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Full text of "Norwich University, 1819-1911; her history, her graduates, her roll of honor"

HISTORY OF 
NORWICH 



1819-1911 




" To our hero-chieftain Ransom 
One glass before we go : 
His blood bestains the rocky height 

In distant Mexico. 
His country's flag waved o'er him 

When the volley smote him low 
And we'll drop for him the silent tear 
In the Old South Barracks, oh!' ' 

—Kent. 



Norwich University 

1819-1911 

Her History, Her Graduates, 
Her Roll of Honor 



Published by 
MAJOR-GENERAL GRENVILLE M. DODGE, C. E., A. M., LL.D. 

Compiled and Edited by 
WILLIAM ARBA ELLIS, B. S., A. M. 



IN THREE VOLUMES 



VOL. 2. 

SKETCHES OF THE TRUSTEES, PRESIDENTS, 

VICE-PRESIDENTS, PROFESSORS, ALUMNI, 

AND PAST CADETS 

1820-66 



Montpelier, Vt. 

THE CAPITAL CITY PRESS 

I9II 



CopjTight, 1911 
By Grenville M. Dodge and William A. Ellis. 






TO COLONEL TRUMAN BISHOP RANSOM, U. S. A. 

ALUMNUS OF THE AMERICAN LITERARY, SCIENTIFIC AND MILITARY 
ACADEMY AND SECOND PRESIDENT OF NORWICH UNIVERSITY, WHO 
DEVOTED MANY YEARS TO MILITARY EDUCATION AND THE DEVELOP- 
MENT OF A CITIZEN SOLDIERY, WHO WHEN HIS COUNTRY NEEDED 
HIS SERVICES IN TIME OP WAR, ENTERED THE ARMY AND HEROICALLY 
SACRIFICED HIS LIFE WHILE LEADING HIS REGIMENT, THE OLD 
NINTH NEW ENGLAND, IN ITS HISTORIC CHARGE UP THE HEIGHTS 
OF CHAPULTEPEC IN MEXICO, 

THIS VOLUME IS RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED. 



CONTENTS. 

Introductory Page - - - - - - - - - -i. 

Dedicatory Page _________ yil. 

Author's Introduction ________ xi. 

List OF Illustrations ---_----- xiU. 

Index of Officials of the University _____ 765-766 

Index of Alumni and Past Cadets _____ 766-772 

Index of Honorary Graduates ______ 772 

Miscellaneous Views ________ xxii. 



Chapter I. Sketches of Trustees, 1834-66, _ _ _ _ 1-20 

Chapter II. Sketches of Presidents and 

Vice-Presidents, 1834-66, - - _ _ _ 21-35 

Chapter III. Sketches of Professors, 1820-66, _ _ _ 36-45 

Chapter IV. Sketches of Cadets of the American Literary, Scientific, 

AND Military Academy, 1820-34, ----- -46-263 

Chapter V. Sketches of Alumni and Past Cadets, 1835-66, 264-752 

Chapter VI. Sketches of Honorary Graduates, 1836-66, - 753-764 



AUTHOR'S INTRODUCTION. 



In the publication of this volume the Publisher and Historian are under 
deep obligation to many persons for assistance rendered in tracing cadets. 
Among those who have assisted in the work are: Gen. Elliott T. Dill, adjutant- 
general of Maine; Rev. J. L. Sherwood, D. D., Keene, N. H.; Rev. Howard F. 
Hill, D. D., Concord, N. H.; Henry Child, Cornish, N. H.;Miss Edith S. Free- 
man, Concord, N. H.; Arthur M. Chase, Concord, N. H.; Gen. Harry B. 
Cilley, adjutant-general of New Hampshire; Mrs. Mary S. Ide, Claremont, 
N. H.; Hon. Frank Plumley, Northfield, Vt.; Capt. H. V. Partridge, Norwich, 
Vt.; Hon. Samuel E. Pingree, Hartford, Vt.; Charles E. Allen, Burlington, Vt.; 
Prof. J. B. Johnson, '79; Col. Kittredge Haskins and ]\Irs. Charles Akeley, 
Brattleboro, Vt.; Gen. L. G. Kingsley, '56, Rutland, Vt.; Mrs. O. O. Jaquith, 
Woodstock, Vt.; Mr. J. K. Egerton, Northfield, Vt.; Prof. Charles Dole, '69, 
Northfield, Vt.; Solon F. Frary, '38, Strafford, Vt.; Mr. W. R. Cutter, '68; 
Mrs. Ora & George Flint, Worcester, Mass.; Gen. WilHam N. Brigham, adjut- 
ant-general of Massachusetts; Mr. Frank F. Starr, Prof. William James, and 
Miss Laura F. Philbrook, Middletown, Conn.; Charles Collard Adams, 
Cromwell, Conn.; Francis B. Trowbridge and Dr. G. Totten McMaster, New 
Haven, Conn.; Rear-Adml. George P. Colvocoresses, '66, Litchfield, Conn.; 
Gen. W. B. Landus, adjutant-general of Connecticut; Prof. Edward S. Holden, 
West Point, N. Y.; Frederick B. Richards, Glens Falls, N. Y.; John B. Ireland, 
New York city; Edward McC. Peters, 'SO, Brooklyn, N. Y.; the late Gen. 
W. H. H. Davis, '42, Doylestown, Pa.; Thomas B. Donaldson, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Brig.-Gen. Fred C. Ainsworth, U. S. A., Washington, D. C; Prof. A. W. 
Brown, U. S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md.; W. A. Clark, Columbia, S. C; 
Mr. A. C. Moore, Columbia, S. C; W. C. Benton, Middleburg, Va.; Judge 
Henry C. Connor, Wilson, N. C; Prof. R. D. W. Connor, Raleigh, N. C; 
Dr. K. P. Battle, and Prof. J. G. de Roulhac Hamilton, Chapel Hill, N. C; 
Judge Henry R. Bryan, Newbern, N. C; Miles O. Sherrill, Raleigh, N. C; 
Louis A. Clark, St. Mary's Ga.; Charles S. Wylly, Brunswwick, Ga.; Prof. 
I'homas M. Owen, Montgomery, Ala.; Mr. William O. Hart, New Orleans, 
La.; Hon. O. H. Leland, '54, McGregor, Texas; Texas State Historical 
Society; Hon. A. W. Wills, Nashville, Tenn.; Otis S. Tenney, '45, Lexington, 
Ky.; Hon. Whittlesey Adams, Warren, Ohio; G. A. Hyde, Cleveland, Ohio; 
Michigan State Historical Society; Illinois State Historical Society; Gen. 
George W. McCoy, adjutant-general of Illinois; Mr. Reuben G. Thwaitcs, 
Madison, Wis.; Gen. C. R. Boardman, adjutant-general of Wisconsin; D. J. 



Xll. AUTHOR S INTRODUCTION. 

Whittemore, Milwaukee, Wis.; The Historical Department of the State of Iowa; 
Gen. WilUam H. Thrift, adjutant-general of Iowa; Mr. J. L. Gillis, Sacramento, 
Cal.; Gen. S. M. Preston, '45, Seattle, Wash. 

The Historian esijecially acknowledges the faithful and efficient services of 
his assistants in the work : Miss C. Kate Story, Miss Dotie Potter, Miss Hazel 
M. Holt, and Miss Clara F. Williams. 

The following papers have generously advertised for information concern- 
ing alumni and |past^ cadets: The Burlington, (Vt.) Free Press; The United 
Opinion, Bradford, Vt.; Fayetteville, (N. C.) Daily Observer; Richmond, (Va.) 
Dispatch and Times; New Orleans, (La.) Picayune; Mobile (Ala.) Register; 
Essex (N. Y.) Record; The Evening Star, Piatt sburg, X. Y.; Port Edward 
(N. Y.) Advertiser; Utica (N. Y.) Daily Pi-ess; Boston (Mass.) Transcript; 
Randolph (Vt.) Herald; St. Albans (Vt.) Messenger; Waltham (Mass.) Evening 
News; the Northfield (Vt.) News; the Reveille. 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PRESIDENTS. 

PAGE 

Partridge, Alden 21, 22, 24 

Ransom, Truman Bishop 26-28 

Butler, James Davie 31 

PROFESSORS. 

Barratt, Joseph 37 

Lathrop, John Hiram 42 

TRUSTEES. 

Cobb, Daniel 2 

Freelon, Thomas William 5 

Moore, John 11 

Pierce, Franklin 15 

SwEATT, William 17 

Vilas, Levi Baker 18 



ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 

Abbott, Lemuel Abijah 682 

Abbott, Walter 655 

Adams, Edward Dean 683 

Adams, Fitz Edward 602 

Adams, James Uriah 47 

Adams, Leonard Jarvis 542 

Aiken, Walter 521 

Ainsworth, James Edward 542 

Alexander, Henry Dana Ward 48 

Allen, Joseph Dana 49 

Alvord, Henry Elijah 667 

Amory, James Sullivan 51 

Amsden, Frank Power 627 

Amsden, Joel 52 

Andrus, Delano Franklin 550 

Arms, Austin Davis 287 

AvERiLL, Clinton Spaulding 446 

Hailey, George Alonzo 669 

Baker, Jonathan 56 

Balloch,George Williamson 405 



XIV. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 

PAGE 

Bancroft, George Doane 730 

Bascom, Gustavus Murray 636 

Barnard, Ebenezer Henry 57 

Barrett, Curtis Sawyer 670 

Barron, Horace Everett 397 

Bates, William Miller 551 

Baxter, Carlos 60 

Baxter, Jedediah Hyde 583 

Baxter, Luther Loren 476 

Baxter, Portus 61 

Belcher, William Caldwell 317 

Benjamin, William Wallace 453 

Bennett, Alexander Moses 394 

BiCKFORD, Frederick True 564 

Binney, Charles .James Fox 63 

Bishop, Linus Dewey 398 

Blackington, William Sumner 748 

BoARDMAN, Napoleon 407 

BoGGS, Charles Stuart 65 

BoMFORD, James Vote 67 

BovAY, Alvan Earl ^ 324 

Breaux, Gustave Arvilien 408, 409 

Bragg, Thomas : 69 

Brigham, Henry Otis 426 

Brisbane, William Henry 70 

Brooks, William Gray 72 

Brown, Edward Marcus 368 

Brownson, Orestes Augustus 73 

Bryant, George Edwin 553 

BuELL, Bela Stevens 554, 573 

Buell, George Pearsons 574 

Buell, James Whitcomb 710 

BuRGE, Royal Ladd 513 

Burton, Henry Stanton 282 

Burton, William Smith 555 

Bush, Charles Edmund 672 

Buswell, Albert 410 

Buttrick, George 584 

Cady, Albemarle 74 

Cameron, Paul Carrington 76 

Cargill, Charles Guy 711 

Carpenter, Ch.arles Carrol 467 

Carpenter Irving Sessions 454 

Carpenter, Lorenzo Dow 730 

Cary, Henry Hamilton 356 

Chaffin, William Henry 712 

Chandler, Edward Aiken 656 

Chase, Arthur 556 

Chase, James Edwin 585 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. .XV. 

PAGE 

Child, Oscar Barron 720 

Childs, Jonathan Webster 61.5 

Clapp, Charles 80 

Clark, Thomas 370 

Cobb, Nathan Bryant 395 

Cobb, Samuel Webster 383 

Colby, Gilbert Winslow 428 

Cole, Daniel Baehr 399 

Colvocoresses, George Musalas 84 

Colvocoresses, George Partridge 739 

Coolidge, Charles Austin 675 

Comings, David Lawrence Morrill 429 

Conn, Granville Priest 543 

Converse, George Albert 673 

CowDiN, Robert Jackson 629 

Craven, Thomas Tingey 88 

Crocker, Charles Thomas 530 

Curtis, Charles Albert 651 

Cushman, Henry Wyles 91 

Cushman, Simeon Sheldon 334 

CuTTS, Edward Holyoke 467 

D.ARLiNG, Joshua Harrison 93 

Davis, Thomas Herbert 565 

Davis, William Watts Hart 344 

Delafield, Walter 586 

Denison, Charles Edward 375 

Denison, Samuel Dexter 97 

Denniston, Charles yox>NG 505 

Dewey, George 557 

Dewey, John Jasper 721 

Dewey, John Worthington 566 

Dewey, William Strong 677 

DeWolf, John James 99 

Dicks, John Weir 100 

DiNSMORE, William 101 

Dixon, Luther Swift 431 

Dodge, Grenville Mellen 477, 480 

Dorr, Alfred 102 

Dow, Roswell 384 

Dow, Simon Chase 290 

Downing, Richard J 103 

Drake, Charles Daniel 103 

Eayre, Thomas Wilkins 957 

Eaton, Robert Bradford 335 

Elliot, George Henry 515 

Emery, Harvey Webstek 506 

Ensign, William H 536 

Estabrook, Alonzo Flagg 264 

Estey, Julius Jacob 687 



XVI. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 

PAGE 

Faerae, Bernard Gains ,385 

Farrar, Frederick Howard 577 

Farrar, William Edward 585 

Fay, Cyrus Hyde 273 

Fifield, S.ymuel Newell 470 

Fletcher, Albert Augustus 516 

Fletcher, Frederick Fayette 604 

Fletcher, Luther Jacobs 336 

Fletcher, Rylaxd Ill 

Flint, Ephraim 326 

Floyd, Henry 432 

Ford, Charles Jackson 517 

Foss, Obed 460 

Foster, Edwy Wells 630 

Fox, William Crary 113 

Frary, Solon Franklin 291 

Frazer, John Fries 114 

Freelon, Thomas Willi.am 115 

Freeman, Frederick Norton 578 

Freeman, Peter Wilder 115 

Fuller, Lloyd Byron 688 

FULLERTON, WiLLLtM HuBBARD 587 

George, Samuel Knox 116 

George, William Moody 589 

Gerrish, William 689 

Gilbert, Horatio Gates 274 

GiLMAN, BENJAillN MOOERS 605 

Gleason, Newell 447 

GoDDARD, Henry Samuel 732 

GoDALL, David 120 

Goodhue, Wells 121 

Goodrich, Levi Whitney 606 

Goodwin, William Stone 713 

Gould, Jacob Parker 448 

Goulding, Joseph Hiram 722 

Gove, Jesse Augustus 450 

Granger, Brownell 599 

Granger, Edward Myron 714 

Granger, Lyman Couch 455 

Gray, Ormando Wyllis 461 

Greely, George Preston 526 

Green, Cogswell Kidder 123 

Greene, Samuel Harrison 733 

Greenwood, William Henry 508 

Gregory, Charles Daniel 691 

Griswold, Charles Edward 544 

Guild, Edwin 588 

Hale, Reuben Charles 126 

Hall, Alfred Gordon 568 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. XVll. 

PAGE 

Hall, Josiah 653 

Hall, William Henry Harrison 434 

Hammond, John Elliot Wright 472 

Harding, William Giles 127 

Harris, Thomas Jefferson 129 

Haskell, Henry Louis Shafter 396 

Hatch, Edward 471 

Hathaway, Guilford H 132 

Henderson, Robert 589 

Henderson, Thomas Albert 663 

Henry, Horace Chapin 690 

Hewitt, Sylvester Miller 313 

Hitchcock, Robert Emmet 622, 649 

Hobbs, George Webster 613 

HoLBROOK, John Calvin 136 

Holley, George Washington 138 

HoLLEY, Henry Whitcomb 473 

HoRTON, Valentine Baxter 141 

Houghton, Edmund Charles 734 

Howard, Henry Augustus 723 

Howard, Noel Byron 646 

Howe, Asa 358 

Hoyt, William Romeo 716 

Hubbard, William Henry 509 

HuGGiNS, William Beers 144 

Hunt, John Henry 591 

Hunt, Roswell 352 

Huntington, William Reed 573, 592 

Hurlbut, Lucius 314 

Hutchinson, Alonzo Burton 664 

Irving, Sanders 148 

Jackman, Alonzo 267 

Jarvis, Charles Alpheus 499 

Jarvis, George Cyprian 517 

Johnson, Alexander Byran 751 

Johnson, Edwin Ferry 149 

Johnson, Richard 153 

Johnson, William Henry 724 

Kelley, Elisha Seeley 546 

Kellogg, Theodore Harvey 662 

Kellogg, William Pitt 425 

Kelton, Dwight Henry 692 

Kendall, Paul Raymond 411 

Kent, Charles Nelson 693 

Kent, Henry Oakes 537, 538 

Kidder, Jefferson Parish 156 

Kimball, Edgar Adison 371 

Kimball, Robert Parker 158 

Kingsley, Levi Gleason 576 



XVIU. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 

PAGE 

Knight, Sumner 318 

Lander, Frederick William 337 

Lane, Moses 339 

Lasier, Thomas Jefferson 694 

Lawrence, Arthur 618 

Lawrence, Francis Gordon 752 

Learnard, Oscar Eugene 559 

Lee, William Little 347 

Lee, William Raymond 162 

Lee, Roswell Walter 161 

Lee, Stephen Berry 359 

Lefavor, Wilton Fields 740 

Leland, Oscar Hopestill 547 

Leverett, Josiah Salisbury 165 

Lewis, Charles Dennison 286 

Lewis, Charles Hildreth 560 

Lewis, William Enos 166 

Lindsay, James Edwin 413 

Little, George 167 

Little, Richard Sullivan 463 

Livingston, William 300 

Long, Charles Hatch 561, 573 

Longnecker, Henry Clay 353 

loomis, pomeroy 593 

Lord, Charles Veazie 569 

Lord, Nathaniel 169 

Lyman, Charles 170 

Lyman, George 171 

McClay, William 340 

McCollester, John Quincy Adams 528 

McCoLLESTER, SULLIVAN HOLMAN 487 

McLean, Eugene Eckel 276 

McNeill, Edwin ■ 387 

Major, Augustine Langdon C 328 

Marsh, Luther Rawson 174 

Marsh, Otis Mason 349 

Marsh, S.amuel 301 

Martin, Henry Oakes 608 

Marvin, Josiah 319 

Mead, John Baldwin Thayer 495 

Mead, William Rutherford 695 

Merrick, George 177 

Merrill, Edward Bagley 519 

Merrill, Jeremiah Degroff 320 

Metcalf, John Washington 609 

Metcalf, Ralph 697 

Miller, Orlando Dana 377 

Milroy, Robert Houston 360 

Miner, Alonzo Ames 179 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. XIX. 

PAGE 

Moore, John Harvey 292 

Morgan, Junius Spencer 181 

Morris, Ephraim 510 

Morris, Henry Villiers 271 

Morton, Charles 649 

Moses, Rufus Leander 678 

Munson, William Day 539 

Murphy, James Garfield 414 

Myrick, Cyrus Gardiner 321 

Needham, William Chauncey Hall 741 

Nichols, Stephen Hersey 415 

Noble, William Henry 185 

No YES, David Knox 389 

Osgood, John Holbrook 698 

Orne, William Wetmore 187 

Papanti, Augustus Lorenzo 725 

Parker, Edgar 623 

Parker, Freman 416 

Parker James Williams 436 

Parker, Wilder Webster 419 

Parker, William 188 

Parsons, George Appleton 610 

Parsons, John William 680 

Partridge, Frederick William 390 

Partridge, Lewis Samuel 293 

Partridge, William 451 

Paulding, Hiram 190 

Penniman, Luther Loomis 594 

Pennock, Nathan Loveman 193 

Perkins, Hamilton Eliot 194 

Perkins, Norman Eliot 364 

Perry, Carlton Holmes 195 

Phelps, Dudley Farley 699 

Phelps, Edward Arah 197 

Phelps, Edward Elisha 199 

Phillips, Henry Moses 700 

Phillips, Phillip 200 

Poole, Benjamin 294 

Porcher, Frederick Adolphus 202 

Post, Eugene Jerome 365 

Preston, Simon Manly 379 

Putnam, James Wellington 404 

Rand, Frederic Henry 701 

Ranney, Henry Joseph 205 

Ransom, Dunbar Richard 28, 490 

Ransom, Thomas Euoenk Greenfield 28, 491, 493 

Ransom, Truman Bishop 26, 28 

Reed, Charles Henry 742 

Rice, Edmund 639 



XX. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

PAGE 

Rich, Charles 206 

Richards, Joseph Swift 726 

Richards, Eber 532 

Richardson, Roderick Julius 658 

Richmond, Joseph Sylvester 437 

Roberts, Benjamin Kearney 702 

RoBBiNS, Henry Alfred 648, 649 

Robinson, Calvin Lewis 452 

Robinson, Norman 681 

Roelofson, Frederick Eugene 595 

Russell, Walter Webster 210 

Russell, William Huntington 211 

Sabine, Albert 168 

Sargent, John Harris 310 

Sargent, Harlan Page 633 

Sessions, Milan Hebard 392 

Seymour, Epaphroditus Hageh 572 

Seymour, Horatio 216 

Seymoitr, Thomas Henry 217 

Seymour, Truman 372 

Shattuck, Abbott Allen 704 

Shattuck, Lemuel 311 

Shattuck, Samuel ^^'ALKER 644 

Shedd, Johnson 287 

Shedd, Solon 496 

Shedd, Warren 322 

Shipp, Barnard 219 

Sigourney, Henry Howell William 220 

Silver, Charles Alexander 331 

Simmons, Seneca Galusha 221 

Slack, Allen Bitrnham 311 

Slayton, Henry Lake 705 

Sleeper, Van Buren 659 

Small, Reuel 743 

Smalley, Henry Adams 502 

Smalley, Jacob Maech 634 

Smith, Elias Frost 439, 660 

Smith, George Conant 439 

Smith, George Wilkins 718 

Smith, Isaac Townsend 223 

Smith, Nathan Abiel Chauncey 533 

Smith, Sumner Timothy 645 

Snow, Asa Hayes 341 

Snow, Gustavus 342 

Standish, John Van Ness 416 

Starr, Elihu William Nathan 227 

Stebbins, Edward Sawyer 295 

Stanyan, John Minot 464 

Stedman, Joseph 624 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. XXI. 

PAGE 

Steele, Benjamin Hinman 611 

Stoddard, Edward Lathrop 727 

Stoughton, Charles Bradley 654 

Stowell, Edward Sherwood 521 

Streeter, Joseph Herman 277 

Streeter, Sebastain Russell 278 

Strobel, Lewis M 492, 497 

Syme, John William 231 

Sweatt, Charles 503 

Sweetser, James Vermilyea 737 

Swett, Josiah 279 

Tarbell, Jonathan 303 

Tattnall, Josiah 233 

Temple, Robert Emmet 237 

Tenney, Otis Seth 380 

Thompson, Charles Stockbridge 238 

Thompson, Daniel 348 

TiLTON, Charles Elliott 440 

ToLLEs, Clarence Weston 738 

Totten, George Mxjirson 239 

Tread WELL, William Augustus 612 

Trowbridge, Thomas Rutherford 241 

Truax, Sewall 535 

Tucker, George 421 

Tucker, Stephen S 242 

TuLLAR, Charles 243 

TuppER, Calvin Keyes 522 

Tuttle, Albert Chapman 596 

Vernam, William Spencer 707 

Vogell, Jacob Augustus 442 

Wales, Thomas Beale 247 

Ward, Frederick Townsend 443 

Ward, Roswell Butler 248 

Waring, Morton 249 

Warner, Stanley Morris 444 

Warren, Stephen Northup 332 

Waterman, Area Nelson 562 

Webb, Charles Augustus 661 

Webb, George White 457 

Webber, Sumner Allen 251 

Webster, Nathan Burnham 367 

Welles, Gideon 253 

Wellman, Samuel Thomas 744 

Wentworth, Charles Eben 728 

Weston, Edmund 445 

Wheeler, Holland 625, 626 

Whipple, Solomon Mason 417 

Whipple, Thomas Jefferson 281 

Whipple, William Monroe 312 



XXll. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 

PAGE 

White, Henry Babnet 458 

Whittier James Anson Laurence 746 

Williams, Seth 323 

Willis, James Franklin 257 

WiLLisTON, Edward Bancroft 573, 580 

Wright, Ch.\uncey 305 

Wright, Horatio Gates , 261 

Wright, Joseph Cornwall 350 

Wright, William Otis 262 

Wood, Henry Clay 581 

Woods, Joseph Waldo 635 

Woodward, Solomon Erskine 523 

Wyman, George Herbert 422 

Young, Joseph Estabrook 465 

HONORARY GRADUATES. 

Cole, Azel Dow 755 

doten hosea 756 

Douglas, Stephen Arnold 757 

Eastman, Charles Gamage 759 

Williamson, Isaac David 763 

MISCELLANEOUS VIEWS. 

Bare Back Drill, State Fair, 1910 620 

Base Ball Team, Returning from West Point in 1911 374, 650 

Camp at the Range, 1907 45 

Camp, 1910 20 

Commencement, 1910 597 

Commission issued Oren Marsh, '25 in 1839 ; 175 

Commons Club House 666 

Drafting, Summer School, 1910 764 

Evening Parade, Commencement, 1910 459 

Group of Cadets of 1854 549 

Group of Cadets of 1855 573 

Group of Cadets of 1859 649 

Group: T. E. G. Ransom, '51, L. M. Strobel, '51 and Unknown 493 

Phi Kappa Delta Fraternity House 728 

Ransom Family 28 

Roman Riding, Commencement, 1911 504 

Schwenger's Glider 393 

Summer School, 1911 423 

Troop B, 1911 284, 351 

LTniversity Buildings, Norwich iv. 



CHAPTER I. 

Sketches of Trustees, 1834-GG. 

GEN. NATHANIEL BRADLEY BAKER, A. B. 

Nathaniel B. Baker was born in Hillsboro, N. H., September 29, 1818; and 
died in Des Moines, la., September 11, 1876. 

He prepared for college at Phillips (Exeter) Academy, class 1834; 
graduated A. B. from Harvard College in 1839. He studied law and was 
admitted to the bar in Concord, N. H. in 1842 and practiced his profession 
there until 1856; was associated with H. H. Carroll, Esq., in the jjublication of 
the New Hampshire Patriot, 1841-4.5. 

In 1856, he removed to Clinton, la., and in 1860 to Des Moines, where he 
resided until his death; practiced his profession in Clinton, 1856-61. 

He was a Republican in politics and held many offices; was clerk of the 
court of common pleas and of the Superior Court of Merrimac County, N. H., 
for some years; represented his district in the House of Representatives 1850 and 
1851, serving as speaker; served in 1852 as presidential elector; was governor 
of New Hampshire, 1854-56; represented Clinton, la., in the State Legisla- 
ture 1859-60; was adjutant-general of the state of Iowa 1861-76. He served 
as Trustee of "N. U.," 1854-59. 

AUGUSTUS OLCOTT BREWSTER. 

Augustus O. Brewster, son of Gen. Amos Avery and Susan (Boudinot) 
Brewster, was born in Hanover. N. H., May 17, 1823, and died in Paterson, 
N. J., January 17, 1897. 

He graduated A. B. from Dartmouth College in 1843; practiced law 
in Hanover, 1845-50; New York City, 1850-52; Boston, Mass., 1852-62; 
Paterson, N. J., 1862-97; served as trustee of "N. U." 1848-53; served 
for some years as colonel in the New Hampshire state militia. 

He was married in 1846, to Georgiana Augusta, daughter of Maj. (Jeorge 
B. Bribby, U. S. A., of Paterson, N. J. 

HON. OLIVER PHELPS CHANDLER, A. B. 

Oliver P. Chandler, son of John Winthrop and Susan Chandler, was 
born in Peacham, Vt., May 29, 1807, and died in Woodstock, Vt., September 
19, 1895. 

He i)rei)ared for college; at the Peacham Academy and gradual (id A. B. 
from Dartmouf.h College; in 1828. 

He studied law and practiced in Woodstocik, Vt., 1833-95. He held 
many public j)ositions. He r(;pre.sented Woodstock in the Constitutional 
Convention in 1836, and represented the town in the House of Rcpresen- 

1 




2 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

tatives, 1830-41, 1862, and 1863; was state senator, 1848-50. He served 
as trustee of the University during 1849-53. 

HON. DANIEL COBB. 

Daniel Cobb, son of Nathan and Lydia (BMss) Cobb, was born in Hanover 
N. H., July 23, 1787, and died in Strafford, Vt., July 26, 1868. 

He prepared for college at Moor's Acad- 
emy, Hanover, N. H., with the intention of 
entering Dartmouth College, but owing to 
his father's heavy financial losses, was forced 
, ' to give up his cherished plan. 

He studied law with Ebenezer Brown, 
Norwich, Vt., 1805-06; with Seth Cushman, 
Guildhall, 1806-09. He was admitted to the 
Essex County bar in December, 1809, and 
practiced his profession in Waterford, Vt., 
December, 1809-April, 1810; removed to 
Strafford, Vt., April, 1810, where he resided 
until his death. He practiced his profession 
many years, meeting with marked success. 
He was a Democrat in politics; repre- 
Hon. Daniel Cobb. sented his town in the House of Represen- 

tatives, 1815-17, 1824, 1825, 1841 and 1842; was assistant judge. Orange 
County Court, 1824-33, 1834, 1837, 1839 and 1842; was a member of the 
State Council, 1831-34; state senator in 1835 and 1839; was candidate for 
presidential elector in 1836. 

On the invasion of Plattsburgh, in 1814, he volunteered for service, but 
in Burlington, when the arms were distributed, it was suggested to him that, 
being lame, he did not need a gun. His reply, "I'll be d — d if I came to run; 
I came to fight!' ' was characteristic of the man. 

He was much interested in educational matters; served as trustee of the 
University, 1835-50. 

He was married in January, 1818, to Marinda Bryant of Templeton, 
Mass., who died September 14, 1860. Six children were born to them: 
Daniel B. B., "N. U.," '37; Samuel Webster, "N. U.," '45; Danforth, born 
1823, died 1826; Mary Marinda, born 1825, died 1826; Nathan B., "N. U.," 
'46; Walter Balfour, born 1829, died 1871. 

SHUBAEL CONVERSE, M. D. 

Shubael Converse, son of Shubael and Phoebe Converse, was born in 
Randolph, Vt., September 7, 1805, and died there, August 6, 1867. He studied 
his profession with Doctor R. D. Mussey of Hanover, N. H., and at Dart- 
mouth College, graduating in 1828. 

Soon after, he settled in Strafford where he practiced his profession 
until 1837, when he purchased the business and homestead of Doctor Horace 
Hatch at the southern border of Norwich village, and remo^^ng there, wa,s 
engaged in the active pursuit of his professional duties for a period of thirty 
3'ears, until his sudden death. Doctor Converse possessed in a high degree 
the respect and confidence of the community, both as a citizen and a physician. 



SKETCHES OF TRUSTEES. 3 

A man of enlightened views and much public spirit, he was especially interested 
in the cause of popular education. He served as trustee of "N. U.," 1851-53. 
He was superintendent of schools in Norwich from 1846 to 1854, and again 
in 1856. After the removal of Norwich University to Northfield, in 1866, 
he was prominent in establishing the Norwich Classical and English Board- 
ing School, the following year. He represented the town in the legislature in 
1845, and 1846, and was chosen senator from Windsor County in 1855 and 
1856. Among other young men who pursued medical studies with Doctor 
Converse at Norwich were, Doctor Henry Baxter, '39, of Highgate and Doctor 
Charles D. Lewis, '38, of Kentucky. 

He was married in 1841, to Louvia E. Morrill, daughter of David and 
Margery Morrill of Strafford, Vt. Two sons were born to them: the eldest, 
Charles B., graduated at Dartmouth College in 1863, and is now a practising 
physician in Jersey City, N. J. He received the degree of M. D. at Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College in 1871. 

HON. ALVAH CROCKER. 

Alvah Crocker was born in Leominster, Mass., October 14, 1801, and 
died in Fitchbm-g, Mass., December 26, 1874. 

He attended the schools of his town and of Fitchburg. 

He was employed in a paper mill in Franklin, N. H., until 1824, when he 
removed to Fitchburg, and began the manufacture of paper, in which business 
he met with marked success. He was the first to use cotton waste in the 
manufacture of paper. 

He early became interested in the construction of railroads; was instru- 
mental in securing the charter for the railroad from Northern Massachusetts 
to Boston, which was completed in 1845; was engaged in building the Vermont 
& Massachusetts R. R.; and the Troy & Boston R. R.; was for several years 
commissioner of the Hoosac- Tunnel; served for several years as president of 
the Boston & Fitchburg R. R. 

He was largely interested in various business enterprises; and was the 
owner of extensive machine shops in Fitchburg. 

He was first a Whig in politics and later a Republican, and held many 
positions. He represented his district in the State Legislature in 1835-36, 1842 
and 1843; was state senator, 1862-64; served as congressman from February 
14, 1872, until his death. 

He served as a trustee of "N. U." 1849 and 1850. A son, Charles 
Thomas Crocker, was a cadet in the class of 1853. 

HON. LSAAC NEWTON CUSHMAN, A. B. 

Isaac N. Cushnian, son of Holmes and Mary (Paddock) Cushman, was 
born in Middleboro, Mass., Januaiy 22, 1788, and died in Hartland, Vt., 
March 9, 1843. 

In 1798, his father moved to Hartland, Vt., where he attended the 
public schools. He graduated A. B. from Middlebm-y College in 1812. 

He studied law with the Hon. Titus Hutchinson, of Woodstock, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1815. He formed a partnership with Mr. Hutch- 
inson, the same year, which was continued until December 8, 1821, when 
he removed to Hartland, Vt. Here he continued his practice until 1833. 



4 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

On this last date he returned to Woodstock, Vt., where he continued his 
practice until his death. 

He met with marked success in his profession; was associated for some 
years in the publication of the Henry Clay in Woodstock; was one of the 
founders of the first circulating library in Woodstock beginning July, 1821. 
He was one of the incorporators of "N. U.," November 6, 1834, and served 
as trustee until his death. 

As colonel on the governor's staff, he served on the reception committee, 
which welcomed Lafayette to Vermont, at Windsor, June 28, 1825. 

He was a Whig in politics, and held many offices; was a member of the 
Council of Censors of Vermont, in 1820; represented Hartland in the House 
of Representatives, 1823-25, 1832; was state's attorney during 1824-27 and 
surveyor general of Vermont, three years. 

He was married, July 11, 1816, to Charlotte Hayden, of Braintree, Mass., 
who died June 21, 1869. Nine children were born to them: Charles James 
Fox, born July 12, 1817, died December 24, 1891; Holmes, born April 8, 
1819, died June 6, 1823; Isaac N. "N. U.," '39, (q. v.); Charlotte, born 
January 14, 1823, died in December 1823; Edmund Soper, born December 
18, 1824, died January 19, 1850; George Hayden, born February 4, 1827, died 
June 23, 1864; Charlotte Eliza, born February 22, 1829, died unman-ied, 
October 18, 1843; Sarah Vaughan, born April 22, 1831, died immarried, 
September 21, 1849; Holmes, born November 4, 1833, died at Morrisville, Vt. 

IRA DAVIS, M. D. 

Ira Davis, son of Moses and Sarah (Sawyer) Davis, was born in Dracut, 
Mass., January 25, 1801, and died in Norwich, Vt., March 1873. 

In 1806, his parents removed to Hanover, N. H., and in 1813, to Norwich, 
Vt. He attended the public schools of Norwich and Hanover, N. H., and 
later attended a medical school in IVIassachusetts. He began the practice 
of medicine in Norwich in 1830, which he continued until his death. In 
1829, he formed a partnership with William T. Porter, and published the 
Vermont Inquirer in Norwich until 1831; was as.sociated with E. Southworth 
in October, 1852, when they started a newspaper under the title of While 
River Adverliser and Vermont Family Gazette. In 1853, when the office 
building burned, the paper was discontinued. 

He took a deep interest in the University, and was one of its incorpora- 
tors in 1834; also served as trustee, 1835-59. He was a member of the board 
of Medical Examiners, and a member of the Executive Committee of the 
University for many years. 

He was a Democrat in politics, and held many to^vii offices; served as 
to\\Ti clerk, 1841-43 and postmaster of Norwich, 1841-49. 

He was an active member of the Methodist Church. 

He was married three times: first, to Folly Hazelton. One child, Charles, 
was born to them. He was married the second time to Rhoda Slack. Five 
children were born to them: Andrew, Frank, Rosella, Margaret, and Belle C, 
who resides in Boston. He was married the third time, October 12, 1858, to 
Lucy A. L. Crary. Two children were born to them: Curtis, now, truant 
officer of Manchester, N. H.; George M., now a physician in Manchester, N. H. 



SKETCHES OB^ TRUSTEES. 5 

HON. WILLIAM HENRY DUNCAN, A. M. 

William H. Duncan, son of William and Mary (McMm-pliy) Duncan, was 
born in Candia, N. H., September 26, 1807, and died in Hanover, N. H., 
March 29, 1883. He graduated from Dartmouth College in 1830, and later 
received the degree of A. M., from that Institution. 

He studied law with Chancellor Benjamin Fanueil Duncan of Charies- 
town, S. C, and was admitted to the bar in that state. He practiced his pro- 
fession in Hanover, 1834-70. 

He was an active friend of "N. U.," serving as trustee dm-ing 1840-49. 

He was married June 25, 1834, to Sarah Murdock, daughter of the Hon. 
Mills Olcott of Hanover. 



JUDGE THOMAS WILLIAM FREELON, A. M. 

Thomas W. Freelon, son of Capt. Thomas W. Freelon, U. S. N., '23, 
and Lydia (Emerson) Freelon, was born in Norwich, Vt., August 8, 1826, 
and died in Oakland, Cal., March 30, 1885. 

He prepared for college at the 
Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, 
N. H-. and graduated A. B., from 
Dartmouth College in 1843, later 
received the degree of A. M. 

He studied law and edited a 
newspaper in Niles, Mich., 1843-46; 
was commissioned first lieutenant 
of infantry from Michigan, March 
2, 1847, and was assigned to the 
15th U. S. Regiment April 9, 1847; 
was regimental quartermaster, July 
1, to September 1, 1847; captain, 
December 4, 1847; was brevetted 
captain, September 13, 1847, for 
"gallant and meritorious services 
in the battle of Chapultepec, 
Mexico"; was mustered out of 
service August 6, 1848; was pro- 
fessor of modern languages, English 
Literature and Belles-Leltres and 
Mihtary Science at "N.U. " 1848-49; 
served as trustee of " N. U." 1843-47. 
He went to California in 1849, 
arriving in San Francisco Octo!>er 9. He soon began the practice of his pro- 
fession in that city and became one of the best known lawyers in the State; 
was judge county court, California, 1852-58; judge probate court, 1864; court 
of appeals, 1878-79; superior court, 1880-83. 

He was a member of the Episcopal Church and the Masonic Lodge. 
He was married February 21, 1865, to Louise, daughter of Isaac Newton 
Partridge of Dayton, Ohio. Two children: Lois Newton, born February 16, 
1866, and Emerson, born February 22, 1868; both children died in in- 
fancy. 




Thomas William Freelon. 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



HON. JEDEDIAH HYDE HARRIS. 



Jedediah H. Harris, son of John and Elizabeth (Hyde) Harris, was born 
in Norwich, Conn., December, 1784, and died in Strafford, Vt., March 8, ISoo. 

When a small child his parents removed to Canaan, N. H., and a few 
years later to Plainfield, N. H. In 1804, he located in Strafford, Vt., where 
he made his home until his death. He engaged in the mercantile business 
and by his ex'cellent judgment, energy and economy acquired a large propert}^ 
He also engaged extensively in farmmg. 

He was a Republican in politics and held many offices; represented his 
town in the House of Representatives, 1810-13, 1814, 1818-22; member of 
the Governor's Council in 1827; state counselor, 1828-31; was a delegate to the 
Constitutional Convention in 1814; was a candidate for Ueutenant governor on 
the National RepubUcan ticket in 1822, and failed of election by only a small 
margin; was assistant judge of the county court, 1821-22; led the list of 
presidential electors in 1844; was treasxu-er of his towTi thirty years; justice 
of the peace many years. He was one of the ablest business men of the state 
and was often called on to settle matters of litigation. He was a good 
neighbor and greatly respected by the people of his towTi and state. 

On November 7, 1812, he was appointed captain in the "Volunteer 
Corps," Vermont troops and commanded his company on its march to Platts- 
burg in 1814. He was a zealous ITniversaUst and gave liberally in support 
of the church. He took a deep interest in educational matters and served as 
trustee of the University 1834-55. 

He was married in 1807, to Judith, daughter of Rev. Joab Young. Mrs. 
Harris died November 1, 1850. Two children were born to them: Marcia Ann, 
born April 30, 1810, married Lj-man Reed, died in Boston, Mass, July 29, 
1871; Ellen Judith Jennette, born November 26, 1811, married Hon. Portus 
Baxter, "N. U.", '24, (q. v.) died June 14, 1882. 

HON. JOHN HARRIS. 

John Harris, third son of Benjamin Harris of Norwich, was born in 
Norwich, Conn., in 1759, and died at Lebanon, N. H., March 29, 1839. 

He settled in that part of Norwich, Vt., known as Bozrah. He after- 
ward removed to Plainfield, N. H.. where he engaged in mercantile business 
many years. He, several times, represented Plainfield in the State Legislature. 
He served as trustee of the University during, 1836-39. 

He was married, February 2, 1782, to Elizabeth Hyde, daughter of 
Zedediah Hyde of Norwich. She died April 24, 1843. 

REV. EBENEZER CARTER HUTCHINSON, A. M., D.D. 

Ebenezer C. Hutchinson, was born at Hebron, Conn., December 25, 
1804, and died at Saratoga, N. Y., July 27, 1876 

He graduated A. B. from Bro^-n Universitj^ in 1826, and later received 
the degree of A. M. in course from that Institution. 

He was a student at the Princeton Theological Seminary, 1827-28, and 
was ordained a Presbyterian clergjTnan in 1829; was pastor of churches in 
Leesburg, Va., in 1830; Shepardstown, Va., 1831-32; Alexandria, Va., 1833- 
35; Petersburg, Va., 1835-40. In 1840, he was ordained an Episcopal clergy- 



gJtSTCHES OF TRUSTEES. 7 

man; served as president of Kemper College, Mo., 1841-45; was rector of 
St. George's church, St. Louis, Mo., 1845-51; Trinity church, St. Louis, 
1855-59, 

He took an active interest in ''N. U.," serving as trustee during 1848-53. 
The University conferred upon him, in 1849, the degree of D. D. A son, Lewis 
B. Hutchinson, was a cadet in the class of 1850. 

HON. SILAS HEMENWAY JENISON. 

Silas H. Jenison, son of Levi and Ruth (Hemenway) Jenison, was born 
in Shoreham, Vt., May 17, 1791, and died, October 30, 1849. 

His father, who was a farmer, died when he was only about a year old, 
so that his hfe for many years was spent upon a farm managed by his mother. 
In his youth he had the advantages of the common district school only; but 
he acquhed a taste for reading, which aided him through life. He also, 
after his school days were ended, engaged the services of Gideon Sissons, 
an old school master of Shoreham, who was skilled in the Latin and French 
languages, Arithmetic, Algebra and Surveying; and from him he acquired 
a handwriting, round and free, and the skill of an accurate siu-veyor, in which 
his services were often employed to the close of his life. 

He was distinguished for his sound ^common sense, j_and ^unvarying 
fidelity to the right. He had an earnest regard for the interests of the State, 
and was fearless in the discharge of every duty which devolved upon him as 
the chief magistrate. In his administration occurred what was called "the 
Patriot Rebellion" in Lower Canada, in which the sympathies of the people 
of Vermont were largely with the rebels; but perceiving that neutrality 
was the duty of the nation, and of Vermont as a part of it, he promptly issued 
his proclamation to that effect, and called out the militia to aid the officers 
of the United States in repressing those bodies of armed men who were moving 
to aid the rebellion in Canada. By this course, he doubtless forfeited the 
good will of many voters, but he was sustained by a majority of the people, 
and in 1840 received the largest majority of votes for governor which had ever 
before been cast. As a member of the legislature he interested himself 
largely in the Grand List, 

Governor Jenison was a member of the general assembly from 1826 until 
1831; judge of Addison county court from 1829 until 1835; delegate to the 
constitutional convention of 1843; judge of probate from 1841 until 1847; 
lieutenant-governor, 1834—35, and acting governor in 1835, and governor from 
1836 until 1841, when he declined a re-election. 

He took a great interest in the University, serving as trustee 1834-49. 

COL. JACOB KENT. 

Jacob Kent, son of Col. Jacob and Martha (Noyes) Kent, was born in 
Newbury, Vt., April 26, 1800, and died there, March 13, 1886. 

He attended the schools of his town, and by individual study became 
a fine student. He was proprietor of the once famous ' Coossuck Hotel" 
at Wells River, Vt., (Newbury) from 1830 until 1850. In this last year he 
removed to Chicago and engaged in the merchantile business; was also con- 
nected with many enterprises for the development of that city. He returned 
to Newbury in 1866, where he made his home until his death. In 1884, 



8 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

he inherited the home farm near Wells River, where he passed his last 
days. 

He was a Democrat in pohtics and held manj' offices; was sheriff of Orange 
county, 1841-44; census enumerator of Orange county, 1830—40, and 1850; 
United States marshal of Vermont, 1845-49; also held many town offices. 

He took an active interest in mihtary matters and rose from a private to 
a colonel of the local mihtia regiment. In the sixties he visited the 29th 
Illinois Infantry at the front and was present at the battles of Shiloh and 
Pittsburg Landing. 

He was a member of the Newbmy Lodge, F. and. A. M., and its Master 
in 1834; the Roj^al Arch Chapter of Xewbury. 

He was an intimate friend of Capt. Alden Partridge and Gen. T. B. 
Ransom, '25. He took a deep interest in the University and sei-\'ed as trustee, 
1848-59. It was through his influence that Col. H. O. Kent, '54, entered the 
University. 

HON. HENRY lOEYES. 

Henry Kej'es, son of Thomas and Margaretta (^SIcArthur) Keyes, was 
born in Vershire, Vt., January 3, 1810, and died in Xewbur>', Vt., September 
24, 1870. 

He removed to Newbmy, Vt., in 1825, and clerked for Reed & Gould 
until 1831, when he formed a partnership with his brother Freeman, under 
the firm name of F. and H. Keyes; and engaged in a general mercantile 
business until 1854. They were verj' successful in their business and soon 
had the largest store in Orange county. 

He was one of the origmal proprietors of the Connecticut and Passiunpsic 
Rivers R. R.; was one of its fu-st directors and in 1854 became its president, 
ser\dng until 1870; was one of the proprietors and a director in the Alt. Wash- 
ington R. R.; a large stock holder in the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe R. R., 
serving as its president at the time of his death. He was interested in the 
United States Hotel in Boston, and in several stage and steamboat Unes. He 
was much interested in agriculture and owned a large stock farm in Haverhill, 
N. H.; was president of the Vermont State Agricultural Society for several 
years. He served as trustee of " N. U.' ' 1853-55. 

He was a Democrat in pohtics; represented his town in the House of 
Representatives in 1855; was state senator, 1847—48; candidate for governor 
in 1856, 1857 and 1858; was a delegate to sevei-al successive national conven- 
tions of the Democratic part}' and was chairman of the ^^ermont delegation 
at the Baltimore convention in 1860, which nominated Stephen A. Douglass 
(honorary graduate "N. U.,' ' '44) for the presidency. 

He was a member of the Congregational Church. 

He was twice married : first. May 2, 1838, to Sarah A. Pierce of Stanstead, 
Canada, who died December 8, 1853. No children were bom of this marriage. 
He was again married, IMay 6, 1856, to Enuna F. Pierce, sister of his first wife, 
who survives him and resides in Boston. Five children were born to them; 
Isabella, born Jime 21, 1859; Henry Wilder, (Hai-vard University, '87,) born 
May 23, 1862, resides Haverhill, N. H.; Martha G., born April 26, 1S64, 
married Ezra Hem-y Baker, died June 16, 1896; George Thomas, (Harvard 
University '89,) born September 7, 1867, resides Pepperell, Mass.; Charles 
Walter, (Harvard University, '93,) born January 16, 1871, resides Pepperell, 
Mass. 



SKETCHES OF TRUSTEES. 9 

WILLIAM BEACH LAWRENCE, A. M., LL. D., D. C. L. 

William B. Lawrence was born in New York City, October 23, 1800, and 
died there March 26, 1881. 

He graduated A. B. from Columbia University in 1818, and in 1823 
received the degree of A. M. from his Alma Mater. He received the degree 
of A. M. from Yale University in 1826; D. C. L. from the University of the 
State of New York in 1873; LL. D. from Brown University in 1869. He 
travelled in Em-ope during 1821-23. He was admitted to the bar and prac- 
ticed his profession in New York for several years; later removed to New- 
port, R. I., where he continued his profession until 1881. He was council for 
Circassian before the International Tribunal, Washington, 1873. 

He was a Republican in politics and held many offices; was secretary 
of legation, London, 1826; charge d'affairs, 1827; lieutenant-governor of 
Rhode Island, 1851-52, and acting governor for a short time; member of the 
Rhode Island Constitutional Convention in 1853. 

He was greatly interested in educational matters; was lecturer on Political 
Economy, Columbia University for several years; lecturer on International 
Law, Columbian College, Washington, D. C, 1872; was trustee of "N. U.," 
1852-59, taking great interest in the welfare of the Institution. He was 
one of the originators of the Institute of the Law of Nations; member New York 
Historical Society and its vice-president 1836-45; trustee of the college of 
Physicians and Surgeons, 1837-55. 

He was the author of several works in English and French, chiefly on 
International Law. He was a contributor to the American Annual Register, 
1829-34. 

COL. JONATHAN PECKHAM MILLER, A. M. 

Jonathan P. Miller was born in Randolph, Vt., February 24, 1797, and 
died in Montpelier, Vt., February 17, 1847. 

He worked for a few months, in 1813, in a tannery in Woodstock, but owng 
to sickness returned to Randoli)h. 

He served in Capt. Lebbeus Egerton's Militia company of Randolph, on its 
march to Plattsburg, in September, 1814. He served as a private in the U. S. 
A. from 1817 until 1819, when he returned to Randolph and attended the 
Orange County Grammar School, and in the summer of 1821 entered Dart- 
mouth College, but only remained a few weeks. He then entered the University 
of Vermont, in the class of 1825, remaining there until the college buildings were 
burned, May 24, 1824. At this time C5r(>ece was struggling to gain her liberty, 
and had enlisted the sympathy of America. Miller determined to give his ser- 
vices to that country, and accordingly applied to the "Greek Committee" in 
Boston, for assistance in reaching the country. His request was granted and he 
was given letters to the president of the Greek Revolutionists at Missolonghi. 
He sailed from Boston, August 21, 1824, for Malta. He was appointed colonel 
on the staff of Brig. Gen. George Jarvis, an American who commanded a 
brigade in Lord Byron's command. Colonel Miller served with great distinction 
in many battles against the Turks, winning the title of the " American Dare- 
Devil." At the siege of Missolonghi in 1826, hv. especially won renown as a 
gallant soldier. In November 1826, he returned to the United States and 
delivered many addresses, in various sections of the country in support of the 



10 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

Grecian struggle for freedom. In February, 1827, he was sent to Greece to 
take charge of distributing the supplies sent from America, which important 
service was rendered with marked ability. One of the romantic incidents con- 
nected ^"ith the service of Colonel Miller in Greece, was his gaining possession 
of the sword worn by Lord Byron in his many campaigns in that country. 
Lord BjTon presented the sword to a Captain Laukas, a Grecian captain, 
and on his death in Athens the sword was sold by the Enghsh consul of Poras, 
for the benefit of the officer's family. Colonel Miller purchased the sword 
and loaned it to a Mr. Castanis, a Grecian patriot, who carried it back to 
Greece. For many years it was beheved the sword was lost. In 1853, it was 
recovered by Colonel Miller's daughter, Mrs. Keith, while on a visit to that 
coxmtry. This sword is now one of the most valuable relics of the Vermont 
Historical Society's Collection in MontpeHer. 

During Colonel Miller's service in Greece he became an intimate friend of 
John Dennison Russ, "N. U." '24, siu-geon of the Grecian Army and one of the 
most noble and efficient of all Ms compatriots in the Revolution. 

He located in Montpelier in 1828, studied law, and was admitted to the bar, 
practiced his profession in Montpelier in company with Nicholas Bayles. He 
made his home for some years in Berlin. He was an active anti-slavery worker, 
and while a member of the Vermont Legislature, in 1833, introduced a reso- 
lution calling on the Vermont delegation in Congress to work toward abolishing 
slavery in the District of Colmnbia. This was the first anti-slavery movement 
in the legislature of the state. He was a delegate from Vermont to the World's 
Anti-Slavery Convention in London in 1840, where he was one of the most 
prominent workers for the cause. 

He was a personal friend of Captain Alden Partridge, and Gen. T. B. Ran- 
som, '25. He was one of the incorporators of the University, November 6, 
1834, and served as a trustee until his death. The University of Vermont con- 
ferred upon him the degree of A. M., in 1829. 

He was a "^Tiig in politics, and held many offices; represented Berlin in the 
House of Representatives in 1830, 1831, and 1833. 

He was married in June, 1828. to Sarah, daughter of Capt. Jonathan Arms 
of Berlin, Vt., who died in Chicago, December 22, 1874. 

One daughter was born to them, who married Abijah Keith. Colonel 
Miller adopted a Grecian boy, Lucas Miltiades, who settled in Wisconsin and 
became one of the most prominent citizens of that State. 

REV. JOHN MOORE. 

John Moore, son of Joshua and Dorothy (Moody) Moore, and uncle of 
Curtis S. Barrett, '63, was born in Strafford, Vt., February 5, 1797, and died in 
Concord, N. H. February 5, 1855. 

He attended the schools of his towTi, and by his own persistent study be- 
came a fine student. He worked in a store in Strafford dm-ing 1817-18. On 
the death of his father in 1818, he returned home and managed the home farm 
and assisted in setthng the estate; also taught school for some time in Strafford. 
He took a deep interest in military matters and was colonel of the local mihtia 
regiment for some time. 

He was ordained a clergyman of the UniversaUst Church, in October 1826; 
preached at Strafford, Vt., 1826-27; Lebanon, N. H., 1827-April 1833; South 
Danvers, Mass., April, 1833-January, 1835; Lebanon and Hanover, N, H., 



SKETCHES OF TRUSTEES. 



11 




1835-1840; Hartford, Conn., 1840-Oct. 1845; Troy, N. Y., 1845-September, 
1846;Lowell, Mass., September 1846-47; Lynn, Mass., 1847-49; Strafford, Vt., 
1849-June 1850; Concord, N. H. June 1850-February 1855. He was the prin- 
cipal editorduring 1846 of the Con- 
necticut Universalist, pubhshed in 
Hartford, Conn. 

He took an active interest in all 
public affairs of the towns where he 
lived; served on the school boards 
of several towns; was active in the 
support of the various schools con- 
nected with his church, especially 
Tufts College; was a trustee of 
"N. II." 1835-38; was nominated 
for governor of New Hampshire in 
1855, by the American Party. 

He was active in the support 
of the temperance movement and a 
strong abolitionist. In November 
1842, he assisted in forming a 
missionary society of which he was 
treasurer for a number of years. 

He was a member of the Blaz- 
ing Star Lodge F. and A. M. of 
Concord, N. H., and its Master, 
1854-55; White Mountain Lodge, 
I. O. O. F. of Concord. Rev. John Moore. 

He was married February 12, 1818, to Mary, daughter of Silas and Eliza- 
beth Alger of Strafford. She died November 28, 1889. 

Two children were born to them; John Harvey, "N. U." '38 (q. v.): 
Jedediah Harris, born May 12, 1821; died in Lebanon, N. H., March 5, 1831. 

HON. JUSTIN SMITH MORRILL., LL. D. 

Justin S. Morrill, son of Nathaniel and Mary (Hunt) Morrill, was born in 
Strafford, Vt., April 14, 1810, and died in Washington, D. C, December 28, 
1898. 

He attended the schools of his native town and the Thetford and Randolph 
Academies. He was a clerk in the store in his town until 1828, when he went to 
Portland, Me., where he was employed by a merchant in the West India ship- 
ping trade. In 1831, he returned to Strafford, Vt., and engaged in business in 
partnership with Judge Jedediah Harris (trustee q. v.), until 1855. He also 
served for many years as director of the Orange County Bank of Chelsea. He 
was a close student and during his spare time read many law works, stocking 
his mind with information, that in after years became of great service to him. 

He was at first a Wliig in politics and later a Republican. In 1854, he was 
elected congressman from the second congressional district and held this office 
until he was elected United States senator in 1866. He continued as senator 
until his death. He was one of the ablest statesmen of his time, gaining great 
prominence for his work in Congress. His most prominent work was, perhaps, 
the establishing of the agricultural colleges in the United States. 



12 XORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

He contributed several articles to the North American Review, and a vol- 
ume entitled Self-Consciousness of Noted Persons, published in 1882 and in 
1886. He was one of the regents of the Smithsonian Institute, and a trustee of 
of the University of Vermont for several years. He was an active friend of 
Norwich University, serving as trustee, 1862-63. The degree of A. M. was 
confeiTcd on him by Dartmouth, and LL. D. by the University of Pennsylvania 
and the University of Vei'mont. 

He was married in 1851, to Ruth, daughter of Dr. Caleb and Ruth (Barrill) 
Swan of Easton, Mass. One son, James S. survived them. 

COL. SAMUEL NUTT. 

Samuel Nutt, son of John and Sarah (Bagley) Nutt, was born in Topsham, 
Vt., December 2-3, 1791, and died in Randolph, Vt., January 1, 1871; was buried 
in Hartford, Vt. 

In 1810, he located in West Lebanon, X. H., where he was employed 
iia the hotel conducted by Erastus Chamberlain. About 1812, he began 
boating on the Connecticut River, and for over twenty years he engaged 
extensively in river transportation. He constructed many boats for use on 
the Connecticut River and on various canals. He served as captain of 
the steamboat John Ledyard, on the Connecticut River, 1829-30. In 1832, 
he retired from the boating basiness. In 1817, he purchased a large farm 
in White River Junction, which he conducted for many years; was also the 
owner of many other valuable farms. He was engaged in many basiness 
enterprises. In 184.5, he built the "Junction House," which he managed for 
many years. He was one of the first subscribers for the stock of the Central 
Vermont R. R. Co., and of the \^ermont and Boston Telegraph Co. He met 
with marked success in his varioas business enterprises and acquired a large 
property. About 1870, he removed to Randolph, where he resided until 
his death. 

He was a Democrat in politics and held many town offices; served as 
postmaster of WTiite River Junction, October 30, 18.50 to December 12, 1859. 

He took a great interest in educational matters and was a firm friend of 
the University, ser\Tng as trustee, 1848-1867. 

He was a member of the United Bretheren Lodge F. and A. M., of Hart- 
ford, and of the Vermont Commandery K. T. 

He was married December 17, 1817, to Hannah Ivibbe of Hartford, Vt., 
who died at ^Miite River Junction February 6, 1870. Eight children were born 
to them: Alonzo, born October 5, 1819, died November 15, 1905; Almena, born 
May 21, 1822, died May 12, 1823; Amanda, born April 22, 1824, died August 
30, 1846; Almena, born May 21, 1826, married I. B. Culver, a prominent 
civil engineer, died in 1908; Albert, born May 11, 1829, died in 1902; Amelia, 
born October 30, 1831, married George W. Blodgett of Amherst, died Sep- 
tember 19, 1907; Almii-a, born February 3, 1838, married H.L. Smith, died 
in February 1908; Adeha, born September 5, 1840, died August 5, 1857. 

REV. ROSWELL PARK, A. M., D. D, 

Roswell Park, son of Avery and Betsey (Meech) Park, was born in Leba- 
non, Conn., October 1, 1807, and died in Chicago, 111., July 16, 1869. 
He passed several years of his boyhood in Preston, Conn., attending 



SKETCHES OF TRUSTEES. 13 

school in that town. In 1820, his parents removed to New York, where he 
prepared for college at Oxford, N. Y., and Hamilton, N. Y., academies and 
entered Hamilton College in 1826, and remained until 1827, when he re- 
ceived an appointment to the United States Military Academy, from which 
institution he graduated in 1831, first in his class. The same year he passed his 
final examination at Union College and graduated B. A. He was elected 
a member of the B K 

He was commissioned 2d lieutenant, U. S. Engineers, July 1, 1831 J 
was assistant engineer, Fort Adams, Newport, R. I., 1831-33; Fort Warren, 
Boston, Mass., 1833-36; Delaware Breakwater, off Delaware Bay, 183(). 
He resigned his commission September 30, 1836. 

He was professor of Chemistry and Natural Philosophy in the University 
of Pennsylvania, 1836-42. He entered the ministry of the Protestant Episco- 
pal Church in 1842; was rector of Christ Chm-ch, Pomfret, Conn., 1842-52. 
He founded in 1845, a private school, "Christ Church Hall" at the same 
place, which he conducted until 1852. He was elected president of Norwich 
University in 1850, but declined the position. He passed six months in travel 
in Europe in 1852, and in the same year located in Racine, Wis. He founded 
Racine College and was its president until 1859. In this last year, St. John's 
School, Delafield, Wis., was united with Racine College and he was appointed 
chancellor, serving until 1863. He was rector of St. Luke's Church, Racine, 
from 1855 until 1863, when he removed to Chicago and opened "Immanuel 
Hall," a literary and scientific school, of which he was rector and proprietor 
until his death. 

He received the degrees of A. M. from Union College in 1836 and from 
Hamilton College in 1837; and D. D. from "N. U.," in 1850. He served as 
a trustee of "N. U." during 1851-53. 

He was the author of several books: Juvenile and Miscellaneous Poems, 
Philadelphia, 1836; Sketch of the History of West Point 1840; Pantology, 
a Systematic Survey of Human Knowledge Philadeli^hia, 1841; Handbook 
for Travellers in Europe, New York, 1853; Jerusalem and other Poems, 
1857; he also prepared several text books for his pupils' use. He was a mem- 
ber and officer in many societies; was one of the founders and original mem- 
bers of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. 

He was twice married: first, December 28, 1836 to Mary Brewster Bald- 
win of Wobum, Mass., who died at Racine, Wis., October 23, 1854. Five 
children were born to them: three died young, two sm-vive; Mary, unman-ied, 
and Dr. Roswell Park, born May 4, 1852, pi-ofessor of Principles and Practice 
of Surgery, University of Buffalo, Buffalo, Y. Y. He was married the second 
time at Waukegan, III., April 25, 1860, to Eunice Elizabeth Niles, who died 
March 30, 1877. There were no children born of the second marriage. 

HON. CYRUS PARTRIDGE. 

Cyrus Partridge, son of Captain Isaac and Lois (Newton) Partridge, 
;uid brother of Cai)t. William Partridge;, of the U. S. Engineer Corps and cousin 
of Capt. Alden Partridge, U. S. A., was born in Norwich, Vt., July 11, 1786; 
and died there July 16, 1842. 

He engaged in the mercantile business in Norwich for many years, 
meeting with success in his business enterprises. He was a Democrat in 
politics and held many offices; was postmaster, 1818-20, 1821-34; represented 



14 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

his town in the House of Representatives, 1829-35 and 1836; served as trustee 
of "N. U.," 1838-42. He was a member of the Congregational Church, 
serving as deacon for some years. 

He was married December 11, 1806, to Mary Loveland, of Norwich, Vt. 
Eight children were born to them: Almira, married WUham Gillett; Harriet, 
married Mr. Knight; Mary, married WUham Carpenter, "N.U.," '25; Emily, 
Henry, Charles; Frederick WUham, "N.U.," '45; Franklin, born December 13 
1825, died in Bm-hngton, Kan., December 24, 1907. 

GEN. CHARLES HAZEN PEASLEE, A. M. 

Charles H. Peaslee, son of WilUam Peaslee, was born in Gilmanton 
N. H., February 6, 1804, and died in St. Paul, Minn., September 20, 1866. 

He attended the schools of his home town and graduated A. B. from 
Dartmouth in 1824; later received the degree of A. M. from that Institution. 
He studied law and practiced his profession in Concord, from 1828 until 
about 1860, when he removed to St. Paul, Minn. 

He was a Democrat in politics and held many offices; represented his 
district in Congress, 1847-53. He was adjutant and inspector general of 
New Hampshire, 1839-47. He was instrumental in founding the asj'lum 
for the insane in Concord, serving as trustee for some j^ears; was collector 
of the Port of Boston, 1854; was a director of the Concord R. R. for many 
years. He took great interest in the University, serving as trustee during 
1848-54. 

HON. LUCH^S BENEDICT PECK. 

Lucius B. Peck, .son of Gen. John Peck, was born in Waterbury, Vt., in 
October, 1802, and died in Lowell, Mass., December 28, 1866, while there on a 
professional visit. 

He entered West Point in 1822, but owing to ill health was forced to re- 
sign his cadetship in 1823. He studied law \\ith Judge Prentiss of Montpelier, 
and with Dennison Smith of Barre, Vt., was admitted to the bar in September, 
1825. He formed a partnership with Mr. Smith and practiced with him mitil 
about 1832, when he removed to Montpelier. He was later a partner with 
B. F. Fifield. He became one of the leading lawyers in the State. 

He was a Democrat in pohtics and held many positions. He represented 
Barre in the House of Representatives in 1831, represented his district in Con- 
gress from 1847 to 1851. He was twice the Democratic cancUdate for governor, 
and served as district attorney of ^'ermont, during 1853-57 . 

He was connected with several business enterprises of his city and state. 
He served as president of the Vermont and Canada Raihoad from 1859-66. He 
took gi-eat interest in the University, serving as trustee, 1853-57. 

He was married in 1830, to the daughter of Ira Day of Barre, who died in 
1845. 

HON. FRANKLIN PIERCE, A. B., LL. D. 

Franklin Pierce, fourteenth president of the United States, was born in 
HUlsborough, N.H., November 23, 1804, and died in Concord, N. H., October 
8, 1869. His father was Gen. Benjamin Pierce, a veteran of the Revolutionary 
War, and later prominent in the political affairs of New Hampshire. His 
mother was Anna Kendrick. 



SKETCHES OF TRUSTEES. 



15 



President Pierce prepared for college at the Hancock and the Francestown 
(N. H.) Academies. He entered Bowdoin College, Maine, in 1820 and gradu- 
ated A. B. in 1824; received the degree of LL.D. from his Alma Mater and 
from "N. U." in 1853, and from Dartmouth in 1860. 

He studied law with Judge Woodbmy of Portsmouth, N. H. during 1824- 
25; attended a law school in Northampton, Mass., 1825-26 and with Judge 
Parker in Amherst, N. H., 1826-27. He was admitted to the bar in 1827, and 
practiced his profession in Concord, N. H., 1827-33, 1842-47, 1857-69. 

He was a Democrat in politics and at an early age took a prominent part in 
the political affairs of his State. He was elected to the State Legislatui'e in 1828, 
and was re-elected for four succeeding years, serving as speaker of the house in 
1831 and 1832. In 1833, he was elected 
to Congress where he at once gained 
prominence serving on several im- 
portant committees. In 1837, he was 
elected United States senator, and 
served until 1842. During his term of 
service in the Unite'l States Senate, he 
gained wide fame as an orator and a 
statesman. In 1844, he dechned an ap- 
pointment to the United States Senate ; 
also in the same year he was nominatc( I 
by his party for governor of the state, 
but decUned the nomination. He 
served as district attorney of New 
Hampshire in 1845. In 1846, he de- 
clined the appointment of attorney 
general of the United States, tendered 
him by President Polk. 

On the breaking out of the Mexican 
War, he took an active part in support 
of the government, and in company 
with his friend Col. Truman B. Ransom, 
'25, then president of "N. U.,"made 
many speeches - throughout New England in support of the war. Show- 
ing his patriot zeal for the 'cause, he enlisted as a private in February 
1847, in a company, being raised in Concord for the 9th United States 
Infantry, the "Old Ninth New England Regiment." He was commissioned 
colonel February 16, 1847, Truman B. Ransom, '25, being the Heutenant 
colonel. On March 3, 1847, he was promoted brigadier general, being 
succeeded in the command of the regiment by Colonel Ransom. His com- 
mand joined General Scott's army in the latter part of June. At the battle of 
Contreras, August 18, 1847, General Pierce performed conspicuous duty; but 
was severely injured by the fall of his horse. He, however, commanded his 
brigade the next day, remaining on the field until the enemy was driven back. 
He continued in service in Mexico until the close of the war, resigning his com- 
mission, March 20, 1848. 

In 1850, he served as president of the constitutional convention of New 
Hamp.shire. He was elected President of the United States in 1852, serving 
from March 4, 1853 until March 4, 1857. His administration was at an event- 




Hon. Franklin Pierce. 



16 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

fill period. Great public disturbances were caused by fillibustering in Central 
America and Cuba, bj^ the citizens of this country. In 1854, the Kansas-Xe- 
braska bill was passed and the slavery question was being agitated in all parts 
of the country. Upon his retirement as president, he returned to Concord and 
continued the practice of law until his death. 

He was a personal friend of Captain .\lden Partridge and Col. Truman B. 
Ransom, '25. He took a deep interest in the welfare of the University, serving 
as trustees from 1841 until 1859. 

He was married in 1834, to Jane Means, daughter of Rev. Jesse Appleton, 
president of Bowdoin College. Mrs. Pierce died in Concord, N. H., December 
2, 1863. Three sons were born to them, but none survive their parents. Two 
died in early youth, and the youngest, Benjamin, was killed in an accident on 
the Boston and Maine R. R. in 1853. 

HON. CHAHLES REED, A. M., LL. B. 

Charles Reed was born in Thetford, Vt., November 24, 1814, and died 
in Montpelier, Vt., March 7, 1873. 

He graduated A. B. from Dartmouth College in 1835, and later received 
the degree of A. M., from that Institution; graduated LL. D., from Har- 
vard University Law School in 1839. He then located in Montpelier, Vt., 
where he practiced his profession many years. 

He was a Repubhcan in politics and held several positions; was state's 
attorney, Washington county, Vt., 1847-48; regis.trar of probate, one year; 
hbrarian of the State Library of Vermont, 1858, until his death. He served as 
trustee of "N. U.,' ' 1853-55. He married Emily Eliza Baldwin. 

JOHN REYNOLDS. 

John Reynolds, son of John and Hannah (Faulder) Reynolds, was born 
in Norfolk, Va., January 1, 1801, and died in Boston, Mass., in 1875. 

He removed to Boston, where he attended the public schools and resided 
there until about 1825, when he removed to Strafford, \t. He was agent 
for the Vermont Copper Company from 1825 until 1865, when he returned 
to Boston. He was captain of the militia company at Strafford, Vt.; served 
as a trustee of "N. U.," from 1850 until he resigned, August 13, 1856. 

He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

He was married in 1829 to Mary Ann, daughter of Benjamin Preston of 
Strafford, Vt., who died in 1873. Six chikh-en were born to them: Susan Duncan 
born in 1830, married Henry R. Reynolds, died in Boston in 1903; Lucy 
Preston, born in 1835, married Edmund Page George, died in 1856; Mary 
Ehzabeth, born in 1845, married George Weston Simmons, died in 1880; 
Mirinda Preston, 'Sla.ry Sanborn, and Evalin died in infancy. 

COL. ALBA STIMSON. 

Alba Stimson, son of Joel and Susanna (Grow) Stimson, was born in 
Norwich, Vt., May 10, 1783 and died in Post Mills, Vt., :March 15, 1864. 

He engaged in teaching in Norwich and vicinity for many years, meeting 
with marked success. He served for several years on the school committee of 
Nor^'ich, and was annually elected superintendent of schools for many years. 
He took an active interest in "N. U.,' ' serving as a trustee from 1848 until 1850. 



SKETCHES OF TRUSTEES. 17 

He was an active member of the "Free Soil Party." He held nearly 
all the town offices of Norwich; represented the town at the state constitu- 
tional convention in 1850. 

He took an active interest in military matters, and held the rank of 
colonel in the state militia. He commanded several companies of the militia 
which met in Windsor, Vt., on June 28, 1825, to welcome General Lafayette 
to the State. He was one of the most respected and influential citizens of 
Norwich. A few years previous to his death, he removed to Post Mills. 

He was married March 16, 1809, to Phoebe, daughter of Pierce Burton 
of Norwich, who died in Norwich, February 7, 1859; no children. 

WILLIAM SWEATT. M. D. 

William Sweatt, son of John and Hannah (Patterson) Sweatt, was 
born in Salisbury, N. H., in 1793, and died at Union Village, Thetford, Vt., 
September 12, 1866. 

He received an academic education, studied medicine and was admitted 
to practice in New Hampshire, February 27, 1816. 

He served as an assistant surgeon in the War of 1812, and was taken 
jjrisoner and taken to England, where he did much service in the hospitals. 
He retm-ned to his native state after the prisoners were exchanged and began 
the practice of medicine about 1820. 

He located in Norwich, Vt., in 1820; 
moved to Union Village, Thetford, in 1837, ^^ 

where he practiced his profession until his 
health failed, caused by a fall from his 

carriage. He was a very successful physician '' ff-'H!^ "Itv '^ 

having an extensive practice not only in , 
Thetford, but in the adjoining towns. He was , 
often sent for in consultation with other \ 
])hysicians, and was often called upon for ad- \ 
vi(!e by Dr. Dixi Crosby, professor of Sur- \ 
gcry at Dartmouth College. 

He was a Democrat in politics until 
the formation of the Republican party, 
when he changed to that political faith; held 
many offices in Norwich; served several Dr. William Sweatt. 

terms in the state senate from his county, and was justice of the 
peace. 

He was much interested in educational matters; served as school director 
in Norwich and Thetiord several years; was also town superintendent of 
schools, Thetford. He served as trustee of "N. U." 1834-50, and was a 
member of the executive committee, 1834-50; also served as medical examiner 
of the University for some yc-ars. 

He married Zilpha Baxter, daughter of Elihu and Triphcua Baxter of 
Norwich. She died at Union Village, (Thetford) Vt., March 15, 1866. 
Six children were born to them: Susan, born January 2, 1825, married 
Dr. Bushrod R. Gibson, died at Angola, Ind., May 20, 1889; John, born 
April 5, 1827, died in West Mitchell, la., January 12, 1902; Elizabeth, born 
December 15, 1825, married Suman S. Frary, died Riverside, Cal., Nov. 27, 
1907. Charles, "N. U." '51 (q. v.); William Stickney, born May 14, 



18 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



1836, resides Riverside, 
Fargo, N. D. 



Cal.; Frederick, born September 9, 1842, resides 



HON. LEVI BAKER VILAS. 

Levi B. Vilas, son of Moses and Mercy (Flint) Vilas, was born in Sterling, 
Vt., February 25, 1811, and died in Madison, Wis., February 6, 1879. 

He received an academic education and studied law; was admitted to the 
bar in St. Albans, Vt., in 1833; practiced his profession in Morrisville, Vt., 
1833-35; Johnson, Vt., 1835-38; Chelsea, Vt., 1838-51. On June 5, 1851, 
he settled in Madison, Wis., where he practiced his profession for a number 
of years, but retii'ed from active work before his death. He met with marked 
success in his profession, becoming one of the best known lawyers in Wis- 
consin. He served as trustee of "N. U.," during 1843-53. 

He was a Democrat in pohtics, 
and held many offices; represented 
Johnson, Vt., in the State Consti- 
tutional Convention in 1835, and 
in the House of Representatives in 
1836 and 1837; Chelsea, Vt., 1840-43 
state senator, 1845-4:6, serving as 
chairman pro tern; was the Demo- 
cratic candidate for Congress in 
1844; was judge of probate three 
years; served as commissioner of 
the Deaf, Dumb and Blind Insti- 
tute of Vermont; was a delegate 
to the National Democratic Con- 
vention in Baltimore, Md.; repre- 
sented Madison, Wis., in the State 
Legislature in 1855, 1368 and 1873; 
was mayor of Madison, Wis., 
1861-62; was regent of the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin, 1853-67; a draft 
commissioner in 1862; a member 
of the Wisconsin State Historical 
Society and of its executive com- 
mittee, from 1866 until his death. 
He was married, October 10, 1837, to Esther Green Smilie of Cambridge, 
Vt., who died in Madison, Wis., June 12, 1892. Ten children were born to 
them: Nathan Smihe, born August 20, 1838, died July 28, 1839; WilUam 
Freeman, born July 9, 1840, served as lieutenant colonel 23d Wisconsin 
Volunteer Infantry in the Civil War; was a prominent lawj'er of the bar of 
Madison, Wis.; postmaster general and secretary of the interior in President 
Cleveland's first cabinet; U. S. senator from Wisconsin, died August 27, 1908; 
Henry, born May 24, 1842, became a lawyer, served in the 12th and 23d 
Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, Civil War, as captain and brevet major; 
city attorney of Appleton, Wis., at the time of his death, November 21, 1872; 
Levi Madison, born February 17, 1844, law^-er; judge of the Ramsay county 
district court, Minnesota, residing at St. Paul, Minn., at the time of his 
death, August 25, 1889; Son born and died December 20, 1844; Charles 




Hon. Levi Baker Vilas. 



SKETCHES OF TRUSTEES, 19 

Harrison, born July 22, 1846, sm-geon; practiced his profession about twenty- 
five years in Chicago, 111., retiring president of the Hahnemann Medical 
College of that City, resides Madison Wis.; Frederick, born February 28, 
1850, died March 29, 1851; Edward Perrin, born November 6, 1852, apro min- 
ent member of the legal profession of Milwaukee, Wis., where he resides; 
Ira Hill, born April 19, 1863, died August 14, 1863; Esther, born August 28 
1865, died October 24, 1885. 

GEORGE EDWARD WALES, A. M. 

George E. Wales was born in Westminster, Vt. May 13, 1790, and died 
in Hartford, Vt., January 8, 1860. He received a common school education 
and studied law with Gen. Stephen R. Bradley of Westminster and Hon. 
Titus Hutchinson of Woodstock; was admitted to the Windsor county bar 
in 1812. 

He practiced his profession in Hartford 1812-29; 1840-60; and in various 
places in Windsor county 1829-40. On the organization of the White River 
Bridge Co. in 1818, he was elected clerk and treasurer, serving until 1825. 

He was a Whig in politics and held many public offices; was a member 
of the Vermont Constitutional Convention in 1822; represented his town in 
the House of Representatives, 1822-24 and was its speaker in 1823 and 1824; 
represented his district in [Congress, 1825-29; was town clerk of Hartford 
1840-60; judge of probate, Hartford district, 1847-50. 

He was a prominent Mason, having joined Warren Lodge No. 23, of 
Woodstock in 1812; was a charter member of United Bretheren Lodge No. 
27, of Hartford and its Master, 1813-24, 1851-53; was Grand Master, 1825-27; 
was a member of the American Legal Association. 

He took great interest in educational matters in his town; was a member 
of the corporation. University of Vermont, 1823-24; was a trustee of "N. U." 
1845-57; received the honorary degree of A. M. from Dartmouth in 1823 and 
from the University of Vermont in 1825. 

He was married in January 1813, to Amanda Jjiithrop of Sharon, by 
whom he had seven children. 

LIEUTENANT JOHN WRIGHT, U. S. A. 

John Wright, son of John and Ohve (Partridge) Wright and cousin of 
Capt. Alden Partridge, was born in Norwich, Vt., June 8, 1792, and died 
there September 10, 1860. 

He entered the U. S. Military Academy May 22, 1812 and graduated 
March 30, 1814; was commissioned 2d lieutenant Corps of Engineers, same 
date; was principal assistant professor of mathematics at the Academy, April 
1, 1814 to December 1, 1816; served with a company of Bombardiers, Sappers 
and Miners at West Point 1816-18; resigned July 23, 1818. 

He read law in the office of his brother Ebenezer Wright, at York, Pa., 
and practiced his profession in Norwich, 1818-60. He was a Democrat in 
I)olitics and held many town offices; was postmaster 183.5-38, 1853-56; member 
(jf the Constitutional Convention in 1830, 1843 and 1857. He served as 
trustee of "N. U.' ' 1843-51. 

He was twice married: first, to Susan, daughter of Dr. Pliineas Parkhurst 
of Lebanon, N. H. She died, August 18, 1820. One child, Susan Ann, born 



20 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



February 18, 1819, married Colby C. Benton of Lebanon, N. H. He was 
married the second time to Almira Ividder Green of Putney, Vt., sister of 
Hon. Cogswell K. Green, '26; she died March 31, 1877. Five children were 
born to them: Leonard Jar\is "N. U.," '51, (q. v.); Mary Jarvis, died, un- 
married at Tewkesbmy, Mass.; Thomas Kidder Green "N. U.," '56 (q. v.); 
two children died in infancy. 




In Camp, ipio. 



CHAPTER Hi 




Sketches of Presidents and Vice-Presidents, 1S34-6G. 

CAPT. ALDEN PARTRIDGE, U. S. A., A. M. 

Alden Partridge, son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Wright) Partridge, was 
born in Norwich, Vt., February 12, 1785, and died there, January 1(5, 1854. 

His father was a farmer in independent circumstances. He had served 
in the Revolution, and had taken part in the capture of Burgoyne and his army 
at Saratoga. He brought up his son in the New^ England fashion; at such 
district schools as the time and the country afforded in the winter, and at 
all sorts of work on the farm at 
other seasons, until he was sixteen 
years of age, when, being of a studious 
turn and fond of reading, he was 
allowed to fit for college, and entered 
Dartmouth in August, 1802. There 
is no record of his studies in college, 
but it is presumed that his predilect- 
ions were for mathematics. In 1805, 
he received the appointment of cadet 
in the artillerists, in the United States 
service, with orders to repair to West 
Point. He reported to the command- 
ing officer of the military academy 
of that place on December 14, 1805. 

The U. S. Military Academy, at 
that time, was very irregularly 
equipped with the men and material 
aids of instruction, although the two 
teachers appointed were abuntlantly 
capable in their respective depart- 
ments. Jared Mansfield, especially, 
the teacher of Natural Philosophy, 
had now such a reputation in 
mathematical studies that he rc- 
<;cive(l his commission as a captain of engineers from Mr. Jeffei-son, for the 
very purpose of becoming a teacher at West Point, which he did by ap- 
pointment in 1802, although in reality he did not perform his duties regu- 
larly, and then only for one year, having been in 1808, appointed by 
President Jefferson to the responsible i)ost of surveyor general, of the 
Northwestern territory. 

Catlet Partridge; graduated from the National Academy on October 30, 
1806, and on the same date he was api)ointed assistant professor of Mathematics, 




Captain Alden Partridge. 

From a portrait made in Middletown. Conn., 

in 1826. 



22 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



Ferdinand Hassler, being the professor. From Professor Hassler, he received 
great help in his mathematical studies. On February 14, 1810, Professor 
Hassler resigned, leaving the department in charge of Lieutenant Partridge. 
He was appointed principal assistant professor of Mathematics, April 29, 1812. 
In 1812, the United States Army was reorganized and a professorship of Mathe- 
matics was allowed and on April 13, 1813, Captain Partridge was appointed 
to the position with the pay and the emoluments of a major. On September 
1, 1813, he was transferred to the department of Civil Engineering, as pro- 
fessor, and held the office until December 31, 1816. He was commissioned 
captain. United States Engineers, July 23, 1810. 

In 1808, Captain Partridge was detailed to act as superintendent in the 
place of Colonel Williams, and continued to act in this capacity with brief 
intervals until January 3, 1815, when he received the permanent appointment, 

and served as such for two terms, until 
July 28, 1817. By a regulation of 
Januarj', 1815, the commandant of the 
Corps of Engineers was constituted an 
inspector of the Academy, and made 
responsible for instruction and was re- 
quired to report to the War Depart- 
ment. 

He resigned from the armj' in the 
early part of Api'il 1818, and from this 
time he devoted himself to the dis- 
semination, by lectm-es and otherwise, 
of the views which he held of the edu- 
cation required by the American citizen, 
and the establishment of institutions in 
which these views could be carried out. 
He was engaged in the summer of 
1818, as miUtary instructor to a volun- 
teer corps, and in giving a course of 
lectures on fortification and other 
branches of military science to a class 
,- of officers and citizens in the city of 

Captain Aiden Partridge U. s. A. New York. The \'iews which he at that 

From a portrait at U. S. MilUtary Academy, ^j^^g presented on the best means of 

national defense were in advance of the "piping times of peace," in 1818; 
but have since been demonstrated to be eminently sound and practical by 
the terrible experience of 1861-65. 

His chief reliance for national defense was in the military habits of the 
great body of the American people — organized into suitable (military) depart- 
ments, corresponding in the main to the limits of the several states, officered 
by men of the right capacity, scientific education, and military training. 

In the early part of 1819, Captain Partridge was engaged in the exploring 
survey of the northeastern boundary, under the fifth article of the treatj^ of 
Ghent. While on this survey, he determined from barometrical and thermome- 
trical observations the altitudes of the highlands dividing the rivers which 
flow northerly into the St. LawTence, from those which flow southerly into 
the .\tlantic Ocean; he also made a profile of the country between several 




SKETCH OF CAPTAIN PARTRIDGE, 23 

points on the St. Lawrence, and corresponding positions in the State of 
Maine. 

In the latter part of 1819, Captain Partridge resigned his position in this 
survey, for the purpose of carrying into practical effect a plan of education 
which had occupied much of his attention since 1810, and which in its main 
features was, doubtless, suggested by his experience at Hanover and West 
Point, and was calculated to supply certain deficiencies which he and others 
had already noticed in our American colleges and higher seminaries of learning. 
His views, both of the deficiencies and theu- remedies, were set forth in a lecture 
delivered at this time, which was subsequently printed. After defining 
"education" in its most perfect state to be the "preparing a youth in the best 
possible manner for the correct discharge of the duties of any station in which 
he may be placed,' ' he proceeds to characterize the existing plan of instruction. 

For the founding of the "American Literary, Scientific and Military 
Academy," see chapter I. 

He was appointed surveyor general of Vermont, in November, 1822, and 
served through the term of his appointment. In 1833, 1834, 1837, and 1839, 
Captain Partridge was elected Representative from the town of Norwich to 
the Legislature of Vermont, and in that capacity labored to give efficiency 
to the military system of the State. In 1834, he secured for certain petitioners 
a charter for the Norwich LTniversity, in which the trustees are required "to 
provide for a constant course of instruction in military science and civil 
engineering," and are "prohibited from establishing any regulations of a 
sectarian character, either in religion or in politics." Of this corporation, 
consisting of twenty-five trustees. Captain Partridge was a member, and on 
organizing the Institution in 1835, he was elected president. He continued 
to instruct in his department of military science and engineering, and adminis- 
tered the affairs of the University until November 11, 1843, when owing to 
some difficulties arising out of the use of the building, arms, and accoutrements, 
which were his private property, he resigned. 

In 1838, he was influential in calling together a convention of military 
officers and persons interested in giving greater efficiency to the organization 
of the militia of the several states, to meet for consultation. This convention 
met at Norwich, on the 4th of July of that year, and continued to meet an- 
nually for several years to discuss plans for the organization and discipline 
of the militia, for the dissemination of a knowledge of military science, for the 
defense of the coast, etc. Many reports of this body were drawn up by him, 
and the proceedings were forwarded to, and printed by order of, the Congress 
of the United States. 

In 1839, on the request of many influential citizens, he visited Portsmouth, 
Va., and established a military school in that place, which was soon after 
recognized by the legislature of the State, as the "Virginia Literary, Scientific 
and Military Institute, " and was aided by an appropriation out of the literary 
fund. This institute, with an institute of a similar character at Lexington, 
in the western part of the State, has been greatly instrumental in diffusing 
widely in Virginia a knowledge and taste for military affairs. The success 
of this institution, and the personal influence of many of his own scholars 
at Norwich and Middletown, led to the establishment of similar schools in 
other Southern states. 

In May, 1842, Captain Partridge accepted the position of camp instructor 



24 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



% 



A 



for a large body of officers and men of the Pennsylvania Volunteer Militia, 
in encampment at Heading, Berks county. Each evening he deUvered a 
lecture to officers assembled in the general's marquee, and during the day 
exercised the troops in the manual of arms, and in company, regimental and 
brigade movements in the field. On this and many similar occasions, he 
demonstrated the correctness and practicability of his theory of national 
defense, so far as testing the qualifications of officeis for command, and giving 
accuracy, rapidity, and steadiness of exercise and movements to troops, by 
assembling officers and men of the state militia, once or twice in the year, in 
convenient numbers and places, under instructors, themselves trained in the 
best military institutions, and famiUar with every improvement in military 
organization, equipment, and movement, and especially when clothed -wdth 
the expectation of success in actual service, would soon bring the entire militia 

of the States into a uniform system, 
and give respectability and efficiency 
to this department of the pubhc 
service. This result would be more 
speedily realized if a number of ed- 
ucational institutions similar to those 
which he had organized under dis- 
advantages, against many prejudicies, 
could call out and cultivate military 
taste and accomplishments among a 
portion of the young men of each 
state. 

In 1853, he opened at Brandy- 
wine Springs near Wilmington, in the 
State of Delaware, another institution 
in which he fondly hoped his idea of a 
national school of education would be 
realized ; an institution in which phy- 
sical trainir!g in connection with 
military exercises and movements, 
should accompany the acquisition of 
practical knowledge of the great 
principles of science that underlie all 
the arts of peace. Arrangements 
were made'for?a class of ten or 
twelve of the most advanced and matured cadets to accompany him to Europe 
to study strategy of the great battles of the' world, and the armies,' armories, 
and resom-ces of the great nations of Europe; but these hopes were darkened 
lor a tune by a great disaster, and soon extinguished by the sudden death 
of the great projector. In the autumn of 1853, the buildings at Brandywine 
Springs were consumed by fire. Arrangements had previously been made 
to secure suitable accomodations at Bristol, Penn., and upwards of one hundred 
pupils enrolled their names to attend for a year at that place, but the great 
motive power of the enterprise was stricken dowTi. 

At the close of the year 1853, Captain Partridge, in apparent good health 
and the best of spirits, returned to Norwdch, where his family still resided. 
A few days after reaching home, he was attacked by sharp and excruciating 




Captain Alden Partridge U. S. A. 
Copied from his last portrait, a daguerreo- 
type, made in 1852. 



SKETCH OF PRESIDENT RANSOM. 25 

pains in his back, which were soon subdued by anodynes; but from the pros- 
tration, and the cause, which proved on a post-mortem examination to be 
aneurism near the base of the spine, and which had been exhausting his vitahty 
for years. He never ralUed, and on the 17th of January, 1854, he breathed 
his last, widely and deeply mourned by troops of friends, who loved him as 
their teacher, and looked up to him as the best expounder of the principles of 
Military Science, Education and National Defense. 

In 1812, Dartmouth college conferred upon Captain Partridge the degree 
of A. M., in course. In 1821, he was elected president of the University of 
Vermont, but was unable to accept the office. The same year the corporation 
conferred upon him the honorary degree of A. M., it being the only compli- 
mentary degree given that year. 

He was married April, 1837, to Ann Elizabeth, eldest daughter of John 
Swazey of Claremont, N. H. She died in Octol>er, 1002. Two sons were 
born to them, George Musallah Colvocoresses, born August 4, 1838, died 
May 12, 1855; Henry Villers, (q. v.) a captain of the Pennsylvania Volunteers 
during the Civil War, and who now resides at Norwich. 

GEN. TRUMAN BISHOP RANSOM, A. M. 

Truman B. Ransom, son of Amasa and Abigal (Root) Ransom, was born 
in Woodstock, Vt., September 20, 1802, and was killed in the battle of Chapul- 
tepec, Mexico, September 13, 1847. 

He was a descendant of Joseph Ransom, who settled at an early date in 
Lyme, Conn. His great-grandfather, Matthew Ransom, and his grandfather, 
George Ransom, served in the Revoutionary \Var, and were in the memorable 
expedition commanded by Benedict Arnold, which made the perilous march 
through the Wilderness of Maine and assailed the walls of Quebec. Amasa 
Ransom, General Ransom's father, died in Woodstock, April 30, 1819, leaving 
the family in nearly a penniless condition. 

Genfiral Ransom at an early age was forced to make his own way in the 
world. At the age of thirteen he was placed in the shop of Artemas LawTcnce 
of Woodstock, to learn the trade of a chair maker and painter. At an eai'ly 
age, he showed a great eagerness to acquire knowledge. Fortunately for him, 
Mr. Lawrence was a kind master and loved his books; so this desire on the 
part of his apprentice was encouraged, and opportunities -vvere given him 
to read and study his books. As he progressed in his studies the desire came 
to give up his apprenticeship and give all his time to study, with the ideii of 
going to college. He asked Lawrence to release him from his engagement, but 
this request was refused. About 1819, Lawrence moved his business to (Juechee 
Vt., and Ransom offered to labor for Lawrence every alternate quart(>r and 
to double the amount of work he usually turned out, provided he woulil allow 
him to attend school one half the time. 'Jliis proposition was agreed to and 
young Ransom entered the "Academy" at Norwi(;h in 1820. He had a great 
deal of musical ability, and played the fife skillfully. Captain Partridge soon 
enrolled him in the fife and drum corps which played for the corps of cadets 
during drill and on their practice marches. In this way, he paid most of his 
expenses at the "Academy." 

For three years he worked for Lawrence and confiiuicd his studies until 
his apprenticeship was served. To a(!complish all this labor, he was oliliged to 




General Truman B. Ransom, A. M. 



SKETCH OF PRESIDENT RANSOM. 27 

work early and late and to forego all those recreations dear to every college man. 

On the death of Lawrence in 1823, Ransom took the shop and carried on 
the business successfully, with his academic work. He managed to manufac- 
ture a large stock of furniture, the sale of which would carry him through the 
"Academy"; but a fire occuring in the building where the stock was stored, 
he lost everything. With savings of less than one hundred dollars, he de- 
termined to go on with his college work. 

Captain Partridge became interested in this resolute cadet and gave a 
helping hand. By playing his fife at parades and occasionally working at 
his trade, he completed the course in 1825, standing high in his class work. 
He was instructor of Mathematics at the "Academy" during 182.5-28; 
Topography, 1827-28; Music, 1825-28. He retm-ned to the" Academy" 
in 1831 as professor of Mathematics, and held the position until 1832. 

He served as vice-president of the University from January 14, 1835, 
until May 3, 1836; was professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy 
1834-35. He was again elected vice-president of the University May 6, 1843, 
and served until February 8, 1844; was acting president from November 11, 
1843, when Captain Partridge resigned, until February 8, 1844, when he was 
elected president. He served as professor of Natural Philosophy, Military 
Science, Political Economy, and Civil Engineering from May 6, 1843, until 
May 7, 1847, when he resigned to serve in the Mexican War; served as trustee 
of the University from 1842 until his death ; received from the University the 
degree of A.M. in 1836. 

He was engineer for the Connecticut River Steamboat and Navigation 
Co., in 1824, and made a map of the river for the company. He, with Elisha 
Dunbar, '23, foimded the New Jersey Institution in Orange, N. J., in the sum- 
mer of 1828, which they successfully conducted until 1830, when, owing to the 
death of Professor Dunbar, in March, the school was given up. In May, 1830, 
he founded a military school at Fayetteville, N. C, which soon became popular 
and prosperous and he was beginning to acquire means when in August, 1831, 
the great fire that nearly destroyed the whole town, burned his school buildings 
and he lost all his property. 

He was professor of Mathematics and Tactics at Jefferson College, 
Mississippi, 1832-34, a class mate, John Holbrook, being acting president. 
Upon the death of Professor Holbrook in August, 1832, he was appointed 
acting president of the Institution and had full charge of its management 
until 1834, when he resigned his position and returned to Norwich, Vt. where he 
made his home. He was several times offered the presidency of this Institu- 
tion; but was obliged to refuse the position, as the climate did not agree with 
the health of his family. 

He was appointed professor of Mathematics in the United States Navy, 
October 2, 1835, and held the position until 1837, serving on the Conslellation 
for some months in the West Indian Squadron; was engineer on the Utica & 
Oswego R. R., in 1837-38, and located the road from Utica to Rome; was 
division engineer for the Illinois Internal Improvement Commission, 1838-39. 

He took great interest in the military affairs of the State of Vermont and 
spent much time in reviving and reorganizing the militia. His ambition was 
to make the "old floodwood" militia into an efficient national guard. He 
was frequently called upon by the officers of the state militia to instruct and 
drill them at their m(!etings for instruction. He proved so valuable to them 



SKETCH OF PRESIDENT RANSOM. 29 

that he was repeatedly urged to take office. In October, 1835, as commissioner, 
appointed by the governor, he presented to the state legislature, an elaborate 
report on the militia laws and many of his recommendations were adopted; 
was elected in 1836, captain of the volunteer militia company of Norwich, 
attached to the 3d brigade, and later in the same year was elected lieutenant 
colonel; in 1837, was successively elected colonel, brigadier general, and major 
general; served as major general until 1844, when he resigned. 

On the breaking out of the Mexican War, he offered his services to the 
government and in the fall of 184G, was appointed recruiting officer for the 
9th United States Infantry, later known as the "Old Ninth New England," 
being recruited in the New England states. He performed valuable service as 
recruiting officer during the winter of 1846-47. He was commissioned major 
of this regiment, February 16, 1847, and lieutenant colonel, April 9, 1847. 
He resigned the presidency of the University, May 7, 1847, and at once pro- 
ceeded with his regiment to Fort Adams, R. I. The regiment sailed from Fort 
Adams about May 31, and landed at Vera Cruz about July 1, and, joined with 
other new levies to the number of 2,509 men, under the command of General 
Franklin Pierce, first colonel of the Ninth, effected a junction at Pueblo, 
August 6, with the American army, commanded by General Scott in person. 
In the campaign that followed Colonel Ransom especially distinguished him- 
self, and received several compliments from the commanding general for the 
good discipline and conduct of his regiment, and his skill in handling troops. 
He was selected to lead the assault on the west side of the hill crowned by the 
fortress and castle of Chapultepec, September 13, 1847. While gallantly 
leading his regiment in this charge, and when about half way up the hill, 
he was shot through the head by a musket ball, and died immediately, in the 
very moment of victory. His body was temporarily interred in the Protestant 
burying ground near the city of Mexico, but was exhumed the following winter 
and brought to Vermont, where it was consigned to its final resting place in 
the old cemetery at Norwich, February 22, 1848. His funeral was attended 
by many of the leading men of his own and adjacent States. The funeral 
discourse was by Rev. J. D. Butler, acting president of the University; 
followed by a eulogy by F. W. Hopkins, adjutant general of the State. He 
was interred with approjjriate military honors. The escort was compo.sed 
of the Claremont N. H., Band, the corps of cadets, two companies of infantry 
from Lebanon and Hanover, N. H., and the West Fairlee Rifle Corps. 

At the October session of the Vermont legislature, in 1847, flattering 
tributes were paid to the memory of Colonel Ransom, and the Governor was 
directed "as a token of the respect of the General Assembly of this State for 
the memory of Colonel Ransom, to present in such time and manner as he may 
deem proper, to the son of Colonel Ransom, an appropriate sword with such 
devices and inscriptions thereon as will best y)erpetuatc the memory of the 
deceased and most effectually awaken in the bosom of the son those sentiments 
of lofty and fervent patriotism for which the father was so pre-eminently 
distinguished". This sword was presented to Dunbar R. Ransom, '51, by 
Hon. J. P. Kidder, a graduate of the "Academy." 

He was a Democrat in politics and a candidate for Coiigress in 1840, 
being defeated by only a small majority. He was an eloquent public speaker 
and delivered many spee(;hes in various political campaigns. 

He was married at Middletown, Conn., February 2, 1830, to Margarctta 



30 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

Morrison Greenfield,. Seven children were born to them: Dunbar Richard, 
"N. IT." '51, (q. v.); Thomas E. G., "N. U." '51, (q.v.); Mary Rozella, 
born at Norwich, April 25, 1837, died May 20, 1843; George Richard, 
born December 9, 1839, at Nor^\ich, died September 23, 1845; Frederick 
Eugene, "N. U.," '68; Mary Rozella, named for sister, born at Norwich, 
April 27, 1843, and died May 20, 1843; Catherine Harriet, born at Norwich, 
November 26, 1846, married Captain James O'Hara, U. S. A. 

PRESIDENT JAMES DAVIE BUTLER, A. M., LL. D. 

James D. Butler, son of James Da^de and Mrs. Rachel (Harris) Maynard 
Butler, was born in Rutland, Vt., March 15, 1815, and died in Madison, Wis., 
November 20, 1905. 

He attended the schools of his town until October 1829, when he went to 
Boston and worked in the hardware store of his cousin. In 1830, he returned 
home and studied Latin in the select school conducted by Rev. Hadley Proctor. 
In April, 1831, he entered Wesleyan Seminar}-, Wilbraham, Mass., where he 
remained until May 10, 1832. He entered ]Middlebury College in September, 
1832, and graduated A. B. in 1836; was distinguished in college for his scholar- 
ship and Uterary ability; dehvered on graduation an oration, "The Poetical 
Merit of the Iliad" ; served as tutor at Middlebury, 1837-38; received from his 
Alma Mater the degrees of A. M. in 1839, and LL. D. in 1862; was for a time 
acting professor. He was a student at the Yale Theological Seminary, 1836-37; 
graduated with honor from the Andover Theological Seminary in 1840; held 
the "Abbott Resident" fellowship, 1840-42; was a student at the L^niversity 
of Zena, Germany for a few months in 1842-43. 

He supplied the Congregational Churches in Burlington, July-December, 
1843; West Newbury, Vt., 1844-45; Wells River, Vt., 184.5-47; was pastor of the 
chm-ch in Wells River, 1847-49; South Danvers (now Peabody) February 
26, 1851-August 4, 1852; First Congi-egational Chiu-ch, Cincinnati, November 
10, 1852-54. In September, 1845, he was elected professor of Ancient Lan- 
guages and English Literature at "N. U." and served until 1847. Upon the 
resignation of President Ransom in March, 1846, he served as acting president 
until August 1847. He returned to the University in 1850, as professor of 
Modem Languages and Belles-Lettres, and held the position one year. He 
was professor of Greek in Wabash College, Crawfords\dlle, Ind., Januarj- 1855- 
December 1858; same, at the L^niversity of Wisconsin, 1858-67. 

He traveled extensiveh' in Germany, Italj^, Switzerland, England, Scot- 
land and Wales, June, 1842-December, 1843; Em-ope and the Bible Lands and 
Egj-pt, 1867-1868. He traveled along the line of the Union Pacific R. R., in 
June, 1869, extended his trip to California and in August sailed for the Sand- 
wich Islands, where he spent some time studying the languages and customs 
of the people. In 1878, he again \-isited Europe, and in 1883 made an extensive 
tour through Mexico. Later in the same year he explored the Yellowstone 
National Park and the Northwest. In 1884, he spent six months in Europe, 
and in 1887, made an extensive trip in Cuba. During July 1890-Sept ember 
1891, he made a tour around the world, ^^siting China, India, Ceylon, the Nile 
Valley, Europe and the land of the "Midnight Sun." 

During 1870-75, he was employed in the land department of the BurUngton 
& Missouri R. R., editing various pubUcations, advertising the country the 




PresidentJJames Davie Butler, A. M., LL. D. 



32 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

road traversed. These publications were translated in various languages and 
circulated by the millions throughout the world. He was a man of broad cul- 
ture and was a cosmopolitan in thought and feeling. As a scholar, he had 
few equals. He was a thorough student, and an able instructor. 

He \\Tote many articles for the American Quarterly Register, Bibliotheca 
Sacra, American Antiquarian, Wisconsin State Journal, Magazine of American 
History, Lijjjrincott's Magazine, New York Nation and many other periodicals; 
also articles for the Neiv England Genealogical Register, transactions of the Wis- 
consin Academy of Sciences; proceedings National Educational Association, 
Wisconsin Historical Collections, Vermont Historical Society. He published 
several pamphlets, among the nimaber being: Discourse at Norwich, Vt., on 
the death of General Ransom, in 1847; address on ih.Q Battle of Bennington, 
Vt., deUvered October 20, 1848; a Guide to the Connecticut and Passumpsic 
R. R. and the White Mountains, 1849; Incentives to Mental Culture among 
Teachers, 1853 ; Scenes in the Life of Christ, and the Catholic Hierarchy in the 
United States, 1866; N^ebraska, a Guide Book, 1873; Hoiv Dead Languages 
Make Live Men, 1874; Prehistoric Wisconsin, 1876; Portraits of Columbus, 
1882; A September Scamper; Guide Book to Nebraska, 1877; Cheap Fuel 
for the Prairies, 1879; The Hapax Legomena in Shakespeare, 1890; Com- 
monplace Books, Why and How Kept, 1887; The Once-used Words in 
Shakespeare, 1826; Alexander Mitchel, the Financier, 1888; He only 
published one book during his long literary career, Butleriana, the genea- 
logy of his family, in 1888. 

He delivered many lectures on his trips in Em-ope through New England 
and other sections of the coimtry. Among his favorite travel topics were: 
"The Architectm-e of St. Peters," "The Ceremonies of Holy Week," "Naples 
and its Neighborhood," Visits to Pompeii," "Alpine Rambles," "Provincial 
German Life," and "European Peculiarities." Among his other popular 
lectures were: "Commonplace Books, Why and How Kept," "Incentives to 
Mental Culture among Teachers" and "How Dead Languages Make Live 
Men." He delivered many historical lectures before the various societies of 
the country. His "Prehistoric Wisconsin" address, excited even trans- 
Atlantic interest. He was elected a member of the American Antiquarian 
Society of Worcester, Mass., in 1854. He was one of the early members of the 
Vermont Historical Society and did much to promote its growth; delivered be- 
fore the society two notable addresses: "Deficiencies in Our History, "1846, and 
the "Battle of Bennington," 1848. He was an active member of the State 
Historical Society of Wisconsin, 1859-1905, its curator 1867-1900, \'ice-president, 
1890-99. He did much to increase the usefulness of this society and for many 
years did more than any other man, save the secretary to secure gifts to the 
library and museum; w-as an active member of the Madison Literary Club, 
1877-95, honorary member, 1891-95, first vice-president 1885-86; Rutland 
County (Vt.) HLstorical Society; New England Historical Genealogical 
Society, Corresponding member of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

He was married, April 21, 1845, to Anna Bates, daughter of Rev. Joshua 
Bates, president of Middlebury College, 1818-39. She died June 9, 1892. 
Six children were born to them: James Davie, born June 25, 1846, resides 
Superior, Wis.; William Bates, born February 3, 1848, died August 1, 1854; 
Mary Bates, born January 6, 1850, died September 28, 1851; Henry Sigourney, 
bom November 16, 1854, resides, Superior, Wis.; Anna Bates, born July 2, 1860, 



SKETCH OF PRESIDENT BOURNS. 33 

resides Superior, Wis., Agnes Campbell, born December 20, 1863, married 
Prof. Benjamin W. Snow of the University of Wisconsin, resides Madison, 
Wis. 

REV. EDWARD BOURNS, A. M., LL. D. 

Edward Bourns was born in Dublin, Ireland, October 29, 1801, and died at 
Norwich, Vt., July 14, 1871. In the fall of 1823, he entered Trinity College, 
Dublin, an Institution classed with Oxford and Cambridge for its scholarly 
training and classical curriculum. For some reason, he did not pursue his 
course consecutively, but left college, to act as tutor in a private family, and 
did not take his degree of B. A. until July 9, 1833. 

After graduating, he- engaged as reviewer and writer for the well known 
publishing firm, Thomas Gregg & Son, doing business in Cheapside, London. 
He engaged later as a teacher in an English family. In August, 1837, he came to 
this country and opened an English and Classical School in Philadelphia, where 
he became acquainted with the Rev. WilUam DeLaney, D. D., provost of the 
Pennsylvania University. After the consecration of Dr. DeLaney as bishop of 
Western New York, and his removal to Geneva, N. Y., in 1838, Doctor Bourns 
was attracted to Geneva. In 1839, he received the degree of M. A. from Hobart 
College, then presided over by Rev. Benjamin Hale, D. D., and the same year 
was elected adjunct professor of the Latin and Greek Languages in that Insti- 
tution. In 1841, the same college conferred upon him the degree of LL. D.; 
also in the same year, on the seventh of March, he was ordained deacon in the 
Protestant Episcopal Church, and the following year, March 12, he was or- 
dained priest. 

In 1845, Doctor Boui-ns resigned his professorship in Hobart College and 
went to Brooklyn, N. Y., where he continued to teach the ancient languages 
until he was elected in Sep'^ember 1850, to the presidency of Norwich Univer- 
sity, Vermont. He continued to hold this office until 1865, and from 1850 
until a few days before his death, discharged the duties of professor of Jjat in and 
Greek. 

During a connection of twenty years with the University, as president and 
I)rofessor of Ancient Languages, Doctor Edward Bourns endeared himself to 
the members of as many classes through his eminent attainments, his kindly 
sympathy, and his delicate, incisive wit. It became a saying in the corps, wit- 
nessed to by generations of cadets, that no one could enter the doctor's rooms 
on the briefest of errands and not depart wiser than he came. The manly, 
honest, and truthful cadet, who got into trouble through exuberance of spirits, 
always felt when undergoing the ])enaltics inflicted for his iufrat-tions of disci- 
pline that he had the respect and symjjathy of the discii)linarian; while; the 
unmanly fellow who attempted to cover or palliate his faults by a falsehood, 
would find "Old Teddy" severe in the extreme, and woukl carry through life 
a memory of that severe look of contempt which would knot the doctor's brow 
as h(; gave a deprecatory shrug to his broad shoulders. Possessed of the na- 
tional wit of his nation, but without its brogue, for his English was of the purest 
diction, he courted that display of it in others; but it is not on record that a 
cadet ever ac(iuir{!(l an advantage over the doctor in an exchange of witticism. 
His was a wit, as before remarked, that was dcli(!at(; and incisive; but it never 
gave pain and it never failed to provoke a smile, even from its victim. 

Dr. Bourns was no ordinary man. The intrinsic force, native shrcwdnciss 



34 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

and genial kindness of his natui'e made him generally respected and admired by 
many. He was a man of learning and acumen. At Dublin University he won 
honorable prizes and in his library were books marked with the printed seal of 
his Alma Mater recording the occasions upon which he won them in scholastic 
competitions. Rev. Dr. Malcolm Douglass, from whose paper on Doctor 
Bom-ns, contributed to a Vermont pubhcation, some portions of this sketch are 
copied says, "He earned by long practice, a right to teach, as it were, ex 
cathedra. He was a voluminous, careful and exhaustive reader, yet never at 
any time in his sermons or addresses, in conservations or in discussions, did he 
ever betray the consequence of the pedant or assume to be other than a sincere 
inquirer after truth.* * * No man could discern better than he the weak 
points of a coxcomb, or a hypocrite; and no man could with keener hmnor and 
presence of mind foil the advances of intrusive persons and turn the tables upon 
them. Yet with a facility of extempore speech, and a native readiness that 
but for his diffidence and physical hindrances would have placed him among our 
foremost pubUc speakers, and with a keen and humorous mother-wit, he guarded 
the portals of his speech with the greatest care from hasty, unbecoming or care- 
less words." 

He had never belonged to a militarj^ organization; but somehow he had 
acquired the swinging stride of the modern soldier, and in his best days at Nor- 
wich it was a pleasant and invigorating sight to see him take a constitutional 
across the plain. When standing erect, liis height was six feet, two inches, with 
a framework — a breadth of shoulders, a development of muscle, and massive 
loins — in equal proportion. His physical courage was perfect. A modest talk 
or two, in which he told the writer of " to^Ti and gown' 'encounters at old Trinity, 
where he bore " a bit of a stick,' ' reveals him as a " broth of a boy. " 

Dr. Bourns may be said, Uke an old time knight, to have Uterally "died in 
his harness." He chmbed the hill to the University for the last time in the 
winter, 1870-71. Grown feeble on account of a lifelong asthma, much earUer 
than his stalwart physique had promised, he was obliged to pause frequently 
in his ascents before reaching the crest. When at last, he reluctantly acknowl- 
edged that he could no longer make the climb to his classes, they were sent to 
his place of residence. Captain Curtis once proposed to relieve him of them, 
but he repHed, "If you take my classes from me, I shall die." And so the 
cadets continued to fill the doctor's sitting room and recite to him, as he lay 
upon a couch and drilled them with all the exactness and critical refinement that 
had distinguished him through healthier days. When the last recitation was 
held and dismissed he rapidly declined, and after midnight of Commencement 
Day, .July 14, 1871, he died. 



SKETCHES OF VICE-rRESIDENTS. 35 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 
JUDGE AARON LOVELAND, A. B. 

Aaron Loveland, son of Joseph and Mercy (Bigelow) Loveland, was born 
in Norwich, Vt., August 10, 1780, and died there, unmarried, January 3, 1870. 

He attended the schools of his town, also receiving instruction from the 
Hon. Daniel Buck, the first lawyer who settled in Norwich. He graduated 
A. B. from Dartmouth College in 1801, delivering an oration in Greek. He 
was a classmate of Daniel Webster and was for some time a room-mate. 

He studied law with the Hon. Daniel Buck, and was admitted to the 
bar. He practiced his profession in Strafford until 1810, when he returned to 
Norwich, and continued his practice many years. He was a fine scholar and 
an able lawyer; was assistant judge of the Windsor County Court, 1823-24, 
and chief justice, 1824-25. 

He was first a 'V^'hig in politics, later a Republican, and held several 
positions. He represented Norwich in the House of Representatives, 1820-23, 
and 1840; also served as a member of the State Constitutional Convention 
in 1828. 

He took great interest in the University, serving as trustee, February 
IS, 1835 to 1862. He succeeded Truman B. Ransom as vice-president, Febru- 
ary 8, 1844, and served until 1859, when he resigned; served also for a numVjer 
of years as a member of the Executive Committee. 

HORACE WEBSTER, A. M., M. D., LL. D. 

Horace Webster was born in Hartford, Vt., September 21, 1794, and died 
in Geneva, N. Y., July 12, 1871. 

He entered the United States Military Academy in 1814, and graduated, 
July 24, 1818, ranking fourth in his class. He was commissioned 2d lieuten- 
ant, 3d United States Infantry, July 24, 1818, and served at the Military 
Academy as assistant professor of Mathematics from August 30, 1818, to 
September 1, 1823, and as principal assistant professor of Mathematics, 
September 21, 1823, to October 3, 1825; was promoted 1st lieutenant, 3d 
United States Infantry, April 5, 1820; resigned from the army, December 31 
1825. 

He was professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy, Geneva 
College, (now Hobart College) 1825-48; principal of the Free Academy, New 
York City, until that Institution became the College of the City of New York. 
He was then elected president and held the office until 1869, when he was 
made professor emeritus; was professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy 
1851-52; Moral, Intellectual and Political Philosophy, 1852-69. He received 
the degree of A. M. from Princeton college in 1823; LL. D. from' Kenyon 
College in 1842, and Columbia College in 1849; M. D.'from the University 
of Pennsylvania in 1850. 

He was a personal fri<!nd of Capt. Alden Partridge and Col. Truman B. 
Ransom, '25. He took an active interest in the University, serving as trustee; 
from 1851 to 1870; was elected vice-president in 1857 and served for several 
years. 



CHAPTER III. 

Sketches of Professors, 1820-G6. 

PROF. SAMUEL JOHNSON ALLEN, M. D. 

Samuel J. Allen, was born in Newport, N. H., January 8, 1819, and died 
in White River Junction, Vt., August 8, 1856. 

He attended the schools of his town and studied medicine ^\ith John 
L. Swett of Newport, in 1839, and later with Dr. Dixi Crosby; gi'aduated M. D. 
from the Castleton Medical College in 1842; practiced his profession in Nor- 
wich, October, 1842-January, 1844; Woodstock, Vt., January 1844- June, 1845; 
Hartford, Conn., June, 1845-March, 1847; WTiite River Junction, Vt., March, 
lS47-July, 1861, 1865-66; was physician and lecturer on Anatomy and 
Physiology at "N. U.,' ' 1850-51. 

On August 15, 1861, he was commissioned surgeon of the 4th Vermont 
Volunteers; was promoted surgeon of the "Vermont Brigade," December 
15, 1862; post surgeon 2d di\nsion 6th Ai-my Corps, Mai'ch, 1863; was mustered 
out of service, September 21, 1864; was appointed acting staff surgeon V. S. A., 
and assigned to duty as medical inspector, 6th Army Corps; was mustered 
out of sei'vicc, July, 1865. He was a brave and efficient officer and served 
in many battles; was twice v."ounded at Opequon Creek, Va., September, 
1864. 

He became one of the best known physicians and surgeons in Vermont 
and New Hampshire. He made many discoveries in connection with his 
practice as surgeon and introduced many methods of practice. He was one 
of the consulting surgeons of the Mary Fletcher Hospital, Burlington, from 
its foundation, until his death. 

He was a member of the Congregational Church, West Lebanon, N. H.; 
United Bretheren Lodge, F. and A. M., of Hartford; Abraham Lincoln, 
Post No. 85, G.A. R., of Hartford; was a member of the White Mountain 
Medical Societ}', Vermont Medical Society, and the American Medical 
Association. 

He was married, June 11, 1844, to Mary J. Lyman of Hartford. Three 
children were born to them: Samuel Johnson, Jr., born April 3, 1846, Dart- 
mouth College Medical Department, '70, physician, White River Junction, 
Vt.; Fred Lyman; Harry Bruce. 

PROF. RUFUS WILLIAIM BAILEY, A. M. 

Rufus W. Bailey, was born in North Yarmouth, Me., April 13, 1793 
and died in Huntsville, Tex., April 25, 1863. 

He graduated A. B. from Dartmouth College in 1813. He later received 
the degree of A. M., in course, from that Institution. He taught school in 
Salisbury, N. H., 1813-14; studied law with Daniel Webster, 1814-15; was 



SKETCHES OF PROFESSORS. 



37 



a student at the Andover Theological Seminary, 1815-16; served as tutor at 
Dartmouth, 1817-18. 

He was ordained a preacher in the Congregational ministry, November 
19, 1819, and preached in Norwich, Vt., 1819-24; chaplain of the "Academy" 
1820-24; professor of Ethics 1820-24; Belles-Lettres, 1821-24; was pastor 
of the Congregational Church in Pittsfield, Mass., 1824-27. He taught 
in South Carolina, 1827-39; in Fay etteville, N. C, 1839-42; and in Staunton, 
Va., 1842-48. He was agent American Colonization Society, Virginia, 
1848-54; was professor at Austin College, Huntsville, Tex., 1854-56 and 
president, 1858-63. 

He was an active anti-slavery worker, and while in Texas \\Tote many 
articles for the papers opposing slavery. He wrote a number of works on 
religious and educational subjects; a volume consisting of newspaper letters; 
The Issue, the Mother's Request, The Family Preacher, A Primary Grammar, 
a collection of sermons, A Manual of English Grammar, The Scholar's Coin- 
panion, 1841, which was issued in eighty editions. 

PROF. JOSEPH BARRATT, M. D. 

Joseph Barratt, son of John and Hannah Elizabeth (Scattergood) Barratt 
was born at Stapleford, Nottinghamshire, England, June 28, 1803; and died' 
unmarried, at the Connecticut Hospital for the Insane, Middlctown, Conn.' 
January 25, 1882. 

He graduated M. D. from the 
Trinity College Medical Depart- 
ment, Cambridge, England, in 1821. 
He then served as surgeon in the 
British Army until 1824, when he 
came to America. In August, 1824, 
he was appointed professor and 
lecturer in Botany, Mineralogy and 
Chemistry at the "Academy," 
which position he held until 1829. 

The following notice api)eared 
on Dr. Bnrratt in the Consiilution of 
Middlctown for January 31, 1882: 
"This gifted and eccentric man 
whose form was ever familiar on our 
streets and who in years agone was 
eagerly sought as a guest has passed 
away. He early in life devoted 
his attention to medicine. He 
l)assed the examination in medicine 
and surgery in London, April 8, 1819, 
and was licensed as an apothecary. 
The following June he sailed for this 
Prof. Joseph Barratt. country, the voyago lasting from 

June 17 to August 6. In December of that year, he was admitted as a licen- 
tiate by the medical society of New York in the practice of physic and surgery. 
In December he located in Philippstown, N. Y., where he remained until July, 
1824, when he removed to Norwich, Vt., and taught Mineralogy and Botany in 




3S NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

Captain Partridge's Military Academy. In IMay, 1825, when the school was 
removed to this city, he came ^ith it and here he resided ever since. 

"He was granted a diploma at the Yale ^Medical College in 1834, andfor a 
long time was regarded as one of the most promising physicians in this section. 
Botany was his favorite study and he could name any plant at sight, giving a 
full description of all its history. His memory and judgment in this respect 
was simply wonderful. Many years since, he prepared a chapter on American 
Willows for a book, which was privately printed by the author in England. 
Only three or four copies of this work ever came to this countrv and one of 
these was sent to Dr. Barratt. During those years, he gavelectiu-es in Chem- 
istry illustrating them with experiments. Had he given his attention to any 
one department he would have established a lasting name for himself. But we 
can only think of what might have been. About the time that Professor 
Hitchcock began lecturing on his famous bird tracks, the Doctor made many 
discoveries in this section, and henceforth gave his time and thought to that 
subject, until it became his one object in life. His business was neglected and 
his room became one grand museum whose walls and tables were covered with 
drawings, specimens, and reUcs of all kinds. 

"Twenty years ago he interested and amused by turns any group that he 
could get to listen to him. For Indian names and traditions he had a peculiar 
fondness and it is oi;\ing to his efforts that so manj' of those old names were pre- 
served in this locality. During the past few years his physical powers have 
gi'adually failed and for the last j^ear and a half he had been in the Hospital. 
He died Wednesday morning, and his funeral took place Friday afternoon, at 
Indian Hill Chapef." 

He was author of the America?i Willows published by Charles H. Pelton, 
Middltown, Conn., 1870. The Watkinson Library of Reference at Hartford 
has a quarto of eight leaves printed on one side which bears this title :"S ALICES 
AiMERICAN^, NORTH A:MERICAN WILL0\A^S." Disposed in sections 
of natural groups, with notes and observations of a practical nature, showing 
the kinds best adapted for the useful arts and those most esteemed in orna- 
mental culture. The preface is dated, October 21, 1840, and in it he makes 
mention of the collection of willows o^ATied by the Duke of Bedford on his estate 
"Woburn Abbey, ' ' among them being specimens of the American willows fur- 
nished liim by the Doctor, and also to the Duke's work, entitled Salicum War- 
burnese, printed in 1829. He also says "I am indebted to his Grace's kindness 
and munificence for a copj^ of this truly splendid work. " 

He was a corresponding member of the Academy of Natural Sciences of 
Philadelphia; the New York Lyceum of Natm-al Histoiy ; Yale Natural History 
Society; and the National Institution for the Promotion of Science at 
Washington. 

As a recognition of his talents, there has been erected at his grave a monu- 
ment of Portland freestone in two parts. The base Is a block composed of two 
fossil logs, each twelve inches in diameter and forty to forty-five inches in 
length, inscribed. The Testimony of the Rocks. The upper stone is a slab whose 
face is 27 by 40 inches and whose thickness Is six inches. The face toward the 
grave bears an inscription giving his name, profession, date and place of his 
birth and death, and the reverse is the hardened bed of clay covered with 
the tracks of the extinct animals known as the Dinosaur Brontozaum Lilli- 
manicum. 



SKETCHES OF PROFESSORS. 39 

PROF. LOAMI SEWELL COBURN, A. B. 

Loami S. Coburn, son of Loami and Polly (Marshall) Coburn, was born 
in Salem, Mass., September 7, 1808, and died in Weston, Vt., March 18, 1885. 

He prepared for college at the Salem LatinJ^School; graduated, A. B., from 
Dartmouth College, 1830, and from the Andover Theological Seminary, 1835. 
He was ordained a Congregational pastor, October 2, 1839. He was pastor of 
the church in Newfane, Vt., 1839-42; professor of Latin and Greek "N.U." 1848- 
49; principal of a classical school in Farmvlle, Va., 1853-57; was pastor of the 
Congregational church, Weston, Vt., 1857-66. He resided in this last town 
until his death. 

He was married, June 21, 1841, to Caroline Smith Day, of Ipswich, 
Mass., who died April 19, 1844. 

CHAPLAIN WALTER COLTON, U. S. N., A. M. 

Walter Colton, son of Walter and Thankful (Cushman) Colton, was born 
in Rutland, Vt., May 9, 1797, and died in Philadelphia, Pa., January 22, 1851. 

He attended the schools of his city and graduated A. B., from Yale Uni- 
versity in 1822; graduated from the Andover Theological Seminary in 1825; 
received the degree of A. M., from Yale in 1828. He was Chaplain at the 
"Academy" 1825-29; Professor of Rhetoric, 1826-27; Belles-Leitres, 1825-28; 
EngUsh Literature, 1828-29; Divinity 1828-29. He also delivered many lec- 
tures to the cadets. He was editor of the American Spectator Washington, 
D. C, 1829-30. 

He was appointed chaplain in the United States Navy, November 6, 1830, 
and served on the Vincennes in the West Indies, 1832-35; on the Constellation 
in the Mediterranean Sea, 1835-37; at the Charlestown Navy Yard, Mass., 
1837-38; Naval Stations, Philadelphia, 1838-45; was ordered to California in 
1845, and served as alcalde of Monterey 1846-48. While holding this posi- 
tion, he caused to be built, partlj' from labor of convicts, partly from the fines 
levied by him as alcalde, " Colton Hall, " a two story building, at the time of its 
erection one of the most imposing buildings in Monterey. In this building the 
Constitutional Convention, which framed the first constitution for California, 
was held. The building is now regarded as one of the historic buildings in 
CaUfornia, and is of interest to all tourists and sightseers. He resigned his 
commission in 1849, and returned to Philadelphia, where he resided until his 
death. 

He edited the Colonization Herald, Boston, 1836-38; the North American, 
Philadelphia, Pa., 1841-42. He established in Monterey, in 1846, the first paper 
published on the Pacific Coast, The Calif ornian. The name of the paper was 
changed to the Alta Californian, and removed to San Francisco. He was a 
prolific writer. Among his ])ul)lished works are: Masonic Obligations, an ad- 
dress before the Masonic bodies of Middletown, Conn., 24 pages, 1826; Re- 
marks on Duelling, a series of lectures before the cadets, 62 pages, 1828; Ship 
and Shore in Maderia, Lisbon and the Mediterranean, 1835; A Visit to Athens 
and Constantinople, 1836; Three Years in California, 1850; Deck and Fort; 
Incidents of a Cruise to California, 1850. He also wrote a drama, Traconi, which 
was played by the cadets in 1826. He built the first schoolhouse in California 
and was the first to announce the discovery of 'gold in a l(;ttcr to the North 
American. 

He was married to Cornelia B. Colton of Philadelphia, who later married 
Simeon B. Chittenden of Philadelphia. 



40 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

PROF. THOMAS RUSSELL CROSBY, A. M., M. D. 

Thomas R. Crosby, son of Dr. Asa Crosby was born in Gilmanton, 
N. H., October 22, 1816, and died in Hanover, N. H., March 7th, 1872. 

He prepared for college at the Gilmanton Academy and entered Dart- 
mouth College with advanced standing, and pm-sued both the classical and 
medical courses at the same time, graduating A. B., and M. D., in 1841. 
He later received the degree of A. M. in course. 

He practiced his profession in Meriden, N. H., 1841^3; iManchester, 
H. N., 1843-52. In 1852, not being able to attend fully to the duties of his 
profession, he removed to Hanover, N. H., where he made his home until 
his death; was professor of Anatomy, Physiology and Natural Historj^ at 
"N. U.," 1854-64. In 1858, he recovered his health and was able to resume 
the active practice of his profession. 

On the breaking out of the Civil War, he offered his ser\'ices to the State 
of New Hampshire, and on September 11, 1862, was commissioned surgeon 
and major of volvmteers and given charge of the Columbia College Hospital 
near Washington, D. C, where he remained untU he was mustered out of 
service, July 27, 1865; was brevetted lieutenant colonel, United States Volun- 
teers June 1, 1865, for "faithful and meritorious services." 

In 1865, he returned to Hanover and resumed his practice. He was 
lecturer on Mihtary Surgery at the National Medical College 1865-71; Hygiene, 
1867-68; professor of Anatomy and Vegetable Physiology and Instructor 
of History, New Hampshire State Agricultural College, Hanover, 1870-72. 

He was married at Norwich, January 17, 1843, to Louisa Partridge, 
daughter of Colonel Oliver Barron, U. S. A. 

PROF. JAMES FREEMAN DANA, A. M., M. D. 

James F. Dana, son of Luther and Lucy (Giddings) Dana, was born in 
Amherst, N. H., September 23, 1793, and died in New York City, April 14, 
1827. 

He prepared for college at the Pliillips Academy, Exeter, N. H., and 
graduated A. B. from Harvard College in 1813; graduated M. D. from the 
Harvard Medical College in 1817. In 1815, on the establishment of a new 
chemical department at Harvard, he was sent to England to pm-chase the 
necessary apparatus. He remained in England several months, studying 
chemistry and laboratory methods. On his return he was placed in charge 
of the fitting up of the laboratory at Harvard; received the degree of A. M., 
in course, from his Alma Mater in 1826. He served as lecturer on Chemistry 
at Dartmouth 1816-20; received the degrees of A. M., and M. D., from that 
Institution in 1821; was assistant professor of Chemistry at Harvard, 1819-20. 
He was professor of Chemistry and Mineralogy at the "Academy" from 1820 
until 1825 and dm-ing tliis tune held the same position at Dartmoutli, con- 
tinuing at that Institution until 1826; was professor of Chemistry, at the New 
York College of Physicians and Surgeons from 1826 until his death. 

He represented Hanover in the State Legislatme in 1825; served as aide-de- 
camp on the staff of Governor Morrill of New Hampshire in 1824; was visitor 
to the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1826. 

He contributed many articles on scientific subjects to various periodicals 
of the country. He was the author of the following works: Outlines of 



SKETCHES OF PROFESSORS. 41 

Mineralogy and Geology of Boston and its Vicinity, (in collaboration with his 
brother, Samuel L. Dana) 1818; An Epitome of Chemical Philosophy, 1825. 
He was a popular lecturer; was lecturer at the New York Athenaeum. He 
was a member of the Linnean Society. 

He was married in January, 1818, to Matilda, daughter of Rev. Samuel 
Webber, president of Harvard College. 

PROF. FRANCOIS PEYRE-FERRY. 

Francois Peyre-Ferry was born in France and in the early part of ISOO 
(!ame to this country. He was professor of French at the "Young Ladies' 
Literary School," conducted by the Rev. J. L. Blake, in Concord, N. H., 
for some time previous to 1822. In August of this year, he became professor 
of French at the "Academy," which position he held until 1828; also taught 
French in a Young Ladies' Seminary in Middletown. He was an accomplished 
teacher and violinist. 

He wrote several poems both in French and English for the Middletown 
pai)ers. One, Extremes a mes Pupils, appeared in the Middlesex Gazette 
of Middletown, January 4, 1825. In 1826, he puhVished" The Art of Epistolary 
Composition.^^ We give the title page :" The. \i't of Epistolary Composition or 
Models of Letters, Billets, Bills of Exchange, Bills of Lading, Invoices, etc., 
with prehminary instructions and notes. To which is added a collection of 
fables intended as exercises for pupils learning the French language; a series 
of letters between a Cadet and his father, describing the system piu-sued at 
the A. L. S. & M. Academy at Middletown, Conn., with some account of 
that place and a Discourse on Education, by Capt, Alden Partridge, Superin- 
tendent of the Academy." 

This work had a large sale and for several years was a standard text 
book. He also published The First Elements of French, which was used 
for several years at the "Academy." 

PROF. JOHN HIRAM LATHROP, A. M., LL. D. 

John H. Lathrop, son of John and Prue (Hatch) Lathrop, was born 
in Shelburne, Chenango, Co., New York, January 22, 1799, and died at Col- 
umbia, Mo., August 2, 1866. 

He was a direct descendent of the Rev. John Lathrop, a graduate of 
Cambridge University and a Congregational clergyman, who came to this 
country in 1634. 

Professor Lathrop prepared for college under private instruction; was 
a student at Hamilton College, N. Y., 1815-1816; graduated A. B., with liigh 
honors, from Yale University in 1819; received the degree of A. M., in course, 
from hhAlma Mater in 1822 and LL. D. from Hamilton College in 1845. 

He taught the grammar school at Farmington, Conn., 1819-21; was 
tutor at Yale University, 1821-26, and during this time completed a law course 
under Judge Daggett; was professor at the A. L. S. & M. Academy, 1826-27; 
principal, Gardiner, Maine, Lyceum, 1837-39; professor of Mathematics, 
and Natural Philosophy, Hamilton College, 1829-35, and held the Maynard 
Professorship of Law, Civil Polity and Political Economy, same Institution 
1835-40; first president of the University of Missouri, 1840-49; first chanc(!llor. 
University of Wisconsin, 1849-59; president Indiana State University, 1859-60. 



42 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



In I860, desiring relief for a time from the responsibilities of adminis- 
tration, he accepted the professorship of English Literature, University of 
Missouri, which position he held until 1865, and served as chairman of the 
faculty, 1862-65, and was re-elected president of the University of Missouri 
in 1865 and labored successfully to relieve the University from the unfortunate 
conditions imposed by the Civil War. 

He was one of the leading educa^'ors of his time. The University of 
Missoiu"i was fortunate in securing his services as its first president. Through 
unremitting tact and diplomacj^ he soon placed the University on a sound foot- 
ing and during his incumbency so increased the curriculum that educationally 
the University compared favorably with the leading Eastern institutions. 
His great abiUty as organizer, scholar and teacher was again exemplified in 

so founding and administering the 
Wisconsin University that it has 
become in a comparatively short 
time one of the greatest in the 
country. He had remarkable hterary 
abiUty. He deUvered many lectures, 
pubUshed many pamphlets and arti- 
cles in leading magazines and the 
newspapers, but unfortunately, o-nnng 
to his many professional obligations 
and cares, never pubUshed his works 
in book form. He took an active 
part in founding university libra- 
ries, gi\ang the larger part of his 
private library as a nucleus for that 
of the Universitj^ of Wisconsin. He 
was interested in the future of the 
Negro race and for some j'ears, be- 
fore the Civil War, was president of 
the National African Colonization 
Society. 

He was married August 15, 1833, to 
Prof. John Hiram Lathrop. Frances Eliza Lathrop of Utica, N. Y., 

who died October 18, 1893. Seven children were born to them: John Hosmer, 
bom June 23, 1834, died, umnarried, April, 1857; Leopold, born August 8, 
1835, died, unmarried, April 27, 1858; Jerusha, born May 8, 1838, and died 
September 10, 1839; Kii-kland, born February 13, 1840, died December 24, 
1840; Frances, born November 25, 1842, married WiUiam N.Smith, at present 
connected with the Claims Department of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa 
Fe Railway Company at Kansas City; Theresa, [born November 25, 1846, 
married Charies C. Ripley, Auditor of the Belt Railway Co., and Treasurer 
of the Union Depot Co., of Kansas City; Gardiner, born February 16, 1850, 
graduated from the University of Missouri in 1867, Yale in 1869, Harvard 
Law School in 1872, now General SoUcitor of the Atchison, Topeka and 
Santa Fe Railway Company, with headquarters at Chicago. 




SKETCHES OP PROFESSORS. 43 

PROF. GEORGE PERKINS MARSH, A. M., LL. D. 

George P. Marsh, son of Hon. Charles and Mrs. Susan (Perkins, Arnold) 
Marsh, was born in Woodstock, Vt., March 15, 1801; and died in Vallombrosa, 
Italy, July 23, 1882. 

He attended the schools of his town and graduated A. B. from Dartmouth 
College in 1820; later received the degree of A. M. in course; in 1860 the degree 
of LL. D. He was the first professor of Latin and Greek at the "Academy," 
serving during 1820-21. He then studied law with his father and in 1825, 
was admitted to the bar. He soon located in BurUngton, Vt., where he prac- 
ticed his profession with marked success for many years. 

He was at first a Whig in politics and later a Republican and held many 
positions; was a member of the Supreme Executive Council of Vermont in 
1835; served as United States congressman, 1842-49; was United States 
minister to Turkey, 1849-53; also to Greece in 1853; raOroad commissioner 
of Vermont, 1853-59; United States minister to Italy from 1861 until his death. 

At an early date he became interested in the study of languages and 
became a distinguished philologist. He contributed many articles to the 
publications of this country and Europe. He was the author of many works 
on Philological, Historical and scientific subjects. Among his best known 
works are: A Grammar of the Icelandic Language, compiled and translated 
from the grammars of Rask, 1838; The Camel, his Organization, Habits 
and Use, Considered with Reference to his Introduction into the United States, 
1856; Lectures on the English Language, 1860, revised and enlarged 
edition, 1855; Origin and History of the English Language and of the Early 
Literature it Embodies, 1882, revised in 1885; Wedgeworth's Dictionary of 
English Etymology, with Notes arid Additions, Vol. 1. A — D (all published,) 
1862; Man and Nature, or Physical Geography as Modified by Human 
Action, 1864, re\\Titten and republished in 1874, with the title, The Earth 
as Modified by Human Action; Mediaeval and Modern Saints and Miracles, 
1876. His complete library, numbering about 13,000 volumes, was presented 
to the University of Vermont by Hon. Frederick BiUings of Woodstock; 
and is now kept in a separate room in the Billings Library. 

He was the recipient of many honors; received the degree of LL. D., 
from Hamilton College in 1859 and from Harvard the same year. He was 
a member of the Vermont and Massachusetts Historical Societies; the National 
Academy of Sciences; Fellow of the American Academy; a literary society 
in Copenhagen, Denmark; and many other societies of a literary and scientific 
nature. 

He was twice married: first, in 1828, to Harriet Buellof Burlington, who 
died August 16, 1833. Two children were born to them : Charles, born in 1829, 
died August 27, 1833; George, born in 1833, died about 1862. He was again 
married, in 1839, to Caroline Crane, a native of Berkley, Mass., who died in 
1905. 

PROF. RALPH METCALF, A. B. 

Ralph Metcalf, son of John Metcalf, was born in North Charlcstown, 
N. H., November 21, 1796, and died in Claremont, H. H., August 26, 1858. 

He graduated A. B. from Dartmouth College in 1823. He served as pro- 
fessor of the Latin and English Languages at the "Academy," during 1821-22. 



44 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

He studied law with Henry Hubbard of Charlestown, Richard Bartlett of 
Concord, and George B. Upham of Chiremont, and was admitted to the Sulli- 
van County bar in 1826. He practiced his profession in Newport, 1826-56 and 
Claremont, N. H., from 1856 until his death. 

He was a Republican in politics and held many positions; served as secre- 
tary of state, 1831-39; represented Newport in the Legislature in 1852 and 
1853; was register of probate of Sulhvan county, 1845-51; was chairman of the 
committee to revise the laws of the State in 1852; served as Governor of New 
Hampshire in 1855 and 1856. 

PROF. JOHN IvnLTON PARTRIDGE. 

John M. Partridge, son of Isaac and Lois (Newton) Partridge, was born 
in Norwich, Vt., July 4, 1799, and was killed by falling from "Butter Hill' ' near 
Tarrytown, Orange County, N.Y., June 26,1831; w^as buried at Tarrytown. 

He was a student at Dartmouth College for some time. He entered the 
United States Military Academy at West Point, March 11, 1813, and resigned, 
at the request of his father, October 18, 1817; was assistant engineer with Capt. 
Alden Partridge on the survey of the Northeastern boundary between the 
United States and Canada in 1819. He was professor of practical Geometry, 
Topography and Sword master at the "Academy" from 1820 until 1825. He 
engaged in the lumbering business at Mclndoes Falls, Vt., from 1825 until 
1828, when he removed to Tarrytown and engaged in the general mercantile 
business until his death; was also engaged in quarrjdng stone for railroad 
I^urposes. 

He was married, February 13, 1822, to Charlotte C. Emerson of Norwich. 
Four children were born to them: Ann Eliza, born September 24, 1824, died 
September 24, 1894; Edward Altamonte, a student in Civil Engineering at 
"N. U.," born March 26, 1826, died May 23, 1853; William Partridge, "N. U." 
'49, (q. v.) John Milton, Jr., born July 5, 1830, died March 31, 1835. 

PROF. JOSE A. PIZARRO. 

Jose A. Pizarro, professor of the Spanish Language and Literature at the 
"Academy" 1826-28, was born in Spain and educated in Universities of that 
country. 

In the early part of 1800, he became a member of the "Constitutional 
Party" and on the adoption of the constitution, was made director general of 
the system of education of Spain. In the war of 1823 he was private secretarj- 
to General Quiroga and on the defeat of his part}- was obhged to leave the 
country. 

He came to the United States in 1824, and taught Spanish in various 
sections of the country until April, 1826, when he succeeded Professor Proal, 
as Professor of the Spanish language at the "Academy." He was an able 
instructor and a writer of ability. 

PROF. PETER PROAL. 

Peter Proal, professor of the Spanish Language and Literature at the 
"Academy,' ' 1825-April 1826, was born in France in 1759. He was educated in 
the Universities of that country. 



SKETCHES OP PROFESSORS, 



45 



Early in 1800, he embraced the Protestant religion and was forced to 
leave the country. He came to the United States and taught the French 
Language until 1825, when he became professor of Spanish at the "Academy." 

He died April 13, 1826, and was buried in Middletown, Conn. 

PROF. MOSES STRONG ROYCE, A. M. 

Moses S. Royce was born in Rutland, Vt., in 1825, and died in Nashville, 
Tenn., Jmie 19, 1873. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his town and graduated A. B., 
from the University of Vermont in 1844. 

He was ordained deacon of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 1850; and 
was rector of the following churches: Greenville, Tenn., 1847-50; Nashville, 
Tenn., 1850-52; Norwich, Vt., 1852-53. He was professor of the Ancient and 
Modern History and Belles-Lettres, at " N. U. " 1852-53; was rector of a church 
in Frankhn, Tenn., 1853-65; and in Nashville, Tenn., 1865-73. 




In Camp at the Range, 1907 



CHAPTER IV 



SKETCHES OF CADETS AT THE AMERICAN LITERARY, SCIENTIFIC, AND 
MILITARY ACADEMY, 1820-34. 



HON. JAMES HOPKINS AD.AMS, A. B. 

James H. Adams, son of Harry Walker and Mary Howell Hart (Good- 
wyn) Adams, was born near Columbia, Richland Countj^, S. C, March 1.5, 
1812, and died at his plantation, "Live Oak, " near Columbia, Julj' 13, 1861. 

He entered the "Academy" in 182G, and graduated in 1829; graduated 
A. B. from Yale University in 1831. 

He engaged in agricultural pursuits, 1832-61, making his home at "Live 
Oak' ' plantation, near Columbia. He met with marked success and acquired 
a large property. He was a Democrat in politics and soon after leaving college 
took an active part in political affairs of the State; was a member of the "nulli- 
fication convention" in 1832 wliich passed the famous nuUification act; repre- 
sented his county in the State Legislature, 1834-50; was state senator, 18.50-5.5; 
Governor of the State, 1855-57; was a candidate for Congress, but was defeated 
by a small margin. He was a member of the Secession Convention of 1860-61 
and was a member of the peace commission sent by the State in 1861 to treat 
with the United States Government. 

He took great interest in military matters and served for several j^ears as 
brigadier general in command of a brigade of cavalry. State militia. He was a 
man of rare intellect; a lover of books and well versed in history; was an elo- 
quent and forceful speaker, which made him a formidable rival in pohtical 
campaigns. He became prominent in the political hfe of his State in a period 
remarkable for the genius and ability of its public men. He served his State 
with honor and ability. 

He was a member of Palmetto Lodge, F. and A. M. of Columbia, and 
the I. O. O. F., of Columbia. 

He was married, April 10, 1832, to Jane Margaret Scott of Richland County, 
South Carolina, who died December 15, 1885. Nine children were born to 
them: Hemy Walker, born January 17, 1833, died in February, 1893; John 
Randolph, born April 13, 1834, died August 28, 1875; Mary Goodwjm, born 
January 3, 1836, married J. Hampden Brooks, died October 31, 1866; Warren, 
born November 28, 1839, died Nov. 4, 1880; Jane Margaret, born June 
26, 1841, married J. Hampden Brooks, resides in Greenwood Countj^, South 
Carohna; Laura, born January 4, 1843, married Hobart Doane Hanahan, died 
May 15, 1866; Ellen, born August 4, 1846, married Iredell Jones, died about 
1860; James Hopkins, born November 8, 1848, died in February, 1894; Caro- 
hne Hopkins, born December 15, 1850, married Louis LeConte, resides near 
Columbia, S. C. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



47 




JAMES URIAH ADAMS, A. B. 

James U. Adams, son of James and Sylvia Adams and cousin of James H. 
Adams, '29, was born in Lowen, Richland County S. C.,'February'21, 1812,'and 
died in Columbia, S. C, March 7, 1871. 

He received an academic educa- 
tion in the schools of his state and 
entered the "Academy" in 1826 and 
graduated in 1829; graduated A. B. 
from Yale University in 1831. He 
was an extensive planter at Gadsden, 
Richland Co., near Columbia, 1832-61 ; 
and owned 500 slaves. He was a 
kind and much loved master. He 
acquired a large property, but lost all 
during the Civil War. He was a 
member of the Masonic Lodge of 
Columbia. 

He was married to Sarah Hoj)- 
kins Adams of Congaree, Richland 
Count}', S. C. Twelve children were 
born to them: William, deceased; 
Preston, born March 4, 1835, died 
vmmarried, December 5, 1857; Well- 
ington Gordon, born March 4, 1837. 
died unmarried, June 26, 1854; James 
Ironsides, born March 4, 1850, resides 
Columbia, S.C.; Joel Robert, resides 




James Uriah Adams. 



in Gadsden, S. C; John Goodwyn, resides in Gadsden; Harry Walker, born 
December 5, 1852, died in 1903; Mary Hopkins, born 1838, married Dr. 
Julius Huguinin, resides in Gadsden, S. C; Sylvia Goodwyn, married Capt. 
Abram Huguinin; Amy, resides in Gadsden, S. C; Sarah married Ed. 
McClarkson, died, 1878; Julia, deceased. 

FIRST-LIEUT. THOMAS BOYLSTON ADAMS, U. S. A. 

Thomas B. Adams was born in Quincy, Mass. in 1809, and died at Fort 
Dade, Fla., December 14, 1837. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1822, 
remaining until 1824, when he was appointed a cadet at the United States 
Military Academy. 

He graduated from West Point, July 1, 1828; and was commissioned 
second lieutenant. Second United States Artillery on the same date; served at 
the Artillery School of Practice at Fort Munroe, Va., 1828-29; at Fort Moultrie, 
S. C, 1829-30; in the Cherokee Nation in 1831 and 1832; in garrison at Charles- 
ton Harbor, S. C, portions of 1830-31 and 1832-32; on ordnance duty, Decem- 
ber 13, 1832-January 17, 1836. He was promoted fa-st lieutenant, Second 
United States Artillery, December 1, 1834; served in the Seminole War, 1836- 
37, being engaged in the skirmi.shes at Camp Izard, February 27-29, and March 
5, 1836; in action at Oloklikaha, March 31, 1836; died of disease contracted in 
the service. 



48 



NORWICH UXIVERSITY. 



HENRY DANA WARD ALEXANDER. 

Hemy D. W. Alexander, son of Dr. Isaac Alexander, a sui-geon dui-ing the 
Rcvolutionarj' War, and Sarah (Thorton) Alexander, was born in Camden, 
N. C, in 1807. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1824, and graduated in 1826. He was 
])rincipal of schools in his State for some time, and then in North CaroUna. 

In 18.36, he returned to South 
Carolina and continued in this line 
of work for some years, meeting 
with success. He constantly made 
use of his military education in his 
schools by introducing the drill. 

He returned to a farm near 
Savannah, Ga., where he resided 
until the Cixil War, when he en- 
listed in the Georgia Volunteers, 
C. S. A., and performed active 
scr\ace as an officer in the Western 
Army for two years, when, on ac- 
count of faUing health, he resigned 
his commission, but soon afterwards 
entered the hospital ser\dce. In 
June, 186.5, his health having com- 
])letely failed, he was forced to leave 
the service. On his way home he 
took a steamer at Augusta, for 
Savannah, which in a few hours 
after leaving that city caught fire; 
and he with many others was 
drowned in the Savannah River. 




Henry Dana Ward Alexander. 



He married Mary Wliite Alexander, a distant relative, of Mecklenburg, 
N. C, who died in 1856. Two children were born to them. A daughter, Mrs. 
Leiiora P. An(ler.son, resides in Hendersonville, N. C. 



ISAAC B. ALEXANDER. 

Isaac B. Alexander, son of Dr. Isaac and Sarah (Thornton) Alexander, was 
born in Camden, N. C, in 1811 and died there in 1884. 

He entered the ''Academy" in 1824, and remained two 3'ears. He then 
went to New York and learned the jeweler's trade, and was, for a number of 
years, associated with a Mr. Dagueree. He returned to Camden, where he 
engaged in his trade until his death. He was also an artist of abUitj', and en- 
gaged extensively in portrait painting on ivory. 

He was sin-vived by five chUdren, three sons and two daughters, of whom 
two sons and two daughters are now li-\-ing. A son, J. H. Alexander, D. D. S. 
resides in Camden, N. C. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



49 



JOSEPH DANA ALLEN, A. M. 

Joseph D. Allen was born in Burlington, Otsego Co., N. Y., October 16, 
1799, and died in Burlington, Vt., October 12, 1878. His father, Phineas, was a 
descendant of Samuel Allen of Bridgewater, Mass., a Deputy of the General 
Court, Mass., and of Gen. Myles Standish of Plymouth, Mass. 

Having received an academic education, he entered the "Academy" in 
1820, graduating with high honors in 1825. While a cadet, the corps made 
some extended marches, one to Burlington, Vt., and Ticonderoga, of which he 
was the official recorder, and his ably wi'itten report shows exceptional 
literary ability. 

He was appointed professor of Civil Engineering at the "Academy;' 'but soon 
resigned to become chief engineer of the Connecticut River Company to make 
a water-way, from Barnet, Vt., to Hartford, Conn. He resigned this position 
in 1826 to survey and plan for New 
York capitalists an inter-coastline 

canal for ocean vessels along the south ^ ^ 

shore of Long Island, from its most 
eastern point to New York Harbor. /■^;*' 

He was chief engineer of the northern 
division of the Blackstone canal, con- 
necting Massachusetts with Long ' 
Island Sound, 1828-29; was chief / ,^ .. 

engineer of location and construction 
of the Cumberland and Oxford canal, 
Maine, 1829-30; engineer of the New 
York Canal Board, locating and per- 
fecting its system of canals, 1830-42; 
chief engineer of construction of the 
Black River canal; the Chemung 
canal, the Chenango canal, Utica to 
Binghamton; chief engineer, 1836-37, 
on surveys and construction of a 
projected railroad (later the N. Y. and 
Harlem R. R.) from New York to 
Albany, the first railroad to lead out 
from New York City; was chief engi- 
neer of the Utica and Oswego R. R., 
1837-38; was engineer on location and building of the Erie R. R., 1838. Rail- 
way building then being new, he devised plans and methods of construction 
for that road which were later adopted on other railways. He was chi(!f engi- 
neer, 1839-43, of the Erie Canal enlargement from Little Falls, N. Y., westward. 

Failing health demanding a less active occui)ation, he acquired an interest 
in the Syracuse, N. Y. Salt works. Subsecjuently, feeling able to resume his 
profession, he became chief engineer of the Erie Canal. Ill health, however, 
forbade active duty and for more complete rest he removed, in 1843, to Bur- 
lington, Vt., which became his permanent residence. In 1845 he organized 
the Winooski Mills Co. of which he was president for several years. After- 
ward at times, as health permitted, he engaged in his profession. 

He was consulting engineer of the Chicago and Northwestern R. R., 
and located its line in Wisconsin; was chief engineer of the Albany 
and Northern R. R., and consulting engineer of the Rutland R. R.; 




Joseph Dana Allen. 



50 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

engineer of a general system of street etc., improvements in Burlington, Vt.; 
in charge, for the United States Government, of construction of the United 
States Post Office, Custom House and Marine Hospital in BurUngton, Vt. and 
harbor, light-house and other federal public works in the Champlain district. 
For many years he was a director of the Merchants' Bank of Burlington, and 
held other public positions. 

In 1836, he received from the Norwich University the honorary degree of 
A. M. and in 1839 the same degree was conferred upon him by the Universitj^ 
of Vermont. He was a member of the Episcopal Church. 

In 1836 he married Eliza Rachel, sister of Edwin F. Johnson, '25, and 
daughter of Hon. John Johnson, for many years surv^eyor general of Vermont. 
Three children were born to them; Charlotte Augusta, who died in infancy; 
Charles Edwin, (University of Vermont, '59,) of Burlington, Vt., and John 
Johnson, (University of ^^ermont, '62,) of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

COT.. CHARLES AMORY, PH. D., M. D. 

Charles Araory, son of Thomas CofFm and Hannah Rowe (Lin zee) 
Amory, was born in Boston, Ma.ss., May 10, 1808, and died in Dorchester, 
Mass., February 10, 1898. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his citj' and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1820, graduating in 1824. He entered the L^niversity of Gottingen, 
Germany, in 1824 and graduated Ph. D. in 1830; graduated M. D. from the 
Harvard ^ledical College in 1832. 

He did not practice his profession; but entered upon a business career in 
Boston, meeting -nith marked success. He was for many years one of the 
best known and most prosperous merchants of his city. He was treasurer 
of the Manchester Pi-int "Works and president of the Stark Mills. 

He served on the staff of (5ov. John A. Andrew in the Massachusetts 
\'olunteer Militia as colonel and assistant quartermaster general, October 9, 
1861, to January 9, 1863. He was an active member of the Episcopal Church. 

He was married October 15, 1832, to Martha Babcock, daughter of Gardi- 
ner Greene of Boston. She died in Paris, France, January 1, 1880. Four 
children were born to them: Charles Copley, born in 1836, died in 1864; Susan 
Greene, born in 1840, married S. Gordon Dexter, resides in Boston; Copley, 
born in 1842, died in 1878; Edward Linzee, born in September, 1845, com- 
mander, U. S. N. (retired), resides in Boston. 

LIEUT. COL. JAMES SULLIVAN AMORY, A. M. 

James S. Amory, son of Jonathan and Mehitable (Sullivtin) Amory, and 
cousin of Charles Amor>', '24, was honi in Boston, Mass., May 14, 1809, and 
died there June 8, 1884. 

He prepared for college at ]Mr. Knapp's private school, Boston, and en- 
tered the "Academy" in 1823, graduating in 1825; was a student at Harvard 
University, 1825-27 and received the degTce of A. M. from that Institution in 
1860. 

He made two voyages to India on sailing ships during 1827-31; engaged in 
mercantile business in Philadelphia, 1831-36. He located in Boston in 1836, 
where he made his home until his death, residing in Brookline, however, for 
about forty j^ears, untU 1880. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



51 



He was treasurer of the cotton mills, Nashua Manufacturing Co., Nashua, 
N. H., 1840-79; Jackson Co., Nashua, 1843-74; Lancaster Mills, Chnton, Mass., 
1847-49, 1863-83. He was vice-president of the Massachusetts Hospital Life 
Insurance Co., 1874-84. He was a member of the Provident Institution for 
Savings, Boston, 1840-84, serving as trustee, 1863-84, president, 1876-82, and 
vice-president, 1882-84. He was a director of the following companies: State 
Bank, Boston, 1847-63; Suffolk National Bank, Boston, 1864-84; American 
Insurance Co., Boston, 1844-84; Boston Manufacturers Mutual Fire Insurance 
Co., 1850-77; New England Mutual Life Insurance Co., 1861-80. 

He took an active interest in 
military matters; served as first lieu- 
tenant in the Independent Corps of ^^^^ 
Cadets, Boston from November 28, 
1827 to August 28, 1829; was dis- 
charged, August 28, 1829. He was 
elected captain; with rank of lieu- 
tenant colonel, July 2, 183.5; resigned, 
April 28, 1840; was readmitted Nov- 
ember 1, 1844; and was discharged, 
March 1, 1846, ser\ang as commander 
for some years; was a member of t lie 
Veteran Association, same company, 
1876-1884. 

He was a member of the Episcopal 
Church, serving as vestryman and 
warden of St. Paul's Church, Brook- 
line, for many years; was a trustee 
of the Episcopal Theological Scliool, 
Cambridge, 1867-1884. 

He was married November 28, 
1837, to Mary Copley Greene of 

Boston, who died April 5, 1892. James SulUvan Amory. 

Twelve children were born to them: James Appleton, Jborn October 29, 
1839, died October 4, 1861; Arthur, born February 6, 1841, resides 
in Boston; Robert, born May 3, 1842, ^resides in] Bar Harbor, Me.; 
Frances Meredith, born May 23, 1843, died August 25, 1844; Frederick, born 
November 26, 1844, resides at Bar Harbor, Me.; Gertrude, born January 6, 
1846, died January 12, 1847; Harold, born December 4, 1847, died September 
24, 1852; Mary Copley, born November 30, 1849, died September 12, 1852; 
Montfort, born September 13, 1850, died Septeniber 10, 1852; Augustine 
Heard, born July 20, 1852, died April 14, 1904; Gardiner Greene, born 
November 27, 1853, died March 14, 1854; Harcourt, born February 10, 1855, 
resides in Boston. 

MAJOii joi;l AMSDEN. 

Joel Anisden, son of Joseph and Jerusha (Brown) Amsden, was born in 
Hartland, Vt., September 5, 1812, and died in Scranton, Pa., December 18, 
1868. He received an academic cdticalion and entered the "Academy" in 
1830 and graduated in 1834. 

He was assistant engineer on the railroad now known as the New York & 




52 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



Erie, (N. Y., L. E. & W.) 1834-38; was resident engineer, during 1838-46, on 
the Black River Canal, with headquarters in Booneville, Oneida County, N. Y., 
and later was stationed at Rome, N. Y.; was also engaged during a portion of 
1838-46, in designing a number of buildings, among the number being, " Stanwix 
Hall' ' in Rome. 

He was engaged in general engneering in Boston from 1846 to the spring 
of 1851, when he removed to Easton, Pa., to superintend the remodehng of the 
Glendon Iron Company's plant at that place. Here he also engaged in mining 
engineering and was the architect of many buildings in Easton and vicinitj'. 

In 1850, at the solicitation of 
Col. George W. Scranton, he removed 
to Scranton, Pa., where he made his 
home untU his death. He was engi- 
neer in charge of construction of the 
manufacturing plant and engineering 
work for the firm of Scranton & Piatt, 
later known as the Lackawanna 
Iron & Coal Co., also laid out for 
I hem the borough of Scranton and 
' I) him is due the credit of the wide 
lid regular streets into which the 
urough was subdi\'ided. He was 
resident engineer during 1854-56, on 
the Northern division of the Dela- 
ware, Lackawaima & Western R. R., 
imder Edwin McNeil, '45, chief 
engineer; and on the resignation of 
Mr. McNeil, was appointed chief 
engineer and had charge of the con- 
struction of the southern division. 
He engaged in general engineering 
in Scranton, 1857-68. 




Major Joel Amsden. 



He took great iuteie.st in military matters and while residing in Rome, 
N. Y., served as brigade inspector, with rank of major, on the staff of Gen. 
William C. Bouch of New Yoi-k. 

He was a member of the Presb3'terian Church and the I. O. O. F. He 
was married at Booneville, N. Y., February 22, 1838, to Anna Theresa Power, 
who died in June, 1SS2. Five children were born to them: Frank Power, 
"N. U." '59; Frederick Joel, born in June, 1841, died in June, 1906; Anna 
Louisa; Charles Joseph, born in September, 1847, died in infancj^; Victoria 
Annette, born in August 1850, died in May 1882. 



COL. willia:m e. anderson. 

WiUiam E. Anderson, cousin of Paul C. Cameron, '28, was born in Peters- 
burg, Va., in 1809, and died in Wilmington, N. C, in 1853. He entered the 
"Academy' ' from Hillsboro, N. C, in 1825, and graduated in 1828. 

Soon after leaving the "Academy" he located in Wilmington, N. C, 
where he became identified with many business enterprises. He served as 
cashier of the State Bank at Wilmington, several years. He took an active 
interest in the State militia, serving as colonel for several yeai's. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 53 

A son, George P., graduated from West Point, and served as brigadier- 
general in the Confederate Army, dying of wounds received at the battle of 
Sharpsburg. A daughter, Mary Reed Anderson, resides in Washington, D. C. 

WHITMEL HILL ANTHONY. 

Whitmel H. Anthony, son of John and Elizabeth (Hill) Anthony, was 
l)orn in Scotland Neck, Halifax Co., N. C, December 25, 1810 and died there 
October 30, 1851. He prepared for college at the Vine Hill Academy, Scot- 
land Neck, and entered the "Academy" in 1826, graduating in 1828. 

He inherited a large fortune. He made his home on his extensive plan- 
tation, near Scotland Neck, until his death. He was a Whig in politics, but 
never held office. 

He was married, July 28, 1831, to Charity Dawson Barnes of Halifax 
County, N. C. Seven children were born to them: Mary Elizabeth, born 
September 25, 1832, married Col. John Whitaker, C. S. A., died in December 
1909; John, born November 30, 1836, served as an officer in the C. S. A., and 
was killed in battle, July 1, 1862; Martha Goodman, born April 25, 1839, mar- 
ried Dr. Benjamin F. Halsey, died December 23, 1866; Henrietta Dillard, 
born February 10, 1841, married Dr. William Ruffin Wood, died October 18, 
1898; Whitmel Hill, born August 24, 1842, served as colonel in the C. S. A., 
died October 31, 1904; James Gordon, born August 24, 1843, officer C. S. A., 
died March 13, 1879; Atherton Barnes, born November 17, 1845, died July 4, 
1846. 

WILLIAM ANTHONY ARMISTEAD, M. D. 

William A. Armistead, son of John and Sarah Carmock (Harrimcnd) 
Armistcad, was born near Plymouth, N. C, November 14, 1809, and died ot 
apoplexy at Franklin, Va., January 17, 1856. 

He prepared for college at the Edenton Academy; and entered the A. L. S. 
& M. Academy in 1825, graduating in 1828. He studied medicine for some 
time with Dr. Norcom in Edenton and graduated M. D., from the University 
of Pennsylvania, about 1832. 

He made his residence at his estate, " Woodlawn,' ' near Plymouth, N. C, 
until his death. Here he practiced his profession, until about 1850, when he 
was obliged to give up active work, owing to inflamatory rheumatism, from 
which he suffered the rest of his life. His death occurred while returning from 
a professional visit to a relative, a student at the University of Virginia. He 
achieved marked success in his profession, being considered one of the most 
skillful physicians in his State. He was a Whig in politics, but never held office. 

He was married, February 26, 1835, to Sophia EfizabethCapehart of Avoca, 
N. C; who died December 21, 1860. Three children were born to them: 
Cullen died in infancy; Ameha Rhodes, born July 20, 1838, married Baldy 
Ashburn Capehart, died in Vance County, N. C, in 1887; Susan Priscilla, 
born De(!ember 24, 1843, died in Bertie County, N. C, May 2, 1860. 

ROMEO AUSTIN. 

Romeo Austin, son of Josiah and Mary B. Austin, was born in Orwell, Vt. 
in 1805, and died in Boston, Mass., March 1, 1888. 

At an early age his parents removed to Rutland, Vt., where he prepared 
for college. He entered the "Academy" in 1823, and graduated in 1825. 



54 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

He was engaged in the mercantile business in Boston, INIass., many years, 
acquiring a valuable property. 

He was married, about 1836, to Sarah C, daughter of Joshua Blake of 
Boston and a relative of John S. Blake, '25. She died in Boston, May 20, 1S64. 
Two children were born to them: Gertrude Blake, born about 1838, died 
unmarried, in July, 1902; Sallie Blake, married Francis Blake Rice and resided 
in Boston for some years. 

MAJOR JACOB BABBITT. 

Jacob Babitt, son of Jacob and Bathsheba Babbitt, was born in Bristol, 
R. I., May 9, 1809, and died December 23, 1862, of woimds received in battle. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his towai and entered the "Acad- 
emy' ' in 1824, and graduated in 1826. 

He engaged in agricultural pursuits for a time, which he abandoned to 
succeed his father as a West India merchant; and subsequently became 
interested in the manufacture of cotton goods. His mills were twice destroyed 
by fire, and for the third time, rising from their ashes, the business, which the 
undismayed owner had built up, was ruined by the breaking out of the Civil 
War. He was instrumental in the organization of the Bristol gas works, and 
succeeded his father as president of the Commonwealth Bank of Bristol. In 
Jime, 1829, he was appointed brigade inspector of the state militia with the 
rank of major. His knowledge of tactics made him ser\nceable in the drill room 
of the Bristol artillery, Wlien, at the breaking out of the Ci^'il War, the State 
called for troops, he responded, although his advanced age almost placed him 
beyond its requirements. As soon as his business permitted, he offered his 
services, refusing any higher commission than the one given him thirty-three 
years before, that of major, by the title of which he had ever since been known. 
Upon re])orting for dutv at Washington, he was assigned to the 10th Rhode 
Island infantry, which he joined at Tenallj'town. Later he was commissioned 
major of the Seventh Rhode Island Infantr\^, which received its "baptism of 
bloofl' ' before Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862. Dming the battle Major 
Babbitt attempted a perilous mission. He was exposed to a deadly cross fire 
and received a mortal wound. He died at the Mansion House Hospital, 
Alexandria, December 23, 1862. 

He was married, October 7, 1826, to Abbey Eliza Briggs. Five children 
were born to them. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BABCOCK. 

Benjamin F. Babcock, son of Benjamin Franklin Babcock, was born in 
Stonington, Conn., about 1808, and died in Liverpool, England, about 1880. 

He prepared for college at the Stonington Academy, and entered the 
"A. L. S. & M. Academy,' ' in 1825 and graduated in 1828. He engaged in the 
mercantile business in New York for several j'ears, then located in Glasgow, 
Scotland, and later in Liverpool, He met uHth marked success in his business 
and acquired a large fortune. He was sur\dved by a brother, Samuel D. Bab- 
cock, a wealthy merchant of New York City. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 55 



EDWARD BAII.EY. 



Edward Bailey, youngest son of Lebbeus and Sarah Sylvester (Myrick) 
Bailey, was born in North Yarmouth, Maine, January 7, 1807, and died" un- 
married, in Galveston, Texas, July 26, 1844. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1821, remaining until 1823. He located in Galveston, Texas, about 
1825, where he engaged in business, acquiring a valuable property. 

JOSEPH STOCKBRIDGE BAILEY. 

Joseph S. Bailey, son of Lebbeus and Sarah Sylvester (Myrick) Bailey, 
was born in North Yarmouth, Maine, April 6, 1804; and died in Portland, Me., 
March 9, 1888. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1821 
and graduated in 1823. Soon ofter liis graduation he removed to Portland, 
Me., where he engaged in the book business for many years; later he engaged in 
the auction business. He was a public spirited citizen and believed in every- 
thing that pertained to the welfare of the city. He was a man of genial dis- 
position, with a quick and ready wit and a good talker. For years his book 
store was a rendevouz for the literary people of Portland. In politics he was at 
first a Whig and later a Republican. 

He was a member of the Congregational Church; Ancient Landmark 
Lodge F. and A. M., and Mt. Vernon Chapter, R. A. M. of Portland. 

He was married at Portland, Me. to Isabel Wilson Dicks, sister of Capt. 
John W. Dicks, '23. She died in Portland, Me., September 28, 1869. Ten 
children were born to them: John Dicks, born November 2, 1832, died March 
14, 1872; Edward Augustus, born July 28, 1834, died in Washington, D. C, 
October 14, 1909; William Stockbridge, born December 14, 1836, died May 22, 
1838; Charles Brooks, born April 9, 1839, resides Washington, D. C; Joseph 
Henry, born July 22, 1841, died September 24, 1863; Isabel Meriel, born 
February 6, 1844, married Clarendon Harris, died at La Porte, Ind., June 
27, 1866; Helen Brooks, born January 11, 1847, married Samuel C. Allen; 
Harriet Peters, born September 12, 1849, married Charles Cook; Anna Dicks, 
born January 27, 1853, resides in Washington, D. C; Herbert Clarendon, born 
March 6, 1856, resides in Portland, Me. 

JAMES BAKER. 

James Baker, son of Major Jonathan and Susanna (Wethcrbee) Baker, 
wasborninCharlestown, N. H., in 1803 and died there September 3, 1839. 
He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1821 
and graduated in 1823. He engaged extensively in farming in Charlcstown, 
N. H. until his death. 

He was married in 1830 to Mary Hagar of Springfield, Vt., who died in 
September, 1888. Four children were born to them: Jane A., married Charles 
Carr of Northampton, Mass., died in 1867; Mary Ellen, born January 25, 1833, 
died February 4, 1849; IIora(!e Hall, born February 15, 1837, died in Spring- 
field, Mass., February 10, 1906; James Lewis, born February 7, 1840, died 
October 7, 1845. 



56 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY 



COL. JONATHAN B.AIvER. 

Jonathan Bakor, fifth child of Maj. Jonathan and Susanna (Wetherbee) 
Baker, was born in Charlestown, N. H., June 8, 1806, and died there of pneu- 
monia, February 26, 1867. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1821, 
graduating in 1824. 

He engaged in mercantile business in Charle.stown, 1825-37, 1865-67; in 
Hardwick, Vt., 1837-45, being senior member of the firm of Baker, Holton 
and Juedc\ane; returned to Charlestown in 1845, where he continued to reside 

until his death; was one of the organ- 
izei-s of the Connecticut River National 
Bank in Charles to^\Ti, and served as 
director until his death. 

Mr. Baker was a man of ready wit, 
fine physique, and unswerving integrity. 
He was a successful business man, ac- 
cumulating a ver\' valuable property. 
He ably and honorably filled many posi- 
tions of responsibility. In politics he 
was a staunch Republican. He was 
postmaster of Hardwick, Vt.; town clerk 
of Charlestown, N. H.; count j' treasurer 
of Sullivan Co., N. H.; deputy sheriff, 
and served several years as chairman of 
the school board in Charlestown. He 
was much interested in military matters 
and held the various offices in the N. H. 
Militia, uj) to and including that of 
colonel. 

Col. Jonathan Baker. Mr. Baker married, January 27, 

ISIO, Harriet M. Willard of Charlestown, who died March 20, 1881. Foiu- 
cliiklren were born to then: Abbie \\'illard, born January 2, 1850, died Nov- 
ember 1, 1869; James Hemy, born January 9, 1S52, died August 23, 1852; 
Lizzie Jane, born January 4, 1855, died April 3, 1SS3; Nelhe Susan, born 
March 20, 1857, married Rev. \Mlliam Benjamin Tyng Smith of Claremont, 
N. H., resides in Charlestown, N. H. 




SECOND-LIEIT. WILLL\M HENRY BAKER, U. S. A. 

William H. Baker was born in 1808 and died in Detroit, Mich., in 1835. 

He entered the "Academ\'" from Detroit, ^lich. in 1820, remaining until 
1S23, when he entered the L'nited States ]\lilitary Academy. He graduated 
July 1, 1828, and on the same date was commissioned second lieutenant, 4th 
United States Infantry. He served at the Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 1828-29; 
on engineer duty, April 29, 1829-January, 1830; at Cantonment Brooke, Fla., 
1830; resigned from the Ai-my, INIay 20, 1831. 



HUGH SWINTON BALL. 

Hugh S. Ball, son of John and Martha Caroline (Swinton) Ball, was 
born in Charleston, S. C, October 18, 1808. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



57 



He prepared for college in the schools of his city, and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1823, and graduated in 1826. 

He was a wealthy rice planter, owning the Pimlico, the Mepshew, and the 
Kecklico, plantations on the Cooper River in South Carolina. 

He married Anna, daughter of Walter Channing of Boston, Mass.; several 
children were born to them, all dying in infancy. He and his wife perished on 
the ill-fated steamer Pulaski, on the night of June 14, 1838, while on their way 
from Charleston, S. C. to New York City. 



MAJ. EBENEZER HENRY BARNARD. 

Ebenezer H. Barnard, son of Timothy and Phoebe (Dewey) Barnard, 
was born in Hartford, Conn., September 28, 1808, and died near Pittsfoi-d, 
Monroe, Co., New York, November 10, 1890. 

He prepared for college in the 
schools of his town and entered the 
"Academy" in 1825, and graduated 
in 1828. 

He engaged in farming in Mendon, 
N. Y., imtil his death; served in the 
New York Militia as major for some 
years. 

He was a Democrat in politics 
and held several offices; was super- 
visor of Mendon township, Monroe 
Co., N. Y., 1865-70. 

He was twice married : first, No- 
vember 7, 1831, to Sophia Griswokl, 
daughter of Gen. Shubal Griswold of 
East Hampton, Conn. She died 
December 3, 1871. Five children 
were born to them: Elizabeth Pitkin, 
born February 11, 1835, married 
Solomon Elwell Smith, died 1896; 
Sarah Stanley, born December 15, 
1837, died June 17, 1848; Frederick 
Griswold, born February 14, 1840, 




Maj. Ebenezer Henry Barnard. 



resides in Pittsford, N. Y.; Henry Dewey, born July 5, 1842, resides in 
Mendon, N. Y.; Mary Sophia, born August 13, 1845, died June 17, 1848; He 
was married, the second time, February 4, 1879, to Ann Williams of Mendon, 
N. Y., who died March 24, 1880. One child, Jane Ann, born January 21, 1880, 
married Hallock Campbell Sherrard, lawyer in Pittsburg, Pa. 



WILLIAM SULLIVAN BARNES. 

W. Sullivan Barnes, son of Capt. Ebenezer and Mrs. Day (widow of Dr. 
Standish Day), was born in Woodstock, Vt., in 1806, and died in Albany, 111. 
June 20, 1869. 

He attended the schools of his town; and entered the "Aca(l(;niy" in 1825 
and graduated in 1827. 

He engaged in Civil Engineering for some time;; was mail agcMit for the 



58 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

United States Government from Baltimore to Washington and Wheeling, 
W. Va., 1835-38; St. Louis to LouLsville, Ky., 1838-40; St. Louls to ^^lemphis, 
Tenn., 1840-41. In 1841, he located in Albany, 111., where he made his home 
imtil his death. He engaged in the commi.ssion and grain business in Albany 
many years, meeting with success. 

He was married in I-owoll, Mass., December 4, 1830, to Adaline Howe of 
T.unenbm-g, Vt., who died about 1880. Five children were born to them: 
Frances Deborah, resides Albany, 111.; Sarah Ehzabeth, married Truman C. 
Phinney, resides in Montpelier, Vt.; Adaline Matilda; Wilham Henry, re.sides 
in Quincy, III; Charles Standish, resides in Quincy, 111. 

BENNET HILLIARD BARROW. 

Bennet H. Barrow, son of William and Philiby (HilUard) Barrow, was 
born on the "Highland Plantation," St. Francis\'ille, La., in 1811, and died 
there, May 29, 1854. 

He entered the "Academy' ' in 1825, and graduated in 1828. He engaged 
extensively as a sugar planter until his death. He was a Democrat in politics, 
but never held office. He was married in 1830, to Ermly Dorr of ^^'oodsville, 
Miss., who died August 22, 1845. Six children were born to them: James, 
born in 1831, died in St. Francisville in 1905; John Dorr, born in 1833, died in 
St. Francisville in 1890; Chft'ord, born in 1839, died in St. Francisville, 1887; 
Armanda, born in 1841, married Mr. Richardson, died in St. Francisville; 
Hilhard Bar, born in 1843, resides in St. Francis\'ille; Emily Ruffin, born in 
1845, married J. B. Jcnnison, resides in St. Francisville. 

HON. LEVI BARTLETT. 

Levi Bartlett, son of Ichabod Colby and Anne (Sleeper) Bartlett, was 
born in Bristol, N. H., January 8, 1807, and died there November 14, 1868. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his to^s-n and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1821 and graduated in 1823. 

He engaged extensively in business in Bristol until about 1852, when, 
having acquired a valuable property, he retired from mercantile business; also 
engaged some years in cattle buying and other business actiA'ities. He took an 
active part in the raising of funds to build the Bristol Branch R. R., now a part 
of the Boston and Maine system. 

He was a Repubhcan in politics and held many offices; was first selectman 
six years, holding office during the Civil War, and was the chief agent in raising 
money for war purposes; to-^Nni clerk ; represented liistown in the State Legis- 
lature two terms. 

He was an active member of the Congregational Church and for many 
years its most Uberal supporter. He was interested in enterprises to improve 
the town and was ready to assist by moral or financial support. He was an 
active temperance man and did much to suppress the traffic in Bristol. 

He was married, July 2, 1839, to Martha Pickering Haines of Canterbury, 
N. H., who died May 8, 1865. Four children were born to them: Frederick 
Haines, born May 25, 1840, resides in Silverton, B. C; Levi Scott, born Janu- 
ary 2, 1842, died September 9, 1846; Annie Pickering, born November 30, 
1843, died September 15, 1882; Mary Elizabeth, born February 5, 1849, resides 
in Bristol. N. H. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 59 

CHAPLAIN FREDERICK AUGUSTUS BARTON, A. M. 

Frederick A. Barton, son of Jabez and Sophia (Hart) Barton, was born 
in Chester, Vt., June 24, 1809, and died in Newtonville, Mass., February 23, 
1881. 

He attended the schools of his town and in 1820 entered the "Academy," 
graduating in 1825. He graduated A. B. from Dartmouth College in 1831; 
was a student at the Theological Seminary, Andover Massachusetts, 1833-34; 
was a teacher at the Phillips Academy, Massachusetts, 1832-38; was ordained 
pastor in the Congregational ministry November 6, 1839; was pastor in Col- 
linsville. Conn., 1838-43; Third Church, Chicopee Falls, Mass., 1843-46. He 
engaged in civil engineering during 1846-57; was pastor of the Indian Orchard 
Church during 1858-61 ; engaged in business, Nashua, N. H., 1862-68. He 
resided in East Boston, 1868-71; Newtonville, 1871. 

On the breaking out of the Civil War, he took a decided stand for the 
Union, and at the great war meeting held in the City Hall, Springfield, made a 
masterly speech for "Liberty, Union and the Constitution." At the close of 
his speech, the audience rose to their feet and cheered him wnth the wildest 
enthusiasm. He immediately set to work to raise a Hampden County regi- 
ment, of which he was to have the colonelcy, two companies of which were 
recruited and organized and encamped in Hampden Park in Springfield. The 
acceptance of the 10th Massachusetts militia as the 10th Massachusetts Vol- 
unteers, changed the plan somewhat, and Mr. Barton was commissioned chap- 
lain of this regiment June 21, 1861. He served with great efficiency with his 
regiment until August 1862, when owing to his failing health he was forced to 
resign. 

He was twice married: first, October 10, 1838, to Philena Deane, daughter 
of Horatio and Phoebe (Deane) Alden of Hartford, Conn. She died in 1839. 
A son Fred, born in 1839, served as captain in the 10th Massachusetts 
Volunteers, died in 1909. He was again married September 8, 1840, to 
Harriet Holmes, daughter of Edmund and Zilpah Holmes (Gerrish) Bartlett 
of Newburyport, Mass. 

HON. CARLOS BAXTER, A. M. 

Carlos Baxter, son of the Hon. William and Lydia (Ashley) Baxter, 
was born in Brownington, Vt., January 15, 1809, and died in Burlington, 
Vt., January 28, 1874. 

He received an academic education and entered the "Academy" in 1821, 
graduating in 1825; graduated A. B. from Union College in 1830. 

He attended the Harvard University and Yale University law schools; 
was admitted to the Orleans county bar, December 28, 1832, and soon located 
in Burlington, where he continued to reside until his death. Possessing an 
ample fortune, he did not practice his profession; but engaged in extensive 
business enterprises. He was one of the original promoters and stock holders 
of the Burlington Woolen Mills. 

He was an ardent Whig in politics and represented Burlington in the 
House of Representatives in 1840 and 1841. Being a strong anti-slavery 
advocate, he joined the Republican party; was United States collector of 
internal revenue, second congressional district, 1862-1866. He was a man 



60 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



of large stature and fine presence and always enjoyed the respect of his fellow 
citizens. 

He was married, May 15, 18.33, to Carolina Deming of Burlington, who 
died, May 25, 1843. Five children were born to them: Frances Ashley, 
born January 30, 1834, now resides in Btn-hngton,Vt.; Ann Eliza, bom Decem- 
ber 28, 1835, married Rev. Isham Bliss, died January 23, 1905; Caroline, 
Maria, born August 4, 1837, married the Hon. Bradley Barlow Smalley, 
resides in Burlington; Charles Deming born July 13, 1839, died January 17, 
1862; Ellen Harris, born August 15, 1841, died May 13, 1842. 



CARLOS BAXTER. 

Carlos Baxter, son of Ira and Arsena (Sprague) Baxter, was born in 
Norwich, Vt., August 1, 1804, and died in'Albanj', Vt., September 17, 1855. 

He prepared for college in the 
schools of his town and entered the 
"Academy" in 1821, graduating in 
1825. 

He engaged in mercantile busi- 
ness in Norwich until 1843, when he 
removed to Albany, Vt., and engaged 
in farming until his death. He was a 
member of the Methodist Church. 
He was twice married: first in 
■J 1830 to Lora Partridge, who died 
December 12, 1837. Three children 
/ were born to them: Charles Morrison, 
^ born April 23, 1831, resides at Red- 
." lands, Cal.; James M., born July 12, 
• 18.32, died in Lewns, la., June 14, 1904; 
W illiam Partridge, born 1835, died in 
Xoi-wich, Vt., August 16, 1856. 

He w^as again married, Septem- 
ber 11, 1839, toRosaUnda Met calf 
Orn, who died November 9, 1886. 
Five children were born to them: 
Lora Partridge, born May 26, 1841, 
died April 28, 1866; Lorene Eliza, 
born June 26, 1843, died October 9, 1864; Allen Sprague, born May 26, 1845, 
resides at Ciriswold, la.; Ellen Luella, born March 26, 1847, married Frank 
Hunt, resides Lewis, la.; Emma^ane, born July 13, 1849, married Milton 
Felser, resides at Palco, Kan. 




Carlos Baxter. 



HON. PORTUS B.\XTER, A. M. 

Portus Baxter, son of the Hon. William and Lydia (Ashley) Baxter, 
was born in Brownington, Vt., December 4, 1806, and died in Washington, 
D.C., March 4, 1868. 

He attended the schools'ot [his town and entered the "Academy" in 1821 
and graduated in lS24;*accompanied the corps of cadets on their march to 
Concord, N. H., in June 1821.|(q.'v.) 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



61 



He engaged in farming in Brownington until 1S2S, wlicn he located in 
Derby, where he made his home until his death. He extensively engaged in 
the mercantile and agricultural pursuits in Derby until 1860. 

He was at first a Whig in politics and later joined the Republican party. 
His positive character, his fine judgment of men, and facile handling of them, 
rapidly won him an influential position in politics, first in his own town, 
and county, then throughout his 
district and state and finally in 
national affairs. He several times 
served as a delegate to the national 
convention of the Whig party. In 
1848, he was the only delegate from 
New England, who advocated from 
the first the nomination of General 
Taylor for president. In 1852-53, 
he headed the electoral ticket and 
voted for General Scott. In 1856-57, 
served as an elector and voted for 
General Fremont. After declining 
two nominations for Congress, he 
finally accepted the nomination for 
the third district in 1860, and held 
this office until 1866, when he declined 
a re-election. He served on the com- 
mittee of elections, agriculture, and 
the special committee on expenditures 
of the Navy Department. He found 
no time to \vrite speeches nor time to 

seek ease and comfort in his Vei'mont Hon. Portus Baxter, 

home. He spent all his energies and time in the service of his const it ucnts 
and in administering to the wants of the soldiers. 

During the ghastly da3^s of the Wilderness campaign, and th(i Battle of 
Fredericksburg, he was at the front to minister to the wounded and suffering; 
and all that summer both he and his wife remained at their post of tender 
duty until they themselves were prostrated with sickness. It was owing 
to this interest he manifested in the soldiers' welfare, that he- earned the 
title of "the soldier's friend.' ' 

He was a ■patriotic politician. He took the greatest pleasure in the science 
of government and the administration of public affairs. He was distinguished 
for his generous nature. He dehghed to serve and advance his friends. He 
was a great leader of men. It is stated that during 1840-50, he exerted a 
greater influence upon the pohtics of Vermont than any other man in the State. 
We quote from the New York Independence, "Mr. Baxter's magnetic and 
winning presence, combined with his utter earnestness, made him a positive 
power in the various government departments. Here all his individual 
forces came into play, and gave him great influence with men in power. 
It was in such contact that he gained the friendship of the great War Secretary 
who, in this man's death, has lost a friend whose faith never faltered and whose 
love was never shaken by the utmost test or trial. His admiration for Edwin 
Stanton could be measured only by his never ceasing devotion.' ' 




62 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

The Umvcrsity of Vermont conferred upon him the degree of A. jVI. in 
1852. He was a member of the UniversaUst Church. 

He was married, June 18, 1832, to Ellen Judith Jennette, daughter 
of Judge J. H. Harris, trustee of "N. U." (q. v.). She died at Derby Line, 
Vt., June 14, 1882. Eight children were born to them: William Harris, 
born March 27, 1833, died April 3, 1843; Jedediah Hyde, born June 20, 1835, 
died March 9, 1836; Jedediah Hyde, "N. U." '56 (q. v.) M\Ton Leslie, born 
June 18, 1840, died at Derby Line, Vt., January 8, 1905; Marcia Elizabeth, 
born August 6, 1842, died April 12, 1843; Henry Clay, "N. U.," '66, (q. v.); 
William Portus, born July 26, 1847, resides in Chicago, 111.; Ellen Janette, 
born March IS, 1850, died September 21, 1862. 

RICHAJID GARNET BAYLOR. 

Richard G. Baylor, son of Richard and Ann (TUden) Baylor, was born 
in Woodbury, Jefferson county, West Virginia (then Virginia) April 8, 1811. 
and died September 25, 1843 in Charlestown, West Va. 

He entered the "Academy' ' in 1826 and graduated in 1828. He inherited 
a large property and engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death. 

He was married, September 25, 1830, to Catherine Tunstall of Norfolk, 
Va., who died about 1880. Sixchildren were born to them. 

WILLIAM AUGUSTUS BEACH. 

William A. Beach, son of Miles and Cynthia (Warren) Beach, was born 
in Saratoga Springs, N. Y., December 9, 1809, and died there, June 28, 1884. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 
1824, graduating in 1828. He studied law viith. his uncle, Judge Warren; and 
was admitted to the bar at Troy. N. Y., in August, 1833. He practiced his 
profession during 1833-51, in Saratoga Springs, meeting with gi-eat success; 
was district attorney, Saratoga countj^, 1843-47. He removed to Troy in 
1851 and formed a partnership with Job Pierson and Levi Smith, the leading 
attorneys of that citj', under the firm name of Pierson, Beach & Smith. This 
partnership continued until the death of Mr. Pierson in 1860. The firm 
was then known as Beach & Smith and was continued until 1870, when he 
withdrew from the firm and removed to New York City. He established 
the firm of Beach & BrowTi in 1870, which was continued until his death. 
The firm soon attained a high reputation. 

He became one of the most prominent advocates of his time and was 
engaged in many notable cases. He was attorney in the Fisk and Gould 
litigations; the suit of the Erie R. R., Co., vs. Commodore Vanderbilt, 
popularly known as the "Five Million Dollar Suit"; coimsel for William H. 
Vanderbilt in the celebrated contest over Commodore Vanderbilt's will; 
leader for the plaintiff in the celebrated IMarie Garrison suit, involving milUons 
of dollars, (83 N. Y. 16'); Felton and Park case. He was the counsel 
for Colonel North in his trial by coiu't-martial during the Ci\'il War, and 
later the counsel of Theodore Tilton in the celebrated Beecher trial. He de- 
fended Judge Barnard during [his ''trial for [impeachment, and was engaged 
in the trial of E. S. Stokes for the murder of James Fisk, Jr. 

Mr. Beach was a man of full height, straight and finely poised, carrjing 
an indescribable air of dignity and repose. He indulged in no superfluous 



Sketches of academy cadets. 



63 



gesticulation. He had a broad, full forehead, slightly retreating; large and 
prominent clear blue eyes, and a face strikingly noble and intellectual. He 
confined his talents strictly tojiisjegaljprofession, never speaking before po- 
litical conventions or other gatherings. 

DANIEL HAVENS BINGHAM. 

Daniel H. Bingham, son of William and Olive (Havens) Bingham, was 
born in Royalton, Vt., February 20, 1802, and died in Athens, Ala. in 1867. 

He received an academic education and entered the "Academy" in 1820, 
graduating in 1823. Soon after graduating, he went to Ai-kansas and was civil 
engineer for the state for some years; later he organized a military school in 
Baltimore, Md., which he conducted for some time; was the founder of the 
Oxford Literary Scientific and Military Academy (q. v.) in Oxford, N. C; 
was editor and proprietor of the Athens Herald, Athens, Ala., which he 
conducted until the breaking out of the Civil War, when he returned North. 

He was twice married: first to a Southern v.-oman. Three children were 
born to them: A daughter, who married a Mr. Miller; Alden Partridge, who 
served gallantly in the C. S. A.; Celia, xriarried an officer in the C. S. A., and 
moved to California. He was again married about 1857 to Mrs. Sarah (Sallie 
Crenshaw) Moiler, who died al)out 1880; no cliildren. 



CHARLES JAMES FOX BINNEY. 



Charles J. F. Binney, son of Capt. 
was born in Boston, Mass., October 2, 
was buried in Mt. Auburn Cemetery, 

He prepared for college at Rev. 
Joseph Richardson's school in Hing- 
ham, Mass.; William Jencks' School 
in Boston, and the Boston Latin 
School. He entered the "Academy" 
in 1823 and graduated in 182.5. In 
1825 he entered his father's office at 
33 Long Wharf, Boston, and engaged 
in the commission and ship brokerage 
business until 1870, when he retired 
from active work. He met with 
marked success in his business and 
acquired a valuable pro])erty. He 
took great interest in military affairs; 
served in the Boston Light Infantry 
for .some time. 

He was an able scliolar and his- 
torian; published the History and 
Genealogy of the Prenlice or Prentiss 
Family, 1S52; Genealogy of the Binney 
Family, 1886; and was engaged in 
writing the history of the Town of 
Hull, Mass., at the time of his death. 



John and Sarah Ann (Callender) Binney, 
180G, and died there December 30, 1888; 
Cambridge, Mass. 




Charles James Fox Binney. 



64 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

He was an active member of the New England Historical and Genealogical 
Society of Boston; Marine Society of Boston; con-esponding member of the 
Pennsylvania Historical Society. He was a member of Dr. Charles Lowell's 
Unitarian Church . 

He vras married, October 29, 1829, to Clarissa, daughter of Deacon George 
Loring of Duxbury.Mass. She died June 2,1897. Six children were born to them : 
Isabella, born November 12, 1830, married Henry FrankUn Stodder, resides 
in Bi-ookline, Mass.; Charles Loring, born July 24, 1832, died at sea, 1863; 
Emily, born January 6, 1833, died May 13, 1839; George Loring, born Sep- 
tember 2, 1840, resides in Toledo, Ohio; Prentiss, born September 21, 1842, 
died September 25, 1849; Mary Prentiss, born May 1, 1850, died January 9, 
1880. 

JOHN THOMPSON BLOIS, A. M. 
John T. Blois, son of Thompson and Rhoda (Howe) Blois, was born in 
New Haven Conn., September 22, 1809; and died in Jones\illo, Mich., June 8, 
1886. 

At an eai-ly age his parents removed to Plj-mouth, where he prepared for 
college. He entered the "Academy" in 1826 and graduated in 1828. In 
1843, the University in recognition of his work as a teacher and educator, con- 
ferred u[)on him the degree of A. iVI. 

His health not permitting him to follow the rough life of a civil engineer, 
he studied the Classics for some time with Rev. Luther Hart of Plymouth; 
studied law with Hon. George H. Briggs of Lanesboro, Mass., and later with 
Judge Henry W. Bishop of Lenox, Mass., and was admitted to the bar. 

He practiced his profession in South CaroUna and Tennesee for some time. 
In 1836, located in Detroit, Mich., where he was principal of the Detroit Aca- 
demy for some time. He collected memoranda for a statistical, topographical 
nnd political history of the state and territory of ^Michigan, which he after- 
wards published under the patronage of the state legislature, as a Gazeteer of 
the State of Michigan. Wliile preparing this work for the press, he found the 
archives barren ; and it was owing only to memoranda f lU'iiished by him to the 
secretary of state that enabled the governor to negotiate what was then called 
the $5,000,000 loan for internal improvement purposes. 

He removed to Jonesville in 1S39 and in connection with Salem T. King 
opened the second law office in the village, under the firm name of King and 
Blois. In 1840, he was elected registrar of deeds for this county, serving two 
years; was circuit court commissioner for eight years. He was one of the 
justices of the peace for the Fayette township from 1840 until 1844, was again 
elected in 1865, and filled that position continuously for twenty-one years. 

He was a man of great intelligence and was an authority on many scientific 
subjects, especially geology and astronom5\ He was in his business, as well as 
in scientific pmsuits, very painstaking and accurate. He was a man of un- 
questioned integrity, a public spirited citizen, active when his health permitted, 
and one who to an unusual degree enjoyed the confidence of the community. 
In 1855, he was elected a member of the American Association of Science, at 
Detroit. 

He was in poor health durmg the greater portion of his fife and was unfitted 
for camp life during the Civil War; but his miliatry education made his services 
as diill master desirable. He drilled and instructed a company for the 4th and 
7th Michigan Volunteer Regiments. 



SKiETCHES OP ACADEMY CADETS. 



65 



He was married in Jonesville, May 4, 1845, to Ormina N. Warriner, who 
died December 4, 1872. He was sm-vived by a son, Edwin T., who resided in 
Wayne, Dupage Co., 111. 



REAR ADMIRAL CHARLES STUART BOGGS, U. S. N. 

Charles S. Boggs, son of Robert and Mary Jane (Lawrence) Boggs, was 
born in New Brunswick, N. J., January 28, 1811, and died there, April 22, 1888. 

He entered the "Academy" in 182.5, and graduated in 1826. He was 
appointed midshipman in the United States Navy, November 1, 1826; 
was assigned to the sloop-of-war Warren and cruised with the Mediterra- 
nean Squadron from 1829 until April 28, 1832, when he was promoted past- 
midshipman. He was in charge of the receiving .ship in New York, until 1836; 
was commissioned lieutenant, September 6, 1837, and assigned to the Saratoga, 
doing duty off the coast of Africa. He was in command of this post until 
1843, when he was attached to the home squadron, where he remained until 
the breaking out of the Mexican War. 
He served with distinction at the cap- 
ture of Vera Cruz ; was in command of 
the receiving ship in New York, 
1848-51; was in charge of the New 
York Navy Yard, 1851-54; inspector 
of Navy Yards in 1855; was commis- 
sioned commander, September 14, 
1855; was commander of the mail 
steamer, Illinois, 1856-58. He was 
appointed lighthouse inspector in 
1860, and on the breaking out of the 
Civil War was serving along the Cali- 
fornia coast. He WTote the Navy 
Department asking an opportunitj^ 
for active service in the South. His 
request was granted and he was given 
command of the Varuna, a passenger 
steamer remodeled into a gunboat, 
and ordered to join Admiral Far- 
ragut's fleet below New Orleans. 

In April, 1862, Admiral Farragut 
determined to run by the forts at the Rear Admiral Charles Stuart Boggs, U. S. N. 
mouth of the Missis.sippi River and attack New Orleans. Coimnander Boggs 
reported to Admiral Farragut that his .ship would not be able to stand the fire 
of the forts, if required to run at the same rate of .speed as the other boats. 
His boat was one of the fastest in the fleet, and he felt the passage could be 
made safely if allowed to go at full speed. His request was granted and his 
boat was placed second from the flagshij). 

On the early morning of April 24, the advance was ordered, and Com- 
mand(>r Boggs, in order to develop .steam in the quickest manner, used his sup- 
ply of jjork for the puri)ose. \\'hen abreast of the forts, he fire<l several broad- 
sides into them. The frail boat shot ahead, wrapi)ed in flame, and was soon 
above the forts. Here he found himself surrounded with Confederate gun- 
boats. He gave the order to "work both sides and load with grape." With 




66 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

no excitement and with perfect coolness his orders were carried out by the men. 
The first ship that received his fire was crowded with troops and at the first 
discharge, her boilers exploded and she drifted ashore. Three other ships 
received his fire and were blo^Ti up. A 32 pound shot, fired from an iron clad, 
raked the Varana, killing and wounding thu'teen men. The guns of the boat 
were soon silenced by the fire from the marines, but in a short time the Varuna 
was twice rammed by the u'on clad, but not fatally. Commander Boggs order- 
ed the engineer to put on full steam, and pushing up stream, swung the iron 
clad around, leaving her wooden side exposed. Instantly five eight-inch 
shells were fired into the exposed part and the boat was diiven ashore in flames. 
The Varuna was then rammed by the iron clad, Stonewall Jackson, the side of 
the boat being staved in. Water rushedjin torrents into the vessel. As the 
Varuna was rapidly sinking, Commander Boggs ordered her run toward the 
river bank, still continuing the fire until the water was above the gun trucks, 
the last shots just skimming the surface. As the ship grounded on the river 
bank, a chain cable was passed aromid a tree, go the boat in sinking would not 
carry the crew with her. In fiftec;n minutes after recei\ang the last blow, the 
Varuna sunk, with her guns roaring and her flags proudly fljing. Commander 
Boggs lost his ship, but won immortal fame as a naval hero. As a token for his 
gallantry in this great naval fight, his native town and State both voted him a 
swoi-d. 

Captain Thomas T. Craven, also an old cadet, performed heroic ser\'ice in 
tliis world famous naval battle. Commander Boggs was commissioned cap- 
tain, July 16, 1862, and given command of the Juniata and served in various 
places until 186-4; was on sjDecial duty in New York, from 1864 until he re- 
ceived his commission as commodore, July 2.5, 1866; was in command of the 
steamer De Soto, in the North Atlantic Squadron, until 1868; was on special 
duty until 1872. He was promoted rear admiral, Juh' 1, 1870, and retired 
January 28, 1872. 

He was tmcc married : first, to Sophia Dore,Vho_died in 1860. Five chil- 
dren were born to them: Emmeline Dore, born in 1836, married Sidney Lovett, 
died 1902; Sophia Stuart, born in 1837, married John H. Pool of New York 
City, died in 1901; Charles Edward, born September 16, 1840, assistant pa}'- 
master U. S. N., died October 1, 1880; Robert, born October 18, 1842, first 
lieutenant, 1st New Jersey Volunteers, died at Harrison Landing, Ya., Au- 
gust 6, 1862; John Dore, born August 30, 1849, died February 28, 1872. He was 
again married,April 9, 1875, to Mrs. Harriet Eugenia (Alott) Bull of Norwich 
and New London, Conn., who survives him and resides in New Brunswick. 
N.J. 

PAY DIRECTOR, WILLIAM BRENTON BOGGS, U. S. N. 

William B. Boggs, son of Robert and Mary (La\\Tence) Boggs, and 
brother of Rear Admiral C. S. Boggs, '26, was born in New Jersej', July 2, 
1809,' and died March 11, 1874. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1825, and graduated in 1828. He 
was a clerk in the Phoenix Bank, New York City for some years; was a 
clerk in the Navy Department, Washington, D. C, September 1, 1842- 
November 30, 1852; purser United States Navj', November 30, 1852; promoted 
pay director June 1, 1871, and retu-ed July 2, 1871. Dm-ing 1852-56, he was 
attached to an expedition, which surveyed the China Sea, Bchring Strait, 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



67 



and the Siberian Coast of the Arctic Ocean. He served with Admu-al Porter 
and while with him on the Mississippi Flotilla, was severely burned in a 
gallant effort to save the government funds in his care on board the U. S. S. 
Mound City. 

He was recognized as one of the best amatuer artists in the Navy. While 
on his various cruises he painted many pictures. He was a brave and efficient 
officer; was of a genial and kindly disposition and was a general favorite 
with the officers of the Navy. 

He married Eleanor Carter, daughter of Charles Beale and Anne 
(Stuart) Carter, of Sabine Hall, Va. Three children were born to them: 
Katherine Stewart, born August 5, 1843, married Jeremiah W. Berry, resides 
"Bowie Hall" Prince George county, Md.; LawTence Gednej^ born April 5, 
1846, rear admiral, U. S. N., retired, now residing in New York City; WilHam 
Brenton, born October 11, 1851, graduated U. S. Naval Academy, 1875, 
assistant engineer U. S. N., died June 21, 1886. 



'BVT. BRIG. GEN. JAMES VOTE BOMFORD, II. S. A. 

James V. Bomford, son of Col. George Bomford, cliicf of ordance, U. S. A., 
and a grandson of Capt. Thomas Bomford of the 60th Royal Artillery, 
was born at Governor's Island, N. Y., in 1811, and died January 6, 1892. 

He entered the "Academy" from Washington, D. C, in 1826, and 
graduated in 1828. He then entered West Point, and was graduated in 
1832, and commissioned brevet sec- 
ond lieutenant. He served in the 
8th Infantry, through the Black 
Hawk and Seminole Wars, and after 
the breaking out of the Mexican 'War 
was a captain in the 8th Infantry, 
serving in Florida. 

He was with Taylor in the mili- 
tary occupation of Texas in 1845-46, 
and later with him in the Mexican 
War, where he fought in the battles of 
Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma, 
Monterey, Cerro Gordo and Molino 
del Rey. He was at the siege of 
Vera Cruz, and at the capture of San 
Antonio. 

He was conspicuous for his 
bravery at Molino del Rej^, and was 
brevetted major for his gallant and 
meritorious conduct in the battles of 
Contreras and Cherubusco, and was 
l)rcvetted lieutenant colonel for gal- 
lant and meritorious conduct at the 

battle of Molino del Rey. Twelve ^^*-^"^-^'"; J*'""' ^°'' ^°'"^'''''' "" ^- ^• 
years of unbroken frontier service in Texas followed. He was lieu- 
tenant colonel of the 8th Infantry when Fort Sumptcr was fired upon. 




68 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

and was surrendered by General Twiggs, but he heroically refused to 
give his parole not to fight the Confederacy, and he was held a prisoner 
from April 1861, untU May, 1862, the latter portion of the time 
being spent in I.ibby Prison. Being at length exchanged, he rejoined 
his regiment, then serving under General Buell and remained with 
them until the battle of Perryville, where he was twice severely wounded; 
when his men fell back, he to urge them on, rode in front of them, and 
gallantly urged 'them to follow him. He rode a white horse which made him 
a conspicuous mark for the enemy. He was brevetted colonel for his gallantry 
in this battle and when the war ended, he was a brevet brigadier general. 
He was promoted colonel of the 8th Infantry, May 18, 1864. He then did 
service on the western frontier until 1874, when he was retired. He removed 
to Elizabeth N. J., where he resided until his death. 

He was noted at the "Academy" for his great strength and athletic 
aliility. He took special deUght in the long marches that Captain Partridge 
was accustomed to give his corps of cadets. While at West Point, he dis- 
tinguished himself by making a long jump, which has not been equalled at 
that Institution to the present time. Many stories have been handed down 
in regard to his enormous strength. 

He was married in 1840, to Louise Victoire, daughter of Bvt. Brig. 
Gen. Newman S. Clarke, U. S. A. Three children were born to them: George 
Xewman born in 1841, and died in New York City in 1897; Elizabeth Belinda, 
married Col. J. W. French, U. S. A.; Frederica Augusta, born in 1859, mar- 
ried Carl Weidner, resides in New York City. 

HON. THOMAS BRAGG. 

Thomas Bragg, son of Thom:\s and Margaret (Crossland) Bragg, was 
born in Warrenton, Warren county, N. C, November 9, 1810, and died in 
Raleigh, N. C, January 21, 1872. 

His father was an architect of ability, who devoted the fruits of his labors 
to educating a large family of children. John, an older brother of Thomas, 
was a distinguished judge in Alabama, and a member of Congress. Gen. 
Braxton Bragg, the noted Confederate leader, was a younger brother. 

The subject of this sketch prepared for college at the Warrenton Academj^ 
and entered the "A. L. S. & M. .\cademy" in 1825 and graduated in 1828. 
He studied law with Judge Hall of Warrenton, and was admitted to the bar 
in 183.3. In this year he located in Jackson, county seat of Northampton 
county, N. C, where he practiced his profession until 1854, when he removed 
to Raleigh. He soon gained distinction as an attorney and began to receive 
honors from the hands of the people. He served as county attorney of 
Northampton county, 1834-38, filling the office with marked ability; served 
in the House of Representatives, 1842-43; was presidential elector on the 
Polk and Dallas ticket, first district, in 1844; was an elector on the Cass and 
Butler ticket in 1848, and on the Pierce and King ticket in 1852. 

He was elected Governor of the State in 1854, and was re-elected in 1856. 
In 1859, he was elected to the United States Senate, succeeding Da\nd S. Reid, 
a former classmate at the "Academy." This positionjie resigned in 1861, 
when his State seceded from the Union. 

He returned to Raleigh and in June, 1801, was appointed by Governor 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



69 



Clark as one of the three persons to act as the governor's mihtary coimcil, 
This position he held but a short time. Though not openly opposed to the 
war, he did not believe the South ^ ^ 

could gain her independence. He , ,. , ,., 

was appointed by President Jefferson 
Davis, attorney general of the Con- 
federate States, which position he re • 
tained until 1864, when he returned 
to Raleigh. After the war he re 
sumed the practice of his profession. 

He was one of the ablest law- 
yers of North Carolina, and took 
part in many noted trials. Some of 
the best known cases were: State 
vs. Hodges, tried in the Wake Su- 
perior Court in 1867; the Johnson 
will case, tried before Chief Justice 
Merriman in 1867; the habeas corpus 
case in 1870, and the Impeachment 
trial of Governor Holden. 

He was married, October 4, 1837, 
to Isabella Margaret Cuthbert, of 
Petersburg, Va. Seven children were 
born to them: John; Blanche, mar- 
ried Andrew Syme; Herbert; Isabella, 
married Charles D. Harot, resides 




Hon. Thomas Bragg. 



in Petersburg, Va.; Fi-ances Rice, died unmarried in 1890; Elsie Ellis, mar- 
ried William L. Morton, resides in Petersburg, Va.; Mary Love, married 
Robert Gilliam, resides in Petersburg, Va.; Mattie Cuthbert, married Robert 
Prichard, resides in Petersburg, Va. 

JACOB SHELDON BRANDEGEE. 

Jacob S. Brandegee, son of Elishama and Emily Stocking (Jabez) Brande- 
gee, was born in Berlin, Conn., September 9, 1812, and died in Alexandria, 
Ind., August 4, 1851. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1824, 
graduating in 1829. He worked in his father's store in Berlin until 1848, 
when he removed to Alexandria, Ind., where he resided until his death. 

He was married May 1.5, 1839, to Sarah M. Hinsdale of Berlin, Conn.; 
no children. Mrs. Brandegee married again and died in Keokuk, Iowa. 



LIEUT. FREDERICK BREWER. 

Frederick Brewer, son of Charles and Hannah (Fairbanks) Brewer, 
was born in Middletown, Conn., December 26, 1811, and died there December 
19, 1885. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his city, and entered the "Aca- 
demy" in 1825, graduating in 1828. He engaged in the dry goods business 
in Middletown, Conn., for many y(\ars. He met with success in his busi- 
ness and acquired a valuable property. 



70 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



He took much interest in military mattei's and served as adjutant, 6th 
Regiment, Connecticut Militia. 

He was survived by several children. 

CHAPLAIN WILLIAM HENRY BRISBANE., M. D. 

William H. Brisbane, son of Adam Fowler and Mary Ann (Mosse) 
Brisbane, was born at Black Swamp, St. Peter's Parish, South Carolina, Octo- 
ber 12, 1806, and died in Arena, Wis., April 5, 1878. 

When he was six [years old he was^ adopted by a wealthy uncle and 
taken to Charleston, S. C, to live. He prepared for college in Charleston 
under the tuition of Bishop England, a prominent Catholic, and Rev. W. T. 
Brantley of Beaufort college, S. C. He completed his preparation under 
a' graduate of Yale, in New Haven, Conn. 

He entered the "Academy" Feb- 
ruary 24, 1824, remaining until March, 
\. 1825,'^when owing to sickness he was 

obliged to give up his work. He was 
distinguished at the "Academy" for his 
scholarship and love of military duty. 

He joined the Baptist Chm-ch at 
Pipe Creek, Ijawtonville, S. C, October 
2, 1825, and later studied for the 
ministry at the Furman, S. C, Theo- 
losiical Institute. He was ordained 
pastor in the Baptist Church at Law- 
tonville, Beaufort District, S. C, 
November 7, 1830. His pastorates 
were: Barnwell and Philadelphia, S. C, 
March 31 to October, 1832; Beach 
Branch, S. C, 1832, to August, 1833; 
Pipe Creek, January 5, 1833; First 
Baptist Church, Cincinnati, Ohio, 
August, 1838-41 ; Sixth Baptist Church, 
Cmcinnati January 20, 1841, to June, 
1845; Haddonfield, N. J., January to 
Chaplain William Henry Brisbane. October, 1848; Cincinnati, Ohio, Octo- 
ber, 1848-49; Cheviot, near Cincinnati, Ohio, July 22, to May 3, 1851; Fort 
Madison, la., January to May, 1860; Madison, Wis., August to November, 
1861; Mozomanie, Wis., February 5, 1871, to September 14, 1873; Spring 
Green, Wis., February, 1871, to March 5, 1876, January to October, 1877; 
this being his last charge. He was agent for the American and Foreign 
Bible Society, December, 1837-1838. 

In the fall of 1827, he began studying medicine, but gave up the work 
for the study of Theology. He attended medical lectures in Charleston, S. C, 
January to November 1835, winter of 1836-37, receiving his diploma January 
27, 1837. He practiced his profession in Lawtonville, S. C, in 1836 and 1837; 
Cincinnati, 1844; Madison, Wis., 1853-54; Arena, Wis., 1854,'and at later 
periods. 

He engaged in business at various times; conducted a store in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, in 1844 and 1851. 




SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 71 

In early manhood he became convinced that slavery was wrong and proved 
the honesty of his*convictions by freeing his own slaves, some thirty in number. 
He brought them North and saw them well settled in Ufe. In 1840, while 
pastor of the First Baptist Church of Cincinnati, he first declared his views 
as an abolitionist, and from this time became an active anti-slavery worker. 
Few men sacrificed more or performed better service in bringing about abolition. 
He was an able %\Titer and an eloquent speaker, and for many years devoted 
much time in educating the people to the true dangers and wrong of slavery. 

He was editor of the SonUiern Baptist of Charleston, S. C; Christian 
Politician and Western Transcript, Cincinnati, October 25, 1844, to May 29, 
1845; American Citizen, Philadelphia, Pa., April 23, 1846, to February 1847; 
The Crisis, Cincinnati, October, 1849, to May, 1851. He contributed many 
articles to the various newspapers of the country. He published Brisbane 
on Slavery, Future of Slavery, 1861. He was agent and correspondent for 
the Ohio Times in 1844; reporter for the Free Democrat of Milwaukee, in the 
Wisconsin Senate in 1854. In March, 1854, he located in Arena, Wis., 
where he made his home until his death. 

He was a popular lecturer and delivered many addresses in various 
parts of the country. Among his favorite topics were: The Life and Character 
of Hon. Thomas Morris; Reminiscences of Great Statesmen. He wrote Albert 
and Mary, published in Autographs of Freedom] also Amanda, and other 
stories, all bringing out the evils of slavery; also many poems. He was, 
so far as known, the first person to form a temperance society in South Caro- 
lina. In October, 1830, he established an "Anti-Intemperance" association 
in Pipe Creek, and his church was the first in the State to require of its mem- 
bers a temperance pledge. He was an active member of the 1. O. G. T. of 
Wisconsin, holding many offices in the order: 

On the breaking out of the Civil W^ar, he offered his ser^nces to the State 
of Wisconsin; was commissioned chaplain of the Second Wisconsin Cavalry 
Volunteers, October 30, 1861. Owing to impaired health, he was forced 
to resign June 19, 1862. 

He took an active part in politics and held several positions; was post- 
master of Beach Branch, S. C, November 1833, to March, 1835; was candidate 
for Congress of the Liberal Party, Hamilton County, O., in 1844; wasa dele- 
gate from Ohio to the Free Democracy, National Convention in Pittsburg, 
Pa., December, 1851; was chairman of the Ohio Delegation of the National 
Free Soil Convention in August, 1852, which nominated John P. Hale for 
president; was lecturing agent for the Free Democracy party in 1852; was an 
active supporter of John C. Fremont for the presidency in 1856, and Abraham 
Lincoln in 1860; was chairman of the executive committee of the Free Demo- 
cratic party, Hamilton County, Ohio, in 1853; was chief clerk of the Wisconsin 
Senate, 1857-58; served as one of the direct tax commissioners for South 
Carolina, October 9, 1862, to November, 1870; delegate from Iowa County, 
Wis., to the Republican National Convention in Cincinnati in ]87(). 

During his service on St. Helena Island, 1862 to October, 1870, he had the 
charg(! of the surveying of the island for the United States Government and the 
laying out of lots for the homes of negroes about Beaufort. Also practiced 
land surveying in Arena, Wis. The Arena Star, in an article published April 12, 
1878, states: "Extensively known, respected and beloved, the notice of the 
death of this man of God will fill with sorrow many hearts in almost every 



72 ORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

state of the Union. As a jjublic man he was looked to by statesmen as 
amongst the ablest advocates of right and safest counselors." He was a 
member of the Medical Club of Cincinnati, 1844; American Medical Asso- 
ciation; Wisconsin State Medical Society; The Philadelphian of Cincinnati, 
an Anti Slavery Society, 1849-53; Round Table of Madison, Wis.; Association 
of Teachers, Columbus, O. 

He was married, May 28, 1825, at Black Swamp, S. C, to Anna Lawton, 
who died in Battle Creek, Neb., February 17, 1888. Ten children were born 
to them: Anna Cornelia, born July 25, 1827, died April 26, 1828; Bentley 
Hasell, born August 31, 1829, died in Cincinnati, Ohio, March 22, 1846; 
Robert Willingham, died in infancy; Benjamin Lawton, born AprU 8, 1834, 
died in Council Bluffs, la., Nov. 10, 1893; William Henry, Jr., born June 20, 
1838, died in Milwaukee, Wis. in May, 1897; Phebe Adeline, born May 14, 1841, 
married Mr. Herbert Reed, resides Helena, Mont.; Mary Julia, died in infancy; 
John Edward, born April 17, 1847, died in Madison, Wis., February 2, 1863. 
Two chilflren died in infanc3% 

WILLIAM GRAY BROOKS. 

William G. Brooks, son of Cotton Brown and Jane (Williams) Brooks' 
was born in Portland, Me., October 12, 1805, and died in North Andovei' 
Mass., January 6, 1879. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his city and entered the "Acad- 
emy' ' in 1822, graduating in 1824. He was distinguished at the "Academy' ' 
for his scholarship; took part in the march made by the corps of cadets from 
Norwich to Manchester, Yt., in September, 1823. He wrote a very interesting 

account of tliLs trip; also prepared a j^rofile 
of the country traversed. These documents 
he presented to the Yermont State Histori- 
cal Society in 1876, where they are care- 
fully preserved in the archives of the Society. 
These documents are not only valuable con- 
tributions to the earl}- history of "N. U.," but 
show that he had more than ordinar}' ability 
as a draftsman. 

He went to Boston in 1826, and began 
chirking for his brother, Charles, in his hard- 
ware stoi-e; became a partner in 1831, and in 
1860, bought his brother's interest in the store 
and continued in the business until late in 
1874, when he sold out and retired from 
William Gray Brooks. yg^j^.g ^,qj.j, j^ j^j^^^ jgyj^ ^le removed to 

North Andovcr, Mass., where he resided until his death. He was a capable 
business man and acquired a valuable property. 

He took great interest in historical matters; was a member of the Massa- 
chusetts State Historical Societj' and one of its most active members, serv- 
ing on the standing committee, 1862-65, 1867-70, 1875-77. He was a mem- 
ber of the Boston Common Council 1847-50; represented his district in the 
Massachusetts House of Representatives, in 1860. 

He was married September 9, 1833, to Mary Ann, daughter of Col. John 
PhilUps of Andover. She died in 18S0. Six children were born to them: 




SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



73 



William Gray, born 1834, banker, Boston, Mass.; Phillips, born 1835, promi- 
nent Episcopal clergyman. Bishop of Massachusetts, died 1893 ; George, born in 
1838, member Co. H, 45th Mass., Vols., died Newbern, N. C, 1863; Frederick, 
born 1842, Episcopal clergyman, Cleveland, Ohio, died 1872; Arthur, born 
1845, Episcopal clergyman, New York City, died 1895; John Cotton, born 
1849, Episcopal clei'gyman, Springfield, Mass., died 1907. 

REV. ORESTES AUGUSTUS BROWNSON, LL. D. 
Orestes A. Brownson, son of Sylvester Augustus and Relief (Metcalf) 
Brovvnson, was born in Stockbridgo, Vt., September 16, 1803, and died in 
Detroit, Mich., April 17, 1876. 

He lived for some years with relatives in Royalton, Vt., and later attended 
an academy in Ballston, N. Y. He was a student for a time in the "Academy' ' 
in Norwich in 1824; received the degree of LL. D. from "N.'^U." in 1846. 

In 1821, he became a Presbj^terian and in June, 1826, he became a Uni- 
versalist clergyman; preached in Vermont, 1826-27, Auburn, N. Y., 1827-29- 
became an independent preacher in 
February, 1831, and preached for 
some time in Ithaca, N. Y. In 1832, 
he became a Unitarian, and was 
pastor in Walpole, N. H., 1832-34; 
was pastor of the First Congrega- 
tional church in Canton, Mass., 
1834-36. In this latter year, he organ- 
ized in Boston the Society for Chris- 
tian Union and Progress and served 
as its pastor until 1843, when lie 
gave up preaching and devoted lii in- 
self to literary work. 

He early became interested in 
the condition of the laboring classes, 
and in social reform; was active in 
his support of Van Buren, delivering 
speeches in various parts of the 
country in his support; assisted in 
founding the Locofoco party in New 
York; later joined the Democratic 
party in Massachusetts. 

He was editor of the Universalist 
paper, The Gospel Advocate, 1826-29; Rev. Orestes Augustus Brownson. 

was an associate editor of the Christian Examiner, in the thirties; was corres- 
ponding editor of the Free Enquirer, New York, 1826-31; published the 
i Philanthropist, for some time in the interest of the working classes, in the 
i thirties; was editor of the Boston Quarterly Review, January 1838-42. In 
\ this last year the Boston Quarterly Review was merged into the United States 

Democratic Review, and he continued one of its principal (contributors. 
j In October, 1844, he became a Roman Cntholic; and from this tiuu; on 

■ wrote many articles in support of the faith. In JaTiuary, 1844, he jniblished 
: the first number of Brownson's Quarterly Review, which he contimied with 
I success until Jatuiary, 1865, when owing'to ill health he suspended the publi- 




74 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



cation. In October, 1872, he again issued this magazine and continued its 
pubUcation until October, 1875. He was the author of many articles on 
Theological, Philosophical and Social subjects. He was the author of New 
Views of Christianity, Society and the Church, 1836; Charles Elivood, or the 
Infidel Converted, 1840; The M editorial Life of Jesus, 1842; Essays and Reviews, 
1852; The Spirit Rapper, an Autobiography, 1854; The Convert, or Leaves from 
my Experience, 1857; The American Republic, its Constitution, Tendencies 
and Destiny, 1855; Conversations on Liberalism and the Church, 1870. He 
contributed many articles to the New York Tablet, Are Maria, and the Catholic 
World. He resided in Boston, 1836, to October, 1855; New York, October, 
1855-57; Elizabeth, N. J., 1857-75; Detroit, Mich., from 1875 until his death. 

He was married June 19, 1827, to Sally Healy of Elbridge, N.Y., who died 
April 9, 1872. Eight children were born to them: Orestes Augustus, 
born April 18, 1828, died in 1892; John Healy, born April 14, 1829, died in 
1857; William, born January 4, 1834, died in 1864; Henry Francis, born 
August 7, 1835, resides Detroit Mich.; Sarah M., born June 7, 1839, married 
William J. Tennej', died in 1876; George, born in 1841, died in 1849; Edward, 
born in 1843, died in 1864; Charles Joseph, born in 1845, died in 1851. 



BREV. BRIG. GEN. ALBEMARLE CADY, U. S. A. 
Albemarle Cady, son of Albe and Sarah (Warner) Cady, was born in 
Keene, N. H., February 15, 1807; and died unmarried March 14, 1888. 

He entered the "Academy'Vin 1821, -and graduated in 1825; graduated 
from the U. S. Military Academy[in 1829. 

He was jcommissioned 2d Ueu- 
tenant, 6th U. S. Infantry July 1, 
1829, served on the frontier and per- 
formed garrison duty; was promoted 
captain, July 7, 1838, and served in 
the same regiment in the Seminole 
War in Florida; served in the Mexi- 
can War with distinction, taking part 
in the seige of Vera Cruz, and the 
l'4 battle of Cerro Gordo, Cherubusco 
and Molino del Rey; was breveted 




innjor, September 8, 1847, for "gallant 
and meritorious conduct" in the 
battle of Molino del Rey; was pro- 
moted major January 27, 1853, and 
lieutenant colonel, June 6, 1861, and 
assigned to the 7th Infantry; was 
promoted colonel, October 20, 1863, 
and assigned to the 8th Infantry; 
served during 1861-64, in the Indian 
Wars in the West, and performed 
garrison duty along the Pacific coast. 
Brev Brig. Gen. Albemarle Cady. u. s. A. In 1864, he was placed in com- 

mand of a draft rendezvous in New Haven, Conn. ; was retired from active 
service May 18, 1864, and was brevetted brigadier general, U. S. A., March 
13, 1865, for "long and faithful service in the army." He made his home in 
New Haven until his death. 



SKETCHES OP ACADEMY CADETS. 75 

HON. PAUL CARRINGTON CAMERON, A. M. 

Paul C. Cameron, son of the distinguished Judge Duncan Cameron, 
of North CaroUna, and Rebecca (Bennehan) Cameron, and a grandson of 
the Rev. John Cameron, D. D., a native of the Highlands of Scotland, who 
settled in Virginia in 1771, and who was a lineal descendant of Sir Ewan 
Cameron, was born September 25, 1808, at Stagville, N. C; and died at Hills- 
boro, January 6, 1891. 

He attended the schools at Hillsboro and Raleigh, and was under the 
private instruction of Willie P. Mangum, afterwards United States Senator. 

He entered the University of North Carolina in 1823, and remained until 
1825, when he entered the "Academy,' ' graduating in 1828. He was a captain 
in the corps of cadets and commanded the battalion in a march to Pough- 
keepsie, where they took the boat for West Point, and engaged in a competi- 
tive drill with the cadets of the National Academy, which then bore on its rolls 
the names of Jefferson Davis and Robert Fl Lee. They then proceeded by 
way of New York City, Philadelphia and Baltimore, to Washington, where they 
were reviewed by President John Quincy Adams. 

He entered Trinity College in 1828, and graduated A. B. in 1829. He 
delivered the commencement address at that Institution in 1879. He was a 
noted athlete during his college days, and is said to have once skated fifty 
continuous miles on the Connecticut river. 

He read law and was admitted to the bar; but he never practiced his 
profession, the burdens of his large property requiring all his time. He 
was one of the most extensive plantation owners in his State; also owned 
extensive cotton plantations in Alabama and Mississippi. Still the life of 
a planter, full of action and care, as he found it to be, did not give full scope 
for the wide range of his energies and faculties. 

He was an active promoter of the building of the North Carolina R. R.; 
and when its construction was begun, he was among the first to undertake a 
large contract, being the first to complete the work. He was for a number 
of years a director in the company, and served as president, during 1861-62. 
He was for a number of years a director of the Raleigh & Gaston R. R., and 
the Raleigh & Augusta Air-Line R. R. He served for many j^ears as director 
of the Citizens and the Raleigh National banks in Raleigh. He was largely 
interested in the cotton manufacture. He was a large stockholder in two 
of the largest factories at Rockingham, Richmond county, N. C; in two 
of the largest mills in Augusta, and in a large factory at Rocky Mountain, N.C. 

He v/as one of the most prominent politicians of his State. He was at 
first a Whig and later a Democrat. In 1856, he rei)resentcd Orange county 
in the State Senate, where he gained distinction as one of the most laborious, 
useful and able men in that body. When his old classmate and friend at 
the "Academy," Hon. Horatio Seymour, was a candidate for the Presidency 
of the United States, he WTote Mr. Cameron that if he was elected, he wanted 
him to accept a place in his cabinet. He was chairman of the North Caro- 
lina delegation to the National Democratic Convention in Chicago in 1876, 
which nominated Samuel J. Tilden, as a candidate for the presidency. 

His greatest influence in the State was felt through his interest in educa- 
tion. He had a keen appreciation of the educational needs of the people; 
and was an earnest advocate of every measure devised to supply them. He 



76 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY, 



i^f 



was especially active in the support of the St. Mary's School for girls, giving 
to the Institution its large and finely equipped art gallery. He was also 
liberal in his support of the military academy established near Hillsboro in 
1859. He, however, gave his most hberal support and active interest to the 
State University; and when at the close of the Civil War, financial ruin 
menaced the Institution, no one gave aid with more readiness than Mr. 
Cameron. He encouraged, animated and pervaded every movement to re- 
estabhsh its usefulness. He contributed liberally toward the construction 
of Memorial Hall, and provided for the beautifjnng of the grounds. He was 
often called upon to speak at the annual commencements. He served for 
several years as chairman of the Alumni Association. 

As a pubUc speaker he had few equals. He was earnest and animated 
and his voice was clear and distinct; his person was majestic, his countenance 

aglow with health and resolution. 
5 His strong features, piercing eyes 

and noble brow, crowned with a 
wealth of snow white locks, formed 
in his later life a picture pleasant to 
behold, which could not easily be for- 
gotten. 

As a master, his slaves received 
strict, humane attention. He took 
pride in the knowledge that all his 
dependents were well fed, clothed 
and housed. A striking feature of 
the solemity of his funeral, was the 
presence of a large body of his for- 
mer slaves, many of whom were 
L^rown men when the emancipation 
1 )roclamation made them free. They 
<j;atheretl about his remains visibh' 
affected, to render a last tribute to 
then- old master and life-long friend. 
A selected number bore the casket 
from the house to the hearse, and 
Hon. Paul Carrington Cameron. from the hearse to the grave, and a 

large number followed in reverential sorrow. The funeral was imposing, 
appropriate to the character and position of the deceased, being attended 
by the governor and other state officials, the president, and faculty of the 
State University, and by prominent citizens of the Commonwealth. He was 
a member of St. Mathew's Episcopal Church, gi\'ing liberally of his time and 
money in support of its various benevolent enterj^rises. 

He was married, December 20, 1832, to Ann, daughter of Chief Justice 
Thomas Ruffin. She died August 29, 1897. Seven children were born 
to them: Rebecca B., born June 27, 1840, married Maj. John W. Graham, 
died in Hillsboro, about 1880; Annie Ruffin, born July 16, 1842, married Maj. 
George P. Colhns, resides in Hillsboro; Margaret, born June 10, 1848, married 
Capt. Robert B. Peebles, died in Hillsboro, N. C; Duncan, born Nov.25, 1850, 
died in Hillsboro, N. C, in 1886; Pauline, born M:u-ch 30, 1853, married 




SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 77 

Capt. William B. Shepard, died in Edenton, N. C; Bennehan, born Sep- 
tember 9, 1854, resides in Stagville, N. C; Mildred C; born March 21, 1857, 
married W. F. Shepard, died in Hillsboro, N. C. 

THOMAS ANIS CAMERON. 

Thomas A. Cameron, son of Judge Duncan and Rebecca (Bennehan) 
Cameron, and brother of Paul C. Cameron '28, was born in Stagville, N. C, 
July 25, 180G, and died unmarried, at the Fairntosh Plantation, near Stag- 
ville, January 20, 1870. 

He prepared for college in the schools of Hillsboro and Raleigh and entered 
the "Academy" in 1825, graduating in 1827. He engaged extensively in 
agricultural pursuits, owning the plantation "Snow Hill," near Stagville. He 
did not aspire to the morg active and stirring affairs of life, but preferred 
the quiet of his home circle; and the enjoyment of overseeing his plantations. 
He made his home with his brother at the Fairntosh Plantation. He was an 
extensive slave owner, but showed the utmost devotion to their welfare. He 
was an earnest Christian worker. 

COL. WILLIAM SIMPSON CAMPBELL. 

Wilham S. Campbell was born in Brunswick County, N. C, ^Lu•ch .3, 
1809, and died in New Orleans, La., in January, 1860. 

He was a student in the University of North Carolina for some time, 
leaving that Institution to enter the "Academy" in 1826. He graduated in 
1828, in the civil engineering department, and at once entered this profession. 
He was assistant engineer on the Erie Canal for some time. He then engaged 
on various engineering works until 1836, when he was sent as a delegate to a 
convention of civil engineers held in Londo]!, England. He was engineer in 
charge of a survey of the peninsula of Florida to determine the practicability 
of building a canal to connect the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico, 
which enterprise, on account of the cost, he reported unfavorably upon; 
and advocated the construction of a railroad instead. 

He removed to New Orleans, La., about 1846, and resided there until 
his death. He was identified with all public works carried out in that State 
up to the time of his death; was city engineer for a number of years.. He pro- 
jected, and was consulting engineer of the New Orleans & Jackson Railroad, 
now the southern division of the llUnois Central Railroad. He was chief 
engineer and general manager of the New Orleans Gas Light Co., and built 
the entire plant. In company with James Robb, a banker of New Orleans, 
he was consulting engineer on the construction of the Havana Gas Works, for 
Queen Christine of Spain. He was in the confidence of Governors Johnson, 
Hebert and "\\^ickliff of Louisana, and served as colonel on their staffs. He 
was consulted by them as to the levees of the Mississippi river and various 
schemes for deepening the mouth of the river. He served two terms in the 
State Senate. 

He married a Miss Nevins of Philadelphia, Penn., who died some years 
after his decease. A son, Charles MacAUster Campbell, resides in Kansas, 
City, Mo. 



78 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

COMMODORE EDWARD WILLIAM CARPENTER, V. S. X. 

Edward W. Carpenter was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., January 28, 1797. 
He was appointed midshipman in the Navj', July 10, 1813. He entered the 
" Academj'' ' from New York Citj^ in 1821, and graduated in 1823, being a class- 
mate of Admiral Paxilding, Commodore Ebenezer Farrand, Josiah Tattnall, 
C. S. N., and Captain James H. Ward, U. S. N. 

)•■ He was commissioned lieutenant, January 13, 1825; served in the Mediter- 
ranean squadron in 1827; on the sloop Falmouth, in the West India squadron in 
1829-30; at therendezvous in Boston, 1833-34; on the frigate Constitution, in the 
Pacific squadron in 1840. He was commissioned commander, September 8, 
1841; was stationed at Norfolk Navy Yard in 1845; was promoted commodore 
in 1862; was prize commissioner at Key West, Fla., during 1864-65. In 1866, 
he retired to Shrewsbmy, N. J., where he made his home until his death, M&y 
16, 1877. 

WILLIAM CARPENTER. 

WilUam Carpenter, son of Dan and Betsej' P. Carpenter, was born in 
Waterbury, Vt., October 25, 1805; and died there March 16, 1881. 

He prepared for college at the MontpeUer Academj' and entered the 
"Academy" in 1821, and gi-aduated in 1823. He entered the Universitj- of 
Vermont in the class of 1826, but owing to ill health was forced to give up the 
work. He engaged in mercantile business in Waterbury until about 1848, 
when he rethed from active labor. 

He was a RepubUcan in poUtics and held several offices; was town clerk, 
1843-51; member of the State Constitutional Convention in 1843; represented 
his towTi in the House of Representatives in 1844 and 1845; was state senator 
in 1848 and 1849. He was a member of the ^Methodist Chm-ch. 

He was married, October 1, 1829, to Mary E., daughter of Cyrus Partridge 
of Nor\\'ich. She cUed about 1880. Sis children were born to them: Louisa, 
born October 28, 1832, died February 17, 1887; George Hemy, born September 
25, 1835, died November 29, 1899; Mary, born October 7, 1S38, died November 
15, 1872; JuUa Eliza, born June 10, 1842, resides in 2^Ianhattan, Kansas; 
Frankhn, born June 19, 1845, resides in Waterbury, ^"t.; William Edward, 
born January 21, 1848, resides in Waterbury, Vt. 



EDWARD CARRINGTON, A. M. 

Edward Carrington, son of Gen. Edv.-ard and Loranoa (Hoppin) Car- 
rington, was born in Providence, R. I., May 10, 1813, and died there May 2, 
1891. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his city and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1826, remaining three years; graduated A. B. from ^liddleburj* 
College in 1832. He was also a student at Yale University for some time and 
received from that Institution the degrees of A. B. and A. M. in 1S79, as for 
1832. 

He was engaged in the East India trade and general shipping business in 
Providence, 1835 until 1859, when he retired from active business. He was a 
fine scholar and possessed a large and valuable libraiy, especially rich in his- 
torical works. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 79 

He was married February 22, 1841, to Candace Crawford Dorr of Provi- 
dence, who died in 1887. Two children were born to them: Ann Iris, born 
October 17, 1849, married WiUiam Ames, resides in Providence R. I.; and 
Edward, Jr., born June 14, 1852, resides in Providence, R. I. 

ALEXANDER RALSTON CHASE, M. D. 

Alexander R. Chase, son of Jonathan and Hannah (Ralston) Chase, 
was born in Cornish, N. H., September 24, 1802, and died in Lockport, N. Y., 
May 31, 1887. 

Reentered the "Academy" in 1821, graduated in 1825; he graduated 
jVI. D. from Yale Medical College in 1829. He soon located in Lockport, 
N. Y., where he practiced his profession many years, meeting with marked 
success. 

He was married October 21, 1834, to Emily G. Cook of Cornish, who died 
about 1880. 

COL. WALES CHENEY. 

Wales Cheney, son of Nathaniel and Hannah (Heed) Cheney, was born 
in Orange, Mass., April 13, 1801, and died in Wyoming, N. Y., Feliruary 14, 
1881. 

In 1813, his parents removed to Jamaica, Vt., where he attended the pub- 
lic schools. He entered the "Academy' ' April 30, 1821, and graduated in 1824. 

In April, 1825, he located in Wyoming, N. Y., where he made his home 
until his death. He taught fencing school classes in New York several years. 

He was largely interested in agriculture and the growing of small fruits, 
and was the originator of the "Colonel Cheney Strawberry." 

He served as adjutant of the 3d Regiment Vermont Militia from June 
12, 1824 until 1825. Pie was commissioned adjutant of the 171st Regiment, 
New York Militia, .August 29, 1825; lieutenant colonel, September 21, 1827; 
and colonel, December 15, 1828. He held this last position several years. 

He was a Republican in politics, but never sought office. He was a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Chiu-ch, and the Masonic Lodge of Wyoming. 

He was married March 28, 1830, to Esther Staunton of Wyoming, N.Y., 
who died several years before Colonel Cheney's death; no children. 

HON. ASA W. H. CLAPP. 

Asa W. H. Clapp, son of Capt. Asa Clapp, was born in Portland, Me., 
March 6, 1805, and died there in 1891. 

He prepared for college in the Portland schools, and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1822, graduating in 1824. Soon after his graduation he entered his 
father's counting-room, where he remained a few years. He then engaged in 
foreign commerce until 1848, when he v.as ol)liged to give up this hnc of work 
and help his father manage his large business interests. In 1831, he was 
appointed aide to Governor Smith, with the rank of lieutenant colonel. He 
was elected to Congress in 1841, and served one term. When the Atlantic & 
St. Lawrence R. R. was projected he took great interest in its success, and was 
appointed a director. He was also deeply interested in the Maine General 
Hospital and the public library in Portland, being a director in each. He met 
with marked success in his business enterprises and acquired a large fortune. 



80 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



His residence was the historic mansion on the corner of Elm and Congress 
streets, Portland. 

He was married in 1834, to Julia M., daughter of Gen. Henry A. S. Dear- 
born, a former mayor of Roxbuiy, Mass. She died in 1880. A daughter. 
Mar}- J. E., was born to them, and resides in Portland. 



CHARLES CLAPP, JR. 

Charles Clapp, son of Charles and Lj^dia (Ham) Clapp, was born in 

Bath, Me., February 1, 1807, and died there April 24, 1881. 

He prepared for college in the 
schools of his town, and entered the 
"Academy "in 1821, and graduated 
in 1824. 

He engaged in the mercantile 
lousiness for some years in Bath, 
firm of Magoun & Clapp; served 
several years as treasurer of the 
Bath Gas Light Co. He was also 
engaged for many j'ears in the ship- 
ping business. He had a large claim 
against the "Alabama Claims Com- 
mission," which was allowed. In 
1S6.5, ha\ang acquired a large 
jiroperty, he retired from active 
work. 

He was an active member of 
the Central Congregational Church, 
and gave liberally to the support of 
the church and its benevolences. 
He made large bequests to various 
educational institutions. He as- 
sisted in the publication of the 
Clapp Genealogj'. 
He was twice married: first in 1829, to Jane Tudor Sprague, who died 

November 10, 1861. No children. 

He married again, November 21, 1862, to Nancy EUingwood, sister of 

his first wife. She died May 12, 1890. No children. One adopted daughter, 

Jane, who married James H. McLellan, of Bath, Me.. 




Ch.: 



Jr. 



ARCHIBALD CLARK. 

Archiliald Clark, son of .Ai-chibald and Rhoda (Wadsworth) Clark, 
and brother of Capt. H. E. W. Clark, '33, was born in St. Mary's, Ga., in 1816. 

He prepared for college at the St. Mary's Academy and entered the 
".\cademy" in 1832, but having a feeble constitution and not being able to 
endure the cold climate of Vermont, was forced to give up his work. He 
entered Franklin College, Ga., in 1834; but late in 1835, was again obliged to 
give up his college course, owing to faiUng health. He rapidly grew, worse 
and died in St. Mary's, Ga., in May, 1836. He was an able student and gave 
promise of a briUiant future. 



SKETCHES or ACADEMY CADETS. 81 

CAPT. HENRY ELIJAH WADSWORTH CLARK, U. S. A. 

Henry E. W. Clark, son of Ai'chibald and Rhoda (Wadsworth) Clark, 
and brother of Archibald Clark, '34, was born in St. Mary's, Ga., May 12, 
1812, and died in Jacksomalle, Fla., September 29, 1857. 

He prepared for college at St. Mary's Acaflemy, and at the IJtchfield 
(Conn.) Academy. He entered the " Academy' ' in 1825, and graduated in 1 833. 

He studied law for some time with his father, but not finding this pro- 
fession congenial, gave it up, and engaged in farming. He owned and worked 
a large plantation in Marion Co., Fla., 1840-1847. He served as captain 
in the Georgia volunteers in the Seminole War; was appointed captain in the 
United States Infantry, March 13, 1847. He was transferred to the 13th 
Regiment, April 9, 1847; served with distinction in General Taylor's army. 
He contracted the j-ellow fever while in service and was ill in Montgomery, 
Ala., several weeks; resigned his commission July 15, 1848. In 1851, he sold 
his plantation and located in Jacksonville, Fla., and engaged in the mercan- 
tile business until his death. 

He was a Democrat in politics and served in the Georgia Legislature 
several terms. He was appointed collector of customs, Jacksonville, Fla., 
in 1857, serving until his death. He was a member of Solomon Lodge, 
No. 20, F. and A. M., of Jacksonville; also a member of the I. O. O. F. 

He was married May 28, 1851, to Anna Mary Harrison of Amelia Island, 
Fla., who died November 20, 1897. Three children were born to them: 
Harrison Wadsworth, born April 16, 1852, died April 9, 1908; Archibald 
Lewis, born December 25, 1853, died May 19, 1854; Henry Roux, born April 
14, 1856, died April 19, 1897. He is survived by a sister, Mrs. James F. 
King, Atkinson, Ga.. and by several grandchildren residing in Jacksonville, Fla. 

PROF. ZERAH COLBURN, A. M. 

Zerah Colbm-n, son of Abia and Elizabeth (Hill) Colljurn, was boin in 
Cabot, Vt., September 1, 1804, and died March, 2, 1839. He was the sixtli 
in a family of nine children. His father was a farmer. 

When nearly six years old, he begun to manifest a remarkable gift in 
arithmetical calculation, and the fact was noised abroad. In his father's 
charge he visited several places in Vermont, where his powers were tested. 
Taken to Hanover, N. H., President Wheelock of Dartmouth College gen- 
erously offered to educate him. In the same year, 1810, other less favor- 
able proposals for his training were made, some involving the raising of part 
or all of the expense by public demonstrations. None of these propositions 
were accepted and his father was severely censured. Whatever mistakes 
were made in the matter, paternal pride and affection played their part. 

Exhibition tours were undertaken to New York, Philadelphia, Washing- 
ton, and elsewhere, in fact, through portions of the eastern, middle and 
southern States. In Philadel[)hia, Rc^mbrandt Peale made a portrait of the 
youthful prodigy, which was placed in the .\rt Museum. His calculations 
were done mentally with accuracy and suri)rising rapidity. Among questions 
answered in Boston, in his seventh year, may be mentioned these: If a clock 
strikes 156 times every day, how many times will it strike in 2,000 years? 
What is the product of 12.225 x 1.223? In June, 1811, while at Portsmouth, 



82 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

N. H., he is on record as having answered in four seconds the question, How 
many seconds in eleven years? 

In April, 1812, with letters of introduction from Ex-Governor Gerry, 
of Massachusetts, and the Hon. Rufus King, former minister to Great Britain, 
and others, the father and son sailed for Liverpool. The boy's reputation 
had preceded him and many people of rank and learning called in person 
to see him. Among them may be named the Bishop of Oxford, the Duke of 
Gloucester, the Earl of Aberdeen, the Countess of Darnlej^, the Princess Char- 
lotte, General Ross, Sir James IVIackintosh and Sir Humphrey Daw. The 
philanthropist, Wilham Wilberforce, kindly received him and presented him 
with useful books. The Duke of Cambridge asked him how many seconds 
there wei-e in 1813 years, 7 months, and 27 days. He gave the answer con- 
taining eleven figures. 

While on exhibition his education had been neglected. He had, however, 
learned to read and write. At a meeting of his friends to devise plans for his 
education, he raised 8 to the 16 power, giving the correct answer in 15 figures. 
He announced the sixth, seventh and eighth powers of some two figiu-e num- 
bers given him. Asked the square root of 106,929 he gave it immediate^, 
and very promptly announced the cube r.oot of a number consisting of nine 
figures. He also performed some astonishing feats in factoring large numbers. 
Having made a journey to Ireland and Scotland, he found the people cordial, 
and men of note were interested; among whom were Dugald Stewart and 
Professor Playfair. He returned to London in March 1814, and pursued 
mathematical studies for a brief period under a private tutor. 

In July he went to Paris and gave his attention first, to learning the French 
language. Introduced to the French Institute by William Temple Frankhn, 
he underwent an examination there, the celebrated LaPlace being present. 
Later on, he entered the Lyceum Napoleon, where his prospects for a good 
education were excellent; but for financial reasons, affecting both father and 
son, his coui'se was discontinued and he was back in London by February, 1816. 

It was in this year, that the truly noble Earl of Bristol proposed to place 
the boy at Westminister School, and to keej) him there until he should finish 
his course, which might require seven or eight years. In September he en- 
tered this school whose curriculum consisted mostly of languages. He was 
fond of such studj' and advanced rapidly. Two vacations were spent with a 
private tutor, a highly educated man, but sometimes harsh and of a hasty 
temper. The Earl subsequently proposed to change the orginal plan, and to 
place the boy entirely in this tutor's charge. The father objected, and Zerah 
left the school in May, 1819. 

Now in his fifteenth year, his educational career cut short, and without 
means of livelihood, he imdertook on his father's advice to studj' for the stage. 
Charles Kemble was one of his teachers. He became a play actor, and 
also wrote five plays; but they never came into use. These j^ears, following 
his school days, were looked back upon with dissatisfaction and regret. He 
felt he would have done better to have been at work farming. 

In October, 1821, he became assistant in a school at High gate for about 
three months. In January, 1822, he opened a school of his own, teaching 
the ordinary branches and was happy in such work. In August he went to 
Scotland on business connected with a proposed book. Towards the close 
of the year the elder Colburn's health began to fail rapidly, on account of 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 83 

which his son felt it necessary to close his school. In 1823, Zerah Colburn 
was introduced by the Bishop of St. David's, to Dr. Thomas Young, Secretary 
of the Board of Longitude, who gave him occasional instruction to fit him to 
become his assistant. In January, 1824, he received his first payment for 
calculations respecting the places and variations of certain stars. Now, at 
last, in his 20th year, he had found a congenial employment, particularly 
suited to his special talent, and with the prospect of an adequate support. 

Abia Colburn died February 14, 1824, and in May, Zerah sailed for 
America^ which he reached after an absence of twelve years and three months, 
of which nine j^ears had been passed in London. In December, 1824, he became 
assistant teacher in a school at Fairfield, N. Y., and in June 1825, he removed 
to Burlington, Vt., where he taught pupils in French, and was a student in 
the University of Vermont. While in Burlington, he united with the Congre- 
gational Church, but he did not feel satisfied; and in December, 1825, he 
was received into the Methodist connection at Cabot, and preached in many 
towns, being appointed to various cu-cuits from year to year. A member 
of the same conference has left on record that many of Mr. Colburn's "pulpit 
efforts were pronounced by good judges to be of a very high order." He 
published an autobiography in 1833. In the appendix is given some explana- 
tions of Ms methods and also some creditable poetry, written in his boyhood 
days. In 1835, he became professor of languages at "N. U." His schooling 
had been mostly in that department. Near the close of his fife he stated 
that he had not lost his faculty in numbers though not making much use of it. 
In 1836, he received from " N.U.' ' the degree of A. M., as one of a number who 
had attended the old "A. L. S. & M.' ' Academy. 

He was married January 13, 1829, to Mary, daughter of William and 
May (Cary) Hoyt of Hartford, Vt., of whom were born five daughters and a 
son. Of these. Miss Jane Colburn of Concord, N. H., survives. The only 
son, WiUiam Henry Colburn, (named for Loi-d Bristol) , enlisted in Co. C, 
3d Vt. Regiment in 1861, and died September 12, that year, from wounds 
received near Chain Bridge, Va. He was buried in the cemetery of the 
Soldier's Home Washington. 

Professor Colburn passed his last years in the service of "N. U." He 
died March 2, 1839, and was bm-ied in Norwich Center. Thus ended a varied 
life of struggle and achievement. Through years of shadow and sunsliine he 
had been conscientious, dutiful and courageous. Many erroneous statements 
about Professor Colbm-n, as to facta, dates and figures, have been given 
currency, and have passed from one printed page to another. Effort has been 
made to avoid such errors in this article. 

MAJ. WILLIAM FRANCIS COLLINS. 

William F. Collins, son of Michael and Elizabeth (Drake) Collins, was 
born in Nash County, N. C, October 24, 1807, and died in Warren County, 
October 26, 1867. 

He attended the schools of his county and entered the "Academy' ' in 1824, 
graduating in 1828. He engaged extensively in farming in Warren Co., N. C, 
during 1830-67. He was captain of the "Oak City Guards," Raleigh, for 
several years, and was later a major of the regiment. He was a Whig in 
politics; served as comptroller of the State of North Carolina, 183(5-51. He 



84 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

was a member of the Methodist Church, and of the Masonic Lodge, serving 
as Grand Master of the Grand Lodge for several years. 

He was married December 18, 1833, to Sarah Apphia WilUams of Hay- 
wood, N. C, who died January 20, 1857. Six children were born to them: 
Mary Emeline, born August 14, 1839, married William Clegg, resides in La- 
fayette, La.; EUzabeth Drake, born March lU, 1843, married Henry Massee 
Miller, resides in Raleigh, N. C; William Francis, born June 21, 1848, died 
November 8, 1897; Sarah Apphia, died in infancy; Florence Maria, born 
January 8, 1851, married John Augustus Williams, resides in Asheville, N.C.; 
Katherine Williams, born November 17, 1856, resides in New Orleans, La. 

CAPTAIN GEORGE MUSALAS COLVOCORESSES, U. S. N. 
George M. Colvocoresses, son of Constantine and Franka (Grimaldi) 
Colvocoresses, was born on the island of Scio, Grecian Archipelago, October 
22, 1816. 

His parents were of the Genoese stock that has peopled Scio since the 
fourteenth century, when that island was ceded to the Repubhc of Genoa by 
the Emperor Andronicus, in return for services rendered him in regaining the 
throne of Constantinople. 

At the massacre of the inhabitants of the 
island by the Turks, in 1822, he was ransomed 
by his father and, with nine* other Greek 
boys, was placed on board the brig Margareta, 
of Baltimore, then at Smyrna, and sent to 
seek asylum in the United States. The story 
of the hardships imdergone by these youths 
greatly impressed Captain Allen Partridge 
and he offered to take charge of and edu- 
cate George at his Academ3^ He was, 
accordingly, sent to Norwich, Vt., where he 
made his home with Aaron Partridge, brother 
of the captain. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1825, 
and graduated in 1831. On February 21, 
Capt. George Musalas Colvocoresses, 1832, he was appointed a midshipman in 
U- S. N. ii^Q United States Navy and on June 23, 

1838, was promoted to passed-midshipman and attached to the exploring 
expedition of Captain WiUces in the Pacific and Antarctic Oceans. In 
1841. he took part in the overland journey from Vancouver's Island to San 
Francisco. He was commissioned a lieutenant, December 7, 1843, and served 
in the Pacific squadron, 1844-46; the Mediterranean squadron 1847-49; on 
the African coast, 1851-52; at New York, 1853-55; East India squadron, 1855- 
58, when he took part in the reduction and capture of the Barrier Forts in the 
Canton River. The years 1858-60, were spent on duty at the Portsmouth 
Navy Yard. 

He was commissioned a commander, July 2, 1861, and served actively 
during the Civil War in command of the United States Ships, Supply and 
Saratoga. While in command of the former vessel he captured the Stephen 
Hart, a blockade runner laden with arms and stores for the Confederates. On 
the Saratoga, he was attached to the South Atlantic squadron, operating on the 




SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 85 

coast of Georgia, where he commanded a division and conducted several 
expeditions that captured Confederate troops and destroyed stores and salt 
works. For these services he was twice thanked in general orders by Admiral 
Dahlgren and was commended for his "zeal, discretion and good services to 
the country' ' in a letter from Secretary Welles, '26. 

He commanded the U. S. S. St. Marys, on the Pacific Station in 1865-66. 
When the Spanish fleet thx'eatened to bombard the city of Valparaiso, his prompt 
and firm action upheld the honor of our flag and afforded protection to Ameri- 
can citizens and their property. On April 4, 1867, he was commissioned 
captain and placed on the retired list. 

Captain Colvocox-esses was the author of a work entitled, Four Years in a 
Government Exploring Expedition, narrating the cruise of Captain Wilkes 
among the islands of the Pacific. He passed his last years in Litchfield, Conn., 
and was assassinated in Bridgeport, Conn., June 3, 1872, while on his way to 
New York. 

He was married May 17, 1846, to Eliza Freelon Halsey, neicc of Com- 
mander Thomas Freelon, U. S. N., '23. A son and three daughters were born 
to them: George Partridge, "N. U.," '66, now rear admu-al U. S. N.; Mrs. 
J. D. Champlin of New York; Mrs. George Eaton Jones of Litchfield, Conn., 
and Mrs. Charles W. Haddock of Beverly, Mass. His second wife was Adeline 
Maria Swasey, a sister of Mrs. Alden Partridge, by whom there was no issue. 

LLOYD BOWERS COOPER. 

Lloyd B. Cooper, son of Samuel and Hannah Cushing (Bowers) Cooper, 
was born in Middletown, Conn., February 18, 1810, and died unmarried, in 
New Orleans, La., September 28, 1830. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1825, 
and graduated in 1828. 

He was in the employ of his father in the shipping business until his death. 

FRANCIS WINTHROP COWLES. 

Francis W. Covvles, son of Martin and Nancy (Hooker) Cowles, was born 
in Farmington, Conn., November 13, 1810, and died there, March 7, 1868. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy' ' in 1825 
and graduated in 1827. He engaged in farming in his native state until his 
death. 

He was married, September 9, 1S35, to Mary Lewis, daughter of Tiiiiotliy 
Hart and Celestia (Lewis) Root. She died, February 21, 1896. Four cliilih'cn 
were born to them . 

GEORGE DEMING COWLES. 

George D. Cowles, son of George and Abigail (Deming) Cowles, was 
born in Farmington, Conn., February 22, 1808, and dietl there, March 18, 
1862. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1825, 
graduating in 1827. He made his home in Farmington until his death. He 
engaged in the drug business; also served as postmaster for many years. 

He was married, September 29, 1831, to Charlotte, daughter of Norah 
Loomis and Jciriima (Stedman) Phelps. Two children were born to them. 



86 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

JULIUS DEMING COW l.ES. 

Julius D. Cowles, son of Gad and Anna (Dcming) Cowles, was born in 
Furniington, Conn., September 22, 1810, and died there, January 26, 1S94. 

He entered the "Academj'" in 1825, graduating in 1828. He resided in 
Farniington until his death. In early life he lost his ej-csight and was 
unable tu engage in active business. 

He was married, September 11, 1842, to Mary, daughter of AKred and 
Hukluh (Brockway) Hull. She died, September 27, 1889. No children. 

RANDOLPH COYLE. 

Randolph Coyle, son of ^Andrew [and Elizabeth (Chisholm) Coyle, was 
born in Wasliington, D. C, October 8, 1812, and died in Warrenton, Va., 
August 27, 1869. 

He attended the schools of his citj' and John McLoud's Academy in 
Washington, and entei'ed the "Academy" in 1825, graduating in 1828. 

He was assistant engineer for the Chesapeake 6: Ohio Canal Co., on con- 
struction work near Shepardstown, Md., 1828-30; was assistant engineer on 
suivc'V's of the Wabash and other rivers in Indiana for the improvement of 
their navigation and for connecting the Great Lakes with the Ohio River, 1830- 
32; was draftsman for the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Co., 1832-37; division 
" engineer Georgia Central Ry., 1837-38; was engineer on surveys of the Alle- 
gheny River in 1838; was engineer for the United States Government on the 
survey of the boundary betw^een the New England States and Canada, 1840-41; 
was draftsman for the U. S. Land Office in Washington, D. C, 1842-45; was 
city surveyor of Washington, D. C, 1846-48; was engineer in charge of sur- 
veys of the Shenandoah River, 1848-49. He began work on the raising of the 
grades of Washington, in 1S51, and continued this work and the planning of 
public parks, together ^^^th work for the Interior department, until 1857. Dur- 
ing this same time he was cliief engineer in charge of the extension of the 
Chesapeake & Ohio Canal up the Potomac River. In 1857, he was appointed 
engineer to jierfect a system of grades for the city of Washington, doing much 
to unprove the pubUc grounds of the city. In the same year he had charge of 
the construction of the bridge across the Potomac River at Little Falls. In 
1858, he was placed in charge of the water department of Washington, holding 
the position until his death. 

He attended the Episcopal Church; was a member of Dawson Lodge, No. 
16, F. and A. M. of Wasliington, D. C; Society of the Oldest Inhabitants of the 
District of Columbia. 

He was married December 14, 1837, to Jane Jackson Moore of Alexandria, 
Va., who died August 15, 1884. Foiu- children were born to them: John Moore, 
born August 13, 1839, resides Wasliington, D. C; Andrew Baber, born June 
29, 1842, resides in New York City; Randolph, Jr., born September 21, 1843, 
died January 4, 1891; Jeanie Maury, born September 11, 1855, married Mr. 
John Dewhiirst Patten, resides in Washington, D. C. 

ALFRED WINGATE CRAVEN, A. B. 

Alfred W. Craven, son of Tunis and Hannah (TingejO Craven, and 
brother of Admiral T. T. Craven, '23, was born at the Washington, D. C. 
Navy Yard, October 20, 1810, and died in Cheswick, England, March 29, 1879. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 87 

He prepared for college at the Phillips Exeter Academy and at the Ber- 
wick Academy and entered the "A. L. S. & M. Academy" in 1824, and re- 
mained until September, 1S25. He graduated A. B. from Columbia Col- 
lege, New York City in 1829. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 
1832, but not finding this work congenial gave it up to enter the profession of 
Civil Engineering. 

He was assistant engineer on the Mad River Valley R. R., December, 
1834-December, 1835; division engineer on the surveys and construction of the 
first division of the Louisville, Cincinnati & Charleston R. R., 1836-38; assis- 
tant and first assistant engineer with Maj. C. W. Whistler on the construction 
of the central division of the Erie R. R., 1838-42; first assistant engineer and 
chief engineer of the Mohawk & Hudson R. R., in charge of location and re- 
moval of the inclined planes at Schenectady and Albany. He was next in 
charge of the construction of the wharves, docks, and basins for the Reading 
R.R. on the Delaware R.R. He then became chief engineer of Schuylkill Valley 
R. R. and the Mine Hill Navigation & Railway Co. ; was then engineer in 
charge of the Camden Branch R. R. in South Carolina. 

On July 17, 1849, he was appointed chief engineer and commissioner of the 
Croton Aqueduct Department, New York City. He brought to his new 
position a wonderful physique, an intimate understanding of men, great ex- 
ecutive ability and uncompromising honesty. During his administration of 
this office, the water service was much extended, the large receiving reservoir 
in Central Park was built, surveys of the water shed of the Croton were 
made, the large catch basin at Boyd's Corner commenced, and the introduction 
of the large main and the pumping engine at High Bridge were contracted for. 
The sewers were transferred to the Croton Department, and the present 
system of sewers inaugurated. Reservoirs on Blackwell's and Ward 's Islands 
were built, with pipe services from the city. He continued in the duties of 
this office, under varied political organizations, with credit to himself and to 
the benefit of the city, until May 1, 1868, when he resigned and with his 
family made an extended tour through Europe. 

He was consulting engineer of the Brooklyn Water worlts; made a rep or 
of the water works for Augusta and Savannah, Georgia; was consulting en- 
gineer for the construction of a quarantine hospital. New York City; was 
advisory engineer to the Department of Public Charity, and Correction; Rifle 
Range Association and Yacht Club. 

On his return from Europe in 1868, he opened an office in New York as 
consulting engineer. He served as commissioner on the Fourth Avenue 
Railroad Improvement; was Chief Engineer of the Syracuse water works; 
was consulting engineer of the Newark and Brooklyn Water works, and the 
Gilbert Elevated Railway. His health failing, ho went to England in 1878, 
where the disease further developed and he died at Cheswick. 

He was identified with the very first efforts to form an American Society 
of Civil Engineers, and attended a meeting'of engineers in Augusta, Georgia, 
by whom a call was made for a convention at Baltimore, February 13, 1839, to 
form an Engineers' Society. He was among the first to form the present Ameri- 
can Society of Civil Engineers in 18.52, and at the reorganization in 1868 
became one of its directors and was president of the Society from November, 
1869, till November, 1871. He was a member of the Episcopal Church and 
Column Club of New York City. 



88 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



He was married November 24, 1840, to Maria Schermerhorn of New 
York City, who died October 4, 1864. Two children were born to them: 
Minna, born, December 14, 1844, married Sidney DeKay, resides New York 
City; Alice, born December 5, 1847, married Aulick Palmer, resides Washington 
D.C. 



REAR ADMIRAL THOMAS TINGEY CRAVEN, U. S. N. 

Thomas T. Craven, son of Tunis and Hannah (Tingey) Craven, and 
brother of Alfred Wingate Craven ("A. L. S. & M.") was born in the 
Commandant's House at the Navy Yard, Washington, December 30, 1808, 
and died at the Navy Yard, Boston, August 23, 1887. 

His father was a purser in the na\'y'. Subsequently he was a naval 
store keeper at Portsmouth, N. H., Navy Yard, 1813-1823. 

The subject of this sketch 

> , entered Phillip's Academy, Eextr, 

^ "* ^'' f N. H., in 1821, and remained until 

1822, when he entered the "A. 
L. S. & M. Academy," and graduated 
in December, 1823. On May 1, 

1823, he received an 'Appointment 
as midshipman, U. S. N., while a 
cadet. 

In January, 1824, he served on 
board the United States Flagship 
on the Pacific Squadron. By special 
leave he became a past-midshipman 
in May, 1828. He was promoted a 
lieutenant in 1830; conunanded the 
Vincennes, of the Wilkes exploring ex- 
pedition of 1838-40; was promoted 
a commander in 1852. From 1851-55 
he was attached to the Naval Acad- 
emy, Annapolis, where he proved 
to be a very valuable officer. Craven 
was a thoroughgoing sailor, and a 
Rear Admiral Thomas Tingey Craven, U. S. N. more efficient commandant of mid- 
shijimen cannot be imagined. To this day he is regarded in the service as the 
highest authoi'ity on seamanship. It was an inspiring sight to witness ■nith 
what ease he could handle a ship. Benjamin, in his history of the Naval 
Academy, styles him "Arch-seaman of the navy." 

To Craven is due the system of practice cruises at the Naval Academy. 
He commanded the first vessel that took such a cruise, and the midshipmen 
learned to regard him as a model of a sailor. Having commanded the Con- 
gress, of the European Squadron, during 1856-58, he returned to the Naval 
Academy for a brief season in 1859. 

At the outbreak of the war for the Union, he was assigned to the command 
of the Potomac Flotilla. After a short service there, he took command of the 
Brooklyn. He was one of the ranking captains in Farragut's attack upon 
the forts below New Orleans. Here his conduct in taking the fire of both 




SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 89 

forts, and withstamling the attack of the ram Manassas, was a splendid 
exhibition of tactics and valor. The Brooklyn sustained a greater loss in 
killed and wounded than any other vessel. Midshipman Anderson was killed 
at the captain's side. Craven stood at the forward edge of the poop, his hands 
on a ratline, and did not once move therefrom during the action. "1 had the 
good fortune through the war,' 'says Captain John R. Bartlett (then a midship- 
man on the BrooJdyn) "to serve with many brave commanders, but I have 
never met in the service, or out of it, a man of such consummate coolness, 
such perfect apparent indifference to danger, as Admii-al Craven.' ' Farragut 
taking Craven^ by both hands after the victory had been won, exclaimed, 
"You and your noble ship have been the salvation of my squadron. You 
were in a complete blaze of fire, so much so that I thought your ship was 
Inu-ning up. I never saw such rapid and precise firing. It has never been 
surpassed and probably never was equalled." 

Craven was made a commodore, July 10, 1862, and in 1864 sailed from 
Boston in command of the Niagara, on special service. In March, 1865, his 
ship, together with the Sacremento, lay in the harbor of Corunna, Spain, in 
a position where it became necessary to determine whether or not to engage 
the Confederate iron clad, Stonewall, just off that port in smooth water. 
Here Commodore Craven exhibited great moral courage in declining to 
sacrifice ship and men in an encounter upon such a disparity of terms. 

He was commissioned a rear admiral, October 10, 1866; was in command 
of the Navy Yard at Mare Island, 1866-68; the North Pacific Squadron in 
1869, and was retired in December of that year. Later he lived at Geneva, 
N. Y. Subsequently he built a cottage on a beautiful site at Kittery Point, 
Me., overlooking the ocean at the entrance to Portsmouth Harbor, and lived 
there until shortly before his death in 1887. The cottage is now owned and 
occupied in the summer season, by William Dean Howells, the author. 

Rear Admiral Craven was married April 21, 1841, at West Point, N. Y., 
to Emily, daughter of Thomas Henderson, Surgeon U. S. A. She died 
in November, 1883. Eight children were born to them: Anna Truxton, 
born February 19, 1841, married Frederick Barnard, resides in Pittsford, 
N. Y.; Charles Henderson, born November 30, 1843, lieut. commander 
U. S. N., died March, 1, 1898; Henry Smith, born October 14, 1845, 
civil engineer, U. S. N., died December 7, 1889; Alfred, born September 16, 
1846, resigned from the Navy, 1870, civil engineer, resides Yonkcrs, N. Y.; 
Evelyn Tingey, born August 12, 1852, married John M. Gregory, died in 
California in the summer of 1906; Emily Henderson, born January 4, 1849, 
married E.C. Merriman, commander U.S.N. , "N. U." '57, resides in Yonkers, 
N. Y.; Ida Maria Forrest, born July 14, 1855, married Frank W. ?Iackett, 
resides Washington, D. C, and Newcastle, N. H.; Macdonough born Nov. 5, 
1858, of the class of 1881, at Naval Academy, resigned as Naval Cadet 1883, 
vol. lieutenant IJ. S. N., Spanish-American War, resides in Kingston, N. Y. 

COMMANDER TUNIS AUGUSTUS MACDONOUGH CRAVEN. 

Tunis A. M. Craven, son of Tunis and Hannah (Tingey) Craven, and 
brother of Admiral Thomas T. Craven, U. S. N., '23, was born in Ports- 
mouth, N. H., January 11, 1813, and died in battle, August 5, 1864. He 
entered the "Academy' ' in 1827, and graduated in 1829. 



90 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

On February 2, 1829, he was commissioned a midshipman, U. S. N.; 
was promoted passed midshipman, July 3, 1835. In 1837, he was assigned to 
the United States Coast Survey Ser\-ice. (Jn September 8, 1841, he was 
promoted lieutenant and served on the Falmo.dh, 1841-43, and on the North 
Carolina, 1843-46. In 1848, he commanded the Dale, and assisted in the 
conquest of Cahfornia. He was engaged on coast sm'vej' service from 1849 
until 1857, when he was assigned to the Atrato expedition and assisted in the 
survey for a ship canal across the Isthmus of Panama. He then served 
some time in command of the Mohawk, in Cuban waters, intercepting slavers. 
He performed conspicuous service in rescuing the crew of a Spanish merchant- 
man; and for his gallant work the Queen of Spain presented him with a 
diploma and a gold medal. The board of underwriters of New York City 
presented his wife with a silver ser\'ice for valuable work in assisting the 
shipping interests. He commanded the Crusader, in 1861 ; and through his 
efficient work the fort at Key West, Fla., was kept from falUng into the hands 
of the Confederacy.vHe was promoted-Vommander, April 24, 1861, and served 
for some time in search of Confederate blockade runners. He blockaded 
the C. S. steamer Sum-pier, at Gibralter, causing the ship to be abandoned. 
He later was given command of the iron-clad, 7'ec'.tm.se/i,and served in the James 
River Flotilla. In 1864, he joined Admiral Farragut's squadron at Mobile 
i^a\'. On the morning of August 5, 1864, on the opening of the battle of 
Mobile Bay, he was given the honor of firing the first shot. In this battle 
his ship was sunk by an explosion of a torpedo and here occured one of the 
bravest acts ever performed in naval history. Commander Craven and the 
pilot remained on board until the officers and men had been rescued. He 
then ordered the pilot to precede him up the ladder in the turret to the 
deck. Bj' this brave act the pilot was saved; but, before the commander 
could reach the deck the Tccunifseh sunk, carrying wMh her the heroic Craven. 

COL. FRANCIS BOARDMAN CROWNINSHIELD, A. M. 

Francis B. Crowninshield, son of Hon. Benjamin Williams Crownin- 
shield, secretary of the United States Navy, 1814-18 and Mary (Boardman) 
Crowninshield, was born in Salem, Mass., April 23, 1809, and died at Marble- 
head, Mass., May 8, 1877. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his city and entered the "Aca- 
demy" in 1823, graduating in 1826. He graduated A. B. from Harvard 
University in 1829, and received the honorarj' degree of A. M. from that 
Institution in 1843. 

He studied law with Leverett Saltonstall of Salem, Mass., and was 
admitted to the bar in 1831. He practiced his profession in Boston, being 
associated with Rufus Choate for some years. He was president of the Old 
Colon}-, Boston & Fowell R. R., for several years; was for some time treasiirer 
of the Merrimack Manufacturing Co., Lowell. 

He was a Republican in politics, and held many offices: represented 
Boston in the State legislature in 1846-49, and was speaker of the House in 
1848 and 1849; was a member of the State Constitutional Convention in 1853, 
and a member of the Peace Convention in Baltimore in 1861. 

He took great interest in military matters and was colonel of the 2d Corps 
of Cadets, Salem, ]\Iass.; was sent to England in 1861 by Gov(;rnor Andrews 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



91 



to procure rifles for the Massachusetts, Maine and New Hampshire 
volunteers. He was the first president of the Somerset Club of Boston. 

He married Sarah Cool Putnam, daughter of Judge Putnam of Salem. 
She died in December in 1880. Seven children were born to them of whom 
four survived them. 

HON HENRY W^LES CUSHMAN, A. M. 

Henry W. Cushman, son of the Hon. Polycapus Loring and Sally (Wyles) 
Cushman, was born in Bernardston, Mass., August 9, 1805, and died there 
November 21, 1863. 

He attended the schools of his town, and finished his preparation for 
college at the academies in Deerficld and New Salem, Mass. He entered the 
"Academy" in 1823, and graduated with high honors in 1825. In 1836, the 
University conferred upon him the degree of A. M. 

He engaged in agricultural 
pursuits and teaching school for 
several years. About 1830, he 
bought the hotel in Bernardston, 
which he successfully managed for 
some years. He was connected with 
several business enterprises; was 
president of the Franklin Count}' 
Bank of Greenfield, 1849-63; was a 
director of the State Life Assur- 
ance Co., and the Conway Fire 
Insurance Co., of Worcester, Mass. ; 
trustee of Franklin Savings Insti- 
tution and president, for some years 
previous to his death. 

He was a Democrat in politics 
and held many town offices; was 
town clerk and treasurer for nine- 
teen consecutive years, 1834-53; 
was postmaster of Bernardston 
several years; represented his town 
in the State legislature in 1837, 
1839, 1840, 1843 and 1844. In 
1841, he was his, party's candidate ^'^'^ ^^^^ Cushman. 

for state senator of Franklin county, but was defeated by a small vote. He was 
renominated in 1843, and 1844. In the latter year a vacancy occuring in the 
senate he was chosen by the legislature to fill the position which he did with 
great credit. In 1847 he was Democratic nominee for lieutenant governor; 
was renominated in 1848, 1849 and 1850. In 1851, there being no choice 
by the people, he was elected to the office and in 1852 was again chosen 
under like circumstances. He filled this position with marked ability. 

He took great interest in agricultural matters, and largely through 
his efforts the State Board of Agriculture was established in 1852. He served 
on the board during 1852-53; was president of the Franklin County Agricul- 
tural Society several years. 




92 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

He was (Iceplj- interested in historical matters. The last years of his 
hfe were devoted to historical and antiquarian research. He compiled the 
Cushman genealogy and was also active in the publishing of the Bernardston 
Annals. He was a member of the New England Historic and Genealogical 
Society of Boston; corresponding member of the State Historical Society of 
Wisconsin. 

In educational matters he was especially active; was for fifteen years a 
member of the school board of his town. He assisted liberally toward the 
erection of the Powers Institute buildings. Two of the buildings, Cushman 
Hail and Cushman Library are named in his honor. 

He was an active member of the Unitarian Church and was for years 
the superintendent of the Sunday School. He gave liberally toward the 
support of the church and its benevolences, and willed his residence to the 
church for a parsonage. He also gave liberally toward various benevolent 
enterprises of the town. Mr. Cushman was a capable business man and 
acquired a valuable property. In all private relations of hfe as a citiy.en, a 
neighbor and friend, he sustained a high and irreproachable character. No 
one of his community or section of the state ever possessed in a greater degree, 
the respect and confidence of the people. 

He was twice married : first, June 16, 1828, to Maria Louise Dickman of 
Bernardston, Mass., who died October 11, 1855. No children. He was 
again married June 2, 1858, to Anne Williams Fettyplace of Salem, Mass., 
who died December 24, 1904. No children. 

CHARLES CUTTER. 

Charles Cutter, son of Moses and Hannah (Webber or Wilbur) Cutter, 
was born in Royalton, Vt., December 13, 1805, and died in St. Louis, Mo., 
in 1869. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1820, 
and graduated in 1822. He located in St. Louis, Mo., where he engaged in 
mercantile business many years. 

He was married, August 18, 1827, to Betsey Day, a native of Royalton. 
Two children were born to them: Emma, born in 1857, resides in St. Louis, and 
Louisa, born in 1863, resides in St. Louis. 

FREDERICK DANA. 

Frederick Dana, son of David and Elizabeth Betsey (Osgood) Dana, 
was born in Portland, Maine, m 1808; and died at sea in 1834, while on a busi- 
ness trip to the Southern states. 

He attended the schools in his city and Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Mass., in 1818 and 1819. He entered the "Academy" in 1822 and graduated 
in 1825. He engaged in the mercantile business in North Yarmouth, Me., 
1826-34. 

He was married in 1828 to Abigail Reed. Two children were born to 
them; Elizabeth A., born in 1829, and George T., born in 1834. 

SURGEON DANIEL D.ARLING, M. D. 

Daniel Darhng, son of Daniel and Elizabeth (Leavitt) DarUng, was born 
in Plymouth, N. H., December 31, 1816, and died in Rumney, N. H., April 
3, 1889. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



93 



He attended the schools of his town and the Hopkinton, N. H., Academy, 
and entered the University in 1832, remaining two years. He studied medicine 
with Dr. Woodbm-y in Rumney, N. H., and Dr. Alonzo A. Whipple of Went- 
worth, N. H., dui-ing 1836-37; graduated M. D. from the Bowdoin Medical 
College in 1839. 

He practiced his profession at Concord, Vt., 1839-42; Wells River, 1842- 
50; Rumney, N. H., 1850-89. He served during 1864 as a contract surgeon 
U. S. A., at the Lincoln Hospital, Washington, D. C. He was a member 
of the Moosilauke Medical Society. 

He was married August 2, 1839, to Sarah Clement Pillsbury of Wentworth, 
N. H. Five children were born to them: EUzabeth, born October 21, 1840, 
married Elisha A. Webster, resides in Rumney; Lydia, born March 15, 1842, 
married David B. Mears, resides in, Lowell, Mass.; Susan, born April 6, 1844, 
married Henry W. Herbert, resides in Rumney; Sarah, born September 2, 1847, 
married Richard Dearborn; Daniel, Jr., born October 15, 1848, died April 4, 
1879. 

JOSHUA HARRISON DARLING. 

Joshua H. Dprling, son of Judge Joshua and Mary (Proctor) Darling, 
and brother of Jonathan P. Darling, '23, was born in Henniker, N. H., Sep- 
tember 5, 1808, and died in Warsaw, N. Y., March 2, 1800. 

He attended the schools of his 
town, and entered the "Academy" in 
1820, graduating in 1824. He en- 
gaged in mercantile business in 
Henniker, N. H., from 1824 until 
1830, when he located in Warsaw, 
N. Y., where he made his home until 
his death. He engaged in mercantile 
business during 1830-31, with Andrew 
W. Young, and from 1830 until 1851 
conducted the business alone. In 
1851, he established the Wyoming 
County Bank, which he' conducted 
until 1865, when it was chartered as 
a National Bank. Since that date he 
served as its president until his death. 

He was at first a Whig in 
politics, later a member of the Free 
Soil Party, and a zealous anti-slavery 
worker. He was a delegate at the 
(lonvention at Saratoga Springs, N. Y., 
in 1854, which founded the Repub- 
li(!an party of New York, and took 
a prominent part in the deliberations 



.^ 




Joshua Hariison Darling. 



of the convention; served as a delegate to the National Republican Con- 
vention in 1860, which nominated Abraham Ijincoln for president. 

He took an active intei'est in all the matters pertaining to the good of 
his town and gave liberally of his time and means to many charitable enter- 
prises. Tie was one of the founders of the Congregational Church, in Warsaw 



94 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

and gave liberally towards the erection of the chui'ch and presented the church 
with a fine pipe organ. He met with marked success in his business enter- 
prises and acquired a large property. He was a man of few words; possessed 
a remarkably impressive personality. He was of large stature, erect, and 
carried his military figure until his death. He was greatly beloved and respect- 
ed by the people of his community. 

He was married three times: first, February 23, 1832, to Lucretia 
Frank of Granville, N. Y., who died December 17, 1844. Seven children 
were born to them: Mary Elizabeth, born March 12, 1833, married Henry B. 
Jenks, resides in Warsaw, N. Y.; William Henry, born January 19, 1835, died 
while a student at Amherst College, December 5, 1853; John Harrison, born 
May 21, 1837, died January 24, 1864; Juha Lucretia, born December 18, 1838, 
married Dr. Edward W. Jenks, died April 25, 1866; James Brainerd, bom 
August 1840, died May, 1841; Emily Maria, born March 14, 1842, married 
Jared Bills, of Indianapohs, Ind., died November 7, 1878;*" Frances Isabel, 
born October 13, 1843, married John W. Cmi:is of Indianapolis, afterwards 
married J. N. Neild; died in Evanston, 111., May 17, 1910. 

He was again married, June 19, 1845, to Laiu-a E. Mosher, of Canandiagua, 
Ontario County, N. Y., who died January- 1, 1862. Seven children were born 
to them; Margaret A., born April 7, 1847, married James B. Chapman, 
resides in EljTia, Ohio; Laura E., born January 30, 1849, died unmarried, 
November 2, 1879; Edward Mosher, bom June 6, 1852, died in Buffalo, 
January, 1902; Grace, born April 21, 1854, resides Salisbury, Coim.; Kate, 
bom October 10, 1856, died at Saranac Lake, September 6, 1889; Alice, 
born December 27, 1858, died unmarried at Saranac Lake, March 17, 1886; 
Frederick Warren, bom February 20, 1861,- died at Macon, Ga., April 4, 1878. 
He was married the third time, August 4, 1863, to Clara B. Bcebe of Litchfield, 
Conn., who survives him and resides in Wallingford, Coim. 

JONATHAN PROCTOR DARLING. 

Jonathan P. Darling, son of Joshua and Polly (Proctor) Darling, was born 
in Henniker, N. H., April 21, 1802, and died in Le Roy, N. Y., Januaiy 21, 
1870. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the "Aca- 
demy' ' in 1822, and remained two years. 

He engaged in mercantile business in Warsaw, N. Y., Buffalo, N. Y., and 
LeRoy, N. Y. 

He was married May 13, 1825, to Susan Wallace of Henniker, N. H. 
Nine children were born to them: Susan Maria, born May 2, 1830, died 
December 14, 1841; Mary, born at La Grange, May 15, 1832, died August 
28, 1850; Jane Wallace, born at Buffalo, Februarj^ 13, 1835; Henrj^ born at 
LeRoy, July 19, 1837, died December 11, 1841; George, born May 28, 1839, 
died June 6, 1840; Maria, born April 25, 1844, died IMay 15, 1844; Grace, 
born August 19, 1845, died May 11, 1861. Two children died in infancy. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON DAVIS. 

George W. Davis, son of General Thomas and Mary (Owen) Davis, was 
born in Fayetteville, N. C, January 7, 1808, and died in Wilmington, N. C, 
April 29, 1860. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 95 

At an early age liis parents removed to Wilmington, where he attended the 
city schools and entered the "Academy" in 1825, graduating in 1827. 

He began his mercantile career in 1828, and became one of the mostpromi- 
nent merchants in the State; engaged extensively in South American trade; 
was a large ship owner. He was a Democrat in politics and held many offices; 
was chairman of the city commissioners, 185.5-56; magistrate, New Hanover 
County; British Vice-Consul, 1840-1860. He was most successful in his busi- 
ness enterprises and acquired a large property. He filled the various positions 
of trust and responsibility with marked success. 

He was married about 1830 to Margaret Young, daughter of Alexander 
Anderson of Wilmington, N. C, formerly of Virginia. She died August 5, 
1889; no cliildren. 

RODMAN GARDINER DAY. 

Rodman G. Day, son of Philo and Emma Eason (Gardiner) Day, was 
born in Catskill, N. Y., April 4, 1801, and died about 1890. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1821, 
graduating in 1823. He was for many years pastor of various churches in New 
York. 

He was twice married: first, September 3, 1823, to Cornelia W. Hoag, who 
died in 1830. Four children were born to them: Thomas, born March 3, 1825; 
Robert Henry, born August 21, 1826; Caroline, born October 17, 1828; Emma 
Cornelia, born April 22, 1831. He was again married December 23, 1832, to 
Mary Hoag, who died about 1870; one child, Gardiner, born December 20, 
1833. 

HENRY GEORGE RALEIGH DEARBORN. 

Henry G. R. Dearborn, son of Maj. Gen. Henry A. S. and Hannah Swett 
(Lee) Dearborn, and grandson of Maj. Gen. Henry Dearborn, IT. S. A., of the 
war of 1812 fame, was born in Salem, Mass., June 22, 1809, and died in Rox- 
bury, Mass. in 1884. 

He prepared for college in the schools of Roxbury, Mass., and entered the 
"Academy" in 1826, graduating in 1829. 

He was chief engineer of the Grand Junction R. R. of Boston for some 
years; later engaged in business in Roxbury. 

He was married July 6, 1840 to Sarah Maria Thurston of Rockford, 111., 
who died in 1890. Two children were born to them : Sarah, born in Roxbury, 
Mass., March 2, 1847, resides in Boston, Mass., and one son who died in infaiu;y. 

CHARLES FOLLETT DEMING, A. B. 

Charles F. Deming, son of Eleazer Hubbcll and Fanny (Follc^tt) D(>ni- 
ing, was born in Burlington, Vt., July 25, 1808, and died there, unmarried, 
September 14, 1832. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1821, 
remaining three years; graduated A. B. from the University of Vermont in 
1827; was a student at the Harvard Law School, 1829-30; was admitted to the 
bar at Burlington, March, 1831, and practiced his profession there until his 
death. 



96 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

BRIG. GEN. MINER RUDD DEMING. 

Miner R. Deniing, son of Stephen Deming, was born in Sharon, Conn., 
Februarj^ 25, 1810, and died suddenly in Carthage, 111., September 10, 1845. 

At an early age his parents removed to Litchfield, Conn., where he at- 
tended the pnbUc schools. He entered the "Academy" in 1825, and graduated 
in 1827. In 183G he removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, and in 1839, to St. Mary, 
111. He at once took a prominent part in the affairs of his State. He was 
appointed brigadier general and placed in command of the State troops and 
took a prominent part in the "IMormon War." In 1844, he was elected sheriff 
of Hancock Co., 111., making his residence in Carthage. 

He was married August 2, 1836, to Abigail Barnum of Danburj', Conn. 
Three children were born to them: Arthur Buel, born March 10, 1840; Eugene 
Macy, born [March 10, 1840, died in 1862; Miner Rudd, born December 11, 
1844. 

HENRY CHAMPLIN DENISON, M. D. 

Henrj^ C. Denison, son of Henry Champlin and Lucy (Perrin) Denison, 
and half-brother of Charles E. Deni.son, '45, was bom in Woodstock, \t., 
January 7, 1807, and died unmarried in St. Jago, Cuba, June 1833. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academj^" in 1820 
and remained two years. 

He studied medicine and dentistry at the Vermont Medical College, 
Woodstock, and located in St. Jago, Cuba, where he was a surgeon dentist 
until his death of yellow fever. 

JOSEPH ADAM DENISON, A. M., M. D. 

Joseph A. Denison, son of Dr. Joseph Adam and Rachel (Cha.se) Deni-son, 
was born in Bethel, Vt., March 23, 1805, and died in Royalton, Vt., July 30, 
1848. 

In 1815, his parents moved to Royalton, Vt., where he prepared for college 
in the Royalton Academy; entered the "A. L. S. & M. Academy" in 1820 and 
remained three years, taking the civil engineering work; was a trustee of 
"N. U." 1848, until his death. He entered the classical course of the L'niver- 
sity of Vermont in 1823 and graduated A. B. in 1825. He received the degree 
of A. M. in cour.se from that Institution in 1828. He entered the Yale Medical 
College in 1825 and gi-aduated M. D. in 1828. On June 2, 1830, he received the 
honorary' degree of M. D. from the Clinical School of Medicine of Woodstock, 
Vt. 

He was associated with liis father in practice from 1828 until his death, 
which was caused by being tbrown from his gig while dri\Tng down a steep 
embankment near where the "Broad Brook" empties mto the White River. 
He gained remarkable success in his profession for so young a man. He was a 
talented horticulturist and did much to improve the orchards of his town. 

He was married December 24, 1829, to Eliza Skinner, daughter of Calvin 
and Sally (BilUngs) Skinner of Royalton, who died in Washington, D. C, 
April 10, 1870. Twelve children were born to them: EUza, born 1830, married 
Hon. John A. Jameson of Chicago, lU.; Philander, died in infancy; George 
Stanton, born 1833, died 18G6; Eleanor, born 1835, died 1841; James, born 
1837, died in Washmgton, D. C, 1910; Alice, born, 1838, died 1904; Franklin, 



Sketches of academy cadets. 



97 



born 1842, resides in Chicago, 111.; Lucy, born 'l843, died 1866; Clara, born 
1844, married Hon. Robert M. McClellan of Galena, 111., resides at Briar Cliff 
Manor, N. Y.; Charles, born 1845, a physician, died in Denver, Col., in 1909; 
Susan, born 1847, married Dr. Edward M. Gallaudet, of Washington, D. C, 
died 1903; Fanny, born 1847, died 1859. 

REV. SAMUEL DEXTER DENISON. 




Samuel D. Denison, son of 
Samuel Fish and Mary Pierce 
(Cleveland) Denison, was born in 
Stonington, Conn., October 7, 1810, 
and died in New York City in 1898. 

He prepared for college at the 
Stonington, Connecticut, Academy, 
and entered the "A. L. S. & M. 
Academy" in 1825, remaining two 
>-cars. He then studied for the Epis- 
copal ministry. He was ordained 
priest in 1830, and was for many 
years rector of churches in Connecti- 
cut and New York. 

He married Sarah F. Blocker. 



Rev. Samuel Dexter Denison. 



WILLIAM CLEVELAND DENISON. 

William C. Denison, son of Samuel Fish and Mary Pierce (Cleveland) 
Denison, was born in Boston, Mass., December 11, 1808, and died unmarried, 
in Key West, Fla., about 1880. 

At an early age his parents removed to Stonington, Conn., where he pre- 
pared for college at the Stonington Academy. He entered the "A. L. S. &. M. 
Academy" in 1826, and graduated in 1828. He was for many years a sea 
captain. 

NATHANIEL FOSTER DERBY, A. B. 

Nathaniel F. Derby, son of John Derby, was born in Salem, Mass., 
February 25, 1809, and divA there of consumption, July 13, 1830. 

He attended Mr. Clark's school, and Mr. Greene's school, Jamaica 
Plain, Ma.ss. He entered the "Academy" in 1822, and graduated in 1825; 
graduating A. B. from Harvard University in 1829. He began the study of 
medicine with Dr. Pierson of Salem, but ill health soon compelled him to give 
up his studies. 



98 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

JOHN ADOLPHUS J. DESCLAUX. 

John A. J. Desclaux, son of Joseph and Marguerite (Carbon) Desclaux, 
was born in St. Mary's, Ga., January 5, 1811, and died there October 4, 1838. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1825, 
and gi-aduated in 1828. He engaged in mercantile business in St. Mary's, 
Ga., 1829-38. He met with marked success in his business and acquired a 
valuable property. 

He was married in 1830, to Louisa Dufour of St. Mary's, Ga., who died 
December 7, 1847. One child was born to them, Louis Dufour, born in 1835, 
and died unmarried in 1858. 

THOMAS MORTON DEWEY, 

T. Morton Dewey, son of Abel and Rhoda (King) Dewey, was born in 
Orford, N. H., March, 16, 1812, and died in Springfield, Mass., July 13, 1888. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 
1828, graduating in 1830. 

He taught school in Orford, N. H., and INlontague, Mass., for some 
years. In 1832, he engaged in boating business on the lower Connecticut 
River, serving as master of a steamboat for towing freight boats. In 1838, 
he removed to Montague, Mass., where he resided for some years; engaged 
in the manufacture of scythe snaths in the firm of Dewey & Kellogg 
until 1840. 

At an early age, he displayed remarkable talent as a musician. In 1838, 
he began teaching singing schools through New England, winters, which he 
continued twenty years, meeting with marked success. His largest school 
was in Boston, Mass., where he had 800 scholars. He assisted in forming 
the National Musical Convention in 1843. In 1847, the name of the organi- 
zation was changed to the Philharmonic Institute; he served as its president 
in 1851. He attended many musical conventions through New England, 
and was president of the convention held in Boston in 1848; was the director 
of music in the various Springfield, Mass., churches. 

In 1840, he engaged in lumbering in Canada, and in 1842 he again engaged 
m the boating business with EUsha Smith of Erving, Mass., In 1848 and 
1849, was agent for John D. Kimball, in extensive lumber operations. 

He studied law during 1853-55, with H. G. Parker, of Greenfield, Mass., 
and Burt & lincoln of Boston; was admitted to the bar October 26, 1855; 
practiced his profession in Greenfield, 1855-00; Montague, Mass., 1860-64; 
Westfield, Mass., September, 1864 until February, 1867; Springfield, Mass., 
February 1867 -1880. 

He was one of the founders of Mt. Cube Lodge, I. O. O. F., of Orford, 
N. H., serving as Noble Grand; later admitted to the De Soto Lodge of 
Springfield, Mass.; member of the Agawam Encampment of Springfield, holding 
various offices. 

He was married January 25, 1838, to Maria Kellogg, of Montague, 
Mass. Five children were born to them: Sherman Burke, born September 4, 
1839, died September 8, 1896; Edward Stanley, born October 15, 1843, resides 
in Boston; Mary Wilcox, born November 27, 1848, died August 29, 1850; 
George Winthrop, born May 21, 1851, died September IS, 1902; Emerson 
King, born July 6, 1855, resides in Springfield, Mass. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



99 



JOHN JAMES De WOLF, M. D., A. B. 

John J. DeWolf, son of John DeWolf, and many years a professor of 
chemistry at Brown University, was born in Bristol, R. I., September 11, 1807, 
and died there July 25, 1894. 

He prepared for college in the 
schools of his city and entered Brown 
University in 1823, but] desiring to 
pursue a military course, left that 
Institution in his senior year. He 
entered the "Academy" in 182G, and 
graduated in 1827. He took part in 
the march made by the corps of 
cadets to Washingtion, D. C, in 
December 1826. 

He entered Harvard Medical 
College in 1833 and graduated M. D. 
in 1836. He practiced his profession 
in Bristol, R. I., 1836-47, and at Prov- 
idence, R. I., 1847-94. 

He received the degree of A. B. 
from Brown University in 1833. He 
was a successful physician and a ': 

fine scholar; was a member of the 
Rhode Island Historical Society. 

He was married in 1829, to _ .• 

Annette Halsey, daughter of John Dr. John James De Wolf. 

Winthrop, of Boston, Mass. She died in 1884. Four children were 
born to them: Winthrop, Elizabeth, John Halsey and James Andrews. 




MASTER JOHN WEIR DICKS, U. S. N. 

John W. Dicks, son of Capt. John and Nancy (Stimpson) Dicks, wiis born 
in Portland, Me., March 20, 1809, and died in Worcester, Mass., May 23, 
1881. He prepared for college in the schools of his city, where he had among 
his schoolmates, Henry W. and Stephen Longfellow. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1823, and graduated in 182.'i. It was his 
father's wish that he continue his education in the classics; but as hQ. had 
a strong desire to follow the sea he refused to take further studies and soon 
after leaving the "A(!ademy" shipped as a common sailor. He engaged as 
a sailor on boats plying between Portland and Boston. At the age of nineteen 
years, he was given command of a ship and visited every port of importance 
in the world; was for a time engaged in the East India tracie; later was in the 
service of the Hudson Bay Co. His ship was one of the hrst to reach San 
Francisco after the discovery of gold in 1848. 

On the breaking out of the Civil War, he offered his services to the United 
States Navy; was stationed for some. time on the training ship North Carolina, 
at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, as drill master. On August 26, 1861, he was 
commissioned acting master, and transferred to the gunboat Isaac Smith; 
served in the South Atlantic Squadron, participating in the capture of Port 



100 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



Royal. In 1S62, this boat was ordered to New York for repaiis and he was 
appointed executive officer. Later the boat returned South and on January 
30, 1862, while making a reconnoisance up the Stono Inlet, S. C, was cap- 
tured by the Confederate navy, under command of Capt. Henry J. Hart- 
stene, '28. He was wounded in this action and taken prisoner; was confined 
in prison in Charleston and Columbia, S. C, and in Libby prison; was 
paroled in May, 1862, and later exchanged; served as executive officer on the 
Ohio, at Charlestown, Mass., until June, 1863; was in command of the dispatch 
boat Pink, on the James River, June, 1863, until July 19, 1864, when owing to 
disability he resigned his commission. 

During 1865-June, 1866, he 
was in command of the Ceres, a 
palatial passenger ship running 
from New Orleans to Havana and 
Vera Cruz. In June, 1866, he re- 
tired from active ser\'ice and re- 
moved to Worcester, Mass., where 
he made his home until his death. 

He was one of the ablest sea 
captains of his time, and during 
his long service never lost a ship, 
and but one man. He was a firm 
disciplinarian, but a just one and 
was highly esteemed by his men. 
During his long service on the 
ocean he experienced many thrill- 
ing incidents. He sailed the China 
seas infested vnth pirates, without 
molestation. He attributed his 
good fortune in this to the power 
of the Masonic signal, flying at his 
masthead. 

He was an earnest Christian for 
many years; was a member of the 




Master John Weir Dicks, U.S.N. 



Plymouth church of Worcester and an active worker in the Sunda\' School. 
He was made a Mason in Amsterdam, Holland, and was an honorary member 
of Ancient Landmark Lodge of Portland, Me.; and secretarj- of the Citizen's 
Exchange of Worcester for some years. 

He was married December 9, 1832, to Anne Tomlin at North Wood 
Church, in Cowes, Isle of Wight, England. Mrs. Dicks died March 5, 1887. 
Seven children were born to them: Isabella, born June 20, 1834, died December 
21, 1836; John Weir, born January 1, 1837, died in infancy; John, 
born April 29, 1839, died at Havanna, Cuba, October 12, 1860; Susan G., 
born December 12, 1841, married Alfred B. Warren, resides in Holden, Mass.; 
Marianna, born December 7, 1843, married Frederick C. Hills, resides Newton 
Highlands, Mass.; Joseph Henry, born May 27, 1846, died April 4, 1849; 
Clara Maria, born August 7, 1852, died September 8, 1853. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 101 

CAPT. WILLIAM DINSMOOR. 

William Dinsmoor, son of Samuel, (the Elder Governor) and Mary 
Boyd (Reid) Dinsmoor, was born in Keene, N. H., September 20, 1805, and 
died there July 9, 1884. 

At an early age he developed a fondness for military pursuits and assisted 
in the organization of a company of infantry composed of boys under age, 
of which he was chosen captain. The company under his command attained 
such proficiency in soldierly bearing as to be officially recognized by the regi- 
ment. This taste his father encouraged, and he was'sentj'accordingly, to the 
"Academy' ' in 1821, where he graduated with honors in 1823. 

He engaged in the tailoring business, 
with Richard Montague, under the firm 
name of Dinsmoor and Montague, 1827-33; 
formed a partnership with Sheldon F. White 
and conducted a clothing store, 183.3-36, 
under the firm name of Dinsmoor, White & 
Lyon. He was one of the incorporators, in 
1853, of the A.shuelot Fire Insurance Co., 
and served as director for some years; was 
director of the Ashuelot National Bank, 
1833-84, and president; was a member of 
the Asheulot Manufacturing Company,Keene, 
183-5-53. He was a successful business man 
and acquired a valuable property. 

He was a Democrat in politics; was 
l)ostmaster of Keene, 1829-37. He kept up Capt. William Dinsmoor. 

his interest in military matters and served as captain of the Keene Light 
Infantry, in 1829. He was a member of the Unitarian Church. 

He was married January 15, 1835, in Keene, N.H., to Julia Ann, daughter 
of Phineas and Mary (Hart) Fiske. She died January 4, 1854. Three children 
were born to them: Mary Boyd, born April 21, 1839, resides in Keene; George 
Reid born May 28, 1841, died April 29, 1901; Frank Fiske, born October 3, 
1845, died July 23, 1870. 

RALPH SMITH DORR. 

Ralj)h S. Dorr was born in Roxbury, Mass., February 1, 1807, and died 
in San Francisco, Cal., June 30, 1869. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his city and entered the "Acad- 
emy' ' in 1820, graduating in 1824. 

He was a merchant in Boston, Mass., 1824-40; Buenos Ayres, Argentina, 
S. A., 1840-49. In the latter year he located in San Francisco, where he 
engaged in the lumber and commission business until his death. He took a 
prominent part in early affairs of San Francisco, serving as alderman dur- 
ing 1851-60. 

He was married in 1830, to Ehza Davis, sister of Horatio Davis, '26. 
She died about 1850. Three children were born to them: Ralph Smith, 
Jr., " N.U.' ' '50; Jonathan, a lawyer in Boston, Mass., many years; a daughter, 
Mrs, George P. Gore, of Chicago, 111. 




102 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



ALFRED DORR. 

Alfred Dorr, son of John and Esther (Goldthwaite) Dorr, was born in 
Boston, Mass., December 12, lS07;'anddiedinDorchester, Mass., June 13, 1851. 

He prepared for college in the 
schools of his citj'' and entered the 
"Academy in 1823, graduating in 
1825. He was a member of the firm 
of Dorr & Allen, auctioneers, Boston, 
and of the firm of Dorr& Ridgeway 
lit No. 12, Rowes Wharf. He met 
with marked success in his business 
and acquired a large fortune. 

He was married May 11, 1830, 
to Anne Lodge of Boston. Six 
children were born to them: Clarence 
Alfred, born March 30, 1831, died 
unmarried, December 18, 1895; 
Henry H. G., born July 25, 1833, 
died September 4, 1835; Herman 
H. G., born July 25, 1833, died 
unmarried, January 29, 1870; Louise 
Anne, born June 7, 1836, married 
William Hayden, Jr., resides in 
Boston, Mass.; EUerton Lodge, bom 
March 7, 1838, resides in Boston; 
Addison, born May 18, 1884, died 
October 11, 1846. 




Alfred Dorr. 



SANDERS PITTMAN DORRANCE, A. B. 

Sanders P. Dorrance, son of Samuel and Mary (Pittman) Dorrance, was 
born in Pro\'idence, R. I., October 29, 1807, and died there, unmarried, Febru- 
ary 18, 1830. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his citj'^ and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1822, and graduated in 1824. He then entered Brown University 
and graduated A. B. in 1828. 

He engaged in business in Providence, R. L until his death. 



RICHARD J. DOWNING. 

Richard J. Dov^Tiing, son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Webster) Downing, 
was born in Downingtown, Chester Co., Pa./january 24, 1810, and died there 
March 12, 1890. 

He prepared for college in the schools of Chester Valley and entered the 
"Academy" in 1826, and graduated in 1829. 

Soon after his graduation he took charge of the family estate of 1500 acres 
of land at Downingtown, Pa., which he later inherited. Here he made his 
home until his death, engaging extensivelj' in farming and stock raising. He 
met with marked success in his business ventures and acquired a large property. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



10,3 



He was an ardent Republican and 
generously aided the North during the 
Civil War. He was a member of the 
Orthodox Society of Friends. 

He was married March 2, 1837, to 
Susan Havard Miller, of Haverford, Pa., 
who died July 7, 1883. Six children 
were born to them: Joseph J., born 
December 30, 1837, died September 30, 
1851; Sarah Miller, born October 12, 
1839, married John J. Pinkerton, 
resides in West Chester, Pa.; Eliza- 
beth Webster, born October 19, 1841, 
died March 6, 1861; Henry Webster, 
born April 13, 1S43, died September 
29, 1851; Jonathan Havard, born 
March 7, 1845, now postmaster at 
Downingtown, Pa.; Richard J. Jr., 
born April 17, 1847, died September 
13, 1851. 




Richard J. Downing. 



HON. CHARLES DANIEL DRAKE, LL. D. 
Charles D. Drake, son of Dr. Daniel Drake, a distinguished physician of 
Cincinnati, and Harriet (Sisson) Drake, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 
11, 1811, and died in Washington, D. C, April 1, 1892. 

He prepared for college in the 
schools of his citj' and was a student 
at St. Joseph's College, Barstown, 
Ky., 1823-24. He entered the 
"Academy" in 1824, and graduated 
in 1827. 

On April 1, 1827, he was com- 
missioned a midshipman in the U. 
S. Navy and served until October 
30, 1829, when he resigned from 
the service. He then returned to 
Cincinnati. He studied law in that 
city during 1830-33, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in the latter year. 
He practiced his ])rofession in St. 
Louis, Mo., 1834-47, 1850-67; Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, 1847-50. He became 
one of the most pr-omincnt attor- 
ii(>ys of Missouri. In 1867, he re- 
moved to Washington, D. C, where 
he made his home until his death. 
He was a Republican in politics 
Hon. Charles Daniel Drake. and held many positions. He repre- 








104 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

sented St. Louis in the State Legislature 1859-60, taking a prominent part in the 
deliberation of that bod}'. He was_a__member,ofjthe_constitutional convention 
of 1863 and 1861, serving as vice-president in the latter year. He framed for 
this convention the instrument known as the "Drake Constitution." He 
served as U. S. Senator from'Missouri from IMarch, 1867 until 1870, when he 
resigned to accept the appointment, by President Grant, of chief justice of the 
U. S. Court of Claims, which office he held until December, 1885. 

He was much interested in school matters. He organized the St. Louis 
Law Library in 1838, the first of its kind in the United States. He received 
the degree of LL. D. from Hanover College, Ind., in 1863, and from the Uni- 
versity of Worcester, Ohio in 1875: He wrote many articles for the magazines 
and papers; published A Treatise on the Law of Suits by Attachment in the 
United States, 1855; Union and Anti-Slavery Speeches delivered during the 
Rebellion; Life of Daniel Drake, 1871. He was an active member of the 
Presbyterian Church, ser\'ing as elder in St. Louis and Wasliington. 

He was twice married : first, to Ella Blow of St. Louis. Three children 
were born to them: Joseph Charles, died in early youth; Harriet, died an 
infant; Ella Blow, married Mr. James C. Cresson of Philadelphia, died in 1883. 
He was again married to Mrs. Margaret Emily (Austin) Cross of St. Louis, 
Mo., who died April 30, 1896. Four children were born to them: James 
Austin, born in 1837, died in 1875; Amia Perrj-, born in 1849, now Mrs. A. P. 
Westcott, resides in Washington, D. C; Susan, died in infancy; Emily, died 
in infancy. 

WILLIAM DUANE. 

William Duane, son of William John and Deborah (Bache) Duane, was 
born in Philadelphia, Pa., February 7, 1808, and died there November 4, 1882. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his city, and entered the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania in 1822, where he remained until 1825, when he entered 
the "Academy," and graduated in 1827. He studied law and was admitted to 
the bar in 1830; practiced his profession in Pittsburg, Pa., 1830-32; Phila- 
delphia, 1832-82. 

He wrote manj' articles for the current magazines and historical publica- 
tions; was author of the following works: ChristopherMarshaU's Diary, edited in 
1839 and 1844; A View of the Relation of Landlord and Tenant in Philadelphia, 
1844; Coffee, Tea and Chocolate, a translation, in 1846; Imw of Roads, Highways, 
Bridges and ferries in Peymsylvania, 1848; Canada and the Continental Congress, 
1850. 

He was a member of the Episcopal Church; Historical Society of Pennsyl- 
vania, and its secretary for some time. 

He was married November 6, 1833, to Loisa Brooks, daughter of Samuel 
Brooks of Philadelphia, who died Januarj^ 24, 1881. Two children were born 
to them: Virginia, born September, 1834, died September 1855; Charles Wil- 
liams, born December 20, 1837, a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, 
and now an Episcopal clergjTnan. 

THEODORE SAMUEL DuBOSE. 

Theodore S. DuBose, son of Samuel and Ehza (Marion) DuBose, was born 
near Charleston, S. C, May 16, 1809, and died at Winnsboro, S. C, Februaiy 
13, 1862. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 105 

He attended the srHooIs of Charleston and entered the "Academy" in 
.1823, and graduated in 1826. 

He engaged in planting near Charleston, S. C, from 1828 until 1836, 
when he removed to Winnsboro, S. C, where he had large plantation interests. 

He was married in 1828, to Jane Sinkler Porcher, who died in 1862. Four- 
teen children were born to them, of whom only seven reached the age of matu- 
rity: Eliza Marion, born in 1829, married Augustus H. Porcher, died in 1895; 
McNeely, born 1831, died in 1860; Anne Stevens, born in 1834, died unmarried 
in 1870; William Porcher, born April 11, 1836, now an Episcopal clergyman, 
resides in Monteagle, Tenn.; Elizabeth Porcher, born in 1838, married John 
Bratton, died in 1875; Jane Porcher, born in 1840, married Beverly Means, 
died in 1888; Robert Marion, born in 1841, died in 1908. 

ALBERT WILLIS DUNBAR. 

Albert W. Dunbar was born at Dunbarton Plantation in Adams Co., 
Miss., January 7, 1809, and died there February 13, 1892; was buried in Nat- 
chez, Miss. 

His'early education was entrusted to tutors until 1825, when he entered 
the "Academy" from Natchez, Miss., and remained two years, being obliged 
to give up his 'course owing to failing health. He entered a college in 
Kentucky, where he remained but a short time, as he was called home by the 
death of his eldest brother to take charge of his mother's large plantation 
interests. 

He entered the same business for himself and soon acquired a large estate. 
In 1853, he traveled extensively through Europe with his wife, and on his re- 
turn home located in Natchez, where he had a beautiful residence. He lived 
there until the Civil War, when he lost his large property. Like many others, 
he struggled manfully to redeem his losses, but without adequate results. In 
spite of all his disappointments he maintained a cheerful spirit to the end. He 
was widely connected by relationship and marriage with the i)rominent 
families in the country, but owing to a retiring and modest disjiosition he never 
aspired to office or public position, but was content with doing his duty as a 
good citizen in all respects. 

He was married August 25, 1852, to Matilda B. Ralston, daugliter of 
George Ralston, a wealthy citizen of Philadelphia, Pa., who survives lum with 
two sons and two daughters. 

PROF. ELISHA DUNBAR. 

Elisha Dunbar, son of John and Eunice (Gallup) Dunbar, was born in 
Hartland, Vt., in 1800, and dicnl unmarried in Orange, N. J., Manih 14, 1830. 

He entered the "Academj'" in 1820, and graduated in 1825. He was dis- 
tinguished at the "Academy" for his mathematical ability; was inst rue-tor in 
Mathematics and Geography, 1823-25; Mathematics and Navigation, 1825-28; 
Fluxions and Descriptive Geometry, 1827-28, 

In the summer of 1828, he assisted Truman B. Ransom, '25, in the founding 
of the New Jersey Institution at Orange, N. J., and was associated with Pro- 
fessor Ransom in the management of the school until his death. lie was a 
popular and able instructor and gave promise of a brilliant future. 

We quote from a notice of his death published in a Middletown paper: 



106 . NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

"He was a person of above the ordinary height, well made and manly; his 
countenance indicated great mildness. He was diffident to excess, seldom 
mingled in general conservation, but to his intimate associates he evinced a 
playfulness of humor which they ■^v'ill never forget. He had a quick sense of 
the beautiful in nature and art, was proficient in music and drawing. With 
all these qualities (and those who knew Dunbar as we knew him, will accord 
to him the possession of them) he was humble as a child. He was a firm be- 
liever in revealed religion, and exemplified by his whole life the sincerity of 
his faith. To our narrow vision, the premature departure of our friend is in- 
scrutable; but, we know the hand which hath taken away, and it becomes 
us to bow in reverential submission.' ' 

PHHJP EASTMAN. 

Philip Eastman son of John Langdon and Mary (Osgood) Eastman, was 
born in Fryeburg, Me., November 2.3, 1S05, and died there January 16, 1893. 

He prepared for college at the Fryeburg Academy and entered the " A.L.S. 
& M. Academy" in 1821, graduating in 1824. 

He engaged in the mercantile business in Frj-eburg from 1828, until 1870, 
when he removed to Lowell, Mass., and retned from active business. He re- 
turned to Fryeburg in 1880, where he made his home until his death. 

He was married in Concord, N. H., January, 1837, to Martha Lovejoy, 
who died in 1884. SLx children were born to them: Susan Elizabeth, born 
October 31, 1838, married Mr. W. H. Abbott, resides Fryeburg, Me.; Katherinc 
Lovejoy, born September 28, 1841, married Mr. Nathaniel Randall, resides 
West Medford, Mass.; Charles yWarren Lovejoj^, born August, 1844, died in 
Lowell, Mass., about 1860; Philip Henry, born July, 1846, died in Los Angeles, 
Cal., about 1890; William Ardmore, born January 8, 1850, resides Brooklyn 
N. Y.;'Ellen Buswell,'born'Octobev'22,'l8.36,'residcs'North Conway, N. H. 

BENJAMIN EDINGS. 

Benjamin Edings, son of Joseph and Sarah (Scott) Edings, and brother 
of William Edings, '28, and Joseph Edings, '28, was born in St. Helena Island, 
S. C, in 1804, and died in Aiken, S. C, May 10, 1863. 

In 1819, his parents removed to Edisto Island where he attended the local 
schools.' He prepared for college in the Beaufort, S. C, school and entered 
the "Academy' ' in 1825, and graduated in 1828. 

He engaged in planting, making his home in Edisto Island, Augusta, 
Ga., and Aiken, S. C. 

He was twice married : first, about 1830, to Charlotte Porcher Chisolm 
of Charleston, S. C, who died about 1840; no children. He was married the 
second time to Susan Anthonj^ of Augusta, Ga. Three children were born to 
them : William, Julian, and Mar}^ who married A. Flint Porrott of Aiken, S. C. 

JOSEPH EDINGS. 

Joseph Edings, son of Joseph and Sarah (Scott) Edings and brother 
of Benjamin and William Edings, class of 1828, was born in St. Helena Island, 
S. C, and died at Chappells, S. C, in 1867. 

In 1819, his parents removed to Edisto Island, where he attended the 
local schools. He entered the "Academy" in 1825, and graduated in 1828. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 107 

He engaged extensively in planting, making his home at Aiken and 
Chappells, S. C. 

He was twice married : first, in 1830, to Abigail Seabrook of Edisto Island, 
who died in 1858. Two children were born to them: Ella, married Col. 
Thomas G. White, died in 1857; Martha Phoebe, married Col. Thomas G. 
White, died in Beaufort, S. C, in 1910. He was again married to Adelaide 
Fripp of St. Helena Island, S. C, who died at Aiken, N. C, in 1863. One 
child was born to them: Charlotte Adelaide, born in 1860, married Lewis 
Beard, Esq., resides at Blackburn, England. 



WILLIAM EDINGS. 

William Edings, son of Joseph and Sarah (Scott) Edings, and brother 
of Joseph Edings, '28, and Benjamin Edings, '28, was born in St. Helena 
Island, S. C, January 15, 1809, and died in Edisto Island, 8. C, November 4, 
1858. 

In 1819, his parents removed to Edisto Island, whei'e he attended the 
local schools. He entered the "Academy" in 1825, and graduated in 1828. 
He engaged in planting in Edisto Island until his death. He was a Democrat 
in politics; represented his district in the House of Representatives. He 
was a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

He was twice married: first in 1836, to Sarah Ann Mikell of Edisto 
Island, who died in 1836. Two children were born to them: Charlotte 
Porcher, born October 18, 1832, married E. C. Bailey, died December 20, 
1909; Joseph, born March 10, 1834, died May 10, 1896. 

He was again married February 14, 1844, to Hess Marion Waring Smith 
of Charleston, S. C, who died March 1, 1905. Nine children were born to 
them: Juliet Ann, born December 22, 1847, resides Edisto Island; William 
Seabrook, born September 1, 1850, resides Edisto Island; David Scott, born 
September 23, 1851. resides in Edisto Island. Six children died in childhood 
and infancy: Horace Waring, William Seabrook, Hess Marion, James Henry, 
Josephine Amelia and one infant. 



ALFRED PIERMONT EDWARDS. 

Alfred P. Edwards, son of Hon. Henry Waggaman and Lydia (Miller) 
Edwards, was born in New Haven, Conn., August 17, 1810, and died in New 
York City, January 8, 1857; was buried in New Haven. 

He attended the schools of his city and entcn-ed the "Academy" in 1825, 
graduating in 1827. 

He then engaged in business. About 1830, he went to Manila, P. I., 
as a clerk for Peel, Hubbell & Co., bankers, and soon became a partner. In 
1855, gave up his business interests and traveled extensively in Europe and 
in 1857, located in New York. He was very successful in business and ac- 
quired a large fortune. He served as United States Consul at Manila, P. I., 
for several years. 

He was married May 14, 1851, to Mary (Jriswold, daughter of Nathaniel 
L. Griswold, a merchant in China. She survived him many years. 



108 iSIORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

WILLIAM JOHNSON EDWARDS. 

William J. Edwards, son of Col. .John Stark and Louisa Maria (Morris) 
Edwards, was born in Warren, Ohio, December 26, 1811, and died in Youngs- 
town, Ohio, May 17, 1901. 

In 1816, the family removed to CoitsvUle, from which town he entered 
the "Academy" in 1826, and gi-aduated in 1828. Owing to deafness, he was 
prevented from engaging in active business pursuits. He engaged in farm- 
ing in Mesopotamia, Ohio, 1835-1848, and inYoungstown 1848 to about 1885. 
He was a man of high character, of fine intellect and had remarkable Hterary 
tastes. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

He was married October 2, lS39,to Mary, daughter of Dr. Hemy Manning 
of Youngstown, Ohio. She died July 16, 1900. One daughter was born 
to them; Louisa Maria, born March 27, 1859, resides in Youngstown, Ohio. 

BENJAMIN SULLIVAN ELLIS. 

Benjamin S. Ellis, son of Benjamin and Deborah (Murdock) Ellis, was 
born in South Carver, Mass., May 10, 1809, and died in Monmouth, Me., 
September 17, 1887. 

He entered the "Academy' ' in 1826, and graduated in 1829. He engaged 
in business in South Carver, Mass., until May, 1837, when he removed to 
Monmouth, Me., where he made his home until his death. Here he engaged 
in farming many years. He was a Democrat in politics, and held many 
offices. 

He was married in September, 1836, to Mary Anne Storms of Sandwich, 
(now Bourne) Mass., who died about 1893. Three children were born to 
them: Benjamin, born August 8, 1839, resides Monmouth, Me.; Charles 
Clinton, born June 7, 1842, resides Sterling, Neb.; Mary Deborah, born 
April 4, 1848, married Mr. Lev\as Holmes, resides in Monmouth, Me. 

CURTIS ABEL EMERSON, A. B. 

Curtis A. Emerson, son of Thomas and Lucy (Curtin) Emerson, was born 
in Norwich, Vt., February 4, 1810. and died unmarried in Saginaw, Mich., 
February 11, 1880. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1821, 
and remained until 1824. He graduated A. B. from the University of Ver- 
mont in 1830. He presented that Institution the old chai)el bell. 

He is said to have resided in Green Bay, Wis., 1830-36. In April of the 
last year, he located in Detroit, Mich., and was agent for a land company, 
travelling through Michigan, Wisconsin and west of the Mississippi River. 
He then engaged in brewing malt liquors, being the first brewer in the State. 
He engaged in mining for copper during 1845 and 1846. In December, 1846, 
he gave up his brewing business and located in Saginaw, Mich., and on July 
4, 1847, removed to East Saginaw, being the first resident of the town, which 
he named Buena Vista, in honor of General Taylor's victory in Mexico. 
He engaged in the manufacture of lumber in Buena Vista until 1856, meeting 
with success. He then engaged in the real estate business imtil about 1863 
He acquired a large property but soon after 1863, he met with heavy reverses. 

He loaded the first schooner with lumber sent from Saginaw and built 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 109 

the first ferry boat. For years he was the most prominent citizen of his town, 
and aided in all, projects for the advancement of the public good. He was 
the first supervisor of Buena Vista, serving several years. He was a member 
of the State Pioneer Society. 

MIDSHIPMAN THOMAS LOCK EMERSON, U. S. N. 

Thomas L. Emerson, son of Thomas and Mary (I^ock) Emerson, was born 
in Norwich, Vt., March 3, 1810, and died at sea in 1836. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1821, 
and graduated in 1823. He was appointed a midshipman March 4, 1823; 
resigned November 24, 1825. 

He was then engaged on sailing vessels until his death. 

JOHN CONELLY EYRE, A. M. 

John C. Eyre, son of Manuel and Anne Louise (Connelly) Eyre, was 
born in Philadelphia, Pa., September 27, 1811, and died there in 1849. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1S2G, 
and graduated in 1828. He then entered the University of Pennsylvania, 
and graduated A. B. in 1832; later received the degree of A. M. in course; 
was a member of the "Zelo' ' Society at the University of Pensylvania. 

He engaged as supercargo and agent for his father in South Ameri(;an 
trade until his death. 

COMMODORE EBENEZER FARRAND, C. S. N. 

Ebenezer Farrand was appointed a midshipman, U. S. N , March 4, 1823; 
and served on the West Indies squadron until 1825, when he obtained a leave 
of absence. He entered the "Academy' ' the same year and graduated in 1827. 

He was promoted passed midshipman, March 23, 1829; Heutenant, March 
3, 1831; commander July 10, 1854. His service during, 1827-60, was as follows: 
on the sloop, Lexington, Mediteri-anean station, 1828-29; on leave, 1830 and 
1831; in command schooner Oriel, in the Gulf of Mexico,1832 and 1833j waiting 
orders 1834; on receiving ship New ForA:, at Norfolk, Va., 1835; on leave of 
absence, 1836-37; on the Independence, Brazil, 1838-40; sloop OnUirio, West 
Indies, 1840-41; on duty at the Navy Yard, Pensacola, Fla., 1841-43; in com- 
mand of the steamer General Taylor, 1844; waiting orders, 1845-47; in com- 
mand schooner Flirt, home squadron, 1848-49; 0/iio, Pacific squadron, 18.50; 
waiting orders, 1851-54; on duty at the Navy Yard, Pensacola, Fla., 1855 and 
18.56; in command sloop Falmouth, Brazil station, 1857-60. 

On June 21, 1861, he resigned his conunission in the Navy and on March 
26, 1861, entered the service of the Conftnlerate government as conunandcr; 
was commissioned captain May 23, 1864; and later,was promoted commodore. 

He commanded the naval batteries at Drewry's Bluff in ihv, engagcnxHit 
with the Federal fleet in April, 1862. On May 15, 1862, he connnanded the 
Confederate fleet in an attack on the Federal ships at City Point on the James 
River. He received a vote of thanks from the Confederate Congress for the 
"great and signal victory achieved by his fleet over tlu; naval forces of the 



110 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

United States in the engagement of May 15, 1862." He served as one of the 
board appointed by the Confederate government to purchase and contract for 
the building of ten gun boats. 

In 1864, he was transferred from Selma, Ala., to relieve Admiral Buchanan 
of the command of the Confederate fleet at Mobile. He continued in com- 
mand of the naval forces in the Alabama waters until May 10, 1865, when he 
was forced to surrender his fleet to Rear Admiral H. K. Thatcher, U. S. N. 

HON. DARWIN A. FIXXEY, A. B. 

Darwin A. Finney, son of Col. Le\a and Orpha (Clark) Finney, and 
brother of Hanibal H. Finney, '39, was born in Shrewsbmy, Vt., August 11, 
1811, and died in Brussels, Belgium, Augu.st 25, 1868. 

He entered the "Academy' ' in 1833, remaining three years; was a student 
at Middlebxn-y College, 1836-39. In this last year, his parents removed to 
Meadville, Pa., where he entered Allegheny College, gi'aduating A. B. in 1840. 
He studied law with Hiram L. Richmond of Meadville, and was admitted to 
the Crawford County bar, December 13, 1842; was admitted to the Supreme 
Court of the State; practiced his profession in Mead\'ille from 1842 until 
1867, becoming one of the leading attorneys in Pennsylvania. 

In 1857, he was one of the incorporators and directors of the INIeadville 
Railroad Co. He was a Republican in politics and held several positions; 
represented his district in the House of Representatives, two terms; was 
state senator, two terms; served as Congressman from the 25th congressional 
district from March 4, 1867 until his death In the spring of 1868, he went 
to Europe for his health and died in Brussels, Belguim. 

He married Marion Johns, who died several years ago; no children. 

REV. THEOPHILIIS FISKE. 

Theophilus Fiske, son of the Rev. Abel and Sarah (Putnam) Fiske, was 
born in Wilton, N. H., December 4, 1801, and died in New York in 1867. 

He attended the schools of his town, and entered the " Academj'" in 1821, 
graduating in 1823. 

He studied for the Universalist ministry and was ordained in 1823. He 
soon became prominent in the chm'ch. He was the first to establish the Uni- 
versalist Church in Washington, D. C; was also pastor of churches in various 
sections of the country. 

He became prominent in Uterary circles; edited papers in Charleston,. 
S. C, New York City, Baltimore, Md., Utica, N. Y., and Portsmouth Va. 
He was a popular lecturer. In 1851, he delivered many lectiu-es in England and 
Ireland. Just before his sudden death, he had completed and arranged 
several volumes of his work on theological and philosophical subjects, for the 
printer. The works were to have been printed in England. He also left a 
manuscript for a book entitled the Philosophy of Evil. 

He was a member of the Masonic and the I. O. O. F. lodges. He was mar- 
ried April 26, 1851, to Susan, daughter of Judge Justin Dwinell of Caze- 
novia, N. Y. She died November 30, 1878. Two children were born to 
them: Louise, born February 2, 1852, married Mr. Gilbert E. Bryson; John 
Dwinells, born September 4, 1853, now a physician in Baltimore, Md. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



Ill 



COL. OLIVER DUKE FITTS. 

Oliver D. Fitts, son of Henry and Sallie (Duke) Fitts, was born in Warren 
Co., N. C, October 3, 1807, and died on his plantation in Warren County, 
February 28, 1854. 

He attended the schools of his county and entered the "Academy" in 
1825, graduating in 1828. 

Soon after graduatin";, he settled on his plantation ^\'hich he managed until 
his death. He was noted for his hospitality and his kindness to the poor. He 
was prominent in politics and represented his county in the State Legislature in 
1842; but owing to feeble health was forced to give up his political affairs. He 
served as colonel of the state militia for several years, and was justice of. the 
peace (Magistrate) for many years. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge 
and was buried by them. 

He was married April 15, 1828, to Harriet Elizabeth Ann Collins, sister of 
William F. CoUins, '28; she died in 1858. Ten children were born to them: 
Betsey, born May 3, 1831, died August 17, 1831 ; Henry, born October 27, 1832, 
died November 13^ 1862; Sallie Duke, born March 20, 1835, died July 28, 1836; 
Olivia Duke, born March 10, 1837, married Mr. W. C. Drake, died January 26, 
1892; Francis Michael, born May 8, 1841, resides Rocky Mt., N. C; Tempe 
Louisa, born February 1, 1843, died May 12, 1843; Harriet Ann, born October 
26, 1844, married Mr. Benjamin R. Arrington, died October 14, 1902; Mary 
Drake, born May 12, 1848, resides Ridgeway, N. C; George Collins, born 
October 15, 1849, resides Roanoke Rapids, N. C; Oliver Duke, born July 1, 
1852, died August 8, 1860. 

HON. RYLAND FLETCHER. 



Ryland Fletcher, youngest son of 
Dr. Asaph and Sally (Green) Fletcher, 
was born in Cavendish, Vt., February 
18, 1799, and died there December 19, 
1885. He attended the schools of 
his town and entered the "Academy' ' 
in 1823, graduating in 1824. 

In 1836, he went West; but after 
a few months spent in a vain quest of 
fortune, he ^returned [to] Cavendish, 
where he made his home until hi-^ 
death. He became active as an ant i- 
slavery man as early as 1837, and wa.-- 
the intimate associate of Garrison, 
Giddings, and John P. Hale in llieir 
work for the cause. In 1854, the prac- 
tical fusion, through the action of the 
state committees, of the Whigs with 
the Free Soilers and Liberty party 
men resulted in his selection as candi- 
date for lieutenant-governor and his 
election to this office in 1854 and 
1855. He distinguished [himself as 




Hon.JRyland Fletcher 



112 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

the presiding officer of the senate and in 1856 was nominated by the 
Republicans for the chief magistracy, to which he was elected by a majority 
of 23,121 over Henry Keyes, Democrat. He was re-elected the next year 
with a Jarger majority. He retired from office, after trying responsibili- 
ties, with the general agreement that his record had been a clean and 
creditable one. He was again called to the public service in 1861-62, when 
his town sent him to the legislature to give the weight of his reputation 
and influence, as well as his ability and experience, to the war measures of the 
State. Here he exerted a powerful influence. He was also a member of the 
Constitutional Convention of 1S70, and strongly favored the policy of biennial 
elections. He was several times a presidential elector and a delegate to Re- 
publican national conventions. He was, at an early date, identified with the 
temperance movement, and gave many lectures and was for several years 
president of the State Temperance Society. He was early identified with the 
militia of the state, ha\'ing passed through the different grades from private 
to brigadier general. This last office he resigned in 1836. 

He was married June 11, 1829, to Mary Ann, daughter of Eleazer May of 
Westminster; she died May 12, 1876. Three children were bom to them: 
Addison, born 1834, died in 183.5; Ann May, born February IS, 1835, died 
May 25, 1860; Henrj^ Addison, born December 11, 1839, became lieutenant- 
governor of Vermont, and died in 1895 at Proctorsville, Vt. 



HON. MARTIN MONROE FLINT. 

Martin M. Flint, son of General Martin Flint, was born in Randolph, Vt., 
February 27, 1816, and died in Pittsburg, Kansas, August 25, 1897, was buried 
in Girard, Kansas. 

He prepared for college at the Orange County Grammar School and en- 
tered the "Academy' ' in 1837, graduating in 1834. 

In 1848, he located in Plymouth, Sheboj-gan County, Wis., where here- 
sided, engaged in farming, until 1870, when he removed to Gifard, Kansas. 
In 1885, he located in Elsinore, Cal., where he made his home until 1891. He 
then removed to Pittsburg, Kansas, where he resided until his death. He was 
at first a Democrat in politics and later a Republican. He took an active part 
in the politics in Wisconsin; served as register of deeds, Sheboygan Count}', 
1860-70. 

On the breaking out of the Ciiil War, he assisted in raising a company for 
the 40th Wisconsin Volunteers, for the service,and served from April 20th until 
July 6, 1861. He re-enlisted in 60th Wisconsin Vohmteers; but was unable to 
pass the examinations, ov\dng to physical disability. He was a member of the 
Episcopal Church; G. A. R., and Grange. 

He was married, March 16, 1842, at Bethel, Vt.,to Eliza Grover Chase of 
Randolph, Vt., who died February 1, 1891. Five children were born to them: 
Charles Munroe, born August 3, 1845, resides San Jose, Cal.; Fay Grover, born 
August 5, 1854, resides Kelsey\alle, Cal.; Dudley Chase, born October 28, 1857, 
resides Girard, Kan.; George Fremont, born March 6, 1860, died February 2, 
1876; Mary Asenath, born December 6, 1847, married Christian Hitz, died 
February 10, 1879. 



.SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



11:3 



EDWARD FORBES. 

Edward Forbes, eldest son of Hon. Abner and Sally (Spooner) Forbes, was 
born in Windsor, Vt., March 22, 1808, and died in California in 1850, while 
there on a visit. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1821, 
and graduated in 1824. He engaged in the grocery business in Windsor until 
his death. 

He was married Nov(!mber 2, 1829, to Abby I^. Pomeroy of Windsor. 
Three children were born to thcin: Edward, Jr., Thomas Pomeroy, and Sarah, 
who married Mr. Robert DcLong, resides in Boston, Mass. 



WILLIAM CRARY FOX, M. D. 

William C. Fox, eldest son of Dr. John and Mary (Crary) Fox, was born 
in Wallingford, Vt., July 4, 1811, and died there May 23, 1880. 

After preparing for college, he 
entered the University in 1826, and 
remained two years. 

He then commenced the studj^of 
medicine in his father's office; at- 
tended lectures at the Castleton Medi- 
cal College and graduated in 1830. 
After practicing his profession in 
Danby, Vt., for a short time, he re- 
turned to Wallingford and continued 
his practice for nearly fifty years. 

He represented the town in the 
State Legislature in 1852 and 1853. 

He took an active interest in 
military affairs; was for many years 
an officer in the state militia, and was 
considered an expert in military 
t actics, being often called upon to in 
struct companies in the drill. 

He was twice married: first, May 
8, 1834, to Sophronia Sparhawk of 
Wal pole, N. H., who died June 29, 

1837. One daughter was born to Dr. V^^illiam Crary Fox. 

them, Harriet Sophronia, now Mrs. Philip H. Emerson of Ogden, Utah. 
He was married again September 3, 1860, to Helen M. Sherman of Walling- 
ford, who died June 9, 1864. Two children were born to Ihem: .lohn, born in 
1861, died 1863 and Helen, born 1863, died 1864. 




PROF. JOHN FRIES FRAZER, LL. D. 

John F. Frazer, son of Robert and Elizabeth (Fries) Frazer, and half 
brother of Robert Frazer, '38, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., July 8, 1812, 
and died there October 12, 1872. 

He attended the schools of his city and entcr(!d the "Academy" in 1824, 
remaining two years; was a student in the Rev. S. B. Wylie's celebrated 



114 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



Classical School, Philadelphia, 1826-28. He entered the junior class of the 
University of Pennsylvania in 1828, and graduated A. B. in 1830, sharing 
the first honors with James Clark. During his coUege course, he was assistant 
to professor A. D. Bache in the first accurate observations of variations in 
the magnetic decUnation in the United States. He studied law with Jonathan 
M. Scott, 1830-33, and was admitted to the bar in Philadelphia, 1833; also 
studied medicine in the Medical Department of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

He was one of the two assistants in 1836-37, to Prof. Henry D. Rogers, 
director of the State Geological Survey; was professor of Natural Philosophy 
in the high school of Philadelphia,'_1842-44; professor in the Franklin Institute, 

1850-66; was vice-provost of the 
University of Pennsylvania, 1855-68; 
professor of Natural Philosophy and 
Chemistry in University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1844-72. 

He was a thoroughly well ground- 
ed classical scholar, as well as a learned 
and always learning scientific man. 
He w^as courageous, frank, and loyal 
with an incisive wit, which only the 
WTong doer had occasion to fear, and 
a sense of humor which made his 
conversation as delightful as it was 
instructive. He was a member of 
the Episcopal church; American Philo- 
sophical Society and its vice- 
president, 1855-58; one of the in- 
corporators of the National Academy 
of Sciences, Washington. 

He wrote many articles for the 
magazines and papers; was editor of 
the Journal of the Franklin Institute, 
Prof. John Fries Frazer. 1850-66; author of numerous treati- 

ses on light, heat, electricity, mechanics, and the steam engine. He received 
the degree of LL. D. from Harvard University in 1857; and the degree of 
Ph. D., from Lewi.sburg University in 1854. 

He was married September 1, 1838, to Charlotte Jeffers Cave of Phila- 
delphia, who died August 19, 1881. Three children were born to them: 
Anne, born July 24, 1839, married the Rev. Thomas Kittera Conrad, resides 
1711 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa.; Sarah, born February 17, 1841, 
married Richard Lewis Ashurst, resides 321 So. 11th Street, Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Presifor, born July 24, 1844, graduated from the University of Pennsylvania 
1862, and decorated by the French Government with the golden palms 
of the Academy; died April 7, 1909; was awarded in 1882 the degree of Docteur 
of Sciences Naturelles, after public examination by the French government, 
being the first, not a native of France, to whom it was granted. 




SKETCHES ACADEMY OF CADETS. 



115 



r 



'f'? 



w- 




COMMANDER THOMAS WILLIAM FREELON, U. S. N. 

Thomas W. Freelon, son of Thomas WilUam Freelon, a capitalist, was 
born in New York City, in 1798, and died there May 10, 1847. 

He was appointed a midship- 
man June 12, 1812; promoted lieu- 
tenant March 28, 1820 and saw service 
in the West Indies, against the pirates 

that infested the waters of the "• <. 

Spanish Main. He entered the i& 

"Academy" in 1821, and graduated 
in 1823. He was commissioned com- 
mander, September 8, 1841, and was 
given command of the U. S. S. Preble, 
on the African Station and took an 
active part in suppressing the slave 
trade. He contracted the African 
fever that seriously impaired his 
health. 

He was a man of much cul- 
ture and greatly interested m in- 
troducing naval reforms. He served 
as trustee of the University during, 
1843-47. 

He was married to Lydia Emer- 
son, daughter of John Emerson of 
Norwich. Three children were born Commander Thomas William Freelon., U.S. N 

to them: Sidney died in infancy; Thomas William (q. v.); and Ann, who 
married Eugene Hotclikiss, resides in Milwaukee, Wis. 



PETER WILDER FREEMAN. 

Peter W. Freeman, son of Capt. 
James and Sally (Coleman) Freeman, 
was born in Boston, Mass., Decem- 
ber 13, 1809 and died there May 1 1 
1869. 

He prepared for college in the 
schools of his city and entered the 
"Academy" in 1823, graduating in 
1825. 

In 1831, he was elected secn^tary 
of the Bo.ston Insurance Company 
in which cai)acity he served until 
lSr)l, when he was elected president 
and contiimctl in that office until his 
death. He made a specialty of marine 
underwriting and adjusting marine 
losses, becoming an expert in that_line 
of insuran(;e. He took an active in- 
terest in the public affairs of his city, 
but never held any office. He met 
with marked success in his business. 




Peter Wilder Freeman. 



116 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

He was a njember of the Brattle street Unitarian Church. 

He was married October 2, 1833, to Frances Aime, daughter of John 
Dorr, of Boston. She died February 24, 1888. Eight children were born 
to them: Frances Louisa, born June 18, 1834, married William C. Oliver, 
died June 11, 1858; Anne Florence, born January 14, 1836, died August 8, 
1883; Charles Chauncey, born July 25, 1837, died April 25, 1839; Susan, 
born May 7, 1840, married Richard B. LawTence, resides in New York; 
Horace Vinton, born August 22, 1842, died March 2, 1894; Peter Wilder, 
born February 4, 1844, died July 3, 1863; Marion Goldthwaite, bom September 
23, 1847, died November 14, 1866; James Goldthwaite, born August 24, 
1849, resides in Boston. 

JOHN GAYLORD. 

John Gaylord, son of Capt. Samuel and Polly Pons (Starr) Gaylord, 
was born in Middleto-mi, Conn., August 14. 1810, and died unmarried, at the 
Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa., September 26, 1880. 

He served as master in the United States Navy for several years. 

He is survived by a sister, Mrs. Haniette N. G. Warner, who resides 
in North Brookfield, Mass. 

MAJ. SAMUEL KNOX GEORGE. 

Samuel K. George, son of Archibald and Isabella (Knox) George, was 
born in Baltimore, Md., September 11, 1809, and died there June 31, 1871. 
He prepared for college in the schools of his city, and entered the "Academy" 
in 1827, and graduated in 1830; received the degree of A. M., from the LTniversity 
in 1842. 

He was engaged in the drj' goods busi- 
ness in Baltimore, from 1830-1860, when he 
retired from active business. He met v\dth 
marked success in his business ventures and 
acquired a large property. He traveled ex- 
tensively in Em-ope; was much interested in 
art and possessed a fine art collection and 
library. 

He was much interested in miUtaiy 
matters; served as a Ueutenant in the Eutaw 
Infantry Co., Md., Mihtia, October 12, 1835- 
1880; was commissioned major in 1840 and 
served on the staff of Gen. George H. 
Stuart. 

He was a 32° Mason and a member of 
Maj. Samuel Knox George. the Maryland Historical Society. 

He was married July 20, 1830, to Ehzabeth Lord of Rutland, Vt., who died 
June 1, 1837. 

Thi-ee children were born to them: Arcliibald, born June 28, 1831, died 
June 30, 1873; Ehzabeth, born October 19, 1833, died May 26, 1834; Samuel 
Knox, born May 12, 1836, resides Baltimore, Md. He was again married 
January 29, 1839, to Sophia Hanson Finley of Baltimore, who died February 
22, 1870. No children. 




SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 117 

CAPT. NORMAN PAGE GIGNILLIAT. 

Norman P. Gignilliat, son of Gilbert and Mary (McDonald) Gignalliat, 
was born at the Ai-dock Plantation, near Darien, Ga., October 28, 1809, and 
died in Marietta, Ga., January 21, 1871. 

He prepared for college, 1816-20, in a school conducted by Josiah Dunham 
in Windsor, Vt. He entered the "Academy" in 1820, and remained until 
1824, when he was obliged to return home to look after his large property, 
which was being squandered by a dishonest guardian; was distinguished 
at the "Academy" for his scholarship and his athletic abiUty. 

On his return home, he found conditions that would have discouraged 
an experienced business man; but^though^only a boy, he showed he had 
remarkable business abiUty. He had another guardian appointed and at once 
began to straighten out his business affairs. When eighteen years of age, he 
assumed full control of his property and was appointed his brother's guardian. 
After a few years of hard work, he cleared his estate of indebtedness. 

He pmxhased a fine plantation, "Windy HiH"five miles from Darien, but 
soon removed to Darien. He constantly added land to his plantation until 
it was one of the largest in the State, containing over 10,000 acres. Dm-ing 
the Civil War, he bought a plantation near Quitman, Brooks county, Ga., 
so he would be further from the seat of war. He owned a large share of Ross- 
well factory at Roswell, which was burned as well as his home by the United 
States troops. At the close of the war, he became a comparatively poor man, 
and removed to Marietta, Ga., where he resided imtil his death. He was an 
extensive slave owner, but was a kind master. A few years after the war, 
his former slaves bought his plantation, Ardock. He took great interest in 
military affairs; served as captain of the Mcintosh Guards. On the breaking 
out of the Civil War, he was forced to resign his commission, as he was unable 
to perform active duty on the field, owing to his great weight. He equipped 
the Mcintosh Guards for service in the War. 

He was married December 30, 1835, to his cousin, Caroline Barbara 
GigniUiat, who died May 10, 1836. No cliildren. He was married the 
second time, February 14, 1838, to Charlotte Gignilliat Trezevant, who sur- 
vives him and resides at the Marietta home. Eleven children were born 
to them: Norman Gilbert, born December 3, 1838, resides in Marietta, Ga.; 
Caroline Barbara, born February 13, 1841, married Rev. John F. Morrall, 
died 1906; John Trezevant, born March 31, 1843, died October 28, 1853; 
Mary Charlotte, born May 21, 1845, married Mr. Charles O. S. Mallard, 
resides in Darien, Ga.; Margaret Helen, born March 12, 1847, married James 
Edward Holmes, resides in Marietta, Ga.; William Henry, born June 25, 
1849, died November 26, 1853; Elizabeth Catherine, born June 19, 1851, 
married Mr. Olivius F. Bacon, died June 6, 1887; George Warren,born Jan. 
17, 18.54, resides Seneca, S. C; Robert Cooper, born April 5, 1856, resides 
Perry S. C; John Farquhar, born August 28, 1858, resides in Marietta, Cia.; 
Charlotte Trezevant, born December 20, 1800, died June 11, 1802. 

JUDGE JASPER WILLETT GILBERT. 

Jasper W. Gilbert, son of Marinus Willett Gilbert and brother of Horatio 
Ciates Gilbert, '37, was born in Rome, N. Y., February 15, 1812, and died in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., February 10, 1881. 



118 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his city and at the Lowville and 
Watertown, N. Y., Academies. He entered the "Academy" in 1830, and 
graduated in 1832. He studied law vnth Abraham Varick of Utica, 1833-34, 
and with Frederick Whittlesey of Utica, 1834-35, being admitted to the bar in 
the latter year; practiced_his profession in Rochester, 1835-51, New York City, 
1851-65, 1883-90. He was one of the most prominent la^\yers of the state, and 
took part in many noted trials. 

He was at first a Whig in politics and later a Democrat, and held many 
positions; was the first city attorney of Rochester, New York, 1839-40; repre- 
sented his district in many county and state conventions. He was elected 
judge on the Supreme Bench of the second judicial district in November, 1865; 
and served until 1883, when he retired, having reached the constitutional age 
limit of seventy years. He gained prominence in 1882 in adjudging seventeen 
aldermen of the city of Brooklyn guilty of contempt of court for violating an 
injunction order. His opinion in this case has often been quoted for its learning 
and for the inflexibility with which he punished those who disregarded the order 
of the court. He made his home in Brooklyn, N. Y., from 1851 until his death. 

He was an active member of the Episcopal Chirrch, serving for many j^ears 
on the standing committee of the Episcopal diocese of Long Island; was vice- 
chancellor of the Garden City Cathedral; church club; Brooklyn and Hamilton 
Clubs; Long Island Historical Society; was president of the Greenwood Ceme- 
tery Association of Brooklyn for many years. 

He was married in 1845, to Katherine A. Horn of New York City. Four 
children were born to them: William T., a lawyer in New Yoi'k City; James H., 
a lawyer in Atlanta, Ga.; Ellen G. and Louisa S. 

SAMUEL SHEPARD GILBERT. 

Samuel S. Gilbert, son of the Hon. Benjamin Joseph and Sarah (Shepard) 
Gilbert, was born in Hanover, N. H., December 25, 1803, and died in Cam- 
bridge, Mass., November 10, 1860. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1S20, and graduated in 1823. He then 
engaged in the mercantile business, making several voyages to the East Indies 
as a supercargo. He spent several years in England and then engaged in 
business in Boston until 1850, when he retired from active business. 

He was married in 1838, to Sarah Devereux of Salem. Mass., who died 
several years ago. He is survived by a son, Shepard Devereux, born July 28, 
1840, who graduated from Harvard in 1862, and now resides in Salem, INlass. 

WILLIAM BRADFORD GILBERT. 

William B. Gilbert was born in Rome, N.Y., in 1810, and died in Palmyra, 
N. Y., September 5, 1897. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1826, 
graduating in 1828. 

He was rodman on a proposed railroad from Canandaigua to Geneva, in 
1829; was assistant engineer, Mohawk & Hudson River R. R., under John B. 
Jervis, 1829-31; Saratoga & Schenectady R. R., 1831, and on its completion 
returned to the Mohawk & Hudson R. R. when the Albany branch was 
built; was assistant engineer on the New York & Harlem R. R. under Benja- 
min Wright, December, 1832, April-1834; Havana & Renan R. R. in Cuba, 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 11!) 

ISSf). He was assistant engineer on the New York & Erie R. R., and had 
charge of the east division from Piermont to Young's Gap in Sullivan Co., N. 
Y.; and after the completion of this road, early in 1836, was appointed chief 
engineer of the Buffalo & Aurora, and had charge of the location. He was city 
engineer, Buffalo, N. Y., 1836-37, and while holding this position was chief 
engineer of the Erie & Kalamazoo Railroad from Toledo, Ohio, to Adrian, 
Mich., which road was completed in the fall of 1836. He was division engineer 
in charge of surveys of the Illinois Central R. R., in the sixth judicial district 
in Illinois, from Galena to Hock River, a distance of 70 miles, 1837 until 1839, 
when the work was abandoned for the want of funds; was division engineer of 
the southern division of the Ogdensliurg & Lake Champlain, under Chief En- 
gineer Edward H. Broadhead, and located the road through the "John Brown 
tract,' ' now the Adirondack Wilderness, in 1840. He was chief engineer of the 
Champlain & Connecticut River R. R. (now the Burlington and Rutland), 
1845-49; was engineer of the Rutland & Burlington in 1849, and had charge of 
the surveys on the Missisquoi Valley R.R.from Lake Champlain to Derby Line, 
Vt., also from Swanton, Vt., to the iSt. LawTence River near Montreal, P. Q. 
He was chief engineer of the Western Vermont R. R. extending from Rutland 
to Manchester and from Manchester to Bennington, 18.50, to December 1, 1851; 
was chief engineer of the SjTacuse & Binghamton R. R. from May, 1852, 
until its completion, October 26, 1854; du)ing this time he made surveys of 
this road to Oswego; was chief engineer and superintendent of this road from 
1854 until April, 1857. He was chief engineer of a land grant railroad in Wis- 
consin, from the St. Croix River, near the Mississippi River, to Lake Superior, 
Wisconsin, 1858-59; was chief engineer in 1860 of the Watertown & Madison, 
also the Milwaukee & Watertown, from Columbus to Portage, 28 miles; also 
the road from Milwaukee to the junction with the Watertown R. R., 14 miles; 
also rebuilt the road, 6,600 feet, across Mud Lake, a very difficult engineering 
feat. He was chief engineer of the New York Central from 1866 until 1868; 
when he resigned to become chief engineer of the New York, Oswego & Mid- 
land R. R. He resigned this position in 1873, and soon retired from active 
engineering work; but was often called upon as consulting engineer in railroad 
compHcations. He made his home in Palmyra, N. Y. until his death. 

He was twice married: first, in 1833, to Mary C. Hubbell of New York 
City. Several children were born to them: the oldest son, Fred W., was for 
many years superintendent of a division of the Northern Pacific R."R., and 
resides at Spokane, Wash. He was again married in 1880, to Amelia Beckwith 
of Palmyra, who died April 23, 1909. 

JOHN WATKINSON GILL. 

John W. Gill, son of Samuel and Jane (Watkinson) Gill, was boi-n in 
Hartford, Conn., in 1811, and died in Gerard, 111., April 27, 1865; was buried 
in Franklin, 111. 

His parents removed to Middletown, Conn., where he attended the public 
schools. He entered the "Academy" in 1825, graduating in 1829. 

He resided in Alton, 111., from 1844 until 1848, when he removed to a farm 
near Girard, 111. Here he engaged in farming until 1865, when he removed to 
Girard, where he made his home until his death. He was a member of the 
Episcopal Church. 



120 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



He married Mrs. Elizabeth (Sturgiss) Hart of Ohio, who died May 18, 
1880. Five children were born to them: Sarah Ellen, resides in Quincy, 111.; 
Hannah Eliza, Martha Jane, Emma and John Henry. 

COMMODORE JAMES GLYNN, U. S. N. 

James Glynn was born in Pennsylvania about 1800, and died in New 
Haven, Conn., May 13, 1871. 

He was commissioned a midshipman, U. S. N. from Virginia, March 4, 
1815; was promoted lieutenant, Januar}^ 13, 182.5. 

He entered the" Academy" from Philadelphia, Pa. in 1821, and graduated 
in 1823. 

He served on an exploring expedition in 1829; with the Mediterranean 
Scjuatlron, 1830-34; on the receiving ship in New York, 1834-37. He com- 
manded the bark Consort, in an exploring expedition, 1837-40; was on coast 
survey duty in 1840. He was commissioned commander, September 8, 1841; 
served with the Pacific squadron, 1848-50; commanded the sloop Preble, Pacific 
Squadron, 1850-52; was stationed at the Bo.ston Navy Yard, 1852; was light- 
house inspector in 1853. He was commissioned captain, September 14, 1855; 
commanded the steam sloop Pensacola, in 1860; commanded the sloop Mace- 
donian, Mediterranean Squadron, in 1861. He was commissioned commodore, 
July 16, 18G2; was on special duty during 1864-65. 

CAPTAIN DAVID GOODALL. 

David Goodall, son of David and Peggy (Persis) Goodall, was born in 
Littleton, N. IL, December 29, 1804, and died in Bennington, Vt., September 7, 
1881. 

His father died in 1812, and he 
was obliged to make his own way in 
the world. Possessing a strong de- 
sire for an education, he studied 
evenings and all his time from work, 
> and was enabled to enter the "Acad- 

emy" in 1822. He graduated in 
1825, and for some years taught 
school. He also studied law with 
his uncle, Ira Goodall, of Bath, N. 
IL, but never practiced his profession. 
In 1830, he located in western 
Now York, w^here he engaged in 
\arious enterprises, meeting with suc- 
cess. In 1832, he returned East and 
engaged in the mercantile business, 
first, in St. Johnsbury, Center, Vt. 
In 1837, he moved is business to East 
St. Johnsbury. He retired from the 
mercantile business about 1860, and 
devoted hLs time to looking after his 
large land interests, financial invest- 
ments and- recreation, retaining his 
home in East St. Johnsbury until 



M ^^ 



'ii 




Capt. David Goodal , 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



121 



his death. Earlj' in the summer of 1881, he went to Saratoga, N. Y., 
for the benefit of the waters. He steadily failed, and in July he was prevailed 
upon by his son. Dr. F. W. Goodall, to go to his home where he remained 
until his death. He served for some years as captain of the Vermont State 
militia. 

He was at first a Whig in politics, and later a Democrat; was postmaster 
at East St. Johnsbury many consecutive years, without regard to changes in 
the political administration. 

He was twice married: first, to Adeline H. Page, who died March 7, 1838. 
Two children were born to them: Leon, born, April 17, 1835, accumulated a 
large property and died February 7, 1871, at his father's home; Frank West, 
born Ajiril 5, 1837, now a physician in Bennington, Vt. He was married the 
second time, May 25, 1839, to Mary E. McGregor, who died in 1873. Two 
children were born to them: George Ellyene, born in 1842, died February 6, 
1903; Inez, born in 1847, resides in St. Johnsbury. • 



WELLS GOODHUE. 



■^^mi^^ 



Wells Goodhue, son of Francis and Mary Ann (Brown) Goodhue, was 
born in Swanzey, N. H., December 19, 1803; and died in New York City, 
December 18, 1874. 

His parents removed to Brattleboro, Vt., in 1811, where he attended 
the public schools. He entered 
the "Academy" in 1821, and grad- 
uated in 1823. 

He was a director of the Old 
Bank of Brattleboro, and on its 
organization as the Vermont 
National Bank in 1863, continued 
as a director until his death; also 
served as president of this bank 
from March 31, 1869, until January 
13, 1874. He was a careful busi 
ness man and had excelhnit ad- 
ministrative ability. He acquii-ed 
a large property. He never sought 
or held public office. Soon after 
his retirement as president of the 
bank, he removed to New York 
city, and made his home with his 
daughter, Mrs. Draper, until his 
death. He was a member of the 
Congregational Church. 

He was married in 1829, to 
I^aura Barnard of Lancaster, N. H., Wells Goodhue, 

who died in 1874. Three children were born to them: Lucy Barnard, born 
in 1830, married the Rev. George B. Draper of New York, died 1903; 
Julia, born September 23, 1833, married Thomas Walto^r of New York, died 
October 1,1867; Charles Wells, born November 2, 1835, died in 1891. 




122 • NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

LOUIS ISAAC GOURDIN. 

Louis I. Gourdiu, son of Samuel and Mary (Doughty) Gourdin, was 
born in Buckhall, St. John's Parish, Berkley, S. C; Januarj- 29, 1809; and 
died of Asiatic cholera, in Cincinnati, Ohio, October, 24, 1832. 

He attended the schools of his parish and entered the "Acatlemy" in 
1823, graduating in 1828. He studied law in Charleston, S. C, and located 
in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1829, where he practiced his profession until his death. 
He met with marked success in his profession and gave promise of a brilliant 
career. 

WILLIAM DOUGHTY GOURDIN. 

William D. Gourdin, son of Samuel and Mary (Doughty) Gourdin, was 
born in Buckliall, St. John's Parish, Berkeley, S. C, July 4, 1807, and died 
in Aiken, S. C, July 1, 1836, of pulmonary disease. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his parish and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1823, graduating in 1826; studied medicine and practiced his pro- 
fession in St. John's Parish during 1829-36. 

He met ^\dth success in his profession and was noted for his benevolence. 
His practice was on the rice plantations along the banks of the Cooper River, 
and it is stated that the night was never so dark and rainy and the summer 
atmosphere of the rice swamp never so deadlj^ that he was deterred from 
the beflside of the sufferer, whether slave or master. The poor of the pine 
woods region were equally the objects of his care, without recompense. 

He was married in April, 1832, to EUinor EUzabeth, daughter of Bartho- 
lemew Gaillaird. Two children were born to them: Susan Dimnom and 
Henr}- (Jourdin, both dying in infancy.. 

COMMODORE JOHN HODGES GRAHAM, U. S. X. 

John H. Graham, son of John Andrew Graham, was born in Vermont, 
March 9, 1794, and died in Newbury, N. H., March 15, 1878. 

He was commissioned a midshipman, U. S. N., June 18, 1812. He sei-ved 
under Commodore Chauncey on Lake Ontario, taking part in the expedition 
against the British fort, near Black Rock, N. Y. He commanded Com- 
modore McDonough's flagship at the battle of Plattsburg, September 11, 1814; 
was promoted lieutenant, March 5, 1817. He entered the "Academy" in 
1827, taking a special course in Military Science and Tactics. He was promoted 
commander February 28, 1838; captain, March 7, 1849; was placed on the 
reserve list, September 13, 1855, and a commodore on the retired list, April 4, 
1867. 

COL. COGGSWELL KIDDER GREEN, A. M. 

Coggswell K. Green, son of Thomas H. and Betsey C. Green, was born in 
Putney, Vt., July 29, 1809, and died in Exeter, N. H., December 3, 1889. 

He attended the schools of his town, the Chesterfield, N. H., Academy 
and a school in Amherst, INIa^s. He entered the "Academy" in 1823, and 
graduated in 1826; received the degree of A. M. from the University in 1843. 

He went to Steubenville, Ohio, in 1828, and studied law with the Hon. 
John C. Wright, member of Congress; was admitted to the bar at Ravenna, 
August 3, 1830, and the the United States Supreme Court, Washington, D. C, 
January 6, 1846. He removed to Niles, Mich., in August 1830, and practiced 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



123 



his profession there until 1854, and in Washington, D. C, 1854-69. He 
retired from active practice in 1869 and removed to Exeter, N.H., where he 
resided until his death. He took an ac^tive part in the business affairs of 
Niles; in company with H. B. and G. 
W. Hoffman, he laid out the "Green 
& Hoffman" addition to Niles. 

He was a Democrat in politics, 
and held many offices; was the first 
judge of probate of Berrien County, 
Mich., also the first countj' clerk; was 
president of the Niles town council; 
rejiresented his county in the State 
Legislature; he was postmaster, 1835- 
1844; was fourth president of Niles; 
was delegate to the National Con- 
vention at Baltimore in 1850; \\:i> 
Collector of the Port of San Francisco, 
Cal., 1851-53. 

He took great interest in military 
affairs; was appointed colonel in the 
Michigan militia by Gov. Lewis Cass, 
and served for some years; also served 
in the Black Hawk War. 

He was a m.ember of the Episco • 
pal Church, and took a prominent 
part in establishing the church in Col. Coggswell Kidder Green. 

Niles, Mich., in 1834; was elected a vestryman and served until 1845; was 
the first lay delegate in 1840, to the convention of the diocese of Michigan. 

He was twice married : first. May 28, 1835, to Nancy A. Howard of Niles, 
Mich., who died February 19, 1843. Two daughters were born to them, 
who married and resided in Detroit, Mich., many years. He was again mar- 
ried November 23, 1854, to Sarah L. Lawrence of Exeter, N. TL, who died 
about 1880. 




MIDSHIPMAN EDWIN LANGDON GREENWOOD, U. S. N. 

Edwin L. Greenwood, son of Dr. William Pitt and Mary (Langdon) 
Greenwood, was born in Boston, Mass., in 1807, and died there March 4, 1865. 

He prepared for college at the Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and 
entered the "Academy" in 1821, graduating in 1824. 

He was appointed a midshipman, U. S. N., December 1, 1826; served on 
the frigate Iowa, was transferred in 1830 to the sloop-of-war Fairfield. He 
resigned his commis.sion May 30, 1833. 

He then studied dentistry with his father and practiced his profession in 
Boston until 1856, when he retired from active work. 



EDWARD THADDEUS GRISWOLD. 

Edward T. Griswold, son of Thaddeus and Esther (Phelps) Griswold, was 
born in Torrington, Conn., July 19, 1804, and died in Boston, Mass., June 10, 
1838. 



124 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1825, and graduated in 1826. He re- 
moved to Boston about 1828 and engaged in business until his death. He 
married Anna M., daughter of Charles Tappan, of Boston. A son, Charles 
Edward, "N. IT." '54, served as colonel of the 56th Massachusetts Volunteers 
during the Civil War. 

WILLIAM FAY GRISWOLD, A. B. 

\\'illiam F. Griswold, son of Judge William Adams and Mary (Fay) Gris- 
wold, was born in Danville, Vt., December 2, 1808, and died in Burlington, Vt., 
October 19, 1858. 

In 1810, his parents removed to Burlington, Vt., where he attended the 
public schools. He entered the "Academy" in 1821, remaining there until 
1824, when he entered the University of Vermont and graduated A. B. in 
1828; was a member of the "Owl Fraternity." He was cashier of the Bank of 
Burlington from 1828 until his death. 

He w^as married June 29, 1840, to Olive Rowena Clemens of Essex, Vt., 
who died September 11, 1908. Seven children were born to them: Mary Susan; 
William Albert, born September 19, 1843, resides Washington, D. C; Charles 
Demming, born September 21, 1845, master, U. S. N., died July 5, 1868; 
Hiram Follett; Susan Maria; Timothy Follett, born April 28, 1851, died in 
August, 1883; Carrie Maria, born July 12, 1853, resides in Bm-lington, Vt. 

LYMAN GUERNSEY. 

Lyman Guernsey, .son of Eldad and Sarah Perry (Lyman) Gm-nsey, was 
born in Rochester, Vt., July 12, 1799, and died in Galveston, Texas, about 1875. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1820, 
and graduated in 1824; was a student at Middlebury College, 1824-26. He 
taught school in North Carolina and later in Texas. For several years pre- 
vious to his death he resided in Galveston, Texas. 

RICHARD WEST HABERSHAM, M. D. 

Richard W. Habersham, son of the Hon. Richard Wylly Habersham, mem- 
ber of Congress from Georgia, 1839-42, and Sarah Hazzard (ElUott) Haber- 
sham, was born in Beaufort, S. C, January 1, 1808, and died in Savannah, or 
Fonsythe, Ga., about 1880. 

In 1810, his parents removed to Savannah, Ga., where he attended the 
pubUc schools. He entered the "Academy" in 1826, and graduated in 1828. 
He studied art in Paris for some time, and later studied medicine. 

He resided in Savannah, 1830-52; Beaufort, S. C, 1852-61; Clarendon, 
S. C, 1861-65; Savannah and Forsythe, Ga., 186.5-1880. He possessed con- 
siderable literary abiUty and wTote several beautiful poems. He was a mem- 
ber of the Episcopal Church. 

He was married about 1836, to Martha Jenkins Matthews of Charleston, 
S. C. Eight children were born to them: Susan Eliza, born in 1839, died in 
1904; Catherine, born in 1841, died in 1842; Richard EUiott, born in 1845, died 
in 1852; John Matthews, born in 1847, died in 1857; Edward Matthews, born 
in 1853; Mary, born in 1853; Martha, born in 1854; Catherine, born in 1858. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 125 

BVT. BRIG. GEN. PETER VALENTINE HAGNER, IT. S. A. 

Peter V. Hagner, son of Peter and Frances (Randall) Hagner, was bom 
in Washington, D. C, August 28, 1815, and died there March 11, 1893. He 
entered the "Academy" in 1828, and graduated in 1832; graduated from West 
Point in 1836 and was commissioned 2d heutenant, 1st Artillery,August 6, 1836; 
was promoted 2d lieutenant of Ordnance, July 9, 1838; 1st lieutenant, May 22, 
1840; captain, July 10, 1851; major, August 3, 1861; lieutenant colonel, June 1, 
1863; colonel, March 7, 1867; retired June 1, 1881. 

He served on topographical duty, July-September, 1836; in the Florida 
War, 1836-37; with field battery and on ordnance duty on the Canadian border 
during the Canadian Rebellion in 1838; conducted recruits to Wisconsin in 
1838; served at Sackett's Harbor, N. Y., and arsenal, Frankfort, Pa., in 1838; 
arsenal. Fort Momoe,Va., 1838-42; arsenal. North Carohna, 1842; inspector of 
small arms, 1842-45; assistant ordnance officer at the arsenal, Washington, 
D. C, 1845-46. 

He served during the Mexican War, 1846-47; took part in the seige of 
Vera Cruz, March 9-29, 1847, battle of Cerro Gordo, April 17-18, 1847; skir- 
mish of Amazoque,May 14, 1847; battle of Molino del Rey, September 8, 1847; 
battle of Chapultepec, September 13, 1847; assault and capture of the city of 
Mexico, September 13-14, 1847, being wounded at the San Cosmo Gate. 

He was engaged in professional work in Europe, 1848-49, inspecting labora- 
tories, manufacture of percussion caps, and procuring information upon the 
system of artillery, the armament and equipment of troops; on special duty at 
Washington, D. C., 1849; in command of the arsenal, Charleston, S. C. 1849- 
51; arsenal, Frankfort Pa., 1851-60; inspector of powder, 1851-55; member of 
Ordnance Board, March, 1854, January-1858, June, 1860; in command of the 
arsenal, Leavenworth, Kansas, 1860-61; arsenal, St. Louis , Mo., 1861. 

He served during the Civil War 1861-66; was inspector of contract arms 
and ordnance stores April 1861-63; member of the Ordnance Board, September, 
1863; in command of the Watervliet Arsenal, December, 1863-65; was a mem- 
ber of the board for trial of breech-loading arms, April-June, 1866. He was 
brevctted captain, April 18, 1847, for gallant and meritorious conduct in the 
battle of Cerro Gordo; major September 13, 1847, for gallantry in battle of 
Chapultepec; colonel and brigadier general March 13, 1865, for faithful and 
meritorious services in the Ordnance Department. 

GEORGE GIDEON HALE. 

George C. Hale, son of Elias White and Jean (Mulholland) Hale, was born 
in Lewiston, Pa., December 1, 1810, and died there January 11, 1837. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1825, graduating in 1828. He was a commission merchant in Lewis- 
ton until his death. 

He was married in 1835, to Elizabeth Bell of Philadelphia, Pa., who died in 
1888; no children. 

OSMER HALE. 

Osmer Hale, son of Gideon and Anna (Case) Hale, was born in Glaston- 
bury, Conn., October 14, 1811, and died there August 4, 1870. He was a 
descendant of the first families of Connecticut; of Governor Thomas Welles, 



126 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



John Tallcott, Elder Jolm White, Samuel Hale, Hon. William Lynch, son of the 
founder of Springfield, Mass. From them he inherited the strong mental and 
moral force which actuated his whole life and commanded the respect of all 
wlio knew him. He attended the schools of his town and prepared for college 
at Bacon Academy, Colchester, Conn., and entered the "Academy" in 1825, 
graduating in 1829. He engaged in farming in Glastonbury for many years, 
and during the latter part of his life he was associated with his son in the 
firm of A. S. Plale & Co., book publishers, at Hartford^ Conn. He was a mem- 
ber of the First Congregational Chiu-ch of Glastonbury. 

He was twice married: first, to Elizabeth Meigs, daughter of AUwyn 
Southmayd of Middletown, Conn. She died in 1846. Three children were 
born to them: Elizabeth Meigs, Allyn Southmayd, and Charles Osmer. Both 
served in the United States Army during the Civil War. He was married 
April 2, 1847, to Susan Smith, daughter of James and Mary (Dowd) North 
and grandaughter of Col. Simeon North, a manufacturer of firearms for the 
United States Government. Six children were born to them: Elizabeth 
Southmayd, Reuben North, Edward White, Emma Susan, Mary North and 
James North. 



BRIG. GEN. REUBEN CHARLES HALE. 

Reuben C. Hale, son of Elias White and Jean (Mulholland) Hale, was 
born in Lewistown, Pa., October 13, 1812, and died at Logan Springs, Pa., 

July 2, 1863. He was a direct de- 
scendant of Thomas Welles, Governor 
of Connecticut, 1665-68. 

Mr. Hale prepared for college in 
the schools of his town and Mifflin, 
Pa. He entered the "Academy" in 
1826 and graduated in 1829; was a 
student at Yale University, 1830-32. 
He studied law in Belief onte. Pa., 
1832-33. He was admitted to the bar 
in 1833, and practiced his profession 
in LewistowTi, Pa., from 1833 until 
1 s.^3. He was a Republican in politics 
Mild held several offices; was surveyor 
of the port of Philadelphia, 1853-57. 

He took great interest in military 
matters; was captain, Lewistown 
Guards, September 18, 1836 to 1843; 
colonel of the famous "Brady" Regi- 
ment 1841; major general of the 14th 
division, State JMilitia for some years. 
On the breaking out of the Ci\dl W^ar, 
he took an active part in organizing 
and drilUng the State troops. He 
was offered an important command, but his health being impaired, was 
forced to decline the commission, but accepted the important position of 
quartermaster general of Permsylvania, wdth rank of brigadier general 
and served from 1861 until July 1863, [when his health broke dowTi, 




Gen. CIimU- K.uben Hale. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



127 



caused chiefly by overwork and anxiety. He was a member of the Episcopal 
Church. 

He was married May 12, 1836, to Sarah Jane Mills of West Hartford, 
Conn., who died January 29, 1884. Eight children were born to them: 
Charles Reuben, born March 13, 1837, Bishop of Cairo; died December 25, 
1901; Johns Mills, born February 18, 1839, died June 17, 1894; Wilham 
Wilberforce, born May 11, 1841, resides in Alden, Hardin County, Iowa; 
Matthew, born July 5, 1843, died November 16, 1843; Sarah Jane, born 
February 9, 1845, died October 24, 1845; Laura Caroline, born October 11, 
1846, married John Addams Mull, resided in PhiUpsbiu'g, Center County, 
Pa., died August 8. 1909; Julia Lucy, born February 5, 1849, resides in Philips- 
burg, Center County, Pa.; Mary EUzabeth, born June 17, 1851, died, unmar- 
ried, February 1, 1889. 



MAJ. GEN. WILLIAM GILES HARDING. 

WiUiam G. Harding, son of John and Susannah (Shute) Harding, was 
born at "Belle Meade," Davidson county, Tenn., September 15, 1808, and 
died there September 15, 1886. 

He prepared for college at the Old Field School in Nashville, and was a 
student for some time at Nashville University. He entered the "Academy" 
in 1824, and graduated "in 1828. 

Soon after leaving the "Acad- 
emy' ' he settled on his farm known 
as "Belle Meade," one of the 
largest estates in Tennesee, contain- 
ing about four thousand acres of 
land. Here he made Ms home until 
his death. He imported a number 
of thoroughbred race horses from 
England, and established at Belle 
Meade one of the most famous stock 
farms in America. 

He studied law and medicine, 
hut never practiced either of these 
l)rofessions. He kept up his interest 
in engineering work, and was often 
consulted by his fricntls as a 
practical engineer. 

His mihtary ability was soon 
recognized and he rose from a 
captain to major general in com- 
mand of the State Militia. He hat! 
charge of mustering the State; 
troops, for the Seminole War. On 
the breaking out of the Civil War, ^^J- ^en. WiUiam Giles Harding, 

he raised and equipped a battery of artillery, known as the Harding Light 
Artillery, which served during the war. He was for some time in charge 
of a factory which manufactured percussion caps for the Confederate Army. 
Soon after the fall of Fort Donelson in 1862, he, with other Southern sympa- 
thizers, fled from Nashville, but returned after the proclamation issued by 




128 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

General Buell. Soon after his return he was, on account of his strong Southern 
sympathies, arrested by Governor Andrew Johnson, and confined for some 
time at Fort Mackinac, Mich. 

He was a member of the Christian Church, and in poUtics was alwaj's a 
Democrat but never held office. 

He was twice married: first, November 10, 1829, to Mary Selene Mc- 
Nairy of Nashville, who died March 29, 1839; one child, John Harding, born in 
1852, resides in Nashville. He was again married January 2, 1840, to Eliza- 
beth Irwin McGavock, who died August 9, 1867. Two children were born 
to them: Selene, born in 1846, married Gen. W. H. Jackson, a prominent 
commander in the Confederate Army, died at Belle Meade, March 30, 1903; 
Mary, born in 1850, married Howell E. Jackson, at one time a United States 
Senator from Tennesee, and later a justice of the Supreme Court of the United 
States. She resides at West Meade, Davidson County, Tenn. 

BVT. MAJ. GEN. WILLIAM SELBY HARNEY, U. S. A. 

William S. Harney, son of Thomas Harney, an officer of the Revolutionary 
Army, was born near Haysboro, Davidson County, Tenn., August 27, 1800, 
and died in Orlando, Fla., May 9, 1899. 

He entered the army from Louisiana and was commissioned 2d lieutenant 
of the 1st United States Infantry, February 13, 1818; was promoted 1st 
lieutenant January 7, 1819; was transferred to the 1st United States Artillerj^, 
November 16, 1821; was transferred to the 1st Infantry, December 21, 1822. 
He was promoted captain. May 14, 1825; major and pa}Tnaster, May 1, 
1823; lieutenant colonel, Second Dragoons, August 15, 1836; colonel, June 
30, 1846; brigadier general, June 14, 1858; was retired, August 1, 1863. 

He was a student at the "Academy" in 1829, taking advanced work in 
Mathematics and Military Science. He performed conspicuous service 
diu-ing the Black Hawk War in 1833 and the Florida War in 1839-40. He was 
brevetted colonel, December 7, 1840, "for gallant and meritorious conduct" 
in successive engagements with the hostile Indians in the Florida." In the 
Mexican War he was commended for his braveiy at the battle of MedilUn, 
March 25, IF 47, and was brevetted brigadier general, April 18, 1847, "for 
gallant and meritorious conduct" in the battle of Cerro Gordo, Mexico. 
He was engaged in many Indian wars on the plains, meeting invariably with 
success. He defeated the Sioux at Sand Hills on the Platte, September 3, 
1855. He was in command of the department of Oregon from 185P until 
1860. On July 9, 1859, he took possession of the Island of San Juan, near 
Vancouver; and as this lead to a controversy with Great Britain, he was re- 
called by the United States Government. In April, 1861, he was placed in 
command of the department of the West, and on going from A\'ashington to 
St. Louis, he was captured by the Confederate troops at Harper's Ferry and 
taken a prisoner to Richmond, Va., where he met several of his old comrades 
in arms, who secured his release. On assuming the command of his depart- 
ment, with headquarters at St. Louis, he issued a proclamation to the people 
of Missouri, warning them of the danger of secession. He was relieved of 
his command. May 29, 1861, and on August 1, 1863, he was placed on the 
retired list. He was brevetted major general, March 13, 1865, "for long and 
faithful service.' ' 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



129 



HON. CALEB BLANCHARD HARRINGTON, A. M. 

Caleb B. Harrington, son of Joshua and Lydia (Blancliard) Harrington, 
was born in Clarendon, Vt., December 23, 1812, and died in Burlington, 
Iowa, January 7, 1892. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1829, and remained one year. He grad- 
uated A. B. from Middlcbmy college in 1832; received the degree of A. M., 
from "N. U.," in 1843. He studied law with Rodney Boyce of Rutland and 
Judge Milo L. Bennett of Manchester, Vt., and was admitted to the bar in 
1835; practiced his profession in Middletown, Vt., 1835-50; Rutland 1850-56. 

In the winter of 1856, he located in Burlington, Iowa, where he made 
his home until his death. He soon formed a partnership with Judge J. C. 
Hall, which continued for some years. He was an able attorney; as an 
adviser he was unequalled in the knowledge of the law and clearness of logic ; 
he had no superior at the bar in his city; was noted for his humorous sayings. 

He was a Republican in politics and held many offices; represented 
Middletown, Vt., in the House of Representatives, 1842, 1843, and 1846; 
was commissioner Vermont Insane Aylum, 1846-47; states attorney, Rutland 
County, 1851-57. 

He was married. May 30, 1838, to Susan Stoddard of Middletown Springs, 
Vt. ; no children. 

HON. THOMAS JEFFERSON HARRIS. 

Thomas J. Harris, son of John and EUzabeth (Hyde) Harris, was born in 
Plainfield, N. H., August 30, 1801, and died in Claremont, N. H., September 9, 
1880. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the "Acad- 
emy in 1820 and graduated in 1822. 

He was engaged for several years -,-t=^-~-,_^ 

in the merchantile business in 
Strafford, Vt., with his brother, the 
Hon. Jedediah H. Harris; later con- 
ducted a store in Plainfield, N. H.; 
located in Claremont, N. H. in 1835, 
where he made his home until his 

death. He soon became one of the , .7 

most prominent business men and 
highly respected citizen in that town; '" i 

was for some years connected witli 

the Claremont Carriage Co.; engaged ; 

in mercantile pursuits and was the 
general agent for the New York Life 
Insurance Co. 

He was a Republican in politics 
and held many offices in his town; 
represented Claremont in the State 
Legi.slature one term; was clerk of 
the House of Rcprescsntatives in 1846; 
was a strong abolitionist and took an 
active part in the enlistment of soldiers 
for the Civil War; served for some 

5 




Hon. Thomas Jeilerson Harris. 



130 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

time as the treasurer of a committee for raising funds for the United States 
Sanitary Commission. He was a member of the First Baptist Church of Clare- 
mont and a deacon for many years. 

He was twice married: first, December 25, 1825, to Emeline Smith of 
Strafford who died in New York Citj^, July 22, 1860. Six cliidren were born 
to them: John Waterman, born November 5, 1826, died February 8, 1846; 
Sarah Elizabeth, born July 27, 1828, married Albert C. Lamson, died in New 
York city in September 1891;] Sidney Smith, born February 5, 1832, died 
Garden City, N. Y., December 11, 1892; Tracy Hyde, born July 12, 1834, 
died at Mentone, France, January 7, 1869; James Benjamin, born July 5, 1838, 
died July 10, 1839; Mary Frances, born December 8, 1841, died Jan, 20, 1843; 
Charles Frederick, born January 4, 1844, resides Santa Barbara, Cal. He 
was again married in April, 1860, to jNIyra Anne Beaumont of Canton, Mass., 
who survives Mm and resides in New York. One cliild was born to them, 
Thomas Jefferson, born July 26, 1865, now a prominent physician in New 
York city. 

CAPT. HENRY J. HARTSTENE, C. S N. 

Heiu-y J. Harstene, was born in North Carolina about 1801 and died in 
Paris, France, March 31, 1868. 

He entered the "Academy" from Savannah, Ga., in 1826, and graduated 
in 1828. He was commissioned a midshipman, U. S. Navj", April 1, 1828; was 
promoted past-midshipman June 14, 1834; Ueutenant, February 23, 1840; 
commander, September 14, 1855. 

^ He served with the Wilkes Explormg Expedition in 1838; on service with 
the coast sm'vey and in command of the Illinois 1851-55. In 1855, he was 
sent to the Arctic region in command of the Kane rescuing party and after 
great privations rescued Dr. Kane and his party at Upernavik, August 6. 
He conveyed to England, the British exploring barque Resolute, wliich had been 
abandoned in the Arctic regions, and rescued by a New London whaler. 
Captain Buddington, and purchased by Congress and presented to the British 
Government. He was later in charge of the sounding for the Atlantic cable. 

He resigned from the Na\^', January 9, 1861, and at once offered his 
ser\'ices to the Confederate goverrmient; wa.s commissioned captain and 
assigned to the South CaroUna NaA^^; was in command of a few gun boats 
that took part in the investment of Fort Sumpter in April, 1861; and was 
present at the evacuation of that fort. He was later transferred to the Con- 
federate States Na\'y^ After the captm-e of the Isaac Smith, carrying nine 
heavy gmis, at Stono Inlet, S. C, January 20, 1862, he was given command 
of this gun boat, renaming it the Stono. John W. Dicks, '25, was the execu- 
tive officer on the boat at its captm-e. 

Captain Hartstene was in command of the Confederate Navy in the 
Charleston, harbor until late in 1862, when becoming suddenly insane, he 
was taken to Paris, France, for treatment, where he died. 

JOHN HART, U. S. N. 
John Hart, son of John and Mary Hart, entered the "Academy" from 
New York city in 1824, remaining until 1826. He was commissioned a mid- 
shipman, U.S. N., January 1, 1825, and was discharged from the service, Decem- 
ber 31, 1828. He later enlisted in the Navy and served for many years as a 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 131 

coxswain. He served many years with Commodore Tattnall, '23, and was 
with this old cadet at the historic battle at the mouth of the Pei-ho River, 
China, where he was killed by a cannon shot, June 25, 1859. In his report to 
the U. S. Navy Department on this incident. Commodore Tattnall especially 
commended Coxswain Hart for his service in the engagement. Charles C. 
Jones, in his Life of Commodore Tailriall, pays the following tribute to Hart: 
"A finer specimen of a seaman is seldom met with. The flag-officer (Tattnall) 
was exceedingly grieved at his loss, as he regarded him with a feeling of personal 
attachment, growing out of his long and faithful service.' ' 

He was survived by a daughter, who lived in Jamaica, Long Island, in 18(50. 

HON. ALBERT GALLATIN HATCH. 

Albert G. Hatch, son of Reuben and Eunice (Denison ) Hatch, was 
born in Norwdch, Vt., December 26, 1801, and died in Chicago, 111., July 6, 
1887. 

He attended the schools of his town, and entered the "Academy" in 
1820, graduating in 1824. He removed to Windsor, Vt., in 1829, and engaged 
in business with Thomas Emerson and Jonas Dudley, under the firm name of 
Emerson, Hatch & Dudley. Later, the business was conducted by Mr. Hatch 
and his youngest brother, Joseph Hatch, under the firm name of A. G. and J.D. 
Hatch. Later, the business was conducted under the firm name of Hatch & 
Foxbury. In 1859, Mr. Hatch retired from active business, and in 1885, he 
removed to Cluicago, where he lived with his son, Henry Lenmiex, until his 
death. He was a Republican in politics, and held several town offices; was 
postmaster of Windsor, 1861-85. 

He was married in 1829, to Harriet, daughter of Henry Elliot and Eliza- 
beth (Lord) Hatch, of Windsor. Three children were born to them: Hemy 
Lemmex, resides Chicago, 111.; Jane Elizabeth, married N.P. Lovering, resides 
in Boston, Mass.; Mary Ellen. 

CAPT. JESSE PIKE HATCH. 

Jesse P. Hatch, son of Adrian and Sarah (POce) Hatch, was born in 
Norwich, Vt., in 1805, and died in Zanesville, Ohio, August 31, 1866. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1823, 
and graduated in 1825; was instructor in bookkeeping, 1825, until November, 
1826. He resided in Norwich from 1827 until 1834, when he removed to 
Zanesville, Ohio, where he resided until his death. 

He organized the Putnam Greys of the State Mihtia, and served as captain 
several years. He was a fine drill master and this company became the best 
drilled organization in the State. 

He was married to Jane Sanderson Hawling of Loudon Co., Va., about 
1828. Two children were born to them: Martha Ann, married a Mr. Bailey, 
resi<lod in Chicago, 111., in 1904; Mary Jane. 

HON. JOSEPH DENISON HATCH, A. B. 

Joseph D. Hatch was born in Norwich, Vt., January 21, 1811, and died 
in Burlington, Vt., May 21, 1898. 

lie attended the schools of his town, and entered th(; "Academy" in 
1823 and remained until 1826. He then entered Dartmouth College, and 
graduated A. B. in 1830. 



132 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

He engaged in the mercantile business with liis brother, Albert G. Hatch, 
'23, in Windsor, Vt., from 1830 until 1859, when he continued the business 
alone. In 1861, he removed to Burlington, where he made his home until 
his death. He served as agent of the Central Vermont R. R., for many years. 
He met with marked success in his business ventures and acquired a large 
fortune. He was a Repubhcan in poUtics, and held several offices; served as 
alderman, 1870-76; mayor, 1876-83. 

He was married April 4, 1832, to Frances A. Forbes, of Windsor, who died 
October 19, 1883. A daughter, Josephine, married Air. Wears, resides in 
Bm'lington, Vt. 

HON. GUILFORD H. HATHAWAY, A. M. 

Guilford H. Hathaway, son of Edmund and Betsey (Hathaway) Hatha- 
way, was born in Freetowai, Mass., (Assonet Village) May 3, 1808, and died 
there, February 12, 1895. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1823, 
remaining two years; received the degree of A. M. in course from the University 
in 1889 as for 1825; was vice-president 'of the Boston Association, 1890. 

•'""-' He taught school in Fall River 

and Assonet Village, Mass., 1826-32; 
was engaged extensively in ship 
building and the West India trade, 
being owTier or part owner of many 
vessels, 1832^8. He resided in Fall 
River, Mass., 1834-76, Boston, 1876- 
80 and Assonet, 1881-95. He was 
prominent in financial circles; was 
director of the Fall River National 
Bank, 1836-95; president, 1876-95; 
member of the board of investment, 
I'all River Sa\ings Bank, 1847-95; 
engaged extensively in settling estates; 
practiced survejdng 1825-78. He 
took an active interest in school 
matters; was a member of the Free- 
toNvn School Committee, 1837, 1838, 
1844 and 1845. 

He was a Republican in politics 
and held many offices; was town 
treasurer of Freetown, 1834—37; 
Hon. Guilford H. Hathaway. represented that town in the Mass- 

achusetts Legislature in 183G; collector of taxes, Freetown, four years; post- 
master, Assonet Village, 1841—45; was assessor, Fall River and chairman of 
the board, thirteen years; county commissioner, Bristol county, 1868-77; 
member of the common council, Fall River, 1864-65 and the board of 
aldermen, 1866 and 1867. 

He travelled extensively, and when over eighty years of age went to Cali- 
fornia via the Isthmus of Panama. He was a member of the LTnitarian Church. 
He was married, November 1, 1832, to Betsey Wilson of Fall River, 
Mass., who died April 9, 1865. Seven chidlren were born to them: Othalia 




SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 133 

Wilson, born September 15, 1834, died September 2, 1870; Abiah, born 
August 24, 1838, died February 2, 1870; Edmund, born October 21, 1840, died 
August 12, 1846; Edward Wilson, born November 1, 1843, died May 9, 1869; 
Edmund, born September 17, 1848, resides in Meridian, Cal.; E. Florence, 
born May 5, 1856, married Joshua F. Crowell, resides in West Yarmouth, 
Mass.; Charles Guilford, born August 12, 1858, died October 4, 1859. 

AUGUSTUS ALLEN HAYES, M. D. 

Augustus A. Hayes, son of Capt. Thomas Allen and Sophia (West) Hayes, 
was born in Windsor, Vt., February 28, 1806, and died in Brookline, Mass., 
June 21, 1882. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the Univer- 
sity in 1820, graduating in 1823. He then studied Chemistry under James F. 
Dana; subsequently he became assistant professor of Chemistry in the New 
Hampshire Medical College, but settled in Boston in 1828, where he devoted 
himself to chemical investigations, filling also the posts of director of an ex- 
tensive factory of colors and chemical products in Roxbury, and of consulting 
chemist to some of the most important dyeing, bleaching, gas, iron, and copper 
smelting establishments in New England. 

Among his early researches was that begun in 1825, for the purpose of de- 
termining the approximate composition of various American medical plants; 
which resulted in his discovery of the organic alkaloid sanguinaria, a compound 
remarkable for the brilUant colors of its salts. Later, he conducted an elaborate 
investigation upon the economical generation of steam and the relative value 
of fuels, which, in 1838, led to a novel arrangement of steam-boilers. He was the 
first to suggest the apphcation of the oxides of iron in refining pig-iron and, 
still earUer,the refining of copper was,under his direction,rendered much shorter 
and more certain by the introduction of scales of oxide of copper. 

Among his other original investigations are those in relation to the chemi- 
cal decomposition of alcohol by chlorine and the formation of chloroform; on 
the action of alcohol on the human system; on the formation, composition, and 
specific differences of the varieties of guano, a memoir on the difference in the 
chemical constitution and action of sea waters on and below the surface, on 
soundings, and at the entrance of rivers ; it being part of an investigation ex- 
ecuted under a commission from the navy department to examine and report 
on subject of copper and copper-sheathing, as appUed in the construction of 
national vcs,sels. 

In 1859-60, while investigating the water supply of Charlestown, Mass., 
he found that the deep water of Mystic pond was far less pure than the surface 
water, and proved that a copper wire passing vertically through two masses of 
water slightly unlike in (-omposition would become polarized and exhibit 
cl(!ctrolytic action. This mode of t(>sting the exact limits of the impure water 
was apphed under his direction, and a large number of observations on this and 
oth(!r masses of water have proved the practical value of this test. 

After the beginning of the Civil War, he called pubUc attention to the 
uncertainty of the supply of saltpetrc,and the necessity of domestic production. 
His efforts resulted in the manufacture for the Navy of a very pm-e product by a 
novel process from sodium nitrate by the action of potassium hydro.xide. Later 
he spent some time abroad, and on his return pubUshed a paper on The Causes 



134 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

of the Color of Lake Lcman, Geneva, and also one on the Red Oxide of Zinc in 
Jersey. 

For many years he held the office of state assaj^er of Massachusetts and in 
1846 received the honorary degree of M. D. from Dartmouth College. He was 
a member of scientific societies in the United States, and contributed numerous 
papers of technical vahie to their proceedings and to the American Journal of 
Science. 

He was married about 1S30, to Henrietta Bridge of Marblehead, Mass., 
who died about 1880. Three children were bom to them: Augustus Allen; 
Samuel Dana, "N.U.," '57; Sophie West, married Capt. George E. Sage, U.S. 
A., retired, resides in Newport, R. I. 

JOHN HAMPDEN HILL, M. D. 

John H. Hill was born in New Hanover County, N. C, April 28, 1807, and 
died in Wilmington, N. C, February 19, 1893. 

He entered the "Academy' ' in 1824, from Wilmington,N.C., and graduated 
in 1828. He then entered the Rutgers ]\Iedical College in New York, and grad- 
uated M. D., March 30, 1830; practiced his profession in Wilmington, N. C, 
many years, meeting with success. He had extensive plantation interests on the 
Cape Fear River, and became the most successful rice planter in the State. He 
was a close student, and his mind was well stored with useful knowledge.^ He 
is described as a man given to "dispensing large hospitahty, a brilliant con- 
versationalist, and one whose society was sought by both old and j^oung.' ' At 
the close of the Civil War, he was, like most of the planters, ruined in fortune. 

He was married to Mary Ann Holmes of Wilmington, N. C, who died in 
1837, leaving three sons: John Hampden, now mayor of Goldsboro, N. C; 
Thomas, a physician in Goldsboro, N. C. ; and Gabriel Holmes, a physician in 
Charlottesville,. Va. 

WILLL\^I H. HILL. 

William H. Hill was born in Wilmington, N. C, about 1807, and died in 
Berkeley, Cal., about 1897. 

He attended the schools of his citj' and entered the "Academy" in 1823, 
remaining two years; was a student at L^nion College 1825-26; graduated from 
Hobart College in 1827; received the degree of A. M. from this Institution in 
1850. He studied law and practiced liis profession for many years in CaMfornia. 

JOHN THEODORE HINSDALE. 

John T. Hinsdale, son of John and Harriet (Johnston) Hinsdale, was born 
in Middletowm, Conn., Januar}^ 10, 1813, and diedjn Cincinnati, Ohio, Febru- 
ary 21, 1858. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1826, 
and remained until 1829. He located in Chicago, 111., about 1832, and engaged 
in mercantile business until 1836, when he removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, where 
he made liis home until his death. He continued in trade in Cincinnati until his 
death. He possessed considerable literary ability and was a frequent contributor 
to the papers of Cincinnati. 



[ SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 135 

He was married in Cincinnati,. November 30, 1836, to Susan Maria Loving, 
a native of New York city, who died September 21, 1890. Two children were 
born to them: Harriette Maria, born January 3, 1838, resides in Cincinnati; 
Loving, born April 19, 1840, died in Pasadena, Cal., March 12, 190G. 

JOSEPH NICHOLS HINSDILL. 

Joseph^N.[^Hinsdill, son of Ensign Joseph and Hannah (Bingham) Hinsdill, 
was born in Bennington, Vt., January 31, 1804; and died in New York city, 
January 13, 1864. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1822, 
graduating in 1824. He engaged in mercantile business in New York many 
years. 

He was married March 9, 1825, to Fanny Walbridge of Bennington, Vt., 
who died ia Bennington, December 15, 1884; no children. 

THOMAS LUDWELL HOBSON. 

Thomas L. Hobson, son of Joseph and Mary Thomas (Mumford) Hobson, 
was born at Clay Banlv, Powliatan Co., Ya., July 4, 1807, and died in Pow- 
hatan Co., October 27, 1862. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1825, and graduated in 1828. He engaged 
extensively in planting on the James River, Powhatan Co., Va., until Ms 
death. He served as a magistrate for many years. He was a member of the 
Episcopal Church. 

He was married at Locust Grove, Cimiberland Co., Va., November 27, 
1833, to Virginia Randolph Page, who sm'vives Mm and resides in Provost, 
Powhatan^Co., Va. Ten__children were[_born to them: Mary Anna, born Decem- 
ber 12, 1834, married Mr. Page, resides in Provost, Powhatan Co., Va. ; Caro- 
line Epps, born May 26, 1836, died unmarried November 10, 1909; Joseph, 
born August 26, 1837, resides in Provost, Powhatan Co., Va.; Virginia Page, 
born February 10, 1839, married Mr. Archer, died in January, 1909; John Page, 
born September 24, 1841, died in 1842; Thomas Mumford, born November 27, 
1842, died in 1862; Ellen Cary, born June 16, 1845, married Mr. Guthrie, resides 
in Gallatin, Tenn.; Clara, born August 16, 1847, married Mr. Nash, resides in 
Richmond, Va. ; Alexander Trent, born September 28, 1849, resides in Provost, 
Powhatan Co., Va.; John Cary, born June 22, 1851, resides in Cleveland, 
Florida. 

MAJOR JOHN HOLBROOK. 

John Holbrook was born in Hartland, Vt., about 1805, and died un- 
married, in Washington, Miss., in August, 1832. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1820, and graduated in 1825. He was 
tutor in Latin and English in 1824 and 1825; assistant professor of Mathe- 
matics and Tactics, 1825-27, and Latin, 1826-27; served as librarian during 
1825-27 and compiled the first catalogue of the books in the "Cadets Library." 

In 1828, he was appointed superintendent of the Scientific department 
of Jefferson Military College, Washington, Miss., where he soon introduced 
the military system as carried out in the "A. L. S. & M. Academy." In April 
1832, Prof. E. B. Williston, '23, president of the college, was forced to resign 
owing to failing health, and Major Holbrook was elected in his place, which 
position he held until his death. 



136 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY^ 



We quote from a letter received from Jefferson Military College : "Major 
Holbrook was greatly beloved by the students. He was a man of fine physique 
and of great mental qualifications. He had a splendid voice for giving com- 
mands. In the middle of the campus, there used to stand a large and beauti- 
ful live-oak tree, under which he was accustomed to stand and give commands 
to his battahon of cadets. He had often been heard to state that if he died 
in the South, he had rather be bmied under that tree than any spot on earth. 
At his death the students desired to carry out his request, but the trustees 
objected, and he was buried some four hundred yards in the rear of the main 
college building. Tradition states that the students, determining to carry 
out their beloved teacher's ^ish, went in the dead of night and removed his 
remains to the middle of the campus and ha\'ing buried them under the Uve- 
oak tree, leveled the grave, tm-fed it over, and then quietly returned to their 
barracks. 

He contributed many articles to the various papers of the country. 
He was the author of Military Tactics, Adapted to the Different Corps in the 
United States, a work of 344 pages and illustrated with many cuts, published 
in 1826. This was one of the finest works of its kind ever issued in America. 



/ 



REV. JOHN CALVIN HOLBROOK, D. D., LL. D. 

John C. Holbrook, son of John and Sarah (Isnowlton) Holbrook, was 
born in Brattleboro, Vt., January 7, 1808, and died in Stockton, Cal., August 
1, 1900. 

He prepared for college at the 
Hopkins Academy, Hadley, Mass., 
1818-20, and under the tuition of 
the Rev. E. H. Newton of Marlboro, 
Vt. He entered the "Academy" in 
1821, and graduated with high rank 
in 1824. 

He was a clerk for Holbrook & 
Fessenden, book publishers and 
manufacturers of paper, Brattleboro, 
1824-28; member of the firm, 1828-34; 
junior member of the firm of Lord & 
Holbrook, Boston, extensive book 
sellers and publishers, 1828-34. In 
1854, he returned to Brattleboro and 
engaged in the book publishing 
business until 1838. During this 
time he pubUshed several extensive 
works; one, the Encyclopedia of Re- 
ligious Knowledge, edited by Rev. 
William Jenks, D. D., had a very 
extensive sale. He located in Daven- 
Rev. John Calvin Holbrook. port, lowa, in 1838, and engaged 

in farming for a short time. He then determined to enter the Congre- 
gational ministry. 

For several years he had taken an active part in rehgious work and had 
often been called upon to supply pulpits. He received approbation in 1841, 




SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 137 

from the Congregational Association, to preach ; served as pastor of the church 
at Dubuque, during 1842-53 and 1856-63. He located in Chicago in 1853 
and established and edited the Congregational Herald until 1856; supplied 
the New England church, Chicago, 1853-56; was pastor of the Homer, N. Y. 
church, 1864-70; Stockton, Cal., chm-ch, 1870-72; was the first secretary of 
the New York Home Missionary Society, with head quarters in Sjrracuse, 
1872-82; was pastor of the West Street chm-ch, Portland, Me., 1882-83. He 
retired from active work in 1883, and resided in Stockton, Cal., until his death. 

He was gi-eatly interested in educational matters; was one of the founders 
of the Cliicago Theological Seminary, being one of its incorporators and first 
directors; was financial agent for Iowa College, 1863-64, meeting with great 
success and seeming over $50,000 towards its endowment; served as member 
of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, from 1851 until 
his death. 

He took an active interest in the cause of slavery and in 1865 was sent as 
a delegate from the American Missionary Association to visit Great Britian 
and advocate the cause of freedom. He spoke in many places in England, and 
Scotland. His labors were successful and he secured $40,000 for the associa- 
tion. He traveled extensively in Eiu-ope. 

He took an active interest in military matters; served as aide-de-camp 
to the general in command of the Vermont Militia, Brattlcboro district, 
1828-34; was commissioner for the State of Vermont, and had charge of the 
expenditiu-e of the appropriation made by the State for the railroad survey 
from the Massachusetts hue up the west bank of the Connecticut River 
about 1838; was one of the founders of the Vermont Asylum for the Insane, 
at Brattleboro. 

He published several historical works and sermons, among the number 
being, Prairie Breaking, or Sketches in the Experience of a Western Pastor; 
The Recollections of a Nonagenarian, 1898, being an autobiography of his life; 
He wrote extensively for the religious press and was for many years a western 
correspondent of the Independent, Boston' Recorder SindjCongregationalisL 

He received the degree of D. D., from WilUams College in 1863 and 
LL. D., from Norwich University in 1897. 

He was an eloquent speaker and in the early days in Dubuque conducted 
many revival meetings through Iowa, southern Wisconsin and western IlUnois. 
He was one of the ablest clergymen of his chm-ch. 

He was married January 12, 1829, to Cynthia S. Tattle of Windsor, who 
died in Dubuque in 1841. Fom children were born to them, all of whom 
died in early childhood. He was again married October 18, 1842, to Ann 
L. Clark of Platteville, Wis., who died November 20, 1896. 

HON. GEORGE WASHINGTON HOLLEY. 

George W. HoUey, son of John Milton and Sally (Porter) Holley, was born 
in Salisbury, Conn., February 17, 1810, and died at Ithaca, N. Y., June 12, 
1897. 

He attcndcfl the schools of his town, and entered the "Academy" in 1823, 
and graduated in 1828. He entered the United States Military Academy at 
West Point in 1829, but soon being afflicted with deafness left the institution 
in 1831. 

He engaged in business in lUinois until about 1840, when he located in 



138 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



Niagara Falls, N. Y., where he made his home until 1883. He then removed 
to Ithaca, N. Y., where he resided wath his daughter, Mrs. Irving P. Church, 
until his death. He was the executor of the estate of the late Gen. Peter B. 
Porter of Niagara Falls. 

On the breaking out of the Civil 
War he served as drill master of Co. 
D, 66th New York Volunteers. He 
was a Repubhcan in poUtics, and held 
several positions; represented his district 
in the New York Legislature in 1853; 
was for some time in the sixties a United 
States Custom House Officer at Niagara 
Falls. 

He was a man of decided Mterary 
tastes, and greatly interested in scienti- 
fic matters. He pubUshed miscellan- 
eous articles and contributions to 
Scientific Societies and Journals. He 
published two books; Niagara, Its 
History and Geology, 1872; Magnetism, 
or a New Cosmography, 1894. 

He was a member of the Episco- 
pal Church; American Association for 
the Advancement of Science. 

He was married August 23. 1833, 
to Caroline Esther Church of SaUsbury, 
Hon. George Washington Holley. Conn., who died in Niagara Falls, 

N. Y., May 30, 1884. Four children were born to them : Porter,' born May 
2, 1844, died August 17, 1844; Porter 2d, born August 8, 1845, died April 14, 
1846; Edith, born April 17, 1847, died February 4, 1859; EUzabeth Porter, 
born June 3, 1849, married Prof. Irving Porter Church, of Cornell University, 
died September 14, 1903. 




HON. JOHN M. HOLLEY, A. B. 

John M. Holley was born in Salisbury, Conn., in November, 1802, and 
died in Jacksonville, Fla., March 8, 1848. 

He graduated; A. B. from Yale College inl822. He entered the" Acad- 
emy" in 1823, and graduated in 1825. He studied law and was admitted 
to the bar in 1825. In the same year he located in Lyons, N. Y., 
where he practiced his profession until 1847. He was a Whig in poUtics, 
and held many positions. He represented his district in the State legislature, 
1838-41; was elected United States Representative in November, 1847, and 
served until his death. '^ He is°sm•^^ved by a son, who resides in La Crosse, Wis. 



MAJ. ARTHm FISHER HOLMES. 

Arthur F. Holmes, son of John Bee and EUzabeth (Edwards) Holmes, 
was born in his ancestral home in Charleston, S. C, October 11, 1805, and 
died there February 13, 1876. 

His father was a lawyer of distinction, and at one time recorder of Charles- 



SKETCHES OE ACADEMY CADETS. 139 

ton, a position then similar to that of cu-cuit judge. He served in the Revo- 
lutionary War at the age of seventeen, as lieutenant, in a regiment of South 
Carolina volunteers, and was present at the storming of Savannah, Ga., and 
after assisting in bearing General Pulaski from the field, after he fell, was 
himseK wounded. He was captm-ed and placed on an English prison ship 
in Charleston harbor. On being exchanged, he served as A. D. C. with rank as 
captain on the staff of General Barnwell. 

The subject of this sketch attended the schools of his native city, and 
CaroUna college, Columbia, S. C. He entered West Point in 1822, and 
remained imtil 1824, when he entered the "Academy," and graduated in 1826. 

He settled in Florida with a colony of South Carolinians, and engaged in 
planting for some years. He took an active part in the Seminole War, though 
ever holding that the whites were the shameful aggressors; and served as major 
on the staff of General Clinch. He distinguished himself for his bravery, 
especially in finding a ford across a river for General Scott's army in face 
of a heavy fire from the Indians on the opposite bank. 

In 1839, he retm-ned to South Carolina where he engaged in farming 
near Aiken until 1841, when we was appointed appraiser of customs at 
Charleston, by President Tyler. He filled the position with marked integrity 
until 1861, when he resigned. He held the same position under the Con- 
federate's State Government, until Charleston was abandoned as a port 
of entry. He made his home in Charleston from 1841 matil his death. He 
was a Whig in poUtics, and held several positions. 

He was married September 15, 1827, in Tallahasse, Fla., to Amelia 
Leving Smith of Baltimore, Md. Sixteen cliildren were born to them. 

LIEUT. JAMES T. HOMANS, U. S. N. 

James T. Homans, was appointed a midshipman U. S. N., in December 
1819. He served on the schooner Grampus in 1822, and at the Navy Yard, 
Washington, D. C, 1822-23. 

He entered the "Academy" from Boston in 1823, and graduated in 1825. 
He engaged in surveying in 1825; was on leave of absence in 1826. He 
served on the Macedonian, Brazil station, 1827, on the sloop Boston, 1828-30; 
was promoted lieutenant, May 17, 1828; served at the Navy Yard, Wash- 
ington, D. C, 1830-32; on the sloop Erie, West Indies, in 1832; schooner 
Shark, West Indies in 1834. He was awaiting orders and on furlough during 
1835-42; on the ship Independence, home squadron, during 1842-43; resigned 
from the service May 15, 1843. 

LEVI HOPPIN. 

Levi Hoppin, son of Benjamin and Esther Phillips (Warner) Hoppin, was 
born in Providence, R. I., March 18, 1805, and died in Pomfret, Conn., June 
24, 1845. 

He prcpannl for college at the Phillips Academy, Andovcr, Mass.; was a 
student at Brown University, 1821-22. He entered the "Academy" in 1822, 
and graduated in 1825. Soon after his graduation he removed to Pomfret, 
Conn., where he owned and managed a large stock farm until his death. 

He was married February 22, 1827, to Nancy Page Sweeting of Pomfret, 
Conn. One child, a daughter. 



140 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

HON. HORACE SEAVER HORTON. 

Horace S. Horton, son of Zenas and Nancy (Seaver) Horton, and brother 
of Hon. Valentine B. Horton, '25, was born in Cornish, N. H., October 2, 1808, 
and died in Pomeroy, Ohio, December 23, 1890. 

In 1820, his parents removed to Windsor, Vt., where he prepared for col- 
lege. He entered the "Academy' ' in 1827, and graduated in 1829. 

He was for a time a guard in the State Prison at Windsor, Vt. He later 
taught in a mihtary school in Mississippi. About 1832, he removed to Pom- 
eroy, Ohio, where he resided imtil his death. He was associated with his 
brother, V. B. Horton, in various business enterprises; was secretary and trea- 
surer of the Pomeroj^ Coal Co. for tMrty-two years; organized the National 
Bank of Pomeroy in 1870, serving as its president nearly twenty years. He was 
a RepubUcan in poUtics; represented his disti-ict in the House of Representa- 
tives one term; was the first mayor of Pomeroy; was state senator four years. 

He was twice married: first, in 1835, to Hannah Merrill of Plainfield, 
N. H., who died in 1857. One child was born to them: Horace Merrill, born 
May 27, 1837, 1st heut. U. S. Volimteers, Civil War, now master in the U. S. 
Light House Service and resides Pomeroy, Ohio. He was again married, May 
3, 1858, to Eleanor Frances Stevens of Plainfield, N. H., who died in Pom- 
eroy, Ohio, June 6, 1889. Three children were born to them: Eleanor Frances, 
born October 20, 1863, resides Cleveland, Ohio; Charles Stevens, born January 
11, 1860, resides in Flagler, Colo.; Norman Stevens, born March 27, 1868, 
resides in Lake Cora, PawPaw, Mich. 

HON. VALENTINE BAXTER HORTON, A. M. 

Valentine B. Horton, son of Zenas and Nancy (Seaver) Horton, was born 
in Windsor, Vt., Januaiy 29, 1802, and died in Pomeroy, Ohio, January 13, 
1888. 

He attended the schools of his towTi and entered the "Academy" in 1821, 
and graduated in 1825 in the class with Truman B. Ransom and Edwin F. 
Johnson. He was distinguished at the "Academy" for his scholarship and 
mihtary attainments, received from the University the degree of A. INI., August 
18, 1838. He .served as trustee of "N. U." 1835-36. He served as assistant 
marshal at the elaborate reception given General Lafayette June 28, 1825. 
He was professor of Mathematics and Engineering and instructor in Tactics at 
the "Academy" from 1825 until 1829. 

He pursued the study of law in connection with his duties as professor and 
in 1830 was admitted to the .Connecticut bar. In the faU of that year he re- 
moved to Pittsbm'g, Pa., where he continued his profession. In 1832, he 
gave up his law practice and removed to Cincinnati where he engaged in busi- 
ness until 1833, when he removed to Pomeroy, Ohio. 

He immediately began the development of the mineral resoiu-ces of the 
State. Being strong, physically, and of a persevering natm'e, difficulties 
vanished at his bidding. The primitive mode of transporting coal by raft and 
flat boats from Permsjdvania and Ohio down the Ohio River at once engaged 
his attention. He conceived the idea of towing barges by steamboats, and in 
1836 built the first Condor. This scheme was pronounced \'isionary by the 
business men of Pittsburg, but he persisted in liis idea. In the early days, 
the coal barges were sold for whatever they could bring as soon as the coal was 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



141 



unloaded. Mr. Horton showed his Yankee thrift by having these barges towed 
back up the river to be used again. His idea proved a success, and the ponder- 
ous and powerful Pittsburg tow boats of to-day are the ideas of a Norwich 
man. He soon had four- Condors in service on the river. For thu-ty-nine years 
there was an uninterrupted succession of Condors passing up and down the 
Ohio. 

He was a Whig in politics and later joined the Repubhcan party; was a 
member of the State Constitutional Convention of Oliio, 1850-51; was nomi- 
nated on the congressional ticket in 
1854, as a "Conscience" or anti- 
slavery Whig, and was victorious in 
one of the fiercest pohtical fights 
ever waged in Ohio. It was at this 
election that John Sherman and John 
Scott Harrison were elected to Con- / 

gress. It is stated that this dele- 
gation was one of the strongest ever 
sent from Oliio, and in this delegation 
no one was held in higher esteem in 
Congress than Mr. Horton. He was 
re-elected to Congress in 1856 and 
1860. He was a member of the 
Peace Congress held in Wasliington 
in 1861. In 1858, he decUned the 
nomination, owing to press of busi- 
ness. In 1878, he was again nomi- 
nated for Congress on the Repubhcan 
ticket, but was defer.ted, owing to his 
district being hopelessly Democratic. 

He amassed a large fortmie in 
his business enterprises, but owing to 
unsuccessful ventm-es dming 1880-84, liis fortune was greatly reduced. With 
the disastrous flood of 1884, which devastated the Ohio Valley, his remaining 
property was swept away. 

He was an active member of the Episcopal Chm-ch, and presented the 
Grace Episcopal Chiu'ch, a copy of a church in England, to the Dfocese. 

Hon. James G. Blaine, in his Twenty Years of Congress, speaks very highly 
of his abilities as a representative: "He was a man of rare personal appear- 
ance, tall, well formed, erect, over all a noble head, a man of mark in any com- 
pany. His face was fine, strong, noble, expressive. His manner was easy, 
self possessed, dehberate, but not slow; dignified in conversation, entertaining, 
courteous and gracious, immovably firm in principle; in intellect, clear and 
comprehensive; of surpassing ability in economic questions and practical enter- 
prise.' ' 

H(! was married in 1833, to Clara Alsop Pomcroy, daughter of Samuel 
Wyllys Pomeroy of Cincinnati. She died September 28, 1894. Six children 
were born to them: Clara Pomeroy, born September 18, 1834, married Gen. 
John Pope, a distinguished sokher during the Civil War, died June 12, 1888; 
Frances Dabney, born April 28, 1836, married Judge Manning F. Force, died 
September 4, 1900; Edwin Johnson, born May 22, 1838, died July 13, 1897; 




Hon. Valentine Baxter Horton. 



142 NORWICH UNIVERSITY, 

Aimee .^Isop, born November 25, 1839, died August 30, 1844; Katherine, bom 
September 14, 1841, married Jolm E. May, died July 14, 1909; Samuel Dana, 
a noted French scholar and author, born January 16. 1844, died February 23, 
1895. 

EDWARD HOUSTON. 

Edward Houston, son of John and Eliza (Williamson) Houston, was born 
in Savannah, Ga., about 1810, and died at "Rose Dhu" the family estate 
near Savannah, Ga. 

He was by right a baronet of "Nova Scotia", a new creation, being first 
in descent from Sir Patrick Houston. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1825, 
and graduated in 1828. He engaged in planting in Georgia untU 1840, when he 
removed to a fine farm near Tallahasee, Fla. In 1870, he sold his farm and 
removed to the old Houston estate, "Rose Dhu," near Savannah, where he 
made his home until his death. He was interested in many business enter- 
prises. He was president and a large stock holder in the Tallahasee & Jack- 
sonville R. R., untU 1870, when he sold his interest to the Florida Central & 
P. R. R. He met with marked success in his business ventures and acquired a 
large fortime. 

He was married about 1835 to Claudia Bond of iNIcIntosh County, Ga. 

AUGUSTUS HOW.\RD. 

AugiLstus Howard, son of John Howard and Jane Vi\'ian Howard, was 
born in Sandersville, Ga., March 5, 1806, and died at Lindsay Creek, near 
Columbus, Ga., February 1, 1867. 

At an early age, his parents removed to Milledgeville, where he attended 
the public schools. He w^as a student at Franklin College, Athens, Ga., 1820- 
22. He entered the "Academy' ' in 1822, gi-aduating -R-ith liigh rank in 1824. 

In 1830, he bought a large plantation near Wilner, Houston County, Ga., 
where he resided until 1836. In this last year, he removed to Wynnton, a 
subm-b of Columbas, Ga., where he resided mitil 1844, when he bought a plan- 
tation near Silver Rim, (now Seale) Russell County, Ala., alternately residing 
there and at Lindsay's Creek, near Columbus, Ga., on a place owmed by his 
wife, until his death. He met with success in his business, acquiring a valuable 
property. 

He wa.s much interested in literary matters, contributing many articles on 
agricultm-al subject to the Southern Cultivator published in Athens, Ga. 
He served in Thomas Evans' Company of Georgia Volunteers during the war 
with the Creek Indians. He w^as a Whig in poUtics, but never held office; 
though often m-ged bj^ liis friends to be a candidate for the legislatm-e and 
congress. 

He was twice married: first, November 23, 1830, to Martha Wimberly 
of Twiggs County, Ga., who died July 12, 1842. Fom- children were born to 
them: Mary Jane, born in January, 1832, died February, 1834; Robert Milton, 
bom January 11, 1834, resides in Columbus, Ga.; Anna Calhoun, born Decem- 
ber 14, 1835, died December 19, 1884; John Tyler, born February 22, 1838. 
He was married the second time, November 14, 1844, to Ann Jane Lindsaj', a 
native of Columbus, Ga., who died January 15, 1907. Twelve children were 
born to them: Mary Elizabeth, born March 17, 1846, mamed Moses Joseph, 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 143 

resides Columbus, Ga., Jet Thomas, born July 27, 1847, died February 16, 
1863; Emma Lindsay, born April 10, 1849, married James H. Bickerstaff, 
resides Columbus, Ga.; Charles Cooper, born January 5, 1851, resides Colum- 
bus, Ga.; Antoinette Rutherford, born October 6, 1852, resides Columbus, Ga.; 
Julia Greenleaf, born March 11, 1854, married Charles C. Gatewood, resides 
Columbus, Ga.; Richard, born May 2, 1855, resides Columbus, Ga.; Sherwood, 
born May 2, 1855, died August 30, 1855; AUce Evans, born December 14, 1857, 
resides Columbus, Ga.; Claudia Hope, born June 26, 1860, married John B. 
Maxwell, died April 3, 1900; Miriam, born November 28, 1862, married Walter 
E. DuBose, resides Columbus, Ga.; Helen Augusta, born May 11, 1865, re- 
sides Columbus, Ga. 

ELIJAH KENT HUBBARD. 

Ehjah K. Hubbard, son of Elijah and Lydia (Mather) Hubbard, and 
brother of Hemy G. Hubbard, '28, was born in Middletown, Conn., October 
8, 1812, and died in Chicago, 111, May 26, 1839. 

He engaged in business in Chicago, 111., from 1834 until his death. 

He was married September 15, 1834, to EUzabeth Sebor De Koven of 
Middletown, Conn. Two children were born to them: Ehjah Kent, born 
July 12, 1835, resides in Middletown, Conn.; Louis, born February, 1837, 
died unmarried in Paris, France, April 1, 1866. 

HON. HENRY GRISWOLD HUBBARD. 

Hemy G. Hubbard, son of Elijah and Lydia (Mather) Hubbard, was 
born in Middletown, Conn., October 8, 1814, and died there July 29, 1891. 

He attended the schools of his city and in 1825 entered the Preparatory 
department of the "Academy" in Norwich, Vt., and in 1827, the regular 
work, and graduated in 1829. 

He was clerk for J. & S. Baldwin, general merchants, Middletown, Conn., 
1831-32; clerk for Jabez Hubbard, commission merchant in woolen goods, 
New York, 1832-33. In this last year, he returned to Middletown and formed 
a partnership with Mr. Jesse G. Baldmn and conducted a dry goods store. 
In 1836, he became a stock holder in the Russell Manufacturing Co., and soon 
became its manager; was its president for many years. The business of the 
company which, up to the time he assumed the management, had been very 
small, and not successful, under liis able business management rapidly in- 
creased until his company was one of the largest and most successful in the 
State. He was also connected with many business enterprises; was director 
of the Middletown Bank, 1844-91; trustee of the Middletown Savings Baixk 
for many years, and its president, 1857-58. He mot with marked success in 
his business ventures and acquired a fortune of two miUions. 

His individual history is indeUbly inscribed in the history of this company, 
and among the hundreds of men, women and children emi)loycd in the five 
great mills. Many were known to him personally, and were the recipients 
of a thousand little acts of kindness unknown to the outside world, for in 
these, he invariably obeyed the Scriptural injunction, "Let not thy right 
hand know what thy left hand doeth.' ' When the Russell Manufacturing Co. 
shall be forgotten, his name will be remembered, for it is written upon the 
hearts of hundreds who have known'^his kindness. While possessed of great 



144 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY, 



wealth, Mr. Hubbard was quiet and unostentatious in his private life and was 
equally approachable to the humblest mechanic or the highest potentate. 

He was a Democrat in politics; represented his district (the 22d) in the 
State senate in 1866-68, and displayed in this office the same marked abihty 
that had characterized his business career; served as presidential elector in 
1884 and 1888. He gave Uberally of his money in support of the chui'ch 
and the many benevolent enterprises connected with it. 

He was married, June 19, 1844, to Charlotte Rosella, daughter of Com- 
modore Thomas Macdonough. Two children were born to them: Margaret 
Sill, born March 31, 1846, married Elijah Kent Hubbard of Middletown, 
Conn., died December 27, 1908; Lucy Macdonough, born 1847, married 
Samuel Russell-of Middletown, Conn., died February 2, 1876. 



WILLIAM BEERS HUGGINS. 

William B. Huggins, son of Stephen and Elizabeth (Beers) Huggins, 
was born in New Hav(>n, Conn., March 16, 1810, and died in Glasgow, 
Scotland, June 20, 1875. 

He prepared for coUege in the 
schools of his city and entered the 
"Academy' ' in 1824, and graduated 
in 1827. 

In 1834, he located in Glasgow, 
Scotland, where he conducted a 
large dry goods commission house 
in American trade, under the firm 
name of W. B. Huggins & Co., 
untU his death. He met with 
marked success in his business ven- 
r 1 ires acquiring a large fortune. He 
was a member of the Episcopal 
Chm'ch and was prominent in 
Masonry, ha\ing attained the 33°; 
was a member of the Western Club, 
and the Royal Northern Yacht Club 
of Glasgow. 

He was married three times: 
\^ first, in 1836, to Jessie Carrick 

Wingate of Glasgow, who died 

--^^ .-^^ about 1840. Two children were 

William Beers Huggins bom to them: Louise, born in 

1842, died in 1844; William J., born in 1844, resides in Nestor, Cal. 

He was again married in 1846, to Hamer Sarah Clarkson, of Edinburgh, 
Scotland, who died in 1867. Eleven children were born to them: Caroline 
Louise Hamer, born 1847, resides in San Diego, Cal. Charles Edward, born 
in 1848, died in 1892; Elizabeth Gertrude, born in 1850, died in 1863; Emily 
Virginia, born in 1852, married Mr. Robert Foster, resides in Portland, 
Oregon; Julia Frances, born in 1853, resides in San Diego, Cal.; Charlotte 
Wilhelmina, born in 1854, died in 1863; Amos Thornton, born in 1856, resides 
in Portland, Ore.; Thomas Sharp, born in 1857, resides in Melbourne, AustraUa; 




SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 145 

Mary Constance, born in 1860, married Walter E. Spratt, resides Portcrsville, 
Cal; Beatrice Wakefield, born in 1862, married James D. Holton, resides 
in Salt Lake, Utah; Henry, born in 1866, died in 1878. 

He was married the third time in 1868, to Elizabeth Pridham Taylor 
of London, who died in 1881. Two children were born to them: Frederick 
Moors, born in 1870, resides in St. Louis, Mo.; John Buckman, born in 1871, 
resides St. Loiiis, Mo. 

HON. WILLIAM HULL. 

William Hull, a descendant of Count Bienville, first governor of Louisiana, 
was born on a plantation near New Orleans, La., in 1815, and died in LaCrosse, 
Wis., September 15, 1881. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1830, and graduated in 183-3. He served 
as a lieutenant in the Seminole War in Florida in 1837. 

He began the study of law with the Hon. Judah P. Benjamin of New 
Orleans, in 1838. A few months afterwards, he was forced to leave the 
State, owing to his fighting a duel with a man who had killed his brother 
on the "field of honor." 

He located in Wisconsin in 1838, and having become acquainted with 
Lieut. Jefferson Davis during his ser\'ice in Florida, he visited him at Fort 
Crawford, Prarie du Chien, where Lieut. Davis was stationed. He entered the 
service of the United States Army and was sent by Lieut. Davis in the same 
year on an important mission to Fort SnelUng, Minn. He soon resigned his mili- 
tary position and located at Polosi, Grant County, Wis., which at that time 
was famous for its rich lead mines. Here he engaged in mining and practicing 
law, acquiring a valuable property. 

He was at first a Henry Clay Whig in politics, but becoming acquainted 
with Gov. Henry Dodge, he joined his party becoming a Dodge Whig. Later, 
he joined the Democratic party. He wielded a great influence in his county 
and held many positions; served as chief clerk of the senate in 1851-52. He 
represented his district in the legislature 1854-56 and in the last year served 
as speaker. He served as a delegate to several state conventions of the 
Democratic party. 

In 1858, he removed to LaCrosse, Wis., where he has made his home until 
his death. He continued his practice in LaCrosse, making a -specialty of 
maritime cases. He served many years as attorney for the packet lines on 
the Mississippi river. 

He was twice married: his first wife died, leaving one son, William 
Hull, Jr. He was again married in 1856, to Maggie, daughter of Peter G. 
Jones, of Madison. 

LIEUT. STERN HUMPHREYS, U. S. N. 

Stern Humphreys was appointed a midshipman, U.S. Navy, January 1, 
1818. He entered the "Academy" in 1822, from Murcellus, N. Y., and gradu- 
ated in 1823. He served at the Boston Navy Yard in 1823; on the corvette 
Cyane, Mediterranean squadron, 1824-25; was on leave and waiting orders, 
1826-30; served on the Pacific squadron in 1831; sloop of war St. Louis, at New 
York in 1832; was on leave of absence and furlough in 1833 and 1834; resigned, 
October 10, 1834. 



146 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

ANDREW BACCUS HUNTINGTON. 

Andrew B. Huntington, son of Joseph and Eunice (Carew) Huntington, 
was born in Nonvdch, Conn., December 16, 1805, and died in Baltimore, Md., 
January 10, 1851. 

He attended the schools of his town and Philips Academy, Andover, Mass. 
He entered the "Academy" in 1824, and graduated in 1827. He removed to 
Baltimore, Md., where he engaged in mercantile business until his death. 

He was married in Baltimore, Md., December 17, 1829, to Jane EUza 
Norris, who died September 20, 1861. Eleven children were born to them: 
Joseph William Norris, born November 26, 1830, died April 24, 1831; Joseph 
WUUam Norris, Second, born January 27, 1832, now an Episcopal Clergjonan; 
Eunice Sarah, married Samuel Barrington of Philadelphia, Pa. ; Andrew Baccus, 
bom January 1, 1835; Charles Snowden, born March 1, 1837; Jane EUza, born 
June 17, 1839; John Buckler, born January 21, 1841, died August 3, 1841; 
Rosahe Letitia Norris, born April 17, 1842, died July 12, 1842; Edward Shaeffer 
Norris, born July 7, 1843, died March 9, 1844; George Frederick, born April 
28, 1845, served in the Civil War; Bui-chard Thomas, born May 24, 1847. 

ERASTUS HUNTINGTON. 

Erastus Huntington, son of Thomas and Mary (Newport Burbridge) 
Huntington, was born in Hartford, Conn., June 9, 1808. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1825, 
remaining until 1827. 

He engaged in newspaper business and in 1860 was a proof-reader for 
Harper Bros., New York, N. Y.; and at that time resided in BrookljTi, N. Y. 

He was married June 14, 1855, to Elizabeth Hecker Vanderhoof. Four 
children were born to them: Thomas, James, Mary, Elizabeth. 

SAMUEL ANDREWS HUNTINGTON. 

Samuel A. Huntington, son of Charles P. and Maria (Perit) Huntington, 
was bom in Norwich, Conn., February 5, 1812, and died unmarried in New 
York city, N. Y., April 28, 1834. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1825, 
and remained until 1828. He was engaged in business in New York city until 
his death. 

MAJ. EPHRAIM HUTCHINS. 

Ephraim Hutchins, son of Abiel (Abel?) and EUzabeth (Partridge) Hutch- 
ins, was born in Concord, N. H., October 4, 1803, and died there. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1820, 
and graduated in 1822. 

He was proprietor of the Phenix Hotel, 1832-49, also engaged in running 
stages. He was a Democrat in poUtics and held several offices; was post master 
of Concord, 1849-53; was a candidate for maj'or in 1854. He was interested 
in the State Militia; was major of the 3d brigade, and served in the Governor's 
"Foot Guards." 

He was married May 22, 1832, to Caroline EUzabeth, daughter of Samuel 
Blodgett of East Randolph, Vt. Three children were born to them: a daugh- 
ter, Mrs. EUzabeth Schutz, resides in Hartford, Conn. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 147 

HENRY S. HUTCHINSON, A. B. 

Heni-y S. Hutchinson, son of Judge Titus and Clarissa (Sage) Hutchinson, 
was born in Woodstock, Vt., June 30, 1806, and died there, unmarried, June 
24, 1885. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1820, 
and remained three years. He then graduated A. B. from the University of 
Vermont in 1825. 

He studied law with his father and was admitted to the bar in June, 1828. 
He then located in New York city, and was admitted to the court of common 
pleas, September 18, 1828, and practiced his profession until 1830, being asso- 
ciated with Geo. W. Brinkerhoff '28. In 1830, he returned to Woodstock and 
practiced his profession a few months and then located in Strafford, where he 
practiced until January, 1832. Through the kindness of Captain Partridge 
and T. B. Ransom, '25, he was introduced to Hon. Aaron Buit, in New York, in 
January, 1832, with the idea of entering his law office. But the plan not prov- 
ing practicable, he went to Albany, N. Y., where he was admitted to practice 
before the Supreme Court of the State, July 5, 1832. He returned to Vermont 
later in the same year and began the practice of his profession March 18, 1833. 
In September, 1837, he went to Texas and in January 6, 1838, located in Nat- 
chez, Miss., and practiced his profession until September, 1843; spent some 
time in St. Louis, Mo., and in December, 1843, located in Cincinnati, where he 
practiced law until about 1848, when he returned to Woodstock, where he 
resided until his death. In 1832, he added the initial S. to his name. 

He possessed considerable literary ability and for several years took an 
active part in the political affairs of Woodstock. He was editor of the Con- 
stitution, August-November, 1836, a paper published in Woodstock, in the 
interest of the Anti-Masonic party. 

HON. JOHN JAY HYDE, A. M., M. D. 

John J. Hyde, son of John and Lucy Anne (Burrow^s) Hyde, was born in 
Stonington, Conn., February 15, 1811, and died in Fort Scott, Kan. in 1875. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1827, 
and graduated in 1831. He graduated A. B. from Union College in 1834, and 
later received the degree of A. M. from the Institution; was valedictorian of his 
class and a member of the (f) B K Fraternity. 

He later studied medicine, but after a brief practice entered the profession 
of journalism. He was associated with Park Benjamin and William Henry 
Herbert in publishing the New York World. He was a Republican in politics 
and held several positions; was U. S. Consul to Porto Rico, during President 
Lincoln's administration. 

He was married, about 1840, to Mrs. Hattie Jones; no children. 

JOSHUA BURROWS HYDE. 

Joshua B. Hyde, son of John and Lucy Ann (Burrows) Hyde, was born in 
Stoningi,on, Conn , June 28, 1809, and di d in New York city, about 1880. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his city and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1827, and graduated in 1829. 

He engaged in mercantile pursuits in New Orleans many years, and later 
removed to New York city, where he continued in business until his death. 



148 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



He met uith marked success in his business ventures and acquired a large 
property. He was a fine scholar and linguist and a passionate lover of art. 
He traveled extensively in Europe. He was one of the first directors of the 
American Institute Fair in New York City. 

WILLIAM HYDE, M. D. 

William Hyde, son of Dr. William and Rhoda ^Palmer) Hyde, was bom in 
Stonington, Conn., October 27, 1808, and died there September 25, 1873. 

He prepared for college at the Stonington Academy, and entered the 
"A. L. S. & M. Academy" in 1825 and graduated in 1827. He studied medi- 
cine Wiih his father and graduated M. D. from Harvard in 1830. He prac- 
ticed liis profession in Stonington from 1830, until his death, meeting with 
marked success. "As a physician he was clear and comprehensive in his 
judgment, frank, high minded and honorable. In all places he exacted and 
received the consideration due to his profession.' ' 

He was connected -nith several business enterprises; was director and 
president, at the time of hLs death, of the Stonington Savings Bank^ one of the 
most reHable banks in the city. He was incorporator of the Stonington 
Cemetery Association and served as pi'esident, 1861-73. 

He was a Repubhcan in poUtics,but his time was too much engrossed in his 
profession to admit of holding office, yet at the earnest sohcitation of his feUow- 
citizens he represented his town in the legislature, 1849-50 and was instru- 
mental in chartering the Stonington Sa\'ings Bank. 

He was twice married: first, to Hepzibah, daughter of Ephraim and 
Hannah Ehza (Denison) WiUiams. Two children were born to them: one who 
died in infancy, and a son, William, who died when twenty years of age. He 
was married the second time to Ellen, daughter of Maj. Gen. Wilham 'and 
Rhoda CB-ibr-ofk') WiUiams. She died about 1890; no children. ^ 




'^. 




Sanders Irving. 



S.^XDERS IRVING. 

Sanders Ir\'ing, son of Ebenezer 
aud Elizabeth (liip) Irving, was born 
in New York City, February 9, 1813, 
and died in Washington, D. C, 
:\Iarch23, 1884. His father, Ebenezer 
Ir\-ing, was the oldest brother of 
Washington Ir^ing, the noted author. 

He prepared for college in the 
schools of his city and entered the 
"Academy" in 1824, and graduated 
in 1829. Immediately upon his 
graduation, he entered the profession 
of ci\il engineering under Captain 
WiUiam H. Swift, on the Boston & 
Alban}^ Raih'oad, after which he was 
engineer for some years on the New 
York Central Railroad. In 1841, 
he went to Washington, D. C, as 
private secretary to Postmaster- 
General Francis Granger, and occu- 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



149 



pied the position for four years, wlien he returned to his profession and 
was employed on the Erie Raih'oad. In 1847, he became connected 
with the Hudson River Raih'oad, and from there went to Covington, Ky., 
where he built the gas works. He returned to New York and engaged in 
his profession. He resided one year in Europe, and then located in Canandai- 
gua, where he made his home until 1878. He then removed to Washington, 
D. C, where he resided until his death. 

He was married in 1840, to Julia, daughter of Gen. John A. Granger 
of Canandaigua, N. Y. Mrs. Irving died in 1900; no children. 

HON. CHARLES L. IVES. 

Charles L. Ives was born in New Haven, Conn., September 18, 1810» 
and died there, December 31, 1880. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1823, 
remaining four years. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in New 
Haven in 1836. He practiced his profession in New Haven many years, 
meeting with marked success. 

He was at first a Democrat in poUtics and later a Republican. He 
represented New Haven m the State Legislature in 1853, and East Haven 
in 1866, 1867, and 1868. In this last year, he served as speaker of the House. 

He was survived by a son, Charles, who died in 1883. 



HON. EDWIN FERRY JOHNSON, C. E., A. M. 

Edwin F. Johnson, son of John and Rachel (Ferry) Johnson, was born 
in Essex, Vt., May 23, 1803, and died in New York City, April 12, 1872^ 

His father was a prominent land 
surveyor and mill owner, and for 
some time surveyor-general of 
Vermont. 

In 1809, his parents removed to 
Burlington, Vt., where he attended 
the pubUc schools, and at the age of 
ten began the study of Latin with 
the Rev. Mr. Clarke, the Unitarian 
minister. At the age of fourteen, he 
had become a very competent land 
surveyor, and in 1818 he accompanied 
his father, as assistant engineer, on 
the boundary survey between the 
I'nited States and Canada, from the 
"northwest head of the Connecticut 
river to the Bay of Fundy." While 
thus employed, he made an inde- 
pendent survey of Lake Temiscouatta 
and the route down that lake by the 
Madawasca and St. John's Rivers to 
the Madawasca settlement; and had 
sole charge of the necessary astro- 
nomical observations and calculations. 




Hon. Edwin i'erry Johnson. 



150 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

He was liis father's assistant in various engineering and surveying pro- 
jects until January, 1823, when he entered the "Academy." He graduated 
with honor in 1825. He was tutor in Mathematics from 1823 to 1825; in- 
structor in Mathematics, 182.5-1826, and assistant professor of Natural 
History at the same time, and professor of Mathematics and Civil Engineer- 
ing, 1826-1829. He accompanied the corps of cadets on their march to 
Plattsbiu-g in 1824; Washington, D. C, in 1826; and to Niagara Falls in 1827, 
writing a sketch of each march, which was afterward published in pamphlet 
form. 

In 1825, wlaile at home in Bui-lington, he drilled a company for the recep- 
tion of Lafayette, who visited the place that year. In 1824, he made a topo- 
graphical survey of Norwich and its vicinity, covering an area of 151 square 
miles, as practice work for his class, and in 1826, vnth the corps of cadets 
under his charge, he made a similar survey of Midleto^\-n, Conn., and its 
vicinit}', covering some 400 scjuare miles. 

He was elected in 1829, professor of Natural Philosophy in the \Yesleyan 
University at Middletown, and liis name appears on the first catalogue issued 
by that Institution, but his connection with it was very brief. In 1836, in 
recognition of his work as a civil engineer, Norwich University conferred upon 
him the degree of A. M., and in 1839, the University of Vermont gave him 
the same degree. He was a trustee of Norwich University from 1834 to 
1848. He was an able instructor and did much to strengthen the course of 
Civil Engineering at the "Academy.' ' 

In 1829, he was in Utica, N. Y., in charge of the survey of the land lines 
of the Erie Canal, from Canastote to Albany; and the survey of the Cham- 
plain canal, which work he completed in the winter of 1830-1831. 

In May 1831, he located a branch hne connecting the Morris canal 
with some factories in Paterson, N. J., and later was assistant on the Catskill 
and Canajoharie R. R., making surveys from Schoharie village towards the 
Susquehanna River and across the summit of Sharon. He was resident en- 
gineer on the construction of the Middle and Western Divisions of the same 
road, October to December, 1831, when work was suspended. During 1831, 
he made a plan of a route, and estimates for same, of a proposed railroad from 
Hartford to Guildford, Conn.; in October 1832, made plans and fm-nished 
estimates and specifications for the govermuent for a bridge over the Potomac 
to Washington, D. C; was assistant engmeer in charge of construction of 
Chenango canal, with headquarters at Chnton, N. Y., April to September, 
1833; was resident engineer, Utica and Schenectady R. R., Western Division, 
Utica to Little Falls, October, 1833 until January, 1835. During 1834,he made 
preUminary sm-veys for the proposed Ontario and Hudson ship canal, under 
commission from Governor Marcy; was principal engineer on the Auburn 
canal dam in 1835; made report, with maps, plans and estimates, of the Ontario 
and Hudson Ship canal; was chief engineer Aubm-n and Syracuse R. R., 1835- 
1838; was associate chief engineer, with Mr. Talcott, on the New York and 
Erie R.R.,in charge of construction from the Hudson River to "Painted Post," 
a distance of 300 miles, February 1836 until March, 1837; chief engineer 
same road, March, 1837 until May, 1838; chief engineer Ogdensburg and 
Champlain R. R., May, 1838, untQ February, 1839; chief engineer New York 
and Albany R. R., 1838-1846; president of the Stevens Association of Hoboken, 
N. J., in charge of that company's steamboats, landed estate and railway 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 151 

in New Jersey, July, 1839, until June, 1840. In 1841, he located the hne of 
the New York and Albany R.R. through Westchester county; made plans for a 
bridge over the Passaic River; was consulting engineer Springfield and Hart- 
ford R. R., in the same year. He declined the position of canal commissioner 
of New York in 1842; also declined chief engineership of the New York and 
Erie R. R., in 1843; was nominated to legislature in 1844, but declined the 
office. He examined the route for the Whitehall R. R.; actively engaged in 
surveys for the New York and Boston Air Line R. R., in 1845; made surveys 
and inspection of coal lands in the Bear Mountain region of Pennsylvania, 
in which he was financially interested, in 1846; chief engineer Syracuse and 
Oswego R. R., July, 1846, until January 1847 

He was chief engineer of the New York and Boston .Air Line R. R., 
in 1848; was chief engineer of branch line, Middletown to Berlin, for the 
Hartford and New Haven R. R., in June, 1849; was employed in the fall 
of the same year by the Rutland and Burlington R. R., to obtain concessions 
from the State Legislature of Vermont. During 1849, he made examinations of 
route and prepared plans and estimates for the Vermont and Canada R. R., 
and the St. La\\Tence and Champlain canal. He dechned the position of 
chief engineer of the Albany water works in 1850; made plans and estimates 
for water works at Middletown, Conn., in 1850; was consulting engineer 
on construction of a bridge at \\Tieeling, Va., in July, 1850. He was chief 
engineer Rock River Valley Union R. R., in Wiscon.sin, September, 1850-1856; 
Wisconsin and IlUnois R. R., 1852-1855. He made report on the construction 
of a railroad from Troy to Oswego in March 1854, and later, m same year, 
was interested with Judge Jessup in the Lackawanna Association; made survey 
of the city of Middletown and planned a new sj-stem of sewerage 1855; com- 
piled a new city charter in 1856. 

He was called to Washington in 1861, to attend a general council on the 
prosecution of the war; prepared a paper embodjang a general plan of opera- 
tions by request of the War Department in July 1862. He was offered the 
commission of brigadier general and a command in Southwest, in 1862, but de- 
clined; was also offered the position of assistant secretary of war, in 1862, which 
office he declined. He prepared a paper on Maine defences by request of 
the War Department in April 1863; visited the Northeastern coast and the 
Northern boundary with the Cabinet and Congressional party in 1864; made 
a careful examination for a proposed ship canal and marine railway at Niagara 
Falls in July, 1865; was consulting engineer, MiddletowTi water works in 1865; 
made surveys at Lewiston and Niagara Falls for ship canal in 1865, and was 
in Washington, in the interest of the project, early in 1866; was consulting 
engineer Lake Ontario Shore Line R. R., 1868-1869. 

On June 14, 1866, he was appointed chief engineer of the Northern 
Pacific R. R., a position which he held until 1870, when he resigned and 
accepted the position of consulting engineer of the same road, which office 
he held till his death in 1872. His successor, Gen. Milnor Roberts, thus speaks 
of his work: "The Northern Pacific Railroad and the American people who 
are to be so largely benefited by the construction of this important railroad 
thoroughfare across the northern portion of the continent, are indebted 
more to the intelligent forecast and untiring energy of Edwin F. Johnson 
than to any other individual.' ' Had he lived five years longer he would have 
seen the metals laid on practicalhj his oivn lines from the A.tlauti,c to the Pacific. 



152 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

He was, unquestionably, one of the ablest, as he was one of the earliest 
if not the earliest, railroad engineers, this country has produced. As early 
as 1825, he paid special attention, in his engineering class, to railroad con- 
struction. In 1828, he 'WTote: ""\Mien the railroad is more thoroughly under- 
stood the larger part by far, of the inland basiness will be conducted upon 
them." It should be remembered that this bold prediction was made at a 
time when the most prominent engineers of the country placed the railway as a 
means of transportation, "Between the canal and a good turnpike." 

His pamphlet, published in 1829, on a proposed railroad to the Mississippi 
River, attracted wide attention. In 1830, he continued his researches and 
investigations on the topograph.y of the countrj^ from the Mississippi River 
to the Pacific coast; and for the next thirty-five years his pen was never 
idle in the advocacy of the construction of railroads across the continent. In 
1853, he pubhshed his work on Railroads to the Pacific in which he advocated 
the present general route of the Northern Pacific Railroad. 

He was a fine draftsman and an artist of considerable ability. He illus- 
trated his maps -nith India ink or water color sketches of noted points along 
the routes portraj'ed. He also possessed great mechanical ingenuity and 
skill. In 1827, he constructed an on-ery for a Air. Newell of Vermont, and 
among other things, he invented and patented a screw-power press, an im- 
provement on canal locks, six-wheeled truck for railway car, an eight-wheeled 
locomotive, the models for which he made himself, as well as the model of a 
marine railway. 

He was connected with many business enterprises. He was a director 
in the Shaler & Hall Quarry Co., from 1842 to 1872 and its president and 
treasurer from 1848 to 1864; was a partner in a warp factory in Burlington, 
Vt., with his brother-in-law, Mr. J. D. Allen, in 1845;was at one time a director 
in the Middlesex County National Bank and later one of the founders of the 
Central National Bank of Aliddletowni, Conn. In co-operation with his 
friend, William B. Ogdcn, Hon. Robert J. Walker and others, he organized the 
Chicago Land Co.. in 1853, and later the Wisconsin Land Co. He possessed 
good military ability, and, but for the pr(>ssing natm'e of his business cares 
would have accepted the commission tendered him in 1862. 

He was a Democrat in pohtics until 1861, when he became a consistent 
member of the Republican party; was mayor of Middletown in 1856 and 1857; 
was State senator in 1856 and a member of the board of education for Middle- 
town for many years. The character of his professional duties, however, 
prevented his engaging to any extent in politics. He was a member of Christ 
(afterwards Holy Trinity) Episcopal Church of Middleto^Ti, and for over 40 
years served as vestrj-man and warden. 

He was one of the most prolific ^Titers of his time, along a -wide range of 
topics. Omitting his professional reports, the following are tte principal 
works published by him: Treatise on Surveying, 1825; Tyler's Arithmetic 
Revised and Reviewed, 1827; The Newellian Sphere, 1828; Land Surveys, 1828; 
Review cf a Project for a Great Westen Railway, 1829; Method of Conducting 
the Canal Surveys of the Stale of New York, 1832; The Epicycloid, 1832; Cid}ical 
Quantities, Railroad xnd Canal, 1837; Mountains in New York, 1839; Tables 
of Quantities for Tracing Railroad Curves, 1840; Railway System of the State 
of New Y'ork, 1840; Width of Track, 1842; Gauge of Railways, 1853; Railroad 
to the Pacific, Northern Route, Its General Character, Relative Merits, etc., 1854; 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



153 



Report of Defences of Maine, to Secretary of War, 1862; Re-port of General 
Plan of Operations, to same, 1863; Caesar's Bridge, 1863; Ship Canal and 
Marine Railways, 1864; First Meridian, 1884; Words for the People, 1865; 
The Reciprocity Treaty, 1866; Navigation of the Lakes, 1866; Our Pacific 
Railroads, 1868; Niagara, 1868; Water Supply of New York, 1870; Trans- 
continental Railways, 1870; Historical Sketch of Norse Settlements and the 
Newport Tower, 1870; Banking and the Currency, 1871; Broad and Narrow 
Gauge, 1871, and numerous professional, scientific, philosophical and political 
papers contributed to reviews, magazines and journals during the space of 
forty-five years. 

He was married September 7, 1830, to Charlotte, daughter of Nathaniel 
Shaler a merchant, of New York, and Middletown. She died May 20, 1883. 
Eight children were born to them: Louisa, born July 4, 1831, died unmarried, 
May 18, 1888; Ehzabeth, born March 5, 1853, died unmarried, October 25, 
1903; Edwin Augustus, born November 4, 1834, died unmarried, December 19, 
1893; William Shaler, born November 23, 1836, resides in Chester, Penn.; 
Frederick Allen, born September 20, 1838, died March 30, 1840; Charles 
Shaler, born August 15, 1840, died May 14, 1848; Joseph Allen, born February 
27, 1843, died August 31, 1849; Lucy Ann Shaler, born September 24, 1845, 
married M. Moncrief Pattison, M. D., resides in England. 



«^ 



71 



CHAPLAIN RICHARD JOHNSON, A. M. 

Richard Johnson, son of William and Elizabeth (WhalejO Johnson, was 
born in Beaufort, S. C, November 13, 1809, and died at Atlanta, Ga., January 
7, 1872. 

He prepared for college in the 
schools of his city and entered the 
"Academy" in 1826, graduated in 
1828; was distinguished at the "Acad- 
emy' ' for his proficiency in drill and 
tactics. He graduated A. B. from 
Trinity College in 1829. He studied 
medicine for some time, when coming 
under the influence of the Rev. 
William Baker, a celebrated Presby- 
terian preacher, he determined to be- \ 
come a clergyman. He graduated 
from the Episcopal Theological 
Seminary at Alexandria, Va., and 
was ordained in the Episcopal ministry 
in 1832; was re(;tor of chureihes in 
South Carolina, Georgia and Louis- 
iana. 

On the breaking out of the Civil 
War, he enlisted in "Hamptons 
Legion," C. S. A.; was appointed 
chaplain and a,ssisted in drilling and 
instructing the command. He was 
an accomplished swordsman and drill 





Rev. Richard Johnson 



154 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

master. He was distinguished for his bravery and often accompanied the 
command in battle and was popularly known as the "fighting parson"; at 
the battle of Culpepper Court House his horse was shot under him while 
taking part in a charge made by the command. He was a fine scholar, an 
eloquent speaker and a writer of more than ordinary abihty. Several of his 
poems and sermons were printed. 

He was married in 1831, to JNIaria, sister of Governor WiUiam Smith of 
Alexandria, Va. Five childi-en were born to them: Wilham Johnson; Caleb 
Smith, resides in Beaufort, S. C; Joseph. 

LIEUT. ROBERT E. JOHNSON, U. S. N. 

Robert E. Johnson entered the "Academy" from Warren Count j-, N. C, 
m 1826, and graduated in 1828. 

He was commissioned a midshipman, U. S. N., October 1, 1827; was pro- 
moted passed midshipman, June 10, 1833, and lieutenant, February 12, 1839. 
He died February 4, 1855. 

DANIEL PINCKNEY JOHNSTON.^ 

Daniel P. Johnston, son of WilUam and Maria (Pinckney) Johnston, was 
born in Charleston, S. C, Januarj^ 15, 1807, and died there November 18, 1871. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his city and entered the "Acad- 
emj^' ' in 1823, and graduated in 1S26. 

He was for several years a rice factor in Charleston and later held a re- 
sponsible position in the U. S. Custom House in Charleston. He served as an 
officer in the South Carolina ^'olunteers in the Seminole War in Florida; was 
appointed by the governor of the state a member of the committee which 
attended General Lafayette on his visit to South Carolina. 

He married a Miss Pringle; two children were born to them. 

MAClvEWN JOHNSTON. 

Mackewn Johnston, son of William and Maria (Pinckney) Johnston, was 
born in Charleston, S. C, October 15, 1811, and died in Hendersonville, N. C, 
May 18, 1894. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his city, and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1825, and graduated in 1828. 

He was a machinist in Charleston for several years; later was superin- 
tendent of Lucas' Rice MiU. In 1852, he removed to Hendersonville, N. C, 
where he owned an extensive plantation. 

He married Martha Cannon Webb, onh' sister of Col. T. L. Webb, '26. 
Three children were born to them: William Alexander, resides Brevard, N. C; 
Frank Webb, superintendent Mexican National R. R., resides, city of ^Mexico; 
Mackewn, a Civil Engineer in Stephenville, Tex. 

HON. GEORGE WALLACE JONES. 

George W. Jones, son of Judge John Rice and Mary (Barger) Jones, was 
born in Vincennes, Ind., April 12, 1804, and died at Dubuque, Iowa, July 22, 
1896. 

He was a student, for some time, at Bishop Dubourg's Roman Cathohc 
College, St. Louis, IMo. He graduated in 1825, from the Transylvania Uni- 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 155 

versity, Lexington, Ky. In the fall of this year, he entered the "Academy" 
with Charles D. Drake, '26, (q. v.) from Cincinnati, Ohio, making a specialty 
of the study of law. He remained at the "Academy" imtil 1826, when he 
located in Missouri and was appointed clerk of the U. S. district court. 

In March, 1827, he resigned this office and removed to Sinsinawa Mound, 
Michigan Territory, now Wisconsin. Here he engaged, for some years in a 
general mercantile business; also in mining and smelting. 

In 1832, he was appointed aide on the staff of Gen. Henry Dodge, and 
served through the Black Hawk War; was later elected colonel in the militia, 
serving for some time. 

He took an active part in the political affairs of the territory and held 
man}^ positions. He served, for some time, as chief justice of the Territorial 
Court. He was elected delegate from Michigan Territory to the 24th Congress 
in 1835. His most important work was the framing of ihe act for the estab- 
lishing of the Wisconsin Territory in 1836. He received a certificate of election 
to the 25th Congress in 1837; but his seat was successfully contested by James 
D. Doty, a Whig, who assumed the office in January, 1839. He framed the act 
for the establishing of the Iowa territory, which through his efforts, was passed, 
July 4, 1838. In December, 1840, he was appointed surveyor general of Iowa 
by President Van Buren, holding the office until July 4, 1841. In March, 1845, 
he was again appointed to this office, which he held until December, 1848. He 
served as U. S. senator from Iowa from December 26, 1848, until March 3, 1859; 
served as U. S. minister to Colombia, South America, April 30, 1859, - 
November 5, 1861. 

He then returned to the United States and here an unfortunate and un- 
called for incident occurred in the life of this distinguished old cadet. Upon 
his arrival in New York City, he was arrested by the order of Secretary Seward, 
on the charge of disloyalty, based on a friendK^ letter he had written to Presi- 
dent Davis of the Confederate government, which had fallen into the hands of 
the State department. He was imprisoned over two months in Fort Lafayette, 
N. Y., when he was released by order of President Lincoln, who believed him 
innocent of disloyalty to the United States. He made his residence in Du- 
buque, Iowa, from 1818, until his death. 

He was married, January 7, 1829, to Josephine, daughter of Cyril Cregoire 
of St. Genevieve, Mo. Mrs. Jones died April 29, 1888. Eight children were 
born to them, of whom two sons and two daughters, survived their parents. 

JUDGE JOHN PRINGLE~JONES, A. B., LL. D. 

John P. Jones, son of William and Elizabeth Haskell (Pringle) Jones, was 
born at the Durham Furnace, Durham, Bucks Co.,Penn., in 1812, and died in 
London, England, March 16, 1874. 

At the death of his father, his mother removed to Philadelphia, where he 
lived for some time. He entered the "Academy" from Philadelphia in 1825, 
and graduated in 1828. He then entered the University of Pennsylvania and 
remained until the beginning of the senior year, 'when he entered the College of 
New Jeresy and graduated A. B. in 1831. He received the honorary degree 
of LL. D. from Franklin and Marshall College, Pennsylvania in 1860. He 
studied law with Charles Chauncey of Philadelphia and was admitted to the 
bar in 1834. He became distinguished in his profession and held several 



156 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



positions of honor, but never a political office. He was district attorney of 
Bucks Co., from 1839 to 1847; was president and judge of the Bucks, Lehigh, 
and Northampton district; afterward of the Bucks, and then of the Lehigh 
and Northampton districts. He was a man of great legal learning, many- 
accomplishments, and extensive reading; handsome in person, of courtly ad- 
dress, fine social qualities, and warm in his friendships. He published two 
volumes of Pennsylvania state reports. 

He was tvn.ce married: first, to Anna Muhlenburg, daughter of Dr. Isaac 
Hiester, and the second time to Catherine Elizabeth Hiester, a grand-daughter 
of Gov. Joseph Hiester. 

SURGEON ANDREW ELLICOTT KENNEDY, XT. S. N., M. D. 

Andrew E. Kennedy, son of Dr. Thomas Ruston and Jane Judith (ElUcott) 
Kennedy, was born in Meadville, Pa., September 18, 1804. 

At an early age his parents removed to Philadelphia, Pa., where he pre- 
pared for college. He entered the "Academy' ' in 182.3, and graduated in 182.5. 

He then entered the University of Pcnnsj-lvania Medical College and 
graduated AI. D. in 1828. He was appointed assistant surgeon U. S. N., 
January 3, 1828, and continued in service until his death at Bata\aa Island, 
Java, June 13, 1833. 



HON. JEFFERSON PARISH KIDDER, A. M. 

Jefferson P. Kidder, son of Lyman and Ruth (Nichols) Kidder, was born 
in Brain tree, Vt., June 4, 1818, and died in St. Paul, Minn., October 2, 1883. 

He attended the schools of his towm, and at the age of fifteen began teaching 

school. He prepared for college at the Orange County Grammar School, 

- Randolph Center, Vt., and entered 

^ the "Academy" in 1832, graduating 

in 1834; served as tutor at the "Acad- 
emy." 

He studied law with B. F. 
Chamborlin of Snowsvillc, (Brain- 
tree) Vt., and was admitted to the 
Orange County bar in 1839; practiced 
his profession in Snowsville, 1839-45; 
West Randolph, Vt., 1845-57. He 
removed to St. Paul, Minn., in 1857, 
where he made his home until 1865, 
when he removed to Vermillion, S. 
Dakota, where he resided until his 
death. 

He was a Democrat in politics 
until 1861, when he joined the Re- 
publican party; was a member of the 
Vermont State Constitutional Con- 
vention in 1841 and 1843; was states 
attorney, Orange County, 1842-47; 
Statejsenator, 1847-48. He was elected 
lieutenant-governor of the State in 



'^- 





'\^'-'5S' 



Hon. Jefferson Parish Kidder. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 157 

1853 on the ticket headed bj^ John S. Robinson of Bennington. There was 
no election by the people that year, and by a union of the "Free Soilers" with 
the Democrats in the legislature, the election of the democratic nominee was 
secured, the first and only democrat who ever held these offices in Vermont; 
during the sickness of the governor, acted in his place for some time; was a 
delegate to the National Democratic Convention, in Chicago, in 1856; repre- 
sented his district in the Minnesota legislature, 1855-60, 1863-64; was 
associate justice of the U. S. Court for the Territory of Dakota, 1865-76, 
1880-83; was delegate to Congress from Dakota, 1876-80. 

He was a very able lawyer and judge; an eloquent speaker and very 
popular with the people. His popularity is well shown in his holding office 
as a Democrat in Vermont when the voters were overwhelmingly Whig or 
Repubhcan. He took great interest in military affairs; served as captain of 
Vermont Mihtia for some years. The University of Vermont conferred upon, 
him the degree of A. M. in 1848. 

He was married Feb. 26, 1838, to Mary Ann Stockwell of Cornwall, Vt. 
who died September 29, 1888. Four children were born to them: Marion 
Josephine, bom December 5, 1839, married Dana White, died in St. Paul, 
Minn.; Lyman Stockwell, born 1842, served in the Civil War and as second 
lieutenant U. S. Cavalry and shot by the Indians while carrying dispatches 
from General Sherman to General Custer in the Sioux campaign, July2, 1868; 
Silas W., born October 24, 1847, resides in Vermillion, South Dakota; Jefferson 
Parish, Jr., born May 15, 1856, died in 1859. 

SURGEON GILMAN KIMBALL, A. M., M. D. 

Oilman Kimball, son of Ebenezer and Polly (Aiken) Kimball, was born in 
New Chester, now Hill, N. H., December 8, 1804, and died in Lowell, Mass., 
July 27, 1892. 

He attended the schools of his city, and entered the "Academy" in 1820, 
and graduated in 1823. He graduated M. D. from the Dartmouth College 
Medical School in 1827; also received the degree of M. D. from Berkshire 
Medical College in 1837; the Vermont Medical College in 1840, and from Yale, 
in 1856; received the degree of A. M. from Dartmouth in 1840. 

He practiced his profession in Lowell, Mass, 1830-92; was professor of 
Surgery, Vermont Medical College, Woodstock, 1837-41; lecturer on Anatomy 
and Surgery, Berkshire Medical College 1838-41; was physician of the corpora- 
tion Hospital, Lowell, Mass., twenty-six years. 

He was appointed brigade surgeon, October 2, 1861, and sc-rved for some 
time at Annapolis, Md., and Fortress Monroe; was appointed medical director 
and assigned to the command of General B. F. Butler. He established many 
military hospitals, but owing to disability was forced to resign his commission, 
April 28, 1862. 

He was one of the best known phy.'^icians of the country. He contributed 
many articles to the Medical Periodicals; was a member of the American 
Gynecological Society, and president in 1882; Massachusetts Medical Society 
and vice-president in 1878. 

He was twice married: first, September 20, 1832, to Mary, daughter of 
Dr. Henry Dewar, of Lassodie, Scotland. She died July 7, 1869. Three 



158 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



children were l)orn of this miiniti<.';e : Gihnan Dewar, John Henry, and 
Ebenezer. 

He was again married in 1872, to Isabel, daughter of Captain Hemy 
Defries of Nantucket, IMass. 



ROBERT PARKER KIMBALL. 




Robert Parker Kimball. 



Robert P. Kimball, son of Benja- 
min Jr., and Rhoda (Beaman) Kimball, 
was born in Concord, N. H., March 18, 
1806, and died there, March 20, 1878. 

He prepared for college in the 
schools of his to-ftTi and Bradford, 
Mass.; and entered the "Academy" in 
1821, graduating in 1824. 

He engaged in mercantile pursuits 
in Concord for some years. 

He was married in Franklin, N. 
H., March 8, 1838, to Rachel, daughter 
of Sanborn and Mehitable (Sanborn) 
Blaisdell, of Wentworth, N. H. She 
died in Concord, N. H., May 31, 1896: 

Four children were born to them. 
Nathaniel Osgood, born March 16, 
1842, resides in Denver, Colo; Ben- 
jamin Ilazen, born Jime 1, 1850, died 
March 5, 1853, Harriet, born Decem- 
ber 5, 1853, died August 8, 1854; 
Lucy Hazen, born October 6, 1855, 
re.«ides in Concord, N. H. 



HON. FREDERICK KINSMAN. 

Frederick Kinsman, son of John and Rebecca (Perkins) Kinsman, was 
born in Kinsman, Ohio, March 4, 1S07, and died in Warren, Ohio. June 24, 
1884. 

His father, who was born in Norwich, Conn., was a soldier of the Revolu- 
tion, member of the Connecticut Legislature, 1797-1800, and bought an estate 
of eighteen thousand acres on the Connecticut Western Reserve in Ohio, 
which eventually became the township of Kinsman. 

The subject of our sketch prepared for college at the Plainfield Academy, 
1824-25, and entered the "A. L. S. & INI. Academy" in 1825, graduating in 
1827. He then returned to Kinsman, where for three j^ears he assisted his 
brothers in the management of the family estate. 

In 1830, he removed to Warren, Ohio, where he entered the land office 
of his uncle, General Simon Perkins, whose partner he eventually became. 
This office, which was the last survivor of the land offices on the ^^'estern 
Reserve, was at one time the most important in the state of Ohio, and continued 
to transact business until 1872. 

Mr. Kinsman took a leading i)art in all business projects of his town and 
county, acquired a large property, and was always active in promoting public 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 159 

objects. He was for many years director of the Western Reserve Bank and 
of the Cleveland and Mahoning Railroad of which he was one of the original 
projectors, also director of the First National Bank. He took active interest 
in the development of his farms and in all agricultural matters, serving for 
two years as president of the County Agricultural Society. 

He was associate judge for his county^from ]845to^l850, and became an 
active abolitionist. After the formation of the Republican party he became 
deeply interested in its success. Although never an office holder, he took an 
active part in the politics of his State; was delegate to the Republican National 
Convention of 1864, which renominated Abraham Lincoln; was Presidential 
elector in 18G8, and had an important share in promoting the political fortunes 
in their first stages, of his friend,General James Abram Garfield; was for some 
time a member of the City Council. 

He was a member of the Episcopal Church and was chief contributor 
to the erection of the present church building in Warren. 

He was twice married: fii'st, on February 1, 1832, to his cousin, Olive 
Douglas Perkins, daughter of General Simon Perkins. She died September 
13, 1838. He was married the second time on March 2.5, 1840 to Cornelia 
Granger Pease, daughter of Calvin Pease, first Chief-justice of Ohio; she died 
February 18, 1873. 

Five children were born to them: Frederick, born August 26, 1841, resides 
in Wilmington,Del.; John, born April 2, 1843, resides in Warren, Ohio; Thomas, 
born March 4, 1846, resides in Warren, Ohio; Charles Pease, born December 
17, 1847, resides in Warren, Ohio; Henry Perkins, born October 25, 1850, 
died July 9, 1880. 

ALEXANDER McKENZIE KHiKLAND. 

Alexander McK. Kirkland, son of William and Margaret (Scott) Kirkland, 
was born in Hillsboro, N. C, December 3, 1807, and died of a cancer, May 4, 
1843. 

He entered the "'Academy" in 1824 and graduated in 1828; was dis- 
tinguished at the "Academy" for his scholarship and athletic ability. 

He engaged in the mercantile business in Hillsboro, 1828-37, and Noxubee 
County, Mississippi, 1837-39. He was a member of the Presbyterian Cliurch. 

He was married February 18, 1835, to Anna McKenzie Cameron of Hills- 
l)oro. Two children were born to them: William Alexander, born July 3, 1836, 
rear admiral, U. S. N., died August 12, 1806; Robert Strange, born, August 31, 
1838, died May 7, 1899. 

CHARLES HENRY LANG]:)ON-ELWYN, A. M. 

Charles H. Langdon-Elwyn, son of Thomas and. Eliza (Langdon) Ehvyn, 
was born in Portsmouth, N. H. in 1807, and died unmarried, in New 
Orleans, La., January 7, 1848. 

He prepared for college at the Phillips Exeter Academy and entered the 
"Academy" from Boston, Mass., in 1822, graduating in 1824; graduated 
A. B. from Harvard University in 1826, ajid later received the degree of A.AL, 
in course, from that Institution. 

He studied law in Philadeli)hia, Pa., and was admitted to the bar; located 
in New Orleans, La., in 1829, where he practiced his profession until his death. 



160 NORWICH UNIVERSITY, 

HORATIO IRELAND LAWTIENCE. 

Horatio I. Lawrence, son of Thomas and Margaret (Ireland) Lawi-ence^ 
was born in New York City in 1814, and died in Rochester, N. Y., November 
30, 1883. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the ''Academy" in 1827, 
remaining two years. He engaged in basiness in New York City imtil 1836, 
when he located in Marshall, Mich., where he engaged in the real estate biLsi- 
ness, meeting with marked success. He later resided in Detroit and Charlotte, 
Mich. In 1880, he removed to Rochester, N. Y., where he made his home 
until his death. He was a member of the .Society Library of New York. 

He was married, October 15, 1840, to Mary Louisa Romaine of New York 
city, who died in Rochester, N. Y., June 13, 1895. Two children were bom 
to them: Benjamin Romaine, born May 10, 1846, died in Rochester, N. Y., 
March 15, 1893; Thomas, born about 1842, died in Michigan. 

NATHAN BUCKINGHAM LEA\^NWORTH. 

Nathan B, Leavenworth, son of General Nathan and Anne (Buckingham) 
Leavenworth, was born in Hinesburgh, "N't., July 7, 1801, and died there INIarch 
27, 1877. 

He received his early education in Biu'lington, Vt., and entered the ''Acad- 
emy' ' in 1820, and graduated in 1823. iVfter leaving the University, he read 
law in the ofTice of his brother at BurUngton, and then engaged in farming in 
his native to\\Ti. Being of a retii'ing disposition, he took no active part in 
public affairs. In his later life, after the death of his wife, his business afTau'S 
were entruste<l to an agent and he spent much time in horseback riding and in 
driving, as long as health permitted. Tall, erect in form, polite in manner, the 
evidences of his military training remained with him until the la.«!t. 

On Juh' 5, 1853, he was married to Saphina Burnam, of New Haven, Vt. 

COL. ROSW^ELL WALTER LEE. 

Roswell W. Lee, son of Roswell Lee, was born in New Haven, Conn., 
August 12, 1810, and died at Fort Worth, Texas, December 20, 1873. 

At an early age, his parents removed to Springfield, IMass., where he at- 
tended the pubhc schools. He entered the "Academy' ' in 1827, and graduated 
in 1829. He entered the U. S. Military Academy Juty 1, 1829, and graduated 
eighth in his class in July, 1833. 

He was brevetted 2d heutenant, 3d U. S. Artillery, July 1, 1833; was 
stationed at Fort Monroe, Va., portions of 1833 and 1834; engaged in the war 
with the Creek Indians, 1833-34; was promoted 2d lieutenant, same regiment, 
September 14, 1834; served at Fort Preble, Mamc, 1834-35, Fort SuUivan, Me., 
183.5-36; engaged in the war against the Seminole Indians, 1836-37, taking pait 
in the battle of Wahoo Swamp, November 21, 1836; promoted 1st lieutenant, 
same regiment May 18, 1837; served on the Northern frontier during the 
Canadian rebelUon, 1838; was discharged from the army, July 16, 1838. 

He moved to Texas the same year- and tendered his services to the "Army 
of the Repubhc,' ' was commissioned a first heutenant and took part in several 
engagements during 1839-41, with the Alexican Army and the Comanche 
Indians; was promoted captain in the "Texan Army" and stationed for some 
time at Fort Warren on the Red River. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS 



161 



In 1841, he located the town of Bonham, Tex., where he made his home 
until his death; was county surveyorof Fannin County, 1840-0 1; clerk of the 
district court of the county, 1842-44; "" 

clerk county court, 1842-52; surveyor 
of Fannin Land District, 1852-54; 
was for some time Indian Commis- 
sioner, having charge of all the 
Indian Tribes of the Southwest; was 
general land agent and notary public 
of Bonham, 1855, until his death. 

He served as colonel of the Texas 
Militia, 1S43-G1. He was com- 
missioned colonel of the C. S. A. and 
commanded a battery in the "Trans- 
Mississippi" department. He was u 
member of the Masonic fraternity. 

He w^as married in 1841 to 
Suannah Rippy (Moody) Jackson, 
widow of Daniel R. Jackson, who 
survived him some years. Three 
children were born to them: Caroline 
Morton, born October 24, 1845, 
married Mr. A. L. Crim, resides 
Dublin, Texas; Martha J. D., born 
March 9, 1848, died in Bonham, 




Col. Walter Koswell Lee. 



Texas, December 18, 1859; Ella Blanche, born October 12, 1850, married 
Randolph Clark, resides Thorp Sjjring, Texas. 



THOMAS GOODRICH LEE, M. D. 

Thomas G. I^ec, son of Thomas and Electa (Riley) Lee, was born ixi 
Berlin, Conn., September 1, 1808, and died in \\'orcester, Mass., October 29, 
183G, while on a visit to the Massachusetts Hospital in that city. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1823 
and graduated in 1825. He studied medicine with Dr. Todd of Hartford- 
Conn., graduated M. D. from Yale University Medical College in 1880. 

He was assistant phy.sician at the Retreat for the Insane at Hartford, 
1830-34; was superintendent of the McLean Asylum, Charlestown, Mass., 
1834-36. He met with success in his profession and gave promise of a bril- 
liant future. We quote from the Hartford Courant of November 183G: "Dr. 
Lee was the first to introduce religious exercises among the insane and the 
(wperiment was attended with the happiest results. He was cut off in the 
midst of a l^right career of usefulness, but not until he had matured the plan 
which has done so much for the sons and daughters of aflliction." He was 
greatly interested in historical matters and gave much assistance to Deacon 
Alfred Andrcsws in compiling the EcdcsioHlical Hislory of New Britain, 
Conn. 

He was married April 21, 1835, to Susan Clark of St. Johnslnu'y, Vt., no 
children. His widow married Rev. Joseph S. Gallagher of Bloomfield, N. J. 



162 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



BVT. BRIG. GEN. WILLIAM Rx\YMOND LEE, A. M. 

William R. Lee, son of William Raymond and Hannah (Tracy) Lee, 
was born in Salem. Mass., August 15, 1807, and died in Roxbury, Ma.ss., 
December 26, 1891. 

He attended the schools at Jamaica Plain, and entered the "Academy" 
in 1820, graduating in 182.5. 

He then entered the II. S. Military Academy at West Point in the class 
of 1829, remaining for nearly the prescribed term, resigning two weeks before 
graduating to look up his father who, in a brain attack, had disappeared. 
He was offered an opportunity to join the class of 1830 that he might graduate, 
but declined as he was then the only support of his father. 

He was chief engineer of the 
Boston & Providence R. R., and 
on its completion became the first 
superintendent. He was superin- 
tendent of the Vermont Central, 
and the New York, Ogdensburg <fe 
Champlain R. R., also served for 
•I number of years as consulting 
engineer for the road. He was ap- 
pointed March 21, 1850, by the 
Governor of Virginia in conjunction 
with other engineers, to adjust the 
difficulties between the city of 
Wheeling and the Baltimore & 
Ohio R. R. 

He was sent by the United 
States Government to Canada 
during the Canadian Rebellion in 
lS38-39,to report on the affairs of 
that country ; was sent on a similar 
mission to Florida. 

In 1830, he was sent to Texas, 
then a province of Mexico, by a 
Bvt. Brig. Gen. William RaymondXee. northern corporation to develop a 

large tract of land which they had J^se cured in that country. He saUed 
from New York in a schooner with a party of men and a years' supphes 
with the necessary outfit for making surveys and a hydrographical and 
geological examination of the property. The schooner was wrecked on 
Bolivar i^oint at the entrance to Galveston Harbor. He and his party were 
arrested by the military authorities on charge of conducting an invasion in 
the Mexican territory. They were confined to the military post of Arrahnac 
until the government investigated the affair. This required a year. Thej' 
were released on condition that they leave the country in ten days. 

On the breaking out of the Civil War, he offered his services to Governor 
Andrew of Massachusetts and was commissioned colonel of the 20th Regiment, 
July 1, 1861. This regiment was his creation. He selected the field and 
staff officers, and most of those in the line. He gave it its standard of military 
duty. He inspired his command with his own high spirit of devotion and 
steadfastness. Well did the regiment repay him by its magnificent behavior 




SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 163 

on many a bloody field. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Ball's Bluff, 
and was one of the hostages selected by the Confederate government to receive 
the treatment which was awarded to Confederate privateersmen by the mis- 
taken policy pm-sued by Federal authorities at the outset of the war. His 
sufferings were severe, and for a time endangered his life. Fortunately this 
exceptional treatment did not last long, and early in 1862 he was exchanged. 
He led his regiment throughout the Peninsula campaign; he was at Yorktown, 
Fair Oaks, Savage's Station, Glendale, and Malvern Hill. In the bloody 
battle of Antietam, the regiment suffered heavy loss, but fully sustained 
its reputation. But the strain of field service proved too much for its com- 
manding officer. After a vain struggle with increasing infirmity, Colonel 
Lee was obliged to resign December 17, 1862. His military life was brief, but 
distinguished. It was also eminently useful. His spirit of unreserved devo- 
tion to the cause, his noble example in bravely and uncomplainingly enduring 
all the hardships of a soldier's life, his strict high standard of military honor and 
duty, inspired his regiment with the like high principles and sentiments; 
while his great kindliness of heart, his unselfishness, and his uniform consid- 
erateness for the rights and feelings of his officers and men made him beloved 
and respected by his entire command. He was brevetted brigadier general of 
Volunteers, March 13, 1865, for conspicuous bravery at the battle of 
Antietam and for gallant services during the war. 

He served during 1863-66, as chief engineer of the Massachusetts Volun- 
teer Militia, on the staff of Governor John A. Andrew,with the rank of briga- 
dier-general. He prepared the plans for a system of obstructions at the 
entrance to Boston Harbor. 

He was a member of the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati, Loyal 
Legion, G. A. R., Fellow of the American Academy. 

He was the author of many reports in relation to railroads, their capacity, 
and construction; also of essaj's upon the consumption of coal applied to 
locomotives and furnaces; the comparative cost of wood and coal in their 
respective capacity for generating steam at high ])ressure; was for many years 
a member of the examining committee in the department of Mathematics 
of Harvard University, This Institution conferred upon him the honorary 
degree of A. M., in 1851. 

He was twice married: first to Mary Evans of Baltimore, who soon died, 
leaving two sons who died of tuberculosis in early youth. He was married 
the second time, July 7, 1842, to Plelen Maria Amory, daughter of Thomas 
Amory of Roxbury, Mass. She died April, 1893. Three children were born 
to them: Elizabeth Amory, born June 10, 1843, married Gen. O. H. Ernst, 
V. S. A., resides Washington, D.C.; Arthur Tracy, born 1845, 2d lieutenant, 
U. S. A., died 1870; liobert Ives, born May 5, 1846, resides in Topeka, Kan. 

GEORGE CLINTON LEIB, M. D. 

George C. Leib, son of Dr. Michael Leib, was born in East Philadelphia 
Pa., August 27, 1809; and died in Philadelphia, August 23, 1888. 

He entered the " Academy' ' in 1825, and graduated in 1828. He graduated 
M. D. from the University of Pennsylvania Medical College in 1833, and 
practiced his profession in Philadelphia many years. 

He was married May 13, 1833, to Susannah Dick. Two children were 
born to them : Emily, and Thomas Nuttall, 



164 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

HENRY FRANKLIN LEIB, M. D. 

Henry F. Lieb, son of Dr. IVIichael Lieb, United States Senator from 
Pennsylvania, was born in East Philadelphia, Pa., March 4, 1811, and died 
in Philadelphia, May 16, 1856. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1825, and graduated in 1829. He then 
entered the University of Pennsylvania Medical College and graduated 
M. D., in 1833. He practiced his profession in Philadelphia until his 
death. 

He was a noted philanthropist and labored among the poorer classes 
of his city; was especially distinguished for his untiring labor during the 
prevalence of cholera in Che.ster, Pa., of which disease he died. He was 
married December 9, 1831, to Eliza Dick, sister of his brother's wofe. Three 
children were born to them: Henry Clinton, Claudia Muranda, and Octavia 
Irene. 

^MLLIAM HENRY LEMMEX. 

Willinm H. Lemmex, son of Henry Elliot and Elizabeth (Lord) liemmex, 
was born in Demorara, British Guiana, S. A., September 7, 1805, and died in 
Windsor, Vt., May 17, 1876. 

He came to this country in 1810, and prepared for college at the Kimball 
Union Academy, N. H. He entered the "Academy" in 1821, and graduated 
in 1825. 

He engaged in mercantile business in \\'indsor, Vt., from 1826 imtil 
1829, when he removed to Hartland and continued in the same business; 
also in the manufacture of woolen goods until 1844. In this last year he re- 
moved to Bridgewater, Vt., and engaged in the manufacture of woolen goods 
until 1866, when he returned to Windsor, Vt., where he resided until his 
death. He was one of the best known manufacturers of woolen goods in the 
State. 

He represented Bridgewater in the House of Representatives. 

He was married June 28, 1828, to Elvira "^^'arner, who died about 1880. 
Four children were born to them: Harriet, Elizabeth, Elvira Jane, Maria 
and Mary Elliot. 

JOSIAH SALISBURY LEVERETT. 

Josiah S. Leverett, son of John and Ehzabeth (SaUsbury) Leverett, was 
born in Windsor, Vt., January 24, 1810, and died in Binghamton, N. Y., 
January 1, 1899. He prepared for college in the schools of Windsor, Vt.,and 
under the private instruction of a Mr. Mills of Windsor. He entered the 
"Academy" in 1820, and graduated in 1823. 

He was employed in Salisbury's Hardware Store, Worcester, Mass., from 
1825 until 1831, when he located in New York city, where he engaged in 
business many years. He was for some years engaged in the hardware com- 
mission business in the firm of Leverett and Thomas; later in the same business 
under different firm names. He was the proprietor of the Leverett ^Axe Fac- 
tory at Napanoch, N. Y.; was also engaged in the manufacture of chemicals 
and glass, and in other business enterprises. He resided in New York city, 
1831-69; Binghamton, N. Y., 1869-70, 1884-99; Orange and East Orange, N. J. , 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



165 



1870-81; East Hampton, Mass., 1881- 
84. He was a member, for some years, 
of the Dutch Ref oimed Church ; and 
was latera member of the Presbj'terian 
Church. 

He was married Maj^ 18, 1865, 
to Annie Matilda Lockwood, a native 
of Binghamton, N. Y., who died 
March 31, 1909. Six children wer(> 
born to them: John, born March 4, 
1866, resides in Napperham Heights, 
Yonkers, N. Y.; Theodore Lockwood, 
born October 8, 1867, resides in Rens- 
selaer Falls, N. Y.; William Josiah, 
born January 11, 1870, now a mis- 
sionary in Nodoa, South China; Annie 
Matilda, born October 12, 1871, died 
in March, 1903; Mary Elizabeth, 
born November 26, 1873, resides 
in Binghamton, N. Y.; Samuel Salis- 
bury, born June 4, 1876, died March 
4, 1891. 




Josiah Salisbury Leverett. 



THOMAS H. LEVERETT. 

Thomas H. Leverett, son of Thomas Suretto and Susannah (Johnson) 
Leverett, was born in Windsor, Vt., February 12, 1806; and died in Keene, 
N. H., November 22, 1882. He attended the public schools of his town and 
entered the '"Academy" in 1820, graduating in 1824. 

He engaged in business in Windsor until 1836, when he removed to Keene, 
N. H., where he made his home until his death. He became prominently 
connected with the business and financial affairs of Keene; was cashier of the 
Ashuelot Bank, 1836-69; was one of the organizers of the Keene Gas Co., in 
1859, and served as a director until 1882; was a member of the committee 
appointed to take charge of the construction of the Keene wat.er works; 
■ also served on the "water loan committee" appointed to finance the construc- 
tion of the water system. 

He was greatly interested in agriculture and horticultural matters; 
was one of the organizers of the Cheshire County Agricultural Society in 1845. 
He took an active part in raising the funds to erect the buildings and improve 
Wheeler Park, and served for many years in the management of its very 
successful exhibitions. 

He was married three times: first, May 20, 1831, to Sarah C. Button. 
Xo children. He was married the second time, April 17, 1834, to Harriet B. 
Xelson ; one child, Sarah D. married Reuben A. 'J'uttle of Boston; died about 
1880. He was married again, October 7, 1841, to Abby Barnes of Keene. 
Three children were born to them: Katherine Fiske, born March 7, 1843, 
resides in Keene; Charles Hudson, born March 23, 1849, died, February 12, 
1851. Francis Johnson, born September 14, 1844, served in the 9th N. II. 
Volunteers and died in service at Paris, Ky., October 1, 1863. 



1G6 



NORWICH UXIVERSITY. 



BRIG. GEN. WILLIAM ENDS LEWIS. 

\A'illiam E. Lewis, son of Dr. Enos and Keturah (Denison) Lewis, and 
brother of Charles D. Lewis, '38, was born in Norwich, Vt., May 28, 1815, and 
died there, January 5, 1892. 

He attended the schools of his town and finished his preparation for college 
at Moor's School connected with 
Dartmouth College, and at Thetford, 
Vt. Academy. He entered the 
"Academy" in 1829, and graduated 
in 1833. 

He was engaged with his mother 
in running the "Mess Hall" at the 
North Barracks, 1839-46; served as 
trustee of the University, 18.51-64:. 
He was engaged in farming in Nor- 
wich, 1833-39; 1846-92. 

He was a Democrat in politics 
until 1872, when he joined the Re- 
publican party. He held many town 
offices: was highway .surveyor, 1838- 
39; lister, 1839-40; first constable, 
1840-43; town clerk, 1843-92; select- 
man several years; justice of the 
peace; town treasurer for eighteen 
years; represented his town in the 
House of Representatives, 1856-.57, 
1863, 1872-73, 1878-79; was assessor 
of the U. S. Internal Revenue thirtl 
district, Vermont, 1863-71. 

He took an active interest in the state militia; was 1st sergeant, "Norwich 
Fusileers," 1833-36; adjutant, first regiment, 3d brigade, 1st division, 1836-37; 
major same, March 1, 1837-August 29, 1838; heutenant colonel, 23d regiment, 
August 29, 1838-June 21, 1839; colonel same, June 21, 1839-1848; brigadier 
general, 1848-61. On the breaking out of the Civil War, he assisted in re- 
cruiting and instructing Co. B, 6th Vermont Volunteers. 

He was married March 23, 1816, to Ruby Wright Hazen of Norwich, who 
survives him and resides in Norwich. Six children were born to them: Lucy 
Ann, born February 19, 1847, married Joseph Fish Toote, resides in Holyoke, 
Mass.; William Hazen, born January 25, 1849, resides in Ascutneyville, Vt.; 
Nina Marie Louise, born September 15, 1851, married William Weeks Morrill, 
resides in Troy, N. Y.; Katie Denison, born July 18, 1857, died August 17, 
1858; Charles Franklin, born Augvist 26, 1859, resides in Norwich, Vt.; Mary 
Denison, born August 14, 1862, died August 25, 1869. 

COLONEL GEORGE LITTLE. 

George Little, second son of William Person and Ann(Hawkins) Little, was 
born in Warren County, North Carolina, February 21, 1811, at his father's 
country-seat "Littleton," near what is now the town of Littleton, which was 
named in his father's honor. He died at Raleigh, November 21, 1876. His 
grandfathers were Major George I;ittle, of Hertford Count}-, and Colonel 




Gen. William Enos Lewis. 



SKEtCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



167 




Philemon Hawkins, Jr., of Warren County, both active patriots^of the Revolu- 
tion. Major George Little of Hertford County was a son of Chief Justice 
William Little, whose wife was a daughter of Chief Justice Christopher Gale, 

and a grand-daughter of Judge Ben- 
jamin leaker. The three latter per- 
sonages were aU men of note in the 
early days of the colony of North 
Carolina. 

George Little, of whom this 
sketch treats, was prepared for college 
by an English tutor and entered the 
"Academy" in 1827, and graduated 
in 1830. 

He studied law in Raleigh, N. C, 
wider the Hon. George E. Badger, 
upwards Secretary of the Navy in 
the cabinets of Presidents Harrison 
and Tyler. After completing his 
legal studies,. Mr. Little was admitted 
to the bar, but decided not to practice, 
as he preferred the quiet life of a 
planter to the contentions and strife 
of the court-room. This action was 
a suri^rise to his friends, as he gave 
promise of attaining distinction as 
Col. George Little. a lawyer. In 1832, he located in 

Raleigh, where he resided throughout [the remainder of his life. He had 
inherited large tracts of land, with slaves sufficiently numerous to cultivate 
them, and he gave his tune to the management of these estates and various 
business enterprises. He took an active part in the construction of the Raleigh 
and Weldon Railroad, and was a member of its board of du'ectors for many 
years. He was also much interested in the State Militia, and served as an aide- 
de-camp, with the rank of Colonel, on the staff of Governor Richard Dobbs 
Spaight, from 1835 to 1837. He was United States Marshal during the adminis- 
tration of President Fillmore, and was offered the same position by President 
Lincoln, in 1861; but declined the appointment in consequence of the approach 
of the war between the states. He was an uncompromising Whig, and, like the 
vast majority of that party, was opposed to secession; but, after hostilities 
began, he sided with the South. Throughout the war he served as aide-de- 
camp on the staff of Governor Vance. Upon the downfall of the Confederacy, 
he accepted the situation without murmuring, and influenced others to follow 
his example. F6r several years after the war, he was engaged upon work in the 
Executive Office, and held the confidence of the Governor in all matters coming 
before him. For several years, he was president of a land company formed at 
Raleigh, for the purpose of inducing the better class of immigrants to locate in 
North Carolina. 

He was a life-long member of the Ei)iscoi)al Church, and was a Democrat 
in politics, after the old Wing Party (with which he had formerly been con- 
nected) had passed out of existence. In poison he was tall and handsome, 
with fine, clear-cut features and commanding presence. 



168 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

On February 1, 1832, he married his first cousin, Margaret Craven, daugh- 
ter of Stephen and DeUa (Hawkins) Hayward. She died in 1898. Several 
children were born to them, including two sons. The elder of these, William 
Little, M. D., was an assistant surgeon in the Confederate Ai-my, and after the 
war became a successful physician in Raleigh, where he died, leaving five sons. 
The younger son of Colonel Little, was George Little, Jr., who, when still a boy, 
served on the Confederate blockade-runner, A doance. After the war he engaged 
in agricultural pursuits in Hertford County, and died there, leaving three 
daughters. 

HENRY ADOLPHUS LONDON. 

Henry A. Ijondon, son of John and Ann (Mauger) London, was born in 
Wilmington, N. C, April 9, 1808, and died in Pittsboro, N. C, November 27, 
1882. Soon after his father's death in 1816, his mother removed to Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., for the purpose of educating her children. He prepared for college 
in the schools of Brooklyn; was a student at the University of North CaroUna 
during 1825-26. He entered the "Academy" in 1826, and graduated 
in 1828. 

He engaged in mercantile pursuits in \\ilmington, 1828-36; and Pittsboro, 
N. C, 1836-82. He was a, highly respected merchant and met with success in 
his business ventures. He was treasurer of the Cape Fear and Deep River 
Navigation Co., 1853-68. 

He was a Democrat in politics. He never sought office, but for over forty 
years no one in the county had so much to do wath its financial affairs as he; 
was chairman of the court of pleas and quarter sessions of Chatham county for 
thirty years, and county treasurer, 1870-72. He was a member of the Prot- 
estant Episcopal Church and vestryman of St. Bartholomew's Parish (Pitts- 
boro, N. C.) for 48 years. 

He was twice married: first, February 29, 1832, to Sally Margaret Lord, 
who died November 3, 1857. Ten children were born to them: John Ruther- 
ford, born January 20, 1833, died June 1, 1905; Ann Mauger, born July 6, 1835, 
resides Pittsboro, N. C; William Lord, born April 3, 1838, resides Pittsboro, 
N. C; Eliza Catherine, born February 1, 1841, married Dr. P. G. Snowden, 
resides in Jacksonville, Fla.; Rufus Marsden, born August 21, 1843, died Octo- 
ber 31, 1863; Henry Ai-mand, born March 1, 1846, resides Pittsboro, N. C; 
Mary Cowan, born January 15, 1849, married Joshua T. James, resides in 
Wilmington, N. C; Fanny Thurston, born November 9, 1850, married John 
W. Taylor, died in 1897; Frederick Hill, born December 16, 1855, died in July, 
1891; Frank Olmstead, born June 28, 1857, died in February, 1908. He was 
again married May 24, 1860, to Catherine S. Moore, of Pittsboro, N. C, who 
died in 1892; no children. 

NATH.\NIEL LORD. 

Nathaniel Lord, son of Nathaniel and Phoebe (Walker) Lord, was born at 
Kenuebunkport, Maine, April 11, 1808, and died in California, July 10, 
1852. 

He prepared for college at the Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., 
and entered the "Academy" in 1823, graduathig in 1825. Soon after 
graduating from the "Academy," he removed to Bangor, Maine, where 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



1 09 



he soon became identified with sev- 
eral business enterprises; he engaged 
in mercantile business until 1849; and 
was interested in real estate and tim- 
ber lands. 

In 1849, he took a steamboat, 
the Go>vrnor Dana, to California, on 
board a sailing vessel around Cape 
Horn, going himself by way of the 
Isthmus of Panama. He was man- 
aging owner of this boat which r;ui 
from Sacremento City up the river 1 1 > 
Marysville. He returned to Bangor 
in 1851 and went again to Califonii;! 
in 18-52, where he was accidentally 
killed by the discharge of a pistol, 
July 10. He was a Whig in poHtics, 
and held several positions; was a 
member of the Bangor City Council, 
1837-38, 1843-44; city treasurer, 
1839-41. 

He was married in 1S38, to 
Frances Augusta Veazie, daughter 
of General Samuel and Susanna (Walker) Veazie. Six children were born to 
them: Charles Veazie "N. U." '55 (q. v.); Frank Nathaniel; Phoebe Louise, 
died in infancy; Maria Antoinette; Fred Dana; Samuel Veazie. 




Nathaniel Lord. 



FRANCIS CALEB LORING, A. B. 

Francis C. Loi'ing, son of Caleb and Ann (Greeley) liOring, was born in 
Boston, Mass., September 19, 1809, and died at Nahant, Mass., August 19, 
1874 . 

He prepared for college at the Boston Latin School and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1821, and graduated in 1825. He graduated A. B. from Harvard 
University in 1828. He studied law with Charles G. Loring and was admitted 
to the bar in 1830; practiced his profession in Boston, 1830-74. 

He was married January 24, 1836, to Miriam Mason Perkins of Boston, 
who died April 28, 1871. Five children were Ijorn to them: Anna Powell, born 
June 24, 1837; Miriam Perkins, born August 31, 1839, resides Boston; Francis 
Caleb, born November 13, 1841, died October 30, 1888; Gertrude, born June 
27, 1844, married N. P. Hamlen, died January 21, 1877; Helen Loring, born 
July 15, 1851, at Nahant, resides in Boston, IMa.ss. 



CHARLES RUSSELL LOWELL, A. M. 

Charles R. Lowell, son of Dr. Charles Lowell and brother of James Russell 
Lowell, the distinguished author, was born in Boston, Mass., October 30, 1807, 
and died of apoplexy June 23, 1870, while visiting in Washington, D. C. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1821, 
gi-aduating in 1824. He graduated A. B. from Harvard University in 1826, 
and later received the degree of A, M. from that Institution. 



170 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



He studied law and was admitted to the bar, but never practiced the pro- 
fession. He engaged in business in Boston for some years, but was not suc- 
cessful. In 1852, he was appointed assistant librarian of the Boston Athen- 
aeum Library, which position he held until his death. He was an able scholar 
and his great work was the preparation of the catalogues of the library. 

He was married in 1832, to Anna Jackson, daughter of Patrick Tracy 
Jackson of Boston. Two children were born to them: Charles Russell, a brig- 
adier general in the Civil War, who died of wounds, October 20, 1864; James 
Jackson, an officer in the Civil War, and killed in battle. 



^ilW^ 




CAPT. CHARLES LYMAN. 

Charles Lyman, son of Elias and Anna (TMiite) Lyman, was born in 

Hartford, Vt., October 5, 1808, and died in Washington, D. C, May 23, 1888. 

^"' He prepared for college in the 

schools of his town and entered the 

"Academy" in 1822, and graduated 

in 1824. 

In 1824, he entered the mer- 
cantile office of his father, head of 
the firm of J. & E. L>Tnan, at 
\^'hite River Junction, Vt., where 
he remained until about 1845, 
when he removed to MontpeUer. 
He continued in the mercantile 
business in that city untU 1847. 
In 1849, he was appointed post- 
master of Montpelier and held the 
position until 1853. In 1861, he 
removed to Washington, D. C, 
where he made his home imtil his 
death. He served as chief of the 
Dead Letter Office from 1861 until 
1866, when he retired from active 
/ work. 

He took an active interest in 
Capt. Charles Lyman. the Vermont State Militia, and 

served as captain. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church in 
Washington. 

He was married December 6, 1837, to Maria Wilder Spaulding of Montpe- 
her, who died August 6, 1874. Five children were born to them: Charles 
Wylj's, born in 1837, captain and quartermaster U. S. Volunteers, died 
October 10, 1866; Maria Spaulding, born in 1839, resides Washington, D. C; 
Sarah Collins, born in 1841, died in 1856; John Spaulding, born in 1847, died 
1859; Fanny Dodd, born in 1850, married PhiUip F. Larner, resides in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

EON. GEORGE LYMAN. 

George LjTiian, son of EUas and Anna (TMiite) Lyman, was born in 
Hartford, Vt., April 6, 1806, and died there July 11, 1879. 



¥* 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



171 



He prepared for college in the schools of his town; entered the "Academy' ' 
in 1820,'and graduated in 1823. 

An an early age, he^entered the counting room of his father, the head 
of the firm of J. and E. Lyman, en- 
gaged in the transportation business 
from Lyman's Point, Hartford, to 
New York City, via the Connecti- 
cut River and Long Island Sound. 
Here he acquired a thorough busi- 
ness training. He engaged in the 
mercantile business in Royalton, Vt., 
1826-42; Norwich, Vt., 1842-47. He 
removed to White River Junction, 
Vt., in 1847, and purchased the old 
family homestead, where he resided 
until his death. He was connected 
with many business enterprises; was 
treasurer of the White River Turn- 
pike Co. 

He was a Republican in politics, 
and held many public offices; was 
justice of the peace several years; 
represented Hartford in the House of 
Representatives, 1852-53; was post- 
master of White River Junction, 

1861-79; trustee and vice-president, Hon. George Lyman. 

Tilden Ladies Seminary, West Lebanon, N. H. He servedas trustee of "N. 
U.," during 1847 and 1848. He was an active member of the Congrega- 
tional church; a member of the LTnited Bretheren Lodge, F. and A. M., of 
White River Junction, Vt. 

He was married December 3, 1828, to Minerva Briggs of Rochester, Vt., 
who died January 9, 1895, at White River Junction, Vt. Eleven children 
were born to them. 




CHARLES McDERMOTT, A. B., M. D. 



Charles McDermott, son of Patrick and Emily (Ozane) McDermott, 
was born in West Feliciana Parish, La., September 22, 1808, and died in 
Dermott, Arkansas, September 13, 1882. 

He prepared for college in Jamaica, N. Y., and Plainfield, Conn., and 
under a private tutor in New York city. He entered the "Academy" from 
St. Francisville, La., in 1824, and graduated in 1826. He entered the Junior 
class of Yale University and graduated A. B. in 1828. 

He studied medicine with his brother-in-law. Dr. Barnes, and practiced 
in West Feliciana, La., until 1844, when he removed to Chicot County, 
Ark., near Dermott. In 1850, he located in Monticello, Drew County, Ark., 
but in 1855, returned to Dermott, where he made his home until his death. 

He was an extensive slave owner, and engaged in planting until the 
Civil War; was also an extensive land owner. He was interested in various 
business enterprises; was president of , and a large stock holder in, the Missis- 



172 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

sippi, Ouachila & Red River R. R., begun in the sixties, and never com- 
pleted, owing to the Civil War. 

He possessed great mechanical abiUty. He invented a cotton picker, 
and a hollow w^edge. He spent much time and money in perfecting a flying 
machine, using the same principles of construction that are now fomid practi- 
cal on the present flj'ing machines. His patent, taken out in 1876, is on file 
at the Patent Office in Washington. 

He was an elder in the Presbyterian Chiurch, from early manhood, and 
exerted a powerful influence for good among his neighbors and slaves; was a 
member of the Masonic Lodge. 

He w^as a Whig in politics before the war, and after that a Democrat. 
He w^as a staunch defender of the Southern cause, though too infirm to enter 
the service except as a home guard. 

He was married December 19, 1833, to Hettie Susan Smith, of West 
FeUciana Parish, who died in Monticello, Ark., November 13, 1880. Thirteen 
children were born to them: Benjamin; Emily; Susan; Edward, died in the 
C. S. A.; Jane, married Rev. M. B. Shaw', resides Centerville, Miss.; Katie 
Lambert, resides in Monticello, Ark.; Charles, resides in Sultana, Cal.; 
Edward Ozan, now a physician in Wilmot, Ark.; William Patrick; Maggie 
Mercer; PhiU, resides in Dermott, Ark.; Annabelle Anderson. 

GEORGE HOUSTON McINTOSH. 

George H. Mcintosh, son of John Houston and EUzabeth (Bayard) 
Mcintosh, was born in Camden Coimty, Ga., about 1805, and died in Ken- 
tucky about 1865. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1824, and gratluated in 1825. He engaged 
extensively in planting in Georgia until about 1830, when he removed to 
Texas. He soon took an important part in the early history of that State. 
He represented the Repubhc of Texas as minister to France, and it was largelj^ 
due to him that France recognized the independence of the country in 1837. 
He returned to Texas about 1840; and in a few years removed to Kentucky 
where he made his home until liis death. 

He was twice married: fii'st, about 1830, to a Miss Hamilton of New^ 
York city; one son, George. He w^as married the second time to a French 
lady by whom he had several children. 

CAPT. JOHN McNABB, U. S. A. 

John McNabb, entered the "Academy" from Norwich, Vt., in 1830, and 
gi-aduated in 1832. 

He enlisted in the 2d U. S. Infantry, April 18, 1840, ser\ang as corporal, 
sergeant, and sergeant major until April 11, 1844, when he was honorably 
discharged. He enlisted in the 9th U. S. Infantry, (Old Ninth New England) 
under Col. T. B. Ransom,'25, April 1, 1847; was soon promoted sergeant major; 
2d lieutenant, August 3, 1847; served as regimental adjutant, January 1, 
until August 26, 1848; was honorably discharged, August 26, 1848. He was 
commissioned 1st lieutenant, 10th U. S. Infantry, March 3, 1855; was regi- 
mental adjutant, April 7, until October 18, 1855; was promoted captain 
April 25, 1861; was discharged, July 1, 1861. He is said to have served as a 
colonel in the Confederate army. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 173 

WILLIAM SPRUCE MACAY. 

William S. Macay, son of Spruce and Elizabetli (Hayes) Macay, was born 
near Salisbmy, Rowan, County, N. C, 1809, and died at Salisbury about 18G0. 

His father was a judge of the Superior Court of the State, appointed in 
1790, and died in the office in 1810. 

The subject of tliis sketch entered the "Academy" in 1825,and graduated in 
1828. He was a wealthy farmer and planter, and owned a mill and many 
thousand acres of land near Salisbury, N. C. He was a member of the Episco- 
pal Church. 

He was twice married: first, December 18, 1848, to Isabella Lowry of 
Rowan County, N. C, who died soon after their marriage; no children. He 
was married the second time in 1858, to Ann Hunt of Yadkin County, N. C. 
One child, Anna, who married Stephen F. Lord. 

LIEUT. DANIEL H. MACKEY, U. S. N. 

Daniel H. IMackey was born in New York. He was commissioned a 
mid.shipman U. S. N., April 16, 1813; lieutenant, January 13, 1825. He 
entered the "Academy" from Philadelphia in 1820, and graduated in 1822. 
He served on the United States Frigate United Stales, in 1822; was stationed 
at Norfolk, Va., in 1823; waiting orders 1824; served on ship of the line 
North Carolina, 182-5-27; was on leave in 1828. He was assigned to the 
sloop of war Hornet, in 1829, and sailed on her last cruise, Februarj' 5, 1829. 
The ship was never heard from and is supposed to have been lost off the 
Tampico. 

HON. LUTHER RAWSON MARSH. 

Luther R. Marsh, son of Luther Marsh, a native of Walpole, N. H., 
was born in Pompey Hill, N. Y., April 4, 1813, and died in Middletown, 
N.Y., August 15, 1902. 

He attended the schools of his town and the Pompey Academy, and 
entered the "Academy" in 1827, graduating in 1829. He was distinguished 
for his scholarship and oratorical ability at the "Academy"; won the silver 
medal for second best English oration, in August, 1827. 

He studied law and was admitted to the bar in Albany, N. Y., in 1830; 
practiced his profession with the Hon. Henry R. Stone, in New York city, 
1836-37, Utica, N. Y., 1838-43. He was attorney for the New York and 
Lake Erie R. R. 1838-43. He returned to Now York city in 1844, and 
formed a partnership with Oscar W. Sturtevant. A short time afterwards, 
Daniel Webster, the distinguished lawyer and orator, entered the firm and 
continued with them for a few years; later he was associated with John T. 
Hoffman; afterwards governor of the State of New York and Judge Wm. 
Leonard. He was a member of the firms of Marsh, Coe & Wallis and Marsh, 
Wilson & Wallis. He continued to practice in New York until 1888. He 
was one of the ablest lawyers of his time and tried many celebrated cases. 

He was a Republican in politics, but refused to hold political i)ositions. 
He was a member of the Union League club, 1868-88, and vice-president for 
several years. He spent much time and labor in advocating laws for th(> publi(! 
good. Among the important measures drawn up and put through the legis- 
lature by him were: "The Abolition of Intramural Interments in New York," 



174 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



"New Parks for New York City," and the "International Reservation at 
Niagara Falls." He WTote the compiler of this history in 1897, giving remi- 
niscences of the "Old Academy," and gave at some length an account of a 
march made by the cadets to Niagara Falls in 1828. He stated that when he 
viewed the Falls in all their grandeur at this time he thought what a grand 
thing it would be for the people of the whole United States to hold land around 

the Falls for a park, little dream- 
ing that in fifty years he would 
serve as chairman of a committee 
to have this matter in charge. 

He was a forceful writer, 
and contributed many articles 
to the papers and magazines, 
also published several pamph- 
lets. In 1892, he began a series 
of articles in the Conolomerate, 
under the title, Recollections of 
fhc Bar and Sprinkles of Biogra- 
phy, which he continued each 
week for three years and which 
embodied sketches and anec- 
dotes of the famous old lawyers, 
who had illustrated the genius of 
the bar. He refused in June, 
18G9, the tempting offer of the 
editorship of the Neic York 
Times. He was a great lover of 
books and possessed one of the 
largest private libraries in the 
State, it being especially com- 
plete in the lines of psychologj'. 
He acquired a large property, and in 1888 removed to Middletown, N. Y., 
where he resided until his death. About 1857, be became interested in 
the works of Swedenborg and later joined the ranks of the modern spirituahsts. 
Since his retirement in 1888, he spent much time in psychical research, and was 
a firm believer in the mysteries of the futm-e life. He published a volume, 
The Voice of the Patriarchs, \n 1887. He gave many lectures on this theme 
and contributed many articles to sph-itualLstic newspapers and periodicals. 
He was man-ied September 15, 1845, to Jane E. Stewart, daughter of 
Alvan Stewart. She died about 1880. No children. 




Hon. Luther Rawson Marsh. 



CAPT. OREN MARSH. 

Oren Marsh, son of Capt. Samuel and Pamela Marsh, was born in Croyden 
N. H., August 19, 1802, and died in VilUsca, Iowa, June 11, 1871. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1823, graduating in 1825. 

He taught school in New Hampshire imtil 1830, when he located in 
Detroit, Mich., where he taught until 1835; was the first teacher, 1834-35, 
employed by the Mechanics' Society of that city; taught in Battle Creek.. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



175 



Mich.,- 1835, until 1839, when he returned to Detroit. He was appointed, in 
1839, the first Ubrarian of the Michigan State Library and served until 1845. 
In 1841, he published the first catalogue of the library, together with the 
rules governing the use of the books. In 1845, he removed to Battle Creek 
where he resided until 1849. 

He took an active interest in military affairs; became an officer in the 
Detroit City Guards on its organization in 1830 and served with this company 
on its march to Chicago in 1832, to protect that village from the attack of the 
Indians in the Black Hawk War; was was commissioned cajrtain Co. A, 
1st regiment, Michigan militia, April 4, 1838. On September 26, 1839, he 
was commissioned captain of riflemen, first regiment, first brigade, first 
division in the "Patriots Army" in upper Canada in the historic "Canadian 





' CTrr,:-. r\),aj.il. ;}..■ VV>i:cro Car.*dian Aidori»iioii,<ti< (iiejt y„ti^ 
^ r-a;i:e Cffpifr. «fi<l fh^ Ciand Ii»ek Cliaptw of Upprr Caiudk 



'^::; 



J v\ 



'/^-r 







^ 



Captain Marsh's Commission in tlie "Patriots Army." 

.Rebellion." We give above the cut of his conmiission which shows the 
American Eagle soaring aloft with the British lion in his talons. 

Many Americans sjanpathized with the Canadians in their rebellion 
and were no doubt led to give their aid in hopes Canada would become a 
part of the United States. Captain Marsh took part with his command in 
many exciting encounters with the Canadian troops. 

In the latter part of 184fi, Captain Marsh, as an officer in the Michigan 
Militia, wrote several letters to Senator Cass urging the enrolling of volunteers 
from the State for the Mexican War and deploring the inactivity of the govern- 
ment in prosecuting the campaign in Mexico. Finally the President issued a 
call for ten regiments of volunteers from Michigan and early in 1847 Captain 
Marsh was appointed a recruiting officer and later served in Mexico until 
the summer of 1848, when owing to sickness he returned to Michigan. 

As his health did not improve, he determined to try a milder climate. 
The discovery of gold in California was causing great excitement in the 



176 XORWICH rXIVERSITY. 

East and Captain ]\larsh concluded to try his fortunes in the new "El Dorado" 
and at the same time regain his health. He sailed from New York early in 
1849, for California via the "Isthmus route." 

He engaged in mining in California until 1859, when he returned East 
and later removed to "\"illisca, Iowa, where he resided until his death, and 
where he engaged in the profession of teaching. 

He was a Deniocrat in politics and was a recognized leader of his party 
in Calhoun County. The high esteem in which Captain Marsh was held 
is shown in the correspondence with the influential men of his party. 

He was maiTic<l at Troy, N. Y., September 6, 1835, to Harriet Volimtine 
of Saratoga County, who died in Battle Creek, Mich., April 15, 1890. Two 
children were born to them: Harriet, born June 18, 1838, died January 5, 1905; 
Martha, born January 7, 1842, married Jonathan M. Lewis of Bowling Green, 
Mo., February 3, 1870. died October 23, 1909. 

BVT. COL. CHARLES AUGUSTUS IMAY, U. S. A. 

Charles A. May, son of John May, was born in Washington, D. C, 
Augu.st 9, 1817, and died in New York City, December 24, 1864. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1828, remaining three yeax's. He was 
commissioned 2d lieutenant, in the 2d Dragoons, June 8, 183G; was promoted 
1st lieutenant, December 15, 1S37. He performed distingui.shrd service 
during the Seminole ^\'ar and had the honor of capturing King Phillip, the 
chief leader of that war. He was commissioned captain, February 2, 1841. 
He served as chief of cavalry, on staff of Gen. Zachary Taylor, during 
the Mexican War. He commanded the cavalry at the battle of Palo Alto, 
Resaca da la Palma, Monterey and Buena Vista. He was brevetted major, 
May 8, 1846, for "gallant and distingui.shed service" in the battle of Palo 
Alto; lieutenant colonel, May 9, 1846, for "gallant and highly distinguished 
conduct" at the battle of l{i'saca de la Palma; colonel, February 23, 1847, 
for "gallant and meritorious conduct" in the battle of Buena Vista. 

At the battle of Resaca de la Palma, he esi)ecially distinguished himself 
by capturing General LeA'ega. He was promoted major, March 3, 1855 and 
transferred to the First Dragoons. On October 23, 1855, he was ordered to 
the Second Dragoons. He resigned from the army, April 20, 1861, and re- 
moved to New York, where he became vice-president of the 8th Avenue 
Railroad. 

ROBERT MEANS. 

Robert Means, son of David McGregor, and Kutherine (Atherton) 
Means, was born in Amherst, N. H., February 19, 1809, and died in Beaufort, 
N.C., April 24, 1863. 

He removed to Sioux City, la., in 1858, and engaged in banking for some 
years, being associated with Judge J. P. Allison. 

He was a member of the Ancient and Honorable Artillerj' Company of 
Boston, and a member of Exeter Lodge, F. and A. M., of Exeter, N. H. He 
took a prominent part in the anti-slaverj' agitation and in 1862, went to New- 
berne, N. C, to assist his brother. Rev. James Means, who was superintendent 
of the Freedraen's Bureau of that place. He was a Democrat in politics. He 
took a prominent part in the local affau's of Sioux City ; was the first mayor of 
that city, 1858-59; receiver, United States Land Office in Sioux City, 1860-61; 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



177 



was inspector United States Custom House, Boston, Mass., 18.53-57; city 
marshal of Manchester, N. H. 

He was twice married: first, to Eliza W. Clark. He was again married 
to Mrs. Sarah L. James of Exeter, N. H., who died in Exeter, N. H., in April 
1896; no children. 

GEORGE MERRICK, A. M. 

George Merrick, son of John and Rebecca (Vaughan) Merrick, was born in 
Hallowell, Me., November 1, 1807, and died, unnuuTied, in Northumberland, 
Pa., May 7, 1862. 

He attended the schools of his 
town and prepared for college at the 
Hallowell Aea,demxy and Dr. Packard's 
private school at Wiscasset, Me. He 
entered the "Academy" in 1822, and 
graduated in 1825. 

He then engaged in engineering 
with the distinguished engineer, Mr. 
Strickland, and was an assistant on 
the Pennsylvania R. R. from Phila- 
delphia to Bristol. He located in 
New Orleans in 1838, and engaged 
in mercantile pursuits for some years; 
built the Ponchatrain R. R., connect- 
ing New Orleans and Lake Poncha- 
train; also a railroad from that city to 
Lafayette; was tendered the position 
of state engineer of Loui.siana, but 
declined the office. He met with 
success in his business ventures and 
acquired a valuable property. About 
1850, he met ^vith heavy losses and re- 
turned to Hallowell, Me., where he en- George Merrick, 
gaged in farming until 1852, when he received an appointment as superinten- 
dent of the Havana (Cuba) Gas Works from the Spanish Government. He 
held this position until 1857, when he resigned and removed to Northumber- 
land, Pa., where he made his home until his death. He received the degree of 
A. M. from Bowdoin college in 1847. 




HON. GEORGE BUCKINGHAM MERWIN. 

George B. Merwin, son of Noble and Minerva (Buckingham) Merwin, was 
born in New Milford, Conn., in 1809, and died in 1888. In 1812, his parents 
removed to Savannah, Ga., and in 1815, to Cleveland, Ohio. He attended the 
schools of Cleveland and in 1824 entered the "Academy" graduating in 1827; 
studied the I'^rench language in Detroit, Mich., 1827-28. 

He returned to Cleveland and was in the employ of Richard Ililliard, diy 
goods merchant, until 1829. He then studied law and was admitted to the; bar. 
In 1853, he went as secretary with E.^-Governor Reuben Wood of Ohio to 



178 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

Valparlso, Chili, South iVmerica, where Mr. Wood served as U. S. Consul for 
some years. 

He was married in 1S35, to I^orettci Wood, daughter of Governor Reuben 
Wood of Ohio; two children: a son and a daughter. The son died in San Fran- 
cisco. 

SURGEON SMITH MANOAH MILES, M. D. 

Smith M. Miles, son of the Rev. Manoah Smith and Abigail (Isaacs) 
Miles, was born in New Haven, Coun., and died in Alleghany City, Cal., May 
8, 1869; was buried in INIarysville, Cal. 

At an early age his parents removed to Chatham, Coim., from which to^\Ti 
he entered the '' Academy' ' in 1826, and graduated in 1828. He studied medi- 
cine at Yale University and practiced his profession in Waterburj^, Conn., and 
later in Georgia, from which state he was commissioned assistant surgeon of 
volunteers for the ^Mexican War, August 4, 1847. He served on the staff of 
General Scott and took part in the battles of Monterey and Monticello; was 
discharged July 20, 1848. 

In 1849, he located in Marysville, Cal.,. and at once took a prominent part 
in the affairs of that town. He was elected its first mayor in 1851, and served 
again in 18.53; represented Sierra County in the State Legislature in 1857. He 
was a member of the Episcopal Church, and a prominent member of the 
Masonic J'raternity. He was married three times. Two children survive 
him: Ehzabeth, who married a Mr. Wilhams, and resided in Mimson, Mass. 

REV. ALOXZO AMES MINER, D. D., LL. D. 

Alonzo A. Miner, son of Benajah Ames and Amanda (Carey) ]Miner, was 
born in Lempster, N. H., August 17, 1814, and died in Tufts College, Mass., 
June 14, 1895. He prepared for college at the academies in Hopldnton, Leba- 
non and Franklin, N. H., and Cavendish, Vt. He entered the "Academy' ' at 
Norwich in the thirties and graduated about 1833. 

He was associated wath James Garvin (A. L. S. and M. A.) in conducting 
the Cavendish Academy in 1834-35. He was principal of the LTnity, N. H., 
Scientific and Military Academy from 1835 to 1839. His cousin, Amasa 
Gleason, '36, was the instructor in drill and tactics and professor of Mathe- 
matics. He formed an earnest desire to enter the Universalist ministry, and 
in 1838, received the fellowship of that church and in 1839 was ordained as a 
minister. He preached his first sermon in Chester, Vt , in Februarj^, 1838. 

He was pastor of the Methuen, Mass., church from 1839 to 1842; the 
church in Lowell, Mass. from 1842 to 1848. In 1848 he went to Boston and 
succeeded the Rev. E. H. Chapin, D. D., as colleague of the venerable Hosea 
Ballou at the Second L'niversalist Church; and as the successor of Dr. Ballou he 
presided over his parish until his death. Wherever he went, he soon made his 
influence felt in educational matters. He served on the school boards of 
Methuen, Lowell, and Boston and on the board of overseers of Harvard Col- 
lege. He was a member of the Massachusetts State Board of Education for 
nearly twenty-five years and for about twenty j'ears was chairman of the board 
of \'isitors of the State Normal .Art School, in the establishment of which he 
was largely instrumental. He served as secretary of the trustees of Tufts 
College and also as a member of the executive committee for some years prior 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



179 



to his election as pre-sidcnt of that institution, in 1S62. He served as presi- 
dent until 1875, and under his able management the growth of the college was 
very great. He did not relinquish his Boston pastorate, nor did he reside at 
the "Hill, " but for the college, as for every thing else with which he had to do, 
his remarkable executive ability accomplished large results. He resigned the 
presidency because he felt that it as well as his pastorate required the entire 
attention of its encumbent; but he continued to serve the trustees as a member 
of the executive committee until his death. He was president of the trustees 
of the Broomfield School at Harvard, Mass., of Dean Academy and of the 
Universalist Pubhshing House. Of 
the last, he was also president of 
the directors, having been the origin- 
ator of the plan of its estal)lishment. 
He was a pioneer of the first Uni- 
versalist Home ^Mission and was a 
member of the American Academy 
of Political and ^Social Science, and 
of the executive committee of the 
American Peace Society. 

He was known ^^through th,' 
country as an uncompromising cham- 
pion of the cause of temperance. He 
was president of the Massachusetts 
Temperance Alliance for twent\' 
years, and allowed his name to !)■ 
used on the Prohibition ticket for tin- 
governnorship of the State, when \ 
every other candidate had been 
frightened from the .^leld. 

He delivered an almost number- 
less number of eloquent addresses, 
orations, and sermons. A few books 
and magazines article from his pen 
have been preserved. He contiibuted to the Bibliotheca Sacra, a paper on 
the Doctrines of Universalism; wrote a chapter in The Unknoivn Country on 
Eschalology, and was the author of the History of Universalism in the 
Memorial History of Boston. He also published Old Forts Taken, which has 
been published in several editions, as has also his Bible h'.ieixises for Sunday 
Schools. 

He gave largely to tlie schools of his denomination. Among other gifts 
to Tufts College, was the sum of forty thousand dollars for building the theo- 
logical hall which bears his name. By his will, he left two thousand dollars 
each to Westbrook Seminary, Goddard (Vt.) Seminary, and Dean Academy; 
and made Tufts College his residuary legatee. 

The honorary degree of A.M. was conferred upon him l)y Tufts in ISGl; 
that of S. T. D. by Harvard in 18(53; and that of I.L. D. by Tufts in 1875. He 
was made an honorary member of the B Kin 1891). 

He was married, August 21. IS'M], to ■Maria S. Perley, of Lempster, N. H. 




Rev. Alonzo Ames Miner. 



180 NORWICH UXIVERSITY. 

GEORGE MINOT, A. B. 

George Alinot, son of James and Sally (Wilson) Minot, was born in New- 
London, N. H., August 10, 1806, and died in Concord, N. IT., March 8, 1861. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his town and the Pembroke 
Academy. He entered the "Academy" in 1822, and graduated in 1824; 
graduated A. B. from Dartmouth College in 1828. 

He studied law in Bristol, N. H., and with N. G. Upham of Concord; was 
admitted to the bar in 1831: practiced his profession in Bristol and Gilmanton, 
N. H., 1831-34; removed to Concord, X. H., in 1834, where he made his home 
until his death; was cashier of the Mechanics' Bank, Concord, 1834-54, and 
president, 1854-61; was treasurer of the B. C. &' M.,R. R., 1847-61: was U. S. 
Pension agent, 1845-49, 1853-61. 

He was a Democrat in poUtics and held .several offices; was a member of 
the Constitutional Convention, 1850; member of the first Concord City Coun- 
cil, 1853. 

He was married in Portsmouth, N. H., May 1, 1839, to Selina Walker 
Clark, who died August 7, 1909. Foiu* children were born to them: Julia 
Maria Barrett, born June 13, 1842, married George H. Twiss, resides in Cleve- 
land, Ohio; Henry Carroll, born October 30, 1845. died January 17, 1906; 
George Edward, born February 15, 1851, resides Littleton, N. H.; Edith Par- 
ker, born October 14, 1853, resides 18 Montgomery St., Concord, N. H. 

LIEUT. JOHN WHITE MOOERS, U. S. N. 

John W. Mooers, son of Major General Benjamin and Hamiah (Piatt) 
Mooers, was born in Plattsburg, N. Y., March 25, 1804; and died in New 
Haven, Conn., November 25, 1841. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his city and entered the "Acad- 
emy' ' in 1823, and graduated in 1824. 

He was appointed a midshipman, U. S. N., May 10, 1820. He served on 
the brig Spark, \\'cst India Squadron; was promoted lieutenant. May 17, 1828; 
served on the schooner Dolphin, Pacific Squadron, sloop Vandalia, West 
India Squadron, sloop Marion, coast of Brazil. He resigned September 22, 
1841 . He married Lucy Miller of New Haven. 

JUNIUS SPENCER MORGAN. 

Junius S. Morgan, son of Joseph and Sarah (Spencer) Morgan, was 
born in West Springfield, Mass., now Holyoke, April 14, 1813. He removed 
with his father to Hartford, Conn., in 1817. He entered the "Academy" 
in 1825, and remained two years. He entered the em.ploy of Alfred Welles 
of Boston, April 7, 1829, and remained with him until Julj^, 1834, when he 
removed to New York Citj^ and became a clerk for the firm of Morgan, 
Ketohum & Co., w'hcre he remained eighteen months. He then retm-ned to 
Hartford and became junior partner in the dry goods house of How^e, Mather 
& Co., w'hich, in 1850, became Mather, Morgan & Co. In 1851, he became 
a partner in the dry goods house of J. M. Beebe, Morgan & Co., in Boston, 
one of the largest establishments in the United States. In 1854, became a 
partner in the firm of George Peabody & Co., of London, England, and in 
1864, upon the retirement of Mr. Peabody, the firm became that of J.S. Morgan 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



181 



& Co., and under this name the house grew hi strength and influence until, 
at present, it ranks as one of the? largest banking firms in the world. 

He remained at the head of the house until his death. For thirty years, 
by his sterling ability and grasp of affairs, he remained a leader and a power 
not only in London, but throughout 
the financial world. He was an 
active member of the Protestant 
Episcopal church. He was vestry- 
man of Christ Church, Hartford, 
1845 until 1849, and was advisor of 
the orphan asylum, 1849-1853; a 
corporator of the Young Men's In- 
stitute, a trustee, 1838-'40, and vice- 
president in 1839. He was a inembcr 
of the Governor's Foot Guards from 
1838-1841, where his military train- 
ing, received under Capt. Alden 
Partridge, proved of great aid to him. 
He was a liberal donor to Trinity 
College, and many charitable enter- 
prises of his church. 

He died from injuries received 
in being thrown from his carriage on 
the liiviera, April 8, 1890, at Monte 
Carlo, near the village of Eze. He 
was buried in Hartford, Conn. 

He married, May 2, 1836, Juliet, 

1 ut. c iu -D T u n- i Junius Spencer Morgan. 

daughter oi the Kev. John Pierpont, 

of the HoUis street church, Boston. Five childern were born to them: John 
Pierpont, born April 17, 1837; Sarah Spencer, born December 5, 1839, married 
George H. Morgan of New York City (of the line of James) June 28, 1806; 
Mary Lyman, born November 5, 1844, married Walter H. Bums of New 
York City, January 29, 1867, in London; Junius Spencer, Jr., born April 6, 
1846, died, 1858; Juliet Pierpont, born December 4, 1847. 

ARTHUR BREESE MORRIS. 

Arthur B. Morris, son of lieut. William Walton Morris, U. S. A., and 
Sarah (Carpenter) Morris, was born in Morrisania, N. Y., in 1812, and died 
in New York City, August 11, 1869. 

His father was a distinguished officer during the Revolutionary War, 
who served in the second artillery. Continental Line, and later on the staff 
of Gen. Anthony W^ayne. 

The subject of this sketch entered the "Academy" in 1826, remaining 
until 1829. He engaged in mercantile pursuits in New York City with his 
brother-in-law, Mr. Aquila (!. Stoah, for several j'ears. He then located in 
Mobile, Ala., where he engaged in the cotton business until the breaking out 
of the Civil War in 1861, when he returned to New York City. He engaginl in 
the wholesale business in New York until his death. 

He was a member of the St. Paul's Episcopal Church of Morrisania. 

He married a Miss Mary Bard of Staten Island, who died in February, 
1870; no children. 




l82 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

ANTHONY MORSE. 

Anthony Morse, sou of Wareham and Elizabeth L. (Lathrop) Morse, 
was born February 14, ISll, and died October 31, 1852; was buried in Lebanon, 
N.H. 

He prepared for college in the schools of Lebanon, N. H., and entered the 
"Academy" in 1826, and gi-aduated in 1830. 

He was married June 24, 1842, to Mary Ann Kelley, who died in New York 
City. Four children were born to them: Wareham Anthony, died a few years 
ago; Elizabeth Lathrop, died unmarried; Carlin, died in infancy; Emma C, 
born November 22, 1850, mariied Charles LeMoyne Mitchell, resides in New 
York City. 

HON. ISAAC EDWARD MORSE, A. B. 

Isaac E. ]Moi-se, son of Nathan and Martha Crawford (Nichols) Morse, 
was born in New Iberia, La., May 22, 1809, and died in New Orleans, La., 
February 11, 1866. 

In 1820, his parents removed to New Orleans, where he attended the 
private schools. He prepared for college under the instruction of a tutor 
and at an academy in EUzabethtown, N. J. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1823, and graduated in 1828, being dis- 
tinguished for his scholarship and love of oratorical \\ ork. He entered Harvard 
University in 1828, and graduated A. B. in 1829; served as president of his 
class. 

He studied law in New Orleans and Paris, France, and was admitted 
to the bar in New Orleans in 1834, where he practiced his profession until 
1835. In tliis last year, he removed to St. Martinsville, La., where he made 
his home until 1851, when he returned to New Orleans and continued his 
practice until his death. He met with marked success in his profession; 
becoming one of the ablest attorneys in the country. 

He was a Democrat in politics and held many positions. He represented 
his district in the state senate in 1838-42. In the faU of 1844, he was elected 
a representative to Congress, in place of Peter E. Bossier, deceased, and held 
this position until March 3, 1851; served as attor'uey general of Louisiana, 
1854-56. He was appointed by President Pierce (q. v.) special envoy and 
minister to New Grenada, now Colombia, to demand indemnity for the murder 
of Americans crossing the Isthmus of Panama and to negotiate a treaty, 
serving during 1856-57. He was a member of the Episcopal Church. 

He was married at Harlem Plantation, Plaquemines Parish La., January 
8, 1835, to Margaretta Smith Wederstrandt, who died in Washington, D. C, 
July 25, 1893. Nine children were born to them: Edward Malcom, born 
December 30, 1835, died June 18, 1890; Charles Nathan, born February 8, 
1837, died January 1, 1880; Alexander Porter, born October 19, 1842, resides 
in Washington, D. C; Rosa, born January 8, 1844, died unmarried, October 
4, 1897; Thomas Nichols, born November 13, 1845, died June 5, 1847; Mary 
Blake, born October 26, 1848, died unmarried, February 28, 1898; Louise, 
born March 20, 1850, died May 15, 1852; Helen Wederstrandt, born January 
28, 1852, married Mr. Edward Janiu, died August 22, 1904; Martha Cornelia, 
born October 30, 1854, resides in Washington, D. C. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 183 

HENRY MOWER. 

Henry Mower, son of Henry and Hannah (Haile) Mower, was born in 
Woodstock, Vt., April 11, 1804. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Acadenij'" in 1820, 
graduating in 1823. 

He was elected ensign, in 182.5, of the Woodstock ^'Vi-tillery, a celebrated 
organization of the early militia of Vermont, and served for some time. Later, 
he located in Michigan, where he lived a roving life with the Indians. He made 
his headquarters for a time at Paw Paw, whore he died abovit 1850. 

SAMUEL MOWER, A. B. 

Samuel Mower, son of Henry and Hannah (Haile) Mower, was born 
in Woodstock, Vt., June 24, 1808, and died in Claremont, N. H., March 14, 
I860." 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1820, 
and remained three years; was a student at the University of Vermont, 1824- 
25; graduated A. B. from Union College, in 1828. 

He engaged in the manufacture of machinery in Boston, Mass., 1828-39, 
and 1845 to 1860. He removed to Michigan City, Ind., in 1839 and engaged in 
the forwarding and commission business until 1845, when he returned to 
Boston. He was the inventor of machines for making bricks, dry clay process, 
boots and shoes, rope and twine. He vv-as a Whig in politics; was mayor of 
Michigan City, Ind., 1843-44. He was a member of the Episcopal Church, 
and I. O. O. F. 

He was married, June 15, 1831, to Julia Ann Stearns of Woodstock, Vt., 
who died January 23, 1847. Four children were born to them : Samuel Belding, 
born lebruary 4, 1832, died February 20, 1885; Henry Stearns, born March 13, 
1833, resides Newton, Mass.; Mary Eliza, born February 1, 1836, married F. F. 
Wills of Calcutta, Ind., died August 15, 1895; Maria Elizabeth, born February 
7, 1836, married John T. Shurtliff of Bennington, Vt., died September 15, 1881. 

CAPT. JAMES MURDOCH. 

James Murdoch was born in Havana, Cuba, in 1805, and died in Boston 
Mass., in 1881. His parents were natives of Massachusetts. 

He was sent to this country at an early age, and prepared for college 
at the academies in Medford, Mass., and E.xeter, N. H., and entered the 
"Academy" in 1822, and graduated in 1824. After graduating, he was em- 
ployed by James Peabody of Salem, and sent on the famous ship George, on 
two voyages, in 1828 and 1829, to Calcutta. In 1830, he left the employ of 
Mr. Peabody and became master of a ship engaged in the East India trade,. 
and subsequently became one of the "crack" captains of Enoch Train's 
celebrated line of packet ships between Boston and IJverpool. In 1848, he 
commanded the famous ship Ocean Monarch, when she was burned only a 
f(!w hours out from Liverpool, on her return to Boston. This sad affair 
terminated his life on the ocean. He then became a residcait of Boston,, 
where he made his home until his death. He was. a. meinber of the Bostom 
Marine Society and Somerset Club. 



184 NORWICH UXIVERSITY. 

REV. BENJAMIN BALL NEWTON, A. B. 

Benjamin B. Newton, was born in St. Alban.s, Vt., July 29, 1808, and died 
in Brooklyn, N. Y., January 17, 187.5. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1828, remaining about two years. He 
graduated A. B. from the University of Vermont in 18-31; taught in the 
Burlington Academy, 1831-32; was a student at the Yale Theological Seminary, 
1833-34; graduated at the Andover Theological Seminary in 1835; was ordained 
a Congregational clergj'man on July 27, 1836; was pastor of the Congregational 
Church in Plattsburg, N. Y^., 1836-39; was a home missionary in Pennsylvania, 
1839-41; in Chelsea, Vt., 1841-46. He engaged in business and preached in 
St. Albans, 1846-5.5. He removed to Kansas' in 1855, where he resided until 
1863, when he removed to Brooklyn, N. Y. He was ordained a deacon in the 
Episcopal church on January 11, 1887, and was assistant rector of the Holy 
Trinity church in Brooklyn until his death. He represented St. Albans in 
the Vermont Legislature in 1849. 

He was twice married: first, November 17, 1835, to Harriet Maria Smith 
of St. Albans. He was again married, February 3, 1842, to Adeline Prichard 
of Bradford, Vt. Two sons were born to them: Benjamin Ball, Jr., "N. U." 
73; Edward Pearsons, now an Episcopal clergyman in Valdez, Alaska. 

JOHN SANFORD NOBLE. 

.lohn S. Noble, son of llie Rev. Birdsey Glover and Charlotte (Sanford) 
Noble, was born in ^Nliddletown, Conn., March 11, 1815, and died unmarried, 
hi Ottawa, ill., June 4, 1889. 

He attended the Cheshire Academy and entered the "A. L. S. & ^L 
Academy" in 1826, remaining until 1829. 

He engaged in general mercantile business in Alton, III., and in the hard- 
ware business in Goshen, N. Y., previous to 1847; was in the employ of the 
South Easton Iron Co., Easton, Pa., 1847-64; conducted a drug store in Easton, 
Pa., 1864-70; engaged with his brother, J. W. NoV)lc, on contract work on 
the construction of the Ottawa, Oswego & Fox River Valley, R. R. (now 
part of the C. B. & Q. R. R.) from Streator to Aurora, 111., 1870-72. He 
retired from active work in this last year. He was a member of the Episcopal 
Church and a Republican in politics. 

BVT. BRIG. GEN. WILLIAM HENRY NOBLE, A. M. 

WiUiam H. Noble, son of the Rev. Birdsey Glover and Charlotte (Sanford) 
Noblf , and brother of John S. Noble, '28, was born in Newtown, Conn., August 
18, 1813, and died in Bridgeport, Conn., January 18, 1894. 

In 1812, his parents removed to Middleto\%Ti, where he attended the 
public schools. He entered the "Academy" in 1825, and remained until 
1828. He took part in the march to New York, July 4, 1826. He entered 
Wa.shington College (Trinity) in 1828, and in 1830, the junior class of Y^ale 
University, graduating A. B. in 1832. He later received the degree of A. M. 
from this last Institution. 

He taught for a short time in Bridgeiiort, in 1834; but soon began the 
study of law with Judge Joseph Wood of that city. He was admitted to the 
bar in 1836 and ])racticed his profession in Bridgeport, 1836-62. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS, 



185 



He was commissioned colonel of the 17th Connecticut Volunteers, July 
22, 1862. He performed conspicuous service in the battle of Chancellorsville, 
May 2, 1863, being severely wounded; was confined in a hospital in Washing- 
ton, D. C, for some time and then given a furlough. Five days before the 
expiration of his furlough, he reported in ^^'ashington to join his regiment 
and take part in the repulse of Lee's movement north. He was directed to 
report to General Schenck, at Baltimore; from there he hastened to Getty s- 
hiiig, where the famous battle was being fought. On hi?^ arrival he was given 
command of his brigade; was stationed at Cemetery Hill, Catletts Hill, and 
from there to Fort Wagner; was ordered to Florida anil commanded his brigade 
in Jacksonville; was ordered to re- 
lieve the 10th Connecticut Volunteers 
at St. Augustine, and was given com- 
mand of the district comprising all 
Florida east of the St. John's River, 
and during this time commanded 
his brigade in expeditions under 
Generals Bunney, Gordon and 
Hatch. He was captured by 
"guerrillas" while proceeding to St. 
.■\ugustine from Jacksonville to 
attend a court martial; was confined 
in prison in Tallahassee, Macon, Ga., 
and Andersonville, and was finally 
exchanged early in 1S6.5. He vvas 
order(-d to \'icksburg, and there 
given command of one thousand 
union troops, just released from 
Confederate prisons and ordered 
to Annapolis, Md. June, 1865. He 
was then ordered to Florida where 
he was in command of ordnance 
stores until July 1865; was mustered 
out of service at Hilton Head, S. C, 
July 19, 1865. On recommendation of General Grant, he was brevetted 
brigadier general for "meritorious services," IMarch 13, lt65. 

He was connected with several business entei'prises; \v'as instrumental 
in securing the charter of the Hoosatonic B. i{., and was secretary of the 
company for a num.ber of years; was in partnership with B. T. Barnum during 
1851-6], in the development of East Bridgeport. Ihe b(>a'if iful Washington 
Park was laid out by them and given to the city. 

He was a Democrat in politics and held many positions; he was states 
attorney Fairfield County in 1846; was clerk of courts of Fairfield County 
several years, was a Democratic candidate for Congress in 1850; represented 
Bridgeport in the House of Re{)resentatives in 1884; was for several years 
a councilman, and alderman of Bridgeporl ; was al^o cliairinan of the Board 
of Park Commissioners. 

He was a member of the Christ Episcofjal Church of Bridgeport, and its 
senior warden for several years; Bridgeport Scientific Society; Fairfield 
County Historical Society; G. A. R. 




Bvt. Brig. Gen. William Henry Noble. 



180 NORWICH University. 

He was married October 16, 1839, to Harriet Jones Brooks of Bridgeport, 
who died June 30, 1901. Four childi'en were born to them; Henrietta Ma- 
tilda, born November 1, 1840, resides Jenkintown, Pa.; John Frederick, 
born June 7, 1844, died unmarried, April 11, 1910; Clarence IMeigs, bom 
March 8, 1S.50, died March 7, 1907; Fannie .^heldon, born August 1, 1859, 
married Mr. Eugene De Puy, resides Jenkintown, Pa. 

SURGEON JAMES NORRIS, U. S. N. 

James Norris was appointed assistant surgeon, U. S. N., December 10 
1814. 

He entered the "Academy" from Exeter, N. H., in 1820, and gi-aduated 
in 1822. He served on the Ship of the Line, Washington D. C, 1822-23; 
the schooner Grampus, West India squadron, 1824. In 1825, he was taken 
ill and was gi-\'en sick leave, and owing to continued disabiUty, he resigned 
from the service, June 20, 1826. 

HON. \MLLIAM OLCOTT, A. B. 

William Olcott, son of the Hon 'SVAh and Sarah (Porter) Olcott, was born 
in Hanover, N. H., September 17, 1806, and died m Slirevepoit, lia., April 1, 
1851. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1820, 
and graduated in 1825; graduated A. B. from Dartmouth College in 1827. 

He studied law with Hon. Joseph Bell of Haverhill, N. H., and was 
admitted to the bar in 1830; practiced his profession in Hanover, N. H., 1830- 
35; in mercantile business, Rochester, N. Y., 1835-43: Buffalo, N. Y., 1843-46; 
Shreveport, La., 1846-51. 

He was married May 28, 1S33, to Harriet Ann Hinsdale, daughter of 
John Hinsdale, of Middletown, Coim., and brother of John T. Hinsdale, 
'28. Five chilcU-en were born to them : WiUis, born 1836, died about 1860; Caro- 
line H., married, James Barrett; Theodore, died in infancy; Harrison Bell, 
died in infancy; William, born November 12, 1849, died unmarried, in Chicago, 
in 1890. 

REV. THOMAS ROBESON OWEN, A. B. 

Thomas R. Ow en, son of Gen. James Owen, was born at Owen Hill, Bladen 
County, N. C, ]March 8,1810, and died at Ingleside, Tenn., July 4, 1882. 

He prepared for college in the schools of Wilmington, N. C, and entered 
the "Academy' ' from that city in 1825. He graduated with high rank in 1829. 
He then entered the University of North Carolina and graduated A. B. in 
1831. He prepared for the Presbyterian ministry at the Union Theological 
Seminary, Prince Edward County, Va., and was ordained about 1833. 

He was for some years pastor of Presbyterian chm-ches in Washington, 
D. C, and in various cities in the South. He later joined the Baptist denomi- 
nation and was pastor of many churches in the South. In 1870, he retked 
from the active ministry and made his home with his daughter, Mrs. Gibbs, at 
Ingleside, Tenn., near Co%ington. He was one of the best known clergjmeu 
in the South. He was a profound scholar and an elequent speaker. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



187 



He was married at Washington, D. C, to Mary Flound McCotter, who 
died in 1876. Five children were born to them : of whom three survive, James 
of Covington, Tenn.; Thomas Robeson of Los Angeles, Cal.; and a daughter, 
Mrs. George R. Gibbs, of Ingleside, Tenn. 

WILLIAM WETMORE ORNE. 

William W. Orne, son of Samuel and Luciiida ('Dwight) Orne, was born 
in Springfield, Mass., Jmie 27, 1811, and dioxl there April 29, 1852. 

He prepared for college in the 
schools of his city and the Phillips- 
Exeter Academy. He entered the 
"Academy" in 1828, and gradu- 
ated in 1826. 

He engaged m mercantile busi- 
ness for a short time, but possess- 
ing an ample fortune, retired from 
active business and devoted him- 
self to study. He possessed a very 
complete library. He was a m.nn 
of talent, uprightness ond honor 
and was greatly respected l)y the 
people of his city. 

He was married May 6, 18o-j, 
to Lucy Gassett J^wight of Spring- 
field, Mass., who died, April 17, 
1887, at Philadelphia, Pa. Three 
children were born to them: 
William, born I'ebiaiary 14, 183.5, 
died August 8, 1862; James Dwight, 
born September 11, 1836, died 
July 31, 1894; Lucinda Howard, 
born October 8, [l840, died Decem- 
ber 29, 1895. 

HORACE PADDOCK. 

Horace Paddock, only son of Hon. ICphraim and Abby (Phelps) Paddock, 
was born in St. Johnsbury, Vt., June 16, 1809, and died there, in 18*7. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1822, graduating in 1825. He was a clerk in a store in Lyndon, Vt., 
from 1825 until 1832, when he located in Troy, Yt. Here he engaged in mer- 
cantile biisiiiess until 1845, when he returned to St. Johnsbvuy, Vt., where he 
made his home until his death. He was bookkeeper for the St. Johnsbury 
Iron Works, 184-5-47; engaged in the wholesale tea and tobacco business in com- 
pany with his father, 1847-60; engaged in farming near St. Johnsbury from 
1860 until his death. 

He is sui-vived by a daughter, Mrs. En)ma J. Taylor, of St. Johnsbury. 

JOHN GPJNDRON PALMER. 
John G. Palmer, son of Joseph and Elizabeth Catherme (Porcher) Palmer, 
was born on the "Springfield "plantation, St. .John's Parish, Berkeley Co., S. 
C, in 1807, and died in St. John's Parish, July 19, 1840. 




William Wetmore Orne. 



188 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY, 



He prepared for college in the schools of Charleston, S. C, and entered the 
"Academy" in 1824, graduating in 1826. He engaged in planting at "Cherry- 
Grove,' ' St. John's Parish until his death. 

He was married in 1829, to Catherine Marion Couturier, a descendant of 
Gen. Francis ^Marion. She died in 1895. Seven children were born to them: 
Francis Gendron, born September 7, 1832, colonel C. S. A., died at Warren- 
town, Pa., December 4, 1862; Harriet Marion, born in November, 1831, married 
Francis Marion Dwight, died in 1896; Eliza Catherine, born in 1834, married 
Isaac Stockton Keith Legare, resides at 92 Church St., Charleston, S. C; 
Joseph, born in 1835, major C. S. A., died in July, 1898; John Gendron, Jr., 
born in 1840, died in 1856; Annie Maham, born in 1838, died in infancy; Char- 
lotte Rebecca, born 1837, married Ellison Capers, brig. gen. C. S. A., after- 
wards Bishop of the Episcopal Church of South Carolina, died in 1908. 



WILLIAM PARKER. 

William Parker, son of James and Penelope (Butler) Parker, was born in 
Perth Amboy, N, J., July 18, 3807, and died at Colon, Isthmus of Panama, 
September 2 1, T^'IS. 

He prepared for college at Mr. 
Chapman's school in Perth Amboy, 
and entered the "Academy" in 
1822, graduating in 1825. He 
assisted in making a topographical 
survey of Norwich and surrounding 
towns in 1824. (See cut of survey 
shov.Ti in Chapter VIII.) 

He was assistant engineer on 
the construction of the Juniata 
Canal in 1825; v/as assistant engi- 
neer on one of the first railroads 
constructed in the United States, 
near Gerrnantown, Pa.; was first 
assistant engineer on the Boston & 
Worcester R. R., 1833-35; chief 
engineer of the East Florida R. R. 
from 1835, to January, 1837; was 
consulting engineer of the Bruns- 
wick (Ga.) Canal Co., in December, 
1837; was engineer of railroads from 
Brunswick (Ga.) to Tallahassee, 
(Fla.) October, 1838-July, 1S39. He 
was superintendent of the Boston 
& Worcester R. R., 1839-49, and on leaving this road, he was presented by the 
employees with a large silver tea service and water pitcher —by the directors 
with a silver cake basket, and by three friends connected with the road, with 
crayon portrait from which the accompanying cut is taken. He was superin- 
tendent of the Baltimore & Ohio R. R. from 1849, to December, 1853, He was 
given a leave of absence of three months for voyage to Europe on account of 
health. On leaving the railroad, he was presented by the employees wth a 




William Parker. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 189 

silver s:ilver, a large tea service, a water pitcher, and a gold watch. He was 
consulting engineer on the construction of the first Niagara Falls Suspension 
Bridge, in 1857; also consulting engineer of the E. &. N. American Ry., Fred- 
erickton, N. B., in 1858. He was consulted as expert by contractors of the 
Hammond River Viaduct, St. Johns, N. B., in regard to claims of the engineer 
in 1860. He was superintendent and engineer of the Jersey City waterworks in 
1860. He was superintendent of the Panama R. R., from January, 1861, until 
September 24, 1868, when he was murdered in Colon. His family was given 
his full salary to Jauuaiy, 1869, and $10,000 as a present. 

He was married in Boston, Mass., in 1836, to lAicy Cushing Whitwell, a 
native of Augusta, Me., who died July 2, 1909. Seven children were born to 
them. 

CAPT. WILLIAM PEARCE PARR0T1\ 

William P. Parrott, son of John F. and Hannah (Parker) Parrott, brother 
of Capt. Robert P. Parrott, U. S. A., and cousin of William Pearce, '24, v/as 
born in Gloucester, Mass., about 1810, and died in Boston, Mass., March 4, 
1868. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1823, 
and graduated in 1825. He then engaged in civil engineering, becoming one of 
the best known engineers in New England. He was chief engineer of the 
Boston and Lowell R . R ., and several other roads in Massachusetts. He was 
one of the founders of the Boston Society of Civil Engineers. 

HON. SAMUEL PARTRIDGE. 

Samuel Partridge, son of Isaac and Lois (Newton) Partridge, was born in 
Norv>dch, Vt., about 1802, and died in Elmira, N. Y., in 1880. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy' ' in 1820, 
and graduated in 1822. 

He was a merchant at Cold Springs,. N. Y., for some time. He then studied 
law and located in Elmira, N. Y ., where he made his home until his death and 
where he practiced his profession for many years. He also engaged in business 
and acquired a large fortune. He was a Democi-at in pohtics and represented 
his district in the IT. S. House of Representatives during 1841-43. 

He was t-ivice married. His second wife was a Miss Hart. 

CAPT. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN PATTON. 

Benjamin F. Patton, son of James Patton, was born in Asheville, N. C. 
February 16, 1807, and died in Clarksville, Ga., in December, 1840. 

He attended the schools of his county and entered the "Academy" in 
1824, antl graduated in 1828. 

He removed to Clarksville, Habersham County, in 1830, where he resided 
until his death. He built a large hotel, which he conducted for some years; 
also engaged in mercantile business and was for a time engaged in mining for 
gold. He was a public spirited citizen; gave the land on which the Presby- 
terian church was built in his town. During the Indian troubles in the thirties, 
he raised a company and served as captain for some time. General Scott, in 
his report to the War Department, states the company was the best in his com- 



190 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



mand and that Captain Patton was the most efficient volunteer officer. He 
was a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

He married Nannie Gage of Union County, S. C. One child was born to 
them: John Gage, captain Co. E, 1st Regiment, Georgia Regulars, C. S. A., 
and was killed in the second battle of Manassas. 



REAR ADMIRAL HIRAM PAULDING, U. 8. N. 

Hiram Paulding, son of John Paulding, one of the captors of Major 
Andre, was born December 11, 1797, in Westchester County, Nev/ York, 
and died at Huntington, L. I., October 20, 1878. 

He attended the village schools vmtil September 1, 1811, when he was 
appointed a midshipman in the United States Navy. War with England was 
shortly afterwards declared, and he was ordered to join Commodore Chaunce.y's 
squadron on Lake Ontario. He was soon transferred to the Preaident, flag- 
ship of Commodore Macdonough, 
and saw considerable lighting on 
Lake Champlain. I'hrough the 
battles which followed, the American 
squadron being short of officers, 
Paulding, though under seventeen 
years of age, was entrusted with a 
lieutenant's duty, and had charge of 
tlie second hea^-y gun division on 
board the Ticonderoija. For gallantry 
during the fight, Paulding was highly 
complimented by his commanding 
officer, and received a vote of thanks 
and a sword from Congress. After 
the war, he joined the squadron of 
Conunodore Decatur, in the .Algerian 
difficulty; and in .\pril, 1816, became 
lieutenant by promotion and went on 
a three years' cruise on the Mace- 
donian, in the Pacific Ocean. 

Upon returning to the United 
States, he procured a leave of 
Rear Admiral Hiram Paulding. absence and spent two years of hard 

study at the American Literary, Scientific and MiUtary Academy, gradua- 
ting with the class [of 1823. The same fall, he joined Commodore Porter's 
squadron as lieutenant on the Sea Gull. 

In 1824, he was ordered to the frigate United States, and made another 
cruise of four years in the Pacific Ocean. For two years subsequent, he was 
on the frigate Conditution, and commanded the AS7i«?7.- from 1834 to 1837. 
He was promoted commander, Februarj^ 9, 1837, and commanded the Levant 
for three years. From 1841 to 1844, he was the executive officer of the New 
York Navy Yard. He was commissioned captain, February 29, 1844, and 
given command of the Vinccnnes, and in 1848, the St. Lawrence. 

In 1851, he was given command of the Washington Navy "^'ard, and 
from 1856 to 1858 was in command of the Home Squadron, first with the 




SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 191 

frigate PoLomac, and afterwards the frigate Wahash, as his flagships. In 1857, 
he broke up the fihbustering expedition of General Walker, which had landed 
at Greytown, Nicaragua, on the steamer Fashion, from Mobile. 

The administration at that time being in s\anpathy with the extension of 
slave territory, in the interest of which this expedition was fitted out, Paulding's 
act was not sustained on the grounds that he had invaded the territory of a 
friendly state; but subsequently the Government of Nicaragua presented him 
with a sword and a large tract of land in recognition of his service to that 
Republic. The latter gift the United States Government did not permit 
him to accept. 

On the outbreak of the Civil War, at the request of President Lincoln, 
Paulding accepted a detail to the Navy Department to assist in rehabiUtating 
the navy. It was due to Ms foresight that the Monitor was so speedily equipp- 
ed for service. 

In July, 1862, the grade of Rear Admiral was created, and Captain 
Paulding was one of the ten distinguished retired officers to receive it. P'rom 
1806 to 1869, he was governor of the Naval Asylum in Philadelphia, and in 
1870, he was assigned to the nominal duty of port admiral in Boston. This 
service ended in 1874, when he retn-ed to his farm at Lloyd's Harbor, L. I., 
where he made his home until his death. 

CAPT. WILLIAM PEARCE. 

William Pearce, son of William Jr., and Clarissa (Sargent) Pearce, was 
born in Gloucester, Mass., in 1805, and died in Calaveras County, Cal., in 
1887. 

He attended the schools of his city, the Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Mass., and entered the "Academy" in 1823, graduating in 1825. 

He was a sea captain for some years, and, in 1849, removed to California, 
where he engaged in ranching in Calaveras Count }■. 

JAMES DUANE PELL. 

James D. Pell, son of Alfred and Adeha (Duane) Pell, was born near 
Hyde Park, N. Y., about 1810, and died in New York city, in 1880. 

He prepared for college in the schools of New York city, and entered the 
"Academy' ' in 1825, and graduated in 1829. 

He engaged extensively in agricultural pursuits at Esopus, N. Y., for 
many years. 

He was married about 1836, to his cousin, Sophia Pell, who died about 
1875. Two children were born to them; Mary, died unmarried, 1890; Walden, 
died in New York city in 1895. 

ROBERT LIVINGSTON PELL. 

Robert L. Pell, son of Alfred and Adelia (Duane) Pell, was born in New 
York city, jNlay 8, 1811, and died there Fel>ruary 11, 1880. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1825, 
and graduated in 1829. He was a student at Yale University from 1829 
until 1832, when he went to Europe, where, he travelled e.Ktensively until 1833. 

He returned to New York and later owned a fine stock and fruit farm 
at Esopus, Ulster, County, N. Y., where he made his summer residence for 



192 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. • 

many years. He was president of the Agricultural Institute in New York 
city many years. He was a member of the Episcopal Chm-ch. 

He was married, July 8, 1837, to Maria Louisa, eldest daughter of James 
L. Brinkerhoff of New York city. Mrs. Pell died November 10, 1866. Three 
childi'en were born to them: Adelia Duane, born July 4, 1838, married Mr. 
John B. Ireland, resides in New York city; Robert Troup, born January, 
1840, died April, 1868; James Brinkerhoff, born in July, 1841, died unmarried, 
in January, 1870. 

CYRIL PEXNOCK. 

Cyril Pennock, son of Peter and Phoebe (Fellows) Pennock, was born in 
Strafford, Yt., December 13, 1799; and died in St. Paul, Minn., March 2, 1880. 

In 1818, his parents removed to Norwich, Vt., where he attended the 
public schools. He entered the "Academy" in September, 1820, being the 
first cadet to em-oll at the Institution, and graduated in 1823. 

He taught school in ^^■indsor, Yt., during 1823-2.5 and in Rutland, Yt., 
during 1824-26. He returned to Norwich in 1S26, where he made his home 
until May 1876, when he removed to St. Paul, Minn., where he resided 
until his death. He taught school in Norwich and vicinity many j-ears; 
also engaged in mason work; was superintendent of schools of Norwich several 
years. He was a Democrat in politics and a member of the Masonic Fra- 
ternity. 

He was married May lo, 182.5, to Sarah, daughter of Daniel AYether- 
bee of Windsor, Yt. She died in St. Paul, Minn., November 22, 1902. 
Twelve children were born to them: Sarah Jane, born June 11, 1826, married 
Henry Wesley Williams, resides in ^»Iinneapolis, Minn.; Mary Lucinda, born 
June 10, 1828, married Royal L. Burge, "N. U." '52, died January 12, 1910; 
Joseph Napoleon, "N. U.," '46; William LewLs, born August 22, 1832, 
died in Boston, Mass., March 9, 1885; Charles Emmet, bom October 8, 
1835, died October 10, 1858; Cynthia Amanda, born February 20, 1838, 
resides in St. Paul, Minn.; Martha Adams, born Maj' 18, 1840, died March 
3, 1841; George Edward, born April 3, 1842, died June 30, 1843; Frederick, 
born November 3, 1844, served in Company B, 6th Yt. Yolunteers, and 
was killed while guarding General Brooks' headquarters on the banks of the 
Chickahominy River, June 27, 1862; George Edward, born April 27, 1847, 
resides in St. Paul Minn.; Adelaide, born May 26, 1849, married Clifton M. 
Davis, resides in St. Charles, 111.; Sylvester Morris, "N. V.]" '68. 

CAPT. NATHAN LOYEMAN PENNOCK. 

Nathan L. Pennock, son of Peter and Phebe (Fellows) Pennock, was born 
in Strafford, Yt., June 10, 1814, and died in Somerville, Mass., December 10, 
1907. 

In 1818, his parents removed to Norwich, \t., where he attended the pub- 
lic schools. He entered the "Academy' ' in 1829, remaining two years. 

At an early age, he learned the harness-making trade and worked at this 
trade at intervals for many j-ears. He was a fine musician and taught singing 
schools in various parts of New England, during the winter months. He made 
his home in Norwich until 1839, when he removed to Randolph, Vt., where he 
worked at his trade for some time, also engaged in building. He built the first 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



193 



two story school house erected in that towii, also the Grace church. In 1863, 
he removed to Lexhigton, Mass., and in 1864, to Somerville. He was in the 
employ of the IMcLean Asylum for twelve years and then conducted a harness 
shop. In 1884, he was appointed janitor of the Davis Grammar School in 
Somerville, which position he held until his death. 

He was a Republican in politics 
and while in Randolph, held several 
positions; was postmaster, 1853-61, 
and justice of the peace, several j-ears. 
He served on the staff of Col. Ira 
Kidder, Vermont Militia, of Ran- 
dolph, for twelve years with rank of 
captain. He was a member of St. 
Thomas' Episcopal Church of Somer- 
ville; Phoenix Lodge, F. and A. M. 
of Randolph, Vt.; White River 
Lodge, I. O. O. F. of Bethel, Vt. 

At the age of 93, he was a re- 
markably well preserved man; was 
able to read and write without the 
aid of glasses. He told the compiler 
of this history in 1907, that he at- 
tributed his remarkable health to the 
early training he received at the old 
"A. L. S. & M. Academy," under 
Captain Partridge. 

He was twice married : first, March 
7, 1844, to Ellen Moulton, neice and Capt. Nathan Loveman Pennock. 

adopted daughter of Hon. Dudley Chase. She died July 22, 1873. Four 
children were born to them: Ellen Maria, born January 8, 1846, married John 
F. Tenney, resides in Federal Point, Fla.; Mary Alice, born September 3, 1848, 
died January 29, 1879; Sarah Elizabeth, born July 1, 1853, married J. L. 
Tyler, died October 12, 1898; Salmon Cotton, born December 18, 1854, now 
a nurse, resides in Somerville, Mass. He was again married, December 20, 
1877, to Mrs. Mary Ann (Foster) Cheney, a native of Randolph, Vt., who 
survives him and resides in Pittsburg, Pa. Two children were born of this 
marriage: Annie Louise, born December 8, 1878, married George N. Putnam, 
resides in Newton, Mass.; Nathan Lewis, born August 1, 1880, resides in West 
Somerville, Mass. 




ALFRED PERKINS, A. B. 

Alfred Perkins, son of Gen. Simon and Nancy (Bishop) Perkins, was born 
in Warren, Ohio, in 1811, and died there, unmarried, March 31, 1840. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1826, and graduated in 1829. lie then 
entered Yale University and graduated A. B. in 1833. 

His health faihng, he traveled in southern Europe during 1837 and 1839? 
in hopes the change of climate would prove beneficial. He was a fine student 
and gave promise of a brilliant career. 



194 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY, 



PROF. EDWIN STURTEVANT PERKINS. 

Edwiu S. Perkins, son of Nathan and Hannah (Stui'tevant) Perkins, was 
born in Woodstock Vt., January 18, 1805, and died in Harrisburg, Pa., June 
18, ISTfD. 

He prepared for college in the schools of Windsor and entered the " Acad- 
emy' ' in 1825, and graduated in 1828. He was an accomplished musician and 
played in the cadet band. 

Soon after graduating he removed to Pennsylvania, where he taught 
school for some j'cars; was professor of Music and instructor in Fencing at the 
Pennsylvania Military Institute, Harrisburg. Pa., 1845-48; also conducted the 
boarding hall connected with the school. He was in the employ -of the Pennsyl- 
vania R. R. at the time of his death. 

He was twice married. His first wife was a Miss Farwell of Hartland, Vt. 
His second wife was a Southern lady. 



JUDGE HAMILTON ELIOT PERKINS. 

Hamilton E. Perkins, son of Roger Ehot and Esther (Blanchard) Perkins, 
was born in Hopkiuton, N. H., November 23, 1809. and died in Concord, N. H., 
January (i, 188(5. 

He attended the schools at 
Pembroke and Derry, N. H., and 
graduated from the PhilUps Exeter 
Ik Academy. He entei'ed the "Acad- 

emy' ' in 1822, and graduated in 1824. 
In 1823, he accompanied the corps of 
cadets in a march from Norwich, Vt., 
to Concord, N. H. The corps 
stopped at his father's house in 
Hopkinton, where they were royally 
entertained, and in the evening a ball 
was given in the town hall in their 
honor. 

He attended the Harvard Law 
School, 1824-26, and was admitted to 
the bar in the latter 3'ear. In 1827, 
he settled upon a large estate, which 
he had inherited in the northern part 
of Hopkinton, called Contoocook, 
\\ here, in addition to his professional 
\\oi-k as a lawyer, he built mills, 
promoted agriculture and was one of 
the chief promoters of the thriving 
settlement at this point. In 1856, 




Judge Hamilton Eliot Perkins. 



he moved to Concord. N. H., where he resided until his death. He was 
judge of proVjate, Merrimack County, 1855-74; was president of the 
Contoocook Valley R. R., (afterwards the Concord & Claremont) for several 
v'ears. He was postmaster of Contoocook, 1849-53; was also president of the 
Merrimack County Agricultural Societj^ for many years. He was a member of 
of the Episcopal Church. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



195 



He was married May 11, 1832, to Clara Bartlett George, of Concord, 
N. H., who died March 31, 1902. Eight children were born to them of whom 
four survived their parents: George H., commodore U. S. N., died October 28, 
1899; Hamilton, resides in Boston, Mass.; Harriet M., married Judge William 
L. Foster, resides in Boston, Mass.; Susan George, resides in Concord, N. H. 



MAJ. CARLTON HOLMES PERRY. 

Carlton H. Perry, son of Col. William and Christian (Marsh) Perry, was 
born in Quechee (Hartford) \'l., Marcli 25, 1802, and died in Keokulc, la., 
December 26, 1880. 

He attended the schools of his town and of Hartland, where his parents 
removed in 1807. He entered the ''Academy' ' in 1820, and graduated in 1823. 
He taught school, winters, in Hartford and Hartland, Yt., until 182.5, when he 
returned to the "Academy" as 
instructor of penmanship, which 
position he held until 1827; was in- 
structor in Algebra, 1827-28, Mathe- 
matics, 1828-29, and adjutant of the 
corps, 1828-29. 

In the fall of 1829, he caught 
the cry of "Westward Ho"! as it 
rang through the New England 
towns, and resolved to cast his lot 
in the unknown "far west." He 
resigned his position at the "Acad- 
emy" and proceeded to St. Louis, 
Mo., after a three weeks passage by 
stage and by boat down the Ohio 
River. Here he spent six months 
teaching school and singing school. 

In the spring of 1830, he re- 
moved to Jacksonville, 111., where 
he clerked in the store of a relative. 
Dr. Gillette, a native of Hartford, 
Vt. He soon formed a partnership 
•with Dr. Gillette, which continued 
a few years. He then engaged in 
business alone until 1838, when with three others, he took a contract to build 
a j)art of the newly projected Illinois Central R.R. between Rock River 
and Bloomington, in Illinois, which undertaking was suspended in the fall 
of 1839, for want of funds. 

In 1841, he moved to Fort Madison, la., and engaged in the mercantile 
business until 1851, when he removed to Keokuk, where he made his home 
until his death. He soon became identified with the business interests of that 
town. He engaged in mercantile business with his brother-in-law, Aiihur 
'Wolcott, for several years. In the meantime he became a large property owner 
in Keokuk. In company with David W^. Kilbourne, Hugh S. Reid, and Wil- 
liam Leighton, engaged in building the; Keokuk, Fort Des Moines &. Minnesota 
R. R. (Des Moines ValU-y) j)rojected in 1855. They advanced the means for 
the completion of the road and by the terms of the contract with the Stat(^ of 




Maj. Carlton Holmes Perry. 



196 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

Iowa came into possession of a large tract of land in north western Iowa, 
which made them independent. He leased the road upon its completion and 
managed it several years 

He took great interest in military affairs; was a colonel in the Illinois Militia; 
served as an officer in the Black Hawk war; was commissioned a colonel of 
volunteers for the Mexican War, but did not serve owing to the close of the 
war. He was an active supporter of the Union cause and on the breaking out 
of the Civil War he assisted in organizing and drilling troops for the service; 
was commissioned major of the 3d Iowa Cavalry, August 26, 1861, and served 
with General Curtis until November 18, 1862, when, owing to failing health, 
he was forced to resign his commission. 

He w^as a Republican in politics, but never accepted office. He v/as a mem- 
ber of the Unitarian Church and assisted in organizing in October, 1853, the 
first church of that denomination in Keokuk; was president of the Keokuk 
Library Association, 1874 and 1875. 

He was married November 28, 1833, to Ehzabeth Ann Wolcott, daugh- 
ter of Elihu Wolcott of East Windsor, Conn. She died December 2, 1892. 
Two children were boi'n to them: Howard Wolcott, born Julj' 8, 1835, resides, 
Humboldt, la.; Kathryn, born September 21, 1837, resides at Capri, Italy. 
He adopted Saidec, daughter of Arthur Wolcott and Sarah Ann Morrison of 
Pennsylvania, and made her an equal heu- in his estate. 

COL. WILLIAM HENRY PETTIS, U. S. A. 

William II. Pettis, son of Frederick Pettis, was born in Windsor, Vt., 
in 1808, and died February 29, 1880. 

He attended the schools of his town and was a cadet at the "Academy" 
during 1824-26. He entered the United States Military Academy, July 1, 
1827, and graduated July 1, 1832: was commissioned brevet 2d Ueutenant, 
First United States Artillery on graduation; was promoted 2d lieutenant, 
September 30, 1833; served at Beaufort, N. C, and ot Fort Monroe, Va., 
1832-33; on duty in the Creek Nation, 1833-34; served at the Charleston, 
S. C, harbor, 1834-36. He served in the Florida War in 1836, being engaged 
in the defense of Volusia, April 14, 1836; and in the skirmish with the Indians, 
JNIay 8, 1836; resigned his commission, September 11, 1836. 

On the breaking out of the Civil War, he offered his services to the state 
of New York; was commiissioned lieut. colonel of the 50th New York Volunteer 
Engineers, September 18, 1861; was promoted colonel, June 3, 1863. He en- 
gaged in the defence of Washington, D. C, September 20, until November 28, 
1861; was stationed at the Engineer Department at Washington, November 29, 
1861, until March 18. 1862; served in the Peninsular campaign with the 
Army of the Potomac, iSTarch until September, 1862, being engaged in the 
seige of Yorktown, April 5 until May 4, 1862, and as engineer on the Chicka- 
hominy and James Rivers, from June vmtil September, 1862; was stationed at 
the Engineer Department at Washington, from September until November, 
1862; was engaged in repairing roads and wharves at Aquia Creek, Va., 
November, 1S62, until March, 1863. He served with the armj' of the Potomac 
in the Rappahannock campaign, from March until June, 1863. He was 
engaged in a skirmish, while constructing a pontoon bridge at Pollock's Mills. 
April, 29, 1863, at Banks Ford ATay 3, 1863; Deep Run, June 5, 1863. Diu-ing 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



197 



Junc-Juh', 1S63, he served in the Pennsylvania Campaign. He was stationed 
at the Engineer Department, Washington, D. C, July 3, -September 2, 1863, 
October, 1863 until March, 1864; and at Rappahannock Station, Va., 
Septembers, until October 10, 1863, March until April, 1864. He was in 
command of the Engineer Department, Washington, D. C; and in supplying 
the Army of the Potomac vsith engineer equi]mient, April, 1864, until June, 
1865; was mustered out of service, June 14, 1865. 

He was assistant commissioner for the distribution of supplies to destitute 
Florida Indians, during 1836-37. He was then appointed civil engineer in 
the service of the United States. He superintended horbor improvements 
at Salmon River, N. Y., 1836-46; on the Genessec River, N. Y., 1842-46; 
at Buffalo, N. Y., 1853-55; and at Dunkirk, N. Y., in 1855. He superintended 
the construction of the Buffalo custom house and post office; was engaged in 
general engineering work near Buffalo, dui'ing 1859-61. 

He married Anna Mansfield of Watertown. N. Y. 



CHARI;ES EDWARD PHELPS. 

Charles E. Phelps, son of Dr. PJdward and Sally (Swan) Phelps, was 
born in Stonington, Conn., in 1808, and died there, unmarried, in 1834. 

He prepared for college at the Stonington Academy and entered the 
"A. L. S. & M. .\cademy" in 1825, graduating in 1828. 

He engaged as a captain in the whale fisheries until his death, meeting 
with marked success. 

GEN. EDWARD ARAPI PHELPS. 

Edward A. Phelps, only son of Capt. Arab and Eltham (Mills) Phelps, 
was born in North Colebrook, Conn., March 26, 1808, and died there, October 
19, 1885. His father was a distin- 
guished soldier of the Revolutionary 
War. 

He attended the schools of his 
town and entered the "Academy" 
in 1825, and graduated in 1828. He 
was a fine student and a powerful 
athlete, being one of the few cadets 
of his time,, able to keep pace with 
Captain Partridge in his ''forced 
marches." 

He studied law with Judge Gould 
in his famous school in litchfield. 
Conn , 1828-29; but feeling that his 
father needed his assistance in the 
management of his largo estate, gave 
up that course and returned to the 
family homestead, which he finally 
inherited and where he lived unti 
his death. The estate, under his able 
management, became one of the most 
productive in the State and noted Gen.' Edward Arab Phelps. 




198 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

for its prize herd of daiiy cattle. He was director of the Hurlbnrt 
National Bank of Winsted, Conn. 

He was a Democrat in politics and held all the important town offices; 
represented the town in the Legislature, in 1S41 and 1851, also served as State 
Bank Commissioner, 1853. He took great interest in the State MiUtia; w^as 
ensign of the 7th company, 21st regiment, August 21, 1827; promoted lieu- 
tenant, Api'il 21, 1829; captain, Cth company, same regiment, August 12, 
1830; major, May 16, 1832; Heutenant colonel. May 12, 1834; colonel, April 13, 
1835; brigadier general, 6th brigade. May 13, 1836. He was a capable business 
man and acquired a valuable property; was a fine scholar and of command- 
ing presence and genial disposition. He was highly respected by the citi- 
zens of his State and was a favorite pupil and lifelong friend of Captain 
Partridge. 

He was twice married: first, January 23, 1835, to Elizabeth Strong 
Carrington of Middletown, Conn., who died October 12, 1847. Three children 
were born to them: Elizabeth, born February 15, 1838, died, December 5, 
1845; Edward Arab, born December 15, 1840. died September 11, 1884; 
Carrington, born October 3, 1847, resides in North Colebrook, Conn. He 
was again married, February 6, 1850, to Charlotte Green Swasey, a sister 
of the wife of Capt. Alden Partridge. She died without issue, July 19, 1891. 

SURGEON F:DWARD ELISHA PHELPS, M. D., A. M., LL. D. 

Edward E. Phelps, son of Elisha and Susanna (Eastman) Phelps, was 
born in Peacham, Vt., April 24, 1803; and died in Windsor, Vt., November 20. 
1880. 

He prepared for college in a private school in Cornish, N. H., and under 
the tuition of Rev. Mr. Crosby of Charlestown, N. H. He was a student at 
Yale University, during 1S19-20 and in September of this last year he entered 
the "Academy," graduating in 1823. 

After serving for a time on a United States training .ship in the Bo.ston 
harbor, he entered the Yale ]\ledical College, and graduated M. D. in 1825. 

His health beginning to fail, he went South and accepted a position in an 
engineering party making a survey for canals in the Dismal Swamp in Virginia, 
where he remained until 1828. During his connection with this survey, he 
made a careful study of the botany of the region and continued his studies 
in the natural sciences. 

In 1828, be began the practice of his profession in Windsor, Vt., which 
he continued for many years. 

He was professor of Anatomy and Surgery at the University of Vermont, 
1835-37; lecturer on Materia Medica, Medical Botany and Medical Juris- 
prudence, Dartmouth Medical College, 1841-42; Medical Botany, 1842-49; 
professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics, 1842-49; professor of Theory 
and Practice of Medicine, Pathology, and Anatomy, 1849-71; professor of 
General Pathology, 1871-75; Emeritus professor irorri. 1875 until his death. 

He was commissioned surgeon in the United States army in 1861. Soon 
after the Peninsula Campaign, he was placed in charge of the hospitals in 
Kentuckj% which under his able administration became the most perfectly 
conducted of any in the coimtry. He was commissioned a brigade surgeon, 
February 4, 1862; and w-as placed in charge of the general hospital in Brattle- 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



199 



boro, Vt., which was one of the largest m the country. Here he remained until 
the close of the war. He was brevetted lieutenant colonel, United States 
Volunteers, June 1, 1865, ''for faith- 
ful and meritorious service during 
the war"; was mustered out of 
service, June 27, 18G5. 

He was one of the ablest physi- 
cians and surgeons of his time. He 
made many discoveries in his pro- 
fession and gave to the world several 
celebrated remedies. In 1835, the 
University of Vermont conferred upon 
him the degree of A. M., and LL. D., 
in 1857. He was a member of the 
Episcopal Church. 

He was married in Boston, Mass., 
September 4, 1832, to Phoebe Fox- 
croft I>yon, a native of Bakersficld, 
Mass., who died December 17, 18S7. 
Three children were born to them: 
Elisha, born July 6, 1831, died in 
Arizona: Mary, born July 24, 1833, 
resides in Windsor, Vt.; George 
Bennedict, born June 14, 1836, died 
November 22, 1869. 




Surgeon Edward Elisha Phelps. 



REV. JOHN CHARLES PHILLIPS, A. B. 

John C. Phillips, son of Hon. John Phillips, first maj'or of Boston, and 
Sally (Walley) Phillips, was bt)rn in Boston, Mass., August 15, 1807, and 
died there, November 5, 1878. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1821, 
graduating in 1824. He then entered Harvard College and graduated A. B. 
in 1826. He prepared for the Congregational ministry at the Andover 
Theological Seminary, graduating in 1832. He was ordained, December 
18, 1833, and served as pastor of the First church in Weymouth, Mass., 
1833-37 and the Methuen, Mo.s3., church, from 1839 until 1860, when owing 
to failing health he was forced to give u[) the ministry. He made his home 
in Boston from 1860, until his death. 

He was married, December 24, 1835, to Harriet, daughter uf Francis 
Welch of Boston, Mass. Seven children were born to them: Margaret Welch, 
born July 12, 1835; John Charles, born in October, 1838; Emily Susan, born 
in June, 1842; Harriet W., born in May, 1845, died young; Merrian^ W., 
born in May, 1849; Anna Duim, born in October, 1850; Caroline Crownin- 
shield, born in July, 1852. 



HON. PHILLH' PtULLIPS, A. M. 
Phillip Phillips, was born in Charleston, S. C, December 17, 1807, and 
died in Washington, D. C, January 14, 1884. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his city and entered the " Academy 



200 



NORWICH UNI\rERSITY. 



in 1823, and graduated in 1S26. In 1836, the University conferred upon him 
the degree of A. M. 

He studied law in Charleston, S. C, and was admitted to the bar in 
1828. He was a Democrat in politics and held many positions. He was a 
member of the South CaroKna state constitutional convention of 1832, known 
as the Nullification Convention. He was elected to the State Legislature in 
1834; but resigned in 183.5, before the expiration of his term, and moved to 
Mobile, Ala., where he practiced his profession with marked success. He was 
president of the Alabama state convention in 1837, and in 1844 was elected to 
the State Legislature and was re-elected in 1852. In 18-52, he was a member 
of the Democratic National conven- 
tion at Baltimore, where he made a 
speech for the election of Franklin 
Pierce. He was a member of Con- 
gress from Alabama, during 1853-55, 
but declined re-election. He then 
moved to Washington, D. C, and 
practiced law until the Civil War, 
when he removed to New Orleans, La., 
After the close of the war, he returned 
to Washington where he resided until 
his death. 

He was a prolific writer on law 
subjects. In 1840, he jjrepared a 
Digest of Deciaions of the Supreme 
Court of Alabama, and was the author 
of Phillips' Practice of the Supreme 
Court of the United States. He be- 
came one of the most noted lawyers 
of his time, and was connected with 
some of the most noted law cases of 
the country. 

He was a member of the Board 
of Governors of the Metropolitan 
Club, Wasliington. 

He was married September 7, 1836, to Eugenie Levy of Savannah, 
Georgia, who died in Washington, D. C, April 1, 1901. Ten children were 
born to them: Cla\dus, born Jmie 1, 1883; Fannj-, born June 6, 1840, married 
Charles S. Hill, deceased; Caroline, born November 27, 1842, married Freder- 
ick Myers, deceased; Salvadora, deceased; Eugene, deceased; John Walker, 
born February' 22, 1848, resides in New Orleans, La. ; John Randolph, born 
November 3, 1850, deceased; William Hallett, born June 16, 1853, deceased; 
Emma Louise, married Octa\'us Cohen; Phillip Lee, born ISlarch 1,1855, 
assistant hbrarian, Congressional Library', Washington, D. C. 

GEN. SAMUEL LEONARD PITKIN. 

Samuel L. Pitkin, son of Samuel and Sarah (Parsons) Pitkin, was born in 
East Hartford, Conn., April 1, 1803, and died there, February 18, 1845. 

He attended the schools of Hartford and entered the "Academy" in 1821, 
graduating in 1823. He engaged in the dry goods business in Hartford during 




Hon. Phillip Phillip^. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 201 

1824-40; was associated with his father in the manufacture of gunpowder at 
Upper Pitkin Falls, Conn., 1836-45; was for some years director of the United 
States bank; was president of the Farmers and Mechanics Bank of Hartford 
for several years. 

He took great interest in the State militia, serving as captain, 1823-30; 
colonel, 1832-35; brigadier general September 7, 1835-May 19, 1836; major 
general, 1836-38. He was adjutant general of the State with rank of major 
general, 1838-44. He was a Democrat in politics and held several offices; repre- 
sented Hartford in the House of Representatives in 1840; was also State senator. 

He was married, December 21, 1831, to Mary Ann, daughter of Dr. 
Nathaniel Lewis of New Haven, Conn. She died September 11, 1891. He is 
survived by two sons: WiUiam H., who resides in Boston, Mass., and James S., 
who resides in New Haven, Conn. 

EBENEZER WATSON POMEROY. 

Ebenezer W. Pomeroy, son of Dr. Thaddeus and Eliza Mason (Sedgwick) 
Pomeroy, was born in Stockbridge, Mass., May 13, 1806, and died in California, 
June 22, 1861. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy' ' in 1823, 
graduating in 1825. He went to California in 1849, where he engaged in 
business until his death. 

He was married in Lexington, Missouri, June 11, 1835, toMaria'Aull, 
daughter of John and Margaret (Fortune) Aull. 

PROF. FREDERICK ADOLPHUS PORCHER, A. M. 

Frederick A. Porcher, son of George and Marianne Gendron (Palmer) 
Porcher, was born at Cedar Spring Plantation in St. John's, Berkley, near 
Charleston, S. C, January 16, 1809, and died in Charleston, S. C, October 15, 



He attended Mr. Steven's school in Pineville, Mr. Dickson's school in 
Charleston, and the Charleston College, 1822-24. He entered the "Academy' ' 
in April, 1824, and remained until April, 1825, when he entered Yale Uni- 
versity and graduated A. B. in 1828. He later received the degree of A. M. 
from Yale. 

He read law with Mazyck & Frost in Charleston for some time, but owing 
to the sickness of his mother gave up his studies and returned to the plantation, 
"Cedar Spring." In the spring of 1835, while attending a brigade encamp- 
ment, he was taken with a hemorrhage of the lungs. This left him in such 
feeble health he determined to make a voyage to Europe, and travel on the 
continent. He spent eighteen months in travel and study in Europe. In 
1848, he was elected professor of History and Belles-Letters, at the College of 
Charleston, whi(;h position he held imtil 1881. From this date and until 1886, 
he lectured before the advanced classes at that Institution. 

He was a profound student and a successful teacher and an authority on 
South Carolina and Southern history. His lectures, frequent addresses and 
essays, all gave evidence of thorough research and classic taste. 

He published the History of Craven County, »S. C, in the Southern Quarterly 
Review in 1852, which was issued in book form in 1887; History for Santee 
County, for the South Carolina Historical Society, and published by the society 



202 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



in 1903; and Memoir of General Gadsden. He contributed many articles to 
Rrissell's Magazine, and to the Southern Quarterly Review, and to several other 
periodicals. 

He was one of the founders of the South Carolina Historical Society in 
1855, serving as its president, 1875-1888. He took an active interest in the 
Charleston Libran,', serving as president from 1855 to 1861. 

He was a Democrat in politics 
and ardent States Rights advocate. 
At an early age he took an active part 
in the political affairs of his county 
and State. He represented his county 
in the State Legislature in 1832 and 
1836 and 1838, taking an important 
part in the deliberations of that body. 

He was three times married : first, 
February 22, 1832, to Rebecca 
Rhodes, who died in November, 
1834; no children. He was again 
married, March 22, 1838, to Emma 
Caroline Gough, who died April 29, 
1848. Four children were born to 
them: Edward Gough, born .June 22, 
1839, surgeon C. S. A., died October 
15, 1865; Anne Smith, born October 
30, 1841, resides in Charleston, S. C; 
Frederick George, born April 15, 
1844, served in C. S. A., died June 16, 
1866; Celia Lightwood, born March 
8, 1847, resides in Charleston, S. C. 
He was married the third time, 
September 17, 1850, to Caroline Smith Parker, who died June 23, 1888. 
One child, Mary Rutledgo, born August 27, 1851, died December 15, 1892. 



f» 



'■^^Ltitaif. ■ 




Prof. Fredeii 



iius Porcher. 



CAPT. THOMAS CORDES PORCHER. 

Thomas C. Porcher, son of Philip and Catherine (Cordes) Porcher, was 
born in St. Stephens Parish, Charleston County, S. C, February 27, 1809, and 
died there, unmarried, August 31, 1862. 

He prepared for college at the Pineville Academy and at the schools in St. 
Stephen's parish and Charleston. He entered the "Academj^" in 1825, and 
graduated in 1828. 

He was an extensive cotton planter until his death. He was captain of 
the St. Stephen's Co. State mihtia, which he enrolled for service dxiring the 
"Nullification" trouble in 1832. 



THOMAS WILLIAM PORCHER, M. D. 

Thomas W. Porcher, son of Samuel Porcher, was born in St. Stephen's 
Parish, Charleston County, S. C, August 26, 1807, and died at his plantation, 
"Walworth," February 11, 1889. 

He prepared for college in the schools of Charleston, S. C, and was, for a 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 203 

time, a student at South Carolina College. He entered the "Academy" in 
1823, and graduated in 182.5. He studied medicine, but only practiced on his 
plantation, "Walworth," where he located in 1838, and where he made his 
home until his death. 

He was a Democrat in politics and held several positions. He represented, 
his parish in the State Legislature, several times; was also for several years a 
member of the parish school board. He traveled extensively in Europe. 

He was married. May 15, 1828, to Elmira Cerdes Gaillard, who died about 
1888. Five children were born to them: Julius Tbuedon, lieutenant colonel, 
C. S. A., killed at Missionary Ridge in 1863; Mary M., wife of Rev. C. P. 
Gadsden; Eleanor Gaillard, wife of .John G. Gaillard; John Stoney, captain, 
10th South Carolina Volunteers, C. S. A., now a resident of El Paso, Tex. His 
oldest grandson, Samuel Porchcr, is purchasing agent for the Pennsylvania 
R. R., and another grandson, Edward Miles Gadsden is chief clerk, money 
order department, Washington, D. C. 

COMMODORE GEORGE ALDRICH PRENTISS, U. S. N. 

George A. Prentiss, .son of John and Diantha (Aldrich) Prentiss, and 
brother of J. W. Prentiss, '22, was born in Iveene, N. H., January 25, 1809, and 
died unmarried, in Carson, S. C, April 8, 1868. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1822, 
graduating in 1824. 

He was commissioned a midshipman in the U. S. Navy, March 1, 1825. 
He was promoted past midshipman, June 4, 1831; lieutenant, February 9, 1837, 
and commander, September 14, 1855. 

He performed active duty at all the naval stations, and was twice ordered 
to the Mediterranean. At the opening of the Civil War, he was in command of 
the Se?ninole, twenty guns, and was ordered to join the Brazilian squadron. 
His vessel was pronounced unseaworthy, but his orders were peremptory, and 
he reached Brazil safely. He was highly comphmented by British officers and 
by his own commodore for the fine appearance of his ship and for his good sea- 
manship. He was recalled to New Orleans and made his way to Washington 
with difficulty during the summer of 1861. Reporting at Washington, he was 
given command of the steam gunboat Albatross, and joined the fleet, block- 
ading the coast of the Carolinas. Several prizes were proof of his efficiency. 
Owing to impaired health he was forced to resign his commission. He was 
promoted commodore, October 24, 1864, and placed on the retired list. He 
was an efficient officer and received the praise of Admiral Goldsborough for his 
bravery in action. 

COL. JOHN WILLIAM PRENTISS. 

John W. Prentiss, son of John and Diantha (Aldrich) Prentiss, and 
brother of Commodore G. A. Prentiss, '24, was born in Keene, N. H., February 
28, 1806, and died there, August 17, 1863. 

He pr<>pared for coll(>gc in the schools of his city and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1820, graduating in 1822. 

Upon graduation, he entered the office of his father, editor and proprietor 
of the Neiv Hampshire Sentinel. In 1828, he became a partner, under the firm 
name of J. & J. W. Prentiss. The company did an extensive book publishing 



204 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

business in addition to printing the Scnlincl. In 1848, his father retired from 
the firm and the^son continued the business under the fii-m name of J. W. Pren- 
tiss & Co., until 1853, when he sold his interests in the newspaper and a portion 
of the pubhshing business, continuing the latter through New York and Boston 
connections. 

He was a member of Uterary and social societies in Keene. He took an 
active interest in military matters; was colonel of the 28th Regiment, New 
Hampshu'e mihtia. 

He was married. May 28, 1851, to Eleanor May, a native of Eversham, 
England, who died February 18, 1906. Three children were born to them: 
Wilham Herbert, born IMarch 22, 1853, now editor of the Sentinel; Fanny May, 
born December 8, 1857, died August 24, 1S5S; John, born September 25, 1861, 
died in Boston, Mass., IMarch 23, 1898. 

REV. EDWARD GOLDSBOROUGH PRESCOTT, A. M. 

Edward G. Prescott, son of Hon. Wilham and Caroline C. (Hickling) 
Prescott, and brother of Wilham Hickling Prescott, was born in Salem, Mass., 
January 2, 1804, and died April 11, 1844. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1821, and graduated in 1823. He then 
entered Harvard University and graduated A. B. in 1825, and later received 
the degree of A. M. from the Institution. Subsequently he studied law -nith 
his father and practiced the profession in Boston for a short time. 

He then studied for the Episcopal ministry, and in 1837, was given a 
church in New Jersey, where, the labors proving severe, his health failed, and, 
he decided to visit the Island of St. Michael, one of the Azores. He em- 
barked with confident hope of recovery, but the second day out he was suddenly 
prostrated and the next morning, April 11, 1844, he died, and his body was 
consigned to the Atlantic Ocean. 

He rose to the rank of colonel in the State militia and was a Representative 
in the State Legislature from Boston. 

He was married in New Jersej'. His wife svu-vived him only a few j'ears ; 
no children. 

MAJ. HENRY JOSEPH RANNEY, A. M. 

Hem-y J. Ranney, son of Moses and Elizabeth (Gilchrist) Ramiej', was 
born in Middletown, Conn, in 1808, and died unmarried at Le'wisburg, La., 
May 1, 1865. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his city and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1824, and graduated in 1828; received the degree of A. M. from the 
University in 1836. 

He was an assistant engineer on the early surveys and construction of the 
Baltimore & Ohio R. R. He was assistant engineer on the Lexington & Ohio 
R. R. between Frankfort and Lexington, Ivy., June-August 16, 1832; was pro- 
moted chief engineer on this last date and held the position until the road was 
completed in 1835. This was the first railroad constructed west of the Alle- 
gheny Mountains. The sm-veys were begun in September, 1830, and the con- 
struction, October 20, 1831. The cars were drawn by horses until Januarj-, 
1835, when the first locomotive was put in operation. On the completion of 
this road, he became associated with his classmate. Col. W. S. Campbell, in 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



205 



various engineering enterprises and maintained with him the closest friendship 
until his death. He removed to New Orleans in 1836; was chief engineer of the 
New Orleans and Nashville R. R. until the enterprise was abandoned in 1842; 
was engineer on the construction of the road from New Orleans to Lake Pont- 
chartrain. 

He leased from the state the canal that connects New Orleans with the 
lake and the Gulf of Mexico, which he conducted until his death; was chief 
engineer of the New Orleans, Jackson 
& Great Northern R. R., now the 
Illinois Central R. R., and its presi- 
dent 1860-65, making his head- 
quarters dm-ing the w'ar at Canton, 
Miss., the terminus of the road; was 
president and large stock holder of the 
New Canal and Shell Road; was an 
extensive owner of real estate in the 
New Orleans vicinity. He was one 
of the wealthiest and most respecterl 
citizens of New Orleans. He was 
universally esteemed for his amiabk' 
and genial traits of character. 

He was a Whig in politics anc 
repeatedly represented New Orleans 
in the State Legislature and was a 
member of that body when it passed 
the ordinance of secession. He was 
not in favor of secession, yet his in- 
terests were so involved in the South 
he was obliged to cast his fortunes 
with the State. After I^ee's sur- 
render, he sought to enter New 




Maj. Henry Joseph Ranney. 



Orleans, but learning, that he would meet with hostile reception by the 
Federal authorities, concluded to cross the country some miles east of 
Lewisburg on Lake Pontchartrain. He was in feeble health, and not able 
to stand the many hardships which he was obliged to undergo. He rapidly 
grew worse and died at Lewisburg. He took great interest in military 
affairs and was major in the Louisiana militia. 



HON. DAVID SETTLE REID. 

David S. Reid, son of Reuben Reid, was born in Rockingham Countj^, 
N. C, April 19, 1813, and died at Pleasantville, N. C, June 19, 1891. 

He attended the "Academy" during 1827-29. Upon his return home, he 
read law and was admitted to the bar in 1834. In 1835, he was elected state 
senator from his county and served for five successive terms. 

In 1842, he was elected to the U. S, House of Representatives, and served 
during 1843-47. In 1848, he was candidate for governor of the State on the 
Democratic ticket, but was defeated. In 1850, he was elected to the office and 
served two terms. Dm'ing his second term as a governor, the General Assem- 



206 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



bly elected him to the U. S. Senate, which position he held until March 3, 1859. 
He represented Rockingham comity in the Secession Convention of 1861. He 
served some time in the Confederate congress, and was a member of the State 
Constitutional Convention of 1875. 

BENJAMIN HURD RHOADES, A. M. 

Benjamin H. Rhoades, son of Ebenezer and Sarah (Hurd) Rhoades, was 
born in Boston, Mass., August 26, 1811, and died in Newport, R. I., December 
23, 1880. 

He attended the schools of liis town and Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Mass. He entered the "Academj^" in 1824, and remained two years; gradu- 
ated A. B. from Brown University in 1833, later received the degree of A. M. 
from that Institution; graduated from the Newton Theological Institution in 
1836. 

He was an instructor in the University Grammar School, Providence, R. I., 
1836-39; was a classical teacher in New York, 1839-41; Brookline, Mass. 
1842-48; Jamaica Plain, Mass., 1848-49. He was principal of a school, con- 
ducted by Rev. John A. Charles, D. D., in Providence, 1849-.54; was engaged in 
tutoring, 1854-56. In 1856, he established the Washington Square Family 
School for boys in Newport, which he conducted until 1859, when he accepted 
the position as librarian of the Redwood Library, Newport, R. I., which posi- 
tion he held at his death. He served as corresponding secretary of the 
library during 1860-70; was assistant secretary 1870-72; secretary, 1872-80. 
He was a fine classical student. He left a widow and one daughter. 

CAPT. CHARLES RICH. 

Charles Rich, son of the Hon. Charles and Molly (Watts) Rich, was born 
in Shoreham, Vt., July 30; 1802, and died in Lapeer, Mich., July 16, 1872. 

He attended the schools of his 
town and entered the "Academy" in 
1820, and graduated in 1823. 

He then engaged in farming in 
Shoreham, making a specialty of rais- 
ing merino sheep, until 1837, when he 
sold his farm and located in Con- 
neautville, Crawford county, Penn. 
Here he engaged in the mercantile 
business until 1847, when he located 
in Lapeer, ]\lich., where he resided 
while his house was being erected in 
the wilderness in Elba township. In 
January, 1848, he removed to his 
farm and began the life of a pioneer. 
In January, 1857, he removed to 
Lapeer, where he made his home 
until his death. In 1867, he formed 
a partnership with E. L. Thompson 
and John T. Rich of Shoreham, and 
engaged in the Imnbering business 
Capt. Charles Rich. untU 1872, meeting with success. 




SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 207 

He was at first a Whig and later a Republican in politics, and held several 
positions; was a candidate for Congress while residing in Pennsylvania; 
was county supervisor and county judge of Lapeer county, Michigan, while 
residing in Elba; was county clerk and register of deeds, 1857-61; judge of 
probate, 1861-69; also held several village offices in Lapeer. He was a member 
of the State Board of Agriculture for four years and rendered valuable aid 
in promoting the State Agricultural College. Rich township in Michigan 
was named in his honor. He served as captain in the Pennsylvania militia. 
He was a member of the Universalist Church. 

He was married March 18, 1827, to Betsey Treadway of Shoreham, who 
died in April, 1884. Four children were born to them: Mary Elizabeth, 
born 1829, died August 6, 1847; Charles Napoleon, born in 1830, died Septem- 
ber 3, 1847; a daughter born in 1845 die<l in infancy; Mary Jeanette, born 
July 10, 1851, died in 1864. 

BREVT. MAJ. SAMUEL CHASE RIDGELY, U. S. A 

Samuel C. Ridgely was born in AnnapoHs, Md., 1809, and died in George- 
town, D. C, July 6, 1859. He attended the schools of his city and entered 
the "Academy" in 1825, and graduated in 1827. 

He entered the United States Military Academy, July 1, 1827, and 
graduated, 9th in his class, July 1, 1831; was commissioned 2d lieutenant, 
4th United States Artillery, same date; 1st lieutenant, September 16, 1836; 
and captain, February 16, 1847, same regiment; was assistant professor of 
Mathematics at West Point, August 28, 1831, until October 4, 1834; was 
principal assistant professor of Engineering, October 4, 1834. until August 28, 
1839; was on leave of absence in the West in 1832, and took part in the Black 
Hawk Expedition; at camp of instruction, near Trenton, N. J., 1839; on 
northern frontier duty during the Canadian Rebellion, with headquarters 
in Detroit, Mich., 1839-41 and Buffalo, N. Y., 1841-42; was stationed at Fort 
McHenry, Md., 1842-43; was acting judge advocate U. S. A., February 8, 
1843, until March 11, 1847. He served in the Mexican War, 1847-48, taking 
part in the battle of Contreras, August 19-20, 1847; MoHno del Rey, September 
8, 1847; assault and capture of the city of Mexico, September 13-14, 1847. 
He was stationed at the New Orleans Barracks, La., 1848-49; served in the 
Seminole War in Florida, 1849-50; Fort Lafayette, N. Y., 1850r51; Fort 
.Johnson, N. C, 1851; Fort Sumptcr, S. C, 1851-52; Fort Ontario, 1852-53; 
P^ort Mifflin, Pa., 1853; Fort Independence, Mass., 1853-54; was a member 
of the board to revise the Rifle and Infantry tactics at West Point, August 
2, 1854, until January 15, 1855; Fort Independence, Mass., 1855-56. In 1856, 
his health beginning to fail, he received a leave of absence; but was not again 
able to rejoin his regiment, and died in 1859. He was brevetted major, 
August 20, 1847, for "Gallant and meritorious conduct in the battles of 
Contreras and Cherubusco, Mexico." 

MONCURE ROBINSON, A. M., LL. D. 

Moncure Robinson, son of the Hon. John Robinson and Agnes Conway 
(Moncure) Robinson, was born in Richmond, Ya., February 2, 1802; and died 
in Philadelphia, Pa., November 11, 1891. 

He entered William and Mary College in 1815, and in 1818 received the 
degree of A. M., though the youngest student in the Institution. 



208 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

In 1818, he accompanied the party sent out by the Board of Public 
Works of Virginia to make a topographical survey and run a line of levels 
from Richmond to the Ohio River. While on this trip, he explored the great 
coal fields of West Virginia and made valuable reports thereon. In 1821, 
he visited the Erie canal and was able to form an estimate of the ability of 
canals as competitors of railroads, and from this time, he became a steady 
advocate of the advantages of raikoads over canals. He entered the "Acad- 
emy' ' to pursue advanced work in civil engineering under Captain Partridge, 
and graduated in 1824. In 1836, the University conferred upon him the degree 
of LL. D., in consideration of his great work in the line of ci\'il engineering and 
philosophical research. 

In 1825, he went to France and made a study of the public works, especi- 
ally its harbors. He also visited England and Wales, and during his stay in 
England became well acquainted with George Stephenson, the noted engineer; 
and was consulted by him in regard to the tunnel then under construction at 
the Liverpool and Manchester Railway. He returned to the United States 
in the latter part of 1827, and early in 1828 was called by the canal commis- 
sioners of Pennsylvania to make the survey of the Pottsville and Danville 
Railroad, with a view to the development of the anthracite coal fields. This 
was the first steam railroad in the United States. Later in this year, he made 
the survey for the Alleghany Portage Railroad, and in 1831 was engaged in 
the construction of the Petersburg and Roanoke and the Richmond and 
Petersburg railways. On the latter, he built the long bridge at Richmond 
over the James River, a structure remarkable for its economical cost and 
noticed by Michel Chevalier in his work pubhshed in 1840 on the public 
improvements of this country. This report gives a full account of the plans, 
cost, and details of the bridge. It attracted the attention of the profession 
generally, and from it has sprung the iron lattice bridge, so much used now 
in Europe. About this time, he began the construction of the Richmond 
and Fredericksburg, and the Winchester and Potomac Railways. In 1834, 
he began the crowning achievement of his professional career, the Philadelphia 
and Reading Railroad, a work stamped for all time with the genius of its 
first engineer. For this railroad, he constructed the bridge at Black Rock 
tunnel, over the Schuylldll. This was the first large stone structm-e built 
for a double track railroad; and wonderful even now for the small cubic 
contents of its masonry, 3,471 cubic yards. In 1836, Elihu Chauncy, first 
president of the road, prevailed upon him to \nsit England and negotiate 
a loan for its completion as far as Pottsville. 

While in London, he became acquainted wdth Isambard Kingdom Brunei, 
builder of the famous Thames tunnel, who submitted to him the plans of the 
Bell Rock Lighthouse, off the east coast of Scotland. In 1840, was completed 
the "Gowan and Marx" engine, after his plans. The report of the unprece- 
dented performance of this engine reached the Czar of Russia, -tt-ith the result 
that in that year, he sent an offer to him, looking to the procui-ing of his 
services as engineer over the grand system of railroads he was about to build 
for the Russian Empire. This tempting offer he declined, as he was unwilling 
to leave his own country and his family. His last professional work was his 
examination of the New York harbor in 1842, during President Tjder's ad- 
ministration, to decide on a suitable site for the great, dry dock now situated 
at Wallabout. He retired, in 1847, from active public fife. Since then, 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 209 

he forwarded the completion of the great Metropolitan route connecting 
Baltimore and the South. He established the Bay Line of steamboats 
running between Baltimore and Norfolk, Va. In 1835, he located in Phila- 
delphia, Pa., where he resided until his death. 

He was an honorary member of the American Philosophical Society. 

He was married, February 2, 1835, to Charlotte Randolph, daughter 
of Bennett and Susan Beverly (Randolph) Taylor, and grand-daughter of 
Edmund Jennings Randolph, first attorney-general of the United States. 
Eight children were born to them. 

STEPHEN MINOR ROUTH. 

Stephen M. Routh, son of Job and Ann (Miller) Routh, was born at 
"Routhland" near Natchez, Miss., December 18, 1808, and died in Wheeling, 
Va., July 11, 1858, while there on a visit. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1824' and graduated in 1826. He owned 
a large plantation, "Roughwood," in Tensas Parish, La., where he Uved until 
his death. He was a Whig in politics, but never held office. 

He was married to Ann Eliza, daughter of Gen. Horatio Stephenson and 
Eliza (Hall) Sprigg. Ten children were born to them: Horatio, died in 
Tensas Parish, about 1878; AHce, died unmarried, about 1905; Job, died 
about 1880; Stephen M., died about 1897; Pauline married Dr. Robert Percy 
of St. Joseph, La., died about 1875; Octo, who became a minister of the Church, 
deceased; Clarence, died in Covington, La., 1910; Charles B., died in New 
Orleans, La., 1907; Ameha, widow of Nicholas Sadler, died at Natchez, 1909; 
Ernest, died about 1890. 

COL. CHARLES JAMES RUSS, A. M. 

Charles J. Russ, son of John and Sally (Dodd) Russ, and cousin of John 
D. Russ, '24, was born in Hartford, Conn., June 9, 1812, and died there, 
February 21, 1861. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1825, 
graduating in 1829. He graduated A. B. from Trinity College in 1831, and 
later received the degree of A. M., in course from that Institution. He took 
an active interest in the State Militia; served for some time in the "Governor's 
Foot Guards,' ' Hartford. 

He was married, November 27, 1847, to Mary Ivirtland Cooke, a native 
of Catskill, N. Y., who died, February 19, 1901. Two children were born to 
them: Mary, born October 7, 1848, died, September 29, 1858; Charles 
Trumbull, born January 16, 1853, died, May 2, 1881. 

SURGEON JOHN DENISON RUSS, A. B., M. D. 

John D. Russ, son of Dr. Parker and Elizabeth (Cogswell) Russ, was born 
in Essex (then the parish of Chebacco in Ipswich) Mass., September 1, 1801, 
and died in Pompton, N. J., March 1, 1881. 

He graduated A. B. from Yale University in 1823, and entered the 
"Academy" in the summer of that year, graduating in 1824. He studied 
medicine for some time with Dr. John D. Wills, professor of Anatomy and 
Physiology in Bowdoin college. He continued his studies in the Baltimore and 
Boston Medical Schools, and graduated M. D. from the Yale Medical School 



210 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



in 1825. After spending a year in hospitals abroad, he begun practice in Xew 
York city, but in June, 1827, sailed from Boston in charge of supplies for the 
Greeks in their struggle for hberty. He remained in Greece, superintending 
the development of a hospital service, until his health failed in the spring of 
1830. He also made use of his military training received at the "Academy," 
in aiding in the organizing and drilUng the Greek patriots. On his return to 
America, he again entered practice in New York city. At an early date, he 
became interested in the condition of poor children, suffering from ophthalmia 
in the city hospitals, and at his o\\ti cost made, in March, 1832, the first at- 
tempt at the instruction of the blind, which was made in America. He was, in 
the same year, appointed superintendent of the newly-chartered New York 
Institution for the Blind, and in that position introduced many devices and 
methods of teaching which have been permanently useful. In the midst of 
these labors his health failed, and he was compelled to resign and seek restora- 
tion by a long absence in Europe. After his retm-n, he engaged in numerous 
other philanthi'opic schemes; served from 1846 to 1854 as the corresponding 
secretarj' of the Prison Association of New York. He originated measiu-es, in 
1849, which led to the incorporation of the New York Juvenile Asylum in 1851. 
He was the superintendent of this asylum, resigning in 1858. He was also a 
member of the Board of Education of the city of New York from 1848 to 1851. 
During his old age, he resided in Pompton, N. J., making further improvements 
in methods of printing for the blind, and interesting himself in other general 
studies. 

He was married in 1830, to Eliza P. Jenkins, daughter of a captain in the 
English nav3\ She survived him, with one grandaughter. 

WAT>TER WEBSTER RUSSELL. 




Walter Webster RusseU. 



Walter W. Russell, son of Moor 
and Betsej'^ (Webster) Russell, was 
born in Plymouth, N. H., March 5, 
1806, and died unmarried, in Gains- 
ville, Ala., June 17, 1878. 

He prepared for college at the 
academies in Plj-mouth and Haver- 
hill, N. H., and entered the "Acad- 
emy' ' in 1821, graduating in 1824. 

He was a clerk for D. "SI. & W. 
\y. Russell, general merchants, Ply- 
mouth, N. H., from 1825, until 1837, 
when he removed to GainsviUe, 
Sumpter Co., Ala., where he engaged 
in mercantile business for many years. 
He met with marked success in his 
business ventm'es and acquired a 
valuable property. 

He was a man of excellent busi- 
ness capacity; was prominent in social 
and business Ufe in Gains\nlle. He 
was an active member of the Pres- 
byterian Church. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



211 



GEORGE OSBORN RUSSELL. 

George O. Russell, son of Samuel and Mary (Osborn) Russell, was born in 
Middletown, Conn., in 1815, and died there, October 9, 1849. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1827, 
remaining two years. He engaged in business in Middletown until his death. 

He was twice married; first, May 16, 1843, to Augusta Harriet Mather, 
who died April 8, 1844; no children. He married the second time, Amelia 
Charlotte Mather, (sister of his first wife). Two children were born to them: 
Samuel, resides in Middletown, Conn., and George O., died unmarried, about 
1890. 



MAJ. GEN. WILLIAM HUNTINGTON RUSSELL, A. M., M. D. 

William H. Russell, son of Deacon Matthew Talcott and Mary Gray 
(Huntington) Russell, was born in Middletown, Conn., August 12, 1809, and 
died in New Haven, Conn., May 19, 1885. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his city and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1826, graduating in 1828. He graduated A. B. from Yale University, 
in 1833; was valedictorian of his class; was founder of the famous. "Skull and 
Bones" society of Yale University, which was incorporated as the Russell Trust 
Association; received from Yale the de- 
gree A. M. in course, and M. D., in 1838. 

He was a tutor at Yale in 1836, and 
instructor in a school at Princeton, N.J. 
He established, in September, 1836, 
the famous Collegiate and Commercial 
Institute at New Haven, Conn., which 

he conducted until his death. He - . 

followed closely the plan of his old 
instructor. Captain Partridge, in pay- 
ing especial attention to the militaiy 
drill. The school attained a high rej^u- 
tation for its military and academic 
work. Between three and four thou- 
sand students received instruction at 
this school, many of whom became dis- 
tinguished in the various walks of life, 
and a large number served in the L^nion 
Army during the War. 

In 1862, he was appointed by 
Governor Buckingham, major genin-al 
in command of the State Militia, and 

had full charge of the drilling and ^^J- ^en. William Huntington Russell, 
equipping the various regiments for service in the Civil War. He reorganized 
the State militia system. 

He was at first a Whig in politics, and was later one of the founders of the 
Republican party. He was one of the earliest abolitionists, and was a per- 
sonal friend of John Brown, who was at many times a guest at his house. He 
was the Connecticut representative of the National Anti-Slavery Committee 
before the Civil War. 




212 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

He was married August 29, 1836, to Mary Elizabeth, daughter of Thoraas 
Hubbard, Professor at Yale University Medical College. She died Decem- 
ber 10, 1890. Ten children were born to them: Lucy Gray, born July 17, 1837, 
died, April 2, 1838; Frances Harriet, born August 14, 1839, died December 29, 
1889; Henrietta Lee, born August 2, 1841;, Mary, born December 29, 1844, 
died June 7, 1847; Talcott Huntington, born March 14, 1847, A. B., Yale, 1869, 
LL. B. Columbia, 1871, resides and practices law in New Haven; WiUiam 
Huntington, born March 23, 1850, died February 27, 1851; Dr. Thomas Hub- 
bard, born December 14, 1851, Ph. B. Yale, 1872, M. D., Yale, 1875, professor 
Yale University Medical College, 1883, to present time, and surgeon New 
Haven Hospital, 1878-1908, resides in New Haven; Phihp Gray, A. B., Yale, 
1876, LL. B. Yale, 1878, born February 14, 18.54, died July 21, 1900; Edward 
Hubbard, born December 27, 1855, Ph. B., Yale, 1878, resides in London, 
England; Robert Gray, born September 17. 1860, died August 21, 1880, while 
a sophomore in Yale College. 

ADOLPHUS SKRINE RUTHERFORD. 

Adolphus S. Rutherford, son of Robert and EUza Jane (Howard) Ruther- 
ford, was born in Milledgeville, Ga., March 4, 1810, and died in Montgomery, 
Ala., December 24, 1861. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his to^Ti and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1826 and graduated in 1828. He engaged extensively in planting in 
Milledgeville until he removed to Columbus, where he lived until his death. 

He was a Whig in politics and held several offices; was sheriff of Muscogee 
Co., Ga., 1852; clerk of the Supreme Com-t, 1857-60; was a delegate to the State 
convention in Milledgeville in 1861, which passed the ordinance of secession in 
that year. He was a member of the I. O. O. F. Fraternity of Coliunbus, Ga. 

He was married in 1830, to Susan Bird Thweatt, of Spai-ta, Ga., who died 
July 10, 1881. Six children were born to them: Elizabeth Peterson, born June 
1, 1833, married Rouvele Ellis, resides in Columbus, Ga.; Robert Ropes, born 
in October, 1835, died about 1860; Augustus Howard, born February 14, 1837, 
died May 11, 1908; Mary Rutherford, born August 2, 1841, married Joseph W. 
Jones, resides in Columbus; Adolphus Skrine, born October 19, 1842, re- 
sides in Columbus; Sallie Howard, born, September 13, 1844, married Dr. 
Wilham Foyle, resides in Columbus, Ga. 

HON. WILLIAM RILEY SANFORD. 

WilUam R. Sanford, son of Clark and Rebecca (Conkey) Sanford, was born 
in Orwell, Vt., March 4, 1805, and died there September^ 23, 1899. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the "Acad- 
emy' ' in 1825, and graduated in 1827. 

He engaged in farming and sheep raising in Orwell, Vt., 1827-1899, being 
one of the best known and successful sheep raisers in this country; was one of 
the first to import the Merino sheep from Spain. He went to England, 
France, Spain and Germany in 1852, and imported many valuable cattle and 
sheep. 

He was a Republican in politics and held many offices in his town, county 
and State; represented Orwell in the House of Representatives in 1853 and 1854; 
was State senator in 1857 and 58; was doorkeeper, U. S. House of Representa- 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 213 

tives, Washington, D. C, 1862-63. He was a member of the Congregational 
Chm-ch, Independence Lodge, F. and A. M., of Orwell. 

He was married October 14, 1828, to Emily Bascom of Orwell, who died 
November 22, 1881. Seven children were born to them: William Clark, born 
August 31, 1829, died February 12, 1903; Oliver Bascom, born August 2, 1831, 
died December 5, 1891; Caroline, born March 19, 1834, married Charles Barrett, 
resides in Freeport, 111.; Charles, born May 3, 1836, died October 24, 1908; 
Helen Elvira, born October 16, 1838, died March 3, 1860; Harriet Semantha, 
born March 13, 1841, married Walter O. Ray of Orwell, died January 22, 1863; 
Emily Clara, born June 16, 1849, married Charles Nelson Brainerd of St. 
Albans, Vt., resides in Orwell, Vt. 

LIEUT. COL. RICHARD BEDON SCREVEN, U. S. A 

Richard B. Screven, son of Dr. Richard Bedon and AHce (Pendarvis) 
Screven, was born in Grahamville, S. C, March 12, 1808, and died in New 
Orleans, La., March 16, 1851. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1823, and graduated in 1825. He entered 
the U. S. Mihtaiy Academy, July 1825, and graduated in 1829; was commis- 
sioned second Ueutenant, 2d United States Infantry, July 1, 1829; served 
at Hancock Barracks, Me., 1829-31; was transferred to the 4th Infantry, 
August 18, 1831; served at Baton Rouge, La., 1831-32; Fort Jessup, La., 
1832, Baton Rouge, La., 1832-35; Bay of St. Louis, Miss., 1835; Fort Woods 
La., 1835-36; in the Florida War against the Seminole Indians, in 1836-37, 
being engaged in the skirmishes at Camp Izard, February 27-29, and March 27, 
the battle of Olokhkaha, March 31, 1836; on Indian duty, April 20 to August 7 
1837; engaged in the battle of Okel-cho-bee, December 25, 1837; was commis- 
sioned captain, 8th Infantry, July 7, 1838; on duty at Ogdensbm-g, N. Y.„ 
1839-40, during the Canadian RebelUon; on recruiting service, 1840; at the 
Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1840; Florida War, 1840-42; at Fort Brooke, Fla.. 
1842-44; Key West, Fla., 1844; in the mihtary occupation of Texas, 1845-46, 

On the breaking out of the Mexican War, he was ordered to Mexico with 
his regiment, where he performed distinguished services. He was engaged 
in the battle of Monterey, September 21-23, 1846; siege of Vera Cruz, March 
9-20, 1847; battle of Cerro, Gordo, April 17-18, 1847; capture of San Antonio, 
August 20, 1847; battle of Cherubusco, August 20, 1847; battle of MoUno 
del Rey, September 8, 1847. He was brevetted major, September 23, 1846, 
for "gallantry and meritorious conduct in the battle of Monterey," and 
lieutenant colonel, September 8, 1847, for "gallant and meritorious conduct" 
in the battle of Molino del Rey. He was engaged in recruiting service at 
Albany, N. Y., 1848, until the latter part of 1850, and was then ordered 
to join his regiment in Texas. He was taken sick en route and died 
in New Orleans. 

He was married June 27, 1831, to Louise Pintard Davidson, who died 
December 24, 1889. Five children were born to them; Richard Davidson, 
born July 6, 1832; Mary Hancock, born August 2, 1834, died in September, 
1835; PJliza Flllen, born Sei)tember 1, 1836, married a Mr. Janvier; AUce 
Cuthburt, born November 25, 1840, died unmarried, February 15, 1871; 
JuUa, Vjorn February 20, 1843, was twice married first, to a Mr. Cushman, 
second to a Mr. Meredith. 



214 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

LIEUT. AUGUSTINE FORTUNATUS SEATOX, U. S. A. 

Augustine F. Seaton, was born in Washington, D. C, in 1810, and died 
at Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, November 18, 1835. 

He prepared for college in the .schools of his city and entered the "Acad- 
emy' ' in 1825, and graduated in 1828. He entered the U. S. Mihtary Academy 
Jaly 1, 1828, and gi-aduated July 1, 1833; was brevetted 2d heutenant, 7th 
United States Infantry, July 1, 1833; promoted 2d heutenant, September 28, 
1834. He was on detached service in New York City during 1833-34; on 
frontier duty at Fort Coffee, I. T., 1834, and Fort Gibson, I. T., 1834, until 
his death. 

HON. PHILO COLLINS SEDGEWICK, A. B. 

Philo C. Sedgewick, son of Benjamin and Ohve (Collins) Sedgewick, 
was bom in Cornwall, Conn., July 18, 1810, and died there, November 26. 
1867. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 
1826, and graduated in 1828; graduated A. B. from Union College in 1831. 

He studied law at the Litchfield Law School, Conn., and practiced 
his profession in Harrisburg, Pa., 1835-55. He returned to Cornwall in 
1858, where he resided until his death. He was very successful in his law 
practice; was clerk of the Circuit court in Pennsylvania for some time. He 
was a RepubUcan in pohtics; represented his town in the State Legislature, 
1861-65. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity. 

He was married October 2, 1833, to Ehza, daughter of John Adams of 
Canaan, Conn. She died March, 1910. Five children were born to them: 
William, born November 7, 1834, died, March 12, 1835; Ada Louise, born 
March 16, 1836, died, December 2, 1866; John Benjamin, born January 24, 
1840 died October 18, 1867; Emily Pamelia, born April, 1842, married 
H. P. Tracy of Elmwood, 111, now resides in Falls Milage, Conn. ; Harry, born 
May 6, 1848, died in Cornwall, Conn., June 26, 1906. 

HON. THEODORE SEDGEWICK, A. B. 

Theodore Sedgewick was born in Albany, N. Y., January 27, 1811, and died 
unmarried in Stockbridge, Mass., December 9, 1859. He was the son of the 
second Theodore of this distinguished faniih-, a lawj-er of marked ability. 
His mother was a grand-daughter of Gov. ^^'ilham Li\'ingstone of New Jersey, 
and was an author of note. The first Theodore Sedgewick was the well knowTi 
statesman of western Massachusetts, justice of the Supreme Court of Massa- 
chusetts, member of Congress, and speaker af the House of Representatives. 
The subject of this sketch entered the "Academy" in 1823, and graduated 
in 1826, and received the degree of A. B. from Columbia College, N. Y., 
in 1829. 

He studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1833. The following 
fifteen months, he passed in Europe, principally in Paris, as attache to the 
U. S. embassy, under Edward Livingstone. On his return, he practiced law 
successfully in New York until 1850, when faiUng health forced h'm to 
retire from active professional labor. President Buchanan tendered him 
the mission to the Hague, in 1857, and he twice dechned the office of assistant 
secretary of state. In January, 1858, he was appointed United States attorney 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 215 

for the southern district of New York, which office he held until his death. 
He was president of the New York Crystal Palace Association in 1852. He 
was trustee of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of New York, 1842-59. 
He was a frequent contributor to periodicals and newspapers, and pub- 
lished a number of books, mostly memoirs and works on law. 

DANIEL MERRILS SEYMOUR. 

Daniel M. Seymour, son of Thomas and Catherine (Merrils) Seymour and 
cousin of Thomas H. Seymour, '29, was born in Hartford, Conn., in 1800, 
and died there, October 12, 1870. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1825, 
and graduated in 1827. He engaged in the wholesale leaf tobacco business in 
Hartford until his death. 

He married Sarah Phelps of Hartford. Two children were boi-n to them: 
Ellen, married Charles Beckwith, and died in St. Paul, Minn. ; Catherine, 
married a Mr. Wheelock, and resides in Massachusetts. 

HENRY SEYMOUR. 

Henry Seymour, son of Moses, Jr., and Mabel (Strong) Seymour, was 
born in Litchfield, Conn., November 25, 1808, and died in Painesville, Ohio, 
November 25, 1857. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1825, 
and graduated in 1828. He was for some years employed in the Bank of 
Brattleboro, at Brattleboro, Vt., with his uncle, Epaphro Seymour. Later, 
he removed to Towleville, Ohio, where he was employed by an extensive 
iron and steel company until his death. 

He married Lavina Hunt of Springfield, Mass., who died in a few years 
after her husband. No children were born to them. 

HON. HORATIO SEYMOUR, LL. D. 

Horatio Seymour, the oldest son of the Hon. Henry and IVIary Ledyard 
(Forman) Seymour, and cousin of Col. Thomas H. Seymour, '29, was born in 
Pompey Hill, near Utica, N. Y., May 31, 1810, and died there at the home of 
his sister, Mrs. Roscoe Conkling. February 12,1886. 

In 1819, his parents removed to Utica, where he attended the public 
schools. He entered the "Academy" in 1824, and graduated in 1828; received 
the degrees of LL. D. from his alma mater in 1859, and from Union College in 
1873. 

He studied law and was admitted to the bar in Utica, in 1832. The death 
of his father in August, 1857. devolved upon him the settlement and manage- 
ment of his large estate and withdrew him from the practice of the profession. 

He was an ardent Democrat, and soon became a factor in the political 
affairs of his party; he held many minor positions; was elected to the State 
Assembly in 1841, and successively re-elected until 1847; was speaker of the 
House, 1845-47; was mayor of Utica in 1842. He was nominated for governor 
in 18.50, but was defeated by the Whig candidate. In 1852, he was again hi.* 
party's nominee for governor, and was elected l)y a large noijority. In 1854,, 
there were fom- candidates for the office and the Whig candidate was elected.. 
He served again as governor during 1863-65. 



216 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



^^ ^IKftc 



In his inaugui-al addi'ess, on January 1, 1863, he said: "Under no cir- 
cumstances can the division of the Union be conceded. We will put forth 
every exertion of power; we will use every pohcy of conciliation; we wiU guaran- 
tee them every right, every consideration demanded by the Constitution and by 
that fraternal regard which must prevail in a common country; but we can 
never voluntarily consent to the breaking up of the union of these states or the 
destruction of the Constitution." 

During his term of office, Governor Seymour commissioned more than 
13,000 officers in the volunteer ser^^ce of the United States in the Civil War. 
In August, 1864, he presided over the Democratic national convention at 
Chicago, which nominated General ]McClelIan for the presidency. He also 
presided over the convention of 1868, held in New York, which nominated him 

__, as a candidate for President, and Gen. 

Francis P. Blair, Jr., for vice- 
president. This election shows his 
great popularity through the covmtry, 
as Gen. U. S. Grant, the successful 
candidate, only received a plurahty 
vote of 305,456. 

In 1868, he was appointed on 
the first commission of State Fish- 
eries; served on the State Board of 
Surveys in 1876-79, being president 
of the board in 1878; was presidential 
elector in 1876. He took deep in- 
terest in military affairs and served 
on staff of Governor Marcy, 1833-39, 
with rank of colonel. 

He was distinguished at the 
"Academy" for his oratorical abihty. 
His tastes were rather for stateman- 
ship than the law. He was one of 
the most eloquent speakers of his 
time. He was criticised for his 
actions during the CiA"!! War, yet 
eymour. subsequent events showed he was 

one of America's greatest statesman. Xo man of our country has passed 
through such a stormy political career, more perfectly immaculate in personal 
reputation. Xo man now of that party has subsided into patriotism, whose 
words were received by men of all political creeds' with a greater assurance 
that they came from absolute purity of motive, and from a clearer sighted 
vision derived from the largest experience. 

Many appreciative eulogies were published at his death: we quote from 
the London Tiines. "Death has of late dealt unsparingly with American 
notables, but there has been no other loss in recent years which has occasioned 
one tithe of the genuine mourning, or evoked one tithe of the heartfelt eulogies 
which will be called forth by the death of Horatio Se\Tnour.' ' He was a great 
political student, and possessed a fine library rich in historical and pohtical 
works. 

He wrote many articles for the various newspapers and magazines of the 




SKETCHES OP ACADEMY CADETS. 



217 



country. His writings and n^ports, if collected, would prove very useful to the 
students of the history of our country. 

In 1879, he retired to his Deerfield farm,." Glen Davie, " near Utica, where 
he passed his last days among his books in the study of history, political and 
the natural sciences. 

He was an able botanist and geologist, and took especial delight in the 
management of his farm, being popularly known as the "Deerfield Farmer." 
One of the last positions he held was road master in his town. 

He served for some years as president of the National Dairymen's Asso- 
ciation. He was the first president of the Oneida Historical Association; also 
a member of the American Prison Association. He was an active member of 
the Episcopal Church, and served as warden many years, also represented his 
parish and diocese at the Church conventions. 

He was married at Albany, N. Y., May 31, 1S35, to Mary, daughter of 
John R. and Hetty Bailey (Linn) Bleeker. She died in 1886; no children. 



HON. THOMAS HENRY SEYMOUR, A. M., LL. D. 

Thomas H. Seymour, son of Henry and Jane (Ellery) Sej^mour, and cousin 
of Horatio Seymoiu-, '28, was born in Hartford, Conn., September 29, 1807, and 
died there, unmarried, September 16, 1868. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his city and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1824, and graduated in 1829. 
The University conferred upon him 
the honorary degrees of A. M., in 1844, 
and LL.D., in 1855. 

He was for some time after h:^ 
returned to Hartford the command- 
ing officer of the Hartford Light 
Guard. He studied law and was ad- / 
mitted to the bar in 1833. He soon , 
attained a fair practice, but never | 
aspired to a high position in his 
profession. In 1837-38, he was edilor | 
of a Democratic newspaper, the ; 
Jeffersonian. He was appointed j udge 
of probate, and went into politics. 
In 1843, he was elected to Congress, 
and at the expiration of his term. 
declined a renomination. \ 

On the breaking out of the / 

Mexican War, he offered his services /' 

to the Government, and was com- 
missioned major of infantry, March 
16, 1847. On April 9, 1847, he wa< Hon. Thomas Henry Seymour. 

assigned to the 9th United States Infantry, the "Old Ninth New England." 
He was promoted heutenant colonel, August 12, 1847; and upon the death 
of Col. T. B. Ransom, '25, in the assault on the fortress of Chapultepec, 
September 13, 1847, took command of the regiment. He scaled the heights 
with his command and was the first to enter the fortress. He was brevctted 
colonel, September 13, 1847, "for gallant and meritorious conduct" in the 




1 IS NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

Battle of Cluipultepec. He served for a time with the 12th United States 
Infantry. He was mustered out of service, July 25, 1848. 

In 1850, he was elected governor of Connecticut by a large majority, and 
was re-elected in 1851, 1852, and 1853. In 1852, he was presidential elector. 
In 1853, he was appointed United States minister to Russia, and resigning the 
governorship, filled the position four years. After a 3^ear of travel, he returned 
to America in 1858. When the Civil War broke out his sympathies were with 
the South, and he continued his opposition to the war until its close, as the 
leader of the Connecticut peace Democrats. In 1863, he was again a candi- 
date for governor, but was defeated by William Buckingham, after an exciting 
contest, owing to the position he had taken during the war. He was a promi- 
nent member of the Masonic Lodge of Hartford, having attained the Knight's 
Templar degrees. 

WILLIAM ELLERY SEYMOUR. 

William E. Seymour, son of Hem-y and Jane (EUery) SejTnour, brother 
of Thos. Henry Seymom-, '29, and cousin of D. M. Seymour, '27, was boi'n in 
Hartford, Conn., March 10, 1810, and died in New Orleans, La., July 29, 1883. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his city and entered the "Acad- 
emy' ' in 1825, and graduated in 1828. 

He engaged in business in Hartford, Conn., until 1836, when he removed 
to New Orleans, La., where he resided until his death. He taught English in 
the French schools during 1836-38. He then engaged in the wholesale paper 
and stationery business with Edward R. Stevens of Saratoga Springs, N. Y., 
under the firm name of Stevens & Seymour. In 1882, he retired from active 
business. He was a member of the Boston Club of New Orleans. 

He was married in New Orleans, July 31, 1851, to Mary Jane Brooks, a 
native of Philadelphia, Pa., who died October 10, 1887. Two children were 
born to them: Helena Ellery, resides in New Orleans; William Harry, born 
April 18, 1854, resides in New Orleans. 

FREDERICK BLOUNT SHEPARD. 

Frederick B. Shepard, son of William and Mary (Blount) Shepard, 
was born in Newbern, N. C, 1803, and died in Mobile, Ala., 1865. He 
attended the schools of his city, and entered the "Academy" in 1821, gradua- 
ting in 1824. He engaged in planting in North Carolina and Alabama for 
many years. 

He was married about 1830, to Susan Martin of Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Ten children were born to them: Frederick, Charlotte, Susan, Margaret 
William, Richard, Sophia, Turgewell, Charles Martin, and Burns. 

BARNARD SHIPP, A. M. 

Barnard Shipp, son of William and Lucy (Barnard) Shipp, and brother 
of WilUam O'Brien Shipp, '28, was born in the "Elysian Fields" five miles 
north of Natchez, Miss., April 30, 1813, and died unmarried, in Russum, 
Miss., November 26, 1904. 

In 1814, his parents removed to New Castle, Ky., and in 1817, returned 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



219 



to Natchez. He attended the schools of Natchez, and was for some time under 
the private instruction of Rev. Benjamin O. Peers, of Lexington, Ky. In 
1824, he entered the "Academy" and graduated in August, 1827; was for a 
brief time in 1831 a student at Yale University. In 1898, "N. U." in recogni- 
tion of his literary work, conferred upon him the degree of A. M. 

He resided in Natchez, Miss., until 1850, when he removed to Louis- 
ville, Ky., where he made his home until his death. He traveled extensively 
in Europe in 1854 and 1857. 
While in St. Petersburg, in 1857, 
he visited Hon. Thomas H. Seymour, 
'29, then United States minister to 
that country. He inherited a large 
property, which enabled him at an ^.v" 

early age to devote himself to ^M'^'',' 

travel and historical research. 

He became an authority on 
the early Spanish explorations in 
America. He published in 1848, a 
volume of poems. Fame and Other 
Poems, which had an extended 
sale,* and gave him literary fame 
throughout the country. In 1852, 
he published the Progress of Free- 
dom and Other Poems. His greatest 
works were along historical lines. 
In 1881, he pubUshed De Soto and 
Florida, an extensive work of 689 
pages, embracing the period be- 
tween 1512, and 1568. In 1897, 
The Indian and Antiquities of 
America, was published, a work of 
451 pages and several illustrations. He left several manuscript works, which he 
had nearly ready for the printer, among the number are : The Events that Lead 
to the Discovery of India aiid America, The Lower Mississippi from its First 
Discovery, The Annals of Louisiana, The Settlements of North America. He 
also wrote extensively for the press. He left a valuable historical library, 
valued upwards of $100,000, which was willed to the University of Virginia. 




Barnard Shipp. 



CAPT. HENRY HOWELL WILLIAMS SIGOURNEY. 

Henry H. W. Sigourney, son of Daniel and Martha (Williams) Sigourney, 
was born in Boston, Mass., August 24, 1807, and died in Milton, Mass., 
June 29, 1874. 

He attended the schools of his city and private schools in Dorchester and 
Hingham, Mass. He cntered^the "Academy" in 1821, and graduated in 
1825. 

He engaged in the mercantile business in Boston from 1825, until 1842, 
when his health began to fail and he removed to CJrafton, Mass., and engaged 
in farming for some years, also at Dedham and Milton, Mass. 

He took great interest in military matters; was commissioned ensign 



220 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



of a Boston company of Light Infantry, April 23, 1835; promoted lieutenant, 
May 3, 1836, and captain, April 4, 1838, resigned, December 4, 1838. 

He was a WTiig in politics, and 
represented Chelsea in the State 
Legislatm-e in 1838; was justice of 
the peace for Norfolk County, Mass., 
1860-66. He took great interest in 
literary matters; compiled the Sigo- 
urney Genealogy, which was published 
in 1857. He was a member of the 
I'nitarian Church. 

He was married at Chelsea, 
Mass., October 31, 1831, to Harriet 
Ardelia WiUiams, who died in Mil- 
ton, Mass., August 15, 1902. Four 
children were born to them: Henry 
Howell WilUams, born August 24, 
1832. resides in Milton, Mass 
Harriet Ardelia, born February 16 
1834, died December 30, 1884 
Eliza Williams, born October 14 
1838, resides in Milton, Mass. 
Thomas Williams, born October 30 
1840, died unmarried, January 12, 

Capt Henry Howell William Sigourney. 18.53. 




REV. FREDERICK SILL. 

Frederick Sill, son of Thomas and Clarissa (Treadway) Sill, was born in 
Middletown, Conn., June 27, 1813, and died in New York city, December 13, 
1874. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1824, and graduated in 1828. 

He learned the jewelers' trade in Norwich, Conn., and engaged in the 
jewelry ]:)usiness in Middletown, 1830-44; Maiden Lane, New York city, 
1844-47; with the manufacturing plant in Middletown, Coim., for some time. 

He studied for the Episcopal ministry during 1846-49, under Rev. Samuel 
Farmer Jarvis of JMiddletowm, Conn.; was ordained deacon in 1849, and priest 
in 1851; was rector of the churches in Durham and Ivillingworth, 1849-50; 
chm-ches in North Guilford and North Haven, in 1850; St. Paul's ^Mission 
Chapel, New Haven, 1850-56, and under his service, the chiu-ch so prospered 
that it was organized as the St. John's Parish; Christ Chiu-ch, Red Hook, 
Dutchess County, N. Y., from November 15, 1856, to July, 1859; St. Thomas 
Mission Chapel, corner of Prince and Thomson Streets, which later became 
the Parish church of St. Ambrose, July 1859-December, 1874. 

He was married June 29, 1837, to ISIargaret Ann Cocks, of New Yorlr 
city, who died May 11, 1885. Four children were born to them: Thoma? 
Henry, an Episcopal clergyman in New York city; Frederick Augustus , 
died. May 28, 1869; Leonora Louisa, resides in New York; Ameha Huntington, 
married Rev. Amos Turner Ashton, D. D., now rector of St. James Chvircb, 
Hyde Park, N. Y. 



SKETCHES OP ACADEMY CADETS. 



221 



COL. SENECA GALUSHA SIMMONS, U. S. A. 




Seneca G. Simmons, son of Alfred and Deborah (Perkins) Simmons 
was born in Windsor, Vt., December 27, 1808, and died of wounds received 
in battle, July 1, 1862; was buried in Richmond, Va. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1826, and graduated in 1829. He entered 
the United States MiUtary Academy at West Point, July 1, 1829, and graduated 
July 1, 1834; was brevetted second lieutenant, 7th United States Infantry, 
same date; and second lieutenant, same regiment, December 31, 1834; was 
assistant to Maj. William G. McNeil, on the survey of the Apalachicola 
Harbor, Fla., August 22, 1834-1835; assistant engineer with Col. Stephen H. 
Long, on coast survey of Maine and on a contemplated raih'oad, Belfast to 
Quebec, Canada, 1835-36; was promoted first heutenant, same regiment, 
January 19, 1837, serving as aide on the staff of General Matthew Arbuckle, 
on frontier duty in the Southwest, ' ~~^ 

October 24, 1837 until May 11, 1842; 

served with his regiment in the \ 

Florida War, spring of 1842; stationed 
at Fort Pike, La., 1842-44; on recruit- 
ing duty, 1844-^7, at Syracuse, N. Y. 

He was ordered to Matamoras, 
Mexico, early in 1847, and served 
as assistant commissary and quarter- 
master at this post until October, 
1847, when he was ordered to join his 
regiment; was promoted captain 7th 
Infantry, February 16, 1847; took 
part in the memorable march of the 
United States Ai-my to the city of 
Mexico and distinguished himself at 
the battle of Huamantla, October 12, 
1847; was stationed at the Jefferson 
Barracks, Mo., 1848-49; took part in 
the war against the Seminole Indians 
in Florida, 1849-50; was stationed 
at Fort Leavenworth for some time 
in 1850; en recruiting service, Potts- 
ville. Pa., 1851-53; in command Fort Ai-buckle, Indian Territory, 1853-57; 
was stationed at Fort Smith, Ai-kansas, 1857-58; Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 
1858; Newi^ort Barracks, Ky., 1859; on sick leave, 1859-61. 

On the breaking out of the Civil War, though far from well, he obtained 
leave of absence from the army and offered his services to the State of Penn- 
sylvania. He assisted for some time in organizing the volunteers, and on 
June 21, 1861, was commissioned colonel of the 5th Pennsylvania Regiment. 
He served in West Virginia in (jeneral Wallace's command for some time in 
1861, and later in the same year in General McCall's command in the defences 
of Washington. On September 9, 1861, he was promoted major of the 4th 
United States Infantry but preferred to remain with the volunteer troops. 
He participated in the action at Drainesville, December 20, 1861; served with 
his regiment on guard duty on the Orange & Alexandria R. R., December 




Col. Seneca Gaiusha Simmons. 



222 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

18G1, until May, 1862; later served on picket duty at Fredericksburg, Va., 
and in the "Seven Daj-s'" fight before Richmond. He performed conspicu- 
ous duty especially at the battles of Mechanicsville and Gaines's Mills. 

At the battle of Charles City Cross Roads, (Wliite Oak Swamp) June 30, 
1862, he fell in the thickest of the fight, while leading his brigade; was captured 
by the Confederates and carried to their hospital and died, July 1, 1862. He 
was a brave and efficient officer and but for his untimely death would have 
held a high command in the army. No braver man drew a sword in the 
defense of the Union. No nobler life was sacrificed in that fratricidal strife. 
He received medals from the United States government for gallantry in battle 
in the Mexican and Civil Wars; also a medal from Pennsylvania for gallant 
services. Col. Seneca G. Simmonds, Post No. 116 of Harrisburg, Pa., was 
named in his honor. He was a member of the INIasonic Fraternity. 

He was married in August, 1834, to Elmira Adelaide Simmons of Wood- 
stock, Vt., who died February 6, 1886. Four children were born to them: 
Charles Francis, born December 21, 1835, a civil engineer, died March 16, 
1856; Frederick Douglass, born in 1837, a civil engineer, died in February, 
1860; Edward Courtney, born in 1840, died, June 29, 1848; Elmira Adelaide, 
born, December 27, 1842, married Daniel J. Attick, resides in Harrisburg, 
Pa. 

HON. JAMES SINKLER. 

James Sinkler was born at the Eutaw Plantation, Buckley County, 
S. C, about 1808, and died th ere about 1850. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1824, and graduated in 1826. He engaged 
extensively in cotton planting until his death. At an early age he became 
prominent in the political affairs of his State. He represented his district 
in the State Legislature several times. 

He was sm'vived by three children: William, who resides in Charleston, 
S. C; Mrs. William H. Ir\dng of "\'irginia; Mrs. ^^'. H. DeSanderson of 
Charleston, S. C. 

CONSUL-GENERAL ISAAC TOWNSEND SMITH, A. M. 

Isaac T. Smith, son of Ebenezer and Elizabeth (Townsend) Smith' 
was born in Boston, Mass., March 12, 1813, and died in New York city, 
March 30, 1906. 

He prepared for college in the Latin schools of the city of Boston, and 
entered the "Academy' ' in 1827, and graduated in 1829. In 1898 the Univer- 
sity conferred upon him the degree of A. M. 

He engaged in mercantile pursuits in Boston, until 1834, when he was 
appointed supercargo of one of the great merchant cUpper-ship.s clearing 
from Boston to the East Indies, making from time to time, voyages to China, 
Singapore, Java and South Africa, and so getting acquainted with large parts 
of the world. After a successful business career in the East, he located in 
New York city in 1840, and engaged in the mercantile business until 1854, 
meeting with marked success. He was also an extensive ship owner and 
banker. He was interested in various business enterprises; was one of the 
incorporators and for twenty-five years president of the Metropolitan Savings 
Bank of New York ciiy. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



223 



The first commercial relations between the United States and Siam 
were opened in 1852, when King Mongut sent a commission to Mr. Smith 
to have prepared in this country and sent to Siam, models, drawings and 
specifications for two vessels to be constructed in Bangkok by native workmen ; 
also to have steam engines and machinery made here and sent to Bangkok 
to be put in the vessels. These vessels were in due time built and made ready 
for the arrival of the machinery. Great difficulty was experienced in those 
days in finding transportation accomodations for sending the machinery. 
A. A. Low of New York, then engaged in the China trade, came to Mr. Smith's 
aid by furnishing room in one of his ships. When Mr. Low's ship arrived in the 
China Sea, he gave orders to go out of the regular course and go up the Gulf 
of Siam and land the machinery at Bangkok. One of the two vessels construct- 
ed was used as a yacht by the King, who named it the Roj/al Scaf. The other 
vessel was made a ship of war for 
the Siamese navy, and was named 
the Enemy Chaser. This vessel, with 
her American armanment, quickly 
cleared the Straight of Malacca and 
the adjacent waters of Malay pirates 
that preyed upon commerce. 

In 1856, he was appointed by 
the Siamese Government as its 
financial agent in the United States, 
and later consul-general, which posi- 
tion he held until his death. In 1890, 
he visited Siam as the guest of the 
Siamese government, when he was 
decorated by His Majesty, the King, 
for his long and faithful services. 
He there, at that time, met the 
Crown Prince of Russia, now the 
Emperor, and Prince George of 
Greece, who were also guests of the 
King. In the summer of 1897, he 
visited Holland, Belgium, France, 
and England with the King of Siam. 

He was an active member of the Madison Avenue Baptist Church of 
New York city. He was an earnest Christian and gave liberally of his 
time and money in the support of the church and benevolent enterprises. 
He assisted in founding th(! first mariners' church of New York city. One 
of the most interesting cha{)tcrs in all the benevolent life of this noble man 
of God is that which tells of his splendid generosity toward the missionaries 
of the Southern Baptists, when during our Civil War, the Federal blockade 
of Southern ports cut these missionaries off from communication or support 
from the Board of Richmond. For three years, he supported them in foreign 
parts himself. This was only one of his many generous deeds. 

He was a man of the broadest liberality. With him the church universal 
was more than the church local, and the church organic, more than the church 
organized. His heart wc^nt out in genuine Christian affection toward all who 




Consul-General Isaac Townsend Smith. 



224 ' NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

love Jesus Christ in sincerity and trutti. His loyalty toward his own church 
no more interfered with his co-operation -^vith churches of other denomina- 
tions than the wings of a bird interfere with its flying, or the organism of the 
sun with its shining. As a member of the Madison Avenue Church of New 
York City, he felt he differed not essentially from any who acknowl- 
edged the supremacy of Jesus Christ as Sovreign and Savior. This breadth 
coupled with the intensity and strong con\dctions, did not make him less 
a Baptist, but it did make him more a Christian — not less a denominationalist, 
but certainly less a sectarian. 

He was a man of fine mental culture. After he retired from active 
business, he devoted much time to literary matters. He wrote many articles 
for the various periodiclas; also delivered many addresses on historical topics. 
His pamphlet on The Early Maritime Life of New England, has been delivered 
as an address before military and naval organizations, universities, clubs and 
societies in different parts of our land. His treatise on European Spoliation 
in the East is a fine discussion by an intelligent and observing traveler and 
student of international matters, while his History of the Underhill and Towns- 
end Families reveals touches of a really gifted biographer. 

He was a Repubhcan in politics and held several positions; was for several 
years commissioner of immigration for the State of New York; was a presi- 
dential elector in 1864, when President Lincoln was re-elected. He was a 
member of the Union League Club of New York city, Lotus Club of New 
York, Genealogical and Biographical Society, the New England Society, 
and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

He married Eliza Palmer Putnam, daughter of Judge Henry Putnam, 
of Brunswick, Me. Three children were born to them, of whom a daughter, 
Mrs. George B. Loring, of New York city, survived her parents. A grand- 
son, Hon. Loring To-misend Hildreth, succeeded Mr. Smith as the Siamese 
consul-general at New York. 

JAMES MALCOLM SMITH, U. S. N., A. B., M. D. 

J. IMalcolm Smith was born in Turk Island, West Indies, about 1808' 
and died at Flushing, L. I., New York, April 29, 1848. 

At an early age his parents removed to New Haven, Conn., where he 
prepared for college. He entered the "Academy" in 1822, and remained 
until 1824. He then entered Yale College and graduated A. B. in 1826; 
also graduated M. D , from the college of Physicians and Surgeons of New 
York City in 1832. 

On September 6, 1837, he was commissioned assistant surgeon. United 
States Navy; was promoted, passed assistant surgeon, March 14, 1843 and 
remained in the service until his death. 

RICHARD DIMOCK SMITH. 

Richard D. Smith, was born in Bristol, R. I., in 1807, and died at his 
plantation in Itobo, Cuba, in 1873. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1824, 
and graduated in 1826. Soon after liis gi-aduation, he went to Cuba where his 
father had settled in 1824, and where he had acquii-ed large plantation interests. 

In 1834, he settled in Itobo, Cuba, in the jurisdiction of Cardenas, on the 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 225 

"San Ricordo" plantation, a land grant of 1,500 acres. Here he made his 
home until his death. After several misfortunes, he became eminently 
successful in his business ventures and acquired a large fortune. 

He was married in 1834, to Hannah Borden of Bristol, R. I., her mother 
being a descendant of the Winslows, who emigrated to this country in the 
Mayflower. 

Five children were born to them: Two daughters, Mrs. Serafina B. 
Barclay of Stanford, Conn., and Mrs. W. H. Hodgkin, and a granddaughter, 
Mrs. Loftus ArkwTight, Parndon Hall, Harlow Esse.x, England, survive him. 

WALTON PEMBROKE SMITH. 

Walton P. Smith, son of William Heashe and Mary Bell (Madison) 
Smith, was born in Madison County, Va., August 7, 1810, and died in Missouri, 
August 28, 1866. 

In 1820, his parents removed to Natchez, Miss., where he attended 
the public schools. He entered the "Academy' ' in 1824, and graduated in 1826. 

Soon after graduating, he located on the extensive plantation, "Roth 
Gowen," Concordia Parish, La., which he had inherited from his father, and 
engaged extensively in agricultural pursuits. He met with marked success 
and became one of the large cotton planters and slave owners in the State. 
In 1850, he retm-ned to Mississippi and located on the "Saragapa" planta- 
tion, near Natchez, now owned by his son, Austin W. Smith. He was also 
an extensive owner of plantations in Mississippi and Missouri. He took no 
active part in the Civil War, but was represented by his four sons, who served 
in the Confederate Army. 

He was married June 6, 1839, to Anna Elizabeth, daughter of Austin 
and Carohne Matilda (Routh) Williams. She died October 4, 1889. Four 
children were born to them: John Davidson; Austin Williams, resides near 
Natchez, Miss.; William Madison, died about 1870; Healler Routh, died 
about 1875. 

SAMUEL GRAY SOUTHMAYED, A. B., M. D. 

Samuel G. Southmayd, son of Samuel and Sarah (Gill) Southmayd, 
was born in Middletown, Conn., October 30, 1811, and died there, October 
9, 1877. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy"" in 1825, 
graduating in 1829; graduated, A. B., from Yale University in 1834, and M. D. 
from Yale University Medical College in 1836. 

He practiced his profession in Middletown, 1836-42. He located in 
New York City in 1842, where he continued the practice of medicine several 
years. He then became interested in a planing mUl in New York city, the 
output of which, being manufactured by patented machines, yielded him a 
moderate fortune. He retired from active business and removed to Hoboken, 
N. J., where he made his home until his death. 

He was twice married: first, November 11, 1838, to Sarah Esther Russell 
of Middletown, who died June 10, 18GG; no children. He was again married, 
April 22, 1868, to Maria Cornelia Larned of Middletown, who survives him 
and resides in Middletown, Conn. One child was born to them: Alice Gray, 
born August 4, 1870, married Elmer Goodrich Derby, resides in Middletown, 
Conn. 



226 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

HON. EDWARD STANLEY. 

Edward Stanlej^, son^of^the^Hon. John^Stanlej', was^born in Newbern, 
N. C, in 1808, and died in San Francisco, Cal., July 12, 1872. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" 
in 1827, and graduated in 1829. He studied law and was admitted to the bar 
in 1832; practiced Ms profession in Washington, Beaufort County, N. C, 
1832-37, 1844-48, meeting with great success. 

He was a Whig in poUtics and later a RepubUcan. At an early age 
he took a prominent part in pohtical affairs of his State; represented his 
district in the United States House of Representatives, 1837-43, 1849-53, 
serving as chairman of the committee on military affairs, 1849-53; represented 
Beaufort County in the lower branch of the State Legislatm-e in 1844, 1846 
and 1848; and was speaker of that body in 1848. He filled this position with 
great abihty and his decisions were characterized by impartiaUtj^ and -wisdom; 
also served as attorney general of the State in 1847. In 1851, he strongly 
advocated the admission of California as a State. 

In 1853, he removed to San Francisco, Cal., where he practiced his pro- 
fession until 1862, when he was appointed by President Lincoln, governor of 
North Carohna, filUng that important position at that critical period with 
marked ability. He resigned that office in 1864, and returned to San Francisco, 
where he resided until his death. 

In 1857, he was nominated by the Republican part}' for governor of the 
State, though he was not fully in accord with all the doctrines of the party. 
The State was largely Democractic, yet such was his popularity that he was 
defeated only by a small margin. 

He was an eloquent speaker and a formidable rival in debate. He was 
distinguished for his fideUty and honesty of purpose, gaining for him the good 
will of even his opponents. He was an earnest christian, a true friend, and 
upright in all his deahngs with his fellow men. 

He was twice married: first, to a daughter of Dr. Hugh James of Hyde 
County. She died about 1855. He was again married about 1860. 

REV. HAR\^EY STANLEY, D. D. 

Harvey Stanlej-, son of James Green and EUza (Harvey) Stanley, and 
cousin of Hon. Edward Stanley, '29, was born at Newbern, N. C, September 
22, 1809, and died at Holy Trinity Rectory, near CoUington, Prince George's 
County, Maryland, January 25, 1885. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his native city, and entered the 
"Academy" in 1825, graduating in 1828. 

He afterwards studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1830 and went 
to Natchez ,Miss., where he practiced his profession until 1835. In 1837, he 
was ordained an Episcopal clergyman. He was rector of the chui'ch in Eiza- 
beth City, N. C, and in Saybrook, Conn. He located in Maryland in 1844, 
and was rector of the church in Princess Anne, Somerset Comitj-, 1844-48; 
of thechiu-ch at old St. Mary's City, St. Mary's County, Marj-land, 1848-51; 
of Holy Trinity Parish, Prince George's Count}', Maryland, from December, 
1851, until his death. 

He was for a nmnber of j^ears a member of the Board of Trustees of the 
General Theological Seminar}- in New York. He was the author of the work, 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



227 



Pilate and Herod, published in 1850. This work was a history to a large ex- 
tent of the early settlement of Maryland, and indirectly of the religions 
controversies prior to and just after the revolution. 

He was married August 4, 1839, to Mary Ann Kinney, of Elizabeth 
City, N. C, who died at Laurel, Md., March 24, 1893. Eight children were 
born to them: Mary, born October 30, 1840, married Mr. Oscar Hinrich, 
a civil engineer, died October 25, 1891; Charles Harvey, born October 20, 
1843, now a lawyer and bank president, resides in Laurel, Md.; James, born 
September 22, 1845, retired merchant, resides in Baltimore, Md.; George, 
born, March 27, 1848, died Jime 28, 1857; Eliza, born March 4, 1856, resides 
in Laurel, Md.; WilUam, born, December 15, 1852, a law;yer, died, March 3, 
1891; Annie Cogdel, born March 30, 1857, resides in Laurel, Md.; Sarah 
Gordon, born September 5, 1855, died, April 14, 1863. 



BRIG.-GEN. ELIHU WILLIAM NATHAN STARR. 

Elihu W. N. Starr, second child and eldest son of Nathan and Grace 
(Townsend) Starr, was born in New Haven, Conn., at the rosidonce of his 
his maternal grandfather, Ebenezer 
Townshend, Angus 10, 1812, and 
died in Middletown, ^Conn., June 14, 
1891. 

At the time of his birth, liis 
father was a resident of New York 
city; but soon after returned to his 
former home, Middletown, Conn., 
which became the permanent resi- 
dence of the subject of this sketch. 
At the opening of the "Academy" 
at Middletown, in August, 1825, he 
became one of the cadets and contin- 
ued so until 1828. 

The winter of 1828-29, he spent 
in New Haven attending lectures at 
Yale college. His father was a manu- 
facturer of swords and fire arms 
and about 1830, he became a book- 
keeper. In 1837, he became in- 
terested with his father, under the 
firm name of N. Starr & Co., in the _. -^ 

manufacture of muskets and rifles, '^ BHg.^Gen. Elihu \viUiam Nathan Starr. 

which continued until 1845, when the government ceased giving out con- 
tracts Under the nam(> of E. W. N. Starr & Co., he was. for a short time,, 
engaged in the manufacture of plane irons. 

By President Van Buren, he was ap(jointed jiostmastcr of Middletown, 
February 20, 1841, and held the position until October 1, 1842. In December, 
1850; he was appointed assistant town clerk, and in October, 1851,' was elected 
town clerk. This, with the office of registrar of births, marriages and deaths, 
to which he was elected in October, 1854, he held up to the time of his death, 
except from October, 1865 to October, 1866. He was city^clerk and treasurer 
from January, 1856, to January, 1864, and judge of probate for the District 




228 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

of Middletown for one year from July 4, 1866, and from July, 1868, to July, 
1872. 

In 1830, he enlisted in the State Militia, and on September 14, 1831, was 
commissioned as sergeant major of the 2nd regiment of Hght artillery and 
later quartermaster and adjutant of the same regiment. In 1836, he organized 
the "Middletown Cadets" and was elected captain, being commissioned 
July 12, 1836. The company was officially known as the First Rifle Company 
in the 6th Regiment. July 29, 1839, he was promoted to the heutenant 
colonelcy of this regiment and to the colonelcy, April 19, 1841. This last 
position he held until his resignation, June 6, 1844. 

In honor of his friend. Col. Joseph Iving Fenno Mansfield, of the regular 
army, he organized, in 1847, the "Mansfield Guards," the 7th Company 
of hght Infantry of the 6th Regiment. He was commissioned captain, Sept- 
ember 24, 1847, and held the office until again elected colonel of the 6th Regi- 
ment, August 2, 1853, of which he was in command until, July 10, 1860. 

While captain of the "Guards," he was appointed adjutant-general, by his 
fellow cadet and lifelong friend. Governor Thomas H. Seymour, '29, holding 
office from May 2, 1850, to May 4, 1854. 

July 10, 1860, he was given a commission as brigadier general of the 2nd 
Brigade, and held the rank until August 1, 1861, when the militia was dis- 
banded, under an act of the State Legislature, approved, July 3, 1861. For 
a few weeks, from September 10, 1861, he held the position of di^^sion inspec- 
tor, but as the law of July, 1861, disbanding the old and creating a new miUtary 
force, was not deemed effective, he resigned his commission. 

Soon after the breaking out of the Civil War, Governor Buckingham 
offered him the command of the 3d Regiment, Connecticut Volimteers. 
Owing to his delicate health, he was obliged to decUne the commission. There 
were over thirty commissioned officers in the field, all considered proficient 
men, who owed their knowledge of military tactics to his gratuitous in- 
struction. Two companies from Wesleyan University were drilled by him 
in the early morning before breakfast, and after the close of the office for 
the day. For some weeks, in 1862, he was in command of the 24th Regiment, 
Connecticut Volunteers, which [encamped at Middleto'mi, before it left for the 
seat of war. This was the last military position held by him, ending a service 
in behalf of his State extending over thirty years. 

He was five feet, ten and one-half inches tall, weighing about one hundred, 
forty pounds and very erect, making liim a marked figm-e He was considered 
a good drillmaster and a very fine horseman. 

He was married, May 27, 1840, to Harriet Wetmore Bush, of Ogdensburg, 
N. Y., who died, February 20, 1904. Six children were born to them: three 
of whom are now liv-ing: William Edward, resides in Cranford, N. J., Frank 
Famsworth, the well known genealogist and historian of MiddletowTi, Conn.; 
and Grace Townsend.. who resides in Middletown, Conn. 

THEODORE BUEL STERLING. 

Theodore B. Sterling, son of Gen. Ehsha and Alma (Canfield) SterUng, 
was born in Sahsbury, Conn., July 18, 1808, and died in Iron Ridge, Wis , June 
16, 1857, He attended the schools of liis town and entered the "Academy" 
in 1823, and graduated in 1827. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 229 

He was superintendent of an iron furnace at Peekham, N. Y., for some 
years. In 1846, he removed to Cleveland, Ohio, where he was in the employ 
of the Cuyahoga Steam Furnace Co., until 1847. He then engaged in the 
grocery business until 1849, when he removed to Iron Ridge, Dodge County, 
Wis. Here he made his home until his death, engaging extensively in min- 
ing, lumbering and farming. He represented his district in the State Legis- 
lature in 1854. 

He was twice married: first, December 31, 1833, to Ruth Ann Smith 
of Beekman, N. Y., who died April 27, 1845. He was again married, August 
14, 1846, to Mary Amanda Smith of [Beekman, who died April 6, 1845. 
He was survived by several children. 

JASON STIMSON. 

Jason Stimson, son of Joel and Susan (Grow) Stimson, and brother of 
Col. Alba Stimson, trustee "N. U.," 1848-57, was born in Norwich, Vt., 
June 25, 1800, and died in Granger, Medina County, Ohio, October 11, 1838. 
He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1820, and 
graduated in 1822. 

He removed to Mendon, N. Y., about 1825, where he engaged in the 
manufacture of wagons and blacksmithing until 1832, when he removed to 
Granger, Ohio, where he resided until his death. He engaged in mercantile 
business in Granger, Ohio, from 1832 until his death, which resulted from 
"Michigan fever," contracted while on a visit to his brother Horace, in 
Michigan, He was an able musician. He was a member of the Congregational 
Church, and a Republican in politics. 

He was married, November 18, 1825, to Mary Jennett, daughter of Josiah 
and Roxanna (Newcomb) Phelps. She afterwards married Calvin Simmonds 
and removed to Winnebago County, 111. 

Six children were born to them: Alba Biers, born April 8, 1827, died in 
Parma, Ohio, March 7, 1868; AurendaMunson, born January 29, 1829, married 
Mr. Edward Gan-etFon Sheldon, died in Granger, Ohio in 1896; Clarissa 
Jennett, born July 4, 1831, married William G. Shnmons, resides in Seward, 
111.; Milton, born December 29, 1833, resides in Manchester, Iowa; Miriam, 
born December 22, 1835, died in 1848; Jason, born November 14, 1837, resides 
in Manchester, Iowa. 

CHAPLAIN JOSEPH STOCKBRIDGE, U. S. N., A. M., D. D. 

Joseph Stockbridge, son of William R. Stockbridge, was born in Yar- 
mouth, Me., July 14, 1811, and died in Philadelphia, Pa., November 16, 1894. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1821, 
remaining until 1824. He graduated A. B. from Bowdoin College, Brunswick, 
Me., in 1830, and received the degree of A. M. in course from that Institution 
and D. D. from the Western University, Pa., in 1868. 

He studied law in Portland, Me., 1830-32; and at the Harvard Law School, 
1832-33; was admitted to the Somerset County bar in June, 1833, and practiced 
his profession in Portland until 1840. 

He was a student of the Theological Seminary, Newton, Mass., 1840-'^] ; 
was commissioned a chaplain in the U. S. Navy, September 8, 1841, and scrvrd 
on the Independence, Commodore Stewart's flagship, for some time, when,owing 



230 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

to failing health he was given a leave of absence and traveled extensively 
through the territory of Dakota and the Northwest; served five years at the 
New York Navy Yard; on the North Carolina; was ordered to the flagship of 
the Brazil Squadron in 1853; traveled extensively in South America; was re- 
tired from the Navy, July 14, 1873. He traveled in Europe with his family in 
1874-75; besides his regular duties as chaplain, he preached in fifteen states. 

He was a fine scholar and of decided literary taste ; was assistant editor of 
the New York Record and was a correspondent of the Daily Times, New York, 
New York Tribune and the Christian Reflector of Boston. 

He was married May 26, 1845, to Julia E. Everett of Portland, Me. Six 
children were born to them: Charles H., Elizabeth, John, Edwin E., and Grace. 

TRISTRAM OILMAN STOCKBRIDGE, M. D. 

Tristram G. Stockbridge, son of Dr. John and Theodosia (Gilman) Stock- 
bridge, was born in Bath, Me., August 18, 1806, and died there, January 20, 
1871. 

He attended the schools of his city and Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. 
He entered the "Academy" in 1820, and remained two years. He was a stu- 
dent for some time at the Harvard Medical College and graduated M. D. from 
the Bowdoin Medical College in 1828. He practiced his profession in Bath, 
Me., until his death. 

LEMUEL GUSTAVUS STORRS. 

Lemuel G. Storrs, son of Lemuel Gustavus and Eliza Watson (Cotton) 
Storrs, was born in Middletown, Conn., February 6, 1813, and died in Paines- 
ville, Ohio, March 31, 1830. 

At an early age his parents removed to Painesville, Ohio, where he pre- 
pared for college. He entered the "Academy" in 1825, and graduated in 1828. 
He then returned to Painesville, and entered the employ of his father who 
was agent of the Connecticut Land Co. 

WILLIAM F. STRUDWICK, M. D. 

William F. Strudwick, son of Hon. William F. Strudwick, member of Con" 
gress from North Carolina, was born at "Long INIeadows," near Hillsboro' 
N. C, in 1810, and died in Hillsboro in 1851, while there on a visit. 

He prepared for college in the schools of Hillsboro and entered the "Acad- 
emy' ' in 1825, and graduated in 1828. He studied medicine and practiced his 
profession in Alabama from 1830, until his death. He was one of the most 
skillful physicians of his State. 

He was married about 1830, to Betsey Webb of Hillsboro, N. C, a sister 
of Henry Webb, '28. Five children were born to them. A son, William, 
resides at Greensboro, N. C. 

JAMES SWAN SULLIVAN, M. D. 

James S. Sullivan, son of William and Sarah Webb (Swan) Sullivan, was 
born in Boston, Mass., February 18, 1809, and died in Savannah, Georgia, 
February 20, 1874. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



231 



He prepared for college in the schools of his city and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1822, graduating in 1826. He graduated M. D. from Harvard 
Medical College in 1832, and practiced his profession in Hopkinton, Galena, 
111., Darien, Ga., and Savannah, Ga. He was survived by several children. 

BENJAMIN SWAN, A. B. 

Benjamin Swan, son of Benjamin and Lucy (Gay) Swan, was born in 
Woodstock, Vt., August 22, 1805, and diedjn Colchester, Conn., August 24, 
1852. He attended the schools of his town and entered the" Academy' ' in 1820, 
and graduated in 1824; graduated A. B. from the University of Vermont in 
1825. 

He studied law in Woodstock, Vt., and was admitted to the Windsor 
County bar in 1828; practiced his profession in Woodstock, under the firm name 
of Marsh & Swan, 1828-41. He engaged in mercantile business in Owasco, 
N. Y. from 1841 until 1845, when he removed to Colchester, Conn., and en- 
gaged in the India rubber business until his death, being a member of the 
Hay ward Rubber Co. from 1845 until 1852. He was a Whig in politics and 
was postmaster of Woodstock, Vt., 1830-39. He was a member of the Con- 
gregational Chm-ch and the I. 0. O. F. 

He was married, July 3, 1834, to Ann Isham of Colchester, Conn., who 
died in St. Louis, Mo., October 6, 1900. Four children were born to them 
.\nn Aylwin, born October 20, 1835, died in New York, October 29, 1867 
Benjamin Ralph, born December 1, 1837, resides in San Francisco, Cal. 
Lyndon Marsh, born July 10, 1839, died in New York, November 26, 1904 
Joseph Isham, born October 24, 1841, resides in St. Louis, Mo. 

HON. JOHN WILLIAM SYME. 

John W. Syme, only son of the 
Rev. Andrew and Jean Mathewson 
(Camerson) Syme, was born in 
Petersburg, Va., January 9, 1811, 
and died there, November 26, 1865. 

He prepared for college in the 
schools of his town and entered the 
"Academy" in 1824, and graduated 
in 1828; graduated from William am 
Mary's College, Williamsburg, Va. 

He studied law with Judge 
Frederick Nash, Hillsboro, N. C, 
and was admitted to the bar in 
1834; i)racticed his profession in 
Petersburg. He was a Whig in politics 
and purchased the Pelarahurg In- 
Icllingencer, the leading organ of the 
Whig party in southern Virginia. 
He conducted this paper until 1856 
when, at the earnest soUcitation of 
leading Whig politicans of North 
Carolina, he purchased the Raleigh 
Register, an official Whig paper of Hon. John William Syme. 




232 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

that State. He labored for the triumph of ^yhig principles. He opposed 
secession until it became an estabUshed fact, and then unhesitatingly gave his 
allegiance to the South and bcame an active supporter of the cause. He repre- 
sented Petersburg in the State Legislatui-e. He resided in Raleigh imtil 
1864, when he returned to liis native town, where he resided until his death. 
He began the publication of the Register in 1864; but was soon forced to sus- 
pend publication, owing to the city becoming the center of the military opera- 
tions. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge and the I. O. O. F. 

He was married April 10, 1833, to IMary Cowan Modden of Petersburg, 
six children were born to them. 

JOHN W. TAPPAN. 

John W. Tappan, son of the Rev. John Tappan, was born in Claremont, 
N. H., in 1807, and died there, Decmber 29, 1869. 

He prepared for college at the Ivimball Union Academy and entered the 
"Academy' ' in 1820, remaining three years. 

He studied law with his uncle, Weare Tappan, of Bradford, and was ad- 
mitted to the Sulhvan County bar; but did not practice the profession, prefer- 
ring instead, a business career. He met with success in his business ventures, 
and acquired a large property. 

He engaged extensively in various business enterprises; was director 
in^the Claremont' Bank, 1842-46; president of the Connecticut River Bank, 
of Charlestown, N. H., for several years. 

He married Harriet Erskine, who died October 3, 1873. She gave 
to the town of Claremont, $30,500 for educational purposes. Two sons, 
who died in infancy, were born to them. 

COMMODORE JOSIAH TATTNALL, C. S. N. 

Josiah^Tattuall,'son of the^Hon.' Josiah and Harriette (Fenmck) Tattnall, 
was born at Bonaventm-e, near Savannah, Ga., November 9, 1795, and 
died at Savannah, Ga., June 14, 1871. 

At an early age, he was left an orphan and at ten years of age, he was 
sent to England and educated imder the supervision of his grandfather, 
Col. John] Mulryne, until November, 1811, when he returned to Georgia. 
He then began the study of medicine in Savannah, but not finding the pro- 
fession congenial, soon gave up the study and determined upon a naval caxeer. 

He was appointed a midshipman. United States Navy, April 1, 1812; 
served on the frigate Constellation, the favorite ship of our navy, August 1, 
1812 until April, 1814. On June 22, 1813, he had his first engagement with 
the British fleet near Corney's Island, Norfolk, Ya. In April, 1814, he 
commanded a company of recruits for the navy from Norfolk, Ya., to the 
Lake Erie Squadron. He then retm-ned to Washington, D. C, arri\'ing in 
time to serve as a volunteer with a company of navy yard employees in the 
battle of Blandensbui-g, Md. He served on the frigate Spervier, in Decatur's 
squadron in the Algerian war, October 10, 1814, imtil June, 1815; served on 
the Constellation, Mediterranean Station, June, 1815, until January, 1817; 
on the corvette Ontario, January until December, 1817; was promoted lieu- 
tenant, April 1, 1818, and served on the frigate Macedonian, on a cruise in the 
Pacific ocean, from June[^30, 1818, until 1821, when he was ordered to the 
United States. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



233 



He was granted a leave of absence in 1821, and entered the "Academy" 
graduating in 1823. His biographer in speaking of his work at the Academy 
says: "Then was securely laid the foundation of a mathematical education, 
which subsequently enlarged, enabled him to meet with accuracy and dis- 
tinction all the requirements of the naval profession.' ' 

He served on the schooner Jackall, on a cruise in the West Indies, for 
the suppression of piracy, 1823-24; on the frigate Constitution, and the Brandy- 
ivine, on the Mediterranean Station, 1824-26; was on leave, 1826, until October, 
1828; served on the corvette Erie, October 1, 1828 until August, 1829, on a 
cruise in the West Indies and there captured the Federal, an Argentine boat, 
which had taken an American ship. 

He was engaged August 17, 
1829-30, in the survey of the 
Tortugas reefs off the coast of 
Florida for a fort to suppress the 
piracy in that region. His efficient 
work was officially commended by 
the President of the United States 
and the Secretary of the Navy. 
He was in command of the Gram- 
pus, March 9, 1831, until Decem- 
ber, 1832, in the West Indies where 
he did effective work in protect- 
ing American and English ships 
from Spanish interference; cap- 
tured the Spanish ship, Monte- 
zuma. From December 1832, to 
1835, he conducted experiments 
in ordnance construction and 
made tidal surveys. 

He was in command of the 
barque Pioneer, from November, 
183.5, until 1838, and accompanied 
the United States Exploring Ex- 
pedition to the South Sea; was 
commissioned commander, Feb- 
ruary 25, 1838; was detailed in 1838, by the United States Government to 
convey President Santa Anna, who had been captured by the Republic of 
Texas, from that country to Mexico, and give him protection. He was in com- 
mand of the Boston Navy Yard during 1838-40; was engaged in making ex- 
periments in ordnance in 1840; was in command of flagship Fairfield, on the 
Mediterranean station, March 2, 1840-43. He was in command of the 
Saratoga, March, 1843-45; on service on the west coast of Africa in suppression 
of the slave trade; was on leave of absence, 184.5-46. 

He was given command of the Spitfire, on June 2, 1846, and served with 
the American fleet on the blockade of the Mexican coast; was given command 
of the bombardment of Vera Cruz, March 9, 1847; shelled the castle of St. 
Juan d'Ulloa on March 10, and March 23, 1847; assisted in the capture of 
towns along the Mexican coast. In the capture of Tuspan, he was severely 
wounded in the right arm, yet he retained the command of his ship until 




Commodore Josiah Tattnall. 



234 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

that city was occupied. In June, 1847, he returned to the United States. 
The legislatm-e of Georgia presented him an elegant sword for his gallantry 
in the Mexican war. 

He was in command of the Boston Navy Yard from October, 1847, to 
October, 1849; was on leave of absence, October, 1849, until February, 1850; 
was promoted captain, February 5, 1850. He was in command of the frigate 
Saranac, February 26, 1850-1851 in the West Indies, where by his diplomacy 
was able to avert war between this country and Spain; was in command of the 
naval station at Pasco, Fla., July 1, 1851-1854, and during this time super- 
intended the construction of extensive naval works at that station, expending 
large svuns of money; was in command of the frigate Independence, and cruised 
along the coast of South America to San Francisco, September 1, 1854, to 
May, 1856; was in command of the naval station on the Great Lakes with 
head quarters at Sackett's Harbor, 1856-57. 

On October 15, 1857, he was ordered to take command of the naval 
forces in the East Indies and the China Sea, with rank of flag officer. The 
relations between Japan and the United States were in a critical state and 
his selection for this important command shows the high regard placed on 
him by the Navy Department. In May, 1858, he transferred his flag to the 
Poivhatan, and on May 21, he reached the mouth of the Pei-ho River, en 
route to Peking, with the American minister. Here the Chinese had thrown 
up fortifications and were keeping the English and French warships from 
passing up the river to Tienstin. One of the English gun boats had run ashore 
under the guns of the Chinese fort, and while trying to float the ship, was 
fired upon with great loss. Tattnall then offered his services and when it 
was suggested that the action would be a breach of the neutraUty law, he 
replied with the famous saying "Blood is thicker than water." Without 
thought of danger to his life, he entered the fight, which was raging fiercely. 
The coxswain* of his boat was killed and several of his men wounded. Through 
his assistance the English ship was saved. The British Parliament gave him 
a vote of thanks and presented him a sword in appreciation of his gallant 
assistance. Soon after this incident, he sailed to Japan and assisted in 
consummating a treatj' between that country and the United States. He 
was ordered to the United States, reaching New York in April. He was the 
recipient of many honors for his heroic work in China. 

He was in command of the Lak^ Station with headquarters at Sacketts 
Harbor, from May 17, 1860, until February 20, 1861, when he resigned from 
the navy and gave his services to the state of Georgia. 

He was an ardent lover of the Union, yet he felt it his duty to stand by 
his State. He was one of the ranking officers of the navy and he knew it 
meant promotion if he remained in the service of the Union. In a sense, 
he had everything to lose and nothing to gain, if he joined the Confederacy. 

In February, 1861, he was commissioned senior flag officer of the Georgia 
navy and in March,'as captain in the Confederate na\y\ He was in command 
of the naval defences in Georgia and South Carolina, March, 1861, until 
March 25, 1862. During December, 1861, March, 1862, he was especially 
active in his operations around Savannah. 

On March 25, 1862, he was given command of the naval forces in the 
waters of Virginia, relieving Commodore Buchanan who had been wounded 
in the great naval fight on Hampton Roads. During April and_May, 1862, 

*John Hart, '27, (q. v.) 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 235 

he made several attempts to engage the United States ship Monitor, and the 
Union fleet with the formidable Virginia; but without success, as the fleet 
was protected by guns of Fortress Monroe. He captured several valuable 
merchants' ships. On the retreat of the Confederate Army under General 
Johnson, to the Chickahoming in Virginia, Norfolk was evacuated, and being 
deserted by the Confederate army and the support of the extensive shore 
batteries, he was forced to destroy the Virginia, to keep her from falling into 
the hands of the Union Army. As a result of this action he was severely 
censured for destroying this vessel, without attacking the enemy's fleet. He 
thereupon demanded a regular court martial to pass upon his conduct, 
by the painstaking finding of which he was honorably acquitted. 

He was given command of the naval forces in Georgia in April, 1862, 
which position he retained until the close of the war. In March, 1863, he 
was given charge of the construction of the Savannah. On the occupation of 
Savannah by the Union forces in 1865, he retreated to Augusta, Ga., where 
he surrendered in April, 186.5, and on May 9 was paroled as a prisoner of war, 
and was allowed to return to Savannah. 

Being unwilling to apply for a "pardon" from the President of the 
United States, for what he felt it his duty to perform, he was allowed to 
leave the country; and in June, 1866, he removed to Halifax, Nova Scotia, 
where he made his home until 1870, when he returned to Savannah. 

He had expended all his pecuniary resources and at the age of seventy- 
five was forced to seek employment. In January, 1870, the city council of 
Savannah, created for him the office of inspector of the Port of Savannah, 
which position he held until his death. 

He was one of the ablest seamen this country ever produced. In the 
language of Captain Whittle, he only lacked what Decatur called opportunity 
to have inscribed his name high among the great naval officers of the world. 

He was married September 6, 1821, to Harriet Fen wick Jackson, of 
Middletown, Conn., who died January 15, 1873. Ten children were born 
to them: Charlotte, born June 26, 1822; died in 1864; Edward Fenwick, born 
March 17, 1824, died in 1850; Josiah Jr., born April 9, 1827, died in 1865; 
John Roger Fenwick, born September 27, 1829, died in 1908; Mary Selina, 
born February 12, 1821, died young; Paulding, died young; Mary, born 
in 1845, married Mr. E. T. Newfille, died about 1890; Harriet 'Fenwick, 
born about 1834, married E. T. Newfille, died December 31, 1904; Claudia 
and Ann Cooper died young. 

BRIG. GEN. GEORGE WILLIAM TAYLOR. 

George W. Taylor, son of Archibald S. and Ann (Bray) Taylor, was born 
near Lebanon, N. J. .November 22, 1808, and died September 1, 1862, of wounds 
received in battle. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1825, 
and graduated, 1827. He was commissioned a midshipman in the U. S. Navy, 
November 1, 1827, and made a thrc^e years cruise in the Mediterranean Sea. 
Owing to failing health, he was forced to resign his commission, December 19, 
1831. 

He then located on a farm near his birthplace, where he resided until the 
Mexican War broke out. He offered his services to the Government and was 
commissioned a first lieutenant U. S Infantry, March 8, 1847; was assigned to 



236 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

the 10th infantry, April, 1847; was promoted captain same regiment, September 
13, 1847. He served with distinction in Gen. Zachary Taylor's army; was 
honorably discharged August 23, 1848. 

He located in CaUfornia in 1849, where he engaged in mining until 1852, 
when he returned to New Jersey. He then engaged in mining and in the manu- 
facture of iron in Lebanon, N. J., until 1861, when he again entered the service 
of his country. 

He was commissioned colonel of the Third New Jersey Volunteers, June 4, 
1861. He served under Gen. Theodo.-o Runyon at the first Battle of Bull 
Rxm; and upon the promotion of Gen. PhiUp Kearney, the brigade commander, 
he was promoted brigadier general, May 9, 1862, and given command of the 
first brigade, first division. Sixth Army Corps. He performed conspicuous 
duty in the series of actions before Richmond, being especially distinguished 
for gallantry in the battle of Gaines' Mills, and White Oak Swamp. While 
leading an advance from Alexandria, August 29, 1862, for the protection of the 
stores at Manassas Jet., he encountered at Bull Run Bridge, Gen. A. P. Hill's 
division and in the encounter was mortally wounded and died in the Mansion 
House Hospital in Alexandria, September 1, 1862. He was a brave and effi- 
cient officer, and would have held a high command had liis life been spared. 

He was survived by two children: Carohne, married Mr. James A. Blau- 
velt, died in 1908, and Archibald S. "N. U.," '57 (q. v.) 

COL. ROBERT EMMET TEMPLE, U. S. A. 

Robert E. Temple, son of Robert and Clarina (Hawkins) Temple, was 
born in Castleton, Vt., September 24, 1808, and died in Albany, N. Y., July 
20, 1854. 

At an early age, his parents removed to Rutland, where he attended the 
pubUc schools. He entered the "Academy' ' in 1821, and remained until June, 
1824, when he left to enter the U. S. Mihtary Academy at West Pouit. He 
graduated from that Institution, July 1, 1828, and was commissioned 2d Heu- 
tenant, 3d Artillery, same date. 

He was assistant professor of Mathematics at the JNliUtary Academy, 
October 19, 1838-September 2, 1829, and assistant professor of Natural and 
Experimental Philosophy, September 2, 1829-February 1, 1830; served on 
recruiting service, 1830; in garrison at Fort Sullivan, Me., 1830-31; served 
at Fort Independence, Mass., 1831; Fort Mom-oe, Va., Artillery School for 
Practice, 1831-32; on staff duty at headquarters, Eastern Department, 1832-36, 
serving as aide-de-cam'p to General Scott, Jime 20, 1832-May 4, 1833. He 
served in the Seminole War in Florida; was engaged in the defence of Convoy 
at Wihka Pond, Fla., July 19, 1836; on ordnance duty, November 5, 1836, to 
July 9, 1838; was assistant ordnance officer at Arsenal, Watervhet N. Y., in 
1838; in command of Arsenal, Baton Rouge La., 1838-39; was ordnance officer 
at Camp Washington, near Trenton, N. J., 1839. He was promoted first 
Ueutenant, 3d Artillery, Jime 22, 1836; and first Ueutenant, ordnance, July 9, 
1838; resigned November 15, 1839. 

On the breaking out of the Mexican War, he offered his services to the 
Govermnent, and was commissioned colonel, 10th U.S. Infantry, April 9, 1847, 
and served with distinction with his regiment on the Rio Grande frontier, and 
was mustered out of service August 20, 1848. He was adjutant general of the 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



237 



state of New York, February 4, 1846-January 1, 1847, January 4, 1853-July 
20, 1854. 

He was admitted to the bar in Albany in 1839, and practiced Ms pro- 
fession in that city during 1839-47, 1853-54, meeting with success. In 1851, 

he was appointed commissioner to 
supply the city of Albany with a 
suitable water system and served in 
that capacity mitil 1854. He was a 
member of St. Peter's Episcopal 
Church of Albany. 

He was married June 12, 1839, 
to Catherine Margaret James of 
Albany, N. Y. Nine children were 
born to them: Robert Temple, born 
November, 1840, died unmarried; 
William James, born March, 1842, 
killed in the battle of Chancellors- 
ville, April 30, 1863; Katherine, 
born August 25, 1843, married Richard 
Stockston Emmet, died September 
25, 1895; Mary Temple, born Decem- 
ber 7, 1845, died, unmarried, March 
8, 1871; Clara, Charlotte and Gren- 
vUle, died in infancy. Ellen James, 
born October 2, 1850, married twice: 
first Chi'istopher Temple Emmet 
Col. Robert Eaimet Temple. of San Francisco, Cal., married 

second, George Hunter of Scotland, resides Salisbury, Conn. ; Henrietta Temple, 
born August 3, 1853, married LesUe Pell-Clarke, of Newport, R. I., and 
Levanswick, Otsego Co., N. Y. 




CHARLES EDWARD THOMPSON, A. B. 

Charles E. Thompson, son of the Hon. Thomas W. and E. EUzabeth 
(Porter) Thompson, was born in Salisbury, N. H., June 19, 1807, and died in 
Schraalenburgh, N. J., November 3, 1883. 

At an early age his parents removed to Concord, N. H., where he attended 
the public schools. He entered the "Academy" in 1820, and gi-aduated in 
1824; graduated A. B. from Dartmouth College in 1828; was a sailor on whal- 
ing ships three years; read law with his brother, William C. Thompson, at Ply- 
mouth, N. H., and Hon. Joseph Bell in Haverhill, N. H.; was admitted to the 
bar and practiced in Haverhill, N. H., Mobile, Ala., Chicago, 111., and Phila- 
delphia, Pa. He removed to Schraalenburgh, N. J., about 1880, where he 
resided until his death. 

He was married May 20, 1835, to Mary Porter, daughter of Mills and 
Sarah (Porter) Olcott of Hanover, N. H. Three children were born to them. 



CAPT. SPEARE SPENCER TIPTON. 

Speare S. Tipton, son of the Hon. John Tipton, was born in Croyden, Ind., 
September 30, 1814, and died in Pueblo, Mexico., July 18, 1847. 



238 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



At an early age his parents removed to Logansport, Ind., where he pre- 
pared for college. He entered the "Academy" in 1830, and graduated in 
1833. 

He studied law and practiced his profession in Logansport until 1846. 
On the breaking out of the Mexican War he offered his services to the State 
and was commissioned first heutenant, Mounted Rifles, Indiana Volunteers, 
May 27, 1846. On June 14, 1846, he was transferred to the First Indiana 
Infantry and commissioned captain. He served with, his regiment in Mexico 
until his death. He was a brave and efficient officer. He was a prominent 
member of the Masonic Lodge at Logansport, ser\ing as Master of the lodge 
in 1840, 1841 and 1844. 

CHARLES STOCI-CBRIDGE THOMPSON. 

Charles S. Thompson, son of 
Ebenezer and Ruth Otis (Stock- 
bridge) Thompson, was bom in 
Pomfret, Conn., Jime 2, 1812, and 
died there April 10, 1891. 

He attended the school at Plain- 
field, Conn., and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1825, graduated in 1828; 
was a student at Trinity College, 
Hartford, Conn., 1828-29. He 
tiavelled extensively in Europe dur- 
iiiL: 1874-75. He was a member of 
( hrist Episcopal Church of Pomfret 
ami served as vestryman and war- 
den, 1847-91 
\ He was married August 7, 1844, 

to Clara Grosvenor of Pomfret, 
daughter of Lemuel Putnam Grosve- 
nor and great grand-daughter of Gen. 
Israel Putnam. She died, January 
10, 1S90. Two children were born to 
them: Ebenezer, born November 21, 
Charles stockbridge Thompson. 1846, now an Episcopal clergyman in 

Sarasota, Fla.; Charles Otis, born June^l9, 1849, now judge of probate, resides 

in Pomfret, Conn. 




ERASTUS CH.ISE TORREY; A. B., M. D. 

Erastus C Torrey, son of Dr. Era^tus and Gratia Ann (Chase) Torrey, 
was born in Windsor, Vt. March 22, 1807, and died in Washington, D. C, 
January 17, 1879. 

He attended the schools of liis town and entered the "Academy" in 1821, 
and graduated in 1824. He graduated A B. Dartmouth College in 1827, and 
M. D. from Bowdoin Medical College, Maine, in 1830. 

He practif^ed his profession in Keene, N. H., 1830-32; Windsor, Vt., 1832- 
50, and Detroit, Mich., 1850-61; was a clerk in the United States Treasury 
Department, Washington, D. C , 1861-79. 

He was married, September 12, 1844, to Eliza Cabot, of Hartland, Vt . 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



239 



GEORGE MUIRSON TOTTEN. 

George M. Totten, son of Gilbert and Mary (Rice) Totten, was born 
in New Haven, Conn., May 28, 1809; and died in New York City, May 17, 
1884. He attended the schools of his city and the Hopkins Grammar 
School, and entered the "Academy' ' in 1824, graduating in 1827. 

He was assistant engineer on the Farmington Canal in Massachusetts, 
1827-28 (later used as the roadbed for the New Haven & Northampton R. R.); 
was assistant engineer on the Juniata Canal in Penn, 1828-31; Delaware & 
Raritan Canal, 1831-35; cliief engineer of the road from Reading to Port 
Clinton, 1835-36; was chief engineer on railroad work in Virginia, 1836-37. 
He constructed the Sunbury & Danville R. R. in Pennsylvania, 1837-40; 
was chief engineer of the Gaston & Raleigh R. R., in North Carolina, 1840-43. 
In this last year he was appointed chief engineer of the Canal del Dique, 
which cormects the Magdalene River 
with the harbor of Carthagena in 
Colombia, South America. He held 
the position until 1850, when he was 
appointed chief engineer of the 
Panama R. R. This was one of the 
greatest engineering works of the 
time; and for twenty-five years, Mr. 
Totten labored under the greatest 
difficulties in the (completion of his 
arduous task. After the completion 
of the road, he was appointed con- 
sulting engineer and served until his 
death. In 1879, M. de Lesseps in- 
vited him to accept a position on the 
commission that went to the Isthmus 
to decide upon the canal jn-oject am 
he was chief of de Les.seps' staff. He 
was the only American engineer on 
that commission which was comprised 
of eminent French and Dutch engi- 
neers. 

He was chief engineer jon sur- 





George Muirson Totten. 



veys of the railroad from La Quayra to Caracas in Venzuela; served for 
some time as chief engineer of the Sassafras Route, the Maryland and Delaware 
Ship canal; was also consulting engineer on many important works. 

In recognition of his distinguished work as an engineer he received many 
testimonials from foreign powers. Napoleon III. of France, presented him a 
ring, bearing the Imperial crown in diamonds. General Guzman Blanco, 
president of Venezuela, presented him with a gold medallion of the bust of 
Liberator, Simon Bolivar, in api)reciation of his work in that country. 

Mr. Totten contributed numerous articles for various technical publica- 
tions. He was a member of the Episcopal Church; American Philosophical 
Society; and many engineering societies. 

He was married at Pottsville, Pa., July 12, 1835, to Harricit Seely, a 
native of Sunbury, Pa., who died August 12, 1898. Four children were 



240 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

born to them: Henry Vethake, born November 19, 1838, died August 20, 18605 
Gilbert Taveau, born March 4, 1840, was a surgeon dining the Civil War, 
died May 21, 1872; Maria EUsa, born, February 10, 1846, married George 
Putnam Smith, son of Isaac T. Smith, '29, (q. v.), resides in New York city; 
Harriet Seely, born, January 23, 1848, died unmarried, Septemberl7, 1885. 

HON. CHARLES TRACY, A. M. 

Charles Tracy, second son of William G. and Rachel (Himtington) 
Tracy, was born in WTiitestown, Oneida County, N. Y., February 17, 1810, 
and died in New York city, March 15, 1885. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 
1826, and graduated in 1828. He then entered Yale College and graduated 
A. B. in 1832, and later received the degree of A. M., from that Institution. 

He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1834. He practiced his 
profession in Utica, N. Y., until 1849, when he removed to New York city, 
and continued his practice until his death. He was one of the most prominent 
members of the New York city bar. 

He was an active member of St. Georges' Episcopal Church, New York 
City, serving as warden for many years; was also a member of the Century 
Club. 

He was married August 30, 1837, to Louisa, daughter of Gen. Joseph 
Kirkland of Utica. Mrs. Tracy died in New York city, June 1, 1885. Seven 
children were born to them: Anne Huntington, born, 1838, married Dudley 
Hoffman Miller, died in 1863; IMary Ivirkland, born in 1839, married Alfred 
Pell, died in 1882; Frances Louise, born in 1842, married Junius Pierpont, 
son of Junius Spencer Morgan, '26, (q. v.) resides in New York City; Clara, 
born in 1843, married Fred Street Hoppin, resides in Pro\'idence, R. I.; 
Charles Edward, born in 1846, died in 1900; Julia Ayres, bom in 1850, married 
Francis Gordon Brown, resides in Flushing, Long Island, N. Y.; Louise 
Kirkland, born in 1857, died unmarried, in 1887. 

LIEUT. THOM.\S S. TR.\SK, U. S. A. 

Thomas S. Trask was born in Windsor, ^^ t , in 1804, and died at Memphis, 
Tenn., August, 1, 1828. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his to\\Ti and entered the "Acad- 
emy' ' in 1820, and graduated in 1822. He entered the United States Military 
Academy, July 1, 1822, and graduated, July 1, 1827. He was commissioned 
on this last date, 2d Ueutenant, 2d United States Infantry. He was stationed 
at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1827-28. 

THOMAS RUTHERFORD TROWBRIDGE. 

Thomas R. Trowbridge, son of Henry and Harriet (Hayes) Trowbridge, 
and cousin of President R. B. Hayes, was born in New Haven, Conn., July 17, 
1810, and died there, May 26, 1887. He attended the schools of his city and 
entered the "Academy" in 1824, graduating in 1826. 

He was a clerk during 1826-31, for Trowbridge & Dwight, extensive and 
prosperous West India merchants, New Haven, Conn., of which firm his 
father was the senior member. He became a partner of the firm in 1831, 
under the firm name of Trowbridge, Son & Dwight. In 1837, his brother 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



241 



Henry was admitted to the business and the firm name became, Trowbridge, 
Sons & Dwight. In 1847, Mr. Dwight retired from the business and the 
firm became H. Trowbridge & Sons. Upon the death of his father, in 1849, 
the firm name was changed to H. Trowbridge's Sons. In 1885, the firm re- 
moved their New Haven office from Long Wharf to the Mechanic's Bank, 
where the business was continued until the disolution of the firm in 1891. 
He was a director of the Mechanics' Bank, 1847-87; New Haven Bank, 1859- 
60; Hartford & New Haven R. R., prior to its absorbtion by the N. Y., N. H. 
& H. R. R.; Security Insurance Co., of New Haven, 1875-87; was secretary 
and treasurer of the Long Wharf Co. for many years; secretary and director 
of the Tomlinson Bridge Co.; was a member of the New Haven Proprietors 
Committee, New Haven Chamber of Commerce, 1835-87, and its president, 
1873-83. 

He met with marked success in 
his business enterprises, and acquired 
a large fortune. He was a merchant 
of a type which honors the com- 
munity, the city and State and his „ 
record adds another link to the long 
line of Connecticut's commercial 

leaders, who^e names have reflected "" 

luster on that commonwealth. 

He was a Republican in politics 
and in 1861 received the unanimous 
nomination of the party for lieu- 
tenant governor of the State, an 
honor he declined, much to the 
chagrin of his party. He took an 
active part in furthering the cause of 
the LTnion during the trying times of 
the Civil War, and was the first to 
generously give towards the support 
of soldiers' families. He presented 
the State flag to the 10th Connecti- 
cut Volunteers and to several other 

Connecticut regiments; also presented Thomas Ruthertord Trowbri'dge. 

swords to numerous officers. He took an active part in forming the branch 
society of the United States Sanitary Commissionin in New Haven. 

He was a fine scholar and was especially interested in historical research; 
was one of the founders of the New Haven Colony Historical Society, in 1862; 
and served as director, 1862-87; and vice-president for many years. He 
published The History of Long Wharf in New Haven, and was the projector of 
The History of the Trowbridge Family, published in 1872, defraying the ex- 
penses of compiling and pubfishing the book. 

He was an active member of the First Ecclesiastical Society of New Haven, 
and a member of the First Congregational Church; was chairman of the 
committee having in charge the construction of the Bixwell Avenue Congre- 
gational Church and contributed liberally to its building fund. 

He was married September 17, 1834, to Caroline, daughter of Captain 
Simeon and Polly (Harrison) Iloadley. She survives him and resides in 




242 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



\; 



New Haven. Seven children were born to them: Henrj^, born August 14, 
1836, died, June 29, 1900; Thomas Rutherford, born, ISIarch 3, 1839, died 
October 28, 1898; WilHam Rutherford Hayes, born May 7, 1842, resides in 
New Haven; Carohne Hoadley, born, July 24, 1861, resides in Florence, Italy; 
Rutherford, born December 1, 1851, resides in New Haven; Emilie EUza, 
born September 1, 1857, married George Bliss Rogers of Boston, resides in 
Florence, Italy; Francis, born July 24, 1861, died July 26, 1861. 

MAJ.-GEN. STEPHEN S. TUCI^R. 
Stephen S. Tucker, son of Stephen and Ruth (Herrick) Tucker, was born 
in Randolph, Vt., October 16, 1807, and died of wounds received in battle, 
November 15, 1861. 

He attended the schools of his town, and the Orange Cbunty Grammar 
school. He entered the University of Vermont in 1824 ind remained about 
two years. He entered the "Academy" in 1829, and remained until 1831. 

He then taught school in 
various places in the South. He 
served as an officer in the Army 
of the Republic of Texas, in the 
struggle with Mexico; was also 
an officer diuing the Seminole 
War. On the breaking out of 
the Mexican War, he offered his 
services to the State of Arkansas 
and was commissioned captain of 
mounted riflemen. May 27, 1846; 
was brevetted major for "gallant 
and meritorious ser^vices" at the 
battle of Chapultepec, Mexico. 
He resigned from the ser\'ice, June 
30, 1851. 

He took part in the occu- 
l)ation of Sonora, Mexico, vmder 
command of the famous Gen. 
William Walker. He also served 
wth General Walker in of the 
"Red Star Guard" with rank of 
major. General Walker in his 
Maj. Gen. Stephen s. Tucker. War in Nicaragua, pays glowing 

tribute to the abihty of ]Major Tucker. He states: "He was an excellent 
officer, punctual in the discharge of his duties and rigid in exacting from 
others the performance of theii-s. * * * Tucker was strict with his men and 
aspired to make them the best soldiers in the Rivas." Major Tucker was 
prominent in several battles. On the downfall of General Walker's govern- 
ment. Major Tucker was captured, as were also several other "N. U." men, 
notably, Thomas F. Wright, '49; Frederick T. Ward, '48. On May 1, 1857, 
Major Tucker was one of officers selected by General Walker to accompany 
him to Panama, under the protection of the United States government. 
Very few details have been preserved of the work of this old cadet from 1857 
until 1861. 




SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



243 



On the breaking out of the Civil War he offered his services to the 
Confederate Government, and was commissioned a colonel in April, 1861. 
He was in command of Fort Morgan, near Mobile, where he was ^shot on 
November 15, 1861. On the night of his death he received his commission 
as major-general, C. S. A. 



COL. CHARLES TULLAR 

Charles TuUar, son of the Rev. 
Martin and Mrs. Charlotte (Clapp) 
(Whitney) TuUar, was born in Royal- 
ton, Vt., September 2.3, 1804, and died 
unmarried in Green Bay, Wis., in 
October 20, 1874. He attended the 
schools of his town and entered the 
"Academy" in 1821, and graduated 
in 1823. 

He clerked for a short time for 
Lawrence Bros., in Boston, Mass., and 
in 182.5, located in Green Bay, Wis., 
where he was employed for some years 
in the store conducted by Daniel 
Whitney, a native of Gilsum, X. H. 
Later he engaged in the mercantile 
busine.ss alone, meeting with success. 

He took great interest in military 
affairs and served as colonel during the 
Black Hawk War, being for a time in 
command of the Menominee Indians; 
he also served for some time during the 
Civil War as provost marshal. 




Col. Charles TuUar. 



PROF. BENJAMIN M. TYLER. 

Benjamin M. Tyler was born in Andover, N. H., in 1792, and died in 
Franklin Falls, N. H., June 9, 1847. He attenied the schools of his town 
and entered the " Academy" in 1820, and graduate! in 1823. 

In September of the same year, he was elected principal of the "Noyes 
School," of Franklin, N. H., founded in 1822, by the provisions of the will of 
James Noyes of that town. The school was opened, September 15, 1823, with 
students from various parts of New Hampshire, also Maine and Vermont. 
The school soon became well known owing to the remarkable ability of its 
principal. The attendance constantly increased and the s(;hool gave promise 
of being one of the largest in New England, l)ut on Ajjril 26, 1828, it was closed 
owing to the litigation over the scihool property which was begun in 1826 by 
the heirs of Mr. Noyes. The closing of this school was felt by the people of 
Franklin as a calamity to the town; and steps were at once taken to found 
another school. In 1830, a large brick buikling was erected and the famous 
"Instructors School" was opened in the fall of the same year. Thus was 
founded the first normal school in the United States. 

We give some details of this scihool as its foundation and successful opera- 
tion was the life work of Professor Tyler. The school building was described 



244 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

as the best one in the State. The school was supervised by a board of directors 
of prominent men in various sections of the State. The studies were " confined 
to the EngUsh branches of education' ' and the students were di\dded into two 
divisions, the Senior and Junior departments. Definite instruction was given 
in the theory of teaching and school management; the students in the Senior 
department were given practical work in assisting in the instruction in the 
Junior department. We quote from the historj^ of the school: "ISIr. Tyler 
was a quarter of a century in advance of his time in his ideas and when the 
records of the school work of New England are justly made up this remarkable 
man will have an honored place. He published an arithmetic and also a gram- 
mar, which were greatly in advance of the common ways of teaching in that 
day. He was original in his methods, an exact thinker, dehghting in mathe- 
matics and the sciences, giving much prominence to practical experiments in 
philosophj- and chemistry, by means of the apparatus with which the school 
was supplied. His was the true idea of education to draw out not to pour in. 
A strict disciplinarian, his pupils thoroughly respected and more loved him. 
He left his endming impress upon hundreds of young Uves, developing in them 
character and intellectual attainments which in tm-n have influenced thousands 
of others.' ' Many of his students became prominent as teachers in New Hamp- 
shu-e and other states. Owing to his failing health, he resigned his principal- 
ship in 184G, and began civil engineering in hopes the out-of-doors work would 
prove beneficial. 

Soon after Noyes School was suspended in 1828, he accepted the professor- 
ship of ISIathematics and Philosophy at the "Academy" which position he 
held until the "Academy" was discontinued at Middletown. He made sur- 
veys for a canal from the Connecticut River to the Merrimack, through New 
London, N. H., to Webster Lake. He located the railroad from Concord 
to Frankhn, N. H., and owing to his persistency in the matter, this location up 
the Merrimack River was selected rather than the route along the Blackwater. 
In the spring of 1847 he caught a severe cold, while engaged in his engineering 
work, which resulted in his death. He was one of the founders of the "Lj'cexun," 
in Franklin in 18-30. He was married in 1835, to Mary Weare of Andover, 
N. H., who died March 30, 1848. 

REV. JAMES HIGGINSON TYNG, A. B. 

James H. Tyng, son of the Hon. Dudley Atkin and Lydia (Higginson) 
Tyng, was born in Boston, Mass., May 12, 1807, and died in BrookljTi, N. Y., 
April 16, 1879. 

He prepared for college under the tuition of Jared Sparks, LL. D., and 
George E. Emerson, LL. D. at Lancaster, ^lass., and Rev. Dr. Anderson at 
Medfield, Mass. He entered the "Academy" in 1820, and remained until 
1824. He graduated A. B. from Bowdoin College, Maine, in 1827. 

He studied theologj- with Bishop Brownell at Hartford, Conn., and -with 
Bishop Griswold at Bristol, R. I.; was ordained deacon in the Episcopal church 
about 1830; was rector of churches at Hopkinton, Mass.; Martinsburg, Va., 
Honesdale and Carbondale, Pa.; Tallahasee, Fla.; Newark and Morristown, 
N. J. For many years he conducted a school for boys at BrookljTi. 

He was married in Boston, Mass., December 29, 1829, to Matilda Temple 
Degen, born in Leghorn, Italy. She died in Exeter, N. H., May 30, 1883. 
Ten children were born to them. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 245 

CASPER FREDERICK UHLHORN. 

Casper F. Uhlhorn, son of Johann Frederick and Harriet (Shattuck) 
Uhlhorn, was born in St. Thomas, West Indies, April 27, 1811, and died in New 
York, December 5, 1862. 

At an early age, his parents removed to New Haven, Conn., where he 
prepared for college. He entered the "Academy" in 1825, and graduated in 
1828. 

He entered the employ of the Resolute Fire Insurance Co., of New York 
in 1829; was president several years previous to his death. 

He was married in New Haven, Conn., June 3, 1835, to Sarah Maria 
Goodrich, who died in Hartford, Conn., May 4, 1897. Six children were born 
to them: John Frederick, born March 25, 1836, died December 30, 1876: 
Harriett Elizabeth, born June 24, 1838, married James B. Cone, resides in 
Hartford; Amelia Buckley, born July 30, 1844, married E. Hayes Trow- 
bridge, died January 31, 1867; Maria Goodrich, born September 31, 1840, died 
unmarried; Frances Augusta, born August 22, 1842, married Jacob Lorillard, 
died August 1, 1896; Catherine Mason, born March 13, 1847, died unmarried. 

HON. JAMES VAN NESS, A. M. 

James Van Ness, son of the Hon. Cornehus Peter Van Ness, Governor of 
Vermont, 1821-23 and Rhoda (Savage) Van Ness, was born in Burlington, Vt., 
1806, and died in San Luis Obispo, Cal., December 28, 1872. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his city and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1820, and remained two years; graduated A. B. from the University 
of Vermont in 1825, and received the degree of A. M. from that Institution 
in 1831. 

He studied law and was admitted to the bar in Biu-lington; practiced his 
profession in Burhngton, Vt., and New Orleans, La., until 1850, when here- 
moved to San Francisco, Cal., and continued the practice until 1861. He at 
once took a prominent part in the political affairs of the city; served on the 
board of Aldermen for some years and was instrumental in passing the famous 
" VanNess' 'ordinance, which secured the possessory titles after a certain date to 
all the lands within the charter limits of 1851 ; was elected the first mayor of the 
city in 1855 and was ex officio police judge during 1855 and 1856, and during the 
reign of the "Vigilance Committee" performed valuable service. Van Ness 
Avenue, one of the most beautiful streets in San Francisco, is named in his 
honor. In 1861, he removed to San Luis Obispo, where he continued his 
practice until his death. He was a Democrat in politics, and represented 
San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara counties in the State Senate in 1871. 

He married Caroline Leslie of Georgia, who died in San Francisco in Au- 
gust, 1858. Two children were born to them: Thomas Casey Van Ness, born 
in New Orleans, La., February 15, 1847, resides in San Francisco; Eliza Bird, 
born in Philadelphia, Pa., 1838, married Hon. Frank McCoppin, of San Fran- 
cisco, died in San Francisco, 1901. 

INSP. GEN. HENRY VAN RENSSELAER, U. S. A. 

Henry Van Rensselaer was born in Albany, N. Y., in 1810, and died in 
Cincinnati, O., March 23, 1864. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 



246 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

1823, and graduated in 1827; was a member of the Polemic society at the 
"Academy." He entered West Point, July 1, 1827, and graduated, 20th in 
his class, July 1, 1831. 

He was brevetted 2d lieutenant. 5th United States Infantry, July 1, 
1831; and was on leave until January 27, 1832, when he resigned. He 
served as colonel on the staff of Governor Seward of New York, during 
1839-40. 

On the breaking out of the Civil War, he offered his services to the 
Government, and was appointed volunteer aide-de-camp, April 29, 1861; 
and regular aide-de-camp, August 5, 1861, and served on the staff of General 
Scott, at the headquarters in Washington, until November 12, 1861; was on 
leave of absence and awaiting orders, November 12, 1861, to March 20, 1862. 
He was inspector general, 1st Army Corps, March 20, until April 4, 1862, 
and of the Department of the Rappahannock, April 4- August 12, 1862; 3d 
Army Corps, August 12 until September 6, 1862; department of the Ohio, 
September 17, 1862, until his death. 

He made his residence in Ogdensburg, N. Y., untU 1852, when he removed 
to New York City, where he made his home until his death. He engaged 
extensively in farming near Ogdensburg, N. Y., 1834-59. He was largely 
interested in mining, was president of the American Mineral Co., the Port 
Henry Iron Ore Co., and the Consolidated Franklinite Co., 1855-60. 

He was a Democrat in politics and represented his district in the United 
States House of Representatives, 1841-43. 

A son, Stephen, became a Jesuit priest; a daughter, Euphemia, became 
a nun; another daughter married a Mr. ^^'addington of New York city. 

PHINEAS FOX VARNUM. 

Phineas F. Varnum, son of Gen. Phineas Varnum and Prudence (Fox) 
Varnum, was born in Portland, Me., September 22, 1806, and died there, 
January 24, 1892. He attended the schools of his city and entered the, 
"Academy" in 1823, graduating in 1825. 

He engaged in the mercantile business in Portland, with his father, 
for some years and later was a member of the firm of Moulton & Rogers. 
He met with success in his business ventures and acquired a valuable 
property. 

He was a RepubUcan in politics and held many offices; served in the city 
council of Portland, in 1835 and was president of that body in 1836. 

He was married, January 1, 1834, to EUzabeth, daughter of Elias and 
Elizabeth (Widgery) Thomas of Portland. Eleven children were born to 
them: Charlotte Vivia, born January 14, 1835, died April 19, 1870; Elizabeth 
Widgery; Prudence Almira, born December 24, 1837, died August 14, 1839; 
Phineas Fox, born August 18, 1839, died June 7, 1840; Gertrude, born 
August 17, 1841, died October 8, 1841; Phineas Fox, born September 23, 
1842, died in infancy; Lawi'ence Phineas, born September 22, 1843; Helen 
Josephine, born September 20, 1846; Elias Thomas, born August 27, 1847, 
died September 22, 1848; John Arkm-ight Marshall, born March 12, 1848; 
Georgiana Julia, born April 4, 1853. 






^ 




SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 247 

THOMAS BEALE WALES. 

Thomas B. Wales, eldest son of Thomas Beale, and Anne (Beale) Wales, 
was born in Boston, Mass., September S, 1808, and died there, October 7, 
1887. 

His father was one of the old sterling ship owners and merchants of 
that city, in the days when her 
maritime commerce extended to 
every clime and her ships were known 
in all parts of the globe. 

He attended the schools of his * \ 

city, and entered the "Academy" 
in 1822, and graduated in 1825. He 
entered his father's counting house as 
a clerk in 1825, and in 1830, became 
a partner in the well known firm of .'■%. Jr" 

Thomas B. Wales & Co., where he ' v* 

remained for many years, until the i * 

decline of American shipping, which 
followed soon after the War of the ' 
Ribellion. His father having died 
in 18.5.3, leaving a large estate, he 
served as one of the ti-ustees until 
his death. He made his residence 
in Boston until his death. He trav- 
elled extensively in Europe. - /'' 

He was a member of the First / ' 

Unitarian church of Boston, serving 
for f-ome years as chairman of the 
Standing Committee, Thomas Beale Wales. 

He was married in 1835, to Maria Howe, of Boston, sister of Dr. Samuel 
G. Howe. She died June 2, 1846. Two children were born to them: Thomas 
Beadle, Jr., born, February 14, 1839, resides Wellesley Hills, Mass.; Joseph 
Howe, born November 11, 1840; died in September, 1907. 

CAPT. JAMES HARMON WARD, U. S. N., A. M. 

James H. Ward, son of Col. James Ward, was boi-n in Hartford, Conn., 
September 25, 1806, and was killed in the battle of Mathias Point, June 27, 
1861. 

He prepared for coll(>ge in the schools of his city and entered the "Acad- 
emy" in 1820, and graduated in 1823; received from the University the degree 
of A. M.,inl8;36. 

He was appointed a midshipman. United States Navy, March 4, 1823, 
and served on the U. S. S., Constitution, under the command of Captain Mac- 
donough, in the Mediterranean sea, and on the coast of Africa, during 1824-28. 
He was promoted lieutenant, March 3, 1831, and commander, September 9, 
18.53. 

He was one of the first officers to advocate the founding of a naval college, 
by the government. During 1842 and 1843, he dclivcn-ed a course of lectm-es 
on "Gunnery," in Philadelphia, having as his main obi<;ct the founding of 
the naval school. 



248 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



■\^Tien the United States Naval Academy was founded on October 10, 1845, 
he was appointed instructor in Gunnery and Steam Engineering, and served 
until 1849. He commanded the U. S. S., Vixen, home squadron, 1840-50. 

During the Mexican War, he was attached to the Gulf Fleet. On the 
breaking out of the Civil War, he was detailed to defend the water approaches 
to Washington. In May, 1861, he organized the Potomac FlotUla, and was 
most energetic in perfecting the defences of that city. He took part in the 
engagement at Acquia Creek, and on June 27, 1861, while sighting a gun on 
the Confederate battery at Mathias Point, was struck by a minie ball, which 
inflicted a mortal wound, causing liis death in one hour. He was the first 
naval officer to die in the support of the Union. He was an heroic and effi- 
cient officer, and was considered the best educated officer in the na\^. He 
was buried inHartford, Conn., with one of the most imposing funeral pageants 
ever witnessed in that city. 

He possessed great literary ability. He contributed many articles to 
the press on miUtary subjects. His pubUshed works are: Instructions on 
Naval Ordnance and Gunnery, 1845; Manual of Naval Tactics, 1858, which 
was the standard work at the Naval Academy for years; Steam for the 
Millions, 1860. He was a member of the Catholic Church. 



CAPT. ROSWELL BUTLER WARD. 
Roswell B. Ward, son of Col. James Ward, and brother of Capt. James H. 
Ward, U. S. N., '23, was born in Hartford, Conn., September 18, 1804, and 
died in New London, Conn., September 8, 1883; was buried in Hartford, Conn. 

He prepared for college at the 
Hartford Grammar School, and after 
two years study at Yale College, en- 
tered the "Academy" in 1822, grad- 
uating with high honor, in 1824. He 
showed remarkable aptitude for the 
classics and a strong liking for 
military drill and tactics. It was 
his ambition to enter the United 
States Arm}', but he was obhged to 
give up his plans, owing to his father's 
failing health, and assist him in the 
management of his large business 
interests. He continued in mercan- 
tile business in Hartford, until 1868, 
when he retired from active work 
and removed to New London, Corm., 
where he made his home until his 
death. 

At an early age, he became 
identified with the State Militia. 
On the organization of the "Hart- 
ford Light Guard," he was elected 
Capt. Roswell Butler Ward. j^s Captain; and held the office for 

several years, when he was succeeded by Thomas H. Sejonour, '29. He was 
an enthusiastic student in historical and genealogical research; and did much 




SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



249 



to encourage the founding of genealogical societies in Hartford. He was a 
public spirited citizen and took a deep interest in all measures that tended to 
promote the welfare of his city. 

He was married March 12, 1832, to Catherine Mary, daughter of Charles 
L. and Catherine C. Webb of Litchfield, Conn. Two daughters were born to 
them: Catherine Webb, and Mary Webb, who resided in Wethersfield, Conn. 

WILLIAM ANDREW WARD. 

Wilham A. Ward, son of Col. James Ward, was born in Hartford, Conn., 
July 23, 1811, and died in New York city, February 8, 1884. 

He attended the schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 1825, 
and graduated in 1828. He engaged in business with his brother, .R. B. 
Ward, '24, until 1844, when he removed to New York city, where he made 
his home until his death. 

He married Ann C, daughter of Col. Solomon Porter of Hartford, Conn. 
He was survived by two sons, William Porter and Henry Sanford Ward, now 
residing in New York city. 




*,•© 



MORTON WARING, M. D. 

Morton Waring, second son of Col. Morton Alexander and Rebecca 
(Hamilton) Waring, was born at West Bank Plantation, on the Ashley 
River, S. C, January 8, 1809, and 
died in Florence, S. C., July 5, 1875. 

At an early age he was 
placed under the teaching of Mr. 
John Ewe, who kept a famous 
preparatory school in Charleston 
After passing creditably through 
this, he attended Mr. Courtney's 
Academy in Charleston, where 
he was prepared for college 

He entered the "Academy" 
in 1823. Choosing civil engineer- 
ing as his profession, he graduated 
with distinction in 1827; but on 
reaching Charleston, S. C, his 
mother entreated him to choose a 
profession that would not take 
him so far from home. This was 
a great disappointment to both 
him and Captain Partridge, who 
had secured a fine situation for 
him in the West, and was feeling 
a keen interest in the success of 
his promising pupil; but the 




Dr. Morton Waring. 



young man with characteristic unselfishness yielded to his mother's wish, 
though he always felt it one of the greatest disappointments of his life. 

He then decided to study medicine at the Medical College in Charleston. 
He graduated with distinction in 1830. The same year, he began to practice 



250 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

in St. John's, Berkeley, where he was most successful. He was respected 
and beloved in his community for his great benevolence and force of character. 
While he was a member of no church, he was most active in all church work, 
and was always a member of the vestry of the Episcopal church. He was also 
an extensive and successful cotton and rice planter until the emancipation in 
1865. He never planted after the close of the war. He moved to Florence, 
S. C, in October, 1869, and soon had a large medical practice,, which he con- 
tinued to follow until his death. 

He was married December 25, 1830, to Anne Henrietta, daughter of 
Nathaniel Henry Rhodes, M. D. She died in 1896. Ten children were 
born to them: Morton Nathaniel, born September 6, 1831, died September 21, 
1882; John Rhodes, born August 27, 1832, died December 25, 1901; Rebecca 
Hamilton, born, October [14, 1833, died May 7, 1855; Thomas Smith, born 
November 27, 1834, died November 2, 1838; Sasan Edith, born February 5, 
1837, died, November 4, 1907; Henry Rhodes, born April 16, 1838, died 
August 2, 1838; Thomas Smith 2d, born May 27, 1840, died October 14, 
1840; Edward, born ISIarch 3, 1842, died June 25, 1842; Paul Hamilton, 
born November, 16, 1843, died May 7, 1845; Mary Rhodes, born April 13, 
1849, married Robert Y. Henagan, resides in Columbia, S. C. 

THOMAS BLACKBURN WASHINGTON. 

Thomas B. Washington, son of Bushrod Corbin and Anna Maria (Black- 
burn) Washington, was born at Rock Hill, Jefferson County, Va., August 19, 
1812, and died of Asiatic cholera at Albany, N. Y., August 3, 1854. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1827, and graduated in 1829; was for some 
time a student at the University of Virginia. 

He engaged in agricultural pursuits at his ClajTnont estate in Virginia, 
until his death. He was a member of the Episcopal Church; Malta Masonic 
Lodge and the Knights Templar. 

He married Rebecca Janett Cunningham, a native of Frederick City, 
Md., who died in London, England, September 23, 1870. Five children were 
born to them: Bushrod Corbin, born May 14, 1839, resides near AJmira, 
Douglas County, Washington; George, born February 22, 1842, died in the 
Confederate Army; James Cunningham, born September 14, 1847, died in 
the Confederate service; Thomas Blackburn, born January 11, 1851, resides 
in Washington, D. C; Anna ]Maria, born October 22, 1854, married Mr. Joseph 
A. Erving of Cambridge, England, died in England in 1909. 

JOHN HUBBARD WATKINSON. 

John H. W^atkinson, son of John Pevel and Hannah (Hubbard) Watkinson, 
was born in Middletown, Conn., about 1810, and died there November 6, 1891. 

He attended the schools of his town, and entered the "Academy" in 1827, 
and graduated in 1829. 

He entered the employ of the Middletown Bank as clerk; was appointed 
cashier, October 12, 1844; president, February 8, 1847, until January 1, 1883, 
when he resigned. He was engaged in various business enterprises, meeting 
with marked success, and acquired a valuable property. He served for some 
years as city treasm-er of Middletown. 

He is sm'vived by a daughter, Mrs. Frank L. Norton, who resides in 
Middletown. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



2,51 



LIEUT. COL. HENRY WEBB. 

Henry Webb, son of Dr. James and Annie Webb, was born in Hillsboro, 
N. C, June 9, 1808, and died in Gadsden, Ala., July 16, 1878. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1825, and graduated in 1828. After 
graduating, he followed farming for a short time near Greensboro, Ala., but 
soon retm-ned to North Carolina and studied medicine with his father After 
completing his studies, he located in Gadsden, Ala., where he made his home 
until his death. 

He served as lieutenant colonel in the Alabama volunteers in the Seminole 
War, and during the Civil War was an engineer in the Confederate Army. 
He married Maria Dickinson of Greensboro, Ala. 

COL. THOMAS LADSON WEBB. 

Thomas L. Webb, son of Daniel Cannon and Eliza (Ladson) Webb, was 
born in Charleston, S. C, in 1809 and died there, April 21, 1872. He pre- 
pared for college in the ^schools of his city and entered the "Academy" in 
1824, and graduated in 1826. 

He engaged for some time in cotton planting near Charleston and later 
removed to Charleston, where he was for many years a prosperous cotton 
factor. He took an active interest in the State Militia, serving as colonel 
for several years. 

He was married, about 1832, to Susan Smith Waring, sister of Dr. Morton 
Waring, '27. Fifteen children were born to them. Five sons served in the 
Confederate Army. 



HON. SUMNER ALLEN WEBBER 

Sumner A. Webber, son of 
Christopher and Electa (Storer) 
Webber, was born in Rutland, Vt., 
December 19, 1798, and died in 
Rochester, Vt., May 20, 1862. 

His parents removed to Caven- 
dish, Vt., where he attended the 
public schools. He entered the 
"Academy" in 1821 and graduated in 
1824. 

He studied law for some time in 
the famous law school in Litchfield, 
Conn., conducted by the Hon. James 
Gould; returned to Vermont and 
studied law with the Hon. Charles K. 
Williams in Rutland, Vt.; was ad- 
mitted to the Rutland County bar in 
1825, and located in Rochester, Vt.; 
in 1826, where he [practiced his pro- 
fession until his death. 

He was prominent in his pro- 
fession; was a wise, safe and able 
councellor; was one of the ablest 
lawyers of the Windsor County bar. 



A. M. 




Hon. Sumner Allen Webber 



252 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

He had convincing powers as a pleader and his appeals for justice were elo- 
quent in their simplicity. He had a though knowledge of literature and 
was especially well versed in the English classics. Middlebury College con- 
ferred upon him, in 1830, the honorary degree of A. M. 

He was early in life a "Whig in politics, but later joined the Republi- 
can party. He held many offices in the town of Rochester; represented the 
town in the House of Representatives, 1856 and 1857, serving on the judiciary 
committee; was a candidate for Congress in the old third district, but failed 
of the nomination by a small margin; was active in the anti-slavery movement. 

He was an active member of the Congregational Church of Rochester, 
and for some years taught a class of young men in the Simday school; was a 
member of Rural Lodge, F. and A. M. He served for some years in the 
Vermont MiUtia. 

He was married January 5, 1831, to Pheobe Jefferson Guernsey of Roches- 
ter, who died September 29, 1861. Five children were born to them: Sumner 
Jefferson, born in 1834, died in 1836; Chi'istopher Allen, born August 8, 
1837, died in August, 1878; Phoebe Augusta, born in Januarj', 1840, died ^in 
September, 1849; Adeline Electra,born October 9, 1842, married Dr. Frederick 
Langdon Morse, died September 11, 1910; Charles Sumner, bom in Nov- 
ember, 1848, died in 1849. 

GEORGE SAGE WEBSTER. 

George S. Webster, son of Ephron and Maria (Sage) Webster, was born 
in Middletown, Conn., December 3, 1812, and died in New Haven, Conn., 
November 11, 1892. 

He entered the "Academy' ' from Cuba, in 1825, and remained three years. 
He owned an extensive plantation near Colosso, Cuba, where he resided until 
1864, when he returned to Middletown, Conn. In 1878, he removed to 
Hartford and in 1890, to New Haven. He was a member of the Episcopal 
Church. 

He was married November 19, 1850, to Harriet Isham of New London, 
who died in Hartford, Conn., September 21, 1901. Five children were born to 
them: William Ephron, born June 4, 1853, died May 10, 1884; Eliza, born 
October 8, 1851, died October 6, 1863; James, born February 14, 1858, died 
September 20, 1877; Anita EHza, born March 13, 1864, married Frederick 
R. Hone}^, resides Hartford, Conn. One child died in infancy. 

HON. GIDEON WELLES, A. M. 

Gideon Welles, son of Samuel and Ann (Hale) Welles, was born in Glas- 
tonbury, Conn., July 1, 1802, and died in Hartford, Conn., February 11, 1873- 

He was a direct descendant of Thomas Welles, who was born in England 
in 1598; was one of the original settlers of Connecticut; treasurer of the Colony, 
1639-51; commissioner 1649-55; and Governor, 1865 and 1868. 

The subject of this sketch prepared for college at the Episcopal Academy 
of Connecticut, at Cheshire, and entered the "Academy" in 1823, graduating 
in 1826; received from the L^niversity the degree of A. M. in 1836. He went 
with the corps of cadets on their march to the \\Tiite Mountains, (q. v.), in the . 
fall of 1824, and was historian of the trip ^ 

In 1826, he was editor and part o-sviier of the Hartford Times with which he 
remained connected until 1854, although he vacated the responsible charge of 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



253 



its columns in 1836. The paper was for many years the chief organ of the 
Democratic party in Connecticut. It advocated the election of Andrew Jack- 
son to the presidency, and supported his administration. In 1827-35, Mr. 
Welles was a member of the legislatm-e, and both in that body and in his 
journal attacked with severity a measure intended to exclude from the courts 
witnesses who did not believe in a future state of rewards and punishments. 
He also labored for years for the repeal of laws imprisoning debtors, opposed 
special and private legislation, and secured the passage of general laws for the 
organization of financial corporations. He began an agitation for a low post- 
age law before the subject had attracted general attention. 

He was elected comptroller of 
the State by the Legislature in 1835, 
and elected to that office by popular 
vote in 1842 and 1843, serving as post- 
master of Hartford in the intervening 
years He was chief of the bureau of 
provisions and clothing in the Navy 
from 1846 until 1849. 

He had always opposed the ex- 
tension of slavery, and upon the 
organization of the Republican party, 
in 1855, promptly identified himself 
with it, and, in 1856, was its candi- 
date for governor of Connecticut. 
He was chah-man of the Connecticut 
delegation to the Chicago convention 
in 1860, which nominated Mr. Lincoln 
for president, and on his election was 
appointed Secretary of the Navy, be- 
ing the first selection made by Mr. 
Lincoln of a member of his Cabinet. 
His executive ability and administra- 
tion of his department was popular 
with the Navy and the country at ^°"- ^''^^°° '^^^^'■ 

large. Owing to his facihty as a writer, his state papers are more interesting 
than such documents usually are. In his first report, dated July 4, 1861, he 
announced the increase of the effective force of the navy from 40 to 82 vessels. 
This, and the subsequent increase in a few months to more than 500 vessels, 
was largely due to his energy. In the report that has just been referred to, 
he also recommended investigations to secure the best iron-clads, and this 
class of vessels was introduced during his administration. He was for years 
a member of the National Repuljlican Committee and member of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee. 

In Cabinet councils, he always opposed all arbitrary m(!asures,and objected 
to the declaration of the blockade of the Southern ports, holding that such 
declaration was ecjuivalent to an acknowledgment of belhgerent rights, and 
that the preferable course would be to close our ports to foreign commerce by 
proclamation. By request of the President, he presented his views in writing, 
but the cabinet finally yielded to the views of Secretary Seward. 

Early in the war, on September 25, 1861, he ordered that negro refugees 
that made their way to naval vessels should be enlisted as seamen. He held 




254 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

his post of secretary until the close of President Johnson's administration in 
1869. In 1872, he acted with the Liberal Republicans, and in 1876, he advo- 
cated the election of Samuel J. Tilden, afterwards taking strong grounds 
against the findings of the electoral commission. 

In 1872, he published a paper claiming that the capture of New Orleans 
in 1862, was entirely due to the Navy, and in 1873, a volume entitled, Lincoln 
and Seward. He contributed many articles to the Galaxy, Atlantic Monthly and 
other periodicals on the events of the Civil War. His "Diary," now being 
published in the Atlantic Monthly, is a valuable contribution to the political 
history of the country and is attracting world wide attention. 

Mr. Welles was a man of commanding figure, bearing himself through life 
with the graceful military carriage acquired on the parade of the Military 
Academy. His venerable and dignified bearing marked him at sight as a man 
not of ordinary type. 

He was married June 16, 1835, to Mary Jane Hale of Lewistown, Pa., 
who died in Hartford, Conn., February 28, 1886. Nine children were born to 
them: Anna Jane, born August 27, 1836, died April 10, 18.54; Samuel, born 
November 12, 1838, died July 27, 1839; Edward Gideon, born November 15, 
1840, died September 18, 1843; Edgar Thaddeus, born August 27, 1843, resides 
550 Park Ave., New York city; Thomas Glastonbury, born July 4, 1848, died 
March 19, 1892; John Arthur, born August 1, 1849, died November 8, 1885; 
Herbert, born August 16, 1852, died August 20, 1863; Mary Juniata, born 
September 2, 1854, died March 25, 1858; Hubart, born May 29, 1858, died 
November 18, 1862. 

GEN. LEONARD ROBBINS WELLES. 

Leonard li. Welles, son of Leonard and Prudence (Robbins) Welles, was 
born in Wethersfield, Conn., April 12, 1803, and died in Malden-on-the-Hud- 
son, N. Y., March 5, 1883. 

He attended the schools of his town and Middletown, Conn., entered the 
"Academy' ' in 1824, and graduated in 1828. He made his home in Wethers- 
field, Conn., until about 1880, when he removed to Maiden, N. Y., where he 
resided until his death. He was president of the Welles & WLlcox Co., man- 
ufacturers of tools in Rocky Hill, Conn., many years. He took an active 
interest in the State Militia; served as major-general in command of the State 
troops several years; was adjutant-general of Connecticut, 1852-53. He was 
a Democrat in politics; served as warden of the States Prison at Wethersfield 
several years. He was a member of the Congregational Church. 

He was married April 19, 1830, to Abigail Lane Pillsbury of Derry, N. H., 
who died in Maiden, N. Y., March 26, 1886. Five children were born to them: 
Leonard Robbins, born October 22, 1832, died in Brooklyn, N. Y., February, 
1897; Edwin Pillsbury, born April 29, 1835, died in Minneapolis, Minn., Octo- 
ber, 1904; George Philipe, born February 4, 1837, resides in Chicago, 111.; 
Charles Frederick, born March 27, 1842, resides in Minneapolis, Minn.; Mary 
Neal, born Julj^ 28, 1850, married John Isham, resides in Pasadena, Cal. 

BRIG. GEN. HENRY WALTON WESSELLS, U. S. A. 
Henry W. Wessells, son of Ashbel and Grace (Ward) Wessells, was born in 
Litchfield, Conn., February 20, 1809, and died January 12, 1889. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1826, 



SKElTCHES OF ACADEMY^CADETS. 255 

graduating in 1829. He enteredjthe U. S. Military Academy in 1828, and 
graduated in 1832 with rank of brevet second lieutenant; was assigned to the 
2d Infantry with which regiment he served many years; was stationed at Han- 
cock Barracks, Maine, near the Canadian line, 1833-34; Boston, Mass., 1834- 
35; served in the Creek War in Georgia in 1835; was stationed at Green Bay 
and Fort Gratiot, Mich., until the breaking out of the Seminole War, November, 
1835, when he was ordered to Florida with his regiment; served with distinc- 
tion in this war until its clo.3e, August 14, 1842; was promoted 2d lieutenant, 
June 28, 1836, 1st lieutenant, July 7, 1838, and captain, February 16, 1847. 

On the breaking out of the Mexican War, he sailed with his regiment to 
Vera Cruz, and served in General Scott's army. He took an active part in the 
battles of Vera Cruz, Cerro Gordo, Contreras, Churubusco, and at the capture 
of the city of Mexico; was especially distinguished for bravery at the battle of 
Contreras in which he was severely^wounded; was brevetted major, August 
20, 1847, for service in this battle and the battle of Churubusco; was ordered to 
California in November, 1848, where he served until 1855; served on the 
Northwestern P'rontier, 1855-61, performing valiant service in the Sioux ex- 
peditions in 1855; was promoted major, June 6, 1861, and assigned to the 6th 
U. S. Infantry. 

He recruited the 8th Kansas Infantry and was commissioned its colonel, 
September 29, 1861; resigned this commission, February 7, 1862, and on April 
25, 1862, was commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers; performed gallant 
service at the battle of Fair Oaks, Va., May 30, 1862, and was brevetted lieu- 
tenant colonel, U. S. A., May 31, 1862, for service in this battle. He took part 
in the defense of Suffolk, Va., September-December, 1862; was transferred to 
North Carolina, December, 1862, and took part in the actions at Kingston and 
Goldsboro and the defense of Newbern. In May, 1863, he was assigned to 
the defense of Plymouth, N. C, which place he was forced to surrender in 
April, 1864, after a severe four day's fight; was a prisoner from April until 
August, 1864, when he was exchanged. 

He was brevetted colonel, U. S. A., April 20, 1864, for his gallant defense of 
Plymouth; served as commissary of prisoners, November, 1864. He was pro- 
moted lieutenant colonel, February 16, 1865, and assigned to the 18th U. S. 
Infantry; was brevetted brigadier general, March 13, 1865, for "gallant and 
meritorious services during the war;" served in the Northwest, 1865.-69; was 
retired from active service, January 1, 1871. In May, 1849, the legislatiu-e of 
Connecticut, in recognition of his distinguished service to the country during 
the Mexican War presented him a sword, beautifully ornamented with gold 
and jewels. 

He was three times married: first, in September, 1834, to Mary Tryphena, 
daughter of Cht^ster Griswold. She died at Fort King, Florida, in the autumn of 
1841. One child, Mary, born June 30, 1836, married Franklin A. Seely of 
Honesdale, Pa., died at Washington, D. C, July 13, 1876. He was married 
the second time in 1844, to Hannah Cooper, of Cooperstown, N. Y., a niece of 
J. Fenimore Cooper. She died in California in February, 1863. Three 
children were born to them: Henry Walton, born December 24, 1846, brigadier 
general, U. S. A., retired, resides in Washington, D. C; Frank Ward, died in 
Omaha, Neb. in 1900; Morris Cooper, died January 14, 1896. He was again 
married, December 10, 1878, to Caroline Wadsworth of Litchfield, Conn., who 
died July 18, 1895. 



256 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

MAJ. GEN. JAMES BRYAN WHITFIELD. 

James B. Whitfield, son cf the Hou. Bryan and Winnifred (Bryan) Whit- 
field, was born at Spring Hill Lenoir County, N. C, May 16, 1809, and died 
at Burns Place, same county, October 1, 1841 

He prepared for college at the Newbem Academy, and entered the 
"Academy" in 1827, graduating in 1829. He engaged extensively in planting 
and in the mercantile business. He was connected with several business enter- 
prises; owned the first line of steamers that plied the Neuse River in North 
Carolina. He was a Whig in politics, and held several positions; served as 
State senator in 1841. He took great interest in the State Militia, and held the 
various ranks up to and including that of major general. 

He was married November 10, 1829, to Sallie Wooten of Sandy Bottom, 
Lenoir County, N. C, who died at Sunnyside, Wayne Co., N. C, November 
20, 1865. Seven children were born to them: Winnifred Bryan^ born Novem- 
ber 1, 1831, resides Mt. Joy, N. C; Richard Allen, born June 6, 1832, resides, 
Tallahassee, Fla.; Lucy Wooten, born February 10, 1834, married Needham 
James Whitfield, resides Aberdeen, Miss.; Nathan Bryan, born December 14, 
1835, resides Burns Place, N.C., Sallie Eliza, born November 13, 1837, married 
Col. John P. Cobb, resides Tallahassee, Fla.; James George, born March 18, 
1840, resides Whitfield, ^Ala. ; Brj^an, born April 18, 1842, resides New Haven, 
Conn. 

HON. BENJAMIN WIGGIN. 

Benjamin Wiggin, son of Joseph and Clarissa (Emerson) Wiggin, was born 
in Old Brighton, (now Newton) Mass., March 23, 1812, and died in Boston, 
about 1890. 

At an early age his parents removed to Boston, where he attended the 
public schools, and in 1826 liis parents removed to Bangor, Me. He entered 
the "Academy" in 1822, and remained two years. He gi-aduated A. B. from 
Union College in 1832; studied at the Harvard Law School for some time and 
was admitted to the bar in Bangor in 1834. He practiced his profession in 
Bangor for many years. He was a Republican in politics and held many offices. 

He married Sarah H., daughter of Judge William Crosby of BeKast, Me. 
One child, Ellen, married Frederick A. Hatch, '56, and resides in Boston, Mass. 

CAPT. JOHN WILLIAMS. 

John WiUiams, son of the Hon. John and Ann (Wray) WiUiams, was bom 
in Salem, N. Y., May 30, 1809, and died at Philadelphia, Pa., June 14, 1846, at 
the home of his brother-in-law, Rev. George W. Bethune, D. D., where he had 
gone for his health. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1824, 
graduating in 1828. He inherited a very valuable property. He made his 
home in Salem at the "Williams Homestead" until his death. He took great 
interest in military matters; served as captain of the Salem Co., New York 
Mihtia, some years. He was a faithful and active member of the "Associate- 
Reformed" Presbyterian Church in Salem, later known as the "Old White 
Church." 

He was married September 9, 1835, to Harriet B3Ton Martin of Auburn, 
N. Y., who died June 10, 1890. Five children were born to them: John Martin, 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



257 



born October 8, 1836, died June 70, 1905; Mary Bethunc, born August 31, 
1838, died January 2, 1842; Fanny Hunt, born February 10, 1841, died Decem- 
ber 23, 1843; Harriet Martin, born January 22, 1843, resides in Salem; Fanny 
Hunt, born February 26, 1845, resides in Salem. 

JAMES FRANKLIN WILLIS. 

James F. Willis, son of James and Rachael (Patterson) Willis, was born in 
Enfield, N. H., July 20, 1808, and died in London, Ohio, February 22, 1874. 

His father was a prosperous 
merchant and business man in En- 
field, N. H. He attended the 
schools of his town and entered the 
"Academy" in 1821, graduating in 
1825. He accompanied the corps of 
cadets on a imarch from Norwich, 
Vt., to Concord, N. H., in June, 
1822. The corps were royally enter- 
tained by his father at his home in * 
Enfield. | ' 

He removed to Mt. Sterling, , 
Ohio, in 1837, and engaged in themer- i 
cantile business until 1860, when he 
purchased a farm near Yankeetown 
Fayette County, Oliio. In 1S54, he 
Sold his farm and removed to Lon- 
don, Ohio, where he resided until his 
death. 

He was married in May, 1831, 
to Triphena Tinsdale Willis, a native 
of Hanover, N. H., who died Decem- 
ber 10, 1878. Two children were 




James Franklin Willis. 



born to them: Irving Franklin, born April 29, 1832, died December 7, 
1881; Julia Frances, born Sejitember 18, 1845, married and died in Chicago, 
III, in 1906. 



PROF. EBENEZER BANCROFT WILLLSTON, A. M. 

Ebenezer B. Williston, son of Rev. David Howe and Susan (Bancroft) 
Williston, was born in Tunbridge, Vt., in 1801, and died in Norwich, Vt., 
December 27, 1827. 

He attended Dartmouth College; for some time, and on the founding of the 
"Academy" in 1819, he; was engaged as instructor in the Greek and Latin 
languages, at the same time carrying on his studies at the "Academy." The 
University of Vermont gave him the degree of A. B. in 1823. He was professor 
of the Latin and CJreek languages at tlie "Academy" from 1820 to 1828. 
Feeble health forced him to spend most of the last nine; years of his life in the 
South, where he was for some time president of Jefferson College, Mississippi. 
He published an edition of Tacitus (Hartford, Conn., 1826), and the Eloquence 
of the United States, five volumes (Middletown, Conn., 1827). 



258 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

He was married in Middletown, Conn., July 13, 1826, to Emma Par* 
tridge and is sm-vived by a son, Brig. Gen. E. B. Williston, U. S. A., "N. U.," 
'56, and a daughter, Mrs. Ellen Clark of Norwich, Vt. 

HIRAM P. WOODWORTH. 

Hiram P. Woodworth was born in Norwich, Vt., and died of cholera at 
Hennepin, 111., in 1852. 

He attended the schools of Norwich and entered the " Academy' ' in 1820, 
and graduated in 1825. He was instructor of Mathematics, and assistant 
professor of Natural Philosophy, 1825-27; vice-president and professor of 
Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, Civil Engineering, Topographical Drawing, 
1834-1836. 

He was appointed in 1837, engineer with the Illinois State Internal Im- 
provement Commi-ssion; and on April 1, 1839, was appointed chief engineer of 
the "Fourth District" with headquarters in Peru, which position he held imtil 
(about) 1841. He then engaged in mercantile business in Hennepin, 111., until 
his death. He was survived by a widow and daughter. 

DAVID MINTON WRIGHT, M. D. 

David M. Wright, cousin of Wilham A. Armistead, M. D., '28, was born 
in Plymouth, N. C, about 1818, and was killed in Norfolk, Va., July 11, 1863. 

He attended the "Academy" in 1826, and graduated in 1829. He then 
entered the University of Pennsylvania Medical College, and graduated M. D. 
about 1833. He located in Norfolk, Va., where he practiced his profession 
until his untimely death. He became one of the most successful physicians 
in his State; and was greatly respected and beloved by the people of Norfolk 
for his efficient and heroic work during the yellow fever epidemic in 1855. 
He was also prominent in his services in caring for the Union soldiers. 

In July, 1863, he was insulted by Lieut. Alanson L. Sanborn, a first 
lieutenant in the First United States Colored Infantry. Dr. Wright shot him 
on the spot. He was tried by the Federal authority and executed, July 11, 
1863. Prof. N. B. Webster, '43, thus WTites in regard to this unfortunate 
affair: "Dr. Wright was grossly insulted by Lieutenant Sanborn, and the 
offence was such as to give him strong provocation for the deed. He was a 
noble man and had done a great deal for our troops." An accoimt of this 
affair is given in some detaU in justice to the memory of a worthy old cadet, 
as the incident has been greatly exaggerated in certain of our Northern his- 
tories. 

HON. EBENEZER E. WRIGHT. 

Ebenezer E. Wright, son of John and Olive (Partridge) Wright, was born 
in Norwich, Vt., June 23, 1783, and died in Lacaster, Pa. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1824, and graduated in 1825. He studied 
law and located in Lancaster, Pa., where he practiced the profession many 
years, becoming one of the best known lawyers in the State. 

He was married, December 30, 1807, to DeUa Redfield. A son, Franklin 
Wright, was a cadet at the "Academy' ' class of 1832. 



SKETCHKS OP ACADEMY CADETS. 259 

FRANKLIN WRIGHT. 

Franklin Wright, son of Ebenezer and Delia (Redfield) Wright, was born 
in Charlestown, N. H., March 22, 1809, and died at Battersea Place, near 
Petersburg, Va., February 16, 1886. His parents removed to Pennsylvania 
soon after his birth, where he fitted for college. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1828, and graduated in 1832. He took 
up civil engineering, his first work being on the "tide water" canal; after 
which he was engaged on the Delaware and Rankin canal. He was chief 
engineer on the Southside Railroad in Virginia; the Alleghany Valley Railroad; 
the Steubenville Railroad ; and chief engineer for the Pennsylvania Railroad 
in charge of the Bennetts Branch Division. He was also engaged for some 
years in the iron business in Pennsylvania. 

He studied law, and was admitted to the bar in York county, Penn., 
in 1848; but was never actively engaged in that profession. In 1870, he 
retired from active work and bought Battersea Place, near Petersburg, Va., 
where he made his home until his death. He was married July 17, 1838 to 
Rebecca Stout, who died Aug. 18, 1889. Three children have been born to 
them; Sarah, Eliza and Amanda. 

BRIG.-GEN. GEORGE WRIGHT, U. S. A. 

George Wright, son of John and Olive (Partridge) Wright, was born in 
Norwich, Vt., about 1803, and was drowned in the Pacific Ocean, July 30, 
1865. 

He entered the United States Military Academy in 1818, and graduated in 
July, 1822, and on the same date was commissioned 2d lieutenant, 3d United 
States Infantry; served on frontier duty at Fort Howard, Wis., 1822-24 and 
for a few months in 1826; was on recruiting service, 1824-26, and for a portion 
of this time took advanced work under the instruction of Captain Partridge 
at the "Academy," in Norwich; was stationed at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 
1826-28, 1829-31; was promoted 1st lieutenant, same regiment, September 23, 
1827; was engaged in frontier duty at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., 1828-29; 
took part in an expedition to Council Bluffs, Iowa, in 1829; served as adjutant 
of regiment, 1831-36; on recruiting service, 1837-38; served on the Northern 
Frontier, during the Canadian Rebellion, in 1838; was transferred to the 8th 
United States Infantry, July 7, 1838; on duty at Sackett's Harbor, N.Y., 1838- 
1840; at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1840; took part in the Florida War, 1840- 
42; was stationed at Fort Brooke, Fla., in 1843; and at Key West,Fla., 1843- 
44; was brevetted major for "meritorious conduct, zeal, energy and persever- 
encc in the war against the Florida Indians.' ' 

He was engaged in recruiting service from 1844 until (he breaking out 
of the Mexican War in 1840, when he was ordered with his regiment to Mexico. 
He performed distinguished service at the siege of Vera Cruz, March 9 to 
29, 1847; at the battle of Cerro Gordo, April 17-18, 1847; at the capture of 
San Antonio, August 20, 1847; and at the battle of Churubusco, August 20, 
1847. He was brevetted lieutenant-colonel, August 20, 1847, for gallantry 
in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco. At the battle of Molino del 
Rey, September 8, 1847, he commanded the storming party, and was severely 
wounded. He was brevetted colonel for his gallantry in this battle. 

In 1848, he was engaged in mustering troops out of service; was stationed 



2G0 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

at Fort Ontario, N. Y., 1848-52; and at Fort Columbus, X. Y., in 1852. He 
was promoted major, January 1, 1848, and transferred to the 4th United 
States Infantry. In 1852, he was ordered to Benicia, Cal.; was in command 
of the Northern District of CaUfornia, from September 17, 1852 to May 19, 
1855, with headquarters at Fort Reading, Cal. 

He was promoted lieutenant-colonel, same regiment, February 3, 1855, 
and colonel, March 3, 1855; and on this last date was given command of the 
9th United States Infantry. He was stationed for some months at Fort 
Munroe, Va., in 1855; was on frontier duty at Fort Vancouver, Wash., in 
1856; was in command of the Northern District of the Department of the 
Pacific, January 28, 1856 until July, 1857. 

He was distinguished for gallantry in meeting an attack of Indians at 
the Cascades, Wash., March 27-28, 1856; later, in the same year, took part 
in the Yokama Expedition, and performed service at Fort Vancouver and at 
Walla Walla. He was stationed at Fort Dalles, Ore., in 1856-58; was in 
command of the Spokane Expedition, in 1858, taking part in battles at Four 
Lakes, September 1, 1858, at Spokane Plains, September 5, 1858; also partici- 
pated in several engagements with the Indians. He was on duty at Fort 
Walla Walla, Wash., 1859-60, and at Fort Vancouver, 1860-61; was in com- 
mand of the Department of Oregon, July 5, 1860, to September 13, 
1861. 

He was promoted brigadier general. United States Volunteers, September 
28, 1861; was in command of the Department of the Pacific, from October 20, 
1861 to July, 1864; and the district of California, from July 1, 1864 to July 27, 
1865. He was brevetted brigadier-general. United States Armj^, December 
19, 1864, "for long, faithful and meritorious services." He was drowned in 
the wreck of the steamer Brother Jonathan, off the coast of Oregon, Julj^ 30, 
1865, u-hilo Jon his v.'ay ] to assume [command of the Department of 
Columbia. 

A son, Bvt. Brig. Gen. Thomas F. Wright, was a cadet at"N.U.," class 
of 1849. 

MAJ.-GEN. HORATIO GATES WRIGHT, U. S. A., LL. D. 

Horatio G. Wright was born in Clinton, Conn., INIarch 6, 1820, and died 
in Washington, D. C, July 2, 1899. 

He entered the "Academj^" in 1834, remaining until 1836. He received 
from "N. U." the degree of LL.D., in 1897. He graduated from West Point, 
second in his class, Julj^ 1, 1841, and was commissioned 2d lieutenant, Corps 
of Engineers; was promoted first lieutenant, February 28, 1848; captain, 
July 1, 1855, major, August 6, 1861; brigadier-general, September 14, 1861; 
brigadier-general of volunteers, March 24, 1863; major-general of volunteers. 
May 12, 1864. 

He served in the engineering corps, and in 1843-44, was assistant professor 
at West Point. He superintended the building of forts and improvements 
in Florida; and until the Civil War was assistant to the chief engineer at 
Washington, also serving on several special ordnance boards. He declined 
a major's commission in the 13th United States Infantrj', May 14, 1861. He 
constructed several of the defences of Washington; took part in the battle of 
Bull Run, as chief engineer of Heintzelman's di^dsion; organized and served in 
the Port Royal expedition as chief engineer, July 24 until September 14, 1861. 



SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 



20 1 



He took part in the capture of Hilton Head, S. C, November 7, 1861; led the 
land forces in the Florida expedition from February to June, 1862. 

He commanded the department 
of the Ohio, from August 19, 1862 
until March 26, 1863; the District 
ofLouisville, Ky., until April 26, 
1863; and then led a division of the 
Army of the Potomac in Pennsyl- 
vania and Rapidan campaigns. After 
the death of Gen. John Sedgwick, May 
9, 1864, he succeeded to the command 
of the Sixth Army Corps. While a1 
Petersburg, he was ordered to the 
defence of Washington, during Gen. 
Jubal A. Early's invasion of Marjdan 
in 1864, and here he did valuable ser- 
vice. He rallied the troops under 
his command, reformed the line and 
did much to retrieve the fortunes of 
the early surprise at Cedar Creek, 
October 19, 1864. His gallant Sixth 
Corps first broke the strong lines at 
Petersburg, on Sunday, April 2, 1865. 
General Grant in his official report 
said :" General Wright penetrated the 




Maj.-Gen. Horatio Gates Wright. 



his whole corps, sweeping everything before him, and to his left, toward sline 
Hatchers' Run, captured many guns and several thousand prisoners." He 
was brevetted brigadier-general United States Army on March 13, 1865, 
for gallantry in the battle of Cold Harbor and major-general for the capture 
of Petersburg, Va. On June 14, 1865, he received the thanks of the Connecti- 
cut Legislature for his efficient services in the Civil War. He was made 
lieutenant-colonel, U. S. A., November 23, 1865, and then served on various 
engneering boards, becoming colonel, March 4, 1879, and chief of engineers 
with the rank of brigadier-general, June 31, 1879. On March 22, 1884, he 
was retired from active service. He was the co-author of a Report on the 
Fabrication of Iron for Defences,' ' Washington, 1871. 

WILLIAM ELY WRIGHT. 

William E. Wright, son of William and Mary (Ely) Wright, was born in 
Rome, N. Y., February 19, 1809, and died there May 16, 1886. 

He prepared for college at the Grosvenor School, Rome, and entered the 
"Academy" in 1824, remaining two years; was a student at Hamilton College, 
New York, 1826-27. 

He engaged in the general mercantile business in Rome, 1828-33; Akron, 
Ohio, 1833-43; Duluth, Minn., 1857-63; Superior, Wis., 1863-64; Cleveland, 
Ohio, 1864-65; Oil City, Pa., 1865-66; engaged in the manufacture of paper 
in Pulaski, N. Y., 1843-50. He was ticket agent for the Rome, Watcrtown 
& Ogdensburg, R. R., Rome N. Y., and Sackcts' Harbor, for some years. 
He retired from active work in 1866 and made his home in Rome until his 
death. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church and the I. O. O. F. 



262 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 

He was married August 23, 1832, to Maria Roberts of Rome, who died 
July 25, 1884. Four children were born to them: Jane Louisa, born July 9, 
1844, married James Frazer, resides in Baldwinsville, N. Y; Anna Maria, 
born February 18, 1848, died unmarried July 22, 1902; Mary Ely, born 
November 16, 1850, married Charles W. Ellis, resides in Rome, N. Y.; Robert 
Doxtater, born July 1, 1854, died January 26, 1860. 

WILLIAM OTIS WRIGHT. 

William O. Wright, son of Jacob and Dorcas (Walker) Wright, was 
born in Charlestown, N. H., October 27, 1817, and died in Chicopee, Mass., 
September 23, 1883. 

He prepared for college in the schools of 
his town and entered the "Academy" in 
' 1832, and] remained] two years. He taught 
school for some time in Charlestown and 
located in Danvers, Mass., in 1845, and en- 
gaged in shoemaking until 1861; removed to 
Chicopee, Mass., in 1861, where he resided 
until his death; was in the employ of the 
Ames Manufacturing Co., 1861-83. He was 
a member of the Methodist Church and 
Chicopee Lodge, F. and A.M. 

He was twice married: first in 1845, to 
Martha Adelia Howard, sister of A. S. 
Howard, '37. She died in Danvers, Mass., 
October 18, 1846. They had one son who 
died in infancy. He was again married, WilUam Otis Wright. 

September 18, 1851, to Margaret Jane Felton of Danvers, who died there 
October 11, 1905. No children. He is 'sm-vivcd' by an adopted son, G. 
Herbert Wright of Danvers, Mass.- 

COL. FRANCIS YATES. 

Francis Yates, son of John and Julia (Lovell) Yates, was born at "Walnut 
Grove," near Charlesto^vTi, Jefferson county, Va., (now West Virginia,) 
September 24, 1811, and died at "Flowing Springs,' ' January 1, 1892. 

He fitted for college at the Charlestown academy, and entered the 
"A. L. S. & M. Academy" in the spring of 1827, and graduated in 1829. 

He took an active part in the State MOitia, and was commissioned major 
in 1839, and later was promoted colonel of the 55th regiment, 16th Brigade, 
3d Division of Virginia Militia, and served in that capacity for some years. 
He representeil his district in the State senate in 1855-56. While in that 
body, he took an active interest in the internal improvement of the State, 
and was instrumental in having a monument erected by the State over the 
tomb of James Madison. He was president of the Middleway, Charlestowm, 
and Harper's Ferry Turnpike Co., for thirty years. He resided at "Flowing 
Springs," Charlestown, from 1840 until his death. He was a member of the 
Episcopal Church. 

He was married June 23, 1840, to Aime Elizabeth Burwell, of Jefferson 
County, who died, June 28, 1862. Four children were born to them: Jeanctte 




SKETCHES OF ACADEMY CADETS. 263 

Burwell, born September 1, 1843, married Charles Wagner, resides in New 
York; John Orfeur, born April 22, 1845, died in September, 1899; Octavia 
Latane, born November 9, 1846, married William S. Mason, resides in 
Woodville, Va.; Arthur Bacon, born July 28, 1848, resides in Fredericksburg, 
Va. He was again married, June 25, 1863, to Sydney Virginia Rooker, of 
Charlestown, who died April 22, 1899. One child was born to them: Mary 
Brooke, born January 8, 1866, married Adrian G. Wynkoop, resides in Charles- 
town, W. Va. 

PRINCE AUGUSTIN JEROME DE YTURBIDE. 

Augustin J. de Yturbide was born in Mexico, September 30, 1807, and 
died in New Yoi"k city, December 14, 1866. 

His father was a Mexican officer in the vice-royal army. In 1821, he 
proclaimed the independence of Mexico, and achieved it through a brilliant 
campaign of seven months. On May 18, 1822, the Mexican Congress, having 
to elect an emperor, according to the independence programme, elected 
Yturbide, who ascended the throne under the name of Augustin I. In 1823, 
he abdicated and went to live in Italy. In July, 1824, unaware that a law 
had been passed condeming him to death in case he should return to the 
country, he went to Mexico; was made a prisoner upon landing, and was shot 
on July 19, 1824. Later, a law of the republic decreed to him the title of 
Liberator. The mother of Prince Augustin was Dona Anna Maria Huarte, 
a native of Valladolid, in the State of Michocan, Mexico, who died in Phila- 
delphia, March 21, 1861. In 1824, after the death of her illustrious husband, 
the Empress Dona Anna Maria Huarte de Yturbide came to this country, 
where she educated her children. 

The subject of our sketch entered the "Academy" in 1827, and graduated 
in 1829. Luther R. Marsh, a classmate, wrote to the historian of "N. U." 
in 1897, giving many facts as to the prince's cadet life. He was a fine student 
and popular with the corps of cadets. 

Soon after leaving the "Academy" he was invited by Gen. Simon Bolivar 
to serve upon liis staff with the rank of colonel, a service which Prince Augustin 
accepted and in which he remained until Bolivar's death in December, 1830. 
Don Augustin soon came to the United States, where he made his home, until 
the law of exile which had been passed against him and his family was revoked. 
He lived quietly in the city of Mexico, talcing no part in politics until 1864, 
when he gave his support to the empire of Maximilian. It was chiefly through 
his influence that Maximilian adopted his nephew, Augustin, a son of his 
brother Angelo, as his successor to the throne. 

In 1865, he went to Paris, France, where his health suddenly failing in 
the fall of 1866, he returned to New York city in November of the same 
year and died December 14th. He was buried in his mother's vault, No. 
9, in the Church of St. John the Evangelist, in Philadelphia. 



CHAPTER V. 
Sketches of Alumni and Past Cadets 1835-66. 

ALONZO FLAGG ESTABROOK. 

Alonzo F. Estabrook, son of Thomas and Sybill (Brown) Estabrook, was 
born in Reading, Vt., March 7, 1814, and died in Lavaca, Nebraska, April 
3, 1892. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 1832, 
and the University in 1834, receiving a certificate from the Civil Engineering 
Department in 1835. 

He studied in the Albany Law School, 1835-36; but not finding this pro- 
fession congenial, he entered upon the work of civil engineering. 

,^— ^- In 1836, he was appointed as- 

sistant engineer on the New York 
Central R. R., and on the completion 
of the road to Utica, in 1837, he work- 
ed for some time making surveys in 
Central and Western New York for 
maps. He was assistant engineer on 
the Wabash & Erie Canal, under 
.\ndrew Young, 1837, to April, 1838, 
being engineer in charge of construc- 
tion of the Western division with 
headquarters at Fort Defiance, 
April to December, 1838; assistant 
engineer from December, 1838, to 
April, 1840, on the Hocking Canal and 
the Muskingum River Improvement 
Commission, in charge of construction 
of the locks and dam at Marietta, 
Devals and Lowell, Ohio, the most 
important and difficult work on the 
canal; was engineer on improvement 
of the Marine Canal, with head- 
quarters at Mercer, Pa., 1840-43; 
Miami Canal, Dayton, Ohio, 1843-45; 




Alonzo Flagg Estabrook. 



Muskingum Canal, Chillicothe, Ohio, 1845-46. He was engineer on the 
Indianapolis & Vincennes R. R., 1847-48; IndianapoHs & Belief ontaine 
with headquarters in Cra-^^ordsville, Ind., 1848-50; was surveyor, Delaware 
County, Ind., 1850-53; chief engineer, Evansville & CrawfordsviUe R. R., in 
Indiana, 1853-54; engaged in general sm-veying, 1854-70; was swamp land com- 
missioner for Sullivan County, Ind., 1855-59; was assistant engineer on the rail- 
road from Rockville to Indianapolis in Indiana, 1863-64; was chief engineer, in 



1835-36] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 265 

1870, on the construction of levees against the back waters of Buseros Creek 
and the Wabash River on "Shaker Prairie" in Sullivan and Knox Counties, 
Ind., thus reclaiming several thousand acres of the best farm land in the State; 
also made surveys and estimates for a large levee in the western part of Sulli- 
van County against the Wabash River; was surveyor, Sullivan County, 1870- 
84; was engineer on the Bedford, Bloomfield, Switz City & Effingham R. R., 
(narrow gauge) from Bloomfield to Switz City in Illinois, 1875-76. 

He made his home on a farm near Carlisle, Ind., from 1854, until 1884, 
when he removed from Indiana to Antelope County, Nebraska and engaged in 
land surveying and locating claims. In 1892, he retired from active work and 
made his home with his son Joseph, near Lavaca, until his death. He was 
Democrat in politics; was notary public, Sullivan Co., Ind., 1855-59. He was 
a member of the Methodist Church. 

He was married in 1844, to Elizabeth Ann, daughter of the Rev. John 
Sutcliffe of Carlisle, Ind. She died March 28, 1877. Three children were born 
to them: Alonzo A,, resides in California; Joseph Sutcliffe, resides in Valentine, 
Neb.; John, resides in California. 



CLASS OF 1836. 
PROF. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN MARSH, A. M, 

Benjamin F. Marsh, son of Otis and Julia (Ransom) Marsh, and nephew of 
Col. T. B. Ransom, '25, was born in Hartland, Vt., November 17, 1815, and 
died in Helena, Montana, April 2, 1903. 

He attended the schools of Hartland and Woodstock, and entered the 
"Academy" in 1830, and graduated from the University by certificate in 1835. 
In 1845, the University conferred upon him the degree of A. M. as for 1835. 

He taught school for a few months in 1835, in Macon, Georgia. In the 
summer of 1836, he entered the employ of Moncure Robinson, '24, on exten- 
sive surveys in North Carolina; was draftsman for the Southern Railroad 
Engineering Bureau of Georgia, 1837-39, and held a similar position with the 
Georgia Railroad Co. from 1839 until 1843, when failing health forced him to 
return to Vermont. He was engineer in charge of the construction of the Con- 
necticut River R. R. north from White River Junction, Vt., during 1844-45. 
He was professor of Mathematics and Engineering at the University, 1845-46, 
and during this time retained general oversight of the construction of the Con- 
necticut River R. R., also during 1845-46, gave his students practical field work. 

He was superintendent of construction of the Concord & Lebanon R. R. 
(now Boston & Maine) in New Hampshire, 1846-47; was division superinten- 
dent of construction of the Rutland & Burlington R. R. 1847-48; chief engi- 
neer of the Jefferson R. R., in Indianna, 1848-50; was also engaged in various 
railroad work in Ohio until 1858; was engineer of a railroad from Indianapolis, 
Ind., to Louisville, Ky., and to St. Louis, Mo.; was chief engineer of the Eastern 
Texas R. R., 1S.58-G1. In 1861, he had a severe attack of billions fever and 
by the time he had recovcn-ed, the Civil War had broken out and the sixty days 
limit, which he had been given by the authorities to return North, had ex- 
pired. He was held in the South during 1861-63, and during this time was 
often placed in prison as a pimishment for his outspoken loyalty to the United 
States Government. He was professor of Mathematics at Soul6 University, 
Texas, 1865-66; was principal of schools of Cambridge, Ind., 1866-67. In 1867, 



266 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. [1836 

he accepted a position with Solomon Meridith, the first U. S. Surveyor 
General of Montana, and entered upon the survey of public lands, under con- 
tract, making the first surveys in the Territory in the summer of the same year. 

He was county surveyor of Clarke County, 1875-91. He made original 
surveys of the township of Butte, and served as the engineer of the town until 
its ncorporation as a city in 1891. He engaged in private practice and civil and 
mining engineering for a number of years. In 1891, he was thrown from a 
carriage and incapacitated for active field work, but continued in office work 
until the time of his death. He opened the first school for young men in the 
Territory, teaching Mathematics and Engineering. He was a distinguished 
mathematician. His formula for determining the true meridian from an 
observation on Polaris, is the one in general use today. He compiled a short 
work on Mathematics, Magic Squares. He was for years an active member of 
the Methodist Church, being one of the founders of the church in Helena; was 
a member of Helena Lodge F. and A. M. 

He was married, August 21, 1845, to Mary Dunham BUss of Woodstock, 
who died in 1889. Five children were born to them: Franklin; John Mason, 
resides in Washington; Emma Julia; Flora Atwood, married Joseph Davis, 
resides in Helena; WilHam Bliss, resides in Montana. 

AMASA GLEASON, A. M. 

Amasa Gleason, son of Solomon and Lucy (Miner) Gleason and cousin of 
Rev. Alonzo A. Miner, '33, was born in Dummerston, Vt., December 18, 1812, 
and died unmarried, in New Bedford, Mass., in 1880. 

At an early age, his parents removed to Hanover, N. H., where he prepared 
for college. He entered the University in 1832, remaining until 1836. In 
1846, the University conferred upon him the degree of A. M. as for 1836. 

He was instructor of Mathematics and Military Tactics at the Unity 
(N. H.) Scientific and Militarj^ Academy, 1836-39, being associated \\ith Rev. 
A. A. Miner, '33; was principal of the Middleboro, Mass., High School, also 
schools in New Bedford, Mass. He was for many years, principal of the Brush 
Street School for boys in New Bedford and, for several years previous to his 
death, was principal of a select school in that city. 

BRIG.-GEN. ALONZO JACKMAN, A. M., LL.D. 

Alonzo Jackman, son of Joseph and Sarah O^^arner) Jackman, was born 
in Thetford, Vt., March 20, 1809, and died in Northfield, Vt., February 24, 
1879. In 1812, his father died and his mother again married, and in the same 
year moved to Strafford and in 1813, to New Boston, a village in Norwdch. 
At the age of twelve he and his oldest brother, Enoch, were told they "must 
shift for themselves.' ' 

He worked for a farmer in Thetford six years, and in 1827 went with his 
brother Enoch to Chatham, now Portland, Conn., where they secured emploj^- 
ment in the Red Sandstone quarries at that place. His opportunities for 
attending school were Hmited, yet the thirst for knowledge was so great, that 
he spent every moment of available time in study. At the age of eleven, he 
became much interested in religious matters, and in order to ascertain the truth 
he began to read the Bible by course, which took him three years. During the 
time he worked in the quarries in Portland, he found some time for attending 
school in the winter. At an early age he began to show wonderful ability in 
mathematics. 




i9 




Brig-Gen. Alonzo Jackman. 



268 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. [1836 

In September, 1828, he shipped on a sloop at the quarries for New York 
cit}^, where he reshipped on a brig bound for Mobile, Ala., and on reaching 
that city was discharged and worked there on boats until the spring of 1829, 
when he returned to Portland on a northern bound boat and again resumed his 
work as a stone cutter. In the winter of 1829, he returned to his home in Ver- 
mont and attended the Thetford Academy, and in the follo\^ing .spring again 
resumed stone cutting in Poilland. On IMarch 12, 1832, he, with his brother 
Enoch, went to Ohio with the idea of locating in that State. In Cincinnati 
they separated. Alonzo shipped on a steamboat running on the Ohio and 
Mississippi Rivers and in the winter of 1832, went to New Orleans and worked 
on boats running between that city and Mobile. He became a very proficient 
sailor and was offered by the last company he worked for the position of busi- 
ness agent but, feeling he needed more education, he dechned the position. 

In the spring of 1833, he returned to ^'ermont and entered the Franklin 
Seminary, at Norwich, Vt., conducted by Mr. Buck. In 1834, the school was 
removed to Newmarket, N. H., and Jackman went with Mr. Buck as a student 
and instructor in his favorite subject, Mathematics. In the summer of 1835, 
he taught Mathematics in the academy at Kingston, N. H., also continuing his 
studies. In December, 1835, he entered the University, and passing the first 
three years work, entered the Senior class and graduated A. B. in 1836, being 
the first gi-aduate of "N. U.;" received the degree of A. M. in 1840 and LL. D. 
in 1862. He was tutor in Mathematics, 1835-37; was professor of IMathema- 
tics, 1837-40, 1844-49, 1852-79; Natural Philosophy, 1837-38, 1858-67, 1870-79; 
Civil Engineering, 1837-38, 1870-79; Topographical drawing, 1837-38; in- 
structor of ^lilitary Science and Tactics, 1837-38, 1848-49, 1852-66; hbrarian, 
1845-46, 1854-62. 

In the summer of 1840, in company with Josiah Swett, '37, he began editing 
and publishing in Norwich the Citizen Soldier, a weekly paper devoted to the 
interests of the State Mihtia. This project did not prove a success, and the 
paper was discontinued in the spring of 1841. In August, 1841, he resigned his 
professorship and with Josiah Swett, '37, opened the New England Seminary 
in Windsor, Yt., which they conducted until the summer of 1844. They both 
returned to their former positions in the "N. U." faculty in the fall of 1844. 
In August, 1849, he was gi-anted a three years leave of absence. In October 
of the same year he sailed for San Francisco in the Argonaut, via Cape Horn, 
reaching his destination after many privations, on March 13, 1850. He was 
accompanied on this trip by President Wheaton of the University, and StiUman 
E. Dana, '50. 

On reaching California, he joined a mining company and was appointed 
its engineer. Interesting details are given in his note book on turning a river 
from its source and the invention of tools and ap})liances for can-jing on the 
work. Some gold was found, but not the amount expected. As the rainy 
season was coming on. General Jackman sold his interests. He was visited in 
this camp by John M, Stanyan, '50, who wTote in 1897, "General Jackman 
talked with me much about the prospects of old "N. U." and very Uttle about 
gold." This shows how deeply General Jackman loved his alma mater which 
in after years was well showTi by the many sacrifices he made to help keep the 
University aUve. 

Early in 1851, he went to Pacific County, Oregon in the section now in- 
cluded in Washington, and secured a claim of 320 acres of land near Pacific City 



1836] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 269 

with the idea of making his home in that remote region. He soon gained the 
respect and confidence of the people of his county; was elected superintendent 
of schools and judge of probate. He also engaged in engineering and surveying. 
He was an able geologist and he believed that the formation of the country 
around his claim was gold bearing and that if the river, which flowed through 
his claim, could be turned, gold would be found in paying quantities, but not 
having the means to carry on the necessary work, had to give it up. He says 
"The opportunity had passed into eternity and my duty was to move on." 
In after years, gold was found here as he predicted. 

His heart was with his beloved " old N. U." and he could not content him- 
self to remain in Oregon and in April, 1852,he resumed his former position at the 
University. His connection with the Univerity was not again broken until he 
was called to the Great Unknown. In this brief biographical sketch, justice can 
not be done to him, the greatest and best of the graduates of " N. U.' ' Captain 
Curtis writes: "Few graduates who received instruction from him failed to 
love and respect him. He was a mathematician first and always, and a military 
tactician without a rival, teaching these branches with eminent success. On 
the parade ground generations of cadets have known him as a thoroughly com- 
petent instructor of infantry and artillery drills; bayonet, small sword and 
broadsword fencings; in the lecture room in all the details of the science and art 
of war. From youth to old age he was known to members of the corps at 
different periods as the 'Lieutenant,' the 'Captain,' the 'Colonel,' and the 
'General,' and privately he was known by a name which was never uttered 
with disrespect, a name which as years have been added to those who sat under 
his instruction, has come to be synonymous of everything loving and tender, 
'Old Jack.'" 

At an early age he showed remarkable fondness for military affairs, and 
while in the University paid especial attention to the study of tactics. In 
1838, during the Canadian RebeUion, he was appointed a lieutenant and drilled 
troops at Enosburg, Berkshire and Sheldon, in anticipation of trouble between 
this country and Canada. In 1847, he was appointed "brigade-drill-master" 
with rank of major of the New Hampshire Militia, by the governor of that 
state. In 18.57, the corps of cadets being organized as an infantry company in 
the State Militia, he was commissioned its captain. On April 7, 1859, he was 
commissioned a colonel of the 2d Vermont Militia and in the fall of the same 
year a brigadier-general, in command of the State troops. On the breaking out 
of the Civil War his attention naturally turned to the field, but Governor 
Fairbanks earnestly requested him to remain at the University. We quote 
from the governor's letter: "There is a duty, a very patriotic duty for you to 
perform; that is, to remain at the Military College and qualify young men for 
duty as officers, and thus you will do your State the best service." During all 
the years of the war. General Jackman, accompanied by a number of highly pro- 
ficient cadet officers, was cverywh(!re present throughout the State, organizing 
and drilUng the volunteers. At the time of the St. Albans raid, he took the 
corps of cadets by order of the governor to the Derby line to repel invasion. 
It was with the deepest regret he gave up going to the front. His high sense 
of duty only kei)t him from entering the servicer and of all the cadets who are 
entitled to a place in th<^ Univeisity "Roll of Honor" (i(>neral .lackiiian should 
head the list. 

He wrote many articles for the various jiapers on inatheniatical, scicnitific 



270 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. [1836 

and military subjects. He published in 1843 a treatise on Series. His demon- 
stration on squaring the circle, issued in pamphlet form in 1872 and revised in 
1874, was a masterly demonstration of that problem. He was also the inventor 
of the ocean telegraph. We quote from a letter received from Prof. J. D. 
Butler, (q. v.) the distinguished scholar, in 1897: "Jackman often expatiated 
to me on his plan of a sub-oceanic telegraph, told how he would construct the 
cable, and by what process he would stretch it from continent to continent. 
After thus describing his project more than once, he wrote it out and brought it 
to me for verbal corrections and suggestions. He then gave his secret to the 
world in extenso at Woodstock, thi'ough the Vermont Mercury on August 14, 
1846. Thus, a decade before the era of Cyrus W. Field, 'coming events cast 
their shadows before' in a Green Mountain hamlet." He sent copies of this 
article on the ocean telegraph to the various scientific societies and to many of 
the great scientists of this and other countries. In most cases the matter was 
considered as visionary, but Cyrus W. Field, the practical man of affairs, 
saw its practicability and made use of it. General Jackman left several 
manuscript works on mathematics. 

From early youth he was remarkably religious. In 1831, he joined the 
Methodist Church and in 1843 joined the Episcopal Church. He took an 
active interest in St. Mary 's , Churchy in Northfield, serving as senior waiden 
for several years. 

General Jackman died on the 24th of February, 1879, at his house in North- 
field at 2 o'clock, p. M. Up to that day, he had regularly attended to his duties. 
That morning he sent word to the president of the college. Captain C. A. Curtis, 
'61, that he would be unable to go to his class room. Standing at a window, 
dressed in uniform, lie suddenly fell dead, dropped like a soldier shot at his post 
of duty. The funeral of General Jackman occured at St. Mary's Church, 
Northfield, February 28, 1879, Rev. Francis W. Bartlett, chaplain of the Uni- 
versity, assisted by Rev. Howard F. HiU, '67, of Concord, N. H., conducting 
the services. BLshop Bissell and many prominent clergj'men of the Episcopal 
Church were present, as well as a large number of distinguished civihans and 
military men. Two companies of the National Guard and the Northfield 
Cornet band did duty as escort, and the Artillery Platoon of the N. U. Corps 
of Cadets fired a funeral salute. In Elmwood cemetery rests the remains of our 
most beloved professor, a good soldier, and a worthy gentlemen. 

He was married June 1, 18.56, to Charlotte Sawj^er of Royalton, Vt., who 
died October 7, 1874. Two children were born to them : Alonzo, born February 
12, 1857, died April 20, 1859; Helen, born AprU 10, 1867, died October 7, 1877. 

MAJ. HENRY VILLIERS MORRIS, M. C. E., A. B. 

Henry V. Morris was born at Glasgow, Amherst County, Va., April 7, 
1819, and died in St. Louis, Mo., May 17, 1898. He was a cadet at the "Acad- 
emy,' ' September 1831-1834, and entered the University in 1834, and remained 
until the summer of 1836, receiving a certificate from the Engineering depart- 
ment. He received the degree of M. C. E., in course in 1838, and A. B. in 
course in 1841 as for 1836. 

He was professor of Topographical Drawing and the Practical Use of 
Instruments in Field Operations at the school of Engineering, University of 
Virginia, 1836-37; was assistant engineer, Illinois State Internal Improvement 



1836] 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



271 



Commission, with Hiram P. Woodworth, '25, chief engineer, 1838-November 
1840; was professor of Civil Engineering at "N. U." 1840-43; professor at the 
Captain Partridge's Military Academy, Bristol, Pa., 1843-45. He was en- 
gaged, during 1845-54, on railroad surveys and construction in Maryland and 
Ohio; was assistant engineer on the Ohio and Mississippi R. R., 1852-54. He 
removed to Cincinnati in 1855 and engaged in the manufacture of railroad 
supplies until 1861; was assistant engineer on the northern extension of the 
Chicago & Northwestern R. R., above Lake Winnebago, Wis., June-August, 
1861. 

He removed to Missouri in 1868, where for many years he was identified 
with the construction of railroads in that State, also in Kansas; was assistant 
and resident engineer on the construction of the St. Louis & Lexington R. R., 
(now the Lexington Branch of the Missouri Pacific R. R.) extending from 
Sedalia to Lexington, Mo., and on the 
St. Louis, Salem & Little Rock R. R. 
now a part of the St. Louis & San 
Francisco Ry., extending from Salem 
to Cuba, Mo., March 1868-November, 
1872; was assistant engineer on the 
Tebo & Neosho R. R., (later the M. 
K. & T.) 1872-73; was assistant en- 
gineer, 1875-78, for the St. Louis, 
Kansas City & Northern R. R., on the 
construction of the Council Bluffs ^: 
St. Louis R. R., from Pattonsburgh, 
Mo., to Council Bluffs, now a part of 
the Wabash R. R., system; also on 
location and construction of the Union 
Depot Line, at St. Louis for the same 
road in 1879. On the consolidation 
in 1879, of the St. L. K. C. & N. Ry., 
with the Toledo, Wabash & Western 
R. R., forming the "Wabash System, " 
he served as assistant engineer in the 
oflBce of the chief engineer in St. 
Louis, which position he held until 
October, 1887, when owing to his 
advanced age, he was made custodian of 
this position until his death. 

In October, 1861, he was commissioned military instructor at Camp 
Douglass, Chicago, "State Rendezvous" at that time, where he remained until 
February, 1862. In May, 1862, he was commissioned by Governor Solomon 
of Wisconsin, adjutant of the 20th Regiment, Wisconsin Infantry. He served 
with the regiment in the "Army of the Frontier" in Southwest Missouri and 
Arkansas, and participated in the battle of Prairie Grove, Ark., December 6 
and 7, 1862. In May, 1863, the regiment was transferred to Vicksburg, Miss., 
and after the fall of that city was forwardcxl to Alabama, taking part in the 
operations about Mobile. In November, 1863, he was commissioned by Presi- 
dent Lincoln in the "Veteran Reserve Corps.' ' In May, 1864, he was assigned 
to the eighth regiment, V. R. C, which with the Sixteenth regiment, was per- 




Maj. Henry Villiers Morris, 
the auditors records. He held 



272 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. [1837 

forming garrison duty and guarding prisoners of war at Camp Douglass, the 
number confined at that time being 16,000. He was appointed on the staff 
of the colonel commanding the post, and continued to discharge duties, in- 
volving the foUo'tt'ing: "charge of all passes, details for guard and picket duty, 
guard mounting, the consolidation of the tri-monthly and monthly post re- 
turns, receiving and forwarding recruits and deserters." He was brevetted 
major at the close of the war by President Johnson, for his services in the 
Twentieth Wisconsin, Volunteers; was commissioned major in the Veteran 
Relief Corps in 1865. 

He removed to St. Louis in 1873, where he made his home until his death. 
He was a member of the Ransom Post, Xo. 131, G. A. R., of St. Louis. He is 
survived by a widow and two sons, and one daughter, now married. 

CLASS OF 1837. 
LIEUT. JOSEPH W. CURTIS, U. S. M. C, A. B. 
Joseph W. Curtis, son of the Hon. Joseph G. and Aurelia Curtis, was born 
in Warren, Vt., in 1816, and died there, unmarried, August 16, 1858. 

He entered the University in 1834, and graduated A. B. in 1837. He was 
commissioned, 2d lieutenant, U. S. Marine Corps, May 4, 1840; was promoted 
1st lieutenant, March 16, 1847; discharged August 26, 1852. He resided in 
the South for some years and th(ni returned to Warren, and engaged in farming 
on the old Curtis estate, until his death. 

REV. CYRUS HYDE FAY, A. M., D. D., LL. D. 

Cyrus H. Fay, son of Joseph Packard and Charlotte (Hyde) Fay and 
nephew of Capt. Alden Partridge, was born in Lebanon, X. H., Xovember 18, 
1815, and died at Stamford, X. Y., July 23, 1903, during a summer sojourn in 
that resort. 

He prepared for college in the schools of Lebanon and entered the Uni- 
versity in 1834, graduating A. B. in 1837, as valedictorian of his class; served 
as trustee of "X. U," 1840-41. In August, 1839, he dehvered the oration 
before the trustees of the University, the subject being, "The Changes of the 
Century," and again in August, 1850, "Principles better than Policy." 

He taught school in Baltimore, Md., in 1838, and during this time studied 
Theology in preparation for the Universalist ministry; was ordained in 1839; 
preached in Hartford, Conn., in 1839, and supplied the Lombard Street Church, 
Philadelphia, Pa., 1839-40; was pastor of the Xorth Universalist Church, 
Woodstock, Vt., 1840-41; Roxbury, Mass., 1841-49; Orchard Street Church, 
Xew York City, 1849-53; Xashua, X. H., 1853-55; Stamford, Conn., 1855-56; 
Middletown, Conn., 1856-58, 1869-73; First Church, Pro\-idence, R. I., Decem- 
ber, 1858-May, 1869; assisted in establishing a memorial church in Washington, 
D. C, in 1873, remaining there until 1877, his last regular pastorate. He 
located in Brooklj^n, X. Y., in 1877, where he resided until his death. The 
intervening years were by no means years of idleness, for besides suppljing 
neighboring pulpits, he ably managed an important estate in Xew York citj'. 

He took an active interest in the public schools and served on the school 
boards in Roxbury, Mass., Xashua, X. H., Middletown, Conn., and Providence, 
R. I. He assisted in founding the Athenaeum in Roxbury, Mass., and was one 
of its first directors; also assisted in establishing the Forest Hills Cemetery. 

He was settled in Providence when the Civil War broke out and rendered 



1837J 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



273 



"^m^ 
W 



valuable assistance in stimulating the patriotism and courage of the people and 
aided in providing for the necessities of the soldiers in the field. 

The University conferred upon him the degree of A. M. and LL. D. 1892; 
St. Lawrence Univei-sity, New York, the degree of D. D. 

The literary ability of Doctor Fay was of no mean order, his sermons and 
addresses being distinguished for their power, versatility, originality and 
application. His delivery was effective, and his remarkable reading of the 
scriptures and hymns attracted notice 
beyond the limits of his denomina- 
tion. His poetical talent has been 
widely recognized by the Universa- 
lists, he having written many hymns 
for general and special services. He 
also has delivered poems on several 
public occasions, notably one at the 
hundredth anniversary of Lebanon, 
N. H., another at the semi-centennial 
of the Universalist Church at Rox- 
bury, and a third at a similar church 
celebration at Providence. 

He was twice married: first, 
October 3, 1839, to Anne Hyne 
Minifie of Baltimore, Md., born in 
Devonshire, England, who died June 
18, 1850. Six children were born to 
them: Anne Gertrude, born May 9, 
1842, died February 13, 1847; Frank- 
lin Parker, boi'n February 5, 1844, 
died May 4, 1865; Charles Ernest, 
born March 10, 1846, since 1871, 
professor at Tufts College, Mass.; 
Alice Hyne, born August 28, 1847, died June 5, 1860; Cyrus Hyde, born Janu- 
ary 20, 1849, died August 17, 1902; WiUiam Wentworth, born April 6, 1850, 
now residing in Boston, Mass. He was again married, August 5, 1851, to Mrs. 
Betsey Ann (Smith) Blossom of New York city, who died December 13, 1898. 
Three children were born of this marriage: Charlotte, born July 13, 1852, now 
Mrs. Henry Brewster of Mt. Vernon, N. Y.; Julia Smith, October 28, 1853, 
now Mrs. Clinton S. Harris of Brooklyn; and Isabel, October 5, 1856, now Mrs. 
Cooper, of Westfield, N.J. 




Rev. Cyrus Hyde Fay. 



ROBERT FRAZER, A. B., M. C. E. 

Robert Frazer, son of Rol)ert and Alice Yarnell (Pennell) Frazer, and 
brother of John Fries Frazer, '26, was born in Newtown, Delaware Co., Pa., 
D(>(;ember 20, 1818, and died of apoplexy in Philadelphia, May 4, 1878. His 
father died January 20, 1821, and he lived with his mother at Edgemont Pa., 
luitil her death in 1830, when he was brought to Philadelphia. He attended 
Dr. Samuel Crawfords private school there and later went to the Pittsfield, 
Mass., Academy. 

In 1834, he entered the University and graduated A. B. and M. C. E., in 



274 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1837 



1837. He was assistant engineer on the construction of the Philadelphia and 
Reading R. R., having charge of the second division above Reading, 1838-40. 
He traveled in Europe in 1840-41; studied law with Judge James Jones, 1841-43, 
and was admitted to the bar in Philadelphia in 1844. In 1845, he was ap- 
pointed'deputy attorney general for Delaware'County, Pa. In 1852, he became 
consulting engineer for the Camden and Atlantic R. R.; from 1850 to 1863 was 
its secretary and treasurer, and from 1863 to 1873, its president; was president 
of the Wilmington and Reading R. R. from 1873 until his death. 

He was a thorough scholar and was much interested in the natural sciences; 
microscopy and entomology had great attractions for him, and he was for a 
number of years president of the Entomological Society of Philadelphia. In 
1866, he was elected a member of the Academy of Natural Sciences. He was 
also a member of the American Philosophical Society and of the Franklin 
Institute. 

He was married in Pottstown, Pa., on March 26, 1848, to Jane Biddle 
Wood, daughter of Samuel and Fanny (Collins) Wood. She died August 29, 
1879. Two children were born to them: Robert, born July 22, 1849, a civil 
and mining engineer and now president of the Belief onto Central R. R.; and 
Fanny, born October 4, 1852, married Herbert Welsh. Both reside in German- 
town, Pa. 

HORATIO GATES GILBERT, A. B. 

Horatio Ci. Gilbert, son of Marinus Willett and Sally (Easton) Gilbert, 
was born in Watertown, N. Y., July 27, 1818, and died in New York city, 

May 26, 1891. He prepared for 
college in the schools of his city and 
entered the University in 1834, grad- 
uating A. B. in 183. 

He was assistant engineer vdth 
the Illinois Internal Improvement 
Commission, with his cousin, WiUiam 
B. Gilbert, '28, 1838-39. He then 
engaged as engineer on the construc- 
tion of many of the railroads and 
canals of New York until about 1844. 
He was cashier and director of the 
Bank of the Capitol, Albany, N. Y., 
18.50 until 1860, when he located in 
Milwaukee, Wis., where he engaged 
in business ^ until fl864. He then 
settled in Tarrj'town, N. Y. In 
1884, he removed to New York city, 
where he made his home until his 
death. He engaged in business in 
New York city from 1864 until 1891. 
He was a member of the Presbyterian 

Horatio Gates Gilbert. Church. 

He was twice married: first, OctoberH5, 1846, to Marie Antoinette Bacon 
of Albany, N. Y., who died in Milwaukee,lWis., April 16, 1862. Seven'children 
were born to them: John Willett, born August 27, 1847, killed in a railway 



y^^ m 





1837] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 275 

accident September 2, 1900; Robert Lansing, born November 11, 1849, died 
February 22, 1852; Bradford Lee, born March 24, 1853, now a prominent 
architect in New^York [city; Elizabeth Bacon, born August^lS, 1856, married 
Prof. Albert J. Moses of Columbia University, died September 19, 1902; 
AUce Knox, born July 3, 1860, died December 21, 1863; Henry Mayhew, born 
April 16, 1862, died October 28, 1862; George Easton, born April 16, 1862, 
died November 4, 1862, He was again married, October 21, 1863, to Susan 
Stevens of New York [city, who died November 14, 1895. Seven children were 
born to them: Susan, born September 4, 1864, married Arthm- V. Taylor, now 
supervisor of evening schools, Newark, N. J.; Alice Maud, born May 26, 1866, 
married Frederick D. Bell, resides in Glen Ridge, N. J.; George Stevens, born 
February 6, 1868, drowned in the Hudson River, June 15, 1885; Horatio Gates, 
Jr., born December 6, 1869, killed in a railroad accident in December, 1903; 
Edward Livingston, born September 2, 1871, resides Englewood, N. J.; Charles 
Bancroft, born June 10, 1874, resides in New York city; Lucy Easton, born 
November 14, 1876, resides in New York city. 

CAPT. GEORGE WASHINGTON GILSON, A. M. 

George W. Gilson, son of Nathaniel and Olive (Larkin) Gilson, was born 
in Stoddard, N. H., May 21, 1816, and died in Chicago, 111., September 29, 
1856. 

He prepared for college at the Unity, (N. H.) Academy, under the princi- 
palship of Rev. Alonzo A. Miner, '33, and entered the University in 1834, 
graduating A. B. in 1837; received the degree of A. M. in course in 1851. 

He located in Peru, La Salle Co., 111., in the spring of 1838, where he made 
his home until the spring of 1856. He was assistant engineer imder T. B. 
Ransom, '25, for the Illinois Internal Improvement Commission for some time. 
He served as city and county engineer for some years. He also laid out many 
town sites and was engineer on many of the railroads of the State. In 1856, he 
removed to Chicago and became a member of the firm of A. J. Galloway & Co. 
and engaged in real estate business until his death. 

He was a Democrat in politics and held several positions; was mayor of 
Peru in 1855. He was a member of the Universalist Church, St. Johns Lodge 
F. and A. M., of Peru, and the I. O. O. F. He^was much interested in military 
matters, organized and was captain of the "Madison Guards" of Peru, the 
first organization of Militia in the State. 

He was a man of rare attainments, genial, frank, open hearted, and an 
able public speaker. 

He was married in December, 1838, to Catherine EUzabeth Greenfield, 
sister of Mrs. T. B. Ransom. She died June 23, 1907. Four children were 
born to them: Emma Rosella, born September 2, 1841, ntiarried Col. Martin 
R. M. Wallace of Chicago, resides in Chicago, 111.; George Washington, Jr., 
born May 17, 1843, died June 1887; Frances Rosalva, born April 11, 1846, 
married George E. Mann, resides in Chicago, 111.; Ella Olive, born June 10, 
1848, married William I. Russell, resides in Jessups, Md, 

COL. EUGENE ECKEL McLEAN, A. B. 
Eugene E. McLean, son of Cornelius Eliza (Espey) McLean, was born in 
Washington, D. C, March 5, 1821, and died in New York city, January 5, 
1906; was buried in Syracuse, N. Y. 



27G 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1837 




KfSPf 



He entered the University in 1834, and graduated A. B. in 1837. He 
entered the U S. Military Academy, West Point, July 1, 1838, and graduated 
in July, 1842; was brevetted 2d lieutenant and assigned to the 2d Infantry, 
2d lieutenant, 1st Infantry, March 1, 1844; 1st lieutenant, 10th Infantry, 
June, 1850; captain and assistant quartermaster, August 29, 1855; resigned 
April 25, 1861. He served on frontier duty at Plattsburgh, N. Y., 1842-44; 

at Fort Crawford, Wis., 1844-45; at 
Fort Leavenworth, Kan., 1845-46. 
He served as acting assistant adjutant- 
general, 3d Military department at 
Mantanazas, Mex., March 29, 1847- 
July 22, 1848; was aid on the staff 
of Maj. Gen. Wool, July 22, 1848- 
Xovember 15, 1853; served in office 
of the quartermaster general U. S. A., 
Washington, D. C, 1853-61. 

On the breaking out of the Civil 
^^'ar, he tendered his services to the 
Confederate States Government, and 
was appointed major and quarter- 
master C. S. A.; served on the staff 
of Jefferson Davis, at Richmond, 
Va., for some time; w'as promoted 
colonel, served in the campaigns in 
Virginia and Termessee. He was 
often consulted by President Davis 
as to the conduct of military oper- 
ations from an engineering stand- 
Col. Eugene Eckel McLean. point. 
At the close of the war, he went to Mexico and engaged in engineering 
until 1807, when he located in New York city, where he made his home until 
his death. He engaged in general engineering in New York city, 1867-81, and 
diu'ing this time held several engineering positions in the city government. 
In 1881, he received an appointment in the Real Estate department of the 
city; w^as soon appointed Civil Engineer for the comptrollers department and 
in this capacity had to pass on all payments for city construction work, a 
position he held until his death. He was distinguished for his integrity, and by 
his careful and honest work,saved the city large sums of money on construction 
work. One of the most important controversies was over the claim for $7,000- 
000 for extra work on the new Croton aqueduct. He was a member of the 
Episcopal Church. 

He was married at Carlisle, Pa., September 3, 1849, to Margaret Foster 
Sumn(>r, daughter of Gen. E. V. Sumner. She died June 11, 1905; no children. 




JITDGE WINFIELD SCOTT SHERWOOD, A. M. 

\Mnfield S. Sherwood w^as born in Sandy Hill, N. Y., in 1819, and died in 
Allegheny, Sierra Co., Cal., June 25, 1870. He prepared for college in the 
schools of his town and entered the University in 1834, and graduated A. B. 
in 1837; received the degree of A. M. in course in 1840. 



1837] 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



277 



He studied law and practiced his profession in New York. Early in 1849, 
he located in California and at once took a prominent part in the affairs of that 
State. He served as a member from the Sacremento District, at the con- 
vention held in Monterey which formed the State Constitution, in September, 

1849, and took an important part in the deliberations of that body. In the fall 
of the same year he was a candidate for governor, but failed of election. In 

1850, he was appointed a district judge for the district including Butte County 
and the northern part of the State, and served until 1853; was an elector on the 
Democratic presidential ticket in 1852. In 1853, he was a candidate before 
the Democratic convention for governor, but was ineligible, as he held a judicial 
office. He held a position in the U. S. Custom House in San Francisco for some 
years. In 1859, he was the Democratic nominee for State senator from Sierra 
County and received a very flattering vote. In 1869, he became interested in 
the opening and development of a gravel mine at Allegheny. He was a man of 
great kindness of heart and left a host of friends. He was an able judge. 



HON. JOSEPH HERMAN STREETER, A. B., M. D. 



Joseph H. Streeter, son of the Rev. Russell and Clarinda (Cook) Streeter, 
was born in Springfield, Vt., July 11, 1820, and died in Roxbury, Mass., May 
30, 1891. He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the 
University in 1834, from Woodstock, Vt., and graduated A. B. in 1837. 

He began the study of medicine 
with Dr. B.R. Palmer of Woodstock; 
graduated M. D. from the Woods- 
tock Medical College in 1841; prac- 
ticed his profession in Providence, 
R. I., 1841-42; Shirley, Mass., 1842- 
45; Roxbury, Mass., 1846-91. He 
was an examining surgeon for the 
Massachusetts volunteers during the 
Civil War, and medical examiner 
for Norfolk County, Mass. He met 
with marked success in his profession. 
He was a Republican in politics 
• represented Roxbury in the Massa- 
chusetts Legislature. He was a mem- 
ber of the Massachusetts Medical 
Society; Northfolk County Medical 
Society, and its president for some 
years. 

He was married Decemlxu- 18, 
1845, to Julia Fowle of Roxbury, who 
died November 20, 1902. Five cM- 
dren were born to them: J(jshua 
Bently, born October 18, 1849, died Jul 
o 




Hon. Joseph Herman Streeter. 
30, 1869; Julia Lizzie, born June 20, 



1852, died June 2, 1857; Angela Mellish, born January 11, 1857, resides in 
Roxbury, Mass.; George Herman, born June 10, 1860, resides in Lexington, 
Mass.; Frank Fowle, born May 10, 1862, resides in Ro.xbury, Mass. 



278 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1837 



CAPT. SEBASTIAN RUSSELL STREETER, A. B. 

Sebastian R. Streeter, son of the 
Rev. Russell and Clarinda (Cook) 
Streeter, was born in Springfield, Vt., 
June 1, 1818, and died in Woodstock, 
Vt., June 9, 1871. In 1834, his 
parents removed to Woodstock. He 
prepared for college in the schools of 
Springfield, Mass., and entered the 
University in 1834, and graduated 
A. B. in 1837. 

He studied law with Tracy & 
Converse of Woodstock, Vt., and 
was admitted to the Windsor 
County Bar, May, 1841. He prac- 
ticed his profession in Barnard, 1841- 
49, Providence, R. I., 1849-60; Rox- 
bury, Mass., 1860-71. He was com- 
missioned 1st lieutenant in the 61st 
Massachusetts Volunteers, October 
17, 1864; promoted captain, Novem- 
ber 9, 1864; resigned January 4, 1865. 

He is survived by a daughter, 
Mrs. R. S. Dinsmore, who resides at 
618 Union Street, Emporia, Kan. 




Capt. SebastianlRussell Streeter. 



REV. JOSIAH SWETT, A. M., D. D. 

Josiah Swett, son of Josiah and Hannah (Healey) Swett, was born in 
Claremont, N. H., August 14, 1814, and died in Highgate, Vt., January 4, 
1890; was buried in Burlington, Vt. 

He prepared for college at the Chester, Vt., Academy and the Kimball 
Union Academy, Meriden, N. H., and entered the University in 1834, and 
graduated, A. B., in 1837; was instructor in the EngUsh Department, 1836-37; 
received the degree of A. M. in course from "N. U.' ' in 1840, and the honorary 
degree of A. M. from Trinity in 1856. 

He was principal of the Claremont, (N. H.) Academy, 1837-40. In 
February, 1840, he was elected professor of the Latin and Greek Languages at 
the University, which position he held until August, 1841. In the summer of 
1840, in company with his friend and former roommate at the University, 
General Alonzo Jackman, he began the publication of the Citizen Soldier, in 
Norwich,' Vt. The enterprise did not prove a success and in the spring of 1841 
they discontinued the paper, and in August they resigned their professorships 
at the University. They soon established the New England Seminary at 
Windsor, which they conducted until the fall of 1844, when they both returned 
to their former positions at the University. In August, 1845, he resigned his 
professorship and became principal of the Claremont Seminary which position 
he held until 1847. 

In 1843, he began studying for the Episcopal ministry and on March 12, 
1847, was ordained deacon by the Bishop of New Hampshire in the church at 



'^0^: ^' 




X.. 



Rev. Josiah Swett, 



280 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. [1837 

Claremout; and prit^st; by Bishop Hopkins of Vermont, September 15, 1847; 
was rector of the church in Bethel, Vt., 1847-65; was professor of Divinity in the 
Vermont Episcopal Institute, Burlington, Vt., 1865-67; was rector of churches 
in Royalton, Jericho, Fairfax, Fairfield, Swanton and Highgate. He made his 
home in Highgate from 1877 until his death. He took great interest in the 
welfare of his alma mater; served as trastee, 1857-88; was secretary of the 
board, 1862-76; acting president, August 12, 1875-October 19, 1876; received 
the degree of D. D. from the University in 1864. 

He met with marked success as a clergyman and was greatly respected and 
beloved, not only by the members of his church, but also by the people of the 
communities where he lived; was president of the Standing Committee of the 
Diocese for twenty-five years and was for several years Dean of the Convention 
of Burlington; was deputy to the General Convention which met in Phila- 
delphia in 1856. He also met with great success as a teacher, and for several 
years conducted the "Champlain Hall" in Highgate, Vt. He took great 
interest in military matters, served for some time as major in the militia, and 
for several years was secretary of the Military Convention of Vermont. 

He was a fine scholar and an able writer. He pubUshed several sermons; 
A Manual of Family Prayer, An Essay on the Firmament as the loork of the Third 
Day of Creation; English Grammar, a work which had an extensive sale, also 
an abridged edition of the same. He published an edition of Thompson's 
Seasons and Pope's Essays on Man, with notes for the use of schools. He 
contributed numerous articles to the various periodicals, and left many un- 
published poems. 

He was twice married: first, December 6, 1843, to Mary Jarvis Campbell, 
of Windsor, Vt., who died April 6, 1845. One child, Mary Campbell, born 
December 21, 1844, married John A. Fitch, resides in Brookline, Mass. He 
was again married, October 30, 1845, to Lucy Miranda Wheeler, of Newport, 
N. H., who died September 28, 1885. Nine children were born to them: 
Hannah Sibyl, married Theodore P. Lukens, resides in Pasadena, Cal.; James 
Wheeler, died December 31, 1876 ("N.U.," 72); Marilla Elizabeth, lives in 
Cambridge, Mass.; William Plummer, resides in Southern Pines, N.C. ; Josiah, 
resides in New Hartford, Conn.; Hester Miranda, died March 19, 1884; Paul 
Flynn, resides in Garden City, Long Island; Katherine Healey, died April 2, 
1901; Lois Jane, resides in Pasadena, Cal. 

COL. THOMAS JEFFERSON WHIPPLE, A. M. 

Thomas J. Wliipple, son of Dr. Thomas and Phoebe (Tabor) WTiipple, was 
born in Wentworth, N. H., January 30, 1816, and died in Laconia, N. H., 
December 21, 1889. 

He prepared for college at the academies in New London, N. H., and 
Bradford, Vt. He entered the University in 1834, and remained two years. 
In 1879, the L^niversity in recognition of his work as a lawyer and soldier, con- 
ferred upon him the degree of A. B., as for 1837; he received the degree of A. M. 
from Dartmouth College in 1867. He studied law with Hon. Joseph Quincy 
of Rumnej^ N. H., and Solomon Wires of Johnson, Vt., and was admitted to the 
bar at Ph'mouth, N. H., in 1840. He practiced his profession in Wentworth, 
N. H., 1840-46; Meredith Bridge, N. H., 1848-55, Laconia, N. H., 1855-61, 
1862-1889. 



1837] 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



281 



uffik^ ^'jif 



In 1833, he served as aide-dc-camj) on the staff of General Cook of the New 
Hampshire MiUtia. In 1837, he raised an independent^company in Went- 
worth, N. H., known as the "Wentworth Phalanx," and served as its captain 
until 1847. He enlisted in the 9tli New England Regiment, April 1847; was 
commissioned first heutenant April 9, 1847; served as adjutant of the regiment, 
April 20-June 15, 1847; resigned February 23, 1848; was stationed for a short 
time at Fort Adams, R. I., served 
with his regiment in Mexico and was 

conspicuous for bravery in several \ 

battles. He was commissioned lieu- ^y^^, 

tenant colonel, 1st New Hampshire 
Infantry, April 29, 1861, and served 
in Virginia; was mustered out, August 
9, 1861. On August 20, 1861, he was 
commissioned colonel of the 4th New 
Hampshire Infantry; served at Port 
Royal, S, C, November 4, 1861- 
January 26, 1862; took part in the 
capture of Fernandina, Jacksonville 
and St. Augustine, Fla. ; he was forced 
to resign his commission May 18, 
1862, owing to disability. 

He was a Democrat in politics 
and held many offices; was assistant 
clerk and clerk of the House of Rep- 
resentatives of New Hampshire; was 
secretary of the Constitutional Con- 
vention in 1850, and a member of the 

Convention, 1876. He was one of Col. Thomas Jttterson Whipple, 

the most popular speakers in New Hampshire and took a leading part in many 
Democratic campaigns. He was very popular with the G. A. R. members and 
was many times the orator at military' reunions. He was one of the ablest 
lawyers in the State and was very popular with the masses. He was very 
witty and humorous. He was a member of Mt. Lebanon Lodge, F. and A. 
M., of Laconia, I. O. O. F., and the G. A. R. 

He was married October 14, 1842, to Belinda Butler Hoadley of Rumney, 
N. H., who died November 14, 1854. One child, Belinda Caroline, born 
August 8, 1846, married G. R. Somes, died in Laconia, February 27, 1895. 




NON-GRADUATES 

HORACE PARKHURST ALLEN. 

Horace P. Allen, son of Jason and Lucy Ann (Parkhurst) Allen, and 
nephew of J. D. Allen, '25, was born in Eastport, Me., November 27, 1817, 
and died in Royalton, Vt., September 2, 1894. 

His parents removed to Lebanon, N. H., in 1830, when; he prepared for 
college. He entered the University in 1833 and remained three years, leaving 
to enter West Point; was appointed a cadet at the U. S. Military Academy, 



282 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



1S3- 



September 1, 1836, and on account of sickness resigned October 5, 1837. He 
located in Royalton, Vt., in 1847, where he resided until his death. He was 
cashier of the Royalton Bank many years. He was a Republican in pohtics 
and held many offices; was justice of the peace, 1860-92; town clerk for several 
years; hster, 1853-90; notary pubUc, 1853-90. 

He was married June 7, 1842, to Susan Waldo, daughter of Phineas and 
Charlotte Stone (Parkhurst) Pierce. One child was born to them, Horace 
Parkhurst, born April 22, 1843, who resides in Boston, Mass. 

BVT. BRIG.-GEN. HENRY STANTON BURTON, U. S. A. 
Henry S. Burton, son of OUver G. and Ahnira (Partridge) Burton, was 
born in Norwich, Vt., September, 1818, and died at Fort Adams, Newport, 
R. I.,April 2, 1869. 

He entered the "Academy" in 1832, and the University in 1834, and re- 
mained until 1835. He entered the United States Mihtary Academy, West 
Point, N. Y., July 1, ]s35, and gi-aduated, 9th in his class, July 1, 1839; was 

commissioned 2d lieutenant, 3d Artil- 
lery July 1, 1839; first lieutenant 
same regiment, November 11, 1839; 
served in the Florida War, 1839-40, 
1840-42; Fort Moultre, S. C, 1842- 
43; assistant instructor of Infantry 
Tactics, West Point, June 16, 1843- 
December 16, 1845, assistant in- 
structor of Artillery same, December 
16, 1845-August 5, 1846. 

On the breaking out of the Mexi- 
can War, he was commissioned lieu- 
tenant-colonel. New York Volun- 
teers, and served in California; took 
I art in the attack on La Paz, L. C, 
and the skirmish at Todos Santas, 
L. C, March 30, 1848. He was com- 
missioned captain 3d Artillery, Sep- 
tember 22, 1847; served on frontier 
duty at Monterey, Cal., 1848-51; San 
Francisco,^ 1851, Monterey, 1851 and 
1852; San Diego, Cal., 1852-57; Fort 
Bvt. Brig.-Gen. HenryBStanton Burton. Yuma, Cal., 1857-58; Fort Gaston, 
1859; on Mojave expedition in 1859; Fort Columbus, N. Y., 1859; on 
leave of absence, 1860-61; stationed at the Artillery School of Practice, Fort 
Monroe, Va., 1861; was promoted major same regiment. May 14, 1861; served 
at Alcatras Island, Cal., 1861-62; in command of prisoners of war. Fort Dela- 
ware, Del., June 1862-September, 1863; promoted lieutenant-colonel, 4th 
Artillery July 25, 1863; and colonel 5th Artillery, August 11,1863; served on 
detached duty. District of Monongahela, Pa., September, 1863-June 21, 1864; 
in command of the Artillery reserve Army of the Potomac, Januar}--May,1864; 
inspector of artillery, Army of the Potomac, Richmond campaign, Maj^-June 
1864; in command of the Artillery 18th Army corps, June-July, 1864; in com- 
mand of 5th Artillery and inspector of artillery. Department of the East, with 




1837] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 283 

headquarters at Fort Richmond, N. Y., September 7, December 2, 1864; 
member of board for retiring disabled officers, at Wilmington, Del., December 2, 
1864-May 15, 1865, October 31-November 27, 1865; in command 5th Artillery 
at Fort Richmond, N. Y., May 15-October 31, 1865; in command of 5th Artil- 
lery Fort Monroe, Va., November 27, 1865, where Jefferson Davis Was a 
prisoner. He was breveted brigadier-general, U. S. A., March 13, 1865, for 
"gallant and meritorious service at the capture of Petersburg, Va." 

He was twice married: first, in 1840, to Elizabeth Furgurson Smith, 
(laughter of Dr. Samuel Blair Smith, U. S. A., and sister of Gen. Charles T. 
Smith, U. S. A. She died at Fort Moultrie, S. C, in 1841. One child, Eliza- 
beth Furgurson, born 1841, married Lieut. Edward P. Lull, U.S.N., died 1868. 
He was again married in 1849, to Maria Amparo de Ruiz of Mexico, who died 
August 12, 1895. Two children: Nellie, born July 4, 1850, married Don 
Miguel- de Pedrorena, of California, died February 5, 1910; Henry H., born 
November 24, 1852, resides in Los Angeles, Cal. 

DANIEL BRYANT BLISS COBB. 

Daniel B. B. Cobb, son of Daniel and Marinda (Bryant) Cobb, and brother 
of N. B. Cobb, '46, was born in Strafford, Vt., January 1, 1819, and died there, 
April 1, 1857. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the Uni- 
versity in the spring of 1834, remaining the winter of 1835. 

He was engaged in the mercantile business in Derby Line, Vt., 1836-51, 
first a clerk, then a partner in the firm of Baxter, Chamberlin & Cobb, then 
senior member of Cobb, Rollins & Co.; was appointed, in 1851, an officer in the 
U. S. Customs at Derby and served for several years; was director and cashier 
of the People's Bank, Derby^Line, until 1856, when owing to illness was forced 
to resign his position. 

He was married, July 28, 1851, to Diantha Isabel West of Derby Line, Vt., 
who married again and now resides in Philadelphia, Pa; no children. 

JAMES BRADLEY SMITH. 

Jamea B. Smith, brother of Franklin W. Smith, '37, was born in Bradford, 
Vt., May 15, 1815, and died in Tennessee, June 14, 1893. At an early age his 
parents removed to Hanover, N. H., where he prepared for college". He entered 
the University in 1833, and remained until 1836. 

He was assistant engineer on the Utica & Schenectady R. R., 1837-40; 
Memphis & Rio Grande, R. R., in Miss., 1840-45. He located in Bolivia 
County, Miss., about 1845, where he resided until 1861; was extensively 
engaged in planting in this county,'servcd as coimty engineer for some years, 
also represented his district in the State Legislature, several terms. In 1861, 
he returned north and in 1874, located in Tennessee, where he made his home 
until his death. 

CAPTAIN TIMOTHY DWIGHT SMITH. 

Timothy D, Smith, brother of Franklin W. Smith, was born in Bradford, 
Vt., December 3, 1818, and died at Fort Abercrombie, Minn., May 6, 1875. 

At an early age his parents removed to Hanover, N. H., where he prepared 
for college. He entered the University in 1835, and remained nearly two years, 



284 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1837 



He engaged in mercantile business in Hanover and Lebanon, N. H., until 
1855, when he removed to St. Paul, Minn. He then engaged in the commis- 
sion business until 1862. He served as colonel in the New Hamp-shire MUitia, 
1850-55; was commissioned captain and assistant quartermaster of volunteers, 
June 21, 1862; resigned May 1, 1865. He was than a sutler at Fort Aber- 
crombie until his death. 

HENRY BARZILLAI STREETER, M. D. 

Hem-y B. Streeter, son of Rev. Russell Streeter, was born in Portland 
Me., September 11, 1822, and died in San Fi-ancisco, Cal., October 6, 1850. 

In 1834, his parents removed to Woodstock. He prepared for college 
in Springfield, Mass. He was a student in the Primary department of the 
University, 1834-36, and entered the Collegiate department in 1836, remain- 
ing one year; studied medicine in Woodstock; graduated M. D. from Ver- 
mont Medical College, Woodstock, in 1846; was a sailor, 1840-42; went to 
California in 1849, where he died unmarried, in 1850. 




Troop B, 191 1. 



1838] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 285 

CLASS OF 1838, 
CAPT. JAY DYER, A. B. 

Jay Dyer, son of Jonathan and Hannah (Dwinell) Dyer, and brother of 
W. N. Dyer, '39, was born in Clarendon, Vt., November 30, 1819, and died 
in Galena, Ohio,December 24, 1906. He entered the University in 1835, and 
graduated, A. B., in 1838. 

He was assistant engineer on the Illinois Central R. R., with Col. T. B. 
Ransom, '25, on the survey of the road from Peru to Dixon, April 1839-40; 
was assistant engineer with "The Illinois Internal Improvement Commission' ' 
on survey of the Illinois River for improvement of navigation, H. P. Wood- 
worth, '25, being chief engineer and Charles Slack, '39, resident engineer, 1840. 
He taught school in Illinois and Ohio, until the .spring of 1850, when he crossed 
the Plains to the gold fields of California. He worked in the mines in Cali- 
fornia, until 1860, when he returned home via the Isthmus of Panama, then up 
the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers to Cincinnati, reaching Galena, Ohio, in 
March, 1861. He then served as county surveyor, Delaware Countj^, until 
August, 1861. 

He offered his services to the state of Ohio; was commissioned captain 
Co. I., 32d Ohio Volunteers, August 31, 1861, of which regiment S. M. Hewitt, 
'40, was major; served with marked distinction in the Army of Western 
Virginia until April 10, 1862, when owing to disability was forced to resign his 
commission; served as county surveyor, 1863-66; was assistant engineer on the 
construction of the Cleveland, Akron & Columbus R. R., 1870-72. He also 
engaged in farming and stock raising from 1862 until his death. 

He was married at Berkshire, Ohio, October 4, 1847, to Hortensia Norton, 
a native of Connecticut, who survives him and resides in Galena. Two chil- 
dren were born to them : Alfred, a graduate of Kenyon College, and now an 
attorney at Kinsley, Kan.; David Norton, now an extensive farmer at Galena, 
Ohio. 

CHARLES DENISON LEWIS, A. B., M. C. E., M. D. 

Charles D. Lewis, son of Enos and Keturah (Denison) Lewis and brother 
of W. E. Lewis, '33, was born in Norwich, Vt., June 6, 1817, and died in Dry 
Ridge, Ky., August 3, 1895; was buried in Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the Uni- 
versity in 1834, graduating A. B. in 1838, and M. C. E. in 1839; received the 
degree of A. M. in course in 1841. 

He began the study of medicine some time previous to his graduation; 
graduated M. D. from the Dartmouth Medical College in 1841. He began 
the practice of his profession in Norwich in 1841, but later in the same year 
moved to Randolph, where he practiced until 1842. He practiced in Fiskburg, 
Kenton County, Ky., for a few months in 1842; Dry Ridge, Ky., 1842-95. He 
was a successful physician. His life was a conscientious consecration to the 
interest of the afflicted and destitute humanity. He was honest in all his 
dealings and was highly respected by the citizens of his county. 



2sr) 



NORWICH ITNIVERSITY. 



[1838 




Charles Dennison Lewis. 



He was an active member of the 
Presbyterian Chm-ch, serving as an 
elder for many years; member of the 
North Kentucky Medical Society; I. O. 
G. T., holding the various offices of 
the order. He was a Republican in 
1 ( ilitics and was an ardent supporter of 
t lie Union during the Civil War. 

He was married in Cincinnati, 
^1 Ohio, March 24, 1847, to CaroHne 
MatUda Cannon of Bourbon Co., Ky., 
who survives him and resided in Dry 
Ridge, Ky. Six children were born 
to them: Loo Emma, bom January 
2, 1851, resides -in Dry Ridge, Ky.; 
Charles Converse, born April 17, 1852, 
died January 17, 1901; Walter Wendell 
Holmes, born May 16, 1855, resides 
in Dry Ridge, Ky.; WilUam Kane, 
born July 28, 1862, resides in Dry 
Ridge, Ky.; two children died in in- 
fancy. 



JEHIEL LILLIE, A. B. 

Jehiel Lillie was born in Tunbridge, Vt., in 1812, and died in Selma, Ala., 
in 1875. 

He entered the Universit}^ in 1835, and graduated A. B. in 1838. He 
studied law and was admitted to the Orange County bar at Chelsea, Vt., in 
1839; practiced his profession in Chelsea, 1839-41; Norwich, Vt., 1841-42; 
removed to Selma, Ala., where he practiced his profession many years, meeting 
with marked success. He was survived by a widow, who died about 1890; one 
child, a son, died in early youth. 



CHARLES SLACK, M. C. E. 

Charles Slack, son of Jesse and Betsey (Burnham) Slack, and brother of 
Allen B. Slack, '39, was born in Windsor, Vt., in 1817, and died in California in 
1859. He attended the schools of his town and entered the University in 1835, 
and graduated M. C. E., in 1838. 

He was engineer in charge of surveys for the improvement of the naviga- 
tions on the Illinois River, for the " Illinois Internal Improvement Commission" 
1839-43, Hiram P, Woodworth, '25, being the chief engineer; was engineer 
on the Erie Canal, 1843-45. Details of his work from 1845 until his death in 
1859 have not been preserved. He went to California in 1850 and on this trip 
was met by his classmate. Jay Dyer, '38, at the head waters of the Humbolt 
River. 



1838] 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



287 



/*^ 



JOHNSON SHEDD, A. B. 

Johnson Shedd, oldest son of William and Jemima (Spaulding) Shedd, 
brother of Gen.Warren Shedd, '40, and Solon Shedd, '51, was born in Stoddard, 
N. H., May 1, 1815, and died of 
measles in Portsmouth, Va., Feb- 
ruary 3, 1842. 

He prepared for college in the 
schools of his town and entered 
the University in 1836, gradua- 
ting A. B., in 1838. He taught a 
school in Strafford, Vt., while a 
cadet; was assistant professor of 
Mathematics and English Litera- 
ture at the University, 1837-39; 
superintendent of the Virginia 
Literary, Scientific and Military 
Academy, Portsmouth, Va., 1839- 
42. 

He was a fine scholar, ex- 
celling in mathematics and was a 
successful teacher. He gave 
promise of a brilliant career in his 
chosen profession. His journal, 
composition and letters show depth 
of thought and literary ability. 

He was not married. Johnson Shedd. 

NON-GRADUATES 1838. 





Austin Davis Arms. 



AUSTIN DAVIS ARMS. 

Austin D. Arms, son of Austin 
and ^ Sally (Davis) Arms, was born 
in Monti)elier, Vt., December 26, 
1817, and died at East Montpelier, 
Vt., September 19, 1896. He pre- 
pared for college in the schools of 
his town and entered the University 
in 1835, remaining until 1837, when 
ho was forced to give up his course 
owing to poor health. 

He studied law for a time with 
his uncle, Col. Jonathan P. Miller of 
Montpelier, but owing to ill health 
gave up this profession. He then 
tried the life of a merchant, for the 
same reason as above, but met with 
no better success. He finally bought 
a farm in East Montpeher, where he 
continued to reside until his death. 

He was town clerk from 1856 
until 1861, when he resigned to enter 



288 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. [1838 

the quartermaster's department, U. S. Volunteers, under Gen. P. P. Pitkin, as 
assistant quartermaster. He was unable to enlist in the service, owing to his 
deafness, yet served with distinction doing all the duties of a soldier until the 
winter of 1864. He was wdth the troops at Fairfax Court House, Culpepper 
Court House, Richmond, City Point and Washington. 

In 1864, he again tried mercantile life in Montpeher, but was forced to 
give it up owing to poor health. He held manj^ positions of trust in his town. 
He was a member of the Aurora Lodge, F. and A. IVI. of Montpelier. 

He was married January 14, 1841, to Fanny Dodge of IVIontpelier, who 
survives him and resides in ]Montpelier, Vt. Three children were born to them: 
Sarah Rebecca, born February 3, 1842, married N. P. Dodge, died in San 
Francisco, November 30, 1864; Stephen Wilfred, born September 21, 1844, 
died October 21, 1885; Fanny Ada, born Jul}' 31, 1855, married Fred W. Strong, 
and resides in East Montpeher, Vt. 

GEORGE HENRY BISSELL, A. B., LL. B. 

George H. Bissell, son of Isaac and Nina (Winple) Bissell, was born in 
Hanover, N. H., November 8, 1821, and died in New York city, November 
19, 1884. He prepared for college in the Hanover schools, and entered the 
University in 1836, remaining three j^ears; graduated from Dartmouth College 
in 1845. 

He was professor of languages at "N. U." for a few months in 1845; was 
the Washington, D.C., correspondent of the Richmond Whig, 1845-46; traveled 
in the West Indies in 1846; was principal of schools in New Orleans, La., 1846- 
48, and supermtendent of schools, 1848-53; was associate editor of the New 
Orleans Delta and Crescent, 1849-50. He studied law with Charles M. Emerson 
in New Orleans, 1849-50, and graduated LL. B. from Jefferson College, Miss., 
in 1851. He removed to New York city in 1853, and practiced law there 
during 1853-59; was admitted to practice before the U. S. Courts in 1855. 

In 1853, he bought a large tract of land in the oil region of Penn.s\dvania 
and was the first to recognize the value of petroleum as an article of commerce, 
and was the first to refine the oil for general use. He organized, in 1845, the 
Pennsylvania Rock Oil Co., in New York city, the first company of the kind in 
America and served as its fu'st president for several years. He removed to 
Oil City, Pa., in 1859, and in 1863 retm-ned to New York city, where he resided 
until his death; was the senior partner in the firm of George H. Bissell & Co., 
brokers. Oil City, Pa. He was very successful in his business and acquired a 
large property. 

He was married, October 14, 1855, to Aphie Louise Griffin of New York 
cit}', who died April 25, 1867. Two children wei'e born to them: Pelham St. 
George, resides in New York; Florence Winple, died November 19, 1884. 

STEPHEN BOSWORTH. 

Stephen Bosworth, son of Jar\as and Barsheba Bosworth, was born in 
Royalton, Vt., in 1814, and died there June 2, 1854 of small pox. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the L'ni- 
versity in 1835, and remained two years. 

He was a merchant in North Royalton for several years. He sold his 



1838] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 289 

business and removed West, where he engaged in business for several years. 
He then retvirned to Royalton, where he resided until his death. 

He married Eliza L. Foster of Timbridge, Vt. Three children were born 
to them: Charles Bartell, born in August, 1847, died February 8, 1852; two 
children died in early youth. 

JAMES WEEDEN BROWN. 

James W. Brown, son of John and Sarah (Weeden) Brown, was born in 
Norwich, Vt., August 2, 1820, and died in Boston, Mass., October 23, 1904. He 
attended the schools of his town and entered the University in 1836, and re- 
mained two years. 

He engaged in mercantile business, Post Mills, Vt., 1837-45; Lowell, Mass., 
1845-50. In 1850, he located in Boston and engaged as wholesale dealer and 
importer of dry goods until 1895, when he retired from active business. He 
met with marked success in his business ventures and acquired valuable 
property. He was an extensive traveled and during the Civil War he made 
many trips South and West and after he was sixty years old made ten 
bu.siness trips to Em'ope. 

He was a Republican in politics and was an active anti-slavery worker with 
Phillips, Garrison and Sumner and was prominent in the "underground rail- 
road" work in freeing slaves. He was a man of decided literary tastes; was 
especially fond of history and possessed a very large and well selected library. 
He was a member of Theodore Parker 's Unitarian Church and gave liberally 
in aid of the various church enterprises. 

He was twice married : first, in 1840, to Sarah Riley Bruce of Post Mills, 
who died about 1850; no children. He was again married, August 10, 1858, to 
Sarah Elizabeth Sweet of Foxboro, Mass., who died in San Jose, Cal., Decem- 
ber 23, 1890. Three children were born to them: Minerva Sweet, born Octo- 
ber 7, 1860, resides in Cambridge, Mass. ; Jeanie Bruce, born June 29, 1862, re- 
sides in Manchester, N. H.; Anne Brooks, born February 14, 1865, resides in 
Manchester, N. H. 

GEORGE HENRY CLARK. 

George H. Clark, son of Benjamin Franklin and Martha (Davis) Clark, 
was born in Sandy Hill, N. Y., June 3, 1820, and died in Brooklyn; N. Y., June 
3, 1905. He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the 
University in 1835, remaining two years. 

He was assistant engineer on the survey of the Genesee Canal, in 1835. 
In 1843, he formed a partnership with Nathan J. Wyeth and engaged in ship- 
ping ice to the West Indices, making his residence in Cambridge, Mass. He 
surveyed the Eagle Bridge R. R., 1848, and was superintendent of the road, 
1856-57; was resident engineer on the Erie Canal, from Albany to Sprakers 
Bridge, N. Y., 1858. He engaged in the grain business with headquarters in 
Buffalo, N. Y., 1862-63; conducted a supply store for soldiers in Memphis 
Tenn., 1863 65; engaged in the stock brokerage business in New York. He 
was a member of the I. O. O. F. 

He was married, February 21, 1846, to Laura Ann Ball, sister of Charles 
Ball, '40. She survives him and resides in Brooklyn, N. Y. Six children were 
born to them: Sarah Elizabeth, born June 1, 1847, married William Kimball 



290 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1838 



Phelps, resides in Brookh^n; Roswell Bennedict, born July 21, 1849, resides in 
Brooklyn; Charles Benjamin born December 24, 1831, died April 21, 1855; 
Martha Davis, born December 15, 1854, married Edgar Southworth Pratt, son 
of the Rev. Horace L. Edgar Pratt, rector of St. Mary's P. E. Church, Staten 
Island, for 18 years, resides in Brooklyn; Mary Grace, born October 29, 1858, 
married John Christopher Otteson, secretary of the Wabash R.R., died Febru- 
ary 9, 1898. 

GEORGE COTTON. 

George Cotton, son of Nathaniel and Prudence Hubbard (Goodwin) 
Cotton, was born in Claremont, N. H., January 5, 1815, and died there Decem- 
ber 8, 1886. He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the 
University in 1835 and remained two years. 

He engaged in various mercantile piirsuits in Claremont, N. H., until 
1844, when he removed to Delavan, Wis., where he resided until 1885. He 
returned to Claremont in 1885, where he resided until his death. He studied 
law and practiced in Delavan, 1844-85; was president of the National Bank in 
that city for some years. 

He was married May 8, 1845, to Mary Marion Chellis of Newport, N. H., 
who died Alarch 27, 1887; no children. 

CAPT. SIMON CHASE DOW, A. M. 
Simon C. Dow, son of Chase and Lucy (Walker) Dow, was born in Straf- 
ford, Vt., October 26, 1818. He prepared for college in the schools of his towTi 

and entered the University in 1835, 
and remained nearly three years; re- 
ceived the degree of A. M. in 1911. 
He engaged in mercantile pur- 
suits in Strafford, 1839 until 1846, 
when he located on a farm in Jo 
Da\aess County, 111. In 1847, 
he located on a farm near Wau- 
paca, Wis., his family being the 
second to settle in that county. 
In 1864, he removed to Alton, 
^^'aseca County, Minnesota, where 
he engaged in farming until 1887, 
when he moved to Lawrence Co., 
Tenn., and engaged in fruit raising. 
In 1892, he returned to Min- 
nesota and located in Walcott, 
Rice County, near Faribault. In 
1899, he retired from active work 
and removed to Faii-bault where 
he has since resided. Dining 1850- 
51, he prospected for gold in 
Colorado, Oregon and California. 
He is a RepubUcan in pohtics 
and has held many offices; was justice of the peace in Wisconsin and ^Minnesota 
many years; postmaster, Greenwood, Wis., for several years; county superin- 




Capt. Simon Chase Dow. 



1838] 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



291 



tendent of schools, Waupaca County, Wis., 1851-53, and treasurer of same 
county, 1851-55. He was captain of the militia company, Strafford, Vt., 
1839-46. He is a member of the UniversaMst Chiu-ch and the Grange. 

He was married March 11, 1845, to Mary BHss Morse of South Fairlee, 
Vt., who died February 9, 1893. Two children were born to them: Frederick 
Morse, born December 1, 1848, died November 15, 1906; Marcella Chase, born 
April 2, 1851, married H. L. Grant, resides in Fairbault, Minn. 



WILLIAM CHASE DOW. 
William C. Dow, son of Jeremiah Dow, owner of the copper mines in 
Shrewsbury, Vt., and cousin of Simon Chase Dow, '38, was born in Shrews- 
bury, Vt., in 1820, and died there about 1850. He attended the schools of 
his town and entered the LTniversity in 1835, remaining two years. He con- 
ducted his father's copper mines and engaged in general mercantile business 
until his death. He was survived by a widow; no children. 

HON. SOLON FRANKLIN FRARY. 

Solon F. Frary, son of Jonathan and Lydia Colcord (Blaisdell) Frary, was 
born in Strafford, Vt., January 27, 1822. He was a lineal descendant from John 
Frary, who came from England in 1638 and was among the earliest settlers of 
Dedham, Mass. He attended the public schools*of his town and in 1835 
entered the LTniversity, remaining two 
years. 

He then began clerking for the 
Hon. Justin S. Morrill and Judge 
Jedediah H. Harris (q. v.) in their 
store in Thetford, Vt., where he re- 
mained three years. Returning to 
Strafford, he continued to engage in 
trade until 1890, when he retired 
from the active duties of life. 

He is a Republican in his politi- 
cal behef and has held the offices of 
town treasurer, town agent, justice of 
the peace, and chairman of the board 
of auditors for sixteen years. He 
represented his town in the State 
Legislature in 1872, and in 1888 was 
elected from Orange County to the 
State senate. He was postmaster, 
1860-1888, and has often \n\in\ made 
chairman of the Republican town 
committee. He is a director of God- 
dard Seminary, Barre, Vt., and has Hon. Solon Franklin Frary. 

been one of the auditors of their accounts and chairman of the investnu>nt 
committee. 

He was married December 18, 1834, to'Adcliza, daughter of Benjamin and 
Betsey (Kent) Oilman. Two children wcre^born to them: Gertrude, born 
September 28, 1855, married Samuel B. Buck, resides in So. Strafford, Vt.; 
Bessie Jane, born September 17, 1858, resides in So. Strafford, Vt. 




292 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1838 



REV. JOHN HARVEY MOORE. 

John H. Moore, son of the Rev. John and Mary (Alger) Moore, was born 
in Strafford, Vt., November 29, 1818, and died in Webster, Mass., March 2, 
1901. In 1828, his parents removed to Lebanon, N. H., where he attended the 
pubhc schools and the Lebanon Academy. He entered the University in 1835, 
and remained two years. 

He studied for the Universalist 
ministry with his father, and Hosea 
^^ Ballou 2d D. D.; was ordained. May 

23, 1844. His pastorates were, 
Warren, Mass., 1844-49; 1862-74; 
South Reading, Mass., (now Wake- 
field) 1849-54; Stamford, Conn., 
1854-55; Concord, N. H., 1855-62; 
Webster, Mass., 1874-78; Newark, 
N. Y., 1879-92. His health beginning 
to fail in 1892, he retired from the 
active work of the ministry and re- 
turned to Warren, where he resided 
until his death. He was one of the 
ablest clergymen of his denomination ; 
was an eloquent and forceful preacher. 
His hfe and character were such 
as to win the love and respect of his 
fellow men. He took a deep and 
active interest in all matters pertain- 
ing to the public good. During the 
trying times of the Civil War, he 
took an active part in the cause of 




Rev. John Harvey Moore. 



the Union and the abolition of slavery. He took an active interest in 
school matters, serving on the school board. He represented Warren in the 
State legislatm-e in 1870. He contributed many articles to the various publi- 
cations and many of his sermons were pulilished in the clim-ch papers. He was 
a member of Quaboag Lodge, F. and A. M., Warren, Mass. 

He was twice married: first, November 26, 1846, to Hannah Ann Moore 
of Warren, Mass., who died July 24, 1876. One child, a son, was born to them 
in 1848, who died in infancy. He was again married October 16, 1877, to 
Mary Bancroft of Petersham, Mass., who survives him and resides in Webster, 
Mass. 

GEN. LEWIS SAMUEL PARTRIDGE. 



Lewis S. Partridge, son of Abel and Alpha (Lewis) Partridge and nephew 
of Capt. Alden Partridge, was born in Norwich, Vt., March 10, 1818, and died 
there May 22, 1886. He attended the schools of his town and entered the 
"Academy" in 1833, and the University in 1834, and remained until 1837. 

He was a clerk in stores in Hanover and Claremont, N. H., and then 
engaged in the mercantile business in Norwich many years; was proprietor of 
the "Union Hotel' ' in Norwich several years. 



1838] 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS, 



293 



He was a Democrat in politics and held many positions; represented 
Norwich in the House of Representatives in 1852 and 1853 ; was his party 's nomi- 
nee for State senator and congressman; was a delegate to National Democratic 
convention in 1854; was United States marshal of Vermont, 1857-61 ; was post- 
master of Norwich, 1853, 1861, 1885-86. He took great interest in military 
matters; held several commissions 
in the State Militia; was adjutant- 
general of Vermont, 1852-54; also 
served for many years as marshal at 
the "N. U." Commencements. 

He was twice married: first, 
June 16, 1846, to Harriet Baxter of 
Norwich, who died August 25, 1854. 
Three children were born of this 
marriage: Lewis Baxter, "N. U.," 
'68 (q. v.); Lizzie Adelia, born 
October 12, 1850, married Wales 
M. Ward of Athol, Mass.; Harriet 
Louise, born May 5, 1854, married 
James Brigham, resides Norwich. 
He was again married. May 27, 
1856, to Elizabeth Jane Woodruff 
of Tinmouth, Vt., who survives him 
and resides in Manchester, N. H. 
Eight children were born to them : 
Edward Irving, born November 12, 
1859, resides in Manchester, N. H.; 
Alliston Lee, born January 13, 1862, 
resides in Manchester. N. H.; 




Gen. Lewis Samuel Partridge. 



Charles Seymour, born June 28, 1864, died at Canaan, N. H., March 7, 
1908; Robert Ashby, born January 21, 1866, resides in Manchester, N. H.; 
Marion Fenella, born October 8, 1868, i-esides in Manchester, N. H.; Mary 
Woodruff, born August 14, 1870, died August 20, 1870; Martha Josephine, 
born April 11, 1872, resides in Manchester, N. H.; William Woodruff, born 
August 5, 1875, resides in Boston, Mass. 

HON. BENJAMIN POOLE, A. B. 

Benjamin Poole was born in Gloucester, Mass., June 9, 1818, and died in 
Roxbury, Mass., September 10, 1906. He attended the schools of his city and 
finished his preparation for college in the Academy in Hampton, N. H. He 
entered the University in 1835, and remained nearly three years. He entered 
Bowdoin College in 1839, and remained tkree years. He then entered Union 
College, N. Y., and graduated A. B. in 1844. 

He studied law with John P. Hale of Dover, N. H., and was admitted to 
the bar in Berwick, Maine, in 1844. He practiced law in Dover, N. H., 1844-45; 
Georgetown, Mass., 1845-49; Lowell, Mass., in company with Theodore Sweet- 
ser, 1842-55; Topsfield, Mass., 1855-60; Boston, Mass., 1860-1900, when he 
retired from active work. He was admitted to practice before the United States 
Supreme Court in 1865. He was associated in many business enterprises; was 
president of the Danvers & Georgetown R. R., 1856-60, and its attorney for 
several years; served as president of the Metropolitan Street Ry. of Boston, 



294 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1838 




Hon. Benjamin Poole. 



1860-75; was president of the United 
States Ballot Box Co., of Topsfield, for 
many years. He made his home in 
Topsfield until 1903, when he re- 
moved to Boston. 

He was at first a Whig in pohtics 
and later a Democrat; represented 
Lowell in the State Legislature in 
1849-50. He was often urged to 
accept political positions, but refused ; 
was trial justice of Topsfield for some 
j^ears. He met with marked success 
in his profession and in his business 
ventures, acquiring a valuable prop- 
erty. He was a member of the Essex 
Bar Association. 

He married Annie E. Bartlett 
of Eliot, Maine, who died April 30, 
1892. Four children were born to 
them: Annie, married Herbert S. 
Hutchinson, resides in Topsfield; 
Mary, married Andrew L. Pierce, 
resides in Topsfield, Mass. 



OLIVER P. REED. 

Oliver P. Reed, son of Daniel Reed, was born in Windsor, Vt., in 1818, 
and died in San Francisco, Cal., about 1860. He prepared for college in the 
schools of his town and entered the University in 1835, remaining nearly three 
years. 

In 1839, he located in Saratoga, N. Y., where he engaged in the insurance 
business for some years. Later he removed to New York City, where he 
engaged in mercantile business. In 1850, he located in San Francisco, Cal., 
where he made his home until his death. 

He was married in 1838, to Adeline O. Bro'mi of Windsor. 

SAMUEL ROBBE. 

Samuel Robbe, son of Daniel and Betsey (Torrey) Robbe, was bom in 

Peterboro, N. H., March 15, 1818, and died in Milton, N. Y., February 25, 
1860. He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the Uni- 
versity in 1835, remaining two years. He engaged in business in Peterboro 
and later in Milton, N. Y. 

He married Harriet N. Paul of Galway, N. Y. 



GEORGE BARKER SHERRILL. 

George B. Sherrill, son of Darius and Mary (Day) Sherrill, was born at 
Sandy Hill, N. Y., in September, 1822, and died there in September, 1889. 
He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the University 
in 1835, remaining three years. 

From early manhood, he took an active part in the pohtics of his Stat?, 



1838] 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



295 



and held numerous offices of trust. He was librarian of the New York 
Assembly in 1850; postmaster of the senate in 1852-53. He also engaged in 
engineering and contracting. He was superintendent of the Salem and 
Champlain canal in 1869, 1877-79, 1883-S9, resigning on account of faiUng 
health. He constructed several of the large public works of New York. He 
was one of Sandy Hill 's most noted citizens, and an active member of the 
Presbyterian Church. 

He was married May 11, 1848, to Angeline Piersons Bennett. Five 
children were born to them: George, now president of the Sherrill Hardware 
Co., resides in Sandy Hill, N. Y.; Robert Bennett, resides in Sandy Hill, N. Y.; 
three children died in infancy. 

JASPER HAZEN SPRAGUE. 

Jasper H. Sprague, son of Philo and Laura (Hazen) Sprague, was born in 
Hartford, Vt., June 6, 1812, and died in Shelbyville, Ind., about 1880. He 
entered the University in 1834, remaining nearly three years. He removed to 
Shelbyville, Ind., about 1850, where he made his home until his death. 

He was married July 16, 1840, to Duleina C. Towne. Seven children were 
born to them: Laura Ann, bora September 24, 1842, resides in Shelbyville; 
Harriet Louisa, born February 24, 18G4, resides in Shelbyville; Charles T., born 
September 29, 1854, resides in Shelbyville; Carrie J., born in 1856, resides in 
Shelbyville. Three children died in infancy. 



HON. EDWARD SAWYER STEBBINS, M. D. 



Edward S. Stebbins, son of Seth 
and Gemima (Hutchinson) Stebbins, 
was born in Norwich, Vt., January 
17, 1819, and died in Dowagiac, 
Mich., January 28, 1899. 

He prepared for college in the 
schools of his town and entered the 
University in 1834, remaining three 
years. He was a student at the New 
England Botanical College, 1845-46; 
received the degree of M. D. from 
the U. S. Medical College in 18S;;. 

In 1841, he located in Wor- 
cester, Mass., where he made his 
home until 1869; was assistant sup- 
erintendent of the Quinsigamond 
Iron & Wire Works, now the South 
works of the American Steel & 
Wire Co., 1844-50; superintendent 
and part owner of the plant, 1850- 
69. He was the inventor of the 
first wire plating machine used in 
this country; also made many 
other inventions in the manufacture 




Hon. Edward Sawyer Stebbins. 



296 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. [1838 

of wire. He practiced medicine in Dowagiac, Mich., 1869-77; East Liver- 
pool, Ohio, 1877-91. In this last j'ear, he returned to Dowagiac, where he 
made his home until his death. 

He was a EepubUcan in pohtics; represented Worcester in the Massa^ 
chusetts Legislature, 1867-68. He was a member of Peninsula Lodge, No. 
214 F. and A. M. of Dowagiac, and of Niles Commandery K. T. 

He was married in 1844, to Harriett Goddard, of Worcester, who died 
at Dowagiac, Mich., December 3, 1869. Five children were born to them: 
Catherine AmeUa, born November 4, 1846, married Mr. Lewis E. Wing, re- 
sides in Michigan City, Ind.; Mary Florence, born December 29, 1848, married 
Dr. H. S. McMaster, resides in Dowagiac, Mich.; Dorrance Edward, born 
February 10, 1851, died March 6, 1855; Waldo Goddard, born May 25, 1854, 
resides in Chicago, 111.; Benjamin Woodbury, born July 21, 1861, died July 4, 
1882. 

SURGEON JOHN STONE, M. D, 

John Stone, son of Luke and Sibyl (Adams) Stone, was born in Barnard, 
Vt., August 31, 1815, and died in Linton, Hancock County, Georgia, in 1868. 
He attended the schools of his town and entered the University in 1835, 
remaining two years. 

He then studied medicine and located near Tennill, Ga., about 1840, 
where he taught school until 1841. He then removed to Linton, Hancock 
Countj^, Georgia, where he practiced medicine until 1856, when he took his 
second com'se of medical lectm'es in Philadelphia, graduating M. D. in 1857. 
He returned to Linton, and continued his practice until his death. He met 
with mai'ked success in his medical work, becoming one of the most skillful 
physicians in his county. He owned a large tract of land, on the Buffalo 
Creek, Hancock County; was also an extensive owner of slaves. He acquired 
a large property. He served as a surgeon in the C. S. A. He was an active 
memVjer of the Baptist Church. He gave one hundred acres of fine farm 
land to establish the Washington Baptist Institute. 

He married Martha Anna Glenn, of Washington Countj^, who died about 
1870. Three children were born to them: Robert Glenn, resides in Linton, 
Ga.; Addie Julia; William S. 

MILTON WADLEIGH. 

Milton Wadleigh, son of Benjamin and Polly (Mastin) Wadleigh, was 
born in Sutton, N. H., February 13, 1810, and died in Galena, 111., April 
5, 1899. 

He entered the University from Barrington, N. H., in September, 1834, 
and remained until the last of March, 1837, nearly completing the course in 
civil engineering. He went to Chicago, 111., in IVIay, 1837, and in June was 
appointed leveler with W. B. Gilbert, '28, resident engineer for the Illinois 
Internal Improvement Commission. Dm"ing the summer and fall of 1837, 
he assisted in making preliminary surveys for three routes for a railroad be- 
tween the Mississippi and Rock Rivers. In the spring of 1838, he was appointed 
junior assistant engineer in charge of a party on construction of a section 
of road from Dixon, 111. Later, he had charge of surveys of the country 
between the Mississippi and Rock Rivers. In the summer of 1839, owing 
to lack of funds, construction work was suspended and Mr. Wadleigh returned 



1838] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 297 

to New Hampshire early in 1840. In the fall of 1841, he went to Havanna, 
111., where he had property interests and remained there until March, 1843, 
engaging in business and surveying. He then located in Galena, 111., then 
a prosperous mining center, and engaged in mining for lead ore until 1846, 
when he was appointed city surveyor. He resurveyed the streets and lots, 
mapped in 1836-37, and through his accurate work, saved the property 
owners from vexatious law suits. He held the office of city surveyor until 
1861 , when owing to his firm stand for the Union, he lost his office. He was 
then elected by the Unionists, county surveyor of Jo Daviess County, which 
position he held with the exception of one year, until 1889, when he retired 
from active work. 

He was married at Galena, 111., Oct. 19, 1852, to Mrs. Elizabeth 
(Griffith) Oliver, a native of Long Buddy, Northhamptonshire, England. 
She died in Chicago, 111., February 16, 1908. Three children were born to 
them: Ben, born July 2.5, 1853, resides in Chicago, 111.; Grace born February 
21, 1858, resides in Chicago, 111.; Frank, born June 27, 1855, died February 
23, 1888. 

JAMES SMITH WOOLLEY. 

James S. Woolley, son of Thomas and Betsey (Dix) Woolley, was born 
in Woodstock, Vt., October 6, 1817, and died in Troy, Vt., January 1, 1805. 
He prepared for college in the schools of Cavendish and Chester, Vt., and 
entered the University from Cavendish, Vt., in 1835, remaining nearly three 
years. 

He taught schools in Plymouth, Vt., 1838-41; engaged in farming 
in Lowell, Vt., 1841-43; mercantile business, Compton, P. Q., 1843-45; 
Chicopee, Mass., 1845-56, 1861-62; Lowell, Vt., 1856-61; Pana, 111., 1862-78. 
He resided in Troy, Vt., 1883-86, 1904-05; Greenville, N. H., 1886-97; 
Charleston, Vt., 1897-1904. During 1849-50, he travelled in California 
and the Western States. He retired from active labor in 1896. 

He was twice married: first, July IS, 1841, to Susan S. Brown, of Ply- 
mouth, Vt., who died October 17, 1877. One child. Electa, born, June 14, 
1842, married twice: first in 1868, to Mr. Albert Mich, second in 1876 to Mr. 
Joseph Zarnell of Pana, 111., and resides in Atlanta, Ga. He was married 
the second time to Jennie Hayes, of Greenville, N. H., who died- in 1897. 

NATHAN SMITH YOUNG. 

Nathan S. Young, son of Nathan and Hannah Smith (Avery) Young, 
was born in Strafford, Vt., August 21, 1818, and died in Batavia, 111., in 1907. 

He prepared for (iollege in the schools of his town and entered the Uni- 
versity in 1835, and remained until 1838. He located in Blackberry, 111., 
in 1839, and engaged in farming until 1850, when he moved to Batavia, 111., 
where he resided unt il his death. H(; engaged in the grain and lumber business 
1850-1907; was one of the organizers of the First National Bank of Batavia 
in 1864, and served as director 1864-79; in 1879, organized the bank of Coffin 
& Young, which did business until 1891, when it was absorbed by the new 
First National Bank; served as vice-president, 1891-1907. 

He was a Republican in politics and held many offices in the various 
towna where he lived; was city treasurer, Batavia, 1860-95; member of 



298 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. [1838-39 

the East Batavia Board of Education, 1870-1907; library director, 1893-1907. 
He was a fine scholar and a great reader. He possessed a large collection 
of rare books and manuscript. 

He was married September 2, 1862, to Mary Ann Hollister of Bata\'ia, 
who died about 1897. Three children were bom to them: Edwin, died in 
infancy; Fanny Maria, resides in Batavia; Justin Holister, now assistant 
cashier. First National Bank, Batavia. 



CLASS OF 1839. 



GEORGE BRADLEY ADAMS, A. B. 

George B. Adams, son of Tyler and Polly (Leland) Adams, was born in 
Barre, Mass., September 29, 1819, and died in Bowling Green, Ivy., June 30, 
1854. He attended the schools of his city and entered the University in 1836, 
graduating A. B. in 1839. 

He located in Bowling Green, Ky., in 1840, and was chief engineer 
of the Bowling Green & Tennessee R. R., (now the main line of the Louisville 
& Nashville) and later, served as president of the road. He also practiced 
law in Bowling Green for several years. 

He was married June 23, 1841, to Caroline Eva Van Meter of Bowhng 
Green, Ky., who died October 23, 1903. Six children were born to them: 
William Usher, born January 30, 1843, died in January, 1904; Mary Leland, 
born July 28, 1844, married Mr. John Jacob Hilburn, died March 2, 1893; 
Samuel Tyler, born July 12, 1846, died December 17, 1893; JuUa Wood- 
bury, born January 2, 1849, married Mr. William R. Carson, died February 9, 
1910; Charles Joseph, born October 25, 1851, resides in BowUng Green, Ky.; 
George Bradley, born September 7, 18.53, resides in Birmingham, Ala. 

COL. CYRUS BARRETT BURNHAM, M. C. E. 

Cyrus B. Burnham, son of John and Harriet (Barrett) Burnham, was 
born in Strafford, Vt., June 6, 1822. He attended the schools of his town 
and entered the LTniversity in September, 1836, graduating M. C. E. in 1839. 

He was a clerk for Hon. J. H. Harris and Hon. Justin S. MorriU, in their 
store in Strafford, from 1839 until September, 1842; engaged in the mercantile 
business in Stanstead, Canada, September, 1842, until September, 1847. 
He left Stanstead for St. Louis, Mo., in September, 1847, arriving in that citj-, 
November 6, where he has made his home to date. He was a clerk for Greeley 
& Gale, wholesale grocers, January, 1848 until 1850, when he became a mem- 
ber of the firm. He continued a member of the firm until 1893, when he retired. 

He has been connected with manj^ business enterprises in his city. He 
was one of the organizers, in November, 1862, of the present National Bank 
of Commerce, of St. Louis. The capital stock of the original corporation 
was $200,000, and its present capital is $10,000,000, with a surplus of $5,000,- 
000. He served as president of the bank from 1875 until 1883, and director 
from 1862 until 1893. Since 1893, he has been connected with the 
Washington Land & Mining Company. 



1839] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 299 

From September, 1861, until August, 1862, he served successively as 
quartermaster-general, commissary-general and ordnance officer and pay- 
master of the Missouri volunteers, of a special force authorized by the Presi- 
dent. (See order No. 96 of the Adjutant General, U. S. A). He was then 
commissioned colonel on the governor's staff, and served in that capacity 
untU the close of the war. He was a member of the Commercial Club of St. 
Louis. 

He was married in Stanstead, Canada, September 9, 1845, to Mary Jane 
Reed, a native of Wells River, Vt. ; no children . 

FRIEND PERRY FLETCHER, A. B. 

Friend P. Fletcher, son of Paris and Anna (Minor) Fletcher, was born in 
Bridport, Vt., November 4, 1819, and died there January 21, 1875. He 
entered the University in 1836, and graduated A. B. m 1839. He engaged in 
mercantile pursuits in his town many years, meeting with success; was also 
largely engaged in farming and had large interests in the manufacture of iron 
and lumber at Port Huron and Westport, N. Y. He was a trustee of "N.U.," 
1847-51. 

He was married fom- times: first, October 4, 1842, to Frances A. Dyer 
of Middlebury, who died April 5, 1846. He was married the second time, 
August 17, 1847, to Ann Thomes of Crown Point, N. Y., who died May 7, 
1855. He was again married October 9, 1856, to Emma E. Gifford of New 
Haven, who died December 13, 1858. He was married the last time, 
March 15, 1862, to Lottie A. Bussell of Middlebury. 

JAMES ASHTON HALL, A. M. 

James A. Hall, son of James Whorrall and Anna (Sawyer) Hall, was born 
in Reading, Vt., February 18, 1816, and died, unmarried, in Cavendish, Vt., 
January 27, 1845. 

He prepared for college at the Cavendish (Vt.) and Chester (Vt.) Acad- 
emies, and the Unity Scientific and Military Academy, Unity, N. H. He 
entered the University in 1836, graduating A. B. in 1839; received the degree 
of A. M. in course in 1842. 

He was principal of the Unity Scientific and Military Academy, 1841-42. 
He studied law with Judge Fletcher Dutton in Cavendish, Vt., 1842-43, and 
during this time performed the duties of recorder in the probate office, Windsor 
District, at Cavendish; was admitted to the Windsor County bar in December, 
1843, but never practiced his profession; practiced land surveying for some 
time in connection with his other work. He was a fine student and gave pro- 
mise of a brilliant career. 

SUMNER AFRICUS HOWARD, A. B. 

Sumner A. Howard, son of Nathan and Martha (Brown) Howard, was 
born in Marlow, N. H., July 30, 1814, and died in Danvers, Mass., January 5. 
1891. 

At an early age, his parents removed to Charlestown, N. H., where he pre- 
pared for college. He entered the University in 1836, and graduated A. B. in 
1839. He taught school in North Chariestown, N. H., 1839-44. He removed 
to Danvers, Mass., in 1844 and engaged in the shoe business. He was town 



300 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1839 



clerk from 1857 until 1886; served for a number of years on the school board; 
was librarian of the Danvers PubUc Library, 1867-1883. He was an active 
member of the Danvers Unitarian Church. 

He was married, December 21, 1845, to Nancy Louise Converse of North 
Charlestown, N. H., who died February 12, 1875. They had no children, but 
an adopted daughter, Lizzie M., born December 16, 1856, now Mrs. Horace 
W. Howard, survives them and resides in Danvers, Mass. 

WALTER BRADLEY HURLBUT, A. M. 

Walter B. Hurlbut, son of Ashbel and Elizabeth (Stevens) Hurlbut, and 
brother of Lucius Hurlbut, '40, was born in Pawlet, Vt., October 26, 1818, and 
died in Granville, N. Y., June 8, 1849. 

He entered the University in 1835, and graduated A. B. in 1839; received 
the degree of A. M. in com'se in 1843. He taught school in Western New York 
for several years and in 1848 located in Granville, N. Y., where he made his 
home until his death. 




REV. WILLIAM LIVINGSTON, A. B. 

William Livingston, son of James and Hannah (Clifford) Livingston, was 
born in Unity, N. H., October 12, 1815, and died in Galesburg, 111., December 
29, 1879. He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the 
University in 1836, and graduated, B. S. in 1839. 

He taught school for some time 
and studied for the Universahst 
ministry; was ordained in 1844 and 
preached in various towns in Ver- 
mont. He was pastor of the West 
Concord, Vt. chiu-ch in 1854, when 
he was tendered the professorship of 
Mathematics at the Lombard Univ- 
ersity, Galesburg, 111. He accepted 
the position and in the fall of that 
year, he removed to Galesburg. In 
1872, he was chosen provisional 
president. Soon after, his health 
began to decline, and in 1875, was ap- 
pointed financial agent. He was an 
earnest, bold and engergetic worker, 
as was well shown all through his 
connection with Lombard LTniver- 
sity. He was especially distinguished 
for his unwavering, firm and honest 
disposition. He met with marked 
success in his work. He was a mem- 
' ■'Rev. WiUiam Livingston. ber of the I. O. O. F. fraternity. 

He was twice married: first, in 1845, to Ehza Pierce, who died in 1855. 
He was again married, in 1858, to Lucinda Stillman, a native of New York. 
Three children were born to them: Hem-y Stillman, died in 1895; WiUiam 
Hawley, resides in Kansas City, Mo.; Emma Jane, married Mr. Alva T. Wing, 
resides in Springfield, Mo. 




1839] 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



301 



THOMPSON LINCOLN, A. B., M. D. 

Thompson Lincoln was born in Cornish, Me., April 30, 1819, and died 
there, October 4, 1881. 

He prepared for college at the Limerick, and the Bridgton (Maine) Acad- 
emies and entered the University in 1837, graduating A. B. in 1839. His 
name, while a cadet, was Joshua Thompson, but soon after graduating, he 
received authority from the State Legislature to drop the first name, .Joshua. 
After leaving the University, he read law with C. R. Ayer of Cornish, and 
was admitted to the bar at Alfred, Me., in the spi'ing of 1844. He afterwards 
studied medicine and was the inventor of numerous well known remedies. 
He was married March 2, 1841, to Hannah Farwell Jenett Clark who died 
about 1900. Four children were born to them: Lam-a Farwell, born March 
18, 1845, married John F. Rand, resides in Everett, Mass.; Fannie Clark, 
born March 18, 1849, resides in Cornish, Maine.; Martha, born October 31, 
1853, died in infancy; Benjamin, born in Sept., 1860, resides in Boston, Mass. 



LIEUT. COL. SAMUEL MARSH, A. B., M. D. 

Samuel Marsh, son of Otis and Julia (Ransom) Marsh, and nephew of Col. 
T. B. Ransom, '25, was born in Hartland, Vt., March 11, 1819, and died, July 
4, 1862, of wounds received in battle. He prepared for college in the schools of 
Woodstock, Vt., and entered the University in 1835, graduating A.B. in 1839. 

He located in Ohio in 1839, where 
he studied medicine for some time. 
He then returned to Vermont and 
graduated M. D. from the Vermont 
Medical College, Woodstock in 1842. 
He then located in Potsdam, N. Y., 
where he made his home untU his 
death. He practiced his profession 
several years, when he accepted the 
instructorship of Mathematics in the 
St. Lawrence Academy, Potsdam, 
N. Y. After teaching in this Acad- 
emy a few years, he resumed the 
practice of medicine, which he con- 
tinued until his death. 

In the spring of 1861, at the 
earnest entreaty of the officers of 
the 16th New York Volunteers, he 
accepted the lieutenant colonelcy of 
that regiment; was soon offered the 
full command, but refused. He was 
with his regiment at the battle of 
Bull Run in 1861, where this regiment 
was one of the few to return to camp in perfect order. He was in command 
of his regiment in the terrible battle before Richmond, June 27, 1862, where 
he distinguished himself for his bravery, but here his gallant career was cut 
short as he received a fatal wound in the neck, injuring the spinal cord and 
paralyzing his limbs. He lived one week and died on the hospital steamer, 




Lieut. Col. Samuel Marsh. 



302 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. [1839 

S. R. Spaulding, on the James River July 4, 1862. His body was carried to 
Potsdam, for interment, where imposing ceremonies were held. The citizens 
of Potsdam erected a monmnent in his memory in Bay Side Cemetery, and 
the G. A. R. Post in that city was named for him. He was an active member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Chm-ch. 

He was married, March 5, 1846, to Hannah Spencer Ayers, who died 
April 13, 1886. Five children were born to them: George Ransom, born April 
29, 1848, resides in Chicago, 111.; Truman Henry, born May 25, 18,52, resides in 
Milwaukee, Wis.; William Dixon, born August 2, 1854, now Methodist Episco- 
pal clergyman, resides at Little Falls, N. Y.; Franklin Mason, born June 19, 
1857, died March 15, 1858; Frederick Latimer, born June 19, 1857, died April 
19, 1874. 

COL. ASA CROSBY MARVIN, A. B. 

Asa C. Marvin, son of William and Mercy (Crosby) Marvin, was born in 
Alstead, N. H., Sept. 26, 1814 and died in Sedalia, Mo., December 10, 1872. 
He attended the schools of his to^Ti and entered the University in 1836, and 
graduated A. B. in 1839. 

He taught school in Pennsylvania, 1839-40; taught a mihtary school 
(q. v.) in Arrow Rock, Saline Co., Mo., for some time. He located in Clinton, 
Henry County, Mo., about 1842, and was admitted to the bar. He had pre- 
viously studied law in New Hampshire and Pennsylvania. He at once met with 
success in his profession and soon became the leading attorney of the county. 

He was a Democrat in pohtics and held many ofSces; was elected repre- 
sentative from Henry County, to the Legislatm-e in 1846 and 1852. He was 
U. S. register of lands, Warsaw, Mo., 1853-55; Clinton, 1855-57. In February, 
1861, he was elected a delegate by the State Legislature to consider the existing 
relations of the general government to the several states. He was recognized as 
one of the most thoughtful, patriotic and far seeing members of that historic 
convention. He was elected State senator in 1862 and served until 1865, also 
served as president pro tern of the body. 

Dm-ing 1862-64, his brother, Levi C. Marvin, was speaker of the House, 
thus the two legislative bodies of the State were presided over by brothers. 
Owing to the political disturbances, incident to the Civil War, he acted for some 
time as Governor of the State. He was author of the term. Judicious Emancipa- 
tion, which was a current expression during the later discussion of the slavery 
agitation. The history of Henry County, states "He was a clear headed, 
safe and prudent law maker, and possessed more than ordinary statesmanship." 

He took an active interest in military matters; was appointed a major in 
the State Militia in 1841. On the breaking out of the Civil War, he took an 
important part in organizing and drilhng the State troops; was commissioned 
lieutenant and battalion adjutant, 7th Missouri Cavalry, May 1, 1862; was 
mustered out July 29, 1862; was commissioned colonel of the 60th Regiment, 
enrolled militia, October 13, 1862; mustered out March 12, 1865. This organi- 
zation composed largely of men past the meridian of life, was designed for the 
purpose of protecting the State against invasion by the Confederates, was often 
called upon to do severe service. He was connected with many business enter- 
prises; organized in 1868 the Tebo and Neosho R. R., now the M. K. & T. 
R. R., ser\dng as its first president. 

He was survived by three children. 



1839] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 303 

SAMUEL NICHOLS, M. C. E., M. D. 

Samuel Nichols, son of Thomas Jr., and Prudence (Thompson) Nichols 
was born in Walpole, (Drewsville) N. H., October 25, 1812, and died in 
Bellows Falls, Vt., July 8, 1887. He attended the schools of his town and 
entered the University in 1836, graduating M. C. E. in 1839. 

He was principal of the Harrisburg (Pa.) High School, 1839-43, and during 
this time studied medicine with Dr. Ortt graduated M. D. from Ver- 
mont Medical College, Woodstock, Vt., in 1844. He practiced his profession 
in Bellows Falls, Vt., from 1847 until 1877, when he retired from active 
practice. He also engaged in the drug business for some years, being at first 
associated with Jonathan Brockway, 1847-52. He was a Democrat in poHtics; 
was postmaster of Bellows Falls, September 15, 1851-53. He was interested 
in the public library and for some years the books were kept in his drug store. 
We quote from the History of Rockingham:" He was pre-eminently the family 
doctor, thoroughly devoted to his profession, much loved for his kindliness of 
heart." 

He was married January 24, 1872, to Sophina C. Smith of Unity, N. H., 
who died August 9, 1905. Seven children were born to them: Emma Medora, 
born May 23, 1850, resides in Bellows Falls, Vt.; Ella Minora, born May 23, 
1850, resides in Bellows Falls, Vt.; Sarah Adelaide, born November 27, 1851, 
died 1854; Jennie Sophia, born February 10, 1853, died February 25, 1853; 
Carrie Edna, born in 1854, died September 24, 1854; Hattie Louise, born in 
1856, died July 14, 1856; Wilham Henry, born April 30, 1858, resides in Bellows 
Falls, Vt. 

BRIG. GEN. JONATHAN TARBELL, A. B. 

Jonathan Tarbell was born in """^ "" 

Moriah, N. Y., in 1820, and died in 
Washington, D. C, March 14, 1888. 

He prepared for college in the 
schools of his town, and entered the 
University in 1836, graduating A. B. 
in 1839. He studied law in Port 
Henry, N. Y., during 1839-42, and 
was admitted to the bar at Rochester, 
N. Y., in the latter year; but instead 
of practicing his profession, he 
entered upon an editorial career. He 
published the Northern Standard, in 
Keeseville, N. Y., 1842-57, and the 
Oswego Times, at Oswego, Orange 
County N. Y., 1857-1861. 

He was much interested in 
miUtary^affairs; was adjutant of the 
9th Regiment New York Militia, 

Ticonderoga, 1839-40; colonel, 1840- / 

42; was as.sistant adjutant general y^ 

of the state of New York under 

Governor Myron H. Clark. On the Brig. Gen. Jonathan Tarbell. 



'1^^^ 

% 



304 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. [1839 

breaking out of the Civil War, he offered his ser\'ices to the State and 
performed valuable work in drilling and instructing the volunteers. He 
was commissioned major of the 24th New York Volunteers, May 17, 1861; 
was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the 91st Xew York Volunteers, Decem- 
ber 26, 1861; colonel, February 11, 1865, and brigadier-general, March 13, 
the same year; was mustered out of service, July 3, 1865. He was a brave 
and efficient officer, and was only absent from his command once, when he was 
detached as a -^vitness before a court-martial in New Orleans. He took an 
active pai't in the following battles: Port Hudson, La., Bailey's Cross Roads, 
Va., Ball's Cross Roads, Va., Falls Chiu-ch, Va., Key West, Fla., Pensacola, 
Fla., Cox Plantation, La., Brashear City, La., Fort Jackson, La., Fort Mc- 
Henry, Md., Fort Federal Hill, Md., Petersburg, Va., Gravelly Run, Va., 
Five Forks, Va., Jetersville Station, Va., Appomattox Court House, Va., 
Lee's Surrender (April 9, 1865.) 

In 1865, he purchased a plantation in Mississippi which he conducted 
until 1880, ^-hen he removed to Washington, D. C, where he made his home 
until his death. He was a Republican in pohtics; served on the commis- 
sion to ascertain the boundary line between New York and Canada, 1856-57; 
served on reconstruction duty in Mississippi; was chief justice of the Supreme 
Court of Missis.sippi, 1865-80; deputj^ first comptroller of the United States 
Treasury, 1880-85. He practiced law before the Departments, 1885-88 
making a specialty of patent and pension claims. He was survived by a 
widow. 

YOUNGS VAIL WOOD, A. B. 

Youngs V. Wood, son of Amos and Eunice (Vail) Wood, was born in 
Pomfret, Vt., July 19, 1819, and died of consumption, July 19, 1865. He 
prepared for college at the Preparatory Department of the University, 1835-36, 
and entered the regular work of the University in 1837, graduating A. B. in 1839. 

He located in Dayton, Ohio, in 1840; taught school in 1840-42, and 
during this time studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1842, practiced his 
profession in Dayton until his death. He was a Whig in pohtics; served as 
clerk in the county recorders office; was first probate judge of Montgomery 
County; was prosecuting attorney, same county, 1863-65. 

He achieved great success in his profession, and was highly esteemed by 
the citizens of his city and county. The County Bar Association passed 
glowing tributes as to his ability as a law^^er and his worth as a citizen. We 
quote: "Our brother has gone in the prime of Ufe and in the midst of a useful 
career. He was a man of great talent and abiUty, discharging his duties 
with great integrity. * * * * He was a true man in all the relations of life, 
public and private and was loyal to his oountry and his God." He was a 
member of the Presbyterian church, of Dayton, Ohio. 

He was married in 1846, to Juha A. EUiott Magie of Elizabeth, N. J., 
who died in 1888. Three children were born to them: Joanna C, married 
Jarvis Adams, died in 1872; Henrietta Elliott, married Oscar P. Apphn, died 
in 1882; Emma E., married John W. McGearj-, resides in BurUngton, Vt. 

MAJ. CHAUNCEY WRIGHT, A. B., M.C.E. 

Chauncoy Wright, son of Joseph and Martha(Camp) Wright, was born in 
the Wright Settlement, Rome, N. Y., April 18, 1818, and died unmarried, in 
Lexington, Miss., January 20, 1895. He prepared for college in the classical 



1839] 



SKETCHES OP ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



305 



school of Mr. Grosvenor in Rome village. He entered the University in 1836, 
and graduated A. B. and M. C. E. in 1839. 

He engaged in engineering dur- 
ing 1839-42, and in the mercantile 
business 1842-45; engaged in lake 
and canal transportation from New 
York to the West at Oswego, N. Y., 

1845-52. In 1852, he went to the ^^ -^. 

gold fields of Australia, returning in 
1854, via England, to New Orleans, 
and thence to Chicago, 111. 

He engaged in banking in 
Chicago, 111., from 1854 until 185G, 
when he returned to Oswego and be- 
came associated with Thomas E. 
Mott, in the grain business. In 1865, 
he returned to Chicago and continued 
in the grain business until 1876; was a 
member of the Chicago Board of 
Trade. In 1876, he removed to Rock 
port, N. D., and engaged in cattle 
raising until 1893, when owing to 
failing health he located in Lexing- 
ton, Miss., where he remained until 
his death. He took gi'eat interest in 
the State Mihtia, and served as aide- 




Ma]. Chauncey Wright. 



de-cam-p in the 48th New York Infantry, 1846-52; was major and brigade in- 
spector of the 22d Regiment in 1852. 



NON-GRADUATES, 1839, 



HON. HENRY BAXTER, M. D. 

Henry Baxter was born in Norwich, Vt., April 15, 1821, and died in High- 
gate, Vt., September 27, 1897. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the University in 1835; 
remaining three years. He graduated M. D. from the Castleton (Vt.) 
Medical College in 1841; and in 1842, located in Highgate, Vt., where he prac- 
ticed his profession until his death. 

He was a Republican in politics and held many town offices; represented 
his town in the House of Representatives in 1857, 1870 and 1884; served as 
State senator from Franklin County. 

HIRAM MORRILL COUCH, M. D. 

Hiram M. Couch, son of Samuel Couch, was born in Salisbury, N. H., 
February 16, 1818, and died December 22, 1862. He prepared for college 
at the Salisbury Academy and entered the University in 1837, and remained 
two years. He was principal of schools in Georgetown, Mass., 1840-42. 



306 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. [1839 

He studied medicine with Dr. Herbert and Dr. Robinson of Salisbury 
and Dr. Timothy Haines of Concord; graduated M. D. from ihe Dartmouth 
Medical College in 1847. He practiced his profession in Georgetown, Mass., 
from 1847 until his death. 

He was married December 13, 1848, to Mahabea Tilton of Sanbornton, 
N. H. Two children were born to them. 

HON. ISAAC NEWTON CUSHMAN, A. M. 

Isaac N. Cushman, son of Hon. Isaac Newton and Charlotte (Hayden) 
Cushman, was born in Woodstock, Vt., March 21, 1821, and died in Irasbm^g, 
Vt., September 29, 1881. 

He attended the schools of his town, the Academy in Ludlow, Vt., and 
entered the University in 1836, remaining until June 1838, when he received 
an appointment to the U. S. Military Academy at West Point. He remained 
at West Point until July 1840, when he resigned his appointment to return 
home to look after his father's business affairs, which demanded immediate 
attention. He worked on the home farm during 1840-41, and taught school 
in Hartland, in the winter of 1841-42, spending all his spare time in studying 
law in his father's office. 

He went to Milwaukee, Wis., in October, 1842, where he taught a select 
school; also engaged in land !-urveying, same city, until October, 1843, when 
he was called home by his father's death. He purchased the home farm 
and undertook to pay off the mortgage, but in 1845, finding it impracticable 
to do this, began the study of law with the Hon. Timothy P. Redfield, in 
Irasburg, Vt.; [was admitted to the bar in 1847; practiced his profession in 
Glover, 1847-49; removed to Irasburg in December, 1849 where he resided 
until his death; was cashier of the Bank of Orleans, Irasburg, 1853-61. 

He was a Republican in politics and held many offices; was town clerk 
of Glover, 1848-49; represented Glover in the House of Representatives in 
1849; was judge of probate, Orleans district, 1849-54, 1880-81; was county 
auditor for several years. State senator, 1878-79; county clerk and treasurer, 
1861-81. 

He was a man of scholarly tastes and was highly respected by the 
people of his county; was an able mathematician, and occasionally practiced 
land surveying in his county; received the degree of A. M. from the Univer- 
sity of Vermont in 1852. He was a charter member of Central Lodge, F. 
and A. M. of Irasburg, serving as Master for some time. 

He was married May 13, 1854, to Sarah Geddes of Irasburg, who died 
September 2, 1898. Two children were born to them: Henry Bates, born 
December 29, 1855, resides in Newport, Vt., and John Geddes, born Nov- 
ember 17, 1859, resides in Fargo, N. D. 

HON. MITCHELL MOSES DAVIS, M. D. 

Mitchell M. Davis was born in Sharon, Vt., August 27, 1820, and died in 
Baraboo, Wis., May 1, 1888. 

In 1830, his parents removed to Tunbridge, Vt., where he prepared for 
college. He entered the University in 1836, remaining three j^ears. 
He studied medicine for some time at the Dartmouth Medical 
College, and graduated M. D. from the Vermont Medical College in Wood- 
stock, in June, 1846. 



1839] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 307 

He practiced his profession in Norwich, Vt., from 1846 until 1854, when 
he removed to Janesville,Wis., and continued his practice for a few months, and 
later, for a brief time, in Baraboo, Wis. He located in Portage, Wis., in 1855, 
and practiced his profession until 1862; was resident trustee of the property 
donated by Congress to the Fox and Wisconsin River Improvement Co., 1862- 
72, making his residence in Appleton, Wis. Determining to resume the active 
duties of his profession and to make up for the time spent outside of his medical 
work, he took a thorough course at the Chicago Medical College, during 1870- 
72, and in this latter year, he resumed the practice of his profession in Baraboo, 
where he made his home until his death. 

He was a Republican in politics and held many positions of trust. He 
took a prominent part in the anti-slavery agitation and served in the Vermont 
convention which nominated John P. Hale for the Presidency; was a delegate, 
in 1855, to the National Convention which nominated General Fremont to the 
Presidency, and Abraham Lincoln in 1860; represented Portage in the House of 
Representatives, 1855-57; served as State senator, 1857-60, serving as president 
pro tern of that body; was appointed by President Lincoln, in 1861 ; Indian agent 
for the Menominee and other Indians, living in the vicinity of Green Bay, and 
served until 1866; was a regent of the State University at Madison, 1856-70; 
trustee of Lawrence University, Appleton, 1863-70; trustee of the State 
Hospital for the Insane, at Mendota for several years. 

He was married in 1848, to Eunice Emerson Dana, sister of S. E. Dana, 
'50, of Warren, Vt. Five children were born to them: Susan Dana, married 
George A. Follansbee, resides in Chicago, 111.; Hem-y Chandler, born September 
11, 1849, resides in New York City; William Mitchell, born in 1854, resides in 
Chickeo, Alaska; John Potter, born in 1857, died in infancy; Eva Dana, born 
in 1863, died unmarried, in 1882. 

HANNIBAL HODGES FINNEY. 

Hannibal H. Finney, son of Col. Levi and Orpha(Clark)Finney, was born 
in Shrewsbury, Vt., November 8, 1816, and died in Rockdale, Crawford County 
Pa., April 20, 1893. 

He entered the University in 1835, remaining three years. He located 
in Meadville, Pa., in 1850 and Rockdale, Pa., in 1852, where he made his 
home until his death. He owned a large tract of timber land and engaged 
in farming and lumbering many years. He also engaged extensively in 
surveying town and county lines and in general engineering. He was a Repub- 
lican in politics; served as justice of the peace for many years. 

He was married January 9, 1845, to Mary Louise Willoughby, a native 
of Shrewsbury, Vt., who now resides in Mill Village, Erie Co., Pa. Ten 
children were born to them: John, born April 11, 1846, died August 25, 1907; 
Frank Clark, born February 6, 1848, resides in Cleveland, Ohio; Charley, born 
February 4, 1850, died June 8, 1857; Darwin Ashel, born February 10, 1852, 
resides in Cambridge Springs, Pa.; Fred Meech, born June 21, 1854, resides 
in Cambridge Springs, Pa.; Hannibal Hodges, Jr., born December 14, 1856, 
resides in Meadville, Pa.; Willoughby, born August 26, 1859, resides in Cam- 
bridge Springs, Pa.; Marion Elizabeth, born June 15, 1862, married V. P. 
Canfield, resides in Millvillage, Pa.; George Levi, born April 2, 1865, resides 
in Cambridge Springs, Pa.; Cassiua Lowe, born December 10, 1870, resides in 
Canton, Ohio. 



308 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. [1839 

HON. OILMAN FOLSOM. 

Oilman Folsom, son of Winthrop and Mary (Noyes) Folsom, was born in 
Dorchester, N. H., April 7, 1818, and died in Iowa City, la., July 15, 1872. He 
attended the schools of his town and entered the University in 1836, remaining 
nearly three years. 

He studied law with Hon. Josiah J. Quincy, and was admitted to the bar 
at Haverhill, N. H., in 1841. He located in Iowa City, la., the same year, 
where he practiced his profession until his death. He soon became the leading 
lawyer of Iowa. The Hon. James B. Edmunds of Washington, D. C, in a 
letter to the Hon. John P. Irish of San Francisco, thus speaks of Mr. Folsom: 
"By the way, I notice you speak of Mr. Folsom as having successors at the 
Iowa Bar. Much lenity should be shown toward kind impulses which you 
exhibit for friends that have gone or are present, but comptrollers, like the 
gods, cannot change the past. In the full sense of the word, Mr. Folsom had 
no successors at that bar. His proper arena was the bar of some large citj^, or, 
having gone West he should, lUiie Benton and Douglas, have been sent to the 
U. S. Senate, where he would have honored his State. It is no disrespect for 
our friends who have passed on, or for the living you have named, or to their 
conspicuous merits, to say that they were not born giants. Mr. Folsom was.' ' 

He was a Democrat in politics and held several offices; served in the House 
of Representatives, 1848-51. He took an active part in the framing of the 
first code of Iowa. His part in the work as an able lawj^er has made a lasting 
impression upon the institution of the State. He served as receiver of the 
U. S. land office at Iowa City, 1853-57. 

He was an able scholar. His training was comprehensive. Every form 
of knowledge, from the law and allied sciences, to art, naval architecture, and 
the principles underlying economics and finance, was in his possession and part 
of his impressive intellectual equipment. His gxasp of tactics and the art of 
war, and his knowledge of the campaigns of the great captains was complete. 

He was married August 31, 1843, to Emily Arthm-, a native of Cleveland, 
Ohio. Three children were born to them: Mary A., resides in Iowa City; 
Arthur; George J., resides in Iowa City. 

JOHN C. HARRIS. 

John C. Harris was born in Brattleboro, Vt., about 1822. At an early age, 
he went to live with an uncle, Howard Harris, in Walhngford, Vt., where he 
attended the public schools. He entered the University in 1836, and remained 
two years. He then engaged in business with his uncle in Wallingford until 
1849, when he went to the California gold fields, where he is supposed to have 
died as he was never heard from. 

He was married, in 1844, to Mary Ann Glynn of Walhngford, who died 
December 16, 1860. Two children were born to them: Alfred, born in 1845; 
Ellen Maria, born in 1848, died October 11, 1860. 

EDWARD MORTON LEWIS. 
E. Morton Lewis, son of Dr. Lyman and Polly (Stiles) Lewis, and cousin 
of Wilham E. Le'nis. '30, was born in Norwich, Vt., in 1819, and died there, 
April 21, 1887. He entered the University in 1835, remaining three years. 
He engaged in mercantile business in Norwich for some years, and later was 
station agent for the Boston & Maine R. R. at Norwich. 



1839] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 309 

He was married in 1844, to Louisa Tilden of Norwich. Five children were 
born to them: Lyman, chief of poUce in Chicago (retired), resides in Chicago, 
111.; George, died in 1908; Ransom Tilden, resides in Norwich, Vt.; Louisa; 
Edward, resides in Norwich, Vt. 

MAJ. GEN. WILLIAM NELSON. 

WiUiam Nelson was born in Maysville, Mason Co., Ky., in 1825. He 
entered the University in 1837, remaining two years. He was commissioned a 
midshipman U. S. N., January 28, 1840, and passed midshipman, July 11, 1846. 
He served dm-ing the Mexican War in the blockading fleet and was conspicuous 
for his work in commanding a battery at the siege of Vera Cruz. He served 
during 1848-54, in the Mediterranean Squadron; was promoted master, Septem- 
ber 19, 1854, and lieutenant, April 18, 1855. During 1858, he commanded the 
Niagara, and returned the slaves to Africa which were taken by the slaver, 
Echo. 

On the breaking out of the Civil War, he was serving on ordnance duty in 
Washington, D. C; and on July 18, 1861, he was given command of the 
gun boats patrolling the Ohio River. Desirous of having more 
active duty, he changed from the Navy to the Army and on September 
18, 1861, was commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers. He 
organized a military camp near Garrondsville, and another at Washington, 
Ky. He took a conspicuous part in the many engagements in Eastern 
Kentucky and was active in raising and organizing regiments for the war. 
He commanded the 2d division of Gen. Don Carlos Buell's army, 
when it joined General Grant at the battle of Shilo. He was severely wounded 
in the engagement at Richmond, Ky., August 29, 1862. He was in command 
of the Union forces in Louisville, Ky., when General Bragg threatened the 
city. He was promoted-major general of volunteers, July 17, 1862. On 
September 29, 1862, he was fatally shot in an affray at the Gait House in 
Louisville, Ky. 

CHARLES HENRY SARGENT. 

Charles H. Sargent, son of Levi and Rosamond B. (Harris) Sargent, was 
born in Cleveland, Ohio in 1819; and died in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1891. 

He attended the schools of his city, also an academy in New Hampshire 
and entered the University in 1836, remaining two years. He returned to 
Cleveland, Ohio, where he engaged in business for some years; later removed to 
Cincinnati. He was, for many years a large stock holder ;uid officer of the 
Cincinnati Enquirer. 

JOHN HARRIS SARGENT. 

John H. Sargent, son of Levi .and Rosamond B. (Harris) Sargent, was born 
in Carthage, N. Y., March 7, 1814, and died in Cleveland, Ohio, October 20, 
1893. 

In 1817, his parents removed to Monroe, Mich., and in 1818, to Cleveland. 
In 1823, he went to live with his grandparents in New Hampshire and prepared 
for college in the schools of that State. In 1836, he entered the University 
remaining two years. 

He then returned to Ohio, where he became prominent as a civil engineer. 
He was prominent in advocating the construction of railroads in his State; was 



310 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1839 



resident engineer during 1840 and 1841 on the construction of the Old Ohio 
Railroad, which was being built on piles, between Cleveland and Manhattan. 
He advocated the construction of a railroad from Cleveland to Columbus and 
Cincinnati, making a map of the route. He located this road and was engineer 

in charge of constructing the portions 
from Cleveland to Wellington, in 
1849; was engineer in charge of con- 
structing the Michigan Southern and 
Xorthern Indiana R. R., and its 
branch lines. 1849-55, from Toledo, 
Ohio, to Chicago, 111. In 1855, he 
returned to Cleveland and in 1857 
was elected city engineer, which posi- 
tion he held two years; was appointed 
sewerage engineer of the city in 1863, 
and during 1864 and 1865 served as 
city engineer; was a member of the 
Waterworks Board in 1869. 

He engaged in the real estate and 
insurance business in Cleveland, 1866- 
93. He was interested in various 
business enterprises; assisted in or- 
ganizing the People's Saving Bank of 
Cleveland, in 1871. 

He was a man of excellent practi- 
cal judgment and scientific acquire- 
John Hams Sargent. ments. He was a member of the 

Early Settlers Association of Ohio, serving for some time as vice-president; 
was also an active member of the Western Reserve Historical Society, serv- 
ing for some time as a trustee; was a member and contributor to the Ci\'il 
Engineers Club of Cleveland. 

He was married June 6, 1857, to Mrs. Julia A. Hall, who died April 18, 
1907. 

ALLEN BURNHAM SLACK. 

Allen B. Slack, son of Jesse and Betsey (Biu-nham) Slack and brother of 
Charles Slack, '38, was born in Windsor, Vt., February 5, 1810, and died in 
San Francisco, Cal., January 2, 1888. He attended the schools of his towTi 
and entered the University in 1836, remaining until the spring of 1839, nearly 
completing the civil engineering course. 

He engaged in engineering in Lowell during 1839-40, and was assistant 
chief engineer on the Erie Canal, with headquarters in Rome, N. Y., 1840-48. 
In this last j^ear, he became chief engineer of the Illinois Central R. R. in Illinois 
which position he held until 1853. In October, 1852, the Lyons and Iowa 
Central R. R., was organized and in January, 1852, Mr. Slack was appointed 
chief engineer. Preliminary surveys were made from Lj'ons through Iowa 
City, Des Moines to Council Bluffs, during May-December the same year. 
The road was located to Des Moines and the grading practically completed 
from Lyons to Iowa City, dui-ing January-June, 1854, when the work was 
suspended owing to the dishonesty of the principal promoter. He was city 




1839] 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



311 



/% 




engineer of Lyons, Iowa, 1855-56, and during this period, the city was resur- 

veyed; was county surveyor of Clinton County, Iowa several terms. In 1880, 

he removed to San Francisco, Cal., 

where he resided until his death ; was 

draftsman for\the Southern Pacific \ 

R. R., 1880-88. He was a member \ 

of the First Presbyterian Church and \ 

served as elder for som.e time; was a ^ » \ 

member of Lyons Lodge F. and A. M. 

of Lyons, Iowa. 

He was twice married: first, in 
Lowell, Mass., in the spring of 1840, 
to Louisa Blanchard of New York 
city who died in summer of 1843. ; 
One child was born to them, now 
deceased. He was again married in 
May, 1846 in Magnolia, 111., to Anna 
Maria Moore, a native of Pittsburg, 
Pa., who died January 2, 1885. 
Eighteen children were born to them 
of whom fourteen died in infancy. 
Ella Leonora, born January 18, 1852, 
married H. R- Mclntyre; resides in 
San Francisco, Cal.; Hattie Marie, 
born August 14, 1857, married J. H. Allen Burnham Slack. 

Wickman of Waterloo, Iowa, died February 1, 1901, in Fair Oaks, Cal.; 
Charles Allen, born November 5, 1862, resides in San Francisco, Cal.; lona 
Elsie, born September 12, 1865, married Harry Russell, resides in San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

HON. LEMUEL SHATTUCK. 



Lemuel Shattuck, son of Peter 
and Ruxbey (Whiting) Shattuck, was 
born in Canaan, N. H., November 7, 
1815, and died in Bridgewater, Vt., 
.hmuary 14, 1895. . 

At an early age,' his parents re- 
moved to Lebanon, N. H., where he 
if tended the public schools. He 
finished his preparations for college 
;if the Kimball Union Academy, and 
cntored the University in 1835, re- 
in.iiniiig until 1839. In 1841, he 
Inratcd in Bridgewater, Vermont, 
where he made his home until his 
death. He engaged in teaching many 
years; taught Mathematics and the 
Natural Sciences at the Green Mount- 
ain Liberal Institute in South Wood- 
stock, several years; also in the public 
schools in Bridgewater. In his later 
life, he engaged in farming. 





Hon. Lemuel Shattuck. 



312 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. [1839 

He was a Republican in politics and held many towTi offices; was superin- 
tendent of schools for several j^ears; represented Bridgewater in the House of 
Representatives in 1888; was State senator in 1894. 

He was married March 8, 1840, to Sarah Ann Champion of Hartford, Vt., 
who died February 12, 1898. Three children were born to them: Helen 
Maria, born May 4, 1845, resides in Bridgewater, Yt.; Edward Herbert, born 
July 17, 1852, resides in Bridgewater; Henry Bacon, born November 22, 1857, 
resides in Chicago, 111. 

HON. WILLIAM IVIONROE WHIPPLE. 

William M. Whipple, son of Capt. William and Judith (Putnam) Whipple, 
was born in Croydon, N. H., August 9, 1817, and died in Sheffield, 111., Decem- 
ber 15, 1885. He prepared for college at the Canaan, N. H., Academy, and 
entered the University, in 1836, remaining two years. 

He engaged in mercantile business 
in Croydon from 1838 until 1840, when 
he removed to Canaan, N. H., where he 
engaged in manufacturing and selling 
machinery, 1840-43 and farming, 1843- 
55. In this last year, he removed to 
Chicago, 111., and in 1857, to Sheffield, 
Bureau Co., 111. In 1873, he removed 
ito Princeton, 111., where he made his 
[home until his death. He engaged in 
mercantile business in Sheffield until 
1SG9. He was an extensive land owner 
I and from 1869 devoted himself to farm- 
ing and monej^ loaning. He was a stock 
hohier and director of the Citizens 
National Bank of Princeton. 

He met with marked success in busi- 
ness and acquired a valuable property. 
He was for years one of the leading men 
of his town and county in Illinois. He 
was a good adviser, a faithful friend and 
loyal citizen. While on a business 
Hon. WiUiam M. Whipple. trip to Sheffield in November 1885, 

he was taken sick and died at the home of his brother-in-law, B. M. 
Howard. 

He was a Republican in politics; represented Canaan, N. H., in the Legis- 
latm-e; nas postmaster of Sheffield, 1865-69; was a delegate to the National 
Liberal Republican Convention in Cincinnati, May, 1872, which nominated 
Horace Greely for the Presidency. He was a member of the Unitarian Church. 
He was married in Berhn, Vermont, May 1, 1845, to Ednah Rebecca 
Cummings, who died in Sheffield, 111., December 23, 1900. One adopted child: 
Annie L. Dewey Whipple, now Mrs. Anson L. Knox of Sheffield, 111. 




1840] 



SKETCHES OP ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



313 



CLASS OF 1840. 



MAJ. SYLVESTER MILLER HEWITT, A. B., M. D. 

Sylvester M. Hewitt, son of Joseph Denison and Rebecca (Miller) Hewitt, 
was born in Pomfret, Vt., August 20, 1819, and died in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
May 17, 1905. 

He attended the schools of the town and the Preparatory department of 
the University, 1835-37, and entered the Classical department of the University 
in 1837, graduating A. B. in 1840. He studied medicine with Dr. Benjamin 
R Palmer of Woodstock and graduated M. D. from llie Vermont Medical 
College, Woodstock, Vt., in 1843. 
He aided Dr. Palmer in one course 
of lectures given at the Berkshire 
Medical College, Pittsfield, Mass., 
early in 1843. He practiced his 
profession at Chesterville, 1843-51; 
Mt. Gilead, 1851-61; Newton, Ohio, 
1864, and in Cincinnati, 1872-1905. 

On the breaking out of the Civil 
War, he offered his services to the 
state of Ohio and was commissioned 
Captain Co. I, 26th Ohio Volunteers, 
June 5, 1861; was commissioned 
major, 32d Ohio Volunteers, July 
26, 1861. His regiment was cap- 
tured at Harpers Ferry, Va., Septem- 
ber 15, 1862, and paroled and sent to 
Chicago. He resigned his commis- 
sion, December 13, 1863; was com- 
missioned, July 5, 1864, surgeon of 
the 136th Ohio Volunteers and saw 
much service in the hospitals near 
Washington, D. C; was mustered Maj. Sylvester Miller Hewitt, 

out of service, December 31, 1864. He took part in the battle of Port Re- 
pubhc McDowell Cross Keys, Maryland Heights, Bolivar Heights, and in 
several minor engagements. He was a 32° Mason and a member of Syrian 
Temple, Mystic Shrine, of Cinciimati; Isracil Taidlow Post, No. 76, G. A. R. 
of Ohio, and its commander several years. 

He was twice married: first, June 2, 1845, to Cailierine Cuynn Miles 
of Chesterville, Ohio, who died January IS, 1SS8. Thr(;e children were born 
to them: Minerva Elizabeth, born June 10, 1846, married Ilcuu-y H. Vail, 
resides in New York; H(!rbert Miller, l)orn December 5, 1847, died in St. Louis, 
March 8, 1902; Livonia Rose, born March 11, 1850, married Sheart Green, 
resides at Raymond, Ohio. He was married the second time, July 30, 1890, 
to Minnie Leota Johnson, of Cincinnati, Ohio, who survives him and resides 
in Cincinnati, Ohio; no children. 




314 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1840 




PROF. LUCIUS HURLBUT, A. M. 

Lucius Hm-lbut, son of Ashbcl and Betsey (Stevens) Hurlbut, and 
brother of Walter B. Hurlbut '39, was born in Pawlet, Vt., October 13, 1816, 
and died in Chicago, 111., November 8, 1898; was bmied in Fredonia, 
N. Y. 

He received an academic education and entered the L'niversity in 1837, 

and graduated A. B. in 1840; received 
the degree of A. M., in 1843. 

He was principal of the Norwich 
(Vt.) Institute, 1840-44; was instruc- 
tor in Mathematics in the Fredonia 
(N. Y.) Academy, 1844-68; was 
.school commissioner, same city, 1857- 
60; was a member of the Normal 
School Board at Fredonia, 1869-71; 
\va.s justice of the peace, 186.5-69; 
clerk of the county board of super- 
visors; took an active part in the 
organization of the Forest Hill 
( Cemetery, Fredonia, in 1854; was one 
of its first board of trustees and its 
first secretary. 

He removed to Waterloo, Iowa, 
in 1871, and engaged in banking 
with his brother-in-law, Mr. Couch, 
until 1876, when he removed to 
Chicago, where he made his home 
until his death. He was district 
assessor, Chicago, several years. He 
was a fine scholar, especially in mathematics; was a &oto ieac/ier and met 
with great success in his profession. 

He was married, Februarj' 12, 1850 to Candace Brigham Couch of West- 
field, N. Y., who died March 29,1907 in Fredonia. One child was born, who 
died in infancy. 




Prof. Lucius Hurlbut. 



ALVIN ROUNDY, A. B. 

Alvin Roundy, son of James and Rebecca (Smith) Roundy, was born in 
Goshen, N. H., December 10, 1819, and died in Unity, N. H., September 13, 
1876. At an early age, his parents removed to Unity, N. H., where he 
prepared for college. He entered the University in 1837, and graduated A. B., 
in 1840. He was principal of schools in Essex, Mass., Claremont, N. H.; 
and Unity, N. H. In 1870, he gave up teaching and engaged in farming until 
his death. 

He was married February 28, 1842, to Harriet Ladd of Unity, N. H., 
who died, March 22, 1898. Three children were born to them : Flora Gertrude, 
born January 16, 1851, died, February 2, 1852; Flora Gertrude, born May 20, 
1855, died September 2, 1863; Carrie Bell, born March 5, 1859, died September 
15, 1861. 



1840] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 315 

PROF. JOSEPH WENTWORTH SHEDD, A. B. 

Joseph W. Shedd, son of John and Lydia (Farnsworth) Shedd, and cousin 
of General Warren Shedd, '39, was born in Washington, N. H., August 4, 
1817, and died at Fonica, 111., September 11, 1886. He prepared for college 
at the Unity (N. H.) Scientific & Military Academy, 1834-37, and entered the 
University in 1837, graduating A. B. in 1840. 

He taught school in Hanover N. H.; Jersey Shore, N. J.; Harrisburg, Pa.; 
Tennessee, Iowa, Fonica, LaSalle County, 111. After nineteen years of con- 
secutive labor as a teacher, failing health compelled him, in 18.59, to seek out- 
of-door occupation. 

He engaged in farming in LaSalle County, 111., from 1859 until 1865, 
when he removed to Forrest, Ijivingstone County, 111, where he made his 
home until his death. Besides a wonderful memory, he possessed in rare 
degree the happy faculty of imparting his knowledge to others; and his early 
education, increased by much reading, was aided and ripened by his wide 
experience, largely in private schools. "His life was honest and upright in 
the highest degree and his example and teachings such as would elevate all 
with whom he came in contact.' ' 

He was married September 19, 1849, to Sarah Jenkes, daughter of 
Livingston and Sallie (Buffington) Jenks of Warren, Pa. She died, October 
5, 1898. Two children were born to them: Livingston Jenks, born April 16, 
1853, died April 2, 1855; Emily, born March 26, 1861, graduated from the 
Hahneman Medical College, now a physician in Breham, Tex. 

COL. SIMEON WHEELER, A. B., LL. B. 

Simeon Wheeler, son of Simeon and Lucy (Putnam) Wheeler, was born 
in NewiJort, N. H., August 30, 1815, and died in Demopolis, Ala., in February, 
1864. He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the 
University in 1837, graduating A. B. in 1840, with the highest honors of 
his class; was distinguished at the University for his scholarship, oratorical 
and athletic ability. 

Previous to his entering the University, he had taught several terms 
of school, meeting with success and soon after graduation was selected by 
Captain Partridge to teach in his Portsmouth (Va.) Military Academy. 
After teaching there a few years, he entered the University qf Virginia Law 
School and graduated with high rank. He practiced his profession in Ports- 
mouth, Va., 1854, when he removed to Demopolis, Ala., to look after the 
extensive property owned by his wife in that town and vicinity. 

He took an active interest in politics; represented Portsmouth in the State 
Legislature. He was much interested in military matters; served as colonel 
in the New Hampshire militia. 

He was married in 1854 to Mrs. Anna Cocke of Portsmouth, Va., who 
died about 1880; no children. 



316 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. [1840 

NON-GRADUATES, 1840. 



NAPOLEON BONAPARTE ATKINSON. 

Napoleon B. Atkinson, son of Daniel C. and Mahala (Tilton) Atkinson, 
and cousin of Charles E. Tilton, '48, was born in Sanborton, N. H., April 14, 
1819, and died in Athens, Ga., about 1900. 

He attended the schools of his towTi and entered the University in 1837, 
remaining two years. He engaged in general mercantile business in Sanbor- 
ton, from 1840 until 1850, when he removed to Athens, Ga. Here he made 
his home until his death. He engaged in the drug business in Athens many 
years. 

He was married in 1842, to Zapherine D. Robinson of Boston, Mass., 
who siu-vives him and resides in Athens, Ga. 

CHARLES SOUTHWORTH BALL. 

Charles S. Ball, son of Daniel and Laura Ann (Southworth) Ball, was born 
in Pittsford, Vt., January 12, 1822, and died unmarried, in Sandy Hill, N. Y., 
December 27, 1841. 

At an early age, his parents removed to Sandy Hill, N. Y., where he 
attended the public schools. He entered the Preparatory Department of the 
University in 1835, and remained until 1836, when owing to ill health, he was 
forced to give up his com-se. In 1837, while engaged in fencing in Sandy Hill, 
with one of the "N. U." men who was at home on a vacation, he broke a 
blood vessel in his lung, which nearly caused his death. He never fully 
recovered from this accident. He had great talent as an artist and a musician. 
He took lessons for some time on the violin with a J\Ir. HUl, a noted musician 
in New York. When Ole Bull, the famous viohnist, made his first visit 
to New York, he called at this school and honored Mr. Ball by playing with him. 
He complimented Mr. Ball very highly, and predicted for him a brilUant career 
as a violinist. 

NIAL RUSS COLBURN. 

Nial R. Colburn, son of Da\dd and Rebecca (Russ) Colburn, was born 
in''Hartford,(Quechee) Vt., in 1820, and died in White River Junction, in 1890. 

He prepared for college at the WTiite River Junction (Hartford) Academy 
and in the Preparatory department of]^the University 1834-36; was a student 
of the Collegiate department, 1836-37. He taught school for some time, but 
owing to ill health was forced to follow out-of-doors~employment; farmed in 
Hartland and Hartford, Vt., and in 1880, removed to WTiite River Junction, 
where he resided until his death. He was a fine student and contributed many 
articles to the local papers. 

He was married in 1838, to Sophia Sarah Lamphere, of Hartland, Vt., who 
survives him and resides in WTiite River Junction. Ten children were born 
to them: Hemy, resides in Boston; Clara Sophia, married Frank Carpenter, 
died in 1890; Willis, killed on the railroad; Maria S., resides in White River 
Junction, Vt.; Charles Lewis, resides in Brattleboro, Vt.; Herbert, resides in 
White River Junction, Vt.; Clement, died in 1900; Wilson, died about 1900; 
Wilbur, died 1901; one child died in infancy. 



1840J SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 317 

WILLIAM CALDWELL BELCHER, A. M. 

William C. Belcher, son of Samuel and Anna Gray (Caldwell) Belcher, 
was born in Stockbridge, Vt., December 12, 1820, and died unmarried, in 
San Francisco, Cal., September 1, 1895. 

He prepared for college at the academies in Royalton and Randolph and 
entered the University in 1837, remaining three years; graduated A. B. from 
the University of Vermont in 1843, and received the degree of A. M., in course 
from that Institution in 1847. He studied medicine, but never practiced the 
profession. 

He was principal of the Brad- 
ford (Vt.) Academy, 1844-49; Platts- 
burg, (N. Y.) Academy, 1849-53; 
professor of the Natural Sciences 
"N. U." 1853-54. He studied law 
during 1851-55 with Judge Eli S. 
Denson, and was admitted to the 
bar in 1856. In the same year he 
located in Marysville, Cal., and 
formed a partnership with his brother, 
Judge Isaac S. Belcher, in the 




practice of his profession, which con- 
tinued until 1874. He removed to 
San Fraicisco in 1874, and became 
a member of the firm of Mastick, 
Belcher & Mastick, Attorneys, and 
continued the practice of his pro- 
fession until his death. He met 
with marked success in his profes- 
sion, and acquired a large property. 
"He was wise in council, bold in 
action and fearless in debate; con- 
scious of the rectitude of his own in- William Caldwell Belcher, 
tentions, he was ever ready to grant to others the same honesty of 
purpose that he claimed for himself. He was a profound jurist, learned 
in the science and ethics of the civil law, and by his scholarly attainments, 
his unflinching integrity and unyielding fidelity to every tj'ust reposed 
in him, he left the impress of his genius upon the jurisprudence of his 
State." He founded and endowed the Belcher Library in his native town 
and made the University of Vermont his residuary legatee. He was a thirty- 
third degree Mason; was Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of California, 
1862-65; chairman of the judiciary committtee of the Grand Lodge, 1865-93; 
and grand commander of the Grand Commandery K. T. of California in 1882. 
He was an active member of the Native Sons of Vermont Association. 

CAPT. JAMES MARTIN GILSON. 
James M. Gilson, son of Samuel and Fanny (Pinney) Gilson, was born in 
Northfield, Vt., October 18, 1818, and died in Leavenworth, Kan., April 21, 
1888; was buried in St. Joseph, Mo. At an early age, his parents removed to 
Stockbridge, Vt.,from which town he entered the University in 1836, remaining 
three years. 



318 



NOKWICH UNIVERSITY, 



[1840 



He studied law with Hon. Le\n B. Vilas, (q. v.) in Chelsea, Vt., and was 
admitted to the bar in 1841. He practiced his profession in Chelsea, 
1841-45, being associated with Mr. Vilas during 1841-43; Cincinnati, 
Ohio, 1845-48; Central Square, N. Y., near SjTacuse, 1848-50. In 1850, he 
went to California, where he worked in the gold fields for some time. He was 
assistant engineer with E. B. Kellogg, '45, June-July, 1851, on surveys of 
Vallejo, Cal. He returned to Central Square early in 1853, and in the fall of 
the same year, he removed to Knoxville, 111., and was assistant engineer on 
construction of the Peoria, Oquawka & Burlington R. R. ; 1853-55, division 
engineer, 1855-57. He then practiced law in Knox\'ille until 1862. 

On the breaking out of the Civil War, he offered his ser\'ices to the State of 
Illinois and was engaged for some time as drill master. He was commissioned 
captain in the 83d Illinois Volunteers in October, 1862; was especially distin- 
guished for gallantry in the battle of Fort Donelson, February 3, 1863, being 
severely wounded; was mustered out of service in June, 1865. He removed 
to Brookfield, Mo., in the fall of 1866, where he practiced his profession until 
1882, when he was appointed pension agent. ""^ Since that date he spent most 
of his time in Kansas. 

He was married June 21, 1844, to Emily Ajtcs Waller, of Bethel, Vt., 
who died in Brookfield, Mo., April 26, 1894.'^^ Two children were born to them: 
Frances Mary, born May 22, 1847, resides in Charlestown, N. H.; Daniel 
Durell, born February 15, 1850, resides'in Brookfield, Mo. 

SUMNER KNIGHT. 



Sumner Knight, son of Joseph and Roxana (Pitcher) Knight, was born 
in Stoddard. X. H., April 6, 1818, and died in Keene, N. H., September 26, 
'^ 1903. He prepared for college in the 

schools of his to'mi and the Hancock, 
N. H. and New Ipswich Academy. 
He entered the University in 1837, re- 
maining nearly three years, not grad- 
uating with, his class as he was teach- 
ing in the Hancock Literary and 
Scientific Institution and unable to 
take the final examinations. 

He taught school for some years 
in various to\\ais in New Hampshire, 
l)ut making his home on the old farm 
in Stoddard, where he was born. He 
engaged in farming in Stoddard from 
1895 untU 1883, when he removed to 
Keene, N. H., where he made his 
home until his death. He engaged 
in land survejdng for many years; 
served six years as county com- 
missioner and for several j'ears as 
deputy sheriff; was collector of in- 
ternal revenue, 1861-66. He was a 
fine scholar, excelling in mathema. 




Sumner Knight 



1840] 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



319 



tics and was a successful teacher. He was distinguished for his honesty and 
uprightness of character and filled the various positions he held with marked 
ability. 

He was twice married: first, June 3, 1845, to Martha Phelps of Marlow, 
N. H., who died January 26, 1855. Three children were born to them : Abbie, 
born in 1848, died in 1852; Eva, born in 1849, died in 1852; Frank Herbert, 
born, January 29, 1852, died in Keene, N. H., March 13, 1907. He was again 
married in April, 1858 to Fannie Emily Whitney of Stoddard, who died July 
10, 1887. Three children: Marcus Whitney, born July 7, 1861, now a physician 
in Milford, Mass.; Florence Sherman, born January 27, 1864, died November 
1, 1889; Charles Sumner, born September 16, 1867, died February 22, 1889. 



REV. JOSIAH MARVIN. 

Josiah Marvin, son of William and Mercy (Crosby) Marvin, was born in 
Alstead, N. H., May 23, 1819; and died there, September 19, 1887; was buried 
in Brattleboro, Vt. He prepared for college at the Alstead Academy and 

entered the University in 1836, re- •. 

maining three years, nearly com- 
pleting his course. 

He studied for the Universalist 
ministry dm-ing 1842-44, and was 
ordained in the latter year. He was 
successively pastor of UniversaUst 
churches in Stoneham, Saugus and 
Fitchburg, Mass., Springfield, 111., 
and Springfield, Mass., and the First 
Church in St. Paul, Minn., February 
3, 1867— September, 1869. In the 
latter year, he was appointed state 
missionary for Minnesota, by the 
Minnesota State Universalist Con- 
vention, holding this position several 
years. He then resided in Nashua, 
N. H., for some time. He returned 
to St. Paul, Minn., in 1880, where he 
made his home until 1886. He was 
an able business man and owned 
valuable real estate interests in St. 
Paul and Minneapolis. He was Rev. Josiah Marvin, 

elected chaplain of the Minnesota State senate in 1871, hokling the office dvu-- 
ing several succeeding sessions. 

He was a prominent member of the I. O. O. F., holding the various offices 
in the subordinate lodge; also served as grand chaplain of the Grand Lodge 
of Minnesota in 1884-85; and Grand Master in 1885-86. In February, 1886, 
he was grand representative to the Grand Encampment in Boston, Mass., and 
while attending the session was taken ill and went to his old home in Alstead, 
N. H. He rapidly failed and died there in 1887. He was married, in 1845, 
to Mary Jane Harris of Chesterfield, N. H., who died in St. Paul, Minn., 
July 14, 1885. Two children were born to them, who died in infancy. 




320 



JsrORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



11840 



JEREMIAH DEGROFF MERRILL. 

Jeremiah D. Merrill, son of John and Sally (Degroff) Merrill, was born in 
Tunbridge, Vt., December 7, 1815, and died in Merrillsville, N. Y., January 
13, 1893. In 1830, his parents removed to the Adirondacks, New York, found- 
ing the settlementof Merrillsville, 
which still bears the family name. 
Cadet Merrill attended the schools 
of Tunbridge and Chelsea and 
entered the University in 1837, re- 
maining two years. 

He taught school in Vermont 
several years. He became one of 
the best known land surveyors in 
Northern New York. He sur- 
veyed gi'eat tracts of forest lands 
■.^' ~ in the Adirondack region and laid 

out public roads through the 
same. He was also for many 
years surve5^or for the C. F. 
Norton Lumber Co., of Plattsbm-g, 
N. Y. He was a Republican in 
politics and held many towTi 
offices. 

He was twice married: first, 
to Sarah Smith; no children. 
He was again married, March 14, 
1860, to Louisa Washburn of 
• Jeremiah Degroff Merrill. Milton, Vt., who died November 

20, 1909. Four children were born to them: Jed Scott, born July 9, 
1861, died November 16, 1888; Sarah Louise, born June 8, 1863, married 
Mr. James Jay FitzGerald, resides in Harriettstown, N. Y.; Elmer Marcellus, 
born April 20, 1865, resides in Saranac Lake, N. Y.; Ina Adell, born July 27, 
1870, resides in Merrillsville, N. Y. 




FRANKLIN TUCKER. 

Franklin Tucker, son of Samuel and Alma (Rice) Tucker, was born 
in Lebanon, N. H., January 4, 1817, and died there, April 28, 
1894. 

At an early age, his parents removed to Northfield, where he prepared for 
college. He entered the University in 1836, and remained two years, when, on 
the death of his father, he was obliged to retui'n home and care for the family. 
He worked the home farm in Northfield until 1853. He then engaged in the 
mercantile business in Northfield from 1853 until 1872, when he removed to 
Lebanon, N. H., where he continued in business until 1892. 

He was married INIay 23, 1852, to Esther Maria Durkee of Lebanon, N. H.i 
who died July 8, 1899. They had one child, Etta Marinda, born May 8, 1860, 
and an adopted son and daughter, Herbert Marion and Lulu M. 



1840] 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



321 



CYRUS GARDINER MYRICK. 

Cyrus G. Myrick, son of Nathan and Harriet (Russell) Myrick, was born 
in Middlebury, Vt., April 26, 1817. and died in Lesueur, Minn., January 9, 
1904. 

He prepared for college at the Middlebury Academy and attended Middle- 
bury College during 1836-37. He entered the University in 1837, and remained 

nearly three years, leaving just before 
commencement to take an engineer- 
ing position. He studied law and was 
admitted to the Addison County Bar 
at Middlebury; practiced his profession 
in Lesueur, Minn., 1858-64. He en- 
gaged in teaching for some years and 
taught the first school in Lesueur, 
Minn. 

He served while a cadet as a drill 
master to the "Canadian Rebels" 
during the Canadian Rebellion, and 
during this time had many narrow 
escapes; served in General Scott's 
Army during the Mexican War; also 
served in the " Lesueiu: Tigers' ' during 
the Indian outbreak in Minnesota in 
1862, taking part in the fierce battle at 
New Ulm. 

He located in Lesueur, Minn., in 

1857, where he made his home until his 

death; served over twenty years as 

county surveyor and several years 

He was a member of the Episcopal 




Cyrus Gardiner Myrick. 



as city engineer of Lesueur. 
Church. 

He was married, November 20, 1860, to Margaret Christine Kuecheu- 
meister of Lesueur who survives him and resides in that town. Three children 
were born to them: Emma Adeline, born March 26, 1862, married Herman 
Winterer, resides in Valley City, N. D.; Florence C, born April 20, 1866, 
married Wilham Russell, resides in Shelby, Mich.; Harriett Russell, born 
December 24, 1878, now superintendent of schools, Elkton, South Dakota. 



BVT. BRIG.- GEN. WARREN SHEDD. 

Warren Shedd, son of William and Jemima (Spaulding) Shedd, was born 
in Stoddard, N. H., February 22, 1821, and died at Tigersville, South Dakota, 
August 29, 1881; was buried in Rapid City, North Dakota. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the Pre- 
paratory department of the University in 1835, and the regular work of the 
Scientific department in 1836, remaining until 1839 

He removed to Illinois about 1840; was principal of the Rock Island high 
school for some time. He later removed to Aledo, Mercer County, 111., where 
he made his home until 1850. In this year, he went to Clear Creek, Cal. 
where he. engaged in mining until 1856. He was assistant engineer with Gen 



322 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1840 



S. M. Preston '45, in 1856 and 1857 on surveys in Iowa. He resided in 
Warrensburg, Mo., 1866-77; Black Hills, S. Dakota., 1878-79; Slate Creek, near 

Tigersville, S. Dakota, 1879-81, where 
he engaged in mining. 

On the breaking out of the Civil 
War, he offered his services to the 
State of Illinois and was appointed 
a drill and recruiting officer ; was com- 
missioned captain Co. A, 30th Illinois 
Infantrj', August 29, 1861; was pro- 
moted major, April 24, 1862; lieu- 
tenant-colonel, January 4, 1863; 
(•(jlonel, June 13, 1863; brevetted 
brigadier-general, U. S. Volunteers, 
March 13, 1865, for "meritorious 
service during the war' ' ; was honor- 
abh- discharged ^\ith his regiment, 
July 17, 1865. He served as brigade 
commander during 1864 and 1865. 

He was a 32° Mason and promi- 
nent member of the G. A. R. The 
G. A. R. Posts in Aledo, 111., and 
Hill City, S. Dakota, are named in 
his honor. 

He was a RepubUcan in pohtics 
Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Warren Shedd. .^j-^^j j-^g^ several positions; was 

treasm-er of Mercer County, 111.. 1858-61; U.S. land agent in Missouri for 
several years; was deputy clerk of United States Court at Wai-rensburg, Mo., 
1870-77. 

He was married July 23, 1858, to Antoinette Kelsey of Sterling\'ille, N.Y., 
who sur\ives him and resides in Hill City, S. Dakota. Eight children were 
born to them: Philip Sheridan, Edward McPherson, Bertie P., Mary Talbert, 
Ethel Garnet, MolUe Sullivan, Jessie Logan, and Jennie Kelsey. 




MAJ.-GEN. SETH WILLIAMS, U. S. A. 

Seth Williams, son of the Hon. Daniel and Mary (Sa^N-telle) WilUams, was 
born in Augusta, Me., Mai'ch 24, 1822, and died unmarried, in Boston, Mass., 
March 23, 1866; was bm-ied in Augusta. He attended the schools of his 
city and entered the University in 1836, remaining until 1838, when he received 
an appointment to the U. S. Mihtary Academy. 

He graduated from West Point, July 1, 1842; was commissioned brevet 2d 
lieutenant, July 1, 1842, 2d Ueutenant 1st U. S. Ai'tillery, August 31, 1844; was 
assigned to Duncan's Battery and served in Texas; was promoted 1st lieutenant 
same regiment, ]\Iarch 3, 1847, and served during the ^lexican War; was dis- 
tinguished for bravery at the battles of Palo Alto and Cerro Gordo and at the 
siege of Vera Cruz; served for some time as mihtary governor of Matmoras; 
served on the staff of General Patterson, on th^ march from Vera Cruz to the 
city of Me.xico; was brevetted captain, April 18, 1847, for "gallani and meri- 
torious conduct in the battle of Cerro Gordo, Mexico;' ' serv'ed as adjutant at 
West Point, 1850- August 16, 1853; was assistant adjutant general with head 



1840] 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



323 



quarters in Washington, August 1853-December, 1860; served in same capacity 
in the department of the West, December, 1860-May, 1861; was commissioned 
brevet major, May 11, 1861 and major, August 3, 1861; served as adjutant- 
general on Maj.-Gen. McClellan's staff during the Virginia campaign in 1861; 
promoted brigadier-general of volunteers, September 23, 1861; served at 
the department headquarters in Washington, July, 1861-March, 1862, and 
during this time labored night and day to systematize the work of the depart- 
ment. He was promoted lieutenant-colonel July 17, 1862. 

He was adjutant-general of the 
Army of the Potomac from March, 
1862, until November, 1864, serving 
in the Peninsular and Maryland cam- 
paigns with General McClellan; also 
in the Rappahannock, Pennsylvania 
and Rapidan campaigns with Gen- 
erals Burnside, Hooker, and Meade 
successively. In November, 1864, 
owing to the severity of his labors and 
the necessary need of a change of 
duties, he was appointed inspector 
general and ordered to Savannah and 
other places South on a tour of inspec- 
tion. 

He was brevetted colonel, July 
3, 1863, for "gallant and meritorious 
service at the battle of Gettysburg' ' ; 
brevet brigadier-general, I". S. A., 
March 13, 1865, for "gallant and 
meritorious service in the campaign 
terminating with the siu'render of the 

insurgent army under Robert T.Lee"; Maj.-Gen. Setn Williams, U. S. A. 

major-general U. S. A., March 13, 1865, for "gallant and meritorious service 
in the field, during the war"; and major-general U. S. Volunteers, August 
1, 1864, for "highly meritorious and faithful service in the field on the 
several campaigns from Gettysburg to Petersburg, Va. " 

As inspector-general on the staff of General Grant, he accompanied that 
officer to Appomattox Court House, Va., and witnessed the surrender of 
General Lee. He continued on the staff of General Grant until February 9, 
1866. He then served as adjutant-general of the division of the Atlantic, with 
headquarters in Philadelphia until March 1, same year, when he was obliged 
to give up his work and seek medical aid. The disease, an acute inflammation, 
progressed with fatal rapidity and he diecl March 23, 1866. 

His last active duty was with the connnission apj^ointed by the Govern- 
ment to investigate; the charg(>s made by the Prussian Governm(>nt in relation 
to the enlistment of their subjects in the Union Army. He was one of the 
ablest officers of the time. He had directly to do with those (>l(nnents which 
determine whether an army shall be a mass of men in uniform or an effective 
army properly sui)plied and equipped and ready at any moment- for acition. 
He held the confidence and admiration of his commanders. Fort Williams, 
Portland, was named in his memory. 




324 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1841 



CLASS OF 1841. 



MAJ. ALVAN EARL BOVAY, A. M. 

Alvan E. Bovay, son of John and Elizabeth (Earl) Bovay, was bom in 
Adams, Jefferson Co., N. Y., Julj^ 12, 1818, and died in Brooklyn, N. Y. He 
prepared for college at the WatertowTi (N.Y.) Academy, and entered the Uni- 
versity in 1838, graduating A. B. in 1S41; was instructor of Ancient and Mod- 
ern Languages, 1840-41; was librarian of the University, 1840-41; received the 
degree of A. M. in course in 1844. 

He was principal of schools in Glens Falls, N. Y., 1841-43; Oswego, N. Y., 
Academy, 1843-44; was professor of languages at Captain Partridge's MiUtary 
School in Bristol, Pa., 1844-45. He studied law during 1842-45, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in New York and 
practiced in that State until 1850, 
when he located in Ripon, Wis., where 
he made his home until 1890. In 
this last year, he removed to Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., where he made his home 
until his death. He continued his 
practice of law in Ripon for many 
years. He took an important part 
in the political affairs of Wisconsin. 
He was an ardent Whig in poUtics 
and the honor of founding the Re- 
publican Party belongs to him. As 
early as 1852, he felt that the end of 
', ^^^H^ '^^^^^^^ ^^^ \Mug party, of which he was a 

W^^^ts '^^^^^^^m i^^Q^t)^!*! '^'^^ near, and while visit- 

^^HjBE. ^^^^^^^^M ^^S ^^ New York, expressed his fore- 

▼^ ''j^^^^^^m bodings to Horace Greeley, and stated 

^^^^^^^^ that a new party would have to be 
organized. On being asked by 
Greeley, who thought the WTiigs 
would ^\in, what name should be given 
to this new party, answered "Repub- 

Maj. Alvan Earl Bovay. lican " 

Henry Wilson's Rise and Fall of the Slave Power, pubhshed in 1874 gives 
an account of the founding of the party, and gives Major Bovay the distinction 
of ha\ang called the first meeting. This meeting was held at his call in the 
Congregational church in Ripon, Wis., February' 28, 1854, and steps were taken 
to found a new party, and a committee of five, three Whigs, one Democrat, 
and one Free Soiler was chosen to begin the task of forming a new party. He 
held man}' to-mi offices. He represented his district in the legislature in 1859 
and 1860; refused a nomination to the senate in the latter year. 

On the breaking out of the Ci^dl War, he offered his serx-ices to the state 
of Wisconsin. He performed valuable ser\ice in drilfing and recruiting troops 
for the service. He was commissioned major of the 19th Wisconsin Infantry, 




1841] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 325 

December 31, 1861; was provost marshal of Norfolk and Portsmouth, Va., for 
some time. Owing to ill health, he was forced to resign his commission 
September 29, 1863. He was an active member of the Episcopal church and 
the G. A. R. 

He was married November 25, 1846, to Elizabeth, daughter of Ransom 
Smith of New York city. She died March 12, 1890, leaving one child, Mary, 
who married Rev. Mr. Colt, an Episcopal clergyman. 

COL. ANDREW JACKSON DORN, A. B. 

Andrew J. Dorn, was born in Florida, N. Y., and died in Austin, Texas* 
about 1888. He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered 
the University in 1838, and graduated A. B. in 1841. 

He was commandant of the Virginia, Literary, Scientific and Military 
Academy (q. v.) Portsmouth, Va., 1842-44. He opened a military school in 
St. Louis, Mo., in 1844. This was the first miUtary school founded west of 
the Allegheny Mountains. James V. A. Shield, '41, a classmate, soon became 
associated with him' in the school. In 1845, Captain Partridge visited the 
school and a torchhght procession was given in his honor by the cadets. He 
delivered his lecture on "Military Education for the Masses," at the city hall, 
which was hstened to by a large audience. The school was very prosperous 
until the breaking out of the Mexica,n War, when Colonel Dorn, having been 
elected a first lieutenant in the Missouri Volunteers, gave the management of 
the school to Professor Shields. Owing to the unsettled conditions of the 
times, the school became reduced in numbers and the enterprise was given up in 
1846. 

He was distinguished at the University for his love of military affairs. 
He served during 1842-43, as major on the governor's staff of New York. On 
June 19, 1846, he was commissioned senior first Heutenant in Wrightman's 
Artillery Company, Clark's battalion Missouri Volunteers. He served with 
distinction in Mexico and at the battle of Sacremento his horse was shot under 
him; was mustered out, June 24, 1847. On August 28, 1847, he was commis- 
sioned second lieutenant in the "Third Dragoons' ' ; was mustered out of service 
July 31, 1848. 

On the breaking out of the Civil War, he removed to Texas and was 
commissioned a colonel in the Confederate Army and was given command of 
the Sachem Indians. He is said to have been promoted a brigadier-general. 
In 1848, he was appointed Indian agent of the Quopous and other Indians at the 
Neosha agency in Missouri, which positions he held until the^Civil War broke 
out. In 1865, he located in Bonham, Texas, where he engaged in the mercantile 
business until 1874, when he removed to Austin, Texas, where he made his 
home until his death. He was Democrat in politics and held several offices; 
was state treasurer of Texas for several years; was an officer in the U. S. Senate, 
1884-89. 

He was married in 1848 to Emily White, daughter of a prominent business 
man of St. Louis and a native of Virginia. A son Robert was drowned in 1887. 

DANIEL H. DUSTIN, A. B. 
Daniel H. Dustin was born in 1819, and entered the University from 
Westworth, N. H., in 1838, graduating A. B., in 1841. He studied law in 
] oston and practiced in that city and in New York, until 1853, when he was 



326 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1841 



appointed U. S. district attorney for Minnesota. Mr. T. M. Newson states 
in his Pe7i Pictures of St. Paul, Minnesota and Biographical Sketches of Old 
Settlers published in 1886: "Mr. Dustin came to St. Paul in 1853 as U. S. 
district attorney and occupied a one story wooden building up upper Third 
St., near Eagle. He was a social gentleman and a lawyer of a good deal of 
ability. He was in perfect health and attended a Fourth of July celebration, 
1854, when in six days after he was dead supposed to have died of cholera.' ' 



HON. EPHRAIM FLINT, A. B. 



Ephraim Flint, son of Ephraim and Phebe (Thompson) Flint, was born 
in Baldwin, ]Me., March 10, 1819, and died in Dover, Maine, June 17, 1884. 
He prepared for college at the Westbrook seminary, and at the academies 
in Parsonfield, Gorham, Bridgeton, and Fryebiu-g. He entered the University 
in 183S, and graduated A. B. in 1841. 

He then studied law with Fes- 
\ senden & Willis, in Portland, and at 

the Harvard Law School and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1843. In 1844, 
he opened a law office in Monson, 
where he continued to practice until 
January, 1851, when, having been 
>^ -Tff--«»- elected clerk of the county court, he 

moved to Dover, where he resided 
until his death. He held this office 
by subsequent elections until the 
close of 1862. He was a Republican 
in politics. In 1863, he served on 
the commission to locate the two 
Normal schools. He was secretary 
of state from 1864 to 1868, and filled 
the office with marked ability. In 
1868, he was transferred to the ex- 
ecutive council. In 1869, he was 
chairman of the commission for the 
revision of the statutes of the State. 
The result of his labor is embodied in 
the Revised Statutes of 1871. He 
then resumed the practice of law, in 




^ 



Hon. Ephraim Flint. 



Dover. In 1880, he was representative to the State Legislature from the 
district composed of Dover, Sangerville, and Parkman, and served on the 
judiciary committee during the session of 1881. He was a member of the 
LTnitarian church; the Masonic Lodge nnd[Kinco'^Lodge,'[l. O. O. F., of 
Dover. 

He was married, in June, 1844, to Laura Maria Riley of Norwich, Vt., 
who sm'vives him and resides in Dover; two children were born to them: 
Henry Burton, now clerk of the Supreme court of Piscataqius, County and 
resides in Dover; Clara Louise, married Mr. Walter Thomas, resides in 
Waltham, Mass. 



1S4 11 SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 327 



HON. CALEB LYON, LL. D. 

Caleb Lyon, son of James Lyon, was born in Creig, N. Y., December 7, 
1822, and died at Rossville, Staten Island, N. Y., September 8, 1875. 

In 1834, his parents removed to Lyonsdale, N. Y., where he attended the 
public schools. He entered the Civil Engineering department of the Uni- 
versity ^in^September, 1837, and graduated by certificate in 1841. In 1851, 
the University, in recognition of his political record, conferred upon him the 
degree of LL. D. 

He traveled extensively in Europe during 1841-45, and in this latter year 
was appointed U. S. Consul at Shanghai, China, which position he held until 
1849. He then traveled several months in South America, and located in 
California in the latter part of 1849. He at once took a prominent part in the 
affaii's of that State; served as secretary of the convention called to frame the 
State Constitution in Monterey. He is said to have designed the State 
seal. 

In 1850, he traveled in Europe and then returned to Lyonsdale. He was 
elected a representative to the State Legislature in November, 1850. Owing 
to a difference of opinion on the question of the enlargement of the Erie Canal 
of which project he was an advocate, he resigned his seat in 1851, and in the 
same year was elected a State senator. He then traveled in Europe and Asia 
until 1853. While visiting in Smyra in 1853, became involved in the Martin 
Koszta Affair, in which the Austrian Consul arrested Koszta, who had a short 
time before declared his intentions of becoming a U. S. citizen in New 
York. 

He served as Congressman from his district in New York, December 5, 
1853-March 3, 1855, as an "Independent." In 1864, he was appointed 
governor of Idaho by President Lincoln and held the office until 1866. In 
1866, his residence in Lyonsdale was burned, and he moved to Rossville, N. Y., 
where he made his home until his death. He is said to have served for some 
time on ths staff of General Scott in 1861. He was a fine scholar and a ready 
orator, whose memory and knowledge of histoiy and statistics made him a 
formidable antagonist in debate; he is survived by two daughters, who reside 
in Rossville, N. Y. 

LUKE E. MILLER, A. B., M. D. 

Luke E. Miller, son of Andrew Miller, was born in Peterboro, N. H., in 
1820, and died in Lanesboro, Minn., about 1890. He prepared for college in 
the school of his town and entered the University in 1838, and graduated A. B. 
in 1841. He entered the Vermont Medical College, Woodstock, Vt., in 1841, 
graduating in 1843; practiced his profession in Troy, N. H., Chatfield and 
Lanesboro, Minn. 

lie was a Republican in politics and represented Chatfield in the State 
Legislature in 1845 and 1846; was State senator in Minnesota, 1802-70; was 
State agent from Minnesota to look after tlieir sick and wounded soldiers, 1864- 
66. He was one of the founders of the Minnesota Asylum for the Insane, and 
a trustee for many years. He was survived by a son, Luke Miller, who resides 
in Chatfield, Minn. 



328 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1841 



CAPT. AUGUSTINE LANGDON C. MAJOR, A. B. 

Augustine L. C. Major was born on a plantation six miles north of Cul- 
peper Court House, Va., and died at Brandy Station, Va., in 1900. He pre- 
pared for college in the schools of his State, and graduated A. B. from the 

University in 1841. After leaving 
the University, he decided to study 
medicine; but, acting on his father's 
advice, decided to become a farmer. 
He owned a large farm near Brandy 
Station, Va., where he resided until 
his death. 

He took an active interest in the 
State Militia, and was captain of a 
company for a number of years. At 
the breaking out of the Civil War, 
he was opposed to secession, and 
did not volunteer his services, al- 
though he had several apphcations 
to raise a company of troops. In 
1864, when the Confederacy passed 
the law compelling every man cap- 
able of military service to enter the 
army, he joined Company E, 
"Mosby's Rangers," as a private, 
and served until the command was 
disbanded. 

Capt. Augustine Langdon C. Major. At the close of the war, he re- 

sumed farming. He met wdth success in this line of work, and was one of the 
most highly respected citizens of the county. He was an active member of 
the Baptist Church for forty-five years, and was county magistrate for a num- 
ber of years. 

He was married in 1849, to Mary Vnginia Fickling. Eleven children were 
born to them. 




COL. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN NALLE, M. C. E. 

Benjamin F. Nalle, son of Jesse and Anne (Botts) Nalle, was born in CiJ- 
peper County, Va., in November, 1818, and died at Rapidan, same county, 
January 2, 1903. He prepared for college in the schools of his State and en- 
tered the University in 1839, graduating M. C. E. in 1841. 

He then traveled for a few months in Canada, and returned to Virginia. 
He intended to follow the life of a civil engineer. At that time there was 
little demand for engineers, and possessing a fine farm in Culpeper Co., Va., he 
took to agricultural pursuits. Finding the work congenial, he continued in 
this vocation until liis death. In 1845, he sold his farm and purchased another 
in Orange County, Va. In 1870, he removed to Rapidan, where he had large 
agricultiu-al interests. Here he resided until his death. 

He took greal interests in mihtary matters. In 1845, he was elected cap- 
tain of a mihtia company enrolled in Orange Count}'. In 1850, he was elected 
colonel and served in that capacity until 1861. 



1841] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 329 

In politics he was a Henry Clay Whig, and was opposed in principle to the 
secession of Virginia from the Union, but, after the State seceded, he took sides 
with his people in the defence of the Southern Confederacy. He was at Harp- 
er's Ferry in command of his regiment on the morning of the 19th of April, 
1861, after the armory and arsenal were burned by the Federal guard, and his 
regiment was thus the first in the field of active service in Virginia. The 
State Militia was under the control of the governor, who appointed all the 
officers. A. P. Hill, afterwards lieutenant-general, C. S. A., was appointed to 
command the regiment which was afterwards known as the Thirteenth Regi- 
ment, Virginia Volunteers, and Colonel Nalle was commissioned captain of 
Company A, and served in that capacity until the reorganization of the army, 
when the Virginia troops were turned over to the Confederate government. 
He was then appointed collector of tax in kind, (food supplies) by the Con- 
federate government, and faithfully served in that capacity to the end of the 
war. He was a member of the Episcopal Church, serving as vestryman and 
warden over thirty years. 

He was married June .5, 1862, to Martha Antrim, of Albemarle Co., Va., 
who died November 5, 1901. Six children were born to them: Haywood Botts, 
born June 14, 186.3, resides in Leesburg, Va.; Cora Ritchie, born June 14, 1866, 
married Mr. Ellis Mills, resides in Rapidan, Va. ; John Antrim, born June 29, 
1868, died January 2, 1869; Margaret Lawson, born July 9, 1875, died August 
11, 1876; Benjamin Franklin, born September 1.3, 1883, died August 6, 1884. 

DAVID RICHARDSON, A. M. 

David Richardson was born in Bethel, Vt., October 22, 1815, and died in 
Clinton, 111., in 1895. In 1825, his parents removed to Woodstock, where he 
attended the public schools. He finished his preparations for college at the 
Winsdor Academy under the principalship of Charles B. Adams. He entered 
the University in 1838, and graduated A. B. August 19, 1841; received the 
degree of A. M. in course in 1844. He was professor of mathematics at the 
University, 1841-June 29, 1844. 

In the fall of 1844, he located in Woodstock, McHenry Co., 111., where he 
resided until 1853. He was principal of the public schools, 1844-49; and con- 
ducted a private school during 1849-52; served during 1848-52 as county sur- 
veyor of McHenry County; was an assistant engineer on railroads in Illinois, 
1853-55. He located in Mill County in 1855, and served as county surveyor 
until 1857. In 1858, he was awarded the contract for constructing the stone 
work of the DeWitt County Jail at Clinton, and moved his family to that city, 
where he resided until his death. He taught in this county many years; was 
county surveyor, 1859-61, 186.5-69, 1875-79, 1886-92. He was a member of the 
Clinton Lodge, F and A. M. 

He was married in August, 1859, to Mrs. Malvina (Briggs) Hampton, 
a native of Woodstock, Vt.,who died April 27, 1899. Seven children were born 
to them: Frank, Fred, Eva, Melvina, Mona, died in infancy; Locklin S., born 
November 1, 1869, resides in Clinton, 111.; Harriet, born December 8, 1864, 
married and resides in Clinton. 

LIEUTENANT JAMES VAN ALLEN SHIELDS, A. B. 
James V. A. Shields, the only son of James Walsh and Sarah (Van Allen) 
Shields, was born in New York City, August 13, 1822, and died in Washington, 
D. C, March 12, 1903. His mother died in 1826, and he was taken to live in 



330 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. [ 1841 

Newburg, N. Y., where he lived until 1836, when he went to "Washington, D. C. 
He prepared for college at the Brookville (Md.) Academy, and entered the 
University in the summer of 1839, and graduated A. B. 1841 ; was assistant in 
Mathematics in 1840-41. 

In the Slimmer of 1843, he went to Mascautah, 111., and taught school until 
1844, when- he joined his classmate, Andrew J. Dorn, who had opened a mili- 
tary academy in St. Louis. In 184.5, they were \'isited by Captain Partridge. 
A torchlight parade was given in his honor by their cadets and he was escorted 
to the City Hall, where he delivered an address to the citizens on the subject 
"Military Education for the Masses." He taught school in Alabama, 1845-46, 
and on the breaking out of the Mexican War, Dorn, having been elected senior 
first lieutenant in June, 1846, of an artillery company, engaged him to conduct 
the military school at St. Louis in his absence. The school becoming much 
reduced in numbers, he abandoned it in the fall of 1846, and became assistant 
to a Mr. Armstrong, who was at the head of a public school in that city. 

In May, 1847, he enlisted as a private in a company commanded by Capt. 
William A. Barnes of Easton's battalion of Missouri Infantry Volunteers and 
was soon appointed sergeant-major. They at once began the nine hundred mile 
march to Santa Fe. The battalion -wdntered at Lemitar. He served in the 
command of Brig. Gen. Sterling Price in the spring of 1848 and did valuable 
service with the command on the Rio Grande, at Chihuahua, and the battle of 
Santa Cruz de Rosalies; was mustered out of service in Independence, Mo., 
October 1848. 

He held a jjosition in a New York mercantile house from 1849, to the winter 
of 18.54, when he removed to Washington, D. C, and became a clerk in the 
Pension Office. He was appointed a "route book clerk" in the Post Office 
department in 1860, and in 1861 was appointed private secretary to General 
Rucker in the depot quartermaster's office, remaining there imtil the close of 
the war. When the city was threatened by the Confederates, McClellan's 
army being at Yorktown, the quartermaster's employees were mustered into 
service, and he was appointed adjutant and 1st lieutenant of the second regi- 
ment, recei\nng his commission from Secretary Stanton which bore this legend 
upon it: Without pay or emolmnents. Since the war, he held office in the munici- 
pal government; was engaged as an expert accountant until 1897, when he 
retired from active work. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church, 
ser\'ing as elder for many years. 

He was married in Bloomingburg, N. Y., January 13, 1852, to Mary 
Banker Slater, a native of New York city, who died in Washington, D. C, 
February 23, 1904. Five children were born to them: Mary Slater, born 
March 6, 1856, married Mr. Martin P. Barr, died August 4, 1889; Anna Phoebe, 
born July 28, 1858, died March 20, 1901; Sarah Van Allen, born June 12, 1861, 
married Mr. Rufus P. Clarke, died March 1, 1897; Jane Clare, born March 1, 
1868, married Mr. Norman T. Elliott, resides in Washington, D. C; James 
Van Allen, born December 9, 1871, resides in London, England. 

CHARLES ALEXANDER SIL\^R, A. B. 
Charles A. Silver, fourth child of Alexander Simpson and Jemima (Peter- 
son) Silver, was born in Norwich, Vt., August 21, 1821. He fitted for college 
in the schools of Normch. and graduated A. B. from the University in 1841. 
He paid for his tuition by acting as drummer. 



18411 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



331 



111 health, the result of a hard cold, compelled him to seek a different 
climate, and in the fall of 1841, he left home to seek his fortune. While 
visiting friends in Brooklyn, N. Y., he was taken dangerously ill, and on his 
recovery determined to make that city his home. 

As mercantile pursuits appealed 
to his taste more strongly than any 
other line of work, he obtained a situ- 
ation as clerk in a grocery store 
where, by hard work and economy, 
he acquired sufhcient means to war- 
rant his entering business for himself. 
By close application and wise busi- 
ness management, he was enabled iu 
1865, to retire from active duties, 
having amassed a comfortable for- 
tune, since which time he has resided 
in Brooklyn. He is a member of 
the First Presbyterian Church, Brook- 
lyn League; Vermont Society and 
New England Society. 

He was married August 2(), 1S47, 
to Helen L. Mann of Orford, N. H 
Four children have been born to 
them: Charles Lewis, born May 14, 
1848, died November 7, 1882; Henry 
Mann, born, March 2, 1841, A. B., 
Dartmouth College, 1872, and M. 
D., Bellevue Hospital Medical Col- 
lege, 1875, now a surgeon and professor of surgery in a New York Medi- 
cal College; Edward Vernon, born, July 24, 1860, A. B., Yale College, 1882, 
and M. D., College of Physicians and Surgeons of New York, 1885, now a 
physician in Salt Lake City, Utah; Lewis Mann, twin brother of Edward 
Vernon, born July 24, 1860, A. B. Yale College, 1882, and M. D., Bellevue 
Medical College,- 1885, now a practicing physician in the city of New York. 




Charles Alexander Silver. 



SURGEON JUSTIN EDWARDS STEVENS. U. S. A., A. M., M. D. 

Justin E. Stevens was born in Charlestown, Mass., March 15, 1822, 
and died in Boston, Mass., December 17, 1852. He prepared for college in 
the schools of Boston and entered the University from that city in 1838, 
graduating, A. B , in 1841; received from the University the degree of A. M., 
in course in 1851. 

He graduated M. D. from Harvard University Medical College in 1844; 
and practiced his profession in Boston until March 3, 1847, when he was 
commissioned surgeon of infantry. He was assigned to the 9tli U S. Infantry 
of the "Old Ninth New England," Apnl 9, 1847, and served with this regi- 
ment until August 26, 1848, when he was mustered out of service. He then 
continued his practice in Boston until his death. 



332 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1841 



COL. STEPHEN NORTHUP WARREN, A. B. 

Stephen N. Warren, son of Philip and Electa (Northup) Warren, was born 
in Schroon, N. Y., May 26, 1815, and died in Orwell, Vt., March 8, 1898. 

^^.._ In 1817, his parents removed 

to Orwell, Vt., where he prepared 

for college and he entered the Univer- 

. sity in 1839, and graduated A. B in 

1841; was instructor of Mathematics 
at the University, 1841-42. 

He returned to Orwell in 1842 
and engaged in farmiag imtil his 
death; was president and director 
of the First National Bank of 
Orwell, 1893-98. He was a Republi- 
can in politics and held many offices; 
represented his town in the House of 
Ptepresentatives, 1861 and 1862; was 
justice of the peace, 1850-90; also 
held nearly all the various town 
offices. He took great interest in 
mihtary matters; served as colonel 
of the sixth regiment, Vermont 
militia, 1844-45. 

He was married September 10, 

1846, to Jane Ann Royce of Orwell, 

who died November 24, 1904. One 

child was born to them: Jennie Nor- 

Jennmgs, "N. U.," '81.. 




Col. Stephen Northup Warren. 



thup, born February 3, 1861, married William A 
resides in Orwell, Vt. 



CAPT. THOMAS WILLIAMS WHITE, A. B. 

Thomas W. White, son of Benajmin AspinwaU and Jane Ellen (De 
Clensie) White, was born in Milledge-\alle, Ga., in 1823, and died there in 1878. 

He entered the University in 1839, graduating A. B. ia 1841. He 
taught school for a time in Ohio, after his graduation, and then returned to 
MUledgeville, and studied law with Col. A. H. Kenan. He was admitted to 
the bar, and practiced law in this city until 1849, when, on the breaking out 
of the gold excitement in California, he formed a company and went overland 
to the new El Dorado. On arriving in Southern California, he formed the 
acquaintance of a Spaniard who owned a large estate where San Jose is now 
located, and was employed by him to lay out his land for a city site, and thus 
San Jose sprang into existence. He followed engineering for some time, 
until the city and country had largely increased in population, when he began 
the practice of law. 

He held various pubhc offices; was the first mayor of San Jose and 
was county judge for some time. He remained in Cahfornia until about 
1854, when he returned to Georgia, and resumed the practice of law in 
Milledgeville. 

On the breaking out of the Civil War, he raised a company of troops 



1841] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 333 

for the C. S. A , and after serving a little over a year as its captain, he was 
transferred to the corps of engineers. He planned and built Fort Pulaski 
and had chai-ge of work along the Georgia coast line. He was taken prisoner 
at the capture of Fort Pulaski by the Union troops,, and was confined in 
Park Island Prison, where he contracted a cold which eventually caused his 
death. After the war, he resumed the practice of law in Milledgeville, and 
held the office of county judge for some years. He was the inventor of a 
cotton gin, one of the best used in the South. His last mechanical work 
was a flying machine. 

He was married in 1866, to the eldest daughter of Col. A. H. Kenan, 
who with a daughter, the wife of Mr. W R. Locke, sui'vives him and resides in 
Pawhuska, Osage Nation, Okla. 



NON-GRADUATES, 1841. 



BVT. MAJ. ELI B. BEAN. 

EH B. Bean, son of General Daniel and Shukand (Bangs) Bean, was 
born in Brownfield, Me., June 11, 1821, and died there, June 25, 1909. He 
prepared for college at the Westbrook Academy, Fryburg and Parsonfield 
Academies and entered the University in 1838, and remained nearly three 
years. 

He was commissioned captain and assistant quartermaster. United States 
volunteers, February 29, 1864; was brevetted major, October 30, 1865, 
"for faithful services"; was mustered out of service, October 30, 1865 He 
served in the Shenandoah Valley and superintended the obtaining of supplies 
and the transportation of over one thousand contrabands, and several thou- 
sand prisoners of war from the Valley to Harper's Ferry, Va.; served also 
on the staff of Col. E. E. Otis, 6th U. S. Cavalry; served for some time at Fort 
Seldon, New Mexico. 

He engaged extensively in the mercantile business in Brownfield, Me., 
until he retired from active work. He was well posted in law, and although 
never admitted to the bar, did considerable law business for the town; settled 
many estates, and was the adviser of the town in all legal matters. 

He was a Republican in poHtics and held many town offices; was justice 
of the peace and notaiy pubUc, 1848-61, 1865-1908, represented his town 
in the State Legislature in 1848; was postmaster for several years. He pre- 
sented his store building to the town for a hbrary. He wrote the history of 
Brownfield, Me., and the genealogical record of the Brownfield families, 
1792-1890; corresponded for several of the State papers. He was a member 
of the Universalist Church; a charter member of the local lodge, F. and A. M.; 
I.O O.F.;G A.R. 

He was married June 8, 1846, to Mary Osgood Spring of Hiram, Me., 
who siu-vives him and resides in Brownfield: no children. 

ALFRED AYERS BURNHAM. 

Alfred A. Burnham, son of John and Harriet (Barrett) Burnham, was 
born in Strafford, Vt., February 7, 1819, and died in New York city, February 
26, 1864; was buried in Strafford. 



334 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1841 



He attended the schools of his town and entered the University in 1839, 
remaining two years. He engaged in business in Strafford until 1851, when 
he located in New York cityJ He engaged in the wholesale hquor business 
from 1860, until his death 

He was married, April 2, 1847, to Mrs. Percy E. Woods of Strafford. 

SIMEON SHELDON CUSHMAN. 

Simeon S. Cushman, son of Simeon and Mary (Sheldon) Cushman, 
was born in Bernardston, Mass., January 6, 1821, and died in Santa Barbara, 

Cal., December 13, 1905. He pre- 
pared for college in the schools of 
his towm, and entered the Univer- 
sity in 1838, remaining two years. 

He taught school in Mass- 
achusetts until 1850, when he re- 
moved to Fairfield, Iowa, where he 
resided until 1865. He then moved 
to a farm near Bedford, la., where 
he made his home until 1897, when 
he removed to Santa Barbara, Cal. 
He engaged extensively in farming 
and sheep raising in Iowa. 

He was married three times: 
first. May 16, 1850, to Sybil Sheldon 
Snow, of Bernardston, Mass., who 
died December 10, 1855. Three 
children were born to them: Mary 
Angelina, born August 20, 1851, 
married Mr. Ray, resides in Santa 
Barbara, Cal.; Harriet Maria, born 
February 22, 1853, died November 
12, 1903; Sybil Sheldon, died in in- 
fancy. He was again married in 
1860, to Mrs. Ai-manda Parmenter, of Bernardston, Mass., who died March 
5, 1862: no children. He was married the third time in August 1863, to 
Mrs. Elizabeth (Cune) Parmenter, of Brattleboro, Vt., who died October 10, 
1884; no children. 

COL. ROBERT BRADFORD EATON. 

Robert B. Eaton, son of Page and Roxanna (Bradford) Eaton, was born 
in Henniker, N. H., July 10, 1820, and died in Woburn, Mass., October 19, 
1900. He was buried in the Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge. He 
attended the schools of his towm and a private school in Hopkinton, and entered 
the University in 1838, remaining nearly three years; was \'ice-president of 
the Boston Alumni Assocation of "N. U." 

In 1841, he entered his father's store in Henniker and engaged in the mer- 
cantile business until 1845, when he removed to Boston, and engaged in the 
wholesale paint and dye stuff trade, with the firm of Nelson, Bradford & Co., 
later known as Eaton, Hill & Chandler. In 1857, owing to business reverses, 
the company was forced to suspend. 




Simeon Sheldon Cushman. 



1841] 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



335 



In 1850, he began the manufacture of chemicals and in 1853 bought a 
large tract of land in the north part of Woburn, where he erected an extensive 
chemical plant. In 1860, he incorporated the company, having as partners, 
John W. Chandler and Charles G. 
Kellogg. In 1863, the plant became 
the property of the Merrimac Chemi- 
cal Co.. one of the largest concerns of 
the kind in the country. He was sup- 
erintendent and manager of the plant 
until 1870, when he retired from 
active management, still retaining a 
large share of the stock of the com- 
pany. 

He was also largely interested in 
a chemical factory in Troy, N. Y., 
and an extensive owner of land and 
live stock in Nebraska. He met with 
marked success in his business enter- 
prises and acquired a large property. 
He served as colonel of a New Hamp- 
shire regiment of militia, 1841-45; 
was postmaster of Henniker for some 
years. He was a man of broad en- 
lightenment and high ideals, and bore 
himself in a most modest manner; his 
acts of chai'ity were manifold and Col. Robert Bradford Eaton. 

generous. He was a noted pedestrian and in middle life it was usual for him 
to walk to and from Boston to Woburn, a distance of twenty miles, to super- 
intend his chemical business. He was senior warden of the Trinity Epis- 
copal Church, Woburn, for many years. 

He was married December 4, 1856, to Adelaide Abigail, daughter of 
Franklin Elmore of Peru, N. Y. She died March 24, 1S74; one child, a son, was 
born to them, who died in infancy. 




REV. LUTHER JACOBS FLETCHER, D. D. 

Luther J. Fletcher, son of David and Polly (Wakefield) Fletcher, was born 
in Croydon, N. H., November 25, 1818, and died in Franklin, Mass., January 
20, 1884; was buried in the Forest Lawn Cemetery, Buffalo, N. Y. He pre- 
pared for college at the Unity, N. H. Academy and entered the University in 
1838, from Langdon, N. H., in advance standing and remained two years, 
receiving the certificate from the Classical department. 

Soon after leaving the University h(^ began studying for the Universalist 
ministry. In early life he was a Baptist, and later joined the Methodist Cluirch, 
but while a cadet he became converted to Universalism. II(^ was ordained, 
in 1843, pastor of the church in Swanzey, N. H., wh(>r(^ ho i-emained until 
1845; supi)lied in Brattleboro, 1843-45, and was pastor August, 1845-46. His 
pastorates were: Cambridgcport, Mass., 1846-48; Shattuck Street Church, 
Lowell, 1848-50, 1859-January, 1863; Brooklyn, N. Y., January, 1863-May, 
1865; Bath, Me., May, 1865-May, 1867; Gardner, Me., May 1867-October, 



336 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1841 



1868; Grand Rapids, Mich., 1868-70; Church of the Messiah, Buffalo, N. Y., 
1870-79; Fort Plain, N. Y., 1879-81; Franklin, Mass., 1881-84. 

At an early age, he began teaching district schools in various New Hamp- 
shire to-rnis. During 1841-43, he was principal of the Surry (N. H.) Academy. 
In 1842, the once famous Mt. Caesar Seminary was founded in Swanzey, N.H., 
and opened September 13, 1843. He was elected its first principal and served 
until 1845. The history of this seminary is of especial interest to the University 
as so many of our graduates entered from that institution. Rev. S. H. Mc- 
Colhster, '51, was principal during 1853-58, and several of our graduates 
served there as instructors. ' He was principal of the Chelmsford (Mass.) 

Academy and Tjoigsboro, (Mass.) 
Academies, 1853-55; principal of the 
Clinton Liberal Institute, Fort Plain, 
N. Y., May 1, 1879-81; served as 
chairman of the Executive Board of 
the Massachusetts Universalist State 
Convention during 1881-83; served 
for some years on the school board 
of Lowell; was trustee of Dean Acad- 
emy, Franklin, Mass., 1881-84 and of 
St . LawTence University. 

Earl}' in March, 1852, he sailed 
to California, via Cape Horn and 
^ worked in the gold regions until early 
in 1853, when he returned to I>owell. 
He wrote from Acapulco, Mexico, in 
April, 1852, to a LoweU newspaper 
"Our passage of 43 days was one of 
unprecendented privation and suffer- 
ing; we are still suffering from recent 
excessive hunger and thirst." 

In 1853, he returned to Lowell 
Rev. Luther Jacobs Fletcher. and began the study of law and was 

admitted to the bar. May 9, 1855; practiced his profession with Adolphus R. 
Brown and Edwin A. Alger until 1856. 

He took an active part in all matters that pertained to the public welfare. 
He joined the "Know Nothing" party on its organization and soon became 
prominent in the party; represented Lowell in the State Legislature in 1856; 
was appointed Judge of the Court of Insolvency in July, 1856, and held the 
office until it was abolished, May 13, 1858. He was an active temperance 
worker and delivered many lectm-es through the New Engand states for the 
cause. He traveled in Europe and the Holy Land in 1873. 

He wi'ote many articles for publication in the papers and magazines; was 
the author of several school books: Gloria Patri for Public Worship, Chant 
for Public Worship; Moss Agate, a Doctrinal Sabbath School Book, also several 
plays. His Sundaj^ lesson books were: The Infant Mind, Key to the Young 
Heart, Guide to Salvation, The Manuel and Harp, Lives of the Apostles, Univer- 
salism. He met with remarkable success in his church work and was one of 
the ablest preachers of his denomination. 

He was a man of versatile talent and whatever line of work he was en- 




1841] 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



337 



gaged in, he made marked success. He was a remarkably eloquent and brilliant 
speaker. His style was graceful and polished and his choice of words most 
happy. He was a formidable rival in debate. He was a member of DeMolay 
Lodge, F. and A. M., and the Royal Arch Masons of Buffalo; he later joined the 
Franklin Lodge of Franklin, Mass.; was also a member of various societies. 
He received the degree of D. D. from St. Lawrence University in 1876. 

He was married three times: first, November 28, 1838, to Amanda P. 
Jennison of Langdon, N. H., who died February 19, 1846. One child, Rosabell 
Amanda, born June 30, 1840, died April 5, 1857. He was again married to 
Lovisa, daughter of Rev. Thomas Whittemore, D. D., of Cambridge, Mass. 
No children by this marriage. He was married the third time, April 27, 1849, 
to Caroline Greenwood of Brighton, Mass., who died March 14, 1907. Two 
children were born to them: Eugene Elton, born April 27, 1851, died Decem- 
ber 4, 1879; Ella Francis, born January 21, 1850,married Charles Allen Bartlett, 
resides in Auburn, Mass. 



BRIG.-GEN. FREDERICK WILLIAM LANDER. 

Frederick W. Lander, son of Edward and Eliza (West) Lauder, was 
born in Salem, Mass., December 17, 1821, and died in camp on the Cacapon 
River, Va., March 2, 1862. He at- 
tended the schools of his city and 
the Dummer Academy, Byfield, 
Mass. He entered the University in 
the class of 1841 and remained two 
years. 

He was assistant engineer on 
railroad surveys in Massachusetts. 
He was then employed by the United 
I^States government "to conduct ex- 
plorations and surveys across the 
country to determine a route for a 
railroad to the Pacific Coast." He 
conducted a second reconnoissance 
and survey across the country at his 
own expense. He surveyed and 
constructed the great overland wagon 
route in 1858, and while engaged in 
this work, his party of seventy men 
were attacked by the Piute Indians, 
over whom they gained a decisive 
victory. He made five trans-conti- 
nental explorations altogether, as an Bri.-Gen. Frederick William Lander, 
engineer, chief engineer or superintendent, and for his efficient services 
received praise in the official reports of the Secretary of the Interior. 

When the Civil War began in 1861, he was employed on important 
secret missions in the Southern states; served as a volunteer aide on General 
McClellan's staff; was commissioned brigadier-general. May 17, 1861, and 
participated with great credit in the capture of Philippi, and the battle of 
Rich Mountain. He led one of the two columns that set out June 3, 1861, to 
suprise the enemy at Philippi, and after marching all night, opened the attack 




338 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. [1841 

with an effective artillery fire and soon put the Confederates to flight. In 
July, 1861, he was given command of one of the three brigades of General 
Stones's division on the upper Potomac. Heading off the disaster of Ball's 
Bluff, he hastened to Edwards' Ferry, which he held ^dth a single company 
of sharp shooters, but was severely wounded in the leg. Before the wound was 
healed, he reported for duty at Hancock, and on January 5, 1862, he repelled 
a greatly superior Confederate force that besieged the town. Though much 
debilitated by his woimd, he made a brilUant dash upon the enemy at Bloom- 
ing Gap, February 14, 1862, for which he received a special letter of thanks 
from the Secretary of War. Increasing ill health compelled him to apply for 
temporary relief from military duty,but while planning an attack on the enemy, 
he died with congestion of the brain, March 2, 1862. His death was announced 
in a special order, issued by General McClellan, March 3. His body was 
bm-ied in Salem, Mass., with imposing ceremonies. In a letter, dated July 
19, 1861, General McClellan, in reporting on the disastrous action at Scary 
Creek, says: "In Heaven's name give me some general officers who understand 
their profession. Give me such men as Marcy, Stevenson, Sackett and 
Lander, and I will answer for it with my life, that I meet with no disaster." 

He -^vTote many stirring patriotic poems on incidents of the campaign 
which were printed in the leading papers. General Lander, Post No. 5, 
G. A. R., of Lynn, ]\Iass., was named in his honor. 

He was married, October 12, 1860, at San Francisco, to Jane Margaret 
Davenport, a noted actress, and a native of Wolverhampton, England. Soon 
after his death, she with her mother took charge of the hospital department 
at Fort Royal, S. C, where for over a year she did valuable service. 

MOSES LANE, A. M., PH. D. 

Moses Lane, son of Joshua and Ivatherine Greene (Hubbart) Lane, 
was born in Northfield, Vt., November 16, 1823, and died in Milwaukee, Wis., 
June 25, 1882. 

He attended the schools of his town, and entered the Preparatory depart- 
ment of the University in 1835, and the regular work of the Scientific depart- 
ment in 1837. He remained in this department two years. Though one of 
the youngest cadets, he soon gained high rank in his mathematical work. 
While at the University, he acquired the sound foundations in mathematics 
and practical engineering work, which in after years was to make him famous 
as an engineer. He graduated A. B. from the L'niversity of "\'ermont in 
1845; received the degree of A. M. from that Institution in 1849 and Ph. D., 
in 1875. 

He was an assistant engineer on the Sullivan County, R. R., in New 
Hampshire a few months in 1845; Central Vermont R. R., 1845-49; was 
principal of the Spring\'ille New York Academj', 1849-53; resident engineer 
Albany & Susquehanna, R. R., ha-sang in charge the Albany Division, 1853-54; 
was principal of the Academy in Clarence, Erie Coimty, N. Y., 1854-57; 
principal assistant engineer, Nassau Waterworks system for Brooklyn, 1857- 
62, chief engineer, 1862-69; chief engineer of the Brookljm waterworks, 1869- 
71, also during this time was associated ydih Mr. Chesborough of Chicago, 
as practicing engineer; was also consulting engineer during 1869-71, for 
IndianapoUs, Ind., Patterson, N. J., and several other cities. 



1841, 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



339 



•^4ff% "^f^ 



•*?• 

,,»<%;, 



.^^ 



In 1871, he was appointed chief engineer of the Milwaukee waterworks 
which position he heki four years; served during 1871-75, as consulting 
engineer on construction of the waterworks at Toledo, Ohio, and Oil City, 
Pa. In 1875, he was appointed city engineer of Milwaukee, having also in 
charge the water works and other public works of the city. This position 
he held until 1878. During 1878-81, he was extensively engaged in hydraulic 
and sanitary engineering, throughout the country; was engineer in charge 
of the new water supply system of New Orleans, La., the sewerage system 
of Buffalo, N. Y., Pittsficld, Mass., and a number of other cities. He was a 
member of the commi.ssion ap- 
pointed by the city of Memphis, 
Tenn., after the yellow fever 
scourge to perfect the drainage sys- 
tem of that city; also consulting 
engineer for the cities of St. Louis 
and Boston; was engineer in charge 
of the extension of the waterworks 
.system of Kansas City in 1880. In 
1881, he was re-appointed city en- 
gineer of Milwaukee, which position 
he held until his death. 

Mr. Lane became one of the 
best known engineers of this coun- 
try and was a recognized authority 
on water works and sewer construc- 
tion. He was a member of the 
Presbyterian Church and the 
Masonic Fraternity; American So- 
ciety of Civil Engineers; Engineer's 
Society of the Northwest and its 
vice-president in 1882. 

He was married June 4, 1852, 
to Marinda Ingalls, of Springville, 
N. Y., who died in Milwaukee, Wis., November 25, 1909. Four children were 
born to them: Kate Naomi, born April 12, 1853 married Mr. Henry Turvill, 
resides in Madison, Wis.; WiUiam Ingalls, born December 13, 1857, resides 
in Milwaukee, Wis.; Helen Durkee, born, February 24, 1863, married Mr. 
William B. Roberts, died in Rock Island, 111., April 16, 1907; Florence Williams 
born, June 10, 1867, resides in Milwaukee. 

PHILANDER MANCHESTER. 

Philander Manchester was born in Manchester, Vt., in 1815, and died 
in Goshen Trop, Anglaize county, Ohio, February 9, 1889. 

At an early age, his mother removed to Bethel, Vt., where he prepared 
for college. He entered the University in 1838, remaining nearly three 
years. He located in Raymond, Ohio, where he was in business with his 
brother-in-law, W. H. H. Titus, '41, from 1853 until 1859. He then located 
in Goshen Trop, where he made his home until his death. He was a Republi- 
can in politics and held several town and county offices. 

He was married, September 7, 1842, to Minerva Hcwett of Pomfret, Vt. 
He was survived by several children. 




Moses Lane. 



340 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1841 



WILLIAM McCLAY. 

William McClay, son of Stephen and Margaret (Hill) McClay, was 
born in Woodstock, Vt., July 3, 1818, and died in Winfield, Mo.June 20, 1870. 
He prepared for college in the schools of his town; entered the University 
in 1838, and remained nearly three years, paying his way largely by teaching 
school, winters. 

,— - , In the fall of 1841, he went to 

/^ X St. Charles Comity, Mo., and taught 

at CuttsAnUe and other places in that 
/ -^ county, and in Lincoln Coimty, until 

1850; spent 1842 and 1846 in Wood- 
stock, Vt. He purchased a farm in 
McHenry Coimty, 111., and carried it 
on from April, 1850, until fall, 1851; 
returned to Lincoln County, Mo., and 
taught from the fall of 1851 until the 
spring, 1853; worked his wife's farm 
near Troy, Lincoln County, Mo., 
spring, 1853-1860. He sold his farm 
and moved to Winfield, Mo., near 
Capaugris, where he resided until 1863, 
when o^vang to his active interest in 
the Union cause, he was forced to sell 
his farm. He moved to Delaware 
County, Iowa, and in 1864 bought a 
farm near Cobmg, which he worked 
until 1865, when he sold out and re- 
turned to his old farm at Winfield, 
William McClay. Mo., whore he resided until his death. 

He was justice of the peace and school director at Capaugris, Mo., many 
years. 

He was married, April 8, 1850, to Malinda Catherine Stuart, of Troy, 
Lincoln Coimty, Mo., who survives him and resides at Winfield, Mo. Four 
children were born to them: Gustavus Henry, born April 24, 1851, and died at 
Winfield, Mo., April 8, 1885; Ida Ruth, born February 19, 1854, married 
John S. Bray, and resides in Bloomington, 111.; Stephen Lewis, born October 
4, 1856, resides at Moore Okla.; Eva Margaret, born March 30, 1865, mar- 
ried C. Morton Forbush and resides at Winfield, Mo. 

WILLIAM H. MOORE. 

WilUam H. Moore was born in Wentworth, N. H., in 1818, and died 
there, unmarried, in 1889. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his to^n and entered the Uni- 
versity in 1838, remaining two years. He engaged in business in Wentworth, 
imtU 1849, when he went to CaUfornia. He returned to Wentworth in 1856, 
where he made his home until his death. He was one of the most success- 
ful farmers of his town. 

He was a Republican in politics and held many towTi offices; served as 
town clerk and selectman many years; was also town superintendent of schools, 
several years; represented his town in the State Legislature, several terms. 




1841] 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



341 



LIEUT. ASA HAYES SNOW. 

Asa H. Snow, son of Martin and Lydia (Haj^es) Snow, and cousin of Gus- 
tavus Snow, '41, was born in Pomfret, Vt., July 26, 1823, and died at the 
National Soldiers' Home at Sawtelle, Cal., February 15, 1901. He attended 
the schools of his town, and entered the University in 1837, and remained three 
years. 

He engaged in farming in Pomfret, 
Vt., until 1849, when he went to Cali- 
fornia, where he engaged in mining 
until 1851, when he returned East. 
He clerked in Boston, Mass , 1851-56; 
Manchester, N. H., 1856-58; engaged 
in farming, Pomfret, Vt., 1858-62, 
1864-66; foreman Monadnock Mill 
Co., Claremont, N. H., 1866-72; 
bookkeeper, Remington Gun Works, 
Ilion, N. Y., 1872-76; accountant, 
Minneapolis, Minn., 1876-81. He lo- 
cated in Wahpeton, Richland Co., 
North Dakota, in 1881, where he 
served as city clerk and deputy counts- 
treasurer until 1890. In this last year, 
he located in California, where he was 
employed several years as an account- 
ant. 

He enlisted in Perkinsville, Wind- 
sor Co., Vt., in Co. D, 9th Vermont 
Regiment, June 17, 1862; was pro- 
moted corporal, June 27, 1862; ser- 




Lieut. Asa jHayes Snow. 



geant December 4, 1862; 2d lieutenant, May 25, 1863; resigned December 
11, 1864. 

He was married in Cambridge, Mass., to Abbie Hastings, who died in 
December, 1855. One child, Clarence Armine, born May 1, 1853, resides in 
Oakland, Cal. 

WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON TITUS.. 

WiUiam H. H. Titus was born in Bethel, Vt., November 20, 1817, and 
died in Raymond, Ohio, March 20, 1883. He attended the schools of his town 
and entered the University in 1838 and remained two years. 

He taught school in Mount Vernon, Knox County, Ohio, 1841-44; en- 
gaged in business in Bethel, Vt., until November, 1853, when he located in 
Raymond, Ohio, where he made his home until his death. He engaged in the 
general mercantile business in liaymond with his brother-in-law. Philander 
Manchester, '41, until 1859. He then engaged extensively in the cattle 
business and farming. He was a Republican in pohtics; was deputy sheriff, 
Windsor County, Vt., 1844-53. He was a member of the Methodist Church. 

He was married, October 14, 1844, to Ehza Crane of Bethel, Vt., who died 
February IS, 1894. Two children were born to them: Corrilla Edgerton, born 
September 12, 1847, married Mr. Courter, resides in Raymond, Ohio; Alonzo, 
born October 17, 1856. 



342 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1841 



GUSTAVUS SNOW. 




Gustavus Snow, son of Nathan and Rhoda (Miller) Snow, was born in 
North Pomfret, Vt., January 13, 1822, and died in Holyoke, Mass., January 
4, 1881. He attended the schools of his town and entered the University in 
1838, remaining nearly three years. 

He was engaged in mercantile 
Inisiness in Pomfret, Vt., 21841 until 
1849, when he located in Holyoke, 
Mass., where he resided until his 
death; engaged in the hardware busi- 
ness, Holyoke, 1849-74; as.sisted in 
organizing the Holyoke Sa^^ngs Bank 
in 18.50 and was its treasurer, 1850- 
67. He was a Republican in politics 
and held many offices; was town clerk 
and treasurer of Holyoke, 1851-67. 
He was a fine scholar; a man of in- 
tegrity and held the respect of the 
citizens of his city. 

He was twice married: first, in 
Holyoke, Mass., December 19, 1853, 
to Mary Louisa Cavis, a native of 
Hopkinton, N. H., who died June 1, 
1864. Two children were born to 
them: Melvin Nathan, born Decem- 
ber 25, 1855, now quartermaster ser- 
geant of the 2d Regiment M. N. G., 
Holyoke, Mass., and Emma Louisa, 
born August 26, 1861, died August 10, 1862. He was again married, 
November 20, 1866, to Sarah Elizabeth Ha\Ties of Chicopee, Mass., who 
survives him and resides in Maiden, Mass. One child was born to them: 
Mary Elizabeth, born April 2, 1870, married Edward S. MacGregor, resides in 
Maiden, Mass. 

JOHN ^^'ALES STRONG. 

John W. Strong, son of Phileas and Anne (Field) Strong, was born in 
Pawlet, Vt., September 10, 1815, and died in Cincinnati, Ohio, December 23, 
1879. He entered the University in 1837, and remained two years. 

He taught school for some time in Vermont, and in Chautuaqua Co., New 
York. In 1862, he located in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he made his home until 
his death. He taught school for several years in Cincinnati and then engaged 
in the book business until his death. 

He was married Maj^ 15, 1860, to Margaret Jeanette Knox, born in 
England, and lineal descendant of John Knox of Scotland; she died about 1880; 
no children. 



Gustavus Snow. 



1842] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS, 343 



CLASS OF 1842. 



ADJ. OEL ALFRED BUCK, A. M., M. C. E. 

Oel A. Buck, relative of Daniel A. A. Buck, member of Congress from 
Vermont, entered the University from Hanover, N. H., in 1839, and graduated 
A. B. and M. C. E. in 1842; received the degree of A. M. in course in 1849. 

He was professor of Mathematics at the Virginia Literary, Scientific and 
Military Academy (q. v.) from 1842 until 1844, when he was appointed pro- 
fessor of Mathematics, Mihtary Tactics, and associate principal of the North 
Carolina Literary, Scientific and Military Academy (q. v.). In 1846, he re- 
signed his position and enlisted in the North Carolina Volunteers for the Mexi- 
can War; was commissioned 1st lieutenant and adjutant of his regiment and 
served until the close of the war. During his service, he had a severe attack 
of Mexican measles and never fully regained his health. He was employed 
by the U. S. Government in Washington from 1848 until about 1854, when 
owing to failing health, he resigned his position and located in Raleigh, N. C, 
where he made his home until his death. 

He was married in 1849, to Lucia Dow of Strafford, Vt., who survived 
him and resided in the South for many years. 

HIRAM CLARK, M. C. E., M. D. 

Hiram Clark, son of Robert and Sally (Wyman) Clark, was born in Ac- 
worth, N. H., in 1817, and died in Lawrence, Kansas in 1855. He entered the 
University in 1839, and graduated A. B. and M. C. E. in 1842. 

Soon after graduating, he was appointed assistant engineer on the North- 
ern railroad in New Hampshire, now a part of the Boston & Maine system. 
After this work was comj^lcte, being in poor health, he decided to go South. He 
engaged in teaching in Georgia, where he was married in 1851. Two years 
after his marriage his wife died, and he at once commenced the study of medi- 
cine, taking a part of his course in New Orleans, La. He practiced his pro- 
fession for a time in Georgia. He moved to Kansas, when that State was first 
being settled, and located in Lawrence, where he commenced the practice of his 
profession, being the first physician in that city. Cholera breaking out in 1855, 
he did efficient and valuable service in saving lives, but he fell a victim to the 
plague, and died in the thirty-eighth year of his age. 

CAPT. CHARLES B. CROWNINSHIELD, M. C. E. 

Charles B. Crowninshield, son of Capt. John and Maria (Crowninshield) 
Crowninshield, was born in Salem, Mass., January 20, 1824, and died, un- 
married in Boston, Mass. He prepared for college in the schools of his city and 
entered the University in 1839, graduating M. C. E., in 1842. 

He engaged in Civil Engineering in Boston, until the breaking out of the 
Mexican War, when he offered his services to the State of Massachusetts, and 
was commissioned captain, Co. E, First Massachusetts Infantry, December 4, 
1841. He served in General Scott's Ai-my in Mexico; was mustered out of 
service August 24, 1848. 



344 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1842 



BVT. BRIG.-GEN. WILLIAM WATTS HART DAVIS, A. M., M. M. S. 
WiUiam W. H. Davis, son of Gen. John and Amy (Hart) Davis, was born 
in Davisville, Southampton township, Bucks Co., Pa., July 27, 1820, and died 
in Doylestown, Pa., December 29, 1910. 

He prepared for college at the classical school in the Southampton Baptist 
Church; the pi'v^ate school conducted by Samuel Long near Da\'isville; the 
Newto^vTi Academy and Samuel Aarow's boarding school in BurUngton, Vt. 
He entered the L'niversity in 1840, graduating A. B. and M. M. S. in 1842; 
received the degree of A. M. in course from the LTniversity in 1846; delivered 
the Commencement address in 1873. 

He was professor and superin- 
tendent of the Virginia MiUtarj^, 
Scientific and Literary Academy (q. 
v.), Portsmouth, Va., 1842-44, being 
^■■^^ associated with William L. Lee, '42, 

and O. A. Buck, '42. He returned 
to Penns3dvania in 1844 and taught 
school in his native county until 

1845. He then studied law with 
Judge John Fox of Doylestown, Pa. 
from 1845 until September, 1846, 
when he was admitted to the bar. 
He then entered Harvard Law School, 
but the Mexican War breaking out 
he left to enter the service. He en- 
listed as a private in Co. E, First 
Massachusetts Infantry, December 5, 

1846, Charles B. Crowninshield, '42, 
being the captain ; was promoted first 
heutenant, December 31, 1846; first 
lieutenant and adjutant, January 16, 
1847; aide-de-camp, June 1, 1847; 
acting assistant adjutant-general, 

Bvt. Brig.-Gen. WiUiam Watts Hart Davis, j^jy jg, 1847; [acting commissary of 
subsistence October 9, 1847; capt. Co. I, Massachusetts Infantry, March 6, 
1848; mustered out of service July 24, 1848. His regiment served in General 
Scott's Army. He took part in all the engagements leading to the capture of 
the city of Me.xico. He was one of the officers who took part in a night ride 
of seventy miles and captured General Valencia. 

On the breaking out of the Civil War, he offered his services to the State, 
and recruited and organized Co. I, 25th Pa., Volunteers; was commissioned 
its captain, April 18, 1861 ; was mustered out of service July 26, 1861. He then 
organized the 104th Pennsylvania Volunteers, and a batterj' for three years' 
service; was commissioned its colonel September 5, 1861; was made a pro^'is- 
ional brigade commander, November 11, 1861; commanded the First Brigade, 
Casey's Division, 4th]Army Corps, November 30, 1861-May, 1862; w:is severely 
wounded at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862; commanded Fu'st Brigade Second Divi- 
sion, 18th Army corps, January 11-March 10, 1863; commanded Second Di\i- 
sion, 18th Army corps, March 10-May 27, 1863; commanded the U. S. forces 
at Port Royal, S. C, May 27-June 14, 1863; in command of Post of Beaufort, 




1842] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 345 

S. C, June 14-July 8, 1863; commanded first brigade Terry's division, July 8- 
January, 1864, taking part in the siege of Charleston, S. C; commanded the 
U. S. forces at Morris Island, S. C, January 19- April 18, 1864; was in command 
of District of Hilton Head, Fort Pulaski, St. Helena, and Tybie Islands, S. C, 
April 18-July 4, 1864; commanded fu-st brigade Hatch's division, July 4, 
July 6, 1864; was wounded at the seige of Charleston, July, 1864; ^was mustered 
out of service September 30, 1864. He was a brave and efficient officer as 
shown by his distinguished service. He acted as a brigadier and major-general 
during most of his service, but being a Democrat in poUtics, was not promoted. 
He was brevetted brigadier-general March 13, 1865, for "meritorious ser\dces 
dm-ing the operations against Charleston, S. C ' 

He enlisted in the "Liberty Guard" in 1839; served as captain of the 
"Diller Artillerists' ' in 1849; and the Doylestown Guards' ' in 1858. 

He practiced law in Doylestown, 1848-53, meeting with success. He was 
a Democrat in politics and held many offices; was U. S. district attorney for 
New Mexico, 1853; acting attorney general for New Mexico, 1853-54; secretary 
of the Territory, 1854-57; acting governor and superintendent of Indian affairs 
1855-57; candidate for auditor general of Pennsylvania, 1866; commissioner to 
the Paris Exposition, 1867; U. S. Pension Agent, Philadelphia, 1885-89; member 
of State Board of Charities. Pa., 1886-88; member of State Board of Com- 
missioners to conduct Geological surveys. Pa., 1891-92; candidate for Congress, 
7th District, 1882, candidate for Congress-at-Large, 1884; was tendered the 
U. S. Consulship at Nice, Italy, by Pi'esident Pierce. During his term of 
office in New Mexico, 1853-57, he published the Santa Fe Gazette in Spanish 
and English. 

In 1857, he purchased the Doylestown Democrat, which he conducted until 
1890, when he sold the paper to the Doylestown Publishing Co., retaining the 
editorship until June, 1901. He was one of the founders of the Bucks County 
Historical Society in 1858, and served as its president from its organization 
until 1910. He was an able writer and pubUshed many articles. He pub- 
lished the following books: El Gringo of New Mexico, and Her People, 1857; 
The Spanish Conquests of New Mexico, 1869; History of the lOith Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, 1866; History of the Hart Family of Bucks' County, 1867; Life of 
General John Lacey, 1868; History of Bucks' County, 1876; Life of John Davis, 
1886; Boylestowns Guards. 18S7 ;Campaign of 1861 in the Shenandoah Valley, 
1893; The Fries Rebellion, 1899; Doylestown, Old and New, 1904; History 
of Buck's County, revised, 1905. 

He was a member of the Episcopal Church, Aztec Club, Society of the War 
of 1812, Loyal Legion, G. A. R , Society of the Army of the Potomac, Society 
of Foreign Wars, Sons of the Amercian Revolution, Mexican Veterans, His- 
torical Society of Pennsylvania, New York Genealogical and Biographical 
Society, the Western Reserve Historical Society, Historical Society of New 
Mexico. 

He was married at Brooklyn, N. Y., June 24, 1856 to Anna Carpenter, 
who died April 3, 1881. Eight children were born to them: Amy Hart, born 
April 17, 1857, died April 20, 1857; Jacob Carpenter, born August 23, 1858, 
resides in Doylestown; Margaret Sprague, born August 12, 1860, resides in 
Doylestown, Pa.; John, born October 26, 1862, died January 1, 1868; Wiliam 
Hart, born December 4, 1868, died April 11, 1869; Eleanor Hart, born May 26, 



346 NORWICH UNIVERSITY. [1842 

1S78, resides in Doylestown, Pa.; Oliver Watts, born August 29, 1873, died 
Sept.^mber 12, 1873; Margaret Sprague, married Samuel A. W. Patterson, now 
Capt. U. S. Marine corps, retired, resides in Doylestown. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON FRANKLIN EMERSON, A. B., M. M. S. 

George W. F. Emerson, son of Josiah and Sarah (Merriam) Emerson, 
was born in Alstead, N. H., November 3, 1820, and died in Harrisburg, Pa., 
in 1865. 

He prepared for college in the schools of his town, and entered the Univer- 
sity in 1839, graduating A. B. and M. M. S., in 1842. 

He was principal of the Pembroke, N. H., Academy, 1843-46. He studied 
law and was admitted to the bar in Harrisburg, February 6, 1849; practiced 
his profession in Harrisburg, Pa., 1849-6.5. He is said to have served in the 
Pennsylvania Volunteers during the war. 

He married Ehza Warner, of Harrisbm'g, Pa. 

BVT. BRIG.-GEN. JOSEPH WASHINGTON FRIZELL, M. M. S, 

Joseph W. Frizell was born in Kentucky and died in Owensville, Ohio, 
in 1897. He entered the University from Vancebtu'g, Ky., in 1840, and 
graduated M. M. S. in 1842. He settled in Ohio, and engaged in various 
business enterprises. 

On the breaking out of the Civil War, he offered his ser^^ces to the 
State of Ohio; was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the 11th Ohio Volunteers, 
July 5, 1861. The colonel of the regiment soon resigned and Colonel Frizell 
was in command imtil a new one was elected by regiment. In the first 
battle this colonel, who was afterwards dismissed for incompetency, was 
fortunately captured by the enemy and Colonel Frizell commanded the 
Eleventh in many important battles. 

Its excellent record from Pocotagio to Sewell's mountain and back 
to Ganley bridge was attributed to his t^kill and bravery. Upon the return 
of his colonel to duty, he resigned, December 21, 1861. The following Juh', 
he was recommended by prominent military officers for the colonelcy of the 
94th regiment and soon after took the field with it. The regiment took part 
in opposing the advance of Ivirby Smith into Kentucky, doing gallant ser\4ce; 
also a prominent part in the battle of Perryville and the pursuit of Bragg in 
his retreat to Tennessee. At Stone River he was so badly wounded that he 
was forced to resign. In the language of a military WTiter of those times, 
"In Colonel Frizell's retirement the service lost a brave officer and his men a 
good commander and faithful friend. He was brevetted brigadier-general 
for meritorious service, March 13, 1863. 

JOHN FULLER JENNISON, A. B., M. D. 

John F. Jennison, son of Levi and Prudence (Fuller) Jennison, was born 
in Walpole, N.H., August 13, 1813, and died in Keene, N. H., December 15, 
1864. 

He entered the "Academy" and remained until 1833; entered the Uni- 
versity from Langdon, N. H., in 1840, and graduated A. B. in 1842; graduated 
M. D., from Dartmouth Medical CoUege in 1843. He practiced his profes- 



1842] 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



U7 



sion in Swanzey, N. H., 1843-54; Keene, 1854-80. He engaged in farming 
near Keene until his death. 

He was married, March 25, 1857, to Ehzabeth Ehza, daughter of Amos 
and Abbie Rebecca (Green) Ross of Keene, N. H., wlio survived him with 
a daughter. 

JUDGE WILLIAM LITTLE LEE, A. M., M. C. E. 

William L. Lee, son of Stephen and Mary (Little) Lee, was born at 
Sandy Hill, N. Y., February 8, 1821, and died at Honolulu, May 28, 1857. 
He entered the University in 1839 and graduated with the degree of A. B. 
andM.C. E.inl842. 

In company with W. W. H. Davis, '42, he went to Portsmouth, Va., 
and conducted Captain Partridge's school for one year. He was a student 
at the Harvard Law School, 1843-44, under Professor Greenleaf and Judge 
Story. He practiced his profession in Troy, N. Y., 1844-46. Being threatened 
with pulmonary consumption, he decided to try residence on the Pacific slope. 

At this time public attention 
was strongly directed toward the 
new territory of Oregon which was 
supposed to offer unusual advan- 
tages. Deciding then to cast his 
fortunes in that young country, Mr. 
Lee embarked with a friend, Chxrlcs 
E,. Bishop, at Newburyport in the 
brig, Henry, bound for the Columbia 
River, by way of the Sandwich 
Islands. After a tempestous voy- 
age of about eight months, the vessel 
arrived at Honolulu on thel2th of 
October, 1846. The time of his ar- 
rival and the long delay of the vessel 
here caused by the extensive re- 
pairs which were found necessary, 
seemed providential. It was a criti- 
cal period in the affairs of this 
young nation . The government was 
engaged in a controversy with some 
of the foreigri residents which had 
embroiled nearly the whole of the 




Judge William Little Lee. 



community and had menaced its very existance. Th(> only officer of the govern- 
ment of l(;gal education and profession was ill cahnilated to conciliate the con- 
tending parties or to inspire that confidence in the government, which was 
necessary to its peace and prosjx'rity. It was at this period that Mr. Lee, acci- 
dently arrived there and Kubse(}U(>nt events showed him to be the very man 
for the emergency as he settled tlie matters in (lis])ute so wisely that the King 
offered him the post of Presiding judge. After some; persuasion ho consented to 
accept this post, provided his friend, Mr. Bishop, could also find sonK^ (>mploy- 
ment. This was done and they made their home in Honolulu. 

Mr. Lee was in time madeChicf Justice, chancellor, and privy counselor 
to the King, with some oth(!r minor offices coimectcd with the crown, which 



348 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1842 



he retained during life. Among his labors were the framing of the revised 
constitution of the IGngdom, and the drawing up of its civil and criminal 
codes. He strenuously urged upon the King and chiefs the pohcy of giving 
up to the common people a thivd of their land, and when a law to that effect 
was passed, he was appointed president of the commission to carry out its 
provisions, but he declined to accept any compensation for his ser\'ices. 

His health, always delicate, gave way as a result of undue exposure 
in attendance upon sick natives during an epidemic of smallpox in 1853. 
This brought on a retm-n of his early malady, and in 1855, in order to obtain 
medical ad\dce, he accepted an appointment as minister plenipotentiary 
and envoy extraordinary to negotiate a treaty wath the United States by which 
sugar from the islands was to be admitted free of duty in return for the ad- 
mission to the islands of lumber, fish, and some other productions of the 
Pacific states. Finding that he was not benefited by his sojourn in this 
country, he returned to the Sandwich Islands, where he died. 

He was one of the ablest lawyers of his time and did much toward ci\al- 
izing the inhabitants of the Hawaiian Islands. He had a wonderful influence 
over them, and was respected and beloved by them. The record of his work 
should be preserved -with that of the great missionaries, who have given 
their lives for the advancement of the church and civihzation. On his death, 
" N. U.' ' lost one of her ablest sons. 

He was married on board ship in Honolulu, March 11, 1848, to Catherine 
E. Newton of Albany, N. Y.; no children. 



DANIEL THOMPSON, M. C E. 




Daniel Thompson. 



Daniel Thompson, was born in 
Westbrook, Maine, June 1, 1824, and 
died at Patterson, La., in 1897. He 
attended the public schools of New 
York city, and finished his prepara- 
tions for college at the Academies in 
Limerick, Fryeburg and Gorham, 
Maine. He entered the University 
from Baldwin, Maine, and graduated 
M. C. E. in 1842. His full name 
while a cadet was Daniel Josiah 
Pierce Thompson, but soon after 
leaving the University, he dropped the 
names "Josiah Pierce." He then 
engaged in ci\al engineering until 
1861. 

In 1862, he was offered the lieu- 
tenant-colonelcy of the 72d Illinois 
^'olunteers of which his classmate, 
Joseph C. Wright, was to be the col- 
onel, but o-ndng to failing health was 
obhged to decline the position. In 
1866, he located in Louisiana and 



1842] 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



349 



soon bought the Calumet Plantation, at Patterson, La., where he resided 
until his death. Through his business like management, this plantation 
became one of the finest in the State. He met with marked success in his 
business enterprises, and acquired a valuable property. 

He was married December 4, 1851, to Georgiana Wibray of New York 
city, who died about 1890. One son, Wibray, now resides on the home planta- 
tion in Patterson. 




CAPT. OTIS MASON MARSH, A. B., M. C. E. 

Otis M. Marsh, son of Otis and Juha (Ransom) Marsh, and nephew of 
Col. T. B. Ransom, '25, was born in Hartland, Vermont, about 1821, and died 

in Lake Charles, La., December 26, 
1892. At an early age his parents 
removed to Woodstock, Vermont, 
where he attended the public schools. 
He entered the University in 1839, 
graduating A. B. and M. C. E. in 
1842. 

He then entered the profession 
of civil engineering in which he 
gained distinction. Owing to the 
loss of the family papers, full details 
of his work cannot be given. He 
was engineer on railroads in many 
of the states of the Union, and in 
Mexico. He was engineer with his 
brother, B. F. Marsh, '35, on the con- 
struction of the Connecticut River R. 
R., 1844-46, Concord & Lebanon R. 
R., in N. H., 1846-47. He was en- 
gaged in the construction of rail- 
roads in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois 
previous to 1857. He surveyed and 
Capt. Otis Mason Marsh. laid Out the city of Lawrence, Kan. 

He located a railroad from Sabine Pass to Beaumont, T-ex., also from 
Beaumont to Houston, and a railroad along the coast of Texas in 1860. In 
1861, he was engaged in engineering work at Sabine Pass, Texas. 

On the breaking out of the Civil War, he was elected captain of Co. A. 
Spreight's Battalion, consisting of two companies of calvary, Co. A., and Co. 
F., and two companies of infantry. This battalion was soon consolidated 
with Colonel (iriffen's battalion, and known as Spreight's regiment. Captain 
Marsh was given command of the two companies of cavalry, which were 
known as "Marsh's Squadron." Captain Marsh acted as major of the regi- 
ment, and was often placed in command of the regiment. He took part in 
several engagements; captured the U. S. Gunboat, Harriet Lane; was discharged 
with his regiment in 1865. Soon after the war, he located in Acadia Parish, 
La., where he made his home until 1876, when he removed to Lake Charles, 
where he resided until his death. He engaged in engineering until about 1865, 
when he retired from active work. 




350 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1842 



During the last years of his Ufe he suffered with a disease of the throat 
and lungs. He was an active member of the Methodist Church from early 
youth. He organized the Sunday School in Lake Charles in 1876, and served 
as its superintendent until 1882; was a charter member of the Lake Charles 
Lodge I. O. O. F., and the Encampment; member of the Confederate Veterans 
Association. 

He was married January 18, 1864, to Laura Olivia Powell, who siu-vives 
him and resides in Lake Charles, La. Eight children were born to them: 
Cora AUce, born June 17, 1866, married Ulyssess Grant Mutersbaugh, re- 
sides in Lake Charles, La. ; Jennie Olivia, born November 2, 1868, married 
Harper F. McLaurin, resides in Lake Charles, La.; Ida Laiu-a, born, Septem- 
ber 2, 1870, married George A. Edgar, died in Los Angeles, Cal., in 1894; 
Mary Emma, born June 26, 1872, died July 7, 1888; Alma Orpha, born Octo- 
ber 2, 1874, died November 17, 1889; Benjamin Otis, born October 7, 1877, 
resides in Lake Charles; Bertha Amanda, born May 31, 1879, died unmarried 
in Hondo, Texas, September 8, 1899; Florence Josephine, born January 25, 
1882, married James W. Baker, resides in Beaumont, Texas. 



COL. JOSEPH CORNWALL WRIGHT, A. B. 

Joseph C. Wright, son of Joseph and Martha (Camp) Wright, was born 
in Rome, N. V.. January 7, 1821, and died in Chicago, 111., July 6, 1863, of 

wounds received in battle. He pre- 
pared for college in the schools of 
his city and entered the University 
in 1839, graduating A. B. in 1842. 

He studied law in Rome, N. Y., 
and was admitted to the bar in 
Oswego in 1843, and practiced his 
profession in that city until 1853, 
meeting with success. In 1853, he 
became interested in the grain busi- 
ness and built the continental eleva- 
tor in Oswego. His business in- 
terests requiring a partial residence 
m Chicago, he removed his family to 
that city in 1853, where he continued 
to reside until his death. He soon 
became prominently interested in the 
business affairs of Chicago; was a 
member of the Chicago Board of 
Trade. 

He was a successful merchant. 

acquiring a valuable property; was 

Col. jo:,e^ii CornwaU Wright. distinguished for his integ^it^^ As a 

lawyer he was eminently successful, his natm-al and acquired attainments 

having fitted him specially for an advocate, and as such he was engaged in 

some of the most important cases in New York state. 

He eloquently advocated at the meetings of the Board of Trade, in 1862, 
the organization and equipment of regiments for service in the Civil War. His 




18421 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



351 



suggestions were adopted and he was offered the colonelcy of the first regiment, 
the 72d Illinois volunteers, sent out by the Board of Trade. He modestly 
declined this honor, but patriotically accepted the lieutenant-colonelcy of the 
regiment at a great pecuniary loss to himself. He was distinguished in camp 
for his thorough military bearing, his gentlemanly conduct and consideration 
for the needs of his men. He was highly respected and loved by the officers 
and men of his command. The regiment performed no active duty until May 
22, 1863, when it was ordered to make an assault on Vicksburg. Owing to 
the illness of Col. Starring he was obliged to take command of the regiment. 
He heroically led the regiment to the rifle pits where he was severely wounded 
in the left arm. His arm was amputated on the field, and as soon as possible 
he was taken to Chicago for treatment. He grew worse and died July 6, 1863. 
His heroic service in this battle reflects lasting honor on his name and the name 
of the regiment. In his death, Illinois lost one of her most promising officers. 
He was married in July, 1846, to Adeline F. Gay, daughter of Calvin B. 
Gay, of Rome, N. Y.; she died May 1, 1895. Two children were born to them: 
John Hammond, born January 24, 18.50, resides in Oswego, N. Y.; Addie 
Gray, born November 20, 1853, married Elisha B. Powell, resides in Oswego, 
N.Y. 




Troop B igii. 



352 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1842 



NON-GRADUATES 1842. 



JOHN LEONARD HAMMOND. 

John L. Hammond, son of Thomas Denny and Pauhne (Austin) Hammond, 
was born in Orwell, Vt., May 16, 1822, and died in Middlebury, Vt., February 
3, 1882. 

He prepared for college at the Shoreham Academy, and entered the 
University in 1838, remaining two years. 

He returned to Orwell, where he made his home until his death. He was 
interested in several business enterprises; served as president of the First 
National Bank of Orwell for many j-ears. He was a member of Independence 
Lodge F. and A. M., of Orwell. He was married, October 3, 1849, to Janet 
Lucinda Thomas of Orwell, who died July 11, 1858. Three children were bom 
to them: Thomas Austin, born September 23, 1851, died June 16, 1887; 
Jessie, born July 16, 1853, married Thad M. Chapman, resides in Middlebury, 
Vt.; Adelia Fletcher, born June 8, 1855, died, unmarried, August 19, 1908. 




Hon. Roswell Hunt. 



HON. ROSWELL HUNT. 

Roswell Hunt; son of Arad and Sally 
(Newell) Hunt, was born in Vernon, Ver- 
mont, May 27, 1823, and died immarried, 
in Ehnira, N. Y., October 10, 1877. He 
received an academic education and entered 
the University in 1828 and remained three 
years. 

In 1846, he located in Brattleboro and 
engaged in business for some time; was a 
member of the firm of Hines and Newman, 
Machinists, in Brattleboro, 1850-60; was a 
deputy sheriff of Windham Co., 1854-57; 
represented Brattleboro in the State Legis- 
lature 1852, and 1853; was engaged in the 
hotel business in Northampton, Mass., 1867- 
70; Elmira, N. Y., 1870-77. 



HENRY CLAY LONGNECKER, A. B. 

Henry Clay Longnecker, son of Henry and EUzabeth (Kendig) Long- 
necker, was born in Allen, near Mechanicsburg, Cumberland County, Perm.; 
April 20, 1820, and died in Allentown, Pa., September 16, 1871, from disease 
contracted in the Civil War. 

He prepai'ed for college at an academj^ in Wilbraham, Mass., and entered 
the University in 1839, and remained two years. He then graduated from 
Lafayette College, Ea.ston, Pa. He studied law with the Hon. James M. 
Porter, and wa.s admitted to the bar in 1844 

He practiced his profession in Allentown, Lehigh County, Pa., from 1844 
until 1847, when he enlisted in the Mexican War; was commissioned first 




1842] SKETCHES OP ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 353 

lieutenant of infantry, February 16, 1847; was transferred to the voltiguer 
regiment Pennsylvania volunteers, April 9, 1847, and served as adjutant of 
his regiment. August 27 until October 27, 1847; took part in all the engage- 
ments under General Scott, ending with the capture of the City of Mexico; 
had a severe attack of the Rio Grande fever, and was confined in a hospital 
in Mexico for some time, being unable to return to the North with his com- 
pany; was honorably discharged, August 29, 1848. On his return home, he 
resumed the practice of his profession which he continued until his death. 

On the breaking out of the 
Civil War, he took an active part ~~| 

in organizing the Pennsylvania 
troops. He was commissioned 
colonel of the 9th Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, April 24, 1861, and 
commanded his brigade in Western ' 
Virginia, taking part in the battles 
of Chancellorsville and Antietam; 
was mustered out of service, July 
29, 1861 ; was commissioned 
colonel of the 5th Pennsylvania i ^ ., - ' 

militia, September 11, 1862, and f 
served until September 27, 1862, j 
when, owing to a disability, he | 

was forced to resign. He was a • 

brave and efficient officer and 

would have attained high rank '• . ' 

in the service, had his health per- ' 

mitted ^°^" ^^^''V ^l^y Longnecker. 

He was a Democrat in politics until 1856, when he joined the Repub- 
lican party; was an earnest anti-slavery worker; was district attorney of 
Lehigh County, Pa., 1848-50; served as delegate to the Democratic State 
Convention in 1851 and 1854; was United States Congressman, December 
5, 1859, until March 3, 1861, serving on the committee of Military Affairs. 

He was a fine student, an able lawyer, and a faithful public servant. 
His counsel was often sought by those in power during the Civil War. He 
was a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, of Allentown, having 
attained the Knights Templar degrees; was a member of the Union League 
Club of Philadelphia 

He was married June 27, 1866, to Mary Jane Lewis of Allentown, who 
died in that city, January 12, 1905. Three children were born to them: 
Kendig Lewis, died in infancy; Elizabeth Bessie, born, 1869, married Mr. 
Ralph R. Metzger, resides in Allentown; Reginald, born, 1870, resides in 
Allentown, Pa, 

THOMAS BUCKINGHAM LOVELAND. 

Thomas B. Loveland, son of Elijah and Mary (Buckingham) Loveland 
and cousin of Charles E. Ensworth, '46, was born in Kingston, Pa., December 
20, 1817, and died in Lock Haven, Pa., June 11, 1891. He attended the 
schools of his town and entered the University in 1838, and remained three 
years. 



354 NORWICH UNIVURSITf . [1842 

He held a responsible position with the Lehigh Coal & Navigation Co., 
during 1836-38. He managed the extensive agi'icultural interests of John 
Bennet of Kingston, dui-ing 1841-46; settled his father's estate, 1846-47. 
In 1848, he bought a large tract of forest land on the west branch of the Sus- 
quehanna River, above Lock Haven, Pa.; built a saw mill and engaged in 
lumbering until 1870. Also during this time he conducted a grist mill on this 
river. In 1870, he removed to Lock Haven and formed a partnership with 
John Y. Cossler which continued until his death, engaging in the manufac- 
ture of doors, sash and blinds. He also conducted large lumber yards in Lock 
Haven, Scranton and Philadelphia. He met with marked success in his 
business and acquired a valuable property, much of which, however, was 
swept away by fire and flood. He was a Republican in poUtics, and a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church, serving as elder for many years. 

He was twice married; first, October 21, 1852, to Sarah Baird of Hiner's 
Run, Pa., who died April 3, 1863. Two children were born to them: 
Mar}', born May 24, 1855, married Heman Dowd, U. S. A., resides in Orange, 
N. J.; Nannie, born June 7, 1858, died July 14, 1860. He was again married 
May 4, 1864, to Emily Cady, a native of Almond, N. Y., who sur\nves him 
and resides in Lock Haven, Pa. SLx children were born to them: Edmund 
Cady, born February 17, 1866, resides in Harrisburg, Pa.; Helen Stoddard, 
born February 3, 1868, served as kindergarten missionary in Japan for some 
years; Lester Cady, born July 9, 1870. died. May 8, 1877; Robert Bucking- 
ham, born April 24, 1873, resides in Rouse, Colorado; Ruth, born September 
6, 1875, married Prof. G. P. Singer, resides in Lock Haven, Pa.; Palmer 
Cady, born October 25, 1877, resides in Crisman, Col. 

DANIEL PE.\SLEE. 

Daniel Peaslee, son of Daniel and Lucy (Pepper) Peaslee, was born in 
Washington, Vt., in 1825, and died in Waterbury, Yt., in 1854. He at- 
tended the schools of his town, and entered the L^niversity in 1838, remaining 
three years. He engaged in various business enterprises in Waterbiiry 
until his death. 

He was married at Waterburj^, Yt., to Lucia Stevens, a native of New- 
bury, Yt., who died in Newbrny. January 1, 1906. One child, Edward 
Stevens, born September 7, 1850, died September 19, 1900. 

JOHN PETTIS, Jr. 

John Pettis, son of Maj. John and Lucy (Richards) Pettis, was born in 
Windsor, Yt., in 1827, and died unmarried at Grass Yalley, Cal.,. in 1865. 

He worked for a few years in Hartford, Conn., as bookkeeper and private 
secretary to Hon. Philip Ripley. In 1849, he sailed T;\-ith a party of New 
York friends for California, via Cape Horn, reaching San Francisco after a 
voyage of six months. He engaged in business in San Francisco for a few 
years and then located in Sacramento, where he resided until about 1864. 
He was bookkeeper for Swett & Arnold for some years. About 1864, he re- 
moved to Grass \' alley, Cal., and engaged in the grocery business under the 
firm name of Clark & Pettis. 

He held several offices; was a trustee of Grass Yalley. He was a member 
of the Episcopal Church. He was one of the founders of the Pioneer Asso- 
ciation of California, and was an active member of the I. O. G. T. 



1842] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 355 

HENRY H. WHITCOMB, M. D. 

Henry H. Whitcomb was born in Quechee, (Hartford) Vt., September 2, 
1817; and died in South Royalton, Vt., September 16, 1884. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the "Academy" in 
1831, remaining three years. In 1839, he entered the University, remaining 
until 1841. He was a student at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 
New York city, from 1841 until 1842, when owing to ill health he had to give 
up his studies and return to Vermont. He graduated M . D. from the Vermont 
Medical College in 1844, and practiced his profession in West Hartford, Vt., 
until 1851. He then located in South Royalton, Vt., where he continued 
his piactice until his death. 

He was survived by several children. 

ALBERT GALLATIN WHITE. 

Albert G. "WTiite, son of Ruluff and Alta (Fuller) White, was born in 
Orwell, Vt., July 8, 1819, ard died in New York City, May 27, 1856. 

He attended the schools of his town and entered the University .in 1838, 
remaining until 1841. He lost his right arm by a prematui-e explosion of a 
cannon in a Fourth of July celebration in Norwich in 1841. He studied law 
and practiced in Shoreham, Whitehall, N. Y., and New York city. 

He was married January 28, 1845, to Caroline Fisher. Two children 
were born to them: Edward Fisher; Ellen C, married George E. Royce, 
resides in Rutland, Vt. 

HON. DECATUR E. NICE. 

Decatur Nice was born in Hamberg, Berks County, Pa., March 5, 1819, 
and died in Pottsville, Pa., July 25, 1898. In 1835, his father moved to Potts- 
ville, Pa., where he attended the public schools. He finished his preparations 
for college at the Milton Academy, and entered the University in 1838, re- 
maining three years, when owing to sickness, he was obliged to give up his 
college course. He graduated in 1842, from the law school in Carhsle, Pa., 
and practiced his profession in Pottsville, Pa., until his death. He was in- 
terested in several business enterprises in Pottsville; served for many years as 
secretary of the Pottsville Gas Company. 

He was a Democrat in politics and held many positions; served as district 
attorney, 1843-44; represented his town in the State Legislature, 1867-68; 
was a member of the town council, three years, serving as president of that 
body. He was a delegate to several State and national conventions of his 
party; served as delegate to the convention which nominated Samuel J. Tilden 
for the Presidency. He was a member and past Master of Pulaski Lodge, 
No. 216, F. and A. M., of Pottsville. 

He was twice married; first, February 14, 1844, to Susan Silliman of 
Pottsville, who died in 1861. Two children were born to them: Sarah Eliza, 
born May 10, 1851, married William Ramsey, died May 25, 1908; Elizabeth 
Hughes, born January 12, 1853, resides in Pottsville. He was married the 
second time in 1863, to Annctta Silliman, sister of his first wife. She died, 
April 27, 1905; no children, 



356 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1843 



CLASS OF 1843. 



HENRY HAMILTON GARY, A. M., M. D. 

Henry H. Gary, son of Denis and Elizabeth (Gady) Gary, was born in 
Weathersfield, Vt., December 4, 1820, and died in La Grange, Georgia, March 
27, 1899. He prepared for college in the Unity (N. H.) Scientific and MiUtary 
Academy and entered the University in 1840, graduating A. B. in 1843; re- 
ceived the degree of A. M., in course, in 1846. 

^ — , He was principal of the Norwich 

Institute, 1843-45, and during the 
time studied medicine with Dr. S. 
Gonverse of Norwich and attended 
one course of lectures at the Dart- 
mouth Medical GoUege in the fall of 
1844. He removed to Augusta, Ga., 
early in 184.5 and entered the 
Medical Gollege of Augusta, grad- 
uating M. D. March 4, 1846. 

He located in La Grange, Ga., 
in 1846, where he made his home 
until his death; practiced his pro- 
fession there until 1868. He served 
as director of the La Grange First 
National Bank, until his death. He 
was a Democrat/ in pohtics; was 
elected judge of probate, 1868 and 
served until 1872; was chairman of 
the board of commissioners, Troup 
Gounty; was chairman of the State 
Fish Gommission a number of years. 
He was an active member of the 
Methodist Ghm-ch. 




Henry Hamilton Gary. 



He was married January 16, 1849, to ]\Iary Jane Prouty of Augusta, who 
died at La Grange, June 6, 1872. Six children were born to them: Ella Garo- 
line, born January 19. 1852, resides in La Grange, Ga.; Henry Ernest, born 
January 7, 1854, died October 30, 1903; Mary Ida, born April 29, 1855, married 
James A. Browne, resides in La Grange, Ga.; Eva A., born September 13, 1856, 
married J. W. Ghapman, resides in Washington, Ga.; Lula Hamilton, born 
May 30, 1861, married Howard R. Gallumay, resides in Atlanta, Ga.; Ashton 
Hall, born February 2, 1865, resides in La Grange, Ga. 



GAPT. JABEZ GUSHMAN GROOICER, A. B. 

Jabcz G. Grooker, son of James and Mary (Palmer) Grooker, was born in 
Woodstock, Vt., January 16, 1820, and died in Lincoln, Neb., January 13, 
1901. He prepared for college in the schools of his town and entered the Uni- 
versity in 1840, graduating A. B. in 1843. 



1843] SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 357 

He was principal of the Academy in South Woodstock, Vt., 1843-44, and 
the Barnard Institute, fall of 1844. He studied law with Tracy & Converse of 
Woodstock, dming portions of 1843-45. He was professor of Mathematics, 
Military Science and Tactics at the Pennsylvania Military Academy (q. v.) 
Harrisburg, Pa., 1845, until December, 1846, when he became professor at 
Captain Partridge's Military School in Wilmington, Del. He succeeded Maj. 
0. S. Tenney, '45, as principal in April, 1847. In September, he resigned this 
position, being desirous of resuming his law studies, and returned to Vermont. 
He was principal of schools in Newport, N. H., 1847-48, and during the time 
continued his law studies and was admitted to the bar in 1848. He practiced 
his profession in Newport, N. H., 1848-49; Windsor, Vt., 1849-51; Stoneham, 
Mass., 1851-56; Mendota, III, 1856-November, 1879; Lincoln, Neb., 1879- 
1901. 

On the breaking out of the Civil War, he offered his services to the State of 
Illinois and was commissioned recruiting officer and drill master. He re- 
cruited over 500 men for the service. He was commissioned captain Co. I, 
55th lUinois Volunteers, July 1861. His regiment was ordered South, and on 
the trip down the Mississippi River, he contracted a severe cold which so im- 
paired his health, that he was forced to resign his commission in the spring of 
1862. He was a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows Lodges. 

He was married, December 11, 1848, to Sarah Bailey Slayton of South 
Woodstock, Vt., who died November 19, 1896. One child was born to them: 
Mary Abba, married Mr. Joseph Hunter, resides in Lincoln, Neb. 

MAJ. HENRY HANCOCK, A. B. 

Henry Hancock, son of Thomas and Lucy Shattuck (Smith) Hancock, was 
born in Bath, N. H., in July, 1822, and died at Santa Monica, Cal., January 9, 
1883. He prepared for college at the Newbury (Vt.) Methodist Seminary, 
now the Montpeiier Seminary. He entered the University in 1840, and grad- 
uated A. B. in 1843. 

He engaged in civil engineering in Missouri until the breaking out of the 
Mexican War, when he enlisted as private; was promoted to the staff of General 
Donaldson for gallantry in delivering despatches under fire. At the close of 
the war he entered the Harvard Law School, but left three months before 
graduating, in 1849, to go to California. He engaged in placer mining for some 
time taking out .S20,000 in six weeks. He located in San Diego in-1850, serving 
for a time as collector of the port. 

In 1853, he located in Los Angeles, Cal., where he resided many years. 
He later removed to Santa Monica, where he made his home until his death. 
He was associated with Colonel Washington in surveying, many years. In 
1853, he made the second- survey of Los Angeles and urged the city council 
to have the streets made wider as "Los Angeles would become a city of 300,- 
000." He surveyed most of the large ranches in southern California. In 
1860, he began the practice of law in Los Angeles which he continued until his 
death. He made a specialty of land cases in which branch he became one of 
the leading authorities in the State. 

On the breaking out of the Civil War, he offered his services to the State 
and enlisted a company for the 4th Regiment, California Volunteers; was com- 
missioned major and served at Benicia and Wilmington, Cal. He had gr(>at 
faith in the future of California and acquired large tracts of land in Los Angeles, 



358 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1843 



Ventura and San Buenaventure counties. In 1866, he began the development 
of the asplialtum deposits on his Rancho La Brea, a tract of nearly 5000 acres 
of land between Los Angeles and Santa Monica (the present sites of Holly- 
wood, Colegrove and Sherman), which he had purchased from the Spanish 
grantees. He used the asphaltum for sidewalks and pa\ing purposes in the 
various cities of CaUfornia. The brown asphaltum was used as fuel by the 
Los Angeles manufacturing establishments during the eighties. Later this 
property became very valuable owng to the discovery of petroleum. The 
Rancho La Brea Oil Co., was formed to develop the property in 1900. He 
met with marked success in his business ventures and acquired a large property. 
He also met with success as an attorney. We quote from the resolution passed 
by the Los Angeles Bar Association: "That in the death of Major Hancock, 
the community in which he lived, the State and nation, have lost the service 
of a pure and upright citizen, an able lawj^er and patriotic soldier." 

He was a Democrat in pohtics, and held several positions; represented 
San Diego in the State legislature in 1852-53. He was a member of the Mexi- 
can War Veterans Association, and Los Angeles County Bar Association. 

He was married in Sonoma, Cal., June 7, 1866, to Ida, daughter of Agostin 
Haraszthy, a count of Hungary, exiled in 1840, and his property confiscated 
for taking part in an effort to free the coimtry from the rule of Aiistria. He 
is survived by three children. 



ASA HO^^E, A. B., I\L D., C. E. 

Asa Howe, son of Abijah and Hannah (Bridgeman) Howe, was born in 
Middleto^vTi, Mass., May 25, 1816, and died in Northfield, Vt., September 29, 
1894. 

In 1834, his parents removed to 
Northfield, where he attended the 
public schools. He followed the sea 
during 1838-40, and entered the 
L'niversity in September of the latter 
year, graduating A. B. in 1843. 

He entered Dartmouth Medical 
College in 1844, and graduated M. 
D. in 1845. He was division engi- 
neer on the Central Vermont R. R. 
from 1846 until 1850, when he went 
to Paris, France, where he attended 
medical lectitres. He returned to 
Northfield in 1854, and resumed civil 
engineering; was assistant engineer 
on the Saratoga & Whitehall R. R., 
1854-55; Passumpsic R. R., 1856-57; 
was agent for the Central Vermont 
R. R., in :^Iontreal, Canada, 1858-59; 
engaged in engineering practice in 
Northfield, 1859-60. He was assis- 
tant engineer for the Passumpsic R. 
R., at Barton Landing and Nexs^port, 




Asa Howe. 



1843] 



SKETCHES OF ALUMNI AND PAST CADETS. 



359 



1862-64; Huntington & Broadtop R. R., in Pennsylvania, 1864-66; was division 
engineer Chicago & Northwestern R. R., 1866-68; was chief engineer on the 
construction of the Montpelier & Wells River R. R., 1874-75; engaged in 
general engineering practice in Northfield, 1875-78; was engaged in engineer- 
ing at Langevill, P. Q., 1878-79; was resident engineer of the Montpelier & 
Wells River R. R., 1880-94. 

In 1880, he was appointed professor of Engineering Field Work, at the 
University, which position he held until his death. From 1866 until 1891, 
he held the chau of Civil Engineering. He did much to strengthen the en- 
gineering work at the University, and many of the cadets of this period owe 
much to him for their success as engineers for his painstaking instruction in 
field work on the Wells River R. R. and on other practical engineering work. 
He was a member of the A 2' I] Fraternity. 

He was married, March 7, 1844, to Lucy Ann Cummings of^^Norwich, 
Vt., who died November 5, 1906. Three children were born to them: Hemy 
John Skinner, "N.U.," '69; Malvern Abijah, "N. U," '82; Ella Theoda, born 
June 18, 1852, married William Clayton Claggett, resides in Northfield, Vt. 



MAJOR STEPHEN BERRY LEE, A. B. 

Stephen B. Lee, son of Stephen and Mary (Little) Lee, and brother of 
William Little Lee, '42, was born in Sandy Hill, N. Y., January 29, 1824. He 
entered the University in 1840, and graduated A. B. in 1843. 

He was engaged in real estate 
and manufacturing interests in Sandy 
Hill, N. Y., and was one of its lead- 
ing citizens. In 1862, he was in 
partnership with U. Cornell Allen 
and the firm of Allen & Lee and ran 
a woolen mill at Bakers Falls, which 
is the local name for the water power 
on the Hudson River at Sandy Hill. 

On account of ill health, he was 
forced to retire from business and lu; 
went to the sanitarium at Battle 
Creek, Mich., hoping for relief, but 
he died there September 30, 1862. 
His body was interred in the family 
burying ground in Sandy Hill, and 
his monument bears this inscription : 
' ' Generous to a fault, he forgot him- 
self in remembering God's poor." 

He served as a delegate; to the; 
National Republican Convention in 
Chicago in 1860. 

He married Mrs. Adelaide Car- 
man in New York City, March 16, 
1859. They had one child, Stephen B. Jr., born at Sandy Hill, N. Y., August 
9, 1861, now connected with the Erie County Savings Bank of Buffalo, N. Y.; 
a stepson. Dr. Albro Carman, a physician in New York City. 




Major Stephen Berry Lee. 



360 



NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



[1843 






***f1| 



MAJ.-GEN. ROBERT HOUSTON MILROY, A. B., LL. B. 
Robert H. Milroy, son of General Samuel and Martha (Houston) Milroy, 
was born near Salem, Washington County, Indiana, June 11, 1816, and died 
in Olympia, Washington, March 29, 1890. His ancestor, the Earl of Amandale, 
in Scotland, and a lineal descendant of Robert Bruce, having taken part in a 
revolution in that country, settled in the north of the island and from there 
came to the United States and settled in Carlisle, Pa. At an early age, his 
parents removed to Delphi, Ind., where he prepared for coUege. 

He entered the University in 1840 and graduated A. B., and M. M. S. 
in 1843; was distinguished at the University for his scholarship and love of 
military duty; was valedictorian of his class; was also distinguished for his 
athletic ability; was one of the most powerful men ever at the University, 
being nearly six feet three inches in height. 

He engaged in business in Delphi 
until the breaking out of the Mexi- 
can War, when he offered his ser- 
vices to the State; was commissioned 
captain C