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Full text of "Nova (Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy)"

ILLINOIS MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE ACADEMY 



r 1 — IIVI^A ^ Pioneering Educational Community 



Volume 8 No. 1 -Fall 1993 



IMSA Crosses Traditional Boundaries of Learning 



By Tina Yee, Student Writer 



This is the first in a two-part series 
reporting on innovative courses initiated 
for sophomores this year. Both used the 
IMSA Integrative Learning System (ILS) 
as a framework for curriculum develop- 
ment. The system is designed to foster the 
development of integrative thinkers who 
see connections within and among disci- 
plines instead of subject-area knowledge 
in isolation. 

e^\ Where in the state can a group 
of high school students take 
chemistry, physics and biology 
at the same time, in one class? 



/a_ 



At the 1 
Science 



linois Mathematic 
Academy. 



and 



For the next two years, 36 IMSA 
students are taking part in an experimen- 
tal course called Integrated Science. This 
is another example of how IMSA is blaz- 
ing new trails to transform science 
education. 



SIDE 



Admissions Information 3 

ASCD/IMSA Consortium 8 

From the Executive Director 2 

Hitachi Grant 4 

Maya Angelou 4 

National Student Conference 3 

Statewide Initiatives 6 

Trailblazers 7 

Wolf Tracking 5 




Students in IMSA 's Integrated Science class make a triangulation measurement of the distance to 
a foul pole. 



Integrated Science blends information 
from "core" sciences (physics, chemistry, 
and biology) with additional material not 
usually covered in the three required 
classes, such as nucleosynthesis and 
solid-state physics. Introduced after 
several years of development, the course 
is taught by Drs. Donald Dosch. John 
Eggebrecht and David Workman. Over 
the summer, incoming sophomores were 
able to request the class and the 36 were 
randomly chosen from 1 19 applicants. 

By presenting science as a unity rather 
than compartmentalized courses, the 
teachers hope to help transform science 
education and stimulate student interest 
in all sciences. 

"We want students to think without 
boundaries." Eggebrecht said. "In tradi- 
tional science classes, you've imposed a 
threshold which students can't pass." 
Workman agreed, adding "science is 
taught in most school systems as separate 
entities, but in the 'real world' everything 
is connected." 



Problem-based Approach 

To anchor the curriculum. Integrated 
Science uses a problem-based approach 
as a method to show the relationships 
among physics, chemistry and biology. 
Using problem situations, students gain 
broad-based knowledge while solving 
specific problems. 

"Problems provide a context where 
learning takes place, " Workman said. 
"Students are motivated by taking owner- 
ship of the problem." Dosch added. 

For example, students have determined 
that overpopulation is going to be a 
significant problem in the early 21st 
century. Consequently, they are studying 
the characteristics and dynamics of popu- 
lations as preparation for dealing with 
this problem. One of their objects of 
study is the goldenrod plant. "We 
launched into a series of activities and 
extensive study to understand what the 

(continued on page 5) 



r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora. Illinois 60506-1000 
708/907-5000 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President 

James D. Pearson 
President 
Aurora Industries 

Vice President 

Dr. Leon Lederman. Nobel Laureate 

Director Emeritus 

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 

Trustees 

John Baird 
Teacher of Physics 
Quincy High School 

G. Carl Ball 
Chairman of the Board 
George J. Ball, Incorporated 

Dr. Larry Braskamp 
Dean, College of Education 
University of Illinois at Chicago 

Fred Conforti 

President 

BRK Electronics 

Sherry R. Eagle 
Superintendent 

Aurora West School District #129 

Forest Etheredge 
Retired State Senator 
Instructor. Aurora University 

Sheila Griffin 

Director of Business Assessment 

Motorola Incorporated 

Cary Israel 

Executive Director 

Illinois Community College Board 

Robert Leininger 
State Superintendent 
State Board of Education 

John McEachern Jr. 

President 

Wayne Circuits Incorporated 

Dr. David Mintzer 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 

Physics and Astronomy 
Northwestern University 

Dr. Sally Pancrazio 

Dean. College of Education 

Illinois State University 

Jesus Manuel Sosa 
Interdepartmental Manager 
Department of Language and 

Cultural Education 
Chicago Public Schools 

Marvin Strunk 

Retired President and Chief Executive Officer 

Madison Bank & Trust Company 

Dr. Richard Wagner 
Executive Director 
State Board of Higher Education 

Dr. Benjamin Williams 

Principal 

Percy Julian Junior High School, Oak Park 

NOVA is published quarterly by the 
IMSA Communications Office. 

Editor 

Catherine C. Veal 

Writer 

Brenda Buschbacher 



From the 

Executive 

Director 




Dear Members of the IMSA Community. 

s we embark on our eighth school year, the Academy enters an ambitious new 
era. one characterized by increased service to Illinois education through 
expanded partnership initiatives with schools and teachers throughout our state. 
The Academy is engaged in organizational redesign and redeployment of resources to 
strengthen our commitment to our primary customers — Illinois educators. This fall, 
staff, students, parents and community members are writing action plans to move us 
forward in this regard. The "new" strategic plan, anchored by a mission to transform 
teaching and learning in mathematics and science, will be considered by the board of 
trustees in January, and we will report highlights in a future issue of NOVA. 

We are very excited about some of our new partnership initiatives. In November, 
we began a distance learning partnership with Walter Dyett Middle School in Chicago, 
made possible by the generous support of Ameritech. Plans for the IMSA electronic 
learning community are well under way, thanks in large part to support from the 
Hitachi Foundation. The Academy also has begun working with schools in Illinois 
and other states, members of the new ASCD/IMSA Consortium for Interdisciplinary 
Teaching and Learning. ASCD, the Association for Supervision and Curriculum 
Development, is the nation's largest education leadership organization. 

Internally, we remain engaged in a search for a new principal, while staff continue 
to pilot promising new programs such as Integrated Science. Our students continue to 
excel, as evidenced by their research accomplishments, classroom projects, cocurricular 
achievements and test scores. For example, the Chicago Tribune recently reported that 
IMSA"s Class of 1993 achieved the highest ACT scores in the nation. This is quite an 
honor and tribute to our students and to those, including parents, home school teachers, 
mentors and IMSA staff, who have nurtured their academic development to date. 

We look forward to an eventful second semester and remain grateful for your 
continuing support. Best wishes for the holiday season. 



Sincerely 



^V/^o /N^/^ 



k_^ 



Stephanie Pace Marshall. Ph.D. 
Executive Director 



IMSA Students Study Local History 
at National Conference in Alabama 



Ten students from the Illinois 
Mathematics and Science 
Academy took a step back in time during 
the sixth annual student conference of the 
National Consortium for Specialized 
Secondary Schools of Mathematics. 
Science and Technology (NCSSSMST) 
October 21-24 in Mobile. Alabama. 

The theme of the conference was 
"Researching Local History." Hosted by 
the Alabama School of Mathematics and 
Science, the conference included visits to 
historical places in the Mobile area 
including Fort Gaines, Dauphin Island 
Sea Lab and archaeological sites. 
Students also visited local corporations 
including the Scott Paper Company and 
Ciba Chemical Corporation. 

Repesenting IMSA were Josephine 
Aung of South Barrington, Rachel 
Burrell of Rockford, Michele Casey 
of Wheaton. Andy Cox of Batavia. 
Don Elmore of Murphysboro. Maritza 
Gamboa of Hillside. Omar Latif of 
Glendale Heights. Deborah Linksvayer 
of Springfield, James Randall of 
Chicago and Raymond Wee of Lake 
Forest. Students from 23 other consor- 
tium schools throughout the country 
also attended. 



Elmore said one of the most 
interesting activities was the 
visit to the archeological site 
on Dauphin Island. "Even 
though some of the artifacts 
I found seemed small or 
seemingly insignificant, they 
turned out to be important 
clues to the history of the 
excavation site," he said. 

Following their research, 
students produced a written 
narrative of the Mobile area 
emphasizing the evolution of 
infrastructures and their 
impact on the environment. 

Founded in 1988. the 
consortium consists of 
specialized high schools 
with advanced programs for 
talented mathematics and 
science students. IMSA is 
a charter member of the 
consortium. The annual 
student conferences are 
designed to acquaint students 
of similar interests and abili- 
ties and to encourage them to 
work together to solve 
science-related problems. 




IMSA students take time out for sightseeing in New Orleans 
while researching local history at the sixth annual 
NCSSSMST student conference. 



1993-94 Admissions Information 

To help prospective students and parents learn more about the Academy's admissions, academic and residential life programs, 
the following activities are scheduled this fall and winter: 

• Statewide Informational Meetings (51). Sites include Bolingbrook. Carlinville, Chicago (7). Collinsville, Country Club 
Hills, Crystal Lake, Danville, Decatur, DeKalb, Dixon, East St. Louis, Effingham, Elgin. Elmhurst, Evanston, Freeport, 
Galena. Galesburg, Grayslake, Harvey, Hazel Crest, Hoffman Estates, Jacksonville, Joliet, Kankakee, Macomb. Marion. 
Mattoon, Maywood, Moline, Mt. Vernon, Normal, Northbrook, Oglesby, Olney, Palos Heights, Peoria, Pontiac, Quincy, 
Rockford, Springfield. Urbana. Vernon Hills, Waukegan. West Chicago. 

• Visitor Information Program Days (2). These will be held at IMSA at 1 :00 p.m. on January 29 and February 20. 

• Application Deadline. The deadline for application to IMSA\s ninth sophomore class- the Class of 1997- is March 1, 1994. 

For more information about the admissions process, statewide informational meetings or VIP Days, call (708) 907-5027 or in 
Illinois 1-800-500-1MSA. 



IMSA FUND FOR 
ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President 

James R. Thompson 
Chairman 
Winston & Strawn 

Executive Vice President 

Donald E. Nordlund 

Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Staley Continental, Inc. 

Vice President 

D. Chet McKee 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Copley Memorial Hospital 

Secretary/Treasurer 

Paul J. O'Hollaren 
Director Genera! 
Moose International 



Linda Anderson* 
Civic Leader 

Roger E. Anderson* 
Retired Chairman and 

Chief Executive Office 
Continental Bank of 

Chicago 

G. Carl Ball 
Chairman of the Board 
George J. Ball, Inc. 

Marjorie Craig Benton 

President 

Chapin Hall Center for 

Children 
University of Chicago 

Michael J. Birck 
President 
Tellabs, Inc. 

Richard H. Brown 
Vice Chairman 
Ameritech Corporation 

Willard Bunn III 
Chairman and Chief 

Executive Officer 
Banc One Illinois 

Corporation 

Dr. Floyd English 
President and Chief 
Executive Officer 
Andrew Corporation 

Clifford L. Greenwalt 
President and Chief 

Executive Officer 
Central Illinois Public 

Service Company 

Leon Jackson 

President 

Multi-Fac Corporation 



John E. Jones 
Chairman of the Board, 

President and Chief 

Executive Officer 
CBI Industries 

Dr. Leon M. Lederman, 

Nobel Laureate 
Director Emeritus 
Fermi National 

Accelerator Laboratory 

Steven H. Lesnik 
Chief Executive Officer 
Kemper Lesnik 
Organization 

Gordon R. Lohman 
President and Chief 
Executive Officer 
Amsted Industries, Inc. 

James D. Pearson 
President 
Aurora Industries 

James T. Schaefer 
Real Estate Consultant 

Susan S. Schanlaber 
Chairman of the Board 

and President 
Aurora National Bank 

Harry C. Stonecipher 
Chairman. President and 
Chief Executive Officer 
Sundstrand Corporation 

Richard Wellek 
President and Chief 
Executive Officer 
Varlen Corporation 

William J. White 
President, Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer 
Bell & Howell Company 



Hitachi Foundation Awards 
$159,500 Grant to IMSA 



Director of Institutional Advancement 

Ted Parge 



•Honorary Members 



The Illinois Mathematics and 
Science Academy Fund for 
Advancement of Education received a 
three-year, $159,500 grant from The 
Hitachi Foundation to further the 
Academy's distance learning initiatives. 

Ted Parge, director of institutional 
advancement, said the grant will support 
Academy plans for an interactive elec- 
tronic learning community. "'By using 
telecommunications tools such as video 
conferencing, elec- 
tronic bulletin boards 
and electronic jour- 
nals, we can expand 
partnerships with 
schools, teachers and 
students throughout 
Illinois and the 
nation," he said. 

Such tools will 
enable teachers to 
exchange curriculum 
ideas while creating 
important partner- 
ships and building 
collaborative 
networks of students 
and teachers. 

Plans for 1993-94 
include establishing the IMSA link on 
INTERNET, the international computer 
network; establishing a project coordina- 
tor; piloting and testing the use of an elec- 
tronic journal and bulletin board for 
teachers, students, mentors, scientists and 
community leaders engaged in problem- 
based learning; and piloting a problem- 
based video conferencing consortium with 



"The format. ..will 
make it possible for 

all students to 

experience success 

in learning." 



Elliot Richardson 

Chairman 

The Hitachi Foundation 



the Center for Problem-Based Learning. 

Activities of the video consortium will 
include consulting services, student inter- 
active network opportunities, teacher 
training, and research and development 
collaborations. 

"The format will help students practice 
the skills of problem identification, 
research and analysis, synthesis, analysis 
of public policy and its applications and 
implications, and ethical and moral deci- 
sion-making," said 
Elliot Richardson, 
chairman of The 
Hitachi Foundation's 
board of directors. 
"It will make it 
possible for all 
students to experi- 
ence success 
in learning." 

The network also 
can be used in the 
future to access 
information about 
IMSA's admissions 
and alumni programs. 

"This grant will 
play a key role in 
establishing IMSA 
as one of the 'stops' on the information 
'superhighway', breaking the boundaries 
of time and space," said Executive 
Director Dr. Stephanie Pace Marshall. 
"It will give educators more meaningful 
opportunities for professional develop- 
ment, in turn enriching the learning 
experiences of their students. The possi- 
bilities are endless." 



Third Annual James R. Thompson 
Leadership Lecture 

December 2, 1993 

Featuring Maya Angelou 
Story in the next issue of NOVA 




Students Track the "Big Bad Wolf" 



^? airy tales such as Goldilocks and 
l_ the Three Bears didn't stop ecol- 
ogy students from their quest to find the 
"big bad wolf in the Boreal Forest of 
Ely, Minnesota. 

As an optional extension of the preda- 
tion unit in John Thompson's class, 12 
seniors headed to northern Minnesota for 
a wolf-tracking expedition October 22-26. 

"Before the trip, students examined 
prejudices against wolves and the fairy 
tales which in part perpetuate those prej- 
udices," said Thompson, IMSA biology 
teacher. 

During their expedition, students stud- 
ied the natural habitat and territory of the 
wolf by using a tracking system coordi- 
nated by the International Wolf Center. 

"A radio collar was attached to a male 
wolf and we tracked him for a 24-hour 
period using radio telemetry equipment 
in vans at two different locations with 
antennas and receivers." Thompson said. 

Student Amanda Kracen of Sycamore 
said she thought the whole night would 
be spent "on the go" but discovered the 
process was much slower. "Instead, we 
spent most of the time just observing. 
We had to take readings every 15 
minutes and it took five minutes just to 
calculate the wolf's exact location." 

Staff members from the International 
Wolf Center also gave students wolf 
howling lessons. "One night we canoed 
to an island and howled at the wolves and 
they actually howled back!" Kracen said. 




Ecology students Jenny Deller and Aimee Chong oj Carbondale im 
den during their wolf-tracking trip to Ely, Minnesota. 



Kracen and Heather McKee of Batavia 
both agreed that the experience taught 
them to be more observant of their 
surroundings. "We had to memorize 
certain types of twigs and how they 
would come off of a branch." Kracen 
said. "You had to be observant of the 
small things." McKee added. 

In addition, students surveyed the local 
residents of Ely and gathered data on 
their attitudes toward the wolf. A survey 
also was taken of the attitudes of people 



in Yorkville. Illinois, and a comparison 
study will be conducted. 

In the future. Thompson plans a tele- 
conference for students with Dr. David 
Meech, world-renowned expert on 
wolves and biologist with the U.S. Fish 
and Wildlife Service. 

Reflecting upon the expedition. 
Thompson said the best part was watch- 
ing the students react to the natural habi- 
tat of the wolves. "They had a sense of 
what real ecoloeists are like." he said. 



IMSA Crosses Traditional Boundaries . 



(continued from page I) 



other forces are that cause the plants to 
distribute themselves in a certain way." 
Eggebrecht said. 

At the same time, students are studying 
the distribution of atoms in crystals and 
stars in the sky. In all cases, the focus is 
on the kinds of useful information that 
can be obtained from careful characteriza- 
tion and study of populations. 

Some students, especially juniors and 
seniors, question whether the two-year, 
double period integrated science program 
will adequately prepare students for high- 



level electives and achievement tests. 
There also are some concerns that the 
opposite could happen and students will 
cover too much material. 

However, most sophomores in the inte- 
grated class seem to think it is a wonder- 
ful learning experience. "It's less the 
teachers teaching us than us teaching 
ourselves," said sophomore Rose Barlow 
of Oak Park. "Since there is no set 
curriculum, we have a lot of freedom and 
input into what we're learning." 

Dr. Mareelline Barron, director for 



integrative teaching and learning 
initiatives, notes. "We are trying a series 
of different experiences from which we 
will find a good blend of core courses." 
Integrated Science, she said, is an impor- 
tant example of IMSA's ongoing R&D 
work to transform teaching and learning 
in mathematics and science. 

Tina Yee. a junior from Naperville, is a 
work service student in the IMSA commu- 
nications office. 



IMSA Seeks Applicants for Statewide Programs 



rhe Illinois Mathematics and 
Science Academy is accepting 
student applications for its 1994 Summer 
'AD'Ventures in Mathematics, Science 
and Technology program and applica- 
tions for IMPACT II mathematics and 
science teaching awards. 

The Summer 'AD' Ventures program 
consists of two sessions. The first, for 
160 students entering grades 7-8 in 1994. 
will be held at IMSA July 5-15. The 
second, for 120 students entering grades 
9-10 in 1994. will be held at Eastern 
Illinois University July 6-17. 

Informational brochures for both 
sessions were mailed to all Illinois 



schools with grades 6-9. Interested 
students can receive an application by 
returning the form enclosed in the 
brochure or calling 708-907-5989. 
The deadline for completed applications 
is January 10, 1994. 

IMSA also is seeking applications for 
this year's IMPACT II mathematics and 
science disseminator awards. All public- 
school mathematics and science teachers 
in Illinois are eligible to apply. The 
purpose of IMPACT II is to promote 
excellence in elementary and secondary 
education by networking teachers and 
their innovative ideas. Nearly 800 Illinois 
teachers are members of the IMPACT II 



network which IMSA administers. 

Disseminator awards enable teachers to 
share their successful programs with 
colleagues through annual catalogs, 
workshops, conferences and interschool 
visits. The deadline for completed 
applications is February 7. 1994. 

Applications are included in the 1993 
IMPACT II catalog of teaching ideas, 
which was mailed to all Illinois public 
schools and Educational Service Centers. 
Teachers also may call 708-907-5950 
for information. 







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IMSA graduates Elizabeth Pine and Katy Kobyluk ( '93) testified at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hearings in Washington. D.C. in September on 
the environmental impact of re-introducing wolves into Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho. 



T R A I L B L A Z E R S 



State and National 
Leadership 

Executive Director Dr. Stephanie Pace 

Marshall presented Understanding the 
Vision, Meaning and Language of 
Educational Transformation to the 
Massachusetts affiliate of the Association 
for Supervision and Curriculum 
Development Sept. 30 in Milford. MA. 

Presentations by mathematics teachers 
at the annual meeting in Springfield of 
the Illinois Council of Teachers of 
Mathematics October 22-23 included 
Chuck Hamberg. Using the Coordinate 
Plane to Teach Junior Higli Math; Sue 
1 (Id ins. Mathematical Investigations: 
Enhancing Interests and Insights; Ruth 
Dover, Exploratory Approach to Taylor 
Series; Titu Andreescu, Tips From an 
Olympic Apprentice Coach; George 
Milauskas, Opening the Door to 
Interconnections in Pre-Algehra 
Mathematics; Rich Kick, The Pendulum: 
An Unlimited Resource for Mathematical 
Investigation; and Ron Vavrinek, Using 
Technology to Explore Real Data. 

Dr. Richard F. Dods, chemistry 
teacher, authored the audio cassette 
Pathophysiology for Chemists available 
nationwide in December. The audio 
cassette, a second in a series, was 
produced and marketed by the American 
Chemical Society to clinical laboratories, 
hospitals, universities and medical 
schools across the country. 

Physics teacher Edward Moyer 

presented a pre-conference session. 
Alternative Assessment, at the annual 
convention of the Illinois Science 
Teachers Association Sept. 29-Oct. 1 in 
Collinsville, IL. 

Bernie Hollister, social science teach- 
er, wrote Using Social Studies Learning 
Logs to Assess Student Learning for the 
October issue of The Councilor, a publi- 
cation of The Illinois Council For The 
Social Studies. 

Joseph Prieto, college/career coun- 
selor, presented Stress Management: 
Practice It and Live the Dream at the 
1993 conference of the National 
Association of College Admission 
Counselors Oct. 7-10 in Pittsburah. PA. 



Dr. Peggy Connolly, mentorship coor- 
dinator, presented Becoming A Catalyst 
in Local and Statewide Partnerships at a 
conference of the Association of 
Community College Trustees Sept. 28- 
Oct. 3 in Toronto. 

Dr. Diann Musial. research specialist, 
and Linda Torp, curriculum and action 
research specialist, co-presented with Dr. 
Susanna Finnell of Texas A & M 
University Articulation Issues: 
Transitioning from Specialized High 
Schools to Institutions of Higher 
Learning at the annual conference of the 
National Collegiate Honors Council 
Oct. 29 in St. Louis. MO. 

George Smith, supervisor of the 
Grainger Inventors' Workshop, is serving 
on the advisory panel for the DuPage 
Children's Museum's Kids Design 
Engineering Lab and Travelling Program. 
The program is funded by the State of 
Illinois Center for Scientific Literacy. 

Student and Staff 
Achievements 

A total of 132 IMSA seniors (63% of 
the class) qualified as semifinalists or 
received letters of commendation in this 
year's National Merit Scholarship 
Corporation competition. In addition, 
four seniors qualified as semifinalists in 
the National Achievement Scholarship 
Program for Outstanding Negro Students 
and four seniors qualified as semifinalists 
in the National Hispanic Scholar Awards 
Program. 

Recipients of this year's innovations 
and initiatives mini-grants, cash awards 
from the IMSA Fund for Advancement 
of Education, include: Michelle Sharp, 
resident counselor; Dalia Bach, choral 
director: Margaret Park, physics teacher; 
John Stark, foreign language teacher; 
Jean Bigger, technical services assistant; 
Sue Eddins, Chuck Hamberg, George 
Milauskas and Ron Vavrinek, mathe- 
matics teachers: Deb McGrath and 
Cheryl McGuirk, social workers; and 
Skip Mosshamer, team leader of 
computer and network systems. This 
program enables Academy employees to 
develop and implement creative ideas 
that support IMSA's mission. 



On Nov. 15. the Chicago Tribune report- 
ed that members of IMSA's Class of 1993 
led the nation with an average American 
College Test exam score of 30.6. 

Social science teacher Hilary Rosenthal 
and Center for Problem-Based Learning 
Director William Stepien received The 

1992 Paper of the Year Award from the 
Gifted Child Quarterly for their article 
The Effects of Problem-Based Learning. 
They co-authored the article with Dr. 
Shelagh Gallagher, assistant director for 
measurement in the longitudinal study of 
American youth at the Chicago Academy 
of Sciences. 

Thirty-two IMSA students and seven 
staff members raised $ 1 500 by participat- 
ing in AIDS Walk Chicago. The event, 
held Sept. 5. raised nearly one million 
dollars for various Chicago AIDS chanties. 



Scott Pfister, '89, Cornell University, 
received a full one-year scholarship from 
the Japanese government to study at 
Kanazawa University in Japan. He will 
complete the last year of a five-year 
program there, majoring in computer 
science engineering and Asian studies. 

David Wochner, "92. Georgetown 
University, was awarded an internship at 
the Middle East Institute, a nonprofit 
organization which promotes knowledge 
and understanding about the Middle East 
through conference, lectures, etc. He is 
working on a guide called Uncommon 
Middle Eastern Languages and Dialects. 

Terri Willard, '89. was one of only 18 
"outstanding Americans" named a 1993- 
94 Luce Scholar by the Henry Luce 
Foundation. As a result, she will live, 
work and study environmental science in 
Silang. The Philippines, for one year. The 
Luce Scholars Program was founded to 
create Asia-aware professionals who will 
assume leading roles in American society. 

Gregory Draves, '91. New York 
University, was elected public relations 
director for Political Spectrum, a campus 
club at New York University, and presi- 
dent of the College Bowl team. 




ASCD/IMSA 
Consortium for 
Interdisciplinary 
Teaching and Learning 

IMSA senior Amanda 
Kracen greets members of 
the ASCD/IMSA 
Consortium during their 
recent visit to the campus. 
ASCD recently selected 
15 schools nationwide, 
including Alan B. Shephard 
High School in Palos 
Heights and Smith 
Elementary School in 
Aurora, for the Consortium. 
IMSA also will offer multi- 
ple partnership opportuni- 
ties for other Illinois 
educators interested in 
advancing the practice 
of integrative teaching and 
learning. 



r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora. Illinois 60506-1000 



NON PROFIT ORG. 

BULK RATE 

U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

AURORA, IL 

PERMIT NO. 129 



Address Correction Requested 



Although we strive for accuracy, if you sec an error in your mailing label 
please call the communications office at (708) 907-5033. 




7a 



ILLINOIS MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE ACADEMY 



r^llVIIjA ^ Pioneering Educational Community 



Volume 8 No. 2 • Winter 1 W4 



Maya Angelou Urges Students to Look for Heroes 
and Sheroes in Their Families and Communities 



By Catherine C. Veal 



\^— imple yet profound were the words 
V__ of a national treasure. Maya 
Angelou. who on December 2. 1993, 
issued a call to love and courage to 
students, staff and guests at the Illinois 
Mathematics and Science Academy. 
Calling love "the condition which holds 
the molecules together.. .and holds the stars 
in the firmament," Angelou said, "if you 
don't have love, you're not going to be 
good mathematicians and good scientists." 

Connecting love and courage to 
heroism, Angelou spoke fondly of her 
poor, uneducated, physically disabled 
Uncle Willie, a black man who lived in 
the segregated South in the early 1900s. 
She told how he, despite the barriers 
and the times, inspired her to learn, and 
how years later she discovered that 
others, including a state legislator and 
a mayor, also credited her Uncle Willie 
for their success. 




•:l Maya Angelou inspi 



SIDE 



Uncle Willie was "a real hero." not a 
pop idol. Angelou said, noting she is 
troubled when young people today speak 

Book Highlights IMSA .... ....3 of rock " s P orts or movie stars as their 

heroes. "Don't look in the National 
Chicago School Partnership 4 Enquirer or on MTV. ..look and find 

Dateline, USA Weekend 3 heroes-sheroes in your family, your 

__ , neighborhood and vour state, and for the 

Prom the Executive Director 2 . .- ,-.- , , , 

rest of your lite you can lean back on 

National Competitions 6 their legacies." she said. 

New Donors 4 Angelou. one of the great voices of 

contemporary literature, was at IMSA to 

New Fund Board Members 4 give the third James R. Thompson 

Pre-Admissions Minority Program 6 Leadership Lecture, an annual event 

. named in honor of the former Governor 

Principals Visit 8 f Illinois. Previous years' speakers 

Trailblazers 7 were Dr. Carl Sis in md Dr. Edward 



fhope, lovi 



Teller. This year's event was co-spon- 
sored by the City of Aurora's Youth 
Services Department. 

In addition to IMSA students and staff, 
lecture guests included students and 
teachers from schools in Chicago. Aurora 
and several other suburbs; major donors 
to the IMSA Fund for Advancement of 
Education; members and friends of the 
Aurora Youth Services Department; and 
local and state government officials. 

An internationally acclaimed poet, 
educator, author, historian, artist, actress. 
producer and civil rights advocate, 
Angelou captivated her audience of 

(continued on back cover) 



r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora. Illinois 60506-1000 
708/907-5000 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President 

James D. Pearson 
President 
Aurora Industries 

Vice President 

Dr. Leon Lederman, Nobel Laureate 
Director Emeritus 

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 
Pritzker Professor of Science 
Illinois Institute of Technology 

Trustees 

John Baird 
Teacher of Physics 
Quincy High School 

G. Carl Ball 
Chairman of the Board 

George J. Ball. Incorporated 

Dr. Larry Braskamp 
Dean, College of Education 
University of Illinois at Chicago 

Fred Conforti 
President 

BRK Electronics 

Sherry R. Eagle 
Superintendent 
Aurora West School District #129 

Forest Etheredge 
Retired State Senator 
Instructor, Aurora University 

Sheila Griffin 

Director of Business Assessment 

Motorola incorporated 

Cary Israel 

Executive Director 

Illinois Community College Board 

Robert Leininger 
State Superintendent 
State Board of Education 

John McEachern Jr. 
President 

Wayne Circuits Incorporated 



Dr. David M 
Prof 



1 Mechanical Engineering, 



Dr. Sally Pancrazio 

Dean, College of Education 

Illinois State University 

Jesus Manuel Sosa 
Interdepartmental Manager 
Department of Language and 

Cultural Education 
Chicago Public Schools 

Marvin Strunk 

Retired President and Chief Executive Officer 

Madison Bank & Trust Company 

Dr. Richard Wagner 
Executive Director 
State Board of Higher Education 

Dr. Benjamin Williams 
Principal 

Percy Julian Junior High School. Oak Park 

NOVA is published quarterly by the 
1MSA Institutional Advancement Office. 

Editor 

Catherine C. Veal 

Writer 

Brenda Buschbacher 



From the 

Executive 

Director 




Dear Members of the IMSA Community. 

•— | — he new year is off to an exciting start at the Illinois Mathematics and Science 
|_ Academy. 

In January, the board of trustees approved IMSA's "new" strategic plan. The new 
plan centers on the transformation of teaching and learning in mathematics and science 
by developing ethical leaders who forge connections within and among mathematics, 
science, the arts and the humanities. We now are redesigning the institution to enable 
mutually supportive partnerships with schools and teachers throughout our state to 
nourish. While in the past the Academy has served other schools, teachers and students 
through initiatives such as IMPACT II and Summer 'AD'Ventures in Mathematics. 
Science and Technology, the new strategic plan greatly strengthens our commitment in 
this regard. In the process. IMSA's identity is changing-from that of a school to that of 
an educational laboratory characterized by research, innovative teaching and service. 

One example of IMSA's service to Illinois educators is the IMSA Math Journal. 
This features creative, innovative problems by IMSA teachers and students, and guest 
authors, that can be used by Illinois teachers to enhance their classroom and cocurricu- 
lar activities. The latest edition of the journal recently was mailed to all public high 
schools in Illinois. We are grateful to CNA Insurance Companies for producing this 
publication. 

Another way in which we are expanding our service to Illinois educators is in the 
area of research and development. The recent attention to IMSA's calculus-based 
physics/mechanics study by Dateline. USA Weekend. Chicago Tribune and others 
(see article on page 3), demonstrates the promise of action research-research in 
which IMSA, as an educational laboratory for the entire state, should engage. 
The results of IMSA's study will be shared with other Illinois educators in the fall. 

At this time, as we all look forward to spring. I would like to thank you for your 
continuing support of the Academy, and invite you to join us as we begin an exciting 
new era in IMSA's history-one dedicated to the transformation of teaching and 
learning in mathematics and science. 



Sincerel 




f-tr^u^ 



^fi^W, 



Stephanie Pace Marshall, Ph.D. 
Executive Director 



Dateline and USA Weekend Spotlight IMSA Study 



^H* hose involved in IMSA's calculus- 

|_ based physics/mechanics course 
may not have antieipated nor expected 
the national attention they would receive, 
but national attention they got. 

In February. IMSA was featured in USA 
Weekend and on NBC-TV's Dateline in 
reports on gender equity in education. The 
reports centered on the work of David and 
Myra Sadkers, professors of education at 
American University, and authors of a 
new book. Failing at Fairness: How 
America 's Schools Cheat Girls. 

The Feb. 4-6 USA Weekend, the nation- 
wide weekend newspaper insert with 
37.? million readers, cited IMSA in a 
cover story by the Sadkers. Three IMSA 
students — Deneb Bates of Aurora. Kara 
Yokley of Chicago, and Eunice Lee of 
Naperville — were pictured on the cover. 

The Dateline report by anchorwoman 
Jane Pauley aired Feb. 8. and featured 
comments by science teacher Dr. David 
Workman. '93 graduate Elizabeth Pine, 
and IMSA senior Deneb Bates. 

Dateline film crews were on campus 
several days in January. 

Both reports featured IMSA's calculus- 
based physics/mechanics course, one 
section of which was all girls for the fall 
semester of the 1993-94 school year. The 
all-girls section was part of the first phase 
of a year-long study designed to learn 
more about how student-teacher, student- 
student, and student-content interaction 




Seniors Deneb Bates (l)andRebi 

with anchor J cine Pauley. 



hen in. ami Dr. David Workman tour Dateline 



affect learning. Three coed sections of 
the same course also were offered. For 
second semester (phase two of the study), 
all sections of the course are coed. 

Numerous Illinois media, including 
the Chicago Tribune, also featured 
IMSA's study. 

The decision to initiate the calculus- 
based physics/mechanics study was based 
on several factors, including faculty and 
staff members" desire to learn more about 
how the teaching and learning environment 
at IMSA both support and inhibits girls; a 
belief that the Aeademv's mission to 



transform teaching and learning in 
mathematics and science cannot be met 
without tackling gender issues head-on; 
and a belief that the study will inform 
the Academy's efforts to provide the 
most appropriate learning environment 
for all students — both girls and bo) s — 
in the future. 

To protect the integrity of the study. 
which is still in progress, the Academy 
will not report results at this time. The 
Academy will analyze the data from the 
study during the summer and will publish 
results in the fall. 



IMSA Featured in New Book; Graduate on Cover 

When New York Times education writer Joseph Berger published his new book, it was no surprise to find IMSA featured in 
the chapter entitled ""Different Strokes." 

The Young Scientists: America's Future and the Winning ofWestinghou.se. copyright 1994. includes a chapter about IMSA 
and several other member schools of the National Consortium for Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science and 
Technology (NCSSSMST). 

Nobel Laureate Dr. Leon Lederman, vice president of the IMSA board of trustees, wrote the book's foreword and was quoted 
throughout. In chapter seven. Lederman spoke fondly of the Academy using his usual flair for humor. "You're nurturing the 
Fort Knox of the country, the most precious thing we have." he said. "One of them is going to cure senility and I need it fast." 

In addition to a chapter on IMSA. 1993 graduate Elizabeth Pine is pictured on the cover and is profiled along with 1989 
graduate Rowan Lockwood. The book also pays tribute to Executive Director Dr. Stephanie Pace Marshall for her unconven- 
tional thinking, creative leadership of IMSA and role in founding the NCSSSMST. Dr. Ronald Pine. IMSA's resident scientist, 
also is mentioned in the book. 



IMSA FUND BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


President 


Vice President 


James R. Thompson 


D. Chet McKee 


Chairman 


President and 


Winston & Strawn 


Chief Executive Officer 




Copley Memorial Hospital 


Executive Vice 




President 


Secretary /Treasurer 


Donald E. Nordlund 


PaulJ.O'Hollaren 


Retired Chairman and 


Chairman of the Executive 


Chief Executive Officer 


Committee 


Staley Continental, Inc. 


Moose International 


Directors 


Linda Anderson* 


Dr. Leon M. Lederman. 


Civic Leader 


Nobel Laureate 




Director Emeritus 


Roger E. Anderson* 


Fermi National 


Retired Chairman and 


Accelerator Laboratory 


Chief Executive Officer 


Pritzker Professor of 


Continental Bank of 


Science 


Chicago 


Illinois Institute of 




Technology 


G. Carl Ball 




Chairman of the Board 


Steven H. Lesnik 


George J. Ball, Inc. 


Chief Executive Officer 




Kemper Lesnik 


Marjorie Craig Benton 


Organization 


President 




Chapin Hall Center for 


Gordon R. Lohman 


Children 


President and Chief 


University of Chicago 


Executive Officer 




Amsted Industries, Inc. 


Michael J. Birck 




President 


Robert Malott 


Telhibs. Inc. 


Chairman of the Executive 




Committee 


Richard H. Brown 


FMC Corporation 


Vice Chairman 




Ameritech Corporation 


Timothy MeCormick 




Vice President 


Willard Bunn III 


Farmer's State Bank of 


Chairman and Chief 


Emden 


Executive Officer 




Banc One Illinois 


James D. Pearson 


Corporation 


President 




Aurora Industries 


Dr. Floyd English 




President and Chief 


James T. Schaefer 


Executive Officer 


Real Estate Consultant 


Andrew Corporation 






Susan S. Schanlaber 


Dr. Philip Francis 


Chairman of the Board 


Vice President 


and President 


Square D Company 


Aurora National Bank 


Clifford L. Greenwalt 


Harry C. Stonecipher 


President and Chief 


Chairman, President and 


Executive Officer 


Chief Executive Officer 


Central Illinois Public 


Sundstrand Coiporation 


Service Company 






Richard Wellek 


Leon Jackson 


President and Chief 


President 


Executive Officer 


Multi-Fac Corporation 


Varlen Corporation 


John E. Jones 


William J. White 


Chairman of the Board, 


President. Chairman and 


President and Chief 


Chief Executive Officer 


Executive Officer 


Bell & Howell Company 


CB1 Industries 




Director of Institutional Advancement 


Ted Parge 




■Honorary Members 





IMSA Fund Elects 
New Board Members 

Welcomes New Corporate/Foundation Donors 



he board of direc- 
tors of the Illinois 
Mathematics and Science 
Academy Fund for 
Advancement of 
Education recently elected 
three new board members: 
Dr. Philip Francis, vice 
president of Square D 
Company in Palatine: 
Robert Malott. chairman 
of the executive commit- 
tee of FMC Coiporation 
in Chicago: and Timothy 
MeCormick, vice- 
president of the Fanner's 
State Bank of Emden. 

They began their three- 
year terms Dec. 15, 1993. 

The IMSA Fund welcomes the following first-time corporate and foundation donors 
of $500 or more (July 30. 1993-January 30, 1994) to the Partners for Educational 
Distinction in Illinois: 

• CNA Insurance Companies • State Farm Insurance 

• Eastman Kodak Company • WMX Environmental Monitoring 

• Goldman. Sachs & Company Labs Inc. 

• Kemper Coiporation • William Blair & Company 

• Oil - Dri Coiporation of America • Woodward Governor Company 



Ameritech Supports IMSA-Walter 
Dyett Middle School Partnership 




Joan Harris, president of the Harris Foundation, William White, 
president of Bell & Howell Company, and Jane White visit during 
a reception following the James R. Thompson Leadership Lecture. 



Through the magic of video tele- 
conferencing, middle school 
students from inner-city Chicago are 
learning physics alongside IMSA 
students without having to leave the city. 

Walter H. Dyett Middle School in 
Chicago recently obtained a video telecon- 
ferencing unit in one of its classrooms 
connecting the school to IMSA students 
and teachers for one year. The connection 
was made possible through a $300,000 
grant from Ameritech. 

During this pilot experiment, IMSA 
teachers and students are interacting 



with Dyett students on physics projects 
several times each month. IMSA junior 
Eunice Lee of Naperville. who is inter- 
ested in pursuing a career in education, 
serves as an on-line tutor as part of her 
mentorship experience at IMSA. 

Dyett science teacher Daucenia Hunter 
said the project provides a unique learn- 
ing experience for students. "It gives 
them a chance to see things they may not 
get a chance to see, to interact with 
people they may not normally meet, to 
mentorship." she said (Chicago Tribune). 



1 




•^ 








-\i-' 








* Jfc 1 


n 


M 





Ted Purge greets Maya Angelou upon her arrival at IMSA. 




Jocelyn Logan and Ms. Angelou get bettei 
acquainted following her lecture. 




Ms. Angelou takes time to chat with students 




Fred Rodger.', oj the Aurora Youth Services Department shares his thoughts on the 
lecture with Dr. Marshall. 



mm 



Platform Party Members: (left to right): Aurora Mayor David Pierce: Executive Director Dr. Stephanie Pace Marshall: 
Poet Maya Angelou: Joan Harris, president of the Harris Foundation: Student Council President Jocelyn Logan: and 
Ted Paige, director of institutional advancement. 





IMSA Students Win National Competitions 



W he construction of a mechanical 
dinosaur and overall knowledge 
led IMSA students to first place in two 
recent national competitions. 

IMSA sophomore Angela Chiu of 
Edwardsville won first place and a 
personal computer in the Advanced 
Engineer division of the national 1993 
Great ERECTOR Construction Contest, 
sponsored by Meccano. Inc. The contest, 
the first in 30 years, marked the 80th 
anniversary of the toy. 

Her project, a "mechanical dinosaur on 
wheels," took about six hours to build in 
the Grainger Inventors' Workshop at 
IMSA. The workshop was funded by a 
grant of $325,000 from The Grainger 
Foundation of Skokie. 

Junior Charles Rayburn of Dolton took 
5th place for the construction of a carni- 
val ride car and sophomore David Buck 
of Normal took 9th place for the 
construction of a three-wheeler. The 
purpose of the ERECTOR Construction 
Contest is to develop new and original 
models of objects made only with parts 




IMSA 's Scholastic B 
competition. 



hed first in the nation in the Knowledge Master Open 



included in the sets. 

A team of 15 IMSA students finished 
first in Illinois and the nation in the 
Dec. 8, 1993, Knowledge Master Open 
competition. A total of 58 Illinois schools 
and 1.576 schools nationally participated 
in this year's event. 

The Knowledge Master Open, sponsored 



by Academic Hallmarks in Durango. 
Colorado, is conducted on Macintosh. 
Apple II and IBM computers. The test 
covers 15 curriculum areas, and students 
are scored on the basis of accuracy and 
speed in answering 200 multiple choice 
questions. Team sponsors were resident 
counselors Bill Berens and Pam Waller. 



Pre-Admissions Program Expands Beyond Chicago 
To Include Fox Valley Minority Students 



A total of 63 Chicago and Fox 
Valley ninth graders conducted 
wellness assessments and family history 
surveys, and learned the fiscal operations 
of a town council as part of the IMSA's 
1993-94 Early Involvement Program (EIP). 

In its fifth year, the program is designed 
primarily to help increase the number and 
competitiveness of black, Hispanic and 
economically disadvantaged students who 
apply to IMSA. The program is supported 
by grants from the Albert Pick Jr. Fund. 
Polk Brothers Foundation and the Alfred 
P. Sloan Foundation. 

In the past, EIP only served students 
from Chicago. This year, Aurora, Elgin 
and Joliet students also participated. 

Held at Loyola University- Water 
Tower Campus and IMSA, the Saturday 
sessions (October - February) included 



"hands-on" and group problem-solving 
activities as well as some preparation for 
the Scholastic Aptitude Test. Students 
developed research, decision-making and 
self-motivation skills while studying 
geometry concepts, wellness and 
American history, and graphing and 
charting data on a computer. In addition 
to the Saturday sessions, students attend- 
ed an all-day retreat at IMSA Dec. 4. 

The sessions were led by IMSA 
teachers Vern Strong, mathematics; 
Mike Fraga. social science; Soon-Heng 
Lim, English; Ed Moyer. physics; and 
Barbara Baber, wellness; and public 
school teachers Ed Caster (Dunn 
Elementary School-Chicago). Bethenia 
Salinas (Gompers Junior High School- 
Joliet), and Ira Lathan (West Aurora 
High School). 



IMSA EIP is one of several programs 
designed to encourage minority students 
who are interested in mathematics and 
science. Other programs include IMSA 
Challenge. IMSA Sloan Challenge and 
Project School Visit. This year, for the 
first time, IMSA also held two recruit- 
ment weekends in February for 48 minor- 
ity students from Springfield and 
Rockford. Contacts were made through 
the University of Illinois Principal's 
Scholars Program. 

Elissa Laird, pre-admissions counselor, 
said these programs demonstrate IMSA's 
commitment to diversity and equity. "We 
believe it is critical for IMSA to play a 
leadership role in identifying and encour- 
aging talented minority students, particu- 
larly those from underrepresented racial 
groups." she said. 



T R A I L B L A Z E R S 



State and National 
Leadership 

Dr. Stephanie Pace Marshall, 

executive director, served as 
"'Distinguished Lecturer" at the annual 
conference of the American Association 
of School Administrators (A ASA) 
Feb. 12 in San Francisco. CA. She spoke 
on Understanding the Vision. Meaning 
and Language of Educational 
Transformation. 

Dr. Marcelline Barron, director for 
integrative teaching and learning initia- 
tives. Dr. Michael Palmisano, director 
for research and design, and Linda Torp, 
curriculum/action research specialist, 
presented Integrative Learning System: 
Building Understanding Through 
Interconnections at the Second Annual 
National Conference on Curriculum 
Integration in Scottsdale. AZ. Jan. 13-16. 

Physics teachers Ed Mover and 
Patrick LaMaster, social science teacher 
Dr. Jim Victory, audio-visual technician 
Brian Thornburg. director of statewide 
collaborative partnerships Michele 
Micetich and Dr. David Barr. director 
of information and communication 
systems, presented a program on four 
integrated technology labs featured in the 
"1st Annual Taste of Technology" 
sponsored by the Illinois Association 
of School Business Officials. 

Bernard Hollister. social science 
teacher, presented two sessions at the 
Seventh Annual Council for American 
Studies Education (CASE) Conference 
Feb. 25 at The Newberry Library in 
Chicago. Doing It By the Numbers and 
// You Care Enough to Send the Very 
Best: Thinking Logs in the Social Studies. 

William J. Stepien. director of the 
Center for Problem-Based Learning, 
science teacher Dr. David Workman. 

and Dr. Shelagh Gallagher of the 
Chicago Academy of Sciences co- 
authored Problem-Based Learning for 
Traditional and Interdisciplinary 
Classrooms in the Journal for the 
Education of the Gifted, vol. 16. no. 4. 



Dr. Raymond Dagenais, curriculum/ 

action research specialist, wrote 
Professional Development of Teachers 
and Administrators: Yesterday, Today 
and Tomorrow. The Views of Robert H. 
Anderson, for the winter issue of Kappa 
Delta Pi Record, a publication of the 
international honor society in education. 

Student and Staff 
Achievements 

The IMS A Pep Band was one of only 
two bands in the state selected to perform 
during the Illinois High School Association 
State Final AA Boys Basketball 
Tournament. The band will perform Mar. 
18. This is the first time IMSA has been 
invited to play during the event. 

An essay by senior Gregory Oleksy of 
Chicago. The Reversal of the Chicago 

River, was published in the Spring 1994 
edition of The Concord Review. 

Junior Sam Vagan of Bourbonnais 
was one of 340 students nationwide 
chosen to attend the National Young 
Leaders Conference Oct. 26-31 in 
Washington. D.C. 

lMSA"s Dance Squad (see photo) 
qualified for the Super Sectionals May 5 
at William Fremd High School in 
Palatine after receiving a "Superior" 
rating at the Plainfield Invitational 
Jan. 22. The team also won first place 
at the Rockford Lutheran Invitational 
competition 
Feb. 5. Team 
sponsors are 
admissions 
office secre- 
taries Phyllis 
Chesnut and 
Re nee 
Krienitz. 



Dr. Marcelline Barron, director for 
integrative teaching and learning initia- 
tives, was invited to perform in Ft. 
Meyers Beach, FL, Dec. 22-26. Barron, 
a baroque contralto, sang selections from 
Handel's Messiah. Bach's Christmas 
Oratorio and other classical pieces for 
the holiday season. 

Sophomore cellist Jason Wang of St. 
Charles received an honorable mention at 
the Fox Valley Symphony's 20th Annual 
Young Artists Competition Jan. 22 at 
Aurora University. 

Alumni Achievements 

Bryan Dunne. '91. Rice University, 
was one of 12 students nationwide select- 
ed to participate in a program sponsored 
by the federal government laboratories. 
He will serve as a research assistant at 
Los Alamos National Laboratory in 
California in the fall of 1994. 

Terri Willard. '89. was one of only 
32 students nationwide selected to 
receive the Rhodes Scholarship this year. 
The scholarship, named for British 
philanthropist and colonial pioneer Cecil 
Rhodes, provides two years of study at 
the University of Oxford in England. 

G. Allen Mayer. '90, has accepted a 
position as legislative aide to Illinois State 
Rep. Laurel Lunt Prussing (D-Urbana). 




Angelou Urges Students 



(continued from page 1) 



1,600 with song, poetry and a powerful 
message of opportunity and hope. In 
conclusion, she urged students to "dedi- 
cate yourself to the most noble cause of 
all, the liberation of the human mind and 
spirit, beginning with my own." 

For years, Angelou has been in great 
demand on the lecture circuit, never more 
so than in 1993 following her stirring 
rendition of the inaugural poem. "On the 
Pulse of Morning." when President 
Clinton took office. 

Lecture guests, who knew they were 
in the presence of a literary giant and 
remarkable human being, gave Angelou 
three standing ovations. 

Dietra Gibson, a junior at Waubonsie 
Valley High School in Aurora, came to 
the lecture as a member of a new multi- 
cultural club at her school. "I'm very 
family-oriented and I think her saying 
that more people need to look for heroes 
in their families is good advice," 
Gibson said. 

IMSA senior Philip Huang of 
Arlington Heights said he was surprised 
by Angelou's effective speaking skills. 
"I expected her to move people, but I 
didn't quite know the effect that she 



had." Huang said. "It was a lot more 
than what I expected." 

Following Angelou's performance, 
IMSA Executive Director Dr. Stephanie 



Pace Marshall presented her a commemo- 
rative portfolio containing IMSA 
students' reactions to Angelou's life, 
work and writings. 




Dr. LuAnn Smith, director of admissions, and Naperville North High School Principal Dr. 
Bruce Cameron exchange ideas at a forum for Chicago area high school administrators. 
The forum. "Let's Talk Curricular Improvement & Collaborative Partnerships. " attracted 
administrators from 65 schools to IMSA in November. 



r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora, Illinois 60506-1000 



NONPROFIT ORG. 

BULK RATE 

U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

AURORA, IL 
PERMIT NO. 129 



Address Correction Requested 



Although we strive for accuracy, if you see an error in your mailing label 
please call the institutional advancement office at (708) 907-5033. 



ILLINOIS MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE ACADEMY 



r 1 -^ IIVI^A ^ Pioneering Educational Community 



Volume 8 No. 3 • Spring 1994 



Students Fulfill Disney Dream for Six-Year-Old 
Leukemia Patient 



^^P his spring. IMSA students 

|_ "finessed" their way to a $5,000 
grand prize in the 4th Annual Create 
Your Dream Prom Contest sponsored by 
YM (Young and Modern) magazine and 
Finesse hair care products. They then 
decided to donate half of the grand prize 
to the Make-A-Wish Foundation of 
Northern Illinois. 

The foundation fulfills the wishes of 
children who suffer from life-threatening 
illnesses. IMSA's donation enabled 
six-year-old Brittany Peluso of Naperville 
to travel to Disney World in Florida 
May 7-12. Brittany, who suffers from 
leukemia, traveled with sisters Natalie 
and Gina and her parents. Ken and 
Debbie Peluso. The family also attended 
a party at IMSA on May 4. 

In the nationwide contest. IMSA prom 
committee members were asked to 
write an essay describing "what you 
would do to make your school's prom the 
most amazing night of your life." Their 
essay, selected for its innovation and 
creativity, described a prom night held at 



SIDE 




Brittany Peluso h 
person. Brittany 
following IMSA s, 



ibbles over with joy at the thought of meeting Mickey and Minnie Mouse in 
vas able to travel to Disney World with her family (mom Debbie pictured) 
niors' $2500 donation to the Make-A-Wish Foundation. 



From the Executive Director.... FAO Schwartz toy store m Cnicag0 

Horwitz Lecture on Ethics 4 with underprivileged children as guests: 

, , , ■ ^ , As we begin our journey as adults, we 

Integrative Humanities Course 6 , ,,",.,, 

do not want to neglect the cherished 

New IMSA Fund Board Member 4 lessons ofouryouth. Those who hove been 

Redbook Award S less fortunate must not be forgotten, and 

we hope that some of these children will be 
Statewide Partnership Initiatives 5 Me tl)jom ,„ „, ourmoment f magic. 

Strategic Plan Update 3 IMSA's entry was written by 

Josephine Auns of South Barrington, 

Teacher Recognition Day 8 „ . , T , . cn ,, XT , 

J Rajesh Keswani ot Roselle. Naresh 

Trailblazers 6. 7 Kilaru of Juliet and Chulee Santilukka 



of Red Bud. 

Hssa\s were judged by a panel 
comprised of YM's advertising and 
promotion department. 

Students on the committee said they 
were happy to share their good fortunes 
with someone less fortunate. 

"We wanted to be able to help some- 
one in our own backyard." Aung said. 
Santilukka agreed, adding, "it allowed us 
to be able to meet Brittany and establish 
a personal relationship with her." 



r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora. Illinois 60506-1000 
708/907-5000 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President 

James D. Pearson 
President 
Aurora Industries 

Vice President 

Dr. Leon Lederman, Nobel Laureate 
Director Emeritus 

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 
Pritzker Professor of Science 
Illinois Institute of Technology 

Trustees 

G. Carl Ball 
Chairman of the Board 
George J. Ball. Incorporated 

Dr. Larry Braskamp 
Dean, College of Education 
University of Illinois at Chicago 

Fred Conforti 

President 

BRK Electronics 

Sherry R. Eagle 
Superintendent 
Aurora West School District #129 

Forest Etheredge 
Retired State Senator 
Instructor, Aurora University 

Sheila Griffin 

Director of Business Assessment 

Motorola Incorporated 

Cary Israel 

Executive Director 

Illinois Community College Board 

John McEachem Jr. 

President 

Wayne Circuits Incorporated 

Dr. David Mintzer 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 

Physics and Astronomy 
Northwestern University 

Dr. Sally Pancrazio 

Dean. College of Education 

Illinois State University 

Jesus Manuel Sosa 
Interdepartmental Manager 
Department of Language and 

Cultural Education 
Chicago Public Schools 

Marvin Strunk 

Retired President and Chief Executive Officer 

Madison Bank & Trust Company 

Dr. Richard Wagner 
Executive Director 
State Board of Higher Education 

Dr. Benjamin Williams 

Principal 

Percy Julian Junior High School, Oak Park 

NOVA is published quarterly by the 
IMSA Institutional Advancement Office. 

Editor 

Catherine C. Veal 

Writer 

Brenda Buschbacher 



From the 

Executive 

Director 




Dear Members of the IMSA Community. 

(^— pring is always an eventful time of year at the Illinois Mathematics and Science 
V ., Academy, and this year is no exception. 

Recently, the Academy initiated long-term, mutually supportive partnerships with 
49 Illinois schools. These represent the Academy's expanding work with other 
educators in our state on issues related to the transformation of teaching and learning in 
mathematics and science. The new partnerships supplement other statewide program 
initiatives already under way (for example, the IMPACT II teachers network. Summer 
'AD'Ventures in Mathematics, Science and Technology, and the IMSA Math Journal). 

Internally, we are looking forward to the graduation of our sixth senior class, the 
Class of 1994, and are delighted that Governor Jim Edgar will be our commencement 
speaker. The Class of 1994 has distinguished itself in many ways, and we will miss 
their leadership and commitment. Of special note is their recent decision to donate half 
of their grand prize prom money to the Make-A-Wish Foundation to enable an ill child 
and her family to go to Disney World. As proud as we are of our students' many 
achievements, this particular one may say the most about their character and compas- 
sion, and I for one am heartened by their decision. 

I am also extremely pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Gregory Sinner as 
IMSA's new principal. Dr. Sinner, who currently serves as principal of New Challenge 
School in Port Charlotte, Florida, has enjoyed a distinguished 22-year career in 
education as a principal, assistant principal, and science and math teacher. Dr. Sinner 
received his B.S. in pharmacy from the University of Minnesota. M.S. in education 
from Antioch College and Ph.D. in molecular biology from Dartmouth College. 
We look forward to his arrival on July 1. At the same time, I also want to acknowledge 
the service of Mr. Harold Burshtan, former principal of Wheaton North High School, 
who came out of retirement to serve as our interim principal through April 1 . We are 
grateful for his many contributions and wish him all the best as he re-retires! 



V^J 




Stephanie Pace Marshall. Ph.D. 
Executive Director 



Organizational Redesign Anchors IMSA's 
Future and "New" Strategic Plan 



/ ^>— uided by a bold commitment to 

V ,,_ transform mathematics and 

science teaching and learning through 
interconnections, IMSA's recently- 
approved "'new'" strategic plan calls for 
expanded attention to statewide partner- 
ship initiatives. In order to leverage 
resources for the future, and continue 
transforming its identity from that of 
"school" to that of "educational laborato- 
ry/resource for the entire state," the 
Academy needed to radically redesign 
its organizational structure. 

Some changes already have been made, 
and others are coming. What will the new- 
organization look like? Gone is the tradi- 
tional, hierarchical, linear organizational 
chart. Instead, the emerging structure 
looks like a kaleidoscope and features 
five flexible, dynamic, interdependent 
systems. The systems, classified as either 
"driving" or "enabling." include: 

• Teaching and Learning System 
("driving" system) 

• System for Partnership Initiatives 
("driving" system-see story on page 5) 



• Institutional Advancement System 
("enabling" system) 

• Integrative Information and Technology 
Support System ("enabling" system) 

• Strategic Leadership and Infrastructure 
Support System ("enabling" system) 

"In the context of organizational 
redesign, although strategic initiatives are 
guided primarily by the work of one 
system, they are informed and often 
collaboratively led by those in another 
system," said Executive Director Dr. 
Stephanie Pace Marshall. "Our intent is 
to expand our creative capacity by 
connecting people and ideas in fluid 
structures rather than isolating them in 
hierarchical ones." 

The entire strategic plan is designed to 
enable the Academy to move forward 
towards accomplishing its objectives 
which are: 

• There will be a generally accepted 
paradigm for teaching and learning 
mathematics and science that embodies 
interconnections as the basis for 
understanding. 

• The achievement of Illinois students in 



mathematics and science will be defined 
and assessed by a new system of 
indicators. 
• Materials and methods inspired or 
developed by IMSA and its partners 
will be so good that they will be the 
choice of Illinois educators for the 
foundation of their mathematics and 
science programs. 

The Academy's initial strategic plan 
was designed in 1989. Since then, it was 
modified in 1992 and again in 1993 
following annual review sessions. This 
year, the Academy embraced a new 
mission, which serves as the nucleus of 
the strategic plan: 

The mission of the Illinois Mathematics 
and Science Academy, a pioneering 
educational community, is to transform 
mathematics and science teaching and 
learning by developing ethical leaders 
who know the joy of discovering and 
forging connections within and among 
mathematics, science, the arts, and the 
humanities by means of an exemplary 
laboratory environment characterized by 
research, innovative teaching, and service. 



IMSA As A Kaleidoscopic Enterprise 




v Strategic 

Leadership 

and Infrastructure 

Support System 



Integrative ** 
Information and 

Technology 
Support System 



Institutional 

Advancement 

System 



Transformation Through Connections 



IMSA FUND BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


President 


Vice President 


James R. Thompson 


D. Chet McKee 


Chairman 


President and 


Winston & Strawn 


Chief Executive Officer 




Copley Memorial Hospital 


Executive Vice 




President 


Secretary/Treasurer 


Donald E. Nordlund 


Paul J. CTHollaren 


Retired Chairman and 


Chairman of the Executive 


Chief Executive Officer 


Committee 


Staley Continental, Inc. 


Moose International 


Directors 


Linda Anderson* 


Steven H. Lesnik 


Civic Leader 


Chief Executive Officer 




Kemper Lesnik 


Roger E. Anderson* 


Organization 


Retired Chairman and 




Chief Executive Officer 


Gordon R. Lohman 


Continental Bank of 


President and Chief 


Chicago 


Executive Officer 




Amsted Industries, Inc. 


G.Carl Ball 




Chairman of the Board 


Robert Malott 


George J. Ball. Inc. 


Chairman of the Executive 




Committee 


Michael J. Birck 


FMC Corporation 


President 




Tellabs. Inc. 


Timothy McCormick 




Vice President 


Willard Bunn III 


Farmer's State Bank of 


Chairman and Chief 


Emden 


Executive Officer 




Banc One Illinois 


James D. Pearson 


Corporation 


President 




Aurora Industries 


Dr. Floyd English 




President and Chief 


James T. Schaefer 


Executive Officer 


Real Estate Consultant 


Andrew Corporation 






Susan S. Schanlaber 


Dr Philip Francis 


Chairman of the Board 


Vice President 


and President 


Square D Company 


Aurora National Bank 


Clifford L. Greenwalt 


Harry C. Stonecipher 


President and Chief 


Chairman, President and 


Executive Officer 


Chief Executive Officer 


Central Illinois Public 


Sundstrand Corporation 


Service Company 






Richard Wellek 


Leon Jackson 


President and Chief 


President 


Executive Officer 


Multi-Fac Corporation 


Varlen Corporation 


John E. Jones 


William J. White 


Chairman of the Board, 


President, Chairman and 


President and Chief 


Chief Executive Officer 


Executive Officer 


Bell & Howell Company 


CBI Industries 




Dr. Leon M. Lederman 


Douglas Whitley 
President 

Ameritech Illinois 


Nobel Laureate 


Director Emeritus 




Fermi National 




Accelerator Laboratory 




Pritzker Professor of 




Science 




Illinois Institute of 




Technology 




Director of Institutional Advancement 


Ted Parge 




•Honorary Members 





IMSA Fund Welcomes 
New Board Member 



louglas Whitley, 
president of 
Ameritech Illinois, 
recently was named a 
new board member to the 
Illinois Mathematics and 
Science Academy Fund 
for Advancement of 
Education. 

Prior to working for 
Ameritech Illinois. 
Whitley served two years 
as director of the Illinois 
Department of Revenue 
under Governor Jim 
Edgar and 1 3 years as 
president of the 
Taxpayers' Federation of 
Illinois. In addition, he 
has served as a political 
commentator for Illinois 
Public Radio and a columnist for 
Crain 's Chicago Business. 

His many memberships include the 
Illinois Distance Learnin" Foundation, 




William Weiss (right), retired chairman of the hoard of 
Ameritech Corporation, and physics teacher Patrick LaMaster 
discuss IMSA's telecommunications technology. Weiss visited 
IMSA March 3 and presented a seminar on the reinvention and 
transformation of Ameritech. 



Illinois Business Roundtable and Chicago 
Central Area Committee. 

Whitley, a central Illinois native, is a 
resident of Batavia. 



Dr. Laurel Burton 
presented Leadership: 
The Role of Personal 
Values in Health Care 
Ethics timing the third 
annual Richard L. 
Horwitz Lecture on 
Ethics held at IMSA 
April 28. Burton is 
associate vice president 
for values and human 
resources at Rush- 
Preshyteriun-St. Luke 's 
Medical Center in 
Chicago. 




IMSA and Illinois Schools Partner for Progress 



L - 1 — he Illinois Mathematics and 

H Science Academy and 49 elemen- 
tary and secondary schools across the 
state are joining forces in a bold experi- 
ment to advance mathematics and science 
teaching and learning. 

Through its new System for Partnership 
Initiatives, IMSA has initiated 49 
'"mutually supportive, school-based 



partnerships" (see box). The themes of 
the new partnerships were determined by 
a market study and focus group research 
involving educators throughout the state. 
In March and April, planning meetings 
were held to determine the outcomes, 
activities and expectations for each of the 
six partnerships. The ends of each is the 
same — transformation of mathematics 



and science teaching and learning. The 
means by which this transformation will 
occur is grounded in "connections within 
and among mathematics, science, the arts 
and the humanities." 

Schools participating in the first group 
of partnerships were chosen based on 
their previous participation in IMSA's 
external programs. 



Partnership Initiatives 

Integrative Approaches to 
Pre-Calculus Mathematics 



New IMSA Partnerships 



Partners 



Belleville Township H.S. 
Breman Community H.S. District '. 
Bowen H.S., Chicago 
Champaign Central H.S. 
Crete-Monee H.S. 
Foreman H.S., Chicago 



Lake Park H.S., Roselle 
28, Midlothian Maine West H.S.. DesPlaines 

Proviso West H.S.. Hillside 
Quincy Senior H.S. 
Robinson H.S. 
Tampico H.S. 



Interdisciplinary Learning 
Experiences Involving 
Mathematics, Science and 
Technology 



Addison Trail H.S. 

Arlington Heights S.D. #25 

Barrington H.S. 

Batavia H.S. 

Benjamin Middle School, West Chicago 

Charleston Junior H.S. 

Coultrap Middle School. Geneva 

Elgin U-46 (K-12) 

Elmwood Park Comm. Unit S.D. #401 

Joliet Central H.S. 

Larkin H.S.. Elain 



Lemont H.S. 

Lyons Township H.S.. LaGrange 

Morrison H.S. 

Morton West H.S., Berwyn 

Oak Lawn Community H.S. 

Proviso West H.S., Hillside 

Walter R. Sundling Junior H.S., Palatine 

Riverside-Brookfield H.S.. Riverside 

Wheaton North H.S. 

Willowbrook H.S., Villa Park 



Problem-Based Learning 
Applications in Mathematics 
and Science 



Authentic Assessment in 
Mathematics and Science 



Aurora East S.D. #131 
Glenview C.C.S.D. #34 (K-12) 
Harper H.S., Chicago 
John Hersey H.S., Arlington Hts 



Evanston Township H.S. 
Glenview C.C.S.D. #34 (K-12) 
Lake Park H.S.. Roselle 
St. Charles H.S. 



North Shore Country Day School. Winnetka 
Palisades Middle School, Burr Ridge 
Warren Township H.S., Gurnee 
Wheeling Elementary S.D. #21 



Integrated Science 



Gender Issues in Mathematics 
and Science Education 



Addison Trail H.S. 
Cary-Grove H.S.. Cary 



Glenbard East H.S., Lombard 
Mt. Vernon City S.D. #80 



North Shore Country Day School. Winnetka 
YorkvilleC.U.D. #115 



T R A I L B L A Z E R S 



State, National and World 
Leadership 

Executive Director Dr. Stephanie Pace 
Marshall attended the Governor's Summit 
on Technology April 19. The statewide 
steering committee on which she served 
will make recommendations to the gover- 
nor on technology planning for education 
in Illinois. Dr. David Barr. director of 
information and communication systems, 
is serving on the working committee for 
technology and infrastructure. 

Dr. Michael Palmisano. director for 
research and design, and Dr. Marcelline 
Barron, director for integrative teaching 
and learning initiatives, presented several 
workshops at the 1994 Educators' 



Conference of the Japan Association for 
Supervision and Curriculum 
Development Apr. 23-25 in Tokyo. 

Russian teacher Julia Husen and 

Barrington High School Russian teacher 
Laura Hagist co-presented Student- 
Centered Russian I High School 
Curriculum at the Central States 
Conference of Foreign Languages 
April 21-24 in Kansas City. MO. 

German teacher John Stark recently 
was elected to the executive council of 
the American Association of Teachers of 
German (AATG). He will represent the 
Midwest region which includes Illinois 
and nine other states. 



Sue Eddins, mathematics teacher, co- 
authored "Geometric Transformations - 
Part I" and "Geometric Transformations - 
Part II" in the March and April issues of 
The Mathematics Teacher (the journal of 
the National Council of Teachers of 
Mathematics). 

Mathematics teacher Charles Hamberg 

presented Patterning, Discovering and 
Connecting Produces Better Problem 
Solvers to high school and middle school 
math teachers at the National Council of 
Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) 
Regional Conference in March in 
Bismark. ND. 

(continued on next page) 



Students Examine History through 
the Study of Literary Documents 



By Tina Yee, Student Writer 



'— I — his is the second in a two-part 
■ series reporting on innovative 
courses initiated for sophomores this 
year. Both used the IMSA Integrative 
Learning System (ILS) as a framework 
for curriculum development. The system 
is designed to foster the development of 
integrative thinkers who see connections 
within and among disciplines instead of 
subject-area knowledge in isolation. 

Instead of memorizing history through 
timelines in traditional textbooks. IMSA 
students are re-living history through 
literature and creating their own interpre- 
tations of the past. 

This year. 39 IMSA sophomores are 
making history themselves as the first 
participants in an integrative humanities 
pilot course which combines Sophomore 
English and American Studies (tradition- 
ally taught as two separate courses). 

"In history books, for the most part, the 
historian provides the interpretation." 
said Soon-Heng Lim. one of the course's 



teachers. In this course, to draw their own 
interpretation of a period in history. 
IMSA students research literary docu- 
ments to see how people from the past 
dealt with issues as they happened. 

For example, the class analyzed the 
foundations of the United States as 
expressed in Puritan literature. Poetry 
and journal entries of prominent colonial 
figures like John Winthrop provided 
students with a new view of the birth 
of a nation. 

"We were seeing what John Winthrop 
was writing. ..while actually studying 
what happened from an objective view- 
point and seeing how the accounts 
differed." student Jennifer Peterson said. 

"Through literature we have been able to 
view history, and through history, we've 
seen literature," said another student, 
Kristin Powell. "It helped me come to a 
more complete understanding of the litera- 
ture," added classmate Adam Gibson. 

Dr. Marcelline Barron, director for inte- 
grative teaching and learning initatives. 



said the class also is designed to identify 
unexamined cultural, historical, and 
personal assumptions and misconceptions. 

To examine misperceptions. for exam- 
ple, students studied indigenous societies 
in pre-Columbian North America from 
two perspectives. While studying history, 
students discovered Native American 
world views, origins, and experiences. 
While studying English, however, they 
examined native myths and oral traditions. 

In addition, the study of indigenous 
peoples also provided opportunities for 
students to explore their own views and 
identities. "They discovered how their 
specific race, class and gender back- 
grounds influenced their views of the 
past," teacher Mike Fraga said. "We are 
responding to the traditional version of 
history by ...underscoring race, class, and 
gender ...[and] showing issues addressed 
by women and others in the past," 
Lim added. 



TRALBLAZERS 




Biology teacher John Thompson 
and six ecology students present- 
ed their research on heavers and 
wolves at a general meeting of 
the Lake County Audubon 
Soviet}- March 7 in Lihertyville. 

(John Thompson ) 



Social science teacher Hilary 
Rosenthal gave two panel presentations 
at the First Midwest Institute for 
Teachers of Psychology Mar. 4-5 at the 
College of DuPage in Glen Ellyn, IL 
{High School Psychology: 
It's Tougher Than You Think and 
Advising Students From High School to 
Graduate School). 

Mathematics teacher George 
Milauskas presented Spreadsheets to 
Enhance the Underpinnings of Algebra 
and Algebra and Geometry Enhance 
Each Other - Through Interconnections 
and Problem Solving at the annual spring 
conference of the Wisconsin 
Mathematics Council Apr. 28-30 in 
Greenlake. WI. Mathematics teacher 
Rich Kick presented Using Computer 
Simulation to Stimulate Mathematical 
Investigations. 



Student and Staff 
Achievements 

Six students-Christopher Jeris and 
Francis Kim of Naperville, Venkatesh 
Natarajan of Inverness. Nicholas 
Rogers of Belleville. Neil Rubin of 
Libertyville and Stephen Wang of St. 
Charles were among the 146 nationally 
who qualified to take the USA 
Mathematical Olympiad (USAMO) exam 
which determined the U.S. team for 
international competition. Wang is one 
of six students in the nation named to 



the U.S. team. He will compete in the 
International Mathematical Olympiad in 
Hong Kong. July 8-20. 

IMSA students received a perfect team 
score on the American High School 
Mathematics Exam and had the highest 
number of students in the nation to achieve 
national honor and merit roll status. 

Senior Eva Schillace of St. Charles 
captured first place in the statewide 
annual Competition of Spoken Russian 
sponsored by the American Council of 
Teachers of Russian. As a result, she 
won an all-expense paid four-week trip to 
Russia in July. 

Sixteen IMSA students presented their 
research at the Eighth National 
Conference on Undergraduate Research 
April 14-16 at Western Michigan 
University. For the third year. IMSA 
was the only high school in the country 
invited to participate in the conference. 

Junior Gina Song of Peoria won first 
place in the '"Books Change Lives" 
contest sponsored by the Illinois Center 
for the Book and Weekly Reader 
Corporation's Read Magazine. 

Junior Michele Casey of Wheaton was 

one of only 75 high school students 
nationwide to receive a 1994 Younger 
Scholars award sponsored by the 
National Endowment for the Humanities. 
The award will support nine weeks of 
full-time research this summer at North 
Park College in Chicago. 



Fourteen IMSA seniors are among 
2.600 nationwide named as semifinalists 
in the 1994 Presidential Scholars Program. 

Senior Elise Sivilay of Elgin received 
the overall physical fitness award and 
was third runner-up in the 1994 Illinois 
Junior Miss Scholarship Program. 

IMSA's student literary magazine 
Heliotrope received an excellent rating 
for its "extremely high quality of writ- 
ing" in the 1993 Program to Recognize 
Excellence in Student Literary 
Magazines, sponsored by the National 
Council of Teachers of English. 



Alumni Achievements 

Kelly Cahill. '89. Vanderbilt 
University law school, was one of three 
students profiled in the fall issue of The 
Vanderbilt Lawyer as a John Wade Scholar. 

Mathevv Unterman. '93, Haverford 
College, was appointed a representative 
to the Haverford president's committee 
on diversity. 

Jennifer Westerfield. '90. University 
of Wyoming, received the Carl A. 
Cinnamon Award for the Outstanding 
Senior Physics Major. 

Jason Trevor. '91, California Institute 
of Technology, received the $5,000 
McLean Brothers Scholarship awarded 
annually to 12 Caltech students for 
academic excellence and leadership. 



Redbook Cites 
IMSA As One of 
"America's Best" 



LJ? or the second time, the Illinois 
Mathematics and Science Academy 
has been honored as one of "America's 
Best Schools" in a national competition 
sponsored by Redbook magazine. The 
winning schools were featured in the 
April 1994 edition. 

A total of 134 high schools were 
honored in one of nine categories. 
IMSA was one of seven winners in 
the "classroom innovation" category. 
These schools were cited for "such 
creative curriculum ideas such as flexible 
scheduling, interdisciplinary courses and 
integration of the latest technology into 
the classroom." In 1992, IMSA was one 
of 16 winners in the "academic achieve- 
ment" category. 

In addition, social science teacher 
Bill Stepien was profiled as one of 1 1 
examples of "people who make 
schools areat." 




IMSA sophomore Nina Chinosornvatana and her former teacher, Bernice Davis of 
Fairview South Elementary- School in Skokie, reunite at IMSA 's Teacher Recognition 
Day ceremony March 4. Davis was honored with the IMSA Award of Excellence, an 
award given annually to home school teachers throughout Illinois for their role in 
supporting and encouraging IMSA students ' academic and personal growth. 



r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora. Illinois 60506-1000 

Address Correction Requested 



NON PROFIT ORG. 

BULK RATE 

U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

AURORA, IL 

PERMIT NO. 129 



Although we strive for accuracy, if you see an error in your mailing label 
please call the institutional advancement office at (708) 907-5033. 







LLINOIS MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE ACADEMY 



r 1 — IIVISA ^ Pioneering Educational Community 



Volume 8 No. 4 • Summer 1994 



Distance Learning Propelled 
To New Heights 

rllinois Governor Jim Edgar had a 
big surprise in store for the Illinois 

Mathematics and Science Academy 

during his commencement address to the 

Class of 1994. 
"Today I am proud to assist the Illinois 

Mathematics and Science Academy 

fulfill its mission even better with $1.7 

million for new state-of-the-art comput- 
ers and other high-tech equipment in the 

labs and classrooms." Edgar said. 

"These funds will allow the Academy to 

continue its efforts to transform math and 

science education in Illinois through 

partnerships with other teachers, students 

and schools." 
The $1.7 million released to IMS A 

came from unused capital development j 

money appropriated for construction C 

projects on campus. The funds will be 

used to further the Academy's distance 

learning initiatives and partnerships with " M y administration is investing 75 

other schools in Illinois. Edgar said million dollars over hve y ears ,n that 

MSA's gift is part of a bisaer plan to new technology to improve our distance 

enhance telecommunications across the leamin § network." he said. "That 

entire state network will allow students in the 

farthest reaches of Illinois to share the 
great resources of other schools such as 
the Illinois Mathematics and Science 
Academy." 

Admissions Invitations 6 Immediate p | ans call for the expansion 

Alumni Reunion 5 of IMSA's Electronic Learning 

Class of 1994 Commencement 3 Community by creating transformational 

„ , „ . „,. ~ technology labs. These labs will include 

From the Executive Director 2 , , ,, ■ , , ■, 

electronic bulletin boards, electronic mail 
Greeting Card 4 anc j video-conferencing capabilities. 

IMSA Fund 1993-94 Highlights 4 The newest of these labs is the Digital 

Longitudinal Study 5 Authoring and Training (DAT) Lab. 

made possible through a $406,000 in- 
Memorial Fund 6 . . , .- c . . , .... , 

kind gitt from Amentech Illinois and a 

Summer Challenge 8 $75,000 gift from the Caterpillar 

Trnlblazers 7 Foundation. Constructed this summer. 




SIDE 



the DAT Lab will allow educators at 
IMSA and across the state to create 
products to enhance classroom learning 
using CD-ROM. laserdisc, video and 
other technological tools. 

Recent projects to be further developed 
by IMSA faculty using new equipment 
supported through the Caterpillar Faculty 
Excellence Fund include: 

• Recording and analyzing the vocal- 
izations of Rockhopper penguins using 
computers and bioacoustical software, in 
an attempt to find distinguishable patterns 
in pictorial and statistical representations. 

• Downloading real-time weather data 
via the nationwide computer network. 
INTERNET, into visualization software 
to analyze the weather data and then 
explore the physics for the weather 
phenomena such as hurricanes, tornados 
and tropical storms, (see photo) 



r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora, Illinois 60506-1000 
708/907-5000 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President 

James D. Pearson 
President 
Aurora Industries 

Vice President 

Dr. Leon Lederman, Nobel Laureate 
Director Emeritus 

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 
Pritzker Professor of Science 
Illinois Institute of Technology 

Trustees 

G. Carl Ball 
Chairman of the Board 
George J. Ball, Incorporated 

Dr. Larry Braskamp 
Dean, College of Education 
University of Illinois at Chicago 

Fred Conforti 

President 

BRK Electronics 

Dr. Sherry R. Eagle 

Superintendent 

Aurora West School District #129 

Forest Etheredge 
Retired State Senator 
Instructor, Aurora University 

Dr. Crisostomo B. Garcia 
Senior Vice President 
Director of Research 
Investment Research Company 

Sheila Griffin 

Director of Business Assessment 

Motorola Incorporated 

Cary Israel 

Executive Director 

Illinois Community College Board 

John McEachem Jr. 

President 

Wayne Circuits Incorporated 

Dr. David Mintzer 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 

Physics and Astronomy 
Northwestern University 

Dr. Sally Pancrazio 

Dean, College of Education 

Illinois State University 

Jesus Manuel Sosa 
Interdepartmental Manager 
Department of Language and 

Cultural Education 
Chicago Public Schools 

Dr. Joseph A. Spagnolo 
State Superintendent 
State Board of Education 

Dr. Richard Wagner 
Executive Director 
State Board of Higher Education 

Dr. Benjamin Williams 
principal 

Percy Julian Junior High School, Oak Park 



NOVA is published quarterly by the 
IMSA Institutional Advancement Office. 

Editor and Writer 

Brenda Buschbacher 



From the 

Executive 

Director 




Dear Members of the IMSA Community. 

ZRk s we complete our eighth year and begin our ninth. I would like to review some 
— \_ of the summer highlights at the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy. 

First, we enjoyed hosting 280 Illinois students in grades 7-10 for our Summer 
'AD'Ventures in Mathematics, Science and Technology program. For the third year, 
this program was held in two sites — at IMSA and at Eastern Illinois University. 
In addition, we enjoyed hosting 130 students from Aurora, Chicago. East St. Louis, 
Elgin, Joliet and West Chicago who were all participants in our Challenge enrichment 
program for underrepresented minority students. 

Third, the 1994 IMSA Leadership Conference was attended by 300 Illinois 
educators June 22-23 in Naperville. Participants in the IMSA/Motorola University 
"District Learning Leadership Teams" initiative to improve mathematics and science 
education explored topics including school-business partnerships, action research and 
the process of change. 

In August, the Center for Problem-Based Learning held the second annual Neison 
and Bette Harris Institutes on Problem-Based Learning in Chicago. This year, two 
separate sessions were attended by 90 educators including an introductory session and 
a session for those who participated at last yearis institute. 

As we look forward to the start of another school year, we are pleased to announce 
that Dr. Sally Ride, a physics professor at the University of California-San Diego and 
former space shuttle astronaut, will be IMSA's featured speaker for the fourth annual 
James R. Thompson Leadership Lecture on October 18. 

At this time, I would like to extend a special congratulations to 1994 IMSA graduate 
Stephen Wang and IMSA mathematics teacher Titu Andreescu. This summer, Stephen 
competed in the International Mathematical Olympiad in Hong Kong as a member of 
the U.S. team which took first place and made history with a perfect team score. 
Titu served as a coach for this award winning team and we share in his pride of this 
incredible accomplishment. 

Looking ahead to the beginning of our ninth school year, we anticipate and welcome 
the challenges that lie ahead. We will be meeting those challenges under the guidance 
of a new principal. Dr. Gregory Sinner, who arrived on July 1 from New Challenge 
School in Port Charlotte. Florida. We would like to welcome him and invite you to 
join us in our continued journey to transform mathematics and science teaching and 
learning for all Illinois students. 



"TX-CO 



^M4. 



Stephanie Pace Marshall. Ph.D. 
Executive Director 



Governor Jim Edgar Joins Class of 1994 
in Commencement Celebration 



Were we men and women of courage? 

Were we people of judgment? 

Were we people of integrity? 

And were we truly people of dedication? 

— John Fitzgerald Kennedy 

Borrowing some "words of 
wisdom" from President John F. 
Kennedy three decades ago, Illinois 
Governor Jim Edgar told members of the 
Illinois Mathematics and Science 
Academy's (IMSA) Class of 1994 that 
courage, judgment, integrity and 
dedication are all qualities they should 
strive to achieve in their daily lives. 

"You must have the courage to stand 
up for your convictions. You must devel- 
op the judgment that will lead you to the 
right decisions ... not the popular 
decisions ... as you face uncounted 
challenges and choices in your lives. 
You must never forget that your integrity 
... your moral character ... is a possession 
that should be valued and must be safe- 
guarded." Edgar said. 

On June 4. proud parents, relatives and 
friends came to Aurora's Paramount Arts 
Centre to see the 206-member class 
receive their diplomas and academic 
medallions. 

IMSA Executive Director Dr. Stephanie 
Pace Marshall noted that members of the 
Class of 1994 distinguished themselves 
in many ways other than academic 
achievements. 



"These young people raised money for 
the American Cancer Society and the 
homeless shelter in Aurora. They dedi- 
cated hundreds of hours to helping build a 
handicap accessible playground at Hope 
Wall School in Aurora." Marshall said. 

Rajesh Keswani of Roselle and Jocelyn 
Logan of Marion were the student 
speakers. Logan encouraged fellow 
classmates to be compassionate to others 
throughout their lives. 

"We should take the understanding of 
people and life that we have developed and 
use it actively to make a difference in 
ourselves and in the community. We 
should take the compassion we have 
exchanged and use it to have compassion 
for those who need it the most." Logan said. 

Following certification by Dean of 
Student Services Deborah Guffy that 
members of the Class of 1994 had met 
graduation requirements, students received 
diplomas from IMSA Board of Trustees 
President James Pearson and commence- 
ment medallions from Dr. Marshall. 




"Tuni adversity into advantage. Challenge into 
opportunity. Confrontation into cooperation. 
And your education into expertise. " Illinois 
governor Jim Edgar advised IMSA graduates. 



IMSA graduate Larry Mills 
of Chicago celebrates his 
achievement with his 
younger brother and sister. 
(Photo by Brenda Buschbacher) 




IMSA FUND BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


President 


Vice President 


James R. Thompson 


D. Chet McKee 


Chairman 


President and 


Winston & Strawn 


Chief Executive Officer 




Copley Memorial Hospital 


Executive Vice 




President 


Secretary /Treasurer 


Donald E. Nordlund 


Paul J. O'Hollaren 


Retired Chairman and 


Chairman of the Executive 


Chief Executive Officer 


Committee 


Staley Continental, Inc. 


Moose International 


Directors 


Linda Anderson* 


Steven H. Lesnik 


Civic Leader 


Chief Executive Officer 




Kemper Lesnik 


Roger E. Anderson* 


Organization 


Retired Chairman and 




Chief Executive Officer 


Gordon R. Lohman 


Continental Bank of 


President and Chief 


Chicago 


Executive Officer 




Amsted Industries. Inc. 


G. Carl Ball 




Chairman of the Board 


Robert Malott 


George J. Ball, Inc. 


Chairman of the Executive 




Committee 


Michael J. Birck 


FMC Corporation 


President 




Tellabs, Inc. 


Timothy McCormick 




Vice President 


Willard Bunn III 


Fanner's State Bank of 


Chairman and Chief 


Emden 


Executive Officer 




Banc One Illinois 


James D. Pearson 


Corporation 


President 




Aurora Industries 


Dr. Floyd English 




President and Chief 


James T. Schaefer 


Executive Officer 


Real Estate Consultant 


Andrew Corporation 






Susan S. Schanlaber 


Dr. Philip Francis 


Chairman of the Board 


Vice President 


and President 


Square D Company 


Aurora National Bank 


Clifford L. Greenwalt 


Harry C. Stonecipher 


President and Chief 


Chairman, President and 


Executive Officer 


Chief Executive Officer 


Central Illinois Public 


Sundstrand Corporation 


Service Company 






Richard Wellek 


Leon Jackson 


President and Chief 


President 


Executive Officer 


Multi-Fac Corporation 


Varlen Corporation 


John E. Jones 


William J. White 


Chairman of the Board, 


President, Cliairman and 


President and Chief 


Chief Executive Officer 


Executive Officer 


Bell & Howell Company 


CBI Industries 






Douglas Whitley 


Dr. Leon M. Lederman 


President 


Nobel Laureate 


Ameritech Illinois 


Director Emeritus 




Fermi National 




Accelerator Laboratory 




Pritzker Professor of 




Science 




Illinois Institute of 




Technology 




Director of Institutional Advancement 


Ted Parge 




•Honorary Members 





IMSA Fund Exceeds $1 Million 
for Second Year 



~~ he Illinois Mathematics and 
Science Academy Fund for 
Advancement of Education raised more 
than $1.1 million dollars for the second 
year in a row from the private sector in 
1993-94. This included a $406,000 
in-kind grant from Ameritech Illinois of 
Chicago to further the Academy's 
distance learning initiatives. 

This successful fundraising year 
pushed the Fund over the $6 million 
mark for its history. 

Among other Fund-related highlights 
in 1993-94. Ted Parge, director of institu- 
tional advancement, cited the following: 

• A three-year $159,500 grant from 
The Hitachi Foundation to support the 
development of a nationwide network 
of K-12 educators trained in problem- 
based learning. 

• A $25,000 grant from the Forest Fund 
of Libertyville for capital programs. 

• A two-year $20,000 grant from the 
Polk Brothers Foundation of Chicago to 
support the Early Involvement Program 
for minority students in Chicago. 

• A $12,000 grant from the Amoco 
Foundation of Chicago to support the 
1993-94 IMSA Challenge minority 
recruitment program. 



A $5,000 grant from Ford Motor 
Company of Chicago to support 
families of students in financial need. 
The Innovations and Initiatives 
Program for staff professional 
development which awarded mini- 
grants totaling $9,500. Employee 
contributions to the IMSA Fund 
supports this competitive program for 
the development of innovative ideas. 
A $5,000 in-kind gift from CNA 
Insurance Companies of Chicago for 
the printing of the IMSA Math Journal. 
A $5,000 in-kind equipment gift from 
Precision Scientific Inc. of Chicago 
including water baths and an incuba- 
tor/oven for the new biotech laboratory. 
IMSA Class of 1989 Alumni Reunion 
at the Holiday Inn in Naperville attend- 
ed by 70 Charter Class members and 
40 guests, (see photo opposite page) 
Poet laureate Maya Angelou presented 
the third annual James R. Thompson 
Leadership Lecture, co-sponsored by 
the City of Aurora's Youth Services 
Department. The lecture was attended 
by 1600 people including 500 students 
from Chicago and area high schools. 



IMSA Holiday Greeting Card Available 



Friends of the Illinois Mathematics and 
Science Academy can show their holiday 
spirit and support education by purchas- 
ing IMSA's holiday greeting card. 

Designed by junior Juanita Garcia of 
Chicago, sales of the card will help support 
the IMSA Fund which provides "margin of 
excellence" investments to support curricu- 
lum development projects, statewide 
external programs, minority recruitment 
programs, laboratory equipment purchases 
and special student activities. 



For a sample 
greeting card 
and information 
on how to order, 
contact the 
IMSA Office of 
Institutional 
Advancement at 
(708)907-5040. 




Charter Class Holds 5-year Reunion; 
First IMSA Graduates Excel in College 



X^T^hose involved in the Illinois 
Mathematics and Science 
Academy's start-up years will never 
orget June 10. 1989, for on that special 
lay. IMSA graduated its first senior 
lass— the Charter Class of 1989. 

Five years later, having earned their 
indergraduate degrees, these IMSA 
jioneers are pursuing graduate studies, 
vorking. traveling and starting families. 

This summer, on June 18, 70 Charter 
Ilass members and 40 guests including 
:urrent and former IMSA staff, came 
ogether to celebrate IMSA's first five- 
rear class reunion at the Holiday Inn in 
sfaperville. While some had not seen each 
)ther since graduation, one thing was 
:lear — the bond was as strong as ever. 

Much was expected of IMSA's Charter 
riass, the first group of students to 
)enefit from the People of Illinois' deci- 
iion to invest in the Illinois Mathematics 
ind Science Academy. And apparently, 
nuch has been delivered. 

Some of the results of a recently- 
■eleased Class of 1989 Longitudinal Study 
Report are shown in graphs to the right. 

Other findings include: 

■ Significantly more IMSA graduates 
najored in mathematics and science than 
:he national norm. 

• Nearly 25% of IMSA graduates 
mentioned academic honors and original 
"esearch or work as a point of pride while 
3nl\ 1 2% of the comparison students 
mentioned academic honors, and none of 
[hem cited original work. 

Only 1 1% of the comparison students 
mentioned merit-based academic recogni- 
tions earned in college, while more than 
30% of IMSA graduates included schol- 
arships, fellowships or research grants in 
their responses. 

• More than 60% of IMSA graduates 
begin college at an intellectual and ethi- 
cal level that is typically not achieved 
until about the third year of college. 

For more information on IMSA's longi- 
tudinal study program, contact Dr. Diann 
Musial at (708) 907-5070. 




IMSA Class of /V.W Officers {left to right) John Ellingson, Andy Oh and Ray Dames hove fun 
while presenting awards to fellow classmates. 

What Is The Highest Degree You Intend To Earn? 



B.A 

MA 

PhD 

Medical 

Law 

Other 

Don't Know 


— 






Ill 


5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 



Class of '89 College Majors 



Math 

Biology 

Engineering 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Comp. Science 

Pre-Med 

Geology 

Anthropology 

Pharmacy 

Poll. Science 

History 

Education 

Int. Affairs 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Philosophy 

Business 

English 

Other 




















=- 


tm- 


— 


™ 










2 4 6 8 10 


12 14 16 18 20 



Family Establishes 

Julie Y. Namkung Memorial Fund 



".../ was so impressed with her 
intelligence, enthusiasm, wonderful 
humor, and gentle nature. ..We talked 
about the notion that it is best if one 
regards life as an adventure, to be lived a 
day at a time, and that one should try to 
leant from even experience. She struck 
me as a very brave and a very sweet 
person.. .She was the sort of student whom 
an instructor notices immediately... " 

— Mark Sheldon. Ph.D. 

Julie Namkung' s instructor 

in Medical Ethics 

Northwestern University 



In May. the Illinois Mathematics and 
Science Academy community was 
saddened by the news of 1991 graduate 
Julie Namkung's untimely death. 

Julie died of natural causes on May 15, 
a week short of her 20th birthday. She 
had just completed the Honors Program 
in Medical Education (HPME) at 
Northwestern University and was looking 
forward to attending Northwestern 
University Medical School in the fall on 
a Navy scholarship. She also had planned 
to go backpacking in Europe this summer 
with former IMSA roommate and '91 



graduate Danielle Pyevich. with whom 
she remained close friends following 
graduation. Pyevich will be attending 
University of Iowa Medical School in 
the fall. 

To honor their daughter's memory. 
Mr. & Mrs. Sunny Namkung of Downers 
Grove have established the Julie Y. 
Namkung Memorial Fund at the Illinois 
Mathematics and Science Academy 
(IMSA). 

To contribute, please make checks 
payable to "IMSA Fund for 
Advancement of Education" for 
"Namkung Fund." 

The address is: IMSA Fund for 
Advancement of Education. Illinois 
Mathematics and Science Academy. 
1500 West Sullivan Road. Aurora, IL 
60506-1000. 

For more information, call 
(708) 907-5040. 



"...Julie will always be a 
favorite student of mine... " 

— Frederick D. Anderson, 
Julie's seventh grade mathematics teacher. 
Herrick Junior High School, 
Downers Grove 




Julie Y. Namkung 



IMSA Invites 9th Sophomore Class 

A total of 230 students from throughout Illinois have been invited to enroll this fall as members of the Illinois Mathematics and 
Science Academy's (IMSA) ninth sophomore class. Chosen from a total of 838 applicants from 447 schools, the invited Class of 
1997 represents 161 schools and 134 communities throughout the state. 

Students offered admissions include 1 12 girls and 1 18 boys. The ethnic distribution of the invited class is white 51.3%, Asian 
28.3%, African American 1 1.3%. Latino/Latina 6.1%, and non-reporting 3.0%. 

The average SAT mathematics and verbal scores for the invited class are 637 and 525 respectively. This compares to the national 
average for college-bound seniors of 478 and 424. 



T R A I L B L 



State, National and World 
Leadership 

Mathematics teacher Titu Andreescu 
won the 1994 Edyth May Sliffe Award 
for Distinguished High School 
Mathematics Teaching sponsored by the 
Mathematical Association of America. 

Mathematics teacher Sue Eddins and 
Dr. Peggy House of Michigan Tech 
University co-authored the chapter 
"Flexible Pathways" in the book 
Windows of Opportunities: Mathematics 
for Students with Special Needs 
published in April. 

Dr. Raymond J. Dagenais, curricu- 
lum and action research specialist, was 
elected 1994-95 president of the Illinois 
Staff Development Council (ISDC). 
The ISDC provides leadership and 
support to educators responsible for 
staff development. 

Rick Bryant, coordinator of the office 
of college counseling and career develop- 
ment, was invited and attended the 44th 
Annual Pugwash Conference on Science 
and World Affairs Towards a War-Free 
World June 30-July 6 in Crete. Greece. 

Joseph Prieto, college/career coun- 
selor, presented The College Selection 
Process at the First Annual Pre- 
Engineering Career Fair: Building the 
Future Through Engineering July 8 at 
Chicago State University. 



1994 graduate Stephen Wang 

receives the USA Mathematical 

Olympiad medal from Professor 

Donald Kreider, president of the 

Mathematical Association of 

America, during an awards 

ceremony in June. Stephen 's 

parents, Drs. Bee-Lan and 

Timothy Wang, accompanied him 

to the ceremony held in 

Washington, D.C. at the National 

Academy of Sciences for the six 

students selected for the U.S. team. 



Student and Staff 
Achievements 

Executive Director Dr. Stephanie Pace 

Marshall received the 1994 Distinguished 
Citizen Award from the Boy Scouts of 
America, Three Fires Council. She is the 
first female to receive the award for the Fox 
Valley Region since its inception in 1972. 

1994 Graduate Stephen Wang of St. 
Charles received a gold medal in the 
International Mathematical Olympiad in 
Hong Kong July 8-20. He was one of six 
students selected for the U.S. team which 
took first place and received a perfect 
team score, (see photo below). 

The poem "Sketch of a Seurat 
Afternoon" written by Cheri Long, 
instructional program aide in English, 
was published in Perspective, the 1994 
anthology of The Poet's Guild in 
Washington, D.C. 

Junior Sarah Song of Northbrook was 

one of 350 students nationwide chosen to 
attend the National Young Leaders 
Conference July 3- 1 3 in Washington, D.C. 

IMSA senior Michele Casey of 

Wheaton participated in Johns Hopkins 
University's 1 994 Center for Talented 
Youth Summer Experience Program. 



From July 1 1-22, she conducted 
research on the effects of a housing 
development on groundwater pollution. 

Seniors Emily Schafer of Glen Ellyn 
and Masum Momaya of Elgin presented 
at the First Annual Student Research 
Symposium of the National Consortium 
for Specialized Secondary Schools of 
Mathematics, Science and Technology. 
The symposium was held June 9-12 at 
Carnegie Mellon University in 
Pittsburgh, P.A. 



Debby Shepard. '91, University of 
Illinois, received the 1994-95 Robert C. 
MacClinchie Scholarship for outstanding 
engineering students. Students are 
selected based on academic merit and 
leadership in campus activities. 

Timothy Bhattacharyya, '90. 
Northwestern University, received a full 
academic scholarship for the seven-year 
M.D./P.h.D. program at Washington 
University. 

Erin Lott, '92, Denison University, 
was selected to serve as a member of the 
University's August Orientation Staff for 
new students and parents. Lott will 
answer questions, serve on student panels 
and act as a group leader. 





Students in IMSA 's 1994 Summer 
Challenge Program conduct 
laboratory experiments as part of 
their role as environmental 
consultants. As consultants, 
students prepared a recommenda- 
tion about the placement of a 
second landfill in the City of 
Geneva. From July 17-22, 
130 students participated in this 
enrichment program for underrep- 
resented minority students. 



^IMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora. Illinois 60506-1000 



NONPROFIT ORG. 

BULK RATE 

U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

AURORA, IL 

PERMIT NO. 129 



Address Correction Requested 



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please call the institutional advancement office at (708) 907-5033.