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Full text of "Note-book kept by Thomas Lechford, esq., lawyer, in Boston, Massachusetts bay, from June 27, 1638, to July 29, 1641"









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REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTfON 



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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRAF 



3 1833 01100 8940 



NOTE-BOOK 



KEPT BY 



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THOMAS LECHFORD,! ESQ., 

En Boston, iHassadjusctts Sag, 

FROM JUNE 27, 1638, TO JULY 29, 1641. 



THC 

NEWBERRY 
LIBRARY 

CHICAGO 



CAMBRIDGE: 

JOHN WILSON AND SON. 

Smbtrsftg 19ress. 

1885. 



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1790970 



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F Lechford, Thomas, 1590?-1GM? 

8441 ^"Xote-book kept by Tliomns Lechford, esq., lawyer, in Bos- 
.5 ton, ^r:i.ss:i(lHisetts bay, from June 27, 1038, to July 29, 1G41. 

■ Cambridge, J. AVilson and son, 1885. 

2 II. l.,x.\viii, k;0 p." 25'"'°. (Added t.-p.: Arclifcolojiia americana. 
Triins:ic-ti()n> .LUii colleotiona of the Amoiican antiquiiriaQ society, vol. 

vii) Tranting. 

Editod hy IMwaid Ererett ILile, jr., from the oriKinal manuscript, 
with the use of uolt-s and material prepared by J. II. Trumbull and 
BHEfCARCothers. , 

"A ski't<h of Uie life of Thomas Lechford. By J. Hammond Trum- 
bull" : ji. (Vii.-xxviii. 

1. Ikist.on- -Hist.— Colonial period. 2. ilassachuRetts — Hist.— Colo- 
nial pormd— yoiines. i. Hale, Edward Everett, 18C3- ed. ii. 
Trunibiill. James Hammond, 1S21-1807. c ^ u ■--. 

^<^v-<-' /■• ^ 0—34789 

Library of Coticrress ( I E172.A3 vol.7 

91P,AF, -^"^y- ^ WrG7.L45 , • ,^ .. 






Copyright, 1SS5, 
Bt The American Antiqcariajt Society, 



xc 



INTEODUCTOEY NOTE. 



^T^PIE Council of tlie American Antiquarian Society 
deteiTnined many years since to include Lecpi- 
ford's Note-book in its publications. ^Ir. Samuel 
Jenxisox, so long an active officer of the Society, 
had obtained the original manuscript from a friend, 
and had devoted much time to its study. He had 
made a beginning in preparing it for the press at 
the time of his death. 

It -svill readily be seen tbat it is one of the most 
valuable documents which liave been preserved, of 
the history of the first generation of Massachusetts. It 
is the daily record of the work done in the office of the 
only professional lawyer in the colony. His duties 
brought liim into close relations with people of every 
class; and in more tlian one instance his memo- 
randa throw light on social customs, on questions of 
•local geography, on points of family history, and on 
the development of the political life of the countr}-. 
Poor Lechford's own character, and the circumstances, 
ahiiost pathetic, of his controversies with the leader of 
the colony, and of his return to England, are all eluci- 
dated in the volume. 



iv INTRODUCTORY NOTE. 

The Council tlianks all the gentlemen who have 
been connected with the publication of the volume for 
the interest whicli tliey have taken in it ; and espe- 
cially our associate, Mr. Samuel Jennison, of Boston, 
the present owner of the original manuscript, for 
permission to print it. It would not even now be 
published but for tlie personal care and attention of 
our lamented friend Judge Foster, who studied, with 
a lawyer's sympathy, these memorials of the life of 
the first New England lawyer. But for his death the 
volume would have been earlier completed. 

Tlie expense of printing has been partially met by a 
special subscription among the members of the Society, 
the Publishing Fund being unfortunately so small that 
the expense of printing the regular '* Proceedings" of the 
Society exhausts all its income. 

For the Committee of Publication, 

Edward E. Hale. 

Boston, September 17, 1SS5. 



VI EDITOR'S NOTE. 

P. Upliam. The notes to the first one hundred pages, 
prepared by Mr. Trumbull for his projected edition, 
have been bodily transferred by me, with such correc- 
tions as that gentleman desired to make. Such notes 
are marked with a [T]. 

I have had at every step in my work the careful 
guidance and assistance of my father, the Rev. Dr. 
Edward E. Hale, who has given much of his time 
to a careful revision of the proofs, as well as most 
unfailing sympathy and interest to every portion of 
the work. I must also gladly acknowledge the kind 
and useful assistance rendered by Mr. John AVard 
Dean, Mr. J. Hammond Trumbull, Dr. Samuel A. 
Green, Mr. Charles Deane, Mr. William S. Appleton, 
Mr. Edmund M. Barton, librarian, end Mr. Reuben 
Colton, assistant librarian, of the Society, in supervis- 
ing and correcting the proof-sheets of a great part 
of the volume. I should like also to thank very cor- 
dially Mr. George Lamb, Mr. William B. Weeden, 
Mr. Henry H. Edes, and ^Ir. Nathan Matthews, Jr., 
for assistance given in matters wdth which they were 
especially conversant. 

The Introductory Life is that prepared by Mr. J. 
Hammond Trumbull for his edition of the Plain Deal- 
ing. With his consent, at the suggestion and desire 
of Judge Foster, and through the courtesy of Mr. 
William P. Lunt, it is now prefixed to this edition of 
the Note-look, 

Edward Everett Hale, Jr. 

Matuxuck, E.L, August 1, 1885. 



viii A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECHFORD. . 

found his new religion no bar to royal favor, notwithstanding 
the unabated severity of the laws against " popish recusants." 
His eldest daughter, Letitia (" alias Bridget," as she is named 
in the record), remained a Protestant, and about 1633 was 
confirmed in the Church of England, to the great displeasure 
of her father.^ Not long afterwards, while Sir Richard Avas 
in attendance upon the king in his journey to Scotland, this 
daughter Letitia and a younger sister Mary, who had been 
placed under the care of an aunt living near London, were 
detained by warrant from the High Commission when about 
to sail from England for some foreign port. Their father 
alleged that they had embarked without his knowledge, and 
were attempting to escape from his authority,; but another 
and more probable version of the story is given by a well- 
informed writer (the Rev. George Gerrard, the gossiping 
London correspondent of the Earl of Strafford), in a letter 
dated May 1,1634 :2_ 

"Sir Richard Lashford,^ a pensioner in ordinary was sending 
two of his daughters to the nunneries beyond the seas; being to 
take shipping in some of the Kentish ports, they were stopp'd and 
sent back to London. My Lord's Grace of Canterbury [Laud] 
being made acquainted with it sent for the father, who offered to 
give caution that they should not go out of England; but my 
Lord asked him, whether he would engage himself that they 
should conform themselves to the religion of the Church of Eng- 
land, which he refused. He asked then of him, of what religion 
he was? He said, A Romish Catholick, and but lately converted. 
He offered him both the Oaths, which peremptorily he refused. 
The Archbishop then told him, he was not a fit servant to be of 
the King's principal guard, that would not take the oath of alle- 
giance unto his M:ijcsty. Since he hath been brought before 
the Lords, absolutely put out of his place, and another sworn 
into it." 

1 Calendar of Brit. State Papers sionally written. Evelyn {Diary, ii. 

(Domest. Sen, Charles I.), 1633-1634, 56, Bohn's edit.) mentions, under date 

pp. 23, 348, 536, 5S1. of Sept. 13, 1670, going "to visit Sir 

^ Strafford's Letters and Dispat., i. Richard Lashford, [his] kinsman." Else- 

242. where, we find the same name written 

' So the name appears to have been Lcecheforde. See note 2 on the next 

generally pronounced, and was coca- page. 



A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECHFORD. IX 

A few weeks afterwards the same correspondent wrote : i — 

<* The Pensioner, Sir Richard Lashford, was again called before 
the Lords, when the oath of allegiance was again offered to him, 
but lie utterly refused it. So order was given to the Attorney 
to indite him in the King's Bench of a Preinunire ; but being 
brought thither, he took it before the Judges, which if he had 
done before, 'tis likely he bad not been jjut from his Pensioner's 
place." 

In other words, the influence of the court upon the judges, 
or a " letter of grace and protection," such as the king about 
this time was accustomed to grant to his courtiers who were 
papists, would have stayed proceedings against him for 
recusancy. 

In November, 1G34, Sir Richard sold the manor of Shell- 
wood and other estates in Surrey, and subsequently resided 
at or near Dorking (in the same county), where he died 
Sept. 14, 1671.2 

The recurrence of the name of Thomas in several genera- 
tions of the Lechfords of Shellwood; the fact that the sur- 
name was by no means common, and does not appear to have 
been represented in England by any other family than this, 
of the rank of gentry ; with other considerations which it is 
unnecessary to mention here, — render it highly probable, in 
fact nearly certain, that the author of Plain Dealing and the 
possessor of this now printed Note-hoolc was of this stock, 
and nearly related to the last-mentioned Sir Richard Lech- 
ford, Knt.', 1634. 

In the address " To the Reader," in Plain Dealing, Thomas 
Lechford describes himself as " a student or practiser at law." 
An entry in the Note-hook ^ shows that he had been a member 
of Clement's Inn hefore he came to New England; and he 

^ Strafford's Letters and DispaL, i. heads, argent. Crest, on a wreatli of 

261. the same colors, a unicorn's head erased, 

' Manning and Bray, i. 586. The arc/cnt, maned, bearded, and horned or, 

arms continued to " Sir Richard Leech- bearing on the same a serpent proper, 

forde of Shelwood," Nov. 22, 1605, b}' Howard's Miscel. Gencal. et Herald. 

W. Segar, Garter, are thus blazoned: (Oct. 1866), p. 54. 
Sable, a chevron betw. three leopards' ^ See post, p. 117. 



X > A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECHFORD. 

resumed his residence there after his return to London, in 
1641, as the titlepage of Plain Dealing informs us. In an 
order of the General Court of Massachusetts, made in 1647, 
he is described as '" an ordinary solicitor in England." ^ It 
does not appear that he was ever called to the bar. The 
Inns of Chancery, of which Clement's was one, were so called 
" probably because they were appropriated to such clerks as 
chiefly studied i\\2 forming of writs, Avhich was the province 
of the cursitors, who are officers of chancery, and such as 
belong to the courts of common pleas and king's bench." - In 
Stowe's time they were " chiefly filled with attorneys, solici- 
tors, and clerks." By an order of the judges, April 15, 1630, 
" attorneys and solicitors, which are but ministerial persons 
of an inferior nature," though permitted to occupy chambers 
in the inns of chancery, were excluded from the inns of 
court, and consequently from a call to the bar.^ In his de- 
fence before the court of magistrates at Boston, in Decem- 
ber, 1640,** Lechford said of himself : " I am no pleader by 
nature; oratory I have little, . . . and if I had never so 
expert a faculty that way, I should not now use it, . . . and 
as for the other part of pleading which consisteth in cliirog- 
ra'phy^ wherein I had some little sJcill, I do not desire to use 
any of that," etc. 

When Hugh Peters was lecturer in St. Sepulchre, in Lon- 
don, before the persecution of Laud drove him to Rotterdam, 
in 1629 or 1630, Lechford was one of his hearers, and " hung 
upon his ministry," as he expresses it in a letter to Peters, 
written in 1639.^ Some years later, he was in Ireland, w.th 
Sir Thomas Wentworth (afterwards Earl of Strafford), then 

1 Sfass. Col. Records, ii. 206. "him in tlie Common Pleas office {in 

2 Herbert's Inns of Court and Clmn- Communi Banco) that ingrosseth Fines 
eery, p. 169. in that Court acknowledged . . . and 

8 Dugdale's Origincs Judicalcs, p. that ■writeth and delivcreth the Inden- 

320. turcs of them unto the parties" (llin- 

* SeejP05^ pp. XXV, 176. sheu, 1627) ; and a chirograph was a 

6 This word appears to be used here bill, bond, or deed indented, written in 

in its more modern sense, for the bnsi- the maker's own hand. 

ness of a draughtsman and scrivener. ^ See post, p. 29. 

In the old law, a clnrogrnpher signified 



A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECHFORD. xi 

lord deputy. In -^hat capacity he went, or how long he 
remained there, does not appear.^ In 1640, when he contem- 
plated departure from New England, he wrote to one of his 
correspondents that he was desirous to return to Ireland, 
" there to follow his old profession, where he had some hope 
of friendship." 2 

In the address "To the Reader" of Plain Dealing, he 
alludes to the fact, " well knowne unto many, that heretofore 
he suffered imprisonment, and a kind of banishment . . . for 
some acts construed to oppose, and as tending to subvert 
Episcopacie, and the settled Ecclesiastical government of 
England." His offence, as we learn from a couple of lines 
in Mr. Cotton's Way of Congregational Churches cleared, was 
his witnessing against the Bishops, in soliciting the cause of 
Mr. Prynne. In the judgment of Laud and of the High 
Commission, his crime could hardly have been greater, or 
have merited more severe punishment. Prynne, a barrister 
of Lincoln's Inn, had drawn upon himself the vengeance of 
the archbishop, by the publication, in 1633, of Htstriomastix. 
He was indicted in the Star Chamber, found guilty of a libel, 
and condemned to a barbarous punishment, to be followed by 
imprisonment for life, for the crime of railing "not only 
against Stage Plays ... but farther in particular against 
Hunting, Publiqiie Festivals, Christmas-keeping, Bonfires and 
Maypoles," etc.^ His real offence (as Hume suggests) was 
probably that he had, " in plain terms, blamed the hierarchy, 
the innovations in religious worship, and the new supersti- 
tions introduced by Laud." Four years afterwards, a renewal 
of this offence called for a yet more vindictive prosecution 
in the same court. On the 14th of June, 1637, he, with 
Henry Burton, bachelor of divinity, and John Bastwick, a 
physician, was tried and convicted of " writing and publish- 

^ "W'entworth was appointed lord teniber, 1639. In December, 1639, he 

deputy in January, 1632, but did not was created Earl of Strafford and Lord 

go to Ireland until July, 1633. In Lieutenant of Ireland (Strafford's Lct- 

June, 1636, he came to London, re- tcrs and Dispatches, i. 63, 84 ; ii. 430, 

niained about six months in England, 431 ; Nalson's Collection, i. 280). 
find returned to Dublin in November. * gge post, p. 159. 

He was not again iu London until Sep- » Eushworth, ii. 220. 



xii A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECHFORD. ■ 

ing seditious, schismatical, and libellous books against the 
hierarchy of the Church." They were sentenced to lose their 
ears in "the pillory, to be fined X5,000 each to the king, to 
perpetual imprisonment in three remote places of the king- 
dom; and Prynne to be branded on both cheeks with the 
letters S. L., for a "Seditious Libeller." This barbarous 
sentence was executed in the palace yard at Westminster, 
June 30 ; "a spectacle no less strange than sad, to see three 
of several professions, the noblest in the kingdom, Divinity, 
Law, and Physick, exposed at one time to such an ignominious 
punishment, and condemned to it by Protestant magistrates, 
for such tenets in religion as the greatest part of Protestants 
in England held, and all the reformed churches in Europe 
maintained." ^ Immediately after summons was issued for 
Prynne's appearance before the court, he was shut up close 
prisoner, refused the use of pen, ink, or paper, and not per- 
mitted to consult counsel until very sliortly before his trial. 
In his speech to the court he said: "I was deserted of all 
means by which I should have drawn my answer. ... I had 
neither pen, ink, nor servant to do any thing for me ; for my 
servant was then also close prisoner, under a pursuivant s 
hands." All who rendered the slightest service to Prynne or 
his fellow-offenders fell under condemnation. " One Gard- 
ener," a scrivener or clerk, who wrote from Prynne's dictation 
a petition to his judges, was apprehended, subjected to fourteen 
days imprisonment, and compelled to give a bond for appear- 
ance when called. His counsel, Holt and Tomlyns, did not 
dare to subscribe his answer, after it was drawn and engrossed. 
After the execution of his sentence, some of his friends vis- 
ited him in Chester, on his way to his prison at Caernarvon. 
. Those who had so offended were summoned before the Privy 
Council, cited into the High Commission at York, imprisoned 
and fined, and enjoined to make a public recantation.^ It is 
not surprising that Lechford, for "soliciting" in Prynne s 
cause or otherwise assisting his defence, should have been 
' severely dealt with. Of his punishment we know no more 

I May's EisL of tJu Pari, b. L ch. 7. « Hargi^ve's State Trials, i. 482, 501. 



A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECHFOllD. xiii 

than lie himself has told us, — that he " suffered imprisonment 
and a kind of banishment." 

Lcchford landed in Boston one year and thirteen days after 
Prynne's trial in the Star Chamber. Four years and five 
months after the trial (Nov. 16, 1641), he dated his " Quaeres 
about Church government " from his chambers in Clement's 
Inn, and, on the first page of Plain Dealing, speaks of " having 
been forth of his native country almost for the space of four 
years last past." Tlie inference, from comparison of these 
dates, seems to be, that he left England in the autumn or 
winter of 1637, but did not then sail directly for Boston. His 
imprisonment could not have been of many months duration. 

In the letter to Hugh Peters, before cited, he writes : — 

"Being thrown out of my station in England ... I forsook 
preferment in a Prince's court that was offered to nie, who of 
Christian princes is the chiefe for godliness (as I was assured), 
Georgius Kagotzki, Prince of Transylvania, and Lord of Lower 
Hungary, successor to Bethleni Gabor. Likewise the Lords of 
Providence offered me place of preferment with them which I 
will not name. Hither I have come, and the Lord knows my 
heart ! fain would I join with your Churches." 

1 have not been able to discover the time or place of 
Lechford's embarkation for New England, nor in which of 
the twenty ships which brought three thousand passengers 
to Massachusetts in the, summer of 1638 ^ he came. The 
Note-hook begins with the date of his arrival : — 

"Boston in New-England, 27? 4' the day of my landing — 
163S." 

From some allusions in his lettere. especially a reference to 
conversation "on sliip-board," I infer that he came fellow- 
passenger with Mr Edmund Browne, afterwards minister of 
Sudbury, and, perhaps, with Emanuel Downing,^ the brother- 
in-law of Governor Winthrop. 

^ irinthrop, i. 268. 1633 (.Vass. Records, i. 236). Sir. Sav- 

' Vet I find elsewhere no earlier age had. apparently overlooked that 

mention of Downing's arrival than that reference when he wrote the note to 

in the records of the Court of Sept. 6, JFinthrop, L 274. 



xiv A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECHFORD. 

From succeeding pages of his Note-hooh "vre gather some — 
but scanty and unsatisfactory — knowledge of his domestic 
relations. His wife is mentioned in 1G39 and afterwards ; 
and, as no evidence has been discovered of his marriage on 
this side of the water, we infer that she accompanied him 
from England ; but he nowhere gives any information of her 
family, nor even introduces her Christian name. In July, 
1640,^ he writes : " I have not yet here an house of my owno 
to put my head in, or any stock going." He lived in a 
house, or part of a house, hired of Nathaniel Micklcthwaitc, 
of Boston, who was, I think, the agent or factor in New Eng- 
land of Ricliard Hutchinson, of Loudon, and perhaps of 
Edward and William Hutchinson after their removal to 
Rhode Island. 

It appears that he paid his rent until August, 1639, to 
Samuel Hutchinson, and subsequently to Mr. Micklcthwaitc, 
whose signature appears, on a page of the Note-hook, to the 
lease of "the chamber etc.," at X5 per year, from S( !. 1, 
1639. From the fact that the name of Thomas Savage -ft^ii 
occurs as a witness to instruments drawn by Lechford, x v.oii- 
jecture that he was a near neighbor, or perhaps a fellow-tenant 
under the same roof. Occasional entries like the following 
give glimpses of the interior of " the chamber etc.," and of 
Lechford's manner of living : — 

1639. June. " Borrowed of Mr Story about a month 

since 2" & halfe of the best sugar at 

2"" the pound 5» S'' 

April. " Rec"' of ]Mr. Keayne for a silver luced coate 

and a gold wrought cap 2' 10' 

May. "Received of Mr. George Story 4 yards 
and halfe a quarter of tuft holland to 
make my wife a wastcoate at 2' S"^ per 
yarde 11* 

1640. Jan. 31. " I payd Nathaniel Ileaton for full of writ- 

ings & cutting wood 5* 

Feb. 1. "I payd John Hurd, delivered to his wife 
by Sara our mayd, for making my 
wife's gowne 8" 

1 Plain Dealing, p. 69. 



A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECHFORD. xi 

1640. Fel.l. "I payd Thomas Marshall before hand for 
wood, delivered by my wife to his wife 
in the 10 moneth last past [Dec. 1630] ^1 
Since which time I had of him 6 loads ~ 
of wood at 5' so I owe him . m. 

Jan. 12. .. Received of Mr. Keayne G'' of Spanish'to^ 
bacco upon account. And I owe him 
1 load of wood, a good load. 
"I payd Mr. Burton for malt, cheese and 
irons, £1. — and owe him b^ 9'^ — in lO*"* 
[month] last. 
1641. "Mary Sherman came to my wife the 

twelveth day of Aprill, ICJl." 

Almost from the hour of his landing at Boston, l,e was 
regarded ,v,th distrust by those whose influenee pre a led „ 
state and church First, because of his ^.„/...L,. for to 

Zb '? 'r"'*™*-'"'""J doubtless to Governor Win! 
t nop himsel , the employment of " lawyers to direct men in 
theu- causes seemed more objectionable than the cnstona of 
ob ammg adv.ce from the judges on an e^ parte statemen 
be ore he public hearing of the cause.' Winthrop himself 

hat'lfdT' f :'"P''->'»"d'er, Downing.-and perhaps p! 
ham and Bradstreet,_had been students of law n England- 
bu on th,s s,de of the Atlantic their legal knowledge was' 
not called mto requisition except as it contributed to quaH 
hem for seats m the Court of Magistrates or as legiLtor's 
for the new colony ; " no advocate being allowed," ^ ani the ex 
ercjse of the profession of an attorney bein^ di countenanecd 
so far as possible without absolute interdiction. 

obfectiotaMl°"Vr"' T,' ""'■' P'"f'''''""'»y ^nt doctrinally 
Ob cct.o able Though he came to New England, as he says 
w.ha d,spos,t.on to " lay aside all by-resp^ets, to join w th 
the Churol, here," "he could not be satisfied in diverse partic- 
u ars," and " desired to open his mind in some material ?h ts 
of «eght concermng the Christian faith" wherein he differed 
f^om tic reeen-ed belief of the Massachusetts churches. He 
was not long m g.ving to these points of difference more than 

Mr. Savage, "after privateiy hearing, 2 yjirf. 



XVI A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECH FORD. 

a sufficient prominence. On his passage hither, he had dis- 
cussed them with his fellow-passengers ; and before, or soon 
after, his arrival, he made a written statement of his oi>inions 
and the arguments by which he sustained them, and placed 
the paper in the hands of Mr. Downing.^ These opinions, 
which he tells us he " did not lightly or hastily take up, but 
upon good grounds and mature deliberation, long before he 
ventured to betake himself into these parts of the world," - 
involved what magistrates and elders held to be fundamental 
errors, and such as prevented his reception to church fel- 
lowship. These errors, as stated by Mr. Cotton, were : 
" 1. That the Antichrist described in the Revelation was not 
yet come, nor any part of that Prophecy yet fulfilled from 
the 4th chapter to the end. 2. That the Apostolick func- 
tion was not yet ceased ; but that there still ought to be 
such, who should by their transcendent Authority govern all 
churches." ^ 

Lechford himself conceived that his opinions on these con- 
troverted points " might be held, or not held, salva fide " and 
without impediment to church fellowship witli those of oppo- 
site belief. Indeed modern orthodoxy, even of the most rigid 
type, would hardly insist on the identification of the pope of 
Rome with the prophetical antichrist, and a denial of the per- 
manency of tlie apostolic function, as essential prerequisites 
to church communion^ or for the elective franchise. But to 
the elders of the Bay, in 1638, — when the churches had not' 
yet escaped the dangers of Antinomianism nor been thoroughly 
purged of all the eighty-two errors condemned by the synod of 
the year previous, — every deviation from the established creed 
was matter of grave importance. Moreover, although Lechford 
professed a disinclination to controversy, he certainly took no 
great pains to avoid it ; so that before he had been many 
weeks in the Colony his peculiar views were somewhat widely 
made known, not only through oral discussions, but by means 
of two or three manuscript volumes of his composition, which 

1 Letter to Edmund Browne. See post, p. 28. 

* Letter to Hugh Peters. See jjost, p. 30. 

' Way of Conrjr. Churches cleared, pt. i. p. 71. 



A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECH FORD. xvii 

he had tendered for the perusal of some of the jealous guar- 
dians of orthodoxy in the churches. 

In the letter to Hugh Peters, before quoted, Lechford writes : 
" I showed Tou my books : you had not leisure to peruse them. 
I likewise, long before, showed my main book to Mr. Cotton. 
He had not leisure to read it ; and the first draught of that 
Of PropJiesie^ it lay in his house at least five weeks." Peters 
had too much work before him, in Xew England and Old, for 
wasting his time over the crude speculations of an honest but 
narrow-minded enthusiast ; and Mr. Cotton was perhaps less 
zealous in heresy-hunting, if not more tolerant of error, than 
before his own narrow escape from the censure of the synod 
of 1637 for an imputed taint of Hutchinsonianism. If Lech- 
ford had gone no farther to look for readers and provoke 
criticism, he might have fared better, — might have found a 
way at last to the fellowship of the churches and the favor 
of magistrates, and have lived and died in Massachusetts, in 
comfortable circumstances and with a more favorable opinion 
of " rigid separations " and " electorie ways " than he has 
expressed in Plain Dealing. But, in an evil hour, he sought 
counsel of the deputy-governor, Thomas Dudley, a man whose 
conscientiousness was as morbid, his vision as narrow, and 
his prejudices as strong as Lechford's own; who was so 
zealous for the purity of the faith that he magnified to a 
mountain every mole-hill of error, and saw in the toleration of 
new opinions a " cockatrice's egg," 

" To poison all with heresy and vice." 

"After the court here ended," wrote Lechford to Hugh Peters, 
in January, 1639, " I delivered [my book] Of PropJiesie to Mr. 
Deputy, to advise thereof as a private friend, as a godly man and 
a member of the Church, whether it were fit to^ be 'jmblished. 
The next news I had was, that at first dash he accused me of 
heresy, and wrote to Mr. Governor that my book was fitter to be 
burned. ..." 

The Court to which Lechford refers was probably the Quarter 
Court held at Boston, Dec. 4, 1638. On the eleventli of the 
same month Dudley wrote from Eoxbury to Winthrop : — 

b 



xviii A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECH FORD. 

" Slr. Since my cominge home, I have read over Mr. Lech- 
ford's hooke, and iinde the scope thereof to be erroneous and dan- 
gerous, if not herelicall, according to my conception — Ilis tenet 
beinge that the office of apostlesldp doth still continew and ought 
soe to doe till Crist's coming, and that a Churcli hath now power 
to make apostles as our Saviour Crist had wjien hee was hcere. 
Other things there are, but I pray you consider of this, and the 
inseparable consequences of it : I heare that Mr, Cotton and Mr. 
Rogers know somethinge of the matter, or man, with whome you 
may if you please conforre : I heare also that liee flivoureth Mr. 
Lentall ' and hath so exprcst himsulfe since Mr. Lentall was ques- 
tyoned by the ministers : It is easyer stoppinge a breach when it 
begins, then afterwards : wee sawe our error in sufferinge Mrs. 
Huchinson too longe, I have sent you the booke lierewith that in 
stead of puttinge it to the presse as hee desireth it may rather be 
putt into the lire as I desire : But I pray you lett him know that 
I have sent the booke to you, that after you have read it (which I 
think you said you had not yet done) it may be restored to him. 
... I suppose the booke to be rather coppyed out then con- 
tryved by Mr. Lechford, hee beinge I thinck, not soe good a 
greeyan and hebritian as the author undertakes to be."^ 

Either Wiiithrop's zeal was less lively, or he saw less danger 
in the new heresy and its " inseparable consequences " than 
his colleague. Before the end of the month Dudley wrote 
again : — 

" For Mr. Lechford and his booke, you say nothing, and I have 
since heard that the worst opynion in his book (which I thinck I 
shall proove to be heresy) is taken upj) by others. Nowe seeing 
that this is the way Sathan invades us by (viz. new opynions and 
heresyes) it behooves us to be the more vigilant, and to stirr upp 
our zeale and stopp breaches at the beginningc, least forbearance 
hurt us as it did before." ^ 

Lechford's character appears in a very favorable light in 
his comment on the course pursued by Mr. Dudley. After 

1 See Plain Dealing, pp. 22, 41, and taken by Robert Keayne, have been 

notes 78, 144. Mr. Lenthall was *' ques- preserved. 

tioned by the ministers," Dec. 11, 1638, ^ Proceed. Mass. Hist. Soe., 1855- 

at a conference (held at the house of 185?, pp. 311, 312. 
Captain Israel Stoughton, in Dorches- « Dudley to Winthrop, Dec. 29, 

ter), of which some manuscript notes, 1638, in 4 Mass. Hist. Coll., vii. 111. 



A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECHFORD. xix 

disavowing the chief heresy imputed to him, " though indeed 
my words might have been so strained," he adds : — • 

"I speak according to my hght, and dare do no otherwise. If 
hotly [pressed by ?] Mr. Deputy, I impute it to his zeal against 
errors: I am not angry with him for it. But when I saw seven 
shejthcrds and eight piincipal men called out against me, as if I 
were an Assyrian [the allusion is to Micah v. 5], I thought there 
might be something in me to be reproved, and that it concerned 
me to look about me. I dealt phiinly. . . . Thereupon my book 
was referred to the consideration of the Elders." 

This reference to the elders was the occasion of his address- 
ing to Hugh Peters, Jan. 3, 1638-1639, the letter from which 
several extracts have been introduced. In an interview with 
some of the magistrates he had " intimated a word of [his] 
other main book," treating of Antichrist and of the millennial 
kingdom of Christ. " They all now press me to produce that. 
I told them it was not ready for their view : I must fair write 
it, and alter some things : yet at length, upon promise that I 
should have it again (for if it be no error, I will not part with 
it for £100) I promised to let them see it. I have accord- 
ingly left it to Mr. Deputy and the Governor (who also 
desired to see it)." This book, with the one Of Prophesie, 
was to be submitted to an assembly of the Elders ; and Lech- 
ford writes to request Mr. Peters that he would himself be 
one of the council, " Mr. Ward another, and Mr. Parker of 
Newbury ; and that Mr. Xorton and Mr. Phillips may likewise 
be called ; " who should " soundly and maturely advise and 
consult of the matter," with "all lawfull favour" to the 
wi'iter. 

I find no subsequent mention of this council, unless it be 
referred to by Mr. Cotton, in the passage already cited (from 
the Way of the Coiigrec/aiional Churches cleared, pt. i. p. 71), 
where Lechford is said to have been " dealt withall both in 
conference and (according to his desire) in writing." Neither 
mode of dealing was effectual to convince him of error, nor 
would the ciders admit that his opinions might be held " salva 
fide'' So he was compelled to remain without the church ; 



XX A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECH FORD. 

and exclusion from church fellowship carried with it exclu- 
sion from the privileges of a freeman and disqualification for 
civil office. 

His professional ability was not inconsiderable; but the 
field for its exercise was restricted. " Kept from all place of 
preferment in the Commonwealth," he was " forced to get his 
liviug by writing i)etty things, which scarce found him bread," 
as he complained to his friends in England, after two years' 
residence hcre.^ Though his imputed heterodoxy did not pre- 
vent his occasional employment, by those of sounder faith, 
as a conveyancer, scrivener, or draughtsman, his receipts for 
such professional services were pitifully small. His JVote-booJc 
contains not only the record of every instrument drawn by 
him while he was in this country, but an account of the com- 
pensation he received ; from which it appears that his profes- 
sional income, for the two years after his arrival, was a little 
more than £47 ; about X9 of which was in debts remaining 
mipaid in July, 1G40. 

In June, 1G39, when he had been nearly a year in Boston, 
he presented to the General Court certain propositions ^ for 
the regulation of civil actions and for the recording of judi- 
cial proceedings. He had perhaps been encouraged to hope 
— for he states that his propositions were " made upon re- 
quest " — that the Cr»urt, notwithstanding his ineligibility to 
public office, would emi)loy his services in the humbler capa- 
city of clerk or public notary, and provide for his support by 
giving him work to do for which his studies and experience 
peculiarly qualified him. His application was not successful. 
" The Court was willing to bestow employment upon me," he 
writes, "but they said to me that ther/ could not do it for fear 
of offending the churches, because of my opinions.'''' Where- 
upon he tbouglit good to propose to them certain propositions, 
which the reader will find set down at large in the Note-look, 
p. 68. 

It was in response to this application, probably, that he was 
"dealt withal, according to his desire, in writing," as Mr. 
Cotton has mentioned. Whether or not the Court gave favor- 

> Plain Dealing, p. 69. 2 Printed in Plain Dealing, pp. 29, 30. 



A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECHFORD. xxi 

able consideration to tlic proposition by which Lechford en- 
gaged himself to refrain from controversy for twelve months, 
on consideration of receiving employment, does not appear. 
But whatever good intentions in his behalf the magistrates, or 
some of them, may have had, were counteracted by his own 
imprudence. 

In the summer of 1639 he was employed by William Cole 
and his wife Elizabeth, for the prosecution of an action against 
her brother, Francis Doughty, of Taunton, whom she charged 
with having defrauded her of her marriage-portion and her 
share in their father's estate. To the preparation of this case 
the Note-book shows that Lechford gave much attention. ^ On 
the trial before a jury, at the Quarter Court in September, his 
zeal for his clients betrayed him into an indiscretion (to use 
no harsher term) which subjected him to the deserved censure 
of the court, and gave occasion — not Avliolly displeasing to tlie 
magistrates, perhaps — to prohibit him from the exercise of the 
profession of an advocate, to which, as has already been inti- 
mated, he does not appear to have had any legitimate title. 
The order of the Court is in these words : — 

"Mr. Thomas Lechford, for going to the Jewry & pleading w"' 
them out of Court, is debarred from jjleadiug any man's cause 
hereafter, unlesse his owne, and admonished not to |/sume to med- 
dle beyond what hee shalbee called to by the Courte." - 

Lechford submitted in a good spirit to this censure. A few 
days after receiving it, he presented to the General Court a 
.petition for pardon, with a frank confession of his fault. Of 
this petition he has preserved a copy in his Note-booh (p. 117), 
which is well worth reading, as characteristic of the man. 
His submission was probably accepted by the Court, and he 
was suffered to return to the practice of his profession as an 
attorney, which, under the restrictions imposed upon it, prom- 
ised little improvement of his " low and poor estate." 

In tlie autumn and winter of 1639 he received some slight 
assistance, in the way of employment, from the magistrates. 

1 See post, p. 171. » Mass. Col. Records, i. 270. 



xxii A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECHFORD. 

For Mr. Endicott, he had written " The Court booke ^ at IG^ a 
sheete, 102 shectcs," and received X6 10s. some time in June 
or July. In November, after the surrender to Massachusetts 
of the Dover' patent, he wrote " For the Country: The writing 
of receipt of the Inhabitants of Dover and Kittery and Oyster 
Eiver into the Protection of this Jurisdiction : The Commis. 
sion to Mr. Bradstreete for those places : The institution and 
limitation of the Counccll of this Jurisdiction: Another of 
the same: Charta llhertatis : The Act of the publique and 
private tenure of land : The division of the Plantation into 
shires : " for all which he received the sum of eleven shillings? 
Not long afterwards he was employed in the more important 
task of transcribing the " breviat of laws," subsequently 
adopted, with some amendments, as the Body of Liberties.^ 
While engaged in this work, — which in his hands we may 
be sure was something more than that of mere transcription, 
— he could not resist the temptation, or, as he chose to express 
it, " he conceived it his duty, in discharge of his conscience," 
and " as Amicus curiae, with all faithfulness to present " to 
the Governor and magistrates his objections to certain laws 
proposed to be embodied in the code. 

In May, 1640, in " a paper intended for the honored John 
Winthrop," he expressed his convictions of the advantages and 
the necessity of submission to the King, and acknowledgment 
of the authority of the Church of England," if it be but by way 
of advice ; " frankly confessing that for himself he " disclaimed 
Parker" and "inclined to Hooker and Jewel as to govern- 
ment."* After this paper was drawn, Dudley was elected 

1 I cannot learn that this copy of the at Chavlestown, Aug. 23, 1630, to the 

" Court Book " has been preserved. It end of the Quarter Court at Boston, 

was undoubtedly a transcript of the June 4, 1639, making 202 pages (55-'256 

Colony Records, made for llr. Endicott's of the tirst volume of the Jlanuscript 

own use or for that of the Salem Quarter Records of tlie Governor and Company ; 

Court. A. C. Goodell, Esq., of Salem, pp. 73-268 of the printed Records), or 

to whom I applied in the hope of dis- 101 folios. 

covering some trace of this volume, calls 2 gee post, ]>. 139. 

my attention to the .agreement of the * See Plain Dealing, pp. 27 and 31. 

number of "sheets" witli the folios of * Plain Dealing, pp. 34-37. 
the Colony Records, from the first court 



A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECH FORD. xxiii 

governor; and it is not likely that Lechford transferred to 
him the good advice prepared for Governor Winthrop. 

The year during which he had conditionally promised to 
keep silence, " saving to the Elders," on matters of difference 
between himself and the churches, had now expired. He had 
been " seriously dealt withal," and had been indulged in his 
desire for " reasons in writing." ^ But his hope that " in some 
good time the reverend Elders and himself might come to a 
perfect, or at least a fair understanding," was less and less 
likely to be realized. He was becoming more dissatisfied with 
the condition of affairs in New England, both in church and 
commonwealth. In July, 16-10, he wrote to England: "I 
know my friends desire to know w-hether I am yet of any 
better mind than some of my actions about the time of my 
coming away did show me to be. I do profess that I am of 
this mind and judgment, I thank God : tliat Cliristians cannot 
live hapily without Bishops, as in England, nor Englishmen 
without a king. Popular elections indanger people with war 
and a multitude of other inconveniences." 2 Of the people of 
Massachusetts he says, " I am not of them, in church or com- 
monweal. Some bid me be gone : others labor with me to stay 
fearing my return will do their cause wrong ; and loth am I 
to heare of stay, but am plucking up stakes with as much speed 
as I may, if so be I may be so happy as to arrive in Ireland, 
there at least to follow my old profession," etc. " Some silence 
my letters and will not dispute with me, I think either out of 
distrust of me, or else despaire of their cause ; some cry out of 
nothing but Antichrist and the Man of Sin. . . . But few know 
my full mind in some things of weight whereof I do prof esse I 
was ignorant and misled in England. You may wonder how 
I am now reformed," etc. 

" I never intended," he writes, " openly to oppose the godly 
here in anything I thought they mistooke." ^ Xf \^q maintained 
some reserve in the expression of his "full mind in some 
things," he certainly made no secret of his dislike of " electory 

* See ante, p. xx; anH Plain Dealing, 2 S^epost, p. 159, and cf. Plain Deal 
*'• ^^* ing, pp. 63, 69. 

• See Plain Dealing, p. 77. 



XXIV A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECHFORD. 

ways " and of Congregationalism, as is evident from the advice 
which he proffered to the Governor and magistrates, and from 
his queries propounded to the Elders of Boston, which chal- 
lenged a discussion of -the .nature and constitution of a church 
and the validity of congregational ordination. 

That his opinions, and his zeal in advocating them, made 
him ohnoxious to the magistrates as well as to the Elders is 
no matter of surprise. AYhen the course which had been 
taken with others who had similarly offended is considered, — 
when it is remembered that not only had teachers of doubtful 
orthodoxy, like Roger Williams and Wheelwright and Mrs. 
Hutchinson, been banished from the jurisdiction, but laymen 
of influence and position, like Stoughton and Aspinwall and 
Coggeshall, when suspected of a taint of heresy or " sedition," 
had bcen^as summarily and as severely dealt with, — the leni- 
ency shown to Lechford is remarkable. It could hardly have 
been from motives of policy — only his own vanity could have 
suggested that it was from " fear his return would do their 
cause wrong" — that he was suffered to remain so long un- 
molested. It must rather have been owing to a conviction of 
his honesty, his conscientiousness, and possibly to his lack of 
influence and the slight danger of infection by his teachings. 
It would not be easy to find in the first fifty years of the his- 
tory of Massachusetts another instance of so great tolerance 
of opinions so radically opposed as were Lechford's to the 
views of the founders of the colony, and so subversive of the 
constitution of civil government and of the church polity they 
sought to establish in New England. lie was neither a free- 
man nor a church member, not even a householder ; in the 
eye of the law he was merely a " transient person," who 
might be driven away with slight ceremony. His calling made 
him unwelcome ; his creed, in the judgment of others besides 
Thomas Dudley, was " erroneous and dangerous, if not hereti- 
cal," He questioned the validity of any non-episcopal ordina- 
tion, and saw, in the exercise by the people of the right to 
elect their own rulers, the root of all evil. He would not 
acknowledge " a church without a bishop," and did not hesi- 
tate to express his belief that all was going wrong, and must 



A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECHFORD. XXV 

go worse in " a state without a king." In the complacent con- 
sciousness of his own clearer light and well-grounded con- 
victions, he felt it to be his duty to point out to Governor 
Winthrop, to jNIr-. Wilson, and to Mr. Cotton the errors 
wherein through ignorance they had gone astray, and were 
misleading others. ^ Tliat he should have been permitted for 
two years and a half to hold his course unchecked, and that his 
unconcealed and somewhat aggressive dissent should have so 
long escaj^ed censure, proves that the founders of Massachu- 
setts were not incapable of the exercise of toleration, even 
though they might not give it a place among the virtues. 

At length, however, their patience was exhausted. In Sep- 
tember, 1640, for a new offence, with which his questioning of 
the Boston Elders may have had something to do, he was pre- 
sented by the grand jury and summoned before the Court of 
Magistrates in December. When the General Court was in 
session (Oct. 7) they were " pleased to say something to him, 
as for good counsel about some tenets and disputations which 
he had held ; advising him to bear himself in silence and as 
became him." A few weeks afterwards he writes in his Note- 
book : " I am summoned to appear in Court to-morrow, being 
the first of 10th, 1G40. The Lord God direct me," etc. In a 
letter to England, dated December 19, he mentions having been 
" lately taken at advantage and brought before the magistrates, 
before whom, giving a quiet and peaceable answer [he] was 
dismissed with favour," etc.^ Of this answer he preserved a 
copy, or perhaps the original draft, in shorthand, in his- Kote- 
hook. Confessing that he had " too far meddled in some matters 
of church government and the like, which [he was] not suffi- 
cient to understand or declare," he threw liimself on the mercy 

^ "0 mercy, mercy, from all the ^ «'Our chiefe difference was about 
powers of mercy in heaven and earth " — the foundation of the Church and ilin- 
he wrote in 1640 — "to such as sin of istery, and what rigid separations may 
Ignorance ! " And against this he mod- tend unto, what is to be feared, in case 
estly noted in the margin : *' In the the most of the people here should re- 
number of the ignorant I hold myself, main unbaptized ; etc." (Plain DeallTixj, 
•nd Mr. Burton, ilr. Prynne, and Dr. p. 77). 
B.istwick, and a multitude more " (post, 

^ 159). 



XXVI A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECHFORD. 

of the Court. His submission was accepted, and the record 
shows that — 

"Mr. Thomas Lechford, acknowledging hee had overshot liim- 
selfe, and is sorry for it, promising to attend his calling, and not to 
meddle w"' controversies, was dismissed." ^ 

Mr. Savage, in a note toWinthrop (vol. ii. p. 36), cites this 
as a " curiosity in legislative and judicial economy." He was 
under the impression that the engagement "not to meddle 
with controversies " was inconsistent with the promise " to 
attend his calling," since " the very calling by which he sought 
to earn his bread was that of an attorney." The inconsist- 
ency disappears on learning from Lechford himself that he 
was brought before the Quarter Court on the presentment of a 
grand jury, and that the controversies in which he had " too 
far meddled " concerned " matters of church government and 
the like," — " the foundation of the church and the ministry, 
and what rigid separations may tend unto." He acknowl- 
edged his fault, promised amendment, and the Court dismissed 
the complaint. Lechford certainly did not feel that he had 
been hardly dealt by. He avers that he was " dismissed with 
favour, and respect promised him by some of the chiefe, for 
the future." 2 

Some time in 1G40 he was enrolled in the "Military 
Company of Massachusetts," afterwards the " Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery." He perhaps owed his election to his 
intimacy with Thomas Savage, one of the original members 
of this company, and to tlie friendship of the captain, Robert 
Keayne. 

Among those with whom Lechford appears to have been 
on very friendly terms was George Story, " a young merchant 
of London," as Winthrop calls him, who lodged in the house 
of Richard Sherman, and who was the chief instigator of the 
proceedings against Captain Keayne in the famous "sow 
case." For six or seven years from its commencement in 
1636, this " great business upon a very small occasion " 

1 Mass. Col. Rcc, i. 310. > Plain Dealing, p, 77. 



A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECHFORD. xxvii 

divided the people of Boston into factions, disturbed the 
peace of the churches, had an influence in elections, awak- 
ened a " democratical spirit" tliroughout the colony, and at 
last (in 1643) came near bringmg about a radical change in 
the constitution of the General Court, by depriving the magis- 
trates of the exercise of a negative voice on the action of the 
house of deputies.! , , .. 

In 1641 tlie quarrel had not yet reached its height, but it 
had already assumed formidable proportions. That Lechford 
■should become implicated in it was inevitable. The only 
attorney in Boston, and the common friend of Story and of 
Keayne, he received the confidences of both parties, tried his 
hand at peacemaking, gave advice to both, and of course 
offended both; besides exposing himself to the suspicion of 
wrong-dealing. The trouble which this affair occasioned him 
may have contributed to hasten his return to England. About 
a week before he sailed from Boston, he drew up a statement 
of his connection with the case for the purpose of clearing 
himself of "divers imputations" of having promoted litiga- 
tion by advice which, " in the simplicity of his heart," he had 
given to Mr. Story and Goody Sherman. This paper is dated 
July 24, 1641. In the first draft in the Note hook he had 
written: "Being purposed some time at least to visit my 
native — ;" but drew his pen through the unfinished sen- 
tence, and interlined in its place : " Now being purposed, God 
willing, to visit my friends in England." In another para- 
graph° alluding to a conversation which he had with Story, 
"one Lord's day wdien the Sacrament was at Boston," he 
fixes the time by adding, " being the next day as I remember 
after the newes that it ivas stijyposed 3Ir. Prynne had sent me 
money for my passaged 

Mr. Cotton says that Lechford, " when he saw he could not 
defend the Error [that the Apostolick function was not yet 
ceased] but by building again the Bishops, against whom he 
had witnessed (as he said; in soliciting the cause of Mr. 
Prynne, he rather then he would revoke his present tenent, 

1 See Winthrop, ii. 69-71, 115-119. 



xxvm A SKETCH OF THOMAS LECHFORD. 

acknowledged he was then in an Error when he took part with 
Mr. Prynue and Mr. Burton, and therefore he would now return 
to England again, to reduce these famous witnesses from the 
Error of their way. And accordingly, away he went." ^ 

On the same day on whicli he wrote the statement abov-e 
mentioned, Lecliford made a letter of attorney to Thomas 
Savage to receive all moneys due him in New England, and all 
letters which should be sent to hhn, " and the same letters to 
peruse and send and return them and the said moneys and 
debts to him in money or goods and commodities," etc.^ 

The last entry in the Note-hook before leaving Boston was 
made on or after July 29. It is a memorandum of his obli- 
gation by bond (in which Mr. David Olllcy was his surety) 
to ISIr. Joshua Hcwes of Roxbury, to pay £8 to " Mr. Joshua 
Foote at the Cocke in Grace church Streete," before Christ- 
mas, on a bill or note dated July 27. 

On the opposite page are two unimportant entries of pay- 
ments of money in England in the discharge of commissions 
intrusted to him before sailing. At the head of this page is 
the date, "Post Mich[aclmas], 17 Car. 1G41." 

The vessel in which he took passage from Boston sailed on 
the third of August. We learn from Winthrop (ii. 31) that 
among her forty passengers were John Vrinthrop, Jr., Hugh 
Peters, Thomas Wclde, and William Hiljbins, who, " finding 
no ship which was to return riglit for England, they went to 
Newfoundland, intending to get a passage frum thence in the 
fishing fleet. . . . They arrived there in 14 days, but could 
not go altogether, so were forced to divide themselves, and go 
from several parts of the island, as they could get shipping." 
Lecliford mentions having •' touched, coming homeward," at 
Newfoundland.^ On the ICtli of November he was once more 
an inmate of Clement's Inn, and had " returned humbly to the 
Church of England." * 

1 Way of Con jr. Churches chared, ^ Plain Dealing, p. 46. 

pt. i. ]). 71. * Plain Dealing, p. 68. 

a See post, p. 234. 



LECHFORD'S 



MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



Boston in Neio England 27°. 4». the day of my landing, 163S. 

John JoUiffei and William Chesebrougli 2 made a grant of 
the house & lot next :M'; Cottons in nature of a mortgage 
for 45 1 to 4 Yorkshire men and their heires. [Is. Jolliffe & 
Chesebrough <tc.] 



1 John Jolliffe, or Joyliffe, is noted 
by Savage as of Boston, 1656, freeman, 
1673 ; many years a selectman ; one of 
the Patriots of 1689 who put Andros in 
prison ; town-recorder in 1691 ; made 
by Increase Mather one of the council 
in the charter of William and Mary ; 
died 23 Nov. 1702. (Savage is here in 
error. He died in 1701.) In the letters 
of Matthew Cradock to Winthrop (4 



laboured under many Infirmities for a 
long time." These notices would seem 
to show that he might have been bom 
as early as 1610, which would make him 
twenty-sLx. at the time of his employ- 
ment by Cradock, if he were that agent. 
There is, therefore, some doubt as to the 
identity. 

2 William Chesebrough was about 
removing from Boston, — or perhaps 



Mass. Hist. Coll., vi. 118 et scqq.) is had already removed to Mount Wollas- 



found frequent mention of John Jolliffe, 
agent for Cradock in New England. 
Tliis must be the man noted in the text. 
Whether it is the same one who is found 
in Savage is doubtfuL If he were Cra- 
dock's agent in 1636, he must have been 
near ninety at the time of las death, 
l-iooking along in Sewall's Diary (5 Mass. 
Hist. Coll., V. and vi.) we find with other 
notice that in 1789 Joyliffe, then on the 
Bench, was old enough to be Sewall's 
father. Sewall was then thirty-seven. 
In 1692 Joyliffe resigned the Kecorder- 
shipon account of blindness, and in 1701 
he died, having "been blind, and having 



ton (Braintree, now Quincy). A few 
years afterwards he again removed to 
Rehoboth ; and thence, before 1649, 
to the Pequot country, where he was 
the first permauent settler in the terri- 
tory now constituting the township of 
Stonington.Conn. (Trumbull, i. 234). 

The "4 Yorkshire men" were prob- 
ably of the company of the Eev. Ezekiel 
Eogers, "who came over with him this 
summer" from Rowley, in Yorkshire 
[irinth., i. 278) ; and may have been 
fellow-passengers with Lechford. 

The ne.xt year (Oct. 7, 1639) Thomas 
Barker, John Johnson, Francis Lam- 



2 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



An arbitration or award was made betweene ^l\ Waltha ^ of 
Weymoutli in N. E. and Captaine Desallcnoba concerning the 
mill, &c. [2s. M. Desallenoba & Waltham.] 

An Assignement of certaine Tenements in New Windsore 
in Com. Berks in An[glia] was made by [hlanh] and liis 
wife unto John Tinker,^ with a declaration that it is in 
trust to sell the same for the said [i>lank] and his wife. 
[3s. Tinker.] 

I writt two manuscripts for Mr Davenporte ^ one in answere 
to M^: Bernard about the Church Covenant <fcc. the other an 
answere to M"; Ball about the Comon prayer booke in E. 
[11 6s. Qd. Mf Davenport.] 



bert, and John Punderson, — the four 
mortgagees, as is hardly doubtful, — 
joined with William Chesebrough in a 
conveyance of this house and lot to Ser- 
jeant ^homas Savage, as a subsequent 
page of Lech ford's Note-hook will show. 
Thomas Barker removed to Rowley, 
where he died, 1650 ; and his widow 
became the third wife of ilr. Kogers. 
Francis Lambert also followed Jlr. Ro- 
gers to Rowley. John Punderson and 
John Johnson had removed to ^STew Ha- 
ven before the date of the conveyance 
of 1639, where the former was chosen 
one of the seven pillai-s, at the first 
church gathering, August, 1639. [T.] 
1 Henry "Waltham, merchant ; repre- 
sentative from Weymouth in 1636. He 
■was a partner with Thomas Richards in 
the mill at Wcyn\outh. Later reference 
is made to him, pp. 178, 195, 207, post. 
See also Mass. Records, i. 267, 31 3. Sel- 
lanova, or De Sallenoba (or Scilla ^ova, 
as Governor Winthrop once wrote it, in 
1636), who was an engineer, had per- 
haps been employed in the construction 
of the mill or dam. [T.] He is men- 
tioned in the Mass. Records as being sent 
for in a proposed expedition against the 
French at Penobscot (i. 160). 



2 John Tinker, at this time of Bos- 
ton, was about making a voyage to Eng- 
land. He returned before March, 1643, 
and was, successively, of Windsor, Bos- 
ton, Lancaster, and New London. He 
was a representative from the last-named 
town in 1660 and 1661, and appointed 
an assistant, or magistrate, there. He 
died in October, 1662. See later in the 
Note-book, p. 189, post. [T.] 

3 John Davenport, the first minister 
of New Haven ; bom at Coventiy, 
England, 1598, died 1670, in Boston, 
where he succeeded John Wilson in the 
ministry of the First Church. He lirst 
arrived in Boston with Hopkins and 
Eaton, June 26, 1637, and remained 
there until ]\Iarch 30, 163S, when he 
sailed for Quinpiack. It would appear 
that he had left his MSS. in Boston, to 
be forwarded to England. Winthrop, 
under October, 1638, writes: "About 
two years since one Mr. [Richard] Ber- 
nard, a minister at Batcomb, in Somer- 
setshire, in England, .=;ent over two books 
in WTiting, one to the magistrates, and 
the other to the elders, wherein he laid 
down arguments against the manner of 
our gathering our churches, etc., which 
the elders could not answer till tlus 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 3 

I writt a peticon for the Country to the Lords Coiuis- 
sioners for forraine plantacons, about the Patent, and a 
letter to the Gierke of the Couucell.i [5s. M^ GovnoT] 2 

Articles of agreement of factorage betweene Thomas Thorn- 
ton ^ and John Tinker, 17.8 [1G38]. [2s. M. Thornton, 
Tinker.] 

Divers writings' for M^ Humfrey^ to M^ Will? Bcllingham,^ 
about 1001 borrowed & cattle ingaged for it. [2s. 6c?. Mr 
Humfrey & Mr Bcllingham.] 



time, by reason of tlie many troubles 
about Mrs. Hutchinson's opinions, etc. 
Mr. Cotton also answered another book 
sent over in defence of set form of 
prayer. This I suppose was Mr. Ball's 
book" {Winth., i. 275). 

Mr. Cotton's Modest and deer Answer 
to Mr. Ball's Discourse of Set Formes 
of Prayer was published in London in 
1642 (4to, 49 pp.). In a note to the 
Rephj to the Ansicers to the Nine Posi- 
tions (London, 1643, p. 7), Mr. Ball 
mentions " having received that answer 
before the publishing of his own Trea- 
tise." From Lechford's note it would 
appear that Mr. Davenport also wrote 
in reply to Ball. The other manuscript 
ti-auscribed by Lech ford was doubtless 
An Apologic of the Eiders of tJie several 
Churehcs in New England for Church 
Covenant, sent over in ansicer to Master 
Bernard in the year 1639 ; with An 
Ansicer to Nine Positions about Church- 
Government, first published in England 
in 1641, and reprinted in 1643, with 
Eichard Mather's Ansicer to Thirty -two 
Questions, etc. ilr. Ball wrote a Pi,eply 
to the Answers to the Nine PositioJis, 
which was printed in 1643, A Letter of 
Many Ministers in old England, Be- 
questing the judgement of their Rever- 
end Brethren in New England concern' 
ing Nine Positions, JVritten Anno Bom. 



1 637. Together with tlieir Ansicer there- 
unto returned, Anno 1639. Aiid the 
Reply made unto the said Answer, and 
sent over unto them, Anno 1640 (London, 
4to, pp. 12, 90). [T.] 

1 Mr. Thomas ^Meautis, or, as Gov- 
ernor Winthrop wrote the name, M^wtis 
(see JVinth., i. 274 ; Hubbard, pp. 268- 
271^. [T.] 

2 John Winthrop, Sr. 

3 Of Dorchester, 1634 ; removed to 
Windsor, Conn. [T.] 

* John Humfrey, one of the six grant- 
ees of the Massachusetts Patent. He 
was allied by marriage to the family of 
the Earl of Lincoln, having married 
Susan, daughter of Thomas, Earl of Lin- 
coln, and sister of Lady Arbella John- 
son and of Bridget, Countess of Lincoln. 
He had been treasurer of tlie Fishing 
Company at Dorchester in England. 
He was chosen Deputy-Governor of the 
Massachusetts Colony in 1629 while 
still in England, but did not leave for 
this country until 1632. He lost much 
of his property, liowever, and suffered 
other ill-fortune, and left the country 
for England in 1641. 

s William Bellingham, of Rowley, 
was the brother of Richard Bellingham. 
He was freeman in 1640, and died in 
1650. 



4 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

A writing of advice to :M^ Strange ^ about liis search in 
E[ngland] for his wife's lands. 18.8. [Is. Od. Mr Strange.] 

A Kclease by W. Swimmer to M'; Humfrey and another 
by M^; Humfrey to W Swimmer. [2s. M. M! Humfrey & 
Swimmer.] 

A shorte Lease made by Augustin Clement of Dorchester in 
N. E. planter, of One messuage or Tenement w'^^ one orchard 
k one garden thereto belonging lying in Wockinghara in the 
County of Berks in E. late in the tenure or occupation of 
Margaret Mathew, unto Willm. Salter 2 of Boston in N. E. 
ffisherman, for 30 dayes, dated 11.8. [8^. Clement, Salter. 
Witnesses Tho : Leveritt,^ Tho : Marshfield, Tho : Lechford.] 

The said Augustin Clement & Elizabeth his wife granted 
the premises by Indenture unto John Tinker of Boston in 
new E. planter,"^ to have k to hold to him the said John and 
his heires k assi"" for ever. With Attornm* by the said 
Willm Salter. 18.8. [Ss. ^d. Clement k ux. Tinker, iidem 
testes, norint attornauit sur dorss. del fait.] * 

Me Augustin Clement &c. tencf John Tinker in 80 1 dat. 
18.8. conditioned to keepe Coven* in the said Indentures 
expressed. [Is. M. Clement Tinker, iidem testes.] 

[Lent to M^ Williams,^ 18.8, my blew manuscf., my re- 
lacon, the brev* of Cambridge, Nath. Wiggins Reasons, k 
the printed relation of the Martyrs. Sent by M^: Throg- 
morton.] [2t 2s. 6d Mt W-] 

1 Probably George Strange, of King- a house out towards the Neck, on 
ham, and fovmerly of Dorchester. Sav-' what is now Boylston Street, near 
a<^e notes the sale of his tenement in Tremont. 

Hingham in 1639, the deed of which » Thomas Leverett the Elder, father 

is recorded (Sitff. Deeds, i. f. 14). Per- of Governor John Leverett. 

haps a successful "search for his wife's * " The same witnesses were present 

lands" encouraged him to return to at the attornment on the back of the 

Enf'land. See p. 26, note, post. [T.] deed." 

2 William Salter, of Boston, is called * Probably this entry refers to Roger 
a shoemaker by Savage, who says that Williams, at this time in Providence, 
he kept the prison later. He had and to George Thrograorton, who came 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 5 

[2] Articles of agreement indented made betwecne Augustin 
Clement ^ of Dorcliester in N. E. planter of the one parte, 
and John Tinker of Boston in N. E. planter of the other 
parte, the xviif^ dag of October, Anno I)nr~ 1638. 

It is hereby covenanted Qoncluded declared and agreed by 
and betwecne the partyes abovesaid in manner and forme fol- 
lowing 1. Imprimis that whereas the said Augnstin Clement 
and Elizabeth his wife have by their deed indented under their 
hands «fe scales bearing date with these presents granted and 
conveyed unto the said John Tinker. One messuage or Tene- 
ment and one orchard and one garden thereto belonging w*> 
tho appurtenances lying in Wockingham in the County of 
Berks in England now or late in the tenure or occupation of 
Margaret Matliew or her assignes To have and to hold to him 
the said John his heires and assignes for ever as more at large 
by the said Deed indented it doth & may appeare Now it is 
covenanted concluded declared and agreed by and betweene 
the said parties to these presents that the said grant & con- 
veyance unto the said John is and shall be upon this speciall 
trust and confidence, that is to say that the said John shall 
joyne in sale of the p'mises w*:^ the said Margaret Mathew 
unto some person or persons in England, if shee shall live soe 
long and be willing thereunto, but if shee be dead or shall 
dye before the sale, then the said John shall or may sell the 
premises himscKe for the said Augustin & Elizabeth and their 

over with him in 1630. Williams and came again in May, 1637. He 

had been banished by the General died at Dorchester, Oct. 1, 1674. From 

Court in the winter gf 1635-1636, these articles of agreement, and the 

and Throgmorton had acconipanied letters which follow, it appears that 

hiiQ to Rhode Island. The entry is he had a house and land at "Woking- 

crossed out, perhaps at the return of ham (or Oakingham), a market- town 

the books. in Berkshire, seven miles from Reading, 

Augustin Clement came to New which was then occupied by his sister, 

r-iigland in the "James," of London, Margaret Mathew, who was proposing 

April, 1635, and in the list is called to como to New England ; and that 

a painter, sometime of Reading ; (3 Anne Clement, the widow of his brother 

J/<iiJ. Hist. Coll., viii. 319 ; cf. ffist. and John, was living at Shenfield [county of 

f'VaeaZ. Reg,^ v. 440). Savage thinks Essex, about ten miles from Chelms- 

«t probable that he went home in 1636, ford, on the road to London]. [T.] 



6 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

use & benefitt for their interest in the premises. And that the 
said John shall and will diligently & faithfully attend and use 
his best skill &, endcvours to advance & further the profitt of 
the said Augustin & Elizabeth k of Margaret Mathew afore- 
said if slice shall live so long. And the moneys that the 
premises shall be sold for are to be at the dispose of the said 
Margaret Mathew if slice be then living, and to be payd unto 
her if shee shall come away for New E. upon trust tliat slice 
will be answerable to the said Augustin & Elizabeth for the 
value of their interest in tlie premises els if the said Marga- 
ret dye then the said John shall receive the money for the 
premises and be accountable for it imto the said Augustin his 
executors k adiiiors. 

2. Itiii if the said lands shall be sold & the said Margaret 
will not come for N. E,, that then the said John shall receive 
the value of the interest of the said Augustin & Elizabeth in 
the premises, k shall be accountable for the same unto the 
said Augustin his executors & administrators : the said value 
being to be compounded & agreed on by and betweene the said 
Margaret & John equally according to their best discreations. 

3. Itiii If the said Margaret shall when the premises are 
sold be disposed to come for N. E, that then the said John 
shall advise, help tfe assist the said Margaret, in making and 
buying provisions for the passage & transportation of herselfe, 
her servants & estate and goods, over the seas into these parts 
of New England according to his best skill & ability faithfully 
and diligently to be performed according to trust reposed in 
him. 

[3] 4. ItiTi that the said Augustin Clement and Elizabeth 
his wife and tlieire heires shall & will from time and at all 
times hereafter within the space of seaven yeares next ensu- 
ing the date hereof at the reasonable request and at the cost 
& charges in the law of the said John Tinker his heires or 
assignes make doe acknowledge suffer levy and execute or 
cause to be made done acknowledged suffered levyed & exe- 
cuted all k every such further & other lawfull k reasonable 
act k acts thing k things devise k devises assurances k con- 
veyances in the law whatsoever for the more better assuring 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 7 

suerty & sure making & conveying of all the premises unto 
the said John Tinker his heires and assignes according to 
tlie meaning hereof and of the said Deed indented as by the 
said John his heires or assignes or his or their counsell 
learned in the law shall be reasonably advised devised or 
required soe as the said Augustin k Elizabeth and their 
heires be not compelled to travell out of the jurisdiccon 
of the Massachusetts in N. E. for the making doing or 
suffering thereof. 

5. Itin that the said Augustine and Elizabeth <fc their heires 
executors &, administrators shall & will from time to tyme 
and at all tymes hereafter save and keepe harmelesse the 
said John Tinker his heires executors and administrators of 
and from all accons suits troubles & demands wch shall any 
wayes arise & come upon or be brouglit against the said John 
his heires executors or administrators for or by reason of any 
reasonable grants articles covenants agreements conditions 
bonds assurances & conveyances wch the said John shall be 
required and enter into or make unto the purchaser or pur- 
chasers of the premises according to the true meaning of 
these presents & the deed indented aforesaid." 

6. Itfn that if the said John shall effect the businesses 
aforesaid for sale of the premises then the said John shall 
receive of the money made of the premises five pounds for 
his paynes whether the said Margaret come over to N. E. 
or no. 

7. Itin If said premises cannot or shall not be sold, after 
the said John hath used his diligent & best endevours to that 
end, either for want of a chapman, or for refusall of the said 
ilarg-et to joyne in the sale afores4 then the said Augustin 
shall give <fe pay unto the said John the summe of twenty 
shillings. 

8. Item that if the premises shall not be sold as aforesaid, 
that then the said John, his heires and assignes shall reconvey 
the premises unto the said Augustin, his heirs and assignes 
or to whomesoever hee or they shall appoint upon reasonable 
demand. In witnesse &c. Witnesses as aforesaid. [Clement 
•fc Tinker 3«. 4J.] 



8 • LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Me Joham Tinker de Boston in Nova Anglia plantatorem 
tene'r et firmitcr obligari Augustine Clement in 80 *, dat"" 18? 
8. lidem testes. 

The Condicon of this obligation is such that if the above- 
bounden John Tinker his heires executors, administrators 
and assignes shall from tyme to tyme and at all tymes here- 
after fullfill, performe, keepe and observe all such Articles, 
covenants, declaracons and [4] agreements, on his and their 
parte to be fullfilled, performed, kept & observed, w'^^ are 
mentioned & conteyncd in certaine Articles of agreement in- 
dented bearing date w*'^ these presents, made betweene the said 
Augustin of the one parte &: the said John of the other parte, 
then this obligation shall be voyd & of none effect, or els it 
shall be and remaine in full force, strength and vertue. [Is.] 

Me Augustin Clement de Dorchester in Nova Anglia, plant- 
atore tener etc Joh'i Tinker in 80 * Dat™ 18. 8. lidem testes. 

Condiconed for liimselfo & his wife ut supra, mutatis mu- 
tandis. [Is.] 

To my loving Sister Anne Clement at Shenficld these dlcliver]^. 

Loving Sister, I and my wife doe both remember our loves 
unto you, hoping that you are well, as praised be God we are. 
These are to entreat you to deliver my deeds and writings 
concerning my Tenement in Wock unto this bearer John 
Tinker my ffricnd, unto whome I have conveyed the same, 
and the deeds tt writings thereto belonging I have granted 
unto him, in trust to make sale thereof for me with my Sister 
Margarett : my wife hath also joyned in the conveyance w*^ 
me to him to that purpose, as by the conveyance may appeare 
w"=^ hee will shew you if you please or reade the same unto you. 
Wherefore I earnestly pray and require you not to delay or 
faylc to deliver them unto him accordingly. Soe I commend 
you to God's tuition and rest. 

Yo' loving Brother, A. C. 

Boston in N. E: 18.8- 

[8^1 



LECH FORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. U 

To my loving frcinds, Mr. John Batcman minister at WocJc, and 
Wm Rutkin there dwelling, or either of them, these d : 

Worthy Mr. Bateman & my good freind Will°^ Rutkin, my 
loving salutations to you <fc yo" remcmbred in the Lord. 
These are to let you understand that I have conveyed my 
Tenement in Wock wherein my sister Margaret Mathew 
dwellcth unto this bearer my freind John Tinker, in trust 
to sell the same for me & her as you may perceive by the 
conveyance and agreements between us, if you please to 
reade the same. Now whereas I left my writings concern- 
ing this land w*^ my brother John Clement, who is dead, & 
they are now in the hands of my sister-in-law, his wife and 
executrix, and as I heare Edward Baker of Reading is over- 
seer of my brother's will, I shall intreate you two to use yo' 
best endevours w*^ my sister Clement & Mr. Baker to deliver 
tliose deeds and writings to this my ffriend, that hee and my 
sister Margaret may goe on to finish the sale thereof accord- 
ing to trust I have put in him, and wlierin I pray you to assist 
and further him what you can. My wife hath also joyned w*^ 
me in the sale, as you may perceive by it, and I hope the 
conveyance is good ; if it be not I will perfit it as the buyer 
shall be advised. Herein 1 doubt not but you will befreind 
me. Soe w*^** my owne & my wife's due respects remembred 
unto you both, I recommend you «fc yours and all the faithfull 
Vi^^ you to God's tuition and rest. 

Yo'^ loving freind 

A. C. 
FFROM Boston in N. E. 18. 8. 

[8^0 

To my loving Sister Margaret Mathew at WocJc^ these d : 

Good Sister, I and my wife both remember our loves to you, 
hoping that you are well & in good health, as praised be our 
pood God, we are. Since we understood of yo"" willingnesse 
to come over to us, whereof we are glad and shall, God 
billing, give you the best entertainment we can, we have 



,0 .A 



10 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

entrusted this bearer, our freind John Tinker, to joyne v:^^ 
you in sale of tlie house and that belongs to it, for w*^'^ pur- 
pose wee have made him a good conveyance of our right 
therin ; wherefore if you are willing, set forward the sale of 
the land & house, that it be effected w"^ convenient speed 
[5] and then we have taken order w^^ him to help you & advise 
for yo' passage & the bringing over of yo' goods & what you 
have, if you are willing to come to us. I pray give & provide 
for our ffricnd the best entertainment you may. Soe the 
Lord God guide you & keepe you & us. 

Yo' very loving brother & sister, 

A. C. E. C. 

FFROM BOSTOX IN N. E. 18. 8. 

[8c?.] 

A Letter to Mr. Prince & another to Mr. Clendan in my owne 
affairs, p John Tinker, 18. 8. in the Mary Anne. 

Other letters sent to S' G. G., Mr. D'^ G, M' B, R. Ellis, & 
my M. by Henry Grey's freind in the same ship.^ 

To all Christian people to whome these presents shall 
come, I John Ilood,^ late of Ilalstcd, in the County of Essex, 
weaver, and now of Cambridge in New England, planter, 
send greeting in our Lord God everlasting <fcc. Knowe yee, 
that I the said John Hood for divers good considerations me 

1 Henry Grey, a tailor, -was of Bos- idence Island (Bahamas), from wliich 

ton in 1633, but removed to Fairfield, company Lechford elsewhere mentions 

Conn., about 1640, with his brother that he had received the offer of an 

John, and their father-in-law, "William advantageous position. [1.] 
Frost. Lechford, in his Phihic Deal- 2 John Hood, a Aveaver, at this time 

irtj, mentions his "old acquaintance, of Cambridge, is found in Lynn in 1650; 

Master Frost, sometime of Nottingham, Kitterj', 1652 (Savage). Halsted is in 

and his sonncs, John Grey and Henry Hinckford Hundred, — on the Eiver 

Grey" (3 ^fnss. Hist. Coll., iil 98). Colne, forty-six miles from London, and 

The initial letters, which Lechford six miles from Braintree, — whence a 

gives, leave wide scope for conjecture as number of Thomas Hooker's congrega- 

to the names of his conespondents. Sir tion or company had come to Cam- 

G. G. was, possibly. Sir Gilbert Gerard, bridge (and Mount WoUaston) in 1632. 

deputy-governor of the Company of Prov- [T. ] 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 11 

thereunto moving have demised, granted and to farme letten, 
and by these p^sents doe demise, graunt, and to farme lett, 
unto Wilhu Dineley,! of Boston in Xew England, planter, all 
those my houses,, mesuages, outhouses and gardens and back- 
sides thereunto belonging, lying in Halsted aforesaid, now or 
late in the tenure or occupation of John Beard - my ffather- 
in-law and of Anne his wife, my mother, or their assignes, be 
the said messuages or houses, backsides, gardens, one or two 
or three tenements or more, by what name or names soever 
they be called and howsoever bounded or described. To have 
and to hold the said houses, messuages, and all and singulare 
the premises w^^ the appurtenances, unto the said William 
Dineley his executers administrators and assignes, for and 
during the space of six dayes from the day of the date hereof 
fully to be complcato and ended. In witnesse — 

Dat. 20. 8. Witnesses, Gregory Stone, Barnaba Lamson 
<fcT. L. [Is. Hood & {blank).-] 

This Indenture made the tweutie second day of October in 
tlie fourteenth yeare of the raigne of our SoQaigne Lord 
Charles by the grace of God King of England, Scotland, 
France <fe Ireland <fcc. Annoque Dmi. 1638, betweene John 
Hood late of Halsted in the County of Essex weaver and now 
of Cambridge in New England Planter of the one parte and 
Thomas Parish,3 of Cambridge aforesaid, planter, of the other 
parte, Witnesseth, that the said John Hood for and in con- 

MViUiam Dinely is perhaps remem- Working Providence, Book II. chap, xv ) 

t*rcd l.y most people rather through his to draw a tooth, he went forth with the 

«on, Fathergone Diuely, than in his ovm maid who had summoned him, and thero 

I''.'r^>ona]yry. He was a barber-surgeon, being a violent snow-storm, they both 

and combined with this vocation the lost their way on going over the x\eck. 

«rt 01 drawing teeth, as was then cus- and died in the snow. His son, born 

loniary. He was a favorer of the heret- shortlyafterthisevent, was baptized with 

»<al doctrines advanced by Mrs. Anne the name of Fathergone. His widow 

utetiinson, and on account of his pecu- subsequently married Richard Critch- 

'•«r calhng had a very great opportunity ley; for whom see note at p. 143, post. 
•J instill these doctrines into the minds 2 Thomas, not John. See deed next 

^- •»=» patients. But being sent for following. 

«'. a winter's night by one of Roxbury 3 Thomas Parish, of Cambridge. 

\ ' may be read in Johnson's Wonder. " came in the ' Increase.' 1635, aged 22 • 



12 LECHFORD'S 31ANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

sideracon of the smne of five shillings to him in hand payd 
before the sealing and delivery of these presents, and for 
divers other good causes & considerations him thereunto 
moving hath granted, bargained & sold, enfeoffed and con- 
firmed°and by these presents doth grant bargaine & sell 
enfeoffe & confirmc unto the said Thomas Parish all those 
houses, messuages outhouses and gardens and backsides there- 
unto belonging lying in Halstcd aforesaid now or late in the 
tenure or occupation of Thomas Beard and Anne his wife, 
mother of the said John Hood or their assignes be the said 
mesuages or houses backsides gardens one or two or three or 
more tenement or tenements, by what name or names so ever 
they be called and howsoever bounded & described together 
with all waycs profits easments lights commodities & emolu- 
ments thereto belonging or therew^i^all used & enjoyed or 
reputed to belong and all rents revercons services & other 
hereditaments thcrunto belonging whatsoever and all deeds 
evidences writings escripts & miniments whatsoever concern- 
ing the same [6] in whose custody soever they be And also 
alfthe right title claime interest and demand of the said John 
Hood of In and to the premises & every parte therof To have 
& to hold the said houses mesuages outhouses gardens back- 
sides & all other the premises w'"^ the appurtenances whatso- 
ever unto the said Thomas Parish his heires and assignes for 
ever to the only use and bchoofe of the said Thomas Parish 
his heires and assignes for ever. To be holden of the clieife 
Lord or Lords of the ffee or ffees of the premises by the 
rents & services therefore due & of right accustomed. Aud 
the said John Hood for himselfe his heires executors adminis- 
trators & assignes Doth covenant promise & grant to and with 
the said Thomas Parish his heires and assignes by these pres- 
ents that he the said Thomas his heires & assignes shall or 

was a physician, though in the custom- from these papers that he was expecting 

house record called, possibly for decep- to sail for England in the autunm of 

tion. a clothier Probably he went 163S. (There is an interval o more than 

home livin- at Nayland, county of three years between the recorded birth of 

■ Suffolk, as his attorney, Thomas Dan- his children : Mary, born April 3. 163S, 

forth, calls him" (Savage). It appears and Thomas, July 21, 1641.) [T.\ 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 13 

may lawfully from time to time & at all times hereafter have 
hold <fc enjoy the premises <fc every parte therof freed <fe dis- 
charged of and from all judgments statutes merchant & of 
the staple, recognizances bargaines sales gifts feoffments 
Leases joyntures dowers & all other titles troubles &, charges 
incumbrances whatsoever except only such estate as the said 
Anne hath thcrin without the let trouble or eviction of the 
said John Hood his lieires or assignes or any other person or 
persons whatsoever lawfully clayming from from by or under 
him them or any of them. And that he the said John Hood 
his heires & assignes shall and will at any tyme within the 
space of seaven yearcs next ensuing the date hereof at 
the reasonable request k at tlie cost & charge in the law 
of the said Thomas Parish his heires or assignes make doe 
& execute or cause to be made done & executed all such 
further & other assurance & assurances in the law whatsoever 
for the better tfe more sure making & conveying the premises 
unto the said Thomas his heires & assignes as by the said 
Thomas his heires or assignes or his or their Councell learned 
in the law shalbe reasonably advised or required soe that for 
the doing & making therof the said John Hood his heires 
and assignes shall not be compelled to travell out of the juris- 
diction of the Massachusetts in New England. And the said 
John Hood doth, hereby constitute & make my welbeloved 
George Crissall and Roger Marret ^ his lawfuU attorneys 
ioyntly or severally for him & in his name to enter into and 
upon the p^'mises <fc possessions therof to take & afterwards 
possession, livery & seizin thereof to deliver over unto the 
said Thomas Parish, his heires or assignes according to the 
Law <fe the tenor hereof ratefying and allowing whatsoever 
niy said Attorneys or either of them shall lawfully doe in the 
premises. In witnesse whereof, the parties abovesaid have 

* Roger Manet was perhaps a rela- distant. Marret, Maryet, Maryot, Slar- 

tive and townsman of Deacon Thomas riot, and perhaps ^larryatt, are dilTerent 

Marn-tt, of Cambridge. About 1765 forms of the same original surname, and 

Jjaies Marriot, LL.D., owned the man- are all now, or were recently, in use in 

or of Twinstead Hall, in the same Hun- England. [T.] 
'I'e^l with Halstead, and about six miles 



14 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

hereunto interchangeably set their hands & seales the day & 
yeare first aboyewritten. In p^ncia : [5s. Hood & Parish.] 

Me Joheiu Hood imp de Halsted in Com Essex, Textorera, 
& nunc de Cantabrigia in Nova Anglia plantatorem tener' &c. 
Thome Parish in sexaginta libris. Dat. 22° 8. 

The condicon of this obligation is such that if the said John 
Hood his heires, executors, administrators and assignes, shall 
from time to time and at all tymes hereafter, observe, kecpe, 
fullfill <t performe all and every such covenants, grants, arti- 
cles & agreements on their parte to be performed, fulfilled, 
kept & observed, as they [7] are menconed and conteyned in 
one paire of indentures bearing date Tvth these p'"nts, made 
betweene the said John Hood of the one parte and the said 
Thomas Parisli of the other parte, then this obligation shall be 
voyd and of none effect, or els shall be and rcmaine in full 
power, strength & vertue. In presencia. [Is. Hood & Parish.] 

Articles of agreement indented made the xxif" day of October in 
the fourteenth yeare of the raigne of our Sovcraigne Lord 
Charles King of Engl. etc. Annoq Dhi 1638. Betivecn^ John 
Hood dx. of the one parte & Thomas Parish &c. of the other 
parte. 

Wliereas the said John Hood by his deed indented bearing 
date herewith hath granted k conveyed certaine lands & tene- 
ments in the County of Essex unto the said Thomas Parish 
his heires and assignes as by the said Deed indented more at 
large it Doth & may appeare Now it is covenanted concluded 
declared <fc agreed by and betwecne the parties aforesaid that 
the said grant & conveyance is & shall be upon tliis speciall 
trust k confidence that the said Thomas Parish shall sell the 
said Lands k Tenements for the said John Hood to some 
person or persons in England for as much money as liee by 
his best skill and endevours can get for the same k returne 
the said money unto the said John Hood his executors ad- 
ministrators or asss. Itui that the said John Hood his heires 
executors administrators or assignes shall k will from tyme 
to tyme and at all tymes hereafter save k keepe harmelcsse 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 15 

the said Thomas Parish his hcires executors and administra- 
tors of and from all accoiis suits troubles charges & demands 
well shall any wayes arise & come upon or be brought against 
the said Thomas Parish his heires executors or administrators 
for or by reason of any reasonable covents grants articles 
agreements bonds conditions assurances & conveyances wch 
the said Thomas shall enter into or make unto the purchaser 
or purchasors of the premises according to the true meaning 
of the said Deed indented <fe of these presents. Itui : that the 
said John shall give unto the said Thomas for his labour and 
charges in k about the premises, the summe of twenty shil- 
lings, if he effect the same well and trustily; but if the said 
Thomas after all his best endevours cannot effect the sale 
aforesaid then he shall have only tenne shillings for his 
charges thereabout. Itm : that if the premises shall not be 
sold as aforesaid that then the said Tho : his heires and as- 
signes shall reconvey the premises unto the said John, his 
heirs, and assignes or to whomesocver he or they shall ap- 
point upon reasonable demand. In witnesse whereof the par- 
ties abovesaid have hereunto interchangeably set their hands 
<fc scales the day & yeare first above written. In p'ncia. 
[Hood & Parish 85.] 

Me Joheiii Hood <fec. tener' Thome Parish in sexaginta 
libris <tc. Dat. 22? 8. 

The condicon of this obligation is such that if the said John 
Hood his heires executors administrators and assignes shall 
from time to time and at all tymes hereafter observe keepe 
full fill (fc performe all and every such Covenants articles decla- 
rations and agreements on their parts to be observed kept 
fullfiUed <fc performed as are menconed & conteyned in cer- 
taine Articles of agreement indented Dated w*^ these presents 
made betweene the said John of the one parte & the said 
lliomas Parish of the other parte then this obligation shall 
be Yoyd and of none effect or els shall be <t remaine in full 
lK)wcr strength &, vertue. [Hood & Parish Is.] 

Me Thoma Parish de Cantabrigia in N. A. plantatorem, 
tPiier. Join Hood in GO* Dat. j)nt script^. Condiconed ut 
fcuj.*, mutatis mutandis. [1.] 



16 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

[8] Be it Knowne unto all men by these presents that I 
Samson Shotton ^ of Mount Woollaston in New England, 
planter, doe hereby acknowledge that I have received of my 
brother Anthony Shotton of Cropstcn in the county of Lei- 
cester, yeoman, the summe of fewer score and tenne pounds 
of lawfuU money of England, given and bequeathed unto me 
as a legacy by the last will & testament of Thomas Shotton 
late of Cropston aforesaid, our father, deceased, and thereof 
and of every parte thereof I doe hereby remise, release, and 
for ever quitt clayme the sayd Anthony Shotton, his heires, 
executors and administrators, And also I doe remise, release 
and for ever quitt clayme unto the said Anthony Shotton all 
and all manner of accons, suits, debts, iudgments, statutes, 
recognizances, trespasses and demands whatsoever, that I 
have or may have against him or them for any cause, matter 
or thing whatsoever from the beginning of the world to this 
present day, In witnesse whereof I have hereunto set my 
hand &. scale the twentie second day of October, in the foure- 
teenth yeare of the raigne of our Soveraigne Lord Charles 
King of England Scotland France & Ireland «fec. Anno^. 
Dni. 1G38. 

In p'^sencia, Thome Savage, Johis Moore, & mei Tho. L. 
[Shotton & Shotton Sd.] 

In the Xame of the Lord God and of our Lord Jesus Christ, 
I John Newgate ^ of Boston in New England, Planter, being 
by God's grace and goodnesse in perfect health of body and 
soundnesse of judgment in minde and memory cleare and 
perfect, doe hereby make and constitute my last will ^ and 

^ One of the partners of Gorton, in and order of his children more fully 

the purchase of Shaomet from the In- than his last will, made twenty-seven 

dians, in January, 1643 ( JFmth., ii. 121, years later, which is printed in the Hisl. 

note); Newport, 1638 ; freeman, 1640, and Gcncal. Reg., xiii. 333-335. His 

but disfranchised, 1641. [T.] eldest son, John, and third son, Joseph 

* John Newgate, hatter, of Boston, [Joshua ?], are not named in the last 

had been a London merchant- but came will, and both died probably before their 

to New England in 1632. He was a father. Nathaniel, — who was one of 

man of influence, once a representative, the principal men of Boston iu 1659, — 

and many times selectman. " went home, probably before marriage," 

" This will, made in contemplation as ilr. Savage thought. [T.] 
of a voyage to England, gives the names 



LECIIFOIiD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 17 

testament in manner and forme following : First, 1 doc desire 
to give up mj soule and body to tlie Lord Jesus Christ to be 
disposed according to his good will and pleasure And I desire 
in his fcare and name and according to his guidance and 
direction to dispose of those outward good things that the 
Lord hath given and possessed me of, unto the children that 
(Jod of his grace hath given me : ffirst, I give unto my eldest 
Sonne John Newgate, all those my Lands and Tenements lying 
in Ilorningcrth in the County of Suffolke in England our 
native country, To have and to hold the same to him and his 
heires for ever. But my will is that my wife Anne Newgate 
shall have the rents, profits and revenues of the said Lands 
k Tenements untill my said sonne shall attaine the age of 
Twenty and foure yeares, for and towards the educating and 
bringing up of him and the rest of my Children, And also tliat 
my said sonne shall pay out of the said Lands fTifty pounds 
unto my daughter Sarah and ffifty pounds more unto my 
daughter Hannah, at her age of twenty one yeares or daye 
of marriage, w*'^ it shall please God to be first, for w""*^ 
l»ayments to be made unto them when my said sonne shall 
come to his age of Twenty foure yeares hee shall either pay 
the same or give bond to my said daughters for payment 
tlicreof as soone as he can make sale of the said Lands and 
Tenements or by any meancs raise the moneys out of the 
>anie. But, if he the said John Newgate my sonne [9] shall 
refuse to give such bond and to make the said paym^^, then 
t!ie said lands shall be sold by my Executors and only one 
liiuidred and ffifty pounds shall be payd unto my said Sonne, 
;iiid the rest of the money that it shall be sold for shall be 
••'lually divided bctweene my other children and my wife. 
And yet if my said sonne shall be stubl)orne and rebellious 
:'-';iinst God or his Church or his mother and will not be 
r'-elaymed, tlien he shall have but thirty pounds of the said 
Jijoney & the rest to be divided as aforesaid, Itin, I give 
^'iitu my sonne Nathanael Newgate my house in Boston aforc- 
^M whcrin I now dwell, w^^ that little ground belonges to it, 
' ' enter upon the same &, enjoy it to him and his heires for 
' '»'r when he shall accomplish the age of twenty foure yeares. 

2 



18 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

And to mj soiine Joseph Newgate, I give and bcqiicatli those 
my house & grounds in the country called rtumney ^larsh ^ in 
N. E., w*^^ hee shall likewise enter upon & enjoy when he shall 
come to the age of twenty fouro yeares. Their mother shall 
have the use & profitt of these last mentioned houses in Boston 
and at Rumney Marsh untill their said respective ages, for 
and towards their education. But if their mother dye before 
either of those times, then the same shall i)rcsently be in. the 
hands of my said sonnes Nathanael & Joseph respectively 
according to my true meaning herein expressed. Itm, I give 
and bequeath unto my daughter Elizabeth Oliver tenne pounds 
"wch jjjy ^yjfQ si^aij pay in money or moneys worth wtliin twelve 
months after my decease. Item, furthermore my will is that 
if any of my children dye before they come to enjoy or have 
right to these Icgacyes aforesd then their & every of their 
respective porcons, lands & legacyes to be equally divided to 
and among my said other children surviving. Itfii, all the rest 
of my estate 1 give <fc bequeath unto my loving wife Anne 
Newgate for the payment of my debts and the bringing up 
of my children, and I leave it to her discreation to give to 
any of my children more then I have given & appointed as 
she shall see cause and when she shall please. Provided all- 
wayes, and my will is, that if it shall please God that I live 
to sell off tliose lands in Suffolke aforesaid. Then I give it to 
my eldest daughter Elizabeth Oliver twenty pounds to be payd 
her at the tymc appointed before for payment of the said 
tenne pounds, and I give my said eldest somie John Newgate 
one hundred and ffifty pounds, and to my daughter Sara three 
score and tenne pounds, and to my daughter Hannah three 
score & tenne pounds, to be payd unto them when they shall 
respectively attaine the age of twenty one yeares or be mar- 
ried, w'^'* of them shall be first. And, if any of my said children 
become stubborne and rebellious against God, or his Church, 
or their mother, then such child or children shall have only 
the fourth parte of their respective legacyes af ores'*, \y^^ I 
have given & bequeathed to them as aforesaid, and tlie other 

^ For tliis land at Rumney Marsh, see Boston Town Records, i. 27, and also 
the Note-book, p. 141, post. 



LECHFORD'S 3IAXUSCEIPT NOTE-BOOK. 19 

three parts the rest thereof to be divided among my other 
children; And all the rest of my estate be it more or lesse I 
bequeath unto my said loving wife [10] for and towards the 
educating and bringing up of my children. Provided also 
that if I shall be cast away at sea and all that estate that I 
shall bring with me out of England then I intreate the Church 
to dispose of that estate I have heere in New England accord- 
ing to their wisedome & discreation, unto and amongst my 
children and my wife, as they shall thinke fitt, anything 
hereinbefore conteyncd to the contrary thereof in any wise 
notwithstanding. Also my will is that if the said estate m"^ 
I shall have in England come over into these parts of New 
England, then I give k bequeath unto Theodore Athinsoni 
my servant twenty pounds, but if it shall be lost by the way 
by sea or otherwise, then only tenne pounds, to be payd him 
when his tyme of service shall be expired. And I make and 
ordaine my said wife Anne Newgate and John Oliver- my 
executors of this my will. And lastly, I doe hereby revoke 
and annull all former wills & testaments by me heretofore 
made whatsoever. In witnesse whereof I have hereunto sett 
my hand «fc scale the xxiij"* day of October Anno Dili 1638. 
Signed, sealed, published k declared to be the last will and 
ti'stament of the said John Newgate, in the presence of us. 
Thomas Savage & mei T. L. [5s. Newgate.] 

To all Christian people to whome these presents shall come 
I William Wilson ^ of Boston in ^q\^ England planter send 

^ "Theodore Atkinson, Boston, 1634, Thomas Oliver, and son-in-law of Xew- 

f'lt-nnker, came in the employment of gate, having married Elizabeth, his 

Jolin Newgate, from Bury, in Co. Lan- ' daughter. " 1G46, April 11, died Mr. 

ci-t<T" (Savage). A lot at Muddy John Oliver," says Hull, in his i^iVrry, 

• •iver (Brookline), for two persons, was "one of choice parts, endued with a 

K'--»Ht(.-d him by the town, Aug. 31, 1640 ; variety of able gifts for the generation ; 

a;i.l he was a constable in 1649, and clerk but God took him away in his youth, to 

<1 the market in 1655 (Drake's Bos- thesaddeningofveiy many godly hearts, 

f ». I'p. 253, 318, 341). His first wife and threatening the rising generation." 

*'^'* -^l^'ig^il (surname unknown), and his He was not quite thirty years old at the 

*^<Jiid was Mary, a daughter of the Kev. time of his death. 

Juhn Wheelwright. [T.] » William Wilson, a joiner by trade, 

'John Oliver, son of the Elder wasadmitted to the church in 1635. He 



20 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

greeting in our Lord God everlasting Knowe yee that I the 
said William Wilson for divers good causes and considera- 
tions me thereunto moving have demised granted & farme 
letten and by these presents doe demise grant and to farme 
let unto William Dineley of Boston aforesaid barber all 
those my three acres & halfe of meadow or pasture ground 
more or' lesse called Marshtoftc lying in Dunnington in the 
County of Lincolne abutting upon the nortli end of the Cop- 
pihold land of my brother Thomas Wilson there w"^^ said 
meadow or pasture ground my ffather William Wilson pur- 
chased of one Avis als i Havye of Dunnington Northrop afore- 
said husbandman deceased To have and to hold the said 
meadow or pasture ground w'"^ the appurtences unto the 
said Willm Dineley his executors administrators and as- 
signes from the day of the date of these presents for and 
during the space oi seaven dayes from thence forth fully 
to be complcat and ended In Witnesse wherof <fcc. 22? 8. 
In presencia Mr Richard Waite Willih Pell k mei Tho. L. 
[Is. Wilson k Dineley .2] 

This Indenture made the Twenty fourth day of October in 
the fourcteenth yearc of the raigne of our Soveraigne Lord 
Charles by the grace of God King of England Scotland France 
& Ireland <fcc. Annoc^ Dui 1G38, Betweene William Wilson 
of Boston in New England, Tlanter, and Patience his wife, of 
the one parte, and John Tinker of Boston aforesaid, planter, 
of the other parte, Witnesseth , that the said William Wilson 
[U] and Patience his wife for and in consideration of the 
summe of five shillings in hand payd before the sealing & 
delivery of these presents by the said John Tinker, and for 
divers other good causes k Considerations them thereunto 

was afterwards deputy-marshal, and kept 2 This short lease, like that of Clom- 

the prison, wherein, it would seem, he ent to Salter, and of Hood to Parish 

lived, or at any mte his widow after (pp. 1, 7, ante), was made only for the 

him {he died in 1646). The General purpose of facilitating the conveyance of 

Court was forced to bribe her to leave the fee, by interposing a fictitious " es- 

quietlv, as she imagined that it belonged tate for years," thereby avoiding livery 

to her by right. an^^ seizin to the grantee (in trust) or to 

1 Avis, alias Havye. the future purchaser. [T.] 



LECUFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 21 

moving have granted, bargained, sold, enfeoffed & confirmed 
unto the said John Tinker, All those three acres and halfe of 
meadow or pasture ground more or lesse, called Marshtofte, 
lying in Dunniugton ^ in the County of Lincolne, abutting 
upon the north end of tlio Coi)piliold land of Thomas Wilson 
brother of the said William Wilson there, w'=^ said meadow 
or pasture ground William Wilson, ffather of the said William 
Wilson party to these presents, purchased of one Avis aP 
Ilavye of Dunnington Northrop aforesaid, husbandman, de- 
ceased. Together with all wayes, profits <fc commodities there- 
unto belonging or reputed to belong And all rents revercons 
services and other hereditaments thereunto belonging what- 
soever And all deeds evidences writings escripts and minu- 
mcnts whatsoever concerning the same in whose custody 
soever they be And also all the right title claime interest 
and demand whatsoever of them the said William Wilson 
and Patience liis wife of in and to the premises and every 
or any parte therof To have and to hold the said meadow 
or pasture ground rents revercons services and all and sin- 
gular the premises w** the appurtenances whatsoever unto 
the said John Tinker his heires and assignes for ever To 
the only use & proper behoofe of the said John Tinker his 
heires and assignes for ever To be holden of the cheife Lord 
or Lords of the ffee or ffees of the premises by the rents 
and services therefore due & of right accustomed. And the 
said William Wilson and Patience his wife doe for them- 
selves their heires executors administrators and assignes 
Covenant promise & grant to and with the said John Tinker 
his heires and assignes by these presents that he and they 
sliull or may lawfully have hold and enjoy the premises and 
every parte therof freed and discharged of all iudgraents 
Statutes, merchant k of the Staple, recognizances bargaincs 
sales gifts grants feoffments wills ioyntures dowers titles 
troubles charges k incumbrances whatsoever from time to 

* Dunnington, or Donnington, about Nortlirop was crossed out by Lechford, 

••ix inilps southwesterly from Boston, in botli in the sliort lease and (at its first 

'-ini^)lnshire. The name was originally occurrence) in this deed to John Tinker, 

written Dunnington Northrop, but the [T.] 



22 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

time and at all times hereafter without the lett trouble or 
eviction of them the said William Wilson & Patience their 
lieires or assignes or of any other person or persons what- 
soever. And that they the said Williu Wilson & Patience their 
heires and assignes shall &, will from time to time and at 
all times hereafter at the reasonable request and cost and 
charges in the law of the said John Tinker his heires or 
assignes make and acknowledge or cause to be made & 
acknoledged any further assurances or conveyances in the 
law whatsoever for the better k more sure sctling & con- 
veying tlie premises unto <fc upon the said John Tinker his 
heires [12] and assignes according to the true intent & 
meaning of these presents so as the said William Wilson 
and Patience his Avife or their heires or assignes be not 
compelled to travell out of the Jurisdiction of the Massa- 
chusetts in New England for the making or acknowledging 
thereof And the said William Wilson and Patience his 
wife doe hereby constitute and make their welbcloved Pichard 
Tunnard, and Thomas Wilson, brother of tlie said William, 
their true and lawful Attorneys, joyntly or severally for them 
the said William and Patience and in their names to enter 
into and upon the premises and quiet &, peaceable possession 
thereof to take and afterwards quiet and peaceable possession 
livery and seizin tlierof to deliver over unto the said John 
Tinker his heires and assignes according to the purporte 
and true meaning of these p'^sents ratcfying and allowing 
whatsoever their said Attorneys shall lawfully doe in the 
premises. In witnesse whereof the parties above sayd have 
hereunto interchangeably sett their hands and scales the 
day and yeare first above written. In p^'ncia nrfi. dcor 
Testin ore Attornem* f Willm Dynely indorse sur Ic fait, fact 
26° 8, <tc. coram nobis. [05. Wilson k Tinker.] 

Me Willm Wilson De Boston in Xova Anglia Plantatorem 
tener k". Jolu Tinker in Centum libris ct": dat. 24. 8. In 
p'ncia nru. dcor Testin. The Condicon of this Obligation 
is such that if the said William Wilson and Patience his 
wife their heires executors administrate^ and assiirnes shall 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 23 

from time to time and at all times hereafter observe keepe 
fulinil and pcrforme all such articles agreements grants & 
Covenants on their parte to be observed kept fullfillcd and 
performed as thej are mentioned and conteyned in one 
pairc of Indentures bearing date w"^ these presents made 
betweene the said William Wilson of the one parte and the 
said John Tinker of the other parte Then this obligacon 
shall be voyd and of none effect or els shall remaine "ct be 
in full power strength and vertue. \ls. Wilson & Tinker.] 

Articles of agreement indented made the ticcnty-fourth clay of Octo- 
hcr, m thefourctcenth yeare of the Baignc of our Soveraigne Lord 
Charles hy the grace of God King of England Scotland France and 
Ireland <tc. Annoq DFii 163S Betweene William Wilson of 
Boston in New England Blanter of the one imrte and Joiix 
Tinker of Boston aforesaid planter of the other imrte. 

AVhereas the said William Wilson and Patience his wife 
have by their deed indented bearing date w"^ these presents 
gi-anted & conveyed ccrtaine meadow or pasture ground lyino- 
in Dunnington in the County of Lincolne unto the said John 
Tinker [13] his heires and assigues for ever as more at laro-e 
by the said deed indented it dotli k may appeare x\ow it is 
Covenanted concluded declared and agreed by and betweene 
tie parties aforesaid that the said grant and convevance is and 
Shall be upon this special! trust and confidence that the said 
John Tinker shall sell the premises for them unto some per- 
son or persons in England for as much money as he by his best 
Skill and endcvours can get for the same. Item, that the 
moneys the premises shall be sold for shall be disposed, first 
ot all towards the payment of the debts of the said William 
Wilsons father, and next towards the bringing over, passao-e 
and provisions of Alice Wilson, mother of the said William 
to these parts of Xew England, if she please to come, wherein 
the said John shall well and faithfully help and advise the 
*><iiu Alice. 

sl.m''"'*!?* *^'' '""''^ •^''^"' '^^"^^ ^*''^^^^ fi^'^ P«"^^d^ ^^^d tenne 

«"Iliugs thereof for his labour and charges thereabout; and 

residue of the said money to be to the said Alice Wilson. 



24 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Itin that the said William Wilson <fe Patience and their 
heires execute admors and assignes shall from time to 
tyme and at all tymes hereafter save & keepe harmelesse 
the said John his heires executors k administrators of and 
from all actions suits troubles charges <fc demands W=^ 
shall any wayes arise and come upon or be brought against 
him or them for or by reason of any reasonable grants cove- 
nants agreements bonds condicons or other assurances w*=^ 
the said John shall be required to enter into or make unto 
the purchasor or purchasors of the premises according to the 
purport of the said Deed indented & of these presents. 

Itin if the said Lands cannot be sold after all the best 
endevours of the said John therein to that purpose then 
the said John shall have only fforty shillings for his paynes 
& charges thereabout and shall upon reasonable demand- 
reconvey the premises to the said William Wilson his heires 
and assignes or to whomsoever hee or they shall appoint. 
In witnesse whereof the parties aforesaid have to these 
presents interchangeably sett tlicir hands and scales the 
day and year first above written In p'"ncia nril. dcor 
Testin. [3s. 4J. Wilson & Tinker.] 

Me Joheiu Tinker de Boston in N. A. Plantat. tener Will 
Wilson in 100^. Dat. 24. 8. In p^'ncia nrfi. dcor Testin. 

The condicon &9 to keepe Covents &". in the said articles 
pnt &? 

[Is. Tinker «fc Wilson.] 

Me WilhTi Wilson De Boston in N. A. Plantat. tener &9 
John Tinker in lOOii Dat. 24. 8. In p'ncia nrri. dcor 
Testin. 

Condiconed ut sup? Rec. p*. in garden fruits. [Is. Wilson 
& Tinker.] 

[14] To all Christian People to whome these presents shall 
come I Thomas Dexter of Lynne in New England, yeoman, 
send greeting in our Lord God everlasting, Knowe Yee that 
for my naturall love and good affection that I beare unto my 
Sonne & heirc apparent Thomas ' Dexter k for other good 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 25 

causes <fe considerations me thereunto moving, I have given 
and granted and by these i/esents doe give & grant unto the 
said Thomas Dexter my sonne, One mansion house and all 
outhouses, barnes, stables, cowhouses & the appurtenances, 
and one water mill w'^ the appurtenances, and six hundred 
acres of land meadow and pasture to the said mansion house 
belonging, lying and being in Sandwich by tlie Indians here- 
tofore called Shawme, w'^in the Jurisdiccon of the Patent of 
Plymouth in New England, and all woods, underwoods, com- 
mons & appurtenances to the same pcrteyning whatsoever. To 
have and to hold the said Mansion house & premises, w'^ all 
& singularc the appurtenances unto the said Thomas Dexter 
my Sonne his heircs and assignes for ever, to tlie only use 
k proper behoofe of the said Tho : Dexter my sonne his heires 
and assignes for ever. And also I doe for the consideracons 
aforesaid give <fc grant unto the said Thomas Dexter my 
Sonne, one plough or teame w"^ foure oxen & one horse or 
mare, w*^ all necessaries to the same. To have <fc to hold to 
him my said sonne, his executors, administrators and assignes 
for ever. And I grant & hereby promise to my said sonne 
that if he shall not tliink good to accept of the premises 
hereby granted, that I will pay him the summe of five hundred 
pounds upon reasonable demands. In witnesse whereof I 
have liereunto set my hand and seale, the twenty fourth day 
of October in the foureteenth yeare of the raigne of our 
Soueraigne Lord Charles King of England etc. Annocp Dili 
1638.1 In p'ncia nrn. Anthonij Swimmer et mei T. L. 
[2s. M. Dexter & Dexter.] 

[15] This Indenture made the thirtietli day of October in 
the foureteenth yeare of tlie raigne of our Soveraiirne lord 
Cliarles by the grace of God King of England Scotland 

' On a subsequent page will be found returne into these parts of New En-- 

a bond given by Tbonias Dexter, the land, or not be well advanced in niar- 

«"!, m consideration of this deed, for riage according to the good likeing of 

l"e payment of £100 to each of his the said Thomas." One of the daugh- 

^"'ters Mary and Frances Dexter, in ters of Thomas Dexter, Sr., married 

Mse the said Thomas (junior) "should John Friend, of Boston, October, 1639 

f^^rry a wife and dye at sea before his (see pp. 20, 21, post). [T.] 



2G LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

France k Ireland <tc. Annocp Dili 1038, Betweenc Katlierine 
Coytmore,! late of Wapping in the County of Midd[lcsex], 
and now of Charles Towne in New England, widdowc, In- 
crease Xowell 2 of Charles Towne aforesaid, Esif , & Parnell 
his wife, Thomas Graves of Wapping aforesaid, mariner, & 
Katlierine his wife, and Mary Eaglesfeild daughter <t heirc 
of Susanna Eglesfeild deceased, sister of the said Parnell & 
Katlierine Graves, all three daughters of Thomas Grey, late 
of Harwich in the county of Essex mariner, deceased, & of 
the said Katlierine Coytmore sometimes his wife, of the one 
parte, and Robert Kidd of Sutton in the comity of Suffolke, 
yeoman, of the other parte, witnesseth, that the said Katlier- 
ine Coytmore, Increase Nowell &, Parnell his wife, Thomas 
Graves k Katherine his wife, and Mary Eaglesfeild, for and 
in consideration of the somme of flive hundred k ffifty pounds 
of lawfull money of England to them in hand payd before the 
sealing and delivery of these presents by the said Robert Kidd, 
wlierof and wherewitli the said Katherine Coytmore Increase 
k Parnell Thomas Graves k Katherine his wife k Mary doe 
acknowledge themselves to be satisfied k payd k therof and 
of every parte therof doe remise release k for ever quitt 
clayme the said Robert Kidd his heires executors adminis- 
trators and assignes by these presents Have aliened, granted 
and enfeoffed, and by these presents doe alien grant and en- 
feoffe unto said Robert Kidd, the one moity and halfendeale 

1 This indenture supplies some addi- fliious to remark tliat this Mrs. Coyt- 

tional infonnation, respecting the family more was not, at a later period, Gov- 

of Mrs. Coytmore, to that which has ernor AVinthrop's wife, but his wife's 

been gathered by Islv. Frothingham mother-in-law. 

(Ulstorij of Cluirlcstoicn, p. 86) and - Increase Nowell came with Win- 
ilr. Savage, showing that she was the throp in 1630 ; and was one of the found- 
daughter of Robert Myles, of Sutton, ers of the church at Charlestown. He 
County Suffolk, and had by her first was at first Euliug Elder ; but it being 
husband, Tliomas Grey, of Harwich, thought that he could not hold this 
County Essex, three daughtei-s : Par- office together with that of assistant, 
nell (married Increase Xowell), Kath- he gave it up. He was for many years 
erine (married Thomas Graves), and Secretary of the Colony, and was as- 
Susanna (married — Eaglesfield), who sistant from 1629 to his death in 1655. 
died before the making of this inden- His wife was Parnell Grey, daughter of 
ture, leaving one daughter, Mary Ea- Katlierine Coytmore by Thomas Grey, 
glestield. [T.] It is probably super- as here shown. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 27 

of all and singulare those freeliold lands and tenements late 
of Robert Myles, of Sutton aforesayd, yeoman, deceased, 
ffatlier of the said Katherinc Coytmore, now or late in the 
tenure or. occupation of the said Robert Kidd or his assignes, 
situate, lying & being in Sutton aforesaid, and in the manners 
or townes or villages of Sutton Storkerland & Campsey, 
Houslye, Setleburgh, Ufford, Blacksall, or any other townes, 
villages, hamlets or manners, w*^in the county of Suff. 
wheresoever, w*'^ all and singulare the appurtenances thereof, 
And all deeds, evidences writings escripts <fc minuments 
Avhatsoever concerning the same in wliose custody soever 
they be that they the said Katherine Coytmore Increase & 
Parnell Thomas Graves and Katherine his wife & Mary or 
any of them can or may come by w'^out suit of law. And 
all their & every of their right title clayme interest and de- 
mand of in and to the premises and every parte & parcell 
thereof To have & to hold the said moity & halfendcale of 
the said ffreehold Lands &, Tenements & all t singulare the 
premises wtli the appurtenances unto the said Robert Kidd 
his heires & assignes for ever To the only use & proper be- 
hoofe of the said Robert Kidd his heires & assignes forever 
To be holden of the cheife Lord or Lords of the ffee or ffees of 
the premises by the rents & services therefore due k of right 
accustomed. And they the said Katherine Coytmore In- 
crease & Parnell Thomas Graves k Katherin his wife [13] 
and Mary doe for themselves their heires executors and ad- 
ministrat" Covenant promise and grant to and wtli the said 
Robert Kidd his heires and assignees by these presents that 
hce & they shall or may lawfully from tyme to t}-me & at 
all tymes hereafter have hold <fc enjoy the premises hereby 
granted and every parrte thereof freed <fc discharged of <t 
from all former &, other grants bargains sales feoffments 
indgmcnts statutes, merchant & of the Staple, Recognizances 
fiines issues amerciaments Joyntures dowers titles of dower 
and of and from all other titles troubles charges & incum- 
brances whatsoever liad made done or suffered or to be had 
made done or suffered by the said Katherine Coytmore In- 
crease and Parnell Thomas Graves k Katherine his wife k 



28 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Mary their heires or assignes or any of them or by their or 
any of their assent meanes or procurement wthout the let 
trouble or eviccon of them or any of them or of any other 
person or persons 'lawfully clayming from by or under them 
or any of them And Also that they & every of them their 
and every of their heires and assignes shall & will from 
time to tyme and at all tymes hereafter Tvthin the space of 
twenty yeares next ensuing the date hereof at the reasonable 
request and at the cost & charges in the law of the said 
Eobert Kidd his heires or assignes make doe acknowledge 
levy & suffer or cause to be made done acknowleged levyed 
& suffered all and every such further &, other lawfuU k rea- 
sonable act tfe acts thing & things assurances & conveyances 
in the law whatsoever for the more better & sure conveying 
& sure making of the premises hereby granted & every parte 
therof unto the said Robert Kidd his heires and assignes as 
by him or them or his or their Councell learned in the Lawe 
shall be reasonably advised devised or required soe that for 
the making doing acknowledging levying or suffering therof 
the said Katherine Coytmore Increase & Parnell Thomas 
Graves and Katherine his wife & Mary their heires and 
assignes or any of them be not compelled to travell out of 
the Jurisdiccon of the Massachusetts in New England. And 
the said Katherine Coytmore Increase <fc Parnell Thomas 
Graves <fc Katherine his wife &. Mary have constituted and 
ordained, <fc in their place have put, k by these p^'sents do con- 
stitute <fc ordaine & in their place put their wclbeloved k hon- 
oured friends S"" William Wiseman of Canfeild Hall ^ in the 
county of Essex, Knight and Baronet, Robert Mather of Sutton 
aforesaid, gent., and Henry Halfm of the same, yeoman, their 
. true and lawfull atturneys, ioyntly k severally for them k in 
their names to enter iuto k upon the premises hereby grated 

1 Sir "William "Wiseman, created a ' He was born in 1600, and succeeded to 

"baronet in 162S, and appointed sheriff the family estates ou the death of his 

of the County of Essex in 163S, was elder brother, Robert, April 21, 16-2S. 

the second son of Thomas Wiseman, He had three sisters, named ^lary, 

" who married Alice, daughter and heir Susan, and Parnell (Morant's History 

of Robert Myles of Sutto^i, in SutTolk, of Essex, ii. 2S3, 462). [T.] 
Esq.," and sister of Mrs. Coytmore. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 29 

& possession tlierof to take, and after snch possession therof 
had & taken for them & in their names full & peaceable pos- 
session, leving and Seizin therof unto the said Robert Kidd 
or his certaine Atturney in this behalfe to deliver according 
to the tenor force forme & effect of these presents Ratefying 
& allowing all & whatsoever their said Attorney or Attor- 
neys or any or either of them shall doe in the premises In 
witnesse wliereof the partyes aboucsaid have hereunto inter- 
changeably sett their hands and scales the day and yeare first 
abovewritten. In p^'ncia nrn. Johis Wintrop & me T. L. Signed 
sealed & dd. by Katherine Coytmore Increase N. &, Parnell his 
wife & Mary E. in p'"ncia nrn. [6s. 8c?. 5s. 0. Mrs. Coytmore 
& others & Kidd.] 

[17] To all Christian people to whome these presents shall 
come Wee Katherine Co)'tmore late of Wapping in the County 
of ]\ndd and now of Charles Towne in New England Widdow 
Increase Xowell of Charles Towne aforesaid Esqr. & Parnell his 
wife Thomas Graves of Wapping aforesaid Mariner & Kather- 
ine his wife and Mary Eaglesfeild Daughter & heire of Susanna 
Eaglesfeild deceased, Sister of the said Parnell & Katherine 
Graves all three daughters of Thomas Grey late of Harwich in 
the County of Essex Mariner & of the said Katherine Coytmore 
sometimes his wife send greeting in our Lord God everlast- 
ing, Knowe yee that we^ have made constituted ordained and 
appointed and by these presents do make constitute ordainc & 
appoint our welbelovcd and honoured ffriends S"" "William Wise- 
man of Canfeild Hall in the County of Essex Knight & Baro- 
net Robert Mather of Sutton in the County of Suff. gent and 
Henry Halfin of the same yeoman and every of them severally 
our sufficient and lawfull Atturney and Atturneys at some 
Court or Courts lioldcn for the Mannor or severall Mannors of 
Sutton, Sutton Storkerland & Campsey Houslye, Setleburgli, 
Ufford, Blacksall or any other Mannor or Mannors w*^in the 
County of Suffolke or for any the said Mannors for us or any of 
us and in our names steads & places or in the name stead or 
place of any of us to surrender into the hands of the Lord or 
severall Lords of the said Mannor or Mannors the one moity and 



30 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

lialfenclcale of all those our Coppihold or Customarj lands 
mesuages or Tenements late of Robert Myles of Sutton afore- 
said yeoman deceased ffatlier of the said Katlierine Coytmore 
now or late in the tenure or occupation of Robert Kidd of Sutton 
aforesaid yeoman or his a^ss and all our or any of our Coppy- 
hold or Customary lands tenements & hereditaments whatso- 
ever in the said Mannor or Manners [18] holdcn of the said 
Mannor or Manners or any of them by Coppy of Court Roll to 
the only use ct bchoofc of the said Robert Kidd his heires and 
assignes according to the custome Sc severall customes of the 
said Mannor or Mannors And further for us and every or any 
of us and in our names & places and in the name or place of 
every or any of us to doe execute and suffer or cause to be done 
executed & suffered all and every such further lawfull act and 
acts thing & things whatsoever whereby tlie said moity and 
halfendeale of the said Coppihold or Customary mesuages lands 
Tenements & hereditaments late of Robert Mylcs aforesaid 
now or late in the tenure or occupacon of the said Robert Kidd 
may be lawfully surrendered setled estated assured and con- 
veyed upon him the said Robert Kidd his heires and asSs accor- 
ding to the custome or severall customes of the said Mannor or 
Mannors as to them our said Atturneys or any or either of them 
shall secmc meete fit or expedient Ratefying allowing approv- 
ing and confirming all and every such thing and things as our 
said Attorney or Attorneys or any or either of them shall doe 
execute or suffer touching and concerning the execution and 
performance of this their power and authority to them and 
every of them herein and hereby granted. In witnesse wdierc- 
of we have hereunto set our hands and scales the thirtieth day 
of October in the fourteentli yeare of the Raigne of our Sover- 
aigne Lord Charles by the grace of God of England Scotland 
France & Ireland <tc. King Anno^ Dili 1638. In p''ncia nrii. 
Johis "Wintrop & mci T. L. [M'1^ Coytmore & others and S' 
"Williu Wiseman <t others 2>s. 4.d. as. 4c:?.] 

Me Katherinam Coytmore imp de Wapping in Com. ]\ridd et 
nunc de Villa Caroli in Nova Anglia viduam tener kc. Willo 
Wiseman De Aula de Caufeild in Com Essex ^liliti et Baronetto 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 31 

in millc llbris kc. Dat. 30.8. coram nobis Johc Wintrop tt me 
T. L. 

The Coiidicon of this obligation is such that whereas tlie 
said Kathcrine Coytmore togctlier \i'^^ Increase Xowcll Esqr 
and Parncll his wife and Thomas Graves Mariner and Kath- 
crine his wife k Mary Eaglesfeild have by their deed indented 
made bctweene them of the one parte «fc Eobert Kidd of the 
other parte for the summe of five hundred and ffifty pounds 
of lawfull money of England aliened granted & enfeoffed 
and made their letter of Attorney for the surrendring the one 
moity and halfendcale of certaine ffrechold and Coppihold 
mesuages lands tenements & hereditaments late of Robert 
Myles deceased, ffather of the said Katherine Coytmore & 
now or late in the occupation or possession of the said 
Robert Kidd lyuig k being in the severall Mannor or Man- 
ners Townes villages or hamlets of Sutton, Sutton Storker- 
land and Campscy Houslye Sctleburgh Ufford Blacksell or 
[19] any other ilannor or Manners Townes villages or Ilam- 
blets wthin the County of Suffolkc whatsoever unto the said 
Robert Kidd his heires and assigncs and unto his and their 
use for ever as by the said deed indented and Letter of 
Attorney both bearing date av*^ these p'nts more at large it 
doth and may appeare And by the last will and testament 
of Thomas Grey, sometimes husband of the said Katherine 
Coytmore it is appointed, willed & devised that when the 
said lands &; tenements should be sold by the said Kathcrine 
Coytmore, slice should enter into one bond of a thousand 
pounds condiconed that she should with the said moneys 
raised by sale of the said lands and tenements, buy & pur- 
chase lands for the use & behoofe of herselfe for her life 
and afterwards for the use and behoofe of the said Parnell 
and Katherine Graves and Susanna Eaglesfeild, and their 
heires or w'^'" said Susanna dying left the said Mary her 
daughter and lieire, If therefore the said Katherine Coytmore 
sliall accordingly w'^ the said five hundred and fifty pounds 
purchase <fc buy land to and for the use & behoofe of her- 
selfe for her life and afterwards for the use and behoofe 
of the said Parncll k Katherine Graves k Mary and their 



32 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

heires, Then this obligation shall be voyd and of none effect, " 
or els shall remaine k be in full power strength and vertue. 
\}l^ Coytmorc k S^ WilhTi Wiseman 2s. M. 2.6. Is. 0.] 

To all Christian people Unto -svliomc these presents shall 
come, I John Cotton,^ Teacher of the Church at Boston in 
New England send greeting in our Lord God everlasting : 
"Whereas Edmund Diggle, late of Sutterton^ in the parts of 
Holland in the County of Lincolnc, Clerke, deceased, by his 
last will & testament made & ordained me, the said John 
Cotton, Overseer of his said last will k, testament, Now Knowe 
yee, that because I remaine by the good providence of God in 
these parts of New England, & for divers good causes k con- 
siderations me therunto moving, I have constituted, made k 
ordained, k by these presents doe constitute, make k ordaine 
k in my place put my welbeloved k respected freind John 
Browne late of Boston in the said county of Lincolne and now 
of Poynton or Horbling in the same county, gent., my true & 
faithfuU deputy. Attorney, and Proctor, for me and in my 
name to oversee the said last will k testament k the perform- 
ance thereof, and all and every lawfull k reasonable thing or 
things, motion or motions, suit or suits, for me k in my name 
concerning the same, and according to the tenor of the said 
last will k testament, to make, doe, pron;ove, k follow, or 
cause to be made, done, promo ved or followed, for the due 
execution of the said trust in me reposed, as effectually to all 
intents k purposes as if I mysclfe were there present in Eng- 
land, Batcfying, allowing, k approving whatsoever my said 
deputy, xlttorncy and Proctor shall lawfully or reasonably 
doe or cause to be done in the premises. In witnesse whereof, 
I have hereunto sett my hand k scale the thirtieth day of 
October Anno Dui, 1638, 14 Car. Coram nobis. [Mr. Cotton 
& Mr. Browne 2s. 0.] 

1 John Cotton, bom at Derby Dec. Boston in Xew England from 1633 until 

4, 15S5; dlerl, Dec. 23, 1652. He his death. 

■was entered at Trinity College, Cam- - Sutterton parish is about six miles 

bridge, and was afterwards a Fellow of from Boston, ^vhe^e 5Ir. Cotton. 

Emmanuel. He preached at Boston in preached before coming to New Eng- 

Lincolnshire from 1012 to 1633, and at land. [T.] 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 33 

[20] To all to whorae these presents shall come greetin,<i, 
Knowe yee, that I Thomas Payiiter ^ of Boston in New Eng- 
land, joyner, for twenty eight pounds of good & lawfull money 
of England to me in hand satisfyed and payd before the scal- 
ing & delivery hereof, Doc by this present writing, grant, 
bargaine, & sell unto George Barrcll of Boston aforesaid, 
Cowpcr, my dwelling house and garden lying in Boston afore- 
said w^i* the appurtenccs thereunto belonging, To have & to 
hold the said dwelling house & garden and all the premises 
w*^ the appurtenances whatsoever, unto the said George Bar- 
rell his heires and assignes for ever. And I grant for me & 
my heires that we will warrant unto the said George & his 
heires the tenements aforesaid against me the said Thomas 
and my heires for ever. In witnesse wherof, I have hereunto 
set my hand & scale the thirty one day of October, Anno Diii 
1G3S, Annocp Begis Caroli decimo quarto. Coram nobis. 
[Paynter & Barrcll.] 

Me Georgium Barrcll de Boston in Nova Anglia Cowp. 
tener etc. Thome Paynter in sexdecim libris etc. Dat. 31. 8. 
Coram nobis. 

The Condicon of this obligation is such that if the above- 
bounden George Barrell his heires executors administrators or 
assignes shall well & truly pay or cause to be payd unto the 
abovenamed Thomas Paynter his executors or assignes the 
somme of eight pounds of lawfull money of England upon 
the twenty fourth day of the fourth moneth next ensuing the 
date hereof if it be not the Lords Day, if it be, then the next 

^ Thomas Taynter of Boston left town. He had a house in Boston (down 
traces throughout New England, — at in the Book of Possessions, G, 26), near 
Providence, where he had a lot of land, Dock S(iuare. George Barrell in the 
at Hingham (1637), then at Charles- Book of Possessions is givena. lot directly 
town. New Haven, Rowley, and Ring- north of Paynter's ; from which I infer 
ham again (before 1643, says Savage ; that Pav-nter retained some of his prop- 
but under this date, 1638, he calls erty. It was on the purchase of this 
himself of Boston). In Hingham he property by Barrell that he was admit- 
got into trouble for his religious views, ted a townsman, on condition of "inof- 
and moved thence to Providence, then fensive carryage" (Boston Town Pu:cordSt 
to Newport, and lastly, in 1661, to p. 36). 
Westerly, with the first settlers of that 



34 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

day after, at or in the no^v D-o'elling house of the said Thomas 
this day by him passed to the said George then this obligation 
shall be voyd & of none effect or els shall be k remaine in 
full force strength '& vertue. [Barrell &, Paynter.] 

Me Thomii Dexter de Sandwich in Nova Anglia, agricolii, 
tener etc. Thome Dexter patri suo, in quadringent. libris &c. 
dat. 30. 8. coram mc T. L. 

The Condicon of this obligation is, that %vhereas the said 
Thomas Dexter the ffathcr by his deed poll under his hand 
& seale bearing date the Twenty fourth Day of this instant 
moneth of October, hath given and granted unto the above 
bounden Thomas Dexter certaine lands ct tenements in the 
precincts & bounds of Sandwich aforesaid in New England 
together w'^ one plough or tcamc wth foure oxen and an horse 
or mare <fc the appurtenances and if the said Thomas Dexter 
above bounden shall not accept the said Land ct premises then 
the said Thomas Dexter the [21] ffathcr granted to pay unto 
the said Thomas Dexter above bounden, the some of five hun- 
dred pounds upon reasonable demand as more at large by the 
said deed poll it doth and may appeare. And whereas the said 
bounden Thomas Dexter hath agreed to and w**^ his said ffather 
Thomas Dexter in Consideration of the said grant & grants, to 
pay or cause to be payd unto Mary Dexter & Frances Dexter 
his daughters, for and towards their porcons the summe of 
one hundred pounds to each of the said daughters at such 
time as the said Thomas Dexter abovebounden shall enter into 
& upon the said lands and tenements after his marriage, or 
at such time as he or his executors administrators or assignes 
shall demand & receive the said five hundred pounds, in case 
the said Thomas Dexter above bounden should marry a wife 
and dye at sea before his returne into these parts of New Eng- 
land, or not be well advanced in marriage according to the good 
likeing of the said Thomas Dexter the ffather. If therefore 
the said Thomas Dexter above bounden, his heirs executors 
administrators or assignes shall well & truly perform fuUfiU k 
keepe the said agreement or cause the same to be well and 
truly performed full filled & kept then this obligation shall 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 35 

be voyd and of none effect or els shall rcmaine & be in full 
power strength <fe vertue. [Dexter & Dexter 2s. Qd.'\ 

To all to wliome these presents shall come greeting Knowe 
yee that I Katherine Coytmore late of Wapping in the 
county of Midd and now of Charles Towne in New England 
Widdow, for divers good considerations nic thereunto moving 
have hereby ordained appointed and in my place put my 
Avellbclovcd ffrcinds William Bates of Wapping aforesaid 
Shipwright George Philips of the same Mariner and Ellen 
his wife my attorneys baylies and receivers joyntly or sever- 
ally to receive my rents out of my lands in Sutton in Suf- 
folke for me & in my name & to make & give acquittances 
for the same and to bring or cause to be brought any accons 
thereabout for me & in my name witnesse my hand & scale 
the xxxjt'^ day of October Anno Dni 1038. Coram nobis 
Johe Wintrop &. me T. L. [Is. Ad.'] " ^ ^Ckr\Ck*V(\ 

To all Christian people to whome these presents shall come, 
I John Wintrop i Esq"^, Governor of the Massachusetts in New 
England send greeting: Knowe yee that Whereas Thomas 
Ewer2 late of Charles Townc in the Massachusetts aforesaid 
Deceased, had divers goods & debts due to him in the Realme 
of England, I have hereby given power and Authority soe 
farre as in me lyeth, unto Anthony Dyaper Citizen and Draper 
of London and Andrew -Blake of StroAvde in the County of 
Kent, gent., ioyntly or severally, to gather up the said goods 
k debts and to use all lawfull meancs for the same and being 
soe gathered to pay out of the same unto William Woodcocke ^ 
of Soaper lane, London, merchant, the somme of forty pounds 

^ * John Winthrop, the son of Adam of the years 1634, 1640, 1645, when 

Winthrop, horn at Edwardstone, near Thomas Dudley was elected, and the 

<:roton, in Suffolk, Jan. 12, 1588, died, years 1635, 1636, 1641, and 1644, when 

M ir,-li 26, 1649. He was chosen gov- Haynes, Yane, Bellingham, and Endi- 

emor of the Company of Massachusetts cott respectively held the office. 

IJiy. Nov. 20, 1629, and set sail for 2 Thomas Ewer came in the ship 

• ^-w Kngland, March 29, 1630, arriving *' James" from London in 1635, and 

^t J^alem, June 12 of the same year, died in 1633 (JFi/man). 

"Was governor of the colony from his « For more concerning Woodcock, 

ernval until 1643, with the exception see pp. 204 ci scq., post. 



36 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

and to one Mt Williams of London, eight pounds, and all 
other debts owing by the said deceased party and the rest of 
the said goods and debts Due to the deceased to returnc hither 
into the Court heere, to be disposed of to the wife and chil- 
dren [22] of the said Thomas Ewer according to La we. In 
witnesse whereof I have hereimto set my hand and the pub- 
lick scale of tf^ Colony, Dated at Boston in the Massachu- 
setts aforesaid, the Thirty one Day of October Anno Dni 
1638, Ann^ RR. Caroli Anglii^ &c. decimo quarto. [Mf 
GovernT Dyaper & Blake for Ewers goods. 2s. 0.] 

Be it knowne unto all men by these presents that we Ralfe 
Sprague,! sometimes of Fordington in the County of Dorset, 
ffuller, and now of Charles TowTie in New England, Planter,' 
and Joane Sprague wife of the said Ralfe, one of the daugh- 
ters of Richard Warren late of Fordington aforesaid, yeoman, 
deceased, Doe by these presents constitute, ordaine & appoint 
our welbeloved ffreinds William Derby of Dorchester in the 
County of Dorset, gentleman, our true and lawfull Attorney 
for us & in our names and to our use to demand & receive all 
such porcons & porcons, summe & summes of money and 
childs parte of the goods & chatties reall or personall, late of 
the said Richard Warren, that is, are, or may be due or be- 
longing unto us or either of us, by any right whatsoever, of 
and from any person or persons whatsoever that ought to pay 
or render the same unto us or either of us : And further, for 
us & in our names to commence & followe or cause to be 
commenced & followed any suit or suits accon or accons in 
any Court or Corts Tcmporall or Ecclesiasticall w*^in the 
Realme of England for the same against any person or per- 
sons that are or shall be lyable therunto & the same of them 
to recover levy and receive by due processe of lawe unto our 
use: And also to doe & performe any act or thing requi- 
site therunto or touching the performance of his power & 

1 Ralph Spragiie, of Fpway, in Dor- own request dismissed from the Boston 

setshire, came to New England in 1629, church. Of these Thomas James was the 

as is generally agreed. He was one of pastor, and Increase No well the most 

the thirty-three original members of the prominent man. Sprague became captain 

church at Charlestown wlio were by their shortly, and was often representative. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK, 37 

authority hereby given unto him for us & in our names as 
cflectually and fully to all intents and purposes as if our 
selves were there present & Ratcfying, allowing, Sc confirm- 
ing whatsoever our said Attorney shall lawfully doe in the 
premises. In witnesse whereof we have hereunto set our 
hands & scales, the eighth day of Xovember, Anno Dni 1638, 
Anmp RR. Caroli Anglia:;, ttc. dccimo quarto, coram nobis, 
Johe Wintrop, Governor of the Massachusetts in N. E. <fc mei 
T. L. [Sprague & ux. «t Derby 2s 6J.] 

To my very ivortliy and good ffreind M': William Derhy at Ms 
house in Dorchester or at his lodging in Terme tyme at the 
Sugerloafe in Sheerelane, London, these d ^eliver']. 

Worthy S"", I heare that my wife's ffather is Deceased, and 
that he leaft a faire estate behindc him. I knowe not 
whether hee made a will or no: my wife and I hope that 
there is a child's parte due unto us, because that she had noe 
porcon as yet from her ffather in his life tyme. These are 
therefore to entreate you to be pleased to dcale for us as ef- 
fectually & circumspectly in this businesse as you can and to 
take all advantages for us in the thing, and that you would 
receive what is due to us, pay yo''selfe for all charges & labour 
in it out of what you receive, & returne us the rest, by my 
Sister Alice Eames at Pomberry mills. We thank the Lord 
we are hecre [23] well^«t in health, and we hope you are so 
also, and that worthy and godly man ^K White yo"" Pastor, 
to whome my wife & I remember our service and yo''selfe & 
M! Peale, beseeching the Lord God to kecpe you & defend 
you & his Churches all in this evill tyme. So I rest 

Yo'^ very loving ffreind 

Ralfe Sprague. 
BosTox in N. E. 8. 9. 1638. 

Wee have sent you here-inclosed a letter of Attorney sealed 
before our worthy Governo' to the purpose in this letter 
mcnconcd. The writer hereof who hath given his advise 
m this businesse salutes you in the Lord. And I leave all 
to yo"" wisedome and discreation. 



38 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



To my Loving Sister Alice Eames at Pomherry milks neare 
Dorchester^ these d. 

Loving Sister, my love to you &, o" f reinds w*^ you rcmem- 
bred, whereas I sent you a letter formerly to treate w'^ my 
wife's ffatliers executors about our porcon, I doe hereby 
revoake those letters & yo^ power by them committed to you, 
& desire you would goe to M!" Derby whomc we have made 
our Attorney, & knowe of him what is or can be done in the 
matter, <fe if he shall recover any thing then you are to re- 
ceive it & send it to me & dispose of it according to my for- 
mer direccons, but howsoever I pray let us heare what is or 
shall be done in the businesse. Soe the Lord keepe you & 

Yo'' loving Brother 

Ralfe Sprague. 

BosTOX in N. E. 8. 9. 1638. 

Mr. Throgmorton a draught of an Assignment, 23. 9. 1638. 
[Is.] 

To all to whome these presents shall come greeting, Knowe 
yee that I John Graves ^ of Roxbury in New England, Cow- 
leech, gardian of Sarah Graves my Daughter under age. Doe 
hereby constitute and make my wellbeloved freinds Robert 
Wood of Harlowe in the County of Essex, shoemaker, and 
Nicholas Campe of Nasing in tlie said County, husbandman, 
my true and lawfull Attorneys joyntly and severally for me 
&, in myne name and my said daughters name to demand and 
receive and by suit of law if need be to recover of Lydia Ford 
late of Nasing aforesaid, widdow, my Sister, the summe of 
seaven pounds and tenne shillings, for six yeares rent of a 
certaine peice of meadow in Nasing aforesd, to be ended 
the Twenty fist day of March next ensuing the date hereof, 
being parte of my said daughter's legacy, according to the 

* John Graves was a fiiend of .Tolin from the town of Xasing, in Essex, and 
Eliot the Apostle, coming, as did Eliot, living in Roxburj'. He died in 1644. 



.d .'I 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK, 39 

last will & Testament of Thomas Finch ^ late of Hertford 
in the county of Hertford, yeoman, deceased. And acquittance 
or acquittances therefore in my name and my said Daughters 
name to make upon such receipt, and the same money re- 
ceived to rcturne unto my welbeloved f rcind Nicholas Parker ^ 
of Boston in New England, Planter, M-home I ha\:e appointed 
to receive the same. Ratefying [24] and allowing all and 
whatsoever my said Attorneys or either of them shall law- 
fully Doe in the premises. In witnesse whereof I have here- 
unto set my hand & scale the twenty third day of Novemb'" 
Anno Dili 1638, Annocp RK. Caroli Anglite &c. decimo quarto. 
Coram nobis, Tho : Savage ct mei T. L. scf hujus. [1. 6] 

To all to whorae these presents shall come, T John Win- 
trop Esq'' Governor of the Massachusetts in New England 
send greeting in our Lord God everlasting, Knowe yec that 
Elizabeth Woolcott and :Mary Woolcott, Daughters of John 
Woolcott^ heretofore of Glaston in the County of Somerset, 



1 This provision for one of the 
daugliters of John Graves may ac- 
count for the omission of her name in 
liis will, made Nov. 1, 1G44, by which 
Lis estate was left to Ids wife, mother, 
aiiJ. children, except Sarah, Perhaps 
she was the only surviving child by 
a second wife (daughter of Thomas 
Finch), who died shortly after his ar- 
rival in Xew England in ilay, 1633, 
or of Judith Alward, or AUard, whom 
bo married in December, 1035, his 
third wife (compare Savage; see Jlox- 
lunj Land Lccjrds, p. SI). [T.] 

* Nicholas Parker, of whom much 
•will be seen from time to time in the 
Note-hook, had been a merchant of 
Iloxbury, where he lived at first, 
but soon removed to Eoston. He 
was probably brother of Richard Park- 
f r, who also appears frequently in the 
Notc-bdok ; but I believe there is no 
difict evidence to show that this was 
the ciisc. 



3 "John Wolcott, Cambridge or 
Watertown, freeman, 4th March, 1635 ; 
representative, ]\Iay fuUowiug ; died in 
July, 1633. His inventory, taken 17th 
of that month by three of the church 
members, — Eev. George Philips being 
one, — and the prefix of respect, show 
tliat he was a man of esteem" {Suv- 
arjc). His first wife died probably 
before his coming to New England. 
He hift a Avidow, Winifred, who after- 
wards married Thomas Allen, of Barn- 
stable (Bond's Watertown, p. 668. 
On p. 975 Bond refers to a notice of 
John Wolcott in History of Brookfidd, 
pp. 37, 33). The memorandum to 
"write to Henry "Wolcott, of Wind- 
sor," to inform him of the choice of 
guardians by the daughters, indicates 
the relationship of John "Wolcott to the 
AVindsor family. The elder daughter 
bore the same name with the wife of 
Henry Wolcott, Elizabeth [Saunders]. 
May not John have been the eldest 



40 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

yeoman, and late of Watertowne in New England, planter, 
deceased, and of Mary sometimes liis wife also deceased, are 
at the tyme of the making hereof in full life and good health, 
and further they have before me chosen and intreated their 
Uncles Hicliard Yayle of Glaston aforcsd, yeoman, and Chris- 
topher Atkins of the same, mercer, to be their guardians 
joyntly and severally for them and in their names to take up, 
occupy and enjoy all those their Coppihold Lands and Tene- 
ments lying in or neare Glaston aforesaid, in whatsoever 
mannor or mannors in the said County until they shall re- 
spectively be of full age or married, and then to render them 
an account of the issues and profits of the same Lands & 
Tenements, and also the possession thereof according to their 
right. And that in the meanewhile they their said uncles 
would for them and in their names do or cause to be done 
all such suit & service to the Court or Courts of the Lord 
or Lords of the premises, and all other things, as shall be 
requisite according to the Law and custome or customcs of 
the Mannor or Mannors where the said lands tfc tenements 
doe lye, for the better obtcyning, holding and enjoying the 
premises accordingly. In witnesse whereof I have hereunto 
set my hand and the publique scale of our Colony, Dated 
at Boston in the Massachusetts aforesaid, the 26*^ Day of 
November, Anno Dili, 1G38, Annocp R R Caroli Angliaa 
&c. 14. [2s. Q,il. Woolcott.] 

\_The foUoiving noted in the margin.'] Write to Henry Wool- 
cott of Windsor in N. E. at M. George Searlc mercer in Tanton 

son of Henry and Elizabeth, born in ily record makes no mention of liini." 

1607, who did not accompany his pa- These daughters of John Wolcott, of 

rents to Xevv EngLind, hut was living Watertown, probably returned to Eng- 

in Wellington, Somersetshire, in 1G31 ? land to the care of their guardians, — 

In a notice of " Henry Wolcott and which, on the supposition of the iJen- 

his Children " in the Conjrerjalioiial tity of the father with the son of 

$ftar<er7yfor April, 1S59 (vol. i. p. 149), Henry, would account for the disap- 

the writer, Eev. Samuel Wolcott, says pearance of their names from the fam- 

tbat the eldest son, John, "apparently ily record. (This is not noticed in 

never emigrated to America. He had the recently published Wolcott Family 

died without issue ]trevious to the date Memoirs, ISSl.) [T.j 
of his father's will, in 1G55. The fani- 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 41 

& Edward Woolcott of Axbridge in Soi2set mercer these to 
be made gardians. 

[25] Be it kuowne unto all men by these presents that we 
Elizabeth Woolcott and Mary Woolcott daugliters of John 
Woolcott heretofore of Glaston in the County of Somerset 
yeoman and late of Watertowne in New England planter 
deceased and of Mary sometimes his wife also Deceased 
being at this time respectively & severally under the age of 
twenty and one yeares and here remayning beyond the seas 
in the parts of New England doe hereby choose and intreate 
our welbcloved Uncles Richard Yayle of Glaston aforesaid 
yeoman and Christofcr Atkins of the same mercer to be our 
gardians joyntly and severally for us and in our names to 
take up occupy and enjoy all those our Coppihold Lands and 
Tenements lying in or nearc Glaston aforesaid in whatsoever 
Mannor or Mannors in the said County untill wee shall re- 
spectively be of full age or married and then to render us an 
account of the issues and profitts of the same Lands &. Tene- ■ 
ments and also the possession thereof according to our 
right and that in the meane while they our said Uncles 
would for us and in our names doe or cause to be done all 
such suit and service to the Court or Courts of the Lord or 
Lords of the premises and all other things as shall be requi- 
site according to the Law and custome or customes of the 
Mannor or Mannors where the said Lands and Tenements 
doe lye for the better obteyning holding and enjoying the 
premises accordingly. In witnesse whereof we have hereunto 
.set our hands <t scales the Twenty sixth day of November 
Anno Dni 1638. Anno^ R R^ Caroli Anglie &c. decimo 
quarto. Coram nobis Joh« Winthrop Gub' et T. L. [2s. 6J.] 

A Bond drawen for M™ Woolcott to M! \hlanh.'] [Is.] 

A writing for John Poole ^ concerning the [death, erased,'] 
correction & examination of John England, 4. 10. 1638. 
[Is.] 

' "John Poole, for abusing his ser- Boston, Dec, 4, 1638 {Mass. Coll. 
»aut, was fined £5 " by tbe court at Rcc. i. 247). ilr. Poole liad before this 



42 LECJIFOliD^S MANUSCPdPT NOTE-BOOK. 

[26] To all xxian [Christianl people to wliome these 
presents shall come Wee James Cade ^ late of Northam in the 
County of Devon and now of Boston in New England ship- 
wright and Margaret his wife send greeting in our Lord God 
everlasting Knowe yee that we the said James and :Margarct 
for and in divers considerations us thereunto moving Doe by 
these presents grant a lien and cnfeoffe unto George°Strange 
gent All that one dwelling house lately erected and four- 
teene acres of land lying in severall places in the parish of 
Xortham aforesaid now or late in the tenure or occupation 
of Mary Busvyne widdow or her assignes and all rents ser- 
vices and revercons tlierof and all deeds and evidences only 
concerning the same in whose custody soever they be To 
have and to hold the said Dwelling house & land w*^ all 
and singulare the appurtenances unto the said G. S. his 
heires and assignes for ever To the only use and proper 
behoofe of the said G. S. his heires and assignes for ever 
And Whereas I the said James Cade have interest and 
right unto one rent charge or annuity of five pounds per 
annu going or coming out of three mesuages and tene- 
ments and fewer acres of land Iwng in Xortham aforesaid 
lately purchased by William Lee of the same Esqr of Chris- 
tofer Cade ffather of me i\\Q said James or by the said 
William Lee his heires or as5s to be payd unto me the said 
James or my assignes after the death of Mary Hopper my 

removed from Boston to Lynn. This in England. It offers an important 

John England, las servant, is probably contribution to the Cade (Cady) gene- 

the same who mms at Xew Haven in alogy. James Cade, of Hingham, 1635, 

1645 and 1647, and afterwards of Bran- "came, it is said, from Wales, or the 

ford, where he died in 1655 {Xcw West of England, Avhich," as Ih: Sav- 

^rtmiCo/.i^ccorcfc, i. 163, 294;ii. 1S6). age thought, "is very loose." This 

L-'^-J draught shows him to have come from 

1 This conveyance was probably Xortham, County Devon, where his 

made, or designed to be made (for the father, Christopher Cade, had held 

omission of the names of witnesses, land, which he sold, charged with an 

and of the usual articles of agreement annuity to his wife Jlargaret, and died 

creating the trust, make it doubtful if before the date of this instrument, 

it was ever executed), in trust, to en- leaving sons, James and John, and 

able Sir. Strange to sell and give con- probably a daughter, Thomasine, wife 

veyance of the premises to a purchaser of John Roe. [T.] 



LECHFOnO'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 43 

mothr for and during the lives of me the said James John 
Cade my brother and Thomasin Hoe wife of John Roe of 
Abbotsham in the said County Mariner and the longest liver 
of us, I Tlie said James doe hereby grant alien assigne and 
convey unto the said [blank'] the said rent charge and all 
the right title and interest of me the said James of in and to 
the same and every parcell thereof To have and to hold the 
said rent charge or annuity w"^ all and singulare [27] the 
last mentioned premises wth the appurtences whatsoever 
unto the said G. S. and his assignes during the tearme 
aforesaid And Whereas also wee the said James and Mar- 
garet hold for the life of the said Margaret one mesuage or 
tenement wth the appurtenances lying in Biddeford in the 
said County wee doe hereby grant and assigne unto the said 
[blank] all our and each of our right title interest & pos- 
session of and in the said last mentioned mesuage or Tene- 
ment To have and to hold the said last mentioned premises 
w*'^ the appurtenances whatsoever unto' the said G. S. & his 
assignes for and during the tearme aforesaid. And Wee 
the said James and Margaret doe for ourselves our heires 
executors administrators and assignes promise & grant to 
the said G. S. his heires and assignes by these presents that 
wee the said James and Margaret our heires executors ad- 
ministrators and assignes shall and will from time to tyme 
and at all tymes hereafter within twenty yeares next ensu- 
ing the date hereof at the reasonable request and at the 
costs & charges in the law of the said G. S. his heires and 
assignes make doe execute levy acknowledge and suffer or 
cause to be made done executed levyed acknowledged and 
suffered all and every such further and other reasonable act 
and acts thing and things assurances and conveyances in 
the Law whatsoever for the more sure conveying and sure 
making of all and singulare the severall premises and every 
parte and parcell thereof unto the said G. S. his heires 
and assignes according to the true meaning of these pres- 
ents be it by ffine or ffines recoverie or recoveries ffeoff- 
ments grants bonds or other assurances whatsoever as by 
the said G. S. his heires or assignes shall be reasonably 



44 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. . 

advised devised or required soe that for the doing suffering 
or acknowledging thereof the said James and Margaret 
their heires executors administrators or assignes shall not 
be compelled to travcll out of the Jurisdiccon of the Massa- 
chusetts in New England And we the said James and Mar- 
garet [28] doe by these presents nominate constitute & 
appoint our wclbeloved freinds Walter Lawrence of Abbots- 
ham in the said County yeoman and Philip Gibb of Northam 
aforesaid our true & sufficient Attorneys ioyntlyand sever- 
ally for us and in our names to enter into and upon the sev- 
erall premises hereby granted or any of them & possession 
therof to take and afterwards full quiet & peaceable pos- 
session livery and seisin therof to deliver over unto the said 
G. S. according to the purporte and true meaning of these 
presents Ratefying and allowing whatsoever our said Attor- 
neys or either of them shall lawfully doe in the premises In 
witnesse whereof TVee have hereunto set our hands & scales 
the fourth day of Decembr Anno Dili 1638 And in the foure- 
teenth yeare of the raigne of our Soveraignc Lord Charles 
by the grace of God King of England &". Coram. 

To my loving Freind^ Mr. Edmond Broione^ at Plymouth, 
these d. 

Mr. Browne. I was somewhat greived [when I was told 
of; crossed GUI'] at a bitter scoffe you put upon me when you 
were in the Bay last, about the Howe. I confesse I did not at 
the present well heare what you said, or not apprehend your 
meaning, but afterwards I understood it. I have not seen you 
since. I use not to flatter or mock at those I respect, or others, 
and I cannot but tell you it was a signe of little charitie & 
respect in you towards me, w*^^ a biting jest to add to the atHic- 

1 This must be the Rev. Edmund show that they arrived in New Eng- 

Brown, first minister of Sudbur}-, where land by the same vessel, June 27, 1633, 

he was ordained in August, 1640. Mr. which Lecliford notes as " the day of 

Savage says that he "came over, his handing." In his first draught, 

1637;" but Lechford's reference to a Lechford addressed him, with the famil- 

discussion "on shipboard" (though inrity of old friendsliip, as i\'cc^ Z?ra)r)ir, 

subsequently crossed out) seems to but subsequently crossed this out. [T.] 



Mi .Uv 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 45 

tion of the afflicted whome rather you should have comforted: 
so much for that. I tooke you for my ffreind and therefore did 
freely open my mind to you from time to time, ever since we 
came acquainted.' I shewed you therefore my writings on the 
Apocalyps and other scriptures, whereon you tooke notes and 
promised you would write me somewhat in answcre, to rectify 
me if I were mistaken in any thing, w<=^' yet you have not 
done. It may be you have not had leasure [but I shall ex- 
pect it, because by yo'" contrary opinion some have been car- 
ryed, I conceive, not only against mo, but against the truth, 
w'li some preiudice ; crossed ouq. I hope you will not deny 
me that freindly office of love, but give me yo"^ opinion as 
soone as you can. Also, you knowe you and I differing about 
the point of prophesying in the Churches, we agreed [on ship 
board ; crossed out'] to set downe our opinions therein under 
our hands. I for my part did so, and delivered the same to 
Mr. Downing,! whome I intreated to [29] communicate the 
same to you, and so I beleive he did ; however [for feare of 
failure ; crossed out] out of respect to you k in performance 
of my word, I have sent you here a coppy of the proposicons. 
Now I desire that you would also performe yo"" word and send 
me your opinion in this thing, when you can finde leasure and 
opportimity, that I may be advised and rectifyed by you if I 
mistake, or els that if you agree to me I may be confirmed in 
the truth. I pray let us not be strangers one to another, 
"iou may perceive I doc not forget you; though you never 
came to visit me, I visit you by letter : but when you come 
hither, if you please I shall be glad to see you, that we may 
come to a better understanding of each other. I pray p-'sent 
my service to Mr. Winslowe and to Mr. Chancey'-^ and his 

* Emanuel Downing, the brother- ford I am inclined to believe that thev 

'n-law of Governor Winthrop. .Air. were fellow-passengers from England 

• 'vage supposed that he arrived with [T.] 
< .'I'tain Peirce early in October, 1638. -' Kev. Charles Chauncy, afterwards 

II'" ani) hia x^\F.. ,^ -.]„.-x^ -I . .,.„., ,. - . _ 



and his wife were admitted mem- 



president of the college at Cambridge, 



''^ of the Salem Church, November 4 was at this time preaching at Tly- 

-^■^^^mg {]Vinth., i. 330, note). But mouth as the colleague or assistant of 

• ' '^'*. llccords, i. 236, show that he was Eev. John Reyner (see Winth., i. 330). 

•'•"' at h.ast as early as September^; [T.] 

■■'••' from this reference to him by Lech- 



46 



LECIIFORD'!^ MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



wife. Soe I pray God to blesse you in all yo'" good proceed- 
ings, and notw'^standing [all former offences and jecres ; 
crossed ouf] anything herein seeming to the contrary, I 
remaine 



Yo'' ffreind to doc you any 

ofl&ces of love very ready, 



T. L. 



BosTOx, 10. 10. 1638. 



^Virtute Haru Patent' Sercnissimi Dili nri Caroli Regis 
Anglice etc. Ego Joh^^ Winthrop Ar' Gubiiator Colonia3 De 
Massachusett in Xova Anglia, Licentiam Dedi, et per p'^scntes 
potestatem concedo Stephano Winthrop ^ mercatori et Will" 
Goose Rectori sIyc Nauclero naviculEe vocataa Ic Sparrowc De 
Boston oncris quinquaginta dolioru vel circiter cum scptem 
personis eisdem adjunctis ad Insulas vocat' SuiTiers Hands 



^ " By virtue of tliese Patents of our 
Most Serene Lord Cliarles, King of Eng- 
land, etc., I, John Winthrop, Estiuire, 
Governor of the Colony of ilassachusetts 
in New England, have given License, 
and by these presents I allow power, to 
Stephen Winthrop, merchant, and Wil- 
liam Goose, commander or master of the 
vessel called the 'Sparrowe,' of Boston, 
of fifty tons' burden, or thereabouts, with 
seven persons joined to them, to sail to 
those Islands called the Summers Islands, 
otherwise Bermudas, and there to do busi- 
ness M-itli the inhabitants of that region. 
And if it shall come to pass that on ac- 
count of adverse winds you shall not be 
able to reach the said islands, then it 
shall be allowable for you to travel to 
other islands inhabited by subjects or 
allies of our King, to the peaceful accom- 
plislmient of your business. And I 
therefore ask from all Governors and 
other Rulers having any jurisdiction or 
authority whatsoever in places of the 
kind aforesaid, that the said vessel may 
be received witli men and goods into 
your ports, and may be permitted, hav- 
ing finished their business, to go thence 



quietly ; and so may your men expect 
and lind the same kindness from us if 
occasion should offer. ProWded alwa3-s 
that by virtue of this Commission it 
shall not be allowed the said Stephen 
and William or their men to inflict any 
hurt or injury upon any one, or to do 
business with any men in islands or 
places prohibited to the commerce of our 
King of England, except by urgent neces- 
sity, on account of provisions or safety. 
In testimony of this tiling I have caused 
the public seal of the said Colony to be 
affixed to these presents, to remain good 
for six months, and no longer. Given 
on the twentieth day of December, in 
the year of our Lord 163S." 

2 Stephen Winthrop, fourth son of 
John Winthrop, but first by his third 
wife, ^largaret, born 1619, and died in 
England, 1052, or thereabouts. He held 
certain offices in New England, but in 
1645 or 1646 went back to take part in 
the Civil War, where he acquired dis- 
tinction, both civil and military. Of 
his partner, William Goose, notliing to 
speak of is known. 



LECHFOUD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 47 

alias Bermuda navijzarc et ibi commortia habere cum incolis 
illius loci. Et si contingat quod ob ventos adversos iiisulas 
pra}dicta3 attingere non possitis, tunc licebit vobis ad aliquas 
alias insulas a Regis nn subditis vel confaideratis inhabitatas 
applicare ad negotia vestra pacificc pcragenda. Peto itaque 
ab omnibus Gubernatorib^ et aliis Jurisdicconem vel xVuthori- 
tatem quacunque in liuiusmodi locis habentib^ ut navicula 
pra^dcIT cum ho'ibus et bonis suis in portus vras recipiatur et 
negotiis peractis illinc quiete solvere permittatur, et sic can- 
dcm a nobis gratiam (occasionc oblata) ho'i'es vcstri semper 
expectarc possint et invcnient. Proviso semper quod favore 
liuius Cummissionis non licebit prajfat' Stcpli'o et Gulielmo 
vel ho'ibus suis damnu vel gravamen aliquod alicui infcrre, 
nee Commercia habere cum ullis ho'ibus in insulis sive locis 
V Rege nru Anglia3 mercaturfi prohibitis nisi urgentc neces- 
sitate ob victu vel salutem. In cuius rei testimoniu sigillu 
publicii Colonia) prredicto3 prtesenti scripto apponi feci V sex 
menses et non ultra in virtutc manerc. Dat' vicesimo Die 
Decembris Anno DIiT 1G38. 

[^Letter from Thomas Lechford to Hugh Peters'^ ;'\ 

Worthy Mr. Peters. My service remembered to you, these 
arc to let you (as a friend in the Lord, upon whom my heart 
much did and doth depend for counsel and ayde,) vnderstand 
some of my affaires ; wherein I presume upon [blanicY and 
your wisdom and gracious disposition which I have ever 
observed in you since I was your auditor and hung upon your 
^linistry at the Graves or Sepulchres.^ You may easily con- 
ceive how it is with me, touching my estate or livelihood, 
being thrown out of my station in England, and [desirous to 

* Hiigli Peters, born 1599, came to from the short-hand copy in the NotC' 

New England in the "Abigail," ns it is book (see Introduction to Plaine DcaU 

tliought, in 1635, was settled the fourth inrj, pp. xiv and xvii). 

minister of Salem, Dec, 21, 1636, He 2 gome word or words were hero 

v^i'nt back to England, in the same omitted by the writer when making 

»'hip with Lechford, in 1641, and en- his short-hand copy. [T.] 

K ';:«'d vigorously in the Civil War. He 3 gj Sepulchre's, in London, where 

^v.vs fxeciitedat the return of Charles II., Hugh Peters was for some time a much- 

^ 't. 16, 1G60. This letter is deciphered approved preacher. 



48 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

make a virtue of necessity?], in joyning to the people and 
Churches of God here, 1 forsook preferment in a Prince's 
court, that -was offered to me, who of Christian Princes is the 
chief for godlynesse (as I was assured) Georgius Ragotzki,i 
Prince of Transylvania and Lord of Lower Hungary, successor 
to Bethlem Gabor ; likewise the Lords of Providence ^ offered 
me place of preferment with them, which I will not name : 
Hither I have come, and the Lord knows my heart, faine 
would I joync with your Churches, but first I desired to open 
my mind in some materiall things of weight concerning our 
profession, even the Christian faith ; which I did, so God is my 
witnesse, not lightly or hastily take up, but upon good grounds 
and mature (as I hope) deliberation, long before I resolved to 
betake myself into these parts of the world : therefore farre 
was it from me, and shall ever be, to raise purposely any 
stirre here ; for I love quietnessc and ease too well, and am 
quickly discouraged. My strength is but small and my judge- 
ment young and slender in great affaires of State. I showed 
you my books : you had not leisure to peruse them. I like- 
wise, long before, showed my maine book to Mr. Cotton. He 
had not leisure to read it ; and the first draught of that Of 
ProjjJiesie, it lay in his house at least five weekes : xifter the 
Court here ended, I delivered that Of Projyliesie to Mr. 
Deputy [Thomas Dudley] ^ to advise thereof as a private 

1 George Ptdkoczy( or Ragotzki), born the defeat of the Turks at the battle 

1591, was electeil Prince of Transyl- of Schalonta in 1C3G, prosecuted tlie 

vania (Siebeuburgcn) in 1631, about war against Ferdinand II. and the 

two years after the death of Bethlen Roman Catholic party, until the rights 

Gabor, whoso daughter he had mar- of the Protestants were for a time 

riei. He was a zealous champion of the secured by the treaty of peace of Lintz 

Protestants of Hungary and Bohemia, in 1645. He died Oct. 14, 1648 (Zed- 

who had suffered bitter persecution ler's Lexicon, art. " Ragoczy, George ; " 

tinder the reign of Ferdinand II. and ]\Ioreri ; r/icyc. i?ri7., art. " Hungary "). 

his successor (1637), Ferdinand III. [T.] 

The Bohemians had elected as their ^ g^e Trumbull's note, Plaine Deal- 

prince Frederick of the Pfalz, son-in- inrj, p. 17. 

law of James I. of England, with 3 See Dudley's harsh judgment of 

whom Bethlen and his successor, book and man, in letter to Winthrop, 

George Kakoczy, maintained a firm 2 Mass. Hist. Soc. Proc, pp. Cll-312, 

alliance. The latter, having estab- and also in another letter, 4 Mass. Hist. 

lished himself -in his principality by Soc. Coll., vii. 111. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 49 

friend, as a godly man and a member of the Church, whether 
it were fit to be published. The next news I had was, that at 
first dash he accused me of heresj and wrote to M^ Governor 
[Winthrop] that mj-book was fitter to be burned. Wot you 
what that heresy was ? Why a thing I never intended, neither 
did you see when you read it; that I said the Apostles of 
churches had not power of to command, and I thought 

the Apostles of Christ claimed no other power than according 
to the word and will of Christ ; therefore, (say he and some 
other,) I implied the Apostles of Christ might erre : and 
indeed my words might have been so strained. But the truth 
is. Apostles ought to remaine in the Churches, likewise Evan- 
gelists and Prophets, as well as Pastors or Teachers, else we 
must be beholden to the sins of men for the propagation of 
the Gospcll : we must stay at home till they persecute us 
abroad, and then we may preach the Gospell. Not that I hold 
myself (the Lord knows my heart and my insufficiency !) fit 
for any of the^e great workes. Likewise, Prophesie is as I 
have said, as I verily believe ; and also Tongues ought to be 
learned and spoken, as I have proposed. I speake according 
to my light, and dare do no otherwise. If hotly pursued me 
^Master Deputy, I impute it to his zeale against errors : I am 
not angrie with him for it : but when I saw seven shepherds 
and eight principall men called out against me, as if I were 
an Assyrian,^ I thought there might be something in me to 
bee reproved, and that it concerned mee to looke about mee. 
I dealt plainely : I told that I held, and so doe from my heart, 
the Apostles neither did nor could erre, because infallibly in- 
spired by the Holy Ghost. Thereupon my book was referred 
t«j the consideration of the Elders. Having intimated a word 
of my other maine taske to M^ Deputy, they all now press 
me to produce that : I told them it was not ready for theire 
view; I must faire write it, and alter some things; yet at 
length, upon promise that I should have it againe (for if it be 
no error, I will not part with it for XIOO.) I promised to let 
them see it. I have accordingly left it to Mr. Deputy and the 

» The allusion is to 3Iicah v. 5. [T.] 
4 



50 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. " 

GoTcrnor (who also desired to see it). Now the reason I 
open these things to you so, is this : First, that if you hcarc 
of some of tliese things, you may from mc understand the 
truth itselfe : Secondly, that I may not be judged upon [im- 
perfections ?i in my writings, by your ayde and counscll to 
the contrary : Thirdly, that the assembly of the Elders may 
be full when you undertake to siftc the maine matters ; and 
that you shall be one, W. Wardc ^ another, and M^ Parker of 
Newbury ; and that M^ Norton and M^ Phillips may likewise 
be called, for it will concerne you all. The maine question 
will be, whether the hierarchy of Rome, or papacie, although 
antichristian, be that Man of Sin [etc.] ? I meane the maine 
that will trouble either nice or the churches : the other things 
I confesse are also of great consequence, but they all concerne 
the day of Judgment and things [after?] in the great and 
excellent Kingdom of our Lord : and I wrote you this letter 
(because of some receipt of injury that hereof is) to let you 
know that I appeal to all the teaching Elders of the Churches 
within this Jurisdiction, et vos omnes tester per nomen caris- 
simuin Domini nostri Jesu Christi, that you soundly and 
maturely would advise and consult of the matter ; and regard 
with all lawfull favour 

Your unworthy servant, 

Thomas Lechford. 
Boston, 3. 11? 1638. 

[ 31] Let all men knowc by these presents that whereas I 
Richard Walker ^ of Lynne in New E., planter, upon the 
special instance and request of [Wan/.] Howes,^ late of Lynne 
aforesd and now of Mattachees, pltr, became suerity for him 
for a certaine debt of his lately owing unto one Samuel Smith, 

1 These are evidently Nathaniel for some ye^irs, and then afterwards for 
"Ward and John Norton, of Ipswich, Reading, whither he removed about 
Thomas Parker, of Newbury, and George 1650; he returned, however, to Lynn, 
Phillips, of AVatertown. where he died, verj"^ aged, in 1687. 

2 Richard Walker, of Lynne, thought ^ Xwo of the name, Samuel and 
to have come in 1 630, was an officer in Thomas Howes, were at Yarmouth 
the militia, so called, and a represen- (ilattachees, or Mattakeese) in 1638. 
tative for Lynn in the Geuei-al Court [T.] 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 51 

« 
the said Howes promising and undertaking to save mc harmc- 
Icsse of the sayd suertiship and all Dammages that should 
arise and come upon mc by reason of the same, and the said 
Samuel Smith presented his accon for the said Debt against 
both me and the said Howes, before the Governor Councell 
and Assistants of the Jurisdiccon of the Massachusetts in 
New E. in the Court there holdcn before them, the fourth day 
of the tenth moneth of this present yeare and therupon re- 
covered against mc and the said Howes the summe of thirty 
biishells of cornc and tonne shillings for costs of suit in dis- 
cliarge whereof I was compelled to pay the summe of nyne 
pounds and tennc shillings, the said Howes not having payd 
any parte thereof, and also I have ben put to other charges 
in travell k expences hereabout, to the summe of twelve shil- 
lings. Now I the said Richard AYalker doc hereby authorize 
and appoint my welbeloved freind Edward Dillingham of 
Sandwich in N. E. gent, my true &, lawfuU Attorney to sue 
the said \biank'\ Howes for me & in my name upon this my 
accon of trespas upon the case, and my Dammages thereupon 
to recover of and against him the said \hhiHh~\ Howes, to my 
use, before the Governor and Court of the Jurisdiccon of New 
riimouth or elsewhere, "Witnesse my hand and scale liereunto 
set, the Twenty nynth day of the eleventh moneth, Anno Dili 
1G38. In p'ncia mei T. L. [Is.] 

This Indenture made the last Day of February, in the foure- 
teenth yeare of the raigne of our Soveraigne Lord Charles by 
• the grace of God King of England &c. Annocp Dm 1638, 
Betweene Samuel Cole of Boston in New England, Inliolder, 
of the one parte, and Captainc Robert Sedgwicke ^ of Charles- 
towne in New England aforesaid, of the other parte, Witncss- 
eth, that the said Samuel Cole ^ for and in consideration of 

» Robert Sedgwick, a man of great « «« Samuel Cole set up the first 

consetiuence, came in 1635 to Charles- house for common entertainment" in 

town ; died in Jamaica, 1656. He -was Boston in 1633 or 1634 ( Wbitli., i. 124- 

a prominent military man, captain of the 125). He was licensed by the General 

artillery company in 1640, commander Court, September, 1635, under the Act 

"f til.' Castle the next year, and after- for the Regulation of Ordinaries passed 

^\ ards major-general of the Colony. the year previous (Mass. Records, i. 159) ; 



52 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK 



the summb of two hundred pounds of lawfull money of Eng- 
land to him in hand satisfied & payd by the said Captainc 
Sedgwicke, before the scaling and delivery hereof , whereof and 



and his was the principal, if not the 
only, inn of Boston until September, 
1638, when, as ajipears by this convey- 
ance, and the articles of agreement which 
follow, he sold it to Captain Robert Sedg- 
wick. The position of the inn has al- 
ways been supposed to have been "on 
the west side of i\Ierchants' Row, mid- 
way from State Street to Faneuil Hall " 
(Whitman's Hist. Ancient and Hon. Ar- 
tillery Co., 2d ed., p. 45 ; see also Drake's 
Boston, pp. 232, 240, and Mcm&rial 
History of Boston, vol. ii. p. xx.). It 
seems, however, from this deed that its 
position was immediatel}' to the north 
of Edward Hutchinson's estate, whereon 
the Old Corner Bookstore now stands. 
The grounds for this opinion are as fol- 
lows : Cole kept an inn and sold beer 
and wine, Sufl'ering various fines and 
punishments, until ilarch 12, 1638, 
when he received leave to sell his house 
for an inn. This deed in the text is 
dated the last day of Februaiy, 1638 ; 
there is nothing to show that it was 
immediately executed. The last men- 
tion of Cole as an innkeeper is May 2, 
1638. In 1642, "whereas Capt. Sedg- 
wick hath before this time set up a 
brew-house at his great charge, &, very 
commodious for this part of the country, 
he is freely licenced to brew beer to sell," 
etc. (Mass. Records, I 214). Thus it 
would seem that Sedgwick, having pur- 
chased the inn, took up the business of 
innkeeping as Cole dropped it. It seems 
that the business was carried on upon 
the spot named above rather than by 
the waterside, from the fact that St-dg- 
wick is given this piece of ground alone 
in the Book of Possrssions, and that 
although the land in the text is not 
accurately described, the idea to be got 



therefrom is that it was to the north of 
Mr. Hutchinson's estate. TLat Cole 
kept his inn on this spot seems clear 
from the fact that he is said in the deed 
to have lately dwelled there, and also 
from his having at this time no other 
land (known to us), except perhaps a 
piece which he sold in 1645 to George 
Halsall, a black^iith and ferryman, 
who had no license to sell beer or keep 
an inn ; from which it would seem that 
none had been kept there. 

[For this reasoning I am indebted to 
Mr. George Lamb, who was kind enough, 
upon my application, to look up all the 
property held by Cole and by Sedg- 
wick, and to send me his opinion upon 
the subject. — E. E. H., Jr.] 

In June, 1C37, the young Lord Ley, 
son of the Earl of JMarlborough, arriving 
at Boston when Governor Winthrop was 
absent, "took up his lodging at the 
common inn ; " and afterwards declined 
the GoveiTior's invitation to become his 
guest, "saying, that he came not to be 
troublesome to any, and the house where 
he was, was so well governed that he 
could be as piivate there as elsewhere " 
{JFiuth., i. 230). A few months after, 
wards (Nov. 15, 1637) ilr. Cole "being 
convented for having had much disorder 
in his house, selling wine co'.itrary to 
order, and beare above the price or- 
dered," was fined £30 (Mass. Records, i. 
208). At the same Court his name ap- 
pears among those of " Boston men to 
be disarmed " for their sympathy with 
!Mr. Wheelwright and Mrs. Hutchinson. 
In JIarch, 1638, his fine was "respited 
till the next Court, and bee hath lib- 
erty to sell his house, for an inne" 
{Ibid., p. 226). And after he had effected 
the sale, his fine was again remitted, 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



53 



wherewith the said Samucll Doth acknowledge himsclfe sat- 
isfied & paid, and thereof and of every parte thereof 
doth acqiiite, release & forever discharge the said Captaine 



and fiually "discounted," by a grant 
of £10, in November, 1G39 {Ibid., pp. 
245,279). Subsequently Mr. Cole lived 
at lluraney Marsh (Chelsea), where he 
had a "great allotment" of laud, 
laid out in 1637. He was one of the 
coustikbles of Boston in I6i8 ; select- 
man, 1653, and for several years after 
(Drake's Bosfon, pp. 235, 312, 333, etc.). 

It appears by this conveyance and 
the accompanying articles of agree- 
ment, that in September, 1638, or 
shortly before, he was living in the 
south half of a new house, adjoining 
the old (which was yet standing), the 
north part of which was sold to Thomas 
Marryott (or Marrett) and others ; and 
that Mr. "William Hutchinson and his 
wife were his next-door neighbors un- 
til the removal of ilr. Hutchinson to 
Rhode Island. 

Whether Captain Sedgwick occu- 
pied for a time tiie house purchased 
of Mr. Cole, or let it to some other 
person as an ordinary, does not ap- 
pear. In November, 1637, he had 
" set up a brew house," and \vas li- 
censed by the Court to brew and sell 
U'er (Mass. Records, i. 214). In No- 
vember, 1639, he " was admonished 
to take heede of oppression" (Ibid., p. 
279), but of what kind, the record does 
not inform us. A few months later 
(April 30, 1640) William Hudson — 
having been chosen by the town of 
r^jston to keep an ordinary — was 
allowed by the Particular Court, and 
by the General Court in Jlay follow- 
ing {Ibid., pp. 2S7, 290). 

Josselyn says : " In 1637 there were 
not many houses in the Town of Bos- 
ton, amongst which were two houses 
of entertainment, called Ordinaries " 



(Sccmd Voyage, p. 173 ; 3 Mass. Hist. 
Coll., iii. 337). Mr. Drake thought 
that "if Josselyn meant that there 
were two inns in 1637, he probably 
included the one in Charlestown," as 
there is nothing in the records to show 
that there was more than one in Bos- 
ton (Hist, of Boston, p. 240, note). 
But it is certain that William Baulston 
(or Balstone) was "licensed to keepe 
a house of intertainment and ... to 
sell such claret and white wine as is 
sent for," in June, 1637 {Mass. lice- 
ords, i. 199). Balstone, like Samuel 
Cole, was an adherent of Mrs. Hutch- 
inson ; like Cole, he was fined — prob- 
ably for "disorder in his house" — in 
November, 1637, and disarmed, with 
other Boston Antinomians, the same 
month ; having been previously fined 
and disfranchised for signing the peti- 
tion in favor of Mr. Wheelwright. 
The following [March he was licensed 
to depart the jurisdiction of Jlassa- 
chusetts (with Coddingtou, Coggeshall, 
and othei-s), and not long afterward? 
removed to Portsmouth, 11. I. (Mass. 
Records, i. 207, 208, 212, 223 ; Sav- 
age, Gcneal. Diet., s. n.). In August, 
1638, the town of Boston authorized 
Mr. Thomas Cornnell to " buy brother 
Willyam Balstone's house, and to be- 
come an inhabitant" {Town Records, 
p. 35) ; and in September the General 
Court licensed Cornnell, or Cornhill [or 
as Lechford once writes the name, far- 
ther on, Corni5.h], "to keepe an inn, in 
tlie roonie of William Baidston " {Mass. 
Records, i. 238). Cornhill was not more 
fortunate than were his predecessors in 
retaining the favor of the Court. In 
June, 1639, after having been fined 
"for several offences," he was "alowed 



64 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Sedgw'ickc, his [32] heircs, executors and administrators and 
ever\' of them by these presents, Hath granted, bargained <fc 
sold, and by these p^'sents doth grant, bargaine t sell nnto the 
said Captaine Sedgwicke, all that parte of one new mansion 
house in Boston aforesaid wherein the said Samuel [yet dwell- 
eth, cros&ed out,'] lately dwelled [together with the old house 
and leanetoos and stable, hogstyes, and house of office, yard 
and garden, betwixt the house <fc garden of Mr. WilhTi Hutch- 
inson on the south parte and that other parte of the said 
mansion house, of the said outhouses — crossed out,] w<=^ lyes 
to the south end of the said house beyond the sommer or 
beame W^^ lyes ovcrthwart the great chamber, and up and 
downe by tlie said beame from the bottome of the seller to 
the top of the house, and in breadth from east to west the full 
extent of the said house and shedds adioyning (excepting 
roome on the south parte of the said beame, next to it, for the 
making of a stacke of brick chimneys from the seller to the 
top of the said new house, for that part of the same house 
assured to the said Thomas Marryot & others) And also all 
that parte of the garden belonging to the said house w*=^ 
lyes from the north parte of the corner post of the new gar- 
den pale southward, and soe through the garden to the west 
end of it, [And also the northerne halfe of the brew house, 
and all that parte of the court yard lying opposite to the old 
house, reaching six foote from the corner of the shedd of the 
new liouse to the corner of the shedd of the old house w'"'* is 
on this (fc from the said shedd south westward to the end of 
the said yarde — crossed out,] And also the old house and lean- 
toos, yard & garden thereto belonging, and all wayes, ease- 
ments, lights ifc fences to the premises belonging, except as 
much ground of the said yard of the old house as reacheth 
straight along from the corner of the shedd of the new house 



a month to sell of his bearo w^h is upon his petition for the remission of the 

his hand, and tlien to cease from keep- penalty, June 6, 1639 (Xotc-book, p. 55, 

ing intertaiiinient, and the towne to post). Jan. 11, lo39-1640, Cornell sold 

provide another" (Ibid., pp. 200, 2tJ6). his house and lands to Edward Tyug 

The offences for which he incurred the {SuJ'. Deeds, ii. 20). [T.] 
displeasure of the Court are set forth in 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 55 

within six foote of the corner of the sliedd of the old house, 
and except ^9?i< supra, To have & to hold all and singulare the 
j/miscs w*'* the appurtenances, except below excepted, unto 
tlie sa'id Captain Sedgewick his heires and assignes for ever 
To the only use and proper behoofc of the said Captain Sedge- 
wick his heires and assignes for ever. And the said Samuel 
Cole doth for himself his heires executors and administrators 
Covenant promise and grant to and w*'* the said Captain Sedge- 
wick his heires and assignes by these presents that he and they 
shall or lawfully may quietly and peaceably hold and enjoy 
the premises and every part thereof hereby mentioned to be 
granted freed and discharged of all incombrances whatsoever 
for any thing done or to be done by the said Samuel Cole his 
heirs executors administrators or assignes to the contrary 
thereof notwithstanding. And further that he the said Samuel 
Cole his heires and assignes and his wife shall and will do and 
make any further assurance in the law whatsoever [33] for 
the more sure making of the premises hereby mentioned to 
be granted unto the said Captain Sedgewick his heires and 
assignes according to the purport of these presents, w*^ war- 
ranty against him the said Samuel Cole and his wife and their 
licirs and against all manner of persons clayming or that shall 
or may clayme from by or under him them or any or either of 
them and by the said Captain Sedgewick his heires or assignes 
shall be reasonably advised devised or required any time w'^in 
the space of seven yeares next ensuing the date hereof so that 
for the doing or making thereof the said Samuel Cole and his 
wife and their heires and assignes shall not be compelled to 
travell out of the jurisdiccon of the Massachusetts bay in New 
England. In witnesse &c. [6s.] 



56 LECHFORD'S MANUSCFdPT NOTE-BOOK. 



Articles of agreement indented made the first Day of Scptenh 
her ^ in the yeare of our Lord 1G38, Betweene Samuel Cole 
of Boston in JSfeio. England, Inholder, of the one parte and 
Captaine Robert Sedwicke of Charlestowne in New England 
of the other parte, in manner and forme following : — 

1. Imprimis tlie said Samuel Cole for himselfe and his vrife 
and their heires shall for two hundred pounds firmly convev & 
assure unto the said Captaine Sedgwicke, his heires and 
assignes for ever, all that parte of the new house wherein the 
said Samuel lately dwelled in Boston aforesaid, and the old 
house adjoyning w'^ the shedds, court yard, garden and appur- 
tenances, to be divided from that parte of the said new house 
and garden w'^ the appurtenances assured to Thomas Marryot 
<fe others, and the old house and Icantoos, yard and garden 
thereto belonging, ^x^^ the appurtenances. 

2. Itiii, the said Captaine Sedgwicke is to find one hoggshead 
of lyme and the said Samuel Cole shall therewith cause to be 
mended the backc of the chimney of the leantoo and the rough 
cast of the outsydc of the new house, the said Samuel finding 
all other matcrialls necessary thereunto. 

3. Itiu, the said Captaine Sedgwicke shall have the buildinges 
and matcrialls of the stable, hogstyes and house of ofiice on 
that parte of the said new house, yard <fc garden assured 
to Thomas M. k others now standing, to be removed by the 
said Captaine Sedgwicke when he will, or when he shall be 
required so to doe by the said Thomas M. and others or their 
assignes. 

4. Itiii, that the said Captaine Sedgwicke, his heires and 
assignes, shall at their costs & charges cause the premises to 
him and them to be granted, to be divided from that parte of 
the said new house and garden and yard assured to Thomas 
Marryot and others as aforesaid, and remove <fe build chim- 
neys & doc all other things, as the said Samuel Cole is bound 
to doe by a certaine writing under his hand &. scale made 
unto the said Thomas Marryot and others. Dated the tenth of 

1 First written (ami crossed out), "the twentyeth day of Febniary." [T.] 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK 



57 



Aprill last past, whereof the said Captaine Sedgwickc may 
take a coppy. 

5. Itfii, the said Captaine Sedgwicke shall at his cost and 
charges cause to be clapboarded round the house frame of the 
said Samuel Cole now in rearing next M. Greenesmith's^ in Bos- 
ton precincts, and cause to be layd two floares in the said house 
w**" boards, and shall pay for the thatching of the said house, and 
lend the said Samuel Cole a lighter to fetch the thatch for 
the same. [2.s. Qd. and a coppy of M? Marriotts bargaine, Sc?.] 

[34] This indenture made the sixteenth day of March, 
Anno Dili 1638, Betweene Richard Evered ^ of Dcdham in New 
England, Pharicr, of the one parte, and Thomas Nelson ^ of 
Boston in New England, gent, of the other parte, Witnesseth, 
that the said Richard Evered for the suiue of tenue pounds to 
him in hand payd by the said Thomas Xelson, whereof the 



1 This was proLaLly Steven Green- 
smith, who had incurred tlie displeasure 
of the Court in March, 1637, "for 
affirming that all the ministers (excejit 
ilr. Cotton, Mr. Wheelriglit, and hee 
thought Mr. Hooker) did teach a cove- 
nant of works." For this he was fined 
£40, and required to give satisfaction 
to the ministers and the churclies. In 
August following he was committed 
for non-payment of his fine {Mass. Rec- 
ords, i. 189, 196, 200; JFuith., i. 234). 
In September, 1636, Mr. Cole was fined 
for the breach of a town order, in selling 
a lot to Mr. Greenfield [Greensmith] 
without consent of authority ; and soon 
after " Mr. Greensmyth " is named as 
the proprietor of land near Mr. Cole's 
ground at Rumney Marsh (Drake's Hus- 
ton, pp. 194, 195). [T.] 

^ Mr. Savage says this name *' is 
unifomdy given Everard." The name 
of Ezekiel Rogers, as a witness to this 
mortgage, suggests the possible affinity 
of this Richard Everard to "Sarah, 
daughter of John Everard, citizen of 



London," who became the second wife of 
the Rev. Daniel Rogeis, of Wethersfield, 
Essex county, son and successor of the 
Rev. Richard Rogers, and elder brother 
of the Rev. Ezekiel Rogers {Candler 
Mmiuscrijyt, corrected reading by Colonel 
J. L. Chester, in Proc. Mass. Hist. Sac, 
1S60-1S62, p. 496). This instrument 
shows Everard to have been a pro- 
prietor and householder at Cambridge, 
if not an inhabitant, before his set- 
tlement at the new plantation of 
Dedham. [T.] 

3 Thomas Nelson came, probably 
with the Rev. Ezekiel Rogers [witness 
to this indenture], in the summer of 
163S, and was living at Boston until 
the establishment of tlie Rowley Com- 
pany in their new plantation (see p. 1, 
ante, note). In his will of Aug. 6, 1648, 
he names as his executors his "uncle, 
Richard Dummer," and Governor Bel- 
lingham {Hist, and Gcneal. Reg., iii. 
267). He married Joanna, daughter of 
Thomas Dummer, of Salisbury, and 
niece of Richard {Savage). [T.] 



58 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. ■ 

said Richard Everard doth hereby acknowledge the receipt and 
that he is thereof and therewith satisfied hath granted, bar- 
gained k sold and by these presents doth grant bargaine & 
sell unto the said Thomas Nelson All that his house and lott 
lying in Cambridge in New England and six acres of arrable 
land thereto adjoyning, and five acres of medowe thereto be- 
longing, Av'^ the appurtenances, To have and to hold the prem- 
ises with all and singulare the appurtenances unto the said 
Thomas Nelson his heires and assignes for ever to the only 
use and proper behoof of him the said Thomas Nelson his 
heires and assignes for ever. And the said Richard Evered 
doth hereby covenant, promise k grant to and w'*" the said 
Thomas Nelson his heires and assignes by these presents that 
they shall or may lawfully quietly hold the premises freed of 
all incumbrances whatsoever notwithstanding any thing done 
or to be done by him the said Richard Evered his heires ex- 
ecutors administrators or assignes. Provided always that if 
the said Richard Evered his heires or executors shall truly 
pay or cause to be payd unto the said Thomas Nelson, his 
heires or assignes, the summe of tcnne pounds, at the house 
of Richard Bellingham Escf in Boston aforesaid, upon the 
thirtieth day of September next ensuing the date hereof, then 
this grant bargaine k sale shall be voyd. In witnesse kc 
Ez. Rogers, Jacobi Luxford, k niei. [3s.] 

To all to whome these presents shall come greeting, 
Whereas I Richard lies ^ of Charlestowne in New England, 
Carpenter, did heretofore reteyne one servant named Ambrose 

^ His name is here -written as it ap- accustomed caution, notices this Pdchard 

pears in the record of his will, on the under the several surnames of "lies or 

first page of the Suffolk Probate Eecords, Hills," "Hill or Hills," and "Eells, 

vol 1. (Hist, and Gcnccd. Reg., ii. 102, Ells, Eels, or Eales;" hut finds "much 

186). Mr. T. W. Harris, in notes on plausibility" in the argument for Hills 

this will (^Ihid., p. 218), said that Eich- {Geiical. Did., ii. 105, 419). Elsewhere 

ard Hills, "incoiTectly written lies" Lechford writes, "John Hes of Dorches- 

■was a cooiier ; admitted an inhabitant ter," whose name usually appears as 

of Charlestown in 1C3S ; and that he Hills, or Hill (p. 90, post). But he 

was probably a younger brother of Mr. wTites "Joseph Hills of Charlestown," 

Joseph Hills, who became an inhabitant as in deposition, July 30, 1639 (p. 91, 

at the same time. Mr. Savage, with post). [T.] 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 59 

Sutton to serve me in tlie trade of Carpentry by the space of 
five yearcs from the last day of May last past to be fully com- 
pleate and ended, for certain ^vag-cs agreed on betweene me 
and the said Ambrose by Indenture made betweene me & 
him, and whereas I appointed him to worke for me at the 
Island, called Aquednet, where he received three pounds and 
twelve shillings for his worke, w*=^ money is due to me, being 
his Master, notwithstanding the sayd ximbrose contrary to his 
duty is departed from my service, carrying w*'' him the said 
money. Therefore hereby I doe authorize and in my place 
put my [35] much esteemed freind M^ Isaacke Allerton my 
lawfull Deputy and Attorney for me and in my name to pur- 
sue, finde out, apprehend and recover my said servant and the 
said money, by the authority of any magistrats or governors 
whatsoever, either Christian or heathen, and him to bring 
or cause to be brought backe to me, ratefying and allowing 
whatsoever my said Attorney or Deputy shall lawfully Doe in 
the p'mises. In witnesse ic. 19 Martii, 1638, in p'ncia mei 
<fc Thome Yeowe.^ 

The description of the said Ambrose Sutton. He is aged 
26 yeares, of browne blacke haire, a full face, a black eye, a 
sharp nose, some liaire upon his upper lip, of middle stature, 
well sett. His cloathes, a coloured white russet hat, a sute of 
kersy home-made cloath neare a lead colour. And he was 
borne in Westwell neare Burford in Oxfordshire. [Is.] 

To all Christian people unto whome these presents shall 
come, 1 Nicholas Parker of BostonS in New England, yeoman, 

1 Thomas Yow is named as a land- supplies yet another, in his nipntion of 

hol.ler in Boston in 164S (Book of Pos- " Tliomas Yau, master of a vessel clear- 

f^ioiis, p. 45) ; and I have not met with ing [from Boston] for the Kenebec," to 

the name earlier, on this side of the whom the Father was "very particu- 

Atlantic, except iu this instrument, and larly commended" bv " Sieur Guebin," 

lu a mortgage by Allen Yewe, of Boston, [.Alajor Gibbons] (Cok. N. F. Hist. Soc, 

nunner, executed in 1640 (and copied 2d sen, iii. 315, 316). [T.] 
on a^ subsequent page from Lechford). 2 Nicholas and Richard Parker, 

-Mr. Savage gives Yow, Yeow, and Yew both of Boston in 1639, were joint 

»•* varieties of the surname Yeo ; and ownere of a house and lot (next ilr. 

father Druillettes, iu the Journal of Thomas Welde's) in Roxbury, which 

«'U embassy to New England, in 1650, they sold, July 18, 1639, to William 



'"60 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

send greeting in our Lord God everlasting, Know yeo that I 
for the summe of thirty pounds of currant money of England 
to me in hand payd by [Walter] Blackborne ^ of Roxbury in 
New England, [gent.,] Doe hereby grant, bargaine and sell 
unto the said [Walter] Blackborne, all that my parcell of 
meadow or pasture ground inclosed lying in Roxbury afore- 
said, contcyning five acres or thereabouts, abutting upon the 
lands of M^ Welles, pastor of Roxbury on the east, upon the 
highway leading from Boston to Roxbury on the west, upon 
a foot path leading from Roxbury to Dorchester on the nortli, 
and upon the land of Mr Samuel Hagburnc, late MF Pinchions, 
on the south, To have and to hold the said parcell of meadow 
or pasture ground w'*" the appurtenances unto the said [Wal- 
ter] Blackbourne his heires and assignes for ever To the only 
use and proper belioof of the said [W^altcr] Blackbourne his 
heires and assignes for ever. In witnesse etc. 

To all to whom these presents shall come greeting, Whereas 
Thomas Beech now remayning att the Dutch Plantation stand- 
eth indebted unto me Peter Garland of New England Mariner 
the summe of thirty three pounds foure shillings and six pence 
upon account between me and him in writing signed with my 
hand the day of the date of these presents and whereas there is 
due to me also divers other debts amounting [36] to the summe 
of six pounds three shillings and nyne pence from sundry per- 
sons as by the particular^ at the foot of the said account ap- 
peareth w'^^ I have authorised the said Thomas Beech for me 
and in my name to collect and take up. Now Know yee that 
I have hereby appointed ct in my place put my trusty ffriend 
Isaacke Allcrton of New England mariner my lawful Attorney 

Cheney, of Roxbury. Richard was ad- Ham Cheney, Sept. 30, 1639, describing 

tnitted an inhabitant of Boston, Sept. himself in the deed as "late of Rox- 

30, 1639. Nicholas had lived at Rox- bury." In 16i0 or 1641 he returned to 

buiy, from his corning to New England, England {Saf. Deeds, i. 20), whither 

in 1633, until lt335 or 1636, when he his wife Elizabeth probably soon fol- 

removed to Boston. [T.] lowed him, as she made a letter of at- 

" Walter Blackbnrne, of Boston, torney in July, 1641, to Joseph Welde 

1640, had perhaps lived at Roxbury " and John Johnson, of Roxbury, to coi- 

(Savage, in Geneal. Diet.). He sold lect debts due her husband and remit 

his house and laud in Roxbuiy to Wil- the money to him. [T.] 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 61 

for me & in mj name to demand & recover the said summe 
of the said Thomas Beech his executors and administrators 
and also for me to receive the said six pounds three shillings 
and nyne pence of the said Thomas Beech from whome the 
same is due to me, to my use ; and acquittances sufficient in 
my place thereupon to make Ratefying and allowing whatever 
my said Attorney shall lawfully doc in the p''mises. In wit- 
nesse, etc. nrfi : Robto. Sedgwicke & mei. [Is.] 

A coppy of the Account ^' Debts, signed hy Peter Garland. 

Thomas Beech, I pray you pay unto my good fTreind Mf 
Isaacke AUerton^ the abovesaid somme of thirty three 
pounds foure shillings and six pence. And I further desire 
you to demand, recover and receive for me the abovesaid 
somme of Ql. 3s. 9tZ. of the said partyes who owe the same 
unto me, and upon payment give them acquittances, w'^'^ when 
you have received pay over to my said ffreind M^ Isaacke 
Allerton according to my Letter of Attorney to him made the 
Pay of the Date hereof in that bchalfe. Witnesse my hand 
the twenty nyneth day of March, Anno Dni 1G39. 

At the foote of the account and note of the said particulare 
Debts. Coram Rbto. Sedgwicke & me. [Is.] 

To all Christian people to whomc these presents shall come, 
I William Coddington^ of Aquednecke in New England, gen- 

* Isaac Allerton, fovnicrly of Ply- the MassacJmsctts Colonial Jlecorcls in 

niouth, came in the " Mayflower," and regard to a debt of his for £100. In 

was one of the signers (the fifth in order) Lcclijord he is twice mentioned as being 

of the Cape Cod Compact. He was sued for debt. His fishing operations 

Assistant at Plymouth for some time, at ilarblehead were not very successful 

nud at this period of his life was one (see 3 Mass. Hist. Coll., vii. 249, and 

of. the richest of the Pilgrims. Subse- Mass. Records, i. 140). He had rela- 

•luently his affairs became disturbed, tions with Virginia, naturally enough, 

He was embarrassed, for instance, by and also with " Xew Holland," as here 

the loss of a trading wigwam at ilachias appears (see also p. 151, footnote) ; but 

>n 1C33 ; " by the wreck of his pinnace lived towards the end of his life at 

fn>m Port Koyal in 1G34; and still further New Haven, where he died in debt, 

in.iMivcrished by the loss of his burk at 1659. 

<"'M>o Ann, in 1635" (3 Mass. Hist. Coll., 2 William Coddington, formerly of 

'■»i. 241). In 163^ lie is mentioned in Boston, at this time of Aqnidneck. 



62 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



tleman, send greeting in onr Lord God everlasting, Knowc yee 
that I for and in consideration of the summe of one thousand 
and three hundred pounds of lawful! money of England, to me 
in hand satisfyed and pay'd before the sealing and delivery 
hereof by. William Tynge ' of Boston in New England, mer- 
chant, Doe by these presents grant [37] bargaine and sell 
unto the said William Tyngc, all that my Dwelling house situ- 
ate in Boston aforesaid adjoyning to the house of Richard 
Bellingham Esq"", w'^ the garden and the orchard, and a cer- 
taine parcell of land, meadow or pasture, thereto adjoyning 
& belonging, and all outhouses, yardes, wayes & easements 
thereunto belonging, And all my land in the Forte Field 
in Boston-necke, and all my right in Spectacle Island,^ and 
my ffarme house at Mount WoUaston and all outhouses, 
barncs, stables, yards, gardens and orchards thereto belong- 
ing, as well on the one sydo as on the other of Mount WoUas- 
ton river there and two acres of ground be it more or Icsse 
allready marked out neare adjoyning to the barne on the 

Chosen assistant, in 1630, in England. 
He was Treasurer of the Colony from 
1633 to 1636, and was then left out of 
office on account of his religious opin- 
ions, and early in 1638 went to PJiode 
Island, where he was first made judge 
of the settlement at Portsmouth ; but 
shortly being driven thence with his 
supporters by some faction, he removed 
■with them and settled at Newport. 
The people at Portsmouth desiring to 
unite again, Coddington was chosen the 
first governor of the Colony in 1640. 
He was ag-ain chosen in 1678, and died 
in the same year. Articles upon him 
are printed in the ITisL d: Gcneal. Ecrj. 
for January, 1874, p. 13, and for April, 
1882, p. 138. 

As for this land at Mount "Wollaston, 
the reader may gain some additional 
knowledge thereon by comparing this 
deed with a purchase made by AVilliam 
Tyng, of the Hutchinsons, who owned 



Hccords, L 7), note' of which may be 
found pp. 212, 214, post, as well as by 
referring to the Records, as above. The 
bounds are so vague that it is hardly 
possible to place the lots with any ac- 
curacy; but a general idea of their posi- 
tion may be obtained. The land here 
spoken of as belonging to Judith Quin- 
sey is, in the references made, called 
land of Edward [Edmund] Quinsey, 
her husband. 

^ William Tyng was a prominent 
Boston merchant. He arrived in Xew 
England about a week after Lechford, 
in his own ship. He became one of 
the first men of the town, frequently 
its representative in the General Court. 
In his later days he moved to Braintree, 
wherein may be seen, throughout the 
Note-hook, he had many dealings in 
lands. He died Jan. IS, 1652. 

- What follows in the draught is 
crossed out, with the direction "vertc 
land just beyond " Mr. Coddington's fo!.," and re-written on the fourth page 
farm and Mr. Wilson's " (Boston Town following, from which I copy. [T.] 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 63 

south syde of the said river, and all my land, meadow, pasture 
and wooddy ground contcyning five hundred acres be it more 
or lesse lying at Mount WoUaston aforesaid in two parcells, 
the one greater, bounding on the common sewer there towards 
the north and north east, on Mount Wollaston River aforesaid 
towards the south and on a parccll of land belonging to Judith 
Quinsey towards the northwest, the lesser parcell thereof 
bounding on the common sewer aforesaid towards the north 
east, on the other syde of the said land belonging to the said 
Judith Quinsey towards the south east, and on the lands of 
John Wilson,! pastor of the Church of Boston, towards the 
northwest. And also a parcell of land wooddy ground and 
pasture contcyning thirty acres be it more or lesse lying on 
the south syde of tlie said river, bounding on the proper allot- 
ment of Samuel Wilborc '-^ towards the south and on another 
parcell of land belonging to the said Judith Quinsey towards 
the west, And all wayes, easements, proffits and commodities 
thereto belonging w"^ the appurtenances, To have and to hold 
all the said houses, lands and Tenements and all and singu- 
lare the premises w"* the appurtences unto the said William 
Tynge his hcires and assignes for ever. In witnesse whereof, 
I have hereunto set my hand and scale, the nyncth day of 
Aprill, in the ffiftecnth yeare of the raigne of our Sovcraigne 
Lord Charles King of England A:c. xinnocp Dni 1639, in p^'ncia 



1. A bond for the payment of 500^ to Mr Coddington. 

Me Williii Tynge de Boston in Nova Anglia mercatorem 
tencr' & firmiter obligar' Will5 Coddington gen' in Mille libris 
etc. Condiconed to pay 5001 at Mr Tynge's house in Boston, 
1° Maij, 1639. 

2. Me WilhTi Tynge, de Boston in N", A. mercatorem, tener' 
<S:c. Willo Coddington gcfi' in 400^, condicon' ad sol vend' 200^ 

* John Wilson. This land was * Samuel "Wilbore was also one of the 

Rnintp.l him in lf;34, or iKThaps before, settlers of Ehode Island (see Savage). 

S •" r.vston Town Rccards, pp. 2, 4, 6, 9, -He married Elizabeth, widow of Lech- 

*liere is much mention of his lands at ford (Hist. & Gemal. Reg., 1876, xxx. 

Mount Wollaston. 202). 



64 LECHFORD'S MAXUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

loco Deo 1° Maij, 1640, si non sit Dies Dominicus, sin sit, 
tunc Die pp. scquen'. 

3. Me WilliTi Tynge de Boston in N. A. M. ten' eidem in 
400" Condicon' ad solvend' 2001 loco Deo 1° die Maij, 1641, si 
non kc. 

4. Me cundem ten' eidem in 4001 <tc. ad solvend' 2001 1° 
Maij, 1642, iit supra. 

5. Me eundem ten' eid' in 4001 ad solv' 2001 1° Maij, 1643, 
ut supra. 

\_This entry, from 1 to 5, 8eem% to he crossed out.'] 

This Indenture made the tcntli day of Aprill in the ffif- 
teenth yeare of the raigne of our Soveraigne Lord Charles 
King of England &c. Anno(|)' Dni 1639, Betweene William 
Tynge of Boston in New E. merchant, of the one parte, and 
William Coddington of Aquedneeke in New England, gent, of 
the other parte witnesseth that tlio said William Tynge for 
and in consideration of tlie summe of eight hundred pounds 
[38] of lawfull money of England W^^ he oweth unto the said 
William Coddington Doth by these presents mortgage and 
grant unto the said William Coddington all those lands tene- 
ments & hereditaments at Mount Wollaston in New England 
W^^^ he the said William Tynge lately purchased oi tlie 
said William Coddington To have and to hold the said lauds 
& Tenements and all and singulare the prmises \:^^ the ap- 
purtenances unto the said William Coddington his heires and 
assignes for ever. Provided alhvayes that if the said William 
Tynge his heires executors admol-s or assignes shall pay or 
cause to be payd unto the said William Coddington his exe- 
cutes ad : or assignes or to his ctaine Atturney the summe of 
eight hundred pounds of lawfull money of England at or in 
the now dwelling house of the said William Tynge situate in 
Boston aforesaid in manner and forme following that is to say 
two hundred pounds thereof on the first day of May w'^'^ shall 
be in the yeare of our Lord 1640. two hundred pounds more 
thereof on the first Day of May w'^'' shall be in the yeare of 
our Lord 1641. two hundred pounds more thereof on the 
first Day of May w'^'^ shall be in the yeare of our Lord 1642. 



LECIIFORD'S MAXi^SCniPT NOTE-BOOK. 65 

and two hundred pounds the residue thereof on the first day 
of May w"^ shall be in the ycarc of our Lord 1G43. (Saving 
that if any of tlie said Daves of payment shall fall out to be 
upon the Lords Day tlien the payment to be made the next 
day after respectively) Then this mortgage & grant shall 
be voyd and of none effect or els it shall stand in full force & 
vertue. Provided also that the said William Coddington his 
heires executors administrators or assigncs shall not enter 
upon the premises to enjoy the same (excepting on some parte 
thereof for this next winter as is expressed in certaine arti- 
cles of agreement indented made bctwcene the said partyes 
bearing date the Day before the Date of these presents) uu- 
lesse the said William Tyngc his heires executors admol-s or 
assigncs shall make Default in payment of the said sunimes 
of money or one of them And lastly it is concluded and 
agreed betweene the partyes to these presents that the said 
Win Coddington his executors adiurs or assignes or his cer- 
taine Attorney receiving the said summes of money shall 
upon the said sevcrall payments made give a sufficient Dis- 
charge in writing unto the said ViiUui Tynge his heires exe- 
cutoi's adiurs «t assignes for so much money as he or they 
shall pay and that upon the last payment above mentioned 
this present mortgage shall be delivered up to the said Win 
Tynge his heires or assignes to be cancelled. In witnesse <tc. 
[All these writings 15s.] 

[39] Articles of agreement indented made the nyneth Day of 
Aprill Anno DTii 1639, hctwccnc William Tynge of Boston 
in New England, merchant, of the one jmrte, and Willia:m 
Coddington, of Aqucdneclce in New Englaiul, gent, of iJie 
other parte. 

"Wliercas the said William Coddington hath sold unto the 
said William Tynge his farmehousc k outhouses and cer- 
taine lands at Blount Wollaston in New England, among other 
things It was and is originally and now agreed bctweene the 
said partyes in manner and forme following : 

Imprimis, that the said William Coddington shall have 
5 



66 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

liberty and free ingrcsse, ergresse & regresse to and for him 
<fe his servants to cut, reape and thresh all his corne now upon 
the said lands sowen or planted. 

Item, that the said William Coddington shall have lib- 
erty, this spring, to sowe and plant all the land that hath bin 
there by him broken up (except thirty acres,) and to reape 
and in the corne thereof. 

Item, that the said William Coddington shall have barne 
roome for his corne there planted or sowen or to be sowen or 
planted this ycare, & liberty therein to thresh the same and 
chamber roome to put it in when it shall be threshed. 

Itm, That the said William Coddington shall have one of 
the cellers for milke, and house roome for his servants and 
house roome for thirty head of cattell and roome to fodder 
them in, until the end of the next winter, and liberty during 
one yeare next ensuing the date hereof for to remove and 
fetch away, or cause to be fetched away, at seasonable times, 
all his cutt wood, timber and trees now- felled on the said 
lands, and all his moveable goods whatsoever that now are 
or at the end of the said terme shall be, upon or in the 
premises, except the Dungc that shall be made thereupon. 

Item, Whereas the said William Coddington hath granted 
unto the said William Tynge twenty acres of land on tlie 
other side of Mount Wollaston river, over and above [40] the 
five'hundrcd acres on this syde the said river, next the said 
farme liouse and the lands of M' John Wilson, pastor of the 
Church of Boston, as by the said grant bargaine & sale in 
writing appearcth, the said William Coddington shall lay 
forth and assigne the said twenty acres of good ground con- 
veniently for the use of the said William Tynge. In witnesse 

&C.1 

Itm, that the said William Coddington, his heires executors 
adiiirs and assignes shall have and enjoy the wood and tim- 
ber trees growing on the soyle of thirteone acres parte of the 
parcell of land, wooddy ground or pasture, conteyning thirty 

1 The last paragraph is crossed out. lineations and cancellings ; so that it is 
This was evidently the first draught of not possible to decide, in every instance, 
the agreement, and has numerous inter- what was the final reading. [T.] 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 67 

acres be it more or lesse lying on the south syde of Mount 
Wollaston River, and shall have liberty from time to time at 
seasonable and fitt times to cut, fell and carry away the sayd 
wood and timber trees, and shall have free ingresse, egresse 
& regresse for him and them & his servants and theirs to 
that end, the said thirteene acres to be measured w*^ equall 
distance as neare as conveniently may be from the swampe 
there. 

[41] I Sergeant Collacot^ of Dorchester in N. E. doe owe 
<fcc. to Wilhn Coddington gent. 123t 5*. 9'f , 1° :Maij, 1G39. 
Dat' 12 Aprii 1639, in p''ncia Georgii Gardiner k mei. \Jdd.'\ 

Rec** of M^ Keayne^ for a silver laced coate and a gold 

wrought cap. [2t 10s.] 

Rec<i of my Lady I^Ioody 3 22. 2. 1639. [11 lis.] 

I borrowed 6^ of M. Story, whereof I payd him 41; 27? 2'! 

\_Crossed out.'] [21 0.] 

[42] Knowe all men by these presents that I John Throck- 
morton* of New Providence, gent., for and in Consideration 
of the summe of ffifty pounds of lawfull money of England 

1 Richard Collacot was a prominent ^ Deborah, Lady Moody, most prob- 
man in Dorchester, of whom the reader ably, who removed from Lynn to Long 
will find frequent mention in the latter Island about 1643. "Winthrop's earliest 
pages of the Note-book. He had been a mention of her, as " a wise and an- 
sergeant in the Pequot war, just finished, ciently religious woman," is under date 
and held also at various times the offices of June, 1643 (vol. ii. p. 123). The 
of selectman and of representative. Colony had granted her, three years 

2 Mr. Robert Keayne was a public- before, four hundred acres of land 
spirited and prominent merchant at this {Mass. Records, i. 290). [T.] 

time. His house and garden were on * John Throckmorton, already men- 

the south side of the market-place, where tioned (p. 1), was excommunicated from 

the Old State House afterwards stood the church at Salem when Hugh Peters 

{Book of Possessions, p. 102). He was was minister there, and went to Provi- 

one of the charter members of the Ancient dence with Roger Williams, where he 

and Honorable Artillery Company, and, lived until his death. His daughter 

indeed, is usually spoken of as Captain married John Coggeshall, one of the 

Robert Keayne. His name constantly settlers on Aquidneck, who moved 

occurs in the Colonial and Boston Totcn thither after the Hutchinsou persecu- 

Records, as well as in the Note-book. tion. 



58 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

to me in hand payd by Richard Parker of Boston in New 
England, merchant, whereof and wherewith I acknowledge 
my selfe satisfied and payd, and thereof and of every parte 
thereof Doc acquit release and discharge the said llichard 
Parker his heirs executors and administrators by these pres- 
ents, Doe hereby grant, bargaine and sell unto the said Richard 
Parker the One moiety or halfendeale of all that Island liere- 
tofo're called by the Indians Chibatchuwese, now called Pru- 
dence,^ lately purchased of Canonicus and Miantinomie, Cheife 
Sachems of the Narrigansetts, w^^ all and singulare the appur- 
tenances, writings and escripts thereunto belonging, To have 
and to hold the said moiety and halfendeale of the said Island 
and all and singular tlie premises w^^ the apurtenanccs what- 
soever unto the said Richard Parker his heires and assigns 
for ever. In witnesse ttc. [2.s.] 

This Indenture made the 2 Day of the 2>^ month, 1G39, 
bctweene John Winthrop Esqr. Governor of the Massachu- 
sets bay in New England, and Richard Parker ^ of Boston in 
New England merchant, of the one parte, and John Throck- 
morton gent, of the other parte, Witnesseth, that the said 
John Winthrop and Richard Parker for divers good causes 
and considerations them thereunto moving. Doe by these 
presents demise, grant k to farme lett unto the said John 

1 Chibatchuwese, or Prudence Isl- {Boston Tov.-n Records, i. 42, 48). He 
and, was purcliascd of Canonicus hy was a prominent merchant for many 
rop;er W'illiamf?, jointly with Governor years ; lir.st selectman in 1651. 
"Winthrop, in November, 1637. Jlr. By the indentures immediately fol- 
Williams hnd sold his half of the isl- lowing it appears that Jlr. Parker, 
and. Governor "Winthrop retained his having purchased Mr. Throckmorton's 
interest, which he left by will to his half of Prudence Island, joined with 
son Stephen ( Jl'inth., ii. 2, app. i.). Governor Winthrop in a lease of the 

2 Richard and Nicholas Parker, who whole island to Mr. Throckmorton for 
were probably brothers, sold their three yeare and a half; that at about 
house and land in Roxbury in Juh', the same time he purchased " the 
1639 (see p. 76. po^t), having for some wharf, crane, and warehouses in Boston," 
time previously resided in Boston, and conveyed one half of the same to 
Richard was admitted an inhabitant I^Ir. Edward Bendall, who had been one 
of Boston, Sept. 30, 1639 ; and in Feb- of the fonner proprietors, and by Avhose 
rnary, 1640, had a grant of four hun- name the wharf was lor many years 
dred acres "at the Mount" WoUastoa afterwards called. [T.] 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT XOTE-BOOK. 69 

Throckmorton, All that their Island called Prudence, w*^ the 
ai>purtenances To have and to hold said Island w'^ the appur- 
tenances unto the said John Throckmorton his executors, 
administrators and assignes, from henceforth forth untill 
the first Day of November next ensuing the date hereof, and 
after for and during the space of three yeares from the last 
Pay of October next ensuing the Date hereof fully to be coni- 
]»lcate and ended, yeelding and paying therefore yearely unto 
the said John Winthrop and Richard Parker their heires and 
assignes the full summe of forty pounds by the ycarc at one 
entire payment upon the last day of October in every of 
the said three yeares. And it is covenanted, concluded and 
agreed by aiid bctweene the parties to these presents that the 
said John Winthrop and Richard Parker shall presently deliver 
unto the said John Throckmorton the summe of forty pounds 
to stock the said Island w^^ swine, these to remainc during 
both the said termes, [43] and in the end thereof the said 
John Throckmorton shall yeild up the said Island w^^ the 
appurtenances unto the said John Winthrop & Richard 
Parker, tlieir heires and assignes, fully stocked w'*^ forty 
pounds worth of swine. And if the said John Throckmor- 
ton, his executors, adm"^ or asss shall build upon and im- 
prove tlie ground of the said Island, as it shall be lawfull 
for them to doe, then in the end of the said terme of 
three yeares he or they shall be reasonably satisfyed for 
thc^ same by the said John Winthrop and Richard Parker, 
their licires or assignes. Provided allwayes that the said 
John Throckmorton his executors administrators and as- 
signes shall not Doe any wast upon the premises and shall 
Duely pay the rent aforesaid at Boston aforementioned. In 
witncsse etc. [o.s.] 

To all Christian people to whome these presents shall 
come We Thomas Levcrit one of the Elders of the Church of 
Roston in New England, William Hutchinson gent., John 
(^ogan merchant, John Coggeshall, John Newgate, James 
Renne, Edward Hutchinson, Thomas Savage, Edward Bendall 
lu^ht., [William] Dyer, Thomas Griffcn,' [Richard] Tuthill, 



70 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. . 

[Thomas ?] Flint, and [Mary ?] Hudson,^ widdow [of Ralph ?] 
send greeting in our Lord God everlasting, Knowe yec, that 
we for and in consideration of the summe of One hundred and 
seventy pounds of lawful! money of England to us in hand payd 
before the sealing and delivery of these p^'sents, by Richard 
Parker of Boston, aforesaid, Merchant, whereof and where- 
with we acknowledge ourselves satisfied and payd and thereof 
and of every parte and parcell thereof Doe remise release 
and discharge the said Richard Parker his heires executors 
administrators and assigncs by these presents. Have granted, 
bargained and sold, and by these presents Doe graunt, 
bargaine and sell unto the said Richard [44] Parker all 
tliat our wharfe, Crane and warehouses lying in Boston^ 
aforesaid, w*'' all Customes, rights, privileges and appurten- 
ances whatsoever thereunto belonging and all our right, title, 
interest and demaund of, in and to the same To have and to 
hold, receive, perceive and take, the said wharfe Crane and 
warehouse and all and singulare the premises w**" the appur- 
tenances unto the said Richard Parker his heires and assigues 
for ever. And also for the consideration aforesaid and to- 
wards the maintenance of the premises, we Doe hereby grant 
unto the said Richard Parker as much as in us lyeth one 
hmidred acres of land lying at Mount Wollaston^ parcell of 

1 It would be more in keeping with " wliere Quiticy Market now is," ac- 

tlie plan of this annotation to describe cording to Jlr. Drake {History of Bos- 

each one of these jjcrsons in this note, ton, p. 804). November 31, 1649, the 

as being the first appearance of their selectmen sold the reversion of "the 

names in the Xotc-hook. But this seems Dock or Cove, Called by the name of 

impracticable ; and as almost all of them Bendall Docke," and the flats belonging 

appear later, I must reserve notice of to it, to James Everill, who had previ- 

them until they appear separately. ously bought land fronting on the dock 

^ "The dock, or cove, which was in from John Shaw (Boston Town Eecords, 

early times the principal seat of trade i. 93 ; Suf. Dccd% i. 115 ; Book of Pos- 

in Boston, was long called by [the] sessions, 19). [T.] 

name [of Edward Bendall], because » Jan. 21, 1638-39 (two months be- 

he owned part of the upland around fore the date of this conveyance), the 

it, and had a warehouse on it. It has town had granted one Imndred acres 

since been called the town dock ; but at Mount "WoUastou to the " owners of 

the exact boundaries, north and south, the wharfe and crane," towards keeping 

cannot probably be explained" {Savage, them in repair {Boston Town Bccords, 

in note to ITinth., ii. 72). It was p. 37). [T.J 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 71 

the lands belonc^ing to the said To^vne of Boston, To have and 
to hold the said one hundred acres unto the said Richard 
Parker his heires and assignes forever. And further we 
grant. that if this conveyance shall not be sufficient to settle 
the said one Imndred acres of land unto and upon the said 
Richard Parker his heires and assignes according to the true 
meaning hereof, That then We will cause and procure the 
Towncsmen of Boston to settle the same unto and upon the " 
said Richard Parker his heires and assignes, in such manner 
t by such conveyance as the said Richard Parker or his 
Counsell shall reasonably advise or require. In witnesse 
whereof we have hereunto set our hands and scales the 
Twenty fifth Day of the ffirst moneth Anno Dni One thousand 
six hundred & thirty nync. 1639. [3s. 4c?.] 

Me Richardum Parker De Boston in Nova Anglia, Merca- 
torem, tener' k firmiter obligar' Thome Leverit vni presby- 
tcror' ecclesie de Boston pred' in ITOl Dat' ut supra. 

The Condicon &c. to pay 85i, 25. 4'. 1639, at Boston, at 
M! Leverits house. [1^.] 

This indenture made the Twenty sixth Day of the ffirst 
moneth. In the yeare of our Lord one thousand six hundred 
and thirty nyne, 1689, Betweene Richard Parker of Boston 
in New England, merchant, of the one parte, and Edward 
Bendall of °the same, merchant, of the otlier parte, Wit- 
nesseth, that the said Richard Parker for and in consid- 
eration of the summe of seaventy and five pounds [45] of 
lawful money of England to him in hand paid by the said 
Edward Bendall wherof & wherwith the said Richard Parker 
doth acknowledge himself satisfyed & payd and therof and 
of every parte thereof Doth acquite release and Discharge 
the said Edward Bendall his heires executors and adminis- 
trators and every one of them by these presents Hath granted, 
bargained and sold and by these presents doth grant, bar- 
gaine and sell unto the said Edward Bendall, All that the 
one moiety and halfendeale of the wharfe, Crane and ware- 
house lying in Boston aforesaid w'^ the moity and halfendeale 



. ■;:^r-'y .;,(' 



iT 



72 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

of all customs, rights, privileges and appurtenances whatso- 
ever thereunto belonging, To have and to hold receive per- 
ceive and take the said moiety and halfendeale and all and 
singular the ' premises hereby mentioned and intended to 
be granted w"* the appurtenances whatsoever unto the said 
Edvrard Bendall his heirs and assignes forever. In witness 
etc. [os. 4tZ.] 

Me Ed"™ Bendall De Boston in Nova Anglia mercatorem 
tener' et firmitcr obligar' Hie" Parker mercatori, in 75^ Dat. 
ut supra. Condiconcd for payment of 37 10! To Richard 
Parker 24. 4. p^^. [Is.] 

This Indenture made the ffirst Day of the third moneth in 
the year of our Lord One thousand six hundred and thirty 
nine, 1639, Between Richard Parker of Boston in New Eng- 
land, merchant, of the one parte, And Edward Bendall 
of the same, merchant, of the other parte, "Witnesscth that 
the said Richard Parker for divers good causes and consid- 
erations him thereunto moving. Hath demised, granted and 
to farme letten, and by these presents Doth Demise, graunt 
and to farme lett unto the said Edward Bendall All that the 
one moity and halfendeale of all the wharfe. Crane and ware- 
houses lying in Boston aforesaid, w*** the moity and halfen- 
deale of all customs, rights, privileges and appurtenances 
Avhatsoever thereunto belouging, To have and to hold receive 
perceive and take the said moiety halfendeal and all and sin- 
gular the ]iremiscs hereby mentioned and intended to be 
demised w*** the appurtenances whatsoever unto the said 
Edward Bendall his executors administrators [46] and as- 
signes from the Day of the Date of these presents for and 
During the space of one year from thenceforth next ensuing 
fully to be comj^lcate and ended. Yeilding and paying there- 
fore unto the said Richard Parker his hcires and assignes the 
full and whole summe of twenty pounds at two scverall pay- 
ments, viz* upon the ffirst Day of the nyncth moneth of this 
yeare and upon the first day of the third monetli of tlie yeare 
next ensuing the Date hereof, by equall portions to be payd. 
And the said Edward Bendall for himselfe, his executors 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 73 

adiurs & a.sss doth hereby Covenant \v"* the said Richard 
Parker his heircs <fc asss that he the said Edward Ben- 
dall att his and their costs and charges well & suffi- 
ciently shall and will repayre maintoine siipi)ly & uphold 
the premises hereby Demised w**^ all nddfull tt necessary rep- 
arations tacklings & matcrialls as often as need shall require 
During the said terme and in the end thereof yeild up the 
same soe well and sufficiently rcpayred maintayned sui> 
plyed <fe upheld unto the said Richard Parker his heircs 
or assignes. [3. 4.] 

This Indenture made the ffirst day of the third moneth in 
the yeare of our Lord one thousand six hundred and thirty 
nyne, 1639, Betweene Richard Parker of Boston in New 
England, merchant, of the one parte, and Edward Bendall of 
the same, merchant, of the other parte, Witnesseth that the 
said Richard Parker for and in divers good Considerations 
him thereunto moving Ilath demised, granted and to farme 
lettcn, and by these presents Doth demise grant and to fanne 
lett unto the said Edward Bendall the one moity and halfen- 
deale of one groate lighter w**" its tacklings and appurtenan- 
ces w^^ the moity and halfendealc of all proffits, commodities 
and advantages that thereby Sc therewith shall be gotten, and 
also the moity and halfendealc of the proffitts, commodi-. 
tics and avantages that shall be gotten by one one servant 
called Thomas Hedger ^ in and w*'' tlie said Lighter to be im- 
ployed. To have and to hold receive perceive and take the said 
nioietyes and halfendeales and all and singular the premises 
with the appurtenances unto the said Edward Bendall his 
executors administrators and assignes from [47] the Day of 
the Date of these presents for and during the space of one 
year thenceforth next ensuing fully to be compleate <fe ended, 
yeilding and paying therefore unto the said Richard Parker 
his heircs and assignes the full and whole sumo of thirty 
pounds at two severall payments viz* upon the ffirst Day of 
the uyneth moneth of this year and upon the first Day of the 

* A Tliomas Heilger was afterwards for many years a resident of AVarwick, 
n. I. {Savarjc). [T.] 



74 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. . 

third moneth of the year next ensuing the Date hereof by 
equal porcons to be paid. And the said Edward Bendall 
Doth hereby for himselfe, his executors administrators and 
assignes Covenant with the said Richard Parker his heires 
and assignes that he the said Edward Bendall liis executors 
administrators and assignes shall and will at his and their 
proper costs and chai'ges, well and sufficiently repairc, main- 
tayne, uphold & supply the said Lighter with all needful and 
necessary reparacons, implements, tacklings and materialls as 
often as need shall require during the said terme and in the 
end of the said terme shall surrender & yielde up the moiety 
& halfcndeale of the said Lighter soc well and sufficiently 
mainteayned repay red upheld, & supply ed as the same is at 
tliis time present reasonable wearing excepted and if the said 
Lighter shall not be cast away, (w** God forbid) unto the 
said Richard Parker, his heires or assignes. In witnesse, &c. 
[3. 4.] 

Worthy Sir ^ : I heartily pray that this honest young man 
Henry Grey, may find all lawful favour with you. His 
freinds have advised him to make a journey on purpose to 

^ The following letter was copied, sister of his brother John's wife. Her 

or drafted in sliorthand, on page 47, father was an "old acquaintance" of 

hut subsequently cancelled by lines Lechford. The "honest young man" 

drawn across. Blanks are left in place must have found favor with Mr. Frost, 

of the words tliat cannot be confidently for the couple were married not many 

deciphered. It was probably written months after. Sept. 18, 1640, Henry 

to Mr. William Frost, one of the early Gray and his wife Lydia conveyed their 

planters at Uncowa (Fairfield), "be- house in Boston in trust to TJionias 

yond Connecticut." John Gray (or Lechford (see after, p. 176) ; and both 

Grey, as Lechford uniformly wrote the John and Henry removed to Uncowa. 

name), of Boston, 1639, an older Lechford, in Plaine Dealing (p. 43), 

brother of Henry, had married Eliza- names among others who M-ere living in 

■ beth (widow of John Watson), a daugh- the plantations " beyond Connecticut," 

ter of Mr. Frost. Henry Gray, "now his "old acquaintance. Master Roger 

of Boston, heretofore citizen and mer- Ludlow, JLaster Frost, sometime of 

chant of London," had a house-lot Nottingham, and Ids sons, John Grey 

granted him by the town, Feb. 19, and Henry Grey." The latter became 

1637-38. "The maid who had prom- a man of some prominence in the plan- 

isedhim," and was "fully satisfied" as tation, and was a deputy from Fairfield 

to his estate and "all other things," to the General Couit in 1656 and 1657. 

was doubtless Lydia Frost, the younger [T.] 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 75 

you, about your satisfaction (?) in the particulars of his 
estate, — which yet the maid doth not stand on, I am in- 
formed, but is fully satisfied thereabout and all other things, 
and her affections to him remain [ ]• I have seen a 

passage in his father's letter, whereby he bestows 20i upon 
him more than formerly, in respect of his charge of building ; 
yet not as his full portion, as I verily believe. His brother 
also, a citizen of London, hath promised to stock him with 
lOOi worth of commodities from time to time, if the Lord 
keepe open the way, and he is to have half the profit, which 
may be of especial advantage. [ ] will show you by 

his account book that his estate is above 50^ for the pres- 
ent, which is as much as her sister here desired and more 
than the maid herself ever stood on. The maid hath prom- 
ised him, and he her, as I heare, and the young man doubts 
whether it may be broken off ; wherefore if you remaine un- 
satisfyed thereabout, whether the promise be good or not 
he will refer [ ] to yourself and 2 other ministers 

meete to be deciders, when you come next into the Bay. For 
my selfe, I [ ] this favour of you, that you would be 

pleased to scale up my treatises and send them to mee by 
this bearer, for I am forced to show them to some Elders ; 
and also I would pray you to send me my letter that I for- 
merly wrote unto you, if you thinke good, for some reasons 
which I will show you when, please God, I see you next; 
wherein you shall do me a great favour. With my best re- 
spects to yourself and your beloved yokefellow in the Lord, 
wishing you all [ ] grace and prosperity from heaven, 

I remain yours to be [ ]. 

Thomas Leckford. 
BosTox, 11. 3. 1G39. 

Peter Palfrey i of Salem for 661 13». 4? conveyed to George 
Richardson, mariner, 200 acres of land, meadow, pasture 
and wooddy ground, lying at the end of Basse River in 

» Peter Palfrey came to Salem, it is first. He died in 1663. George Rich- 
thought, in 1629, with Roger Couant. ardson, of Watertown, may be found 
He was admitted freeman among the (with a small family) in Bond. 



76 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. ' 

Salem for ever, and to lay out & sever the p'mises. Dat' 
13. 3. 1G39. The money to be payd by bill, upon the 13 of 9 
next. Coram Hugh Peters, Wiii° Hathorne, & me. [Is.] 

. [48] Edmund Batter ^ of Salem for 501 conveys to 
George Richardson, mariner, all that his Dwelling house and 
garden and two acres of land more or lesse thereunto belong- 
ing, w^^ the appurtcnccs, lying in Salem, for ever. And is to 
provide & deliver 500 pales S: rayles & posts answerable for 
the fenccing of the same before 1. 2. p^x''. Dat' 13. 3. 1639. 
Coram Gcrvasio Garford, "Wiii" Hathorne, Tho. L. [Is.] 

This Indenture made the fifteenth Day of the third moncth 
Anno Dai 1G39, Betweene George Richardson, mariner, and 
Michael Gabilloe, Frenchman, of the one parte, and Edmund 
James ^ of Watertowne in Xew England, planter, of the other 
parte, Witncsseth that the said George Richardson for the 
summe of eight pounds to him in hand payd for the passage 
of the said Michael, by the said Edmund James, doth assigne 
and put over the said Michael, and the said Michael Doth put 
himselfe a servant unto the said Edmund James, him his 
executors administrators and assignes truly <fc faithfully to 
serve from the day of the Date of these presents for and Dur- 
ing the space of seaven yeares thenceforth next ensuing fully 
to be compleat & ended. And the said Edmund James shall 
finde and provide to & for his said servant sufficient & reas- 
onable mcate drinke lodging & apparell during the said 
terme, and in the end of the said terme shall give his said 
servant double apparell <t five pounds in money. Mei et 
Alex : Huntridge. [2s.] 

* Edmund Batter, of Salem, was a marriage (Aug. 11, 1640), of Eeana, 

maltster from Salisbury, in the county •R-idow of one Edmund James, of "Water- 

of "Wilts. town. Not much is known aboat either 

2 Bond notes an Edmmid James, of them, however, and nothing at all 

proprietor, (in Watertown) 163-637, of Michael Gabilloe, as might be sur- 

selectman 1633. See Savage for the mised. 



LECEFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 77 

To tlie right wor^ the Governor, Councell and Assistants of 
the Jurisdiction of the Massachusets Baif in yetv England, 
and to the general Court there assembled, 22" 3'. 1G39. 

Tlie humble petition of Samuel Gough in bclialfe of Thomas 
Gough ^ of London, merchant, his ffather, and of himselfe. 

[49] Yo'' Petitioner humbly prayeth you the Hono^'able 
Governor and the Court, that you would be pleased to bestowe 
upon his said ffather and himselfe a comjietcnt parcell of 
ground as well for yo"" petitioners present imploymcnt as for 
his ffathcrs benefit, if it shall please God of his goodnesse to 
bring him and his ffamily into these parts ; wherein yo' peti- 
tioner hopcth and doubteth not but you will favourably re- 
spect the good of his ffather as well as himselfe, being that 
his said ffather is better knowno unto you and approved then 
himselfe is as yet ; and yo"" petitioner hopeth the Lord will so 
guide his yo"" petitioners wayes that you shall not have cause 
to repent of any yo'' goodnesse & bounty unto him or his said 
ffather. 

Yo'' petitioner is and shall be ever he hopeth a Petitioner to 
the throne of grace for yo' prosperity and . of the whole 
State. [2.S. 6c7.] 

This Indenture made the Twenty fourth Day of the third 
moneth In the yeare of our Lord One thousand six hundred 
and thirty nyne, Betweene Willm Hudson ^ of Boston in 

^ Thomas GofTe, a merchant of Lon- office as an assistant, IMr. Simon Brad- 
don, bad been interested in the colony street being elected in his place {Mass. 
at New Plymonth, and was afterwards a Col. Lcc, vol. i.; Mass. Hist. Coll., 
l-atenteeof the Massiichnsetts Company, . iii. 48 ; Savage, in TFinth., i. S). 
by whom he was chosen deputy-gov- It appears from this petition that so 
cnior in 1628 and 1G29, and was desig- late as 3 639 he had not entirely aban- 
iiated by the. Court, in November, 16-29, doned tlie purpose of emigration to 
^vith Winthrop, Saltonstall, and the Jklassachusotts. "Was his son Samuel 
other principal members of the com- already a resident here? [T.] 
l«ny, as one of the "undertakers for 2 William Hudson at this time had 
the joint-stock." He did not acconi- not been recommended to the Gene- 
pany his associates to New England, ral Court by the Town of Boston to 
und at the meeting at Southampton, keep an ordinary. He was allowed by 
March 18, 1629-1630, was left out of the Court, April 30, 1640; and there are 



78 LECHFOnO'S MAXUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

New England, Baker, and Henry Mother of the same, of the 
one parte, and Thomas Cornish i of Boston aforesaid, In- 
holder, of the other parte, Witnesseth that the said Wilhm 
Hudson for and in consideration of the summe of tenne 
pounds to him in hand payd by the said Thomas Cornish 
before the sealing & delivery hereof doth put o\er and the 
said Henry Mother doth put and place himselfe servant nnto 
the said Thomas Cornish by these presents w*^ him to dwell 
and serve by the space of fower yeares from the Date of these 
p^'sents fully to be compleate and ended During all w'='' time 
the said Henry his said master shall well and faithfully serve 
his commandos lawfull & honest he shall obey and doe his 
said masters secrets he shall keepc his goods he shall not 
wast nor purloyne from his said service he shall not himselfe 
w*Mraw or eloygne. And the said Thomas Cornish shall 
During the said tyme fynd & provide for his said servant suffi- 
cient meate drinke lodging & apparell. In witness <fcc. . 
[Is. 6d.] 

Be it known unto all men by these presents that I Robert 
Feke ^ of Watertowne in New England gent Doe hereby con- 
stititute and make & in my place put my welbeloved ffrcind 
Robert Harding of Boston in New England Merchant my true 
and lawfull Atturney for me and in my name to sue arrest 

in Lechford one or two mentions of his to the General Court, and in 1636 was 

house, in ngreements "to be paid at appointed one of the magistrates to 

Wm. Hudson's house," wliich I sup- keep county courts at "Watertown. 
pose to refer to tlie inn. His house, as Robert Harding carre in the tieet with 

noted in the Book of Possessions, was "Wintlirop, and his name is among the 

on the south side of State Street, close to early signatures of tlie cliurch covenant. 

the water (near Kilby Street), where he He was an ensign in Captain Underbill's 

had a wharf running out over the company, then captain, and was for a 

marsh. long time selectman of Boston. He 

1 Cornell or Cornhill ? See note was an adherent of the Hutchinsons, 
on p. 31, ante. [T.] and in 1639 removed to Rhode Island, 

2 Robert Feke, of "Watertown, is Avliere he was an assistant in 1641. In 
thought to have come over in the fleet the Note-hook later (p. 183) he is called 
with Winthrop. He was made freeman "Cap. Robert Harding, of Newport." 
May 18, 1631, and lieutenant Septem- In 1646 he went back to England, and, 
ber, 1632 ; he was several times deputy I suppose, remained there. 



LECEFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 79 

and implcade Henry Flccte ^ late Captaine of the Barke 
Waricke ffor the siiiiie of [50] One hundred pounds Currant 
money of England w*=^ he oweth unto me to be payd in in 
good merchantable corne at six shillings a bushell to be deliv- 
ered unto me at Watertowne in New England (the w"=^ should 
have ben payd and Delivered unto me there upon the last Day 
of July Anno Dili 1632 as by one bill obligatory under the 
hand and seale of the said Henry Fleet dated the twenty 
third Day of March Anno Diii 1631 appeareth) and the same 
Debts and dammages for the Deteyning thereof to recover and 
receive to my use before any his Majesties Governor or Gov- 
ernors in any Cort or Corts wheresoever or by their authority 
howsoever. And "Whereas heretofore I made a letter of At- 
torney unto George Ludlowe gent authorizing him to receive 
and recover the said Debt of the said Henry Fleete for me 
and to my use I Doe hereby also authorize and appoint the 
said Robert Harding my now Atturney for me and in my 
name to call and bring the said George Ludlowe to account 
for the same and in case he hath received the said Debt or 
any parte thereof the said Robert Harding to receive and 
recover the same of him for me and in my name and to my 
use before any his Majesties Governor or Governors in any 
Court or Corts wheresoever or by their authority howsoever 
And further I authorize and appoint my said Atturney for 
me k in my name to doe &: make any other la\\'full act or 
thing in and about the recovery and receiving of the Debt & 
Dammages aforesaid as fully and effectually as if I my selfe 

* Henry Fleet sailed from England ralty in July, 1634, allege that, by 

>n 1G31, in the employ of George Grif- authority of Sir John Harvey, Gov- 

fitli and others, proi)rietors of the bark ernor of Virginia, Fleet had restrained 

"Warwick," of London, on a voyage to the vessel and profits, to tlieir great 

New England and Virginia for trade loss (Colonial Papers, iii. 21 ; in Sains- 

aiid discovery. "Winthrop mentions bury's Calendar, i. 184 ; Winth., i. 71, 

li.T arrival at Nantasket, JIarch 14, 72). 

1C31-1632, "having been at Pascata- George Ludlow probably removed 

<i».ick and at Salem to sell com, which from Massachusetts to Virginia as early 

»l»o brought from Virginia;" April 9, as 1G31. He was there, at any rate, in 

"tho bark, with Mr. Maverick's pin- 1639, and was appointed one of Sir 

na'^'p, went out towards Virginia." The William Berkeley's Council in 1650 

I-roprietors, in a petition to the Admi- (Saiusbury's Calendar, i. 292, 340). [T.] 



80 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK, 

were present, Ratefying and allowing whatsoever my said 
Attorney shall lawfully Do in the premises. In witnesse A:c. 
30. Maij 1G39. 

A Coppy of the bill aforesaid testyfied before John Win- 
throp Governor. 30 Maij prd. [Is. 8.] 

William CockerclP of Hingham ffishcrman, pit. William 
Cockerham of the same, mariner, deft, in a mixt accon. 4. 4. 
1639. The Plaintiffe sheweth & complayneth that the ffree- 
men of Hingham aforesaid did in or about the sixth moneth 
in the yeare of our Lord, 1037, by their ioynt consent and 
generall vote assigue and allot out unto this Pltilfe. fewer 
acres of ground lying at a place called Broadcove in Hingham 
aforesaid next adjoyning to the lands of the Defendant there 
towards the Avcst, to have and to enjoy to him the said plaint- 
iffe ct his heircs for ever. The plaintiffe made his clayme and 
entry unto and upon the said lands in or about the sixth 
moneth of the last yearc, 1G38, and this ycarc in the first 
moneth, and since hath cndevoured to plant and build his 
dwelling house upon the said lands, but the said Defendant 
knowing hereof hath forbidden [51] and hindred the Plain- 
tiffe both in building and planting therupon hitherunto, so 
that he must buy all his come and garden fruits this yeare 
for himsclfe and his family k pay for houseroome els where, 
and is otherwise hindred & damnifyed to the summe of twenty 
pounds for w*=^ as well as for the said lands he brings his 
suit. [Is.] 

William Sprague of Hingham, Planter, plaintiff & Thomas 
Clap of the same Towne, Planter, defendt. 4. 4. 1639, in an 
action ui)on the case. 

The plaintiffe complayneth that whereas upon the twenty 
fifth day of the third moneth of this yeare, 1039, he was 
poss'd of one good milch Cowe of the age of twelve yeares, 
the Defendant had also another Cow w^ was wont to push 

1 Strangely enough, Cockerell and had made up the whole business out of 
Cockerham are hoth known characters ; his head. Little is known of them, 
though it would seem as if Lechford however. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 81 

and goare cattle and thereof the defendant had notice and 
warning, but the Defendant did not restraine his said Cowe, 
see that on the said twenty fifth day of the said third 
moncth last past the defeudts said Cowe did goare the plain- 
tiffs said cowe so that her gutts and bowells fell out and 
licr belly being thrust through, to his dammage 201, ^-ch ^j-^^ 
Defendt. hath not rendrcd unto the pit. although he hath ben 
required the same, and therupon the pit. brings his suit.^ 

Thomas ^Moulton of Charlestowne, fisherman, aged about 
30 yeares maketh oath that one Batman dwelling by the river 
of Saco on or about the last day of the first monetli Anno 
Dili. 1638, did place his daughter Margery Batman servant 
unto Henry Lawrence of Charlestowne ffisherman, w*** him to 
Dwell ik, serve for the space of five yeares from that time to 
be complcate and ended, for the w*^^ service the said Henry 
Lawrence was to deliver unto the said Batman, her father, one 
she-goate for the benefit of the said Margery, at Charles 
Towne aforesaid, and therupon the said Batman the ffather 
Did deliver the said Margery to the said Henry, at Sacoe river 
aforesaid, to be brought to Charlestowne aforesayd, on or 
about the last day of the first moncth aforesayd, and accord- 
ingly the said Henry [52J Lawrence brought the said Margery 
unto his house at Charlestowne where she remayned w'*^ him 
about a quarter of a yeare and no longer, and then the said 
Batman the ffather came to Charlestowne aforesaid and tooke 
his said daughter from the said Henry Lawrence againe, why 
the sayd Depon't Doth not knowe, and the said Batman hath 
since placed his said daughter w'" one Elias Parke since 
dwelling at Kenecticot. And whereas the said Henry Law- 
rence Doubted to receive and carry her the said Marg. away, 
for feare she should be a servant to some body, the said Bat- 
man bid tlie said Henry Lawrence not to feare, for that he the 
said Batman would discharge him of any trouble or dammage 

' From a later entry in the Note- suit, on the ground of IIt. Sprague's 
^k (p. 113), it would seem as if tliere fences being in a bad state of repair; 
DiigUt have been some defence in this but such matters are for conjecture only. 



82 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



that should come upon him for carrying the said Margery 
away, if it should cost him forty pounds. And the said Henry 
Lawrence did provide and give the said Margery some 
cloathcs, but of what value this depont knoweth not.^ [Is.] 

4:4:1639 

John Lawrence of Cliarlestowne,^ fisherman, aged about 
twenty foure yeares maketh oath that Szc againe because his 
said ffatlier would not give him the said Batman 4\ in money 
instead of the said she-goate, w*^^ was contrary to the first 
agreement, and &c. 

Thomas Hett of Hingham, Cowper, Pltiffe, Thomas Shave ^ 
late of the same, planter, defend*. In an accon of trespas 



1 This and the following depositions 
probably relate to a matter noticed in 
the Colony Records. At a Quarter 
Court at Boston, June 4, 1639, " Henry 
Laurence was for the p''scnt discharged 
about Cajjt. Bonito his servant" {Mass. 
Records, i. 265). With a mark of 
contraction over the final o, Captain 
Bonito may stand for Richard Bouy- 
thon, or Bonighton, of Saco, and a 
magistrate there in 1636; and it may 
be inferred that Margery Batman — 
brought from Saco by Henry Lawrence 
in 1638 — was claimed by Captain Bo- 
nython as his servant by prior inden- 
ture or agreement. 

There was a Stephen Batson at Saco 
in 1636, who had a daughter Margeiy : 
he removed to Cape Porpus in 1653 
(Folsom, Ifistonj of Saco, pp. 33, 124). 
Possibly the two names indicate the 
same man ; but whether Batman or 
Batson is correct I have no means of 
deciding. ^lore may be found of JIoul- 
ton iu another connection, post, p. 152, 
[T.] 

2 John Lawrence, "of Charlcstown " 
in 1639, is shown to be the son of Henry 
Lawrence of the .same town. There 
can be no doubt of his identity with 



John La\vrence of Watertown, 1636- 
1662, afterwards of Groton ; and his age 
at the time of deposing, refers his birth 
to the year 1614 or 1615. The Lawrence 
Genealogy ( Bond's JFaiertoicn, pp. lOSO- 
lOSl) proves John Lawrence, who was 
"in New England" Jvily, 1639, to have 
been a son of Henry Lawrence, of Wis- 
set, Co. Suffolk, England, " supposed 
to be the Henry Lawrence of Charles- 
town, as early as 1635, who died between 
1 638 and 1647." But the same genealogy 
shows that one John, son of Henry, 
was baptized at AVisset, Oct. 8, 1609, 
and a brother, Robert, baptized Sept. 
16, 1612. The discrepancy in ages 
thus indicated may be reconciled by 
supposing the John whose date of bap- 
tism is given in the genealogy to have 
died young, and that John of "Water- 
town was a second sou of the same 
name, two or three years younger than 
his brother Robert, who remained in 
England. [T.] 

3 "Thomas Shaw, Hingham, 1637, 
removed before 1643 to Barnstable. . . . 
Some liave written the name Shave " 
(Savage). This declaration shows that 
Sh.ave had removed from Hingham 
before June 4, 1639 ; probably shortly 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 83 

upon the case, 4. 4. 1639. The Plaintiffe complayneth that 
whereas a certaine parcel of meadow or marish ground coii- 
tcyning five acres or neare therabouts lying in Hinghani afore- 
said, was heretofore wrongfully deteyned by the towncsmen of 
tlie said Towne from the Defend' upon conference therof had 
by and betweene the said Plaintiffe <fc Defend' on or about the 
first day of the fifth moneth in the yeare 1637, at Hingham 
aforesaid. The said Defend' did promise the Plaintiffe that in 
. consideration he would help the defend' in obteyning the said 
lands againe into his possession that he the Defend' would 
give the pl'tifTe [53J the one halfe of the sayd lands to have 
and to enjoy to him and his heires for ever. And the pl'tiffe 
saith that indeed he did help the Defend' in obteyning the said 
lands againe into his possession & he hath since enjoyed the 
same and taken the proffits thereof above the space of one 
yeare last past. Notw"»standing the Defend' not regarding 
liis promise aforesaid but intending to defraud the said pltiffe 
of the one halfe of the said lands & the profits thereof, hath 
refused to give the said one halfe of the said lands to the 
Pl'tiffe but hath taken the proffitts therof wholly to himselfe 
Although the Pit. Did on or about the last Day of the fifth 
moneth of the yeare 1638 last past require the Defendt. to 
performe his said promise unto him this Plaintiffe. To the 
Dammage of the Plaintiffe lOl, and thereupon he brings 
this suit. [Is. Jonathan Bosworth &, Benjamin Bosworth 
witnesses for the Pit.] 

Thomas Hett of Hingham, Cowper, pit. ) ;,, ^ ,eal accon 
JOHN TosE of the same, planter, Defendant S 4. 4. 1639. 

The Pit. sheweth that whereas Thomas Shave late of Hing^ 
ham aforesaid, planter, did on or about the tenth Day of 
the first moneth, Anno Diii 1637, give unto the Plaintiffe the 
one halfe of a certaine parcell of meadow or marish ground 
conteyning five acres or neare therabouts lying in Hing- 
ham aforesaid. Now the said Defend' claymeth and holdeth 

l>crore that date, as the word ''late" waa interUned before "of HiDfrham," after 
the first draft. 



84 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

possession of all the said lands and rcfuseth to let the pltiffe. 
"have & enjoy the said one halfe of the said lands <fe profhts 
thereof. And for the enjoyment of the said halfe of the said 
lands the Plaintiffe brings his suit. [Is. Witnesses afores*^.] 

[54] Jonathan Bosvrorth ^ of Hingham, taylor, aged about 
26 yeares, maketh oath that Thomas Shave about the begin- 
inge of the fifth moneth 1G37 upon occasion of conference 
betweene him & this Deponent about a parcell of ground in 
Hingham conteyning about 5 acres then kept from him told this 
depoiit that he had promised to give halfe thcrof to Thomas 
Hett for to help him to obteyne the possession of the said 
ground and at another time this deponent was present when 
the said Thomas Het and Thomas Shave talked together of 
the said promise wherof this deponent remembreth this pas- 
sage that Thomas Hett asked the said Thomas Shave whether 
he would be as good as his word, he sayd yes. Then sayd 
Thomas Hett you are like to have yo' ground againe but 
when you have it againe I doubt you will be unwilling to let 
me have halfe of it Noe said Thomas Shave you shall have the 
one halfe if ever I get it and I shall be glad of the other halfe. 

Benjamin Bosworth ^ of Hingham .planter aged about 24 
yeares maketh oath that Thomas Shave about the begin- 
ning of the fifth moneth 1637 upon occasion of conference 
betweene him and this Depoiit about a parcell of ground in 
Hingham conteyning about 5 acres then kept from him the 
said Thomas told this Depoiit that he had promised to give 
Thomas Hett halfe therof for to help him recover the same 
and the said Thomas Shave said further that when he did get 
the said ground Thomas Het should have halfe of it w*^ 
heart &: good will and that he the said Thomas Shave should 
be glad of the rest himselfe tfe prase God for it. [6c?.] 

. 1 Benjamin, Jonathan, and (as I in- and probably sons of Edvrard, who 

fer from an entry on a subsequent page, died on his passage to New England, 

as well as from Mass. Col. Jlcc, i. 152) or before July, 1635. 
Nathaniel Bosworth were brothers, 



LECH FORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 85 



[55] To the Right Wor^^ the Croverno^, Councill and Assist- 
ants of the Jurisdiccon of the diassachusetts bay in New 
England, ^' to the generall Court there assembled, 6. 4. 1639- 

The humble petition of Thomas Cornell ^ of Boston In- 
keeper. 

Sheweth that whereas in the winter tyme when provisions 
were Deare & scarce and yo' petitioner had much losse by his 
small beare by the frost, he did sell some stronger beere w'^'* 
he was at cost to preserve from the frost by fire, for the ne- 
cessary use of strangers, unto some others, for 2d. a quarte, 
and did since draw out about a rundlct of sacke in his house, 
not knowing any law to the contrary, seing W. Fortescue 
told him that he had liberty to Draw by the gallon, or 2 or 3 
gallons, yo'' petitioner hoping that he might so Doc & save 
himselfe a labour of sending to the taverne. But seeing yo' 
petitioner now understandeth that these things are against 
the lawes, he is very sorry for his offences and all other offen- 
ces that have been taken notice of by the Court, beseeching 
you to consider that some miscarriages may passe in such an 
house against his will and w'^out his knowledge, but he hath 
ben hitherto carefuU and shall hereafter Godwilling be more 
carefull to keepe a good conscience in the said place if you 
shall please to continue him therein, if not he shalbe ready 
to leave the same as saone as he can get a chapman for his 
house, for that he hath not ben heretofore accustomed to 

^ Thomas Cornell, or Cornhill, as ing entry in the records of the Quarter 

has been before mentioned, was the Court, June 4, 1639, shows the occa- 

successor of "William Balston in the sion of this petition. " Thomas Corne- 

Becoud of the two inns or ordinaries hill was fined £30 for severall offences, 

licensed iu Boston before 1639 (see selling wine wti^out license, and beare 

note on p. 31, ante). With consent at 2^ a quart. Hee had warning the 

of the townsmen, Aug. 20, 1638, he lO^l^ 4'*" mo" (Mass. Col. Rec, i. 266). 

bought Mr. Balston's house, j-ards, gar- On the sixth of June the Court abated 

den, and one close "on the backside £10 of his fine and respited the re- 

of Mr. Coddington's," — one acre, more mainder ; but provided that he should 

or less, — two acres in the Mill Field, "cease from keeping intertainment, and 

three at Hog Island, and eighty at the town to provide another" (Ibid., 

Mount Wollaston (Town Records, i. p. 260). [T.] 
35 ; Suf. Deeds, L 26). The follow- 



86 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

such a liousekeeping and these are his first offences and his 
first warning. 

All W*^'' Considered yo*" petitioner humbly prayeth the Co'* 
to be pleased to remit his fiinc lately imposed upon him by 
the Court of Assistants for the said offences, and as long as 
he continueth in the said housekeeping he promiseth by the 
help of God to be careful! not to offend in such things or in 
any other, and shall as his duty bynds him pray for your 
long life & prosperity & the whole State. \_2s. Qd.^ 

A Coppy of a Deed betweene Mathew Allyn of Kenecticot, 
gent, and Margaret his wife/ of the one parte, and Thomas 
Allyn of Barnstable in the County of Devon, yeoman, of the 
other parte, Dated 17. 10. 1038. being a Conveyance of lands 
in Devonshire to the said Thomas. [3s.] 

Me Mathew' Allyn De Hartforde super flumen de Kenecticot, 
in America gen. toner' &c. Thome Allyn in duobus millc 
libris (fcc. Dat' 6. 3. 1639. 

The condition of this obligation is such that if the above- 
bounden ^^lathew Allyn and Margaret his wife, and their 
heires, shall from time to time and at all times hereafter 
well and truly observe performe &, keepe all such grants 
Covenants & agreements as are menconed and [56] ex- 
pressed in one payre of Indentures dated the seaventeenth 
day of December last past before the date of these presents, 
made betweene the said Mathew Allyn and Margaret his wife 
of. the one parte and the abovcnamed Thomas Allyn of the 
other parte w*''' on the parte & behalfe of the said Mathew 
Allyn and Margaret his wife and their heires are to be ob- 
served, performed and kept, And if the said Mathew Allyn 
and Margaret his wife shall Doe and execute all such further 

1 Mathew Allyn was at Cambridge and 1664. The lands granted to Tho- 

inl632. He removed to Hartford, where mas Allyn, of P.ani.staple, Devonshire, 

he had a considerable allotment in the were probably the same, "in Bowport 

first division of lands, but soon after Street," which Thomas Allyn, then of 

settled at "Windsor. He was an assist- Barnstable in New England, sold in 

ant from IG.'JS to 1G67, and a commis- 1641 to John Eells, of Dorcliester (see 

sioner for the United Colonies in 1660 copy of the conveyance, post, p. 227). 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 8. 

assurances as by the said Indentures they have covenanted 
to Doe so that they be not required for the Doing thereof to 
travell out of the Jurisdiccon of Kenecticot plantation above- 
said and so that the said assurances be tcndred unto them 
w'^'in the space of seaven yeares next ensuing the date here- 
of then this obligation shall be voyd and of none effect or els 
shall remaine & be in full power strength & vertue. [3s.] 

Boston ix New England 7" Junii 1639. 
At thirty Days after sight of this my first bill of exchange 
my second or third not being payd, be pleased to pay unto Mf 
Richard Hutchinson of London, Linnen Draper, Dwelling at 
the sign of the Angell and Starre in Cheapsyde, or his as- 
signcs, the summe of one hundred pounds of Currant money 
of England, for so much received here of Mf John Cogan ^ of 
Boston in New England merchant. I pray make good pay- 
ment and place it to account according to advice, 

for me, James Forrett.^ 



To the right Hon^Je the Earle 
of Starling Secretary for the 
Kingdom of Scotland, at his 
house in Covent Garden in Midd. [Is. 6J.] 



[57] A Paper of Certain Propositions^ to the general Cort 
made upon request 8. 4. 1639. 

1. It were good that all accons betweene party es were en- 
trcd in the Court booke by the Secretary before the Courte 
sittes. 

1 John Cogan. See note on p. 138, inson, the ironmonger in Cheapside. 
post. Forrett returned to England in 1641 

2 James Forrett, agent of William, (see jrinth., ii. 4, 5; Conn. Col. Ecc., 
F^rl of Stirling, for his patent of Long ii. 93, note). 

Island, was in Boston in 1639, as 3 Though these propositions of 

ai.i«.-ar3 by this bill, drawn on his em- Lechfoid— looking to his employment 

plover, in favor of Richard Hutchin- as "publick notary" — were not adopt- 

*>on, brother of William, of Boston and ed, they may have led to the passage 

Xiwjwrt, and uncle of Richard Hutch- (at the next session of the Geueral 



88 LECHFORD'S MA.VUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

2. That every accon be declared in writing and the De- 
fendts answer general or speciall as the case shall require be 
put in writing by a Public Notary before the cause be heard. 

3. The Secretary to take the verdits & make forth the iudi- 
cial commands or writts. 

4. The public notary to Record all the proceedings in a faire 
booke and to enter satisfaccons acknowledged and executions 
or commands done. 

5. The i!ees in all these to be no more then in an inferiour 
Court of Record in England w*^ fees to be allowed by the 
generall Court or Court of Assistants. 

The hejiefit hereof to the puhlicke good. 

1. It will give an easy and quicke dispatch to all causes for 
thereby the Court and Jury will quickly see the pohit in hand ' 
and accordingly give their verdict <fc judgmt. 

2. The Court shall the better knowe constantly how to judge 
the same things : and it is not possible that Judges from time 
to time should allwayes remember clcarely or know to proceed 
certainly w'^'out a faithfull record. 

3. The partyes may hereby more surely and clcarely obteyne 
their right for through ignorance k passion men may quickly 
wrong one another in their bare words without a record. 

4. Hereby shall the Law of God and justice be Duly admin- 
istred to the people according to certainc and unchangeable 

- rules so that they may know what is the Law and what riglit 
they may looke for at the mouthes of all their Judges. 

5. Hereby the subjects have a greate parte of their evi- 
dences and assurances for their proprieties both of lands & 
goods. 

The people may also use the puhlicke notary in Divers 
cases to the ease of the Magistrates and for making severall 
writings &c. 

Court), in September, 1639, of a law posterity," and also prov-iding for the 

requiring "that henceforward every record of wills, inventories, etc., and of 

judgment, w^ all the evidence, bee lands {^Mass. Col. Ilcc, L 275, 276J. 

recorded in a booke, to bee kept to [T.] 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 89 



{^Beloiu is the following note, in cipher: — ] 

The Court was willing to bestow employment upon me, 
but they said to me that tlicy could not doe it for feare of 
ofTciiding the Churches, because of my opinions. Whcre- 
u])on I thought good to propose unto them as followeth 
over leaf : — 

[58] Certaine proposicons to the generall Co% 11. 4. 1639. 

"Whereas I have delivered that prophesying in the Church 
is properly k therefore ought to be maincly of propheticall 
scriptures, and that Apostles, Evangelists & Prophets ought 
to be continued as well and as long as Pastors & Teach- 
ers, or any other the undoubted officers by vertue of the Insti- 
tution, Some apostles., some prophets tfcc, and that it is probable 
there shall come yet a greater Antichrist then ever hath 
bin, <tc. 

1. I Doe not refuse Church Communion w*^ any that hold 
the contrary. 

2. If the Elders upon perusall of my bookes <t hearing 
me will give their censure and reasons in writing or otherwise 
against the maigne propositions in my bookes, if they cannot 
satisfy me so far as to recant yet I shall be content to be 
silent. 

3. If the Elders upon perusall of my bookes <fc hearing 
luc can convince me of error in the maigne propositions, I 
shall be ready to retract, yea, to burne my bookes. 

4. If the State & the Elders thinke that the matters I 
trcate on are not tanti^ or that they are just occasion of Dis- 
turbance, I shall be content they will advise of them 12. 
moncths or more, w^'' silence on my parte During that space 
f^aving to the Elders and cheife men, provided that T may have 
unployment to subsist among you, and in the meane while be 

The manuscript is seemingly plaiu ; but this woid ta^Ui is curiously 
cliosen, [T.] 



90 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



admitted to the privileges of God's house ; for that all I write 
may be held or not held salvafide, as I conceive. W^'^all Due 
submission to this hono"® Co'''. 

Yo' humble suppliant 

Tho: Lechford. 

[^ITie folloiving is in cipher, except the first four words.'\ 

A Draught of reasons for 3 deputies to be sent from each 
town to the General Court : A sheet of paper : At the request 
of MT Bellinghami : 19. 4. 1639. [0-0.] 

Coppy of a bill or letter of Attorney to Mf Rob* Harding 
to receive 4^ 15f of George Ludlowe ^ for Richard Callacott. 
Dated 19. 4. 1639. [8c?.] 

\^This in cipher.'] 

Received of M!^ Glover ^ in May or the beginning of the 
month of June, 1639. [10s.] 



1 The name of Bellingham is writ- 
ten in the cipher — in accordance with 
its popular pronunciation of the period — 
as Bcllingc'm (with g soft). [T.] 

It appears from this entry by Lech- 
ford that Jlr. Bellingham — though 
himself one of the assistants — was 
opposed to the order of March, 1639, 
by which towns were prohibited from 
sending more than two deputies, and 
which "occasioned some to fear that 
the magistrates intended to make them- 
selves stronger and the deputies weak- 
er, and so, in time, to bring all power 
into the liands of the magistrates ; so 
as the i>eople in some towns were much 
displeased," etc. ( JVinth., i. 300). [T.j 

Mr. Bellingham and Mr. Saltonstall, 
as Governor Winthrop comjdains, 
" held together, and joined with the 
deputies against the rest of the magis- 



trates," in "cases where any difference 
was" ( IVinth., ii. 186, 210). Yet, he 
concedes, "these gentlemen were such 
as feared God ; " and " where they 
went aside it was merely for want of 
light, or their eyes were held througli 
some temptation for a time, that they 
could not make use of the light tht-y 
had." So mild a judgment on offenders 
who "went aside" towards democracy, 
and perhaps went so far as to maintain 
the right of petition for the repeal of 
an obnoxious law, — a measure which, 
in the Governoi-'s opinion, "savored of 
resisting an ordinance of God," — is the 
highest evidence of 'his charity and 
goodness of heart [T.J 

2 George Ludlow came over in 1630, 
but returned to England very soon. 

' For Mi-s. Glover, the wife of the 
Rev. Josse Glover, see note, p. 119, post. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 91 

[■59] Articles of Agreement indented 7nade the twentieth 
Day of the fourth moneth in the year of our Lord One thou-^ 
sand six hundred thirty nyne Betweene RlCllARD CoOKE ^ of 
Boston in New Enyland, tayler, of the one parte, and Arthur 
Perry of the same, tayler, of the other parte. 

1. Imprimis, it is Covenanted, agreed, and fully concluded 
by and betweene the said jmrties to these presents, that they 
shall and will be Co-partners in the trade of Taylery, from 
the Date of these prsents for and During tlie space of seaven 
yeares thenceforth fully to be compleate and ended, if it shall 
please Almighty God that they two shall so long live. During 
all w'='^ time they shall be and continue together daylie in one 
shoppe and be at equall costs and charges in providing & 
paying for shoproome and all necessary utcnsills and things 
requisite to their said trade, and shall each of them have one 
Apprentice servant in their joynt shopp from time to time 
during the said terme of seaven yeares. 

2. Item, it is Covenanted, agreed & fully concluded by and 
betweene the said parties to these presents that all the prof- 
fitts, commodities and advantages w'^^ shall be gotten by 
them in their said trade, and by the industry and worke of 
them the said partyes to these presents, and of their Appren- 
tice servants therein During the said terme of seaven yeares 
shall be equally Due and be divided and parted from time to 
time unto and betweene the said parties to these presents. 

3. Item, further it is Covenanted agreed and fully concluded 
by and betweene the said partyes to these presents that neither 

1 Richard Cooke and Arthur Perry, been appointed in 163S with a salary of 

tho tailors, had, in 1645 or earlier, two £5 for "drumming to the company on aU 

houses on School Street. Whether their occasions." Later, however, he agreed 

partnership had by that time dissolved, to " give his Best diligence in Teaching 

or whether they still did their business George Clifford and Nathaniel Newgate 

in one shop, I cannot say. Cooke was in all the skill and use of the drum 

later known as a military man, being of needfull to all common service in mili- 

the Artillery Company, and rising in tary ainiyres." And this agreement I 

1656 to the rank of lieutenant. As for suppose he carried out ; for in a year or 

I'erry, his rank was more humble. He two he ceased from di-umming, — at least 

was at this time town drummer, and in public, 
licld the place for some yeai-s. He had 



92 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-DOOK. 

of them shall in their said trade Doe nor permit to be done by 
their said servants anything w^^out the assent & consent of 
each other of them the said pties to these piTits, During the 
said terme. 

4. Item, It is Covenanted agreed and fully concluded by 
and betweene the said partyes to these p'^sents that in the 
case of sicknesse or other necessary occasion of absence of 
them the said parties to these presents from their said joynt 
shopp during the said terme, if the said absence shall be by 
the space of a Day or more, that then the one of the said par- 
ties shall allowe unto the other xij'? for every Dayes absence 
of each other. 

In witnesse kc. Coram Johe' Cogan <fc meipo. [2s. 6J.] 

Articles about a bargaine betweene Lieutenant Richard 
Morris 1 and Mf Richard Parker for 7000 of clapboards 
pypestavcs at 181 p millc, to be Dd at Pascattaquay any time 
after the last Day of the 5'^ moneth. Dated 20. 4. 1639. 
Coram me. [4s. GcZ.] 

[60] Be it knowne unto all men by these presents that I 
Mary Fayrcweather^ of Boston, widdowe, in consideration of 
my naturall love and good affection that I beare unto my 
Sonne John Fayreweather, Doe hereby give and graunt unto 
the said John the one halfe of all my lands Ijing in Pullin- 
point necke ^ and Hogg Island, w*^ the appurtenances, equally 

1 Richard Morris was a militaiy man Point Neck, Jan. 8, 1637 ( Tmcn Rec- 

from Iloxliury. He had been disarmed, ords, i. 30). He died late in 1638 

in 1637, with others of tlie Hutchinson (S'tvage). John, his son, — who in 

party, and liad gone to Exeter with Mr. 1689 was made commander of the cas- 

Wheelwright, and is met with fre- tie after it was surrendered by An- 

quently in the Kotc-hook, in transac- dros, — was bom (about) September, 

tions like the present. Eichard Bulgar, 1634 ; and so was not five years old at 

also a ftoxbury man, who was disarmed, the date of this deed of gift. A revised 

went at first to Rhode Island, but after- draft of this deed of gift, with addi- 

•wards to Jfaine, where he is met with tional provisos, is found on another 

in connection with ilorris later in the page. [T.] For John Evered, alias 

Kotc-book. "Webb, or John Webb, alias Evered, 

* Widow of Thomas Fayerweather, see pp. 138, 224, p>s<. 
an early settler, who had an "allot- ^ PuUin Point (now Point Shirley, 

ment " in the division of lands at Pullin Chelsea) was so called, as Wood informs 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 93 

to be Dcvidcd, To have & to hold the said one halfe of the 
said lands unto him the said John Fayrcwcathcr his heires 
and assignes for ever. And I doe hereby grannt unto the said 
John Fayroweathcr that I and the said John shall & will 
stand seized of the other halfe of ' my said lands unto the use 
of myselfe for my life and afterwards to the use of such 
child and children that shall be lawfully begotten betwecne 
me and John Everct als. Webb whomc I intend by the grace 
of God to take to my husband, and the heires of such childe 
or children for cvf and for default of such issue to the use of 
the said John Fayrewcathcr, his heires and assignes for ever. 
And lastly, I Doe hereby give and graunt unto the said John 
Fayreweather one heyfer of two yeares old, To have and to 
liold the said heyfer unto the said John Fayreweather his 
executors administrators & assignes for ever. In witnesse 
whereof I have hereunto set my hand &, scale the twenty first 
Day of the fourth moncth. Anno Dmi. 1639. [2s. 4.] 

Copie of a grant of Powderhornc Hill ^ by Henry Vane 
Esq! to William Brampton gent. Dated 2. 1638 [sic]. [6<i.] 

Vincent Potter ^ gent. Ijjlaces .?] and John Johnson places 
himselfe unto Daniel Pierce of Watertowne, blacksmith, for 
9 ycarcs from this Day for 12^, double apparell, & 5^. Coram 
me ct Duobus aliis testibus. [2s. 60?.] 

This Indenture etc. Dated 25. 4. 1639. 

[T7ie next two entries are in sJiort-hand.'] 

Received of Mr Hibbins 25. 4. 1639. [10s.] 

Received of Mr Bellingham for loan or gift \_illegihle'\, which 
I please; but if [it] please God that I am able [illegille']^ I 
intend to pay him. [11.] 

ns, because those who passed it in ance to "William Brampton (Brenton?) 

••oats, when the tide was strong, "are was probably executed in England. [T.J 
fonstrayned to goe ashore, and hale 2 Vincent Potter came in "1635, 

their boates by the sealing, or roades " aged 21, was next year a soldier at the 

(y^w England: s ProsjKd, ^. A^). [T.] castle" {Savage). See later in the i\'(?i<;- 

* In Chelsea, where Vane was one of hook, pp. 65, 119. 
the largest proprietors. This convey- 



94 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



[61] Articles of Agreement Indented made the ffoiverteenth 
Day of the second moneth Anno Dfii One thousand six hun- 
dred thirty and nyne Betiveene "William Tyng of Boston 
in Hew England^ merchant^ of the one parte, And John 
Reade^ of Waymouth in New England Planter, of the 
other parte, in manner and forme folloiving. 

It is Covenanted, agreed and fully concluded by and be- 
tweene the said partyes to these presents, Imprimis, that the 
said John Rcade shall and will occupy e and enjoy all that the 
said William Tyng's ffarme house and ffarme at Mount Wol- 
laston called Salter's ffarme, w*^ all the appurtenances lately 
by him purchased of William Coddington late of Boston,^ 
gent., from the Day of the Date hereof for and During the 
space of Tenne yeares thenceforth next ensuing, fully to be 
compleate and ended. 

2. ItiTi, that the said William Tyng shall and will stocke 
the said house <fc farme to the hand of the said John 
Reade, in manner following, that is to say, w*^ tenne milch 
cowes, tenne heyfers of two yeares old a peece, tenne heyfers 
of one yeare old a peece, ten cowe calves, One bull of two 
yeares old and one bull calfe, Tenne Oxen, fower mares, One 
stoned colt of a yeare old, twenty ewe goats. One goate 
ramme, three sowes, One boare, eight store swyne, One cocke, 
tenne hennes, One turkey cocke, two turkey hennes, One 
gander, four geese. One Drake and fowre Ducks. 

3. Itiii, that the said John Reade shall and will keep and 
improve all the said live stocke upon the premises as near as 
may be from time to time During the said termc of tenne 
yeares. And that the said John Rcade shall ct will w'^'in 
15 moneths next after the date hereof build or cause to be 
built at his proper costs & charges on the premises, One 
barne of seaventy fowre feete in length and forty feete in 
breadth and convenient heigth proportionable, taking all 

^ John Reade had been of Dorchester, but was now a man of property and 
influence in Weymouth. 

2 See pp. 36-40, aiite. [T.] 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 95 

such matcrialls that will serve thereunto upon the lands 
belonging to the said farrae. 

4. Item, that the said John Iteade shall and will from time 
to time during the said terme at his proper costs & charges 
well & sufficiently repayre, maintaine uphold & keepc the 
said ffarme house <fe Barn & all outhouses to the said ffarrae 
belonging and all fences & increase fences and the garden 
thereunto belonging and the fruit trees thereon with all 
needful k necessary reparacons hedges pales fences mounds & 
ditches and the same so well <fc sufficiently repayred main- 
tained upheld & kept shall k will leave & yield up in the end 
of the said terme unto the said William Tynge, 

5. Item, that the sayd John Reade shall and may have & 
take in & upon the premises wood & timber for reparations 
of the said farme houses & barne & outhouses fences and all 
needfull k necessary hcdgboote, gateboote, palcboote <fe fire- 
boote not Doing any voluntary wast upon the said premises 
from time to time During the said terme. 

6. Itm, that the said John Reade shall and will fynd <fe pro- 
vide sufficient seed corne for the premises this present yeare 
And shall & will from time to tymc During the said terme, 
finde & provide all necessary ploughes, ploughshares, carts, 
harnesses for the same, Dayrie implements, cythes, axes, 
hatchets, hammers, mattocks, pickaxes, spades, slio veils, 
rakes, saws, wedges, and all other necessary utensils for the 
managing of the said ffarme & stocke k the increase thereof. 

7. Itin, that the said William Tyng in the end of the said 
terme shall k will buy of the sayd John Reade the ploughes 
ploughshares carts harnesses for the same dayrie implements 
cythes axes hatchetts hammers mattocks pickaxes spades 
shovells rakes sawes wedges k all other necessary uten- 
sills used and bought by the said John Reade for the man- 
aging of the premises at such reasonable rates k prizes as 
tliey shall ])e valued at by two indifferent men betwecne the 
said partyes to be chosen or by the arbitrators in these 
presents named. 

8. Item, tliat the said John Reade shall k will from time 
to tyme kcepe seaven men servants able for their severall 



96 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

imploymcnts and Wo able mayd servants, and that lie shall 
and will imployc his ownc labour and industry and the labor 
and industry of all his said servants for the improvement of 
the said ffarme and live stocke w''' its increase During the 
sayd terme, 

9. ItiTi, that the sayd John Rcade shall not nor will put on 
nor receive any other cattell, swyne or poultrey of his owne 
or of any other p''son or persons to be fedd or kept upon the 
premises, w*^out the consent of the said William Tyng, and 
then the said William Tyng shall have halfe the profits for 
keeping and feeding of all such other cattell, swyne or 
poultry. 

10. ItiTi, that the said John Reade shall k ynW breake up 
and improve w'^ the plough and plant or sowe eight acres of 
the arrable ground of the premises that hath not ben formerly 
broken up or ploughed, planted or sowen formerly, every 
yeare During the said terme. ' . :, 

11. Itm, that the said John Reade shall not nor will give, 
sell or carry any hay or strawe off the premises to the value 
of five shillings p annu, w'^out the consent of the sayd Wil- 
liam Tyng. 

[62] 1 12. Item, that the said John Reade shall & will lay 
or cause to be layd all the compost, manure or Dung w*^*^ shall 
be made there on the premises in husbandly manner where 
most need shall be from time to time During the said 
terme. 

\A? Itiii, that the first tenne heyfers of the said stocke that 
shall come to the payle shall be kept for stocke, and if any of 
them faylc, the said number to be made up out of the said 
stockes increase from time to time ever after during the 
sayd terme, and in the end thereof to be equally Divided 
between the sayd partyes. 



1 It may seem that tlie paging here position in the page. The page-marks 

is very irregular. This arises from the have been set in where they occur; but in 

fact that the articles in the present the case of pp. 62-64 they mean but 

agreement have been printed accord- little, as the articles have been very 

ing to the order indicated by the num- generally transferred. 
bering i-athcr than according to their ^ There is no item numbered 13. [T.] 



LECTIFORD'S .MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 97 

15. Itm, that the increase of the said stoekc & bcnefitts & 
jtroilitts of the said farrae siiall equally belong unto & be di- 
vided unto and bct\vecne the said partyes from time to tyme 
During the said terme in manner & forme herein expressed. 

[63 ] 1(3. Item, that the said John Rcade shall & will from 
time to time during the said terme upon one moneths warn- 
ing give an account in writing under his hand, unto the 
said William Tyng of all increase and decrease of the said 
stocke. 

17. Itih, that the increase of the sayd stocke & proffits 
of the said farme shall from time to tyme during the said 
terme be divided, as the sayd partyes shall cither of them 
require of the other upon one moneth's warning: so that 
none of the said cattell of the increase of the said stocke 
shall be divided till they breed or be wayed in the yoake, nor 
shall the corne be divided till it be brought into the barne & 
threshed, & then to be divided by the bushell. 

18. Jtiii, that upon every dividend the continuing stocke 
shall be made good if any fayle from time to tyme Duringe 
the sayd terme out of the said stocke's increase, saving that 
if any parte of the said stocke Dye or fayle through the 
wilfull default of tha said John Read then he shall forthwith 
make good & repaire the same at his owne costs & charges. 

19. Itrn, that from time to tyme during the said terme 
upon every dividend, the said William Tyng shall have lib- 
erty to appoint what cattell, horses mares or swyne shall be 
kept for the standing and continuing stocke. 

20. Itiu, that the sayd John Rcade shall in the end of the 
^ayd terme leave ct yield up unto the said Willm Tyng the 
said farme fully stocked in such manner & kind as the said 
John Read receiveth the same from the said William Tyng. 

21. Itiu, that the said John Reade shall forbear to fell such 
trees about the said farm house as the said William Tynge 
shall direct. 

22. Itiu, that the said John Read shall not nor will have 
any dealing in any other farm or trade during the said terme, 
except his letting & [64] setting his farm at Weymouth, 
^V'^out the consent of the sayd Win Tyng. 



98 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-DOOK. 

23. Itm, that the said John Reade shall not nor will durintr 
the said termo do or suffer to be Done anything to the breach 
of any of the articles of agreement or Covenants made be- 
tween the said WilhTi Tyng and M^ Coddington a coppy ^ 
whereof the said John Reade hath in liis custody. 

24. Itin, that the sayd John Reade shall and will from time 
to time during the sayd terme pay all towne rates for Mount 
WoUaston charged upon the said farme or his person, but 
all other rates for the sayd farme shall be payd out of the 
increase of the sayd stocke & pTits of the said farme. 

25. Itili, that the said Partyes shall equally have and enjoy 
the improvements and profitts of tt by the said servants, 
ploughs carts k teames, to be equally Divided with the in- 
crease of the sayd stocke from time to time During the said 
terme. 

26. Itiii, the sayd William Tyng shall and will from time to 
time during the sayd terme pay halfe the charges for hire and 
maintenance of workmen or women, when any shall be hired 
& employed over and above the sayd servants, as need shall 
require for planting, reaping, mowing and making of hay. 

27. Itin, that the sayd John Rcado shall and will from time 
to time during the said terme allow unto the sayd AVilliam 
Tyng lodging and Dyet for liimself Sc horsemeat & stable- 
roome for his horse when he shall come to the sayd farme to 
survey the same, make a dividend or for any other occasions 
Vi'^^ he shall have liberty to doe at one or more times in the 
yeare, for the space of one moneth in the yeare, yearely During 
the sayd terme and at these tymes he shall have the use of 
the chamber w*=^ M^ Coddington used to lye in for his lodging. 

28. Itin, that the said William Tynge shall have liberty 
from time to time During the sayd term to fell, cut, saw, hew 
<fe carry away any wood tymber, trees, boards, planks, pales 
or other wood things whatsoever leaving sufficient tymber 
trees k wood for the mayntenance of the sayd farme. 

29. ItiTi, that the sayd Willm Tyng shall have liberty to 
erect k build one watermill on the premises for the use of 
him k his assignes and to make dammes, floodgates or pooles 

1 See pp. 39, 40, ante. [T.] 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 99 

for that end, and to lay two acres of ground tliereto, and 
shall have free ingrcsse, egrcsse &, regrcsse for him & his 
assigncs and those that shall grindo their corne therein into 
and from the same mill Avhen it shall be set up & built, the 
said William Tynge or his assignes from time to time During 
the sayd terme after the said mill shall be erected & built 
grinding the corne of the said John Readc for the said farme 
house keeping, or allowing yearoly unto the said John Reade 
what the grinding of fifty bushells of corne shall be worth. 

30. Itiu, that if the said William Tyng shall hereafter at 
any time during the said terme be necessitated to sell the said 
ilarme house & farme, then the said John Readc for fifty 
pounds to be payd him in hand, upon six raoncths warning, 
shall & will surrender & redeliver unto the sayd Willm 
Tyng the said farme house & farme Sc stocke, w''' his parte of 
the dividend, increase & profitts thereof. 

31. Itiu, that if the sayd Willm Tyng shall hereafter at any 
time during the sayd terme be disposed to sell the said farme 
house and farme for his ownc profit & advantage, then the 
said John Rcade for one hundred ]iounds to be payd him in 
hand upon six moneths warning shall & will surrender unto 
the said- William Tyng the sayd farme house & farme & 
stocke w*"^ all his parte of tlie dividend, increase Sc profitts 
thereof. 

32. Item, that in case any difference shall arise between 
the said partyes their heires or executors about or concerning 
the premises, that then they shall and will from time to tyme 
perform, fullfill, stand to & keepe the arbitrement of Thomas 
Leveriti one of the Elders of the Church of Boston &, of 
William Colbron Deacon of the same or of two others Arbi- 
trators indifferently chosen or to be chosen by & between the 

^ Thomas Leverett and William Col- fleet with "Wintlirop, was for a long 

^Ton, prominent men in the church, time deacon, and later ruling elJer"; 

wei-e of high consideration in Boston, often, too, selectman. His opinions on 

Thomas Leverett was ruling elder, and religious matters had decided leanings 

also selectman from the time of his towards the heresies of "Wheelwright ; 

fhoii-e, shortly after he came over from but he was neither disarmed nor"dis- 

old Boston, in 1633, until his death, in franchised therefor. 
10:0. William Colbron came in the 



100 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

sajd partjcs, their hcires or executors.^ (Ild 10s in pt 3. 10. 
1639.) 

[65] Be it kno^vn imto all men by these presents that I 
Mary Faireweather of Boston in Ne^v England widdow, in- 
tending by the grace of God to take to husband John Everet 
ais Webb- of Boston aforesaid, in Consideration of my natu- 
rall love & good affection that I beare unto my Sonne John 
Fayreweathcr doc hereby before the said marriage give and 
grant unto the said John Faireweather the one halfe of all 
my lands lying in Pullinpoint necke and Hogge Island vf^"^ 
the appurtenances equally to be divided To have and to hold 
the said one halfe of the said lands unto him the said John 
Fayreweathcr his hcires and assignes for ever, Provided all- 
wayes that if the said John Faireweather shall happen to 
Dye without issue before he shall attaine to his age of twenty 
and oneyearcs then this grant shall be voyd And I doc hereby 
grant unto tlie said John Faireweather that I and the said 
John Webb and the hcires of our two bodies lawfully to be 
begotten bctwecne us sliall and will stand seised of the other 
halfe of my said lands to the use of me and the said John 
Everet ais Webb during our lives and the longest liver of us 
and after to the use of the hcires of our bodies bctwecne us 
lawfully to be begotten and for default of such issue to the 
use of the said John Fayreweathcr his lieires & assignes for 
ever And in case he Dye as aforesaid w'^out issue then to the 
use of my right hcires for ever Provided allwayes that in case 
I and the sayd John Everet ais Webb shall be disposed for 
. necessity or convenience to make sale of the said last men- 
coned halfe of the said lands that then upon tender of six 
pence imto a Deacon of the Church of Boston this entaylc 
shall be voyd and thenceforth it shall be lawfull for us to Dis- 
pose thereof by our joynt consent k grant in writing before 
sufficient witnesses. And lastly I Doe hereby give and grant 
unto the said John Fayreweathcr one hevfer &c. pnt Devant. 
[2.9. 6J.] 

1 It is douhtful if these articles were a man "of good property and influence,' 
executed by the parties. John liead September, 16S5 {Savage). [T.] 
was at Eehoboth in 1645, where he died, = See p. 60, ante, and note. [T.] 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-DGOK. 



101 



William Hutchinson of Aqiiednecke, gent, and Edward 
Hutchinson of Boston, his sonne, of the one parte, and David 
.^L'llecke of Dorchester, soap boyler, of the other pt, — for 
801, to pay 20^ in hand and 60i w^'^in 5 yeares, in the mcane 
time the yearely • rent of & at 2 payments, 1 payment 
20. 10, & [the other] 24. 4 ; but if the money be payd the 
rent to cease, — sell one Dwelling house in Dorchester hereto- 
fore built by M^ Rosseter, and one acre & halfe more or lesse, 
for the home lott or garden, 16 acres of wood ground lying on 
the southwest syde of the plantation, and all their right in 
Dorchester necke, 3 acres k halfe be it more or lesse.^ 

Vincent Potter - gent, assignes Stephen Barret to Wili Fos- 
ter of Ipswich in Xew England Planter for lo^ in hand <fe 
31 15s. a ycare for five yeares from the 21''} 4. Coram me 
k npore. [2s. 6.] 

Me Robtum Sedgwicke De villa Caroli in N. A. Pandopato- 
rcm tener' Arc. Edw. Tyng De B. merchant in 5001. Condi- 
coned for payment of 1691 7s. 2>d. 29. 5 and so much 6. 7. 
pp. Dat. 26. 4. 1639. Coram Willo Tyng t meipo. [Is.] 

[66] This Indenture <tc. Dat. 26. 4. 1639. Betweene Yin- 
cent Potter gent k Willm Parke. An assignement of Henry 
Kcnninge an Apprentice from 21.4 for 8 yeares &c. coram. 
[2s. 6c7.] 



^ The notes or memoranda for a 
<lr,iught (which is given at length two 
I'lges farther on) of a conveyance by 
\\ illiam and Edward Hutchinson of a 
house and garden in Dorchester, and 
w.\t«.'en acres of woodland, " on the 
southwest syde of the said Towne plan- 
tation, and bounded w* the lands of 
M' John Warham yv^^ he hath in 
T'o'it of his wife or her children, on 
tin.' e;ist parte, w«» the said Towne 
tormnon on the west, w^ the high 
^*>y leading to Nepouset river on the 
•H.nh parte, and w^^ the said Towne 
•■ouimon on the south parte. Dated 



24. 4. 1639. Coram Samuel Hutchin- 
son, Tho. Savage, et me ipso for [Ed- 
ward Hutchinson, the son]." [T.J 

For David Sellicke, see note on p. 
133. 

■- Vincent Potter, who had been a 
soldier at the castle during his stay in 
Boston, went back to England, Dec. 
15, 1639. William Foster, of Ipswich, 
came [probably] in the same ship with 
Thomas Foster, afterwards gunner at 
the castle. They may or may not liave 
been brothers, but it is possible that 
Potter came across ^Villiam through his 
brother Thomas. See Savage. 



THC 

NEWBERRY 
LIBRARY 

CHICAGO 



102 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

A letter hy Katheriiie Wceldcn to W. John Shanrat of Xot- 
tingham dated 29. 4. 1639. touching tlic Death etc. of Martlia 
Weeklen of Dedham wlio was Drowned about 12 Dayes be- 
fore. She was a godly mayde by all probabilities hi this 
letter testifyed. [0-0.] 

Borrowed of Mr Story i about a moneth since 2Z5 ) _ 
& halfe of the best Suger at 2s. the pound. \ ^^' ^' 

Borrowed of Mr David Offlcy 3i to be payd 6. 7. 1G39. 

• The Condicon of this obligation is such that if the said 
John Ecade shall from time to time observe fullfill k kecpe 
all such Covenants articles and agreements as are on his parte 
to be observed fullfilled <t kept mentioned in ccrtaine Articles 
indented bearing Date w'^ these presents made bctweene the 
said William Tyng of the one parte and the sayd John of the 
othr p* then this obligation shall be voyd & of none effect or 
els shall be k remaine in full power strength k vertue. 

Nos Johcin Reade de Weymouth in Nova Anglia Plantator 
et Richardum Wright do Mountwollaston in X. A. Plantato- 
rera tcner' Arc. Wiiio Tyng mcrcator in \hlank\ libris Dat. 14. 
2. 1639. coram. 

Condiconed ut supa mutatis mutandis. 

This Indenture made the Twenty fourth Day of the fourth 
moneth In the yeare of our Lo]-d One thousand six hundred 
thirty and nyne betweene William Hutchinson of Aquednccke 
Island gent and Edward Hutchinson of Boston in New 
England sonne k heirc apparant of the said Willih of the 
one parte and David Sellecke of Dorchester in New England 

1 "One George Storj', a young mer- with Captain Robert Keayne [Winth., 

chant of Lon.lon," who became con- ii. G9, 117), makes here his first recorded 

spieuous some tliree years later as tlie appearance in the colony. [T.] (See 

solicitor of Mrs. Sherman, in the suit pp. 84,181, 234, ■post.) 



LECIIFORD'S MAXCJSCRfPr NOTE-BOOK. 103 

s.iapc boylcr of the other parte Witncsscth that the sayd 
WilHain ilutclunson and Edward Hutchinson for and in Con- 
>id.-ration of the summe of ffowcr score pounds of lawfull 
money of EngUmd to them by the sayd David Sellecke his 
heircs or asss to be payd in manner & forme following that 
is to say twenty pounds thereof in hand at the scaling & de- 
livery hereof and the other sixty pounds thereof w*^in the 
space of five yearcs next [67] ensuing the Date hereof have 
granted bargained and sold and by these presents Doe grant 
bargaine & sell unto the said David Sellecke one Dwelling 
liouse situate in Dorchester aforcsayd W^'' was heretofore 
built by M^ Rosscter and all outhouses and one garden or^ 
home iott thereunto belonging and sixtecne acres of wood 
ground be it more or lesse thereunto belonging lying & being 
on the southwest syde of the said Towne plantation and 
bounded w^'^ the lands of W. John Warham w<=^ he hath in 
right of his wife or her children on the east parte m-'^ the 
said Towne common on the west parte w"^e highway leading 
to Xeponset River on the north parte and AV^^e said Towne 
Common on the south parte and allso all there right title 
interest and demand of in and to three acres and three quar- 
ters and three roddes of land be it more or lesse lying in 
Dorchester necke and all Commons profits commodities hered- 
itaments and appurtenances whatsoever to the sayd premises 
belonging To have & to hold the said Dwelling house and 
Lands w'*^ all and singulare the premises \x^^ the appurte- 
nances whatsoever unto the said David Sellecke his heires 
and assign es in ffec farme untill the sayd sixty pounds shall 
be by him or them payd unto the said William Hutchinson 
and Edward Hutchinson their executes administrators or as- 
signes And afterwards To have and to hold the sayd Dwelling 
house and lands & all and singulare the p^mises w"^ the 
appurtenances whatsoever unto the said David Sellecke his 
heircs and assignes absolutely for ever Yielding and paying 
therefore yearely unto the said William Hutchinson and Ed- 
ward Hutchinson their executors administrators or assignes 
or some or one of them the summe of six pounds by the yeare 
at two severall Dayes of payment viz* the 25''J Day of Decern- 



104 LECIIFORD 'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

ber and the 24'^ day of the fourth moneth every yeare uiitill 
the sayd principall sixty pounds shall be payd as aforesayd 
Provided allwayes that if the sayd yearely summe of six 
pounds shall he behind or unpayd in parte or in all by the 
space of tenne Dayes after either of the said Dayes of pay- 
ment thereof wherein the same ought to be payd as aforesaid 
being lawfully demanded or if the said principall sixty i)ounds 
or any parte thereof shall be behind or unpayd at the end of 
the said fyve ycares next ensuing the Date hereof that tlien 
& from thenceforth it shall and may be lawfull to and for 
the said William Hutchinson &. Edward Hutchinson their 
heires or assignes into the premises & every parte therof to 
reenter and the same to have againe possesse k enjoy as in 
their former right and estate for and notw'^standing any- 
thing in these presents conteyned to the contrary thereof in 
any Avise notw* 'standing. In witnesse &c. coram Samuel 
Hutchinson Tho. Savage & meipo p Edw. fiiiu. [G. 6J.] 

Me Davide Sellecke De Dorchester in Nova Anglia soape- 
boyler tener' <tc. WiH:o Hutchinson gen et Edvo Hutchinson 
filio et heredi apparent! eimsdem Wiiii in Centum et viginti 
libris Dat. vicesimo quarto. 4. 1G39. Coram. Coram p^'e. 
testibus. 

[68] The Condition of this obligation is such that if the 
said David Sellecke his heires executors administrators or 
assignes shall well and truly pay or cause to be payd unto the 
said William Hutchinson and Edward Hutchinson or one of 
them their or cither of their executors administrators or 
assignes or any of them the yearely rent of six pounds and 
the principal summe of sixty pounds reserved and limitted in 
and by one payre of indentures bearing date w^*" these pre- 
sents made betweene the said William &, Edward of the one 
parte & the said David of the other parte according to the 
force forme and effect of the said reservation and limittation 
in and by the said indentures then this obligation shall be 
voyd <t of none effect or els shal remayne & be in full 
power strength & vertue. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 105 



TJiC Oath proposed in England whereon the Lords Say ^' Seale 
,f- Brooke ivere imprisoned at Yorke tuhea the King luent 
against the Scotts iv"" an Armg. Anno 1G39. 

I Due swearc before the Almighty and cverliving God, 
that I will bcare all faithfull allegiance to my true and un- 
doubted Soveraigne Lord King Charles, who is lawfull King 
of this Island and all other his dominions both by sea and 
land by the Law of God and man and by lawfull succession, 
and that 1 will most constantly and checrefully even to the 
utmost hazard of my life and fortune oppose all seditions, 
rebellions, Conspiracies, Covenants, and treasons whatsoever 
against his ma"'" Crowne and dignity or person, raysed or 
sett up under what pretence of religion or colour soever, 
And if it shall come veyled under pretence of religion 1 
hould it most abominable before God & man. And this oath 
1 take voluntary, under the faith of a good Christian and 
loyall subject, w'^out any equivocation or mentall reservation 
wliatsoever, from w''^ I hould no power on earth can absolve 
me in any parte. 

Me Edvlim Hutchinson de Boston in nova Anglia gen. tener' 
kc. Davidi Sellecke in Octaginta libris bone et legalis monet 
Anglic etc. Dat' vicesimo quarto quarti 1639. Coram. Samuel 
Hutchinson, Tho : Savage & meipo. 

The CondicoTi of this obligation is such that if the above- 
bounden Edward Hutchinson shall procure and prevaylo w*^ 
liis il'ather William Hutchinson of Aquedncckc Island gent 
to signc seale and Deliver as his act and Deed unto the above- 
named David Sellecke or to some other to the use of the 
said David Sellecke before two or three credible and sufficient 
witnesses One Indenture of bargainc and sale of a certaine 
Dwelling house and lands in Dorchester allready drawne 
bctwecne the said William and Edward of the one parte and 
tiic said David of the other parte and allready [69] sealed 
unto by the said Edward Dated w'** these p'sents and if the 
•^aid Edward shall Deliver or cause the same so sealed by 



106 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

his said ffathcr and liimselfe to be Delivered unto the saiil 
David safe inidefaced and uncancelled before the last Day of 
October next ensuing the date hereof then this obligation 
shallbe voyd and of none effect or els shall remaine and be 
in full power strength and vertuc [Is.] 

Bctwecnc Iliehard Bellingham of Boston in New England 
Esq' of the one pte and George Minot of Dorchester in New 
England one of the Elders of the Church there, of the other 
parte, AYitnesseth that the sayd Richard Bellingiiam for and 
in Consideration of the sumnie of one hundred pounds of 
laAvfull money of England to him in hand payd before the 
scaling S: delivery of these presents, by the said George 

Minot. One Dwelling House and home lott and barne and 

all lands, meadowes, pastures, ^vood lands. Commons & appur- 
tenances thereunto belonging, heretofore in the possession of 
one Pomroy or now or late in the possession of the sayd 
Eichard Bellingham or his assignes. 4. 5. 1639. To the use 
of the said Church. Coram Jo : Knowles & meipo. [Is.] 

A bill by George Minot to Mr Bellingham for payment of 
50^i tlie last parte of the said money 1. S. 1639. Dat' 4. 5. 
As pre coram Johe Knowles & meipo. [6cZ.] 

Tlie good ship called the Beaver of London, Mf George 
Maync, arived here the 22"^ Junii, 1639, and the passingers 
and goods safely Delivered. 

I John AVinthrop Esq' Governor of the Jurisdiccon of the 
Massachusets bay in New England Doe hereby Certifie unto 
all manner of persons whome it may any wise concerne that 
M'. George Mayne, Master of the good ship called the Beaver 
of London by the blessing of Allmighty God arived heere in 
Charles River V^ the said ship and passingers therein upon 
the twenty second Day of June in the yeare of our Lord one 
thousand six hundred thirty and nyne, and hath since landed 
and Dc'Hvered the passingers and goods w'^'^ he brought in the 
same ship. In witnesse whereof 1 have hereto sett my hand 
the ffifth day of July Anno Dmi. 1639. [Is.] 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 107 

A Bargainc tt sale by Richard Bulg-ar to EicliarJ Parker 
nichaiit, of one bull calfc of 5 monctlis old, for 31 8. 5. 
IGoU. Coram me. [6c?.] 

[70] Bctweene Elizabeth Evans of Bridgend in the County 
of Glamorgan, and John Whcclcwright ^ minister. A Cov- 
enant for service for three yeares from 25. of June last past. 
AVagcs 31 p annii and passage payd for by J. W. Dat' 5. 5. 
1G39. Coram 

Letter of Attorney by Thomas Hett of Ilingham planter to 
Lieuten* Richard Morris, agaiiist Philip Swaddcn- Dwelling 
neare the river of Pascattaquay in New England for 5Gs. Dat' 
9. 5. 1639. Coram me. [GcZ.] 

Betweenc Robert Scott ^ of Boston in N. E. haberdasher 
and Captaine "William Jennison of Water Towne in N. E. 
Whereas Indentures &:c. 

Now ffifty pounds to be payd to him. 

Mr Scot to undertake the Delivery up of the said Indenture 
or an affidavit, and to be bomide in a bond of lOO^'. 

1 John Wheelwright took degrees at ^ "Philip Su-addon, "Watertown, ser- 

Canibridge, 1614 and 1613, and came to vant of Robert Sully, 1630, ,set free 

>'e\v England 163G. He was banished next year, on condition of paying ,£10 

from the colony, with his religious to his master, was of Kittery, 1640 " 

friends and supporters, in 163S, and [Sara^jr). 

established the town of Exeter, where ^ Robert Scott (see pp. 158, 161, 

he resided till 1643, when he removed }>ost). "William Jennison was " caj)tain 

to 'Wells, Me. Four years later, hav- of the military company in "Watertown, — 

ing been prenously reconciled to the an able man, who had been there from 

Massachusetts authorities, he settled at the first settling of that town" (IVinth., 

Hampton. In 1656 he went to Eng- ii. 176). He was the elder brother of 

land, and remained there till 1662, Robert, who was the ancestor of Rev. 

when he returned to New England, and AVilliam of Salem, Samuel (H. C. 1774), 

settled at Salisbury. Here he died Samuel of Worcester, and Samuel (II. C. 

Nov. 15, 1679, aged, it is said, above 1S39). See Bond, 
eighty years. 



108 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



Articles of agreement made the W^ day of July Anno Dim 
1G39, Annoq^ Jl. R. Caroli Anglice ^-c. XF", hcticeene 
Robert Scott of Boston in Neiv England, haberdaslier, on 
the hehalfe of Richard Spitty of Greys Inne in the County 
of 3Iidd., gent., sonne and heire ^ Executor of the last will 
^ testament of Richard Spitty of high holhorne, gent., 
deceased, of the one j^arte, and Cajytaine William Jenni- 
sox of Watertowne in New England of the other -j^arte, as 
folloicetli :. 

Imprimis, that the said Captainc Jennison shall and T\'ill 
presently at the sealing and Delivery hereof pay mito the said 
Robert Scott, the summe of ffifty pounds of lawfidl money of 
England, to the use of the said Richard Spitty of Greys Inne, 
gent., ill full Discharge of all reckonings, debts, Dutyes and 
Demands whatsoever ^s"^ he hath against the said Captaine 
Jennison by vertue of one Indenture of Copartnership made 
the fifth day of March Anno Dili 1629, betwecne the said Cap- 
taine Jennison of the one parte and the said Richard Spitty 
Deceased of the other parte. 

ItiTi, that the said Richard Spitty of Greys Inne, gent., as 
executor of the said last will tt Testament of his said ffather, 
shall in convenient time, as soone as he may, make, scale and 
deliver as his act ct deed one particulare release of all actions 
and Demands whatsoever- w<=^ he hath against the said Capt: 
Jennison by vertue of the said Indenture, to some person to 
the use of the said Captaine Jennison, and send the same over 
imto him into New England. 

Itiii, that the said Richard Spitty of Greys Inne gent, shall 
also in convenient time, as soone as he may, send the [71] 
Counterparte of the said Indenture of Copartnership under 
the hand and scale of the said Captaine Jennison, if the said 
Richard Spitty can or may finde or come by the same, over 
unto the said Captaine Jennison in New England, to be 
cancelled. 

Itiii, that the said Captaine Jennison shall and will upon 
receipt of a release to be made as aforesaid and of the said 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 109 

Coimtcrpartc or an Affidavit or sufficient certificate that the 
same Counterpartc hath bin sent in case the same shall be cast 
away or lost by the way, make, scale and deliver as his act 
and Deed, one particulare release of all actions and Demands 
whatsoever w*^^ he hath against the said Richard Spitty gent, 
as executor as aforesaid, by vcrtue of the said Indenture, unto 
said Robert Scott, or some other person, to the use of the said 
Richard Spitty of Greys Line, gent., to be sent over unto him 
into England, and also shall and will then deliver unto the 
said Robert Scott the Counterpartc of tlie said Indenture w''^ 
the said Captaine Jennison hath under the hand & scale of the 
said Richard Spitty Deceased, to be sent over unto the said 
Richard Spitty of Greys Innc, to be cancelled. 

Itin, that the said partyes to these presents shall presently 
enter into bond of lOOli a peece to each other, conditioned for 
the performance of the said former menconed Articles. 

In witnesse <tc. Coram. [3s.] 

Me Robtuih Scott De Boston in N. A. haberdasher tener' etc. 
Capitaneo Willo Jennison in Centum libris Dat' 11. Julij 
1G39. coram. 

The Condicon Arc. [l.«.] 

Me Capitanen Willielmu. Jennison de Watertowne in N. A. 
tener' <tc. 

Robto Scott in Centum libris Dat' 11. 5. 1639. 
Condiconcd iit supra. [Is.] 

One acquittance for the receipt of the said SO^i by Robert 
Scott. 11. 5. 1G39. [Qd.-] 

One Release by the said Richard Spitty of greys Inne, gent., 
to be sealed in England, to the use of Captaine Jennison. 

Osmond Douch i of Bridport in y« County of Dorset mariner 
assignes to Thomas Bishop of Bridport aforesaid haberdasher 

^ Osman, or Osmyn, Dutch, as Mr. ords, had been admitted an inhabit- 
Savage gives the name, from the rec- ant of New^rt in 1638. From this 



110 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

One tenement and a crarden lying in the East Streete in Brid- 
port aforesaid now or late in the occupacon or possession of 
the said Osmond or his assignes w*^^ lie heretofore purchased 
of Rohert Ward of Apsham in the County of Devon gent to 
him and his assignes During the life of the said Osmond and 
Grace his wife and Eobert^ his sonne, \_and constitutes] [72] 
John Bishop feltmaker and Richard Hallet carpenter Attor- 
neys and all his goods & moveables to send over his wife and 
children etc. 

Barnaby Da^yes^ of Charlestowne in N. E. planter and 
Thomas Errington ^ of the same planter, bound to Hugh 
Courtney merchant in 45^ 12. 5. 1G39, for payment of 225 
10s. upon the 12^^ of October next. [Is.] 

To all Christian people to whome these presents shall come, 
I Osmond Douch of Bridport in the county of Dorset, mar- 
iner, send greeting in our Lord God everlasting, Knowe yee 
that whereas Robert "Ward of Apsham in the county of 
Devon, gent., by his Deed Indented under his hand and scale 
did heretofore Lease, Demise, grant and to farme let unto me 
the said Osmond Douch One tenement and garden with the 
appurtenances thereunto belonging now in the occupation of 

assignment, with the letter, bond, and greater confidence than probaLility is 

release ivhich follow, we learn that his said" {Savage). [T.] 
■wife, Grace, and his children were still ^ Robert Douch (Dutch) was at 

living at Bridport, Dorsetshire, in Gloucester, with -vvife JIary, in 1C46. 

July, 1632>, and that he, having been In September, 1656, IJobert Doutch 

at some time in the employ of ilr. — proliably the same person — was 

AVilliam Hooke (of York, and after-- admitted an inhabitant of Doston 

wards of Salisbury), was now, "since (Town Records, i. 131), but did not 

he came last" to New England, in long remain there, as he was settled 

partnership with Thomas ililward, of in Ipswich before ^lay, 1G59 {Savaxjc). 

Noddle's Island, engaged in the fishing His son Robert, born 1647, was perh;ips 

trade. In the bond, executed at nearly the Soldier, of Moseley's company, wlio 

the same time with the assignment of escaped with the loss of his scalp in 

lease, he is called of Cape Ann, or King Philip's war. [T.] 
Gloucester, where Jlr. Savage finds - For ample mention of Barnabas 

him, with wife, Grace, and children, in Davis, see pp. 204 ctscqq.,post. 
1646, and where he died December, ^ Thomas Errington afterwards was 

1684, "aged a hundred or more, as with of Lyun. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-DOOK. . Ill 

nic the said Osmond Doucli or my assigncs, To *EIave and 
to hold the said tenement and garden with all and singular 
the premises with the appurtenances unto me the said Osmond 
Douch or my assignes, for and During the lives of me the said 
Osmond Douch and of Grace my wife and Robert my sonnc 
and the life of the longest liver of me and them, under the 
yearly rent and covenants therein expressed, as by the said 
Deed indented the more at large it Doth and may appear. 
Xow I the said Osmond Douch for good causes and Considera- 
tions me thereunto moving Doe by these presents grant, 
assigne and sett over mito Thomas Bishop of Bridport afore- 
said, haberdasher, the said Tenement and garden w'^ the 
appurtenances and all my right title interest clayme and 
Demand of in and to the same and every part thereof 
together w^^ the said Indenture of Lease, To have and to 
hold the said Tenement & garden and all and singular the 
premises with the appurtenances unto him the said Thomas 
Bishop and his assignes for and during the lives of me the 
said Osmond Douch and the said Grace my wife and Robert 
my Sonne and the life of the longest liver of me and them. 
And I the said Osmond Douch hereby constitute ordaine and 
appoint my wellbeloved ffriend John Bishop of Bridport afore- 
said fcltmaker [73] and Richard Hallet of the same carpen- 
ter, my true and lawful Attorneys jointly or severally for me 
and in my name into the premises to enter and thereof full 
and peacable possession and seisin to take and after full and 
pcacable possession thereof so had & taken full and peacable 
possession livery and seisin thereof for me and in my name 
to Deliver over unto the said Thomas Bishop To have and 
to liold the premises &. every part thereof unto him the said 
Thomas Bishop and his assignes according to the purpose 
true intent and meaning of these presents Ratefying and 
allowing all &: whatsoever my said Attorneys or either of 
them shall lawfully Doe in the premises And also I the said 
Osmond Douch ffor and in consideration of six pence to me in 
hand payd by the said Thomas Bishop Do hereby grant bar- 
gaine and sell unto the said Thomas Bishop all my goods and 
chottclls reall and personall moveable and immoveable what- 



112 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

soever in England To haye and to hold the same to him the 
said Thomas Lishop his executors administrators and assignes 
for ever. In witncsse, etc. Coram Gubernatore nro. Tho; 
Millward ct meipo. [3s. 6cZ.] 

Good wife, my love remembered to you in the Lord, These 
are to lett you understand that God be praysed I am well in 
health heere in this Country at the time of the writing this 
letter, and so I hope are you in health together with our Chil- 
dren. Scing it hath pleased God to blcsse me heere in this 
land since I came last, 1 thanke God, I have cleared 40^ and 
shall be able to make good provision for to intertaine you tt 
my children, as I hope in the Lord. Therefore I desire you 
would by all meanes come over to me w^^ the children by the 
f [all] or as soone as you can the next spring : To that end and 
purpose I have hereinclosed sent you an Assignement of the 
house and therin a deed of gift also of the goods, scaled 
before our honoured Governo'", wherewithall I have intrusted 
yo'" kinsman Mf Thomas Bishop, the haberdasher, whome I 
Doc intreate to sell the house at as good advantage as he can 
and such of the goods as are not fitt for transportation, and 
w*^ the money to make provision for yo"" comming, for clothes 
for yo'selfe & the children, & for some refreshments by the 
way, and for yo"^ passage : Of the goods that you have there- 
w'*^ you sell not any brassc, pewter, bedding nor linnen : but 
furnish yo^'selfe w*** these as Avell as you can. And if you 
want any thing more to come forth, or to make yo^ better pro- 
vision, then I shall take order w*^ my partner M^ Millard ^ 

1 Thomas ]\Iihvard was probably the found at Newbury, where he was a 

"pilot and mate to Mr. Fearne, in the proprietor (Coffin's Nev:bury, pp. 22, 

'Hector,'" whose denunciation of the 31, 310); but in September, 1G39, he 

people of Massachusetts as "all rebels was granted land in Boston (Toiai 

and traitors," because they had not the Records, p. 42), and in August of the 

King's flag at the fort, brought upon following year described himself, in a 

him the censure of the Court, in June, deposition taken by Lechford, as of 

1636 {Mass. Records, i. 176, 17S ; Cape Ann, aged forty years. He died 

Winth., i. 187). In the Records the name in Boston in 1653. Neither Douch nor 

is written Miller, ]\Iillerd, and Jlillard ; Milward appears to have had any 

by Winthrop, Miller. Sliortlyaftenvards place of settled residence in 1639. 

"Mr. Thomas Milward, mariner," was They carried on the fishery at Cape 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 113 

[74] of Xoddill's Island, who is my partner in the fishing 
trade v,'"^ we now are setting upon, that he shall deale with 
;Mr Maurice Tompson,^ merchant. Dwelling at [blank] in Lon- 
don, to send you what money you <t ^V. Bishop shall thinke 
will be further nccdfull, besides the money to be made of the 
house & household implements not fitt to bring in the ship. 
And you are to send Mr Tompson this inclosed letter and 
note under Mr Miller's liand, and he will send you downe the 
money by the carrier. You must take care that by the way 
you may have some refreshments besides the ships provision 
for yo''selfe and my children : that is, some suger and fine 
ruske or bisket, and a little barrell of ale to make warme 
meate, and oatmeale & currants <fe a little spice, and some fine 
flower & eggs, Sc a few chickens w*"^ a henne or two, and" a 
little butter &, honey. If you cannot come by Weymoutli, 
then come by Bristoll w^'^ one Mr Ilazzard to whome I have 
allready spoken. [Is. 6c?.] 

\_Froin the heglnning of page 74 to the end of this entry 
seems to have been crossed out, but nothi7ig substituted there- 
for.-] 

Nov'^int univ^s' p p'sentcs me Mathcum Allyn De Hertford 
sup flumen Dc Kcnnccticot' in America gen', ten' et firmit' 
obligar' Ilumphrie' Hooke Civi et Aldermanno Civitat' Bris- 

■Ann and along tlie coast, probaLly pounds, for wliich service they received 

in partnership, with, or in the employ thethanksof both Houses of Parliament. 

of, ilr. Maverick, of Noddle's Island. He is mentioned in Strj-pes' edition of 

LT'J Stowe's Survey of London as the person 

^ This was probably Maurice Thomp- who, by his own bounty and application 

son, a London merchant, who was gov- toothers, principally advanced the build- 

ernor of the East India Company in the ing of the Chapel at Poplar in 1653 " 

time of Charles I. "lu or about the {Collins). His son. Sir John Thompson, 

year 1647 he went over to Holland, was created Baron Havcrsham May 4, 

>*'itn two or three other commissioners, 1696. Maurice Thompson was ]irobably 

to solicit the States-General for some the person mentioned by Winthrop in 

relief for the many distressed Protestant 1639 (Jonrnnl, i. 307) as having begun 

families in Ireland that had been phm- a fishing tmde at Cape Ann. In tlie 

dered or ruined in the war ; and having mst. and Gcneol. Rcrj. for July, 1SS4 

obtained leave of the States to collect (vol. xxxviii. p. 318), may be found 

voluntary contributions, they brought many interesting details in regard to 

fi-om thence above thirty-one thousand himself and his family. 

8 



dh.ltl 



114 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-DOOK. 

toll' in 2501 Dat' 18 Julij, 1G39, coram Will° Hooke, Samucr 
Mavericke et mcip°. 

Condiconed for the payment of 200^ upon 3 bills of 
exchange by Roger Dellbridge of Barnstable in Devon, 
merchant, [Is.] 

Me Osmond ii Douch Dc Capoe Annoe in nova Anglia, naiita 
tener' et firmif obligar' Will" Hooke mcrcatori in 40 ii, Dat" 
18. 5. 1639, coram Tho : Mihvard & meipo. 

Condiconed for the payment of 20^ to MF Hooke at M! 
Maverick's house in Nodill's Island IT Julij. p'^x". [Is. 6J.] 

A Release by Mr WilhTi Hooke to Osmond Douch for undu- 
tifull Departure from his service, w*^ a boatc, 18. 5. 1G39, 
coram Tho : Milward & meipo. [vj c?.] 

Two letters for M^' Bittgood.i [2s.] 

[75] James Brocke ^ of Ratdiffe in the county of Mldd. 
mariner, pP, Joseph Bacheller of Salem, Defend', in an 
accon of Account. 

In a particulare Court 18. 5. 1G39. 

The Plaintiffe shewcth that whereas the said Defend' here- 
tofore stood accountable, unto Henry Paramor of the Isle of 
Thanet in the County of Kent gent., for a certainc stocke of 
one lumdred and sixty pounds and the profits thereof intrusted 
by the said Henry Paramor unto the Defendant in or about 
the moneth of Aprill in the yeare of our Lord 1G3T, to be 
imployed by the defend' for the benefitt of the said Henry 

1 "Bidgood, or Betgood, Boston tries in the J\'b?c-5ooZ: lie seems to have 
merchant, from IJomscy in Hants, came been in New Enghind in 1636, %vhen he 
in the 'Confidence' from Southampton, was at certain cliargesfor the expedition 
1638; was of Ipswich, 1642" (Sav- against Block Island in the Peiiuot 
age). [T.] war, as appears from pages 99 and 109, 

2 James Brocke does not appear in post. For further account of this action 
Savage ; as is natural enough, for he against Bacheller, see pages 100, 103, 
cannot have spent any very consider- and 115, post. 

able time in New England. From en- 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 115 

Paramor and tlie Defend' to have reasonable allowance for 
his labour t paincs therein, The said Henry Paramor Did 
upon the xxvit^^ Day of ffebruary last past assigne the said 
stocke k pfitts thereof unto the Plaintiffe, whereby the 
Defend' now standeth accountable unto him the said Plain- 
tiffe for the same. Now the said Plaintiffe chargeth the 
Defendant in manner <fc forme following, Imprimis, w'^ the 
profitts of the goods and merchandize bought w'^^ the said 
principall money, w^^ gg^^^ ^ merchandize and profits thereof 
the pi' Doth not knowe, therefore he requireth that the 
Defend' sett forth upon his oath what the said goods & mer- 
chandize were and what profitts he made of them. 

Itm, with the kine W^"^ the Defend' brought over into New 
England and reserved for a parte of the said stocke, and 
because the Plaintiffe doth not knowe how many or what kine 
the said Defend' Did bring over, nor how many calves they 
have brought forth since, the PI' requireth that the Defend' 
set forth the same upon his oath. Itiu, w"^ three other kyne 
bought the last yeare and three calves w«i» they have since 
brought forth. Itiu, w^^^ the money raysed upon sale of one 
liouse & lands thereto belonging lying in Dorchester, bought 
heretofore for the said Henry Paramor and the profits thereof 
since ; and because the Plaintiffe knoweth not how long the 
said house ct lands were in the said Defend'^ mannaging for 
the said Henry Paramor, nor what profitts have bin bv the 
Dcf made thereof, the Plaintiffe- requireth that the Defend' 
set the same forth upon his oath. And the Plaintiffe is ready 
to allow the Defend' all his reasonable charges and Disburse- 
ments and for his labour and paynes about the premises as 
tins Court shall award. And for the said stocke & cleare 
protfitts thereof as the same shall appcare upon this account 
to be made bctweene the said partyes, the Pi' brings this 
suit. 

Itm, w'Mhe summe of fforty five pounds in monev, part 
of the said stocke, w'^'^ the Defend' had in his hands or 
^y las direction in the hands of some others accountable to 
himselfe, about the S"' Day of October, last past. fVacat 
2«. {id.-] ^ ^ 



116 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



[76] John Bourne of Wapping in the county of Midd. mar- 
iner, pV, and [blanlc] Hawkins,^ of Dorchester, and Nicho- 
las Hewett of -the same, sMpivright, Defend'% 

In the particular Court, 18. 5. 1G39. 

The Plaintiffe by James Brockc his attorney sheweth that 
whereas the Defend' Nicholas Hewett borrowed of the Plain- 
tiffe for the use of himselfe and the Defend* [bla),h\ Hawkins, 
the summe of tenne pounds in or about the fourth moneth in 
the yeare of our Lord, 1G38, the Defend^^ nor either of them 
hath not payd tlie sayd tenne pounds unto the Pltiffe although 
they have been required so to Doe, To the Dammage of the 
PP twenty shillings over k ahove the said Debt, whereupon he 
brings his suit. 

l^Froni beginning of page 76 to the end of this entry seems to 
he crossed out.'] 

Nos Samuele' ]\Iavericke De Nodill's Insula in N. A. g', et 
Thomii Dexter De Lynne in N. A. yeoman, tener' &c. WilP 
Hooke mercator, in BOO" Dat' 16. 5. 1639. 

Condiconcd for payment of 436^ upon the 16'^ Day January 
next ensuing ttc. [Is.] 

To all Christian People c^'C. Nicholas Parker of Boston in 
N. E. and Richard Parker ^ of the same, merchant, for 102li 
Doe grant, bargaine and sell unto William Cheney of Roxbury 
in New E. [6/a«^-] all that their Dwelling house and home 
lott situate in Roxbury aforesaid, betweene the house of Mf 
Welles,^ Pastor of the Church there, on the north side and 

1 Hawkins I suppose to be Cap- 2 gee note on p. 42, ante. [T.] 

tain Thomas Hawkins, of Dorchester, a ^ For an account of the Rev. Thomas 

shipmaster and shipbuilder. For some Wclde, pastor of tlie church at Roxbury, 

account of him, see note, p. 122. see the HL^t. and Genml. Reg., xxxvi. 

"Whether John Bourne, of Wapping, -was 36. A catalogue of his library is printed 

any relation to Nehemiah Bourne, the in the same volume (p. 371), as are 

shipbuilder of Dorchester and Boston, other matters of interest relating to 

is a question of some little interest, him. 
See p. 127, post. 



t-^ij 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 117 

the house of [i/an^] Webb on the south side, and forty acres 
of land and pasture & wooddy ground thereto belonging w"* 
the appurteiices whatsoever, situate and being in Roxbury 
aforesayd, Habendum to the said Will™ Cheney, his heires 
and assignes for ever. Dat. 18. 5. 1G39. [Is. 6tZ.] 

IIenby Paramor of the Isle of Thanett in the County of Kent 

gent. Plaintiffe. 
Joseph Bacheller of Salem in New England i^lanter, Defend^. 
In an aecon of account. 

Att a paeticulare Court at Boston, 18. 5. 1G39. 



The plaintiffe requireth that the Defend* instly and with- 
out delay render unto him the said plaintiffe his reasonable 
account from the time that he was the bayliffe & receiver of 
the money goods and chattells of the Pltiffe both in England 
and New England And the plaintiffe saith that in or about the 
moneth of Aprill Anno Dili IGoT, lie Delivered unto the Deft 
[77] one stocke of the summc of one hundred and sixty 
pounds in England wherewithal! the Defendt was Directed 
by the pit & did undertake to buy divers goods Sz chattells 
and the same to cause to be transported into New England 
and there to imploye the same for the profitt and advantage 
of the Plaintiffe and because the pit Doth not knowe what 
the said goods and chattells were nor what ])rofitts the 
Defendt made of them the pit requireth that the Defendt set 
forth tlKi same upon his oath. And the Defendt brought over 
into New England certaine kyne and reserved them for a 
parte of the said stocke and because the plaintiffe Doth not 
knowe how many or what kyne the said Defendt Did bring 
over nor how many calves they have brought forth since the 
pit requireth that the Defendt sett forth the same upon his 
oath And also the Defendt bought three otlier kyne the last 
yeare for parte of the said stocke w'=^ brought forth three 
calves since And the Defendt raysed above fifty and nyne 
pounds by the occupying and sale of one house and lands 
thereto belonging lying in Dorchester in New England bought 
heretofore by the deft for the Pit as parte of the said stocke 



118 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

And because the PR knoweth not how long the sayd house ^ 
lands were in the defeudts managing for the pit nor wliat 
other profitts certainly the DefFmade thereof the pit requiretii 
that the Defendt set the same forth ui)on his oath And also 
the Defendt on or about tlic 8^^^ Day of October last past Lad 
forty and five pounds more parte of the said stocke in Lis 
owne hands or in the hands of some others accountable to 
himselfe. And the Fit is ready to allowe the Defendt his reas- 
onable charges and Disbursements and for his labour and 
paynes about Jhe premises as this Court shall awarde and 
therefore the Pit prayeth that he may have restored unto him 
his said goods and chattells and moneys rcmayning in the 
Defendts hands to such value and in kinde as the same shall 
appcare upon this account to be made and thereupon he 
bringes his suit. [2s. Gc?.] 

19 JuUi, 1639. Thomas Rucke of Charlestowne in New 
England planter, aged about 48 yeares, maketh oath that 
Divers goods and chattels of his viz^ bedds and bedding 
and other household implements, meate, butter, cheese, salt, 
wheate, malt, and rye ; stuffcs, fustians, Canvas, bed tykes, 
working tooles. Iron ware, Oatemeale, bootes, shooes, and 
leather, linsey woolsey, brasse, pewter and iron potts; w*^*^ 
were put up in foure chests, three butts, one dryfatt, one 
powdering tubb, two packes, three kilderkins; one bundle of 
spitts, curtainc rodds and gunnes; six barrells and tenne 
hogsheads ; conteyning in all about Six hundred and halfe, 
that were delivered at Maiden, in Essex into an Ipswich 
Ilye, were all sliipt into the good ship the Castle of [78] of 
London in the moncth of Aprill, Anno Dmi. 1G38, at London 
and were all afterwards safely transported & brought in the 
said ship to New England, and there safely Delivered forth 
unto the said Deponents hands in the moneth of July in the 
yeare aforesaid, according to the cocket made thereof at 
Maiden aforesaid. [Is.] 

Thomas Ashley of Charlestowne in New England servant of 
Thomas Rucke of the same, aged about 26 yeares, maketh 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 110 

oath that he hath licard read the affidavit of the said Thomas 
liiickc concerning the shijjping and transportation of his 
trootls into Xew Enghmd, and he this Depon' vercly bcleiveth 
the same to be true in all points, for that he was the said 
Thomas Ruck's servant before he came forth of England, and 
is still, and this Dcpon' knoweth that all the vessclls and 
j)ackcs and bundell mentioned in the said affidav* were safely 
Delivered to his said master forth of the good ship the castle 
of London, at Charlestowne, aforesaid, about tiiis time twelve- 
moncths since. 

John Winthrop Esq^ Governor of the Jurisdiction of the 
Massachusetts Bay in New England to y^ Honoble the Lord 
Cheife Baron and the rest of the Barons of His Maties Court 
of Exchcqr and to all his Mats Customers and other oflicers 
whomc it may concerne greeting Knowe ycc that upon the 
nyneteenth Bay of July in the fifteenth yeare of the raignc of 
our Soveraigne Lord Charles by the grace of God King of 
England Scotland France and Ireland Defender of the ffaith 
&c. Thomas Rucke of Charlestowne in New England Planter 
came before me and tooke his corporall oath in these words 
scilt Thomas Rucke &c. 

All w'=^ at the speciall instance and request of the said 
Thomas Rucke I have thought good to certifye and in testi- 
mony thereof have caused the Common Scale of our Colony 
to be hereunto affixed the 22. Day of July in the yeare 
aforesayd. • 

22. 5. 1G39. 

Abraham Hawkins of Charlestowne in New England, ser- 
vant of Thomas Rucke of the same, aged about 28 }ears 
makcth oath ^^^ supra p Tho. Ashley [G] 

[79] Wee whose names are hereunder written Arbitrators 
indifferently chosen by k betweene James Brocke Mariner 
Atturney for Henry Paramor gent and Joseph Bacheller of 
Salem i)lanter for the ending and awarding of all matters in 
Difference betweene the said partycs Doe hereby Declare that 
we fynde that the said Josei^h Bacheller received of the said 



120 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Henry Paramor the summe of One liimdrcd and sixty pounds 
to mannage for the said Henry Paramor according to the best 
skill and abilities of the said Joseph w*^'' said somme halb 
bin accordingly mannaged by the said Joseph as a})peareth bv 
his account upon oath made before our honoured governo''. 
Now the said James Brocke not being able to disprove (nor 
we the said Arbitrators neither) anything conteyned in the 
said account Therefore we Doe thinke it meete and Doe 
thus order and award bctweene the said partyes viz*. That 
whereas the account of the principall 'together w'^'^the produce 
thereof amounteth to the summe of two hundred and seavcn 
pounds and fiftccne shillings according to the estimation and 
account returned by the said Joseph in cattell money and 
some iron, the said Joseph shall presently surrender the same 
stocke into the hands of the said James Brocke for the use 
of the said Henry Paramor his executors administrators k 
assignes. And we Doe allowe unto the said Joseph for his 
Sallarie and factorie therein after the rate of five pounds j) 
Centn upon the said principall from the twentieth Day of July 
Anno Dili 1G37 uiitill this present Day w'^^ amounteth unto 
sixteene pounds And that the said Henry Paramor shall 
Discharge all rates imposed or to be imposed upon the said 
stocke. Witnesse our hands as well as the hands of the said 
partyes hereunto sett the twentith day of July Anno Dni 
1039. 

T^r.. , , ^ Edward Giboxes. 

\\ itnesses hereunto | m -nw 

T -v,^ n K Thomas Kucke. 

John uinthrop Gov^ > t t^ 

f James Brocke. 

et egomet I r -r, 

° ) Joseph Bacheller. 

[3s.] 

Articles betweene James Brocke on the behalfe of Henry 
Parramr k Js. Bacheller. 1. Joseph Bach, undertakes & Cov- 
enants that the stocke & produce thereof mcnconed in the 
account is such k. of such value as in the said account is 
specifyed. 2. It is agreed That he shall mannage k improve" 
the said stocke [80] one yeare more viz*, from this present 
Day 20. Julii 1039 and shall in the end render a just account 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 121 

thereof k deliver up the same to the said Henry Paramor & 
liis assignes. 3. That he the said Joseph Bachcller shall 
Deduct Gl out of the said money parte of the said stocke for 
parte of his sallary & factory in &, about the said stocke untill 
this present Day according to the award. 5. That he shall 
have for his sallary and factorage about the said stocke for 
the yeare ensuing as he sliall reasonably deserve. 4. That 
wliereas also according to the award J. B. is to have 10" 
more for his sallary & he shall take the same either out 
of the said stocke or of M^ Sharpe as W. Paramor shall 
require. 

Articles of Covenant & agreement indented inndc the twentith day 
of July Anno Dni 1639 hetwccne James Brocke Mariner 
on the Tjchalfc of Henry Paramor yent of the one jjf^'^'te & 
Joseph Bach KLLER of Salem Planter of the other 'parte as 
followcth. 

Imprimis the said Joseph Bacheller doth hereby Covenant 
w*'' the said Henry Paramor that the stocke w^'^ the produce 
thereof mentioned in one account under the hand & upon 
oath of the said Joseph made tliis present Day is such & of 
such value as in the said account is spccifyed. 

Itin It is agreed by tt betweene the sayd partycs that the 
sayd Joseph sliall mannage and improve the said stocke &, 
produce from tliis present Day for the space of one yeare fully 
to be compleate to and for the benefit of the said Henry 
Paramor and his assignes and in the end of the said terme 
shall render a just account thereof and of the meane profitts 
thereof and the same deliver up unto the said Henry Paramor 
«fc his assignes. 

Itfh that the said Joseph Bacheller shall Deduct six pounds 
out of the money parte of the said stocke for parte of his 
sallary and factory in and about the said stocke allowed 
unto him by the award betweene the said partycs made this 
present Day. 

Itiii That whereas also according to the said award [81] the 
said Joseph Bachcller is to have tenne pounds more for his 
sallary and factory he shall take the same either out of any 



122 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



moneys parte of the sajd stocke or of M! Sharpe as the said 
Henry ParaiuT shall require. 

Itiii that the said Joseph Bacheller shall have for his sal- 
lary Sc factory about the said stocke for this yeare ensuing as 
he shall reasonably 'deserve. In "witnesse. Samuel Hutchinsu 
& myselfe. [26'. GtZ.] 

Me Josephum Bacheller De Salem in N. A. Plantatorem 
tener' <tc. Jacobo Brocke in trecentis Sc quinquaginta libris 
<fcc. Dat' 20. 5. 1639. Coram Samuel Hutchinson Sc meipo. 

Gondiconed for performance of the said articles on his pte. 

[Is.] 

The account of Joseph Bacheller of Salem in Neiv England 
Planter, made unto James Brocke, Atturney for Henry 
VKE.x'^loVi gent, the xx*^ day of July, Anno Dni. 1639. 

The said Joseph Bacheller received of M^ Paramor in England 

about Apiill, IGOT 1601 

This accountant Delivered to ]\I. Willard in money and com- 
modities and corne about July, 16o7 llOi 

"V^^lel•e^Yithall ceituine lands at Concord were purchased for Mr 
Paramor, wcii were againe sold or lest and the moneys for the 
most parte returned to this accountant in July, 1G38, 

This accountant also bought an house and land at Dorchester for 
Mt Paramor, and kept the same one yeare and above and 
then sold it for 51i 



The present stocke as it cost. The 
worth now. 



imjDTOvement as it is 



One blacke cowe 

One browne cowe 

One blacke cowe 

One blacke hayfer 

One yeareling blacke cowe calfe 
One December steere calfe . . 
One red bull calfe 03 



Fower ewe goats & one ewe kidd 
In the house at Dorchester . . 
In Mr Sharpes hands to stay the 
sale of his farme, 

The plough irons 

MT Willard reteynes for a rate 
Payd for keeping the calves . . 

ICarried forward 1651 o^j 



oot 




. . 25i 


22 




. . 25i 


20 




. . 251 


20 




. . 231 


13 




. . 141 


04 




. . 051 


03 




. . 031 


09 




. . 091 108 


18 




. . 201 


10 




. . 101 


31 128 . . 


. . 31 128 


21 


. 


. . 21 


0. 


158 . . 


. . 0. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 123 

165 i ''sT 
IBrougJit forward ■ ' ■ • ,^i ■* 

[82] ^"^ ^'^^ ^^""^'^ ±\ 

One blacke steere calfe * 

One blacke cowe calfe 10* 

One yeares rent for the house at i 

Dorchester, 20 s more being pay 'd ^ . . . . U 

out upon the house, J loi i^s 

Remayniug in my hands more J- ^^ 

Sum total 2071 15s 

Joseph Bacheller.' 



The said accountant deposeth upon his oath that this is his true account 
the Day and yeare abovesayd, before 

Jo: AYlNTHROP Govr 

of the Massachusetts 

n -, in New England. 

[2s.] 

A coppy of the exemplification of W. Ruck's aftldavit to 
send to Kennecticot, 20. 5. 1639, [Is. Gel] 

1 This Indenture made the Twenty second Day of the ffifth 
moneth Anno Dili 1639. One thousand six hundred thirty 
and nvne. Betweene Thomas Purcliase ^ of Pagiscott gent 
of the"^one parte And John Winthrop Esq' Governor of the 
Massachusetts on the behalfe of himselfe tiic Governor and 
Companie of the Massachusetts aforcsayd of the other parte 
Witnesseth that the said Thomas for Divers good Causes and 
Considerations him thereunto moving hath given and granted 
and by these presents Doth give and grant unto the said John 
Winthrop and his successors the Governor and Company of 
the Massachusetts for ever All that tracte of land at Pagis- 
cott aforesaid upon both sydes of the river of Androscoggin 
being foure miles square towards the sea with all liberty es and 
privileges thereunto belonging so as they may plant the same 
w^ii an"" English Colony when they shall see fitt And shall 

1 This conveyance, or release," is re- cliange of the name from Ameriscoggin 
cordea in Mass. Col. Bee, i. 272, 273. to Androscoggin, in honor of Sir Ed- 
It will be observed that in the draught, mund Andros, — who came first to ^ ew 
as in the record, the name of the river England in 16S6. [T.] 
is written Androscoggin. This fact ^ Thomas Purchase ; see p. 219, 
sufficiently disposes of the story of the note. 



124 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

have as full power for ever to exercise Jurisdiccon there as thcv 
have in the Massachusetts Provided that the interest and pos- 
session of such lands as the said Thomas now useth or shall 
make use of for his owne stocke and improvement w^Hxi 
seaven yeares next ensuing the Date hereof shall be and 
remayne to the sayd Thomas and his heires and assignes for 
ever under the Jurisdiction aforesaid And as well the said 
Thomas hiraselfe and his family and his heires and assignes 
as all other the Inhabitants upon the said lands are for ever 
to be under the due protection of the said Governo"^ and 
Company by order of the generall Co!' as other Inhabitants 
of the same Jurisdiction are. This grant by approbation of 
the said Generall Co^.' to be recorded «fc exemplify ed under 
the Comon seal otherwise to be voyd In witnessc whereof the 
partyes abovesaid have hereunto interchangeably sett their 
• hands & scales the Day and yeare first above written. Coram 
Stepho Winthrop meipo Amos Eichardson. [3s. 0] 

Exemplification or Certificate of the three affidavits for W. 
Eucke under the common scale, 22. 5. 1G39. [3s.] 

Received a dish of 4 perches from Mr Rucke, 20. 5 1639 

[83] Articles of Agreement indented made, covenanted and 
agreed on the first Dag of the third moneth in the yeare 
of onr Lord one thousand six hundred thirty and ngne, 
Betiveene WiLlJAM Gaylard of Windsore vpon the river of 
Kennecticot in America, planter, on the behalfe of John 
Ware AM Pastor of the Church there, and Jane his wife, 
executrix of the last iv ill and testament o/ Thomas Xewbery 
gent. Deceased,'^ of the ojie parte. And Richard Wright, 
of Mount Wollaston, husbandman, of the other parte, as 
folloiveth : 

Imprimis, It is covenanted, condescended and agreed that 
the said Will°> Gaylard for the said John and Jane Doth 

1 Tliis instrument discloses a fact ham, and the mother of his children, 
not previously ascertained, that Jane, was the widow of Thomas Xcwheiy, of 
the second wife of Eev. John War- Dorchester. Mr. Warliam's first wife 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 125 

frrant and to farmc let and set unto the said Richard Wright, 
his executors adiTi" and assignes all that messuage and 
farme or parcell of ground thereto belonging lying on the 
southerly syde of the River called Aponsctt, w'^'* the said 
Tliomas Ncwbery purchased of "William Pyncheon, together 
\\*^ nync cou'cs in and upon the same, To have and to possesse 
the said farme and Cowes w''' the profitt, increase and 
])rovenuc thereof unto the said Richard his executors, admin- 
istrators and assignes from the Date of these presents for the 
terme of foure ycares from thence next ensuing fully to be 
compleate and ended. And if it so fall out that one or more 
of the said Cowcs dye or decay w^'in the said terme then the 
said John &, Jane or their assignes are to putt another in the 
room thereof to make up the number of nync for the residue 
of the said terme unexpired And if any the said Cowes shall 
calve w^'^in four Days after the end of the said terme, then 
the said Richard his executors administrators, or assignes 
shall have such calfe or calves and shall weane or take it or 
them from such said cowes within foure days after the 
calving. 

Itin, the said Richard Wright doth covenant, promise and 
agree that he the said Richard his executors administrators 
and assignes shall upon the first Day of the third moncth 
every yeare During the said terme pay or cause to be payd 
unto the said John and Jane their executors administrators 
or assignes the yearly rent and summe of sixty pounds 
of lawfuU money of England for and in lieu of the said 
provenues and increase of the said ffarmc and cowes. And 

died in tlie autumn, or early in Decern- ventory included "land in England," 

bcr, 1634 ( JVinth., i. app. A, 55). Mr. valued at £300. Mr. AVarliain and Mr. 

Xewbery ivaa early engaged in the "STilliam Gaylord were named overseers 

movement for emigration to Connecti' of the will {Gcneal. Reg., vii. 29 ; His- 

cut, and had sold a portion of his tory of Dorchester, p. 69). It is not 

Dorchester i)roperty with a view to certain whether !Mr. Warham married 

removal, when prevented by death in the widow at Dorchester, or after the 

December, 1635, or Januaiy, 1636. By removal of the family to Windsor ; but 

his will, made Dec. 12, 1635, he gave the former is the more prol)able. 

hLs wife Jane £200, and constituted her 'William Gaylord was a deacon of the 

his sole executrix ; and the rest of his Dorchester church before and after the 

estate was left to his children. His in- removal to Connecticut. [T.] 



.TKli/iRO 



126 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK: . 

that he the said Richard Wright his executors administrator^ 
and assignos shall During the said terme carefully and pro\ i- 
dcntly looke to and kecpe the said cowes both in sumraerin,' 
and wintering of them at his own costs and charges or tlieiis 
And shall not lett nor sett the said ffarme k Cowes or any oi 
them to any other person or persons Avhatsoever, except John 
Wilson, Pastor of the Church at Boston, during the said 
terme and in the end of the said terme shall peacably and 
quietly deliver the said messuage, farmc & cowes and every 
of them in good plight and condition into the hands & posses- 
sion of the said John Yv arham and Jane his wife their or one 
of their executors administrators or assignes. And if the 
said Kichard his executors admurs or assignes shall [84] wil- 
fully or carelessly spoyle or misuse the said Cowes or any of 
them so as they or any of them Dye or be lame or the like 
he or they shall make good the same out of his or their owne 
estate. 

Item. It is agreed that if the said Hichard his executors, 
administrators or assignes shall be willing to fence w*'^ posts 
& rayles and pales or cause to be so fenced any part of the 
said lands for the improvement thereof he or they may so 
Doe, and take timber growing on the premises for the same 
end and shall or may recoupe & abate so much of the said 
rent as the said fenceing shall be worth reasonably. In 
witnesse Avhereof the partyes abovesaid have hereunto inter- 
changeably sett their hands & scales the Day k yeare first 
within writtcrL coram. [-Is.] 

Me Richimi Wright De Monte Wollaston in Nova Angli 
agricola tencr' et firmiter obligare Johi Warliam Pastor Eccle- 
siaj de Windsor sup flumcn De Kennecticot in America et 
Jano uxor eius executrici testament! et ultimo voluntatis 
Thome Newberry gen defunct in trecentis libris <fcc. Dat' 
primo. terrij 1639. coram. 

The Condicon to keepe Covenants on his p* &c. prout supa 

[Is.] 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 127 

. . . lis. 



Keceived of ^M"! George Story i yards and halfe "I 
quarter of tuft hoUand to make my wife ^ V 



a wastcoate at 2*-. Scl. ^ yarde, 

\_The next entry in short-hand :"] 

22. 5. 1G39. Received the same day of W. John ^ 

B[. ..] o"e ream of paper at Gi-. Gc/. wanting )- ..... 65. 6(f. 
one quire, ■^ 

Materialls for inlce cost me 17s. 

\s. Ad. Keceived for a quarte of inke. 
M. For halfe a pinte more. 
6f/. For about a pinte before to M^ Harrison, before he went. 

Thomas Purchcs gent makes a letter of Atturney to Daniel 
Adams Citizen and Roper of Bristoll to receive of [6/ani] 
Ilayman widdow executrix of the last will <fc testament or 
administratrix of the goods <fe Chattells of James Hayman 
mariner Deceased for Divers goods & merchandizes of the 
value of ffifty pounds or thereabouts Delivered to the said 
James in or about September Anno 1635 and the prove- 
nues ct profitts thereof. 

And an other letter of Attorney to Captaine Edward 
Gibones to recover of John Treworthy^ iunior of Pascatta- 
quay merchant [85] twenty six pounds for a greate boate he 
bought of M^ Purches in or about July 1036 and foure 
pounds for the hire of another boate to transporte him from 
Pascattaquay to Pagiscott ^\'^'^ he was necessitated to hire 
whereas by the originall bargaine he was to have had the 

^ This, with others as cursory on whom is mentioned hy Lochford later. 

pp. 142, 203, 215, are the only allusions This John Treworthy is spoken of later 

to a !Mrs. Lechford in this volume, (p. 172) as being agent for j\Ir. Shapley, 

She married Samuel Wilbore after of Dartmouth, who was, I think, his 

Lechfonl's death. See Hist. andGcncal. brother James's father-indaw (Savage). 

H-ij., XXX. 202. All three were inhabitants of the towns 

* The mention here and afterwards along the JIaine coast, — which would 

of John Treworthy may do something explain their virtual absence from any 

towards allaying the susjiicions of tiiose written records'. (Sec, however, ^[ass. 

who have doubted his existence (see Co7. 7?cc., i. 254, wIkm'c Mr. Treworthy is 

Sii'agc). He had two brothers, as I sup- mentioned, with others, of the Maine 

I^Jse, Nicholas and James ; the first of coast). 



128 lECHFOXD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

same boato for that voyage And for Bammagos for detev,,!,, 
of the sa:d money being 80« by the space of °three ycarel ' 

Be it knowne unto all men bv these presents that T H'l 
Purches of Pagiseot in An.eri^a, gent^Doe b^ J con u";" 
ordeyne and appoint my welbeloved in Christ Danie Ad I' 
C.t.zen and Roper of Bristoll my true and lawful! A to, 'v 
for me and n, n>y name to sue, arrest and impleadt f " 
Hayman widdo.,e.eeutrix of the last .ill ^ t s aLnt" 
adm,mstratr.x of the goods and chattells of James Hayma, 
manner, deceased, if she be yet sole or if she be 4aT„Tma ' 
ned then her and her husband or by whatsoeve; na-nH 
names shoe or hoe are called or any other person or p r on 
.^i Z ^H "" P"""'™ "■" S-ds and chattells' , 
01 and for eertame goods and merchandizes of the value of 
ffifty pounds or thereabouts which the said James Havman 

Dfi To' - "', Z "'■ ^'r' "" ''''' "'''■ "' September, IrZ 
Dm ICoo, and the profitts thereof in course of mercha^- 
fce ever smee w- amounteth in all to the summe of nynety 
pounds or thereabouts and the same of and from her and ftem 
to ,eeve and recover by Due course of Law or equity in any 
i"s Mats Courts of justice & whatsoever in my name and to 
my use and behoofe And further I Doe hereby give pow r 
unto my sa.d Atturney for me and in my name to ma\e ny 
reasonable conaposition w» her and then for and touchin. the 
or sat,, „„^,^ ^,^^ j^^_.y_^^. ^^ P^^ ^^^_^^ W 

rea enable act or thing whatsoever for the recovery of the 
sa,d money or as much as may be recovered for the said goods 
A merchandizes reasonably as powerfully and effectually as if 
Imyselfe were present Ratefying and allowing all and what- 

In witnesso. 2o. o. 1039. Coram mo and 2 al. [2s. Gd.] 

PureVo?Tp'"™'° "" "'" ^^' ""^''= P'^^"*^ «>''t I Thomas 
rrdete f f '^''-ott m America gent Doe hereby constitute 
ordeyne and appomt my welbeloved and trusty ffreind Cap- 



LECIIFORD'S MAXUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 129 

tainc Edward Gibones of Boston in New England my true & 
lawfull Atmrncy for me and in my name to sue arrest and 
impleade John Treworthy of Pascattaquay the younger mer- 
cliant for the summe of twenty six pounds w"^^ he oweth me 
f()r a greate boate & its tackling w'^^ he had of me on or 
about the last Bay of the fifth moneth in the yeare of our 
Lord 1G36 and foure pounds more for the hire of an [86] 
other boate w'^^ (for want of the said greate boate w'^'^ 
according to the originall bargaine bctwcenc me and hira I 
was to have had for to carry me to Pagiscott aforesaid but 
througli his default I had it not) I was forced to hire to carry 
me from Pascattaquay to Pagiscott aforcsayd about the same 
time And Dammagcs for Detcyning the said moneys ever since 
and the same of him his executors and administrators to 
receive and recover by any course of Lawe or equity whatso- 
ever before any his Matyes Governors or Justices wheresoever 
in my name and to my use and behoofe And further I Doe 
liereby give unto my said Atturney pht Devant in lauter Icttrc 
au fine. Dat' 25. 5. 1639. Coram me & Duobus al [2s. OJ.] 

And a letter to MF Rice of Bristol!. 

Be it knowne unto all men by these presents that I Cato 
otherwise Goodmanes, for five coates, five wastcoats, five shirts, 
five payre of stockins, five payre of shooes, five hatchetts, 
five houghes, five knives, five pounds of tobacco and tenne 
fadome of wampum pcge, All w'^^ I have received of George 
Munninge ^ in the bchalfc of himsclfc & the rest of the plant- 
ers of tlie new plantation lying south of Concord called 
Xannitt Doc by tliis my writing give and grant, bargaine and 
sell unto the said George Munninge and the s*^ planters of the 

^ George Munning, as is seen here, ■n-as made on the east side of the Con- 
was one of the original proprietors of cord Piiver. Munning afterwards re- 
the town of Sudbury, at that time turned to Boston, where he kept the 
hounded on the north and northeast by jail for some years, and died in 1658. 
Concord, and on the east by Water- Edmund Brown was the first minister 
town, while there were no corporate in Sudbury. He was ordained in 1640, 
towns nor land-grants near them on the and died in 1677. 
west and south. The first settlement 



130 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

said new Plantation and their successors for ever, All tlmt 
tracte of land contcyning two myles square from the nov/ 
Dwelling house of Bryan Pendleton gentleman, on all sydcs 
but on the north side to Concord lyne, be it two myles more 
or lesse, w"^ all libertyes Priviledges and appurtenances 
thereto belonging, together w'^ the River there running v,-*"in 
all the said tracte of land hereby granted. And I Grant unto 
them, for me and my heires and brethren, that I and thoy 
shall and will at any time make any further assurance in 
■writing for the more perfect assuring of the said lands and 
all the premises w"^ the appurtenances, unto the said George 
Munninge and the said Planters, and their successors as they 
shall require. In witncsse whereof, I have hereunto put my 
hand and scale the Twenty fifth Day of the fiifth moneth in 
the yeare that Christians write of Christ the Lord One thou- 
sand six hundred thirty and nyne. Coram Johe : Winthrop 
Gub""" & meipo. 

Edmund Browne and Anna Browne my wife lately the 
widdow relict of John Loueru of Watertowne in N. E. yeom : 
let 2 letters of atturney be made for the sayd Ed : to S"' 
Thom. Bowes, Brooly Mag. in Essex : to Mr Anthony AYit- 
ting, Bentley in Essex, Clearke, to Jonathan Goffe of East 
Berghold, Suff : Clothier, and \hlanh] Cole of Dedham, Essex, 
Clothier : to demand and sue out a division of dowre of the 
lands, whether free or'coppy, of the said John deceased living 
in Ardly in Essex now in the possession of William Louerum 
of Alda in Suff : or George Louerii or in any other mans : 
bretheren of my predecessor : and also to compound for the 
same according to Equity .^ 



1 This mpmorandum is not in Lech- Gai.Eeg.,xxx. 79. He gave all his prop- 
ford's handwritinjif, and may perhaps erty to his wife, with £100 to "his 
have heen entered by Jlr. Brown him- brother that had children," and £20 to 
self. The letter of attorney drawn by the chnrch, after her life. His widow 
Lechford in accordance with the memo- married the Eev. Ednmnd Browne, of 
randum is entered at leng;:h on the two Sudbury, June 19, 1C39, as Governor 
following pages of the manuscript. "\Vinthro]i's attest shows. Mr. Savnge, 

The nuncupative will of John Love- on the authority of Barry and Bond, Ikis 

ran, or Loverun, is printed from the given the date of lier second marriage 

Sufiblk County records in His', caul as 16-14. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 131 

[87] The Recognition of two ffines of lands in Suffolke by 
John Newgate and Anne his wife, indorsed tfe the Captions 
filled by me, before the Governor & Deputy, 25. o. 1639, — 
and for my attcndance-therein. [5s. given.] 

To all Christian people to whom these presents shall 
come, Ave Edmund Brown of Watcrtown in New England and 
Anne Brown wife of the said Edmund send greeting in our 
Lord God everlasting Knowe yee that we for diverse good 
causes and Considerations us thereunto moving Doc hereby 
constitute ordeyne and appoint our welbclovcd and honoured 
ffreind S^ Thomas Bowes of Bromley magna in the County 
of Essex Knight And our Avelbeloved ffreinds Anthony 
Whiting of Bcntly in the said County Gierke Jonathan Goffe 
of East Bergliolt in the County of Suffolke Clothier and \ilank'] 
Cole of Dedham in the said County of Essex Clothier our true 
and lawfull Atturneys ioyntly or severally for us and in our 
names to clayme Demand and sue for the reasonable Dower 
w'=^ belongcth to the said Anne Avho was the wife of John 
Loverun late of Watertowne in New England yeoman De- 
ceased of the ffree hold w'^'* was the said John Loveruns 
sometime her husband in Ardley in the County of Essex 
aforesd or elswhcre whereof slice hath nothing yet assigned 
unto her and w'=^ is Dcteyncd from her by "William Loverun 
of Aldham in the County of Suffolke aforesaid or George 
Loverun yeomen brethren of the said John Loverun or by 
some other person or persons the present tenant or tenants 
of the said ffreehold and for that end and purpose to sue 
forth one or more writ or writts of Dower for us and in our 
names against the said William Loverun or George Loverun 
or against any other person or persons who is or arc or shall 
be the tenant or tenants of the said ffreehold for the time 
being and the same writt or writts to prosecute w*** effect to 
judgment and execution before his Maties Justices of the 

Tliomas Loveran, son of "William, of 1670 purchased the homestead and 

Aldham, Suflblk (named in the letter of other lands there from Jlr. Browne 

attorney as a brother ol John), settled and wife (Bond's JFatcrtou-n, p. 353). 

ill Watertown about 1GG3, and in [T.] 



132 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOCK. 

Bench at Westminster And also for ns and in our names to 
goe unto the Court or Courts Baron of the chcife Lord or 
Lords of the said Towne or Manner of Ardley or of anv 
other Manner or manners whatsoever and there to require 
clayme and Demand to be and to be admitted Tenants ur 
Tenant of all or parte of such Coppihold lands as late were 
the said John Loveruns sometimes husband of the said Anne 
in such right and estate as bclongeth to the said Anne accord- 
ing to the custome or customes of the said Manner or 
Manners And moreover we Doe hereby give and conferre unto 
and upon our said Atturneys full power and lawfull Author- 
ity ioyntly or severally for us and in our names by advice 
of Nathaniel Bacon Esqr Counsellor at Law or some other 
learned in the Lawe to article covenant condicon agree and 
compound with the said William Loverun and George 
Loverun or either of them or w^^ any other person or 
persons for and about the release sale grant surrender or 
purchase of the said Dower & title of Dower and Coppihold 
lands unto them or any of them or their or any of their use 
and behoofe for [88] and in such consideracon or Considera- 
tions or such summc or summes of money as they our snid 
Atturneys or any of them shall tliinke to be reasonable and 
the same summe and summes of money for us and in our 
names & to our use to receive and to returne unto us 
according to other letters of advice by w*=^ articleing cov- 
enanting condiconing agreeing and compounding our said 
Atturneys or any of them may bynde us to make any further 
reasonable assurance by Recovery ffine Deed surrender or 
otherwise as Councell learned in the law shall advise so that 
we be not compelled for the Doing thereof to travell forth of 
the Jurisdiction of the Massachusetts Bay in New England 
Ratefying gratefully accepting and confirming all and what- 
soever our said Atturneys or any of them shall lawfully Doe 
in the premises In witnesse whereof we have hereunto sett 
our hands k scales the twenty fifth day of July in the 
ffifteenth yeare of the raigne of our Soveraigne Lord Charles 
now King of England *S:c. Annoq^ Dfii 1G39. Signed sealed 
& delived in the presence of John Winthrop Governor of 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 133 

tlic Maisacliusetts in Xcw England <fe mei. Tho. Lecliford 
scriptoris liujus. 

And in testimony thereof and that the said Edmund and 
Anne are man and wife together and were married upon the 
xix''^ day of June last past at w"^ marriage I the said John 
"Winthrop was present I have caused the Common seale of 
our Colony to be hereunto affixed the day of the date of these 
presents. [8s.] 

William Cole^ of New England gent and Elizabeth his 
wife executrix of Francis Doughty the Elder of Bristoll mer- 
chant Deceased makes a letter of Attorney unto John Cole his 
brother to receive of M! Fabian Hill of Bristoll lynnendrap 
their former Attorney 60ii upon a bond made by Johm Barlvcr 
of the City of Bristoll merchant unto the said Francis 
Doughty Condicohcd to save him harmelcsse of one other 
bond wherein at request of the said John Barker the said 
Francis became bound to Robert Doughty his brother who 
left Margaret his wife his executrix & she sued the said 
Francis to judgment & the said Elizabeth payd 42 ^ and 10s. 
above 2 yeares since and hath been at other charges of Mary 
Barker widdowe executrix of the said John Barker. Dated 
18. 8. 2. Cor : 1626. 

Be it knowne unto all men by these presents that we 
William Cole late of Sutton in the parish of Cliew-magna 
in the County of Somerset yeoman & Elizabeth Cole his wife 
one of the Daughters & Executrix of the last will k testa- 
ment of Francis Douglity of the City of Bristoll Merchant 
Deceased doe hereby constitute ordeync & appoint our wclbe- 
loved brother John Cole our true and lawfull Attorney for us 
" and in our names to sue Arrest and impleadc Mary Barker 
widdow Executrix of the last will & testament of John 
Barker late of Bristoll aforesaid Merchant Deceased upon one 
bond entred into by the said John Barker for himself e his 
hcires executors & administrators unto the said Francis 

* For William Cole and his wife Elizabetli, a troublesome woman in lier ways, 
see later in the Note-hook, p. 110. 



134 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Doughty conditioned to save him ct his executors harmelosso 
of one other bond eutred into by the said Francis at the 
request and for the Debt of the said John Barker unto Robert 
Doughty brother of the said Francis Condiconcd for the pav- 
inent of fforty pounds unto the said Robert at a Day long 
since past (w*"^ fforty pounds with Divers other moneys t*c 
costs and charges the said Ehzabeth was [89] above two 
yeares sithence forced to pay to the said Robert Doughty and 
hath thereby bin put to other costs & charges in the law and 
Daranifyed to the value of the whole penalty of bond aforesaid 
conditioned to save harmelesse) and the penalty thereof for us 
in our names & to our use to receive <t recover by suit of law 
of & from the said Mary her executors ct administrators And 
"Wee give unto our said Attorney full power *t lawfull author- 
ity for us and in our names to compound & agree av'^ the 
said Mary Darker her executors or administrators for and con- 
cerning the said Debt and the same of her or them to receive 
in our names & to our use and upon payment and satisfaction 
to make unto her or them sufficient acquittance or release And 
further to Doe and make any other lawfull act or thing what- 
soever for and about the recovery of the said Debt as i)ower- 
fuUy and effectually as if we our selves were p^'sent And 
furthermore whereas we heretofore did make scale & deliver 
one other letter of Atturney as our act & Deed unto Fabian 
Hill Citizen & linnen Draper of Bristoll him authorizing to 
sue for & receive of the said Mary her executors & adminis- 
trators the said Debt Now in case the said Fabian Hill 
hath all ready received or recovered the same then we Doe 
hereby authorize the said John Cole our brother & now Attur- 
ney to receive the said Debt of the said Fabian Hill for us in 
our names & to our use But if he liath not received nor recov- 
ered the same then we authorize him our said brother John 
Cole to receive & take the said bond and all other writings 
concerning the same forth of his hands and then to proceede 
as aforesaid against the said ]Mary Barker her executors and 
administrators Ratefying gratefully accepting & alloAving all 
and whatsoever our said brother John Cole our now Attorney 
shall lawfully Doe in the p''mises. In wittnesse whereof we 



LECEFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 135 

liave hereunto sett our hands Sc scales the twenty nineth day 
\)i July in tlie ffifteenth ycare of the raigne of our Soveraigne 
Lord Charles now King of England <tc. Annoq"" Dui 1039. 
Coram Johe Winthrop Gub. Ric. Bellingham & meipo. 

Thomas Foster of Boston in New England, Canonier, 
makes a letter of Attorney to Richard Foster of Ipswich, his 
brother, shipmaster, Anthony Boycat of Ipswich, cheese- 
monger, and James Brocke of Ratcliffe in the county of 
Mitld., mariner, to receive of the Executor of his ffather 
Thomas Foster, minister, Deceased, all such legacycs given 
him by his will or by Deed. 

Be it knownc unto all men by these presents tiiat I Tliomas 
Foster of the Castle in Castle Island in New England Cano- 
nier, Sonne of etc. Dat' 29 Julii, 1G39. Coram Petro Olliver 
k meipo. [Is.] 

John Cole of Farrington in the County- of Somerset, yeo- 
man, aged about twenty scavcn ycares, maketh oath that he 
knoweth that his brother William Cole and Elizabeth his wife 
did on or about the 20"^ day of xVprill Anno 1G37, pay unto 
Robert Nelson gent, the summe of sixtccnc pounds for the 
Debt of Francis Doughty, merchant, Deceased, father of the 
said Elizabeth, and this Deponent was present wlien the said 
Robert Nelson sealed [90] and delivered as his act and Deed 
one generall release thereupon unto the said William and 
Elizabeth to w'^ release now shewed to this Deponent he set 
his name as a witncsse. And also that this Deponent know- 
eth that at the same time the said Will"> and Elizabeth payd 
for the tythes of the farme called Hamsteed Farme, unto 
Marmaduke Chapman, Clarke, the summe of tenne pounds 
for \\"^ the said Marmaduke gave his generall release now 
shewed to this Dcpt to the said Willin & Elizabeth in this 
Deponents presence & he saw it sealed & Delivered although 
his name be not thereto inscribed as a witnessc. And also 
this Depoiit knoweth that Francis Doughty brother of the 



130 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

said Elizabeth ovcrhcld the said William k Elizabeth out of 
possession of the said ffarme called Hamstced farme ever since 
their marriage, how rightfully this Depoiit knoweth not. [l.s.] 

Thomas Marslifeild had of John lies ^ of Dorchester in X. 
E. 28i to be payd to Adam Ilurden of Barnstaple in Devon, 
in or about the moncth of January last past, w*"^ was the Debt 
of lies. Now the said Thomas M. and Henry Woolcott and 
William Gaylard are to be bound to secure John lies of all 
Damages thereabout. 

Nos Thoma Marshfeild de Windsor sup flumcn Do Kennect- 
icot in America, plantatore, Ilenricum Woolcott De eadem, et 
Will™ Gayhird De eadem plantatores, tener' etc. Joh' lies in 
501 Dat' 29. 5. 1639. Coram — 

The Condicon of this obligation is such that wliereas the 
abovebounden Thomas Marshfield heretofore received of the 
abovenamcd John lies the summe of twenty & eight pounds 
in New England the which or the like summe the said 
Thomas undertooke to pay unto one Adam Hurden of Barn- 
staple in the County of Devon unto whome the said John lies 
Did owe the same If therefore the said Thomas Henry and 
William their heires executors or administrators or any of 
them shall from time to time and at all times hereafter upon 
reasonable notice save & keepe harmelesse the said John lies 
his heires executors <fc adiiirs of &. from all suits troubles 
Dammagcs costs &, charges that shall arise and come upon 
him or them for or by reason of the said Debt of twenty & 
eight pounds heretofore Due unto the said Adam Hurden Then 
this obligation to be voyd & of none effect or els to rcmaine 
& be in full power strength & vertue. [Is. Qd.~\ 

1 I suppose thnt John lies here men- he moved to "Windsor in 1G38. AVolcott, 

tioned was the man whom tradition pre- also from Dorchester, was one of the 

sented to Jlr. Savage nnder the name earliest settlers at Windsor, to which 

of John Hills. This latter was said to place he journeyed in 1G35. Tlionias 

be a blacksmith of Dorchester. Thomas Marshfield is supposed to have come 

lilarshfield and Henry Wolcott, of from Dorchester also; but this cannot 

Windsor, are spoken of in tlie Xote-hooh be made certain without confounding 

several times ( ])p. 174, 180). William him with Thomas Marshall. 
Gavlord had been of Dorchester, whence 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. lo"( 

Me Thoma ^rarslificld Dc Windsor sup fliimcn De Kcnncct 
ic-ot in America plantatorem toner' &c. Henrico Woolcott & 
Willo Gaylard in Centum libris «fcc. Dat' 29. 5. 1631^ 
coram. 

The CondicoTi to save harmelesso them of the said bond tc 
John lies. [Is. 6t?.] 

[91] Mc Franciscii Doughty De Dorcestria in N. A. plan^ 
tator' tener' etc. Henrico Webb in quingentis libris <tc. Dat 
29. 5. 1G39. Coram Johe Winthrop gub. k meipu. 

The Condicuh to save harmclcsse the said Henrv of ono 
recognizance of 5001 to the King, entred into at the request of 
the said Fr : by the said H. condiconcd for the personall 
appearance of the said Fr : at the next quarter Court lieere 
to answer Willm. Cole <fc Elizabeth his wife in such actions & 
Demands as they shall bring against him & in particularc one 
accon upon the case. [Is.] 

Me Richardii Parker de Boston in N. A. m[ercatorem], 
tener' <tc. Samueli Hutchinson, m. et Tho : Savage in 18001 
Dat' 8. 5. 1639. coram. 

Condiconed for the payment of 9391 Ig.s. Ad., 9. 11. prx° at 
the late dwelling house of W. H. in Boston aforesaid. [Is.] 

Joseph Hills ^ of Charlcstowne in New England, Woollen- 
draper, aged about 36 yeares, sworne, saith upon his oath 
that he came to New England undertaker in the ship called 
the Susan &, Ellen of London, whereof w^as Master Mr 
Edward Payne, in the yeare of our Lord One thousand six 
hundred thirty and eight, the 14th yeare of the raigne of our 
Sou'aigne Lord the King that now is, and this dep* knowes 
that Divers goods <t chattells victualls & commodities of 
Joseph Loomis, late of BrayntVee in the County of Essex, 

* Joseph Hills was afterwards select- of "Windsor, was not first at Dorchester, 

nmn of Charlestown and captain of mi- perhaps, and tlie family tradition tliut he 

litia in the town, and also representative came in the ' Jlary and John ' is wrong. " 

in the General Court and Speaker of the He thinks that Loomis came in 16158 ; 

House. JosephLoomis, Savage says, was it does not say here when he came. 



138 LECIlFOnD-S ilAXUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

«-ooIlo„dn,por, w- ,,,,, j.^j ^^ .^ ,,__.^^ ^^^^ 

One iK. fhogshed, ono ban-ell, one tubb & throe lirkinrt ' ,, 
ported f,-o,u JIaldeu i„ the Co.nt, of Essex to Lond:,; ^ t 

Day Apnii ,„ t,,, yeare abovesayd, and thU De|«„,., ' 
cleared the said goods w'^ Divers other goods of tl c a 
Joseph Loo„„s and other mens, in the Cnston.e ho.^se 
London as may appeare by the Cnstomer's bookes, and thi 
Dop saUh that the said goods were transported nto Xe 
tngland in the said ship, where he arrived on the seave, 
tcenth Day of July in the yeare aforesavd. [1. ] 

RM^Volf'r;™*; T*° "" '"'" ^^ *'"=''= P''''^'=»t^ «>»' I Thomas 
Kucke of Charlcstowne in New England planter Doe hereby 

const, ute ordeyiio and appoint my welbelovod and trusty 

Pumnf^r°;r' "f'^°* ^""'^"" Laberdasher and Tiiomas 
Plum of Maiden ,n the County of Essex gent inv true <t lau- 
lull Atturneys joyntly or severally for me and in mv name to 
Demand receive aud recover unto my use by suit 'of la,v or 

th a,d Debts bo if any of them be misreeited in the 

fct, ,n T 'TT'"'" """'-'f ™'^'"' ^ '"^"^»"«^ °f ^ f'-«» 'I'o 
scveial Debtors owing the same unto me whose names are 

meant & mentioned also in the said Schedule and to that end 

& purpose or me and in my name to sue arrest i- impleade 

the said debtors and every or any of them bv what name or 

names soever they be called upon or for their said severall 

DeMs and the same to reeover by due proeisse in any his 

Mats Corts of Justice whatsoever and further for me & in my 

name to compound & agree w- all or any of the said Debtors 

for their severall Debts aforesaid and tlie same of them & 

every of them to receive to my use and after sueh pavment 

and safsfacfon m my name to give them or anv of' them 

sulTieient aeqmttanee and acquittances release <t releases and 

to doe or make any other lawfull & reasonable act or tiling 

whatsoever for & about the receipt & recovery of the said 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 139 

Debts as powerfully & effectually as if I myselfe were present 
Katefyiiig &c. Dat' 80. 5. 1639. [2s. Gd.j 

[92] John Grcy,^ & Elizabeth his wife, sell to Valentine 
Ilill, one house & homelott cont : an acre, and five acres more , 
therto belonging, lying in Lynne, heretofore in the possession 
of one Edmunds, — for 121 iu hand and the rest to be payd 
wlien it is sold, 40s. to Joseph Armitage, and the rest John 
Grey. 

Tliis Indenture <tc. BetAvcene John Grey of Boston in new 
England planter and Elizabeth his wife of the one parte xind 
Valentine Hill of Boston aforesaid merchant of the other 
parte Witnesseth that the said John and Elizabeth for twelve 
pounds to them in hand payd by the said Valentine have 
granted bargained & sold and by these p'^nts do grant bargayn 
& sell unto the said Valentine all that their house & home 
lott conteyning one acre and five acres of land more thereto 
belonging in Lynne heretofore in the possession of one 
Edmunds w'** the appurtenances To have and to hold the said 
house & lands & all & singulare the premises w^*^ the appur- 
tenances whatsoever unto the said Valentine his heires and 
assignes for ever And the said John <k Elizabeth Doe hereby 
Covenant promise & grant to & w*** the said Valentine his 
heires <fc assignes that he & they shall or may quietly enjoy 
the premises freed of all debts & incumbrances of the said 
John & Elizabeth for anything Done or to be Done by them 
the said John & Elizabeth or cither of them And the said 
Valentine Doth hereby Covenant promise & grant to & \v^^ 
tlie said John & Elizabeth that he the said Valentine shall & 
will endevour to sell the said premises for as much money as 

^ One John Gray and Ins wife Eliza- selectmen of Boston. Later he became 
beth are noted iu Savage, with no date. interested in lands at Dover, and I sup- 
Valentine Hill here aj)pears in his pose lived tliere some time. He was at 
niost familiar vocation, as a dealer in this period often representative for the 
real estate. He was one of the most town. There is mention of him sev- 
enterprising of the Boston merchants, eral times in the Xote-bool: 
Ho came in 1636, was made freeman Joseph Armitage, of Lynn, was aa 
M\i\ also deacon of the church in 1640, innkeeper (see p. 202). 
and was for a lon<? time one of the 



140 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

reasonably he can and if he shall sell the same for more then 
twelve pounds then he shall and will pay out of such moneys 
above twelve pounds to be raysed thereof fforty shillings to 
Joseph Armitage and shall & will pay the rest whatsoever it 
shall be to the said John Grey. In witnessc <fcc. 1. G. IGoO. 
p Eliz: Coram. 

Robert Meriam of Concord in New England planter, aged 
about 26 ycares, sworne, Deposeth upon his oath that in the 
moneth of Aprill in the foureteenth yeare of the Kings 
Ma*^ raigne that now is he delivered unto "William Hatch ^ 
one of the undertakers in the ship called the Castle of 
London, for her voyage to Xew England that yeare, in the 
Master's Roundhouse aboard the said ship while she was in 
the River of Thames, the summe of thirty & five pounds of 
la^vfull money of England, in the behalfe of Joseph Meriam 
brother of this Deponent, and the said William Hatch sayd 
to this Deponent at the tyme when he received the said 
money, I shall not need to give you an acquittance for this 
money, I will sett it Downe in writing heere for remem- 
brance, or wordes to that effect, and this Depon' then saw 
him write upon some paper, but what he writ this De- 
pon' knoweth not. Jur' 1. (6.) 1639. Coram Johe Winthrop 
Gub^ [Is.] 

A Rate for Boston made 29. 5. 1639, written for M^ 
Cogan. [Is. 6d.] 

[93] Edmund Hubbard of Hingham in New England 
Planter and Sarah his wiie sometime wife of John Lyford 
Gierke Deceased Obadiah Lyford Gierke deceased and Mor- 
decai Lyford his brother and lieire ffree land in the County 
of Tyrone. And the lease of Leballeglishe. [Is. 6(^.] 

Joseph Meriam against William Hatch for 5^ above the 
said thirty pounds on the affidavit & 5^ 14s. more under his 
hand. [2s. 0.] " 

1 There is much in the Kotc-hook on this case (see p. 105). 



LECUFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 141 

Gabriel Fish ^ of Exeter in Now England, ffisherman, 
makes a letter of Attorney to Edward Rishworth of the 
same husbandman, to receive of James Carrington of Thors- 
thorp in the County of Lincolne, gent the summe of tenne 
pounds w"=^ he was to receive of John Hutchinson of 
Alford in the s<i County, woollen draper, the remainder 
of 181 Due upon one bond left w*'' the said M^ Carrington, 
Dat' 3 Aug. 1G39. Coram Sam : H[utchinson] E. Hutchinson 
k meipo, [Is.] 

John \\''intlirop EsqF Governor of the Jurisdiction of the 
Massachusetts Bay in Xcw England Szc. to all or any his 
Majesties Judges & Justices and all other officers & others 
whomesoever it may concerne, greeting: Knowe yee that 
upon the first Day of August in the ffifteenth yeare of the 
raigne of our Soveraignc Lord Charles by the grace of God 
King of England, Scotland, France and Ireland Defender of 
the ffaith <fcc. Mordccai Lyford, an infant under the age 
of twenty and one yeares, that is to say, of the age of 
foureteene yeares or thereabouts as described came before 
me and Did elect and choose his ffather-in-law Edmund 
Hubbard ^ of Hingham in New England planter, then also 

1 Gabriel Fish was an early inhabit- Monlecai, Hingham, 1642." And under 
ant of Boston, and soon moved back from Edmund Hobart he says: " I see reason 
Exeter, where ho had gone in 1038. Ed- to infer that a widow Lyford, whom he 
ward Rishworth, Exeter, 1639, mryried a married later in life, was relict of tliat 
daughter of the Eev. John Wheehnight, Rev. John Lyford who was at Ply- 
founder of Exeter. He was a son of the mouth." This, under the light of this 
Rev. Thomas Rishworth, and a nephew entry and those immediately following, 
of Samuel Hutchinson, being a son of is seen to be substantially correct. Sarah 
his sister. (not Anne, as Savage thinks) had bi^en 

2 Of these people Savage has the fol- the wife of Eev. John Lyford, first of 
lowingunder John Lyford, of Plymouth, Lebeleglish, near Loughgaid (Lough- 
who bred disturbance tlicre, and was gall ? see page 154), in the County of 
compelled to move away. "About 1627 Armagh, Ireland, and subsequently of 
he moved with some adherents to Yir- Plymontli and elsewhere, ilordecai 
ginia, and tliere died soon, it is thought. Lyford was their son, born about 1625. 
A reasonable conjecture is that he had For Ruth Lyford, see Sufr. Deeds, i. 27. 
wife, Ann, and children, Ruth and Jlor- After the death of John, Sarah married, 
decai, left at Xantasket, and that his Oct. 10, 1634, in Charlestown, Edmund 
widow, Ann, who died 1639, had mar- Hobart, of Hingham. For John Lyford, 
Tied Edmund Hobart, of Hingham. ... see Bradford's History of Phjmoutlu 



142 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

present before mo, to be his Guardian, for him and in his 
name to bring & foUowc or cause 'to be brought & followed 
all k all manner of actions reall & personall, and all I)e- 
mands whatsoever to make, that he the said infant hath or 
may have against any person or persons whatsoever for any 
Lands <fe tenements, goods k chattells or any other matter or 
thing of right belonging to him in any his Ma*'^= Courts of 
Justice in Ireland or elswhere, and there to clayme enter 
upon & take or cause to be claymed entered upon or taken 
into his hands, to and for the use of the said infant certainc 
Lands & tenements lying in the County of Tyrone lawfully 
Descended to the said infant. All which at the speciall 
instance & request of the said Edmund Hubbard and Sarali 
his wife, I have thought good to certify and in testimony 
thereof have caused the Common Scale of our Colony to 
be hereunto affixed the sixth day of August in the fifteenth 
year afores!^ ■ ■ .• 

[94] And at the same time Sarah the wife of the said 
Edmund IluJjbard was present before me and tooke her cor- 
porall oath in these words following ssc. Sarah Hubbard wife 
of Edmund Hubbard of Hingham in New England planter, 
aged about fifty 3 yeares, sometimes the wife of John Lyford, 
Gierke, Deceased, and mother of Obadiah Lyford, Gierke, 
deceased, and of Mordecai Lyford, sworne, saith upon her 
oath that the said ^^lordecai who hath this Day chosen the 
said Edmund Hubbard to be his guardian, is brother and next 
heire of the said Oliadiah. And also I have scene a sulficient 
Register of the marriage of the said Edmund and Sarah, tes- 
tifying that they were lawfully married at Charlestowne in 
New England upon the tenth Day of October in the tenth 
yeare of his said Majesties raigne. All w*^'' ttc. [3s.] 

Direct yo"" letters to ^ff John Bradley merchant in Cateaton 
streete in London or to Mr Richard Andrcwes at the signe of 
the ^feremayd near the Crosse in Cheapside, — to be sent to 
Mr Bladen. 

To all Christian people to whom these presents shall come 
wee Edmund Hubbard of Hingham in New England planter. 



LECHFORD'S MAN'USCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 143 

enarJian of ]\rordccai Lyford brother & heir of Obediah 
Lyford Gierke, Deceased and Sarah wife of the said Edmund, 
send greeting in our Lord God everhisting, Know Yec that 
\vc have constituted, ordeyned & in our place put our welbe- 
loved & trusty freinds William Bladen alderman of the city 
of Dublin and John Fisher citizen of the same city, our true 
& lawfull Attorneys joyntly and severally for iis and in 
our names or in the name of either of ns as the case shall 
require, to Demand k receive all and all manner of Debts 
rights & summes of money Due unto us or either of us or 
unto the said Mordecai Lyford, of and from any person or 
persons whatsoever that ought to render & pay the same and 
to that end & purpose in our name or names or the name of 
the said Mordecai to sue arrest & implead or cause to be 
sued arrested &, impleaded all and every such person or per- 
sons in any his Mats Gourts of Justice whatsoever for the 
said sums of money rights & Debts & them to recover to our 
use or to the use of the s*^ Mordecai and further reasonably to 
compound & agree w*^ all or any the said persons for the said 
Debts rights & summes of money and upon receipt thereof 
to give to all and every the said persons & person sufficient 
ac(]uittancc or [95] acquittances release or releases for iis & 
the s"^ Mordecai k in our names & his. And also to make 
& doc all and every other lawfull & reasonable act or acts 
thing or things for & touching the recovery of the said Debts 
rights & summes of money as effectually & powerfully as if we 
ourselves and the said ^Mordecai were present. And lastly we 
Do hereby Authorise k appoint our said Attorneys joyntly & 
severally for us & in our names or the names of either of us 
and of the said Mordecai, as the case shall require to sue for, 
lett and sett for reasonable rents all the Lands in the County 
of Tyrone or elsewhere lawfully Descended imto the said 
Mordecai, and to sue for, grant, bargaine & sell assyne and 
set over all our right title & interest in the Lease at Leballeg- 
lish in the Gounty of Ardmagh, for reasonable considerations 
and rents and it shall be lawfull for them our said Atturncys 
or either of them to bind us to make any further assurance 
by Recovery fyne Deed or otherwise as Counscll learned in 



144 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

the Law shall advise so as for Doing thereof we shall not he 
compelled to travell forth of the Jurisdccon of the Massa- 
chusetts bay in New England. Ratefying &c. Coram j)°' ct 
meipo. Dat' 6. G. 1639. [os.] 

Me Rob'"™ Waggett de TVapping in Com. Midd. nauta 
tener' kc. Edv'' Payne ^ nauta in lOQi Dat' 5. G. 1G39. Coram 
Sam : H. Ed : II. Nath. Micklethwaite &, meipo. Condiconed 
to serve five years according to Indentures. [2^. Q>d. given.] 

Three letters one to Mf Bladen and Mf Fisher and one 
to Mf John Bullingbrooke and the other to Mr William 
Peirson. [4 s.] 

Be it knowne unto all men by these p'sents that I John 
Cogan of Boston in New England merchant Doc hereby con- 
stitute ordcyiie & appoint and in my place putt my welbcloued 
ffreind Isaacke Northcot of Hunniton in the County of ■ . .i 
mercer my true & lawfull Attorney and Procurator for x^^u cv- 
in my name to Demand <fc receive of & from the Executor 
Executrix or Executors of the last will <fc Testament of my 
mother Elianor Cogan late of Tiverton in the said County 
of Devon - widd Deceased who or whomsoev he she or they 
are or shall be all ct every such legacy or legecyes gift or gifts 
or bequest or bequests by her the said Elianor my mother in 
and by her said last will & testament given & bequeathed 
unto me and to that end ct purpose to sue arrest & implcade 
or cause to be sued arrested ct impleaded the said Executor 
Executrix or Executors for the said Icgacie or legacyes gift or 
gifts bequest or bequests and the same of him her or them to 
recover in any Court or Courts whatsoever as the case shall 
require But if the said Elianor my mother did not give me 
any or not any considerable legacy or legacyes gift or gifts 
bequest or bequests by her said last will and Testament or 
Dyed intestate then to demand ct receive of her Executors or 

1 Edward Payne, master of the "Susan England John Cogan emigrated. He 
and Ellen," of London, as aboTe, p. 91. may have come from Tiverton, in the 
3 It is not known from what part of County of Devon. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 145 

Administrators of her goods rights & credits who or whomso- 
ever he she or they shall be all such childs parte &. portion of 
her personal! estate as of right belongeth unto me and to that 
end <fe purpose to sue arrest & impleade or cause to be sued 
arrested & impleaded the said Executors or Administrators 
for tlie said Childs parte & portion and the same [96] of them 
to recover in any Court or Courts whatsoever And for me k 
in my name upon receipt of the said legacy or legacyes gift 
or gifts bequest or bequests or childs parte & portion to 
make & give sufficient & lawfuU acquittance or release ac- 
quittances or releases unto the said Executors or Adminis- 
trators And further for me k, in my name to Doe «fc make or 
cause to be done & made all & every other reasonable act & 
acts thing & things whatsoever for <fe touching the Demand 
receipt & recovery of the said legacy or legacyes gift or gifts 
bequest or bequests or childs parte <fc portion as powerfully &, 
effectually as if I my selfe were present Ratefying gratefully 
accepting & allowing all k whatsoever my said Atturney & 
Procurator shall lawfully Doe in the premises In witnesse 
whereof I have hereunto set my hand & scale the seaventh 
Day of August In the ffifteenth yeare of i\\Q raigne of our 
Soveraigne Lord Charles now King of England &c. Annoq"" 
Dni 1639. Coram meipo k Johe Cogan iun': [2. 6.] 

Be it knowne unto all men by these presents that I John 
Cogan of Boston in New England merchant Doe hereby con- 
stitute ordeyrie k appoint and in my place put my welbeloved 
ffreind John Stoning Citizen k haberdasher of London my 
true k lawfuU Attorney for me k in my name to sue arrest k 
impleade or cause to be sued arrested k impleaded John 
Harrison 1 late of Boston aforesaid gent for the summe of 
twenty six pounds foure shillings & five pence w*^*^ he oweth 

* There are also in the Note-hook unless he be tlie ropemaker of Boston, 

(pp. 121, 126) entries relating to a letter which I greatly doubt. I think he must 

of attorney from John Stratton of Salem be the gambler who was admonished and 

to Richard Plutchinson of London to fined lO.v. in a court held in June, 1639. 

collect money of John Harrison. This On this matter see pp. 97, 99. 
man is not to be found in Savage, 

10 



146 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



unto mc & promised to pay mc at Dayes «& times past and the 
same of and from liim to recover or receive by any course of 
lawe or equity in any liis Mats Corts of Justice whatsoever 
or otherwise And upon receipt of the said money w''^ all 
charges costs & Dammages concerning the same for me & in 
my name to give & make or cause to be made & given unto 
him a sufficient release & Discharge And all & every other 
lawfull & reasonable act or acts thing or things touching the 
recovery or receipt of the said money for me <fe in my name 
to make & doe or cause to be made & Done as powerfully 
k effectually as if I my selfc were present. Ratefying &c. 
Coram meipo & Johe Cogan iun^ [1. 6.] 

Joseph Fabcr of London, Cooper, sells to Christopher 
Stanley ^ of Boston in N. E. Tayler, one house and garden 



1 Christopher Stauley, of Boston, came 
in 1635, and died eleven years after. 
Savage thinks he was called "tayler" 
because a member of the Company of 
Merchant Taylors of London. The only 
argument for this known to me is that he 
is often called Mr. Stanley, or Jlr. Chris- 
topher Staule}'. Besides the property 
here spoken of he purchased of the town, 
a few years before his death, several acres 
of the marsh in the Mill-field opposite 
Charlestown, where he built a wharf. 

Joseph Faber, now called of London, 
'though he may at the time have been 
in Boston, had for some years been of 
Boston, where he came in 1637, but 
stayed only a year or so. He is men- 
tioned in Winthrop, however, as being 
in Boston in September, 1640, which 
must have been a full year after the 
present entry. 

John Everet, alias Webb, of course as 
above, p. 60. 

These two houses are not very easy 
to identify. Anne Orrasbee was ad- 
mitted to the church at Boston in 1634, 
and recommended to the church at Ded- 
ham in 1639. She had a ^rant of land 



at Muddy River in 1637 [Boston Toiai 
Records, p. 24), and in the Book of Pos- 
sessions there is a note in the " Posses- 
sions of William Aspinwall at Hogg 
Island one Acre of Upland and three 
quarters of Marsh bought of Mrs. Ornis- 
bee " (p. 30). No land is found belong- 
ing to her in Boston. Robert Rice 
owned land, and had a house on Fort 
Street (now Milk) ; and taking this as a 
northern boundary would make the lot 
here mentioned part of Robert Keayne's 
garden, in regard to the boundaries of 
which there is some doubt. So it seems 
as though the question must reraaiu iu 
doubt. 

The other house is entered in the 
name of Christopher Stanley in the notes 
on the Book of Possessions, p. 96. The 
note reads : "William Balston sold the 
lot August, 163S, when it consisted of 
house, yard, garden, and close," backside 
of Mr. Coddington, " to Thomas Cornell, 
or Corn well, who sold to Edward Tyng, 
1643, and he to Christopher Stanley." 
This statement does not agree with the 
present entry ; and I must think that 
the deed from which it is drawn (Book 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 147 

lying in Boston aforesaid, betweene the house of Rob' Rice on 
the north p* and the house late M':'" Ormisbyes on the south 
parte, halfe an acre and 8 rodds more or lesse w'^^ the appur- 
tenances, for IGl 10s. A bond to pay the 161 10s. at the house 
afores*^ 

John Everct of Boston in N. E. planter, and Mary, his 
wife, sells to the sayd Christoper [Stanley] one house 
& garden thereto belonging, lying in Boston betweene 
the houses of Richard Bcllingham Esq': on the east parte 
& the house of Thomas Buttolph on the west, for 501 in 
hand. 

And the first house to be made over to the said John 
Everet. 

Nathaniel Enfling ^ of Boston, in New England, servant of 
John Cogan of the same, merchant, aged about 18 ycarcs, 
sworne saith upon his oath, that John Harrison late of 
Boston aforesaid, gent, being heretofore indebted unto 
this deponent's said master, did upon the eleventh Day of 
January last past make over and sell unto him one 
mare in Discharge of foureteene pounds of the said debt 
[97] and promised to pay the residue thereof, being twenty 
two pounds, unto his said master at or before the first 
day of :May last past, for the w*=^ payment the said John 
Harrison set his hand unto a note or writing now shewed 
to this Deponent, whereto this deponent also set his name 
as at witnesse. [Is.] 

To the right Honorable his Mats Judges & Justices & 
others whome it may concerne the Certificate of Increase 
Nowell Esq"^ one of the Assistants & Secretary for the Juris- 
diccon of the Massachusetts Bay in New England Knowe yee 

of Possessions, pp. 16, 17) referred to tioned in any other authority known to 

some other lot of land. Tliis lot in me goes towards showing either that he 

question was on Washington Street, near was in Boston for a short time only, or 

Cornhill, directly opposite the house of that he lived the most retired life im- 

Major Edward Gibhons and the shops of aginable. One would at least suppose 

Thomas Savage and John Newgate. that a ser^'ant to John Cogan could be 

^ That Nathaniel Enfling is unmen- found on the church register. 



148 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

that upon the eighth Day of August in the ffiftccnth yearc of 
the raigne of our Soveraigne Lord Charles now King of Eng- 
land <fcc. Xathaniel Enfling came before me & tooke his corpo- 
rall oath in these words following ssc. &c. w*^^ at the spcciall 
instance & request of the above named John Cogan I have 
thought good to Certify In testimony whereof I have here- 
unto set my hand & scale the said eighth Day of August in 
the fifteenth yeare aforesaid. [2. 6.] 

Be it knowne unto all men by these presents that I John 
Cogan of Boston in New England merchant Doe hereby con- 
stitute ordeyne and appoint & in my place put my welbeloved 
ffreind Nicholas Carwithye Citizen & Grocer of Exeter my 
true <fc lawfuU Atturney and Procurator for me <fc in my name 
to Demand & receive of the Executors of the last will & 
testament of Ignatius Jordan Alderman of Exeter aforesaid 
or of the Administrators of his goods rights & credits who 
or whomsoever they are or shall be the summe of sixty six 
pounds thirteene shillings & foure pence payable unto me my 
lawfull Atturney or assignes by bill or bond under the hand 
& scale of the said Ignatius w'^in a certaine tyme after his 
Death as by the said bill or bond remayning in the hands & 
custody of my said Atturney it Doth & may appeare And for 
that end & purpose to sue arrest & impleade or cause to be 
sued arrested k impleaded the sayd Executors or administra- 
tors for the said money & the same of them to recover in any 
Court or Courts whatsoever And also to demand «t receive 
all tt every such legacy <fe legacyes gift & gifts bequest & 
bequests by the said Ignatius in and by his last will & testa- 
ment given or that shall be given unto me my wife or chil- 
dren and to that end <fc purpose to sue arrest & impleade or 
cause to be sued arrested & impleaded the said Executors for 
the said legacy tt legacyes gift & gifts bequest Sc bequests and 
the same of them to recover in any Court or Courts whatso- 
ever for me & my wife and children or any of us and in my 
name & theirs or any of our names And upon receipt of the 
said money legacy and legacyes gift & gifts bequest & be- 
quests to make & give unto the said Executors or Administra- 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 149 

tors sufficient acquittance and release acquittances & releases 
[98] for me my wife & children or any of us and in my name 
<fc tlieirs or the name of any of us as the case shall 
require and further to make & doe all & every other lawfull 
& reasonable act <fe acts thing & things for & touching 
the receipt & recovery of the said money legacy & legacyes 
gift & gifts bequest & bequests as powerfully & effectually 
as if I my self e & my wife & children or any of us were 
present Ratefying &c. Coram meipo & Johe Cogan iun^ 
[2. 6.] 

To all Christian people to whome these presents shall come 
I Joseph Faber of London Couper send greeting in our Lord 
God everlasting Knowe yee that I for sixteene pounds and 
tenne shillings to me in hand payd by Christopher Stanley 
of Boston in New England Tayler Doe hereby grant bargaine 
& sell unto the said Christopher all that my house & garden 
conteyning halfe an acre and three rods be it more or lesse 
lying & being in Boston aforesaid betwecne the house & 
lands of Robert Rice Northward & the house & lands late 
m^ Ormesbyes southward and all commons & appurtenances 
thereto belonging To have & to hold the said house & garden 
& all & singuiare the premises w'*^ the appurtenances unto the 
said Christopher Stanley his heires & assignes for ever. In 
witnesse whereof I have hereunto sett my hand & scale the 
seaventh day of the sixth monetli in the ffifteenth yeare of 
tlie raigne'o'f our soveraigne Lord Charles now King of Eng- 
land &c. Annoq' Diii 1639. Coram. Jo. Webb, Richo Waite 
& meipo. [2s.] 

Me Christofern Stanley De Boston in N. A. Scissorena 
tcner' &c. Josepho Faber in triginta & Duabus libris <S:c. 
Dat' 7. 6. 1639. Coram. Jo. Webb Rico Waite & meipo. 

Condicohed for payment of 16 10s. at or in the said house 
unto the said Joseph his executors <tc. [Is.] 

To all Christian people to whome these presents shall come 
We John Everet of Boston in New England Planter & Mary 



150 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Everet wife of the said John send greeting in our Lord God 
everlastnig Knowe yee that we for fifty pounds to us in 
hand satisfyed & payd by Christofcr Stanley of Bostoii 
aforesayd Tayler Doe by these presents grant bargaine & sell 
unto the said Christofer all that our house & garden thereto 
belonging lying & being in Boston aforesaid betweene the 
house & lands of Richard Eellingham EsqT eastward & the 
house & lands of Thomas Buttolph westward and all Com- 
mons & appurtenances thereto belonging To have and to hold 
the said house & garden & all & singulare the p^mises w'^ 
the appurtenances unto the said Chrifef Stanley his heires «t 
assignes for ever. In witnesse <fcc. Dat' ut supra. Coram- 
Josepho Faber, Rico Waite & meipo. [2s.] 

To all Oiristian people to whome these presents shall come 
I Christofr Stanley of Boston in New England tayler send 
greeting in our [99] Lord God everlasting Knowe yee that I 
for and in consideration of the grant of one house & garden 
lying in Boston aforesaid betweene the house & lands of 
Richard Bellingham EsqT Eastward & the house & lands of 
Thomas Buttolph westward unto me made by John Everet 
of Boston aforesaid planter & Mary Everet his wife before 
the sealing & delivery hereof Doe by these presents grant 
bargaine & sell unto the said John & Mary all that my 
house & garden conteyning halfe an acre & three rodds be 
It more or lesse lying & being in Boston aforesaid betweene 
the house and lands of Robert Rice Northward & the 
house & lands late m^ Ormesbyes southward and all com- 
mons & appurtenances thereto belonging & the deed of 
Joseph Faber concerning the same To have and to hold 
the said last mentioned house & garden and all & sinn-u- 
lare the p'mises w^'' the appurtenances unto the said John 
and Mary their heires and assignes for ever. In witnesse 
&c. Dat' ut Supa. Coram. Josepho Faber Rico Waite & 
meipo. [2s.] 

Christoper Stanley for 101 lOs. Assignes the boy, and all 
writings concerning him, Richard Bayly, to be bound to 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 151 

Isaacke Cullimore ^ of Boston in N. E. Carpenter, his appren- 
tice, to serve liim from 24. 4. ult° for 7 yearcs, & to give him 
an ewe kidd at the end of foure yeares if he doe his duty, and 
5 at the end of the tcrme, meate, drinke & clothes, & Double 
apparell when he goes forth. 8. 6. 1G39. Coram Tho : Payn- 
ter & meip5. [2s. Gd.J 

Anne Coleman of Watertowne in N. E. spinster, aged 16 
yeares, and Samuel Hosier ^ of the same, her tutor & gar- 
dian make a letter of Attorney to JefTery Coleman of 
Colchester in the county of Essex, Say maker, and James 
Wade of the same. Clothier, their atturneys to receive of the 
Executors of William Coleman late of Colchester aforesaid, 
Saymaker, Deceased, the summe of 51 or any other summe 
or legacy given her by the last will & testament of the said 
Will-^ her father. 8. 6. 1639. Coram Gubern., Rob*" Feke 
<fc meip5. [Is. 6(f.] 

John Cogan aged about seventeene yeares ^ sonne of John 
Cogan of Boston in New England merchant, sworne, saith 
upon his oath that this Deponent, for his said father Deliv- 
ered at diverse times betweenc the 13"^ day of ffebruary and 
the 17'^ day of Aprill last past, unto John Harrison late of 
Boston aforesaid, gent., and to some others by his directions as 
this deponent believeth, for his use & behoofe, these wares at 
these prices following, that is to say, 

1 Isaac Cullimore (which seems the ^ Anne Coleman and Samuel Hosier 
more common way of spelling the name) did not get their five pounds as soon as 
is called a ship w right hy Savage ; on what seemed well to them, and made a second 
evidence I cannot say. His most prom- letter of attorney — to vhom I know not 
inent appearance in the Town Record is — for the same purpose. See p. 167, post. 
as being appointed to look to the car- - Savage speaks of John Cogan, Jr., 
riages and wheels of the great artillery, admitted freeman in 1642, as being son 
In the Colonial Record, also, he is spoken of Humphrey, who never came to New 
of as mending carriages, so that one England. I think this must be a mis- 
would think that he was something of take, for it very clearly says in this 
a wheelwright. He lived near Gallop's place that John Cogan, Jr., was the son 
Point, on the water-side, by the ship- of John. His age, now about seventeen, 
yards of Nehemiah Bourne and Thomas would make him twenty or twenty-one 
Hawkins, the shipwrights, and Thomas when he took the freeman's oath, ilay 
Joy, the carpenter. 18, 1642. 



152 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

One payre of wosted stockins at six shillings six pence, 
one payer of wosted stockins at eiglit shillings, 
foure Dozen of tobacco pipes at two shillings, 
hard sealing wax at three pence, 
one paire of wosted stockins at eight shillings, 
two payre of stockins at twelve shillings and eight pence, 
nyneteene yards of white fustian at twenty eight shillings six pence, 
eleven yards and one quarter of white Diinmety at sixteene shillings 

ten pence, 
one paire of stockins at twenty pence, 

in all coiuming to foure pounds foure shillings & five pence. 

[1..] 

Letter of Attiirney by Samuel Appleton of Ipswicli in X. 
E. g. made to Isaacke Appletoii & al. twice ingrossed 8. 6. 
1639. scaled Coram. Gubern. Willo Hubbard <fc meipo. 

James Brooke mariner ag*. the Governor <fc Society of the 
Mattaclmsetts Bay in Nc\7 England, for 30t worth of butter, 
chese and other provisions to Block Island voyage in the 
warres ag'. the Pecots in or about the moneth of July, Anno 
1636, and Dammages for the same ever since to his Dam- 
mage 601 Dcclaracon to be drawen. [Is,] 

[100] A letter of Attorney made by James Brocke of 
Ratclift'e in the County of Midd., mariner, to myselfe to sue 
<fe recover of the Governo'' & Company of the Massachusetts 
Bay in N. E. the said 301 & Dammages. 9. 6. 1639.^ 
Coram. [Is.] 

A Letter of Attorney p eundem to myselfe to answere 
Joseph Bachcllcr in a plea of trespass upon the case for 
words, 9. 6. 1639. Coram [0. 4cZ.] 

Francis Godsome- of Lynne in X. E. h. doth give grant k 
enfeoffe unto John Fuller of Boston in N. E. ioyner all that 

1 This letter of attorney will be Fuller was a somewhat common one, but 
found more fully in the Note-book, I am unable to identify either of those 
p. 101. here mentioned. Of the three asses- 

2 We unfortunately know little more sors, Knight is probably tlie mason of 
than is here stated of any one of the con- Salem, who had a grant of land in 1637, 
tracting parties. Godson is mentioned mentioned by Savage ; the other two 
in Mass. Col. Lcc, i. 123. The name are unknown. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 153 

his liousc and homo lott conteyning five acres and three 
acres of meadow and thirty acres of wood & upland thereto 
belonging & all privileges & accommodations thereto be- 
longing by the Townesmens grant or promise, — if Edward 
Fuller of Olncy in the County of Bucks yeoman shall pay unto 
the said F : GQi on or before the second day of February next. 

Articles. That John Fuller may refuse the bargaine and 
require his money at returne, but if Allen Brade Edward 
Farrington & William Knight shall deem the premises worth 
GOi then to pay 5^ for dam : to Francis. 

Not to receive the money if before the day Jo. F: send 
word of dislike but if dislike by letter come afterwards then 
to return the monej' to his father. 

Either to refuse the bargain for 5^ 

If in the mean while the said Francis improve and manage 
the premises from May day next he is to be payd reasonably 
if the bargaine take not effect. 

Jo. ; Fuller to receive of Rich. Brooks ^ of Lynne 40s. <t 
of Dunton 20s. towards making of selleragc, and 4 dayes 
worke of Edward Weeden carpenter. [Vacat.] 

[The above entry crossed out.'] 

John Crabtrce^ of Boston in N. E. joyner, to receive 
Solomon Greene sonne of John Greene of Hadley in Suff 
clothier his apprentice for 7 yeares & 1 yeare a journeyman 
<fc wages for that yeare 8t,<fe space for what money to be 
repaid. Dat' 12. 6. 1639. Coram Gub: & meipse. [2s. Qd.] 

John Crabtree and William Hudson ^ the younger flfisher- 
nian to have the one the sonne the other Mary Greene the 

* Richard Brooks lived in Lynn some - John Crabtree was sufficiently well 

tirae before removing (1650) to East- known as a carpenter. He may have 

hanipton, L. I. Edward Weeden — gen- been a good pne, though he sometimes 

eially called of Boston — came from charged too much (J/ass. Co?, iicc.,1. 301, 

f'ngland in the same sliij) (" Susan and 327). Of the Greenes — father, son, and 

Ellen," 1635) as Richard Brooks. As daughter — I can find nothing, 

for Dunton, I cannot fix him. There 3 William Hudson the younger — 

were Duntons of Reading, at this time probably the son of William Hudson the 

a part of Lynn. innkeeper — was at this time about 



154 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

daughter apprentices k to be guardians k receive lH a yean- 
for the 2 children as tutors masters and guardians of the 
said children. William Richardson of Hadley in Suffolk gent 
Executor, Josuah Foot of London Ironmonger & Thomas 
Hughson citizen merchant of London Attorneys. Coram 
Rico. Saltonstall ^ & mcipse. Under tlie Common Scale ami 
that the said Solomon and Mary choose the tutors & guar- 
dians abovesaid before the Governor. Tlie agreement also 
p""' scquetur in the next leaf but one. [2s. 6c?.] 

[101] To all Christian people &c I Samuel Appleton^ of 
Ipswich in N. E. g. send greeting in our Lord God everlasting 
Knowe yee tliat I the said S. have ordeyncd & constituted k 
made and in my place have put and by these presents do or- 
deyne constitute make & in my place put my wellbeloved in 
Christ I. A. J. G. D. R. R. S. & R. S. my true and lawfull 
Atturneys and dcputyes all or the greater number of them for 
me & in my name to enter on lawfully and to make a lease 
or leases of all or any of the lands and tenements both free- 
hold and Coi)pihold whatsoever of me the said S. situate lying 
and being in Monkes Elye in the aforesaid County of Suff. 
with leave of the Lorde of the Manor whereof the said Coppi- 
hold lands are held for and touching such lands for any terme 
of yearcs not exceeding the number of seaven yeares from the 
time of the making of such lease or leases and so as no such 
lease or leases be made in reversion but the same to be made 
only in possession and under what rent & rentes and upon 

twenty years old. He is here called time was an assistant. The governor 
fisherman. Later he was in a company here spoken of was John AViuthro]i, Sr. 
of vintners {Mass. Col. Ilcc, ii. 277), but " Samuel Appleton was one of the 
very probably he turned his hand to first settlers at Ipswich in 1G36. He 
whatever came iippennost. He served was chosen representative in 1637, and 
in the Parliamentary war in England, in the same year was chosen assistant 
being ensign in Mr. John Leverett's justice at Ipswich. The persons men- 
foot company ( JVinth., ii. 245), and died tioned as attorneys I have not the means 
in the summer of IGSl. of identifying. Isaac Appleton was 
1 Eichard Saltonstall came to Massa- probably either the son or brother of 
chusetts with his father 1G30, but re- Samuel, who liad a grandson bearing 
turned soon to England. He came back that name. 
to Massachusetts, however, and at this 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 155 

what Covenants & Conditions my said Attorneys or the greater 
number of them shall see fitting and also from time to time 
to discliarge place and displace lawfully all and singular the 
tenants that now or hereafter shall be of any the said lands 
or tenements. And also from time to time to fell cut up &, 
take off or cause to be felled cut up & taken off all or any the 
woods k timber now growing or being or w'^'* hereafter shall 
growe or be upon the said freehold lands and also upon the 
said Coppihold lands with lease of the Lord of the said Manor 
for the wood and timber on such lands &, to sell the same wood 
and timber for the use of me the said Samuel and from time 
to time to take and receive to the use of me the said Samuel 
or my assignes all rentes issues &, profitts of the aforesaid 
premises w'=^ now are due or w*=^ at any time hereafter shall 
growe or be due to me the said Samuel out of the p''mises 
aforesaid And generally to do execute and perform all and 
every lawful act and acts thing and things for and in the 
name of me the said S. as I shall by any letter or writing 
under my hand «fc warrant appoint or allowe to be done 
executed or performed as amply & fully as I the said S. in 
my owne proper person may or might doe. Hereby ratifying 
& confirming all k every thing whatsoever they or the greater 
number of them shall lawfully doe in the p''mises. In wit- 
nesse whereof I have hereunto set my hand <fe scale this 
eighth Day of August in the fifteenth yeare of the raigne 
of our Soveraigne Lord Charles now King of England <tc 
Annoq*" Dni 1639. Signed sealed & delivered in the presence 
of "Will : Hubbard & mei Tho : Lechford scriptoris hujus. 
And I John Winthrop Esq^ Governor of the Massachusetts 
Bay in New England having seen these presents signed sealed 
,& delivered in my presence have at the request of the above- 
named Samuel Appleton caused the common scale of our 
Colony to be hereunto affixed the day of the date thereof. 

Samuel Appleton. 
John' "Winthrop : 

Twice written Sc ingrossed. [6s. M. Attorneys — Isaack 
Appleton ar., Jo : Gurdon ar., Dan : Rogers cl., Ri : Stansby cl., 



156 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



Ri: Sebbornc cL, I Ap: ar. de little Waldingfield in Com Snfi. 
& Henry Smith D' of Divinity k Master of Magdalen Culkin- 
in Cambridge.] 

[102] William Hutchinson ^ of Aquidnecke in New Eu;^'- 
land gent and Samuel Hutchinson Brother of the said Wil. 
liam convey to Richard Hutchinson citizen <fc ironmonger 
of London all that their dwelling house in Boston in Xew 
England and the garden or orchard thereunto adjoyning and 
all courte yardes stables stalles outhouses commons & appur- 
tenances thereunto belonging parte of w*^^ house & garden was 
heretofore purchased by the s<* Wm. of John CoggeshalP 
late of Boston aforesaid merchant and the rest of the prem- 
ises was assigned to the said Will'" by the Townesmen of 



1 The names of various of the Hut- 
cliinsou family repeatedly occur in Lech- 
ford. Mr. Savage has published a careful 
enumeration of the dilTerent members 
in his Genealogical Diciionary. It will 
make clearer the papers relating to the 
family which occur later in the Note-hook 
to remember that William Hutchinson, 
the husband of the famous Anne, had 
brothers, — Richard, of London; Samuel, 
of Boston; and Edward, of the same. 
His sons were Edward, who came to New 
England before his father, Richard, and 
others who are not mentioned in Lech- 
ford. Of these brothers, Richard never 
came to New England at all. William 
came to New England in 163i with his 
wife and all his sons save Edward. He 
was forced through church troubles to 
remove in 163S to Rhode Island, where, 
with Aspinwall, Coddington, and others, 
he formed a political community, of 
which, in their second year, he was 
chosen ruler or judge. He died about 
1642. Samuel was of Boston. He was 
involved, with the rest of his family, in 
the Autinomian dispute (Mass. Col. Rec. 
L 207, 338). He may or may not have 
gone with his brother William to Aquid- 
neck, where he had a gi-an t of land, May 



20, 1638. He is subsequently mentioned 
by Lechford, however. Edward, tho 
brother, is not mentioned in the KoU- 
bool; except perhaps ante, p. 93. He 
went to Rhode Island, and from there 
to England. Of the sons, Edward and 
Richard are the only ones mentioned by 
Lechford. Edward came to Boston a 
year before his father and mother. With 
his father he removed to Rhode Island, 
but shortly afterward returned to Bos- 
ton. He served in King Philip's war, 
where he received a wound of which he 
died Aug. 17, 1675. Richard came from 
England with his father, but returned 
to London before the other members of 
the family moved to Rhode Island. He 
is repeatedly referred to in the Note-hook, 
as well as his shop, — The Angel and 
Star, in Cheapside, London. 

2 John Coggeshall, another sympa- 
thizer with Mrs. Hutchinson and Jlr. 
Wheelwright, also went to Newport, 
where he became one of the principal 
men, as he had before been in Boston. 
The house and girden alluded to were 
on what is now the comer of School 
and Washington. The Old Corner 
Bookstore occupies a portion of the 
property. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 157. 

Boston aforcs'^ by common consent and order of the generall 
court. [3s. 4001 consider.] 

Edward Hutchinson of Boston in New England mercer and 
S'gcant Thomas Savage ^ of the same doe convey unto the 
said Richard Hutch: all that our farme house k other build- 
iuges thereunto adjoyning and all the gardens yardes and 
outhouses thereto bclonguig lying & being in the precincts of 
Dorchester in New England and all that parcell of land called 
a farme <tc. and to thatch the new buildings daub the chim- 
ney lay the floores k hang the doorcs thereof & IG acres of 
meadow lying on the east side of Neponset river heretofore 
had in exchange of Captaine Stoughton for so much lying over 
ag : it on tlie other side of the s^ river lying next to the mill 
there and so along the said river : a farme lying on the east 
side of Neponsctt river bounded in on the east side with an 
higli Ridge w'^'* is Boston Bounds on the west side with a 
freshe brooke called Unkataquassctt and for the length of it 
to runne one hundred and sixty poles into the land w*^ all 
the meadow lying before it as it is bounded with a greate 
salte cricke unto the aforesaid high ridge as also tenne acres 
of meadowe or thereabout lying on the west syde of the afore- 
said fresh brooke with one little house and one frame with all 
the timbers and appurtenances thereto belonging either falling 
or standinge. All w^'* said farme k lands came unto us by 
purchase from William Plutcliinson ffathcr .of me the said 
Edward who purchased the same of Bray Rossiter- gent, to 
whome the s"^ premisses came by purchase from the Indians k 
granted by tlie Court k Towne w'^ all rights priviledges com- 
mons in Xocks of Land Islands or Inlands with all other appur- 
tenances thereunto belonging. [3s. 8cZ. 3201 Consideration, 
againe written Is. 8c?. and other writinges toto. 8s. 4'i.] 

^ Sergeant Thomas Savage, born 1608, turned to Boston, where he died Feb. 

married Faith, daughter of William 14, 1632. 

Hutchinson. He was disarmed in 1637 ^ gray Rossiter was of Dorcliester, 

for his sympathy with Sirs. Hutchinson 1631, but removed to Winsor, Conn., 

and Wheelwright, and removed to Rhode and then to Guilford; he died 1672. 

Island with the Hutchinsons, but re- John Gore was of Roxbury. William 

Wyatt I have been unable to find. 



158 



LECH FORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



These deeds attested & sealed by John Gore to William 
Wyatt before the governor & the common scale affixed 12. I; 
1639. Coram Jacobo Brock & mcipse. [3^;. 6cZ.] 



iza- 



[103] Memorandum that the Agreement bctweene EL..a- 
betli Legeri for her sonne Solomon and John Crabtrce is 
that the said John Crabtree sliall have to his owne use and 
behoofe for receiving the said Solomon to apprentice and ^vitli 
him the jearely summe of five pounds & tenne shillings from 
the executor of the last will & testament of John°Grccne 
within named if the said Elizabeth so long live and the said 
John Crabtree in regard thereof shall pay & allowe twenty 
pounds unto the said Solomon at the end of the terme o'f 
seaven y cares within mentioned according to the true meanin- 
of these present Indentures. Witnesses hereunto AVilliara 
Hudson k myself and M-: Governor knows the agreement 
also. [Is.] 

A letter of Attorney made by [blank'] of [blank'] in New 
England to Robert Barrington of Hatfield Broadoke in the 
County of Essex Esqf and Robert Keayne of Boston in New 
England merchant to receive of Thomas Coney of Staple Innc 
London gent the summe of 2001 dat' 13. 6. 1639. [Is.] 

A letter for M-; Cogan & M-: Keayne. 13. 6. 1639. [Is. OtZ.] 

A letter of Atturney by Benjamin Keayne 2 of Boston in 
N. E. gent to Tobyas Dixon citizen <fc mercer of London to 
receive 5t of John Harrison gent upon bill. 14. 6. 1639. 
Coram. [1.] 

A letter to James Brocke about Mr Peters letter & the 
Governors answer thereupon to stay the cause betweene M.' 
Bacheller & him till James Brocke returne. 14. 6. 1639. 
[Ad.] 

1 Elizabeth Loger may be tlie maiden 2 Benjamin Keayne was tbe son of 

name of Solomon Greene's mother ; if Robert. He lived in Xew England for 

not, I cannot tell who she is. Leger is some time, but finally returned" to Eng- 

not a New England name. land {Savage). 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 159 

Me John Hill cle Boston in N. A. carpenter tcner' <S:c. Anne 
Garrold ^ in viginti libris etc. dat' 14. G. 1G39. Coram me et 
Willo Barrel!. 

To pay her lOl upon the 24*^ of August w'=^ shall be in the 
yearc of our Lord 1656 at or in. the now dwelling house of 
George Barrell situate in Boston. [Is.] 

Timotliie Ilatherley^ of Scituate in N. E. Planter, pit. 
Joseph Young 3 mariner deft, for oOi of beaver worth 15^ 
delivered about y° 29'"^ 8. 1638 upon 1 Nov. into the • Mary & 
Anne to his custody to be carryed for England lost by the 
way. To procure a warrant against Young and John Pease 
of Salem a witnesse to declare for the pit. & Avrite M^ Hath- 
erly a letter to send some proofe of the quantity or to make 
oath himself thereof. [2s.] 

Knowe all men by these presents that whcras Gabriel 
Cornish* of Weymouth & !Melcomb Regis in the County of 
Dorset mariner did by his letter of Attorney under his hand 
<fe scale dated the sixth day of May last past authorize and 
appoint me Israel Stoughton ^ of Dorchester in New England 

1 Anne Garrold may have been the found in Bradford's History. Hatherly 
sister or the wife of Henry Garrold, of and AUerton, the latter principally, con- 
Boston, 1C3D, mentioned by Savage. I ducted the business of the Plymouth 
ran find the name nowhere else. George Colony with James Shirley, their Lon- 
Barrel and William Barrel were brothers ; don correspondent and his [lartners. 
and the wife of George was named Ann; ^ Joseph Young, I suppose, was of 
from which I imagine that he married Salem (Mass. Col. Rcc, ii. 36). Pease 
Anne GaiTold. The house spoken of was in later years a favorer of the 
was on Hanover Street, a little below Gortonist movement {Mass. Col. Eec, 
"Washington (Book of Possessions, p. ii. 50). 
421). < Gabriel Cornish never came to this 

- Timothy Hatherly, one of the country. There was a Gabriel Cornish 
prineipal first settlers at Scituate, was in Connecticut toward the latter part 
l-efore a London merchant. He came of the century, who might easily be a 
to Plymouth in lG-23, and was well descendant of this man. 
known there for some time, but went ^ Israel Stoughton, a prominent man 
home again. He came back again to in Dorchester, owned the mill alluded 
Ikiston in 1632. He died in 1666. In to a few pages back in the deed of Ed- 
regard to this matter, see itifra. Jliich ward Hutchinson, etc. He came to 
in regard to Hatherly, though not per- America, says Savage, in 1632 ; was 
tinent to the matter in hand, is to be admitted freeman 1C33; was representa- 



IGO LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Esq"- to receive of Thomas Ricliards ^ of Dorchester aforcsa;<] 
yeoman the summe of one hundred pounds of lawfull monov 
of England w'^i^ should be due unto him the said Gabriel froi'u 
the said Thomas Richards upon the thirtieth day of July tiien 
next coming & now last past by a bond or obligation made 
by him unto the said Gabriel bearing date the foureteenth day 
of November last past W^"^ bond ^vas left heere at Dorchester 
aforesaid in the hands of Thomas Millet tayler and upon pay- 
ment of the said hundred pouuds to give any manner of 
Release acquittance or other legall discharge for the same as 
more at large by the said letter of Attorney it doth and [104] 
may appeare. And whereas the said Thomas Richards made 
unto the said Gabriel Cornish one other bond or obligation 
for the same money av«'> bond the said Gabriel carryed into 
England and by his letter to me written did promise to 
cancell or deliver up the said last mcnconed bond upon notice 
of the payment of the said one hundred pounds to me by 
vertue of the said letter of Atturney according to the appoint- 
ment or demand of the said Thomas Richards, Now knowc 
yee that I have received the said summe of one hundred 
pounds of the said Thomas Richards according to the forme 
<fc effect of the said bonds and letter of Attorney, And there- 
upon doe by these presents for as much as in me lyeth for and 
in the name of the said Gabriel remise release and forever 
quitt clayme unto the sayd Thomas Richards all and all 
manner of actions and demands w"=^ the said Gabriel his 
executors or administrators have or can or may have against 
him the said Thomas Richards his heires executors or admin- 
istrators for and concerning the said debt of one hundred 
pounds or upon tlie sayd bonds or either of them. 

And further 1 doe hereby give ct grant unto the said Thomas 
Eichards the said letter of Attorney safe and uncancelled to 
have to him his executors & administrators forever. 

tivein the General Court for some years, i Thomas Eichards's name occurs 

and commamled the force against the seyerul times in the early Dorchester 

Petiuots in 1637. lie went back to Eng- records, but he removed soon after this 

land, and commanded a company for the date to Weymoutli, where he was liviuij 

Parliament in the Civil "War ; but died when he is next mentioned in the Note- 

of sickness at Lincoln in 1644. hook. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. IGl. 

In witnesse etc. Dat' 3. 7. 1639. [^s. 4J. A coppy of the 
letter of Attorney of Mr Stoughton under seale of the Company. 
Is. 8f/.] 

Omnia ista prerecitata acta fuerunt apud Boston in Nova 
Anglia coram me Johe Winthrop Ar Gubcrnator de le Matta- 
cliusctts Bay in Nova Anglia pro modo et forma prount 
superius scripta sunt In cuius rei testimon nomen meum sub- 
scripsi Sigillumq^ huius Colonia commune presentibus hisce 
apponi causavi die &, anno ultima supra scriptis.^ 

To the said letter of Attorney a publicke Notary sealed & 
subscribed & attested prount - sequitur. Omnia ista prerecitata 
acta fuerunt apud Waymouth et Metcomb Regis p'''^ modo et 
forma prount superius scripta sunt In cuius rei testimonium 
nomen meum subscripsi sigillumq'' meum quo in hac parte 
utor apponi causavi die et anno supra scriptis. 

BosTOX IX New Exglaxd 10° Augusti Anno Dmi 1639. 
At sight of this ^ my first bill of exchange any time after 
the twentieth day of December next coming my second and 
third not being payd I pray you pay unto M^. Robert Offley 
Citizen & mercer of London or his assigns the summe of fifty 
six pounds of current money of England for foure heyfers heere 
received by yoursclfe of me David Offley of Boston gent. I 
pray make good payment.. To my very loving friend Thomas 
Nicholls at Coggeshall in the County of Essex. [Is. 6c?.] 

^ " All these things set do^vn above according to the foiro ahove written. In 

were done at Boston in Xew England in testimony of -vvhich I have subscril)ed 

the presence of me, John "Winthrop, Es- my name and have caused my seale -which 

•piire, Govcraour of the ilassachusetts I here use to be affixed on the day and 

Bay in Xew England after the manner year above UTitten." 

and according to the form above written. ' There is another bill of exchange 

In testimony of which I have subscribed later in the Xotc-lmJ: between these two 

my name and have caused the Common men, drawn for the benefit of Stephen 

Seale of this Colony to be affixed to Offley, who, as well as Robert, seems 

these presents on the day and year last never to have come to America. Thomas 

written above." Nichols and George Nichols, mentioned 

^ "As follows: All these things set in the second bill of exchange, were also 

down above were done at Weymouth Englishmen, and I believe never came 

and Melcomb Regis after the manner and to New England. 

11 



162 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



Articles of agreement made the 16"* daij of the sixth moneth in 
the yeare of our Lord 1639 Betweene David Offley ( ;' 
Boston in Neio England gent of the one p'^ and Samukl 
Hosier 1 of Watertoivne in New England Planter of the 
other p^^ as folloiceth. 

Imprimis It is agreed betweene the partyes abovesayd that 
they shall & will be partners together in procuring sturgiun 
to be taken & cured and sold at Yarmouth in Xew England or 
elswhere for & during the space of foure yeares from the day 
of the date hereof. 

[105] Item that the sayd partyes shall beare equal! charges 
therabout. 

Item tliat they shall have equall profitts and account 
to each other upon reasonable demand from time to tymc 
during the said terme. 

Item that they shall not doc anything contrary to the 
mindes of each other therabouts. 

Item that neither of them shall admit of any other partner 
or partners without each others consent. 

Item that if either of the said parties shall be minded to 
imploy a greater stocke this way about sturgian than the other 
he may so doe upon his owne account & to his owne advantage 
charge & losse. 

In witnesse &c Coram meipe. [2s.] 

Robert Meriam of Concord in N. E. pltr. and William 
Boreman^ late of the same his servant put the said Bore- 

2 Samuel Hosier, of Watertowii, was tim than he turned him over to Wil- 

chosen constable in 1644, but otherwise liam Townsliend, thatcher, who, I ima- 

is not mentioned by contemporary au- gine, turned him over to .Job Judkin, of 

thorities. I should imagine that he was what trade 1 know not; and his last ap- 

of that well-to-do class who are not of pearance in this ^Vo<e-5ooi is in the act of 

a station high enough to get into the being turned over by this last to Thom- 

records as officers, nor low enough to ap- as Witherly, mariner. Now "Witherly 

pear therein as criminals, and are there- came from Connecticut, and went back 

fore almost unnoticed by historj-. there at times, and may have brought 

' William Boreman could not have Boreman with him; for we find against 

been a satisfactory apprentice. Kichard Boreman's name in Savage, "perhaps 

Gridley, the brickraaker, no sooner had of Wethersfield, 1645; was of Guilford, 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 1G3 

man apprentice to Richard Gridley of Boston in New England 
Brickmaker, for 6 yeares from 29 Sept. next, meat drinke 
lodging it apparell k double apparell at the end of the terme. 
in p'ncia mei <fc T. Savage. Dat' 19. G. 1039. [2s. 6c/.] 

TH03IAS EuCKE of Cliarlestoivne in Keio England planter Pit. 
William Hatch of Scituate in JVeiv Enyland planter Defdt. 

To the Governor k assistants of the Jurisdiction of New 
Plymouth in New England humbly complayning showcth unto 
yo*" Worshipps Thomas Ruckc of Charlestowne in New England 
planter that whereas this ComP" and one Joseph Meriam of 
Concord in New England Planter and AVilliam Hatch of Scituate 
in New England Planter Came joynt undertakers in the shipp 
Castle of London w'''' arrived at the port of Charlestowne in 
the moneth of July Anno Dili 1638. x\.nd one the said William 
Hatch of London was also undertaker with them and undcr- 
tooke by agreement to manage as a steward all their joynt 
businesse of undertaking and concerning every mans passage 
and all passengers goods that came in the said shipp and to 
take notice and keepe account how much every passengers 
goods and how much the said severall undertakers owne goods 
were in tunnage and what every one of the said passengers 
and undertakers were to pay for their severall passage & 
goods and to deliver to every [one] of the said undertakers 
& passengers their severall allowance of victualls & to cause 
that all the Caske vessells rundletts & provisions layd in for 
store and left at the said sliipps arrival in New England afore- 
said should be equally divided to the said undertakers parte 
k part like, for W^"" stewardship the said William Hatch was 
allowed by the said Com^^' k Joseph IVferiam the summe. of 
301 i and other profitts to the value of 20iimore in all SO^i 

1650." He may uot be the same man, militia, and was also one of the ■water- 
however. As for Gridley, he was one of bailiffs of the town for some time. He 
the very early settlers, and is frequently is mentioned in the Colonial llrxords only 
mentioned in the early Boston records, in the orders relating to the Plutchinson 
sometimes in relation to his trade as disturbance ; from which it may be in- 
brickniaker, and sometimes in regard to ferred that he was more popular in the 
his public duties. He was captain of townof Boston than in the colony at large. 



164 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

whereupon this ComP" hoped that the said William Ilat'li 
would have made a just account betweene the master of tinj 
said ship k others & the said undertakers. 

But the said William Hatch taking advantage of tliis 
Comp^'" sicknesse & weaknesse at sea did in the p'"sence of 
the master of the said ship at Boston in New England iu 
July aforesaid <fe at Charlestowne aforesaid overreckon mis- 
reckon account short & mischarge upon this Com^^'^ divers 
particulare things hereinafter expressed w""^ this Com^^' since 
came to the knowledge k remembrance of: And first this 
ComPi'^ showeth [108] that the proper goods of this Comf ' 
brought in the said ship did amount in tunnage but to tcnne 
tunnes & an halfe the tunnage whereof came to but thirty one 
pounds & tenne shillings but the said William Hatch charged 
the said ComP" w^^ fifteen tunns of goods & a barrell k for 
the same the ComP^' hath payd for the tunnage of so much 
forty five pounds whereby the said William Hatch overreck- 
oned this ComP^^ 14li Item by the said overreckoning of this 
ComP" goods the said Wm, Hatch charged the summe of forty 
sliillings on the said ComP'* for custome of foure tunnes k 
halfe oi goods more than belonged to the ComP" to allow for : 
at 9' by the tunne. Item thereby the said William Hatch 
overcharged this ComP" eight shillings payd to the said 
Master for primage k average and eight shillings more to 
lightermen for lighterage of foure tunnes k halfe of goods 
more than belonged to this ComP^' to allow for. Item the 
said William Hatch should have accounted to this ComP'' for 
three bushells k halfe of meale worth twenty and eight 
shillings W^" meale was to have bin delivered to this ComP^' 
for him k his family by sea according to common allow- 
ance but this ComP'^ having meale for his owne use agreed 
to receive his said allowance in meale altogether at land- 
ing but the said William Hatch never accounted for nor 
satisfyed this ComP" for the same. Item the said William 
Hatch hath not accounted for hor satisfyed this ComP^^ for his 
parte of the bread sacks brought by the said undertakers 
joyntly W^^ p' was worth ftlfty two shillings & six pence. 
Item nor for this ConiP>'^ parte of the cookes store by the 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 165 

said undertakers joyntlj provided w''^ parte was worth thirty 
six shillings and six pence nor for this ComP"^ parte of the 
vinegar hrought by the said undertakers of the voyage w'^^ 
parte vras worth 3 shillings & sixpence. Nor for this ComP"' 
parte of the empty rundlets k wine casks provided by the 
said undertakers ^\'^^ parte was worth two shillings & six- 
pence, Nor for this ComP"^ parte of the suger brought by the 
said undertakers w<=^ parte was worth eight shillings <t six 
pence, Nor for this Complaynants parte of the money for the 
victualls w'^'^ the Brother of the said William k 8 or 9 other 
persons the proper passengers of the said William had for 
three weeks together after the said ship came to anchor in 
the said porte which parte the said William Hatch was to 
answer for & pay to this ComP'^ they being his the said Wm. 
Hatch's proper passengers, & amounted to oQs. at the least. 
He prayeth that the said William Hatch be injoyned to sett 
downe the same in writing upon his oath. Item the said 
William [107] Hatch mischarged or overcharged this ComP'* 
with sixteene shillings <fc foure pence for tunnage of halfe 
a tun of goods of Henry Swan w=^ he refuseth & hath not 
right to pay so much because they were victualls & not 
broadcloth. Item the said William Hatch mischarged this 
ComP" with fifteene shillings and six pence for the tunnadge 
of Ann Baker her goods w'=^ the said Joseph Meriam did 
receive. Item the said William Hatch accounted short the 
bisket of the said undertakers w<=^ he sould at Boston afore- 
said wh''of the ComP" parte came to three shillings and three 
pence more than the said William Hatch did account for. 
Item the said W. H. hath confessed himself to be in ar- 
reages to the ComP" the summe of ITii 9! by his letter dated 
14"^ Sept. 1G38 whereof since the said Wm. Hatch hath paid 
the ComP^' lOH by the hands of Joseph Kitcherell and by M^ 
Sparhawke 35s. M. and by John Fishenden 17s. in all 12^ 
12s. Qd. so that there resteth due the residue whereof that is 
41 16. 9 to the ComP" So that the said William Hatch is 
in arrerages to this Complaynant the summe of 31. 6. Zd. 
pounds at the least. All w*' premises are well knowne to the 
said William Hatch. And because the said Complainant 



166 LECHFORD'S MAXUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

cannot so exactly prove the said particulare things as Iu-a- 
requires therefore he prayeth that the said William liutcli 
may be enjoyned to answer all the premises upon his oath 
particularely in wjiting and further to stand to & abide sucli 
order & decree tlicrein as shall seeme to yo"" worships to staml 
with equity & good conscience. And this Complaynant shall 
as his duty byndeth him pray for yo'' worships health & pros- 
perity and of the publicke. [6s. 8d. Sent to U\ Nath. Souther 
at Plimmouth 26. 6. 1639 by John Crabtrees friend.] 

Thomas Rucke of Charlcstowne in New England planter 
aged about 48 yeares sworne saith upon his oath that he know- 
eth that William Hatch reckoned with Joseph Meriam in the 
moneth of July Anno Diii 1638 being the 14"^ yeare of tlie 
raigne of our Sov : Lord Ch now king of England &c that he 
the said Wm. llatcli had received to the use of the said JoscjjIi 
from Robert Meriam his brother but thirty pounds & no more. 
And this deponent saith that he hath seen a note of remem- 
brance of the said William Hatchs owne handwriting in a 
little paper booke of the said Joseph Meriams v:"^ note cou- 
teyneth these words & figures following that is to say " July 
W^ 1638. One after pt of the profitts of the freight of the 
Castle and of provisions left in my hands comes unto w'^^ I 
doe owe unto Joseph Meriam 15^ 14^. William Hatch " : w'='' this 
deponent doth very well know to be the hand writing of the 
said William Hatch because this deponent hath often seen 
him the said Hatch write, and hath many other writings of 
the said Hatch at this time in his hands. [Is.] 

%' 
Th omas W atson ^ late of Duxbury pltr against John 

Rogers - of Duxbury planter : for Henry Blage brickmaker 

turned over to him for about 3 yeares about No : last 40s. to be 

pd at 12 Feb : for certaine brick tools 30s. for a fouling peice 

1 Thomas TVatson \vas at this time "Watson is hardly an uncommon one in 

winding up his affairs preparatory to Duxbury. 

returning to England, as vrill be seen 'X 2 John Rogers may have been the son 
by the later references to him in the lof Thomas Rogers, who came over in the 
Note-book. Exactly who this man "Mayflower." " Henry Blagge, Brain- 
was is uncertain, although the name tree brickbumer," 1643 (Savage). 

>■ ■ - . 






■r-K 



;lV-v..,.^.;;V.,\ 



N \>-^ 



LECIIFORB'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 167 

30s. in January last, and for 5 dayes worke about bricke <fc 
plaiiting in June last to himselfo k John Broomcii but 
"llogcrs undertooke to pay it. [Is.] 

New Plymouth in Nkw England 3 Sept 1639 

IN THE COURT THERE. 



Joseph Meriam of Concord in JVew 

England Fit 
William Hatch of Scituate in New 

Engla7id Deft 



in an action of 
upon the case 



The Pit complayneth against the defendt that whereas 
the defendt heretofore that is to say in the moneth of 
Aprill in the fourteenth yeare of the raigne of our soveraigne 
Lord [108] Charles now King of England the defnt was 
indebted unto the pit the summe of thirty & five pounds w*=^ 
he received of Kobcrt Meriam for the pits use and on his 
behalf which the defendt promised to pay when he should be 
required the same and the Defendt did afterwards indeed pay 
unto the Pit the summe of thirty pounds thereof. And 
whereas the Pltiff & Defendt upon the thirteenth day of July 
in the foureteenth yeare aforesaid did account together for 
divers moneys due from the one to the other & the Defendt 
was then found in arrearges to the pit the summe of fifteene 
pounds & fourteene shillings w"='^ then also he promised to pay 
unto the pit when he should be required the same and the 
defendt did afterwards indeed pay unto the pit the summe of 
tenne pounds thereof Notwithstanding the aforesaid defendt 
intending to deceive the pit of the summe of five pounds the 
residue of the said thirty & five pounds & of five pounds & 
fourteene shillings the residue of the said summe of fifteene 
pounds & fourteene shillings amounting in the whole unto 
tenne pounds & fourteene shillings hath not yet payd the 
same to the said pit althougli he hath bin required the same 
upon the 14th day of July aforesaid but refused and still 
doth refuse to pay the said tenne pounds k fouretecne shil- 
lings to the pit. whereby the pit hath lost divers moneys &, 
profitts & commodities w'^*' by trading with the said money he 



168 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

might have gotten to his dammage eleven pounds & ttno 
shillings thereupon he brings this suit. [Sent to Pljm : to 
M^. Nath. Souther p'^t devant.] 

In the Cort at Boston 3. (7.) 1639. 

Timothy Hatherley pit ) . , ^ , ^, 

__ . ^ ^ . } til a plea of trespass upon the case. 

Joseph i oung manner deft ) ^ -" -^ -^ 

The plaintiffe complaynetli that -whereas the Defendt. upon 
the last day of October last past Avas master of the ship 
called the Mary- & Anne & undertooke therein to transporte 
passengers & goods from New England to the porte of 
London and by the law the Defendt was to take care that all 
goods delivered into the said ship should be safely delivered 
forth of the same to all such persons as the same goods 
should apperteyne or to whome the said goods should be con- 
signed & appointed to be delivered by the owners thereof. 
And the Pit indeed saith that he being possessed of one par- 
cell of beaver skins of the value of 15^ of lawfuU money of 
England at Boston aforesaid upon the first day of November 
last past he caused the said beaver skins to be then & there 
delivered aboard the said ship into the Charge & custody of 
the said deft the said ship then riding at anchor in the porte 
of Boston aforesaid to be transported to the said porte of 
London <fe there to be delivered forth of the said ship unto 
M': Hooke by him to be disposed & sold to the pltfs use & 
, benefitt & was to make return thereof to the said plaintiffe 
in other commodities according to his letters of advice sent 
unto the said Hooke notwithstanding the Defendt afterwards 
passing over to the said porte of London in the said shippe 
did not deliver the said beaver skinnes unto the said Hooke 
although the Defent was required the same in the porte of 
London aforesaid by the said Hooke but converted them to 
his the said Defendt' owue use whereby the pit lost divers 
moneys <fc profitts & commodities w*^'* by trading w*^ the said 
other commodities [109] he might have gotten to his dam- 
mage 201 and thereupon he brings his suit. [2s. 6d. Is. Gd.] 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 169 

In the Court at Boston 3. (7.) 1639. 
John Rogers, de;^t y 



'.e case. 



The pit complajneth against the defendt for that whereas 
tlie defendt in the moneth of February last past ^vas indebted 
unto the pit in the summe of 40s. for the service of one Henry 
Blage whome the pit before that time did assigne & put over 
to the defend' in consideration thereof he did assume & promise 
to pay the same to the pit when he should be thereto required. 
And whereas also the defend^ in the moneth of February 
aforesaid was indebted unto the pit the summe of thirty shil- 
lings for ccrtaine tools that is to say two shovells 3 spades 
two pickaxes iron vyse smale lynes a furgin of iron <fc curtaine 
rings before that time by the said defend* bought &, had of the 
pit the said defend' in consideration thereof did assume & 
promise to pay the said thirty shillings unto the pit when he 
should be required the same and whereas also in the moneth 
of May last the defend' was indebted to tlie pit in the summe 
of thirty shillings for one fouling peece before that time by 
the defend' bought &, had of the pit. the defend', in consider- 
ation thereof did then assume and promise to pay the said 
thirty shillings unto the pit when he should be thereunto 
required And whereas the Defend' in the moneth of June 
last past was indebted unto the pit the summe of five shillings 
for five daycs worke done by the pit in the service of the 
defend' and one John Groome the defend'^ partner — the 
defend' in consideration thereof did then assume & promise 
to pay the said five shillings to the pit when he should be 
required the same. TV^^ said severall summes of money doe 
amount unto the summe of five pounds & five shillings 
whereof since the defend' hath payd the pit only the summe 
of thirty shillings thereof Notwithstanding the defend' little 
regarding his severall promises & assumptions aforesaid but 
intending to deceive the pit of seaventy five shillings the 
residue of the said five pounds &. fifteen shillings hath not 
payd the same unto the pit according to his the defend'^ said 



170 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

severall promises & assumptions although he was by tho 
Pit required the same at Mount Wollaston upon the nvnf- 
teenth day of August last past but did refuse & still dotli 
refuse to pay the said seventy five shillings to the pit to liis 
damage eighty shillings & thereupon he brings his suit. 
[3«. affid Jo : Groome Is.] 

To the right wor" the Governor council <fc Assistants of 
the Jurisdiction of the Massachusetts bay in New England. 

The humble petition of James Brocke ^ mariner sheweth 
that whereas tlie Governor k Company of the Massachusetts 
bay aforesaid were heretofore that is to say in the moncth of 
July in the yeare of our Lord 1G3G indebted to yo' petitioner 
the summe of thirty pounds for butter cheese [110] and 
other provisions had by them of yo' petitioner for their use k 
service in the voyage to Block Island towards the warres 
against the Pequods w^^^ thirty pounds should have bin then 
presently payd to yo'^ petitioner in the said moneth of July 
notwithstanding the same was not payd him till the nync- 
teenth day of the sixth moneth last past and whereas by 
deteiyning the said thirty pounds the said three yeares the 
petitioner lost thirty pounds more w=^ he could in that time 
reasonably have gotten by the same in trading to <fe from 
England hither according to the rate of SQt in the C as usu- 
ally merchants make of their commodities as well heere as 
in other countryes & the rather in this country because the 
adventure & danger is greater k the passage long bctweene 
this k England. These premises considered yC" petitioner 
prayeth y' worpps to order the worppful Gov of the Company 
to pay him for the said demand 30^ more or if you"" worships 
so think good you may put it to the consideration k verdict 
of a Jury whether the same be not reasonable to be payd k 
allowed to the petitioner k he shall be ready to stand to their 
verdict k yo' order thereupon k shall according to his duty 
pray for yo worpps health k prosperity k the publique. 2—6 

1 I am unable to find any mention, diesex, would seem to show that he spent 
except in Lechfonl, of this James Brocke. no length of time in the country. 
Being called of Ratclitie, County of Mid- 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 171 

To the right wor" the Governor Councill and Assistants of 
the Jurisdiction of the Massachusetts bay in New England 

Humbly complayning shews unto yo'^ worpps William Cole 
late of Chew magna in the county of Somerset gent & Eliza- 
beth his wife Daughter & executrix of the last will & tes- 
tament of Francis Doughty ^ late of the city of Bristoll 
merchant deceased that whereas the said Francis Doughty 
in his life time stood master of & had right unto a certaine 
lease of a farme called Hamstcd farme in the county of Glou- 
cester to enioy to him and his assigns during the lives of 
divers of his children w=^ farme was worth 2000^ at the least 
and was possessed of some small personal estate to the value 
of forty pounds or thereabouts and whereas Francis Doughty 
Gierke son of the said Francis Doughty Deceased being in his 
said fathers displeasure came to this comP" Elizabeth when 
she was sole and intreated her to speake unto her said father 
for the said Francis the sonne & to pursuade w**" her said 
father that he would bestowe and settle the said lease of the 
said farme on the said Francis the sonne in case that Jacob 
Doughty brother of the said Elizabeth were dead or should 
dye so that the said Francis the sonne might enjoy the same 
after the debts & legacyes should be payd & his will per- 
formed and then promised her that if she would so speak for 
him & that she could prevayle with her said father that he 
would so bestowe & settle the said lease & farme upon him 
the said Francis the sonne as aforesaid that he would give her 
a better portion than her father would give unto her and the 
said Compl' saith that she the said Elizabeth did speake unto 
her said father for the said Francis the sonne accordingly and 

' Of Francia Doughty the elder I volume of Miiss. Col. JRec, pp. 74, 191, 

know nothing more than is here set 203, 257, 272; also in the third and fourth 

down. He never came to America. His volumes of the same, if the investigator's 

son Francis, however, was a minister at patience should by any chance hold out, 

Taunton for some years, after which he Mrs. Cole did not get what she wanted, 

removed to Long Island. Of Cole, who finally full sick, and was cared for at the 

married Elizabeth Doughty, nothing is expense of the Colony ; after which her 

known, save that he died a year or two petitions ceased. The Humphrey Hooke 

after this date. The course of events in may be the same man as the one who had 

this case may be followed in the second dealings with Joseph Younge, mariner. 



172 



LECIIFORD'S ilAXUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



h r saul father d.d thereupon bestowe & settle upon the .V 1 
Fra„e,3 the sonne the said lease of the said farme to be 
after the debts & legaevos of the said Franeis Do.H.t.- f 
ceased shou d be pa,^ a„d his will performed and toTl^^ j 
A purpose the sa,d Franeis Doughty Deeeased did in h ' 
tune by Indenture make a demise of the said farm,, 
Humfrey Hooke merchant <t otliors for the terme of t 
yeares [lU] [,„,,.,.,, ,„ „^;,„.j f„,. ^ eZn „ -" 
his wdl namely for the payment of his debt & rav h . 
porc.nsforthe children of the said Francis and after ar 

farm Vwe '"*"" "' '""'' °''''' '^°"™-™"- «- ■ 
se tTed t best '"/■'™"'7 ""-■ «''' ■^-'J t»"o yeares ..,s 
set led A besto^red upon the said Francis sonne by his said 
father through the mediation of the said Elizabeth.' And 
sad Compi" say also that the said -Franeis Doughty Decea 
did by h,s last will & testament and by tl,e said Indcltur 
g.vennto he said Elizabeth the summe of 1C0> in moley A' 
goods for her portion & made her his sole executrix of his 

making the said Indenture or dying shortly after, so that he 
IS lyablo to pay unto flie Comp'"in regard of the premises the 
summe of 160, but the said Francis Doughty the son," l.avl': 
since gotten possession of the said farme & lease sold the same 
for above 1000. being altogether careless & little weigW 
his promise aforesaid did not give the said Compl' lliza! 
both when she was sole nor any time since the Compl" mar- 
riage, to them both or either of them hath not given a better 
portion than U.e said Francis Doughty Deceased did give no 
her the said Elizabeth although he hath often bin put in mind 
& required the same by the Comp'-, but hath refused & still 
doth refuse to performo his sayd promise. And whereas also 
by the said Ehzabeth her Exeeutrixship aforesaid shee had 
riglit to the surplusage of the money that should have bin 
maydo out of the said terme of tenne yeares in the said farme 
after he said debts & legacyes payd w* would have bin at 
least two hu,,dred pounds [«>;«t] so endeavoring to defeate 
the Comp". of the .said surplusage which seeing that it would 
Have bin two hundred pounds at the least it was & would 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 173 

have bin <fc still is in right <fc equity due to the said ComP"^ 
by vertue of the said Exccutrixship. And whereas also by 
the said Indenture made to the said Humfrey Hooke & others 
or at least by equity thereof all the debts of the said Francis 
Doughty Deceased & all charges going forth of the said farme 
■were to be payd forth of the profitts of the said farme or out 
of the said farme itself [ci/.^Acr] notwithstanding the said 
CompP Elizabeth out of her the said Elizabeths smale portion 
aforesaid was compelled to pay unto Robert Nelson gent the 
summe of sixteene pounds for the debt of the said Francis 
Doughty Deceased & unto Marmaduke Chapman Gierke tenne 
pounds for tythes of the said farme w'=^ being in all twenty six 
pounds the said Francis Doughty the sonne ought in equity in 
regard of the promises to repay unto the said Compl'^ \_Ci- 
jplicr.'] And whereas also the said Compl' William Cole at the 
speciall instance & request of the said Francis Doughty and 
for the debt of the said Francis became bounden with him in 
and by one [112] obligation bearing date the eleventh day of 
December in tlie tenth yeare of his Ma*' raigne that now is 
unto one Edmund Belsine whilest he lived of the city of Bris- 
toU sopemaker in the summe of three score pounds for the 
payment of thirty pounds on the twenty fifth day of March 
w'='' shall be in the yeare of our Lord One thousand six hun- 
dred k forty so that the said William Cole is lyable to pay 
the said thirty pounds to the Executrix of the said Edmund & 
he knoweth not how much costs & dammages besides if the 
said Francis doc not pay the same and forasmuch as the said 
Francis hath a purpose to remove his dwelling forth of the 
Jurisdiction of this Court where this Compl* cannot tell he 
humbly prayeth that the said Francis may be enjoyned hecre 
forthwith to save the pit. from the said bond. And because 
the said Compl'^ have not such exact proofe of the premises 
as the Law requires therefore they humbly pray that the said 
Francis may be enjoyned to answer the premises and every 
parte thereof in writing upon his oath. And further to stand 
to Sc abide such order k decree therein as to yo' Worships 
shall secme to stand in equity & yo' Supliants shall as their 
duty bynds them ever pray for yo^ worpps health <t prosperity 



174 LECHFORD'S MAXUSCniPT NOTE-BOOK. 

& the piiblique. [Gs. Sd. Copia os. 4d. A coppy of the 
words of the deed, id. Writing the action, Is. 6d. cop : 8s. 
4. 11. lOcZ. ffee 6 ver 7s. — rest 10.] 

John Winthrop Esqr Governor of the Jurisdiccon of the 
Mattachusetts hay in New England To the wor" my loving 
Friend & neighbor [William Bradford] Esqr Governor of tlie 
Jurisdiccon of New Plymouth salutacons in the Lord <tc. For- 
asmuch as blessed be the Lord God there hath bin & is and it 
much concerncth tliat ever there should be mutuall amjty and 
correspondancc betwcene our severall Plantations and to the 
end Justice may be equall administred to the Kings subjects 
w'^ us it will often come to i)asse that we shall have occasion 
to write one unto the other touching justice to be done and 
partyes to be righted in their causes as hath bin used hereto- 
fore according to w*=^ good custome I shalle request you that 
you cause full & speedy iustice to be done betweene Joseph 
Meriam & William Hatch in the cause herewith sent unto you 
according as you shall find the merits of the said cause to 
require And the like favour &, iustice you for any of yo" shall 
upon occasion offred finde w^^ us And I likewise send you the 
depositions of Robert Meriam & Thomas Rucke taken before 
myselfe concerning the said cause. Thus I wish you right 
heartily well to fare in the Lord & rest 

Yo' loving freind 

Jo W Gov'. 
Boston 22. (6.) 1639. 

\_This letter ivas afterward crossed out.'] 

Edward Wood^ for 13^ 5s. in hand assignes Thomas 
Cooper Sonne of Henry Cooper of little Bowden in North*°° 

1 Edward Wood here mentioned may Battels, and the Colonial Eccords Bow- 

have been the baker of Charlestown of tie) was allowed an inhabitant Xot. 

the same name, with whom Lechford 25, 1639, and had a house, though 

had dealings, as we shall see later. Leon- where it was I cannot say [hut see 

ard Buttolph (or Buttal, Buttol, But- Si/f. Deeds, i. 142]. He had later two 

tolph, Buttolfe, Buttle, for in all these limekilns on Captain Gibbons's ground 

ways docs his name appear in the Boston at Foxhill. "What connection he had 

Toicn liccords, while Savage calls him with Thomas of the same name is not 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 175 

laborer Apprentice to Leonard Buttolpe bricklayer of Boston 
apparel double at the end & ol for 6 yeares from midsummer 
last past, dated 29. 6. 1G39. [26-. 6cZ.] 

L. Buttolpe bound 'by bill to E. Wood: for 7i to be pd. 10. 
10. 1G39. dat' ut supra. \JocL'\ 

[113] Samuel Cole ^ of Boston in N. E. g. placeth John 
Colo his grandchilde Apprentice to John Mylam of Boston 
aforesaid Coop for 7 yeares from 1° 1! IGoS dat 5. 7. 1639. 
[2s. 6c7.] 

Thomas Hamond 2 of Hingham pit Edmund Hubbard [hlanh] 
dcf. for trespasse in his Indian corne since planting time till 
now to the value of 50.s. in his corne ground at Hingham. 
[Is. Robt. Jones John Tucker & Isack Martin.] 

Against David Phippen for trespasse w*^ his hogs in the 
same corne to the value of 40s. [R. I. I. M. Is.] 



clear. Thomas Cooper I suppose to 
have been the man who in 16il re- 
moved to Springfield, and was killed by 
the Indians in 1675. 

^ Savage saj's that John Cole, the 
son of Samuel, was born in England. 
If Samuel had another son besides the 
John noted in Savage, he must have 
died early, as would seem from the 
grandfather putting the boy to prentice 
rather than the father. John llylara, 
the cooper, had a house on the north 
shore of Town Cove, and a wharf in 
front of it. Some difference of opinion 
existed in regard to the spelling of 
his name, as well as to that of Mr. 
Buttolph. 

' Thomas Hammond came to Hing- 
ham, was freeman 1637, and after- 
wards removed to Watertown, and 
again to Cambridge. Edmund Hub- 
kird we have already noted. Of the 
rest, David Phippen was freeman ^larch 
3, 1035 ; is mentioned in the Colonial 
P^ccords as defendant in a case which 



was not tried. He removed to Boston, 
and died, meantime, before 1650. Henry 
Smith came over from England, and 
was made freeman this very year. He 
was an inhabitant of Hingham until 
1641, when he removed to Rehoboth. 
I think he may liave been some relative 
to the Henry Smith who was named 
with Ludlow and others as having leave 
to go to Connecticut. Thomas Under- 
wood while of Hingham was represent- 
ative twice, and once selectman. He 
afterwards removed to Watcrtown. John 
Folsom came over in the same ship with 
Henry Smith — the "Diligent," of Ips- 
wich — from Old Hingham, in Norfolk. 
He died at Exeter, whore he had re- 
moved Dec. 27, 1681. William Sprague 
came to Hingham in 1635, and lived 
there most of his life, though he moved 
to ilarshfield and back again probably 
be-fore this time. Joseph Parke I have 
not been able to fin<l. Parke was by no 
means an uncommon name, but I do not 
discover any Joseph. 



176 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

And against David Phippcn Joseph Parke Henry Smith 
Thomas Underwood John Folsom cfe William Spraguc for 
their fences being downe & unrepayred whereby all the tres- 
passes have ben don upon the pit. to his dam : 3^ [iideni l.^.l 

John Long^ hath a peticion to the Governor <tc for Mf 
Whetcombs ^ land. 

Showeth that whcras Simon TThetcombe Deceased had 
right to certaine ground in New England that one Isaackc 
Richmond did inclose for the use of the said Simon and the 
frame & timber he provided for the building of an house tliere 
and whereas Mary Whetcombe the late wife k executrix of 
the last will Sc testament of the said Simon did give all the 
right she had in the premises and intended all right of the 
said Simons adventure unto one Thomas Brooke who made 
his will nuncupative at sea & gave yo' petitioner all right in 
the said lands <fc premises & dyed. Yo'" pctioner humbly 
prayeth that for as much as the said Simon Whetcombe had 
some adventure in this Plantation that the said lands may 
be conferred on yo'" petitioner to wliome the right in equity is 
duely come if they may be found if not that then some other 
lands may be -given this petitioner in lieu thereof & of the said 
adventure according to equity and yo'' petitioner shall as his 
duty is ever pray for yo'' worpps health <fe prosperity & tlic 
publique. [1-'.] 

^ I cannot think that this is the man our knowledge of him is confined to the 

who came with his father, Robert, in the few facts which we gather from the 

" Defence " from London in 1635; for if Kecords " (Archccologia Avierkaiui, vol. 

so he woiikl be but ten j'ears old. It is iii. p. li). I liave nowhere found nicn- 

hardly pertinent to the case to know that tion of the land granted to him. In a 

John Long was, a year or two after this, letter from the Company in England to 

fined for distemper in drinking (Mass. Endicott {Mass. Col. lice, i. 404) it siys 

Col. lice, i. 316). The name occurs later that Mr. Whitcomb recommemls to the 

in the Note-book in another matter. Company one Isack Hickman to receive 

2 Simon AVhitcomb is, however, bet- liia diet and house-room at the charge 

ter known. He was " an active member of the Company. I suppose this is the 

of the Company at home," says ^Ir. man here called Isaac Eichuiond, of 

Haven, " but did not come to New Eng- whom otherwise I find no mention iu 

land. . . . We may conclude that he Savage or elsewhere. Thomas Brooke 

was a man of some substance, a respect- must have died at sea, since his will 

able citizen, and a zealous Puritan ; but was considered valid. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-DOOK. in 

Elizabeth Pole ^ Spinster agt John Treworthy gent 3. (7.) 
lOo'J. [Is.] 

A Certificate by the Governor that M^ John Endicott is 
alive. 3. (7.) 1639. 

John Wintlirop Esq^ Governor of the Jurisdiccon of .Matta- 
chusctts bay in New England to all manner of persons whom 
it may concernc greeting Knowe yee that John Endicott Esq"^ 
one of the Councill for the Jm'isdiccon aforesaid is Blessed be 
God at this present in full life & health w<=^ at the request of 
the said John Endicott I have thought good to Certifye. In 
testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name^ & 
caused the Common scale of our Colony to be affixed the third 
dav of September in the fifteenth yeare of the raigne of our 
SoVeraigne Lord Charles now King of England &c. Annoq^ 
Dm 1639. [2s.] 

[m] Lydia Dastin2 ^^fe of Josiah Dastiu of Charles- 
towne in New England aged about 26 yeares sworne saith 
upon her oath that^about a monetli since this deponent being 
in the house of M! Cradocke at Misticke in a ccrtaine roomc 
there at meatc one Robert Panarc offered violence to her & 
would have kissed her & offered to put his hands under her 
coats & sayd he came of a woman & knew what belonged to 
a woman & because her husband was not able to give her a 
great belly he would help him or such most shamefull words 
& he caused her to cut her hand & her apron in striving with 
him. And this depont saith that she refusing to commit this 

1 Elizabeth Poole is well known as history of Josiah Dastin, or of his wife 
being the founder of the town of Taun- Lydia, and still less about the incident 
ton, which plantation she began in 1637, here referred to. The name is usually 
a.s one finds in Winthrop (i. 252), who spelt Dustin. In regard to Matthew 
calls her "an ancient maid, one Mrs. Cradock's house near the Slystic, the 
Toole." She was at that time forty- ground was granted to him by the Gen- 
eight years old, having been bom in eral Court some years before this {Mass. 
1 J89. Her brother William accompanied Col. Ecc, i. 141), although Cradoek was 
her to Taunton, and lived some time not at that time, nor at any time, in 
there, but returned afterwards to Dor- New England. See Brooks's Mcd/ord, 
Chester, whence he had come. p. 46, and Drake's Lnndnmrks of Mid- 

' Little is known from contemporary dlcscx, p. 137. 
12 



178 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

wickednesse he used some threatening words as well I avUI 
be meet with you but if you will not do it for love you will 
not for anything else, and this offence being done late ui)on a 
last day of the weekc a little before night this deponent went 
presently purposing to make it knowne to goodman Kniiilit 
but he was at top of an house & could not conveniently conir 
downe at that time and her husband coming home late that 
night she made it knowne to him the next evening after. 
[1..] 

In the Cort at Boston 3. (7.) 1639. 

Timothy IIatherly. pit. ) . y j^ ^ t*i 
' i ^ ^ \ in a plea of debt.^ 
ISAACKE AlLERTON, defeildt ) 

(The Defcndt was charged to answer the [a feiv words in 
cipher']') The pit saith that the defcndt upon the first day of 
August in the yearc of our Lord One thousand six hundred 
thirty and six became bounden unto the pit in one writing 
obligatory in these words &c Xotwithstanding the said defend* 
hath not payd the pit the summe of loOt according to the 
tenor of the sayde writing obligatory but refused and still 
refuseth to pay the same to the pP' dammage 150^ & thereupon 
he brings his suit, [attach™* 2s. GtZ.] 

Idem rcsp*^ eundem. 

The Pit complayneth against the defend* for that whereas 
the pit heretofore that is to say in the moneth of [6/a;J.] in the 
yeare of our Lord [^blank] at the speciall instance & request 
of the Defend' became bound with & for tlie Defend' unto one 
Iblanic] Willis in one bond of [blank] Conditioned for the pay- 
ment of the summe of nynety five pounds <t fifteen shillings 
at a day long since past. And whereas the said defend* did at 
the sealing of the said bond in consideration thereof promise it- 
assume that he the Defend' would pay the said 95t & 15s. unto 

1 This case between Hatherly and Company and their English correspon- 

AUerton was doubtless something grow- dents, on which some light (though 

ing ont of their previous transactions but flickering) is thrown by Bradford's 

with each other and with the Plymouth History. 



LECHFORD^S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 179 

tlie said [Wa»/.] Willis according to the said bond & condicon 
thereof and that he would from time to time save & keepe 
harmlesse the pit of & from the said bond & all accons & 
repay unto the pit costs & damages that should come or be 
brought upon or recovered against the Pit upon the said bond 
or concerning the said debt when he should [U5] be there- 
unto required. . And the Pit saith that indeed the defend' did 
not pay the said 95^ & 15s. unto the said [idank-] Willis accord- 
ing to the said bond & condition thereof whereby the said 
[Uank'\ Willis hath by suit of law recovered against & received 
of the pit the summe of 1271 for dammages k costs of suit 
upon the said bond & for the said debt and the pit hath bin 
put to divers other troubles costs & dammages thereabouts. 
Notwithstanding the defend' hath not saved the pit harmlesse 
of & from the said bond nor from Icipler^ the said damages 
k costs of 1271 nor from the said other troubles costs k 
dammages although he hath bin thereunto required but re- 
fused cCstill doth refuse to doe the same to the pits damage 
1401 k thereupon he brings his suit. [Is. M.'\ 

John Tre worthy gent agt Eliz. Pole in a plea of trespas 
upon the case. M^ Deputy undertakes she shall answer this 
accon at the Cort in March next. M^ Peters p"^ Id of money 
in his hands recovered in another accon by the defend' ag' the 
pit is stayed by order of Court till the Court in March next 
when the Pit is to proceede in his accon against the said 
defend'. [Is.] 

James Brooke at the suit of Joseph Bacheller defendt in a 
plea of trespas upon the case. The Defendt by T. L. his At- 
torney saith that by the law of the land he ought not to be 
compelled nor is he any wayes bound to answcre unto the pit 
in this Court because the pit hath not put in his declaracon in 
writing to remaine upon Record And thereupon this Defendt 
doth dcmurre in law k restes upon the Judgment of the said 
Court whether he ought to be compelled to answere the Pit 
otherwise in the said action. 

[!Z7u"s entry crossed out.'\ 



180 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



Elisha Bridges relcascth Mary Fisher ^iddow for 301 legacy 
given by Thomas Fisher ^ the testator to John Blackston and 
Sara his wife daughter of the said Thomas k payd by the said 
Mary executrix of the said Thomas Fisher unto the said 
Elisha Attorney for the said John BLackston & Sara his wife 
dated 4. 7. 1639. before Mr [blank] Hawkins Ed : Michelsou 
&, myselfe. [Is. Qd.'\ 

A Coppy of the said Bridges letter of Attorney. [l.«. 6(?.] 

A fine & two deeds acknowledged Sc sealed by [blank] John- 
son 2 k Jane his wife to [blank] Rossetcr gent of lands in the 
County of Som'* before MT Jo: Winthrop Gov^ & MF John 
Humfrey & myselfe 4. 7. 1G39. [2. 6.] . 



1 It is difficult to be sure of identi- 
fying this Thomas Fisher and Mary 
his widow; but I think hiui the man 
of that name who came from Wiuton 
,in Eiigkud to Cambridge in 1G34, and 
moved, says Savage, from there to Ded- 
ham in 1637. Exactly when he died I 
cannot say. The date here is two years 
after his removal to Dedham, which 
would afford him ample time. Some 
while after, this Widow Fisher, — whom 
I suppose to be the Mary in the text, — 
of Dedham, had liberty given her by the 
General Court to take the administra- 
tion of her husband's estate for the bene- 
fit of her children {Mass. Col. Rcc^, i. 
292). This Mary Fisher we may rea- 
sonably believe to have been the widow 
■who joined the Boston Church in 1647, 
and died 1653. "Great labor," says 
Savage, " I have found to conciliate 
these Fishers ; arid some of it may seem 
unsuccess." I think, however, this pas- 
sage in Lech ford supplies a link which 
was wanting in Savage's train of reason- 
ing. 

In regard to Elisha Bridges and John 
Blackstone and Sara Ms wife, I regret 



to say my researches have been less suc- 
cessful. The name of Elisha Bridges 
does not occur in Savage ; Blackstone 
may have been some relative to the 
Ecv. "\Vm. Blaxton, who had a son 
John. 

It seems to me that this Johnson 
is some relative of Davy Johnson, who 
came over in 1C30 in the "Mary and 
John" with Edward Eossiter, a mcmkr 
of the Company. They both settled in 
Dorchester, and died there, — Eossiter 
in a year, and Johnson some years be- 
fore the date of this entry. Edward 
Eossiter had a son of the same name 
as himself, who had property in the 
county of Somerset. I feel quite sure 
that the Eossiter here alluded to is one 
of the sons of Edward Eossiter. As for 
the Johnson, I am more doubtful. All 
my search in Savage has failed to find 
any Johnson with wife Jane. Francis 
Johnson of Salem, who came over in 
the same year as Davy, had a wife Joan, 
and he and his wife may be the ones 
mentioned here. It could not be Davy 
Johnson who is meant, for he died K^- 
fore 1636. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 181 

Daniel Gierke^ at tlie Kings suit for misdemeanor in 
drinking. Witnesses Jolin Wedgwood & Mary his wife, and 
Anne Crosse she thought. [3. 6.] 

[U6] To all Christian people to whome these presents shall 
come we Christopher Batt- of [Wa«i] in New England planter 
and Anne Batt wife of the said Christopher send greeting in 
our Lord God everlasting Knowe yee that whereas heretofore 
there was a certaine wine license granted by course of law in 
that Kinde to me the said Anne & to Elizabeth Maddox the 
wife of William Maddox & to Kathcrine Barriton to have & 
to enjoy to me the said Anne & to them the said Elizabeth 
& Katherine for and during the lives of me the said Anne & 
of them the said Elizabeth & Katlierine as by the said wine 
license it doth and may more at large appearc. Now wee the 
said Christopher & Anne for divers good causes <fc considera- 
tions us thereunto moving have released surrended & con- 
firmed & by these presents doe remise release & confirm unto 
the said Katherine all our right title & interest in the said 
wine license and all profits & commodities thereby accruing 
whatsoever To have hold & enioy all our said right title & 
interest and all & singular the premises w*** the appurte- 

1 Daniel Clarke, who is thus an-ested trade; but, besides this, he was at times 
at the King's suit, was tried at a quarter drill officer, commissioner for trying 
court held in Boston Sept. 3, 1639, and small causes, and many times deputy, 
found to be an immoderate drinker. He He came from the city of Salisbury, Eng- 
was fined £2, of which, says the Record, land, in 1G3S, lieing thirty-seven years 
he paid 3s. to the jury, and the rest to of age. He lived, as has been said, at 
Increase Xowell, the secretary. Besides Salisbury, in New England, and removed 
this, he does not api>ear again in court to Boston, where he was accidentally 
for some time, — nor, indeed, anywhere killed Aug. 10, 16G1. Of the others I 
else. I suppose him to be of Ipswich, can find no mention, and suppose that 
As for John Wedgewood, the witness, he the whole transaction refers to affairs in 
got small good for his trouble, for he England to which no successful illumi- 
was condemned to be set in the stocks nation can be applied. "Peter Thati'her 
at Ipswich for being in the company of clerke," called " our beloved brother," 
drunkards. He had serveJ in the Pe- may have been the rector of Salisbury, 
quot war, and had there been wounded. Wilts, father of Kev. Thomas, of "Wey- 

2 Christopher Batt, of Colchester, mouth, or brother of Rev. Thomas (and 
afterwards Salisbury, was a prominent son of TLev. Peter). 

man in his towTi. He was a tanner by 



182 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

nances unto the said Kathcrinc and her assigns for ever. 
And wo grant unto tlie said Kat. that we will at any time 
hereafter within the space of five yeares next ensuing make 
any further reasonable assurance of the premises unto the 
said Katherin at her costs & charges as she shall require bv 
advice of Counsell learned in the law so. that for the makin" 
thereof we be not compelled to travel above the space of tcnu 
miles from our dwelling place. In witnesse &c. {2s. (jd-^ 

And we hereby give full power & lawfull Authority unto 
our beloved brother Peter Thatcher, clerke, for us tfc in our 
names generally to doe all k every other act &, acts requisite 
for tlie firmc conveyance of our said right title <t interest in the 
premises unto the said Katherine & her assigns accordingly 
as fully & effectually as if we ourselves were personally 
present. In Witt : 

[117] To the non^l^ the Governor, Council and Assistants of 
this Jurisdiction and to the General Court thereof assembled 
10-7~1G39. 

I7ie humble supplication or petition of Thomas Lechford [late 
of Clements Inn in the county of 3Iiddlesex Gent, crossed 
out on revision]. 

Truly showing and acknowledging that he did offend in 
speaking to the Jury without leave, in the cause of William 
Cole and his wife ; and so much the more inexcusable was 
this delinquent inasmuch as he knew it was not to be done by 
the law of England. Yet he conceived it was not Embracery, 
for that he had no reward so to doe ; and some extenuation 
may, he conceiveth, be gathered by one or two seeming appro- 
bations of the like which he hath observed in other Causes 
here. Notwithstanding, he is heartily sorry for his offence, 
and acknowlcdgeth the justice of this Court, and is comforted 
in this — that he hopeth it may doe him good and the example 
be a benefit to the publick. Touching his speaking in j)ublick 
for future time, he submitteth to the wisdom of the Court ; 
and for that which is past, he came to the Court being retained, 
and it 's true stood there at the lower end, next the deputy 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 183 

Marshal, attending unto a cause or two wherein your peti- 
tioner was retained. It was to show his readiness to do the 
Country any service he might, as well as to get a little money 
fur himself. Some speeches of his, specially some involuntary 
and of sudden [interruptions ?] of some [in authoritie ?] being 
made, whereof some might be occasioned by themselves [being 
too tartly, as he conceiveth, rebuked and hindered by some of 
the Court] and zeal of speaking for his matters, may seem to 
offend such as have not been accustomed much to publique 
jtleadings of advocates. Such [passion ?] of his and involun- 
tary offences he humbly prayeth may be ])assed by : and such 
occasions of publique pleadings your supplicant will readily 
forbear, as not being sufficient or inclinable by nature there- 
unto. And he hopetli that this Court and Country may upon 
trial of this petitioner in some other [use] find him, as in nrany 
things [ignorant] so teachable and tractable. In the mean- 
while, if your petitioner hath any the least talent to doe you any 
service in any way of profitting himself [for his] livelihood, 
he desireth it. He is heartily ready, and humbly prayeth the 
same, in regard of his low and poor estate, not unknown to 
some of your Worships : Unfeignedly desiring both to live 
and die with you in the way of God's ordinances, wherein your 
petitioner hopetli in some good time or other some of the rev- 
erend Elders and himself may come to a perfect or at least a 
fair understanding of each other, which that we may do is the 
unfeigned daily prayer of your unworthy petitioner. 

Thomas Lechford. 



The humble peticon of Isaacke Morrell ^' Thomas Carter ^ 
blacksmithes in the behalfe of themselves ^ the rest of the 
blacksmithes within this Colony. 

Shewing & informing this Court that whereas heretofore 
Coles have bin in this Country sold them for 30s. a chaldron 

* Isaac Morrell and Thomas Carter behalf of blacksmiths ; whence I jiulge 
both appear in the Co/oju'a^ Ticcorrfs, but that it was not granted. In an entry 
neither iu connection with a petition in Sept. 27, 1642, the Record says : "The 



184 



LECHFORD'S MAXUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



no\7 of late tlicj arc raysed to 4i lacking but 2.s. clialdron, and 
moreover that they are forced speedily to buy them at tlun 
great price or els they can not be gotten for money but mo 
bought up tfc sent away into other parts of this Continent,— 
and yo' pcticoners conceive that unlesse some speedy remeav 
be found out to help & prevent these mischeifes their trade 
will be much hurt and the commonweal tli deeply prejudiced. 

Therefore yo' pcticoners in this case humbly crave the Ad- 
vice & help of this Court k shall dayly as their duty is pray 
for yo^ health &: prosperity & the publicke. 

Will™ Edwards bound in 5i to said Mr John Stone i of 
Hertford one servant within 12. moneth dat' 10. 7. 1039. coram 
Nath. Micklethwaite & meipse. [Is.'] 

To all Christian people 'to wliome these presents shall come 
Wee Thomas Mayliew^ of Watertowne in New England 

Governor, Mr. Dudley, Mr. Bellinghara, yard 1081. His ion, Thomas Mayliew, 
and lucr. Xowell are desired to consider Jr., was lost at sea in 1657, at the age 
of Goodman Morrel's petition." But no of thirty-seven. This passage sliouM 
further mention being made of it, I sup- correct some confusion in Savage's ac- 
pose that this also remained ungranted. count of the Mayhews, father and sou. 
Carter is noted in "Wyman (p. ISG) as a 
blacksmith. Morrill was born, it was 
said, in 15SS, came in 1632 in the 
"Lion," and lived in IJoxbury. He had 
a wife and several children, and died 
Dec. 20, 1661. 

^ John Stone had been of Hartford, 
but shortly aftef this, if not even be- 



Mr. Savage would make the wile of 

Tliomas Mayhew the elder to be Grace, 

the Avidow of Thomas Paine. Jane 

Paine, he thinks (perhaps a daughter of 

Grace), was the wife of Thomas ]\Iayliew, 

Jr. "Xor,"hegoeson, " do 1 believe that 

it was the son who was, in 1647, chosen 

by Thomas Paine, then fifteen years old, 

fore, removed to Guilford. William Ed- as with his wife Grace, guardians for him." 

wards was freeman at Hartford in 1658, Tliis becomes now much clearer. If we 

although he had been there since 1639. can trust Lechford, we must believe, first, 

2 Thomas Jlayhew was at this time of that the widow of Thomas Paine was 



"Watertown.but afterwards, about 1647, 
together with his son, removed to 
Martha's Vineyard, where they had 
charge of the church there gathered. 
He came to New England before 1632, 
having with Iiim his wife Jane and a son, 
Thomas Mayhew, Jr., the son of a former 
wife, at tliat time ten or eleven yeara 
old. Thomas Mayhew died in the Vine- 



not Grace, but Jane; second, that Thomas 
Mayhew Jr.'s wife, whatever her name 
may have been, was not the Jane Paine 
here spoken of ; and, la-stly, that whom- 
ever Thomas Paine chose in 1647 fit 
fifteen years of age, he did choose, eight 
yeai-s before, his father-in-law, Tliomas 
ilayhew, and his mother, Jane Paino 
Mayhew, to be his guardians. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 185 

mciclmiit and Jane Mayhew wife of the said Thomas Mayhcw 
sometimes wife of Thomas Payne kite of London merchant 
trnardians & tuitors of Thomas Payne an infant of the age of 
seaven yea res or thereabouts sonne of the said Thomas Payne 
and Jane Mayhew send greeting in our Lord God everlasting 
Knowe yea that we for divers causes & considerations us 
thereunto moving Doe hereby constitute ordeync & appoint & 
in our place put our wellbeloved ffriends Richard Payne of 
Abingdon in the County of Berks gent John Shepard of 
Totnester & Edward Barker of Yarnbrook in the County 
of North'"" gent and John Cooke of Wanting {_Wanta[ie'\ in 
the said County of Berks yeoman, our true & lawfuU Attor- 
neys and Procurators jointly or severally for us & in our 
names and in the name of the said Thomas Payne the sonne 
lawfully to enter on & to make a lease or leases of all or any 
the [118] lands and tenements whatsoever of the said Thomas 
Payne the sonne situate lying & being in Whittlebury in the 
County of Northampton lawfully descended unto him from his 
ancestors or any of them for any terme of ycares not exceeding 
the number of seaven yeares from the time of making of such 
lease or leases and so as no such lease or leases be made in 
reversion but the same to be made only in possession and 
under what rent & rents and upon what covenant or condicons 
our said Attorneys & Procurators or any of them shall see 
fitting And also from time to time to discharge place k dis- 
place lawfully all & singulare the tenants that now be or here- 
after shall be of any the said lands or tenements and from 
time to time to take & receive to the use of us & the said 
Thomas Payne the sonne or our assignes all rents issues &, 
profitts of the said lands & tenements w'^^ now are due or w'^'* 
at any time hereafter shall growe or be due to the said Thomas 
Payne the sonne or to us for him out of the premises. And 
further to sue for receive & recover the rents issues & proffitts 
of the said lands <fc tenements and all childs brothers or 
nephewes porcons or parts due or that shall be due unto the 
said Thomas Payne the sonne of & from any person or per- 
sons whatsoever lyable to pay & render tlie same to the use of 
the said Thomas Payne & of us k our assignes for him And 



18G LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

generally to doc render tt perform all k every such lawfull act 
<fc acts thing & things touching the premises for and in tin- 
names of us tt the said Thomas Payne as we shall by any letter 
or writing under our hand tt warrant appoint or allow to bo 
done executed or performed as amply k fully as we in our 
owne proper persons may or might doe Hereby ratifying k 
confirming all k every thing whatsoever our sayd Attorneys 
and Procurators or any of them shall lawfully doc concerning 
the premises. In "Witnesse kc dat' 18. 7. 1639. Coram : 

And I John Wintbrop Esq*" Governor of the Jurisdicon of 
the Mattachusctts Bay in New England doe liereby Certify that 
the abovesayd Thomas Payne the sonne did upon the day A: 
yeare abovesaid appeare before me w*^ the abovesaid Thomas 
Mayliew k Jane his wife k did tlien elect k choose tlicm to 
be his guardians k tuitors whereupon the said Thomas May- 
hew k Jane his wife sealed k delivered as their act k deed the 
abovewritten letter of Attorney to the use of the abovenamed 
Attorneys k Procurators in my presence In testimony svhere- 
of I have at the request of the said Thomas Mayhew k Jane 
his wife caused the Common scale of our Colony to be here- 
unto affixed the day k yeare abovesaid. [3s.] 

Payd W. Samuel Hutchinson in part of house rent — 13s. Ad. 
[16. 7. 1639.] 

Payd Mr Micklethwayte in part of house rent k making of 
the writinge to Mr Richard Hutchinson — 8 — 4. 

[119] John Rogers ^ of Dedliam in Xew England makes a 
letter of Attorney to Arthur Draper it Danicll Rogers to 
receive 36i of Thomas Rogers dated 17. 7. 1639. [2s. OJ.] 

•Elizabeth Glover ^ of Cambridge in New England widdowe 
for 241 10s. sells to John Newgate of Boston Feltmaker all that 

1 The number of John IJogerses to be be the men here mentioned, I imagine 

found in Sava!:,'c is so large, and they are tliat they remained in England. Arthur 

so confused, that I have been unable to Draper, for the same reason, I sliould 

fix this one by the slight hold that we imagine to be an Englishman. 
have on liim. From tlie fact that no ^ Jirs. Elizabeth Glover was the widow 

Thomas and no Daniel there noted, could of the Rev. Jesse Glover, of Sutton, in 



LECH FORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 187 

iiarccll of land contcyning forty nyiie acres or thereabouts 
lying ncarc llumncy marsh in New England abutting upon 
the sea towards the east upon the highway leading to the 
Lotts of divers men towards the "west on the lands of Rich- 
ard Tuthill on the north and the lands of Samuel Cole on 
the south, heretofore assigned by the Common consent 
of the Townesmen of B. aforesaid to Mr Joas Glover late 
husband of the said Elizabeth to him & his heircs for ever. 
[Is. Qd.l 

BosTOX IX Nkw England 23° Septembris 1039. 

Att three score and ten days after sight of this my first bill 
of exchange my second and third not being payd I pray pay 
unto Mr Richard Hutchinson of London Hnnen draper dwelling 
at the signe of the Angcll & Starro in Cheapside or his assignes 
the suramc of sixty pounds of currant money of England for 
soe much here received of S''geant Thomas Savage of Boston 
aforesaid I pray make good payment & place it to account 
according to advice. 

Thomas Allen.^ 

To my loving friend Mr Roger Delbridgo merchant at his 
house in Barnstable in the County of Devon. [Is.] 

Borrowed of Mr George Story 2 os. [21.-7.] 

Surrey, who died on the passage to New likely that this was the Eev. Tliomas 

England. Mr. Glover, it is said, had Allen, of Cambridge, the friend of John 

made contract with one Stephen Day to Harvard, though there is small ground 

come to America and set up a printing- for any decision among the three or four 

press at Cambridge. Accordingly we Thomas Aliens mentioned by Savage, 

see in Winthrop(i. 239) that Day on his 2 Qporge Story, who is mentioned 

arrival set up the press, altliough ilr. once or twice after this in the Notc- 

Glover had died. Mrs. Glover subse- book, I suppose to have been the one 

quently married Henry Dunster, after- who assisted Mrs. Sherman i her suit 

wards the first president of Harvard Col- against Captain Keayne two or three years 

\egQ{Savarjc). Mrs. Glover is frequently after this. For the whole of the story 

alluded to in the succeeding pages of the about the pig, see Winthrop (ii. 09, 116). 

Note-book. As for the land at ILumney No more is known of him, however, 

Marsh, see post, p. 141. than this, unless, says Savage, he were 

^ Thomas Allen. I think it most in 1643 of Maine. 



188 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



Mr Vincent Potter ^ tunies over "Willm Browne to Tliumus 
Jove 2 of B Carpenter for such time as he was to serve W. 1\,{. 
ter to wit 9 yeares from the day of his arivall heere ^\■''^ was the 
22th day of June last : for v,-""^ he is to pay 10^ at receipt of the 
boy & 101 iQo Maii i)X & ;Mr Potter to pay the money coven- 
anted w^^ tlic boy. [2s. Gc7.] 

John Wiclces ^ of Aqucdnecke in New England planter to 
pay to William Withington-^ oh 20 dayes after sight. 

Boston in New England, 24° Sept. 1639. 

Att twenty dayes after sight of this my first bill of exchange 
my second & third not being payd I pray pay unto William 



1 Vincent Potter ^vas in Xew Eng- 
land for only a shoit time. He came 
over in 1635, tcing twentj'-one years 
old. For a year or two he was a soldier 
at the castle, but went back to England 
1639 (see ante, 60, 65). As for Wil- 
liam Browne, he may be the same who 
•was admonished (Mass. Col. Ecc, i. 315) 
not to use such base speeches as he had 
on one occasion been guilty of. Other- 
wise, I fear we know him not, — unless, 
indeed, he be. one among the thirteen 
William Brownes to be found in Sav- 
age. 

2 Thomas Joy is, I am happy to say, 
by no means such an unknown quantity. 
He was a house-carpenter, who was at 
this time only two or three years in the 
town. He married Joan, the daughter 
of John Gallop, and lived in a house on 
the north shore of the Town Cove (Book 
of Possessions, K. 20, p. 127), some few 
lots to the east of his father-in-law. He 
removed, however, to Hingham about 
16-17, and lived there until his death in 
1678. As late, however, as 1660 there 
is a reference in the Toioi Records to the 
accounts of Thomas Joy and partner for 
building the town-house and staircases. 
Who the partner was I cannot say. It 
may have been William Browne. 



^ John Wickes had before this lived 
at riymouth, where he is said first to 
have met Samuel Gorton, with whom lie 
subsequently became involved. He ori- 
ginally came from Staines, in iliddlesex, 
where he had been a tanner ; and leaving 
his brother Thomas, he went to New Eng- 
land with his wife and an infant daugh- 
ter. At Portsmouth, where he lived, 
he seems to have had relations with the 
Hutchinsons, who remained there after 
Coddington and his friends had Mith- 
drawn to Newport. In 1643, however, 
Wickes moved across the bay to what 
is now Warwick, where Gorton and his 
company had settled. AVhen the Gor- 
tonists were brought to Boston, AVickes 
was one of them, and, with six others, 
was condemned to confinement with hard 
labor and irons. Wickes was confined 
at Ipswich, Gorton at C'harlestown, and 
the rest at other towns. I should im- 
agine that he was released shortly, how- 
ever, for in 1647 he was a town magistrate. 
He was killed by Indians 1675, at the 
age of about sixty-six. 

* William Withington, of Newport, 
was a carpenter. His name is merely 
noted by Savage as being oirthe list of 
freemen in 1655. The name occurs sev- 
eral times in the Xole-book, 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 189 

Witliington of Aquednccke iii New Engiand planter or his 
assigiies tlie summe of thirty-one pounds currant money of 
Kngland for so much of liini lieere received I pray make good 
payments place it to-account according to advise. 

John Wickes. 

To my loving brother Mf Thomas Wickcs dwelling in Stanes 
in the County of Midi. [Is.] 

Boston 2G. Sept. 1639. 

Att twenty eight dayes after sight of this my first bill of ex- 
change my second ct third not being payd I pray pay unto 
Mr Richard Hutchinson of London lynen draper dwelling &c. 
40i for so much here received of S''geant Thomas Savage. 

John Wickes. 

To Mr Tho Wickes ut supra and 40^ more 30 Sept. At 
40 dayes sight. [Is. 141 IQs. upon 14 dayes <tc.] 

[120] I John Winthrop Esqr. Governor of the Mattaclmsetts 
Bay in New England doe hereby Certify unto all manner of 
persons whatsoever whome it may concerne that Isaacke Aller- 
ton merchant hath no visible estate reall or personall heere in 
this Jurisdiction or Country for the present to my knowledge 
and yet I am well acquainted w*^ him & his trade <fc dealings 
in this Country And thus much I have thought good at the 
request of Mr Thomas AUyn to testify in witnesse whereof I 
have caused tlie Common scale of oar Colony to be hereunto 
affixed the 26'^ day of Sept. Anno Dmi 1G30. [Is.] 

Isaacke Allerton of New Plimmouth in New England merchant 
aged about 53 yeares sworne saitli that the ship White Angell 
■was heretofore in the yeare of our Lord 1631 bought at Bristol! 
of Alderman Aldworth by this deponent to the use of Mr James 
Sherley Mr Richard Andrcwes Mr John Beauchamp of London 
merchants ^ Mr Timothy Hatherley tiien of London feltmaker 

^ Shirley, Andrews, and Beauchamp Plymouth people looked for support and 
Were the London merchants to whom the aid ; they were their business correspou- 



190 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-LOOK 



<fc this deponent, but this deponent saith that tlic said Tim- 
othy Hatherlcy did afterwards refuse to accept of the s;iii 
bargaine. And this deponent saith that the ship Frend.Nlii:. 
was heretofore liired & victualled by this deponent in the vearo 
aforesaid for the use of the said Mr Sherley Mr Andrews .M! 
Beauchampc Mr Ilathcrley and all the partners & purchascr.s .,f 
the plantation of Plimmouth aforesaid. And further tliis de- 
ponent saith that afterwards divers losses falling out upon tlu- 
said ship Friendship the said Mr Hatherlcy and tliis deponent 
did in the behalf of themselves & the said MT Sherley M! An- 
drews & Mr Beauchampe agree & undertake to discharge vV 
save harmlesse all the rest of the said partners ct purchasers 
of &, from the said losses for two hundred pounds.^ [Is.] 



dents. The business affiiirs of the Ply- 
nionth Colony with these merchants, as 
conducted by Allerton, form a great part 
of the subject-matter of Bradford's His- 
tory, which must be read by any one 
who would entirely understand these 
matters. 

1 There is not here space enough to 
go at length into the transactions al- 
luded to in this case. Isaac Allerton, 
the business man of the Ph-mouth Col- 
ony for many years, in 1631 surprised 
and grieved his New England friends 
by bringing across the Atlantie these 
two shi[)s, the " White Angel," a trad- 
ing vessel, and a fishing ship, the 
'* Friendship." The following is from a 
letter from James Shirley to his Ply- 
mouth partners: — 

"Gentle-men, partners, and loving 
friends, &c., — Breefly thus: we have 
this year set forth a fishing ship and a 
trading ship, which later we have bought; 
and so have disbursed a greate deale of 
money, as may and will appear by y« 
accounts. And because this ship (called 
y* Wliite AngcU) is to acte 2. jiarts, (as 
I may say,) fishing for bass, and trading; 
and that while Jl^ Allerton was im- 
ployed about y* trading, the fishing 



might suffer by rarelesnes or neglecte of 
y sailors, \vq have entreated your and 
our loving friend MT Hather' " +o r:o'> 
over with him, knowing he ;. 
comfort to JI"' Allerton, a jc_ :i- 
to see a carefuU and loving friend, anu 
a great stay to y^ bussincs." 

Upon which Bradford comments a^ 
follows : — 

"It needs not be thought strange that 
these things should amaze and trouble 
them; first, that this fishing ship should 
be set out . . . And now a ship to come 
on their accounte, clean contrary to their 
both end & order, was a misterie tiny 
could not understand ; and so much y" 
worse, seeing she had shuch ill success 
as to lose both her voiage and provissions. 
The 2. thing, that another ship should be 
bought and sent oute on newe designcs, 
a thing not so much as once thought on 
by any here, much less, not a word inti- 
mated or spoaken of by any liere, eitlier 
by word or letter, neither could they 
imagine why this should be. Bass fish- 
ing was never lookt at by them, but as 
soon as ever they heard on it, they looked 
at it as a vaine thing, that would cer- 
tainly turn to loss. ... At length 
Mr Hatherlev & M^ Allerton came unto 



LECIIFORD'S MAXU SCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



191 



A note given by Mr Tho : Savage to pay 20^ upon 20 dayes 
sight after notice of 40^ payd Mr Richard Hutchinson of Lon- 
don by John Wickes to be payd to the said John "Wickes or 
his assg. Dat' 26. 7. 1G39. Coram me. [GcZ.] 

Mr David Offley ^ k Eliz : his wife make a letter of Attorney 
to Mr Edward Woolcott Mf Ilcnry Woolcott Richard Payne &, 
Christofer Atkins or any of them to let & sell receive rents & 
profitts ct to sell their interest of & in their coppiliold lands in 
Glaston for what money they arc well worth in time of peace 
dated 20. 7. 1G39. [Is. Q>d.} 

[121] A letter of Assignment & Attorney made by Mr John 
Stratton-of Salim to Mr Richard Hutchinson to receive 50^ 
of My John Harrison upon a writing under his hand of 1001 
penalty dated 26. 7. 1G39. 

And I John Wintlirop Esq*' governor of the Jurisdiction of 
the Mattachusetts Bay in New England having seen these 
presents signed sealed & delivered & taken the oath of Adam 
AVinthrop ^ my sonne aged about [nineteen] yeares testifying 



tliem, (after tlipy had delivered their 
goods,) and finding them strucken with 
some sadness about e these tilings, ^l\ 
Allerton tould them that v^ ship Whit. 
Angell did not belong to them, nor their 
accounte, neither neede they have any- 
thing to do with her excepte they 
would" {Bradford, 270 et scq.). 

^ David Offley, of whom we have 
heard before, was of Boston, and had <a 
house and garden on what is now Essex 
Street, near Chauiicy. He was a mem- 
ber of the Artillery Company. Removed 
to Plymouth 16 i3, says Savage, for 
which see Phjmoiifh Colon)/ Records, ii. 
57; but the date of the Book of Posses- 
sions (F. 106, p. S7) being some years 
later than this, I suppose that he moved 
hack again, as Savage inferred, lie 
is not mentioned in the Toiot Ri'cords 
after 1639; but that does not prove that 
he did not live in tlie town, for he might 



have been both unimportant and inof- 
fensive. 

2 Mr. John Stratton, of Salem, is a 
man of whom we hear more later on a 
difl'erent subject. He came to Salem 
from Scarborough, where he was as early 
as 1633, and is supposed to have moved 
to Easthampton, L. I., about 1643. He 
is mentioned several times in the Col- 
onial Bccorels, in various ways, — once 
as being fined for lending a gnn to an 
Indian ; again, as helping to run the 
line three miles north of the Merrimac. 
For a continuation of this particular 
case, see }>ost, p. 126. 

3 Adam Winthrop, fifth son of John 
Winthrop, came over in the "Lion" 
1631; married Elizabeth, daughter of 
^Irs. Glover, of whom mention has al- 
ready been made, and with her lived on 
Governor's Island, in the Harbor. He 
died Aug. 24, 1652. 



192 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

that he sawe the said Jolui narrison subscribe the said bill .a- 
writing <fc that the said Adam did subscribe his name al.-, 
thereto as a witncsse as thereby ap^Dcareth v;"^ bill or writin-j- 
was shewed unto the said Adam at the time of taking his said 
oath 1 liare thought good at tlie request of the said John Strat- 
ton to certifye the same in testimony <tc. [Is. 8t?.] 

A letter of Assignment & Attorney made by the said Jolm 
Stratton to the said Richard Hutchinson to receive the said 
50t of Mr John Harrison upon another bill dated 8 July IGoO, 
dat' 26. 7. 1639. [Is.] 

A Coppy of both these bills, with this Certificate. 

Forasmuch as the abovenamed John Stratton hath assigncl 
the summc of fifty pounds due unto him from the abovenamed 
John Harrison by the said bills or writinge or one of tlieui 
both being for the same debt unto Richard Hutchinson Citizen 
&, ironmonger of London & intendeth accordingly to send over 
the said bills or writings to him A least the same should mis- 
carry these Coppies have bin taken thereof, 1 Jolm Winthrop 
Esqr Governor of tlie Jurisdiceon of the Mattachusetts Bay in 
New England having examined the said Coppies by the origi- 
nalls doe fynde them to accordc verbatim. W*^^ at the request 
of the said Jolm Stratton I have througlit good to Exemplifye. 
In testimony whereof I have hereunto caused the Common 
Scale of our Colony to be affixed this xxvi th day of September 
Anno Dai 1639. [Is.] 

Henry Jackson of Watertowne in New E : planter makes a 
letter of Attorney to Edward How ^ of Watertowne One of 
tlie Elders of the Church there to receive all his debts in New 
England according to the bills w'^^ are given him. [Is.] 

Be it knowne unto all men by these presents that I Eliza- 
beth Glover of Cambridge in Xew England widdowe have 

^ Edward Plow, of Watertown, was tliough not often mentioned, is known 

"freeman May 14, 1634, ruling elder, to have been a lessee of a fishing weir 

often selectman, and representative." there, and is thought to have moved to 

Died June 24, 1644. Henry Jackson, Fairfield, where he had some estate. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-DOOK. 



1.93 



received of John Harris Doctor of Divinity k warden of 
the College neare Winchester k of Richard Davys Citizen & 
merchant of London Executors of the last will & testament of 
JossG Glover late of London my husband Deceased the 
summe of five hundred pounds of lawfull money of England 
being parte of the goods k chattels of the said Josse Glover at 
the time of his death k by him bequeathed unto me the said 
Elizabetli by the said last will k testament and I doc hereby 
remise release k forever quitt clayme unto the [122] said John 
Harris k Richard Davys their executors k administrators all 
k all manner of actions k demands concerning the said five 
hundred pounds in witnesse etc 27. T. 1639. 4 of these acquit- 
tances all before R. Bellingham : Tho : Hawkins Nehemiah 
Boarne ^ k myselfe. [2. 8(i.J 

A letter of Attorney made by Valentine Hill to M!" Richard 
Hutchinson to receive \blank\ of MF John Harrison dated 26. 
7.1639. [Is.] 

Ml* Glovers Inventory. [2s.] 



^ These three names are in the same 
way appended as witnesses to a letter of 
attorney, a few pages farther on, from this 
Mrs. Glover to Joseph Davis and Thomas 
Hawkins. Mr. Bellingham was at this 
time an assistant. Thomas Hawkins, 
visually called Captain Hawkins by Win- 
throp, was originally of London, though 
he owned land in Charlestown, and lived 
in Boston and in Dorchester for some 
years, and was a deputy from the latter 
place. His business was that of a ship- 
wright, but he was also a merchant, and 
part-owner of many vessels. He was to 
some extent mixed up in the D'AuInay 
ami De La Tour complication, which we 
can hardly touch here. He is several 
times mentioned in "Wiuthrop. Savage, 
in his notes, su]>poses him to have died 
abroad (in 1648), — which is likely 



enough, as he passed the greater part of 
his time on the water, and was quite as 
likely to be in London as in Dorchester. 
At the time of his death he owned prop- 
erty in Dorchester and Boston. He had 
business connections with Captain Ed- 
ward Gibbons, of which we find notice 
Xiost, p. 213. Nehemiah Bourne was a 
Charlestown shipbuilder. He also lived 
at Dorchester for some time, and a j-ear 
or two after this moved to Boston. In 
1644 he went to England, as major of 
the regiment of which Israel Stougliton 
was lieutenant-colonel. He is said to 
have commanded a ship-of-war under the 
Parliament. He came back again to 
Boston, but returned to England, and 
died in 1691. See Hist, and Gcneal. 
Ecg., xsvii. 26-36. 



13 



194 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Mr John Huinfrcy bound to M? Eliz : Glover in ciirlitv 
pounds to pay at 2 mouctlis or els to give cattell in paymeui 
according to the rates of the Country at the time. [Gt?.] 

Mr Joseph Davys merchant [Thomas] Hawkins Attornovs 
for M''!* Eliz : Glover to receive etc of Dr. Harris <fc Richard 
Davys the Executors all the estate. 

Thomas TTatson 1 late of Duxbury planter makes a letter 
of Attorney to Stephen Tracy of the same planter to receive 
all moneys. Stephen Tracy 46s. Thomas Goodman 53s-. John 
Moore 5s. 4fZ. John Barker 4.9, John Groome 20s. : Anna Wat- 
son' chuio^tcr _^o|^ John-AYiLtson Deceased dwelling with her 
mother in lawe Elizabeth the wife of John Grey dwelling 
neare Quinapeage is to have all this & his truncke with the 
goods in it if he dye before he come or send over. Jolm 
Groome is to pay this 20s. to hiniselfe when he comes over or 
upon notice from him to his Attorney. 

Knowe all men by these p'sents that I Elizabeth Glover of 
Cambridge in Xew England Aviddowe doe hereby constitute 
ordeyne and in my place put my wellbeloved friends Joseph 
Davys of London merchant Sc Thomas Hawkins merchant my 
true & lawful Attorneys for me <fc in my name to demand k 
receive of Jolm Harris Doctor of Divinity & Warden of the 
College neare Winchester and of Richard Davys Citizen k. 
merchant of London Executors of the last will & testament 
of Josse Glover my late husband deceased all and all manner 

1 Here aro more of the arrangements of Anna "Watson.. The others are more 

of Thonuns "\Vatj ^on purposing to return difficult to identify. John Groome, wlio 

to Enghind. Stephen Trac}% his attor- was to pay 205. to himself when he canu- 

ney, had been in New England for a long over, never did come over that I know 

time, having come to Plyinouth in 1623. of. It may he that he transacted tlie 

He did not, however, remain in the business with Thomas Watson wlu.ii lie 

countr}-, but went home to England in met him in England. John Barker, it 

1655. John Grey and his wife, it may is recorded, moved to Marshfield from 

be remembered, sold their house in Lynn Duxbury 1638, and was drowned 10.''-. 

to Valentine Hill. Savage calls the The names of John ^Moore and Thomas 

wife of John Grey the "Widow Eliz^ibeth Goodman are not found elsewhere. 
"Watson; she was probably step-mother 



Y^5'xM- 



-^^^K^^Kx'^K^^^^.^ ^^>^^,^x 



fr« 



urA 



LECII FORDS MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 195 

of summcs of money goods & chattels given k bequeathed to 
uie by my said husband in <fc by his said hist -will Sc testament 
and upon receipt of the said summes of money goods k chat- 
tels for mc tt in my name to give malce & deliver unto the 
said Executors sufficient &: legall acquittance k acquittances 
release &, releases But in case the said Executors shall refuse 
upon demand to paye & deliver to my sayd Attorneys the said 
summes of money goods & chattells tlien I doe hereby authorize 
[123] and appoint my said Attorneys for me & in my name to 
sue & imple^de the said Executors &, their executors and ad- 
ministrators and all other administrators of tile goods &, chat- 
tells riglits <fe credits of the said Josse Glover not administered 
that shall be whatsoever for the said summs of money goods 
& chattells and the same of them & every [one] of them by 
due processc to recover for me & in my name k to my use & 
behoofe. And further for me & in my name to make doe &. 
execute all & every other lawfull & reasonable act Sc acts thing 
<fc things requisite for the receipt ct recovery of the said summes 
ot money goods & chattells as powerfully &, effectually as I 
inyselfe in my owne proper person might or could doe Hereby 
ratifying & confirming all & whatsoever my said Attorneys or 
any two of them in case one should dye shall lawfully doe in 
the p'mises In witnesse kc 27. 7. 1639 coram Ric : Belling- 
ham. Tho : Hawkins Nehemialr Bourne & myselfe. [2. 6.] 

A peticon for Nicholas Frost ^ of Pascattaquay mason to 
the Governor k Deputy k the Assistants neare at hand. 

A letter of Attorney made by Katherine Earwing of Dor- 
chester widdow to Xeliemiah Bourne of Dorchester merchant 
k Anthony Earwing of London mariner to receive all moneys 
due to her in England. [Is. 16.] 

* Nicholas Frost was banished seven pardoned I do not know. In 1647 he 

yearsbelore this for theft, etc., committed was still living at Pascattaquay, with 

on the Indians at Damerill's Cove. He certain associates, " in a most ryotous. 

Was once before this, in 163."), punished niutinus & turbulent maner." He died 

by a fine ol £5 (wliich was remitted him, in 1663. The full te.vt of the petition is 

by the way). Whether he were ever given in the course of a page or two. 



196 LECIIFORD^S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

A letter of Attornev made by Ncliemiali Bourne to Mf Sam- 
uel Shcpheard^ of Cambridge geut ^vhereas he l^atli payd u 
loot to M! Nath Eaton for w<=^ he hath given 3 bdLs oi .x- 
chano-c charged on Mr Thomas Adams of London ^^-oolh.n- 
draper to inquire of him what authority order or power h,- 
hath received from M! Adams to charge the said bills on huu 
& if in case he cannot produce k shew such lawful authoniy 
in writing then to sue him to put in sutticient security. 

Me Elizabeth Glover de Cantabrigia in Nova Ang^ia wi_d 
tener' <tc Joseph Davys de London mercatori in 3d01 Dat •_.. 
7. 1639. [Is.] 

The condicon of this obligation is such that whereas the 
abovebounden Elizabeth Glover heretofore charged certamc 
bills of exchange upon the abovcsaid Joseph Davys for tlu;eo 
hundred & tliirty pounds w^Mie accordingly payd to one M^ 
Greensmith & one MrFoote, if heretofore the executors of th 
last will & testament of Josse Glover late of London Deceased 
late husband of the said Elizabeth, shall allowe and suffer the 
said Joseph Davyes to pay tliem so much the lesse upon the 
bonds bv him made unto the said Josse Glover m his life tune 
& shall thereof remise release k quittclayme the said Joseph 
Davys his heires executors & administrators all actions c^ 
demands concerning the said three hundred pounds then Arc. 

1 Mr Samuel Sheivml^vas one of the accordiug to Wmthrop, he spent the 
pj::.f™;:t!s^Ca.hHage. ne .^-erpa.ofMs..ein^statec.n.c^ 
came over in 1635 from London, and be- icatlon,-^vh^ch, it .^ ould seen , ^v^s 

,ic„t, ,nd was first head of \U,- tLropatgreatlenglK.. 30S 31» . 1 
WCo,,..:. (*o..... not oaned ...... is a,so in - - -, ^ note .> ^^Sa> V^ 



War 



was the brother of Governor Eaton of ....— -"-.-. ' g 3^3) There 

Connecticnt, and was first head of liar- ^^^^^^'^^'^'f''}'^^^^^^^ 

vard College (though not called presi- is also - ^^^^^^^.er u ^^^id^ the 

dent). He fell into disgrace in Massa- regarding the ^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^ ,uh 

eh Jtts on account of his treatment of ^^^^2^;!^^^-^-^ 

one Brisco, a scholar; and. on being cen- which it may be -tere^ni i ^^ 

sured by the court, he tied to Pascatta- the ^^f^^"^^^"'. I'" ^^'j/^^t's scholar.. 

quay, and thence to Virginia, where, Samuel Hough, one of Latoa s s 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 197 

[124] Josiah Stanboroughi Qf Lvnno in New England 
planter Sc Frances his wife daughter of Henry Gransdon of 
Tiirnbridge in the County of Kent Deceased, whereas the said 
II. Gransden in his life time stood lease of certaine lands & 
tenements in Tunbridge *t at Stansted also in Kent w'=^ lands 
were bequeathed with certaine rent charge among other things 
of 51 a yeare to the said Frances by the last will & testament of 
the said H. G. & were also descendible to Joane Alice Anne 
3Iary Frances Sarali k Martha his daughters notwithstanding 
Alice Gransden wid hath sold the said lands & tenements in 
Tunbridge: to sue her in the Court of Requests or Chancery to 
pay them their parts as well as the 4 elder w'^'' is 200. Attor- 
ney Richard Young Citizen <fc cooper of London. [l6\] 

The humble pcticon of Nicholas Frost mason. Showeth 
that whereas yo'' peticoner being a banished man and notwith- 
standing having he trusteth in some measure tlirougli the grace 
of God repented of his sinnes k trespasses wherefore he was 
iustly banished and being before yo"" worpps some time since the 
said Sentence of banishment he conceived by some words then 
spoken by some of yo"" worpps that he might come into this 
Jurisdiction about his necessary busincsse <fc affaires yo' peti- 
coner did in simplicity of his heart not intending any contempt 
repayre hither about his occasions ; but since he understands 
that there is no order entered yet for revocation of the said 
Censure he knoweth he liath offended and is heartily sorry 
therefore ct Humbly prayeth he may be for this time dis- 
charged of his imprisonment <fc he promiseth never to come 
hither againe without Licence by Order of the Generall Court 
<fe shall as his duty bindes him pray for yo' worpps. [1. 6.] 

Knowe all men by these presents that 1 Nehemiah Bourne of 
Dorchester in New England merchant doe hereby constitute 
ordeync k in my place put my wellbelovcd ffriend Samuel 
Shepheard of Cambridge in New England gent my true k 

* Josiah Stanborough moved to Long anipton, and died there 1639. Nothing 
Island, perhaps in the same company of his antecedents is known to enlighten 
as John Stratton. He settled in South- the present facts. 



198 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



lawfull Attorney for mo Sc in my name to sue arrest k im- 
pleade Natbaniel Eaton of Cambridge aforesaid gent for the 
summe of one hundred pounds w*''' he received of me ui>ou <ir 
about the [blank'] day of [blank] last jnist and w"^ he oweth nii' 
& the same of him his executors & adm" to recover to my use 
unlesse he or they can shewe suflicicnt authority order ^v 
power in writing that he had to charge the said one hundred 
pounds upon Thomas Adams of London WooUendrap. by cer- 
taine bills of exchange And further to doe any other lawful 
act or thing touching the premises as effectually tt power- 
fully as 1 myselfe in my owne pper person might or could due 
Ratefying <tc. [1. G.] 

[125] Mr Will™ Leigh of Gratoton in Suff k his wife a letter 
for Martha Hancock for service goodman Golston goodnian 
Newton ^Mather Stephen Gostlin and their wives k to Eliz. 
Jordcn k to the rest k to her Cosin Harbert k his wife, 
especially to her brother Robert.^ 

A letter of Attorney for Henry Grey ~ now of Boston in 
N. E. t. k heretofore citizen k m''chant t of London to Joseph 
Young mariner to receive k recover 8^ of George Spencer 
dat' 28. 7. 1639. coram. [Is.] 



1 I believe all these persons to be at 
this time iu Englaiul. The names of 
Golston, Newton ilather, Stephen Gost- 
lin, are not to be found in Savage's 
Dictionary, while it seems impossible 
to identify Martha Hancock, Cousin 
Herbert, and Ilobert Hancock on the 
slight information here given. It is curi- 
ous that so marked a name as Mather 
should appear with the unknown Chris- 
tian name of Newton. Mr. Richard 
Mather, the father of Increase, was at 
this time in America with his sons, the 
eldest of whom was thirteen years old. 
It may be that Newton blather was re- 
lated to him. I have not come across 
the name in reading the Magnalia, nor 
indeed anywhere save here. The omis- 



sion of anj' place of residence would lead 
one to doubt their being in New Eng- 
land at this time. 

2 Tliis name is mentioned four times 
in the Note-book, and each time in so 
cursory a manner that speculations as 
to the identity are almost useless. First, 
Henry Gray is spoken of {ante, p. 47) as 
an honest young man with a brother who 
is a citizen of London. In this ]>lace 
Henry Gray was formerly a citizen and 
merchant of London himself. The next 
mention (p. 141) is in a bill of ex- 
change drawn by his brother "William 
Gray on Jeremiah White, of Plymouth ; 
and, lastly (p. 176), there is a deed of 
a house from one Henry Gray of Bos- 
ton to Thomas Lechford. In the Boston 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 190 

^^ 
I TiioinasWatson ^ late of Duxbiuy in Xcw England planter 

])ur})Osing God ^villing to imbarke niysclfe for England very 
.shortly & considering the fraylty of my life I thought good & 
do make my will in this manner I commend myselfe my soulc 
it body unto the dispose of the Almighty & touching a few 
debts & goods that I have heere I give <t bequeath them unto 
my ncice Anna Yfatson daughter of John^'atson^ Deceased 
dwelling w*"^ her mother in law Elizabeth the wife of John 
Grey dwelling neare Quinapeage; that is to say forty six shil- 
lings owing to me by Stephen Tracy, fifty three shillings 
owing to mc by Thomas Goodman five shillings foure pence 
owing to me by John Moore foure shillings owing to me 
by John Barker and twenty shillings owing to me by John 
Groome, & one truncke of clothes & other things w'^'^ I have 
leaft with John Stevanes of Boston tayler, And I name my 
executor hereof the said John Grey. Witnesse my hand the 
28. 7. 1639. [1. G.] 

Knowe all men by these presents that we Josiah Stanboraugh 
of Lynne in New England planter &, Frances his wife Daugh- 
ter of Henry Gransden late of Tunbridge in the County of 
Kent gent Deceased doe hereby constitute ordeyne & in our 
place put our wellbeloved & trusty ffriend Richard Young 
Citizen & Cooper of London our true & lawfull Attorney for 
us & in our names to demand & receive of and from Alice 
Gransden of Tunbridge aforesaid widdowe all such summes 

Town Records is mention of Henry p. 101 (TrumbuU's eel.). As for George 

Gray, a tailor. Besides this, Savage Spencer, there is mention of one of his 

mentions Ileniy Gray, Fairfield, 1643, name being jtnnished for receiving sto- 

with wife Lydia. Otherwise, 1 find ho len goods {Mass. Col. lice, 1. 203). 
■ mention of Grays or Greys either. Jilr. ^ This is the last mention of Thomas 

Trumbull thinks that there was hut one "Watson, who probably did sail for Eiig- 

Henry Grey, a tailor of London and land as he purposed; though whether he 

afterward of Boston, who had a wife ever reached the country in safety we 

Lydia. He calls John Grey (ante, can hardly be sure. To the facts stated 

p. 122) and Henry Grey brothers, and about those indebted to hhn I regret 

supposes their wives to be Elizabeth that I can add nothing. I have learned 

and Lydia, daughters of William Frost, notliing of them, nor of John Stevens, 

of Nottingham. See Conn. Col. lice, — a name which occurs frequently iu 

i- 465, and Lechford's Plaine Dcalhij, Savage. 



}iju^- W«u\flit-,l''1 •^ "-(^ i) 



200 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

of money as are due unto us for our parte of the lands k 
tenements in Tunbridge aforesaid whereof the said Ilcniv 
dyed seized k \i'^^ together w^^ other lands & tenements Avcre 
charged with a certaine rent charge or annuity to us or one 
of us payable by vertue of the last will & testament of tin* 
said Henry Gransden whereof the said Alice was made Execu- 
trix k who proved the same, w'^^ lands and tenements were also 
lawfully descended unto us or one of us together with y^ six 
other sisters of me the said Frances w*"^ lands & tenements 
the said Alice hath sold & passed away to [ hlanic] of [ Haul:'] his 
heires & assignes and hath satisfy ed & payd the foure elder 
sisters of me the said Frances for their pa'rts of the said lands 
& tenements but hath not yet payd us or either of us for our 
said parte thereof And upon receipt of the said sumnies of 
money for us & in our names to make & give a sufficient k legall 
release and discharge for the same k for the said rent charge or 
animity unto the said Alice and further to make k execute any 
other reasonable and lawfuU act or deed acts or deeds for the 
firme conveyance of our interest in the premises unto the said 
Alice or [ bkinh'] and their or either of their heires or to any other 
person or persons whatsoever as the said Alice shall appoint 
And in such case we grant that we will make k levy k exe- 
cute or cause to be made levyed k executed any other reason- 
able assurance or assurances in the lawe whatsoever for the 
settling of the premises accordingly as the Counsel learned in 
the Law of the said Alice shall advise or require so that for 
the doing levying k executing thereof we be not [126] com- 
pelled to travell forth of the Jurisdiccon of the Mattachusetts 
Bay in New England. But in case the said Alice shall refuse 
to satisfye k pay the sayd summcs of money to our said At- 
torney then we doe hereby Authorize k ap})oint our said Attor- 
ney by advice of good Counsell learned in the law to sue arrest 
k impleadc the said Alice k her heires execators k admini- 
strators and the said [ blank] all or any of them in his Mats 
Courts of equity k iustice thereby to- compell her k them to 
reconvey k settle the said lands & tenements in such estate 
k condition as they were in at the time of the death of the 
said Ilenry and also to recover of k from her k them our said 



LECIIFORD'S MAXL^SCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 201 

Rent charge or annuity Hereby ratifying all & wliatsoever our 
said Attorney shall lawfully & reasonably doc in the premises 
In Avitncs «S:c 28. 7. 1639. [5- 8. r in ptc 5s. 1- 8- 1639.] 

A letter to Mr Harlow i fr° M^ Stauborough in this matter. 

A letter of Attorney niade by John Stedman ~ to ]\P Tho : 
Hawkins to receive of tho executors of M^" Glover 501 legacy 
dated 28. 7. 1639. & a release to the. Executors. 

And I John Winthrop Esqr. Governor of the Jurisdiction of 
the Mattaclmsetts Bay in New England having seen these 
presents signed sealed & delivered by the abovenamed Josiah 
Stanborough & Frances his wife to the use of the abovenamed 
Attorney have thought good at the request of the said Josiah 
& Frances to Certifyc the same and the rather that it might 
appcare unto all whome it may concerne that the said Josiah 
& Frances are at this time in full life & health In testimony 
whereof I have caused the Common scale of our Colony to be 
hereunto affixed the said last day of September 1639. 

Me Johen Elford ^ de Salem in Nova xinglia Nauta tener' 
Johi White de Dorcesteria in com Dor^* Cl'ico & Thome 
Busteed do eadem Gen in 21t coram me et Willo Pierce* 
iund. 31. 7. 1639. 

1 ilr. Ilarlowe may have been the » John Elford, of Salem, was in 1630 
young man (mentioned b}' Savage as a in trouble on an accusation of muider 
means of introducing his three wives of one Thomas Puckett ; but I cannot 
and thirteen children) who had been find out that the case was ever decided 
living at Lynn, but was now at Sand- one way or another. He was excom- 
wich or Plymouth. More probably how- municated in 1639, says Savage, who 
ever he was in England. classes him with " Roger Williams and 

2 John Stelnian, of Cambridge, came other outcasts." He is called here "rfo 
from England in the same year, and ^nis/c^of^aw!," but the phrase was crossed 
probably in the same ship, with the Rev. out and " nupcr dc Salem " substituted. 
Josse Glover. He was often selectman "Cl'ico" perhaps is short for Clerico. 
of Cambridge, and in 1645, "on the This would be naturally enough applied 
town's request, he was established En- to the Rev. John White of Dorchester, 
sign of the company there," says the England. [T.] 

Colonial R-cord. He died in 1093, 4 There were two persons of the name 
being ninety-two years old. of William Pierce, each sufficiently 



202 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Condiconcd to pay 12t Gs. Gc7. upon the 29. Sept 1040 at or 
in the house called or kiiowne by the signe of the Kini: of 
England BristoU k upon the [/%/Wc] in Amstei'dum being 
the house of Constantino Welles. [Is,] 

Knowc all men by these presents that I John Stratton of 
Salem in New England gent, for and in parte of payment of 
fifty pounds vs'^^ I owe unto A^alentine Hill of Boston in Xew 
England mercer doe hereby give &: grant unto the said Taleii- 
tine Hill all that my lott or farme granted and assigned to me 
by the Townsmen of Salem aforesaid conteyning one hundred 
acres or thereabouts be it more or lesse lying k being in the 
village within the precincts of the said townc of Salem neare 
the lands of M'" Hawthorne ^ Sc Lieutenant Davenport w*^ the 
appurtenances To have & to hold the said lott or farme w^^ 
the appurtenances unto the said Valentine Hill his heires ct as- 
signs for ever I say in |)arte of payment of so much of the said 
fifty pounds as the said premises arc well worth but if the 
premises are worth fifty pounds then in full payment of the 
said fifty pounds [127] then what in value the same shall come 
shorte of the said fifty pounds I or my heires executors or 
adm", shall & will i)ay k satisfy unto the said Valentine Hill 
his executor or administrators as soonc as the said Valentine 
Hill shall receive newes from England that the said fifty pounds 
are not or cannot be recovered of John Harrison gent by vertue 
of one letter of Attorney made by me unto Richard Hutchin- 
son Citizen & Ironmonger of London upon a bill or writing 

important. I take this one to be Mr. 163i. He was often a representative, 

William Pierce, \\\\o came, in 1033, and served as a captain or major iu 

iu the "Gritiiu" with John 'Cotton King Philip's AVar. Lieutenant Davcn- 

and Hooker and others (for whom see port was one of the earliest inhabitants 

Wintli., i. lOy). The other man of the of Salem, having come, in 162S, with 

name was Captain "William Pierce, a Endicott. He was an ensign in 1634, 

prominent merchant, of whom mention and in 1G3G was a lieutenant in the 

will be made later. Pequot "War. He was subsequently cap- 

1 I am sorry not to be able to place tain of the castle in Boston, where he 

exactly the lot here referred to. Jlr. had moved, and was killed by lightning 

Hawthorne was probably William Ha- in IGfia. (For the letter of attorney, 

thorn, who came in the " Arb.Ua " with see ante, p. 121.) 
Wiuthrop, and moved to Salem about 



LECllFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 20-3 

wliereunto Adam Wintlirop was witncssc according- to a})poiiit- 
lucnt of the said Valentine Hill <fc to the said llichard Hutch- 
inson his executors administrators or assignes according to the 
said letter of Attorney then this present gift & grant shall be 
voyd tt of no force. And 1 further Covenant promise & grant 
to & w'^ the said Valentine Hill that I will pay all costs and 
charges to be expended in the endeavour to recover the said 
fifty pounds of the said John Harrisson if the same shall not 
be recovered of him. In witnesse ttc. [1. C] 

John Bourne ^ bound to IsV. Xehemiah Bourne for 6 yeares 
if he will undertake at his coming from England to instruct 
him in the trade of a shipwright if not for 4 yeares dated ult 
Sept 1639. coram me k T. Savage. [2s.] 

A letter of dcputacon by ]\Ir Nehem : Bourne to Hannah his 
wife to receive debts <fcc dated ult 7. 1G39 coram Tho : Savage 
&. meipe. both these. [1^".] 

Knowe all men by these presents that I Walter Blackbourne 
late of Roxsbery in New England Planter doe hereby for 
2151 to me in hand payd by William Cheney of Boxbery afore- 
said planter doe hereby grant bargaine & sell unto the said 
William Cheney all that my dwelling house in Roxbcrry afore- 
said with the lands k ground heretofore by me bought with 
the same that is to say six acres of upland meadowe more or 

' I cannot say who John Bourne is, This I infer from the deeds in Lechford 
but think that he is not mentioned by (post, pp. 215, 216), in wliich Elizabeth 
Savage. Possibly he never came over Blaikburne transfers this lot to Fran- 
from England. JIuch is found in the cis Lisle, barber (see also Suff. Dtcds, i. 
Note-book in regard to transactions be- 20). The lot may be found in tlie re- 
tween Walter Blackburne and "William print of the Book of Possessions (F, 65, 
Cheney, as well as the proceedings of p. S3) with this note : "Walter Black- 
Elizabeth Blackburne after her bus- burue had liis lot, which Elizabeth . . . 
band's departure for Europe. I su])pose sold in 1G41 to Francis Lyle tlie bar- 
this house and land to be the same that ber." Blackburne's lot was said to be 
he bought of Nicholas Parker (ante, in the "Gentry Field." Perhaps the 
p. 35). He moved into Boston after sell- site in the Book 0/ Possessions could not 
ing this house, and lived on Wasli- come under this head; in which case 1 
ington Street, about opposite the spot sujipose there were tvro lots. 
•where the Old South Church now stands. 



204 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

lesse six acres of salt marsh more or lessc sixteene acres in a 
greate lott -with a Common fence nyne acres & an lialfc of ^vooddv 
upland unfcnccd twelve acres of a rocky woody lott fenced 
tenn acres belonging to the said house and two acres more or 
lessc by me heretofore also purchased at another time and also 
the Co we house or barnc set up but not quite finished k all 
my hay upon the premises w*^ the appurtenances and all writ- 
ings concerning the same that I have in my custody To have 
& to hold the said house & dwelling & all and. singulare 
the premises w"^ the appurtenances whatsoever unto the said 
Willm Cheney his heires k assignes for ever In witnesse &c. 
dat' ult 7. 1039. [1. 8.] 

Me Willm. Cheney de Roxberry in Nova Anglia plantator 
tener' Yv^altcr Blackbourne in llOl dat' ult die Sept 1G39. 

Condicoucd for payment of 55^ 29. 7. 1G40 at the dwelling 
house of the said Walter in Boston, [1.] 

This Indenture made the last day of September in the 15*^ 
yeare of the raignc of our Soveraigne Lorde Charles now King 
of England <tc Anno^ Dmi lGo9, Betwecne Walter Black- 
bourne late of Roxberry in New England planter of the one 
parte And William Cheney of Roxberry aforesaid planter of 
the other parte Witnesseth that the said Walter Blackbourne 
for divers good considerations him [128] thereunto moving 
doth by these presents grant alien k enfeoffe unto the said 
William Cheney eight acres of salt marsh more or lesse lying 
in Roxberry aforesd And five acres of upland whereof three 
acres are ploughed k some broken np k fenced And twelve 
acres k an halfe of upland wooddy ground unfcnccd w'^ all 
my posts k rayls provided to fence the same w'^ the appurten- 
ances. To have and to hold the said lands k premises w*^ the 
appurtenances unto the said W™ Cheney his heires k assignes 
for ever Yeilding k paying unto the said Walter Blackbourne 
his heires k assignes for the premises the yearelyfee farme rents 
following that is to say for the said eight acres of salt mrs 
three pounds for the said five acres of upland ploughed broken 
up k fenced fourc pounds k for the said twelve acres and an 



LECIIFORD'S MAXUSCrarT NOTE-BOOK. 



205 



halfc of upland wooddy ground unfcnccd twenty shillings at 
two tcrmcs in the vearc that is to say the twenty fifth day of 
March and the twenty nyneth day of September by cquall por- 
Pons to be payd- Provided allwayes that whensoever the said 
William Cheney his heires or assigns shall pay unto the said 
Walter Blackbourne his heires & assignes the summe of twenty 
foure pounds for the said eight acres of salt marsh then the 
said rent thereof shall cease & the said William Cheney his 
heires & assignes shall have the same to him k them his & 
their heires & assignes in absolute ffec simple for ever and 
whensoever the said William Cheney his heires or assignes 
shall pay unto the said Walter Blackborne his heires or as- 
sio-nes twenty pounds for the said five acres of upland plowed 
/broken up & fenced then the said rent thereof shall cease 
& the said William Cheney his heires & assignes shall have the 
same to him & them his & their heires & assignes in absolute 
fee smple for ever and whensoever the said William Cheney 
his heires or assignes shall pay unto the said Walter Black- 
borne his heires or assignes twelve pounds & ten shillings for 
the said twelve acres & halfc of upland wooddy grounds un- 
fenced then the said rent thereof shall cease k the said William 
Cheney his heires & assignes Shall have the same to him k 
them his k their heires k assignes in absolute fee simple for 
ever. In witnesse &c. ult T. 1639. [3s. 6.] 

Articles of agreement indented made the last day of 
September anno BRS. Caroli nunc Anglii <tc. Anno^ Dni 
1639. Betweenc Walter Blackborne late of Roxberry in New 
England planter of the one parte k Willm Cheney of Rox- 
berry aforesaid planter of the other parte as followeth. 

1. Imprimist he said Walter Blackbourne agrecth k puttes 
six Cowes to keeping unto the said William Cheney from the 
day of the date hereof for three yeares fully to he compleat i<.' 

ended. 

2. Item the said Willm Cheney agreeth k undertaketh well 
k carefully to keepe k looke to the said Cowes ct their living 
increase a'nd to fynd k provide sufficient hay fodder k all 
necessarys for them during the said terme. 



206 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

[129] 3. Item it is agreed bctwcene the said partj-s that oiut 
a yearc during the said terme the living increase of the said 
cowcs shall be equally divided to & betweene the said partyes. 

4. Item that if during the said terme any of the said cowrs 
dye the said partyes shall equally bcare the losse tliereof A- 
also equally rcpaire such losse by making up the said number 
of six cowes forthwith upon such Death. 

5. Item the said "Walter Blackborne agreeth k promiseth to 
pay halfe the Country rates but not any of the towne rates 
whereAv'^all the said Cowes shall be charged during the said 
terme. 

6. Item the said William Clieney agreeth ct promiseth to re- 
deliver the said six cowes or others in their roome from time 
to time to be repayred ct made up as aforesd if any of them 
dye at tlie end of the said terme together w**^ halfe the living 
increase of them unto the said "Walter Blackbourne his execu- 
tors administrators or assignes. In witnesse <tc. [2. 6.] 

Michael Williamson ^ & Anne his wife make a letter of 
deputation & procuratorship to Anthony Staplcy of Patcham 
in Sussex Esq'' to rec of Elizabeth Gecre of Lewis in Sussex 
widdowe Executrix of the last will cfc testament of Dennis 
Geere late of Saugost deceased 50^ legacy given by him t;^ the 
said Anne by the name of Anne Panckhurst. Dated 2. 8 1 "89 

Coram Tho: Savage & meip.j w^^ the Certificate o.' :'.■■':■. 

marriage by the Go^'"" under the Common scale. [Is. 8c7.j 

And their release to the said Executrix for the sam ,. 

A letter to M'?^ Geere. And a release conditional! to M! 
Staplcy. [6ff.] 

Robert Harding- of Boston mercer conveys one acre <fe 
halfe of upland k one acre k halfe of marsh ground lying in 
Hogg Island w'=^ were assigned to him by the Townesmen of 

^ " Michael Williamson," says Sav- three or four years after he is heard of 

age, "Ipswich, can>e in the 'Planter' in Khode Island." See ^ws^, p. 171. 
early in 1C3"), aged thirty, as one of the " Robert Harding moved soon after 

servants of George GidtUngs ; and I this to Rhode Island [Savage). 
would gladly learn more of him, for in 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 207 

r,o.ton, and one acre of upland and three quarters of an acre 
of miAh .^-^^'as the lott of Barnabas Dcrritordi ^,,,x one 
acre of upland and three q- of an acre of marsh j^Mvasthe 
lott of John Pemberton to S^geant Tho : Savage k his heires 
for 4i 10s. [Is.] 



Me Will Cheney de Roxberry in Nova Anglia plantatore 
tener' &c Waltero Blackborne in 56^ 10s. dat ult i. lGo9. 

^'condiconed +o pay the rent according to the aforesaid 
Indenture. [Is.] 

A mort-ao-e of the first lands av*^ the Dwelling house by Wil- 
liam Cheney to Walter blackborne w^*^ proviso to redeliver the 
(5 cowes w*^ their living increase at the 3 yeares end according 
to the said Articles & to fullfiU the articles &c. 

A letter for M^ John Johnson ^ to M^ Willm Pincheon of 
Aggawam upon the river of Konnecticot. \Q>d.'] 

Knowe all men by these presents that we Yovawan Sachem 
of Pommanocc and Aswaw Sachem his wife ffor ten Coates 
of tradinn- Cloath to us before the making hereof payd and 
delivered"[130] by Lion Gardiner » Commander of the forte 

1 The spcllin'^ of this name seems earlymemberof the Company; and being 

clearly Dcniford! I think however that already an assistant, came over m the 

rl. must he Barnaby Dorryfalls, or lleet .Uh ^Vlnthrop 1 6=30. He sett ed .n 
Derrifall, who had a lot in Boston which Eoxbury, but m 1^36 removed to the 
is several times alluded to in the records. Connecticut Paver where he founded 
He was a servant of Coddington, came the town of Springfield. He got into re- 
over in 1633, and lived at Biaintree. ligious controversy with the autaont.os 
His name is 155th on the list of mem- however, in the 3-- l^^^' ^ Jf ^^"^ 
hers of the First Church. to England, where he died 66 Hi. 

2 Which John Johnson of the seven- family remained in ^ew Lngland. 

teen mentioned in Savage this may be, 3 Uon Gardiner was commander of 

I cannot tell, but suppose him to be the fort at Saybrook from the year 1(.3d 

Mr. John Johnson of Roxbury, from the till he moved to Long Island,^ ^vllere he 

title of respect applied to him. Mr. lived until his deatli xn 1^^ " J^ 

William Pincheon (or Pynchon, as the island here spoken of was called bj him 

name is more commonly spelled), how- the Isle of Wight, but has since be n 

ever, was widely known. He was an called by his name. For his Me. s on 



208 LECIIFORD'S MAXUSCIUPT NOTE-BOOK. 

called Say brook ffort ais Paslipeshauks at the mouth of the 
river of Keniiccticot doe hereby for us and our heires k Suc- 
cessors grant bargaine & sell unto the said Lion Gardiner all 
that our Island called Manchonat w'^ the appurtenances, and 
all our right title & demand of in <fc to the same To have and 
to hold the said Island \\^^ the appurtenances unto the said 
Lion Gardiner his heires k assignes for ever. In witnesso 
whereof we have hereto sett our hands <t scales the third 
day of the monetli called by the English May in the yeare h\ 
them of their Lord written One thousand six hundred thirty 
and nyne 1639. [2. 6.] 

Thomas Barker John Johnson Francis Lambert and John 
Punderson ^ &: William Chesebrough sell the house dwelling 
house and lott contcyning ncare an acre lying in Boston next 
adjoyning to Mr Cotton s lott to S'"geant Thomas Savage of 
Boston k his heires dat' 7. 8. 1GC9. [Is.] 

Me Samuel Hagborne^ tener' Walter Blackborne in GO^ 
condiconed for payment of 301 31 15§. half yearly. [1-s-] 

Comfort Starre^ of Duxbury in New England Chirurgian 
makes a letter of Attorney to Edward Michelson of Cambridge 

the Pequot war, tlirougliout which he Mason had destroyed tlie Pequot foit. 

held Saybrook Fort, see his llelation, Starr removed from Duxbury to Boston 

Z Mass. Hist. Coll., iii. 131. some years after this (164a), and died 

1 The first four men may be supposed Jan. 2, 1660. Edward ilichelson is 
to have been the four Yorkshire men three times mentioned in Lechford ; but 

■ spoken of in the first entr}' of the Xote- otherwise I find little of him. He was 

book. Mr. Cotton's lot was on Tremont marshal of the colony ; and there is 

Street, near Scollay Square, running notice of his having been appointed 

back into what is now Temberton Square marshal of the court, togetlier with a 

{Book of Possrssion>t, 111, H, 13). statement of his fees (Mass. Col. Ecc, 

2 Samuel Haghorne of lioxbury may i. 217), as well as mention of him as 
be found in Savage. marshal two or three times, in the first 

8 Comfort Starr, of Duxbury, came book of Stiff. Deeds. He was not a 

to New England in 1635. He was freeman. John Jones, of Concord, can 

chosen surgeon, in 1637, to go with hardly be the minister of that name, 

the troops under Captain Patrick to the nor yet his son ; but I know no other 

Pequot war. The party reached the of that name there, 
scene of war just after Underhill and 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



209 



aeiit to receive of John Jones of Concord brickmaker 55s: the 
remamdcr of 41 crwing to him dat' 12. 8. 1639. [6^/.] 

Thomas Nicholls . of Hinghami planter bound to John 
Cockercll mercatori in 60^ dat' 15. 8. 1639. If 30^ be payd by 
the brother of the said Thomas who was Executor of the last 
will of Walter Nichols of Coggeshall in Essex clothier de- 
ceased upon the first day of Aprill to John Cockercll or his 
ass" [Is.] 

M' John Stratton of Salem gent conveys all his interest in 
lands whatsoever at Cape Porpice^ to Richard Saltonstall 
Esq' & Hugh Peters Pastor of Salem & their heires the rest 
that is not sold Matthew Cradocke mercator pro lOt [Is.] 

Roger Conant^ of Salem in New England planter malces a 
letter of Attorney to ^Ir Thomas Weston merchant to receive 



1 Of Thomas NicLolls, of Hingham, 
it is stated that he married a wife and 
moved to Scituate, but shortly returned. 
Besides this I know nothing more of 
ttie various parties to this agreement, 
whatever may be inferred from p. 180 
post. The name of William Cockercll 
occurs ante, p.' 50. 

2 Cape Porpice (Lech ford's method of 
spelling Porpoise) is in York County in 
Maine, and now forms the northeast 
boundary of Kennebunk Harbor. Hugh 
Peter, in spite of the fact of his being 
a minister of the Gospel, seems to have 
been something of a man of business as 
well. He is mentioned in the Cohninl 
Records as being requested to import 
saltpetre from Holland ; also as present- 
ing a schedule of Piobert Saltonstall's 
property to satisfy his creditors. Kich- 
ard Saltonstairs alfairs, however, did 
not, as a rule, terminate successfully ; 
and it is to be hoped that this was an 
exception to the rule. Hugh Peter 
went back to England shortly after this 
in the same ship \nth Lechford himself. 
Matthew Cradock, although he never 



came to New England, had frequent 
grants of land there from the General 
Court, and evidently had many business 
enterprises there. 

For convenience, I append here a few 
dates and facts. Piichard Saltonstall, 
son of Sir Richard, was brought by his 
father in 1630. He had been a member of 
Emmanuel College, University of Cam- 
bridge. Shortly after arriving he went 
home to England, and did not come to 
New England again iintil 1635, when 
he brought his newly married wife and 
a daughter. He was representative in 
1636 and 1637 ; assistant in 1637 ; 
returaed to England again, 1640; was in 
Iilassachusetts for a few yeai-s, 16S0; 
died in England 1694. 

Cradock, a wealthy London merchant, 
was governor of the ^Lassachusetts Com- 
pany before the election of John "Win- 
throp. He never came to New England, 
but was of great help to the colony. 
He was a member of the Long Parlia- 
ment. He died May 27, 1641. 

8 Pioger Conant, born 1592, came to 
New England in 1623, and had lived at 
14 



210 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

of Captaine [ blank] Fleet 7^ 14s. by bill owing to him seven 
yearcs IG. 8. 1G39. [Qd.'] 

Me Johem Humfrcy ar tener' <S:c Daniel Butler de London 
haberdasher in 200t dat' 17. 8. 1G39 Condiconcd for the pay- 
ment of 1001 Feb^ px. [Is.] 

Richard Gridley tunies over Willm Boreman to Willni 
Townesend ^ of Boston in N E thatchcr for G yeares from 
29. 7 last past to be Apprentice of the crafte of a thatchcr by 
Indenture dated 17. 8. 1G39. [2.] 

Me Martin Stibbcns^ dc Roxbury gardiner tener' &c Walter 
Blackborne in 221 dat' 

Condiconcd to pay 111 in three yeares halfe yearely 3Gs. 8t?. 
at a payment at Mf Blackbornes house in Boston. 1st pay- 
ment V Maii px. [Is.] 

[131] Articles of agreement made the 30*'* day of the seventh 
moneth Anno Dmi 1G39 Bctweene Thomas Hawkins of Dor- 
chester in New England shipwright of the one parte and Willm 

Plymouth first, and then at many other Boreman, may imagine his journey to 

places before settling at Salem. He his new master whenever they walk up 

was appointed governor of the Dor- Summer Street. As for Townsend, he 

Chester pLmtation, which was projected was one of those resi)ectable persons 

in 1625. He was several times deputy, who, because they do not figure promi- 

was assistant at the court at S;Llem, nently in town records and such like, 

and so forth. He died 1679. Thomas either as notables or criminals, are for- 

"Weston was now a merchant of Lon- gotten by posteiity. He was a worthy 

don, and had been in the country only man, I should judge, even though he was 

once, — for a year or two, about 1G23, forced to deliver up his arms to Captain 

at Weymouth, Mhere he had under- Hobert Keayne, with fifty-seven other 

taken to plant a colony, which was citizens who, like himself, had been 

unsuccessful. seduced and led into dangerous errors 

1 William Townsend lived on Wash- by our friends Mr. Wheelwright and 

ington Street a little north of Winter Mistress Anne Hutchinson. 

(Book of Possessions, p. 84, F, 72). 2 Martin Stebbins was a brewer of 

Gridley himself lived on the north side Roxbury. He subse(iuently moved into 

of Summer Street, by the water, not far Boston, where he continued. The Bos- 

from what is now Federal Street. An}' ion Toic'n Records have notice of him 

readers, therefore, who are interested several times, but never, save once, in 

in the somewhat pathetic wanderings regard to anything except beer. 
of this Jack-of-all-trades of a William 



\/'^l 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 211 

Robinson ^ of the same Imsbandman of the other parte. As 
followeth. 

1. Imprhnis the said Thomas doth agree <fc hereby let unto 
the said William all that parte <fc portion of land sometime in 
the occupation of Roger Ludlowe^ gent lying w^'^in the bounds 
of Dorchester aforesaid contcyning neare 100 acres of upland 
Sc medowe w*^ the neck of land called Squenton on the east k 
ecrtaine marsh on the west and one house nearely erected 
thereupon but not finished w'^'* the said Thomas Hawkins shall 
<fc will cause a stacke of brick chimneys to be erected &, the 
floares both aloft k below to be layd all but in one roome there- 
of in convenient time, together w'** eight Cowes two sowes 
sixty eight goates foure oxen and one bull w'^ one plough one 
cart one paire of wheeles and one paire of harrowes w*^*" one 
chaine bowe & yokes upon the said lands to be kept used & 
imployed from the making hereof for & during the- space 
of seven yeares from thenceforth next ensuing fully to be 
compleate & ended. 

2. Item that the said Thomas shall sell the said William cart 
wheeles &: the said W" sliall pay the said Thomas for them at 
the second harvest after the date hereof. 

3. Item the said William Robinson doth agree undertake & 
receive the said premises accordingly and in considiration 
thereof Doth promise & Covenant w'*" the said Thomas that 
he will at his cost & charges thatch the said house and all 
other housing that the said Thomas shall have occasion to build 
upon the premises at any time during the said terme. 

4. That he the said William shall Sc will in manner k forme 
following pay k deliver unto the said Thomas Hawkins the 
one halfe of the increase of the said Cattle k swine and halfe 

1 "William Robinson, of Dorchester, same year, and settled in Dorchester. 

is continually mentioned in the records He was in 1634 maile deputy-gov- 

of that town, where ho was a well- ernor, and in 1635 removed to Windsor, 

known citizen. He came over in 1636, Conn., and thence (1639) to Fairfield. 

and was admitted freeman 1642. "Went off to Virginia, 1654, " under a 

2 The place and time of the birth and maledict." says Savage, "for carrying 

death of Iloger Ludlow are unknown, away the town rcc, \vh. was a charge 

He was chosen assistant, Feb. 10, 1630; long aft. refut. by find, the vol. in 

came to Jsew England in May of the town." 



212 LECBFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

of the butter cheese k milke of them and halfe such corno as 
by the best cndevours of the said Willm k his servants w'*' 
the blessing of God upon the same shall yearely growe & rcnewo 
upon the premises during the said terme and that the said 
William shall & Avill every yeare plant <fe plough 12 acres of 
all sorts of graine more than other at the least. 

5. Item that the living increase of the said stocke except 
swine shall be equally divided betwecnc the said parties at the 
end of three yeares next after the date hereof and againc at the 
end of the said terme or sooner if the said lands shall be found 
uncapable of bearing & susteyning the' number of cattle \\^^ 
their increase aforesaid. 

6. Item that if any beast of the said stocke hereby demised 
shall happen to dye during the said terme the said Willm shall 
& will beare the losse &, expense upon such death at his coste 
make good the first number of the said stocke from time to 
time <fc in the end of the said terme redeliver the same stocke 
or other cattel as good in their roome unto the said Thomas 
his executors & assignes together ^x^'^ the said increase thereof 
as aforesaid. 

7. Item the said Thomas shall allow the said W™ a boat for 
his necessary occasions from time to time during the said terme 
the said W™ repayring & taking charge of the said boat & to 
provide a new one in case the said boat shall be split or cast 
away in his service. And in lieu of the said boat the said W™ 
shall allow the said Thomas the use of the said oxen & cart 
one monetli bctweone hay liarvest <t cornc harvest every yeare 
during the said terme to fetch home his firewood & the said 
W™ to greant the said cart <fc be payd for his worke according 
to the rate of ordinary wages for the time being. 

8. Item that if any beast or beasts of the said stocke dye 
the first three yeares then the said Thomas shall lay downe 
money to rcpaire the said stocke and the said Willm shall 
recompense the said Thomas w**" one yeares increase w'holly 
to himself according to the time that the said money shall 
be forborne. 

9. Item the said parties sliall & may agree &. consult to- 
gether from time to time during the said terme about the 



LECIIFOnD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 213 

altering any of tlie cowes of the said stocke k taking in any 
of the increase or other beast for stock. 

10. Item that the said Thomas shall or may take his parte 
of the increase of the swine at his pleasure and the butter 
cheese & milke to be divided as the said Thomas shall call 
for it. 

[132] 11. Item that the said William shall & will within the 
first yeare of the said terme ditch so much of the said lands 
as may fence the same from all cattell & swine and within the 
first three yeares of the said terme shall <fc will ditch the said 
lands round w^*" a sufficient ditch and crosse fence the same 
from ditch to ditch w'** postes tt rayles. 

12. Item that the said Willm shall & will well & suffi- 
ciently repaire scoure & dense & maintaine the said house &. 
all other housings to be built on the premises ct the said ditches 
k fences w^"^ all necdfull Sc necessary reparations clensings & 
scourings when k as often as need shall require during the 
said terme and the same so well k sufficiently repaired scoured 
k mainteyned in the end of the said terme shall k will sur- 
render k yield up unto the said Thomas his hcires executors 
k assignes together w'^ the said plough Cart wheeles harrowes 
chaine bowes k yoakes in so good case k condicon as he received 
them necessary use excepted in meane while if any of the said 
utensills of husbandry faile or be broken or lost the said W" 
is to buy new. 

13. Item that if the 'said W™ shall dye within the said terme 
then his wife or executors shall surrender the said farme k 
stocke unto the said Thomas upon such termes as two or three 
indifferent men by them to be chosen shall determine w''^ ref- 
erence to former respects k future hopes. 

14. Item that if any difference or other considerable matter 
concerning the premises shall hereafter fall out between the 
said partyes yet unknown to them the same shall be ordered 
by 3 arbitrators indiferently to be chosen by k between the 
said partyes. 

15. Item that the said Willm shall k will this first yeare 
fence in a large garden plott upon the premises neare the said 
house k shall from yeare to yeare during the said terme plant 



214 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

it w*'' iisiiall garden fruits tliereof allowe & deliver yearely to 
the said Thomas one halfc except such soiucr fruits as the 
said Willm shall spend k use in his house. 

IG. Item that the said Thomas & Willm shall k will equally 
pay & discharge from time to time all rates that shall be im- 
posed on the said house lands k stockc during the said terme 
out of the increase of the said Cattel k profiitts of the said 
lands. 

17. Item that the said Thomas shall lend the said "Willm 
tenn pounds and twenty five bushclls of Indian corne who shall 
repay the same at the next harvest according to the rates of 
corne then k now differing. \ 

Mr Thomam Martin ^ de villa Caroli in Nova Anglia planta- 
tor to be bound by bill to Solomon Saffery in 301 to be payd 
1. 1° next. [6cZ.] 

Thomas Witherle^ mariner pit 31 Oct 1G39. 
Edward Heale ^ deft. 

The pit complaineth against Befen^' for that whereas the 
Defen"^* did upon the SG^*" day of May last past reteync the pit 

^ Thomas Martin moved to Cam- post, where he is called of Southwark, 

bridge, aud thence may have moved to Co. Surrey. 

New London. Solomon Saffery is said ^ The name of Edward Heale occurs 
by Savage, on Hutchinson's authority, several times in the i\''o/c-iooZ,-, sometimes 
to have been a mathematician, who as- being spelled Hele, and sometimes Heale. 
sisted Nathaniel "Woodward to run the Savage calls it Healey, or Haley, some- 
south line of the Colony. He is nowhere times Hale, Hele, or Heale, the same 
else mentioned that I know of. name. Nevertheless, there is no Kd- 

2 Thomas Witherle. I think this ward among them all. From the 

name is Witherly, as it is so spelled mention of Edward Hele, of Bri>tol, 

later in the Note-book. Thomas AVitli- later in the Note-hook, I am led to think 

erly was fined for contempt [Mass. Col. that if the two names (Heale and 

Rec, i. 261) ; but the name is not to be Hele) refer to the same person, this 

found in Savage, who gives Wetherell, person was an English merchant who 

•which he says is the same as VVitherly, never remained in the country for any 

but no Thomas. Or is this Thomas length of time, if, indeed, he was ever 

"Witherly a Connecticut man, as appears there. It is very possible that he may 

later (p. 189 post), to whom that roll- have had a correspondent in Virginia, 

ing stone, ^Villiam Boreman, is finally and may have passed some time in that 

intrusted (p. 142 post) ? See also p. 158 part of the country. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 215 

to be his servant in the place of master of the barke patience 
nou- ridino- in the harbor of Boston to sayle to & fro upon the 
seas in the occasions of the defend' for tlie wages of 4i by the 
nioneth ever since ^v.<^^ time the pit accordingly served the said 
defend' in the said barke in severall voyages whereof the last 
was from Virginia to Boston aforesaid where the said barke 
arrived the 20'^ of September last so that there is due 
to pit for his wages aforesd sixteene pounds for foure full 
moncths wanting but one day or two at most till that time. 
Also since the said twentieth of September the pit being un- 
payd his wao-es aforesaid whereby he is not discharged from 
the said barke but kept from returning to Virginia about his 
occasions where he hath divers debts owing to him & being 
not there to demand them while tobacco is in mens hands 
there he may be in danger to loose his said debts thereby And 
the pit further saith that by the law he ought to have wages 
& dyct from the said defen'^' till he be payd off all wages but 
the said defend' hath both refused to pay the pit his wages 
and to allow liim diet since the said 20"^ of Sept w<=^ hath to 
this day cost the pit 5i besides 5^ and 5s. due [133] for wages 
of one moneth & ten dayes since the said 20'^ of September 
till this present day so that there is due to the pit for wages & 
dyet as aforesaid 2Gt 5s. besides his dammages aforesaid To 
the Dimmagc of the pit 301 and thereupon he brings his suit. 
[Is. Qd.-] 

Leonard Butters ^ Defendt. 
Israel Stoughton Esq^ pit. 

The Defend' saith that the reason why he hath not finished 
the pits worke is because that John Peircc mason the Defend- 
ents iourneyman was pressed from this Defend' for the Coun- 
tryes service about the Castle & the defend' could not get 
another workman but hath ben ever since about other worke 

1 Leonard Butters, or Buttoli.h, ^vas relative. In regard to the work about 

the l.rieklaver. mason, and lime-burner the castle, I quote from the Colouiai 

already spoken of. As to John Pierce, llccords of the date June 6. 1639, vol. i. 

he may be the bricklayer of that name p. 2G0 : — 
of Boston (1670), or his father, or some 



216 



LECHFORD'S MAXUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



w'^*' was in hand before the pits saving for foure dayes k ikiw 
the dcfendt is ready to enter upon the pits worke if that li<- 
please & for those foure dayes he referreth himself e to tin- 
iudgnient of the Court. [Is.] 

Ralfe Scott agt Edward Healc in an accon of the case. 
[1..] 

Jonathan Weymouth ^ against the same in an accon of the 
case. [Is.] 

Coppy of an account for Mr Nicholas Terise & Mr Joshua 
Hewes. [2s.] 

David Selleckc^ of Dorchester soap boyler bound untu 
John Baker of Ipswich grocer in & to be payd 1 ^laii at the 
house of Francis Hudson in Boston, dat' 2 No : 1639. [6 J.] 



" It was ordered tliat a levy of lOOOl 
be raised fourthw'^i. ... Of this 10001 
there is 250^ appointed and alowed to 
build a house, & repair the batteries 
at Castle Island. The Governo"' [Win- 
throp], the Deputie Governo'' [Dudley], 
k Mr. Israeli Stoughtou are appointed 
to agree with Capt. Gibons, how to be- 
stow this 250, &, what men to keep at 
the fort for the 100^ p @i after it, is re- 
paired." 

1 Neither Ralfe Scott nor Jonathan 
Weymouth is to be found in Savage. 

2 David Sellecke, soap-boiler, is twice 
mentioned in an unimportant manner 
in the Dorchester Toicn Records. He is 
called of Boston by Savage, who says 
he died in Virginia in 1654. Savage is 
somewhat confused in his aecount of 
the various John Bakers ; but he must 
be right when he says that "one was 
of Ipswich, perhaps he who was born at 
Norwich, County of Norfolk, a grocer, 
that came in 1637, aged thirty-nine, to 
Boston in the 'Rose of Yarmouth,' with 
Elizabeth, his wife," etc. Francis Hud- 



son, the fisherman and ferryman, w;is 
said to be one of the first to set foot on 
the peninsula of Boston.- I am not cer- 
tain as to the position of his house here 
referred to. He had leave (Feb. 2S, 
1052) "to wharfe Befor his own ground 
near the Ferry at Charlestown." But 
in the Book of Possessions his house is 
])Ut down somewhere near Galliip's 
Point (on Hanover Street). There is 
a difference between the dates of these 
two entries of seven or eiglit years, so 
it is possible that the latter is here 
referred to. But Hudson's name is 
always connected with the other side of 
the peninsula, — that opposite Charles- 
town. Hudson's Point, named from 
him, is at the foot of Copp's Hill; and 
it was on this side of the town that the 
ferries from Charlestown and Winnisim- 
met reached Boston ; and it was here, I 
should think, that Hudson's house was 
likely to be. He had lease of the ferry 
toward the end of his life, and died 
Nov. 3, 1700. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 217 

And a release of executions etc. bj John Baker to David 
Sellcckc Dat' 1 No. 1639. [GcZ.] 

William Brackenbcrry ^ of Charlestowne in N E Plan- 
ter sells for 391 IO5. unto Edward Wood Baker one dwelling 
liouse lying in Cliarlestownc aforesaid betweene the lands of 
Joseph Hill on the south & the lands late M";'^ Higginsons on 
tlic north w'*" a foreyard already palled out and the halfe of 
one garden thereunto belonging tliat is to say the south halfe 
to be equally divided in the middst & impalled at equall costs 
in convenient time and all outhouses &, appurtenances thereto 
belonging. Provided that the said Brackenberry shall have 
liberty to bring his cattell to & from his owne yard Doore 
through the foresaid foreyard finding stuffe for the setting up 
of the fore dore to the said yard tlie dore to be made fitting for 
the occasions of the said Edward Wood And liberty to make 
a leanto unto the end of the parlor stopping no light & making 
no annoyance to the house by filthy stincks or otherwise. 
And that the said Brack : shall not bake or cause to be baked 
any sorts of bread to sell except only for his owne famile 
dm-ing the time the said partyes live in Charlestowne together, 
except the magistrates shall find a necessity in regard of his 
or his wifes poverty or in regard of the townes want. [6(i.] 

A bond to perform Covenants in 39^ 10s. 

A bill to Brack : for 151 to be payd 21 Dec. penall. [Is-] 

This Indenture the [blanl:'\ day of [Wr/jiZ.] betweene William 
Brackenberry of Charlestowne in New England planter of the 

^ "William Brackenbury was a baker in Chailestown, and extended back east 

by trade. He was apparently a public- ward to the marali by "Wapping Dock 

spirited man as well, for he had served (Wyman's Charlcstown). Joseph Hills, 

as constable for Charlestown a year who lived on one side of this house, was 

Of two before this. He subsequently a wooUendraper from Maiden in Eng- 

moved to Maiden, where he was for land, and his sons and grand.sons lived 

some time selectman, and died August, in Maiden here. Mrs. Higgiusoii was 

1663. The name, by the way, often Ann, the wife of the Rev. Francis Hig- 

appears siielled Brankenbury. Little is ginson, of Salem (who died in August, 

known of Edward Wood which cannot 1630). She had moved to New Haven, 

be inferred from this passage. The where she died in 1640. 
Louse spoken of faced the Market Place 



218 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

one parte & Edward Wood of the same baker of the oilier 
parte witiiesscth that the said William Brackcnbcrry for thirtv 
iiyne pounds ct ten shillings to him in hand payd tt satisflt-,! 
by the said Edward Wood before the sealing & delivery licrout 
whereof & wherewith he the said Willm Brackenbcrry doth 
acknowledge himself to be satisfied & paid & thereof k of 
every parte thereof doth acquite release & forever dischurL'-'' 
the said Edward Wood his hcircs executors & administratoi-s 
by these presents doth [134] hereby grant bargainc &, sell unto 
the said Edward Wood one dwelling house situate in Charlcs- 
towne aforesaid betwecne the lands of Joseph Hill on the south 
parte & the lands late ^Vl^ Higginsons on the novth parte \\^ 
a foreyard already palled out of y* breadth of two yards and 
three ynches at the entrance thereof out of the streete there 
and the one lialfe of one garden thereunto belonging that is 
to say the south halfe to be equally divided in the middcst 
at the equall costs & charges of the said partyes to these 
presents in convenient time and all ovens outhouses wayes 
lights eas'ments k appurtenances thereunto belonging And 
all the right title interest ct demand of the said WilhTi Brack- 
enbcrry of in &, to the premises hereby granted To have 
& to hold the said dwelling house & all & singulare the 
premises hereby granted w*^ the appurtenances unto the said 
Edward Wood his hcires <fe assignes for ever. And the said 
Willm Brackenbcrry doth hereby for himself his heires execu- 
tors <fc administrators Covenant promise &: grant to & with the 
said Edward Wood his heires & assignes that he & they shall 
or may lawfully quietly & peaceably have hold & enjoy the 
said preriiiscs hereby granted <fc every parte thereof without 
the lest trouble or eviction of him the said William Bracken- 
berry <fe [ Wa«i] his wife their heires & assignes or any of them 
or by their or any of their meanes assent or prom™' And the 
said Edward Wood doth hereby for himselfe his heires «fc as- 
signes grant unto the said Willm Brackenbcrry his heires and 
assignes free liberty of ingressc egresse <fc rcgrcsse for hiui 
«fc themselves &: his k their cattcU k goods to pass to and 
from his k their owne yards into k through the aforesaid fore- 
yard He k they finding stuffe k wood for the setting ui) ^*^' 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 219 

upholding of the forcdoore of the said foreyard the said doore 
to be made fitting for the occasions of the said Edward "Wood 
liis heires & assignes who is & are to set up & from time to 
time amend the said forcdoore witli the matcrialls of the said 
WiUm Brackcnberry his heires & assignes And further that 
it shall be lawfull to & for the said Willm Brackenberry his 
heires & assignes at any time to make a leanto unto the outside 
end of the parlor of the said dwelling house upon his & their 
owne ground not stopping or hindering any light or lights of 
the same parlor or other rooms of the said house nor making 
or causing any annoyance by any privyes hogstyes or any other 
fdthy stincks or otherwise unto the said house or dwellers 
therein. And furthermore in Consideration of the said money 
tt bargaine & that the said Edward Wood is a Baker by his 
trade & the said "Willm Brackenberry & his wife were not 
brought up to the said trade but did for a smale time use the 
same in case of necessity lieretofore Now the said Willm 
Brackenberry for himselfe & his said wife his executors & 
adm" doth Covenant promise & grant to & w'^ the said Ed- 
ward Wood by these presents that he the said Willm Bracken- 
berry & his said wife or either of them shall not bake or cause 
to be baked any sorts of bread to sell during the time that the 
said parties to these presents and the said [ ilank ] shall live in 
the said Towne of Charlestowne together saving that the said 
Willm Brackenberry <fc his said wife may bake bread for the 
spending of themselves' & their family And except the mag- 
istrates shall hereafter judge the said William or his wife to 
be necessitated thereunto through poverty or that the said 
Towne cannot otherwise be supplyed. 
In witnesse &c. [os.] 

[135] Joseph Cooke^ of Cambridge in New England gent 
Sonne of Thomas Cooke of great Yealdham in the County of 

^ Joseph Cooke came over in the came to America. He had a grant of 

"Defence" (1635) vith his younger land at Cambridge, which he forfeited 

brother, George, and with Roger liav- by remaining in Enghind. Joseph Cooke 

lackenden, the younger brother of Kieh- and liis brotlier wera boih prominent 

ard here mentioned. Richard never citizens of Cambridge, often deputies to 



220 LECHFORD'S MAXUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Essex gent Dccensed makes a letter of Attorney to Thomas 
Cooke of Wormingford in Essex gent his brother & to ^l! Rich- 
ard Hcrlakendcn of Earles Colne in Essex Esq! lawfully V) 
enter upon the ffreehold lands in Rynkesey in Suff & all Cu{^ 
pihold lands in great Brysett called Brysett Kell liolden (ti- 
the mannor of Bryset aforesaid belonging to Kings College 
in Cambridge. 

Me Willm Brackenberry de Charlcstowne in Nova Angliu 
plantator tenor' etc Edw Wood in 39^ IO5. dat' &c. 
Condiconed to pforme Covents. [Is.] 

Knowe all men by these presents that I Joseph Cooke of 
Cambridge in New England gent one of the 2 sonnes of 
Thomas Cooke late of Great Yealdliam in the County of Es- 
sex gent Deceased Doe hereby constitute ordeyne and in 
my place put my wellbeloved & deare brother Tiiomas Cooke 
of Wormingfold in the said County of Essex gent and my 
wellbeloved ffricnd Richard Herlakenden of Earles Colnc 
in the said County EsqT my true & lawfull Attorneys joyntly 
or severally for me & in my name lawfully to enter on 
all those my freeliold &, coppihold lands & tenements called 
Brysett Kell lying & being in Rynkesey & Great Brysett w'" 
•were given bequeathed settled to &, upon me either by the last 
will & testament or any deed & conveyance or surrender of 
my said ffather or otherwise in the County of Suffolke or any 
other place whatsoever l)y what name or names soever the said 
lands & tenements [be] called And also to goe unto the Court 
Baron or Courts Baron of the manor of great Brysett afore- 
said or manors whereof the said Coppihold lands are held and 

the General Court, etc. George went book Joseph Cooke calls himself one of 

home to England and served in the Civil the two sons of Thomas Cooke, the 

"War, and died in Ireland. Joseph, it is other being Thomas Cooke, of Wormiiig- 

thought, returned to England after his ford, Essex. If we trust Lechford, and 

brother's death. This information I take the passage to mean onhj two sons, 

have taken from Savage, who says noth- as is most natural, George Cooke cannot 

ing about any other Joseph Cooke that be the brother of Thomas Cooke, as 

will correspond to what we know. But stated by Savage ; he may be a cousin, 

in the next entry but one in the Note- or some more distant relative. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 221 

for mc <fc in my name to require to be admitted tenant or Ten- 
ants of all the said Coppiliold lands ct tenements according to 
the Customc of the said mannor or mannors And for me & in 
my name to performc. all such suit & service att the said Court 
Baron or Courts Baron as to me belongcth to be done in regard 
of the said Cop})iliold lands and to compound ct agree for and 
pay all such payments duties & respect of homage or fealty as 
I ought to perform to & w^^ the Kings Ma"^ c^' the Lord and 
Lords of the said mannor or mannors or their Stewards or to & 
w"* any other person or persons to whome such payments duties 
<fe respect are or shall be due & payable for the said freehold & 
coppihold lands & tenements w'^ license of the Kings Mai*' or 
of the Lord or Lords aforesaid as the case shall require And 
afterwards for me & in my name to demise let &, sett & to take 
the rents issues & profiits of the said freehold & cop|»iliold lands 
& ten*.* And further for me & in my name to article covenant 
& agree w*'^ any person or persons about the sale surren- 
der & purchase of the said freehold tt coppihold lands & tene- 
ments for such reasonable summcs of money as they are worth 
and the said money for mc & in my name to receive & then the 
said lands & tenements to such person or persons purchasing 
the same & to their use for mc & in my name to convey assure 
& surrender according to law & the Customc of the said mannor 
or mannors whereby they my sayd Attorneys or either of them 
may bynd me to make any further legall assurance conveyance 
or surrender as the said purchaser or purchasers or their 
Counsell learned in the law shall reasonably advise or require 
so that for the doing thereof I be not compelled to travel forth 
of the Jurisdiccon of the Mattaclmsetts Bay in New England 
And further for me & in my name to make doe & execute all 
other lawfull acts & deeds requisite for the recovery entering 
on & taking possession of the said lands & tenements & further 
touching the letting setting & taking the rents issues & profitts 
thereof and touching the selling Sc passing away of the same 
and all otiier the premises as fully powerfully & [138] effec- 
tually as I myselfo in my owne proper person might or could 
doe Hereby ratifying gratefully accepting & confirming all & 
whatsoever my said Attorneys or either of them shall lawfully 



222 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT K€TE-BOOK. 

doc in the premises In witncsse whereof I have hereunto sett 
my hand & sealc the ftifth day of November in the fliftocmh 
yeare of the raignc of our Soveraigne Lord Charles now Kii-i: 
of England <tc Annocp Dfii. 1G39 Coram Willo Hibbcns ^ tV 
[W«n^] & meipse. 

And I John Winthrop Esq' Governor of the Jurisdiccon of 
the Mattachusetts Bay in New England having seenc these 
presents signed, sealed & delivered in my presence have tliought 
good at the speciall instance & request of the abovcmcntioncd 
Joseph Cooke to certify the same. In testimony whereof I 
have hereunto caused tlic Common Scale of our Colony to be 
affixed the day & yeare abovesaid. [3s, GcZ.] 

This Indenture .&c Betweene "Willm Cheney of Roxbury in 
N. E. p. of the one pte & Walter Blackhorne late of Roxbury 
afor's*^ p of tlie other pte Witnesseth that the said Willm 
Cheney for divers good causes & considerations him there- 
unto moving Doth by these presents grant alien & enfcoffe 
unto tlie said Walter Blackborne all that his dwelling house 
in Roxbury aforesaid w*^ the lands heretofore purchased w'^ 
the same that is to say six acres of upland medow more or 
lessc six acres of salt mrsli more or lesse sixtcene acres in 
a great lott w*^ a common fence nyne acres & an halfe of 
woody upland unfenced twelve acres of a rocky woodlott 
fenced tenn acres belonging to the said house & two acres 
more or less heretofore purchased at another time & also the 
Cowehouse or barnc set up but not quite finished w'"" all & 
singulare the appurtenances To have & to hold tlie said Dwel- 
ling house & lands & all & singulare the premises w'*^ the 
appurtenances unto the said Walter Blackborne his heires and 
assignes for ever. Provided always that if the said William 
Cheney his executors & administrators shall from time to time 
& at all times hereafter well & truly observe fullfill & keepe 
all such articles Covenants condicons agreements & promises 

1 "William Hibluns was admitted an but soon returned, and was chosen as- 

inhabitant of Boston May 27, 1639 ; sistant in 1643, which office he held till 

made freeman May 13, 1C40; deputy, his death, 1G54. 
1640 and 1641 ; then went to England, 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 2:^3 

nicnconcd t conteyncd in certaine Articles of agreement in- 
dented made the Day before the Day of the date of these 
presents between the said Walter Clackborne of the one pane 
«fc tlic said Willm Cheney of the other parte concerning the 
keeping of six Cowes &, their living increase & rendring the 
said Cowes [137] & an equall halfe of the said living increase 
unto the said Walter his executors & adm" at the end of three 
ycarcs from thenceforth as on the parte & behalfe of the said 
William Cheney his executors or administrators are to be ob- 
served fullfiUed k kept then this present grant & feoffment 
shall bo voyd & of none effect or els it shall be & remainc in 
full power strength it vertuc The said Wm Cheney his hcires 
& assignes to continue in possession of the said House & pos- 
sessions before granted unlesse a manifest breach of the said 
Articles fall out to be committed by him or them their executors 
or administrators. In witnesse etc. 1 Oct. 1G39. [4. 4.] 

Me Ed"™™ Colcord ' Sc Lieutenant Richard Morice de Dover 
ppe flumen de Pascattaqua in Nova x\nglia plantator in 701 
Stephano Greensmyth. The Condicon to deliver to S Gr 5000 
of Clapboard 4 foot ct halfe long and at the heart from 2 inches 
to 5 inches thickc or upward every way merchantable <t at any 
time after the last of March next within a Cables length of the 
usuall riding place of the shipps just at the waters side at 
Pascatt rivers mouth & to fynd a boat or lighter to help put 
them aboard. [Is. Is. 6c?.] 

Jonathan Weymouth - makes a letter of Attorney to Hich- 
ard Wayt to receive of Edward Plelc mercli'^ 7^ 5s. recovered 

^ Edward Colcord was allied with Mr. matters, but seldom in any other 

Wheelwright in the purchase of some connection. 

lands from Indians whereon to found '^ It will he remembered that Jonathan 

the town of Exeter. He was of Dover "Weymouth and Edward H(de are not to 

in 1640, and moved thence to Hamp- be easily found. lUchard Waite I take 

ton, where he died 16S2. Lieutenant to be the Boston tailor who served in 

Mon-is we have met with before in such the Pequot war as sergeant. He was 

transactions as the present. Stephen freeman, 1037 ; disarmed, as so many 

(Ireensmith is frequently mentioned, in with whom we have had to do, for sym- 

" inthrop and elsewhere, as being prose- pathy with Anne Hutchinson, and died 

cuted for too rash speaking on religious 1680, or thereabouts. 



224 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

ag* him in the Cort at Boston 5 No: 1639 Dat' 12. 9. IGG'.i. 
coram me. [Gt?.] 

The same makes a letter of Attorney to the same agt Arthur 
BroAvne ^ of Casko merchant for 3i Dat' 12. 9. 1639 ' coram 
me. [6(?.] 

John "Winthrop Esqr Governor of the Jurisdiccon of tlic 
Mattachiisetts bay in New Enghmd to all manner of persons 
whome it may concerne greeting These are to certify you that 
William Sergeant ^ late of Northampton haberdasher of Hatts 
and now of Charlestown in New England' planter & Sarah liis 
wife late the wife of William Minshall of Whitchurch in the 
County of Salop gent. Deceased are both blessed be God in full 
life & good health at the time of the making hereof In testi- 
mony whereof I have caused the publicke scale of our Colony 
to be hereto affixed the fourteenth day of November in the fif- 
teenth ycare of the raigne of our Soveraignc Lord Charles now 
King of England Arc Ami0(p Dili 1639. [Is.] 

Captaine Morris ^ makes a letter of Attorney to Willm Peirco 
of Boston mariner agt Daniel Cornelius sawyer k ffisherman 
for foure pounds in money ct for two hoggsheads of cod fish to 
the value of three pounds w'^^ should have ben payd this time 
twelve moneth. 14. 9. 1639. [6f?.] 

This Indenture of a ffreightment made the twenty fourth day 
of October in the fifteenth yeare of the Raigne of our Soveraignc 

1 Artluir Brown, of Casco, and later and elsewhere. He is said to have inade 
of Winnegansett (post, p. 219), I sup- more voyages to and from Boston tliau 
pose to be Arthur Browne, Saco, 1636, had any other in the same years. H-' 
noted by Savage. . was the compiler of "an almanac made 

2 William Sargent and his wife Sarah for New England" (Jrinth., i. 2S9), 
are both mentioned by Savage, who which was the first thing after the Free- 
knows hut little else that is now perti- vian's Oath (proljably only a broadside), 
nent except the fact here certified to by printed at the pivss at Cambridge by 
Winthrop. Stephen Day, the partner of the Kev. 

2 Morris was captain of I know not Josse Glover, as has been already noted 

what, but frequently has the title given above. Captain Peirce was killed in 

him after this entry. William Peirce the West Indies by the Spaniards some 

was a Boston sea-captain, of whom very two years after this date, as may be read 

frequent mention is found in Winthrop in Winthrop (ii. 33). 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. t-'l^o 

Lorde Charles now King of England kc Annoip Dili. 1639 
IJctwcene Nicholas Trerise ^ Muster of the good ship the 
Planter of the burden of three hundred and fifty tunnes or 
thereabouts of the one parte and Samuel Maverickc gent in bc- 
halfe of himselfe & his Company of the other parte Witneseth 
that the said Master Nicholas Trerise Doth hereby Covenant 
k promise to and with the said Samuel Maverickc k his Com- 
pany that he the said Nicholas Trerise shall k will compleatly 
furnish the said ship w"' men victualls ammunition and other 
necessaries and w"" what [138] convenient s})eed he may sayle 
directly from New England unto the roade of poynt Comfort in 
A'irginia and there or in such other place or places in James 
river or yorke river as he shall be assigned to goe unto and 
there take aboard his said ship such tobacco as shall be pro- 
vided for him by the Assignee or Assignes of the said Samuel 
^Maverickc k his Comjmny unto the full quantity of two hun- 
dred tunnes. For loading of w'^^ tobacco It is agreed betweene 
the partyes to these presents that the said Master w*^ his said 
ship shall stay from the day of his arivall at Poynt Comfort 
aforesaid seventy dayes if need so require : and shall afforde 

1 Nicliolas Trerise (the name is spelled "Planter" of thirty-five tons, let to 

in many ways) had been captain of La Tour, is called a pinnace by "\Vin- 

tlie "Planter" five years before, when throp. Those anxious to make out the 

that shi^rcame from London, and lived connection, as I am, may please them- 

in Charlestown. Thence he moved to selves by imagining that tlie smaller 

AVoburn. Of the members of this' Com- boat was some sort of tender or long- 

pany, headed by itr. Samuel Maverick, boat of the larger, of which Maverick 

I can hardly fomi a conjecture. In had become possessed. Another refer- 

regard to the " Planter," the follow- ence is in a deposition of Maverick 

ing may interest the curious : In 1646 (3 Mass. Hist. Soc, vii. 116), in wliich 

Monsieur de la Tour hired of Sanmel the "Barque 'Planter'" is sjwken of 

Iklaverick, who acted for Sir David as La Tour's ship. In the Massochii,- 

Kirke and partners, "a certain vessel setts Colonial Record (iii. 226) there 

called the plan [ter], burden thirty fyve is mention of a ship "Planter" in con- 

tuuns of tliere about, for a voyage in nection with Edward Bendall and WW- 

her to be made vppon the coast of liam Asjiinwall, which may or may not 

Lacadie" {Suff. Deeds, i. f. 75). This have had some connection with the two 

is uotiiing more, however, than a coin- here mentioned. The year is 1651, si.x 

cidence in names and numbers. The years after the deed to La Tour. The 

" Planter " in which Trerise commanded name " Planter " was probably a com- 

could hardly be of less than three hun- mon one, however, and nothing can be 

dred and fifty tons burden ; and the really inferred from it. 

15 



226 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

what help k assistance he can \\^^ boats ctmcn for the speedier 
loading of the said tobacco aboard the said ship accordinL' t • 
the Custome of the Countrey necessary attendance for safttv 
of the said ship excepted. And the said Samuel Maverickc in 
behalfe of himselfe & his Company doth hereby Covenant a 
promise to and w'** the said Nicholas Trerisc that he the sai^l 
Samuel & his Company shall k will provide the said quant it v 
of two hundred tunnes of tobacco as aforesaid within the 
time afore praefixcd and shall & will pay or caused to be jimmI 
unto the said Master or his Assignes fowcr pounds k tenn shil- 
lings for every tunn of tobacco taken in on his or their account 
accounting fower hoggsheads of Virginia casks to a tun one 
thousand and three hundred pounds of leafc tobacco and 
two thousand pounds of rould tobacco in bulke to a tunno. 
This afores*^ money to be payd one halfe at twenty dayes aft«T 
the said ships arivall at her portc of Discharge w*^^ is London 
if no other place be agreed on in the interim by a joynt Cmi- 
sent of the said Master k loaders k the other halfe at t\venty 
dayes after the said twenty dayes. Good security being given 
by the loaders for the payment of the aforesaid money — viz 
the whole quantity of the said Tobacco or so much as the said 
Master shall thinkc fitt to be Deteyned in his hands or custody 
for payment <fe satisfaccon of the aforesaid summcs of money 
and if payment be not made at the times afore prefixed tlien 
the said Master may Dispose of as much as will pay the freight 
and to be accountable to the loaders for the remainder of the 
said Tobacco. In witnesse whereof the partyes abovesaid have 
hereunto interchangeably set their hands k scales the day ».t 
yeare first above written, [os. 'od.'] 

The will of Mr Willm Bernard ^ of Charlestowne 15. 0. 
1639. [3s.] 

A Supplication for the shopkeej)crs of Boston ^V. Cogan - k 
the rest to the Genall Cort 13. 9. 1639. [2s. 6cZ.] 

1 Of William Barnard there is a note 2 John Cogan was this year one of 

in W}Tnan's Charhsloicn Estates and the selectmen, and was one of the town 

Genealogies : " Inhabitant 1642-3 ; constables as well. His house ami fclK'p 

m. Alice, who was aJm. church 1. {[>), were on the northeast corner made by 

1645." Other mention is lacking. Stale Street and Washington, nc.^t to 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



227 



John Evercd als Webb of Boston Planter conveys to John 
Ilansett^ of Boston husbandman one garden of halfe an acre 
or thereabouts lying bctwecne the lands of goodman Reynolds 
on the north & the lands of Richard Wayt on the south &, the 
lands of Nicholas Parker on the east & the highway on the 
west for 91. In presencia mei & Willi Herickc. [Is. 6c?.] 

[139] For the Country. 

The writing of the receipt of the Inhabitants of Dover Kit- 
tery & Oyster river into the Proteccon of this Jurisdiccon. 
[Is. 6(i] 

The Commission to Mr Bradstrcatc for those places. [Is.] 

The Institution <fc liraittation of the Councell of this Juris- 
diccon. [2.] 

Another of the same. [2.] 

Charta libcrtatis. [2.-G.] 

The Act of the publique &, private tenure of land. [1.] 

The division of the Plantation into shires. [1.] 



the house of tlie Re%% John Wilson and 
opposite that of Captain Robert Keayne, 
who lived on the southeast corner. These, 
three houses were on the open JIarket 
Place, where the Old State House was 
afterwards built, while just across Wash- 
ington Street was built, a year or two 
later, the Meeting-Ilouse. At this time 
the Meeting-IIuuse was on the south side 
of State Street, some few steps below 
Kobert Keayne's {Book of Possessions, 
G. 60, 64, 81, 84, 85, pp. 98-103). 

^ John Ilansett, called in the church 
record " servant of our pastor, John 
Wilson," moved after this to Braintree, 
— where he may have lived on Wilson's 
land there, or acted as overseer, — and 
ngain to Iloxbury, and died in 1684. 
John Evered, as well as Stephen Evered 
(perhaps his brother), always appears as 
"alias Webb," and later in the Koic- 
hook a,s "Webbals [WrtJi/.]," (p. 224). 
He came from Wiltshire, where, accord- 
ing to Savage, Webb is a common name ; 



went to Chelmsford, and then to Dra- 
cut, and died in 1668. This I get from 
Savage. But he bought in 1658 the 
house of Richard Hutchinson, of Lon- 
don, witli the ground whereon the Old 
Corner Bookstore now stands. He sold 
the property, or a part of it, in 16G1 
(ShurtlefT's Boston, p. 675). This, I 
suppose, was just before his removal to 
Chelmsford, where he was representa- 
tive 1663-1665. The garden, of half 
an acre or thereabouts, is easily iden- 
tified. It was on the east side of Wash- 
ington Street, south of Milk Street. 
[Savage thought it might be "unavail- 
ing to ask why this family is described 
in all the records by a double surname." 
A fact mentioned in Fuller's Church 
History (p. 110) suggests a probable an- 
swer. In the reign of Edward III. many 
Dutch tradesmen emigrated to Eng- 
land from the Xetherlands; and "I am 
informed," says Fuller, " that a prime 
Dutch clothmaker in Glocestershire had 



22J 



L E CUFOIID ' 5 MA N US CRIP T NO TE-B OK. 



Richard Carter ^ of Boston it Matling Knight of the sam-; 
doe undertake for 5^ to fell & cutt out the wood growing in u 
"swampe of Xicholas Parkers at Rumney marsh ^ Avithin 2': 
dayes after the date hereof & to place them in heapes fit fur 
carriage & reasonable burdens fitt for a man easily to carrv. 

For every great lighter load of Ed : Bendalls 235. 4f/. If the 
worke come to more they are to have more if lesse to repay 
what it comes short. [6d] 

Lieuten"^ Robert Feke of Waterton in New England gent 
and Sargeant William Palmer of Yarmouth in Xew Eu'/- 



the surname of Web [i. e. weaver] given 
Mm by King Edward there, — a family 
still [164S-1655] famous for their man- 
ufacture." T.] The lot is in the Book 
of Possessions (p. 81, F, 49), standing in 
the name of Edward Fletcher. It has 
the same abutters, except Nathaniel 
Bishop, instead of Xicholas Parker. 
Bishop's lot (in IGiS, or thereabouts) 
was immediately between Fletcher's and 
Parker's, and it is probable that he 
purchased it after the date of this 
grant. 

1 Richard Carter, of Boston, is gen- 
erally called a carpenter. He had a 
house, bought just about this time, of 
William Hudson, Jr., on the west side 
of Washington Street, near Boylston 
Street, then well out in the suburbs. 
Of Matling Knight, I find niention sev- 
eral times in the Toicn Record and else- 
where. He was admitted townsman 
March 31, 1645, and was appointed 
fence- viewer at iluddy River in 1653. 
There are other unimportant references 
to him and to his house, which, I think, 
was somewhere in the region oF SeoUay 
Square, near the corner of Hanover and 
Washington streets; though I am not 
certain of it, for he has no land in the 
Book of Possessions (Boston Toicn Rec- 
ords, i. 11-1; Book of Possessions, p. Ill; 
H. 11). 



- The land here spoken of is tiie 
great allotment made in 1637 to Mr. 
Henry Vane (Town Records, i. 27), 
which by this time had come into tlie 
|>ossession of Nicholas Parker. Here Sfc 
p. 141, post, and note thereon. As for 
Edward Bendall, it was one of his avo- 
cations to keep the ferry over to Nodillts 
Island and to the ships riding before 
the town. But it is likely enough tliat 
he had a "great lighter" on purpose to 
do such work as the present. There is' 
much in Lechford, which the careful 
reader will remember, on the subject of 
a great lighter owned by Pilchard Parkt-r 
and Edward Bendall, and managed by 
one Thomas Hedger. But I cannot s:iy 
that that must be the same lighter us 
the one here referred to. The ijues- 
tion of lighters becomes more involved 
on the inspection of these extracts 
(dates and all) from the Colonial Record 
(i. 165, 181), March 3, 1 635-1 6ot>: 
"Ordered, that there shall be xxl 
gyven Edward Bendal out of the tre;i- 
sury towards the loss of his lighter:' 
and October 25, 1636 : " Whereas Ed- 
ward Bendall had 20i yielded toward tli<- 
loss of the lighter and that the lighter 
was recovered the Court allowed him 12' 
out of the 201 well he should have liad, 
if it had been' lost towards his charge & 
hindrance. " 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



220 



land & Judith his wife, and Tobyas Fekc ^ aged 17 sonnc & 
Daughter of James Feke, late of London goldsmith Deceased 
makes a ler of Attorney to Tobyas Dixon Citizen tt mercer of 
London to sell one tenement or house & shopp in Lumbard 
street London held of the Company of Goldsmiths in London 
whereof he dyed poss®*^, late in the occupacons of one Bramp- 
ton, dat' 5. lO^f'^ 1639, coram Jo Winthrop Gov'' James 
Luxford - & meipse. [3s.] 

The Information of Edward Hall of Ipswich servant to 
Richard Salstonstall Esqr to the right wor" the Governor k 
Counsellors & Assistants in the Court of assis*^ now assembled : 
This informant saith that he knowcth Marmaduke Pierce ^ of 
Salem tayler k knew his late servant a boy of about thirteen 
yeares of age Deceased upon whoso Death the said Marmaduke 
was lately arraigned in the Court at Boston as for a supposed 
Murder of the said boy And this inform'^ saith that he can de- 
pose upon his oath if this Court please that when he wrought 



^ Tobyas Feke is not noted in Savage, 
and so I suppose is not heard of again 
in New England. William Palmer was 
brought to Plymouth by his father, of 
the same name, in 1621. When married 
(in 1634), he lived at Scituate, and after- 
ward at Yarmouth. Savage says he 
moved to Yarmouth "before 1643," 
which we may amend to "before 1639." 
He became a lieutenant later, and died 
in Xewtown, L. I., before 1661. 

"^ The appearance of the names of 
James Luxford and John Winthrop re- 
calls the frequent mention of the "un- 
faithfulness of my servant Luxford" in 
the Winthrop Papers (4 Mass. Hist. 
Coll. vL & vii. passim). It is curious 
that tlie two should iiave been together 
at this time, for it must have been very 
close upon the time of Luxford's breach 
with Winthrop. Hugh Peters says: 
"James Luxford was at Saugust when 
I came by. I have layd out for him." 
This is in a letter evidently written after 
Winthrop's misfortunes, dated Salem, 



Dec. 26, 1639 (4 Mass. Hist. Coll. 
vii. 202). James Luxford is also noticed 
in the Colonial Record as having two 
wives, and being punished for the same 
(i. 245, 283, 295). 

3 The trial of ^larmaduke Pierce for 
the murder of his servant is related 
shortly by Winthrop (i. 319), from 
whom, and also from the Colonial Rec- 
ord, I take these facts. He was first 
accused Sept 3, 1639; but the mat- 
ter not seeming quite clear, it was 
put off till the next Quarter Court to l>e 
tried. At this trial the jury could not 
agree, and the case was continued, Pierce 
being let out on bail. This deposition 
in Lechford was sworn to on December 
3 of that year, and, with this additional 
evidence and perhaps more that we 
know nothing of, the case was tiied 
December 3, and the jury rendered a 
verdict of " not guilty." Winthrop says 
that two of the jury dissented. Pierce 
was not finally discharged until ^larch 
of the next year. 



230 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

for the said Marmaclukc at liis house in Salem in or about th.; 
first moneth last was twelve moneth the said Marmaduki- 
having whijiped this said boy for mooching the next moniiii_' 
after the whipping he came voluntarily A: shewed this infiMiu' 
his body to see how his said Master had whipped him and tliis 
informant saith that the said boy did put downc his breoelirs 
before this informant and he lifted up the said boys shirt iV 
viewed his body well both behind & before & his Doublt-tt 
being some thing loose this inform* saw also the sd boys 
wast & lialfe way up his backe & this inform* saith he saw the 
mark? of stripes upon the said boys buttocks on both sides red 
& wales but no blood neither did this informt see any signe of 
stripe upon the said boys belly forepart of his theighes wast 
or any parte of his backe but all the said parts of his body 
besides his buttockcs were vrhite & faire and this inform' 
believeth [140] the said correction was w**^ a rod upon w-*" 
whipping this inform''* saith that within a day or such a space 
after one M^ Perin of Salem brought home the said boy to the 
house of the said Marmaduke & Mf Perin then said he had seen 
how the said boy was whipped & therefore wished the said 
Marmaduke Pierce his wife he being then from home to give 
the said boy some victualls <t to spare any further correction for 
that time for that he thought the boy had sufficient correction 
for that time or spake words to that effect. And this inform* 
saith that he hath heard one goodman Walker of Salem did 
upon the same whipping meete w*'' the said boy in the woods ct 
together w*^ the said M- Pcrrin saw the signes of the said stripes. 
And further this inf°"™* saith that upon the sixt day of the 
fourth moneth last past he met the said boy at the Townes end 
of Salem & this informant seeing him hold his head aside asked 
him what ayled him whereto the said boy answered that he had 
bin keeping of goats or swine & sitting in the woods under a 
tree a limbe of the tree fell downe upon him & struck his licad 
& said that his head was very sore and this informant told him 
that he doubted he had bin a mooching as he was wont to do 
& wished him to tell his Master & Dame of his sore liead and 
this informant hath heard the sayd boy dyed upon or about tiie 
thirteenth day of the same fourth moneth And also this 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 231 

infor™* saith that whilest lie wrought w''^ the said Marmaduke 
v;''^ was about the space of fortnight the said boy complaycd 
to this inform^'^ for Avaiit of victualls as he said and the said 
Marmaduke comphiyncd to this infor™' agt the said boy for 
lying mooching k idlencsse &, the like wherefore this inform"' 
gave the said boy as good counsell as he could but told not hira 
or his Master each others ComP''^ and did observe that at din- 
ners constantly during that space the said boy had victualls 
enough & to leave : <fe lastly this informant saith that he did 
ever & dotli still take the said Marmaduke for a moderate & 
Cliristianlike man. And further this informant cannot say or 
depose materially. [2. 6cZ.] 

"Willm Whitered ^ mortgageth certaine lands at Ipswich to 
Willm Tynge merchant w'^ proviso or condicon to satisfie 
Mr Tynge all Debts & lawfull demands within twelve moneths. 
Dated 3. 10. 1639. Coram Tho : Burton Robto Feke & me- 
ipse. [2s.] 

An account of the widdowe halfield at suit of W°^ Whitered. 
[1..] 

Ingrosment of the last will k Testament of Roger Harlaken- 
den 2 Esqr & the Inventorie. [6s.] 

Received of Mf Bellingham 26 Xo : 1639 upon account to 
the Country 5i. 

Received of him more 12. 22. 2s. 

[141] To write for TVillm Palmer to Mr Dixson at the goat 
in Lumbard street mercer to excuse a bill of Exr charged upon 

^ I can make nothing of this aj^ree- Thomas Burton of Hingham, whom I 

inent. Whitered is only mentioned in find in Savage, or not, having nothing 

Lechford (in the next entry), and is not to guide me. The "widdowe halfield" 

found anywhere else that 1 know of, nor I take to be the relict of Richard Haifoe, 

can I find any other connection than or Haffield, of Ipswich, who came in 

this paper between either of the parties 1635 with his wife Martha, and whose 

to the agreement and any of the wit- will has date Feb. 17, 1639. 
nesses. Indeed, I know not if the 2 Ijoger Harlarkenden died Is'ov. 16, 

Thomas Burton here mentioned be 163S. 



232 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

him to one Edmimd Anger ^ of Cambridge for his occasions a 
new plant & his wife lying in & to advise liim of the Le"" of At- 
torney & further writing, to buy 101 of butter & to spend the 
rest in linnen & wollen cloath f or a suit & coate & a gowne for 
his wife of good broadcloth, viz buckram & a piece of ;:oud 
stufTe for pettycoates a Dozen of shooes halfe a dozen for wcjuun 
7°* & so many for men 9°* six paire of russet bootes 9"' 3 for 
winter & 3 for summer. &, a coppy of the le^ of attorney. 
[Is. 6cZ.] 

John Winthrop Esqr Governor of the Jurisdiccon of the M : 
&c for 801 sells to John Newgate of Boston ffeltmaker One 
Lott of upland -lying neare Rumney marsh conteyning 150 
acres abutting upon the highway leading to divers mens lotts 
on the east and upon the lands pteyning to Charles-Towne to 
tlie west and the lands now of Nicholas Parker sometimes 
MF Vanes on the south and partly upon the lands of James Pen 
& partly upon the lands of the said John Newgate on the north 
pt. in fee : [1-G] 

William Grey ^ makes a letter of Attorney by his brother 
Henry Grey to Philip White of Pascattaquay mariner against 
Jeremiah Willis* late of Sagus ais Lynne for 31 lis. 16s. Gd. 
charge to sue him at Plymouth & 5s. for a short hand booke. 

1 Edmund Angier had lived with with one exception, — the name of Jlr. 
John Cotton in Lincolnshire, and had Vane stands in the Town Lccord, wliile 
intended to embark with liim. He did "Nicholas Parker sometimes Mt Vane's" 
not, however, come over until 1636, and is in Lechford. The third name is 
was not made freeman until 1640. that of James Penn, above mentioned, 

2 This land was given to "Winthrop wlio had fifty acres. The fourth name 
Jan. 8, 1637-163S [Boston Record, on the list is that of John Xewg-ate 
i. 27], in the portioning of the great aforesaid, who received one hundred and 
allotments at Piumney Marsh from the twelve acres. 

town of Boston. The fn-st name in the ^ Concerning these and other Greys, 

allotment is " Mr. Henr}- Vane, Esq.," there is much confusion. Savage men- 

who received two hundred acres, which, tions no "William Grey, and this nien- 

as will be remembered, were now in the tion of his brother Henry is too vague 

pcssession of Nicltolas Parker. The for identification. 

next name is that of John "Winthrop, the * "Jeremiah ^Villis, Lynn, 1637, 

elder, who received one hundred and found in freeman's list at Newport, 

fifty acres, described precisely as above, 1655 " (Savage). 



LECIIFOllD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 233 

WiUm Tester,! an affidavit 11. 9. 1639. [Is.] 

Articles of Agreement made tlie 9'*' day of January Anno 
Pnii 1G39 bctweene Edward Hcale'-of Bristoll of the one parte 
and William Pester of Salem in New England mercer of the 
other parte as foUowetli 

Imprimis the said Edward llealc doth liereby for himselfe 
his heires executors and administrators Covenant promise and 
grant to & with the said William Pester his executors admin- 
istrators and assignes by these presents that he the said Ed- 
ward Heale his heires executors or administrators shall <fe will 
pay or cause to be payd unto the said William Pester his exec- 
utors administrators or assignes the simime of sixty-five pounds 
sixtecne shillings and eight pence together w*"" all such Dam- 
mages as he or they hath bin or shall be iustly put unto for 
not-payment of the said money from the twenty-fift day of 
Marcli last past, upon the \hlanii] day of [l>!ai,k] next ensuing 
the date hereof at or in the Insurance office in or neare the 
royall exchange London. 

Item the said Willm Pester doth for himselfe his heires 
executors & administrators and assignes covenant promise and 
grant to and w^^ the said Edward Hcalc his executors adminis- 
trators and assignes by these presents that he the said William 
Pester his heires executors administrators or assignes shall k 
will accept of so much money as the nyne hundred weight 
of tobacco w*"** the said William Pester heretofore had of the 
said Edward Heale & one Richard Barnhouse ^ are or shall 
be sold for by the said William Pester his executors admin is- 

1 "William Pester, mercer of Salem, Bristol, which gives me the impression 
since 1637. He must be the one who that he was not in America for any 
owed " the country for wine bought and length of time, particularly as his dwell- 
sould fortie one shillings & eight pence." ing-place is not stated in any of the re- 
{Mass. Coll. Ilcc. i. 225), though the ferences to him made heretofore. 

trade of mercer seems hardly compatible ^ Richard Barnhouse may have been 

with that of a wine-seller. Savage says: Ttichard Barnes of Marlborougli (see 

" Salem 1637 when with grant of land Sarac/c), but I think, rather, that he was 

he had the prefix of respect, yet abun- an Englishman, or more likely a Yirgin- 

doned the country in 16-42, and ten j-ears ian, with whom Heale had had dealings 

later not being heard of, his wife Dorothy (see mitc, p. 132, where is mention of 

had leave to marry agiiin." Heale's connection with Virginia). 

2 Edward Heale is here called of 



234 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT yOTE-BOOK. 

trators or assigncs according to their best endeayours in pmt,. 
of payment of the said summe of sixtie five pounds sixtt-.-n^- 
shillings k eight pence and Dammages if the said ToIki.t,) 
shall be as aforesaid sold for lesse than the said sumnio and 
Dammages but if the said Tobacco is or shall be as aforesaid 
sold for more tlian the said summe and Dammages then ilic 
said William Pester his lieires executors adm*^ or assg shall *v- 
will pay and allow all the lust overplus of the said money unto 
the said Edward ITeale his executors adm" or ass? within one 
weeke after lawfuU demand thereof by him or them to be nia.le. 
Item it is agreed and fully condescended unto by and i.c- 
tweene the said ])artyes to tiiese presents that all former bills 
bonds writings deeds covenants and promises made to each 
other concerning the premises other than these presents k the 
writings abovesaid now agreed to be made are & shall be voyd 
& of none effect and each to release the other of them pres- 
ently And that the said W™ P. 

In witnesse itc 
Item it is agreed and fully condescended unto by and be- 
tweene the partyes to these presents that each of them shall 
presently become bounden each to the other in one bond of 
{blank'] pounds apeece for the effectual performance of these 
present articles. [2. Qd. payment taken liere about 3. 4.] 

[142] Mr Micklethwayt agreed w*'^ me for to let me the 
chamber <tc at 5^ a yeare from the first of September 1G39 to 
be payd quarterly or after that rate whensoever I goe away. 
His time also began 1. Aug: before w'=^ moneth he alloweth 
me for the Avritings w'^^ I made for M"^ bcmis 8s. — and hence- 
forward to pay the rent to Mf Hill. 23? 11? 1G39. 

Tho : Lechford Nathaniell Mickletiiwaite. 

James Pen sells to Nicholas Parker 50 acres of land lying 
at Rumney Marsh ^ lying betwecne the Lands of John Xewgate 
feltmaker for 2Sl to be pd 1. 4. 

^ This fifty acres was James Penn's received something less than Ws. an 
allotment before spoken of. Winthrop acre for Lis land. James Penn reccircd 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



23^ 



Articles of agreement & other writings made betwecnc Ed- 
ward Tyng mcrcliant & Thomas Cornell ^ of Boston 30. 11 
1G30. [lOs.] 

Job Judkin turnes over Willm Boreman and he placeth 
himselfc apprentice to Thomas Witherley mariner for six 
yeares by Indenture dated 30. 11. 1G39. [2s.] 

Robert Harding conveys his ground where his house stood 
<tc. to Robert Keayne Richard Parker & John Cogan & their 
heires. 12. 1. 1G39. [Is. Qcl] 



A writing for 
1G39. [Is.] 



MT Cogan agt Timothy Hawkins.2 12. 1. 



A mortgage by Edward Bendall to Willm Tyng merchant 
11. 20. 1G39 for 108 to be paid 20. 6. 1G39. coram Tho : 
Burton ^ & meipse. [2. G.] 



something more than ll5. an acre. The 
dilTeieuce, however, was only about six- 
pence an acre. Edward Tyng, a Boston 
merchant, "early wrote himself brewer," 
says Savage, as we shall see later (see 
post, p. 144). He was a man of great 
influence in the Colony, as was also his 
elder brother "William, of whom Lech- 
ford makes frequent mention. He lived 
to an old age and died in 16S1. He had 
two sons and several daughters. Of 
these last, Hunuah married Habijah 
Savage, son of Thomas Savage, and 
at his death, Major-General Gookin; 
Deliverance married Daniel Searle ; He- 
becca, Joseph Dudley, afterwards gover- 
nor ; and Eunice, Samuel "Willard, Vice- 
President of Harvard College. 

1 Of Thomas Cornell little is known. 
He is said to have removed, in lGo4, to 
Rhode Island, where he was freeman in 
1655. Job Judkin must have received 
"William Boreman from William Towus- 
hend of Boston, thatcher, to whom, the 
reader may remember, Boreman was 
intrusted by Richard Gridley. Either 



Boreman was apt at the learning of 
trades, or his character may be inferred 
from his name. He makes four changes 
in the course of six months, thus experi- 
encing four trades, each of which re- 
quires six years completely to master 
it. This transfer to Thomas "Witherly 
removes him from Lechford. I suspect 
that he went to Wethersfield, Connecti- 
cut (see ante, p. 105, note). Of Job Jud- 
kin nothing is known except the names 
(and dates of the birth and death) of 
his wife and five children, for which the 
inquiring reader may consult Savage. 

2 Timothy Hawkins I suppose to be 
the carpenter of that name mentioned 
later in Lechford. He was, I believe, of 
"Watertown ; but I can find but little 
mention of him, except in the Colonial 
Record (i. 112, 244), where he is fined 
for selling (and drinking) strong water. 
I do not think he was ever freeman of 
the Colony. 

3 Thomas Burton (perhaps the one 
mentioned ante, p. 140) may have been 
the man of that name who, wUIi others, 



23G 



LECIIFORD'S MAXi'SCniPT yOTE-BOOK 



A grant by James Pen to Nicholas Parker of the 50 acres 
aforesaid upon condicon of paym' of 28^ 4. 2. 1G40. [2. G.l 

I payd Nathaniel Ileaton^ for full of writings & cuttini: 
wood. 11. 31. 1G39. 5s. 



I payd John Hurd^ delivered to his wife by Sara our mavil 
for making my wifcs gowne. 12. 1. 1639. 8s. 

I payd Thomas ^Marshall ^ before hand for ^Vood delivered 
by my wife to his wife in the 10 moneth last past. 11 



became obnoxious to tlie General Court 
on account of liis views on government. 
There is little for or against this theory, 
except that I can find no other of the 
name, and think it likel}- that Lechford 
would have had some dealings with the 
agitator if he were at this time in 
Boston (see Wivth., ii. 262, 302). 

^ Nathaniel Heaton was of Boston as 
early as 1634. lie died shortly after 
this date (about \QU or 1645, I ghould 
say), and his wife Eliza married succes- 
sively two husbands, both of whom she 
survived. 

2 John Hard, the tailor, had his 
house and garden on "Washington Street, 
between Summer and Bedford. His 
shop may have been there too ; but I 
think from some words in the Toicn 
Record that it was somewhere north of 
the Town Dock. [The Town Record says 
(vol. i. p. 101): " Mr Glover and Brother 
Burden iiatli set unto them the ground 
before their proprietyes, so Fare as from 
the Corner of Jl^ Webs house to the 
Corner of Goodman Hurds Sliop upon a 
streiglit line." Glover and Burden lived 
next each other on the north side of 
Dock Square, being then directly on the 
water, opi)osite tlic Town Dock. There 
is, however, no mention of either "Webb 
or Hurd in the neighborhood, nor of 
Glover and Burden living beside each 
other, as this extract would seem to 



imply they did, in any other part of the 
town. But it seems to me that this was 
not an unlikely place for a tailor's shop. 
Thomas Savage the tailor and John 
Newgate the hatter had shops in Ed- 
ward Gibbons's house, nearly opposite, 
and George Burden, just mentioned, was 
a shoemaker. These last facts are from 
the Book of Possessions, which was com- 
piled between 1645 and 1650, while the 
date of the extract from the Toicn Record 
is March 31, 1651.] 

2 "Great indulgence," says Savage, 
"in speaking of Thomas Marshall the 
ferrjinan, must be granted to investigat. 
a. this name, for ano. Thomas, Boston 
1643." There are, also, two other 
Thomas Marshalls of date near enough 
to this, one of Beading and one of Dor- 
chester. Every one of tliese four had a 
wife at this time, so we get small help 
from that (juarter. Nevertheless, I think 
that the one here mentioned is the 
Thomas ilai-shall who kept the feriy to 
Charlestown, and it is not unlikely 
that he brought the wood from some of 
the lots at Bumney Marsh in which we 
have interested ourselves just above. 
If this be the man, like many more of 
Lechford's friends he had been elisfran- 
chised and disarmed in the "Wheelwright 
times, but afterwards rose to some dis- 
tinction in the town histoiy. 



LECIIFORD^S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 237 

^ince w-^^timc I had of him six loads of wood at 5s. so I owe 
him 10s. And I payd Zacheus Bosworthi 2«. for 2 loads 
bringing & owe him for y^ rest 45. 12. 3. 1G39. 

I writt 5 coppies more of the Lawcs for the Country by the 
direction of our Governor. 11. 8. 1C39. [12.s. CJ.] 

Seven of them & the former had 3 lawes more added. 
[3s. Gd.] 

A Coppic of the Abstract of the Lawes of New England dd 
to the Governor 11. 15. 1639. [5. 6.] 

And 12 Coppies of the said Lawes first delivered vizt in 10 
last. [11 10s.] 

I wrote M"^ Keaynes answerc before the Elders to ^IT Sals- 
tonstalls letter the answer dated 11. 3. 1639. Rec Gd. & ISd, 
allowed him for an houreglasse. [2.] 

Received of :Mr Keaync 61 of Spanish tol)acco upon account 
11. 12. 1639. And I owe him one load of wood a good load. 

I payd W. Burton for malt cheese & irons H <fc owe him 
8s. M. in 10 last. 

For writing a Coppy of the breviat of the body of Lawes for 
the Country. 12.5.39. [3s.] 

[143] The 3 lawes added to the Copie of Lawes for Dor- 
chester dd. to the Constable 12. 6. 1639. [6c7.] 

1 Zaccheus, or Zachariah, Bosworth in 1637, and also in that of the richer 

was earlv of Boston, and may have come inhabitants who contributed tl'e }ear 

with Winthrop. li. the Tou.i P.ccords, before to the support ot Daniel Maude 

where he is once or twice mentionerl, as schoolmaster. We have otten had 

he goes by the name of " Zackie " or occasion to refer to these lusts, and shall 

"Zache," as though nobody was very undoubtedly again; for almost every 

sure as to which Christian name was Boston man mentioned by Lechtonl 

in right his. His name, or nickname, figures in one or other of them, -as is 

is found in the list of those disarmed indeed most natural. 



238 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCPdPT NOTE-BOOK. 

The 3 lawcs added to 4 more of the said Coppics brou'dit 
by the marshall 12. 11. 39. [2s.] 

Three Copvcs of the said brcviat delivered to the Governo^ 
besides the first 12. 12. 1G39 Coppy dd to M! B for an uhl 
hogshed. [9s.] 



w 



One Coppy of the said breviate delivered to Mf Bcllingham 
* one coppy of the originall Institution <fc limitation of the 
Counccll at 4s. and 2s. 12. 17. 1639. [1. 2.] 

Three bills of exchange betweene Thomas Nicholls and 
David OfTiey ^ for 21' to be payd by George Nichols t.. 
Stephen Offley in 15 dayes after sight any time after 1. Julv 
pxl2. 20. 39. [1-^6.] 

Eeceived of M. Bcllingham 12. 22. 1639. 2s. 

For drawing Articles for Ml Cradocke & Gould & Putnam 
&c. 12. 27. [Qs.-] 

Seven coppyes more of the said breviate. [1^ Is.] 

Be it known unto all men by these presents that we Wcb- 
cowites and the Squa Sachem of Misticke wife of the said 
Webcowites calling to minde and well considering the many 
kindnesses ct bcnefitts we have received from the hands of 
Captaine Edward Giboncs ^ of Boston in New England in 
parte of requitall whcrof and for our tender love and good 

^ David Offley. See note, p. 104, Salem he became converted from whnt- 

antc. ever Mortonism he may liave had, ami 

' I think this is the first mention of became freeman early in 103], his name 
Captain Edward Gibbons in Lechford. being in the first list of those admitted. 
He is too well known to make it ne- He shortly afterwards moved to Boston, 
cessary to insert in this place any where he became one of the most prom- 
description of his life, but a few dates inent citizens. In Colony matters he 
may be some help to tlie reader's mem- was also forward, being almost continu- 
ory. He was witli Morton, of iferry- ally deputy from Boston between 1034 
mount, before the settlenient of the town and 1G44. He was always cmploj-ed in 
of Boston, and lived in Salem 1629, some any enterprise relntiug to military mat- 
little time before moving to Boston. In ters, both by the town and the Colony. 



nU V 



LllClIFORD'S MAyUSCniPT NOTE-BOOK. 



239 



,e.i.cct that wc doe bcarc to Jotham Giboncs Sonne and 
lleirc Apparent of the said Captuine Gibones doc hereby o 
our owne motion & accord give and grant unto the said 
Jotham Gibones the -reversion of all that parcel of and ^^• 
Ives ac^ainst the ponds at Misticke aforesaid together w 
the said ponds all w<=^ we reserved from Charlestowne and 
Cambrido-c late called Newtowne And all hcrrcditaments 
and appurtenances thereunto belonging after the Death ot 
the said Sachem To have and to hold the said Reversion 
of the said parcel of land and ponds and all & singulare the 
premises w^^ the appurtenances unto the said Jotham Gib- 
ones his heires & Assigncs for ever In ^vitnesse whereof we 
have hereunto set our hands & seales the thirteenth day ot 
the eleventh moneth in the [blank] yeare so Declared by 
Christians One thousand six hundred thirty and nyne and in 
the ffiftcenth yeare of the raigne of King Charles of England 
S:c Willinn- that these be recorded before our much hon- 
oured friends the Governor of Mattachusctts Bay in New 
England and the rest of the Magistrates there for perpetual 
remembrance of this thing. [2— G. r. Is.] 

In 163G he was chosen lieutenant for sachems. It was with the de.ire of 

Boston, the redoubtable John UnderhiU treating with the " S^iua Sachem that 

being captain, and Robert IL.rding Miles Standish made his explovauons 

ensi^. He hud been ensign to Under- about Boston some nin^ years before the 

hilffor two years. In 1637 he was in town was settled. She lived on good 

the Artillery Company, and in 1611 was terms with the Colonists, bartermg W 

its captain, as well as twice in later with them, and recen.ng a ' eoate acl 

years. In 1649 lie was made major- winter from the town of Cambridg . as 

general of all the Massachusetts forces, well as corn from the same town (wluch 

and in 1650 was made assistant. He did not supply these small luxum 

died Dec 9,1651. He had been pos- regularly without some orders from the 

seLedof co;siderable fortune, but had General Court). Tlds deed in Lech ord 

. probably suffered large losses towards maybe found (with some smal dill. - 
the end of his life, having been mixed ences in text) in Suf Deeds, L, , /• 4o, 



the La Tour Complications, _ entered in the year 1643. Tht 



and bein- on the whole rather more Sachem" made her sign a bo^^ and 

advent::!, than steady-going as a arrow) fi.t, ^^'''''^Tl^Z:^ 

Webcowites was her second liusbana, 

"t^ AVebcowites (or Webba Cowet, and had formerly been only J-Hcine- 

as it is sometimes written) and the man. Jotham Gibbons was at tins time 

"Squa Sachem " of ^listicko, they were about six years old. 

both well known among the friendly 



240 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

A petition for llicliard Cricliley ^ k his wife 1. 3. 1C3D 

[1..] 

Kiiowe all men by these presents that whereas I David 
Offlej of Boston in Xew England gentleman did heretofore 
receive of Kobcrt Bowen^ of Boston aforesaid Cutler one case 
of Knives of the value of [W«)iA] shillings upon condition to 
pay him ten pounds upon the birth of a child w*^'* he should 
have by his next wife and did promise to scale him a bond 
or bill for the same when he should require it and wheras 
his former wife is dead as he saitli & he hath since married 
another Now I the said David Oflley in performance of my 
said promise doe hereby acknowledge myselfe to be indebted 
unto the said Robert Bowen the summe of ten pounds to be 
payd unto the said Robert Bowen his executors administra- 
tors or assignes upon the birth of a child w'^'^ he shall have by 
his present wife for the w'^^ payment well Sc truly to be made 
I bynd me my heircs executors & administrators firmly by 
these presents sealed w*** my scale Dated the third day of 
the first moneth Anno Dmi 1639. [9s. Qd.'] 

[144] A letter of Attorney for ll\ Thomas Mayhewe ^ & 
Jane his wife for her sonne to 3 Attorneys <tc. [2. 6.] 

Articles of agreement^ betweene W. John Wilson Pastor of 
the Church of Boston & Richard Wright 1. 3. 1639. [65.] 

1 I do not fiud this petition men- * Tliese articles of agreement I .sui>- 
tioned in the Colonial Record. Critch- pose to be on some subject connected 
ley was a Haeksmith who lived on Coui-t with ilr. "Wilson's land at Biaintrce, 
Street (where S. S. Pierce lias had his which was granted to him in 1634 in 
store so many years). His wife was exchange for land which he held at 
Alice, the widow of \Villiani Dinely and Mystic. Eicliard Wright was of Boston 
mother of Fathergone Dinelj-, born after about this time ; but as he is always 
the death of lier husband. Tlie liouse mentioned in connection with affaii-s at 
and land belonged to the heirs, and was Mount Wollaston, I do not think that 
hehl for them by Critchley. he lived in the city at all, but rather 

2 Bowen I cannot find any trace of. on his farm. He has no land in the 
8 ^Ir. Thomas Mayhew was at this Book of Possessions five or six years later 

time living at Waterlown. He did than this date, though his land is iiien- 
Eot move to Martha's Vineyard until tioned as bounding an estate at Mount 
1647. 'Wollaston. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 2-il 

Borrowed of :M^ Blackborne to pay M": Mickletliwayt for 
liouse roome 2^ 10s. 1. 9. 1639 to be repayd in a moiieth & I 
payd W. Micklethwayt the same for w'='' I have his receipt. 
isic. [payd.] 

James Pen^ conveys an house sometimes a brew house 
adjoyning to the ware house neare to the wharfe in boston 
w'^ the ground to the said first mentioned house belonging 
upon parte of av«=^ grounds towards the waters syde with an 
hi"-hway leading from the said wharfe to Edward Bendalls 
wharfe, to Nicholas Parker his heires & assignes. 

Nicholas Parker conveys the same to Edward Tyng k his 
heires &c. [2s. I owe ill Parker all reckoning seven beside 
7s. Qd. for wood, pd.] 

Articles of agreement betweene Mr John Cogan & Thomas 
Stocker2 o. 12. 1G40. &c. [ps.l 

Copy of the freemens oath to goodman Shrimpton.3 [6^.-] 



1 James Penu came in the fleet with 
Winthrop, and held several offices in 
Church and State before his death, in 
1671. The liouse "sometimes a brew- 
house" is down in the Book of Possessions 
in the name of Edward Tyng, who sold 
it in 1651 to James Everill. It was on 
the north side of State Street. The 
highway mentioned is now Merchants' 
Row, and the south side of Faneuil Hall 
Square. The highway I suppose led 
alons; the shore end of the wharves. On 
the way up to what is now Washington 
Street (through Dock Square) from 
this wharf, comes first a house of Valen- 
tine Hill's (whether he had a wharf or 
not, I cannot say), and then, after Isaac 
Grosse, is the stone house and ware- 
house of Edward Bendall, on the cor- 
ner of Exchange Row with the wharf 
spoken of. On the highway (Iwyond 
E.xchange Row) came George Foxcroft, 
Robert Xash, the butcher (who was 
in the habit apparently of killing beasts 



on this very street until warned by the 
selectmen), and "William Franklin, 
blacksmith. Beyond Wilson's lane 
(now Devonshire Street) was John "Wil- 
son's property, running back from 
State Street, and on the comer of "Wash- 
ington Street was Major Edward Gib- 
bons's house with two shops, one occu- 
pied by Thomas Savage, and the other 
by John Newgate. 

2 Of Stocker I find no mention be- 
fore 1651. Savage's remark is " Chelsea 
and Lynn, 1651, 167-2, "with some de- 
tails as to his wife and children. 

3 Goodman Shrimpton I suppose is 
" Henry Shrimpton, a Brasyer ... al- 
lowed to be an Inhabitant." 25. 1. 1639 
(Boston Toini Records, i. 40). As one of 
the few references to him in the Tovrti 
Records mentions a fine of five pounds 
for refusing to serve as constable when 
elected, I think it by no means un- 
likely that he never cared to incumber 
himself with civic responsibility so far 



16 



242 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

M^ Keayne 4 bills at 6cZ. 2 agreements at 12t7. one pctltHni 
at Is. 6c?/ [5 — GJ.] 

To the right ivor" the -Governor Councill ^ Assistants jj- the 
rest of the General Cort noio Assembled 3. 13. 1G40. 

The humble peticon of Edward Palmer ^ carpenter 

Sheweth that he was heretofore fined 5* for taking 19s. for the 
timber of the stocks in Boston w'^'^ was adiiidged an excessive 
price yo' peticoner is heartily sorry for his offence ^\''^ though 
not great in itselfe yet was of evil example to others and there- 
fore he is the more sory for it, He confesseth it was 5s. 
too much Av'^'^ he is willing to restore Yet forasmuch as this 
was his first offence in this kinde & as he is poore & no 
wayes able to pay the said fine having a wife & 6 children all 
or some of w'^^ he expects to come fortli of England to him 
shortly he humbly prayes the honourable Court to be pleased 
to remit unto him the said fine and he shall dayly as in duty 
he is bound pray for yo"" worpp* & the weale Publicke. [1. 1.] 

Wor" S"", — When I came first into the Country w*"^ was 7 
yeares since upon taking an oath of an Inhabitant heere in 
this Jurisdiccon I was proinised that I should have all privi- 
leges of a free inhabitant & particularly in Disposing of towne 
lotts w*^ other men since w'^^ time I have bin twice sent forth 
a souldier from Waterton in the Country's service I never had 
yet any thing but bare wages for my reward neither hath the 
Towne of Waterton given me any Lott but some of them 
say their towne is full & yet I know where ground lyeth un- 
disposed of wherein they may give me a portion if please 
them I have a wife & child & reason to looke for my subsis- 

even as to take the freeman's oath. His about a yt:ar before, and Palmer was 

name is not to be found in the list. His punished by a fine of £5, which was 

son Samuel, perhaps through filial rev- remitted to IO5. "With a grim sense 

erence, some twenty years later refused of humor not wholly foreign to the Gen- 

to sei-v-e as constable, and paid a fine of eral Court, he was also set for an liour 

ten pounds. in these very stocks. He paid his tine 

1 We may find this case in the Mclss. of 10s. at the Court assembled on the 

Records. The offence was committed date above {.l/oss. Co^. .Bee., i. 260, 291). 



LECHFORD^S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 243 

tcnce & the maintenance of my famyly & Now upon this my 
presenting ray case unto you I humbly desire yo' worp« 
Counscll & best help to be afforded to me resting 

Yo' humble servant, 

John Stubbin.i 

Thomas Richards 2 of Weymouth conyeys to Nicholas 
Butler 3 12 acres more or lesse lying in Dorchester necke 
being parcell of the lott assigned to the said Thomas. [Is.] 

John Hanset sells an house in Boston & a garden plot* of 
halfe an acre or thereabout lying next to Ralfe Mason on the 
south & M^. Flints house on the north to Tliomas Paynter & 
he conveys it to Thomas Gierke 25! 41 [2s.] 

[145] Inventory of John Johnsons goods. [2. Qd.'] 

Releases & acquittances by Thomas Barker & Francis 
Lambert for themselves & John Johnsons children to M' 
Thomas Savage 3. 14. 1G40. [Is.] 

1 John Stubbin, of WatertowTi, is by noticing the abutters. It was on the 
very va-uely heard from in various ways, west side of Washington Street, north 
Sava-e°says he may have moved to of West Street. It is in the Book of 
New°London, and mentionshis wife and Posscs.-!io;is under the name of Thomas 
the time of his death. He never took Clarke. I do not know exactly who this 
the freeman's oath, but was probably John Johnson may have been, though I 
admitted an inhabitant of Watertown. suppose him to have been one of the 

2 Thomas Richards, it will be remem- " four Yorkshiremcn " (ante, p. 1). If 
bered, had just moved from Dorchester he were dead at this time, he had left a 
to Weymouth (see p. 103, ante). He took son of the same name (noted in Savage 
the freeman's oath about this time (May as "Rowley, IGoO"), who was one of 
13, 1640), and it is possible that he may the children mentioned below. Thomas 
have taken the opportuiiitv of a journey Barker and Francis Lambert were two 
to Boston to make this bargain. of the Yorkshiremcn spoken of; and 

« Nicholas Butler was one of the altogether this business, I suppose, may 

more prominent inhabitants of Dorches. have had some connection with the 

ter. He moved in 1651 to Martha's conveying of the house spoken of 

Vineyard. above, ~ though there is no mention 

* This lot of land was not the one of Punderson, who was now settled at 

spoken of above (p. 138), as may be seen New Haven. 



'i' '^ooniillhwiio -h ir'.-c.izohil 



&l[! 



244 LECH FORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Fourc writings for foure Children of Mr Will™ Skipper 3. 14. 
1640. [4.9.] 

Coppy of the frecmens oath to Mr Eucke.^ \Jdd.'\ 

To the Tionor^^ Governor ^ Court assembled. 

The pcticon of Abraham Palmer of Charlestowne Sheweth 
That this Court was pleased about a yeare since to grant him 
200 acres for money put into the common stocke about 12 
yeares past Yo'' petit-oner humbly desircth that tlie same may 
be layd out to him at the end of Charlestowne bounds And 
he shall as his duty bynds him pray for this Court &c.2 
[1..] 

T payd Thomas Marshall in full for all wood 3. 15. 1G40 
— l.Gd. 

And goodman [Zachie] Bosworth & I are also even for 
payd him the same day — 1. 

Articles of agreement made the ffifteenth day of May Anno Lhi 
1640 hetu'cene Richakd Parker of Boston in Neiu England 
merchant of the one j^arte and John Parker ^ of Dedham 
in Keio England yeoman of the other parte as followeth. 

Imprimis the said Richard Parker doth hereby demise & to 
farme letts unto the said John Parker one ffarme and lands 
thereto belonging lying in Dedham aforesaid w*^ the appurte- 
nances To have & to hold the said farme house & premises 
w**" the appurtenances unto him the said John Parker his 

1 If thig is the same date as the two the petition. He was a merchant from 
entries above, 'Mr. Thomas Eueke had London, vrho in 1G2S was interested in 
already taken the oath the day before. the patent. Ho came over in 1629, 

2 This land was granted him by and was made freeman 1630. He was 
the General Court Sept. 9, 1638. later a representative, and served in the 
Whether it was laid out as he wished, I Pequot war. He was an active merchant, 
cannot say. I find no record of it in and died in London, 1651. See Savage 
Wyman's CJiay-Icstoini. Palmer was an and Wyman. 

influential man in his town, and had ^ John Parker, of Dedham, I can 

much to do with laying out the lands throw no light on, and it is hardly neces- 
etc, and I sujipose that the Court granted sary here to say anything of Richard. 



LECEFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 245 

executors administrators & assignes from the twenty nynth 
day of September last past for & during the terme of seven 
ycares from thenceforth next ensuing fully to be compleat 
& ended. 

Item the said Richard Parker doth hereby let & deliver 
unto the said John Parker the stocke hereafter mentioned 
that is to say nyne cowes one bull of two yeares old one steere 
of foure yeare old one steere of three yeare old and one steere 
of two yeare old six ewe goats and one ram one breeding 
sowe two turky hcnnes & a cocke one waine w*^ wheeles & 
other furniture thereto belonging also one plough <fc furniture 
therto belonging and one boate w''' the appurtenances valued 
&c. in a schedule hereto annexed mentioned to be kept used 
& improved on the premises & in the managing thereof 
according to the true meaning of these presents. 

Item that the said Richard Parker shall & will finish the 
housing on the premises and build a new barne w'*" necessary 
outhouses for the cattle in convenient time. 

Item that the said partyes shall each of them have the one 
halfe of the increase of the said live stocke & the profitts of 
the said farme during the said terme except of the corne 
thereon growing this present yeare w'^'^ the said John Parker 
is to reape & have to himselfe & afterwards during the said 
terme the corne to be equally divided betweene the said 
partyes by the bushell. 

Item that the increase of the said live stocke shall be 
equally divided betweene the said partyes att the end of every 
two yeares during the said terme and at the end of the said 
terme. 

Item that the said John Parker shall & will keepe & im- 
ploy on the premises two men servants & one mayd. servant 
together w"* his owne labour & industry during the said 
terme. 

Item that the said John Parker shall & will breake up <fe 
plough so much of the ground on the premises as shall make 
up the ground thereon already broken up twenty acres within 
the terme aforesaid and what ground more he [146] shall break 
up on the premises that he cannot take two cropps of the said 



246 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Richard Parker shall & will allow him so much for the doin;' 
thereof as it shall be worth. 

Item that if any of the said live stocke decay during ilie 
said terme the same shall be made up in kinde from time to 
time out of the best of the increase of the said stocke. 

Item that the said John Parker shall & will from time to 
time repaire maintain & uphold the said ffarme house t'c 
premises w*^ all needful & necessary reparations & fences as 
often as need shall require during the said terme (saving that 
if the said house or any of the premises shall be wasted by 
fire windes or Enemies without any wilfull default found in 
the said Jolm Parker or his servants then such reparations 
shall be done at the charges of the said Richard Parker) And 
the same so well & sufficiently repaired & fenced the said 
John Parker shall & will in the end of the said terme 
together w''* a waine wheeles plough & furniture boate ct 
appurtenances as good as those hereby letten leave & yeild 
up unto the said Richard Parker. 

Item that if the said John Parker shall receive any other 
cattell to summer or winter on the premises the said Richard 
Parker shall have halfe the profitts thereof. 

Item that if any help shall be att any time during the said 
terme hired in planting hay tyme or harvest besides the said 
Jolin Parker <fe the said servants for the mannaging the 
premises the charges thereof shall be equally borne betweene 
the said partyes. 

Item that all ordinary towne rates shall be equally borne 
betweene the said partyes. 

Item that it shall or may be lawfull to & for the said 
Richard Parker from time to time to exchange & renew the 
said live stocke as good as the old stocke or better at any 
time at his owne discreation. 

Item that the said John Parker shall & will in the end of 
the said terme redeliver unto the said Richard Parker the said 
live stocke as good for number & kinde as the same that is 
now letten together w^^ his parte of the increase thereof. 

Item that the heircs executors administrators & assignes 
of each party shall enjoy like privelcgcs k bcnefitts & be 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 247 

equally & reciprocally bound to each other by vertue here- 
of as fully & effectually as if their names were punctually 
expressed in ct throughout every article m the same. 
In witncssc «tc. 

Me Johciii Griffen de civitate Bristoll nautor tencr' Szo,. 
p nobili War. in 2001 dat' 3. 20. 1640. 

The Condicon of this Obligation is such that if the above- 
bounden John Griffin shall within 40 dayes next after his 
arivall in England personally appeare before the right hon- 
orable the abovesaid Earle of Warwicke^ to answere all 
such matters as shall be objected against him the said John 
Griffin in any Course of Lawe or justice as the said Earle of 
Warwicke shall advise «t direct or otherwise and shall abide 
his LorPP^ direction k commandment in all things concerning 
the same matters and not depart away from his Lor^P^ presence 
or attendance upon his Lor^P without his leave & dismission 
then this obligation shall be voyd & of none effect or els it 
shall be & remaine in full power strength & vertue. [2 — 6] 

MeRobtum Luker^ de [hianJc'] in Xova Anglia tener' <tc. Guber- 
nator Assistent & Societat De Le Mattachusetts bay in Xova 
Anglia in 30^ dat' ut supra. Condiconed for the said Griffins 
apparance ut supra. 

[147] To the Honoured Governor <f Cort Assembled 

Hie humble lyeticon of Daniell Howe.^ 

Shcweth that heretofore the Towne of Lynne assigned unto 
yo' peticoncr 60 acres of land lying in the outmost of the 

1 The Earl of "Warwick was after- 2 if ^\^q Governor of Massachusetts 
wards one of the commissioners for was to have any such hunt for Robert 
regulating the affairs of the West Indies Luker as I have had, his "condicioncd 
and the Colonies iu America, and was for the said Griffin's appearance " must 
in other ways interested iu New Eng- have been worth but little. I can find 
land and the other parts of the Xew the name mentioned nowhere, and sup- 
World. (Cf. Winthropin various places.) pose that he, too, was a sailor of Bristol. 
Of GriGin I liave not found anything. 3 Daniel Howe may or may not have 
It is tantalizing to meet everywhere received the ratification he wished. The 
abundant mention of the ship "Griffin," Eccords say nothing of the matter, 
but no word of the sailor. though there is much other mention 



248 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

bounds of that ToAvne and because there may be (lni,!,( 
whether it pcrteyne to the Towne or no W peticoncr huml.K 
prayeth yo' woi-pp' to be pleased to ratify the same lands t*. 
him by the Authority of this Cort and he shall daylie prav Ac 
[1..] 

31: Cogan a letter of Attorney to Silvester Calton of Wax- 
risquete in Virginia merchant. 

Knowe all men by these presents -that whereas Nathanitl 
Eaton 1 late of Cambridge in New England Master of Arts did 
about the 8'^ day of August last past receive of me John Coiran 
of Boston in New England merchant the summe of one hundnd 
pounds of lawfull money of England to be by him the said 
Nathaniel returned unto one Roger Clay factor of Blackwell 
hall as by one of the bills of exchange thereof hereunto anncxt-d 
appeareth And whereas the Letter of advice sent by the said 
Nathaniel unto one John Hobson merchant upon whomc the 
said bills were charged did purporte that the said John Hob- 
son should receive order for discharge of the said bills of 
exchange from Theophilus Eaton merchant brother of the 
said Nathaniel W*=^ since the said Theophilus hath disavowed 
& testifyed to sufficient witnesse that he had not nor would 
give order unto the said John Hobson for the payment of the 
said summe of money accordingly "Wherby it api)eareth that 
the said Nathaniel Eaton- had not any power to charge the 
said John Hobson therewith Now Knowe yee that I the said 
John Cogan doc hereby authorize k in my place put my lov- 
ing ffriend Silvester Calton of Waxrisquete in Virginia mer- 
chant my true tt lawfull Attorney for me & in my name to 
sue the said Nathaniel by way of Equity before the honoured 
k right wor" the Governor & other Magistrates in Virginia 

of Howe, who was a well-known man, ^ Sotne time after this, Eaton sent 

being often deputy from Lynn. He from Virginia for his wife to join him. 

moved to Southampton, L. L, about "Whereon, after speaking of her friemls 

1641, where he was one of the earliest who desired that she should remain in 

settlers, so that the inference would Boston, Winthrop remarks, witli quiet 

be that he did not receive what he joy, that "she went notwithstanding, 

wanted. and the vessel was never heard of again." 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 249 

thereby to compell him the said Nathaniel to put in sufficient 
caution unto the said Governor k Magistrates or some otlier 
sufficient Officer by them authorized to the summe of one 
hundred & fifty pounds at the least for answere of such 
Dammages as may accrew unto me by reason of the premises. 
In witnesse &c 

Coppy of the bill of exchange. 

And I Thomas Dudley Esqr. Governor of the jurisdiction 
of the Mattachusctts bay in Xew England having seen these 
presents sealed k delivered in my presence doe hereby certify 
the same to l)c the act & deed of the said John Cogan In tes- 
timony whereof I have caused the Common scale of our 
Colony to be hereunto affixed the day & yeare abovesaid. 

And I T D <S:c having seenc a writing purporting a bill of 
Exchange signed by Nathaniel Eaton Master of Arts whereof 
the writing above said is a true coppy doe hereby at the re- 
quest of John Cogan merchant grant to exemplyfie the same 
under the common scale of -our Colony the 2Gth dav of May 
1640, (tc. 



W. John Humfrey letts one mesuage and 'ffarme called the 
playnes conteyning by estimation ffive hundred acres of arra- 
ble & wooddy ground be it more or lesse and all the fresh <t 
salt march thereto belonging lying cfc being within the liber- 
tyes of Salem in New Enghmd unto Zacheus Gooldi of Lynne 
yeoman for 10 yeares from the 29 Sept. next. Rent 900 bush- 
els of corne yearely in this manner 400 rye 300 wheat 200 
barley w*^ 8 oxen 5 Cowes 2 heyfers & 4 Calves 2 mares. 

[148] M^ Humfrey is to make up of broken ground at liis 
charge 60 acres in time convenient. 

The cattle to be inventoryed k the like for number kinde 
age <fe quality to be redelivered M^ Willm Hawthorne k 
Kichard Wright to inventory the same. 

1 Zaccheus Gould seems a more com- if he is the one of Braintree, who had 

men name than might bn supposed, for been of Lynn, as Savage seems to think. 

I find four examples noted in Savage. Jlr. Humphrey, one of tlie assistants. 

Of this particular one little is known, was about to go to England at this time. 

William Hawthorne, of Salem, we liave He sailed in 1641. 
noted before, and also Eichard Wright, 



250 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Mr Hiimfrcy to make up all fences needful to defend the 
ploughed ground k the rent to repaire k make good the saiutj 
& so deliver it up -well repay red. 

Articles <tc. 

Imprimis that the Cattle and utensils demised k lettcn 
by the said John Humfrey unto the said Zacheus shall 
be inventoried k valued by Willm Hawthorne gent and 
Richard Wright and the inventory thereof to be hereunto 
annexed. 

Item, that the said John Humfrey shall k will at his pro])cr 
costs k charges cause to be broken up so much ground on the 
premises as shall make up the ground already broken up 
sixty acres in convenient time. 

Item, that the said John Humfrey shall k will at his proper 
cost k charges from time to time during the terme of the 
lease made bctweene the said partyes cause to be made up all 
new fences necessary for the ploughed ground on the prem- 
ises and the same being so made the said Zacheus Goold 
shall k will from time to time at his proper costs k charges 
well k sufficiently repaire k so repay red shall & will leave k 
yield up unto the" said John Humfrey his heires or assignes 
in the end of the said terme together w**" all the premises by 
the said lease demised. In witnesse <S:c. [3-4. 1-8] 

Richard Wright of Mount Wollaston yeoman bound to 
Walter Blackborne in 120^ Condicon to pay 601 by 51 every 
halfe yeare at Mr Blackbornes house in Boston. [Is.] 

James Marshall of Exon merchant consigned certaine com- 
modities of the value of 34-11 9^^ 2>d. unto John Cogan k George 
Allcocke^ to take for factorage betweene them what the 
factorage was worth. Richard Mansfield for Marshall. M^ 
Cogan tooke 5 p Centum ITi 4s. for haHe the factorage. 
[2-6] 

1 George Alcocke ■was of Eoxbury. etc. He had come in 1630 Avith "^in- 

He is often mentioned in the Colonial tbrop, liad been admitted freeman tlie 

(and Eoxbury) Fiords as being appoint- next year, and was representative several 

ed to run lines, determine boundaries, times. He died towards the end of 1C40. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 2.51 

Derinondt Matthew ^ servant of George Strange gent com- 
plaines against liis master for that whereas the said Matthew 
was to serve the said George from the 9tli day of May 1C39 
for six yeares for the wages of foure pounds by the yeare and 
a pigg to be payd at every yeares end and in the end of the 
tcrme to have a Convenient lott for his service. He promised 
also the said servant three suits of apparel & six shirts. All 
Av'^'* appeares by an Indenture &, sufficient witnesse. 

The said George Strange hath not payd him any wages nor 
given him any clothes accordhig to his bargaine. Also the 
said Dermondt Matthew did bind Teg Mathew his sonne a 
child of 9 yeares old apprentice to the said George Strange 
for ten yeares from the said 9tli day of May w'-'' Covenant to 
keepe him two yeares at school and the other eight he was to 
serve in the same house w**^ his ffather the said Dermondt 
Matthew. But the said George Strange hath w%ut the 
consent of the said Dermondt sold the said Tegg to one Mr 
Browne of Salem to his the said Dermondts great grief of 
heart & contrary to the said Covenant. And whereas the 
said Dermondt being an ignorant illittercd man & trusting 
upon the faire promises of the said George Strange that he 
would ever use him well & shew him his Indentures as often 
as he would now the said Dermondt having no chest nor box 
to put the said Indentures in they were rotted & spoyled in 
his pocket before he was aware. Notwithstanding the said 
George Strange refuscth to let the said Dermondt or his 
friends see the said Indentures Therefore the said Dermondt 
Matthesv humbly prayeth the Court that the said Indentures 
may be shewed to the Court by the [149] said George Strange 

1 Dermont ilatthew and liis son Teg recompence his m^ for damage done him, 

are not met with in many of the contera- k losse of his time, & his master 

porarj' authorities. The following from was willed for this time not to correct 

the Colonial Record (vol. ii. p. 20) is of ' him." The careful reader must decide 

date almost exactly two years after this for himself if there be connection be- 

entry : " Dearmont Mathewe was ordered tween these cases. !Matthew died before 

to go home to his m', & if he can 1661, for inventory of his estate (£112 

prove his mf did beat him, whi?n hee \s. 4d. ) is found with date Aug. 2, 1661 

came home with order from M' Deputy, {SitJ". Proh. Rcc, 4. 8S). 
his mt to bee punished ; if not hee is to 



252 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK 



& that they may be recorded or els that his wages may be ap- 
pointed by the Court & justice done him in the premises. [G.s.] 



To the HoNOEED Richard Belltxgham Esqr deputy Governor 
^' to the rest of the llacjistrates now asscmhled. 

The humble pcticon of Thomas Grey^ of 3IarUe head fiahcr man 

Shewcth that he "was heretofore iustly fined <fe punislkd 
for a great offence in his passion committed by drawinir 
his knife in the Court for w'='' he hath ben very sorry k is 
much ashamed of it. He humbly prayeth the Court in regaivl 
of his poverty to be pleased to forgive & remit his ffine im- 
posed upon him for the said offence and he shall ever pray for 
you <fe endeavor by the help of God to live more conformably 
to good order. [Is. Qd. Cipher.'] 

Thomas Brownell of Mount Wgllaston als Braintree Planter 
sells to Deodatus Curtis ^ of Braintree aforesayd Planter for 



1 Thomas Gray was always in trouble 
with the Government, bntli for his own 
behavior and for that of his friends, 
who gathered at his house at JIarble 
Harbor (which seems even at that early 
time to have had something of the same 
reputation that it enjoys at the present 
day). He probably came over in 1626 
with Roger Conant, perhaps before. He 
was banished from the jurisdiction of 
the Colony very early (1030), his house 
was ordered to be pulled down, and 
all persons were forbade giving him 
shelter. Nevertheless, he lived on 
at Marble Harbor, the winter being 
cold for a man with no house, and 
Governor "Wintlnop being indulgent 
{Winth., i. 85) ; so in 163S the sen- 
tence, of banishment was ordered to be 
carried into clTect. He still remained, 
however, and the occasion of his draw- 
ing his knife in court seems to have 
been the wind-up of some debauch at 
his house. ** Ralfe Wainncr is lined 10 
sh for being at excessive drinking at 



Thom : Grayes at Marble Head," and 
"Thorn: Gray for being drunke, pro- 
phaning of the name of God, keeping a 
tipling house & drawing his knife in 
Courte was censured to be severely 
whiped & fined 51," are the entries in 
the ■ Record. There is one more entry 
recording a sentence for drunkenness, 
June 2, 1640, which may be before, or 
aftep this petition. Otherwise his prom- 
ise of good behavior seenis to have betii 
sincere, for he appears no more in a 
criminal or other capacity. He was still 
at Marblehead in 16-48, says Savage. • 

It was at this court, where Thomas 
Gray drew his knife, that " Thomas 
Lechford, for going to the Jewry & plead- 
ing w^h them out of Court," was "de- 
barred from pleading any mans cause 
hereafter, unlessehis owne, & admonished 
not to presume to meddle beyond what 
he shall be called to by the Courte" 
{Mass: Coll. ncc.,i. 21 Q). 

2 The names of Deodatus Curtis nud 
Thomas Brownell are both noted in 



252 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK 



& that they may be recorded or els that his wages may be a]i- 
pointed by the Court & justice done him in the premises. [G.s.] 



To the HoNOKED Richard Belltngham Esqr deputy Governor 
^^ to the rent of the 3Ia<jhtrates now assembled. 

The humble ijeticon of Thomas Grey ^ of Marble head fisherman 

Shewcth that he \\'as heretofore iustly fined & punislicd 
for a great offence in his passion committed by drawiiiff 
his knife in the Court for w''^ he hath ben very sorry k is 
much ashamed of it. He humbly prayeth the Court in regard 
of his poverty to be pleased to forgive & remit his ffine im- 
posed upon him for the said offence and. he shall ever pray for 
you & endeavor by the help of God to live more conformably 
to good order. [Is. GtZ. Cipher.'] 

Thomas Brownell of Mount Wgllaston als Braintree Planter 
sells to Deodatus Curtis ^ of Braintree aforesayd Planter for 



1 Thomas Gray was always in trouble 
with the Government, both for his own 
behavior and for that of his friends, 
who gathered at his house at Jlarble 
Harbor (which seems even at that early 
time to have had sometliing of the same 
reputation that it enjoys at the present 
day). He probably came over in 1626 
with Roger Conant, perhaps before. He 
was banished from the jurisdiction of 
the Colony very early (1600), his house 
was ordered to be pulled down, and 
all persons were forbade giving him 
shelter. Nevertheless, he lived on 
at Marble Harbor, the winter being 
cold for a man with no house, and 
Governor "Winthrop being indulgent 
(Winth., i. 85) ; so in 163S the sen- 
tence, of banishment was ordered to be 
carried into clTcct. He still remained, 
however, and the occasion of his draw- 
ing his knife in court seems to have 
been the wind-up of some debauch at 
his house. ** Ralfe Wainner is lined 10 
sh for being at excessive diinkiug at 



Thorn : Grayes at JIaible Head," and 
" Thorn : Gray for being drunke, pro- 
phaning of the name of God, keeping a 
tipling house k drawing his knife in 
Courte was censured to be severely 
whiped & fined 51," are the entries in 
the ■ Hecord. There is one more entry 
recording a sentence for drunkenness, 
June 2, 1640, which may be before, or 
aftep this petition. Otherwise his prom- 
ise of good behavior seenis to have been 
sincere, for he appears no more in a 
criminal or other capacity. He was still 
at Marblehead in 164S, says Savage. • 

It was at this court, where Thomas 
Gray drew his knife, that "Thomas 
Lechford, for going to the Jewry & vilead- 
ing wth them out of Court," was "de- 
barred from pleading any mans cause 
hereafter, unlessehis owne, k adnionislied 
not to presume to meddle bt'yond what 
he shall be called to by the Courte" 
{Mass: Coll. Rcc, i. 276). 

2 The names of Deodatus Curtis and 
Thomas Biowuell are both noted in 



LECHFORD'S MAXUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 253 

381 One Iioilse and one garden and six acres of arable land in 
Braintree aforesaid parcell of the lands heretofore of Edward 
Raynsford of Boston w*^ the appurtenances to him & his 
heires for ever. 

Thomas Brownell is to Deliver unto the said Deodatus soe 
many foot of planke & board as will make up the boards 
in the house 1000 foot presently —lying fourc square to 
the said house. ' the land is bounded on the common on the 
west part on the lands of goodman Best on the east on the 
lands of goodman Dawson on the north and on the lauds of 
Nathaniel [blank'] on the south. [2s.] 

Myles Brathwavtei of the Isle of Providence riariter 
makes a letter of Attorney to James Olivers of Boston sur- 
veyor to receive of John Seaverne tayler 31 14s. Sd, for 
1121 of tobacco at Sd. a t, 6 10 1G40 and of one that is a 
Cooper of Scituate money for 1011 of tobacco or els the to- 
bacco againe delivered him out of goodman Sweets celler 
delivered by Richard Newton And leaves him 5001 waight of 
tobacco or therabout to dispose for me to my best advantage. 
[lOi.] • 



Savat'e with little addition. I suppose 



Seavearne, tailor, little is known that 



-that Brownell was selling his property will be of help here. 



aratory to moving to Portsmouth, 



2 Miles Brathwayte may have been a 

preparatory to moving i-u xuii.:=iii.^uL.., jiiieb uiam^aj , ti e 

R -1. where he is mentioned, 1655. as member of the church in the Isle of 

freeman. Edward llaynsford was a well- Providence, of the Bahamas, of which 

known man in Boston. He came with the unlucky end may be read m John- 

Winthrop in 1630, and was a deacon son,hk. ii. ch. xx.,and JVinthrop, u. 33. 

and rulinc^ elder in the church. He Kichard Newton, who delivered the 

died in ICSO tobacco out of Goodman Sweete's cel- 

1 Thomas Oliver brought with him lar (in the Mill Field, I suppose, near 

to this country, in 1632, two sons, John Gallop's Point, Book of Possessions, 

and James. I think that the Oliver 123, K, 3). may be one of the two men 

here mentioned must be John, for he is of that name who took the freeuian s 

the one of the two brothers who would oath. Savage calls one of Sudbury, 



be more likely to be called surveyor, 



and mentions his wife and children ; 



havin-beon on committees appointed to adding that he took the oath in 1C4d. 

run lines or determine boundaries, while and again. 1647. "for no other Kich- 

his brother Jan,es (this year made free- ard is heard of." It is barely pos- 

man) was a merchant, and would hardly, sible that this may be that other 

I think, be called surveyor. Of John Richard." 



254 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

George Liixon^ assignes k Mathew Dove places liiniself.- 
servant to John Blacklcath of Salem for 4 yearcs from the 1 
of June for 4^ a yeare. [2s. 6fZ.] 

KnoAve all men by these presents that ^vhereas I John 
Throckmorton 2 gent have received 83* of Richard Park«,T 
of Boston in New England merchant I doe hereby Covenant 
promise & grant to &: w'^ the said Richard Parker that I shall 
& will pay imto the said Richard Parker his executors adnir" 
or assignes at or in his dwelling house in Boston aforesaid 
the summe of twenty pounds upon the 11th day of June av""^ 
shall be in the yeare of our Lord 1G41 and twenty pounds 
upon the 11th day of June w'^^ shall be in the yeare of our 
Lord 1G42. And shall & will then deliver «fc pay unto the 
said Richard Parker his executors administrators or assignes 
forty one goats every one of them under five yeares of age 
and two ram goats each above one yeare old. And whereas the 
said Richard Parker hath letten unto me two Cowes vizt one 
blacke and the other red to receive <fe take the increase k 
profltts of the said blacke cowe from the first day of May last 
past for <t during the terme of two yeares and of the said red 
cowe from the 10th day of September next ensuing the date 
hereof for k during the terme of two yeares I doe hereby 
Covenant promise <fc grant to and with the said Richard 
Parker that I shall <fc will pay or cause to be payd unto the 
said Richard Parker his executors administrators & assignes 
at or [150] in his dwelling house aforesaid the summe of five 
pounds by the yeare for the increase k profitts of the said 
blacke cowe k five pounds a yeare more for the increase k 
profitts of the said red cowe And to the true performance 

* George Luxon, who is mentioned time after this, and finally to Hart- 
several times in the pages following, ford. 

•was master of the "Fellowship," and ^ John Throckmorton came over in 
was probably never in Xew England the same ship with Roger Williams, 
for any length of time. He ajipears with whom he warmly synipathizi^d. 
in the Kotc-hook generally as factor He was with him banished from the 
for some person or other. John Black- church at Salem, where he lived, and 
leach was a busy merchant of Salem, moved to Providence. He removed after- 
He moved, however, to Boston some wards to New Jersey, and died there. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. lioo 

of all the premises I bynd mo as aforesaid &c also my heircs 
executors Sc administrators firmely by these presents. Sealed 
y;'^ my scale kc. June 11 1G40. [1-GJ 

John Johnson ^ of Roxbury in N. E. yeoman in behalfe of 
Willm Perkins gent mortgageth to Walter Blackborne of 
Boston in N E merchant six ac of planting ground lying in 
the Calves pasture in Eoxbury leading to Dorchester. Also 
20 acres lying in the plaine in Roxbury betw^eene the great 
lotts & the frcsli mcadowes And 25 acres of the last division 
lying at the end of Roxljury bounds nearc Dedham. 

My Blackborne to convey the same to John Johnson Josuah 
Hughes &, Thomas Lambe And they 3 to become bound to 
Mr Blackborne in *fcc. for the paymt of the annuity. [5s.] 

Whereas John Cogau merchant hath told me that William 
Pester did inform the Cort that I tooke three pounds a tunne 
for the freight of shott brought in a ship wherein I was under- 
taker and hath desired me to testifye whether I did take so 
much or no I doe hereby deny that I tooke so much for the 
sayd shott but I did pay Mr Hassard for the freight of a tun 
of shott for my sclfe 3s. about the same time <fe so much for a 
tun I should have taken & did take & no more ^ Witnesse my 
hand (4) 16. 1G40. [8cZ.] 

Robert Lewes ^ late of Tanton in New England Carpenter 
turnes over Willm Roberts to serve John Crabtree or his 

1 Of this John Johnson, fortunately a minister in this country. Savage says 
more is known than of the Yorkshire- "minister, but where educated is un- 
man mentioned above. He was one of heard." I find in the Emmanuel T.eg- 
the substantial men of Eoxbur}', having ister at the English Cambridge, *' 1624. 
come with "Winthrop. He was often "\Vm. Perkins, Pensioner, A. B." 
representative in the General Court. ^ \ can add nothing further to e.x- 
Joshua Hughes (the name is generally plain this business. Hassard may be 
Hewes) was an active merchant of the Thomas Hazard, the ship-carpenter of 
same town. Thomas Lamb, also of Pox- Boston, though he had by this time 
bury, came with his wife and children moved to Khode Island. 
in the fleet with Winthrop. From the * Pobert Lewis, of Newbury, who 
title of "gent," applied to "William came to Salem in 1635, may be the man. 
Perkins, I should infer that though a Inquiry fails to add anything in regard 
preacher, he had not yet been ordained to John Crabtree to the note on p. 100. 



25G LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-LOOK. 

assigncs from this time till the 6th of December come twelve 
moneth for 4^ a jeare quarterly to be payd 

for 5^ upon the 1 of March 1G40. 

<fc for 5* upon the 1 of August 1641. 

[1-6] 

Boston (4). 25. 1G40. 

The Answere & Complaint of Elizabeth Cole wife of "Williu 
Cole concerning a deed of trust made by A: betweene Francis 
Doughty her brother and her sister Bridget Doughty on the 
behalf e of the said Elizabeth on tlie one parte and her said 
husband before their marriage on the other parte \_ciphcr~\ 

The Court booke at l&d a sheete 102 sheetes for Mf Ende- 
cott commeth to 6^ 16s. [6^ 16s.] 
• [ Two lines in cipher'\ 

Thomas Scudamore ^ late of Westerley in the County of 
Glouc"^ blacksmith makes a letter of Attorney to [W«n/C] Haz- 
zard of Bristoll mariner <t AYillm Prigge of Westerley afore- 
said yeoman to sell & dispose of One mesuage or tenement 
w*^ an orchard & garden lying in Westerley & to bring over 
his wife & children. The lease is from Thomas Roberts of 
Westerley Esqr to T S for 99 yeares if he & Ellen his wife 
[151] & Thomas their sonne or any of them so long live. He 
warrants to sell it for 50* k to dispose thereof & to bring over 
his wife k children & such commodities as I shall by my 
letter direct. 

Know all men by these presents that whereas I Thomas 
Scudamore late of Westerley in the County of Glouc' & now 
of Cambridge in New England blacksmith stand possessed to 
me & assignes of & in One messuage or tenement w*^ an or- 
chard & garden w*^ the appurtenances thereunto belonging 
lying in "Westerley aforesaid for the terme of fouerscore and 

1 ,Thom.is Scudamore may be Thomas vol. i.. Appendix, A. p. 59), I can find 

Skidmore, who is vagnely heard of in no Scudamore at all, and fear inquiry is 

1636 in connection with John "Win- useless in regard to Hazzard of Bristol, 

throp's expedition to Say brook ( Winth., or Prigge of Westerly. 



iiioo AoiJi 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 257 

nyneteciic ycares from tlie date of a certaine lease made 
thereof unto me by Thomas Roberts Esqr fully to be com- 
plcat & ended. 

John Pickering- 1 of Pascataqiiay in New England planter 
makes a letter of Attorney to Isacke Allerton merchant to 
attach and bring backe Richard Price his servant who was to 
serve him for 4 ycares from the 25th of Aprill 1639. he is 
now undutifully departed his service a tayler by his trade 
borne in Shrewsbury in the County of Salop as he hath sayd 
a man of middle stature black long hairc black beard thin 
faced of a swartliy color in a tawney kersy Doublet & liose 
w*'^ ash colored points at the knees a russett hat, to bring him 
backe or 10' for his time. [Is.] 

[This note seems to he set in the very middle of the letter 
of attorney.'] 

w^'* lease is determinable upon the Deaths of me the said 
Thomas Scidmore and of Ellen my wife k Thomas my sonne 
as more at large by the said Lease appeareth. Now Knowe 
yee tliat I the said Thomas Scidmore doe hereby constitute &, 
ordeyne my much respected ffricnd Henry Hazzard of Bristol! 
mariner my true ct lawfull Attorney for me & in my name to 
contract to and w'^ any person or persons for the sale of the 
premises A; all my right title Sc interest therein for fifty 
pounds & to bynd me my Executors & Administrators to 
make any further legall <fc reasonable assurance thereof as the 
purchasers thereof or their Counsell learned in the law shall 
ad\'ise or require Or if my sayd Attorney please himselfc to 
purchase the same when he shall sec the said Lease & premi- 
ses at the price aforesaid I authorize him to take the said 
Lease in his hands & possession and I hereby promise upon 

^ Savage notes John Pickering, of such service as the one here spoken of. 

Portsmouth, 1G35, of whom little is I hope lie had better luck in searching 

known, who may be the man. He is for Price than I have had. Thomas 

referred to again, p. 158, post. As for Hawkins was of course a very different 

Allerton, he was doubtless well known man from the merchant (p. 122, ante) of 

all along the coast up to Jlachias, and the same name. This man was at the 

it would be natural enough for a man time a baker, and later is said to have 

at Pascatta(][uay to call on hini for any kept an inn. 

17 



258 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

account <fc receipt of tlic said fifty pounds in manner herein 
expressed to be imployed & disbursed that I my executors A- 
administrators shall k will make any further legal! & rcasoji- 
able assurance thereof unto him as lie or his counsell IcanuMi 
in the law shall advise or require. And lastly for the <v''A 
fifty pounds I appoint the same to be disposed in this maniior 
vizt for the passage & transportation of my said wife A: our 
Children from England to this Country of New England .^nd 
the rest of the money to be disposed of as by my letters of 
advice or other direction I shall warrant him In Avitncsjc 
<fcc. [Is. 6c?.] 

John Crabtree of Boston ioyner & Thomas Hawkins of the 
same Baker to be bound to George Luxon in 12* to be payd 
to him or liis ass^ upon the sixth of January next at the 
house of Nicholas Willis ^ in Boston. [6(7.] 

Griffith Bowen2 Willm Colbron & Jacob Eliott to be 
bound unto Francis Kingsmyle Esqr "Willm Arundel 1 Willm 
Fleming & George Waters merchants in 265* to pay 235^ to 
them upon the first day of January next ensuing the date 
hereof 7. (5) 1640. [Is. Q>d. copayd Is. copayd Is.] 

Abend by John Downes^to George Luxon Nicholas Brook- 
ing* <fc John Morris in 160* Condiconed for payment of SOi 

^ The Nicholas "Willis here spoken of merchants mentioned were, I suppose, 

■was a mercer by trade, and his house Englishmen, though they may have been 

(and shop as well, I snppose) vas just Virginians (p. 153, jMst). 
off Dock Square, on Union Street. He ^ Inquiry as to John Downes "<le 

was, by the M'ay, chairman of the jury Ponte Bondon in Como Cork" (p. 158, 

in the trial of ilarmaduke Pierce for ^wsO, merely results in the followiiig : 

murder, mentioned above. ' "Bandon Bridge, a market town of 

2 Griffith Bowen (also a juryman in Cork, on the River Bandon, 13 m. fio!" 

the same trial) was a Welshman, who Cork, and 136 from Dublin. This town 

lived for a time in Poxbury, biit finally was erected in IGIO in the midst of an 

returned to England. William Colbron impassable bog by Pichard Boyle, F.ail 

and Jacob Eliott were both early set- of Cork " (Ca])pcr's Dictionary 0/ Gratt 

tiers and well-known men in Boston, Britain). Seo post, p. 158. 
being deacons of the church there. Both * Of Nicholas Brooking I find no 

■were sympathizers with Jlrs. Hutchin- mention, and notice of John Morris is 

son, although tlu^ former was not dis- so vague as to be useless here. 
armed nor disfranchised. The four 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 259 

witliiii 10 dayes after the arrivall of the John & Francis in 
England or Ireland 6. (o) 1640. [Is. Qcl] 

A letter of Attorney by one of Plymotli to M! Isacke 
AUerton ^ agt a dutchman. 4. 5, 1G40. [Cc?.] 

[152] Thomas Moulton ^ & Jane his wife complaine against 
"Willm Stidson & his wife in an action of trcspasse upon the 
Case. 

The Comp^'^ say that slice the said Jane being a woman of 
good name and conversation was about nyne ycares since as- 
saulted by John Treble who feloniously did endeavor to ravish 
her when she was alone in an house in the ffields whereupon 
she cryed out & ran away from him to another house a good 
way of and afterwards proscecuted against him so that he fled 
out of this Jurisdiction unto Pascattaquay & thence into Eng- 
land, that since about halfe a yeare agone the said [blank'] 
Stidsons wife maliciously intending to take away & Destroy 
the good name of the said Jane hath reported that the said 
Jane did owe unto the said Treble bever or money and sayd 
that he had a letter to receive and that when he came to aske 
bis owne meaning the said bever or money then she put that 
Tricke upon him meaning the said accusation of Rape and 
said she would have him before the Governor for it and 
further that tlic said letter was to that purpose w*^'' was a 
false & malicious slander cast upon the said Jane by the said 

1 Mr. Deane's note on AUerton says : declaration or certificate in regard to an 

"From some evidence lie would seera Indian gift of land with others, mostly 

to have been a resident of Xew Am- Dutch, as " Isaack AUerton, of SuITjlk." 

sterdam in 1643; and in a document [See Documents relating to the Colonial 

recorded in the Old Colony Records, History of Kcio York, i. 140, 191, 192, 

bearing date 27th October, 1646, he 597, 509.] AUerton died in New Haven 

styles himself as 'of Xew Amsterdam Feb. 12, 1658. 

in the province of New Netherlands'" 2 Tjje names of Thomas Moulton and 

{Bradford, p. 300, note). In 1642 his "William Stidson are known in connec- 

name is found among the " eight men " tion with other matters, but pcrhajis 

of New Amsterdam, looking curiously tins particular affair is not worth much 

out of place among the strangely spelled inquiry. There is no trace of it in the 

names of his Dutch friends. Later it Colonial Records or in AVinthrop. 
is signed (at Fort Nassau, 1651) to a 



2G0 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Stidsons wife to the great Imrt of the good name of the said 
Jane k much disquiet <t contention betwecne the Pits, to the 
damage of the Pits xt. 

and did also declare the same before many persons tV 
especially Mercy Paster James Browne & John Lawrence and 
at a time when some Difference came betwecne the said Jam; 
and the said Mercy Paster & the wife of the said Lawrenrc 
neare James Prownes house at Charlestowue Jane Moulton 
meeting w*^ Will™ Stidsons wife neere unto the house & in the 
presence of James Prowne of Charlestowue did aske the said 
Stidsons wife what was the matter betwecne John Treble and 
her the said Jane the said Stidsons wife answered that that 
was best knownc to God & her the said Janes conscience the 
said Jane reply ed it scemes yon knowc and therefore I pray 
you tell how it was whereupon she sayd that the said Jane 
did owe unto the said Treble bever or money and that they 
had a letter to demand it of her and further that when the 
said Treable came to aske his owne then she put that tricke 
upon liim and sayd she would have him before the Governor 
for attempting to ravish her and that the said letter was to 
that purpose or words to that effect. Then the said James 
Prowne asked the said Stidsons wife how long time agone that 
was that that letter was sent she said seven yeare agone why 
then sayd the said Prowne was it not spoken of till now she 
replyed because the said Jane was a member & he the said 
Elias was then none he thouglit she should be believed k nut 
hee nay that is not well sayd the sayd Prowne for an honest 
man that lives in the fearc of God is to be believed as 
soone as a memlicr but where is the letter sayd he ? the said 
Stidsons wife answered that it was sent backe into England 
who had the said letter she said Elias ^lavericke then sayd 
the said Prowne Put what doth this amount now how comes 
it to passe that this is now spoken of said tlie said Prowne I 
doe not knowe sayd the said Stidsons wife it is nothing to me. 
And tliis Conference was about halfe a yeare since. [Is. G(7.] 

The humble petition of Thomas Moulton sheweth that 
whereas heretofore the wor'^ W. Xowell did divers tymes put 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 2G1 

vo"' peticoncr off from having a warrant against Willm Stid- 
son <fc liis wife for wrong done to yo"^ peticoners wife and had 
trespassed yo'' pcticoner in his medow ground neare 100 pole 
long w*''* he complayed of to him but had no remedy the said 
Mr Xowell turning to other conference Yo"^ poore petitioner 
was much grieved & in his passion at a neighbours house sayd 
some misbesecming words of injustice against M^ Xowell for 
vi"^ he hath since humbled himself to him it craved forgive- 
ness & so doth now againe beseech yo'^ worshipps to forgive 
him <fc to discharge your said pcticoner of the recognizance 
taken before W. Nowell himselfe [153] k some other old 
matter that came in upon this for his apparance at the Court 
thereabout k the rather because that the man that heard the 
said words hath given out x — p that yo"" pcticoner shall be 
whipt & he is thereby so much terrifyed that he cannot w*'* 
chcerefulnesse goe about his businesse or rest quictt a suffi- 
cient punishment to him. And yo"" pcticoner shall according 
to his duty pray for yo'' wor^* [l6'.] 

Me Ricum Parker de Boston in Nova Anglia mercatorem 
tener' &c. Thome Fowle ^ Armigero in 400' dat' 25 Decembris 
1639 

Condiconcd to pay 205 upon the fift of March w'=^ shall be 
Anno Dmi 1640. [Is. Cipher.'] 

This Indenture made the seventh day of July Anno Dmi 1640. 

. Betweene Griffith' Bowen of Boston in New England 

gent of the 07ie jxirte And "William Colbron (/ Boston 

aforesaid gent and Jacob Eliott of the same planter of the 

other parte 

Witnesseth that the said Griffith Bowen (for in Consid- 
eration that the said William Colbron and Jacob Elliott at 

^ Thomas Fowle, often mentioned He became involved in tlie complica- 

in subsequent pages of tlie Note-look, tions about D'Aulnay and La Tour, 

was a well-known mercliaut of Bos- which we cannot liope to unravel here, 

ton. Savage says he came over before and in certain religious controversies 

1635. He was at any rate allowed to (Dr. Child; see JFinih., ii. 261, 265, 

be aa iuhaVatant of Boston in 1639. 321). 



262 LECHFORD'S MAXUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

the speciall instance and request of the said Griffith Bu\\\n 
together w*^ him and for him stand bounden unto Frauris 
Kingsmill Esqr WiUm Arundel! William Flemming and 
George Waters merchants in one obligation or bond of lb.' 
summc of two hundred sixty and five pounds bearing date 
the Day of the Date of these presents Condiconed for the ])a\ - 
mcnt of the summe of two hundred thirty & five pounds uniu 
them or any of them their or any of their Executors adminis- 
trators or assigncs upon or before the first day of January 
next ensuing tlie date of the said obligation) hath granled 
bargained and assigned and by these presents doth grant bar- 
gaine & assigne unto the said Willm Colbron and Jacob 
Eliott all those twenty five head of cattell w"^ were bought 
by the said Griffith Bo wen of George Lux son ff actor for tlio 
said Obligees To have and to hold the said Cattell unto the 
said Willm Colbron and Jacob Elliott their executors adminis- 
trators and assignes Provided allways that if the said Grifiitli 
Bowen his heircs executors administrators or assignes shall 
well and truly pay or cause to be payd unto the said Francis 
Kingsmill Willm Arundcll Willm Fleming and George Waters 
or any of them their or any of their executors administers or 
assignes the said summe of two hundred thirty and five 
pounds according to the tenor of the said Obligation or Con- 
dicon thereof then this present grant bargainc & assignenicnt 
shall be voyd S: of none effect or els it shall remaine & be 
in full power strength &'vertue. In witnesse whereof the 
partyes abovesaid have hereunto interchangeably sett tluir 
hands & scales the Day' & yeare first abovewritten. [2-G r a 
bushell of corne.] 

1. Wheras ^ M": Tre worthy bought a boate of seaven tun or 
thereabout of ^ll Thomas Purches I alleadge that he under- 
stood how old the boate was and agreed to give 25t for it and 
2. in the bargainc being made at Pascattaway at a house 
called Xequickananmicke then M"!'^ Masons I was to have the 

1 I suppose that this is written by with John -Treworthy about this same 
Thomas Purchas, of Pagiscott, who, it boat that is mentioned by LechtorJ 
may be reaiembereJ, had some trouble (ante, p. 84), 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 2G3 

boate -uitliin 8 dajes to transporte me home w^^ one man of 
M^ Trewortbys & then also w'^ the boate to receive the 
money. 

3. The bargainc was made about the midst of July 1636 I 
was forced to stay myselfe &, 3 men a monetli at charges ex- 
pecting the boate to carry us home whereby I lost the labour 
of my men for 5 weckes in the midst of hay harvest so that 
my Cattell suffered much thereby besydcs my losses otherwise. 

4. I was put to charges of 4^ for our transportation home 
at that tyme wheras we were to have had that boate to have 
gone home in wthout that charge. 

5. It appeareth that the money being 25 at first & the said 
4* & my other charges for me & 3 men of 5^ in all 34* hath 
ben deteyned 4 yeares w*^'^ might in way of merchandize have 
benefitted mc in that tyme so much more so that I may 
iustly say my dammage is 68* which I leave to yo"^ worthy 
Consideration. 

[154J I Thomas Dudley Esqr Governor of the Jurisdicon 
of the Mattachusetts Bay in New England Doe hereby certify 
unto all manner of persons whome it may concerne that Ed- 
ward Hall* late of the parish of Henborough in the County 
of Gloucester carpenter and now of Duxbury in New England 
Sonne of Francis Hall late of Henborough aforesaid yeoman 
Deceased as appeareth unto me by his owne oath «fc the oath 
of James Smith marriner is now at the making hereof in full 
life and health. In testimony whereof at the request of the 
said Edward Hall I have caused the Common Scale of our 
Colony to be hereunto affixed the fifteenth day of July in the 
sixteenth yeare of the Raigne of our Sovcraigne Lorde Charles 
now King of England <tc. Annoq^ Dmi 1640. [2-6] 

That Sarah Hubbard wife of Edmund Hubbard of Hingham 
in New England sometime Avife of John Lyford Gierke some- 
time Minister at Lcvelegkish neare Laughgaid in the County 
of Ardmagh Deceased is alive &c. [A writing of advise QdJ] 

* This is not the Edward Hall men- bury as early as 1636, and later of 
tionod above (p. 139) as servant of Mr. Bridgewater, and then of Rehoboth. 
Kichard Saltonstall. He was of Dux- 



2Gi LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Boston 15 Julii ICIO. 
Upon sight of this my first bill of exchange my sccujiil ^v 
third not heing payd I pray you pay unto James Smith niar- 
riner or hisassignes the summc of ten pounds A: ten shilliu-^ 
currant money of England w^'' is for so much in Commodili* -, 
heere received of him to the use of myseKe &, my brother John 
Hall late of Henborough in the County of Gloucester tii\ u r 
sonncs of Francis Hall late of the same yeoman Deeuaxd. 
I pray make good payment it charge it to the account of the 
said John Hall as by advice. So I rest 

Yo' loving Friend 

Edward Hall. 

To my very loving friends Edward Stokes of Charleton in 
the parish of Henborough aforesaid yeoman & John Tauntuu 
late of Henborough aforesaid husbandman Executors of the 
last will & Testament of the said Francis Hall or to either of 
them. 

The Commodities received 2 barrells of beife at 40^ 

p peace 4i 

Item 3 barrells of oatmeale at G^ p bushell .... 31 IS^ 

Item two peices flauuiug of tJ3 yardes at St? .... 2 1 

[2-6. 27° Julij. The ship called the Mary Rose about one 
of the Clocks riding a^t Anchor before Charles Towne was 
blown up wherein among other marriners & seamen the said 
James Smith.] 

Me W™ Bevan^ de Ci\'itate Bristoll mercatorem tcncr 
Thome Dudley Ar Gubernator de le Mattachusetts in Xi»va 
Anglia in mille libris Hat 17 die Julii 16 Caroli 1040. [1 •>«•.] 

The Condicon of this obligation is such that whereas the 
aboveboundcn Willm Bevin hath lately bought of Robert 
Saltonstall gent Certaine peeces of Iron Ordinance that is to 
say two Demy Culverins of the weight of three thousand one 

1 The name Bcvans is found in New but it is unlikely that this man was ever 
England towards the end of the century ; ia New England for any length of time. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 265 

liundrcd fifty six pounds a peece for the proper use and ser- 
vice of him the said Wilhn Bevin. If therefore the said Wilhn 
Bevin shall not sell or putt off the said peeces of Ordinance 
or either of them to any [155] person or persons not being- the 
subject or subjects of our Soveraigne Lordo King Charles 
then &c. [Is.] 

Nos Johcm Squire 1 de Attamenticus in Nova Anglia Pisca- 
torcm Nichiim Squire de cadem piscatorem k Sampson Anger 
de eadem in Piscatorem tener Thome Foule Ar in GQi dat 21 
(5) 1G40. 

Condicon, That if the aboveboundcn John Squire Nicholas 
Squire Sampson Anger or any of them their or any of their 
heires executors or administrators shall well and truly pay 
and deliver unto the abovenamed Thomas Foule his executors 
administrators or assignes so much well-condiconed and mer- 
chantable dry codd fish at the rate of foureteenc shillings the 
Kentall or in default thereof so much money aboard such 
vessells or shippcs at or neare the Isle of Sholes or Pascat- 
taway in New England before the first day of July next ensuing 
the Date hereof as shall fully satisfy and countervayle all such 
goods & commodities as the said Thomas Foule his execu- 
tors administrators or assignes shall at any time or times 
before the said first day of July upon request of the said John 
Nicholas & Sampson or any of them their or any of their 
executors administrators or assignes deliver unto them or any 
of them at such prices and rates as they shall agree upon. 
[Is. 6tZ.] 

Me Thoman Foule de Boston in Nova Anglia Ar tener <tc. 
Johi Squire Nicholas Squire et Sampson Anger in GOl dat 21 
July 1640. 

That if the aboveboundcn Thomas Foule his heires execu- 
tors administrators or assignes or any of them shall from 
time to time take and buy or cause to be taken & bought 

1 Of the Sr^uires of Agamenticus I freeman 1652, ami constable 1655. The 

find no satisfactory mention. Sampson name is spelli-d Alger more often, appar- 

Anger, however, is noted in Savage as ently, than either Anger or Auger, 
on the grand jury at York in 1649, 



266 LECH FORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

of the abovesaid John Nicholas & Sampson their execu- 
tors administrators or assignes such & so much wcll-con- 
diconed and merchantable dry codd fish as they or anv of 
them shall cure- dressc and provide at the rate of fourtuene 
shillings the kentall & receive the same into some ressclls or 
shippes at or neare the Isle of Sholes or Pascattaway in Xew 
England before the first day of July next ensuing the dato 
liereof either with & for redy money or in Default thereof 
goods & commodities at the prices & rates as they shall agree 
upon. Theji. [Is. 6t?.] 

Samuel Freeman ^ of Watcrtowne in N. E. g. makes a letter 
of Attorney to Andrew Walker Citizen & tallow chandler of 
London vers Willm Gierke &c. 

Knowe all men by these presents that whereas "Willm 
Gierke Cittizcn and Skinner of London standeth bound unto 
me Samuel Freeman now of Watertowne in New England it 
late of Mawlyn in the County of Kent gent in one bond or 
obligation of eight hundred pounds Dated the second day of 
November in the twelveth yeare of the Raigne of our Sovc- 
raigne Lord Charles by the grace of God King of England S:c 
Annoq*" Dfii 1636. Condiconed for a surrender of a certaine 
coppihold Cottage or Tenement orchard and garden and two 
acres & halfe of land w*^ the appurtenances in Cheswicke in 
the County of Midd to be made by the lieire or heires of 
Elizabeth Gierke late wife of the said Willm Gierke unio 
Robert Cogan of Cheswicke aforesaid Esqr in such manner 
and form & for saving harmlesse me the said Samuel and my 
heires as in and by the Gondicon indorsed on the said bond 
is expressed as more at large in & by the said bond & Condi- 
con thereof it doth & may appeare. Now Knowe yee that I 
for divers good Causes and Considerations me thereunto 
moveing have granted and assigned and by these presents 
doe grant & assigne the said bond and all profitts advan- 
tages & money thereby to be recovered unto Andrew Walker 
Cittizen & Tallow chandler of London To have and to hold 

1 Samuel Freeman, of Watertown, had home to England shortly after this, and 
probably come with Winthrop, but went there died, as it is reported. 



LECIIFORD'S MAXUSCniPT NOTE-BOOK. 2G7 

receive k perceive the said bond profitts advantages & money 
thereby to be recovered unto him [156] the said Andrew 
Walker his heires & Assignes. And further for that end & 
purpose I doc hereby make ordeyne constitute and in my 
stead & place by these presents put and appoint the said 
Andrew Walker my true and lawful! Attorney irrevocable 
for me and in my name but to the proper use of the said 
Andrew Walker his heires and assignes to sue for recover 
and receive of & from the said Wilhn Gierke his heires execu- 
tors and administrator the said eight hundred pounds giving 
and granting unto my said Attorney my full power and 
Authority in execution of the premises for me and in my 
name to arrest sue implcade imprison condemne and out of 
prison to. deliver and plead processe & prosecutions for me 
& in my name to susteyne & m'ainteyne in any Cort or Corts 
and before what Judges or Magistrates soever and to com[.oiind 
and agree and upon the Rccoverys and receipts in that behalfe 
acquittances or otlier sufficient Discharges for me and in my 
name to make scale & deliver and if need be satisfaclion 
upon record to acknowledge and also the said bond or obliga- 
tion to Canccll & deliver up And Attorney or Attorneys one 
or more under him to doe the premises to substitute and 
revoke And further to doe say affirme procure & cause to be 
done all k every otlier matter and thing whatsoever w^^ in or 
about the premises shall be requisite or needful in as large k 
ample manner k forme as I might or could doe myselfe if I 
were personally present Ratifying confirming k allowing all 
k whatsoever my said Attorney shall lawfully doe or cause 
to be done in or about the execution of the premises or any 
of them. In wltnesse whereof I have hereunto put my hand 
k scale the Twenty second day of July in the sixteenth 
yeare of the Raigne of our Soveraigne Lord Charles by tlie 
grace of God King of England Scotland France k Ireland 
Defender of the Faith ka Annoq^ Dili 1640. [3-4] 

Francis Willoughbyi of Charlestowne in N. E. merchant 
k Nicholas Parker of Boston in N. E. g. to be bound to 

1 Francis Willoughby had come to and was already well known. He was 
New England two or three years before, representative in 1642 and twice after- 



2G8 LECIIFORD'S MAXCSCIIIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Captaine Timothy Tliornliill in ffifty pounds — to be payd at 
Mf Wintlirop's house in B 1 Feb'' next. A mortgajxe of 
the Tobacco & a Counterbond. 

Wilhn Ilalcs Planter assures the tobacco to them fur 
security. [4s.] 

I Thomas Dudley Esqr Governor of the Jurisdiction of the 
Mattachusetts Bay in Xew England having seen these presents 
signed sealed <fc delivered in ray presence by the abovesaid 
Samuell Freeman to the use of the abovemcntioned Andrew 
Walker doe liereby Certify the same to be the Act and deed 
of the said Samuel Freeman. In testimony "whereof At the 
request of the said Samuell I have caused the Comnion scale 
of our Colony to be hereunto affixed the twenty second day 
of July aforesaid. 

Nos W™ Cole do Weymouth in N A planter k Jacobus 
Smith de N A prd p tciier' Capitando T. T. in 30t dated 23 
Julii 1640 Condiconed to pay lot 6^ 1 Feb"^ px at M! Winthrops 
house in Boston. [1.?.] 

[157] Nos Edmun IIull de Boston in N A gen Will" John- 
son dc eadem plantator Ricm Cooke de eadem scissor ct 
Arthur™ Perry ^ de eadem scissor tener &c Capitando T. T. in 
40t dat 25 Julii 1G40. Condiconed to pay {blank] 1 1 Feb"" px 
at or in Mr Winth house in Boston. [Is.] 

A Case. A servant reteynes an Attorney in his Masters 
name & w*^ his consent to sue U D for money due to the 
master for goods bought out of his shop by the said R P in 
w^'^ suit the Attorney expendes money & p'"secutcs w^*" effect. 
So The suit is upon Record betwecne the said Master & the 

wards. Later he was chosen an assis- I take to have been a Virginia planter ; 

tant, and in 1665 was elected Deputy- he was not a New Englander. These 

Governor, wliich olfice he held until two men can hardly be identified, 

his death in 1671. It may be a stretch James Smith, of Weymouth, is merely 

of imagination to suppose Captain Tim- noted by Savage, but uothijig more, 

othy Thornhill to be Captain Tliomas i For Richard Cooko and Arthur 

Thornell, a transient resident, thinks Perry, see ante, p. 59 and note. 
Savaw, who died 1060. ^^'illiara Hales 



LECIIFORD'S MAXUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 2G9 

said Debtor Sc for the goods of the said master and tliat by his 
consent. The Question is although tlie servant did promise 
to pay the Attorney all due fees & charges in case he hath 
not p'^ the same, whether the Attorney may not recover the 
said fees & charges at his election of either the said master 
or servant. 

I conceive this case to be very clcarc & that the master is 
bound both in Law cfc equity to pay the Attorneys bill. Jo. 
Winthrop 5. 25. 1G40. 

Now I can depose upon my oath that rcmaines due to me 
for charges expended k for my due fees in the said suit 23^ 4*^ 
for w^^ I have the hand A; promise of the servant to my 
booke in England. 

MF' Thomas Barnardiston against Mr Thomas Weston^ in 
an accon of debt for G3l 14! [3s. 4c?;] 

Knowe all men by these presents that wheras by vertue of 
the within written Letter of xlttorney 1 Thomas Lechford one 
of the Attorneys within named caused procossc to be served 
on the goods of the within mentioned Thomas Weston in the 
name of the within written Thomas Barnardiston for the debt 
within specifyed and afterwards by Direction of John Win- 
throp Esq^ the said Thomas Weston & I myselfe on tlie 
behalfe of the said Thomas Barnardiston submitted the said 
cause to the Arbitremcnt & Determination of Samuel Mav- 
ericke gent and Capt. Edward Gibones Arbitrators indifferently 
chosen bctweene us whereupon the said Arbitrators upon 
hearing and Consideration of the said Cause did in writing 
under their hands award that the said Tliomas Weston should 
deliver unto me to the use of the said Thomas Barnardiston 
soe much well condiconed merchantable leafe tobacco w^^ caske 
at 6^ the pound as will amount to the said principall debt *t 

^ Thomas "Weston I suppose to be other pei-son of the name is mentioned 

the London merchant wjio was inter- in the early history of New England, 

ested in the planting of "Weymouth in Thomas Barnardiston I know nothing 

1622. Ho is said to have died at Bris- of, and suppose from the fact that Lech- 

tol, — I suppose at the storm of the town ford acts as attorney for him that he 

by Maurice and Uupert in 1643. No was at this time in Eugland or Virginia. 



270 LECIIFORD'S MAXUSCRTPT NOTE-BOOK. 

bill k that thereupon I should in the name of tlic said T l; 
release the said Thomas Weston of the said debt &: bill thc'v. 
of within mentioned. Xow I the said Thomas Lechford due 
hereby acknowledge tliat I have received of the said Thomas 
"Weston the summe of two thousand five hundred forty ei-lit 
pounds of well conditioned merchantable leafe tobacco at th.' 
rate of G'1 the pound in full discharge of the said debt ct ]»ill 
And therefore in performance of the said award and by vertuc 
of the said Letter of Attorney I the said Thomas Lechford 
doc hereby in the name & for and on the behalfc of the said 
Thomas Barnardiston remise release and forever quitt cla\ me 
unto the said Thomas Weston his heires executors and 
administrators the said debt &. bill and all «fc all manner of 
accons suits iudgments exemptions charges and demands 
whatsoever that the said Thomas Barnardiston his executors 
or administrators have or may have against the said Thomas 
Weston his heires executors or administrators by reason of 
the said bill or debt. In witnesse <S:c. 5. 27. 1G40. 

5. 27. 1G40. Received by authority of Letters of advise of 
& from Thomas Lechford one of the Attorneys in the above 
written Coppie of a Letter of Attorney mentioned all the 
tobacco in caske w*=^ he recovered of & from W. Thomas 
Weston at the suit of Thomas Barnardiston in the said Copy 
mentioned I doe approve of the said proceedings & I say I 
have received to the use of the said T. B. of well condiconed 
leafe tobacco in caske the weight of 25481 [2. 6. Copied 
Attornat 1 — 6. Cop orbit 1. ^U Winthrops' receipt 1 — 
Marshalls fee 5 — 15 — 4.] 

[158] Morgain Lewys of Pascattaway marriner makes a 
letter of Attorney to John Pickering ^ of Pascattaway planter 
to receive of Mr Thomas Warrenton the summe of 14i due to 
me by bill dated 4 December lGo9 payable & that should have 
bin payd 30 Martii ult. Dat 27. Julii 1G40 Coram me Ch" 
Hardy & Samson Salter. [1 — 6] 

1 John rickerin.r, already notod, is Of the two witnesses, I find Samson 
the only one of these three of whom I Salter as "Newport, 1639;" but no 
can find any mention in a curaory search. Christopher Hardy. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



Til 



Me John"^™ Downcs dc Ponte Boiidon in Com Corke mercat . 
tener' Gcorgio Liixson Xicli^ Brookings tt Jolii Morris in 341 
dat 27 Julii 1G40 Condicon to pay them ITt vi'"''^ 10 daycs 
aftir the arriyall of the John k Francis of youghall ^ in Eng- 
land or Ireland. [Is.] 

Captaine Timothy Thornhill makes a Letter of Attorney 
to AVill™ Raynborowe ^ merchant to receive all Debts &. 
summes due to the said Captaine Thornhill. 5. 27. 1640. 
[1 — Qcl. ; a note 6tZ.] 

Thomas Witherley marriner makes a letter of Attorney 
unto Will™ Vicars ^ of Connecticot planter to receive all debts 
& dispose & sell all cattcll goods & chattells due to him or 
WilP QuickC. 5. 27. 1G40. [1—0.] 

Thomas Robinson of Boston marriner for 40 sells unto 
Thomas Withcrlcy marriner One barke' called the Speedwell* 



1 From the same kindly authority 
which gave me the \vhereabouts of 
"Ponte BonJon in Com Corke," I 
learn that Yoiicrliall is " a considerable 
seaport in the County of Cork, at the 
moutli of the Blackwater," some little 
■way to the east of Cork Harbor. 

- William liaynborowe (called of 
Charlestown, ;)asV, p. 164) must be a 
misspelling for William Kainsborough, 
of that town. Kainsborough lived some 
time in New England, but in 16-i5 he 
■went to England to serve in the Civil 
War. He was himself made colonel, 
and had Israel Stoughton as his lieu- 
tenant-colonel, and Nehemiah Bourne 
as major. Other Xew Englanders ■«-ho 
went with him were Jlr. John Leverett, 
William Hudson the younger, and 
Francis Lisle the surgeon, of most of 
whom we liave had mention in this 
book. Kainsborough is called in one 
of Winthrop's letters the brother of 
Stephen Winthrop. He was the brother 



of Judith, the wife of Stephen Winthrop. 
If Wyman is right, he was also his step- 
grandfather, by the marriiige of JIartba 
Kainsborough Coytmore with Governor 
Winthrop. (See Wyman's Ch'irlcstoicn, 
and IVinth., vol. ii. apx. A, C5). 

^ William Vicars may be the father 
of Thomas Yigars, of Hartford, born 
1G50. Savage offers the conjecture that 
the family was Dutch ; but I find no 
trace of the name in any early papers 
relating to the New Netherlands that I 
have seen. William Quick, called a 
sailor {Suff. Deeds, i. f. 50), is noted 
at Newport, 1638, but seems by a later 
entry in the Kotc-hooh to be of Con- 
necticut (pp. 182, 189, posO- 

* Whether the" Speed well,"of pilgrim 
fame, lasted out forty years after being 
sent back to London as unseaworthy, is 
a subject which may interest the curious. 
One Robert Corbin was master of the 
" Speedwell " 15 Aug., 1637 ( Winth., 
ii. 34S). 



272 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

w*^ all tacklings & appurtenances to the same belonging w'-- 
■warranty against all men. 5. 27. 1G40. [1 — 0.] 

TJiomas "Witherle is bound to Thomas Robinson. 

Me Thomam Witherle de Southwarkc in Com Snrr tenor' 
et firmif obligar Thome Robinson in 70^ condiconed that if 
bills of exchange be payd by Mr Edward Hopkins^ fur 
35l then to be voyd. The bills to be payd at 30 dayes. Tliu 
bills of exchange only passe. [1 — 6.] 

Allen Yewe^ of Boston seaman assures his" two third parts 
of one shallop w*^ tackling ct appurtenances thereunto belong- 
ing unto Thomas Foule k Samuel ]\Iavericke Esqr^ for 22i w'^ 
they payd for him to Richard Pin seaman w*^ proviso that if 
he pay the money upon the 9 of October next then to be voyd 
els he will also serve them & their assignes from thence 3 
yeares. 5. 28. 1640. [2—8.] 

Boston ix New England July 28 16-10. 

At sight of this my first bill of exchange my second & 
third not being payd I pray you be pleased to pay upon the 
iiyneth day of November next ensuing the date hereof or any 
time after that day unto Mr George Ilussey Citizen Sc silk- 
man of London dwelling at the signe of the Doggs head in 
the pott in Cheapside London or his assignes the summc of 
twenty pounds starling w'^^ is for so much heere by me received 
of Mr Robert Scott ^ of Boston aforesaid haberdasher I pray 
you make good payment & place it to account as by advice. 

[2] Thomas Matson. 

^ Edward Hopkins, at tins time gov- tinuations of this business may be found 

ernor of Connecticut, came to Boston in below (pp. 159, 164). 
1637 with Davenport and Eaton, and 3 ji^^ Eobert Scott, subsequently 

went the same year to Hartford, where ensign, had come with "Wintlirop in 

he was made an assistant, then gov- 1630. He was once or twice selectiuaii. 

ernor. He returned to England in 1652, His house was on tlie south side of State 

where he died in 1657. Street, on the corner, it is supposed, 

* Of AUeu Yewe little seems to be of Pudding Lane, so called, now Devon- 
known, save the fact that his name shire Street. 
is spelled in a variety of ways. Con- 



ftfih )o :Jif-offi +A 



LECIJFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 273 

To my loving Sister in law M".^ [lAankl^ Chambers dwelling 
at the signc of tlie golden key in Sherborne Lane London wid- 
dow and Executrix of the last will ct testament of Thomas 
Chambers Cittizeu k. clothworker of London Deceased. 

John Davys ^ of Boston in New England ioyner bound in 
a bill to W°^ Herricke in 3. 16^ to be payd 25 Dec next dat' 
5. 28. 1640. [QcL'] 

A Release by Thomas Matson ^ of Brayntree in New Eng- 
land gunsmith and Anne his wife unto M'i' [hkmk'] Cliambcrs 
widdow ct executrix of the last will k testament of Thomas 
Chambers Citizen &, Cloathworker of London deceased for 20^ 
parte of their Legacy 5. 28. 1640. [6c?.] 

[159] EichardPinne of Boston in New England seaman 
makes a letter of Attorney to Allen Yewe to receive k re- 
cover all moneys debts dutyes & parte of a boate & netts 
due to him from divers persons upon Cape Codd voyage 
wherein I was imployed w'^ others And certaine money due 
to me from one Nicliolas servant to M"! Thatcher at yarmouih 
in New England. 5. 28. 1640. [Is.] 

Me Allen Yewe de Boston in Nova Anglia nauta tener' &c 
RiC Pinne in 61 dat' 5. 28. 1640. Condiconed to pay 3^ ult 
Junii 1641 at Robert Turners house in Boston. [Is.] 

1 John Davis, of Boston, joiner, came in 1637, with which he sympathized. 
iu the "Increase" in 1635, and was, I Afterwards, says Savage, he became a 
think, disarmed in 1637, with so many military officer. Where Robert Turner's 
more of Lechford's clients. But the liouse was at this time I hardly know, 
name John Davis is a confused one. He had what I suppose to be a pasture 
There were two or three of the name lot near what is now the corner of 
(all joiners) about this time. William Franklin and Congress streets ; but I 
Herrick was of Soutliampton, L. I. think there was probably no house upon 

2 Thomas Matson had been of Boston it. Later he bouglit of Valentine Hill 
since Winthrop came over, —a gun- a house on the west side of Washington 
smith by trade and an early member Street, north of Court Street. It was 
of the church ; freeman Jilarch 4, across the street from Jilajor Gibbons's 
1633. He moved to Braiiitree after the {Ek. Possess., G, 44, p. 96j. 
discomfiture of the Hutchinson party 

'l3 



274 LECUFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

And now, Worthy Sir, wliat news can I write you from us, 
but such as is heavy and sad, in every respect? YestcnUiv, 
being the 27th of July, a tall ship riding at anchor before 
Charlestowne, that brought hither provisions from Brisloll, 
called the Mary Rose,^ was (most part) blown up with gun- 
powder which she had in her for defence, (and the rest sunke 
downc immcdiatelie,) through some careless rummaging with 
candle-light in the hold : wherein died a brave mariner Ca]>- 
taine Davis, with ten others, seamen, and two or three uf the 
Country being then on boarde. Fourteen others of the ship's 
company being on shore, through the mercy of God escaped : 
I never heard such a fearful blow : it shook the house wherein 
I was being a mile off, as an earthquake. A sad and doleful 
accident, and much laid to heart by me. This was at one 
a clock in the afternoone. God of his mercy grant that we 
the living may lay it to heart and repent indeed, lest we all 
likewise perish ! 

\_3Iarghi : " This is not ivrittai'^l I for my part, though 
I hear things are at an ill way in our native country, could 
yet wish myselfe there, or else in some other place of his 
Majestie's dominions, considering the errors and disorderlie 
proceedings we run into and persist in dayly here, as sheep 
without a shepherd. I know my friends desire to know 
whether I am yet of any better mind than some of my actions 
about the time of my coming away did show me to bee. I 
doe professe that I am of this mind and judgment, I thank 
God : that Christians cannot live happily without Bishops, as 
in England ; nor Englishmen without a King. Popular elec- 
tions indangcr people with war and a multitude of other 
inconveniences. The people here, in short time, if the course 
here hold long, (which God forbid!) arc like to be most 
unchristian, and the rest erroneous and ignorant enough : 
I have not received the Sacrament these two yeares, nor am 
yet like to doe, for I cannot agree to such proceedings. I am 

1 The blowing up of the ship " Mary later, pp. 165, 167, 187- If interested 

Rose" in the harbor created much ex- in the matter, he will not fail to consult 

citement in the Colony. The reader will Winth., ii. 11, 72, 74, and 4 Mass. Hist. 

remember Lechford's marginal note, \>. Coll., vi. 141, where is a letter from 

154, and he will meet further reference Eudicott to Winthrop on the matter. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. tio 

not of tliem, in cliurcb or common weal : Some bid me be 
gone, of whicli I am in some sort glad : others labor with me 
to stay, fearing my returnc will do theire cause wrong ; and 
loth am I to lieare of a stay, but am plucking up stakes with 
as much speed as I may, if so be I may be so happy as to 
arrive in Ireland, there at leaste to follow my old profession, 
and where I have hope of some friendship, since I was last 
there with my Lord Deputy Wentworth now lord lieutenant- 
general. When they press me to stay, I hold them to sucli 
points as these : 1, Let them be pleased to show me by the 
Scriptures that a people may make [themselves ?] a church 
without the presence and approbation of an Apostle or Evan- 
gelist sent unto them from a church : 2dly, That a people 
have power to choose and ordain their own officers: 3dly, 
That any ministers have power of imposition of hands, with- 
out apostolicall or evangelicall Bishops ; and if they can, then 
I will stay. But I know not whether they will stay me volens 
nolens or what [ways ?] they may use to- stay me : but this, 
God willing, is the mind I sliall, I hope, live and die in. I 
tell them the Scots have done tlicy know not what, in putting 
out of Bishops : I say further to them that others may if tlicy 
will strain at gnats, the cap, tippet, surplice, cross, kneeling 
at the Sacrament, (tc, whereof none can be singly evil : but 
I for my part will pray that I may never swallow such camels 
as departe from Christ and his Apostles and Evangelists, but 
dissent [from] receiving ilnposition of hands from one another, 
downe from the days of the Apostles hitlierto : though perad- 
venture great corruptions and many sins liave intervened and 
[undecipherable'^ many, whicli God pardou unto us ! Further, I 
say to my friends that Apostles, Prophets and Evangelists ought 
and doe continue, as well as pastors or teachers, to the end 
of the world : How else can the Gospel be propagated to the 
Indian or Pagan nations ? for Pastors and Teachers, these here 
make to be overseers of the flock, only. How can churches 
be administered without them, in peace and uniformitic ? 
For if all churches are so free, and still one [over ?] another (as 
they here holdc), are they not in danger to become soe many 
fractions, if not factions, sects, divisions, confusions, wliat not 



276 LECIIFORD'S MANi^SCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

[else?] ? Also, if apostolical and evangelical Bishops, or su- 
pervisors are necessarie for the propagation of the Gu>p(l 
and gathering together churches of God <tc., ho^\'- can they be, 
without great impiety, thrust out from administering to thi'in, 
being gathered and approved ? May they not visit suuh 
churches as thej gather or approve ? Must they not ? 

To all these they give me no sufficient answers ; and some 
silence my letters;^ some cry out of nothing but Antichrist 
and the Man of Sin : I desire such to consider Mr. Zanchy's 
opinion, out of the Fathers, of Antichrist, and the doubtful 
expressions of our interpreters on the Revelation and the 
second Epistle to the Thcssalonians and 2d chapter : whether 
the seat upon seven hills be a double type : whether it may 
not be Constantinople as well as R-ome, &c. When they urtie 
the example of Geneva, some churches in Germany, both the 
Higher and Lower, Scotland, &c., I then propound to tliem 
to consider what experience any of these churches had in 
mission to convert and plant churches among pagans and 
heathens. But things are amiss, and grievances burden us 
in temporalis and spiritualls. I [ask] what peace can avc 
have, or deserve to have, if we goc on in such a way of dis- 
obedience to Apostolical rules? They urge the Common 
Prayer Book, and sermons are their burden. I say the best 
and learnedest are and have been beholden to forms, and 
when the poor Indians are to be taught, will they not tcacii 
them by forms ? for extempore long prayers in publique and 
long [continued?] I conceive, without forms in set words 
and the reading of the Scriptures as well as preaching, the 
generation following will be more ignorant, if not erronious. 
In England. 12 or 13 Chapters and Psalmes'-^ are read every 
Sunday, in all Churches, beside what is upon Wednesdays and 

1 After "letters " these -words were land every Sunday are read in publiniu' 
written and erased: "And will not dis- Cliai»ters and Tsalines in every Churcli. 
pute with niee. I think either out of besides the eleven or twelve Cominand- 
[contenipt] of meor elsedespaireof their ments," etc. This, doubtless, should 
cause." [T.] be read, " eleven or twelve Chapters utiil 

2 In a marginal note to the Plainc Psahnes besides the Conimandmcuts, 
Dca?/«<7(p. 20;3M. H. S. iii. 79) Lech- etc. [T.] 

ford is made to say, "Whereas iu Eng- 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 2TI 

Fridays and other holydays ; but here, Scripture twice a 
Sunday, in any Church, and upon any otiier day none at all, 
in whatsoever assembly or upon whatsoever occasion ; but 
preaching and long [conceived ?] prayers. Men may be 
unmercifull in their long prayers, to those that heare them. 
Doctrinal discourses [delivered] in prayer are not so fitting 
or proper unto prayer: And for ceremonies, bowing at the 
name of Jesus, and the like, there is no danger in them ; but 
alreadie to drive such things out tends more to Atheisme, 
Arianisme, <tc., than they are aware of. I forget not to tell 
some, that they have taken upon tliem opus infinitum et 
impossihile, in their publique discipline toward offenders. By 
what rule, I asked them, are the faults of men to bee so 
publiquely handled before all the world as to undo them? 
Is not a consistorie better and more. agreeable to the Word of 
God? Is not some due pastorall [collation?] between the 
people and their own watchman (with reference to the Apos- 
tolicall or Evangelicall [bishop ?] in weighty matters,) a great 
dealc better and more consonant to Scripture? Besides, if 
all men among them were admitted to the privileges of the 
Church and Sacraments, in their way, then, I say, if offenses 
must bee so handled, I see not but they must doe nothing else 
almost ; it will be so infinite : and further, what power have 
any ordinarie men (I mean those not of the ministrie) at all to 
[decide ?] either in admission or excommunication ? seeing 
they have not power of b[ind]ing? But Apostles and Evan- 
gelists have [express] ly power of b[ind]ing; to them it was 
therefore committed, consequentially, of admission and ex- 
communication. These and the like discourses we have, but 
few know my full mind in some things of weight whereof 
I do professe I was ignorant and misled in England. You 
may wonder how I am now reformed: Truly, Sir, I was 
forced for my owne satisfaction to studie these things, and 
the Lord giving lesser and great, hath also given a blessing, 
I hope, unto mec. The land certainely is of great consequence ; 
besides the fishing trade furs and other commodityes, there 
are surely rich Mines (as I believe upon credible report, and 
thinks I can prove) ; which if his Majesty [never ?] takes 



278 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

notice of, we hope his wisest counsels will bend to look at us, 
a poor forlorn ignorant people. mercy, mercy, from all the 
powers of mercy in heaven and on earth, to such as sin of 
ignorance!^ Long live England, and England's friends: let 
them prosper that love her. If a man travel from East to 
West, England is a good land : Ireland also. [Great, almost 
incredible are the difficulties of new plantations].- Here are 
it 's true some wise men : they want estates and maintenance, 
and in this way they are never like to get them, I fear. The 
Patent they thinke bears them out to uphold their electorie -^ 
proceedings, though I hearc it be declared voide and sent 
for.^ [It were good, 1 thinke, if his Majesty were so.] ^ — 
The God of Heaven guard his Majesty and his councils, and 
continue to England and the united Kingdomes of our Sov- 
ereigne, and all his dominions, every blessing there and peace. 
If I come over as I hope to do, I shall discourse to you more 
at length. In the mcane while, I commend you and yours to 
God ; not forgetting my best respects unto your beloved ^M? 
Bacon and your neighbours, all whom I love and respect 
heartily, M^ Alexander Jett my s[chool] fellow, and your kins- 
woman his wife ; rests yours assuredly in all love, service and 
thankfulnesse, 

Thomas Lechford. 

John Cogan of Boston merchant makes a letter of Attorney 
to James Love to receive of Richard Foxwell and Ambrose 
Berry ^ what debts & summcs of money they owe him 5. 
28. 1640. [Is. p-i in corne.] 

^ In the margiu Lechford modestly * See Winth., Jour., ii. 12. [T.] 

wroto : "In the number of the igno- ^ These words erased. [T.] 

rant, I liold mysclfe, and Mr Burton, ^ This is part of John Cogan's busi- 

MT Prynne and Doctor Bastoek [Bast- ness with the main coast. More may 

wick], and a multitude more." [T.] be found in regard to Richard Foxwell, 

2 These words were erased. [T.] I presume on this sanie matter, p. 196, 

' A favorite word with Lechford. jnyst. lie was an old inhabitant of lh:it 

** Some electorie ways tend to the over- region, having been at Piseatacjua .is 

throw of Kingdomes," he tells us in early as 1630, and being, as I sui^jiom-, 

Plaine Dcaliwj (3 M. H. C. iii., 121); now settled at Scarborough, where ho 

and again, "Tiiat electorie courses will went in 1636. Ambrose Berry was ol 

not long be safe here, either in Church Saco, but nothing is known of him. 
or Commonwealtli " {Id., p. 100). [T.] 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 279 

[160] The account of Thomas Robinson marriner concerning the 
partnership hetweene him and John S\mnforth ^ ship Car- 
penter intestate deceased in one barhe called the Speedwell 
5. 29. 1640. 

Since they last made even they layd out iu Winter 

last 91 Os. Od. 

For an Anchor 2 5 

For an other Anchor 1 3 6 

For a boate 3 

¥or a niaine bonnet 1 10 

For a barren of tarre -.115 

For a pott & pitch . 12 

For Carpenters wages 1 10 

To Thomas Stanton 1 12 

To My Richard Parker for a foresayle .... 1 3 

To goodman Gilham for a barrel! of tarre ... 1 10 
For ropes & other smale things belonging to the 

barke 1 

Sum 27 6 

Since they last made even they have earned w"' 
the barke 16 

So the losse surmounts the gain 11 6 

The losse being equally to be borne John Swin- 

forths parte to beare thereof is 5 10 3 

He also owes otherwise unto Thomas Robinson 2 7 

Vi,'<^^ added to John Swinforths parte 

of the losse is 7 19 Zd. 

The said barke is sold for .... 401 

Whereof John Swinforths parte is .20 

Out of w-ch deducting the said . . 7 17 3 

There remains in the hands of Tho- 
mas Robinson due to the estate of 
John Svvinforth 121 2s Qd. 

[1-6] 

* James Svrinforth, ship-carpenter, Toicn Record that on one occasion 
like Thomas Robinson, mariner, left no going so far as to make a fire out on 
record by which any of his history may Ids wharf to heat a "pitch-pott " and 
be traced. Goodman Gilham (or Gillam), being detected at the same, he was 
who sold the "tarre," was a ship-car- fined ten shillings, of which he was 
pentcr, who had his shop in the fort made to pay five. But this was seven- 
field on the town cove. That Goodman teen years after the " Speedwell " was 
Gillam, F.enjaminby name, had "tarre" sold to Thomas Witherly to carry Wil- 
is sure enough ; for we may see by the liam Boreman away to Connecticut. 



280 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

An Account for Timothy Hawkins ^ Carpenter made 5. 20. 
1640. [Is.] 

Be it knownc unto all men by these presents that I John 
Coltman ^ late of Newton. Ilarcoatc in the parish of Weston 
in the County of Leicester and now of AVethcrfield upon tlic 
River of Connccticot planter doe hereby make ordeync con- 
stitute and in my place and stead put my Dearely beloved 
Father Thomas Coltman of Xewton Harcoatc aforesaid Black- 
smith my true and lawf all Attorney for me and in my name 
Lawfully to enter into and upon and to grant bargaine and 
sell for such reasonable snmmes of money as He shall thiiike 
meete unto any person or persons all such Lands Tenements 
Free and Coppihold whatsoever and all goods &. Chattells reall 
and personal whatsoever [161] within the Kingdome of Eng- 
land belonging unto me And in defalt of a purchaser or i)ur- 
chasers of the said Lands or tenements for me and in my 
name into and upon the same lawfully to enter & make a 
Lease or Leases unto any person or persons whatsoever for 
any terme or termes not exceeding the terme of seven ycares 
from the date of such Lease or Leases and under such reason- 
able yearely rent or rents Covenants or Conditions as to my 
said Attorney shall seeme meete and so as the same Lease 
and Leases be made in immediate possession and not in 
reversion And the said Tenant & Tenants lawfully to remove 
&, Displace and others to put in their roome from time to 
time as cause shall require And for me and in my name to 
aske demand receive and recover all the moneys accrewing 
and belonging to me by reason of the premises. All rents 
issues and profitts thereof all Debts Dueties and demands due 
unto me from any person or persons whatsoever And the said 
moneys rents issues profitts Debts <fc Duties to returne unto 
mc as by my letters of advise I shall from time to time Direct 

1 This account of Timothy Hawkins - John Coltman, of "Wethcrsfit^ld, was 
may have been one which he presented later a schoolmaster ; but whether in- 
to tlie General Court in regard to a got his learning on this side of tiie 
house with which he had had something water, or studied by the light of bis 
to do (see post, p. 171). He was a father's forge, is not known. 
Watertown man, it seems. 



LECHFORUS MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 281 

and appoint. And to tliat end and purpose for me & in my 
name to commence and prosecute w'^ effect or cause to be 
commenced Sc prosecuted w'^ effect any actions suits or writs 
against any person or persons whatsoever about the premises 
or any of them and to compound & agree upon receipts <fe 
recoverys in that behalfe for me &. in my name acquittances 
or other sufficient Discharges or releases to make scale and 
deliver And I also grant unto my said Attorney that he shall 
or may by any deed or deeds covenant or covenants Ijynd mo 
my heires executors and administrators, to make acknowledge 
levy execute & suffer any further lawful and reasonable acts 
and deeds fines Recoverys or other assurances for the more 
sure making and conveying of the premises or any of them 
unto such purchaser or purchasers of the same as my sayd 
Attorney shall for me & in my name bargaine or agree w*^ for 
and about the premises or any of them and at their costs & 
charges in the law as shall be by the said purchaser or pur- 
chasers or their Counsell learned in the law reasonably 
advised devised or required so as for the doing or suffering 
thereof I be not compelled to travell above ten mylcs from 
Wethersfield aforesd And all and every other matter or thing 
lawful tfe requisite to be done or w'^^ I shall from time to time 
under my hand «fc warrant direct in and about the execution 
of the premises for me and in my name to doe execute and 
performc as fully powerfully ct effectually as I myselfe in my 
proper person might or could doe if I were present Ratifying 
confirming and Allowing all and whatsoever my said Attorney 
shall lawfully doe or cause to be done in the premises or any 
of them In witnesse whereof I have hereunto sett my hand 
k scale the Twenty nyncth day of July in the sixteenth yeare 
of the Raigne of our Soveraigne Lord Charles by the grace 
of God King of England Scotland France and Ireland 
Defender of the faith ic AnnoqT Dmi 1G40. [3—4.] 

Thomas Pinny of Weymouth in N. E. t makes a Le"" of 
Attorney to M^ Richard Garrett ^ of Scituatc in New England 



^ ^Ir. Richard Ganett was town-clerk of "Weymouth, but had formerly been 
of Scituate. EoserAminidown wasnow a Salem man. 



282 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

merchant to re° 22^ of Roger Ammiclowne of AVevmo-jt!, 
aforesaid sbipwriglit. Dat' 31 Julij. 1640. [G^?.] 

Knowe all men by these presents that whereas RidiiMi 
Bulgar of Dover ^ in New England planter for and in co-i- 
sideration of Indian corne planted and growing on two arn s 
or nere thereabouts being the land of one Willm Beard .,f 
Oyster river two breeding sowes whereof one is great w*^ iiiL'L-s 
and seven hundred of pales cloven lying neare the said coni.- 
to the said Eichard Bulgar assigned and bargained bv lut^ 
William Downes late of Dover aforesaid planter did pronii>o 
and undertake that I should in his behalfe receive of and fmni 
MT Valentine Hill of Boston commodities to the value of 
foure pounds and that the said Richard Bulgar would satisfv 
and pay five pounds more unto M^ John Turner for mv 
intended passage into the West Indies. But the said ^H 
Turner hath refused to accept of the satisfaction in the Icticr 
of the said Richard Bulgar dated the 24th of the last momth 
propounded whereby he hath not fullfilled the said bargain*^ 
on his parte and I am disappointed of my voyage aforesaid. 
Now I the said [162] William Downes in Consideration of nyuo 
pounds of lawful money of England to me in hand payd and 
satisfycd by Captaine Richard Morris doe by these presents 
grant bargaine and sell unto the said Captaine Morris the 
said Corne two swine and pales and all the encrease of tlie 
said swine k all my right & title of in & to the premises k 
every parte thereof To have hold and enjoy the said Corne 
swine & pales all & singulare the premises w*** the Ajipur- 

^ This piece of business is clearer sentative later. IHr. John Turner wa.s 

than most of tlie transactions that took a Salem West India merchant; h-'- 

place at Dover or Oyster River. Hichard died at Barl3adoes. "William Beard, ff 

Morris and Richard Bulgar we know Dover, was long after this killed hy t!io 

were both Roxbury men who had left Indians at Durham. Of William Dow !.<!< 

their homes during t!ie Hutchinson con- alone is there no trace; but I sujipos^' 

troversies, and were now at Exeter, or he went down to the West Indies,— p'T- 

perhaps Dover. They must hare known haps to the church at Isle of Provi loii>---- 

each other well, though they may not in the ship in which Cajifciin Wi!li.i!ti 

have transacted business together. Val- Pierce was killed. Such persons alforJ 

entine Hill had continual relations with ample ground for conjecture. 
Dover, from which place he was repre- 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-DOOK. 283 

tenanccs whatsoever unto the said Captaine Eichard Morris 
his executors administrators and assignes And further for 
that end k purpose I hereby make ordeyne & appoint the said 
Captaine Morris my true &, lawful Attorney for me & in my 
name to aske demand receive and recover the premises and 
every parte thereof of and from the said Ricliard Bulgar and 
all manner of persons els whatsoever interupting therewith. 
In witnesse &c. 6. 1. 1G40. [Is.] 

I Captaine Ricliard Morris doe hereby acknowledge that I 
am indebted unto Richard Bulgar the surame of foure pounds 
w*^^ was for goods and commodities of that value received 
by William Downes of Mf Valentino Hill upon the account of 
Edward Calcott by the direction of the said Richard Bulgar 
In witnesse ttc. G. 1. 1040. this was altered & made payable 
to M! Colcord. 

I Captaine Richard Morris doe hereby acknowledge myselfe 
to be indebted unto William Downes the summe of five pounds 
to be payd unto the said Will" his executors admrs or assignes 
upon the fifteenth day of July next ensuing the date hereof 
for ■w'^^ payment I bynd me my heires executors and adm" 
firmely by these presents ko, dat' 6. 1. 1640. [6t?.] 

John Peakes bound by bill to Thomas Robinson for 40' to 
be payd 29. 7. 1640 dat 18. 6. 1640. [4cZ.] 

Matthew Southerland ^ of Newporte in the Island of Rodes 
in new England marriner bound by bill to Thomas Robinson 
for 41 to be payd the 9th of 8'*'^^ 1640. dat' 20. 6. 1640. [6cf.] 

This Indenture made the ffourth day of July in the sixteenth 
yeare of the raigne of our Soveraigne Lord Charles by the 
grace of God of England Scotland France and Ireland King 
<fcc Annoq' Dhi 1640. Betwcene Richard Bellingham of 
Boston in New England of the one parte and Thomas Joy 

1 Of Matthew Southerland Savage to liave been a sort of partner of Eob- 
knows no more than the fact that he iuson. (Seoi>os/, p. 170.) 
existed, and where he lived. lie seems 



284 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

of the same Carpenter of the other parte Witnesscth that the 
said Richard Bellingliam for and in divers good considerations 
him thereunto moving hath demised granted and to fl'armc 
letten And by these presents dotli demise grant and to fuirme 
let unto the said Thomas Joy all those the saw pitts ^ of the 
said llichard Bellingliam and the marsh ground adjoyning 
thereunto lying in Boston aforesaid betweene the hou.ses k 
grounds of John Crabtree &: John Lowe conteyning in leugih 
from tlie Beach there foure rods w"' the appurtenances To 
have and to hold the said sawpitts <fc marsh ground and all 
and singulare tlie premises w*'* the appurtenances whatsoever 
unto the said Thomas Joy his executors adm" & Assignes from 
the day of the date hereof for and during the terme of twenty 
yeares thenceforth next ensuing fully to be compleat Sc eudeil 
Yeilding Sc paying therefore yearely unto the said Richard 
Bellingliam his heires and assignes the summe of five pounds 
[163] of lawful money of England at foure termes of the yearc 
tliat is to say the third day of the first wecke in the moncth 
of October the third day of the first -weeke in the moncth 
of January the third day of the first week in the moncth of 
Aprill <t the third day of the first weeke in the moncth of 
July by equall portions to be payd. Provided allways that 
if the said yearely rent shall be behind & unpayd in parte or 
in all by the space of foureteene days next after any of the 
several! days of payment aforesaid being lawfully demanded 
that then it shall or may be lawfull to and for the said Richard 
Bellingham his heires and assignes into the premises to 
reenter and the same to have againe & enjoy as in his or their 
former estate any thing in these presents to the contrary 
thereof conteyned in any wise notwithstanding. And it is 
Covenanted k agreed betweene the partyes abovesaid tliat 
whatsoever buildings the said Thomas Joy his executors 

^ These sawpits of Richard Belling- Possessions; but John Crabtree's is not 

ham ■were in a marsh belonging to him mentioned anywhere in the volume, 

which lay on the northwest side of the John Lowe was a wheelwright; the other 

Town Cove, (over opposite Deudall's two were caq)enters. Joy moved to 

Dock). The ]dace is between Union Hingham in 1647, and I canuot say 

and Nortli streets, just off Dock Square, what then became of the .sawjiiis. 
John Lowe's lot is noted in the Book of 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. . 285 

administrators or assignes shall build upon the premises 
during the said termc the same shall be valued at the end of 
the said termc of twenty yearcs by two indifferent men to be 
chosen by & betweene the said Richard Bcllingham his heires 
oi- assignes and the said Thomas Joy his executors adminis- 
trators or assignes and being soe valued the said Richard 
Bellingham his heires or assignes shall and will pay and 
satisfie the said Tliom : Joy his executors administrators or 
assignes for the said buildings according to the said value 
thereof soe made as aforesaid In witnesse &c. [3-4] 

This Indenture made the twentieth day of August in the 
sixteenth yearc of the Ruigne of our Soveraigne Lord Charles 
by the grace of God of England Scotland France and Ireland 
King Defender of the Faith &c Annocf Dni 1G40. Cetweene 
Thomas Dexter ^ of Lynne in New England yeoman of the 
one parte and Humfrey ITooke Citizen and Alderman of 
BristoU and Edward Godfrey gent and Hugh Courtney of 
Bristoll aforesaid merchant for and on the bohalfe of the said 
Humfrey Ilookc of the other parte "Witnesseth that whereas 
the said Thomas Dexter standeth indebted and doth owe unto 
the said Humfrey Ilookc the samme of foure hundred & fifty 
pounds of lawful money of England as by one judgment of 
the said Thomas Dexter acknowledged in the Court at Boston 
before the Governor Deputy & Assistants of the Society of 
the Mattachusetts Bay in New England a])peareth the said 
Thomas Dexter in Consideration thereof and for further & 
better security of payment & satisfaccon thereof hath granted 
bargained sold enfeoffed & confirmed and by these presents 
doth grant bargainc sell enfeoffc & confirme unto the said 
Humfrey Ilookc All that ffarme house and ffarme conteyning 
Eight hundred acres of land lying & being within the precincts 
of Lynne afores*^ called &, knowne by the name of Thomas 
Dcxters ffarme w*^ the appurtenances and such Croppes of 

* Tliomns Dexter is not infrequently from an over-jovial temperament and an 

met w-itli in the old authorities. There unrul}' tongue. He was now of Lynn, 

is some little that may be found to and had been since 1630 ; but he sub- 

his discredit in the Colonial Records, — sc(iuently moved to Barnstable, in the 

chiefly such as would naturally result Colony of Plymouth. 



286 LECIIFORD^S MAXUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. . 

Corne as thereto bclongetli and twenty head of Cattell To 
have and to hold the said ffarmc house & ffarmc corne .V- 
cattell and all & singulare the premises w'^ the appnrtenanrrs 
unto the said Humfrey Hookc his heires and assignes for ever 
Provided allways that if the said Thomas Dexter his henv.s 
cxecntors administrators or assignes shall well and truly pay 
or cause to be payd unto the said Humfrey Hooke [164] Ins 
executors administrators or assignes the summe of fhve hun- 
dred pounds of lawfull money of England upon the ffirst day 
of June next ensuing the Date hereof at or in the now dwelling 
house of AVill'" Hudson situate in Boston aforesaid Then this 
present grant bargaine sale feoffement & confirmation shall 
be vovd and of none effect or els it shall be & remame m full 
power strength and vertue And it is agreed betweeno the 
said partycs that if the said mortgage take place through non 
payment'as abovesaid that the overplus coming upon sale of 
the premises beyond the said five hundred pounds and for- 
bearance money after the rate of eleven pounds by the hundred 
for the said fourc hundred & fifty pounds untill such sale made 
•shall be payd unto the said Thomas Dexter his executors 
administrators or assignes In witncssc &c. [3-4] 

Samuel Searle of Quinapeage Planter in the bchalfe of 
Jasper Crane i of the same Agent or Attorney for W. [w-'^J 
Roe Citizen of London Dcmiseth unto Henry Dawson and 
John Search of the sanle one house & house lott & three acie. 
of land-lying in Boston wherein Will- Herricke now dwellclh 
from 20 Sept next for 5 yearcs 4^ 10s. rent halfe yearely, to 
fence to the value of 4^ 10s. to repaire 21. G. 1G40. [os.] 

Thomas Bright ^ of Waterton in N. E. g. mortgageth all 
his house & lands being ten acres lying in the precmcts ot 

iJasrer Crane was after this (in Quinepiac, but were l^^or of Boston 

1650) representative for New Haven. The fonner was — ^^ /« f l^' 

He was now one of the assistants of New Hudson the younger -d h d he c^ 

Haven Colony, and ten years after was of his concerns wd,en Hu.h^n J- 

assistant in Connecticut for three years, engaged an the Cml ^^ ar in n, nd 
This nuy be found in Savage, who says ^ Thomas Bright was son.c^nU^ 

nothin/at all about Samuel Searle. v<^^^^^?^ to Henry Bnght, sur^cyorol 

Dawson and Search are here called of arras at Watertown. 



LECIIFORUS MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 287 

Waterton aforesaid w'** he purchased of Eobert Feke gent 
\,-^^ the appurtenances together also w^^ the Croppes of Cornc 
growing upon the same unto Will™ Raynhorowe of Charleston 
in N. E. m. for 1201 to be payd 6 Marcii px dat 24 Aug : 1640. 
[2-6 pd in shott 10^ barrell i all 9. 30. 1040. 2d. ^ 1 so I had 
GtZ. shot above ye 2s. (jd.^ 

An assignment of Richard Pymies Debt due from Allen 
Yewe to Robert Turner 24, Aug. 1640. [4t7.] 

Sir — 

Here is a good land, and yeilding many good commodities, 
especially fish, and furs cornc and other richer things, if well 
followed, and if that popular elections destroy us not. It is 
a good Land, I say, that instructs us to repentance, Avhen we 
consider what a good Land we came from, what good lawes 
and government we have left, to make experiments of govern- 
ing ourselves here by wayes, wherein (like young Pliysitians) 
of necessity we must hurt and spoile one another a great while, 
before we come to such a setled Commonwealth, or church 
government as is in England. 

I thank God, now I understand by experience, that there 
is no such government for English men or any nation as a 
Monarchy ; nor for Christians, as by a lawfull Ministeric, 
under godly Diocesan Bishops, deducing their station and 
calling from Christ and his Apostles, in descent or succession ; 
a thing -of greater consequence than ceremonies (would to 
God I had known it sooner) which while I have in my place 
stood for here these two years, and not agreeing to this new 
discipline, impossible to be executed, or long continued, what 
I have suffered, many here can tell ; I am kept from the 
Sacrament, and all places of preferment in the Common- 
wealth, and forced to get my living by writing petty things, 
which scarce finds me bread ; and therefore sometimes I took 
to planting of corne, but have not yet here an house of my 
owne to put my head in or any stock going: whereupon I was 
determined to come back into Ireland, but by the over-entreaty 
of my wife and some other friends, I here think to stay a 



288 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCrdPT NOTE-BOOK. 

while longer, hoping that the Lord will shortly give a l'ow.j 
issue to things both in our native country, and Scotland, aii'l 
here, as well as in all other his Majesties dominions. 1 u.ts 
very glad to sec My Lord Bishop of Exeters Book of E|.:.- 
copacie by divine right; it gave me much satisfaction. If 
the people may make ministers, or any ministers make otli. is 
without an apostolicall Bishop, what confusion will \\nvr 
be? If the whole Church, or every congregation, as oiu- 
good men think, have the power of the keyes, how many 
Bishops then shall we have ? If every Parish or congregation 
be so free and independent, as they terme it, what unity can 
we expect ? 

Glad also was I to see Master Balls Book of the tryall of 
the grounds of separation, both which are newly come over, 
and I hope will work much good among us here ? 

And whereas I was sometimes misled by those of opinion 
that Bishops, and Presbyters, & all Ministers are of the sani- 
authority ; when I came to consider the necessary propagarinn 
of the truth, and government of the Church by experimental! 
footsteps here I quickly saw my error; For besides, if th>' 
congregations be not united under one Diocesan in fit coni- 
passe, they are in a confusion, not withstanding all their 
classicall pretendments, how can the Gospel be propagati-i 
to the Indians without an apostolical Bishop ? If any Church. 
or people, by the Kings leave send forth Ministers to tea''li 
and instruct the poore Indians in the Christian Religion, thry 
must have at least Apostolicall power to ordain Ministers or 
Elders in every congregation among them; and when thty 
have so done, they liave power of Visitation where they plant — 
Nor can they without just cause be thrust out from government 
without great impiety; and where they have planted, that i-^ 
their line or Pioccse. Thus I came to see that of necessity 
a Diocese and Bishop Diocesan, is very neere, if not altogetlit^'r 
of Divine authority. 

[165] I am also of opinion, that it were good for our Mim.- 
ters to learn how to doe this work from some of our revcn-nd 
Bishops in England, for I feare our Ministers know not li<'\^' 
to goe about it — whether must not some Ministers learne 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. . 289 

their language ? It is a copious language, as I am informed, 
and they have as many words to express one thing as wg 
have. And when they teach Indians to pray, will they not 
teach them hya forme? And how can Gods worship be 
maintained among ignorant persons without a forme ? I am 
firm of opinion that the best of us have been much beholding 
to the word read, and formes of prayer. 

From Boston in X. E. 
Julii 28, 1G40. 

Thomas Taylor bound to Thomas Miller^ in 42s. to be 
payd to his wife Isabell Miller 24 Aug. 1G40. & a letter to 
her. [8tZ.] 

Eichard Betscombe ^ of Hingham in Ncav England late of 
Bridi)ortc in the County of Dorset haberdasher in behalfe of 
Mary & Martha his Daughters makes a letter of Attorney 
to Andrew Robert & Christofer his brothers to receive two 
Legacyes of 50* a pccce given by Philip Strong late of the 
devizes in the County of Wiltcs gent Deceased to the said 
Mary & Martha of Philip Strong Brewer his Sonne & exec- 
utor 6. 25. 1G40. [Is.] 

Me Ricum TValdern ^ de Dorobern in Nova Anglia planta- 
tore tener' etc Edv Payne Naute in 801 dat 24° Aug 1640 
Condiconed to pay 401 or the value in merchantable commodi- 
ties according to the rates of the Country upon the first day 
of Janu-ary next at or in the now dwelling house of the said 
Richard. [1-s.] 

1 Thomas ^Miller was one of tlie early Kew England. After 1645 he is con- 
settlers of Middk'tov-n, Conn. His wife, stantly heard of in the Colonial Records 
Isahell, died in ItJGG. in connection with atfairs at Dover, 

2 Pdchard Bctscombe was of Hingham for which he was many times deputy up 
1635, freeman 1G37. There is no men- to 1679. Pie then became a man of 
tion found of the three brothers, who, I great prominence in the newly consti- 
conclude, stayed on their side tho ocean, tuted Xew Hampshire, but was killed 

' rJchard Waldern, of Dover, e.xccpt by Indians in 17S9. Edward Payno 
for this and one other entry, is not was of Lynn in 163S, and tlie next year 
mentioned before 1645. Tradition, of Charlcstown, but is found of Dover 
however, says that he came in 1635, in 1643. He went to England in 1649. 
returned to England, and came again to 

19 



290 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Thomas 3Iil]ardiof Cape An in New England frislirriu-a 
aged 40. svrorne saith that before the ship ]\rary rose v...-, 
blown up He was intrcated by M! John Olliver of XcwIk-i) v 
to goe w'** a shallop to the said ship & this deponent ac-(_-<M.l- 
ingly went in his shallop w*^ the said John Olliver to the s;ini" 
sliipp & there demanded and was very earnest for a paeke cf 
goods to be delivered him but some of the shipes Comjiany 
answered they would not deliver it because Ml Danuet \v;is 
not aboard. 

Knowe all men by these presents that "Whereas John Jordtn 
Citizen & grocer of London by his Letter of Attorney boariiiu' 
date 21 ]\Iaii IG Car" hath given full power and Authority 
unto us Willm Waldern- and Richard "Waldcrn of Pascatta- 
way in New England or either of us to agree compound ainl 
receive all such debts and sumraes of money as Samuel CnIc' 
of Boston in New England standeth ingaged for himself c unlr 
tlie said John Jordcn and for & upon one bond of the prin;iii 
Summe of 2001 bearing date the 13th day of June in the 4; It 
yeare of the raigne of said our Soveraignc Lord King Charl's 
w'^ and for the debt of John Tongue late of Boston in the 
County of Lincolne deceased made unto tlie said John Joid'n 
as in and by the said Letter of Attorney more at large it di.th 
and may appearc Now Knowe yec that wo the said William 
Waldern & Richard Waldern have by vertuc of our said 

^ Thomas Millard, of Gloucester, was dall and furtlier notice of Jlr. P.;:;- 

after this selectman. He moved a year net, of whom we can hope to l<.>i:! 

or two afterwards to Xewhury, and died little beyond the fact that he was a 

in Boston in 1659. John Oliver, of "prophane scoffer." 
Newbury, is called "younger brother, ^ William Waldern was the t-Li' r 

or perhaps nephew, of elder Thomas brother of Richard, in all jirobability. 

Oliver." At any rate he came over from and had very much the same jio^itii':! 

England with him in IC'32 and lived in and influence at Dover. He wasdiouin ■! 

Boston until 163S, when, having been in 1646, being only about forty-live y.. its 

disarmed in 1()37, and rejected as a of age. 

representative by the House for being ^ Samuel Cole was an early Costoiii..n 

a supporter of Wheelwright, he moved (1630), and opened in 1633 the la-', 

to Newbury, where he died in 1642. house of entertainment, though U'<i 

In regard to this pack of goods so probably on the same spot v.ln le li-' 

earnestly demanded, see p. 167, posf, house was later, — out in the ^lilH i> • •• 

■where is a deposition of Edward Ben- by Gallui>'s Point. 



L ^UD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 291 

Authority and in full discharge of the premises received of 
and from the said Samuel Cole to the use of the abovesaid 
John Jorden three Cowes and one Cowe calfe and one bond 
of 40 pounds bearing date the 24th day of this instant moneth 
of August conditioned for the payment of 20 pounds unto the 
said John Jorden his executors administrators or assignes 
upon the [Wa^/j] day of August w*^^ shall be in yeare of our 
Lord 1643 w'^ this agreement that if ten pounds be payd to 
the said John Jorden y^"^ the said Samuel Cole directed to be 
payd by Nicholas Trerise ^ or some passenger that went in his 
shippe tliat the same shall be accounted as in parte of dis- 
charge of the said forty pounds We therefore the said Wil- 
liam Waldern and Richard Walderne doe hereby for and in 
the name of the said John Jorden [166] remise release and 
forever quittclayme unto the said Samuel Cole his heires &c. 
all and all manner of actions suits debts bonds bills reckon- 
ings accounts & demands whatsoever that the said John 
Jorden his executors or adm" hath or may have against the 
said Samuel Cole his heires executors or administrators for 
or by reason of any matter or cause whatsoever from the 
beginning of the world unto this present day In Witnesse 
&c. 18. Aug:lG40. [2s.] 

Me Samucle Cole de Boston in Nova Anglia, plantator tener' 
<fcc Johi Jorden Civi et grocer London in 401 dat 24 Aug. 1640. 
Condiconed for the pay™' of 20i 24 Aug: 1643. at W^ Hudsons 
house in Boston. [Is.] 

Me Samuelem Cole do Boston in Nova Anglia plantator 
tener' &c Johi Jorden in 601 dat 24 Aug 1640." Condiconed 
for the quiet enjoy""' of 3 Cowes and one cowe calfe. [Is.] 

Isaacke Sterne ^ of Waterton in New England planter 
sometimes of Stoke Nayland in the County of Suffolke tayler 

^ Nicholas Trerise, it may be remem- 2 Isaac Steams came, according to 

bered, was master of the " Planter" (see Savage, from Neyland, in Sussex. He 

ante, p. 137). But what the voyage was in the fleet with Sir Eichard Salton- 

referred to was, is hardly matter for con- stall in 1630. 
jecture even. 



292 LECIIFOUD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

and Mary liis "wife dauglitcr of John Barker late of Stoke 
Nayland aforesaid clothier deceased makes a letter of Attor- 
ney to Thomas Gilson of Sudbury in the said County of 
Suffolk baker to receive <t recover of Sc from [bluuk] Munnincs 
of Gaynes Colne in the County of Essex yeoman the summc 
of five pounds of lawfull money of England due unto her bv 
some bond covenant or agreement made by the said [hhui^ 
Munnings before or upon his marriage w*^ Margaret Barker 
mother of the said ]Mary. 

I Thomas Dudley Esq' Governor of the Jurisdicon of the 
Mattachusetts Bay in New England doe hereby Certify all 
manner of persons Avhomc it may concerne that these presents 
are the act k deed of tlic aljovesayd Isacke & Mary In testi- 
mony whereof I liave at their request caused the Common 
scale of our Colony to be hereunto affixed the day & yeare 
abovesaid. [I3. Qd.'] 

The Susann and Ellen of London 240 tunncs Robert Clay 
Master 30 mai/e. 

^ Omnibus Christi fi deli bus ad quos praesentes Letteres 
testimoniales pracveirlcnt i)raecipueque quibuscumque Guber- 
natoribus ct magistratibus Authoritatem vel jurisdicconem 
quamcumque habentibus Thomas Dudley Armiger Gubcrnator 
de Mattachusetts in Nova Anglia infra Jurisdicconem Regis 
Anglia salutcm c^-c Scitis quod l)ona navis vocata Susanna ct 
Ellen de- London oneris 240 dolior vel circitcr nunc in portu 
nostro de Boston existcns et inde solute parata Eius Naucteriis 

1 "Thomas Dudley, Esquire, Gov- or master, Robert Clay, and the other 

ernor of 3Iassachiisetts in New Enghind men of the same ship, to the number of 

under the jurisdiction of the King of Eug- thirty, and the inhabitants of the said 

land, to all the foithful of Christ, and Boston and also of those regions lying 

especially to any governors and niagis- round about it, are in good health, Aviih 

trates and any persons whatsoever hold- no pest or infection, being free from any 

ing any authority to whom these pre- ill, weakness, or disease. In testimony 

sents may come, greeting : Know ye that whereof I have fixed to these presents 

the good ship called 'Susan and Ellen' the public seal of this Colon}-, on the 

of London, of 240 tons burden or there- twenty-sixth day of August in the year 

abouts, being now in our port of Boston of our Lord one thousand six hundred 

and preparing to sail thence, the sailor and forty." 



Errata - p. 293, note 3:- 

John Bent did not retiirn to England. 

— cf. Banks' Planters of the 
Commonwealth, 1930, p. 195, 
201-2. 
N.E.H.G.R. xxxii, 407-11. 



LECIIFORD'S MAXUSCRTPT NOTE-BOOK. 203 

sive magistcr Robertus Clay et alii eiusdcm navis Homines ad 
numera trigenta ct inlialjitantes dc Boston praedicta et eos ^ 
loci circum jaccntcs sunt in [167] bona salubritate absque uUa 
peste vol pcstilcntia et ab omnia alio morbo vcl pestifero vel 
mortali immunes In cuius rei testimonium Sigillum publi- 
cum luiius Coloniae pracsentibus apponi feri vicesimo scxt die 
Attensis Augusti Anno Dni millcsimo sexcentesimo et quad- 
ragesimo. [Is. 6(Z.] 

Daniel Paul - of Boston in N E late of Ips^vich in the 
County of Suff marrincr makes a letter of Attorney to John 
Cole of Ipswich Shippwright to sell all his Lands tenements 
goods <t chattells & the money to deliver to Elizabeth his 
wife. [2s. 6cZ.] 

John Bent 3 of Sudbury in New England late of Waybill 
in the County of Southampton husbandman makes a letter 
of Attorney unto his brother in law Will™ Baker of New 
Sarum in the County of Wiltes Plummer to receive & recover 
of and from Will"* Cole of Waybill aforesaid husbandman 
the summe of twenty pounds of lawfull money of England w*=^ 
he owes him by bond now in the hands of my savd Attornev. 
[Is. 6ti] 

Nos Bic""' Parker in et Nic"™ Parker g de B in N. ten &c 
Hen^ Symonds^ merch* in 1601 dat' 27 Aug: 16 JO. Con- 
diconcd to pay 87.10 & after 10 in C at 6 moneths & 3 dayes 
91t 17^ 6-^ at [Is. r in corn :] 

1 This word I take to be eos, or eis, age), but returned to England to bring 

intended by Lechford to agree with loci. more. 

There are many corrections in the Latin * Henry Symonds had a house and 

of this entry, but in this case the cor- lot just south of Mr. Bellingham's 

rection is far more ungramraitical than marsh (wlierein were the sawpits It-t to 

was the first draft. Thomas Joy). He also was of tlie Coin- 

- Daniel Paul is heard in of 1643 at pany to whom was granted tlie marsh 

New Haven, and later at Kitter}'. towards Charlestown to improve {Boston 

^ Joliu Bent had just come over to Toini Ilccords, i. 74). This was in 

New England to stay permanently. He 1643, however. At the time of the above 

had come in 163S with a wife and five agreement, and later, he was of Lynn, 

children (all under twelve years of (See p. 202, post). 



294 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. " 

Nos Nic'^"' Parker & Ric"'" Parker &g ten Hen' Srmonds 
mcrcli* in 2301 dat' iit supra Condiconed to pay 115i & after 
101 in C. at 6 moneths. [Is.] 

A letter of Attorney for Anne Coleman & Samuel Hosier 
for the 51 afore Aug 8. 1039. at 27 Aug 1640. [Is.'] 

William Talmage of Boston in N E. Carpenter Thomas 
Talmage Eobert Talmage ^ and Richard Walker husband of 
Jane Talmage deceased sonnes and daughter of Thomas Tal- 
mage brother of John Talmage of Xewton Stacej in the 
County of South'°" husbandman deceased make a Le' of Attor- 
ney to Richard Canying and William Dowlyng Overseers of 
the will of the said John Talmage deceased to receive of the 
Executors k adm""^ of the Last will & testament of Symon 
Talmage our brother and of John Talmage aforesaid the 
summes of money due unto us by the will of the said John 
Talmage. & a Certificat under the pub :' seale. [3s.] 

A Bill of Lading for Mf John Johnson. [6s. M.] 

Will™ Longley ^ of Lynne in Xew England sonne <fc heire ot 
John Longley late of Frisby in the County of Lincolne Gierke 
• deceased makes a letter of Attorney to Tho : Meeke of Wayn- 
flete St ;Mary in the County of Lincolne aforesaid gent to sell 
all lands & tenements descended to him from his said father 
in Frisby aforesaid and Steeping or els where in the said 
County in the meane while to receive the rent & to receive all 
goods <fc legacys & childs parte due unto him. [3s.] 

1 William, Thomas, and Eobert Tal- one of the three brothers who lived in 
mage are all mentioned in Savage, who Boston, had a house on Boylston Street, 
does not say that they were brothers, tlie north side, near Wasliington Street. 
though he suspects the relationship of 2 William Longley, of Lynn, has been 
Thomas and William. William was of a puzzling man to the antiquarians, and 
Boston 1630, Thomas of Boston 1634, this entry does not help in clearing mat- 
but now of Lynn, and Hobeit was later ters. He is called son of Kichard by 
of New Haven. Of their brother-in-law, Savage, who feels rather confused about 
Walker, I find nothing very satisfactory, him. It may be that there were two 
There is another reference to these four, men of the same name. William Lang- 
p. 175, ^05^ William Talmage, the only ley, of Lynn, adds to the confusion. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 295 

Edward Bcndall of Boston in New England aged about 
[Wan/t] yearcs sworne saith upon his oath that upon the very 
day the Ship Mary Rose was blowne up in Charles river ^ 
this deponent in the hehalfe of Mf John Olliver of Newberry 
in New England Avas going aboard the said shipp in the morn- 
ing before the same was blowne up .[168] to demand & take 
order to fetch away a certaine packe of goods sent in the said 
ship to the said John OUivcr and by the way this deponent 
met w'^ Mr Dannet one of the merchants of tlie said shippe 
coming ashore and told him this deponents errand whereupon 
Mr Dannet sayd that if he had knowne this deponent was to 
have received it he should have had it before that tyme and 
therefore at that time bad this deponent trouble himselfe no 
further about it the said MF Dannet promising that he would 
at high water or the next tyde send the said packe ashore to 
this deponent in the long boate of the said ship. [Is.] 

Robert Gamlyn ^ of Roxbury in New England planter and 
Elizabeth his wife gardians & tutors of John Mayo an infant 
of the age of eleven yeares or thereabout Sonne & hcire of 
Thomas Mayo late husband of the said Elizabeth and sonne 
of John jNIayo late of Towne ]\Iarroling in the County of Kent 
hosier and Rebecca his wife and Mary Mayo of Dorchester in 
New England aforesaid spinster daughter of the said John 

1 The following may interest the let fall in the same into the water" 

reader who does not care to consult {JFinth., i'l. 11). 

■\Vinthiop'(vol. ii. pp. 11, 72) and John- 2 Robert Gamlyn, of Roxbury, may 

son (vol. iii. p. ix, B) : " Within two he found in Savage. There were two of 

hours after this (being about dinner- the name, who came wi.th Elder Thomas 

time) the powder took fire (no man "Weld in 1632. Tlie elder one lived at 

knows how), and blew all up ; viz., Concord the greater part of his life, hut 

the captain and nine or ten of his the other, called "junior " (by which 

men, and some four or five strangers, it may be supposed he was son of the 

There was a special providence that former), remained at Eoxbury. He liad 

there were no more ; for many principal brought his wife Mary and her son, here 

men were going aboard at that ■ time, mentioned, from England with him. 

and some were in a boat near the ship, John !»Iayo is noted in Savagf' as having 

and others were diverted by a sudden been brouglit as a young ohihl by his 

shower of rain, and otliers by other stepfather to New England. To ^l^huy 

occasions. There was one man sived. Mayo, the aunt of John here mentioned, 

being carried up in the scuttle, and so I find no reference. 



296 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Majo & Rebecca make a letter of attorney imto tlieir beloved 
fj-ieiid &, Brotlier in Law Steven England of Sandwich in tin- 
County of Kent taylcr & Francis his wife our Sister our true 
k lawfull Attorneys to receive their parte of the rent of a 
certaine mesuage or tenement <fc orchard situate in towne 
Marroling aforesaid now or late in the tenure or occupation 
of Thomas Martyn. & to sell the same &c. [2s.] 

The good ship called tlie Charles ^ of Bristoll burden 300 
tunnes master Will™ Elliott and 44 men. [Is. GtZ.] 

John Prior 2 of Scituate in New England and Daniell Prior 
of the same Sonnes of Thomas Prior late of Watford in the 
County of Hertford Malster deceased make a Letter of At- 
torney unto Ralfo King of Watford aforesaid wollendraper 
and Launcellott Welles of the same wheeler to sell One messu- 
age or tenement and orchard w^^ the Appurtenances in Wat- 
ford aforesaid now or late in the occupation of Roger Brewer 
& all their interest therein 28. 6. 1640. [2s. Qd.'] 

Abraham Harding ^ of Boston in New England sonne of 
John Harding late of Boram in the County of Essex husband- 

1 I cannot say with wliat purpose ^ Savage says that John and Daniel 
Lechford inserts this mention of the good Prior came from London in the *' Hope- 
ship "Charles," of Bristol. There is well" at the respective ages of fifteen 
mention of the vessel in Winthrop (vol. and thirteen. This was late in 1635. They 
ii. pj\ 22, 44), Avho says tliat altliough were both of Scituate, and later moved 
the master was a plain, quiet man, tlie to Duxbury. 

crew were very wicked. Indeed it is ^ Abraham Harding, Savage calls an 

on account of this wicked crew tliat the early settler at Dedham, and says "per- 

*' Charles" finds its way into history, haps lived first at Braintree." Biaintree 

For these forty-four men wei-e such was at this time pait of Boston; but 

contemners of the Lord's Day that vari- it is prol'able that if Harding lived at 

ous judgments befell them, which may Dedham at all, it was before the date of 

be observed by the curious reader in tlie this entry in the Note-look, for the 

Journal as above indicated. Winthrop early settlers of Dedham had begun 

in one jilace says the ship was of four their town and dug their canal from the 

hundred tons burden, and that it came Charles to the Xeponset before this 

from Dartmouth. I hesitate to assert time. He may have moved to Dedham 

thatthis vessel was the same which came afterwards. "Boram in the county of 

in the fleet with the" Arbella," and was Essex" may be found by looking lor 

set on by Dunkirkers on its return. Boreham. 



LECIIFORD'S MAXUSCTdPT NOTE-BOOK. 297 

man deceased makes a letter of Attorney to Gyles Barro 
Cittizen & Wollendraper of London dwelling at the signe of 
the Plough in Watling streete to receive k recover of k from 
Agnes Greene of Tarling in the County of Essex widdow 
executrix of the last will k testament of the said John Hard- 
ing sometimes her husband the snmnie of 77^ of lawfull money 
of England the remainder of 80t legacy given him by his said 
ffathers will 28. 6. 16-iO. [2s. Qd. a letter 6cZ.] ' 

^ Knowe all men by these presents that I Anne Floyd wife 
of John Floyd Citizen and haberdasher of London for and on 
the bchalfe of my sayd Husband and by his authority doc 
hereby make ordaine and in my place and stead and in the 
place k stead of my sayd husband put my wellbcloved and 
Cliristian ffriends Will™ Colbron - one of the deacons of the 
Church of Boston in N E and John Button of the same 
Church our true and lawfull attorneys and deputyes ioyntly 
or severally for us k in our names or the name of either of us 
to take the Care k tuition of Thomas Floyd " our Sonne now 

1 This entr}' may throw light on a as here stated, and, like most of their 

very unimportant point which I find brothers in that church, had decided 

unsettled in Savage, — as to one of the leanings towards the heretical doctrines 

name of F oyd who was in 1650 treas- of Mrs. Hutchinson. John Button was 

urer of the Society for Propagating the disarmed; but being held in some honor 

Gospel. Deane says that John Floyd by his townsmen, was in the course of 

of Scituate and Boston was the man, a year or two elected constable. He was 

and Hutchinson supposes Richard Floyd a miller by trade, and had been even 

to be the treasurer of that corporation, while in Old England, where he was 

Savage himself says that "on turning born in 1594. He set up his mill on 

to Scobell's Acts of that Parliament, Copps' Hill, Avhich, it may be, was called 

we find the family name of the member ]\liU Field after it. He lived near b}-, 

of that corporation was Lloyd, and not and was always a member of the com- 

Floyd,;" and adds, "we may be sure mittees appointeil to oversee the fences 

the treasurer must have been a London or highways in the ilill Field. He gave 

merchant." It may be that the here- up the mill to John Jlylain, as I think, 

mentioned John Floyd, citizen and in 1643. (See Boston Town Records, 

haberdasher of London was the person p. 76, and Sitff. Dcecb, li. f. 307.) He 

iu question, and that his name was continued to live in the Mill Field, 

Floyd, Savage and Scobell to the con- however, and was at times surveyor 

trary notwithstanding. of highways. He died in 16S1. 

3 "William Colbron and John Button » It is hard to think that all this care 

were members of the Boston church, and tuition should not have educated 



298 LEC II FORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

remavning ^^■^'^ Arthur [169] Howlaiid of Duxbury in Xl-w 
England Planter and to send for and take our said sonnc int(j 
their or one of their Custody & twenty foure pounds k ei-lit 
pence to aske demand recover & receive of the said xVrtluu- 
Howland ^ ^\^^' he hath in his hands for the maintenance of 
our sayd sonne while he remained w*^ him the said Arthur 
Howland according to the notes and bills and schedule hcre- 
mito annexed And our sayd sonnc w^^ the said moneys to 
maintainc educate and bring up according as I or my sayd 
husband shall from time to time by our letters direct and in 
the meanewhilc according to their owne discretion And so 
to keepc our sayd sonne and stocke aforesaid till I or my said 
husband otherwise dispose I or my sayd husband paying for 
our sayd sonncs schooling k cloathing besydcs And further 
for me and my said husband & in our names or the name of 
one of us and to the use of my said husband to aslce demand 
recover and receive of & from the sevcrall persons hereafter 
named in the said schedule the severall debts goods k chat- 
tells or their value in money thereinafter expressed to witt in 
the said schedule (that is to say of and from Samuel Grymes 2 
of Boston afores"* pcwterer six pounds of k from {hlank'] 
Hurst of Cambridge tayler thirty eight shillings k ten pence 
of and from :Mr [hhnk'] Freeman of Sandwich seven shillings 
of k from [Wa«/l] Hawkins of Rode Island three pounds of 
k from Phillip Tayler of Accamackc in Virginia fourteenc 
pounds k ten shillings And 1 leave in the hands of my said 
attorney John Button thirteenc pounds k ten shillings w^^ he 

Thomas Floyd to be such a man as spelled. He may have been the old man 

might have claimed a place in Savage's who was dead, according to a pop- 

Dktionary. I find no such name as ular song, and who was in the habit 

Thomas, however, at Floyd, or Loyd while in life of wearing a long gray 

either. coat, which he buttoned down before, 

1 No other mention of Arthur How- instead of buttoning it up, as is custom- 
land is found earlier than 1643, and scant ary. As for Hurst, I find a Goodman 
notice enough after that date. In 16G9 Hurst, who, like tlie man in ([uestion 
it is known that he was aged and poor; here, seems, says Savage, not to have 
but how aged or how poor I find stated enjoyed a Christian name. William 
nowhere. Hawkins, of Providence, freeman 1C55, 

2 Not much can be said of Samuel may have been the "Rode Island" man 
Grymes, or Graemes, as it is sometimes spoken of. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 299 

oweth me One sow & piggs o^ and one ITlocke bedd & bolster 
and a pairc of Curtaines A: valcns of the value of fifty shillings 
one wigge of the value of twenty foure shillings and a payre 
of andirons tongues fyre shovel & forke topped w*^ brasse of 
the value of tennc shillings one brasse pott and hookes and 
hangers of the value of fifteen shillings and one preserving 
pan of brasse tinned of the value of nyne shillings one frize 
Coate for a woman of the value of thirty shillings and one 
head peece of the value of two shillings) and for us and in 
our names or one of our names to sue arrest attach impleade 
prosecute & recover And upon receipts in that behalfe suf- 
ficient & legall acquittances & releases to make scale & de- 
liver And one Attorney or more under them for execution 
of the premises to substitute and revoke. And all other 
matters & things acts & deeds requisite in and about the 
premises to doc execute & performe for me & my sayd hus- 
band in our or one of our names as fully effectually & power- 
fully as I or my said husband might or could doe if we were 
present Ratifying allowing & confirming all and whatsoever 
our sayd Attorneys or either of them shall lawfully doe in the 
premises. In witncsse <fcc 28. 6. 1G40. [Draught Is. 8d. 
The two Coppics 3s. Od. The schedule Is. 8d. The bills of 
lading Is. Od. — 7s. 4tZ.] 

In the hands of Arthur Ilowland 

In goods delivered by him to Christofer Wads- 

•worth^ 7i 5s. 

In goods that were received of me ... 16 1 

In other goods 10 6d 

A palre of shooes 2 8 

Received of goodraan Wasborne for me , . 14 

[he received of John Willis ^ for me 71 8' — 20+8. whereof 
40* put to Christofer Wadsworth] 

1 Christopher "Wadsworth was one of 2 John T\'illis was at this time of 

the earliest settlers at Duxbury, and Duxbury, but afterwards was one of 

one of the most respectable and honor- those who settled Bridgewater. He was 

able of its inhabitants. He served the often representative from the latter 

town as constable, and later as select- town. 
man and deputy to the General Court. 



300 LECIIFORD'S MAXUSCRIPT NOTE-DOOK. 

[170] Tliomas Odingscllc ^ charges a bill of 401 upon John 
Odingselle Esq"" of Epjjerston in the County of Nottingham to 
be payd to Mr Maurice Gittins Cittizcn k AVollcndrapcr of 
London at the signc of the bell in Watling streate. upon 20 
dayes sight for so much received of AYill™ Pester of Salem 
in Nev,' England mcrcei-. [Is.] 

Salem ix N. E. 2S° August IGiO. 
So may it please you upon 20 dayes after sight of this my 
first bill of exchange my second & third not being payd to 
-pay unto Mr Maurice Gittins Cittizen & Wollcndraper of Lon- 
don dwelling at the signc of the Bell in Watling streetc or his 
assignes the summc of forty pounds starhng v;"^ is for so 
much heere received of Captaine Edward Gibones of Boston 
aforesayd I beseech you make good payment <t place it to 
account as by advise. 

Yo'^ obedient Sonne 

Thomas Odingselle. 

To the W01-" my deare & loving father Jonx Odingselle of Epperston 
in the County of Xottinghani Esq' or to my loving Brother ^l'. Joiix 
Odingselle at M: Mansfields at the seven starres on Ludgate hill. 

Nos Thomam Odingselle de Salem in Nova Anglia gen ct 
Will°^ Pester de cadem mercer tener' (tc Cai»itando Edvo 
Gibones bound to him to pay all dammages if the bills be 

not satisfied. [Qd.'] 

« 

Salem ix Xew Exglakd. 
So may it please you upon 20 dayes after sight of this my 
first ex to pay unto Mr Maurice «tc forty pounds starling ko. 
rec of the same ko.. 

Yo"" Dutifid nephew 

Will" Pester. 

To the wor" my deare uncle Will" Pester Esq' at Barnards Castle my 
Lord Chamberlaynes house in Thames streete London. [l.<.] 

1 We may hope that John Oding- than his son has been by tlie present 
selle was to be found more easily by writer. Xo such name is to be found in 
the bearers of these bills of e.\change Savaf^e. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 301 

James Forrctt^ of Long Island in New England Esq' 
makes a deed of gift unto Thomas Pvolnnson and Mattlicw 
Southerland of one Boate or smalc shallop of burden foure 
tunncs or thereabouts w*^ maine sayle anchor Cable all new 
and a Compass w*^» oarcs and the appurtenances in payment 
of twelve parts of 51 greater debt owing by him unto them. 
29. 6. 1640. [2.S.] 

Ralfe Sprague - of Charlestowne in New England & Joane 
his wife make° their letter of attorney unto John Holland of 
Tinckleton in the County of Dorset ffullcr to receive of John 
Cox of Bowlington and Elizabeth his wife Executors of 
Richard Warren deceased 7l W^"^ was given by his will to the 
said Joane and her children John Jonathan Richard Samuel 
Mary and Phineas or any other summe due unto them *tc. 
[1..] 

[171] Know all men by these presents that I Joseph Cooke ^ 
of Cambridge in New England gent Second Sonne of Thomas 
Cooke late of great Yealdham in the County of Essex gent 
deceased doe hereby remise release and absolutely for me & 
my heires quitt Clayme unto my Brother Thomas Cooke of 
Wormingford in the said County of Essex gent All the right 
title and'^Clayme that I had have or any wayes hereafter may 
have of and in One* Customary Tenement in Brysett magna 
called Brysett Kell in the County of Suffolk w'^ all the Cus- 
tomary and Lease Lands thereunto belonging In witnesse 
whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and scale the last 
day of August in the Sixteenth yeare of the raigne of our 

1 James Forret of Long Island was sons John and Richard. He was of that 

the agent of the Eavl of Stirling for his part of the Boston church which were 

patent of Long Island. He was in dismissed to form the church at Charles- 

Boston about this time the next year, town. His children ^lary, riiineas, and 

but probably only temporarily. (See Jonathan were born in Xew England. 

ante, p. 66). Samuel was married in 1655, but I cannot 

2'Ralfe Sprague came to New Eng- say where lie was born. Joan Si-rague 

land in 1029 (according to Savage, was, it may be remembered, the daughter 

whom I see no reason to doubt, though of Richard Warren, here mentioned, 
there is in this case some question). 3 Of Joseph Cooke the reader may 

He brought with him his wife and his remember something at p. 135, ante. 



302 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Soveraigne Lord Charles by the grace of God of England 
Scotland France and Ireland King Defender of the Faith 
&c. Annoq' Dili. 1G40. [2s. OfZ.] 

His Letter of Attorney to his said Brother for the ffreehold 
lands as afore. Dat' ult 6. 1640. [3s. OfZ.] 

Will"^ Rix 1 of Boston in New England Planter one of the 
sonnes of Kohert Rix of Kenninghall in the County of Nor- 
folke grocer deceased gives and grants unto his Sister Ehza- 
beth Waters of Kcnningliall aforesaid widdow All his lands 
tenements goods & Chattels in Wortham in the County of 
Suffolke or els where due unto him by his said feathers will 
Mr John Davy Clarke of Kenninghall afores^ Henry Rix of 
Pagrave in Suffolke Attorneys to give Livery. [31 — 6. 1640.] 
[5s. OJ.] 

2 Michael "Williamson of Rode Island in New England 
locksmith and Anne his wife otherwise called Anne Panckhurst 
releases the Elizabeth Gcere <tc. And Mr Stapley aforesaid 
and a letter &c. 1 Sept. 1640. [3s. 6c?.] 

John Davys ^ joyner is to build Will™ Rix one framed house 
16 foot long & 14 foote wyde w^^ a chamber floare finisht 
summer & ioysts a celler floaro w''' ioyst-s finisht the roofo 
& walles Clapboarded on the outsydc the Chimney framed with- 
out dawbiug to be done w*'^ liewen timber. Will"* Rix is for 

1 William VAx, of Boston, was a John Davys in my mind (see p. 158, 
weaver. He was not in any way promi- ante), there being several of that name 
nent, however, for I find no mention of who followed the trade of a carpenter. 
him in the Toicn Rccorch nor in the Tlie "plott of ground" I suppose to be 
Colonin.} Records. His name is not in somewhere in the neighborhood of the 
the Book of Possessions in any con- corner of Washington and Merrimac 
nection. streets, just south of Hayniarket Square, 

2 This matter is in regard to the will which then would have bordered on the 
of Dennis Geer, husband of the here- ^li'l Cove opposite Cliarlestown. It 
mentioned Elizabeth, of which more ^vas here that John Davies and James 
may be seen {ante, p. 129). This men- Johnson had lots, and I suppose tliat 
tion of Williamson adds little, to what the lot here mentioned was incorporated 
is already known of him. in one of them, and so entered in the 

'There is some confusion about Rook of Possessions. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 303 

this to paj to John Davis 211 yz 41 in hand 71 when it is 
finisht and the rest first of May 1641. w*'* one plott of ground 
lying bctweene John Davis & James Johnson, ult G. 1640. 
[Is. 8^.] 

A writing for Mr Sanlcy.' [8r/.] 

To the right ivor^^ the Governor and Assistants this present 
Court assembled 1 jSejJt. 1640. 

The humlle jjetition'^ of Timothy Hawkins Carj^enter 

Shewcth that he hath built an house for the Country at 
Castle Island w'^'' he thought he had done in all things according 
to his Covenant except some smale foult in the postes yet now 
the same being viewed by workmen it appeareth that there is 
some other default therein on yo'" peticoner parte for w'^'' he 
much grieved being no ways able now to mend the same yet 
as it is now done the charge thereof comes to 1301 besides 
yo' peticoners owne Labor and his boys w'^'* comes to 201 
more at the least yo' peticoner hath received but 831 11^ in 
parte So that 661 93 more will scarce make yo' peticoner a 
saver for the worke yet by covenant he confesseth there is due 
but 371 9^ to him : [172] And wheras yo' peticoner standeth 
yet indebted to divers for the same workc the summe of 451 
w'^'' he is no way able to pay except he should sell his house & 
planting ground w'=^ if he should doe he seeth no way for the 

1 There is no such name as S.i nicy to undertakers, vho were aided by sub- 
be found in Savage. I fear conjecture sidies from the General Court. It was 
as to another spelling would be useless. not kept up to the satisfaction of the 

- I think that it nuist be as an answer Court, however, and the island and the 
to this petition that the General Court, house thereon were given to Captain Gib- 
2 June, 1641, voted that "it is con- bons until such time as the public good 
ceived that Tymo: Hawkins hath nothing might need them back again. The pub- 
due to him in justice, so nothing is to lie good needed them in 1643, when the 
be allowed hira ; but if he will put in arrival of La Tour with a large ship 
security to pay 451, hee is granted tlie showed the inhabitants of the town how 
house to take away, & dispose of it, much harm might be done by the ar- 
provided he give his answer within a rival of an enemy. The island was then 
month." re-fortified, great exertions being made 
The fortifications at Castle Island by the tov?ns around the liarbor, as may 
were at this time in the hands of private be seen in the Boston Toicn Records. 



304 LECIIFORD'S .MANUSCRIPT XOTE-BOOK. 

present for the Comfortable maintainance of himself k his 
family. Yo'' peticoner humbly prayeth the Court in regai'd 
of the premises that the whole matter may be referred to 
the Arbitrement of this Court Sc indifferent workmen to sett 
downe & determine what moneys more yo^ peticoner oujiht in 
equity to have for his said worke & that it may speedily Ijo 
payd in respect of this peticoners necessity And he shall as 
his duty byndeth him allways pray for you «tc. [l^s. 6cZ.] 

1. 7. 1G40. Henry Smith i pit Timothy Hawkins defend* 
for timber boards k carriage 29t 15* C w*"^ should have bin 
payd all but 6 — 7 — 6*^ 1 Martii and the said G — 7 — G*^ upon 
15 of May he hath received but 50* in corne so that there 
remaines 27 — 5 — 6^ &. damm. Edward Gillman by himself for 
51 10* for planke & carriage to be payd 1 Martii. [Is.] 

Thomas Tayler^ of Watcrton in Xew England jdanter 
bound to Will"" Goose mariner in 4i to be payd within G 
weekes after the arivall of the good ship the Sparrow in the 
port of London, bound in Gl 1. 7H'" 1G40. [^d.'] 

Boston in Xew England the 1st of September IGIO. 
Sr I pray you upon 20 dayes after sight of this my first 
bill of exchange my second & third not being payd to be 

^ From the mention here of Henry little is known. He had a cliihl bom a 
Smith and Edward Gillman together, I year or two after this, whom he named 
shoukl like to believe them to be the Seabred. As for the "Sparrow," the 
men bearing those names who came over name, met with once or twice in the in- 
together in 163S and settled at Hing- dorsemcnt of some of Governor Win- 
ham. It is true that the fact that two throp's letters, " IJesp. per the Spar- 
men crossed tlie ocean in the same ship row, J. Bradshaw,"is indorsed on a letter 
does not necessarily imply that they are dated March 15, 1639 j and the same 
always to be mentioned together, and occurs on letters dated May 15, 1640, 
also that it is a little unlikely that and [March 26, 1640. In 1622 Mr. 
Timothy Hawkins should have bought Thomas AVeston sent " 3 small ships 
lumber of a couple of Hinghara men for for his perticuler plantation, the greatest 
Castle Island, which lies much nearer whereof beiug 100 tune." Of these the 
Dorchester Xeck than anywhere else. "Sparrow" was one, not the largest. But 
If this Henrj' Smith was the Hingham I cannot say that the ship here men- 
man, he was representative in the Gen- tioned was the one which conveyed the 
eral Court the next year. * unlucky emigrants sent by Tlioraas 

2 Of Thomas Taylor, of Watertown, "Weston. 



LECnFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 305 

pleased to pay unto Mr Thomas Thoroughgood of Grim- 
ston in the County of Norfolke Gierke or his assignes the 
summe of 33i 6* 8 starling w''^ is for so much lieerc by 
me received of Bozoun Allen ^ of Hhigham in New England 
mercer I pray make good payment & place to account as 
by advise. 

Yo^ loving Sonne in Law, 

Tho: Grubb. 

To my loving father-in-Law Jeffry Salter of Kings Lynne in the 
County of Norfolke Tanner. 

[1..] 

A Release by Thomas Grubb 2 & Anne bis wife of Boston 
in N E planter unto him. [Is. 6c?.] 

Bozoun Allen of IJinghara in X E mercer bound to Tho : 
Grubbe in 15i to be payd upon" intelligence that the said bills 
be satisfy ed. \pd.'] 

A Certificates that Ephraim 'Wliecler of Concord in the 
Mattachusetts Bay in Xew England being a young man of 
twenty one yeares of age or therabout dwelleth at Concord 
aforesaid. [I5.J 

1 Bozoum Allen was of Hingham. His name occurs frequently enough in 
He came over in 1638,— in tlie same the Toicn Record as surveying high- 
ship, by the way, Avith Henry Smith and ways, inspecting fences, and levying 
Edward Gillman. He was representa- rates. As miglit have been expected, he 
tive from Hingham in 1641 and various was neither high enough in station nor 
other years. His name is remembered low enough to make an appearance in 
by the reader of Winthrop as being that the Eecords of the Colony, where few 
of one of the principals in that very cu- besides magistrates and criminals are to 
rious contest in regard to religious, civil, be found. 

and military liberty which was waged in 3 n is pleasant to find this statement 

the General Court in regard to tlie confinned in Savage. Wheeler removed 

Hingham train-band in the year 1645. to Fairfield with some other Concord 

2 Thomas Grubb. leather-dresser, of men in 1644, and died there in very 

Boston, was constable of tlie town in good circumstances in 1670. Savage, 

1646. His house was on the west side following Fanner, says that he had a 

ofwhat is now Washington Street, some- son Isaac, born 163S. Tliis may or 

what south of the Old South Church, may not be true. 
20 



306 LECIIFORD'S MAXUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Benjamin and Xathanicll Bosworth ^ charge bills ii].r)u 
Josepli Boswortli of Coventry in the County of Wa^'' sliou- 
maker for tennc pounds' to be payd to Thomas Lund of Lon- 
don Icathcrdresscr or his assigncs upon 20 dayes sight. [Is.] 

A bond to pave it accordingly by Will™ Buckland carpenter 
& Thomas Turner of Hingham. [Is.] 

A writing for Counter security All dated 1 Sept. 1G40. 
[6^.] 

Will"' Hollway of Cohannct com])laineth against John Trc- 
worthy ^ gent Agent or factor for his Grandfather Mr Shaploy 
of Dartmouth owner and Richard Day master of the ship 
called the Desire of Totneys for that whereas Simon Edwards 
of Cullampton in the County of Devon shipt in the said ship 
in good order and well conditioned the value of two hoggs- 
heads of pease three hoggsheads of malt & one hoggshead of 
girts oatmeale w'^ certaine cheeses and certaine other goods 
of the value of eight pounds 12 T*^ to be landed at Boston in 
New England in like good condicon for the use of the said 
Will™ Hollway. The said Will™ Hollway now complaincth 
that the goods were brought to Bascataway & there lauded & 
that one of the said hogsheads of pease was broken up & two 
bushells or thereabout wanting thereof and that one [173] 
hoggshead of girts was broken up and thereto put a baggc of 

1 Savage is confused between tno married James Treworthy, of Kittery, 
Benjamins and two Nathaniels. I sup- who is thouglit to have been the brother 
poso the two here mentioned to have of John. As has been ah-eady said, tlicre 
been brothers, and each of them to have are doubts as to the existence of John 
had a son named after himself. The Treworthy, but it seems from this as 
first generation lived in Hingham, and though they were ill-founded. 'Sh: 
the second lived in Hull. Shapley was the grandfather of the u-//e 

2 John Treworthy will be remem- of James Treworthy, and the graud- 
bered by the reader" as having been uncle-in-law of John, though not here 

ntioncd before in the Xotc-book. Mr. so called. As for the ship " Desire " of 



me 



Shapley, of Dartmouth, was perhaps the Totnes, it can hanlly be the ship of that 

father of Alexander Shapley, wlio was name which was built at JIarblehead 

in New England at about this time as in 1636 and made several successful 

agent for Ferdinando Gorges. Catherine, voyages to England and back again. 
the daughter of Alexander Shapley, 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 307 

pease to the value of two bushclls or thcrabouts and round 
about the bag Indian huskes Sc strawc w*^'* pease being put 
into the said hoggshead of pease made up the same full but 
there being only twa or three cheeses in the said hoggshead 
of girts the girts remayning were but two bushells or ther- 
abouts so that there is wanting of the girts about 5 bushells 
to the value of 50^ And the said W™ Hollway is charged 
w*^ twenty eight shillings for carryage of the said goods from 
Pascattaway to Boston w*^'^ he ought not to pay And lastly 
the said Will'" Hollway complaincth that there are lost of the 
said goods of the value of 8t 12. 7. divers of them to the value 
of six pounds twelve shillings or thcrabouts All the said 
wrongs k injuries done by the default of the said John Tre- 
worthy and his said Grandfather and Richard Day. To the 
Pits dam mage 9l 18^ whereupon he brings his suit And 
whereas this Comp" letters and bills of lading are kept from 
him by the said defen*^'^ so that the plaintiffe cannot presently 
make such proofe of all the premises as is requisite He 
humbly prayeth that upon consideration of that proofe w'^^ he 
can make the money demanded by the defend'^ for freight and 
other charges may be deteyned in the hands of p'''«'« upon 
security till he can make his cause fully appeare by proofe 
from England. And the Pit submitts liimselfe to the order 
of the Cort. [l.s. M.'] 

John King ^ and Mary his wife heretofore servants to the 
wor" John Humfrcy Esq"" make their account as followeth. 

They say that being bound to serve foure yeares only it 
was agreed that they should be freed when they came to Xew 
England for two dayes worke a weeke by the said- John King 
only for seven yeares w^'^ comes to at the rate of twelve pence 
a day meat & drinke 86-8^ 

And whereas the said servants did serve one yeare and a 
quarter of the said foure yeares the same being valued accord- 
ing to the said rate of 6' a weeke for the said John King and 

1 This was a year 1:>efore Humfrey in Savage as having a daughter .Mary, 
left the countiy. Jolin King is a difli- horn 1G39, and one or two other 
cult man to identify, being merely noted children. 



308 LECIIFORD'S MAXUSCniPT NOTE-BOOK. ■ 

three shillings a wecko for his said wife comes to 29^ ^)^ 
And wheras the said John King since his departure hath 
served the said John Ilumfrey twelve weekes w""'' comes at 
the said rate of 6^ a wecke to 3t 12' in all 321 17^ ^ych i_,^.jj^j, 
deducted out of the said 36i 8' There remaynes due to the 
said John Humfrcy 3^ 11'. 

John King Mary King. Boston 2 Sept. iGto. 

[Is. Gd.-] 

Thomas Eobinson ^ of Scituato complaines against Alice 
Tompson widdowe for that wheras she standeth indebted 
unto the said pltiffe in the summc of one hundred three score 
and ten pounds to be payd upon certaine dayes agreed on 
and for the payment of parte should have signed certaine bills 
of exchange to be payd in England she hath refused to signe 
the said billes & is now going for England therefore the Plain- 
tiffe humbly craveth that the said defend* may put in better 
security for the discharge of the said debt according to the 
agreement aforesaid. 

[Is.] Thomas Robinson. 

My Tyng for 2 Charter partyes. [os.] 

My Robert Saltonstall a declaration and brcv-iat. 

[174] 2 In the matter bctweene Andrew Coleman & Wil- 
liam Swift it is ordered by the Court that whereas heretofore 

1 Thomas Robinson, of Seituate, was unimportant differences, may be found 
not the mariner of the same name of in the Mass. Col. Sec, i. 298. The 
whom mention has been made before, last paragraph, in regard to the arrest of 
He married the daughter of John Cogan Goodman Swift and the suit about 
(Marj-) in 1642, and subsequently (at Sniithman and Stacey, is not in the 
her death), Elizabeth Sherman, both of Record. In its place is this paragraph, 
whom were at the time widows. It is immediately following that ending "as 
to be hoped tliat his troubles with the shall be agreeable to equity:" — 
widow Thompson were of a purely " If the Court be pleased to record 
financial nature. TVliether Thomiison this order, I consent to it. 
was her maiden name, or the name of "jo: Hatn'es." 
her husband, is hardly more than mat- 
ter for remote conjecture. The paper in the Colonial Record is 

a This same document, with certain headed, "A Eecord of a Former Cusi- 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 809 

the said Andrew Coleman by his letter of Attorney dated the 
[W««/l] day of [Hank'] Anno Dfii 163G made unto John Haynes 
Esc/ gave him power & authority to sue and compound w^** 
the said Will'^ Swift for & upon one bond of O bearing date 
the [blank] day of [blank'] in the yeare 1G35 wherein the said 
Will"' Swift as a suerty was bound w^^ Roger Spring principall 
debter and Josiah Smith of Bermondsey strecte leather-dresser 
another suerty for the payment of fifty two pounds upon a 
certaine day past And thereupon the said John Haynes agreed 
& compounded w*'^ the said William Swift and the said William 
Swift mortgaged his house & lands at Watertowne aforesaid 
unto the said John Haynes in bchalfe of the said xindrew 
Coleman by one deed or writing made in or about the moneth 
of [blank] in the yeare 1636 And whereas the said Will™ 
Swift alleadgeth that the said Andrew Coleman hath already 
recovered for the said debt the summe of eighteen pounds & 
five shillings from John Smithman & WilP Stacy jun of 
Booking Clothiers w<=^ they owed to the said Will™ Swift W^^^ 
comes to halfe of the same debt wanting but five shillings 
and that halfe thereof is as much in equity as he being a 
suerty w"' another ought to pay and the other suerty the said 
Josiah Smith being a man of sufficient estate ought to pay 
the other halfe. And that since the said mortgage the said 
Andrew Coleman hath contrary to the said agreement arrested 
and troubled the said Will™ Swift in England for the said 
debt and recovered from him seven pounds <t ten shillings 
more w'^^ in all being twenty five pounds and fiftecne shillings. 
This Court hath ordered that the possession of the said house 
& lands shall remainc in the hands of the said John Haynes 
till midsommer next to the end the said Will™ Swift may 

ness;" but I have been unable to dis- Savage says, came from Bocking was the 

cover any trace of it before this date, same man as the above-mentioned, for 

HajTies was at this time Lieutenant Savage goes on, " Sold his esuite 1G37, 

Governor of Connecticut. Andrew Cole- and removed, probably to Sandwich; 

man does not a[ipear in Savage, and of there died January, 1644." It was 

Swift Savage seems to have known lit- about midsummer, 1C37, that Swift was 

tie that he did not gain from the above arrested and imprisoned in Whitechapel. 

paper, except that he was of "Watertown Of his son Edward " that was prentice " 

and came before 1634. Indeed it is there is no mention in New England 

doubtful if the "William Swift who, as authorities. 



310 LECn FORD'S .MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

make -what proofc he can of the premises in the mcane time 
And then tliis Court will set downe a finall order in the 
premises as shall be agreeable to equity. 

Goodman Swift was arrested about Midsomer 1037 & im- 
prisoned in White chapel & at y'' pye without Algate payd to 
Joshua Smith & Mr Heath the Scrivener T^ 10^ The suit 
ag Smithman & Stacey was in Guildhall 1G36 Edward Swift 
his Sonne that was prentice with George Andrewes butcher in 
Eastcheape little Eastcheape. [And a letter. 3s. 6d. Is. Oa. 
Write to goodman Swift at Sandwich the letters to be left 
with goodman Buttolph glover in Boston.] 

1 Will™ Eliott master of the shippe Charles of Bristoll John 
Searchfield of Bristoll merchant and Hugh Courtney of the 
same merch* and Valentine Hill of Boston in New England 
merchant bound to Henry Woolcott & Samucll Wakeman in 
Ci. Condiconed to pay & satisfie to the Obligees for all such 
goods as shall be found wanting by the Boatsons books & 
found by the men assigned by the Court viz* W. John Cogan 
& Mr Will"' Peirce by the next quarter Court held at Boston 
in December next, except those goods already recovered 2 
Sept 1640. [Is. 6d] 

m John Cogan '- makes a letter of Attorney to Ml Will" 
Blackallow of Exon merch* to receive & recover all Leg- 
acys given unto him or his wife or children by Mr Ignatius 

1 This entry is interesting as bring- inent merchants of Boston, and Tierce 

ing together the names of several promi- was a noted shipmaster. Of the Bristol 

nent New England merchants. Samuel merchants I am sorry to say I have 

Wakeman was one of the earliest set- no knowledge. The ship " Charles " was 

tiers at Hartford, having before lived in owned by Mr. Thomas Elbridge, alder- 

Roxbury and Cambridge. About a year man of Bristol, as we may see in the 

after this time he was killed (together accounts which appear later, 
with Captain William Tierce) in the 2 This would seem as though ilrs. 

course of a voyage to the West Indies, Ann Cogan had been a Jordan before 

having been "sent with goods to buy marriage. The name Dominicus Jordan, 

cotton" {Wiuthrop, ii. 33). Henry which appears in Scarborough towards 

Wolcott was also of Connecticut. He the end of the seventeenth century, 

was a prominent man in Windsor, and seems as if it might be in some way con- 

a large merchant. Valentine HUl and nected with the late Ignatius Jordan. 
John Cogan were two of tlie most prom- 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 311 

Jordan of Exon Alderman deceased. 3 Sept 1G40. [Is. pd 
in corn.] 

John Gierke^ of Newberry in New England late Citizen 
and Cliirurgion of London one of the Executors of the last 
will and Testament of Anne Ward late of Stratford in the 
County of Suff widdow deceased makes a letter of Attorney 
to Edmund Sherman of Dedham in the County of Essex 
Clothier to receive <fe recover all rents issues k profitts and 
arreages of rents whatsoever issuing out of any Lands «L tene- 
ments whatsoever in the Townes of East or West Mersey or 
elswhere in the County of Essex due k belonging to John 
Ward Sonne & heire of John Ward of Stratford afores*^ 
Clothier deceased [175] by vertue of the Last will and testa- 
ment of the said John Ward and of the said last will and 
testament of the said Anne Ward or one of them and by 
vertue of the same payable unto me during tlie nonage of the 
John Ward the sonne and the profitts revennues & income of 
two shippes k other rights belonging to the said John Ward 
by vertue of tlie aforesaid wills k testaments or one of them. 

John Pierce of Hartford in Connecticot an Inhabitant 
Certify ed. [Is.] 

A letter of Attorney by Will™ Talmage Thomas Talmage 
and Robert Talm : aforesaid and Richard Walker to M! Ralfe 
King p^ut devant to receive the money of the said Overseers 
dat 3° Sept IGIO. A Certificat under the pub : scale. [2s. OtZ.] 

Right Worthy Sir. I sent yon at my first landing here an 
unwise letter of which I [deserved ?] to receive no answer, — 

^ There \Yere two physicians of the stall, and survived him for sixteen years 

name of John Clarke in Xew England at more or less, during wliich time it may 

this time. The one was John Clarke of be inferred she subsisted on the proceeds 

Newport, who had been driven from of certain patent stoves invented by her 

Boston with Mrs. Hutchinson. The husband. (See Mass. Col. liec, iv. 104, 

other, here mentioned, was of Newbury 260. ) The patent was granted to her 

at this time, bat later moved to Boston, husband only for life, but at his death 

where he died in 1664. His wife, ilar- there were many stoves left which came 

tlia, was the sister of Sir Richard Salton- to her by his will. 



312 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

I cannot forget my respect towards you and your wortliv an! 
beloved family, my good lady and all your dear and hojidUl 
children, as in my [poor?] supplications I remember d:iylv. 
In a word or two, wc-hearc of great disturbances in our dcuiv 
native countrey ; I am heartily sorry that I had [ever hand ':] 
in some of the [causes ?]. I beseech you take my briclV' 
opmion ; we here are quite out of the way of right govern- 
ment both in Church and Commonwealth, as I verily think, 
and as far as I can judge upon better consideration, and 
some pains taken in searching after the bottome of some 
things. Poure Electoric wayes tried to the overthrow of 
Kiugdomes : 

No such way for government of Englishmen, as a Mon- 
archic ; of Christians as by Diocesan Bishops or Evangelists 
in their line. Better yeeld to many pressures in a Monarchic: 
then for subjects to destroy and spoile one another, [as I 
fear we must do here-long before we come to any settledness 
either in Church or Commonwealth.] If I were worthy to 
advise a word, I should desire you to have a care, and so all 
your friends, you prejudice not your estate, or posterity, by 
too much opposing the Regall power ; For I verily bcleeve 
the King's Majesty hath in general a good cause touching 
Episcopacic [against the Sectaries]. My reasons I could 
better deliver in presence, if haply God give opportunity to 
see you, or if you require it hereafter, I will be ready to 
present my thoughts unto you ; all this, as I shall answer 
before the Lord, without any by-respects. If you were here 
I presume you would see more than I can, but I think you 
would be much of my mind. I hear that you [required?] 
that 20t I owed you of Mr. Hill. God's will be dune. 
I am not able to pay it yet, but shall be mindfuU, God 
willing to discharge it as soon as I can. I am thankful! 
and desire to be yet more thankfull to you for the loan of 
it. If you hear anything of me s|)ecially from Mr. Hooke 
or his wife, pray keep an ear for me, for we have had some 
[^several icords erasecT^. I wish you knew how I am used: 
For this time thus I take my leave heartily recommending 
your worship and all yours to the guidance and [undeciphemhle] 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 313 

of his heavenly majesty, resting yours in all service to ha 
commanded. 

Thomas Lechford. 

Thomas Starres of Windsor in Conneticot [Is.] ; Robert 
Parker of Wethersficld in Connecticot [Is.] ; PJchard Payne 
of the same [Is] , — certified that they are there inliabitauts ^ 
4 Sept 1640. 

The forme of a hill of lading 

Shipped by the grace of God in good order and Tvell con- 
diconed by I. K. in and upon the ship called the M <t B of L 
whereof is Master under God for this present voyage J. B. 
and now riding at anchor in the p of J and by Gods grace 
bound for the p of B. in N E to say fower hogsheads of Come 
being marked and numbered as in the margent and are to be 
delivered in the like good order and well condiconcd at the 
abovesayd Port of B. (the danger of the seas only excepted) 
and the said I K or to his assignes he or they paying fraight 
for the said goods k w*'^ primage and average accustomed or 
to his assignes the fraight being alreddy payd w**" primage and 
average accustomed. In witnes whereof the master or purser 
of the said shippe hath affirmed to three bills of lading all of 
this Tenor k Date the one of w'^^ three bills being accomplished 
the other two to stand voyd. And so God send the good ship 
to her desired port in safety Amen dated in L the 5' day of 
September Anno Dili 1640. outwardly well condiconed the 
contents I know not p : me I. B. [I. K.] 

Chaelestowxe in New England S Sept 1G40. 

Sr Upon eight dayes after sight of this my first bill of 
Exchange my second & third not being payd I pray you be 
pleased to pay unto John Chickley ^ of Boston in New Eng- 
land aforesaid or his assignes the summe of one hundred and 

• 1 If Savage had seen this entry, I 2 John Chickley is one of those of 

think he vrouhl have added three more whom nothing can be found at present, 
names to his Gcncaloijlcal Dictionary. For William Bernard, see p. 138, ante. 



314 LECIIFORD'S MAXUSC12IPT NOTE-BOOK. 

twenty pounds starling v,'"^ is for so much licere received by 
me of him I beseech you malvc good pavement and place it to 
account as p. advice. 

Yo' loving kinsman 

Wm Bernard. 

To my very loving Cosiu M^ Thomas Free merch* at his warehouse at 
the George in Lunibard streate Loudon. 

Thomas Hawkins of Boston in New England baker bound 
to John Pollard i of Boston in 151 to be payd 29 Sept 1640. 
for w'^^ payment he is bound in 30i to be payd at John Buttons 
house. 30 Julii 1640. mei. [Gd.] 

Rec to make red wax Bossen 6^ bees wax 2^ oyle 4 ounces 
turpentine 4 ounces vermillion 8 ounces, for winter temper 
the same quantity of wax and rossen w*'' 4 ounces of turpentine 
and li of oyle. Mr Sherman.^ 

[176] I am summoned to appear in Court tomorrow, being 
the 1^' of 10^*^ 1640. The Lord God direct me. 

Will'" Withington^ of Portsmouth planter assignes his 
servant Richard Haynes unto John Budd of Quinapeagc 

1 The Note-hook mentions John Pol- tain Keayne in the matter of the 

lard briefly after this in several places, stray sow, — of which some mention is 

but in each place in some business con- made in the latter part of the Nof.e- 

nection. He may be barely mentioned booh (post, p. 234). 
by Savage, or it may be another of the 3 William 'Withington was (ante, p. 

same name who is there noted. He 119) of Newport. At this time the 

would seem to have been a small busi- two towns of Portsmouth and Newpoit 

ness man who attended so carefully to were embraced in one body politic, 

his own concerns as to escape the big Portsmouth had been settled first by 

books of the Town Clerk or the Secretary William Hutchinson, Aspinwall Cod- 

of the Colony. John Button had three dington, John Clarke, and others ; but 

houses on the road leading west from certain dissensions occurring, Codding- 

Bendall's Dock, now called Elm Street ton and otliers were cast out of the body, 

(according to Lamb's map ; G, 24, Uook and Hutchinson was chosen judge in 

of Possessions). the place of Coddington. The latter 

2 This Mr. Sherman I imagine, upon with his adherents removed to the spot 

some slight evidence, to be the husband wluch is now the city of Newport, and 

of the woman who gained notoriety formed a separate body. In a little 

by her persistent opposition to Cap- more than a year, however, the iuhabi- 



LECH FORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK 



315 



planter 1 from 24 Mail iilt' for 5 yeares 10 7^^ 1G40. for 201 in 
cattell or worke. [10t7.] 

A bill to pay the 201 yiz* in cattell 121 to W. {hlanq Good- 
yer2 of Quinapeage within a fortnight or 5 dayes after sight. 
and 81 in cattell in December 1G40. [Is. GJ.] 

BosTOX IX Nkw England 10. 7. 1640. 
Upon 5 dayes after sight of this my first bill of exchange 
my second & third not being payd I pray you pay unto W. 
Oooddier3 ^r\^Q came over this yeare in the ship St. John of 
London or his assignes the value of twelve pounds in cattell 
w«=^ is for so much heere received of Will" Withingtoii of 
Rode Island * Carpenter I pray make good payment and place 
it to account as by advice. [M! Will™ James of Quinapeage.] 

Billa Salubritatis bona navis vocat' Prospera^ de Dart- 
mouth oneris IGO ' dolior' vel circiter Ejus nancterus sive 



tants of Portsmouth were, at their own 
request, united to the people of Newport, 
and Coddiiigton was chosen Governor, 
with Hutchinson as one of the assistants. 

1 John Budd was long after this 
(1664 and later) a prominent man in 
New Haven. He held the office of lieu- 
tenant, and also of representative. 

* Mr. Stephen Goodyear was a Lon- 
don merchant who lived in New Haven 
from 1G3S to 1C56. He was assistant 
during his earlier residence, and Deputy 
Governor during his later stay. His 
wife went home some time hefore him, 
and was wrecked on the way to London 
in a vessel of Mr. George Lamberton's, 
which was lost with all on board. Mr. 
Goodyear consoled himself by marriage 
with Mrs. Lamberton, with whom he 
went back to London. One of his 
daughters became the wife of Samuel 
"Wakeman, of whom mention was made 
just above. 

* Although Savage puts 1638 as the 
date of Stephen Goodyear's magistracy 



at New Haven, I must think that this 
is the same man. Andrew, the son of 
Stephen, was not born until 1640. It may 
be that John Goodyear, the brother (?) 
of Stephen is referred to in both cases. 
Of this latter little is known save his 
residence at New Haven. 

* Palfrey says that the name of 
Phode Island was given to the island 
of Rhode Island in 1644. This mention 
is nearly three years before that time. 

6 I do not find any mention at all of 
the " Prospera " of Dartmouth. Even 
in the Winthrop Papers, where the 
name of the ship bringing the letter is 
often indorsed on the back of it, there 
is no trace of the " Prospera." It is 
probable enough that the "Prospera" 
seldom came to Boston, her chief busi- 
ness naturally being at Piscataqua, 
where the three Treworthys were in 
business. Owen Williams is on the 
freeman's list at Newport in 1655. He 
afterwards moved to Norwich, Conn., 
and there died in 1682. 



316 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



magistcr Nicholaus Trewortliy Imius ad iiumero 21. — 15 
Sept IGIO. [Is. Gc7.] 

A payre of Indentures betweene Timothy Hawkins and 
Henry Smith k Edward [llank] liis liouse lands <fc corne to 
them & their heircs 3. 7. 1640. [2s. Qd.] 

Owen Williams sonnc of Markc Williams of St. Johns parish 
in the County of Cardiffe placeth himselfc Apprentice to 
Will"" Withington of Portsmoutli in New England Carpenter 
from 16 September 1640 for six yeares 51 at the cnde k double 
apparell. [2s. Od] 

Will™ Withington and John Lowe ^ whcelewright bound to 
Philip Gibb^ nauter in 7^ to be payd 16 October next in 
Boston. [Qd.'] 

Harman Garrett^ of Charlestowne in New England Gun- 
smith covenants w'^ John Edwards of the same blacksmith 



^ John Lowe was of Boston, and, as 
is here said, a wheelwright by his trade. 
His shop was along by the water-side 
north of the Town Dock, and near the 
sawpits in Eiehnrd Bcllingham's marsh, 
of which-mention has been made. Good- 
man Lowe he is called in the Toicn 
Ilccords, where he is seldom mentioned, 
though references to his house occur 
more tlian once. 

^ There is more to be found in Lech- 
ford's Kotc-hook about Philip Gibb than 
in all other Xew England authorities 
put together, where he is conspicuous 
only by his almost absolute absence. 
As we shall fmd later, he was the agent 
of James Gammon and Thomas Har- 
wood, merchants of ljarnstai>le, in the 
County of Devon, neither of whom, I 
am verj- sure, ever came to New Eng- 
land, although the name Thomas Har- 
wood occurs in Savage. There are in 
the Note-hook notices of business trans- 
actions between Gibb (sometnnes acting 



for Harwood and Gammon, and some- 
times with no reference to them), and 
llichard Parker and John Cogan, and I 
have no doubt that he had to do with 
other Boston merchants. That his name 
does not occur in Savage is not remark- 
able, for he probably never went to 
church, married, had children, died, 
committed a crime, or held an office in 
Is ew England, — the principal methods 
by which many of his time made them- 
selves known to posterity and to Jlr. 
Savage. The only mention of him 
I can recall is in the Colonial Record 
(vol. i. p. 339), where he is called " Jlr. 
Philip Gibs," or "Mr. Gibs," which 
seems as if he were a person of some 
consideration. 

3 Harman Garrett (or Herman, as it 
is generally spelled) was a blacksmith 
as well as gunsmith at Charlestown, 
where he lived from 163S to 1G52, when 
he moved to Boston. It is not impos- 
sible that John Edwards may have 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 317 

to instruct him in the art of a g:unsmith according to the best 
of his skill within the space of one yeare next ensuing & that 
the said John shall have the one halfe of the profitts of his 
owne worke in that art during the said terme & for this he is 
to pay the said Harman five pounds & ten shillings within 3 
moneths next ensuing the date hereof dated 17. 7. 1640. And 
after the said terme the said John is not to sett up the said 
trade in Charlestowne aforesaid unlesse that he buy the house 
of the said Harman for such reasonable price as shall be 
agreed on by 4 men indifferently to bo chosen betweene them 
and then the said Harman is to departe from the said towne. 
[1-6.] 

Knowe all men by these presents that I Henry Gray of 
Boston in New England tayler doe hereby give grant enfe- 
oEe and confirme unto Thomas Lechford gent all that my 
Dwelling house & garden thereunto belonging lying & being in 
Boston aforesaid contoyning in breadth towards the streat syde 
\_blaiik'j foot or thereabouts and at the farther end of the said 
garden [Wa/it] foot or therabouts w'^ the appurtenances To have 
and to hold the said house and garden and all & singulare the 
premises w'^ the appurtenances unto the said Thomas Lech- 
ford his lieires and assigncs for ever And furthermore I the 
said Henry doe hereby grant for me & my heires that we will 
warrant to the aforesaid Thomas and his heires the aforesaid 
tenements w^^ the appurtenances against me the said Henry 
and Lydia my wife and my heires and all manner of person 
and persons lawfully clayming from by and under me or them 
or any of them for ever In witnesse &c. 18. 7. 1640. 

[177] ;MF Will"* Hutchinson of Portsmouth in Aquednecke 
of Rode Island gent and Edward Hutchinson his sonne & 
heire apparent sell unto MF Will™ Tyng merchant one hun- 
dred and fifty acres of land ^ or therabouts being parte of the 

moved to AVethersfiekl, where there ^ I wish I could be sure that this 

was one of that name who came from land was that of which an eiitrj- is made 

the neighborhood of Watertown (see in the Toicn Record as being "att 

post, pp. 223, 225). . Mount Woolystone beyond Jlr. Cod- 



318 LECITFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

great Lott of the said Will™ Hutchinson at Brayntree lyins: 
next the lands of the said W™ Tyng betweene the dead 
swampe there and Mountwollaston brooke for 13^ 4"^ an 
acre halfe to be payd in land & halfe at 12 moneths end. 
18. 7. 1640. 

Margaret Stiibbin -wife of John Stubbin of Watcrtowne in 
New England aged thirty yearcs sworne saith upon her oath 
that in or about the moneth of October last was twelve moncth 
she bought & received of Moyses Cox ^ now of Hampton in 
New England at Ipswich in New England when he was going 
to live first at Hampton aforesaid so much tryed suet as was 
worth ten shillings or therabouts w'''' she payd unto him and 
that then at Ipswich aforesaid the said ^loyses spent some 
smale quantity of fruit & cheese w'^^ he brought w^^ him in 
this deponents presence the ccrtaine value whereof she cannot 
remember 19. 7. 1G40. [Is.] 

Edward Bridges second sonne of E B late of Eaynham in 
C Som'' Esq' makes a le'' of Attorney & assignment to TV'^ill™ 
Hudson of Boston Inkeeper to rec & recover of & from 
Richard Jackson 2 of Cambridge 4t 21.7.1640. [6c?.] 

Nathaniell Patten^ late of Crewkerne in the County of 
Som^* yeoman makes a letter of Attorney to Henry Andrewes 
of Taunton in New England planter to sue Will" HoUoway 

dington's farnie and ilr. Wilson's jnto ^ Nathaniel Patten, it -would seem, 

the country adjoining to Dorchester had but just come over; for a week after 

bounds." I think, however, that this tliis date he purulinsed a house and land 

is the lot spoken of from later passages in Dorchester of one Eels, as maybe read 

in the Note-book (pp. 212, 214\ and also in the Fourth Report of the RcL-ord Com- 

a later passage in the Town liccords missioners. His name occurs frequently 

(pp. 7-9). afterwards in various ways. He was 

1 Moses Cox, of Hampton, and Mar- selectman in 1C57 and 1G58, and died 

garet, the wife of John Stebbins, of in 1661, leaving no chiMren, as Savage 

"Watertown, are both in Savage; but I supposes. Henry Andrewes was one of 

find no mention of the tried suet. the first settlers of Taunton, and repre- 

- Richard Jackson, of Cambridge, was sentative 1639-1644. William Hollo- 

a man of note in the town for many way, of Taunton, was there for a few 

years, being representative to the Gen- years only, and in 1652 moved to 

eral Court. Boston. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 319 

of Taunton aforesaid planter or mercer for IG^ for one cowe 
\f^^ was Will" Downes ^ sold unto him by W. Nicholas Streete. 
[0 g* acquaint.] 

2 Boston August 8 1G39. 

Loving friend Mr Hobson I pray you pay unto Mr Roger 
Clay factor of Blackwell Hall or his assignes within thirty 
dayes after sight of this my first bill my second or third not 
being payd the summe of one hundred pounds 'being for so 
much received heere of Mr John Cogan and put it to account 
as p advice I rest yo'' loving ffriend Nathanaell Eaton. Lower 
is written To the wor" his loving firiend M": John Hobson mer- 
chant in Coleman streete. dd. 

On the seven and twentieth day of the moncth of February 
Anno Dili according to the computation of the Church of 
England one thousand six hundred nyne k thirty and in the 
fifteenth yeare of the raigne of our Soveraignc Lorde King 
Charles &c at the instance and request of M! Roger Clay 
factor of Elackwell Hall London I Josua Mainett Notary and 
Tabellion publicke dwelling in tliis City of London by the 
Authority of the said Kings Ma"^ admitted and sworne re- 
quired Mr John Hobson merchant dwelling in Coleman streete 
in London for to pay the summe of one hundred pounds men- 
tioned in a certainc originall bill of exchange unto him shewen 
and whereof the Coppy hcrebefore is written word for worde 
seeing he acknowledged to have scene the same bill of ex- 
change above thirty dayes agone whereupon the said John 
Hobson answered that for want of provision from the drawer 
he would not pay the said bill of exchange, w'=^ answere I 

1 ■William Downes can hardly be - "Why this bill of exchange, Avith the 

identified by the fact that he onco protest thereof, was not inserted above, 

bought a cow from Mr. Nicholas Streete. p. 147, where it belongs, is not clear. 

The hist-named was at this time the It is perfectly possible that Lechford 

minister at Taunton, and we may hope did not then have it in his possession, 

that he was paid for the cow, which Eaton was about this time in Virginia, 

might easily have been his whole quar- where our friend Governor "Winthrop 

ter's salary. He was afterwards minister says he was given up " to extreme pride 

in New Haven in place of Hooke, who and sensuality, being usually drunken, 

had been his colleague in Taunton. as the custom is there." 



6-20 LECHFORD'S MANUSCPdPT NOTE-BOOK. 

the said Xotary havini]: heard h.tve in the name and at instance 
as aforesaid })rotested even as I doe protest by these presents 
for want of payment of the said bill of exchange and recharn;c 
and for all costs dammagcs and interests by reason [178] 
thereof already susteyned and suffered and yet to be suffered 
and susteyned as well against Xathaniell Eaton drawer or sub- 
scriber of the said bill of exchange as against all others in the 
said exc? in any wise bound for to recover all the same of 
them or of their goods in time & place as of right shall apper- 
teyne to me Thus done & protested in this City of London 
in the presence of John Paniell and George Kellam witnesses 
hereunto called and required. Quod attestes rogatus et 
requisitus. 
1G39. JosuA Maixett Note pub''"" 

John Greenland^ carpenter peticons the Court 

That yo' peticoncr hath bin an inhabitant in Charlestowne 
by the space of two yeares last past and all that while 
sojourned in other mens houses because he had none of his 
owne at length he spake to some of the Townesmen to entreate 
them to be a meanes to the rest that he might have a house 
lott given liim whereon he might build an house but he received 
answere that the Towne had no house lott to give & therefore 
the said townesmen wished him to buy one "Whereupon yo'' 
peticoner hath bought of Samuel Richardson of Charlestowne 
five acres of land within Charlestowne bounds on Misticke 
syde nearc to Thomas ■\roulton k the widdow Wilkins and hath 
begun & halfe built his house upon it as yo"" peticoner con- 
ceiveth it w^as lawfull for him to do seeing that he hath built 
on five acres of ground Notwithstanding some of the said 
Towne have given forth words to discourage yo"^ peticoner to 
goe on to plant there w*"^ may turne to his great hinderance 

1 "John Greenlandis .granted his peti- account of the vray in which John 

tion, which is to plant upon a five-acre Greenland acquired this lot; but there 

lot in Charles Town bounds on Mi&ticke is mention of his exchanging a lot (this 

side" (Mass. Col. Ecc, i. 309, under one, as I suppose) of five acres "at Mol- 

date Oct. 7, 1640). tons Island" with Thomas Moulton 

In Wyraan's Charlcsiotai I find no against ten acres of land in Maiden. 



LECUFORD'S MAXL'SCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



521 



if he should be no-sr caused to remove. Yo'' pcticoner liurubly 
prajcth this wor" Cort to be pleased in consideration of the 
premises to confirme yo"" peticoners said planting on misticke 
syde in the place aforesaid. And yo"" peticoner shall pray for 
this Cort, «fcc. [2—6.] 

Joseph Hollway of Sandwich in New England millwright 
aged about thirty five ycares sworne saith upon his oath that 
about nyne moneths since he had certaine commodities of the 
wife of Thomas Richards of Weymouth that is to say kersey 
at 6« C p yard bayes at 4? 2^ p yard and bynding lace at 7"^ 
a yard when he came to reckon for it she did affirme that he 
had of her three quarters of a yard of kersey more than he 
had & sayd it was so much upon the booke & would have ben 
payd for so much. 

That in or about March last past he heard the wife of 
Thomas Richards of Weymouth speaking of Henry Waltham 
& Will"^ Waltham say these words viz* The Walthams are 
cozeners & cheaters. ^ [6 J.] 



1 It is unfortunate that tlie privnte Richards were fined 5' for want of 
character of Mr. Henry Waltham and of scales and weights in their mill and to 

provide them by the next Court. W. 
Waltham was fined 31 for taking too 
much tole, in some above double what 
was dew, whereof 20* to be given the 
witnes" [Mass. Col. Rec, i. 267). 

30 January, 1639. " William Wal- 
tham, for being drunke aboard tlie ship 
called the Bristowe Marchant, w""" he 
confessed, was fined twenty shillings, it 
being the first time he was known to be 
drunke, & so was seriously admonished, 
& dismissed " (Ibid., i. 2S5). 

Thomas Richards Iiad come to New 
England in 1030, and settled at Dor- 
chester, but by this time was removed 
to Weymouth. William Waltham died 
very shortly after this. 



Mrs. Richards is not a more important 
matter of history, for the Note-hook 
throws considerable light upon it. The 
careful reader of the two other passages 
of the Note-book referring to them (pp. 
195, 207, pout) who may compare tlicm 
with the Colonial Record, i. 267, cannot 
fail to be of the mind that although 
Mrs. Richards was undoubtedly preju- 
diced in her statements, the opinion 
here expressed, in regard to Henry Wal- 
tham at least, was in some measure 
justifiable. The casual reader, who may 
not care to consult the R-cord, will find 
these extracts helpful in forming an 
opinion : — 
4 June, 1639. " M! Waltham and M! 



21 



i.JU lijjl ii' 



322 LECIIFOnD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

[179] To the rigid wor" the Ciovernor Council ^ Assistants 
and the rest of the generall Court noiv assembled (8) 7. 104 0. 

The humble ^eticon of Zaciieus Gould ^ of Lijmie huslaivl- 
man in behalf e of himself e and all other husbandmen of ilw 
Country 

Slioweth tliat whereas husbandry and tillage much coii- 
cerne the good of this Commonwealth and yo'' peticonors 
have undertaken the managing tt tillage of divers ffarmcs in 
the Country & sowing of English corne their servants are 
oftentimes drawne from their workc to trayne in seed time 
hay tyme k harvest to the great discouragement & dara- 
magc of yo"" peticoners and yo"" peticoner the said Zachcus 
Gould for himself saith that for one days trayning this ycaro 
he was much damnnfyed in his hay. And fTorasmuch as fish- 
ermen upon just grounds arc exempted from trayning Ijccause 
their trade is also for the Common wealth, Yo"" peticoners 
humbly pray that this Court Avill be i^leased to take the 
premises into their grave Consideration and thereupon to give 
order for the incouragement of yo' peticoners who are hus- 
bandmen imploycd about English graine that they & their 
servants may be exempted from ordinary traynings in seed 
tyme hay tyme k harvest And yo"" peticoners shall as their 
duty bynds them pray &c. 

Edward Howell ^ late of Marsh Gibbon in the County of 
Buckingham and now of Lynne in New England gent makes 
a Letter of Attorney unto Roger Stevens of Wotton Under- 
wood in Com Buck husbandman German Major Citizen k 
mercer of London and John Reese of Marsh Gibbon aforesaid 
gent to surrender all his Coppihold lands k tenements in 
Wotton Underwood aforesaid to the use of Richard Grcnville 
of -Wotton Underwood aforesaid Esq^ [5.] 

1 Zaccheus Gould has been mentioned - Edward Howell, of Lynn, had five 

before (p. .147, ant.>). He was, as is here hundred acres of land granted liim "i 

said, of Lynn ; but little more is known that place, but soon removed to South- 

of him. Later in the Xof.c-booJ: is more ampton, L. L, where he was a magistrat.', 

mention of him on different matters. and where his son lived after liim. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 323 

I Thomas Dudley Esq'" Governor of the Jurisdiction of the 
Mattachusetts Buy in New England hereby certify unto all 
manner of persons to "whomsoever these presents shall come 
that Henry Russell ^ late of Weymouth in New England 
Sonne of Thomas Russell late of Chalfont St Gyles in the 
County of Buckingham yeoman deceased the ffoure and twen- 
tieth day of May last past And that this present day Jane the 
late wife of the said Henry and Elizabeth their Daughter <fe 
only child living being about the age of ten yeares came before 
me <fc presented tlie Avriting hereunto annexed as the last will 
and testament of the said Henry Russell w''* an addition there- 
unto and also Edward Batte one of the witnesses named in 
the said writing deijoscd before me upon his oath that the said 
Henry Russell did declare publish and signc the same to be 
his last will A: testament and the addition also to be parte of 
his said will and. further then the said Elizabeth did before me 
freely choose her said mother to be her tuitorix and guardian 
during her minority In testimony whereof I have caused the 
publicke scale of our Colony to be hereunto affixed the nyeth 
day of October 1640 &c. [5s.] 

A letter of Attorney by MF Howell to Mf German Major to 
receive 311 annuity out of my late freehold lands in Wotton 
Underwood in the County of Buck of Richard Grenville Esq"" 
or Roger Stevens husbandman and one hundred pounds of 
Richard Francis of Marsh Gibbon in the County of Buck 
woollmerchant w'=*' he received for mc & to my use of Thomas 
Beckwith of Andbrooke in the parish of Masham in the County 
of Yorke gent and Robert Pickersgill of the maizes in the said 
parish of Masham husbandman. [5s.] 

[180] Thomas Xicholls^ of Hingham planter makes John 
Cockerell of Cockshall his attorn to receive his legacy given 

1 Henry Russell, of Weymouth, and copied from Savage. George and "Walter 
his wife and daughter are all noted in Kichols and John Cockerell (whose 
Savage with but little addition. name is spelled Copewell above), being 

2 ForTlioniasNii'holsseep. 130, frn^iT, Englishmen, are practically unfiudable. 
where the very little known of him is 



o'2i LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Ilim by Walter Xicliolls his ffatlier of George Nicliolls 80^ 0. 
(8) 1G40. [1—6.] 

"Will"* James of Boston in New England mercer sonne (jf 
Albon James late Citizen and mercer of London makes a Ictti^- 
of Attorney unto his uncle George Strange gent to sell all his 
Freehold Lands & tenements in reversion after the death of 
[ Manic] James given and bequeathed unto him by his uncle 
Will- James. ['2—0.] 

Me Richard Parker etc tener' Samuell Hutchinson k Tho : 
Savage in 5001 to pay 3901. 

^Nathaxiell Pattex charges upon Henry Wolcott Thomas 
Marsufield ^- Samuell Wakeman joynt undertakers of 
the shipjies the Cluirles of Bristoll and the Hopewell of 
London. 

Imprimis delivered to Thomas ]\Iarshfield the. 10th of Aprill 1640 . 20 1 

Itm delivered to Thomas :Mar6hfield U Apr 1G40 301 

Itm delivered to Henry "Wolcottin April 1040 12 1 

Itm delivered to Samuell Wakemau 29 Aprill 1640 301 

Itra delivered to Henry Wolcott 6° Maii 16iO 201 for w^h there is a 
note under his hand dated by mistake 6" April 1640 including 
that and the said 301 to Samuel Wakeraan for 50^ w<=^ showes 

they did things as partners 201 

Itra delivered to Tliomas Marshfield 30 IMaii 1640 12 ' 

Itm delivered to Tlionias Marshfield to pay to Ml Elbridge owner of 

the Charles 13 Junii 1G40 80 » 

Itm delivered to Henry Wolcott about that time Ql 

Itm delivered unto Thomas Marshfield 17 Junii 1040 201 

S 2301 
Itm for a bag of hoppes spoyled by the raine because some of 

the undertakers gave order it should not be received aboard . 6 12 G 

1 Although there is a difference in "For M^ Patten, I conceive he hath 

point of time of about a year between received some wronge ; I did receive 

the two, I connect this account with one hundred & fiftye pounds allniost 

almost the only other mention of Tho- of him — not that that is all Due to 

mas Marshfield in Xew England chron- him." 

ology, — part of a letter written from Marshfield died the next year, — or 

Tho. ]Marshfield to Sanuiel "Wakeman, at least disappeared, — and his family 

which was copied into the first volume moved to Springfield. (See Co7in. L'C, 

of Sufolk Deeds (f. 12) by John "Win- Oct. 12, 1642.) 
throp(6. 3. 1641): — 



ErratTiin, D.525 (foot-note) 

Joh^l Bib^le d. in 1655 not 1658 

-cf.Kew Eng. Register, IX, p. 506-7, 



'pope's Pioneers, p. 48 
m.w.f . 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 325 

Itm for a nimming sheet and rugg lent unto the Steward Robert ^ 

Rino- for the undertakers use - 

Itm fo°a cabbiu bouglit m the ship because I had not conven- 
ience in the ship according to agreement for myselte & ^ ^^ ^ 

ItrnTr a woraans pillion lost in the ship Hopewell . . • . . 10 
Itm costs & charges att BristoU from the 24th of May till the 
ISth of June for myselfe & family because att the said 24th 
day we should have bin gone 

1 Itm they iiiidcrtooke to victuall the said ship Charles for 
16 weckes & to carry but 150 passingers but they carryed in 
the savd ship a great many more passingers to my remem- 
brance and they the passingers were debarred of oui' beere 
k water before landing and if we had bin put to a long voyage 
we must needs have suffered much more than we did W^^ I 
leave to the consideration of the Cort. [2-G] 



Henry Lymon defend' att tic suit o/ Henry Wolcot. 
Forasmuch as the defendant can prove by MT Avery master 
of the Hopewell and John Gover of Assize Newton in Devon- 
shire that the plaintiffe promised the dcfendent upon payment 
of 201 5' in Bristoll he should have his goods dehvered in 
New England w'^out any more to doe And whcras he [181] 
alleged before the Jury that he could make such proofe but 
did not name the witnesses whereupon the Jury being m hast 
hath cast him in 31 16^ The defendant humbly prayeth that 
judgment & execution be stayed till he can produce his 
witnesses. [Is.] 

John Bibhle2 make a letter of Attorney to Sibill Bibble 
his wife of Shadwell in Stepney parish & John Waterton of 

1 It may have been that it was at 1C37, and subsequently moved to ilal- 
the end of this vovar;e, rcfovred to above, den. He died in 1658 ; and at this his 
tbat Samuel Maverick gave bond for wife came to Xew England, and desirous 
1201 for the Company of the Charles " to perhaps of riddii.c; herself of her sibilant 
answer such actions as are or shall be name, married ^liles Nutt, and subse- 
brought." queutly John Doolittle. 

2 John Bibble was a Boston man in 



326 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

the same shippwright to sue James Buckley of Shad well afore- 
said upon the bond annexed &g. [Gt?.] 

John Barnes of Plymouth merchant bound to John Parker 
in lOOi for payment of 50^ 1 Sept next at his house at 
Plymouth. [Is.] 

Robert Mantell of Dorchester bynds himselfe by a writing 
under his hand to Theodore Atkinson to pay unto his use unto 
"William Baker Citizen & haberdasher of London dwelling in 
or neare Creed lane w^^in three weekes after the arivall of 
the ship wherein the said Robert ^ intendes to passe in England. 
dated 15 Oct 1G40. [C] 

Thomas Lund^ late of Hingham in N E makes a Ic' of 
Attorney to Thomas Grubb of Boston in N E to receive all 
moneys due unto him. 24 Oct 1640. [Qd.'] 

Will™ Pomfret^ of Dover upon Pascattaway river Planter 
bound to George DruelH of London marriner to deliver &, 
pay unto him or his assignes one thousand of redd oake mer- 
chantable clapboard for the passage of Hosanna Pomfrett his 
wife & Elizabeth their daughter. [Is.] 

John Holgrave ^ of Salem in N. E. marriner bound to Edward 
Paine of Wap : in the County of Midd marriner for payment 
of 37^ ult' Julii px at his house in Salem. [Is.] 

1 The said Robert did pass into Eng- This is all Savage says on the matter. 
land, I imagine, for he ccrtiunly has left Thomas Grabb -was a leather-dresser 
no trace behind him except this one living on Washington Street, opposite 
mention. Theodore Atkinson was a llilk. (See ante, p. 172. ) 
feltmaker of Boston. He came to this ° William Pomt'ret was early town 
country in 1634 in the employment of clerk of Dover, and lieutenant. He 
John Newgate the hatter, who, one may lived until 16S0. 

imagine, made the tall hats worn by all * George Druell, of London, called at 

the Puritan Governors; for he was a one time "marriner," and at another 

man of conseriuence, and 1 doubt not "grocer," was agent for one Edward 

was one of the first in his trade. Payne, mariner, of Wapping, as well, 

2 Thomas Lund, a merchant, brought doubtless, as for others. 

from Loudon, 1G46, power from certain & It is curious that this agreement of 

citizens of London to collect debts. John Holgi-ave should have been made 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 32T 

A charter party bctwcene M^ George Story ^ of Boston in 
N E merchant of the one p'° and Marke Beaplc master of the 
ship Green Lyon of Barnstable of burden 240 tunnes or 
thereab : part owners of the said ship of the other p^^ Wheras 
the said merchant hath laden the said ship ^s^^ Clapboards to 
the number of 8000 k 500 or thereabouts to be dd at {hlanh'] for 
^,ch fraight the said merchant or his assignes is to pay the said 
master w^'^in twelve dayes after arivall 2251 and o^ towards a 
pylott : the goods to be bound for security of payment. [0] 

Samuell HaskilP citizen t silk throster of London bound 
to John Hill gent in 141 to pay 7i upon the Arrivall of the 
ship the green Lyon in England aboard the said ship Coram 
me ct Jona Hopkins 2(3. Oct. 1640. \_M.] 

Elizabeth Freestone late of Alford in the County of Lin- 
colne and now of Boston in New England spinster daughter 
of Richard Frceston late of Horncastle in the County of 
Lincolne aforesaid woUendrapcr deceased makes a letter of 
Attorney to John Hutchinson of Alford aforesaid woUen- 
draper to receive & recover 401 of Mary Freeston of Thimbleby 
in the said County 'widdow & Executrix of the last will & 
testament of Robert Freeston my uncle who was executor of 
the last will & testament of Robert Freeston my grandfather 

with Edward Pavne rather than Druell, factory for the throwsting or twisting 
his agent in New England. It may be, of silk after it had been first wound 
however, that Druell was only Payne's and before it could be woven. At this 
agent for some particular transaction, time London was full of French Hague- 
John Holgrave himself is merely noted nots, busily engaged in introducing the 
by Savage as being representative at the silk manufacture there, who all turned 
first Assembly. their eyes to the New AYorld as a means 

1 Of George Story, of Boston, mer- of obtaining silk that need not come 
chant, little i^ known beyond what may through France and Italy. The experi- 
be derived from the history of Captain menls in silk culture were not suc- 
Keayne'3 sow, so frequently alluded to cessful even in the Southern and Middle 
by early historians of this country. States, where they were most tried, 

2 This entry unfortunately does not and in New England veiy little was 
throw any light on a subject of some ever done at all. See a very interesting 
interest which it calls to mind,— the article on " Colonial Husbandry " by 
culture of silk in New England. The Edward Eggleston in the Ccuiuri/J/asfa- 
silk-throwster was a man who ran a zine for January, ISSi. 



328 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

one of the Executors of the last will «fc testament of my said 
father and & 13^ 4*^ dividend part belonging to me by reason 
of the Death of my sister Mary and 5^ of Nathaniell Cuthljcrt 
of AVarming-ton in the County of Northampton Executor of tlie 
last will k testament of my grandmother Mary Cuthbert given 
me by her will. [os. Qd. 2 6] 

Md. Wheras the within mentioned one thousand of Clap- 
boards will be worth 111 it is agreed between the parties w*^in 
named that if the passage money Av^'^in mentioned <fe intended 
come not to so much that the said George Druell shall pay the 
said Wiir° Pomfrct in money so much as the said passage 
money or other charges for the w*^in mentioned Ilosanna and 
Eliz shall come short of the said ll^. 

[182] Phillip Gibbs <t al con Tlioma Allen &, Ricum 
Callicot 1 in recuss. [Is.] 

Philip Gibbs & al con Thoma Allen. [Is.] 

Will" Yicars of Wethersfield upon the river of Connccticott 
Planter a Certificat that he is there Inhabitant.^ [Is.] 

Samuell Haskill bound to Will™ Vicars for 7 yeares pro- 
vided that if 81 be payd him w*^in G dayes after the arrivall of 
the green lyon at London at the ship taverne near Billatcr 
lane London then this Indenture to be voyd MT John Cooke 
of Fanchurch streat belonging to the Custome House hath 50* 
of his given by his grandfather Mr George Cooke Inkeeper 
at the white horse w^**in Algate deceased 13 yeares since. 
[3s.] 

^ Richard Callicot was of Dorchester, that name. He appears only once or 

as was Thomas Allen. (See. p. 195. post.) twice in the Dorchester Records. 

The name of the former occurs fre- - This certificate (if it could be 

quently in the Dorchester Toicn Records found) ought to convince one of the 

(usually spelled Collicot). It is diffi- existence of Wm. Yicars, Savage not- 

cult to identify Thomas Allen in Savage, withstanding. 
on account of the lar-'e number bearing 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 329 

Abraham Sliawe^ sometime of Hallifax in the County of 
Yorke Clothier & late of Dedham in N E planter made his 
last will &, testament about November 1G38. & thereby made 
Joseph Shawe his eldest sonne & Nicholas Biram his sonne in 
lawe his executors & dyed having 100^ & divers other dutyes 
in the hands of severall persons they give a letter of attorney 
to Mr [blanki Best of Hallifax aforesaid Clothier to receive the 
same <t all profitts of Colemines whatsoever & the same 
Colemines to sell <fcc, [5s.] 

Joseph Redknap late of Hampton in the County of Midd and 
Citizen & coupcr of London makes a letter of attorney unto 
Reynold Stevens of London gent and John Stevens of Hamp- 
ton aforesaid yeoman to surrender a Coppihold in Hampton 
called Blackbush eight ^ now or late in the occupacon of 
Elizabeth Rcdknap his mother & all his interest therein. 
[2-6] 

John Bradshaw late of Lynne in New England husbandman 
makes a letter of attorney & assignement to Zacheus Gould 
of Lynne aforesaid yeoman to receive & recover 31 & all costs 
<fe charges^ w^^'^he recouvered in the last Court at Salem against 
M^ Thomas Willis. [6] 

John Page * of Waterton in N E pi. for 321 8' mortgageth 
unto George Druell Citizen & grocer of London Attorney & 
assignee of Edward Payne of Wapping in the C of ]\Iid mar- 
riner six heads of Cattel specifyed in a schedule hereunto 

1 We can aJd notliing to Savage's 3 "What these "costs and charges" 
note on Abraham Shaw from this letter could have been for, I can hardly imag- 
of attorney. ine. Mr. Thomas "Willis at this time was 

2 Savage says that this estate, called one of those appointed to " joyne with 
by him " Blackbush right," was sold by the magistrates at Salem to assist them 
Redknap in 1649 to one Edward Tom- in keeping their Courts." Bradshaw has 
lyns, which would seem as though it left no traceof himself. This notice seems 
■were not surrendered at this time. A as though he were going to England. 
friend suggests " Blackbush Eyot " as * John Page came to New England 
the name of the estate. The spelling with Winthrop, and lived in Water- 
in the text above, " eight," might easily town for a long time, having a son of 
stand for " Eyot." his name who lived there after him. 



330 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

annexed Provided that if he pay the said money ult' Mail |.x 
at his house in Waterton then &c. [2-8] 

Joseph Beraisi.of Waterton pi: bound to George Drudl 
agent for W. Payne in 141 to pay Ti 7' upon tlie 10'^ of March 
in good or merchantable Indian corne at 3^ 4^ the bushell at 
Mr Edward Tyngs at Boston in New England. [St?.] 

John Sampson of London merchant makes a letter of 
attorney to Philip White marriner to receive of Will°» Quicke 
18}. [Is.] 

[183] Job Judkin ^ & his wife a letter and a Release. [SfZ.] 

Mr Christopher Stanley for a letter coppied & a letter for 
his brother. [1-6] 

Articles of Agreement made tJie ScventJi day of November 
Aymo Dnl 1640 Bctiveeyie Captaine Robert Harding ^ of 
Newporte in the Me of Aquednecke in New England of the 
one parte And William Withington of Portsmouth in 
Aquednecke aforesaid Carpenter of the other parte as 
followeth. 

Imprimis the said Robert doth hereby grant and to ffarme lett 
unto the said Will™ all that the ffarme granted unto the said 
Robert by the said Towne- of Xewporte conteyning 300 acres 
at the leastc lying neare unto an Island called Canonicute w''^ 
all the medow ground thereunto belonging To have & to hold 
the said ffarme k all <fe singulare the jjremises w^^ the appur- 
tenances unto the said W'" his executors adm : t assigncs 
from the Date of these presents for the terme of nyne yeares 
from thenceforth next ensuing fully to be compleate and ended 

1 Joseph Bemis was not so old an some manner of trade to "William Bore- 
inhabitant, having been at Watertown man (y>. 142, ante). 

for only a year or so. He was a prorai- ^ Robert Harding went to Newport 

nent man in town affairs, often select- with others of tlie Hutchinson party 

man and so forth. after their defeat in Boston. He was a 

2 Job Judkin, it may be remembered, man of consideration in his new home, 
was one of those who undertook to teach as he had been in his old. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 331 

yealding and allowing therefore for the first seven yeares of 
the said termc at the end of the said seven yeares unto the 
said Robert his heires and assignes the worth of two hundred 
and ten pounds in buildings fencings draynings of mcdow or 
other labour bestowed in improving the premises to be made 
& done on the same in the meane time the said buildings 
fencings draynings and labour thereabout or other labour as 
afors"^= to be valued by indifferent men to be chosen by and 
betweene the said partyes to these presents their heires ex- 
ecutors administrators and assignes according to every dayes 
labour of men thereabout at the rate of 2^ 6*^ for a mans dayes 
worke and for cattells labour at 10^ a Dayes worke for a suffi- 
cient 'teame And yeilding and paying therefore yearely for 
the two last yeares of the said terme of nyne yeares unto the 
said Robert his heires and assignes the yearely rent of forty 
pounds at two termes in the yeare that is to say the seventh 
day of May and the seventh day of November by equall por- 
tions to be payd. 

Itm that the said Will™ his executors adm" or assignes 
shall or may lawfully have &, take timber & wood on the 
premises if there it may be had for the said buildings fences 
draynings and reparations thereof and also firewood for his 
& their owne spending from time to time during the said 
terme w^^out doing any voluntary wast on the premises by 
selling or carrying away of timber or otherwise. 

Itm that the said Will™ his executors adm" or ass^ shall 
& will from time to time well ct sufficiently rcpaire & amend 
the said buildings fences <fc draynings during the said two last 
yeares of the said terme of nyne yeares and the same so well 
& sufficiently repaired & amended w*^ all tlic premises in the 
end of the said terme to leave & yeald up unto the said Robert 
his heires or assignes. 

Itm that the said Robert his heires & assignes shall in the 
end of the said terme take off & buy all such cartes waynes 
<fc husbandry instruments w*^ the appurtenances as the said 
Will™ liis executors adni" or ass^ shall make and use on the 
prmises during the said terme at the rate they cost according 
to 2? 6? a mans dayes worke in the making of them if the 



832 LECHFORD'S MAXUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

said TV™ liis executors adrn'^^ or ass^ shall be willing to sell 
the said cart "wayiics «t instruments. 

Itm the said Robert doth hereby let unto the said Will™ one 
stocke of eight Cowcs all- supposed to bo w^^ Calfe one young 
bull one young steare two cow calfes and one great sowc all w'=^ 
are esteemed to be worth ten Cowes To have and to hold the 
said stocke of Cattell unto the said W™ his executors admin- 
istrators and assignes during the said tcrme of nync yeares 
jeilding & allowing therefore at the end of the first three 
yeares of the said terme unto the said Robert his executors 
adm" or assignes ten of the best cattell that he or they shall 
choose out of the increase of the said stocke and in lieu of 
the said bull steare calfes and sowc makeing the said stocke to 
be ten Cowes by adding two Cowes to the said Eight Cowes 
And yeilding & allowing att the end of the sixt yeare of the 
said terme ten more of the best new increase cattell that the 
said Robert his executors adm" or assignes shall choose out 
of- the said new increase of the said stocke of ten cowes And 
at the end of the nyneth k last yeare of the said terme ten 
more of the best new increase cattell that he or they shall 
choose out of the said new increase of the said stocke of ten 
Cowes together w*^ said stocke of ten Cowes or as many of 
tliem as shall be tlicn alive and all other Cowes added to 
the same stocke. 

Itm that the said Robert his executors adm" and assignes 
shall from time to time stand to the losse of the said stocke 
and make good the same as they shall decrease or decay 
during the said tcrme so it be not through the wilfull default 
of the said Will"^ his executors adm" or ass^ in w*^*" case he 
or they shall make good the said stocke by the valuation 
also of indifferent men as aforesaid. 

Itm that at the end of the said third sixt & nyneth yeares 
■when the said Robert his executors adm" or assignes have 
made choice of their said increase cattell the residue of the 
increase Cattell of the said stocke except the said two cowes 
to be added to the said stocke shall be accounted and be the 
proper goods k chattells of the said "William his executors 
adm" or assignes. 



L.;.. 



LECJIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 606 

Itm the said William his executors administrators or as- 
signes shall keepe the ten new increase Cattell to be yeildcd 
& allowed as aforesaid out of the said new increase at the 
said sixt ycare arid during the said last three yeares of the said 
terme yeilding and allowing therefore at the end of the said 
terme unto the said Robert his executors administrators and 
assignes ten of the best cattell that he or they shall choose out 
of the increase of the said ten new increase Cattell together 
w"* the said ten new increase Cattell or as many of them as 
shall be then alive and all other Cattell added unto the said 
new increase Cattell [184] the said Robert his executors ad- 
ministrators and assignes standing to the hazzard of the said 
ten increase cattell and from time to time make good the same 
number of them during the said terme if they decrease or 
decay so it be not through the wilfull default of the said 
"Will™ his executors admrs or assg in w*'"' case he or they shall 
make good the said number of ten increase cattell and the 
said "Will™ his executors administrators and assignes to have 
the residue of the increase. of the said ten new cattell as his 
& their owne proper goods & chattells. 

Itm the said Robert doth hereby grant unto the said Wil- 
liam all the hay now upon the premises to be valued for 
quantity by indifferent men to be chosen betweenc the said 
Ptys and the said valuation to-be written on the back syde of 
these presents To have and to enjoy the said Hay to the said 
Will™ his executors administrators and assignes Yeilding and 
allowing therefore unto the said Robert his executors admini- 
strators and assignes the keepeing of one Cowe this winter 
and the summering and wintering of one calfe every yeare 
following during the said terme of nyne yeares and twice so 
much hay or els twice as much hay and once as much straw 
in quantity as the said hay now granted shall be valued at. In 
witnesse &c. [6s. or a bushcll of wheat or a bs <fe halfe of Ind.] 

Anne Stratton^ of Salem in New England widdow aged 
about fifty yeares late wife of John Stratton of Shotley in the 

^ The Note-book for some pages is and notes in regard to a suit brouglit 
now filled with depositions, petitions, by Mrs. Anne Stratton, of Salem, ag-ainst 



334 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

County of Suffolk gent deceased sworne saith that Josejdi 
Stratton sometime of Harwich in the County of Essex mui- 
riner and now of James Citty in Virginia brother of her said 
husband did in or about the yeare of our Lord one thousand 
six lumdred and twenty eight stand indebted unto AVill"^ 
Stratton this deponent her sonnc deceased in the summe of 
80i principall debt for payment whereof the said Joseph 
entered into one bond or obligation of a greater sumrac ^v"^ 
said debt should have bin payd unto this deponent her said 
Sonne in his life time about 12 yearcs since. And this de- 
ponent saitli that the said Joseph Stratton did likewise in or 
about the yeare of our Lord one thousand six hundred and 
twenty three stand indebted unto her said husband by bill or 
bond in the summe of sixty pounds at the least principall 
debt w'^'* should have bin payd unto her said husband in his 
lifetime about IT yearcs since and this deponent saith that 
she doth not knowe that the said Joseph hath payd or satis- 
fied the said principall debts or any parte thereof one or other 
unto her said Sonne or husband their [or] either of their exe- 
cutors administrators or ass^. And this deponent saith that 
the said Joseph did by Avord of mouth in this deponents hear- 
ing and by letters of this w'^^ this deponent hath seen & read 
acknowledge the said debt of 80^ unto the said Will™ Stratton 
and promised satisfaction thereof and did also acknowledge 
the said debt of sixty pounds demanded on the behalfe of her 
said husband and likewise promised payment thereof twelve 
yearcs since or thereabouts. And this deponent saith that 
she had both the said spccialtyes in keeping divers yearcs 
but after the death of the said Will"" this deponent to her best 
remembrance delivered them unto her sonnc John Stratton 
of Salem aforesaid to whomc of right the said debts did &: 
doth belong as she conceiveth He being Executor of the last 
will <fc Testament of her said late husband and brother unto 
the said Will™ .who was also indebted unto the said John and 

hev brotlicr-in-la\v "VHUirtHi Stratton, of (see nnfc, p. 121), and of Elizabeth, 
James City (so called), Virginia. We wlio became the wife of John Thorn- 
learn little from the case that is now of dike, — a fact unknown to Savage. Of 
interest. Jlrs. Anne Stratton was the Joseph Stratton, of Virginia, I know 
mother of John Stratton, of Scarborough nothing. 



LECIIFORUS MAyUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 335 

ill particular bv the ^vriting now shewed unto this deponent 
whereto she did write her name as a witnesse and was present 
when the same was subscribed sealed & delivered by the said 
Will'^ And she. hath credibly heard and verely believcth that 
the said John lost the said two first mentioned specialtycs by 
Castin- away of a Boatc w^^ many other goods & writings 
belonghig to the said John And further [185] this deponent 
saith'the said Will" being to goe for Virginia in the yearc 
1G28 first above mentioned had of her this deponent divers 
goods amounting to the value of forty pounds at the least 
of lawfull money of England and that he had of the said 
John other goods to the value of fifty pounds at the least of > 
like lawfull money of England all w'^'^ goods or very ncarc all 
of them the said Joseph carryed away w^^ him to Yirgiiiia 
leaving the said WilP behind him in England. And lastly 
this deponent sailh that the said Joseph about the time of 
his said departure forth of England had of the said John her 
Sonne one Watch and a Clockc for W^^ the said Joseph was 
to pay nnto the said John the summe of five pounds of like 
lawfull money. [2s. 6] 

Ralph Fogge i of Salem in New England gent aged about 
forty yeares^ sworne saith that he was present to his best 
remembrance and saw Avhen the two specialtycs mentioned 
in the aforewrittcn deposition of M'?^ Anne Stratton were by 
her delivered unto her said sonne John Stratton at Dedliam 
in the County of Essex. [Gd.] 

Elizabeth Thorndike aged about 26 yeares wife of John 
Thorndike of Salem in New England gent sworne saith that 
she was present and saw when her mother W}' Anne Stratton 
delivered unto her brother John Stratton the two bonds or 
specialtves w-^^ she hath heard & verely believeth were made 
by ^IT Joseph Stratton the one of them for eighty pounds to 
her brother Will"' Stratton deceased and the other of them 

1 Ralph Fo--, whose deposition in ^vards moved to Salem, where he re- 
the Stratton case here ai-pears, was a mained until 1652. when he went home 
Plymouth man at first (1033), but after- . to London. 



336 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

for sixty pounds unto her father M^ John Stratton deceased 
to the best remembrance of this deponent And this deponent 
knoweth that her brother John Stratton Avas & is executor 
of the last will k testament of her said father &c. [1.] - 

John Stratton of Salem in New England gent aged about 
34 yeares sworne saith that his mother M™ xinne Stratton in 
or about the moneth of December in the yeare of our Lord 
1631 delivered unto this deponent at Dedham in Essex in the 
presence of E,alfc Fogge and this deponents sister Elizabeth 
Thorndike the two specialtyes wherein liis uncle M^ Joseph 
stood bound in the one of them for eighty pounds unto my 
brother Will™ Stratton deceased and in the other of them for 
sixty pounds unto his father M! John Stratton deceased And 
this deponent saith that he knoweth the said specialtyes were 
the proper acts and deeds of the said Joseph by his hand k 
scale and further this deponent saith that he lost the said 
specialtyes w'^ other writings & goods by the casting away 
of a boate at Cape Porpis in America about ten yeares since. 
And this deponent saith that the writing now shewed unto 
him is the testimony of Isaacke Allerton marriner and that 
it is subscribed w^^ his proper hand writing & name <tc. 
[1-6] 

To Thomas Dudley Esq' Governor of the Jurisdiccon of the 
Mattachusetts Bay in New England and all other his Isla^ 
Judges &, Officers whomsoever it may concerne [186] The 
Certificat of John Endecott Esq'' one of the Assistants or 
Magistrates of the Jurisdicon aforesayd I the said John 
Endecott doe hereby Certify that the severall Testimonies 
hereafter written were taken before me upon the oathes of 
the severall deponents upon the [hlank\ day of Xovember Anno 
Dui 1640 and that the sayd scA-erall depponents subscribed 
their severall names to their said respective testimonies and 
that one writing concerning a thousand pounds of tobacco w*^^ 
should have bin sent by one "Will™ Stratton unto John Strat- 
ton now of Salem in New England gent was sliewed before me 
unto Wl^ Anne Stratton at the time of her examination and 



LECIIFOllD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. oo ( 

deposition hereafter \\-ritten And [mother writing purporting 
to be a testimony under the handwriting of Isaacke Allerton 
was likewise shewed before me unto John Stratton aforesaid 
at the time of his examination and deposition liereafter speci- 
fyed to w'=^ scverall writings I have also sett my hand in testi- 
mony thereof And lastly that true Coppies of the said two 
writings are hereafter specifyed as foUoweth <fcc. [2s. 6] 

Mr Kobert Keayne Mr Thomas Owen^ merch* and M^ 
Thomas Stegge of "W^ynoke in Virginia Merchant Attorneys 
for M^ Stratton. Mf Owen only for M^^ Stratton. [2-6] 

Knowe all men by these presents that I Anne Stratton of 
Salem in New England widd doe hereby constitute <fcc Thomas 
Owen of Boston in N E merchant my true and lawfull Attor- 
ney &Q,. 50^ or 401 (tc and all and all manner of dammages 
costs charges & expences lost suffered or layd out by reason 
of the [(%/We] or for and about the recovery of the said debts 
& summcs of money or any of them. [Is.] 

HoNERESSiME DoMiNE — Multa sit tibi salus precor a Deo 
forti nostro ac omnipotenti p dominum Jcsum unicH Salva- 
torem. Gratias tibi habeo Domine propter tuam crga me 
meosquc bcnevolentiam singularem et cum fuerimus vobis- 
cum ct adhuc coniugem meam liospitando <fcc De Colonia 
stabilienda p Confabulationem cum Eeclesia (cui me devinxit 
solemnc pactum) pro comperto habeo, lis precipue esse Cura 
ut ubicumque operi edificando Incumburit politicum regimen 
libernum absolutum et independens iis stabiliri possit Domi- 
nus Underbill ^ ad te statim venturus est. Rursus ac rursum 
pro omni tua in me bcnevolentia tibi gratolor et tutelae Dei 
te Committens maneo. 

Tui observantissimus 

RiCHAKDUs Morris. 

Novembr 5 1640. 

^ Thomas Owen is known only ^ f^jig jg i\^ g^st mention of Under- 
through mention of him by AVinthrop, hill in the Xote-hook ; but it seems more 
not here pertinent, and another of like proper to reserve notice of him until 
nature in Mass. Col. Ecc, i. 223. p. 222. 

22 



338 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

[187] To the right tvor^' the Governor Council ^- Assist* of this 
Jurisdiccon. 

The Complaint ''■ 0/ Richard Lang of Wei/inouth in N E Clajy- 
board ryver against John Upham arid Will*' Smith in 
behalfe of themselves ^' the rest of the freemen of the said 
Towne of Weymouth 

Sheweth that this Comp^hathbinan Inhabitant in Weymouth 
aforesaid by the space of six yeares last past or thereabouts 
and ought in right to have a share in the necke of land in 
Waymouth. the said John Upham k W S Sc the rest of the 
said defend'^ w*^out the gcnerall Consent of the Towne made 
an agreement that the new Planters with Richard Silvester 
& Arthur Warren should have the said necke of land allot- 
ted among them and unjustly left out this Compl*^ name say- 
ing that he was no planter and whereas this Compl* should 
have had three acres of land at the least upon the plainc 
the Defend'* have assigned him but two acres there And 
whereas the Pit had three acres of land going to the mill 
the said Defend** have uniustly given the same to Richard 
Knight And the said Defend'* deteyne the Pits share of the 
meddow ground within the said towne w*^^ should be three 
acres at the least And the said defend*^ have assigned and 
taken great lotts to themselves but have not assigned any 
great lotts to the rest of the planters there. And tliey have 
uniustly given away lands out of this CompP* and other men 
their rights And also have overrated tliis Compl' and other 
inhabits there. Lastly the said defend'* keepe the Towne 
booke disorderly some leaves having bin cutt forth <fc some 
blotts and other defects there are therein Tlie Compl* praycth 
that the defend'* may be enjoined to appeare at the next 
Court to answere the premises k bring the said Towne booke 
w*"* them. [1—6] 

1 I cannot find that this petition of also deputies, and Warren and Silvester 

Eichard Lang was ever acted njion. were both well-known men ; so it is 

John Upham and William Smith were probable that the matter was passed 

both commissionei-s for Weymouth, and over. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 339 

Captaine Richard Morris bound to Josuah Hewes for 141 to 
be p-*' 20 April px 23 Nov: IG-iO. [GJ.] 

John Rogers of Accamenticus in New England aged about 
27 yeares sworne saith that in or about May last past he this 
deponent delivered unto Thomas Jones a tayler who after- 
wards dyed as this deponent hath heard by the blowing up 
of the Mary Rose these commodities hereafter following 
to be made into stockings <fe a cap viz* a yarde of kersey 
or thereabouts worth 4^ and two yards & haKe of bayes 
worth 6*. 

Robert Rogers of Boston in New England aged 23 yeares 
sworne saith that in or about the moneth of June last 
Thomas James a tayler who was slayne in the blowing 
up of the Mary Rose confessed he had things to make for 
this deponents kinsman John Rogers <fc promised to make 
them up. 

[188] To the right tiwr" S^ Francis "Wyatt KnigW^ Governor 
and Captaine generall of his 3Ia'^ Colony in Virginia 

The Bill of Complaint of John Stratton of Salem in New 
England gent 

In all humble manner sheweth unto yo' wor^ that yo' sup- 
pliant is Sonne and heire and Executor of the last will and 
Testament of John Stratton sometime of Shotley in the County 
of Suffolk gent deceased and that Joseph Stratton now of 
James City in Virginia gent yo' suppliants uncle and brother 
of the said Testator in or about the yeare of our Lord One 
thousand six hundred twenty and three stood indebted by bill 
or bond unto the said Testator yo'^ suppliants said ffather in 
the summe of sixty pounds of lawfull money of England prin- 
cipal! debt : And that yo'' suppliant had a Brother one William 

1 Savage saj-s, in a note on JVin- Sir Francis Wyatt from 1639, when 

throp, ii. 150, that S. AV. Campbell is Hervoy was superseded, to 1611, when 

the only wTiter known to him " who Berkeley was appointed." 
takes notice of the administration of 



T J'l \l 



340 LECIIFORD'S MAXUSCRIPr NOTE-BOOK. 

Stratton of Ardlye in tlio County of Essex gent deceased who 
about the yeare of our Lord one thousand six hundred and 
twenty eight intended to passe over from England into A'ir- 
ginia in Company with the said Joseph Stratton and had for 
his portion one hundred pounds in redy money in his purse 
and besides yo'' suppliants adventured by him and delivered 
into his hands divers moneys goods and commodities to the 
value of ffifty pounds at the least And tins Complainant saith 
that tlie said Joseph by his faire intreatics <fc perswasions in 
the said yeare 1G28 borrowed eighty pounds of the said Will'^ 
out of his said portion and entered into one bond of a greater 
summe how much in certaine this Comp'^ cannot remember for 
the repayment of the said eighty pounds after that sometime 
in the same yeare or neare thereabouts and also the said Josepli 
by his said intreatys and perswasions gott into his hands Sc 
possession all or very neare all of the said goods & commodi- 
ties w'^'* this Complainant delivered unto the said Will™ and 
the said Joseph having gotten into his hands the said 801 and 
501 worth of goods and upon some pretence of businesse sent 
the said Will™ from Plymouth to Ardelye afors"^ the said 
Joseph bearing the said Will™ in hand that he would stay at 
Plimouth aforesaid till the said Will™ returned thither and so 
both together to passe over into Virginia but the said Will™ 
was no sooner come to Ardelye aforesaid but newes followed 
him that the said Joseph had sett sayle <fc was gone for Vir- 
ginia and so he carrycd away the said BQl being the greatest 
parte of the said Will™^ portion and the said fifty pounds 
worth of goods and commodities and left the said Will™ in 
England to rely upon yo"" suppliant and his mother for his 
maintenance to their great costs & charges And yo"" supjdiant 
further showeth [189] that the said Joseph never payd tlic 
said debts or any parte of the same either to yo' suppliants 
ffather or Brother in their lives time nor since to yo'' suppliant 
and further that his mother M"!' Anne Stratton now of Salem 
aforesaid did deliver both the said specialtyes to yo"" Suppliant 
about ten yeares since at Dcdham in Essex and afterwards 
the same yeare or thereabout yo' suppliant lost them by cast- 
ing away of a boate at Cape porpis in America wherein the 



LECIIFORUS MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 341 

said specialtyes &, many other -vy'ritiiigs k goods of this Com- 
pl'^ were lost. Also this CompP shewetli that he is the only 
brother and heire of the said Will™ and that he was indebted 
■ unto yo' Siippts and therefore of right the administration of 
tlie said Will™ his goods rights k credits belongeth to be 
granted unto yo"" suppliant as next of kin and creditor to 
the said Will™ or to whomsoever yo' suppl' shall depute there- 
unto and because yo"" SupP cannot at this season conveniently 
travell to Virginia he hath deputed W. Robert Keaync Mr 
Thomas Owen and ]\lr Thomas Stegge or either of them to 
procure the said letters of admm unto whome yo^ suppliant 
prayeth yo"" Avor^* to grant the saide or to one of them and to 
take their names or one of them as CompP^ in this present 
bill w*"^ yo'" suppliant for the better recovery of the premises 
in yo"" suppP* behalfc And this Compl* further showeth tliat 
the said Joseph had of yo"" suppP one watch and one clocke in 
tlie said yeare 1628 for w*^^ the said Joseph was by agreement 
shortly after to pay yo"" suppliant live pounds but he hath not 
to this day payd the same nor any parte thereof to yo"" sup- 
pliant. Notwithstanding yo'' said suppl* shewetli that the said 
Joseph did often times both by word of mouth k letters of his 
acknowledge the said debts k receipt of the said goods k of 
the said watch k clocke k promised satisfaction of all the 
premises to the full but when he understood that yo"" sup- 
pliant had so lost the said specialtyes afores*^ then the said 
Joseph refused to performe his said promises or to make pay- 
ment k satisfaction for the p''mis and still refuseth so to doe 
Now forasmuch as yo'^ suppliant hath no remedy by the strict 
rules of the Common Law but in equity he ought to be 
relieved in the premises He humbly prayeth yo' worships 
releife therein according to equity and good Conscience and 
that the said CompP may be allowed not only the said prin- 
cipall debts comming in all to 1951 or thereabouts but for Pam- 
mage and Dcteyning of the same all this while w*^*^ comes to 
2001 more at the least, and yo' suppliant prayeth that the said 
Joseph may be cnjoyncd immediately to answere the premises 
k to stand to yo' wor^P* order k decree in the same And yo' 
suppliant shall pray etc. 



342 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Robert Keayne of Boston in N E m ; makes a Ic'' of Attoin 
unto John Tinker ^ of Windsorc upon the river of Connerti- 
cott planter to receive of Will™ llubberd of Windsorc 10' of 
John Ilaynes Esq' 21 10^ :M^ Robert Saltonstall oOt. Iknry 
Browning 41 4* S-^- Thomas Witherle 21 14^ 2'^- Will™ Quicke 
41 7' W^ W Higginson 15^ David Anderson Gl G^ [Is.] 

[190] An Afti'^' for Mf Keayne twice written. [Is.] 

The orders of the last Cort for Boston ^ Mr Cogan. [2—0] 

John Scobell of Boston Carpenter jjlt. 

John Hollx^d of Dorchester fcrrpnan defend'- 

in trespass on the Case? 

1. The CompP sheweth that whereas the defendant was to pay 
him 45* 8*^ for Carpentry worke done at the defendts house 
by agreement of both party es and 31 19' 8*^ for sawing & 
squaring of timber k boards and the said last menconed 
summes the Defend' unjustly as his owne judge by order of a 
certaine attachment in his owne person attached and defaulted 
31 18^ of the same money when he had tendred the said whole 
summe of six pounds five shillings and foure pence before 
witnesse saying he attached this money as due unto himselfc 
never sending the said attach™ to this CompP never warning 
him to any court nor giving him any Coppy of the said 
attachm* and deteyned the same in his hands about two 
moneths, whereby the Pit was not only damnifyed butt the 

1 John Tinker, several times men- nature (vol.i. p. 152), — where lie had 
tioned in the first few pages of tlie Note- to do with a different character from the 
hook, was at this time at Windsor, but meek Scobell. This last had not sutli- 
subsequentl}- was of Boston, and after- cient force of mind even to do anything 
wards of New London. The names which should have brought his name 
which follow may be found in Savage, down to us (such as being born, marry- 
^"t nothing of consequence is kno\\Ti of ing, dying, being chosen to oversee 
them. fences, and the like). Holland, on the 

2 There is no mention at all of this contrary, was well known in Dorchester, 
case in the Colonial Record. Holland's — a merchant of good repute, says Sav- 
name may be seen there, in another age, and usually honored in the Toini 
case, however, of somewhat the same Record by the title of Jlr. 



LECH FORD'S MANUSCRIPr NOTE-BOOK. 6V6 

Magistrates and Justice of the Country disiionoured for w'='^ 
tlic defend' is lyable to a fine and also to satisfye the pit for 
his dammagcs aforesaid y^"^ he alleageth to be ten shillings at 
the least by Arbitrement of certaine men indifferent and that 
after much trouble charge <t expence of time w'^^ the defend* 
wrongfully put the pit to thereabout. [Wm Evans] 

2. The Plaintiffe complainctli that when the said Arbitration 
was to be made he offered the defend* to submit all things 
■^yrch ^yp^-e owlng by the plaintiffe unto the defend' unto the 
said Arbitrators to end at once and further offered to pay 
and allow the said defend* what was due unto him for any 
cause or thing whatsoever but the defend* intending to cir- 
cumvent the pit w'^ faire pretences allcaging the things due 
to him the said defend* were for womens matters and that 
he would afterwards put those things to the arbitr™* of any 
indifferent men persuaded the pit to let his demands only 
be arbitrated W^^ was done accordingly by the said arbi- 
trators But afterwards the said defend* hath unjustly quar- 
relled against the said arbitrement and demanded of the 
plaintiffe more than was his defendants due but refused to 
put his said demands to the arbitrement of any arbitrators 
contrary to his promise aforesaid. But afterwards and after 
the said wrongfull attachm* upon the persuasion of some of the 
Church of Dorchester the said defend* did condescend to sub- 
mit his said demands to the arbitrement of the two Elders 
there and this Corapl* did also yeild thereunto. Notwith- 
standing the said defend* after all tliat trouble to the said 
Elders k charges and trouble to the plaintiffe in coming 
from Boston to Dorchester about it twice brake of the said 
arbitremt because he could not persuade this Compl* to dis- 
solve the said first Arbitracon w*^*" he knew not whether he 
might lawfully doe seeing both the said partyes were by writ- 
ing under their hands bound in 201 apeece to stand to the 
award of the said first Arbitrators. [Witnesses the Arbitra- 
tors. Mr Henry Witherington & W"* Ware.] 

And in the Cort before the Magistrates «fc the Jury the 
defend* alleaged that this Compl* had wroaght w**^ him 25 
weekes & brought his servant Edward Emans to witnesse the 



344 LECIIFOIID'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. - 

same upon oath and according to that time demanded for dvct 
lodging washing & starching for this CompP «fc house roonie 
for his goods. [The Cort booke. John Matthcwes for begin 
time John Smith & Richard Evans for the end.] 

for dyet from (9) 4 1G39. for 6 weekes the pit Trrought for 
meat drink lodging and 20'' a day. -w*^^ comes to 45* 8*^ after- 
wards till the 3*^ day of the first mon : |^|9 the pit was to 
worke for the defend' in the woods to saw <fc square tim- 
ber & boards for halfc the sawing worke [191] or the value 
thereof and one weeke of this time he was dyetted by the 
defend* but afterwards dyetted himsclfe saving upon last 
dayes at night & upon the Lords Days during that time. 

1. He alleaged & proved by oath in Court that the Compl' 
had diet last dayes night & Lords dayes 13 or 14. whereas it 
was but 8 or 9 for the pit wrought w'*' him but 17 weekes in 
all so hereby the pit Avas ovcrreckoned 5* 10*^. [W™ Evans 
Agnes Evans Richard Evans.] 

2. for washing & starching 8* G*^ reckoning 4*^ a weeke for 25 
weekes w"^ was 2* 8"^ too much k besydes the pit lost a band 
worth 2^ w°^ is 4^ 8"^ in all. [W™ Evans Agnes Evans] 

3. the defendant demanded for lodging the pit the said first 
5 weekes 3^ or thereabouts Avhcreas he was not to pay anything 
for the same. [John ^Matthews Ric^ Evans.] 

4. the defend' demanded for lodging the pit w'^ his boyes the 
said last dayes nights & Lords dayes nights 2* G'^ when his 
owne servant lodged upon the pi'* bed at dorchester mill the 
other five dayes in the weeke w'^^ at 1*^ a night comes to 3* so 
that for this the pP is to be allowed 5*. [John Smith "W™ 
Evans.] 

6. the defend' demanded for houseroome of 2 halfe hogs- 
heads 2 chests ct one smale box & a case of bottles 8* G*^ w'^*' 
yet were stowed over a Cowhouse av'=^ the pit built k was not 
satisfied for till the time of the said attachment and the de- 
fend'* wife <fc servant hurt some of the pit* tooles yet for 14 
weekes houseroome 5* the pit willingly alloweth so that he 
may have forbearance of his hire of 45* 8'^ abovesaid. [W"" 
Evans k his wife Agnes.] 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 345 

6. the defend* demanded 6^ for three dayes worke of his in 
the woods w'=^ the Comp'' saith was cut off by the said first 
arbitrement and is another breach of the said arbitreinent by 
the defelld^ [Arb : Rich Evans John Math : W^ Ware.] 
AVhereby the pit hath bin put to tlicse losses 
1. at the making of the first arbitrement lo^ 2. lost for 
2 dayes workc to demand the money on the arbitrement 4? 
misreckoning & overreckoning 11 8^ 18* costs of suit losse 
of time 6\ 2 dayes worke 4^ viz* 15' so that the pit hath 
now no more than just 4^ 4*^ for all his winters worke lost and 
all through the defend*' fault. [6-0 r 3'. r 2.] 

In the Court at Boston 10. 1. 1G40. 

John Scobell of Boston Carpenter pit ^ .^^ ^^ ^^.^^ ^^ 
John Holland of Dorchester ferryman > ^ ,, ^^, ^j,, ,^,,. 
def J 

The PP"^^ complaineth that whereas the defend* was in- 
debted unto the pit about the 10*^ day of the lO*'^ moncth 
1639. in the summe of 45' 8*^ for carpentry worke done by the 
pit for the defend* at his house in Dorchester at the rate of 
twenty pence a Day dyet and lodging by agreement betweene 
the said pit and defend* and wheras afterwards the said pit 
was by like agreement betweene them to worke and did 
worke for the defend* w*^ one of his servants in the woods 
in Dorchester bounds in sawing k, squaring of timber & 
boards from about the said 10'^ day of the said 10*^ moneth 
till the 3'^ day of the first moneth then following for halfe of 
the said sawing worke or the value thereof and to have meate 
and drinke of the defend* for 5' a weeke and the pit so luul 
meate & drinke of the defend* for one weeke from the said 
tenth day but afterwards by agreement also betweene them 
the said pit was to find and did find himselfe meate & drinke 
in the woods and whereas the said pi* received some smale 
comforts of the defend* as houseroome in an outhouse for 
a few goods last dayes at night suppers k Lords dayes dyet 
washing & starching lone of a boate <fe men to fetch the 
pi** goods by night and lodging the said last dayes <fc night & 



346 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK.. 

Lords dayes & nights for w«=^ tlier was no agreement betwccne ' 
them of any payment to be made by the pi* for the same. [192j 
Tlie said pP saith that he upon the said S""-^ day of the first 
moneth upon just cause given by the defend' k his servant left 
off worke in the woods for the deft and afterwards damantkd 
of him satisfaccon for the said worke ' according to the said 
at^reement But the said defend' refusing to let the said pi' 
have halfe the said sawing worke for his labour aforcsayd and 
going about to deceive the pP of his just recompcncc for lii.s 
labour aforesaid alleaged that the plaintiffe was not to be his 
owne judge of the worth of his said labour nor should have 
his owne asking but required the same might be arbitrated 
betweene them by indifferent men whereto the pi' willingly 
condescended but the said defend' refused to attend the said 
arbitrement k delayed the pi' k put to nmch trouble there- 
about so that the pi' was at length forced to sue the defend' 
at the law k the pi' w"^ his witnesses k the defend' coming 
to Boston thereabout upon the 2 day of the 7'^ mo : 1640 the 
defend' then k there promised the pi* if that he would with- 
draw his said accon k put the said matters in controversy 
betweene them for the said worke to the arbitracon of indif- 
ferent men that the defend' would also afterwards put all his 
demands touching the controversy aforesayd being as he said 
but womens matters to tlie arbitrement of men indifferent 
w'^out suit and the said pi' indeed saith that he trusting upon 
the said promise of the defend' did withdraw the said accon 
and thereupon the pi' put the same matter of the worke in 
the woods to the arbitrement and they bound themselves each 
to other in a bond or assumpsit of 201 a peece to stand to the 
arbitrement of indifferent men betweene them that is to say 
John Mathew Robert Streson Richard Evans and Will" Ware 
for and about all matters in controversy betweene them the 
said pi' and defend' touching the said sawing worke k timber 
wromrht k squared in the woods k all things thereabout And 
tlie said Arbiti-ators thereupon awarded that the said defend' 
should pay the said pit for the same 31 19^ 8"^ out of w<=^ the 
pi' was to allow unto the defend' for worke done for one 
[WanJt] Leeds 22^ Q" whereof the pit was redy and did offer 



LECHFOIW'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE^BOOK. 347 

the defend' allowance And the pit saith the defend* had 
notice of the said Arbitrement and being demanded by the 
Pit to fulfill the same he the defend' pretended he would so 
do hut did not performe the same contrary to his said bond 
or assumpsit of 201 and deteyned the said 54' 8*^ nyne or ten 
monetlis and contrary to his promise afores*^ refused to put 
his said demands touching the said controversies to the ar- 
bitrement of indifferent men and under colour of an attach- 
ment w*=^ he as his owne judge in his owne person executed 
deteyned the said pits right upon the said arbitrement being 
2t. 17^ 2**. two moneths or thereabouts never warning the 
plaintifFe to appeare at any Court nor giving him any coppy 
or readiug of the said attach™' to him And although the pit 
and defend' afterwards submitted themselves touching the 
said defendts demands to the arbitrement of the two ruling 
Elders of the Church of Dorchester yet the said defend' after- 
wards when the said Elders mett to consider thereof brake off 
the said arbitrement because the pit would not dissolve the 
said first arbitrement touching the said worke in the woods 
And thereupon the defend' brought his accon for his said 
demands in the last Court at Boston whereof the pit had but 
one dayes cleare notice and then and there before the Magis- 
trates k Jury in open Court taking the pit unprovided of his 
proofes did overreckon the pit and by and under proofes 
recovered against the pit above thirty shillings more than 
by any right or reason he was to pay unto the said defend' 
besydes costs trouble charges and other dammages the pit 
received thereabout in all 20^ And thereupon he brings his 
suit. [ps. IM., 4s. M., OS. Od., 5s. Od., 38. 6d., Gs. = V 8s. Od.'] 
The pits proofes. 

1. That the defendant owed the pit 45^ 8*^ for carpentry 
worke done about the 10'^ of December 1639 and payd him 
not for it till the last of September 1640. [Cort booke John 
Mathews W™ Evans W™ Ware.] 

2. That the worke in the woods was to be done on such 
termes as is declared & began about the said tenth day of the ' 
said 10"" moneth and ended the 3rd day of the first month 
following. [Richard Evans "Will™ Evans.] 



348 LECHFORD'S MAXUSClUrT NOTE-BOOK. 

3. for the meate & drinke at 5^ one weeke. [The defts 
note.] 

4. That the pit had just cause to leave off working for tlie 
detend'. [John Smith.] 

[193] 5. That the defend' refused to pay the p? for the 
worke in the woods without arbitremcnt and yet would not 
let it be arbitrated. [Will™ Evans Richard Evans.] 

6. To prove the promise about withdrawing the pP accon 
&, putting the worke in the woods to arbitrement that there- 
upon the defend* would put his demands to arbitremcnt. 
[The Arbitrators John Mathews W° Ware.] 

7. To prove the pl'^ withdrawing his accon & the bond or 
assumpst of 20^ [Mr Xowell k the Arbitrat'^.] 

8. To prove the award to be as it is declared. [The 
Arbitrate.] 

9. That the defend'' had notice of the said award made. 
[The Arbitrate.] 

10. That the defend' never payd the 21 IV 1^ to the pit al- 
though demanded whereby the def hath forfeited to the said 
pit the said bond or assumpst of twenty pounds. [W™ Evans.] 

Objection the defend' attached it. 

Answere the pit was never possessed of tlxo, money and 
therefore the award was never fulfilled by the defend'. [W°* 
Evans.] 

11. In executing that attachment the defend' was his owne 
judge and therein committed a cryme to the dishonor of the 
Magistrates and Judges of the Country w'^^ is an offence to 
be punished by the Magistrates. [W" Evans Gill confest in 
Cort.] 

12. The defend' never read the said attachment nor gave 
a coppy of it to the pi' nor warned him to any Cort there- 
upon. [Let the Dei' prove this if he can.] 

13. That the defend' refused to put his demands of the 
womens matters to arbitrement and quarrelled against the 
former just arbitrement. [W™ Evans.] 

14. That afterwards the pi' k defend' submitted themselves 
toucliing the defend'* demands to the arbitrement of the two 
Elders. [M^ Henry Witheringtou k W°» Ware.] 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 349 

15. That after this notwithstanding the defend' brake of 
the said arbitrcm* because the pit would not dissolve & un- 
doe tlie said first arbitrem* w'=^ if he should have done the 
defend* like enough would have taken advantage ag* him 
thereupon for his 20^ [Mf Witherington W" Ware.] 

16. That the defend' brought his accon for the said de- 
mands for the womcns matters in the Cort at Boston whereof 
the pP had but one dayes notice, for he heard the defend' 
would bring it in Court upon the 3^*^ day & the Cort was the 
fift. [Will"" Ware.] 

17. for the defend ts overreckoniug the pi' & under proof es 
made in Cort. 

A Coppy of the Declaration to the defend'. [Is.] 

[194] In the Cort at Boston (10) 1. 1G40. 

Edward Griffith ^ merch* pV \ . , t , om c, od 
Richard Callicott defend'^ ) 

The pi' saith that the defend' (fee. deteyned 8 yeares dam* 
201. [301 8 yeares deteyned. Is.] 

The peticon of John Hogg 2 brother of Roger Hosg. 
[1-6] 

The peticon of John Palmer ^ tlie younger of Boston Carpenter. 

Showeth that whereas yo"" peticoner married Mary Smith 
daughter of Christoferf Smith of Rocksbury and upon the 

1 Edward Griffith must have been take the land back again. This was 
some Englishman or other wlio turned llarch 21, 1636. In 1640, JIareli 30, 
up at Boston for a short time. John Palmer the younger was admitted 

2 John Hogg is merely noted by Sav- to be an inhabitant, provided that he 
age, who says, " Jlii-ss. 1639. Felt. Per- could " gett an house or land to sett an 
hap3 he was only transient." He does house upon (it being not proper to all.jwe 
not mention Roger in any way. a man an Inhabitant AVithout habita- 

* From the Boston Touvi Record it tion)." In 16-11, Nov. 29th, there was 

appears that a grant of land was made a grant of land made to John Palmer, 

to John Palmer (where or when is not Sr., at Braintry for two heads. In the 

stated), and the same not l)eing built Book of Possessions the two Palmers, 

upon, the Town declared itself free to father and son, have houses on the north 



350 LECH FORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. ■ 

marriage yo' petlconers father John Palmer promised to bp- 
stowe upon yo' peticoner for his portion the house & grouiul 
at Braintree to be made -svorth 40^ yet yo"" peticoners said 
father liath not performed his said promise and besides hath 
taken away from yo^ peticoner 10^ that was yo"" petieoncrK 
owne money gotten since his said marriage and deteyncd 40* 
w°^ he lent his said father and keepeth backe 40* more ■sv'^'' is 
due to yo"" peticoner for his halfe of the new wharfe worke 
and moreover w'=^ most of all grciveth yo' peticoner his said 
father hath greivously abused yo' peticoners wife w**' ill words 
& mockings unfit for him to mention against his said fatlicr 
Yo"" peticoner humbly prayeth the speedy releife of this Court 
in the premises against his said father that the said house k 
ground may be presently assured to yo' peticoner and the said 
moneys restored to him, &c. [2-G & a note to Mr Hill.] 

Walter Merry ^ makes a letter of Attorney to Captaine 
Rih : Morris to apprehend & send backe John Savery his serv' 
(10) 2. 1G40. [Is.] 

M' Valentine Hill of Boston merchant and Mr Tliomas 
Mayhew^of Watertowne in N E gent bound to each other 

side of :Mill Street (now Summer). The Jolin Seberry mentioned later (p. 236) 

father's house was some way down the in connection with "Walter ilerry, were 

road ; the son's was near the corner (of it not for the difference in condition. 

"Washington Street). Curiously enough, John Seberry is called in the Boston 

there are four Christopher Smiths in Toicn Record a seaman, which traiie is 

Savage, no one of whom can be the man not incompatible with a shipwright's 

here mentioned. Thf-re is noted a Chris- journeyman. 

topher Smith of Hartford, thought to " Thomas Mayhcwe senior, most prob- 
be son of one of the same name having ably, who was this year (as well as in 
a sister Mary who was married to one other years) representative from Water- 
William Partridge. John Palmer is town. Nicholas Davison was a Charlos- 
thought to have moved to "Wethersfield town mercliant, of whom much may 
before his death, and it may very well be read in Wymau and in the Sufolk 
be that this Mary was his widow. Deeds, as well as elsewhere. He was the 
^ Walter Merry was a shipwright, agent of JIatthew Cradock, and in otluT 
having his shipyard and wharf at the ways a prominent man. The other arbi- 
Point bearing his name, just to the trators were among the first merchants 
north of Gallup's Point. John Savery of the Colony, and we need not doubt 
I should be tempted to believe to be that the case was decided on its merits. 



in 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 351 

... 300i to stand to the arbitrement of M^ Will™ Tyng Josiali 
Hcwes Mr Will™ Pierce and Nicholas Davison so the arbitre- 
ment be made in writing and delivered to each party w'^'in 
the space of 9 dayes. [28.] 

Josiali Hewes of Roxl^ury in New England merchant makes 
a letter of Attorney to Ca])t R. Morris to receive & recover of 
Richard Turner of Providence planter the summe of 38' due 
3 yearc (10) 2. 1G40. [6J.] 

Richard Wright of Braintreo yeoman to be bound to Mf 
Henry Symonds for the sum of 6i 10' 8 to be paid 25 March 
next dat' 29 Sept 1G40 G' G'^ in G-17-2. [I5.] 

And G. 9. 4*^ to M^ George Alcockci of Roxbury to be 10. 
2. 40. [6.] 

[195] Henry Waltham against Thomas Richards ^ and Wel- 
thin his wife in Weymouth for the division of one dwelling 
house belonging to the mill in Weymouth. [Is.] 

Thomas Symons ^ to MF Richard Parker a mortgage of his 
house and land at Braintree 10. 3. 1G40 for 18 to be p'^ 4. 24 
px. [Is.] 

I John Pollard late of Bclcham in the County of Essex 
husbandman doe hereby acknowledge that I have received of 
Bozoum Allen of Hingham in N E mercer nyiie hundred 
weight of cheese in Caske w'^^ was sent over in the Parramor 
of London by MF Thomas Rodbard Cheesemonger of London 
to the said Bozoum Allen for a thousand weight whereof I 
the said John Pollard doe hereby promise to discharge the 
said Boz. Allen against the said Thomas Rodbard of 121 12« 
for the said Cheese & caske but I the said Bozoum Allen doe 

1 George Alcocke (see p. 148, ante) « "The 24th of Feb., 1639, was 

died Dec. 30, 1640, or tliereabouts. granted to Thomas Simons, of Blount 

* Henry Waltham and Thomas Rich- Woolystone, for 10 heads 40 Acres upon 

ards, it will be rememliered, were part- the Covenant of 3.?. per acre " {Boston 

ners in tlie mill at "Weymouth ; see Toion Records, i. 49). 
pp. 178, ant<^, and 207, post. 



352 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

hereby declare that I would not have willingly payd so much 
by twenty shillings for it because the said cheese was not 
sent according to Covenant. [1-GJ 

A peticon for George Allen ^ about the ferry at Weymouth. 

Thomas Allen of Dorchester in N. A. gen Srieant Richard 
Callacott of the same and Ensigne Jolin Holman ^ of the same 
bound to Edward Michaelson in M libris. Condioon to save 
him harmlesse of one judgment of 487^ 14^ 3*^ recovered 
against him at the suit of Thomas Harwood & James Gammon 
merchants in an accon of the Case. [1-] 

And a Counterbond of 2 Ml by the two obligees unto Ensign 
Holman dat' 10. 10. 1640. [Is.'] 

Know all men by these presents that I Robert Keayne of 
Boston in N E m doe hereby promise that if John Stratton 
gent shall deliver unto Mf Thomas Stcgg or Mf Thomas Owen 
at Virginia goods and merchandize w''*' shall be of the value 
of 100^ when the said goods & merchandize come heere in 
New England and shall be heere delivered unto me or to my 
use that after I am satisfyed for my iust debt w'^^ the sayd 
John Stratton owctli me and for such dammages in forbear- 
ance concerning the same as two indifferent men to be named 
by myselfe shall judge I will be accountable unto him for so 
much as the said goods & merchandize shall come unto above 
the said satisfaction 10. 11. 1640. 

Knowe all men by these presents that T John Stratton of 
Salem in N E gen doe hereby promise unto Robert Keayne of 
Boston in X E merchant that if I can recover or receive in 

1 George Allen, of "Weyinonth, is as well as the rest, a prominent Dor- 
noted in Savage. He is also mentioned Chester man, and his name occui-s Ire- 
later in the Note-bonk (p. 215). quently in the Colony and Toicn Records. 

2 Ensign John Holman is the only He was selectman in 1636, ensign in 
one here who has not already been 1637, and died along towards 1652 \nth 
spoken of in the Note-book. He was, a very good estate. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 353 

Virginia or Maryland the debt ^x"^ MF Thomas Morris cweth 
me and the debt w*"^ my uncle Joseph Stratton oweth me or 
any of them that I Avill out of the same deliver into the hands 
of M^ Thomas Stegg- or Ml Thomas Owen goods k com- 
modities w'=^ shall be of the value of 100^ of lawful! money of 
England when they come heere in New England to be there 
delivered upon the adventure <fe charge by the joynt procure- 
ment of myselfe and the said Thomas Stegg or Thomas Owen 
unto the said Robert Keayne at his now dwelling house in 
Boston to the end he may out of the same rayse k deduct so 
much money as shall satisfye him for his iust debt w*"^ I owe 
him and for such dammages in forbearance concerning the 
same as two indifferent men to be chosen by the said Robert 
Keayne shall judge and be accountable unto me for the rest 
10.13.1640. 

[196] To the right wor» S""" Francis Wyatt Knight Gov- 
ernor & Captaine Generall of his Ma'' Colony in Virginia and 
all other his Ma*^ Judges and Officers whomsoever it may 
concerne. I Thomas Dudley Esff Governor of the Jurisdiccon 
of the Mattachusetts Bay in New England doe hereby certify 
that I have received this present Certificat ^ before written 
from John Endicott Esq' therein named and have at the 
request of John Stratton therein also named granted to 
exemplifie the same In testimony whereof I have caused 
the publickc scale of our Colony to be hereunto affixed the 
eleventh day of Pecember Anno Dui 1640. 

In the name of God Amen I John Stratton in this present 
Letter of Attorney mentioned doc hereby make and declare 
my last will and Testament touching the suits & matters 
therein contained as followeth My Will is that if it please 
God that I depart this life before the said suits &, matters are 
finished that my Attorneys in the said letter of Attorney 
named shall be my Executors joyntly or severally to sue for 
& recover the premises In testimony whereof I have here- 

* 

^ The certificate spoken of must be that on p. 186. 
23 



354 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

unto sett my hand the day of the date of the said letter of 
Attorney 1640. 

And i the said Governor doe hereby certify that the above- 
said John Strattou did in my presence publish and declare the 
said ^vriting in the margin to be his last will & testament 
touching the ])rcmises ^x"^ I grant also to testifye under the 
said publicke scale even the day & yearc aforesaid. 

Thomas Morris of the Province of Maryland in Virginia 
Chirurgion owes by bill dated 25 Aug. 1639 unto John 
Stratton merchant 33t W 2^ to be pd in tobacco ult' nov: 
1639. 

I John Scratton in the within written letter of Attorney 
named doe hereby in like manner authorize my said Attorneys 
therein mentioned joyntly or severally to demand receive & 
recover of & from Thomas Morris of the Province of Mary- 
land in Virginia Chirurgion the summe of thirty three pounds 
fourteene shillings and two pence W^** he oweth me by bill 
dated 25 Aug: 1639 & should have bin payd unto me in 
tobacco upon Uie last day of November 1639 as by the same 
bill appeareth & all costs & dammages concerning the same 
Witnesse my hand hereunto sett the day & yeare last within 
written. 

[197] John Stratton of Salem in New England gent aged 
about 34 V. sworne saith that his mother M^i^ Anne Stratton of 
Salem did depose and subscribe to a certaine writing of her 
testimony cone the writing hereunto annexed is the testimony 
of his mother M^i^ Anne Stratton mentioned in the note of 
testimony under the hand of Isacke Allerton mariner w^'^ is 
Certifyed unto the Governor of Virginia. 

A note of charges for M^ Strattons writings. 

The Certificats of testimonies written 2« 0" y peece ' ' ^ ^ 
The letter of Attorney will Adition & Certificats ... 2 6 
The t-sro reciprocall writin-s betweene ISI^ Keayne & 
MJ Stratton 



i jj';<- vJ 



LECHFORD'S MAXUSCRJPT NOTE-BOOK. 355 

The Coppie of 'M'. Strattons writinrr to ]\Ir Keayne ..10 

The exeiiiplication of M^ Morris his bill 1 Q 

The bills of Complaint 5 

Two letters of Attorney by M".' Stratton 1 6 

Another affidavit concerning M^ Allertons testimony . . 17 6. 

[Mr Keayne is to pay this bill,] 

John Humfrey Esq"" Ictts unto Zacheus Gould of Lynne y 
All those his two ffannes one called the Plaines ^ and the 
other called the Ponds w*** the appurtenances for 10 yeares 
from 29 of 1^^ last 1601 the second yeare and after 2001 g an. 
to be paid in corne wheate & rye at 5* p bs. barley at 4^ p bs. 
at Saggamore Hill Stocke IG oxen 12 Cowes 6 heyfars 6 last 
y calves 2 bulls 4 sowes & 2 boares 2 mares and 2 horses. 
Buildings & necessary fencings to be made by the Lessee & 
to be allowed out of the rent. The stocke to be inventoryed 
and the like in kind to be red'd at the end. [1-G] 

Nehemiah Bourne makes a letter of Attorney unto Captaine 
Thomas Willoughby of Virginia to recoTcr lOOi & dammages 
&c p protest. [1-0] 

ACertificat. [1-0] 

Samuell Pcirce of London merchant by vertue of a letter 
of Attorney from Thomas Southey of London merchant dated 
March 12. 1637 13 Car. releases Robert Sedgwicke of Charles- 
towne in N. E. merchant put &c. [3s.] 

Thomas Owen of Boston in New England merchant makes 
a bill of sale of 15 Lidian cloathes unto Samuel Hutchinson 
and Thomas Savage for security of payment of 113* by the 
15th of March next And a bond of 2o6t to save them harm- 
lesse for the not payment of 1131 w*='^ he received of them 
upon the 21th day of IMarch last past and should have ben 
payd to Mr John Pococke of London WoUendraper. 

* For a lease of the farm called the " Plains " by John ITumfrey to Zaccheus 
Gould, see p. 147, ante. 



356 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

A bond by Nathaniel Bisco^ of Watcrton and Ml Owen in 
8001 to save M! Hutchinson and M^ Savage harmlcssc <fcc. 
[2-G] 

[198] Thomas Dudley Esq"" Governor of the Jurisdiction 
of the Mattachusetts bay in New England to all his Ma'^ 
Judges k Justices whomsoever it may concernc greeting 
Knowe yee that I have bin informed by writing under the 
hand of Mr Increase Nowell one of the Assistants and Secre- 
tary of this Jurisdiction wliu was appointed one of the Com- 
missioners about the estate of M! Natha: Eaton ^ that they 
the said Commissioners did onely deliver to M! John Cogan 
but one Cowe w'''' they left w'^ him & for w"^ hee is to be 
accountable and that other of the said estate he hath not any 
toward the 100^ delivered by him to the said Nath Eaton that 
the said Increase Nowell knoweth or hath heard of. In 
testimony whereof I have caused the publicke scale of our 
Colony to be hereunto affixed even the nynetecnth day of 
December in the sixteenth ycare of the Raigne of our Sov- 
eraigne Lord King Charles &c Annoqr Dili 1640. [1-] 

The Ansicere^ of John Cogan of Boston in N E merchant 
defend} to the hill of Complaint of Richard Foxwill 
Com2'>lainant 

All advantages of exemption to the inccrtainties & insufti- 
encies of the said bill of CompP to this defend* now & at all 
times hereafter saved this defendalit for his answere saith 
that whereas the Compl* alleageth in his said bill of Complaint 

1 Nathaniel Bisco [or Biiscol was a appointed by tlie Court to settle the 
rich tanner of Watertown, selectman affairs of Eaton were William Jennison 
later in life, and father of the student and John Bridge. See Mass. Col. lice, 
of the same name who got into trouble i. 277. 

with Nathaniel Eaton. ^ This may have some reference to 

2 Nathaniel Eaton was not dead, as the business in whicli the same names 
might from this be supposed, but, on appear in tlie Kotc-book, p. 159. Tlio- 
the contrary, was living in Virginia in mas Gorges was nephew of Sir Ferdi- 
a manner very horrible to his New Eng- nando Gorges, and was in New England, 
land acquaintances, already described in at York, from 1640 to 1643. 

these pages. The other commissioners 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 357 

that he was forced to enter into the bill obligatory mentioned 
in the said bill of complaint this defend* saitli that he did not 
in any unjust manner force the said Comp" to enter into the 
said bill obligatory but fairely required him to performe his 
former ingagement to this defend' for the same under his the 
Comp"^ owne hand writing to this defend* made Sc delivered 
the sixt day of January Anno Dfii 1032 as by the same 
appeareth And whereas the said Comp" in his said bill of 
CompI* saith that the said goods k commodities by him 
received of this defend' whereupon the debt in the said bill 
obligatory grew were unserviceable & not useful in the Coun- 
try and lay long on his hands this defend' saith that the most 
of them Avcre knives & some other things there were amongst 
them w'=^ this defend' thought by advise to be best for the 
Country and about those times this defend' hath bin informed 
that two or three knives would have traded for a beaver 
skinne and this defend' saith that the said goods being sent 
in November 1629 this defend* comming liimselfe about two 
or three yeares after that into the Country would willingly 
have received the said goods again if the said Comp" had not 
traded them away and for anything I know for two or three 
hundred weight of bever And therefore this defend' saith 
that he hopeth it standeth w''^ equity & good Conscience that 
he should have and recover from the said Comp" not only 
the iust debt in the said bill obligatory specifyed but all his 
dammagcs [199] lost by the not payment and deteyning of 
the same w'^'^ comes to 15 pounds above the said debt All 
w*=^ matters this defend' humbly offereth unto the wor" Thomas 
Gorge Esq' and the rest of the wor" Commissioners for the 
Province of Mayne and all & every Competant Judge Chan- 
cellor <fe officer therein the Court of Chancery there estab- 
lished to aver &, prove as the said Court shall award and 
prayeth to be thence dismissed w"" his reasonable costs &, 
charges in this behalfe susteyncd. [2-0 Letter — 6] 



358 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



In the Court at Boston. 

John Cogan merchant Pit. V in an action of 

Thomas Symonds, Nathaniel Woodward, > trespasse 
John Biggs, Will'' Tallmage, Defend'' J upon the case. 

The said John Cogan complaineth against the said defend'^ 
for that whereas heretofore he did retcyne the said Thomas 
Sjmonds to doe a parcell of Carpentry worke for the said pit 
to be adioyned unto his dwelling house ^ in Boston aforesaid 
for 80t and the said Thomas Symonds made the low buildings 
adioyning to the said dwelling house as now they are being 
not so much in worke as by the first agreement and bargain 
he was to performe viz* a [i'%/We] next the garden there and 
therefore the said Comp" being not willing to pay the said 
Thomas Symonds the said whole summe of 80^ for the said 
low buildings there grew a difference betweene him and the 
said Thomas Symonds about the worth of the Carpentry worke 
of the said low buildings whereupon the said pit and the said 
Thomas Symonds agreed and did submit themselves touching 
the same to the arbitrement of the said Nathaniell Woodward 
John Biggs & Will'" Tallmage and bound themselves each to 
otlier in one hundred pounds to stand to their award in the 
premises w*=^ tlic said p" was the more willing to doe because a 
sufficient and skillfull carpenter had viewed the said carpen- 
try worke and valued the worth of it at but forty six pounds 
hoping therefore that the said p" should have had some good 
abatement of the said 80^ allowed him by the said Arbitrators 
But the said pit saith that the said Matter being so referred 
to the arbitrement of the said Arbitrators as aforesaid they 

1 John Cogan's house and shop was settlers of Boston, having lived in the 

next to Mr. John Wilson's land, on the town since 1630, with some little time 

corner of State Street and Washington spent at Ipswich. He was disarmed 

Street. Nathaniel Woodward here men- with the rest in 1637. Besides living 

tioned may be the surveyor and mathe- at Ipswich, he spent a few years at 

matician of that name (.Voss. Col. Itec, Dorchester, and also at Exeter ; but was 

L 323, 333), but was more probably his a member of the Artillery Company in 

son, of whom little enough is to be found Boston in 1641. 
out John Biggs was one of the early 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 359 

the said defend'^ all of them unlawfully conspired together to 
defraud the said jtP and to draw from him for the said worke 
a greater summe of money than the same was truly worth 
and thereupon by Conspiracy as aforesaid the said Nathaniell 
Woodward John Biggs and "Will™ Talmage awarded that the 
said pi* should pay unto the said Thomas Symonds for the 
said Carpentry worlxc [200] the summe of 140^ and thereupon 
the said Thomas Symonds seeing the same was unjust abated 
201 and the sayd pP payd him the rest being 120^ w*^*' he was 
obliged to pay as aforesaid although the said worke was not 
neare worth so much as the said 120^ As by certificate un- 
der the hands of other indifferent Carpenters by appointment 
of Authority certified it appcareth to the dammage of the pit 
501 and thereupon he brings his suit. 

A letter of Attorney to mysclfe to follow this suit [0 — 4c?.] 

In the Court at Boston. 

John Cogan of Boston merchant pi' •) 

Mathew Allen ^ of Hertford upon Con : [ in t" upon y^ case. 
gen def J 

The said John Cogan complayneth against the defend' that 
whereas the said p" is and ever hath lived from his nativity 
hitherunto a man of good name & fame and a faithfull sub- 
ject to his Ma"*" and gaincth living for himselfe & his family 
by trading <fe merchandizing all w*=^ is k was well knowne to 
the said defend* he the said defend* in malice & evill will 
against the said pi* going about utterly to destroy <fc take away 
his the said pl*^ good name and fame and consequently the 
meanes «fe livelihood of the said pi* k his family having con- 
ference in England this last summer w*** certaine merchants 
viz* ]\n Thomas Ilarwood & James G anion w*'' whome the i)lain- 
tiffe hath formerly had k now hath dealings w*^ concerning the 

^ Matthew Allyn had heen of Cam- scntative and afterwards assistant from 

bridge, was representative in the Gen- 1648 to 16G7, and twice commissioner 

eral Court in March, 1636, after wliich for the United Colonies. He appears in 

he moved to Connecticut, where he was the Note-book later (p. 226) in as disa- 

held in high estimation, being repre- greeable a connection as the present. 



300 LECJIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

said pP did utter and spake out tlicn of the said pi* these false 
& scandalous words viz* Mr Cogan is a troublesome man and 
that he the said defend* would not deale w*"* him meaning the 
said pi* for halfe the cattcll meaning the cattell then in ques- 
tion being worth above 500^ and further that the said pi* was 
so troublesome that every Court in New England he was sued 
or did sue or words to that effect And that afterwards in this 
Country even in time of the last generall Cort before divers 
of the Magistrates & other the Kings subjects the said ^lathcw 
Allen falsely Sc maliciously again iterated uttered and spake 
the said false & scandalous words or to that effect And 
whereas afterAvards the said pit offered the said defend* that 
if he would publiqucly give him the said pi* satisfaction by 
acknowledging the said defend* spake the said false & scan- 
dalous words in passion and not upon due consideration then 
the said pi* would passe by k remit the same the sayd defend* 
persisting in his said malice affirmed that he spake nothing 
but the truth & upon consideration [201] ' so that the pi* is 
thereby greatly hurt and damnifyed in his good name & estate 
and that both w*^ his M*'*"* subjects in England and also in this 
Colony to the Pit' dammagc 5001 A:c. [1— Rec of III Cogan 
towards these last Avritings comming to 9% 5^ in money the 
rest to be p*^ in comoditics.] 

A letter of Attorney for Mr Athcrton Ilaugh of Boston in 
new E. g against M! Natli Eaton for 8t 10' to M': Thomas 
Owen^ and an affidavit 4 Sept 1639 Censure, about 4 or 5 
weekes b lOi delivered to M^ Eaton before hand. [1 — 6] 

Ric°" Parker bound to Philip Gibb to the use of Thomas 
Harwood <fc James Gammon merchants for 1541 — 33 — lo*^ 
ob to be payd in Boston 11 Junii px dat' 11 Sept ult. double. 
[-6] 

John Cogan bound to Philip Gibb &c in 1961 19' 2^. [—6] 

1 ilr, Thomas Owen was at this those who have read all about the John 
time either in Virginia or about to Stratton business above, 
travel there, as may be remembered by 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 361 

1 Samuel Haugh of Boston in New England aged about 19 
yeares sonnc and lieire apparent of Atherton Haugh " of Bos- 
ton aforesaid gent sworne saitii upon his oath that his said 
ffather having heretofore phiced him this deponent a schoUer 
to be taught by his hxte master Mf Nathaniell Eaton at Cam- 
bridge in New England and to be boarded in house w*^ him 
for the reward of sixteenc pounds by the yearc unto the said 
Natha : Eaton to be payd quarterly by equall portions before 
hand that upon or about the last day of July xVnno Dili one 
thousand six hundred thirty and nyne this deponents said 
father upon the said Nathaniell Eatons letter hereunto an- 
nexed to his said father directed & delivered unto the said 
Nathaniell Eaton not only one quarters payment being fourc 
pounds as he himself e told this deponent but sent him six 
potmds more by the hands of this deponent delivered unto 
the said Nathaniell Eaton so that he had in all upon the said 
letter ten pounds and this depon* saith that after that he 
abode as a schoUer Sc boarder w'^ his said master Nathaniell 
Eaton about foure weekes being so much time as came to the 
summe of about nyne and twenty not fully thirty shillings to 
be allowed to the said Nathaniell Eaton for the same so that 
he oweth unto this deponents said father the full summe of 
eight pounds and ten shillings at the least, the remainder of 
the said ten pounds. 

2 Memorandum it is agreed betweene the parties within 
written that if the Indian cloathes within mentioned come 
to be sold by the within-mentioned Samuel Plutchinson and 
Thomas Savage their executors adm"^ or assignes for satisfac- 

^ Those wlio feel an interest in com- Cotton, and arrived at Boston on Loard 

paring the early administration of Hur- tlie "Griffin," of three hundred tons, 

vard College with the more recent will Sept. 4, 1633, in company with Mr. 

find it worth while to compare here Cotton, Mr. Hooker, Mr. Pierce, and 

Savage'snotetoWinthrop(vol. i.p. 310). Mr. Haynes. He was a man of great 

2 Atherton Hough, the father of cunsideration in the town, being chosen 

Samuel, was, before he came to New assistant in 1635, and many times 

England, mayor of Boston in Lincoln- deputy to the General Court. He died 

shire. He left that town, however, in in 16jO. 

1633, on the example of the Rev. John ^ gee ante, p. 197. 



362 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

tion of the moneys within mentioned they and every of thcni 
shall take the advise of Captaine Ed G in the s^ sale k. Ihu 
surplusage of the moneys arising for the same cloathes sold 
beyond the within-mentioned summe of 113^ and the just dam- 
mages for the same shall belong and be payd unto the witliiu 
mentioned Tliomas Owen his executors administrators or 
assigncs. 

[202] Joseph Armitage' bound to John Pollord to pay 
71 21^ 4(1 12. 12. 1C40 in money or beaver merchantable. 
\Qd.-] 

Mf Thomas Owen makes a Letter of Attorney to Captaine 
Edward Gibones to receive tfcc. all moneys due to liim or to 
be due from any person or persons whatsoever. [Is.] « 

John Chandler 2 of Boston shoomaker placcth John Chan- 
dler his Sonne Apprentice unto Will™ Webb of Roxberry baker 
his executors adm" and assignes for seven yeares from tiie 
29* of September last for to be instructed in the trade of tlie 
Baker and to have meate drink k clothes washing & wringing 
and in the end of the terme double apparell &, 20^ in money? 
before myself. [1-C] 

W. Thomas Owen of Boston merchant &,)... , ^ . 
-»Tr T 1 n c -n ^ 1 ^ [ doe hire of Joseph 

M^ John Cogan of Boston merchant \ ^ 

Grafton 2 of Salem in New England marriner his Catch called 

the Endevor of Salem for a voyage from New England to 

Virginia w* three men a pilott and a boy w*^ tackling well f ur- 

nisht to touch at such ports & places by the way as they shall 

direct and in Virginia attend upon their occasions till they 

1 Josej.h Armitage, of Lynn, kept the Joseph Grafton, of Salem, was a 
first inn in tlie town, says Savage, busy merchant and sailor, and mention 
though he was a tailor. of liim as well as of his ketches may be 

2 John Chandler was allowed a towns- found in Winthrop (vol. i. p. 217, ar.d 
man of Boston May 31, 1647. Besides voL ii. p. 332). Cotton ]\Iather relates 
this mention of him there is nothing in his Wonderful Deliverances the f-tory 
to be found either of him or of his of the escape of Joseph Grafton in Ins 
father, though several of the same name ketch the " Providence." In regard to 
may be found in Savage. the " Endeavor," see p. 224, post. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. SG3 

can provide a ffreight backc provided it be before Aprill next. 
And liis pay to be 40* p moneth to begin from the seven- 
teenth day of December instant to be continued till his vesscll 
returne & be discharged of her freight, [3-] 

Robert Braddish ^ of Cambridge places Hannah his daugh- 
ter apprentice unto Thomas Hawkins for 4 ycares from this 
till the end of 4 yeares from 25 March next, or to Hannah his 
wife meat drinkc &, cloathes & double apparell in the end. 
[1..] 

Richard Sanford^ of Boston in N E planter doth place 
his Sonne John Sanford apprentice to Joseph Armitage of 
Lynne tayler for G yeares from this day 14. 11. 1640. Dyet & 
cloathing and at the end of the tcrrae double apparell Sc 5* pro- 
vided that the youth be not turned over w'^out the consent of 
his said father his executors or ass". [1-6] 

Bay en. Noughcha. John Saggamore of Merrimacke 28. 11. 
1640. 

Articles of agreem* betweene Captaine Sedgwicke & Mr 
Offley for 60 h.gs. merchantable been vinegar for 35* a h «fe 
3<^ p* of the caske. to be redy 6. 1. leil^dat' 11. 28. 1640. 
[r Is. Qd. Mf Offley owes Qd. or QtZ. for the Cap* gave me 3cZ.] 

M'i^ Richards owes me for a peticon. [2. 6.] 

Joseph Armitage of Lynne Inholder bound. to Henry Symons 
merch* in 33* 19* b^ to be payd 25. 1. px dat' 29. 7.' 1640. 
[6.] 

3 Thomas Joy hath an account against M^ Robert Keayne 
for Doing the Carpentry worke of a Barne at M'. Keaynes 

1 Eobert Bradisli. Hannah was same name) who kept an inn in his 

daugliter of Robert Bradish by Jlary latter days, says Savage, 

his lirst wife, who died September, 1638. ^ "Richard Sanfurd, Boston, 1640, 

The Thomas Hawkins here mentioned lal)orcr . . . had possibly sons John 

was most probably the baker (to be dis- and Robert " (Snvrgc). 

tinguished from the merchant of the * See p. 162, aide. 



.Uf(U 



364 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

house at Riimney Marsh & for setting up & finishing the same 
being of 72 foot in length & 26 foot wide & 10 foot high w'^ 2 
porches each of 13 foot wide one way k 12 another for w"^ the 
said Tlio : J allcagcth lie ought to be payd so much as the Car- 
pentry worke thereof is worth and he saith that the said worke 
comes unto in value as followeth in particulares viz' the fram- 
ing of the said barne 30' the sawing of thereof 17*. The felling 
[203] crosse cutting & squaring of the timber 15* and more 
the rearing up of the barne by him &, his servants 7' the clap- 
boarding of the barne 11* o' for boards 4* 10" for laying of 600 
of boards over the porches 18* for making of 4 payre of great 
doores &. hanging of them 2* for making of two paire of stayres 
6* for making of 4 little doors 6^ for laying the barne fioarc 
w*** plancks 600 1* 10' for putting on gutters upon the barne 

V 10^ for ferry age of him and his servants 2. 10* for losse 
of time in going and comming 4* w*=^ commes in all to 98* 1' 
[30. 15. 15. 7 11-5 4-16 -18 2-0 -G -6 1-10 1-10 2-10 
4-0 86-l.J 

M' Thomas Joy this day gave me his fowling peece upon 
condicon that I should hereafter write it out for him if he had 
occasion, my wife being present. Formerly I writt for him a 
paire of Indentures betweene hiin and IsVl Bellingham 3^ 4*^ 
Another Avriting when he was sicke about M^ Keaynes account 
of Wares delivered him V Q^ and lastly this accon drawne. 

V Q" 12. 14. 1640. 

Write to ^Ir Comfort Starro at Duxbury for a quarter of a 
pynt of henbane seed and a quarter of a pound of hemlock 
seede for G. <tc. 

To the riglit ivoi-" the Governor Council J- Assistants 

The humble petitjon o/ James Pemberton Prudence Wilkln'SON 
widdoice Lewis Lulett George Felt George Knowe John 
Greenland and Thomas Whittlmore. 

The petir-oners shewe that whereas they having bin here- 
tofore inhabitants in Charlestowne and could not there liave 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 305 

accommodation to live comfortably they vere forced to crave 
leave of the Cort to build and plant upon Mysticke syde w'^"'* 
they did by the leave of the Court afores*^ and have expended 
a great parte of their estates therein, Some of the Towne 
endeavoring to straighten tlie peticoners and to hinder others 
from comming to them as they say have procured divers orders 
to be made in the Towne meeting w*=^ to the peticoners are 
very prcjudiciall and they thinke unreasonable viz* that any 
of the peticoners shall pay for every swine taken in the marsh 
2^ Q^ a tyme besides the dammage, whereas the orders for the 
towne are but to yoake & ring the swine or els to pay double 
dammage. 2'^ whereas yo' peticoners cannot live to pay rates 
to Towne &. Country except they have some convenient com- 
mon allotted them to keepe some cattell about them, their 
said opponents have procured a towne order to be made for 
the making of a common fence a great way from yo'' peticon- 
ers houses w*=^ will not keepe out swine and yet would have 
the peticoners contribute and afford wood to the said com- 
mon fence w'^^ yet tends to their undoing, whereas the fence 
is made for the present only to defend the Townesmens 
medow ground w"^^ the peticoners were willing to joyne w''' 
them so they would only have fenced in the medow and 
left the peticoners convenient common. These things yo"^ 
peticoners humbly desire the Court in their wisdome to con- 
sider and to order that they may have a convenient com- 
mon allowed them and may have equall remedie in their 
said greivanccs And they shall as their duty bindes them 
pray for yo'' wor^^^ [2 — 6] 

To the right wor^^ the Governor Councill ^ Assistants. 

The Ansivere aiid humhle petlcon o/ John Askew of Cambridge 
to the suit o/ Edward Winslow^ of Salisbury complayn* 

This defendant saith that whereas the Complainant de- 
mandeth of him this def* lot ^-ch jj^ passed his word for in the 

1 Edward Wiiislow was at this time sentative from that place. Savage 
commissioner to decide small cases at thinks the name must have been Wens- 
Salisbury. He was afterwards repre- ley, but I can hardly believe him right. 



366 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

behalfe of one John Upton, the case standeth thus, this defend' 
was heretofore rcteyned by one Thomas Bendight of Yarmouth 
in the County of Nor*' to serve him 4 yeares, who not over into 
New E himselfe made a letter of Attorney to the Comp'' givintr 
him power to imploy this defend' in the said Compl'" owne 
service, Whereupon this defend' did serve the said compl' three 
quarters of a yeare in w"^ time this defend' did earne as much 
money for the said compl' as payd for this def' passage, After- 
wards this def desired that he might buy his time and not be 
sould to any other as the said Comp" had done most of his 
other servants, the said Compl' therefore demanded of this 
defend' 251 for the remainder of his said time being 3 yeares 
and a quarter w'^^ this def was then willing the times being 
then quicke & money plentifullto give him rather than to be 
so sould, w'=^ 251 the said defend' hath since payd the pi' in 
money howbcit this defend' humbly conceiveth it was more 
than in equity the Comp" could demand of him and was [204] 
101 more than he sould any of his other servants for yet so it 
might please yo"* wor^P" that the said Compl' having made this 
defend' price of 25* for his time as aforesaid took a moneths 
time to consider of the bargain before he would consider it in 
w"^ time the said John Upton another servant of the Comp'" 
likewise desired to buy his time w<=^ was valued by the Compl' 
at 151 And when the said moneth was expired the said pi' 
would not take the said 25* of this defend' unlesse he would 
passe his word for 15* for the said John Upton w<=^ to pur- 
chase his liberty this deft yeilded to doe Now this dcfendt 
sheweth that he having payd the Compl' 15* the last summer 
and 10* the yearc before the same hath caused yo'" peticoner to 
run into divers debts and yet now the said Compl' demands 
the said 15* of yo' peticoner for the said John Upton \\^^ this 
peticoner is no way able to pay being much indebted and w'=^ 
in equity he alleagcth he is not bound to pay Yo"" peticoner 
huml)ly prayetli yo"" wor^P^ in tender consideracon of the prem- 
ises to sett down an order for the discharge of yo' peticoner 
concerning the said 15* and this peticoner leaveth it to yo' 
grave consideration whetlier you will please to order the said 
Comp" to pay this peticoner backe any parte of the said 251 



LECllFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



m 



And this peticoncr humbly prayeth that the said pit may be 
injoyned to stand to the order of this Cort in the premises as 
this defend' humbly submitteth himself also to the award &, 
iudgment of the Court k, he shall as he is in duty bound pray 
for yo'' worP*. 

To the rir/ht ivor^ the (xoy""'" Council cf- Ass*' 

The Answere peticon and account of Barnabas Davis of 
Charles Toivne to the demands of M"! John Woodcocke. 

Barnabas Davis ^ sheweth that about 2 yeares before the 
Pequid warre he was reteyned by Mf Will™ Woodcocke to 
come over into New England to looke to his affaires heere that 
he landed at Boston and after that w'^'in tan dayes went on foot 
to Connecticott where Francis Stiles was to build a house for 
Mr Woodcocke k impale him 400 acres of ground that this 
was in the beginning of the plantation there whereby this 
Accountant indured much hardship When this accountant 
come there the said Stiles was gone for England having before 



^ Of Barnabas Davis, whose suit 
against John Woodcocke occupies many- 
pages iu the Note-hook, nothing seems 
to be known except that he came in 
the " Blessing " in 1636 to Charlcstowii, 
and that he afterwards was a tallow- 
chandler by trade. Of the Woodcockcs 
nothing can be found in New England, — 
naturally enough, as it does not directly 
appear that they were ever there. There 
was a John Woodcocke of Springlield 
in 16.33, but I do not believe him to 
be the one here mentioned. Francis 
Stiles and Edward Ilolyoke (or Hol- 
liokc here spelled) are, however, easily 
identified, and much of their history is 
known. Stiles came to Connecticut very 
earl}', was at "Windsor in 1G36, and after- 
wards lived perhaps at Saybrook for 
some time, but died at Wind.-<or in 1653 
or thereabouts. He was eiigi^ced in 
Connecticut, among other things in 
work about the estate of Sir lUchard 



Saltonstall with Robert Saltonstall, the 
younger son of Sir Richard. His man- 
agement could not have been very effi- 
cient, for he involved the Salton&talls in 
much financial inconvenience. Edward 
Holyoke owned land in many towns, 
but lived chiefly at Rumney Marsh. He 
was frequently representative to the 
General Court, — often. Savage thinks, 
from towns where he only held property. 
His family lived in Springfield after- 
wanls ; and from the fact that John 
Woodcocke is noted in Springfield in 
1638, I should not think it improbable 
that Holyoke lived there for a time. 
He died in 1660. 

The whole case admits of very little 
illustration. The best thing for the 
reader to do (if he be in any way inter- 
ested^, is to refer to an opinion delivered 
by Lechford which may be found in the 
Note-book, p. 216. 



368 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

built himself a sufficient house at Connecticott Then by 
W. Hookers advise this Accountant returned into England 
againe w*'' letters from Mr Hooker both to my Lord Say & to 
Mf Woodcocke of the estate of Mf "Woodcockes affairs to the 
intent Stiles might be dealt withall in England that this ac- 
countant as soone as he could get shipping tooke his voyage 
backe into England w*^ ]MT Bable and landed at Portsmouth 
and thence he rode to London and delivered his letters 
Whereupon Francis Styles was againe dealt av*^ to goe on 
with MT Woodcockes plantation there and sold him his said 
house bearing him in hand that the Towne would accommo- 
date ^Ir Woodcocke w*'' 400 acres of land thereunto The said 
Styles w*''in a monetli after came away againe for N E and ^I"". 
Woodcocke reteyned this accountant still to goe in the next 
ship after him to see the said Styles to performe the worke and 
this accountant was but to goe from London to his wife at 
Teuxbury and to returne againe to London to take shipping w*^*^ 
this accountant did and came into New England tlic second 
time and landed at Boston in the ycare of the Pequid Avarres 
and w^^'in ten dayes after went in a pinnace to Connecticott to 
follow Mr Woodcockes businesse and delivered my Lord Says 
letter and Mf Woodcockes letter to Mr Hooker who was 
pleased to goe w*'^ this accountant from Mr Hookers house to 
the sayd Styles house being 6 myles about treaty w*^ the said 
Styles when it was dangerous travelling in regard of the 
Pequids that M! Warhani and divers others w*^ W. Hooker 
treating the cause determined that Styles had dealt ill w"' 
Mi Woodcocke in not procuring the 400 acres of land to be 
layd to the said house k impaling it as he undertookc Avherc- 
upon this accountant was by Mr Hookers direccon to returne 
w*^ his letters thereof into England againe to certify my Lord 
Say and W. Woodcocke of Styles miscarriage of the businesse 
but in the meane while before this Accountant could get shi{> 
ping he Avas taken a Souldier against the Pequids and before 
he could thence returne & get shipping in the sea ncarc upon 
a yeare was spent from his last landing That he returned w'** 
Mr Cutter at the time M^ Yanc returned landed at Deale and 
thence went to London on foote and delivered the letters to 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. S69 

MT Woodcockc & a letter to my Lord Say [205] That this 
accountant was afterwards reteyned by the said W. Woodcocke 
to ride from Teuxbury to London nine or tQw times and from 
London into Essex about twelve times and from London to 
Dunstable & from London to Bristoll and after to and fro 
upon his occasions and did rcteyne this accountant from his 
last landing in his service in England neare a yeare & three 
quarters. That the said accountant purposing at his first 
voyage aforesaid to come for New E w*'^ his Avife and family 
as a planter he brought up his wife & cliildrcn & goods to 
London to that purpose but jM' Woodcocke pi'cvayled w'^ his 
. wife to stay in England to the end this accountant might serve 
him only in this busines aforesaid and that this accountant 
should in the meane time leave his goods as bedding brasse k 
pewter to tlie value of 20i w"^ M": Woodcocke to keepe till his 
businesse was settled ct then this accountant to fetch his wife 
& family Sc live upon :M^ Woodcockes plantation to improve 
the same for him. That M^ AVoodcocke made use of this ac- 
countants goods and wore out a brasse kettle & pott to holes 
so that the said goods were 51 the worse. That the said Mf 
Woodcocke never yet gave this accountant any recompense 
for his sayd travell & paynes but as in the account annexed is 
specify ed and afterwards the said M! Woodcocke deceased 
Whereupon j\i^ John Woodcocke brother of the said deceased 
intreated M! Robert Bridges of Anster to send for this ac- 
countant to Teuxbury to treat av'^ him about M^ Will°> Wood- 
cockes estate in N E. <fe thereupon come to Anster and 
informed M^ Bridges of the said estate and this accoun*^ 
expences tt his acts <t paines thereabouts that the said W. 
Bridges might thereof certify the said John Woodcocke he 
did also reteyne this accountant to come over againo into 
New England about the said estate and to recover the same 
against the said Stiles for w'=*' this accountant was to have 20^. 
That he landed here at Boston in June 1639 and thereupon 
went to Connec* and there did recover of the said Stvles a 
judgment of 3001 w'='^ lyes in M^ Hopkins hand in Connecticott 
and tooke into his custody the cattcU and sold them by advise 
of M^ HoUioke <fc M^ Bridges of Lynne for vi^^ cattell this 
24 



370 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

accountant received 1501 and since that time he hath bonglit 
as many cattell as came to 11 Ot. That this accomitant is now 
reteyned & still intangled w'** this imployment & estate & can- 
not be lawfully discharged thereof whereby he hath lost divers 
advantages for himself having yet no land to plant of his ownc 
for himselfe & his wife & 4 children <fc family whereby he is 
damnifyed at least 501 Therefore he rcquireth allowance of 
his said accounts recompense of his dammages aforesaid S: a 
sufficient discharge from M"!' Washburne Administratrix of 
the goods & chattells of the said Will™ Woodcockc and from 
the said John Woodcocke both for himselfe & Mr Hopkins who 
is interest in this matter only by this accountants meanes A: 
procurement. 

The account about the cattell. 

Imprimis I received for tlie cattell as aforesaid about 

August 1639 1501 



Itm I then presently bought ten head of young cattell 
ofM' Luxfordfor ',.... 1051 

Itm I payd to Captaine Sedgwicke in parting the 
cattell 0011 

Itm for summering the said cattell to James Luxford, 

as I verily believe 0051 

Itm for wintering them to ^I'. "Winthrop & looking 
unto them 151 

Itm for blooding & drenching them to James Lux- 
ford . 6 8 

Itm payd for keeping twenty sheepe of ISI^ Will"" 

Woodcockes to James Luxford 10 

Itm charges of suits against Lawthrop & his wife for 
a debt of M' Will'" Woodcockes 7 

Itm payd to one M' (Jridley for a debt of I\I^ "Will™ 

Woodcocke . 1 10 

138 01 

1501 

138 01 2 

11 15 10 



LECH FORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 371 

So resteth in my hand upon this account .... 11 15 10 

Itm 1 exclianged the sayd young cattell in Aprill last 
in this manner 8 of them for 4 oxen and a cart val- 
ued at . 1001 

Itm the other two beasts I exchanged for two other 
valued at 30^ 

[2 J6] Itm earned w"' these oxen by plowing & cart- 
ing 20 dayes Ill 

Itm for carrying wood & timber for myselfe & others 
w*!* them 27 loads 410 

Itm for carrying five loads of hay for 2 neighbors . . 16 6 

Itm for carrying 8 loads of corne 2 



145 3 6 
To he deducted about the oxen Sj" cart. 

Imprimis for the Country rates upon the oxen ... 1 10 

Itm for summering the said oxen and to the keepers . 2 

It™ they cost in wintering allready 12 

It" two bushells of corne they have eaten .... 8 

It™ 32 bushells of corne w<='' they did dammage into 

Cambridge mens corne 6 8 

It" for 2 men and a boy to goe w"* the oxen the said 
20 dayes at 2* a day for the men a peece and S*^ a 

day for the boy 4 13 4 

It™ for a man & a boy to goe w''* the oxen at the rate 
of 2' a day for the value of 10 dayes about the wood 

& timber 1 12 

It™ for a man & a boy to goe w''' the oxen at the rate 

of 2* 8*^ a day for 4 dayes about the corne ... 10 8 

It™ for a man & a boy to goe w''' the oxen at the rate of 
It»» for expences about this account in attendance 
heere at this Court and what els it may cost me if 
I should be put to prove every particulare w"" I 
hope I can doe. As the Court shall assesse. 

[3s. 4(?. A bushcll of rye or wheat or malt.] 

Richard Chadwell ^ sheweth that he was absent this day 
when verdict was given against him not out of any contempt 

1 Richard Chadwell and Thomas his when compared with another (post, p. 

brother are both noted by Savage, — 220), wherein Richard Chadwell biings 

with no hint, however, as to their rela- suit against John Sampson and Harry 

tionship. John Sampson is not even no- Bennet, a house carpenter, 
ticed. This paragraph will seem clearer 



i;{ I 

8 01 



372 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

of the Court but by being deteyned at the other side of the 
water at Charlestowne whether he went to lodge. And where- 
as there is 20' allowed against him in the verdict for not teach- 
ing John Sampson the trade of a shipwright This peticoner 
alloageth that he hath endeavored both by himselfe and his 
brother Thomas Chadwell to instruct the said Sampson in that 
trade both at home & abroad w'^*' the peticoner could have 
made proofe of if that point had bin insisted upon to this peti- 
coners understanding before the Jury went together Touching 
the not moving of the barke if this peticoner had knowne that 
he should now have bin questioned he could have proved 
Sampson faulty therein by 2 witnesses but seeing he was a boy 
under age as he saith if he riske that appeare the peticoner 
willingly \_il!e;iMe'j to the cancelling of that 5* bill This ])ctico- 
ner willingly alloweth foure pounds for 3 quarters of a yeares 
service w'=^ this peticoner was mistaken in through Sampsons 
owne misinformation and will provide him toolcs & 40" towards 
cloathes in these things he desireth investigation & if it please 
the Cort. [2s.] 

Barnabas Davis. 

Touching the 2 servants they cost betweene us. . . 221 10s 
I had for one of them of IM": Long an house valued . 20 
The other servant being married having a wife & 3 

children hath bin a burden to me and no profit. 

So granting tliat I am to allow M": Woodcock halfe 

the value of the house aforesaid 101 

M^ Woodcocke is to allow fifty shillings to me for his 

halfe of the five pounds due to M": Hoggs estate. . 2 10 
And also M'? Woodcocke is to beare halfe charges for 

Edward Wynne w^'' may come for ought I knowe to 10 

And therefore this accountant concciveth that ]\r^ Woodcocke 
is rather accountable to me than I to him. 

[207] Jeremy Gould of Rode Island yeoman & Wiir 
Jeffreys of Weymouth in New England gent to be bound to 
Henry Waltham gent in 30^ The condicon that the said Jer- 
emie shall on or before the 24th of August next assure & con- 
vey a sufficient and lawful estate unto the said Henry Waltliam 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 3(3 

his heires or assigncs of and in three acres of march medow 
lying in Weymouth aforesaid now [Ulegible'j other things mort- 
gaged unto Joseph Holloway. [Is.] 

Samuel! Milles of Weymouth in New EngL^nd aged about 
21 yeares servant of ]\If Henry Y»''altham sworne saith upon liis 
oath that about two monetlis since Morgan Graver singing in 
the mill house by the fire one of Situate came into the said 
house What he said to Morgan this deponent did not heare but 
he heard Morgan answer that he did not sing so loude but we 
may heare the clap of the mill. Whereupon M"!^ Richards 
came forth and said that She heretofore asked money of the 
said M' Waltham and he bad her hold her peace that he might 
heare the clap of the mill and then said to Morgan this thou 
hast learned of thy master that old Waltham that wicked man 
he that never feared God nor never will. And Morgan speaking 
something what in particulare this deponent cannot remember 
the said M'!^ Richards in the hearing of John Gill ^ bid him 
hold his peace or els she would make John Gill bast him by 
& by and thereupon as the said Morgan talked further to her 
the said John Gill w*^ his left hand strucke the said Morgan 
upon his head and said hold yo'' tounge. And at another time 
upon another occasion what in particulare this deponent can- 
not remember he saith he heard the said M".^ Richards speake 
in tlie mill roome he standing by the trough there the like 
reproachfull words against his said Mr that is to say that old 
Waltham that wicked man he that never feared God nor never 
will. 

A peticon for John ^[orecroft.^ [Is.] 

* Jolm Gill is somewhat interesting owners of the mill at "Weymouth were 
here because a man of his name bought not everything that could be wished. 
(in 1073) the n)il] of Israel Stoughton in 2 'pi^jg jietition, I imagine, was to en- 
Dorchester (now Hilton). I am unable, treat the Court to grant some abate- 
however, to affirm confidently that he was ment of the fine of 201 which had been 
the same man who struck Jlorgan Cra- imposed upon .Tohn Morecroft by the 
ver upon his head and bade him hold Court some days before this " for his 
his tongue. It would seem from this unfit carriage." I cannot find that it 
as though the relations between the was ever granted. 



374 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Robert Hcmpcnstall of Boston in New England sonne of 
Thomas Ilempenstall late of Soutliold in the County of Suffolk 
marriner deceased doth remise & release unto Will"* Woolncr 
of Westell in the said County yeoman one house or tenement 
w*^ the appurtenances in Soutliold aforesaid w^^' Henry Har- 
wood my father in law lately purchased for him & myselfe 
and my Sister Elizabeth of Robert Anderson and Nicholas 
Anderson his sonne w'=^ promise for further assurance &c dat' 
11. 1. KUO. 

Robert Thomson of Boston in New England merchant letts 
unto Joseph Armitage of Lynne in N England one lighter of 
the burden of twenty tunnes or thereabouts for Id a yeare 
from the first of the first moneth 1G40 or 1641. and to deliver 
the boate in repaire as good as now it is in. 

To all Christian People unto whome these presents shall 
come I Robert Hcmpenstall i of Boston ' in New England 
Shipwright sonne of Thomas Hcmpenstall late of Southold in 
the County of Suffolke marriner deceased send greeting &c 
Knowe yec that I the said Robert H. doe by these presents 
remise release & absolutely for me & my heires quittclairae 
unto Will"^ Woolner of Westell in the said County of Suffolke 
yeoman all the right title & claime w'^'^ I had have or hereafter 
anv wayes may have of & in one house or tenement w'^ the 
appurtenances bv what name or names soever it be called 
lyinff & being in^ Southold aforesaid w^^ Henry Harwood my 
father in law latelv j.urchased to himselfe myselfe and my 
Sister Elizabeth Hcmpenstall of and from Robert Anderson 
and Nicholas Anderson. [2s.] 

This Indenture made the first day of the first moneth Anno 
Dm 1G41 or 1G40 Betweene 2 Robert Thomson of Boston m 

1 The name is not found in Savage,— Edward Bendall to Thomas Ha^vkins, 
at least not in this fonn. 1650, a lot of land is spoken of as having 

2 Kolx'it Thompson is not to be met belonged to Mr. Robert TliomiKson {BooL 
with in Savage, and the only mention of of Possessions, G, 124). Its position is 
him found by me is in the i?oo7.-o/ Posses- not defined, but it was near the lots 
smi3, where in a deed of land from of Nehemiah Bourne, Thomas Hawknis, 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 375 

N E merchant of the one parte And Joseph Armitage of 
Lynne in N E Inholdcr of the other })arte wittnesseth that the 
said Robert Thompson for good Consideration liim thereunto 
moving doth hereby demise and to farme lett unto the said 
Joseph Armitage one Ligliter boate of the burden of twenty 
tunnes or thereabouts w'^ the taclcling and appurtenances 
[208] thereunto belonging To have and to hold the sayd 
lighter boate and all and singulare the premises w'^ the ap- 
purtenances whatsoever unto the said Joseph Armitage his 
executors administrators or assignes from the day of the date 
of these presents for and during the terme of one whole yearc 
thenceforth next ensuing fully to be compleat & ended yeild- 
ing Sc paying therefore at the end of the said terme unto the 
said Robert Thomson his executors administrators and as- 
signes the full & whole rent & summc of sixteene pounds of 
lawfull money of England And the said Joseph Armitage 
doth for himselfe his executors administrators & assignes cov- 
enant promise & grant to and w'^ the said Robert Thomson 
his executors administrators and assignes by these presents 
that he tlie said Josei)h Armitage his executors administra- 
tors and assignes shall & will well and sufficiently repaire 
& keepe the said Lighter boate aforesaid in good repaire 
from time to time as often as need shall require during 
the said terme and the same so well and sufficiently re- 
paired and kept shall in the end of the said terme deliver 
and yeild up together w*^ such tackling and furniture for 
the said lighter boate as in a note under these presents are 
expressed or otliers of the same sorte as good in quality 
as they are now at this present time and shall also well 
and truly pay the said rent unto the said Robert Thomson 
his executors administrators & assignes In witnesse &c. 
[2-6] 
At the petition of the said R T his exec, ad : & asss. 

and Edward Bendall, all men deriving he was a seaman without any very fixed 

their livelihood more or less from the sea; place of abode, who managed to steer 

so that this notice of Robert Thompson clear of the books of record from which 

in Lechford, combined with lack of no- we fondly hope to make the acqnaint- 

tice elsewhere, would seem to show that auce of our ancestors. 



376 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

To all Christian people unto whome these presents shall 
come I George Crispe ^ of Piim6uth in New England husband- 
man send greeting <fcc Knowe yee that I doe hereby consti- 
tute and ordainc my Dearc brotlier Robert Crispe of Soutlnvarke 
in the County of Surrey marriner my true andla^-fuU Attor- 
ney for me and in my name lawfully to enter into and upon 
all that my parte and portion of fourc acres of garden ground 
land medow or pasture or whatsoever it be w^** the appurte- 
nances lying and being in the parishe of Word ncare Sand- 
wich in the County of Kent given and bequeatlied and of right 
belongijig unto me my heires and assignes for ever by the last 
will and testament of my uncle George Crispe late of Black- 
wall in the parish of Stibcnheatli in tlie County of Mid^ Shij> 
wright deceased as in and by the said last will and testament 
more at large it doth and may appearc w*^^ said foure acres 
now are or lately were in the occupation or possession of John 
Firmo'' of Sandwich abovesaid Taylor and Fermin Johnson of 
Word aforesaid gardiner their or one of their assignee or as- 
signes. And furthermore I doe hereby authorize and appoint 
my said attorney for me k in my name to grant bargaine and 
sell all my right title & interest in the premises to any person 
or persons whomsoever that will purchase the same for any 
reasonable summe or summes of money so it be not under 421 
and the same to receive <fe recover to my use and returne unto 
me as I sliall by my letters of advise appoint. And to that 
end (fe purpose of & for me ct in my name to make scale Sc 
deliver any reasonable act or acts deed or deeds bring k per- 
forme w**" effect any action or suit and to doe every other 
lawfuU thing requisite in and about the premises as fully 
powerfully and effectually as I my [209] selfe in proper per- 
son might or could doe Ratcfying confirming k allowing all 
and whatsoever my said Attorney shall lawfully doc or cause 
to be done in the premises In witnesse kc. 1. 19. 1640. 16 
Car. [2-6] 

George Druell of London grocer for and in the behalfe of 
Edward Payne of Wapping in the County of Mid^ mariner sells 

George Ciispe is not fouml in Savage. 



LECnrORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 377 

to Will" Phillips 1 of Charlcstowne in New England butcher 
all those five acres of land lying upon Wormwood Point on 
Misticke sydc in Charlestowne precincts for 5t for ever. [Is.] 

Robert Shute^ of Winnegansett in New England planter 
Walter :Merchant late of BristoU haberdasher k Mathew 
Norman of Pcmmaquid als Aldworth towne in New England 
planter to be bound to the said Robert Shute in 501 condiconed 
to save him harmlesse for the payment of a debt of about 25^ 
due to the said Walter Merchant for commodities heretofore 
bought of him in Bristoll And a Release. [1—6] 

Thomas Foster of Boston in New England gunner of the 
Castle in Castle Island and. Abigail his wife daughter of 
Mathew Winies late of Ipswich in the County of Suffolk 
[illegible'] doceascd makes a Le"" of Attorney unto George 
Strange gent lawfully to enter into & upon all lands tene- 
ments and hereditaments belonging to them or either of them 
in Ipswich aforesaid by vertue of the last will & testament of 
the said Mathew AVimes or otherwise & to recover the same 
<fe make sale of it and to deliver all save 501 unto Robert 
Wimes of Ipswich aforesaid Glacier, w*^'^ 501 is to be imployed 
as I shall direct M^: Stranges reasonable charges k. recompence 
being deducted, [vacat.] 

Thomas Wallis ^ of Plimouth in N E merchant assignes to 
Henry Watts of blacke Poynt in N E in the Province of 

1 William Phillips is noted in Wy- a transaction far less creditable to iiim 
man as an innholdcr of Charlestown who than the present {post, \\ 219). Mat- 
moved away to the Eastward. Reference tliew Norman does not appear in 
is also there made to this purcliase of Savage. 

land, though what was purchased is not ^ Mr. Thomas Wallis is among the 
stated, nor what was paid for it. Phil- list of those taking the freeman's oath, 
lips lived afterwards in Saco, where he May 10, 1643 ; but otlierwise there is no 
behaved with much courage in the In- mention of him. Henry Watts is noted 
dian wars, as may be read in Savage ; in Savage at different points in the 
he came back, however, to Boston, and Province of Maine. He became free- 
there died. man of Massachusetts in 1659, and was 

2 Robert Shute lived at Peraaquid then chosen constable. He was repre- 
later, with his brother Riclianl. He sentative in 1660 and 1661, after which 
is ne.xt mentioned in the Xotc-book in little is known of hira. 



3<8 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Maine ffislimoiiger in debts 601 and is to pay iiim in money ov 
commodities such as he shall appoint 201 & in consideration 
H W is to deliver or cause to be d. unto the said T W Arc 100 
firkins of good and merchantable Sturgion at MT Richard 
Russells house in Charlestowne in N E at or before the lO'** 
day of Sept next ensuing. Bond to performe in 1601. 
And a lett^ of Attorney, [nil.] 

I John Winthrop Esq^ one of the Council and Assistants 
for the Jurisdiccon of the Mattachusetts Bay in New England 
doe hereby certify unto all manner of persons whome it mav 
Concerne that Thomas xVUyn of Xew Barnstable in Ne\v 
England yeoman did before the twentieth day of July Anno 
Dni one thousand six hundred thirty and nine procure from 
myselfe at that time being Governor of this Jurisdiccon a war- 
rant at the suit of John Tooker of Barnstable in the Countv 
of Devon merchant against Isaack Allerton merchant for a 
debt due to the said John Tooker from the said Isaack Aller- 
ton w-^^ warrant as appeareth to me by suthcient testimony 
upon oath was served according to the custome of this Country 
And further I doe hereby certifie that it did then appeare to 
me that the said Isaacke Allerton had no visible estate rcall 
or personal in this Country In testimony whereof I have at 
the request of the said Thomas Allyn hereunto sett my liand 
and scale the 22th day of March Anno Dni 1640. 2 of them 
vrere made. [1-6] 

[210] 1 Worthy S^ My service & hearty love remem- 
bered unto you <tc. I am necessitated at this time to trouble 

> This letter is written by Barnabas (Anne) M-as born after 1662.] Perry's 
Davis on liis afTairs in regard to tlie Hcrt's GcneaL, p. 6." 
Woodcocke suit to one Mr. Lygon, of The introduction at the end of tlie 
whom I find note in Jlr. TruuibuU's letter of Nayman, Jlr. Antony Swini- 
MS. index as follows: "Richard Ly.gon, nier's brother, is puzzling. I have not 
Esq., of iladresfield, co. Worcester, ob. found either name. Tliis letter I sup- 
3 p. 15, and buried ]8 April 16S7, at pose to have been carried by Lechfoi-d 
Madresfd, — was 1st husband of Anne, himself, who went home in the August 
eldest daughter of Sir Francis Russel, of this year, though it may be another 
of Strenshani, co. "Worcester, bart., and one wliich is referred to in the Note- 
niece of Sir Wna. Sytton. [His wife book; p. 239. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



379 



you w*^ a few lines about my Occasions wherein I earnestly 
pray yo' loving and Christian helpc ; It is not uuknowne unto 
you that I was imployd by ]\K Wil^ Woodcocke in his af- 
faires hither to New England about five or six yeares since, 
and that I had a Letter from my honourable Lord Say yo^ good 
Lord & master to the reverend Mr Hooker in M! Woodcockes 
behalfe, that I returned out of New England w*^ W. Hookers 
letter in answere to my Lord and that againc I was sent by 
Ml Woodcocke into New England w^*' another letter from my 
Lord to W. Hooker and did againe returnc into England w'^ 
MMIookers letter in answere to his Lordship. You knowe 
likewise that I complained to yo' selfe often thues that I had 
travailed nuich in M^ Woodcockes affaires & was at great 
expenccs thereabout & that he had not satisfyed me for my 
said travaile paynes & charges, [once more kind Mr Liggon 
let me intreate you when you have prepared yo' Letter & have 
received all the other letters or writings to procure my Lord 
Say to write upon the one parte of each writing if it be but 
upon the backe side that such a day of the moneth & yeare 
such a writing or letter was shewed to his Lor^P by yo^selfe 
setting thereto but his Lor^P^namc]! that once if you remember 
you had conference w*^ M: Will™ Woodcocke hereabout and 
that he confessed he was in my debt & promised to give me 
satisfaction you can I hope remember the effect of his words 
to you thereabouts, you knowe I intended to come over as a 
planter at my first voyage and to that end did bring up my 
goods to London but W. Woodcocke diverted my wife and 
sent me over into New England upon his occasions my goods 
being left w*'^ U: Woodcocke till a fitt time I might returne to 
fetch my wife And since I returned the second time you 
knowe I was imployed by Ml Willm Woodcocke divers jour- 
neys & hindered from coraming over hither by reason he did 
not pay me for my former paines & charges. And you may 
remember I hired Edward Winne and another young man 
Carpenters at Broughton servants for me in New England & 
brought them to London w''^ Winnes family at my owne 
charges w''^ servants because M^ Woodcocke faylcd to pay me 

1 The part in brackets written here in the margin, but erased. 



880 



LECHFORD^S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 



my money tv-^ he OTved mc I ^vas forced to put awny to one 
Kog^rlloggeafterNvards they were againe assii^ned to me & 
M. John Woodcocke by tlie same Roger Ilouirc Mr Woodcocko 
laying downe one half of the money yet if £ business of im'- 
paling did not goe on then I was to have the servants to mv- 
selle & allow him his said money I shall beseech vou to talk 
w him about this particulare of the servants & to'take notice 
ot his answere therein whether it were so or no. And then I 
shall desire yon S^ to be pleased to write yo^ knowledge in all 
tliose particulares to the Governor for the time being ^in New 
England or his deputy, but let it come to my owne hand to be 
delivered, I live at Charlestowne. And if mv Lord write a 
word in my behalfe toucliing any of these tlungs I shall be 
much beholding to his Loi- W-all I beseech you to peruse 
his inclosed to Mr Coventry servant to my Lord Brooke & 
then scale <t deliver or send it .fe request an answere w<=^ I be- 
seech you to returne w- yo". Also I shall intreate you to 
receive my father James his letter k my brothers w<=^ will be 
brought or sent you <t send them w^'^ the first slm.pino- vou 
can heare of either from London or Bristol! And I shall eVer 
rest thankful to you. 1. 22. 1640. 

M^ Coventry I beseech you in a letter to the Governor of 
New England or his Deputy declare yo^ knowledge concern- 
ing the lourneys & imployments I underwent in England since 
m>- second returne into England out of New Endand in Af^ 
Vs iham Woodcockes affaires from London into Essex to Hod- 
wells & another place above 30 miles about 12 times from 
London to Bristoll once, from London to Dunstable for the 
children once, from Teuxbury to London 9 or 10 times, and 
about his service in London at the custome house & elsuhere 
weighing tobacco and doing other businesses knowne to yo' 
selle And you knowe of my goods that lay at MT Woodcockes 
rom the time of my first comming into New Endand you 
knowe my goods were worth about 201 I received ^them not 
till since W. Woodcockes death you knowe tliev were used in 
tlie house & some of them spoyled and I think you ma^ 

fCi^\'n +li/^.- . n 11 ^ . "^ 



con- 



ceive tliey were 5t the worse I beseecli vou declare yo' knowl- 
edge & what you believe herein w%ut favor or respect to me 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 381 

or any living or dead and w'^all what satisfaction you icnowe 
Mr Woodcocke ever gave me And I pray deliver yo' letter to 
My Liggon who will convey it to me 1. 22. IC-iO. 
Nayman M^ Antony. Swimmers brother. 

[211] George Denison ^ of Rocksbury in New England gent 
and Bridget Denison his wife daughter of Jolin Thompson 
late of Preston in the County of Xorth*"'' gent deceased and 
of M""!^ Alice Thomi)son now dwelling at Rocksbury aforesaid 
make a letter of Attorney to Thomas Worlidge Citizen & silk 
dyer of London and M! Viner citizen & silk dyer of London 
to demand receive ct recover of Mr Spencer Clarke parson of 
the parish Church of Scaldwell in the County of Northamp- 
ton or any other lyable thereunto the portion of the said 
Bridget given her by her said fathers last will & testament 
1. 22. 1640. 

Lewes Kidby^ of Boston &c a lett^ of Attorney to Will"* 
Hudson. 1. 22. 1640. 

Tiiomas Page^ of Saco in the Province of Maigne gent 
bound to Robert Lucar in 80^ ; Condiconed that if forty 
pounds be truly payd according to certaine bills of exchange 
drawne by him upon Mr Christopher PhcUin of Fanchurch 
streete London to Mr John Huxton of Wapping Shipwright 
then <fcc dat' 1. 22. 1640. 

Good ffather I shall intreate you & my brother Rcade to be 
pleased to call to minde these particulares following w*^'' I am 

1 George Denison was one of three ^ J_,ewis Kidbj' is called by Savage 
brothers who at this time lived in Eox- a fisherman. He lived at this time, I 
bury. His wife Bridget died in 16-43, suppose, on a house-lot which had been 
and he himself went to England, where granted to him in 1639, near ^Ir. Bel- 
he gained some military experience in lingham's marsh-lots, on the Town Cove, 
the civil wars and also married a second >* Thomas Page is called in Savage a 
wife, with whom he came back to this tailor, but he may have been a "gent" 
country. He turned his military for all that. The name of Lucar is 
knowledge to account in King Philip's among the freemen at Newport, 1650, 
■war. where he behaved with much bra- but with the Christian name Mark in- 



very. 



He died in 1694. stead of Piobcrt. 



382 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

to make proofe of in New England. You knowe that about 
five yeares since Mf Will"' Woodcocke did reteyne me by 
writing betweene us to come over into New England to follow 
his businesses heere that I was to have of him after the rate 
of 10' a yeare for my travaile & my charges borne that I tooke 
shipping for New England about the time of Easter 1635 
That I returned againe into England the same yeare about the 
beginning of March — that I went upon the same agreement 
the second time for the said Mr Woodcocke into New England 
and tooke shipping thither about the time of Easter in the 
yeare of our Lord 1G36 that I returned againe into England 
about Sept in the yeare 1G37. That M^ William Woodcocke 
used me in divers businesses as his servant and attendant 
from that time till the day of his death w'^^ was about a yeare 
& three quarters that in that time I rode divers journeys from 
Teuxbury to London to attend upon him 9 or 10 times from 
London to Hodgwells in Essex and another place as farre 
about 12 times from London to BristoU once from London to 
Dunstable once. That I intended to come into New Engl : as 
a planter at the time of my first voyage & to that end brought 
my wife & family k goods to London but Mf Woodcocke pre- 
vaylcd w^^ my wife to stay behind and to send me about his 
business bearing me in hand that I should when his planta- 
tion was prepared come over k fetch my wife & live upon his 
lands to improve them for him, and in the meane while to 
leave w''^ him my goods, as bedding brasse pewter & other 
things of the value of 20* or more, that these goods remained 
from that time till the day of his death he having used them 
in his house & spoyled some of them so that they were I con- 
ceive you or one of you may knowe 5* the worse. That I 
often complayned to you that W. Woodcocke had not satisfyed 
me for my service and charges, I thinke you good father once 
did ride to London to speake to Mr Woodcocke in my absence 
for 51 yi"^ should have bin by covenant payd to my wife but 
was not and that by reason Mr Woodcocke did not pay me for 
my travell k charges I was hindered from coming into N. E. 
till after his death I intreate you good father to write yo"" 
lett' to the Governor of the Mattachusetts bay in N E for the 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK 383 

time being or his deputy of yo'' knowledge in these things or 
any other particulare you may remember in this businesse. 
And for my brother Readc I shall pray him to inquire out 
Ml Babb the ship master who dwelles in Wapping and get a 
note under his hand to certify that I payd him five pounds 
for my passage from New E to E in the yeare 1G35. and that 
afterwards another time 1 sold him a parccll of strong waters 
to the value of 201 for tobacco And then because he dwelles 
neare London to goe unto one Ml Archbold in the Ship 
Clarks office or some other experienced Clarke there & intrcate 
l}im to drawe a breife & punctuall affidavit of his knowledge 
or M^hat he verily believes in all these particulares & then send 
or deliver the same to M^ Liggon my Lord Says gentleman 
whome I have intreated to convey these things to me and soe 
doe I desire yo"" letf may be also delivered to Ml Liggon to be 
sent to me These things stand me upon both in my good 
name & estate & I beseech you to doe me this favor as to stirre 
in it that I may have a speedy answere returned w"^ sliall be 
sent me by Ml Liggon or if he should be dead \\"^ God forbid 
by some of my Lords Says family who may shewe the writings 
to his LorPP before they be sent me that there be no doubt 
made of them when they come heere, [10s. for these letters 
& one to Mr. Bridges.] 

[212] John Palmer 1 of Hingham seaman aged about 40. 
yeares sworne saith upon his oath that about 4 yeares since 
he came to dwell at Hingham and shortly after one Nicholas 
Jacob procured this deponent to goe fetch a load of hay for 
the widow Large and this deponent commending the hay when 
he saw it said it was prety good hay yea said Nicholas Jacob 

1 This John Palmer of course is not 1648 and in 1649. He died in 1659. 

the man \vho got into difficulties with The Widow Large I take to be the 

his fatlier (ante, p. 194). This one is relict of one William Large, who came 

merely noted by Savage, who says that to Hingham in 1635. He is said by 

he may have moved to Scituate. Savage to have removed to Cape Cod, 

Nicholas Jacob came to Nt-w England but he may also have made the longer 

in 1633, and moved from Watertown, journey which would have justified 

where he had first lived, to Hingham his wife in assuming the title in the 

in 1635. He was a representative in text. 



384 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

you might have had as much hay on yor"" owne lott as wouh] 
have wintered yo"^ cow why said this deponent hath the widdow 
Largo any lott lieere ? No said Jacob it is one Mathew Hemes 
lott who is gone for England &, it is thought he will come no 
more or words to this purpose, [nil gains :] 

John Cutten of Newberry in New England marrincr and 
John Cutten ^ the younger of the same marriner mastei's of 
the good ship the Desire- of Boston in N England doe bynd 
themselves to pay Lawrence Hazzard of London shi])wriglit 
30^ 14^ 6*^ to Robert Crispe of London marriner 9^ 2* for his 
7 moneths service in the said ship to Will™Wilbert of London 
marriner 17^ 10* upon the 10th day of ^May next or at the 
arrival of the said ship in England. [2 — 6.] 

Leonard Buttler ^ of boston bricklayer mortgageth liis house 
& garden in Boston & 2 acres of land at long island to Ather- 
ton Haiigh of Boston gent on behalfe of John Whittingham of 
Ipswich gent for 25^ layd out for him above two yeares since 
w'^ reasonable dammages in Worke and other commodities 
w^^in a twelve moneth dated 25. 1. 1641. [1 — 6.] 

John Crabtree of Boston joyner makes a letter of Attorney 
to Isaack Haynes gent to receive & recover of Mathew Wood- 
rowe^ of Hartford upon the river of Connecticott carpenter 
the summe of xli* xi*^ w"^^ he oweth me. 1. 29 1641. [6.] 

^ The names are read " Cutting" by was at this time the master of the 

Savage, who notices them in his Die- ship. 

tionary. They are certainly not Cutting ^ Leonard Buttler is of course the 

in Lechford, but more like Cutten. The same man alluded to before in the Xote- 

younger was a shipmaster who made book, with diflereut spelling of his last 

many voyages in his time. name. John "Whittingham came from 

2 The ship "Desire," of Marblehead, Lincolnshire in England, being the 

is spoken of several times in Winthrop. gi-andson of William Whittingham, Dcau 

She was built at Jlarblehead in 1636, of Durham in the time of Elizabeth. 

and her captain, for some voyages at ♦ Itlatthew Woodrow [or Woodrufi"] 

least, was William Pierce, wlio was was one of the first settlers of Farming- 

in 1641 absent in the West Indies on ton, Isaac Haynes would seem as 

that cruise whereon he met his death ; though he might be a relative of John 

so it is likely enough that John Cutten Haynes. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 385 

M! Will™ Hutchinson t his Sonne Edward Hutchinson for 
1001 sell unto Mr Wm, Tynge of Boston 160 acres of land 
little more or less in the precincts of Brayntree as it is now 
layd out.i [1 _] • 

A note of account of the money due to me from my father 
in law Thomas Dexter.^ 

First upon the 12tli day of July 1039. he borrowed 

of jne to be payd upon demand 80^ 

Also that summer he had of uie two ferkins of 

butter w''^ cost me out of my purse .... 3 10 
Also he had of M! King of Lynue by my aj^point- 

ment the same summer 6 10 

Also upon the 17. day of March IGoO. he had 

of me 15 

Also he had of me or my wife in the summer 

following 2 

Also he had of M! Hill upon my account the 

same summer 2 12 

My wife's portion was to be 100. to be payd at the 

day of marriage w<=ii was in October 1039. 

thereof 50 

And more thereof w'^^in six moneths after ... 50 

Toto 209 12 

My ffather-in-law paid me w"'in a moneth after 

our marriage 20^ 

And in February 1639 he payd me more ... 191 

Memorandum that 17 Martii 1G39 we reckoned & 
my father upon the whole was behinde to me 
(forgetting Mr King's bill of 61 10' ) for w'='> he 
gave me a bill under his hand 155 

After he gave me another bill for 10 13» 6* 

Afterwards my ffather sent me 2 goats at ... 5^ 

And thereupon 2G June 1G40 bound the mill unto 

me for 150 

. So that the bill of IQi 13^ 6*^ was to be discharged for u 
servant & other things w^^ I had of him. 

[1-] John Frend. 

1 See p. 177, ante. was made freeman of Massaithusetts 

2 Thomas Uexter, the father-in-law 1631, but was disfranchised 1633. He 
of John Friend, came to Lynn in 1630, moved to Sandwich about 1640, where 

25 



38G LECHFORD'S MAXUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Two writings for Barnabas Davis 2. 12. 1641. [Is.] 

[213] Captaine Edward Gibones of Boston & M";^ Elizabeth 
Glover of Cambridge widdowe doe grant bargainc sell & con- 
firme unto jMr Maurice Thomson of London merchant severally 
their [blank] partes in the ship planter of London heretofore 
by their order sold by M^ Thomas Hawkins unto the said 
W. Thomson. 

Richard Callacot of Dorchester in N E tayler for 82 4^ the 
remainder of 1221 10* due by bill to George Alcocko dated 
19. Julii 1639 payable 15. Aprilis 1640 doth mortgage his 
house at Dorchester & his ffarmc house & all his other lands 
lying in Dorchester to Phillip Eliott & William Parke executors 
of the last will & testament of George Alcockc ^ deceased to 
pay the same viz* by giving suflicient bills to pay the same to 
M' Nicholas Treworthy of Exeter merchant or in rcdy money 
<fe discharge the executors of the said money & damraages 
from such time as the same was due by the said bill. The 
mortgage to be to pay the money & dammages w'^^ Mr Tre- 
worthy shall recover on the first of August leave a space 
proviso if R Callacot can procure bills to the executors satis- 
faction that then the same shall bo accepted in payment if 
the bills be accordingly discharged. [1221 10s. — 40^ 6s. = 
821 4s.] 



I should think he was at this time, the Rer. John Eliot, the apostle. He 

He was admitted freeman of Plymouth came, it is thought, about 1635 to Rnx- 

1658, aud died in Boston 1677. Savage bury, where he was a deacon in the 

names two sons, and thinks he must cliurch. William Parke came to 13os- 

have had other children. One of them ton in 1631 with Roger AVillianis iu 

I take to have married John Friend, a the " Lion." He served thirty-thn e 

carpenter, who lived at diti'erent times years in the General Court, and dii-d iu 

in many parts of New England, but was 1687. All that Savage can tell about 

probably now living in Boston, where Jeremy Blaekwell is that he came in 

he was allowed to be an inhabitant the "Truelove" in 1635 at the age of 

March 30, 1640. eighteen. We do not learn so nun h 

^ George Alcocke died Dec. 30, 1610, even as this from the entries above. 

or thereabouts. (See ]>. 148, ante.) Edward Burcham, of Lynn, clerk of the 

Philip Eliot was brotlier of Jacob Eliot, writs in 1645, went back to England 

mentioned above (pp. 151, 153), and of 1656. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 387 

George Burcham of London merchant bound to Jercmie 
Blackwell in 17* Condiconcd that if 17* be payd by John 
Blackwell unto one Mr [idan ] Too according to the intent k 
true meaning of certaine bills of exchange heretofore for tiie 
same drawne & signed by the said Jeremy then the said George 
shall pay unto the said Jeremy his executors &c 8* 10' upon 
demand <fc suflicient notice of the same 17* so payd. 

\_The above enti'i/ is crossed out.'] 

Whereas Jeremy Blackwell heretofore owed me George 
Burchum of Lincolne mercer the sunnne of 8* 10* upon ac- 
counts of bargaines betweene him & me whereupon according 
to agreement betweene us the said Jeremie drewe & signed a 
letter of Attorney for seventeenc pounds to be payd by his 
brother John Blackwell unto Jonathan Newcomen mercer 
dwelling on London bridge And whereas afterwards the said 
Jeremie Blackwell gave me a bill or writing for the payment 
of the said 8 and 10* w*^ reasonable dammages for the whole 
171 abovesaid to me heere in New England Now I doe declare 
that the said last mentioned bill or writing was given me by 
him for security of payment of the said 17 pounds and there- 
fore if the same be or shall be accordingly payd in England 
then the said bill or writing of 8* 10* & the penalty thereupon 
is to be voyd & of none effect & shall be delivered up & can- 
celled & also I shall & will satisfie & pay or cause to be payd 
unto him his executors adm" or assignes the summe of 81 10* 
upon sufficient notice of the said 17i so payd & upon demand 
■made to me or Edward Burchum of Lynne in New England 
witnesse my hand the 23th of the 2. moneth 1611. [l.s.] 

Knowe all men by these presents that whereas I Captaine 
Edward Gibons of Boston in New England did heretofore give 
order and authority unto Thomas Hawkins of Dorchester in 
New England Shii)wright for me & in my name to grant bar- 
gainc & sell unto ^laurice Thomson of London merchant or 
to any person or persons all that my right & interest of and 
in the [idanh] parte of the ship planter of London whereupon 
the said Thomas Hawkins hath granted bargained k sold my 



388 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

said right and interest in the said ship accordingly unto the 
said Maurice Thomson Now I the said Captaine Gibones doe 
hereby for me my executors & administrators conlirnie unto 
the said Maurice Thomson all that my said right and interest 
of and in the said [hlanh'] parte of the said ship k rights & 
appurtenances thereunto belonging To have and to hold the 
said [blank] parte of the said ship and all & singulare the prem- 
ises w'^ the appurtenances whatsoever unto the said Maurice 
Thomson his executors administrators and assigncs according 
to the purport true intent &, meaning of the said grant bar- 
gaine & sale made by the said Thomas Hawkins & of these 
presents In witnessc &c 2. 22. 1641. [Is.] 

The like by M^l« Glover &c [Is.] 

This Indenture made the 22th day of the 2. moneth 1641. be- 
tweene Richard Callacot of Dorchester in N E tayler of the 
one parte and Philipp Elliott and William Parke two of the 
deacons of the Church of Roxbury in New England executors 
of the last will & testament of George Alcocke late of the 
same deceased of the other parte Witnesseth that the said 
Richard Callacott for and in consideracon of the Summe of 
eighty two pounds & foure shillings the remainder of a debt of 
one hundred twenty two pounds and ten shillings w*^^ he owed 
unto the said George Alcocke & should have bin payd unto 
him Tijjon the fifteenth day of Aprill Anno Dni 1640 and w'^^* 
the said R. C now oweth unto the said executors Philipp Elliot 
& William Parke as more at large in and by one bill obli- 
gatory concerning the same debt bearing date the nineteenth 
day of July 1639 under the hand & scale of the said Richard 
Collacot it doetli and may appeare and for full payment of the 
said eighty two pounds & foure shillings and reasonable dam- 
mages for deteyning the same doeth hereby grant bargaine & 
sell make k confirme unto the said executors Philipp Elliott 
& William Parke all that his dwelling house & farme house 
and all the lands k tenements woods & underwoods and here- 
ditaments houses of the said Richard Collacot lying & being 
in Dorchester aforesaid or the precincts thereof and all 
orchards & appurtenances to the said houses or either of them 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 389 

belonging or reported to belong To have [214] and to hould 
the said dwelling houses lands & tenements and all & singu- 
lare the premises w^^ the appurtenances whatsoever unto the 
said executors Pliilipp Elliot & William Parke their heires and 
Assignes for ever Provided alhvays that if the said Ricliard 
CoUacott his heires executors or administrators shall well <t 
truly pay or cause to be payd unto the said Executors Pliilipp 
Elliott & Will™ Parke their heires or assignes the full summe 
of eighty two pounds & foure shillings w'^ reasonable damma- 
ges for deteyning the same as aforesaid as a Jury shall award 
upon or before the [blank] day of the {blank] moneth next ensu- 
ing the date hereof at or in the now dwelling liouse of the 
said Philipp Elliott situate in Rocksbury aforesaid Then these 
presents shall be voyd & of none effect & the said Richard 
Collacot his heires & assignes shall or may lawfully have & 
enjoy the premises <fc every parte thereof as in his or their 
former estate anything in these presents to the contrary con- 
tcyned in any wise notwithstanding And the said executors 
Philipp Elliott & Will" Parke doe hereby grant unto the said 
Richard Collacot that if he shall on or before the said [blank] 
day of the [blank] monetli aforesaid draw good bills of ex- 
change such as the said executors shall admit k allow for the 
true payment of the said eighty two pounds & foure shillings 
unto Nicholas Treworthy of the City of Exeter merchant & 
the same shall be accordingly payd unto him or his assignes 
that then the said executors will accept of the said bills of 
exchange in discharge of the said eighty two pounds & foure 
shillings according to these presents & not require the said 
dammagcs unlcsse the said Nicholas require or recover dam- 
mages of the said executors so much money by them k their 
testator owing unto him the said Nicholas and that in the 
meane time the said Richard Collacot may remaine in posses- 
sion of the premises as their lessee In -witnesse <tc [3-4] 

Angell Holland ^ of Weymouth in N E yeoman and Wil- 
liam Game his servant put him servant to John Crabtree for 

1 Savage spells the name Hollaid, servant I know nothing at all. I sup- 
"hut I think the spelling in Lechfonl is pose he may have become a member of 
Holland. He was a shoemaker. Of his the church at 2s ew Providence spoken 



390 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

three yeares from his landing in the West Indies in or ncare 
the Isle of providence for meate drinke <t cloathes. [vacat] 

Hugh Deordall ^ of Hingham millwright t Jolm Knight = of 
Waterton in X. E. carpenter bound to Will"" Knap for 4i T» to 
be payd in money or corne : 24. Junii 1G41. w'^ a Counterbond 
toJK. [2.-.] 

The bounds of M-: Hatcliinsons IGO acres 3 bounded on one 
syde w^^ :Mount Wollaston brooke running up by III Tings 
house w*^ the lands of W. Ting & Edmand Quinsey on another 
syde k w-'' a swamp on another syde and w"' a straight lyne 
dividing betweene the lands of the said III Ilutchinsons .fc M"". 
Ting as now it is layd out being i)arcell of iha groat lott liere- 
tofore given the said Will°^ Hutchinson by the Towue of 
Boston. 

Knowe all men by these presents that I Sergeant Edward 
Hutchinson of Boston in New England Sonne k heire apparent 
of William Hutchinson of Aquidncckc Hand gent as well l)y 
vertue of one letter of Attorney made sealed k delivered unto 
me as his act k deed for his interest as in my owne right k 
interest whatsoever doe hereby for k in the consideration of 
one hundred pounds of lawful money of England to me in hand 
payd k satisfied before the sealing k delivery hereof to the 
use of my said ffather k mysclfe by William Tynge of Boston 
aforesaid merchant grant bargaine k sell unto the said Will" 
Tynge all those one hundred and sixty acres of land belonging 
to my said father and myselfe lying within the precincts of 
Brayntree in Xew England bounded on one syde w*^ Mount 
Wollaston brooke running up by the house of the said William 
Tynge on another syde with the lands of the said William 

of with reprobation by Johnson (ii. oh, a pop these lands of tlie Hutchinsons 

^^•)- see pp. 177 and 212, ante, and BosU'ii 

1 Hugh Deordal], Newport, 1639 Toini iicrarffe, pp.7 and 9 ; also cf. p. 37, 
[Savage). ante. Edward Hutcliinson, it will be 

2 Jolm Knight is called a maltster remembered, had returned before this 
in Savage, who notes him as being of from Newport to Boston, where he was a 
Wntertown in 1G35. "William Knapp prominent man until his death in Kii.'i' 
waa also of Watertown. Philip's war. 



LECHFOIiD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 391 

Tjnge and Edward Quinsey on another syde w''° a swampe and 
on the other syde "\v"* a straight lyne dividing betweene the 
lands of my said ffathcr <t of me and the lands of the said 
William Tyngc as it is now layd out And all "woods under- 
woods (fc hereditaments thereunto belonging To have & to hold 
the said one hundred tt sixty acres of land &, all & singulare 
the premises w"" the appurtenances whatsoever unto the said 
William Tynge his heires and assignes for ever In witnesse 
&c. 

John Long of Weymouth in New England husbandman 
aged about twenty foure yeares sworne saith upon his oath that 
whereas Mary Lane was to serve Richard Silvester ^ of Wey- 
mouth aforesaid for the space of foure yeares or therabouts 
from about the beginning of the first moneth last as this 
deponent hath credibly heard, one Edward Pole - of Weymouth 
in the first moneth aforesaid was Desirous to marry her & to 
buy out lier time of service aforesaid and in this deponents 
hearing did promise to pay unto the said Richard Silvester for 
the same two hundred foot of boards and foure pounds in 
money or such good commodities as he should like of upon 
Midsomer eve next & then the said Pole was to takb lier away 
& marry her. [1 — 0] 

[215] Mary Sherman ^ came to mj wife the twelveth day 
of April!, 1G41. 

1 Richard Silvester, of Weymouth, seven children, but not of his wifej who 
had come to Xew England in 1630. A was named executrix, so that we can- 
few years before this mention, in 1039, not tell with certainty how this matter 
however, r;etting into some trouble with turned out. Of the difficulty of iden- 
.the Colonial Government, he sold his tifying this or any other John Long 
estate, and shortly afterwards moved to of this period we have already spoken 
Scituate, under the jurisdiction of the (p. llZ,nv/c). 

Plymouth Colony. 3 Mary Sherman I should like to 

2 Edward Pole here mentioned must think was the woman interested in 
have been Edward Poole, of Xewport, Captain Keayne's sow. From an affi- 
who, according to Savage, passed most davit of J.echford's later in the Note- 
of his tiuie at Weymouth (naturally 6t»oA- (p. 234), and various entries in the 
enougli, considering the attraction), earlier part (pp. 66, 84), it appears 
His will (1064) gives the names of that he had relations with Story and 



392 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Thomas Rawlins of Weymouth in Xew England ffisherman 
aged about 33. yeares swornc saith upon his oath that in or 
about Oct last he heard John King of Weymouth seaman 
undertake unto Thomas Applegate ^ of AVeymoutli planter to 
goe in his boate as Master thereof if an other man could be 
gotten by either of them to goe w**" him the said John King 
to help manage the said boate and they agreed together that 
the said John King should have his owne parte of the fishe 
taken by himselfe in the s*^ boate freight free &.that the said 
Thomas Ap{)lcgate should hare the 4*^ penny of freight of 
goods carryed in the said boate and that if the boate or any 
goods therein should be miscarryed cast aNvay or hurt by the 
ill ordering or laying of the said boate the said John King 
should beare the dammage thereof and their words & agreement 
were to this pui-pose. 

George Allen of Weymouth in New England planter aged 
about twenty one yeares sworne saith nj)on his oath that about 
the beginning of November last one day late w*^in night he 
was present in the house of John Kiug of Weymouth seaman 
Master of Thomas Applegates boate & there heard the said 
John King say to William Newland that he would not stand 
to the adventure of the goods of the said William Newland 
laden in the said boate if that one hogshead of salt more of 
his were put into the same boate, whereto the said Newland 
answered that noth withstanding he would have the said hogs- 
head put into the said boate that night and if the boate were 
overladen in the morning some of the said goods might be 
againe taken out therof or words to that purpose and hcre- 

the Shermans, though he may not have next year he was discharged therefrom, 

been ultimate with them. This men- it seems from later entries, where iuqui- 

tion and that above (p. 175) seem to ries are made as to certain pei-sons 

me to refer to Mr. Sherman and his drowned from a canoe, that he continued 

wife. Savage, however, thinks that the business in 1638, though possibly 

the woman's name was Elizabeth. one "William Blunter was the regular 

1 Thomas Applegate, of Weymouth, feriyman at the time {Mass. Col. Rcc, 

is spoken of once or twice in the Colo- i. 156, 165, 246, 249). George Allen, 

nial Record. In 1635 he was licensed John King, and Thomas Tlawlins were 

to keep a ferry between "Wessaguscus all inhabitants of "Weymouth at this 

n.ud Mount Wollaston ; and though the time, as may be seen in Savage. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. S93 

upon this Deponent w*^ others did help put in the said hogs- 
head that night into the said boate <fe in the next morning the 
boatc did not rise but sunke to that side where the said hogs- 
head lay and this deponent knoweth that the said boate did 
rise well enough one tyde when the rest of the said goods 
besides the said hogshead were in it. 

George Carre of Salisbury in N E shipwright rcleaseth 
Thomas Coccrey ^ his apprentice of the remaining time of his 
service & upon legall &. reasonable demand to deliver up his 
Indenture, k give liim his wearing coate an old p of bootes of 
his & 2 paire of drawers & his two paire of old stockins ct a 
wearing shirt. 

Thomas Coccrey is to be bound unto G C in 40^ Condiconed 
that T C shall not intcrmedle in ferry on Merrimacke river 
w^'^'out the consent of G C at any time hereafter and save him 
harmlessc of all charges & dammages w*^^ may arise <t come 
upon G C. his executors Arc by reason of the said Apprentiship 
except those for phisicke & surgery at Ipswich Xewberry &, 
Salisbury. [2*\] 

And a release by Thomas Coccrey to G Carre of all accons 
& demands whatsoever. 

2 Elizabeth Blackborne wife of "Walter Blackborne late of 
Boston in N E shopkeeper for & in the name of her said hus- 
band by vcrtue of a letter of Attorney to her made by him 
dated &c selles unto Francis Lisle ^ of Boston aforesaid 

1 Thomas Coccrey is the nearest to Blackborne, about to set out for Eng- 
the lis. that I have been able to get land in the "Desire," as well as a 
for this man's name, but no name with mention of the deeds in the Xote-book. 
any resemblance thereto is to be found ^ Francis Lisle was a barber and sur- 
in Savage. George Carr was an Ips- geon of Boston. The lot of land here 
wich man originally, but moved to spoken of was on Washington Street, 
Salisbury with the first settlers of the very nearly opposite the spot where the 
town. lie was then a person of some Old South now stands. Up had also 
esteem, married, and having children. a lot in the new field. With several 

2 This transaction is noticed in Stiff, other New Englanders he went to Old 
Deeds (vol. i. p. 20), where may be found England during the Civil War, where he 
the letter of attorney aud will of Walter served as surgeon in the Earl of Man- 



!;>r>o.. 



ModT 
.If 



394 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

barber the dwelling house & shopp T^ith outhouses garden ct 
2 acres & halfe of land in Gentry field of the said Walters 
forever in fee simple for 401 by Articles of agreement to be 
payd 101 a yeare upon or before every tenth of December first 
payment to be 10 10^"^ 1G41 at or in the dwelling house of 
Eichard Hutchinson situate in Cheapside London knowne ])v 
the name of the sigue of the Angell «fc Starrc provided that if 
30 or 40^ the portion of Elizabeth Sutton daughter of [hiank] 
can in the meane time be recovered the same shall be paid in 
discharge of the ]j''mises. 

The hangings of the parlor to goe w*'^ the house. The house 
to be bound & the money to be payd in commodities merchant- 
able in England if money fayle. [o&-,] 

This Indenture made the eighteenth day of the third moncth 
Anno Dili 1G41 betwecne Elizabeth Elackborne wife of Walter 
Blackborne late of Boston in New England shopkeeper for and 
on the bchalfe of her said liusband of the one parte and Francis 
Lisle of the same barber of the other parte witnesseth that 
wheras the said Walter Blackborne by his deed under his 
liand <fc scale dated the two & twentieth day of the first monetli 
last past sealed in the presence of Thomas Miller & Thomas 
Fowle give unto the said Elizabeth Blackborne full power ct 
authority to sell & dispose as she should think fitt all such 
houses Sz lands among other things as did belong unto the said 
Walter Blackborne as more at large by the said deed recorded 
[216] by the Recorder of Boston aforesaid it doth & may ap- 
peare Now witnesseth these presents that the said Elizabeth 
Blackborne doth hereby for & in the behalfe of her said hus- 
band give grant enfeoffc ct confirine unto the said Francis 
Lisle all that the late dwelling house ct shop new built of the 
said Walter Blackborne <fc the garden thereunto adioyning Sc 
two acres Sc halfe of land thereunto belonging Iving in Gentry 
field witli the appurtenances and the hangings of the parlor 

Chester's life-guard. He returned to liis Dictionary, and LioU in his edition 

New England, however, in 1C46. See of Winthrop. It is Lisle in the printed 

Winthrop (vol. ii. p. 245) and Savage. Siifolk Drcds, and very clearly Lisle in 

The name is spelled by Savage, Lyall in the Lechford MS. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT KOTE-UOOK. 395 

Of the saia dwelling house To have and to hold the said dueli- 
ng house & shop gardeu & lond and all & -'S-l-- > - 
premises w- the appuitenauces unto the said Francs LiJe 
hs 1 res & assi.nes for ever Upon eondition that the sa.d 
Franeis Lisle Ids heires executors administrators or ass.gucs 
sh U & -iU .ell & truly pay or eause to be paya uuto the sa.d 
Walter Blaekborne his e.xeeu.ors administrators or a ^gn 
thesummeof forty pounds of lawfuU money of England me » 
the full value thereof in goods & commodities me. ehant be 
in En-land at or in the now dwelling house or shoppeof 1. h- 
a d mitchinson linendraper situate in eheapsidc london called 
by the name of the signo of the Angell & Starro in manner & 
forme following that it is to say ten pounds on or hefoie h 
first day of the'third moneth next ensuing the date heree 
pounds on or before the tenth day of the tenth moneth .^ 
Tha 11 be in the yeare of our Lord 1642. ten pounds on or 
ef"e1h:tenth\lay of the tenth moneth -' sl^'-e in «.c 
veare of our Lord 1043. And ten pounds on or befoie the tcntl 
day ot the tenth moneth w- shall be in the yeare of our Lord 
1644 Xeverthelesse the said Francis Lisle doth hereby grant 
„ 1 th'sa^d Walter Blaekborne that if 30 or 40^ the portion 
of Elizabetli Sutton can be in the mean tune recovered that the 
!am 01 so much therof as .ill suffice shall be payd over unto 
ril Walter Blaekborne his executors adm" or ass.gnes m 
u iTprLnt discharge of the premises or so much thci.o as 
shall remaine unpaid at the time of such recover,- In -^ - 
&c scaled before Ml Edward Hutchinson mysolfc i, John Bi s. 
Fo re billes of 10. a pcece to be sealed ™to the use o he 
said Walter Blaekborne to he payd as abovesa.d dated i scaled 
before the same witnesses. 

8 20 1641. A medicine for the whites & immoderate flux of 
the"cour.esbvD^ Moiley Scabies one liandfuU raysons of tne 
'lZ:a one handfuUwood sorrell one l>-f "' ^ ; -;- 
halfe a pintc a nutmeg grated one f -''^-;™?*»„^t;t' eth r 
berrv leaves lialfc an handtuU hartshorne filed hoj led together 
so t\y n aquarteof running w.ater one houre strayned & sweet- 
r„ed w- silar to be taken betweene mealcs as a julip warme. 



396 LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

The Case of Bra-nabas Davies viz* betweene John Woodcocke 
by his Attorney M^. Edward HoUioke plaintiffe against y*" said 
Barnabas Davies in a matter of the nature of au accon of 
account as the bayliffe servant &, Attorney of the said John 
Woodcocke k betweene the said Barnabas Davies plaintiffe 
against y^ s*^ W. Holyoke xittorney for the said John Woodcocke 
gent for the reasonable expenses & dammages of the said Bar- 
nabas upon the Statute of West™"^ 2. & 10*^ or 11^^ w^^^ cnactcth 
that as all baylilfes & servants ought to account before Audi- 
tors & make speedy agreement so that the Auditors allow the 
accountants their reasonable expense Sc costs <tc. The causes 
came to tryall «fc hearing as a crosse suit one party against 
the other in the Court at Boston the second day of the first 
moneth 1640 or 41. [5s.] 

Edward Hall ^ of Duxbury in New England Carpenter & 
late of Henborough in the County of Glouc'' bound in 30^ to 
John Pollard to pay him 16l — 4 — 7"^ upon the 9th day of 
October next ensuing dated 3. 21. 1G41. the paym* to be made 
at the Tolsey in Bristoll. sealed coram me. [Is.] 

[217] 2 The said John Woodcocke by his Attorney the said 
M^ HoUiocke demands an account of the said Barnabas Davies 
for 1501 received by him for certaine cattell w'^^ belonged to 
William Woodcocke brother of the said John and for the halfe 
of the profitts of two carpenters service the joynt servants of 
the said John Woodcocke & Barnabas Davies <fc for some other 
moneys received by the said Barnabas to the use of the said 
John Woodcocke. 

Tlie said Barnabas accounted shewing that w*^ the said 
1501 he bought other cattell & afterwards exchanged them 
for six oxen Sc a carte w'^^ he was & is ready to deliver unto 
the pP' said Attorn'' whereof and of the profits gained by 

1 Edward Hall, of Duxbur}-, is noted = xhis written opinion of Lechford 

in Savage and in Winsor. He was on the Barnabas Davis case does not 

later of Taunton, then of Bridgewater, throw any additional light on the statp- 

and left the Colony a debtor in 1652, ments and affidavits of pp. 204, 210, 

says "Winsor. and 211, though it is a good summing up. 



LECllFOllD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 397 

them &, his charges about all the said cattell k moneys re- 
ceived the said Barnabas makes his reasonable account, & for 
the said car[)enters service & the profits thereof he saith he is 
redy to allowe halfe the profits thereof to the said John AVood- 
cocke provided tliat he beare halfe charges concerning them 
according to equity, as api)eareth by the account of the said 
Barnabas exhibited into the Court. Barnabas Davies in his 
suit demands allowance of his reasonable charges and payment 
of his sallary or wages for his services voyages & travailes 
midergone as well for the said William as for the said John 
together w'^ recompense for certainc dammages as appeareth 
in the said account and alleadgeth that 04^ 10^ 10*^ or ther- 
abouts is due nnto the said Barnabas for his said charges & 
sallary besides the said dammages. 

The Court was clcare in this that the said Barnabas was in 
equity to be payd for his service k travailes undergone as well 
for the said William as for the said John k all dammages 
chargeable upon either in as much as the same estate was first 
Williams k by him conveyed to his said brother John and that 
the said Barnabas was imploycd by both of them. 

The Jury gave a speciall verdit w*"^ is entered to this effect 
that the said M^ Edward Ilolliocke for the said M^ John 
Woodcocke shall have all such money goods k cattell as shall 
be found M^ Woodcocks k halfe the carpenters k 10^ costs k 

what [a few words of untranslated cipher here] 

and M^ Ilolliocke is to give the said Barnabas Davies what 
shall appeare due upon a iust accoujit and he to have dammage 
for his money since demanded k M^ William Tynge k ]MF 
Thomas Lcchford were appointed Auditors. Whereupon ^.I' 
Holyoke demands k Barnabe Davis delivers the said six 
oxen k carte to the said M^ Holyoke according to the said ver- 
dict <fc order. At the day appointed for the audit the said M^ 
Holyoke demanded the account to be examined onely about 
Barnaby Davis his agency for John Woodcocke it saith that 
was the meaning of the Court Jury verdict k order and 
alleageth that he the said M! Holyoke thinks any accompts 
for William Woodcocke deceased were not to be agitated till 



398 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

he heard from England about William Woodcocks dealings 
w*'' Barnabc Davies or to this effect. 

Barnabas Davies alleadgcth that he conceives the Court 
intended that his account should be heard both for William 
Woodcockes k John Woodcockes occasions <t services done 
by the said Barnabas Davies and is un^villing the Auditors 
should proceed unlcssc M"". Ilolyoke will yeeld therto -which he 
denying ut supra the said Auditors certify that they con- 
ceive thereupon (& not finding Will™ AVoodcocke mentioned 
in the said order of Court or verdit) that the service expected 
from them could not be effectually accomplisht. 

Questions hereupon. 

1. Whether or no the Court & Jury by the said words in the 
verdict that M^ Ilolliockc should give Barnabas Davies what 
shall appeare due upon a just account did not intend the said 
Barnabas Davis his account touching both the said brothers 
William & John Woodcock ? 

2. Wliether or no it be equall that Barnabas Davies being 
now out of possession of any parte of the estate equall in any 
measure to his demands be stayed from his remedy till infor- 
mation be had from England from I knowe not whome nor 
when nor by whome. 

[218] Having perused the case of Barnabas Davies and his 
account & all things therto belonging w''^' he hath shewed me 
I conceive opinion that the verdit might have bin made by the 
Jury or at least entered more certainc Sc plaine than it is yet 
doe not doubt but the Court will adjudge it to be just k equall 
that the account ouglit to be heard and allowed as well for 
William as John Woodcocks services k that Barnabas Davis 
shall have his speedy reasonable allowances k remedy accord- 
ing to the equity of the Statute of Westm'' 2. 10 or 11""' and 
so had Joseph Bachcllor his present allowances against James 
Brocke Attorney for ^f Paramor^ of the Isle of Thanct allowed 
here in New England, upon the account, and divers actions 
have bin brought here against the Attorneys k Agents of 
others in England k recovered without stay to hearc the par- 

1 See ante, pp. 75, 76, 79. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-DOOK. 399 

tyes owne answero ont of England. Neverthelesse I thinke it 
equall that if licreaftcr M^. Ilolyoke can shewe any discharge 
or acquittance ^vhich will cutt off any parte of Barnabas Davis 
demands that then he should repay the same & give security 
so to doe. Furthermore to give what light I may to the Audi- 
tors or Jurors that shall hereafter deale in this businesse k 
for the better ct more speedy ending of the same I thinke good 
to deliver my opinion in some other particulares incident to 
the cause. And first I doe conceive that Barnabas Davis being 
a servant bayliffe k Attorney for M^ William <fe M! John Wood- 
cocke is to be believed in his account for all voyages travailes 
services costs & charges receipts & disbursements by him 
made for them unlesse they or their Attorney ^I^ Holyoke can 
disprove tlie same, especially if the said Barnabas Davis de- 
liver his said account upon his oath & so was the said Joseph 
Bachellor believed in his account for it would be an infinite <fc 
allmost impossible worke to prove every particulare by wit- 
nesses remaining both heere k in England dispersedly besides 
servants are by their masters trusted from the beginning of 
their imployment k if they doe deceive their masters they are 
in fault to trust such servants k therefore it must be presumed 
the servants are faitlifull els their masters would not trust 
them : Neverthelesse Barnabas Davis should doe well to make 
as good proofe as he can. 

Secondly I conceive that if Barnabas Davis cannot prove 
what in particulare his sallary should be that the same ought 
to be assessed by the Auditors or by a Jury so it be not above 
his demands. 

Thirdly that if Barnabas Davis canne prove that besides his 
said sallary he was to live upon M^ William k iMr John Wood- 
cocks plantation to improve the same for them as their bayliffe 
or Lessee for such other consideration as should be thought 
equall, then because he hath bin hereby hindered five yeares 
from planting for himselfe in this Country I conceive his 
dammagcs herein also are to be assessed by the Auditors or a 
Jury so it be not above his demands for no man can thinke it 
reasonable that Barnabas Davis should mannage a ffarme of 400 
acres w^** stocke thereon onely for 4* a weeke sallary accord- 



400 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. ■ 

iiig to w*^^ rate onely he hath demanded for his sallary being 
as it seems the originall agreement w*^ M! Will™ \Voodcocke 
that 4^ a weeke was to be Barnabas Davis his wages till the 
ffarme should be recovered & that was to be upon the second 
voyage at latest <fc allthough then it were not recovered nor is 
yet notwithstanding now W. John Woodcocke liath recovered 
dammages for the same and therfore Barnabas Davis is to 
have his dammages also. Neverthelesse because M! John 
Woodcocke is not yet in possession of all that he hath re- 
covered & the estate is much impaired by the fall of cattle <fcc 
the Court will no doubt have consideration hereof in mitigat- 
ing the dammages & so direct the Jurors or Auditors that shall 
have to deale herein. 

Fourthly that if Barnabas Davis can prove that before Mf 
Holyokes accon brought he offered to agree w*'^ him on reason- 
able terms & to deliver him the oxen & carte if he M'ould pay 
& allowe unto the said Barnabas what should be found his due 
then I conceive the said 10^ costs given against him are to be 
discharged. 

Fifthly upon the same ground I conceive he is to be dis- 
charged of any pretence of dammages for any supposed im- 
paire of the estate since M^ Holyokes letter of Attorney 
shewed to Barnabas Davis : for that it is both law & equity 
& so declared by the said Law of Westm' the second that 
Accountants in w'^^ number are Bayliffs receivers chamberlains 
servants &c are to be allowed their reasonable expences & 
costs & therefore that this case differeth from crosse debts & 
accons at Lawe betweene party & party where stoppage is no 
payment, yet by course of equity such stoppages are often made 
[and may be [219] levyed in the Sheriffs hands redy to be 
delivered to' the party yet if the defend* shewe the King in 
Chancery that the plaintife is departing the Kingdome and 
that the defend* hath no means to recover his debt of the pltiff 
when he is gone : the Court Avill in some cases award a ne 
exeat rcgnum & cause the Sheriffe to bring in the money into 
Court all w"^'* is but equall & oftentimes in practise. — all 
between these brackets crossed out-l 21y all dammages for and 
about these businesses of Will'" &, John W^oodcocke are of 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCTdPT NOTE-BOOK. 401 

the nature of expences unto Barnabas Davis if not expense 
of his money yet of his time <fc other losses as precious as 
money and therfore W. Holyoke could not say to Barnabas 
Davis render me an account for John Woodcocke <fe recover 
your owne as you can. 

Sixtly I conceive that although the verdit be that M'' Holy- 
oke shall give Barnabas Davis what shall appcare due upon a 
just account yet that ]\P, Holyoke is not chargeable herewith 
out of liis owne estate but out of Mr John Woodcocks &, such 
as are or shall come to the hands of the said Mr Holyoke. 

Seventhly that if any of the cattell dye or be dead in M^ 
Holyokes hands w^^out liis default he is neither to answere 
them to John Woodcocke nor Barnabas Davis. 

Boston 3. 20. 16il. 

All which at the request of the said Barnabas Davis I have 
made bould to deliver as my opinion in the premises the rather 
because I desire not to be further interested in this matter 
which neverthclesse I humbl}^ submitt to the Judgment of the 
Court. 

Tho: Lechford. 

Robert Saltonstall ^ gent bound to Beniamin Keayne gent 
to pay him as much money as two steeres w*^^ he is to have of 
Captaine Edward Gibones by appointment of the said Robert 
Saltonstall shall come shorte of twenty pounds in value w'^'in 
three weckcs after the date hereof dated 3. 28. 1641. [Gtl] 

• Thomas Purchcs ^ of Pagiscot gent makes a letter of At- 
torney unto M' John Olliver g Thomas Lecliford g George 

1 Robert Saltonstall was at this time own and Lis brother's, in which he was 

at "Windsor, Conn. This agreement assisted by Francis Styles, who appears 

probably has some connection with the iu the Barnabas Davis case, and by him 

letter of attorney on p. 189 from led into such expenditure as inconve- 

Robert Keayne to one Tinker, of Wind- nienced the whole family in later yeai-s. 

sor, to collect several dfbts, and among ^ Thomas Purches, of Pagiscot, was 

others 501 from Robert Saltonstall. one of the many adventurers who 

Robert was a younger son of the baro- crowded the shores of ilaine in the 

net, and was engaged at Windsor in early times of the Colony, and of more 

looking out for some property of his ability and discretion, apparently, than 

26 



402 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

Dier of dorchester pi : & Jolin Gallop of Boston mariner 
ioyntly or severally to sue Robert Morgan of Pemmaquid 
James Smith of Wayquait Robert Sliute «t Arthur Browne of 
Winniganset for trespasse on the case in wrongfully taking 
away 44 moose skins of the value of 50i out of the house of the 
said M! Pu relies & converting the same to their owne use w'^^ 
skins were left there by Abacodusset an Indian Saggamore of 
Kennebeckc in trust with the said Thomas Purches so that 
afterwards the said Indian repaired to the said Mf Purches for 
satisfaccon for the said skinncs & hath received some satis- 
faction & relycth upon him for full satisfaccon for the same & 
was not in a little danger of his life & the lives of his wufe 
& family therabout & further hath lost divers advantages of 
trade w'^ the said Saggamore & all his company & undergone 
scandall among the English before the truth was knowne W^^ 
lay hid a yeare & halfe from the fact done to his dammage 
500». [3 — 4] 

Knowe all men by these presents that I Thomas Purches 
of Pagiscot in New England gent doe hereby in my place put 
John Oliver gent Thomas Lechford gent George Dier i planter 
& John Gallops marriner my Attorneys joyntly or severally 
against Robert Morgan of Pemmaquid James Smith of Way- 
most of his kind. He came over in is known to posterit)' from the name 
1628 ; afterwards was one of the chief Gallop's Point, which was given to the 
men at the settlement of Pagiscot or first point of land on the peninsula 
Pegypscott, at the mouth of the Andro- north of the Town Cove. The next 
scoggin River. A deed of this land to was called Meny's Point, after Walter 
Governor Winthrop and the rest of tlie !^^erry, and the next Hudson's Point, 
Massachusetts Colony may be seen in after Francis Hudson the fisherman. 
the ^fass. Col. lice, i. 272, signed by Gallop was a fisherman and [lilot, and 
Thomas Purches. Towards the end lived partly in Boston, where he had a 
of his life he lived in Lynn, having house on the road running by the sea- 
been troubled by the Indian wars which side, just south of Gallop's Point. Tlie 
ravaged the region of Ids fonner home, other names here are hardly worth in- 
He died in 1678. quiring about. They may all be found in 

1 George Dyer, of Dorchester, where Savage as inhabitants of some one of the 
he was a man of some prominence, towns along the coast of ]\Iaine. Eobert 
is often mentioned in the Dorchester Shute and Arthur Brown have appeared 
Records. in the Note-book before (pp. 137 and 

* John Gallop, of Boston, mariner, 209), but neither is of consequence. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 403 

quait Robert Shute <fe Arthur Browne of Winniganset in an 
accon of trespasse on tlie case scilicet ffor tliat tliej the said 
Robert James Robert <fc Artimr upon the [blank] day of [blank'] 
in the fifteenth yeare of the raignc of the Kings Mat*^ that now 
is my [220] house at [blank'] did break and enter and tliere did 
take tfc carry away & convert to their owne use forty foure 
moose skinnes of the value of fifty pounds W^^ were there 
before that time left in trust w*'' me by Abacodusset an Indian 
Saggamore of Kennebecke so that afterwards the said Sagga- 
more with his company repayred to me for satisfaction for the 
said moose skinnes & I was necessitated to give him satisfac- 
tion in parte and to promise him full satisfaction for tlie same 
for w'='^ he rclyeth upon me and hereby I was not in a little 
danger of my life and the lives of my wife &, family & further 
I have thereby lost divers goods profits &, advantages of trade 
with the said Saggamore &, all his company <fc have undergone 
great scandall among both the English and Indians to my 
dammage five hundred pounds starling, the same of them to 
recover. And to that end them to sue arrest impleado im- 
prison for me & in my name Witnesse my hand &. seale the 
last day of May Anno Dni 1641. 



In the Court of 4. 2. 1641. 

Richard Chadwell^ sJdpwrir/Jit plaintiff e 
John Sampson & Samuell Bennet defend} 



in an accon of 

tresjjasse 
on the case. 



The said Richard Shadwell complaineth against the defend'' 
for that wheras Francis Toby of Rotherhith in the County of 
Surrey shipwright in or about June 1635 placed the said Jolin 
Sampson & the said John Sampson placed himselfe apprentice 
w*'' the plaintiffe for the terme of five yeares then next ensu- 
ing the said Sampsons Indenture of Apprenticeship nothwith- 
standing w'^'^ were not [ill^^jible] or assigned to the plaintiffe 

1 The spelling of Chadwell's name This case may be remembered ; see 

is doubtful in this entry, where it looks p. 206, ante. Samuel Bennet was a 

as thoufih it began with an S. Chad- carpenter of Lynn, 
well is, I think, the more correct. 



404 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

and the plaintiffe refused to receive him for lesse than five 
yeares and the said Sampson consented to serve the plaintiffe 
five ycares rather than to serve John Tucker an house carpen- 
ter 3 yeares in consideration the said Plaintiffe was a ship- 
wright k in that art promised to instruct the said Sampson 
and whereas the said John Sampson served the plaintiffe three 
ycares of the said five yeares but in an ill <t undutifuU man- 
ner, in which time the plaintiffe by himselfe <t his brother 
cndevoured to instruct the said Sampson in the art of a ship- 
wright but he was most times cither incapable therof or un- 
willing to it, so tliat when the pl"^^ had procured Richard 
Hollingworth of Salem Shipwright to teacli the said Sampson 
the said trade he refused to goe dwell with the said Holling- 
worth but chose rather to goe dwell with the said Samuell 
Bennet an House carpenter the said Bennet having before un- 
lawfully slocked [or flocked ?] Sc enticed the said Sampson to 
come away from tlic plaintiffe to serve him the said Bennet 
"Whereupon the said Sampson being an ill servant before <fc 
through the said slocking [or flocking?] & enticeing made worse 
& more unwilling the said plaintiffe assigned the said Sampson 
&he put himselfe apprentice unto the said Bennet for the said 
last two yeares of the said five yeares for w'^'' service the said 
Bennet was to pay the p" lH. And the said Sampson in re- 
compense of his said undutiful service Sc other things was to pay 
the plaintiffe five pounds. And the plaintiffe further sliewetli 
that whcras He came to demand the said 11^ of the said Ben- 
net at the last quarter Court in Boston & was then unprovided 
for his defence in other the premises Now the said Richard 
Shadwell coraplaineth that the said defend*^ then ioyned to- 
gether not onely to deceive the plaintiffe of the said 111 and 
6i but to damnify him further than they had formerly the one 
by ill <fc undutifuU service & the other by slocking ct enticeing 
him away as aforesaid and upon this ioyning together con- 
trived that the said John Sampson should bring an accon 
against the said jilaintiffe upon an Indenture to w'^'^ the said 
plaintife was neither party nor privy and first [221] for not 
teaching the said Sampson the said trade of a shipwright 
according to the said indenture and secondly for deteyning 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 405 

the said Sampson in service longer time than was expressed 
in the said indenture & make some other false allegations 
against the pl"*^® w*^"^ said complotmcnt accordingly the said 
John Sampson fullfilled and imdidj recovered dammages 
against the plaintiffe viz* 20^ for a supposed not teaching the 
said Sampson the said trade of a shipwright whcras the pi* 
did by, all meanes duly endovor it as afores*^ and 7^ 10^ for a 
supposed overreckoning in his time of service, whcras he vol- 
untarily consented to serve 5 yeares as aforesaid : and obteyned 
the cancelling of the said five pounds upon pretence that it was 
wrested from him oncly for dammage done the said plaintiffe 
about the not moaving of a barke whereas it was for divers 
other ill services and dammages. And hereby the })laintiffe 
saith he hath suffered in his good name & estate and hath bin 
damnified 501 and therupon he brings his suit. [3 — 4 
Thomas Xicholls testis.] 

The peticon of some of the Inhabitants of Hingham that 
wheras the Cort heretofore gave the Towne certaine lands for 
enlargement at Conihasset^ to be sett out by certaine com- 
mittees of Dorchester <fc Rocksbury in the order therof named 
the said lands arc not yet sett out by them but divided by 
certaine men of the said towne of Hingham contrary to the 
said order & contrary to the liking of many in the said towne 
& the peticoners therefore beseech the Court to take the same 
into their consideration k to give direction that the said order 
be pursued as it was first intended. [Is.] 

The peticon of Anthony Eames - that wheras he hath bin 
here inhabitant seven yeares or therabouts & his charge hath 

^ The meadows at Coniliasset (be- interference by the General Court in a 

tween Scituate and Hinf:;liaiii) had been quarrel among the people of Hin,a;ham 

given to the townspeople of Hingham as to whether Allen or Eames should be 

by the General Court, May 13, 1640 the captain of their trainband. Eames 

{Mass. Col. Rcc, i. 290). was naturally a person of some conse- 

2 Anthony Eaini's will be reniera- quence in tlie town, having been rep- 

bered by any one who took the trouble resentative many times, commissioner 

to investigate the case of Bozoum Allen to decide small cases, and lieutenant, 

{ante, p. 172) in Winthrop (vol. ii. before he was chosen captain. 
p. 221). The trouble arose from the 



406 . LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

bin great & done some service for the Country in laying out 
the lyne betweene this Patent & Plimmouth he was also 
promised accommodation in Couihasset when it should be con- 
ferred on Ilingham, and having [i%/We] & a teame & wants 
imploymcnt for them dcsii-es the Court to consider hereof 
that ho may have a proportionable accommodation in Conni- 
hassct as the Court shall please to appoint; his accommoda- 
tion already being but small & except it be enlarged he shall 
be constrayncd to looke out for himselfe elswhere. [0 — ] 

M! Cutton saitli that there is due 424^ or therabouts w^^ 
should have ben payed 22 April last. Charter party dated 
9 Jan: 39. [2—] 

The petition of certaine of the Freemen & Inhabitants of 
Hingham ^ that they intending God willing a ffishing planta- 
tion at Nantascet may be instituted into a company according 
to the wisdome of the Court & that they may have granted 
them all the said necke of land called Nantascet^ from sea to 
sea unto the head of straits pond w^^ all y® appurtenances and 
that yo' peticoners may for the same good end & purpose be 
instituted into a Company with such power & limittations as 
to this Court shall seeme meet. [Is.'] 

Joseph Armitage of Lynne lets a shallop of 3 tunnes or 
therabouts unto Abraham Robinson Thomas Ashley & Will'° 
Browne of Cape Anne fishermen ^ till 29. 7. px with the tack- 
ling & appurtenences & they are to pay 3' in money or good 

1 I do not think that this petition tations thither, shall have land and 

was granted in precisely the foriu meadows upon Nantasket Neck," etc. 

wherein it here appears. But under There is no patent for a company to be 

date 2d June, 1641, the Court ordered found, however, in the Records. 
"that a plantation for the furthering of 2 Wg cannot easily identify these 

fishing shall fourth with bee set up at fishermen, and perhaps it is hardly 

Nantaseot, & that all the neck to the necessary to do so. Abraham Eobin- 

end of the furthest beach towards son is found at Gloucester some years 

Hingham, where the tide over tloweth, after this mention, and Thomas Ashley 

shall belong to it ; and tliat such of the may be the man of that name who was 

present inhabitants of Hingham as will in Maine 1654 ; but even if this be the 

follow fishing k will remove their habi- case, not much is gained. 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCPdPT NOTE-BOOK. 407 

& merchantable dry fish to the said Joseph at the end of the 
said terme therefore & redeliver the said shallop w^^ the same 
appurtenences at Ljnne. [6<i.] 

A peticon for Timothy Hawkins 4. 4. 1641. 

The humble peticon of Barnabas Davis 

Sheweth that wheras the Court hath ordered me to account 
to John Woodcocke & to attach the cattle that was Will" 
Woodcocks as in a new accon I humbly conceive that the 
verdit of the Jury was given as upon a crosse suit ioyntly 
comming to hearing together w*^^ in effect one of the Jury 
testified in Court for he said that their meaning was tliat I 
should be allowed what should appeare due to me upon a just 
account as well for W™ as John. Woodcocke and [222] with 
all due submission to yo' wor^* for I thinke yo*" worships have 
bin fully informed through my weaknesse m my cause & that 
your worships doe not yet so clearely understand my cause & 
it so nearely concernes me that the greatest parte of my estate 
lyeth in it, the cattle arre taken out of my possession I being 
a servant accountant am not allowed my charges & reason- 
able expences I demand 64* 10' 10*^ besides dammages halfe of 
the said moneys is my meere expences & the cattle will not 
satisfie me I verily believe. In tender consideration wherof 
I beseech yo" worships in yo'^ grave wisdomcs & pittyfull com- 
passion towards me to be pleased but to let my account the 
auditors joynt certificat, the case thereupon & the opinion of 
one of the Auditors on the whole matter be read either inpub- 
licke or private before yo' wor^* and thereupon to consider 
whether it be not fitt «fc equall that seeing I am putt off from 
hearing at this Court that the cattle be attached from M^ 
Holyoke <fc delivered upon security to me till the cause be 
heard And so I leave myselfe & my matters at yo' worP' feet 
to be at God's dispose. 



408 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOGK. 

The peticon of Ralfe "Wory^ WJiite tanner of Leather 
dwelling at Charlestowne. 

1. He prajeth the Court that no goates might he hilled 
under two yearcs old except kids by the butchers. 

2. That the butchers & others that take off skinns might 
be enioyncd not to slawter cut or rent the skiunes under 
some paine of forfeiture. 

3. That Tanners may tanne no goat buck doc nor moose 
skinncs nor white tanners taue no cowe nor oxe hide under 
paine of some forfeiture. 

4. That some Officers be appointed to view all leather made 
in the Country before it be sold or put to use. 

5.' That none may buy skinnes killed in the Country but 
those that dresse them hcere. 

M^ William Hooke - of Accamenticus. 
My John Underbill a peticon. 

> 

Wheras we understand that Mf William Hooke of Accamen- 
ticus intendeth shortly a voyage into England we have thought 
good to accompany him -w^^ this our testimoniall tliat he hath 
borne himsclfe in this Countrey in all things we knowe of hon- 
estly soberly fairely & therefore with us he hath this esteeme 
to be a sober discreat <fc religious man & for such we recom- 
mend him to those whome it may concerne. [1 — ] 

TJie peticon of Captaine John Underhill ^ 

Sheweth that he humbly acknowledgeth himselfe to have 
ben a very greivous offender against God <fc this Common- 

1 Ralph "Woorey, leather-dresser, is shortly, for he was representative in 
noted in Wyman, but nothing to speak 1643 as well as in 1637, and died in 
of is known of him. No mention of this country in 1654. 

the petition is to be found in the ^ The sentence of banishment for 

Record. Captain John Underhill was rejiealed 

2 Mr. William Hooke was not the June 2, 1641, the session of the Court, 
minister of that name, but the brother I suppose, at which this petition was 
of Francis Hooke, of Kittery. He must presented. 

have returned from England very 



408 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

The peticon of Ralfe "Wory^ WJiite tanner of Leather 
dwelling at Charlestowne, 

1. He prajeth the Court that no goates might be l^illed 
under two yearcs old except kids by the butchers. 

2. That the butchers & others that take off skinns might 
be enioyncd not to slawter cut or rent the skiunes under 
some paine of forfeiture. 

3. That Tanners may tanne no goat buck doe nor moose 
skinncs nor white tanners taue no cowe nor oxe hide under 
paine of some forfeiture. 

4. That some Officers be appointed to view all leather made 
in the Country before it be sold or put to use. 

6.' That none may buy skinnes killed in the Country but 
those that dresse them heere. 

M^ "William Hooke - of xiccamenticus. 
Mr John Underbill a peticon. 

> 

Wheras we understand that Mf William Hooke of Accameu- 

ticus intendeth shortly a voyage into England we have thought 
good to accompany him w^^ this our testimoniall tliat he hath 
borne himsclfe in this Countrey in all things we knowe of hon- 
estly soberly fairely & therefore with us he hath this esteeme 
to be a sober discreat <fc religious man & for such we recom- 
mend him to those whome it may concerne. [1 — ] 

TJie peticon of Captaine John Underhill ^ 

Sheweth that he humbly acknowledgeth himselfe to have 
ben a very greivous offender against God <fc this Common- 

1 Ralph Woorey, leather-dresser, is shortly, for he was representative m 
noted in Wyman, but nothing to speak 1643 as well as in 1637, and died in 
of is known of him. No mention of this country in 1654. 

the petition is to be found in the ^ The senteni^e of banishment for 

Record. Captain John Underhill was rejiealed 

2 Mr. "William Hooke was not the June 2, 1641, the session of the Court, 
minister of that name, but the brother I suppose, at which this petition was 
of Francis Hooke, of Kittery. He must presented. 

have returned from England very 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 409 

wealth and thereby hath received severe censures past upon 
liim both by the Church & this Court Notwithstanding as lie 
hopeth the God of heaven will give him more true repentence 
& thereupon some more comfortable forgiveness in his due 
time <fc the Church of God hatli bin pleased upon his humble 
& hearty contritiou & confession of his abominations to loose 
liim from his deserved bonds so though unworthy of the least 
favor from you he humbly beseecheth this liono"'^ Court to be 
pleased to remit his civill censure by him rashly foolishly & 
unadvisedly incurd And that you would be pleased to restore 
this Distressed petitioner to his former libertys ffor w'^^ humble 
request he should have in person awayted this hono^^® Court 
but that lie is now called asyde upon other lawfull occasions 
at Aquedncy as it is well kiiowne &c. 

[223] The humble pctlcon of Richard Parkek^ of Boston 
7iierchant^ 

Sheweth that wheras some powder being found heretofore 
in the hands of certaine Indians yo' peticoner was examined 
whether he had sold any powder to any Indian, & if he had 
how much, he answered and confessed he had, once before 
that time sold about 4 ounces of powder to the Saggamore 
Aggawam. Now forasmuch as this sale of powder to the said 
Aggawam was above two yeares since when yo"^ peticoner was 
but a new commer & not knowemg the orders of the Country 
[& one to whome as this peticoner hath lieard the Country 
had some confidence in <fc who was in the service against 
the Pequids and continually converseth w*'^ us as a friend & 
to whome some liberty of fowling with his peece hath bin 
granted by the Court as this peticoner hath heard, — all be- 
tween these brackets crossed out.'] and that was yo' peticoners 
onely offence in this kinde <.t in so smale a quantity. 

In tender consideration of tlie premises yo'' peticoner hum- 
bly prayeth this hono'''^ Cort to be pleased to remit the said 

1 Exactly when this sentence was General Court, and at that meeting (at 

pronounced I do not know. In De- which I sup{X)se this petition was pre- 

ceraher, 1640, Richard Parker was sented) his fine was lowered from lOl to 

respited until the next meeting of the 10s. 



410 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

offence iinto him promising to be liencefortli so careful that 
ncitlier he nor any of his shall at any time sell any powder or 
ammunition to the Indians without direction 6c command So 
restes yo' obliged Richard Parker. [1 — 6. 4. 9-41] 

The humble peticon of Sergeant Edward Mellowes^ of 
Charlestoivne, 

Sheweth that wheras about 10 or 11 yeares since his father 
M' Abraliam ilellowes at the motion of tlie hono''^^ M^ Hum- 
frey did put into the Common Stocke fifty pounds of lawfull 
money of England he promising that the peticoners said father 
or his heires or assigncs should have a valuable proportion of 
land in this Jurisdiction to at least 500 acres of land for the 
same. 

And whereas yo' peticoner is heire & assignee of his said 
ffather deceased, & hath yet obteyncd towards satisfaccon of 
the premises onely 200 acres in one -place where no more 
can be had & whicli is no valuable proportion for the said 501. 
In tender consideration of the premises yo"" peticoner humbly 
prayeth the Court to be pleased to grant him the other 300 
acres together in some other place So restes yo' obliged Ed 
Mellowes. [1 ; 4. 9. 41] 

The peticon of Will" Savill^ of Cambridge joyner 

Sheweth that wheras he did worke heretofore at Cambridge 
for M^ NathanicU Eaton and for parte of this peticoners pay 
he received by apprizemcnt one cowe Sc a steere calfe for 25^ 
w''' then was 5i overvalued at least & out of w'='' he payd 9^ 
to workmen in money besides then presently cattle fell more 
& so have done ever since and now they are not worth above 

1 Two hundred acres were granted to ham's statement that he was a partner 

the heirs of Abmham Jlellows by the in the Company for 50i. Edward ilel- 

Court to whith tlie petition was pre- lows was freeman before his father 

sented. Abraham Mellows, with his (March 4, 1634), and was afterwards 

wife, and child, were admitted to the constable, town clerk, selectman, etc. 

church in 1G33; he was freeman May He died in 1650. 

14, 1634, and died, Savage says, before 2 "William Savill cannot be found in 

1639. This passage coulirms Frothing- Savage. 



LECIIFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 411 

121 vv'=^ another bull calfe increased having bin kept about a 
yeare so that yo^ peticoner is damnifyed 13 besides 2^ 10^ for 
the keeping of them since w'^^ amounts to in all to 15^ 10^ 
In tender consideration wherof yo'^ peticoner humbly prayeth 
he may be relieved in the premises according to equity against 
the said W. Eaton & his estate heere by the order of this Court 
and that especially because the apprisement aforesaid -was 
made not to this peticoner, but halfe a yeare before for pay- 
ments to other men & he was faigne to take these though so 
much too deere because he apprehended not any other way to 
be satisfyed. So restes. [Is.] 

^John Edwards of Charlestowne makes a peticon against 
Harman Garret <fe the two apprizers Steven Fozdike &, Robert 
Nash for prizing the house too deere 40^ at least & bound 
in 200^ to pay 120^ for a house & an acre of ground or 
therabouts. 

The peticon q/WiLL" BuCKNUM of Charlestowne carpenter, 

Sheweth that wheras his mother in Law the widdow Wil- 
kinson keepes away from him his Sonne John Bucknum 
against the good will of this peticoner w*^^ is like to be a breach 
of peace betweene us, Yo"" peticoner humbly prayeth the wid- 
dow Wilkinson may be ordered to redeliver to this peticoner 
his said child.^ 

[224] The peticon^ of the Freemen of Carnhridge 

Sheweth that wheras there are some differences betweene 
some neighbor townes &, ourselves about wood <fe timber & 

1 For this matter see pp. 176, ante, eighteen years. William Bucknam, in 

& 225, post. his will, gave a smaller fortune to his 

« 2 That William Bucknam married son John than to his children by his 

(first wife) a daughter of Prudence second wife, partly on account of his 

Wilkinson may be seen in Wyman's infirmity, and partly because he was 

Charlcstci.ni. Savage goes on to say taken by his grandmother, as appears 

(partly by conjecture) that by this wife by this passage in the Note-book. 

he had a son John, whom (or else his ^ {^ ^^-^g jq consequence of this peti- 

son) he thinks is the one spoken of tion that the Court appointed (June 2, 

by Sewall as having been dumb for 1641) Mr. Thomas Mayhew and John 



412 LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

about certaine lands on the south of Charles river v;"^ we con- 
ceive belong to our bounds for want of explanation of the 
order of Court therof, and by reason of certaine lands claymed 
from us unequally J^s we conceive by the running of a lyne 
betwccne us & Watertownc We humbly crave of this hon- 
oured Court that for the settlement of peece <fc quiet among 
us you would be pleased to heare our deputyes to the particu- 
lares aforesaid k therupon to take such good order as to yo"" 
worP* shall seeme to stand w*^ equity. [1 — ] 

The peticon of Roger Toll servant to M^ Henry Webb^ 
of Boston 

Sheweth that wheras about two yeares since yo'' peticoner 
being a new commer nut knowing the Orders of the Country 
sould certaine powder to the quantity of but about 2i unto 
some of Cusshaunequins his master not knowing of tlie said 
sale till afterwards The peticoner humbly prayeth this 
hono""'^ Court to be pleased for this his first offence in this 
kinde to remit the same unto him promising hereafter to be 
so carefull that neither for himselfe nor any other he will sell 
or deliver powder or munition to any Indian w'^out order or 
command I reste yo'' obliged. [1 — rec in corn] 

TJiepeticon of Thomas Makepeace ^ of Dorchester gent 

Sheweth that wheras he bought a certaine house <fc farme 
of 200 acres of land wherof some is inclosed lying on the cast 
parte of M^ Haynes his farme neare dedham of Mf Crowe 

Bridge to adjust the differences here Toll was his apprentice, as Savage 

spoken of; "and if they cannot agree, thinks. 

they are to choose a third man to ^ Thomas Makepeace came to Dor- 
settle things." Chester with his family in 163G. He 
1 Henry Webb was a merchant who was there a person of consideration 
had his house and shop, I suppose, one (although 1 do not find that he ever 
or two doors below Captain Keayne's, on held office), being almost invariably 
what is now State Street. He came referred to by the title of Mr. In 
to Boston 1637, and died September response to this petition, the Court 
7, 1660, leaving much to Harvard appointed a committee of three to view 
College in the way of land that is and settle " Mr. Makepeace his farme of 
now of the greatest value. Roger two hundred acres." 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 413 

sometime of Charlestowne as it is layd out. Yo' pcticoner 
dcsireth this hono"° Cort to be pleased to coafirme the same 
unto him by order of this Court. [G J.] 

The humhle peticoyi 0/ Robert CookrI gf Charlestoivne 

Sheweth that wheras the Country was indebted to his 
ifather 401 and for satisfaccon therof this peticoner was 
ordered to goe to the Treasurer for payment M! Treasurer 
assigned this peticoner a bill to be payd by Lynne and they 
would pay him no otherwise but in corne at 4* p b. & he hath 
received in parte 120 bushells at 4' ^ b. and the rest he must 
accept from them at the same rate. The peticoner humljly 
preycth allowance of the Court such as you shall thinke fitt 
corne having passed at 3' p b. & much to be bought under. 
[6cZ.] 

John Pollard 2 of Boston in New England • merchant makes 
a letter of Attorney unto Josuah Hughes of Roxbury ironmon- 
ger and George Pollard of Duxbury in N England miller to 
receive all debts &c. 4. 19. 41. [8cZ.] 

A Commission to John Webbe ais {idank] s of Boston and 
his company to trade k doe their businesse at the Isle of 
Sables & to passe in the barke Endevor of Salem wherof is 
Master Joseph Grafton. 4.' 21. 41. [3—4] 

1 There is some little doubt in tho 3 "John TVebbals [hlanl:]" must be 
passes of Savage as to whether the name "John Evered als "Webb" {ante, p. 138). 
of this man were Eichard or Robert, one I know nothing more of his occupation 
name being found in the list of freemen, than is contained in the note on that 
and the other in that of church-mem- page. The Colonial Record has no 
bers. In the Mass. Col. liec., however, • notice of this commission. The ketch 
is record of an order that I2d. in a "Endeavour," it may be remembered, 
bushel should be paid to Mr. Eobert was hired of Joseph Grafton by John 
Cooke to make up for the depreciation of Cogan and Thomas Owen until April, 
corn, amounting to 401. 1641 (gee p. 202, ante). This conimis- 

2 It would seem as if George Pollard sion is in June of the same year, by 
were related to John, though the fact -which time the voyage to Virginia and 
is not noted by Savage, wlio says little back there spoken of was, we may hope, 
of either George or John ; for whom see .successfully accomplished. 

p. 175, ante. 



414 LE en FORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 

John Sampson of London merchant makes a generall letter 
of Attorney unto David Yale^ merchant now resident in 
Boston in N E. 4. 21. 41. [2s.] 

Know all men by these presents that wheras I Elizabeth 
Glover of Cambridge in N E widdowe & trustee of the last will 
& testament of li\ Jesse Glover deceased doe hereby for good 
considerations me thereunto moving for and in parte perform- 
ance of the said last will & testament grant assigne and sett 
over unto William Stibbins of Boston in N E gent and Ibhniq 
of [blank-] in N E aforesaid all that my reversion after the de- 
cease of M» Anne Glover of Londou widdow of and in all those 
lands t tenements lying in Ratcliff within the mannor of Steb- 
bonheath in the County of Midd with the appurtenances settled 
upon me by my said late husband To have & to hold the said 
Reversion <fc premises and all & singulare tlie premises w''^ 
the appurtenances unto the said W S & [blank] and — [gnc?s 
thus ; the whole jJaragraph is crossed out.] 

[225] To the right ivor" the Governor ^ Assistants 

The hill of Complaiiit of John Edwards of Charlestowne 
gunsmith 

Sheweth that wheras by agreement betweene Harman 
Garret of Charlestowne aforesaid Gunsmith & this Complain- 
ant ^ in writing made upon the 17th day of the seventh 
moneth Anno Diii 1640 the said Harman was to sell unto 
this Complainant liis house in Charlestowne aforesaid for such 
reasonable price as should be agreed on by foure men indiffer- 
ently to be chosen betweene them the said Harman taking 

1 David Yale (thought by some to Boston To^on Eecord or the Book of 

be the fatlier of Elihii Yale) "came to Possessions; and from the mention in 

New England with his father-in-law, Massachusetts Colonial Record (vol. ii.) 

Governor Eaton, in 1637." He lived he might have lived anywhere. 
at Boston chiefly, I should imagine, 2 xhe agreement here referred to be- 

although he owned land at New Haven, tween Garret and Edwards may be found 

and quitted the country in 1652. set down at length earlier in the .Vo^c- 

There is no mention of him in the book {ante, p. 176). 



LECHFORD'S MANUSCRIPT NOTE-BOOK. 415 

advantage of this Complaynants unexpcriencedncsse in build- 
ings pressed him to buy the same house before the said termc 
in the said agreement mentioned was ended and for the ap- 
prizement thcrof pcrswaded this Complainant that two men 
were suflicicnt to performe the same, and when this Complain- 
ant had named for him two men to wit Stephen Fossedike and 
Barnabas Davis of Charlestowne the said Harman Garret said 
that Barnabas Davis was not skilled in matters of building but 
mucli commended the said Steven Fossedike saying that he 
was an honest man and a member of the Church and one that 
helped build the said house & one whome he might well put 
this matter unto k to him ouely & that the said Harman Gar- 
ret thought to make choice of him for himselfe & so in effect 
he made choice of him the said Steven Fossedike as well as of 
the other arbitrator Robert Nash and this was no indifferent 
choice & but of two men wheras by the said agreement the 
same was to be referred to fours men indifferently to be chosen 
To w^^ two Arbitrators the price of the said house being re- 
ferred they the said Arbitrators were to sett downe what they 
esteemed the said house & some other things to be w^orth at 
that present to be sold to any person one or other & n