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Full text of "Notable events in the history of Dover, New Hampshire, from the first settlement in 1623 to 1865"

NOTABLE EVENTS 

IN THE 

HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 



NOTABLE EVENTS 



IN THE 



HISTORY OF DOVER 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FROM THE FIRST SETTLEMENT IN 1623 TO 1865 



Bv GEORGE WADLEIGH 



DOVER, N. H. 
1913 



Copyright, 1913 
By G. H. Wadleigh 



THE TUFTS COLLEGE PRESS 
1913 



3?7 



PREFACE 

This record of Events in the History of Old Dover has been 
gathered from many sources and with considerable labor. It is 
not intended to take the place of any history of this ancient 
town which may be and it is hoped will sometime be written, 
but is designed merely to place in a connected and accessible 
form, a record of such events as have been deemed worthy 
of preservation, and to which the inhabitants of Dover may 
occasionally wish to refer. 

George Wadleigh 
Dover, April 1882. 



NOTICE 

It was the inteution of the collector of these notes to com- 
plete them to a later date, then to revise and publish them, but 
he did not live to do so. They are now published without the 
revision the collector would have made, in order that his work 
may not be entirely lost. 



CONTENTS 



Chapter I 
Settlement. 1623-1641. i 

Chapter II 
Under Colony of Massachusetts. 1642-1679. . 23 

Chapter III 
Under Province of New Hampshire. 1680-1775. 86 

Chapter IV 
Under State Government. 1775-1865. . . 162 

Errata 297 

Index 299 



NOTABLE EVENTS 

IN THE 

HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 



CHAPTER I 

SETTLEMENT 

1623 

Dover Point — Its First Settlement 

The first settlement of Dover, as well as of New Hampshire, 
is involved in some obscurity. Unlike the " Pilgrim Fathers " 
who landed on Plymouth Rock, no records have been found 
which fix beyond doubt the time when or the manner in which 
the settlers upon the Piscataqua first landed on its shores. 

For more than two hundred years, on the authority of Hub- 
bard, Prince, and other early historians, followed by Belknap, 
the facts in relation to these settlements, briefly stated, and 
generally accepted, were, that Sir Ferdinand© Gorges and 
Captain John Mason having obtained from the Council con- 
stituted by the King of England, "for the planting, ruling and 
governing of New England," a grant of all the land between 
the Rivers Merrimack and Sagadehock, extending back to the 
great lakes and river of Canada, formed a company with several 
merchants of London and other cities, and styling themselves 
"the company of Laconia," attempted the establishment of a 
colony and fishery at the mouth of the Piscataqua river. For 
this purpose in the spring of 1623, they sent out David Thomson 
and Edward and William Hilton, who had been fishmongers in 
London, with a number of other people, in two divisions, fur- 
nished with all the necessaries for carrying out the design. 
Thomson landed at the river's mouth at a place which he called 
Little Harbor, where he built a house, afterwards known as 
"Mason Hall," erected Salt Works, and made other prepara- 
tions for carrying on his business, but the Hiltons set up their 
fishing stages eight miles further up the river on a neck of land 
which the Indians called Winnichahannet, but they named it 
Northam and afterwards Dover. Thomson, not being pleased 



2 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1623 

with his company or situation, removed the next spring, or in 
a short time after, to an island in Massachusetts ba}', where he 
subsequently lived and soon after died, while the Hiltons and 
their associates remained and made a permanent settlement in 
Dover. 

All efforts to ascertain the precise date of their arrival, or 
the ship in which they came, had proved unavailing. The day 
of the month and the month wxre unknown. In 1823, at the 
celebration of the 200th anniversary of the settlement of the 
State, at Portsmouth, when it was considered desirable to fix 
upon the day of their arrival, if possible, for the purpose of 
suitably observing it, all efforts to do so were found to be in 
vain. It was then authoritatively stated by Mr. Savage, the 
most learned antiquarian of that day, that "Prince, the most 
laborious of all antiquaries in New England, in 1736, could 
give no precise date, and no discovery of documents since has 
made it more definite " than that they arrived in the spring of 
the year. From the fact that no vessel was known to have 
arrived from England in that year until about the ist of June, 
it was conjectured that the colonists might have been landed at 
the Piscataqua late in May, and the 23rd of that month was 
accordingly selected for the celebration. 

These statements remained unquestioned and were incorpo- 
rated into all our histories and school books, until a document 
found in 1875 among the ancient papers of Governor Winthrop, 
then in possession of his descendant, the Hon. Robert C. Win- 
throp, gave a different reading to our early history. This 
document is an indenture, dated Dec. 14, 1622, between David 
Thomson on the one part, and three merchants, Abraham 
Colmer, Nicholas Sherwill and Leonard Pomroy, all of Ply- 
mouth, England, on the other part. A copy of it was, soon 
after its discovery, published in the proceedings of the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society, with notes by Charles Deane, Esq., 
an eminent antiquary. 

The indenture recites that the Council for New England had granted 
to Thomson (Oct. 16, 1622), 6000 acres of land and one island in New 
England, and that Thomson had conveyed one quarter part of the island 
to the three merchants named and agreed also to convey to them one 
quarter part of the 6000 acres, on these conditions: 

I. That the three merchants, at their own charge, should provide and 
send that present year two men with Thomson, in the ship Jonathan of 
Plymouth, to New England, with such victuals, provisions, &c., as shall 
suffice them till they are landed. 



1623] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 3 

2. The three merchants, at their own charge, were also to provide 
aud send the same year, three additional men in the ship Providence of 
Plymouth, if they could so soon be gotten, or in some other ship, to 
New England; the charges of these three men to be borne equally by 
all the parties. 

3. Two other men were also to be sent the same year in the Jonathan ; 
the charges to be borne by all the parties equally. 

4. Thomson with the seven men as soon as landed was to find a fit 
place and make choice of 6000 acres of land and a fit place to settle and 
erect buildings. 

Further provision was made for dividing the property at the end of 
five years agreeably to the indenture, three fourths to Thomson and one 
fourth to the other three. Three fourths of the charge for planting, 
building, &c., was to be borne by Thomson, and one fourth by the others. 
All the profits from fishing, trading, &c., were to be divided equally, the 
three merchants having liberty to employ the ships to fish, at their own 
charge, if Thomson did not choose to bear his share of such charge. 

From this agreement it appears reasonably certain that 
Thomson did come over as stipulated, arriving at the mouth of 
the Piscataqua sometime in the spring of 1623, as Hubbard has 
recorded. By the indenture he was to proceed " this present year " 
(1622). By the method of reckoning at that time the year ended 
on the 24th of March following. It is equally certain, however, 
that he did not come out as the agent of the Company of 
Laconia, for that company was not then in existence, not having 
been formed until 163 1. This error appears to have originated 
with Dr. Belknap, who knew that Mason and Gorges had a 
grant (Aug. 10, 1622), embracing the territory between the 
Merrimack and Sagadehock, which they intended to call the 
Province of Maine, but of which they never made any use, as 
the council afterwards made other grants covering the same 
territory. Dr. Belknap also knew that Mason and Gorges with 
other persons were members of the Company of Laconia. From 
this and some statements of Hubbard he doubtless concluded 
that the grant of 1622 was the Laconia grant, and that the 
associates, under the name of the Company of Laconia, began 
the settlement at Little Harbor and Hilton's point in 1623. It 
is now known that the Laconia patent was not issued until Nov. 
17, 1629, and the company was formed soon after. 

There is no evidence in the indenture that the Hiltons were 
associated with Thomson in the enterprise, either as partners or 
servants. From this fact an attempt has been made by Mr. 
Deane and others to discredit the statement of Hubbard, and it 
lias been contended that the Hiltons never saw Dover until 



4 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1623 

five or six years after Thomson and his party landed at L,ittle 
Harbor, or at least that no settlement could have been made in 
1623 as has been generally believed. 

To establish this position it is alleged that no such place was 
known to or once spoken of by any of the visitors of Thomson, 
of whom there were several, during the years 1623 and 1624; 
that it is absurd to suppose that Edward Hilton, without any 
colony to assist him, should have gone so far from the succor of 
his friends into the wilderness in the midst of treacherous and 
cruel savages when the whole country practically lay open 
before him to go in and occupy where he would ; that the 
"stages" which it is alleged were set up at the Point were 
"large and expensive structures" intended for use in the 
fishing business, and that "no experienced fisherman would 
have selected such a site for a fishing establishment, five or six 
miles above the mouth of the Piscataqua, a stream of such 
rapidity that it is often impossible for a boat to contend against 
it, while the great cod fisheries are several miles out at sea, 
which a fisherman leaving Hilton's Point at the very turn of 
the ebb tide could not reach and return from the same day, if 
he stopped to cast his hook." (/. >S. Jemiess's Notes 071 the First 
Settlements on the Piscataqtia.) 

As to the fact of priority of settlement, if a mere fishing and 
trading post is to be regarded as such, it may be admitted that 
at lyittle Harbor ( now in the town of Rye) the first planting of 
New Hampshire was commenced. There is no doubt that 
Thomson and his men first disembarked at or near that place, 
and pitched their tents or erected such huts as were requisite for 
shelter. The question is, who came with him? We only know 
that seven men were to be furnished to assist him. Four were 
to come over with him in the Jonathan, and three more were to 
be provided the same year. 

It is admitted, and it is reasonable to conclude, that Edward 
Hilton may have come over from England in one of the vessels 
which brought David Thomson and his men to the Piscataqua, 
on his own account, if not as an assistant of Thomson, as 
Hubbard asserts. The Hiltons had been fishmongers in 
London, and were acquainted with at least one branch of the 
business in which Thomson was to engage. They were just 
the men who would be selected to assist in the enterprise. 
William Hilton had previously been in America. He came to 
Plymouth in 162 1, and his wife and two children came over in 



1623] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 5 

1623. He may have gone back and returned with them, or 
they may have come over to join him here. Hubbard, who 
wrote in 1680, is supposed to have been personally acquainted 
with the Hiltons, and must have had some knowledge of their 
history and movements. William Hilton had a grant of land 
in Plymouth in 1623, but he left that place soon after, apparently 
on account of some disagreement in relation to church matters, 
and is found next at Piscataqua with his brother. 

As the business of Thomson and his assistants was to be 
fishing, and trading with the Indians, it is not probable that 
they would all remain permanently in the same place. The 
Hiltons, with one or more of the party, after seeing the others 
safely established at the mouth of the river, may have come up 
to the Point, as Hubbard records. Or, as the party is said to 
have come over in "two divisions," it is more probable that 
they did not arrive until after Thomson and the four men who 
came in the Jonathan had established themselves at Little 
Harbor. Of the other three who were to be provided and sent 
over in the Providence, the Hiltons may have been two. The 
tradition has always been that Thomas Roberts was one of the 
original emigrants with them. If he was this would complete 
the number which was to be provided. 

The distance between Little Harbor and the Point, as the 
crow flies, is but six or seven miles and the location at the Point 
was doubtless at first selected for the convenience of trading 
with the Indians about the falls of the Cochecho, a favorite 
resort with them. It was also in the vicinity of good fishing 
ground, for the various branches of the Piscataqua, up to their 
first falls, must at that day (as they did long after and do now 
at some seasons), have swarmed with fish, and there was no 
need of going far to cast the hook and obtain them. 

It is not supposed that a party of three men, at the most, 
would go miles at sea to the great fishing grounds to obtain fish 
when there was an abundance of fish so near them, or that large 
and expensive stages were required for curing them. By the 
terms of the indenture the owners of the Jonathan were to 
pursue the fishing business independently of Thomson and his 
men, if he did not choose to bear part of the charge. It is 
probable that the vessels from England attended to the deep 
sea fishing, while the parties on shore confined their operations 
to the harbor and rivers. 

If the Hiltons were never mentioned by visitors to Little 



6 NOTABLE EJ'ENTS IN THE [1623 

Harbor in 1623 and 1624, the same may be said of the other 
men who were with Thomson. The name of no man who was 
with him — and there were seven — is known unless we accept 
the statement of Hubbard. 

It may have been that the fishing and trading post at the 
Point was at the outset regarded rather as a temporary than a 
permanent settlement, a place to which at first they resorted 
only during the day, returning at night to the common rendez- 
vous at the mouth of the river. But its advantages must have 
been soon seen and appreciated. The "whole country was 
open before them to go in and occupy where they would," and 
they could hardly have found a more inviting place than the 
Point, either for fishing, planting, or trading with the Indians, 
exchanging such articles as they brought with them from Eng- 
land for the Beaver skins and other peltries of the Indians. 
For safety no resort could have been better than this narrow 
neck of land, and from which by their boats there were such 
immediate means of escape, if escape was at any time necessary. 
For planting also, in which they were to engage, so far at least 
as they could contribute to their own wants, the Point was of 
all places the spot which they would select, far preferable to 
any land nearer to Little Harbor. 

Thomson's enterprise, it appears, was not a success. He 
abandoned it after about three years' residence (by some 
accounts "the next year"), and removed to Massachusetts,. 
Hubbard says, "out of dislike either to the place or his 
employers." He never set up any claim afterwards to the 
patent, nor does it appear that his partners in England reaped 
any advantages from it. Thomson's men are supposed to have 
remained at Little Harbor after his departure, but even this is 
uncertain. The only evidence that it was occupied is that 
there was a settlement somewhere at " Pascataquack," besides 
Hilton's in 1628, and that such settlement paid two pounds ten 
shillings as its contribution for expelling Morton from Merry 
Mount. What is there more probable than that the Hiltons 
may have remained at the Point or in its vicinity, with some of 
the other men of the company, after Thomson left ? 

If, as it is alleged, there is no authentic information of 
Edward Hilton being in this vicinity previous to 1627 or 1628, 
the information which we get of him at that time is sufficient to 
show that he must then have been settled here for some years 
and that he had a considerable stake in the country. In 1628, 



1623] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 7 

as recorded by Bradford, he was assessed one pound towards 
the expense of the war upon Morton of Merry Mount, already 
alluded to, the whole expense of the campaign being twelve 
pounds seven shillings, of which the Plymouth colony paid two 
pounds ten shillings, or but little more than twice the amount 
contributed by Hilton. It is also evident that the Hiltons must 
have been among the men that the partners of Thomson provided 
and sent over in 1623, from the fact that we find them settled 
so near to Little Harbor, on territory which must have been 
included within that which Thomson's patent covered, or was 
supposed to cover, where they would not have been, by any 
right, had they not been connected with Thomson's company, 
and that when in 1630 Edward Hilton obtained a patent from 
the Council of Plymouth of the land upon which he had settled, 
he had been for some considerable time established thereon. 
So long, in fact, that the place had come to be known by his 
name, for we read that his patent included " all that part of the 
river Piscataqua called or knoivn by the name of Hiltoti' s Point, 
with the south side of said river, up to the falls of Squamscot 
and three miles into the main land for breadth," and it sets 
forth that Hilton and his associates had transported thither serv- 
ants, built houses and planted corn, and intended the further 
increase and advancement of the plantation. 

It is asked if it can be believed " that Hilton founded a plan- 
tation at Hilton's Point in 1623, seven years before he got a 
deed of the land" ? In reply it may be said that if, as it is 
presumed, he came out with or soon after Thomson, we have 
seen for what purpose he came. He was one of the men sent 
out by Thomson's partners, the merchants in England, to assist 
in the enterprise, if not as a representative of their interest in 
it. He had no legal claim in his own name to the soil under 
the patent. Thomson gave up his claim and went off before 
the expiration of the five years when the profits of the enter- 
prise as well as the land were to be divided between the parties. 
The patent granted was evidently regarded by him as of little 
value, because neither he, or his heirs, ever afterwards set up 
any effective claim to it. All the interest which they possessed 
at Eittle Harbor passed into the hands of the Laconia company 
of which Gorges and Mason were chiefs, under a new grant 
from the Council, when Edward Hilton, it xna.y be assumed, 
finding himself abandoned by Thomson, for his own security 
and that of the company by which he had been employed, obtained 



8 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1623 

(in 1630) a new patent for the settlement at the Point. This 
patent he afterwards sold in part to other parties, who appointed 
Captain Thomas Wiggin their agent, by whom, in 1633, a con- 
siderable acquisition was obtained to the population. 

The Laconia company, in the meantime, having obtained 
possession of the lands granted to Thomson at Little Harbor, 
appointed Captain Neal as their agent, not for the settlement of 
a colony, but for the management of a fishing and trading com- 
pany, a speculation similar to that in which Thomson had been 
engaged. At or about this time (1631) the headquarters of the 
company were removed from Little Harbor to Portsmouth, or 
the "Bank," as it was called, where the " Great House" was 
built and occupied by those employed. In a few years this 
company broke up and the servants were discharged ; the whole 
scheme proving a failure. On a division of the property Mason 
bought the shares of some of his associates and sent over a new 
supply of men, set up saw mills, and soon after died. 

The Thomson house erected at Little Harbor in 1623, though 
built of stone, could have been no such substantial structure as 
has been assumed for it. It is not probable that "it presented 
the general appearance of the dwelling houses of the time of 
James I, vast numbers of which still remain in good preserva- 
tion all over the old country." {Jcnuess.) Had it been of this 
character it would hardly have been reduced to the dilapidated 
condition in which it was found by Hubbard in 1680, less than 
sixty years after its erection, when only "the chimney and 
some parts of the stone wall were standing." It is probable 
that as it must have been hastily built, it only sufficed for 
the immediate needs of Thomson and his little party, as a 
shelter from the elements. "Mason Hall," or the Great House, 
as it has been styled, was located at Strawberry Bank (now 
Portsmouth), probably as a more suitable location for carrying 
on the business of the settlement, while the station at Little 
Harbor was abandoned. Such as it was, it passed into the 
hands of Mason's men, and was sometimes called his "stone 
house," though it is now conceded the term "Mason Hall" 
was never, as has been popularly supposed, applied to it. 

This summary account of the early settlement of Hilton's 
Point, written in 1876, is now fully corroborated by additional 
cumulative evidence. This as well as the substantial accuracy 
of Hubbard's narrative is confirmed by the discovery in the 
Court files of Suffolk County of the Petition of William 



1623] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 9 

Hilton, sou of the first settler of that name, dated June i, 1660, 
to the Honored General Court then assembled in Boston, in 
relation to some lands bought by him and his father of the 
Pennacook Indians in 1636. In this petition William Hilton 
says, that "your petitioner's father, William Hilton, came 
over into New England about the year Anno Dom. 1621, 
and 3^our petitioner came about one year and a half after, and 
771 a little time follozvins; settled ourselves upon the rive?- of Pis- 
cataqua with Mr. Ed7v. Hilton, -who icere the first English 
planters there.'' 

These settlements on the " Piscataqua " went on but slowly 
for several years. In 1629 there were but three houses or 
settlements in all this region, namely, at lyittle Harbor or 
Portsmouth at the "Bank," at Dover Point and at Newich- 
wannock. Their occupants turned their attention chiefly to 
trade and the fisheries, the cultivation of the grape and the dis- 
covery of mines ; in the latter it is hardly necessary to say that 
they did not meet with much success. Very little improvement 
was made on the lands, and bread was either brought from 
England, in meal, or from Virginia in grain, and then sent to 
the windmill in Boston to be ground. That they fared hard, if 
they did not work hard, is evident. One of theui (Ambrose 
Gibbons) in a letter to the proprietors in England, complains 
that for himself, wife and child, and four men, "an have but 
half a barrel of corn" ; "beef and pork I have not had but one 
piece this three months, nor beer this four months." " I nor 
the servants have neither money nor clothes," etc. These 
complaints were made at a time when very little sufficed for 
the support of life, the expense per man for a year not ex- 
ceeding what could be bought for about ten or fifteen dollars at 
the present time. 

The dwellings of the early settlers for nearly a hundred years 
were hastily constructed and of the rudest character. Their 
houses had but one or two rooms. Very few of them had other 
than block windows. Their furnishing, beyond a few necessary 
cooking utensils, was of the most meagre description. Of the 
dwellings of the settlers at Plymouth, at about the same time, 
we collect here and there (says Palfrey) a hint as to their con- 
struction. A storm on the 4th of February, 1621, "caused 
much daubing of our houses to fall down " ; this was the clay 
or other earth which filled the chinks between the logs. Wins- 



10 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1629 

low wrote to persons proposing to emigrate, " Bring paper and 
linseed oil for your windows." 

The earliest houses on Cape Cod were built by selecting 
large logs of the right dimensions for sills and plates. In these, 
holes were bored about six inches apart and poles were inserted 
as a sort of studding, intervals being allowed for doors and win- 
dows. The spaces between them were filled with stones and 
clay. The most thoroughly built were plastered with clay. The 
roofs were thatched with long grass. The chimney was built 
of sticks, arranged like a cob house and plastered with clay 
inside. The windows were supplied with oiled paper instead of 
glass. The floors were nothing more than the bare earth or per- 
haps in some cases flat stones covered with straw, for as late as 
1623 the cottages of the common people in England, of whom 
the emigrants were chiefly composed, were no better finished. 



1629 

The "Wheelwright Deed," if authentic, belongs to this 
period of the town's history. This document, which purports 
to be dated on the 17th day of May, 1629, conveys to Wheel- 
wright and others all that part of the main land between the 
Merrimack and Piscataqua rivers, and extending into the coun- 
try so as to embrace that portion of the State included within a 
line from the present town of Amherst, and crossing the Merri- 
mack near the falls of Amoskeag, passing through Chester, 
Nottingham, Barrington and Rochester, and striking the 
Salmon Falls river about a dozen miles above the Cochecho. 
The conditions of this grant were that Wheelwright should 
within ten years begin a plantation at Squamscot Falls (Exeter); 
that other inhabitants should have the same privileges with 
him ; that no plantation should exceed ten miles square ; that 
no lands should be granted but in townships ; and that these 
should be subject to the government of the Massachusetts 
colony, until they should have a settled government among 
themselves ; that for each township there should be paid an 
annual acknowledgment of one coat of trucking cloth to Passa- 
conaway, the chief sagamore, or his successors, and two bushels 
of Indian corn to Wheelwright and his heirs. The Indians 
reserved to themselves free liberty of fishing, fowling, hunting 
and planting within these limits. This deed was signed by 
Passaconaway and three other Indian Chiefs, and duly wit- 



1630] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. U 

nessed and delivered by Edward Hilton, Thomas Wiggin, 
Ambrose Gibbons and others. It included, as will be seen, all 
that portion of the State then known to the English settlers, 
and of which Thomson and others had alreadj^ received grants 
from the Crown. That they did not regard it as conflicting 
with their own rights, but rather as confirming them, is evident 
from their signatures as witnesses of the transaction. 

The authenticity of the deed has been much controverted, 
and ingenious arguments have been advanced to show that it 
was an impossibility that it could have been given at the time 
of its date. But the inadequacy of the motives ascribed for its 
fabrication, together with the fact that it was believed to be 
authentic for nearly two hundred years after it was given, must 
be regarded as outweighing all that can be adduced against it. 

These Indian deeds, it is well to remember, were considered 
at no time as conveying to the settlers a fee in the soil, because 
this was a right which belonged to the home government, not 
to the savage tribes who merely roamed over this country. The 
Indian conveyance was nothing more than a quit claim of ex- 
clusive right on their part to this privilege, with the acknowl- 
edgment of an equal right on the part of the English settlers 
and the assurance of peace and amity on their part, an assur- 
ance which soon proved to be of little worth. 



1630 

Edward Hilton, having obtained a grant of the patent in his 
own name (March 12, 1630), acted as his own agent until he 
disposed of a portion of his interest to others, when Captain 
Thomas Wiggin was appointed, Mr. Hilton being made one of 
the commissioners for the affairs of New England by the Lords 
of the Council, and as such was attorney for the delivery of 
possession of Saco and Biddeford to Richard Vines. 

This grant from the Council conveyed to Edward Hilton and 
his associates all that part of the river Piscataqua called by the 
natives Wecanacohunt, and by the settlers Hilton's point, with 
the south side of said river up to the falls of Squamscot, and 
three miles into the main land for breadth. This grant now 
contains within its limits Dover, Durham, Stratham, and parts 
of Newington and Greenland. 

From the date of this grant we must undoubtedly reckon the 
change of Dover from a trading and fishing post to an organized 



12 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1630 

community. All rights previously had been those of " squatter 
sovereignty." No records had been kept, and no forms of gov- 
ernment adopted. The same was true also of the settlement at 
Little Harbor. Thomson had abandoned it within a year or 
two after his arrival and removed to his island in Massachusetts 
bay, and whether any of his men kept the settlement alive till 
new patents were granted to the lyaconia associates, in 1630, is 
uncertain. 

The colonization of the Piscataqua was a private commercial 
enterprise. There is no evidence that the patentees or grantees 
designed to provide an asylum for a discontented, disaffected or 
persecuted people, or for any who were obnoxious to the laws of 
the realm. Nor is there the slightest evidence that at the 
outset of the enterprise its promotors even so much as dreamed 
of founding a self-governing State, or a community in any es- 
sential degree independent of the Imperial sovereignty. They 
were XoyaX to the Crown and the Church of England. But as 
no scheme of this kind could be expected to succeed without 
local superintendents, so we find that the colony had its " gov- 
ernors," agents of the chief adventurers and overseers of their 
interests. The first settlers, mostly servants in the employ of 
the grantees, were ruled by these overseers, under the instruc- 
tions of their principals. All were governed by the laws of 
England. 

As the population increased a more efficient government 
became necessary. This necessity was the more pressing after 
Portsmouth and Dover became distinct centres of population. 
In the absence of records it is impossible to fix upon the exact 
time when these two communities set up government for them- 
selves, but it was at an earlier period, most likely, than has 
generally been assigned. 

The settlers of Exeter formed themselves into a body politic 
July 4, 1639. Dover followed Oct. 22, the same year. Whether 
their action was followed or preceded by that of Portsmouth is 
uncertain. Hampton, which was claimed by Massachusetts, 
was made a town in 1639. Population at that time about 1000. 

There is no evidence that prior to 1641 either Portsmouth or 
Dover had adopted a formal code of laws. Still it is not to be 
inferred that these communities were lawless or destitute of 
some kind of regulations for the conduct of their public affairs. 
They certainly had the laws and customs of England which they 
brought with them. {Hoyt's Notes.) 



[1633 HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 13 

1633 

Captain Wiggin entered upon his duties as Governor, and 
after about one year's residence in the country, made a voyage 
to England to procure more ample means for carrying on the 
plantation. In the meantime the grantees at Bristol, the asso- 
ciates of Hilton, had sold their interest to the Ivords Say and 
Brook, George Willys and William Whiting, who continued 
Wiggin in the agency and procured a considerable number of 
families in the west of England, " some of whom were of good 
estate and of some account for religion to come over and increase 
the colony." The heads of the principal families now added 
by Captain Wiggin to the settlement, in addition to Edward 
and William Hilton, were John Ault, Thomas Beard, Thomas 
Canney, Edward Colcatt, John Dam, William Furber, John 
Goddard, John Hall, Thomas Johnson, Henry L/angstaff, 
Thomas Layton, William I^everidge, Francis Matthews, James 
Nute, Hatevil Nutter, James Ordway, Richard Pinkham, 
William Pomfrett, Thomas Roberts, Henry Tebbetts, John 
Tuttle and Richard Waldron. 

While these events were in progress, conflicting claims to the 
patent had arisen. The Government of Massachusetts Bay, 
whose charter was granted in March, 1629, set up claims which 
not only covered the whole of the New Hampshire settlements, 
but a considerable part of Maine. These claims, after much 
controversy, were ended for the time, by the extension of the 
Massachusetts government over all the settlements on the 
Piscataqua. Many collisions occurred while the controversy 
was going on, not only between the settlers and the emissaries 
of Massachusetts, but between the settlers of the different towns 
on the river themselves. Captain Wiggin of the Dover patent 
and Captain Walter Neale of the Strawberry Bank settlement 
made preparations for a fight, if they did not come to open hos- 
tilities, the fame of which has come down to us. Hubbard in- 
forms us that Wiggin, being forbidden by Neale " to come upon 
a certain point of land, that lieth in the midway betwixt Dover 
and Exeter, Captain Wiggin intended to have defended his right 
by the sword, but it seems both the litigants had so much wit 
in their anger as to wave the battle, each accounting himself to 
have done very manfully in what was threatened ; so as in 
respect not of what did, but what might have fallen out, the 
place to this day retains the formidable name of Bloody Point." 

Mingled with the dispute as to territorial rights there was 



14 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1633 

also a bitter controversy always going on of a political and re- 
ligious character. The settlers of Massachusetts were Puritans ; 
those on the Piscataqua, so far as they had any religion, ad- 
hered to the Church of England ; the former had come over to 
found a new settlement for conscience sake ; the latter to fish 
and trade with the Indians. When Edward Hilton sold his 
patent, it went into the hands of the friends of the Puritans in 
England, and Captain Wiggin was appointed to conduct it in 
their interest. On his return from England he accordingly 
brought with him besides settlers of ' ' some account for religion, ' ' 
a "worthy puritan divine," the Reverend William Leveridge, 
who arrived Oct. lo, 1633, and continued till 1635, when he 
left for want of adequate support. The Puritan element in the 
settlement, though strong, was not able to maintain itself 
against those of a different sentiment. Captain Wiggin, its 
ruler, was not able to stand up against it. After Mr. Eeveridge 
left, the Reverend George Burdet came among them, and 
between 1637 and 1640 the settlement was a scene of confusion 
and trouble, both civil and ecclesiastical. 

Burdet came to Dover from Salem, where during a year or 
two he had preached at different times to the satisfaction of the 
people. Whether he was then playing a part, or whether he 
afterwards changed his mind, is not altogether certain ; but he 
turned out at last to be a spy of Archbishop Eaud, the most 
inveterate enemy of the Puritans. In Dover he began to preach 
and also to intrigue. He aspired to be a sort of Pope, uniting 
in himself both the spiritual and the temporal leaderships. 
Addressing himself to the anti-Puritan interest, he prevailed on 
a majority of the settlers, after receiving him as their minister, 
to make him their ruler, which they did by deposing Wiggin, 
who had acted as agent for the English patentees from 1631. 
Burdet remained at the head of affairs for about a year, when 
Captain John Underbill, who had found it necessary to leave 
Massachusetts, came to Dover to establish himself, and by his 
superior address succeeded in obtaining the place of Burdet. 
Underbill became commander of the military and also procured 
a church to be gathered who chose Hauserd Knollys for their 
minister. He had come over from England the year before, 
but being an Anabaptist, of the Antinomian cast, was not 
well received in Massachusetts, and came here while Burdet 
was in office, who forbade his preaching. But Underbill agree- 
ing better with him prevailed to have him chosen minister. 



1638] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 15 

1638 

Hubbard says : — 

About the year 1638, they attempted to gather themselves into a church 
estate. But for want of discretion, if not of something else, in them 
that were called to this solemn work, they soon after fell into factions, 
and strange confusions, one part taking upon them to excommunicate 
and punish the other in the church and in the court ; an ordinary effect 
of loose and pragmatical spirits under any popular government, whether 
civil or ecclesiastical. 

The disreputable character of Burdet soon manifested itself 
and he left Dover and went to Agamenticus, now York, Maine, 
where his reputation followed him and his career was but a 
repetition of the practices of which he had been guilty in Dover. 
He was indicted for adultery and fined twenty pounds sterling, 
on repeated occasions. 

Dr. Belknap says in his MS. History of the First Church : — 

Being cleared of Burdet, it (the plantation) was ridden by another 
churchman, Thomas Larkham, Coming to New England, and not favor- 
ing the discipline, he removed hither (1640), and the people of Dover 
were much taken with his public preaching, he being of good parts and 
well gifted. But not being able to maintain two ministers, they resolved 
to cast off Mr. Knolles and embrace Mr. Larkham. Whereupon Mr. 
Knolles, making a virtue of necessity, gave place, and the other, soon 
after he was chosen, discovered himself by taking into the church all that 
offered, though never so notoriously immoral and ignorant, if they would 
but promise amendment ; and moreover fell into contentions with the 
people, taking it upon him to rule all, even the magistrates themselves. 
This occasioned a sharp dispute between him and Mr. Knolles, who 
either yet retained, or upon this occasion reassumed the pastoral office. 
Whereupon they were neither able quietly to divide into two churches, 
nor live peaceably together in one. The more religious sort still adher- 
ing to Mr. Knolles, he, in their name, excommunicated Mr. Larkham, 
who, in return, laid violent hands on Knolles, taking the hat from his 
head, pretending it was not paid for ; but he was so civil as to send it to 
him again. 

In this heat it began to grow to a tumult, and some of the magistrates 
joined with Mr. Larkham and assembled a company to fetch Capt. 
Underhill before the Court ; he also gathered some of their neighbors 
together to defend themselves and keep the peace, and so marched out 
to meet Mr. Larkham, one carrying a Bible on a halberd for an ensign, 
Mr. Knolles being armed with a pistol. When Mr. Larkham saw them 
thus provided, he withdrew his party, and went no further, but sent 
down to Mr. Williams, Governor of Strawberry Bank, for assistance, 
who came up with a company of armed men and beset Mr. Knolles house 
where Capt. Underhill was, kept a guard upon him night and day till 
they could call a Court, and then Mr. Williams, sitting as Judge, they 
found Underhill and his company guilty of a riot, and set great fines 



16 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [163S 

upon them, and ordered him and some others to depart out of the 

plantation. -,1.1 

The cause of this eager persecution was because Capt. Underhill had 
procured a good part of the inhabitants to offer themselves to the gov- 
ernment of Massachusetts; and being then prosecuted they sent a peti- 
tion to them for aid. The Governor and assistants commissioned Mr. 
Bradstreet, Hugh Peters of Salem, and Mr. Dalton of Hampton, who 
came hither on foot to inquire into the matter and endeavor to make 
peace. They succeeded so well that Mr. Larkham was released from 
his excommunication, and Capt. Underhill and the rest from their 
sentences. 

Another account of these troubles is given by Lechford : — 

They two (Larkham and Knollys) fell out about baptizing children, 
receiving of members, burial of the dead; and the contention was so 
sharp that Knollys and his party rose up and excommunicated Mr. 
Larkham and some that held with him ; and further, Mr. Larkham, 
flying to the magistrates, Mr. Knollys and Capt. Underhill raised arms, 
and expected help from the Bay, Mr. Knollys going before the troop 
with a Bible upon a pole's top, and giving forth that their side were 
Scots and the English. Whereupon the gentlemen of Sir F. Gorges' 
plantation came in and kept court with the magistrates of Piscataqua, 
who fined all those who were in arms for a riot, by indictment, jury and 
verdict, formally; nine of them were censured to be whipped, but that 
was spared; Mr. Knollys and the Captain, their leaders, were fined 
100 pounds apiece, which they were not able to pay. 

Soon after (1640) Mr. Knollys left the scene of confusion, and 
in 1641, Mr. I^arkham left to avoid the shame of a scandalous 
sin it was found he had committed. 

From the conflicting accounts which have come down to us 
of these religious and political controversies it is difl&cult to 
extract the exact truth. Both Ivarkham and Knollys were 
charged with gross immorality. Both it is believed were 
unjustly accused. 

Says the Rev. Dr. Spalding in his 250th anniversary sermon 
of the Settlement of Dover and the organization of the First 
Church : — 

The early settlers of Dover and Portsmouth were attached to the 
Church of England, and had little connection with the Puritans of Mas- 
sachusetts, though there were those in Dover whose sympathies were 
with the Bay Company and the independent ideas, both civil and reli- 
gious, which the Puritans represented. These, for the most part, were 
the men who came over with the Puritan minister, Mr. Leveridge. The 
fact that there existed here in Dover these two parties, representing 
principles and politics thus antagonistic, is the true key for our solution 
of the strange events which occurred during this turbulent period of the 
town's history. The conflict which was fought out within the walls of 
the old church and along the single street of Dover, was the same in 



1638] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 17 

character with that which had been raging for half a century in Eng- 
laad, and which was yet to soak with the blood of its noblest citizens 
many of its fair fields. Hanserd Knollys was a Puritan. Hatred of the 
English established church had been generated in him by the persecu- 
tions which began to be brought against him from that quarter from the 
day when he renounced the ordination which he had received from its 
hands. Thomas Larkham had been an Episcopal minister at Northam, 
England. Finding the Massachusetts Puritanism uncongenial to him, 
he came to Dover. He was a man of considerable wealth, and buying 
some of the shares of the plantation company, he became greatly influ- 
ential. This is seen in the fact that he persuaded the people here to 
change the name of their town to Northam, this last being the name of 
his English home. He was a man of brilliant speech and popular 
address, and having supplanted Knollys, manifested his church notions 
at once and in a very marked way, and which led to the contentions 
which have been related. 

The church which was founded in these "troublous times," 
survived them all and lives to this day, as the " First Church in 
Dover," as it was the first in New Hampshire. The first meet- 
ing house was undoubtedly built in 1634, soon after Mr. Lever- 
idge came to Dover. The church itself dates from Jan. 13, 
1762, Old Style. 

Of the first meeting house. Dr. Belknap says : — 

It appears from ancient records that Capt. Wiggin had a power of 
granting lands to the settlers, but as trade was their principal object, 
they took up small lots, intending to build a compact town on Dover 
Neck. On the most inviting part of this eminence they built a meeting 
house, which was afterwards surrounded with an entrenchment and 
flankarts. 

It was not the first but the second meeting house which was 
surrounded by intrenchments, as will be seen by the records of 
1652. 

Of the location, as well as the materials of which the first 
meeting house was constructed, we have no definite informa- 
tion. The first meeting house in Boston, built about the same 
time, is "said to have had mud walls and a thatched roof" 
{Palfrey). It is reasonable to conclude that in the absence of 
other material the Dover meeting house was of a similar char- 
acter. As no reference is made to the first meeting house, in 
the vote of the town for building the second house, it is not 
certain whether it stood in the same place, or further down on 
the Neck. Had the location been the same, reference to the 
old edifice in the vote for building the new one it would seem 
could hardly have been avoided. 



18 



NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE 



[1640 



1640 

The ' ' Combii ^Jon of the People of Dover to Establish a 
Form of Government" was entered into this year. The original 
was in existence upon the Town Records about 1665, when it 
was quoted by Hubbard, but it could not be found when Dr. 
Belknap wrote his History. A copy made by Governor Cranfield 
in 1682 has since been found in the Public Record office in 
London ; of which the following is a transcript : 

Whereas suudry Misclieifes and inconveniences have befaln us, and 
more and greater may in regard of want of Civill Government, his 
Gratious Matie haveing hitherto setled uo Order for us to our Knowl- 
edge : 

Wee whose names are underwritten being Inhabitants upon the River 
Piscataquack have voluntarily agreed to combine our Selves into a Body 
Politique that wee may the more comfortably enjoy the benefit of his 
Maties Lawes. And do hereby actually ingage our Selves to Submit to 
his Royal Maties L,awes together with all such Orders as shalbee con- 
cluded by a Major part of the Freemen of our Society, in case they bee 
not repugnant to the Lawes of England and administred in the behalfe 
of his Majesty. 

And this wee have mutually promised and concluded to do and so to 
continue till his Excellent Matie shall give other Order concerning us. 

In Witness wee have hereto Set our hands the two ,S: twentieth day 
of October in the Sixteenth yeare of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord 
Charles by the grace of God King of Great Brittain France & Ireland 
Defender of the Faith &c Annoq Domi: 1640. 



Samuel Haiues 

William Jones 

John Dam 

Bartholmew Hunt 

Thomas Canning 

John Heard 

Fran: Champernoon 

Henry Beck 

Henry Lahorn 

Richard Waldern 

Anthony Emery 

William Furber 

John Crosse 

Bartholmew Smith 
This is a True Copy compared with ye Originall by me 

Edw Cranfield 
(Endorsed) 
New England N. Hampshire 
The Combination for Govern- 
ment by ye people at Pascataq. 

1640 
Reed abt 13 Febr. 82-3 



John Follett 
John Underbill 
Phillip Swaddow 
Steven Teddar 
William Bowden 
John Phillips 
John Hall 
Hansed Knowles 
Robert Huggins 
Edward Starr 
William Waldern 
Richard Laham 
Tho: Layton 
George Webb 



Robert Nanney 
Peter Garland 
Richard Pinckhame 
John Upgroufe 
John Wastill 
Tho: Dunstar 
Abel Camond 
Edward Col cord 
Thom. Ivarkham 
James Nute 
William Storer 
William Pomfret 
Tho: Roberts 
James Rawlins 



1641] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 19 

Some of the names were no doubt copied inaccurately for 
Governor Cranfield. Phillip Swaddow is Siuaddni on the pro- 
test of 1641. Abel Ccuiioid is conjectured to be the Caniock 
named Abel. Steven Teddar is doubtless the Stephen Kidder 
of Berwick in 1632, if Belknap gives the name right. Thomas 
Can7ting was, later Cannie, but Camiing was doubtless the 
original form. Thomas Dunstar is somtimes given as Durstin. 
Edward Starr was doubtless the Edward Starbuck of that 
period. The name sometimes given as Robert Varney is clearly 
Robert Nanney, but may have become Varney. 

This combination was entered into from the fact that John 
Underhill had become a strong advocate for the union of the 
plantation with Massachusetts, as related by Belknap, while 
pretending to be hostile to that government from which he had 
been banished. This duplicity produced the utmost confusion 
in the colony. Underhill attempted to ' ' rend this combination, ' ' 
and contrary to his oath and fidelity went from house to house, 
and for his own ends by flattering and threatening, got some 
hands to a note of their willingness to submit themselves to the 
government of Massachusetts. This led to the violent pro- 
ceedings of both parties as related by Belknap, and to the 
decree banishing Underhill from the colony. 



1641 

In March, 1641, the leading inhabitants of Dover sent the 
following letter to the Governor of Massachusetts explanatory 
of Underhill' s conduct, and of their objections to coming under 
the government of Massachusetts. 

Nortliam, 4, imo ( March 4, 1640-1) 

Honoured Sir: — We, the inhabitants of Northam, make bould to 
trouble you with these few lynes, Certifyinge you that whereas wee 
suppose Captaiue Underhill hath informed you and the rest of your 
brethren of the Matechusheth baye, that wee are all willinge, volun- 
tarily to submit our Selves to your Government upon fformer Articles 
propounded ; truth it is wee doe very well aprove of your judicious 
wayes, and shall be very ioyful, yu please God to enlarge us, that wee 
may be free from other ingagements and promises wch some of us are 
obliged in to the owners or patentees, from whom under his Mat's Letter 
Patents we enjoy our free liberty, wch causeth us not for present to sub- 
mit to any other government than that wch wee have already entered 
into combination to observe according to the King's Mat's Lawes, until 
such time as the owners come over to us, which wee suppose will be 
about three months hence, and then our prpositions Considered as the 



20 



NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE 



[1641 



Lord shall direct us, wee will labour more to satisfy you. But for the 
prcedings of Captain Underhill seeking to Undermyne us, and contrary 
to his oath and fidellyty as we suppose intrusted to him, hath went from 
house to house, and for his own ends, by flattery and threatining, gotten 
some hands to a note of their willingness to submit themselves under 
your government, and some that have no habitation, to bring his 
purposes to pass; we doubt not but you are to well acquainted with his 
stratagems in plotting his owne designs, wch wee refer to your grave 
iudgments. Some of those that subscribed to his note have this day 
utterly prtested against their owne act, for he hath raysed such a 
mutinie amongst us wch if we take not Course for the stoping thereof it 
may Cause the effusion of blood, by reason he hath by his designes 
privately rent the combination as much as in him lyeth. Contrary to his 
Act, that is that wee should continue him in the same govmnt, except 
an agreement or cause shewed to the Contrary in open Court, agreed on 
by the maior p'ts. thus Much we thought good to acquaynt your wor'p, 
wthall beseeching your favorable construction, hoping you will weigh 
our Case in Equity and conscience, and not any way to enforce us to any 
act whereby wee should break pr'mise or Covenant with the patentees 
or amongst ourselves whehin soe doinge we should sinne greatly, we 
heartyly desire your prayers for us, and comit you to the pr'tection of 
the Almightye at yor to be comanded. 



Thorn Larkham 

William Jones 

John ffollett 

Robert Varney 

Thomas Durston 
Thomas Roberts 
Samuel haines 
Bartholmew Smith 

John Dam 

Barthol'ew r+)Hunt 



William Waldern 
sign 

John (+; Tuttle 

of 
henry beck 

mark 
Thos (T) Layton 

of 
Edward Starbuck 
William Pomfrett 
William furbur 
William Storer 

mark 
John (H) Hall 

of 

Phillip Swaddon 



Richard Waldern 
Edward Colcorde 

sig 

Robert (R) huckins 
of 

Richard Pinkcom 
Thomas Tricky 



The final result of these proceedings was that the people of 
Dover were willing to agree to the surrender of their jurisdiction 
to Massachusetts, as soon as the agent of the new proprietors 
who had recently purchased the rights of Edward Hilton in the 
colony should arrive in the country. This act was accordingly 
soon consummated. 

Having placed itself under the protection of Massachusetts, 
Dover as well as Portsmouth was substantially a part of that 
colony for nearly fifty years. Governed by its laws. New Hamp- 
shire, of which these two towns formed the component parts, had 
virtually no history of its own, for Hampton had always owed 



[1641 HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 21 

allegiance to the Bay and Exeter was but an outlying parish 
over which guard had been constantly placed to keep John 
Wheelwright and his heresies at bay. Thus situated little prog- 
ress was made in its settlement, though extensive grants were 
constantly made to men of influence in this country and in Eng- 
land, the favorites of the home government. It was indeed 
graciously allowed that the inhabitants should enjoy the same 
liberties with their own people, and have a court of justice 
erected among them ; that they should be exempted from all 
public charges, except what should arise among themselves, or 
for their own peculiar benefit ; that they should enjoy their for- 
mer liberties of fishing, planting and selling timber ; and that 
they should send two deputies to the General Court sitting in 
Boston. These terms were indeed liberal, though Massachusetts 
could well afford them, and leading men in New Hampshire 
were allowed to hold prominent places below the highest in the 
management of affairs. That "stalwart" leader in the Dover 
settlement, Major Richard Waldron, represented his people for 
more than twenty years in the General Court, of which on seven 
successive occasions he was chosen the Speaker. 

The historian of New England {Palfrej), after reciting the 
terms of the union and the disorderly conduct in the settlements 
which led to it, remarks: "Experiences of this kind taught 
them that they were not in a condition to go on comfortably by 
themselves ; the territorial claim of Massachusetts was always 
hanging over their heads ; the state of affairs in England pre- 
cluded the expectation of any present attention from that 
quarter ; and the communities were too dissimilar from each 
other, as well as singly too feeble and heterogeneous, to find 
sufiicient strength in a union together. The natural and pru- 
dent resource was to seek the protection of Massachusetts." 

However advantageous this union may have been at the 
start, in cleaning out the disorderly elements which prevailed 
in the settlements, the chain soon began to gall. As early as 
1646, or in about five years after the connection was formed, 
dissatisfaction with government by Massachusetts began to 
manifest itself. The inhabitants of Dover, by "humble pe- 
tition," complained to the General Court that they were sub- 
jected to inconvenience and wrong in being compelled to defray 
all their own court charges, while subjected to the courts of 
Massachusetts in matters which it was agreed should be left to 
their own jurisdiction. They complained that while it was 



22 HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. [i64i 

stipulated that in all minor matters they should answer only to 
their own courts, which had power to punish all offenders 
except for " life, limb or banishment," they had warrants served 
upon them to appear at Boston about selling of wine, and had 
been arrested divers times for small sums and been forced to 
travel as far as Boston, Salem and Ipswich for a debt of ten 
shillings, &c. 

In answer to this petition the General Court decided that the 
complainants " had no other liberties concerning trials and suits 
in law than the inhabitants of Salem and others of other parts 
of this jurisdiction have." " Nevertheless the Court being sen- 
sible of the great burthen which may fall upon the inhabitants 
of the river, if they shall be forced upon small occasions to 
travel to Boston, or other courts far off, ordered that they should 
not be compelled upon any original process to travel out of the 
limits of Norfolk to answer in any civil action of less than loo 
pounds debt and damage, or have liberty to call any person out 
of any other limits to answer in any like action to be holden in 
Norfolk under the same value." 

With these and other concessions the union went on until 
1679, when New Hampshire was made a province and left 
mainly to its own guidance. The revolution in England, com- 
plications growing out of the Mason claim and repeated Indian 
massacres of the defenceless inhabitants induced (1689-90) 
a majority of the harassed people to ask to be restored to the 
protection of Massachusetts. Measures to that end were in 
progress, but before the union had been fully consummated, 
after a nominal control of affairs for about three years, Massa- 
chusetts relinquished its authority in 1692, and New Hampshire 
ever after remained a separate province, though the boundary 
line between them was not finally settled until 1741. 



CHAPTER II 

Under Colony of Massachusetts 
1642 

Jan. 2. — At a town meeting it was ordered that if any turbu- 
lent person shall molest any of the Townsmen appointed, or 
quarrel with them, or contest against any of their lawful actions, 
done according to town order, he shall be first admonished, and 
the second time fined 5s. and the third time los. for every such 
offence. 

("Townsmen " was the term used for Town Officers.) 

June i.^ — It was ordered that no inhabitant should fall above 
ten trees for clapboards or pipe staves till he had wrought them 
up. Anyone having above ten trees fallen at any time not 
wrought up was to forfeit for every tree ten shillings. 

Same date. — It was ordered that "Mr. Daniel Maud and Mary 
his wife shall enjoy the house they now dwell in during their 
lives provided he continue amongst us as Teacher or pastor if 
please God to call him to it." 

Mr. Maud was the fifth minister of Dover. He came to this 
country as early as 1635, and was admitted a freeman by the 
Massachusetts Colony, Oct. 25, 1635. He settled in Boston and 
was a schoolmaster there several years. He came to Dover this 
year and continued here till his death in 1655. " He was a 
good man, of a serious spirit and a quiet and peaceable dis- 
position." 

7th mo. — It is ordered that the Associates at Piscataqua shall 
have power to try any cause under 20 pounds, though no other 
be sent to them. Mr. William Hilton, William Waldron and 
Edward Colcott had authority to end differences under i pound. 

Ordered, that the Elders be desired to take the case of the 
inhabitants of Strawberry bank into their consideration and 
afford their help for providing a minister for them. 

The inhabitants of Northam (Dover) upon their petition were 
granted the liberty other towns have, and Mr. Samuel Dudley, 
Mr. William Paine, Mr. Winslow^ and Mr. Boyse were appointed 
to settle their limits. 

(The above, 7th mo., &c., though appearing on the Town 
records, was doubtless the action of the Massachusetts Assembly, 
under whose government the Piscataqua towns had placed 
themselves.) 



24 



NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE 



[1643 



A barrel of powder was granted the inhabitants of Dover by 
the Massachusetts government on their delivering dry fish for it 
in Boston by agreement with the surveyor general. 

Twenty acre lots were laid out this year, on the west side of 
Back river, to the following inhabitants (the lots being described 
as "in breadth at the water side 40 poles, and in length 80 
poles up in the woods " ) : 

Thomas Roberts, Barthy Srney, 

Richard Rogers, John Ugroiie, 

Henry Tebbetts, John Dam, 

Mr. Larkham, Wm. Pomfrett, 

Edward Colcord, Wm. Hilton, sen, 

George Webb, Edward Starbuck, 

John Tuttle Samuel Haines, 

William Storey, Robert Huggins 



John Croesse, 
Tho. La3'ton, 
John Hall, 
Hatevil Nutter, 
Henry Beck 
John Westell, 
Richard Pinkham 



1643 
The inhabitants of Bloody Point, who had been severed from 
Dover and annexed to Portsmouth, by the Commissioners 
appointed by Massachusetts to define the boundaries after the 
union with that government in 1641, petitioned to be re-annexed 
to Dover, assigning as reasons that it was done altogether 
without their consent ; that they had promise from you ( Massa- 
chusetts) to enjoy all their lawful liberty of felling timber 
and the like, but from which they are now debarred ; that 
Strawberry Bank was four miles from them, or thereabouts, 
whereby they were all debarred from hearing the word by 
reason of the tides falling out so that they could go but once a 
fortnight and then stay but a part of the day, making it rather 
a day of toil and labor than rest unto the I,ord, and yet they 
were forced to pay for the maintenance of their minister. And 
it was further alleged that " sithence the Court they have laid 
out to themselves 50, 100, or 200 acres a pts (apiece) round 
about us, penning us up and denying us falling of any Timber 
without their leave and making every one that will have of the 
said land to pay yearly 50s. for a C Acres and so after the rate 
for more or less, they being some fourteen or fifteen families 
living remote from one another scattering upon the river 2 miles 
and 4, 5, or 6 miles from us, yet have taken to themselves all 
our best land adjoining to us." The petitioners conclude by 
" Humbly beseaching your good Worpps to be pleasrd to take 
our case into your pious consideration and to take some order 



[1643 HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 25 

for us that we may enjoy our former liberties and continue in 
the same Township we were of, and that the order of Court 
may be confirmed which was that our Neck should be in 
Dover Town, otherwise we shall be forced to remove with (our 
families) to our undoing, being 12 poor families." &c. The 
signers of the petition were John Godard, James Johnson, 
Thomas Canning, Henry I^angstaff, Thomas Ffursen, John 
Payer, William Fray, Oliver Trimings, William Jones, Philip 
I^ewis, Thomas Trickey and another whose name is unread- 
able. The result was that — 

March 10. It appearing to the Court that the Commissioners 
appointed to lay out the bounds between Dover and Strawberry 
Bank did not consider Strawberry Bank as a Town, nor so 
exactly viewed the land on that side of the river as was needful 
and thereupon laid out certain lauds to Dover which is most 
convenient for Strawberry Bank, and certain lands to Straw- 
berry Bank which is most convenient for Dover, it was ordered 
that all the marsh and Meddow ground lying against the Great 
Bay on Strawberry Bank side should belong to Dover, together 
with four hundred ackers of upland ground adjoining and lying 
as may be most convenient for the imprisoning and fencing in 
of the said meadow, the remainder of the said ground to belong 
to Strawberry Bank, reserving the due right to every one that 
hath property in the same. 

6th mo. 31. George Webb was presented by the Court " for 
living idle like a swine." 

Warrant was ordered to be sent to Dover to redress their two 
mistakes of sending a new deputy and sending an imperfect 
number of males from 16 years old to 60 years. It was also 
ordered that an admonition should be sent to Dover for sending 
a new deputy without leave, or new summons, and not allowing 
means to the former deputy, whereby he was hindered from 
coming. {Mass. Records.) 

William Pomfret was appointed in Edward Colcott's place to 
assist in ending small causes at Dover. ( Mass. Records.) 

Sept. 30.— It was ordered that William Pomfrett should have 
the neck of land between the mouth of Cochecho river and 
Newichwannock river with the marsh thereupon to the first 
narrow. 

Dec. 8. — It was ordered that no man should fall any timber 
for clapboards or pipe staves, plank or boards (on public land) 
without the approbation of the Townsmen. 



26 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1644 

1644 

April 20. — It was ordered that Mr. Edward Starbuck, Richard 
Walderne and William Furber be Wearesmen for Cotcheco 
falls and river, during their lives, or so long as they continue 
inhabitants in the town and at any one of their deaths or 
departure out of the town the said falls, wears and fishing to 
return again to the disposing of the town, to put in another, 
paying yearly six thousand Alewives for rent to the town. The 
first fish they catch are to be employed for the use of the Church 
and what fish is wanting for the Church's use to be delivered at 
common price, that is to say three shillings a thousand at the 
utmost, and the first Salmon they catch to be given to the pastor 
or teacher, and none are to fish in the said falls or weares but the 
above written. And further said wearsmen are bound to use all 
diligence in catching fish, sdly. The said wearsmen are to have 
six thousand of fish each of them for their ground. 3d, Church 
officers are to be served with fish. 4th, All that bear office in 
the commonwealth, and sthly the most ancient inhabitants to 
be served with fish, and so every man a thousand of fish equally 
divided or so many as every school of fish affords and every 
man to go up for his fish and tend there for it in fishing season, 
and for the odd fish that come before the school to be the wears- 
men's if they exceed not above two or three hundred. After 
the Church have had six thousand of fish the next to be served 
are the wearsmen. Those men who do not use the fish them- 
selves it shall be at the disposing of the wearmen. And those 
that neglect to take their turn shall lose their fish for that time. 
And it is ordered that no man shall molest the said Wearsmen 
in their fishing upon pain of nineteen shillings for every default. 

Aug. 2. — It was ordered by the Court that Elisabeth, wife of 
Mathew Giles, be whipped or redeemed with a fine of 20 shil- 
lings for reviling words against some of the members of the 
church. 

Ordered, that William Jones shall make a public acknowl- 
edgement to Elder Starbuck and others he hath reviled upon 
Lord's day come sennitt. 

"Anthony Emery, of Dover, his petition is referred to the 
next court at Dover and he is allowed to draw out his wine in 
the meantime." {Mass. R(Xords.) 

On the report of Richard Bellingham and Richard Saltonstall, 
appointed by the General Court of Massachusetts to examine 



1645] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 27 

the case concerning a certain quantity of land in question be- 
tween Dover and Strawberry Bank, it was ordered that the land 
should be laid to Dover. 

1645 

July 10.— John Baker was fined ten shillings for drawing his 
sword and running after Indians with it drawn, and to pay 
2S. 6d. fees. He was also admonished for trading with Indians 
on the Sabbath day, and ordered to pay 2s. 6d. fees. He was 
further presented for beating Richard Nason so that he was 
black and blue, and for throwing a fire shovel at his wife ; 
5 shillings. 

It is ordered that the Treasurer should pay John Rosse, due for 
ferrige of the magistrates to Dover, and demand the one half 
of the Treasurer of Dover. Mr. Bradstreet and Mr. Symonds 
are appointed to keep courts at Dover for the year ensuing. 
Capt. Wiggin, Mr. Williams and Mr. Smith are appointed a.sso- 
ciates with them. {Mass. Records.) 

Oct. 7. — It is ordered that Strawberry Bank and Dover be 
sent to for what they stand indebted to the country for their 
deputies' diet and court charges, and course taken for it. {Mass. 
Records^ 

The Massachusetts General Court granted to Dover the entire 
neck of land, known as Bloody Point, bounded on the south- 
ward by a line drawn from Canney's creek to Hogsty Cove. 

1647 

Oct. 27. — It was ordered that Mr. Ambrose Gibbons, William 
Pomfrett, Anthony Emery, Richard Waldron and Thomas L,ay- 
ton treat with Mr. Hate Evil Nutter and Company of Elders, 
concerning the erecting and setting up of a saw mill at Campron 
river, and as the parties should agree it would be the act of the 
town. 

By the agreement which follows, the ' ' Company of Elders ' ' 
aforesaid, which seems to have consisted of Elder Nutter and 
Elder Starbuck, were granted a commodious and fit place at 
the upper or lower fall, for the setting up of a saw mill, with 
what timber and wood should be necessary for that purpose. 
They were allowed to fall either oak or pine for sawing, and 
were to pay for every tree six pence to the town, either in 
boards or plank. 



28 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1,647 

The inhabitants of Dover were granted exemption from serv- 
ing at the General Court, except at the Court of election, and 
their fine for not appearing was remitted. ( Mass. Records.) 

Nov. I. — William Pomfrett chosen town clerk. 

Nov. II — Town Marks agreed upon by the General Court 
for Horses, ordered to be set upon one of the nere quarters : 
" S (trawberry banke), N (ortham), H (ampton), E(xiter.)." 
{Mass. Reco7'ds.) 

The Court took order for the administration of the estate 
of William Waldron, deceased, by decreeing that said estate 
should be delivered into the hands of Capt. Wiggin and Edward 
Rawson, who were to settle the same and make an equal dis- 
tribution of the proceeds to the several creditors, making return 
of their doings to the next Court. 

The following ordinance in relation to the valuation of prop- 
erty for the purpose of taxation was adopted this year : — 

" Vicesimo Septimo die loth mo Anno Domini '47." 

" Memorand. it is this day ordered, constituted, concluded and agreed 
upon that the inhabitants of Dover doe and shall constitute and agree 
unto a form of levieing (levying) of Rates and Assessments for raising 
of public charges, According to an order of Court made and held at 
Boston dated 13th of the 9th nio. (1647) as followeth viz : — 

1st. That the Selectmen and one man more chosen by the inhabitants 
aforesaid, shall have full power and authority to make rates and to follow 
this forme as followeth. 

2nd. That they take and make an exact and perfect List of all the 
male Inhabitants within this Township from the age of sixteen yearesand 
upwards. According to a true valuation and Estimate of all the Estate, 
as well reall aspersonall of houses and Lands of all Sorts unbroken uppas 
others. Except such as shall bee comou for free feeding of cattell to the 
use of the inhabitants in generall whether belonging to Townds or par- 
ticular persons viz: — Mills, shypps, merchantable goods. Cranes, wharfes 

and all other sorts of cattell and other goods or estates either at Sea 

or land. The which said persons and estates are by the said selectmen 
and commissioners to be assessed and rated as hereafter followeth, viz : 

That evie (every) person aforesaid ( Magistrates only excepted) two 
shillings and six pence per head and all estates both Reall & personal 
at one penny for evie twenty shillings According to the rate of cattell 
hereafter mentioned viz : — 

That evie cowe of foure yeares and upwards shall be valued at five 
pounds. 

That evie heifer and Steirs betweene three and foure yeares old shall 
bee valued at foure pounds, betweene two and three yeares at fifty shil- 
lings and betweene one and two yeares old at thirty shillings. 

That evie Oxe at foure yeares old and upwards shall bee valued at 
sixe pounds. 



1648] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 29 

That evorie horse and mare at foure years old and upwards shall bee 
valued at Seaven pounds, and of three yearesold at five pounds, betweene 
two and three yeares old at three pounds and of one yeare old forty 
shillings. 

That evie sheepe above one yeare old shall bee valued at thirty 
shillings and evie Goate above one yeare old at eight shillings. 

That evie swine above one yeare old shall bee valued at twenty 
shillings and above one yeare old at forty shillings. 

All sorts of Cattell under one yeare old are exempted. 

That all such persons as by their Arts are inabled to carry along public 
charges, As Bakers, Brewers and Artificers, are to bee rated according to 
the valuation of their said Arts and Imployments. 



1648 

Feb. 22.— It was ordered that George Smith, William Pom- 
frett and John Hall being chosen shall have full power and 
authority to put an end to all controversies that shall at any 
time arise for the space of one whole year. 

Aug. 3. — The Grand Jury presented Elder Starbuck for dis- 
turbing the peace of the church, and for refusing to join with it 
in the ordinance of baptism ; for which he was admonished and 
discharged. 

Sept. 27 — It was ordered that all such person or persons that 
shall be found absent without lawful cause from the town meet- 
ing shall for such default pay a fine of six shillings. 

Same date. — It was ordered that Richard Pinkham shall beat 
the drum on Lord's day to give notice for the time of meeting 
and to sweep the meeting house for the which he shall be 
allowed six bushels of Indian corn for his pay this year and to be 
freed from rates. 

Oct. 12. — There was granted to Richard Waldron fifteen hun- 
dred trees, either oak or pine, for the accommodation of a saw 
mill which he intendeth shortly by God's permission to erect 
and set up at or upon the lower fall of the river Cochchechoe. 
The said Richard Waldron is to pay three pence per tree. 

Oct. 29. — It was ordered that George Walton should pay 
twenty shillings for every pipe of wine drawn either by him or 
his appointment to any person or persons whatsoever since the 
time of his keeping an ordinary, and also for the price of two 
pipes and one hogshead of wine since the last Court the sum of 
fifty shillings upon demand. 

lyOts were assigned this year in Cochecho Marsh to the follow- 
ing persons: Anthony Emery 12 acres, the Church 12 acres. 



30 



NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE 



[164S 



and to George Walton, John Hall, John Hurd, Henry Beck, 
William Waldron, John Newgrow, Henry Langstaff, John 
Goddard, James Nute, Robert Huckins, James Rollins, William 
Furber, Richard Waldron, John Baker and Mr. Belley, 6 acres 
each. Mr. Nutter was also assigned 6 acres, which was after- 
wards exchanged with Edward Colcord for his six acre lot of 
marsh in the Great Bay. And it is further recorded that, "next 
joining these lots there is lo acres given to John Baker and the 
rest of the marsh to Richard Waldron by a town meeting, and 
all the marsh is divided." 



Town Records 
A town rate of 4d ou a pound was made igtli loth mo. on the following 
persons : 



Joseph Austin 
Charles Adams 
John Alt 
William Beard 
Jonas Binns 
John Bickford 
John Baker 
Henry Beck 
Tho. Beard 
Geo. Branson 
Tho. Canney 
Philip Chasley 
John Damme 
William Drew 
Antho. Emery 

more to pay for a bull 
William Furber 
Darby Field 
Tho. Footman 
Tho. Fursen 
John Goddard 
Ambrose Gibbons 
Matthew Gyles 
Samuel Haines 
Jo. Hall 
John Hilton 
Robt. Hetliersey 
John Hall 
Tho. Johnson 
Oliver Kent 
Henry Langstaff 
Tho. Layton 
Francis Littlefield 



lO. 
lO. 



Pd. 
91. 

31- 
69. 
76. 

42. 

115- 
92. 
40. 
62. 

30- 

84. 

78. 
104. 

70. o. 

108. 10. 

2. 10. 

81. 

81. 

60. 

16. 
129. 

86. 
194. 

65. 

79- 

46. 

60. 

42. 

40. 

70. 

75- 
156. 

60. 



10. o. 

10. o. 

o. o. 

10. o. 

o. o. 

10. o. 

10. o. 

16. o. 

o. o. 

o. o. 



10. o. 

o. o. 

o. o. 

o. o. 

10. o. 

o. o. 

10. o. 

10. o. 

12. O. 

O. O. 

O. O. 

O. O. 

O. O. 

10. O. 

o. o. 

10. o. 

15. o. 



Rate 
II. 2, 



4- 
o. 
6. 

4. 

6. 

10. 

7. 
8. 
o. 
o. 
6. 
10. 

4- 
o, 
10. 
2. 
o. 
o. 
o. 

2. 

O. 

2. 

10. 

8. 

4- 
o. 
o. 

4. 

o. 
o. 
o. 
3- 



1648] 



HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 



31 





Pd. 


s. 


d. 




Mrs. Matthews 


139- 


10. 


0. 


2. 


John Martin 


41. 


10. 


0. 




Hatevill Nutter 


78. 


6. 


0. 


I. 


James Nute 


83- 


0. 


0. 


I 


William Pomfrett 


71. 


0. 


0. 


I. 


Mr. Roberts 


69. 


10. 


0. 


I. 


William Roberts 


46. 


10. 


0. 




James Rawlins 


60. 


0. 


0, 


I. 


Jeffrey Ragg 


4. 


0. 


0. 




William Storey 


66. 


4- 


0. 


I. 


Edw. Starbuck 


45- 


10. 


0. 




Tho. Stephenson 


50- 


0. 


0. 




Mr. Seeley 


8. 


0. 


0. 




Francis Small 


10. 


0. 


0. 




George Smith 


32- 


8. 


0. 




John Ture 


35- 


0. 


0. 




Henry Tibbetts 


87. 


0. 


0. 


I. 


John Tattle 


■ 69. 


0. 


0. 


I 


Thomas Trickett 


104. 


10. 


0. 


I 


Thomsons point house 


4- 


0. 


0. 




George Webb 


46. 





0. 




George Walton 


84. 


0. 


0. 


I 


Tho. Willey 


71- 


10. 


0. 


I 


Rich. Walderne 


141. 


0. 


0. 


2 


more to pay 


— 


— 


— 




Richard Yorke 


72. 


8. 





I 



Rate 



0' 

i3- 


10. 


6 


3- 


7 


8. 


3 


8. 


3 


2. 


15 


2. 


0. 


0. 


I 


4. 


2 


I. 


15 


4- 


16 


4- 


2, 


8. 


3- 


4- 


10 


9- 


I 


8. 


9 


2. 


3 


0. 


8 


4- 


I 


4. 


12 


8. 


7 


• 4- 


3 


6. 


3 


. 4. 


3 


• 4- 


4 


0. 



The first column of figures was the estimated value of the 
estate taxed ; the second the amount of the tax. 

The rate here specified was to be paid in these commodities, 
at the time and place following : 

One fourth part in corn to be paid and brought in at the rates as 
follows, viz: Indian corn at 4s. per bushel, wheat and peas at 5s. per 
bushel, and to be paid by the loth day of the next mo. at the house of 
Wm. Pomfrett, and ye rest of the rate to be pd in by the loth day of 
March next ensuing, at the saw pitt below Tho. Canny's for one place of 
receipt for part of the said rate, and ye other to be paid in at the back 
cove, to the Constables or his assignes. All pipe staves are to be deliv- 
ered in at the rate of 3 pds 10 s o d, and hh staves at 2 pds 5 s o d. 
And for default of payment in either or any of the said payments in part 
or in all contrary to the form aforesaid, we do hereby authorize and give 
uuto the Constable full power to arrest and attach the goods of such per- 
son or persons as shall make denial. 

Witness our hands this 19th day of ye loth mo. '48. 

Ambrose Gibbons, Hatevil Nutter, 

William Pomfrett, Antho. Emery, 

Tho. Layton. 



32 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1649 

1649 

Aug. 23. — The privilege at Bellemy Bank was granted to 
William Pomfrett, Thomas I^ayton and John Dam, for the erect- 
ing of a saw mill, and also 1500 trees, oak and pine, to be 
" failed " in the swamp above the falls. Pomfrett and his part- 
ners also had liberty to fall timber in any place on the river out 
of other men's lots, paying the town 3d. for every tree. 

Sept. 19. — Oyster river falls were granted to Valentine Hill 
and Thomas Beard. 

Oct. 18. — The Court being informed of a great misdemeanor 
committed by Edward Starbuck of Dover, with profession of 
Anabaptism, for which he is to be proceeded against at the next 
Court of Assistants, if evidence can be prepared by that time, 
and it being very far for witnesses to travel to Boston at that 
season of the year, appointed Captain Thomas Wiggin and Mr. 
Edward (George?) Smith to take the testimony of the witnesses 
for the prosecution of Starbuck, whose offence, apparently, was 
the wearing of his hair beyond the statute length, " after the 
manner of ruffians and barbarous Indians," which had been 
decreed by the Court to be " sinful." 

1650 ) 

Jul}' 4. — Thomas Wiggin and Edward Starbuck received per- 
mission for erecting a saw mill at the second falls of Cochecho 
river, with accommodation of timber adjacent, paying ten 
pounds rent per year after the mill is at work ; and if they did 
not build it and set at work within one year after the first of 
July ensuing, they were to pay ten pounds. They also had 
land given them. 

Same date. — Thomas Wiggin and Simon Bradstreet were 
granted accommodation for a saw mill to be erected and set up 
by them in the River Newichwannock above the first fall, or at 
Quamphegan. Also accommodation of timber, 10 pounds rent. 

The above is recorded as follows : 

At a toweu meting heilld the foerth of the fifeth mo 50 
Giuen and granted unto Mr. Thomas Wiggieu and Edward Starbuck, 
their heires and asignes for euer acomedation for the Ereicteing or 
setting downe a sawe mill at the secont fall of Coechechae Reuer with 
acomedation of tember near adjasent as the sayd miell shall improue with 
acomedation of land as the townsmen shall see fett or such as shall be 
depeuted and for the foernamed Grant the afoersayd mr. Toomas Wig- 
gine and Edward Starbucke aer to pay to the towne of Douer the soem of 



1650] 



HISTOR Y OF DO VER, N. H. 



33 



tenn pounds starling by the year after it is sett to worke and if theay 
shall not sett up the sayd mill to worke with in one yeare the afoersayd 
parties ar to pay to the towne tenn pounds for the fierst yeare after the 
fierst July wich will be in the year 51 or likwise if theay shall desert it 
theay are to pay 10 lb for the kiping of it and not improuing it acording 
to the intent of the towne and that thear shall noe mill bee set up aboue 
theim to hinder them. 

At the same time, is given and granted mr Thomas Wiggin and his 
heres & asigns one hondred Ackers of upland ajasent to the mill at the 
second fall of Coechechaue. 

At the same time is giuen and granted to Edward Starbucke his hieres 
and asyneys 50 Ackes of upland near ajasent alsoe. 

At a Publique Towne meetinge 10 5 Mo 50 

Giuen & Granted unto Captaine Thomas Wiggins one hundred Acres 
of up Land neer adjacent to the aforementioned Mill. 



A rate was made this 
the following persons: 



Thomas Roberts 
Ralph Hall 
Thomas Beard 
A. Emery 
John Tuttle 
William Storey 
John Hall, sen. 
Elder Nutter 
John Roberts 
Anthony Nutter 
James Nute 
William Furber 
Thomas Canny 
Henry Tebbitts 
Isaac Nash 
Thomas Clayton 
Rice Howell 
John Dam 
Thomas L,ayton 
William Pomfrett 
Henry Langstaff 
Thomas Trickey 
John Martin 
John Hall, jr. 
John Laues 
Richard Keatler 
James Rollins 
Wm. Weutworth 
Joseph Austin 



Town Records 
year, for the public charges of the town, upon 



Pd. 


S. 


d. 


I. 


00. 


6. 


I. 


2. 


6. 




13- 


4. 




6. 






19. 




I. 


00. 


4. 


I. 


4- 


6. 


I. 


15- 


6. 




13- 


8. 




14. 


6. 


I. 


0. 


8. 


I. 


14. 




I. 


7- 


6. 


I. 


II. 
10. 
10, 


2. 


I. 


14. 


8. 


2. 


12. 


5- 


I. 


2. 


2. 


I. 


3- 


4- 


I. 


II. 
17- 






12. 


6. 




14. 




I. 


5- 


4. 




17- 


2. 


I. 


2. 


8. 


I. 


17- 


4- 



Richard Waldron 
Abraham Radford 
Peter Coffin 
Valentine Hill 
William Beard 
Philip Chesley 
Thomas Johnson 
John Hall 
Ambrose Gibbens 
William Roberts 
Thomas Steunson 
William Drew 
Matthew Giles 
Oliver Kentt 
Charles Adams 
Mrs. Mathes 
James Bines 
John Bickford 
Thomas Willey 
John Allt 
George Webb 
George Branson 
Philip Lewis 
William Follet 
Thomas Footman 
Richard York 
John Hill 
Goodie Feild 



Pd. 
3- 



d. 



2. 
10. 
10. 

2. 

4- 



I. 


2. 






14. 


8. 




10. 


0. 


I. 


4- 


8. 




17- 


2. 




16. 


0. 




12. 


4- 


2. 








13- 


2. 


I. 


0. 


10. 


I. 


0. 


0. 




14. 


4- 


I. 


17- 


4- 


I. 


13- 


2. 


I. 


3- 


4. 




3- 


4- 




10. 


0. 




18. 


8. 




10. 


0. 




12. 


8. 


I. 


0. 
10. 


6. 


I. 


0. 


0, 


61. 


12, 


I. 



34 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1651 

Although this list of tax-payers contains the same number 
as paid taxes in 1648 viz. 57, there is considerable variation in 
the names ; many persons had left the settlement, whose places 
had been taken by others. 



1651 

]y[a^y ^ — yYt a town meeting it was voted to raise 100 Pounds 
by the year towards the maintenance of two ministers, one to 
live at Oyster River and the other at Dover. Only one minister 
thus far had been supported, and the Oyster river folks objected 
to paying their rates on account of the distance which they had 
to travel to reach the meeting house on the Neck. The above 
rate was to meet this objection. It was also voted that the two 
ministers, when one was provided for Oyster river, should 
changeably exercise their duties, sometime at one place and 
sometime at the other, according as they shall agree. And it 
was further agreed that Mr. Maud should have his 50 pounds a 
year till the Oyster river minister was settled, after which the 
100 Pounds was to be equally divided between them. 

]yjay 16.— William Pomfrett of Dover, planter, deeded to 
William Follett and Philip IvCwis, "for the sum of 4 Pounds, 
two thirds of the acomedation of a saw mill given to me at 
Bellemies Bank Fall by the town of Dover," Aug. 23, 1649. 

J^ly g — George Walton was presented for abusing the lyord's 
day in carrying boards and going to the Isle of Shoals. 
Admonished. 

Philip Chesley, Thomas Footman, Thomas Johnson and Wil- 
liam Roberts presented for going in the time of meeting to the 
ordinary on the afternoon of the 25th of May last. Admonished. 

Thomas Footman was presented for abusing the constable, 
Thomas Beard, and fined 13 s. 4d. 

j^ly J4 _Xhe town granted Thomas Wiggin 500 acres of 
upland for a farm at the second falls of Cochecho, to be laid 
out as convenient as may be both for the inhabitants and Mr. 
Wiggin. 

Oct. 14.— The town of Dover was fined 10 Pounds for neglect- 
ing to send a Deputy to the General Court of Massachusetts at 
two successive sessions. Upon the request of Mr. Maud the 
fine was ' ' respited and not to be levied till the next Court of 
Election, that the Court may judge of Dover's answer." 



1652] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 35 

1652 

Some difficulties having arisen between the grantees of the 
different mill privileges, in consequence of disputed bound- 
aries, the town appointed Ambrose Gibbons and Elder Nutter 
to join with the selectmen in fixing the bounds of the several 
grants, by whom the matter was amicably settled. 

Aug. 8.— James Nute was presented for abusing the Town 
Clerk in saying that " he was a deceitful man and had a deceit- 
ful heart." Thomas Fursen was presented for over much 
drinking. 

Major Waldron, who had extensive grants covering all the 
lower falls of the Cochecho, with much timber, in consideration 
thereof, besides a rent of 12 Pounds per year in boards or plank, 
bound himself, his heirs and administrators, to erect a Meeting 
House upon the hill near Elder Nutter's, the dimensions of 
which were to be forty foot long, twenty six feet wide, sixteen 
foot stud, with six windows, two doors fit for such a house, with 
a " tite " covering, and to plank all the walls, with glass and 
nails for it, the whole to be finished "betwixt this and April 
next come twelve month, which will be in the year 1654." 

This was of course the second meeting house, though we 
have no record of the building of the first, except the statement 
of Dr. Belknap that " on the most inviting part of this eminence 
they built a meeting house," &c. That must have been erected 
soon after the arrival of Mr. Eeveridge in 1633. Whether it 
stood upon the site of the one built by Major Waldron appears 
to be uncertain, though it has generally been supposed that it 
did. The entrenchment or fort which was built around the 
second house was not constructed until 1667, as will be seen by 
referring to the record of that year. From the fact that no ref- 
erence is made to the old meeting house, in this vote for build- 
ing the new one, the inference is that it did not stand in the 
same place where the new one was to be built, viz. " upon the 
hill near Elder Nutter's." Had it been so, it is reasonable to 
conclude the fact would have been mentioned. 

Fresh Creek mill privilege was granted to William Furber, 
William Wentworth, Henry Eangster and Thomas Canney, at a 
rate of six Pounds for the wood, besides ten shilling for every 
such mast as they make use of. 

Eittle John's Creek privilege was given to Joseph Austin, at 



36 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1652 

a rent of 6 Pounds for the timber he needs, and lo shillings for 
every tree above 24 inches through cut for masts. 

(Little John's Creek crosses the road to Dover Neck.) 

The Quamphegan falls privilege was confirmed to Capt, 
Thomas Wiggins and Simon Bradstreet, with the trees on land 
a couple of miles long and one mile broad. 10 Pounds rent. 

Valentine Hill, located at Oyster river, had a grant of timber 
and land half a mile to the eastward of Thomas Johnson's creek, 
at a rent of 10 Pounds. Mr. Hill was also reminded that he 
had "permission to build mills at Lamprey river, but has not 
yet done it." 

The inhabitants on the Neck were granted ' ' all the land 
below the Town which is called the swamp, and so to Hilton's 
point, for to make an ox pasture." Also, the land that lieth 
waste on the west side of the Neck to make them a calves' pas- 
ture from the lot of John Hall and Philip Lewis to the water 
side, to be fenced in by them. 

Val. Hill and Richard Waldron, in behalf of the town, com- 
plained to the Court that ' ' some we have formerly betrusted 
and employed at the General Courts have neglected wht we 
betrusted themwith, among other things in a special manner the 
recording of our township according to the grant of said court." 
They therefore craved the favor that " the said limits according 
to our grant may be confirmed to us." And for the settling of 
the rights and bounds of the town the Court was asked to " con- 
sider these things ": 

I. A purchase from the Indians of Lampereel river 1635. 

2. Possession and use of it by planting, fishing, and felling of timber. 

3. When taken into the Government of the Bay the agreement that 
they should enjoy all such lawful liberties of fishing, planting and fell- 
ing of timber as formerly. 4. The liberty granted to Dover which other 
towns have. 5. The bounds of Dover as settled by commissioners 
appointed for that purpose, upon which the town had granted several 
properties. 6. The bounds of Lampereel river as by consent of Dover 
and Exeter men, a neck of land being reserved to Exeter on the north 
side. 7. The distance from the river to each town being about six 
miles. 8. Dover cannot be enlarged as Exeter may, for the river 
between Kittery and Dover bounds them northward, and Lampereel 
river and Exeter bounds them southward, and the commissioners have 
bound them eastward and southward. 9. Exeter besides the bounds 
towards Lampereel river may be enlarged westward and southward. 
10. Between Lampereel river and Oyster river Dover had settled a 
ministry, which ere long is like to be a town of itself, in respect of the 
accommodation of Lampereel river, it being but about 3 miles between 



1654] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 37 

the two rivers, ii. That Exeter purchased of the Indians in 1638, and 
began to be a town after they submitted to the Bay in 1644 with the same 
conditions as other towns, and that Dover's former rights were con- 
firmed to them before that time. 

7th mo. 8th. — A committee consisting of William Payne, 
Samuel Winslow and Matthew Bo3'se was appointed by the 
General Court to lay out the bounds of Dover, who reported 
' ' that the utmost bound on the west is a creek on the east side 
of Lamperill river, the next creek in the river, and from the end 
of that creek to L,amperill river first fall, and so from the first 
fall on a west and by north line six miles from Newichannick 
first fall on a north and south line four miles from a creek next 
below Thomas Canney's house to a certain cove near the mouth 
of the Great Bay called the Hogsty cove, and all the marsh and 
meadow ground lying and butting on the Great Bay, with con- 
venient upland to set their hay." 

Oct. 10. — It was ordered that William Furber should be 
steward of the town for the coming year, to receive all such 
rents as should become due, with full power to collect by dis- 
tress all such sums as were not paid on demand. 

Oct. 19. — The General Court ordered that the northern 
bounds of Dover should extend from the first fall of Newiche- 
wannick river upon a north and by west line four miles. 

The freemen of Dover had increased to that number that they 
were authorized to send two Deputies to the General Court, 
instead of one as heretofore. 

5: 10 mo (16)52. 

Giuen »& granted unto Mr. Richard Walderne his Heires 
Executors & Assignes the Accommodations of the north side of 
Cocheche second falls with the Accommedations of Timber, all 
that is aboue the Grant of Captaine Wiggins & Elder Starbucke. 

1654 

Commissioners were appointed this year to "lay out the 
dividing bounds" between Dover and Kittery, whose decision 
follows : 

Whereas we whose names are here under written are made choyce of 
by the towns of Dover and Kittery to lay out ye Deviding bounds 
between ye said Towns we have mutually concluded and agreed that the 
great River at Newichawanuk shall be and remain the deviding bound 
between ye aforsd Towns, the one half of ye sd River to appertain and 
belong unto ye Town of Dover on the South and ye other half unto ye 
Town of Kittery on ye North. 



38 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1655 

In confirmation hereof we have interchangal)ly set to our hands this 

fourth of Aprill 1654. 

Nic Shapleigh 

A true copie taken ye 13th Richard Waldron 

day of Aprill 1654 Edward Starbuck 

by me Nicholas ffrost 

Humphrey Chadborn Richard Nason 

Town Claicus William Ffurber 

(Frost and Nason "set their hands" to the document by their marks.) 

At the reqtiest of the town lyieut. Pomfret was appointed by 
the Court to join in marriage such as should be published 
according to law. 

The town again complained of infringements upon its bound- 
aries, and asked the protection of the Court, especially that 
some order might be taken to restrain such as disturbed and 
molested them in their habitations, claiming that they were 
trespassing upon their lands and that they must pay rent for 
cutting grass, timber, &c. 

1655 

pgb_ j5_ — por the "comfortable maintenance of the ministry" 
of Dover and Oyster river, it was agreed that " all the rent of 
the saw mills shall be set apart into a town stock, with two 
pence upon the pound to be rated upon the estates of all the 
inhabitants, and all such estates so appointed are to be put 
into the hands of any that shall be chosen Treasurer by the 
said town to receive the same, which sum that hath respect to 
the rate is to be paid in money, beaver, beef, pork, wheat, peas, 
mault, butter, cheese, in one or any of these. This order to 
take place the 25th of June next and to continue one whole 
year." 

On the Exeter records is found the following curious inquest 
held in Dover at this time. 

The names of the Jury panneld Coroners Inquest upon the body of 
Thomas Tuttell, the sonne of John Tuttell of Dover, the first month, 
1655, viz: Thomas Roberts, Thomas Laiton, John Hall, William Furber, 
John Roberts, Anthony Nutter, Thomas Beasel, Job Clements, William 
Story, James Newett, Joseph Austin, Jeremy Tibbetts. Wee whose 
names are subscribed do testifie how wee found Thomas Tuttell, the son 
of John Tuttell, by the stump of a tree which he had newly fallin upon 
another tree rebounding back and fell upon him which was the cause of 
his death as wee consider; this was found the last day of the last March, 

1654. 

A true coppie from the original by me, 

Renald Fernald. 



1656] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 39 

1656 

Jan. 10. — It was agreed that there shall be no more grants of 
lands made either to any of the present inhabitants or to any 
others until all the grants that are already made be laid out and 
bounded, and likewise that commonage be laid out to all our 
inhabitants in our several respective places. Also that no 
further grants of land shall be made to any but by the 
consent of every inhabitant, reserving power for the present 
selectmen till the last of February next to accommodate any 
inhabitant further as in their wisdom they see meet if any shall 
desire it, which time being expired the present acts are hereby 
ratified and confirmed. 

The same day the town confirms all previous grants and 
further agreed that "whereas there are several grants of land 
made by the town to the inhabitants of which some are in con- 
troversy," to appoint Elder Wentworth, John Heard, John 
Bickford, William Furber and Left. Hall to "bound any of the 
lands which are or shall be in controversy betwixt us and any 
of our inhabitants or neighbors," engaging to "rest satisfied 
with their decision whether it be more or less than our grants 
provide, the persons acting herein to be upon their oaths to lay 
it out according to every man's grant as near as they can to their 
best judgment and understanding, which being done by them 
or any three of them aforementioned shall stand for a current 
act," and they were to continue in this service till others were 
chosen. 

Jan. 30. — The town voted to build a house at Oyster river, 
near the meeting house, for the use of the minister, of the fol- 
lowing dimensions, viz: 36 feet long, 10 feet wide, 12 feet in the 
wall, with two chimnies, to be suitably finished. 

June 27. — James Rollins was presented for neglecting to 
attend meeting, and was admonished and ordered to pay the 
fees of the court, 2 shillings and 6 pence. 

Nov. 14. — The people in arrears as to saw mill rents are 
ordered to settle up. 

Dec. 4. — Mr. Valentine Hill and "one or two more," ap- 
pointed a committee to run the line between Dover and Exeter. 
Mr. Hill also had permission to turn part of the water of Lam- 
pereel River into Oyster river for the supply of his mills. 

The town again petitions to be protected in their rights 
against certain claims and divisions of patents grounded upon 



40 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1657 

some former act of the Court, which disenabled them from their 
continued upholding of the ministry, for which by their utmost 
endeavors they had raised 170 Pounds per annum and "upon 
which the welfare of society, whether ecclesiastical or political, 
doth much depend." 

1657 

Jan. 30. — It was ordered that the Deputy chosen to go to the 
General Court should have 30 shillings for his charges going 
and coming and his diet borne by the town during his attend- 
ance, and 2 shillings and 6 pence per day for his time. Which 
order was to stand till the town see cause to alter it. 

March 30. — John Hall, Thomas Footman and Peter Coffin 
were chosen to call the townsmen to account for all accounts 
belonging to the town for the time past, to stand till others are 
chosen, and to notify the inhabitants thereof at a public town 
meeting. 

Mr. Valentine Hill rendered his account for "Deputy 
charges," as follows : 

For himself 7 times 21 weeks to the General Court 
" his charges in going to and again 2 times in the spring 
" 6 times at the fall 
" his horse 7 voyages 
" his horse charges at the spring 
" his horse charges at the fall 
" charges in going 3 times about Mr. Flecher 
" charges about him and his bringing 
" extraordinary charges in expense in Boston 
" charges in raising the meeting house at Oyster river 
" men's hire for underpinning the meeting house 

51- 5. 6. 

A tax of 6d upon a Pound was assessed this year to be paid 
in provisions, merchantable pipe-staves, and hogshead staves, 
boards and fat cattle, for the clearing of all the engagements of 
the town, at the prices following : pipe- staves 4 Pd per M, hogs- 
head staves 2 Pd 10 s per M, boards at 50s, wheat 5 s per 
bushel, pease at 4 s, beef 2 i/2d per lb, pork 3 1/2 d, Indian corn 
4 s per bushel. To be delivered at Bloody Point, Sandy Point, 
and the Back Cove, and at John Bickford's at Oyster river. 
Where any man was "defective" the constable had power 
to take the tax by distress. 

Charles Buckner was chosen by vote a schoolmaster for the 



Pd. 


s. 


d. 


21. 


00. 


00. 


6. 


00. 


00. 


4- 


10. 


00. 


7. 


00. 


00. 


0. 


14. 


00. 


I. 


04. 


06. 


3- 


GO. 


00. 


2. 


00. 


00. 


4- 


00. 


00. 




17- 


00. 


I. 


05- 


00. 



1657] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 41 

town, and all tradesmen were exempted from paying rates for 
their trade, " for the rate now past." 

The following agreement between Dover and Kxeter in rela- 
tion to boundaries was made this year. 

At a meeting at Exeter between certain men of Dover and others of 
Exeter deputed by the Towns for the settling of the bounds between the 
towns, it was concluded by them whose names are here under written, 
that the west and by north line from the lower falls of Lampereel river 
running up into the country six miles shall stand, with these considera- 
tions following, to say, that the lower falls of Puscassicke with the mill 
thereon shall belong to Exeter with accommodation of timber belonging 
thereto, being a mile and a quarter from the mill towards the upper fall 
within the line, and the neck of land possessed by John Godard, except- 
ing the marsh possessed at present by Exeter men, to belong to Dover. 
And for the land within the line with the rest of the timber to belong to 
Dover, provided that Exeter shall have free commonage for their cattle 
upon the same land. And also the owners of the mill shall have the 
neck of land on the east side of Puscassicke river down to Lampreel 
river (only six pole by the river side excepted.) And also convenient 
cartways from the upper fall to the lower fall of the said river, as also 
the owners of the mills, to say, Mr. Thomas Kemball, William Hilton 
and Robert Smart shall have sixty acres of land apiece for tillage to lie 
adjacent to their mill on the norwest side of the said river. To hold and 
to have the said land to them and their heirs and assigns forever without 
paying any rates to Dover either for the mill or the said lands. 

Witness our hands the 14th of April, 1657. 

Edward Hilton, 

Val: Hill, 

John Bickford, sen. 

John Gillman, 

Wlliam Furber. 

May 6. — Capt. Rich. Walden, a deputy for Dover, having 
urgent occasion, upon his request is dismist the Court. {Mass. 
Records.) 

May 15. — Bryan Pendleton and Peter Coffin, a committee 
appointed by the court, laid out 200 acres of land for Mr. 
Edward Rawson, secretary, 100 acres of which were on the east 
side of Quochecho river, and 100 on the west side, a little below 
the Indian path, the said path being about three miles above 
Cofnn's house. 

June 17. — It was ordered that whoever should kill a wolf or 
wolves, whether English or Indian, within the town should have 
for so doing four pounds for every wolf killed, the head to be 
brought to the meeting house on Dover Neck or delivered to 
the constable and be by him publicly declared. 

Same date. — It is recorded that " Mr. Fletcher and the town 



42 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1657 

having had some discourse whether he will leave them, he will- 
ingly manifested that he was not minded to stay any longer but 
to prepare himself for old England, and could not justly lay any 
blame upon the town." 

Mr. Fletcher was the minister at Oyster river, where he seems 
to have been settled in 1656, though no distinct record appears 
to have been made of the fact. The meeting house was built 
there in 1655 and the minister's house as already stated in 1656. 
His departure appears to have had something to do with the 
difficulties which were constantly existing between Oyster River 
and Dover Neck. For quite a number of years after his de- 
parture the Oyster River folks refused to pay "rates" for the 
support of the ministry. 

August — It is recorded that " the propositions of Mr. Rayner 
in his writing bearing date the i8th of the 4th mo. 1657, con- 
cerning his yearly allowance from the town is granted and 
accepted upon the terms therein he hath expressed himself." 

Mr. Rayner's "terms " are not distinctly stated in the records 
under this date, but it may be inferred from subsequent pro- 
ceedings that he claimed an addition to his salary of 50 Pounds 
from the fact that Oyster River was now without a minister, and 
it was ordered that the inhabitants there should contribute to 
the support of the minister on the Neck whenever they were with- 
out one above four months, the Neck people to "do the like by 
them in the like case." 

Oct. 21. — It was ordered that all the inhabitants should have 
a respect to the order made concerning the falling of timber, 
which was that no man should fall above five trees for clapboards 
or pipe staves before he had wrought theui up into those articles. 
Whoever violated this order should be liable to the penalties 
before specified, and Joseph Austin was chosen for Dover Neck 
and Thomas Footman for Oyster River to see that the order was 
enforced, being allowed one half of the fines which were in- 
curred. Any other inhabitant who should inform and prove 
violations of the order should have the like part of the fines. 

Thomas Crawlie, presented for living idle in his calling, was 
admonished with 2s 6d fees. Elizabeth Gils, presented for 
calling John Alt, constable, "constable Roge," was admonished 
with 2 s 6 d fees. 



1658] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 43 

1658 

Feb. 5. — It was agreed that 20 Pounds per annum should be 
raised for the maintenance of a schoohnaster for teaching all the 
children of the town, he having the privilege of all strangers out 
of the town ; reading, writing, latin and casting accounts to be 
taught as the parents should require. 

Feb. 19. — The town instructed Capt. Richard Waldron, 
Deputy to the General Court, not to consent to the passage of 
an}' act infringing upon their privileges concerning customs or 
the Beaver trade, or any privileges which formerly they had 
enjoyed. He was to enter his dissent to all such acts as took 
away their rights and was to bring home all such laws as were 
made as other Deputies do. 

Same date. — It was "voted by the inhabitants in general a 
second time, that the first engagement and promise of the town 
unto Mr. Rayner of 120 Pounds yearly is ratified and confirmed 
to be made good unto him, only with annexing thereto such 
provisions and limitations as will stand with the true meaning 
thereof and may secure the town from such burthens and pres- 
sures as are feared to come upon them thereby." 

These " provisions and limitations " were : — 

1st. — That " he accept of the ministry and ofJfice in this church and 
continue therein according to the rule of God's word." 

2d. — That "men's estates generally in the town be not observably 
decayed nor the rents belonging to the town impaired, neither the one 
or the other, from what they are in the town's present undertaking for 
120 Pounds yearly, but if so be the town be impaired and decayed at any 
time in their estates and rents, then accordingly for such time and no 
longer, the yearly stipend may by the town be lowered, only if thereby 
the maintenance fall below 100 Pounds yearly without probability of its 
rising afterwards, and that he cannot therewith comfortably carry on 
family occasions, he may make use of some other help for his comfort- 
able continuance here, or removing to some other place without offence." 

3d. — " In case it be testified to him by the town or the major part 
thereof that their expenses for this or that present year are above what 
they are usually in respect to more than ordinary or urgent occasions, 
and that the use of their estates is not such as they can comfortably bear 
it and yet make good the sum agreed upon, in such case the town may 
be at liberty to take off from the same sum with respect to such expenses 
for the present time as may seem meet to them, provided it be not above 
20 Pounds per annum." 

At a meeting of the Selectmen ye 26: 2 mo. 58. 

It is agreed upon that the Rate that was made for the Cleeringe of the 
Towne debts shall goe forthwith to be leued & gathered in by the Con- 
stables, or whome the select men shall depute. 



44 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1658 

2ily. that if in Case it doth aappeae ye forty pounds wch is to be 
paid for the agreement with the owners be made appear to belouge to 
the propriators of the Marshes, although it now be paid by the whole 
Towne, thet then the propriators of the Marshes shell pay the said forty 
pounds backe againe to the Towne. 

3dly. that Wee the Selectmen do make Choyce of Leiftenant Hall, 
& Robert Burnam to put up a petition to the next Courte at Poachmouth 
for their Solution Concerning Rateinge of Saw Mills, & other visible 
estates belonginge thereunto. 

4thly. If any of the inhabitants doe finde the marshes to be over 
Rated, they may repaire to the present select men, or any three of them, 
upon just Cause they shall haue Relief, 8: likewise if it be found that 
any of our Inhabitants be not Rated accordinge to their Reall & visible 
estates, as they were at the makinge of the Rates, they are to be brought 
into the Rate now, and that the persons whome this Order concerneth 
shell appear at Dover at Liefenant Halls house upon ye loth of May at 
nine of the clock in the morninge. 

At the same time granted unto Thomas Turner & William Hilton 
Liberty to gather seauenty Loade of pine knotts upon the Commons 
upon the Neck of Lande betweene Oyster & the Backe Riuer, provided 
they come not into any mans grants, & in Consideration of the said 
Grant the foresaid Thomas and William haue Ingaged themselves to pay 
unto Thomas Canny the summ of three pounds tenn shillings between 
the date hereof & the nine and twentyeth of September next. 

At the same time giuen Lieftenant Hall order to receiue the Rents of 
the Mills & the Arrearges of Masts due to the Towne, & to pay where, 
the Towne is Indebted. 

Nov. lo. — It was voted that the charges for " fitting the two 
meeting houses of Dover and Oyster River," should be borne 
by each place respectively, each place taking care of its own 
house ; an indication that the two parishes, as they could no 
longer agree, had agreed to disagree. 

Dec. 21. — It was voted that the meeting house on Dover 

Neck be underpinned, and catted and sealed with boards, a 

pulpit and seats convenient be made, and a bell purchased, to be 

paid for by a rate upon each man's estate according to the law 

of the country. 

Town Records 

A Rate maed the 12th 8th ( 16)58 for mr Reyner his preuetione 



Isake nash 





12 


3 


Tho Downes 





8 


II 


Job Clements 


I 


9 


I 


Mr. Roberds 





7 


i>^ 


William Pomfrett 





8 


9 


Tho Beard 


I 


12 


8 


Tho lay ton 


2 


12 


6 


John Hall Decon 





16 





John Dam sinyer 


I 


II 


yA 


John Tuttell 





II 


9 


John Dam Juner 





II 


I 


left Hall 





13 


^}i 


William Storey 





16 


9 


Elder nutter 


I 


8 


i>^ 


Josephf Astin 


I 


5 


II 


Tho Caney 


I 


16 


2 



1659] 



HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 



45 



John Roberds 


I 


lO 


ID 


John Hilton 


o 


7 


2 


Ralphf Twomly 


o 


9 


4 


James Nutt 


o 


12 


6 


Jeremy Tebetts 





12 


o)i 


Henrey Tebetts 


I 


i6 


2 


Tho nocke 


o 


8 


7 
Blo. 


William Tomson 
Poynt 


o 


5 


O 


James Rallins 


o 


12 


6 


Richard Catter 


I 


I 


6 


Tho Trickey 


I 


O 


4 


John Bickford 


o 


13 


ID 


Henry Lankster 


r 


II 


6 


William ffurber 


I 


4 


IlK 


Antoney nutter 


I 


5 


I 


Tho Roberds 


o 


12 


6 


Michiell Brane 


o 


6 


o 
















Cochechae 








Edward Starbuck 


I 


3 


^% 


Capt Wiggin 


1 


i6 


8 


Fetter Coffin 


o 


II 


8 


Mr Broughton 


o 


i6 


8 


Henrey hobes 


o 


5 


o 


Phelep Cromwell 


o 


6 


4 


Richard Sloper 


o 


I 


8 


Nathanell Starbuck 


o 


6 


8 


Tho Hanson 


o 


i8 


o 


Edward Paterson 


o 


5 


o 


Ickeabod Shiffilld 


o 


5 


o 


William Shiffilld 


o 


9 


o 


Roberd Jones 


o 


19 


8 


Campt. walldern 


3 


3 


4 


Charll Buckner 


o 


5 


O 


Gorge Goldwier 


I 


5 


2 


John heard 


I 


9 


4>^ 


Richard Otes 


o 


15 


2 


paid in bef 


I 


8 


ii;^ 


John Curtes 


o 


5 


2 


John louring 


o 


5 


o 


William haket 


o 


5 


o 


Elder Wentworth 


I 


4 


ID 


William loue 


o 


5 


4 


James Grant 


o 


8 


4 


henrey magoune 


o 


5 


2 


Barthellme lippincott 


o 


5 


o 


William ffollett 


9 
48 


3 
19 


4* 










♦Evidently a 


mistake. 





1659 

March 26. — Ordered that all waste land upon the Neck and 
at Back river shall be held in common for our cattle. 

April 4. — David Leudecoes,? Ed I^ine, John Hance and 
Humfrey Varney received as inhabitants. 

April 6. — It was voted that all inhabitants who had taken the 
oath of fidelity should " have their free vote " in the choice of 
selectmen and all other town officers, and " that the former act 
of the choice of selectmen made the 17th 4th mo '57 in point of 
time is nullified and of no effect." John Hall, " Deacon," was 
chosen town clerk, and the selectmen were authorized to receive 
the town books from the former clerk and deliver them to the 
new clerk "after he hath taken his oath." A new clerk 
appears to have been chosen because " the court would not give 
the then chosen clerk his oath." The selectmen also had power 
to " furnish the town's house that Mr. Rayner liveth in accord- 



46 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1659 

ing to covenant and to sell the said house to Mr. Rayner or 
any other man as they see cause." 

April 13. — Isaac Stokes and John Wingate received as 
inhabitants. 

April 28. — The Jury presented the Town of Dover for the 
" wayes " between Hilton's point and Cochecho, and enjoined 
them to mend the same before the next Court, on penalty of 5 
Pounds and fees. They were also notified to ' ' mend their 
wayes" between Oyster River Point and Mr, Hill's mill, and 
at the head of Thomas Johnson's creek. 

With a due regard for the public welfare the Court also pre- 
sented all the ordinaries of Dover and Portsmouth for the crime 
of selling wine at 8s and rum at i6s per gallon. They also regu- 
lated the time in which and the persons to whom liquor should 
be sold, on " hearing of this suffering of persons to continue 
drinking to excess, as also unto drunkenness, quarreling and 
fighting," &c. and " accounting it their duty by all due means 
to prevent the like abuses for the future," did order that "hence- 
forth no Wine Tavern shall either directly or indirectly permit 
or suffer any person to have any wine on the Sabbath Day, 
neither shall they at any time sell any wine for more than iSd a 
quart, on penalty or forfeiture of the licenses, and 5s a pint for 
selling any on the Sabbath day, or on evenings of the Sabbath, 
excepting only to fishermen if they lodge at their houses on 
Saturday night, half a pint a man, or to sick persons; " and no 
ordinary or house of common entertainment was to sell any 
strong liquor on any pretence whatever. The Court made a 
further order that henceforth only one Wine Tavern should be 
licensed at Dover. 

July 7 — It is recorded that "at a public town meeting the 
inhabitants of Oyster river do deny (refuse) to give in a list of 
their estates for the provision rate as formerly the}' have done." 
This rate was for the support of the minister and the refusal of 
the Oyster river people to contribute to it soon led to a decree 
that the Townsmen (selectmen) should "make distress upon 
them for the rents and revenues and rates due to the town since 
Mr. Fletcher went away and the town is to bear them out." 

Oct. 10. — Ordered that the place called Huckleberry hill, 
which was laid out for a sheep pasture, be a public training 
place for the township of Dover. 

With a due regard to the proprieties of life the authorities 
convicted and punished the following persons for not " going to 



1659] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 47 

meeting:" William Roberts of Oyster River, who had been 
absent 28 Sundays. William Williams, sen. 8 days. William 
Follett, 16 days. James Smith, 14 days, and one day " con f est 
to have been at a Quaker meeting," for which he was fined 10 
shillings. John Goddard, 4 days and twice at the Quakers. 
Thomas Roberts, 13 days. James Nute, sen. and wife and son, 
26 days, "and for entertaining Quakers 4 hours in one day," 
he was fined 40 shillings an hour, "according to law." 
Humphrey Varney " pleaded non-conviction " for his absences, 
" unto whom the law was this day read and he admonished." 
Mary Hanson, 13 days. Richard Oates, wife and servant maid, 
13 days. Robert Burnura who had been to Strawberry Bank to 
meeting and explained the matter which "shewed him to the 
Court not to be obstinate." Jellian Pinkham, 13 days. Her 
husband refused to pay the fine, which was five shillings per 
day in each case, and she was adjudged to be set in the stocks 
one hour. 

Oyster Riuer Prouition Rate rnaed the 22: 9: (16)59. 

the great Rate 



Mr. Hill 


Pd 
2. 


s 
12. 


d 

8. 


Thomes umfirie the stiller 


0. 


8. 


4- 


John meader 


0. 


13- 


4. 


William Graues 


0. 


5- 


0. 


Einain lonhn Daues 


0. 


15- 


0. 


Juner william willyams 


0. 


8. 


0. 


James Bunker 


0. 


8. 


0. 


Will follett 


I. 


0. 


0. 


Thomes Jonson 


0. 


13- 


4- 


Phellep Chesley 


I. 


12. 


8. 


Roberd Junkes 


0. 


8. 


4- 


James Jackson 


0. 


5- 


0. 


Walter Jackson 


0. 


5- 


0. 


William Beard 


2. 


7- 


8. 


John woodman 


0. 


IS- 


0. 


Patrick Jemeson 


0. 


IS- 


0. 


Henrey Browne 


0. 


10. 


0. 


Thomes Dowty 


0. 


10. 


0. 


James Oer 


0. 


10. 


0. 


James medellman 


0. 


10. 


0. 


Edward Arwin 


0. 


10. 


0. 


John Barber 


0. 


5- 


0. 


Edward Patterson 


0. 


10. 


0. 


Roberd Bernom 


I. 


6. 


8. 


william Pitman 


0. 


10. 


0. 


William Roberd s 


0. 


10, 


0, 



Pd 


s 


d 


5- 


5- 


4. 


0. 


16. 


8. 


I. 


7- 


4- 


0. 


10. 


0. 


I. 


10. 


0. 


0. 


16. 


0. 


0. 


16. 


0. 


2. 


0. 


0. 


I. 


6. 


8. 


3- 


5- 


4- 


0. 


16. 


8. 


0. 


10. 


0. 


0. 


10. 


0. 


4- 


15- 


4- 


I. 


10. 


0. 


I. 


10. 


0. 


I. 


0. 


0. 


I. 


0. 


0. 


I. 


0. 


0. 


I. 


0. 


0. 


I. 


0. 


0. 


0. 


10. 


0. 


I. 


0. 


0. 


2. 


13- 


4. 


I. 


0. 


0. 


I. 


0. 


0. 



48 



NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE 



[1660 



William Willyams sin 


I. 


5- 


8. 


2. 


II. 


4- 


Thomes Steuenson 


o. 


13- 


4- 


I. 


6. 


8. 


William Drew 


o. 


II. 


8. 


I. 


4- 


4. 


Rice howell 


o. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


10. 


0. 


Joseph filld 


o. 


8. 


4- 


0. 


16. 


8. 


Mathew Gills 


I. 


6. 


8. 


2. 


13- 


4- 




24. 


I. 


6. 


47- 


6. 


0. 


mathew willyams 


0. 


10. 


6. 


I. 


I. 


0. 


Beniamen mathews 


I. 


5- 


0. 


2. 


10. 


0. 


Charlls Adames 


0. 


13- 


0. 


I. 


6. 


8. 


John Bickford 


I. 


6. 


8. 


2. 


13- 


4- 


Thomes welley 


0. 


18. 


4- 


I. 


16. 


8. 


John Allt 


0. 


19. 


10. 


I, 


19. 


8. 


Richard Braye 


0. 


6. 


10. 


0. 


13- 


8. 


John Hill 


0. 


6. 


8. 


0. 


13- 


4- 


Thomas footman 


I. 


3- 


4. 


2. 


6. 


8. 


Richard yorke 


0. 


19- 


4- 


I. 


iS. 


8. 


John martin 


0. 


18. 


0. 


I. 


16. 


0. 


John Godder 


I. 


14. 


8. 


3- 


9- 


4- 


Beniamen Hull 


0. 


8. 


4- 


0. 


16. 


S. 


John Hilton 


0. 


6. 


8. 


0. 


13- 


4- 


James Nutt Juner 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


10. 


0. 


Olleuer Kent 


0. 


8. 


4- 


0. 


j6. 


8. 


John hance 


0. 


5- 


0, 


0. 


10. 


0. 


John Dauill 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


10. 


0. 


Roberd Hussey 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


10. 


0. 


William Risbey (Risley?) 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


10. 


0. 


Thomas Ginu (Green?) 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


10. 


0. 


Steuen ye (westinman?) 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


10. 


0. 


Will Jones 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


10. 


0. 




14. 


0. 


2. 


28. 


II. 


4- 



1660 

March 25. — The Deputy to the General Court was instructed : 
ist. To endeavor to procure for the town a " commission court 
as high as Portsmouth." 2d. To "take care to reverse the 
order that Capt. Pembellton hath concerning the frosen man." 
3d. To "stand to maintain our privileges concerning military 
affairs, that we may not be drawn out of our county of Dover 
and Portsmouth, according to our first agreement." 4th. To 
" desire the solution of the General Court concerning the choice 
of town officers, whether or no all that have taken the oath of 
fidelity have liberty to choose." 5th. To " stand to maintain 
our privileges by virtue of our articles of agreement, and to 
bring the proceedings of the Court that concern us, in writing." 



1660] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 49 

The following receipt given by Rev. Mr. Rayner shows that 
he had some difficulty in collecting his dues, probably on 
account of the " secession " of the Oyster river folks. 

" Mr. Rayner his receipt, Dover 12-4-60. 

Rec. of the treasurer and selectmen for the town of Dover for the 
three first years of my abode there and being exercised there in way of 
ministry the whole salary for the said years, viz. six score pounds per 
annum. Also, received of the selectmen for the town the fourth year 
towards the salary there of the sum of four score and nine pounds, eight 
shillings and six pence. I say received towards the fourth year's salary 
89-8-6, the rest of the salary for the aforesaid fourth year remains due to 
me from the town at the date hereof, neither is there any account made 
between me and the selectmen for the fifth year which begins in July or 
thereabouts 1659 ^^^ ends the same time of the year 1660, either as con- 
cerning the provision rate or any part of the salary for the said year. 

Witness my hand, John Rayner." 

April 13. — It was voted hereafter in the choice of Prudential 
men that two should be at the Neck and one in every respective 
place of the town. 

After this vote five Prudential men were chosen, two upon the 
Neck, and one each for Cochecho, Oyster River, and Bloody 
Point. Before this, no particular numbers appear to have been 
chosen, sometimes but two, both of which probably were from 
the Neck. Robert Burnham and twelve other inhabitants of 
Oyster river entered their protest against this vote. 

Same date. — Richard Waldron sold to Richard Russell of 
Charlestown, for 120 Pounds, one fourth of a saw mill at Belle- 
mies Bank which he had lately purchased of Philip I^ewis, 
Thomas Bird and Thomas Scruton, with timber, &c. On Nov. 
26, Waldron leased the other three fourths of the same mill to 
Philip Cromwell. 

July 17. — Another effort was made to reconcile the differences 
between Dover Neck and Oyster River in relation to the support 
of the ministry, as appears by the following document on 
record : 

We whose names are hereunder written being chosen by the Town of 
Dover are appointed by their order to hear and determine all such differ- 
ences as appear betwixt the inhabitants of the two thirds of the Town of 
Dover and the one third of the town in Oyster River, do conclude at 
present as foUoweth, that is to say : 

ily. That from the first of April 1657 and so forward from year to 
year it is hereby mutually agreed upon that the neighborhood of Oyster 
River shall enjoy full right and interest of twenty pounds out of the 
rents of the town to be from Lamperill River grant rent performed, as 
also two penny rate rising from within themselves, both which twenty 



50 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1661 

pounds and two penny rate is for the supply of the ministry within them- 
selves and to be ordered by themselves for the end expressed. 

2ly. It is agreed and determined that the said neighborhood shall 
have liberty from time to time to make choice of a ministrey for their 
accommodation, provided that they have the approbation of the said 
town or any three adjacent Elders. 

3ly. That in case the neighborhood of Oyster River shall be without 
a ministrey above four months they shall return the twenty pounds 
abovesaid unto the common treasury with proportionable contribution, 
they of Dover doing the like to them in proportion in the like case, and 
this mutually to be done so long as there is defects of either side. 

4ly. It is ordered for the ministrey of Dover Neck there is set apart 
fifty five pounds of town rents with the two-penny rate upon all the 
inhabitants, except Oyster River is set apart for the ministre}' there, 
and in case this do not make up the salary, then to be made up by a rate 
upon the said inhabitants, Bloody Point excepted only paying the two 
penny rate. 

sly. It is ordered for the supply of Cochecho there is set apart fifteen 
pounds of town rents for the ministrey there in the winter season. 

61y. It is agreed that the house of Mr. Valentine Hill which is his 
now dwelling house at Rocky Point shall be within the line of division 
to Oyster River. 

Witness our hands this 17th of July 1660. 

Valentine Hill, Richard Waldron, 

William Weutworth, Ralph Hall, 

Richard Otis, William Furber, 

John Davis, Robert Burnham, 

William Williams, William Roberts. 

At the same time ordered by the town that there shall be 
forthwith a rate made of a hundred pounds for fitting up the 
meeting house on Dover Neck. 



1661 

April 5. — Captain Richard Waldron and Mr. Edward Hilton 
were chosen " Associates for the Court," and Elder Nutter, 
Williain Pomfrett and John Dam, senior, ' ' Commissioners for 
small cases." Other town officers were chosen and Thomas 
Hanson and Thomas Humphreys took the oath of fidelity. 

The following inhabitants had right of commonage to the ox 
pasture and calves pasture on Dover Neck, where they were 
land owners, though all of them did not live there : Thomas 
Kimball, Job Clements, Thomas Downes, Thomas Roberts, The 
Minister's house, Charles Buckner, William Pomfret, Thomas 
Beard, John Tuttle, sen. Deacon John Hall, Thomas I^eigh- 



1661] 



HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 



51 



ton, John Dam, sen. Lieut. Ralph Hall, Elder Nutter, Joseph 
Austin, Philip Cromwell, William Furber, Jeremiah Tebets, 
Humphrey Varney, James Nute, Richard Pinkham, Thomas 
Canney, John Roberts, Thomas Roberts, jr. Jedediah Andrews, 
Henry Tebets, Thomas Nock. 

April 14. — The town voted that the grant made to Valentine 
Hill to erect a saw mill on lyamprill river be revoked unless 
some person should appear within six months to hold and 
improve the same. 

(Mr. Hill died previous to this time. He came from Boston 
and went largely into business, being one year the largest 
tax-payer. He left his affairs in disorder, and the above vote 
was passed by the town to straighten them out, so far as it 
operated.) 

June — .Tho. Canney of Dover, desiring the Court to free him 
from common training by reason of losing his eyesight, his 
request was granted. 

Aug. 7. — Dover and Portsmouth were presented for want of a 
suflScient bridge for horse and foot over Cochecho river. The 
Court ordered a committee to be chosen from the two towns to 
view the same and if they found it needful to make a bridge. 

Tax Lists. 

(The first group of figures iu this list is headed :) 
Oyster riuer 3d Raet. 4: gmo in the yeir 61. 

(The second group was probably in the same year, but another levy, 
and headed : ) 

Oyster Riu in ye yeir 





lb 


£ 


d 




lb 






John Godder 


3- 


14 


I. 


1/ 

/2 


I. 


9 


5- 


Einsin John Daues 


I. 


?. 


3- 




0. 


19 


2. 


John Meader 


I. 


I 


0. 




0. 


14 


0. 


John Martin 


I. 


? 


9- 




0. 


19 


6. 


Richard Yorke 


2. 


5 


6. 




I. 


10 


4- 


Joseph filld 


0. 


? 


• 7- 


y^ 


0. 


12 


5- 


hew doeun 


0. 


9 


• 9- 




0. 


6 


6. 


Mr. hills mill and house and 
















lands 


?. 


15 


0. 




5- 


16. 


0. 


Will Willyams juner 


0. 


12 


6. 




0. 


8. 


4- 


James Bunker 


0. 


7 


6. 




0. 


5- 


4- 


William foUett 


I. 


17 


6. 




I. 


5- 


0. 


The estat of Tho Jonson 


0. 


12 


6. 




0. 


8. 


4- 


Phellep Chesly 


2. 


17 


6. 




I. 


18. 


4- 


Jams and wat Jackson 


r. 


7 


6. 




0. 


18. 


4. 


Will Beard 


3- 


II 


I. 




2. 


7- 


5- 


John woodman 


I. 


7 


6. 




0. 


18. 


4- 



52 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1661 

Patrick Jemson 
heurey Browne 
Thomas Dowty 
James Oer 
James Medlton 
Edward Eirwing ? 
John Barber 
Elexsander mackdouell 
Elexsander Gowing 
Edward Patterson 
John hance 
Roberd Burnam 
William Pittman 
William Roberd s 
William Willyams sinyer 
Thomas Steuenson 
William Drew 
Rice Howell 
mathew willyams 
mathew Gilles 
Benjamin hull 
Benjamin mathews 
Charles Adams 
John Bickford sinyer 
Thomas Welly 
John Allt 
henrey hollawaye 
John hill 
Thomas footman 
John hilton 
Oleuer kent 
Teackge Riall 
Josephf Smeth 
Dauey Danell 
Steuen Jones 
John Collman 

John Di ell 

Roberd — isley 

Steuen binson 

Will J(ones) 

Samew iamin 

Will Shu 

The plase the Raet unto is Ei (nsin) John (Daues] 

Josephf lessen forgot 7s 6d yet down in the Constables Rate. 



I. 


2. 


6. 


0. 


15- 


0. 


I. 


12. 


4- 


I. 


I. 


8. 


I. 


12. 


4- 


I. 


I. 


8. 


I. 


12. 


4- 








I. 


12. 


4- 


I. 


I. 


8. 


I. 


12. 


4- 


I. 


I. 


8. 


0. 


7- 


6. 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


7. 


6. 


0. 


5- 


4- 


0. 


7- 


6. 


0. 


5- 


5- 


0. 


15- 


0. 


0. 


II. 


0. 


0. 


7- 


6. 


0. 


5- 


0. 


2. 


0. 


0. 


I. 


6. 


8. 


0. 


IS- 


0. 


0. 


10. 


0. 


0. 


IS- 


0. 


0. 


10. 


0. 


2. 


0. 


0. 


I. 


5- 


8. 


I. 


0. 


0. 


0. 


13- 


4- 


0. 


17- 


6. 


0. 


II. 


8. 


0. 


7- 


6. 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


7- 


6. 


0. 


5- 


0. 


2. 


0. 


0. 


I. 


6. 


6. 


0. 


12. 


6. 


0. 


8. 


4- 


2. 


0. 


0. 


1. 


6. 


8. 


0. 


17- 


6. 


0. 


II. 


8. 


2. 


0. 


0. 


I. 


6. 


8. 


I. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


18. 


4- 


I. 


9- 


9- 


0. 


19- 


10. 


0. 


10. 


10. 


I. 


6. 


9- 


0. 


17- 


6. 


0. 


II. 


8. 


I. 


7- 


6. 


0. 


18. 


2. 


0. 


7- 


6. 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


12. 


6. 


0. 


8. 


4- 


0. 


7- 


6. 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


7- 


6. 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


7- 


6. 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


7- 


5- 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


7- 


6. 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


7- 


6. 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


7- 


6. 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


7- 


6. 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


7- 


6. 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


7. 


6. 


0. 


5- 


0. 


0. 


15- 


0. 


0. 


10. 


0. 



1662] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 53 

1662. 

Feb. 3. — Capt. Waldron and Capt. Pike were chosen " Asso- 
ciates for the Court." Capt. Waldron, Elder Nutter and L,eft. 
Hall " Commissioners for small cases." Constables and other 
town ofScers were also chosen, and the Constables were upon 
complaint " remitted from their fines which the Court did fine 

them for want of measures ' ' which from a defect 

in the record does not clearly appear. 

Capt. Walter Barfoott was granted four score foot in breadth 
of flats below high water mark at Sandy point, and 24 foot of 
upland, not intrenching upon any former grant, to be built upon 
within one whole year from date or else to be void. 

Capt. Richard Waldron was also granted 24 foot of upland to 
join his former grant of flats at Sandy point, and at the same 
time the Captain was chosen Deputy to the General Court. 

April 15. — Richard Ros (?) was accepted as an inhabitant and 
Peter Cofl&n's grant at Sandy point renewed till the 29th of Sept. 

May 22. — The selectmen of Dover and Portsmouth were or- 
dered to pay Capt. Brian Pendleton 10 Pd. 8s. 4d. out of the 
treasury of each town " as satisfaction for so much by him ex- 
pended on a frosen person some years past, that came into the 
river, whose charity this court Judgeth it meet to encourage." 
{Mass. Records^ 

Capt. Richard Waldron was impowered by the Court to marry 
such as shall be published according to law within the precincts 
of Dover. 

At a town meeting holden this year, it was "ordered that a cage 
be made or some other means invented by the Selectmen to punish 
such as sleep or take tobacco on the Lord's day out of the meet- 
ing, in the time of the publish exercise." "Voted, that whoever 
shall kill a wolf within the bounds of this town, and shall bring 
some of the next neighbors, where such wolf was killed, to tes- 
tify that it was done in this town's bounds, and shall na3^1e the 
head of such wolf killed, upon the meeting house, he shall have 
five pounds for his paynes, to be paid by the treasurer, the proof 
thereof being made to the treasurer in being." 

In answer to the petition of the inhabitants of Dover, " hum- 
bly craving relief against the spreading &c. the wicked errors of 
the Quakers among them," &c. the General Court ordered " that 
Capt. Richard Waldron shall and hereby is empowered to act in 
the execution of the laws of this jurisdiction against all crimi- 



54 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1662 

nal offenders within the said town of Dover, as any one magis- 
trate may do, until this Court shall take further order." 

In pursuance of this order the following warrant, under the 
hand of Captain Waldron, was issued : 

To the constables of Dover, Hampton, Salisbury, Newbviry, Rowley, 
Ipswich, Wenham, Linn, Boston, Roxbury, Dedham, and until these 
vagabond Quakers are carried out of this jurisdiction, 

You, and every one of you are required in the King's Majesty's name, 
to take these vagabond Quakers, Ann Coleman, Mary Tompkins and 
Alice Ambrose, and make them fast to the cart's tail, and driving the 
cart through your several tovpns, to whip their naked backs, not exceed- 
ing ten stripes apiece on each of them, in each town ; and so to convey 
them from constable to constable, till they are out of this jurisdiction ; 
as you shall answer it at your peril ; and this shall be your warrant. 

Per me 

Richard Waldron. 

At Dover, dated December 22, 1662. 

The manner in which this order was executed is described in 
Sewall's History of the Quakers : 

* * * Now in a very cold day, the deputy at Dover, caused these 
women to be stripped naked from the middle upwards, and tied to a cart 
and then whipped them, ivJnle the priest looked on and laughed at it. 

* * * The women being thus whipped at Dover, were carried to 
Hampton and there delivered to the constable, who having understood 
by the constable of Dover what work he had in bringing them through a 
deep road, thought to have daunted them, and said, " you must not think 
to make fools of men." To which they answered, " They should be able 
to deal with him as with the other." The constable the next morning 
would have whipped them before day, but they refused, saying they were 
not ashamed of their sufferings. Then he would have whipped them 
with their clothes on, when he had tied them to the cart. But they said, 
"Set us free, or do according to thine order." He then spoke to a 
woman to take of their clothes. But she said she would not for all the 
world. Why, said he, then I'll do it myself. So he stripped them, and 
then stood trembling whip in hand, and so he did the execution. Then 
he carried them to Salisbury through the dirt and snow half the leg 
deep ; and here they were whipped again. 

* * * Indeed their bodies were so torn, that if Providence had 
not watched over them, they might have been in danger of their lives. 
But it so fell out that they were discharged ; for the constable at Salis- 
bury, who must have carried them to Newbury, was desired by one 
Walter Barefoot, to make him his deputy, who receiving the warrant set 
them at liberty; though /c/;« Wheelwright the priest advised the consta- 
ble to drive on as his safest way. 

"It is worthy of remark that in Dover, where only, within 
this Province, the Quakers were persecuted, that sect has flour- 
ished perhaps to a greater extent than in any other town in New 



i662] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 55 

Hampshire." At one time, according to the estimate of Belk- 
nap, they constituted one third of the population. 

A tax rate was made this year over the whole town to pay 
Mr. Rayner the amount due him as salary, in provisions, at the 
following prices : Beef 3 1/2 pence per lb, pork 4 1/2 d, wheat 
6 shillings per bushel, malt 6 shillings, barley 6 shillings, peas 
5 shillings. 

At this time 28 tax payers lived on Dover Neck, 29 lived at 
Cochecho, 12 at Bloody Point, 42 at Oyster River and one, 
William Follet, at Bellamy Bank. 

Town Records. 

A Rate maed the 19th of 9 Month 1662 for Mr. Rayners Prouition. 

Thomas Kemble 
Capt Walter Bar foot 
John Dam sinyer 
Thomas layton 
Thomas Beard 
D(e)acon hall 
Job Clemant 
Thomas Roberds sinyer 
John Tuttell sinyer 
Thomas Umphres stiller 
Elder Nutter 
left hall 
henrey Tebbett 
Thomas Nocke 
Jeremey Tebbett 
James Newtt sinyer 
Jam Newtt Juner 
Bartholomew leppincutt 
humfrey Varney 
Nicholas Vutter 
Edward Waymoeth 
Isake Stokes 
Christopher Batt 
Thomas Roberds Juner 
Sar John Roberds 
Thomas Caney 
Jeddediah Andrees 
William Pomfrett 
Charles Buckner 
lasaries Permett 

II 13 






5 


? 





5 


6 





14 





I 


4 


6 


00 


15 


6 


00 


IG 


6 


00 


7 





00 


3 


iK 


00 


6 


2 


00 


7 


6 


00 


14 


6 


00 


6 


6 


00 


2 


6 


00 


6 


8 


00 


7 


TO 


GO 


II 


9 





2 








2 


6 





2 


II 





2 


6 





2 


9 





2 


II 





12 


6 





IG 


rA 


00 


16 


2V2 





17 


(^% 


GO 


6 


8 





5 


8 





4 


12 


G 


2 


6 



56 



NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE 



[1662 



This Rate is to be payd in Beffe at 3d >^ p lb, Pork at 4 ;4, Wheat at 
6s p boshell, ( Ma)llt at 6s, ( B)arley at 6s, Pease at 5s. 

(Margin) This Rate charge to the old ace. 
Cochechae 1662. 
Capt Walderne 
Petter Coffin 

James Coffin Roberd Euens John Chirch 
Thomas Payne 
John Scruen 
Josephf Sanders 
Thomas Wiggin 
henrey hobes 
John louring 
Roberd Jones 
Richard Ottes 
Thomas Downes 
Elder Wentworth 
Samewell Wentworth 
John heard 
James keyd 
Phellep Cromwell 
Clemant Raphf 
John Adams 
Will home 
Thomas hanson 
Tobey hanson 
Raphf Twamley 
George Waldern 
Ouamphegon Mill 
Josephf Astin 
Thomas Rallines 
William FoUett at Bellemes banke 



I 


9 


10 


I 


13 


II 





12 


6 





2 


6 


00 


3 


7 


00 


2 





00 


14 


3 


00 


5 


II 


00 


9 


8 


00 


4 


I 


00 


II 


4 


00 


4 


5 


00 


9 





00 


4 


2 


I 


00 


1 


00 


3 


4 


01 


I 


4 


00 


3 


4 


00 


2 


6 


00 


4 





00 


12 


II 


00 


4 





00 


3 


3 


00 


2 


7 


00 


16 


8 


00 


10 


4 


00 


2 


6 


00 


4 


2 



Blode poynt 

henrey lankester 
Richard Catter 
Michill Brane 
Thomas Trickey 
James Rallines 
William Shuckford 
Sargant hall 
william Furber 
Antoney Nutter 
John Bickford Juner 
Richard Rooe 
John Dam Juner 



I 


00 


^y^ 


00 


10 


3 





7 


I 





14 


8 


00 


8 


2 


00 


5 


4 


I 


5 


i>^ 


00 


16 


^% 


I 


2 


9% 


00 


6 


II 


00 


4 





00 


7 


? 



1662] 



HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 



57 



A Prouition Rate made the igtli of the 9th 
iuhabetauts in Oyster Riuer at a penny apon the 



month (1662) apon the 
pound. 





lb 


S 


d 


Richard Yorke 


00 


15 


^y^ 


John martin 


00 


12 


A% 


John Godderd 


I 


5 


6 


hew Donn 


00 


3 


4 


Edward Erwin and Conipey 


02 


17 


12 


Patrick Jemeson 


GO 


9 


9 


Walter Jackson 


00 


15 


I 


Edward Patterson 


00 


5 


9 


Roberd Burnum 


00 


14 


2 


William Pettman 


00 


5 


5 


William Willyams sinyer 


00 


13 


4 


Josephf Filld 


GO 


4 


2 


William Roberds 


GO 


3 


7 


Phellep Chesley 


I 


00 


5 


John Woed 


00 


6 


10 


John hance 


00 


3 


4 


Thomas Johnson his Estate 








in the hands of William Furber 








and William FoUett 


00 


6 


II 


William Drew 


OG 


II 


2 


Mathew Gills 


00 


13 


9 


Beniaman hull 


00 


8 


7 


mathew williams 


00 


2 


II 


Charles Addams 


00 


5 


9 


Dauey and Phellep Cromwell 


00 


9 


9 


Mrs mathews 


00 


I 


4 


Thomas Welley 


00 


7 


3 


John Bickford sinyer 


GO 


16 


2 


Thomas Footman 


00 


14 


7 


John Allt 


00 


9 


10 


henry holloway 


00 


5 


3 


william Perkens 


00 


2 


10 


william willyams Juner 


00 


4 


8 


Einsin John Daues 


GO 


8 


3 


Josephf Smeth 


GO 


6 


I 


william Beard 


00 


19 


10 


John woodman 


00 


9 


10 


James Smeth 


00 


2 


6 


John Smeth 


00 


2 


6 


John hilton 


00 


3 


7 


Olleuer Kent 


00 


I 


8 


Teage Reiall 


00 


2 


II 


Steuen Jones 


GO 


2 


6 


William Jones 


00 


2 


6 



58 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1663 

1663 

April 18.— Capt. Waldron was chosen Deputy to the General 
Court at Boston, and instructed not to " condecend to anything 
concerning the town of Portsmouth but what was acted" at a 
previous meeting, which was, that the County Court should be 
altered so as to be holden the first Tuesday of the 8th month ; 
likewise for a special Court ; also a commissioners Court for 20 
Pound cases, as "formerly granted to our Associates at our 
coming in under the Government." 

The town apparently obtained what it demanded, for it is 
recorded that "the Court allows Mr. Rayner's daughters 20s 
for their pains in attending the Magistracy at their father's 
house the time of the Court and order that the Treasurer of 
Dover pay it in to them." James Nute was also chosen to be 
steward for the town at the Ordinary at the Court time. 

Toll-end. or " Tolend," as it is sometimes spelt, which is still 
known as a local name, appears in the tax list of this year for 
the purpose of designating the residence of some of the inhabi- 
tants, a proof of its respectable antiquity, though why so called 
is not known to this day. 

A Prouition Rate made the 7th loth month 1663 Apon all the Inhabe- 

tants of this townshep (of) Douer at a peney apon the pound. 

lb s d 

Mr. Thomas Wiggin 

Capt Barffoott 

Thomas Roberds siny 

Fetter Glanfilld 

William Pomfrett 

John hall Deacon 

Thomas layton 

John Dam siny 

Elder Nutter 

Thomas Beard 

left hall 

wedoew Tutell 

Thomas Nock 

Thomas whitehouse 

Jeremie Tebbettes 

Nichles Vtter 

James Newtt siny 

Thomas Caney 

Sar John Roberds 

Thomas Roberds Juner 

Judediae Androes 

Isake Stokes 

Edward Waymoeth 

Saraie Astin 

Humfrey Varney 






3 


3 





6 


3 





6 








2 


II 





9 


I 





10 


5 


I 


6 


7 





14 


6 





13 


6 





14 


8 





4 


II 





3 


I 





7 


2j 





2 


6 





8 


10 





2 


10 





II 


9 





19 


I 





18 


2; 





9 


I 


(No figures) 





4 


7 





3 


3 





10 


4 





2 


II 



1663] 



HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 



59 





Blodie poynt 








heurey laukster 




I 


2 


iV^ 


Mickell Brane 




ou 


7 


7 


Thomas Trickey 




CO 


13 


lo 


Richard Catter 




GO 


lo 


8K 


John Bickford Juner 




C)0 


6 


4 


James Rallens 




oo 


14 


TO 


Christafer Batt 




t)0 


2 


8 


william Shuck forth 




oo 


8 


2 


John Dam Juner 




oo 


8 


8 


Antoney Nutter 




I 


2 


I 


Richard Rooe 


(Fig 


ures crossed ou 


t.) 


William Furber 




I 


o 


4 


Sargant John Hall 




I 


lO 


1% 


John Woddin 




(No figures.) 




(Cochecho.) 








Capt walldern 




I 


9 


2 


Mr Fetter Coffin 




I 


i6 


5 


John heard 




I 


OO 


9 


Elder wentworth 




oo 


i8 


II 


Richard Otes 




oo 


13 


I 


Thomas hanson 




oo 


12 


9 


John Scriuen 




oo 


5 


6 


Thomas Downes 




oo 


3 


II 


James Coffin 




oo 


4 


5^ 


Roberd Euens 




oo 


4 


by^ 


John Chirch 




oo 


4 


5% 


william home 




oo 


4 


rA 


John kiniston 




oo 


2 


6 


Samewell wintworth 




oo 


3 


7 


Thomas Payne 




oo 


4 


2 


George walldern 




oo 


2 


7 


Richard Seaman 




oo 


2 


6 


Josephf Sanders 




oo 


2 


6 


Christin Dolack 




oo 


3 


4 


lasares Permitt 




oo 


2 


6 


John Addams 




oo 


2 


6 


Tobey hanson 




oo 


2 


6 


Raphfe Twamly 




oo 


6 


8 


Thomas Rallins 




oo 


2 


6 


Clement Rafe 




oo 


4 


2 


Antoney Page 




oo 


2 


6 


John Sharpe 




oo 


3 


4 


Phelep Cromwell 




I 


5 


7 


Abraham folets man 




o 


2 


6 


william layton 




o 


3 


4 


henrey hobes 




o 


6 


8 


John louring 




o 


lO 


lO 



o 


i6 


b 


o 


4 


2 


o 


lO 


OO 


o 


4 


2 


oo 


4 


2 



60 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1663 

ye mill at quamphigou 
wm follet at Belli bank 
capt wiggin at tollend 
capt Clark at tollend 
tnr nathaniell frier 

14 16 

(Oy)ster R Prouetion Rate made throwe the hole towneshep the 7th 
loth month 1663 

Roberd Burnum 
william Pettman 
William willyams siny 
Thomas morrise 
Tho steuensons estat 
William Drew 
matthew Gilles 
Charles Addams 
Thomas welley 
John Bickford si 

Tho Fottman 
John Allt 
William Pirkins 
William Dergin 
Josephf filld 
Dauey Danell 
Phellep Cromet 
Thomas Dowty 
John Godder 

Richard Yorke 

John martin 

hew Donn 

John hillton 040 

Beiniamen hull o 8 o>^ 

Phellep Chesley 1 5 0% 

Elexsander mack Donnell (Mackdaniel) ? 
his estat 

waiter Jackson 

Pattrick Jamison 

Edward Patterson 

Henrey Browne and Compeney 

John meader 

Thomas humfries 

Steuen Jones 

will willyams Juuer 

william follett 

william Roberds 

James Bonker 

Thomas Jonson his estat 

Steuen Robinson 



17 


6 


5 


9 


12 


I 


3 


4 


4 


3 


8 


ii>^ 


13 


8 


5 


10 


8 


i>4 


15 


6 


13 


2 


II 


7 


2 


9 


3 


4 


5 


9 


8 


8,'^ 


3 


2 


13 


e% 


9 


11V2 


15 


9% 


12 


4 


3 


4 






5 3 





12 9 





9 9 





5 10 


2 


17 2 





9 6 





II 4 





4 2 





5 2 


I 


00 10 


(No figures.) 



1664] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 61 



James Smeth 
Williain Beard 

Smeth 

Daues 



John woodman 
mr hills estat 
Tage RiaU 
mathew willyams 
Roberd Chapman 
Pattrick Denmark 



o 


2 


6 


I 


2 


I 


o 


4 


VA 




lO 


ii'A 


;2 


CO 


3 


o 


9 


ID 


I 


5 


o 


o 


2 


6 


o 


2 


II 


o 


2 


6 


o 


2 


6 


2 


5 


3 


22 


CO 


3 


2 


5 


3 



. 5 6 
Theis Rate is to be payd in Beff at 3d •< p lb, Porke at 4d A per lb, 
wheat at 5s p boshcll, malt at 6 s p boshell, Barley at 6s p boshell, Pease 
at 4s p boshell. If aney shall denie to pay the Constabells ar to take it 
By way of destres. 

1664. 

Jan. 17.— Thomas lyay ton and John Roberts were chosen to 
" appraise goods taken by distress," and Robert Burnuni and 
William Follett to "go in preambulation of the towns bounds " 
between Dover and Exeter. Philip Chesley was also chosen to 
look after " persons that do trangress the town's orders about 
the cutting of timber for pipe staves," at Oyster river. 

Feb. 28.— Philip Chesley and Patrick Jemison were chosen to 
lay out the highways from Oyster River to Cochecho, make 
them fit for horse and foot, and bring an account of their charges 
to the Townsmen. Left, Hall and John Hall, Deacon, were ap- 
pointed to lay out the highway from Lamperill falls to the water- 
side betwixt John Godder and John Martin. Thomas Beard 
was chosen to keep an Ordinary. 

From the tax list of this year it appears that white oak pipe 
staves were worth 4 Pounds per thousand, pine boards 45 shil- 
lings, hogshead staves 50 shillings, red oak pipe staves 3 Pounds, 
and barrel staves 40 shillings. 



62 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1665 

1665 

The care which was taken to repel, instead of inviting immi- 
gration in these early days, is shown in the order made by the 
Selectmen at a meeting held the 15th of the 2d month, in this 
year, that " no person coming into the town as a servant or by 
purchasing of lands should be accepted as an inhabitant until 
he was allowed or accepted by the town or the selectmen." 

The selectmen, at the same time, authorized Peter Coflfin to 
agree wath some workmen to build a " terrett upon the Meeting 
House for to hang the bell," which they had bought of Capt. 
Waldron, the cost to be paid out of what credit the Neck had 
in Mr. Coffin's hands, and if it cost more they engaging to pay 
him on the town account. 

Feb. 17. — Capt. Waldron was chosen Deputy to the General 
Court, and was instructed, as usual, to "stand to mayntaynour 
preveledges," and to bring the proceedings of the Court in 
writing. Also, "that whereas we are informed that several 
persons have made some writing in way of complaint against us 
or some of our proceedings, we know no cause they have to do 
so, and do desire you to make all the defence j^ou [can against 
them." They also requested that " as our parts are so far dis- 
tant from Boston and the law doth enjoin all that will be made 
freemen" to appear there for that purpose that their Deputy 
would "petition the Court that those that are capable to be 
made free may be at our County Court." 

July 10. — Thomas Whitehouse was received as an inhabitant 
on condition that, "the town not being of a capacity to give 
accomodation as heretofore," he was to have no other privileges 
than what he had purchased for cattle. That is, he was to have 
no rights of pasturage upon the commons. William Layton 
was received at the same time upon the same "farms," and 
"Gorg Gooe " was "forewarned (forbidden) to stay or have 
any habitation in the town of Dover." This appears to be the 
first instance in which a person was "warned" out of the 
settlement. 

July 28. — The treasurer was ordered to pay for the killing of 
a wolf in the year 1663, "as appeareth in a note under the Con- 
stable's hands, in the hands of John Hall, Deacon, under the 
selectmen's hands," the money to go to the said John Hall, 
Deacon, and fifteen other persons, each to receive an equal por- 
tion. As the price for killing a wolf was but 5 Pds. the share 
of each could not have been large, though it was very proper, 



1665] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 63 

as the town had given its note for the amount, that the same 
should be paid. 

Oct. ID. — The heirs of Mason about this time having procured 
the signatures of some disaffected persons to a petition for dis- 
solving the union of the New Hampshire towns with Massachu- 
setts, the principal citizens of Dover signed a remonstrance 
against the movement and directed it, in town meeting assem- 
bled, to be presented to the General Court as the town's act. 

Oct. 25. — The selectmen, in view of the fact that "many 
persons do fall timber and make staves without order, whereby 
the town and the settled inhabitants are much injured," em- 
powered John Roberts, Thomas Nock and Philip Chesley, or 
any two of them, to make diligent search into all the woods for 
such transgressors of the town's order, and to seize their spoil 
for the use of the town, the informers to have one half for their 
pains. 

At the same time it was ordered, that as there are "several 

differences apprehended to be betwixt the inhabitants of Dover, 

and are principally with our neighbors at Oyster River," it was 

desired of all having any grievances "to meet together and to 

propound what matter of difference there is and to state the case 

against the next public town meeting, on the third Monday in 

March, at the meeting house on Dover Neck, there to discover 

the said differences for the settling of peace amongst us, or if it 

cannot be there agreed then to choose some others to hear and 

determine the same." And the constables were ordered to give 

notice to all the neighbors at their respective places to meet for 

the end aforesaid. 

Town Records 

voted at a Publick Towne melting holden the 14th 2tli moneth 
166 I (5?) 

that whereas thear was a grant made to mr vallintin hill of doner of 
a Riuer Called lamprill Riuer in the Towneshep of doner for to Erekt 
Sawemill worke and to Contunew his or his assignes soe longe as he or 
theay kep posietion thearof nowe know all to whome this may Conserne 
that in Case noe man doe appeier to whold posseistion and make it knowne 
to the Sellecktmen of the sayd towne within 6 months after the date 
heirof that then the towne doeth Resolue to take it in to thear owne 
hands and despose of it or sell it for the use of the Towne to Clear all 
Rareges (arrearages? ) 

and that a Copey of this be set up at som Publick plac at Boston and a 
nother at Doner. 

By the Seleckmen at A meittinge holden the 15th 2th mo (65, 

Odred that noe Parson that Cometh into this Towne as a saruant or 
By Perchising of lands shall not be Exsepted as An inhabetant in town 



64 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1665 

of Dover untell he be Alowed or Exsepted by the Towne or the 
Selleckmen. 

By the sellecktmen the 15th 2th mo (65. 

Ordered that mr Fetter Coffin shall be Impowered by this meitting to 
A Gree with some workmen to Build a Terrett upon the meitting house 
for to hang the Bell wich wee haue Bought of Capt walldern and what it 
Cost to pay out of what credet the Neck of land hathe in your hand and 
if Cost moer wee doe iuGage to pay you apon the Towne a Compt. 

Richard Wallderue 
Will Wentworth 
John Roberds. 

At A Publick Towne meitting holden the 17th 2th moneth (65. 
voted that Elder nutter and william Pomfrett ar to mett with Porch- 
moueth men to open the vottes for asotates. 

At ye same tim 

John Danes Chosen Constabell. 

John louring Chosen Constabell. 

Richard Catter chosen Constabell. 

Jurey of Trialls. 

Petter Coffin, Rafe Twamly, Antouey nutter, John marttin, 

John Robberds, Thomas Nocke, Roberd Burnum. 

Gran Jurey, 

Jobe Clements, John Meder, John heard, John Bickford sinyer, 

John woodman, Thomas Wiggin, John hill. 

At The same time, 

Capt walldern Chosen Depety for the Generall Courte for this yeir. 

At A Metting of the selecktmen the 29tli 2th month 1665, 

Orders for Capt walldern Debety for the Generall Courtt. 

1. ordred that wold stand to mayntayu our preueledgs by vertu of 
our Articklers of agrement and to bring the proseding of the Court in 
writing. 

2. that you move the Generall Courtt that our County Court may be 
Altred for time of it untell September. 

3. that we desire thankfullness may be Returned unto the Court for 
ther Caer and Gouerment under his maijsty. 

4. that whereas we ar informed that seuerall persons haue made som 
writing in way of Complaynt against us or som of our prosedings we 
know noe Case theay haue so to doe and doe desier you to make all the 
Defence you Can against them. 

5. and that whear as our parts ar soe fer destant from boston and 
the lawe doeth Injoyne all that will be maed freemen to appeir at boston 
that you wold peteshone the Court that those that ar Capabell to be 
maed free may bee at our Countey Courte. 

Asotiates for this Countey Courtt that is to Be holden the last 
Tewsday in June 1665 at Doner was Chosen by openning the votes the 
5th 3th mo 1665. 

Capt Pendellton 29 

Capt walldern 36 

mr Richard Cutt 33 



1666] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 65 

Capt Picke 35 

Mr John Cutt 18 

Test 

Johu Cutt 
Hatevil Nutter 
Henrie Sherburne 
William Pomfrett 
( These last four names are autographs.) 
At A Meitting of the selecktmen the 28th July 1665. 
All ACounts mad up with Thomas Beard for the Acounts Boeth for 
the Charges of the asochaett Courtt and the Countey Courtt last with 
all their Expenses that the sellecktmen haue Expended unto this day 
wich some doeth Com to thirty three Pounds and doe order the Tres- 
serer to pay the same in Action money and fines of the Courte and 
place it to the Towns aCount as witness our hands the day and yeir 
above written. 

Richard walldern 
henrey lankster 
John Danes 
John Roberds. 

1666 

March 10. — The town at a public meeting voted that all dif- 
ferences and grievances which the inhabitants might have with 
one another should be referred to Capt. Robert Pike, Mr. 
Wencoll and Mr. Elias Stillman, and what these arbitrators 
should determine by the last of the month the town engaged to 
"stand to." Capt. Richard Waldron and six other citizens 
were chosen to lay the grievances before the arbitrators, and 
Capt. Waldron was desired to notify them of their appointment 
and request them to attend to the duty. 

Thomas Edgerley, James Coffin, John Church, John Fost, 
Robert Evans and Stephen Robinson were received as inhabi- 
tants, " upon the same terms that Thomas Whitehouse and 
others were received," i.e. without the right of commonage for 
their cattle. At the same time there was "given unto Walter 
Jackson 20 acers of land at the head of his own lot betwixt the 
cow path and the swamp." 

April 2, — The selectmen were requested to " take any oppor- 
tunity to treat with the selectmen of Portsmouth about the 
affairs of the country, and what they shall see useful for us, to 
present at the next town meeting." The selectmen with a com- 
mittee of citizens were also requested to " draw up something in 
writing to present at the next town meeting concerning the 
right of commonage and other things concerning the town 
affairs." 



66 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1666 

William Pomfrett was requested to give Rev. Mr. Rayner an 
order for the rents due from the mills towards his salary, and 
also to Elder Wentworth an order for 15 Pounds " for his pains 
at Cochecho the last winter." 

Aug. 19. — Captain Waldron was chosen Deputy to the Gen- 
eral Court, and instructed not to consent to anything infringing 
upon the town's privileges, or " act anything for the hinderance 
or stopping of any person or persons that his Majesty hath sent 
for." 

Sept. 26 — The selectmen gave orders that Thomas Turner be 
warned out of the town by Ensign John Davis and John Bick- 
ford, and that he depart according to law. Also, that the wife 
of William Risley be warned out of town by Anthony Nutter. 

Henry Kerk was appointed to keep an Ordinary, and to 
" stand till the next County Court upon his good behavior." 

Many inconveniences and damages coming upon the town in 
consequence of the practice which had been adopted by the 
inhabitants of ' ' taking in several persons both men and women, ' ' 
the selectmen gave orders that none should henceforth admit or 
entertain any inmate or sojourner or servant to be hired or taken 
into their houses without giving notice to the selectmen within 
thirty days, upon the penalty of nineteen shillings fine to the 
town, besides making good all other damages which the town 
might suffer. 

The town at this early day had become somewhat crowded, 
or inhabitants had been taken in who could not be accommo- 
dated, whereupon it was voted that no more persons should be 
admitted until all former grants had been laid out and duly 
recorded on the town's book, and a list made out of all inhabi- 
tants so that ' ' the town may see how many we are to take 
care of." 

At this time the w^hole number of tax payers on record was 

At Dover Neck 22 At Bloody Point 16 

" Cochecho 20 " Fresh Creek 21 

" Oyster River 54 — 133 families, or a population of 

about 530, according to the estimate of the present time, when 
four voters or polls are usually found in every 1 5 to 20 inhab- 
itants. 

Dover, this year, gave 32 Pounds towards erecting a new 
brick building at Harvard College. 



1666] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 67 

A Prouetion Rate maed the 2th loth month i666 for mr Rayner at a 
peney in the pound throwe the hole townshep. 
Doner neck 
Thomas layton 
John hall Deacon 
John Dam sinyer 
Thomas Beard 
Jeremie Tebetes 
Thomas Roberds Juner 
Thomas Caney 
Elder nutter 
henrey Tebtes 
John Roberds 
James Newtt Juner 
Capt. Barfoot 
Tho Roberds siny 
henrey kerke 
mr Job Clemants 
John Tuttell 
Thomas Whithouse 
Judediae Androes 
John Pinkoem 
James Newtt siny 
Isake Stokes 
William Pomfrett 

blode poynt 
henrey lankster 
William furber 
Richard Catter 
John hall sargent 
James Rallins 
Thomas Trickey 
John Bickford Jun 
Michill Brane 
Rich Rooe 
John Dam Juner 
William Suchforth 
Antoney Nutter 
Abraham Newtt 
Eexsander Wallden 
Thomas Pinkom 
Phellep Cromwell 

Cochechae 
Capt walldern 
leften Coffin 
Samewell hale 
Nathell Stuens 
John willson 
Samewell Seward 



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68 



NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1666 



John Chirch 
Autoney Page 
lazearus Permit 
Jolin ham 
Jnkin Jones 
Clarke Gilles 
Biniamen heard 
Thomas Downes 
wedowe hanson 
Tobias hanson 
Thomas hanson 
Robert Euens 
Ralphf Twamly 
John winget 



humfrey varney 
Jeriemey hodsdon 
John heard 
Josephf Sanders 
Thomas Payne 
Richar Bowell 
Thomas hamacke 
william home 
William Ceiam (?) 
John Addams 
John Scriuen 
Quamphigone Mill 
John louring 
henrey hobbes 
John foste 
.William lay ton 
Elder wentworth 
Samewell wentworth 
Mr George wallderne 
Richard Otes 
James Coffin 

8 17 10 
Oyster Riuer 

William follet i 5 o 

Will Roberds 3 6 

Will Willyams Juner 5 ' 

John Meader 9 3 
Steuen Jones 

Nicloes harrise 3 



3 


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2 


6 


2 


6 


3 


4 


2 


6 


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6 


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4 





4 


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5 


2 


7 


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8 


ID 


19 


4 


4 


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9 


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4 


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6 


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7 


8 


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6 


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16 


9 


12 


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10 


9 


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15 


10 


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4 



I 



Einsinejohn Danes ^3 4X 

henrey Browne ^7 1° 

Roberd watson ^ 

Pattrick Denmarke ^ ° 

waiter Jackson ° 4 



1666] 



HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 



69 



Matthew willyams 




3 


7 


John Smeth 




3 


4 


Josephf Semethe 




4 


2 


James Smeth 




2 


6 


William Drew 




15 


8 


William Beard 




i6 


8 


Mathew Gilles 




13 


lo 


William Pitman 




6 


o 


Josephf Steunson 




8 


7 


Salathell Denboe 




2 


6 


William willyams sinyer 




12 


4 


John woodman 




lO 


7 


Thomas morise 




5 


o 


William Dergin 




5 


o 


John hilton 




3 


3 


Richard Yorke 




15 


lO 


John Martin 




II 


5^2 


John Godder 


I 


6 


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Arter Bennett 




2 


o 


Charells Addames 




6 


5 


Thomas welley 




8 


6 


Thomas Edgerley 


oo 


2 


9 


William Perkines 


oo 


3 


lO 


Abraham Collines 


ot> 


2 


6 


John Allt 


oo 


12 


5 


John Bickford siny 


oo 


i6 


5 


Sachrey filld 


oo 


3 


4 


Mickall Simonds 


oo 


3 


4 


Teag Riall 


oo 


3 


2 


James huggins 


oo 


2 


II 


Edward lethers 


oo 


2 


6 


Phellep Chesley 


OI 


2 


3 


Thomas Chesley 


oo 


4 


5 


Josepf filld 


oo 


4 


2 


Tage Danell 


oo 


3 


4 


Pattrick Jemeson 


oo 


12 


3 


Roberd Burnum 


oo 


lO 


O 


Dauey Danell and Phellep Cromett 


oo 


7 


3 


Thomas footman 


oo 


15 


2 


Tho feloes, John Parnill, and 








ther men and Vassell 


OI 


lo 





Steuen Robinson 


oo 


2 


6 



8 05 6 
This Rat made at a peney in the pound for mr Raners proution and is 
in part of his sallerey for the last yeir and to be reterned to his hand 
by the Constabell and if in Case aney shall Rfuse to pay apon demand 
thear in his maighteys name to Empower you to take it by way destres 
witness our hands. 

Bef at 3d p lb, Pork at 4d;4 p lb, wheat at 5s p boshell, Indan Come 
4s p boshell, pease at 4s p boshell 



70 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1667 

1667 

May 7. — A meeting of the selectmeu of Dover and Ports- 
mouth was held in Portsmouth, for " remedying several incon- 
veniences," and it was mutually agreed and ordered between 
them that as by custom the public charges both of Court and 
County had been carried on bj^ each town distinctly for the time 
past, for the future all charges should be borne jointly by the 
County, and a County Treasurer chosen according to law. 

Captain Waldron, Deputy to the General Court, was in- 
structed to make known to the Court the papers received from 
Major Shapleigh, and also not to engage the town by compul- 
sion to build fortifications. lyikewise to consult with the Depu- 
ties of Portsmouth concerning the enlargement of the County. 

The selectmen ordered the three half penny rate made over 
the whole town, to be delivered to Captain Waldron by the sev- 
eral constables, and for him to dispose of the same according to 
the selectmen's order from time to time. 

June 25. — Goodman Kirke of Dover, licensed to keep a house 
of entertainment. 

July 4. — The selectmen " agreed with Left. Cofl&n to build 
the fort about the meeting house on Dover Neck, (built in 1652) 
one hundred foot square with two sconces of sixteen foot square, 
and all the timber to be twelve inches thick and the wall to be 
eight foot high with sills and braces, and the selectmen with the 
military officers have agreed to pay him 100 Pds. in days works 
at 2S 6d per day, and also to all persons concerned in the work 
one day to help raise the work at so many one day as he shall 
appoint." 

This fort was constructed upon the mound of earth the relics 
of which still remain and are plainly visible on the Neck. 
(1872.) The building of this fort is the first intimation we have 
of the construction of any defences against the Indians. The 
colonists of Cochecho had been unmolested as yet, although 
there had been troubles in the south at an early period ; nor did 
any open act of hostility occur here until the breaking out of 
Philip's war in 1675. But the construction of these defences 
implies that at this period, 1667, suspicions were entertained as 
to the disposition of the savages. 

The selectmen " reckoned with Stephen Jones about keeping 
Mrs. Hill and her child the year past," and acknowledged 
themselves debtors in the sum of 25 Pds. which he was to have 



1668] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 71 

in part pay for Thomas Johnson's estate at Oyster River when 
the deeds from the town were made "according to the law of 
estates." 

Mrs. Hill was the widow of Valentine Hill who was of Boston 
about 1643 and came to Dover. He was a man of considerable 
property, being at one time the highest tax pa3'er in town. He 
lived at Oyster river where he had extensive grants of mill 
privileges, land and timber. He was Representative in 1653-5 
and 7, and died about 1660. The child here spoken of was his 
only one, and was born about the time of the father's death. 
The arrangement for its support and that of its mother by the 
town would imply that the selectmen, in their capacity as towns- 
men, had the settlement of the estate. 

Sept. 3. — At a public town meeting it was ordered that everj^ 
Indian who should kill a wolf and bring the head to some public 
officer, should have thirty shillings and no more, and the former 
order concerning Indians killing wolves was annulled. 

At the same time it was " ordered that the selectmen are to 
treat with John Church concerning Naomie's child and to put 
the child to him, agreeing with him for the taking of the child 
and satisfying him in land," provided it does not exceed sixty 
acres. 

Sept. 15. — -The grand jury presented the town for want of 
stocks, whipping post, standard weights and measures, a sealer 
of leather, a pound, a watch house, powder match and bullets. 

The Court enjoined the town to provide themselves wdth these 
accompaniments of civilization "by y^ next court" or pay a 
fine of 5 Pounds and 2s 6d fees. 

1668 

Feb. 20. — Capt. Waldron and Robert Burnum were chosen to 
oversee the work of the minister's house at 03'ster River, and 
lycft. Coffin and William Follett were instructed not to "act 
anything " without their consent, and " what they shall consent 
unto shall be the act of the town for finishing the house." 

March 5. — Voted that Capt. Waldron, Ensign John Davis 
and Mr. Job Clements are empowered to treat with the select- 
men of Portsmouth about running the line from Canney's Creek 
and Hogsty Cove, and what they shall do shall be a final deter- 
mination of that difference and stand as a town act as if the 
town were all present. 



72 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1669 

July 14. — Ordered by the selectmen that forthwith the Con- 
stable shall take of William Williams, sen. by way of distress 
the sum of 19 shillings for a fine for breach of a town order for 
entertaining Naomi Hull. 

The selectmen also ordered that John Hance should have 4 
pounds for killing a wolf. Nicholas Doe was received as an 
inhabitant upon the same terms as Thomas Whitehouse in 1665. 

The town for want of a pair of stocks was again sentenced to 
' ' get a pair by the next Court of Associates, or pay a fine of 
5 Pds. and fees." 

A Trucking House was built at Penacook (Concord) this year 
by Capt. Waldron, which was enclosed by a fort, and was prob- 
ably the first house ever erected there. Waldron with Peter 
Coffin and others designed making a settlement and had ground 
broken up to be improved, but in June one Thomas Dickinson 
was murdered by an Indian, which caused great excitement. 
It appeared on investigation that liquor had been sold to the 
Indians, which was contrary to law. Waldron and his son 
Paul were charged with the deed, but both denied it under oath 
and were acquitted. Peter Coffin was also charged with the 
offence, and was obliged to confess that the liquor came from 
his store, and was sold to the Indians by his agent, though with- 
out his knowledge. He was accordingly fined 50 Pounds and 
all charges. This affair appears to have broken up the Pena- 
cook settlement at this time, and no other was made there until 
1726, more than half a century after. 

1669 

Jan. 15. — The selectmen ordered all that have been constables 
who had not a discharge from the towai for the rates which they 
had collected, to appear and make up their accounts at Left. 
Pomfrett's house, on the Neck, on the 22d of the month, upon 
penalty of such fines as they should impose. 

Jan. 29. — Peter Coffin, Anthony Nutter, Wm. Follett, Robert 
Burnum, William Roberts and Richard Otis were appointed to 
go to Lamperill river to meet with Exeter men to perambulate 
the lines and set bounds between the two towns. 

May 3. — Robert Wadleigh was received as an inhabitant 
"according to the tenure of the last inhabitant received." At 
the same time he received this grant: 

At A Generall towne Meeting held at Dover the; 3: 3: 1669 

Giuen and granted unto Robert Wadleigh An accommodations for the 



16f;9] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 73 

erecting and setting of a Sawmill or Mills at the oppermost falls uppon 
Lamperele riuer, Comonly called by the name of ye Ilelaud falls : wth 
an accomedation of timber there vnto belonging ye bounds of the timber 
are as followeth ; yt is to : say all ye timber on ye south side aboue the 
sd falls as farr as ye towne bounds doth goe, and on the north side all ye 
Timber that is within one Mile of the Riuer aboue ye sd falls as farr as 
the towne bounds doth goe, with one hundred acres of land on ye south 
side of ye sd Riuer and twenty acres of Land on the north side of the 
riuer Adjacent unto the said falls one both sides: all which falls timber 
and Land is granted unto ye sd Wadleigh and his heires executors 
Administr : and assignes prouided it doth not Itrench, upon any former 
grant either in pt : or the whole. In Consideration of the sd grant of 
falls Timber and land ; the sd Rob: Wadleigh doth Ingage himselfe his 
heires executrs and Administr to pay or cause to be paid vnto the Towne 
of doner the some of tenn: pounds: peran: in Marchanta: pine bords at 
price Currant at the ordinary Landing place by Lamperele riutr lower 
falls ; as long as he or they doe keepe posession thereof wch paymt: is 
to begin the last of August next Insueing this Instant : to be made unto 
the selectmen of doner or theire order, and farther it is agreed and 
ordered that if any pt: there of be taken away by any former grant then 
the towne is to abate of the rent proportionablely And also the town 
doth reserue free eagrasse and Regrasse for ye transportation of timber 
either by land or water : and the Inhabitants have ye same Liberty in this 
grant as they haue in other Mill grants 

Hatevil Nutter, who had an interest in a former grant at or 
near the same place, entered his dissent to this grant. 

At the same time, at the request of Elder Wentworth and 
some of the brethren, Left. Coffin, Ensign Davis, Thomas Beard 
and Anthony Nutter were chosen to ' ' join with the church in 
their agitation." 

May 22. — For the accommodation of the ministry on Dover 
Neck the town voted to set apart 40 Pds. of mill rents and a 
penny rate in provisions upon the estates of all the inhabitants, 
excepting Oyster river, the vote to stand for one year, the 
penny rate to be paid in October or November, or " a free con- 
tribution what every man will free give." 

At the same time it was voted to build a Minister's house 
upon Dover Neck, 44 feet in length, 20 feet wide, 14 feet be- 
tween joist and joist, with a stack of brick chimnies and a cellar 
16 feet square; the house to be built "at the charge of the 
whole town in general." 

At a "training," the 21st June, the following persons are 
recorded as taking the "oath of fidelity:" — Samuel Went- 
worth, Tho. Caney, Tho. Edgerly, Benja. Heard, John Foste, 
Tho. Hanson, John Gerrish, James Smith, John Wentworth, 



74 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1669 

Robert Evans, Charles Adams, Beuja. Mathews, Richard Row, 
John York, Will. Perkins, Tho. Welley, Tho. Perkins, Will. 
Shuckford. 

July 22. — The town gave Mr. John Rayner, junior, a call to 
" officiate in the ministry " until the 22d July next ensuing, and 
at a meeting held the 27th Sept. Mr. Rayner "gave in his 
acceptance to that service." 

Rev. John Rayner, senior, died April 20th of this year, hav- 
ing been assisted in the last few years of his ministry by his son, 
who was now called to succeed him. 

The difficulties between Dover Neck and Oyster River broke 
out afresh this year, and petitions to the General Court were 
got up by some of the inhabitants of the latter place to be set off 
into a town by themselves. To counteract these proceedings, 
Left. Peter Coffin was chosen in behalf of the town to go to the 
General Court and "answer the complaints." After several 
public meetings had been held and sundry resolutions passed, a 
temporary accommodation of the difficulties appears to have been 
made. Oyster River was to build a meeting house on their own 
account and at their own charge, and Dover Neck was to build 
a minister's house on the same terms. Neither was to call on 
the other for " any help for the future ; " but as the Ivamperill 
river grant for the support of the ministry at Oyster River could 
not be collected, for the reason that no person could be found 
there to pay it, it was voted that they should have 10 Pds. per 
annum from Robert Wadleigh's grant in addition to the 10 
Pds. from their own grant, and when anything was recovered 
from the lyamperill grant it should be ordered and disposed 
of by the whole town. 

At the second session of the General Court held at Boston, 
Oct. 18, the Court judgeth it meet to appoint John Gerrish to be 
Quarter Master to the Troop raised in Portsmouth and Dover. 

Also "in answer to the petition of Robert Wadleigh com- 
plaining of being illegally dispossessed of a house, mill and 
other estate by virtue of an execution on a judgment against 
Nicholas Leeson at the County Court in Norfolk in April 1668, 
Henry Roby, Attorney to and for Robert Wadleigh, appeared 
and publicly engaged himself and his heirs to stand to and sat- 
isfy the charge of this Court in and for the hearing of this 
case. The Court on a full hearing of the case and what hath 
been alledged by the parties therein, do judge that the petitioner 
hath been illegally dispossessed and order that he be repossessed 



ir,71] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 75 

iu the said estate and have the cost of this Court fifty four shil- 
lings besides the charge of the court." 

The town made a donation of 32 Pds. to Harvard College for 
the purpose of erecting a new brick building, the old wooden 
one being small and decayed. 



1670 
From the tax list of this year we learn that the prices of beef, 
pork, &c. remained "firm," to adopt the language of modern 
times, and also that butter was worth 4 pence per pound, cheese 
6d, and that Indian corn brought 4 shillings per bushel. 

167 1 

April 28. — At a meeting of the selectmen, it was ordered that 
all timber found cut and carried to the water side, either at 
Oyster river, or Fore river, or Bellamey's bank mill, belonging 
to the Little John's creek grant, shall be seized, and notice 
given to all persons who have cut the timber, or lay claim to it, 
to appear before them and make answer thereto, on the 15th of 
May ensuing, at the house of William Pomfrett on Dover Neck. 
The constable and Philip Cromwell were empowered to give the 
notice and carry into effect the order in regard to seizing the 
timber. 

At the same time it was ordered that as there were several 
rates in the hands of the constables of many years standing, 
and rents and other revenues behind, whereby the town was 
much injured and lieth in debt to several persons, Philip Crom- 
well was appointed to demand and receive the same and pay the 
persons to whom the town was indebted. 

May 15.— Richard Waldron and Richard Coocke chosen dep- 
uties to the General Court. 

July 5. — Mr. John Rayner, jr. ordained Pastor, as the suc- 
cessor of his father. 



76 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1673 

1672 

March 19. — At a meeting of the selectmen all delinquent con- 
stables were ordered to "make up their accounts with the 
Treasurer" for "all old arrears," and in case of neglect they 
might expect to hear from the selectmen forthwith and be dealt 
with according to law. At the same time the Treasurer was 
directed to "repair the glass about the meeting house," and 
place it to the town's account. 

lycft. Cofhn, who had been ordered to " provide ammunition 
for the town according to law," is credited with delivering to 
Capt. Waldron on the 2 2d of the month " too baralls of Powder 
and mach." 

The selectmen agreed with Dea. John Hall to "sweep the 
meeting house and ring the bell for one whole year," for the 
sum of 3 Pds. 

April 16. — Philip Croniet had liberty to keep a ferry at lyam- 
perill river, to charge 2d for every person, and 6d for every 
horse and man passing, which order was "to stand until the 
County Court take order about it." 

For "the better encouragement of Mr. John Rayner in the 
ministry," it was voted that the 40 Pds. of mill rents with the 
penny rate, should be paid him yearly so long as he continued 
minister of Dover ; this penny rate to be levied on the inhab- 
itants of Dover Neck, Cochecho, Bloody Point and Oyster River 
" according to their articles." 

The selectmen also had power to treat with Mr. Rayner and 
to " agree with him for his building for himself convenient 
housing not exceeding 70 Pds." Twenty acres of swamp land 
were at the same time laid out for the use of the ministry, in the 
great swamp upon the Neck, which was not to be alienated 
without the consent of every inhabitant. 

Richard Waldron and Peter Coffin were chosen Deputies to 
the General Court. 

1673 
Jan. 25. — John Roberts and Jeremie Tebbets had liberty from 
the selectmen to improve six acres of land in the common lying 
off the east side of the path that ' ' doeth go unto the watering 
place on Dover Neck near unto Thomas Perkins' house," which 
land was to be improved by them seven years for their use, and 
then to be returned for the town's use, and left plains for feed- 
ing ground. 



1675] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 77 

1674 

March 2. — In choosing town officers this year, the town voted 
that Nicholas Hanson should " officiate no longer as a seller of 
pipe staves." The surveyor of highways for last year was to 
stand for this year. 

June 18. — A committee consisting of Ensign John Davis, 
Sargent Robert Burnum, Deacon John Hall, John Gerrish and 
John Wingate was appointed to run the line from Newichwan- 
nock river unto the utmost bounds on the south side of lyam- 
perill river. 

Upon the complaint of James Nute, sen. that Philip Cromwell 
was "taking in his highway and trespassing on the common," 
Sargent John Roberts and Deacon John Hall were appointed to 
" go to the place and take notice of what is done and give an 
account at our next meeting that we may regulate the same 
according to equity." At the next meeting, on report of the 
committee, Philip Cromwell was ordered to remove his fence 
forthwith and set it according to his own bounds that "we may 
have our old ways to pass in upon, on penalty of having his 
fence pulled down and also fined." 

Under date of 14th 12th mo. of this year, Rev. John Elliot's 
Church Records of the First Church in Roxbury, Mass., says : 

A lishermau about Pascatoway had 2 servants, who in anger conspired 
to kill yr master, did so, tooke his mony & fled, but were taken & both 
executed. 

This is the first record of the execution of white men in any 
of the Piscataqua plantations, so far as noticed. 

1675 

May 12. — In answer to the petition of the inhabitants of 
Oyster river Philip HoUet, Jno. Bickford, Robert Burnhams, 
John Woodman and others, the General Court ordered, "that 
the petitioners shall have liberty yearly to choose three select- 
men, who shall have power to make such rate or rates as they 
shall see the necessity for the maintenance of the ministry, to 
be collected by the constables according to law." 

July 15. — William Furber, Anthony Nutter and John Wood- 
man were chosen " to treat and discourse with the selectmen of 
Portsmouth and of the Isle of Shoals or other meet persons," 
about ' ' raising money for the relief of those who have suffered 
either by their estates or services in the present war with the 
Indians." 



78 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1675 

Another indication of the troublous times upon which the 
colonists had entered appears in the record : — 

Whereas the selectmen neglected the making a provision rate this 
present year, according to the former order, by reason of the troubles of 
the times, it is voted that the selectmen shall make provision rate for 
this present year according to the last year's rate, making abatement of 
such men's estates as they see just cause for at their discretion. 

Sept. — . — Two houses belonging to two persons named Ches- 
ley at Oyster River were attacked and burned by the Indians, 
two men in a canoe were killed, and two made prisoners, both 
of whom soon after made their escape. A few days afterwards, 
five or six houses were also burned at Oyster River by the 
Indians and two more men, William Roberts and his son-in-law, 
killed. 

To make reprisals for these daring and murderous assaults, 
about twenty young men, chiefly of Dover, obtained leave of 
Major Waldron, then commander of the militia, to try their skill 
and courage with the Indians in their own way. Having scat- 
tered themselves in the woods, a small party of them discovered 
five Indians in a field near a deserted house, some of whom were 
gathering corn, and others kindling a fire to roast it. The men 
were at such a distance from their fellows that they could make 
no signal to them without danger of a discovery; two of them 
therefore crept along silently, near to the house, from whence 
they suddenly rushed upon those two Indians who were busy at 
the fire, and knocked them down with the butts of their guns ; 
the other three took the alarm and escaped. 

Soon after this, the Indians assaulted a house at Oyster River, 
which was garrisoned. Meeting with a good old man without 
the garrison, whose name was Beard, they killed him upon the 
place, and in a barbarous manner cut off his head and set it on 
a pole in derision. {Hubbard'' s Eastern Wars.) 

Oct. 13. — The General Court "for the better security of the 
County of Dover and Portsmouth and of Yorkshire and the parts 
adjacent, ordered that there should be forthwith 40 able men 
raised and sent to Major Waldron to be by him disposed of for 
the end aforesaid, and not to be called off without the said 
major's consent, or else by order of the General Court and 
Council." 



1675] 



HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 



79 



Town Records 
Provision Rate 1675 
Of Dover Neck and Cochecho 



Mr. Nutter 
Deacon Hall 
Deacon dam 
Joseph Canie 
Thomas Canie Junior 
Henery Tibit 
Philip Benmore 
John Pinckham 
Jeremi Tibits 
Tho: Beard 
Tho: Perkins 
Isaac Stockes 
Tho: Roberts 
Jo: Tuttle 
Philip Crumell 
Rich: Pinckham 
Tho: Wliitehouse 

nine names 

John Roberts 
Leiftenant Pomfrit 
James Newt Junior 
Mr. Clements 
Johnathan Wattson 
Tho: Leighton 
Thomas Paine 
John Deues 
John Heard 
Mr. George Waldern 
Ralf Twamlie 
Ezekiel Wentworth 
William Taskett 
widdow Hanson 
John Church 

Of Bloody Point 
Sargant Hall 
william ffurber 
Antony Nutter 

and eight names 

Of Oyster Riuer 
(Ensign D)avis 
(Ja)mes Huckins 
John Alt 
John Bickford 
Tho: Willie 
Joseph Smith 



James Newt Senior 
Mr. Clements 
Abraham Newt » 
John Hall Junior 
Richard Rich 
John Dereie 
Tho: Teare (?) 
Ralph welch 
Zacharie ffeeld 
Nathaniell Stephens 
ginkin Jones 
John Ham 
William Home 
Tho: Harnett 
John Elis 
Humphire Varnie 

missing 
david L,arkin 
Tho: Austyn 
Tho: Haines 
Capt walden 

George Ricker and brother 
Richard Otis 
John gearish 
Tho: Hanson 
Robert Evens 
gershom Wentworth 
James Coffen 
Tho: downes 
Mark Giles 
Benjamin Head 



Henerie Langster 
william ffurber Junior 
Edward Allin 
are missing 



(- 



-) 



Tho: Edgerlie 

John Hill 

John Meader 

William Williams Junior 

Philip Cheslie senior 



80 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1676 

Steephen Jones waiter Jackson 

Robert Watson Edward Leathers 

John Davis Junior James Smith 

William Hill Tho: and Philip cheslie 

John york John Godard 

Nicholas dow Benjamin york 

Charles Adams Samuel willie 

Joseph Stimson Nichlas Haris 

Steephin Willie Stimson 

Joseph ffeild John dow 

Tho: Moris william durgin 

Nicholas Follett John woodman 

Robert Burnum William Williams senior 

Mr. John Cutt (Non Resident,) Nathaniel Lummack 

Salathiel Denbow davi daniel 

Benjamin Mathews ffrancis drew 

william perkins william Pittmans 

george goe william Follett 
This provisions is to be paid att ye price followeth 
wheat 5s 6d p bushel, Indian Come 4s p bushel, pease 4s p bushel, beif 
2d>^ p pound, pork 4 p pound, barlie 4 p bushel, butter 5d p pound. 

There were other names on the list to which the word '• nothing " had 
been added : viz : 

Isaac Stockes Capt. Barfoott 

Rich: Pinckham Elder Wentworth 

ffrances hyuck (of Bl Pt) 

John Migel (O. R.) Joseph Bickford (O. R.) 

Teage Reall (O. R.) Philip Cromell (O. R.) 

The highest tax payer on the above list was Capt Waldern 
who paid Pds. 2-7-4 ; the second was John Roberds who paid 
Pds. i-i6-3><5; the third Job Clements, paying Pds. i-i5-6>^; 
the fourth Richard Otis, paying Pds. 1-5-7/^. The lowest on 
the list were John EHs and six or seven others, each of whom 
paid 2s 6d. 

1676 
A treaty was made this year by Wonolancet, chief of the 
Penacooks, with Major Waldron in behalf of the Province, of 
which the following is a copy: 

Piscataqua River, Cochecho, 

3 July- 

At a meeting of ye Com appointed by ye Houd Genl. Ct. for to treat 
ye Inds. of the Eastern parts in order for ye procuring an Honll Peace 
with ym. Wee wth ye mutll consent of ye Sagamores l^nderwritten in 
behalfe of themselves and ye men — Indians belonging to them being 
about 300 in Number, have agreed as followeth : 

ily. That hence forward none of ye said Indians shall offer any vio- 



1676] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 81 

lence to ye persons of any English, nor doe any Damage to theyre 
Estates in any kind whatsoever. And if any Indian or Indians shall 
offend herein, they shall bring or cause to bee brought ye offender to 
some English authority, there to be prosecuted by ye English Lawes 
according to Nature of ye Offence. 

2ly. That none of said Indians shall entertain at any time any of our 
enemies, but shall give psent notice to ye Coute when any one come 
among them, ingaging to goe forth with ye English against them (if de- 
sired ) in order to ye seizing of them. And if any of sd Indians shall them- 
selves at any time bring such or Enemies vnto vs, they shall for their 
reward have 3 Pds. for each they shall so bring in. 

3ly. The Indians performing on their part, as is before expressed, 
wee ye committee doe ingage in ye behalfe of ye English not to offer any 
violence to any of their persons or estates, and if any injury be offered to 
said Indians by any English they (their) complaints to authority, ye 
offender shall be prosecuted by English Lawes according to ye nature of 
ye offence ; 

In witness to each and all ye promises we have mutually shaken 
hands and subscribed our names. 

Richard Waldern X Wanolucet, Sagamore 
Committee Nic. Shapleigh X Sampson Aboquecemoka 

Tho: Daniels X Mr Wm Sagamore 

X Squando, Sagamore 
X Dony 
X Serogumba 

Samll Numphow 
The mark X Warockomec 

After this treaty many of the Indians who had joined in 
Philip's war upon the English joined themselves to the Pena- 
cooks hoping that by means of Wonolancet's influence to escape 
punishment. By the invitation of Major Waldron this sagamore 
had come to Cochecho, and with him many of these Indians to 
the number of three or four hundred. These had the promise 
of good usage and had the advice of Major Waldron been fol- 
lowed, good faith would have been kept with them. But the 
renewal of hostilities by other Indians, occasioned the sending 
of two companies of soldiers from Massachusetts, under Captain 
Joseph Syll and Captain William Hathorne. In the course of 
their march, they came to Cochecho, on the 6th of September, 
where the Indians were met at the house of Major Waldron. 
The two captains would have fallen upon them at once, having 
it in their orders to seize all Indians, who had been concerned 
in the war. The major dissuaded them from that purpose, and 
contrived the following stratagem. He proposed to the Indians 
to have a training the next day, and a sham fight after the 
English mode ; and summoning his own men, with those under 



82 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1676 

Captain Frost of Kittery, they, in conjunction with the two 
companies, formed one party, and the Indians another. Having 
diverted them a while in this manner, and caused the Indians 
to fire the first volley, by a peculiar dexterity the whole body of 
them (except two or three) were surrounded, before they could 
form a suspicion of what was intended. They were immediately 
seized and disarmed, without the loss of a man on either side. 
A separation was then made : Wonolancet, with the Penacook 
Indians, and others who had joined in making peace the winter 
before, were peaceably dismissed ; but the strange Indians (as 
they were called) who had fled from the southward and taken 
refuge among them, were made prisoners, to the number of two 
hundred ; and being sent to Boston, seven or eight of them who 
were known to have killed any Englishmen were condemned 
and hanged ; the rest were sold into slavery in foreign parts. 
{Belknap.) 

This is the account of the affair as given by Dr. Belknap, 
who wrote while people born at the time, the children of some 
of those who were participants or eye witnesses of it, were on 
the stage and must have been familiar with all its details. 

Tradition adds to this that the Indians were furnished with 
a cannon mounted upon wheels, which pleased them very much. 
They were ignorant of its management and were furnished with 
gunners by the English. The Indians manned the drag ropes, 
and the sham fight commenced. In changing the direction of 
the cannon, the English gunners ranged the piece along a file of 
the Indians upon one of the drag ropes, and fired, killing and 
wounding a large number. This was attributed to accident. 

Major Waldron, it is evident, was deserving of praise instead 
of censure for his prudent course in this matter, and had the 
Indians known of his influence in their favor, it would doubtless 
have prevented the massacre that took place 13 years afterwards, 
when the Major was sacrificed to avenge the wrongs erroneously 
attributed to him. Having promised them good usage it is 
clear that he did all in his power to redeem his promise and by 
his advice saved many of the Indians from certain death. 

The heirs of Mason revived their claims to the Province this 
year by petition to the King, and at a public town meeting in 
Dover, in July, it was "unanimously agreed upon, voted and 
ordered that our trusty and well beloved Richard Walderne, 
sarjent Major, do in the name and behalf of our town petition 
his Maj'te that he would interpose his Royal authority and 



167 7] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 83 

afford us his wonted favor, that we be not disturbed by said 
Mason or any other, but continue peaceably in our present just 
rights under his Majesty's Massachusetts Bay government." 

They further declared that they had bona-fide purchased their 
lauds of the Indians ; recognized their subjection to the govern- 
ment of Massachusetts, under whom they had lived happily, and 
by whom they were now assisted in defending their estates and 
families against the savage enemy. {Belk?iap.) 

The General Court ordered that a committee of militia in the 
towns and county of Dover and Portsmouth should be required 
to "make nine several rates on the inhabitants thereof, accord- 
ing to law," to defray the charges of the war. 

Dec. 21. — "Mr. John Rayner, jr. minister of Dover, died of a 
cold and fever that he took in the field among the soldiers." 
{HuWs Diary ^ The soldiers composed the expedition which 
arrived in Dover Sept. 6, and those under the command of 
Major Waldron, who joined them here. Mr. Rayner doubtless 
acted as chaplain while they were in service here, and in their 
march eastward. 

1677 

March 30. — Indians being discovered in the woods, Major 
Waldron sent out eight of the Indians in his employ, one of 
whom was called Blind Will, to obtain further information in 
relation to them. Those sent out were all surprised together, 
by a company of Mohawks; two or three escaped, the others 
were either killed or taken. Blind Will was dragged away by 
his hair, and being wounded, perished in the woods on a neck 
of land formed by the confluence of Cochecho and Ising-glass 
rivers, which still bears the name of Blind Will's Neck. 

May 24. — The Court ordered that the Indians about Piscataqua 
should be settled about Quochecho, and to prevent the incon- 
venience by Indians travelling the woods with their guns it was 
further ordered that all "neighbor Indians and friends" should 
be enjoined on the sight of any English person, or being called 
unto, to immediately lay down their " gunns," and no Indian had 
liberty to travel in the woods on this side of the Merrimack 
river without a certificate from Major Waldron. 

Oct. 22.— The inhabitants of Dover, opposed to Mason's 
claim and desirous of continuing under the government of 
Massachusetts, addressed a petition to the Home government 
as follows : 



84 



NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE 



1679] 



To the King's Most Excellent Majesty — The humble petition of your 
Majesty's subjects the householders of the towu of Dover upou the Pis- 
cataqua river, New Euglaud. 

That forasmuch as through the goodness of God and the favor of your 
Most Excellent Majesty (which like the sweet influences of superior or 
heavenly bodies to the tender plants, ) hath cherished us in our weaker 
beginnings, having been continued through your special grace under 
your Majesty's protection and government of the Massachusetts, to which 
we voluntarily subjected ourselves, many years ago, yet not without 
some necessity, in part felt for want of government, and in part feared 
upon the account of protection which hath been more apparent since ; 
the happy event or issue of which doth cause us to be humble and 
earnest supplicants to your Majesty at this time, that we may be continued 
under the jurisdiction of the Massachusetts as formerly, our full acquiesc- 
ing wherein and ample satisfaction wherewith we do hereby make our 
serious profession of, and do therefore beg your royal assent thereunto, 
which favor of your Majesty's we shall account as a cloud of the latter 
rain and be further quickened to pray for all manner of prosperity upon 
your Majesty's person and councils as becomes your loyal subjects. 

Dated at Dover the 22d October 1677. 

They pray to be continued under ye Massachusetts government. 



John Evans Richard Waldron 

William Shukford William Wentworth 

Isak Trackie John Davis 

Gershom X Wentworth John Robearts 



John Hill 
John Rann 
Wm Ffurber, jr 
John Gerrish 
George X Bacon 
JohnX Winget 
Stephen Jones 
Richard X Roe 
Thomas X Canney 
Thomas X Hamock 



Ezekell X Winford 
Thomas Downes 
Joseph Canne 
John Church 
Thomas Edgrly 
John Dam 
John Ham 
John Hall, jr 
William Ffurber 
Henry X Langtof 
John Hall, senior 



Anthony Nutter 
John X Hud 
John X Bickford 
Thomas Beard 
Charles X Adams 
Job Clements 
John Bickford 
Nathaniel Stones 
Ginkin X Jonnes 
Thomas X Roberts 

Those with an X made their marks. 



1678 
Under this year Rev. John Pike has the following memoran- 
dum among other personal "occurents" in his journal: 

John Pike came to Dov^er for ye work of the ministry Nov. i. 



1679 
May 28. — In answer to the petition of Mrs. Frances Rayner, 
widow of Rev. John Rayner, the Court ordered that the select- 
men of Dover "do take effectual care to settle the accounts 
between the inhabitants of said town and Mrs. Rayner, admin- 



1679] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 85 

istratrix to the estate of the deceased Mr. John Rayner, relating 
to his salary, and the payment of such arrears as are yet unpaid, 
and that this be done at or before the last day of September 
next." 

May 30. — The Court ordered the County Court, next to be 
held at Dover, to "take effectual care for the levying of the 
public rates payable and due from the inhabitants of that Court, 
as well those on the Isle of Shoals, as elsewhere, that so the 
dues belonging to those that have done service in the late war, 
and disbursed their estates for the public, may be paid as in 
equity we are bound." 

Sept. 18. — The union of New Hampshire with Massachusetts 
was dissolved at this time by royal proclamation. John Cutt 
was appointed President of the Province with a council of six 
of the principal inhabitants, of whom Richard Waldron of Dover 
was one. Agreeably to the royal direction they chose three 
other gentlemen into the council, of whom Job Clements of 
Dover was one. The President nominated Major Waldron to 
be his deputy or vice-president and John Roberts, marshal. 



CHAPTER III 

Under Province of New Hampshire 

1680 

Writs were issued for calling a General Assembly, the persons 
in each town who were judged qualified to vote were named in 
the writs, and the oath of allegiance was administered to each 
voter. 

The number of qualified voters in Dover at this time was 61, 
in Portsmouth 71, in Hampton 57, in Exeter 20; in all 209. 

The Assembly met at Portsmouth on the i6th of March. The 
members from Dover were Peter Coffin, Anthony Nutter and 
Richard Waldron, jr. 

1681 

May 5. — Rev. John Pike, the minister of Dover, married 
Sarah, the second daughter of Mr. Joshua Moody, the minister 
of Portsmouth. Took office Aug. 31, following, being a stormy 
da3^ the same in which Mr. Moody with his wife and others 
were overset in a canoe, and in some danger of drowning. 
{Pike:) 

Another attempt of Mason to revive his claims was success- 
fully resisted. Having come over from England with a man- 
damus, requiring the council to admit him to a seat at the board, 
he soon endeavored to persuade some of the people to take 
leases from him, threatening others if they did not, forbidding 
them to cut firewood and timber, asserting his right to the prov- 
ince and assuming the title of Lord protector. The council 
having prohibited these proceedings, Mason refused to hold his 
seat with them, and a warrant being issued for his apprehension, 
he suddenly returned to England. During these transactions 
President Cutt died, and Major Waldron, as vice president, suc- 
ceeded him. The vacancy made in the council by the death of 
President Cutt was filled by Richard Waldron, jr. 



1683] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 87 

1682 

Jan. 3. — Colonel Waldrou's mills burnt down in a very rainy 
night. {Pike.) 

The following order, which is preserved in the Provincial 
Records, shows up one of the neighborhood quarrels of the 
time : 

To the Constable of Dover: — You are hereby required, in his 
Majesty's name, to summon Ephraim Trickie to appear before the court 
to morrow, being the 5th instant, to answer to the complaint of Mary 
Carter, for pulling down her fence, about her cornfield, some time the 
last week, and for swearing many oaths. And you are also hereby 
required to summon Thomas Bickford to appear at the same time before 
the court, to answer for his swearing many oaths at the same time ; 
and you are hereby required to summon Henry Langstare, sen. to appear, 
to give in his evidence to what he knows about the fence above said 
being thrown dovyn. Hereof fail not, and so make a return under your 
hand. 

Dated at Portsmouth, September 4th, 1682. 

By me : Richard Martyn of the Council. 

I have summoned the persons above mentioned, Ephraim Trickie, 
Thomas Bickford, and Henry Langstare, sen. according to law, to give 
iu evidence in the case intended. 

Sept. 4. Will. Henderson, Constable. 

A tax of four pence on a pound was laid by the court this 
year, payable in merchantable pine boards, at " any convenient 
landing place in Piscataqua river," at 26s. per M., white oak 
pipe staves at 50s., Red oak, 35s, beef 2d per lb., pork 3d, corn 
3s per bush., wheat 5s, peas 4s, malt 3s, fish at price current; 
and whoever paid their rates in money were to be " abated one 
third." 

1683 

The trial of Edward Gove for " high treason " occurred this 
year, being the first and last trial of the kind in the colony or 
province of New Hampshire. Gove, who lived in that part of 
Hampton, now Seabrook, was a leading man as well as a mem- 
ber of the assembly, and was very active in his opposition to 
Mason's claims and to the Governor who favored them. He 
finally carried his opposition so far as to visit Dover, Ports- 
mouth and Exeter, and raised men to rebel against the govern- 
ment. Warrants were issued for his arrest and when a justice 
and a constable attempted to arrest him he resisted and they 
failed in his arrest. He with his followers rode from Exeter to 



88 NO TABLE E VENTS IN THE [ 1 684 

Hampton with trumpets blowing and drawn swords. At Hamp- 
ton they were surrounded and taken, all but the trumpeter who 
broke through and escaped. Gove was taken to Portsmouth 
and a special court was summoned Feb. 15, 1682-3, when he 
was tried for high treason, found guilty and sentenced to be 
hanged, drawn and quartered. Sentence was deferred to learn 
the King's pleasure. He was sent to England and confined in 
the tower of lyondon for three years, was pardoned Sept. 14, 
1685, returned home and his estate was restored to him. 

July 19. — Foul weather set in after something of a drought, 
and continued till the beginning of September, to the great 
damage and almost ruin of husbandry. {Pike.) 

Oct. 8. — Writs were issued on the complaint of Robert Mason 
for attaching the goods, or for want thereof, taking the bodies of 
Major Waldron and other inhabitants, and taking bond for their 
appearance at the court of pleas to be held at Great Island, to 
answer in an action of trespass for illegally keeping said Mason 
out of possession of certain lands and tenements in Cochecho, 
Dover, and other places in the said province, and felling his 
woods, to the damage of three thousand pounds, &c. 



Feb. 3. — An earthquake was sensibly observed by many, 
though not universally perceived. This happened Sabbath day, 
4 o'clock afternoon. 

March 13. — The Governor and Council ordered, "that the 
meeting house at Dover be immediately fortified, and a line 
drawn about it, which meeting house shall be the main garrison 
for defending the inhabitants against the attacks of the enemy; 
also that the house, formerly called the watch house, be a by- 
guard; likewise, that the houses of Peter Coffin, Esq. and 
Richard Otis, be by-garrisons for Cochecho, for securing the 
inhabitants that dwell thereabout." 

March 22. — A prodigious tide, rising some feet higher than 
the observation of the oldest settlers in this place, did great 
damage to wharves and warehouses in Boston and Pascataqua. 

April 22. — Happened a tide a little inferior to the former, and 
in some places flowed somewhat higher. 

Nov. 8. — Was exceeding dark, from ten in the morning, till 
two in the afternoon, which might be occasioned by a very black 
and thick cloud passing over very low. It seemed as though the 
sun had been greatly and totally eclipsed. 



1685] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 89 

1685 

The attempt of the heirs of Capt. Mason to obtain possession 
of the lands claimed by them, and the countenance which the}' 
received from the courts at the instigation of Gov. Cranfield, led 
to forcible resistance on the part of some of the inhabitants. 
Executions were issued for the arrest of Major Waldron and 
other principal men. An attempt being made to serve the exe- 
cution in Dover a number of persons forcibly resisted the officer, 
and obliged him to relinquish his design. Warrants were then 
issued against the rioters, and the sheriff with his attendants 
attempted to seize them, whilst the people were assembled for 
divine service. This caused an uproar in the congregation, in 
which a young heroine distinguished herself by knocking down 
one of the officers with her bible. They were all so roughly 
handled that they were glad to escape with their lives. (Bclkyiap.) 

Mason then brought suits by writ against Major Waldron, 
who had always distinguished himself in opposition to his 
claim, for holding lands and felling timber, to the amount of 
four thousand pounds. The Major appeared in court, and 
challenged every one of the jury as interested persons, some of 
them having taken leases of Mason, and all of them having 
lands which he claimed. The judge then caused the oath of 
voire dire to be administered to each juror, purporting " that he 
was not concerned in the lands in question, and that he should 
neither gain or lose by the cause." Upon which the Major 
said aloud to the people present, " that his was a leading case, 
and that if he were cast they must all become tenants of Mason ; 
and that all persons in the province being interested, none of 
them could legally be of the jury." The cause however went 
on ; but he made no defence, asserted no title and gave no evi- 
dence. Judgment was given against him, and at the next court 
he was fined for "mutinous and seditious words." 

Suits were instituted against many other land owners and 
decided in the same summary manner. In Dover, besides 
Waldron, there were John Heard, sen. William Home, Jenkin 
Jones, William Furbur, jr. John Hall, jr. Joseph Field, 
Nathaniel Hill, James Huckins, William Tasket, Zachery 
Field, Philip Chesley, jr. Thomas Chesley, Robert Burnham, 
Anthony Nutter, Williajn Furbur, sen. Thomas Paine, Charles 
Adams, Thomas Edgerly, Henry Langstaff, Thomas Stevenson, 
John Meader, John Woodman, John Windict, John Davis, sen. 
Joseph Beard, John Roberts, Joseph Stevenson, Samuel Hill, 



90 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1689 

Philip Lewis, John Gerrish, John Hill, Joseph Hall, Thomas 
Roberts, sen. and perhaps others, who were thus declared dis- 
possessed. From seven to twelve cases were dispatched each 
day. Some executions were levied ; but the officers could 
neither retain possession nor find purchasers, so that the property 
soon reverted to its owners. 

1686 

Sept, 13. — At a general town meeting the selectmen were 
empowered to layout highways for " his Majisty's and country's 
use" in all parts of the township of Dover. 

It was also voted to pay the minister of Dover 60 Pounds, 
and the minister at Oyster river 40 Pounds for the year ensuing 
from the loth June last, ' ' in such species and prices ' ' as follows : 
pine boards 20 shillings, pork 3d per lb, wheat 5s per bush, 
peas 4s, barley 3s, corn 3s. 

John Evans was voted 20 shillings per year, besides his fees, 
so long as he shall supply the office of town clerk. 

1687 

April 27. — It was voted that the selectmen have power to 
make a rate to the value of 15 Pds. for the relief of wadow 
Dorothy Roberts and to be employed for her use ; to be " paid 
in such species as followeth : " wheat 5s per bushel, Indian 
corn 3s, peas 4s, pork 3d per lb, beef 2d. " For the use of the 
poor," is added to the vote in parenthesis. 

This winter was productive of few snows, and those very 
shallow. It seldom fell above an inch at a time, and perhaps 
all together would not have amounted to above a foot or a foot 
and a half deep ; but many rains in lieu thereof. {Pike) 

Sept. 3. — Pheasant Eastwick, coroner, makes return of an 
inquest held at Oyster river, on the body of Elizabeth Jenkins, 
wife of Stephen Jenkins, planter, that "she wilfully destroyed 
herself by casting herself into the water." 

1688 

"This year ye meazells raged thro out ye country, beginning 
at Boston and so coming eastward." {Pike) 



June 27. — The "destruction of Cochecho," as it was called 
for many years, occurred at this time, the particulars of which 
are mainly from Dr. Belknap's History. 



i689] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 91 

Thirteen years had almost elapsed since the seizure of the 400 Indians, 
by Major Waldron. During all tliis time an inextinguishable thirst of 
revenge had been cherished by them which never till now found oppor- 
tunity for gratification. Wonolaucet, one of the sachems of Penacook, 
who was dismissed with his people at the time of the seizure, always ob- 
served his father's dying charge not to quarrel with the English; but 
Hagkins, another sachem, with some of those Indians who were seized 
and sold into slavery abroad and had now found their way home, could 
not rest till they had revenge. There were five garrisoned houses at the 
time around the falls where are now situated the works of the Cocheco 
Manufacturing Co. three on the north side, viz. Waldron's, Otis' and 
Heard's, and two on the south side, viz. Peter Coffin's and his son's. 
These houses were surrounded with timber walls, the gates of which, as 
well as the house doors, were secured with bolts and bars. The neigh- 
boring families, living in houses not fortified, retired to these houses by 
night, " but by an unaccountable negligence, no watch was kept. The 
Indians, who were daily passing through the town, visiting and trading 
with the inhabitants, as usual in time of peace, viewed their situation 
with an attentive eye. Some hints of a mischievous design had been 
given out by their squaws, but in such dark and ambiguous terms that 
no one could comprehend their meaning. Some of the people were 
uneasy, but Waldron, who from a long course of experience, was inti- 
mately acquainted with the Indians, and on other occasions had been 
ready enough to suspect them, was now so thoroughly secure, that when 
some of the people hinted their fears to him, he merrily bade them go 
and plant their pumpkins, saying that he would tell them when the 
Indians would break out. The very evening before the mischief was 
done, being told by a young man that the town was full of Indians and 
the people were much concerned ; he answered that he knew the Indians 
very well and there was no danger." 

The plan which the Indians had formed was, that two squaws should 
go to each of the garrisoned houses, in the evening, and ask leave to 
lodge by the fire ; that in the night when the people were asleep, they 
should open the doors and gates, and give the signal by a whistle ; upon 
which the strange Indians, who were to be within hearing, should rush 
in and take their long meditated revenge. On the evening of Thursday, 
the 27th of June, two squaws accordingly applied to each of the garri- 
sons for lodgings, as they frequently did in time of peace. They were 
admitted into all but the younger Coffin's, and the people at their request, 
showed them how to open the doors, in case they should have occasion 
to go out in the night. Mesandowit, one of their chiefs, went to Wal- 
dron's garrison, and was kindly entertained, as he had often been before. 
The squaws told the Major that a number of Indians were coming to 
trade with him the next day, and Mesandowit while at supper, with his 
usual familiarity, said, "Brother Waldron, what would you do if the 
strange Indians should come ? " The Major carelessly answered, that he 
could assemble an hundred men, by lifting up his finger. In this unsus- 
pecting confidence the family retired to rest. 

When all was quiet the gates were opened and the signal was given. 
The Indians entered, set a guard at the door, and rushed into the major's 



92 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1689 

apartment, which was an inner room. Awakened by the noise, he 
jumped out of bed, and though now advanced in life to the age of eighty 
years, he retained so much vigor as to drive them with his sword through 
two or three doors, but as he was returning for his other arms they came 
behind him, stunned him with a hatchet, drew him into his hall, and 
seating him in an elbow chair, on a long table, insultingly asked him, 
" Who shall judge Indians now ?" They then obliged the people in the 
house to get them some victuals, and when they had done eating they 
cut the major across the breast and belly with knives, each one with a 
stroke saying, "I cross out my account." They then cut off his nose 
and ears, forcing them into his mouth; and when spent with the loss of 
blood, he was falling down from the table, one of them held his own 
sword under him, which put an end to his misery. They also killed his 
son-in-law Abraham Lee, but took his daughter Lee with several others, 
and having pillaged the house, set it on fire. Otis's garrison, which was 
next to the Major's met with the same fate ; he was killed with several 
others, and his wife and children made prisoners. Heard's was saved by 
the barking of a dog, just as the Indians were entering. Elder Went- 
worth, who was awakened by the noise, pushed them out, and falling on 
his back, set his feet against the gate and held it till he had alarmed the 
people. Two balls were fired through it, but both missed him. Coffin's 
house was surprised, but as the Indians had no particular emnity to him, 
they spared his life and the lives of his family and contented themselves 
with pillaging the house. Finding a bag of money, they made him 
throw it by handfuls on the floor, while they amused themselves by 
scrambling for it. They then went to the house of his son, who would 
not admit the squaws in the evening, and summoned him to surrender, 
promising him quarter. He declined their offer, and determined to de- 
fend his house, till they brought out his father and threatened to kill 
him before his eyes. Filial affection then overcame his resolution and 
he surrendered. They put both families together into a deserted house, 
intending to reserve them for prisoners, but while the Indians were busy 
in plundering, they all escaped. Twenty-three people were killed in this 
surprisal, and twenty-nine made prisoners. Five or six houses with the 
mills were burned. So expeditious were the Indians in the execution of 
their plot, that before the people could be collected from the other parts 
of the town to oppose them, they fled with their prisoners and booty. As 
they passed Heard's garrison in their retreat, they fired upon it, but the 
people being prepared and resolved to defend it, and the enemy being 
in haste, it was preserved. The preservation of its owner was more 
remarkable. 

Elizabeth Heard, with her three sons and a daughter, and some others, 
were returning in the night from Portsmouth. They passed up the 
river in their boat unperceived by the Indians, who were then in posses- 
sion of the houses ; but suspecting danger by the noise they heard, 
after they had landed they betook themselves to Waldron's garrison, 
where they saw lights, which they imagined were set up for direction to 
those who might be seeking a refuge. They knocked and begged earn- 
estly for admission, but no answer being given a young man of the 
company climbed up the wall and saw to his inexpressible surprise, an 



1689] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 93 

luiliau standing in the door of the house with his gun. The woman 
was so overcome with the fright that she was unable to fly, but begged 
her children to shift for themselves, and they with heavy hearts left her. 
When she had a little recovered, she crawled into some bushes and lay 
there till daylight. She then perceived an Indian coming toward her 
with a pistol in his hand ; he looked at her and went away ; returning he 
looked at her again, and she asked him what he would have; he made 
no answer, but ran yelling to the house, and she saw him no more. She 
kept her place till the house was burned and the Indians were gone, and 
then returning home found her own house safe. Her preservation in 
these dangerous circumstances was more remarkable, if, as is supposed, 
it was an instance of justice and gratitude in the Indians. At the time 
when the four hundred were seized in 1676, a yoving Indian escaped and 
took refuge in her house, where she concealed him ; in return for which 
kindness he promised her that he would never kill her, nor any of her 
family in any future war, and that he would use his influence with the 
other Indians to the same purpose. This Indian was one of the party 
who surprised the place and she was well known to the most of them. 

The same day, after the mischief was done, a letter from Secretary 
Addington, written by order of the government, directed to Major Wal- 
dron, giving him notice of the intention of the Indians to surprise him 
under pretence of trade, fell into the hands of his son. This design was 
communicated to Governor Bradstreet by Major Hinchman of Chelms- 
ford, who had learned it of the Indians. The letter was despatched 
from Boston, the day before, by Mr. Weare ; but some delay which he 
met with at Newbury ferry prevented its arrival in season. 

The prisoners taken at this time were mostly carried to Canada, and 
sold to the French, being the first that were ever carried there. One of 
these prisoners was Sarah Gerrish, a remarkably fine child of seven 
years, and grand-daughter of Major Waldron, in whose house she lodged 
that fatal night. Some circumstances attending her captivity are truly- 
affecting. When she was awakened by the noise of the Indians in the 
house, she crept into another bed and hid herself under the clothes to 
escape their search. She remained in their hands till the next winter 
and was sold from one to another for several times. An Indian girl once 
pushed her into the river, but catching hold by the bushes, she escaped 
drowning, yet durst not tell how she came to be wet. Once she was so 
weary with travelling that she did not awake in the morning till the 
Indians were gone and then found herself alone in the woods, covered 
with snow and without any food. Having found their tracks she went 
crying after them till they heard her and took her with them. At another 
time they kindled a great fire and the young Indians told her she was to 
be roasted. She burst into tears, threw her arms around her master's 
neck and begged him to save her, which he promised to do if she would 
behave well. In Canada, she was bought by the Intendant's lady, who 
treated her well and sent her to a nunnery for her education. But when 
Sir William Phipps was at Quebec she was exchanged and returned to 
her friends, with whom she lived till she was sixteen years old. 

The wife of Richard Otis was taken at the same time, with an infant 
daughter of three months old. The French priests took this child under 



94 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1690 

Iheir care, baptized her by the name of Christina, and educated her in 
the Romish religion. She passed some time in a nunnery, but declined 
taking the veil, and was married to a Frenchman, by whom she had 
two children. But her desire to see New England was so strong, that 
upon an exchange of prisoners in 1714, being then a widow, she left 
both her children, who were not permitted to come with her, and 
returned home, where she abjured the Romish faith. She was married 
afterwards to Capt. Thomas Baker, and lived in Dover till her death in 
1773- 

Oct. 28. — At a public town meeting held at the meeting house 
on the Neck, lyieut. John Tuttle was chosen to open the votes 
at Portsmouth for the choice of a commissioner, for the joining 
with the commissioners of the United Colonies, and to join with 
the rest of the representatives of the Province, in giving such 
instructions to the said commissioners as shall be thought meet, 
for the vigorous management of the present war. 

1690 
Jan. I. — At a public town meeting the following proceedings 
took place in reference to the government of the Province which 
had been thrown into disorder by the revolution in Massachu- 
setts, whereb}' the Andros Government had been overthrown: 

Whereas this Province, since the last revolution in the Massachusetts 
Colony, has been destitute of government, and has hitherto waited 
their Majesties' order for a settlement thereof, which, not yet arriving, 
and seeing a present necessity of falling into some method of government, 
in order to our defence against the common enemy : 

Voted, nemine contradicente, that six persons be chosen in this town, 
as commissioners, to meet with the commissioners of the other towns of 
the Province, to confer about and resolve upon a method of government 
within this Province, and what the said commissioners of the whole 
Province, or the major part of them, shall conclude upon, and agree as 
to the settlement of government among us : we, the inhabitants of Dover, 
shall hold as good and valid to all intents and purposes; hereby obliging 
ourselves to yield all ready obedience thereiinto, until their Majesties' 
order shall arrive for the settlement of the government over us. 

The persons chosen by the majority of votes of the town are Capt. 
John Woodman, Capt. John Gerrish, Lieut. John Tuttle, Mr. Thomas 
Edgerly, Lieut. John Roberts, Mr. Nicholas Follett. 

At the first meeting of the commissioners from the towns of 
Dover, Portsmouth and Exeter, they came to no conclusion; but 
afterward, they thought it best to return to their ancient union 
with Massachusetts. A petition for this purpose, signed by 392 
persons, being presented, tTiey were readily admitted till the 
King's pleasure should be known; and the members were sent 
to the general court which met there in this and the two follow- 



1690] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 95 

ing years. The gentlemen who had formerly been in commission 
for the peace, the militia and the civil oflSces, were by town 
votes, approved by the general court, restored to their places, 
and ancient laws and customs continued to be observed. 
{Belknap.) 

In addition to this statement of Belknap, the following from 
C. W. Tuttle, Esq., published in the proceedings of the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society gives details of interest. 

"When the memorable year 1689 ended, the four towns in New 
Hampshire were still without union and without government. The 
prospect of having a provincial government set over them by William 
and Mary was no better than when the government of Andros was 
withdrawn from them, more than eight months before. * * * At 
this juncture of affairs, Portsmouth, Dover and Exeter came to an 
understanding that each should choose commissioners with full power 
to meet in joint convention and devise "some method of govern- 
ment in order to their defence against the common enemy." Hamp- 
ton, at first reluctant, finally joined with the other towns. Each 
selected six delegates, with the exception of Exeter, which elected 
four, making 22 in all. They were the chief persons in the four 
towns of the Province, and heads of families. The commissioners met 
in Portsmouth on the 24th Jan. 1690. How they organized and who their 
officers were, is unknown. The Convention unanimously adopted a 
simple form of government, substantially like that set over the Province 
by the royal Commissions of Charles II, to President Cutt and also Lt. 
Gov. Cranfield. To give their act the greatest force and authority, each 
and every member of the Convention set his hand to the instrument on 
which was drawn the form of the new provincial government. This 
celebrated document, the only remaining record of the Convention now 
known, is in the handwriting of John Pickering, a lawyer of Portsmouth, 
and a member of the Convention. Having finished its labors, the Con- 
vention adjourned to meet again , after the election of officers for the new 
government, and count the votes." 

This venerable document came to Mr. Tuttle's hands several 
years since among the papers of John Tuttle, a member of the 
Convention and his paternal ancestor. It had never before 
appeared in print and no copy of it was preserved in the public 

archives. 

Form of Government. 

New Hampshire in New England. 

At a meeting of the Committee chosen by the inhabitants of the 
respective towns within this Province for the settlement of a method of 
order and government over the same, until their Majesties take care 
thereof, held in Portsmouth the 24th of January 1689-90. 

Whereas, Since the late revolution in the Massachusetts Colony, no 
order from their Majesties has yet arrived for the settlement of govern- 
ment in this Province, and no authority being left in the Province save 



96 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1690 

that of the late Justice of Peace: which, considering our present circum- 
stances, cannot answer the end of government, viz. the raising of men, 
money, &c. for our defence against the common enemy. 

Resolved, That a President and Council, consisting of ten persons, as 
also a Treasurer and Secretary, be chosen in the Province, in manner and 
form following: viz. for the Council, three persons of the inhabitants 
of Portsmouth, three persons of the inhabitants of Hampton, two 
persons of the inhabitants of Dover, and two persons of the in- 
habitants of Exeter; which persons shall be chosen by the major 
vote of the inhabitants of the town where they live, and the President, 
Treasurer and Secretary to be chosen by a major vote of the whole 
Province, which President shall also have the power over the militia 
of the Province as major, and the President and Council so chosen, or 
the major part thereof, shall with all convenient speed call an assembly 
of the representatives of the people not exceeding three persons from 
one town, which said President & Council or the major part of them, 
whereof the President or his Deputy to be : or together with the repre- 
sentatives aforesaid, or the major part of them, from time to time shall 
make such acts and orders, and exert such powers and authority as may 
in all respects have a tendency to the preservation of the peace, punish- 
ment of offenders, and defence of their Majesties' subjects against the 
common enemy, provided they exceed not the bounds his late Majesty, 
King Charles the Second, was graciously pleased to limit in his royal 
commission to the late President and Council of this Province. 

Robt: Wadleigh John Woodman Henry Green Nathanll Fryer 

Willm Hilton John Gerrish Nathll Weare Wm. Vaughn 

Samuel Leavitt John Tuttle Samuel Shurbern Robt Elliott 

his 
Jonathan Thing Thomas Edgerly Morris X Hobbs Richd Waldron 

mark 

John Robearts Henry Dow John Pickerin 

Nich. Follett Edward Gove Tho. Cobbett 

Jan. 30. — A town meeting was held in Dover to choose two 
members of the Council, and to vote for President, Secretary and 
Treasurer. Capt. John Gerrish and Capt. John Woodman were 
elected members of the Council. The votes for the other Pro- 
vincial officers were given and sealed up to be opened by the 
commissioners and counted with the votes of the other towns. 

About the same time a meeting was held in Hampton for a 
similar purpose, when a majority agreed not to vote for any 
provincial officers, to the great surprise of the whole Province, 
the six commissioners from that town having agreed in Conven- 
tion to the form of government. This action put an end to the 
attempt to form a provincial government, and a union was 
formed with Massachusetts as related by Dr. Belknap. 

March 18.— Salmon Falls was surprised by the Indians and 
French, just after the manner of Cochecho. The whole place 



1692] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 97 

was destroyed by fire; 27 persons slain, and 52 carried 
captive. 

The party which came from Trois Rivieres, was under the 
command of Sieur Hertel, an ofl&cer of great repute in Canada, 
and consisted of 52 men of whom 25 were Indians under Hoop- 
hood, a noted warrior. 

July 6. — Two companies under the Captains Floyd & Wiswall, 
who were scouting, discovered an Indian track, which they pur- 
sued till they came up with the enemy at Wheelwright's Pond, 
in Ivce (then a part of Dover), where a bloody engagement 
ensued for some hours; in which Wiswall, his lieutenant, 
Flagg, and sergeant Walker, with twelve more, were killed, 
and several wounded. It was not known how many of the 
enemy fell, as they always carried off their dead. Floyd main- 
tained the fight after Wiswall's death, till his men, fatigued and 
wounded, drew off; which obliged him to follow. The enemy 
retreated at the same time ; for when Captain Convers went to 
look after the wounded, he found seven alive, w^hom he brought 
in by sunrise the next morning, and then returned to bury the 
dead. {Belkyiap.) 

1691 

The heirs of Mason having sold their title to lands in New 
Hampshire to Samuel Allen, a London merchant, the latter pro- 
cured a commission for government of New Hampshire, in 
which his son-in-law, John Usher, was named as lieutenant 
governor, with power to execute the commission in Allen's 
absence. The people of Dover and the other towns in the 
province again submitted, with extreme reluctance, to the 
unavoidable necessity of being under a government distinct 
from Massachusetts. {Betkjiap.) 

1692 

Nov. 28. — The Provincial Council, to prevent the drawing off 
of the soldiers from Cochecho and Oyster river, ordered the 
Treasurer to disburse twenty or thirty pounds to supply said 
soldiers with provisions, and to enable them to continue at their 
posts for the better defence of the Province. {Pivv. Records.) 

Dec. 25. — A doeful and tremendous noise was affirmed to be 
heard in the air nigh Capt. Gerrish's garrison, which continued 
with a little intermission near half an hour. {Pike.) 



98 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1694 

1693 

Jan. 21. — Another small earthquake happened about two 
hours before day. 

May 10. — Tobias Hanson killed by the Indians, as he 
travelled the path near the west corner of Thomas Downs' 
field. 

Oct. 15. — Sabbath day, about 10 o'clock in the morning, a 
great rumbling noise was heard by many towards the northeast, 
supposed to be a considerable earthquake. {Pike.) 

The General Assembly in ordering that every town in the 
Province should provide a schoolmaster for the supply of the 
town on penalty of ten pounds, excepted Dover during the war 
wnth the French and Indians from the provisions of the act. 
This exemption was doubtless in consequence of the desolation 
of the town in 1689, from which it had not yet sufficiently 
recovered to support the charge of a school. 

1694 
The settlement at Oyster river was attacked by the Indians, 
under the lead of Villieu, a French missionary, in this year. A 
body of about two hundred and fifty of them, collected from the 
tribes of St. John, Penobscot and Norridgewog, approached 
the place undiscovered and halted near the falls on Tuesday 
evening, the 17th of July. The settlement was on both sides of 
the river and the houses chiefly near the water. There were 
twelve garrisoned houses in all, sufficient for the defence of the 
inhabitants, but apprehending no danger, some families remained 
at their own unfortified houses, and those who were in the 
garrisons were but indifferently provided for defence, some being 
even destitute of powder. The Indians were formed in two 
divisions, one of which was to go on each side of the river 
and plant themselves in ambush, in small parties, near every 
house, so as to be ready for the attack at the rising of the sun ; 
and the first gun was to be the signal. John Dean, whose house 
stood by the saw-mill at the falls, intending to go from home 
very early, arose before the dawn of day, and was shot as he 
came out of his door. This firing, in part, disconcerted their 
plan ; several parties who had some distance to go, had not then 
arrived at their stations ; and the inhabitants in general being 
alarmed, some of them had time to make their escape, and 
others to prepare for their defence. 



1694] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 99 

Of the twelve garrisoned houses, five were destroyed, viz. Adams', 
Drew's, Edgerly's, Header's, and Beard's. They entered Adams' with- 
out resistance, where they killed fourteen persons; "the grave is still to 
be seen in which they were all buried." Drew surrendered his garrison 
on the promise of security, but was murdered when he fell into their 
hands. One of his children, a boy nine years old, was made to run 
through a lane of Indians as a mark for them to throw their hatchets at, 
till they had dispatched him. Edgerly's was evacuated. The people 
took their boat, and one of them was mortally wounded before they got 
out of reach of the enemy's shot. Beard's and Meader's were also 
evacuated and the people escaped. The defenceless houses were nearly 
all set on fire, the inhabitants being either killed or taken in them, or 
else in endeavoring to fly to the garrisons. Some escaped by hiding in 
the bushes and other secret places. Thomas Edgerly, by concealing him- 
self in his cellar, preserved his house, though twice set on fire. The 
house of John Buss, the minister, was destroyed, with a valuable 
library. He was absent; his wife and family fled to the woods and 
escaped. The wife of John Dean, at whom the first gun was fired, was 
taken with her daughter, and carried about two miles up the river, 
where they were left under the care of an old Indian, while the others 
returned to their bloody work. The Indian complained of a pain in his 
head, and asked the woman what would be a proper remedy; she 
answered occapee, which is the Indian word for rum, of which she knew 
he had taken a bottle from her house. The remedy being agreeable, he 
took a large dose and soon fell asleep, and she took that opportunity to 
make her escape, with her child, into the woods, and kept herself con- 
cealed till they were gone. 

The other seven garrisons, viz. Burnham's, Bickford's, Smith's, Davis', 
Bunker's, Jones' and Woodman's, were resolutely and successfully de- 
fended. At Burnham's, the gate was left open. The Indians, ten in 
number, who were appointed to surprise it, were asleep under the 
bank of the river, at the time the alarm was given. A man within, 
who had been kept awake by the toothache, hearing the first gun, 
aroused the people and secured the gate, just as the Indians, who were 
awakened by the same noise, were entering. Finding themselves dis- 
appointed, they ran to Pitman's defenceless house, and forced the door 
at the moment that he had burst a way through that end of the house 
which was next to the garrison, to which he with his family, taking 
advantage of the shade of some trees, it being moonlight, happily 
escaped. Still defeated, they attacked the house of John Davis, which 
after some resistance, he surrendered on terms ; but the terms were 
violated and the whole family was either killed or made captives. 
Thomas Bickford preserved his house in a singular manner. It was 
situated near the river and surrounded with a palisade. Being alarmed 
before the enemy had reached the house, he sent off his family in a boat, 
and then shutting his gate, betook himself alone to the defence of his 
fortress. Despising alike the promises and threats by which the Indians 
would have persuaded him to surrender, he kept up a constant fire at 
them, changing his dress as often as he could, showing himself with a 
different cap, hat or coat, and sometimes without either, and giving 



100 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1694 

directions alond as if he had a number of men with him. Finding their 
attempt vain, the enemy withdrew, and left him sole master of the house, 
which he had defended with such admirable address. Smith's, Bunker's 
and Davis' garrisons being seasonably apprised of the danger, were 
resolutely defended. One Indian was supposed to be killed and another 
wounded by a shot from Davis'. Jones' garrison was beset before day. 
Captain Jones hearing his dogs bark and imagining wolves might be 
near, went out to secure some swine and returned unmolested. He then 
went up into the fiankhart and sat on the wall. Discerning the flash of 
a gun, he dropped backward; the ball entered the place from which he 
had withdrawn his legs. The enemy from behind a rock kept firing on 
the house for sometime and then quitted it. During these transactions, 
the French priest took possession of the meeting-house, and employed 
himself in writing on the pulpit with chalk, but the house received no 
damage. 

Those parties of the enemy who were on the south side of the river 
having completed their destructive work, collected in a field adjoining 
Burnham's garrison, where they insultingly showed their prisoners and 
derided the people, thinking themselves out of reach of their shot. A 
young man from the sentry-box fired at one who was making some 
indecent signs of defiance and wounded him in the heel : him they 
placed on a horse and carried away. Both divisions then met at the 
falls, where they had parted the evening before, and proceeded together 
to Capt. Woodman's garrison. The ground being uneven, they ap- 
proached without danger, and from behind a hill kept up a long and 
severe fire at the hats and caps which the people within held up on sticks 
above the walls, without doing any other damage than galling the roof 
of the house. At length, apprehending it was time for the people of the 
neighboring settlements to be collected in pursuit of them, they finally 
withdrew; having killed or carried away between ninety four and a 
hundred persons, and burned about twenty houses, of which five were 
garrisons. {Belknap.^ 

The names of the killed, so far as preserved, are these : John 
Dean, James Huckins, five Chesleys, Robert Watson and others 
of his family, Mrs. Emerson's mother and sister, Ensign John 
Davis and wife and several children, and his sister Smith and 
two sons, a Clark, a Gellison, a brother of the last named who 
jumped into a well and there died, Samuel Adams, his wife and 
twelve others of his family, Edward Leathers' wife, a woman 
named Jackson, some children of Thomas Edgerly, jr. Zackariah, 
son of Thomas Edgerly, sen. Francis Drew, his wife and son 
Benjamin. Of the captured were two daughters of Ensign 
John Davis, one of whom never returned ; one or two of Samuel 
Adams' family, one or two persons in the house of Thomas 
Edgerly, jr. Thomas Edgerly, a daughter and his son Joseph, 
Thomas Drew and his wife. The names of the others, killed 
or captured, are lost. 



1696] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 101 

The Provincial Council took measures to relieve the sufferers, 
sending soldiers for their protection and provisions for their 
subsistence. 

William Furber, on his petition, was authorized to keep a 
ferry from his house at Welchman's cove, to transport travellers 
over to Oyster river, and to receive of passengers, viz. for a man 
three pence and for horse and man eight pence, to land at 
Mathews' neck ; for those landing at Durgin's, six pence for a 
man and twelve pence for horse and man ; and the same for 
returning. The said Furber "to keep attendance and a suffi- 
cient boat or gundaloa." 

1695 

April 3. — The inhabitants of Dover and Oyster river having 
been at the charge of subsisting the soldiers sent from Massa- 
chusetts for the protection of the frontiers, the Provincial Council 
directed the Treasurer to give orders to the respective constables 
of those places to forbear collecting taxes from such persons as 
had been thus charged. 

Nov. 14. — Orders were issued to the Treasurer of the Province 
to pay the bills for ' ' billeting soldiers ' ' as follows : To Cochecho 
from the 15th May to nth June and from 15th July to 14th Oct. 
excepting 14 days of the time, 16 pds. is. 4/^d. To Oyster 
River from i6th May to nth June and from 15th July to 14th 
Oct. wanting 10 days, 81 pds. os. 6d. 

1696 

Feb. 17th. — The Provincial Council having information that 
the bridge over Cochecho river was broken and gone, whereby 
relief to Heard's Garrison would be hindered in case of an 
attack from the enemy, ordered the Secretary to give notice to 
Capt. John Woodman, Capt. John Tuttle and the Selectmen of 
Dover that they with all convenient speed call the inhabitants 
of the town together and make a sufficient bridge over the 
same. 

April 27. — Capt. Tuttle's account for subsistence of soldiers 
at Cochecho and Dover, 16 pds. 6s. iid. and Capt. Woodman's 
account for similar services at Oyster River, 51 pds. 5s. od. were 
ordered by the Council to be paid. 

May 7. — John Church, sen. slain by the Indians, as he 
travelled to seek his horse, upon a little hill betwixt Cochecho 
and Tolend. {Pike.) 



102 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1698 

July 26. — The people of Dover were waylaid as they were 
returning from the public worship, when three were killed, 
three wounded, and three carried to Penobscot, from whence 
they soon found their way home. 

The persons killed were Nicholas Otis, Mary Downs and 
Mary Jones; those wounded were Richard Otis, Anthony Low- 
den and Experience Heard ; those captured were John Tucker, 
Nicholas Otis, jr. and Judith Ricker. 

As these persons all appear to have lived between Waldron's 
Garrison and Garrison Hill, it is probable that the attack was 
between the upper falls and the brow of the hill before reaching 
Otis' Garrison. 

Aug. 27. — David Davis killed by the Indians at Ivubber-laud. 

(Pike.) 

^ ^ 1697 

April 15. — The Provincial Council ordered Major Wm. 
Vaughn to send six men to Heard's Garrison at Dover for 
strengthening the same, the men to be equally divided between 
Portsmouth and Hampton. 

Also — "Ordered, that Thursday the 29th of this inst. April, 
be kept as a day of public thanksgiving through out this Prov- 
ince and all servile labor to be forbidden thereon : Major 
Vaughn and Richard Waldron, Esq. appointed to draw up the 
proclamation and to be sent by the Sheriff to the ministers of 
each town to observe it accordingly." 

The bills of inhabitants of Dover for subsistence of soldiers 
amounting to 37 pds. 14s. 3d, and of inhabitants of Oyster river for 
the same, amounting to 25 pds. 4s, were examined and allowed. 

F'rom the Council Records at Concord, in the office of Secre- 
tary of State : 

"These may certify whom it may concern that Samuel Snell a soldier 
hath served his Majeste in garrison in Dover since ye last account from 
ye 2ist of June 1697, till the 20th of July following being four weeks and 
one day. Test. John Tuttell, Capt." 

Nov. 15. — Tho. Chesley, sen. slain by the Indians not far 
from Johnson's Creek; Will Jackson taken at the same time, 
and at the same time made his escape. {Pike.) 

1698 
This summer was generally wet and pretty hot, especially 
from the first week in June ; but from the middle of August it 
proved exceeding wet, to the great hindrance and damage of 
husbandry. {Pike.) 



1699] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 103 

Sept. 30. — A violent southeast storm that blew down many- 
fences, and shattered the tops of some houses and barns. 
{Pike.) 

Oct. 13. — A violent northeast storm produced the like effects 
— nearer the sea, it fell rain, higher up the country, snow. 
{Pike.) 

Oct. 19. — A violent northeast storm of rain, which melting 
the aforementioned snows caused an extraordinary freshet, 
flowing higher than the observation of the oldest standers in 
these parts — carried away many logs and boards, and endan- 
gered the very mills. {Pike.) 

1699 

Jan. 31. — A considerable earthquake happened about i o'clock 
this day, and another the night following, if it was not a clap of 
thunder. 

Feb. 8. — Experience Heard, alias Jenkins, who was scalped 
by the Indians July 26, 1696, recovered and lived to have one 
child, died chiefly of her wounds bleeding. {Pike?) 

Feb. 19. — "The lyt. Governor was pleased to give the Council 
to understand that this day Capt. John Tuttle of Dover with 
some other of the inhabitants of said town had been to inform 
him that the Indians late conversant at Cochecho were all sud- 
denly withdrawn, and that they departed on Thursday night 
last, supposed to be occasioned by an Indian that came that 
afternoon out of the woods, and made all dispatch to gather all 
the Indians together, with whom he went away that night. 
Some of the squaws who seemed to be well affected to the 
English discovered a great deal of sorrow, saying they should 
never see them again, and by their whole carriage gave occasion 
for suspicion that the Indians designed mischief against us, and 
therek)re desired the Council's advice: — who thought meet that 
the Lt. Governor forthwith issue out his order to the Major of 
the Militia of this Province, wath all expedition requiring him to 
command all the Captains of the several towns that they immedi- 
ately appoint Watch and Ward in their several precincts, and 
that they continue so till further order ; and likewise take care 
that if any Indians come into any of the towns in a peaceable 
manner they may be civilly treated." {Prov. Records.) 

From March 25-29 was a continued .storm of snow, rain, hail, 
thunder and extreme wind. It began with snow and ended with 
snow. {Pike.) 



104 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1701 

May i6. — The Treasurer of the Province was directed to pay 
Capt. John Tuttle of Dover, one half of his account for soldiers 
wages and subsistence out of Dover rates, the whole sum being 
92 pds. 6s. lod. — and the other half to be paid out of the first 
money raised by the Assembly, after Major William Vaughan 
hath adjusted his account as Treasurer. 

1700 
Sept. 6. — Travelling in Amesbury woods with two more in 
my company, we killed a rattlesnake near Hunt's new field, 
which had three rattles in ye end of his tail, with which he 
made a prodigious and terrible noise. {Pike.) 

1701 

Jan. 30. — The L,t. Governor laid before the Assembly a letter 
from John Bridger, Surveyor of his Majesty's woods, dated at 
Boston the 21st, in which he states that he had " prepared a 
great many thousand trees in order to make tar for the use of 
his Majesty, in the river Piscataqua, particularly on the commons 
of Dover, on that side next to Suhawannick ? river, and in the 
woods next Quamphegan mill, and in the woods by John Win- 
gett's, and on a point below the house of Wm. Henderson, sen ; 
all of which land being common and by act of assembly open 
to the improvement of any person, he presumed his Majesty 
might when no injury to the subject — yet some envious, 
malicious and Unthinking people had felled many of the said 
trees which he had prepared to the great disappointment of the 
project he was on, and his Majesty's interests at home as well 
as here. He therefore makes these unlawful actions known to 
the Lt. Governor and asks for the punishment of the offenders, 
which done will prevent his asking redress from other places or 
persons; otherwise he must seek to put a stop to such pro- 
ceedings by the best and momentous care he is capable of." 

This letter the I^t. Governor and Council regarded as a 
reflection on their loyalty, and in reply "did much admire" 
the writer's different sentiments concerning the government of 
the Province from what they were at his first coming hither. And 
as for the persons complained of they thought it his duty to 
prosecute such offenders that they may receive condign punish- 
ment according to their demerits ; promising that nothing should 
be wanting on their parts to prevent any prejudice to his 
Majesty's interests therein. 



1702] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 105 

Committees were chosen by the freeholders to survey and lay 
out convenient highways in the several parts of the town ; in 
pursuance of which it was ordered, that the highway to the 
spring near the back cove should be left open clear through in 
to the swamp by the bed of the creek as in ancient times; that 
a convenient highway four rods wide should be laid out from 
the mast path to Chesley's mills on Oyster river and over the 
freshet and by Edward Small's clear through to the old way 
formerly laid out into the commons by Edward Small's and so 
to Eamperill second falls, maintaining the same width ; that all 
the land at the head of Oyster river formerly used for a landing 
place should be left open for the conveniency of the people for 
transportation of goods and the mast path from Oyster river 
falls to the utmost bounds of the township as it now goes should 
be a stated highway 4 rods wide, &c. 

Dec. 3. — Commissioners were appointed by the Council to 
run the lines between the several towns of the Province and to 
" make good and sufficient bound trees or bound marks" — the 
Dover commissioners consisting of Capt. John Tuttle, Lt. James 
Davis and Lt. William Furber. 

1702 

March 4. — The Indians " by their late carriage having given 
occasion for suspicion that they design mischief," the Lt. Gov- 
ernor gave orders that scouting parties should be organized 
from Kings Town to Salmon Falls river. Capt. Woodman of 
Oyster river was required to send two men from that place to 
lyamperill river and back, and two other men to Toll End falls 
to the house of John Ham, jr. and Capt. John Tuttle of Dover 
was required to send two men from Ham's to Salmon Falls to 
the house of Capt. Ichabod Plaisted : this scout to be daily kept, 
unless on such days as the weather will not admit of travel. 
{Prov. Records.) 

April 6. — Mr. Richard Waldron, son of the Major, received 
by vote of the town a grant of the falls, in Cochecho river, 
"commonly called Hayes's falls, with due regard to the falls 
below;" said Waldron paying thirty shillings a year therefor, 
the rent to begin June 24, 1704. 

Rev. John Pike having several times signified to the town 
"that he was minded to remove to Salisbury" and by the 
removal of his family had given just cause to expect the same, 
it was voted that Capt. John Gerrish, Mr. Richard Waldron and 



106 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1704 

Capt. John Tuttle be invested with full power to join with the 
Selectmen to settle with Mr. Pike for the payment of arrears, 
and also to treat with him for his further continuance in town. 

1703 

The Selectmen this year laid out a convenient highway to the 
mill erected at the "second falls of the Cochecho " (upper 
factory) and also ways for accommodation to the falls at Tolend 
— showing that the water power at these falls had thus early 
been improved. 

Oct. 30. — One Christopher Patrick, a soldier, was slain by 
the Indians betwixt Quamphegan and Salmon Falls, about half 
an hour after sunset. He had five guns discharged upon him, 
and was shot with many bullets. {Pike.) 

First snow, Sept. 28, very cold. Winter began Oct. 31, and 
ended March 7. {Pike.) 

1704 

Jan. 15. — Happened the highest tide that ever was observed 
in these parts of the country. Did great damage to warehouses 
and cellars ; carried away some houses and many stages at Isle 
of Shoals ; transported many hay stacks, and in some places 
tore up great quantities of marsh and removed it far off into 
other places. {Pike.) 

Jan. 27. — Volunteers being called for to "go forth against the 
Indian enemy," Lt. Samuel Chesley adviseth the Council of 40 
or 50 as ready to list under his conduct as captain from Dover 
and Oyster river : that they have upwards of 30 pair of snow 
shoes and rackets already made : and that their principal want 
will be for a further supply of snow shoes and some bread. 

March 27. — Capt. John Woodman, Capt. John Tuttle and 
Capt. John Knight of Dover were ordered to muster their sev- 
eral companies at the meeting house on Dover Neck on Wed- 
nesday the 5th of April by 10 o'clock, a.m., and Capt. John 
Tuttle then and there was to take a list of such as shall enter 
themselves volunteers in the service against the French and 
Indian enemy. 

April 25. — At a public town meeting it was voted, " forasmuch 
as it is found by experience that it is very grievous to the select- 
men to be exposed to the great trouble of going from house to 
house to take an inventory in order to make an assessment, for 



1704] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 107 

redressing said grievance for time to come," the selectmen 
should post an order in the public meeting places in the respec- 
tive parts of the town and this should be accounted sufficient 
notice to the tax payers to bring in their accounts, and those 
who neglected to do so it should be lawful for the selectmen to 
rate by doom. 

Nathaniel Header was slain by the Indians at Oyster river, 
not far from the place where Nicholas Follet formerly dwelt. 

April 26. — Edward Taylor was slain by the Indians at L,am- 
per-eel river. His wife and one child carried away. {Pike.) 

April 28. — Thamsin Mesarvey, Mr. Waldron's maid servant, 
was taken by 4 Indians, betwixt sunset and dark, at a spring in 
the Major's pasture, between his house (formerly burnt) and 
barn; and after examination was knocked down and left for 
dead, but recovered again. The enemy flying hastily away at 
the outcry of the watch, by which means Mr. Waldron escaped, 
that was then coming over the Boom. {Pike.) 

The Boston News Letter oi May 8, 1704, contained this account 
of the affair from its correspondent at Portsmouth : 

Piscataqua, April 29. — By Letters thence, acquainted, that on Fryday 
the 28, four Indians Seized a Servant Maid of Richard Waldron's Esq. at 
Cochecho, who went about 150 yards from the Garrison to a Spring, for a 
Jugg of Water, about half an hour after Sun down : Supposed to be the 
same Indians that did the mischief mentioned in my last, upon Natlianiel 
Header and Edivard Taylor: They askt her many Questions: viz — 
Whither there was not a French Shallop put on Shoar in Nerv England 
in a Storm ? And what was become of the Frenchmen ? Whither or not 
we had any Forces going out against the French? What number of 
Souldiers was in the Garrison? What Mr Waldron had been doing in his 
Field all day? What he designed to do with that new Timber hal'd to 
the side of his House? They told her that they had lyen near his House 
all that day, and a week before to wait to catch him, whom they saw to 
pass over his Boom towards Capt. Gerrishes two Houses, by Sun-set ; and 
that they might take him on his return, they had crept down to the foot 
of the Boom, as near as possible: at which time the Maid came along, 
and were forced to take her, otherwise they must have been discovered : 
They told her also that they had been so near him in the Field, that one 
had cock'd his Gun at him, and going to discharge, another persuaded 
him to forbear, he would presently have a better Shot at him : They like- 
wise told her 'twas never the near (of no use?) for him to build his For- 
tifications round his House, for they would certainly take him, and that 
'twere in Vain for him to Plant his new Orchard in his Field, for he should 
neither eat the apples, nor drink the Cyder, for that they would have 
him by & by, and roast him, and She should see it. In the Interim Mr 
Waldron coming over the Boom, the Watchman on the top of his House, 



108 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1704 

not knowiug who it was, call'd Stand ; which the Indians hearing, being 
frightened ran all away, one slept back and with the head of his Hatchet, 
knock't the Girl down and left her for Dead, who lay in the Spot' two 
Hours, till being found wanting, was enquir'd after and search'd for at 
the spring, where she was found, a little come to her self; hope she 
may do well, for her skull is not broke. Thus Mr Waldron narrowly 
escap'd. 

A manuscript note attached to this article, in the handwriting 
of Rev. Dr. Elliott, by whom the volume of the Neivs Letter 
was formerly owned, says " this story was invented by the girl 
to conceal her staying too long at the spring with a young man." 
But this report was doubtless itself an invention. Rev. Mr. 
Pike, as quoted previously, recorded the event without expressing 
any doubts of the girl's story, and Penhallow, who resided in 
Portsmouth, gives the same account in his Indian wars. Dr. 
Belknap, whose accuracy and research are well known, when 
he wrote his history 75 years after, in this town, had never 
heard the truth of Thamsin's story questioned. After he removed 
to Boston he appears to have heard of the manuscript "elucida- 
tion " attached to the News Letter, and added a note to that 
effect in an interleaved copy of his History. 

April 30. — Persuant to an order from John Pickering, Speaker 
of the House of Representatives, for the choice of " two princi- 
pal men to join with the Representatives to debate and determine 
matters relating to Mr. Allen's claims," the town made choice 
of Richard Waldron and John Tuttle. 

May 28. — Sacrament day — an ambush of four Indians lay 
betwixt Tristram Heard's and Ephr. Wentworth's, upon the 
north side of the hill, but were happily discovered and escaped. 
{Pike.) 

The following from the Boston News Letter oi June i, probably 
refers to the above : 

"On Sabbath last, some of the sculking Enemy lay in ambush for 
people at Cochecho, going to Public Worship, and narrowly escap't being 
on Horseback, ran safely by them, scouts went out immediately after 
them, and found some dryed Beef and pewter bullets in the thickets 
where they lay." 

June I. — Samuel Tasker was slain by eight or nine Indians 
at Oyster river. {Pike.) 

Aug. II. — Mark Giles, sen. of Cochecho, and his son John, 
slain by seven or eight Indians as they were passing a corner of 
their field. {Pike.) 

Aug. 19. — Joseph Pitman slain by the Indians as he was 



1705] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 109 

guarding some mowers, not far from Oyster river meeting 
house. {Pike.) 

Information having been received from the eastward that 600 
Indians designed an attack on the settlers at the head of 
Piscataqua river, orders were issued to the several captains to 
call every person into garrison, and if possible to bring in their 
cattle, and observe all other duties of watching and warding 
that might be of advantage for their security. No such great 
force as this appeared, but small parties kept hovering on the 
outskirts, who committed the outrages above mentioned. 

1705 

June 28. — John Hewland, a young man that came out of 
England with Major Vaughan, was drowned at Cochecho. 
{Pike.) 

July 18. — Mr. Henry Longstar of Bloody point deceased after 
10 days sickness, occasioned by a fall into his leanto, 4 stairs 
high, whereby, being grievously bruised, it brought an inflamma- 
tion upon him. He was about 100 years old — a hale, strong, 
hearty man. {Pike.) 

(The name of this man sometimes appears in the records as 
IvOngstaff, and again as Lancaster, which probably is the correct 
orthography.) 

"Upon the humble application of Capt. John Knight of Dover, near 
Bloody Point, setting forth that the ferry there kept to Hilton's Point 
belonging to Dover Neck, and the other from the said Bloody Point 
to Kittery Neck, were always holden by the inhabitants of Trickey's 
farm, which now is his by purchase, and thereupon humbly prays that 
the right of said ferrys may be conferred upon him. 

It is accordingly agreed, that the Governor be desired to give him a 
patent for the said ferrys, he not demanding more than twelve pence for 
every horse and man at each ferry, and three pence for every single 
person without Horse, he always taking care that there be Boats always 
ready, that there be no complaint thereupon. {Assembly Records.) 

This year the winter began to set in hard about Nov. 19 — 
began to break up Candlemas day. Most part of April and 
May was stormy, wet, cold, cloudy weather. The summer 
following pretty hot. The coldest was Dec. 25, the hottest day 
was June 29. {Pike.) 



no NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1706 

1706 

March 26. — The town of Dover was ordered by the Provincial 
Council to pay James Ball 4 pds. 4s. for his services as a soldier 
at her Majesty's Fort Wm. and Mary, from 13th June 1705, to 
20th Sept. 1705, there being a neglect of said town in making 
an exchange of soldiers every ten days according to order of 
Governor and Council. 

April 22. — At the meeting for the election of town officers, 
the committee formerly chosen to lay out highways was con- 
tinued, and the districts for the surveyors to keep in repair were 
thus defined: "The inhabitants of Dover Neck from Hilton's 
Point to Abraham Clark's; the inhabitants on the North side of 
Oyster river from said Clark's to Oyster river falls; the inhabi- 
tants on the South side of Oyster river from Oyster river falls to 
lyamperill falls; Cochecho from Cochecho to Salmon falls." 

April 27. — The Indians came in upon the south part of Oyster 
river, by the little bay, and killed ten persons, the chief whereof 
were brother John Wheeler and his wife, John Drew, &c. It is 
thought this was done by Bombazeer? {Pike.) 

Belknap says: "The garrison was near, but not a man in it: 
the women, however, seeing nothing but death before them, 
fired an alarm, and then putting on hats, and loosening their 
hair that they might appear like men, they fired so briskly that 
the enemy apprehending that the people were alarmed, fled 
without burning or even plundering the house which they had 
attacked. John Wheeler, meeting this party and mistaking 
them for friendly Indians, unhappily fell into their hands and 
was killed with his wife and two children. Four of his sons 
took refuge in a cave by the back of the Little Bay, and though 
pursued by the Indians, escaped unhurt." 

June 4. — George Ricker and Maturin Ricker of Cochecho, 
were slain by the Indians. George was killed running up the 
lane near the garrison. Maturin was killed in his field, and his 
little son carried away. {Pike.) 

Aug. 10. — Nicholas Peaslee was slain by the Indians in the 
day time, at his cave, some miles above Oyster river, where he 
had dwelt night and day, summer and winter, from the last 
breaking out of the war, precisely three years, though he was 
in the very wake and way where the enemy used to pass. He 
was a man of strange confidence, and would not be persuaded 
to leave his place. {Pike.) 



1708] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. Ill 

1707 

July 8- — John Bunker and Ichabod Rawlins, both of Dover, 
going with a cart from Lt. Zachariah Field's garrison to James 
Bunker's for a loom, were assaulted by many Indians, and both 
slain. The enemy, supposed to be 20 or 30 in number, slaught- 
ered m^any cattle for the Jones's at the same time, to the number 
of 15 or more. {Pike.) 

Sept. 17. — Capt. Samuel Chesley, his brother James Chesley, 
and six more stout young men, were slain by the Indians, as 
they were cutting and hauling timber, not far from Capt. Ches- 
ley's house. The Indian that killed James Chesley was slain 
upon the spot by Robert Torason. Phillip Chesley and three 
more escaped. {Pike.) 

Sept. 30. — Old Widow Horn was taken by the Indians near 
the lower corner of Capt. Gerrish's field, as she travelled the 
road. The same day several troops passed the road, both before 
and after she was taken. {Pike.) 

Nov. 17. — At a public town meeting at the meeting house on 
Dover Neck, Capt. John Gerrish, moderator, it was voted that 
Mr. Pike have 15 pds. per annum added to his salary of 65 pds, 
one third part thereof to be paid in money, the other two thirds 
in provision as formerly, and that the mill rents as they shall be 
received be a part of his salar}'. 

This winter began to set in hard about 19th of December — 
began to break about 27th of January (though we had some 
winter-like weather till the latter end of March). Snows not so 
deep nor many this winter as formerly, but the weather extreme 
cold. Spring wet, cold and backward. Summer following very 
hot and dry — so likewise was the fall : by which means hay and 
corn were cut exceeding short. {Pike.) 

1708 
May 10. — Philip Chesley, Ezekiel Wentworth, John Downing 
and John Tuttle were appointed a committee to join with the 
selectmen for the repairing or building of such bridges as were 
thought necessary over such river or rivers as belong to the 
town. It was also voted that as "several persons made scruples 
about paying their mill rents according to the conditions made 
with the town," John Tuttle, the treasurer, was "empowered 
to use all lawful means by action or other ways about recovering 
the same." 



112 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1709 

Sept. i8. — David Kincaid of Oyster river was assaulted by 
three Indians at his house, some considerable distance from 
Woodman's garrison; — 3 guns were fired at him and his lad, but 
through mercy, both escaped well. {Pike.) 

Scouting parties were organized by the Council for the pro- 
tection of the people on the frontiers. Capt. Robert Coffin, with 
the troop under his command was ordered to "march from 
Exeter to Kingstown and thence to Oyster river, and there take 
up their quarters the first night, and from thence to Cochecho 
and so up towards Whitehall, and so to return to Cochecho the 
next night, and there quarter; and thence to return the third 
day to Exeter again and there lodge, and to continue this march 
from day to day till further order, unless diverted by the appear- 
ance of the enemy; where upon the first advice he is to repair 
immediately to give present relief to any part that may be 
assaulted; and that the Treasurer supply the said Troop with 
provision for their constant subsistence, unless such as will sub- 
sist themselves, who shall be allowed the same that the Massa- 
chusetts Troopers have." 

A Ivatin free school was established by an act of the Assembly 
this year. It was to be kept at Portsmouth for the benefit of all 
the towns in the Province. The salary of the master was fixed 
at 50 pds, of which Portsmouth was to pay 28 pds, Hampton 8 
pds, Dover 6 pds, Exeter 6 pds, Newcastle 2 pds. This was the 
first lyatin free school established by law in New Hampshire, 
though Dover as early as 1658 had required its schoolmaster to 
teach the language, as will be seen by the record of that year. 

1709 

May 9. — As complaint had been made that the pound on 
the Neck was not sufficient to accommodate other parts of 
the town, it was ordered that the inhabitants or any part of 
them living at Cochecho, Oyster river, or Bloody Point, should 
have liberty to build a pound in all or each of said places, 
at their own cost and charge, the same to be holden and 
accounted the town pound or pounds, and the keepers thereof 
and their fees were to be appointed, ordered and directed by the 
selectmen. 

June 30. — Bartholomew Simpson, jr. of Oyster river, was 
slain by an ambushcade of Indians, near Capt. Woodman's 
garrison. {Pike.) 



1710] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 113 

Aug. 22. — Jeremy Tibbetts, sen. was accidentally shot in 
ye thigh by his bro. John. The wound shortly began to 
gangrene (and mauger ye physician) issued in his death Aug. 
31. i^Pike) 

1710 

Rev. John Pike, the minister, died on the loth of March of 
this year, in the 57th year of his age, and the town at a public 
meeting held on the 22d May voted to advance 10 pds. towards 
defraying the charge of his funeral. In order to procure a suc- 
cessor "as soon as may be," Capt. John Gerrish, Richard 
Waldron, Esq. Capt. John Knight, Capt. John Tuttle, Capt. 
Nath. Hall, Mr. Ezekiel Wentworth and Eieut. Thos. Tebbetts, 
by a vote of the town, were "desired to take care as often as 
they can to procure a person to preach on the Lord's days and 
as soon as possible to write or send to Mr. Sever to endeavor to 
obtain his company a month or more to a constant settlement 
among us as we shall agree : and for his encouragement to let 
him know that if by God's providence he do settle amongst us 
his salary shall not be less than 80 pds. per annum money, and 
100 pds. payable in two years towards the purchase of house 
and land as he sees meet, and that whoever preaches among us 
until a settlement shall have twenty shillings every day and 
subsistence for himself and horse paid out of the town treasury." 
•At another meeting held Dec. 18, it was voted that "the 
minister that it shall please God by his providence to settle 
among us shall have ten acres of land for his encouragement to 
build a house on over and above the 100 pds. voted in order 
to his settlement," and 6 pds. added to his salary to procure 
him wood. It was also voted that " fifty or sixty acres of land 
on the Bloody Point side should be set apart for the use of the 
ministry when it shall please God to erect a settlement of that 
kind among them there." 

Jacob Garland w^as killed by the Indians this summer when 
on his return from public worship on the sabbath. 



114 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1712 

1711 

Rev. Nicholas Sever, was ordained on the nth April as the 
successor of Rev. John Pike, and remained the minister of Dover 
until the spring of 1715, when he was dismissed "on account of 
an impediment of his speech." 

In the spring of this year the Indians renewed their ravages 
on the frontiers in small parties. Thomas Downs, John Church, 
a son of the John Church who was killed by the Indians in 1696, 
and three others were killed in Dover ; and on a sabbath day 
several of the people of the town fell into an ambush as they 
were returning from public worship. John Horn was wounded, 
and Humphrey Foss was taken, but by the determined bravery 
of Lieut. Heard, he was recovered out of the hands of the 
enemy. 

In consequence of these ravages the House of Assembly 
passed the following vote : 

"Voted for Incouragement of Volunteers to Kill and Destroy the 
Indian Rebels in the province of New Hampe for every man shall be 
paid sixty pound, for every woman forty pound, for every child thirty 
to be paid out of the Treasury, and that the said Volenteers shall Re- 
main in that service at least four months, not leaving any Garrison i:n- 
armed, but have the consent of the comitte of Meletia for there so 
Inlisting. 

10 May, 1711, by order of the house. Sam'l Keais, Clark." 

May II. — The town " voted and ordered that from and after 
the first day of April next ensuing no person shall presume to 
turn any geese upon the commons in Dover on penalty of for- 
feiting the same," and it was made lawful for any person to kill 
such geese as he should find on the commons as well as his own 
land, " for they shall be accounted as wild geese." 

1712 

April. — About this time the Indians renewed their hostilities. 
Ensign Tuttle was killed in Dover, and Jeremiah Crommet at 
Oyster river. In July, an ambush was discovered, but the 
enemy escaped; and while a party was gone in pursuit of them, 
two children of John Waldron were taken, and for want of time 
to scalp them, their heads were cut off. There being no man 
at that time in Heard's garrison, a woman named Esther Jones 
mounted guard, and with a commanding voice called so loudly 
and resolutely, as made the enemy think there was help at hand, 
and prevented farther mischief. 



1713] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 115 

Dec. 15. — The town voted that a suflScient boom should be 
erected over Cochecho river, (above the lower falls, probably,) 
and that bridges should be built over Bellamy Bank and Oyster 
rivers, and also voted 20 pds. towards the building of a boom 
over Ivampril river ' ' for passage of man and horse till further 
order." 

1713 

May 25. — Nath. Roberts "refused to serve in the constable's 
office, being chosen thereunto," and paid his fine of 5 pds. 
James Heard also refused a similar honor and paid a like fine. 
John Hanson who was chosen in his stead, refused to serve, and 
was let off with a fine of 4 pds. los. 

The inhabitants of Bloody Point, with a portion of those ad- 
joining them in Portsmouth, petitioned the General Assembly 
to be made a separate and distinct parish from Dover and Ports- 
mouth. The parties were heard on the i6th of July, and it was 
"ordered that the petition be granted, and the place made a 
parish by themselves, and that they forthwith establish an able, 
orthodox, and learned minister among them, and be henceforth 
acquitted from the support of the ministry of Dover and Ports- 
mouth." His Excellency Governor Dudley named the parish 
at Bloody Point, Newington. 

Aug. 17. — At a town meeting legally called at the meeting 
house on Dover Neck, Capt. Tebbets, Ens. Heard and Samuel 
Emerson were chosen to represent the town at the next session 
of the General Assembly to show reasons why the meeting 
house at Cochecho should not be the stated place of public 
worship for the future. 

A new meeting house had been built at Cochecho about this 
time, not by the town, but by individuals. It stood on Pine 
Hill a few rods north of the ancient Gushing tomb, and the 
above vote indicates that it had been opened for public worship. 
This was the third meeting house erected in Dover, separate 
from those at Oyster river and Bloody Point. 

Although no record has been found of it, it is probable that 
the Pine Hill burying ground began to be used for burial pur- 
poses at this time. Previous to this the ancient Waldron bury- 
ing ground near the Methodist church, and the still more ancient 
cemetery not far from the old meeting house on the Neck, must 
have been in use. No monuments exist of the dead, if any 
were ever raised, (as they probably were not) for the first hun- 
dred years after the settlement of the town. The dead of that 



116 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1714 

early period probably were buried without much ceremony, and 
in some cases all marks of sepulcher were concealed to prevent 
their desecration by the Indians. In that early day nothing 
was read nor any funeral sermon made at a burial, but at the 
tolling of the bell, or some other signal, all the neighborhood 
came together, and after bearing the dead solemnly to the grave, 
stood by until it was closed. The ministers were commonly, 
but not always, present. 

1714 

May 17. — The town meetings continued to be held at the 
meeting house on Dover Neck, as the most populous part of the 
town, but other sections had now become strong enough to 
demand and obtain some of the privileges which had up to this 
time centred at the point. Accordingly after the choice of town 
officers this year, it was voted that " Mr. Sever preach the next 
Lord's day at Cochecho and so every other Lord's day this 
summer and till a final settlement be directed." 

This arrangement not proving satisfactorj^ appeal was made 
to the Council who advised the choice of a committee of three 
persons on the part of the town to treat with those of Cochecho 
that were at the charge to erect the meeting house there, in 
order to settle the matter, and if they could not come to an 
agreement to appear at the next session of the Assembly and 
make their report, the meetings in the meantime "to be kept 
one sabbath day at Dover Neck in the old meeting house, and 
the other at Cochecho, in the new." 

Considerable difficulty seems to have been met with about this 
time, in finding persons willing to serve as constables, for we 
find it recorded, Sept. 27, that at a public meeting for the choice 
of constable to supply Cochecho part of the town by reason of 
Joseph Hanson's refusal, John Richards was chosen in the room 
of Hanson, and Benedictus Tarr in Joseph Jenkins's room. At 
another meeting, Oct. 29, John Hayes was chosen to supply the 
vacancy made by John Ricker's refusal, and Samuel Emerson 
in the room of Benedictus Tarr. 

The frame of a meeting house built in Kittery this year was 
hewn out in Dover and floated down the river. 



1715] HIS TOR Y OF DO VER, N. H. 117 

1715 

April II. — At the choice of Assembly men this year Capt. 
Timothy Gerrish received 19 votes, Ens. Stephen Jones 19, and 
Capt. John Downing 29. For selectmen Capt. Tebbetts 75, 
Tobias Hanson 53, Joseph Meder 86, John Ambler 78, and 
Sargt. Thomas Roberts 89. 

Complaint being made that " there had been from time to 
time sundry trespassers upon the Town's Common hy fencing 
in the same without any grant from the town to the prejudice of 
the several inhabitants," it was voted that Capt. John Tuttle 
and Mr. Samuel Emerson prosecute at law all such trespassers 
and offenders and do the utmost the law will allow that the 
town's rights and privileges may be preserved, and the select- 
men were directed to pay any extraordinary charge they might 
be at in the affair. 

At the above meeting for the choice of Assembly men, it was 
voted that in future no votes should be received but " such as 
are delivered by the hand of the voter and not sent by the hand 
of another man : " from which it would seem that voting by 
proxy was not uncommon in those days. 

April 22. — The Council and General Assembly appointed a 
committee, consisting of John Plaisted, Mark Hunking, Sam- 
uel Thing and Peter Weare, to "go to Dover and view both 
meeting houses there, and make report which of the two 
houses, since the separation of Newington, best suits the re- 
maining inhabitants to meet constantly to attend the public 
worship of God on the Eord's day " — the committee appointed 
by the town being unable to come to any agreement. 

April 26. — The above committee reported that they had at- 
tended to the duty assigned them and "do find that the new 
meeting house hath 73 inhabitants as convenient to it as the old 
hath 23, which renders the difference three to one, and we are 
of opinion that the new meeting house at Cochecho is the most 
suitable place for the public worship in that town." 

Whereupon it was ordered that the meeting should be held 
hereafter at the new meeting house, and that all the inhabitants 
of the town pay in proportion towards the maintenance of the 
minister there. 

Nov. II. — Fifty-five of the inhabitants of Oyster river by 
petition to the Assembly complain that either by the neglect of 
the constable, or the selectmen of the town, or both, no provi- 



118] NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1716 

siou has been niatle for the support of their minister ; so that 
either some few of them must maintain him or they must be 
without one and return to Dover again, which was thought a 
hardship more than forty years ago, and would be much more 
so now when they were increased to double the number they 
then were. They therefore pray that the constable and select- 
men may be called to answer for their neglect. Also that they 
may have power to choose annually suitable persons to assess 
and tax the inhabitants of their parish for the support of their 
minister, and also to choose and settle a schoolmaster, " without 
any other regard to the town in general than that the constable 
annually chosen at the general town meeting for collecting the 
Province tax in our district, may also collect our parish dues." 
{Assembly Records.) 

The Assembly in answer to the petition, ordered the select- 
men of Dover to proceed forthwith to call to account Joseph 
Davis, the delinquent constable, and see to it that he make up 
his accounts and pay the money, and in case of his neglect to 
do so, to treat him as the law directs, and that the selectmen 
forthwith make an assessment as formerly on the inhabitants of 
the Parish of Oyster River for the support of the present minis- 
ter, Mr. Buss, until another minister shall be called and settled 
in his room. 

Dec. 24. — The " multiplicity of public houses occasioning 
many disorders," the Assembly enacted that there should be 
but six taverns in Portsmouth, three in Hampton, two in Dover, 
one at Oyster River, two at Exeter, two at New Castle, and one 
in the parish of Newington, and that " all other tippling houses 
be suppressed." 

1716 

May 4. — The Assembly voted "that the agreement of the 
town of Dover with that part of the town called Oyster River 
about maintaining a minister among them at their own cost and 
charge be confirmed : and that the new meeting house built 
there, be the place of the public worship of God in that Dis- 
trict," and established a distinct district with all rights and 
privileges belonging to a Parish, with full power and authoritj^ 
to call and settle a minister there and make assessment for the 
payment of his salary and all other Parish charges, equally on 
the several inhabitants within the district, and annually to 
choose five persons, freeholders within said Parish, to make the 
tax and manage all affairs of the Parish, and that persons so 



1716] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 119 

chosen, with a Justice of the Peace of this Province, shall, 
whenever they see cause, call a Parish meetiug to transact any 
matters concerning the Parish, and that the first meeting be on 
Monday the 14th inst. at the aforesaid meeting house, and that 
John Thompson, the present constable of that District, notify 
the inhabitants thereof ; and further that all persons that have 
of late years paid to the minister there, shall continue to pay 
their proportion to him that shall succeed in said office. 

The "unhappy differences" between the inhabitants of 
Dover Neck and Cochecho, in relation to ministerial affairs, 
having been settled by the Council and Assembly as before 
stated, most of the inhabitants of both sections reconciled them- 
selves thereto, as appears by the following record : — 

Whereas there has been of late an unhappy difference between the 
inhabitants of Dover Neck and Cochecha with Refference to the ministry 
and meeting house there in order an amicable union and for maintaining 
of Peace and Christian Love Amongst us, the subscribers hereto, viz. 
Richard Waldron, Esq. Capt. Timo Gerrish, Ltt Tristram Heard, Ens 
Paul Wentworth, Sergtt John Ham and Mr Will ffost on the behalf of 
the inhabitants of Cochecha, and Captt Thomas Tebbetts, Ltt Joseph 
Roberts, mr Sam'U Tebbets, mr Thomas Robbarts senr. and Ens Joseph 
heard in behalf of the inhabitants of dover neck have unanimously 
agreed to Joyn together in Calling a minister to preach at new meeting 
house at Cochecha Every sabbath day in the month of november, december, 
Janry, february, march, April, and Every other sabbath in the months of 
may, June, July, August and September, October and the Remainder of 
the year, viz. that Every other sabbath in the Last six months mentioned 
he preach for the people at the old meeting house in dover and that in 
the same Rate made for the ffinishing the new meeting house money shall 
be Raised not Exceeding tenn pounds for the better Repairing of the sd 
old meeting but In Case at the public Town Meeting the Town by a major 
voat of the Inhabit consent not to this agreement Then we the subscribers 
in the behalf of the inhabitants of dover neck, viz., Capt. Thos. Tebbets, 
Ltt Joseph Robbarts, Mr. Samll Tebbets, Mr. Thos Robbarts, sen. and 
Ens Joseph heard do hereby oblige ourselves to Joyn with the Inhabit- 
ants of Cochecha to Call a minister and pay our proportion of his yearly 
sallarey, and further upon due compliance with this agreement b}- the 
Town in general the new meeting house at Cochecha to become the 
Towns meeting house they paying in Equal proportion towards the decent 
finishing the same with proviso that who so Ever is granted the privilege 
of building a pew there for the accommodation of himself and family 
shall pay ten pounds towards the building and finishing of the sd meet- 
ing house. 

In witness whereof we the parties before named oblidg ourselves Each 
to the other to perform on our parts Every article in the foregoing agree- 
ment, to which we have hereunto set our hands this eleventh day of 
may 1716. 



120 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1717 

Tho Tebbets Richard Waldrou 

Tho Robl)arts Timo Gerrish 

Jos Robbarts Tristram heard 

Samll Tebbets william fost 

Jos heard Jno ham 

paul Wentworth 

At a public town meeting held at the meeting house on the 
Neck on the 28th May it was "voted a concurrence with the 
foregoing articles and that the same be recorded in the Town 
book." "John Tuttle descented from the vote." 

Joseph Roberts and Samuel Tebbets of the Neck and Timothy 
Gerrish and Tristram Heard of Cochecho were joined with the 
selectmen as a committee to call a minister in order to a settle- 
ment according to the agreement. 

1717. 

Jan. 7. — The committee formerly chosen for calling a minister 
in order to a settlement was authorized to offer him 90 pds. a 
year salary for his " Incuridgment." To which Samuel Emer- 
son and five others entered their " docents." 

March 25. — At a meeting called for the choice of Assembly 
men, it was voted that for the future they should have four 
shillings a day for their services in the General Assembly. 

May 20. — The town voted that, as the money granted for the 
glazing and seating of the new meeting house at Cochecho was 
found insuflScient to "do it for conveniency," if any gentlemen 
would be so kind as to advance twenty or thirty pounds for that 
service and trust the town for the same till next year the money 
should then be raised to reimburse them and they first paid. 

At the same time " the inhabitants commonly called Quakers " 
were granted ten acres of land for a pasture, for the purpose of 
enabling them the better to accommodate their travelling friends, 
to be "laid out in some convenient place between the watering 
place or gutt and Cochecho," not intrenching upon any former 
grant. 

Nicholas Harford had liberty to keep a ferry from Beck's slip 
to Kittery, with a sufficient boat or gundalo for the safe trans- 
portation of man and horse, for which service his fee was to be 
2d for a single person, and 6d for man and horse. 

Sept. 18. — Rev. Jonathan Cushing was ordained as the minis- 
ter of Dover, being the successor of Rev. Nicholas Sever. 



1718] HIS TORY OF DOVER, N. H. 12 1 

1718. 
Feb. 2. — The town voted to build a substantial standing 
bridge over Lamperill river, and appointed Capt. Samuel 
Emerson, Capt. Samuel Tebbets, Capt. Paul Gerrish and 
Lieut. Joseph Jones, with the selectmen, a committee to view 
the place and agree with workmen to build the same, the 
selectmen to raise money in the next town rate to defray the 
charge thereof. 

March 7. — " We are informed from Dover that the snow lies 
two feet deep on the ground, and that several parts are bare on 
the Neck, where last week were seen swarms of grasshoppers, 
some hopping and some flying, which considering the season of 
the year and the nature of the creatures seems verj' strange." 
{Boston News Letter.^ 

The following notice also appeared in the News Letter : 

At Oyster River- Parish in Dover, March 26. This day (through the 
smiles of Heaven upon us) we had a Church gathered here, in the 
Decency and Order of the Gospel, and our Teacher the Reverend Mr. 
Hugh Adams was then consecrated and established the Pastor thereof : 
who then preached from the Text in Cort. 3, 11. We being thtn favored 
with the Presence and Approbation of some Reverend Pastors of ihe 
next Neighboring Churches, with the Honored Messengers thtreof, at 
the said Solemnity, in our New Meeting House, wherein they gave the 
Right Hand of Fellowship. 

As Witness Our Hands, Nathaniel Hill, 

Stephen Jones. 

Oct. 8. — Mr. John Buss, the late minister at Oyster River, 
petitioned the Governor, the Council and Representatives, to 
"order a competent maintenance for him during life " — where- 
upon it was voted " that the Selectmen of Dover be advised to 
do their duty and take care of the said John Buss, and supply 
him with what he is in necessity of, according to the law of this 
Province; and that the selectmen of Dover pay him twenty 
pounds out of the town stock to be paid quarterly from year to 
year." 

Oct. II. — The clerk of the Council was ordered to send noti- 
fications to Dover and Exeter, to be published on the meeting 
house doors, that an}^ person that has any objection to make 
against cutting off the entail on the land of Peter Coffin, Esq. 
deceased, made to his grandsons Eliphalet and Tristram Coffin, 
their heirs, &c. may appear at the next spring sessions of the 
Assembly and object accordingly. 



122 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1722 

1719 

The aurora borealis was first noticed in New Hampshire this 
year, causing much consternation in some places, many believ- 
ing that the end of the world was at hand. 

1720 

May 26. — For the " conveniency of the inhabitants to go 
down to Oyster River," the Selectmen laid out a highway " be- 
ginning on the south side of Edward Euines house and so to 
go southerly between John Bussell's land and Joseph Daniels' 
twenty acre lort and running down to Et. Joseph Jones' land 
and so turning west and be south by said Jones' line keeping 
the same breadth of two rods and so running to said Jones' 
norwest corner bound mark then turning south and by east by 
said Jones' line taking off a corner of Thomas Willies' land 
keeping the same breadth till it comes to ye highway that leads 
to the King's thoroughfare road between the two white pines 
standing by the said road." 

1722 

The town of Barrington was granted by George I. this year, 
"to our loving subjects the present proprietors of ye Iron works 
lately set up at lyampry river," Hon. John Wentworth and 
others for their encouragement and accommodation to carry on 
and maintain the aforesaid works. Among the conditions were 
that they were to build fifty dwelling houses and settle a family 
in each within seven years and break up three acres of ground 
for each settlement and plant or sow the same ; build a meeting 
house : and reserve two hundred acres of land for a parsonage 
and one hundred acres for the benefit of a school. 

Feb. 6. — The Provincial Council having heard that there were 
a considerable number of Indians at Dover whose words and 
actions gave just grounds of suspicion of an ill design against 
that town, requested the Governor to cover the inhabitants there 
with fifty men for six days : and ordered that the Treasurer sup- 
ply them with three hundred weight of bread. {Prov. Records.) 

May 2. — The inhabitants of Dover, by their Committe, Col. 
Waldron, Capt. Jones and Capt. Paul Gerrish, petitioned the 
Assembly ' ' that Cochecho River and Lamprey River might be 
bridged at the province charge." They also petitioned for a 
tract of land above the town, and it was ordered that "Col. 



1723] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 123 

Waldron and Capt. Wentwortli might collect out of the said 
petitioners such persons as they thought proper to be proprietors 
and present the same to the board for approbation." 

June 28. — Men were impressed for scouting and cutting a 
road from "Winnipishoky" pond to Dover, and the Treasurer 
was directed to supply them with provision and ammunition, 
and that no sons under age or servants be admitted to take up 
any of their wages, without their parents or masters consent. 

Aug. 29. — On petition of the representatives of the town of 
Dover for a special act to "exempt the town from keeping a 
gramar school during the Indian warr," it was voted that the 
prayer be allowed, provided they keep a school for reading, 
writing and arithmetic. (^Assembly Records.) 

As the petitioners represented that the circumstances and 
situation or settlements of the inhabitants of the town were such, 
"the houses being scattered over the whole township so that 
in no one place six houses were within call, by which inconven- 
iency they could have no benefit of a gramar school," that " as 
the time fit for children to go and come from school was gen- 
erally the chief time of the Indians doing mischief, and that 
they were afraid to send the children to school and the children 
dare not venture, so that the salary of the schoolmaster was 
wholly lost," it is doubtful whether the vote of the Assembly 
was such an answer to their request as they desired. We judge 
that they wished to dispense with all schools for a time, and 
that they did so, for it will be seen that in 1723 Humphry 
Sullivan, the schoolmaster, petitioned the Assembly to require 
the town to pay his bill for services rendered. 

The following notice, duly recorded on the Town books, 
shows the law or usage, at the time, in regard to estrays : 

Advertisement — These may Certify whome it may Concarne that John 
Smith of Ivouberland has got in his Constity A Stray mare of a black 
Roone Coller In defferent Large and if aney Person Cann lay A Just 
Clame to the same Paying the Charg of Keepping and Crying may obtaine 
the same mare. 

December the 13th 1722. 

1723 
March 13. — At a meeting of the selectmen liberty was given 
to John Parell of Dover to keep a ferry over the Back river from 
his house or landing place over to Sargt. Drew's usual landing 
place, and for his services he was to receive one penny for every 
inhabitant carried over the river and two pence for strangers. 



124 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1724 

May 20. — Ordered that two schoolmasters be procured for 
the ensuing year and that their salary exceed not 30 pds. apiece, 
to attend the directions of the selectmen for the service of the 
town in equal proportions. 

At the same time Mr. Sullivan accepts to serve the town as 
schoolmaster three months certain, beginning his services the 
2ist day of May; promising the selectmen if he left sooner he 
would give them a month's notice to provide themselves with 
another, and the selectmen were also to give him a month's 
notice if they disliked him. 

July 22. — The committee appointed by the General Assembly 
to fix upon the most commodious place for building a bridge 
upon lyamprill river, between Dover and Exeter reported that 
the picked rock, so called, a little above the first dam, was the 
most proper place. The clerk w^as directed to notify the select- 
men of said towns thereof, and further ' ' that his Honor the 
Lieut. Governor and Council expect that a suitable bridge be 
built as soon as possible at the place mentioned in said report." 

On the petition of Humphry Sullivan for 50 pds. to be paid him 
by the town of Dover for his services as schoolmaster, &c. the 
Assembly ordered that the selectmen be served with a copy thereof 
and directed to give answer thereto before the 15th of March next. 

(What answer the towm made does not appear.) 

The unnecessary firing of guns during the present Indian war 
was prohibited in Dover and the other towns on penalty of 40 
shillings. 

1724. 

The following record establishes the main highway to Dover 
Neck and the Point, the same substantially, no doubt, as it 
exists at the present time : 

March 28. — At a meeting of the selectmen this day, thej finding noth- 
ing upon record of a highway ever laid out from Cochecho to Dover, 
which they think necessary to be done, and accordingly order that the 
said highway shall begin at the country road that comes over Bellamy 
Bank river on the western side of the meeting house at Cochecho, and 
from thence Dover Neck down to the spring near Capt. Millets house, 
and from thence between the land of Capt. Millet and the land of 
Capt. John Tuttle late deceased, down to Hilton's Point, as it has hith- 
erto been in use, keeping the breadth of four rods throughout the same 
and something more where the badness of the way requires it. 

Stephen Jones, 1 

John Smith, ^ 1 4. 

Benjamin Wentworth, Selectmen. 

Nicklas Harfutt, J 



1724] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 125 

June 12. — Robert Burnham was admitted into the Council 
Chamber, and presented an Indian scalp to the board, and made 
oath that it was bona fide the scalp of an Indian slain two days 
before at Oyster River by a party of men under the command 
of Mr. Abraham Bennick and that he believed the said Indian 
was an enemy Indian, &c. Whereupon it was ordered the 
slayer be paid loo pounds out of the treasury. 

Aug. 27. — The house of John Hanson, at Nock's Marsh, was 
attacked by the Indians, two of his children killed, and his 
wife, maid servant and four children carried into captivity. 
Being a Friend he refused to leave his exposed position, as 
advised by his neighbors in the more compact part of the settle- 
ment. Thirteen Indians and French Mohawks lay for several 
days near his house in ambush waiting until Hanson and his men 
were away. When he had gone to the weekday meeting and 
two sons were at work at some distance the Indians entered the 
house. Mrs. Hanson with the servant and four children were 
in the house, of which one child the Indians immediately killed 
to terrify the others ; two other children were at play in the 
orchard and would have escaped but that just as the Indians 
had finished rifling the house the two came in sight and made 
such noise that the Indians killed the youngest boy to stop the 
alarm. They then started for Canada, with Mrs. Hanson (who 
had been confined but two weeks previously,) her babe, a boy 
of six years, and two daughters of 14 and 16 years, and the 
servant girl. They all reached Canada and Mr. Hanson, soon 
after the attack, went there to ransom them. This he succeeded 
in doing, with the exception of his daughter of 16, whose ransom 
he was unable to obtain, as the Indians would not release her 
on any terras. Mr. Hanson got home Sept. i, 1725, but he 
could not content himself while his daughter was in bondage, 
and about the 19th April 1727 started in company with a kins- 
man who with his wife was bound on a similarly sad errand to 
redeem children ; but he was taken sick and died on the journey. 
The daughter married a Frenchman and never returned. (An 
interesting account of Mrs. Hanson's capture and residence in 
Canada was published in 1780.) 

Sept. 18. — The town appointed Capt. Paul Gerrish and Capt. 
Benjamin Wentworth agents or attorneys to prosecute all actions 
of trespass upon the town's commons " already begun or here- 
after to begin and to substitute attorneys under them as they 
see cause." 



126 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1725 

1725 

Feb. 20. — The bloody fight with the Indians by Capt. t,ove- 
well and his men, at the pond in Wakefield which has ever since 
gone by his name took place at this time. On the 24th, the 
brave company with the scalps of the enemy ten in number, 
stretched on hoops, and elevated on poles, entered Dover in 
triumph, and proceeded thence to Boston, where they received 
the bounty of 100 pds. for each scalp. 

May 20. — Rev. Mr. Hugh Adams, the minister at Oyster 
River, having addressed a manuscript to his Hon. the Lieut. 
Gov. and General Assembly " Entitled a Theosophical Thesis, 
&c. with an appendix under the title of remarkable Instances," 
&c. praying the countenance and grant of the Government for 
the publication thereof — the Assembly voted forasmuch as the 
contents of said manuscript are principally controversal points 
of Divinity and some Enthusiastical accounts of God's Judge- 
ments, &c. and therefore more properly the object of considera- 
tion for an Ecclesiastical than a Civil Council, the Reverend the 
Gospell Ministers of this Province be desired to take the said 
whole manuscript under their consideration and report their 
opinion thereon to the end that the publication thereof may be 
countenanced or discouraged, and the said manuscript disposed 
of as may be most for the glory of God. 

The Reverend gentlemen to whom the manuscript was re- 
ferred, made their report, at a later day, received the thanks of 
the government for the same, and it was ordered that the said 
manuscript be lodged in the Secretary's office and that the clerk 
of the Council be directed not to give a copy of it or any part 
thereof directly or indirectly to any person on any pretence 
whatsoever without the consent of the General Assembly. 

The character of Mr. Adams's production which the Assembly 
so carefully excluded from the public eye, may be gathered 
from the report of the Reverend gentlemen who sat upon it, 
which was as follows : 

To the honble the Liut. Governor & Comander in chief in and over 
his Majties Province of New hampshire in New England and the honble 
the Councill & the Representatives of the Said Province. 

Tho we are loth to Expose the weakness of our Brother the reverend 
mr. Hugh Adams, yet inasmuch as he has so Publickly Exposed himself 
by addressing to your hour & the Generall assembly a Manuscript so full 
of Enthusiasm & Impertinence, In obedience to your Desire we have 
considered the contents of the said Manuscript and have made the fol- 
lowing remarks — 



1725] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 127 

i) Wee are sorry to See that mr Adams has therein Discovered such 
au affectation of finding out new and Strange doctrines in Divinity. 

2) That he Should So wretchedly pervert the Sacred Scriptures to 
Support his odd extravagant Notions. 

3) That he has so little Modesty as confidently to Set up his Single 
oppinion in Many Instances in opposition to the Judgment of all the 
famous divines in the world. 

4) That he layes So great a Stress on his groundless opinion as to 
Make fundamentall articles of faith and Such an unchristian unchari- 
table Spirit in complaining to the almighty agt Som verry worthy Psous 
for Crossing his unreasonable Humor. 

On these & Severall other accounts that Might be Mentioned wee 
Judge the above Said manuscript unworthy of the Least countena from 
the Government. 

So recomendiug yr honr & this honble house to the Divine Conduct in 
all the Important affairs that lie before you wee Subscribe our Selves 
your most humble & obedint Servants. 

Jabez Fitch 
William Shurtleff 
In the name and at the Desire of the Ministers of the Province. 

Mr. Adams continued the minister at Oyster River, after- 
wards Durham, until 1750, when he died, at the age of 74. He 
was graduated at Harvard in 1696. A very curious petition of 
his to the Provincial Assembly in 1738, complaining of the 
delinquency and trespasses of his parishioners, has been pre- 
served. In this petition, Mr. Adams represents Durham "as 
an Achan in the camp : and as the seven sons of Saul in the 
days of King David : and as Jonah in the ship of the Common- 
wealth of the Province." And he prays, not only for justice to 
himself, but that a neglect to pay a minister, may be made 
penal, and presentable by the grand jury, as it was in Massa- 
chusetts, which he considered the principal reason why the 
people of that Province had been "proportionably spared from 
the throat pestilence, and other impoverishing more than New 
Hampshire." The old gentleman appears to have had singular 
notions of the efficacy of his prayers ; and among other things 
which he had accomplished by prayer, he informs the Assembly 
that, being provoked by the injustice of his people, and their 
robbing him of the 50 pds. addition to his salary, he prayed 
while it was yet more than three months to the harvest, that "it 
might not rain: and it rained not for three months after;" 
when some of his friendly brethren prevailed upon him, and he 
"appointed and conscientiously sanctified a church fast from 
evening to evening and abstained three meals from eating, 



128 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1726 

drinkhig and smoking anything," and the Lord, he says, was 
pleased to hear, and granted such plentiful and warm rains as 
to produce " a considerable harvest; so as was then remark- 
able." He concludes his petition by importunately asking for 
justice, and expressing his firm belief that, afte)- he had obtained 
it, God will be entreated for the land in New Hampshire. What 
impression his petition made upon the Assembly, or what 
answer it received, is not recorded. {N.H. Hist. Coll) 

Aug. 16. — At a meeting of the freeholders of Dover Parish, 
at Cochecho meeting house, Col. Waldron moderator, it was 
" voted that our minister Mr. Jonathan Cushing's salary that 
the town gave him of 100 pds. in the year 1717, shall be made 
as good to him as it was at his first settlement amongst us." 

1726 

March 26. — On the petition of Nicholas Hartford, who 
"humbly sheweth " that his grant of liberty to keep a ferry 
over the fore river from Dover Neck to Kittery, made in 1717, 
had been of little profit at present nor likely to be for many 
years, and as he had been at great charge in building conven- 
iences, and had no assurance of said ferry any longer than his 
own life, the said ferry was confirmed to him and his heirs. 

Capt. Samuel Emerson was chosen in the room of Capt. Ben- 
jamin Wentworth, deceased, to join with Capt. Paul GerrLsh to 
prosecute at law any person or persons that trespass on the Town 
commons. 

April 25. — Through the backwardness of the Spring, and the 
great want of hay, a great many cattle have perished for want 
of fodder; which is the general complaint throughout this 
Province and the County of York. {Boston Paper.) 

May 20. — The Assembly voted to build a Court House and 
Prison in Dover for the use of the Town and Province. 

Sept. 2.— By order of the Council, Dover and the other towns 
in the Province were served with a copy of a Proclamation of 
Peace, which was sent to "ye Chief Military Officer in each 
town, to be proclaimed by beat of Drum." 



1728] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 129 

1727 

May. — . — The polls and estates of the Province were assessed 
as follows : 

Polls, 1 6 years old and upwards, 5 ; Income upon trade, per 
Pd. I penny; OflBcers' income per Pd. i penny; Houses and 
lands, valued at 6 years income, per Pd. i penny ; Oxen 4 
years old and upwards 4 Pd ; Cows 3 years old and upwards 2 
Pd. ids; Horses 3 years old and upw^ards 4 Pd ; Swine i year 
old i6s; Sheep free for encouragement; Indian and Negro 
slaves, ad valorem, 16 to 40 years of age. 

Oct. 29. — An earthquake occurred of which it is recorded 
that "the shake was very hard, and was attended with a terrible 
noise, something like thunder. The houses trembled as if they 
were falling; divers chimneys were cracked and some had their 
tops broken off. ' ' 

Rev. Hugh Adams, in his Church Records at Oyster River, 
under date of Nov. 7, says, "Tuesday. At Oyster River Parish. 
On our Parish Fast Day on Account of the Awful Earthquake, 
which had been on Sabbath night about 1/2 hour after 10— So 
in all our Land. Then I baptized Mary Hix, daur. of Joseph." 

1728 

May 24. — The several towns in the Province, in the valuation 
of their lands for the purpose of taxation, having adopted the 
practice of valuing them in one town at one rate and in other 
towns at not half that value, the Assembly voted for the purpose 
of making a more equal proportion that in Dover, Portsmouth, 
Exeter, and other towns, with the exception of I^ondonderry 
and Kingston, the valuation should be six shillings an acre, 
and in the two latter towns five shillings per acre. Also that 
all Negro, Indian and Mulatto slaves be valued at 20 Pds. per 
head. 

June 23.— Rev. Hugh Adams in his Church Records notes 
the baptism of " Phillis, our servant child, born in my house of 
Maria, our Indian Woman Servant;" — showing that Indians 
were sometimes employed as servants, as many, it is well known, 
were also held and sold as slaves. 



130 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1729 

1729 
April 4.— Howard Henderson, Elisha Clark, James Wellmet, 
Joseph Canne and Abigail Blackston made complaint to the 
Governor and Council that having been settled on a certain 
tract or neck of land for upwards of forty years, of which they 
had been put in peaceable possession by the freeholders of the 
town, and all of which time had been partly spent in subduing 
the Indian enemy and partly in subduing and cultivating the 
wild land, Richard Waldron as administrator of his father's 
estate, had brought an action against them to recover possession 
of the same, pretending that one half thereof was granted to 
his father in 1652 and the other half to William Furber and 
others ; that said grant to Waldron having been made when the 
town was under the government of Massachusetts was esteemed 
by many of no validity, but the court having put him in posses- 
sion of the half which he claimed and a jury had set off the 
upper part to him and the lower part to them where their settle- 
ments, orchards and improvements had been made, but that 
Waldron being dissatisfied with the award had procured another 
jury, which had given him the lower half where the petitioner's 
houses, barns, &c. stood, so that after thirty years labor and 
the expense of much blood and the sweat of their brows they 
with their wives and children were now drove into the wild 
wilderness, and for all this injustice they asked such relief as to 
law and equity did appertain. 

What action was taken upon this petition does not appear. 

April 25. — The inhabitants of the north east of Dover (Somers- 
worth), petitioned the Assembly to be set off as a parish for the 
benefit of the ministry. 

May 13. — The petitioners appeared and were heard by their 
counsel, resulting in the appointment of a committee "to go on 
the spot and view the several districts and settle a dividing line 
according to their best judgments and that the petitioners in the 
meantime be free from being rated to the minister of the old 
town, &c. and the major part agreeing shall be accounted suffi- 
cient to make return at the next session for confirmation." 

Oct. 10.— The committee reported, and it was voted that the 
petitioners have liberty to bring in a bill accordingly, "varying 
the bounds from the head of Fresh Creek to a white oak tree as 
the road goes." The bill incorporating the Parish passed the 
Assembly in December. 



1730] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 131 

A petition from several Quakers in behalf of themselves and 
their friends at Dover, praying to be exempted from gathering 
the Minister's rates as Constables, was presented to the 
Assembly. 

The Rev. Hugh Adams also presented a petition praying 
"for some remedy in regard to ye debasedness of ye paper 
currency, &c." 

Dec. 15.— Capt. Paul Gerrish preferr'd a petition signed by 
near three score of the principal men in Dover praying an order 
to rectify some abuses suffered by Dover Town book of Records 
by the fault of the late Town Clerk, as they apprehend. Where- 
upon it was 

Voted, That the clerk of the said town of Dover for the time being be 
hereby prohibited entering any old Committee Grants that are suspected 
not to be legally obtained and to enter only such grants as have been or 
may be allowed by said Town or the selectmen thereof until the next 
sitting of the General Assembly and that there be a committee chosen 
by the General Assembly to go to the Town Clerk for the time being who 
is hereby required to show unto such Committee such entrys, matters 
and things as he or any of the said Town suppose to be done by ill prac- 
tice, and the said Committee shall by virtue hereof summon before them 
all such persons that can give any light in explaining any matters or 
things which they may see occasion to examine into for discovering the 
truth and detecting such vile practices and to give such person or per- 
sons their oaths, and to make return of their doings therein to the 
General Assembly next session, and that Nathl Wear, Esq. and Theo. 
Atkinson, Esq. be a committee of this House to join such as shall be 
appointed above for that end and that the Petitioners pay the charges. 

Jam Jaffrey, Cler Assem. 

1730 
March 24. — The report of the committee appointed to examine 
the Dover Town Books was in substance that they found by the 
said Town book that great forgery and fraud had been used and 
frequently practiced by entering grants many years back in the 
inter spaces of the book and that the book had often been 
exposed and lay open to many persons to enter what grants 
they saw proper therein and that they found many of the said 
original grants in the former Town clerk's hand which appeared 
to be fraudulent and deceitful ; that great quantities of land 
had been laid out by virtue of said grants by which the town, 
they imagined, had been stripped of at least fifteen thousand 
pounds worth of land. 

Oct. 28. — The Rev. James Pike was ordained pastor of the 
church in Somersworth parish. The ceremony was opened by 



132 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1730 

the Rev. Mr. Tufts, the Rev. Mr. Wise preached from the gth 
chap, of Matt. 37 «& 38 verses. The Rev. Mr. Gushing 
gave the charge and the Rev. Mr. Rogers the Right Hand of 
Fellowship. 

Mr. Pike was born in Newbury, Mass. March i, 1703 ; grad. 
H. C. 1725. He taught school in Berwick, by which means he 
became acquainted with Somersworth people and began to 
preach there. He was ordained and remained until his death 
March 19, 1792. The first Somersworth meeting house was 
built in 1729 and taken down in 1773. 

Dec. 30. — Upon the report of the committee on the Town Books, made 
March 24, it was voted that another committee be chosen to make a more 
exact and particular inquiry into the several grants and returns in said 
book, supposed to be corrupt and vicious ; and that they have full power 
to summon and examine any person or persons upon oath, in order to dis- 
cover the truth as far as may be, and any person or persons duly convened 
by summon before the said committee, and refusing to declare upon oath 
what he or they know of the affair, shall be committed to prison by said 
committee, or the major part of them, there to remain till they comply 
to take their oaths, and that then the said committee give public notice 
on all the meeting houses in Dover (with convenient time for all persons 
that have any claims to any land by virtue of the aforesaid supposed 
vicious grants or returns) to make out the same before the said com- 
mittee, at a certain day and when the said committee have made a 
strict examination in the Town book and fully heard all the claimers 
upon their grants and returns, then to make a particular report 
how many corrupt and vicious grants and returns they find on the said 
book, with the dates thereof, in what folios of the book they stand 
recorded, and who are the respective granters, and what quantity of 
acres is mentioned in each grant and return, in order to the General 
Assembly's proceeding thereon as to justice doth appertain ; and that 
Mr. Odiorn and Mr. Sherburne be of the committe from the Council to 
join with such as the House shall appoint to act in the above affair. 

R. Waldron, Sec. 

The House concurred, with an amendment, that the whole 
town of Dover pay the charge of the committee, and appointed 
Nathl Weare and Theo. Atkinson as the committee on their 
part. 



1732] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 133 

1731 

April 30. — The committee appointed by the Assembly to 
examine the Dover Town Book made a detailed report which 
is now on file in the Secretary's office and is published in the 
9th Vol. of State Papers. They found fifty four cases of land 
grants entered on the books "fraudulent, corrupt and vicious," 
for reasons given. They also report that " many things appear 
very dark by the record which we have omitted because we 
could not come at the original grants nor find any particular 
information about them." Also that "by James Barnum's own 
oath he purchased a bundle of those grants from the widow of 
William Furber, the former clerk, and sold them to many per- 
sons, who have got them recorded." 

By a vote of the town this year, one and a half acres of laud 
at Pine Hill, near the meeting house, were set apart as a public 
burying ground. 

May 3. — Thomas Millet and the Proprietors of Hilton's Point 
in Dover petitioned the Assembly for a Gate Way, and an order 
was passed that the petitioners serve the selectmen with a copy 
to appear to show cause, &c. 

Capt. Mathes, a selectman of Dover appearing and not object- 
ing, the petitioners had leave to set up a gate at the entrance 
into the highway that leads up from the water's side by Capt. 
Millets over Huckleberry hill, &c. 

The "people called Quakers" again petitioned to be ex- 
cused, when constables, from gathering Minister's rates ; and 
the Assembly excused them by enacting that such persons shall 
be exempted from gathering such rates of any other persuasion, 
and that the town should make choice of those who were not 
Quakers to gather the same. 

1732 
March — "On the 8th of this month Doctor Alden was found 
Dead in the High Street of Dover at his Horses Feet. He had 
a deep Wound in his Head supposed to be received in his Fall 
from a Glass Bottle he held in his Right Hand : One of his I^egs 
was broke, and he was frozen stiff." {Boston News Letter^ 

List made in the year of our Lord one thousand Seven hundred and 
thirty two of all ye trained soldiers at ye South side of Oyster River in 
Dover ye third comppenney in Coll Gilmans Regiment and under ye 
command of John Smith Junner our preasant Captain May ye fifth. 

Peter Mason, John Smith ye third, Samuel Smith, Benjamin Smith, 
Joshua Crumit, Robert Kant, Joseph Thomas, William Shepard, Daniel 



134 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1733 

Doo, Abraham Beiinet, Solomon Davies, Jabues Davies, Jeremiah Davies, 
John Moor. John Laski, William Randal, John Randal, John Petman, Na- 
thaniel Meader, Thomas Drew Junuer, Eli Clark, Eleazer Benet, John 
Genkens, John Gra, John Jenkens Junner, George Gray, Jacob Wormwood, 
Richard Denmore, Joseph Daveis Junner,Beniamin Daveis, Samuel Daveis, 
Salathiel Denmore Junner, Hezekias Marsh, Stephen Willie, Benjamin 
Durgin, John Drew, Joseph Chesly, John Durgin, James Durgin, Thomas 
Chesley , James Smith, Joseph Durgin, Joseph Woodman , Thomas Langley , 
John Davies, Jonathan Durgin, Joshua Davies, John Runls, Joseph Worm- 
wood, John Daveis Junner, Jeremiah Pender, Ebenezer Daveis, John 
Doo, Joseph Doo, Benjamin Doo, TheoderWille, Francis Drew, Francies 
Footman, Thomas Drew ye third, Eliphalet Daniel, John Langley 
Stephen Genkins Junner. 

May 8. — Stephen Jones of Oyster river made application to 
the Assembly for relief, on the ground that "when his father's 
house was burnt, he had burnt in his chest in said house forty 
two pounds of this Province money." It was voted that he be 
paid that sum "out of the money now to be burnt." (The 
Assembly at every session was in the habit of ordering 
" brought in to be burnt" all the paper money issued by the 
Province which had been received for taxes, &c.) 

Paul Gerrish, Esq. one of the Dover representatives had 
"liberty to be absent on Extraordinary occasions." 

May 15. — The Assembly voted that Oyster River be a Parish 
by the name of Durham, and the act was approved by Gov. 
Belcher on this day. 

1733 

Feb. 6. — A petition of 226 inhabitants of Dover to Gov. 
Belcher and his Majesty's Council represented "that there was 
a very considerable tract of land very commodious for settlement 
lying nigh Winnepessocay Pond, and these humble petitioners 
not having a competency of land to afford them a comfortable 
subsistence, prayed that their honors would be pleased to grant 
them said tract of land for a township of such dimensions, and 
with such limitations, restrictions and conditions as they in 
their great wisdom should think proper." 

The petition was ordered to "lye for consideration." 



1735-6] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 135 

1734 

Oct. 18. — A petition of Christian Baker, praying for liberty 
to keep a House of public entertainment was read ; the prayer 
of the petitioner granted, with liberty to bring in a bill accord- 
ingly, {Asscjnb/y Records.) 

(Mrs. Christina Baker was a daughter of Capt. Richard Otis, 
and with her mother and others was taken captive, in infancy, by 
the Indians, in their attack on Dover, as related in 1689.) 

David Dunbar, Lieut. Governor of New Hampshire and Sur- 
veyor of the King's Woods, at this time, had marked some 
timber in Dover as the "King's Own." Paul Gerrish, who 
had Major Waldron's blood in his veins, thought he had a 
better right to it than Dunbar or the King either, and deter- 
mined to maintain it. He sawed the timber into boards, with- 
out any reverence for or regard to the King's mark. Dunbar 
on hearing of his audacity, forthwith came to Dover with a 
boats crew to seize the boards. He found Gerrish at the mill 
at the head of a goodly number of workmen prepared to dis- 
pute his claims. But Dunbar was fearless, and blustered and 
threatened and looked big. Gerrish and his men, however, 
feared neither law nor the sword. When Dunbar threatened 
they threatened, and when he swore they swore back again, 
until he concluded that discretion was the better part of valor, 
and retreated without effecting his object, and without the 
boards. 

1735-6 

The country was visited with a new epidemic which obtained 
the name of the " throat distemper," and which was very fatal 
to children. It prevailed extensively in almost every town in 
New Hampshire, and many families lost all their children. 
About one thousand died in fifteen towns. The number of 
deaths in Dover was eighty eight, seventy seven of which were 
children under ten years of age. 

From July 1735, to September 1736, in Hampton, 55 persons 
died of throat distemper ; 99 in Portsmouth; 88 in Dover ; 127 
in Exeter; 11 in Newcastle ; 37 in Gossport; 44 in Rye ; 18 in 
Greenland; 21 in Newington; 22 in Newmarket; 18 in Stratham ; 
113 in Kingston ; 100 in Durham ; 22 in Chester; 210 in Hampton 
Falls. {Belknap.) 

There was published in Boston a pamphlet of 17 pages of 
rhyme, concerning the ravages of the throat distemper. The 
two following verses are a specimen : 



136 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1738 

" To Newbury O go and see 
To Hampton and Kingston 
To York likewise and Kittery 
Behold what God hath done. 

The bow of God is bent abroad 

Its arrows swiftly fly 

Young men and maids and sucking babes 

Are smitten down thereby." 

1737 
This year we had a hard winter, backward spring, and hay 
exceedingly scarce ; many cattle died. In the summer there 
was a scarcity of corn also, so that many people went about 
begging people to sell them at almost any price a quart of corn, 
to keep them from starving. A good crop of English hay, and 
afterwards of corn, put a stop to this severe suffering. 

1738 

Feb. 25. — At Oyster River Mr. Pere's house was burnt down, 
& himself and four children consumed in the flames. His wife 
jumped out of a chamber window, but is scorched to such a 
degree that her life is despaired of. {Boston paper.) 

The following deposition of Christine Baker is given in 
Bourne's History of Kennebunk as used in a suit brought by 
Aaron Littlefield against the executors of his father's will to 
recover his portion of the estate. He had been taken prisoner 
by the Indians and carried to Canada where he was detained 
several years. When he returned the other heirs objected to 
his claim on the ground that he had become a Catholic, and 
therefore had no rights which the court was bound to respect. 
Bourne mistakenly says that " Captain Christian Baker in 1714 
discovered that L,ittlefield was at Quebec and gave such infor- 
mation to the Governor as succeeded in securing his return," 
&c., whereas " Christian " was the "Christine Otis " whose 
captivity is related under the head of 1689. 

The deposition of Christen Baker. All that I can say concerning 
Aaron Littlefield Who Whares taken by the Ingons from Calebunk in ye 
Province of Massitusetts to the Best of My knowledge is as follows, 
that I Very Well knew him in Canady, and that he was baptized Peter 
and that he was A papist by Profeshon, and his Living and his Marige 
was in a place called Bashervell in Canady, Nine Miles from Mount 
Royal, and that I See his Sister in the Nunnery in Canady About fifteen 
or Sixteen years ago. And this is ye Hull truth of What I know, as 

witness my hand. 

Sworn to Before Paul Gerrish, J. P. 
Dover, April 1738. 



1742] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 137 

Sept. 9. — In the Assembly, it was ordered that the clerk send 
to Dover and Exeter representatives that have been absent this 
session, to appear Monday next, to attend to his Majesty's ser- 
vice at their peril. 

A moderate winter ; all sorts of provisions plenty and a good 
crop of corn and hay. 

1739 
An exceedingly hard winter ; hay scarce and dear. In the 
summer a great crop of hay and grain, but a short crop of 
Indian corn. 

1740 

July 21. — "A list of the training men under Thos. Millet, 
Capn. of Dover," published in the State Papers, Vol. 9th, gives 
the number as 97 ; and ' ' a list of ye Second foot Company of 
Dover, July 24, 1740," published in the same volume, gives the 
names of 153. Attested by John Wingate, Left. The "List 
of the Troopers under the command of CopU Tristram ColEn 
in Dover, July ye 29, 1740," also published in the same volume, 
gives the names of 40. Stephen Robarts, dark. Making a 
total of 290. 

Moderate winter; a great crop of corn, but very green. In 
the fall a long storm of twenty days, in which there was not 
one whole fair day. Many mills, bridges &c. were carried 
away ; cellars were full of water, and corn being green, rotted 
in the chambers. 

1741 

A hard winter ; deep snows, scarcely any passing except 
through fields and on snow shoes. Hay scarce in the spring. 
In the summer good crops of hay, grain and corn. 

1742 

Among the acts of the Assembly this year was an act for 
" Docking an Intail " of a certain parcel of Land containing 
ninety seven acres, situate in Dover, given and devised by 
Thomas Hanson, in and by his last will and testament, unto his 
two sons Manl and Jonathan. 

The widow of Thomas Pinckham, late of Dover, complained 
to the Assembly that her late husband "did inlist himself in his 
Majesty's service for the late Cuba expedition, and that there 
was allowed him the sum of 2 pds. 14s. for his subsistence 



138 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1744 

money, which was never paid him or her " — whereupon the 
Assembly voted that the said widow be paid the sum claimed 
"old tenour in full of all demands." 

The proportion which Dover paid at this time upon every 
looo pds. of Provincial taxes was 86 pds. The only towns 
which exceeded it were Portsmouth and Exeter, the former pay- 
ing 140 pds. and the latter 89 pds. 

A moderate winter and fruitful summer. The throat distem- 
per prevailed this year, and 95 persons died in a population of 
about 800. 

1743 

The Provincial Assembly this year appointed a committee 
" to take a draft of the whole township of Dover, and to set off 
that part that is set off to Durham, and likewise set off what is 
Somersworth and to set off what they think is necessary for a 
new Parish at Madbury and to represent the quantity and quality 
of the lands in the Parish of old Dover and that proposed 
for Madbury, in the best manner they can and to make their 
report at the next session." 

The Assembly voted that Capt. John Gage (one of the Dover 
representatives) be paid the sum of 7 pds. old tenor for a pair 
of blankets supplied Capt. Cowas and his squaw, per the 
Governor's order. 

Members of the Assembly who did not attend promptly to 
their duty w^ere fined or had their pay docked. June 29, it is 
recorded that " the question was put whether Capt. Wallingford 
(a Dover member) shall be allowed a day for the 24th curr't, he 
only appearing in the forenoon about an hour. It past in the 
negative, and that the clerk strike that day out of entry." At 
the same session the fine for absence without leave was increased 
from five to ten shillings. 

A moderate winter. In the summer a multitude of devouring 
worms appeared, so thick in some places as to make people sick 
while mowing their grass, and the hay stunk after being put 
into the barns. Grasshoppers also devoured much corn and 

grass. 

1744 

Feb. 15. — Col. Thomas Wallingford, a member of the Assem- 
bly from Dover, made complaint to the House that on the 13th, 
during the session, Cyprian Jeffrey, of Portsmouth, storekeeper, 
made an assault upon him and drawing his knife said "he 



1745] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 139 

would cut his (Wallingford's) throat, if he got forty men to do 
it." The House, considering that Jeffre}^ in so doing, did 
greatly affront, insult and offer great indignity to them, issued 
a warrant for his arrest, and on his being brought before 
them he acknowledged himself to be in fault and declared that 
he had no design to affront the House or Col. Wallingford and 
prayed for forgiveness, which was granted. Col. Wallingford 
declaring himself satisfied, and the offender dismissed on paying 
costs. 

"A hard winter, but fruitful summer. Provisions were 
plenty, and people complained because they could not find a 
market for their produce. Many people driven out of the woods 
this year by the Indians." 

1745 

At the meeting of the Assembly this year, Thomas Millet, 
Esq. and Capt. John Wingate appeared before the House and 
represented that no proper return had been made by the 
selectmen of Dover of the election of Col. Thomas Walling- 
ford, John Gage, Esq. and Major Thomas Davis, who claimed 
seats as members from that town ; and that four of the select- 
men had made a return on the precept for three other persons. 
Upon this representation the House sent for the sheriff to pro- 
duce his precept and returns, who appeared and alleged as the 
reason why he returned the sitting members was because he 
was at the town meeting and thought the gentlemen he had 
returned were the proper persons. 

On examination it appeared that four of the selectmen out of 
the five had made a return on the precept for three other per- 
sons. The question was then raised whether an election " can 
be due unless the qualifications of the electors be judged of by 
the selectmen and moderator or the major part of them as 
directed by the triennial act." The majority of the House 
decided that the question " ought not to be put," and then after 
considerable debate it was voted that the sitting members were 
legally elected to represent the town. From this decision 
Meshech Weare and five other members ' ' pray 'd leave to dissent 
and accordingly did dissent." 

At the capture of Louisburg this year Dover furnished a 
company of soldiers which was under the command of Capt. 
Thomas Westbrook Waldron, and afterwards of Samuel Hale. 



140 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE 1745] 

The muster roll of this company, which has been preserved 
by William Hale, a grandson of Capt. Samuel Hale, contains 
the following names : 

Samuel Hale, Captain, Dover. Entrance Feby 13. In the service 
till Octr, I, — 32 weeks, 6 days. Received of the Commissary, 
19 shillings, 6 pence. 

Moses Wingett, Ivieutenant. 

Clement Ham, Ensign. 

Eleazar Young, Sergeant. 

Benjamin Lebby, Sergeant, a. 

Samuel Heard, Sergeant, a. c. 

John Bussell, Sergeant. 

John Giles, Corporal, a. c. 

Samuel Tibbets, Corporal, c. 

Thomas Perkins, Corporal. Rochester. 

Reuben Gray, Corporal, a. 

John Hubbard, Drummer. , 

Samuel Merrow, Rochester. 

Jacob Bussell. Father, John Bussell. 

Ichabod Hill. a. d. 

John Titcomb. c. 

John Hussey. 

Benjamin Stanton. Father Ben Stanton, a. 

Josiah Clark. Father, Josiah Clark, a. 

R. Kenny Waldron. a. 

Stephen Evans. Master, Elihu Hayes, a. 

Ebenezer Cook. c. 

Joseph Abbot. 

Samuel Watson, c. 

Daniel Wingett. 

Thomas Ash. b. 

Archibald Smith. 

Daniel Lebby. Master, David Danels. a. d. 

William Glidden. 

John Forse. a. 

William Thompson. Rochester. 

Nicholas Grace. Master, William Gerrish. a. d. 

Joseph Berrey. a. 

Paul Nute. 

L,ove Kenney, 

Morrice Fowler. 

David Kinket. Master, Wm. Damm. a. 

Zebulon Drue. c. 

John Gowell. 

Richard Harris, a. 

Jacob Hossom. a. c. 

John Smith, a. 

Thomas Roberts. Master, Samuel Roberts, a. d. 

Nathaniel Perkins, Master, Samuel Roberts, a. d. 



1745] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 141 

D. Henry Sleeper. Portsmouth. Master, Joseph Buss. 
D. Sam. Indian, Portsmouth. Master, Richard Salter. 
D. Samuel Hunt. ( Huntress on another slip). Portsmouth. 
D. Eliphalet Ring. Portsmouth. 

D. Joseph Nelson. Portsmouth. Master, Charles Holt. 
D. Jonathan Stoodley, Portsmouth. 

D. George Damm. Portsmouth. Master Solomon (PReede). 
D. Theophilus Damm, Newington. 
Benjamin Bunker, Clerk, Durham, a. 
Louisburg. Octr ist, 1745. 

Errors Excepted. Saml Hale 

Wm Wi Commissary. 

a. In service until October i, — 32 weeks, 6 days. 

b. In service until May 20, — 13 weeks, 5 days. 

c. Received of the Commissary, one pair of Mogasons. 

d. Received of the Commissary, one pound four shillings. 
D. " Draughted Men." 

Belknap, speaking of the New Hampshire vohinteers, says : 
" By the 17th of February, two hundred and fifty men were 
enlisted for the service." New Hampshire furnished, in all, 
three hundred and fifty men, under command of Col. Samuel 
Moore ; not including one hundred and fifty men raised in our 
Province, but in the pay of Massachusetts. New Hampshire 
furnished one eighth of the entire force raised in New England ; 
a less proportion than at Bunker Hill, where more than one half 
were from our State. 

The throat distemper prevailed this year. A letter from 
Benja. Hanson, jr. to I^t. Moses Wingate, who was in the 
army, gives this local intelligence : 

Wm. Twombly 3d has lost 2 children and Joseph Twombly has lost 
one, his only son. We have had very violent thunder and lightning, 
such as you and I never saw hardly in our lifetimes. Your brother John 
Drew was killed by lightning in the month of May on Sabbath day. 
* * * We had a hard trial for Assembly men, such as you never saw in 
this town though you are an older man than I am. * * * They have got 
John Gage, Esq. Thomas Wallingford, Esq. and Thomas Davis. Major, 
my loving friend, I have writ the heads of all the news and concerns of 
our town. Your wife has often been at my house and she bears your 
absence as well as you or I can expect any woman, considering their cir- 
cumstances. I write in short, having no opportunity but this, being 
from home at Capt. Hanson's, without any jacket on my back, but 
thanks be my credit and purse I have a good bowl of punch in my hand 
and I wish you was with me to take a part with me. 

A very moderate winter and fruitful summer. Provisions 
plenty and cheap, but merchants' goods very dear. 



142 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1746 

In 1842 the New Boston Artillery had in its possession an 
ancient piece of ordnance which, it is stated : 

Is a handsome French piece, cast at Paris in 1743, and has upon it the 
French Colonial Arms, and an appropriate inscription. The marks upon 
it evince that it has seen other service in its day than that of stirring up 
the echoes among the New Boston hills at annual Regimental Musters. 
An abrasion upon its knob shows that it has been struck by the shot of 
an opposing gun, and sabre hacks liberally distributed over it, mark it 
as the trophy of some desperate conflict. It was captured by the New 
Hampshire troops under command of Sir William Pepperell at the 
seige of Louisburg in 1745, and is supposed to have been presented by 
him to the Province through Governor Wentworth. 

Two other guns, which were captured at the same time, after 
being used by the Portsmouth Artillery until they were con- 
sidered dangerous, were exchanged with some brass founder for 
old bronze. 

1746 

June 27. — A party of Indians came down to Rochester, where 
seeing live men at work in a field with their arms at hand, the 
Indians concealed themselves and one of them fired his gun for 
the purpose of inducing the men to discharge their pieces, 
which they did. The Indians then rushed upon them before 
they could load again and the men retreated to a small deserted 
house and fastened the door. The Indians tore off the roof, and 
with their guns and tomahawks despatched Joseph Heard, 
Joseph Richards, John Wentworth and Gershom Downs. They 
wounded and took John Richards, and then crossing over to 
another road, came to some men who were at work in a field, all 
of whom escaped ; but they took Jonathan Door, a boy, as he 
was sitting on a fence. Richards was kindly used, his wounds 
were healed, and after eighteen months, he was sent to Boston 
in a flag of truce. Door lived with the Indians and acquired 
their manners and habits, but after the conquest of Canada 
returned to Rochester. {Belknap.) 

Thursday, Oct. 16, was appointed by the Governor with 
advice of Council, as a day of public fasting and prayer on 
account of the French fleet now upon or near our coast, the 
shortness of our harvest of corn, &c. 

Moderate winter. A terrible drought in the summer, which 
cut short both the corn and grass, so that corn which had been 
selling at ids. per bushel, now sold at 26s. 



1749] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 143 

1747 
Jan. 7. — A portion of the regiment which had been raised for 
the reduction of Canada, set out on their march from Dover to 
Winnipiseogee pond this day. Walter Bryant, who accompanied 
the expedition as surveyor and guide, records the starting of the 
expedition as follows : 

Wednesday, January 7th, A. D. 1746-7— Major Davis, Capt. Goffe, and 
Capt. Shackford with sundry of their men marcht from Cochecho to 
Rochester. 

On a Sabbath morning in the spring of this year, at Rochester, the 
wife of Jonathan Hodgdon was taken by the Indians, as she was going to 
milk her cows. She called aloud to her husband. The Indians would 
have kept her quiet, but as she persisted in calling, they killed her, 
apparently contrary to their intentions. Her husband heard her cries 
and came to her assistance at the instant of her death. His gun missed 
fire and he escaped. 

A tedious hard wnnter; drifting snows and diflBcult passing, 
but a fruitful summer. This year the value of paper money 
sank extremely low, making it difficult to transact business. 

1748 

Petitions for the new town of Somersworth were presented to 
the Assembly this year, and the House voted to set it off from 
Dover " invested with all the privileges and powers of a town, 
distinct from Dover, except the managing of the common lands," 
but in the Council the bill was " read and debated and ordered 
to lay for consideration." 

A hard, cold winter, the most severe ever known. The severe 
cold began on the 27th of November, and on the 3d of Decem- 
ber the deep snows began to come, and continued storms soon 
made it very difficult to pass even across the fields or on the 
rivers. It was estimated that twelve feet of snow fell during the 
winter. This large body of snow went away strangely, without 
any rain or flood. A terrible drought followed in the summer, 
which cut short the English grain and grass, but the Indian corn 
stood it wonderfully. Much damage done by fires in the woods. 

1749 

Great excitement was occasioned at this time by a controversy 

between the Governor and the Provincial Legislature in respect 

to the prerogatives of the former, who claimed the privilege of 

granting writs for the election of members independent of the 



144 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1750 

consent of the Assembly. The party in opposition to the Gov- 
ernor elected Richard Waldron Speaker. The Governor nega- 
tived his appointment and ordered the house to admit the new 
members and choose another speaker. This they refused to do, 
and as neither party would yield, no business was transacted. 
The Assembly met about once in a month and was kept alive, 
by adjournments and prorogations, for three years. The public 
credit suffered greatly by this controversy. No taxes could be 
laid or collected. The public records were shut up. No 
authenticated papers could be obtained. The soldiers who 
guarded the frontiers could not get their pay. 

A comfortable winter, but in April came a most distressing 
drought, which cut off the English grain and grass, and cattle 
were ready to perish for want of feed. Indian corn seemed 
almost past recovery, but a fine rain on the 6th of July revived 
the corn so that we had the best crop ever known, which was 
the principal support of both man and beast. Many people 
went from forty to sixty miles into the woods to cut meadows, 
and others drove their cattle into the woods, to browse them. 

1750 

Aug. 26. — A singular and splendid appearance in the heavens 
was noticed at this time which is thus described by one who 
witnessed it. "This evening I was suddenly surprised by an 
explosion in the air. It was a quarter after nine, and the sky 
as free from [clouds and thick of stars as I ever saw it. It 
appeared as if the sky opened in the south about half way from 
the horizon, as large as the broadside of a house, and the flame 
as deep a color as any fire I ever saw. It closed up gradually, 
and was near two minutes before it disappeared." {I>ite?ieaved 
almanac .^ 

Sept. 26. — An Indian named Nambrous, belonging to the 
Penobscot tribe, was arrested for attempting to kill Moses Win- 
gate of Dover by stabbing him with a knife ; but there being 
no evidence to convict him, the court, Hon. Ellis Huske, Chief 
Justice, considering that the Indian natives were making war 
upon the people of New England, referred the question of his 
discharge to the Council, which body advised the Governor to 
give orders to the sheriff to detain the Indian and his squaw till 
further orders. 

A hard winter, which made it difficult keeping cattle alive. 
This was done chiefly by corn and browse. The summer was 
a fruitful one. 



1753] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 145 

1751 

"New Year's day " commenced this 3'ear on the 21st of 
December, according to the old style of reckoning, and January 
I, instead of March 21, as heretofore, was made the beginning 
of the year or " first month " for all future time. 

An uncommonly moderate winter, so that the ferry boat 
crossed the salt river every month in the year, but a cold and 
backward spring, and a wet summer. Great crops of hay, and 
a middling crop of corn. 

1752 

The time for which the Assembly was elected having expired, 
a new one was called in the same manner, which came together 
with a spirit of moderation and a disposition to transact the long 
neglected business. Meshech Weare was elected Speaker, and 
all things went on smoothly. 

We had a more than common cold, close, hard winter; the 
severe cold continuing for two full months, and frozen so hard 
that it was the common practice to go with sleds and sleighs 
from Boston to Castle William, and vessels were all frozen in. 
A very dry spring; in the summer wet, and a great crop of hay, 
and a good prospect for a crop of corn, but on August 29th 
there was a severe frost, w^hich killed the corn and almost every 
green thing. There was scarcely any sound corn raised and 
people were put to great diflficulty for seed corn in the spring, 
and in the spring following there was such a scarcity of provi- 
sions, both corn and meat, that it would make the hardest heart 
ache to hear the complaints of the multitudes of people ready 
to perish for want of food, and begging for a handfuU of corn. 
In the summer corn was brought in vessels from over the sea, 
and many were able to get a supply at 45s. per bushel. 

{Lane' s diary.) 

1753 
The " Friend's meetings " which had begun to be allowed, 
if not fully tolerated, in various places, at this time, became 
greatly annoyed by outsiders who took this measure to prevent 
the spread of the "heresy." At Brentwood, where a meeting 
was allowed, complaint was made that "several persons, men 
and women are speaking at onetime," also " saluting each other 
men and women, old and young pretending it to be a kiss of 



146 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1755 

charity which will prove of ill consequences if you continue 
therein." This complaint resulted in the discontinuance of 
the meeting for a time. 

An open winter, a favorable season, and good crops of corn 
and grass. Very sickly throughout the country. 

1754 

Feb. 22. — Petitions for a new parish in Dover, by the name of 
Somersworth, were presented again this year, and the Assembly 
appointed a committee " to take a view of such part of Dover 
as may be necessary in order to judge whether the prayer of the 
petition ought to be granted or not, and make report thereof as 
soon as may be, the petitioners to be at the cost and charge 
thereof." 

April 22. — The act for incorporating the parish of Somers- 
worth into a town was passed by the Assembly — the town taking 
the name which the parish had formerly borne, and possessing 
the same boundaries. 

A moderate winter, remarkable for an uncommonly cold day 
coming up suddenly, the 22d January, in which many people 
out a-fishing and otherwise employed, perished. A fruitful 
summer. 

1755 

Madbury was disannexed from Dover and made a parish for 
the support of a minister this year ; being as they alleged at a 
distance from the meeting houses in Dover and Durham, and 
having some years since at their own cost built a meeting house 
situated more conveniently. 

Two companies were raised this year in Dover and the towns 
formerly a part of it, for the expedition to Crown Point, and 
another, under Capt. Paul Gerrish, for Albany. New Hamp- 
shire furnished in all 500 men. 

Nov. 18. — "About four o'clock in the morning was an ex- 
ceeding shock of ye earthquake which shock was nere as much 
as that in ye year 1727, Oct. 29, but ye noise was not so loud." 

{Kelly's diary.) 

John Winthrop, Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Philoso- 
phy at Harvard College, described the " great earthquake which 
so lately (Tuesday, Nov. 18, 1755) spread terror and threatened 
desolation throughout New England," in a lecture delivered in 
the chapel of the college on the week following the earthquake. 



1757] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 147 

The shocks were sufficient to throw bricks from the professor's 
chimneys with a velocity of twenty-one feet per second, to burst 
a distiller's cistern by the agitation of the liquor in it, and to 
break off the spindle of the vane on Faneuil Hall in Boston. 
This spindle was a pine stick, five inches in diameter and ten 
feet in height, and carried a weight of thirty pounds on its top. 
A moderate winter, a middling crop of hay and a light crop 
of corn. A troublesome year on account of the war. 

1756 

A regiment was raised in New Hampshire this year to operate 
against Crown Point, the command of which was given to Col. 
Nathaniel Meserve, and Hon. Thomas Westbrooke Waldron of 
Dover, was appointed a commissioner, to reside at Albany, for 
the purpose of taking charge of the stores. 

In the expedition against Crown Point, Samuel Gerrish led 
one of the Dover companies and John Titcomb another. 

"A fourth open winter in succession. Many people plowed 
and fenced in the month of February, and as good carting as in 
summer. We had a fruitful summer." 

1757 

June 20. — At a public town meeting held for the purpose of 
seeing if the town would take any measures "to provide a 
meeting house suitable to attend the public worship of God of 
which we are destitute at present," it was voted that the town 
would provide a suitable place. Also that the old meeting 
house be pulled down and applied towards the building of a 
new one as far as it will go ; that the new house be set up either 
where the old one stands or near by on the Town privilege, 
either on the hill or under the side of the hill as the Town shall 
think most proper, and that a committee be chosen to draw a 
plan for the house, to take proper advice as to the bigness and 
model of the same, and to " serve at their own cost." 

July 4. — It was voted that a plan of Berwick lower meeting 
house taken by the committee be accepted, that Thomas W. 
Waldron, Stephen Evans and Dudley Watson be appointed to 
sell the pew privileges and take other means for building the 
house. Laboring men in building the house to have thirty 
shillings old tenor per day, finding themselves, and the same 
for their oxen in hauling timber, &c. 



148 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1758 

Dec. 23. — Samuel Heard of Dover, a soldier in the Crown 
Point Expedition, in Col. Nathl Meserve's regiment, having 
represented to the Assembly his indigent circumstances and his 
not being able to subsist himself by reason of the loss of his leg 
in May, 1756, and the late grant made him by the government 
being spent, it was voted that he be allowed the sum of thirty 
pounds, to be delivered him as occasion may require, by Capt. 
Thomas Wk. Waldron. 

A hard winter, much snow and a great scarcity of hay. A 
very sharp drought in summer, which cut short the fruits of the 
earth. The season a very sickly one. 

1758 

March 27. — At a public town meeting, among other officers, 
Stephen Evans and George Hanson were chosen " Informers or 
Inspectors against killing Deer out of season." 

Thomas W. Waldron and Howard Henderson were chosen 
representatives this year. 

The Assembly passed a bill this year limiting the number of 
taverns in the State. The number allowed to Dover was three. 

April 28. — " We hear from Dover that at a late regimental 
muster an enlisting officer had part of one of his feet shot away 
by the carelessness of a soldier." (A''. H. Gazette?) 

(Enlisting was going on at this time to raise soldiers for the 
French war — of which New Hampshire furnished 800.) 

June 5. — At a public town meeting it was voted that the new 
meeting house be built on the bilinear the old one. At another 
meeting, held July 10, this was reconsidered, and it was voted 
to set it upon a lot purchased of Joseph Hanson, against which 
Thomas Millet and seven others (living on Dover Neck) entered 
their dissent. A committee was appointed to procure and make 
suitable provision for raising the new meeting house. 

Nov. 27. — At a public town meeting it was voted that Rev. 
Mr. Gushing for this winter season shall preach and hold forth 
the public worship of God in the new meeting house and there 
continue said service for the future and that he begin the public 
worship there by preaching one or more sermons on Wednesday 
the 13th of Dec. next. 

The selectmen were directed to take care of the old meeting 
house " so that it may not be exposed to be torn to pieces this 
winter." 



1760] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 149 

' ' A very hard winter, deep snows and the most difficult passing 
we have had for ten years. The latter end of March the snow 
lying 3 or 4 feet deep was as hard as ice and people sledded 
upon it over fences. Hay was scarce. A wet summer, the corn 
being very green stank in our chambers. Corn sold at 4 pds. a 
bushel." 

1759 

March 26. — At a public town meeting held at the old meeting 
house on Pine Hill, Col. John Gage, Capt. Howard Henderson 
and lyieut. Dudley Watson were chosen a committee to petition 
the General Assembly for liberty to raise money by a lottery to 
build a bridge over Cochecho river. 

It was also voted to have two schools in town, exclusive of a 
grammer school and the school in Madbury part. (Madbury 
was still a part of Dover.) Also to pay the constables at the 
rate of 20 shillings for every 100 pds. for collecting the taxes, 
instead of their rates being given in as heretofore, provided 
they make up with the selectmen at the end of the year. 

July 7. — At 'a public town meeting held at the new meeting 
house, it was voted that 2500 pds. old tenor be raised and paid 
to the committee for building the house. Also that Rev. Mr. 
Cushing have 1000 pds. old tenor, for his salary. Mr. Cushing 
being present at the vote accepted the same. 

Sept. I. — Nicholas Powers coming up the river on his way 
home from Elliot was drowned. He was, it is said, a school- 
master and was returning from his school at Elliot to his home 
on Dover Neck when his boat was upset. 

Nov. 26. — A committee was appointed to sell the old meeting 
house and pay the proceeds thereof to the committee for build- 
ing the new house. Also voted that the vacancy left " in front 
of the front gallery in the new house be for pew privileges." 

"A comfortable winter, a very wet summer, and in general 
the most plentiful year for all sorts of provisions and fruits of the 
earth that I ever knew." Corn sold at half a dollar a bushel. 

1760 

March 31. — At a public town meeting held at the old meeting 
house on Pine Hill, it was voted that there be no more schools 
for the year ensuing than by law is required. 

A committee was appointed to settle the lines between Dover 
and Barrington and empowered to prosecute or petition to the 



ISO NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1761 

General Assembly if needful and carry on the same to a final 
issue. 

(This appears to have been the last "public town meeting 
held at the old meeting house on Pine Hill.") 

Oct. 13. — At a public town meeting held at the Quaker meet- 
ing house, a committee was appointed to sell the old school 
house standing on Pine Hill and pay the proceeds thereof to 
the selectmen. 

The Assembly this year passed an act granting the town lib- 
erty to raise two thousand pounds, new tenor, by way of IvOt- 
tery, to rebuild their Great Bridge over Cochecho river — the act 
to be in force three years and no longer. 

Another comfortable winter and fruitful summer. 

1761 

Jan. 28. — The Quakers of Dover, by Joseph Austin, Thomas 
Tuttle and Samuel Austin, for and on behalf of themselves and 
the rest of their brethren and by order of their monthly meeting 
held at Cochecho the i8th day of the loth mo. 1760, petitioned 
the Assembly, setting forth that they were burthened with a tax 
to hire soldiers into the service, and praying, for reasons assigned, 
to be relieved therefrom. The Assembly assigned a day for a 
hearing thereon, and ordered them to cause the chief ofl&cer of 
the Regiment, & the selectmen of the town to be served with a 
copy of the petition and order thereon, at their own cost and 
charge, that they might appear and shew cause, if any they 
had, why the prayer should not be granted. 

Feb. 6. — It was voted that the prayer thereof be granted and 
that the tax ordered by the Treasurer's warrant to be assessed 
on the people called Quakers in the towns of Dover, Durham, 
Somersworth, Rochester and Barrington in the year 1760, be 
remitted and that the same be added to the Province Tax of 
said towns for the year 1761. 

March 30. — At a public town meeting it was voted to petition 
the General Court for a law to empower the First Parish to 
transact their affairs exclusive of the other town business. 

July 27. — The committee for building the new meeting house 
having complained that the money for that purpose had not been 
fully paid them, that many persons who had agreed to do so, by 
the purchase of pew privileges, had neglected it, &c. a town 
meeting was held at which the committee for examining their 
accounts made report that the whole amount expended was 



1762] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 151 

ii248pds. 1 8s. 4d, old tenor: which report was accepted and 
the building committee was empowered to sue those men who 
owe money towards building the house. 

Aug. 27. — The town voted to build a new bridge over the 
Cochecho in place of the old one, the latter "not being fit to 
repair on any account so as to be passable for man or horse." 
Three thousand pds. old tenor, were raised for building the 
bridge. 

The drought was so severe this summer as to cut short the 
crops and render supplies from abroad necessary. During the 
drought a great fire raged in the woods, in the towns of Barring- 
ton and Rochester, burning with irresistible fury for several 
weeks, and was not extinguished till a plentiful rain fell in 
August. An immense quantity of the best timber was destroyed 
by this conflagration. 

1762 

June II. — The First Church was incorporated as a Parish dis- 
tinct from the town at this time. 

Oct. 4. — The town voted to build a new bridge over Bellimons 
Bank river, at or near the place where the old bridge was stand- 
ing, and raised 1200 pds. old tenor, for that purpose. 

Howard Henderson and Thomas W. Waldron were chosen 
representatives to the Assembly. 

Oct. 30. — A boat was upset in the river near Dover Point and 
four persons, viz. Mr. Walton and wife, her brother Hunking 
Moses, and Walton's sister, were drowned. (A". H. Gazette.^ 

We had the most severe cold long winter ever known, with 
deep and drifted snows, which made it exceedingly difficult 
passing and difficult browsing cattle in the woods, which many 
people depended on doing for want of hay. The spring being 
backward, many cattle, horses, swine and sheep died. People 
were put to great difi&culty to get their plowing done, and hay 
sold for 100 pds. per ton. In the upper towns especially by the 
month of February there was scarcely any corn to be bought, 
and the people were obliged to come to the lower towns begging 
and pleading for a quart of corn. Those people who had corn 
were obliged to deal it out little by little, as long as they had 
any, and to depend for a supply from abroad when the vessels 
should come in. The vessels began to come about the middle 
of March and people came from the upper towns and lugged the 
corn up through the snow drifts, leading their horses. Corn at 



152 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1763 

first was sold at 3 pds. 15s, but afterwards as high as 6 pds. a 
bushel. When the spring came, all, rich and poor, were buyers 
of provisions. But the discouraging circumstances of the people 
did not end here. They had no sooner planted their ground 
than the worms appeared and it seemed as if they would destroy 
everything. Many planted over the second and third time. 
Gardens were wholly eaten up and ruined. Then a most dis- 
tressing early drouth came on in the month of May, exceeding that 
of last year, for we had but little rain in the spring, not enough 
to settle the ground after the frost was out. The drouth was so 
sharp and grass dried up so fast that people began to mow what 
little they had in June, and there was not more than half or 
two thirds as much as last year. It sold for 120 pds. a ton. 
English grain grew strangely and we had a pretty good crop, 
especially winter grain. Indian corn stalks dried up and it was 
thought after the middle of August that we should have little 
or no Indian corn, for most of it was quite dead ; but Aug. 18 
we had a plentiful rain, followed by seasonable weather, which 
remarkably renewed the face of nature and recovered most of 
our Indian corn, so that some people had a middling crop. 
Grass grew remarkably and the poor cattle came to good beef. 
People also gathered abundance of acorns and nuts and fattened 
their pork on these, thus saving their corn. During the severe 
drouth of this summer terrible fires prevailed in many places, 
destroying an immense amount of property, filling the inhabi- 
tants with terror and dismay. Many buildings were destroyed 
and fields laid waste by the fires. {Lane' s Journal^ 

1763 

March 28. — The town voted to build a new bridge over the 
river near Capt. Paul Gerrish's mill in Madbury. 

Oct. 7. — As two men were running horses in Dover one of the 
men was hove off and instantly killed. {N. H. Gazette.') 

" We had a third hard winter, deep snows and difficult travel- 
ling ; (hay scarce, 120 pds. a ton;) and a very wet summer. 
Much hay cut, but mean and flashy, sold for 20 pds. a ton. 
Middling crops of English grain, good crops of flax and Indian 
corn, and abundance of Spanish potatoes, and tho' every thing 
has been scarce the two years past, yet everything is very plenty 
this fall except money." 



1765] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 153 

1764 

A comfortable winter and provisions plenty, but a very 
unfruitful summer, short crops of Indian and English corn. 
Indian corn being eaten by worms and planted over again, was 
very late and backward, and early frosts killed abundance of it. 

1765 

March 25. — The town voted to have five schools for the term 
of six months, increasing the number from that required b)' 
law, which appears to have been three including Madbury, 
which was still a parish of Dover. 

Howard Henderson and Thomas W. Waldron were chosen 
assembly men. 

July 22. — The vote passed at the annual meeting in March 
" to hire five scliools for the space or term of six months," was 
reconsidered at a meeting called at the request of thirty free- 
holders hy a constable, the selectmen having declined to do it. 

There were no organized school districts required by statute 
law until after 1800; hence, but few schoolhouses were erected 
and but few instructors were required. 

In December, 1771, Governor Wentworth in his message to 
the legislature called their attention to this important subject in 
these words : 

The promotion of learning obviously calls for legislation. The 
insufficiency of the present laws is evident, seeing that nine-tenths of 
our towns are wholly without schools or have such vagrant foreign mas- 
ters as are much worse than none, being for the most part unknown in 
their principles and deplorably illiterate. 

This picture may have been too highly colored, but it was 
true that in many of our towns no money was rai.sed for the 
support of schools until after the peace of 1783. The towns in 
those days had large taxes to pay, but moderate means to pay 
them, and all their energies were required to obtain the com- 
forts of life and carry on the war. 

A. hard, cold and difficult winter, with deep snows and as 
difficult passing as ever known. Corn scarce and beef plenty. 
A very good crop of ha)' and corn this summer. The land is 
in great commotion b)' reason of the Stamp Act. 



154 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1767 

1766 

Jan. 16. — Lee, part of the original territory of Dover, and 
afterwards of Durham, set off and incorporated as a town. 

June 2. — The town voted to erect a dwelling house, stable, 
ferry ways, &c. at Hilton's Point for the convenience of trav- 
ellers and a committee was appointed to obtain subscriptions to 
defray the expense. 

July 31. — Rev. Jeremy Belknap was invited to preach in 
Dover as an assistant of Rev. Mr. Gushing, and after he had 
preached " as a probationer" for a month it was unanimously 
voted by the parish to pay him one hundred pounds lawful 
money, yearly or every year, as a salary. It was also voted to 
give him one hundred and fifty pounds, to be paid at the follow- 
ing periods : 5opds. in three months, and 50 pds. in six months, 
and 50 pds. in nine months next after his ordination, to provide 
him with a convenient house to dwell in during his ministry ; 
or, instead of said 150 pds., that the parish shall provide him a 
convenient house, barn and garden ; and that it be left to his 
determination and choice which to accept. Mr. Belknap 
decided to accept the 150 pds. 

Dr. Belknap afterwards purchased of Charles Clapham the 
house on Silver street where he lived during his ministry in 
Dover, which stood on the site of the Belknap school house, 
and was taken down when the school house was built in 1854. 
The Belknap lot originally comprised the adjoining lot on 
which the house built about 1776 by Dr. Ezra Green stands, 
where Dr. Green lived until his death in 1847, and which did 
not pass out of the hands of his descendants until 1876. 

A moderate winter and plentiful crop of all the fruits of the 
earth this summer. Health, Peace and Plenty. 

1767 

April 13. — The town voted to appoint a committee " to search 
the Town's former accounts to see if there is any mistake in said 
accounts and if they find any to endeavor to have them recti- 
fied ; " 40 pds. were raised for the support of schools. Capt. 
Shadrach Hodgdon had leave to hang a gate near the house of 
Joseph Hodgdon at his own cost ; Elijah Estes was indemnified 
for the loss he sustained in the weight of gold as purser for the 
selectmen ; and it was voted not to purchase a Town House. 

Thos. W. Waldron and Otis Baker were chosen represen- 
tatives. 



1767] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 155 

The population of Dover as found by the census taken this 
3'ear was 1614, viz : Unmarried men from 16 to 60, 186 ; Married 
men from 16 to 60, 217; Boys 16 years and under, 347; Men 
60 years and above, 39; Females unmarried, 500; Females 
married, 239; Male slaves, 19; Female slaves, 9; Widows, 58; 
— the number of inhabitants in the State being 52700. By this 
census it is seen that in the previous century the population of 
the town had increased from about 500 to more than 1600, 
though Oyster River had been detached from it and incorporated 
in part as Durham in 1732 and Lee in 1766, Bloody Point as 
Newington in 1764 and Fresh Creek as Somersworth in 1754. 
This part of the territory of the old town set off from the parent 
stock contained in 1775, Durham 12 14, I,ee 954, Newington 
332, and Somersworth 965, a population of 3465 in all, or more 
than double that of Dover in 1770. 

This population, the third and fourth generations in descent 
from the original settlers, was mainly dependent upon what they 
could produce from the soil for support. Some additional 
grants of land had been made to outsiders in the outlying parts 
of the town where there was timber and water power, as to 
Robert Wadleigh and others in 1669, near the boundaries of 
Exeter, from which an attempt was made by previous settlers 
to eject them, but which the courts in Massachusetts, which had 
then assumed jurisdiction, confirmed to them. 

The following correspondence, honorable to both parties, 
preserves an incident in Town history, or of that of some of its 
prominent citizens, the occasion for it being the fact that Rev. 
Mr. Belknap, in returning from his wedding tour to Boston had 
injured a neighbor's horse, of which he had had the use : 

From Mr. Belknap to Capt. Waldron. 

Sir : — 

I never heard till this day, that your horse was dead of the wound 
which he got by my riding him from Boston. Justice demands and 
gratitude obliges me, to offer a compensation. I therefore sincerely and 
readily make you an offer of my horse (valued at 12 pds, which is the 
sum I gave for him), and will give you a promissory note of as much 
more as you shall judge will make an equivalent. 

I am very sorry for jour loss, and that I was the occasion of it ; but 
can truly say, I shall be glad if you will accept what I have offered 
above. 

I am. Sir, with the greatest respect, 
Your obliged, humble servant, 

July 15th, 1767. Jer. Belknap, 



156 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1768 

Capt. Waldron replied as follows: 

Rev. Sir : — My horse slipped his wind the 20th June last, under 
the care of Farrier Coleman. If some unconcerned, officious gabbler 
had not blabbed the secret, I trust a jubilee year from that Hegira would 
have passed, without its reaching your ears. 

I never had the slightest thought of your making any satisfaction for 
him, and now freely declare, that I disclaim any demand that could be 
made relative thereto on Mr. Belknap by his 

Most respectful, humble servant, 

Julv 16, 1767. Thomas W. Waldron. 

The following account of the wedding journey, taken from 
the Doctor's interleaved almanac, as given in his biography, is 
a model of brevity : 

June I2th. Set out for Boston, lodged North Hill. 

i3tli. Travelled to Ipswich ; met Governor Wentworth on the road ; 
he entered Portsmouth this day. 

14th. Preached at Ipswich. 

15th. Reached Boston ; evening married. 

i8th. Set out on our return, rode through the rain, and lodged at 
Hampton, Mr. Thayer's. 

iglh. Got home to Dover in the evening safe and well. 

Deaths in Dover this year, by the Record of Rev. Mr. 
Belknap, 9. 

Middling winter ; in summer a short crop of hay ; plenty of 
Indian corn, but no demand for it for the last two years. Duties 
laid on glass, tea, paper &c. at home, makes uneasiness here. 
Money is scarce. 

1768 

March 14. — The town voted that there was no objection to 
the Parish of Madbury being set ofif as a town, according to the 
prayer of their petition to the Governor, Council and Assembly. 

March 28. — The selectmen were empowered to purchase a 
sufficient quantity of common land for landings on each side of 
Cochecho river. 

May 27. — Final and complete separation between Madbury 
and Dover was made by an act of the Assembly passed at this 
time, which gave the parish all the town powers and privileges 
which were not given it previously. 

Deaths in town this year, 17. 

A moderate winter and not a ver}'^ fruitful summer. An 
army and fleet sent over to bring us into subjection. 



1771] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 157 

1769 

May II. — When the apple trees were in bloom this day, there 
was the unusual sight of snow covering them in the afternoon, 
and continuing till the next morning. (^Dr. Belknap.') 

Deaths this year, 19. 

Very cold weather this winter after the middle of January, 
which held more than a month and froze harder than for several 
years. In summer a good crop of hay and corn. 

1770 

Jan. 22. — The town voted to build anew bridge over Cochecho 
river " at the upper ware next below Capt. Waldron's mills at 
the lower falls." 200 pds. was raised by tax for the purpose 
and 2S. lawful money was to be paid per day to the men work- 
ing on the same, finding themselves. A meeting was held Feb. 
26, to see if the town would reconsider the above vote, when 
" by polling " ii was voted not to reconsider. 

March 26. — It was voted to build a Town House and a com- 
mittee was appointed for that purpose, who were to do it in the 
best and cheapest manner. 

Deaths this year, 16. 

A moderate winter ; a terrible drouth in summer so that about 
the middle of August there was but little prospect of a crop of 
corn. The worms ate the corn in the spring and a very uncom- 
mon sort of worm, called the canker worm, ate the corn and 
grass, all as they went, above ground, which cut short the crops 
in many places. 

1771 

The building of the bridges, above and below the falls, was 
the subject of some contention this year, and the cause of an 
appeal to the Assembly, which body thereupon voted that, " it 
appearing that there was a Town vote for building the Lower 
Bridge it is thought to be just that the charge thereof should be 
paid by the whole Town. But it appearing that the Upper 
Bridge is more useful for the public, therefore voted that said 
Upper Bridge shall hereafter be maintained at the charge and 
expense of said Town, and that the petitioners have leave to 
bring in a bill accordingly." 

Otis Baker and John Gage chosen representatives. 

Deaths this year, 23. 



158. NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1773 

An open winter and several great freshets, which carried away 
mills, bridges, &c. In summer very hot weather and a middling 
crop of hay and corn. 

1772 

Nov. 10. — This day Rev. Mr. Belknap preached a sermon 
before his Excellency John Wentworth, Esq. governor of His 
Majesty's province of New Hampshire, at a review of the second 
regiment of Foot, at Dover, in said province; and met so favor- 
able a hearing, that the ofl&cers requested a copy for the press, 
which was granted. 

(Life of Dr. Belknap?) 

Deaths this year, 17. 

1773 

The first courts in Strafford county were holden in Dover this 
year. Previous to this, in consequence of the sparseness of the 
population, the county had remained annexed to Rockingham 
for judicial purposes and all the courts were held at Portsmouth. 

The following incident, recorded in a memorandum of Rev. 
Mr. Belknap, occurred about this time : 

After the laudable example of the ladies in divers towns of this and 
the neighboring provinces, on Thursday last, about forty ladies met at 
the minister's house in Dover, some of whom brought with them fiax 
and cotton to spin, and others the yarn ready spun ; and, after spending 
the day in a very industrious and agreeable manner, they generously pre- 
sented to Mrs. Belknap the fruits of their labor, which amounted to 242 
skeins of seven knots each, beside the surplus of their materials, which 
the time did not allow them to spin. They behaved with the utmost order 
and decency, and were entertained with the best refreshments the season 
afforded, which were kindly and plentifully supplied by those who were 
well-wishers to industry. 

On the petition of Otis Baker and others that the town would 
give or sell the county a lot for a jail, it was voted that the 
town could not give one, but that the selectmen might sell 
one in some suitable place. The selectmen were also authorized 
to pay Benjamin Geer 4 pds. 6s. 6d. to satisfy the claim of 
Dr. Atkinson for curing a wound he received in his knee. 

Deaths this year, 15. 

The number of polls in Dover this year was 338, value of 
rateable estates 530 pds. and its proportion of each 1000 pds. of 
the Province tax, as fixed by the General Assembly, 25 pds. 13s. 



1774] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 159 

1774 

The following document copied from the Town records, shows 
the stand taken by the patriots of the Revolution against the 
arbitrary proceedings of the British Gov^ernment, whose iron 
rule had begun to lead many of them to think that independence, 
if not inevitable, was desirable. This eloquent protest against 
the tyranny of the Mother Country and its "good and gracious 
king" (as they still called him) is among the first mutterings 
of the Revolution which was soon to follow. It appears to have 
been a general protest adopted by the several colonies of New 
England, and Dr. Belknap, the Minister of Dover, taking a 
deep interest in the patriot cause, and contributing by his writ- 
ings for the press, and his exhortations from the pulpit and on 
other public occasions, to hasten the crisis which led the colonists 
to take up arms to vindicate their rights, may have been its 
author. 

At a legal meeting of the qualified voters of the town of Dover, this 
tenth (lay of January, 1774, convened at the Friend's meeting house, in 
said town on purpose to consider of the innovations attempted to be made 
on American privileges. 

Col. Otis Baker was chosen moderator. 

Although we deprecate every thing -which in its infant motions tends 
to alienate the affections which ought to subsist among the subjects of 
the same King, yet, we can not longer behold the arts used to curtail the 
privileges purchased with the blood and treasure of British America, 
and of New England in particular, for their posterity, without bearing 
our testimony against them. 

As these colonies have ever recognized the Protestant Kings of Great 
Britain as their Lawful Sovereign, and we in this Province, the man whom 
the king has pleased to send us as his representative.— We acknowledge 
this representative from our first formation into a Government has had 
a negative voice on all Bills proposed for Laws in the manner his Majesty 
has at home. 

And as it doth not appear that any Parliaments have been parties to 
any contracts made with the European settlers in this once howling 
wilderness, now become a pleasant field, we look on our rights too dearly 
bought, to admit them now as Tax masters. — Since (by laws as firm as 
the honor of crowned heads can make them, and which we have no ap- 
prehension so good and gracious a King as we obey, will suffer to be 
abridged) we have Parliaments of our own, — who always with the great- 
est cheerfulness furnished his Majesty such aids as he has been pleased 
to require from time to time according to the abilities of the people, and 
even beyond them ; of which, none but themselves could be adequate 
judges. 

Why the King's subjects in Great Britain should frame laws for his 
subjects iu America, rather than the reverse, we cannot well conceive, as 



160 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1774 

we do uot admit it to be drawu from any Pact made by our ancestors, 
or from the nature of the British Constitution, which makes Represen- 
tion essential to Taxation, and this supposed power of Parliament for 
taxing America is quite novel, some few instances for the better regula- 
tion of trade excepted, which no more prove their supposed right, than 
the tortious entry of a neighbor into the" infant's field does that of the 
intruder. But if superior strength be the best plea, how would they 
relish the alternative ? which if political arithmetic deceives not advances 
with hasty strides ; tho' nothing but downright oppression will ever 
effect it. 

Therefore, Resolved ist, That any attempt to take the property of any 
of the King's subjects for any purpose whatever where they are not rep- 
resented, is an infraction of the English Constitution, and manifestly 
tends as well to destroy it, as the subject's private property, of which 
recent proofs are plenty. 

Resolved 2d, That we, and our American brethren, are the liege people 
of King George the Third, and therefore have as full and ample a claim 
to all the privileges and immunities of Englishmen, as any of his sub- 
jects three thousand miles distant, the truth of which, our demeanor 
clearly evinces. 

Resolved 3d, That the Parliament in Britain by suffering the East 
Indian Company to send us their Teas subject to duty on landing, have 
in a measure testified a disregard to the interests of Americans, whose 
liberal services ill deserves such ungenerous treatment. 

Resolved 4th, That we are of opinion that any seeming supineness of 
this Province in these very, very interesting matters, hath proceeded 
from a consideration of their smallness among their brethren, rather 
than from any sensibility of impending evils. 

Resolved 5th, That this town approves the general exertions, and 
noble struggles made by the opulent colonies through the continent, for 
preventing so fatal a catastrophe as is implied in taxation without repre- 
sentation, viz. slavery, than which, to a generous mind, death is more 
eligible. 

Resolved 6th, That we are, and always will be, ready in every consti- 
tutional way, to give all the weight in our power to avert so dire a 
calamity. 

Resolved 7th, That a dread of being enslaved ourselves, and of trans- 
mitting the chains to our posterity (by which we should justly merit their 
curses) is the principal inducement to these measures. 

And whereas, our House of Commons have a committee for corre- 
sponding with those of the several colonies on these matters, and the 
committees of the several towns in this Government to correspond with 
each other at the necessary time, may be subservient to the common 
cause, — therefore resolved, that a committee to consist of five persons 
be chosen for that purpose. 

Voted that Col. Otis Baker, Capt. Caleb Hodgdon, Capt. Stephen 
Evans, Capt. Joshua Wiugate, and John Wentworth, Jr., or either three 
of them be the Committee of Correspondence for this town. 

Voted that the proceedings of this meeting be entered in the Records 
of this Town, and that an attested copy thereof be sent to the Committee 



1774] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 161 

of Correspondence at Portsmouth, to assure them and all coucerned, 
that our hearts are knit with those, who wish the weal (as it is constitu- 
tionally fixed) of our most gracious Sovereign and all his numerous 
subjects. 

These votes and resolves after being maturely considered, were 
unanimously passed by the voters present at said meeting — after which, 
followed a dissolution. 

Otis Baker, Moderator. 

Recorded agreeably to the proceedings at said meeting. 

Pr. John Wentworth, Junr. Clerk p Tem. 

Jtily 1 8. — A committee of five consisting of Capt. John Wal- 
dron, Capt. Caleb Hodgdon, Capt. Joshua Wingate, Capt. 
Stephen Evans and Nathaniel Cooper, was chosen to represent 
the town at a meeting to be held at Exeter for "appointing 
Delegates to join in a General Congress of the Provinces for 
considering of and advising to the most conciliating methods of 
establishing their rights and harmony among all the subjects of 
our gracious Sovereign, which meeting is proposed to be held 
on the ist Sept. at Philadelphia." And 6 pds. lo s. were voted 
as the proportion of Dover towards paying the expenses of the 
delegates, which the selectmen were authorized to advance. 

The following tho' not occurring in Dover is worthy of preser- 
vation. 

1774, July 21. — The delegates from the several towns in the Province 
of New Hampshire met at Exeter, and chose John Sullivan, Esq. and 
Colonel Nathaniel Folsome, to join the General Congress at Philadelphia 
the first of Sept. next. {Boston ttewspaper.) 

Nov. 7. — A town meeting was held to see if the inhabitants 
would raise anything, either "in money, fat cattle or sheep," 
for the relief of the poor of Boston, then suffering from the 
operations of the Port Bill. And it was voted that the town 
would "give something." 

Deaths this year, 10. 



CHAPTER IV 

Under State Government 

1775 
Jan. 2. — At a town meeting the following preamble and reso- 
lutions were adopted : — 

The Designs of the Continental Congress holden at Philadelphia being 
so humane and benevolent, the result of their proceedings so salutary 
and effective as justly to attract the notice of the millions of freemen in 
America, this town on mature consultation are fully convinced that 
nothing (under Heaven) will so evidently tend to preserve the rights of 
Americans or frustrate the attempts already made for their destruction 
as carrying the same into full execution. For which purpose, 

Voted, That Messrs. Otis Baker, Shadrach Hodgdon, Stephen Evans, 
Joshua Wingate, John Waldron 3d, Caleb Hodgdon, Job Wentworth, jr. 
John Kielle and John Gage be a committee. 

Voted, they have the following instructions, viz : 

ist. We expect that to the utmost of your power you carefully intend 
the preservation of peace and good order in the town so far as the same 
may be endangered by a discussion of sentiment relative to political 
matters. 

2d. We enjoin you that by every lawful means you see the recom- 
mendations and proceedings of the Continental Congress steadily com- 
plied with by the inhabitants of this town so far as we are therein 
concerned. 

3dly. As examples you are to encourage every kind of Temperance, 
Frugality, Industry and Economy, and to discountenance every species 
of Vice, Immorality and Profaneness. Neither to use any sort of Game- 
ing or unlawful diversions yourselves, nor suffer it to be done within 
your knowledge without intimating your own dislike and the displeasure 
of the town thereat. 

4ly. Whereas, Hawkers, Pedlars and Petty Chapmen are continually 
strolling through the Country with Goods, Wares and Merchandize 
(much of which was undoubtedly forwarded by the enemies of America) 
in order to vend the same to the great hurt and decay of trade and in 
defiance of a good and wholesome law of this Government— You are 
therefore not knowingly to harbor, conceal or entertain any of them, 
nor purchase any of their wares, nor permit any within your knowledge 
to do it, and in case any Taverner, Innholder, or Retailer within this 
town, after being duly informed thereof, shall be knowingly guilty of 
either the acts in this instruction mentioned,— You are to take every legal 
measures to prevent their ever hereafter being licensed by the Court of 
Sessions either as Taverners or Retailers. 

5ly. Notwithstanding any persons may be so daring and hardy as to 
counteract the sense of the town expressed by these instructions, you 
are by no means to suffer any insult or abuse to be offered to either per- 
sons or estates, but use your utmost endeavor to prevent the same. 



1775] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 163 

61y. Of all breaches of these instructions you are as soon as may be 
to inform your neighbors and the Selectmen of the town that whenever 
it may be necessary the town may be convened in order to consult and 
advise thereon. 

May 15. — Capt. Shadrach Hodgdon and Capt. Stephen Evans 
were chosen to represent the town at the Provincial Convention 
to be held at Exeter, to continue in office six months if the 
Convention shall so agree, with full power to act for the town 
in the best manner they can devise, subject to such further 
instructions as the town may think proper to give them. 

The Convention met at Exeter April 21, and continued in 
session till May 2, though it is not certain that it adjourned on 
that day, the journal, which appears to have been imperfectly 
kept, not taking note of it. John Wentworth was its President. 
Another Convention met May 17, composed in part of the same 
members, who held over from former elections, and of others 
newly elected. Matthew Thornton was chosen President. It 
continued in session until Sept. 2, when it adjourned till Oct. 
31, when another session of 17 days was held, closing its work 
finally on the i6th of November. 

May 31. — Madbury set off from Dover, and incorporated as a 
town, Population 677. 

June 3, — A Committee of Safety was chosen by the town and 
it was voted that the recommendations of the Provincial Con- 
gress to the inhabitants of the colony be a general rule for the 
conduct of the committee and that the inhabitants of the town 
do strictly conform to the same. 

Thirty one companies of soldiers were raised in New Hamp- 
shire at this time and marched to Medford, Mass. to reinforce 
Gen. Sullivan. The company raised in Dover constituted the 
i8th — John Waldron, Captain; Ebenezer Ricker, ist Eieut ; 
John Goodwin, 2d L,ieut. 

July 22. — At a town meeting held on the petition of 31 
inhabitants, to see if the town would vote to " let the schools 
drop this present year for the reason of extraordinary charges 
other ways," 29 voted to "let them drop" and 28 against. A 
poll was demanded when 37 voted for and 37 against schools, 
the moderator then added his vote to one side and the clerk to 
the other, making the poll 38 for and 38 against, when a motion 
was made to adjourn to the 7th of August, which was carried, at 
which time it was "voted nemine contradicente that there be no 
schoolsthis present year, ten being the number of hands therefor. ' ' 



164 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1776 

Rev. Mr. Belknap having been chosen by the Committee of 
Safety to serve as Chaplain to the New Hampshire troops sta- 
tioned in the vicinity of Boston, notified them of his readiness 
to perform his part, if, as he was led to infer, the ministers in 
the other parts of the vState were to snpply the army by turns; 
but to reside there constantly in the chairacter of chaplain was 
what many considerations besides the precarious state of his 
health, concurred to forbid. 

Dec. 9. — Otis Baker and Stephen Evans were elected to rep- 
resent the town in the body which now assumed the name of the 
Provincial Congress. Col. Baker declined and John Wentworth, 
jr. was elected in his place. This Congress met at Exeter Dec. 
21, being styled in the records the " Fifth Provincial Congress." 

The Committee of Safety, being required to take charge of a 
company of tories sent from New York, ordered 19 of them to 
be sent to Dover jail, 28 to Exeter, 14 to Amherst and 7 to 
Portsmouth. 

By a census of the State taken this year " for the purpose of 
establishing an adequate representation of the people," Dover 
was found to contain males under 16 years of age 410, males 
from 16 years of age to 50 not in the army 342, males above 50 
years of age 74, persons gone in the army 28, all females 786, 
negroes and slaves for life 26 — total 1666. Also, 180 stand of 
arms, 60 wt of powder. 

1776 

Jan. 14. — Johnson, an Indian, preached in Dover, for whom 
a contribution was made amounting to 5 pds. 4s. 9d. {Nath. 
Cooper' s almcDiac.) 

Jan. 16. — Hon. Thomas Westbrook Waldron, having been 
appointed by the " Honorable Congress or General Assembly," 
a Councillor for the County of Strafford, declined the office, in 
consequence of having been ' ' little able to leave home for three 
winters successively." 

Jan. 29. — Fast through the State of New Hampshire. 

May 17. — Continental Fast. 

July 9. — The key of Peter Mitchell's store in Dover was taken 
from him by the Committee of Safety, agreeably to a requisition 
of the colonial authorities, and the goods therein afterwards 
confiscated. Mitchell appears to have been the servant or book- 
keeper of one James McMarster of Portsmouth, a suspected 
person, who petitioned the Assembly to have his property 



1777] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 165 

restored. This was refused and Mitchell was ordered to confine 
himself within the town of Dover till further orders, afterwards 
modified to " leave to travel anywhere within twelve miles of 
Dover." 

A regiment of soldiers was raised at this time for operations 
in Canada and placed under the command of Col. Joshua Win- 
gate of Dover. Timothy White also of Dover was Quarter- 
master. The compan}^ raised in Dover was officered as follows : 
Caleb Hodgdon, Captain and Major ; Abraham Perkins, Capt. 
and Lieut. ; Tobias Leighton, Lieut. ; Samuel Stagpole, Lieut. ; 
John Starbord, Ensign. 

July 13. — It was voted that forty two shillings be given by 
the town to each of the soldiers enlisted and that shall enlist 
since the nth inst. and proceed in the present expedition to 
Canada not exceeding fifteen or sixteen men, and that the 
Selectmen hire the money (and pa}' the same) in the best man- 
ner they can immediately on the town's account. 

Nov. 21. — Thanksgiving through the State of New Hamp- 
shire. 

Dec. 21. — A Convention met at Exeter and formed a tempo- 
rary Constitution, to continue during the war with Great Britain, 
under which Constitution Meshech Weare was elected Presi- 
dent. This was the first Constitution formed in any of the 
Colonies after the Revolution commenced. 

Deaths this 5"ear, 47 — of which 8 were " abroad in war." 



1777 

Jan. 23. — Theophilus Dame, Esq. sheriff of the County of 
Strafford, received orders from the Committee of Safety to 
" liberate from prison all such of the New York prisoners as 
gave bonds with two sufficient sureties, to the Speaker of the 
House, to remain true prisoners within the town of Dover — 
such sureties being inhabitants of this State." 

March 27. — The committee appointed by the Assembly to 
examine into the condition of the goods seized as the effects of 
James McMarster and to nominate some person to dispose of 
them, made a report recommending Nathaniel Cooper, "whose 
hands the goods are now in," and that he pa}'- the net proceeds 
into the treasury, after deducting five per cent commission for 
all trouble and expense. 



166 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1777 

April 22. — Mr. John B. Hanson was ordered to deliver to 
Theophilus Dame, Esq. "as much beef as he shall desire for 
the use of the New York prisoners confined in Dover Goal." 

May I. — Snow storm. 

May 5. — Voted that Col. Otis Baker, Capt. Thomas Young, 
and Capt. John Hayes be empowered to enlist what men are 
wanting to make this town's quota of men for completing the 
Battalions to be raised in this State, on the best terms they can. 
It was also voted that the selectmen furnish the committee with 
money to hire said men and raise the same in the next tax bill. 

May 15. — John Wentworth, Esq., Col. Wingate, J. Kielle, S. 
Heard, Andrew "Wingate, J. B. Hanson, Capt. Gage, Capt. J. 
Hayes, Nathl. Cooper, chosen Committee of Safety. 

Voted that the Alarm and Train Band Lists have three shillings 
a day, and one shilling and sixpence a half a day, allowed them 
by the town for each day they train in a year more than the law 
requires. 

Sept. 10. — It was voted that "thirty dollars be given to each 
soldier who enlists for the Continental Service until the last of 
November next, and that the Selectmen pay each soldier said 
sum when mustered." 

Dec. 12. — Small flight of snow being the firsf of this season. 
{Nathl. Cooper's interleaved alma7iac.) 

The town this year petitioned the Assembly for the privilege 
of raising money by lottery for the purpose of building a bridge, 
and Josiah Bartlett, the chairman of the committee, reported 
that "although they esteem Lotteries in general to be preju- 
dicial to .society, yet considering the unhappy disputes that have 
arose and still subsist in the town of Dover on account of said 
bridges," that an act be passed enabling the town to raise 
150 pds. by lottery for that purpose. The act was passed. 

The "institution of slavery" existed, (though it could 
hardly be said to flourish) in Dover, until after the Declaration 
of Independence. Dec. 6, 1773, Col. Otis Baker bought of 
Henry Ward of Newport, Rhode Island, "a negro boy named 
Cato," which boy the aforesaid Ward, for and in consideration 
of the sum of " one thousand four hundred pounds, old tenor," 
promised the said Baker to ' ' defend to him and his assigns 
forever, against the lawful claims of all persons whatsoever." 
June 4, 1777, Col. Baker gave Cato his freedom, the certificate 
of emancipation being signed by Jeremy Belknap as a witness. 



1779] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 167 

As already stated, by the census of 1775 there were " 26 negroes 
and slaves for life " in Dover in that 3'ear. These were mostly 
emancipated by their nominal owners during the revolution, or 
all became free by general consent and the adoption of the 
State Constitution soon after. Many of them, however, re- 
mained for life in the families which they had faithfully served 
as slaves, preferring the protection of their old masters to the 
larger liberty which was offered them. 

1778 

March 14. — The Assembly voted that "it is offensive to this 
house that any member should play at cards or any other un- 
lawful game in public houses and that they be desired to desist 
therefrom." 

March 30. — The town voted that " a committee of two per- 
sons be chosen to inquire into the state of our quota of Conti- 
nental troops, and if we are found lacking to take the most 
effectual measures for filling up the same." 

June 15. — Voted that Mr. John Bm. Hanson, Col. Joshua 
Wingate and Major Caleb Hodgdon be a committee to hire six 
men as soldiers to go to Rhode Island to reinforce General 
Sullivan's Division. 

1779 

March 18. — The committee on estates of absentees (tories 
who adhered to the royal cause) having advertised for sale in 
Dover sundr}^ articles as part of the estate of Gov. John Went- 
worth, among which were named a large and valuable collection 
of books, and two fine weather glasses, the Assembly " consid- 
ering that they would be more likely to sell at much greater 
advantage in the town of Exeter, where there was a constant 
resort of people from other towns, especially when the General 
Court is sitting there, than in Dover," ordered the committee 
to adjourn the sale to that town on the 25th inst. 

These articles were the "spoils" of the Governor's seat at 
Wolfborough, and so far as appears from the records of the time 
he was the only loyalist who was so dealt with in the county of 
Strafford, with the exception of the servant of James McMarster, 
previously mentioned. 

May 4. — One of the most violent thunder storms which was 
ever known in the maritime parts of New Hampshire, occurred 
this day, at noon. A cloud rose in the N. W. and another in 



168 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1780 

the S. W. at the same time: they crossed each other, and the 
former passed very near the earth ; a very black darkness came 
on, the lightning was an incessant glare, and the thunder 
a continual peal for about an hour. Many trees, several barns, 
mills and dwelling houses were struck ; cattle and sheep were 
killed in the pastures in several towns ; and a valuable new 
house built for religious worship, at Somersworth, was set on 
fire and consumed. Its steeple had a metallic vane and spindle, 
but no conductor to the earth. The bell was melted and fell 
while in a state of fusion, and no piece of it larger than a mus- 
ket ball could be found. {Dr. Belknap.) 

May ID. — The town voted " that the Selectmen advance the 
Continental and State bounty agreeably to a request of the 
Committee of Safety, if they have it in stock, and if not the 
Selectmen are empowered to hire money for said purpose." 

July 5. — Voted, " that the selectmen advance the Continental 
bounty, being 60 pds. and State bounty of 30 pds. and travel for 
five men, and if they have it not in hand that they hire the 
same and have power to raise it in the next year's tax." Also, 
that a committee be chosen to hire eight men for the Continental 
Army one year, and five men for the service of Rhode Island 
six months. 

Aug. 30. — Voted "that a hundred dollars a month be given 
nine men to serve as soldiers at Portsmouth, &c. including 
what the State is to pay them." 

On the question of accepting the declaration of rights and 

plan of government for the State, as transmitted by the committee 

of the Convention at Exeter, it was unanimously voted that the 

town does not approve of the same. 

Deaths this year 9. 

1780 

During the winter of 1779-80 snow lay on the ground from 
the middle of November to the middle of April, four feet deep 
everywhere. In December and January a snow storm continued 
seven successive days, and the snow fell to four feet on a level, 
with drifts eight and ten feet high. Sheep were buried in the 
drifts many days, and even men and animals perished with cold. 
Long Island Sound was crossed by heavy artillery on the ice. 
It was followed by a backward spring. <yOId record.) 

May 19. — The unusual darkness of this day, which has ever 
since caused it to be known as the " Dark Day," is thus 
described by Dr. Belknap, then a resident of Dover : 



1781] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 169 

Fires had spread very extensively in the woods, and the westerly wind 
had driven the smoke over all the country. It was so thick near the 
horizon, for several preceding days, that the sun disappeared half an 
hour before its sitting ; and in the low grounds it was almost suffocating. 
The morning of the 19th was cloudy, with some rain ; and a black cloud 
appeared in the south west, from which thunder was heard. The rain 
water, and the surface of rivers, was covered with a sooty scum. The re- 
mains of a snow drift, which had been raked clean, the preceding day, 
became black. Several small birds flew into the houses, and others were 
found dead abroad, being suffocated. About an hour before noon, the 
clouds assumed a brassy appearance ; after which their color became a 
dusky grey; at one hour after noon it was necessary to light candles. 
At the time of the greatest obscuration, the smoke of a chimney was 
observed to rise perpendicularly, and then incline to the west. A thick 
fog, which came in from the sea, moved aloug the hill tops in the same 
direction. A light gleam was seen in the north. The extent of this 
darkness was more than 200 miles, from north to south. To the westward 
it reached beyond Albany, and it was observed, by a vessel at sea, 15 
leagues beyond Cape Ann. The darkness varied its appearance, in some 
places, through the afternoon ; but in the maritime parts of New Hamp- 
shire, there was no cessation or interruption of it; and the evening pre- 
sented a complete specimen of as total darkness as can be conceived. 
Before midnight the vapors dispersed, and the next morning there was 
no appearance of them. 

June 26. — The town voted " that the selectmen be a commit- 
tee for the purpose of getting eight men for the Continental 
service on the best terms they can." 

July 4. — Voted "that the Selectmen with the two Captains of 
the companies in Dover be a committee to get our quota of 
militia men for the Continental service." 

Joshua Wingate and John Kielle were chosen representatives 
to the Convention to settle a plan of government for the State. 

1781 

Jan. 22. — The town voted " that Mr. Andrew Torr, Capt, John 
Gage and Maj. Benja. Titcomb be a committee to get the pro- 
portion of men wanting from this town to fill up and complete 
the Continental Army in the cheapest and most expeditious 
manner possible." 

March 5. — Voted "that each recruit from this town as their 
quota of men for completing the Continental Army have and 
receive as wages fourteen bushels of Indian corn per month 
during their stay in the service, and that the selectmen give 
their security for the payment of the same accordingl}'." 

July 16. — On the petition of Capt. Thomas Young and Capt. 



170 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1781 

James Calef, stating that they had been "ordered by Col. 
Stephen Evans without loss of time to enlist or draft fourteen 
able bodied effective men to serve three months if not sooner 
discharged, wherever the Commander in Chief shall order as 
soldiers," it was voted " Capt. Young and Capt. Calef be a 
committee to raise the fourteen men required, and that they 
give thirty shillings silver money to each man that enlists, 
which they shall have whether called on to go into service or 
not, and when they march each man shall receive thirty shillings 
more like money." 

Sept. 19. — At a town meeting held for raising soldiers, it was 
voted "that nine men now to be raised for three months be 
given ten silver dollars each as bounty and paid fourteen 
bushels of merchantable Indian corn per month by the town 
in Jan. 1782." 

Oct. Theseige and surrender of Yorktown, the crowning 

event of the war of the Revolution, was concluded this month, 
at which the gallant Colonel Alexander Scammell, one of the 
bravest and most distinguished officers of the war, who went 
from Durham in command of a New Hampshire Regiment, was 
foully murdered by the enemy. 

" On the morning that the enemy evacuated their advanced redoubts, 
he being officer of the day, reconnoitered rather too far, and fell insensi- 
bly among a number of horsemen who were patrolling in front of the 
lines they had retired to. Two of them addressed him in rather harsh 
terms, the one seized his bridle and the other presented a pistol to his 
breast. Thus situated he acknowledged himself a prisoner, when a third 
rode up, presented his pistol close enough to burn his coat, and shot 
him in the back ; a fourth made a stroke at him with his sword, but the 
shot having weakened him, he fell from his horse, and the intention of 
the villains was frustrated. They plundered him of everything he had, 
and hurried him into their lines. The officers who were present never 
interfered, nor even after he was carried in did they treat him with any 
kind of civility or respect. He was released on parole the next day, and 
died six days afterwards of his wounds. Col. Scammell was but 33 at 
the time of his death. Much of his early life was passed in this vicinity. 
At one time he kept school in Berwick, and afterwards studied law with 
Gen. Sullivan at Durham, from whose office he went into the war at its 
commencement. Of great stature, six feet two inches in height, he was 
not only a conspicuous figure, but universally beloved for the amiability 
of his character, as well as admired for his daring bravery." 



1782] 



HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 
1782 



171 



Jan. II. — The General Assembly in granting a tax on the 
polls and estates of the inhabitants, this year, of i loooo pds, 
specified the following articles, in addition to silver and gold, in 
which it might be paid : 



Good New England Rum 

West India Rum ...... 

Beef Cattle, first payment by last of June 
2d " Sept. 

" " 3d " Nov. 

Men's neat leather shoes, good 

" yarn hose, of best quality 
Cotton or cotton & linen cloth ^ wide 
Good tow & linen cloth i yd wide 
Good white woolen cloth )i wide 
Linen cloth '/% wide for shirting for officers 
Good felt hals ..... 

Good 8 quarter blankets, for soldiers 
Good wheat flour ..... 



at 2S. 


6d. 


per Gallon 


4s. 




do. 




3>^d 


lb. 




3d 


do. 




2>^d 


do. 


6s 




per pair. 


5s. 




do. 


2S. 




per yd. 


IS. 


6d 


do. 


7s 




do. 


5S. 




do. 


5s. 






2IS. 






42s. 




per cwt. 



Some of the towns which were delinquent in their payments 
were notified by John Wentworth, in the Portsmouth and Boston 
papers, that they would be proceeded against, with the amount 
of rum or Spanish milled dollars respectively due, viz : Tufton- 
borough II Gallons of W. I. or 16 1/2 Gallons N. E. or i 
Spanish milled dollar for each gallon. The rum was to be de- 
livered at Boston or Haverhill, Mass., or Portsmouth. 

Feb. 17. — An unusual kind of hoar frost was observed. The 
wind had been northerly' on the preceding day, with some 
appearance of snow. The morning was calm and foggy. The 
trees and bushes were white with frost, which appeared on the 
north sides only of the twigs and smaller branches ; but on the 
larger limbs and trunks, there was none. Nor was any seen on 
the houses or fences, excepting on the sharp edges of boards, 
but every point of a stick or nail, and every rope and string, 
which was exposed to the north, was covered. The spiculae 
were of all lengths, from an inch downward, and about the 
thickness of a knitting pin. They increased in number and 
size, for about two hours after the rising of the sun, and in 
about an hour after this began to fall like snow on the ground ; 
they did not all disappear till two hours after noon. {Dr. 
Belknap?) 



172 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1784 

Dec. 9. — The town voted to accept the plan of government 
for the State as proposed by the Convention, being of opinion 
that "it was as perfect as the present state of affairs would 
admit." 

1783 

March 31. — The town voted that the present form of govern- 
ment be in full force till a better plan is established. 

May 26. — The town voted to procure a piece of ground for 
the purpose of erecting a county (court) house and to raise two 
hundred dollars towards building the same. 

Oct. 13. — The town voted unanimously to adhere to the former 
vote respecting a plan of government for the State without the 
alterations proposed in the late address of the Convention ; 
(referring to the Convention held for the purpose of forming a 
Constitution.) 

Oct. 31. — The new State Constitution was finished this day. 

1784 

March 29. — The first election of State Officers by the people 
took place this year, and at a legal meeting held at Dover this 
29th day of March the Hon. Meshech Weare received 155 votes 
tor President, General Sullivan 11, and Wiseman Clagett 2. 

June 2. — The new Constitution went into operation this day, 
and Meshech Weare was duly inaugurated as President of the 
State, having been found elected to that office by the people at 
the State election in March. 

The chief magistrate was styled "President" from 1784 to 
1793, when the term "Governor" was substituted under the 
amended Constitution of that year. 

Dr. Belknap, this year, made a journey to the White Moun- 
tains, leaving Dover July 20th and returning on the 31st, in 
company with Rev. Mr. Little of Wells, Mr. Cutler of Ipswich, 
Dr. Fisher of Beverly, and Mr. Heard of Ipswich. The journey 
was made on horseback, and the diary which he kept has been 
published, the original being among the Belknap papers in the 
Mass. Historical Society. 

The number of soldiers lost by the war of the Revolution 
from Dover, is stated by Dr. Belknap to have been 29. Having 
taken much pains to collect the returns from the several towns, 
he found that the loss from 27 towns in different parts of the 



17S5] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 173 

State amounted to 377. From this he estimated that the num- 
ber lost from the whole State amounted to 1362, and if a farther 
allowance was made for the sailors, &c. the number would reach 
1400. 

Deaths this year, 24. " Abroad in war " from 1777, 21. 

1785 

March 28. — At the annual town meeting the vote for Presi- 
dent of the State was for George Atkinson 124, John Sullivan 
36, John Langdon 7. Party distinctions were not very clearly 
defined at this time, but the votes for Atkinson were doubtless 
cast by those who subsequently ranked with the Federalists. 
The whole vote of the State this year was 7079. George Atkin- 
son had 2755, John Langdon 2497, John Sullivan 777, Josiah 
Bartlett 720, scattering 330. There being no choice by the 
people, John lyangdon was chosen by the Senate. 

The selectmen were authorized to sell lots on the Ivanding for 
the purpose of promoting and encouraging trade, &c. 100 
pounds was raised for the support of schools. John Waldron 
chosen representative. 

April 3. — Died, Thomas Westbrooke Waldron. He was the 
fourth in descent from Major Richard Waldron, and was born 
July 26, 1 72 1. He inherited the large landed possessions of his 
family in Dover, and was for many years its most important 
citizen. He served with distinction as Captain in the I,ouisburg 
expedition under Sir William Pepperell ; was Commissioner at 
Albany, Provincial Representative, Councillor, &c. and after 
the establishment of the State Government held many town and 
county offices. 

April 9. — This day a schooner of fiftj^ tons burthen, built at 
Garrison Hill, by Capt. Richard Tripe, was hauled and landed 
on the ice a few rods below the lower bridge. The snow cover- 
ing the earth at this time was not less than three feet deep. 

October — . — A great freshet, carrying off all the bridges in 
the town, and covering the Landing with water. 

October 31. — The town voted to build a bridge, this fall if 
possible, below Waldron's falls, where the lower bridge formerly 
stood. 

Deaths this year, 33. 



174 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1787 

1786 

March 26. — The vote for President of the State was for Major 
General Sullivan 228; all others 12. The whole vote of the 
State this year was 8567, of which John Sullivan, who was 
elected, received 4309, John lyangdon 3600, scattering 658. 
John Waldron chosen representative. 

Dr. Ezra Green and others petitioned the town to appropriate 
some of the money which the Landing lots were sold for to the 
purchase of a bell, inasmuch as Dover was the only shire town 
in the county and was in much need of a bell for its own accom- 
modation and for that of the court when in session. The town 
voted in the negative. 

Sept. II, — The pastoral relation of Dr. Jeremy Belknap with 
the First Church ended. 

Oct. 26. — At a town meeting held for the purpose of taking 
the minds of the people on the plan for emitting a paper cur- 
rency agreeably to the requisition of the General Court, 17 
voted for accepting the plan as sent out, 2 for not having any 
paper currency, and i for having 100,000 pounds emitted to 
redeem public securities at twenty shillings on the pound and 
said money to pass in all payments. 

Deaths this year to September, 8. 

1787 

Jan. 10. — Died, John Wentworth, jr., the first lawyer in Dover 
and an eminent and useful citizen. He was born July 14, 1745, 
graduated at Harvard College 1768, was a member of the 
House of Representatives and of the Committee of Safety, and 
a member of the Continental Congress in 1 778-1 780. 

Feb. 28. — Rev. Robert Gray settled as the successor of Rev. 
Jeremy Belknap. Mr. Gray was a native of Andover, Mass. 
where he was born in 1761, and after serving in the war of the 
Revolution, graduated at Harvard College in 1786. His con- 
nection with the Parish was regularly dissolved May 20, 1805. 
He was never resettled in the ministry and died at Wolfborough 
in 1822. 

March 26. — The vote for President of the State was for John 
Sullivan 243, John lyangdon i. The whole vote of the State 
was for Sullivan 4642, lyangdon 4034, Josiah Bartlett 628, 
Samuel Livermore 608. There being no choice by the people, 
John Sullivan was elected by the Senate. 



1788] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 175 

1788 

Jail. 7. — Dr. Ezra Green was elected to meet the Convention 
to be held at Exeter Feb. 2, to consider the proceedings of the 
Federal Convention for forming a Constitution. 

March 31. — At the annual town meeting John Sullivan re- 
ceived 178 votes for President of the State, John Langdon 14. 
The vote of the State this year was for John Ivangdon 4421, 
John Sullivan 3366, scattering 1053 ; whole vote 8840, neces- 
sar}' for a choice 4419. Langdon, having two majority, was 
elected. John Waldron was chosen Representative. 

It was voted to grant a lot of land for the erection of a hay 
market. 

June 3. — Elisha Thomas was executed in Dover for the mur- 
der of Capt. Peter Drown at New Durham, in the preceding 
February. This being the first execution in the county of 
Strafford, a large concourse of people were present from Dover 
and all the neighboring towns to witness it. The scaffold was 
erected near the foot of the hill leading from Central street to 
the river, on ground now enclosed in the yard of the Cochecho 
Print Works. 

It is recorded of the execution that : — 

The very peculiar circumstances of this unhappy man's fate induced 
a vast concourse of spectators to attend his execution. He appeared to 
be much affected with his situation, and employed the few moments then 
allotted to him, in exercises, but did not address the spectators. Indeed, 
the melancholy catastrophe, which his rash conduct had occasioned, 
operated so powerfully upon his senses, that it was with difficulty he 
supported himself to the fatal moment, which was to cut the thread of 
his existence, had arrived. The Sheriff treated the criminal with a 
degree of tenderness and humanity which did him honor; nor did he 
hurry him out of the world, but let him live till the last moment ; 
which having arrived, after shaking hands with the sheriff, he was 
launched into eternity. {N . H. Gazette.^ 

The murder for which Thomas was executed took place in 
the tavern of Mr. Randall in New Durham, where Thomas got 
into an altercation with another man, and Capt. Drown, in 
endeavoring to. separate them, was stabbed with a knife by 
Thomas and died in a few hours. Thomas left at home a wife 
and six children. Some days after he was committed to jail his 
wife, taking her youngest child to one of the neighbors, set out 
for Dover to see her husband. In the night, the other five chil- 
dren being in bed, the house caught fire and was burnt, and 



176 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1788 

four of the children were burnt with it, the oldest only escap- 
ing. While in jail, and a few days before his execution, 
Thomas attempted to escape, having removed his chains and 
penetrated the chimney almost sufficient to pass through, before 
he relinquished his design. During his imprisonment, he was 
allowed on Sundays the privilege of attending church, being 
guarded by the vSheriff and his posse to the meeting house which 
stood on the site of the present edifice at the ' ' corner. ' ' The jail 
at that time was on what was long known as "jail hill," the 
ground later occupied by the house of Daniel Niles. 

July There was great rejoicing all over the country at 

this time in consequence of the ratification of the Federal Con- 
stitution by the requisite number of States to enable it to go 
into effect. New Hampshire was the ninth State which gave 
its assent — the number required to secure its adoption. The 
Constitution was ratified by the State Convention at Concord, 
June 21, and expresses were immediately sent off to carry the 
news to the country. 

The New Hampshire Gazette, at Portsmouth of July i, gives 
the following account of the celebration in Dover "in conse- 
quence of having the most Important Pillar in the Federal Edi- 
fice Erected in New Hampshire." 

In the afternoon of Tuesday last, a number of gentlemen of that town 
assembled, and being embodied, nine cannon were discharged, at the 
distance of nine minutes from each other — the nifie States of the Union 
were given as toasts, one immediately preceding each cannon, in the 
order they adopted the Constitution, and were succeeded by nine cheers. 

The corps of Light Horse, and a company of foot were joined. The 
member of the Convention from Dover, was then waited on, and a toast 
was given as a testament of thanks, for his services and was succeeded 
by musick and &feu de joy from horse and foot. 

After passing the town (in procession) animated by the approving 
smiles of the ladies present — a semicircle was formed near the meeting 
house, where nine cannon were again discharged, and nine toasts were 
publicly given. 

After repeated cheers and expressions of unaffected joy, the company 
received an invitation to the Hall Chamber — where ;/z;/t' flowing bowles, 
and four empty stood prepared for their reception, and wzw^ social Songs 
were sung, which closed the evening in harmony. 

(The "four empty bowles " were of course symbolic of the 
four States which at that time had not ratified the Constitution.) 

As an illustration of the spirit of the times it is stated that 
in the neighboring town of Berwick, a delegate to the Conven- 
tion having bargained with a trader for the cloth for a suit of 



1788] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 177 

clothes, to wear on the occasion, being asked his sentiments in 
relation to the Constitution, and letting it be known that he 
intended to vote against it, was compelled to go without his new 
suit, the patriotic trader refusing to let him have it when he 
called for it. 

Aug. 19. — A violent hurricane destroyed hundreds of acres 
of woodland in New Hampshire, unroofed many barns, and did 
much other damage. 

Sept. 13. — The vote of Dover for Presidential Electors, for 
choosing the first President under the Constitution, is thus 
recorded : For John Sullivan 30 votes, John Parker 38, John 
Pickering 27, Judge Dudley 20, Gen. Bartlett 17, Col. Dame 10, 
Col. Toppan 10, Paine Wingate 2, Gen. Cilley 2, Daniel Rindge 
I, Dr. Cutter i. 

The whole number of votes cast in the State was 20142. No 
person having the requisite number for a choice, the Legislature, 
Jan. 7, 1789, made choice of Benj. Bellows, John Pickering, 
Ebenezer Thompson, John Sullivan and John Parker, they 
having the largest number of votes. They cast their votes for 
George Washington and John Adams, the first President and 
Vice President. 

The selectmen were authorized to sell as many of the town's 
lots on the Landing as would be sufficient for the purchase of a 
Bell, and no more. 

Nov. 4. — The Congregational Society in Dover, New Hamp- 
shire, have lately received for the use of their meeting house, 
and of the town, an elegant bell of considerable size. The 
Society of Friends, in that town, propose furnishing a clock at 
their expense. {Salem pape?'.) 

This story about the " Friends " and the clock was doubtless 
intended for a joke upon them, or it was perhaps a sly hit of 
their own upon the " world's people," who had been spending 
the town's money upon such a useless article as a bell. So far 
from purchasing a clock, the Friends in Dover, who at that 
time constituted perhaps nearly one half of the population, then, 
as in subsequent years, needed neither clock or bell as a remin- 
der for them to assemble, on the Sabbath, or at any other time, 
at their place of worship. They accordingly objected to being 
taxed for the purpose of buying bells for the "steeple houses " 
of other denominations. But they were out-voted in town 
meeting— Church and State — the Parish and the Town — being 
then one and indivisible. Like peaceable folks they submitted, 



178 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1789 

though doubtless with some strong remonstrance ; for the town, 
to reconcile them to the purchase, and perhaps with some con- 
sciousness that it was their due, voted to pay them a certain 
sum annually for the use of their Society as an equivalent for 
what they were required to pay towards the bell. This subsidy, 
however, did not continue many years — the vote was either 
repealed or conveniently forgotten — and the music of the bell 
was thereafter free to all, as it had been paid for by all, if it 
was not regarded by all as " its own exceeding great reward." 
The truth of history perhaps requires that it should be added 
that the bell thus obtained did not prosper. A few years after 
(1796) through some flaw in its manufacture or hard usage in 
ringing it for fires, on the 4th of July, or other occasions, it 
became cracked, was taken down and recast into its successor, 
which has since done duty on the First Congregational meeting 
house, and which from the long service to which it has been 
subjected may be regarded as tolerably safe from any similar 
accident. 

Dec. 17. — John Burnham Hanson, a citizen of prominence, 
holding the offices of town clerk, county treasurer, &c. was 
found dead in the river, supposed to have drowned himself in a 
fit of temporary insanity. 

Dec. 18. — On the petition of a large number of the Society 
of Friends to have the vote for purchasing a Bell reconsidered, 
the town voted not to reconsider — yeas no, noes 120. 

1789 

March 30. — Vote for President of the State, John Pickering 
138, John Sullivan 107. Parties this year began to assume the 
distinction of Federal and Republican. There was no choice of 
President by the people. John Sullivan, who was supported by 
the republicans, had 3657 votes, John Pickering, who was the 
federal candidate, 3488, Josiah Bartlett 968, Joshua Wentworth 
89, scattering 332. John Sullivan was elected by the Senate. 

The Committee appointed by the Court of Sessions to report 
a plan for a Court House, reported that the House be erected 
near where the Pound stood ; that a grant be made to the town 
of $300, for that purpose, the Town to finish the same by the 
time of the setting of the Court in November next. 

April 6. — The old Court House, at the Corner, was erected 
this year, the court previously having held its sessions in the 
meeting house. The County granted $300 for the purpose. 



1790] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 179 

The town gave the land and voted to sell so much of the com- 
mon Landing as would be sufficient to complete the building in 
addition to what was subscribed by individuals and granted by 
the county. Richard Tripe was the contractor for building. 
When the Court House was completed, some difficulty occurred 
in effecting a settlement, Capt. Tripe having charged for some 
work not contained in the specifications and which the Town 
declined to pay for. He brought an action against the Town 
for the amount claimed, and the Town appointed a Committee 
to defend the suit. 

Nov. 2. — The town voted to allow the Society of Friends 
13000 feet of boards for their proportion of the money paid for 
the purchase of a bell, as soon as the same could be collected 
from the persons who bought the lots. 

Nov. 23. — The selectmen with Col. Amos Cogswell, Mr. 
Charles Chapham and Mr. Stephen Sawder were a committee 
to settle with Mr. R. Tripe including what he has done more 
than was required by the Court. 



1790 

Jan. 18. — Voted "That if Mr. Tripe has any proposals of 
accommodation to make to the Town respecting the action he 
has now^ brot against said Town that the Committee be impow- 
ered to hear the same and lay it before the meeting at their 
adjustment." 

Feb. 9. — Voted not to receive Tripe's proposals. 

March 29. — At the annual town meeting the vote for Presi- 
dent of the State was for John Pickering 126, Joshua Went- 
worth 85, Josiah Bartlett 2. There was again no choice of 
President by the people, John Pickering who was again run by 
the federalists, had 3189 votes, Joshua Wentworth, republican, 
2389, Josiah Bartlett, republican, 1676, scattering 528. Josiah 
Bartlett was elected by the Senate. 

April 26. — A committee was appointed to see if the terms on 
which the mill privileges at the falls had been granted to 
Richard Waldron in 1653, viz : the payment yearly of 12 pounds 
in boards or plank so long as the same were occupied, had been 
complied with, and if not why not. The committee were 
directed to search the Salem Records for evidence of the con- 
tract, who subsequently reported through Dr. Ezra Green, that 
nothing could be found there about it. 



180 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1792 

July 12. — The first newspaper published in the town, entitled 
" The Political and Sentimental Repository or Strafford Regis- 
ter," appeared this day. 

Aug. 30. — Voted to build a Pound near the Gravel Pit at the 
foot of Pine Hill. Afterwards reconsidered and erected on 
Pine Hill back of Anthony Hanson's house. 

The following "marriage in high life" appeared in "The 
Political and Sentimental Repository or Strafford Register," 
under date of December 9, 1790 : 

Married in this town, by the Rev. Mr. Gray, on Sunday morning last, 
Mr. David Boardman to the agreeable & accomplished Miss Nabby 
Waldron, youngest daughter of the late Thomas Westbrook Waldron, 
Esq. 

Where friendship full exerts her softest power, 

Perfect esteem enlivened by desire 

Ineffable, & sympathy of soul : 

Thought meeting thought, & will promoting will, 

With boundless confidence : For nought but love 

Can answer love, & render bliss secure. 

Dec. 13. — A committee was appointed to remonstrate against 
the division of the County of Strafford, by the setting off of 
Dover, Durham, Lee, Madbury and Somersworth to the County 
of Rockingham, a plan which was agitated at this time. 

1791 

March 28. — Vote for President of State Josiah Bartlett 159, 
scattering 7. There was no opposition to Bartlett's election 
this year. He received all the votes cast (8699) but 288, which 
were counted as scattering. 

July 4. — Independence was celebrated this day and an oration 
delivered by Wm. King Atkinson, which was afterwards printed 
by E. I^add. 

1792 

Jan. 14. — The printing oflSce of EHphalet I^add, situated at 
the Corner was burnt, which caused for a short time the sus- 
pension of his paper. In less than a month however it reappeared 
with the title of "The Phoenix." The number for Feb. 14, 
which is apparently not the first of the new issue, and two or 
three succeeding numbers, contained communications reflecting 
upon citizens for delinquency in not assisting in extinguishing 
the flames, until in the paper of Feb. 29, the editor says : 



1792] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 181 

"Several pieces are received respecting the fire, but as there 
has been too much already published concerning that accident, 
we forbear troubling our readers with anj^ more on the subject, 
— as it has become too personal and abusive to be admitted." 

March 26. — Vote for President, Josiah Bartlett 138. Whole 
vote of the State 8389, of which Bartlett received 8092. 

May 7. — At a town meeting held at the Court House to take 
into consideration the Constitution of the State with the amend- 
ments thereto, it is recorded that " the town voted against the 
larger part of said amendments." 

June.— The State Legislature held its first and last session in 
Dover this year. The Phoenix of June 7 says: "Yesterday 
the Hon. General Court of this State assembled in this town, 
when John S. Sherburne, Esq. was chosen Speaker of the 
House of Representatives — and they proceeded to business. 
This day at 11 o'clock they repaired to the Meeting house where 
the Rev. Mr. Morrison of Londonderry delivered an ingenious, 
spirited and animating discourse from Romans, chap. 13, 
ver. 3," &c. 

The Legislature sat in the Court House, then just built. 
The number of members was about 100. Josiah Bartlett 
Governor. 

Among the amusements of the day The Phoenix advertises 

the following : 

Theatre — At the Theatre in Dover, on Friday evening the 8th inst. 
will be presented an Opera, called the Beggar's Opera. To which will 
be added Garrick's Satyrical Farce called Lethe or Aesop in the Shades. 
Tickets is 6 may be had at this office. 

The Legislature continued in session until June 22, when " in 
the afternoon his Excellency left this town on his way to his 
seat at Kingston." 

July 5. — " We are informed from good authority that a canal 
is to be dug from Winnepissiokee pond to unite the waters with 
Cochecho river — and that a subscription is filling for that 
purpose — and we hear that a gentleman of Property in Ports- 
mouth has offered 500 pounds towards the undertaking — and 
considering the rage for Canal cutting — it will be accomplished 
with ease — as 'tis said, that the water in the pond at the time 
of the great freshet, a few years since, overflowed, and found 
their way into Cochecho river." 

A correspondent of the Phoenix, in the issue of July 19, offers 
to " communicate " the waters of the pond and the Cochecho 



182 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1792 

for one hundred dollars, though he says " to make it navigable 
for rafts of lumber, &c. from Merry meeting river to Norway- 
plain in Rochester, it will undoubtedly cost several thousands." 

Aug. 15. — There has been as great a drought in this part of 
the country for this three weeks past, as was ever known in this 
county, there not having been any rain of consequence these 
four weeks, till last Sunday evening, when we had a very severe 
shower attended with as heavy thunder and sharp lightning as 
has been known here these several years ; it broke in a number 
of places in this town, but we have not as yet heard of its doing 
any damage. The corn in dry places, we apprehend, is too far 
gone to be recovered by the refreshing shower. {Phoenix?) 

Aug, 22 — I^ast Monday afternoon several countrymen w^ere 
running horses in the centre of this town, when Mr. Joseph 
Burnham running into the street one of the horses ran him 
down, threw his rider, and went down over the hill. Mr. Burn- 
ham was taken up to all appearance dead, but by the exertions 
of the citizens and doctors of the town, by rubbing, bathing, 
&c. he was in some measure recovered, his shoulder was put 
out; and his left ear nearly torn from his head — he was other- 
wise verj' much hurt, but w^e hope not mortally. The rider 
received no damage, and we hope this accident may prove a 
warning, and prevent in future the bad practice of running 
horses in this town. {Phoenix .) 

The following is the first notice which we have of a regular 
post for the conveyance of letters, &c. No post office had yet 
been established in the town : 

The subscriber having undertaken to ride post from the Printing- 
office in Dover through Rochester, Wakefield, Wolfboiough, Middle- 
town, New Durham, the Gore to Gilmantown, and to return through 
Barnstead, Barrington, North wood, Lee, Durham to Dover- — Would 
inform the public that he will supply them with the Dover Newspaper, 
at 8s per year in produce or 6s. 8d. in cash. Those gentlemen who may 
think fit to employ him on any private business, may depend on his 
exertions, his punctuality and fidelity — (being under bonds, with suffi- 
cient sureties for the faithful performance of the undertaking) — and he 
proposes to go to Portt mouth should sufficient encouragement offer — 
the above rout will be performed weekly (extraordiuaries excepted) — 
and those gentlemen who live on the road, who thick fit to take the 
papers, he shall leave their papers weekly at their houses and he hopes 
by this means to give general satisfaction — as they will receive the 
freshest intelligence directly from the press. 



1793] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 183 

He will Jeave the Printing Office in Dover everj' Wednesday morning 
at 8 o'clock, and as soon as possible will inform the public of his several 
stages and the times and places, where he may be found on the rout. 

All letters and papers will be conveyed at the rate established by 
Congress. Josiah Paine. 

Dover, Aug. 29, 1792. 

Sept. 12. — It is a fact that the lightning during the past sum- 
mer has struck as much as fifteen times within a mile and a 
half of this ofiice. {Phoenix.) 

Sept. 26. — Died in this town Mrs. Stacpole aged loi. 

On Saturday morning last about 2 o'clock this Printing Ofi&ce 
was again threatened with fire, a Blacksmith Shop belonging to 
Mr. Samuel Estes, nearly opposite the office, was discovered in 
flames and entirely consumed. {Phoenix?) 

Nov. — The following persons were chosen Electors of Presi- 
dent & Vice President, whose votes were again cast for Wash- 
ington and Adams : Josiah Bartlett, John Taylor Oilman, 
Jonathan Freeman, John Pickering, Ebenezer Thompson, 
Benja. Bellows. Whole vote of the State 25564. 

The vote of Dover was as follows : 43 for each of the candi- 
dates. 

Dec. 26. — The rage for Bridge building has increased to such 
an amazing height that we learn it is in contemplation to erect 
one from this town over Bloody point ferry to Newington — and 
that lots are now selling to build a city on the beautiful peninsula 
leading to the ferry. {Phoenix?) 

1793 

Jan. 26. — " On Thursday last the gentlemen of this town met 
at Capt. Shannon's tavern, and celebrated the complete estab- 
lishment of the Liberty of the French Nation, when after an 
elegant entertainment patriotic toasts were given." &c. 

March 4. — Vote for Governor, Josiah Bartlett 187, John 
Langdon 12, scattering 6. President Bartlett was this year 
elected the first Governor under the amended Constitution, 
receiving 7388 votes. John Eangdon had 1306, John Taylor 
Oilman 708, Timothy Walker, 382, scattering 70. Whole vote 

9854- 

March 23. — " Died in this town Mr. Benjamin Deane in the 
31st year of his age — an useful and active citizen. During the 
late revolution, he was captured, while in the service of his 
country, and was confined in Forton prison for the space of 



1.S4 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1793 

eighteen months: during which he four times with others 
effected his escape from the prison, by digging beneath the 
walls, but unfortunately was retaken before he could get with- 
out the realms of despotism. He has left a wife and two small 
children to bemoan his loss. 

While man is growing, Life is in decrease, 

And Cradles rock us nearer to the Tomb. 

Our Birth is nothing but our Death begun. 

As Tapers waste the instant they take Fire. 

July 2. — No Post Ofl&ce being established in Dover at this 
time letters were held for delivery at the Portsmouth office, and 
those not called for within the prescribed time were advertised 
in the Portsmouth papers. The Portsmouth Oracle in its adver- 
tised list of this date, has the following for Dover people : 
Eliphalet I^add, Freeman Perry, Edward Thomas. 

July 6. — "The Fourth of July was celebrated in this town 
by the inhabitants with their usual vivacity. The day was 
ushered in by the ringing of bells and discharge of cannon. 
The morn appeared for a short time overspread with clouds and 
darkness, truly like the morn of '76, but it was but momentary. 
We soon saw the clouds and darkness disperse and beheld the 
bright sun of Independence beaming its rays upon us in all the 
splendor of meridian day," &c. 

Aug. 5. — Last Wednesday evening, at 8 o'clock a fiery Meteor 
of uncommon size was seen in this and neighboring places. 
Its apparent diameter when first observed was small but in- 
creased until it appeared larger than the sun. {Newspaper of 
the day.) 

Aug. 13. — Died, Mrs. Elisa Mellen, aged 21, the amiable 
consort of Henry Mellen, Esq. 

The petition of Samuel Wentworth, collector of taxes, repre- 
sented that from motives which originated partly in his own 
private interests and partly from his attachment to the town, 
he was induced to undertake the labor of collecting the town 
taxes " at a lay" that was more favorable to the town than 
was ever before known, in fact that he paid the town a small 
consideration for the office, but that finding great difficulty 
and trouble and having spent a great deal of time in the work, 
and being called upon by the selectmen for money which he 
had been unable to collect, he prayed that the town would 
make him such allowance as their great wisdom should deem 
just. The town voted to pay him 9 pounds. 



1794] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 185 

The town voted to sell six lots on the I,anding ; the money 
arising therefrom to be paid into the treasury. Also, to build a 
bridge over Back river, near Libbey's, agreeably to the report 
of a committee, the common laborers to have 3 shillings a day, 
and the committee the same, they finding themselves. 

Aug. 26. — Theophilus Dame, Sheriff, gives notice that "the 
noted Henry Tufts broke out of goal on the night of the 25th." 
He was " confined for his old offence, that is, /^//, " (sic) and is 
described as "about six feet high, and forty years of age, wears 
his own hair, short and dark coloured, had on a long blue coat." 
Five dollars reward is offered for his arrest. 

Tufts, who was a native of Lee or that vicinity, was the most 
noted vagabond of his day, and spent much of his time in Dover 
and other jails for the petty offences of which he was guilty. 
A history of his life and misdeeds was published about the year 
1800 from the Dover printing office, written by Major Thomas 
Tash of New Durham, from Tufts dictation. Tufts lived 
many years after this time, and died in Maine about the year 
1825 under an assumed name. 

Oct. 15. — Many people are now complaining of a distemper 
arising from an uncommon cold, the effects of which visibly 
proclaim it a species of the influenza, though in operation not 
so severe, nor lasting. {Nezvspaper of the day.) 

1794 

March 3. — Vote for Governor, Ebenezer Thompson 133, John 
Taylor Oilman 69, scattering 3. John Taylor Oilman was 
elected Oovernor, receiving 7629 votes, and there were 2841 
votes cast for various other candidates. He was subsequently 
chosen for ten successive years, for the most part with little 
opposition. 

The spring of this year was very early ; apple trees were in 
blossom April 23. The " great frost " occured the night of the 
17th of May, the apples which were as large as pistol balls and 
the rye and flax, which were headed were all killed. The can- 
ker worms were also killed. {Chase's Diary.) 

Piscataqua Bridge, leading from Durham to Newington, and 
connecting Dover with Portsmouth, was built this year. It 
was begun in April and finished in December. 



186 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1796 

1795 

March 2. — Vote for Governor, John T. Oilman 186, scattering 7. 

The selectmen were empowered to send the bell on the meeting 
house to Europe to the foundry where it was cast, to get it cast 
over again. It was also voted not to build a work house for 
the employ of the town's poor. 

On the petition of Walter Cooper to have the town " account- 
able for the future maintenance of a poor negro woman now in 
his family," the town voted that it would not be accountable. 

The summer of this year was remarkably wet. Throughout 
ten weeks, from the middle of June it rained more or less more 
than half of the days. {Chase's Diary.) 

1796 

March 28. — Vote for Oovernor, John T. Oilman 177, scatter- 
ing 3. Voted, to divide the town into Districts and compel 
each District to build a school house within six months. If 
any District refuses, the selectmen were to build the house at 
the expense of the District. 

July 18. — The town voted to lay out roads 4 rods wide across 
the Landing, and sell the lots at auction. 

Aug. 29. — Dr. Ezra Oreen was appointed agent to dispose of 
the town bell and procure a new one of nearly the same magni- 
tude as the old one, at his discretion. It was afterwards voted 
not to release the Society of Friends from paying their propor- 
tion of the cost of the last bell. 

Nov. 7. — The vote of Dover for President this year was 39 
for the Electors who subsequently voted for John Adams and 
Oliver Ellsworth. Adams and Jefferson being chosen President 
and Vice President. The whole vote of the State was but 4374. 
The electors chosen were Oliver Peabody, John Taylor Oilman, 
Benja. Bellows, Timothy Farrar, Eben Thompson, Timothy 
Walker. 

Dr. Dwight, in his travels through New England, visited 
Dover this year, and records the following as his impressions of 

the town : 

The site of Dover is chiefly a declivity. The buildings are substan- 
tial and decent, but formed with very little taste or beauty. A small 
number of them only are painted : and most of these with a dull dis- 
agreeable color. There is nothing sprightly in the appearance of the 
town, except the activity of its inhabitants. The commerce of Dover 
consists chiefly in lumber. The material is daily diminishing, and in a 
short time will probably fail. Whether a substitute can be found by the 
inhabitants, I am ignorant. 



1798] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 187 

1797 

March 27. — Vote for Governor, John T. Oilman 147 — no 
opposition. 

Aug. 28.— Voted to allow Dr. Jacob Kittredge to open a hos- 
pital to innoculate for the small pox, and that the selectmen, 
with Dr. Ezra Green and William Hale be a committee to locate 
the same and order when it should be opened and closed. 

Sept. 13. — Voted that the land for a burying place on Pine 
Hill be laid out and a plan be returned to the Town Clerk. 

Pine Hill had been occupied as a burying ground from the 
time, probably, of the erection of the meeting house there in 
1 7 13, and in 1 73 1 one and a half acres were by vote of the town, 
ordered to be laid out for that purpose. The action of the town 
at this time would indicate that the previous order had not been 
complied with, or no return thereof had been made. 



1798 

March— Vote for Governor, John Taylor Gilman 177, no 
opposition. 

The following Proclamation, signed by some of the "first 
citizens " of Dover, appears in the Sun of April 4 : 

To whom it may Concern.— Know ye that we the undersigned, being 
duly appointed to the care of all the Hogs of the ancient and honorable 
town of Dover, going contrary to the Laws of the Land, for the current 
year, deeply penetrated with a sense of the importance and exfensive- 
ness of our office and thinking we may say without vanity that no men 
are better qualified therefor than ourselves (as some of us have hereto- 
fore sustained the same office and had the honorable testimony of the 
approbation of our constituents, by being dismissed for being ovetzealous 
in the performance of our duty.) 

We shall therefore immediately after the publication hereof, on our 
part according to rules of true bienseance pay our respects to all the 
multitude of swine thus committed to our care, and if on theirs we do not 
find their necks properly decorated with a certain piece of machinery vul- 
garly called a Yoke, somewhat larger than a modernpudding, that is to 
say, equal to the swine's neck above the neck, half as much below, with 
the bottom thereof three times as long as the thickness of the neck, 
together with a ring in the Nose; for this offence against the rules of 
Decorum, we shall not spit at them, nor challenge to private duel, but we 
shall (even if a majority of us shall agree to it) positively expel. We 
shall join in grand alliance with their old and arch enemys the Jews, 
and shall prosecute and persecute them without discrimination of age or 
character. 



188 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1798 

Given under our hand in Town Meeting, this aytli day of March, 1798. 
Amos Cogswell, \ 

Henry Mellen, I 

Wm. K. Atkinson, t. i^^'u^i* ^t +v,^ 

^, IT i I In behalf of the 

Thos. rootman, \ 

John Remich, / Hogreeves. 

Sam'l. Wentworth, I 

Sam'l. Bragg, Jr. 1 

N. B. — As an encouragement to the owners to pay the small fees 
attached to our office, with promptitude and alacrity we inform, that we 
have it in contemplation to appropriate the net proceeds, to the purchase 
of an ENGINE. 

April II. — The body of Mr. Peter Man, who had been missing 
almost eight weeks, was found in the pasture of Mr. Ezra 
Young. It appears that he was disordered when he left his 
home, and having wandered about one mile and a half through a 
very deep snow, it is supposed that he was taken in a fit and 
expired. 

May 30. — The following address from the President of the 
United States appears in the Sun newspaper : 

To the Inhabitants of Dover in the State of New Hampshire : 

Gentlemen: — I thank you for your Address to the President and Con- 
gress, which has been presented to me by your Senator in Congress, Mr. 
L/ivermore.* 

The present alarms do indeed presage events of the highest import- 
ance, not only to the wealth, dignity, and glory, of the nation, but to the 
existence of the American name — the machinations of force and fraud 
have been so long practiced upon the United States, that they must be 
dead, to every sense of honor, and feeling of resentment, against insult 
or injury, and every prudent precaution of self preservation, if they are 
not, at length aroused, to unanimous and manly resistance. 

The indignation of the inhabitants of Dover, at the conduct of the 
French Republic towards these States, is as natural, as their approbation 
of the measures taken to appease its unjust and implacable outrages — 
and their exultation in the enjo3'ment of the rights of Freemen, are 
honorable to the government they have instituted and chosen. 

Your resolution that while patriotism shall be esteemed a virtue, and 
the love of freedom continue to warm the human heart, no nation under 
heaven shall rob you of your rights, is in the genuine style of freemen, 
and determined Republicans. 

JOHN ADAMS. 

Philadelphia, May 17th, 1798, 



* No copy of this address has been preserved on the Town Records. 



ISOO] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 189 

June 6. — The Rev. Mr. Gray of Dover delivered before the 
Legislature, which sat at Hopkinton, "an ingenious and patri- 
otic Discourse, which discovered at once the true Patriot and 
able Divine." The House voted that 500 copies be printed and 
50 presented to Mr. Gray. 

July 4.— "That Day ever memorable in the annals of Ameri- 
can glory, was duly celebrated in Dover. An Oration was pro- 
nounced by Daniel M. Durell, Esq. in which were united an 
elegance of style and that glow of energetic patriotism which is 
so highly congenial with the feelings of every one who deserves 
the name of an American," &c. {Su?i.) 

Aug. 27. — At a town meeting for the choice of Representa- 
tives to Congress, Peleg Sprague received 48 votes, Abiel 
Foster 48, William Gordon 47, Jonathan Freeman 38, James 
Sheafe 7, Joseph Dennie 4. 

Sept. 8. — Mr. Joseph Young went on board a loaded gondola 
at the Landing, in order to watch her till high water, but being 
tired, he went into the cuddy and there fell asleep till the tide 
came up and filled her, by which he was drowned. 

Sept. 27. — On Thursday the 27th inst. His Excellency John 
T. Oilman reviewed the troops belonging to Col. Fisher's Regi- 
ment in Dover. 

Dec. 3. — Voted, that the roads be broken out and the labor 
in doing it be paid for as other labor on the highways. 

1799 

March 25. — Vote for Governor, John Taylor Oilman 188, no 
opposition. 

On the petition of Joseph Clements and others for liberty to 
build a school house on meeting house hill (so called), the town 
voted that it had " no objection." 

"Meeting house hill" was the elevation on Dover Neck 
where the second, if not the first, meeting house was built. 

1800 

Jan. I. — Intelligence of the death of Washington was pub- 
lished in the Dover Sun, which was dressed in mourning on the 
occasion. 

Jan. 10. — Died, Colonel Theophilus Dame, aged 73. He was 
a Canadian by birth, and had been an officer in the British ser- 
vice, but became a citizen of Dover about 1768. He was 



190 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1800 

Sheriff of the County froui its formation in 1773 till the time of 
his death, and as such had charge of the Jail, and was at all 
times a leading citizen. 

March 6. — "Arrived at Portsmouth, schooner Fanny, Capt. 
John Riley of Dover, 29 days from Martinique. Feb. 12, was 
brought to by a French privateer, called the Hasard from Porto 
Rico, who ordered the Fanny's boat to be hoisted out, in which 
Capt. Riley and two men went on board the privateer — the 
boat soon returned with five Frenchmen, who searched the vessel 
and took away property to the value of about 400 dollars, and 
left her." {Dover Siui?) 

March 31. — The votes for Governor, cast this day in Dover, 
were for John Taylor Oilman 117, Timothy Walker 109. Joseph 
Gage was elected Representative to the General Court. At 
this time Barrington and Rochester were both larger than 
Dover, each electing two Representatives. 

July 4. — " The day was celebrated in a manner worthy the 
occasion, and such as reflected great honor upon the citizens. 
At 12 o'clock the principal gentlemen of the place convened at 
Mrs. Dydia Tebbets' where, after cooling punch and a good 
dinner they drank the following toasts," &c. The 12th toast 
was as follows : 

"The Bright Star of Federalism — At the approaching elec- 
tion may it conduct the wise men of the west to Qimiey, the 
American Bethlehem, the residence of our political Savior" — 
Three cheers. 

Aug. 25. — Voted to lay out and lease a tier of lots on the 
Landing for one year, and the proceeds go towards the purchase 
of an engine. 

The L,egislature chose Presidential electors, this year, viz : 
Oliver Peabody, John Prentice, Ebenr. Thompson, Timothy 
Farrar, Benjamin Bellows and Arthur Livermore, who cast the 
vote of the State for John Adams and Charles C. Pinckney — 
Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr being subsequently elected 
by the House of Representatives President and Vice President. 



1802] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 191 

1801 

March 30. — Vote for Governor, John Taylor Oilman 59, Tim- 
othy Walker 130. 

Voted, to divide the centre school district into two districts. 

Oct. 27. — Died, Colonel Otis Baker, aged 75. He was a 
member of the House of Representatives and of the Committee 
of Safety, during the Revolution, and a Justice of the Court of 
Common Pleas from 1773 to 1785. 

1802 

Jan. I. — John Wheeler appointed Postmaster vice Dr. Ezra 
Green resigned. 

March 29. — Vote for Governor, John T. Oilman 66, John 
Langdon 213. The Republicans or Jeffersonians, this year 
brought out John Langdon as their candidate for Governor and 
made a vigorous opposition to the election of Gov. Oilman, but 
he was chosen by a vote of 10377 to 8753 for Langdon. Dover, 
at this time, after giving the federal ticket almost an unani- 
mous vote for several years, appears to have fallen into the 
hands of the Republicans. 

Voted, that William Hale, Joseph Smith and Mark Walker 
be a committee to examine the Landing and find a suitable 
place for building a slaughter house. 

April 3. — Notice is given that the Postmaster General has it 
in contemplation to convey the mails from Boston to Portland, 
passing through Dover, in 24 hours. 

April 7. — Died, much lamented, Mr. Joseph Gage, merchant. 
The offspring of virtue, the child of humanity, have lost a 
friend. The grief of his numerous friends and relations may 
be great, but the world will mourn the loss of an " honest man." 
{Dove?' Sun.) 

Died, at sea, on his passage home from the West Indies, 
Captain David Boardman, aged 34. Candor and strict honesty 
in his behavior through life entitled him to true respect, and an 
affectionate wife and five young children will long feel the loss — 
as will his numerous relations. (Dover Sun.) 



192 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1804 

1803 

March 7. — Vote for Governor, John T. Gilman 86, John 
Langdon 114. The vote this year was the largest ever cast in 
the State, being 21317. Gilman received 12263, Langdon 
901 1, scattering 43. 

The town voted to adopt by-laws against swine running at 
large under a penalty of $3.30 for each offence, and also adopted 
an act of the General Court in relation to the extinguishing of 
fires. 

Dec. 17. — Notice is given of the organization of the Strafford 
Bank, the first established in town. Subscribers to the stock 
are notified by Win. King Atkinson, President, that One hun- 
dred dollars on each share will become due on the fourth Tues- 
day of January, and that "one fourth part at least, and as much 
more as may be convenient, will be expected in gold and silver, 
and the residue in bills of the banks of Massachusetts." 

By an act of the Legislature this year the Proprietors of 
Piscataqua Bridge were authorized to raise $15000 by lottery 
for the purpose of repairing ^the bridge. loooo tickets were 
issued at $5 each. The bridge at that time, it was stated, had 
been erected by individual enterprise at an expense of nearly 
$70000, and had never netted three per cent interest. 

1804 

Feb. 8. — A shock of an earthquake about 2 o'clock in the 
morning. Uncommon quantity of snow for the season. 

Feb. 25. — William Hurd and John Jones, for passing coun- 
terfeit ten dollar bills of the New Hampshire Bank, were sen- 
tenced by the Supreme Judicial Court, held in Dover, "to sit 
one hour in the pillory, pay a fine of $200 each, and costs of 
prosecution, and to stand committed until sentence be per- 
formed." 

March 13. — Vote for Governor, John T. Gilman 86, John 
Langdon 160. Whole vote of the State, Gilman 12246, Lang- 
don 12009, scattering 27. 

A committee of eleven, including the selectmen, was ap- 
pointed to examine the several school districts and agree with 
the inhabitants how and where to build school houses. 

Aug. 27. — A committee w^as appointed to agree with some 
man or men to run out the town and make a plan of the same. 



1805] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 193 

Oct. 9. — A most violent and destructive storm occurred, occa- 
sioning the loss of many vessels and lives on the coast. The 
weather was so cold that farmers lost large quantities of pota- 
toes by being frozen in the ground. The snow was greatly 
drifted and much of it remained by the side of fences until 
April 1805. 

Nov. 5. — Vote for Presidential Electors in Dover this year, 
in favor of Thomas Jefferson 75, opposition 140. The State 
was carried by the Republicans. Whole vote 17452. Requisite 
for choice 8727. John Goddard, Levi Bartlett, Jonathan Steele, 
Robert Alcock, Timothy Walker, George Aldrich and William 
Tarlton were chosen by votes varying from 8995 to 9088. They 
cast the vote of the State for Thomas Jefferson and George 
Clinton, who were subsequently elected President and Vice 
President. 

1805 

March 12. — Vote for Governor, John T. Gilman 109, John 
Langdon 202. After a sharp contest, and with the largest vote 
ever cast in the State, the Republicans succeeded in unseating 
Gilman and electing Langdon Governor. The whole vote was 
28443. Langdon received 16097, Oilman 12287, and there were 
59 scattering. 

April 6. — The following notice appeared in the Dover Sun : 

IMPORTANT DISCOVERY.— A number of men digging up the earth, in 
this town, for the purpose of making an aqueduct through Mr. Daniel 
Waldron's land, discovered a vein of dark brown sand running from 
east to west, much impregnated with Quick-silver of the best quality. 
Upon close inspection globules of this metal were found dispersed 
through this vein from the size of the smallest grain of sand to that of a 
duck shot — which leaves no room for doubt, but upon further attention, 
larger quantities may be discovered, and prove beneficial to the owner of 
the land. 

May 17. — The Dover Turnpike road from Dover to South 
Berwick was opened this year. In the Sun, of this date, John 
Wheeler, Treasurer, gives notice to stockholders that the 
Directors have ordered the fourth assessment to be paid, and 
Stephen Sawyer advertises for "30 or 40 stout able bodied 
young men " to work on the road. 



194 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1806 

July 4. — The day was noticed with "uncommon festivity." 
"Its early dawn was liberally saluted by Capt. Henderson's 
company of Artillerists, which performed the occasional evolu- 
tions with great spirit and precision." At 11 o'clock the com- 
pany collected at Mr. Ela's tavern "where the parched throat 
was agreeably slacked with cooling punch." An elegant 
dinner was prepared in " Union Hall upon the hill opposite the 
great falls." 

1806 

March 4. — A new line of stages for the accommodation and 
convenience of passengers who wish to travel between Boston 
and Portland, the upper road, was established at this time. It 
left Boston & Portland, Mondays, Wednesdays & Fridays at 6 
o'clock A.M., met at Richardson's tavern in Durham the same 
evening, exchanged passengers, and returned next day. 
' ' Those persons who put their names down first for a passage, 
before the stage starts, will have the preference, and no more 
than nine passengers will be taken." Nathl. W. Ela, Dover, 
was one of the ten proprietors issuing the notice. 

March 11. — Vote for Governor, John Langdon 199, John T. 
Oilman i, Michael Read, Esq. 9. The federal party made but 
feeble opposition to the election of Eangdon this year as is 
indicated by the vote of Dover. The whole vote was 20573, of 
which Ivangdon received 15277. Of the remainder Timothy 
Farrar had 1720, John T. Oilman 1553, Jeremiah Smith 902, 
Oliver Peabody 866, scattering 255. 

Voted, to give a premium of ten cents to any person killing 
a crow within the limits of the town the present year. 

Oct. II. — The wife of Mr. Roberts of Dover, N. H. was 
lately delivered of three beautiful & perfect boys, each weigh- 
ing 7 pounds : who with their prolific mother are all in perfect 
health. {Oracle.) 

Nov. I.— On Wednesday last, at the request of the Church 
of Christ in Dover, an Ecclesiastical Council convened in that 
place for the purpose of ordaining Mr. Martin L. Herlbut, their 
Pastor elect. 



1808] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 195 

Though the council were fully satisfied with the quality of the candi- 
date, literary, moral & ministerial, though they approved the ardor and 
engagedness manifested by his friends in endeavoring to obtain his set- 
tlement with them : yet, such was the determined spirit of remonstrance 
that was presented, such the number of names affixed, and so solemn the 
protestations of its supporters, that it was their zais/i to have a settled 
minister among them, if they could be gratified in the man, that it was 
thought expedient by the council not to proceed to ordination, but to 
give those who professed themselves dissatisfied an opportunity to show 
the sincerity of their zeal in endeavoring to obtain a candidate. And 
we fervently pray that one may be obtained whom God will honor as an 
instrument of softening the prejudices that seem to exist, and enkindling 
the dying embers of social and religious affection in that respectable 
village whose present state in a social and religious view, excites painful 
and anxious apprehensions in the breasts of all who are the friends of 
piety, peace & order ! {Portsmouth Oracle, Nov. 15, 1S06.) 

1807 

March 10.— Vote for Governor, John Langdon 180, no opposi- 
tion. Vote of the State 16861, of which Langdon received 
13912, scattering 2949. 

July 15. — Died, Dr. Jacob Kittredge, aged 76 years — an old 
and much esteemed physician. 

Aug. 19. — Mr. Watson, while tinloading a gundalo in the 
evening, accidentally fell overboard and was drowned. 

Oct. 8. — A comet which attracted much attention was seen 

about this time. 

1808 

March 8. — Vote for Governor, John L,angdon 133; no oppo- 
sition. The selectmen were " empowered to point out a lot of 
land suitable for a gun and engine house where they may think 
the most proper." They selected a lot near the Court House 
which after much opposition from adjoining property holders 
was finally occupied for the engine. 

June 26. — At 20 minutes past 2 o'clock in the morning the 
shock of an earthquake was sensibly felt. Its duration from i 
to i^ minutes. 

July 4. — " On this day the Federalists of this town celebrated 
the anniversary of the day on which America became inde- 
pendent in the true spirit of Freemen. The day was ushered 
in by the discharge of cannon and ringing of the bells. At 
ID o'clock, A.M. a procession was formed at Mrs. Tebbetts' by 
Ezra Green, Esq. the Marshal of the day ; consisting of about 
sixty gentlemen of this and the neighboring towns who (pre- 
ceeded by a number of gentlemen musicians of this town who 



196 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1808 

generously volunteered their services in promoting the amuse- 
ments of the day) marched to the Meeting-house. The public 
exercises commenced with an appropriate ode, composed for the 
occasion by Henry Mellen, Esq. which was sung and played 
by a select band of musicians in a style of superior excellence, 
after which an interesting, patriotic and elegant oration was 
delivered to a brilliant and highly gratified audience by Moses 
Hodgdon, Esq. in which the orator forcibly and correctly 
traced to their sources the causes of the democratic faction in 
our nation, the various measures by which they ascended to 
power, and the causes of the present deplorable situation of our 
beloved country. The performance being closed by another 
ode prepared for the occasion, the company repaired to the 
Court House and partook of an elegant dinner which was pro- 
vided for the occasion by Mrs. Lydia Tebbetts, the hall and 
table being ingeniously and elegantly decorated, after which the 
following toasts were given accompanied by discharge of cannon 
and appropriate music and among the rest that much admired 
one entitled the " Embargo " was sung by Henry Mellen, Esq. 
The utmost harmony prevailed through the day which was 
closed in the full expectation of a glorious resurrection of the 
cause of truth and federalism." 

The following specimen of the toasts drank on the occasion 
with one stanza of Mr. Mellen's ode, will suffice : — 

77^1? President on the flats— ihe tide of a "successful experiment" 
being out. 

/. Q. Adams — When political dancers rigadoon at the top and change 
sides— ih^y ought to attend to the tune. "There is no luck." 
Dear sirs, it is wrong 
To demand a Nezu Song : 
I have let all the breath I can spare go; 
With the muse I've conferred, 
And she wont say a word, 
But keeps laughing about this Embargo. 

]^ov. 4. — The vote for Presidential Electors was for the Madi- 
son ticket headed by John Langdon 172; for the opposition 
headed by Jeremiah Smith 133. 

The federal party at this election regained the State. Their 
Presidential electors were chosen by votes varying from 13929 to 
14006 : the whole vote of the State being 26721, and 13361 being 
requisite for a choice. They cast the vote of the State for Charles 
C. Pinckney for President and Rufus King Vice President — 
James Madison and George Clinton being subsequently elected. 



1810] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 197 

1809 

March 14. — Vote for Governor, John Langdon 173, Jeremiah 
Smith 131. The federal party this year brought out Jeremiah 
Smith for Governor and elected him. He received in the State 
15610 votes, John Langdon 15241, scattering 132. 

It was voted to " purchase a lot of land of Capt. Moses Ham 
to set the gun house on if he would sell for $30, which he 
agreed to do in town meeting." 

1810 

Jan. 19. — The memorable " Cold Friday " occurred, of which 
mention is frequently made by New^ England historians. The 
thermometer ranged all day long from 15 to 20 degrees below 
zero while the wind attained to the proportions of a hurricane. 
A family in Sanbornton, whose house was prostrated by the 
gale, perished before its members could reach the nearest shel- 
ter, a half mile away. A stage driver on the route from Boston 
to Salem, was found frozen stiff upon his box with the reins in 
his hands, when the horses halted before the hotel door in 
Ivynn. 

March 13. — Vote for Governor, John Langdon 176, Jeremiah 
Smith 135. The Republicans this year recovered the control 
of the State, electing Langdon by a vote of 16325 to 15 166 for 
Smith, with 84 scattering. 

Aug. 27. — Voted that the selectmen be empowered to sell the 
uncurrent bank bills now in the town chest to the best advan- 
tage. 

Dec. 26. — This Wednesday evening, at 9^ o'clock, the in- 
habitants of Dover were alarmed by the cry of fire. It com- 
menced its destructive progress in a large building owned by 
Samuel Bragg, jr. printer, in the bindery on the lower floor, 
the upper story of which was occupied by Mr. Bragg as a Print- 
ing Office and Bookstore, and the remainder of the ground floor 
was tenanted by Messrs. Philemon Chandler, shop-keeper, and 
Jesse Varney, morocco shoemaker. On the first discovery the 
Bindery, which was full of books, and loose paper, appeared 
completely enveloped in flames and before means could be pos- 
sibly taken for alarming the citizens the stair-case leading to 
the Printing Office and Bookstore were shrouded in a sheet of 
fire. The conflagration from room to room was rapid beyond 
conception : and although the inhabitants who were in large 



198 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1810 

numbers assembled in a few minutes made every exertion in 
the power of mortals to arrest the velocity of this devouring 
element, the whole building soon exhibited one column of 
flame, ascending in awful grandeur to the clouds. The dwelling 
house of Samuel Bragg, the elder, standing within a few paces 
of the Printing office, after having had the fire frequently extin- 
guished upon it in various places, at last yielded to the fury of 
the raging flames and in a few minutes became aheap of smok- 
ing ruins. A small dwelling house situated near the south end 
of the Printing office, belonging to a Mrs. Marshall, was also 
consumed. A large dwelling house, in one end of which was a 
store, occupied by Mr. Horace Parmele and family, standing 
near, was almost wholly destroyed by attempts to pull it in 
pieces in order to save the stores and buildings on the opposite 
sides of the streets. Providentially the evening was very calm. 
Not a single article was saved from the Printing office and 
Bookstore. A few articles from Mr. Chandler's shop, and a few 
articles with his account books from Mr. Varney's shoe store, 
were rescued. Mr. Parmele's loss was also considerable. 

The grateful thanks of all interested are due to the prompt, 
judicious and persevering exertions of the citizens and Engine 
company in their united endeavors to rescue the property of the 
sufferers from destruction and to prevent a more general devasta- 
tion. The Engine company of Berwick deserve great praise 
for their manly endeavors to afford assistance at this awful 
period. Fortunately throughout this scene of consternation and 
amazement no life was lost, nor limb broken. 

The christian and philanthropist, the wealthy of all denomi- 
nations, are earnestly besought to afford from their abundance 
liberal assistance to these unfortunate sufferers. No claims 
can be stronger on the feelings of humanity than, those of the 
honest and industrious whose hard earnings have been swept to 
destruction in a moment by the maddening power of this master 
of the elements. {Letter from Dover on the vioj-ning after the 
fire, to the Portsvioidh Oracle^ 



1812] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 199 

i8ii 

March 12. — Vote for Governor, John Langdon 184, Jeremiah 
Smith 106, scattering 2. Another hard contest for the Govern- 
orship and the Republicans successful, Langdon receiving 
17554, Smith 14477' scattering 65. 

It was voted by the town to give a premium of 20 cents for each 
full grown crow that may be killed in the town the ensuing year. 

Dec. 8. — Died, Mr. Samuel Bragg, jr. editor and printer of 
the Dover Sun. "In the death of Mr. Bragg the town of Dover 
has experienced a great loss. He was a very industrious and 
enterprising man of steady habits and attention to his business. 
He had by his assiduity and great diligence acquired a very 
handsome property, when about twelve months since, while 
absent on a journe3^ he was in a moment stripped of almost 
every dollar by the all-devouring element of fire. This disaster 
took such hold of his mind, as, after a while, to produce a de- 
jection of spirits, and invite a complication of disorders which 
has thus early put a period to his mortal existence." 

Dr. Dwight, who again visited Dover about this time, says : — 

" I found Dover considerably improved since my last visit, and, 

what was not a little gratifying to me, furnished wdth a good 

Minister of the Gospel." This was the " pious and judicious 

Clary." 

1812 

March 10. — Vote for Governor, John Taylor Gilman 156, 
William Plumer 155, scattering 2. Both parties brought out 
new candidates for Governor this year, and the Federalists, 
aided by the unpopularity of Madison's administration and the 
war which was impending, succeeded in outvoting the Republi- 
cans, but did not regain the State. John Taylor Gilman, their 
candidate, who was again brought forward as their strongest 
man, received 15613 votes, William Plumer, the republican can- 
didate 15492, and there were 877 scattering. There being no 
choice the lyegislature, which was republican, elected Plumer. 

Sept. 2. — A meeting of sundry persons from almost all the 
towns in the county of Strafford was holden in Dover and it was 
voted "to call a public meeting of the friends of peace who 
disapprove of the present premature, impolitic and unnecessary 
war, at Gilmanton, on the 7th of Oct. to take into consideration 
the present alarming state of our public affairs and to adopt 
such prudent legal and constitutional measures as will most 
effectually promote the interests, welfare and honor of the 



200 NOTABLE EVENTS IN' THE [1812 

nation. All persons of the foregoing description were requested 
punctually to attend." The notice was signed by " Moses 
Hodgdon, Secretary for Com. of Arrangements." 

The meeting was held at Gilmanton as notified and largely 
attended, some 3000 persons being present. Resolutions and 
an address in opposition to Madison and the war were adopted, 
and candidates for Presidential Electors and Members of Con- 
gress nominated. Among the latter was Daniel Webster, who, 
with the other candidates on the Federal ticket, was subsequently 
elected. New Hampshire at this election voted for De Witt 
Clinton giving him 8 votes to o for James Madison. The vote 
of Dover was 236 for Clinton, 87 for Madison. 

Oct. 12. — Military inspection and parade in Dover of the 2d 
Regiment, upon the area fronting the Court House, the appear- 
ance of the soldiers being highly commended in the ' ' Sun ' ' news- 
paper. "Major Edward Sise appeared equipped cap-a-pie for the 
exercises of the day and proceeded with great dignity and mili- 
tary precision to dispose his company in battalion array. After 
which he moved them to an elevated and spacious field on the 
western side of Dry Hill (so called) where he formed them in 
line," &c. &c. 

]sq-oy 2. — The vote for Presidential Electors was 232 for the 
Clinton ticket and 73 for the Madison ticket. This election 
was sharply contested and the vote of the State increased to 
34800. The federal party made choice of their electoral ticket 
by votes varying from 18839 to 20386. They cast the eight 
votes to which the State was then entitled for De Witt Clinton 
for President, and for Jared Ingersoll for Vice President 7, and 
for Elbridge Gerry i. Madison and Gerry were subsequently 
elected. 

Dec. 26. — John Wheeler notified the proprietors of the Dover 
Cotton Factory to meet at Mrs. Eydia Tibbetts' dwelling house 
on the 19th of Jan. 1813, at 5 o'clock P. M. for the purpose of 
organizing under their ^ct of incorporation. 

The ' ' Dover Cotton Factory ' ' which was incorporated this 
year, with a capital of $50000, was the first attempt at manufac- 
turing on an extensive scale in the town. As the lower falls 
were supposed to be fully occupied with the saw and grist mills 
which then stood thereon, the first Factory was built two miles 
up the river and was long known as the Upper Factory. Like 
most new enterprises it was but moderately successful to its 
projectors. John Williams was agent of the corporation. 



1813] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 201 

1813 

March 9. — Vote for Governor, John T. Oilman 184, William 
Plumer 164. The vote of the State was Oilman 18107, Plumer 
1 7410, scattering 212. 

March 31. — Died, John Waldron, senior, aged about 90, and 
on the 28th his wife Hannah, aged 85; having lived together 
in a married state 67 years and 5 months. 

April 24. — Daniel L. Currier and Richard Oove inform the 
public that they will carry on the Cloth Dressing and Colouring 
business at Currier's mills near the Landing, and "for the 
accommodation of their customers, at this critical moment, 
when MONEY appears to have takeyi wijigs, they will gladly 
receive in payment for their labor such good things as the Earth 
bii7igs forth." 

May 3. — The dwelling house of Mr. Woodman Colman burnt. 

June 19. — ^William H. OriflSn advertises his Nail Factory at 
Waldron's falls, for sale, with all the machinery. This, so far 
as appears, was the first Nail Factory established here. The 
business was pursued, in a small way, for several years, until 
it was superseded by the superior inventions of Jacob Perkins, 
by which cut nails were furnished much cheaper. 

Same date — A painter residing in a neighboring town, adver- 
tises for emplo3^ment in Dover, payment for which may be 
" made in wood, lumber or cash as maybe most agreeable." 
This would seem to indicate that the painting business was still 
unrepresented in Dover, as it was seventeen years previously, 
according to the note of Dr. Dwight. (See 1796.) 

July 3. — Ezra Oreen, L,ibrarian, advertises the books missing 
from the Dover Library, among them the following : indicating 
that "light reading " was not one of the follies of the times: 
Adams's View of Religion, Chauncey on Universal Salvation, 
Fordyce's Sermons to Young Women, Hoadley's Forms of 
Prayer, &c. The nearest approach to the "sensational" is 
Lady Montague's Letters and the Life of Dean Swift. 

Sept. 4. — Yesterday detachments of U. S. troops, recruited 
in the District of Maine, amounting to about 350, passed through 
this town on their way to Burlington, Vt. They were fine 
hardy looking men. 

Sept. 9. — This da}' was observed as a National Fast bj' Pro- 
clamation of President Madison, on account of the war with 
England then in progress. 



202 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1814 

Oct. 27. — The General Court convened in extra session at 
Concord, on the call of Gov. Gilman, principally to consider 
the difficulty then existing in relation to holding the Courts. 
The Legislature, at the June session, had remodeled the Judi- 
ciary, by which operation sundry Judges had found themselves 
out of office. Instead of submitting quietly, as in later times, 
they persisted in holding on, and the Governor in his message 
states that v^rhen the regular Judges, their successors, opened 
the court for Strafford County, at Dover, Richard Evans and 
Clifton Claggett, two persons who were Judges of the old Court, 
pretended also to open a court, having a person of their own 
appointment, whom they called a clerk, and proceeded to make 
speeches and do other acts in defiance of law. 

The Collector of Direct Taxes was about — one of the ways 
and means for carrying on the war — and the Dover newspaper 
feelingly complains, that "for the purpose of receiving the 
license tribute our little town was visited last week and the sum 
of about $600 was received of the retailers and inn-keepers." 

J. Mosely, " Fashionable Hair Dresser, Cutter, Shaver and 
Boot Blacker," offers his services to the public, and assures his 
friends of his " assiduous endeavors to prove himself worthy of 
their patronage." ly. S. Parmly, a travelling dentist, offers to 
furnish " durable enamel artificial teeth," and perform various 
dental operations. All who desire his services are requested to 
call at Mrs. Hodgdon's tavern for three days. About this time, 
also, William Palmer, a well known mason for half a century 
afterwards, offers to build, at the shortest notice, "Russian 
Stoves, on a new and improved plan, with or without fireplaces." 
All of which furnishes indications of the progress which Dover 
was making in " modern " fashions and improvements. 

1814 

Feb. 23. — A barn belonging to John Tebbetts was burnt by 
an incendiary and with it 13 head of cattle, 50 tons of hay, and 
a quantity of cider. 

March 8.— Vote for Governor, John T. Gilman 176, William 
Plumer 192. Vote of the State, Gilman 19695, Plumer 18794, 
scattering 73. 

April 30. — Proposals were issued for building the Dover Cot- 
ton Factory and Dam, at the falls near Jona. Kimball's — the 
building to be 100 feet in length, 32 feet wide and three stories 
high. 



1814] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 203 

Same date — John T. Hanson, aged 24, died from injuries re- 
ceived in assisting in the removal of a house. May i. — Died, 
Col. Caleb Hodgdon, aged 82. " He bore an active part in the 
war which gave independence to the country." (Sun.) 

May 20. — A violent hail storm and tornado occurred, doing 
much damage to crops, buildings, &c. in some towns in New 
Hampshire. The violence of the wind may be estimated by 
the report that a pair of oxen were taken up by it, carried some 
distance, thrown into a pond and one of them Killed ! 

May 21. — In consequence of frequent alarms from Portsmouth 
that British ships of war, hovering on the coast, designed to 
attack that place, the militia of Dover with others, was ordered 
by Gov. Oilman to assist in repelling the enemj^ The Dover 
company was commanded by Capt. Andrew Peirce, and con- 
sisted of 66 men, rank and file, who continued on duty from 
May 24 to July 3. The only fighting recorded is reported by 
the Sun of June 4: — 

Skirmish at Rye. — Reports are circulating of a skirmish at Rye, 
between an English barge and a party of the militia. We know not 
what foundation there is for the report, but thus it stands : A coasting 
vessel was chased into Rye on Monday last by a barge from one of the 
British frigates, manned with from 40 to 50 men. A small party of 
militia (15) lay concealed behind a stone wall with their muskets well 
charged with ball and buckshot : — they awaited the appearance of the 
British to within good ducking distance, when they poured a most deadly 
fire into the barge, which compelled her instantly to pull for the frigate, 
the militia firing upon them with sportsmanlike aim until out of reach. 
A Mr. Haley was afterwards on board the frigate, who states that he was 
informed by one of the officers that the barge lost 16 men in her rencontre 
with the militia. 

If true, this engagement must inspire our foe with a due respect for 
stone walls and Yankee marksmen. 

Aug. 29. — The town appointed a committee, of which Daniel 
M. Durell was chairman, to examine into the situation of the 
common lands of the town and whether any encroachments had 
been made thereon. The committee reported that sundry roads 
had been fenced in by adjoining landholders and much common 
land that formerly belonged to the town had also by some means 
become included in the lots of private individuals. The report 
was accepted, but no other action appears to have been taken 
upon it. 



204 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1815 

Sept. lo. — A public meeting was held at which it was re- 
solved : — 

That at the present alarming crisis we will to the utmost of our power 
exert ourselves to assist the constituted authorities in providing the 
means necessary for the defence of our coast and every other part of the 
country that may be in danger of invasion. 

That a committee of 12 persons, of whom the selectmen shall be 
three, be chosen, which shall be called the Committee of Defence, and 
that said committee be authorized at the expense of the town to repair 
such arms and accoutrements of the militia of this town as may be de- 
fective, and to provide suitable necessaries and conveniences for such as 
are or maybe called into active service, having particular regard to the 
ability of the individuals who own such arms and accoutrements. 

That in compliance with the recommendations of the Committee of 
Defence of the town of Portsmouth, it is recommended to the inhabit- 
ants of this town to repair to Fort Sullivan, and labor to-morrow or on 
Monday next, and every man who shall faithfully so labor for eight 
hours and provide his suitable implements shall be paid |i.go by the 
town. 

That it be recommended to all able bodied men of this town who are 
by law exempt from military duty to meet at the Court House on Mon- 
day next at 3 o'clock, P.M. in order to form themselves into a military 
company for defence. 

That Wm. King Atkinson, Amos Cogswell, Oliver Crosby, John Wil- 
liams, John Waldron, D. M. Durell, Walter Cooper, Joseph Smith and 
Robert Rogers with the selectmen be the Committee of Defence, and 
Amos White overseer of the men going to the fort to work. 

1815 

March 14. — Vote for Governor, William Plumer 193, John 
T. Oilman 165. Vote of the State, Oilman 18357, Plumer 
17799, scattering 38. 

March 25.— Died, after a short illness, John Phillips Oilman, 
aged 49. Mr. Oilman maintained through life a reputation of 
unspotted integrity. He was for a number of years (1793 to 
1803) Register of Deeds for the County of Strafford, which office 
he filled with honor to himself and to the satisfaction of his 
fellow citizens. He was born in Exeter and received his name 
at the request of Hon. John Phillips founder of Exeter Acad- 
emy, who made him a handsome present. 

The first block of brick stores on the lyanding was built this 
year by Joseph Smith and Rogers & Patten. It was still stand- 
ing, on the east side of Main street, in 1872. 



1S16] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 205 

1816 

March 12. — Vote for Governor, William Plumer 196, James 
Sheafe 163. Governor Gilman having declined a re-election 
this year, the federal party brought out James Sheafe, as their 
candidate, and received their final defeat in the State. The 
vote was for Plumer 20338, Sheafe 17994, scattering 75. 

The representatives to the General Court were instructed to 
procure the passage of a law to prevent the seining of alewives 
in Cochecho river. 

The committee appointed to purchase a town farm for the 
poor, reported that they had bought one from the heirs of Richard 
Waldron : price $4824. 

Nov. 4. — Vote for Presidential Electors, 136 republican, 95 
opposition. In the State, republican 15188, federal 13367. The 
8 votes of the State were cast for James Monroe and Daniel D. 
Tompkins, for President & Vice President. 

Nov. 25. — Voted to sell the public land on the south side of 
the road leading over Pine Hill and apply the proceeds towards 
the expense of fencing the burying ground. 

This year, (1816), commonly called the "cold year," was 
thus described : " The whole face of nature appeared shrouded 
in gloom. The lamps of heaven kept their orbits, but their 
light was cheerless. The bosom of the earth on a mid-summer 
day was covered with a wintry mantle; and man, and beast, 
and bird, sickened at the prospect. On the 6th of June the 
snow fell several inches deep, followed by a cold, frosty night, 
and on the two following days, snow fell and frost continued. 
On the I ith of July a deep and deadly frost came which killed 
most vegetables ; corn which had the appearance of maturity 
was destitute of its natural taste or substance ; rye was good and 
supplied the article of bread for the inhabitants." 

The following is extracted from a Diary kept at the time : 

May 15: froze hard enough on plowed land to bear a man. June 6: 
snow squalls. June 8: a snow squall. June 10: frost. June 11 : a heavy 
frost, killed a great deal of corn — some pieces of it were entirely dead, 
and five-sixths of the apples killed. June 22 : ice remained in Wason 
tan yard. August 20 : a squall of rain, but snow on the mountains in 
Goffstown. August 22 : a heavy frost which killed a great deal of corn 
and potatoes. 



206 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1817 

1817 

March 11. — The vote for Governor was for William Plumer 177, 
James Sheafe 1 1 1 . The vote of the State was William Plumer 
19088, James Sheafe 12029. Jeremiah Mason 3607, Josiah 
Bartlett 539, scattering 112. 

July 17. — President Monroe, who took his seat on the 4th of 
March of this year, made a visit to New England, going from 
Boston to Portsmouth and Portland, and returning by way of 
Dover, which he reached this day. He was received at the line 
of the State by the committee appointed by the town authorities, 
conducted by the Marshals and select escort, when the following 
address was made to him by the Hon. D. M. Durell: — 

Mr. President — In the progress of your national visit you confer an 
additional honor upon New Hampshire, by this day re-entering the first 
State upon the records of our union. 

Your fellow citizens of the vicinity eagerly seized the occasion for 
again paying their respects to the Chief Magistrate of a great and 
happy nation. 

We cheerfully present you, sir, the tribute of our most affectionate 
regards, and pray you to accept it, as the pledge of our veneration and 
esteem, both for yourself and for the government over which you are 
called to preside. 

The President was then escorted by the principal inhabitants 
of Dover, a part of Capt. Ivjniian's troop from Rochester & 
Milton, under the command of Col. Edward Sise, and a great 
cavalcade of citizens, to this town. On his arrival, he received 
a national salute from the artillery. After passing a few 
moments at Wyatt's Inn, the President, attended by his suite, 
proceeded to an eminence arranged for the purpose, near Col. 
Cogswell's, decorated with the rural simplicity of evergreens 
and roses, where he was addressed by the Hon. Wm. King 
Atkinson, as follows: 

Mr. President — Sir: Forming a small but component part of the 
great nation over which you preside, permit us in behalf of the inhabit- 
ants of the ancient town of Dover, to express the lively sensibility, with 
which it receives within its borders, a personage so distinguished, in 
obtaining and perfecting the independence of our common country. 

Believe us, sir, we duly appreciate your eminent services, in the 
various high and honorable departments assigned you by the public 
voice. These we consider as the surest pledges of love of country. 
These must receive the gratitude of the nation ; your best reward ; 
indeed, sir, you now receive it. 



1817] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 207 

As to ourselves, we enter into no competition with other places, in 
external demonstrations of respect ; yet, sir, we beg leave to assure you 
that the interest we take in your happiness, as well on your own account, 
as for the high and honorable station to which you have been called by 
the voice of your fellow citizens, is no less sincere than theirs. 

We have no fortifications, no attractions, for your view. Our pursuits 
are principally agricultural. The little commerce which we /lad, has 
suffered the depression incident to that on the Atlantic shore. We turn 
in part to domestic manufactures. 

We now give you, sir, 'tis all we can, a most cordial welcome to this 
part of New Hampshire. A similar pleasure has been unknown to her 
citizens, except in the instance of one of your illustrious predecessors, 
whose arms you followed in youthful life, in the perilous, but glorious 
contest for the freedom of your country. 

We humbly implore the Great Parent of the Universe, with whom is 
the destiny of nations, to take you into His holy keeping ; that under 
your auspices and fostering care, this great, free and independent nation 
may increase in splendor, and its government be administered for the 
best interest of its citizens ; that your health may be preserved and 
invigorated by your present tour, and that you may have a happy return 
to the bosom of your friends and family. We wish you long life, health 
and a prosperous administration. 

To this address, the President made an elegant, appropriate 
and particular answer. He with great modesty, observed, that 
he considered this attention not paid to him as an individual, 
but to his oflBce ; that he had little or no claim for the services 
that he had been enabled to perform towards the happiness of 
the nation ; that the depression of our commerce ought to be 
borne with fortitude, and must have been expected on the return 
of peace ; that he felt himself honored by the attentions paid 
him in this section of the union, and united with us in fervent 
prayer that our government might be administered for the best 
interest of the nation. 

The President and suite, were then escorted back to Wyatt's 
Inn, by the Committee, with whom he dined, and soon after, he 
gratified a great concourse of attending citizens by making his 
appearance in our streets. He passed the evening and night 
with the Hon. William Hale who invited many respectable 
citizens and ladies to spend the evening, and they were intro- 
duced to the President, and were highly gratified by his 
dignified affability. 

The President and suite left Dover on the i8th for Concord. 

Wyatt's Inn, in 1817, was the old Dover Hotel, and Colonel 
Cogswell's house stood opposite, where the New Hampshire 
House was built later. 



208 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1818 

1818 

March 10. — Vote for Governor in Dover, William Plumer 152, 
William Hale 49. Plumer was re-elected, receiving 18674 
votes in the State, with feeble opposition from the federal party, 
who divided their votes, giving Jeremiah Mason 6850, William 
Hale 5019, scattering 922. 

A Sabbath School was opened for the first time in Dover, 
Aug. 16, at the Court House, pursuant to a notice signed by 
Rev. Joseph W. Clary, John W. Hayes, Amos White, Andrew 
Peirce and Wm. Woodman, Committee. Parents were re- 
quested to send such of their Children as were reading in a 
class. The books to be used, the Bible, or Testament, Psalms 
and Hymns, Catechism, &c. Parents not able to furnish their 
children with suitable clothing were requested to send them 
dressed in the best clothes they had, and ladies connected with 
the society would furnish them with such additional clothing as 
was found necessary. In the fall of the year the school was 
suspended for the winter, when the following report was made : 
Average number of scholars no; number of verses of scripture 
recited 9934; verses in hymns 6029; answers in catechism 5366. 
A little girl 7 years of age, recited 544 verses in scripture, 99 in 
hymns, 361 in catechism. 

Nov. 6.— Died, Capt. John Riley, aged 66. His death was 
occasioned by a fall from the staging of a ship building in this 
town, two days previous, by which both his thighs were broken 
and mangled in the most shocking manner. He has left a 
numerous family to mourn the loss of a kind husband and father 
and true friend. {Strafford Register.) 

The Dover Franklin Academy was incorporated this year, 
receiving a liberal endowment for the times from public spirited 
citizens, the chief of which was in the land on which it stands 
and several lots on Central street adjoining, the gift of Daniel 
Waldron. 

Dec. 8.— "We are happy to be able to inform the public that 
the Academy in this place, so much needed and so long ex- 
pected, was on Saturday last solemnly dedicated to God and to 
Science ; that it is now opened for the reception of students, 
and that about 25 have already commenced their studies in 
various departments of literature and science. The dedicatory 
services were commenced by appropriate sacred music, per- 
formed in scientific style by a select choir. This was followed 



1820] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 209 

by a very devout and appropriate prayer by Rev. Mr. Clary. 
Mr, Andrew G. Thayer, the preceptor elect of the institution, 
then delivered to a numerous, brilliant and highly gratified 
audience an Address, in which were portrayed in true glowing 
colors, the blessings of religious, moral, literary and scientific 
education, and the several duties of teachers and pupils, in such 
a manner as to evince his thorough acquaintance with the sub- 
ject, and to afford a flattering expectation that his election to 
the office of preceptor will be a lasting blessing to all who may 
enjoy the benefits of his instruction." 

Dec. 31. — Observed as a day of Thanksgiving throughout 
the State by proclamation of Gov. Plumer, who was somewhat 
censured by the people for putting off the time honored festival 
to the last day of the year. 

1819 

Jan. 7.— Whittier's mills, at Tolend, (Whittier's Falls) con- 
sisting of a fulling, and grist mill, and a building used for cloth 
dressing, were destroyed by fire. lyoss between $2000 and $3000. 

Jan. 19. — "Our bleak and inhospitable winters have been 
this year exchanged for vernal weather and delicious westerly 
winds. Our December and January have resembled our old 
fashioned May and June, and the ground has not yet been cov- 
ered with snow. On the contrary our Southern brethren have 
been visited by one of our rigorous winters and are everywhere 
whining about snow and frost." {Newspaper report.) 

At March election. Vote for Governor, Samuel Bell no, no 
opposition. In the State, Bell received 13761, William Hale 
8660, scattering 1844. This was the last rally of the federalists 
as a party. 

June 9. — A hurricane blew^ down Mr. Ford's barn. 

{^Emerson's Diary.) 

1820 

March 14. — Vote for Governor, Samuel Bell 254, scattering 8. 
Governor Bell received 22212 votes in the State and 2559 were 
counted as scattering. 

Aug. 20. — There was a severe drought ihis summer and veg- 
etation was also much injured by grasshoppers — corn and 
potatoes on the higher ground being almost entirely cut off. 



210 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1821 

Sept. 29. — Died, Hon. William King Atkinson, aged 56. He 
was born in Portsmouth, and was a nephew of George King, 
who inherited the property of Theodore Atkinson who died in 
1779. George King was a relative of Atkinson and changed 
his name to George Atkinson when he became his heir. He 
died without issue, and the large entailed Atkinson estate be- 
came the property of his nephew, William King, who also 
assumed the name of Atkinson. William King Atkinson grad- 
uated at Harvard College in 1783, commenced the practice of 
law in Dover about 1786, was Register of Probate from 1787 to 
18 19, Attorney General of the State, and Judge of the Superior 
Court, and from his large wealth and official position was for 
many years one of Dover's most eminent citizens. 

Nov. . — At the Presidential election there was no opposition 
in the State to Mr. Monroe. It was the " era of good feeling." 
The Presidential Electors in Dover received from 58 to 26 votes 
each. 

The town voted $800 to repair the Court House, raising it 3 
feet from the foundation and adding 15 feet in length. 

1821 

March 13. — Vote for Governor, Samuel Bell 276, scattering 
II. In the State, Bell 22582, scattering 1866. 

The Dover Cotton Factory, having obtained possession, this 
year, of the Lower Falls, so long the property chiefly of the 
Waldron family, enlarged their operations by increasing their 
capital to $500000, and building the first Cotton Mill erected in 
that locality. This mill was called and was long known as No. 
2, to distinguish it from the mill at the Upper Falls. 

The corner-stone of the new P'actory was laid on the 4th of 
July with masonic ceremonies, when Col. Andrew Peirce deliv- 
ered an appropriate and pertinent address. The brethren after- 
wards partook of a collation at the house of Mrs. Tebbetts, and 
spent the evening in characteristic harmony {Strafford Register^ 

A Nail Factory was also set up at the Lower Falls this year, 
at which 1000 tons of Iron were rolled and 700 tons manufactured 
into nails annually, but the business becoming unprofitable, it 
was abandoned. 

vSept. 14. — The commissioned and non-commissioned officers 
of the Dover military companies formed a volunteer association 
under the title of " Soul of Soldiery," and under command of 
Capt. Brewer made their first public appearance this day in a 



1822] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 211 

neat uniform. The numerous manoeuvres performed were prin- 
cipally of the Light Infantry Drill, and were executed with a 
correctness and rapidity highly gratifying to the numerous 
spectators : their firing in line, in square, and in chain, were 
admirably well done, considering this was their first effort in 
public. {Strafford Register^ 

The month of September was long remembered as a season 
of uncommon storms and tempests. On the 3d, a most violent 
storm raged on the whole Atlantic coast, from Portsmouth to 
Charleston, in which many lives and a great amount of property 
were destroyed. On the 9th a tornado occurred, by which in 
New Hampshire and other New England States several persons 
were killed and wounded, numerous houses, barns, &c. demol- 
ished, and many domestic animals destroyed. 

1822 

Jan. 15. — Died, Mr. Dover Gage, a respectable black man, at 
a very advanced age. He, and his sister, was stolen from his 
parents in Africa, while playing a short distance from his home, 
by some of those miscreants in human shape who violate the 
rights of their fellow man and make slaves of those whose com- 
plexions the God of all may have tinged with a darker hue 
than their own. He lived in this town from his youth, useful 
and respected ; but it seems to have been the peculiarly hard 
fate of Mr. Gage to have been denied a home where his own 
choice or that of his friends would have fixed him : for scarcely 
had he been placed in his grave ere his body was again stolen, 
and it may be by his unrelenting white persecutors. 

{Strafford Register?) 

March 12. — Vote for Governor, Samuel Bell 166, no opposi- 
tion. In the State, Bell 22934, scattering 1046. 

June 5. — On petition of the officers of the 2d Regiment, the 
Regiment was divided by the Legislature, and a new Regiment, 
the 39th, constituted, composed of soldiers in Rochester, Farm- 
ington, &c. leaving to the 2d the towns of Dover and Somers- 
worth only. As an argument in favor of the division it was 
represented that those towns alone had 631 enrolled men, and 
that as Rochester was the territorial centre where the regiment 
usually mustered, it was a great hardship to compel the largest 
portion of the men to go from ten to twelve miles to attend it, 
occupying the best part of three days, during which they were 



212 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1^22 

allowed by their respective towns "beef and bread enough for 
one dinner only and a drink of rum." 

July 23. — Drowned in the river, near the falls, Mr. Jedediah 
Hanson, aged 63. He had been reaping grain in a field near 
the river through the day, and went into the water to bathe. 
He was observed by those who had been at work with him to 
swim with "extraordinary lightness" some rods from the 
shore, when he very suddenly sunk. His body was recovered 
the next day. 

Aug. 25.— Died at Wolf borough, Rev. Robert Gray, aged 
61; a Revolutionary pensioner and pastor of the Congregational 
Church in Dover from 1787 to 1805. 

Sept. 9. — An accommodation stage between Dover and Ports- 
mouth commenced running, three days in the week, fare 50 
cents. 

Oct. 30. — Died after an illness of eight days, the Hon. Charles 
Woodman, aged 31 years. He was interred Nov. i. with the 
masonic honors. A great number of masonic brethren, 
together with a large collection of people testified by their 
attendance at the funeral, their respect to his memory. There 
has seldom been an instance of a young man cut down amid 
prospects more flattering than those of Mr. Woodman. He was 
surrounded by almost all those circumstances which we so 
uniformly consider as constituting the sum of human happi- 
ness. An amiable family, a sound and vigorous bodily consti- 
tution, an ample property, and an extensive popularity, all com- 
bined to render his life pleasant, and to attach him to this world. 
But from all these enjoyments, and from the bright anticipations 
of future honors, he has been suddenly removed. 

"How frail, men, things! how momentary both." 

For three years past Mr. Woodman has been annually elected 
a member of the Legislature from this town, and was at the 
time of his death Speaker of the House of Representatives, 
having been chosen to that office at their last session. At the 
late Congressional election he was put in nomination for 
member of Congress and was one of the two highest of the 
unelected candidates. 

Mr. Woodman for his success in life has been indebted almost 
entirely to his own exertions. He commenced his career with- 
out the aid of that patronage to which young men oftentimes 



1823] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 213 

owe their early promotion. His friends were such as he had 
attached to him in his intercourse with them, and these were 
numerous. He possessed in a remarkable degree the happy 
faculty of retaining and increasing their number, and at the 
same time of conciliating his enemies. A warm and obliging 
disposition, a strong attachment to his friends, and a persevering 
industry in all his concerns, were distinguishing traits of his 
character. {Strafford Register^ 

1823 

March 11. — Parties took a new departure this year. Samuel 
Dinsmoor was nominated b}^ a lyCgislative caucus as the Repub- 
lican candidate for Governor, to which some of the members of 
that party took exception and brought out Judge Levi Wood- 
bury as an opposing candidate. After a sharp contest, 
Woodbury was elected, receiving the votes of all opposed to 
" lyCgislative dictation." He received 16985 votes to 127 18 for 
Dinsmoor, and 240 scattering. 

The vote of Dover was for Woodbury 378, for Dinsmoor 21. 

June 20. — A person on the Landing having in charge a 
wagon loaded with powder, strewed a quantity on the ground; 
a lad touched the loose powder with a coal of fire, which com- 
municated to the straw in the wagon, and the whole exploded. 
Two men were killed in attempting to stop the horses, and a 
third was seriously injured. The wagon was blown to atoms. 

Oct. 20. — Died in Lee, Walter Cooper, aged 49, the first 
Cashier of Strafford Bank. 

Dec. 30. — The Dover Bank, incoporated at the June session 
of the Legislature, this year, commenced business in its new 
building near the Landing. 

The name of the Dover Cotton Factory was this year changed 
to Dover Manufacturing Company, its capital increased to 
$1000000, and Mill No. 3 was built. The Dover Bank and the 
Savings Bank for the County of Strafford were incorporated. 
The Dover Aqueduct Co. was chartered and the Strafford 
Guards organized. 

Deaths, this year, males 18, females 12, children 15 — Total 45. 



214 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1824 

1824 

Feb. 12. — Great freshet on the Cochecho, raising the water 
much higher than had been known for many years. The bridge 
on the main road to Boston (near Sawyer's) and that near Ham's 
mills were carried away, but the Upper bridge built by the 
Manufacturing Co. and the I^anding bridge, although severely 
shaken remained safe. 

Feb. 17. — Notice was given that the Savings Bank for the 
County of Strafford was organized and ready to receive 
deposits. 

March 9. — Vote for Governor, Levi Woodbury 244, David ly. 
Morril 127, scattering 3. At the election, this year, the federal 
party having disbanded, the voters rallied to the polls on the 
Presidential line which was then forming, a large majority in 
the State favoring the election of John Quincy Adams, while 
William H. Crawford and General Andrew Jackson had their 
supporters. David L. Morril was brought out as the Adams 
candidate for Governor, while Judge Woodbury, whose course 
as Governor had disaffected many who had voted for him at the 
previous election, was nevertheless vigorously supported, as 
will be seen by the vote of Dover, where he was also regarded 
as a firm friend of Mr. Adams. The result was a failure to 
elect in the State. Morril received 14899 votes, Woodbury 
1 1 741, and there were 3708 scattering. The whole vote was 
30348 and 15 1 75 being necessary for a choice Mr. Morril lacked 
a few votes of an election. The Legislature containing a 
majority of his friends, he was elected Governor in a conven- 
tion of the two houses. 

May 2. — Mr. Samuel Howard, aged about 70, fell into a 
spring head foremost, in endeavoring to dip a bucket of water, 
and was drowned. 

A number of new enterprises were projected this year. 

July 28. — The proprietors of the Cochecho River Boat Co. 
held their first meeting for the choice of officers, &c. At the 
June session of the Legislature petitions were presented for a 
charter to build a canal, or railway from Winnepisiogee Lake 
to Dover ; also for the purpose of plying ferry boats to be moved 
by horse power across the river from Dover Point to Newington. 
Mr. Alfred I. Sawyer commenced the business of cloth dressing 
at the place formerly known as Libby's mills, which was the 
foundation of and has since grown into the Sawyer Woolen 
Company. 



1824] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 215 

The choice of Bank Directors at this time shows who were 
the leading business men of the day : Strafford Bank— John 
Wheeler, Joseph Doe, Moses Hodgdon, Nathaniel Young, Asa 
Freeman, Jacob M. Currier, Eri Perkins. Dover Bank— 
Andrew Peirce, James Bartlett, Stephen Hanson, Barnabas H. 
Palmer, John Williams, J. B. H. Odiorne, John Ball, Jesse 
Varney, Jacob Kittredge. 

General Lafayette made his visit to the country this year and 
was everywhere received with demonstrations of respect. A 
committee was appointed (Aug. 30) to invite him to Dover. 
This committee consisted of John Waldron, Amos Cogswell, 
Moses Wingate, (who had been soldiers with Lafayette in the 
Revolution), William Hale, Daniel M. Durell, John Wheeler 
and John Williams. The committee waited upon the General at 
Portsmouth (Sept. i,) and presented the following address: 

The citizens of Dover, recognizing in you the early friend of the 
United States, and participating in the sentiment that gratitude is an 
acceptable return for friendship so disinterested, have deputed their 
committee to assure you how sincerely they venerate your character, 
and how highly they appreciate the services you so generously rendered 
the American people in the hour of peril. 

In the name of our fellow townsmen we thank you for your services— 
we congratulate you upon your return to our beloved country, and bid 
you a cordial welcome to New Hampshire. 

The principles of freedom to which you have been so long devoted, 
and which are so dear to the hearts of Americans, belong to no particular 
age or country — they are equally the birthright of all who have the 
courage to assert and the virtue to defend them:— hence, we perceive in 
you, not only the friend of America, but the benefactor of the whole 
human family. 

If your early visit to this country inspired our fathers with an 
admiration for your virtues never to be forgotten, your return hither, 
at this auspicious period, has awakened in their posterity the strongest 
recollection of your former services and excited the tenderest sympathies 
for the many sacrifices you have made in the cause of liberty. 

We wish you, sir, all the felicity consequent to a life devoted to so 
good a cause, and, in the name of our fellow townsmen, solicit you to 
favor them with the opportunity of tendering you the homage of their 
respect in the village of Dover. The time, sir, is submitted to your con- 
venience. 



216 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1824 

General Lafayette replied as follows : 

Gentlemen — The warm reception I have this day experienced in the 
State of New Hampshire is very gratifying to my feelings— and the good 
people of the town of Dover have done me additional honor by deputing 
their committee to greet me on this occasion. 

I beg leave, gentlemen, to thank you for the favorable opinion they 
are pleased to express, through you, of my revolutionary services, and 
for the kind invitation they have given me to make them a visit. 

When I shall have the pleasure of again seeing this part of the 
Union, which I hope to have in the course of the ensuing spring, I will 
do myself the honor to pay my respects to the village of Dover. 

In the meantime, gentlemen, I beg of you to accept my thanks for 
vour personal and very flattering attentions and assure you that the first 
wish of my heart is for the lasting happiness and prosperity of your 
beloved country. 

The people of Dover, in large numbers, availed themselves of 
the opportunity to greet the Nation's Guest by going down to 
Portsmouth, as he could not come to them, at this time. The 
Strafford Guards, their favorite military organization, went 
down to perform escort duty and was highly commended for its 
fine appearance. 

Sept. ID. — Died, Tristram Coffin, by suicide, aged 43 — the 
last male descendant of Peter Coffin, the original settler, in 
Dover. 

Nov. I. — At the Presidential election the whole vote of the 
State was but 9389. So decisive was public sentiment in favor 
of the election of Mr. Adams that no opposition was made to 
the electoral ticket which was formed for his support. They 
received all the votes which were cast, varying from 8869 to 
9339, and gave the 8 electoral votes of the State to Mr. Adams 
for President, and John C. Calhoun for Vice President. In 
Dover 85 votes were cast for the highest candidate on the Adams 
ticket ; Ichabod Bartlett had 105 votes for Member of Congress 
and 12 other candidates received from 85 to 9 votes each. The 
State at this time was entitled to 6 members and elected them 
by general ticket. 

Nov. 22. — The town voted to give $5000 towards the building 
of a new stone Jail provided the same should be erected in 
Dover. 

Deaths this year, 53. 



1825] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 217 

1825 

Jan. 28.— The New Hampshire Turnpike, leading from 
Portsmouth to Concord, was surrendered by the Proprietors to 
the State for the purpose of establishing a free highway. 

Feb. 12.— The trial of Amos Fernald of Gilford, for the 
murder of his natural son, Alfred Fernald, aged 5 years, which 
took place before the Superior Court, excited much interest. 
The prisoner was charged with keeping his child confined and 
literally starving him to death, and after a four days trial the 
jury returned a verdict of manslaughter. The number of 
spectators, their anxiety to hear the trial, and the want of room 
in the Court House, induced the Court to adjourn to the Meet- 
ing House, where the trial was held. 

March 8.— Vote for Governor, David L. Morril 538, scatter- 
ing 5. There was no opposing candidate in the State to Mr. 
Morril. He received 29166 votes and 563 were returned as 
scattering. 

April 28. — The Methodist meeting house, the first one of this 
denomination built in town, was dedicated this day. 

May 3. — This being the day of the annual military parade 
and inspection, the Strafford Guards paraded in front of the 
house of Hon. William Hale, when a beautiful standard was 
presented to them, in behalf of the ladies of Dover, by John W. 
Mellen, accompanied by an eloquent address, to which Ensign 
Sperling, on receiving the standard, made an appropriate 
reply. 

May 18. — A meeting was held at Ela's tavern to consider the 
expediency of constructing a canal or railway from Winni- 
piseogee Lake to the tide waters of the Piscataqua river, a charter 
for which had been obtained at the fall session of the Legisla- 
ture in 1824. The meeting was largely attended, gentlemen 
being present from Portsmouth and Dover, and from many of the 
towns bordering on the Lake, and resulted in the appointment 
of committees to obtain the necessary surveys and prepare plans 
for procuring the stock of the company to be taken up. The 
cost of a canal, connecting the waters of the Lake with the 
streams running into the Cochecho at Dover, of sufficient depth 
for boat navigation, was estimated at about $700000. 



218 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1825 

June 23. — The long expected visit of the Nation's guest, 
General lyafayette, was made to Dover at this time. Having 
come from Concord where he had been received by the Legisla- 
ture, he was met near the Durham line by the Dover committee 
of arrangements and a large number of citizens in carriages and 
on horseback, among whom were about thirty young gentlemen, 
from 15 to 20 years of age, in uniform dress, and mounted, who 
added much interest to the scene. The General was introduced 
to the chief marshal, Hon. D. M. Durell, by Major Walker, 
marshal of the escort of Durham, who addressed him as fol- 
lows : 

General — The citizens of Dover, apprised of your approach to the 
neighborhood of their village, and of your kind intentions to afford 
them an opportunity of paying you their respects therein, have deputed 
their committee to congratulate you upon your safe arrival in this part 
of the State of New Hampshire, and to proffer to you the attentions of a 
select number of gentlemen to escort you to town. They have all re- 
quested me to solicit the favor that you will honor them with your com- 
pany at dinner this day, at such hour as may best suit your convenience. 

To which the General replied, that he was greatly indebted 
to the good citizens of Dover, for the kind solicitude they mani- 
fested for his personal safety. That he accepted their proffered 
attentions to accompany him to town, and also their very polite 
invitation to dine with them. And said, he embraced the 
present occasion to tender to them and to their committee his 
best respects. 

The procession was then formed and the General escorted 
into town. When on the hill near Capt. Dunn's a salute of 13 
guns was fired by the Dover Artillery, stationed on Pine Hill. 
Two fine military companies, the Strafford Guards, commanded 
by Capt. Paul, and the Rockingham Guards of Portsmouth, 
commanded by Capt. Lafavour, performed escort duty. Amidst 
the joyous acclamations of a vast concourse of people who lined 
the streets, and filled the adjacent houses and house-tops on 
either side, the procession proceeded down Pleasant street to 
the Corner, where it passed beneath a grand arch, twined with 
evergreens and banners, and from thence onward to the new 
upper bridge, over which another arch was thrown, and so on 
to Franklin square, returning by way of the I^anding to the 
Dover Hotel. Here the General was introduced to the commit- 
tee of arrangements, the chairman of which, the Hon. William 
Hale, addressed'him as follows: 



1825] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 219 

General Lafayette : The Freemen of Dover, participating; in the 
blessings extended to the United States, in the establishment of their 
independence and republican government, will ever retain deep senti- 
ments of gratitude for the distinguished and enlightened Patriots who 
in our revolutionary struggle voluntarily contributed their mighty 
efforts. 

To you, sir, who so eminently served us in the time of our utmost 
need, we mingle with the nation, the homage of our gratitude, and re- 
joice that amid the convulsions which have agitated the country of your 
nativity, your virtue has dignified and preserved you. 

We rejoice, sir, in beholding you as one of the most early, distin- 
guished and effective advocates of that revolution that gave us liberty. 

We more rejoice in now seeing you a matured monument of republican 
glory, whose firm integrity has been alike impervious to the allurements 
of power, or to the frowns of adversity. 

We most cordially welcome you to our village. 

To which the General made an appropriate reply, which was 
received with loud and repeated cheers from the surrounding 
multitude. 

A very great number of people were then introduced to and 
kindly greeted by the General, among whom were many of the 
surviving officers and soldiers of the revolution. 

After a suitable time for repose, the General accompanied by 
the committee of arrangements, the Governor's aid, the legis- 
lative committee, Col. Dunlapand Col. Emery, the aids of Gov. 
Parris of Maine, and a large number of other citizens, repaired 
to the town hall, which was elegantly fitted and decorated with 
appropriate ornaments and emblems, where they partook of an 
excellent and sumptuous dinner, prepared by Mr. Wyatt for 
the occasion. After the cloth was removed, the following toasts 
announced by D. M. Christie, Esq. were drunk, accompanied 
by appropriate music and the discharge of artillery. 

1. The United States of America — May their internal prosperity 
continue to progress, and their peaceful Foreign relations be perpetual. 

Hail Columbia. 

2. Our Republican institutions — May they endure while Liberty has 
a name. 

Song, by Mr. Barnes — Columbia land of Liberty. 

3. John Quincy Adams — May his Presidential term be as prosperous 
as it is now auspicious. Adams and Liberty. 

4. The memory of Washington. Pleyel's Hymn. 

5. General Lafayette — May his glory and happiness be equal to his 
exertions and sufferings in the cause of Liberty. 



220 NO TABL E E VENTS IN THE [1825 

General I^afayette after having expressed his thanks for the 
welcome of the people of Dover, for the toast just now given, 
and for the manner in which it had been received, proposed the 
following sentiment : 

The town of Dover — May this cradle of New Hampshire for ever and 
ever, and more and more enjoy every sort of agricultural and manufac- 
turing prosperity, the happy results of American Independence and 
Republican Freedom. 

Song — (Written and Sung by John W. Mellen, Esq.) 

Hail to the vet'ran who once fought our battles, ^ 

And planted his laurels when green were his years. 
We greet theeouce more, while no hostile gun rattles. 
But peace and contentment in beauty appears. 
War's blasts are heard no more, 
Or the loud tempest's roar 
Of armies in conflict once terribly joined. 

Hail to Thee, Patriot! — thy sun's setting glory 

Shall shed o'er the world the bright light of thy fame, 
Monarchs and Conquerors can live but in story, 
But virtues like thine, unborn ages proclaim. 
Heaven guard thy sacred head, 
Long may its dews be shed 
In life-giving freshness to lengthen thy days. 

O perish the thought, that so soon we must change 

The spot where we take the last soul thrilling look, 
Of him who returns to his own lov'd La Grange, 
For the scene that's imprinted on memory's book. 
Smooth be thy passage o'er 
The blue wave that safely bore 
The youthful adventurer, the Patriot in years. 

6. Our Revolutionary Patriots — A nations gratitude is theirs. 

Duet — "The worn soldier," &c. 

7. Our allies during our revolutionary struggle — A grateful remem- 
brance of their services. Marseilles Hymn. 

8. The Holy Alliance — May its schemes of tyranny be frustrated by 
the spirit of rational Liberty. Rogue's March. 

9. The South American Republics — A long continuance to their dear 
bought liberties. Washington's March. 

10. General Bolivar — He who can decline the distinction of reigning 
over, is worthy of reigning in the hearts of his countrymen. 

President's March. 

11. Agriculture — The basis of all human sustenance. 

Speed the Plough. 

12. Manufactures — May industry and enterprise meet an ample 
reward. Woodcutter's March. 

13. Our rising Commerce — Let it be the handmaid of agriculture and 
manufactures. Hull's Victory. 

By G. W. Lafayette — Equality of rights, the corner stone of the tem- 
ple of Liberty. 



1S25] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 221 

By Mr. Lavasseur— Industry, source of prosperity, the surest guarantee 
of Liberty. 

By S. Mitchell, Esq.— The Major Generals of our Revolutionary Army— 
The chief-columns that sustained Liberty's Temple throughout the war 
of independence— "rest" to the /«//^«— health to Lafayette the last 
chief-column standing. 

After dinner the General and suite agreeably to previous in- 
vitation, retired to the mansion of the Hon. William Hale, 
where were assembled much of the beauty and fashion of this 
and the adjacent towns, for the purpose of being introduced, 
and of reciprocating smiles and congratulations with the Gen- 
eral. And where too was prepared by Mrs. Hale and her 
daughters in a most elegant and tasteful style, a supper, that, 
after the General had retired, was promiscuously participated 
in by a very splendid and great collection of ladies and gentle- 
men in the most perfect familiarity, cheer and good humor. 

The General left the house of Mr. Hale on Friday morning 
at 8 o'clock, for Maine, preceded by the committee of arrange- 
ments in carriages and followed by the Legislative Committee. 
On arriving opposite the Cotton Factories the carriages were 
halted, the Great Gate of the Factory yard was thrown open, 
discovering a double line of the females employed in the Factory 
to the number of nearly two hundred, tastefully and handsomely 
dressed in white with blue sashes. The General on entering 
the Factory yard was repeatedly cheered with the huzzas of 
hundreds from the tops of the buildings surrounding the Factory 
yard; he was conducted by Messrs. Williams and Bridge into 
the Factory, the porch of which was tastefully decorated with 
wreaths of evergreen and roses. The Factory was still for a 
moment, but as if by magic it was instantly in full operation, 
attended throughout by the girls w^ho had received the company 
on entering the yard, each at her proper place and busy in her 
proper employment. On leaving the Factory, the General was 
conducted to his carriage and escorted by the committee of 
arrangements and marshals of Dover to the line of the State of 
Maine, where he was received by Cols. Dunlap and Emery, aids 
of the Governor of Maine. 

The good humor and order which prevailed throughout the 
occasion, sufficiently evinced the pleasure and kind feelings 
with which our distinguished visitor was received ; as there were 
probably not less than ten thousand persons of all classes of 
citizens from this and the neighboring towns assembled, among 



222 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1825 

whom not an instance of irregularity or disorder was noticed. 
Much credit is due to the alacrity and taste of the ladies of the 
village displayed in the various decorations of the dining hall, 
arches and streets, which were such as to elicit the applause of 
strangers who were present. 

It is due to the chief Marshal of the day to notice the enter- 
tainment given by him to the escort, lyegislative Committee and 
other Gentlemen on their return from Berwick, which was in a 
style of elegance and taste seldom surpassed. 

Of the military escort it is sufficient to say that they received, 
as they deserved, the unqualified commendation of the General. 

The artillery company appeared in a new and beautiful uni- 
form, and their discipline and good conduct on the occasion was 
highly creditable to the company and their officers. 

We are glad the General took time for a passing visit to the 
extensive establishment of the Dover Manufacturing Co. as it 
gave him an opportunity of observing personally the progress in 
one important branch of the useful arts; and it is presumed, 
he can no where meet with Factories more complete and thor- 
ough in their construction and arrangement, both for the fabri- 
cation of cotton cloth and of the machinery requisite for the 
same; all being of the very first description. The General ex- 
pressed himself very much gratified with the healthy appear- 
ance of those of both sexes engaged within the Factories, the 
order among thera, and the perfect neatness of every room into 
which he was introduced ; of the machinery, and gearing of the 
mills, he spoke in high terms, "much more perfect than any he 
had witnessed," and the quality of the goods, "far superior to 
any he had seen in the country." It was a subject of regret 
that he could not have examined more particularly the machine 
shop, where nearly all the parts of the whole machinery for the 
establishment are manufactured from the raw material, where 
some valuable improvements have been made in the mode of 
preparing the important parts of the machinery, as well as 
highly valuable alterations made upon those generally in use in 
the larger manufacturing concerns. 

On the whole, the General's visit was highly gratifying to 
himself, son and secretary, who expressed themselves very 
fully on the subject ; and it will be a source of pride to the 
proprietors, to Mr. Williams the Agent, and to Mr. Bridge, 
under whose special care the arrangements were made for the 
reception of the illustrious Guest. (A^. H. Republica7i.) 



1826] 



HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 



223 



July 26. — The weather of the last week has probably 
equalled in heat that of any season for many years. In many 
places in New England the thermometer stood at about 100 on 
Thursday. Numerous deaths have taken place in consequence 
of the extreme heat and drinking cold water. 

{N. H. Republicayi.) 

Aug. 9. — Mr. Israel Tebbets, of Madbury, was weighed in 
this town a few days since and his weight found to be 435 
pounds ! (A^. H. Republican^ 

Nov. 16. — The Wiunipiseogee Canal Co. held its first 
meeting for the choice of Directors in Dover, this day, when 
the following were chosen: Jeremiah Mason, Ichabod Bartlett, 
Timothy Upham, Daniel Brown, Joseph Smith, Andrew Peirce, 
John Williams, James Bartlett, J. B. H. Odione, D. M. Durell, 
Asa Freeman, David Barker, jr., John B. Swasey, John 
Wingate, jr., John Coe. 



icord of Death 


s in Dover for 33 years. 






1792 


4- 


1809 


34. 


1793 


15- 


1810 


32- 


1794 


14. 


i8ri 


23- 


1795 


14. 


1812 


26. 


1796 


27. 


1813 


47- 


1797 


22. 


1814 


16. 


1798 


31- 


1815 


47- 


1799 


26. 


1816 


3°- 


1800 


40. 


1817 


40. 


1801 


41. 


1818 


32. 


1802 


61. 


1819 




1803 


25- 


1820 




1804 


24. 


1821 


27. 


1805 


25- 


1822 


58. 


1806 


43- 


1823 


46. 


1807 


12. 


1824 


54. 


1808 


26. 


1825 


lOI. 



1826. 

Jan. 28. — Died, Col. Amos Cogswell, aged 74 years. He 
was engaged in the long and arduous struggle of his country 
for its independence, from the commencement to the close, a 
term of eight years. He entered its service a private and came 
out a major. A colonel's commission was conferred on him 
some time after, giving command of a body of horse in the 
militia. For a number of years he was a member of the State 
Legislature, both in its representative and senatorial depart- 



224 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1826 

ments. The diversified obligations arising from these various 
relations, were discharged in a manner satisfactory to the public 
and honorable to himself. His social and domestic virtues 
secured to him universal respect for the former, and such vv^as 
his kindness of heart that he became peculiarly endeared to 
all the inmates of his domestic circle. The peculiar traits of 
mental excellence referable to him, were, that integrity of 
principle which was above suspicion, and that firmness of 
purpose that knew no wavering, constituting the prominent 
characteristics of a mind of a superior order. 

{N. H. Republican^ 

March 14. — Vote for Governor, David L. Morril 413, Benja. 
Pierce 89. A sharp contest took place this year in the State 
for Governor. David L. Morril, who was supported by those 
friendly to Mr. Adams's administration, received 17679 votes 
and was elected. Gen. Benja. Pierce, who was the candidate 
of the Jackson men, though he had not then distinctly avowed 
himself as an opponent of Mr. Adams, received 12287 votes 
and 285 were returned as scattering. 

April II. — A census of the town taken at this time gave 
a population of 4160, showing an increase of 1289 since 1820, 
when the number was 2871. Washington street from Central 
square to the Tolend road was opened this year, principally 
through the Coffin property, which had been in possession of the 
family since it was granted to Peter Coffin, the original settler: 
and so averse were the heirs to the " improvement," that for a 
long time they refused to accept the damages awarded them by 
the town. 

June 9.— Died, Nicholas St. John Durell, aged 21 years, the 
oldest son of Hon. D. M. Durell. A young man of much 
promise and a member of the West Point Military Academy, 
from which he was on the point of graduating with high 
honors. 

July 4.— The 50th anniversary of American Independence 
was celebrated with much eclat. Oration by John W. Mellen, 
who, in speaking of Adams & Jefferson, then supposed to be 
living, but who died before the close of the day, and of the 
"rising glories of the country which they had labored to 
establish," said, "it will give new keenness to their mortal 
vision and add new vigor to their wasting strength as hand in 
hand they enter the dark valley ^ 



1826] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 225 

Aug. 7.— A very heavy thunder shower, during which the 
house of Moses Hodgdon, Esq. on Silver street, was struck by 
lightning. A beautiful sycamore tree in front of the house 
received the electric fluid, an immense body of which ran down 
the trunk, ripping off the bark, a portion of the lightning 
entering the house by a limb of the tree. The house of Mr. 
John Evans, about 50 rods distant, was struck at the same 
instant : a man was struck to the floor, but recovered in a few 
minutes. About the same time, a barn belonging to Mr. Benja. 
Kielle, about 2>^ miles from the village, was struck and con- 
siderably injured. 

Ivieuts. Worth and Findlay, U. S. Engineers, appointed by 
the Secretary of War, made a reconnoissance and survey of 
the contemplated canal route from Dover to Winnipiseogee, in 
August of this year. 

Great rains and freshets, carrying away dams, bridges, &c. 
and doing much damage to crops. In a period of 35 days, 
from Aug. 11 to Sept. 14, rain fell on 17 days. "A damp mold 
and rust are penetrating every part of our dwellings. The hay 
in our barns, the vegetables in our gardens, and the potatoes in 
our fields are perishing with rot.'" (N. H. Republican^ 

Oct. 18. — Died, Marble Osborne, aged 74, a member of the 
Society of Friends. He was much esteemed by all who knew 
him, and it may be emphatically said, he was that noblest work 
of God, an honest man. Also died, Oct. 23, Mercy, aged 67, 
relict of Marble Osborne. 

Nov. 21. — Proposals were issued by a committee of the 
citizens of Dover, in behalf of the town and county, for the 
building of a new Jail on Silver street. 

A person sailing upon the Cochecho, in a small boat, saw a 
mink swimming rapidly towards the shore, having seized a 
large eel which he succeeded in bearing to the shore, in spite 
of its efforts to free itself by entangling the mink in its folds. 
The mink had nearly secured the eel in its den. when the 
spectator landed and seized it himself. It weighed more than 
two pounds. 



226 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1827 

1827 

March 13. — Vote for Governor, Benja. Pierce 558, scattering 
20. Gov. Morril having declined a reelection, public sentiment 
turned towards Gen. Benja. Pierce, who had been his competitor 
at the previous election as a suitable successor to the office, 
especially as it was understood that, like Gov. Morril, he was 
friendly to the administration of Mr. Adams, which was then 
being powerfully assailed by the supporters of Gen. Jackson. 
Gen. Pierce, it was asserted, had given the most postive assur- 
ances that such was his position. A legislative caucus, con- 
trolled by the Adams men, had accordingly nominated him, 
and he was therefore generally voted for — there being no opposing 
candidate. A portion of the voters, however, having some 
doubts as to his sentiments, or believing that he would be con- 
trolled by the opponents of Mr. Adams, withheld their support. 
Some of them voted for Gov. Morril and others threw scattering 
votes. The result in the State was as follows : Benja. Pierce 
23695, D. L. Morril 2529, scattering 1187. 

Aug. 28. — A remarkable celestial phenomenon was observed 
in many places. About half past nine o'clock in the evening a 
luminous arch was seen rising from the western horizon and ex- 
tending across the hemisphere to the eastern verge. The arch or 
belt at the zenith was apparently two or three degrees in width, 
while its extremities narrowed almost to points at the horizon. 
The western point was the most brilliant, and at times exhibited 
a sparkling appearance — the centre being less intense and more 
tremulous than either extremity. The magnificent spectacle 
lasted nearly an hour, the arch moving gradually to the south, 
and growing fainter until it disappeared. As the light of this 
phenomenon diminished, the aurora borealis appeared around 
the whole northern portion of the horizon and increased to an 
unusual degree of brilliancy. 

Aug. 31. — Died at Brunswick, Me. at the residence of his 
son, Col. John Waldron, aged 87, a native and life long resident 
of Dover. He was a Colonel in the Army of the Revolution, 
marching his Regiment of 700 men whom he had himself 
enlisted, to Cambridge when the war broke out. He was 
prominent also in civil affairs, having served as moderator of 
town meetings about 30 years in succession, and represented 
the town and district in both branches of the Legislature. 

Locust street, through the Cogswell field, to Central street 
near the residence of Hon. Wm. Hale, was opened this year. 
Deaths in Dover this year, 77. 



1S28] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 227 

1828 
Feb. 26. — Publication of Dover Enquirer commenced. 

March I. — Drowned, near Waldron's Falls, Mar}', daughter 
of Mr. William Kimball, aged 10 years. Her bod}- was found 
under Central street bridge, above the factories. 

March 11. — State election sharply contested between the 
supporters of Adams and Jackson. Vote of Dover for Gov- 
ernor, John Bell (Adams) 517; Benja. Pierce (Jackson) 235. 

There being no doubt, this year, as to the sentiments of Gov. 
Pierce in relation to the administration of Mr. Adams — he 
being, if not an avowed opponent, completely in the control of 
those who were — the supporters of Adams organized for victory, 
and selecting John Bell as their candidate, elected him by a 
decisive majority. The vote in Dover was the largest ever 
thrown here up to that time, as it was also the largest ever 
thrown in the State. The whole number cast was 39897, 
of which Pierce received 18672, and Bell 21 149, with 76 
scattering. 

Net amount of postage accruing at Dover Post Office for 
year ending March 31, 1827 — $819.70 — being largest in the 
State except Portsmouth, 

May I. — Numerous failures among the business men of 
Dover, Portsmouth, Great Falls, &c. occasioned in part by the 
suspension of some of the managers of the Manufacturing 
Companies. The Enquirer of May 6, remarks : 

Between most, if not all, of those who have failed there seems to 
have been a connection and mutual dependence; and though it is said 
there is an insolvency somewhere, yet we have good authority for sa}irg 
that some of the individuals who have stopped business, were perfectly 
solvent, but were driven to this extremity by the want of public confi- 
dence which for a day or two seemed completely overturned. The 
solvency of the Commercial Bank at Portsmouth, and the Dover Bank 
were for a day or two suspected and their bills refused in Boston, but 
were received again as soon as the situation of things were understood. 

The business of the Dover Manufacturing Company at this 
time was closed up and the Cocheco Company incorporated in 
its place. Williams and Wendell, the pioneers in the enter- 
prise, giving place to Boston managers. Joseph Smith, Isaac 
Wendell and John Williams resigned their positions as Directors 
of the Dover Bank and other parties were appointed. 



228 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1829 

June 8. — A party of seven men and boys sailing down the 
river on a pleasure excursion, on Sunday, the boat when near 
Dover Point was upset and Henry Demeritt aged 25, and 
Ebenezer Paul, 14, were drowned. Demeritt was a good 
swimmer and lost his life by endeavoring to save Paul, who 
could not swim. 

June 28. — Exceeding warm weather — thermometer 97 in the 
shade. Ivightning struck in various places in town, killing 
animals and shattering buildings. 

Aug. 8. — "Dover Society for the promotion of Temperance" 
formed — the members pledging themselves to abstain entirely 
from the use of ardent spirits, except for medicinal purposes — 
the first Society of the kind in the town. 

Aug. 26. — John H. White appointed Postmaster of Dover, in 
place of Asa A. Tufts, resigned. 

Sept. 29. — Mr. Ham Foss of Barrington, a carpenter employed 
on the Unitarian Church, which was built this year, while 
placing some timbers for the roof, the plank upon which he 
stood gave way and he fell 35 feet, surviving the accident but a 
few hours. 

The old Jail on Pleasant street was taken down this year and 
the materials sold Oct. 29. 

Nov. 3. — Presidential election ; after a warm contest between 
the supporters of Adams and Jackson, the vote of Dover was 
505 for Adams, 322 for Jackson. 

Dec. 28. — River closed by the ice. 

1829 

Feb. 18. — The new brick Church, erected the last season for 
the use of the " First Unitarian Society of Christians in Dover," 
was dedicated, and Mr. Samuel Kirkland Lothrop ordained 
as Minister over the Church and Society. 

March 10. — The State election was vigorously contested, but 
the drift in favor of the new administration of Jackson, then just 
inaugurated, was too powerful to be successfully resisted by the 
defeated partisans of Adams. The voters of Dover stood up 
manfully to the rack, giving Bell 362 votes to 301 for Pierce, 
but in the State Pierce had 22615, Bell 19583, with 485 scatter- 
ing, and thenceforth commenced that reign of the New Hamp- 
shire Democracy which continued for more than twenty five 
years. 



1830] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 229 

March 17.— A Boston paper gives notice that "the last weekly 
Dover Packet from New Hampshire, brought nearly as many 
cotton and woolen goods to this market as were brought by the 
packet ship Dover, and more than were brought by the packet 
New England, from Liverpool. Cotton goods which were once 
purchased in England for 38 cents, and thought remarkably 
cheap, were not better cottons than can now be purchased here 
at 20 cents." 

There was a great body of snow and ice until the first week 
in April. The snow was much drifted; in some places in the 
roads 5 or 6 feet deep. A heavy rain commenced on the 2d of 
April and the snow soon melted. 

April 3. — The waters of the Cochecho below the falls rose to 
an unusual height— even higher, it is believed, than ever before 
known — causing considerable losses of lumber, lime, &c. on the 
wharves, which were all inundated. The rise was occasioned 
by the collection of ice below, which dammed up the river. 

May 19. — Barnabas H. Palmer appointed Postmaster of Dover 
in place of John H. White. 

Aug. 3. — James G. Avery, a young man in the employ of the 
Manufacturing Company, fell from the Dry House, a distance of 
about 40 feet, surviving the accident but a few hours. 

Aug. 22. — William Bentley, a native of England, was 
drowned in attempting to swim across the Cochecho, a short 
distance above the Falls — aged 32. 

A very severe drought this year, compelling farmers to come 
to Dover from many miles in the country to buy corn, an unusual 
occurrence. 

Dec. 31. — The new Brick Meeting House, erected by the 
First Parish, was dedicated. Sermon by Rev. Mr. Winslow, 
the Pastor, from Psalms 95 : 3. 

1830 

March 8.— A portion of Piscataqua Bridge, extending from 
the arch about 400 feet south, was carried away by the force of 
the waters and a great pressure of ice, of about three acres in 
extent. 

March 9. — The political contest of this year was noted for its 
acrimonious character. The Jackson party having nominated 
Matthew Harvey for Governor, the opposition, which retained 
the name of Republicans, brought out Gen. Timothy Upham. 



230 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1^30 

The latter was virulently assailed in the Jackson papers, which 
led to a prosecution for libel, and finally to a cow-hiding of the 
chief assailant. The vote in Dover was for Upham 429, Harvey 
263, and in the State Upham had 19040, Harvey 23214, scatter- 
ing 187. Mr. Harvey, having been appointed U. S. District 
Judge before the close of his term, resigned, and Jos. M. 
Harper, President of the Senate, became acting Governor. 

April 13. — Hon. Daniel M. Durell of Dover, appointed a 
Director of the United States Bank ; also, U. S. District Attor- 
ney for New Hampshire. 

The river and harbor bill, containing an appropriation of 
$4200, for improving the Cochecho branch of the Piscataqua 
river from Dover Falls to its confluence with the Piscataqua, 
was vetoed by President Jackson. 

July 4. — Philip Emery committed suicide by shooting himself 
in the bowels. 

July 8.— Mr. Ichabod Hayes, a respectable citizen of Milton, 
was thrown from his wagon in Dover, and so much injured as 
to occasion his death in a few hours. 

Weather unusually warm, the thermometer for three days in 
succession (July 16, 17, 18,) ranging from 92 to 98 in the shade. 

July 27. — Present appearances promise an unusual crop of 
potatoes. Some farmers have offered them at ninepence (i2>^ 
cents) a bushel, in anticipation of the harvest. Good hay is 
now selling for $5 a ton. {Dover Enquirer?) 

Aug. 28. — John P. Hale of Dover, admitted to practice as an 
attorney. 

Nov. II. — The dwelling house of Mr. Michael Whidden, on 
Silver street, burnt. 

Dec. 9. — Dover Relief Society organized — Hon. William 
Hale, President ; Asa A. Tufts, Treasurer and Secretary. 

Dec. 15. — Jonathan H. Carr of Somersworth, found dead in 
a field near the road leading from Dover to Great Falls. Ver- 
dict — " Death by intoxication and exposure to cold." 

Deaths in Dover in the year 1830 — 72 ; males 33, females 29. 



1831] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 231 

1831 

There were belonging in Dover, at the commencement of this 
year, six sloops and schooners, constituting a regular line of 
packets, plying between Dover and Boston and other places. 
Also three daily packets running between Dover and Ports- 
mouth. A steamboat was also run on the river a part of the 
time. 

Jan. 15. — A great snow storm, blocking up the roads and 
delaying the mails from all quarters. 

Feb. I.— John Gage, James Gage and Samuel Gage, the first 
two brothers, and the last a son of James, sentenced to the State 
Prison for five years for store breaking. A third brother, 
Thomas, died in jail previous to the trial. The wife of John 
Gage, a few months after, committed suicide by hanging 
herself. 

March 8. — Vote of Dover for Governor, Ichabod Bartlett, 
Republican, 403; Samuel Dinsmoor, Democrat, 271. New 
candidates for Governor were brought out by both parties this 
year — the Jackson, or Democratic party, as they began to call 
themselves about this time, nominating Samuel Dinsmoor who 
had been beaten by Woodbury eight years before, and the 
Republicans, Ichabod Bartlett, who had served six years in 
Congress, and w^as the ablest speaker and foremost lawyer in 
the State. The result was for Dinsmoor 23503, Bartlett 18681, 
scattering no. 

March 15.— A large seal, six feet eight inches in length, and 
weighing nearly 400 pounds, taken in the Cochecho, a few miles 
below the town. 

July 26. — John H. Rand, while at work on the Dye House of 
the Manufacturing Co., fell 15 feet and was instantly killed. 

Oct. 8. — The White Mountains covered with snow, which 
also fell in various parts of the State. 

Oct. 19. — A young woman by the name of Page, committed 
suicide by hanging herself, with her apron, from an apple tree. 

Nov. 25. — The barn of Mr. Jacob Sawyer, at Garrison Hill, 
burnt, with eleven head of cattle and a large quantity of hay. 

Dec. 18.— Died, Doctor Jacob Kittredge, aged 36— a well 
beloved physician. 

Dec. 22. — Extremely cold — the thermometer one to ten 
degrees below zero through the day. 

Deaths in Dover this year 85 — males 39, females 46. 



232 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1832 

1832 

Jan. 7. — An association by the name of the " Dover Lyceum" 
organized — its object being to "hold meetings for reading, con- 
versation, discussion, dissertations, illustrating the sciences, or 
other exercises which shall be thought expedient." 

March 13. — Vote for Governor, Ichabod Bartlett, Rep. 250, 
Samuel Dinsmoor, Dem. 301. The Republican party made its 
last rally this year at the State election and was beaten, as at 
the previous election. Dinsmoor, in the State received 24167 
votes, Bartlett 14920, scattering 146. Dover, which seldom 
faltered, gave Dinsmoor a majority as above, and a combination 
of a few disaffected republicans, under the name of " Working- 
men " with the democracy, succeeded in electing their repre- 
sentatives to the Legislature, one of whom was John P, Hale, 
who thus received that start in public life which he afterwards 
made so distinguished as well as honorable to himself and useful 
to the country. 

March 17. — A great freshet occasioned by heavy rains and 
the melting of the snow. The dam at Bow Pond giving way 
much alarm was felt for the safety of property on the Landing, 
the Bridges, &c. Several mills and every bridge on the river 
but one above Dover were destroyed : also a store and black- 
smith's shop at the outlet of the Pond in Strafford. 

March 31. — A meeting to consider the expediency of estab- 
lishing a steamboat on Winnipiseogee Lake held in Portsmouth 
and a committee appointed to make arrangements therefor — 
J. B. H. Odiorne and John Coe of Dover members thereof. 
An adjourned meeting was held in Rochester, in April, at 
which it was announced that all the stock was taken up. 
Charles F. Bell, the engineer employed in building the boat, 
drowned in the Lake, June 12. 

May 20. — The new Freewill Baptist Meeting House dedicated. 

June 24. — At a public town meeting the selectmen and 
physicians of the town were constituted a Board of Health and 
authorized to adopt measures necessary for the public safety 
from the Asiatic cholera, then alarmingly prevalent in the 
country. 

Sept. — Ivory H. Willey, 22, killed by the falling of a drum- 
wheel upon his head while at work in the Upper Factory. 



1833] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 233 

Nov. 6. — Vote of Dover for President: Henry Clay 562, 
Andrew Jackson 324. The vote in the State was for Clay 
electors 19627, for Jackson 26269. 

Nov. 20. — The bells of the town tolled and minute guns fired 
as a token of respect for the memory of Charles Carroll of 
Carrollton, the last signer of the Declaration of Independence, 
who died Nov. 15. 

Cocheco Block built this year. Deaths in town for the year 
73 — males 29, females 44. 

1833 

Feb. 6. — Rev. David Root installed as Pastor of the Congre- 
gational Church. 

March 12. — Vote for Governor, Samuel Dinsmoor 300, Arthur 
Livermore 95. Governor Dinsmoor was re-elected this year 
with little opposition, viz : In the State Dinsmoor 28277, 
Livermore 3959, scattering 1240. 

June II. — Joseph Hammons of Farmington, appointed Post- 
master of Dover. 

June 18. — A public meeting was held for the purpose of 
making arrangements for the reception of President Jackson, 
then on a visit to Concord, and who was expected to pass 
through town on his way to Portland. But the President, in 
consequence of feeble health, returned direct to Boston and 
Washington. 

July 4. — Steamer Belknap commenced running on Winni- 
piseogee Lake — The first boat ever run by steam on the Lake. 
"She glided across the Lake in good style, with fine music 
and a large company on board — about 1000 people having 
assembled to witness the first attempt to navigate the waters of 
the Winnipiseogee by steam." A new line of stages from 
Portsmouth through Dover to the Lake was also established. 

The " Dover Lyceum " incorporated by the Legislature. 

Aug. 6. — Act of the Legislature, authorizing "Jeremiah 
Colbath of Farmington to take the name of Henry Wilson," 
published in Dover Enquirer. 

Aug. 26. — Died, widow Abigail Brown, aged 102 years, 4 
mos. 19 days. She was born in Madbury (then part of Dover) 
March 27, 173 1, O. S. Her mother lived to the age of 102, and 
her grandmother to the age of 104. 



234 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1834 

Sept. lo. — It is mentioned that snow has fallen upon the 
White Mountains every month of the past summer — an unusual 
occurrence. 

Hon. John Quincy Adams passed through Dover on his re- 
turn from the White Mountains, remarking to a gentleman with 
whom he was in conversation, " that in all his travels he had 
never beheld natural scenery so imposing and beautiful as that 
to be met in New Hampshire." 

Nov. 13. — Meteoric shower of stars observable, between 3 
and 4 o'clock in the morning, which attracted much attention 
throughout the country. 

Dec. 26. — First lecture of Dover Lyceum course delivered, 
by the President, Hon. James Bartlett. 

Same date. — At a public town meeting a committee of ten 
was appointed to memorialize Congress for an appropriation to 
remove obstructions in Cochecho river. 

Deaths in town during the year 52 — males 27, females 25. 

1834 

March 4. — Mills of Cocheco Manufacturing Co. stopped for 
three days in consequence of a turn out of the female operatives, 
occasioned by a reduction of their pay. 

March 11. — Vote for Governor, William Badger 242, scatter- 
ing 189. Voted to build a market house at an expense not ex- 
ceeding $5000. The selectmen were authorized to employ a 
surveyor to make a plan of the town, provided he will furnish 
a lithographic map of the same — expense not to exceed $50. 
Representatives instructed to procure the passage of an act au- 
thorizing the town to appropriate a portion of its school money 
for the support of a High School. 

March 15 — Public meeting held to memorialize Congress 
relative to the great and increasing distress in the country, con- 
sequent on the measures of the National Administration in 
regard to the public monies, the tariff, &c. 

April 28. — Pastoral relations between the Unitarian Society 
and Rev. Samuel K. Lothrop dissolved, he having accepted a 
call to the Brattle Street Church, Boston. 

May 5. — Wife of John Dunn committed suicide by cutting 
her throat with a razor, leaving three children, the youngest 
but a week old. 



1835] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 235 

Aug. I.— William B. Smith appointed Postmaster in place of 
Joseph Hammons resigned. 

Aug. II. — William Reynolds died from the effects of a blow 
given him by his father Joseph Reynolds, with a fire shovel, 
while the former, who was in liquor, was in controversy with 
his step-mother. Joseph Reynolds, the father, who was 76 
years of age, was found guilty of manslaughter, and sentenced 
to the State Prison for 5 years. 

Sept. 6.— Honors to the memory of the illustrious lyafayette 
were paid by the citizens of Dover, the Hon. Caleb Gushing of 
Newburyport, delivering an eloquent eulogy on the deceased, 
the Governor of the State with his staff, and other distinguished 
guests attending and marching in procession. The Rocking- 
ham Guards of Portsmouth, the Great Falls Rifle Co. and the 
Strafford Guards being the escort. 

Sept. 13.— Mr. Cyrus Ames killed by the bursting of a gun 
fired by another person near whom he was standing. 

Nov. 5.— Drowned in the Cochecho, near the Landing, Capt. 
Moses P. Perkins, aged 40. 

j3ec. 2. — A paragraph announcing that it was contemplated 
to build a railroad from the termination of the Lowell Railroad 
in Wilmington to Andover, first published in a Dover paper. 
The editor anticipating the possibility that the road might in 
time be built to Dover. 

1835 

Jan. 4. — The coldest morning observed for many years, the 
thermometer indicating 28 degrees below zero. 

Jan. 31. — Two boys, children of John B. Sargent and David 
Bickford, one 8 and the other 6 years of age, drowned near the 
Upper Factory in crossing the river on the ice. 

March 10. — Vote for Governor, Joseph Healey 373, William 
Badger 362. The rival parties from this time were styled or 
assumed the names of Whigs and Democrats. The Whigs 
previous to this election had at a State Convention, nominated 
Andrew Peirce of Dover, as their candidate for Governor. The 
Democrats had nominated William Badger. Mr. Peirce de- 
clined the nomination, and Joseph Healey, who had been the 
next highest candidate in the Convention, was recommended as 
a substitute for Mr. Peirce, at a County Convention held in 
Dover. The result in the State was for Badger 25767, for 
Healey 14825, scattering 308. 



236 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1835 

Lithographic Map of the town, from surveys of Geo. L. 
Whitehouse, published. 

May I. — " This day a steeple clock, built by Benjamin Morrill 
of Boscawen, N. H. was set going in the tower of the First 
Parish Meeting House. The cost of the clock including dial 
and fixtures about $300. This is the first steeple clock ever set 
up in Dover. This clock was paid for by subscriptions from 
various persons, citizens of Dover, and was put up in the tower 
of the meeting house by consent of the Parish. Mr. Asa A. 
Tufts and Mr. Geo. Quint took care of it for several years, when 
the selectmen agreed to pay some one to keep it going." 

( Tufts Record?) 

June 30. — Bill to incorporate the Boston & Maine Railroad 
passed by the Legislature. 

July 5. — John Kenney, aged 29, and John Casley, aged 23, 
drowned while bathing in the river above the Upper Bridge. 

July 14. — Plato Waldron, aged about 56, (colored) drowned 
in the Cochecho, near the Landing. Plato was born a slave of 
Thomas Westbrook Waldron and was probably about the last 
member of the "peculiar institution" who lived and died in 
Dover. For many years previous to his death he was Janitor 
of the Courts when in session in the old Court House. 

July 28.— Meeting held and a committee appointed to con- 
sider and report upon the subject of building a railroad from 
Haverhill or Portsmouth to Dover. 

Aug. II. — The committee reported in favor of a road from 
Haverhill and also to Alton Bay. 

Aug. 22. — Directors chosen by the grantees of the Boston & 
Maine Railroad at a meeting held at Dover Hotel, and on the 
31st. books were open for subscriptions to the stock. 

Dec. 16. — The coldest day on record for many years. Ther- 
mometer at noon 13 degrees below zero — average for the 
day -13. 

Dec. 30. — Rev. Edgar Buckingham ordained as minister of 
the Unitarian Society. 

Deaths in town this year 82, males 24, females 58. 



1836] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 237 

1836 

Jan. 19. — Rev. Holmes Cushman, a Methodist minister and 
afterwards a trader in Dover, was sentenced to the Massachu- 
setts State Prison for 3 years, for obtaining goods by false pre- 
tences in Boston. 

March 8. — Vote for Governor, Joseph Healey 317, Isaac Hill 
435. Isaac Hill, long the editor of the N. H. Patriot and the 
most influential party leader in the State, was elected Governor 
this year without any organized opposition. He had been 
appointed 2d Controller of the Treasury by Gen. Jackson, and 
rejected by the Senate, whereupon the N. H. Legislature elected 
him a member of the body which had rejected him. He took 
his seat in the Senate, but before serving out his full term he 
was nominated for Governor and elected by the following vote : 
Hill 24904, Healey 2566, George Sullivan 2344, scattering iiii. 

March 10. — Mr. Daniel Hayes was instantly killed while 
adjusting the machinery of a steam grist mill on Young's 
wharf. 

April 2. — Jacob Ford, an old citizen of Dover Neck, 70 
years of age, was drowned at the Portsmouth bridge by«the 
upsetting of his boat, in which he was proceeding to that town, 

April 18. — The small pox was prevalent in Dover this year 
and a number of deaths occurred from it. 

July 4. — Died, Dr. George W. Kittredge, aged 36. His death 
was caused by his labors in attendance upon those sick with 
small pox. 

Ten thousand dollars were granted by Congress this year for 
improving the navigation of Cochecho river. 

Steam Boat " Tom Thumb " advertised to run daily between 
Dover and Portsmouth this season. 

Nov. 7. — Vote for President, Harrison 140, Van Buren 269. 
But little opposition was made in New Hampshire to the elec- 
tion of Mr. Van Buren to the Presidency. The whole vote was 
24980. The Van Buren electors were chosen by votes varying 
from 18658 to 18722. Vote on division of the county of Straf- 
ford, ayes 19, nays 19. For a State Insane Hospital, ayes 416, 
nays 3. 

The coldest day of the year was Feb. 2 — 17 degrees below 
zero, average 8)^^ degrees below. The warmest day, July 9 — 
98 above, and average 81 for the day. 



238 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1837 

1837 
Feb. II. — At a public town meeting it was voted to receive 
the surplus revenue belonging to the town, which had been 
deposited by the General Government with the State, and 
William Woodman was appointed agent to receive the same. 
The selectmen were appointed commissioners to manage the 
fund, the interest to be applied to the payment of the expenses 
of the town. The whole amount of this surplus deposited with 
the States was $37468859.97 — of which the sum assigned to New 
Hampshire was $892115.71. Dover's proportion was $14767.79. 
An attempt was made to retain it in the State Treasury as a 
permanent fund, to be returned to the General Government (if 
ever called for) according to the terms of the act, but the Legis- 
lature voted to make the several towns the custodians, requiring 
them to hold and use it in such manner as to be able to return it 
when necessary. Some of them did so, but most of them finally 
made another distribution by depositing it in the pockets of the 
people. Dover did this by vote of the town in May 1838. 

March 14. — Vote for Governor, Isaac Hill 481, scattering 2. 
Mr.* Hill was re-elected Governor this year with less opposition 
than the previous year. Whole vote 24532. Isaac Hill 22361, 
Joseph Healey 557, George Sullivan 458, scattering 1156. In 
Dover, where the party organization was generally very strin- 
gently maintained, it was so far relaxed that the Democratic 
party elected their full board of representatives to the Legisla- 
ture, which was a very unusual event in its political history, 
not occurring again for many years. 

May — Suspension of specie payments by the Banks, and 
great excitement in business affairs. Many failures and a gen- 
eral suspension of manufacturing operations. The Mills in 
Dover were mostly shut down and a large number of people 
thrown out of employment. An extra session of Congress was 
called by President Van Buren. 

May 15. — Died, Dr. Samuel W. Dow, aged 34. Drowned in 
the Cochecho, William Field, 6 years of age. 

June 3. — A very severe thunder storm, the lightning striking 
in several places in town, and burning a barn in Madbury, con- 
taining six cows. 

July 17. — Died, Hon. James Bartlett, 44. 



1838] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 239 

July 20. — Died, Deborah Coffin, the oldest person in town, 
having been baptised Sept. 17, 1738, She was born in the 
house on Central street which stood on the high bank which 
was dug away to make room for Varney's block, and in which 
her ancestors lived until the great earthquake in 1755 shook 
down the chimney. Her great grandfather was Peter Coffin, 
whose garrison stood on the spot where she was born, and 
whose house and mills were burnt when Major Waldron was 
killed by the Indians in 1689. It was a tradition of the family 
that when the Indians entered his garrison four of his hired 
men attempted to put them out, but the family prevented them 
believing they could trust the Indians. The Indians murdered 
the four hired men, but spared all the family. Her father had 
ten children, the eighth of whom was Deborah. She remem- 
bered that when she was young and the women went out to 
milk, a man went with them with a gun, for fear of the Indians. 
Much of the land on Washington street, granted originally to 
Peter Coffin, remained in the family until "Aunt Deborah's" 
death. 

Sept. 9. — A little child, 6 years old, daughter of Wm. B. 
Hayes, was knocked down and trampled to death by a team of 
stage horses near the New Hampshire Hotel. 

Sept. 14. — A ship of about 600 tons was launched from the 
ship yard of Robert Rogers near the Gulf this day. 

Dec. 8. — The Universalist Church on 3d street, built this 
year, was dedicated. 

The coldest day in the year was Jan. 4. — thermometer 18 
below zero. The warmest day July i — 95 above zero. 

1838 

March 13. — Vote for Governor, James Wilson, jr. 617, Isaac 
Hill 407. The election was sharply contested this year and a 
large vote was brought out — the largest ever cast in the State. 
The opposing candidates were James Wilson, Whig, and Isaac 
Hill, Democrat, who was running for a third term. Result : 
Whole vote 54570, of which Wilson had 25675, Hill 28697, 
scattering 198. 

The town voted against a division of the County ; also against 
calling a Convention for revising the Constitution, or for making 
Town Clerks Recorders of Deeds — all of which questions were 
submitted to the voters by order of the Legislature. 



240 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1838 

May 9. — The town voted to loan the Surplus Revenue depos- 
ited with the town by the General Government, to the legal 
voters in equal proportions. 

May 23. — Rev. R. O. Williams installed as Pastor of the 
Universalist Society. 

June 5. — Rev. Lucian Hayden ordained as Pastor of the 
Franklin Street Baptist Society. 

July 13. — The house of Mr. Samuel Howard at Mount 
Pleasant, burnt by a spark from the chimney — the first dwelling 
burnt in town since 1831. 

July 29. — Great heat — thermometer 97 in the shade. 

July 30. — The house of Francis Drew, at Back river, burnt. 

Sept. 4. — Great scarcity of water — Mills shut down half of 
each day. 

Oct. 25. — Meeting held to secure the building of the Boston 
& Maine Railroad from Exeter to Dover, instead of Exeter to 
Portsmouth. 

Dec. — The town voted to subscribe for 140 shares in the 
Boston & Maine Railroad and pay for the same with the Surplus 
Revenue. 

Died, in Texas, in June of this year, George Clinton Durell, 
aged 22, son of Hon. D. M. Durell, and Charles Ela, aged 27, 
son of N. W. Ela — supposed to have been murdered by some of 
the lawless desperadoes of that territory, whither they had gone 
on a business expedition. 

The Nutter & Pierce brick block on the corner of Washing- 
ton and Main streets (since purchased by the Manufacturing 
Co.) was built this year — the third brick block erected on the 
Landing, 

Number of arrivals of vessels in Boston from Dover during 
the year 97, — larger than from any other place east of New York 
except Portland. 

Deaths for the year 86. 



1839] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 241 

1839 
Jan. 9. — Died, Dr. Jabez Dow, aged 63, an old and well 
known physician. 

March 12. — ^Vote for Governor, James Wilson 597, John Page 
373, scattering 5. On division of the County, 25 for, 253 
against. The whole vote of the State was for James Wilson, 
Whig, 23928, John Page, Democrat, 30518, scattering 562. 

The town voted to reconsider the vote passed in December, 
to take stock in the Boston & Maine Railroad. 

April . — James F. Curtis, Superintendent of the Boston and 
Worcester Railroad, and for several years Superintendent of the 
Cocheco Manufacturing Co., was instantly killed by putting 
his head from the car window near Boston. 

June 25. — Rev. Edgar Buckingham dissolved his connection 
with the Unitarian Society, and Rev. David Root his relations 
with the Congregational Society. 

The ship Orinoco, Captain Rogers, (the last ship built in 
Dover) was lost at sea, Sept. 4, on her passage from St. 
Petersburg to Boston. 

Sept. 12. — Mr. William Pidgin committed suicide by hang- 
ing himself in his barn. 

Oct. 19. — A town meeting was held to see if the town would 
authorize the selectmen to pay the assessments on the stock in 
the Boston & Maine Railroad which they were instructed to 
subscribe for at the meeting held in December last. The town 
by a vote of 220 to 117, refused to so instruct. 

Nov. 20. — Rev. Jeremiah S. Young ordained over the Con- 
gregational Society. 

Dec. 15. — A very severe storm, causing great destruction to 
shipping. 

The Cochecho Mutual Fire Insurance Co. was incorporated 
this year. The Dover Librar}^ was opened, and St. Thomas 
Church organized ; Rev. William Horton, Rector. 

Deaths for the year 106. 



242 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1840 

1840 

Feb. 7. — By a decisiou of the Court of Common Pleas, the 
Turnpike from Dover to South Berwick was declared a free 
road from this date and the toll-gate removed. 

March 10. — Vote for Governor, Enos Stevens, Whig, 579, 
John Page, Dem., 379, scattering 9. In the State, Stevens 
20716, Page 30518, scattering 562. 

April 3. — Died, Hon. John Wheeler, aged 70 — for 25 years 
Postmaster of Dover, having been appointed by Jefferson in 
1801. 

April 22. — Rev. John Parkman installed as minister of the 
Unitarian Church. 

June 17. — Great Harrison convention at Concord — loooo 
people present — 200 from Dover. 

June 24. — Boston & Maine Railroad opened to Exeter. 

June 29. — George Fletcher, aged 1 1 , drowned in the Cochecho 
while bathing. 

July 4. — The day was celebrated with much enthusiasm by 
the whig party — a procession and collation, toasts, speeches, 
&c. The following sentiment was sent in by Dr. Ezra Green, 
then in his 94th year, and who at the November election follow- 
ing, cast his last vote for General Harrison for President : 

The Union of all parties upon the principles of the Revolution and 
the Constitution— that Whig Principles may prevail among all the People 
—May the choice of General William H. Harrison as President of the 
United States, be a death blovp to all party spirit and a revival of the 
spirit of '75. 

(Received with three times three cheers.) 

July 24. — Extreme heat — the glass standing at 103 in the 
shade. 

Oct. 16. — Died, Moses Hodgdon, Esq. Counselor at Eaw, 
aged 66— one of the oldest members of the Strafford Bar, hav- 
ing commenced practice in 1801. He had represented the town 
in the Legislature and at the time of his decease was President 
of Strafford Bank and of the Savings Bank for the County of 
Strafford. 

Oct. 22. — A store house near Young's Tannery on the Land- 
ing burnt, and a large quantity of merchandise destroyed. 

Nov. 2. — Presidential election — great contest between Harrison 
and Van Buren. Vote of Dover, Harrison 662, Van Buren 412. 



1S41] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 243 

The Presidential election this j^ear was the greatest political 
contest ever known. For manj' weeks the whole country was 
in a blaze of excitement. In Dover, as elsewhere, the whole 
population was arrayed in opposing parties, and great political 
gatherings at which there was speaking and singing of songs, 
were of constant occurrence. In June 200 of the voters of 
Dover went in a body to the great Mass Meeting in Concord, at 
which more than loooo persons were present. The whole vote 
of the State was for Harrison 26434, for Van Buren 32671. 
New Hampshire was the only Northern State which was carried 
for Van Buren. 

Dec. 23. — Act passed by the Legislature to divide the County 
of Strafford. 

St. Thomas Church built this year. 

Deaths during the year 87. 

1841 

Jan. 9. — Benjamin Hodgdon, aged 70, was instantly killed 
by falling beneath his cart wheel on Franklin square. 

Jan. 26. — Asa A. Tufts appointed Postmaster in place of 
William B. Smith, resigned. 

March 9. — State election. Vote of Dover for Governor, 
Enos Stevens 524, John Page 368, Daniel Hoit 28. The 
Abolition or Free Soil party began to make its appearance this 
year. Result in the State, John Page, Dem., 291 16, Enos 
Stevens, Whig, 21230, Daniel Hoit, Freesoil, 2812, scattering 

358. 

May 6. — Died, Hon. Daniel M. Durell, aged 71. He was 
apparently in the enjoyment of good health, had ridden out on 
horseback during the day, and was seen walking on the street 
with his usual vigorous step until late in the afternoon. About 
six o'clock he was found by his family dead in the yard near 
his residence. The deceased was one of Dover's most opulent 
and distinguished citizens and in the course of a long and 
active life, had filled many offices of trust and importance. He 
was a graduate of Dartmouth College of the class of 1794. and 
commenced the practice of law in Dover as early as 1797- 
From 1807 to 1809 he was a member of Congress from New 
Hampshire. He afterwards represented the town in the State 
Legislature, and in 18 14 was appointed Chief Justice of the 



244 . NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1842 

First District Court of Common Pleas, which office he held 
until the Judiciary system was changed and the Court abolished. 
In 1830 he was appointed United States District Attorney for 
New Hampshire and held the office until 1834. 

Aug. 10. — A very severe drought this summer. 

Sept. I. — The annual meeting of the Boston & Maine Rail- 
road was held in Dover for the first time, on which occasion the 
road was opened for the conveyance of passengers to the tem- 
porary depot beyond the "deep cut " on Washington street. 

Oct. 4. — A very severe storm doing much damage to shipping. 
Snow fell in considerable quantities, covering the tops of hills 
and giving them the aspect of midwinter. 

Nov. 20. — The town voted to distribute the Surplus Revenue, 
except that part which had been appropriated to the payment of 
poll taxes, in equal proportions among the legal voters of the 
town and the widows of citizens. 

Also voted to erect a suitable Town House for the accommo- 
dation of the town ; the proceeds of Town L,ots recently sold to 
be used for the purpose of building the House, and the select- 
men authorized to hire a sum not exceeding $5000 in addition 
thereto,, making in all $10000. The County subsequently 
granted $3000. 

Deaths in Dover during the year 108, males 53, females 45, 
unknown 10. 

1842 

Jan. 30. — The thermometer at noon rose to 57 above zero. 
In the month of Jul}' last, at three different times, it sunk 
lower. 

March 3.^ — Dennis Halleran, aged 50, was killed by the 
caving of the earth, while at work in an excavation on the 
railroad near the village. 

March 8. — State election. — Vote for Governor, Enos Stevens 
342, Daniel Hoit 138, Henry Hubbard 522, John H. White 12. 
The death of President Harrison and the results which followed, 
had a marked effect upon the politics of the State. Parties 
became somewhat mixed. In the election of this year there 
were four organizations in the field — the Whig, Democratic, 
Independent Democratic, and Free Soil. Result of the vote : 
Henry Hubbard, Dera., 26831, Enos Stevens, Whig, 12234. 
John H. White, Ind. Dem., 5869, Daniel Hoit, Free Soil, 2812, 
scattering 358. 



1842] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 245 

The selectmen were instructed to grant no licenses for the 
sale of liquor. Vote for revision of State Constitution 21, 
against 90. 

March 9.— Died, John B. H. Odiorne, aged 50— for many 
years a well known business man. He was in Dartmoor prison, 
in England, at the time of the massacre of American prisoners, 
in the war of 181 2. 

March 25. — Rain, thunder and snow, about four inches of 
the latter falling, which was more than at any one time during 
the winter. 

April 22.— The thermometer rose to 87 in the shade this day. 

May '21. — Died, Captain Joha Riley, aged 61. He had 
attended to his usual business during the day — was present at 
a public meeting in the evening — retired to his house about 10 
o'clock, and before another hour had ceased to be numbered 
with the living. For many years he was a selectman and 
Treasurer of the town, had been its representative in the 
Legislature, and at the time of his death was one of the 
Directors of the Boston & Maine Railroad, in the building 
of which he took a deep interest, and to advance it con- 
tributed liberally and efficiently, both by his means and 
superintendence. 

June II. — Snow fell for several hours on the hills of New 
Hampshire this day. 

June 30. —The cars of the Boston & Maine Railroad crossed 
the Cochecho for the first time, arriving at the new Depot on 
Franklin square at io>^ o'clock, which with the bridge across 
the river was completed a few days previously. 

Aug. 29. — The remains of two skeletons, supposed to be 
those of Indians, were found in digging down the high bank 
which stood where Orchard street funs into Central street, near 
which was also the site of Peter Coffin's garrison house in 1689, 

Aug. 30. — Stephen Tuttle and William Ellison, young men 
about 19 years of age, were drowned by the upsetting of their 
boat near Dover Point. 

Sept. 21. — Died, Hon. Jeremiah Smith, aged 83, formerly of 
Exeter, but for the last years of his life a resident of Dover. 
He was a representative in Congress during Washington's 
administration, for many years a Judge of the United States 



246 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1843 

and State Courts, and Governor of the State. Few citizens 
were more widely known as a Statesman and Jurist, and none 
ever left behind them a more enduring reputation. 

Oct. 6. — ^The corner stone of the new Town Hall was laid 
this day, on which occasion appropriate remarks were made by 
Hon. John P. Hale. A variety of pamphlets, papers, coins and 
other matters, were deposited in a box under the corner stone, 
including a sketch of Dover, map of the village, list of Town 
Officers, newspapers published in town, &c. 

Nov. i8. — Michael Powers, aged 6o, killed by the caving of 
the earth while digging on the railroad near the deep cut on 
Washington street. 

Deaths during the year 153 — males 60, females 93. 

1843 

Jan. 2. — Boston & Maine Railroad completed to the Junction 
in Berwick. 

Feb. 21.— Died, Nathaniel W. Ela, aged 77, for nearly half a 
century the keeper of a well known hotel on the lyanding. 

March 14. — Vote for Governor, Anthony Colby 256, Daniel 
Hoit 174, Henry Hubbard 459, John H. White 44. The vote 
in the State this year was as follows : Henry Hubbard, Dem., 
23050; Anthony Colby, Whig, 12551; John H. White, Ind. 
Dem., 5497; Daniel Hoit, Freesoil, 3402; scattering 83. 

March 28. — The snow in the upper part of the State was five 
feet deep on a level at this time, and it was remarked that there 
had not been so much on the ground so late in the season for 
forty years. 

jijly 4. — The new Town Hall opened to the public for the 
first time on the occasion of a great Temperance Celebration by 
the "Martha Washington \ssociation of Dover." 

July 17.— Died, in Boston, John Williams, aged 63, for 
several years the agent of the Manufacturing Co. in Dover and 
largely interested in the establishment of the business in this 
place. 

July 24. — At a town meeting held in the new Town Hall, the 
town voted to convey to the County of Strafford, the use of the 
Court Room with the necessary rooms for County Officers, Jury 
Rooms, &c. so long as the Court shall sit in Dover, upon the 
payment of $3000. 



1844] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 247 

Aug. I. — The Court held its first term in the new Court 
Room. 

Sept. 1 6. — The town voted to purchase four acres of land on 
the north side of Cochecho river for a Burying Ground, and 
authorized the selectmen to lay out the same into lots. (This 
land was on Fifth street. The Burying Ground, after being 
used for a short time, was found unsuitable for the purpose and 
was abandoned and sold.) 

Sept. 19. — Phebe Hanson murdered by Andrew Howard in 
Rochester. Howard was arrested on the 20th and committed 
to jail in Dover. On Oct. 20, he made an attempt to hang him- 
self in his cell with his handkerchief, and was cut down in 
season barely to save his life. 

Sept. 21. — The new Freewill Baptist Meeting House on 
Washington street was dedicated this day. (This was the 
building afterwards converted into the Freewill Baptist Printing 
Establishment, which had an office in the basement when 
originally built.) 

Dec. 30. — The selectmen were authorized to sell the old 
Court House and lot for the benefit of the town. 

About 100 tenements were built in different parts of the town 
this year, a larger number than had been erected in any year 
since 1825. Also the Stafford Bank blbck. 

Deaths during the year 105 — males 43, females 62. 

1844 

Jan. 3. — Moses W. Ham of Farraington, left Dover in the 
evening for his home during a severe storm, and was found 
dead the next morning near Gage's hill, with his horse and 
sleigh near by. 

Jan. 16. — Fire in Harper's Furniture Store (Badgers building) 
which came near destroying the Enquirer office. 

Feb. 3. — Mr. B. A. Ford passed with a horse and sleigh on 
the ice from Dover Neck to Newington, a circumstance which 
had not before occurred for 30 years. Winter very severe and 
Boston harbor frozen over so that a canal had to be cut to admit 
the passage of vessels. 

Feb. 12. — Died, Captain William Flagg, aged 74. In early 
life he was an oflScer in the naval service of his country, for 
which at the time of his death he received a pension from the 



248 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1844 

Government. He was afterwards an enterprising shipmaster, 
and long enjoyed the respect and confidence of his fellow 
citizens. 

March 12. — Vote for Governor, John H. Steele 581, Anthony 
Colby 351, Daniel Hoit 109, John H. White 20. Result in the 
State, John H. Steele, Dem., 25986; Anthony Colby, Whig, 
14750; Daniel Hoit, Freesoil, 5767 ; John H. White, Ind. Dem., 
1988 ; scattering 201. 

April 5. — A man named Ira Libbey was found drowned in a 
small pond at the west end of the Town Hall (where Locust 
street now runs), and where he had fallen the previous night in 
a state of intoxication. 

Aug. 12. — Andrew Howard tried for the murder of Phebe 
Hanson ; the jury failing to agree he was remanded to prison. 

Nov. 4. — Vote for President, Henry Clay 562 ; James K. 
Polk 456; James G. Birney 61. The Whig party made a 
gallant but unavailing effort to carry the country for its greatest 
leader— Henry Clay— in this his last contest for the Presidency. 
In the State the vote was for Clay 17776; for Polk 27762 ; for 
Birney, the Freesoil candidate, 7559- 

The Priutery of the Manufacturing Co. on Payne street was 
erected this year, also Varney's Block, and Union Block, on 
Central street, and Railroad Block on Franklin Square. 

Thomas W. Waldron, aged 30, the United States Consul and 
Naval Agent at Canton, died at Hong Kong, China, Sept. 8. 
He was son of Daniel Waldron late of Dover, the last possessor 
of the Waldron Homestead. 

Deaths during the year 121— males 55, females 66. Among 
those who died was Lewis Colbath (at the alms house), a brother 
of a future Vice President of the United States. 



1845] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 249 

1845 

Jan. 7. — Hon. John P. Hale's letter to his constituents against 
the annexation of Texas, published. 

Feb. 5. — Andrew Howard was again tried for the murder of 
Phebe Hanson, when the jury returned a verdict of wilful 
murder. 

March 11.— Vote for Governor, Anthony Colby 557 ; John H. 
Steele 385 ; Daniel Hoit 109; scattering 6. Vote of the State, 
Steele, Dem., 23406; Colby, Whig, 15579; Hoit, Freesoil, 5786; 
scattering 994. 

John P. Hale, who had been nominated for re-election to Con- 
gress by the Democratic party, was at this election dropped from 
the ticket, and John Woodbury substituted, in consequence of 
Mr. Hale's refusal to go with the party in voting for the annex- 
ation of Texas. A portion of the party, consisting of those who 
approved of his opposition to the extension of slavery, voted for 
him, and succeeded in defeating his opponent, leaving a vacancy 
in the delegation. 

May 2. — During a heavy blow an apple tree, known as the 
great Wingate apple tree, standing on the farm of William P. 
Wingate, on the Neck road, was prostrated to the earth. This 
tree, from authentic tradition, is supposed to have been nearly 
200 years old. It measured i6}4 feet in circumference, and has 
been known to bear 40 bushels of apples a year in succession. 
One year it bore 60 bushels, and it has probably averaged 30 
bushels a year for 150 years. The farm on which it stood was 
first settled by John Wingate, the ancestor of all the Wingates, 
in 1658 or 9, and has always remained in the hands of his 
descendants. 

June 25. — The steam mill of James Davis on Union street 
burnt. 

July I. — Thomas Stackpole appointed Postmaster in place of 
Asa A. Tufts, resigned. 

July 9. — Rev. Homer Barrows installed as pastor of the First 
Congregational Church. 

July 10. — During a heavy thunder shower a hail storm passed 
over Dover Neck, in which hail stones fell resembling large 
pieces of icicles — one measuring 8 ^/lo inches in length and 
7 ^ in circumference. The vein was apparently but two or 
three miles wide. 



250 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1846 

Very hot weather, the thermometer rising as high as 104. 
The rails on the Boston & Maine Railroad near Andover, Mass. 
expanded so much by the intense heat of the sun as to throw 
them from their places. 

Aug. II. — Andrew Howard sentenced to be hung on the 12th 
of November next. 

Nov. 12. — All the necessary preparations for the execution of 
Andrew Howard this day, were made. The gallows was 
erected in the jail yard, and there was a collection of several 
thousand persons to witness the execution, when the reprieve of 
the prisoner to the 8th of July, 1846, was announced. 

The old Court House was sold this year and converted into 
tenements, having first been turned around, as it was originally 
built to face the south. 

There was great political excitement in the town and State 
this year, in consequence of the abandonment by John P. Hale 
of the Democratic party on the Texas question. Two .special 
elections were held for member of Congress (in Sept. and Nov.) 
at neither of which was there a choice. 

Deaths during the year 99. 

1846 

Feb. 4. — Mr. Plumer Hayes was killed by his head coming 
in contact with a circular saw in Davis's steam mill. 

March 10. — Vote for Governor, Anthony Colby 650 ; Jared 
W. Williams 377; Nathaniel S. Berry 237. Hon. John P. Hale 
was elected a representative to the lyCgislature, which subse- 
quently elected him its Speaker and then Senator in Congress. 
The Democratic party, after ruling the State for seventeen 
years, was this year defeated in its election of Governor. The 
vote was for Jared W. Williams, Dem., 26740; Anthony Colby, 
Whig, 17707; Nathaniels. Berry, Freesoil, 10379; scattering 
568. There being no choice, the Legislature, which contained 
an anti-democratic majority, elected Anthony Colby. 

June 28. — Dr. Ezra Green completed his looth year this day, 
on which occasion Rev. S. K. lyOthrop of Boston, preached a 
commemorative sermon at the Unitarian Church, and afterwards 
administered the sacrament at the house of the venerable 
centenarian. 



1846] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 251 

July 4. — Two young men belonging in Great Falls were 
knocked from the top of a railroad car in passing a bridge in 
Dover, and so severely injured that both died soon after. 

July 8. — Andrew Howard was hung in the jail yard for the 
murder of Phebe Hanson Sept. 19, 1843. 

Aug. 25. — A smart shock of an earthquake was felt in many 
places. To those within doors it sounded like a carriage driven 
violently over the ground, or the departure of a heavy train of 
railroad cars, for which it was at the time by many mistaken. 

Oct. 13.— A friendly address to the people of Dover, from the 
people of Dover, in England, in favor of peace, was received by 
the selectmen and published in the Enquirer. 

Oct. 31. — A dwelling house and barn with a yoke of oxen, a 
cow, and a large quantity of hay, belonging to Moses Whittier 
on Academy (Waldron) street, were burnt. The same night 
another barn belonging to the same person, a mile distant, at 
Whittier's B'alls, was burnt. Both fires were caused by incen- 
diaries, for the detection of whom the selectmen were author- 
ized to offer a reward of $500. 

Dec. 12. — The town voted to enlarge the Burying Ground on 
Pine Hill by purchasing adjoining lands. 

An ancient dwelling house, standing on the corner of Silver 
and High (now Locust) streets, pulled down this year, was sup- 
posed to be one of the oldest buildings in town, if not the old- 
est. It is said to have been built by the Society of Friends in 
the early part of 1700, as a place of business or worship, prob- 
ably for both. The first Friends' meeting house in town was 
built prior to 1700, and stood on Dover Neck, about half a mile 
north of the old fort, or meeting house, built by the first settlers 
of the town in 1633. This house was taken down about the 
year 1700, and the frame and principal materials carried across 
the river and rebuilt for a Friends' Society in Eliot, (then a part 
of Kittery). The second Friends' meeting house, which was 
the one above alluded to on Silver street, must have been built 
soon after the first, or at least some years prior to 1720 : for it 
appears by their records that in December of that year, they 
agreed "to repair their house at Cochecho," as this part of 
Dover was then and for many years after universally called, to 
distinguish it from the Neck, Oyster river, &c. At that time 
(1720) the Friends held meetings both at Dover Neck and 



252 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1847 

Cochecho, constituting then about one third of the population. 
The present Friends' meeting house was built about 1770, at 
which time probably, the house on Silver street like the one on 
the Neck, ceased to be used, and was converted into a dwelling. 

The Cochecho Bank block and Tetherly's block were erected 
this year. 

By a census of the town taken this year by the selectmen, the 
population was found to be 81 17, an increase of 1659 since 
1840. 

Deaths during the year 107 — males 53, females 54. 

1847 
Feb. 18. — Died, Stephen Hanson, aged 73. He left his house 
in the morning, went down town and transacted some business 
and was returning home. When near the Congregational 
meeting house, at the corner, he fell and expired in a few min- 
utes. He was a member of the Society of Friends, and was 
extensively known as a business man, having taken a leading 
part in the introduction of the manufacturing business into the 
place. 

March 9. — Vote for Governor, Anthony Colby 679, J. W. 
Williams 457, Nathaniel S. Berry 188, scattering 2. The Dem- 
ocrats, at this election, regained the State, electing their Gov- 
ernor, Jared W. Williams, over all opposition. The vote was : 
Williams 30806; Colby 21 109; Berry 8531; scattering 54. 
Majority for Williams 1212. 

The town voted to raise a sum not exceeding 3}^ per cent in 
addition to the amount required for the support of schools, to be 
appropriated for a Teachers' Institute in the county. 

March 28. — A public meeting held for the relief of the people 
of Ireland, who were suffering from the famine occasioned by 
the potato rot. A committee appointed for the purpose raised 
by subscription about $2500, besides a considerable amount of 
provisions and clothing. 

April 17. — The Calico Printery at Bellamy burnt. Loss four 
to five thousand dollars. Insured. 

June I. — The wires for the magnetic telegraph from Boston to 
Portland put up and an office opened in town. 

July 2. — President Polk and suite passed through Dover this 
day, in a special train, on his way to Portland. 



1S47] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 253 

July 25. — Died, Dr. Ezra Green, aged loi years and 28 days. 
Dr. Green was born in Maiden, Mass. June 17, 1746, O. S., gradu- 
ated at Harvard College 1765, and settled in Dover as a physi- 
cian in 1767. He served in the Army and Navy five years in 
the war of the Revolution, sailing with the celebrated Captain 
Paul Jones in the " Ranger," but ever afterwards lived in Dover, 
where he was held in great respect. For many years in early 
life, having given up the practice of his profession, he was the 
principal merchant or trader, going once or twice in the season 
to Boston to purchase his most valuable goods. He was the first 
Postmaster appointed for the town by President Washington, 
and held the office until he voluntarily resigned it during Mr. 
Jefferson's administration. He attended church regularly al- 
most up to the last years of his life, was accustomed to vote in 
town meetings when he was nearly one hundred years old, 
and took a lively interest in public affairs as long as he lived. 

Sept. 2. — Mr. John Savil instantly killed in front of the U. S. 
Hotel (later Cochecho Bank) on Franklin Square, by the falling 
of a pair of sheers with which he was engaged, with others, in 
hoisting a sign post. 

Nov. 30. — The Strafford Bank removed from its old location 
near the Dover Hotel, to Central Square. 

Dec. 27. — A row of wooden stores north of the American 
House, on Franklin Square, burnt on a very cold night. L,oss 
about $6000. 

A charter for the Cochecho Railroad from Dover to Alton was 
obtained this year. 

Deaths during the year 217 — of which 108 occurred in about 
eight weeks between July 20 and Sept. 10, principally children. 
Two children were drowned in the summer by falling into the 
river, and one in the winter while skating. 



254 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1848 

1848 
March 1 1. — A public meeting in the Town Hall, at which the 
war with Mexico, the Texas question, &c. were discussed by 
General Sam Houston and Horace Greeley. 

March 14- — Vote for Governor, Nathaniel S. Berry 780, Jared 
W. Williams 488, scattering 29. In the State, Williams 32245; 
Berry 28829 ; scattering 468. 

April 5.— The freight house of the Boston & Maine R. R. in 
Dover, burnt, destroying property stored in it estimated at from 
fifteen to twenty thousand dollars. 

May I. — The old Somersworth meeting house, near the Dover 
line, burnt by an incendiary. It was built in 1780, and stood 
on the site of the former house which was struck by lightning 
and burnt in 1779. A parsonage house, standing near, was 
burnt in 181 2, with the communion plate and parish library. 

Oct. 17. — The Post Office was removed from Cocheco Block 
to Marston's Block. 

Nov. 7. — Vote for President, Zachery Taylor 527, Lewis Cass 
455, Martin Van Buren 149. In the State, Taylor 14789, Cass 
27762, Van Buren 7559. 

jq-Qv. 8. — Died, Hon. William Hale, in the 84th year of his 
age. Mr. Hale was one of Dover's oldest, wealthiest and most 
respected citizens. He represented the State in Congress two 
years from 1809 to 181 1, and four years from 18 13 to 18 17, and 
filled at different times the offices of Representative, Senator and 
Counsellor under the State Government— the duties of which 
he discharged with honor to himself and to the acceptance of his 
fellow citizens. Few men ever lived in the community whose 
integrity and worth commanded more respect, and none have 
departed from among us who have filled up the measure of their 
days more honorably to themselves, or more usefully to their 
fellow men. {E?iquirer.) 

Dec. 13. — Mr. Jeremy Young, aged about 60, of the well 
known firm of N. & J. Young, was accidentally drowned in the 
Cochecho. 

The lower Bridge was rebuilt this year at an expense of $1400. 
The "Badger Building" a brick block of three stories, con- 
taining stores, offices, &c. built by Joseph Badger in 1825, and 
standing just west of the bridge, was taken down, and the store 
house of the Cocheco Manf . Co. built. 

Surveys for a railroad from Dover to Portsmouth were made. 



1849] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 255 

1849 

Feb. I. — S. S. Moulton appointed Postmaster in place of 
Thomas Stackpole, resigned. 

March 13. — Vote for Governor, Levi Chamberlain 618, 
Samuel Dinsmoor 486, Nathaniel S. Berry 139. In the State, 
Dinsmoor 30107, Chamberlain 18784, Berry 7045, scattering 117. 

May 14. — Died, Eunice Varney, aged 99 years, 5 months, 21 
days — a member of the Society of Friends and the oldest person 
in town. 

July I. — George T. Wentworth, appointed Postmaster, in 
place of S. S. Moulton, removed. 

July 3. — The town of Rollinsford, formerly part of Dover, 
and afterwards of Somersworth, set off and incorporated. 

July 13. — Died in Madbury, Catherine Evans, widow of Sol- 
omon Evans, aged 102 years and two months, a member of the 
Society of Friends. She was born in Dover May 1747, when 
Madbury was a part of Dover. 

July 23. — A great drought this summer, and great heat. 
Several persons in Barrington and other towns, are recorded as 
dying from sun stroke while at work in their fields. 

July 31. — Died, Alfred I. Sawyer, aged 49 — a useful and 
enterprising citizen, and the founder of the "Sawyer Woolen 

Mills." 

Aug. 3. — The day was observed as a National Fast, on the 
recommendation of President Taylor, on account of the ravages 
of the cholera. 

Sept. 18. — The Cochecho Railroad was opened to Farming- 
ton for public travel this day — the first ground upon it having 
been broken in May 1848, 

Oct. 8. — The mountains and highlands in various parts of the 
State covered by an early snow storm. 

Nov. 18. — Rev. John Parkman closed his connection with the 
Unitarian Society. 

The " Upper Factory," the first erected in town, having been 
for some time disused, was taken down this year. 



256 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1850 

1850 

Jan. 6. — Died in Concord, Jeremiah Stickney, aged 85. He 
was the first person to introduce the manufacture of cotton and 
woolen hand cards in Dover, having established the business 
here as early as 1798, in a building which stood where No. 2 
Factory now stands. For many years he employed a large 
number of persons, principally children, in the manufacture of 
cards, the teeth of which were then set by hand. The manu- 
facture of cards by machinery, which invention was introduced 
about 1820, superseded the old process, and he gave up the 
business. 

Jan. II.— The Dry Goods Store of H. S. Plumer & Co. in 
Cocheco Block, burnt. Loss estimated at figooo — insurance 
$5000. 

March i. — A very mild winter, but little snow having fallen, 
and the mercury falling to zero but twice. 

March 12. — Vote for Governor, Levi Chamberlain 619, Sam- 
uel Dinsmoor 504, Nathaniel S. Berry 138. In the State, Dins- 
moor 30751, Chamberlain 18512, Berry 6472, scattering 54. 

April 16. — "Six inches of snow on the ground, and the 
weather more like midwinter than the middle of the second 
month of spring." 

April 20. — At a town meeting held to see if the town would 
vote to apply to the Legislature for a City charter, the meeting 
voted by a large majority to dissolve. At another meeting held 
May 25, the matter was again indefinitely postponed. 

Oct. 8. — The following were elected Delegates to the Con- 
vention to revise the Constitution of the State : Andrew Peirce, 
Thomas E. Sawyer, Asa Freeman, Shubael Varney, Wm. 
Plaisted Drew, John H. Wiggins. 

The High School in District No. 2 was established, and the 
School House, near the upper bridge, erected this year. 



1851] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 257 

1851 

March 11. — Vote for Governor, Thomas E. Sawyer 719, 
Samuel Dinsmoor 472, John Atwood 52, scattering 5. Thomas 
E. Sawyer, of Dover, was the whig candidate for Governor this 
year, and there was no choice by the people. The vote was 
for Dinsmoor, Dem., 27425; Sawyer, Whig, 18458; Atwood. 
Freesoil, 12049; scattering 179. Mr. Atwood had been the 
regular nominee of the democrats, but failing to meet all re- 
quirements on the slavery question, he had been "disestab- 
lished " and Dinsmoor taken up in his place. The Legislature, 
containing a Democratic majority, elected Dinsmoor. 

March 12. — Charles Colby, aged 20, in attempting to jump 
upon the cars at the depot, was instantly killed. 

April 5. — A boy about 8 years old, son of Patrick McKear- 
ney, fell into a well at the foot of Payne street, and was 
drowned. 

April was a stormy month; Minot's Rock Lighthouse and 
two Keepers were swept away on the 17th, and there was a 
north east snow storm on the 20th. Trees in bloom May 11. 

May 7. — Rev. Henry S. Bond installed as pastor of the Uni- 
tarian Church. 

May 19. — The barn of Mr. John Guppy burnt by an incen- 
diary fire, and with it 2 horses, 4 oxen, 3 cows, and a large 
quantity of hay. 

Aug. 30. — The Cochecho Railroad was opened from Farm- 
ington to Alton Bay, and the steamer Dover, which was built 
this year, commenced running from Alton Bay to Wolfborough 
and Centre Harbor. 

Sept. 2. — The barn of Mr. Paul Randall on South Pine 
street, w^as struck by lightning and entirely consumed. 

Sept. 9. — Incendiary fires being very prevalent at this time, 
a town meeting was held at which the selectmen were author- 
ized to offer suitable rewards for the apprehension of the 
incendiaries, and to appoint a night watch and committee of 
vigilance. 

Oct. 27. — "There was a smart snow storm early this morn- 
ing — a thing of rare occurrence in this latitude, in October." 

{Enquirer^ 



258 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1852 

Nov. 21. — Three men, Samuel T. Twombly, engineer, 
Charles Young, fireman, and Richard M'Clusky, repair hand, 
were killed on the Cocliecho Railroad, near Rochester, the 
engine falling into a culvert which had been washed away by a 
heavy rain. 

The Cochecho Bank was incorporated this year. 



1852 

March 9. — Vote for Governor, Thomas E. Sawyer 723, Noah 
Martin 491, John Atwood 126, scattering 2. Both of the can- 
didates of the leading parties were from Dover this year. The 
vote of the State was for Martin, Dem., 30807 ; Sawyer, Whig, 
19850; Atwood, Freesoil, 9479; scattering 269. 

A petition for a division of the town, so as to make Dover 
Neck, Back River, &c. a new town by the name of South 
Dover, was indefinitely postponed. On the question of amend- 
ing the Constitution, by abolishing the religious test, the town 
voted yeas 472, nays 220. On abolishing the property qualifica- 
tion, yeas 570, nays 119. On making future amendments to the 
Constitution by the Legislature, yeas 598, nays 113. 

These votes were on the amendments to the Constitution sub- 
mitted to the people, for a second time, by the Convention of 
1851, when the only one which was adopted was that abolishing 
the property qualification. 

April 2. — The body of a woman was found dead in the river, 
about four miles below the landing, apparently from 40 to 45 
years of age. No marks of violence were found on her person, 
and she was buried by the town authorities in the Dover Neck 
burying ground. 

April 5. — Nearly a foot of snow, much drifted, detaining the 
cars on the railroad four hours. It was nearly six months 
between the first and last snow of this winter — one of the long- 
est and severest ever remembered. 

April 10 — Five men belonging in Durham were drowned near 
Dover Point, by the upsetting of their boat, which was deeply 
laden and the wind blowing violently at the time. Their names 
were Elliot G. and Pillow Burnham, father and son, George 
Bunker, Edward Furness and Stephen Garland. 



1852] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 259 

A very severe storm which continued nearly a week, com- 
menced April ID, raising the streams so high as to overflow 
their banks, and compelling the Factories to suspend work. 
Bridges were carried away and much other damage done. 

April 22.— The Paper-hanging manufactory of Crawford & 
Busby on Fifth street was burnt. Loss about $4500. 

May —Rev. Homer Barrows, pastor of the First Congrega- 
tional Church resigned. Incendiary fires prevailed at this time. 
The barns on the Cofhn place and the Ham field, burnt. 

June 16.— Candace Waldron, born a slave in the family of 
Thomas W. Waldron in 1781, died, aged 71. William H. 
aged 10, son of the late Dr. J. W. Cowan, drowned in Back 
river. 

Surveys for a railroad from Dover to^Portsmouth were made 
at this time, and it was estimated that the road could be built 
for $200000. 

Oct. 7. — Five persons killed and a large number badly injured 
by a railroad collision near the Wiers — among whom were John 
H. Smith (killed) and Richard B. Cater (injured and died two 
days after) of Dover. 

Nov. 2.— Vote for President, Winfield Scott 637, Franklin 
Pierce 471, John P. Hale 137. Vote in the State, Scott, Whig, 
15540; Pierce, Dem., 28884; Hale, Freesoil, 6568. 

Nov. 27. — The shock of an earthquake was distinctly felt, 
resembling the rattling of carriage wheels on frozen ground. 

Deaths during the year 144. 



260 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1853 

1853 
Jan. 12. — Rev. Benjamin F. Parsons installed as pastor of 
the First Congregational Church. 

Feb. 8. — A very mild winter, but little snow, and the river 
broke up this day, after being closed but 43 days. 

March 8. — Vote for Governor, James Bell, Whig, 653 ; Noah 
Martin, Dem., 474 ; John H. White, Freesoil, 135 ; scattering 3. 
No choice of Representatives to lyCgislature. In the State, 
Bell 17590; Martin 30934 ; White 7995 ; scattering 47. 

June 3. — Jonathan I,ittlefield, aged 22, was drowned while 
bathing in the Cochecho, near the railroad bridge. 

June 24. — Died, Miss Elisabeth Coffin, aged 68. She was a 
lineal descendant of Peter Coffin and the last retaining the 
family name in Dover. She lived and died on lands originally 
owned by her ancestor, and which had remained in the family 
for 200 years. 

A very severe drought, less rain having fallen in the month 
of May than in any one month for nearly 30 years, viz. ^/j^ of 
an inch, the average quantity being 2 ^/j^ inches, or 9 times as 
much, 

Aug. 23. — Hot weather, followed by heavy showers, and rot 
in the potatoes, whole fields in some cases, being destroyed. 

Sept. 20. — Gas lights were first used in Dover this evening, 
the mills and many stores having been supplied with it by the 
Gas Co. v^rhich was established this year. 

A gold medal was presented to Hon. John P. Hale by the 
sailors of the U. S. Sloop of War Germantown, as a testimonial 
for his success in procuring the abolishment of flogging in the 
Navy. 

Dec. 12. — A son of Isaac Adams, 10 years old, drowned 
while skating on the pond in the rear of the Unitarian Church. 

A pine tree, judged to be over 200 years old, and measuring 
14 feet in circumference at the butt, and 78 feet in length, was 
cut on the land of Mr. Samuel Emerson at Back river. 

Dec. 29. — A very severe storm, tw^o or three feet of snow fall- 
ing on a level, greatly impeding travel on the roads and causing 
a suspension of business. 

Deaths during the year 165. 



1854] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 261 

1854 

Feb. 22. — Aaron Roberts, living on Dover Neck, committed 
suicide by hanging himself with a bridle, while in a state of 
insanity. 

March 14.— Vote for Governor, James Bell, Whig, 701 ; 
Nathaniel B. Baker, Dem., 371 ; Jared Perkins, Freesoil, 185 ; 
scatterings. In the State, Bell 16941; Baker 29788; Perkins 
1 1080; scattering 122. 

The town adopted resolutions against the repeal of the Mis- 
souri Compromise by Congress, by a large majority of votes. 
It was also voted to light the streets with Gas. 

May 2.— The " Dover Hotel," supposed to be one of the old- 
est public houses in the State, was closed and converted into 
tenements. 

May 6. — The thermometer sank below the freezing point and 
ice nearly half an inch thick was formed. It also snowed quite 
fast for about half an hour. 

June — The Langdon Bank incorporated. 

Aug. I.— The New Hampshire Hotel injured by fire. Loss 
about $1500. 

Aug. 30. — A meteor of unusual brilliancy was seen a few 
miniites after 7 P.M. 

Oct. 10.— The mills of the Cocheco Manufacturing Co, obliged 
to suspend operations on account of the scarcity of water — the 
streams being lower than they had been for many years. 

Nov. 7.— Died, in Milton, Mrs. Abigail Leighton, aged one 
hundred and five years. {Enquirer^ 

Dec. II. — A smart shock of an earthquake was felt between 
12 and I o'clock in the night. 

Mowing machines were first used by the farmers of Dover, 
for cutting their grass this year. 

The old dwelling house on Silver street, purchased by Dr. 
Belknap the Historian of New Hampshire, soon after his settle- 
ment in Dover, in 1767, in which he lived while he was the 
Minister here, and where he wrote the first volume of his history, 
was taken down this year to make room for the "Belknap 
Grammar School House." 

Deaths during the year 132 — males 66, females 66. 



262 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1855 

1855 

Jan. 18. — The shock of an earthquake was felt in many 
places about half past six in the evening. 

Feb. 22. — The Piscataqua Bridge became impassable and its 
use was discontinued, about 500 feet of it being carried away 
by the ice. 

March 13. — The election of this year was distinguished by 
the appearance in the field of the " Know Nothing " or Ameri- 
can party, which swept the State and elected nearly all of its 
candidates over those of all other parties. The vote in Dover 
was for Governor, Ralph Metcalf, American, 806; Nathaniel B. 
Baker, Dem., 447; James Bell, Whig, 82; Asa Fowler, Free 
Dem., 15. The vote of the State was, Metcalf 32119; Baker 
27055; Bell 3436; Fowler 1237; scattering 193. The Legisla- 
ture which contained a large majority of the successful party, 
elected John P. Hale and James Bell Senators in Congress, both 
seats having become vacant by the failure of the lyCgislature to 
elect at the previous session. 

The representatives to the Legislature were instructed to use 
their influence for the passage of a prohibitory liquor law, simi- 
lar to the " Maine liquor law." 

April II. — Ground white with snow, an inch or two of which 
had fallen during the night. Weather cold and uncomfortable. 
The ice on Lake Winnipiseogee is said to be 2 or 3 feet thick 
and loaded teams still pass over it. The sleighing still con- 
tinues in the country and snow in abundance. {Efigzu?-er.) 

July 2.- — Rev. Henry F. Bond resigned the pastorate of the 
Unitarian Church. 

Aug. 2. — A Horse Mackerel weighing over 1400 pounds was 
caught by Dover fishermen near the Isles of Shoals and exhib- 
ited in town last week. {E7iguirer.) 

Sept. I. — A town meeting was held this day to vote on the 
acceptance of a City charter which was granted by the Legis- 
lature at the June session ; the vote was 498 for accepting and 
454 against — a majority of 44 in its favor. 

Oct. 13. — The Piscataqua Ferry Co. for carrying passengers 
from Dover Point to Newington was organized. Capital $2000. 



1856] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 263 

Oct. 14. — One of the heaviest thunder showers of the season 
took place this evening about 11 o'clock. The lightning struck 
in various places, shattering buildings, &c. and the watchman 
at the gas works was knocked down and stunned. 

Nov. 26. — Elections for Ward Officers under the new city 
charter were held on Monday and Tuesday of this week. 

Dec, 27. — Mr. Ebenezer Gordon, an old and respected citizen 
of Dover, was killed by being thrown from his sleigh while 
descending Swain's hill in Barrington. 

Deaths during the year 160. 



1856 

Jan. 12. — One of the greatest snow storms known for many 
years. The ground covered to the depth of nearly two feet, 
and drifted in many places to the depth of five or six feet. All 
the railroad trains thrown into confusion and travel much 
impeded. 

Feb. 17. — Another severe snow storm occurred at this time, 
blocking up travel so effectually that no trains reached Dover 
on any railroad for four days. 

March 11.— The vote for Governor was, for Ralph Metcalf, 
American, 794; John S. Wells, Dem., 646; Ichabod Goodwin, 
Whig, 57. In the State, Metcalf 32 119 ; Wells 32031; Good- 
win 2360; scattering 193. There being no choice by the peo- 
ple, the Legislature elected Metcalf, 

Hon. Andrew Peirce was elected the first Mayor of the city. 

The weather still continues of the coldness of midwinter, and 
the deposits of snow undiminished. On Monday and Tuesday 
mornings (loth and nth) the thermometer ranged from 10 to 12 
degrees below zero. As evidence of the severity of the season, 
we are informed that the Piscataqua between Dover Point and 
Newington has been twice frozen over — once in January and a 
second time in February — strong enough to enable travellers to 
pass over. This circumstance has not before occurred probably 
within the recollection of the oldest inhabitant — the rapidity of 
the current and the depth of the water being such that many 
winters frequently pass without its freezing. {Enquirer^ 



264 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1856 

March 25. — First organization of the City Government — Hon. 
Andrew Peirce, the Mayor elect, taking the oath of office, and 
Charles Clements, Esq. Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, 
surrendering the official seals and records of the town to his 
successor. 

April 19. — The salaries of City officers were established as 
follows : Mayor $200 ; City Clerk $200 and fees ; City Marshal 
$100; Assistant $50; Treasurer $50. Voted to purchase the 
lot known as the "sand bank," adjoining Pine Hill, for $300. 
Valuation of the city this year $3562978. Rate of taxation 
88 cents on $100. 

June 14. — A silver Salver was presented to Hon. John P. 
Hale by citizens of Dover, as " a token of their approbation of 
his fidelity to Human Rights." 

Nov. 4.— The vote for President this year was for John C. 
Fremont 914; James Buchanan 598; Millard Filmore 9. In 
the State, all opposing parties to the Democracy, united, and 
assuming the name of " Republicans," swept the State. Vote : 
Republican 38345 ; Democratic 32787 ; scattering 422, The 
five electoral votes to which the State was entitled were given 
for Fremont and Dayton. 

Nov. 19. — Two young men, George S. Clark, aged 26, and 
John Foss, aged 23, were killed by the premature discharge of 
a cannon which they were firing on Garrison Hill, to celebrate 
the election of President Buchanan. 

The "Dover Five Cents Savings Bank" was incorporated 
this year. 

This year was "remarkable for long continuance of intense 
cold in winter, and for the long continuance of great heat in 
summer." 

Deaths during the year 141. 



1858] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 265 

1857 
Jan. 7. — Rev. Edwin M. Wheelock ordained as pastor of the 
Unitarian Church. 

March 10. — \"ote for Governor, William Haile, Republican, 
827; John S. Wells, Democrat, 569; scattering 12. In the 
State, Haile 34216 ; Wells 312 14 ; scattering 452. 

April 6. — Samuel D. Smith was killed at the Railroad station 
in attempting to get on the cars. 

May II. — The Belknap School House was first opened for 
use this day, with an address by Hon. John P. Hale. The cost 
of the lot and building was about loooo dollars. 

Sept. 17. — Died, Joseph Smith, Esq. aged 85 — for many years 
one of the most extensive traders in Strafford County. 

In digging the cellar for a house on Nelson street, the founda- 
tions of a chimney and part of a cellar wall were disinterred, 
which are supposed to be the remains of the garrison house of 
the son of Peter Coffin, or of that of the first tavern opened in 
Dover, which it is known stood in that vicinity. Within the 
abutment were also found human bones judged to be those of a 
female, and a spoon differing entirely from anything that had 
been in use for more than 150 years. (Enquirer.) 

Nov. 5. — Suspension of specie payments by the banks and 
numerous failures throughout the country. All manufacturing 
operations in Dover for a time suspended. 

Deaths during the year 134. 

1858 
March 9. — Vote for Governor, William Haile, Rep., 918 ; Asa 
P. Cate, Dem., 487. In the State, Haile 36212 ; Cate 31679 ; 
scattering 72. 

May — Patrick H. Burns appointed Postmaster. 

July 22. — Very heavy thunder showers — the lightning striking 
No. 5 Factory, prostrating several of the help, and setting fire 
to the waste in one of the rooms. 

Oct. 6. — The State Fair was held this year, for the first time 
in Dover, continuing four days, on the grounds near Willand's 
Pond. It was estimated that from twenty to thirty thousand 
people attended the fair. 

Deaths during the year 1 19, 



266 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1860 

1859 
March 8. — Vote for Governor, Ichabod Goodwin, Rep., 971; 
Asa P. Gate, Dem., 615. In the State, Goodwin 36326; Gate 
32802; scattering 27. 

July 4. — The corner stone of the Belknap Ghurch, adjoining 
the City Hall, was laid with appropriate ceremonies. 

Aug. 4. — The City Council appointed a committee to confer 
with the Manufacturing Co. respecting a lease to the city of 
their land on Cochecho river, known as the "Grove," for a 
public park ; the city to lay out walks and ornament it with 
shrubbery, etc. 

Wednesday, June 29, was the hottest day of the season, and 
the warmest for three years, the thermometer rising to 98 in the 
shade. Friday morning, July i, the mercury was down to 45. 
Frost was visible in many places. Frost again appeared in 
August. 

Oct. 5. — The State Fair was held this year, for the second 
time in Dover, on the Ricker field. The attendance was large 
and the receipts $6000—" a larger sum than ever before taken." 

Nov. 23. — Mrs. J. Stone of Tuftonboro' killed at the depot 
in attempting to get on the cars — she being on her way to Boston 
to spend Thanksgiving with her son. The month of November 
the mildest for 35 years. 

Dec. I. — John Lord committed suicide by drowning in the 
river near Log Hill spring, while insane. 

Dec. 2. — Thermometer rose to 66. 

Dec. 4. — Five inches of snow. 

Dec. 29. — Belknap Church dedicated ; cost of house $15000, 

i860 

March 2. — Abraham Lincoln of Illinois, since known to the 
country as "the martyr President," addressed the Republicans 
of Dover on the politics of the day. 

March 13. — Vote for Governor, Ichabod Goodwin, Rep., 966 ; 
Asa P. Gate, Dem., 615. In the State, Goodwin 38037; Gate 
33544; scattering 21. Valuation of Dover this year $3867078. 
Polls 1905. — Amount of taxes raised $39475.68. Rate of taxa- 
tion 84 cents on $100. 



1860] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 267 

June 7. — Nathaniel Tuttle of Dover, who went down the river 
on a fishing excursion, was drowned by the upsetting of his 
boat near Portsmouth Light. 

July 9. — Died, Captain Moses Paul, aged 63. He was Agent 
of the Cocheco Manufacturing Co. for nearly 30 years, and had 
been connected with the manufacturing business from its first 
introduction into the place. During this long period, the affairs 
of the Company were conducted by him with an energy and 
success which secured the approbation of its stockholders, while 
the care and attention which he ever bestowed upon the many 
thousands in its emplo3^ won for him their respect and esteem. 
Few manufacturing establishments in the country have been 
managed with more success, and in none has a better feeling 
more uniformly prevailed between the employers and the em- 
ployed. Liberal and public spirited as a citizen — ever ready 
with his counsel and his means to advance the welfare of the 
community — the city of Dover owes much of its prosperity and 
many of its public improvements to his open hand and generous 
heart. Few men have enjoyed more deservedly a larger meas- 
ure of the respect of their fellow citizens, and the death of none 
will be more deeply and generally regretted. {^Enquirer ^ 

Sept. 13. — A man named Alfred Varney, in attempting to 
jump from the cars at the depot was fatally injured and died 
five days after. • 

Sept. 19. — Fire on the Landing, destroyed the store house at 
Young's tannery, and a large amount of merchandise, such as 
flour, salt, lime, &c. 

Oct. 17. — The shock of an earthquake was felt a few minutes 
before 6 o'clock in the morning. 

Oct. 19. — William H. Davis was found in the upper factory 
road, about a mile and a half from the City Hall, badly injured 
from wounds of which he soon after died. His death was sup- 
posed to have been caused by injuries inflicted by some person 
unknown. 

Nov. 6. — Vote for President in Dover, Lincoln & Hamlin, 
Rep., 983; Douglass & Johnson, Dem., 354; Breckinridge & 
Lane, Dem., 137; Bell & Everett, Union, 15. In the State, 
Lincoln 37519; Douglass 25881 ; Breckinridge 2 112; Bell 411. 

Dec. 2. — Dedication of First Congregational Chapel on Cen- 
tral street, which was built this year. 

Deaths during the year 138. 



268 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1861 

i86i 

March 12. — Vote for Governor, Nathaniel S. Berry, Rep,, 
859; George Stark, Dem., 601. In the State, Berry 35467; 
Stark 31452; scattering 42. 

Intelligence of the surrender of Fort Sumter to the rebel guns 
of South Carolina, was received in Dover on Sunday April 14, 
and full details of the capitulation on Monday the 15th, with a 
call from President Lincoln for 75000 troops to suppress the 
insurrection, and maintain the honor, the integrity, and the 
existence of our Union. On Monda}^ evening the citizens of 
Dover, without distinction of party, and almost without notice, 
assembled at the City Hall, to take action in relation to the 
condition of the country. Finding the large Hall occupied for 
another purpose they filled to overflowing the Court Room 
below, many being unable to obtain admission. 

The meeting was organized by the choice of the following 
Officers. 

President, Hon. Alphonso Bickford, Mayor. 

Vice Presidents, 
Hon, Joseph H. Smith Hon. Thomas E. Sawyer 

Hon. Daniel M. Christie Hon. C. W. Woodman 

Samuel M. Wheeler, Esq. Daniel Osborne, Esq. 

Thomas L. Smith, Esq. Geo. D. Vittum, Esq. 

Dr. Jeremiah Home Z. S. Wallingford, Esq. 

Secretaries, 
Andrew C. Chesley Hiram Rollins 

Mayor Bickford on taking the chair stated briefly the object 

of the meeting. 

Hon. C. W. Woodman after a few pertinent remarks, offered 

the following resolutions. 

Whereas, the authority of the Federal Government of the United 
States has been denied, the Flag of the Country fired upon, and the 
Forts, Arsenals, and other public property seized, and a series of out- 
rages and wrongs perpetrated for months upon the Government, whose 
forbearance has been received as proof of its pusillanimity, till open 
and flagrant war has been wantonly and causelessly waged upon the 
Government and People of these United States and the President has 
been forced to appeal to the People to maintain by force the honor, dig- 
nity and continued existence of the Government they have established, — 
therefore 

Resolved, in answer to such appeal of the President, that we, the citi- 
zens of Dover, feeling that our Country is above party, hereby pledge 
ourselves to sustain the Administration of the General Government in 



1861] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 269 

the manly and patriotic position assumed by the President in his recent 
Proclamation and that we cheerfully and readily tender to the Governor 
of this State, and through him to the President of the United States, 
our full proportion of such volunteer force as may be required of this 
State. 

Resolved, that a committee of three be appointed at this meeting to 
obtain the names of at least One Hundred Men, who will hold them- 
selves ready at the shortest notice to march wherever the demands of 
the Country and the orders of the Government shall require. 

Resolved, that these proceedings be signed by the Chairman and 
Secretary, and a certified copy thereof be sent to the Governor of this 
State and the President of the United States. 

Hon. John P. Hale being loudly called for, addressed the 
meeting for about twenty minutes in support of the resolutions, 
with his usual eloquence and power. 

April 1 8. — At a special meeting of the City Council, the 
following preamble and resolution were unanimously passed : 

Whereas, Civil war has been inaugurated, our Glorious Union assailed, 
and our institutions endangered, and whereas, our fellow citizens 
promptly and cheerfully answer to the call of the Government, for aid 
in this its hour of peril, therefore : 

Resolved, by the City Council of the City of Dover, that the sum of 
ten thousand dollars, or so much thereof as may be needed, be and 
hereby is appropriated for the benefit and wants of the families of those 
who have responded, or shall respond to the call of their country for 
the support of its Constitution and Laws, and that the Mayor with such 
as the Common Council may join, be a committee to properly distribute 
the same. (The Common Council on their part joined Messrs. Burr, 
Haynes and N. Twombly.) 

The Mayor was authorized to purchase and present a revolver 
to each citizen of Dover enlisting as a volunteer. 

The City Treasurer was authorized to borrow $3000, to meet 
extra expenses. 

The City Hall was also set apart for the use of the soldiers en- 
listing, for a drill room, and the Mayor was authorized to cause 
the National Flag to be displayed on the City Hall building and 
from the flag staffs on Franklin Square, the expense thereof 
to be paid from any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated. 

A recruiting office was opened April 17, by George W. 
Colbath, by authority from the Governor. Before Saturday, 
the 20th, he had enlisted a full company, when he received 
orders to keep the enlistment open for another company. More 
than the requisite number were obtained, upwards of 150 hav- 
ing applied for a place in the ranks. 



270 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1861 

The Directors of the Strafford Bank voted to loan the State 
the sum of $20000, to a,id in the equipment of volunteers, and 
the trustees of the Savings Bank for the County of Strafford, 
and the Dover Five Cents Savings Bank also tendered a loan of 
$15000, each. 

The members of the Strafford Medical Association in Dover, 
voted to tender their professional services gratuitously to the 
families of volunteers for the war. 

The women of Dover to the number of 100 and more, met at 
the vestry of the First Church "armed and equipped" with 
needles, sewing machines, &c. and made up 400 flannel shirts 
for the volunteers. They also furnished handkerchiefs, socks, 
and other necessary articles not supplied by the State. 

April 29. — The two companies enlisted here having received 
orders to rendezvous at Concord, in obedience thereto, left 
the cit5% 145 men in all. The companies were mustered at 
their respective quarters at 7 A.M., and at 10 o'clock were 
formed on Central Square, where the Rev. Mr. Salter of the 
Episcopal Church offered prayer. The Rev. Mr. Clapp of the 
Calvin Baptist Church made appropriate remarks, and Mayor 
Bickford closed the proceedings with a patriotic address. 

May 2.— The quota of troops required of New Hampshire is 
now ready for marching orders at Concord. They are encamped 
on the Fair Ground, on the Dark Plains on the east side of the 
river, opposite the State House. The following is the number 
of recruits which have been enlisted in each town thus far. 

Dover 220. Great Falls 78. Concord 190. Salem 62. 

Portsmouth 85. Manchester 130. Newport 38. Lancaster 44. 

New lyondon 12. I^aconia 40. Claremont 6o.' Conway 2. 

Hampton 45. Littleton 42. Plymouth 11. lyebanon 10. 

Contocookville 11. Keene about 100. Nashua 150. 

This does not include the Abbott Guards, Captain Knowlton^ 
78, and the Manchester Phalanx, Captain Pierce, 78. 

On May 3d the President issued his call for volunteers for 
three years, when many of the 3d company, who had previously 
enlisted for three months, immediately volunteered and were 
assigned to the 2d Regiment. 

May 18. — The 3d company enlisted in Dover left for Ports- 
mouth to join the 2d Regiment. Previous to their departure 
Col. Samuel Snell presented them with an ancient Bugle, a 
relic of the old French and Revolutionary wars. The Colonel, 



1861] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. Til 

in presenting it, expressed the hope that its martial strains 
would inspire their hearts as they went forth to battle, as it did 
those of the patriots of '76. He was suitably replied to by E. 
O. Adams, one of the volunteers. 

The ofl&cers and members of this company are as follows : 

Hiram Rollins, Captain. Samuel P. Sayles, ist Lieut. Warren H. 
Parmenter, 2d Lieut. Enoch G. Adams, Clerk. Jacob Hall, Orderly 
Sergeant. 

Privates.— Joseph F. Ayers, John I. Burnham, Moses Chadbourne, 
Ezra Cross, Thomas C. Coyle, Monroe Corson, James H. Currier, Warren 
Drew, E. F. Demeritt, John H. Durgin, Calvin E. Downs, George W. 
Dudley, James Davis, Stephen M. Deshore, David O. Davis, Albion Dyer, 
Martin V. Drew, Henry H. Emerson, John S. Garland, Benjamin F. 
Gerrish, Wilson Gray, Henry Hay ward, John V. Hayes, Franklin W, 
Heath, Alvah K. Head, Charles F. Hall, John Hanscom, Harrison Hous- 
ton, Henry O. Jenness, Christie L. Jones, Charles Jackson, Charles E. 
Jones, Andrew Jackson, James F. Jenness, Peter Kane, Alphonso 
Leathers, Johnson C. Logan, George F. Lord, John C. Locke, Oliver 
Lord, George Lobby, John F. Lord, John McCabe, Erastus Mullen, Peter 
Maloy, Andrew Morrison, Robert Miller, T. J. Mahoney, John H. Otis, 
Charles H. Place, George P. Pendergast, Charles E. Perkins, Andrew J. 
Pinkham, Stephen Richardson, Stephen H. Rogers, Daniel Sherburne, 
Abraham C. Stevens, Moses S. F. Smith, George H. Staples, Charles 
Sanders, George H. Stevens, George H. Scruton, Benjamin F. Stevens, 
John H. Sanborn, James H. Tibbetts, William H. Tripp, Benjamin F. 
Welch, Sylvester B. Wallace, Thomas H. Walker, Henry West, John F. 
Waldron, Richard Walsh, James M. Venner, Tharon F. Varney, Nathaniel 
Willey, Alexander S. Abbott, Luther W. Chadwick, Moses J. Colby, 
George K. Otis, Charles Briggs, Moses Otis, Wingate Garland, Charles 
W. Goodwin, Jesse W. Knox, Jeremiah Rothwell, John Staples, John S. 
Varney, Charles P. Roberts, Edwin S. Tash, Jacob Hall, Ambrose Foss, 
Horace Randall, Solomon W. Foss, John Malloy, Charles A. Graves, 
Samuel Brown, William Goodwin. 

The cost of fitting out each volunteer, according to the offi- 
cial report, was as follows : 



Coat and pants 




I7.00. 


Overcoat 


17.87. 


Cap 




1. 10. 


Shoes 


1.25. 


Blouse 




3.00. 


2 pair socks 


.62. 


2 shirts 




1.92. 


I pair drawers 


.46. 


Blanket 




1.87. 


Knapsack 


2.25. 


Haversack 




•75- 


Canteen 


•75- 


Gun sling 




.50. 






Cartridge box 


& belt. 


scabbard & belt, and cap box 


5-50. 



Total 34.84 



272 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1861 

June 23. — The ladies of Dover met at the Court Room for the 
purpose of forming an association to furnish the soldiers from 
the State in actual service with clothing, hospital stores, &c. 
necessary to health and comfort, when not supplied by the gov- 
ernment, and also to carefully watch and care for the general 
well being of the New Hampshire soldiers in every possible 
particular. The Association was organized by the choice of 
Mrs. John P. Hale as President ; Mrs. N. Low, Mrs. A. G. 
Fenner, Vice-Presidents; Mrs. D. H. Wendell, Treasurer; 
Miss Charlotte Palmer, Cor. Secretary; Mrs. J. J. Duxbury, 
Rec. Secretarj^ ; with two ladies from each of the religious Socie- 
ties in the city as Managers. This Society continued its opera- 
tions through the war and sent large contributions to the Sani- 
tary Commission for the relief of the soldiers. 

The 2d Regiment, under the command of Col. Oilman 
Marston, left Portsmouth for Washington, June 30. In the 
battle of Bull Run, July 21, the casualties of this Regiment 
were, killed 9, wounded 36, missing 63. 

Aug. 10. — After an absence of more than three months, com- 
panies A and B of the ist Regiment returned to Dover, having 
reached Concord a few days previously. They were met at the 
depot by the volunteers, under the command of Captain Little- 
field, numbering about 100 men, and the several Fire Companies 
of the city, and escorted through the principal streets to the 
grove near the High School House, where a collation was pro- 
vided for them, and where appropriate speeches were made by 
the Mayor, Captain Bell, Lieut. Sawyer and others. 

Aug. 21. — The Governor issued his proclamation for the 
enlistment of two additional regiments, and Lieuts. George W. 
Colbath and Charles W. Sawyer of the late ist Regiment, imme- 
diately opened a rendezvous at the City Hall for the enrollment 
of volunteers. 

On Thursday, Sept. 6, the day appointed by the President 
for a National Fast, clergymen of the city preached appropriate 
discourses and the citizens, without distinction of party, held a 
meeting in the evening at the City Hall, which was largely 
attended and eloquently and patriotically^ addressed by gentle- 
men present. 

At this time ten recruiting offices were open in the city. 



1862] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 273 

1862 

Jan. 6.— The row of buildings known as Marston's Block, 
(since Union), caught fire in the store of D. H. Wendell, and 
before the fire was extinguished five or six stores and property 
to the amount of $20000 was destroyed. 

peb. I. — Up to this date the thermometer had not been below 
zero during the winter. 

Feb. 19. — A severe storm with much snow, followed by a 
thunder storm and a furious gale, with the thermometer down 
to zero. 

March 11.— Vote for Governor, N. S. Berry 737; George 
Stark 463; Paul J. Wheeler 19. In the State, Berry, Rep., 
32150, Stark, Dem., 28566, Wheeler, Uem. Union, 1709, 
scattering 45. 

April 17.— The ice went out of the Cochecho last week and 
the Portsmouth Journal announces the first arrival of the season 
from up river — " Lalla Rookh, Freeman, Dover." Now that 
navigation is reopened the two cities will be 50 or 100 miles 
nearer each other and doubtless better acquainted for a season. 

{Enquirer?) 

April 20. — It is recorded as a matter worthy of remembrance 
that the farmers at this time, were hauling wood on the top of 
the snow "across lots" without regard to roads and fences. 
In the same week (April 17 and 18) the thermometer rose to 
77. Its greatest altitude in April for 15 years. 

May 12.— A salute was fired and all the bells in the city rung, 
by order of the Mayor, in honor of the glorious achievement of 
our arms at New Orleans, Norfolk and elsewhere. 

May 17. — The mercury rose to 92 and the heat for several 
days was greater than is usually known in May, A man in 
Madbury was sun struck. 

June 16. — A heavy frost which destroyed corn in many 
places. 

July 10. — Three additional Regiments being called for from 
New Hampshire, a public meeting was held and measures taken 
to furnish the quota from Dover. The city government held a 
special meeting and passed the following resolution : 



274 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1862 

Resolved, that the sum of $12000 be and hereby is appropriated for 
the purpose of payiug a bounty of $75 to each of those persons, residents 
of Dover, prior to the passage of this resolution, who have already, or 
may hereafter enlist in this city, under the last call of the President for 
300000 more men — and to each of those persons residents of Dover, at 
the time of their enlistment, who have enlisted, or shall hereafter enlist 
in the 9th Regiment, provided said persons enlist on or before the 1st of 
September next, and that said bounty shall be paid by the City Treasurer, 
upon the order of the Mayor, after said persons shall have been mustered 
into the service of the United States. 

Aug. 7. — It was voted that an additional bounty of $50 be 
paid to each volunteer enlisting in the city before Aug. 15, and 
afterwards the bounty of $125 was extended to all enlisting 
before Sept. i ; and $500 was appropriated for the purpose of 
procuring voluntary enlistments under the act of the legislature. 

An enrollment by the City authorities of those liable to be 
called into the service at this time, presented the following : 

Number between 18 and 45 subject to draft 856 
" now in the service 488 
" enlisted but not mustered in 97 1441 



Sept. 4. — Died, Col. Andrew Peirce, aged 77. He was born 
in Portsmouth Dec. 18, 1785, but nearly all his life was a resi- 
dent of Dover, having filled, during his active and eminently 
useful life, almost every office in the gift of his fellow citizens. 
He was Speaker of the Legislature in 1823 ; Senator of the 5th 
District in 1825 and 1826; Counsellor in 1827 and 1828; and in 
1850 was a member of the Convention which was called to 
revise the Constitution of the State. When Dover was incor- 
porated as a city, Col. Peirce, as an honor especially due him, 
was elected its first Mayor. For eighteen years he served as 
Clerk of the Strafford Courts, and for a term of years was 
Cashier and President of the Dover Bank. Of the First Con- 
gregational Church he was a Deacon for 24 years. In politics 
Col. Peirce was originally a Republican, and with that ardent 
love for his country which characterized his life and was 
breathed in his latest prayers, he, as Captain, led his company 
into the field on the occasion of Portsmouth being threatened in 
the war of 1812. As a christian he was earnest and sincere. 
His Christianity has ever been the operative principle of his 
public life, which has been characterized by not less ability than 
purest patriotism and most ardent devotion to the public good. 
No man can say that as a public officer, or as an agent in any 



1863] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 275 

business, lie has ever manifested less of interest than in the 
administration of his own private affairs, or treated himself 
better than hfe has treated any other individual. As a neighbor, 
it is only necessary to say that his neighbors are all mourners, 
and his name is spoken with affection by the widow and orphan. 
To say, after all this, that he was the kindest of husbands and 
fathers, would be to multiply words. Peace to his ashes. 
When shall we see his like again ? {Enquirer.) 

Oct. i6. — Died at the hospital Camp Kearney, near New 
Orleans, of camp fever, Daniel ly. Perkins, only son of Jeremy 
Perkins of this city, aged 27. Early in the expedition of Gen. 
Butler to Ship Island, Mr. Perkins enlisted in the 6th Mass. 
Battery, and was a member thereof at the time of his death. 
He was at the capture of New Orleans and the battle of Baton 
Rouge, where he exhibited daring feats of bravery and was 
commended by his officers for his noble bearing. 

The amount of taxes paid by Dover under the United States 
excise law for 3 months ending Nov. 30, was $10223.83. 

Deaths during the year 145. 

1863 

Jan. 8. — Charles H. Flanders of Dover, a soldier in Co. K, 
nth Regiment, who died of wounds received at the battle of 
Fredericksburg, was buried with military honors by the 
Strafford Guards. 

Jan. II. — Eli Bunce, of the 9th Regiment, who died of 
disease contracted while on duty, was buried with military 
honors. 

Jan. 29. — There are at this time eight N. H. Regiments with 
the Army of the Potomac, viz. the 2d, 5th, 6th, 9th, loth, nth, 
12th, and 13th. 

Feb. 4. — The Dover Ladies Aid Society gave a Tea Party for 
the benefit of the Soldiers Aid Society, realizing the sum of 

$358-24- 

March 5. — The 2d N. H. Regiment, after being engaged in 
all the battles on the Potomac and the Peninsula, obtained leave 
to return home at this time to recruit. They left Washington 
on Feb. 28, and reached home on the 3d inst. numbering about 
500 men, including new recruits, the original members not aver- 
aging 20 men to a company. Nearly all the original officers 
have been killed or disabled, and most of the present line offi- 
cers promoted from the ranks. 



276 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1863 

John T. Rand of the 7th Regiment, died at Tortugas, and 
was brought to this city and buried. Daniel C. Hayes of the 
4th Regt. died from wounds received at the battle of Beaufort, 
S. C. 

March 10. — Vote for Governor, Joseph A. Gilmore, Rep., 
755; Ira A. Eastman, Dem., 557; Walter Harriman, Dem. 
Union, 44. In the State, Gilmore 29035 ; Eastman 32383 ; 
Harriman 4372 ; scattering 363. There being no choice by the 
people, the Legislature elected Gilmore. 

The heaviest snow storm of the season commenced on Satur- 
day, the 7th, and continued until Monday morning. Nearly a 
foot of snow fell, making excellent sleighing. 

April 10.— Died on Dover Neck, Mr. Thomas Henderson, 
aged 91 — the oldest man in town. 

April 23. — The Cochecho Railroad sold to the Dover & Win- 
nipiseogee Railroad Company. 

May 4.— William H. Hackett of the 35th Mass. Regt. killed 
at the battle of Antietam, was buried in this city, where he 
belonged. 

May 14.— Hon. D. M. Christie and others of Dover, publish 
an invitation to the people to hold a Grand Union Mass Meeting 
at Concord, June 17. 

May 25. — The 2d Regiment returned to Washington, S. P. 
Sayles, Major. 

May 28. — Died, Dr. Noah Martin, aged 62. He was elected 
Governor of the State in 1852 and '53, and held various other 
offices. "As a physician he stood high in his profession, had 
an extensive practice, and accumulated a large estate. As a 
politician, he enjoyed the confidence of his party, adhered with 
fidelity to its principles and usages, and received its highest 
honors." He died suddenly of apoplexy, having been in his 
usual health up to within an hour of his decease. 

June 22. — Amaziah Goodwin of Lyman, Me. a revolutionary 
soldier, aged 100 years and 4 months, arrived in town, on his 
way to Boston, to be present at the celebration of the 88th anni- 
versary of the battle of Bunker Hill. Stopping at a relatives 
to recruit, he was taken sick and died this day. 

July 6.— The bells of the city were rung by order of the city 
authorities, on the receipt this day of the news of the surrender 
of Vicksburg to the Union Array under General Grant. 



1863] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 277 

Captain George W. Roberts of the 2d N. H. Regiment, was 
killed at the battle of Gettysburg, while gallantl}^ leading his 
company against the enemy. He enlisted in the Regiment at 
the breaking out of the war, as a private, had fought in all the 
bloody battles in which it had been engaged, and was promoted 
to Captain when the Regiment returned to the front in May 
last. 

July 16. — The drafting of soldiers for this Congressional 
District commenced at Portsmouth on Tuesday the 14th inst. 
The number to be drawn is 1968, which includes the excess of 
two fifths required for exemptions — so that the real number 
which the district is to furnish is a few less than 1200. The 
forces enrolled are subject to draft for two years from the first 
day of July following the enrollment, and if drawn are liable to 
serve during the rebellion, not exceeding three years, having 
the same pay and bounty as the volunteers for three years. 

They are divided into two classes — the first comprising all 
between the ages of twenty and thirty-five, and all unmarried 
menl^etween thirty-five and forty-five, and the second comprising 
all others. 

The second class "shall not, in any district, be called into 
the service of the United States until those of the first class 
shall have been called." The classes are enrolled separately. 

Persons drawn are to be notified within ten days and informed 
of the place of rendezvous, where they are to be inspected, and 
claims for exemption for disability are to be passed upon, 

A person not exempt, drafted in the first class may show that 
he should be enrolled in the second, and thus be released by the 
Board or Court on Habeas Corpus. He may furnish within ten 
days an acceptable substitute. He may pay $300, or he may 
show physical or mental disability. 

Not being entitled to release under either of these provisions, 
the drafted man must report himself at the time notified to him 
for military duty. Failing in this, he is to be deemed a deserter, 
and may be arrested by the Provost Marshal and sent to the 
nearest military post for trial by Court Martial. 

The L,egislature of this State, at ^its recent session, passed a 
law authorizing towns to pay drafted men a bounty of $300 ten 
days after they have been mustered into the public service. 



278 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1863 

July 17. — A meeting was held at the City Hall at which reso- 
lutions were passed requesting the City Government to pay a 
bounty of $300 to every soldier drafted from Dover, before he 
leaves the State, and $200 at the expiration of his term of ser- 
vice. Also that the city pay the $300 commutation for every 
drafted man whose circumstances prevent him from going into 
the army. 

Aug. 14. — A draft of 152 men was made from Dover for filling 
up the depleted ranks of the N. H. Regiments and the City 
Council passed an ordinance for the payment of $300 to every 
drafted man or his substitute, ten da^^s after being mustered 
into the service of the United States. The Dover conscripts, 
when the draft became known, met in front of the City Hall 
from whence with music and torches they marched through the 
principal streets. Great enthusiasm and much good feeling 
prevailed. 

Samuel Wyatt, for many years a well known landlord in 
Dover, died in Georgetown, Mass. aged 87. 

Sept. 7. — The Cocheco Manufacturing Co. after a years 
suspension recommenced work. 

Nov. 2. — The Boston and Maine Railroad hires the Dover and 
Winnipiseogee Railroad on a lease of fifty years, paying annu- 
ally $29000, and buying all its rolling stock. 

Nov. 4. — Governor Gilmore issued his proclamation for a 
draft of 3768 men to fill the quota of New Hampshire for 300000 
more soldiers, called for by President Lincoln, of which number 
Dover was required to raise 72 men. 

Nov. 7. — A Union meeting at the City Hall was largely 
attended, and addressed by Hon. John P. Hale, who expressed 
in a most eloquent manner his undoubting conviction of the 
triumph of our National cause and the re-establishment of jus- 
tice and right on a firm and enduring basis. 

The City Council made an appropriation of $34000 for the 
payment of the General and State Government bounties to 
volunteers, and the Mayor made a contract with a substitute 
broker for the supply of the 72 men required from the city, at 
$440 per man. 



1864] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 279 

1864 

March 8. — Vote for Governor, Joseph A. Gilmore, Rep., 
893 ; Edward W. Harrington, Dera., 509. In the State, Gil- 
more 37006, Harrington 31340, scattering, 79. 

April 28. — Of the 13 Regiments in the field from New Hamp- 
shire at this time, all but two or three had joined, or been or- 
dered to join either Grant or Burnside for active operations. 
The following was their disposition : The 2d has left Point 
Lookout and gone to Yorktown ; the 3d and 4th have re-enlisted 
and gone to Washington ; the 5th is at Point Lookout ; the 6th 
is at Annapolis ; the re-enlisted men of the 7th are on furlough 
and the remainder of the Regiment in Florida ; the 8th is 
mounted at present, and is in the expedition which has recently 
seen hard fighting on Red River ; the 9th is at Annapolis ; of 
the loth we have no recent report; the nth is at Annapolis; 
the 1 2th is at Yorktown ; the 13th at Norfolk or vicinity; the 
14th has just arrived at New Orleans. 

May 2. — Michael Coffey killed at the Depot in attempting to 
get upon the cars when they were moving. 

May 5. — The Strafford Guards were ordered to Fort Consti- 
tution for 60 days — the two companies of Heavy Artillery 
stationed there having been ordered south. 

May 17. — A draft was made at this time to supply the defi- 
ciencies under the call of the President for 300000 soldiers, but 
the quota of Dover being full, it did not apply to this city. The 
Strafford Guards however volunteered for service and were 
ordered as above. 

June 3. — John B. Sargent, aged 64, died suddenly while 
ploughing his garden. 

July 21. — Another call of the President for 500000 men was 
made at this time. The quota of the State was 6502, and of 
Dover 149, the credits to which the city was entitled reducing 
this number to about no. At a special meeting of the City 
Council held July 23, it was voted to pay the largest bounties 
for volunteers authorized by a recent act of the Legislature, 
viz : $100 for i years men, $200 for 2 years men, and $300 for 
3 years men ; and the Mayor was authorized to take immediate 
measures for carrying the vote into effect, and raising the 
necessary men. 



280 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1864 

Aug. 4. — The Strafford Guards after being recruited up to 
full numbers for the purpose of doing duty for a further term of 
60 days, were discharged, and an artiller}^ company from the 
interior of the State ordered to take their place. 

Aug. 20. — The City Council voted to pay the highest bounty 
authorized by law ($200), in addition to the State and United 
States bounties, to such citizens as should enlist prior to the 5th 
of September. 

Aug. 22. — Five companies of Heavy Artillery having been 
called for from New Hampshire, a rendezvous for enlisting one of 
these companies for the term of one, two or three years, was 
opened in Dover, and a full company enlisted within the week, 
which was dispatched to Concord with a large number of super- 
numeraries to take the places of those who might fail to pass the 
requisite examinations. George W. Colbath was commissioned 
as Captain. 

At the same time an ofRce was opened for recruits for the i8th 
Regiment by Lieut. John O. Wallingford, and the City Council 
voted to increase the bounty to all who enlist from Dover, to 
$500. 

The Artillery companies were sent to Washington immedi- 
ately, and stationed at the forts around the Capital. 

Aug. 31. — Rev. Francis E. Abbot ordained as Pastor of the 
Unitarian Society. 

Sept. 3. — Died, Michael Read, Esq. aged 86. A native and 
always a resident of Dover, and taking a lively interest in its 
local affairs, he was probably more familiar with them than any 
other person in town. In his boyhood he listened to the preach- 
ing of Dr. Belknap who left Dover in 1786; he witnessed the 
execution of Elisha Thomas in 1788 ; and attended the sessions 
of the General Court which sat here in the old Court House in 
1793. He could remember when Dover lyanding was a common, 
covered in part with trees — when the "great house" of the 
Waldrons occupied Franklin Square in solitary grandeur, and 
their possessions monopolized all the territory in that part of the 
town ; when the Coffins owned what the Waldrons did not about 
Cochecho falls, and when the populous city, which he lived to 
see grow up around them, contained not much more than a 
score of houses. {Enquirer.) 



1S64] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 281 

Sept. 15. — The quota of Dover (149) was reported to be more 
than full, the number furnished being 160 — 60 of whom had 
enlisted in the Navy, 32 in the Heavy Artillery, 20 in the 
1 8th Regiment and 48 furnished by enrolled men with the excess 
from the last call. 

Oct. 20. — Governor Gilmore issued a requisition for 600 men 
to fill up the 1 8th Regiment, stating that although our quota 
was full, it was desirable to anticipate the wants of the Govern- 
ment, even though no call was made, and no draft pending. 

Same date.— died, John P. Robinson, aged 64, a distinguished 
citizen of Lowell, Mass. and a native of Dover. 

]Sfov. 8. — Vote for President in this exciting contest, Abraham 
Lincoln 863; George B. McClellan 569. In the State, Lincoln 
and Johnson, Rep., 36400; McClellan and Pendleton, Dem., 

33034- 

Nov. 15. — Great Union demonstration in honor of the re- 
election of President Lincoln, and the glorious and overwhelm- 
ing victory of Law, Liberty and Union, over Secession, 
Disunion and Treason. 

The Union Citizens of Strafford County and vicinity, con- 
templated a grand Union mass meeting before election, but the 
severe storm prevented, and it was postponed to Tuesday the 
15th when the recent glorious and overwhelming victory of Law, 
Liberty and Union over Secession, Disunion and Treason might 
be appropriately observed. The day opened finely and every- 
thing betokened a rousing demonstration. Early in the morn- 
ing the streets of the city began to be thronged with people and 
delegations arrived by the morning trains from Alton, Farming- 
ton, Rochester, New Market, Madbury, Exeter, Concord, 
Portsmouth, Great Falls and other places. At 12 o'clock the 
procession moved through our principal streets, escorted by the 
Strafford Guards, the whole under the direction of Hon. William 
F. Estes, Chief Marshal. 

A salute was fired at the starting of the procession ; flags 
were displayed on the City Hall, Republican flag staff and 
Engine Houses. In the procession was Governor Gilmore and 
staff mounted and in full uniform; the 13th N. H. Band from 
the front ; the Young Lincoln and the Young Washington 
Guards ; a Cavalcade of 200 Horse, and Citizens of this and 
all the neighboring towns in carriages to the number of 500. 



282 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1864 

At I P.M. the people assembled at Central Square where a 
Grand Mass Meeting was held— an immense gathering having 
met together. 

Z. S.J Wallingford, Esq. Chairman of the Committee of 
Arrangements, called the meeting to order and proposed a list 
of officers which was adopted. 

Hon. T. E. Sawyer was chosen President with 30 Vice Presi- 
dents from different towns in the vicinity. Mr. Sawyer thanked 
the meeting for the honor conferred upon him and remarked 
upon the glorious victory recently achieved in defence of the 
Government, and counselled the opposition to lay aside party 
prejudices and unite as one man to strengthen the arm of 
National power and put down the rebellion. 

Governor Gilmore was then introduced and was greeted with 
enthusiastic cheers. He advised his friends not to deal harshly 
with the defeated Democracy, yet he could not but rejoice that 
we had given them such a glorious beating. "If we are true 
to duty we shall surely conquer." He was for giving every 
dollar and man, if need be, to put down this accursed rebellion. 

Hon. D. M. Christie, Hon. J. P. Hale, Hon. E. H. Rollins, 
Hon. J. D. Lyman, S. M, Wheeler, W. Hamlin, and J. H. Ela, 
Esqs. were called upon and responded with eloquent speeches. 

Music was furnished by the Dover Cornet Band, 13th N. H. 
Regiment Band, and Newmarket Band. 

In the evening, notwithstanding the severe snow storm which 
had suddenly sprung up, the Torch Light Procession came off, 
several hundred, plucky and undaunted in spite of the weather, 
participating. 

The procession formed in Central Square at 7 o'clock, 
under charge of Chief Marshal R. N. Ross and Assistant 
Ira A. Moody. The whole city was liberally illuminated and 
decorated. 

Fireworks were displayed all along the route preceding the 
procession, also by the citizens generally. In the procession 
were several very neat and appropriate transparencies and 
mottoes, among them a transparency with an elegant portrait of 
Lincoln & Johnson with a list of the States giving Union 
Majorities: on the other side the motto, "With these true 
hearts through victory to Peace;" another, "Hail Columbia 
Happy Land, 'Tis Freedom's Jubilee;" "We shall Con- 
quer, Never Fear; " another, "Freedom to all — Equal chances 
for all— Glory Hallelujah;" "Union Triumphant! Secession 



1865] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 283 

Defeated!" "Down with Traitors," (with Lincoln pitching 
Traitors overboard.) The cit}^ was extensively and handsomely 
decorated and illuminated with flags, lanterns, mottoes &c. 
with many elaborate and elegant designs — there being some 
200 in number. 

The whole affair passed off finely and the citizens of Dover will 
ever remember the occasion with much interest. {Enquirer.^ 

1865 

Early in the year when it became apparent that the rebellion 
was tottering to its downfall, and that it was only requisite that 
the Union forces should be kept up to their full numbers to 
insure a speedy end of the war, repeated calls were made by 
the General Government for more soldiers; to all of which 
Dover in common with the other towns and cities of the State, 
made a prompt response. Drafts were necessary in some places, 
but in most the municipal authorities by energetic work were 
able to fill up their quotas without resorting to it. In Dover 
the Mayor was successful in his efforts and the City Council, 
on the 14th of February, manifested their appreciation of the 
measures which he had adopted in the following terms : 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Dover, that the 
thanks of the citizens of this city be tendered through the 
Council to his Honor Mayor Estes, for the prompt and success- 
ful manner in which he has completed his plans for filling the 
quota of our city under the several calls for troops by our 
Government. 

Feb. 22. — The bells of the city were rung and a grand salute 
fired in commemoration of the fall of Charleston, S. C. and the 
rehoisting of the flag of the Union upon Fort Sumter. 

March 4. — The bells were again rung and a National salute 
fired in honor of the inauguration of President Lincoln for his 
second term, and of the glorious victories of the armies of the 
Union " marching on " through the Carolinas. 

March 10. — The invitation extended to General Butler some 
weeks since, to address the citizens of Dover, was fulfilled this 
evening, the engagements of the General having prevented his 
speaking at an earlier day. The City Hall was crowded and 
hundreds were unable to obtain admission. Hon. D. M. 
Christie presided and introduced General Butler in a few fitting 
remarks, who then proceeded to address the audience, speaking 
for an hour with great eloquence and effect. 



284 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1865 

The meeting was closed with several patriotic songs by Mr. 
Pope of Washington, and music by the Dover Cornet Band. 

(^Enquirer?) 

March 14. — Vote for governor, Frederic Smyth, Rep., 825 ; 
Edward W. Harrington, Dem., 451. In the State, Smyth 
34145, Harrington 28017, scattering 57. 

April 10. — News of the surrender of I^ee and the fall of the 
Rebellion was received with unbounded demonstrations of Joy. 
All the bells in the city were rung until noon and again for two 
hours at night, accompanied with a grand salute and fireworks 
in the evening. The fire Department turned out in a body, and 
escorted by the Strafford Guards, with the Dover Cornet Band 
and a Cavalcade of Citizens, marched through the principal 
streets. A meeting of congratulation was held in the evening 
at the City Hall, at which Hon. John P. Hale, Samuel M. 
Wheeler and others made speeches. 

The Enquirer of April 13, says: 

The glorious news of General Lee's surrender was announced to our 
citizens by a telegraphic dispatch at the American Ivine Office, Col. 
Charles A. Tufts, agent, and it created the wildest enthusiasm and the 
most intense rejoicing throughout the city. The news spread like wild- 
fire and the crowd in Central Square began to gather and increase till it 
numbered several hundreds. The factory bell (Cocheco works) pealed 
forth the joyous news and the other bells soon followed suit. 

The stores were at once closed, the schools dismissed and 
business suspended. Every one was jubilant — full of thanks- 
giving that peace was so near and our brave Army under the 
heroic Grant had at last forced the General-in-Chief of the 
Confederate Armies to succumb to the Nation's power. 

The City Council was summoned together and passed the 
following resolutions : 

Resolved, That the City Council of Dover have this day heard with joy 
of the surrender of General Lee and the army of Northern Virginia, and 
we hail the return of peace as the harbinger of better days to our country, 
as giving more stability to our institutions and liberty to the oppressed 
of this and other lands. 

Resolved, That the thanks of the Council are hereby extended to the 
brave and gallant soldiers and sailors who have volunteered so nobly in 
our country's defence ; that we shall ever hold in grateful remembrance 
their distinguished services on the field of battle or when guarding the 
nation's honor on the sea. 

Resolved, That honor is due to Lieutenant General Grant— the second 
saviour of our Country— who by his devotion to the cause of American 
nationality and the enforcement of law as well as defence of the consti- 



1865] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 285 

tutional rights of the people and by his skill on the field of battle and 
the splendor of his success, merits the gratitude of every patriot heart. 

Resolved, That our gratitude is no less due to the bold and daring 
Sherman, to the expert and dashing Sheridan, to the cool and intrepid 
Meade, and in fact, to all the able and noble Commanders, who both on 
sea and laud, have so nobly struggled to suppress this unholy rebellion. 
The thanks of the American people will be due to them for all coming 
time. 

Resolved, By the City Council of Dover, that the sum of Three Hun- 
dred Dollars be, and hereby is appropriated for the purpose of ringing 
the bells, displaying of fireworks and firing a salute, in consequence of 
the surrender of General Lee and his army, and the glorious news gen- 
erally which has reached us this day. 

A telegraphic dispatch was received in the afternoon from 
Governor Gilmore, ordering a sahtte on account of the State, 
v^^hich was carried out. 

The citizens held an impromptu meeting in Central Square, 
and decided to have a demonstration at once, resulting in the 
appointment of Colonel Thomas H. Cushing as Marshal. The 
ladies soon appeared thronging the square, and making the 
scene one of special interest and eclat. The "red white and 
blue" was displayed by them in small pennants from their hats 
and dresses generally, and their hearty co-operation was indeed 
tnanifested in every possible way. 

At half-past eleven o'clock the procession moved from Central 
Square in the following order. 

Chief Marshal with Aids. 
Dover Cornet Band, J. B. Pinkham, Leader. 
Strafford Guards, Ueut. Thomas Currier, Commanding. 
Cavalcade of Citizens in large numbers. 
The old 19th Artillery Field Piece. 

The Fire Department (in part) viz : 
Hook and Ladder, No. i. Captain Mark F. Nason. 
Tiger, No. 2. Captain J. S. Hayes, 2d. 
Fountain, No. 3. Captain D. Crockett. 
Cocheco, No. 5. Captain T. L. Tebbetts. 
Citizens on foot and in carriages. 
All along the route the American Ensign was liberally dis- 
played and the streets crowded with the enthusiastic populace. 

The bells continued ringing all the forenoon and during the 
moving of the procession and Dover was beside itself " for one 
day only." The Dover Band paraded the streets in the after- 
noon, serenading the citizens, engine companies and others. 



286 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1865 

At sunset the bells were again rung and a salute ordered by 
Gov. Gilmore was fired by Captain Glines and assistants. In 
the evening a brilliant display of fireworks was had notwith- 
standing the rain, for not even a deluge could have dampened 
the enthusiasm of the day. 

And also a public meeting was held in the evening at the 
City Hall. Mayor Estes presided. Eloquent and stirring 
speeches were made by Hon. John P. Hale, S. M. Wheeler, 
Esq. Dr. E. G. Hill and others; the meeting closing with 
three cheers for Grant, Sherman, Sheridan and the "Boys 
in Blue." 

By the exhibit and quotas and credits of the several towns in 
this District, in the Army and Navy, it was found that the 
quota of Dover was 339 men, and that she furnished 427 — an 
excess of 88, from the opening of the Provost Marshal's office 
to this time. 

April 15. — Our citizens of all parties were deeply shocked by 
the appalling intelligence from Washington of the assassination 
of the President. The deed reported was so monstrous that at 
first many refused to believe it, but incredulity was soon forced 
to give way to the official report, confirming the sad news. 
The flags were at once placed at half-mast, all the bells in the 
city were tolled, business was suspended and many stores and 
other places were draped in mourning. 

April 16. — The death of the President was the theme of the 
pulpit in all our Churches, some of them were draped in 
mourning. 

April 18. — The City Council held a special meeting and 
passed a series of appropriate resolutions in relation to the 
exalted life and character of Abraham Eincoln and the great 
loss the Nation sustained in his death, and appropriated a sum 
of money towards observing the funeral obsequies on Wednes- 
day the 19th, conforming to the request of Acting Secretary of 
State Hunter at Washington, and Governor Gilmore of this 
State. A resolution was also passed appointing a committee to 
invite some fit person to deliver an eulogy upon the late President 
at an early day. 



1865] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 287 

April 19. — Bells were tolled from 11 A.M. till 12 M. and from 
Yyi P.M. till 3 P.M. Guns fired every 30 minutes from 10 A.M. 
till 6 P.M. Flags draped in mourning were displayed through- 
out the city. Services were held at the Unitarian, Congrega- 
tional, Belknap, Episcopal and Calvin Baptist Churches. 

At the Unitarian Church Hon. John P. Hale delivered an 
eloquent and impressive address, being the last ever made by 
him in Dover, as he left a few weeks after for Spain, to which 
country he had been appointed Minister, and from which he did 
not return until after five years with health too much impaired 
to speak in public. 



Mr. Hale's address was as follows : 

My Friends and Fellow Citizens: 

When I saw that the Authorities of the Nation and the State, with singu- 
lar propriety had invited the people at this hour appointed for the funeral 
obsequies of our departed President, to turn aside from the ordinary 
pursuits and avocations of daily life, and for a brief space of time to 
give themselves up to the reflections and contemplations which the event 
and the hour were so well calculated to excite, it occurred to me that it 
would be a fitting and appropriate occasion to utter a very few words 
which I wished to say to you and through you to the people. 

Subsequent reflection has caused me to doubt the propriety of the 
course here suggested, for it seemed to me that the event which we 
deplore was so awful and appalling that itself taught its own lesson bet- 
ter than any commentary that could be made upon it, and that it would 
be presumptuous in any one to undertake to elucidate or illustrate 
the great lesson which God in His providence was teaching the Nation 
and the world. I feared and felt that at this hour the sublime eloquence 
of silence was more impressive than any babbling of man. Nevertheless 
as I had agreed to undertake it and expectation had been excited by the 
announcement that I would make the attempt and in consequence 
thereof this immense assemblage has come together I proceed. 

Perhaps it is known to most of you that I recently returned from 
Washington. I was there at the time of the assassination ; I had an 
interview with the deceased President on the day the deed was done and 
about seven hours before the event took place. Three hours after his 
death I had an interview with his successor, free, confidential and highly 
satisfactory. 



288 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1865 

These circumstances have furnished me with a few facts and reflec- 
tions which constitute the reasons why I stand before you at this time. 
First in regard to the visit to Mr. Lincoln within a few hours of his 
death. I am happy to be able to state that the result of it was all I could 
have wished, and was so characteristic of his whole life, viz. an act of 
clemency and kindness. At the conclusion of our interview when he 
had decided to grant what was asked, and requested me to bring the 
papers to him, I remarked that there was not time to do it that afternoon, 
he pleasantly replied, "there will be time enough tomorrow," and I left 
him to return tomorrow, to have the business completed. Tomorrow 
came but at the ordinary time of admitting visitors, ten o'clock in the 
morning, he had been for nearly three hours a corpse. Never before in 
my life had I impressed upon me, as this event did, the import and the 
wisdom of the injunction " boast not thyself of tomorrow." It will 
ever be a source of pleasure amid all the sad remembrances of the hour 
to recall the fact that the last interview I ever had with the departed 
President was one in which he left such an impression of the kindness 
of his heart as a man and the clemency of his rule as chief magistrate. 

Now let me say a word as to the interview with his successor. I know 
that at this time there is the most intense and anxious solicitude in the 
public mind to know all that can be known of him on whom the mantle 
of the President has fallen, and what may be hoped of him on whom 
Providence has so unexpectedly and so suddenly devolved the task of 
leading this Nation through the perils that still environ us. 

What I can do to gratify this feeling shall cheerfully be done. I have 
known Mr. Johnson well for nearly twenty two years, having commenced 
my Congressional life with him at the commencement of the twenty 
eighth Congress and known him well ever since, having served with him 
in the Senate all the time he was a member of that body. Early on the 
morning of the late President's death, I sought an interview with Presi- 
dent Johnson and was fortunate enough to succeed in obtaining it. I 
had a full, free and confidential conversation with him, no one else being 
present. What transpired in that confidential talk, I, of course, am not 
at liberty to disclose here or elsewhere, but I am at perfect liberty to 
state the impression it left on my mind. During my long acquaintance 
with Mr. Johnson, the first time that I ever heard his name connected 
with intoxicating drink was the fourth of March last, and I left him on 
the fifteenth of April last, fully impressed and convinced that the Patriot 
need have no apprehension that there is anything to fear on that subject 
in the future. I remained with him till after Chief Justice Chase came 
into the room and administered to him the oath of office as President of 
the United States, and I think I express the universal sentiment of all 
who were present on that occasion when I remark that his whole deport- 
ment and conduct was marked by the most perfect propriety, and entirely 
in accord with what the very solemn and momentous circumstances 
demanded. This is one of the statements I was desirous of making to 
the public. 



1865] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 289 

In regard to the death of the President the most obvious thought which 
suggests itself is the suddenness of the transition from exultant and 
exuberant joy to the depths of wailing and woe. Perhaps no City ever 
presented a more brilliant and gorgeous exhibition of all the insignia 
and external manifestations of public rejoicing and gladness than did the 
City of Washington the evening preceding this event. The next evening 
as if by magic all was changed ; the sounds of gratulation and triumph 
were turned to wailing and lamentation for the dead, and the gorgeous 
decorations in which the National Capital had enveloped herself that she 
might appropriately celebrate the crowning victories with which Provi- 
dence had so recently blessed the National cause, vanished as if by a 
Magician's wand, and when the curtain again rose the mourner's weed 
and the funeral pall were all that met the eye. 

One fact worth mentioning in this connexion, and which goes far to 
illustrate the estimation in which the deceased President was holden 
among the humble, the lowly and the oppressed, is, that while the 
stately mansions of the wealthy, and the public edifices of the Nation 
gave evidence that no avarice or stinted economy restrained the profusion 
with which all classes were eager to testify their grief for the Nation's 
loss, the humblest inhabitants of the lowliest huts, the abodes of the 
desolate, the oppressed and the down trodden colored people of the 
City, all decorated their dwellings with some sign of woe, and although 
in many instances, a black rag that poverty itself would hardly have 
picked up from the street, was all that destitution and want could afford 
to testify their grief, yet it was none the less sincere, and spoke most 
eloquently of the regard in which the deceased President was held by 
these humble ones whom politicians never look after, and whose good 
opinions are of no esteem with the scheming and ambitious. I know 
not how it may strike you, my friends, but I confess that to my mind it 
was one of the most touching tributes to the memory of Mr. Lincoln 
that his death has called forth, and which if his spirit is permitted to 
take cognizance of what transpires here, would be most grateful to his 
own feelings. 

A few words as to the personal character of Mr. Lincoln. He was a 
man of pure and blameless life ; no tale of oppression, injustice, fraud 
or lust stains his record. He was genial in his temper, affable in his 
manners and accessible almost to a fault. He was a Patriot, no sinister 
or selfish motive mingled with the earnest simplicity with which he 
devoted all his energies to the welfare of his Country. These two dis- 
tinguishing traits in his character explain and illustrate the great hold 
he had on the popular heart. Perhaps you know, my fellow Citizens, as 
well as anybody that I did not fully approve and endorse all the 
measures of all the branches of Mr. Lincoln's Administration, and I 
thank God that when I failed to approve I did not hesitate to avow it ; 
but of Mr. Lincoln personally, of his strict integrity, his undoubted 
patriotism, his exemplary purity and blameless life, I never entertained 
the slightest doubt. I have avowed these sentiments frequently, pub- 
licly and privately in his life time, and now that the seal of death has 
been placed upon the record of his life, I am happy in repeating it here. 



290 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE [1865 

Though I do not claim the honor of a very intimate friendship with 
the late President, yet I knew him well for a long time, commencing my 
acquaintance with him long before he was thought of for the Presidency 
when he was a member of the House of Representatives ; I have seen 
him at his home in Springfield, and as you all know was a member of 
the U. S. Senate during the whole of his first Presidential term. I 
mention this that you may have an idea of my means of forming a 
correct estimate of his character. 

It is now a little more than four years since under more peculiar and 
trying circumstances than any of his predecessors, Mr. Lincoln entered 
upon the discharge of the duties of the office of President of the United 
States. In the hour of entering on these perilous duties, with felicitous 
thought and expression, in his inaugural address, he "announced in no 
ambiguous terms the political principles by which his conduct would be 
governed. Read that inaugural to day and you will find it to be mainly 
an enunciation of this great cardinal truth, viz. that the Union of the 
States ivas perpetual, and as a consequence of that primal truth, the 
duty devolved on him of enforcing the laws of the United States, so far 
as he was able, in all the States of the Union. 

With this simple annunciation he commenced his official career 
confronted in a very few weeks with the most powerful and gigantic 
rebellion that the world has ever known. 

How he met the emergencies of the occasion the impartial pen of 
history will tell. 

What should we have said if we had been called upon to select for 
the Nation a leader to conduct us through the great crisis before us? 

We should probably have selected a skillful general, an educated 
financier, a man whose commanding genius would have flashed intelli- 
gence on the public councils with the clearness and the force of 
inspiration. 

Such however was not the wisdom of Providence, a man of peace 
without military skill, education or experience was chosen to conduct to 
a successful termination the mightiest war that history has recorded. 

He had no peculiar education as a financier, yet under his administra- 
tion a revenue was created fully equal to the enormous and incredible 
demands which the war so suddenly made, and which flowed into our 
treasury with a copiousness and munificence far exceeding the most 
extravagant tales of Eastern fiction. 

Such was President Lincoln, and though we may mourn and the 
whole Country deplore his untimely death, yet so far as he is concerned, 
it can hardly be said to be untimely or premature. He had done his 
work, the rebellion was crushed. The National life had been saved; 
the rightful supremacy of the Constitution and the laws had been 
vindicated, and the old flag had been made to float in triumph over the 
strongholds from which it had been stricken down by traitorous hands, 
and last of all, on fort Sumter the place where four years ago amid the 
sulphurous fumes with which the insanity of Rebellion had filled the 
air, it had been lowered, it had again been raised amid the shouts and 
gratulations of thousands who had assembled from afar to witness so 
grateful a ceremony. 



1865] HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 291 

The tempest of battle was over, the torrents of blood had been 
stayed, the thanksgivings of a redeemed people were ascending in 
mighty shouts to Heaven for the great deliverance which had been 
wrought out for them and as if borne on this out-gushing and rapturous 
expression of thanksgiving and praise, the spirit of Mr. Lincoln passed 
from Earth to Heaven. And although we in our ignorance and blind- 
ness might not so have arranged the order of events, who now is so 
impious or so skeptical as to question the wisdom or the goodness of God 
in this providence so sudden, so unexpected, and so widely different 
from what we would have ordered ? His work was done and well done, 
the measure of his fame was full and he has gone to his rest, we humbly 
and confidently hope, to his reward. Let us remember, my friends, that 
though the President is dead, God lives, sitting on the throne of Eternity 
as of old, forever unchangeable. 

And let us remember too that we still have a Country to serve. Let 
us then to day with renewed energy of purpose, devote ourselves to the 
faithful and patriotic discharge of all the duties which our Country in 
this dark hour or the coming future may require of us. Let us with 
earnest prayer and ardent faith commend our Country to the blessing of 
God, with the more confidence when we remember all that she has done 
and is still doing to purge herself of her great sin, and let us confi- 
dently hope that she is about entering, nay that she has already entered 
on a new career of prosperity, honor and glory far exceeding anything 
which has yet transpired in her history, when we shall be in truth and 
in fact what we have hitherto been only in name, a free people. 



292 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE 

Moderators of Town Meetings 
1661 to 1749. 

1661 Elder Wentworth. 

1664 Peter Coffin. 

1674 Richard Waldron. 

1696 Job Clements. 

1702 James Davis. 

1703 Richard Waldron. 

1704 John Gerrish. 

1713 James Davis. 

1714 John Gerrish. 

1715 Richard Waldron. James Davis. 
1720 James Davis. 

1730 Thomas Millet. Stephen Jones. 

1731 James Davis. 

1732 Thomas Millet. 

1733 Paul Wentworth. 

1734 Thomas Millet. 

1739 John Wingate. Thomas Wallingford. 

1740 Thomas Millet. 
1745 Thomas Wallingford. 

1747 John Wood. 

1748 Thomas Wallingford. 

1749 Thomas Millet. 



1761 to 1799. 
1761 John Wingate. 

1762-1769 Thomas Westbrook Waldron. 
1770 John Wingate. 

1771-1774 Thomas Westbrook Waldron. 

1775 John Gage. Shadrach Hodgdon. Thomas W. Waldron. 

1776 John Gage. 

1777 John Wentworth. Col. Joshua Wingate. John Gage. 

1778 Stephen Evans. Shadrach Hodgdon. Otis Baker. 

1779 John Gage. Shadrach Hodgdon. 

1780 John Wentworth. 

1 781 John Wentworth. Otis Baker. Stephen Evans. 

1782 John Gage. John Wentworth. 
1783-1786 John Wentworth. 

1787 Stephen Evans. John Gage. 

1788 John Waldron. Peter Hodgdon. 

1789 John Waldron. 

1790 John Waldron. Doctor Ezra Green. 
1791-1796 John Waldron. 

1797 John Waldron. William K. Atkinson. 

1798 John Waldron. 

1799 John Waldron. James Jewett. 

(During the stirring times of the Revolution Town Meetings were fre- 
quent, which will account for the number of Moderators chosen in some 
of the above years. 



HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 293 

Town Clerks 
1647-1855. 

1647-1685 William Pomfrett. 

1686-1719 John Tuttle. 

1720-1726 Thomas Tebbetts. 

1727-1743 Paul Gerrish. 

1 743-1758 Joseph Hanson. 

1759-1770 Bphraim Hanson. 

1771-1785 Thomas Westbrook Waldron. (Died April 1785.) 

1785-1788 John Burnam Hanson. 

1789-1794 Nathaniel Cooper. 

1 795-1 799 Walter Cooper. 

1800-1815 Dominions Hanson. 

1816-1819 Andrew Peirce. 

1820-1835 James Richardson. 

1836-1837 Charles Young. 

1838-1842 George Piper. 

1843-1844 Thomas Stackpole, 

1845-1849 George T. Wentworth. 

1850-1851 Charles E. Soule. 

1852 Charles A. Tufts. (Appointed by Selectmen in place of 

Soule resigned.) 

1853-1855 Amasa Roberts. 



Representatives 
1692-1855. 
Samuel Allen was appointed Governor of New Hampshire March i, 
1692, and assumed office August 13, following. Assemblies were called, 
and summoned by writ of the Royal Governor up to the time of the 
Revolution. 

1692-93. — John Woodman, Job Clements, William Furber. 
1693-94- — William Furber, John Woodman, Job Clements. (Clem- 
ents refused to take the oaths, and I,t. John Tuttle was 
returned.) 
1694-96. — John Woodman, John Hall, William Furber. 

1696 John Hall, Thomas Chesley, Job Clements. (Clements 
refused to take the oaths.) 

1697 Capt.John Gerrish; probably others but no names given. 
1697-98, — Joshua Cromwell, James Davis, William Furber. 
1698-1702.— Capt. John Tuttle, Lt. William Furber, Lt. James Davis. 

At adjourned session August 1699, in place of Furber and 

Davis appeared Capt. John Woodman and Nathaniel Hill. 

In place of Capt. John Tuttle, James Davis appeared 1701. 
1703 William Furber, Nathaniel Hill, Capt. John Woodman. 

1704-09.— Capt. John Woodman, Lt. William Furber, Lt. Nathaniel 

Hill. (Capt. John Tuttle is on Dover records, said to be 

chosen 1707; no mention on Provincial records.) 
1709-14.— Nathaniel Hill, Stephen Jones, Ezekiel Wentworth. 

(Mr. Wentworth died, and Capt. Timothy Gerrish was 

sworn in 1712.) 



294 NOTABLE EVENTS IN THE 

1715 Capt. Timothy Gerrish, John Downing, Stephen Jones. 

1715-22. — James Davis, Samuel Tebbets. 

1722-27. — James Davis, Capt. Timothy Gerrish, Capt. Samuel 

Tebbets. (Mr. Gerrish removed from the Province. 

Benjamin Wentworth was sworn in 1724; he died and 

Paul Gerrish was sworn in 1727.) 
1727-28. — Paul Gerrish, Capt. Samuel Tebbets, John Smith. 
1728-30. — Paul Gerrish, Capt. Samuel Tebbets, Capt. Francis 

Mathes. 
1731-32. — Paul Gerrish, Capt. Francis Mathes, Capt. Thomas 

Millet. 
1732-33. — Paul Wentworth, Nicholas Hartford, William Damm. 
1734-37. — Paul Gerrish, Paul Weutworth, Capt. Thomas Millet. 
1739-40. — Paul Gerrish, Thomas Millet, Capt. Thomas Wallingford. 
1740-41. — Lt. Thomas Davis, Capt. John Gage, Capt. Thomas 

Wallingford. 
1742-45. — Capt. John Canney (a Quaker who "affirmed "), Capt. 

Thomas Wallingford. 
1745 Capt. Thomas Wallingford, Thomas Millet, Capt. John 

Winget. 
1745-48. — John Gage, Col. Thomas Wallingford, Major Thomas 

Davis. 
1749-52. — Thomas Millet, Major Thomas Davis, John Wentworth. 
1752-55.— Thomas Millet, Major Thomas Davis, John Wentworth, 

3d. (apparently same as previous year.) 
1755-58. — Capt. Thomas Westbrook Waldron, Thomas Millet. 
1758-68. — Capt. Thomas W. Waldron, Capt. Howard Henderson. 
1768-71.— Capt. Thomas W. Waldron, Otis Baker. 
1771-74. — John Gage, Otis Baker. 

1774 Capt. John Waldron, Capt. Caleb Hodgdon. 

1775 Otis Baker, Capt. Caleb Hodgdon. The last Assembly 
under the Crown. 



In the period 1774-1783; first date of meeting of 
Convention. 

1774 Capt. John Waldron, Capt. Caleb Hodgdon, Capt. 
Joshua Wingate, Capt. Stephen FJvans, Nathaniel 
Cooper. 

1775 Major Caleb Hodgdon, John Waldron, 3d., Joshua Win- 
gate, Stephen Evans, Nathaniel Cooper, Capt. Shadrach 
Hodgdon, Otis Baker. 

T776 Col. Stephen Evans, John Wentworth, jr., (Col. Otis 

Baker elected, but declined.) 
1777-79. — Jolin Wentworth, jr.. Major Caleb Hodgdon. 
1777-79. — Convention to form a government. Captain John 

Gage, Major Caleb Hodgdon. 
1780 Col. Joshua Wingate, John Kielle ; — also authorized to 

act in Constitutional Convention. 



HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 295 

1781-82.— Col. John Waldron, Major Caleb Hodgdon. 

1781 Constitutional Convention. Col. Otis Baker, Col. 

Joshua Wingate. 
1783 Col. John Waldron, Capt. James Calef. 



Under the State Constitution. 
1784 Capt. James Calef. 

1785-86.— Col. John Waldron. 

1787 Joshua Wingate. 

1788 Convention on Constitution of the United States. 
Dr. Ezra Green. 

1788 Col. John Waldron, (Col. Waldron was afterwards 
elected Senator, and Andrew Torr chosen to fill the 
vacancy.) 

1789 Andrew Torr. 
1790-92. — John Kielle. 

1791 John Waldron, delegate to Constitutional Convention. 

1793-94- — Col. John Waldron. 

1795 Andrew Torr, Richard Tripe. 

1796 Capt. Moses Wingate, Richard Tripe. 

1797- Col. John Waldron, Capt. Moses Wingate. 

1798- Col. John Waldron. 

1799 Capt. Moses Wingate. 

1800 Joseph Gage. 
1801-02 Col. John Waldron. 

1803 Col. John Waldron, Daniel Henderson. 

1804-06 Daniel Henderson. 

1807-10 Amos Cogswell. 

1811 Tobias Tuttle. 

1812 Amos Coggswell, Moses Hodgdon. 

1813 Moses Hodgdon, Tobias Tuttle. 

1814 Tobias Tuttle, Amos Cogswell. 

1815 Amos Cogswell, John Waldron. 

1816 Daniel M. Durell, John Williams. (Mr. Durell resigned, 
and John Waldron was chosen.) 

1817 John Williams, Andrew Peirce. 

1818 Andrew Peirce, William Flagg. 

1819 Andrew Peirce, Nathaniel W. Ela. 

1820 Andrew Peirce, Charles Woodman. 

1821-22. — Charles Woodman, Speaker; Nathaniel W. Ela. 

1823 Andrew Peirce, Speaker ; William Hale, James Bartlett. 

1824 Andrew Peirce, James Bartlett, Nathaniel W. Ela. 

1825 James Bartlett, John Williams, Robert Rogers. 

1826 James Bartlett, John Williams, Daniel M. Christie, 
Samuel Kimball. 

1827-28. — John Williams, Daniel M. Christie, Samuel Kimball, 
Eri Perkins. (Mr. Christie resigned and John Wheeler 
was chosen.) 

1829 James Bartlett, John Wheeler , John Riley, Walter Sawyer. 

1830 James Bartlett, Daniel M. Christie, Jacob Kittredge. 



296 HISTORY OF DOVER, N. H. 

1831 Daniel M. Christie, Jacob Kittredge, Samuel W. Carr, 
Cyrus Goss. 

1832 Samuel W. Carr, John P. Hale, Thomas E. Sawyer, 
Elhanan W. Fenner. 

1833 Thomas E. Sawyer, Nathaniel Young, William Hale, jr., 
John H. White, 

1834 Nathaniel Young, John H. White, John B. H. Odiorne, 
Thomas W. Kittredge. 

1835 Thomas W. Kittredge, John B. H. Odiorne, Thomas E. 
Sawyer. 

1836 Thomas E. Sawyer, Thomas W. Kittredge, Andrew 
Peirce, Benjamin Wiggin. 

1837 Noah Martin, Joseph H. Smith, Charles Ham, Daniel 
Hussey. 

1838 Thomas E. Sawyer, George Wadleigh, William Pickering 
Drew, Benjamin Wiggin. 

1839 Daniel M. Christie, George Wadleigh, William Pickering 
Drew, Oliver S. Home. 

1840 Thomas E. Sawyer, Oliver S. Home, Jonas D. Townsend, 
Samuel Drew. 

1841 Thomas E. Sawyer, Andrew Peirce, Jonas D. Townsend, 
Daniel M. Christie. 

1842 Andrew Peirce, Thomas T. Edgerly, Daniel Hussey. 
Nathaniel Jenness. 

1843 Andrew Peirce, Nathaniel Jenness, Horace Clark. 

1844 Charles Ham, James W. Cowan, Hanson Roberts, David 
Wilson, Alfred H. Otis. 

1845 Thomas E. Sawyer, Andrew Peirce, Elijah Wadleigh, 
Wells Waldron. 

1846 Thomas E. Sawyer, Elijah Wadleigh, Daniel M. Christie, 
Nathaniel Low, Wells Waldron, John P. Hale, Speaker. 

1847 Thomas E. Sawyer, Elijah Wadleigh. Nathaniel Low, 
Darius T. Johnson, William F. Estes, Samuel Hanson, 2d. 

1848 Samuel Hanson, 2d., Calvin Hale, George Wadleigh. 

1849 Daniel M. Christie, George Wadleigh, Joseph T. Peaslee, 
John H. Wiggins, James R. Moulton. 

1850 Thomas E. Sawyer, Thomas W. Kittredge, Benjamin 
Wiggin, Calvin Hale, James Austin, William F. Estes. 

1850 To Constitutional Convention. Thomas E. Sawyer, 

Andrew Peirce, Shubael Varney, Asa Freeman, William 
Plaisted Drew, John H. Wiggins. 

T851 Thomas W. Kittredge, Joseph Morrill, Benjamin Wiggin, 

William B. Wiggin, James Austin, William F. Estes. 

1852 Joseph Morrill, William B. Wiggin, George P. Folsom, 
Silas Moody, John H. Wiggins, Joseph Hanson, 3d. 

1853 None elected. 

1854 James Bennett, George Mathewson, George P. Folsom, 
Silas Moody, Daniel H. Wendell. William Hale. 

1855 Daniel M. Christie, Nathaniel Wiggin, James Bennett, 
William S. Stevens, Ivory Paul, Edmund J. Lane. 



ERRATA 

Page 77, par. 4, line i, for " Rev. John Elliot's" read Rev. 

John Eliot's. 
Page 77, par. 8, line 2, for " Robert Burnhams " read Robert 

Burnham. 
Page 108, par. 2, line 2, for " Rev. Dr. Elliott" read Rev. Dr. 

Eliot. 
Page 133, par. 8, line 2, for " William Shepard " read William 

Sheperd. 
Page 134, par. i, line i, for " Jeremiah Davies " read Jeremiah 

Daveis. 
Page 134, par. i, line 6, for " Stephen Willie " read Stephen 

Wille. 
Page 134, par. i, line 9, for "Joshua Davies" read Joshua 

Daveis. 
Page 135, par. 5, line 3, for " Gossport " read Gosport. 
Page 149, par. 5, lines 2 and 3, for " Elliot" read Eliot. 
Page 223, par. 3, line 5, for "J. B. H. Odione " read J. B. H. 

Odiorne. 
Page 257, par. 5, line i, for " Rev. Henry S. Bond " read Rev. 

Henry F. Bond. 
Page 271, par. i, lines 3 and 4, for " E. Q. Adams " read E. 

G. Adams. 
Page 271, par. 4, line 24, for "John Malloy " read John Molloy. 
Page 271, par. 4. line 24, for "Charles A. Graves" read 

Charles A. Grover. 



INDEX 



Abbot, Francis E-, Rev., 280 

Joseph, 140 
Abbott, Alexander S., 271 
Abbott Guards, 270 
Aboquecemoka, Sampson, 81 
Academy, Exeter, 204 

Franklin, 208 
Academy Street, 251 
Adams, Charles, 30, 33, 48, 52, 57, 
60, 69, 74, 80, 84, 89 
Enoch G., 271, 297 
Hugh, Rev., 121, 126, 127, 
129, 131 
- Isaac, 260 
John, 56, 59, 68 
John, President, 177, 183, 

186, 188, 190, 224 
John Quincy, President, 196, 
214, 216, 219, 224, 226, 
227, 228, 234 
Samuel, 100 
Adams' Garrison, 99 
Addington, Secretary, 93 
Africa, 211 
Agamenticus, 15 
Alarm List, 166 

Albany, N. Y., 146, 147, 169, 173 
Alcock, Robert, 193 
Alden, Dr., 133 
Aldrich, George, 193 
Alewives, 26, 205 
Allen, Edward, 79 
Mr., 108 
Samuel, 97, 293 
Alt, John, 30, 33, 42, 48, 52, 57, 60, 

69. 79 
Alton, 253, 281 

Bay, 236, 257 
Ambler, John, 117 
Ambrose, Alice, 54 
America, 4, 159, 160, 162, 215 
American House, 253 

Party, 262 
Ames, Cyrus, 235 
Amesbury, Mass., 104 
Amherst, 10, 164 



Ammuuition, 24, 71, 76, 123 
Amoskeag, 10 
Anabaptism, 14, 32 
Andover, Mass., 174, 235, 250 
Andrews, Jedediah, 51, 55, 58, 67 
Audros Government, 94, 95 
Annapolis, Md., 279 
Antietam, 276 
Aqueduct, 193 

Company, 213 
Arms, 164, 204 

Army, Continental, 167, 168, 169, 
226 

English, 156 

Potomac, 275 

Union, 276, 283 

United States, 286 
Artificers, 29 

Artillery, Dover, 194, 206, 218, 222, 
285 

Heavy, 279, 280, 281 

New Boston, 142 

Portsmouth, 142 
Arwin, Edward, 47 
Ash, Thomas, 140 
Assembly, General, 86, 87, 98, 104, 
112, 114, 115, 116, 117, 
118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 
123, 124, 126, 128, 129, 
130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 

137. 138. 139. 143. 144, 
145, 146, 148, 149, 150, 

151. 153. 156, 157. 158, 
164, 165, 166,167, 171, 

293 
Massachusetts, 23 
Provincial, 127, 138, 293, 294 
Aseembly Men, 86, 87, 115, 117, 120, 

138, 139. 153 
Records, 109, 118, 123, 135 

Assessments, 28, 106, 118, 129 
Assistants, Court of, 32 
Associates, Court, 27, 50, 53, 64, 

65. 72 
Associates, Piscataqua, 23, 58 
Atkinson, Dr., 158 



300 



INDEX 



Atkinson, George, 173, 210 

Theodore, 131, 132, 210 
William K., 180, 188, 192, 
204, 206, 210, 292 

Atwood, John, 257, 258 

Ault, John, 13 

Aurora Borealis, 122, 226 

Austin, James, 296 

Joseph, 30, 33, 35, 38, 42, 44, 

51. 56, 150 
Samuel, 150 
Sarah, 58 
Thomas, 79 

Avery, James G., 229 

Ayers, Joseph F., 271 

Back Cove, 31, 4°. i05 

River, 24, 44, 45. 123, 185, 
240, 258, 260 
Bacon, George, 84 
Badger, Joseph, 254 

William, 234, 235 
Badger's Building, 247, 254 
Baker, Christina, 135, 136 

John, 27, 30 

Nathaniel B., 261, 262 

Otis, 154, 157. 158, 159. 160, 
161, 162, 164, 166, 191, 
292, 294, 295 

Thomas, 94 
Bakers, 29 
Ball, James, no 

John, 215 
Band, Dover, 282, 284, 285 

Newmarket, 282 

13th Regiment, 281, 282 
Bank, Cochecho, 253, 258 

Commercial, 227 

Dover, 213, 215, 227 

Five Cents Savings, 264, 270 

Langdon, 261 

New Hampshire, 192 

Strafford, 192, 213, 215, 242, 
253. 270 

Strafford Savings, 213, 214, 
242, 270 

United States, 230 
Bank Bills, Uncurrent, 197 

Directors, 215 
Bank, The, 8, 9 



Baptist, Franklin Street, 240 

Freewill, 232 

Washington Street, 247 
Barber, John, 47, 52 
Barfoot, Walter, 53, 54, 55, 58, 67, 

80 
Barker, David, 223 
Barley, 55. 56, 61 
Barnes, Benjamin, 219 
Barnstead, 182 
Barnum, James, 133 
Barriugton, 10, 122, 149, 150, 151, 

182, 190, 228, 255 263 
Barrows, Homer, Rev., 249, 259 
Bartlett, General, 177 

Ichabod, 216, 223, 231, 232 

James, 215, 223, 234, 238, 295 

Josiah, 166, 173, 174, 178, 179, 
180, 181, 183, 206 

Levi, 193 
Bashervell, Canada, 136 
Baton Rouge, La., 275 
Batt, Christopher, 55, 59 
Bay Government, 16, 21, 36, 37, 83 
Beard, Joseph, 89 

Thomas, 13, 30, 32, 33, 34, 44, 
50, 55. 58; 61, 65, 67,73, 

79. 84 
William, 30, 33, 47, 51, 57, 61, 
69 

,78 

Beard's Garrison, 99 

Beasel, Thomas, 38 

Beaufort, S. C, 276 

Beaver Trade, 6, 43 

Beck, Henry, 18, 20, 24, 30 

Beck Slip, 120 

Beef, 40, 55, 56, 61, 75, 87 

Belcher, William, 134 

Belknap, Jeremy, Rev,, i, 3, 15, 17, 
18, 19, 35, 55. 82, 83, 89, 
90, 95, 96, 97, 100, 108, 
no, 135, 141, 142, 154. 
155. 156, 157, 158, 159. 
164, 166, 168, 171, 172, 
174, 261, 280 
Mrs., 158 

Belknap Church, 266, 287 

School House, 154, 261, 265 
Steamboat, 233 



INDEX 



301 



Bell, Captain, 272 

Charles F., 232 

James, 260, 261, 262 

John, 227, 228, 267 

Samuel, 209, 210, 211 
Bell, Meeting House, 44, 62, 76, 
177, 186 

Town, 174, 177, 178, 186 
Bellemy Printery, 252 
Bellemy Bank, 32, 49, 55, 56, 60, 75, 

151 
Bank, Falls, 34 
Bank, Mills, 75 
Bank, River, 32, 115, 124, 151 
Belley, Mr., 30 
Bellingham, Richard, 26 
Bellows, Benjamin, 177, 183, 186, 

190 
Benet, Eleazer, 134 
Benjamin, Samuel, 52 
Benmore, Philip, 79 
Bennet, Abraham, 134 
Bennett, Arthur, 69 

James, 296 
Bennick, Abraham, 125 
Bently, William, 229 
Bernom, Robert, 47 
Berrey, Joseph, 140 
Berry, Nathaniel S., 250, 252, 254, 

255, 256, 268, 273 
Berwick, Me., 19, 132, 147, 170, 176, 

198, 222, 246 
Beverly, Mass., 172 
Bickford, Alphonso, 268, 270 
David, 235 
John, 30, 33, 39, 40, 41, 45, 48, 

52, 56, 57. 59. 60, 64, 66, 

67, 69, 77, 79, 84 
Joseph, 80 
Thomas, 87, 99 
Bickford's Garrison, 99 
Biddeford, Me., 11 
Bindery, 197 
Bines, James, 33 
Binns, Jonas, 30 
Bird, Thomas, 49 
Birney, James G., 248 
Blackston, Abigail, 130 
Blankets, 138, 171 
Blind Will, 83 



49. 
,76, 
113. 



Blind Will's Neck, 83 
Block, Cochecho Bank, 252 

Cocheco, 233, 254, 256 

Marston's, 254, 273 

Nutter & Pierce, 240 

Railroad, 248 

Strafford Bank, 247 

Tetherly's, 252 

Union, 248, 273 

Varney's, 239, 248 
Bloody Point, 13, 24, 27, 40, 45, 
50, 55, 56, 59. 66, 67 
79, 80, 109, 112, 

115, 155. 183 
Bloody Point Petition, 24, 25 
Board of Health, 232 
Boardman, David, 180, 191 
Boards, 25, 61, 87 
Boat Co., Cochecho, 214 
Bombazeer, no 

Bond, Henry F., Rev., 257, 262, 297 
Bookstore, 197 
Booms, 107, 115 
Boscawen, 236 
Boston, 9, 17, 21, 22, 23, 24, 28, 

40, 51, 54, 58, 62, 63 

71, 74, 82, 88, 90, 
104, 126, 128, 142, 
155, 156, 161, 171, 
194, 197, 206, 231, 
241 

Boston News Letter, 107, 108, 

133 
Boston & Maine R.R., 236, 240, 

242, 244, 245, 246, 

254, 278 
Boston & Worcester R.R., 241 
Boundaries, 22, 23, 24, 25, 27, 

36, 37, 38, 39, 41, 61 

72, 77, 105, 130, 138 
Bounties, 114, 125, 126, 165, 

168, 170, 274, 277, 

279, 280 
Bourne, Mr., 136 
Bowden, William, 18 
Bowell, Richard, 68 
Bow Pond, 232 
Boyse, Matthew, 37 

Mr,, 23 
Bradford, William, 7 



32, 
,64, 

93- 
145, 
191, 
240, 

121, 

241, 
250, 



35, 
. 71- 

149 
166, 
278, 



302 



INDEX 



Bradstreet, Governor, 93 

Mr., 16, 27 

Simon, 32, 36 
Bragg, Samuel, 188, 197, 198, 199 
Brane, Michael, 45, 56, 59, 67 
Branson, George, 30, 33 
Brattle Street Church, 234 
Braye, Richard, 48 
Breckenridge, John C, 267 
Brentwood, 145 
Brewer, Captain, 210 
Brewers, 29 
Brick Stores, 204, 240 
Bridge, Mr., 221, 222 
Bridge, Central Street, 227 

Cochecho, 51, lox, 122, 149, 

151 
Great, 150 
Lamprey River, 121, 122, 124 

Landing, 214 

Lower, 157, 173, 254 

Piscataqua, 185, 192, 229, 262 

Portsmouth, 237 

Railroad, 245, 260 

Upper, 157, 214, 218, 236, 256 

Bridges, 51, iii, 115, i37> iSL 152, 

157. 158, 166, 173, 183, 

185, 214, 225, 227, 232, 

245. 259 
Bridger, John, 104 
Briggs, Charles, 271 
Bristol, England, 13 
British America, 159 

frigate, 203 

Government, 159 
Brook, Lord, 13 
Broughton, Mr., 45 
Brown, Abigail, 233 

Daniel, 223 

Henry, 47, 52, 60, 68 

Samuel, 271 
Brunswick, Me., 226 
Bryant, Walter, 143 
Buchanan, James, President, 264 
Buckingham, Edgar, Rev., 236, 241 
Buckner, Charles, 40, 45, 50, 55 
Bugle, 270 
Bull Run, 272 
Bunce, Eli, 275 
Bunker Hill, 141, 276 



Bunker, Benjamin, 141 

George, 258 

James, 47, 51, 60, iii 

John, III 
Bunker's Garrison, 99, 100 
Burdet, George, Rev., 14, 15 
Burlington, Vt., 201 
Burnham, Elliot G., 258 

John I., 271 

Joseph, 182 

Pillow, 258 

Robert, 49, 50, 89, 125, 297 
Buruham's Garrison, 99, 100 
Burns, Patrick H., 265 
Burnside, General, 279 
Burnum, Robert, 44, 47, 52, 57, 60, 
61, 64, 69, 71, 72, 77, 80 
Burr, Aaron, 190 

William, 269 
Burying Ground, Fifth St., 247 

Neck, 115 

Pine Hill, 115, 133, 187, 205, 

251 

Waldron's, T15 
Buss, John, Rev., 99, 118, 121 

Joseph, 141 
Bussell, Jacob, 140 

John, 122, 140 
Butler, Benjamin F., 275, 283 
Butter, 75 
By Garrison, 88 
By Guard, 88 

Cage, 53 

Calebunk, 136 

Calef, James, 170, 295 

Calhoun, John C, 216 

Calves pasture, 36, 50 

Calvin Baptist Church, 270, 287 

Cambridge, Mass., 226 

Camock, Abel, 19 

Camond, Abel, 18, 19 

Camp Kearney, 275 

Campron River, 27 

Canada, i, 93, 97, 125, 136, 142, 143, 

165 
Canal, Winnipiseogee, 181, 214, 217, 

223, 225 
Canker worm, 157 
Canne, Joseph, 79, 84, 130 



INDEX 



303 



Canney, John, 294 

Thomas, 13, 30, 31, 33, 35> 37. 
44, 51. 55, 58, 67, 73, 84 
Canney 's Creek, 27, 37, 71 
Canuie, Thomas, 19, 79 
Canning, Thomas, 18, 19, 25 
Canton, 248 
Cape Ann, 169 
Cape Cod, 10 
Cards, 167 

Carr, Jonathan H., 230 
Samuel W., 296 
Carroll, Charles, 233 
Carter, Mary, 87 
Casley, John, 236 
Cass, Lewis, 254 
Castle William, 145 
Cate, Asa P., 265, 266 
Cater, Richard B., 259 
Catter, Richard, 45, 56, 59, 64, 67 
Cattle, 28, 29, 40, 62, 65, 144, 152, 

161, 168, 171 
Ceiam, William, 68 
Celebrations, 176, 180, 183, 184, 189, 
190, 194, 195, 206, 218, 
224, 242, 246, 281, 282, 
284, 285, 286 
Celestial Pbenomena, 144, 226 
Census, 28, 55, 66, 155, 164, 224, 252 
Central Square, 224, 253, 270, 282, 
285 
Street, 175, 208, 226, 239, 245, 

248, 267 
Street Bridge, 227 
Centre Harbor, 257 
Chadborn, Humphrey, 38 
Chadbourne, Moses, 271 
Chadwick, Luther W., 271 
Chamberlain, Levi, 255, 256 
Champernoon, Francis, 18 
Chandler, Philemon, 197, 198 
Chapel, First Congregational, 267 
Chapham, Charles, 179 
Chapman, Robert, 61 
Charles I., 18 
Charles II., 95, 96 
Charleston, S. C, 211, 283 
Charlestown, Mass., 49 
Chase, Chief Justice, 288 
Chase's Diary, 185, 186 



Chasley, Philip, 30 
Cheese, 75 

Chelmsford, Mass., 93 
Chesley, Andrew C, 268 

Captain, iii 

James, iii 

Joseph, 134 

Philip, 33, 34, 47, 51, 57, 60, 

61, 63, 69, 79, 80, 89, III 

Samuel, 106, 11 1 

Thomas, 69, 80, 89, 102, 134, 

293 

, 78, 100 

Chesley's Mills, 105 

Chester, 10, 135 

Chief Justice, 144 

Chirch, John, 56, 59, 68 

Cholera, 232, 255 

Christie, Daniel M., 219, 268, 276, 

282, 283, 295, 296 
Church, John, 65, 71, 79, 84, loi, 

114 
Church, Belknap, 266, 287 

Calvin Baptist, 270, 287 
Congregational, 177, 233, 249, 

287 
First, 15, 16, 17, 26, 29, 151, 

174 
First Congregational, 249, 

259, 260, 270, 274 
Methodist, 115, 217 
of Christ, 194 
of England, 12, 14, 16, 17 
St. Thomas, 241, 243, 270 , 287, 
Unitarian, 228, 242, 250, 257, 

265, 287 
Universalist, 239 
Cilley, General, 177 
City Charter, 256, 262, 263 
Clerk, 264 
Councils, 266, 269, 278, 279, 

280, 283, 284, 285, 286 
Hall, 268, 269, 272, 278, 281, 

284, 286 
Marshal, 264 
Officers, 264 
Civil War, 269 
Clagett, Clifton, 202 
Wiseman, 172 
Clapboards, 23, 25, 42 



304 



INDEX 



Clapham, Charles, 154 
Clapp, Rev. Mr., 270 
Claremont, 270 
Clark, Abraham, no 

Captain, 60 

Eli, 134 

Elisha, 130 

George S., 264 

Horace, 296 

Josiah, 140 

, 100 

Clary, Joseph W. Rev., 199, 208, 

209 
Clay, Henry, 233, 248 
Clayton, Thomas, 33 
Clements, Charles, 264 

Job, 38, 44, 50. 55, 64, 67, 
71, 80, 84, 85, 292, 293 

Joseph, 189 

Mr., 79 

Ralph, 56, 59 
Clinton, De Witt, 200 

George, 193, 196 
Clock, Steeple, 177, 236 
Cloth, Cotton, 171, 229 

L/inen, 171 

Woolen, 171 
Cobbett, Thomas, 96 
Cochecho, 45, 46, 49, 50, 55, 56, 59, 
61, 66, 67, 70, 76, 79, 80, 
81, 88, 90, 96, 97, loi, 
103, 105, 107, 108, 109, 
no, 112, 115, 116, 117, 
119, 120, 124, 128, 143, 
150, 251, 252 

Bank, 253, 258 

Bank Block, 252 

Boat Co., 214 

Bridge, 51, loi, 122, 149, 151, 

Destruction of, 90, 91, 92, 93, 

94 
Falls, 5, 26, 29, 35, 115, 229, 

280 
Fire Insurance Co., 241 
Marsh, 29, 30 
Pound, 178, 180 
Railroad, 253, 255, 257, 258, 

276 
River, 5, 10, 25, 26, 29, 41, 51, 

83, loi, 105, 115, 122, 



Cochecho River [continued] 

151, 156, 157, 181, 205, 
214, 217, 225, 229, 230, 
231, 234, 235, 237, 238, 
242, 245, 247, 266, 273 
Second Falls, 32, 33, 34, 37, 
106 
Cocheco Block, 233, 254, 256 

Manufacturing Co., 91, 227, 
229, 231, 234, 240, 241, 
248, 254, 261, 266, 267, 
278 
Print Works, 175, 248 
Coe, John, 223, 232 
Coffey, Michael, 279 
Cofhn, Deborah, 239 
Eliphalet, 121 
Elisabeth, 260 
James, 56, 59, 65, 68, 79 
Lieutenant, 67, 70, 71, 73, 76 
Peter, 33, 40, 41, 45, 53, 56, 
59, 62, 64, 72, 74, 76, 86, 88, 121, 
216, 224, 239, 245, 260, 
265, 292 
Robert, 112 
Tristam, 121, 137, 216 
Coffin, Peter, Garrison, 88, 91, 92, 

245 
Coffin, Tristam, Garrison, 91, 92, 

265 
Coffin place, 259 
Coffins, 280 
Cogswell, Amos, 179, 188, 204, 206, 

207, 215, 223, 295 
Colbath, George W., 269, 272, 280 
Jeremiah, 233 
Lewis, 248 
Colby, Anthony, 246, 248, 249, 250, 
252. 
Charles, 257 
Moses J., 271 
Colcord, Edward, 18, 20, 24, 30 
Colcott, Edward, 13, 23, 25 
Cold Friday, 197 

Winters, 143, 151, 152, 247, 

258, 263 
Year, 205 
Coleman, Ann, 54 
Farrier, 156 
Collector, 184, 202 



INDEX 



305 



Collins, Abraham, 69 
Collman, John, 52 
Colman, Woodman, 201 
Colmer, Abraham, 2 
Combination, Dover, 18, 19, 20 
Comet, 195 

Commercial Bank, 227 
Commissioners, 11, 24, 25, 28, 36, 
37. 50, 53. 94. 95. 96, 105 
Court, 48, 58 
for New England, 11 
Committee, Correspondence, 160, 
161 
of Defence, 204 
of Safety, 163, 164, 165, 166, 

168, 174, 191 
Vigilance, 257 
Commonage, 39, 41, 50, 65 
Commons, 28, 44, 45, 62, 76, 77, 105, 
114, 117, 125, 128, 143, 
203 
Concord, 72, 102, 176, 202, 207, 217, 
218, 233, 242, 256, 270, 
276, 280, 281 
Congregational Church, 177, 233, 
249, 252, 287 
Society, 177, 241 
Congress, Continental, 162, 174 
General, 161 
Provincial, 163, 164 
United States, 188, 234, 237, 

238, 261 
Constables, 31, 34, 4°. 4i, 42, 43, 

52, 53. 54. 61, 62, 63, 64, 
69, 70, 72, 75, 76, 77, 87, 
Id, 115, 116, 117, 118, 
119, 131, 133, 149 
Constitution, Federal, 175, 176, 177, 

295 
Fort, 279 
State, 165, 169, 172, 181, 183, 

239, 245, 256, 258, 295 
Continental Army, 168, 169 

Congress, 162, 174 

Fast, 164 

Service, t66, 169 
Continentals, 167 
Contocookville, 270 
Convention, Federal, 175, 295 

Provincial, 95, 163 



Convention, Stale, 165, 168, 169, 
172, 175, 176, 239, 256, 
258, 294 295, 296 
Whig, 235, 242, 243 
Convers, Captain, 97 
Convyay, 270 
Coocke, Richard, 75 
Cook, Ebenezer, 140 
Cooper, Nathaniel, 161, 164, 165, 166, 

293. 294 
Walter, 186, 204, 213, 293 
Corner, The, 176, 178, 180, 218, 252 
Coroners, 38, 90 
Correspondence Committee, 160, 

161 
Corson, Monroe, 271 
Cotton Cloth, 171, 229 

Factory, 200, 202, 210, 213, 
221, 222, 256 
Council, Ecclesiastical, 126, 194 

For New England, r, 2, 7, 11 
Plymouth, 7 

Provincial, 78, 85, 86, 87, 88, 
96, 97, loi, 102, 103, 105, 

106, no, 112, 116, 117, 
119, 121, 122, 124, 128, 
130, 132, 143, 144, 156 

Records, 102 
Councillor, 164, 173 
Counterfeits, 192 
County Officers, 246 
County, Rockingham, 158, 180 

Strafford, 158, 164, 165, 167, 
175, 178, 180, 199, 202, 
204, 237, 239, 241, 243, 
246, 265, 281 
Court, Assistants, 32 

Associates, 27, 50, 53, 64, 65, 72 
Commissioners, 48, 58 
County, 44, 58, 62, 64, 6.5, 66, 
74. 76, 85, 87, 202, 246, 
247 
General, 9, 21, 22, 24, 25, 26, 
27, 28, 32, 34, 36, 37, 38, 
40, 41, 43. 46. 48, 51. 53, 
54, 58, 62, 63, 64, 66, 70, 
71. 74, 75. 77. 78, 80, 83, 
84, 85, 95, 150, 167, 174, 
181, 190, 192, 202, 205, 
280 



306 



INDEX 



Court of Elections, 28, 34 

of Pleas, 88, 191, 242, 244 

of Sessions, 162, 178 

Special, 58, 88 

Superior, 210, 217 

Supreme, 192 

United States, 245 
Court House, 128, 172, 178, 179, 181, 
195, 196, 200, 204, 208, 
210, 236, 247, 250, 280 
Cowan, James W., 259, 296 

William H., 259 
Cowas, Captain, 138 
Cow path, 65 
Cows, 28, 129 
Coyle, Thomas C, 271 
Cranfield, Edward, 18 

Governor, 18, 19, 89, 95 
Crawford, William H., 214 
Crawford & Busby, 259 
Crawlie, Thomas, 42 
Crockett, D., 285 
Cromell, Philip, 80 
Cromet, Philip, 60, 69, 76 
Crommet, Jeremiah, 114 
Cromwell, David, 57 

Joshua, 293 

Philip, 45, 49, 51, 56, 57, 59, 

67> 75, 77 
Crosby, Oliver, 204 
Cross, Ezra, 271 
Crosse, John, 18, 24 
Crown, 12 

Crown Point, 146, 147, 148 
Crows, 194, 199 
Crumell, Philip, 79 
Crumit, Joshua, 133 
Cuba Expedition, 137 
Currency, Paper, 131, 134, 143, 174 
Currier, Daniel L,., 201 

Jacob M., 215 

James H., 271 

Thomas, 285 
Currier's Mills, 201 
Curtes, John, 45 
Curtis, James F., 241 
Cushing, Caleb, 235 

Jonathan, Rev., 120, 128, 132, 
148, 149, 154 

Thomas H., 285 



Cushing Tomb, 115 
Cushman, Holmes, 237 
Cutler, Mr., 172 
Cutt, John, 65, 80, 85, 86, 95 

Richard, 64 
Cutter, Dr., 177 

D ALTON, Mr., 16 
Dam, Deacon, 79 

John, 13, 18, 20, 24, 32, 33, 
44. 50, 51, 55. 56, 58, 59. 
67,84 
Dame, Colonel, 177 

Theophilus, 165, 166, 185, 
189 
Damm, George, 141 

Theophilus, 141 

William, 140, 294 
Damme, John, 30 
Danell, David, 52, 60, 69, 80, 140 

Tage, 69 
Daniel, Eliphalet, 134 

Joseph, 122 

Thomas, 81 
Dark Day, 168, 169 
Dark Plains, Concord, 270 
Dartmoor Prison, 245 
Dartmouth College, 243 
Dauill, John, 48 
Daveis, Benjamin, 134 

Ebenezer, 134 

Jeremiah, 134, 297 

Joseph, 134 

Joshua, 134, 297 

Samuel, 134 
Davies, Jabez, 134 

John, 134 

Solomon, 134 
Davis, David, 102 

David O., 271 

Ensign, 73, 79 

James, 105, 249, 250, 271, 292, 

293. 294 
John, 47, 50, 51, 52, 57, 64, 

65, 66, 68, 71, 77, 80, 84, 

89, 99, 100 
Joseph, 118 
Major, 139, 143 
Thomas, 139, 141, 294 
William H., 267 



INDEX 



307 



-, 6i 



Davis, 

Davis' Garrison, 99, 100 

Dayton, William L., 264 

Dean, John, 98, 99, 100 

Deane, Benjamin, 183 
Charles, 2, 3 

Deaths, 135, 156, 157, 158, i6r, 165, 
168, 173, 174, 213, 216, 
223, 226, 230, 231, 233, 
234, 236, 237, 240, 241, 
243, 244, 246, 247, 248, 
250, 252, 253, 259, 260, 
261, 263, 264, 265, 267, 

275 
Declaration of Independence, 166, 

233 
of Rights, 168 
Dedham, Mass., 54 
Deep Cut, 244, 246 
Deer, 148 

Defence, Committee of, 204 
Demeritt, E. F., 271 

Henry, 228 
Democrats, 231, 235, 239, 244, 249, 

250, 252, 257, 264, 282 
Denboe, Salathiel, 69, 80 
Denmark, Patrick, 61, 68 
Denmore, Richard, 134 

Salathiel, 134 
Dennie, Joseph, 189 
Deputies, 21, 25, 27, 34, 37, 40, 41. 
43, 48, 53- 54, 58, 62, 64, 
66, 70, 75, 76 
Dereie, John, 79 
Dergin, William, 60, 69 
Deshore, Stephen M., 271 
Destruction of Cochecho, 90, 91, 92, 

93, 94 
Deues, John, 79 
Dickinson, Thomas, 72 
Dinsmoor, Samuel, 213, 231, 232, 

233, 255- 256, 257 
Division of County, 180, 237, 239, 

241, 243 
Division of Town, 258 

Di ell, John, 52 

Docking Intail, 137 
Doe, Joseph, 215 

Nicholas, 72 
Doenn, Hew, 51 



Dolack, Christin, 59 
Donn, Hew, 57, 60 
Dony, 81 

Doo, Benjamin, 134 
Daniel, 134 
John, 134 
Joseph, 134 
Door, Jonathan, 142 
Douglass, Stephen A., 267 
Dover, Aqueduct Co., 213 
Artillery, 218, 222 
Band, 282, 284, 285 
Bank, 213, 215, 227 
City Charter, 256, 262, 263 
Enquirer, 227, 230, 247, 254, 
261, 262, 263, 265, 267, 
273, 275. 280, 283, 284 
Cotton Factory, 200, 202, 210, 

213 
Five Cents Savings Bank, 

264, 270 
Hotel, 207, 218, 236, 253, 

261 
Ladies' Aid Society, 275 
Library, 201, 241 
Lyceum, 232, 233, 234 
Manufacturing Co., 213, 222, 
227, 246 
■ Massacre, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94 
Neck, 17, 24, 25, 34, 35. 36. 
40, 41, 42, 44, 45.49, 50. 
55, 62,63, 64, 66, 67, 70. 
72, 73- 74, 75. 76,79. 88, 

94, 106, 109, no. III, 

112, 115, 116,. 119, 120, 
124, 128, 148, 189, 237, 
247, 249, 251, 252, 258, 
261, 276 
Neck Burying Ground, 115 
Neck Pound, 112 
Packets, 229, 231 
Parish, 115, 118, 128 
Dover Point, 5, 6,9, 124, 151, 214, 
228, 245, 258, 262, 263 
Relief Society, 230 
Dover, ship, 229 
Dover, steamer, 257 

Sun, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 
193, 199, 200, 203 
Dover, Temperance Society, 228 



308 



INDEX 



Dover, Vote, 94,96, 117, 172, 173,174, 
175. 177, 178, 179. i8o, 
181, 183, 185, 186, 187, 
189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 

194, 195. 196, 197. 199. 
200, 201, 202, 204, 205, 

206, 2C8, 209, 210, 211, 

213, 214, 216, 217, 224, 

226, 228, 230, 231, 232, 

233, 234, 235, 237, 238, 

239, 241, 242, 243, 244, 

246, 248, 249, 250, 252, 
254, 255, 256, 257, 258, 

259, 260, 261, 262, 263, 

264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 

273, 276, 279, 281, 284 

Dover, England, 251 

Dover & Portsmouth; R. R., 236, 

254, 259 
Dover & Winnipiseogee R. R., 276, 

278 
Dow, Henry, 96 
Jabez, 241 
John, 80 
Nicholas, 80 
Samuel W., 238 
Downes, Thomas, 44. 5°. 56, 

59, 68, 79, 84, 98, 114 
Downing, John, 11 1, 117, 294 
Downs, Calvin E., 271 

Gershom, 142 

Mary, 102 
Dowty, Thomas, 47, 52, 60 
Drafts, 274, 277, 278, 279, 283 
Drew, Benjamin, 100 

Francis, 80, 100, 134, 240 

John, no, 134. 141 

Martin V., 271 

Samuel, 296 

Sergeant, 123 

Thomas, 100, 134 

Warren, 171 

William, 30, 33, 48, 52, 57. 

60, 69 
William Pickering, 296 
William Plaisted, 256, 296 

Drew's Garrison, 99 

Droughts, 88, 142, 143. I44, 148, 151. 
152, 157. 182, 209, 229, 
240, 244, 255, 260, 261 



Drown, Peter, 175 
Drue, Zebulon, 140 
Dry Hill, 200 

House, 229 
Dudley, George W., 271 

Governor, 115 

Judge, 177 

Samuel, 23 

Dunbar, David, 135 
Dunlap, Colonel, 219, 221 
Dunn, Captain, 218 

John, 234 
Dunstar, Thomas, 18, 19 
Durell, Daniel M., 189, 203, 204, 206, 
215, 218, 223, 224, 230, 
240, 243, 295 

George Clinton, 240 

Nicholas St. John, 224 
Durgin, Benjamin, 134 

James, 134 

John, 134 

John H., 271 

Jonathan, 134 

Joseph, 134 

William, 60, 69, 80 
Durgiu's, loi 

Durham, II, 127, 134, 135, 138, 141, 146, 
150, 154, 155, 170, 180, 
182, 185, 194, 218, 258 
Durstin, Thomas, 19, 20 
Duties, 156, 160 
Duxbury, John J., Mrs., 272 
Dwellings, 9, 10 
D wight. Dr., 186, 199, 201 
Dye House, 231 
Dyer, Albion, 271 

Early Settlers, 9, 13 

Earthquakes, 88, 98, 103, 129, 146, 
147, 192, 195, 239, 251, 
259, 261, 262, 267 

East India Co., 160 

Eastman, Ira A., 276 

Eastwick, Pheasant, 90 

Ecclesiastical Council, 126, 194 

Eclipse, 88 

Edgerly, Joseph, 100 

Thomas, 65, 69, 73, 79, 84, 89, 

94, 96, 99, 100 
Thomas T., 296 



INDEX 



309 



Zachariah, loo 
Edgerly's Garrison, 99 
Eirwing, Edward, 52 
Ela, Charles, 240 

Jacob H., 282 

Nathaniel W., 194, 240, 

295 

Ela's Tavern, 194, 217 

Elders, 23, 27, 50 

Elections, 96, no, 117, 139. 172. 
174. 175. 177. 178, 
180, 181, 183, 185, 
187, 189, 190, 191, 

193. 194, 195. 196. 
199, 200, 201, 202, 
205, 206, 208, 209, 
211, 213, 214, 216, 
224, 226, 228, 230, 
^32, 233, 234, 235, 
238, 239, 241, 242, 
244, 246, 248, 249, 
252, 254, 255, 256, 
258, 259, 260, 261, 
263, 264, 265, 266, 
268, 273, 276, 279, 
284 

Eliot, John, Rev., 77, 297 
Rev. Dr., 108, 297 

Eliot, Me., 149, 251, 297 

Elis, John, 79. 80 

Elliot, Robert, 96 

Ellison, William, 245 

Ellsworth, Oliver, 186 

Embargo, 196 

Emerson, Henry H., 271 

Emerson, Mrs., 100 

Samuel, 115, 116, 117, 
121, 128, 260 

Emerson's Diary, 209 

Emery, Anthony, 18, 26, 27, 29 

31. 33 
Colonel, 219, 221 
Philip, 230 
Engine, 188, 190 

Companies, 198 

House, 195, 281 

England, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 12 

14, 17, 18, 2T, 22, 42 

88, 201, 229,245, 251 

England, Church of, 12, 14, 16, 



246, 



173, 
179. 
186, 
192, 

197, 
204, 
210, 
217, 
231. 
237. 
243. 
250, 

257. 
262, 
267, 
281, 



13. 
, 86, 

17 



English Fleet, 156 
English Settlers, 11 
Enquirer, Dover, 227, 230, 247, 254, 
261, 262, 263, 265, 267, 
273. 275, 280, 283, 284 
Episcopal Church, 270, 287 

Minister, 17 
Erwin, Edward, 57 
Estates, 28, 31, 43, 46, 77. 129, 

158, 167, 171 
Estes, Elijah, 154 
Samuel, 183 

William F., 281, 283, 286, 296 
Estrays, 123 
Euines, Edward, 122 
Europe, 186 
Evans, Catherine, 255 
John, 84, 90, 225 
Richard, 202 

Robert, 56, 59, 65, 68, 74, 79 
Solomon, 255 

Stephen, 140, 147, 148, 160, 
161, 162, 163, 164, 170, 
292, 294 
Everett, Edward, 267 
Executions, 77, 175, 251 
Exeter, 10, 12, 13, 21, 28, 36, 37, 38, 
39, 41, 61, 72, 86, 87, 
94, 95, 96. 112, ;ii8, 121, 
124, 129, 135, 137, 138, 
155, 161, 163, 164, 165, 
167, 168, 204, 240, 242, 
281 
Exeter Academy, 204 

Factory, Cotton, 200, 202, 210, 213, 
221, 222, 256 

Nail, 201, 210 

Upper, 106, 200, 232, 235, 255 
Failures, 227, 238, 265 
Falls, Bellemy Bank, 34 

Cochecho, 5, 26, 29, 35, 115, 
229, 280 

Hayes, 105 

Ileland, 73 

Lampereel, 37, 61, 73, 105, 
no 

Lower, 29, 115, 157, 200, 210 

Oyster River, 32, 98, no 

Quamphegan, 36 



310 



INDEX 



Falls, Second, 32, 33, 34, 37, 106 
Squamscot, 7, 10, 11 
Tollend, 105, 106 
Upper, 102, 210 
Waldron's, 173, 179, 201, 227 
Whittier's, 209 
Faneuil Hall, 147 
Fanny, schooner, 190 
Farmington, 211, 233, 247, 255, 257, 

281 
Farrer, Timothy, 186, 190, 194 
Fast Day, 142, 164, 201, 255, 272 
Fayer, John, 25 
Federal Constitution, 175, 176 
Federals, 173, 178, 194, 195, 199, 205, 

209, 214 
Feild, Goodie, 33 
Feloes, Thomas, 69 
Fences, 77, 87, 117, 203 
Fenner, Elhanan W., 296 

A. G., Mrs., 272 
Fernald, Alfred, 217 
Amos, 217 
Renald, 38 
Ferries, 76, loi, 109, 120, 123, 128, 

154, 183, 214, 262 
Ffost, William, 119, 120 
Ffrost, Nicholas, 38 
Ffursen, Thomas, 25 
Field, Darby, 30 

William, 238 
Field's Garrison, iii 
Fifth Street, 247, 259 

Street Burying Ground, 247 
Filld, Joseph, 48, 51, 57, 60, 69, 80, 
89 
Zackery, 69, 79, 89, iii 
Fillmore, Millard, President, 264 
Fines, 23, 26, 27, 29, 34, 42, 47, 53, 
65. 66, 71, 72, 89, 115, 
138 
Findlay, Lieutenant, 225 
Fire Companies, 272, 284, 285 
Insurance Co., 241 
Works, 282, 286 
Fires, 136, 151, 152, 169, 180, 183, 
197, 201, 202, 209, 230, 
231, 240, 242, 247, 249, 
251, 252, 253, 254, 256, 
257. 259. 261, 267, 273 



First Congregational Chapel, 267, 
Congregational Church, 249, 

259, 260, 270, 274 
Church, 15, 16, 17,26, 29, 151, 

174 

Parish, 150, 151, 174, 229 
Fish, 87 

Fishing, 3, 5, 10, 36 
Fishing and Trading Post, 5 , 6, 8, 11 

Laws, 26, 205 

Stages, I, 4. 5 
Fishmongers, i, 4 
Fisher, Colonel, 189 

Dr., 172 
Fitch, Jabez, 127 

Five Cents Savings Bank, 264, 270 
Flagg, Lieutenant, 97 

William, 247, 295 
Flanders, Charles H., 275 
Flankarts, 17 
Fleet, English, 156 

French, 142 
Fletcher, George, 242 

Rev. Mr., 40, 41, 42, 46 
Florida, 279 
Flour, 171 
Floyd, Captain, 97 
Follett, Abraham, 59 

John, 18, 20 

Nicholas, 80, 94, 96, 107 

William, 33, 34, 45, 47, 51, 
55. 56, 57. 60, 61, 68, 71, 
72, 80 
Folsom, George P., 296 

Nathaniel, 161 
Footman, Francis, 134 

Thomas, 30, 33, 34, 40, 42, 48, 
52, 57, 60, 69, 188 
Ford, B. A., 247 

Jacob, 237 

Mr., 209 
Fore River, 75, 128 
Form of Government, 18, 94, 95, 

96, 168, 172 
Forse, John, 140 

Fort, Dover Neck, 35, 70, 88, 251 
Fort Constitution, 279 

Sullivan, 204 

Sumter, 268, 283 

William and Mary, no 



INDEX 



311 



Forton Prison, 183 
Foss, Ambrose, 271 

Ham, 228 

Humphrey, 114 
John, 264 

Solomon W., 271 
Fost, John, 65, 68, 73 
Foster, Abiel, 189 
Fourth of July, 180, 184, 189, 190, 

194, 195, 210, 224, 242 
Fowler, Asa, 262 

Morrice, 140 
Fowling, 10 
France, 18 
Franklin Academy, 20S 

Square, 218, 243, 245, 248, 
253, 269, 280 

Street, Baptist Society, 240 
Fray, William, 25 
Fredericksburg, 275 
Freeholders, 105, 118, 128, 130, 153 
Freeman, Asa, 215, 223, 256, 296 

Captain, 273 

Jonathan, 183, 189 
Freemen, 18, 64 
Freesoil party, 243, 244, 246, 248, 

250, 259 
Freewill, Baptist, 232, 247 

Baptist Printing Office, 247 
Fremont, John C, 264 
French, 96, 98, 106, 125 
French Fleet, 142 

Nation, 183 

privateer, 190 

Republic, 188 

War, 148, 270 
Fresh Creek, 35, 66, 130, 155 
Freshet, The, 105 
Freshets, 103, 137, 158, 173, 214, 

225, 229, 232, 259 
Friend's Meetings, 145 

Meeting House, 159, 251, 252, 

Society, 177, 178, 179, 186, 
225, 251, 252, 255 
Frier, Nathaniel, 60 
Frost, Captain, 82 
Fryer, Nathaniel, 96 
Furber, William, 13, 18, 20, 26, 30, 
33. 35, 37, 38, 39. 41. 45, 
50, 51, 56, 57, 59, 67, 



Furber, William (continued) 

77, 79, 84, 89, loi, 105, 
130. 133, 293 

Furness, Edward, 258 

Fursen, Thomas, 30, 35 

Gage, Captain, 166 

Dover, 211 

James, 231 

John, 138, 139, 141, 149, 157, 
162, 169, 231, 292, 294 

Joseph, 190, 191, 295 

Samuel, 231 

Thomas, 231 
Gage's Hill, 247 
Garland, Jacob, 113 

John S., 271 

Peter, 18 

Stephen, 258 

Wingate, 271 
Garrison Hill, 102, 173, 231. 264 
Garrison, Adams', 99 

Beard's, 99 

Bick ford's, 99 

Bunker's, 99, 100 

Burnham's, 99, 100 

Coffin's, 91, 92 

Davis', 99, 100 

Drew's, 99 

Edgerly's, 99 

Field's, III 

Gerrish's, 97 

Heard's, 91, 92, loi, 102, 114 

Jones', 99, 100 

Main, 88 

Header's, 99 

Otis', 88, 91, 92, 102 

Peter Coffin's, 88, 91, 92, 
265 

Smith's, 99, 100 

Waldron's, 91, 92, 102, 107 

Woodman's, 99, 100, 112 
Gas Company, 260 

Lights, 260, 261 
Gateway, 133 
Gazette, New Hampshire, 151, 152, 

175, 176 
Geer, Benjamin, 158 
Geese, 114 
Gellison, , 100 



312 



INDEX 



General Assembly, 86, 87, 98, 104, 

112, 114, 115, 116, 117, 

118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 

123, 124, 126, 128, 129, 

130. 131. 132, 133. 134, 

137. 138. 139. 143. 144. 

145, 146, 148, 149, 150, 

151. 153. 156, 157. 158, 
164, 165, 166, 167, 171, 

293 

General Congress, 161 

General Court, 9, 21, 22, 24, 25, 26, 
27, 28, 32, 34, 36, 37, 38, 
40, 41.43. 46, 48, 51. 53. 
54, 58, 62, 63, 64, 66, 70, 
71. 74. 75. 77. 78, 80, 83, 
84. 85, 95, 150, 167, 174, 
181, 190, 191, 192, 202, 
205, 280 

General Government, 238, 240, 268, 
283 

Genkens, John, 134 
Stephen, 134 

George I., 122 

George III., 160 

Georgetown, Mass., 278 

Germantowu, U. S. Ship, 260 

Gerrish, Benjamin F., 271 

Captain, 97, 105, 107, in 
John, 73, 74, 77, 79,84, 90, 94, 
96, 105, III, 113, 292, 

293 
Paul, 121, 122, 125, 128, 131, 

135, 136, 146, 152, 293, 

294 
Samuel, 147 
Sarah, 93 
Timothy, 117, 119, 120, 293, 

294 
William, 140 
Gerrish's Garrison, 97 
Gerry, Elbridge, 200 
Gettysburg, 277 
Gibbons, Ambrose, 9, 11, 27, 30, 31, 

33. 35 
Giles, Ulisabeth, 26, 42 
John, 108, 140 
Mark, 79, 108 
Mathew, 26, 33, 48, 52, 57, 60, 

69 



Gilford, 217 
Gilles, Clark, 68 
Gilman, Colonel, 133 
John, 41 

John Phillips, 204 
John Taylor, 183, 185, 186, 
189, 190, 191, 192, 
194, 199, 201, 202, 

204, 205 
Gilmanton, 182, 199, 200 
Gilmore, Joseph A., 276, 278, 

281, 282, 285, 286 

Glanfilld, Peter, 58 

Glidden, William, 140 

Glines, Captain, 286 

Goats, 29 

Goddard, John, 13, 25, 30, 41, 47 
51. 52, 57. 60, 61, 69 
193 

Goe, George, 80 

Goffe, Captain, 143 

Goffstown, 205 

Goldwier, George, 45 

Goodwin, Amaziah, 276 
Charles W., 271 
Ichabod, 263, 266 
John, 163 
William, 271 

Gooe, Gorg, 62 

Gordon, Ebenezer, 263 
William, 189 

Gore, the, 182 

Gorges, Ferdinando, i, 3, 7, 16 

Gosport, 135, 297 

Goss Cyrus, 296 

Gove, Edward, 87, 88, 96 
Richard, 201 

Gove's Rebellion, 87, 88 

Government, Plan of, 18,94, 95 
168, 172 

Governor, Provincial, 87, 88, 
III, 121, 122, 130, 
136, 138, 142, 143, 
153. 156, 158, 293 

Governor, State, 172, 181, 183, 
186, 187, 189, 190, 
192, 193, 194, 195, 
199, 201, 202, 203, 

205, 206, 208, 209, 
211, 213, 214, 217, 



187, 
193. 
203, 



279. 



,80, 



96. 

109, 
134. 
144. 

185, 
191, 
197, 
204, 
210, 
224, 



INDEX 



313 



Governor, State (continued) 

226, 227, 229, 230, 231, 
232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 
238, 239, 241, 242, 243, 
244, 246, 248, 249, 250, 
252, 254, 255, 256, 257, 
258, 260, 261, 262, 263, 
265, 266, 268, 269, 272, 
273, 276, 278, 279, 281, 
282, 285, 286 
Gowell, John, 140 
Gowing, Elexander, 52 
Gra, John, 134 
Grace, Nicholas, 140 
Grammar School, 123, 149, 261 
Grand Jury, 29, 64, 71, 127 
Grant, General, 276, 279, 284 

James, 45 
Gravel pit, 180 
Graves, Charles A., 271, 297 

William, 47 

Gray, George, 134 

Reuben, 140 

Robert, Rev., 174, 180, 189, 212 
Wilson, 271 
Great Bay, 25, 30, 37 
Great Bridge, 150 
Great Britain, 159, 165 
Great Falls, 227, 230, 251, 270, 281 
Great Falls Rifle Co., 235 
Great Frost, 185 
Great House, 8, 280 
Great Island, 88 
Greeley, Horace, 254 
Green, Ezra, 154, 174, 175, 179, 186, 
187, 191, 195, 201, 242, 
250, 253, 292, 295 
Henry, 96 
Thomas, 48 
Greenland, 11, 135 
Griffin, William H., 201 
Grove, the, 266, 272 
Grover, Charles A., 271, 297 (See 

Graves.) 
Gulf, the, 239 
Gun House, 195, 197 
Gundalos, loi, 120, 189, 195 
Guppy, John, 257 
Gutt, the, 120 
Gyles, Mathew, 30 



Hackett, William, H., 276 
Hagkins, 91 
Haile, William, 265 
Haines, Samuel, 18, 20, 24, 30 

Thomas, 79 
Haket, William, 45 
Hale, Calvin, 296 

John P., 230, 232, 246, 249, 
250, 259, 260, 262, 264, 
265, 269, 272, 278, 282, 
284, 286, 287, 296 
Samuel, 67, 139, 140, 141 
William, 140, 187, 191, 207, 
208, 209, 215, 217, 218, 
221, 226, 230, 254, 295, 
296 
Haley, Mr., 203 
Hall, Charles F., 271 

Deacon, 45, 55, 79 
Jacob, 271 

John, 13, 18, 20, 24, 29, 30, 33, 
36, 38, 40, 44, 45, 50, 58, 
59, 61,62,67, 76, 77. 79. 
84, 89, 293 
Joseph, 30, 90 

Lieutenant, 39, 44, 53, 55, 58, 61 
Nathaniel, 113 
Ralph, 33, 50, 51 
Sargant, 56, 79 
Halleran, Dennis, 244 
Ham, Charles, 296 
Clement, 140 

John, 68, 79, 84, 105, 119, 120 
Moses, 197 
Moses W., 247 
Ham Field, 259 
Ham's Mills, 214 
Hamacke, Thomas, 68 
Hamett, Thomas, 79 
Hamlin, Hannibal, 267 
Hamlin, W., 282 
Hammons, Joseph, 233, 235 
Hamock, Thomas, 84 
Hampton, 12, 16, 20, 28, 54, 86, 87, 
88, 95, 96, 102, 112, 118, 
135. 136, 156, 270 
Hampton Falls, 135 
Hance, John, 45, 48, 52, 57, 72 
Hand Cards, Manufacture of, 256 
Hanscom, John, 271 



314 



INDEX 



Hanson, Anthony, i8o 
Benjamin, 141 
Captain, 141 
Dominicus, 293 
Ephraim, 293 
George, 148 
Jedediah, 212 
John, 115, 125 
John B., 166, 167, 178, 293 
John T., 203 
Jonathan, 137 
Joseph, 116, 148, 293, 296 
Manuel, 137 
Mary, 47 
Mrs., 125 
Nicholas, 77 
Phebe, 247, 248, 249, 251 
Samuel, 296 
Stephen, 215, 252 
Thomas, 45, 50, 56, 59, 68, 73, 

79. 137 

Tobey, 56, 59 

Tobias, 68, 9S, 117 

Widow, 68, 79 
Harfutt, Nicklas, 124 
Harper, Joseph M., 230 
Harper's Store, 247 
Harriman, Walter, 276 
Harrington, Edward W., 279, 284 
Harris, Nicholas, 68, 80 

Richard, 140 
Harrison, William H., President, 

237. 242, 243, 244 
Hartford, Nicholas, 120, 128, 294 
Harvard College, 66, 75, 146 
Harvey, Mathew, 229, 230 
Hasard, privateer, 190 
Hathorne, William, 81 
Hats, 171 

Haverhill, Mass., 171, 236 
Hawkers, 162 
Hay Market, 175 
Hayden, Lucian, 240 
Hayes, Daniel, 237 

Daniel C, 276 

Elihu, 140 

Ichabod, 230 

J. S., 285 

John, 116, 166 

John v., 271 



Hayes, John W. ,208 

Plumer, 250 

William B., 239 
Hayes Falls, 105 
Haynes, Mr., 269 
Hayward, Henry, 271 
Head, Alvah K., 271 

Benjamin, 79 
Heal ey, Joseph, 235, 237, 238 
Heard, Benjamin, 68, 73 

Elizabeth, 92 

Ensign, 115 

Experience, 102, 103 

James, 115 

John, 18, 39, 45, 56, 59, 64. 68, 

79- 89 

Joseph, 119, 120, 142 

Lieutenant, 114 

Mr., 172 

Samuel, 140, 148, 166 

Tristram, 108, 119, 120 
Heard's Garrison, 91, 92, loi, 102, 

114 
Heath, Franklin W., 271 
Heavy Artillery, 279, 280, 281 
Henderson, Captain, 194 

Daniel, 295 

Howard, 130, 148, 149, 151, 

153- 294 

Thomas, 276 

William, 87, 104 
Herlbut, Martin L., Rev. 194 
Hertel, Sieur, 97 
Hethersey, Robert, 30 
Hewland, John, 109 
High School, 234, 256 

Street, 251 
High Treason, 87, 88 
Highways, 61, 77, 90, 105, 106, no, 

122, 124, 133, 217 
Hill, Ichabod, 140 

Isaac, 237, 238, 239 

John, 33, 48, 52, 64, 79. 84. 9"> 

L. G., 286 

Mr., 46, 47, 51, 61 

Mrs., 70, 71 

Nathaniel, 89, 121, 293 

Samuel, 89 

Valentine, 32, 33, 36, 39, 40, 
41. 50. 51. 63, 71 



INDEX 



315 



Hill, William, 80 

Hilton, Edward, i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 

II, 13, 14, 20, 41, 50 

John, 30, 45. 48, 52, 57. 60, 69 

William, i, 2, 3,4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 

13, 23, 24, 41.44, 96 

Hilton's Point, 3, 4. 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, 36, 

46, 109, no, 124, 133, 

154 
Hincliman, Major, 93 
Historical Collection, N. H., 128 

Society, Mass., 2, 95, 172 
Hix, Joseph, 129 

Mary, 129 
Hoar frost, 171 
Hobbs, Morris, 96 
Hobes, Henry, 45, 56, 59, 68 
Hodgdon, Benjamin, 243 

Caleb, 160, 161, 162, 165, 167, 
203, 294, 295 

Jeremy, 68 

Jonathan, 143 

Joseph, 154 

Moses, 196, 200, 215, 225, 242, 

295 
Mrs., 202 
Peter, 292 
Shadrach, 154, 162, 163. 292, 

294 
Hogreeves, 187, 188 
Hogshead Staves, 31, 40, 61 
Hogsty Cove, 27, 37, 71 
Hoit, Daniel, 243, 244, 246, 248, 249 
Hollawaye, Henry, 52, 57 
Hollet, Philip, 77 
Holt, Charles, 141 
Hong Kong, 248 
Hook & Ladder Co., 285 
Hoophood, 97 
Hopkinton, 189 

Horn, John, 114 
Widow, III 

Home, Jeremiah, 268 
Oliver S., 296 
William, 56, 59, 68, 79, 89 

Horses, 29, 129 

Horse Mackerel, 262 

Horton, William, Rev., 241 

Hose, 171 

Hospital, 187 



Hossom, Jacob, 140 
Hotel, American, 253 

Dover, 207, 218, 236, 253, 261 

Ela's, 217 

New Hampshire, 207, 239, 261 

United States, 253 
Houses, 9, 10, 28, 129 
Houston, Harrison, 271 

Sam, 254 
Howard, Andrew, 247, 248, 249, 250, 

251 
Samuel, 214, 240 
Howell, Rice, 33, 48, 52 
Hoyt's Notes, 12 
Hubbard, Henry, 244, 246 
John, 140 

William, i, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 13, 15, 
18, 78 
Huckins, James, 79, 89, 100 

Robert, 20, 30 
Huckleberry Hill, 46, 133 
Hud, John, 84 
Huggins, James, 69 

Robert, 18, 24 
Hull, Benjamin, 48, 52, 57, 60 

Naomi, 71, 72 
Hull's Diary, 83 
Humphreys, Thomas, 50, 60 
Hunking, Mark, 117 
Hunt, Bartholmew, 18, 20 

Samuel, 141 
Hunter, Secretary of State, 286 
Huntress, Samuel, 141 
Hurd, John, 30 

William, 192 
Hurricanes, 177, 209 
Huske, Ellis, 144 
Hussey, Daniel, 296 

John, 140 

Robert, 48 
Hyuck, Ffrances, 80 

Ilei-and Falls, 73 

Immigration, 62 

Incendiary Fires, 202, 251, 254, 257, 

259 
Indenture, 2, 3, 5, 6 
Independence Day, 180, i84, 189, 

190, 194, 195, 210, 224, 

242 



316 



INDEX 



Indian Corn, lo, 29, 31, 40, 75, 87, 
142, 143, 144, 152, 157 
Deed, 11 
Path, 41 
Servants, 129 
Slaves, 129 
Treaty, 80, 81 
Troubles, 22, 70, 72, 77, 78, 83, 

90. 91. 92, 93.94. 96, 97. 
98, 99, 100, loi, 102, 103, 
106, 107, 108, no, III, 
112, 114, 123, 125, 126, 
142, 143 

Ingersol, Jared. 200 

Insane Asylum, 237 

Institute, Teachers, 252 

Insurance Co., Cochecho, 241 

Intrenchments, 17, 35 

Ipswich, Mass., 22, 54, 156, 172 

Ireland, 18 

Relief, 252 

Iron Works, 122 

Ising-glass River, 83 

Isles of Shoals, 34, 77, 85, 106, 
262 

Jackson, Andrew, 271 
Charles, 271 
General, 214, 224, 226, 227, 

228, 230, 233, 237 
James, 47, 51 
Walter, 47, 51, 57, 60, 65, 68, 

80 
William, 102 

, 100 

Jaffrey, James, 131 

Jail, 158, 164, 166, 176, 185, 190, 216, 

225, 228 
Jail Hill, 176 
James I., 8 

Jefferson, Thomas, President, 186, 
190, 193, 224, 242, 253 
Jeffersonians, 191 
Jeffrey, Cyprian, 138, 139 
Jemeson, Patrick, 47, 52, 57, 60, 61, 

69 
Jenkins, Elizabeth, 90 
Experience, 103 
John, 134 
Joseph, 116 



Jenkins, Stephen, 90 
Jenness, Henry O., 271 

James F., 271 

J.S., 4, 8 

Nathaniel, 296 
Jewett, James, 292 
Johnson, Andrew, President, 281, 
288 

Darius, T., 296 

H. v., 267 

James, 25 

Thomas, 13, 30, 33, 34, 36, 47, 
51, 57, 60, 71 

, 164 

Johnson's Creek, 36, 46, 102 
Jonathan, ship, 2, 3, 4, 5 
Jones, Captain, 100, 122 

Charles E., 271 

Christie L., 271 

Esther, 114 

Jenkin, 68, 79, 84, 89 

John, 192 

Joseph, 121, 122 

Mary, 102 

Paul, 253 

Robert, 45, 56 

Stephen, 52, 57, 60, 68, 70, 
80,84, 117, 121, 124, 134, 
292, 293, 294 

William, 18, 20, 25, 26, 48, 52, 

57 

, III 

Jones' Garrison, 99, 100 
Judiciary, 202, 244 
Junkes, Robert, 47 
Jury, Coroners, 38 

Grand, 29, 64, 71, 127 

of Trials, 64 

Kane, Peter, 271 
Kant, Robert, 133 
Keais, Samuel, 114 
Kearney, Camp, La., 275 
Keatler, Richard, 33 
Keene, 270 
Kelly's Diary, 146 
Kembell, Thomas, 41, 50, 55 
Kennebunk, Me., 136 
Kenney,John, 236 
Love, 140 



INDEX 



317 



Kent, Oliver, 30, 33, 48, 52, 57 
Kerk, Henry, 66, 67 
Keyd, James, 56 
Kidder, Steven, 19 
Kielle, Benjamin, 225 

John, 162, 166, 169, 294, 295 
Kimball, Jonathon, 202 

Mary, 227 

Samuel, 295 

Thomas, 50 

William, 227 
Kincaid, David, 112 
King, George, 210 

Rufus, 196 

William, 210 
King of England . i , 1 1 , 82, 84, 88, 159 
King's Own, 135 

Thoroughfare, 122 

Woods, 135 
Kings Town, 105, 112 
Kingston, 129, 135, 136, iSi 
Kiniston, John, 59 
Kinket, David, 140 
Kirke, Goodman, 70 
Kittery, Me., 36,37, 82, 116, 120, 128, 
136, 251 

Neck, 109 
Kittredge, George W., 237 

Jacob, 187, 195, 215, 231, 295, 
296 

Thomas W., 296 
Knight, John, 106, 109, 113 
Knollys, Hansard, Rev., 14. 15. 16, 

17, 18 
Knowlton, Captain, 270 
Know Nothing Party, 262 
Knox, Jesse W., 271 

Laconia, 270 

Company, i, 3, 7, 8, 12 
Ladd, Eliphalet, 180, 184 
Lefavour, Captain, 218 
Lafayette, General, 215, 216, 218, 
219, 220, 221, 222, 235 

G. W., 220 
Ivaham, Richard, 18 
Lahorn, Henry, 18 
Laiton, Thomas, 38 
Lalla Rookh, vessel, 273 
Lampereel Falls, 37, 61, 73, 105, no 



Lampereel River, 36, 37, 39, 4I1 49. 
51. 63, 72, 73.74. 76. 77, 
105, 107, 115, 121, 124 

Lamprey River, 36, 122 

River Bridge, 121, 122, 124 

Lancaster, 270 

Land Claims, 22, 82, 83, 86, 87, 88, 
89, 97 

Landgrants, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 
13, 17, 24, 25, 27, 29, 30, 
32, 33. 34. 35, 36. 37. 39- 
41, 53-65, 71.72, 73, 74. 
76, 113, 120, 13T, 132, 

133. 175 
Landing, 173, 174. i77, i79- 185, 186, 

189, 190, 191, 201, 204, 

213, 218, 232, 235, 236, 

240, 242, 246, 267, 280 
Landing Bridge, 214 
Landings, 105, 123, 156 
Lane, Edmund J., 296 

Joseph, 267 
Lane's Diary, 145, 152 
Langdon, John, 173, 174, I75- 183, 

191, 192, 193, 194. 195. 

196, 197. 199 
Langdon Bank, 261 
Langley, John, 134 
Thomas, 134 
Langstaff, Henry, 13, 25, 30, 33, 89 
Langtof, Henry, 84 
Lankster, Henry, 35, 45- S^, 59, 65, 

67, 79, 87, 109 
Larkham, Thomas, Rev., 15, 16, 17, 

18, 20, 24 
Larkin, David, 79 
Laski, John, 134 
Latin School, 112 
Laud, Archbishop, 14 
Laues, John, 33 
Lavasseur, Mr., 221 
Laws, Fishing, 26, 205 

Liquor, 29, 46, 245, 262 
Layton, Thomas, 13, 18, 20, 24, 27, 

30. 31. 32, 33, 44, 55, 58, 

61, 67 
William, 59, 62, 68 
Leathers, Alphonso, 271 

Edward, 69, 80, 100 
Leavitt, Samuel, 96 



318 



INDEX 



Lebanon, 270 
Lebby, Benjamin, 140 

Daniel, 140 
Lechford, Thomas, 16 
Lee, Abraham, 92 

General, 284, 285 
Lee, 97, 154, 155. 180, 182, 185, 213 
Leeson, Nicholas, 74 
Legislature, 143, 153, 177, 181, 189, 
190, 192, 199, 202, 211, 
212, 213, 214, 217, 218, 
232, 233, 236, 237, 238, 
239, 243, 250, 257, 258, 
262, 276, 279 
Leighton, Abigail, 261 

Thomas, 50, 79 

Tobias, 165 
Leppincutt, Bartholomew, 45, 55 
Lessen, Joseph, 52 
Leudecoes, David, 45 
Leveridge, William, Rev., 13, 14, 

16, 17. 35 
Lewis, Philip, 25, 33, 34, 36, 49. 9° 
Libbey, Ira, 248 
Libby's Mills, 185, 214 
Library, 201, 241 
Lieut. Governor, 97, 103, 104, 105, 

124, 126, 135 
Light Horse, 176 
Lightning, 183, 225, 228, 257, 263, 

265 
Lincoln, Abraham, President, 266, 
267, 268, 278, 281, 283, 
286, 288, 289, 290, 291 
Line, Edward, 45 
Linen Cloth, 171 
Liquor Laws, 29, 46, 245, 262 
Little, Rev., Mr., 172 
Little Bay, no 

Harbor, 1,3, 4.5.6,7.8,9, 12 

John's Creek, 35, 36, 75 
Littlefield, Aaron, 136 

Captain, 272 

Francis, 30 

Jonathan, 260 
Littleton, 270 
Livermore, Arthur, 190, 233 

Samuel, 174, 188 
Liverpool, 229 
Lobby, George, 271 



Locke, John C, 271 
Locust Street, 226, 248, 251 
Logan, Johnson C, 271 
Log Hill Spring, 266 
London, i, 4, 18, 83 
Londonderry, 129, 181 
Long Island Sound, 168 
Longstar, Henry, 109 
Lord Protector, 86 
Lord, George F., 271 

John, 266 

John F., 271 

Oliver, 271 
Lothrop, Samuel K., Rev., 228, 234, 

250 
Lotteries, 150, 166, 192 
Loue, William, 45 
Louisburg, 139, 141, 142, 173 
Louring, John, 45, 56, 59, 64, 68 
Lovewell, Captain, 126 
Low, Nathaniel, 272, 296 
Lowdeu, Anthony, 102 
Lowell, Mass., 281 

Railroad, 235 
Lower Bridge, 157, 173, 254 

Falls, 29, 35, 115, 157, 200, 210 
Lubberland, 102, 123 
Lummack, Nathaniel, 80 
Lyceum, 232, 233, 234 
Lyman, Captain, 206 

John D., 282 
Lyman, Maine, 276 
Lynn, Mass., 54, 197 

Mackdaniel, Elexander, 60 
Mackdonell, Elexander, 52, 60 
Madbury, 138, 146, I49.!i52, I53. 156, 

163, iSo, 223, 233, 238, 

255. 273, 281 
Madison, James, President, 196, 199, 

200, 201 
Magoune, Henry, 45 
Mahoney, T. J., 271 
Main Garrison, 88 

Street, 204, 240 
Maine, 3, 13, 15, 185, 201, 219, 221 
Maiden, Mass., 253 
Malloy, John, 271, 297 
Maloy, Peter, 271 
Malt, 56, 61, 87 



INDEX 



319 



Man, Peter, i88 
Manchester, 270 

Phalanx, 270 
Manufacturing Co., Cocheco, 91, 
227, 229, 231, 234, 240, 
241, 248, 254, 261, 266, 
267, 278 
Co., Dover, 213. 222, 227, 246 
Map of Town, 234, 236, 246 
Market House, 234 
Marriage, 38, 53, 180 
Marsh, Hezekiah, 134 
Marshall, Mrs., 198 
Marshes, 25, 29, 30, 37, 41. 44. 125 
Marston, Oilman, 272 
Marston's Block, 254, 273 
Martin, John, 31, 33, 48, 51. 57. 60, 
61, 64, 69 
Noah, 258, 260, 276, 296 
Martinique, 190 
Martyn, Richard, 87 
Mason, Jeremiah, 206, 208, 223 

John, I, 3, 7, 8, 63, 82, 86, 97 
Peter, 133 
Robert, 88 
Mason Hall, i, 8 

Land Claims, 22, 82, 83, 86, 
87, 88, 89, 97 
Mass Meetings, 199, 200, 243, 276, 

281, 282 
Massachusetts, 2, 6, 10, 12, 13, 14, 
16, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 
63, 8r, 83, 84, 85, 94, 96, 
97, loi, 127, 130, 141, 155 
Assembly, 23 
Bay, 2, 12 
Bay Government, 13, 19, 21, 

24. 36. 37. 83, 84, 130 
Hist. Society, 2, 95, 172 
Records, 25, 26, 27, 28, 41, 53 
Massacre, Dover, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94 
Oyster River, 98, 99, 100 
Salmon Falls, 96, 97 
Mast Path, 105 
Masts, 35, 36, 44 
Mathes, Captain, 133 
Francis, 294 
Mrs., 33 
Mathews, Benjamin, 48, 52, 74, 80 
Mrs., 57 



Mathew's Neck, loi 
Mathewson, Oeorge, 296 
Matthews, Francis, 13 

Mrs., 31 
Maud, Daniel, Rev., 23, 34 

Mary, 23 
Mayors, 263, 264, 268, 269, 270, 272, 

283, 286 
McCabe, John, 271 
McClellan, Oeorge B., 281 
M'Cluskey, Richard, 258 
McKearney, Patrick, 257 
McMarster, James, 164, 165, 167 
Meade, General, 285 
Meader, John, 47, 51, 60, 64, 68, 79, 

89 
Meader, Nathaniel, 107, 134 
Meader's Oarrison, 99 
Meadows, 25, 37 
Measles, 90 
Measures, 71 
Medellman, James, 47 
Meder, Joseph, 117 
Medford, Mass., 163 
Medical Association, Strafford, 270 
Medlton, James, 52 
Meeting House, Barrington, 122 

Berwick, 147 

Cochecho, 115, 117, 119. 120, 
124, 128, 147, 148, 149. 

150 

Dover Neck, 29, 34, 35, 40. 
41, 44, 62, 63, 64, 70, 
76, 88, 94, 106, III, 115, 
116, 117, 120, 251 

Exeter, 121 

First, 17, 29, 35, 189 

First Parish, 229, 236 

Freewill Baptist, 232, 247 

Friends, 159, 251, 252 

Kittery, 116 

Madbury, 146 

Methodist, 115, 217 

Oyster River, 39, 40, 42, 44, 
74, 109, ri8, 121 

Pine Hill, 115, 117, 147.148, 
149. 150 

Quaker, 150 

Second, 17, 35, 189 

Somersworth, 132, 254 



320 



INDEX 



217 



114, 
141, 
165, 
206, 
218, 

204, 



Meeting House Hill, 189 

Mellen, Elisa, 184 

Henry, 184. 188, 196 
John W., 217, 220, 224 
Merrimack River, i, 3, 10, 83 
Merrow, Samuel, 140 
Merry Meeting River, 182 
Merry Mount, 6, 7 
Mesandowit, 91 
Mesarvey, Thamsin, 107, 108 
Meserve, Nathaniel, 147, 148 
Metcalf, Ralph, 262, 263 
Meteors, 184, 234, 261 
Methodist Meeting House, 115 
Mexican War, 254 
Middletown, 182 
Migel, John, 80 
Military, 14, 48, 74. 81, 97, 106, 
133. ^34, 139. 140, 
146, 147. 158, 163, 
166, 170, 176, 200, 
210, 211, 216, 217, 
222, 235 
Militia, 78, 83, 97, 103, 114, 203, 

223 
Miller, Robert, 271 
Millet, Captain, 124, 133 

Thomas, 133, 137, 139. 148, 
292, 294 
Mills, Bellemy Bank, 75 
Chesley's, 105 
Cocheco, 231 
Currier's, 201 
Gerrish's, 152 
Ham's, 214 
Hill's, 39, 46 
Libby's, 185, 214 
Quamphegan, 56, 60, 68, 
Sawyer's, 214 
Waldron's, 87, 157 
Whittier's, 209 
Milton, 206, 230, 261 
Mines, 9 

Ministers, 14. 15, 16, 17, 23, 
34, 39, 42, 43, 46, 49 
73. 74- 75. 76, 83, 84 
90, 102, 113, 114, 
116, 118, 119, 120, 
126, 127, 129, 131, 
148, 149. 154. 164, 



104 



24. 
', 71. 
, 86, 

115. 
121, 

132. 
172, 



Ministers (continued) 

174, 194, 208, 228, 229, 
233, 236, 240, 241, 242, 
249, 257, 260, 265, 270, 
280 

Ministry, 36. 38, 40, 43, 49, 50, 73, 

74, 77. 113. 154 
Minots Rock Light House, 257 
Missouri Compromise, 261 
Mitchell, Peter, 164, 165 

S., 221 
Moderators, 163, 226, 292 
Mohawks, 83, 125 

Molloy, John, 271, 297(866 Malloy.) 
Money, Counterfeit, 192 
Monroe, James, President, 205, 206, 

207, 210 
Moody, Ira A., 282 

Joshua, 86 

Sarah, 86 

Silas, 296 
Moor, John, 134 
Moore, Samuel, 141 
Morril, David L., 214, 217, 224, 226 
Morrill, Benjamin, 236 

Joseph, 296 
Morris, Thomas, 60, 69, 80 
Morrison, Andrew, 271 

Rev. Mr., 181 
Morton of Merry Mount, 6, 7 
Mosely, J., 202 
Moses, Hunking, 151 
Moulton, James R,, 296 

S. S., 255 
Mount Pleasant, 240 

Royal, Canada, 136 
Mowing Machines, 261 
Mullen, Erastus, 271 

Nail Factory, 201, 210 
Nambrous, 144 
Nanney, Robert, 18, 19 
Naomi, 71 
Nash, Isaac, 33, 44 
Nashua, 270 
Nasou, Mark F., 285 
Richard, 27, 38 
Navy, United States, 247, 281, 286 
Neale, Walter, 8, 13 
Negroes, 129, 164, 166, 167 



INDEX 



321 



NelsoD, Joseph, 141 
Nelson Street, 265 
New Boston Artillery, 142 
Newbury, Mass., 54, 132, 136 

Ferry, 93 
Newburyport, Mass., 235 
Newcastle, 112, 118, 135 
New Durham, 175, 182, 185 
New England, i, 2, 3, 9, 15, 18, 21, 

84,94. 95. 141, 146, 159 
Council, I, 2, 7, II 
Packet, 229 
Rum, 171 
Newett, James, 38 
Newgrow, John, 30 
New Hampshire, i, 4, 13, 17, 18, 20, 
21, 22, 55, 85, 87, 95, 
97, 114, 126, 135, 141, 
146, 158, 161, 163, 176 
Bank, 192 

Gazette, 151, 152, 175, 176 
Historical Coll., 128 
Hotel, 207, 239, 261 
Patriot, 237 
Republican, 222, 223, 224, 

225 
Troops, 74, III, 112, 133, 134, 
137, 139. 140, 141. 142, 
146, 147, 158, 163, 164, 
165, 166, 270 
Newichwannock, 9, 37 

River, 25, 32, 37, 77 
Newington, 11, 115, 117, 118, 135, 
141, 155, 183, 185, 214, 
247, 262, 263 
New London, 270 
Newmarket, 135, 281 
New Orleans, 273, 275, 279 
Newport, 270 
Newport, R. I., 166 
New Style, 145 
New York, 164, 165, 166, 240 
News Letter, Boston, 107, 108, 121, 

133 
Newspaper, 180, 182 
Newtt, Abraham, 67, 79 

James, 55, 58, 67, 69 
Night watch, 257 
Niles, Daniel, 176 
Nock, Thomas, 45, 51, 55, 58, 63, 64 



Nock's Marsh, 125 

Norfolk, Va., 273, 279 

Norfolk County, Mass., 22, 74 

Norridgewog, 98 

North Hill, 156 

Northam, i, 17, 19, 23, 28 

North wood, 182 

Norway-plain, 182 

Nottingham, 10 

Numphow, Samll, 81 

Nute, James, 13, 18, 30, 31, 33, 35, 

47, 51. 58. 77 
Paul, 140 
Nutt, James, 45, 48 
Nutter, Anthony, 33, 38, 45, 56, 59, 
64, 66, 67, 72, 73, 77, 
79, 84, 86, 89 
Elder, 27, 33, 35, 44, 50, 51, 

53, 55, 58, 64, 67 
Hatevil, 13, 24, 27, 31, 65, 73 
Mr., 30, 79 
Nutter & Pierce Block, 240 

Gates, Richard, 47 
Gath of Allegiance, 86 

of Fidelity, 45, 48, 50, 73 
Gdiorn, Mr., 132 
Gdiorne, John B. H., 215, 223, 232, 

245, 296, 297 
Ger, James, 47, 52 
Officers, City, 264 

County, 246 

State, 172 

Town, 23. 45, 48, 50, 53, 77, 
no, 117, 246 
Old Style, 3, 17, 145 
Opera, 181 
Oracle, Portsmouth, 184, 194, 195, 

198 
Orchard Street, 245 
Ordinaries, 29, 34, 46, 58, 61, 66, 70 
Ordway, James, 13 
Orinoco, ship, 241 
Osborne, Daniel, 268 

Marble, 225 

Mercy, 225 
Otis, Alfred H., 296 

Christina, 94, 136 

George K., 271 

John H., 271 



322 



INDEX 



Otis, Moses, 271 

Nicholas, 102 

Richard, 45, 50, 56, 59, 68, 72, 

79, 80, 88, 93, 102, 135 
Otis' Garrison, 88, 91, 92, 102 
Oxen, 28, 129 

Ox pasture, 36, 50 

Oyster River, 34, 36, 38, 39, 40, 42, 

44, 46, 47,49*50. 51. 55. 

57, 60, 61, 63, 66, 68, 71, 

73. 74, 75, 76, 77. 78, 79. 

80, 90, 97, 98, 99, 100, 
loi, 102, 105, 106, 107, 

109, no, 112, 114, 115, 

117, 118, 121, 122, 125, 

126, 127, 129, 133, 134, 
136, 155. 251 

Oyster River Falls, 32, 98, 105, no 
Massacre, 98, 99, 100 
Meeting House, 34, 39, 40, 

42, 44, 74, 109, 121 
Parish, 118, 119, 121, 129, 134 
Point, 46 

Packets, 229, 231 
Page, Antoney, 59, 68 

John, 241, 242, 243 

, 231 

Paine, Josiah, 183 

Thomas, 79, 89 

William, 23 
Painters, 201 

Palfrey, John G., 9, 17, 21 
Palmer, Barnabas H., 215, 229 

Charlotte, 272 

William, 202 
Paper Currency, 131, 134, 143, 174, 

Hanging Manufactory, 259 
Parell, John, 123 
Parish, Dover, 115, 118, 128 

First, 150, 151, 174, 229 

Newiugton, 115 

Oyster River, 118, 119, 121, 
129, 134 

Portsmouth, 115 

Somersworth, 130, 131, 132, 
146 
Parker, John, 177 
Parkman, John, Rev., 242, 255 
Parliament, 159, 160 



Parmele, Horace, 198 

Parmenter, Warren H., 271 

Family, L. S., 202 

Parnill, John, 69 

Parris, Governor, 219 

Parsons, Benjamin F., Rev., 260 

Pascataquack, 6, 18 

Pascatoway, 77 

Passaconoway, Sagamore, 10 

Patrick, Christopher, 106 

Patterson, Edward, 45, 47. 52, 57, 

60 
Paul, Ebenezer, 128 

Ivory, 296 

Moses, 218, 267 
Payne, Thomas, 56, 59, 68 

William, 37 
Payne Street, 248, 257 
PeaboJy, Oliver, 186, 190, 194 
Peace proclamation, 128 
Peas, 31, 40, 56, 61 
Peaslee, Joseph T., 296 

Nicholas, no 
Peddlers, 162 

Peirce, Andrew, 203, 208, 210, 215, 
223, 235, 256, 263, 264, 
274, 293, 295, 296 
Penacook, 72, 91 
Penacooks, 9, 80, 81, 82 
Pender, Jeremiah, 134 
Pendergast, George P., 271 
Pendleton, Bryan, 41, 48, 53, 64 

George H., 281 
Penhallow, Samuel, 108 
Penobscot, 98, 102, 144 
Pepperell, William, 142, 173 
Pare, Mr., 136 
Perkins, Abraham, 165 

Charles E., 271 

Daniel L., 275 

Eri, 215, 295 

Jacob, 201 

Jared, 261 

Jeremy, 275 

Moses P., 235 

Nathaniel, 140 

Thomas, 74, 76, 79, 140 

William, 57, 60, 69, 74, 80 
Permett, Lasares, 55, 59, 68 
Perry, Freeman, 184 



INDEX 



323 



Peters, Hugh, 16 
Petition, Bloody Point, 24 

Dover, 21, 39, 40, 82, 83, 84, 
94, 122, 131, 13; 
Petman, John, 134 
Pettman, William, 57, 60 
Petty Chapmen, 162 
Pew rents, 119 
Philadelphia, 161, 162, 188 
Philip's War, 70, 81 
Phillips, John, 18, 204 
Phipps, William, 93 
Phtfinix, The, 180, 181, 182, 183 
Picked Rock, 124 
Pickering, John, 95, 96, 108, 177, 

178, 179, 183 
Pidgin, William, 241 
Pierce, Benjamin, 224, 226, 227, 228 

Captain, 270 

Franklin, President, 259 
Pike, Captain, 53, 65 

James, Rev., 131, 132 

John, Rev., 84, 86, 87, 88, 90, 
97. 98, loi, 102, 103, 104, 
105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 
no. III, 112, 113, 114 

Robert, 65 
Pilgrim Fathers, i 
Pinckhame, Richard, 18, 79, 80 
Pinckney, Charles C, 190, 196 
Pine Hill, 115, 133, 147, 148, 149. 
150, 180, 187, 205, 218, 
251, 264 
Pine Hill Burying Ground, 115, 133, 

187, 205, 251 
Pinkcom, Richard, 20 
Pinkham, Andrew J., 271 

Jellian, 47 

John, 67, 79 

J. B., 285 

Richard, 13, 24, 29, 51 

Thomas, 67, 137 
Pipe Staves, 23, 25, 31, 40, 42, 61, 

77. 87 
Piper, George, 293 
Piscataqua Associates, 23 

Bridge, 185, 192, 229, 262 
Ferry Co., 214, 262 
River, i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 
II, 12, 13, 14, 16, 18, 77, 



Piscataqua River, (continued) 

80, 83, 84, 87, 88, 104, 
107, 109, 217, 230, 263 
Towns, 23 
Pitman, Joseph, 108 

William, 47, 52, 69, 80 

, 99 

Place, Charles H., 271 
Plaisted, Ichabod, 105 

John, 117 
Plan of Government, 18, 94, 95, 96, 
168, 169, 172 
of Town, 192, 234 
Pleas, Court of, 88, 191 
Pleasant Street, 218, 228 
Plumer, H. S. & Co., 256 

William, 199, 201, 202, 204, 
205, 206, 208, 209 
Plymouth, 270 

Eugland, 2, 3 
Mass., 4, 5, 9 
Plymouth Colony, 7 
Council of, 7 
Rock, I 
Point Lookout, Md., 279 
Polk, James K., President, 248, 252 
Polls, 86, 129, 158, 171, 266 
Pomfret, Lieutenant, 38, 72, 79 

William, 13, 18, 20, 24, 25, 27, 
28, 29, 31, 32, 33,34, 44. 
50, 55. 58, 64,65, 66, 67, 
75, 293 
Pomroy, Leonard, 2 
Pope, Mr., 284 
Population, 12, 55, 66, 155, 164, 224, 

252 
Pork, 40, 56, 61, 75, 87 
Port Bill, 161 
Portland, Me., 191, 194, 206, 233, 

240, 252 
Porto Rico, 190 

Portsmouth, 2, 8, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24, 
44, 46, 48, 51, 53, 58,64, 
65. 70, 71, 74, 77, 78,83, 
86, 87, 88, 92, 94, 95,96, 
102, 107, 108, 112, 115, 
118, 129, 135, 138, 141, 
156, 158, 161, 164, 168, 
171, 176, 181, 182, 184, 
185, 190, 203, 204, 206, 



324 



INDEX 



Portsmouth, (continued) 

2IO, 211, 212, 215, 216, 
217, 218, 227, 231, 232, 
236, 237, 240, 267, 270, 
272, 281 

Portsmouth Artillery, 142 
Deputies, 27 
Journal, 273 

Oracle, 184, 194, 195, 198 
Railroad, 236 

Postmaster, 191, 228, 229, 233, 235, 
242, 243, 249, 253, 255, 
265 
General, 191 

Post Office, 182, 184, 227, 254 

Pound, Cochecho, 178, 180 
Dover Neck, 71, 112 

Powder, 24, 71, 76, 164, 213 

Powers, Michael, 246 
Nicholas, 149 

Prentice, John, 190 

President, Province, 85, 86, 96 

State, 165, 172, 173, 174, 175, 

178, 179, 180, 181 
United States, 177, 183, 186, 
188, 190, 193, 196, 200, 
201, 205, 206, 207, 210, 
216, 226, 233, 237, 243, 
248, 252, 254, 259, 264, 
267, 268, 269, 278, 279, 
281, 283, 286, 287, 288, 
289, 290, 291 

Presidential Electors, 177, 183, 186, 
190, 193, 196, 200, 205 

Prince, Thomas, i, 2 

Print Works, Cocheco, 175, 248 

Printery, Bellemy, 252 

Printing Office, 180, 182, 183, 197, 198 

Prison, 128, 183, 235, 237 

Prisoners, 165, 166 

Privateer, French, 190 

Proclamation of Peace, 128 

Property Qualifications, 258 

Protest, Revolutionary, 159 

Providence, ship, 3, 5 

Province of Maine, 3 

of New Hampshire, 86, 94 

Provincial Assembly, 127, 128, 129, 
130 

Provincial Convention, 163, 164 



Provincial Congress, 163, 164 
Council, (See Council) 
Governor, (See Governor) 
Records, 87, 97, 103, 105, 122, 

293 
Prudential Men, 49 
Public Houses, 118, 135, 167 

Lands, 25, 205 

Park, 266 

Record Office, London, 18 
Puritans, 14, 16, 17 
Purser, 154 
Puscassicke River, 41 

Quakers, 47. 53. '54. 120, 125, 131, 

133. 150, 177 
Quamphegan, 32, 106 
Falls, 36 

Mills, 56, 60, 68, 104 
Quebec, 93, 136 
Quicksilver, 193 
Quint, George, 236 
Ouochecho, 41, 83 
Quotas, 167, 169, 270, 272, 273, 274, 

277, 278, 279, 280, 281, 

283, 286 

Radford, Abraham, 33 
Rafe, Clement, 59 
Ragg, Jeffrey, 31 
Railroad Accidents, 258, 259 
Block, 248 
Bridge, 245, 260 
Railroad, Boston & Maine, 236, 240, 
241, 278 
" Boston & Worcester, 241 
Cochecho, 253, 255, 257, 258, 

276 
Dover & Portsmouth, 236, 

254. 259 
Dover & Winnipiseogee, 276, 

278 
Lowell, 235 
Rallins, James, 45, 56, 59, 67 

Thomas, 56, 59 
Rand, John H., 231 
John T., 276 
Randal, John, 134 
William, 134 
Randall, Horace, 271 



INDEX 



325 



Randall, Mr., 175 
Paul, 257 

Ranger, Frigate, 253 

Rann, John, 84 

Raphf, Clemant, 56 

Rates, 28,30, 31, 33, 34, 38, 41, 42, 
43, 44. 46, 47. 48,50, 51.- 
52, 55. 5.657, 58, 59. 60, 
61, 67, 68, 69, 70, 73, 75, 
76,77,78,79.80,83,85, 
87,90, 104, 129, 131, 133, 
138, 149. 154, 157, 264, 
266 

Rawlins, Ichabod, 11 1 
James, 18, 31 

Rawson, Edward, 28, 41 

Rayner, Frances, Mrs., 84 

John, Rev., 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 
49. 55. 58, 66, 67, 69, 74, 
75, 76, 83, 84, 85 

Read, Michael, 194, 280 

Rebellion, 268, 269, 270, 271, 272, 
273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 
278, 279, 280, 281, 282, 
283, 284, 285, 286 

Recorder of Deeds, 239 

Records, Assembly, 109, 118, 123, 

135 
Council, 102 
Massachusetts, 25, 26, 27, 28, 

41. 53 
Provincial, 87, 97, 103, 105 

122, 293 
Town, 18, 23, 30, 33, 44, 45, 47, 

48,51,55. 56, 63, 64, 79, 

80, 159, 160, 188, 264, 

293 
Recruiting Office, 269, 272, 280 
Red River, I,a., 279 
Reede, Solomon, 141 
Regiment, New Hampshire, 143, 
148, 150, 158, 170, 189, 
273. 278 
1st., 270, 272 
2nd., 158, 200, 211, 270, 271, 

272, 275, 276, 277, 279 
3d., 279 
4th., 276, 279 
5th., 275, 279 
6th., 275, 279 



Regiment, 7th., 276, 279 

8th., 279 

9th., 274, 275, 279 

loth., 275, 279 

nth., 275, 279 

i2th., 275, 279 

13th., 275, 279 

14th., 279 

i8th., 280, 281 

39th., 211 
Register of Deeds, 204 

of Probate, 210 
Register, Strafford, 180, 208, 210, 

211, 213 
Relief Society, 230 
Religious test, 258 

troubles, 14, 15, 16, 17, 24 
Remich.John, 188 
Rendezvous, 272, 280 
Rents, 37, 38, 39, 43, 44, 49, 50, 66, 

73. 76, III 
Representatives, 71, 108, 115, 121, 

123, 134. 137, 148, 151, 
154. ^57. 161, 164, 169, 
173, 174, 175, 189, 190, 
205, 212, 238, 243, 254, 
260, 293 
Republicans, 178, 179, 188, 191, 193, 
197, 199, 205, 213, 229, 
232, 264, 266 
Retailers, 162, 202 
Revenue, Surplus, 238, 240, 244 
Revolution, 159, 165, 170, 172, 174, 

253, 270, 293 
Reynolds, Joseph, 235 

William, 235 
Rhode Island, 166, 167, 168 
Riall, Teage, 52, 57, 61, 69, 80 
Rich, Richard, 79 
Richards, John, 116, 142 

Joseph, 142 
Richardson, James, 293 

Stephen, 271 
Richardson's Tavern, 194 
Ricker, Ebenezer, 163 
George, 79, no 
John, 116 
Judith, 102 
Maturin, no 
Ricker field, 166 



326 



INDEX 



Riding post, 182 

Rifle Co., Great Falls, 235 

Riley, John, 190, 208, 245, 295 

Rindge, Daniel, 177 

Ring, Eliphalet, 141 

Risley, Robert, 52 

William, 48, 66 
River & Harbor Bill, 230 
Roads, 186, 189, 203 
Roberts, Aaron, 261 

Aniasa, 293 

Charles P., 271 

Dorothy, 90 

George W., 277 

Hanson, 296 

John, 33, 38, 45, 51, 55. 58, 
61, 63, 64, 65, 67, 76, 77, 
79, 80, 84, 85,89, 90, 94, 
96 

Joseph, 119, 120 

Mr., 31, 44, 194 

Nathaniel, 115 

Samuel, 140 

Stephen, 137 

Thomas, 5, 13, 18, 20, 24, 33, 
38, 45.47, 50, 51. 55-58- 
67, 79. 84, 93, 117, 119, 
120, 140 

William, 31, 33, 34, 47. 5°. 52, 
57, 60, 68. 72, 78 
Robinson, Jonn P., 281 

Stephen, 52, 60, 65, 69 
Roby, Henry, 74 

Rochester, 10, 140, 142, 143, 150, 
151, 182, 190, 206, 211, 
232, 247, 258, 281 
Rockingham County, 158, 180 

Guards, 218, 235 
Rocky Point, 50 
Roe, Richard, 84 
Rogers, Captain, 241 

Rev. Mr., 132 

Richard, 24 

Robert, 204, 239, 295 

Stephen H., 271 
Rogers & Patten, 204 
Rollins, Edward H., 282 

Hiram, 268, 271 

James, 30, 33, 39 
RolHnsford, 255 



Rooe, Richard, 56, 59, 67 
Root, David, Rev., 233, 241 
Ros, Richard, 53 
Ross, Richard N., 282 
Rosse, John, 27 
Rothwell, Jeremiah, 271 
Row, Richard, 74 
Rowley, Mass., 54 
Roxbury, Mass., 54, 77 
Rum, New England, 171 

West India, 171 
Runls, JohUj 134 
Russell, Richard, 49 
Russian Stoves, 202 
Rye, 4, 135, 203 

Sabbath School, 208 

Saco, Me., 11 

Safety, Committee of, 163, 164, 165, 

166, 168, 174, 191 
Sagadehock River, i, 3 
Sagamores, 80, 81 
St. John Indians, 98 
St. Petersburg, 241 
St. Thomas Church, 241, 243 
Salem, 270 
Salem, Mass., 14, 16, 22, 177. 179, 

197 
Salisbury, Mass., 54, 105 
Salmon, 26 

Salmon Falls, 96, 105, 106, no 
Salmon Falls River, 10, 105 
Salt Works, i 
Salter, Rev. Mr., 270 

Richard, 141 
Saltonstall, Richard, 26 
Salutes, 176, 184, 194, 195, 206, 218, 

273, 281, 283, 284, 285, 

286 
Sam, Indian, 141 
Samll Numphow, 81 
Sampson Aboquecemoka, 81 
Sanborn, John II., 271 
Sanbornton, 197 
Sand Bank, 264 
Sanders, Charles, 271 

Joseph, 56, 59, 68 
Sandy Point, 40, 53 
Sanitary Commission, 272 
Sargent, John B., 235, 279 



INDEX 



327 



Savage, James, 2 

Savil, John, 253 

Saviugs Bank, Straffoid, 213, 214, 

242, 270 
Saw Mills, 8, 27, 29, 32, 33, 34, 35, 
36, 38, 39.44. 49.51. 63, 
73. 98, 200 
Sawyer, Alfred I., 214, 255 
Cbarles W., 272 
Jacob, 231 
Stephen, 179, 193 
Thomas E., 256, 257, 258, 268, 

282, 296 
Walter, 295 
Sawyer Woolen Mills, 214, 255 
Say, Lord, 13 

Sayles, Samuel P., 271, 276 
Seamen, Richard, 59 
Scammell, Alexander, 170 
School, Belknap, 261, 265 

Grammar, 123, 149, 265 
High, 234, 256 
Latin 112 
School Districts, 153, 186, 191, 192 
Houses, 150, 154. 186, 189, 192, 
256, 261, 265, 272 
Schoolmasters, 40, 43, 98, 112, 118, 

123, 124 
Schools, 112, 123, 149, 153, 163, 173, 

234, 256, 265 
Schooner, 173 
Scott, Winfield, 259 
Scouting, 78,83, 97, 105, 108, 112, 123 
Scruien, John, 56, 59, 68 
Scruton, George H., 271 

Thomas, 49 
Seabrook, 87 
Second Falls, Cochecho, 32, 33, 34, 

37. 106 
Second Meeting House, 17, 35 
Secretary of State, 102, 286 

of War, 225 
Seeley, Mr., 31 

Selectmen, 28, 39, 43, 44, 45.46, 49 
53, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 70 
71. 72, 75. 76, 90, loi 
106, 107, 117, 118, 121 
122, 123, 124, 139, 150 
154, 163, 165, 166, 168 
169, 173. 177. 179. 184 



Selectmen, (continued) 

186, 234, 238, 241, 252, 

257, 264, 293 
Senate, State, 173, 174, 178, 179, 254, 

274 
United States, 237, 250, 262 
Senators, 188, 295 
Serogumba, 81 
Settlement, i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 

II, 12 
Sever, Nicholas, Rev., 113, 114, 116, 

120 
Sewall, Mr., 54 
Seward, Samuel, 67 
Shackford, Captain, 143 
Sham Fight, 81, 82 
Shannon, Captain, 183 
Shapleigh, Major, 70 
Nicholas, 38, 81 
Sharpe, John, 59 
Sheafe, James, 189, 205, 206 
Sheep, 29, 129, 161, 168 
Sheperd, William, 133, 297 
Sherburne, Daniel, 271 
Henry, 65 
John S., 181 
Mr., 132 
Samuel, 96 
Sheridan, General, 285 
Sheriff, 89, 102, 139, 165, 175, 176, 

185, 190 
Sherman, General, 285 
Sherwill, Nicholas, 2 
Shiffilld, Ickeabod, 45 

William, 45 
Ship Island, La., 275 
Ship Yard, 239 

Shipping, 28, 229, 231, 241, 244 
Shoes, 171 

Shuckford, William, 56, 59, 74, 84 
Shurtleff, William, 127 

Shu , Will, 52 

Silver Street, 154, 225, 230, 251, 252, 

261 
Simonds, Michael, 69 
Simpson, Bartholmew, 112 
Sise, Edward, 200, 2c6 
Slaughter House, 191 
Slaves, 129, 155, 164, 166, 167, 211, 
236. 259 



328 



INDEX 



Sleeper, Henry, 141 
Sloper, Richard, 45 
Small, Edward, 105 

Francis, 31 
Small Pox, 187, 237 
Smart, Robert, 41 
Smey, Bartliey, 24 
Smith, Archibald, 140 

Bartholmew, 18, 20 

Benjamin, 133 

Edward, 32 

George, 29, 31, 32 

James, 47, 57, 61, 69, 73, 80, 

134 
Jeremiah, 191, 196, 197, 199, 

245 

John, 57, 69, 123, 124, 133, 140, 
294 

John H., 259 

Joseph, 52, 57, 69, 79, 191, 204, 
223, 227, 265 

Joseph H., 268, 296 

Moses S. F., 271 

Mr., 27 

Samuel, 133 

Samuel D., 265 

Thomas L., 268 

William B., 235, 243 

, 61, 100 

Smith's Garrison, 99, 100 

Smyth, Frederic, 2S4 

Snell, Samuel, 102, 270 

Society of Friends, 177, 178, 179, 

186, 225, 251, 252, 255 
Soldiers, 74, 78, 81, 83, 97, loi, 102, 
104, ic6, III, 112, 114, 
122, 133, 134, 137. 139. 
140, 141, 143. 144, 146, 
147, 148, 150, 158, 163, 
164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 
169, 170, 172, 203, 270, 
271, 272, 273, 274, 275, 
276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 
281, 283, 284, 285, 286 
Soldiers Aid Society, 272 
Somersworth, 130, 131, 132, 138, 143, 
146, 150, 155, 168, 180, 
211, 230, 255 

Meeting House, 132, 245 

Parish, 130, 131, 132, 146 



Soul of Soldiery, 210 
Soule, Charles E., 293 
South Berwick, Me., 193, 242 

Carolina, 268 

Dover, 258 

Pine Street, 257 
Spalding, George B., Rev., 16 
Speaker, 21, 108, 144, 145, 165, 181, 

212, 250, 274, 295, 296 
Special Court, 58, 88 
Specie Payment, Siaspension of, 

238, 265 
Sperling, Ensign, 217 
Sprague, Peleg, 189 
Squamscot Falls, 7, 10, ir 
Squando, Sagamore, 81 
Stackpole, Thomas, 249, 255, 293 
Stacpole, Mrs., 183 
Stages, 191, 194, 212, 233 
Stagpole, Samuel, 165 
Stamp Act, 153 
Stanton, Benjamin, 140 
Staples, George H., 271 

John, 271 
Starbord, John, 165 
Starbuck, Edward, 19, 20, 24, 26, 31, 

32, 33. 38, 45 
Elder, 26, 27, 29, 37 
Nathaniel, 45 
Stark, George, 268, 273 
Starr, Edward, 18, 19 
State Constitution, 165, 167, 172, 
181, 239, 245 
Convention, 165, 168, 169, 172, 

175. 176 

Fair, 265, 266 

Governor, (See Governor) 

House, 270 

Officers, 172 

Papers, 133, 137 

Presidents, 165, 172, 173, 174, 
175, 178, 179, 180, 181 
Steamboats, 231, 232, 237, 257 
Steam Mills, 237, 249, 250 
Steele, John H., 248, 249 

Jonathan, 193 
Steeple Clock, 177, 236 

House, 177 
Stephenson, Thomas, 31 
Steuenson, Thomas, 33, 48, 52, 60 



INDEX 



329 



Stevens, Abraham C, 271 

Benjaiuin F., 271 

Enos, 242, 243, 244 

George H., 271 

Nathaniel, 79 

William S., 296 
Stevenson, Joseph, 69, 89 

Thomas, 89 
Steward, Town, 37, 58 
Stickney, Jeremiah, 256 
Stillman, EHas, 65 
Stimsou, Joseph, 80 

, 80 

Stocks, 47, 71, 72 
Stokes, Isaac, 46, 55, 58, 67, 79, 80 
Stone, J., Mrs., 266 
Stones, Nathaniel, 84 
Stoodley, Jonathan, 141 
Storer, William, 18, 20 
Storey, William, 24, 31, 33, 38, 44 
Strafford, 232 

Strafford Bank, 192, 213, 215, 242, 
253. 270 

Bank Block, 247 
Strafford County, 158, 164, 165, 167, 
175, 178, 180, 199, 202, 
204, 237, 239, 241, 243, 
246, 265, 281 

Guards, 213, 216, 217, 218, 235, 
275, 279, 280, 281, 284, 
285 

Medical Association, 270 

Register, 180, 208, 210, 211,213 

Savings Bank, 213, 214, 242, 
270 
Stratham, 11, 135 
Strawberry Bank, 8, 9, 13, 15, 23, 

24, 25, 27, 28, 47 
Stuens, Nathaniel, 67 
Suchforth, William, 67 
Suffolk County, Mass., 8 
Suhawannick River, 104 
Suicides, 90, 178, 216, 230, 231, 234, 

241, 261, 266 
Sullivan, Fort, 204 
Sullivan, General, 163, 167, 170, 
172, 174 

George, 237, 238 

Humphrey, 123, 124 

John, 161, 173, 174, 175-177. 178 



Sumter, Fort, 268, 283 

Sun, Dover, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 

193, 199, 200, 203 
Superior Court, 210, 217 
Supreme Court, 192 
Surplus Revenue, 238, 240, 244 
Surrender of Lee, 284 
Surveyor, 77, 104, no, 135 

General, 24 
Suspension of Specie payment, 238, 

265 
Swadden, Philip, 19, 20 
Swaddow, Philip, 18, 19 
Swain's Hill, 263 
Swamps, 32, 36, 65, 76, 78, 105 
Swasey, John B., 223 
Swine, 129, 129, 192 
Syll, Joseph, 81 
Symonds, Mr., 27 

Tan Yards, 205 
Tar, 104 
Tariff, 234 

Tarlton, William, 193 
Tarr, Beuedictus, 116 
Tash, Edwin S., 271 

Thomas, 185 
Tasker, Samuel, 108 
Taskett, William, 79, 89 
Taverners, 162 
Taverns, 46, 70, 118, 135, 148, 183, 

194, 202, 217, 265 
Taxes, 28, 29, 30, 31, 33, 34, 39, 40, 

44, 45, 47. 48, 50, 51, 52, 
55. 56, 57. 58,59. 60,61, 
67, 68, 69, 73, 75, 87, 
loi, 118, 129, 134, 138, 
144, 149, 150, 153, 157, 
158, 171, 202, 244, 264, 
266, 275 

Tax Payers, 30, 31, 33, 34, 44, 45, 47. 
48,51. 52. 55, 56,57, 58, 
59, 60, 61, 66, 67, 68, 69, 
79, 80, 107 

Taylor, Edward, 107 

Zackery, President, 254, 255 

Tea, Duty on, 160 

Teachers Instititte, 252 

Teare, Thomas, 79 

Tebbetts, Captain, 115, 117, 119 



330 



INDEX 



Tebbetts, Henry, 13, 24, 33, 45, 51. 
55> 67 
Israel, 223 

Jeremiah, 45, 51, 55, 58, 67, 76, 
John, 202 

Lydia, 190, 195, 196, 200, 210 
Samuel, 119, 120, 121, 294 
Thomas, 113, 119, 120, 293 
T. L., 285 
Teddar, Steven, 18, 19 
Telegraph, 252 

Temperance Societies, 22S, 246 
Tenements, 247, 250, 261 
Tetherly's Block, 252 
Texas, 240, 249, 250, 254 
Thanksgiving, 102, 165, 209 
Thayer, Andrew G., 209 

Mr., 156 
Theatre, 181 
Thing, Jonathan, 96 

Samuel, 117 
Third Street, 239 
Thomas, Edward, 184 

Elisha, 175, 176, 280 
Joseph, 133 
Thomas Johnson's Creek, 36, 46, 

102 
Thompson, Ebenezer, 177, 183, 185, 
186, 190 
John, 119 
William, 140 
Thomson, David, i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 

8, II, 12 
Thomson's Point House, 31 
Thornton, Matthew, 163 
Throat Distemper, 127, 135, 138, 141 
Thunder Storms, 141, 167, 168, 182, 
225, 238, 249, 263, 265, 

273 
Tibbetts, Henry, 31, 79 
James H., 271 
Jeremy, 38, 79, 113 
John, 113 
Samual, 140 
Tides, 88, 106 

Timber, 24, 25, 32, 35, 36, 37, 41. 42, 
49, 61, 63, 73, 75. 89, 

135. 155 
Titcomb, Benjamin, 169 
John, 140, 147 



Tobacco, 53 

Toll-end, 58, 60, loi, 209, 224 

Falls, 105, 106 
Tompkins, Daniel D., 205 

Mary, 54 
Tomson, Robert, iii 

William, 45 
Tom Thumb, steamer, 247 
Toppan, Colonel, 177 
Torchlight Procession, 282 
Tories, 164, 165, 167 
Tornadoes, 203, 211 
Torr, Andrew, 169, 295 
Tortugas, 276 
Town Accounts, 154 

Bell, 174, 177, 178, 186 

Books, 45, 66, 120, 123, 131, 

132, 133 
Clerk, 28, 35, 38, 45, 90, 131, 

163, 178, 187, 239, 293 
Debts, 43 
Farm, 205 
Hall, 219, 246, 248 
House, 154, 157, 244 
Lots, 173, 174, 177, 185, 186, 

190, 205, 244 
Marks, 28 

Meetings, 23, 29, 30, 32, 33, 
34.46. 53, 63, 64,65, 71, 
72, 90, 94, 96, III, 115, 
116, 120, 147, 148, 149, 
150, 161, 162, 163, 170, 
174, 181 
Officers, 23, 45, 48, 50, 53, 77, 

no, 116, 246 
Plan of, 192, 234 
Records, 18, 23, 30, 33, 44, 
45, 47, 48, 5'. 55-56, 63, 
64, 79, 80, 159, 160, 188, 
264, 293 
Steward, 37, 58 
Townsmen, 23, 25, 32, 40, 46, 61, 71 
Townsend, Jonas D., 296 
Trackie, Isaac, 84 
Trading with Indians, 5, 6, 14, 27 
Train Baud List, 166 
Training Men, 137 

Place, 46 
Transparencies, 282, 283 
Treason, 87, 88 



INDEX 



331 



Treasurer, 27, 38, 58, 65, 70, 76, 96, 
97, 101, 104, III, 112, 
122, 123, 150, 178, 245, 
264, 269, 274 
Trickett, Thomas, 31 
Trickey, EpUraim, 87 

Thomas, 20, 25, 33, 45, 56, 59, 
67 
Trickey 's Farm, 109 
Trimiiigs, Oliver, 25 
Tripe, Richard, 173, 179, 295 
Tripp, William H., 271 
Trois Rivieres, 97 
Troopers, 137 
Troops, Continental, 167 

New Hampshire, 74, in, 112, 
133- 134, 137. 139, 140, 
141, 146, 147, 148, 158, 
163, 164, 165, 170, 189, 
200, 211 
United States, 201 
Trucking Cloth, 10 

House, 72 
Tucker, John, 102 
Tuftonborough, 171, 266 
Tufts, Asa A., 228, 230, 236, 243, 249 
Charles A., 284, 293 
Henry, 185 
Rev. Mr., 132 
Ture, John, 31 
Turner, Thomas, 44, 66 
Turnpike, 193, 217, 242 
Tuttell, John, 38, 44, 55, 67, 102 
Thomas, 38 
Widow, 58 
Tuttle, Charles W., 95 
Ensign, 114 

John, 13, 20, 24, 31, 33, 50, 94, 
95, 96, loi, 102, 103, 104, 
105, 106, 108, III, 113, 
117, 120, 124, 293 

Jo., 79 

Nathaniel, 267 

Stephen, 245 

Thomas, 150 

Tobias, 295 
Twenty Acre Lots, 24 
Twamly, Ralph, 45, 56, 59, 64, 68, 

79 
Twombley, Joseph, 141 



Twombley, Nathaniel, 269 
Samuel T., 258 
William, 141 

Ugroue, Johx, 24 
Umfirie, Thomas, 47, 55 
Uncurrent Bank Bills, 197 
Underbill, John, 14,15,16, 18, 19, 

20 
Union Army, 276, 283 

Block, 248, 273 

Hall, 194 

Mass Meeting, 276, 281, 282 

Street, 249 
Union with Massachusetts, 19, 20, 
21, 22, 24, 63, 85, 9 J, 96 
Unitarian Church, 228, 242, 250, 
257, 260, 262, 265, 287 

Society, 228, 234, 236, 241, 
255. 280 
United Colonies, 94 
United States Army, 286 

Bank, 230 

Congress, 188, 200, 216, 231, 
234, 237, 238, 261 

Consul, 248 

Engineers, 225 

Hotel, 253 

Navy, 247, 281, 286 

President, (See President) 

Troops, 201 
Universalist Church, 239, 240 
Upgroufe, John, 18 
Upham, Timothy, 223, 229, 230 
Upper Bridge, 157, 214, 236, 256 

Factory, 106, 200, 232, 235, 255 

Falls, 102, 210 
Usher, John, 97 

Valuation, 28, 29, 129, 158, 264, 

266 
Van Buren, Martin, President, 237, 

238, 242, 243, 254 
Varney, Alfred, 267 
Eunice, 255 
Humphrey, 45, 47. 5^. 55, 58, 

68, 79 
Jesse, 197, 198, 215 
John S., 271 
Robert, 19, 20 



332 



INDEX 



Varney, Shubael, 256, 296 

Tharon F., 271 
Varney's Block, 239, 248 
Vaughan, Major, 109 

William, 96, 102, 104 
Veuner, James M., 271 
Vessels, 229, 231, 240 
Vice President, 85, 86, 177, 183, 186, 
190, 193, 196, 200, 205, 
216, 267, 281 
Vicksburg, Miss., 276 
Vigilance Committee, 257 
Villieu, 98 
Vines, Richard, 11 
Virginia, 9 

Vittum, George D., 268 
Volunteers, 106, 114, 141 

Three Months, 268, 269, 270 
271, 272 

Three Years, 270, 273, 274, 
278, 279, 280, 281, 286 
Vote of Dover, (See Dover Vote) 
Voters, 86, 117,158, 266 
Vutter, Nicholas, 55, 58 

WADI.E1GH, Elijah, 296 
George, 296 

Robert, 72, 73, 74, 96, '55 
Wakefield, 126, 182 
Waldron, Abigail, 180 
Candace, 259 
Captain, 45, 53, 56, 58, 59, 62, 

64. 66, 67, 70, 71, 72, 76, 

79, 80, 155, 156, 157 
Colonel, 87, 122, 123, 128 
Daniel, 193, 208, 248 
Elexander, 67 
George, 56, 59, 68, 79 
Hannah, 201 
John, 114, 161, 162, 163, 173, 

174, 175, 201, 204, 215, 

226, 292, 294, 295 
John F., 271 
Major, 21, 35, 78, 80, 81, 82, 

83, 86, 88, 89, 91, 92, 93. 

105, 107, 135, 173, 239 
Paul, 72 
Plato, 236 
Richard, 13, 18, 20, 21, 26, 27, 

29. 30. 31. 33. 36, 37. 38. 



Waldron, Richard, (continued) 

41. 43> 49. 50. 53. 54. 64. 
65, 71. 72, 75. 76,81,84, 
85, 86, 88, 96, 102, 105, 
107, 108, 113, 119, 120, 
130, 132, 144, 179, 205, 
292 
R. Kenny, 140 

Thomas W,, 147, 148, 151, 153, 
154, 156, 248, 259. 292, 

294 
Thomas Westbrook, 139, 147, 

148, 164, 173, 180, 236, 

292, 293, 294 
Wells, 296 

William, 18, 20, 23, 28, 30 
Waldron Burying Ground, 115 
Falls, 173, 179, 201, 227 
Garrison, 91, 92, 102, 107 
Mills, 87, 157, 179 
Street, 251 
Waldrons, 280 
Walker, Major, 218 
Mark, 191 
Sergeant, 97 
Thomas H., 271 
Timothy, 183, 186, 190, 191, 

193 
Wallace, Sylvester B., 271 
Wallingford, Captain, 138, 139 
Colonel, 138 
John O., 280 

Thomas, 138, 139, 141,292,294 
Z. S., 268, 282 
Walsh, Richard, 271 
Walton, George, 29, 30, 31, 34 

Mr., 151 
Wanolucet, Sagamore, 81 
War with England, 199, 200, 201, 

202, 203 
Ward, Henry, 166 
Ward Officers, 263 
Warockomec, 81 

Washington, George, President, 
177, 183, 189, 219, 253 
Martha, Association, 246 
City, 233, 272, 275, 276, 279, 

280, 284, 286, 287, 289 
Street, 224, 239, 240, 244, 246, 
247 



INDEX 



333 



Wason Tan Yard, 205 
Wastill, John, 18 
Watch House, 71, 88 
Watch & Ward, 103, 109 
Watering Place, 76, 120 
Watson, Dudley, 147, 149 
Jonathan, 79 

Mr., 195 

Robert, 68, 80, 100 

Samuel, 140 
Wa5'es, 46, 77 

Waymouth, Edward, 55, 58 
Weare, Meshech, 139, 145, 165, 172 

Mr., 93 

Nathaniel, 96, 131, 132 

Peter, 117 
Wearesmen, 26 

Webb, George, 18, 24, 25, 31, 33 
Webster, Daniel, 200 
Wecanacohunt, 11 
Weights, 71 
Welch, Benjamin F., 271 

Ralph, 79 
Welchmau's Cove, loi 
Wellmet, James, 130 
Wells, Me., 172 
Wells, John S., 263, 265 
Wencoll, Mr., 65 
Wendell, Daniel H., 272, 273, 296 

Isaac, 227 
Wenham, Mass., 54 
Wentworth, Benjamin, 124, 125, 
128, 294 

Captain, 123 

Elder, 39, 45. 56, 59. 66, 68, 
73, 80, 92, 292 

Ephraim, 108 

Ezekiel, 79, iii, 113, 293 

George T., 255, 293 

Gershom, 79, 84 

Governor, 142, 153, 156, 158, 
167 

Job, 162 

John, 73, 122, 142, 158, 160, 
163, 164, 166, 171, 174, 
292, 294 

Joshua, 178, 179 

Paul, 119, 120, 292, 294 

Samuel, 56,59, 68, 73, 184, 188 

William, 33, 35, 50, 64, 84 



West, Henry, 271 
West India Rum, 171 
West Indies, 191 
West Point, 224 
Westell, John, 24 
Westinman, the, 48 
Wharves, 28, 229, 237 
Wheat, 31, 40, 56, 61, 87 
Wheeler, John, no, 191, 193, 200, 
215, 242, 295 

Paul J., 273 

Samuel M., 268, 282, 284, 286 
Wheelock, Edwin M., Rev., 265 
Wheelwright, John, 10, 21, 54 
Wheelwright Deed, 10, 11 
Wheelwright's Pond, 97 
Whidden, Michael, 230 
Whig Convention, 242, 243 
Whigs, 235, 239, 242, 244, 248, 250, 

257, 259, 262 
Whipping Post, 71 
White, Amos, 204, 208 

John H., 228, 229, 244, 246, 
248, 260, 296 

Timothy, 165 
White Mountains, 172, 231, 234 
Whitehall, 112 
Whitehouse, George L., 236 

Thomas, 58, 62, 65, 67, 72, 79 
Whiting, William, 13 
Whittier, Moses, 251 
Whittier's Falls, 209, 251 

Mills, 209 
Wiers, 259 
Wiggin, Benjamin, 296 

Captain, 13, 14, 17, 27, 28, 37, 
45 > 60 

Nathaniel, 296 

Thomas, 8, 11, 32, 33, 34, 36, 
56, 58, 64 

William B., 296 
Wiggins, John H., 256, 296 
Willand's Pond, 265 
Wille, Stephen, 134, 297 

Theoder, 134 
Willey, Ivory H., 232 

Nathaniel, 271 

Thomas, 31, 33, 48, 52, 57. 60, 
69, 74, 79, 122 
William, Sagamore, 81 



334 



INDEX 



William & Mary, gS 
William and Mary, Fort, no 

Williams, Jared 2., 250, 252, 254 

John, 200, 204, 215, 221, 222, 
223, 227, 246, 295 

Mathew, 48, 52, 57, 61, 69 

Mr., 15, 27 

R. O., Rev., 240 

William, 47, 48, 50, 51, 52, 57, 
60, 68, 69, 72, 79, 80 
Willie, Samuel, 80 

Stephen, So 
Willys, George, 13 
Wilmington, Mass., 235 
Wilson, David, 296 • 

Henry, 233 

James, 239, 241 

John, 67 
Windict, John, 89 
Wine Taverns, 46 
Winford, Ezekiel, 84 
Wingate, Andrew, 166 

John, 46, 77, 137, 139, 223, 249, 
292 

Joshua, 160, 161, 162, 165, 166, 
167, 169, 292, 294, 295 

Moses, 140, 141, 144, 215, 295 

Paine, 177 

William P., 249 
Wingate Apple Tree, 249 
Winget, John, 68, 84, 104, 294 

Daniel, 140 
Winnepessocay Pond, 134 
Winnichahannet, i 
Winnipiseogee Canal, 181, 214, 217, 
223, 225 

Lake, 214, 217,232, 233, 262 

Pond, 143, 181 
Winnipishoky pond, 123 
Winslow, Mr., 9, 23, 229 

Samuel, 37 
Winthrop, Governor, 2 

John, 146 

Robert C, 2 
Wise, Rev. Mr., 132 
Wiswall, Captain, 97 



Wi- 



-, Wm., 141 



Woddin, John, 59 

Wolf rates, 41, 53, 62, 71, 72 

Wolfborough, 167, 174, 182, 212, 257 

Wonolancet, 80, 81, 82, 91 

Wood, John, 57, 292 

Woodbury, John, 249 

Levi, 213, 214, 231 
Woodman, Captain, ico, loi, 105 

Charles, 212, 295 

Charles W., 268 

John, 47, 51, 57.61, 64, 69, 77, 
80, 89, 94, 96, loi, 106, 

293 

Joseph, 134 

William, 208, 238 
Woodman's Garrison, 99, 100, 112 
Woolen cloth, 171 
Woolen Mills, Sawyer, 214, 255 
Workhouse, 186 
Workingmen, 232 
Wormwood, Jacob, 134 

Joseph, 134 
Worth, Lieutenant, 225 
Wyatt, Samuel, 219, 278 
Wyatt's Inn, 206, 207 

York, Benjamin, 80 

John, 74, 80 
York, Me., 15, 136 
York County, 128 
Yorke, Richard, 31, 33, 48, 51, 57, 

60, 69 
Yorkshire, 78 
Yorktown, Va., 170, 279 
Young, Charles, 258, 293 

Eleazer, 140 

Ezra, 188 

Jeremiah S. Rev., 241 

Jeremy, 254 

Joseph, 189 

Nathaniel, 215, 296 

Thomas, 166, 169, 170 
Young Lincoln Guards, 281 
Young Washington Guards, 281 
Young's Tannery, 242, 267 

Wharf, 237 



BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

F44.D7F13 BOSS 

Notable events in the history of Dover, 



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