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Full text of "Nova (Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy)"

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ILLINOIS MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE ACADEMY 



r'-^IIVI^A '^ Pi()ncerini> Ecliicalioiuil Coiiumiiiity 



Volume 14 No. 1 • Winter 2000 



IMSA-Chicago Public Schools 
Consortium to Prepare Quality Teachers 

Speaker Hastert, Congressman Blagojevich Help Secure $4 Million Grant 



On December 20, Speaker of 
the House Dennis Hastert, 
U.S. Representative Rod Blagojevich, 
Chicago Public Schools CEO Paul Vallas 
and IMSA President Dr. Stephanie Pace 
Marshall announced the establishment of 
a unique partnership designed to increase 
the number of well qualified teachers for 
the 21st Centui7. Special emphasis will 
be given to the high needs areas of mathe- 
matics, science and technology, and urban 
and rural settings. 

At a press conference 
held in the Tellabs 
Studio for Professional 
Development at IMS.A. 
Speaker Hasten said the 
IMSA-Chicago Public - ' 

Schools (CPS) 



partnership was an important step in 
ensuring evei7 student a good education. 

■"We need to put the best teacher in 
every classroom in this state and in this 
nation," Hasteil said. "Eveiy kid in this 
country deserves a good school and a 
good learning experience." 

The three components of the 
Consortium include: 

OJointly, the CPS and IMSA will 
plan, develop, implement and disseminate 
model programs to address the critical 
needs of recruitment, preparation and 
retention of quality teachers in Chicago 
and other urban centers: 

©The CPS will develop programs 
to help launch the National Teaching 
Academy of Chicago 
(in Chicago): 
©IMSA will 
develop programs 
to help launch the 
Institute for the 
Ad\ancement 
and Renewal 
of Learning 




Speaker dj the House 
Dennis Hastert visited 
IMSA December 20. 
IW9 to announce a 
'1.7 million gift front 
the U.S. Department 
of Edncation. The grant 
Mill he used to help 
uh rccise the number of 
\iell qualified teachers 
for the 21st century. 
Pholo b\ Rich Malec Photography 



and Teaching in Mathematics, Science 
and Technology (on IMSA's campus). 

Initial funding includes a $4 million 
grant from the U.S. Department of 
Education: the CPS will receive 
$2.3 million and IMSA will receive 
$1.7 million. Public and private sector 
investments also will be sought. 

Among other things, TTie Consortium will: 

• Attract exceptional teachers to teach 
in Chicago and other areas of Illinois 

" Provide ongoing professional 

development and mentoring 
'• Create alteniati\'e pathways to 

teacher licensure 

• Recruit some of Illinois' best and 
brightest high school and college 
students to explore careers in teaching 

• Support career teachers in their 
pursuit of advanced certification 
through the National Board of 
Professional Teaching Standards 
"Already the National Commission 

on Teaching and America's Future has 
reported that 50,000 unqualified teachers 
have been hired annually on an emergency 
basis to meet this growing demand," 

(Continued on page 8) 



SIDE 



Center® IMSA Activities 5 

From the President 2 

Great Minds Program/Calendar 3 

IMSA Open House 7 

News in Brief 7 

Real Science CD-ROM 4 

Women Leaders Luncheon 6 



r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora. Illinois 60506-1000 
630/907-5000 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Chairman 

John H. McEachem Jr. 

President 

Wayne Circuits Incorporated 

Vice-Chairman 

Sheila MB Griffin 
Vice President and Director 
Strategic Marketing Office 
Motorola Incorporated 

Trustees 

Dr. Joseph Cipfl 

Executive Director 

Illinois Community College Board 

Fred Conforti 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Pittway Systems Technology Group 

Dr. Sherry R. Eagle 

Superintendent 

Aurora West School District #129 

Dr. Forest Etheredge 

Dean 

School of Business and Professional Studies 

Aurora University 

Steve Isoye 

Science Department Chairperson 

Highland Park High School 

Dr. Glenn "Max" McGee 

State Superintendent 

Illinois State Board of Education 

Dr. Luis Nunez 

Chemist 

Separation Science and Technology Section 

Argonne National Laboratory 

James D. Pearson 

President 

Aurora Metals Division L.L.C. 

Dr. Marsha R. Rosner 

Professor 

The Ben May Institute for Cancer Research 

The University of Chicago 

Dr. Keith Sanders 
Executive Director 
Illinois Board of Higher Education 

Jesus Manuel Sosa 

Administrator 

Chicago Public Schools. Region One 

Sharon Tenhouse 

Teacher and Parent Educator 

Community Unit School District #2 (Liberty. IL) 

Dr. Alfonzo Thurman 
Dean. College of Education 
Northern Illinois University 

Dr. Michael S. Turner 

Department Chairman 

Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics 

The University of Chicago 



President 

Dr. Stephar 



; Pace Marshall 



NOVA is published three times a year by the 
IMSA Office of Institutional Advancement 
and Public Policy. 

Send comments or questions to: 
Editor and Writer 

Brcnda Buschbacher 
brenda{s imsaedu 



From the President 



Dear IMSA shareholders. 




V 



/ . / elcome to the new millennium! It is indeed exciting to be a part of history 
\_ as we celebrate the new century. At the Illinois Mathematics and Science 



Academy, I am pleased to report many new and exciting initiatives for the beginning 
of the year 2000. Let me cite a few highlights: 

First, we are very proud to announce that two IMSA faculty members. Mathematics 
teacher Susan Eddins and Biology teacher Dr. Donald Dosch, successfully completed 
all of the requirements for certification with the National Board of Professional 
Teaching Standards (NBPTS). This is a rigorous and competitive national certification 
process that credentials successful candidates as Master Teachers. The success rate is 
less than 50% of those applying so we congratulate and celebrate their success. 

As noted in the cover story, we are excited to announce the formation of a unique 
partnership between IMSA and the Chicago Public Schools, designed to increase 
the number of well qualified teachers for this new century. The partnership, the 
Consortium for the Advancement of Teaching, was announced at a special press 
conference at IMSA by Speaker of the House Dennis Hasten, U.S. Representative Rod 
Blagojevich and Chicago Public Schools CEO Paul Vallas. We are extremely excited 
about the impact that this unique partnership can make and hope that it can serve as 
a model to be replicated nationwide. 

From March 1-4. we will host the 13"' Annual Professional Conference of the 
National Consortium for Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science 
and Technology (NCSSSMST). IMSA is a founding member of the Consortium so 
we are especially pleased to host the event which will bring together approximately 
300 educators from around the country. 

Keynote speeches will be presented by Robert W. Galvin, chairman of the 
executive committee. Motorola. Inc.. Dr. Paul Sereno. world-renowned paleontologist 
and dinosaur hunter, and Benjamin Zander, conductor of the Boston Philharmonic 
Orchestra. We are delighted to have the Motorola Foundation as our exclusive 
corporate sponsor. You can visit our website at www.imsa.edu/ncsssmst/ for 
additional conference information. 

Finally, on April 4 IMSA will be hosting the Annual Horwitz Lecture on Ethics 
featuring keynote speaker Rabbi Lawrence Kushner. Rabbi Kushner. who will 
present Invisible Lines of Connection: Social Responsibi!ir\- and Cowardice, has 
served as rabbi of Congregation Beth El in Sudbury, Massachusetts for the past 27 
years and is widely regarded as one of the most creative religious writers in America. 

As the NCSSSMST conference host this year. IMSA has chosen the theme 
Liberating Goodness and Genius for the World. What greater calling can you imagine? 
As we enter into a new century, we hope you will join us in our quest to liberate the 
soodness and senius of all children. 



Sincerelv, 



p^^:>€z5tA»*vc/^ 



/yUUC^-jLaU^C^ 



Stephanie Pace Marshall, Ph.D 
President 



1999-2000 IMSA Great Minds 
Program Draws Sold-Out Crowds 

Bill Kurtis One of Headline Speakers 




rhe IMSA Great Minds Program, 
now in its second yeai". got off to a 
successful start in 1999 and most recently 
featured some of the prominent figures in 
national print and television media. 
On December 1. 1999. Malcolm 
Browne, New York Times Senior Writer. 
Paula Apsell. Executive Producer of the 
award-winning PBS television series 
NOVA, and Bill Kurtis (pictured). 
E.xecutive Producer and host of the 
award-winning The New Explorers and 



Investigative Reports with Bill Kurtis 
\isited IMSA to present the Great Minds 
Program dialogue Science and the Media. 

During the dialogue, which was 
attended by more than 430 middle and 
high school students and teachers from 
throughout the Chicagoland area, the 
three panelists discussed how media 
coverage influences the public percep- 
tion of science, and the challenges media 
face in communicating science in an 
informative yet interesting way. The 



Spring 2000 Great Minds Program Calendar of Events 



1/06/00 The Science and Politics 
of Climate Change 

Nobel Laureate 
Dr. Mario Molina 

\l2Am Frontiers of 

Educational Technology 

Roger Schank. Robert 
Tinker. Louis Gomez, 
Alan November 

2/09/nn Stories of a Scientist- 

Physicists Dr. Leon Lederman 
& Dr. Edward "Rocky"' Kolb 



2/23/00 Science, Law & Technology 

Dr. Marsha Rosner and 
Attorney Charles Laff 

4/t)4/0() Richard L. Horwitz 
Lecture on Ethics 

Rabbi Lawrence Kushner 

4/ 1 2/00 Science Education 
in the 21st Century 

Ronald Anderson. Rodger 
Bybee. George "Pinkey"" 
Nelson. Lynn Haeffele. 
Jane Kahle. Ronald Gidwitz 
and Norman Lederman 



panelists also answered questions from 
the audience such as "how does the 
media decide what science stories to 
report'" . "how does the media educate 
themselves about science?," and "how 
does the media separate science from 
science fiction?" 

Earlier in the year iin October 12. 
IMSA Resident Scholar and Nobel 
Laureate Dr. Leon Lederman presented 
the Great Minds Program community 
lecture Science in the 21st Century: Issues 
and Predictions. The evening lecture, 
vv hich was open to the public, was 
attended by approximately 250 guests. 

On October 13. Dr Lederman and 
Dr. Edward "Rocky" Kolb. professor 
of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the 
L'niversity of Chicago and Member of 
the NASA Fennilab Astrophysics 
Group, presented the dialogue Stories 
of a Scientist. The dialogue was filled 
to capacity by middle and high school 
students and educators. Because of the 
osei'whelming response, an encore perfor- 
mance is being held February 9. 2000. 

Watch for future stories in NOVA 
on the following Great Minds Program 
Events listed in the chart at lower left. 

For more information on a 
particular event, contact Dr. Judy 
Scheppler at (630) 907-5899 or visit 
the Great Minds Program website at 
webdb.irnsa.edu/ereatminds. 




Dr. Ethicinl "Roikx" Kalh talk.', with .stiiJeiil.s 
follcnviiii; the ilialoguc. Stories of a Scientist 
on October 13. IW9. 



IMSA FUND BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


Chairman 


President 


James R. Thompson 


Michael J. Birck 


Chairman of the 


President and CEO 


Execuiive Committee 


Tellabs, Inc. 


Winston & Straw n 






Vice President 


Vice President 


William J. While 


Robert Malotl 


Professor 


Retireii Chairman 


Northwestern University 


FMC Corporation 






SecretarjTTreasu re r 




Susan S. Schanlaber 




President 




The Landmark Group. Inc. 


Directors 


G. Carl Ball 


Richard Lumpkin 


President 


Chaimmn and CEO 


Ball Foundation 


Consolidated 




Communications, Inc. 


G. Thomas Castino 




President and CEO 


Robert M. Malchione 


Underwriters Laboratories, 


Vice President 


Inc. 


The Boston Consulting 




Group. Inc. 


Dr. Floyd English 




President and CEO 


Timothy McCormick 


Andrew Corporation 


Vice President 




Farmer's State Bank 


Larry Flynn 


of Emden 


Major Accounts Vice 




President 


Andrew M. Oh 


Nortel 


Research Analyst 




Stifel. Nicolaus and Co. 


Peter Fox 




Senior Managing Director 


James D. Pearson 


Bear Steams and Company 


President 




Aurora Metals Division 


Dr Philip Francis 


L.L.C. 


President 




Mascon Management 


James T. Schaefer 


Consulting 


Real Estate Consultant 


David J. Geary 


Honey Jacobs Skinner 


Vice President-North America 


Partner 


Lucent Technologies 


Sidley & Austin 


Joanne Hansen 


WilhamA. VanSanten 


President 


Partner 


Fumas Foundation. Inc. 


Wood. Phillips. VanSanten. 




Clark and Mortimer 


Leon Jackson 




President 


Joset Wright 


Multi-Fac Corporation 


President 




Ameritech Illinois 


James Lancaster 




Retired Executive 


Linda Anderson* 


Vice President 


C/i7c Leader 


First Chicago NED Corp. 






Roger E. Anderson* 


Steven H. Lesnik 


Retired Chainnan and CEO 


CEO 


Continental Bank of 


Kemper Lesnik 


Chicago 


Organization 




Gordon R. Lohman 




Retired Chairman 




and CEO 




Amsted Industries, Inc. 





Vice-president for Institutional Advancement 
CEO, IMSA Fund 

Ted Parge 

* Honorary Members 



"Printed by Authority of the State of Illinois, 
6500. 01/00, Purchase Order No. 200854." 



The Center@IMSA Programs 

IMSA Students Share Love of Science 
through the Real Science CD-ROM 

Slumnim Dohsiin 
'02 inten'iews 
Dr. Ledennan for 
the Real Science 
CD-ROM at the 
Ledennan Center. 



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IMSA students have developed the 
second issue of Reed Science, an 
interactive CD-ROM designed for upper 
elementary school students (grades 3-5). 
hi it, students can learn everything from 
Atoms to Rockets. 

The 1 999 issue was developed 
during the 1998-99 school year by 
students involved in the Real Science 
club, headed by Editors Jorge Reyes "99 
(Chicago). Janessa Stream "99 
(Ro.'isville). Hari Phatak "99 (Wilmette} 
and Neha Narula "99 (Barringion). 
More than 1200 elementary schools 
were mailed surveys in 1998 about 
Real Science topic development: 350 
schools returned the survey and as a result 
received a free Real Science CD-ROM 
this fall. The concept and first issue of 
Real Science was developed in 1995 by 
IMSA students Matt Brody "95 (Highland 
Park) and Ai-vind Sekar '95 (Danville). 

Huong Banh, ESL/Computer Teacher 
from Willard Elementary in Evanston, is 
pleased with the 1999 issue and gives it 
high marks for ease of use and content. 
Students use the CD-ROM individually 
in the computer lab and in a classroom 
setting, "ifs great. My students really 
enjoy this," Huong said. Topics in the 
Real Science "99 issue include: 



Aerodynamics, Atoms. Cell City, 
Polymers, Plutonium and Rockets. 
Interviews with Nobel Laureate Dr. 
Leon Ledernian and Captain James 
Lovell are also included. The printing of 
Real Science '99 CD- ROMS and book- 
lets was donated by Mr. John Benson of 
Beta Graphics Corporation in Aurora. 

Real Science 2000 is currently under 
development and will contain articles to 
address curriculum areas needing more 
information, technology or resources as 
identified in the fall '98 survey. Some of 
the topics for the 2000 issue include: 
Seasons. Tropical Rainforests. The Lives 
of Stars. Parts of Plants, Our Solar 
System and "On the Road at Feniiilab." 

Editois for Real Science 2000 include: 
Jonathan Berger "00 (Wayne). Ashlee 
Riddle '00 (Elgin), Denny Tu '00 
(NapeiTille). Cindy Xi '01 (Napennlle) 
and Margai-et Wat '01 (NapeiTille). Senior 
Editor Ashlee Riddle has this to say about 
her experience, "Real Science has been a 
wonderful way for IMSA students to 
acquire new writing and multimedia 
skills, and to find a way to reach out to 
the young, curious minds of Illinois' chil- 
dren." Real Science 2000 will be mailed 
out to participating Chicagoland elemen- 
tai7 schools in May. 2000. 



^rvices for Illinois Students & Teachers 



Registration Now Open for Programs of The Center@IIVISA 



'I'liis spring and snnimer. llie Illinois 
Mathematics and Science Academy will 
once again fill its classrooms with students 
and teachers from throughout Illinois. For 
the following opportunities, student ages 
are specified; professional development 
experiences are most appropriate for 
middle and high school teachers. 

Call The Ci'it!cr@IMSA at (630) 
907-5^56 III- email center@imsa.edu 
for more detailed information <m these 
or other programs available, or to 
register for the following professional 
developmeni programs: 



FOR TEACHERS 



Spring 2000 

Experiences in Mathematics 

2/.^ So, What is Matheiuatica? 

2/16 Paper, Pencil or 

Graphing Calculator? 

2/16 Patterning, 

Discoveries, Connections 

2/23 My Students Have /7-<V9'v. 
\'ow What Do I Do? 

Reform Based Calculus: 

A Series of 3 Individual Workshops 

(participate in one or all three) 
3/8 Workshop I: 

Differential Equations 
Fall Workshop II: Derivatives 
Fall Workshop III: Integrals 

3/ 1 4 Assessing What Counts 

4/ 1 4 Mathematical Investigations 

(IMSA's curriculum) 

Summer 2000 

Experiences in Mathematics 

and other Areas 

6/ 1 6 or How to Apply for Teaching 
Fall Awards or Master Teacher 
Certification 

6/12-15 Patterning, Discoveries, 
Connections 

6/26-30 C++ Practicum 

7/10-12 T3 PCALC-CALC Seminar 

7/13-14 Mathematica in the Classroom 

(no previous experience reipiired) 



7/10-21 Illinois Prohlem-Iiased 

Learning Network Summer 
Institute {Sunimer Sleuths) 

7/10-14 Biotechnology in the Classroom 

8/7- 1 ( ) Harris Institute for Introduction 
to Problem-Based Learning 

(Morton Arboretum location) 

In addition to the above scheduled 
professional development programs. 
The Center@lMSA is also coordinating 
Project Keystone, funded by the ISBE 
Scientific Literacy Program. A series 
of two-day Institutes offered in six loca- 
tions across Illinois immerses teachers 
in strategies for curriculum alignment 
with Illinois Learning Standards while 
addressing implications of international 
research fmdings relating to curriculum 
and instruction. 

Numerous learning opportunities in 
other areas will also be available thi.s 
spring and summer including: 

• Standards-based Education 

curriculum materials evaluation, 
unburdening the curriculum, etc. 

• Science Content and Pedagogy 

physical ami earth science concepts 
and strinegies. scientific inquiry, etc. 

• Strategies for Learning: 

Technology - IMSA Internet Toolkit, 
locating/evalualing/iutegraling infonua- 
tion resources, online opportunities, etc 




Problem-based learning-specific 

/() special education, gifted, culiim 
research, cognitive cocuhing. 
mcasurenicn! striUcgies and tools, etc. 

For more information on dates and 
locations, contact The Center&IMSA 
at (630)907-59.56 or email center@imsa.edu 
oi check our web.site: www.imsa.edii/center 
(some customizing opportunities are also 
available to meet your specific district's 
or school's needs; please call us). 

Registration for summer programs for 
Illinois students begins March I. 2000. 
Call the IMSA Kids Institute at (630) 
907-5041 or email klong@imsa.edu to 
be placed on the nuuling list for the 
following progrcuns. 



FOR STUDENTS 



Science Explorers 

6n9-2} Session I 

7/3 1 -8/4 Session II 

For students entering 4-6lh grades 

6/26-30 Math Explorers 

For students entering 7th and 8th grades 

7/17-20 Summer Sleuths 

For students enternig 7-9th grades 

Explorations in Biotechnology 

6n9-M) Session I 

7/\l-2» Session II 

For high school science students 



Elvii! Harms. Jr. 
Fennilab Engineering 
Physicist, gives a 
tour (if the Antipriiton 
Siiiirce enclosure to 
Rt'iil Science inler- 
\ic\\'cr .Sliiiiiiitui 
l)ohs,m V2. 



IMSA Fund Hosts Luncheon for Women Leaders 



Focus on Female 
student Research 
and Preparing 
Tomorrow's 
Workforce 



.^ 




IMSA senior Mita Patel presents lite 
findings of her research on heart 
disease conducted at Loyola University 
Medical Center 

(At rii;htl IMSA senior Danielle Neuell 
discusses education with event co-chair 
Honey Jacobs Skinner (left) and luncheon 
guest Melanie Hununer president of 
Hummer Financial Advisory Sen'ices, 
Inc. in Chicago. 



everal female IMSA students 
V >r^,# recently had the unique opportu- 
nity of discussing their passion for 
inquiry and research at a luncheon held 
for Chicago area women leaders. 

The luncheon, sponsored by the IMSA 
Fund for Advancement of Education, 
was held to raise awareness about IMSA 
and its programs, and more specifically, 
to showcase the unique learning opportu- 
nities available for female students. The 
event was co-chaired by IMSA Finid 
Board Member Honey Jacobs Skinner 
and Former First Lady of Illinois Jayne 
Carr Thompson. In welcoming the 
guests. Thompson spoke about the 
importance of preparing tomorrow's 
women leaders. 

"Although more women are beginning 
to pursue careers in mathematics, 
science and technology, women are still 
underrepresented in these fields." 
Thompson said. "This must change, for 
the sake of women and for the sake of 
business and society who simply need 
more talented women to provide exper- 
tise and leadership in these fields which 
are so important to future economic 
development and quality of life in our 
state, nation and world." 



During the luncheon, women leaders 
from the corporate, education and private 
sectors who have an interest in exem- 
plary educational programs heard 
research presentations by IMSA seniors 
Alexa Bisinger of Naperville and Mita 
Patel of Mattoon. Both Alexa and Mita 
participate in mentorship at IMSA. and 
have made substantive contributions to 
their respective fields of research. 

"Through their research. IMSA 
students" substantive contributions are 
making the world better; from discovering 
a new technique in immunology to identi- 
fying better intervention programs for 
abused children, from identifying why 
prostheses disintegrate in the human body 
to creating mathematical formulas to 
predict the shelf life of products." said 
Mentorship Coordinator Dr. Peggy 
Connolly. "Thanks to the support of 
people like you. IMSA students are trans- 
forming human thought and experience." 

Other IMSA student participants at the 
event included IMSA seniors Annie 
Vankata Naria of Springfield. Ashlee 
Riddle of Elgin. Donielle Newell of 
Naperville and Grace Yang of Chicago. 
IMSA student Kathleen King of St. 
Charles served as the pianist for the event. 




E W S 



I N 



BRIEF 



Professional Contributions 

Recent examples include: 

President Dr. Stephanie Pace 
Marshall cd-produccd the play 2L\i 
Centuiy Learning: Education on Trial 
presented during the annual State of the 
World Forum in San Francisco. CA. The 
play was written hy I MSA Social Science 
teacher Dr Robert Kiely and Novice 
Network Administrator Anthony DiSanlo. 

Mathematics teacher Susan Eddins 
and biology teacher Dr. Donald Dosch 
recently earned certification with the 
National Board for Professional 
Teaching Standards. The NBPTS desig- 
nation is a rigorous and competitive 
national certification process that creden- 
tials successful candidates as Master 
Teachers. Eddins also recently presented 
Good Tasks + Discourse = Matheniatical 
Connections at the National Council of 
Teachers of Mathematics Western 
Regional Conference. 

Mathematics teacher Don Porzio 
presented Using Tl-92 Geonietiy 
to Create Geometric Models for 
Optimization Problems at the 1 2th 
Annual International Conference on 
Technology in Collegiate Mathematics. 

Director of Enrollment Services 
Dr. LuAnn Smith co-presented 
Advising and Recruiting the Young 
Intellectual at the 55th National 
Conference of the National Association 
for College Admission Counseling. 

Dr. Susan L.S. Bisinger, coordinator 
for strategic initiatives, co-presented 
Effective Staff Development in 20 
Minutes at the annual conference of 
the National Staff Development Council. 

8 faculty and staff members presented 
at the 5 1st Annual Meeting of the Illinois 
Council of Teachers of Mathematics. 

Deb Gerdes. professional development 
and research coordinator, co-presented 
Investigation II: Problem-based Learning 
with the Centers for Disease Control at 
the Fall Forum Pre-conference for the 
Coalition of Es.sential Schools. Classroom 
teachers were engaged in a one-day PEL 
immersion experience organized around 
data from the CDC. 

Karen Meyer, research associate, 
and Dr. Steve Cordogan. coordinator 
of research and evaluation, presented a 
research paper on SAT Scores and the 



Student Descriptive Questionnaire at the 
29th Annual Conference of the Illinois 
Association for Institutional Research. 
In addition. Cordogan and Research 
Specialist Jay Thomas presented a 
research paper on Web-based Sun-eys 
in Institutional Rcseai\h and Evcdiiation. 

Dr. Ray Dagenais. coordinator of 
strategic science initiatives, co-authored 
the chapter The Emeritus Teacher in the 
book LZ/i? Cycle of the Career Teacher. 
In addition. Dagenais" past publication 
on the subject of Mentoring was 
referenced in another chapter titled 
The Apprentice Teacher. 

Dr. David Barr. director of 
Learning-at-a-Distance Programs, 
presented Searching the Internet: 
Tools/Techniques at the Illinois 
Education and Technology Conference. 

Tracey Rosenberg, instructional 
program assistant in English, was 
awarded a Fulbright grant to Romania for 
the 1999-2000 school year. The Fulbright 
Program is designed to ""increase mutual 
understanding between the people of 
the United States and the people of 
other countries." Rosenberg is based in 
Bucharest, Romania, and is researching 
and writing a novel about Jewish 
dissidents during the communist era. 

Charter Librarian and Archivist 
Martha CJuarin assisted Peoria High 
School (PHS) for two days with the 
preservation of school and community 
documents. PHS was founded in 1856 
and is the oldest high school in Illinois. 
Guarin studied archival preservation at the 
National Archives in Washington, D.C. 

Student Achievements 

Recent examples include: 

Ahkil Narang of Crystal Lake and 
Samir Meghani of Naperville were 
named two of only 10 Midwestern 
Regional Finalists in the national 
Siemens-Westinghouse Science & 
Technology Competition. The competi- 
tion, in its inaugural year, was open to 
indiv iduals or teams of high school 
students who develop independent 
research projects in the physical or 
biological sciences, or mathematics. 
In addition, Jason Chang of Glenview 
was named a regional semitlnalist in the 
competition. 



Heidi Kim of Flossmoor ( 1999 gradu- 
ate) co-authored the paper /I role for 
hcpatocMc growth factor during earlv 
post-implantiUum growth of the placental 
lineage to be published in the medical 
journal. Biology of Reproduction. 

Loretta Li of Naperville was one of 50 
students selected from U.S. high schools 
to attend the 16th annual Research 
Science Institute at the Massachu.setts 
Institute of Technology. During the six- 
week session, Loretta attended classroom 
instruction and research activities on the 
MIT campus in the summer 

Andrea Llenos of Carol Stream 
received a perfect score of 36 on the ACT 
exam. She was one of only 60 students 
nationwide to receive a perfect score. 

43 IMSA seniors qualified as 
semifinalists m the 2000 National Merit 
Scholarship Corporation competition. 
Three qualified as semifinalists in the 
2000 National Achievement Scholarship 
Program and two students qualified as 
finalists in the 2000 National Hispanic 
Recognition Program. 

40 IMSA students attended the 
workshop Don 7 Put The Fhuues Out: 
A Life in the Arts by nationally recog- 
nized functional potter Steven Hill at 
Waubonsee Community College. 




FermiUih Direct, >r .Muhae! Wilhcrcll in:^hl) 
gets a tiiur of the new Grainger Center for 
Imagiiuition and Inquiiy during the IMSA 
Open House. Also pictured are Dr Judy 
Schepplen IMSA Coordinator of Student 
Impun/Director of the Grainger Center, and 
IMSA Resident Scholar Dr Leon Ledcnnon. 
The Open House was held Dec. 7 and was 
ullendecl h\ 200 i;ues/s. 



Consortium (continued fi-om cover) 

Blagojevich said. "We cannot afford to 
ignore tiiis disturbing trend." 

The Institute 

(envisioned for IMSA 's campus) 

The Institute is envisioned to be an inter- 
active, intergenerational learning and 
teaching laboratory/center in mathematics, 
science and technology for Illinois teach- 
ers, educational leaders, policymakers 
and students. It will be clo.sely linked to 
IMSA's pioneering academic/residential 
program for Illinois students and will build 
on and significantly scale up programs and 
services for Illinois educators, policymak- 
ers and students currently offered by The 
Center® IMSA (see pp. 4-5). 

Marshall thanked Hastert for his 
leadership in helping to create this part- 
nership. "We believe this partnership and 
The Institute to be designed on IMSA's 
campus will enable us to fulfill in an 
innovative and bold manner, our legisla- 
tive mandate to the teachers and school 
systems of the State of Illinois," 
Marshall said. 

National Teaching Academy (Chicago) 
The National Teaching Academy is 
a Pre K-8 Chicago Public Elementary 
School and a 9-12 Chicago Public High 
School that combines classroom instruc- 
tion and student learning with teacher 
recruitment and preparation. 




pictured l-lo-r: Chicaga Public Sclu«,ls CEO Paul Vallas: IMSA Vice Presuleiu for Pulylic Policy 
and Service Dr Micliael Pcdmisano; Diane Grigsby Jackson, Chief of Staff to Paul Vallas; IMSA 
President Dr. Stephanie Pace Marshall: Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert: U.S. Rep. Rod 
Blagojevich: Board of Trustees Chairman John McEachern. Jr 



Vallas said IMSA will play an active 
role in the training of teachers who attend 
the National Teaching Academy. 

"In partnering with IMSA. our mentor 
(master) teachers will go through various 
training programs at IMSA .so that we 
can take their skills up to another level," 
Vallas said. 

IMSA mathematics teachers Sue 
Eddins, who was recently certified by the 
National Board of Professional Teaching 
Standards and serves on the board of the 



National Council for Teachers of 
Mathematics, said the focus on teacher 
recruitment, preparation and retention 
makes the IMSA-CPS partnership 
very compelling. 

"It is incredibly exciting to know that 
IMSA will be working on the grassroots 
level of a unique partnership that can have 
such as significant impact on teaching and 
student performance nationwide, she said." 



r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1 500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora. Illinois 60506-1000 



NON PROFIT ORG. 

U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

AURORA, IL 

PERMIT NO. 129 



Address Correction Requested 



Visit us on the World Wide Web! 
http:/Av\v\v.imsa.edu/ 



Although we strive for accuracy, 
if you see an error in yinir mailing 
label please call the Office of 
Institutional Advancement and 
Public Policy at (630) 907-5033. 



R^ 



W 



ILLINOIS MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE ACADEMY 



r'-^IIVI jA ^ Pioneering Educational Coiiiniunity 



Volume 14 No. 2 • Spring 20(){) 



IMSA Hosts National Education Conference 

Theme: Liberating Goodness and Genius for the World 



Z. pproximately 300 educators from 
— 1_ around the country gathered at 
the Illinois Mathematics and Science 
Academy March 2-4 for the 13th Annual 
Professional Conference of the National 
Consortium for Specialized Secondary 
Schools of Mathematics, Science and 
Technology (NCSSSMST). IMSA is a 
founding member of the Consortium. 

The conference, sponsored by a gener- 
ous contribution from the Motorola 
Foundation, featured keynote speakers 
Robert Galvin, chairman of the executive 
committee. Motorola, Inc.: Dr. Paul 
Sereno. professor at The University of 
Chicago and world-renowned paleontol- 

Di: Paul Sereno. i>rofessor at 
The University of Chicago 




ogist and dinosaur hunter; and Benjamin 
Zander, conductor of the Boston 
Philhannonic Orchestra {see photos inset). 

Educators attended presentations 
and panel discussions by IMSA faculty 
and staff and educators from other 
Consortium schools in tlve strands — 
Student Research and Inquii7. Student 
Leadership Development. Under- 
represented/Underserved Populations, 
Professional Development, and Public 
Policy for Mathematics, Science and 
Technology Education. 

Conference Program Coordinator 
Dr. Susan Bisinger said she was 
extremely pleased with the quality of 
programming for this year's conference. 

■"The individual break-out sessions 
covered a breadth of topics that engaged 
all the participants," Bisinger said. "The 
presenters did a terrific job!" (see page 3 
for liighliglits of these sessions.) 

Steve Howard, mathematics teacher 
at Central Virginia Governor's School, 
was especially impressed with the 
keynote speakers. "The speakers you had 
were FABULOUS! They could have 
been a conference all by themselves!" 

The most interactive keynote presen- 
tation was given by Zander, whose 
transformational, motivational and inspi- 
rational speech Leadership. Teamwork, 
Creativity. Relationship, Partnership 
and tlie Liberation of the Human Spirit 
featured a German sing-a-long, an 
impromptu cello performance and a 
lesson in how to transform the "ordinary" 
song "Happy Birthday to You" into 
something "extraordinary." 

"The role of classical music is to take 
people out of the box of ordinary life . . . 
and take people into the world of possi- 

(Continiied on page .^) 




Robert Calvin, chainnan of the exeeulivi 
committee. Motorola. Inc. 




Benjamin Zander, conductor Boston 
Philhannonic Orchestra 



AAAS Research Conference 6 

From an IMSA Partner in Education 2 

Great Minds Program 5 

Horwitz Lecture on Ethics 4 

National Education Conference 3 

News in Brief 7 

Smithsonian Network 8 

Summer Proaram Resistralion 8 



r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora. Illinois 60506-1000 
630/907-5000 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Chairman 

John H. McEachem Jr. 

PresUienl 

Wayne Circuits Incorporated 

Vice-Chairman 

Sheila MB Griffin 
Vice President and Director 
Strategic Marketing Office 
Motorola Incorporated 

Trustees 

Dr. Joseph Cipfl 

Executive Director 

Illinois Community College Board 

Fred Conforti 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Pittway Systems Technology Group 

Dr. Sherry R. Eagle 

Superintendent 

Aurora West School District #129 

Dr. Forest Etheredge 

Dean 

School of Business and Professional Studies 

Aurora University 

Steve Isoye 

Science Department Chairperson 

Highland Park High School 

Dr. Glenn "Max" McGee 

State Superintendent 

Illinois State Board of Education 

Dr. Luis Nufiez 

Chemist 

Separation Science and Technology Section 

Argonne National Laboratory 

James D. Pearson 

President 

Aurora Metals Division L.L.C. 

Dr Marsha R. Rosner 

Professor 

The Ben May Institute for Cancer Research 

The University of Chicago 

Dr. Keith Sanders 
Executive Director 
Illinois Board of Higher Education 

Jesus Manuel Sosa 

Administrator 

Chicago Public Schools. Region One 

Sharon Tenhouse 

Teacher and Parent Educator 

Community Unit School District #2 (Liberty. IL) 

Dr Alfonzo Thurman 
Dean. College of Education 
Northern Ilhnois University 

Dr Michael S. Turner 

Department Chairman 

Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics 

The University of Chicago 

President 

Dr. Stephanie Pace Marshall 

NOVA is pubUshed three times a year by the 
IMSA Office of Institutional Advancement 
and Public Policy. 

Send comments or questions to: 
Editor and Writer 

Brenda Buschbacher 
brenda@imsa.edu 



From an IMSA Partner 
in Education 




Dear IMSA Shareholders, 

Zs a long-term partner in education and teacher professional development with 
_^_ the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy. I am pleased to share highlights 
of the Smithsonian Institution's work with IMSA to help transform mathematics and 
science teaching and learning in Illinois. 

The Smithsonian Institution's support of IMSA began in 1992 with a unique part- 
nership designed to develop innovative curriculum models in mathematics and science 
that could be shared with teachers to help improve mathematics and science teaching 
and learning. Eight years later, the IMSA-Smithsonian Partnership continues to grow 
and is now focused on measuring the impact of curriculum models in schools. 

This year, 1 1 Illinois middle and high schools are working with IMSA as part of the 
Smithsonian Research and Diffusion Network. The Network is supported by a grant 
from the Smithsonian Institution and is designed to gather evidence to see how innovative 
educational approaches are transforming teaching and learning in Illinois. 

Members of the Smithsonian Research and Diffusion Network use several IMSA- 
developed curriculum models in their classrooms including problem-based learning, 
integrated science, mathematical investigations, interdisciplinary instruction and 
curriculum alignment with state standards. 

As Director of the Smithsonian Institution's Center for Education and Museum 
Studies, working with IMSA gives me great hope and excitement for the future of 
education in America. IMSA's commitment to educational excellence and teacher 
professional development serve as a model for the rest of the country. 

I am proud to work in collaboration with IMSA and want to thank you, our 
shareholders in the public and private sectors, for supporting IMSA's work. 



Sincerely, 






Ann Bay 

Director, Smithsbnian Center for 

Education and Museum Studies 



X 



Conference iamtinueJ from cover) 



bility." Zander said. "My job is to remind 
people of the rhythm of transformation." 

Speaking on the theme of leadership. 
Zander said that we all have the choice 
to lead and to transform all of life's 
experiences. 

"Tliere are three possible responses for 
all life's situations: resignation, anger and 
possibility," Zander said. "It's all invented 
... so why don't we invent something that 
lights up our life and the life of the 
people around us. because we actually 
have the choice to do that all the time." 

The NCSSSMST is the nation's fore- 
most alliance of schools dedicated to 



transforming mathematics, science and 
technology education. There are more 
than 60 member .schools in the 
Consortium representing about half the 
states. Affiliate members include colleges 
and universities throughout the U.S. 

Two IMSA staff members ser\e on the 
NCSSSMST Board of Directors. They are 
mathematics teacher Susan Eddins and 
research specialist Jay Thomas. 




Ricsenter Dana Yaiicoskie shows lu>w to use 
pain- paper to explore math topics such as 
Ali;ehra I & II and Precalcuhis. 



Children from Cabruu Green in Chicago 
demonstrate their love for biochemistry in a 
DNA Learning Lxib presentation. IMSA 
students help to teach the children as part of 

CI mentorship and community setrice project. 




Fostering Leadership 
through the Community 
Development Program 

Unlocking Goodness and 
Genius through Research, 
Inquiry and Investigations 

Teaching Inquiiy with the 
Latest Technologies 

Physics for Eve ly one 

Crossing Boundaries: 

Integrating Math 

and Science 

State Standards and the 
Specialized School 

Where Do They Go From 

Here? A Longitudinal Study 

of NCSSSMST Graduates 

Panel: Identifying 

and Serving 
Talented Minorities 

Economic Theoiy. Derivative 
Trading and the Internet 

Forensic Science in 
High School 

The Discovery-Based 

Learning Approach 

to Diversity 



Benjamin Zander leads NCSSSMST 
conference participants in a rousing 
rendition of "Happy Birthday to You.' 



EMSA FUND BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


Chairman 


President 


James R. Thompson 


MichaelJ. Birck 


Cliairman of the 


President and CEO 


Executive Committee 


Tellabs, Inc. 


Winston & Strawn 






Vice President 


Vice President 


William J. White 


Robert Malott 


Professor 


Retired Chainnan 


Northwestern University 


FMC Corporation 






Secretary /Treasurer 




Susan S. Schanlaber 




President 




The Landmark Group. Inc. 


Directors 


G. Carl Ball 


Richard Lumpkin 


President 


Chairman and CEO 


Ball Foundation 


Consolidated 




Communications, Inc. 


G. Thomas Castino 




President and CEO 


Robert M. Malchione 


Underwriters Laboratories, 


Vice President 


Inc. 


The Boston Consulting 




Group, Inc. 


Dr. Floyd English 




President and CEO 


Timothy McCormick 


Andrew Corporation 


Vice President 




Farmer's State Bank 


Larry Flynn 


of Emden 


Major Accounts Vice 




President 


Andrew M. Oh 


Nortel 


Research Analyst 




Stifel, Nicolaus and Co. 


Peter Fox 




Senior Managing Director 


James D. Pearson 


Bear Steams and Company 


President 




Aurora Metals Division 


Dr. Phihp Francis 


L.L.C. 


President 




Mascon Management 


James T. Schaefer 


Consulting 


Real Estate Consultant 


David J. Geary 


Honey Jacobs Skinner 


VicePresident-I^hrth America 


Parmer 


Lucent Technologies 


Sidley & Austin 


Joanne Hansen 


William A. VanSanten 


President 


Partner 


Furnas Foundation. Inc. 


Wood. Philhps, VanSanten. 




Clark and Mortimer 


Leon Jackson 




President 


Joset Wright 


Multi-Fac Corporation 


President 




Ameritech Illinois 


James Lancaster 




Retired Executive 


Linda Anderson* 


Vice President 


Civic Leader 


First Chicago NBD Corp. 






Roger E. Anderson* 


Steven H. Lesnik 


Retired Clminnan and CEO 


CEO 


Continental Bank of 


Kemper Lesnik 


Chicago 


Organization 




Gordon R. Lohman 




Retired Chairman 




and CEO 




Amsted Industries. Inc. 




Vice-president for Institutional Advancement | 


CEO, IMSA Fund 




Ted Parge 




*Honorary Members 




"Trinted by Authority of the State of Illinois. 


6500. 04/00. Purchase Order No. 201 172," 



Rabbi Lawrence Kushner Attracts 
Crowd of 400 to Ethics Lecture 



L— ) abbi Lawrence Kushner attracted 
~^ more than 400 people to the 
eighth annual Richard L. Horwitz 
Lecture on Ethics held April 4 in the 
IMSA auditorium. 

Rabbi Kushner. widely regarded as 
one of the most creative religious writers 
in America, presented his lecture 
Invisible Lines of Connection: Social 
Responsibility and Cowardice. 

The lecture series is held in memory 
of Auroran Richard Horwitz. IMSA's 
first legal counsel, who died in August 
1990. Lectures are presented by promi- 
nent leaders in education, goveminent 
and the private sector for IMSA faculty, 
staff, alumni and seniors, and friends 
and family of Richard Horwitz. 

Rabbi Kushner served as rabbi of 
Congregation Beth El in Sudbury. 
Massachusetts, a suburb of Boston, for 
the past 27 years. Through his lectures, 
articles and 10 books, he has helped 



shape the agenda for personal and 
institutional spiritual renewal. 

A well-published author, his most 
recent books include Eyes Remade for 
Wonder ( 1998) and Invisible Lines of 
Connection (1996). Following the 
lecture, Kushner signed copies of his 
books and met with students, staff and 
guests for a special reception. 

The Horwitz lecture is supported by 
the Richard L. Horwitz Ethics Lecture 
Fund within the IMSA Fund for 
Advancement of Education. The IMSA 
Fund is a not-for-profit corporation that 
enlists investments of corporate, founda- 
tion and individual donors in the 
Academy. These investments support 
curriculum development projects, 
statewide outreach programs, minority 
recruitment programs, laboratory 
equipment purchases, facility enhance- 
ments, special student activities and a 
permanent endowment. 




Registration Open for 
Summer Programs of 



IMSA is accepting registration for a variety of profes- 
sional development experiences being offered from 
May through August in mathematics, science and 
problem-based learning. These experiences are most 
appropriate for middle and high school teachers. 
Call The Center@IMSA at (630) 907-5956 or email 
center@imsa.ei:lu for more information or to register 
for a professional development program. 

In addition, registration is open for programs of the 
IMSA Kids Institute for students in grades 7-12. 
Call the IMSA Kids Institute at (630) 907-5041 or 
email klong@imsa.edu lo register. 



y 




Great Minds 2000 Program Events 



Dr. Louis Gomez speaks about educational technology 
during the Great Minds Dialogue "Frontiers of 
Educational Technology" held Januaiy 24. 








m t^ ^ 




\ ^M' 






L 


#'^ 


^1 


ti 


B 



Nobel Laureate Dr Mario Molina speaks about global 
warming during the Great Minds Lecture "The Science 
and Politics of Climate Change " held January 6. 



Dr Bob Tinker d Alan November discuss thei 
views of educational technology in the future. 




(l-to-r) Nobel Umreate Dr Mario Molina, IMSA 
President Dr Stephanie Pace Marshall and Nobel 
Laureate Dr Leon Ledennan. 



IMSA Students Present Impressive Work at 
National Professional Conferences 



LMSA students recently showcased 
the results of their hard work while 
attending several national professional 
conferences. 

Nineteen IMSA students and one 
student from Niles West High School 
represented the Illinois Junior Academy 
of Science at the AAAS/AJAS Annual 
Meeting and Science Innovation 
Exposition February 17-22 in 
Washington, D.C. 

The 166th national meeting of 
the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science (AAAS) 
brought together more than 5,000 
scientists, engineers, educators, 
policy-makers, and researchers in a 
multi-disciplinary forum to share the 
latest research advances. 

Students from IMSA and Niles West 
made oral and poster presentations on 
their research projects as representatives 
of the Illinois Junior Academy of 
Science (see list). As part of the annual 
AAAS meeting, the American Junior 
Academy of Science showcases the work 
of promising future scientists who repre- 
sent their state Junior Academies from 
across the nation. 

IMSA students conducted their 
research as part of the Student Inquiry 
and Research Program (SIR). This chal- 
lenges students to engage in scholarly and 
.scientific investigation, as well as creative 
and artistic expression. This process 
culminates in the exhibition of products 
of ethical research, study and creativity. 

In addition to presenting at the AAAS 
conference, students also made presenta- 
tions at the joint National Conferences of 
the National Association of African 
American Studies, National Association 
of Hispanic and Latino Studies, National 
Association of Native American Studies 
and International Association of 
Asian Studies. 

The joint national minority conference 
was held February 21-26 in Houston, 
Texas, and IMSA was the only high 
school invited to attend. 



Students Bayly Wheeler of Glen Ellyn 
and Anjali Joshi of Schaumburg made 
presentations on the CYCLE'S WIZ 
Factory of Learning program for 
students from North Town Cabrini 
Green. Wheeler and 
Joshi created the 
"Girls Love Math 
Lab" for students in 
grades K-2 from the 
Cabrini Green low- 
income housing 
development. Students 
Kiyomi Davis of 
Calumet City and 
Nicole Brown of Oak 
Lawn made a presen- 
tation on the IMSA 
Science Explorers 
program for students 
in grades 4-6. 



The trips for the IMSA students were 
sponsored in part by the Lucent Young 
Scientist Program, created by a grant 
from Lucent Technologies of Naperville. 




In partnership with the Smithsonian Institution. IMSA student 
Jennifer Vanichsomhat of Chicago introduces 5th grade students 
at Stuart-Hol}son Magnet School in Washington D.C. to IMSA's 
Science Explorers Program. 



■ fUi^njiu-h^, 


Alexa BJsinger (Naperville) 


Meivy Mathew (Downers Grove) 


The Effects of Hypoxia on the Frequeticy of 


Investigations of How Mutations in Large 


Gasp-like Rhythm Generation in Mice 


T-Antigen Affect SV40 Growth 


Jason Chang (Glenview) 


Akhil Narang (Crystal Lake) and Samir 


Cloning and Characterization of a Novel 


Meghani (Naperville) 


NLS Receptor, Importln a 4, from 


Optimization of Magnetic Field Homogeneity 


Caenorhabditls elegans 


With Respect to the Nuclear Magnetic 


Sylvie Chau (North Aurora) 


Resonance Spectrometer Coil Geometry 


The ADP Pathway as a Mechanism for Platelet 


Donielle Newell (Naperville) & 


Activation in HIT 


Jennifer Vanichsomhat (Chicago) 


Jennifer Creamer (Brimfield) 


Science Explorers: Hands-On Learning. 


Underhalr Structure of Castor Canadensis and 


Mita Patel (Mattoon) 


Its Historical Implications 


Monitoring of the Anti-platelet Effects of New 


Thomas Kim (Naperville) 


Drugs for the Management of Acute 


Isolation and Characterization of Human 


Myocardial Infarction 


Antl-alphaGal IgG Antibodies 


Ashlee Riddle (Elgin) 


Jennifer Leung (South Barrington) and 


Fabrication of Porous Structures Using 


Jill Starzyk (St. Charles) 


Layered Manufacturing 


Pediatric AIDS: HIV- 1 Viral Burden, VIRAL 


Clara Shih (Arlington Heights) 


BURDEN. CD4/CD8 Counts, and the role of VPR 


Development of a PVDF film sensor for 


in Disease Prevention 


Infrastructure monitoring 


Loretta Li (Naperville). Steven Andreoli 


Himabindu Vidula (Naperville) 


(Wheaton), and Matthew Noesen (Bartlett) 


Assaying the Effects of FGF on Mouse 


Analysis of the MLL Breakpoint Cluster Region 


Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation to 


to Identify Sequence Polymorphisms 


Myocardial Cells 



Grainger Center Awards 

IMSA's Grainger Center for Imagination 
and Inquiry received the Shirley Cooper 
Award from the American Association 
of School Administrators, American 
Institute of Architects and Council of 
Educational Facilities Planners; this is 
one of the top honors given by AASA 
each year. The Grainger Center also was 
recognized for excellence in the design 
of Educational Environments by the 
Illinois Association of School Boards. 

Fort St.Louis des Illinois 




For lhree+ years. IMSA sriidetils wider 
the siipeiTision of social science teacher 
Dr. Claiborne Skinner, have researched and 
Iniih an incredible diorama that depicts "The 
Siei;e." a 10-day battle between the Iroquois, 
the French officers, and Illiniwek Indians in 
the Fort (see photo). Tlw defeat of the Iroquois 
was a prelude to the French and Indian Wars 
and France 's claitn to the entire Mississippi 
Valley. It marked a turning point in the 
history of colonial America. 
Fort St.Louis des Illinois, from 1682- 1691 
France 's westernmost outpost, will go on 
permanent display at Starred Rock State Park 
in Utica. Illinois, this year 



Recent examples include: 
President Dr. Stephanie Marshall 

was recently appointed to a national 
commission for the National Academy of 
Science to recommend programming for 
the advanced study of math and science 
for American youth. 

Gemian teacher John Stark's article 
"Educating Global Citizens."" was 
published in the January-August 2000 



edition of Lenmelten. Issue 3, a journal 
of the Goethe Institute. New York, for 
German students in the USA. 

Tonda Hager, coordinator for profes- 
sional development in mathematics, 
presented a workshop on advocacy for 
girls in mathematics and science at the 
Association of Girl Scout Executive Staff "s 
spring 2000 conference in Elgin. IL. 

Mathematics teacher Ruth Dover 
recently presented a workshop on tech- 
nology applications in the mathematics 
classroom at the Teachers Teaching with 
Technology Annual Conference in 
Dallas. Texas. 

Julia Husen, Russian teacher, 
presented a session on video assessment 
in foreign language classrooms at the 
American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Slavic Studies conference in 
St. Louis. 

Mathematics teacher Dr. Don Porzio 
is serving on the Program Committee 
for the 13th Annual Illinois Council of 
Teachers of Mathematics (ICTM) 
International Conference on Technology. 

Ted Parge, vice-president for institu- 
tional advancement, was appointed to the 
board of directors for Avery Coonley 
School in Downers Grove, IL. 

Eight staff members presented sessions 
for 320 Illinois educators at IMSA"s 
Great Minds Program Frontiers of 
Educatiou Technoloiiy Jan. 24. They were 
Dr. David Barr, Ruth Dover, Dr. Don 
Porzio, Dr. Mark Horrell, Britta 
McKenna, Dr. Steven Rogg, Catherine 
Veal and Matt Wicks. 

Dr. David Barr. director of Online 
Learning Programs, presented Introduction 
to Internet Information Literacy Concepts 
to .school and public librarians in Illinois 
School Districts 203 and 204. 

English teacher Dr. Riva Kuhl served 
as Poet-in-Residence at the Mary 
Anderson Center for the Arts in Mt. St. 
Francis, Indiana, from May 1-7. 

Recent examples include: 

IMSA captured tnst place in overall 
points in this year's North Suburban 
Math League competition. Kartik 
Lamba of Downers Grove placed first 
overall at the Senior level. 



Donielle Newell of Naperville, one of 
20 outstanding African-American high 
school seniors nationwide, is the only 
student from Illinois to be named a Ron 
Brown Scholar. She was awarded a 
$40,000 college scholarship by the CAP 
Charitable Foundation (USA). 

Jason Chang of Glenview was named 
a semifinalist in this year's Intel Science 
Talent Search competition for his 
research on a cell's regulation of the 
nuclear transport process. 

Yogesh Raut of Springfield was 
named First Team All-State for the 1999- 
2000 season by the Illinois High School 
Scholastic Bowl Coaches' Association. 
The Science Olympiad Team recently 
won the regional competition and quali- 
fied for state competition. Eleven of the 
1 5 team members earned one or more 
first place medals. 

Matt Noesen of Bartlett, Margaret 
Anderson of Chicago and Carl Pickerill 
of Genoa have won a year-long student 
trip to Germany sponsored by the U.S. 
Congress and the German Bundestag. 
Because of their high scores on the 
American Mathematics Competition test, 
96 students are eligible to participate in 
the American Invitational Math Exam. 
Fourteen students are on the Chicago 
Area All Star Math Team. 

Student saxophonist Mark Zelesky of 
Calumet City received an award in the 
National Foundation for Advancement 
in the Arts' 2000 Arts Recognition and 
Talent Search program. 

Winn Wasson of Dixon. Christopher 
Young of Westchester and Ryan Kelly 
of Makanda scored in the 99th percentile 
on this year's national German exam 
sponsored by the American Association 
of Teachers of German. 

Angela Campbell of Geneva partici- 
pated in the NASA Reduced Gravity 
Student Flight at Johnson Space Center 
in Houston. 

Seven students won awards in the 
Advanced level of the 1 8th National 
Russian Contest. 



Smithsonian Partnership Flourishes: Networic 
Established to Research Effects on Student Learning 



( -«_ ince 1992, the Smithsonian 
C^^ Institution has generously 
supported IMSA's work to develop 
innovative curriculum models in science 
and mathematics to share with schools 
throughout Illinois. Eight years later, 
the IMSA-Smithsonian Partnership 
continues to flourish with the recently 
established Smithsonian Research and 
Diffusion Network. 

The Smithsonian Research and 
Diffusion Network, developed this 
year and supported by a grant from the 
Smithsonian Institution, is designed to 
gather evidence to see how these inno- 
vative approaches are transforming 
teaching and learning in Illinois schools. 

Dr. Linda Brazdil. coordinator of the 
Network, said it is important to help 
support teachers in their work and to 
gather evidence that shows how innova- 
tions are affecting changes in classroom 
instruction and school-wide practices. 

■'While the ultimate goal is improved 
student learning, it is changes in teachers' 
knowledge, skills and attitudes that lead 
to modifications in classroom conditions 
and activities that enhance student 
learning." Brazdil said. "Changes in 
school-wide practices also are necessary 



to sustain and support innovations so that 
student achievement is improved." 

Illinois schools selected for the 
network represent urban, suburban and 
rural communities. All of the schools in 
the network have a history of long-term 
involvement in IMSA's professional 
development programs and have teachers 
and administrators that are committed to 
curriculum innovation. Members of the 
Smithsonian Research and Diffusion 
Network in the 1999-2000 year include: 

Alan B. Shepard High School 

Aurora West High School 

Burr Ridge Middle School 

Charleston Middle School 

Hinsdale Central High School 

Lisle High School 

Morton High School 

Newark High School 

Niles North High School 

Roxana High School 

Williamsville Junior High School 

The curriculum models being tested 
at partner schools include problem-based 
learning, integrated science, mathema- 
tical investigations, interdisciplinary 
instruction and curriculum alignment 
with state standards. 



In addition to gathering important 
evidence about student learning in the 
classroom, the network also provides 
opportunities for professional develop- 
ment in classroom-based action research. 

The Smithsonian Research and 
Diffusion Network provides valuable 
benefits for both IMSA and the member 
schools. "The network schools are able 
to receive technical support from IMSA 
in the design of action research projects, 
data collection/analysis and reporting of 
results," Brazdil said. "Most importantly, 
the network schools will have data high- 
lighting the effects of their innovations 
and supporting continued innovation 
to enhance student achievement in 
mathematics and science." 

"IMSA's involvement with the 
Smithsonian Research and Diffusion 
Network gives us formative data to help 
improve our professional development 
programs statewide and to measure the 
usefulness of IMSA-developed models 
to teachers in local school settings." 



r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora, Illinois 60506-1000 

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ILLINOIS MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE ACADEMY 



Jz_||y|^y^ A Pioui'i'hug Echicatiimal Coinmunin 



Volume 14 No. 3 • Summer 2000 



Seniors Present at Prestigious Russian Research 
Conference; Elsenheimer Wins Highest Honor 



I n 1999-2000. IMS A student researchers 
|_ presented their work at several national 
and international scientific conferences. The 
year's presentations ended half way around 
the globe in Russia May 14-21 at Sakharov"s 
Readings, a highly selective research confer- 
ence in St. Petersburg. 



Sakharov's Readings Presentations 

Si. Petersburg, Russia • May 14-21, 2000 

Probing the Birth of the Solar System - this 
research involves the analysis of meteorites to 
determine the chemical and environmental conditions 
present dunng the creation of the solar system. 
EVISA Student Researcher: Rebecca Elsenheimer 
(Lisle) Mentors: Drs. Steven Simon and 
Lawrence Grossman. University of Chicago 

Underhair Structure of Castor Canadensis 
and its Historical Implications - this research 
challenges centuries-old beliefs about the morpho- 
logical structure of animal pelts. 
IMSA Student Researcher: Jennifer Creamer 
(Brimfield); Co-Investigators: Erikka Conrad 
(IMSA '99); Nicole Gerlach (IMSA "98); Zachary 
Shipp (IMSA '98) Mentor: John Thompson. IMSA 

Optimization of Magnetic Field Homogeneity 
with Respect to the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 
Spectrometer Coil Geometry - this research 
in\'olves refining imaging equipment with applica- 
tions for medicine such as more sensitive diagnosis 
of brain tumors. IMSA Student Researchers: 
Akhil Narang (Crystal Lake); Samir Meghani 
(Naperville) Mentor: Dr. Alan Feinerman, 
University of lUinois at Chicago 

Monitoring of the Anti-Platelet Effects of New 
Drugs for the Management of Acute Myocardial 
Infarction - this rese;irch involves determining the 
efficacy of new medicines used to treat coronary 
disease. IMS.\ Student Researcher: Mita Patel 
(Mattoon) Mentors: Drs. Jawed Fareed and Debra 
Hoppensteadt. Loyola University Medical Center 

Development of a PVDF Film Sensor for 
Infrastructure Monitoring - this research involves 
developing a technology to monitor stresses in 
structures such as bndges and highways as well 
as medical equipment, IMS.A Student Researcher: 
Clara Shih (Arlington Heights) .Mentors: 
D. Satpathi. J.P. Victor. M^L. Wang. H. Y. Yang 
and C. C. Shih, University of Illinois 



Si.x seniors were among 210 young 
researchers from throughout the world 
who were invited by the Russian 
Academy of Sciences to participate in 
the conference. IMSA students" research, 
which was reviewed by a panel of scien- 
tists and researchers from the Academy 
and the loffe Physics Institute, repre- 
sents geophysics, imaging technology, 
pathology and engineering fields. 

The research conference is held 
annually as a tribute to the memory 
of physicist and Nobel Peace Laureate 
Dr. Andrei Dmitrievich Sakharov. The 
IMSA students' trip was underwritten in 
part by The Lucent Technologies Young 
Scientist Fund. 

"The invitation to present research 
at this prestigious conference is an 
acknowledgment of the substantive 
contributions to science these young 
researchers have made," said 
Mentorship Coordinator Dr. Peggy 
Connolly. "It is a well-deserved honor, 
and I am very appreciative of the 
mentors who guided the students to 
this level of accomplishment." 

Rebecca Elsenheimer of Lisle received 
the highest recognition given at the 
conference for her work on the birth of 
the solar system. Delivered in Russian. 
Elsenheimer's presentation was cited for 
"fundamental and physically significant 
choice of problem." 

In addition. Akhil Narang of Crystal 
Lake and Samir Meghani of Naperville 
were awarded honors for "Impressive 
synthesis of theoretical research and 
experimental development." 




IMSA stiiJciU Rchcccci Elsfiilwiimr of 
Lisle dtUvt'icd Iwr research in Russian. 




Mita Patel of Mattoon presents her research 
on coronary disease treatments. Standing with 
Palel is IMSA Russian teacher Julia Hiisen. 



Commencement - Class of 2000 3 

From IMSA Parents 2 

Great Minds Program Calendar 3 

IMSA Fund Highlights 4 

IMSA Kids Institute 5 

IMSA-Shcpard Research Partnership ....8 

Staff Professional Contributions 6 

Student Achievements 7 



r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora, Illinois 60506-1000 
630/907-5000 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Chairman 

John H- McEachem Jr. 

President 

Wayne Circuits Incorporated 

Vice- Chairman 

Sheila MB Griffin 
Vice Presiden! and Director 
Strategic Marketing Office 
Motorola Incorporated 

Trustees 

Dr. Joseph Cipfl 

Executive Director 

Illinois Community College Board 

Dr. Sherry R. Eagle 

Superintendent 

Aurora West School Dislnct #129 

Dr. Forest Etheredge 

Dean 

School of Business atid Professional Studies 

Aurora University 

Steve Isoye 

Curriculum Leader for Science 

Warren Township High School 

Dr. Glenn "Max" McGee 

Stale Superintendent 

Illinois State Board of Education 

Dr. Luis Nuiiez 

Chemist 

Separation Science and Technology Section 

Argonne National Laboratory 

James D. Pearson 

President 

Aurora Metals Division L.L.C. 

Dr. Marsha R. Rosner 

Director 

The Ben May Institute for Cancer Research 

The University of Chicago 

Dr. Keith Sanders 
Executive Director 
Illinois Board of Higher Education 

Jesus Manuel Sosa 

Administrator 

Chicago Public Schools, Region One 

Sharon Tenhouse 

Teacher and Parent Educator 

Community Unit School District #2 (Liberty. IL) 

Dr. Alfonzo Thurman 
Dean. College of Education 
Northern Illinois University 

Dr. Michael S. Turner 

Department Chairman 

Departtnent of Astronomy & Astrophysics 

The University of Chicago 

President 

Dr. Stephanie Pace Marshall 



NOVA is published three times a year by the 
IMSA Office of Institutional Advancement 
and Public Policy. 

Send comments or questions to: 
Editor and Writer 

Brenda Buschbacher 
brenda@imsa.edu 



From 

IMSA Parents 




Dear IMSA Shareholders, 

, -^^ raduation 2000 was a wonderful day that will forever be fondly remembered 
\^i_ by our family and others. Many emotions, reflections and ideas for the 
future all converged upon us as we watched the graduates receive their diplomas 
and academic medallions. 

An emotional day . . . thinking about how our first bom soon would be attending an 
educational institution 2000 miles away. An emotional day... appreciating that our 
son. Jonathan, had been given a wonderful opportunity at IMSA, receiving one of the 
best educations possible. An emotional day. . . saying goodbye to people who cared for 
and about Jonathan with extraordinary dedication. We savored these emotions because 
as parents, we knew we had helped direct Jonathan to the "right" place. 

A day of reflection... recalling how overwhelmed we were three years ago to 
learn of the vast number of opportunities that awaited each IMSA student. A day 
of reflection... remembering how initially at IMSA we felt technologically and 
scientifically in a different world. We didn't care, however, because it seemed to be 
what the students were looking for. A day of reflection... recalling how Jonathan 
organized his room away from home and how we took comfort in IMSA's high 
expectations for ethical behavior. 

A day viewing the future... being grateful for an institution that has shaped and 
expanded inquisitive minds, preparing them for a world with many unknowns ready 
to be discovered. A day viewing the future... admiring dedicated students who 
embrace a larger service that transcends individual self-interest. A day viewing 
the future... appreciating students who are genuinely committed to improving their 
respective locales and the entire universe. 

Graduation solidified our commitment to a renaissance development for our 
children. A craving for expansion was evident, and the excitement of approaching 
scientific mysteries is ever present. However, fostering a renaissance atmosphere 
does not occur automatically or magically. It requires hard work, discipline, consis- 
tency, an integrated approach and dedication from all involved - the board, staff, 
students and parents. We appreciate IMSA's commitment to the renaissance 
student. Our sincere thanks to the People of Illinois for supporting IMSA's work 
and to an institution that make us feel proud. 

Sincerely, 



Carol and John Berger 



Former NASA Astronaut Dr. Mae Jemison Urges 
Graduates to Take Risks and Care for Planet Earth 




s the first African American 
_ female astronaut to travel into 
space. Dr. Mae C. Jemison knows what 
risk-taking means. As the owner of a 
company dedicated to using science and 
technology for the benefit of everyday 
life, she understands what caring for 
Planet Earth means. 

"Technology is just a tool," Jemison 
told IMSA Class of 2000 graduates. 
"At its best, technology should address 
and further three needs: to be loved, 
to feel safe and to be happy." 

Proud family members and friends 
assembled on June 3 at the Paramount 
Arts Centre in Aurora to hear Jemison's 
words of wisdom and honor 191 seniors 
as they received their diplomas and 
academic medallions. 

Jemison said that the field of science 
is misunderstood by many, including 
those who are closest to it. She said there 
is much more to science than just the 
mathematical, technical side. 

"At the heart of science are the words 
I think, I wonder and I understand," 
Jemison said. "To me, science is a 
search for understanding and technology 
is putting that understanding into some 
practical use." 



Donielle Newell of Naperville and 
Mathew Blaine Eubanks of Eldorado 
were the student speakers. 

Impressive Service to Illinois 

All members of the Class of 2000 
contributed at least 80 hours of 
community service to Illinois. However, 
the Class" cumulative hours totaled more 
than 20,000 with 70 students completing 
100 or more hours. Examples included: 

Michael Sunu — 324 hours at Edward 
Hospital in Naperville and the Muscular 
Dystrophy Association in Hinsdale 

Ajali Vijayakumar — 30 1 hours at 
Veteran's Administration Hospital in 
Chicago and CYCLE Program in 
Cabrini Green in Chicago 

Stacey Cruz — 296 hours at Elssy 
Fabcla Foundation and McCleery 
Accelerated School, Aurora 

Amith Bokka — 266 hours at Rush 
Copley Medical Center, Aurora 

Sarah Hoffman — 257 hours at Alexian 
Brothers Medical Center in Palatine and 
McCleery Accelerated School in Aurora 

Jessica McAlear — 250 hours at ADOPT 
(Animals Deserving of Proper Treatment) 
in Naper\'ille. 




Above: IMSA President Dr. Stephanie Marshall 
is pictured with Stanford University graduate 
Dr Mae Jemison and soon-to-be Stanford 
student Jonulhon Berber 

Below: Vanessa Clark is overjoyed that her years 
of hard work at IMSA have finally paid off! 



Great Minds Program - Save the Dates! 



The Great Minds Program supports 
IMSAs learning agenda by creating 
unique teaching and learning opportuni- 
ties to help shape mathematics and 
science education policy in Illinois 
and the nation. The intellectual resources 
of the Great Minds Program are shared 
with students and teachers throughout 
Illinois and the nation through seminars, 
dialogues, community lectures, on-line 
chat groups and the website 
( http ://wcbdb. i msa.edu/greatmi nds/) . 

Fall 2000 Great Minds 
Program Calendar of Events 

Great Minds Seminars 

far IMSA students, stuff and invited quests 

September 1 8, 2000 
Douglas Hofstadter, Mathematician 
Title: A Jolly Romp in the EucUdnal 
Plane. Where Points and Lines Have 
Their Roles Reversed 



October 5. 2000, 10:30 am-noon 
Lynn Margulis. Biologist on 
Endosybiotic Theory 
Title: The Living Earth from Space 
Great Minds Community Lecture 

for the genend public 

October 17,2000,7:30 pm 
(post-reception with book signing) 
Nobel Laureate and IMSA Resident 
Scholar Dr. Leon Lederman 
Title: Science and Anti-Science: 
Technology and Its Burdens 
Great Minds Dialogues 

for Illinois educators and students 

October 25, 2000, 10:00 am-noon 

for high school students only 

Chemist Dr. Luis Nufiez and 

Physicist Dr. Herman White 

Stories of a Scientist 

For more information, contact 

Dr. Judith Scheppler at (630) 907-5899 

or email greatminds@imsa.edu. 



IMSA FUND BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


Chairman 


President 


James R. Thompson 


Michael J. Birck 


Chairman of the 


Chairman 


Executive Commiliee 


Tellabs, Inc. 


Winston & Strawn 






Vice President 


Vice President 


William J. White 


Robert Malott 


Professor 


Retired Chairman 


Northwestern University 


FMC Corporation 






Secretary/Treasurer 




Susan S. Schanlaber 




President 




The Landmark Group, Inc. 


Directors 


G. Carl Ball 


Richard Lumpkin 


President 


Chairman and CEO 


Ball Foundation 


Consolidated 




Communications. Inc 


G. Thomas Castino 




President and CEO 


Roberi M. Malchione 


Underwriters Laboratories, 


Vice President 


Inc. 


The Boston Consulting 




Group. Inc. 


Dr. Floyd English 




President and CEO 


Timothy McCormick 


Andrew Corporation 


Vice President 




Farmer's State Bank 


Larry Rynn 


of Emden 


Major Accounts Vice 




President 


Andrew M. Oh 


Nortel 


En treprenuer- in- Res iden ce 




Reactivity 


Peter Fox 




Senior Managing Director 


James D. Pearson 


Bear Steams and Company 


President 




Aurora Metals Division 


Dr. Philip Francis 


LLC. 


President 




Mascon Management 


James T. Schaefer 


Consulting 


Real Estate Consultant 


David J. Geary 


Honey Jacobs Skmncr 


Vice President-North America 


Partner 


Lucent Technologies 


Sidley & Auslm 


Joanne Hansen 


William A. VanSanten 


President 


Partner 


Fumas Foundation. Inc. 


Wood, Phillips. VanSanten. 




Clark and Mortimer 


Leon Jackson 




President 


Joset Wright 


Multi-Fac Corporation 


President 




Ameritech Illinois 


James Lancaster 




Retired Executive 


Linda Anderson* 


Vice President 


Civic Uader 


First Chicago NBD Corp. 






Roger E. Anderson* 


Steven H. Lesnik 


Retired Cltaimmit and CEO 


CEO 


Continental Bank of 


Kemper Lesnik 


Chicago 


Organization 




Gordon R. Lohman 




Retired Chairman 




and CEO 




Amsted Industries, Inc. 




Vice-president for Institutional Advancement | 


CEO, IMSA Fund 




Ted Parge 




*Honorary Members 




"Printed by Authority of the State of Illinois, 


6500 09/00, Purchase Order No. 210345." 



Internet Toolkit Gets $50,000 Boost; 
IMSA Fund Welcomes New Investors 



I— I — his summer. State Senator 
|_ Chris Lauzen presented IMSA 
with a S50.000 check from the Illinois 
Department of Commerce and Community 
Affairs (IDCCA). (See photo below). 
The grant will support further dissemina- 
tion of IMSAs Internet Toolkit to 
Illinois educators. This is part of IMSAs 
Internet Information Fluency project. 

The Toolkit, developed by IMSA, 
includes a set of learning materials and 
software tools that helps educators more 
easily and effectively navigate the web 

"In the coming year, the grant will 
help us to field test the online workshop 
with 50 Illinois educators (teachers, 
librarians and media/technology coordi- 
nators) and develop model lesson plans 
using Internet Toolkit materials and 
tools," said Dr. David Barr, director for 
development of online resources. 

SBC Supports Minority 
Recruitment 

The IMSA Fund was named one 
of five not-for-profit organizations 
to share a $210,000 contribution 
awarded in connection with the SBC 
2000 Senior Open golf tournament held 
June 8. 2000. 

The $25,000 contribution will advance 
outreach programs for minority students 
in mathematics and science. Some of 
these include the Early Involvement 




Program for 9th graders from Aurora, 
East St. Louis and Joliet and the 
Summer Enrichment for Academics 
in Mathematics and Science program 
for 8th graders from Chicago. 

"This recent contribution will 
allow us to expand our outreach efforts 
throughout Illinois so that we can recruit 
and retain more minorities who want to 
pursue careers in mathematics and 
science," Ted Parge, IMSA vice-presi- 
dent for institutional advancement said. 

New Investors 

Several new investors were recently 
added to the ranks of those contributing 
to IMSAs external and internal programs 
for students and teachers. 

These include: 

• Pritzker Foundation (for the Great 
Minds PvogTum-see pg. 3). 

• Nalco Foundation (for minority 
recruitment and retention programs), 

• American Honda Foundation 

(for the Kids Institute-j'ce opposite page), 

• ComEd (for minority recruitment and 
retention programs). 

Other 1999-2000 highlights included 
a $20,000 grant from The Lumpkin 
Foundation for development and dissemi- 
nation of the Internet Toolkit and $5,000 
from Ford Motor Co. for scholarship 
support of deserving IMSA students. 

In reflecting on the fiscal 2000 
year, Parge noted that the additional 
$1 .6 million federal grant 
for IMSA (part of the IMSA- 
Chicago Public Schools 
partnership) brings the total 
amount for external funding 
of Academy programs to a 
record $2.9 million. 

"IMSA was created as a 
working partnership between 
L \ the public and private sector 
4 : ■ and the financial results of 
l_ FY 2000 clearly demonstrate 
growth in these key areas," 
Parge said. 



Pictured (l-to-r) are Dr David Barr State Senator Cliris 
Lauzen and IMSA President Dr Steplumie Marstudl. 



IMSA Kids Institute Expands Summer Programs 

Biotechnology and Math Explorers Attract New Illinois Students 



I n 1998. the IMSA Kids Institute 
[_ began with just 50 students who 

signed on as IMSA's first class 
of Science Explorers. Since then, the 
Kids Institute has grown to serve nearly 
300 Illinois students in the summer and 
600 students during the school year. 
In addition. 350 Illinois schools each 
received a copy of the 1999 edition 
of the Real Science CD-ROM. 

Building on this success. IMSA hosted 
two new "camps" this year. Math 
Explorers, for students entering 8th and 
9th grades in the fall of 2000. was held 
June 26-30. Explorations in Biotechnology. 
sponsored by the Chicago Public Schools 
for Chicago students entering 10th grade 
in the fall, was held June 19-30. 

IMSA also hosted two sessions of 
Science Explorers for students entering 
4th-6th grades and Summer Sleuths for 
students entering 7th-9th grades. 

Chicago Students Delve into DMA 

Students from se\en Chicago high 
schools spent two weeks at IMSA. 
pert'omiing experiments such as bacterial 
transformation. DNA spooling, polymerase 
chain reaction, restriction enzyme analysis, 
and gel electrophoresis of proteins. 

These experiments were part of the 
Explorations in Biotechnology camp, a 
program led and developed by IMSA staff 
members Dr. Don Dosch. Dr. Steve Rogg. 
Dr. Judith Scheppler and Dr. Sue Styer. 

Guest Speakers Kelly Connerton- 
Moyer of Loyola University Medical 
Center, and Russell "Bo" Kowalczyk 
from MediChem. spoke about genetic 
birth defects and work at biotechnology 
companies respectively. 

The final day. students presented 
posters about medical advances related 
to biotechnology. 

iVIath Explorers Solve 
Complex Problems 

More than 50 Chicagoland students 
cracked codes using cryptography, 
constructed mobiles using geometry 
principles, designed fractals on computers 
and played mathematical games 




Cldcknisc fiDiii lop "Silence Explorers" 
Emily Biiiker (left) and Sam Shanbmin 
of St. Charles are testinti natural water 
filtration techniques. 

Chica,i;o Puhlic School students 
peiforni experimenis in IMSA's 
Grainger Center for Inuigination 
and bujuin: 

Science Explorers students 
denwnstrate what type of shoe 
are needed on Mars during the 
Mars Millennium Day. 



using logic during 
IMSA's inaugural Math 
Explorers Program. 

This experience was developed by 
IMSA students with assistance from 
Academy mathematics faculty. 

Mathematics teacher Chuck Hamberg. 
featured mathematician for the week, 
said the 'explorers" were introduced to 
mathematical concepts not typically 
found in a middle school math curricu- 
lum including branches of discrete 
mathematics. He said it was exciting to 
see IMSA students sharing their passion 
for mathematics. 

"It was wondert'ul to watch the IMSA 
students grow as "coaches' and build upon 
and modify their curriculum based upon 
the learners' questions." Hamberg said. 



Real Science 2000 CD-ROM 

The Kids Institute recently released 
the newest issue of its Real Science 
CD-ROM and plans to distribute it to 
more than 500 Illinois schools this fall. 

The Real Science 2000 CD-ROM. 
funded in part by Nortel Networks, is an 
interactive science CD entirely produced 
by IMSA students for Illinois 3rd-5th 
grade classrooms. The purpose of the 
project is to help spark young students' 
interest in science. 

The latest version is now compatible 
on Windows or Macintosh platforms. 

For a free copy of the Real Science 
2000 CD-ROM, contact Kathleen Long at 
630.907.5041 or email kl0n2@imsa.edu. 



Professional Contributions of 
IMSA Staff Benefit Education 



By Catherine C. Veal 

ne way the Illinois Mutlwinatics 
I ' and Science Academy senses the 

educational community in Illinois 
and beyond is through the professional 
contributions of its faculty and staff. 
Many give generously of their time, 
expertise and talent to help improve 
education in Illinois and beyond. 
Examples of professional contributions 
by IMSA staff in 1999-2000 include: 

Dr. Stephanie Pace Marshall, presi- 
dent, wrote an invited article "A New 
Story of Learning and Schooling" for 
the millennial edition of The School 
Administrator . December 1999. She 
also was named to the National Academy 
of Sciences Committee for the Study 
of Programs for Advanced Study of 
Mathematics and Science in American 
High Schools. Nobel Laureate and 
Resident Scholar Dr. Leon Lederman 
presented Science Education Research 
on IMSA's Great Minds Program and 
the ARISE program at the National 
Association for Research in Science 
Teaching Conference. 

Susan Eddlns. curriculum and 
assessment leader in mathematics, 
was a co-teacher on a grant given to 
The University of Chicago to upgrade 
the mathematical content knowledge of 
teachers in the Chicago Public Schools. 
She also helped write the Principles 
and Standards for School Mathematics 
(2000). the update of the original 
National Council of Teachers of 
Mathematics Standards ( 1989). 
Dr. Raymond Dagenais. curriculum 
and assessment leader in science, 
was the principal author of the chapter 
The Emeritus Teacher in the book Life 
Cycle of the Career Teacher , published 
by Corwin Press in January 2000. 

Dr. Judy Scheppler. coordinator of 
student inquiry, co-authored the book 
Biotechnology Explorations: Applying 
the Fundamentals . Washington. D.C.: 
ASM Press. The book {see graphic above) 
exposes high school and college students 
to modem DNA technologies. 



Mathematics teacher Chuck 
Hamberg was a member of the 
AYA/Mathematics Standards 
Committee for the National 
Board for Professional Teaching 
Standards. His colleague Ruth 
Dover presented Logistic 
Differential Equations at this 
year's National Council of 
Teachers of Mathematics 
Annual Meeting and sessions 
at the Teachers Teaching with 
Technology national conference. 

Matthew Wicks, director 
of virtual learning, co-chaired 
the Illinois Virtual High School 
Steering Committee. 

Mentorship Coordinator 
Dr. Peggy Connolly presented 
Creating Power from Potential: 
Young Women Scientists & Scholars 
at the Women's Leadership Institute 
Symposium. 

Willa Shultz. foreign language 
teacher, led a National Coalition 
Building Institute Diversity Workshop 
for The Institute for Educational 
Leadership. Her colleague John Stark 
served on the editorial board of Tlte 
Unterricht.sprax.sis , a journal devoted 
to applied linguistics and the teaching 
of German published by the American 
Association of Teachers of German. 

A number of staff presented sessions 
at the 13th Annual Professional 
Conference of the National Consortium 
for Specialized Secondary Schools of 
Mathematics. Science and Technology 
Conference. Examples include: 

• Paula Altekruse, study skills 
specialist, a session on empowering 
passive learners; 

• Don Porzio and Michael Sloan. 
mathematics teachers, a workshop on 
the Texas Instruments TI-89 calculator; 

• Dr. John Eggebrecht. science teacher, 
and Susan Yates, mathematics teacher. 

a session on integrating mathematics and 
science (they also presented at the 
National Science Teachers Association 
and the National Council of Teachers of 
Mathematics Annual Meeting); 




• Jay Thomas, research specialist, 
(see photo opposite page) a session 
on the results of the first year of the 
NCSSSMST longitudinal study, an 
investigation involving 10 member 
schools and more than 400 student 
interviews and 

• Dr. Steve Cordogan. a session on 
SAT scores, weighting and prediction 
(he also presented papers at the Annual 
Meeting of the American Educational 
Research Association). 

Dalia Bach, music teacher, led a 
session for choral educators from Illinois 
and neighboring states at the American 
Choral Directors Association Annual 
State Conference. Wellness Team 
members Barbara Baber, John Martin 
and Nancy Todnem presented the 
Wellness standards-based curriculum 
to the Naperville Central High School 
health and physical education staff. 
The editor of the society newsletter News 
and Notes. Dr. Christian Nokkentved, 
social science teacher, served on the 
executive council of the Society for the 
Advancement of Scandinavian Studies. 

Sandee Donahue, coordinator of 
information resource center and elec- 
tronic media, served as chair of the 
Illinois Library Association (ILA) 
Awards Committee. In April, she was 
elected Vice-President/President Elect 
(continued on page 7) 



STUDENT A C H 1 



Kelly McArdle of Elmwood Park, 
Brian Park of Park Ridge, Erica and 
Alison Ruddy of Aurora, and Margaret 

Wat of Naperville presented their 
research at the Seventh Annual Student 
Research Symposium of the National 
Consortium for Specialized Secondary 
Schools of Mathematics. Science and 
Technology June 8-11 at Lynchburg 
College in VA. 

Jung Hong of Niles won first place 
for the Individual Written Competition 
(Senior Division) at the Future Problem 
Solving Program International 
Conference June 8-11 at the University 
of Georgia in Athens, GA. 

Nia Dukov of Chicago took first place 
in the National Spanish Exam competi- 
tion (Level 2) for the Chicagoland area. 
More than 600 secondary school students 
took the exam. 

Clara Shih of Arlington Heights was 
one of only two Illinois students selected 
to be a 2000 Presidential Scholar by 
The White House Commission on 
Presidential Scholars. 

Kartik Lamba of Downers Grove and 
Dan Mellis of Chicago were two of only 
175 students nationwide who qualified to 
take the semi-tlnal exam for the U.S. 
Physics team. 



Christine Tsai of Naperville was 
accepted to MIT's Research Science 
Institute this summer. Only 51 U.S. high 
school juniors are selected each year. 

Maria Wilson of Quincy, Su-san 
Johnson of St. Charles. Noah Lauricella 
of Dwight, Kevin White of Baillett and 
Mark Zelesky of Calumet City were 
named to the Illinois Music Educators 
Association 1999-2000 All-State Honor 
Roll in Band, Choir and Orchestra. 

Brian Fitting of North Aurora, Yun Ji 
of Hoffman Estates. Zhihao Liu of 
Lisle, Nicholas Rupprecht of Gumee 
and Denny Tli of Naperville were among 
200 students nationally who qualified to 
take the USA Mathematical Olympiad 
(USAMO). IMSA had the second 
highest number of qualifying students 
in the nation. 

Catherine Kuo of Skokie. Andrea 
Llenos of Carol Stream and Katassa 
Tenhouse of Liberty received the rank 
of "National Outstanding" in the second 
annual High School Mathematical 
Contest in Modeling (HiMCM). Only 
1 1 teams out of 128 that competed 
nationwide received this ranking. 

Nicholas Rupprecht of Gumee. 
Zhihao Liu of Lisle. Taiyang Liang 
of Naperville, and Charles Wang of 



Machesney Park helped the Chicago A 
team win a first place tie (Division A) in 
the 25th Annual American Region Math 
League (ARML) Competition. Rupprecht 
and Liu aLso were two of only 14 students 
nafionwide who correctly an.swered 7 out 
of 8 possible individual problems. 

Four projects by IMSA students 
received superior ratings at the 14th 
Annual Illinois History Exposition in 
Springfield. A video by Kathleen King 
of St. Charles and Lisa Kelly of 
Libertyville qualified for National 
History Day competition. 




IMSA Research Specialist Jay Thomas senes 
on the NCSSSMST Board of Directors. 



of the Illinois Association of College 
and Research Libraries which represents 
the interests and concerns of academic 
libraries in the state. 

Charter Librarian Marti Guarin, 
who serves on the Board of the Illinois 
School Library Media Association repre- 
sented public libraries at the American 
Library Association's 35th Annual 
Legislative Day in Washington, D.C., 
meeting with legislators about library 
and education issues. 

Vicki Burgholzer, instructional 
program assistant in science, presented 
a hands-on demonstration of biodiver- 
sity in the animal kingdom for 7th and 
8th graders at Our Lady of the Wayside 
School in Arlington Heights, Illinois. 

At the American Association for 
College Registrars and Admission 
Officers annual convention. Registrar 



Sandi Miller facilitated several sessions 
dealing with high school issues and 
federal record keeping regulations. 
Miller has served as the National 
Committee Chair on High School Issues 
for the AACRAO. 

Through their professional contribu- 
tions, faculty and staff demonstrate their 
strong commitment to teaching and 
learning, professional development, and 
educational research and public policy. 

Catherine C. Veal is I MSA's chief of stuff. 



Interdisciplinary 
Favorable Marks 

multi-year research study 
between IMSA and Shepard High 
School in Palos Heights. Illinois, is 
showing promising results in measure- 
ments of student performance and 
behaviors after implementation of an 
interdisciplinary curriculum program. 

The research partnership began in 1993 
when Shepard teachers and administrators 
wanted to better meet the needs of 
"at-risk" students. They joined the 
Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning 
Consortium, co-sponsored by IMSA and 
the Association for Supervision and 
Curriculum Development (ASCD). 

The Interdisciphnary Teaching and 
Learning (ITL) Program at Shepard began 
in Fall 1993 with one coordinator and 
four teachers who shared the same 48 
students for two of their five-period teach- 
ing load. The ITL Program integrated 
English 1, Algebra. World History and 
Biology through themes, concepts, skills 
and strategies. 

Because of the positive outcomes 
the first year, the ITL Program expanded 
the following year to include mainstream 
students, including an honors group. 
Later changes included the incorporation 



Curriculum Program Receives 
in IMSA Research Study 



of problem-based learning, in which 
the role of "teacher" is transformed to 
that of "facilitator" as students work 
collaboratively to solve real-world 
problems. IMSA and other proponents of 
this approach maintain that the "real-life 
relevance" in problem-based learning is 
more meaningful to students than the 
traditional, discipline-based approach. 

By 1998-99. participadon had increased 
to 600 freshmen, sophomores and juniors, 
as well as 39 teachers from various disci- 
plines and academic levels serving on 14 
interdisciplinary teams. 

Interdisciplinary Findings Positive 

The research study of the ITL Program 
focused on the 461 students who were 
members of the Shepard Class of 2000. 
tracking the initial members of the Class 
and other students who enrolled in the 
ITL Program during high school. 

The study compared the interdiscipli- 
nary students to the traditional- 
curriculum students using academic 
performance measures including GPA. 
scores on the Iowa Test of Educational 
Development and its subsections, 
percentages of students taking the ACT 
tests and ACT scores. The study also 



used behavioral measures including 
attendance, tardiness and suspensions. 

Findings of the first three years of the 
four-year study include: 

• Academic performance levels as 
measured by GPA, were much higher for 
interdisciplinary students: 

• The percentage of interdisciplinary 
students taking the ACT by the end of 
their junior year was much higher and 
their average scores were higher; 

• The Iowa Test of Educational 
Development scores were equal or 
higher for the interdisciplinary students; 

• Students in the interdisciphnary 
program demonstrate lower rates for 
absences, suspensions and leaving school. 
Transfer patterns in and out of both the 
interdisciplinary and discipline-based 
programs strongly demonstrate a prefer- 
ence for the former by most smdents: 

• Interdisciplinary teachers expressed a 
strong preference for their current teaching 
experience over prior non-integrative ones. 

For more informaUon. contact 
Dr. Steve Cordogan at (630) 907-5071 
or cordogan@imsa.edu. 



r^lM 



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