Nels J. 
Lincoln, Elliott Curtis 
Linderman, Frank Bird 
Luce, Edward S. 
MacLane, Mary 



MacLeod, Norman 

McNickle, D'Arcy 

Marquis, Thomas Bailey 

Merriam, Harold G. 

Murphy, Dennis 

Nelson, Ira Stephens 

Noble, Carl 

Osgood, Ernest Staples 

Owen, Major John 

Peet, Creighton 

Phillips, Paul C. 

Rak, Mary Kidder 

Reed, Dallas 

Russell, Charles M. 

Ryerson, Florence 

Sarett, Lew 

Scearce, Stanley 

Schak, Al 

Schultz, James Willard 

Sherman, Richard 

Shannon, Monica 

Smith, Helen Huntington 

Stone, Arthur L. 

Stuart, Granville 

Toponce, Alexander 

Tucker, Patrick T. 

Wagner, Glendolin Damon 

Walker, Mildred (Mrs. Frederick 

Schemm) 
Work, John 



OREGON 



Alexander, Charles 
Allen, Eleanor 
Atwood, Rev. A. 
Austin, Margot 
Balch, Frederick Homer 
Ball, John 
Banks, Louis Albert 
Barber, Charles F. 
Barnes, J. C. 
Barr, Hy Max 
Barry, J. Neilson 
Bates, Ernest Sutherland 
Bogstad, Valborg C. 
Boyer, Clarence V. 
Brand, Charles A. 
Buck, J. 

Bunnel, Clarence Orvel 
Burgess, F, Ina 
Bush, Willard C. 
Campbell, Agnes Dorena 
Canse, John Martin 
Carey, Charles H. 
Carr, Mary Jane 
Case, Robert Ormond 



Chapel, Beatrice Shaw 

Childs, Herbert Ellsworth 

Chittick, V. L. O. 

Churchill, Claire Warner 

Clark, Dan Elbert 

Clark, Robert Carlton 

Clarke, S. A. 

Coe, Erling C. 

Coffin, Marie M. 

Colter, Eli (Mrs. Glenn Fagalde) 

Conner, Sabra 

Cooper, J. C. 

Corning, Howard McKinley 

Cotton, Samuel J. 

Cunningham, Bessie Mothersill 

Dake, Henry C. 

Dana, Marshall N. 

Davenport, Homer 

Davies, Mary Carolyn 

Davis, Harold Lenoir 

Dee, Minnie Roof 

DeLaRhue, Trevino 

De Lespinasse, Cobie 

De Moss, Catherine Cornwall 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 



26! 



Denton, V. L. 

Dietz, Fred L. 

Dobbs, Mrs. Caroline (Conselyea) 

Doone, Radko 

Down, Robert Horace 

Dunham, Wayland A. 

Dye, Eva Emory 

Easton, T. E. 

Eliot, Henrietta R. 

Ernest, Brother C. S. C. 

Ernst, Mrs. Alice Henson 

Estes, George 

Euwer, Anthony 

Faubion, Nina Lane 

Fee, Chester Anders 

Finck, Henry T. 

Finley, William Lovell 

Fleener, Frank Lester 

French, Chauncey Del 

French, Henry Clay 

Frost, George Edwin 

Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Gabrielson, Ira Noel 

Garman, John C. 

Gatlin, George Oury 

Garlinger, Mrs. Irene 

Geer, T. T. 

Gilkey, Helen Margaret 

Gilkey, J. A. 

Gill, Laura Frances 

Gill, John 

Goldenweiser, Alexander A. 

Grannatt, Harry Silleck 

Griffith, Jason 

Guthrie, John D. 

Haberly, Loyd 

Hagen, Lois D. 

Haines, Frances 

Hall, Grace E. 

Hall, Hazel 

Hall, Olof, pseud. (O. E. Hallstrom) 

Hamot, Alice Turnidge 

Hanley, William 

Hargreaves, Sheba 

Harper, Theodore Acland 

Hart, Alan 

Haskin, Leslie L. 

Haycox, Ernest 

Hazen, David W. 

Hedges, Ada Hastings 

Helm, Richard Izer 

Hendricks, Robert J. 

Hodges, Lawrence Kaye 

Holbrook, Stewart Hall 

Holmstrom, Frances 

Horner, John B. 

Hosmer, Paul 



Huffman, Bert 

Hull, Alexander 

Ingharn^ Clara Cogswell 

Jewett, Stanley Gordon 

Jonasson, Jonas Adalsteinn 

Johnson, Robert C. 

Kahn, Stephen B. 

Kelley, Hall J. 

Kendall, Nancy Noon 

La Barre, Julia 

Lampman, Ben Hur 

Lancaster, Samuel Christopher 

Lapham, Stanley C. 

Laughliti, Sceva Bright 

Lay, Marian (Mrs. H. L. Davis) 

Leiter, Wilma 

Lindsay, Rev. Gordon 

Lockhart, Agnes Ruth 

Lockley, Fred 

Loe, Kelley 

Lyman, Horace S. 

McArthur, Lewis A. 

McCulloch, Elizabeth 

McNeil, Fred H. 

Maize, Lillian Taft 

Markham, Edwin 

Marshal, Edison 

Miller, Joaquin 

Miller, Marian (Mrs. Edith Knight 
Hill) 

Moll, Ernest George 

Monroe, Anne Shannon 

Montgomery, Richard Gill 

Moore, Dallas 

Moore, Wert Emmit 

Munford, Kenneth 

Neuberger, Richard L. 

Nichols, Mrs. Marie Leona 

Norton, William Bernard 

O'Neal, George S. 

Parrish, Philip H. 

Parsons, Mabel Holmes 

Parsons, John 

Payne, Doris D aimer 

Perkins, Phil H. 

Peterson, Martin Severin 

Powell, Frederick Wilbur 

Powers, Alfred 

Pratt, Laurence 

Quiett, Glenn Chesney 

Rea, Ella M. 

Rebec, Mary Lowell 

Reed, Edwin T. 

Reed, John 

Riasanovsky, Mrs. Antonia (pseud. 
Nina Federova) 

Richardson, Mrs. Ruth Ellsworth 



262 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 



Riddle, George W. 

Rockwood, Eleanor Ruth 

Rogers, Thomas H. 

Rucker, Maude A. 

Rusk, Claude Ewing 

Ryan, Marah Ellis 

Schafer, Joseph 

Schuyleman, John L. 

Scott, Harvey W. 

Seeley, Vernita (Mrs. Paul Stark) 

Sheldon, Henry 3D. 

Sherrard, Drew 

Simpson, Samuel L. 

Skiff, Frederick Woodward 

Sloan, Donald 

Smith, Geddes 

Smith, Samuel Stevenson 

Smith, Wallace 

Smith, Warren DuPre 

Starbuck, Edith 

Sternberg, Charles H. 

Stephens, Louise G. 

Stevenson, Elmo N. 

Stowall, Dennis H. 

Strahan, Kay Cleaver 

Strong, Thomas Nelson 

Thayer, Claudius 

Tobias, Ruby Weyburn 

Townsend, Harvey Gates 



Turnbull, George Stanley 

Turney, Ida Virginia 

Twining, Frances Staver 

Utter, Ethel C. 

Waggoner, George A. 

Walker, Charles F. 

Warner, Estella Ford 

Wells, Harry L. 

Wet jen, Albert Richard 

White, Ared (Gen. George Ared 

White) 

Whitney, Ruth Cooper 
Wilbur, Earl Morse 
Wilkinson, Marguerite 
Williamson, George 
Wilson, C. Lee 
Wilson, John Fleming 
Wines, Georgiana 
Winter, William 
Wolverton, Bruce 
Wood, Charles Erskine Scott 
Wood, Elizabeth Lambert 
Wood, Lambert Alexander 
Woodward, Mary Alethea 
Workman, Rona Morris 
Yeager, Francis (Morden) 
Young, Beatrice 
Ziefle, Adolph 



WASHINGTON 



Adams, Leta Zoe 

Allen, Edward Weber 

Anderson, Ada Woodruff 

Anderson, Eva Greenslit 

Anderson, Florence Bennett 

Andrews, Clarence Leroy 

Archibald, Norman 

Ashton, James M* 

Bagley, Clarence Booth 

Balch, Frederick H. 

Banfcson, Russell S. 

Bashford, Herbert 

Bass, Sophie Frye 

Bechdolt, Frederick R. 

Benham, Allen Rogers 

Bennett, Florence Mary (Mrs. L. F. 

Anderson) 
Bennett, Richard 
Bibb, Thomas W. 
Binns, Archie 
Bissett, Clark Prescott 
Blankenship, Russell 
Blair, Walter 
Bolton, Frederick E. 
Bowden, Angie Burt 



Brier, Howard Maxwell 

Brier, Royce 

Browne, Belmore 

Bryan, Enoch A. 

Buchanan, Victor A. 

Bunnell, Clarence Orvel 

Burglon, Nora 

Burks, Arthur J. 

Butler, Julia 

Cantwell, Robert 

Carr, Sarah Pratt 

Cass, Frank Hadley 

Chevigny, Hector 

Champrey, Elizabeth Williams 

Clark, Ella Elizabeth 

Clark, Marjorie Ruth 

Cochrane, Ben H. 

Coldiron, William Dean 

Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt 

Commander, Kingsmill 

Crawford, Harriet Ann 

Crawford, M. Leola 

Cunningham, Albert J. 

Dafcin, Dorothy 

Drumheller, Daniel Montgomery 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 



263 



Dill, Clarence Cleveland 

Dove, Mourning (Mrs. Fred Garett) 

Downie, Ralph Ernest 

Dunbar, Ruth 

Eliot, Willard Ayres 

Elmendorf, Mary J. 

Ethel, Garland 

Fargo, Lucille Foster 

Fielde, Adele M. 

Forrest, Elizabeth Chabot 

Foster, Michael 

Fullenwider, Elmer D. 

Fuller, George W. 

Fulton, Reed 

Goodrich, Laurence 

Gould, Dorothy Fay 

Gowen, Herbert Henry 

Grose, J. Gordon 

Guberlet, Muriel Lewin 

Guthrie, Edwin R. 

Hall, Josef Washington 

Handforth, Thomas 

Hanford, Cornelius Holgate 

Hanson, Rita Mohler 

Harrison, Joseph Barlow 

Hart, Alan 

Havighurst, Walter 

Higginson, Mrs. Ella Rhodes 

Hazard, Joseph T. 

Hughes, Babette 

Hughes, Glen 

Hurley, Victor 

Hutchison, Paula 
Hutchinson, Arthur Howard 
Inverarity, Robert Bruce 
Isaacs, Walter F. 
Jackson, Leroy Freeman 
Jacobs, Melvin Clay 
Johnson, Claudius Osborne 
Jones, Nard 

Judson, Katharine Berry 
Kimball, William Alden 
King, William A. 
King, Stoddard 
Lamb, Frank Haines 
Landis, Paul H. 
Landis, Judson T. 
Lauridsen, G. M. 
Levy, Melvin 
Lewis, William S. 
Lincoln, Elliott C. 
Long, Dwight 
Lucas, Henry S. 
Lyman, William Denison 
McCormick, Dell I. 
McCurdy, James G. 



McKenzie, Vernon 

McRae, John 

McWhorter, L. V. 

Magnusson, Edna Cooper 

Mansfield, Norma Bicknell 

Marion, Elizabeth 

Mayol, Lurline Bowles 

Meany, Edmond Stephen 

Meeker, Ezra 

Miles, Charles 

Miller, Max 

Monroe, Anne Shannon 

Nelson, Rhoda 

Noel, Jacqueline 

O'Connor, Harvey 

Offord, Lenore Glen 

Orr, Frederick W. 

Osborn, Frederick A. 

Parrington, Vernon Louis 

Peery, Wilson Ramsey 

Pellegrini, Angelo M. 

Peltret, Edouard 

Penrose, Stephen B, L. 

Pettibone, Anita 

Phillips, W. S. 

Pollard, Lancaster 

Quiett, Glenn Chesney 

Rader, Melvin Miller 

Raysor, Thomas M. 

Reynolds, Helen Mary 

Ripley, Clements 

Rosenstein, Helen Mary 

Ross, Nancy Wilson 

Sasse, Alma Benecke 

Savage, George Milton 

Sayre, Willis 

Schmoe, F. W. 

Shephard, Esther 

Shiels, Archibald William 

Sickels, Eleanor M. 

Simon, S. F. 

Smith, A. A. 

Sparrow, Wilbur 

Spector, Ivor 

Sperlin, Ottis B. 

Splawn, Andrew Johnson 

Starr, Frederick 

Steiner, Jesse Frederick 

Stephenson, Delia Deirdre (Morris) 

Stevens, James 

Stirling, Brents 

Strong, Anna Louise 

Strong, Sidney 

Suzzalo, Henry 

Sweetman, Lude D. 

Thomas, Edward Harper 



264 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Thompson, Margaret Winther, Sophus Keith 

Wagenknecht, Edward Charles Wood, Elizabeth Lambert 

Walkinshaw, Robert Woodbridge, William Witherspoon 

Waring, Guy Woolston, Howard B. 

Watt, Roberta Frye Wright, William Henry 

Weatherwax, Clara Wurdeman, Audrey (Mrs. Joseph 

Webster, Edward B. Auslander) 

Weir, Florence Roney Young, Samuel Hall 

Wells, Rev. Lemuel H. Youell, George 

Willis, Elizabeth Bayley Zillman, Lawrence John 



NORTHWEST BOOKS Part II 

"When a man*s knowledge is not in order y 
the more of it he has the greater will be 
his confusion" 



NORTHWEST MAGAZINE BIBLIOGRAPHY 

The following bibliography is selective. The contribution of some of 
the more prolific writers has been limited to productions of the last ten 
years or less. Abbreviations of months, dates, and titles are those em 
ployed by The Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature, which through 
out has been the chief standard determining the acceptability of an au 
thor's work. Contributions to certain regional periodicals not listed in 
The Readers' Guide have also been included, such, for instance, as The 
Frontier and Midland (V I, 1920 suspended publication V 19, Sum 
mer 1939), Seeing Idaho (VI, 1922, suspended publication, 1939), 
The Lariat (V I, 1922, suspended publication, 1928). The first of 
these periodicals is abbreviated F & M and only those writers in it who 
have two or more contributions to their credit are listed. The letters 
I, O, W, M, in parentheses after an author's name indicate the state 
(Idaho, Oregon, Washington, Montana) in which he was born or with 
which he has been connected as a former or present resident. For full 
reference consult the author index. If the literary type of any particular 
contribution is not indicated, it is understood to be an essay, article, or 
sketch; otherwise the descriptive words: poem, story, or novel are ap 
pended. Starred names are ones represented in the list of book reviews. 

Abandoned conestoga; poem, Bright, Verne 

Abandoned farm; poem, Morden, Phyllis 

Abandoned farmhouse; poem, Scheffer, John 

Abbess of the shaven path, The ; story, Thompson, Cardwell 

Abbott, Edith Cordelia (M) 

Sun bath; poem, Hygeia, 6:398, Jl '28 
*Abbott, N. C. (M) 

How Montana counties were named; Mont. Education II: S. My S 34- J 35 

Much-needed coordination; Mont. Education 6:14-15 Ja '30 
Aberdeen, Washington; poem, Erkkila, Ernest 
Aberration; poem, Benjamin, Ida 
Above all else ; story, Bretherton, Vivien R. 
Abracadabra ; poem, Tull, Jewell Bothwell 
Abroad with April; Lampman, Ben Hur 
Absolutely Mr. Shean ; poem, Braley, Berton 
Abundant Life in Books ; Chase, Mary Ellen 
According to plan; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Achievement; poem, Hoefs, Erna E. 
Achievement; story, Sherman, Richard 
Act of faith ; story, Struckman, Robert Tod 
Adamantine ; poem, Morden, Phyllis B. 
Adams, Janet (W) 

He loved them and left them; story, Ladies H J 49:10-11 0*32 
Adult Education in other lands ; Jones, Mrs. Pamelia Pearl 
Advent; poem, Clapp, Mary Brennan 

An adventure in the Idaho mines; John J. Healy; McLemore, Clyde, ed. 
Adventures of Peter J. ; Cory, Fanny Young 
Adventures of a small town hotel keeper; Dunbar, Ruth 
Advocate and Guardian; story, Coates, Grace Stone 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 267 

Aesop Debunked; poem, Braley, Berton 

Affirmation; poem, Scheffer, John 

After a summer shower; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

After June rains; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Afternoon call, An ; story, Rowse, Doris 

After the Custer Battle ; Partoll, Albert, ed. 

Afterwards ; poem, Ericson, E. E. 

Against the mob ; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Agency for a second term; Lindley, Ernst Eadder 

Ah, gentle nurse ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Aiken, Mrs. Lulu Piper (O) 

Desert woman ; poem. Bird Lore 39 ^4, N. '37 

Fall flight; poem. Bird Lore 39:282, Ji '37 

Hail and farewell; poem. Bird Lore 40:119, Mr. '38 

Indian summer; poem, Nature Mag., 31:524, N '38 

Slumber no more ; poem. Lit. Digest 121 :28, My '36 

Strange passage; poem. Bird Lore 38: 346, S '36 

They also serve ; poem. Bird Lore 39: 210, My '37 
Air hazard; story, Hosmer, Paul 
Alabama morn ; poem, Erkkila, Ernest 
* Alexander, Charles (O) 

Errand for the wife; story. Collier's, 103:14-15, Ap '39 

Governor's lady, The; story. Collier's, 104:18-19, N '39 

Hop man's daughter; story, Sat Eve Post, 212:16-17, Ag 26 '39 

Little warrior; story. Collier's, 105:16, Je '40 

Playing tag with the game warden; Sat Eve Post, 210:52-6, Ja '29 

Red petticoat; story. Collier's, 105:12, F 10 '40 

Wild pride; story, Colliers, My u, '40 
Alien; poem, Haste, Gwendolyn 
*Allen, Eleanor (O) 

Blue herons ; poem, F & M, 9 :io5-i4, Ja '29 

End of summer; poem, F & M, 19:240, Summer '39 

Mountain flowers of the Indians ; Travel, 65 41-42, Jl '35 

Oregon etching; poem. Overland n.s., 88:205, J 1 '3 

Pity all the sleeping poor; poem, Lit Digest, 113:22, Ap 16 '32 

Songs of the street; Old woman; Night birds; Little seamstress; Marceller; 
On the wharf; Angelo, The fruit vendor; poems. Overland n.s., 88:100, 
Ap '30 

Water ; poem. F & M, 9 1239, Mr '29 
Allen, Eric (O) 

Boots and quenelles; story, Fortnightly, 152 ns. 146, 313:320, S '39 
Allen, Sally E (M) 

In league with the stars. F & M, 11:235, Mr '31 

Lambs have the grace to suckle kneeling; poem, F & M, 10:220, Mr '30 

Warp and woof; story. F & M, 10:136, Ja '30 
All is fair ; story, Hawkins, John 
All of my life ; story, Eunson, Dale 
All over again; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
All shipshape ; poem, Braley, Berton 
Alma mater; story, Lay, Marion 
Alone ; story, Stone, Jack 
Alone he built it ; story, Miller, Laura 
Alone in a stope ; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 
Alphabet of Safety ; poem, Braley, Berton 
Amateurs and Professionals ; Hughes, Glenn 
Ama2ing fraud ; Connolly, Christopher P, 



268 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Amenities of book selecting; Lehman, Benjamin Harrison 

American apostle ; Davis, Harold L. 

American Cowboy; Branch, Edward Douglas 

American father attends his wife's reunion ; Chase, Mary Ellen 

Americanus sum; poem, Braley, Berton 

America talks court; Neuberger, Richard L. 

Anderson's narrative of a ride to the Rocky Mountains; Partoll, Albert, ed. 

And one came back; story, Peterkin, Dorothy M. Johnson 

And one loved dogs ; story, Case, Robert Ormond 

Andromache; poem, Hamilton, Ruth 

And the greatest of these ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Angel Guri ; poem, Lee, Borghild 

Angels come riding; story, Bower, B. M, 

Angry god and the people of corn ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 

Anhedonia; poem, Thompson, Lloyd S. 

Another gold band; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

Another wisdom; poem, Markham, Edwin 

Antichrist; story, Thomson, Cardwell 

Answer ; poem, Dewey, Margaret 

Anti-lynching bill: speech in the Senate January 7, 1938; Borah, William E. 

Antithesis ; poem, Parsons, Mabel Holmes 

Antrum tantrums; poem, Collins, Dean 

Apple seed and apple thorn ; story, Schemm, Mildred Walker 

Apres avoir entendu une voix cherie ; poem, Wiley, Neami E. Lee 

April; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

April ; poem, Plummer, Eleanor 

April snowflakes ; poem, Linderman, Wilda 

April west Oregon ; poem, Pratt, Laurence L. 

April wood ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Are fish citizens?; Pierce, Frank Richardson (pseud. Seth Ranger) 

Are parents afraid of their children ; Chase, Mary Ellen 

Are publishers feeble-minded ? ; Williamson, Thames Ross 

Are salmon now sold down the river? ; Finley, William Lovell 

Are the intellegentsia intelligent?; poem, Braley, Berton 

Are wildcats wild? ; Finley, William Lovall 

Are you having any fun? ; poem, Braley, Berton 

Argument; poem, Houseman, Mary W. 

Armistice day; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Armour, William K. (I) 

Crater's Creed, The ; Lariat v. II no. 3 Jl '28 

Dial, The ; poem ; Lariat v. 9 no. 6 p 277 Je '27 

One mile of brook ; poem, Seeing Idaho 1 139 Jl '37 

Seven devils land, The ; Lariat v. 10 no. 5 p. 520 N '27 

To write; poem; Lariat, v. 8 no. 6 p 593 D '26 
Around the ring; Last courage; Potent circle; Father John; Story faith; Life 

be kind ; poerns, Olsen, Chas. Oluf 
Arrow points ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Arts and Crafts ; poem, Braley, Berton 
Ascent to vision ; poem, Thorpe, Iris Lora 
Ashmun, Margaret Eliza (M) 

Chintzes; poem, Bet Horn and Card, 13:93 Ap '35 

Compensation; poem, Christian Cent, 52:364 Mr 29 '35 
As if at dusk in Genesis ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Aspiration; Grissom, Irene Welch 

Aspirations and Inspirations of a Ranchwoman ; Hazen, Lillian Weston 
At breakfast; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 269 

At cinders lake; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

At home the Tamarack forests ; poem, Frohlicher, Eugenie E. 

At home with mountains ; Shannon, Monica 

Atlantic Union Plan and the Americas ; Streit, Clarence K. 

At St. Patrick's ; sketch, Jordan, Rachel 

Attention Horation ; story, Evans, Helena Grace 

At timberline ; poem. Fuller, Ethel Romig 

*Atwater, Mary (M) 

Colonial Pattern Weaving House; House B, 56:1324, Ag, O '24 

Keeping the convalescent busy; Parents M, 5:17 F '30 
August afternoon; poem, Maring, Helen Emma 
Aurora Argent; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 
Autobiography of a Sioux; Marquis, Thomas B. 
Autumn; poem, Baldwin, Grace D. 
Autumn ; poem, Stone, Jack 
Autumn Dusk; poem, Bright, Verne 
Autumn Idyl ; poem, Eunson, Dale 

Autumn in the hills of Idaho ; poem, Short, Minnie Todd 
Autumn song; poem, Littell, Lydia B. 
Autumn time ; poem, Woodward, Amy Temple 

*Babson, Naomi Lane (M) (Mrs. Paul Grieder) 

Encounter with a ghost; story, Good H, 108:24, My '39 

Fare well in Shanghai; story, Pict R 40:18 F '39 

God's Smile; story, Colliers 100:12 N 20, '37 

Grave on the hill; story, Colliers 101:20, Ap 16 '38 

Her people; story, Pict R, 38:16, S '37 

Old Precious; story, Sat Eve Post 210:18 Je 25 '38 

Quiet wedding; story Ladies H J 57:22 Je '40 

Rainy Day in summer; story, Sat Eve Post 210:18 Je 17 '37 

Road leads west; story, Colliers 105:12-13 Ja 13, '40 

Shake hands forever; story, Pict R 39:14 Ag '38 

Singsong Girl; story, Sat Eve Post 210:18 Ap 2 '38 

Something to remember; story, Woman's H C 65:18 o J i8 

Star in the sky; story, Pict R 39:11 D '37 

Until you see Again; story, Pict R 39:10 My '38 

We have been young; story, Pict R 39:20 N '37 

What love is ; story, Womans H C 67 :22 Ja '40 

Wings for the dragon; story, Sat Eve Post, 210:22, D 4 '37 
Back of a Mountain ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Back to the land, Oregon 1907, Davis, Harold L. 
Backward States, The; Freeman, Edmund L. 
Badgered; Stevenson, Elmo Nail 
Bad-man Bridges; Neuberger, Richard 
*Bailey, Robert G. (I) 

Do eagles prey on wild sheep and goats; Seeing Idaho, i: 22-23, N '37 

Down the river of no return ; Seeing Idaho, i : 4-5 Jl '37 

Seeing Idaho from the top of the world; Seeing Idaho, i : 10 S '37 
Balance all; poem, Braley, Berton 
Baldwin, Grace D. (M) 

Autumn; poem, F & M, 6: i 12, N '25 

But you are like waves ; poem, F & M, 5 : 8, N '24 

Critic, The; poem, F & M, 6: 112, N '25 

Evening; poem, F & M, 4: 82, N '23 

Finding out about Paul ; poem, F & M, 5:18, N '24 

Gray; poem, F & M, 4:120, Mr '24 



270 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

I go the way we used to go; poem, F & M, 6:121, N '25 

I have known high moments ; poem, F & M, 6:167, My '26 

I know two people like two mountains; poem, F & M, 7:108, My '27 

Night ; poem, F & M, 3 :28, Mr '23 

Police court sketches ; poem, F & M, i :88, F '21 

Somewhere off the highway; poem, F & M, 10:218, Mr '30 

Trail; poem, F & M, 4:82, N '23 

Wild ducks; poem, F & M, 3:44, My '23 

Winter dusk; poem, F & M, 5:8, N '24 

Yellow pine, The; poem, F & M, 4:82, N '23 
Baldy Bill takes a wife; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Ballad of Long George ; poem, Leeper, Marion Le Mayne 
Ballad of Peter, The ; poem, Bright, Verne 
Ballad of Sam Davis; poem, Braley, Berton 
Ballad of the taciturn three ; poem, Elmendorf, Mary J. 
Ballads of Babbitt Abroad ; poem, Braley, Berton 
Ballinger; shyster, Connolly, Christopher P, 
Ballot poison for labor ; Neuberger, Richard 
Balm of Gillead ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Banana Bill; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Bankson, Russell A. (W) Romance Trail; Sunset, 61:20-2 Je '28 
Bannack and Gallatin City, 1862-3, a letter from Mrs. Emily R. Meredith, 

McLemore, Clyde, ed. 
Barberry bush ; poem, Lee, Borghild 
Barnaby Bright; Bright, Verne 
Barnes of Albany ; Connolly, Christopher 
Barometer ; poem, Martin, Naomi R. 

Bartlett, Stanley Foss (I) Jam Breaker; poem, Lit Digest, 93:37 My 28 '27 
Bathing on the wing; Miller, Laura 
Battle cry of beauty; Lay, Marion 
Battle of Bear River, The ; Sudweeks, Leslie L. 
Battle of the Big Hole, The ; diary, Phillips, Paul C. 
*Beal, Samuel M. (I) 

History of Fort Henry; Seeing Idaho, 1:16-17, S '37 

Salmon river mission; Seeing Idaho, 1:22-3, 47-8, My '37 
Bearers of integrity; poem, Olsen, Chas. Oluf. 
Beach Squatter; story, Davis, Harold L. 
Beacons on the high seas ; Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Bears I have met; Finley, William Lovell 
Bear looks over the mountain ; Marshall, James 
*Bechdolt, Frederich Ritchie (W) 

Cleaning up of hathrop; Sat Eve Post, 192:46, My 18, '20 

Fire line, Colliers, 66:20, S 10 '20 

Flanagan's stool-pigeon; story, McClure, 38:440, F '12 

Heart of a thief; story, Am M, 71 :i95-2O4, D J io 

Hobo and the nun; story, Harp W, 57:18 Jl 26 '13 

Little man of Paradise; story, Colliers, 71:3 Mr 10 '23 

On the spur of the moment; story, Everybody's, 17:704, N '07 

Rock; Sat Eve Post, 208:5-7, N 2 '35 

Stampede, 1936 model; Sat Eve Post, 209:14-15, N '36 

Striker; story, Harpers W, 57:8-9, Jl 19 '13 
Beckman ; story, Jones, Nard 
Beckham of Kentucky ; Connolly, Christopher P. 
Bedded sheep ; poem, Kidd, Walter Evans 
Bed tarp ; poem, Tracey, Paul E. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 271 

Beebe, Beatrice (0) 

Fighting the Indians with Joaquin Miller ; Overland n.s., 87 154, F '29 
Finished symphony; poem, Overland n.s., 88:258, S '30 
Hunting for the Blue Bucket diggings; Overland n.s., 87:252, Ag '29 
Letters of Joaquin Miller, F & M, 12:121-4; 223-8; 344-7, Ja-My '32 
Beet tavern angel ; Bolles, Jason H. J. 
Beggar of beauty; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Beginnings of journalism in frontier Montana, The; Housman, Robert L. 
Be good and eat alone ; story, Fitzgerald, Brassil 
Behind the Borah boom ; Neuberger, Richard 
Behind the headlines; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Bellevue hospital; 1934; poem, Macleod, Norman 
Bell, Ralph (M) 

Character; F & M, 1:118, My '21 
Wild Bill ; story, F & M, 1 173, Fe '21 
Bells of Croatia ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Bells of Culiacan ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Belly River (for Lew Sarett) ; poem, Macleod, Norman 
Benjamin, Ida (M) 

Aberration; poem, F & M, 2:162, N '21 
Frozen Flowers; story, F & M, 2:150, N J 2i 
Old Paul Motte; F & M, 2:212, My '22 
Bequest to youth ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Berries sweet and bitter ; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 
Better dress; Welch, Douglas 
Between enemies; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Beynon, Merle (M). Stone Breaker; poem, F & M, 13:281, My '33 
Big business ; Connolly, Christopher P. 
Big business; story, Robinson, Gladys 
Biggest thing on earth; Neuberger, Richard 
Big Hat; story, James, Will 
Big ones get away; story, Wylie, Philip 
Billing, Marjorie (M) 

Going to Kuhang ; F & M, 6 '.5, My J 26 
Revery ; sketch, F & M, 6 17, My '26 
Biographical Note, A; Paul C. Phillips, Bozeman, John 
Biographical Sketch; Chase, Mary Ellen 
Biography in blues ; poems, Macleod, Norman 
*Bird, Annie Laurie (I) 

Christmas Cactus, The ; poem, Seeing Idaho, i :29, D '29 
Heralds of Spring; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:39, My '39 
Idaho's Senator Borah; Seeing Idaho, 1:20-21, 45-46, My '37 
Bird bathing ; poem, Russell, Myna 
Bird Girl ; story, Bretherton, Vivien R. 
Bird into beast; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 
*Birkeland, Joran J. (M) 

Just the way it goes ; story, F & M, 5 ^., N '24 
Leanes; poem, F & M, 6:4, N '25 
Rubbers ; F & M, 6:13, Mr '26 
Wintering; F & M, 6:<;, N '25 
Bishop of the sea ; Foster, Michael 
Bishop's Visitation ; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 
Bitter Brew ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Bitter Roots ; Macleod, Norman 

Blackboard vs. blue eyes ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Black cow ; story, Haines, Merle J. 



272 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Black crepe hat, The ; story, Hamilton, Ruth 

Black Envelope; Brown, Zenith Jones (David Frome; Leslie Ford) 

Blackfeet Indian peace council ; Partoll, Albert 

Black Harris, a tall tale ; story, Chittick, V. L. O. 

Black, Lauren A. (M) 

Meeting, The ; story, F & M, 5 190, My '25 
To Nina ; poem, F & M, 5 173, My '25 
Black magic ; poern, Huston, Frances 
Blair, Hilda Knowles (M) 

Little Lake Mary Ron an ; F & M, 3 14, Mr '23 

Matchmaking of Jean Mar jean, The; F & M, 3:4, N '22 

Shiny shoes ; story, F & M, 5:5, Mr '25 
Blessed idiot; story, Bretherton, Vivian R. 
Blessed isle; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Blessings on your pioneers ; poem, Lawrence, Lola Greenfield 
Blind alley; poem, MacLeod, Norman 
Blind Buckers; story, James, Will 
Blind commander, The ; story, Thornton, Marion 
Blind one, The ; story, Hutchens, John K. 
Blizzard; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Blond royal ; story, Atwater, Montgomery 
Blowing dust; story, Wylie, Philip 
Blow the lawyer down; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Bluebeard and the Spanish witch ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Bluebirds ; story, Woodward, Amy Temple 
Blue carnation ; Larnpman, Ben Hur 
Blue dress ; story, Foster, Michael 
Blue herons ; poem, Allen, Eleanor 
Blue sky; sketch, Cromwell, Anne 
Blue windflowers; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Boat in the stream ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Bogie of the box, The ; sketch, Linderman, Frank B. 
Boiled onion racket; Welch, Douglas 
Boiler boy, Oregon ; poem, Jonson, Arthur 
Bolles, Jason J. J. 

Beer tavern angel; F & M, 15:270, Mr '35 

Coyote; Lit Digest, 112:19, Ja 23 '32 

Dark girl; F & M, 15:103, Ja '35 

Dinner for two ; F & M, 15 :io4, Ja '35 

Four Amerindian poets; F & M, 9:126, Ja '29 

Good year; poem, F & M, 13 147, N '32 

John Colter; poem, F & M, 14.231, Mr '34 

Let me praise once your body; F & M, 15:104, Ja '35 

Love came like a landlord; F & M, 8:163, N '27 

Man in the morass, The ; F & M, 15:10, Ja '35 

Night piece ; F & M, 8 1243, Mr '28 

On Bridger hill; F & M, 10:49, N '29 

Night was made for sleep ; F & M, 8:164, N '^7 

Our elders; Harper, 116:72, My '33 

Pioneers; poem, F & M, 12:211, Mr '32 

Pussy willows; F & M, 9:11, N '28 

Roadhouse girl; poem, F & M, 11:330, My '31 

Romance; poem, F & M, 11:143, Ja '31 

Sentence; F & M, 15:102, Ja '35 

Short girls ; F & M, 8 1335, My '28 

Three Amerindian poems; F & M, 8:162, N '37 

Tintagel ; poem, F & M, 12 1343, My '32 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 273 

Bonneville ; Neuberger, Richard 

Boob ballads; Chris the Nut; poem, Braley, Berton 

Boomdoggle Ballad; poem, Braley, Berton 

Boomerang; story, Sherman, Richard 

Boots and quenelles ; story, Allen, Eric 

Borah, William Edgar (I) 

Anti-lynching bill; speech In the Senate, Jan. 7, 1938; Rf Shelf, n no. 

10:17-38, '38 

Constitutional government; Vital speeches; 4:4-7, O 15 '37 
Embargo and European power politics; speech in Senate, O 2, 1939. Vital 

Speeches, 6:21-3, O 15 '39 

Our imperative task; Vital speeches; 4:386-9, O 15 '38 
Retain the various embargo; Vital speeches; 5:741-3, O i, '39 
Selling arms; a step toward war; Forum, 102:818-19, N '39 
What our position should be; Vital speeches; 5:397-9, Ap 15 '39 
Border trumpet; novel, Haycox, Ernest 
Born to conquer; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Both sides of election day; Stewart, Mary 
Boundaries; poem, Smith, Bess Foster 
Bower, B. M. (M) 

Angels come riding ; story, Am M, 23 :8o-2, F '37 
Desert rat; McClure, 47:40-2, Jl '16 
Gun-runners; McClure, 47-25-7, O '16 
Lone Rider; McClure, 47:9-11, My S i6 
Boy in Idaho; story, Stevens, James 
Boys as mother-helpers; Thompson, Margaret 
Boy who had a hero; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Boy with a silver plow ; Murphy, Dennis 
Bozeman, John (M) 

Biographical Note, A.: Paul C. Phillips; F & M, 9:354, My '24 
Reminiscence of James Kirkpatrick, A; F & M, 9:354, My '29 
*Bradley, John Hodgdon (M) 

Children of the free; Sci Monthly, 28:122-5, F '29 
Compromising; with death; Am Merc, 45:43-8, D '38 
Cooperation in nature; Yale R n.s., 27 no. 4:712-32, Je '38 
Declaration of progress; Sci Monthly, 30:450-7, My '30 
Enemies are valuable; Am Monthly, 44:302-6, Jl '38 
Evolution in reverse; Forum, 83:36-41* Ja '30 
Good little boys of science ; New Repub, 63 :222-5 Jl '30 
In the beginning; Yale R n.s., 25:733-47* Je '36 
Is man an absurdity? ; Harper, 173:528-34, O '36 
Learn the art of getting on; Am Scholar, 7 no. 2:144-52, Ap '38 
Letter from a scientist to a priest; Atlan, 150:698-700, D '32 
Man's unique discontent; Forum, 98:248-53, N '37 
Old wine in new bottles; New Rep, 64:38-40, Ap 27 '30 
Other side of progress; Yale R n.s.. 26:566-77, Mr '37 
Patterns of success; Yale R n.s., No 2:315-31, D '37 
Sex freedom and the family; Forum, 97:219-23, Ap '37 
Short walks; New Republic, 57:268-70, Ja '29 
Tales that dead men tell; Sci Monthly, 28x27-30, Je '29 
Voice from the wilderness; Sat R Lit, 7:758, Ap 18 '31 
*Bralev, Berton (M) 

Absolutely Mr. Shean; Parents M, 10:93, O '35 
Aesop debunked; St N, 58:193, Ja '31 
All Shipshape; Pop Sci, 126:31, F '35 
Alphabet of safety; Pop Sci, 131:41, Ag '37 



274 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Americanus sum ; Sat Eve Post, 205 :yo, F 4 '33 

Are the intellegentsia intelligent; Lit Digest, 117:32, Je 2 '34 

Are you having any fun; Pop Sci, 136:98, F '40 

Arts and Crafts; Atlan, 151:128, Ja '33 

Balance all; Ladies H J, 55:88, D '38 

Ballad of Sam Davis; poem, St N, 63:20, Ap '36 

Ballads of Babbit Abroad; Sat Eve Post, 205:31, Ja '33 

Boob Ballads; Chris the nut; poem, St N, 58:286, F '31 

Boomdoggle Ballad; Lit Digest, 1229, Ag 15 '36 

Burden; Am M, 115:136, Je '33 

Can do; Pop Sci, 136:103, Mr '40 

Children's Hour; Or Longfellow didn't know the half of it; Read Digest 

Classics come to limerick; poem, Sat Eve Post, 205:71, D n '32 

Customer's man; poem, Sat Eve Post, 205:73, Je 16 '32 

From any angle; Ladies H J, 56:38, S '39 

Gentle art of selling manuscripts; Am Merc, 35:482-4, Ag '35 

Goal ahead; Pop Sci, 135:107, O '39 

Handy man; poem, Pop Sci, 126:29, Ja '35 

Ho-hum! ; Sat Eve Post, 209:61, Ja 16 '37 

Home work; poem, Pop Sci, 126:35, Mr '35 

Husband rebels; Am M, 125:120, Je '38 

If Tombstones told the truth; poem, Pop Sci, 135:134, D '39 

Kinda soft; poem, Am Mag, 128:100, Ag '39 

Lays for loving parents; poem, Hygeia, n:F, My '33 

Magic Makers; poem, Business Week 32, Ag 3 '35 

Mellowing years; poem, Good H, 106:230, Ap '38 

Mere shop; poem, Commonweal, 14:342, Ag 5 '31 

Miracle; story, Hygeia, 13:20-1, Ja '35 

No thank you; poem, Sat Eve Post, 203:126, Jl 26 '30 

Pan and the plumber; poem, Atlan, 149:774, Je '32 

People do read poetry; poem, Lit Digest, 117:41, F 3 '34 

Perfect understanding; poem, Hygeia, 17:32, Ja '39 

Quitters can't win; poem, Pop Sci, 135:83 ; S '39 

Road test; poem, Pop Sci, 136:95, Ap '40 

Rules of the Rude; poem, Atlan, 150:251, Ag '32 

Security ; poem, Am M, 123 :i44, Je '37 

Shoot the works; poem, Pop Sci, 135:99. N '39 

Sic transit; poem, N Y Times Mp. 15, Ja 28 '40 

Smart young man; poem, Atlan, 150:127, Jl '32 

Song of power; poem, Lit Digest 110:23, Ag i, '31 

Song of the restless; poem, Good H, 107:120, O '38 

Strategic retreat; poem, Sat Eve Post, 202:90, Mr 29 '30 

Uncle Sam says uncle; poem. Forum, 98:7, Ag '37 

Use what you've got; poem, Pop Sci, 136:95, My '40 

Vainglory; poem, Christian Cent, *>3:42, Ja 8 '36 

What makes a champion? ; poem. Pop Sci T 135:90, Ag '39 

Will of Thomas Taber, a ballad of Quaker Hill; poem, Sat Eve Post, 212: 
28, Jl 15 '39 

You don't tell me (or yes you do) ; poem, Hygeia, 16:491, Je '38 

You never can tell ; poem, POP Sci, 125:3*, D '34 

You should worry; poem. St N, 58:362, Mr '31 
*B ranch, Edward Douglas (M) 

American cowbov; Mentor, 15:1-10, Jl '27 

Jingle bells; Sat Rev Lit 17:3-4., D 4. '27 
Brand new woman ; story, Welch, Douglas 
Bread and hyacinths ; poem, Johnson, Dorothy Marie 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 275 

Break, The; story, Stevens, James 

Breaking in of Bob Herries ; story, Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt 

Breed, The ; poem, Johnson, Dorothy Marie 

Bretherton, Vivien R. (O) 

Above all else; story, Good H, 100:26-9, Mr '35 

Bird girl; story, Good H, 88:18-21, Mr '31 

Blessed idiot; story, Am M, 127:16-9, Jn '39 

By hook or by crook; story, Good H, 102-44-7, My '36 

Fair weather friends ; story, Good H, 90 :3o-$, Ja '30 

Fiancee for rent; story, Ladies H J, 46:18-19, S '29 

Fifth Farridon; story, Delin, 121:10-11, S '32 

Flirt hat; story, Good H, 90:48-51, Mr '30 

Gallantry; story, Ladies H J, 49:18-19, Ap '32 

Hollywood legend; story, Am M, 126:14-17, O '38 

Love me, love my car; story, Sat Eve Post, 208:27, Ag 3 '35 

Miss Nancy Cupid; story, Good H, 96:26-9, F '33 

Old garden speaks; story, Good H, 10140-3, S '35 

Over the holly hedge; story, Good H, 96:26-9, My '33 

Romantic Samaritan; story, Delin, 116:28, Mr '30 

Second Lilith; story, Good H, 95:32-5 Jl '32 

Three rebels; story, Ladies H J, 48:14-15, My '31 

Ticket to Samarkand; story, Good H, 107:22-5, Ag '38 

Wind across the garden; story, Ladies H J, 56:14-15, O '39 
Bridge table appurtenances ; Thompson, Margaret, and Ferry, Christine 
Brigham and Amelia; Fisher, Vardis 
Bright road ; story, Hawkins, John 
Bright, Verne (O) 

Abandoned conestoga; poem, F & M, 17:32, Ag '36 

Autumn dusk ; poem, F & M, 1 1 :27, N '30 

The ballad of Peter; poem, F & M, 10:17, Mr '30 

Barnaby Bright; F & M, 9 :238, Mr '29 

Cape Perpetua; poem, Overland n.s., 88:164, Jn '30 

Comrade Christ; poem, Christian Cent, 48:611, My '31 

Doors; poem, Christian Cent, 48:1137, S '31 

Elemental; Honeycomb; Graystone; poems, Poetry, 37:322-323, Mr '31 

Good soil; poem, Poetry, 47:187, Ja '36 

I have gone seeking; poem, Lit Digest, 104:28, F '30 

Jefferson Boone; poem, North American, 242:232-240, D '36 

Meek of Oregon; poem, F & M, 10:37, N '29 

Mill wife; poem, F & M, 19:87, winter '38 

Mystic; poem, World T, 12:108, Mr '29 

Old Dan Boone; poem, F & M, 14:191-2, Mr '34 

Peter ; Old sailor ; poems, F & M, 9 ^7, N '28 

Pine tree; poem, Overland n.s., 88:45, F '30 

Pioneer; Death's hour; April moments; poems, Poetry, 34:23-24, Ap '29 

Riding of sundown; poem, Sat Eve Post, 211:66, S '38 

Sea islands; poems, Overland n.s., 87:114, Ap '29 

Sea wind; poem, F & M, 10:18, N '29 

Stone breaker; poem, F & M, 16:283, summer '36 

Stone country; poem, F & M, 14:192-4, Mr '34 

Strange city; poem, Christian Cent, 47:1379, N '30 

Three poems; Poetry, 49:72-73, N '36 

Up-river men; poem, F & M, 16:1834, spring '36 

Wingren farm: The farmstead; Annual magic; Spring plowing; Wingren 
water; The fence; Wingren church; Poorhouse road; Haunted house; 
Stony field; Midsummer night; Indian stone-axe; Sheep herders; Harvest; 



276 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Autumn tree; Apple harvest; The Schoolhouse ; The day before winter; 
Hearth fire; Silver thaw; Midwinter night; poems, F & M, 11:311-18, 
My } 3I 

Wingren people: April advent; Country weekly; Hill dwellers; Earth 
prisoned; Dark autumn; Summer's end; Early frost; Return; Storm in 
May; Country gentleman; Edom's mill; Strange fruit; Spanish lady; Joab 
Starr; Prophet of God; Old mother bric-a-brac; Lament for old men; 
December solstice; poems, F & M, 12:194-200, Mr '32. 
*Brinig, Myron (M) 

Fear God and take your own part; story, Pictorial Review, 26:5-7, J e '%$ 
*Brink, Carol Ryrie (I) 

Creche; poem, Commonweal, 11:19-6, D 18 '29 
Fairie Wife; poem, Poetry, 28:312-13, S '26 
Briton just before the Storm; Burg, Amos 
Broad-leaf evergreens ; Gatke, Robert Moulton 
Brook; Daniels, Bradford K. 
Brotherhood; poem, Markham, Edwin 
Brown Stallion ; story, Davis, Harold L. 
Brown, Zenith Jones (David Frome; Leslie Ford) (W) 
Black Envelope; story, Am M, 124:15-17, Je '37 
Clock Strikes; short novel, Am M, 119:12-15, My '35 
Death stops at a tourist camp; story, Am M, 121:30-3, Ap '36 
False to any man; novel, Sat Eve Post, 211:5-7, Mr i8-Ap 22 '39 
Farewell party; story, Pkt R, 39:89-104, F '38 
111 met by Moonlight; novel, Sat Eve Post, 209:5-7, Ja 2-F 13 '37 
Mr. Pinkerton, present; story, Am M, 122:38-41, O '36 
Mr. Pinkerton lends a hand; novel, Delin, 128:8-10, Ja-Mr '36 
Old lover's Ghost; novel, Sat Eve Post, 212:9-11, Ja 13 '40 
Passage for one; story, Am M, 125:53-7, F '38 
Reno Rendezvous; story, Am M, 127:53-7, Ja '39 
Road to Folly; novel, Good H, 109:20-3, S 32-3, Ja '40 
Simple way of Poison; novel, Sat Eve Post, 210:5-7 No. 13, Ja '38 
Strangled witness; story, Am M, 117:18-23, My '35 
Three Bright pebbles; novel, Sat Eve Post, 211:5-7, Ag 20-8 24 '38 
Town Cries murder; novel, Good H, 107:20-3, S, F '39 
Visitor in night; story, Am M, 128:57-62, Je '39 
Brosnan, Cornelius James (I) 

Oregon Memorial of 1838; Oregon Historical Quarterly, 34:68-77, Mr '33 
Signers of the Oregon Memorial of 1838 

Brownel!, Helena Maxwell (I). Workless days, Atlantic, 148-328-32, S '31 
Buchen, Frieda M. (M) ; Mrs. B Natural's Party, Etude, 53:10, Ja '35 
Buck meets Nannette; Finley, William Lovell 
Buffalo Grass ; story, Muckler, Winifred 
Buffalo in the Judith basin, 1883 ; Tucker, Pat 
Buffet entertaining ; Thompson, Margaret 
Bug-house camp ; Holbrook, Stewart H. 
Bulldogger; story, Stevens, James 
Bull elk; poem. Murphy, Dennis 
Bullet proof culture; Laird, Charlton G. 
Bundrant, Mm. C. Jr.; Stranger from the ridges; poem, F & M, 13:114; Ja 

'33 

Burden ; poem, Braley, Berton 

Burg, Amos (O) 

Britain just before the storm; Nat Geog Mag, 78:185-212, Ag '40 

Color glimpses of the changing south seas; Nat Geog Mag, 65:281-8, Mr '34 

Inside Cape Horn; Nat Geog Mag, 72:743-783, D '37 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 277 



Native son's rambles in Oregon; Nat Geog Mag, 65:173-234, F '34 

On Mackenzie's trail to the polar sea; Nat Geog Mag, 60:12-56, Ag '31 

Today on the Yukon trail of 1898; Nat Geog Mag, 58:85-126, Jl '30 

Buried alive ; Hook, Joseph F. 

Buried treasure; story, Cleland, Mabel Goodwin 

Buried treasure ; Glamour of the north ; Poems, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Burned ; story, Wilson, Ann 

Burned Matches; story, Case, Robert Ormond 

Burnie, Dolald, pseud (I) Tscenieniscence, Lucke river people; poem, F & M, 
10:280-2, My '30 

Burnt, but not starved ; Tucker, Pat 

Burnt snag ; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 

Business men against Wilson ; Connolly, Christopher P, 

Butler, Edward H. (W) Obvious Athlete, Atlan, 113:422-6, N '14 

But once an emperor ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 

But you are like waves; poem, Baldwin, Grace D. 

By a northern river; poems, Winslow Walker 

Byers, John Reid (W) 

Home town laughter; story, Sat Eve Post, 203:14-15, N 29 '30 
You'll never be lonesome; story, Sat Eve Post, 207:10-11, Ap '35 
Judy finds an opening; story, Sat Eve Post, 209:18-19, S 5 '36 
Unhappy endings; story, Sat Eve Post, 208:18-19, D 7 '35 

By-flow; poem, Haste, Gwendolyn 

By hook or by crook ; story, Bretherton, Vivien R. 

By rule of thumb; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

By the sea ; poem, Littell, Lydia B. 

By the Sumida river ; drama, Clements, Colin Campbell 

By this last fire ; poem, Thorpe, Iris Lora 

Byway Orchard ; poem, Morden, Phyllis B. 



Cabbages and kings; story, Robb, Inez Calloway 

Cabin on elk prairie, The ; story, Corning, Howard McKinley 

Cabins ; poem, Linderman, Frank B. 

Cabin, The ; story, Goodwin, Margaret Swarthout 

Cabinet gorge ; Sowder Jr., Chas. 

Caesar and Lizz ; poem, Lister, Queene B. 

Caiilaux case ; Connolly, Christopher P. 

Calif pasture gate ; poem, Kidd, Walter Evans 

Call, Mrs. Hughie Florence (M) 

Evesdroppers in Eden; Scrib M, 100:75, O '36 

Sheep bought it; Sat Eve Post, 209:14, Mr 27 '37 

We, the living; story, Am M, 126:18, O '38 
Calligraphy of the Moslems ; Streit, Clarence K. 
Callvert, Ronald G. (0) 

My country 'tis of thee; Pulitzer prize winner editorial; Current History, 

50:43-44, Je '39 

Calypsos ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Camper's prayer; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Campfires ; Frohlicher, Eugenie E. 
Campfires; poem, Lincoln, Elliott C. 
Canceled; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 
Candle glow ; story, Corning, Howard McKinley 
Candle in the heart ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Candlesticks and candles ; Thompson, Margaret, and Ferry, Christine 
Can do ; poem, Braley, Berton 
Can eight billion dollars stay neutral ? ; Lindley, Ernest Kidder. 



278 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Canfield, Roy H. (M) 

Eleventh hour, The; F & M, 4:113, Mr '24 

Night trail, The; F & M, 4:85, '23 
Canyon evening; poem, Leonard, Lillian T. 
Cape Perpetua; poem, Bright, Verne 
Captain Belson's mate; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Cargoes of romance ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Carpenter; poem, Morden, Phyllis 
*Carr, Mary Jane (O) 

Fifteen years of radio reviewing. Pub weekly, 138:930, S '40 
Cascade tunnel 198; poem, Marshal, James L. 
Case of Reddy ; Stevenson, Elmo Nail 
Case of West Virginia ; Connolly, Christopher P. 
*Case, Robert Ormond (0) 

And one loved dogs; story, Colliers, 91:19, Mr '33 

Burned matches; story, Am M, 122:46-48, D '36 

Eighth world wonder; Sat Eve Post, 208:23, Jl '35 

Expert witness; story. Colliers, 99:14, F '37 

Fortitude; story, Colliers, 102:17, N '38; Scholastic, 34:33, Mr '39 

Golden portage; novel; Sat Eve Post, 211:5-7, Je 3:18-19, Je i-; 20-21, Je 
17; 20-21, Je 24; 212:20-21, Jl 1:20-21, Jl '39 

He shot the Colorado alone; Sat Eve Post, 210:8-9, F '38 

Iron woman; story, Colliers, 93:25, F '34 

Life watch; story, Colliers, 90:26, S '32 

Lost and found; story, Colliers, 96:24, S '35 

Whale of a bargain; story, Am M, 124:30-31, N '37 

Wings north; novel, Sat Eve Post, 210:5-7, J a ' I ^-i9, Ja 15; 

Ja 22 ; 27-28, Ja 29 ; 20-21, F 5 ; 27, F '38 
Casteel, John L. (O) 

Estrangement in winter; poem, F & M, 12:212, Mr '32 

Little houses; poem, F & M, 10:220, Mr '30 
Castle on the Snake; Minger, Viola Oilman 
Cats on the logs ; Holbrook, Stewart H. 
Cattle bedding in snow; poem, Kidd, Walter Evans 
Cattle country; Story, Coates, Grace Stone , 
Cauliflower ears; Whicker, Harold W. 
Cave dwellers of arctic; Miller, Max 
Cave-in ; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 
Censorship; Hughes, Glenn 

Ceremony of after-dinner coffee; Thompson, Margaret, and Ferry, Christine 
Certainty; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 
Certainty ; poem, White, Hal S. 
Change; poem, Doerr, Mary Elizabeth 
Changeling ; poem, Rowe, Telsa V. 
Change of station; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Character; sketch, Bell, Ralph 
Characters; sketches, Thompson, Lloyd S. 
Charcoal kiln ; Gossi, Eva Ellis 

Charge to keep I have ; story, Clements, Colin Campbell 
Charity; poem, Maring, Helen Emma 
Charles, Ruth (M) 

Rides of a country schoolmarm ; F & M, 3 :8, N '23 

Picture; poem, F & M, 4:84; N '23 

Charles Russell, cowboy artist; sketch, Linderman, Frank 
Charms of Alaska ; Connolly, Christopher P. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 279 

*Chase, Mary Ellen (M) 

Abundant life in books; Ladies H J, 53:19) S '36 

American father attends his wife's reunion; Scrib M, 96:22-4, Jl '34 

Are parents afraid of their children?; Ladies H J, 54:604, Jl '37 

Biographical sketch; Bulletin Pan Am Union, 8:322, F '34 

Scholastic; 30:4, Ap 17 '37 

Chores; Readers Digest, 28:84-86, Ja '37 

Christmas is a state of mind; Read Dig, 35:39-40* D ? 39 

Concerning old things and new; House B, 69:52, Ja '31 

Confidences of a lecturer; Commonweal, 18:100-2, My 26 '33 

Dean of American Essayists; Commonweal, 18:384-6, Ag 18 '33 

Golden age; story, No Am, 241:135-44, Mr '36 

I like the younger generation; Ladies H J, 56:21, D '39 

Mrs. Gowen gives notice; Atlan, 146:611-19, My '32 

Mrs. Penlust of Damascus Road; Atlan, 151:411-17, O '32 

My earliest teachers; Read Digest, 36:28-32, My '40 

Pinch of snuff; story, No Am, 240:122-43, Je '35 

She's had the doctor; Atlan, 151:726-32, Je '33 

Sink or swim; Scholastic, 36:174 F 2,6 '40 

Taxi driver 63; story, Delin, 128:12-13, F '36 

What do you expect of college for your daughter?; Ladies H J, 53:154, 

Ag'36 

Checkered tablecloth, The ; Smith, Bess Foster 
Cherry-bark ; poem, Wurdemann, Audrey 
Chief of the Loch McCree; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Child of the border; poem, Haste, Gwendolyn 
Children's nature interests; Stevenson, Elmo Nail 
Child life; poem, Maring, Helen 
Children of the sun ; Bradley, John Hodgdon 
Children's crusade; Struckman, Robert Tod 
Children of God; story, Fisher, Vardis 

Children hour; Or Longfellow didn't know the half of it; Braley, Berton 
Child thoughts ; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 
Chinook; sketch, Jordan, Rachel 
Chinook; poem, Peek, Tate W. 
Chintzes ; poem, Ashmun, Margaret Eliza 
Chippewa crossbows; Linderman, Frank 
*Chittick, V. L. O. (M) 

Black Harris; a tall tale; story, F & M, 12:173-4, Ja '32 
Colonel Crockett's ride on a buffalo; F & M, 11:276, Mr '31 
Ring-tailed roarers; poem, F & M, 13:257-63, My '33 
Choosing; poem, Rowe, Telsa V. 
Chores; Chase, Marv Ellen 
Christian, A; story. Stone, Jack 
Christmas Cactus, The ; poem, Bird, Annie Laurie 
Christmas gifts ; poem. Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Christmas is a state of mind ; Chase, Mary Ellen 
Chromatin ; poem, Mallory, Sarah Trousdale 
Chronicle of the 8o's ; story, Dally, George L. 
Church, Frederick Corss 

Literature of the Italian reformation, Journal of Modern History, 3457-73> 

S'3i 

C. L 0. far western front ; Neuber^er, Richard L. 
Circle; poem, Markham, Edwin 
Circuit rider; poem, Tracey, Paul E. 
City evening after rain ; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 



28o NORTHWEST BOOKS 

City vignettes ; poem, Morden, Phyllis 
Claim jumpers ; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Clam-digger, The ; poem, Elmendorf, Mary J. 
*Clapp, Mary Brennan (M) 

Advent; poem, Cath World, 122:364, D '25 

Dearest thing she had; story, Cath World, 130:200, N '29 

Desert fruit; story, Cath World, 134., O '31 

During music; poem, F & M, 12:254, Mr '32 

Embers ; poem, F & M, 12:360, My '32 

Gilead; poem, Cath World, 130:429, Ja '30 

Grace of God; poem, Cath World, 131:192, My '30 

Hopes; poem, Spirit, S '37 

Hospital hours; poem, Cath World, 131:688, S '30 

Requeim; poem, Cath World, 149:30, Ap '39 

Return; poem, Commonweal, 15:411, F 10 '32 

Sculptor; poem, Ladies H J, 40:140, My '32 

She leaves a family of little children; poem, Cath World, 130:575, F '30 

Spring song; poem, F & M, 19:239, summer '39 

Vainglory; poem, Christian Cent, 53:42, Ja '36 

Young girl at the piano ; poem, F & M, 12 :222, My '32 

Clarissa's own child; story, Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt (Mrs. Wm. D.) 
Classics come to limerick; poem, Braley, Berton 
Cleaning day: Peter helps; Cory, Fanny Young 
Clearing the sagebrush ; poem, Grissom, Irene Welsh 
Cleaning up of hathrop ; Bedidolt, Frederich Ritchie 
Cleland, Mabel Goodwin (W) 

Buried Treasure; story, St N, 60:233-5, Mr '33 
*Clements, Colin Campbell (M) 

By the Sumida River; drama, Poet Lore, 31:166, Je '20 

Cherry Blossom River; drama, Poet Lore, 31:159, Je '20 

Charge to keep I have; story. Overland, 81:18, '23 

Colin Clements M. Wright; Poet Lore, 31:576, D '20 

Father; drama, Poet Lore, 31:187, Je '20 

Growing old together; drama, Poet Lore, 31:176, Je '20 

Life; poem, Asia, 19:119, F '19 

Life is a dream; drama, Poet Lore, 31:204, Je '20 

Man and his wife; drama, Poet Lore, 31:197, Je '20 

Marie of Rumania; Good H, 74:25, My '22 

Modern Harlequinade; drama, Poet Lore, 31:579, "D '20 

Pirates; Overland, 79:35, Je '22 

Rhythm in acting; Drama, 16:132, Ja '26 

Star dust path; drama. Poet Lore, 31:181, Je '20 

Yesterdav: story. Overland, 80:7, O '22 
Climb, fish, climb; Neuberger, Richard 

Clock strikes; novel, Brown, Zenith Jones (David Frome; Leslie Ford) 
Clod the magician ; story, Dahlberg, D'Arcy 
Closed up ; poem, McDowall, Elsie 
Clotho and Atropos ; poem, Pratt, Laurence 
*Coates, Grace Stone (M) 

Advocate and guardian; poem, F & M, 14:296, My '34 

At breakfast; poem, Am Merc, 12:102, S '27 14:2 

Aurora argent; poem, Lit Digest, 106:24, S 13 '30 

Berries sweet and bitter; poem, Lit Digest, 106:25, S 13 '30 

Bishop's visitation; poem, F & M. 14:200, Mr '34 

Canceled; poem, F & M, 10:120, Ja '30 

Cattle country; F & M, 10:238, Mr '32 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 281 

Child thoughts; poem, Poetry, 35:198-9, Ja '30 

Church challenges youth; Stewart, George 

Cloak, The; poem, F & M, 8:198, My '28 

Corn knife, The; story, F & M, 10:210-13, Mr "30 

Dream fears; poem, F & M, 12:60, N '31 

Encircled; poem, F & M, 10:88, Ja '30 

Far back, far forward; F & M, 15:299, summer '35 

Hills; poem, Overland n.s., 86:352, O '28 

Horn, The ; story, F & M, 9 :23~6, N '28 

Insult out of amity; poem, F & M, 13:105. Ja '33 

Late fruit; story, F & M, 8:213-18, Mr '28 

Makers of song ; poem, F & M, 8 :iy3, N '27 

Mea culpa ; poem, 9 :22, N '28 

Mutter korn; poem, Poetry, 35:198-9, Ja '30 

Old freighter comes back in a Ford; poem, Poetry, 28:319-21, S '26 

Picture, The; story, F & M, 12:316, My '32 

Pine tree, The; story, F & M, 11:120, Ja '31 

Plaster of Paris; story, F & M, 9:106-9, Ja '29 

Postscripts; poem, F M, 11:120, Ja '31 

Prairie birth ; poem, Lit Digest, 106 :24, S i '30 

Promise; poem, Poetry, 35:198-9, Ja '30 

Response; poem, Am Merc, 12:102, S '27 

Salvage; poem, F & M, 11:148, Ja '31 

Trees of heaven; story, F & M, 9:309-10, My '29 

Under trees; poem, F & M, 8:313, My '28 

The way of the transgressor; story, F & M, 10:44-8, N '29 

Wild honey; poem, F & M, n :i56, Ja '31 

Wild plums; story, F & M, 9:215-19, Mr '29 
Cobwebs; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 
Cochran, Joseph (M) 

Sawmill phantoms; F & M, 6:106, N '25 

Song of the Volga, The ; F & M, 5 =44, Mr '25 
Cock's early crowing ; poem, Russell, Myna A. 
Coffin boat, The; story, Corning, Howard McKinley 
Coffin of print; poems, Macleod, Norman 
Cold; poem, Tracey, Paul 

Cold harvest; woman at the edge of town; Black frost with wind; After the 
freeze; A snowy orchard; Blackraspberry patch; poems, Kidd, Walter Evans 
Colin Clements M. Wright; Clements, Colin Campbell 
College age ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
College spirit and patriotism; Thompson, Lloyd S. 
Collins, Dean (O) 

Antrum tantrums; poem, Hygeia, 13:1113, D '35 

Hay! hayi ; poem, Hygeia, 13:785* S '35 

Oswald; poem, Hygeia, 14:21, Ja '36 

Scenery, if you can see it; poem, American City, 39** I 47> D *8 
Colonel Crockett's ride on a buffalo ; Chittick, V, L. O. 
Colonel's daughter; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Colonial pattern weaving house ; Atwater, Mary 
Color glimpses of the changing south seas ; Bury, Amos 
Color of beauty; poem, Morden, Phyllis B. 
Colossus in the west ; Neuberger, Richard 
Columbia flows to the land ; Neuberger, Richard 
Columbia river power; Neuberger, Richard 
Come on, you communist ! ; story, Jones, Nard 
Comedy, Thomson, Cardwell 



a8a NORTHWEST BOOKS 

*Corner, Cornelia Atwood Pratt (Mrs. Wra. D.) (W) 

Breaking in of Bob Herries ; story, Putnam's, 6 1349, Je '09 

Clarissa's own child; story, Atlan, 109:739, Je '12 

Drawing the color line; story, Harpers W, 52:22, O 17 '08 

Folly o' the wise ; story, Putnam's, 7:441, Ja 7 io 

Indian Gift; story, Scrib M, 31:625, My '02 

Kinzer portraits, The; story, Atlan, 105:77, Ja J io 

Land of youth; story, Putnam's, 7:582, F '10 

Letter to rising generation; Atlan, 150:164-32, N '32 

Little grey ghost; story, Atlan, 109:311, Mr '12 

Long inheritance, The; story, Atlan, 108:145, Ag 'n 

Making of a doctor; story, Putnam's, 5:510, F '09 

Man in front of Mannering's; story, Harper, 127:41, Je '13 

Massey money, The; story, Atlan, 111:320, Mr '13 

Obsequies of Peter Schwartz; story, Harper, 127:894, N '13 
Preliminaries; story, Atlan, io6:"669, N '10 

Serena's religious experience; story, Cent. 45*o5 2 3 n - s - 28 5> D '32 

Soul of William Jones, The ; story, Cent, 59 :832, Ap 1900 

Witherle's freedom ; story, Cent, 26 :98, My '94 
Comfort me with apples ; Walker, Mildred 
Commemoration; poem, Stone, Jack 
Company; story, Sherman, Richard 
Compensation; poem, Ashmun, Margaret Eliza 
Composer of music ; poern, Maring, Helen Emma 
Comrade Christ; poem, Bright, Verne 
Compromising with death ; Bradley, John Hodgdon 
Concerning boundaries ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Concerning old things and new; Chase, Mary Ellen 
Concrete worker; poem, Nelson, Robert 
Confession ; poern, Johnson, Dorothy Marie 
Confidences of a lecturer, Chase, Mary Ellen 
Connecticut river; December; poems, Wurdemann, Audrey 
*Connolly, Christopher P. (M) 

Amazing fraud; McClure, 47:15-17, Jl '16 

Ballinger, Shyster, Colliers, 45:16-17, Ap 2 '10 

Barnes of Albany; Colliers, 49:10-11, S 14 '12 

Bechman of Kentucky; Harpers W, 59:35-6, Jl n '14 

Big business and the bench; Everybody's, 26:146-60, 291-30, 439-53, 659-72, 
827-41; 27:116-28, F-J1 J i2 

Business men against Wilson; Everybody's, 35:412-21, O '16 

Caillaux case; Everybody's, 40:24-8, My '19 

Core of West Virginia; Colliers, 50:12-3, D 21 '12 

Chorus of Alaska; Colliers, 45:15, Je 16 5 io 

Fight for the Minnie Herly; McClure, 29:317-32, Jl '07 

Fight of the Copper Kings; McClure, 29:1-16, 214-28, My-Je '07 

Frank Case; Colliers, 54:6-7, D 19:18-20, D 26 '14 

Freight tariff; Colliers, 43:13-4, Ap 3 '09 

From temperance to Wheelerism; Commonweal, 12:191, Je 18 '30 

Gallinger of New Hampshire ; Colliers, 43 ij Ja 9 '09 

Glory of the States; Montana, Am M, 81:31, Je '16 

Governor Glynn of New York; Colliers, 52:7-8, Mr 7 '14 

Labor fuss in Butte; Everybody's, 31:205-8, Ap '14 

More loopholes; Colliers, 42:9, F 20 "09 

Presidential possibilities; Colliers, 55:5-6, Jl 31 '15 

Protests by dynamite; Colliers, 48:9-10, Ja 13 '12 

Raiding the people's land; Colliers, 44:18-19, Ja '10 

Savings of Clarence Darrow; Colliers, 48:9-10, D 23 *u 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 283 

Senator Warren of Wyoming; Colliers, 49:10-11, Ag 31 '12 

Story of Montana; McClure, 27:346-61, 451-65, 629-39; 26:27-43, 198-210, 

Ag-D '06 

Trial at Los Angeles; Colliers, 48:17, O 14 5 n 
Who is behind Ballinger?; Colliers, 45, 16-17, Ap 9 ' IO 
Conservatives in overalls; Stevens, James 
Consistent man; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Constitutional government; Borah, William Edgar 
Continued brightness ; Maxwell, Ben 
Contrarieties; poem, Tull, Jewel Bothwell 
Controlled prices and democracy; Dale, Harrison Clifford 
Cooperation in nature; Bradley, John Hodgdon 
Cornflowers ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
*Corning, Howard McKinley (O) 

Bird into beast; poem, Sat R Lit, 8:453, Ja 16 '32 

Burnt snag; poem, F & M, 12:292, My '32 

The cabin on elk prairie; story, F & M, 10:105-10, Ja '30 

Candle glow; story, F & M, 12:9-14, N '31 

City evening after rain; poem, Am Merc, 40:150, F '37 

Coffin boat, The; story, F & M, 13:202-11, Mr '33 

Curtains; Three old ladies; Bride's story; Husband's story; Empty cabins; 
poems, Lit Digest, 108:45, Mr '31 

Dead furrow in the forest; poem, F & M, 18:88, winter J 37- S 38 

Deerfoot prints; story, F & M, 11:227-30 Mr '31 

Dry land boat; story, F & M, 16:216-20, spring '36 

Farther sight; poem, Am Merc, 36:272, N '35 

Fruits of rain; Men walk in rain; I seek the orchid; Meadow brook runs 
over; poems, Poetry, 39:82-84, N '31 

Full tide at sunset; poem, F & M, 9:291-2, My '29 

Hard neighbor; poem, New Repub, 70:45, F '32 

Kettle cache; An episode at Sixes; story, F & M, 13:283-5, My '33 

Lament of the white peak men ; poem, F & M, 14:263-4, My '34 

Legend before darkness; poem, New Repub, 95:12, My '38 

Mountain dwellers; poem, Lit Digest, 113:24, Ap '32 

Mountain in the sky, The ; poem, F & M, 9 :i2, N '28 

Mountain love; poem, Nation, 136:264, Mr '33 

Mountain village; poem, F & M, 16:275, summer '36 

Mounted man; poem, F & M, 16:195, spring '36 

Multitude; poem, Commonweal, 15:64, N '31 

Never deny a mountain; poem, Am Merc, 43:232-233, F '38 

North trail; poem, F & M, 12:129-30, Ja '32 

Only the windless meadow; poem, Poetry, 44:126-7, Je '34; Lit Digest, 
118:25, Ag '34 

Rock, The; poem, F & M, 16:54, autumn '35 

Season for the mind; poem, New Repub, 85:197, D '35 

Six curtains; The three old ladies; The bride's story; The Husband's story; 
The empty cabin; poems, F & M, 11:13-14, N '30 

The sixes runs to the sea; story, F & M, *3:i-n, N '32 

Song to explain a late Oregon settler; poem, F & M, 15:290, summer '35 

They dwelt on the Sixes river; story, F & M, 19:223-8, summer '39 

This is the death; poem, Nation, 133:136, Ag '31 

To be a great man; story, F & M, 18:215-23, summer '38 

Toward the mountain; poem, Nation, 133:366, O '31 

Willamette portage; poem, F & M, 9:183, Mr '29 

Windy places; Northwest passage; Green councillors; Proud man walks in 
the desert; Song to say a farewell; poems, Poetry, 36:80-83, My '30 

Winter apples; story, F & M, 13:115-22, Ja '33 



284 NORTHWEST BOOKS 



Corn Knife, The ; story, Coates, Grace Stone 
Cory, Fanny Young (M) 

Adventures of Peter J.; St N, 52:690, My 25 
Cleaning Day; Peter helps. St N, 52:1026, Ag 25 
Country Life; Phillips, Paul C. 

Coupe, Delores M. (I) t n ~ , 

Skull Behind the bar, The; story, Seeing Idaho, 1:5 24-5, U 37 
Song of the rancher's wife, The ; poem, Seeing Idaho, i -4, & 37 
Course of the blue eagle; Haycox, Ernest 
Court day; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Cowboy artist, The ; Smith, Cecil 
Cowboy can ride, The ; Shope, Irving 
Cow camp Christmas ; Shope, Irving 
Cow town widows; story, Davis, Harold L. 
Cow trails in September ; poem, Howe, Lucy 
*Cox, Sidney Hayes (M) xvr , 

Definition of the Indefinable, A; F & M, 4:158, My 24. 
Joseph Harding Underwood; F & M, 7:4, N '28 

Literary faith and conscience of Wm. D. Howells, The; F & M, 1:52, N 20 
Visits of literary men and women; F & M, 2:169, Mr '22 
Why my God wears a pitying smile ; F & M, 3 '-7, N '22 
Coyote; Bolles, Jason (H. J.) 
Coyote; Murphy, Dennis 

Coyote who talked with God ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Crab; poem, Wurdemann, Audrey 
Cracking down on forest fires ; Holbrook, Stewart H. 
Craftsman ; poem, Lincoln, Elliott C. 
Crandell, Richard F. (M) 

Daubers; F & M, 5:35, Mr '25 
Mr. Trimble goes fishing; F & M, 4:162, My '24 
Punctuation; F & M, 5:24, N '24 
Oljolaned; F & M, 4:100, N '23 
To the vigilantes; F & M, 4 : * 2 9> Mr '24 
Wind's a foolish thing; F & M, 5:36, Mr '25 
Crater's Creed, The ; Armour, William K. 
Craw, Nina (M) 

Death in Summer ; poem, F & M, 9 :294 My '29 
Restless; poem, F & M, 9:241, Mr '29 
Crazy Pashka ; story, Notkin, Natalie B. 
Creatures of mist; Ernst Alice Henson 
Creche ; poem, Brink, Carol Ryie 
Crickets and the weather; Lampman. Ben Hur 
Critic, The ; poem, Baldwin, Grace D. 
Cromwell, Anne (M) 

Blue sky; F & M, 2:142, N '21 
In a small town Lawyer's Office; F & M, 3:6, N '22 
Moods; poem, F & M, 4:117, Mr '24. 
Remnants at the Poor farm; poem, F & M, 4:94, N '23 
Why must I write a book report? ; F & M, i :227, My '21 
Crop campers; poem, Davis, Harold L. 

Cross-sections of Eskimo life; Forrest, Elizabeth Chabot (Mrs. Earle Forrest) 
Cry-because-he-have-no-wife ; story, Lister, Queene B. 
Cultural aspects of the conference in Lima ; McSpadden, George E. 
Curtain call ; poem, Marshall, James L. 
Curtains; Three old ladies; Bride's story; Husband's story; Empty cabins; 

poems, Corning, Howard McKinley 
Custom of the country; story, Thomas, E. H. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 285 

Customer's man ; poem, Braley, Berton 
Cycle; poem, Dahlberg, D'Arcy 

Dahlberg, D'Arcy (M) see also D'Arcy McNickle 

Clod the magician; story, F & M, 4:150-2, My '24 

Cycle ; poem, F & M, 5 13, N '24 

Going to school; story, F & M, 9:339-46, My '29 

Man hesitates but man urges; poem, F & M, 6:146, Mr '26 

Minuet in G; poem, F & M, 5:43, Mr '25 

Mountain, The ; poem, F & M, 5 :y8-9, My '25 

Plowing; poem, F & M, 4:131, Mr '24 

Sailing, a sailing; F & M, 6:122-5, N '25 

Silver locket, The; story, F & M, 4:96-9, N '23 

Today ; poem, F & M, 5 :24, N '24 
Dale, Harrison Clifford (I) 

Controlled prices end democracy; Nation's business, 25:15-17, F '37 

Planaceas; Nation's Business, 25:98, My '37 
Dally, Geo. L. (M) 

A chronicle of the 8o's; story, F & M, 2:193, Mr '22 

Danger mansion; story, Wylie, Philip 

Schroppers; story, F & M, 2:139, N '21 
Daniels, Bradford K. (W) 

Brook; Atlan, 154:213-22, Ag '34 

Gotterdammerung; Atlan, 145:105-8, Ja '30 

In the way they should go; Atlan, 149-29-32, Ja '32 

My last frontier; Atlan, 148:710-18, D '31 

Pagan boyhood; Atlan, 145-166-79, Ap '30 

Rose Marie; Atlan, 156:206-9, Ag '35 
Danish folk high school; Jones, Mrs. Pamelia Pearl, Sell & Soc, 44:185,82, 

215-17, Ag 8-15 '36 

Dark girl; Bolles, Jason, F & M, 15:103, Ja '35 
Dark land waiting ; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Dark of the train ; poem, MacLeod, Norman 
Dark retreat; story, Thane, Eric 
Dark room; Lull, Rhoderick 
Daubers; sketch, Crandell, Richard 
*Davis, Harold L. (O) 

American apostle; Am Merc, 30:219-227, O '33 

Back to the land, Oregon 1907; Am Merc, 16:314-323, Mr '29 

Beach squatter; story, Sat Eve Post, 209:18-19, N 21 '36 

Brown stallion; story, Am Merc, 18:8-16, S '29 

Cow-town widows; story, Am Merc, 18:464-473, D '29 

Crop campers; poem, Am Merc, 16:94-95, Ja '29 

Extra gang; Am Merc, 24:161-170, O '31 

Flying switch; story, Colliers, 86:14-15, Ag 2 '30 

Hand-press journalist; Am Merc, 19:478-486, Ap '30 

Hell to be smart; story, Am Merc, 36:292-303, N '35 

Homestead orchard; story, Sat Eve Post, 212:14-15, Jl 29 '39 

Horse for Felipa; story, Colliers, 95:16-17, Je 15 '35 

In Argos ; New birds; poems, Poetry, 42:61-69, My '33 

Juan Chacon; poem, F & M, 10:187-91, Mr '30 

Last Indian outbreak 1906; Arn Merc. 30:50-7, S '33 

Mrs. Almina Steed; story, Ladies H J, *>3 130-31, Mr '36 

Murder story; Am Merc, 30:303-11, N '33 

Old-fashioned land Eastern Oregon, The; F & M, 9:201-7, Mr '29 

Old man Isbell's wife; story, Am Merc, 16:142-149, F '29 

Open winter; story, Sat Eve Post, 211:12-13, My 6 '39 



286 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Pioneer captain, Am Merc, 22:149-59, F '31 

Railroad beef; story, Colliers, 96:29, O 29 '35 

Shotgun junction; story, Colliers, 94:24, N 3 '34 

Spanish lady; story, Colliers, 94:7-8, Jl 14 '34 

Team bells woke me; story, Am Merc, 22:444-53, Ap '31 

Three hells: a comparative study; Am Merc, 20:257-67, Jl '30 

Town in eastern Oregon; Am Merc. 19:75-83, Ja '30 

Vanishing wolf; story, Colliers, 95:17, F 2 '35 

Water on the wheat; Am Merc, 19:137-144, F '30 

Wild headlight; story, Colliers, 92:34-5, D 30 '33 

Wild horse siding; story, Colliers, 88:14-15, O 17 '31 
Dawn and new snows ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Dawn thoughts ; sketch, Heiferlin, Pearl 
Day dreams ; story, Woodward, Amy Temple 
Day in town ; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Day with a ranchwoman ; Hazen, Lillian Weston 
Day's work; Hubert, Ernest E. 
Dead brain ; poem, Elmendorf, Mary J. 
Dead-Indian Ledge; poem, Micken, Ralph A. 
Dead furrow in the forest ; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 
Deaf ; poem, Olsen, Charles Oltif 
De Amicitia; story, Sherman, Richard 
Dean of American Essayists ; Chase, Mary Ellen 
Dearest thing she had ; story, Clapp, Mary Brennan 
Death flies east; story, Wylie, Philip 
Death in summer; poem, Craw, Nina 
Death of Mr. Barker ; story, Lull, Roderick 
Death stops at a tourist camp ; story, Brown, Zenith Jones 
December; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 

Decoration extends to the closet; Thompson, Margaret and Ferry, Christine 
Deep harbor ; story, Hawkins, John 
Deep west; novel, Haycox, Ernest 
Deerfoot prints ; story, Corning, Howard McKinley 
Defense is not required ; Doerr, Mary Elizabeth 
Definition of the Indefinable ; Cox, Sidney Hayes 
Delusion of progress; Bradley, John Hodgdon 
Desert Christmas; Stahlberg, John 
Desert dead; poem, Grissom, Irene Welch 
Desert fruit; story, Clapp, Mary Brennan 
Desert hill ; poem, Hedges, Ada Hastings 
Desert rat; Bower, B. M. 
Desert secret, A ; Hubert, Ernest E. 
Desert spring; Hedges, Ada Hastings 
Desert trail, The ; poem, Marshall, James H. 
Desert woman ; poem, Aiken, Mrs. Lulu Piper 
Desolate; poem, Swartz, Elsa E. 
Destination ; sketch, Faich, Helen 
Detroit the dynamic ; Stevens, James 
Dewey, Margaret (M) 

Answer; poem, F & M, 11:318, My '31 

Dissemblance; poem, F & M, 18:167, spring '38 

Quality; poem, F & M, 12:347, My '32 

Silence; poem, F & M, 11:310, My '31 
Dial, The; poem, Armour, William K. 
Diaries ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Difference ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Dinner for two ; Bolles, Jason H. J. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 287 

Disillusionment; poem, Muckler, Winifred 

Disinherited; story, Wet j en, Albert Richard 

Dismal Sauger; story, Stevens, James 

Dissemblance; poem, Dewey, Margaret 

Do college students read ? ; Young, Beatrice 

Doctors of dullness ; Whicker, Harold W. 

Doctor of Philosophy, A ; sketch, Hutchens, John K. 

Do eagles prey on wild sheep or goats? ; Bailey, Robert G. 

Doerr, Mary Elizabeth (M) 

Change; poem, F & M, 2:192, Mr '22 

Defense is not required ; F & M, 1 142, N '20 

In southern California; F & M, 3:70, My '23 

Knight of the Road, A ; F & M, 2 1220, My '22 

Light and Shadow; F & M, 1:113, My '21 

Prophecy; F & M, 2:138, N '21 

Renunciation ; F & M, i 43, N '20 

Xo ; poem, F & M, 1:113, My '21 

To the Marble Faun; F & M, 1:87, F '21 
Dog's Life, A; sketch, Linderman, Frank B. 
Dolorosa, here I come ; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Don Constanzio Dores ! ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Donkey kicks his heels ; Lindley, Ernest Kidder 
Don't call it Frisco ; Miller, Max 
Don't ever forget; story, Foster, Michael 
Don't get me wrong; story, Lull, Roderick 
Don't give it a thought; story, Sherman, Richard 
Don't send flowers ; story, Wylie, Philip 
Doomed battalion; poem, Wurdemann, Audrey 
Door-carrier ; Haskin, Leslie Loren 
Doors; poem, Bright, Verne 
Dose Wampus cat ; poem, Frohlicher, Eugenie E. 
Double billing; story, Foster, Michael 
Down glacier way ; poem, Gould, Kari C. 
Down the river ; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Down the river of no return ; Bailey, Robert G. 
Downfall of Elder Barton; story, Stevens, James 
Dragon comes ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 

Drawing the color line; story, Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt (Mrs. W. D.) 
Dream fears ; story, Coates, Grace Stone 
Dream not too much ; poem, Green, Mary Walter 
Dressing tables and their appointments ; Thompson, Margaret 
Drifter; novel, Haycox, Ernest 
Drought ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Drums of death, The; poem, Macleod, Norman 
Drums on the wind; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
*Drury, Clifford Merrill (I) 

Hinduism in the United States; Mission Review, 44:281-3, Ap *2r 
How Ginling college was saved; Mission Review, 55*165, Mr '32 
Idaho's First Mill; Seeing Idaho, 1:5, 8-9, O '37 
Ten years' growth in China; Mission Review, 58:62, F '35 
Dry Drive; Stewart, George R. J. 
Dry land boat; story, Coming, Howard McKinley 
Ducats of the western tide ; Lampman, Ben Hur 
Dunbar, Ruth (W) 

Adventures of a small town hotel keeper; Am M, 99-54, Mr '25 
Dun horse, The; story, Lister, Queene B. 
During music ; poem, Clapp, Mary Brennan 



288 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Early day horse trailing; sketch, Sweetman, Luke D. 

Early December dusk ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Earth bound rock; Struckman, Robert Tod 

Ebb Tide ; poem, Linderman, Wilda 

Editor to the reader, The ; Merriam, H. G. 

Education ; poem, Tull, Jewel Bothwell 

Ee-Dah-How; poem, Haroldsen-Lovell, Edith Ann 

Ego and His Oron, The ; story, Thompson, Lloyd S. 

Eighth world wonder ; Case, Robert Ormond 

Elegy; poem, Stone, Jack 

Elemental ; Honeycomb ; Gray Stone ; poems, Bright, Verne 

*Elmendorf, Mary J. (W) 

Ballad of the taciturn three; poem, F & M, 15:58, autumn '34 

Claim-digger, The; poem, F & M, 10:201-2, Mr '30 

Dead brain, The; poem, F & M, 12:119, Ja '32 

Gray dog, The; poem, F & M, 12:119, Mr '32 

Hold-up, The; poem, F & M, 11:157, Jr '31 

Lumberjack; poem, F & M, 15:290, summer '35 

October; poem, Poetry, 41:81, N '32 
Eleventh hour, The; sketch, Canfield, Roy H. 
*Elrod, Morton John (M) 

Flowers and snow; Nature M, 20:80, Ag '32 

Stranded blooms; Nature M, 20:164, O '32 
Eluding title ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Embargo and European power politics ; Borah, William Edgar 
Embers ; poem, Clapp, Mary Brennan 
Emery, Clark (O) 

Night hunt; poem, F & M, 19:229, summer '39 
Empty stackyard, The; story, Smith, Cecil 
Encircled; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 
Encounter with a ghost; story, Babson, Naomi Lane 
Endless march, The ; poem, Maring, Helen 
Endlessly the covered wagon ; editorial, Merriam, H. G. 
End of a dream; Marshall, James H. 
End of the season ; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 
End of summer ; poem, Allen, Eleanor 
Enemies are valuable ; Bradley, John Hodgdon 
Erickson, Kenneth L. (I) 

Into sun valley rode the '400; Seeing Idaho, 1:26-27-28-29-39, My '37 

Thunder over the sawtooths; Seeing Idaho, 1:14-15, Jl '37 
Ericson, E. E. (M) 

Afterwards; poem, F & M, 6:175, My '26 

Home; F & M, 6:175, My '26 

Neighbors ; F & M, 5 :23, N '24 

Roanoke of the Prairie; F & M, 4:157, My '24 

Serf, The; F & M, 3:39, Mr '23 

Sheepherder, The; F & M, 3:56, My '23 
Erkkila, Ernest (M) 

Aberdeen, Washington ; poem, F & M, 9 :i94, Mr '29 

Alabama Marie; poem, F & M, 7:19, N '26 

There's hope to squander; poem, F & M, 7:107, My '27 
*Ernst, Alice Henson (O) 

Creatures of mist; F & M, 15:31-6, autumn '34 

Masks of the northwest coast; Theatre Arts Monthly, 17:646-656, Ag '33 

Northwest coast animal dances; Theatre Arts Monthly, 23:661-672, S '39 

Two Indian poems: Morning song (Makah) ; Ya IhFs song to the north 
wind (Thlingit) ; poems, F & M, 14:239-40, Mr '34 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 289 

Valley of lost men; drama, Theatre Arts Monthly, 14:4.30-44.0, My '30 
Errand for the wife; story, Alexander, Charles 
Error; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Eternally David ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Estrangement in winter ; poem, Casteel, John L. 
*Eunson > Dale (M) 

All of my life; story, Am M, 126:46, S '38 

Autumn Idyl; poem, Cosmo, N '34 

Helpmeet; poem, Harper, O '34 

Jake, I need help ; poem, McCall's M, S '35 

Lady lies; story, JPict R, 38:16, F '37 

Sun dog; story, Womans H C, 58:7, N '31 
Evans, Helena Grace (M) 

Attention horation; F & M, 3:14, N '22 

House across the way, The ; F & M, 2:222, My '22 
Even if no dreams are true ; poem, Markham, Edwin 
Evening poem ; Baldwin, Grace D. 
Evening's entertainment; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Evesdroppers in Eden ; Call, Mrs. Hughie Florence 
Evolution in reverse; Bradley, John Hodgdon 
Expert witness; story, Case, Robert Ormond 
Extra gang ; Davis, Harold L. 
Fable; poem, Hutchens, John K. 
Faick, Helen (M) 

Destination; F & M, 3:58, My 23 

Linoleum cuts ; F & M, 9 :i24, Ja '29 
Fair return; story, Miller, Laura 
Fair weather friends ; story, Bretherton, Vivien R. 
Fairy wife ; poem, Brink, Carol Ryrie 
Fall flight ; poem, Aiken, Mrs. Lulu Piper 
False to any man ; novel, Brown, Zenith Jones 
Familiarity; poem, Wilson, Ann 
Family affiair; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

Family letters of two Oregon fur traders, 1828-36; Phillips, Paul C, 
Far back, far forward; Coates, Grace Stone 
Far eastern war in Geneva ; Streit, Clarence K. 
Fare well in Shanghai; story, Babson, Naomi Lane 
Farewell party; story, Brown, Zenith Jones 
Farewell to the years ; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Fargo, Idaruth Scofield (O) 

Sun gone down, The; poem, F & M, n :i42, Ja '31 
Farmer; Murphy, Dennis 
Farmer; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Farnsworth, Mary (M) 

Highlands, The; poem, F & M, 7:85, My '27 

Fog; poem, F & M, 7:121, My '27 

Second dusk; F & M, 7:85, My '27 

Snow; F & M, 7:85, My '27 
Farther sight ; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 
Far west and near east; James, Will 
Father (d) ; Clements, Colin Campbell 

Father Mengarini's narrative of the rockies, 1841-50; Partoll, Albert 
Fawn ; poem, Murphy, Dennis 
Fear ; story, Johnson, Dorothy Marie 
Fear God and take your own part; Brinig, Myron 
Feathered nomads of the sea ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Feather in the cap ; poem, Maring, Helen 



290 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

F. B. Linderman ; Struckrnan, Robert Tod 

Federation's collect ; Stewart, Mary 

Feedpipes for skyscrapers; Lindley, Ernest Kidder 

Ferris, Christine. See Thompson, Margaret 

Fiancee for rent ; story, Bretherton, Vivien R. 

Fickland expedition, The ; McLemore, Clyde 

Fidelity; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Fifteen hundred miles ; poem, Robinson, Lucy M. C. 

Fifteen years of radio reviewing; Carr, Mary Jane 

Fifth Farridon; story, Bretherton, Vivien R. 

Fifty-fifty or quit; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Fight for the copper kings ; Connolly, Christopher P. 

Fight for the Minnie Healy; Connolly, Christopher P. 

Fighting forest fires ; Holbrook, Stewart H. 

Fighting for the Indians with Joaquin Miller ; Beebe, Beatrice 

Fightin' mad; story, Stevens, James 

Fillips for the winter's entertaining ; Thompson, Margaret 

Finding out about Paul ; poem, Baldwin, Grace D. 

Finished symphony; poem, Beebe, Beatrice 

*Finley, William Lovell (0) 

Are salmon now sold down the river?; Nature M, 28:107-108, Ag '36 

Are wildcats wild?; Nature M, 23:189-191, Ap '34. 

Bears I have met; Mentor, 17:41-48, My '29 

Fish protection and the industrial use of waters; Bird Lore, 39:122-126, 

Mr '37 

Reclamation vs. conservation; Nature M, 26:46-48, Jl '35 

Salmon or kilowatts; Nature M, 26:ioj-io8, Ag '35 

Malheur, the unfortunate; Nature M, 28:171-173, S '36 

Salmon, seals and skull duggery; Nature M, 28:299-303, N '36 

Skeezix, a white coyote; Nature M, 15:227-229, Ap '30 
*Finley, William Lovell, and Finley, Irene 

Buck meets Nannette; Nature M, 14:74-9, Ag '29. Excerpts; Review of 

Reviews, 80:96-9, S '29 
Fire in the timber ; Holbrook, Stewart 
Fire line; Bechdolt, Ritchie 
Fireweed; Fuller, Ethel Romig 
First day ; storv, Sherman, Richard 
First money ; story, James, Will 

First pioneer, a desperately historical note ; Marshall, James H. 
Fisherman's wife; poem, Lee, Borghild 
*Fisher, Vardis (I) 

Brigham and Amelia; story, Harper, 179:235-42, Ag '39 

Children of God; novel, abridged, Read Digest, 36:137-92. i4*~88, Ap; 
141-88, My '40 

Laughter: story, Scrib M, 99:168-70, Mr '36 

Mother, The; story, F & M, 14:1, N '33 

This about authors; F & M, 13:177, Mr '33 

Pinch of Advice; Writer, 53:227-9, Ag '40 
Fishing in summer; poem, Macleod, Norman 

Fish protection and the industrial use of waters ; Finley, W. Lovell 
Fish that glitter; Lampman, Ben Hur 
Fitzgerald, Brassil (M) 

Be good and eat alone; story, Good H, 104:46-9, My '37 

Fraternity; story, F & M, 13:38, N '32 

Gallagher's game; story, Colliers, 96:46, O 12 '35 

Genius in flight; F & M, 13:106, Ja '33 

London Fantasy, A; poem, F & M, 11:158, Ja '31 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 291 

Notes from a professor's diary; F & M, 9:301-6; My '29 
Tap-dancer's husband; story, Colliers, 97:10-11, Ap n '36 
Flanagan's stool pigeon ; story, Bechdolt, Frederick Ritchie 
Flathead Lake ; sketch, Schok, Al 
Fligelrnan, Belle (M) 

Hark, hark the dogs do bark; story, F & M, 18:179, spring '38 
Royal family, The; story, F & M, 16:, autumn '35 
Flight of the herons ; play, Kennard, Marietta C. 
Flirt hat ; story, Bretherton, Vivien R. 
Flower of gold ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Flowers and snow; Elrod, Morton John 
Flowery coast; story, Foster, Michael 
Flute ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Flying switch ; story, Davis, Harold L. 
Fog; poem, Farnsworth, Mary 
Fog; poem, White, Phillip 
Folly and Farewell ; story, Sherman, Richard 

Folly of the wise; story, Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt (Mrs. Wm, D.) 
Footprints; novel, Strahan, Mrs. Kay Cleaver 
Ford, Leslie. Pseud., see Brown, Zenith Jones 
Foremen, fore and aft ; Holbrook, Stewart 
Forest; poem, Maring, Helen 
Forest home; poem, Haste, Gwendolyn 
Forget; poem, Stone, Jack 
Forgotten firefly; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
For my lady; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Forrest, Mrs. Earle, See Forrest, Elizabeth Chabot 
*Forrest, Elizabeth; Elizabeth Chabot (Mrs, Earle Forrest) (W) 
Cross-sections of Eskimo life; Hygeia, 10:628-32, Jl '32 
Gossip; story, Canad M, 86:12-15, D '36 
Stork expected at Point Barrow; Atlan, 157:129-37, F '36 
Whale; Atlan, 157:326-30, Mr '36 
Fortitude; story, Case, Robert Ormond 
Fortitude ; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
*Foster, Michael (W) 

Bishop of the sea; story, Colliers, 98:16017, D 28 '35 
Blue dress; story, Colliers, 102-30, Ag 27 '38 
Don't ever forget; story; Colliers, 102:9-10, Jl 23 '30 
Double billing; story, Colliers, 105:7-9, Ja 6 '40 
Flowery coast; story, Colliers, 101:9-10, Ja 29 '38 
Light for the flag; story, Colliers, 101:9-11, Mr 5 '38 
Man from the sea; story, Colliers, 102:20-1, S 3 '38 
Four Amerindian poets ; poems, Bolles, Jason H. J. 
Four months on a freighter ; Stevens, James 
Fourth son; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Four walls of rotting logs ; poem, Stone, Jack 
Foxes among the lambs ; poem, Moll, Ernest George 
Fragments of time ; poems, Macleod, Norman 
Frank case ; Connolly, Christopher P. 
Franklin, Viola Price (O) 

In memoriam: Ina Coolbrith; poem, Overland, 87:253, Ag '29 
Fraternity; story, Fitzgerald, Bassil 
Frazier, Neta Lohnes (W) 

Story makings; story, F & M, 10:121, Ja '30 
Free land; story, Haycox, Ernest 
*Freeman, Edmund L. (M) 

Backward states, The; F & M, 10:283, My '30 



292 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Letters III from London ; F & M, 3 148, Mr '23 
London Letter, A; F & M, 3:71, My '23 
On War literature; F & M, 9:312, My '29 
Freight tariffs; Connolly, Christopher P. 
French Leave; story, Sherman, Richard 
Fresh-water mermaid ; story, Wylie, Philip 
Freund, Otto (0) 

Nocturne; poem, Sat Eve Post, 290:59, Ap 17 '37 

Vachel Lindsay enters heaven; poem, F & M, 13:113, Ja '33 
Friendly door ; poem, Markham, Edwin 
Friend to man, A ; poem, Roberts, Clark L. 
Frohlicher, John C. (M) 

Alone in a stope; poem, F & M, 10:12, N '29 

Cave in; poem, F & M, 8:314, My '28 

Certainty; poem, F & M, 6:104, N '25 

Cobwebs; poem, F & M, 5:17, N '24 

December; poem, F & M, 4:116, Mr '24 

End of the season ; poem, F & M, 9 :39, N '28 

Frontier towns; poem, F & M, 4:161, My '24 

Ghost camp today; poem, F & M, 2:122, Ja '33 

Ghosts; poem, F & M, 10:12, N '29 

I have known green mountain meadows ; poem, F & M, 5 45, Mr '25 

Man is named, A; poem, F & M, 6:282, My '33 

Modern fairies; poem, F & M, 6:150, Mr '26 

Not too much rest; poem, F & M, 6:133, Mr '26 

November ; poem, F & M, 9 139, N '28 

Premonition; poem, F & M, 7:51, Mr '27 

River driver's death ; poem, F & M, 8 :243, Mr '28 

Se-wa-tin muses ; poem, F & M, 9 :39, N '28 

Siaami, Indian celebration at St. Ignatious; F & M, 1:60, N '30 

Smelter Smoke ; poem, F & M, 7 :22, N '26 

Through a homesteader's window; poem, F & M, 5:71, My '25 

Wild Irish; poem, F & M, 8:172, N '27 
Frohlicher, Eugenie E. (M) 

Campfires; F & M, 2:217, My '22 

Dose wampus cat; F & M, 3:19, N '22 

Gray and gold to white ; F & M, 5 19, N '24 

Home the Tamarack forests, At ; F & M, 5 122, N '24 

Judge Shepard; F & M, 2:136, Mr '23 

Late Blizzard; F & M, 3:36, Mr '23 

Patrick creek country; F & M, 1:101 ; My J 2i 

Sunlight-moonlight; F & M, 1:54, N '21 
From a train window ; poem, Johnson, Dorothy Marie 
From any angle ; poem, Braley, Berton 
Frome, David. See Brown, Zenith Jones 
From evermore to evermore ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
From gates of paradise ; poem, Markham, Edwin 
From temperance to Wheelerism ; Connolly, C. P. 
From the hillside ; poem, McAllister, Adalouie 
Frontier food; Haskin, Leslie Loren 
Frontier towns ; poem, Frohlicher, John C. 
Fruits of rain; Men walk in rain; I seek the orchid; Meadow brook runs over; 

poems, Corning, Howard McKinley 
Fruit tramp, The ; story, Johnson, Dorothy Marie 
Fulfillment; poem, Holmstrom, Frances 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 293 

*Fuller, Ethel Romig (Mrs. Chas. E. Fuller) 

After a summer shower; poem, Ladies H J, 53 :8o, F '36 



j greatest of these; poem, Christian Cent, 56:761, Je 39 

April ; poem, Christian Cent, 49 445, Ap 6 '32 

April wood; poem, Christian Cent, 5^554, Ap 25 '34 

Armistice day; poem, Ladies H J, 52:104, N '35 

Arrow points; poem, World T, 12:279, Je '29 

As if at dusk in Genesis; poem, Christian Cent, 53 : 53> Ap 36 

At Timberline; poem, F & M, 10:17, N '29 

Back of a mountain ; F & M, 8 :i48, My '28 

Balm of Gilead; poem, Christian Cent, 48-770, Je '31 

Beacons on the high seas; Travel, 6i:34-37> O '33 

Beggar of beauty; poem, Christian Cent, 52:602, My '35 

Bells of Croatia; poem, Commonweal, 10:161, Je '29 

Bequest to youth; poem, Christian Cent, 53:74? J a '36 

Bitter brew; poem, Lit Digest, 121 -.29, My '36 

Blue windflowers; poem, Christian Cent, 47:618, My '30 

Buried treasure; Glamour of the north; poems, Lit Digest, 116:39, Ag 19 '33 

By rule of thumb; poem, Christian Cent, 54:1016; Ag '37 

Calyposos ; poem, F & M, 9 1241, Mr '29 

Camper's prayer; poem, Christian Cent, 52:73. J a 16 '35 

Candle in the heart; poem, Good H, 97 : * 3 7, Jl *33 

Cargoes of romance; poem, St. Nicholas, 58:290, F J 3i 

College age; poem, Good H, 89:21, S '29 

Concerning boundaries; poem, Christian Cent, 47:1209, O 8 30 

Christmas gifts; poem, Sunset, 63:70, D '29 

Cornflowers ; poem, F & M, 12 -.302, My '32 

Dawn and New snows; poem, F & M, 8:149, My '28 

Diaries; poem, Christian Cent, 47 :io, Ja i '30 

Difference; poem, Lit Digest, 121:34, Ap '36 

Drought; poem, Survey, 68:271, Je 15 '32 

Early December dusk; poem, F & M, 16:122, winter '36 

Eluding title; poem, Ind Woman, 17:102, Ap '38 

Eternally David; poem, Christian Cent, 51:490? A P '34 

Farmer; poem, Sat Eve Post, 210:40, Ja '38 

Feathered nomads of the sea; poem, Travel, 62:6-12, F '34 

Fireweed ; poem, F & M, 8 :2io, Mr '28 ^ 

From evermore to evermore; poem, Christian Cent, 54:578, My 5 37 

Gifts for your children; poem, Parent's M, 4:51, D '29 

Glacial stream; poem, F & M, 13:46, N '32 

Gold dust of content; poem, Bet Horn and Gard, 18:48, D 39 

Golden goose; poem, Ladies H J, 51:42, Jl '34 

Grand Dalles hills, The; F & M, 9:21, N '28 

Grist; poem, Ind Woman, 16:280, S '37 

Guardians of the windjammers; poem, Travel, 65:25-7, Jl '35 

Halloween pumpkin; verse, St. Nicholas, 64:9, O '37 

Heroes of the timberline; poem, Travel, 61:28-9, Je '33 

Hi yu olallie ; poem, Christian Science, Monitor Mag, P. 12, S '40 

Hike the trails ; poem, St. Nicholas, 66:9, Ag '39 

Hill woman to summer guest; poem, Good H, 100:125, Mr 35 

Hospital; poem, Survey, 67:308, D 15 J 3* 

In my garden; poem, Sunset, 62:30, Ap '29 

Jack-be-nimble ; poem, Commonweal, 15:11, N 4 '31 

Joy; poem, Ladies H J, 53:86, D '36 

KHckitat hills; poem, F & M, 11:231, Mr '31 



294 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Lavendar and snow; poem, Survey, 67:141, N 31; Lit Digest, 11:27, N 28 '31 

Lemuel Lane; poem, F & M, 9:319, My '29 

Letter to a daughter-in-law; poem, Good H, 110:4.1, My '40 

Lightship No. 88; F & M, 14:127, Ja '34 

Like a water lily; poem, F & M, 17:163, spring '37 

Little girl goes to summer camp; poem, Hygeia, 16:723, Ag '38 

Lost detours; poem, Good H, 110-41, Je '40 

Love is ; poem, Ladies H J, 54:47, N '37 

Loves; poem, Good H, 88:130, F '29 

Man is hungry; poem, Survey, 71:6, Ja '35 

Man speaks; poem, Sunset, 63:14, O '29 

Maples after frost; poem, Ladies H J, 53:85, N '36 

Merchandising books for culture; Pub weekly, 116:604-605, Ag '29 

Monday; poem, Sunset, 62:56, Je '29 

Mother speaks; poem, Parent's M, 10:24, D '35 

Mt. Shuksan; poem, Sunset, 62:56, Je '29 

Musical composition; poem, Ladies H J, 51:52, N '34 

My neighbor's yard; poem, Parent's M, 8:5, O '33 

Nocturne; poem, Christian Cent, 53:1458, N 4 '36 

Northwest is buying books once more; Pub weekly, 130:1411-12, O 3 '36 

Not one too many; poem, Bet Horn and Gard, 14:73, N '35 

Old hill-road; poem, F & M, 19:230-1, summer '39 

On the air; poem, Good H, 90:17, F '30 

Parents in the audience; poem, Hygeia, 17:535, Je '39 

Peter Schatt; poem, F & M, 8-147, My '28 

Playing hooky; poem, Parent's M, 12:44, F '37 

Prayer for the vacations of young office workers; poem, Ind Woman, 18:178, 

Je '39 

Rain on the roof; verse, St. Nicholas, 63:23, Ag '36 
Ranch night, winter; poem, Sat Eve Post, 210:40, F '38 
Reference room, public library; poem, Libraries, 36:372, O '31 
Refutation; poem, Christian Cent, 54:802, Je '37 
Remembering rocks; poem, Poetry, 43:69, N '33 
Salt March; poem, F & M, 10:191, Mr '30 
Sea; poem, Poetry, 34:255, Ag '29 
Seasonal information; poem, Ladies H J, 55:79, My '38 

Season's first trillium; It must be May; poem, St. Nicholas, 64:11, 21, My '37 
Silvery, shimmering season; poem, Bet Horn & Gard, 15:7, D '36 
Six-horse limited mail, The; poem, F & M, 10:1, N '29 
Sky-clipper; poem, St. Nicholas, 64:25, S '37 
Snow; poem, Christian Cent, 53:291, F 19 '36 
Song of home; poem, Good H, 89:31, Ag '29 
Sonnet for a young girl; poem, Commonweal, 10:361, Ag '29 
Sources; poem, Ladies H J, 52:61, Jl '35 
Sugar weather; poem, Sat Eve Post, 210:52, Mr '38 
Thank you; poem, Good H, 106:160, Ja '38 
When wild geese depart; poem, Christian Cent, 54:1230, O 6 '37 
Woods in winter; poem, Christian Cent, 46:1538, D u '29 
Woman counts her blessings; poem, Good H, 105:42, N '37 
Woman's week; poem, Good H, 92*46, My '-31 
Who knows a mountain ? ; poem, Photo-Era, 63 :6, Jl '29 
Why climb a mountain? ; poem, Sunset, 63 :i8, Jl '29 
Willow whistle; poem, Commonweal, 10:451, S 4 '29 ; Lit Digest, 103-28 

O 26 '29 ' 

Wings; poem, Parent's M, 5:16, Ja '30 
Winter day; poem, St Nicholas, 65:16, Ja '38 
Winter mountain; poem, Sunset, 63:15, D '29 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 295 

Winter night; poem, Ladies H J, 52:62, D '35 

Winter Rhymes: Hills to Christmas; On frosty nights; First snow; Winter 
sunset; poems, Poetry, 35:128-130, D '29 

Wheat ripens; poem, Christian Cent, 49:1098, S '32 

Thank you, God; poem, Ladies H J, 50:44., D '33 

This time of year; poem, Ladies H J, 52:132, My '35; Lit Digest, 100:32, 
F '29 

Toward Nazareth; poem, Good H, 97:18, D '33 

Trilliums; poem, Christian Cent, 47:746, Je n '30 

Trustee; poem, Christian Cent, 51:83, Ja 17 '34 

Tulips; poem, Ladies H J, 52:92, Ap '35 

Up huckleberry (to E. A.) ; poem, F & M, 9:210, Mr '29 

Vacation; poem, Good H, 99:131, Jl '34 

Waterfall; poem, Commonweal, 11:560, Mr 19 '30 

Full tide at sunset (Cannon Beach, Ore.) ; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 
Fulton, Eb (I) 

Idaho . . . The ideal vacation land. Seeing Idaho, i :2o-2i, Jl '37 

There's gold in them frills; Seeing Idaho, 1:26-27, Ag '37 
*Fulton, Reed (W) 

Tide of the thirteenth; story, St N, 52:1040-6, Ag '25 

Gal chickie ; poem, Kidd, Walter Evans 

Gallagher's game; story, Fitzgerald, Brassil 

Gallantry; story, Bretherton, Vivien R. 

Gallinger of New Hampshire; Connolly, Christopher P. 

Gambler's luck ; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

Game day; story, O'Neill, Paul 

Gardener; poem, Maring, Helen 

Garlic and such ; essay, McCorrnick, Washington Jay 

Gastronomy in the woods ; Holbrook, Stewart H. 

Gatke, Robert Moulton (O) 

Broad-leaf evergreens; Country Life, 78:15, 51, Ag '40 
Needed: a rubber-stamp senate; World T, 15:141-3, My '32 
Rhododendrons for your garden ; Country Life, 74:41, Je '38 
Why don't you plant a hedgerow instead of just a hedge?; Am Home, 
22:24-5, N '39 

Gehri, Alfred (W) 

Plumbing's no pipe; Sat Eve Post, an 130, Ap 26 '39 

Sons of Tugboat Annie; Sat Eve Post, 212:20, Ja '40 

Genius in flight; Fitzgerald, Brassil 

Gentle art of selling manuscripts ; Braley, Berton 

Gentlemen stand together; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Gem of the mountains; poem, Lawrence, Lola Greenfield 

Germany under the choke-bit; Neuberger, Richard 

Getting along together ; Monroe, Anne Shannon 

Gettin* licked; poem, Perkins, Phil 

Ghost camp today ; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 

Ghosts ; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 

Ghostly acres; poem, Olsen, Charles Oluf 

Gifts for your children ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Gilded wings; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Gilead ; poem, Clapp, Mary Brennan 

*Gill, Frances (0) 

Outside; poem, Poetry, 35:308-12, Mr '30 

Girl back home; Hurst, Samuel Bertram Hawerts 

Girl must wait ; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Girl of the loneliness ; Lincoln, Elliott C, 



ag6 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Girl who really got kisses ; story, Wylie, Philip 

Girl would be free, A; Struckman, Robert Tod 

Glacial Stream; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Gleaner of echoes ; poem, Hansen, Eleanor 

Glen does some thinking; story, Guthrie, A. Bertram 

Glorious buccaneer ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 

Glory of the states ; Montana ; Connolly, Christopher P. 

Goal ahead; poem, Braley, Berton 

Goat girl; Tracey, Paul 

Godmother ; poem, Morden, Phyllis B. 

God's smile ; story, Babson, Naomi Lane 

Going to Kuhang; sketch, Billing, Marjorie 

Going to school ; story, Dahlberg, D'Arcy 

Gold afar; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 

Golden age ; story, Chase, Mary Ellen 

Golden chairs ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 

Golden Goose; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Golden Idaho; poem, Lawrence, Lola Greenfield 

Golden key; verse, Morden, Phyllis 

Golden portage; novel, Case, Robert Ormond 

Golden sponge, The; story, Linderman, Wilda 

*Goldenweiser, Alexander A. (O) 

Tolstoy saga; New Repub, 74:250-1, Ap '33 
Gold in the grain ; story, Miller, Laura 
Gold dust of content; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Good Christmas; Stahlberg, John 
Good cook ; Hurst, Samuel Bertram Hawerts 
Good little boys of science ; Bradley, John Hodgdon 
Good marriage ; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Goodpasture, G. Frank (W) 

Heritage; poem, F & M, 14:100, Ja '34 

Mother; poem, F & M, 10:308, My '30 

Requiem; poem, F & M, 12:118, Mr '32 

Sea, The; poem, F & M, 13:12-13, N '32 

Shadows; poem, F & M, 17:50, autumn '36 

Ship cabin in the hills; poem, F & M, 18:178, spring '38 

Sturgeon, The; poem, F & M, 17:198, spring '37 

Three poems: Bars may tire, Uncovered, An invitation; F & M, 14:288, 
My '34 

Vine maple; poetry, F & M, 14:47, N '33 
Good reader and the good book; Lehman, Benjamin Harrison 
Good shepherd ; Struckman, Robert Tod 
Good soil; poern, Bright, Verne 
Good year; poem, Bolles, Jason H. J. 
Goodwin, Margaret Swarthout (I) 

Cabin, The; story, Seeing Idaho, 1:25, S '37 

Nuggets in the pan; Seeing Idaho, 1:13, O '37 

Old Diggins; story, Seeing Idaho, 1:15, Ag '37 
Goon squads, halt!; Neuberger, Richard 
Gosse, Eva Ellis (I) 

Charcoal Kiln; Seeing Idaho, 1:33, S '37 

Wild horse roundup, The; Seeing Idaho, 1 116-17, Jl '37 
Gossip; story, Forrest, Elizabeth Chabot (Mrs. Earle Forrest) 
Gotterdammerung! Daniels, Bradford K. 
Gould, Kari C. (O) 

Down glacier way; poem, F & M, 16:16, autumn '35 
Governor Glynn of New York ; Connolly, Christopher P. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 297 

Governor's lady, The; story, Alexander, Charles 

Grace of God ; poem, Clapp, Mary Brennan 

Grain of the wood; In the city; Kinship Rehabilitation; Consider two cats; 

Goal; Temporal; Rebuked; poems, Olsen, Chas. Oluf 
Grand Dalles hills, The ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Grandmother's autumn thoughts; poem, Smith, Bess Foster 
Grasshopper dance ; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Grave on the hill ; story, Babson, Naomi Lane 
Graves of the road agents ; poem, McCormick, Washington Jay 
Gray; poem, Baldwin, Grace D. 

Gray and gold to white; sketch, Frohlicher, Eugenie E. 
Gray dog, The ; poem, Elmendorf, Mary J. 
Great hunter of the woods, The ; story, Stevens, James 
Great loss, The; poem, Leitner, Delia Adams 
Green, Mary Walter (W) 

Dream not too much; poem, F & M, 13 1214, Mr '33 
Green plush rocker, The; story, Hefferlin, Pearl ' 

Gridiron G-man ; Neuberger, Richard 
Griffin, Myron (0) '; 

Man in the house, A; story, F & M, 19:253-7, summer '39 
*Grissom, Irene Welch (I) 

Aspiration; poem, Overland, 82:403, S '24 

Cleaning the sagebrush; poem, F & M, 9:219, M;r '29 

Desert dead; poem, Overland, 83:85, F '25 

Home in the desert; Overland, 83:99-102, i64y6, 240-5, 236-7, 270-1, 305, 
346-7, 377, Mr-O '25 

Leaving the dry farm; poem, Overland, 88:45, F ^30 

Sand hills; poem, F & M, 13:212, Mr '33 j 

Short water; story, F & M, 18:153, spring '38 

Trees; poem, Lit Digest, 91:40, O 16 '26; Homilific Review, 94:165, Ag '27 

When the railroad comes; poem, F & M, 11:248, M|* '31 
Grist ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Growing old together (d) ; Clements, Colin Campbell 
Growing up to play ; Whicker, Harold W* 
Guardians of the windjammers; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Gun-runners; Bower, B. M. 
Gunsight trail ; poem, Macleod, Norman 
Guthrie, A. Bertram (M) 

Glen does some thinking; F & M, 2:227, My '22 

Infallibility of the infallible, The ; F & M, 3 .-57, My '23 

Trail riding; poem, F & M, 3:13, N '22 

Views; poem, F & M, 3:38, Mr '23 
Gypsy road; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 

Hail and farewell ; poem, Aiken, Mrs. Lulu Piper 
Haines, Merle J, (M) 

Black cow; storv, F & M, 10:326, My '30 

Mike ; story, F & M, 8 :294, My '29 

Potatoes ; story, F & M, 9 73 My '29 

Turn down man, The; F & M, 9:101, Ja '29 
Half an hour; story, Sherman, Richard 
Halloween pumpkin ; poem, Fuller, Ethel 'Rornig 
Hamilton, Eloise (0) 

Heritage; poem, F & M, 16:284, summer '36 
Hamilton, Ruth (M) 

Andromache; poem, F & M, 1:13, My '20 

Black crepe hat, The ; story, F & M, x 119, My J 2O 



298 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Pulling out; F & M, 1 158, N '20 
Hammond, Eleanor (O) 

Second love; Fugitive; I bear old scars; Bed and board; Heritage; poems, 

F & M, 13:1751 Mr 3 33 
Hancock, Alice Passano (M) 

Mendel's Miracle; story, F & M, 9:110, Ja '29 

Pride ; story, F & M, 7 :6y, Mr '27 

Round trip; story, F & M, 7:109, My '27 

There are night and day, brother ; story, F & M, 7 :6, N '26 

Waiting room; story, F & M, 11:343, My '31 

Years; F & M, 8:315, My J 28 
Hand-press journalist; Davis, Harold L. 
Handy man; poem, Braley, Berton 
Hans ; story, Hartwick, Mrs. Mary Hesse 
Hansen, Eleanor (O) 

Gleaner of echoes; poem, F & M, 11:124, Ja '31 

Transplanted; poem, F & M, 10:323, My '30 
Happy Valley ; story, Peterkin, Dorothy M. Johnson 
Hard case ; Hurst, Samuel Bertram Hawerts 
Hard neighbor ; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 
Hark, hark, the dogs do bark ; story, Fligelman, Belle 
Haroldsen-Lovell, Edith Anna (I) 

EE-Dah-How; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:28, D '37 

The old freighter; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:40, My '37 

That rare old sport called snipe hunting; story, Seeing Idaho, 1:26-27, D '37 

Treasure hunt; Seeing Idaho, 1:23, N '37 
Hartwick, Mrs. Mary Hesse (M) 

Hans; F & M, 8:306, My '28 

Hills of home; Scrib M, 90:411-20, O '31 

Homesteader's trail; F & M, 9:173, Mr '29 

Salt and pepper; F & M, 9:30, N '28 

Tony and Marcia; F & M, 10:91, Ja '30 
*Haskm, Leslie Loren (O) 

Door-carrier; Nature M, 14:207, O '29 

Frontier food; Nature M, 14:171-2, S '29 

Mother lizard makes her nest; Nature M, 15:169, Mr '30 

Nunas and noonas; Nature M, 14:119, Ag '29 

Plants that catch fish; Nature M, 18:286, 8, N '31 

That strange thing called fascination; Nature M, 25:166-8, Ap '35 
*Haste, Gwendolyn (M) 

Alien; Overland n.s., 84:261, Ag '26 

By-flow; poem, Lit Digest, 114:33, N 26 '32 

Child of the border; poem, F & M, 11:40, N '30 

Forest home; poem, St N, 57:362-3, My '30 

Horseman; poem, Poetry, 36:132-3, Je '30 

Indian scare; poem, St N, 57:362-3, Mr '30 

Milktime; poem, St N, 57:362-3, Mr '30 

Night journey; poem, St N, 57:362-3, Mr '30 

Scapegoat; poem, Lit Digest, 104:27, F 15 '30 

Winter visitor; poem, St N, 57:362-3, Mr '30 
Haunted house; poem, Morden, Phyllis 
Hawkins, John (0) 

All is fair; story, Am M, 129:28-31, My '40 

Bright road; story, Colliers, 101:14-15, My 28 '38 

Deep harbor; story, Colliers, 100:18-19, N 6 '37 

Home-town job; story, Colliers, 102:14, O 29 '38 

Job for a man; story, Colliers, 102:22, S 17 '38 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 299 

Love is elected ; story, Colliers, 101 114-15, F 26 '38 

Matter of routine; story, Colliers, 105:19, Mr 23 '40 

Money player; story, Colliers, 102-11-12, N 5 '38 

Night shift; story, Colliers, 103:18-19, Ja 21 '39 

This is my love song; story, Colliers, 101:14-15, Ja 8 '38 

Tryout; story, Am M, 130:54, S '40 

Without luck; story, Colliers, 104:16-17, Jl 22 '39 

Sky was red; story, Colliers, 106:18, O 12 '40 

We will meet again; Colliers, 104:9-10, S 30; 16-17, O 7; 17, O 14; 

24 O 21 ; 22 O 28 ; 21 N 4; 48 N ii ; 22 N 18 '39 
Hay; hay! ; poem, Collins, Dean 
Hayes, Anna Hansen (I) 

An Idaho cowboy; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:23-24, Ag '37 

To him who hath; story, Seeing Idaho, 1:23-24, Ag '37 
*Haycox, Ernest (O) 

Against the mob; story, Colliers, 95:18-19, Ja 19 '35 

Behind the headlines; story, Colliers, 93:18, Ja 20 '34 

Blizzard; story, Colliers, 103:17, F 25 '39 

Border trumpet; novel, Colliers, 103:12-13, Ap 29; 20, My 6; 14, My 13; 
23, My 20; 70, My 27; 59, Je 3; 22, Je 10; 28, Je 17; 20, Je 24; 
104:17, Jl i '39 

Born to conquer; story, Colliers, 97:12-13, Mr 2j '36 

Change of station ; story, Colliers, 105 :i2, Ap '40 

Claim jumpers; story, Colliers, 106:13, S '40 

Clouds on the circle-P; story, Colliers, 90:18-19, Jl 9 '32 

Colonel's daughter; story, Colliers, 99:21, My 29 ^37 

Course of the blue eagle; Rotarian, 43:6-8, D '33 , 

Court day; story, Colliers, 98:19-20, D 19 '36 

Dark land waiting; story, Colliers, 106:14-15, Jl 27 '40 

Day in town ; story, Colliers, 101 :7-8, Ja i '38 

Deep west; novel, Colliers, 99:7-9, Ja 2; 18-20, Ja 9:20-1, Ja 16; 20-21, 
Ja 23 ; 22, Ja 30 ; 33, F 6 ; 35, F 13 ; 28, F 20 '37 

Dolorosa, here I come; story, Colliers, 87:10-11, F 28 '31 

Down the river; story, Colliers, 102:15, Ag 13 '38 

Drifter; novel, Colliers, 106:9-10, O 5, 22; O 12 '40 

Evening's entertainment; story, Colliers, 88:12-13, S 26 '31 

Farewell to the years; story, Colliers, 99:20, My 8 '37 

Fidelity; story, Colliers, 103:20-1; Ap 15 '39 

Fifty-fifty or quit; story, Colliers, 95:14-15, F 2 '35 x 

Found out; story, Colliers, 90:16-17, Jl 23 '32 

Fourth son; story, Colliers, 103:18, Mr 18 '39 

Free land; story, Colliers, 99:9-11, My 22 '37 

Gentlemen stand together; story, Colliers, 97:24, F 22 '36 

Gilded wings; story, Colliers, 95:20-1, Ja 5 '35 

Girl must wait; story, Colliers, 104:16-17, S 2 '39 

Good marriage; story, Colliers, 103:12-13, Ap '39 

Grasshopper dance; story, Colliers, 101:13, Mr 26 '38 

Important question; story, Colliers, 101:51, Mr 12 '38 

In Bullhide canyon; story, Colliers, 91:12-13; F 25 '33 

Interval in youth; story, Colliers, 102; 14, 22 '38 

Last draw; story, Colliers, 91:18-19, F 4 '33 

Last rodeo; story, Colliers, 91:18, My 20 '33 

Long years; story, Colliers, 104:18, Jl 15 '39 

McQuestion rides; story, Colliers, 87:7-9, Je 20 '31 

Make me behave; story, Colliers, 95:14-15, Mr 23 '35 

Man in the saddle; novel, Colliers, 101:9-11, Ap a; 25, Ap 9; 22, Ap 16; 
20, Ap 23; 19, Ap 30; 15, My 7; 38, My 14; 22, My 21; 71, My 28 '38 



300 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Man needs an answer; story. Colliers, 102:13, S 10 '38 

Man with a past; story, Colliers, 99:35, Mr 6 '37 

Man with the smoke-gray eyes; story, Colliers, 94:18-19, D '34 

Motives of an overlord; story, Am M, 117:14-17, Ja '34 

Odd chance; story, Colliers, 92:22-3, O 21 '33 

Officer's choice; story, Colliers, 88:10-11, Jl 4 '3 1 

Old glory; story, Colliers, 104:23, S 30 '39 

On Don Jaime street; story, Colliers, 105:16, My 25 '40 

On texas street! ; story, Colliers, 94:18-19, D 22 '34 

On the silver bow; story, Colliers, 98:12-13, D 12 '36 

Once and for all; story, Colliers, 96:12-13, N 16 '35 

One more river; story, Colliers, 89:20-1, My 7 '32 

One star by night; story, Colliers, 100:30, D n '37 

Other hero; story, Colliers, 94:18-19, Jl 21 '34 

Proud people; story, Colliers, 97:22, My 23 '36 

Question of blood; story. Colliers, 100:44, Jl 17 J 37 

Reckless dusk; story, Colliers, 93:14-15, Je 16 '34 

Ride the river; story, Colliers, 93:19, My 26 '34 

Romance renewed; story, Colliers, 91:24, My 27 '33 

Room 515; story, Colliers, 105:14-15, My 18 '40 

Rough air; novel, Colliers, 93:7-9, F *7; i4-*5, F 24; 20-21, Mr 3; 

Mr 10; 20-21, Mr 17; 18-19, Mr. 24; 22, Mr 31; 18-19, Ap 7; 18, Ap 14; 

21, Ap 21 '34 

Rule by power; story, Colliers, 100:25-6, S 18 '37 

Saddle and ride; novel, Colliers, 104:14-15, D 16; 16-17, E> 23; 28-30, 

D 30, 39; 105:28-30, Ja 6; 25, Ja 13; 15, Ja 20; 18, Ja 27; 24, F 3, '40 
Salute to time; story, Colliers, 104:16, D 9 '39 
Scout detail; story, Colliers, 101:16-17, Je n '38 
Second-money man; story, Colliers, 92:24, N n '33 
Silver desert; novel, Colliers, 96:7-9; Ag 17; 18-19, Ag 24; 20, S 7; 

24-5, S 14; 20-1, S 21 ; 26, S 28; 16, O 5; 18-19, O 12; 22, O 19 '35 
Silver saddle ; story, Colliers, 105 :22-3, Mr 9 '40 
Some were brave; story, Colliers, 105:74, Je 15 '40 
Stage station; story, Colliers, 103:14, Ap 22 '39 
Stage to Lordsburg; story, Colliers, 99:18-19, Ap 10 '37 
Starlight rider; novel, Colliers, 92:7-9, Jl i; 16-17, Jl 8; 18-19, Jl 15; 

22-23, Jl 22 5 24-25, Jl 29; 21-22, Ag 5; 20-21, Ag 12; 18-19, Ag 19; 

22-23, Ag 26 ; 20-22, S 2 '33 
Stranger; story, Colliers, 97:18-19, Je 6 '36 
Sundown Jim; novel, Colliers, 100:9-11, S 25; 19-20, O 2; 19-20, O 9 ; 26, 

O 16; 40, O 23; 18, O 30; 99-105, N 6; 46, N 13; 22, N 20; 24, N 27 '37 
Their own lights; story, Colliers, 92:14-15, O 7 '33 
This woman and this man; story, Colliers, 102:9-10, Jl 2, '38 
To the limit; story, Colliers, 91:10-11, Je 10 '33 
Tradition; story, Colliers, 94;io-n, S 22 '34 
Trail smoke; novel, Colliers, 96:7-9, N 23; 22, N 30; 16-18, D 7; 20-21, 

D 14; 26, D 21 ; 23-24, D 28 '35; 97:24-25, Ja 4; 16-17, Ja n; 24, Ja 18; 

22, Ja 25 '36 

Trouble shooter; novel, Colliers, 97:7-9, Je 20; 20-21, Je 27; 98:14-15, 
Jl 4; 18-19, Jl n ; 33, Jl 18; 20-21, Jl 25; 20-21, Ag i; 24-25, Ag 8; 
19-20, Ag 15; 20-21, Ag 22 '36 

Two worlds; story, Colliers, 104:12, D 2 '39 

Waste no words; story, Colliers, 95:28, Mr 30 '35 

Weight of command; story, Colliers, 105:22, Mr 16 '40 

When you carry the star; story, Colliers, 88:14-16, D 5 '31 

Wild enough; story, Colliers, 92:14-15, S 16 '33 

Woman hungry; story, Colliers, 99:12, F 27 '37 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 301 

Hazen, Lillian Weston (M) 

Aspirations and inspirations of a ranchwoman; Scrib M, F '23 

Day with a ranchwoman; Scrib M, Ap '22 

Ranchwoman' s guests ; Scrib M, O '22 
Heart of a thief; story, Bechdolt, Frederick Ritchie 
Hendrick, Mrs. Helen (O) 

I remember the rain; story, Sat Eve Post, 211 :y, My 13 '39 

Leopard's mountains; story, Colliers, 104:16-17, O 21 '39 

Road kid; story, Sat Eve Post, 211 :i8-i9, Ag 27 '38 

They last so long; story, Sat Eve Post, 212:36, fe 22 '40 
Hefferlin, Pearl (M) 

Dawn thoughts; F & M, 2:189, Mr '22 

Green plush rocker, The ; F & M, i :22, My '20 

Line that waits, The; F & M, 4:95, N '23 

Montana ; F & M, 1 144, N '20 
*Hedges, Ada Hastings (O) 

Desert hill ; poem, F & M, 11:113, Ja '31 

Desert spring; poem, Nation, 128:451, Ap 17 '29 

Love; poem, Pictorial Review, 36:74, Ap '35 

Spring night; poem, Good H, 102:62, Ap '36 

Summer; poem, Nation, 129:306, S 18 '29 

Then April; poem, Good H, 104:22, Ap '37 
Heights; poem, Maring, Helen 
Hellas again; poem, Markham, Edwin 
Hellion; story, Stevens, James 

He'll make a good sheriff ; story, Johnson, Dorothy Marie 
Hell's canyon, the biggest of all ; Neuberger, Richard 
Hell's shootin' ; Wood, Charles Erskine Scott 
Hell to be smart; story, Davis, Harold L. 
He loved them and left them ; story, Adams, Janet 
Helping hand, The ; story, Snell, George Dixon 
Helpmeet; poem, Eunson, Dale 
Henry O. K. Fuller; story, Holbrook, Stewart 
Heralds of spring ; poem, Bird, Annie Laurie 
Hercules in the woods; Holbrook, Stewart 
Heresy; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Heritage ; poem, Goodpasture, G. Frank 
Heritage ; poem, Hamilton, Eloise 
Heritage ; poem, Lofton, Blanche DeGood 
Hermit mood ; poem, Littell, Lydia 
Hero; story, O'Neill, Paul 
Hero; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Heroes of the timberline ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Hero number three; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Her people ; story, Babson, Naomi Lane 
He served the cause of art ; Markham, Edwin 
He shot the Colorado alone ; Case, Robert Ormond 
He will never know ; story, Sherman, Richard 
Highlands, The; poem, Farnsworth, Mary 
High pastures ; poem, Winslow, Walker 
Hike the trails ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Highways are happy ways ; story, Johnson, Dorothy Marie 
Hills; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 
Hills of home ; Hartwick, Mrs. Mary Hesse 
Hill woman to summer guest ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Hinduism in the United States; Drury, Clifford Merrill 
Hi yu olallie ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 



302 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

History of Fort Henry; Beal, Salmon M. 

His wife; poem, Turner, Faith 

Hobo and the nun ; Bechdolt, Frederick Ritchie 

Hobo's apology, The ; Stevens, James 

Hoefs, Erna E. (O) Achievement; poem, Etude, 52:1, Ja '34 

Hogan, Steve (M) 

My father ; poem, F & M, 8 '.244, Mr '28 

Trails; poem, F & M, 13:225, Mr '33 

Wake, The; F & M, 8:172, N '27 
Ho-hum ! ; Bradley, Berton 
*Holbrook, Stewart H. (O) 

Bug-house camp; Am Merc, 22:347-52, Mr '31 

Cats on the logs; Colliers, 103:18, Ja 7 '39 

Cracking down on forest fires ; Read Digest, 37 :82-4, S '40 

Fighting forest fires; Travel, 63:22-5, S '34 

Fire in the timber; Sat Eve Post, 211:18-19, Je '39 

Foremen, fore and aft; Factory and Industrial management, 80:738-9, O 30 

Gastronomy in the woods; Am Merc, 20:338-41, Jl '30 

Henry O. K. Fuller; story, F & M, 14:222-7, Mr '34 

Hercules in the woods; Am Merc, 21:233-7, O '30 

Homestead murders case; Am Merc, 46:169-75, F '39 

Horatio Alger was no hero ; Am Merc, 51 120-9, O '40 

Ink-slinger; Cent, 117:491-5, F '29 

Lumberjacks go sissy; Am Merc, 39:193-8, O '36 

Oregon's secret love cult; Am Merc, 40:167-74, F '37 

Original nature man; Am Merc, 39:417-25, D '36 

Paul Bunyan in the flesh ; Am Merc, 41 :292-6, Jl '37 

Steel-strike war; Am Merc, 46:40-8, Ja '39 

Vanishing American male; Am Merc, 40:270-9, Mr '37 

White-water men; Read Digest, 32:84-6, Ap '38 

With the loggers of the Northwest; Travel, 60:35-9, F '33 
Hold-up, The ; poem, Elmendorf, Mary J. 
Holiday on Parnassus ; Whicker, Harold W. 
Hollyhocks; poem, Garett, Lew 
Hollywood legend; story, Bretherton, Vivien R. 

*Holmstrom, Frances (O) Fulfillment; poem, Christian Cent, 47 1658, My 21 '30 
Holter, Anton M. (M) Pioneer Lumbering in Montana, F & M, 8:336, My '28 
Home; Ericson, E. E. 
Home grown philosophy; Reid, Agnes Just 
Home in the desert; Grissom, Irene Welch 
Homesick; poem, Minger, Viola Gilman 
Homestead in Alberta ; poem, Macleod, Norman 
Homestead murders case ; Holbrook, Stewart 
Homestead orchard; story, Davis, Harold L. 
Homesteader's trail; story, Hartwick, Mrs, Mary Hesse 
Home town laughter ; story, Byers, John Reid 
Home-town job ; story, Hawkins, John 
Home work; poem, Braley, Berton 
Honey-colored hair; story, Struckman, Robert Tod 
Hooks; story, James, Will 

Hook, Joseph F. (W) Buried alive, Harper, 157:483-91, S '28 
Hook, line and sinker; story, Wylie, Philip 
Hopes ; poem, Clapp, Mary Brennan 
Hooverisra in the funnies ; Neuberger, Richard 
Hop man's daughter; story, Alexander, Charles 
Horatio Alger was no hero ; Holbrook, Stewart 
Horn, The ; story, Coates, Grace Stone 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 303 

Horned toad ; poem, Tracey, Paul E, 
Horseman ; poem, Haste, Gwendolyn 
Horse for Felipa; story, Davis, Harold L. 
Horsemeat; poem, Tracey, Paul E. 
Horses; story, Stevens, James 
*Hosmer, Paul (O) 

Air hazard; story, St N, 58:280-2, F '31 

Wild horses and hard men; St N, 58:110-13, D '30 
Hospital hours ; poem, Clapp, Mary Brennan 
Hospital ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Hostile Hostak; Pierce, Frank Richardson (pseud. Seth Ranger) 
House across the way, The ; Story, Evans, Helena Grace 
House of darkness; poem, Lee, Borghild 
Housman, Mary W. (M) 

Argument; poem, F & M, 14:119, Ja '34 

Self; poem, F & M, 14:109, Ja '34 
Housman, Robert L. (M) 

Beginnings of journalism in frontier Montana, The; F & M, 15:326, sum 
mer '35 

Why journalism re-searches (M) ; F & M, 18:175, spring '38 
How an Employer should behave ; Stewart, Mary 
How Ginling college was saved ; Drury, Clifford Merrill 
Howe, Lucy (O) 

Cow trails in September; poem, F & M, 19:27, autumn '38 

Weed pasture; poem, F & M, 19:27, autumn '38 
How Montana counties were named ; Abbott, N. C. 
How much conservation?; Neuberger, Richard 
How to ride a bronch ; Tracey, Paul E. 
How would you like to buck this game ? ; James, Will 

Hoyt Palmer (O) In conservative Oregon, Review of Reviews, 93:43, Mr '36 
Hubert, Ernest E. (I) 

Day's work, F & M, 13:152, Ja '33 

A desert secret; F & M, 14:237, Mr '34 

An Indian game corral ; F & M, 14:238, Mr '34 
*Hughes, Glenn (W) 

Amateurs and professionals; Theatre Arts, 24:530-1, Jl '40 

Censorship; Theatre Arts, 21:245-6, Mr '37 
Hulme, Edward Maslin (I) Personal equation in history, Pacific Historical 

Review, 2:129-40, Je '33 
Hunger; West, Richard 
Hunter, The ; story, Struckman, Robert Tod 
Hunting for the Blue Bucket diggers ; Beebe, Beatrice 
Hurley, Victor (W) Zamboango holiday; story, Am M, 124:11-13, '37 
Hurst, Samuel Bertram Hawerts (W) 

Girl back home; story, Colliers, 91:25, Ja 14 '33 

Good cook; story, Colliers, 91:25, My 6 '33 

Hard case; story, Colliers, 90:20-1, N 5 '32 

Lucy of limehouse; story, Good H, 97:22-5, Ag '33 

Salt of the sea; story, Woman's H C, 60:7-8, Ag '33 

They will never die; storv, Colliers, 92:12-13, Ag 12 '33 

Up stick and run; story, Colliers, 90:15-16, Ag 20 '32 
Husband rebels; poem, Braley, Berton 
Huston, Frances (O) 

Black magic; poem, F & M, 10:288-9, My '30 

Late Summer; poem, F & M, 14:47, N '33 
Hutchens, John K. (M) 

Blind one, The; F & M, 7:101, My '27 



3Q4 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Doctor of Philosophy, A; F & M, 7:99, My '27 
Fable; F & M, 7:33, Mr '27 
Old pain ; F & M, 7:61, Mr '27 
Wood note ; F & M, 7:12, N '26 
Hymn for a dark age; poem, Littell, Lydia 

I am the cat; poem, Morden, Phyllis 

I can not sing ; poem, Smith, Foster 

Ice-locked; poem, Skavlan, Margaret 

Idaho; Stevens, James 

I-d-a-h-o- ; poem, Short, Minnie Todd 

Idaho cowboy, An ; poem, Hayes, Anna Hansen 

Idaho's first mill ; Drury, Clifford M. 

Idaho's Heyburn state park playground; Sowder, Jr. Chas. 

Idaho, my Idaho ; poem, Reid, Agnes Just 

Idaho's Senator Borah ; Bird, Annie Laurie 

Idaho Silhouettes; poem, Platt, Kenneth Batdorf 

Idaho . . . the ideal vacation land ; Fulton, Eb. 

Idioma ; Linderman, Frank 

If I should go; poem, Thompson, Lloyd S. 

If this be despotism ; Lindley, Ernest Kidder 

If tombstones told the truth ; poem, Braley, Berton 

If you know war again ; poem, Johnson, Dorothy Marie 

I go the way we used to go; poem, Baldwin, Grace D. 

I have been building houses ; poem, Trusler, Margaret 

I have gone seeking ; poem, Bright, Verne 

I have known green mountain meadows ; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 

I have known high moments ; poem, Baldwin, Grace D. 

I know two people like two mountains ; poem, Baldwin, Grace D. 

I like the younger generation ; Chase, Mary Ellen 

111 met by moonlight; novel, Brown, Zenith Jones (David Frome, Leslie Ford) 

I love the land ; poem, Reid. Agnes Just 

Important question ; story, Haycox, Ernest 

In Argon: new birds; poems, Davis, Harold L. 

Inarticulate ; poem, Robinson, Lucy M. C. 

In a small town lawyer's office ; poem, Cromwell, Anne 

In bullhide canyon ; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Incorrigible; poem, Mueller, Dorothy 

In conservative Oregon ; Hoyt, Palmer 

Indiana's magnificent McNutt; Stevens, James 

An Indian game corral ; Hubert, Ernest E. 

Indian gift; story, Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt (Mrs. Wm. D.) 

Indian girls; poem, Linderman, Verne 

Indian names in Glacier park; Schultz, James Willard 

Indian scare; poem, Haste, Gwendolyn 

Indian summer; poem, Aiken, Mrs. Lulu Piper 

Indian weather signs; poem, Martin, Naomi R. 

India won't wait; Marshall, James L. 

Indispensable table; Thompson. Margaret; and Ferry, Christine 

Infallibility of the infallible, The ; Guthrie, A. Bertram 

In full corroboree; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

In gun smoke; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

Ink-slinger; Holbrook, Stewart 

In league with the stars ; Allen, Sally E. 

In memoriam: Ina Coolbrith; poem, Franklin, Viola Price 

In memoriam: J. H. U. 1874-1926; poem, Merriam, H. G. 

In memory of the loan ; Squier, Emma Lindsay 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 305 

In Montana; poem, Leonard, Lillian T. 

In my garden ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Inquest; poem, Macleod, Norman 

Inside Cape Horn ; Burg, Amos 

In southern California ; sketch, Doerr, Mary Elizabeth 

Insult out of Amity ; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 

Intellectual ferret, muzzled ; poem, Moll, Ernest George 

Interval in youth ; story, Haycox, Ernest 

In the Beartooth country; poem, Leonard, Lillian T. 

In the beginning; Bradley, John Hodgdon 

In the dark hour; poem, Wurdemann, Audrey 

In the king's hut; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

In the Twilight; story, Linderman, Verne 

In the way they should go ; Daniels, Bradford K. 

Intolerable hope, The; story, Mueller, Dorothy 

Into Sun Valley rode the '400; Erickson, Kenneth L, 

In winter ; poems, Macleod, Norman 

I only know; poem, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

I remember the rain ; story, Hedrick, Mrs. Helen 

Iron man of Saginaw; story, Stevens, James 

Iron touch; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

Iron woman ; story, Case, Robert Ormond 

Irony; poem, Lee, Borghild 

Irrigation ; poem, Leitner, Delia Adams 

I shall not tell you now ; poem, Plummer, Eleanor 

Is man an absurdity?; Bradley, John Hodgdon 

Is Protestantism dying in Europe?; Stewart, George 

I was never a river; poem, Johnson, Dorothy Marie 

Jack-be-nimble ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Jake Adams, Sourdough ; story, James, Will 

Jake, I need help ; story, Eunson, Dale 

Jam Breaker; poem, Bartlett, Stanley Foss 

James, Will (M) 

Big hat; story, Sat Eve Post, 201 ^65-6, Je '32 

Blind buckers; story, Scrib M, 91:365-6, Je '32 

Far West and near east; Bookm, 67:712-14, Ag '28 

First money; story, Sunset, 54:36-9, F '25 

Hooks; Sat Eve Post, 201:154, D 15 '28 

How would you like to buck this game? ; Am M, 113:54-6, Je '32 

Jake Adams, Sourdough; story, Scrib M, 86:601-16, D '29 

Last coach at sand wash; story, Sunset, 57:20-1, S '26 

On circle; Sat Eve Post, 200:40, N 12 '27 

Remuda; Sat Eve Post, 200:208-9, N 19 '27 

Round-up wagon; Sat Eve Post, 200:36 Jl 23 '27 

Smoky; stories, Scrib M, 79'339-53> 487-503, 578-9^,* 80:3-16, Ap-Jl '26 

Thirty years gathering; Sat Eve Post 200:45, Ap 7 '28 

Two old timers; Scrib M, 82:273-87, S '27 

When wages are low; Sunset, 54:9-12, Ja '27 

Wild horse; story, Scrib M, 81:31-42, Ja '27 

Young cowboy; story, Scrib M, 81:31-42, Ja '27 
Japan ; poem, Linderman, Wilda 
j. D. Ross: Northwest dynamo; Neuberger, Richard 
Jefferson Boone; poem, Bright, Verne 
Jewels of Qu'apelle; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Jewels of the dead ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Jingle bells ; Branch, Edward Doueclas 
Job for a man ; story, Hawkins, John 



3 o6 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

John Colter; poem, Bolles, Jason (H. J.) 

Johnson, Dorothy; see also Peterkin, Dorothy M. Johnson 

Johnson, Dorothy (M) 

Bread and hyacinths; poem, F & M, 6:145, Mr '26 

Breed, The; poem, F & M, 4:160, My '24 

Confession ; poem, F & M, 5 143, Mr '25 

Fear; F & M, 10:234, Mr '30 

From a train window; F & M, 4:152, My '24 

Fruit tramp, The; story, F & M, 10:131, Ja '30 

He'll make a good sheriff ; F & M, 7 152, Mr '27 

Highways are happy ways; story, F & M, 11:249, Mr '32 

If you know war again; poem, F & M, 14:202, Mr '34 

I was never a river; poem, F & M, 7:11, N '26 

Marjory; poem, F & M, 4:118, Mr '24 

Mountain meadow; poem, F & M, 13:91, N '32 

Old mine; poem, F & M, 4:145, My '24 

Question ; poem, F & M, 5 145, Mr '25 

Shams ; poem, F & M, 5 .-45, Mr '25 

Johnson, Lament (I) Mother earth has a pain in her sawdust; Seeing Idaho, 
i .-26-27, S '37 

Saga of Peg-leg Annie,- The; Seeing Idaho, 1:18-19, N '37 
Johan; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
*Jones, Nard (W) 

Beckman; story, F & M, autumn '34 

Come on, you communist! ; story, F & M, 17:171, spring '37 
, Linda ; story, F & M, 17:265, summer '37 

Mob, The; story, F & M, 15:305, summer '35 

Superspecial ; story, Colliers, 98:41, Jl 4 '36 

Zest of the earth; story, F & M, 12:132, Ja '32 
Jones, Mrs. Pamelia Pearl (W) 

Adult education in other lands; Sch & Soc, 46:599-604, 613-4, N 6 13 '37 

Danish folk high school; Sch & Soc, 44:185-8, 215-17, Ag 8-15 '36 
Jonson, Arthur (O) 

Boiler bay, Oregon; poem, F & M, 19:37, autumn '38 

Nostalgia; poem, F & M, 12:212, Mr '32 
Jordan, Rachel (M) 

At St. Patrick's ; F & M, 1 72, F '21 

Chinook; F & M, 1 158, N '20 
Joseph Harding Underwood: Cox, Sidney Hayes 
Journey; Maxwell, Alice Hankinson 
Joy; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Juan Chacon ; poem, Davis, Harold L. 
Judge Shepard; story, Frohlicher, Eugenie E. 
Judy finds an opening; story, Byer, John Reid 
Jungle war; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Junior Employment Problems; Stewart, Mary 
June Trail ; poem, Lincoln, Elliott C. 
Just call me babe ; Neuberger, Richard 
Just paddle 'em down the road ; Neuberger, Richard 
Just the way it goes ; story, Birkeland, Joran J. 

Keeping the convalescent busy; Atwater, Mary 

Kennard, Marietta C. (W) ; Flight of the herons; play, Drama, 14:97-8, D '23 
Kester, Randall B. (O) ; The war industries board, 1917-1918; a study in indus 
trial mobilization; American Political Science Review, 34:655-84, Ag '40 
Keogh-Bismark stage route, The ; McLemore, Clyde 
Kettle cache ; An episode at sixes ; story, Corning, Howard McKinley 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 307 

KIdd, Walter Evans (O) 

Bedded sheep; poem, F & M, 11:232, Mr '31 

Calf pasture gate; poem, F & M, 13 1147, Ja '33 

Cattle bedding in snow; poem, New Repub, 102:110, Ja 22 '40 

Cold harvest; Woman at the edge of town; Black frost with wind; After 
the freeze; A snowy orchard; Blackraspberry patch; poems, Poetry, 
34:203-5, Jl '29 

Gal chickie; poem, F & M, 11:56, N '30 

Measure of earth; Praise for stars; Frigid interval; Soil mate; poems, 
Poetry, 50:144-6, Je '37 

Old haystacks; poem, F & M, 15:41, autumn '34 

Ranch mother, The; poem, F & M, 9:319, My '29 

Windy fire ; story, F & M, 9 :83-9p, Ja '29 

Yellowstone park, The sleeping giant; poem, F & M, 9:184, Mr '29 
Kill-deer, The ; poem, Linderman, Wilda 
Killer, The ; West, Richard 
Kinda soft; poem, Braley, Berton 

Kinzer portraits, The ; story, Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt 
Kiskis, The ; story, Vontver, May 
Klickitat hills ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Knight of the road, A ; poem, Doerr, Mary Elizabeth 

Laborers east and west; Stevens, James 

Laborer's lunch ; Stevens, James 

Labor fuss in Butte ; Connolly, Christopher P. 

Labor's cycle in Seattle; Neuberger, Richard 

Labor's overlords ; Neuberger, Richard L. 

Lady Lies ; story, Eunson, Dale 

Lady of Panama; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 

Laird, Charlton G. (I) 

Bullet proof culture; Vanity Fair, XXXVII 158-59, 90, '31 

Snowshoe for a horse; Seeing Idaho, 1:12-13, 46, My '37 

Sufficient unto the day is the propaganda thereof; Sch& Soc, 51:769-73, Je '40 
Lambs have the grace to suckle kneeling; Allen, Sally E. 
Lament for 49ers; White, Hal S. 

Lament of the white peak ; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 
*Lampman, Ben Hur (0) 

Abroad with April; Nature M, 13:219-22, Ap '29 

Blue carnation; Nature M, 15:266, Ap '30 

Crickets and the weather; Nature M, 20:68, Ag '32 

Ducats of the western tide; Nature M, 17:168-71, Mr '31 

Fish that glitter; Nature M, 20:165, O '32 

Leading a frog's life; Nature M, 20:108, S '32 

Old Nevermore, the outlaw; Nature M, 18:100-3, Ag '31 

Once upon a time; Nature M, 18:21, Jl '31 

Philihert, the silver-gray; Nature M, 16:233-6, O '30 

Pholas, the artisan anchorite; Nature M, 19:364-5, Je '32 

Servants of the sea; Nature M, 19:178-9, Mr '32 

Skipper, the murre; Nature M, 15:87-8, F '30 

Thespian of the garden; Nature M, 22:17-18, Jl '33 

This gardening business; Nature M, 16:148-51, S '30 

Wit of a rat; Nature M, 14:155-7, S '29 

Lamps in the decorative scheme; Thompson, Margaret; and Ferry, Christine 
Landing party; story, O'Neill, Paul 

Land of youth; story, Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt (Mrs. Wm. D.) 
Last coach at sand wash; story, James, Will 
Last draw ; story, Haycox, Ernest 



308 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Last Indian outbreak 1906 ; Davis, Harold L. 

Last of the northern buffalo, The ; Sweetman, Luke D. 

Last picayune ; story, Miller, Laura 

Last rodeo; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Late blizzard; poem, Frohlicher, Eugenie E. 

Late fruit; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 

Late summer; poem, Huston, Frances 

Lavendar and snow ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Laughing pirate ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 

Laughter; Fisher, Vardis 

La Yoga, meaning of the deep wound ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 

Lawrence, Lola Greenfield (I) 

Blessings on your pioneers; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:31, J '38 

Gem of the mountains; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:31, J '38 

Golden Idaho; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:38, My '37 
Laying the iron trail in the north west ; Sweetman, Luke D. 
*Lay, Marion (Mrs. H. L. Davis) (O) 

Alma mater; story, Pict R, 36:12-13, Ap '35 

Battle cry of beauty; Sunset, 63:20-1, O '29 

Mexican cuisine; Am Merc, 29:465-7, Ag '33 

Mexico on $20 a month; Forum, 94:38-43, Jl '35 

Tall tales; Sunset, 62:16, My '29 

Where-to-go-man ; story, Colliers, 96:14-15, N 16 '35 
Lays for loving parents; poem, Braley, Berton 
Lazy man ; story, Sherman, Richard 
Lead from strength; Monroe, Anne Shannon 
Leading a frog's life ; Lampman, Ben Hur 
League of nations assembly in action ; Streit, Clarence K. 
League's defenders make answer ; Streit, Clarence K. 
Leanes; poem, Birkeland, Joran J. 
Learn the art of getting on ; Bradley, John Hodgdon 
Leaving the dry farm ; poem, Grissom, Irene Welch 
Lee, Borghild (O) 

Angel Guri; poem, Nation, 127:689, D 19 '28 

Barberry bush; poem, Commonweal, 10:531, S 25 '29 

Fisherman's wife; poem, F & M, 11:359, My '31 

House of darkness; poem, F & M, 12:143, Ja '32 

Irony; poem, Poetry, 34:322, S '29 

Lilac ; fantasy, F & M, 9 :307-8, My '29 

Prairie; poem, Nation, 128:374, Mr 27 '29 

Saint Per; poem, Poetry, 33:126-8, D '28; Lit Digest, 99:29, D 22 '28 

Sea maid; poem, Commonweal, 13:150, D 10 '30 

Two poems: Tongues; Age; poems, F & M, 9:120, Ja '29 
*Leeper, Marion Le Mayne (M) 

Ballad of Long George; F & M, 2:90 ; winter '38 

Once heaven was music; poem, Harpers, 175 491, Ap '37 

Paradox; poem, Harpers, 174:367, Mr '37 
Legend before darkness; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 
Lehman, Benjamin Harrison (I) 

Amenities of book selections; Library Journal, 64:623-8, S '39 

Good reader and the good book; Library Journal, 55:633-8, Ag '30; Librar 
ies, 35:336-9, O '30 

Robinson Jeffers; story, Sat R Lit, 8:97-9, S 5 '31 

Sons; story, Harpers, 150:169-75, Ja '25 
Leitner, Delia Adams (I) 

Great loss, The; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:31, Ja '38 

Irrigation; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:31, Ja '37 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 309 

Lemuel Lane; Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Lennstrend, Tesla V. (M). See also Rowe, Tesla V. 

Little Drab Man, The ; story, F & M, i :y, N '20 

Lodging; poern, F & M, 1:25, My '20 

Query ; poem, F & M, 1 232, N '20 

Shadows ; poem, F & M, 1 132, N '20 

Vagrancy ; F & M, 1 127, My '20 

Vision ; F & M, 1 132, N '20 
Leonard, Lillian T. (M) 

Of regrets; poem, F & M, 10:322, My '30 

O pioneer! ; poem, Scrib M, 89:488, My '31 

Poem; F & M, 8:171, N '27 

Spring gardening; poem, Scrib M, 81:29, Ja '27 

Woman homesteader; poem, Scrib M, 81:29, Ja '27 

Canyon evening; poem, F & M, 8:171, N '27 

In the beartooth country; poem, Scrib M, 89:488, My '31 

In Montana; poem, Scrib M, 81:29, Ja '27 
Leopard's mountains; story, Hedrick, Mrs. Helen 
Let me move lightly; poem, Mueller, Dorothy 
Let me praise once your body; Bolles, Jason (H. J,) 
Let's wait till spring; story, McBrien, Edna 
Letter Chicago; Stone, Jack 

Letter from a scientist to a priest; Bradley, John Hodgdon 
Letters of Joaquin Miller ; Beebe, Beatrice B. 
Letters III from London; Freeman, Edmund L. 
Letter to a daughter-in-law; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Letter to P. T. Tucker ; Russell, Charles M. 

Letter to rising generation; Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt (Mrs. Wm. D.) 
Letter to the league of western writers ; Markham, Edwin 
Lewis and the third term ; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Liberal arts in State-supported schools; Merriam, H. G. 
Liberalism backfires in Oregon ; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Life; poem, Clements, Colin Campbell 
Life and adventures of Calamity Jane ; Phillips, Paul C. 
Life is a dream ; Clements, Colin Campbell 
Life watch; story, Case, Robert Ormond 
Light and shadow ; poem, Doerr, Mary Elizabeth 
Light for the flag; story, Foster, Michael 
Lightship No. 88 ; Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Like a water lily; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Lilac; fantasy; Lee, Borghild 
Limits and levels ; Murray, Evelyn 
*Lincoln, Elliott C. (M) 

Campfires; poem, Cur Op, 77:505, O '24 

Craftsman; poem, Sunset, 51:14; S '23 

Girl of the loneliness; Lit Digest, 72:34, Mr 25 '22 

June trail; poem, Sunset, 45:47, Jl '20 

Loss; poem, Lit Digest, 79:36, N 3 '23 

Montana night; poem, Lit Digest, 63:39, D 27 '19 

Tony; Sunset, 57:27, N '26 

Varmint; poem, Sunset, 44:35, F '20 

Visitin' ; poem, Sunset, 46:50, Ja '21 

Visitor; poem, Ladies H J, 37:206, O '20 
Lincoln, the man of the people ; poem, Markham, Edwin 
Linda; story, Jones, Nard 
*Lmderman, Frank B. (M) 

Bogie of the box, The; F & M, n :i6o, Ja '31 



3 io NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Cabins; F & M, 19:173, spring '39 

Charles Russell, cowboy artist; Outlook, 145:466-8, Ap 13 '27 

Chippewa Crossbones; F & M, 14:236, N '33 

Dog's life, A; F & M, 11:65, N '30 

Idioma; F & M, 9:55-6, N '28 

Lousy Hank; F & M, 15:313, summer '35 

Morning Star Son of the Sun; story, F & M, 8:138-61, N '27 

My camp kettle career; F & M, 19:152, spring '39 

Old Bateese; poem, F & M, 8:312-13, My '28 

Old man coyote and the whirlwind ; story, F & M, 9:312-5, Ja '29 

Old frontier, The; F & M, 10:172, spring '39 

Partners (ist) ; F & M, 14:62, Ja '34 

Partners (2nd) ; F & M, 14:153, Mr '34 

Pete Lebeau's Lament; F & M, 19:172, spring '39 

Recollections of Charley Russell; F & M, 19:168, spring '39 

Secret of Keep Cool; F & M, 14:328, My '34 

Two Anecdotes; F & M, 15:313, summer '35 

Yong Sing; F & M, 15:313, summer '35 
Linderman, Verne (M) 

In the twilight ; story, F & M, i ^.6, N '20 

Indian Girls ; poem, F & M, i :96, My '21 
Linderman, Wilda (M) 

April snowflakes; F & M, 2:216, My '22 

Ebb Tide; poem, F & M, i .-53, N '20 

Golden sponge, The ; story, F & M, 1 114, My '20 

Japan; poem, F & M, i 121, My '20 

Kill-deer, The; poem, F & M, 1:78, F '21 

Schoolroom, The; F & M, 5:61, Mr '25 

Suggestion ; poem, F & M, i :34, N '20 
Lindley, Ernest Kidder (I) 

Agency for a second term; Virginia Quarterly Review, 13:129, Ja '37 

Can eight billion dollars stay neutral?; Sat Eve Post, 209:8-9, F 13 '37 

Donkey kicks his heels; Outlook, 155:443-5, Jl 23 '30 

Feedpipes for skyscrapers; Review of Reviews, 78:170-7, Ag '28 

If this be despotism; Scrib M, 100:129-33, S '36 

Mr. Roosevelt and his efforts at a purge; Congressional Digest, 17:242-4, 
0' 3 8 

New congress; Cur Hist, 49-15-17, F '39 

New deal faces 1940; Virginia Quarterly Review, 15 no. 3:321-32, Jl '39 

New problems in national affairs; Vital Speeches, Ag i '39 

Review of President Roosevelt and Congress; Lit Digest, 117:7, Je 2 '34 

Rivals in the GOP camp; Cur Hist, 43:561-7 

Tax-dodgers on parade; Nation, 144:667, Je 12 '37 

Two years of Franklin D. Roosevelt; Nation, 131:289-91, S '30 

U. S. lets Japan guess; Asia, 38:276-8, My '38 

Wall street under the New Deal; Lit Digest, 116:3-4, Jl 22 '33 

War on the brain trusts; Scrib M, 94:257-66, N '33 

Whither political parties ; Chris Sci M, Pl-2, O 19 '38 

Will the United States gain by recognizing Russia?; Lit Digest, 116:15, 

O 28 '33 

Linesman ; poem, Tracey, Paul E. 
Line that waits, The ; story, Hefferlin, Pearl 
Linoleum Cuts; Faick, Helen 
Lion's daughter ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Lister, Queene B. (O) 

Caesar and Lizz ; play, F & M, 11:43, N '30 

Cry-because-he-have-no-wife ; story, F & M, 11:380-2, My '31 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 311 

Dun horse, The; story, F & M, 10:55, N '29 

Poems: God made de worl, Levee sermon, Jeff; F & M, 10:215, Mr '30 

River swing, The; story, F & M, 18:145-51, spring '38 

Spirit wife, The; story; F & M, 9:129-31, Ja '29 

Star, The; poem, F & M, 10:90, Ja '30 

Thad; poem, F & M, 13:14, N '32 

Willow weaver; poem, F & M, 9 ^17, My '29 

Literary faith and conscience of Wm. D. Howells, The ; Cox, Sidney 
Literature of the Italian reformation ; Church, Frederic Corss 
Littell, Lydia B. (O) 

Autumn song; poem, Library Journal, 61:725, O i '36 

By the sea; poem, F & M, 13:33, N '32 

Hermit mood; poem, Commonweal, 21:341, Ja 18 '35 

Hymn for a dark age; poem, F & M, Frontispiece, summer '36 

Isolation; poem, F & M, 15:390, summer '35 

Sun ; poem, F & M, 18:89, winter '37, '38 

Little black man with a rose in his hat; poem, Wurdemann, Audrey 
Little drab man, The ; story, Lennstrend, Tesla V. 
Little gay heart of me ; poem, Stewart, Mary 
Little girl goes to summer camp ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Little grey ghost; story, Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt (Mrs. Wm. D.) 
Little houses ; poem, Casteel, John L. 
Little lake Mary Ronan ; poem, Blair, Hilda Knowles 
Little man of paradise ; Bechdolt, Frederick Ritchie 
Little warrior; story, Alexander, Charles 
Lodging; poem, Lennstrend, Tesla V. 

Lofton, Blanche DeGood (O) ; Heritage; poem, F & M, 19:252, summer '39 
Lombardy Poplars ; poem, Rowe, Tesla V. 
London Fantasy,A; poem, Fitzgerald, Brassil 
London letter, A; Freeman, Edmund L. 
Loneliness; Murray, Evelyn 
Lone rider; Bower, B. M. 

Lonesome Christmas tree; story, McLean, Margharite Fisher 
I/one Wolf; poem, Stahlberg, John 
Long horns ; Tucker, Pat 

Long inheritance, The; story, Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt (Mrs. Wm. D.) 
Long night, The ; story, Lull, Roderick 
Long patrol; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Long years; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Look ahead; poem, Markham, Edwin 
Looking down wells ; Monroe, Anne Shannon 
Loss; poem, Lincoln, Elliott C. 
Lost and found ; story, Case, Robert Ormond 
Lost children ; poem, Stewart, Mary 
Lost detours ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Lost little song of Chag Hao ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Lousy Hank ; story, Linderman, Frank 
Love; poem, Hedges, Ada Hastings 
Love affair; story, Stevens, James 
Lover come back ; story, O'Neill, Paul 
Love came like a landlord; poem, Bolles, Jason (H. J.) 
Love is ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Love is elected; story, Hawkins, John 
Love me, love my car ; story, Bretherton, Vivien R. 
Loves; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Lucky man; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Lucy of Limehouse; story, Hurst, Samuel Bertram Hawerts 



3 i2 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Lull, Roderick (O) 

Dark room; story, Harper, 180:270-7, F '40 

Death of Mr. Barker; story, Atlan, 153:338-46, Mr '34 

Don't get me wrong; story, Atlan, 165:324-31, Mr '40 

Long night, The; story, F & M, 14:131-8, Ja '34 

That fine place we had last year; story, Scholastic, 35:29-31, Ja 15 40 

Third degree; story, Am Merc, 38:207-12, Je '36 

World on a silver platter; story, Am Merc, 44:461-6, Ag '38 
Lumberjack; poem, Elmendorf, Mary J. 
Lumberjacks go sissy; Holbrook, Stewart 

Luncheon table adopts covers of lacy loveliness; Thompson, Margaret; and 
Ferry, Christine 

McAllister, Adalouie (M) 

From the hillside ; poem, F & M, 2 :2o6, My '22 

Misunderstanding; F & M, 2:206, My '22 

Struggle, The; F & M, 4:129, Mr '24 
McBrien, Edna (O) 

Let's wait till Spring; story, F & M, 9:13-17, N '28 
McCormick, Washington Jay (M) 

Garlic and such; F & M, 5:80, My '25 

Graves of the road agents ; poem, F & M, 5 :6, N '24 
McDowall, Elsie (M) 

Closed up; poem, F & M, 6:141, Mr '26 

My life lies grand along the hills; poem, F & M, 5:72, My '25 

Spring night; poem, F & M, 7:86, My '27 

Young saplings are so eager for the sky; F & M, 6:11, N '25 
Maclay, Sallie Sinclair (M) 

Old John ; story, F & M, 9 :28, N '28 

Petals; poem, F & M, 10:2, N '29 

Silhouette; poem, F & M, 10:322, My '30 

There is something; poem, F & M, 10:22, N '29 
McLean, Margharite Fisher (M) 

Lonesome Christmas Tree; story, Scrib M, 80:1646, D '26 

One grand Swede ; story, No Amer, 228 722, D '29 

West of romance; story, Scrib M, 7^:593 D ' 2 5 
McLemore, Clyde 

An adventure in the Idaho mines, by John J. Healy, F & M, 18:109, win 
ter 7 37- J 38 

Bannock and Gallation city, 1862-63, a letter from Mrs. Emil R. Merideth, 
F & M, 17:282, summer '37 

Ficklin Expedition, The; F & M, 16:66, autumn '35 

Keogh-Bismark stage route, The ; F & M, 13 :i40, Ja '33 

My personal story; Lieut. Charles C De Rudio; F & M, I4^55> J a '34 

Virginia city: 1864; story, F & M, 19:129, winter '38 
*Macleod, Norman 

Bellevue hospital: 1934; poem, New Repub, 82:335, My i '35 

Belly River; poem, F & M, 10:104, Ja '30 

Biography in blues; poems, Poetry, 41:144-9, D '32 

Blind Alley ; poem, F & M, 9 :292, My '29 

Coffin of print; poems, Poetry, 54:255-8, Ag '39 

Dark of the train; poem, Nation, 131 :99, Je 23 '30 

Drums of death, The; poem, F & M, 16:5, autumn '35 

Fishing in summer; poem, Scrib M, 94:102, Ag '33 

Frequents of time; poems, Poetry, 50:252-3, Ag '37 

Gunsight trail ; poem, F & M, 9 :i84, Mr '29 

Homestead in Alberta; poem, New Repub, 77:279, Ja 17 '34 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 313 

Inquest; poem, Nation, 132:354, Ap i '31 

In winter; poems, Poetry, 47:202-3, Ja '36 

Period Piece; poem, Nation, 151:535, N 30 '40 

Prospector; poem, F & M, 8:314, My '28 

Rebel; poem; F & M, 1147, N '30 

Red furnace; poem, Sat R .Lit, 14:19, Ag 15 '36 

Reflections; poems, 42:241-5, Ag '33 

Scrub cedar; poem, Overland n.s., 87:213, Je '29 

Shrapnel of the heart; poem, F & M, 15:138, winter J 34-'35 

Song for the turquoise people; poem, Poetry, 37:253, K '31 

Sons of the soil; poem, Poetry, 46:111, My '35 

Stride on the desert; poem, Scrib M, 90:325, S '31; Lit Digest, 110:29, S 

12 '31 

Subway; poem, Sat R Lit, 11:571, Mr 23 '35 

Time of the year; poems, Poetry, 38:203-7, Jl '31 

Trail of the sunset; poem, F & M, 12:130, Ja '32 

Vagabond ; poem, F & M, 8 :245, Mr '28 

Walking my baby back home; F M, 17:195, spring '37 

We ain't lazy; we're dreaming; poem, F & M, 15:222, spring '35 

We thank you all the time; poems, F & M, 19:88, winter '38 

Windsinger; poem, F & M, 16:177, spring '36 
McNary of Fir cone ; Neuberger, Richard L. 
*McNickle, D'Arcy; see also Dahlberg, D'Arcy 

Meat for God; Esquire, S '36 

Sweet is the prairie; poem, F & M, 15:8, autumn '34 

Train time; story, Scholastic, 29:13, O 24 '36 
McQuestion rides; story, Haycox, Ernest 
McSpadden, George E. (I) 

Cultural aspects of the conference in Lima, Hispania, XXII :i 59, 164, '39 
Mad November; poem, Spaulding, Kenneth 
Madonna of the mesa; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Magic makers ; poem, Braley, Berton 
Make me behave ; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Make your store a main entrance ; Montgomery, Richard Gill 
Makers of song; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 
Making bolshevists at Palm Beach ; Robb, Inez Callaway 
Making of a doctor; story, Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt (Mrs. Wm. D.) 
Making the out-of-door repast a gay adventure; Thompson, Margaret; and 

Ferry, Christine 

Malheur, the unfortunate ; Finley, William Lovell 
Mallory, Sarah Trousdale (I) 

Chromatic; poem. Forum, 95:294, My '36 

Puritan; poem, Lit Digest, 121:30, My 9 '36 

Vesta; poem, Delineator, 123:25, Ag '33 
Man and a half ; story, Stevens, James 
Man and his wife ; Clements, Colin Campbell 
Man bait; story, Maxwell, Alice Hankinson 
Man from the sea ; story, Foster, Michael 
Man hesitates but life urges ; poem, Dahlberg, D'Arcy 
Man in front of Mannering's; story, Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt (Mrs. 

Wm. D.) 

Man in the House, A; story, Griffin, Myron 
Man in the Morass, The; Bolles, Jason 
Man in the saddle ; novel, Haycox, Ernest 
Man is hungry ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Man is named, A ; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 
Man needs an answer ; story, Haycox, Ernest 



3 1 4 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Man speaks ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Man's unique discontent; Bradley, John Hodgdon 

Man with a past ; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Man with the hoe ; poem, Markham, Edwin 

Man with the smoke gray eyes ; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Man who didn't want to be a pirate; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 

Maples after the frost; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

March of time; poem, Markham, Edwin 

Marie of Rumania ; Clements, Colin Campbell 

Maring, Helen Emma (W) 

August Afternoon; poem, St N, 64:18, Ag '37 

Charity; poem, Survey, 74:72, Mr '38 

Child wife; poem, F & M, 9:311, My '29 

Composer of music; poem, Ind Woman, 16:340, N '37 

Endless march, The; poem, F & M, 13:113, Ja '33 

Feather in the cap ; poem, F & M, 15 :207, spring '35 

Forest; poem, F & M, 12:51, N '31 

Gardener; poem, 10:218-9, Mr '30 

Heights ; poem, F & M, 10 :305, My '30 

Motor venture; poem, F & M, 19:43, autumn '38 

Spendthrift wind; poem, Bet Horn & Card, 17:85, S '38 

To a girl poet; poem, F & M, 15:147, winter J 34~ J 35 

Triumph; poem, Ind Woman, 19:292, S '40 
Marjorie; poem, Johnson, Dorothy Marie 
Markham, Edwin (O) 

Another wisdom; poem, Rotarian, 56:6, My '40 

Brotherhood ; poem, Sat R Lit, 21 :9, F 17 '40 

Circle; poem, Golden Book, 21:420, My '35 

Even if no dreams are true; poem, Rotarian, 47:6, N '35 

Friendly door; poem, Overland n.s., 87:380, D '29 

From gates of paradise; poem, Overland n.s., 88:170, Je '30 

He served the cause of art; Overland n.s., 88:337, N '30 

Hellas again; poem, 113:39, Je u '32 

Letter to the league of western writers; Overland n.s., 87:305, O '29 

Lincoln, the man of the people; poem, Lit Digest, 117:5, F 10 '34; Nat Ed 
Assn Journal, 26:60, F '37 

Look ahead; poem, Good H, 98:17, Ap '34 

Man with the hoe ; poem, Life, 9 :46-7, Jl 29 '40 

March of time ; poem, Rotarian, 50.6, Ja '37 

Resting on the road; poem, Rotarian, 49:63, D '36 

San Francisco arising; poem, Overland n.s., 87:305, O '29 

To a young man; poem, Rotarian, 51:60, Jl '37 

What is our greatness? ; poem, Rotarian, 48:4, Mr '36 
Marquis, Thomas B. (M) 

Autobiography of a Sioux; Cent, 113:182-8, D '26 

Red Rupe's Squaw; Cent, 118-201, Je '29 

Worshipping the Great Medicine; Catholic Mission Almanac, '34 
Marriage is more than this ; story, Sherman, Richard 
Marsh cat ; poem, Wurdemann, Audrey 
Marshall, James L. (W) 

Bear looks over the mountain; Colliers, 106:18-19, Ag 31 '40 

Cascade tunnel '98 ; poem, F & M, 9:98-100, Ja '29 

Curtain call; poem, F & M, 9:11, N '28 

Desert trail, The; poem, F & M, 10:41, N '29 

End of a dream; Colliers, 105:18-19, Jl 27 '40 

First pioneer, The; F & M, 10:238-9, Mr '30 

India won't wait; 105:20-1, Je 8 '40 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 315 

Oregon trail ; 1851 ; poem, F & M, 8 1219-20, Mr '28 
Saint on the spot; Colliers, 106:13, Je 20 '40 
Seat tracks; 1792; poem, F & M, 10:307, My '30 
Martin, Naomi R. (I) 

Barometer; poem. Seeing Idaho, 1:31, N '37 
Indian weather signs; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:30, N '37 
Massey money, The; story, Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt (Mrs. Wm. D.) 
Masks of the Northwest coast ; Ernst, Mrs. Alice Henson 
Master, The ; poem, Swartz, Elsa E. 
Master; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Masters of the craft; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Matchmaking of Jean Mar jean; story, Blair, Hilda Knowles 
Matter of routine ; story, Hawkins, John 
Maxwell, Alice Hankinson (I) 

Journey; story, Woman's H C, 62:11-12, D '35 
Man Bait; story, Am M, 127:16-19, Mr '39 
Maxwell, Ben (0) 

Continued brightness ; Am Home, 23 124, Ja '40 

What my brief experience with roses has taught me; Bet Horn & Gard, 

10:29, Mr '32 

Mea Culpa; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 
Measure of earth; Praise for stars; Frigid interval; Soil mate; poems, Kidd, 

Walter Evans 

Mead for God; McNickle, D'Arcy 
Medicine men; Stevens, James 
Meek of Oregon ; poem, Bright, Verne 
Meeting, The; story, Black, Laurena A. 
Mellowing years; poem, Braley, Berton 
Melody lingers on; story, O'Neill, Paul 
Mendel's Miracle; story, Hancock, Alice Passano 
Merchandising books for culture ; Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Mere shop; poem, Braley, Berton 
*Merriam, H. G. (M) 

Editor to the reader, The; F & M, 9:172, Mr '29 
Endlessly the covered wagon ; F & M, 9:172, Mr '29 
In memoriam J. H. U. 1874-19*6; poem, F & M, 7:3, N '26 
Liberal arts college in State-supported schools; Sch & Soc, 44:417, 3 3 36 
Note by the instructor, A ; F & M, 5 126, Mr '25 
Northwest harvest ; F & M, 9 :2, N '28 
Merrill, Harrison R. (I) 

Salmon are easy; Seeing Idaho, 1:8-9, 34, S '37 
There is a happy hunting ground; Seeing Idaho, 1:14-15, N '37 
Metamorphosis of the slip cover; Thompson, Margaret, and Ferry, Christine 
Mexican cuisine ; Lay, Marion 
Mexico on $20 a month; Lay, Marion 
Micken, Ralph A. (M) 

Dead-Indian ledge; poem, F & M, 15:297, Mr '35 
On two medicine creek; F & M, 17:270, summer '37 
Revelation on Mount Cannon; F & M, 18:96, autumn '37 
Mike ; story, Haines, Merle J. 
Mildred Agnes Peterson ; Smith, Bess Foster 
Milktime; poem, Haste, Gwendolyn 
Miller, Laura (0) 

Alone he built it; story, Woman's H C, 57:11-12, S '30 
Bathing on the wing; Nature M, 30:64, Jl '37 
Fair return; story, Woman's H C, 61:16, Ap '34 
Gold in the grain; story, Woman's H C, 61:16-17, N '34 



316 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Last picayune; story, Woman's H C, 61:14-15, Ja '34. 
Pride of possession; story, Woman's H C, 57-11-12, Mr '30 
Rancher's bride; Woman's H C, 67:19, Ag '40 
*Miller, Max (W) 

Cave dwellers of arctic; Travel, 70:32-34, Ap '36 

Don't call it Frisco; Good H, 108:40-1, Ap '39 

Stranger came to port; story, Scrib M, 104:22-7, N '39 
Mill wife; poem, Bright, Verne 
Minger, Viola Gilman (I) 

Cattle on the Snake; Seeing Idaho, 1:36, S '37 

Homesick; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:19, Ag '37 
Minuet in G; poem, Dahlberg, D'Arcy 
Minuet in G; poem, Mueller, Dorothy 
Miracle ; story, Braley, Berton 
Miracle in concrete ; Neuberger, Richard L. 

Mirrors past and present ; Thompson, Margaret, and Ferry, Christine 
Miss Hattie's prayer; story, Mueller, Dorothy 
Miss Nancy Cupid ; Bretherton, Vivien R. 
Misunderstanding; poem, McAllister, Adalouie 
Mob, The; story, Jones, Nard 
Modern fairies ; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 
Modern Harlequinde; Clements, Colin Campbell 
*Moll, Ernest George (0) 

Foxes among the lambs; poem, Atlan, 165:769, Je '40 

Intellectual ferret, muzzled; poem, Sat R Lit, 12:18, Je '35 

Two friends; poem, Atlan, 166:506, O '40 

Winter plowing; poem, Atlan, 163:406, Mr '39 
Monday; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Money player; story, Hawkins, John 
*Monroe, Anne Shannon (O) 

Getting along together; Good H, 93:103-4, S '31 

Lead from strength; Good H, 93:108, O '31 

Looking down wells; Good H, 97:26-7, Ag '33 

One at a time; Good H, 98:59, Ja '34 

Seeing out; Good H, 102:13, F '36 

Things that can not fail; Good H, 91:109-10, Ag '30 

Toward every stranger; Good H, 98:223-6, My '34 

We want daddies; Good H, 90:51, Je '30 

Walk with me, lad! ; Good H, 98:39, Mr '34 
Montana; Hefferlin, Pearl 

Montana as it is in 1865 (an account by Granville Stuart) ; Phillips, Paul C., ed. 
Montana Mountain ; Pratt, Laurence L. 
Montana night; poem, Lincoln, Elliott 
*Montgomery, Richard Gill (O) 

Make your store a main entrance; Publishers Weekly 117, 2101-2, Ap 19 '30 

Paradox of book sales; Publishers Weekly, 124-153-5, Jl 15 '33 
Moods; poem, Cromwell, Anne 
Moonlight; poem, Stone, Jack 
Morden, Phyllis B. (O) 

Abandoned farm; poem, Lit Digest, 107:22, N 8 '30 

Adamantine; poem, Christian Cent, 54:1040, Ag 25 '37 

Byway orchard ; poem, F & M, 12 .-246, Mr '32 

Carpenter; poem, Hygeia, 9:944, O '31 

City vignettes; poern, F & M, 17:42-3, autumn '36 

Color of beauty; poem, F & M, 10:218, Mr '30 

Mountain orchard; poem, F & M, 14:180, Mr '34 

Godmother; poem, Commonweal, 14:437, S 9 '31 ; Lit Digest, 111:21, 24 '31 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 317 

Golden Key; poem, Hygeia, 10:980, N '32 

Haunted house; poem, Lit Digest, 111:42, N 7 '31 

I am the cat! ; poem, Sat R Lit, 12:7, Jl 27 '35 

No one ever told me; poem, Hygeia, 10:808, S '32 
More loopholes ; Connolly, Christopher P. 
More work for uplifters; Stevens, James 
Mormons find a way ; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Morning ; sketch, Robinson, Gladys 
Morning comes; poem, Wood, Charles Erskine Scott 
Morning star son of the sun ; story, Linderman, Frank B. 
Morrissette, Pat V. (O) 

Riley on the glory road; poems ' 

I. Riley rests in Death Valley; F & M, 17:240-2, summer '37 

II. Riley spends him a night in jail; F & M, 18:40-2, autumn '37 

III. Riley goes over the Rockies; F & M, 18:99-101, winter '37^38 

IV. Entrance into Arkansas; F & M, 18:248-51, summer '38 
Mother, The; story, Fisher, Vardis 

Mother ; poem, Goodpasture, G. Frank 

Mother earth has a pain in her sawdust ; Johnson, Lament 

Mother lizard makes her nest ; Haskin, Leslie Loren 

Mother speaks; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Motives of an overlord ; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Motor venture; poem, Maring, Helen 

Mountain dwellers; poems, Corning, Howard McKinley 

Mountain flowers of the Indians ; story, Allen, Eleanor 

Mountain in the sky, The; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 

Mountain lore; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 

Mountain meadow ; poem, Johnson, Dorothy Marie 

Mountain orchard ; poem, Morden, Phyllis B. 

Mountain people; Murphy, Dennis 

Mountains, The; poem, Dahlberg, D'Arcy 

Mountain village ; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 

Mounted man; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 

Mr. Pinkerton, present; story, Brown, Zenith Jones 

Mr. Pinkerton lends a hand ; novel, Brown, Zenith Jones 

Mr. Roosevelt and his efforts at a purge ; Lindley, Ernest Kidder 

Mrs. Almina Steed; story, Davis, Harold L. 

Mrs. B. Natural's party; Buchen, Frieda M. 

Mrs. Gowen gives notice ; Chase, Mary Ellen 

Mrs. Penlust of Damascus road ; story, Chase, Mary Ellen 

Mrs. Union station; story, Welch, Douglas 

Mr. Trimble goes fishing; story, Crandell, Richard F. 

Mt. Shuksan; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Much needed coordination; Abbott, N. C. 

Muckler, Winifred (M) 

Buffalo grass; F & M, 4:3-153, My '24 

Disillusionment; poem, F & M, 5:1-11, N '24 
Mueller, Dorothy (M) 

Incorrigible; poem, F & M, 6:3-161, My '26 

Intolerable hope, The; story, F & M, 5:12-17, N '24 

Let me move lightly; poem, F & M, 6:3-174, My '26 

Minuet in G ; poem, F & M, 5, Mr '25 

Miss Hattie's prayer; story, F & M, 6:113, N '25 

Silence; poem, F & M, 6:134, Mr J a6 

Wherever the road forked; poem, F & M, 7:19, N '26 
Multitude ; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 
Murder story; Davis, Harold L. 



3i8 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

*Murphy, Dennis (M) 

Boy with a silver plow; Scholastic, 24:10, Mr 24 '34 

Bull elk; F & M, 19:232, summer '39 

Coyote; F & M, 19:232, summer '39 

Farmer; F & M, 18:11, autumn '37 

Fawn; F & M, 19:232, summer '39 

Mountain people; Harper, 166:169, Ja '33 

Ozark song; Scholastic, 24:10, Mr 24 '34 

Petal fall; poem, Poetry, 40:137, Je '32 

Poetry corner; Scholastic, 24:10, Mr 34 '34 

To an old farmer plowing; Sat R Lit, 8 :62o, Mr i '32 

Two sonnets; poem, F & M, 17:264, summer '37 
Murray, Evelyn (M) 

Limits and levels; F & M, 4:2-119, Mr '24 

Loneliness; sketch, F & M, 4:3-160, My '24 

Turn of the faucet, A; essay, F & M, 4:2-119, Mr '24 
Musical composition ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Mutter korn ; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 
My camp kettle career ; Linderman, Frank 

My country tis of thee ; Pulitzer prize winner editorial ; Callvert, Ronald G. 
My earliest teachers; Chase, Mary Ellen 
My father ; poem, Hogan, Steve 
My last frontier ; Daniels, Bradford K. 
My life lies grand along the hills ; poem, McDowall, Elsie 
My life on a Montana Ranch ; McDowell, Inza 
My neighbor's yard ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

My personal story; Lieut. Charles C. DeRudio; McLemore, Clyde, ed. 
Myra; story, Sherman, Richard 
Mystery of Galleon Bay; novel, Wylie }> Philip 
Mystery of twilight; poem, Thorpe, Iris Lora 
Mystic ; poem, Bright, Verne 
Myths about authors ; Fisher, Vardis 

Naming of the northwest ; Thomas, E. H. 

Napoleon of the sea; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

Narrow channel ; story. Wetjen, Albert Richard 

Native son's rambles in Oregon ; Burg, Amos 

Native wood notes ; Norman, Henderson Daingerfield 

Natural history of Seattle ; Stevens, James 

Navajo; Wagner, Glendolin 

Needed : a rubber-stamp senate ; Gatke, Robert Moulton 

Needham, Anne Cromwell (M) ; see also Cromwell, Anne 

To Comanche, a cow pony; F & M, 10:4-331, My '30 

Successful woman, A; poem, F & M, 6:145, Mr '26 
Neighbors ; story, Ericson, E. E. 
Nelson, Robert (M) 

Concrete worker; poem, F & M, 11:247, Mr '31 

Plains; poem, F & M, 9:1-51, N '28 
*Neuberger, Richard L. (O) 

America talks court; Cur Hist, 46:33-8, Je '37 

Bad-man bridges; Forum, 101:195-9, Ap '39 

Ballot poison for labor; Nation, 147:444-6, O 29 '38 

Behind the Borah boom; Cur Hist, 43:463-6, F '36 

Biggest thing on earth; Harper, 174:247-58, F '37 

Bonneville; New Repub, 95:72, My 25 '38 

C.I.O. ; far western front; Nation, 144:725-6, Je 26 '37 

Climb, fish, climb!; Colliers, 100:27, N 6 '37 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 319 

Colossus in the west; New Repub, 97:310-11, Ja 18 '39 

Columbia flows to the land; Survey Graphic, 28:440-5, Jl '39 

Columbia river power; New Repub, 102:177-8, F 5 '40 

Germany under the choke-bit; New Repub, 77:13-15, N 15 '33 

Goon squads, halt ! ; Colliers, 101 :24, Ap 2 '28 

Gridiron G-man; Colliers, 102:74, N 19 '38 

Hell's canyon, the biggest of all; Harper, 178:527-35, Ap '39 

Hooverism in the funnies; New Repub, 79:234, Jl n '34 

How much conservation? ; Sat Eve Post, 212:13-13, J e *5 J 4 

J. D. Ross: Northwest dynamo; Survey Graphic, 27:586-90, D '38 

Just call me Babe; Colliers, 100:19, N 20 '37 

Just paddle 'em down the road! ; Nation, 141:162, Ag '35 

Labor's cycle in Seattle; Cur Hist, 48:36-8, Je '38 

Labor's overlords; Am M, 125:16-17, Mr '38 

Lewis and the third term; Nation, 148:571, N 25 '39 

Liberalism backfires in Oregon; Cur Hist, 50:33-6, Mr '39 

McNary of Fir Cone ; Life, 9 :76-8, Ag 12 '40 

Miracle in concrete; Nation, 150:675-7, Je i '40 

Mormons find a way; Am M, 126:22-3, Jl '38 

New Germany; Nation, 137:376-9, O 4 '33 

New Oregon trail; Colliers, 99:14-15, Mr 27 '37 

Northwest goes leftish; New Repub, 80:357, N 7 '34 

Old people's crusade; Harper, 172:426-38, Mr '36 

Oregon strikes back; Colliers, 103:12-13, Ja 28 '39 

Oregon's people confront the military drill issue; Christian Cent, 53:1110-11, 
Ag 19 '36 

Political notes from the northwest; Nation, 142:610-12, My 13 '36 

Politician unafraid; Harper, 173:540-50, O '36 

Power as an issue; Cur Hist, 44:64-71, S '36 

Power dams and politics; Nation, 148:317-19, Mr 18 '39 

Power play; Colliers, 102:12-13, O 22 '38 

Prairie senator; Survey Graphic, 28:724-7, D '39 

President comes to our town; New Repub, 80:44-5, Ag 22 '34 

Putt and take ; Colliers, 105 :74~7, Mr 23 '40 

Refugees from the dust bowl; Cur Hist, 50:32-5, Ap '39 

Roosevelt rides again; Cur Hist, 47:42-7, N '37 

Senator Wheeler's plight; Cur Hist, 46:29-31, Ag '37 

Should government own our utilities? Power belongs to the people; Forum, 
102:268-70, W '39 

Some like Roosevelt; Nation, 147:7-8, Jl 2 '38 

They love Roosevelt; Forum, 101:11-15, Ja '39 

Townsend plan exposed; Nation, 141:505-7, O 30 '35 

Townsend racket, new phase; Nation, 147:259-60, S 17 '38 

Trouble in the tall timber; New Repub, 102:434-6, Ap i '40 

Unhappy fishing ground; Colliers, 104:19, O 21 '39 

What the home folks say about events abroad; Harper, 179:407-12, S '39 

Wheeler of Montana; Harper, 180-609-18, My '40 

Wheeler faces the music; Nation, 145:217-19, Ag 28 '37 

Who are the Associated farmers?; Survey Graphic, 28:516-21, S '39 

Who's laughing now? ; Am M, 124:22-3, S '37 

World's greatest engineering wonder; Am M, i25:^4.-i5, Ja '38 

Young man with two horns; Sat Eve Post, 212:25, Jl 8 '39 

Zioncheck: an American tragedy; Nation, 143:207-8, Ag 22 '36 
Never deny a mountain ; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 
New Congress; Lindley, Ernest Kidder 
New deal faces 1940; Lindley, Ernest Kidder 
New Germany ; Neuberger, Richard L. 



320 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

New northwest; Stevens, James 

New Oregon Trail ; Neuberger, Richard "L. 

New politics; Stewart, Mary 

New problems in National affairs ; Lindley, Ernest Kidder m 

New ways to use Christmas holly; Sherrard, S. Drew (Mrs. Thomas Hernck 

Sherrard) 

New year; poem, Woodward, Amy Temple 
New year resolution ; poem, Smith, Bess Foster 
Nez Perce harvest; Whicker, Harold W. 
*Nichols, M. Leona (O) 

Regal lily; Sunset, 63:40, O '29 
Night; poem, Baldwin, Grace D. 
Night hunt; poem, Emory, Clark 
Night journey; poem, Haste, Gwendolyn 
Night of the pig; story, Struckman, Robert Tod 
Night piece ; poem, Bolles, Jason H. J. 
Night shift; story, Hawkins, John 
Night trail ; Canfield, Roy H. 

Night was made for sleep ; poem, Bolles, Jason H. J. 
Nocturne; poems, Freund, Otto 
Nocturne; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Nocturne in a Butte setting ; sketch, Schok, Al 
No one ever told me ; poem, Morden, Phyllis 
Norman, Henderson Daingerfield (W) 

Native woods notes; Atlan, 138:771-5. D '26 
Northwest coast animal dances ; Ernest, .Mrs. Alice Henson 
Northwest goes leftish ; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Northwest Harvest ; Merriam, H. G. 
Northwest is buying books once more ; Fuller, Ethel Roimg 
Northwest takes to poesy ; Stevens, James 
North trail; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 
Nostalgia; poem, Jonson, Arthur 
Note by the instructor ; Merriam, H. G. 
Notes from a professor's diary; Fitzgerald, Brassil 
No thank you; poem, Braley, Berton 
Not in the specifications; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Nothing but a ghost; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Notkin, Natalie B. (W) 

Crazy Pashka; story, Atlan, i53 : 743-5 2 > > J e '34 
Not one too many; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Not too much rest; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 
November; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 
Nuggets in the pan ; Goodwin, Margaret Swarthout 
Nunas and Noonas ; Haskin, Leslie Loren 

Obsequies of Peter Schwartz; stories, Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt (Mrs. 

Wm. D.) 

Obvious athlete; Butler, Edward H. 
October; poem, Elmendorf, Mary J. 
October; poem, Tull, Jewell Bothwell 
Odd chance ; story, Haycox, Ernest 
O'Donnell, Alicia (M) 

On a writer reading his own work; F & M, 11:161, Ja '31 

Retreat for horses; poem, F & M, 10:143, Ja '30 

Tears ; poem, F & M, 9 :240, Mr '29 

Triolet; F & M, 11:128, Ja '31 

Wind at night; poem, F & M, 10:2-141, Ja '30 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 321 

Officer's choice; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Of regrets ; poem, Leonard, Lillian T. 

Oil fields people; sketch, Vontver, May 

Old Bateese ; poem, Linderman, Frank 

Old blazes ; poem, Smith, Bess Foster 

Old crawdad ; story, Wylie, Philip 

Old Dan Boone; poem, Bright, Verne 

Old Diggins ; story, Goodwin, Margaret Swarthout 

Old-fashioned land Eastern Oregon ; Davis, Harold L. 

Old freighter ; poem, Haroldsen-Lovell, Edith Ann 

Old freighter comes back in a ford ; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 

Old frontier ; poem, Linderman, Frank 

Old garden speaks ; story, Bretherton, Vivien R. 

Old glory; story, Havcox, Ernest 

Old haystacks ; poem, Kidd, Walter Evans 

Old hill-road ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Old home camp ; story, Stevens, James 

Old ironface; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

Old John ; story, Maclay, Sallie Sinclair 

Old Lover's Ghost; novel, Brown, Zenith Jones 

Old man coyote; story, Wagner, Glendolin 

Old man coyote and the whirlwind; story, Linderman, Frank B. 

Old man Isabell's wife ; story, Davis, Harold L. 

Old mine ; poem, Johnson, Dorothy Marie 

Old nevermore, the outlaw ; Lampman, Ben Hur 

Old pain ; story, Hutchens, John K. 

Old Paul Motte; story, Benjamin, Ida 

Old people's crusade; Neuberger, Richard L, and Loe, Kelley 

Old precious; story, Babson, Naomi Lane 

Old wine in new bottles ; Bradley, John Hodgdon 

Old workmare, The ; story, Pendleton, Conrad 

Oljolaned; story, Crandell, Richard F. 

Olsen, Chas. Oluf (O) 

Around the ring; Last courage; Potent circle; Father John; Story faith; 
Life be kind; poems, Poetry, 37:147-9, D '30 

Bearers of integrity; poem, F & M, 10:331, My '30 

Deaf; poem, Commonweal, 11:311, Ja 15 '30 

Ghostly acres; poem, F & M, 12:8, N '31 

Grain of the wood; In the city; Kinship; Rehabilitation; Consider two 
cats; Goal; Temporal; Rebuked; poems, Poetry, 33:246-9, F '29 

Threshold poem, F & M, 16:32, autumn '35 

To the heart; Hemlock draught; poems, Poetry, 44:316, S '34 

Transformation; poem, Commonweal, 12:159, J e JI '3 

Wood smoke, poem, F & M, 11:359, My '31 
On a writer reading his own work ; poem, O'Donnell, Alicia 
On bridger hill; Bolles, Jason H. J. 
Once and for all ; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Once heaven was music ; poem, Leeper, Marion Le Mayne 
Once upon a time ; Lampman, Ben Hur 
Once upon a time; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
On circle; story, James, Will 
On Don Jaime street ; story, Haycox, Ernest 
One at a time ; Monroe, Anne Shannon 
O'Neill, Paul (W) 

Game day; story, Sat Eve Post, 2-12:22-2-3, D 9 '39 

Hero; story, Colliers, 101:54, My 21 '38 

Landing party; story, Am M, 124:20-1, S '37 



3 22 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Lover come back; story, Colliers, 102:18-19, D 10 '38 

Melody lingers on; story, Sat Eve Post, 210:14-16, Ag 28 '37 

One rookie they won't forget; Sat Eve Post, an :35i P^s Mr n '39 

Pilot weeping; story, Am M, 124:38-9, Ag '37 ' 

Second meeting; story, Am M, 127:42, F '39 

One grand Swede; story, McLean, Margharite Fisher 

One man road; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

One mile of brook ; poem, Armour, Will K. 

One more river ; story, Haycox, Ernest 

One night in paradise ; story, Sherman, Richard 

One rookie they won't forget ; O'Neill, Paul 

One star by night ; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Only my opinion ; poem, Shannon, Monica 

Only the windless meadow ; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 

On Mackenzie's trail to the polar sea; Burg, Amos 

On Texas street; story, Haycox, Ernest 

On the air ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

On the beach; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

On the road to Oregon ; short story, Sudweeks, Leslie L. 

On the silver bow ; story, Haycox, Ernest 

On the spur of the moment ; story, Bechdolt, Frederick Ritchie 

On two medicine creek ; poem, Micken, Ralph A. 

On war literature; Freeman, Edmund L. 

Open winter; story, Davis, Harold L. 

O Pioneer ! ; poem, Leonard, Lillian T. 

Orange blossoms for Montana ; poem, Robinson, Lucy M. C. 

Oregon Etching; poem, Allen, Eleanor 

Oregon Memorial of 1838 ; Brosnan, Cornelius James 

Oregon missions as seen in the Walker letters 1839-1851, The; Phillips, Paul C. 

Oregon night song; Spaulding, Kenneth 

Oregon trail; 1851; poem, Marshall, James H. - 

Oregon's secret love cult; Holbrook, Stewart ' 

Oregon strikes back; Neuberger, Richard L. 

Oregon's people confront the military drill issue ; Neuberger, Richard 

Original nature man; Holbrook, Stewart 

Oswald; poem, Collins, Dean * 

Other dear charmer; story, Sherman, Richard ' 

Other hero; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Other side of progress; Bradley, John Hodgdon 

Our critical renaissance ; Whicker, Harold W. 

Our elders; Bolles, Jason H. J. 

Our imperative task ; Borah, William Edgar 

Our palingenesis of talk ; Whicker, Harold W. 

Outside; poem, Gill, Frances 

Over the hollyhedge; story, Bretherfon, Vivien R. 

Over the reefs; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

Ozark; song; Murphy, Dennis 

Pacific blooms; A flower girl; Three leis; ,For a 'parting; poems, Winslow, 

Walker ' " 

Pagan boyhood; Daniels, Bradford K. 
Pan and the plumber; poem, Braley, Berton 
Paper mill, The ; poem, Pratt, Laurence L. 
Paper mill community; poem, Pratt, Laurence L. 
Paradox of book sales ; Montgomery, Richard Gill * 
Paradise canyon mystery; story, Wylie, Philip 
Paradox ; poem, Leeper, Marion Le Mayne 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 323 

Parents in the audience ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
*Parsons, Mabel Holmes (O) 

Antithesis; poem, F & M, 10:130, Ja '30 
Partners; Linderman, Frank (ist) 
Partners; Linderman, Frank (2nd) 
Partners in Eden; story, Stevens, James 
Partoll, Albert (M) 

Anderson's narrative of a ride to the Rocky mountains; F & M, 19:54-63, 
autumn '38 

After the Custer battle; F & M, 19:277-79, summer '39 

Blackfeet Indian peace council; F & M, 17:199-297, spring '37 

Father Mengarini's narrative of the rockies, 1841-50; F & M, 18:193, 

spring '38 

Passage for one; story, Brown, Zenith James 
Passing of the timber beast, The ; Stevens, James 
Patrick creek country; Frohlicher, Eugenie E. 
Patterns of success; Bradley, John Hodgdon 
Paul Bunyan in the flesh; Holbrook, Stewart 
Peek, Tate W. (M) 

Chinook ; poem, F & M, 5 :2-6o, Mr '25 

Scoffin' Butte ; story, F & M, 3 :3~59, My '23 

What fools these mortals be; F & M, 1:4-114, My '21 
Pendleton, Conrad (O) 

The old workmare; story, F & M, 16:303-6, summer '36 

Sunset, Plow in the; story, F & M, 16:211-15, spring '36 
People do read poetry; poem, Braley, Berton 
Perfect understanding ; poem, Braley, Berton 
Period piece; poem, Macleod, Norman 
*Perkins, Phil (O) 

Gettin' licked; poem, Lit Digest, 113:21, Ap 30 '32 
Personal equation in history; Hulme, Edward Maslin 
Perspective ; poem, Wurdemann, Audrey 
Petal fall; poem, Murphy, Dennis 
Petals ; poem, Maclay, Sally Sinclair 
Pete Lebeau's lament; poem, Linderman t Frank 
Peterkin, Dorothy M. Johnson (M) 

And one came back; story, F & M, 7:3-87, My '27 

Happy valley; story, F & M, 8:1-165, N '27 
Peter ; Old sailor ; poems, Bright, Verne 
Peter Schatt ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Philihert, the silver-gray; Lampman, Ben Hur 
^Phillips, Paul C. (M) 

Battle of the Big Hole, The; F & M, 10:1-63, N '29 

Country life; F & M, 55:65, Ap '29 

Family letters of two Oregon fur traders, 1828-36; F & M, 1:66, N '33 

Granville Stuart; Montana as it is in 1865; F & M, 12:72-79, N '31 

Life and adventures of Calamity Jane; F & M, 4:34, summer 36 

Oregon mission as seen in the Walker letters 1839-1851 ; F & M, 1:74, N '31 

Upham letters from the upper Missouri 1865; F & M, 4:311, My '33 

Trail of the painted parks; F & M, 1:72, N '31 
*Phillips, Walter S. (W) 

Well-named devil's club; Nature M, 21:166-7, Ap '33 
Pholas, the artisan anchorite ; Lampman, Ben Hur 
Photo finish; story, Welch, Douglas 
Picture, The; Coates, Grace Stone 
Picture; poem, Charles, Ruth 
Pictures in decoration ; Thompson, Margaret, and Ferry, Christine 



324 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Pierce, Frank Richardson (W) (pseud. Seth Ranger) 

Are fish citizens? ; Sat Eve .Post, 210:34, N 6 '37 

Hostile Hostak; Colliers, 104:28-9, S a '39 

Sucker trick; story, Am M, 128:32, Ag '39 
Pilgrimage into summer ; poem, Thorpe, Iris Lora 
Pilot weeping; story, O'Neill, Paul 
Pinch of advice ; Fisher, Vardis 
Pinch of snuff ; story, Chase, Mary Ellen 
Pine tree; poem, Bright, Verne 
Pine tree, The ; Coates, Grace Stone 
Pioneer captain; Davis, Harold L. 

Pioneer; death's hour; April moments; poem, Bright, Verne 
Pioneer on esthetics, The ; Tracey, Paul E, 
Pioneer lumbering in Montana ; Holter, Anton M. 
Pioneers; poem, Stone, Jack 
Pioneers ; poem, Bolles, J ason H. J. 
Pirates; Clements, Colin Campbell 
Pity all the sleeping poor ; poem, Allen, Eleanor 
Plains; poem, Nelson, Robert 
Planaceas; Dale, Harrison Clifford 

Planning the bride's table linen; Thompson, Margaret, and Ferry, Christine 
Plants that catch fish ; Haskin, Leslie Loren 
Plaster of paris ; story, Coates, Grace Stone 
Platt, Kenneth Batdork (I) 

Idaho Silhouettes; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:38, Jl '37 

Spring poem; Seeing Idaho, 1:38; Jl '37 
Playground or prison; Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Playing hooky; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Playing tag with the game warden ; story, Alexander, Charles 
Pleasure trip ; story, Thompson, Margaret 
Plowing; poem, Dahlberg, D'Arcy 
Plow in the sunset; story, Pendleton, Conrad 
Plumber; poem, Tracey, Paul E. 
Plumbing's no pipe; Gehri, Alfred 
Plummer, Eleanor (M) 

April; poem, F & M, 19:108, winter '38 

I shall not tell you now ; poem, F & M, 19 :io8, winter '38 
Poem; Leonard, Lillian T, 

Poems ; "God made de worl," Levee sermon, Jeff ; Lister, Queen B. 
Poetry corner ; Murphy, Dennis 
Poet's paradise ; Smith, Bess Foster 
Pointing bone; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Police court sketches ; poem, Baldwin, Grace D. 
Political notes from the northwest ; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Politician unafraid ; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Poor people; story, Struckmann, Robert Tod 
Portland, Athens of the West ; Stevens, James 
Possession ; poem, Pratt, Laurence 
Postscripts ; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 

Post-war oppression of German sects in foreign countries ; Stewart, George 
Potatoes; story, Haines, Merle J. 
Power as an issue ; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Power dams and politics; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Power play; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Prairie; poem, Lee, Borghild 
Prairie birth ; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 
Prairie senator; Neuberger, Richard L. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 325 

Prairie town; Stevens, James 
*Pratt, Laurence L. (0) 

April West Oregon; poem, F & M, 11:233, Mr '31 

Clotho and Atropos; poem, Lit Digest, 107:28, D 13 '30 

Montana mountain; poem, F & M, 13:46, N '32 

Paper mill, The; F & M, 12:337, My '32 

Paper mill community; poem, F & M, 14:301, My '34 

Possession; poem, Overland n.s., 88:213, Jl '30 

Refraction; poem, F & M, 10:2-135, Ja '30 

Relics ; poem, F & M, 19 a 50-1, summer '39 

Sonnets of a paper mill; F & M, 11:207, Mr '31 

To a poet; June; poems, Overland n.s., 88:149, 159, My '30 

West wind; poem, Lit Digest, 118:27, Jl 14*34 
Prayer at the services for Henry Gushing; poem, Stewart, George 
Prayer for the vacations of young office workers; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Preliminaries; story, Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt (Mrs. Wm. D.) 
Premonition; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 
Prentiss, Ruth Eliot (O) 

To one from home; poem, F & M, 9:135, Ja '39 
President comes to our town; Neuberger, Richard L. 
.Presidential possibilities; Connolly, Christopher P. 
Preview; story, Sherman, Richard 
Price of Tuecksoo, The ; Scearce, Stanley 
Pride ; story, Hancock, Alice Passano 
Pride of possession ; story, Miller, Laura 
Privacy impossible ; story, Wylie, Philip 

Problems in curtaining the window; Thompson, Margaret, and Ferry, Christine 
Promise; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 
Prophecy; poem, Doerr, Mary Elizabeth 
Prospector, The ; poem, Turner, Faith 
Prospector; poem, Macleod, Norman 
Prospector's Will, The ; poem, Roberts, Clark L. 
Protests by dynamite ; Connollv, Christopher P. 
Proud people; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Pulling out; poem, Hamilton, Ruth 
Punctuation; poem, Crandell, Richard F. 
Purchase price; poem, Smith, Bess Foster 
Puriton; poem, Mallory, Sarath Trousdale 
Pussy willows ; Bolles, Jason H. J. 
Putt and take ; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Puzzle in snow; story, Wylie, Philip 
Quality; poem, Dewey, Margaret 
Queen of pearls ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Onery; poem, Lennstrend, Tesla V. 
Question of blood ; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Question ; poem, Johnson, Dorothy Marie 
Quiet hour ; poem, Wurdemann, Audrey 
Quiet wedding; story, Babson, Naomi Lane 
Quitter as a hero; story, Wvlie, Philip 
Quitters can't win ; poem, Braley, Berton 
Racketeering on Parnassus; Whicker, Harold W. 
Raiding the people's land; Connolly, Christopher P. 
Railroad beef ; story, Davis, Harold L. 
Rain on the roof ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Roraig 
Rainv day in summer ; story, Babson, Naomi Lane 
Rancher's bride : Miller, Laura 
Ranch mother, The; poem, Kidd, Walter Evans 



326 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Ranch night, winter ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Ranchwoman's guests; Hazen, Lillian Weston 

Ranch women; story, Vontver, May 

Ranger, Seth, pseud. See Pierce, Frank Richardson (Cross-reference) 

Rare lace ; poem, Staab, Lonna Powell 

Rebel, The; Poem, Macleod, Norman 

Reckless dusk ; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Reclamation vs. conservation ; Finley, William Lovell 

Recollections of Charley Russell ; Linderrnan, Frank 

Red furnace ; poem, Macleod, Norman 

Red palanquin, The; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 

Red petticoat; story, Alexander, Charles 

Red Rupe's squaw; Marquis, Thomas B. 

Reference room, public library (poem) ; Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Reflections; poems, Macleod, Norman 

Reformer ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 

Refraction ; poem, Pratt, Laurence L. 

Refugees from the dust bowl ; Neuberger, Richard L. 

Refutation ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Regal lily; Nichols, M. Leona 

*Reid, Agnes Just (I) 

Idaho, My Idaho; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:38, My '37 

I love the land; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:39, Jl '37 

Homegrown philosophy; Seeing Idaho, 1:38, My '37 
Relics; poem, Pratt, Laurence 
Remembering rocks; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Reminiscence of James Kirkpatrick, A ; Bozeman, John 
Remnants at the poor farm ; poem, Cromwell, Anne 
Remuda; story, James, Will 
Reno rendezvous ; story, Brown, Zenith Jones 
Renunciation ; poem, Doerr, Mary Elizabeth 
Requiem; poem, Clapp, Mary Brennan 
Requiem ; poem, Goodpasture, G. Frank 
Response ; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 
Resting on the road; poem, Markham, Edwin 
Restless; poem, Craw, Nina 
Retain the arms embargo ; Borah, William Edgar 
Retreat for Horses; poem, O'Donnell, Alicia 
Retrospect; poem, Triesler, Margaret 
Return; poem, Clapp, Mary Brennan 
Revelation on Mount Cannon ; poem, Micken, Ralph A. 
Revenge and what comes after ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Reverie; poem, Stone, Jack 
Revery; sketch, Billing, Marjorie 
Review of President Roosevelt; Lindley, Ernest Kidder 
Rhododendrons for vour garden ; Gatke, Robert Moulton 
Rhythm in acting; Clements, Colin Campbell 
Ride the river; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Riding of sundown ; poem, Bright, Verne 
Rides on a country schoolmarm, The ; Charles, Ruth 
Riley on the glory road ; poems, Morrissette, Pat V. 

I. Riley rests in Death Valley 

II. Riley spends a night in jail 

III. Riley goes over the Rockies 

IV. Entrance into Arkansas 

Right objects for the mantel shelf; Thompson, Margaret, and Ferry, Christine 
Ring-tailed roarers ; Chittick, V. L. O. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 327 

*Ripley, Clements, Mrs (W) 

What's a man to do?; story, Atlan, 150:4,78-84, O '32 
Rivals in the G.O.P. camp ; Lindley, Ernest Kidder 
River driver's death ; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 
River swing, The ; story, Lister, Queene B. 
Road gang; Father; poems, Tracey, Paul E. 
Roadhouse girl ; poem, Bolles, Jason H. J. 
Road kid ; story, Hedrick, Mrs. Helen 
Road leads west ; story, Babson, Naomi Lane 
Road test ; poem, Braley, Berton 
Road to fall ; novel, Brown, Zenith Jones 
Roanoke of the prairie; sketch, Ericson, E. E. 
Robb, Inez Callaway (I) 

Cabbages and Kings; story, New Repub, 67:177-8, Jl i '31 

Making Bolshevists at Palm Beach; New Repub, 66:206-7, Ap '31 
Roberts, Clark L. (I) 

Friend to man, A; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:39, Jl '37 

The prospector's will; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:39, Jl *37 
Robinson, Gladys (M) 

Big business ; story, F & M, 2 ^-225, My '22 

Morning; sketch, F & M, 2:3-220, My '22 
Robinson Jeffers ; story, Lehman, Robinson Harrison 
Robinson, Lucy M. C. (W) 

Fifteen hundred miles; poem, F & M, 10:38-9, N '29 

Inarticulate; poem, F & M, 10:135, Ja '39 

Orange blossoms for Montana; poem, F & M, 12:50, N '31 
Roch ; Bechdolt, Frederick Ritchie 
Rock, The; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 
Rolling stones; story, Welch, Douglas 
Romance; poem, Bolles, Jason H. J. 
Romance renewed; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Romance and sagebrush ; story, Sudweeks, Leslie L. 
Romantic Samaritan; story, Bretherton, Vivien R. 
Romance trail ; Baubson, Russell 
Romantic road, The; sketch, Stevens, James 
Romantic sailor, The ; story, Stevens, James 
Room of the golden lovers; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Room 515; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Roosevelt rides again; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Rose Marie; Daniels, Bradford K. 
Rough air ; novel, Haycox, Ernest 
Round trip ; story, Haycox, Alice Passano 
Round-up wagon ; story, James, Will 
Rowe, Tesla V. (M) See also Lennestrend, Tesla 

Changeling, The ; poem, F & M, 3 :3-6p, My '23 

Choosing; poem, F & M, 5:3-77, My 25 

Lombardy poplars; poem, F & M, 5:2-62, Mr '25 

Spring again; poem, F & M, 4:2-120, Mr '24 
Rowse, Doris (M) 

Afternoon call, An; story, F & M, 6:2-147, Mr 26 

Summer on a Montana ranch, A; F & M, 6:1-107, N '25 

Whistling Bill; story, F & M, 6:3-168, My '26 
Royal family, The; story, Fligelman, Belle 
Royal raiment; Stevens, James 
Rubber-tired rustler, The; Smith, Cecil 
Rubbers; Birkeland, Joran J. 
Rule by power; story, Haycox, Ernest 



328 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Rules of the rude ; poem, Braley, Berton 

*Russell, Charles M. (M) 

Letter to P. T. Tucker ; F & M, 9 1226, Mr '29 

Savage Santa Claus; story, Country Life, 55:65-6, D '28 

Russell, Myna (O) 

Bird bathing; poem, Bet Horn & Gard, 15:142, Ap '37 
Cock's early crowing; poem, F & M, 19:239, summer '39 

Sacred rock vision ; story, Schultz, James Willard 

Saddle and ride; novel, Haycox, Ernest 

Sad story of a high-heeled cow puncher, The ; Tucker, Pat 

Saga of Peg-leg Annie, The ; Johnson, Lamont 

Sailing, a sailing; Dahlberg, D'Arcy 

Saint on the spot ; Marshall, James H. 

Saint Per; Lee, Borghild 

Salmon or kilowatts ; Finley, William Lovell 

Salmon and easy; Merrill, Harrison R. 

Salmon river mission ; Beal, Samuel M* 

Salmon, seals and skull duggery; Finley, William Lovell 

Saloon days; Stevens, James 

Salt marsh ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Salt of the sea ; story, Hurst, Samuel Bertram Hawerts 

Salt and pepper; story, Hartwick, Mrs. Mary Hesse 

Salute for a sailor; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

Salute to time ; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Salvage; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 

Sand hills; poem, Grissom, Irene Welch 

Sand in the shepherd's pie; Shephard, Esther (Mrs. C. E. Shephard) 

San Francisco arising ;, poem, Markham, Edwin 

San Francisco disturbance; story, Stevens, James 

Saturday night dance ; story, Sherman, Richard 

Savage Santa Claus; story, Russell, Charles M. 

Saving of Clarence Darrow; Connolly, Christopher P. 

Sawmill phantoms; Cochran, Joseph 

Scapegoat; poem, Haste, Gwendolyn 

Scarf ace Charlie ; poem, Tracey, Paul E. 

*Scearce, Stanley (M) 

Price of Tuecksoo, The ; F & M, 1 163, N '34. 

Six matched huskies, The; F & M, 2:148, Ja '35 

Yukon winter; F & M, 2:143, "winter '36 
Scenery, if you can see it ; poem, Collins, Dean 
Scheffer, John (M) 

Abandoned farmhouse; F & M, 10:110, Ja '30 

Affirmation; Poetry, 38:86, My '31 

This youth bewildered; Poetry, 38:87, My '31 
Schernm, Mildred Walker (M). See also Walker, Mildred 

Apple-seed and apple-thorn; story, F & M, 19:233, summer '39 
Schok, Al (M) 

Flathead lake ; sketch, F & M, 5 :i-2i, N '24 

Nocturne in a Butte setting; F & M, 5:125, N '24 
Schoolroom, The; Linderman, Wilda 
Schroppers, The ; story, Dally, Geo. L. 
*Schultz, James Willard (M) 

Indian names in Glacier park, Outlook; 143:442-4, Jl 28 '26 

Sacred rock vision; story, St N, 63:9-11, Ja '36 

Skunk cap's medicine; story, St N, 64:12, My 14 '37 
Scoffin' Butte ; story, Peek, Tate W. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 329 

Scout detail; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Scrub cedar; poem, Macleod, Norman 

Sculptor ; poem, Clapp, Mary Brennan 

Sea ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Sea, The ; five poems ; Goodpasture, G. Frank 

Sea drift ; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

Sea islands ; poem, Bright, Verne 

Sea maid; poem, Lee, Borghild 

Sea wind; poem, Bright, Verne 

Season, The ; poem, White, Phillip 

Seasonal information ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Season for the mind ; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 

Season's first trillium; It must be May; poems, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Seat tracks; 1792; poem, Marshall, James 

Second dusk; poem, Farnsworth, Mary 

Second holiday; storv, Sherman, Richard 

Second lilith ; story, Bretherton, Vivien R. 

Second love; Fugitive; I bear old scars; Bed and board; Heritage; poems, 

Hammond, Eleanor 
Second meeting; story, O'Neill, Paul 
Second-money man; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Secret heart; poem, Wurdemann, Audrey 
Secret of keep cool ; anecdote, Linderman, Frank 
Security; poem, Braley, Berton 

Seeing Idaho from the top of the world ; Bailey, Robert G. 
Seeing out; Monroe, Anne Shannon 

Select next year's tulips now ; Twining, Mrs. Frances Staver 
Self; poem, Housman, Mary W. 

Selling arms ; a step toward war ; Borah, William Edgar 
Senator Warren of Wyoming ; Connolly, Christopher P. 
Senator Wheeler's plight; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Sentence ; Bolles, Jason H. J. 

Serenade for a wealthy widow ; story, Sherman, Richard 
Serena's religious experience; story, Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt (Mrs. 

Wm. D) 

Serf, The ; poem, Ericson, E. E. 
Servants of the sea ; Lampman, Ben Hur 
Se-wa-tin muses; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 
Sex freedom and the family; Bradley, John Hodgdon 
Shadow, poem, Goodpasture, G. Frank 
Shadows ; poem, Lennstrend, Tesla V. 
Shake hands forever; story, Babson, Naomi Lane 
Shall we have union now ? ; Streit, Charles K. 
Shameless pearls; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Shams; poem, Johnson, Dorothy Marie 
^Shannon, Monica (M) 

At home with mountains; autob., Pub W, 127:2420, Je 29 '35 

Only my opinion; poem, Nat E A Journal, 21 :i88, Je '32 

Tomato boats and rebels; Atlan, 144:39, Jl '29 
Sheep bought it ; Call, Mrs. Hughie Florence 
Sheepherder, The; poem, Ericson, E. E, 
Shelby picks a fight; Thane, Eric, pseud. 

She leaves a family of little children ; poem, Clapp, Mary Brennan 
*Shephard, Esther (Mrs. C. E. Shephard) (W) 

Sand in the shepherd's pie; New Repub, 95:23-4, My u '38 
*Sherman, Richard (M) 

Achievement; story, Colliers, 101:58, My 28 '38 



330 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Boomerang; story, Forum, 84:90, Ag '30 

Company; story, Sat Eve Post, 209:12, Ag 29 '36 

De Amicitia; story, Forum, 82:293, N '29 

Don't give it a thought; story, Am Merc, 35:438, Ag '33 

First day; story, Am M, 119:46, Je '35 

Folly and farewell; story, Sat Eve Post, 209:5, S 19, 26 '36 

French leave; story, Sat Eve Post, 208:16, Ag 24 '35 

Half an hour; story, Am M, 119:64, My '35 

He will never know; story, Colliers, 95:26, Mr 2 '35 

Lazy man ; story, Am M, 121 :io8, F '36 

Marriage is more than this; story, Pict R, 36:20, My '33 

Myra; story, Sat Eve Post, 212:5, D 30 '39 

One night in paradise; story, Sat Eve Post, 208:8, O 12 '35 

Other dear charmer; story, Sat Eve Post, 210:14, S 18 '37 

Preview; story, Sat Eve Post, 211:5 ; N 5, 12 '38 

Saturday night dance; story, Delin, 127:14, S '35 

Second holiday; story, Am M, 128:48, Jl '39 

Serenade for a wealthy widow; story, Sat Eve Post, 210, Ag 21, 28 '37 

Shining shadow; story, Colliers, 94:23, N 24 '34 

St. Louis Blues; story, Colliers, 95:26, Mr 2 '35 

Sudden shower; story, Delin, 127:16, Jl '35 

This is where she sleeps; story, Am M, 127:36, F '39 

Two of them; story, Atlan, 151:212, F '33 

Waif; story, Delin, 126:52, Ap '35 

Won't you walk a little faster; story, Sat Eve Post, 212:10, N 18 '39 

You all want something; story, Sat Eve Post, 209:5, O 17 '36 

Young people are conservative; story, Woman's H C, 61:220, O '34 

You're as old as you feel; story, Sat Eve Post, 212, F 17 '40 
*Sherrard, S. Drew (Bennett) (Mrs. Thomas Herrick Sherrard) (O) 

New ways to use Christmas holly; Am Home, 19:26, D '37 

Wild flower gardens; Woman's H C, 64:180, Ap '37 
She's had the doctor ; Chase, Mary Ellen 
Shiney shoes; story, Blair, Hilda Knowles 
Shining shadow ; story, Sherman, Richard 
Ship cabin in the hills ; poem, Goodpasture, G. Frank 
Ship-world; poem, Wiley, Naomi E. Lee 
Shoot the works ; poem, Braley, Berton 
Shope, Irving (M) 

Cowboy can ride, The; F & M, 10:4-272, My '30 

Cow camp Christmas; F & M, 2:104, Ja '31 
Short girls ; poem, Bolles, Jason H. J. 
Short, Minnie Todd (I) 

Autumn in the hills of Idaho; poem, seeing Idaho, i :35, My '37 

I-d-a-h-o; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:46, My '37 

Wind music; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:28, D '37 
Short walks; Bradley, John Hodgdon 
Short water ; story, Grissom, Irene Welch 
Shotgun junction ; story, Davis, Harold L. 
Should government own our utilities? Power belongs to the people; Neuberger, 

Richard L. 

Shrapnel of the heart; poem, Macleod, Norman 
Siaami, Indian Celebration at St. Ignatious ; Frochlicher, John C. 
Sic transit; poem, Braley, Berton 

Signers of the Oregon memorial of 1838 ; Brosnan, Cornelius James 
Silence; poem, Dewey, Margaret, F & M, u :3io, My '31 
Silence; poem, Mueller, Dorothy 
Silence; Vontver, May 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 331 

Silhouette; poem, Maclay, Sallie Sinclair 

Silver desert; novel, Haycox, Ernest 

Silver locket, The; Dahlberg, D'Arcy 

Silver saddle ; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Silvery, Shimmering season; poem, Bet Horn & Gard, 15:7, D '36 

Simple way of poison; novel, Brown, Zenith Jones 

Singsong girl ; story, Babson, Naomi Lane 

Sink or swim ; Chase, Mary Ellen 

Six curtains; The three old ladies; The bride's story; The husband's story; 

The empty cabin ; poems, Corning, Howard McKinley 
Six matched huskies, The ; Scearce, Stanley 
Sixes runs to the sea, The ; story, Corning, Howard McKinley 
Six horse limited mail, The ; Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Skavlan, Margaret (O) 

Ice-locked; poem, F & M, 11:124., Ja '31 

Soapy and Frank, and how they died; Lost ladies of Skagway; F & M, 

10:306-7, My '30 

Skeezix, a white coyote ; Finley, William Lovell 
Skipper, the murre; Lampman, Ben Hur 
Skull behind the bar; story, Coupe, Delores M. 
Skunk cap's medicine ; story, Schultz, James Willard 
Sky-clipper; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Sky was red ; story, Hawkins, John 
Sky wisdom; poem, Thorpe, Iris Lora 
Slumber no more; poem, Aiken, Mrs. Lulu Piper 
Smart young man ; poem, Braley, Berton 
Smelter Smoke; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 
*Smith, Bess Foster (I) 

Boundaries; poern, Seeing Idaho, 1:31, S '37 
Checkered tablecloth, The ; Seeing Idaho, i :3o, N '37 
Grandmother's autumn thoughts; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:28, O '37 
I cannot sing; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:30, S '37 
Mildred Agnes Peterson ; Seeing Idaho, 1 130, '37 
New year resolution ; Seeing Idaho, 1 130, J '37 
Old blazes; poem, Seeing Idaho, I: A '37 
Poet's paradise; Seeing Idaho, 1:38, Jl ? 37 
Purchase price ; poem, Seeing Idaho, i :i9, A '37 
Thrifty soul; poem, Seeing Idaho, i :i8, A '37 
*Smith, Cecil (I) 

Cowboy artist, The ; Seeing Idaho, i :p, Je '38 
Empty stackyard, The; story, Seeing Idaho, 1:18019, My '37 
Rubber-tired rustler, The; Seeing Idaho, 1:6-7, A '37 
*Smith, Warren D. (0) 

World population; Scientific Monthly, 40:33-43, Ja '35 
Smoky; stories, James, Will (M) 
*SneIl, George Dixon 

The helping hand; story, F & M, 16:178, spring '36 
Snow; poem, Farnsworth, Mary 
Snow; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Snowshoe for a horse ; Laird, Charlton G. 
Sober workingmen ; Stevens, James 
Some like Roosevelt; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Some of Oregon's early newspapers ; Turnbull, George 
Something extra for midnight; story, Struckman, Robert Tod 
Something for nothing ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Something to remember ; story, Babson, Naomi Lane 



332 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Some were brave ; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Somewhere off the highway; poem, Baldwin, Grace D. 

Song for the turquise people ; poem, Macleod, Norman 

Song of home ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Song of Larnock; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

Song of power; poem, Braley, Berton 

Song of the rancher's wife, The ; poem, Coupe, Delores M. 

Song of the restless; poern, Braley, Berton 

Song of the volga, The ; sketch, Cochran, Joseph 

Song to explain a late Oregon settler ; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 

Songs of the street: Old Woman; Nightbirds; Little seamstress; Marcellar; On 

the wharf ; Angelo ; The fruit vendor ; poems, Allen, Eleanor 
Sonnet for a young girl ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Sonnets of a paper mill ; Pratt, Laurence L. 
Sons; story, Lehman, Benjamin Harrison 
Sons of the soil ; poem, Macleod, Norman 
Sons of tugboat Annie ; Gehri, Alfred 

Soul of William Jones; story, Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt (Mrs. Wm. D.) 
Sources ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Sourdough drive; story, Stevens, James 
Sowder Jr., Chas. (I) 

Cabinet gorge; Seeing Idaho, 1:10-11, N '37 

Idaho's Heyburn state park playground; Seeing Idaho, 1:21-22-23; J '38 
Spanish lady; story, Davis, Harold L. 
Spaulding, Kenneth (M) 

Mad November; poem, F & M, 18:96, autumn '37 

Oregon night song; F & M, 17:280, summer '37 
Spendthrift wind ; poem, Maring, Helen 
Spiked fists; story, Stevens, James 
Spirit of the game ; Whicker, Harold W. 
Spring; poem, Platt, Kenneth Batdorf 
Spirit wife, The ; story, Lister, Queene B. 
Spring again ; poem, Rowe, Tesla V. 
Spring gardening; poem, Leonard, Lillian T. 
Spring night; poem, Hedges, Ada Hastings 
Spring night; poem, McDowall, Elsie 
Spring song; poem, Clapp, Mary Brennan 
Squier, Emma Lindsay (W) 

Angry god and the people of corn; story, Good H, 84:16, Mr '27 

Banana Bill; story, Ladies H J, 46:16, My '29 

Bells of Culiacan; story, Good H, 84:34, My '27 

Blackboard vs. blue eyes; story, Good H, 100:44-7, Mr '35 

Bluebeard and the Spanish witch; story, Good H, 95:58, D '32 

Boat in the stream; story, Good H, 74:15, F '22 

But once an emperor; story, Ladies H J, 40:10, My '23 

Coyote who talked with god; story, Good H, 77:30, D '23 

Don Constanzio Dores! ; story, Colliers, 86:10, 18 "30 

Dragon conies; story, Good H, 97:24, O '33 

Flower of gold ; story, Ladies' H J, 41 :io, F '24 

Flute; story, Good H, 73:47, D '21 

Forgotten firefly; story, Ladies H J, 47:18, Mr '30 

Glorious buccaneer; story, Colliers, 86:14, D 27 '30 

Gold afar; story, Good H, 90:48, Ja '30 

Golden chairs; story, Good H, 98:28, Mr '34 

Gypsy road; story, Delin, no:io, My '27 

In memory of the loan; story, Good H, 76:72, F '23 

Jewels of Qu'apelle; story, Colliers, 77:15, Ja 30 '26 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 333 

Jewels of the dead; story, Colliers, 85:20, Ja 18 '30 
Lady of Panama; story, Good H, 97:28, Jl '33 

La Voga, meaning of the deep wound; story, Good H, 96:26-9, Ap '33 
Laughing pirate; story, Good H, 97:46, D '33 
Lion's daughter; story, Colliers' 91:15, F 4 '33 
Lost little song of Chang Hao ; story, Ladies H J, 43:16, O '26 
Madonna of the mesa; story, Colliers, 76:3, D 19 '25 
Man who didn't want to be a pirate ; story, Good H, 99 46-9, Jl '34 
Playground or prison; Good H, 98:44-5, F '34 
Queen of pearls; story, Colliers, 88:20, Ag 29 '31 
Red palanquin, The; story, Asia, 24:697, S '24 
Reformer; story, Sunset, 54:30, My '25 

Revenge and what comes after; story, Good H, 81 :24, Ag '25 
Room of the golden lovers; story, Colliers, 79:24, Mr 19 '27 
Shameless pearls; story, Ladies H J, 44:10, Mr '27 
Something for nothing; story, Colliers, 88:14, 10 '31 
Starlight and fireside; story, Good H, 100:40-3, Ja '35 
Totem of Amarillo ; story, Good H, 76 .'84, Ap '23 
Two ladies of Hau ; story, Ladies H J, 43 :6, Mr '26 
Voice of the silver bells, The ; story, Asia, 25 :665, Ag '25 
White stallion; story, Am M, 112:27, D '31 

Staab, Lonna Powell (O) ; Rare lace; poem, F & M, 16:121, winter '36 
Stage station; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Stage to Lordsburg ; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Stahlberg, John (M) 

Desert Christmas; F & M, 17:1, winter '37 
Good Christmas; F & M, 19:73, winter '38 
Lone Wolf; poem, F & M, 18:10, autumn '37 
Stampede, 1936 model; Bechdolt, Frederick Ritchie 
Star, The ; poem, Lister, Queene B. 
Star dust path ; Clements, Colin Campbell 
Star in the sky; story, Babson, Naomi Lane 
Starlight and fireside ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Starlight rider; novel, Haycox, Ernest 
Steel sings the blues ; Stevens, James 
Steel-strike war; Holbrook, Stewart 
*Stevens, James (W) 

Boy in Idaho; story, Am Merc, 4:480-8, Ap '35 

Break, The; story, F & M, 16:95-100, winter '36 

Bulldogger; story, Scholastic, 30:3-5, F 20 '37 

Conservatives in overalls; Sat Eve Post, 201:49, S 22 '28 

Detroit the dynamic; Am Merc, 36:285-91, N '35 

Dismal sauger ; story, Am Merc, 8 :302~7, F '25 

Downfall of Elder Barton; story, Am Merc, 24:461-71, D '31 

Fightin* mad; story, Am Merc. 112:20-3, D '31 

Four months on a freighter; F & M, 10:50-2, N '29 

Great hunter of the woods, The ; story, F & M, n 1129, Ja '31 

Hellion; story, Colliers, 82:5-6, D 29 '28 

Lobo's apology, The; Cent, 109:464-72, F '25 

Horses; story, Am Merc, 7:458-65, Ap '26 

Idaho; Sunset, 60:22-5, Mr '28 

Indiana's magnificent McNutt; Am Merc, 41:430-7, Ag '37 

Iron man of Saginaw; story, Am Merc, 21:484-92, D '30 

Laborers east and west; Sat Eve Post, 197:18, D 6 '24 

Laborer's lunch; Sat Eve Post, 197:1?, D 6 '^4 

Love affair; story, Am Merc, 6:161-6, O '25 

Man and a half; story, Am Merc, 115:71-4, My '33 



334 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Medicine men ; Am Merc, 28 ^.87-97, Ap '33 

More work for uplifters; Am Merc, 31:347-52, N '24 

Natural history of Seattle; Am Merc, 27:402-9, D '32 

New Northwest; Sunset, 56:12-15, Je '26 

Northwest takes to poesy; Arn Merc, 16:64-70, Ja '29 

Old home camp; story, Golden Bk, 19:679-88, Je '34 

Partners in Eden; story, Am Merc, 35:324-31, Jl '35 

Passing of the timber beast, The ; F & M, 9 :92-8, Ja '29 

Portland, Athens of the west; Am Merc, 37:344-50, Mr '36 

Prairie town; Am Merc, 6:99-106, S '25 

Romantic road, The; F & M, 9:19-21, N '28 

Romantic sailor, The; story, F & M, 8:301-4, My '28 

Royal raiment; Sat Eve Post, 197:23, Mr 7 '25 

Saloon days; Am Merc, 1 1:264-75, Jl '27 

San Francisco disturbance; Am Merc, 46:329-34, Mr '39 

Sober workingmen; Sat Eve Post, 198:38, Ja 16 '26 

Sourdough drive; story, Golden Bk, 19:630-40, My '34 

Spiked fists; story, Am Merc, 115:28-30, Ja '33 

Steel sings the blues; Am Merc, 40:59-66, Ja '37 

Tormented men; Sat Eve Post, 197:22, N i '24 

Jonah; story, Colliers, 93:22, Ap 14 '34 

Jungle war; story, Colliers, 99:31, Ja 30 '37 

Long patrol; story, Sat Eve Post, 209:18-19, Ag 29 '36 

Lucky man; story, Colliers, 99:22, Ja 23 '37 

Master ; story, Colliers, 105 :2o, Je i '40 

Masters of the craft; story, Colliers, 89:30, Ja 2 '32 

Napoleon of the sea; story, Colliers, 95:18-19, Ap 20 '35 

Narrow channel; story, Colliers, 94:14-15, S 29 '34 

Not in the specifications; story, Sat Eve Post, 205:10-11, O 29 '32 

Nothing but a ghost; story, Colliers, 84:30-2, S 14 '29 

Old Ironface; story, Colliers, 103:22-3, je 17 '39 

On the beach; story, Colliers, 86:7-9, Ag 23 '30 

One man road; story, Colliers, 103:17, My 27 '39 

Once upon a time; story, Colliers, 92:14-15, Jl 8 '33 

Over the reef; story, Colliers, 103:12-13, Mr 25 '39 

Pointing bone; story, Sat Eve Post, 210:14-15, F 26 '38 

Salute for a sailor; story, Colliers, 96:i4-i<;, Ag 31 '35 

Sea drift; story, Sat Eve Post, 210:18-19, Ag 28 '37 

Song of Larnock; story, Sat Eve Post, 211:12-13, Ap 22 '39 

Stevens takes command; story, Colliers, 91:12-13, Ja 21 '33 

Sweet music; story, Colliers, 102:15, O 29 '38 

Ten matched pearls; story, Colliers, 91:22, Ap 8 '33 

There was a girl ; poem, F & M, 9:91, Ja '29 

There were giants; story, Sat Eve Post, 202:10-11, My 3 '30 

Trapped; story, Colliers, 96:42, S 14 '35 

Water is where you find it; story, Sat Eve Post, 211:20-1, O 8 '38 

While the world paused: story, Woman's H C, 57:15-17, N '30 

Uplift on the frontier; Am Merc. 1:413-18, Ap '24 

When rivers were young and wild; story, Woman's H C, 58:26-7, Jl '31 

Why poker was invented; story, Am Merc, 15:129-28, O '38 
*Stevenson, Elmo Nail (O) 

Badgered; Nature M, 24:40-1, Jl '34 

Case of Reddy; Nature M, 27:140-2, Mr '^6 

Children's nature interests: .Elementary School Journal, 32:276-84, D '31 
Stevens takes command ; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
*Stewart, George R., Jr. (I) 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 335 

*Stewart, George (I) 

Is Protestantism dying in Europe?; Cur Hist M, N Y Times, 23:171-7, N '25 
Post-war oppression of German sects in foreign countries ; Cur Hist M, N Y 

Times, 24:4.3-7, Ap '26 

Church challenges youth; Scrib M, 100:150-3, S '36 

Prayer at the services for Henry Cushing, Poem; Hygiea, 18:217, Mr '40 
Stewart, Mary (M) 

Both sides of Election day; Good H, 71:60, N '20 
Federation's collect; Ind Woman, 14:1, Ja '35 
How an employer should behave; Good H, 106:34, Ja '38 
Junior employment problems; Nat Conf Soc Work, '21 
Little gay heart of me; poem, Good H, 73:74, Ag '21 
Lost children; poem, Good H, 72:54, Je '21 
New politics; Good H, 71:79, Jl '20 
Who is they; poem, Ind Woman, 17:320, O '38 
St. Louis Blues ; story, Sherman, Richard 

Stocking the china closet when space is limited ; Thompson, Margaret 
Stocking the modern linen closet; Thompson, Margaret, and Ferry, Christine 
Stone Breaker; poem, Beynon, Merle 
Stone breaker; poem, Bright, Verne 
Stone country ; poem, Bright, Verne 
Stone, Jack (M) 

Alone; story, F & M, 22:148, N '21 
Autumn ; poem, F & M, 22:21-195, Mr '22 
Christian, A; story, F & M, 2:196, Mr '22 
Commemoration ; poem, F & M, 3 :i2, N '22 
Elegy J poem, F & M, 1:2 :59, N '20 
Forget; poem, F & M, 3:1:3, N '22 
Four walls of Rotting logs; poem, F & M, 1:4:117, My '21 
Letter Chicago; F & M, 4:2:32, Mr '24 
Moonlight ; poem, F & M, i '.3 :7O, F '21 
Pioneers; poem, F & M, 2:1:35, N J 2i 
Reverie; poem, F & M, 2:2:173, Mr '22 
To a barbed wire fence ; poem, F & M, i :3 70, F J 2i 

Stork expected at Point Barrow; Forrest, Elizabeth Chabot (Mrs. Earle Forrest) 
Storm, The; story, Struckman, Robert Tod 
Story makin's ; story, Frazier, Neta Lohnes 
Story of Montana ; Connolly, Christopher P. 
*Strahan, Mrs. Kay Cleaver (O) 

Footprints; novel, Delineator, 113:10-11, O 26-7, N 22-4, D '28; 114:32-3. 

Ja '35, F '29 

Stranded Blooms ; Elrod, Morton John 
Strange City ; poem, Bright, Verne 
Strange passage ; poem, Aiken, Mrs. Lulu Piper 
Stranger; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Stranger came to port ; story, Miller, Max 
Stranger from the ridges ; poem, Bundrant, Wm. 

Strangled witness; story, Brown, Zenith Jones (David Frome; Leslie Ford) 
Strategic retreat ; poem, Braley, Berton 
Streit's vision ; Streit, Clarence K. 
Streit, Clarence K. (M) 

Atlantic union plan and the Americas; Ann Am Acad, 204:93, Jl '39 

Calligraphy of the Moslems; Int Studio, 81 :346, Ag '25 

Far eastern war in Geneva; Asia, 33:78, F '33 

League of nations assembly in action ; Cur Hist, 33:557, Ja '31 

League's defenders make answer; Int Council, 298-83, Mr '34 

Shall we have union now?; Forum, 102:28, Jl '39 



336 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Streit's vision; Fortune, 19:66, Ap '39; Read Digest, 34:99, Je '39 

Union now or never; Liv Age, 357:318, D '39 
Striker, Bechdolt, Frederick Ritchie 
Stride on the desert; poem, Macleod, Norman 
Struckrnan, Robert Tod (M) 

Act of faith; Household M, Ap '34 

Children's Crusade; F & M, 15:59-61, Ag '34 

Earth bound rock ; Household M, F '34 

F. B. Linderman; NW Lit Review, My '35 

A girl would be free; Household M, Ap '33 

Good shepherd; F & M, 9:211-14, Mr '29 

Honey-colored hair; household M, O '35; Fiction Parade & Golden Bk, '35 

Hunter, The; story, Household M, Je '31 

Night of the pig; Esquire, O '35 

Poor people; F & M, 12:313-14, My '32 

Something extra for midnight ; Household M, F '36 

Storm, The; story, Household M, Ap '32 

Sun dance; F & M, 14:310-16, My '34 

Tantrum; Little Magazine, D '33 

Train, The; story, F & M, n :34*-42, My '31 
Struggle, The ; McAllister, Adalouie 
Sturgeon, The; poem, Goodpasture, G. Frank 
Subway; poem, Macleod, Norman 
Successful woman, A; poem, Needham, Anne Crosswell 
Sucker trick; story, Pierce, Frank Richardson (pseud., Seth Ranger) 
Sudden shower; story, Sherman, Richard 
Sudweeks, Leslie L. (I) 

Battle of bear river, The; Seeing Idaho, 1:36-37, My '37 

On the road to Oregon; story, Seeing Idaho, 1:21-22-23, O '37 

Romance and sagebrush; story, Seeing Idaho, 1:36-37, My '37 
Sufficient unto the day is the propaganda thereof ; Laird, Charlton G. 
Sugar weather ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Suggestion; poem, Linderman, Wilda 
Summer; poem, Hedges, Ada Hastings 
Summer on a Montana ranch, A; Rowse, Doris 
Sun; poem, Littell, Lydia 
Sun bath; poem, Abbott, N. C. 
Sun dance ; story, Struckrnan, Robert Tod 
Sun dog; story, Eunson, Dale 
Sundown Jim; novel, Haycox, Ernest 
Sun gone down. The; poem, Fargo, Idarislt Scofield 
Sunlight-moonlight; Frohlicher, Eugenie E. 
Superspecial ; story, Jones, Nard 
Sutor; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Swartz, Elsa E. (M) 

Desolate ; poem, F & M, 9 :2oo, Mr '29 

Master, The; poem, F & M, 5:39, Mr '25 
Sweet is the prairie ; poem, McNickle, D'Arcy 
*Sweetman, Luke D. (M) 

Early day horse trailing; F & M, 10:143, Ja '30 

Last of the northern buffalo, The; F & M, 12:144, Ja '32 

Laying the iron trail in the northwest ; F & M, 9 :347, My '29 
Sweet music; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Syringa; poem, Woodward, Amy 

Tales that dead men tell ; Bradley, John Hodgdon 
Tall tales ; Lay, Marion 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 337 

Tamed; poem, Weister, Alice 

Tantrum ; story, Struckman, Robert Tod 

Tap-dancer's husband ; story, Fitzgerald, Brassil 

Tax-dodgers on parade ; Lindley, Ernest Kidder 

Taxi driver 63 ; story, Chase, Mary Ellen 

Team bells woke me ; story, Davis, Harold L. 

Tears ; poem, O'Donnell, Alicia 

Ten matched pearls; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

Ten years' growth in China ; Drury, Clifford Merrill 

Testament of love ; poem, Wurdemann, Audrey 

Thad ; poem, Lister, Queene B. 

Thane, Eric; pseud. (M) (Henry, Ralph) 

Dark Retreat; story, F & M, 18:73, winter '37 

Shelby picks a fight; Am Merc, 46:463-7, Ap '39 

Water hole; story, F & M, 19:95, winter '38 
Thanksgiving ; poem, Woodward, Amy Temple 
Thank you ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Thank you, God ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
That fine place we had last year; story, Lull, Roderick 

That rare old sport called snipe hunting; story, Haroldsen-Lovell, Edith Ann 
That strange thing called fascination ; Haskin, Leslie Loren 
Their own lights ; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Then April; poem, Hedges, Ada Hastings 
There are night and day, brother; story, Hancock, Alice Passano 
There he blows ; story, Wylie, Philip 
There is a happy hunting ground ; Merrill, Harrison R. 
There is something; poem, Maclay, Sallie Sinclair 
There's gold in them frills; Fulton, Eb 
There's hope to squander; poem, Erkkila, Ernest 
There was a girl ; poem, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
There were giants; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Thespian of the garden ; Lampman, Ben Hur 
They also serve ; poem, Aiken, Mrs, Lulu Piper 
They dwelt on the Sixes river ; story, Corning, Howard McKinley 
They last so long; story, Hedrick, Mrs. Helen 
They love Roosevelt ; Neuberger, Richard L. 
They will never die ; story, Hurst, Samuel Bertram Hawerts 
Things that cannot fail ; Monroe, Anne Shannon 
Third degree; story, Am Merc, 38:207-12, Je '36 
Thirty years gathering; story, James, Will 
This is where she sleeps ; story, Sherman, Richard 
This gardening business ; Lampman, Ben Hur 
This is my love song; story, Hawkins, John 
This is the death; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 
This time of year ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
This woman and this man ; story, Haycox, Ernest 
This youth bewildered ; Scheffer, John 
*Thomas, E. H. (W) 

Custom of the country; story, Overland n.s., 83:56-8, F '25 

Naming of the Northwest; Overland n.s., 83:109-10, Mr .25 
Thompson, Lloyd S. (M) 

Anhedonia ; poem, F & M, 6:134, Mr '26 

Characters; F & M, 1:119, My J 2i 

College spirit and patriotism; F & M, 1:90, F '21 

Ego and his Oron, The ; story, F & M, 5 174, My '25 

If I should go; poem, F & M, 2:199, Mr '22 

You are returning; poem, F & M, i :io, F '21 



338 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

*Thompson, Margaret (O) 

Dressing tables and their appointments; House B, 70:123-6 Ag '31 
Fillips for the winter's entertaining; House B, 74:129-31, O '33 
Pleasure trip ; story, Good H, 108 ^4-5, Je '39 

Stocking the china closet when space is limited; House B, 73:264-5, Je '33 
*Thompson, Margaret, and Ferry, Christine (O) 

Ceremony of after-dinner coffee; House B, 74:264-5, D '33 
Bridge table appurtenances; House B, 67:464-5, Ap '30 
Candlesticks and candles; House B, 68:474-5, N '30 
Decoration extends to the closet; House B, 68:124-5, Ag '30 
Indispensable table; House B, 70:205-8, S '31 
Lamps in the decorative scheme; House B, 69:36-8, Ja '31 
Luncheon table adopts covers of lacy loveliness; House B, 69:362-3, Ap '31 
Making the out-of-door repast a gay adventure; House B, 68:34-5, Jl '30 
Metamorphosis of the slip cover; House B, 67:741-3, Je '30 
Mirrors past and present; House B, 68:360-1, O '30 
Pictures in decoration ; House B, 68 :228~9, S '30 
Planning the bride's table linen; Ladies H J, 46:118-20, Ap '29 
Problems in curtaining the window; House B, 69:522-5, My '31 
Right objects for the mantel shelf; House B, 69:135-7, F '31 
Stocking the modern linen closet; House B, 66:418-19, O '29 
Trays and their appointments ; House B, 66 :282-3, S '29 
Your dining table ; House B, 65 :628~3o, My '29 
Boys as mother-helpers; Parent's M, 14:24, Ag '39 
Buffet entertaining; House B, 74:200-2, N '33 
Thompson, Cardwell (M) 

Abbess of the Shaven Path, The; story, F & M, 4:121, Mr '24 
Antichrist; story, F & M, 4:90, N '23 
Comedy; F & M, 4:130, Mr '24 
Thornton, Marion (W) ; The Blind commander; story, Colliers, 88:12-13, O 3 '31 

Thoroughbred pulls through ; story, Atwater, Montgomery 

Thorpe, Iris Lora(O) 

Ascent to vision; poem, F & M, 19:231, summer '39 

By this last fire; poem, F & M, 17:24, autumn '36 

Mystery of twilight; poem, Overland n.s., 88:277, S '30 

Pilgrimage into summer; poem, F & M, 15:269, summer '35 

Sky wisdom; poem, Overland n.s., 88:213, Jl '30 

Trails to the grey emperors; poem, F & M, 18:152, spring '38 

Water chanson; poem, F & M, 15:40, autumn '34 

Three Amerindian poems; poems, Bolles, Jason (H. J.) 

Three bright pebbles; Brown, Zenith Jones (David Frome; Leslie Ford) 

Three hells; a comparative study; Davis, Harold L. 

Three poems; poems, Bright, Verne 

Three poems: Bars may tire; Uncovered; An invitation; Goodpasture, G. Frank 

Three rebels ; story, Bretherton, Vivien R. 

Threshold; poem, Olsen, Chas. Oluf 

Thrifty soul ; poem, Smith, Bess Foster 

Through a homesteader's window ; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 

Through the park ; story, Wylie, Philip 

Thunder over the Sawtooths ; Erickson, Kenneth L. 

Ticket to Samarkand ; story, Bretherton, Vivien R. 

Tide of the thirteenth ; story, Fulton, Reed 

Time of the year ; poems, Macleod, Norman 

Times and places ; White, Phillip 

Tintagel; poem, Bolles, Jason (H. J.) 

To ; poem, Doerr, Mary Elizabeth 

To a barbed wire fence ; poem, Stone, Jack 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 339 

To a girl poet; poem, Maring, Helen 

To an old farmer, plowing; Murphy, Dennis 

To a poet ; June ; poems, Pratt, Laurence 

To a young man ; poem, Markham, Edwin 

To be a great man ; story, Corning, Howard McKinley 

To comanche, a cow pony ; poem, Needham, Anne Cromwell 

Today; poem, Dahlberg, D'Arcy 

Today on the Yukon Trail of 1898; Burg, Amos 

To him who hath; story, Hayes, Anna Hansen 

Tolstoy saga ; Goldenweiser, Alexander A. 

Tomato boats and rebels ; Shannon, Monica 

To Nina ; poem, Black, Laurena A. 

Tony ! ; Lincoln, Elliott C. 

Tony and Marcia ; story, Hartwick, Mrs. Mary Hesse 

To one from home ; poem, Prentiss, Ruth Eliot 

Tormented men; Stevens, James 

Totem of Amarillo ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 

To the heart; Hemlock draught; poems, Olsen, Chas. Oluf 

To the limit ; story, Haycox, Ernest 

To the Marble Faun ; poem, Doerr, Mary Elizabeth 

To the vigilantes ; poem, Crandell, Richard F. 

Toward every stranger ; Monroe, Anne Shannon 

Toward Nazareth; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Toward the mountain ; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 

To wheat; poem, Woodward, Amy 

Town cries murder; novel, Brown, Zenith Jones (David Frorae; Leslie Ford) 

Town in eastern Oregon ; Davis, Harold L. 

Townsend plan exposed ; Neuberger, Richard L. 

Townsend racket, new phase ; Neuberger, Richard L. 

To write ; poem, Armour, William K. 

Tracey, Paul E. (O) 

Bed tarp; poem, F & M, 14:48, N '33 

Circuit rider; poem, F & M, 13:92, N '32 

Cold; poem, Poetry, 39:306, Mr '32 

Goat girl; poem, F & M, 19:223, summer '39 

Horned toad; poem, F & M, 10:331, My '30 

Horsemeat; poem, F & M, 11:73, N '30 

How to ride a broncho; F & M, 10:237-8, Mr '30 

Linesman; poem, F & M, 12:328, My '32 

Pioneer on esthetics, The; F & M, 11:269, Mr '31 

Plumber; poem, Poetry, 35:30, O '29 

Road gang; Father; poems, Poetry, 42:18-19, Ap '33 

Scarf ace Charley; poem, F & M, 10:142, Ja '30 

Westerners; poem, F & M, n :376, My '31 
Tradition; story, Colliers, 94:10-11, S '34 
Trail; poem, Baldwin, Grace D. 
Trail of the painted parks ; Phillips, Paul C. 
Trail of the sunset ; poem, Macleod, Norman 
Trail Riding; poem, Guthrie, A. Bertram 
Trails; poem, Hogan, Steve 
Trail smoke; novel, Haycox, Ernest 
Trails to the grey emperors ; poem, Thorpe, Iris Lora 
Train, The ; story, Struckman, Robert Tod 
Training the cut-throat competitor ; Whicker, Harold W. 
Train time; story, McNickle, D'Arcy 
Transformation ; poem, Olsen, Chas. Oluf 
Transplanted ; poem, Hansen, Eleanor 



340 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Trapped; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

Trays and their appointments; Thompson, Margaret, and Ferry, Christine 

Treasure hunt; Haroldsen-Lovell, Edith Ann 

Trees; poem, Grissom, Irene Welch 

Trees of heaven ; story, Coates, Grace Stone 

Trial at Los Angeles ; Connolly, Christopher P. 

Trial of Mark Adams; story, Wylie, Philip 

Trilliums ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Triolet; O'Donnell, Alicia 

Triumph; poem, Maring, Helen 

Trouble in the tall timber ; Neuberger, Richard L. 

Trouble shooter; Haycox, Ernest 

Two old timers ; story, James, Will 

Two poems: Soapy and Frank, and how they died; Lost ladies of Skagway; 

Skavlan, Margaret 

Two poems : Tongues ; Age ; Lee, Borghild 
Two sonnets; poem, Murphy, Dennis 
Two worlds; Haycox, Ernest 

Two years of Franklin D. Roosevelt ; Lindley, Ernest Kidder 
Trusler, Margaret (Mrs. V. Fisher) (I) 

I have been building houses; poem, F & M, 14:309, My '34 

Retrospect; poem, F & M, 14:283, summer '35 
Trustee; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Tryout; story, Hawkins, John 
Tsceminicum; poem, Burnie, Donald, pseud. 
Tucker, Pat (M) 

Buffalo in the Judith Basin 1883 (personal experience) ; F&M, 9:227, Mr '29 

Burnt, but not starved (personal experience) ; F & M, 9 :352, My '29 

Long horns; sketch, F & M, 3:282, Mr '31 

Sad story of a high-heeled cow puncher, The; F & M, 10:235, Mr '30 
Tulips ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Tull, Jewell Bothwell (I) 

Abracadabra; poem; Charm; Rite; Sign; Poetry, 34:262-3, Ag '29 

Contrarities ; poem, Poetry, 381:259, Ag '31 

Education; poem, World T, 16:666, D 7 '33 

October; poem, Poetry, 21:22-3, O '22 

Woman in a hurry; poem, Lit Digest, 115:32, Je 17, '33 
*Turnbull, George (0) 

Some of Oregon's early newspapers; F & M, n :385~4oo, My '31 
Turn down man, The ; story, Haines, Merle J. 
Turn of the faucet, A; Murray, Evelyn 
*Twining, Mrs. Frances Staver (O) 

Select next year's tulips now ; Am Home, 8 :i4o, Je '32 

Where rocks and flowers contend for a footing; Am Home, 10:13, Je '33 
Two anecdotes; Linderman, Frank B. 
Two friends ; poem, Moll, Ernest George 
Two Indian poems; Morning song; Ya-Ihl's song to the north wind (Thlingit) ; 

poems^ Ernst, Mrs. Alice Henson 
Two ladies of Hau ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
Two miners; sketch, White, Phillip 
Two of them; story, Sherman, Richard 

Uncle Sam says uncle; poem, Braley, Berton 
Under trees ; poem, Coates, Grace Stone 
Unhappy endings ; story, Byer, John Reid 
Unhappy fishing ground ; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Union now or never; Streit, Clarence K. 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 341 

Until you see again ; story, Babson, Naomi Lane 

Upham letters trom the upper Missouri 1865 ; Phillips, Paul C. 

Up huckleberry ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Uplift on the frontier ; Stevens, James 

Up-river men; poem, Bright, Verne 

Up stick and run ; story, Hurst, Samuel Bertram Hawerts 

Use what you've got; poem, Braley, Berton 

U. S. lets J apan guess ; Lindley, Ernest Kidder 

Vacation ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Vachel Lindsay enters heaven ; poem, Greund, Otto 

Vagabond; poem, Macleod, Norman 

Vagrancy; poem, Lennstrend, Tesla V. 

Vainglory; poem, Braley, Berton 

Vainglory ; poem, Clapp, Mary Brennan 

Valley of lost men ; drama, Ernst, Mrs. Alice Henson 

Vanishing American male ; Holbrook, Stewart 

Vanishing wolf; story, Davis, Harold L. 

Varmint; poem, Lincoln, Elliott C. 

Vesta ; poem, Mallory, Sarah Trousdale 

Views ; poem, Guthric, A. Bertram 

Vine maple; poem, Goodpasture, G. Frank 

Virginia City; 1864 (two letters) ; McLemore, Clyde, ed. 

Vision; poem, Lennstrend, Tesla V. 

Visitin' ; poem, Lincoln, Elliott C. 

Visiting fire eater ; story, Wylie, Philip 

Visitor ; poem, Lincoln, Elliott C. 

Visitor in night; story, Brown, Zenith Jones (David Frome; Leslie Ford) 

Visits of Literary men and women ; Cox, Sidney Hayes 

Voice from the wilderness ; Bradley, John Hodgdon 

Voice of the silver bells, The ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 

Vontver, May (M) 

Kiskis, The ; story, F & M, 9 1220, Mr '29 

Oil fields people ; sketch, F & M, 9 143, N '28 

Ranch women; story, F & M, 10:232, Mr '30 

Silence; sketch, F & M, 9:295, My '29 

*Wagner, Glendolin (Mrs. Michael Wagner) (M) 

Navajo; F & M, '34-^35 

Old man coyote; F & M, '33-' 34 
Waif; story, Sherman, Richard 
Waiting room; story, Hancock, Alice Passano 
Wake, The; poem, Hogan, Steve 
Walker, Mildred ; see also Schemm, Mildred Walker 
*Walker, Mildred (Mrs. F. R. Schemm) (M) 

Comfort me with apples; Am M, A '34 
Walking my baby back home ; Macleod, Norman 
Walk with, lad ! ; Monroe, Anne Shannon 
Wall street under the New Deal ; Lindley, .Ernst Kidder 
Warp and Woof ; story, Allen, Sally E. 
War industries board, The ; Kester, Randall B. 
War on the brain trusts ; Lindley, Ernst Kidder 
Waste no words; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Water; poem, Allen, Eleanor 
Water chanson; poem, Thorpe, Iris Lora 
Waterfall ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Water hole; story, Thane, Eric 



342 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Water is where you find it; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 

Water on the wheat ; Davis, Harold L. 

Way of the transgressor, The ; story, Coates, Grace Stone 

We ain't lazy, we're dreaming; poem, Macleod, Norman 

Weed pasture ; poem, Howe, Lucy 

We go fast ; story, Welch, Douglas 

We have been young; story, Babson, Naomi Lane 

Weight of command ; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Weister, Alice (O) 

Tamed; poem, Overland n.s., 87:245, Ag '29 

Western hill, The ; poem, F & M, 9 1234, Mr '29 
Welch, Douglas (W) 

Better dress; Sat Eve Post, 209:110, D 12 '36 

Boiled onion racket; Sat Eve Post, 207:31, D 8 '34 

Brand new woman; story, Am M, 125:44-7, My '3$ 

Mrs. Union station; story, Sat Eve Post, 210:8-9, D 25 '37 

Photo finish; story, Sat Eve Post, 211:10-11, Ap i '39 

Rolling stones; story, Am M, 127:38-41, Je '39 

We go fast; story, Sat Eve Post, 211:12-13, F u '39 
Well-named devil's club ; Phillips, Walter Shelley 
West of romance ; story, McLean, Margharite Fisher 
West, Richard (M) 

Hunger; sketch, F & M, 9:232, Mr '29 

Killer, The; sketch, F & M, 9:231, Mr '29 
Westerners ; poem, Tracey, Paul E. 
Western hill, The ; poem, Weister, Alice 
West wind ; poem, Pratt, Laurence 
We thank you all the time ; poem, Macleod, Norman 
We, the living ; story, Call, Mrs. Hughie Florence 
* Wetjen, Albert Richard (O) 

According to plan; story, Colliers, 95:14-15, Je 22 '35 

All over again; story, Colliers, 97:17, D 9 '33 

Another gold band; story, Colliers, 95:20, Mr 23 '35 

At cinders lake; story, Colliers, 92:22-4, D 30 '33 

Baldy Bill takes a wife; story, Sat Eve Post, 211:18-19, Ja 28 '39 

Between enemies; story, Colliers, 94:14-15, S 22 '34 

Blessed isle; story, Am M, 119:32-4, Mr '35 

Blow the lawyer down; story, Sat Eve Post, 209:10-11, F 27 '37 

Boy who had a hero; story, Colliers, 97:45-6, F 29 '36 

Captain Belson's mate; story, Colliers, 91:7-8; Je 17 '33 

Chief of the Loch McCree; story, Colliers, 83:15-16, F 16 '29 

Consistent man; story, Sat Eve Post, 208:18-19, N 16 '35 

Disinherited; story, Colliers, 101:12-13, F 19 '38 

Drums on the wind; story, Colliers, 100:16, Jl 17, '37 

Error; story, Sat Eve Post, 203:8-9, Ja 24 '31 

Family affair; story, Sat Eve Post, 203:8-9, My 16 '31 

For my lady; Colliers, 90:18-20, Jl 30 '32; Golden Book, 22:225-32, Ag '35; 
Scholastic, 24:4-6, Mr 3 '34 

Fortitude; story, Sat Eve Post, 202:10-11 ; Ja 18 '30 

Gambler's luck; story, Sat Eve Post, 213:18-19, Ag 3 '40 

Heresy; story, F & M, 10:23-8, N '29 

Hero; story, Colliers, 90:12-13, N 19 '32 

Hero number three; story, Colliers, 91:14-15, Ap i '33 

In full corroboree ; story, Sat Eve Post, 209 :22-3, Ap 10 '37 

In gun smoke; story, Colliers, 98:54, S 26 '36 

In the king's hut; story, Colliers, 92:17, Jl 22 '33 

I only know; poem, F & M, 13:279, My '33 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 343 

Iron touch; story, Colliers, 101:23, Ap 2 '38 

Sutor; story, F & M, 14:49, N '33 

With the cape mail; story, Colliers, 91 17-9, Mr 18 '33 
We want daddies ; Monroe, Anne Shannon 
We will meet again ; Hawkins, John 
Whale; Forrest, Elizabeth Chabot (Mrs. Earle Forrest) 
Whale of a bargain ; story, Case, Robert Ormond 

What do you expect for your daughter from college ; Chase, Mary Ellen 
What fools these mortals be ; Peek, TateW. 

What the home folks say about events abroad ; Neuberger, Richard L. 
What is our greatness ? ; poem, Markham, Edwin 
What love is ; story, Babson, Naomi Lane 
What makes a champion? ; poem, Braley, Berton 
What my brief experience with roses has taught me ; Maxwell, Ben 
What our position should be ; Borah, William Edgar 
What's a man to do ? ; story, Ripley, Clements, Mrs. 
Wheat ripens ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Wheeler faces the music ; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Wheeler of Montana ; Neuberger, Richard L. 
When the railroad comes; poem, Grissom, Irene Welch 
When rivers were young and wild ; story, Stevens, James 
When wages are low ; story, James, Will 
When you carry the star ; story, Haycox, Ernest 
When wild geese depart; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Where rocks and flowers contend for a footing; Twining, Mrs. Frances Staver 
Where-to-go-man ; story, Lay, Marion 
Wherever the road forked ; poem, Mueller, Dorothy 
Whicker, Harold W. (W) 

Cauliflower ears; No Am, 234:19-26, Je '32 

Doctors of dullness; No Am, 228:115-19, Jl '29 

Growing up to play; No Am, 235:465-71, My '33 

Holiday on Parnassus; No Am, 238:367-75, O '34 

Nez Perce honest; No Am, 236:154-62, Ag '33 

Our critical renaissance; No Am, 234:335-42, O '32 

Our palingenesis of talk; No Am, 239:37-42, Ja '35 

Racketing in Parnassus; No Am, 235:529-36, Je '33 

Spirit of the game; Scrib M, 85:217-20, F '29 

Training the cutthroat competitor; No Am, 236:271-8, S '33 

Why amateurs?; No Am, 233:300-5, Ap '32 
While the world paused; story, Wetjen, Albert Richard 
Whistling Bill; story, Rowse, Doris 
White, Hal S. (M) 

Certainty ; poem, F & M, 3 :2 =37, Mr '23 

Lament for 49ers; F & M, 14:120, Ja '34 

Fog; poem, F & M, 4:2:131, Mr '24 

Seasons, The; poem, F & M, 1:3:64, F '21 

Times and places ; F & M, i :i :53, My '22 

Two miners ; sketch, F & M, 2 :3 :207, My '22 
White stallion ; story, Squier, Emma Lindsay 
White-water men; Holbrook, Stewart 
Whither political parties ; Lindley, Ernest Kidder 
Who are the associated farmers?; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Who is behind Ballinger? ; Connolly, Christopher P. 
Who is they ; poem, Stewart, Mary 
Who knows a mountain ? ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Who's laughing now? ; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Why amateurs? ; Whicker, Harold W. 



344 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Why climb a mountain ? ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Why don't you plant a hedgerow instead of just a hedge? ; Gatke, Robert Moulton 

Why journalism re-searches; Housman, Robert L. 

Why must I write a book report ; poem, Cromwell, Anne 

Why my God wears a pitying smile ; Cox, Sidney Hayes 

Why poker was invented ; story, Stevens, James 

Wild Bill; story, Bell, Ralph 

Wild ducks; poem, Baldwin, Grace D. 

Wild enough; story, Haycox, Ernest 

Wild flower gardens; Sherrard, S. Drew (Bennett) (Mrs. Thomas Herrick 
Sherrard) 

Wild headlight; story, Davis, Harold JL. 

Wild honey; story, Coates, Grace Stone 

Wild horse; story, James, Will 

Wild horses and hard men ; Hosmer, Paul 

Wild horse roundup, The; Gosse, Eva Ellis 

Wild horse siding; story, Davis, Harold L. 

Wild Irish ; poem, Frochlicher, John C. 

Wild plums ; story, Coates, Grace Stone 

Wild pride ; story, Alexander, Charles 

Wiley, Naomi E. Lee (M) 

Apres avoir entendu une voix cherie ; poem, F & M, 9 1240, Mr '29 
Ship-world; poem, F & M, 10:217, Mr '30 

Willamette portage ; poem, Corning, Howard McKinley 

^Williamson, Thames Ross (I) , 

Are publishers feeble-minded?; Bookman, 75:669-74, N '32 

Will of Thomas Taber, a ballad of Quaker hill ; poem, Braley, Berton 

Willow weaver ; poem, Lister, Queene B. 

Willow whistle ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Will the United States gain by recognizing Russia ? ; Lindley, Ernest Kidder 

Wilson, Ann (M) 

Burned ; story, F & M, 1 13 71, F '21 
Familiarity; poem, F & M, 2:1:143, N '21 

Wind across the garden ; story, Bretherton, Vivien R. 

Wind at night; poem, O'Donnell, Alicia 

Wind music; poem, Short, Minnie Todd 

Wind's a foolish thing; poem, Crandell, Richard F. 

Windsinger; poem, Macleod, Norman 

Windy fire ; story, Kidd, Walter Evans 

Windy places; Northwest passage; Green councillors; Proud man walks in 
desert; Song to say farewell; poems, Corning, Howard McKinley 

Wingren farm; The farmstead; Annual magic; Spring plowing; Wingren 
water; The fence; Wingren church; Poorhouse road; Haunted house, Stony 
field; Midsummer night; Indian stone-axe; Sheep-herders; Harvest; Autumn 
trees; Apple harvest; The schoolhouse; The day before winter; Hearth fire; 
Silver thaw ; Midwinter night ; poems, Bright, Verne 

Wingren people; April advent; Country Gentlemen; Edom's hill; Strange fruit; 
Earth prisoned; Dark autumn; Summer's end; Early frost; Return; Spanish 
Lady; Joab Starr; Prophet of God; Old mother bric-a-brac; Lament for old 
men ; December solstice ; poems, Bright, Verne 

Wings ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Wings for the dragon ; story, Babson, Naomi Lane 

Wings north ; novel, Case, Robert Ormond 

Winslow, Walker (O) 

By a northern river; poem, F & M, 19:258, summer '39 
High pastures; poem, F & M, 16:113, winter '36 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 345 

Pacific blooms; A flower girl; Three leis for a parting; poems, Poetry, 
46:314-16, S '35 

Wolves; poem, F & M, 15:309, summer '35 
Winter apples; story, Corning, Howard McKinley 
Winter day; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Winter dusk ; poem, Baldwin, Grace D. 
Wintering; sketch, Birkeland, Joran J. 
Winter plowing; poem, Moll, Ernest George 
Winter Mountain ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Winter night; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 

Winter rhymes ; Hills to Christmas ; On frosty nights ; First snow ; Winter sun 
set ; poems, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Winter visitor ; poem, Haste, Gwendolyn 
Witherle's freedom ; story, Comer, Cornelia Atwood Pratt 
Without luck ; story, Hawkins, John 
With the Cape mail ; story, Wetj en, Albert Richard 
With the loggers of the Northwest ; Holbrook, Stewart 
Wit of a rat; Lampman, Ben Hur 
Wolves; poem, Winslow, Walker 

Woman counts her blessings ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Woman homesteader ; poem, Leonard, Lillian T. 
Woman hungry; story, Haycox, Ernest 
Woman in a hurry; poem, Tull, Jewel Bothwell 
Woman's week ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Won't you walk a little faster ; story, Sherman, Richard 
*Wood, Charles Erskine Scott (O) 

Hell's shootin'; No Am, 230:62-70, Jl '30 

Morning comes; poem, Overland n.s., 88:38, F '30 
Wood note; story, Hutchens, John K. 
Woods in winter ; poem, Fuller, Ethel Romig 
Wood smoke; poem, Olsen, Charles Oluf 
* Woodward, Amy Temple (I) 

Autumn time; poem, Library Journal, 59:302, Ap i '34 

Day dreams; story, Library Journal, 59:105, F i '34 

His wife ; poem, Seeing Idaho, i :29, J '38 

New year; poem, Library Journal, 59:8, Ja i '34 

Prospector; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:29, J '38 

Svringa; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:38, Jl '37 

Thanksgiving; poem, Library Journal, 58:967, D i '33 

To wheat; poem, Seeing Idaho, 1:30, S '37 

Yuletide; poem, Library Journal, 58:1029, D 15 '33 
Workless days; Brownell, Helena Maxwell 
World on a silver platter; story, Lull, Roderick 
World population ; Smith, Warren D. 

World's greatest engineering; wonder ; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Worshipping the great medicine ; Marquis, Thomas B. 
Writing for the movies ; Wylie, Philip 
*Wurdemann, Audrey (W) 

Cherry bark; poem, Pict R, 39:17, Mr '38 

Connecticut river; December; poems, Sat R Lit, 17:16, D 4 '37 

Crab; poem, Sat R Lit, 18:13, Jl 2 '38 

Doomed battalion; poem, No Am, 244:273-4, D '37 

In the dark hour; poem, Sat Eve Post, 212:48, Ja 6 '40 

Little black man with a rose in his hat; poem. Sat Eve Post, 213:58, Ag 3 '40 

Marsh cat; poem, Sat R Lit, 22:8, Je 8 '40 

Perspective; poem, Commonweal, 27:96, N 19 '37 



346 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Quiet hour; song for the roebuck; Epithalamium ; poems, Sat Eve Post, 

212:97, Ap 13 '40 

Secret heart; poem, Sat Eve Post, 211:33, My 13 '39 
Testament of love; poem, Sat Eve Post, 211 128, D 24 '38 
Wylie, Philip (W) 

Big ones get away; story, Sat Eve Post, 212:12-13, S 23 '39 
Blowing dust; story, Sat Eve Post, 212:8-9, O 14 '39 
Danger mansion; story, Am M, 124:53-8, D '37 
Death flies east; story, Am M, 118:24-9, Jl '34 
Don't send flowers; story, Colliers, 94:10-11, Jl 7 '34 
Fresh-water mermaid ; story, Sat Eve Post, Mr 23 '40 
Girl who really got kissed; story, Pict R, 38:26-7, O '36 
Hooky line and sinker; story, Sat Eve Post, 211:7-8, Je 24 '39 
Mystery of Galleon Bay; novel, Am M, 119:12-15, Mr '35 
Old crawdad; story, Sat Eve Post, 212:12-13, Ag 19 '39 
Paradise canyon mystery; story, Am M, 122:36-9, Jl '36 
Privacy impossible; story, Delin, 123:11, Ag '23 
Puzzle in snow; story, Am M, 123:11-13, Je '37 
Quitter as a hero; story, Harper, 167:633-6, O '33 
There he blows; story, Sat Eve Post, 212:10-11, N ir '39 
Through the park; story, Pict R, 36:10-11, F '35 
Trial of Mark Adams; story, Am M, 120:32-5, S '35 
Visiting fire eater; story, Sat Eve Post, 212:10-11, D 23 '39 
Writing for the movies; Harper, 167:715-26, N '33 

Years ; story, Hancock, Alice Passano 

Yellow pine; poem, Baldwin, Grace D. 

Yellowstone park ; The sleeping giant ; poem, Kidd, Walter Evans 

Yesterday; story, Clements, Colin Campbell 

Yong Sing ; Linderman, Frank B. 

You all want something; story, Sherman, Richard 

You are returning; poem, Thompson, Lloyd S. 

You don't tell me (oh yes you do) ; poem, Braley, Berton 

You never can tell ; poem, Braley, Berton 

You'll never be lonesome ; story, Byers, John Reid 

*Young, Beatrice (O) 

Do college students read?; Wilson Bull, 6:31-5, S '31 
Young cowboy ; story, James, Will 
Young girl at the piano; poem, Clapp, Mary Brennan 
Young man with two horns ; Neuberger, Richard L. 
Young people are conservative; story, Sherman, Richard 
Young saplings are so eager for the sky ; poem, McDowall, Elsie 
Your dining table ; Thompson, Margaret, and Ferry, Christine 
You're as old as you feel ; story, Sherman, Richard 
You should worry; poem, Braley, Berton 
Yukon winter; Scearce, Stanley 
Yuletide; poem, Woodward, Amy Temple 

Zamboango holiday; story, Hurley, Victor 

Zest of the earth ; story, Jones, Nard 

Zioncheck ; an American tragedy ; Neuberger, Richard L. 



^SELECTED, DESCRIPTIVE LIST OF BOOKS ABOUT THE 
PACIFIC NORTHWEST BY NON-NATIVE OR 

NON-RESIDENT AUTHORS 

BIOGRAPHY 

Alter, J. Cecil; James Bridger; Salt Lake City, Shepard Book Co., 1925. 
Chittenden, H. M., and Richardson, A. T, ; Life, Letters and Travels of Father 

Pierre- Jean de Smet; S. J. New York, 1905. 4 vol. 
Garfield, James A.; James A. Garfield's Diary of a Trip to Montana in 1872 

(reprint from The frontier and Midland,, winter, 1934-5) Holmes, Oliver 

W., editor. 
Gay, Theresa; Life and Letters of Mrs, Jason Lee; Portland, Binfords & Mort, 

1936". (The wife of an early Methodist missionary in Oregon.) 
Gebhard, Elizabeth Louise ; Life and Ventures of the Original John Jacob Astor; 

Hudson, New York, Bryant Printing Co., 1915. 
Godwin, George Stanley; Vancouver, A Life f 1757-1798; New York, D. Appleton 

and Co., 1931. 
Hagedorn, Hermann; Magnate, William Boyce Thompson and His Time; New 

York, John Day and Co., Inc., 1935. (A well-known business man who began 

his life in Montana.) 
Hebard, Grace Raymond; Sacajawea; Glendale, California; Arthur H. Clark 

Co., 1933. 
Hulbert, Archer B. ; Marcus Whitman, Crusader; Colorado Springs, the Stewart 

Commission of Colorado College and the Denver Public Library, 1934. 

(Overland to the Pacific, v. 4.) 
Jacob, John G. ; The Life and Times of Patrick Gass, now sole survivor of the 

overland expedition to the Pacific, under Lewis and Clark in 1804-5 J Wells- 
burg, Virginia, Jacob & Smith, 1859. 
Jacobs, Orange; Memoirs of Orange Jacobs; Seattle, Washington, Lowman & 

Hanford Co., 1908. 
Kane, Paul; Wanderings of an Artist Among the Indians of North America 

from Canada to Vancouver's Island and Oregon through The Hudson's Bay 

Company's territory and back again; The Redisson Society of Canada, Ltd., 

1925- 

Laveille, E.; Life of Father De Smet; S. J. New York, P. J. Kenedy & Sons, 1915. 

Mackenzie, Cecil Walter; Donald Mackenzie, "King of the Northwest"; the 
story of an international hero of the Oregon Country and the Red River 
settlement at Lower Fort Garry (Winnipeg) ; Los Angeles, Ivan Deach, Jr., 

1937- 

Porter, Kenneth Wiggins; John Jacob Astor, Businessman; Cambridge, Massa 
chusetts; Harvard University Press, 1931. 

Quaife, Milo Milton, Ed.; Yellowstone Kelly; the memoirs of Luther S. Kelly; 
New Haven, Yale University Press, 1926. (Experiences of Luther S. Kelly, 
a well-known army scout who saw service around the i87o's in Eastern 
Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado). 

Roosevelt, Theodore; Hunting Trips of a Ranchman; New York & London, 
G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1855. 

Thompson, David; David Thompson's narrative of his explorations in Western 
America, 1784-1812 (edited by J. B. Tyrrell), Toronto, The Champlain 
society, 1916. 

Van de Water, Frederick F. ; Glory-Hunter, the Life of Custer; New York, The 
Bobbs-Merrill Co., 1934. 



*In this list many well-known sources have been omitted owing to their 
inaccessibility. 



348 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Vinton, Stallo; John Colter, Discoverer of Yellowstone Park; New York, E. 

Eberhardt, 1926. 
Walsh, Richard J. ; The Making of Buffalo Bill; Indianapolis & New York, 

G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1904.. 
Wyeth, Nathaniel; Correspondence and Journals of Captain Nathaniel Wyeth, 

1831-6; Eugene, Oregon, University of Oregon, 1899. 

FICTION 
Adams, Andy; The Log of a Cowboy; Boston and New York, Houghton, Mifflin 

Co., 1927. (Covers cattle range from Mexico to Fort Benton, Montana.) 
Atherton, Gertrude; Perch of the Devil; New York, Frederick A. Stokes Co., 

1914. (Story of early Butte.) 
Gabriel, Gilbert Wolf; I, James Lewis; novel; New York, Doubleday, Doran 

and Co., 1932. (Tale of the Astor fur trading expedition to Oregon in 1811.) 
Hoffine, Lyla; White Buffalo, a Children's story of the Northwest fur trade; 

New York, Longman's, Green and Co., 1939. 

Hough, Emerson ; The Covered Wagon; New York, Appleton, 1922. 
Johnson, James William; The Bitterroot Trail; Caldwell, Idaho, The Caxton 

Printers, Ltd., 1935. (Gold rush days in Idaho in 1860.) 
Margaret, Helene; Father De Smet; New York, Farrar & Rinehart, Inc., 1940. 

(Fictionized biography of a famous missionary containing, in addition, much 

general information about pioneer west.) 
Morrow, Honore Willsie; 

On to Oregon! ; New York, William Morrow & Co., 1926. (Story of pioneer 

boy on Oregon Trail.) 
We Must March; New York, William Morrow & Co., 1925. (The story of 

missionary pioneers and the part they played in the winning of Oregon.) 
Raine, William McLeod ; Under Northern Stars; Boston & New York, Houghton, 

Mifflin Co., 1932. (A supposed criminal from Texas meets a Montana girl. 

The usual consequences.) 
Rollins, Phillip Ashton; 

Gone Haywire, two tenderfoots on the Montana cattle range in 1886; New 

York, Scribner's Sons, 1939. ("This story is based largely on personal remi 
niscences, and the writer has distorted facts in only a few particulars.") 
Jinglebob; New York, Charles Scribner's Sons, 1927. (Primarily a boy's story 

of a "real" cowboy.) 
White, Stewart Edward; Long Rifle; Garden City, New York, Doubleday, 

Doran & Co., 1932. (Story of young frontiersman J 

HISTORY AND TRAVEL 
Bancroft, Hubert Howe; 

History of the Northwest Coast; San Francisco, A. L. Bancroft & Co., 1886. 
History of Washington, Idaho, and Montana; San Francisco, The History Co., 

1890. 

Washington, Idaho, and Montana, 1845-1889. 

Birney, Hoffman; Vigilantes; Philadelphia; The Penn Publishing Co., 1922. 
Briggs, Harold E. ; Frontiers of the Northwest; New York, Appleton-Century 

Co., 1940 
Burt, Struthers; Powder River; New York, Farrar & Rinehart, 1939. (Story and 

history of famous river in Eastern Montana and Wyoming.) 

Chittenden, Hiram Martin; The American Fur Trade of the Far West; a his 
tory of the pioneer trading posts and early fur companies of the Missouri 
Valley and the Rocky Mountains and of the overland commerce with Santa 
Fe. New York, F. P. Harper, 1902, 3 vol. 

Cox, Ross; Adventure on the Columbia River; New York, J. J. Harper, 1832. 
Davidson, Levette J., and Bostwick, Prudence (editors) ; The Literature of the 
Rocky Mountain West, 1803-1903; Caldwell, Idaho; The Caxton Printers, 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 349 

Ltd., 1939. (Pioneer anthology in this field including some sixty writers. 

Good reference in biography, history, and travel.) 
Davis, Julia (Mrs. Paul West) ; No Other White Man; New York, Button, 1937. 

(Very readable account of the Lewis and Clark expedition for young people, 

ages 8-12 or older.) 
Deming, Therese; Many Snows Ago; New York, Frederick A. Stokes Co., 1929. 

(Story of Indian life before the coming of white men.) 
Franchere, Gabriel; Narrative of a voyage to the Northwest coast of America; 

New York, Redfield, 1854. 
Freeman, Harry Campbell; A Brief History of Butte, Montana; Chicago, The 

Henry O. Shepard Co., 1900. 
Gass, Patrick ; History of the Expedition under the Command of Lewis and Clark 

to the Sources of the Missouri River, Thence across the Rocky Mountains 

and down the Columbia River to the Pacific Ocean; New York, F. P. 

Harper, 1893. 4 vol. 
Ghent, William James ; The Road to Oregon, A Chronicle of the Great Emigrant 

Trail; London, New York, etc., Longman's, Green & Co., 1929. 
Glasscock, Carl Burgess; The War of the Copper Kings; Indianapolis, New 

York, The Bobbs-Merrill Co., 1935. (Copper-mining in Butte Feud between 

Daly and Clark.) 

Gould, Dorothy Wheaton (Mrs. Carl Frelinghuysen) ; Beyond the Shining Moun 
tains; Portland, Oregon, Binfords & Mort, 1938. (Travel in the Pacific 

Northwest.) 

Griffin, George H.; Legends of the Evergreen Coast; Clark & Stuart, 1935. 
Harlean, James; Romance of the National Parks; New York, Macmillan Co., 

1939. (Glacier and Yellowstone Parks.) 

Hebard, Grace Raymond; History of the Expedition of Lewis and Clark; Glen- 
dale, California, Arthur H. Clark Co., 1933. 
Howard, Bonnie C. ; On the Trail with Lewis and Clark; New York; Silver, 

Burdett Co., 1939. 
Hulbert, Archer B. ; 

The Call of the Columbia; iron men and saints take the Oregon Trail; Colo 
rado Springs, the Stewart commission of Colorado college and the Denver 

Public Library, 1934. (Overland to the Pacific, v. 4.) 
The Oregon Crusade; across Land and Sea to Oregon; Colorado Springs, 

the Stewart commission of Colorado College and the Denver Public Library, 

I 935' (Overland to the Pacific, v. 5.) 
Where Rolls the Oregon; prophet and pessimist look Northwest; Colorado 

Springs, the Stewart commission of Colorado College and the Denver Public 

Library, 1933. (Overland to the Pacific, v. 3.) 
Irving, Washington ; 

The Adventures of Captain Bonneville; New York, G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1868. 
Astoria, or, Anecdotes of an Enterprise Beyond the Rocky Mountains; New 

York, G, P. Putnam's Sons, 1902. 
Jacobs, Melvin Clay; Winning Oregon; a study of an expansionist movement; 

Caldwell, Idaho, the Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1936. 
Joralemon, Ira Beaman ; Romantic Copper; New York, D. Appleton- Century Co,, 

1934. (History of copper mining by an expert engineer. Part deals with 

Butte.) 
Ledyard, John; Journal of Captain Cook's Last Voyage to the Pacific Ocean; 

Hartford, N. Patten, 1783. 
McBride, Robert M.; Trails Through the Golden West (Glacier Park); New 

York, Charles Scribner's Sons, 1932. 
Mecklenburg, George; The Last of the Old West; Washington, D. C,, The 

Capital Book Co., 1927. 

Menzies, Archibald; Journal of Vancouver's Voyage; C. F. Newcombe, 1923. 
Myall, William; Scenic West Travelogue; Boston, The Stratford Co., 1929. 



350 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Ogden, Peter Skene; Traits of American Indian Life and Character; Douglas 

S. Watson, 1933. 

Palladino, Lawrence B. ; Indian and White in the Northwest; Lancaster, Penn 
sylvania, Wickersham Publishing Co., 1922. 

Parkman; Francis; The Oregon Trail; Boston, Little, Brown & Co., 1925. (Ex 
pedition from St. Louis to Fort Laramie and return made in 1846.) 
Patch, Edith M., and Fenton, Carroll L.;Mountain Neighbors; New York, The 
Macmillan Co., 1936. (Animals, birds, and plants of the Rocky Mountains.) 
Putnam, George Palmer; In the Oregon Country; out-doors in Oregon, Wash 
ington, and California, together with some legendary lore, and glimpses of 
the modern west in the making. New York and London, G. P. Putnam's 
Sons, 1915. 

Quiett, Glenn Chesney; 

Pay Dirt; New York, D. Appleton-Century Co., Inc., 1936. (Gold rushes.) 
They Built the West, an epic of rails and cities; Nek York, D. Appleton- 
Century Co., Inc., 1933. 
Richardson, Marvin M. ; The Whitman Mission; the third station on the Old 

Oregon Trail; Walla Walla, Washington, Whitman Publishing Co., 1940. 
Rinehart, Mary Roberts ; 

Tenting Tonight; Boston and New York, Houghton, Mifflin Co., 1922. ("A 
chronicle of sport and adventure in Glacier Park and the Cascade Moun 
tains.") 

Through Glacier Park; Boston and New York, Houghton, Miffln Co., 1916. 
Rollins, Phillip Ashton ; 

The Cowboy; New York, Charles Scribner's Sons, 1922. 

The Discovery of the Oregon Trail; Robert Stuart's narrative of his overland 
trip eastward from Astoria in 1812-13; New York, Charles Scribner's Sons, 

1935- 

Ross, Alexander; The fur hunters of the far West; London, Smith, Elder and 
Co., 1855. (2 vols.) 

Skinner, Constance Lindsay; Adventures of Oregon; A Chronicle of the Fur 
Trade; New Haven, Yale University Press, 1921. 

Stout, Tom; Montana* Its Story and Biography; Chicago and. New York, Ameri 
can Historical Society, 1921. 

Victor, Mrs. Frances Fuller;^// Over Oregon and Washington; San Fran 
cisco, Carmany, 1872. 

Wheeler, Olin D.; The Trail of Lewis and Clark, 1804-1904; New York, 
G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1904. 

Willson, Beckles; The Great Company, being a history of the honourable 
company of merchants-adventurers trading into Hudson's Bay; New 
York, Dodd, Mead and Co., 1906. 

Wood, Ruth Kedzie; The Tourist's Northwest; New York, Dodd, Mead & 
Co., 1916. 

Wyeth, John B.; Wyeth's Oregon, or a Short History of a Long Journey; Cleve 
land, Ohio, 1905. (Reprint original edition, Cambridge, Mass., 1833.) 

POETRY 

Finger, Charles; Frontier Ballads; Garden City, New York, Doubleday, Doran 

and Co., 1927. 

Lomax, Alan, and Lomax, John A.; Cowboy Sonffs and Other Frontier Bal 
lads; New York, The Macmillan Co., 1938. 
Lomax, John A. ; 

Cowboy Ballads; New York, Macmillan Company, 1922. 

Songs of the Cattle Trail and Cow Camp; New York, Macmillan Co., 1939. 



A SELECTED, DESCRIPTIVE LIST OF IMPORTANT 

NORTHWEST PUBLIC, STATE, AND 

COLLEGE LIBRARIES 

The following lists, it is hoped, may be of some service to professional 
research workers or to advanced students or readers wishing information 
on Northwest source materials. They are by no means exhaustive. The 
editors have merely contacted as many representative organizations as 
possible. Owing to limited space many of the more detailed reports have 
suffered radical revision. Despite this excision, however, it is hoped that 
these notices may be helpful. 

Aberdeen Public Library, Aberdeen, Washington. Florence K. Lewis, librarian: 
Files of local newspapers running back to 1880, including Aberdeen Herald, 
Aberdeen World, and Grays Harbor Post. 

Albany Public Library, Albany, Oregon. Mrs. Ary Neptune, librarian: Oregon 
and Northwest Collection numbering 154 volumes. 

Billings Public Library, Billings, Montana. See Parmly Billings Memorial. 

Boise Public Library, Boise, Idaho. Eunice VonEnde, librarian: Idaho and 
Boise material. 

Butte Public Library, Butte, Montana. Mrs. Margaret McCarthy, librarian: 
A wide collection of books on Montana. Western history collection. 

Central Washington College of Education, Ellensburg, Washington. Special 

Northwest History collection numbering 1,041 volumes. 

Coeur d'Alene Public Library, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Mrs. Jennie Schmelzel, 
librarian: Scrap book of clippings on Idaho. 

Eastern Washington College of Education Library, Cheney, Washington. Leonard 
Thorp, reference librarian: The C. S. Kingston Collection of Northwest 
History numbering about 1500 volumes. 

Eugene Public Library, Eugene, Oregon. Elma L. Hendricks, librarian: Frances 
Droste Memorial Collection of illustrated children's books. 

Great Falls Public Library, Great Falls, Montana. Louise M. Fernald, librarian: 

i Charles M. Russell collection: three scrap books of Russell's life, his works, 

his death ; collection of books written by Russell and all books known to have 

been illustrated by him; prints and photographs of his works including his 

collection of bronzes. 

2 Outstanding Montana and Western Historical Collection. 
3 A genealogical collection of some 600 or 700 volumes. 

Havre Public Librarv. Havre, Montana. Mrs. Emlyn Benson, librarian: A col 
lection of about 130 books on Montana. 

Helena Public Library, Helena, Montana. Mabel Miller, librarian: "This library 
contains copies of almost all of the outstanding literature (fiction and non- 
fiction) concerning the State of Montana." 

Historical Society of Montana, Helena, Montana. Mrs. Lucinda B. Scott, librarian: 
! Complete files of all newspapers of the State since 1864 to the present. 
2 Diaries, manuscripts, articles, reminiscences of pioneers and others, collec 
tion of letters and correspondence of well known residents of the state, state 
officials, etc. 

3 A Northwest Americana Collection. 

4 A collection of oil paintings, photographs, etc., of early residents, scenes of 
early days, pictures of various towns and villages of Montana, 

Library Association of Portland, Oregon. Nell Avery linger, Kbrarian: 

i Wilson Collection especially strong in the history of printing, with good 
examples of manuscripts and early printed books in rare first editions of art 
books, and in books on Catholicism and on the occult, 10,000 volumes. 



352 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

2 Oregon Collection Printed materials on Oregon with additional titles 

which throw light on Oregon history or form a background for it. 
3 F. S. Doernbecker Memorial Technical Collection business and technical 
books on industries of interest to Oregon, including foreign trade, ocean ship 
ping, wool industry and technology, fisheries, lumber, canning, etc. 
Linfield College Library, McMinnville, Oregon. Carolyn E. Smith, librarian: 

Baptist church collection history of Baptist church and the Baptists. 
Livingston Public Library, Livingston, Montana. Mary L. McEwen, librarian: 

A complete file of Livingston papers in bound volumes. 

Miles City Carnegie Public Library, Miles City, Montana. Mrs. Laura Zook, 
librarian: File of the Yellowstone Journals from 1879-1900, bound in heavy 
cardboard. 

Missoula Public Library, Missoula, Montana. Nina Ford, librarian: 
i "Montana" collection compiled in Montana room. 
2 J. H. T. Ryman Collection Montana and the Pacific Northwest. 
3 Scrap book on Montana with clippings from newspapers and magazines. 
Montana State College, Bozeman, Montana. Mrs. Lois Payson, librarian: Mon 
tana Collection. 

Montana State University, Missoula, Montana. Kathleen Campbell, librarian: 
i Special "Western History Collection," with particular reference to Pacific 
Northwest Americana; also collection of about 300 maps covering this region. 
2 Document collection. Depository library for federal documents. Relatively 

complete collection of Montana state documents. 
3 H. W. Whicker collection of original letters and documents. 
Mount Angel College Library, St. Benedict, Oregon. Mark J. Schmid, librarian: 
i Collection of books printed prior to our Revolutionary War Period (1780). 

Nearly 4000 volumes representing 14 different languages. 
2 About 2000 volumes of Latin works; Latin poets, Latin works of bible and 

theologicals. 
Oregon City Public Library, Oregon City, Oregon. Gertrude Brumbaugh, 

librarian: Oregon collection, 

Oregon Historical Society Library, Portland, Oregon. Nellie B. Pipes, librarian: 
Boundary questions, 1814-45; Early Oregon newspapers; Material relating 
to the history of the Oregon Central, Oregon and California, and Northern 
Pacific railroad companies from 1867-1886. 

Oregon State College Library, Corvallis, Oregon. Lucy M. Lewis, librarian: 
i Plant pathology and mycology collections. These rank among the upper five 

in the United States. 

2 Taxonomv collection outstanding for research. 
3 Plant ecology collection outstanding for research source material. 
Oregon State Library, Salem, Oregon. Eleanor Stephens, librarian: Oregon 
collection : composed of 3 types of material : Oregon documents publications 
of the state ; Oregon history and travel publications relating to the North 
west; Oregon authors books written by people living in Oregon. 
Pacific College Library, Newberg, Oregon. Richard Binford, librarian: Quaker 

collection. 

Pacific University Library, Forest Grove, Oregon. Lottie S. Peters, librarian: 
i George H. Atkinson collection, a pioneer Congregational minister 576 

volumes. 
2 Reverend John Griffin collection a pioneer minister of the Congregational 

church 12* volumes. 
3 Sidney E. Morse collection rare items of geography and travel ^500 

volumes. 

4 Oregon and Pacific Northwest material 600 volumes. 

Parmlv Billings Memorial Library Billings. Montana. Margaret Fulmer, libra 
rian: Montana room containing 1000 volumes of early Northwest Americana, 



NORTHWEST BOOKS 353 

Montana history and biography, first editions of Montana authors, and pub 
lications of Montana schools and state departments. Montana notebook collec 
tion an alphabetical and chronological list of Montana authors. Montana 
room contains maps, pictures, and portraits of Montana pioneers. 
Pocatello Public Library, Pocatello, Idaho. Annette Crogster, librarian: North 
west Americana, especially books on early Idaho, Fort Hall, and the Oregon 
Trail. 
Reed College Library, Portland, Oregon. Hazel A. Johnson, librarian: 

i Bibliotheca Belgica contains over 600 volumes and a number of sets of 

periodicals. Only two other separate collections in United States. 
2 Simeon G. Reed collection of letters and private papers valuable source of 
information for the history of the Pacific Northwest from 1852-1905. Is the 
nucleus of a great collection of Northwest economic documents which, it is 
hoped, will some day be housed at Reed College. 10,000 letters and 1500 legal 
papers, besides many hundreds of receipted bills, cancelled checks, payroll 
accounts. Covers especially the fields of navigation and transportation, min 
ing, agriculture, real-estate, finance, and personal history. 
Roseburg Public Library, Roseburg, Oregon. Hildegarde Reizenstein, librarian: 

S. D. Evans Collection emphasizes Northwest material. 

Seattle Public Library, Seattle, Washington. Judson T. Jennings, librarian: 
Approximately 2500 books on the Pacific Northwest, with especial reference 
to Seattle and the State of Washington. Books by Seattle authors are included. 
Spokane Public Library, Spokane, Washington. Gladys S. Puckett, librarian: 
"The Northwest History Collection including diaries, letters, and old photo 
graphs. This last year, a fine beginning was made in the Ottmar P. Mem- 
hard Memorial Collection, books which are purchased from the income from 
bonds left to the library by Mr. Memhard. We are also laying a definite 
emphasis on our genealogies and expect soon to have a very creditable col 
lection for a library of the size of ours." 
State College of Washington Library, Pullman, Washington. W. W. Foote, 

librarian: Northwest Collection: 

! 15,000 cards covering volumes of newspapers and periodicals. 
2 Vincent Collection: numbers 691 volumes. Includes more than 150 auto- 
graphed volumes, many first editions, and more than 130 out-of-print items. 
3 Finest collections of Nez Perce literature found anywhere. Original Walker 

library including diary of Mrs. Walker. 

4. "Since 1915 our collection of Washington State papers is the most complete 
of its kind in existence. These are all nicely bound and available for refer 
ence and include more than 200 titles . . . When speaking of our Northwest 
collection of newspapers, I am not referring to the mass of our main collec 
tion of newspapers representing the entire country and numbering 10,000 
volumes, but simply to the papers published in the Northwest states: Wash 
ington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, and British Columbia." 
State of Washington State Library, Olympia, Washington. William P. Tucker, 

librarian : 
i Newspaper collection Next to the State College Library file, we have the 

largest collection of Washington newspapers in the state. 
2 Washington State Documents an extra fine official file. 
3 Genealogical Collection contains much valuable material used by people 

throughout the state. 

4 xhe McCardle Collection of Northwest Americana some 3000 volumes, 
and 1000 pamphlets, and 50 volumes of scrap books, and a 5o-volume loose- 
leaf manuscript index to the collection. 

5 Nursing Books a valuable collection of 200 volumes received from the 
State Department of Licenses, including considerable material in allied fields 
which touch upon nursing; for example, sociology, psychology, and psychia 
try, etc. 



354 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

University of Idaho Library, Moscow, Idaho. M. Belle Sweet, librarian: Scrap 

books concerning the public career of Senator William Edgar Borah compiled 

by his wife. The material consists of magazine and newspaper clippings, 

letters, telegrams, cartoons, etc. 
University of Idaho, Southern Branch, Pocatello, Idaho. Historical Museum, 

Charlton G. Laird, chairman: 
i Perhaps 75,000 uncatalogued pieces concerning the late Senator Fred T. 

Dubois; these are mostly letters to and from Dubois, but include some 

lengthy manuscripts and thousands of clippings, 
a Commercial papers of the McNutt-Phillips store in Salmon City, pioneer 

Idaho mercantile house. 
3 Letters and official documents from the abandoned Indian agency at Lemhi, 

Idaho. 
4 Several hundred diaries, reminiscences, and letters concerning people in 

Eastern Idaho; the largest number of letters concern the late Colonel George 

L. Shoup, first governor and first senator of the state. 
5 About 40 early maps and photostats of maps of Idaho. 
6 Perhaps 400 pictures, prints, and film of subjects important for Eastern 

Idaho, a large part of which concerns the Bannock and Shoshone Indians 

at Fort Hall. 
7 Phonographic records of Bannock and Shoshone Indian speech, legends, 

songs, dances, etc. 
University of Idaho, Southern Branch, Library, Pocatello, Idaho. Ina Stout, 

librarian: Bound newspaper files of 10 dailies and 21 weeklies Idaho, dat 
ing from about 1933-4, with the exception of the Pocatello Tribune in 1927, 

the Salt Lake Tribune in 1937, and the New York Times in 1922. 
University of Oregon Library, Eugene, Oregon. Matthew Hale Douglass, 

librarian : 

i Burgess Collection of rare books and manuscripts includes 15 Latin manu 
scripts, a number of Near Eastern manuscripts, 38 volumes of incunabula 

and rare books of the i7th, i8th, and i9th centuries. 
2 Municipal Reference Library 5200 items mainly pamphlets dealing with 

the problems of local government. 
3 Law Library over 26,800 volumes including gifts from the libraries of 

Lewis Russell, Judge Matthew P. Deady, Judge W. Fenton, Judge Robert 

Sharp Bean, and S. D. Allen. 

4 School of Architecture and Arts Reference Collection, including the archi 
tecture library of the late Ion Lewis, Portland architect, and the library of 

William Whidden. 
5 Oregon Collection about 5500 books and periodicals by Oregon authors; 

Oregon documents. 
6 University of Oregon Collection books, pamphlets, periodicals, and pictures 

relating to the University, books by the faculty, alumni and students and 

University theses. 
7 Newspaper Collection about 8000 volumes of files of newspapers from 

towns and cities throughout the state available for historical research. 
8 John Henry Nash Collection 2500 volumes, Semi-permanent loan. Examples 

of fine printing of all ages. An outstanding collection. 
9 Braille Collection 800 volumes. 
10 Philip Ranney Brooks Memorial Library 2000 volumes of standard works 

in a wide variety of subject fields for reference use. 
University of Oregon Medical School Library, Portland, Oregon. Bertha B. 

Hallam, librarian: Pacific Northwest medical collection. 
University of Portland Library, Portland, Oregon. Brother David Martin, 

librarian: Mountaineering collection. 
University of Washington Library, Seattle, Washington. Charles W. Smith, 

librarian: Books referring to the Northwest only a collection of Pacific 



NORTHWEST. BOOKS 355 

Northwest Americana containing 10,000 books and pamphlets on the political, 
social, and economic history of the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and 
Montana, the territory of Alaska, and tl*e Province of British Columbia. This 
collection also contains several hundred volumes of Washington newspapers, 
published prior to 1900, a group of pioneer, letters and diaries, a file of 
maps of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska, and a large collection of news 
papers and magazine clippings. 

University of Washington Law Library, Seattle, Washington. Arthur Sidney 
Beardsley, librarian: An excellent collection of between 500 and 600 volumes 
on Northwest and Pacific coast law, 

Wasco County Library, The Dalles, Oregon. Mary Frances Gilbert, librarian: 
Oregon collection containing some rare items; clipping collection containing 
105 volumes in notebook form. 

Whitman College Library, Walla Walla, Washington. Ruth S. Reynolds, 
librarian: Eels Northwest Collection composed of books, periodicals and 
pamphlets on the Northwest and material published in the Northwest. A part 
of the collection housed in the Whitman Museum contains many Northwest 
manuscripts and letters. 

Willamette University Library, Salem, Oregon. Robinson Spencer, librarian: 
Pacific Northwest material. ; 



A SELECTED, DESCRIPTIVE LIST OF IMPORTANT 
NORTHWEST PRIVATE LIBRARIES 

Allen, Edward W., Seattle, Washington. Material on i Jean Francois Galoup 
de Leperouse; 2 General Alaska; 3 historical maps of the Northwest coast. 

Anderson, Louis F., Walla Walla, Washington. About 6000 volumes on i 
Books of general interest, with sprinkling of books in French, German, 
Italian and Spanish; 2 Special library, consisting of texts of reference, 
critical apparatus, offering good working library for study of Greek and 
Latin literature, philology, and archaelogy; 3 Special library bearing on 
study of Art. Some portfolios and series of plates of permanent value. 

Brown, John G., Helena, Montana. Books on Indians and Montana history. 

Curry, Bruce Y., 3025 N. E. 2snd Ave., Portland, Oregon, 2500 volumes, con 
sisting mainly of American first editions and books on Oregon. Also a large 
number of early Oregon law books. 

Dodge, Robert E., Ashland, Oregon. A small collection on Oregon and the 
Northwest, many of which are rather rare. 

Elliott, T. C., Walla Walla, Washington. "Private collection of books relating 
to the sources of the history of the Pacific Northwest, particularly the fur 
trade period and more particularly to the basin of the Columbia river, 
1807-57. This includes the discovery of the Fraser and Columbia rivers and 
tributaries. Some rare items such as set of Proceedings of the British-Ameri 
can Commission relating to claims of the Hudson's Bay Company for proper 
ties in the United States according to the treaty of 1846, but in the main not 
first editions only. Generally speaking, a quite sufficient collection of printed 
source material relating to history of Northwest west ^of the Rockv^ Moun 
tains, including bound volumes of publications of pioneer and historical 
societies of Oregon and Washington, Idaho and Montana." 

Fenton, Ralph A., Route i, Oswego, Oregon. About 700 volumes History of 
Pacific Northwest including some unique pamphlets and maps. 

Hamilton, Dean J. M. (deceased), Bozeman, Montana. Library in care of Mrs. 
Hamilton. It includes: i Collections of Montana history; 2 Collections on 
history of Yellowtsone Park; 3 rare books, pamphlets, and government re 
ports yet uncatalogued. 



356 NORTHWEST BOOKS 

Laubaugh, Mrs. Beth (deceased). Present owners are: J. E. Laubaugh, Salt 
Lake City, and Mrs. Lucile Laubaugh, 1020 E. State Street, Boise, Idaho. 
Library consists of about 2000 volumes. 

Leggat, Alexander, Butte, Montana. Books on all phases of Montana history, 
including mining and geology, fur trading, Indian history and folk lore, and 
fiction relating to the state now out of print. 

Lockley, Fred, Portland, Oregon, collector and bookseller. Library of about 
1000 volumes on Northwest Americana, including many manuscript diaries, 
letters and correspondence. 

Mueller, Oscar O., Lewistown, Montana, i Map of the Territory of Montana 
(Delacy, 1870) ; a Diary of C. W. Cook and David Folsom of the Cook- 
Folsom party on their exploration trip to Yellowstone Park in 1869. 

Penrose, S. B. L., Walla Walla, Washington.^ About 3000 volumes a gentle 
man's library with some emphasis upon philosophy. 

Powers, Dean Alfred, Portland, Oregon. Pacific Northwest Collection about 
2000 volumes (approximately two-thirds Oregon and one-third Pacific North 
west states and California). More poetry than is usual in such a collection. 

Skiff, Frederick Woodward, 1608 N. E. Halsey St., Portland, Oregon. 21,000 
volumes including: i First issues of first editions of American authors; 
2 early volumes in Oregoniana; 3 Angling and American sporting books, 
particularly hunting. 

Spencer, Omar C., 1410 Yeon BIdg., Portland, Oregon. Approximately 2500 
volumes, including about 750 volumes covering Pacific Northwest history. 
A number of quite rare items. 

Turnbull, J. E., 1160 Madison, Eugene, Oregon. Several hundred items on 
Northwest Americana. 




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