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NORWICH, 



CONNECTICUT 



Its Importance as a Business and Manu- 
facturing Centre and as a 
Place of Residence. 



A Brie/ Review of Its Past and Present. 



issued by 
THE NORWICH BOARD OF TRADE, 



January, 1888. 



NORWICH : 

PRESS OF THE P.ULl.ETIN COMl'AXV 
1888. 



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OFFICERS OF THE NORWICH BOARD OF TRADE. 



Fresuleiit, 

HUGH H. OSGOOD. 



Vice Presidents, 

E. WINSI.OW WILLIAMS. 
Dr. P.^TRICK CASSn)V, 
FRANK A. MITCHE[,L. 



Recurdiiig Secretary, 

CHARLES E. DYER. 

C<>rres|»<»ii<liiiij Secretary, 

IL H. GALLUl'. 

Treasurer, 

JONWTH.W TRI'.NHiULL. 

Kvecutive Coiiini i t toe, 

H. n. OSGOOD. 
E. WINSLOW \VH,LL\MS. PATRICK CASSIDV, 

FRANK A. MnxiIELL. SOLOMON LUCAS, 

EDWIN S. ELY. WM. N. HLACKSTONE, 

ADAMS W CARROLL. LVMES A. IIROWN. 



(»1 I'lCKRS OF TIIK NOF<\VICH HOARD OF TRADE. 
<;<>iiiiiiitt>e oil Trades an«I Manufactures. 

AMOS \V. PRENTICE, 
THOMAS D. SAYLES, CHARLES BARD, 

WM. ir. SIUKLDS, DANIEL M. LESTER. 

Coirmiittee on Entertainments, 

DAVID A. WELLS, 
WW. A. AIKEN, ARTHUR H. BREWER. 

EDWARD N. CHBBS, ARCHIBALD MITCHELL. 

Cuniniittve on Arbitration, 

CHARLES BARD, 
JEREMIAH J. DESMOND, JAMES IT. ARNOLD, 

REUBEN S. BARTLETT, WM. T. LANE. 

Committee on Transportation, 

HENRY H. GALLUP, 
CHARLES E. DYER, JOHN H. CRANSTON, 

ADAM REID, \VM. C. MOWRY. 

Committee on Statistics, 

JOHN C. AVERILL, 
BE LA P. LEARNED. JOHN T. BROWN, 

FRANK J. LEAYENS, S. ALPHEUS GILBERT. 



MEMBERS OF THE NORWICH BOARD OF TRADE. 



Aiken, Wm. A. .... . Prop. Norwich Nickel Works. 

AvERii.L, John C Clerk Courts N. L. County. 

At.my, a. H Pres. Bozrah Mineral Spring Co. 

.A.NDRE\vs, P. St. .M Superintendent N. & W. R. R. 

Arnold, J. H Builder and Contractor. 

Barber, M. Angelo .... Machinist. 

Bard, Charles Receiver Hayward Rubber Co. 

Blackstone, J. D. T Cotton Manufacturer. 

Blackstone, VVaf. N Cotton Manufacturer. 

Barstow, John P Stoves and Farming Implements. 

Brewer, Arthur H Coal and Lumber. 

Brown, John T. ..... Agent Marvin Safe Co. 

Brewer, J. M Druggist. 

Butts, H. L File Manufacturer. 

Bishop, Herbert M Physician. 

Beckwith, a. a Flour and Grain. 

Browning, Charles I). . . Groceries and Dry Goods. 

Bill, Henry Book Publisher. 

Briscoe, Willis A LaVvyer. 

Brown, James A Wholesale Grocer. 

Bart LETT, R. S Grocer. 

Brand, Junius A Supt. Norwich Aqueduct Co. 

Bliven, S. E Paper Box Manufacturer. 

Beebe, Chas. H Treas. & M'ger Nor. Lock Mfg. Co. 

Brown, Robert Plumber. 

Cardwell, W. H (jrocer. 

Carroll, Adams P Cotton and Wool. 

Carroll, Geo. W Cotton and Wool. 



6 MKMHKRS OF THK NORWICH HOARD OF IRADE. 

Cassidy, Patrick Physician. 

CoNGDON, Gii.HERT 1 Buildcr and Contractor. 

Camp, Frederick S Secretary Ponemah Mills. 

Carpenter, Increase VV. . . Mayor of Norwich. 

Chandler, Chas. E Surveyor and Civil Engineer. 

Converse, Chas. A Pistol Manufacturer. 

Cranston, J. H Printing Press Manufacturer. 

Carroll, L. W Cotton Manufacturer. 

Cogswell, Chas. P Banker. 

CoiT, George D Treasurer Chelsea Savings Bank. 

Carey, A. E Builder and Contractor. 

Chapman, Enoch F Coal and Lumber. 

Crandall, S. a Lawyer. 

CosGROVE, James F Boots and Shoes. 

Cranston, B. T. ..... Books and Stationery. 

Desmond, J. J Lawyer. 

Duggan, James Druggist. 

Dawson, Jr., James .... Meat Market. 

Day, Norman Manufacturer. 

Dyer, Charles E Manager Norwich Bulletin. 

Dowe, F. E Dry Goods. 

Davis, C. H Wholesale]Pork and Lard. 

Davis, George A Books and Stationery. 

Ely, Wm. G Treas. Falls and Shetucket Mills. 

Ely, Edwin S Pres. Uncas Bank and Paper Mfr. 

Eaton, Luther S Hardware. 

Gould, Geo. W Manufacturer. 

Gibbs, Edward N Cashier Thames National Bank. 

Gilbert, S. Alpheus .... Furniture and Carpets. 

Gallup, H. H Norwich Belt Manufacturing Co. 



Harris, E. D Coal Deale 



Jewett, L. R Coal Dealer. 

Johnson, Frank President Norwich National Bank. 

Jones, David R Merchant Tailor. 

Johnson, Jr., Oliver L. . . . Treas. Norwich & N. Y. Trans. Co. 

Johnson, Charles S Manufacturer. 



MEMBERS OF THE NORWICH BOARD OF TRADE. -] 

King, Charles J Flour, Meal and Hay. 

Kelley, John H Boots, Shoes and Leather. 

Keep, John H Book-keeper. 

Kingsbury, A. B Jeweler. 

Leavens, Frank J Cotton Manufacturer. 

Learned, Bela P Insurance. 

Lucas, Solomon ..... Lawyer. 

Lester, D. M Mfr. of Envelope Machinery. 

Lane, W. T Harness and Trunks. 

Lane, Geo. A Harness and Trunks. 

Lathrop, Arthur D. ... Forwarding Agent. 

Mitchell, Frank A Treas. Cold Spring Iron Works. 

Mitchell, Archibald . . . Dry Goods. 

Mitchell, A. G. .... Sec. Cold Spring Iron Works. 

MowRY, Wm. C Manufacturer Page Steam Heaters. 

Osgood, Hugh H Drugs and Medicines. 

Prentice, Amos W Hardware. 

Palmer, H. F Real Estate Agent. 

Peck, Seth L Lime, Brick and Cement. 

Preston, Chas. H Hardware. 

Page, Wm. H Manufacturer Wood Type. 

Potter, A. L. ...... Coal. 

PoRTEous, John Dry Goods. 

Raymond, Geo. C West India Trade. 

RoYCE, A. Irving Insurance. 

Reid, Adam ....... Dry Goods. 

Robbins, Z. R Merchant. 

Rallion, H. D Grocer. 

Sayles, Thos. D Woolen Manufacturer. 

Smith, A. D Merchant Tailor. 

Snell. Daniel W. Business (College. 

Shields, Wm. H Lawyer. 

Smith, J. Hunt Treas. Dime Savings Bank. 

Smith, George S Franklin Steam Mills. 

Smith, Frank H Stoves, Ranges, etc. 

Small, N.athan Concrete Pavement and Roofing. 

Shannon, J. B Groceries. 



8 ■ MK.MliliKS OF THK NOFiWlCH HOARD OF TKADK. 

Tarkant, Nicholas .... Real Estate Agent. 

TkUMiiULL, Jonathan . . . West India Trade. 

TuRNKR, Sidney President Norwich Lock Mfg. Co. 

Turner, F. C Secretary Ossawan Mills. 

Tucker, Wm. C Superintendent Ponemah Mills. 

Tyler, Fred. C Teas, Coffees and Spices. 

Ulmer, Frank Norwich Belt Co. 

Wells, David A Political Economist. 

Williams, E. Winslow . . . Woolen Manufacturer. 

Williams, Winslow T. . . . Secretary Yantic Woolen Co. 

Williams, Jerome F Insurance. 

Whittemore, M. M Clerk N. & W. R. R. Co. 

WooDARD, F. L Asst. Treas. Dime Savings Bank. 

Warner, J. E. • Sec'y Hopkins & Allen Mfg. Co. 

Wasley, F. R Mfr. Envelope Machinery. 

Winters, Chas. J Dealer Chicago Dressed Beef. 

WORTHINGTON, E. B Teas, Coffees and Spices. 



BY WAY OF INTRODUCTION. 



By referring to the constitution and by-laws of the Norwich Board 
OF Trade it will be seen that the object of the organization is for " the 
advancement of the individual and general business interests of the 
community ; the encouragement of commercial and manufacturing 
industries ; the improvement of facilities for transportation ; the diffus- 
ion of information concerning trades, manufacturing, and other inter- 
ests ; the cultivation of a more intimate knowledge of all events and 
questions affecting the public welfare," etc. 

It is with the desire of promoting and encouraging the interests above 
enumerated that the following pages of statistical and local information 
are given to the public. Much care has been taken in the preparation 
of the work to confine all statements and figures within conservative 
bounds, the sole object being to present a true picture of Norwich as it 
is to-day, with its splendid educational facilities, its business interests, 
its importance as a manufacturing centre, its reputation as a healthy city, 
and various important subjects that make a place attractive, in order 
that strangers and intelligent inquirers may fully realize the great ad- 
vantages of this locality as a place of residence, as well as a desirable 
field for locating manufactories of various kinds. 

Schools, Churches, Public Libraries, Police and Fire Departments, 
Water Supply, Sewerage, Street Railways, Gas and Electric Light, Banks 
and Banking, Post Office Statistics, Cotton and Wool Trade, Coal and 
Lumber Trade, Railroad and Steamboat Freights, Tonnage of Thames 
River, Mill Privileges to be utilized, and various important matters are 
briefly mentioned in connection with the long array of statistical in- 
formation that is given of Norwich industries, and of industries that are 
tributary to Norwich in the neighboring towns. 



NORWICH: PAST AND PRESENT. 



The early history of Norwich, like that of many other of the old 
New England cities, reads more like a romance at the present day than 
a reality. It is difficult to conceive that where now stands its beautiful 
and palatial dwellings and public buildings, its fine ware houses and 
stores, its busy manufactories, and its miles of streets teeming with a 
busy population, was once the home and hunting grounds of the Indian, 
without the first vestige of civilization. The city, which now has the 
reputation of being one of the most romantic and beautiful in New 
England, was first settled in 1659, by a small party of emigrants, led 
by Captain John Mason, who afterwards became famous as a leader and 
an officer in the Pequot and Mohegan wars. 

For a long number of years it was a cheerless, dreary home for tiie 
white men who had built their log-houses amidst the treacherous sav- 
ages, and where their lives were in constant peril from the nomadic 
tribes, who were jealous of the intrusion on their hunting grounds. 
But they had come to stay, and gradually, as years rolled by, increased 
in population and importance. As early as 1732, the town which they 
had founded was made a half-shire town, and in 17S1. was one of the 
five incorporated cities of the State. 

The city is romantically situated at the head of the river Thames, 
fourteen miles above Long Island Sound, at the junction of the Yantic 
and Shetucket rivers, and at the head of tide-water. As the city is ap- 
proached from the river below, a high, rocky bluff presents itself — its 
base encircled by stores and ware-houses, while rising one above another 
to the rocky eminences which overhangs the business portion of the 
city, are zig-zag streets, cut out of solid rock like Alpine roads, on which 
are located the churches, public buildings and handsome private resi- 
dences. 



12 THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 

The growth of the city has been substantial, though neither slow or 
rapid. In the year 1800, the grand list of the town was $1,797,879 ; in 
1825, $2,200,000 • in 1850, $4,446,480 ; in 1885, it had increased to the 
large amount of $13,157,869, to which should be added the sum of 
$14,682,856 of property, such as churches, public buildings, school- 
houses, etc., which are e.xempt from taxation. 

In the year 1821, Norwich had but 3,500 inhabitants; in 1870, ac- 
cording to the census taken then, there were 16,653; in 1880, by the 
census returns, there were 21,143. At this present time the increase 
must make the population in the immediate neighborhood of 25,000. 

The city owes much of its prosperity to its commercial interests, and 
to its unsurpassed manufacturing facilities — having a fine harbor, easily 
accessible to lar^e-size vessels drawing thirteen feet of water; and a 
very extensive water front, as well as excellent railroad privileges, being 
on the lines of the Norwich & Worcester Division of the New York & 
New England Railroad, and on the New London Northern Railroad. 
In addition to this, Norwich owes a large share of its growth to the 
splendid water-power privileges on the Shetucket, Yantic and Quinne- 
baug rivers, which flow through the town, and that have been utilized 
for manufacturing purposes by some of the largest mills in the country. 

In its earlier days, Norwich was prominent among the few commer- 
cial cities of New England, on account of its shipping and ship build- 
ing interests. As early as 1714, 1716 and 1722, the town granted rights 
to build ship-yards for ship-building purposes, giving the land and a free 
right to go into the forests and cut all the timber necessary to carry on 
the work. In 1788, Norwich exported 549 horses, 205 mules, 300 
horned cattle, 321 sheep, 566 hogs, a large quantity of beef and pork, 
besides 30,000 lbs. of butter. In 1795, a large foreign trade was car- 
ried on with several European ports, especially with the West Indies, 
when the foundations of many Norwich fortunes were made. At that 
time, the shipping belonging to this port consisted of 7 ships — all over 
200 tons burthen— 9 brigs, 9 schooners, 17 sloops, besides a nuVnber of 
New York and river packets, the aggregate tonnage amounting to nearly 
5,000 tons. From Captain Story's ship-yard, on the west side of the 
harbor, ships were launched of over 300 tons burthen. 

Previous to the year 181 7, travelers could only pass to or from New 
York by sail vessels or packets, which were advertised to make their 
weekly or monthly trips. The time occupied in making the passage 
varied according to the weather, and the direction from which the wind 



NORWICH : PAST AND PRESENT. I3 

was blowing — sometimes only a week, and often two and three would 
be used while becalmed, on encountering adverse winds. The passage 
was $5.00, with an additional $2.00 for " living ;" but whether the 
"living" was regulated by an increase, with the contingency of a two 
or three weeks' trip, the writer knows not. There was, also, great ri\al- 
ry and opposition between the owners and captains of the packets ply- 
ing between the two cities, and many comical stories are told of the 
"arts and wiles" that were resorted to by them to obtain passengers 
and freight. The Norwich man in New York, with grip-sack in hand, 
eager to obtain passage to his "native heath " to rejoin his long anxious 
family, was often met by a crowd of importuning sailors belonging to 
the different rival packets, and often by the captains themselves, all 
cl.imoring for his patronage, and eager for his money. At such times 
opposition ran high, and if the Norwich man was keen and shrewd, as 
he generally was, the cost of his trip home was but a very small 
item of his expenses while absent. It is related that a goodly farmer 
from the neighboring town of Franklin, finding himself thus situated 
one afternoon in New York, about seventy years ago, commenced re- 
ceiving bids of two rival packet masters to transport him to Norwich. 
Dollar by dollar they lowered their prices, until one of them agreed to 
bring him free, with no charge for "living;" but our economical and 
ancient neighbor finally accepted the offer of Captain Tyler, .of the op- 
position packet, who not only agreed to bring him free, but to furnish 
him with free " grub " and free grog on the passage, and pay him fifty 
cents when the vessel reached Norwich — a promise that was religiously 
fulfilled on the application of the farmer for the money ere he stepped 
foot on shore. 

In those days, the departure of a Norwich man for New York on 
business or pleasure — and they seldom went for the latter — was a great 
event, and of as much importance as it would be now for a man to start 
on a trip to Russia, or around the world: For weeks in advance, the 
matter was talked over and canvassed in the family circle, and prepara- 
tions made for the perilous voyage. If he was a practical and method- 
ical man, he made his will, in anticipation of contingencies of shipwreck, 
or being waylaid and murdered in the streets of New York ; and his 
affairs were left in such a condition that they could be easily adjusted 
by an administrator in case he never returned. When the hour for his 
departure at last arrived, and he was to tear himself from his weeping 
family, the scene was as affecting and heart-rending as the separation of 



I| THK CITV OF NORWICH, CONN. 

John Rogers from his wife and nine little ones when he was burned at 
the stake. 

Jn 1817, the first steamboat ploughed the waters of the river Thames, 
and some of the old inhabitants — and there are but few of them left — 
will well remember the first trip of the wonderful steamer " Fulton," 
Captain Bunker. As she moved away from the wharf at Norwich, 
smoke and flames belching forth from the smoke-stack, the revolving 
paddle-wheels lashing the heretofore (juiet waters into an angry foam, 
the gallant captain walking the deck and giving orders with all the im- 
portance of a newly-appointed brigadier on muster day, it made a scene 
long remembered by the crowds of people that lined the adjacent shores 
and the wharf from which the marine monster made its departure. After 
the " Fulton," the steamer " H. E. Eckford," Captain Davison, was put 
on the route to New York, being replaced about 1827 by the " Fanny," 
with the same captain. In 1833, Captain Wm. W. Coit, once an hon- 
ored resident, completed the " Jackson." Her first trip was to New 
London, with a large excursion party, on the occasion of laying the cor- 
ner-stone of Groton Monument; and President Jackson, after whom 
the steamer was named, was the distinguished guest on board. In 1836, 
Captain Coit built the '' Norwich," which he commanded till 1842, when 
the " Worcester," also built under the direction of this officer, took the 
place of the " Norwich." Soon after, it was deemed advisable to run 
two boats, on alternate days, and the "Charter Oak," Captain Sanford, 
was placed on the route. 

Then came successively the " Knickerbocker," the '' Connecticut," 
the ill-fated and beautiful steamers " Atlantic " and " Commonwealth," 
— one wrecked on Fisher's Island, and the other destroyed by fire at 
the dock in Groton. 

At present, the commodious steamers, "City of Worcester," " City of 
Boston," and '' City of New York," together with the freight boats, 
" City of Lawrence," and " City of Norwich," — the former carrying pas- 
sengers as well as freight — connect Norwich with the great metropolis. 

Among those early connected with the shipping interests of Norwich 
in the present century, and who contributed largely to its permanent es- 
tablishment and success, Captain W. W. Coit, before referred to, ranks 
foremost. In the year 1817, when but nineteen years of age, he practi- 
cally commenced his seafaring life, by going as master of the packet 
" McDonough," plying between Norwich and New York, touching at the 



NORWICH : PAST AND PRESEN'J'. 1 5 

port of New London. He continued going as master of various pack- 
ets until 1833, when the fruits of long years of toil and devoted atten- 
tion to the duties of a mariner's life, enabled him to build and command 
the steamer "Jackson." During all the time that he had been connect- 
ed with or commanded vessels propelled either by wind or steam, he 
proudly boasted — and well he might — that he had never lost a passen- 
ger, or a man, or a dollar's worth of freight or merchandise, by fire, ac- 
cident or negligence. Can a similar record be produced.' 

During the memorable September gale, in 1815, Norwich suffered se- 
verely. The tide rose to an unprecedented height, submerged all what is 
now the business part of the city, destroying a large number of stores and 
ware-houses, and injuring many others. All the shipping in the harbor 
was driven ashore, and a large brig was left high and dry when the 
waters had receded, nearly opposite where now stands the grocery store 
of F. L. Gardner. The venerable drug store wliich stood on the ground 
now occupied by the handsome Tyler block, on Water Street, was 
nearly swept away by the rising tide ; but it stood its ground, though 
the waters reached the second floor. Many more incidents of great in- 
terest to the present generation might be spoken of relating to the Nor- 
wich OF THE Past, but limited space compels us to pass on, and speak 
of the Norwich of the Present. 



1 6 THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 



NORWICH MANUFACTORIES. 



At a very early period in the history of Norwich the advantages of 
establishing manufactories of various kinds engaged a large share of the 
public attention, and the interest then taken in the subject gradually de- 
veloped in the building of several large mills on the splendid water 
privileges that were in the town limits. Previous to 1840, Norwich was 
the largest manufacturing town in the State — the product of its mills in 
1839, according to the report made to the Secretary of State, amounting 
to ^1,150,205.00, which, in those days, was considered an enormous sum 
to be derived from such a source. Manufacturing at that time was in 
its infancy, compared to what it is at present. There was not then a 
steam engine probably in the whole town — the mill-owners depending 
entirely upon water power to drive their machinery. Below we give a 
list of the various manufactories that are in active operation in Norwich 
on the first of January of the present year, together with a few import- 
ant but brief statistics connected therewith ; the number of hands em- 
ployed in the many mills and work-shops ; the aggregate amount paid 
annually for labor ; the vast amount of yearly products ; the raw mate- 
rial consumed; the tons of freight handled, and various other items, will 
be a good deal of a surprise, not only to many of the inhabitants of 
Norwich, but to many outside its borders who may have imagined this 
to be a city chiefly celebrated for its beautiful residences, picturesque 
scenery, its unsurpassed educational facilities, its healthy climate, and 
its citizens depending upon retired wealth and outside interests for 
very many of the comforts as well as the necessities of life. As will 
be seen by referring to the statistics, 5,344 persons (more than one-fifth 
of the inhabitants) are employed in the manufactories, to whom $2,1 10,- 
500.00 are paid annually for their labor. This large sum is constantly 



NORWICH MANUFACTORIES. I 7 

changing hands in our midst. It supports our schools and churches ; 
it clothes the naked, and feeds the hungry; it enters the homes of the 
poor, as well as the rich, furnishing the necessities of life, as well as the 
luxuries and comforts. 

The Ponemah Mill, which is said to be the second largest cotton mill 
in the world, has more employes than many of the towns in the state 
have inhabitants ; and the yards of cloth it annually manufactures, if 
spread out, would reach a distance of 11,364 miles, or nearly half round 
the world. The yards of cloth turned out by the Norwich Bleaching, 
Dyeing and Printing Company (28,4091,3 miles) would extend around 
the world, with about four thousand miles to spare. The enormous 
amount of goods turned out by these two mammoth concerns can only 
be appreciated by some such practical illustration as the above. 

The statistics gathered from the various mills and manufactories have 
been furnished on personal application — with two or three exceptions — 
from the owners or managers themselves, and are as nearly correct as 
it is possible to get them, without too much time being spent in going 
over the ledgers and journals to arrive at exact amount ot each. The 
figures given are about the general average, baseJ upon the last year's 
expenditures and products. It is to be regretted that this aggregate of 
all the sales or products of the different manufactories could not be ob- 
tained, but this was found impossible, as many of the owners or propri- 
etors preferred not to have the amount of their sales made public. 

It is to be hoped that this remarkable showing which the many in- 
dustries make, will be the means of inducing more ot our capitalists and 
men of wealth to invest their money in home enterprises, instead of go- 
ing abroad and investing in uncertain stocks and wildcat speculations. 
A good paying industry not only gives a fair return to investors, but it 
helps to build up a town, by increasing its wealth, adding to its popula- 
tion, and doubling the value of real estate. And no town in New 
England offers better advantages or facilities for manufacturing in its 
, various branches than Norwich. 



THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 



COTTON MANUFACTORIES. 



Since Norwich became prominent as a manufacturing town, which 
was over fifty years ago, the making of cotton fabrics has taken the 
precedence among its various industries. From 1823 to 1829, four joint 
stock companies were organized to manufacture cotton goods in con- 
nection with woolen goods, whose combined capital was limited to 
^1,530,000.00. Whether this capital was all employed, or whether the 
mills went into active operation, is doubtful ; but this cotton industry 
has continued to flourish from those years to the present, and has been 
the main source of the growth of the town. Three of the four cotton 
mills which are now in operation in Norwich have a combined capital 
of ^2,500,000.00 — the fourth, the Totokett, not being a joint stock com- 
pany. The four mills employ 2,800 operatives, pay annually $810,- 
000.00 for labor, manufacture 34,500,000 yards goods, consume 8,650,- 
000 lbs. cotton, run 184,000 spindles. The Shetucket, Falls and Toto- 
kett mills handle annually 7,250 tons freight, and pay $49,000 freight- 
age. 

THE PONEMAH COTTON MILLS. 

This mammoth establishment is said to be the second largest cotton 
factory in the United States, if not in the world. It is situated on the 
Shetucket river, in the village of Taftville— a suburb of Norwich about 
3^ miles from the centre of the city. The building of the dam and 
the mill was commenced in 1867, and the company commenced running 
the machinery in 1870. At that time there was not a house in sight of 
the privileges ; and where now stands a small city in appearance, with 
streets lined with handsome houses spreading out in various directions, 
there was but rocky, half-cultivated and neglected farming lands. The 
entire length of the mill, including a hundred-foot machine shop, is 



COTTON MANUFACTORIES. I 9 

1,576 feet. Some idea of its vast size can be arrived at by stating that 
this number of feet makes the mill but a trifle less than a third of a mile 
long. It manufactures a fine quality of cotton goods, which find a 
ready market all over the country. The company owns 190 tenement 
houses, besides stores, store-houses, and various buildings connected 
with their manufactory. 

Capital slock $1,500,000 

Bales cotton consumed per annum 6,500 

Number of spindles 125,000 

Yards goods made annually 20.000,000 

Amount annually paid for labor S 450,000 

Number of hands employed 1,500 



FALLS CO. 

Next to the Ponemah Mills in size and importance are the Falls 
Company's Mills, situated at the Falls, so called, about half-a-mile from 
the business centre of the city, and within the city limits. The prod- 
ucts of the mills are heavy, colored cotton goods, awnings, tickings, etc. 

Capital stock .S 500,000 

Lbs. cotton consumed per annum 2,600,000 

Yards colored goods manufactured per annum 5,500,000 

Estimated lbs. of freight per annum 6.000,000 

Number of spindles 23,000 

Number of hands employed .... 550 

Freights paid per annum . . $ 24,000 

Amount annually paid for labor S 160,000 



THE SHETUCKET CO. 

The mills of this large corporation for the manufacture of cotton 

goods, are situated at Greeneville, on the Shetucket river, a mile from^ 

city centre, and also in city limits. 

Capital stock $ 500.000 

Lbs. cotton consumed per annum 2.400,000 

Yards colored goods manufactured per annum 6,000.000 

Estimated lbs. of freight per annum 4,500,000 

Freights paid per annum S 22,000 

Number of spindles 20,000 

Number of hands employed 500 

Amount annually paid for labor ::? 150,000 



20 THE CITY OV NORWICH. CONN. 

TOTOKETT MILLS. 

Situated on the Shetucket river, 4)4 miles from the centre of the City 

of Norwich, owned by Lorenzo Blackstone, and managed by his sons. 

They manufacture a fine quality of sheetings. 

Number of spindles 16,000 

Lbs. cotton consumed per annum 400,000 

Yards sheetings manufactured per annum 3,000,000 

Estimated lbs. of freight per annum 4,000,000 

Amount paid for freight per annum $ 5. 000 

Amount paid for labor per annum $ 5"iOOO 

Number of hands emplo3'ed 250 



WOOLEN MANUFACTORIES. 



Next in importance to that of the cotton industry, which for a long 
number of years has been prominent as one of the sources of the city's 
growth and material prosperity, is that of the manufacture of woolen 
goods. At present, there are four mills engaged in this class of manu- 
facture, the largest of which is that of the 

YANTIC WOOLEN COMPANY, 

whose mills are on the Yantic river, in the village of the same name — 
another of the suburbs of our city. It manufactures a fine quality of 
flannels and ladies' dress goods. 

Capital stock $ 75,000 

Lbs. scoured wool consumed annually 430,000 

Yards flannel manufactured annually 2,250,000 

Tons of freight handled annually 2,100 

Amount paid freights annually . . $ 5.000 

Number setts of cards 10 j/j 

Number hands employed 150 

Amount paid for labor per annum $ 50,000 




.J 



WOOLEN MANUFACTORIES. 2 1 

NORWICH WOOLEN COMPANY. 

Located on the Yantic river, a mile-and-a-half north of the centre of 
the city, and make the manufacture of flannels a specialty. 

Capital stock c; 100,000 

Lbs. scoured wool consumed annually 300,000 

Number of hands employed 100 

Amount annually paid for labor § 40,000 

Setts of cards 12 



THAMES VALLEY MH.LS. 

Located at Trading Cove, so called, a mile-and-a-half below the city, 
and at the outlet of Trading Cove brook. It is owned and run by the 
Hall Brothers. 

Lbs. unscoured wool annually consumed 270,000 

Yards flannel annually made 350,000 

Number of hands employed 50 

Amount paid for labor per annum S 12,000 

Tons of freight handled 650 



CLINTON WOOLEN MILLS. 

On the Yantic river, near Bean Hill, so called. A joint stock com- 
pany. 

Capital stock $ 200,000 

Number of hands employed 130 

Amount annually paid for labor 38,000 

Setts cards in mill 10 

Lbs. scoured wool annually consumed 200,000 

Lbs. cotton warps " " 75.000 

Lbs. woolen dress goods annually manufactured 165 200 

Lbs. woolen and cotton warp manufactured 70,800 

Tons freight annually handled 762 



THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 




PTSTOL MANUFACTORIES. 



PISTOL MANUFACTORIES. 



Norwich, for many years, has been very largely interested in the 
manufacture of pistols ; and the making of these familiar and danger- 
ous weapons has long been one of the chief industries of this city. A 
few years ago, it was said that more pistols were annually made in Nor- 
wich than in all the other pistol manufactories in the United States com- 
bined. As late as 18S2 and 1883, when the trade began to fall off, from 
45,000 to 50,000 pistols a month were the products of the several man- 
ufactories in the city. Owing to over-production, close competition and 
the decreased demand from foreign countries, the business in Norwich, 
as it has in many other places, has become less remunerative than for- 
merly, especially on the cheap class of pistols, and several of the shops 
have stopped manufacturing, until times are better and prices more sat- 
isfactory. It is rumored that one of the large pistol shops now lying 
idle, will turn its attention to the manufacture of a new and improved 
patent gun, provided the works can be turned into a joint stock com- 
pany. 

THE HOPKINS & ALLEN FIRE ARMS CO., 

whose extensive works on Franklin Street occupy nearly a whole square 
is one of the largest concerns in this state engaged in this branch of 
industry, ranking third in importance to Colt's, at Hartford, and Win- 
chester, at New Haven. They manufacture a superior class of pistol, 
and also a celebrated grade of shot guns and rifles, which find pur- 
chasers in all parts of the civilized world. The firm first commenced 
the manufacture of pistols in this city in 1868, and have successfully 
pursued the business from that date. 

Capital stock .i^ i25,o<io 

Average number of hands employed 175 

Amount annually paid for labor $ 120,000 

Value of yearly products S 175,000 

Number of guns and rifles made in a year . . . 6,000 

Number of pistols made in a year 100,000 



24 



THE CITY OK NORWICH, CONN. 




PISTOL MANUFACTORIF.S. 25 

THOS. E. RYAN'S PISTOL MANUFACTORY, 

on Franklin Street, of which Mr. Ryan is the sole proprietor, com- 
menced business eleven years ago. 

Number of hands employed 45 

Amount annually paid for labor $ 20,000 

Number of pislols made in a year 30,000 

BACON ARMS CO. 

The manufacture of pistols was first commenced under the name 
of the above firm in 1858, by Thos. K. Bacon. [A few years afterwards 
it was made a joint stock company, the business was enlarged, and for 
a long time did a successful business. For the last two or three years 
the company have given up the manufacture of pistols, and are making 
a breech-loading, single-barrel gun, with reduced help from what they 
previously employed. 

Capital slock § 40,000 

Number of hands employed 20 

Number of guns made in a year 2.400 

Amount annually jiaid for labor § 10,000 



MISCELLANEOUS INDUSTRIES. 



NORWICH BLEACHING, DYEING & PRINTING CO. 

This mammoth establishment commenced bleaching and calendering 
in 1840, and has expanded its works from year to year, until at present, 
it has grown to be one of the largest, if not ///e largest concern in 
America, engaged in this particular industry. 'I'he works are located 
Greeneville, and cover over a vast area of ground. 

Capital stock $ 500,000 

Yards cotton goods annually turned off, about 50.000,000 

Number of hands employed 350 

Amount annually paid for labor If 200,000 



26 THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 

NORWICH & WORCESTER CAR AND MACHINE SHOPS. 

Norwich is the southern terminus of the Norwich & Worcester rail- 
road, and the shops for repairs and making the rolling stock for the 
road, are located in this city. The company manufacture locomotives, 
passenger, freight and dirt cars, besides doing all their own repairs, 
which make an important item in the number of men they employ, and 
their annual disbursements. 

Number of men employed 175 

Amount annually paid fur labor $ 120,000 



THE NORWICH LOCK MANUFACTURING CO. 

is not only one of the largest among the miscellaneous industries of our 

city, but one of the three largest concerns in the country engaged in the 

manufacture of locks, padlocks, and builders' hardware. The works 

have been in operation for fifteen years. The variety and patterns of 

goods manufactured is something enormous, requiring a list of twelve 

closely printed 8x12 pages, two columns to a page. 

Capital stock $ 75,000 

Amount annually paid for labor $ 100,000 

Number of hands employed 275 

Tons of freight handled per annum, about 2,200 



CHELSEA PAPER MANUFACTURING CO. 

This is another of the huge establishments that has long identified 
Norwich as a large and important manufacturing centre. The works are 
established at Greeneville, within the city limits, and commenced oper- 
ations as long ago as 1835. It manufactures printing paper of an extra 
quality, and for many years has supplied the Harper Brothers, of New 
York, with paper for their many publications, including Harper's 
Monthly, Harper's Weekly, Harper's Bazaar, etc. 

Capital stock S 200,000 

Lbs. paper manufactured per annum 10,000,000 

Amount annually paid for labor ."? 120,000 

Number of hands employed 230 

Tons of freight annually received at works 15,000 



MISCELLANEOUS INDUSTRIES. 27 

THE RICHMOND STOVE CO. 

This is another of our large industries, which has added much to the 
growth and prosperity of our city. The works were first started 
in 1S67, by ApoUos Richmond, of Brooklyn, Conn., who had long been 
identified witli A. C. Barstow, of Providence, in the manufacture of 
stoves, furnaces, etc. The increased demands for the products of this 
manufactory from year to year, have necessitated the building of large 
additions from time to time, so that at present the works extend over a 
vast space of ground. The company manufacture first-class warm-air 
furnaces, steam heaters, ranges, parlor and cooking stoves, which are on 
sale in nearly every city of the Union. 

Capital stock ,■> 1 50,000 

Amount paid for labor per annum S 100,000 

Number of hands employed 150 

Tons of iron, coal, etc,, handled per annum 5.000 



COLD SPRING IRON WORKS. 

One of the oldest concerns in the state that has been engaged in the 
manufacture of iron, having been first started in 1845. The works are 
located at Thamesville, on the Thames river, a mile from the center of 
the city, and are easily accessible by water for the loading and unload- 
ing of the heavy material that the works receive and ship to different 
points. The plant is owned and managed by Mitchell Brothers, and the 
products are merchantable iron of various kinds. 

Number of hands employed '. . 50 

Amount paid annually for labor $ 30,000 

Tons scrap iron " consumed 3,000 

■' coal " in furnaces 2,500 

" fire-brick, sand, etc., annually consumed 300 

" merchantable iron " manufactured .... 2,200 



THE NORWICH NICKEL WORKS. 

Gen. Wm. A. Aiken is the manager and sole proprietor Factory on 
Chestnut Street, and do electro-plating in nickel, silver and gold. Also, 
manufactures nickel plated window display fixtures for exhibiting goods 
in stores. 

Number of men employed 25 



28 



THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 




MISCELLANEOUS INDUSTRIES. 29 

C. B. ROGERS & CO., 

Makers of Wood- IVorkitig Machinery. 

These works were first started by Caleb B. Rogers, in 1S46, on a 
small scale, but gradually increased, so that in 1863 it was incorporated 
as a joint stock company. Their machinery finds sale not only in vari- 
ous sections of this country, but is exported to South America, Mex- 
ico, New Zealand, Australia, and various points of Europe. 

Capital stock $ 200,000 

Amount paid for labor per annum $ 70,000 

Tons freight handled per annum 1,200 

Number of hands employed 125 



THAMES IRON WORKS, 

are located in the immediate vicinity of the Cold Spring Iron Works, 
and are but a few hundred feet apart. A joint stock company, which 
was organized and commenced business in 1863. Its products are bar 
and spike iron. 

Capital stock $ 20,000 

Number of hands employed 45 

Amount paid annually for labor $ 36,000 

Tons coal " consumed in furnaces. ... 3.500 

" of iron " manufactured 3,000 



ALLEN SPOOL AND PRINTING CO. 

Their factory is on Franklin Street, and is managed by Edwin Allen, 
the inventor of the machinery. It is a joint stock company, and re- 
quires but a small capital. The work is mostly done by boys. 

Capital stock $ 15,000 

Amount paid annually for labor .•? 10,000 

Number of hands employed 25 

Amount of products per annum, about $ 36,000 



THE OSS A WAN MILLS CO. 

The factory on East Broad Street is the largest one in the country 
that makes the manufacture of picture, shade and furniture cord a 
specialty. The labor is mostly performed by girls. Since the intro- 



30 THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 

duction of fine varieties of wire in the making of picture cord, the 
company consumes a ton a week of this article. 

Capital stock S 20,000 

Amount paid annually for labor $ g.ooo 

Number of hands employed 40 



NORWICH CORK MANUFACTORY. 

Previous to 1855, all the corks used in this country were imported 
from Spain and Portugal, where they were cut by hand. In that year, 
the brothers, J. D. & W. R. Crocker, of Norwich, invented and per- 
fected the first machine that was ever made for cutting corks by ma- 
chinery. This invention has been the means of working a revolution 
in the manufacture of corks all over the world, and in reducing the 
prices. The Crocker machines are now not only in operation in sev- 
eral of our American cities, but also in Europe, where they have super- 
seded the hand-labor process. Barnes & Co., of this city, organized a 
company in 1856, and first put the machines in practical operation, im- 
porting the cork-wood bark from Spain and Portugal, the countries 
where it grows. At present, the business is carried on in Norwich by 
Richard F. Goodwin, at his works on Franklin Street. 

Number of machines in operation 8 

Number of corks annually manufactured, about 10,000,000 

Number of hands employed, mostly boys . 10 

Amount annually paid for labor $ 4,000 



NORWICH BELT MANUFACTURING CO. 

This is an important industry, that was commenced in Norwich in 

1873, and has increased to one of large magnitude. The company make, 

in addition to belts, various kinds of goods for manufacturers' use, which 

find a large and ready sale all over the country. They have an office 

and depots for the sale of their goods in New York, Philadelphia and 

Chicago. Works are situated between Greeneville and Taftville. 

Amount of products sold per annum $ 300,000 

Tons of freight handled per annum 1,500 

Number of hides worked into belts per annum 15,000 

Number of hands employed 60 

Amount annually paid for labor S 30.000 



MISCELLANEOUS INDUSTRIES. 3 I 

NORWICH MALT COMPANY. 

A new industry that has recently been introduced in Norwich, and 
that has not fairly yet got in operation. It is a joint stock company, 
and obtained its charter a little over a year ago, in iS86, for making 
malt by a new process, which promises a handsome profit on the invest- 
ment. Works located in the Elevator building, on Central wharf. 

Capital stock $ 60,000 

Bushels of bailey made into malt per anuum 175,000 

Number of hands at present employed 10 

Yearly expenses including salaries . 10,500 

C. H. DAVIS & GO'S PORK PACKING ESTABLISHMENT. 

Works located on the Taftville road, above Greeneville. Products 
sold principally throughout New England. 

Number of hogs slaughtered and packed annually 16.OOO 

" " men employed 18 

Amount paid for labor j^er annum S 10,000 

CHELSEA FILE WORKS. 

Commenced manufacturing and recutting files, in their present estab- 
lishment near Franklin Square, in 1863. Their files are sold through- 
out New F^ngland, and the West. 

Number of men employed 3° 

Amount paid annually for labor S 12,000 

THE WM. H. PAGE WOOD TYPE CO. 

These works have been in operation a number of years, and their 
celebrated wood type, which is made by machinery, is used in the ma- 
jority of printing establishments throughout the country, and also to a 
large extent in South America and the West Indies. A new process of 
making wood type, very recently invented by one of the firm, will en- 
able this company to more than double the present amount of business 
with the same number of hands now employed. 

Capital stock $ 10,000 

Number of hands employed 40 

Amount of products per annum, about S 45'000 

Amount paid for labor per annum $ 18 000 



32 THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 

LESTER & WASLEY. 

This firm manufacture envelope machinery, in their works on Frank- 
lin Street. 

Number of hands employed 12 

Amount paid for labor per annum. . S l2,ooo 



THE SIBLEY MACHINE CO. 

This company manufacture paper machinery, paper engines, cotton 
and woolen machinery, etc. 

Capital stock S 12,000 

Number of hands employed 40 

Amount paid for labor per annum S 15,000 

Amount of business done per annum S 140,000 



J. H. CRANSTON, 

Manufacturer Printing Presses. 

Works situated at Thamesville, and turning off a large number of 
printing presses annually, which are sold all over the country, and many 
exported abroad. Commenced business in 1879. 

Number of hands employed ... 60 

Amount annually paid for labor $ 36,000 

" of annual sales $ 95,000 



PAGE STEAM HEATING COMPANY. 

A joint stock company whose works are located on the Greeneville 
road, a short distance from the business centre of the city. Its cel- 
ebrated steam heaters, which have gained a high reputation for doing 
satisfactory and effective work, are sold in the various states. Col. 
W. C. Mowry, is treasurer and manager of the works. 

Capital stock. ... % 20,000 

Xumber of hands employed 10 

Amount annually paid for labor $ 10,000 



MISCELLANEOUS INDUSTRIES. 33 

BENGAL CHUTNEY MANUFACTORY. 

A recent industry which has been introduced in Norwich, and which 
promises to be of much importance in the future, its sales constantly 

increasing. Its factory for manufacturing located on Chestnut St. 

Number of hands emi^loyed 18 

Amount annually paid for labor S 8.000 



THAMRS KNITTING CO. 

Manufactures stockinets. Works on Franklin Street. 

Capital stock S lo.ooo 

Machines run 25 



J. B. MERROW & SONS, 

Manufacturers of crochet machines for finisliing the edges of knit goods, 
occupy rooms in Myers & Bailey building, on Franklin Street. 



NORWICH HOSIERY CO., 

Manufacture cotton hosiery, and run 14 knitting machines. Occupy 
rooms in Myers & Bailey building, on Franklin Street. 

The above three concerns employ about 30 hands, and pay out in the 
neighborhood of $15,000 ])er annum for labor. 



J. P. COLLINS & COMPANY, 
Manufacturers of Turbine Water Wheels and heavy Mill .\fachi/tery. 

Works on West Thames Street. 

Number of men employed 20 

Amount paid annually for labor $ l(),000 

Tons weight material annually used 200 

3 



34 IHE CIT\' OF NORWICH, CONN. 

NORWICH IRON FOUNl>RY, 
A. If. Vajjghn ^ Sons, Proprietors. 

Established in 1854. 

Number of men employed 35 

Amount paid annually for labor S 20,000 

Tons of iron consumed annually 600 

A. W. PRENTICE & CO., 

Afanufacturers of Cotton Ropes, Cords and Tiuines. 

This is probably one of the oldest rope-walks in the state, having been 
established in the latter part of the eighteenth century. For many years 
it was known as " John Breed's Rope-walk," and did a large business in 
making heavy ropes and cordage. 

Number of men employed 6 

Amount paid annually for labor. . $ 5, 000 

The above list, with the exception of one large mill in Greeneville, 
which declined to give any statistics to the Board of Trade, comprises all 
the manufactories in Norwich that are in active operation at the present 
time. It will be seen that there are in all, with the one exception, thir- 
ty-nine industries, or manufactories. 



MISCELLANEOUS INDUSTRIES. 



35 




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TRIBUTARY MANUFACTURING COMPANIES. 37 



MANUFACTURING COMPANIES THAT ARE TRIBUTARY TO NORWICH. 



Norwich is really the center of the great bulk of the manufacturing 
interests of Eastern Connecticut. In the neighboring towns, and in 
many of the villages on the Norwich & Worcester and the New Lon- 
don Nortliern railroads, are a number of mills that are owned wholly 
or in part by Norwich capitalists, and depend upon Norwich for their 
mill supplies and banking privileges. That our city is greatly in- 
debted to these outside interests for much of its wealth and prosperity, 
there is no denying. From these manufactories and their operatives our 
merchants derive a large trade, which has increased from year to year 
in the past, and promises to increase in the future. A large share of the 
freightage to and from these mills, passes through Norwich. 

We give below a list of those from whom we have been able to get 
statistics. 

THE W. A. SLATER COTTON MILLS, 

at Jewett City, nine miles from Norwich, is owned by Mr. Slater, who 
resides in this city. It has 16,000 si)indles, consumes 2,280,000 pounds 
raw cotton annually, produces 6,500,000 yards colored cottons, employs 
430 operatives, pays out $115,000 annually for labor, and handles about 
3,200 tons freight. 



THE ASHLAND COMPANY, 

in the same village, has a capital stock of $400,000, the great share of 
which is owned in Norwich. It has 25,000 spindles, consumes 830,000 
pounds raw cotton, produces 1,250,000 yards cambric, twills etc., em- 
ploys 350 operatives, and pays out $70,000 yearly for labor. 



38 THE CITY OF NORWICH. CONN. 

THE GRISWOLD COTTON MILL, 

in the town of Griswold, near the village of Voluntown, about twelve 
miles from Norwich, is owned by L. VV. Carroll of this city, where he 
has his main office. 

It has 11,000 spindles, consumes 800 bales of cotton yearly, produces 
3,000,000 yards print cloths a year, employs 130 operatives, pays out 
$50,000 a year for help, and handles about 800 tons freight. 



BRIGGS MANUFACTURING CO., 

in Voluntown, has a capital of $100,000 and runs three mills with 15,000 
spindles, consumes 900,000 pounds raw cotton, employs 200 operatives, 
pays out yearly for labor, $36,000. 

A portion of the stock owned in Norwich. 



GLASGO YARN MILLS CO. 

in the Town of Griswold, ten miles from Norwich, has a capital stock 
of $250,000 — partly owned in this city. It employs no hands, to whom 
is paid $32,000 a year for labor. It manufactures fine cotton yarns 
and consumes 450,000 lbs. long staple cotton a year, and produces 
340,000 lbs. fine yarns. 



ATTAWAUGAN COMPANY, 

comprises three mills — the Attawaugan and Ballou Mills at Dayville, 
Conn., and the Pequot Mill at Montville, Conn., seven miles from Nor- 
wich. They have a capital stock of $600,000, the majority of which is 
owned in Norwich, where the main office is located. The company 
runs 46,000 spindles, consumes 5,000 bales raw cotton yearly, employs 
800 operatives, and pay out $150,000 ar^nually for labor. Freights han- 
dled 4,000 tons, and amount paid yearly for mill supplies $25,000. Main 
office in this city 



TRIBUTARY MANUFACTURING COMPANIES. 39 

SAYLES & WASHBURN WOOLEN MILLS, 

at Mechanicsville, on the Norwich and Worcester Railroad. Partly 
owned in Norwich. Employ 352 operatives, pay annually for labor 
$106,000. Setts cards in mill, 18 ; and manufactures 438,000 yards 6-4 
cloth. 

WHITESTONE COMPANY. 

Mills at East Killingly. Capital stock $200,000. Run 8000 spindles, 
employ 100 hands, consumes 900 bales raw cotton annually, pay-roll 
$25,000 yearly, handle 800 tons freight, and make 18,000,000 yards cot- 
ton cloth. Stock owned in Norwich. 

KIRK MILLS. 

Situated at Central Village, eighteen miles from Norwich. The two 
mills run 11,000 spindles, employ 125 hands, consume 1,000 bales cotton, 
pay $30,000 annually for labor, and make 2,500,000 yards cotton cloth. 
Tons of freight handled, t,ooo. The mills are owned and managed by 
the Leavens Brothers, of Norwich- 

BOZRAHVILLE MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 

Located at Bozrahville, eight miles from Norwich. Capital stock 
$80,000, number of spindles 7944, employ 120 hands, pay annually for 
labor $32,000, manufactured during the past year 2,219,761 yards light 
sheetings and twills. Pounds cotton consumed, 476,487. Stock owned 
in Norwich. 

HALLVILLE MILLS. 

Located in Preston, four miles from Norwich. Employ 175 hands, 
and consume 720,000 pounds wool annually. Make 865,000 yards flan- 
nels, and pay out for labor $60,000 a year. Handle 2,200 tons freight 
The Hall Brothers, who own and manage the mills, live in Norwich, 
where they have their main office. 



40 THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 

PALMER BROTHERS, 

Manufacturers of bed comfortables, being the largest concern in the 
world that make the manufacture of this class of goods a specialty. 
They have three mills : one each at Filchville, Montville and Oakdale, 
which is in the town of Montville. The three mills are in the immedi- 
ate vicinity, and but a few miles from Norwich, and are partly owned in 
this city. 

FiTCHViLi.E Mill. 

Number of hands employed, 275 ; wages paid annually, $80,000 ; 
number of comfortables made in a year, 1,000,000; consumes 12,000,- 
000 yards calico and 6,000,000 lbs. cotton, and other material for filling 
in making the million comfortables, 

Montville I\1ill. 

Employs 150 hands — its yearly pay-roll amounting to $50,000 ; makes 
400,000 comfortables ; consumes 5,000,000 yds. calico and 2,500,000 lbs, 
cotton annually. 

Oakdale Mill. 

Employs 75 hands, and pays out $25,000 a year for labor ; makes 
5,000,000 comfortables ; and consumes 5,000,000 yards calico, and 2,- 
500,000 lbs. cotton and other material for filling annually. 

Sum Total of the Three Mills. 

IS umber of hands employed 500 

Wages paid annually $ 155,000 

Comfortables made annually 1,800,000 

Yards calico consumed annually 21,000,000 

' Lbs. cotlon and other material consumed annually 11,000,000 



NIANTIC WOOLEN MILLS. 

At East Lyme, sixteen miles from Norwich. Manufactures ladies' 
dress goods and flannels. Employs 150 hands, and its yearly pay-roll 
amounts to $40,000. Runs 12 setts cards. The mills are owned and 
managed by A. P. Sturtevant and Son, of Norwich. 



TRIBUTARY M ANUFACTURIN'G COMPANIES. 41 

WILLIMANTIC SILK COMPANY. 

Located just across the Shetucket river, in Preston, about a quarter 
of a mile from Norwich center. Manufactures silk ribbons. Employs 
ninety hands, and pays out to its help $25,000 annually. Its capital 
stock is $20,000, and consumes about 10,000 pounds raw silk a year. 
Was organized sixteen years ago. 



B. LUCAS & GO'S WOOLEN MILLS. 

At Poquetannock, four miles from Norwich center. Manufactures 
flannels and dress goods. Employ 48 hands, and pay out $20,000 a' 
year for wages. Make 325,000 yards goods, and consume 90,000 pounds 
scoured wool annually. Run four setts cards, and 28 115-inch looms. 
The concern is partly owned in Norwich. 



GLEN WOOLEN CO. 

J^ocated in Preston, about five miles from Norwich. Number of 
hands employed, 35 ; has 2 setts of cards, and consumes 75,000 lbs. of 
wool annually ; pays its help $12,000. Owned and managed by A. P. 
Sturtevant, of Norwich. 



R. G. HOOPER WOOLEN MILLS. 

Located at Montville, seven miles from Norwich. Manutactures 
fancy cassimeres ; employs 70 men, and pays for labor $30,000 a year ; 
has 4 setts cards, and makes 240,000 yards goods annually. 



L. M. HEERY .^ CO. WOOLEN ^IILLS. 

Located in Lisbon, on the Shetucket river, a few rods from the Nor- 
wich boundary. Make cassimeres ; employ 325 hands, and run 100 
looms and 17 setts cards ; pay-roll amounts to $75,000 a year; consumes 
1,000,000 lbs. wool, and produces 500,000 yards 6-4 goods. 



42 THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 

ALLEN WOOLEN MILLS. 

At Hanover, ten miles from Norwich. Manufacture flannels, tweeds 
and cassimeres ; run 6 sett cards, and lo narrow and 27 broad looms. 



AMBROSE REYNOLDS MILLS. 

At Blissville, in Lisbon, three miles from Norwich centre. Manu- 
factures cotton warp flannels and shoddy ; run 2 setts cards, 24 narrow- 
looms and I shoddy picker. 



B. F. SCHOLFIELD MILL. 

At Montville, about seven miles from Norwich. Manufactures sati- 
nets. Run one sett cards and four looms. 



CHARLES SCHOLFIELD MILL. 
At Montville. Manufactures woolen goods. One sett cards. 

BEAVER BROOK MILL. 

At Baltic, six miles from Norwich. Manufactures flannels. Run two 
setts cards, and twenty-two looms. 

J. B. SHANNON & CO'S MILL. 

At Baltic. Manufactures flannels. Run three setts cards, and twen- 
ty-four looms. 



WEST INDIA TRADE. RAILROAD FREIGHTS. 43 

WEST INDIA TRADE. 



Commercial relations between Norwich and the West Indies existed 
previous to the commencement of tlie present century, and have been 
kept up most of the time since, though not on a large scale. Many of the 
merchants of former days laid the foundations of handsome fortunes by 
exporting and importing live stock and various kinds of merchandise 
to and from these islands. The only house at iiresent engaged in the 
trade is that of J. M. Huntington & Co., which was established in 1S58. 
During the thirty years that the firm had vessels plying back and forth 
between the West Indies and Norwich, the amount of merchandise they 
have brought here, especially of molasses and sugar, would represent 
many millions of dollars, a great portion of which found purchasers in 
Eastern Connecticut. In the year 1887, the importations of the firm 
were : 

4,I0'5 hhds. molasses from Poito Rico, ) * 

^' ^ ,. .. ;j ,, - SI 74.000 

322 tierces u .. ^ , 1-, 

10 puncheons bay rum from Porlo Rico, / 

7obarrels " •* " [ 7,300 

24 hhds. sugar " " I1673 

1,902 bushels salt from Turk's Island 1,050 

.$184,023 

In addition to this, the firm brought from New Orleans by vessel 501 
bbls. molasses, valued at $10,900 ; and exported to Porto Rico cooper- 
age materials, provisions, etc., to the amount of $22,500. 



RAILROAD FREIGHTS. 



The Norwich & Worcester Railroad forwarded from Norwich, from 
Dec. ist, 1S86 to Dec. ist, 1887, 234,583 tons of freight, and delivered 
at Norwich in the same time, 51,595 tons. 



44 THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 



TONNAGE OF THAMES RIVER. 



The freight of all kinds brought up to Norwich by steamers and sail 
vessels during the past year amounts to 330,000 tons, valued at $4,000,000. 

One-fourth of this was landed at Allyn's Point, seven miles below the 
city, and the balance, about 250,000 tons, valued at $3,250,000, was 
brought to this port. 

The number of steamers of the "Norwich Line" that discharged 
freights at Allyn's Point and at wharf in Norwich to be transported 
north by the Norwich & Worcester Railroad, was 185 ; and the number 
of sail vessels with coal, pig iron, steel billets, etc-, landing at the same 
places for railroad transportation was 450. In addition to these, there 
were 569 steamers and sailing vessels that landed freights of lumber, 
brick, iron, coal and other merchandise at the wharves in Norwich for 
Norwich parties, making 1,204 sail vessels and steam vessels in all. 



COAL AND LUMBER. 



The facilities for shipping lumber and coal direct to the wharves in 
this city by sailing vessels or steamers, instead of transporting by rail, 
which would be much more expensive, makes Norwich a desirable mar- 
ket for purchasing the supplies. By careful estimates, it was found that 
in the immediate neighborhood of 60,000 tons of coal was handled in 
Norwich the past year, which does not include the very heavy amount 
handled at Allyn's Point, and transported by rail to Worcester and 
points beyond. 

Of the lumber trade, it was found that about 15,000,000 feet was han- 
dled in Norwich the past twelve months. 



COTTON AND WOOL TRADK. MILL PRIVILF.OES. 45 

COTTON AND WOOL TRADE. 



Norwich being the center of a large manufacturing district, its sales 
of raw material that enter into the making of cloths and of manufactur- 
ers' supplies are consequently heavy. The dealers in cottons and wools 
report their sales the last year to have been 3,000,000 pounds wool, and 
5,000,000 pounds cotton. 



MILL PRIVILEGES. 



It may be imagined by many after reading the statistics which we 
have given elsewhere of the large number of mills that are already in ac- 
tive operation in Norwicli, that all the available water power has been 
utilized. But such is not the fact, as there are several fine privileges 
that are so centrally located near tide-water and railroad facilities, as to 
offer great inducements to manufacturers to locate upon. The tunnel 
privilege, so called, on the Quinnebaug river about a mile above Greene- 
ville, is one of the best unoccupied privileges in New England. It has 
a 22 foot fall with a capacity of iSoo horse power, and can be developed 
at small cost. The Norwich & Worcester railroad adjoins it, and the 
Taftville station is but iioo yards away. The privilege, with the nine- 
ty acres of land that goes with it, has been recently surveyed by the 
Shetucket Company, to whom it belongs, for the purpose of putting it 
in the market. The Falls Company have a desirable privilege located 
a short distance above their mill at the Falls village. It has a fall of 
fourteen feet, and a 200 horse power, and but a few hundred yards dis- 
tant from the New London Northern railroad. Near the Totokett Mills, 
above Taftville, is another privilege with 13 foot fall, and dam already 
built. It has a capacity of 140 horse power the whole year, and 360 
for part of the year. 



46 THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 



NORWICH POST OFFICE. 



The following statistics, showing the business done at the Norwich 
Post Office during the year ending December 31st, 1887, have been 
kindly furnished the Board of Trade by Postmaster Avery. 

RECEIPTS. 

Received from stamps, envelopes, etc $26,747 98 

" box rents i,47i 5° 

" waste paper . 417 

$28,223 65 

EXPENSES. 

Post office $ 5,906 22 

Postmaster's salary 2,700 00 

Letter Carriers' expenses 5,554 93 

Mail Messenger 332 50 

$14,493 65 

Net income $13, 730 00 



MONEY ORDER BUSINESS. 

Balance on hand January ist, 1887 $ 304 90 

Domestic money orders issued 44.830 74 

" " " fees 35913 

Postal notes 4, 167 89 

" fees 7539 

International money orders 7.886 30 

" " " fees 105 10 

357,729 45 

Domestic money orders paid $33,362 42 

Postal notes paid 4, 206 67 

International money orders paid 1,118 74 

Amount repaid 470 22 

Amount remitted by draft 18,231 75 

Balance on hand December 31, 18S7 339 65 

S57.729 45 

REGISTRY DEPARTMENT. 

Number of letters and packages registered 3,236 

" ■' " " received 3.783 

" " " " in transit 4.310 

11,329 



NORWICH POST OFFICE. 47 

LETTER CARRIERS' DEPARTMENT. 

Carriers employed 7 

Delivery trip daily 22 

Collection " " .•••.... 24 

Registered letters delivered ii497 

Letters delivered. 540,192 

Postal cards delivered 80,585 

Newspapers, packages, circulars, etc. delivered 432,234 

Letters collected 366,319 

Postal cards collected 56,090 

Newspapers, etc., collected 41.3T8 

1.518.235 

BOX AND GENERAL DELIVERY. 

Letters delivered 506,142 

Postal cards 79. 720 

Newspapers, packages, etc n 2. 305 

698,167 

MAILING DEPARTMENT. 

Letters mailed •••• 1.160,334 

Postal cards mailed 150, 307 

Circulars, newspapers, packages, etc 696,870 

2.007,511 

GENERAL BUSINESS. 

Total receipts from postage account. ... $28,223 ^^5 

Balance on hand, money order account, January 1st, 18.S7. . . 304 90 

Total receipts from money orders, etc 57,424 55 

$85,953 10 

Total expenses Post Office ..$14,49365 

Net income to department postage account ... 13,730 00 

Total money orders paid 39.158 05 

Total money orders remitted by draft 18,231 75 

Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1887 339 65 

$85,953 10 

The Post Office receipts for the past year liave been $3,000 larger than 
any previous year. 



48 



THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 



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Biurell W. Hyde. 
C. B. Chapman. 
F. L. Woodward, 




Costello Lippitt, 
Geo. D. Coit, 
J. Hunt Smith, 




Presidents. 


Franklin Nichols, 
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lAXKS AND BANKING. STREET RAILWAYS. 49 

BANKS AND BANKING. 



Norwich is the banking centre of Eastern Connecticut, and carries 
a heavy capital to accommodate the many manufacturers and business 
men in this part of the state. It is safe to say that no city in New 
England of its size has better banking facilities founded on a sounder 
basis. The investments of the different banks are loaned on the 
safest securities, and depositors, as well as stockholders, have every 
reason to rest assured that their money and their interests are well pro- 
tected. The following table, giving a list of the national banks, shows 
the amount of stock of each, and when first organized, together with 
the amount of capital stock, and the surplus on hand the ist of January, 
1888. It also gives the deposits and surplus of the savings banks on 
the same date. It will be seen that the six national banks have a capi- 
tal of $2,320,000.00, and a surplus of earnings amounting to $606,700; 
while the three savings institutions have deposits amounting to $13," 
101,365.39, and a surplus of $342,500.00, all combined making the heavy 
total of $15,421,365.39 of capital and deposits, and $949,200.00 of sur- 
plus. The Norwich Savings Bank with its $8,066,646.39 of deposits is 
one of the oldest savings institutions in New England, and, with one 
exception, has the heaviest amount of deposits of any similar institu- 
tion in Connecticut. 

Worcester, which claims at present, a population of about 100,000. 
has but seven national banks with an aggregate capital of $2,250,000.00, 
and four savings banks, with an aggregate of $19,000,000.00 of accu- 
mulated savings. 



STREET RAILWAYS. 



Street railways are not only a great luxury, but have become a pub- 
lic necessity in all of our cities. Norwich is not behind the spirit of 
the age in this respect, being well provided and accommodated with 
this convenient and pleasant mode of transportation. The street cars 

4 



50 IHK (TIY OK NORWICH, CONN. 

commenced running in rS68, and the travel on them has gradually in- 
creased from year to year, and have proved such a convenience that it 
would be difficult to dispense with them. One of the lines extends 
from Franklin Square to the upper end of Greeneville, a distance of i^^ 
miles ; and another from Fiinklin Square through North Washington St. 
to Norwich Town and Bean Hill, a distance of 3^^ miles. From the 
latter line there is a branch that extends from Williams Fark through 
Sachem Street to the Falls village, and from thence through Lafayette 
Street to North Washington Street, where it connects with the Norwich 
Town and Bean Hill route, a distance of about i]/^ miles. The line 
from Greeneville is being extended and the rails laid to Taftville, 21^ 
miles, thus connecting that large and thriving village with our city. It 
is expected that this extension will be completed, and the cars running 
early in the coming spring. 

The cars run at stated intervals during the day, and until ten o'clock 
in the evening, thus being a great accommodation to merchants and 
others doing business in the city and living in the suburbs. 



CITY WATER SUPPLY= 



No city in New England has a more abundant supply of good, 
wholesome water than Norwich. The reservoir, which covers 66 acres, 
being \}i miles long and an average width of 480 feet, is situated on 
high, elevated ground in the northerly part of the town, 2^2 miles from 
Franklin Square, the centre of the city. At this point the level of the 
overflow at the dam is 234 feet, and at tide water 253 feet, thus giving 
it a pressure or head that makes it of inestimable value as an auxiliary 
to our fire department in extinguishing fires. The reservoir gets its sup- 
ply from natural springs that flow into it from the surrounding hills, and 
a water shed of upwards of 400 acres. It has a capacity of 350,000,000 
gallons, and by a small outlay can be made to hold a much larger 
amount should future demands require ; but, at present, the supply is 
fully adequate to the wants of a city twice the size of Norwich. The 
water from the reservoir is conducted as far as the Soldiers' Monument, 
at the head of Williams Park — a distance of 1J2 miles — in two mains : 




^^^■ 





through 2.^ in- cast iron 7 



PLA.N OF PIPES THROUGH DAM, 

F'oputation /GDOO. 

Cost of original ttrorks. jI^U.67^6^JZ. 
Disti^ihvilion - l/Virau^Jitiron ceTfteni Zineci. 
/Oinch. ^B??JfeGt. 

h ■■ 5i>t^/S ■ 
i/ ■ /9907 

To tat Z&nyth, 79^0/. 




WATER SUPPLY 

NORWICH CONN. 



T^orroClatian 25000» 

Total cast qfiATOTlcsJ^irrSi^'it'SjSSi 
Expense foryexir! ^noHny - - - /^ 
Receipts .- " - " " -^v 

/^ - - ¥^ 

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Ibtxil lenpih of dListriiz*l;to7i /6- 

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T^r-es&uTB in /bicszTzess "portion ^OZ'bB, 



I. 



CITY WATER SUPPLY. SEWERS AND SEWERAGE. 5 I 

one ] 6-inch and one 14-incIi. From this point water is distributed 
through smaller pipes to all i)arts of the city, including Greeneville, 
Laurel Hill, Thamesville and the Falls village. At the present time 
the water is supplied to 3,277 families, 815 offices and stores, 259 livery 
and private stables, 318 garden hydrants and hose, 287 public fire hy- 
drants, 20 fire cisterns. 16 school-houses, 22 fountains, 41 steam en- 
gines, 62 manufactories, 230 street front sprinklers, 45 saloons, 26 
markets, 25 green-houses and graperies, 9 fire engine houses, and for a 
large number of other purposes. The amount received for water rates 
for the year ending March 31st, 1887, was $31,897.02, and the sums 
paid for keeping the works in repair, and for salaries and various ex- 
penses, amounted to $10,231.11, leaving a balance of $21,665.91 due 
the city. The total length of pipes now laid in the streets, including 
the mains, is 188,666 feet, or a trille less than 36 miles. 

The distribution of 287 fire hydrants throughout the streets of the city, 
and the pressure of a 250-feet head, makes the city almost safe against 
a fire of any magnitude. With such a force of water from a fountain 
head of such large capacity, in connection with our efficient fire de- 
partment, Norwich virtually insures itself against the devouring element. 
Hose attached to one of the hydrants will easily throw a stream over 
the highest buildings in the city. The first public test of the fire hy- 
drants was made in 1869, when under a 220-feet iiead, water was forced 
through 200 feet of 2^ -inch hose, with a i ^2-inch nozzle, vertically, to 
a height of 140 feet. The whole cost of the water works up to the pres- 
ent time is about $600,000. 



SEWERS AND SEWERAGE. 



It is difficult for any city or town to obtain good sewerage where it 
is built on land that has an almost level surface. In such localities 
sewers may be, and are constructed, and if they do their work at all, 
they do it sluggishly, and to little or no purpose. Water will not llow 
naturally unless moved by the impetus of a downward tendency- 



52 THK CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 

Many of our New England, as well as our Western cities, suffer from 
having been built on plain lands, where it is impossible to get good 
drainage, and, in consequence, are visited periodically with fevers, epi- 
demics and contagious diseases. All of the great scientists of the pres- 
ent day, and those among the medical fraternity who have made the or- 
igin of various diseases and epidemics a special study, unite in affirming 
that a large majority, even if not all epidemics and scourges which 
sweep off its victims by the hundreds and thousands — often designated 
as " visitations of God," — are attributable to the want of sewerage, or 
to imperfect sewerage. As an instance in support of this conclusion, 
the case of Memphis, Tennessee, is referred to, which was almost de- 
populated a few years ago by yellow fever. Here, on account of the 
even surface of the land on which Memphis is built, no public or pri- 
vate sewerage had ever been attempted ; but when the dreaded scourge 
had almost wasted itself for the want of more victims to feed upon, the 
remnant of inhabitants awoke from their lethargy, and at an enormous 
expense and debt to the city, constructed sewers, with artificial flowage, 
which have seemingly had the effect of averting a repetition of the epi- 
demic. 

Happily, Norwich is so situated that it needs no artificial means to 
force running water through its sewers, or to wash its streets and gut- 
ters like Paris, and many cities which could be mentioned. Nature 
takes this work upon herself in our city, and often, after heavy rains 
and freshets, does it too lavishly. The streets lined with beautiful resi- 
dences, ware-houses and public buildings, rising one above another, are 
built on lands that rise abruptly from the rivers' banks that almost en- 
close the city, thus giving a natural and almost effective drainage. In 
connection with what nature has done in this respect, Norwich has 
built within a few years 9J/2 miles of sewers, at an expense of $160,- 
000.00, through its principal streets, which empty themselves in a rapid 
current into the river. Vital statistics testify that there is no city in 
New England more healthy than Norwich, or one that is more free of 
epidemics of every kind, malaria, fevers or fever and ague. 

Three years ago, 5,111 feet (a trifle less than a mile) of sewers were 
built in the streets of Greeneville, at an expense of $30,552.64, thus 
making that thrifty manufacturing suburb of the city a healthy, as well 
as a pleasant place of residence. 




ST. PATRICKS ROMAN CATHOLIC CHL Kc H, NOKWRH, CONN. 



CHURCHES. 




FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH. 



54 



THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 



CHURCHES. 



Norwich is well represented in churches, which embrace all well- 
know^n denominations and societies. The buildings are so located as to 
be convenient to all parts of the city, and to cover the entire popula- 
tion, rich and poor, with the benign influences growing out of the or- 
ganizations. In all of the churches there are well-organized societies 
for Christian work among the poor, in attending the sick, feeding the 
hungry, and for the purposes of extending a hospitable hand to strang- 
ers, thereby exerting a great influence for good. By the list given be- 
low, it will be seen that three of the churches were organized long be- 
fore the commencement of the present century— the Norwich Town 
Congregational Church being the oldest, dating back to 1660. 

The following list embraces all the church organizations, all of which 
possess comfortable buildings for holding services, several of which are 
handsome architectural structures, and ornaments to the city. 



First Conrrregational Church, Norwich Town, 



Broadway "' " 

Second 

Park 

Fourth, 

Taftville 

Christ Church (Episcopal), 

Trinity " " 

St. Andrew's Ch. 

Grace Chapel 

Central M. E. Church, 

East Main St. " 

S.ichem St. ' " 

First 

Greeneville, 

First Baptist Churcli, 

Central " " 

Third 

Mount Calvary " " (coFd) 49 High Street, 

Universalist Church, 2gS Main Street, 

German Lutheran Church, 169 Franklin Street, 

A. M. E. Zion's Church (col'd) 362 

St. Patrick's R. C. Church, 205 Broadway, 

Sacred Heart " ' Taftville, 

St. Joseph's '■ " Occum, 

St. Mary's " " North Main Street, 



89 Broadway, 
63 Church Street, . 
283 Broadway, . 
Greeneville, . 
Taftville, 

78 Washington Street, 
Church Street, 
Greeneville, . 
Yantic, 
57 Main Street, 

315 " 

49 Sachem Street, 

Bean Hill, 

Greeneville, 

239 West Main Street, 

43 Broadway, 

Greeneville, 



Organized 1660 

1852 

" 1760 

1874 

1867 
1746 



1859 

1855 



i3oo 
1840 
1846 
1871 




BROADWAY CONGKEGA 1 lON .v i 




PARK. C0NC;REGA'I10XA1. (Hl'RCH, NOKWU H. i(i\\ 



CHURCHE? 




Mj-ioltWyafci^* 



FIRST CONGREGAlKi.NAL CHLkCH. 




SECOND CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. 



56 THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 

Making, in all, of different denominations : 

Congregational, ........... 6 

Methodist Episcopal, ......... 5 

Episcopal, ............ 4 

Baptist ■ 4 

Roman Catholic, ........... 4 

Univeisalist, .......... i 

German Lutheran, .......... I 

A. M. E. Zion's, I 

26 

In addition to the above, is the Buckingham Chapel, 140 Boswell 
Avenue, connected with the Broadway Congregational Church, a neat 
and handsome structure, the gift of Governor William A. Buckingham ; 
and Trinity Church Chapel on Mt. Pleasant Street, connected with 
Trinity Church. 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES. 



The Otis Library, at the corner of Church Street and Broadway, was 
erected and endowed with a liberal fund for the purchase of new books 
by the late Joseph Otis, in 1858. It contains at present about 15,000 
carefully selected volumes, besides having on its tables about 50 Amer- 
ican and foreign magazines and reviews. All of the new and popular 
books are purchased as fast as issued from the press. For the use of the 
books and periodicals a moderate sum is charged. 

The library is open from 10 a. m. to 8 p. m. every day in the week, 
except Sundays, and its quiet alcoves are a pleasant retreat for those who 
have leisure hours for reading and looking over books of reference. 

The library building is already too small to accommodate the rapidly- 
increasing number of books, and the indications are that in a short time 
it will be enlarged to double its present size. It has a fund of about 
$20,000, the income of which is devoted exclusively to the purchase of 
new books. 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES. 




OTIS LIBRARY. 



58 THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 

The Peck Library, in the new Slater Memorial Hall, was designed by 
its donor, Mrs. General William Williams, more particularly for the 
benefit of the scholars of the Norwich Free Academy ; but on cer- 
tain days of the week it is open to the public, though none of the books 
are allowed to be taken from the building. It contains about 6,000 
volumes, and has a fund of $10,000. 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 



The philanthropic and Christian organizations under the above name 
are rapidly becoming factors in the business and social life of our cities. 
There are over one thousand in the United States alone, and last year 
(1887) the benevolent contributions to these associations amounted to 
upwards of two millions of dollars. Six millions of dollars are already 
invested in association property, and the buildings recently erected 
are among the beautiful and attractive edifices of modern times, a prac- 
tical demonstration of the value of their work. 

The aim of the organization is " the improvement of the three-sided 
nature of young men," — physical, mental and moral — commends itself to 
business men, in that, when demonstrated, better service is secured, and 
the moral tone of a city is made higher and more intellectual. 

The organization in Norwich from the start, April, 1885, has had the 
warmest sympathy and support of the business men of the city. The rooms 
— ten in number — are located conveniently on a principal street, and are 
in arrangement and furnishing second to none in the state. The associa- 
tion, from the first, has been popular with young men — the average daily 
attendance being upwards of one hundred and fifty. The educational 
classes are of the best, the gymnasium is popular, and the religious ser- 
vices largely attended. Yet the organization has by no means struck 
twelve, and the ambition of the managers and friends of the association 
is looking forward to the day when, like similar institutions of other 
cities, they shall have a building of their own, adapted to their large 
and varied work. Strong encouragement has been given for the erec- 
tion of such a building, the cost of which will probably exceed $50,000. 



DISTANCE TABLE. 59 



DISTANCES BETWEEN NORWICH AND IMPORTANT RAILROAD CENTRES. 



Norwich from Boston, ..... 95 miies. 

" " Worcester, .... 59 " 

" '' Springfield, .... 67 " 

" " Hartford, .... 48 " 

" New Haven, 6^y^ " 

" " Bridgeport, . . . . 81 " 

" " Williraantic, 17 " 

" " Palmer, 52 " 



Putnam, 



33 



Waterbury, . 81 '" 

Middletown, .... 47 " 

Providence, . . 5 ' /2 " 

Meriden, ..... 66 " 

New Britain, .... 58 " 

Norwalk, ..... 95 " 

New London, . 133/3 " 

New York, 136^2 " 

Albany, ..... 280 " 

Buffalo, • • ■ . • 559 " 

Cleveland, 7'7 " 

Cincinnati, ... 744 

Chicago, . . 10 :;4 ■■ 

Philadelphia, •2-4/'2 " 

Baltimore, t,2t, 

Washington, . . ,^').^ 

Pittsburg, . 5^7 " 



6o THI-: CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 



EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES OF NORWICH 



To those who are seeking a change of residence, in order that their 
children may have the advantages of schools of the highest order and 
excellence, no place in the country offers greater inducements than 
Norwich. From an early date the subject of education has been of 
great interest to its citizens, and this interest has increased from year to 
year, until it has developed a high grade of schools, and a school sys- 
tem that has but few, if any equals in the country. In 1850, or there- 
abouts, the change was made from the old school system to graded 
schools. The change was not all made in a year, or five years, but the 
work, backed up by those who had the future interests of Norwich at 
heart, was gradual, until every district had new and beautiful school 
buildings, with graded schools of the highest order. 

The Central District has five handsome school buildings, with graded 
schools of which the Broadway School may be considered the high, or 
grammar school. 

The West Chelsea District has four school buildings, all of which are 
graded. 

The Norwich Town, Falls and Greeneville Districts have each a com- 
modious school building, with graded schools. 

In addition to these, there are ten school buildings in districts of the 
town outside of those above mentioned, making in all twenty-two school 
buildings in Norwich, all of which are handsomely built, and with am- 
ple room for the scholars, which are increasing in numbers from year to 
year. The Broadway school-house, together with the new addition re- 
cently built, which is of equal size of the original building, cost over 
$60,000. 

The enumeration of scholars in town between the ages of four and 
sixteen years numbers 2,515 ; and the apportionment of public money 
to the several school districts for the support of the public schools for 
the year ending August 31st, 1887, was $25,872.38. 



EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES. 



6i 




BROADWAY SCHOOL-HOUSE— CENTRAL DISTRICT. 



()2 THK CrrV OF NORWICH, CONN. 



THE NORWICH FREE ACADEMY. 

Which is the crowning apex of our school system, was dedicated in 
1 856. For this noble institution, Norwich is chiefly indebted to the long 
and persevering efforts of Rev. Dr. John P. Gulliver, who first con- 
ceived the idea of establishing an endowed school of this class, and who 
secured the co-operation and generous contributions of many of our 
wealthy and most benevolent citizens in carrying out the project. Funds 
sufficient to erect the present handsome and commodious building, and 
endow it with a fund sufficient to employ an able corps of teachers 
were at last realized, and very soon the much-talked of Academy, which 
was to be free to the rich and poor alike, became a reality. What its 
success as an educator has been during the last thirty odd years is ap- 
parent from the high stand its many graduates have attained in the sev- 
eral professions, mercantile pursuits and the various walks of life. 

During the past year (1887) the scholars attending the academy — 
boys and girls — numbered 253, all of whom, with the few exceptions of 
those living outside of the town, worked their way up from the primary 
to the senior departments of the graded schools of Norwich. All those 
who wish to enjoy the privileges of the academy are obliged to pass 
rigid examinations in arithmetic, geography, history, English grammar 
and spelling before they can enter. The time for completing an 
academic course, and before the scholar can graduate and receive his 
diploma, is four years. 

There are two courses of study : the classical course, which gives a 
thorough preparation for college ; and the general course, which pre- 
pares for practical life, or for scientific and technical schools. At the com- 
mencement of the second middle year, scholars choose between the two 
courses, and are assigned to the course they prefer. 

It was at first designed by the trustees of the institution that none but 
those living in the limits of Norwich should be admitted to the acade- 
my, but as the school gained in excellence and reputation, the requests 
of scholars from outside the borders for admittance became so frequent 
and pressing, that it was at last decided to discard the rule originally 
adhered to, and allow scholars from the neighboring towns, or elsewhere, 
the same privilege as those living in town. To these non-resident pu- 
pils a tuition fee of $10 a term of three terms a year is charged, in ad- 
dition to the $5 for incidentals. 



EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES. 



(>3 




NORWICH KREE ACADEMY 



EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES. 65 

No scholars of the academy have more distinguished themselves, or 
brought greater honor to the school, than the many representatives from 
the country towns of Eastern Connecticut. A warm invitation is ex- 
tended to all young men and women of this class who desire to enjoy 
the advantages of the academy, especially to such as contemplate a 
college course, to correspond with the principal. Dr. Keep, with refer- 
ence to entrance into the academy. The school, at present, contains 
no boarding house of its own, l)ut good board may be obtained, at low 
rates, in excellent families residing not far distant from the school. 
Most of the scholars who come from out of town, and there are forty 
at present, remain in Norwich only from Monday morning to Friday 
afternoon, and pay for board for only four-and-a-half days. In some 
cases, out-of-town scholars club together, and board themselves, thus 
making their term expenses very light. 

The productive funds, whose income supports the academy, amount 
to $153,056.00. In addition to this, the several funds for scholarship, 
the Peck Library fund, the cost of the building and grounds, furniture 
and philosophical apparatus, swells the amount contributed to the ])er- 
nianent support of the academy about $240,000.00 since its incorpora- 
tion in 1854. The beautiful memorial building, presented the trustees 
of the academy by Wm. A. Slater, for educational purposes in connec- 
tion with that institution, cost $160,000.00, which makes the total as- 
sets of the academy amount to $400,000.00. 



THE SLATER MEMORIAL BUILDING. 

Norwich may well feel proud of the large and elegant building re- 
cently conipleted and i)resented to the trustees of the Free Academy 
by William A. Slater, in memory of his father. It is 150 feet long bv 
68 feet wide, and has a round tower on the front rising to the height of 
145 feet. The structure is of dark red brick and brown sand-stone, 
resting upon a base of Monson granite. The whole of the interior is 
faced with pressed brick and terra-cotta, and the wainscotings through- 
out are of polished gray marble, which give a rich and pleasant effect. 
The first floor contains a large, spacious hall designed to be used by the 
scholars of the PVee Academy for graduating exercises, and also, for 
lectures, concerts, amateur theatricals, etc. In the rear are two small 
halls, separated from the main hall with sliding glass partitions, which 
5 



66 THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 

can be tl-.rown open, making one grand hall capable of holding i,ioo 
peo])le. The lart-e s|)ace over the main hall, comprising the two upper 
stories, is to be devoted to a museum, which is designed to be one of 
the finest, as well as one of the largest in New England. It is 47 feet 
high, and its four sides are encircled by an i8-feet gallery. The mu- 
seum will soon be stored with rare and interesting treasures of art, 
gathered from the old world. Through Mr. Slater's generosity, an agent 
is now abroad purchasing replicas of art, and also, plaster-cast repro- 
ductions of the master-pieces of the great Roman, Greek and Italian 
sculptors. 

A portion of the second and third stories west of the large museum 
hall is occupied by the Peck Library, and two large and commodious 
rooms to be used in connection with the Free Academy for classes in 
drawing, painting, etc. The Peck Library room deserves a more than 
passing notice. It is large and spacious, with lofty arched ceilings of 
polished cherry, with book-cases, tables, chairs, etc., made of the same 
wood. A goodly space of one end of the room is occupied by a large 
and beautiful terra-cotta fire-place and mantel, built after the style of 
" y' olden time," and such as will be found in the baronial castles of 
the old world. 

In the vestibule of the main entrance of the memorial building is an 
elegant bronze tablet, about five feet high and three feet wide, bordered 
with a laurel wreath, on which is the following inscription : 

^l)is Bttilbing, 

DEDICATED TO THE EDUCATION OF THE YOUNG, 

AND COMMEMORATIVE OF JOHN F. SLATER, 

IS ERECTED BY HIS SON, 

lUiH. a, scales li, 

AND BY HIM PRESENTED TO THE 

NORWICH FREE ACADEMY, 

IN GRATEFUL RECOGNITION 

OF ADVANTAGES THERE ENJOYED. 



RAILROADS. 67 



RAILROADS. 



Norwich has two railroads, the Norwich & Worcester and the New 
London Northern. The former, of which Norwich is the southern ter- 
minus, is one of the oldest of the first two or three railroads that were 
built in this country, having been chartered as long ago as 1832. Since 
its completion, no road in the country has been more ably or carefully 
managed, or more free from accidents or mishaps arising from negli- 
gence, or incompetency. This road was leased to the Boston, Hartford 
and Erie R. R. Co. in 1869, and the lease assumed by its successor, the 
New York and New England R. R. Co., in 1SS5. 

Between Norwich and Worcester, there are five regular trains that run 
daily each way, Sundays excepted. The steamboat trains that leave 
Norwich at 4:45 a. m., with passengers from the New York steamers 
that land at New London, connect at Putnam with trains for Boston, 
and the trains that leave Worcester at 7:40 p. M., and from Boston at 
6:30 p. M. with passengers for New York and way stations, also connect 
at Putnam. 

The New London Northern railroad, which passes through Norwich, 
runs seven daily trains, Sundays excepted, between different points on 
the road. Its northern terminus is Braltleboro, Vermont. Connections 
are made at Willimantic for Hartford, Middletown and New York, and 
at Palmer with the Boston & Albany and Ware River roads, for all 
points west and north. A late daily train from Brattleboro connects at 
New London with the Norwich line of steamers for New York, every 
evening, Sundays excepted. 



68 



THK CM'^■ OI' NORWICH, CONN. 




WATER FACILITIKS. 69 



STEAMERS FOR NEW YORK. 



THE "NORWICH l.INE." 

The " Norwich Line" of steamers for New York is one of the old- 
est, safest and most popular routes that connect the great metropolis 
with New England. It is a daily passenger and freight line, and is con- 
trolled and operated by the New York and New England Railroad, the 
connections with which bring passengers from Boston and Worcester 
and intermediate points, and from the Boston & Albany, Worcester & 
Nashua, and New London Northern railroads. The line consists of 
five large, iron steamers, namely: the " City of Worcester," "City of 
New York," " City of Boston," " City of Lawrence," and " City of 
Norwich." The first three land and receive passengers at New London, 
and the two latter, the " ("ity of Lawrence," and " City of Norwich," 
which carry freight ])rincipally, make Norwich their terminus on this 
end of the line. The " City of Worcester," which has recently been 
built, is one of the largest and most elegant steamers that plough the 
waters of the Sound. She is 340 feet long, 80 feet wide, and is built 
for strength, as well as elegance. 

Persons traveling by th.e " Norwich Line " arrive at Pier 40, North 
River, at an early hour in the morning, in time to take all the early 
trains South and West by crossing the Pennsylvania Railroad Ferry, 
whose pier joins that of the " Norwich Line." The Norwich steamers 
leave New York daily, Sundays excepted, at 5 p. m. in the summer, and 
4:30 p. M. in the winter. 

In addition to the above steamers, there is a propeller line for carry- 
ing freight, that makes regular trips between Norwich and New York. 

During tlie summer season, two lines of steamers run daily between 
Norwich and the summer resorts on Long Island Sound. Persons leav- 
ing Norwich in the morning by one of these steamers "can spend the 
day, or a good share of it, at either Watch Hill, Block Island, Mystic 
Island, Fort Griswold or Pequot House, and return to their homes by 
six or seven o'clock in the afternoon. 



-JO THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 

THE CITY HALL. 



This building, which was erected fifteen years ago, is one of the hand- 
somest public edifices in the state, and of which the citizens are justly 
proud. It is built of Philadelphia pressed brick of the finest quality, 
with basement, lintels, window trimmings, etc., of faced granite. In 
addition to the city offices, which comprise the Council Chamber, May- 
or's office, Chief Engineer of the Fire Department's office, City Water 
Works, City Collector's and Treasurer's offices, are the Superior Court 
rooms, the Police Court rooms, the Town Hall for public meetings, the 
Judge of Probate, Town Clerk and Treasurer's offices, Selectmen's 
rooms and Police Head-quarters with twenty cells for criminals and of- 
fenders, offices for the Clerk of Courts New London County, and the 
County Commissioners. The building cost $360,000, and is an orna- 
ment to the city. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Norwich is well protected by its police force, which consists of 
eighteen efficient men, including its staff officers. In addition to this 
number, there are six special policemen, appointed by the Board of 
Common Council, to act in case of emergency. Within a short time 
three signal boxes: one on the corner of Franklin Square and Franklin 
Street ; one at the West Side, corner of Thames and West Main Streets ; 
and one at Greeneville, have been connected with police head-quarters, 
and give good satisfaction. By the telephone communication connected 
with these signal boxes, the officer in charge of the head-quarters can 
communicate with patrolmen in different parts of the city, day or night, 
at a moment's notice. It also enables patrolmen to send electric calls 
for help whenever occasion requires. The scarcity of buri^laries, street 
brawls and thieving attest the efficiency of this department. Its cost to 
the city is about $17,000 per annum. 



llkK DKl'AKTMKNT AND I.KiHTS. 72 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



The city has three steam fire engines, two hook and ladder compa- 
nies, seven hose companies and nine engine houses. Twenty-three fire 
alarm boxes are located so as to be convenient to residents in all parts 
of the city. 'J"he department has 300 officers and men, 240 of whom are 
under pay for their services. Six thousand feel of hose are kept con- 
stantly on hand to be used in connection with the steam fire engines 
and the 287 fire hydrants that are located at available points through- 
out the city. As has been stated on another page, these hydrants are 
fed from the city reservoir, and have a pressure that throws a stream 
over the highest buildings, thus almost effectually protecting the city 
against a fire of any magnitude. The very few fires that ha\e occurred 
during the last several years, and the small loss that has resulted from 
the same, attest the thorough and skillfid manner in which fires are 
handled by the department and ils efficient chief. The latter po])ular 
officer makes it his business to vis^it and personally inspect at intervals 
during the year all of the manufactories and buildings throughout the 
city to see that they are guarded from fires, either by accident, or from 
the im]:)roper construction of cliimneys, Hues and smoke pipes. The 
chief of the Boston fire department, who makes a sjiecialty of record- 
ing all the fires, and their origin, throughout the country, recently stated 
that Norwich, according to its size, suffered the least from fires and the 
loss attending the same of any city in New England. The cost of the 
fire department to the city the past year was a trifle less than $10,000. 



LIGHTS. 



Norwich is well provided with light, both from gas and electricity. 
The use of gas, of course, predominates, and is supplied at reasonable 
rates. There are fifteen miles of gas pipes, which are not only laid in 
all the streets of the city, but extend out into the suburban villages. 
I'he electric light, which is supplied from the Thomson-Houston system, 
has lately been introduced into the city, and lights many of the business 
streets and principal stores. The gas comjjany have a capital stock of 
$125,000, and the electric liglit comi)any of $25,000. 




'S^-b.v'^vSL' 



AS A PLACE OF RESIDENCK. 73- 



NORWICH AS A PLACE OF RESIDENCE. 



So much of our space has been devoted to statistical information of 
the manufacturing and business interests of our city, it may be inferred 
by many wlio are strangers to the place that Norwich, like many man- 
ufacturing centres in New England, is not desirable as a place of resi- 
dence. But such is not the fact. Probably no citv in New England is 
more picturesquely situated, or more attractive in its varied beauties, 
than this same Norwich. Lying between sheltering hills, watered by the 
Thames, Shetucket, Yanticand Quinnebaug rivers, shaded from the heat 
of summer by lordly elms, oaks and maples, it excites the admiration 
and delight of all visitors, and has gained for itself the notoriety of be- 
ing the most charming city in New England. It is the city and country 
combined. Stroll through Washington Street and Broadway, and view 
the beautiful private residences on either side of those charming thor- 
oughfares. Where is their e(iu3l in outward elegance, or picturesijue 
surroundings ? Rest, for a moment in your stroll, at Williams Park, the 
plaza of the city, encircled, as it is, by fine elms and more of the beau- 
tiful residences which have made Norwich famous. A short distance 
to the east is a background of wooded hills ; and to the west, an oi)en, 
undulating country, with vistas of forests, farm houses and streams of 
flowing water. Near by, and facing the park, is the handsome Slater 
Memorial building, the Free Academy and Park Church, which have 
been elsewhere mentioned. From the upper end of the Park, and near 
the fine Soldier's Monument, take the street that leads to Norwich 
Town, a mile or more distant, which was the original settlement long 
before there was a building where the city now stands. Here, perched 
upon a high, rocky cliff in the rear of the present church edifice, the first 
church was built by the early settlers — built high, and almost inaccessi- 
ble, with a stockade around it to jirotcct the building and tlie worship- 
ers from the sudden onslaughts of the wily savages. It required a good 
amount of courage to attend church in those days, for there was likely 
to be danger lurking behind every rock and forest tree. The brave 



74 THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN. 

church-goers reHgiously carried their rifles with them, and during divine 
service armed sentinels were stationed outside to guard against sudden 
attacks. 

In this old town lived the Huntingtons, the Hydes, the Fitches, the 
Clevelands, the Masons, the Tracys, and scores of others of honored 
memories, whose ashes have long since mingled with the dust. Near 
the village green Mrs. Sigourney grew up from childhood amid the ro- 
mantic scenery, the beauty of which she afterwards loved so dearly to 
recount in verse and prose. Times have changed wonderfully since 
those days ; the public buildings have either been torn down, or chang- 
ed into modern dwelling houses ; and with the exception of some very 
old gabled-roof shops, there is little to remind one of the past. Stand- 
ing upon the high rocks in the rear of the church, on a pleasant sum- 
mer afternoon, one could imagine himself surveying the happy valley 
of Rasselas, so dreamy is the prevailing quietness, so gentle and noise- 
less the flow of the shining river as it winds and curves through the 
green meadows below. 

Returning to Williams Park by the northerly street, you pass the 
grand old mansion, once the residence of Gen. Jedediah Huntington a 
century ago, and where he entertained Washington in the dark days of 
the revolution. Eastward of this, at the turn of the street southward, 
is a plain, unpretentious house, the birthplace of Lydia H. Sigourney, 
and where she passed her childhood days. A mile or more south of this 
is pointed out the spot on which the house stood where Benedict 
Arnold was born, and passed his younger days. The house was demol- 
ished many years ago, and nothing remains to remind one of this famous 
character — famous as a soldier, as well as a traitor, — but the old well 
and the curb that encloses it. 

Arriving once more at Williams Park, turn down Sachem Street, you 
come to a place of great historical, as well as local interest, the grave of 
Uncas. The last resting place of this warrior and chief of the Mohe- 
gan tribe is romantically situated in a small grove by the wayside, and 
is surrounded by the graves of many of his red descendants. A plain, 
granite shaft, bearing the simple name UNCAS on the base, covers the 
ashes of him who was a monarch with his tribe, and whose autiiority 
extended over the country far and near. The corner-stone of the mon- 
ument was laid by President Jackson, in 1833 ; but the monument was 
not raised until 1842, when the ladies of Norwich completed the work 



AS A PLACE OF RESIDENCE. 75 

which had remained so long unfinished. Further down the street is a 
pretty, rural cottage: which will long be known and pointed out as hav- 
ing once been the home of Donald G. Mitchell, and where, under the 
nom de pliane of " Ik Marvel," he wrote two of his best works — Rever- 
ies of a Bachelor, and Dream Life. 

Still further west, taking either of the two short streets which lead in 
a southerly direction, you come to the Falls Village, which derives its 
name from what was once a romantic cascade, formed by the waters of 
the Yantic wildly plunging through a narrow, rocky channel from a 
height of about forty feet. In years gone by, '" The Falls " was a famous 
resort for all strangers visiting the city, thousands being attracted to it 
by the wildness of the scenery, the rushing, roaring waters covered with 
white foam, together with the old legends connected with the locality, 
especially that of a band of Indians while being pursued by their ene- 
mies, jumping from the overhanging precipices into the boiling, seeth- 
ing waters below — a doubtful legend, to be sure, of Indian history, but 
of sufficient plausibility to give the place a weird and romantic interest. 
But what was known as " The Falls " of former days exists no longer 
in its original beauty and wildness, except it may be at times in the 
winter or spring, when the heavy rains and melting snows bring down 
vast bodies of water that come " tumbling and rumbling, and pouring 
and roaring like the waters of Lodore." The waters that once through 
all months of the year rushed madly down the rocky cascade, have 
been, in part, diverted through artificial channels to the great mills be- 
low, where they waste their strength in driving acres of machinery. The 
old rustic wooden bridge which spanned for so many years the roaring 
waterfall, and from which so many youths and lovers by moonlight and 
starlight have gazed upon the foaming waters beneath, has been re- 
moved by ruthless hands, and there is but little that now remains to 
connect the romances of the past with the business realities of the 
present. 

Among the many beautiful drives and walks in and about Norwich, 
let the stranger not fail to visit Laurel Hill. Cross the fine iron bridge 
over the Shetucket from the eastern terminus of Water Street, and take 
the road that borders, and in many places nearly overhangs the river, 
for two or three miles, in the direction of Poquelannoc. No view on 
the Hudson is more romantic or charming. As you pass over Laurel 
Hill, its streets bordered by elegant houses, and surrounded by tasteful 



76 THE CITY OF NORWICH, CONN., AS A PLACE OF RESIDENCE, 

and well-kept lawns, a beautiful panorama presents itself. Far below 
you the river Thames stretches its blue waters lazily towards Long Isl- 
and Sound, while nearly beneath your feet, as it were, and within stone's 
throw, lies the business part of the city. It was but a few years ago 
that Laurel Hill was a wild tract of hilly, mountainous land, covered 
with laurels, rocks, wild cedars and brush ; a crooked cart path leading 
over it, and scarcely an indication that it was ever under cultivation, or 
even inhabited, if we may except a very old wooden farm house that 
still stands in the background of the main avenue as a relict of the past. 
Within a few years, this pleasant suburb has been constantly and largely 
increasing, and promises eventually to rival in importance the older por- 
tion of the city as a place of residence. 

Let the stranger, while in Norwich, be sure to visit Taftville, and see 
the mammoth Ponemah Mills, which have been mentioned in a previous 
part of this book. The short journey will well repay the trouble. It 
is a pleasant drive to pass through the manufacturing suburb of Greene - 
ville, with its long array of mills and store-houses that line the river's 
banks. About a mile above, he comes to Sachem's Plain. Pause here 
a moment. In the open field yonder, on slightly elevated ground, is a 
square block of granite, on the base of which is carved the name of 
MIANTONOMOH, placed there to mark the spot where this celebrated 
Indian chief was slain by his bitter enemy, Uncas. A mile further, he 
comes to Taftville, and the enormous mill springs up before him as if by 
magic, and there seems to be no end to the vast pile of bright red brick 
and countless windows that reach into the far distance, like giant's cas- 
tles in childhood's dreams. If there is time, go inside the mill, and 
take a glance at the acres and acres of moving machinery, and hear the 
hum, the whirr, and the rattle of wheels, and looms, and cards, and the 
one hundred and twenty-five thousand spindles, operated by fifteen 
hundred men, women and children. 

Returning to the city, take the road to the left, and pass over Plain 
Hill and VVawecus Hill, one of the most delightful drives in the state — 
the high altitude enabling you to get a magnificent view of the country 
far and near. Here you see fine farm houses and farming lands border- 
ing the highways, villages here and there nestling among the forest cov- 
ered hills ; and occasionally you catch a glimpse of the river Thames as 
it flows southward, and empties its waters into Long Island Sound. 







"'\ r^'r.'Sifr 



Mtmww 





WAUREGAN HOTEL, NORWICH, CONN, 



NORWICH, CONN., 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



AND 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



78 



NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



NORWICH SAVINGS SOCIETY, 

24 SHETUCKEX STREKX, 

Incorporated May, 1824. 



OKKICERS : 

PRESIDENT, 

FRANKLIN NICHOLS. 
VICE PRESIDENTS, 

LUCIUS W. CARROLL, JOHN A. MORGAN, 

AMOS W. PRENTICE, JOHN BREWSTER. 









DIRECTORS, 






JOHN MITCHELL, 


LUCIUh 


BROWN, GEORGE 


R. HYDE, 


HEZEKIAH 


F. RUDD, 


BE LA P 


LEARNED, ASA 


BACKUS, 


HENRY 


LARRABEE, 

■ 

SECRE 


FRANK 


JOHNSON. SID^ 


4EY 


TURNER. 




TARY AND TREASURER, 








COSTELLO LIPPITT. 












ATTORNEY, 










JEREMIAH HALSEY. 






Amount 


of 


Deposits January ist, 


1835, - 




$ 147,161.00 










1845. . 

1855, . . 
1865, . 




264,305-00 
1,883,195.00 
4,202,191.00 






«< t 




1875, 

1876, . . . 

T878, 

1879, 
1880, 
1881, . 
1882, 
1883, . 
1884, 




7,492,306.00 
7,750,466.00 
7,717,134.00 
7,382,768.00 
7,438,55900 
7,552,799-00 
7,601,738.00 
7,801,362.00 
7,928,571.00 


(> 




t( t 




1885, . 




8,088,825.00 


(( 




(1 i 




1886, 




8,003,550.00 


(< 




it ( 




1887, . 




8,279,529.00 


<( 




li t 




1888, 




8,472,150.36 



Balance to credit of Surplus and Profit and Loss, Jan. 1, 1888, $401,959.44. 



NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRFCTORY. 79 

THE mmU SAVIMS BANK, 

NORWICH, COXX. 

Incorporafifl /.VJ.V. 

Deposits, March 1st, 1 888, $3,967,674. 1 6 



DIVIDKN^lJS, MyVRCH AND SKPXKMBKR- 

Deposits made ihe first business clay of any month will draw interest from that date ; 
all other deposits will draw interest from the first day of the next succeeding month. 



OKKICEKS : 

President, LORENZO BLACKSTONE. 

Vice Presidents : HENRY BILL, JOHN T. WAIT, JAMES A. HOVEY. 

Directors : 

JOHN P. BARSTOW, O. J. LAMB, OLIVER P. AVERY, 

EDWARD HAKLAND, GEORGE D. COIT. HKNRY H. GALLUP, 

DAVID A. BILLINGS, W. N. BLACKSTONE, WM. A. SLATER. 

Counsel, JEREMIAH H.\LSEY. Attorneys, THAYER & THAYER. 

Secretary and Treasurer, GEORGE D. COIT. 

Assistant Treasurer, CHARLES B. CHAP.M.A.N. 

Bank Hours — From lo a. m. to i p. m., and from 2 to 3 p. M., except Saturday. 
Closed Srturday Afternoon. 

TheDimeSavingsBank 

OF NORWICH, CONN. 
Organized September, ISdit. 

Deposits, March 1 st, 1 888, $ 1 ,350,833.69 



Amounts received from Ten Cents to One Thousand Dollars. All deposits 
are placed on interest the first of every month. 



OKKICERS : 

President, EDWARD R. THOMPSON. 
Vice Presidents : HUGH H. OSGOOD, WILLIS R. AUSTIN. 

Directors : 

WM. C. OSGOOD, W. R. BURNHAM, GARDINER GREENE, JR. 

F.J LFAVENS, J. HUNT SMITH, GEORGE C. RAV.MOND, 

C. D. BROWNING. E. G. BIDWELL, I. W. CARPENTER, 

NICHOLAS TARRANT. 

Secretary and Treasurer, J. HUNT SMITH. 

Assistant Treasurer, FRANK L. WOODARD. 

Attorney, GARDINER GREENE, JR. 



8o NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Thames National Bank 

16 SHETUCKET STREET. 
Uoitecl States Depository. 



INCORPORATED 1825. 



Capital Stock, -$1,000,000.00 



OKKICKRS: 

PRESIDENT. 

FRANKLIN NICHOLS. 

CASHIER. 

EDWARD N. GIBBS. 

DIRECTORS. 

FRANKLIN NICHOLS, JOHN MITCHELL, 

ALFRED A. YOUNG, CHARLES BARD, 

JAMES L. HUBBARD, THOMAS D. SAYLES, 

LORENZO BLACKSTONE, EDWARD N. GIBBS, 

WILLIAM G. JOHNSON, WILLIAM A. SLATER, 

HUGH H. OSGOOD, HENRY H. GALLUP. 



Discount Days, Tuesdays and Fridays. 

BANK HOURS — From lo A. .m. to i p. .m., and from 2 to 3 r. M., except Saturday. 
Closed Saturday Afternoon. 



NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 8l 

First National Bank, 

Richards Buildino-, 87 Main Street. 
Capital Stock, - - $500,000 



OFFICERS : 

Presitleiit, LUCIUS W. CARROLL. Cashier, LEWIS A. HYUE. 

l>irectors : 

LUCIUS W. CARROLL, CHARLES D. BROWNING, 

JEREMIAH HALSEY, ERAXCIS J. LEAYENS, 

AMOS W. PRENTICE, CHARLES H. KENYON, 

JOHN A. MORGAN, R. N. PARISH. 

Discount Days, Mondays and Thursdays. 

Bank Hours — From lo a. m. to i r. m.. and from 2 to 3 r. M.. except Saturday. 
Closed Saturday Afternoon. 

SECOND NATIONAL BANK. 

CAPITAL, $800,000.00. 

BOARD OF DIKKC'TORS. 

E. R. THOMPSON, W. R. BURN" HAM. 

C. P. COGSWELL. LYMAN GOULD. 

W. R. AUSTIN. 



Mercantile and Corporate Accounts respectfully solicited. 

Norwich National Bank, 

Shetucket, ccjr. Altiiii iStreet, 

IJSrCOR-X'Oie.-A.TEID 1796. 

Capitol StocU, = = S2J( ),()()(). 



President, C. C. JOHNSON. Caiililer. S. It. MKKt H. 



Discount Days, Tuesdays and Fridays. 

6 



82 NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRF.CTORY. 



Uncas National Bank, 

42 SlietiieUet Street. 

Organized under the Free Banking Law of 1853. Incorporated Ijy 
General Act, 1855. 



Capital Stock, - - $200,000 



OFFICERS : 

President, EDWIN S. ELY. Cashier, CHAS. M. TRACY. 

Directors : 

EDWIN S. ELY, GEO. W. GOULD. 

JAMES A. HOVEY, NATHL. B. WILLIAMS, 

JOHN T. WAIT, ALDEN A. BAKER, 

JOSEPH HUTCHINS, EDWARD F. BURLESON, 

CHAS. M. TRACY. 

Discount Days, Mondays and Thursdays. 

Bank Hours — From lo a. m. to i p. m., and from 2 to 3 p. m.. except Saturday. 
Closed Saturday Afternoon. 

THE MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK 

71 NIAIN STRKKX. 

INCORPORATED 1833. 

Capital stock, - $100,000 



OFFICERS : 

President, J. HUNT SMITH. Cashier, CHARLES H. PHELPS. 
Directors : 

WILLIAM C. OSGOOD, WM. A. THOMPSON, 

COSTELLO LIPPITT, GEORGE F. BARD, 

CHARLES F. SETCHEL, JOHN D. BREWSTER, 

CALVIN L. HARWOOD, \VM. H. FITCH, 

J. HUNT SMITH, CHAS. H. PHELPS. 

Discount Days, Mondays and Tliursdays. 

Bank Hours — From 10 a. m. to i p. m., and from 2 to 3 p. m.. except Saturday. 
Closed Saturday Afternoon. 



NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTOR V. 9,;^^ 

New London County Mutual 
Fire Insurance Company, 

OF NORWICH, CONN., 
Office, Rieliorclt^ 1 5i liklii ijr, <^> 1 Mniii St. 

Surplus, Jan. (, 1888, 885,000. 

This old and reliabfc ('oiHjtttnij htstirefi Dtrcllimj IFoifses, 

Churches, School -Itoiises and their contents against loss 

or dainaf/e by Jire or lightninf/ on 

FA VOltABLE TERMS. 



DIKKCTORS: 



E. F. PARKER, DEN'ISON P. COON, F. I.. OSGOOD, 

P. St. M. ANDREWS, F. L. (lARDXF.R, CHAS. J. WINTERS. 

JOHN A. MORGAN, C. H. OSGOOD, [OHN L. BOSWELL, 

J. F. WILLIAMS, IRA L. PF.CK. 

.r. F. WILI.IAMS, Sec'y. IKA I.. PKCK, Treas. K. F. PAKKEK, Prest. 

The Norwich MA Worl(s, 

NICKEL, COPPER, BRASS, SILVER | GOLD. 

^^"AJ.h WORK aUARAyXEKn AGAISSr FLAKISd. 

sr>H:ciA.L'riH:« : 

Fire Arms, Stove Castings, Steamboat and 

Yacint Trimmings, Steam and Fire 

Engine Work, Etc. 



MANlJFACTjrUEliS OF 

FINEST METAL DISPLAY FIXTURES 

FOR STORK WINDOWS AND INTERIORS, 

AU^l^lKl) TO ALL XRA.])KS. 

N, Y- SALES ROOMS, OFFICE AND FACTORY. 

702 Broadway, New York. 51 Chestnut St., Norwich, Conn 



84 NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 




Patented in the United States, Great Britain, France and Germany. • 
MANUFACTURED BY 

LESTER &WASLEY, 

NORWICH, CONN., U. S. A. 

The Leader Machine will f/uni^ foldf co unt and 
deliver in packages of twen ty-five^ ready for band- 
ing ^ at the rate of 100 envelopes jyer minute on 
Drug and Letter si^e. 

These Mnvelope Machines are built in different 



sizes, viz : Drug^ Letter^ No, ,9, 10, 1 1, 12 and 14. 
Lstiniates for other sizes, and any other informa- 
tion desired, will be cheerfully given on application. 



■ ■cjg> 



XHK^^ 



All Right Steam Heater. 

Nearly ^1-C^C^ i^^ use, and not one has ever 

given out, or cracked in use. 

We are prepared to make estimates on all 

classes of Steam or Hot Water Heating, 

and guarantee satisfaction in all cases. 

Circulars on application to 

THE COMBINATION CO., No. 286 Franklin Street, Norwich, Conn., 

or to WM. H. PAGE, Treasurer, satne place. 



NORWICH, CONN., HUSINESS DIRF.CTORY. 



J. B. Merrow & Sons, 



Mv\Ivi£l^i^ ()1- 



The Merrow Special Crochet Machine 

For Finishing the Edges of Knit Goods, from the flnest to the heaviest, 

Is rapid, simple and satisfactory. 
18 and 20 White's Court, - Norwich, Conn. 

Norwich Lock Mfg, Co,, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

LOCKS, KNOBS, 

AND 

Builders' Harowakh:, 



nsro:R,"VvriGHr, consrisr. 



EXCLUSIVELY HAND-CUT FILES and RASPS : 
manuPactured by 

THE CHELSEA FILE WORKS 
HORSE RASPS A SPECIALTY. 

Patronize Home Industry by using the 
"Chelsea" Files and Rasps. 

LYMAN GOULD, President- R. W, PERKINS, Secretary. 

C. B. ROGERS & CO., 

Makers of the Latest Improved 

Wood-WorkiRg MaGhincry, 

Principal Office and Manufactory, Norwich, Conn. 

Incorporated 1863. Wareroom, 109 Liberty Street, New York- 



86 NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS J^IRECTORV. 

Tk Ho itiiis (I Aicii iaiiiifacliiiif; Ciiiii laiii, 

MANUFACTURERS OF THK 

Blue Jacket, XL, Army 44 and 45 Calibre, 
Double Action and Automatic 38 and 32 

Revolvers, Shot Guns, 

AND RIKLKS, 

132 Franklin St., - Norwich, Conn. 

OFFICERS : 
U. A, BRIGGS, Pres't. JOHN E. WARNER, Sec'y. C. W. HOPKINS, Treas. 



Depot : Merwin, Halbert & Co., 26 W. m St,, New York. 

The Allen Spool sprinting Co., 

MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF 

Spools and 

Braid Rolls, 

COTTON ROLLS AND NOVELTIES, 

132 Franklin St., Norwich, Conn. 



NORWKH, CON\., BUSINESS DtRF.CTORV. 87 

THE OSSAWAN MILLS CO., 

MANUFACTUREKS OF 

Braided and Twisted Worsted, Silk, Cotton, 
Also, the Crown Solid Braided Cords^ 

NORWICH, CONN. 



RICHARD F. GOODWIN, 

Successor to Goodwin Sc Parker, Manufacturer of 

MACHINE-CUT CORKS 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

SPECIALTIES-Cork Washers and Sliced Cork. 
nsrorR-wiGEC, consrisr. 

ANSEL CLARK, 

MANUFACTURER OF THE 

Avery Low Pressure^^ ^. 

* Improved Steam Heater. 

This Heater is the luost eeiiiKiiiiiciil Steaiii Heater luaiie or ii^ed. 
It will heat a greater area, with lens I'uel, tliaii <>th»'rs of greater <'a|iaeit.v. 
TeNtiiuonials and I'riee l.ist fiiriii>he(l upon application. 

.A.IjSO, 

COWraACTOB att4 SUIl-DER, 

stone, Slate, Brick, Cement, Lime, Planter, Hair, Fire Jirirk 
and Clay, Beach Stiiul, Drain I'ifte, S/n-af/iint/ /'a/xr, Ai\, 

AT wiroLKSAi.i: AM> iii:i\iii.. 

Prompt attention to orders for MASON WORK of all 
kinds and SLATE ROOFING. 

Telephone, 13 Water St., Norwich, Conn. 



88 NORWICH, CONN., I'.USINF.SS DIRECTORY. 

A. T. CONVERSE, 

Office, Warehouse and Wharf, 23 Commerce St., 
NORWICH, CONN., 

Blast Furnace and Rolling Mill Products, 

INCLUDING 

Most Approved Brands of Foundry Pig Iron, 

Special Grades of Puddled Bar Iron, 

Galvanized and Black Sheet Iron, 

Warranted Best Cast and Machinery Steel, 

Rolled Iron Beams and Shapes for Structural 
Purposes, 

Finished Shafting and Machinery for Transmis- 
sion of Povy^er, 

Etc., Etc. 

Machinist and Engineer. 

All kinds of General Machine Worli, Jobbing | Repairing. 

SPECIALTIES— Cork Machinery, Laundry Machinery, and Steam 
Engine Repairing. 

Expert Mechanical and Indicator Work Solicited. 

No. 22 FERRY STREET, - - NORWICH, CONN. 

BREWSTER & BURNETT, 

STOVES, TIN WARE, AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, 

SEEDS, STOCKBRIDGE FERTILIZERS OF ALL KINDS. 

Sole Agents for the " Good News" and " Magee " Ranges, and Magee Goods 

Ok All Kir^DS. 

Tin Roofing and General Jobbing, Sheet Iron and Copper Workers. 

t) and 11 Water Street, Norwich, Conn. 



NORWK H, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 89 

NORWICH IRON FOUNDRY, 

i;STAJ5LISHlil> 1«.^>4, 

A. H. VAUGHN & SONS, Proprietors, 

Nos. 11 to 25 Ferry Street, Norwich, Ct., 

CASTINGS, OF EVERY DESCRIPTION, 

JFURINISHEI^ I?I10311^TLY. 

PAXXERNS MADE TO Ok]3K1^. 

The Sibley Machine Company, 

MANUI ACii:UKK.S OF 

Paper Making Machinery, 

Paper Engines, Dusters ; Ra^, Rope and Pajier Cutters ; Roll 15ais .iml Ik-tl Plates. 

Also, Cotton and Wool .Machinery, Mill Gearing, Shafting, Pulleys and 

Hangers, Reed and Rowen's Combined Upsetter Shear and Punch. 

[. 1!. West's .American Tire Setter. 

JOBBING OF ALL KINDS- CASTINGS AT SHORT NOTICE. 

Agents for Hunt's 1 5oul>le=A.otin}j: Turhii^e Wtittsr Wlie'i,-!. 

Telephone Connection. /•*>*-? Fmnldhi St., Xonrir/i, Conn. 

NORWICH BELT MANUFACTURING CO., 

TANNERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

Superior Oak Leather Belting 

Dealers in Saddlery and Mill Supplies. 

Rubber and Cotton Belting, 

Rubber, Cotton and Linen Hose, 
Rubber and Oiled Clothing, 
Leather of all kinds, 

Horse Blankets, Robes, Whips, Hides, Pelts and Skins. 

35 "Water St., Norwich, Conn. 

Western Department, :$;{ Koi-tli ChiihI .Strct-t. <iii<'aK<>< IH. 



90 NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIREC'IORY. 





The Ricliinond Stove Company, 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE CELEBRATED 

Richmond Ranges, 
Richmond Stoves, 

Richmond Furnaces, 

Richmond Victor Steam Heaters. 

OFFICE AND FOUNDRY, 

Nos. 120 to 170 Thames Street, 
NORWICH, CONN. 





NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



r^) T^'i Ws^. (•^\ ^ 



5\\ ^r^\ f^ 'sif>pi fy^ wwt f^\ !^^ , 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 



h: .A. m) "VvT .^^ I?, E 



AND 



House-Furnishing Goods, 

33 and 37 Shetucket Street and 162 Water Street, Norwich, Conn. 
-:- Oldest Hardware House in New London County. -:- 

A. W. PRENTICE &l CO., 

JOBBERS AND RETAILERS OF 

Hardware, Cordage, Cutlery, 

Mill Supplies, Machinists' Tools, Carpenters', 
Carriage Makers' and Blacksmiths' Materials, 

ELECTRIC BELLS, GAS LIGHTERS AND SUPPLIES, 

Fire Arms, Ammunition, Fishing Tackle, &c. 

Agents for Howe's Scales, Hoyt's Belting, Dupont's Celebrated Gunpowder, 
and Miner's Friend Dynamite. 

3, 5 and 7 Commerce Street, Norwich, Conn. 

AMOS W. PRENTICE. LUTHER S. EATON. 

J'0MWF^ MAMMrQW'& CO'., 



DKAI.KKS IN 



Stoves, Furnaces, Ranges, 

Seeds, Farm Implements, and Fertilizers, 

No. 15 Water Street, Norwich, Conn. 

John P. Barstow. I- rank II. Smith. George S. Bylos. 



p2 NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

ESX.A.BLISIlEr) 1843. 



L W. CARROLL & SON, 

Commission Merchants, 



AND DEALERS IN 



WOOL, COTTON, 

Manufacturers' Supplies, Dye Stuffs, Acids, 

BURLAPS, TWINES, STARCH, 

Paints, Oils, Glass, &c. 

Nos. 17, 19 and 31 Water St., Norwich, Ct, 

CHARLES OSGOOD & CO., 

WHOLESALE DRUGSISTS 



AND DEALERS IN 



Patent Medicines, 

Masury's Railroad Colors, 
White Lead, 

Painter's Supplies, 

KEROSENE OIL, CHIMNEYS AND BURNERS. 



PROPRIETORS OF 



OSGOOD'S STEAMBOAT OIL-Water White--150° Test, 

45 and 47 Commerce St., Norwich, Ct. 



NORWICH, C()N\., F'.rSINESS DIRECTORY. 93 

LEE & OSGOOD, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

DRUGGISTS, 

129, 131 and 133 Main Street, and 1 50 and 
152 Water Street, Norwich, Conn., 

DEALERS IN 

Kerosene Oil, 

Chemicals, 

Acids, 

Paints, 

Oils, 
Varnishes, 

Window Glass, 

Brushes, 

Popular Patent Medicines 



AND 



Mineral Spring Waters, 



94 NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



TGstablished 1860. 



Duggan's Pharmacy, 

50 Main Street, Norwich, Conn. 

We offer to I bysicians and \\)e I ublic i\)e services of 
careful and competent olpotpecanes. 

John Pvl. Brewer, 

Dealer in Drugs, Medicines, Clieniicals, 

Fine Toilet Soaps, Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, 

AND FANCY TOILET ARTICLES IN GREAT VARIETY. 

Physician's Prescriptions accurately compoiinded. 

BURRILL A. HERRICK, 

Waursgan House PbarmaGy, 

Komer Broadway and Main St., Norwicl], 2onn. 
RURK Drugs. Low Rricks. 

N. DOUGLAS SEVIN, 

Druggist, Dispensing Chemist. 

Wholesale and Met ail Dealer in Chemicals, Patent Medi- 
cines, Perfutner]/, Fine Wines and Liquors, 

Brushes, Combs, Soaps, Chamois Skins, Sponges, Trusses, Mineral Waters, 
Champagne, London Porter, Scotch Ale. 

Special attention given to the proper application of Trusses, Supporters, 
Klastic Hose. &c. 

lis !M!a.iTL Street, !Nor\ricli, Conn. 



NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 95 

B. P. LEARNED, 

INSURANCE in all tranches 

BONDS OF INDEMNITY for Employers, Exeoutors, Aeent8, TruHtees, &c. 

FOREIGN DRAFTS aiul LETTERS OF CREDIT. 

VALUABLE PACKAGES by Registered Post or ExpreHH, Insured 

at Low Rates of Premium. 

Office, 20 Shetucket Street, over Thames National Bank. 

JOHN F. PARKER, 

FIRE AND MARINE 

INSURANCE AGENCY 

Room No. 3 Chelsea Savings Bank Building, 
Shetucket St., Norwich, Ct. 

Telephone Connection. 

J. F. WILLIAMS & SON, 

Fire and Marine Insurance, 

91 MAIN STREET, NORVVJCH, CONxN. 

REPRESENTING THE OLDEST AND MOST RELIABLE STOCK AND MUTUAL 
^COMPANIES, INCLUDING THE 

SUN FIRE OFFICE. OF LONDON. 

THE OLDEST FIRE INSURAXC K COMPANY IN THE WORLD. 
J. 1'. Williams. L. H. Williams. 

A. IRVING ROYCE, 

-:-FIRE INSURANCE-:- 

Office, over Thames National Bank, Shetucket Street, Nonyich, Koijd. 

Companies Represented: Phanix, Hartford ; Meriden, Merideii ; Teoples, Mid- 
dletown ; Security, New Haven ; German American, N. V. ; Niagara, N. V. •, 
Continental, N. Y. ; Commercial Union, London ; London Assurance, Lon- 
don ; Liverpool and London and Globe. 



g6 NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORV. 

EDWARD CHAPPELL & CO.. 

LUMBER AND COAL, 

WHOLESALE AND l-iETAIL. 

J:LZ'iZn. 46 to 76 W. Main St., Central Wharf, Monnich, Ct. 

JEWETT BROTHERS, 

rACKAWANNA CO AL"™iZI 



Yard, 58 Thames St, Branch Office, 154 Main St, 



E. D. HARRIS, 



DEALEK IN 



Anthracite 1 Bituminous Coal. 

Offices, 28 Broadway and 449 N. Main St., Norwich, Ct. 

Telephioaae Connections. 

SETH L. PECK, 

fflASON'S BUILDING MATERIALS. 

BRICK, CEMENT AND STONE. 

LIME FOR BUILDING, BLEACHING AND PAPER MAKING PURPOSES. 

Sewer Pipe—Akron and Cement. Sheathing Paper^ Slc. 
Central Wtiarf, = Norx\-icti, Cooii, 



NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



97 



N. S. GILBERT & SONS, 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 



Furniture, Carpets, 
Wall Papers, 

137 &» 141 Mniii St., Xorwicli, Ct. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

FURNITURE, OIL CLOTHS and CARPETS. 

Also, Furnishing Undertakers. 

Furniture and Mattresses Re-upholstered and Made to Order. 

Nos. 37 and 4 I Main St., I>of/fe's lifock. Xorwicli. 

jftL- yxr, x>ic3X3C3gs^sr, 

DEALER IN 

KXJRNI T IIRB, 

FEATHERS, MATTRESSES, MIRRORS, &c., 

26 and 28 Broadway. - Norwich, Conn. 



SOI. I'; A<iK>'T F<U{ 

Chickerin^ & Sons' Pianos, and Loring & Blake's Organs. 



Also, I'ianos of several other reliable makers coiisLanlly in slock, ami sold for 

cash or installments, or rented on favorable Icrnis. Also, a laro;e stork of 

Carpets, Oil Cloths. Rugs, Mats, Mattings, Paper Hangings, Curtains, Borders 

K. W. YKl^l^INOTON, K^O M.iiu iSi. 

7 



98 N<^RW1CH, CONN., HUS1NESS DlREC'rORY. 

robertIbrown, 

SteaniandGasFitterandPlufflber. 

AGENT FOR GORTON STEAM HEATERS. 

BRASS CASTINGS. 

Pequot Building, Central Wharf, Norwich, Conn. 

STEAM, GAS FITTER AND PLUMBER, 

BRASS FOUNDER AND COPPERSMITH, 

Dealer in Wrought iron Pipe, Fittings, 
Valves, Engineers' Supplies, SiC, 

24 Ferry Street, = IMorwich, Conn. 

Manufacturers of Harness, 

Collars, Halters, &c. 

Junction Water and Commerce Sts., Norwich, Conn. 



ESTjft.BLISIIEr) 1841. 



MANUFACTURKK OF 



AND DKALEK IN 



Trunks, Traveling Bags, Valises, Blankets, Whips, Saddles, 

CARRIAGE ROKES, fi-c, 
213 Main Street, Franklin Square, Norwich, Ct. 



NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS UlkEC'lORV. 99 

NoYBs ^ 13a\ IS, 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 



BOOKS, STATIONERY, 

Artists' Materials and Ptiotograpliic Supplies, 

152 and 154 Main Street, - Norwich, Conn. 

Books, Stationery, Artists' Materials, 

WINDOW SHADES AND PAPER HANGINGS, 

Wliolejsole c'liicl Retiiil. 
Next Door to Post Office, - Norwich, Conn. 

Established, in. 1«40. 

B. T. CRANSTON. W. R. I.. CRANSTON. I . H. I RANSTON. 

(Formerly M. Snfford .f- Co.) Johlxrs ami lictaihrs. 

Bool(sellers, Stationers and News Dealers, 

Artists' Materials and Photographic Outfits and Supplies. 

Telephone Connection. ^•><'»" Main street, yonrich. Conn. 

gHAS. E. 6HANDLER, 

61VIL Engineer and 8urvey0r. 

161 Mam St., cor. Sl^etucbet, Norwicb, Conn, 
fiouse Drainage ai?d Sewerage a Specialty, 



NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Clothing, Hats, Caps, 

AND FURNISHING GOODS 

Of the reliable Combination Clothiers, 

K. A. WKLLS &> CO., 

84 IVlain Street, Nor^vicli, Ct. 

Boston & Norwich Clothing Co., 

49 Main Street, Norwicli, Conn., 

DEALERS IN 

™^™ CLOTHING. 



MEDIOH GRADE 



HISLOP, PORTEOOS A MITCHELL, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

Dry and Fancy Goods, 

93 and 95 Main Street, 

Wholesale Entrances, 1 OO to 110 Water St., 
NORWICH, CONN. 



BRANCH HOUSES--New London, Conn.; Syracuse, N. Y.; Auburn, N. Y.; 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 



NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



THE BOSTOII STORE, Reid & Hughes, 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS, 

Wliolesale and Retail, 
193 to 201 Main Street, Norwich, Ct. 

DEALER IN 

Ladies' Dress and Wrap Trimniiiigs, Hosiery, Kid Gloves, 

ARTISTIC EMBROIDERIES AND EMBROIDERY MATERIALS, 

157 Main and 19 Shetucket Streets, Norwich, Conn. 

Summer Branch, "The Bazaar," at Watch Hill, R. I. 

C. C. BLISS, 




i«ics,y»s,j 



) 




a 



1 26 Main St., Norwich, Ct. 

A. B. KINGSBURY, 
WATCHES, DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, PLATED WARE, 

Spectacles and Eye Glasses. 

I sell all makes of Anil' ric(fn IVatcfns, and am Special Agent 
for The F. A. Jioyers Silrer Co, 

Cor. Broacixvay and NIain St., MorwMcli. 



NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRKCTORY. 



Franklin Steam Mills, 

ESTABLISHED 1846. 

GEO. S. SMia^H, Proprietor, 

ANU DKALEK IN 

Green and Roasted Coffees, Spices, Mustard, Cream Tartar 

and Extracts. A FULL LINE OF FINE TEAS. 

Sole Manufacturer of Palmer's Celebrated Dandelion Coffee. 
11 — 13 Commerce Street, Norwich, Conn. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Teas, Coffees, Spices 

Mfrs. of Coffee Preparations from Cereals. 

58 Main Street, Norwich, Conn. . 

JOBBER IN 

TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES 

MUSTARD, CREAM TARTAR, &c. 
A FULL LINE OF TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 

81 Water Street, ISTorxvidTi, Coi^in. 

Estate of WILLIAM SPRAGUE, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

Silver Plated and Britannia Ware and House Furnishing Goods, 

145 Main Street, Norwich, Conn. 



NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



A. D. SmiTH. JO.S. W. GILBEKT. 

SMITH & GILBERT, 

Merchant Tailors 

AM)- 

MEN'S FINE FURNISHINGS. 

140 Nlaiii Street, = IMorwich, Conn. 



(^^yied- 6/^ ^^^)<^'9^, 




/J 



■-^/CC-t-,^. -^ ....^.^j 



CURRIER BROTHERS, 

-:Merchant Tailors,:- 

DEALERS IN 

Men's and Boys' Clothing, 

No. 207 Main Street, Norwich, Conn. 

HATTER, FURRIER & MEN'S FURNISHER 

Has on hand a complete line of the above goods, at reasonable 
prices. Fur repairing and storing a specialty. 

None 1)1 It Kirst-Clo«« Ooocl^^ s;<)kl. 

A PLEASURE TO SHOW GOODS. 
13 Lirouclwov, X< )r\\ i<.M V, t^Oiiii. 



I04 NORWICH, CONN., I'.USINESS DIKKCTORV. 

GEO, W. KIES & CO., 



Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



Boots, Shoes and Rubbers, 

80 Main Street, Norwich, Conn., directly opposite Post Office. 

GEO. W. KIES. JAMES L. COFFEE. 



ESTABLISHED 1847. 

Dealer in Ladies', Misses' and Cliildren's Slioes, and Men's and Boys' 
BOOTS AND SHOES of all grades, 

E. C. BURT $c GO'S GOODS FOR LADIES, 
HATHAWAY, SOULE & HARKINGTON'S GOODS FOR MEN AND BOYS. 

Also, LEATHER AND SHOE FINDINGS, AND HARNESS LEATHER. 
No. 1 8 Franklin Square, Norwich, Conn. 

Boots, Shoes and Rubbers. 

Oi4r goods are bargains in quality and price. We warrant 
every pair of shoes we sell. Gents., ask for 

Every pair cut front extra fine tannery calf Skins. 
No. 134 Main Street, - - Norwich, Conn. 

bootsj«lshoes. 

Fine Goods a Specialty. 

We keep in stock everything that can he found in a J^'irst- 
Class Boot and Shoe Store. 

OUR MOTTO— Best Value given every time for the Money. 

JAS. F, COSGROVE & CO., 206 Main St., Norwich, Conn, 



NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Konfectionery MaRufaGtiirer, 

The Largest Confectionery Estahlishtnent in the state. 

Assortment pmbracing every variety of Sandies known to the trade. 

Perkins Block, Main Street, — Norwich, Conn 

CONNECTICUT POP CORN CO., 

Maniffacfurers of J'op Corn and Corn Cahcs in all the jiop- 
nlar forms and /favors ; also, of 

CHIOIOE COISr:FEOTIO:N'EI^"Y', 

in every desiraitle flavor and sliape, and nut and fruit 

combinations to meet the puftlic demand, 

n HOLES ALE AND liETAIL, 

Our prices are always the lowest market prices for the grade of goods offered. 

Orders by telc^^raph, mail or telephone promptly filled. 

C. H. NOYES, Agent. Ofllce, 88 Broadway, Norwich, Conn, 

Real Estate Office. 

Experience, rfeatural ©act, Monon and Qnterpnse 
9as won tr)e ISonner for this olc^ency. 

H. F. PALMER. 45 Main St.. Norwicli, Ct. 



N. TARRANT, 

REAL ESTATE AGENT 

KST^VBl^lSI-IKi:) 1S70. 

45 Main Street, - Norwich, Conn. 



Io6 NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

Woodworth &» Small, 

DRUGS, CHEMICALS 

PAINTS, OILS, WINDOW GLASS. 

Agents for H. W. John's Liquid Paint. 

NORWICH, CONN. 

THE S. F. BEER CO., 

C. B. HARBIN GTON, Proprietor, 

Manufacturers of GROCERS' SUPPLIES, 

AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN VINEGAR, 

1 7 Commerce Street, - Norwich, Conn. 

Manufacturer and Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Imported Havana and Domestic Cigars, 

Tobacco, Pipes, Snuff and Smokers' Articles generally. 

1 10 Main Street, Norwich, Conn. 

J.M. HUNTINGTON & CO., 

Importers of Molasses, 

AND 
General Shipping and Commission Merchants. 



NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



ARMOUR &- CO., 

IX 



Oiiaii lli'Kseil Be 





"I 



ill 



- ^ 



Foot of Ferry St., Norwich, Conn. 

WINTERS, SV7IFT & CO., 



WHOLKSAI.K I>KAI.KKS IN 



SWIFT'S CHICAGO DRESSED BEEF 

LAMB, MUTTON, PORK, TONGUES AND TRIPE, 

Sales Room and Office, opposite N. L. N. R. R. Depot, Norwich, Conn. 

CASE & FULLER, 



WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 



Flour, Groceries, Butter, Cheese 

Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 

Nos, 45 to itl Water Street, - - JVornic/t, Conn. 

Wholesale Dealer in Groceries and Fruits, 

>^NO COMMISSIOX MKKCII.VXr. 
FINEST on ADES BUTT Eli AND CHEESE. 

Burlaps, Starch, Bale Rope, and Mill Supplies to order a spefially. 
No. .^1 Water Street, = - Norwitli, L(>iiii 
Telephone Comiieotiori. 



lO.S NORWICH, CONN., 15USINESS DIRRCTORV. 

DEALER IN 

CHOICE FAMILY GROCERIES, 

Always on hand, a full line of Slioice dreamery Butter. 
Sole Agent in Norwich for the " VIENNA HAXALL," Choice Red River Flour. 

4 Main Street, (Breed Hall) Norwich, Conn. 

DEALER IN FINE GROCERIES, FLOUR OF ALL GRADES, 

Selected Teas, Pure Coffees and Spices. 

Butter and Cheese, from best Vermont and New York Dairies. 

Choice Syrup and Molasses, Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 
C'amted Fruits in variety. 

Also, a complete assortment of Goods usually kept in a First-Class Store. 
Goods delivered promptly, free of expense. 

"VST", h:. OA.i^r)"w^Ei_,ij, 

Wlolesale anfl Betall Dealer in Groceries, Provisions, Flonr, 

CANNED GOODS, &;c., 

Nos. 3 to 9 3IAIiKET STBEET, NORWICH, CONN. 

Highly important it is that new-comei's to our city should know that "W. H. 

CARDWELL., Nos. 3 to 9 Market Street, is one of its live grocers. 

This means business, and that is its length, breadth and thickness. 

F. L. GARDNER, 

DEALER IN - 

FINE -^ mum% ^ AND ^ TEAS, 

Provisions, Flour, Grain, Fruit, Wooden Ware, &c., 

Corner Market and Water Streets, - Norwich, Conn. 



NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



109 



Dealer in Groceries, Flour, Fruit, 

AND AN ASSORTMENT OF 

Cannbo Goons, 

26 1 Main Street, - - Norwich, Conn. 

H. D. RALLION, 

No. 10 Broadway, Norwich, Conn. 
Fine Goods a Specialty. 

ESTABLISHED IX 18G8. 

JOHN F. SEVIN, 



DEALER IN 



u 



racMies.PifiiiisiiiiilliiiiliM'Siiliiiiis 

190 and 1»2 Kast Broad Street, Norwioli, Coim. 



O. H. Kb:vNOi.i)s, 

-:- Hack, Livery and Boarding Stable, -:- 

Nos. 55, 57 and 59 Shetucket St., Norwich, Ct. 

Carriages furnished for Funerals, Parties and Weddings. 

Orders by Telcgrap/i, Telephone or Mail, prom pthi nitindnl to. 



NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



PAGE STEAM HEATING CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

Page Low Pressure 



Steam Boiler. 



ALSO, 

Standard Hot Water Heater, 

Correspondence Solicited. 

Address W. C. MOWRY, Treas., Lock Box 1163, Norwich, Conn. 

THE NORWICH MALT CO., 

10 to 20 WEST MAIN STREET. 

INCORPORATED 1886- 



ANDREW WIGGIN, President and General 3Ianager. 
JOHN W. FREE, Vice President. 

J. R. COaiSTOCK, Secretary and Treasurer. 



The only place in the United States where MALT is now made by 
continuous niE'.lting, by 

MacMnery under Patents owned by JOHN W. FREE. 

Brewers, Maltsters, and others interested in improvements 
are invited to call and examine the process of manu- 
facturing. Samples sent to any part of the 
country on application. 



NORWICH, CONN., BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



J. P. COLLINS & CO., 

BUILDERS OF 

Turtine Water Wheels, 

Both Horizontal and Vertical, together with 
Heavy Connecting Machinery. 

The "CRANSTON" 

PRINTING PRESSES. 

Printers, Publishers and Stationers contem- 
plating purchase of a Cylinder Printing 
Press are invited to investigate the 
merits of the "Cranston." 

IT IS IN EVERY RESPECT A SUPERIOR PRESS. 

—EVERY REASONABLE GUARANTEE GIVEN WITH IT. 

Catalogue, Price List and full information furnished |)roni[)tly upon 
application to the manufacturer, 

J. H. CRANSTON, - Norwich, Conn. 



0ny furtl^er information il;at may be desired concern- 
ina i\)e Pacllities to be obtained for [I ianutacturmp, 
PHecijanical or transportation Purposes vvill be cheer- 
fully furnisbed by addressina t[;e Oorrespondmg Secretary 
of tl^e Rorwicb Board of ^rade, 

H. H. Qallup, 

KorwicI;, Conn. 



THE LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 

Santa Barbara 



THIS BOOK IS DUE ON THE LAST DATE 
STAMPED BELOW. 



Series 9482