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Dr. P.K. Menzies 



THE 



ILLUSTRATED 

WAR NEWS. 



Being a Pictorial Record of the Great War. 



VOLUME 8 



PARTS 85 96. (Jan. 23rd to April 10th, 1918.) 



Published by the ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS AND SKETCH, Ltd., 

172, Strand, London, W.C. 2. 



P 

501 



LONDON : 

THB II.I.rSTKATF.D LONDON N KWS AND SKKTPH, I.TMTTF.T), 
172, STRAND, LONDON, W.r 2. 




TTie Illustrated War Newt, Jan. 23, 1918. Part 85, New Seriei. 



Cfte Illustrated War neu)$ 



r;SH LAVAMENTO ON THE ITALIAN FRONT: AM OPEN-AIR LAUNDRY. 

BritisJ: Official Ptolopaph. 




- I 
Z |_ 



Part 85 ~1 
Ntw Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 23. 1918 




SIGNS OF THE TIMES-BRUTE FORCE v. MORAL FORCE-BRITISH MAN-POWER-LONDON 
RATIONING-CA1LLAUX-THE WINTER CAMPAIGN IN THE WEST-KARLSRUHE BOMBED. 



DURING a week of which the military incidents 
could be summarised in a few lines, for the 
Arctic conditions on the European fronts con- 
tinued to keep fighting in the field on a relatively 
quiet level, the political and social outlook proved 
more than ordinarily interesting. On the War of 
Machines a lull had fallen ; the War of Moral 
Forces showed a steady increase of power. There 
were happenings at home and abroad which the 
future philosophical historian of this struggle will 
one day seize upon as vital factors of the stupen- 
dous drama, wherein, perhaps, he will be more 



to meet the tempest. For good or ill, the voice of 
organised Labour becomes more insistent, Labour 
itself comes to a fuller self-consciousness, and 
shows signs of a stern determination to take the 
guidance of affairs. The recent message of 
British Labour to the nominal Government of 
Russia is a most significant sign of the times. 
No less significant is the curious perplexity of the 
enemy before the dialectic of the Russian peace 
negotiators. Brute force stands for the moment 
inactive in the presence of war by argument. It 
is the strangest surprise of a surprising age. A 




WITH THE BRITISH IN ITALY : THE FUNERAL OF TWO BRITISH SOLDIERS. 

Official Photograph. 



concerned with the psychological than with the 
material elements. His theme will still be " Arms 
and the Man," as with the Mantuan of old ; but 
it seems as if the Man would preponderate. For 
the destiny of the human race, now at stake, is 
being decided less by the crossing of bayonets 
than by the crossing of national wills. Daily it 
becomes clearer (although contemporary eyes can 
catch only a partial glimpse of the present world- 
movement) that the will of the masses gathers 
momentum. It is a thing distinct from the policy 
of official rulers everywhere, who are manifestly 
aware of the fact, and are trimming their sails to 
the breeze, if they are not already shortening sail 



parallel on a smaller scale may be found in the 
perplexities of Mary Stuart's Court before the 
plain-dealing of Knox. Rooted in subtleties, the 
intriguers knew not what to do with a single- 
minded man. They could meet rogues on their 
own ground. Honesty was too much for them. 
Whether the Bolshevists can endure to the end is 
still a problem. Their true character has yet to 
be proved. The interesting fact remains that 
armed German might received from their words 
a check and an embarrassment which Russian 
artillery failed to inflict. It is a move in the 
great game which will have far-reaching con- 
sequences. But these no man dare predict. 



Jan. 23. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Par. 85 "I . 
LNfw Series J~ 



Apart from the international situation, various 
urgent domestic problems occupied the Allies. 
The chief Parliamentary event was the speech of 
Sir Auckland Geddes on man-power. He made a 
successful first appearance in the House ; his 
statements gave satisfaction, and he struck out at 
least one memorable phrase which found wide 



in restaurants. 




WITH THE BRITISH TROOPS IN ITALY : ROYAL ENGINEERS BRIDGE 
BUILDING. [Official Photograph.] 



quotation. Speaking of the younger munition 
workers, who threatened to strike if they 
were drafted to active military service, he 
warned them that, if they did so, they would 
meet " such a blast of hatred 
and contempt as would surprise 
them." The phrase had its 
uses, and those who might re- 
gard it as an irritant would 
do well to read it strictly in 
the light of Sir Auckland's plea 
for fairness to the men who 
ought not to be called up and 
those who have now more than 
earned relief from active ser- 
vice. The trouble of such vivid 
expressions is that, for their 
mere effectiveness, they are 
wrenched apart from their con- 
text and are liable to be mis- 
understood. The warning was 
the logical outcome of the 
Government's recruiting policy, 
which is to raise 450,000 men 
by the abolition of exemptions 
in certified occupations and by 
the withdrawal of occupational 
certificates. The age limit re- 
mains unchanged, compulsion 
will not be applied to Ireland, no soldier under 
nineteen is to be sent abroad. 

Various developments in the question of Food 
Control fell also to be noted. A Rationing Scheme 
for London, to take effect on Feb. 25, if approved 
by the Local Food Committees, begins with butter 



and margarine. Tea and meat may be rationed 
later, and the cards now to be issued will be used 
for the equal distribution of all controlled food- 
stuffs, as the successive orders take effect. Heavy- 
workers will have to make special application for 
a larger ration. There is a hint of coupons for use 
The counties affected by the 
scheme are Middlesex, Surrey, 
Sussex, Kent, Hertfordshire, and 
Essex. Emergency cards will 
be provided for travellers, sol- 
d.'ers on leave, and persons who 
have lost their cards. Existing 
regulations had not yet secured 
uniformity in certain prices, 
which during the week had 
again risen. New Orders fixing 
prices were in contemplation. 

France produced a sensa- 
tional event in the arrest, on 
Jan. 14, of M. Caillaux, who 
was committed to the common 
prison of the Sante on charges 
of conspiracy with the enemy. 
The information which led to 
the arrest was supplied to the 
French Government by Mr. 
Lansing, the American Secretary 
of State. It was alleged that 
the ex- Premier, when on a visit 
to South America at the close of 
1915, had opened negotiations 



with Germany, through the notorious Count Lux- 
burg, to secure an eaily peace at any price. The 
prosecution is in conformity. with M. Clemenceau's 
declared policy, on taking office, to seek out and 




WITH THE BRITISH TROOPS IN ITALY : BRITISH TROOPS ABOUT TO 
BEGIN THE DIGGING OF A TRENCH. [Official Photograph.] 

punish the traitors to France within her own 
gates. It is further alleged that incriminating 
documents have been found in Florence. These 
are said to relate to M. Caillaux's visit to 
Northern Italy, which occasioned much comment 
at the time. 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 23. 1918 



In a period of brief reports, the areas of 
.-trictly local fighting, raids, patrol encounters, and 
artillery duels, on the Western front, were thos-j 
around Armentieres, Ypres, Messines and the 
Srarpe, Vimy Ridge, north of Lens, Mericourt, 
south-east of Lens, St. Julien, Hargicourt, and 
St. Quentin. North of Lens the Canadians made 
a dashing and successful raid at no cost to them- 
selves. Air work was for several days suspended 
owing to the weather, but on Jan. 14 our 
squadrons made 
a daylight raid 

on Karlsruhe, 

heavily dam- 
aging railways 

and factories. 

The same night, 

Thionville and 

two junctions 

near Metz were 

visited. The 

previous day saw 

also much useful 

work over the 

enemy lines. On 

the 1 7th, save 

for successful 

Belgian artillery 

work at Dix- 

mude, Ramsca- 

pelle, and a raid 

at Epehy, there 

was nothing to 

report. The 




BRITISH SOLDIERS VERSUS ITALIAN SOLDIERS AT FOOTBALL 
THE BRITISH SIDE ENTERING THE FIELD. [Official Photograph.} 



same day Bernsdorf was bombed by airmen. 
The French kept up a series of useful bombing 
raids in the Vosges. Artillery duels, rising to 
some intensity, took place at Beaumont and 
Caurieres, in the Verdun region, where also a 
fierce enemy attack on the Bois le Chaume was 
broken up. At Badonvilliers, in Lorraine, a 



enjoying a welcome respite. The French airmen 
seized every chance to beat up the enemy's 
quarters. The i/th was quiet, except for gun-fire 
south of St. Quentin and near Main de Massiges. 
The Italians, after a fierce fight in three feet 
of snow, on Jan. 14 made progress north of 
Osteria il Lepre, and captured 292 prisoners. At 
Monte Solarolo they entered the enemy's trenches. 
On the Venetian lagoons a surprise extended the 
bridge-head east of Capo Sile, seized trenches, and 

held them 
against counter- 
attacks. On the 
following day 
these gains were 
successfully 
m a i n t a i n e d 
against fresh as- 
saults of great 
and determined 
vigour. In this 
action the artil- 
lery, the 2nd 
Grenadiers, and 
the 7th Bersag- 
lieri Cyclists were 
particularly dis- 
tinguished. The 
enemy'spositions 
were thickly 
strewn with his 
dead, and prison- 
ers were taken in 
co ns ide rable 



numbers. On the rest of the front there was nothing 
of special interest in the report of Jan. 17. The 
Italian resistance stiffens every hour, and, between 
the Allies and the deep snow, the Austro-German 
command is not finding its incursion into Italy 
the picnic it promised its troops when they struck 
for the northern plains. The situation again 








i H 



' i 

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"LUl Ml " 1 

- JL J ^ J L Jt ^ u J KL 



* BRITISH IN ITALY: THE BRITISH ELEVEN WHICH PLAYED FOOTBALL AGAINST AN ITAL.AN TEAM 

Official Photograph. 

S2T^WL2rS Jf I'.' "^^ ^- '- Meanwhiie, both ItaHan and 

tish aviators were fully occupied, and brought 
down enemy machines. LONDON; JAN. 10, ,016. 



Jan. 23. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Put t i . 

|_New SeviesJ~ s 



H ''personal" Side of the Olar: Creature Comforts. 




The hardships of active service are many and inevitable, but even 
in the Tery maelstrom of events, with the ever-present risks of 
disaster and death, there are intervals in which the troops can 
find time to indulge in the very real comfort of a cup of hot coffee, 
or, with an eye to the future, may set to' work cutting up trunks 
of trees into logs for use on camp fires when occasion serves. 



ACCOUNT. 

Our first photograph shows troops on the Western Front in France 
enjoying coffee at a Y.M.C.A. dug-out, and it may be not out of 
place to mention here the amount of kindly work that the Asso- 
ciation has done for the troops since the outbreak of the war. The 
second photograph tells its own tale of foresight for such comfort and 
health as war conditions make possible. [Official Photographs.] 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 23. 









H Real "Ole Bill" in the British "Trenches. 







AT THE FRONT IN FRANCE: "OLD BILL" AT THE PERISCOPE; SENDING UP 



If w* an corr.et In our rutftpf of th* not* lupplled with th* 
up*r photnpph, th.r. It a r*al "Old Bill " at th* Front, and 
toll MM to It. Th* not* tay> i "A u*n In a front-lln* 
trnch. Whll* on* of th.lr party hu a w*ll-4*MrTd rut bhlnd 
thm, th* oth.r two ar* on duty : th* on* nurut (' Old BUI ') 
o t*t hit watchful *y* oa th* ptrl*cop on th* top of th* 



A ROCKET. 



trmch." Wh*th*r he It th* orlflnal of th* famom Biriufthr 
character, w* cannot tar. Probablj there ar* many "Old Bill. " 
to th* Army, hardy and humoroiu ntuau with a weather nt 
alway. op*n. Th* lower photofraph ihow( th* firing of a rocktt 
' r8nt - lto ""' * Inl to th. artill*ry.- 



Jan. 23. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Part 8S -1 _ 
LNW Series J ' 



"Brandy trench" and a Shave at the front. 






LIFE ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT: SOUP IN "BRANDY TRENCH"; AN OFFICERS' DUG-OUT. 



Many Indications of the unconquerable humour of the British 
soldier, and his cheerfulness in discorrfort and danger, can be 
observed in these *wo photographs taken recently on the Western 
Front. In the upper one may be seen a notice-board, just behind 
the soldier's head, inscribed "Brandy Trench." As to the origin 
of the name, history is silent, but the soldier in it has to be 



content, at the moment, with soup, and, indeed, he does seem 
quite content with it. The lower photograph illustrates an early 
morning scene in an officers' dug-out in a front-line trench. If 
the quarters are somewhat cramped there is at any rate a stove 
to diffuse warmth, and a genial spirit of camaraderie evidently - 
prevails among the six occupants. [Official Photographs.] 



r Put M 

" 



FHE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 23, 1918 




.. 



Hnd if You Knows of A Better 'ole 




^ 





t 




RECALLING THE EMBARKATION OF NOAH: AN UNUSUAL TYPE OF BILLET FOR BRITISH SOLDIERS. 
Ery Bill, it might be said, rarying the familiar proverb, has hi, pl,s^ ezpreion on their faces Certainly 

SSLS^S-Sw ^v-=i= 

SLvaSrSSsiaSSs?? HH H* 



Jan. 23. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r P.rt 81 -I. . 
LNe Series J * 



de're Ota.ting for the Bocbe . . and de're Ready." 








SCOTS AT THE FRONT : A LEWIS GUN IN ACTION ; A MEAL IN THE FRONT LINE. 



Since Glengarries gae place to steel helmeU, it i> not to easy to 
recognise ScottUh troops, but regmrdinf thoM seen in our photo- 
graphs, we hare the official photographer's word. The fighting 
spirit of the Scots is as fine as ever. "Yesterday," writes Mr. 
Philip Gibbs on January 13, "I met the Cordons in their 
billets. . . . 'What do you think of the prospects? ' I ask. . . . 



' We 're waiting for the Boche to show his hand, and we 're 
ready {or him. It seems likely that he will try to break our 
lines, but if he could not do it before when he had ten to one, 
how can he hope to do it now, when it will be man for man 
and gun for gun ? We shall hold him all right.' That is the 
faith of all our men." [Offitial 



ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. J... 23. 1918 




Olinter precautions against "the promise of Sprino 




STRENGTHENING OUR DEFENCES ON THE WESTERN FRONT IN FRA 

On another page in this number we give two photographs of a wiring-party receiving instructions from their officer, and 
setting out from the trenches to perform their task. In the above illustration a wiring-party is seen actually at work on 
the British front fixing posts for entanglements. They are out in the open in daylight, so presumably the enemy is not very 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. J*n. 2S. 



being Barbed dire Gntanglements in the Snow. 







^ 





/ 





BRITISH WIRING-PARTY AT WORK IN THE SNOW ON OPEN GROUND. 

lose. Often the work of wirinp-party has to be done under cover of the dark in No Man's Land, when it is difficult and 
>us, for at any moment a German star-shell may reveal their whereabouts and fire be opened upon them. Formerly the 
J were driven into the wound with muffled mallets, but now iron posts are used with screw-ends. [Official Photograph 

' ! 



CPutU 1 
N UUJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 23. 1918 



ROMANCES OF THE REGIMENTS: LXXXV.-THE 79ra HIGHLANDERS. 



THE SERGEANT AND THE TSAR. 



OUTSIDE, it was snowing in thick, determined 
flakes, and the night was settling down in 
storm that bade fair to last till morning. The 
company in the inn-parlour drew closer to the 
fire, ordered fresh pipes, together with other 
comforts, and prepared to make the best of it. 
There could be no thought 
of anyone's taking the road 
again for many hours, per- 
haps days. The time was 
the first quarter of the nine- 
teenth century. The long 
Peace had run for several 
years ; but the memories of 
the Napoleonic wars were 
still fresh in men's thoughts, 
and chance companies such 
as this in the inn -parlour 
often met fellow -wayfarers 
who had good stories to tell 
of adventures in the great 
struggle. 

" I see," said one travel- 
ler, laying down a week-old 
newspaper, " that the Tsar 
is dead." 

" Ay," said a huge-built, 
soldierly - looking stranger, 
who had sat silent in the 
chimney-corner. " Ay ay, and so he 's awa', is 
he ? He was a pretty figure o' a man." 

" Latterly," remarked another, " he came too 
much under the thumb of Metternich." 



" Well, ye 




ON THE BRITISH FRONT IN ITALY OUR 
FIRST PRISONER : AN AUSTRIAN INFANTRYMAN 
OF A. LINE REGIMENT. [Official 



" He was a fine chiel, for a" that," continued 
the Scotsman, with rising spirit. 

" You seem to take a personal interest in 
his late Majesty, Sergeant Campbell. How 's 
that ? " 

see," continued the Sergeant, 
" there was a time when 
Alexander I. took an interest 
in me. A verra personal 
and particular interest," he 
added, with a twinkle. 

" Now you 've let your- 
self in for a story, Ser- 
geant. You 've been a 
listener all evening, It 's 
your turn to fire away, 
after rousing the company's 
curiosity. Fill up your 
tumbler." 

The Sergeant repaired 
his dram, took a long whiff 
at his pipe, and seemed 
to delve for a little in the 
memories of his campaign- 
ing days. 

" Maybe," he began, " it 
will no seem so much after 
all in the tellin', but the 
fact remains that chance 
once threw me, the simple sergeant of the 79th, 
into contact wi' the Tsar o* All the Rooshias, 
and I wat he gaed throw me in style that he did, 
honest man. But to mak' a long story short, 




ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT-A CHRISTMAS EVE TROPHY: A GERMAN AEROPLANE AS IT CAME 
DOWN INTACT IN OUR LINES ON DECEMBER ^.-{Official Photograph.} 



Jan 23. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



"fjow the Barbed dire Gets t:bere." 




A WIRING-PARTY ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT : THE START ; AN OFFICER INSTRUCTING. 



Barbed-wire entanglements arc now usually fixed on iron posts 
"corkscrewed" into the ground, of the f}pe shown in these 
photographs of a British wiring-party setting out for their task. 
An officer h> described barbed wire as a kind of land octopus. 
"At the front," he writes, "we have learnt to loathe it more 
than any other inanimate object. . . . People at home probably 



nerer realise how the barbed wire gets there in the first place. 
One day the commanding officer, on his way round the trenches, 
discovers, with the aid of his periscope, that the ground in front 
of your trench needs wiring. 'Send in an indent for some wire,' 
he says. 'You had better organise a wiring-party for the first 
cloudy night.' " The operation is dangerous. [Official Photographs.} 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 23. 1918 



gentlemen, it was in the August following 
Waterloo that we were in Paris wi' the rest 
of the Allied Army. On the 24th July 
previous the Tsar had reviewed the whole 
force, and, it seemed, he had be> n greatly 
.struck wi' the Highlanders' appearance. On 
Aug. 17 we heard more of it, for orders 
cam' for me mysel', wi' Private John Eraser 
and Piper Kenneth Mackay, all of the 79th, 
along with some chaps o' the Black Watch 
and the 92nd, to go to the Elyse Palace 
to be inspected by his Majesty, who was 
particularly anxious to examine our dress and 
equipments. There was nine of us a'thcgither. 
Let me see. Besides us three of the 79th, 



Emperor we were come. In aboot ten minutes in 
cam' the Emperor, wi' his two brothers, also 
Prince Bliicher, Count Platoff, and various other 
celebrities. The Tsar began his inspection, and 
verra minute it was. Nothing seemed too small 
for his notice. He singled me out, as bein' the 
tallest man present, bade me step to the front, 
and told the rest to sit down. All the other 
nobility crowded round me, and you would a 
thocht I was some queer beast, the way they 
lookit at my kilt, my bonnet, my legs, an' a'. His 
Majesty thoombed me a' ower, and examined a' 
my appointments, one by one. He drew my 
sword and asked if I could perform any exercise 
with it. I told him I could not, and Lord Cathcart 




WITH THE BRITISH ARMY IN ITALY: OUR MEN BILLETED IN ONE OF THE HOUSES OF A TOWN 
A SHORT DISTANCE FROM THE BATTLE-LINE. [Official Photograph.] 



there was Sergeant M'Grigor, Private Munro, 
and Piper M'Kenzie of the 42nd ; Sergeant Grant, 
Private Logan, and Piper Cameron of the gand. 
Ye need not be told that we made ourselves as 
spang an' sprush as pipe-clay could mak' us, and, 
though I say it mysel', we were a gey presentable 
set o' birkies, I 'se warrant." 

" Were any of them taller or broader than you, 
Sergeant Campbell ? " 

' No ; 1 happened to be the biggest man on 
parade, so I cam' in for the most o' the speirin'. 
Weel, we marched to the Elysee, an' waitet half 
an hour. Syne down cam' Lord Cathcart's valet 
wha led us up to the Grand Hall. Lord Cathcart 
was there. He spoke to me at once, and bade me 
take charge o' the party while he went to tell the 



said that was a deficiency in the British Army he 
had never taken into consideration before. For 
we carried the sword, gentlemen, but were never 
taught to use it. 

" The Tsar next examined my hose, gaiters, 
and legs. Then he pinched my skin, thinking 
I wore something under my skin. He then 
asked about Waterloo and Egypt, and if 
the kilt was cauld in winter, was I married, 
and were my parents alive. After that, we 
did the manual and platoon exercise, and 
the pipers played, to the Emperor's great 
delight. After refreshments and a piece of 
money each,* we were dismissed. And that, 
gentlemen, is how I cam' to feel that in 
Alexander I. I had lost a friend." 



Jan. 23. 1918 



FHE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



[Pan Hi 1 . 
New SeriJ 1 



H popuUr Labour Leader at the front. 



8=5$ 




MR. BEN TILLETT AMONG THE BRITISH TROOPS : AT VPRES ; DRINKING COFFEE AT A Y.M.C.A. STALL. 



While at the British (root in France recently, Mr. Ben Tillett, it 
rill be noted, wore a "tin hat." He has alao recently been 
visiting munition works in and around Paris, making informal 
speeches (which were interpreted) to the workers. In one of these 
addresses he said that he brought greetings to France from the 
British Allies and workers. It was cheaper to make shells than 






men, and modern warfare was a warfare not merely of brains and 
numbers, but of guns, shells, material, and transport. The workers 
must appreciate this fact and hurry up supplies. The more shells 
they sent, the fewer men would be necessary at the front, and the 
more men would return in safety, thanks to the shells, which were 
produced by the sweat of labour. {British Official Photographs.} 



Part M T 

sriJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 2$. 1918 




Interesting Trophies on the British Western front. 




CAPTURED GERMAN MACHINES OF VERY MODERN 



Aircraft and Tanks, and the special guns invented to counter 
them, are among the most modern phenomena of scientific warfare. 
Our photographs show Interesting specimens recently taken from 
the Germans on the British front in the West. In the upper 
illustration is seen an enemy scouting aeroplane which had been 
brought down in the British lines, being carried away, shorn of 



TYPES : AN AEROPLANE ; AN ANTI-TANK GUN. 

its wings, on a lorry trailer by men of the R.F.C. The lower 
photograph shows some New Zealanders examining a captured 
German anti-Tank gun, which was mounted in an armour-plattt 1 
turret half sunk in the soil, with a domed roof. The gun, seen 
protruding on the further side, could thus be fired horizontally just 
shore the surface. [British and New Zealand Official Photographs.] 



Jan, 23. 1918 



FHE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWi 



Pirt.M "I 

IW srie. J 



Hustrian "Crashed" on our front in Italy. 




THE BRITISH FRONT IN ITALY : AN ENEMY AEROPLANE 



Our airmen in Italy have been very active ever since our forces 
entered the fighting-line. Thu, on January 2, General Plumer 
reported: "Splendid work U being done by our RF.C., who have 
destroyed Kveral enemy aircraft, and have successfully carried out 
several bombing-raids and long-distance reconnaissances " ; and 
on January 8 : "During the past week we have destroyed 8 enemy 



THAT FELL IN FLAMES IN OUR LINES. 



machines and driven down I others out of control, losing only 
I machine ourselves. Several successful raids on enemy aerodromes 
have been carried out." Again, on the ifith, General Plumer 
stated : " During the past week our aeroplanes htve destroyed 
6 enemy machines and driven down others." On the occasion illus- 
trated, the enemy machine fell in flames iZirilisA Official Photo.] 



ran U 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 23. 1918 



Interesting Trophies on the British (Hestern front. 




CAPTURED GERMAN MACHINES OF VERY MODERN TYPES: AN AEROPLANE; AN ANTI-TANK GUN. 



Aircraft and Tanks, and the ipeci.I guns invented to count 
them, are among the most modern phenomena of scientific warfare. 
Our photographs ihow Interesting specimens recently taken froni 
the Germans on the British front in the West. In the upper 
illustration is seen an enemy scouting aeroplane which had been 
brought down in the British lines, being carried away, shorn of 



its wings, on a lorry trailer by men of the RF.C. The lower 
photograph shows some New Zealanders examining a captured 
German anti-Tank gun, which was mounted in an armour-plated 
turret half sunk in the soil, with a domed roof. The gun, seen 
protruding on the further side, could thus be fired horizontally jut 
above the surface. (British and New Zealand Official Photographs,} 



I 

\ 






Jan. 23. 1918 



FHE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



EPan M )_,. 
New Series J 19 




Hustrian "Crashed" on our front in Italy. 






THE BRITISH FRONT IN ITALY : AN ENEMY 



Our airmen in Italy have been very active ever iince our forces 
entered the fighting-line. Thut, on January 2, Genera) Plumer 
reported : "Splendid work ii being done by our R.F.C., who have 
destroyed KTeral enemy aircraft, and have .ucceMfully carried out 
several bombing-raidl and long-distance reconnaiMance. " ; and 
on January 8 : " During the past week we have destroyed 8 enemy 



AEROPLANE THAT FELL IN FLAMES IN OUR LINES. 

machines and driven down 2 others out of control, losing only 
I machine ourselves. Several successful raids on enemy aerodromes 
have been carried out." Again, on the i6th, General Plumer 
stated : " During the past week our aeroplanes litre destroyed 
6 enemy machines and driven down others." On the occasion illus- 
trated, the enemy machine fell in names-~[Bri/K* Official Photo.] 



20 - [N. 1 ? rt ^Ll- THE ILLUSTRATI 




"Cdbat of the J^igbt?' -H Last 




A RESPONSIBLE DUTY ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT : 

To many minds the tragic happenings at the Front, with their terrible death-rolls and lists of casualties, have a tendency to obs< 
the almost equally tragic nerve-strain to which officers are subjected by the inescapable sense of responsibility for the safety 
others which is with them day and night Our picturesque photograph from the Western Front, with its striking contrasts 



HEWS, J,. 23, 1918.- LN 



Round to Sec if "HU'e (Hell' 




IE ROUND 



DUG-OUT IN 



A SUPPORT-LINE. 

id light and deepest shadow, shows an bfficer going his round in France to make lure that all is well in a due-out in * i 
port line, before turning in for such rest as he may get. Those at home may feel how much they owe to our gallant army and 
Allies, but ,uch p,ctures a, thu compel them to visualise and understand what 1. being done for them beyond the lr4CMMWMtt 

_J 



- r Part Hi 1 
(.New Serin 1 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NtWs, 



Jut.- 21. 1918 



fits Majesty's kand-Sbip "Ole're HU In It." 




ON 



THE BRITISH FRONT IN FRANCE: A CORNER OF THE BATTLEFIELD; 



For some time the wintry weather imposed a comparative lull upon 
l <to Uie Wtern Front. "It is six weeks," wrote 
Mr. Philip Cibbs on January 13, " , in ce the German counter- 
ittacks at Cambrai, two months since our capture of PaWhendaele 
and th lines hare bn quiet since then under the heay snow' 
except for bursts of gun-fire and ni^ht-raids, and that flame-assault 



A TIRED TANK. 



last week. Our men hare been glad of this respite from fight- 
ng. ... They are waiting now for the arena to be cleared of 

now. For a few days they looked to the likelihood of some 
other kmd of settlement, by statesmen rather than by soldier. 

ut now the enemy seems to want war instead of peace, and oar 
m .re re.dy to give him all he wants. "-[Official Photographs.] 



23. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



CPrtrt 85 ~l _ o 
New Series J Z3 



George Robey on a *Canh (not in Trafalgar Square) 




: r 



" THESE NEW INSTRUMENTS PROVED THEIR WORTH ' 



On the side of the Tank teen in the upper photograph has been 
depicted a caricature of Mr. George Robey, whoie effort! on behalf 
of the Tank Bank in Trafalgar Square, and various war-charities, 
are familiar to Londoners. On the roof of the Tank is its mascot 
puppy, in conversation with an officer. The derelict Tank shown 
in the lower photograph has been utilised to form the roof of a 



dug-out. The triumph of the Tanks in the Cambrai battle is now 
historic. Of their previous work last year Sir Douglas Hnig says 
in his recently issued despatch: "Long before the conclusion of 
the Flanders offensive, these new instruments had proved their 
worth and amply justified the labour, material, and personnel 
diverted to their construction and development" [Official Photos.} 






., Irtt lU-USfKAltD WAK NtWi. Jan. * j. 1*18 



l | H Striking Group of Men and Munitions 



on 




AN OBJECT-LESSON FROM FRANCE, WHERE OUR TROOPS 



ARE FIGHTING 






THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. Jan. 23. 



icstern front in f rancc : f)ow (Hare arc (Hon. 




THE MEN AND MATERIAL BY WHICH THE GREAT WAR IS BEING FOUGHT TO A FINISH. 

amended. The picture we give here, taken on the British Western Front, shows a working party and a dump oi shells, and 

10 suggests and illustrates one phase of the war with clearness, even to those whose imagination has not in other ways been 
stirred. -[Official Photographs.} 






.. f Pirt IS 1 
*~L ScrtoiJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



JM. 23. 1918 



THE NEW WARRIORS: XVI.- THE CLAN OF MUD. 



PAUL tells me that his job is twenty-four hours 
a day, and mainly mud. He says that, as 

far as he can see, he is a B.A. in Mud. If there 

is ever a Chair of Mud at any of the European 

universities, he, by earthy flavour, will be the 

first choice. He is a pundit in soppy earth. He 

knows intimately all the 

really thorough muds 

from Oise to Nieuport, 

from the terrible stuff 

born of chalk and H.E. 

to Flanders which is 

not mud, but a chronic 

evil. And he knows mud 

not by trench-boots and 

through one's food in 

dug-outs alone, but as a 

lifter and chucker-about 

of mud. Not only does 

he walk in it and eat it, 

as do the most noble of 

men ; he digs it, conveys 

it, bags it, casts it, em- 
banks it, metals it, con- 
trols it, and otherwise 

curbs its passion. 

Paul was once K.C. 

or, perhaps, almost so. 
Now he is L.C. and L.C., 
as he insists, is mainly 
alluvial soil. 

The L.C. was first 
anybody, generally " fa- 
tigues " hoicked out from 
infantry battalions, with 
R.E. men standing over 
them and 
telling them 
how badly 
they did their 
labouring. 
Then this war 
got a little 
bit topside, 
and some men. 
were wanted 
for fighting. 
The infantry 
went back to 
do it, and the 
R.E. bunched 
together 
navvy com- 
panies, and 
told them 
that, with 
plenty of 
R.E.'s to 
direct them, 
there was a 




A WESTERN FRONT ROAD WARNING TO PREVENT 

INJURY TO HORSES' FEET AND MOTOR-VEHICLE 

TYRES: "PICK UP EVERY NAIL." 

Along the roads, particularly where the roads traverse de- 
stroyed villages, labelled boxes are fixed up at places with 
the notice seen here. [Official Photograph.] 




WITH 



GENERAL ALLENBY'S MEN IN PALESTINE: THE WATER-SUPPLY 
STATION AT SOLOMON'S POOL.-tOffoaJ Photograph.} 



chance of their reaching perfection some day. 
The war became rather larger, as some may have 
noticed, and the R.E.'s were wanted elsewhere 
to put up telephone wires, so the Navvies had to 



carry on alone, changed themselves into a Labour 
Corps, enlisted every possible man from over-age 
to category B 2 to C 2, and from the Negro Isles 
(wherever they are) to the citizens of China, and 
became a small army in themselves. 

Paul, over age, joined up to go to war. Since 
that moment he has been 
too busy to notice the 
war he has been engaged 
in grappling with mud. 
His battalion is a pick- 
and-shovel warrior clan, 
though it has done other 
things. At one time, 
quite early in its offen- 
sive, they put it on a 
wharf, and it spent not 
inglorious days in lifting 
war material from rail- 
way-trucks into freight- 
sheds, and then wheeling 
this material from freight- . 
sheds to ship-side, sling- 
ing and stowing the stuff 
aboard as fast as ships 
could come alongside and 
get away. They worked 
with Negro and Indian 
Labour Battalions beside 
them, but didn't have 
much time to reflect upon 
them, as the insatiable 
ships never ceased to 
push into place as soon 
as others cleared for sea. 
Some bright brain de- 
cided, after 
many months, 
that they 
needed a 
rest, so they 
went inland 
for a spell, 
tore the vitals 
out of a series 
of gravel hills, 
and built an 
aerodrome 
upon that 
spot. A 
Brigadier saw 
their spade- 
work, and, 
liking the 
technique of 
it, had them 
off to France 
before . they 
could knock 
the sand out 



_ . fc*\* MM*U WUC 

their puttees. In France nobody knew about 
their spade-work, so they took shift and shift 
about with German prisoners at the Base port 
unloading at express speed the ships they had 

{Continued owrtea/. 



Jan. 23. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 




Zealand Officer's funeral on the Cdestem front. 






'PIKO NEI TE MATENGA": MAORI SOLDIERS SINGING AT THE GRAVE OF LIEUT.-COL. G. KING, D.S.O. 



Very brave, at evidenced by the award of the D.S.O., and idolised 
by the men of the New Zealand forces of whom he was the leader, 
Lieut-Colonel G. King was buried on the Western Front with full 
military honours, and with every token of the high regard and 
affection in which he was held. Our first photograph shows the 
reverent, simple, but touching service, conducted by a clergyman 



who wore khaki under his surplice. In the second photograph 
Maori soldiers are seen at the graveside of their beloved leader, 
singing the hymn, " Piko Nei te Matenga," familiar to English 
congregations as "When our heads are bowed with woe." The 
devotion of the men to their leader was made manifest in most 
touching manner. (Nat: Zealand Government Official Photographs.] 



i 

SrieJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, 



Jan. 23. 1918 



once loaded in Blighty. When they were 
warming to this job, and just learning the 
best way to ask for " Woodbines " in French 
of the district, an Army decided to " push " 
somewhere, and Paul and his low-comedians 
went up by slow trains to make things more pain- 
ful for the Gerries than ordinary circumstances 







WINTER ON THE WESTERN FRONT: A FIELD-GUN BATTERY PASSING 
THROUGH ONE OF THE BATTLEFIELD VILLAGES. 
Official Photograph. 

might permit. They graded and banked and 
made cuttings foi a web of Decauville railways ; 
they ballasted the line, and clamped home the 
rails. They unloaded the rolling stock, and set 
it on its wheels. After that, they detrained 
the ammunition, stores, guns, 
and the several things that any 
young Push ought to have, loaded 
up the Decauville trucks day in 
and night in, constructed depots 
and sheds, laid down dumps, 
and did a score and more things 
to meet the crying need for un- 
limited supply. Those who 
weren't making railways were 
making roads, with a Chinese 
Labour Battalion to help them. 
They made roads on quite good 
places for roads, and they also 
made roads on quite impossible 
places for roads. They shifted 
mud, they coerced mud with 
ballast, they forced roads across 
quagmires on the corduroy sys- 
tem. They struck their roads 
straight across fields, through 
houses, and over streams with 
unfaltering zest ; and when their 
roads became worn with per- 
petual traffic they patched and 
built them up anew. As they 



short) range artillery. Paul's little lot followed 
close on the heels of the push. Their roads and 
railways were shoving across the trenches and 
the No Man's Land that had been, and climbing 
the hills only a little less nimbly than the men 
who had gone over the top with bomb and 
bayonet " You could see the roads moving 
after the troops," someone said. 
At one moment in this push 
the battalion came in for all the 
emotions of front - line troops 
with none of the retaliatory 
compensations. An urgent voice 
over a spider-wire had called 
them up, and they had pushed 
through a minor barrage to set 
up earthworks and dig trenches, 
bury dead, and generally build 
a good defensive system and 
clean up the battlefield. While 
so engaged Fritz countered, and 
got into the trenches where 
Paul's shovel men were work- 
ing. Some of the shovel men 
so far forgot their categories as 
to do very pretty execution with 
pick and whirling spade ; all of 
them helped somehow, mainly 
in saving and carrying the 
wounded to shelter and to the 
Field Post. When Fritz had 
been driven off, the L.C. went 
on with its job. 

Its job is all sorts of jobs, from digging 
under fire to picking up bits of paper in 
billets. It buries the dead, and collects the 
sound and broken bits that are scattered over 
the battlefields ; it builds hutments at the base 




ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT INSIDE A CHURCH DESTROYED 
BY ENEMY SHELLS: PICKAXE-ING THE SNOW WHERE THE ALTAR- 
RAILS STOOD. [Official Photograph.] 

worked, several of their numbers went down 

some for ever. They had no rifles, Paul's men, 
but shells do not distinguish in these matters, 



and working parties are meet game for long (and 



and dug-outs at the front. It does anything 
with work in it. It is mainly category B 2 or 
C 2 or over age, and its labour is always in- 
valuable. W. DOUGLAS NEWTON. 



Jan. 23. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



f fan Si -] _ 
iNe- Secies J 2 




H Battlefield Light Railway in Gltnter. 







ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE : A WORKING-PARTY ON A LIGHT RAILWAY. 



Light railways play an ever-increasing part in modern war, especially 
in the preparation of an offensive. ' ' Nobody, ' ' lays a writer In 
Che "Times," "who has not witnessed the preliminaries of a battle 
on the Western Front can realise what an enormous amount of 
labour has to be done in accumulating immense supplies of ammuni- 
tion and stores before a move forward can be made. Incredible 



masses of shell have to b dumped at the artillery stations, and 
all the heavy plant and material for repairing roads and building 
light railways is piled up, so that the guns can be pushed on as 
rapidly as possible behind the advancing infantry." Light railways 
are used, not only for transporting guns, ammunition, and material, 
but also for bringing back the wounded. [Official Photograph.] 



I? 



,- r p>n u ) 

30 -[N.. s.nJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 23. 1011 



H pantomime Rehearsal on the Qlestem front. 




"DULCE EST DESIPERE IN LOCO": THE PRINCE AND CINDERELLA AT 



There u clinic authority for the belief that it is pleaunt at timej 
lo forget the graver aide of life and indulge in recreation, even 
in circumstances that in themselves are acarcely propitious. For 
that reason, our two photogr.phs are of a very heartening nature 
for thejr afford further evidence, if such were needed, that our 
men at the Front keep up their spirits and join with rest in such 



REHEARSAL. 



timely diversions as amateur acting. Photograph No. I shows 
the Prince and Cinderella rehearsing their parts, obviously with a 
keen enjoyment of the situation. The second picture is a scene 
the general rehearsal. The sense of drama is rery acute in 
many of our troops, and nothing pleases them more than to take 
part in theatricals "behind the lines. "-(OfficM Photographs.} 



Jan. 23. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Part S "I .. 
(.New SerieJ~31 



JL. 



H pantomime Rehearsal on the Olestern front. 






REMINISCENT OF "THE LANE" ON^ BOXING NIGHT: "THE UGLY SISTERS" AND CINDERELLA. 



Despite the prevalence of "war's alarms," even at Christraastide, 
old customs and old amusements were not forgotten by our brave 
troopi 00 the Western Front, where, among other seasonable 
diversion!, * humorous and clever war-version of "Cinderella" 
that always-popular Christmas heroine was given by some of our 
troops. Our first photograph is of the two Ugly Sisters rehearsing, 



on a stage donkey, and we may pay the performers a real com- 
pliment by assuring them that their presentment of the popular 
pair Is irresistibly reminiscent of those never-forgotten favourites 
at "The Lane," Dan Lcno and Herbert Campbell. In the second 
photograph an officer is shown as a notably attractive Cinderella, 
an always popular heroine. [Official Photographs.] 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan 23. 1918 






Che Deliverer of lerusalem in* the fioly City. 





I A "SON OF ANAK" AMONG HIS OFFICERS: GENERAL ALLENBV AND HIS STAFF IN JERUSALEM! 



I entered this city," s^d General Allenby in hi. memorable 

trom Jerusalem on December n, ".t noon to-day, with 

* few of my staff. ... The procession was all on foot." Thus 

Uy and without ostentation, the delirertr of the Holy City 

made his entry-, striking ,,, , ,,. bomt)Mlic 4^ o( 

the Kair during hi, risit in 1898, of which contemporary 



drawings appeared in the "Illustrated London News " for January 19 
! General Allenby's entry Mr. W. T. Massey writes: "The Com- 
mander-m-Chief and hii small staff, a guard of less Than 150 all 
told of Allied troops, a quiet ceremonial of the reading of a pro- 
clamation and of meeting the notables . . . .nd the official entry 
was over."_[poto. by the American Colony in Jerusalem] 



>,.: 23. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Part 85 ~l ,. 
[.He* SeiiesJ~ 33 




General flllenby Greeting the potables of 7crusalem. 





AFTER THE ENTRY INTO JERUSALEM : GENERAL ALLENBY RECEIVING NOTABLES AT THE BARRACKS. 



Describing the entry into Jerulai em, Mr. W. T. Matey writes : 
"Re-forming, the procession mov>.d up Zlon Street to the barrack 
square, where General Allenby received the notables and heads of 
the religious communities. The Mayor and the Mufti were pre- 
sented, the sheikhs in charge of the Mosques of Omar and Akaa, 
and Moslems belonging to the Khaldieh and Alamieeh families. 



The Patriarchs of the Latin, Greek Orthodox, and Armenian 
Churches, and the Coptic Bishop, had been directed by the Turks 
to leave Jerusalem, hut their representatives were introduced, as 
also the heads of the Jewish Committees, the Syrian Church, the 
Greek Catholic Church, the Abyssinian Bishop, and a representative 
of the Anglican Church." fP*o*>. &y<* A merifan Cofotiv IN Imtyilcm.} 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



. 23. 1918 



WOMEN AND THE WAR. 



THE Imperial War Exhibition at Burlington 
House helps to emphasise the great and still 
growing share that women are taking in the war. 
From the purely feminine point of view, not the 
least interesting section of 
the show is that organ- 
ised through the courtesy 
of the Ministry of Muni- 
tions, and illustrating the 
extent to which women 
are helping in the produc- 
tion of munitions of war. 
Aircraft exhibits prove 
that women can safely 
be trusted to undertake 
work on which the lives 
of our flying men de- 
pend. Parts of gun- 
mechanism help to show 
that the efficiency of the 
deadliest weapons is in 
no way impaired just 
because women happen 
to have had a hand in 
the making of them. 
Fuses, bombs, shells are 
other death - dealing im- 
plements which owe their 
existence to the efforts 
of feminine fingers ; chem- 
ical glass - ware, optical 
munitions, and other 
things demonstrate that, when it comes to this 
particular type of war work, woman is as 
versatile and as skilful as she is willing to learn. 

Much good 
ink will be 
used and 
quite an ap> 
pr e ciable 
amount of 
work be added 
to the duties 
of post-office 
officials before 
all the letters 
of congratula- 
tion necessi- 
tated by the 
recent Hon- 
ours List shall 
have reached 
their destina- 
tions. After 
having been 
severely left 
out in the cold 




WOMEN WORKERS FOR THE BRITISH NAVY 

IN WAR-TIME: ROUGH WORK IN THE YARDS. 

Official Photograph. 



nothing of higher officials, admitted the other day 
to the new and most excellent Order of the 
British Empire. The awards are nothing if not 
varied. The " lady clerk " in a Government 
office is in the same 
boat as the head of the 
bacon distribution depart- 
ment, and the joint head 
of the Women's Service 
Section in the Ministry 
of Food, and the wife of 
an eminent General. If 
the award of honours con- 
tinues as it has begun, 
and the war goes on long 
enough, there will be no 
" disappointeds " in the 
ranks of the women who 
work for the war. 



Mrs. Jessy Mair, who 
is now entitled to the 
letters O.B.E. after her 
name, has earned the 
honour by thinking out 
a scheme for distributing 
the bacon that everyone 
wants, but so few are 
able to get or afford. 
To Lady Plumer the 
Aldwych Hut for Over- 
seas and other members of 




his Majesty's forces owes much, if not all, of its 
success. Mrs. Constance D. E. Peel has done 
more than any other Englishwoman to raise the 

business of 
house and 
home keeping 
to the level 
of a science, 
and incident- 
ally to incul- 
cate in the 
minds of 
housewives 
those princi- 
ples of thrift 
and good 
management 
that are now 
reckoned high 
among the 
virtues. Nor 
did she wait 
until the war 



WOMEN 



for so long, women may be excused if they feel 
a little bewildered and amused at the over- 
whelming array of feminine " officers," to say 



WORKERS FOR THE BRITISH NAVY IN WAR-TIME- A 
JOB. BUT WILLINGLY UNDERTAKEN.-tOflcwl Photograph.} 



HARD 



began to do it. 
Her outspoken 
criticisms on 
extravagant British methods of housekeeping and 
her suggestions for reform date from a long time 
prior to August 1914. That they fell to a great. 

{Continued ntrlea/. 



Jan. 2S, 118 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r prt w -| ,- 

LNe Series J ~ 3 & 



Cdomcn-Cdorhcra in dar-Cime : Scenes in the J^ortb. 






PICTORIAL PROOF OF THB AXIOM OF THE MINISTER OF MUNITIONS : HARD WORK FOR WOMEN. 



IL 



In * notable putafl ln hl rtcnt Tiforout tpeech, made before 
> Urf*>r Amtric*n tudltOM, on* of tht moit flctln polnu 
nutf* by tht Kl|ht Hon. Wliuten Churchill, Mlnltur o( Munitioni, 
wti tht "wenwn mutt coottnukllr In thttt tlmw of it rut bcom 
mort dttplj lnrlTt4 In ttrtnuout manual labour." That woratn 
and tmploytn tllkt art fully alir to thlt frowlng nct>iltr, and 



rttpondlaf to tht call with alacrity, It ihown by our photograph! 
on thlt pan. Tht fir it picture ahowi womtn and girls doing 
work in ont of tht treat jrardt in tht North, where, notably on 
tht Clyde and at Ntwcattlt, they art now largely employed In 
manual labour of an ontrout dttcrlptlon. The atcond ihowi a woman 
at a machine which tstractt metal from rubbiah. [Official Pkotos.] 



J 



r 

* I 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



J.n 23. 19IS 



extent on unheeding ears is a misfortune ; that 
she tills a position in which her special knowledge 
can be utilised lor the benefit of the country is 
a real piece of luck for the nation. 

Dame Katharine Furse, nothing if not prac- 
tical, announces that five hostels for " Wren " 



whether the authorities deliberately took into 
consideration women's proveibial fondness for 
" looking nice " when drawing up the dress 
regulations for the new service. Anyhow, I 
expect their decisions will have quite a far- 
reaching effect when it comes to actually recruit- 
ing for the new organisation. 




WOMEN WORKING FOR THE BRITISH NAVY IN WAR-TIME: BUSILY 
ENCAGED IN ONE OF THE MACHINE-SHOPS. (Official Photograph.] 



recruits will shortly be opened. As she is not 
one to allow grass to grow under her feet, the 
thing may be an accomplished fact by the time 
these words appear in print. At the time of 
writing details of conditions of service are not 
obtainable, bu,t women have at least had plenty 
of warning of the kind of clothes they will be 
expected to wear if they join 
the new body. They sound prac- 
tical as well as becoming, so that 
none of the ten thousand or so 
women whose services are re- 
quired will be called upon to 
sacrifice their personal vanity 
in the cause of patriotism. 



Not everyone can aspire to 
the brass naval button-trimmed 
coat and skirt, with graded 
Patrick's blue rings to denote 
rank on the sleeves, that will dis- 
tinguish the Director and her 
assistants. However, there is 
nothing about the petty officers' 
kit of pilot jacket and skirt with 
black buttons to offend the most 
fastidious taste ; and there is no 
end to the ways in which a 
hat of stitched cloth can be 
made to look becoming, how- 
ever uncompromising it appears 
at first sight. Coat-frocks of 
blue serge are already well-tried 



However, we are warned in 
advance that becoming uniforms 
do not mean " cushy " jobs. 
Anyone who desires to become 
a " Wren " has to make up her 
mind to hard work, and plenty 
of it, for " the duration," whether 
she applies for enrolment as 
cook or clerk, chauffeur, wire- 
less telegraphist by - the - bye, 
women have qualified as wireless 
workers before, though hitherto 
their services have not been 
extensively utilised or any 
other class of worker that hap- 
pens to be required. Heaps 
of people will welcome the an- 
nouncement of Dame Furse 
that women now engaged in 
routine work of no especial 
importance will be useful as 
a source of supply of officers, 
for there are still plenty of 
women whose very enthusiasm for being use- 
ful has led to their undertaking work which 
other and less experienced women could do 
equally well il the necessity arose. But there is 
no fear of the Women's Naval Service being 
over - staffed. The Director has already ex- 
pressed herself clearly on that point It will 




WOMEN WORKING FOR THE BRITISH NAVY IN WAR-TIME : 
WORK IN THE YARDS. [Official Photograph.] 



ROUGH 



friends, and the rank-and-file are really to be 
congratulated on the fate that assigns them such 
clothes. One can't help wondering 



be " run " by the " minimum of officers and 
women," so that is one anxiety off the mind 
of the taxpayer. CJ.AUDINE CLEVE. 



Jan. 23. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



f Part fS "I 
l_New Series J 



YARMOUTH AGAIN BOMBARDED - A CONVOY TORPEDOED BETTER SUBMARINE 

RETURNS THE RUSSIAN NEWS MEDLEY GERMAN DOMESTIC CONFLICTS THE 

BALKANS AND PALESTINE-CHANGES AT G.H.Q. 

ON Jan. 15, for the third time during the war, sunk and the other damaged. The tonnage was 
Yarmouth was bombarded. The attack about 5000. One vessel was new, the other 

dated from 1907. Dr. Macnamara further stated 
that the hospital-ship Rewa was not in waters 



^N Jan. 15, for the third time during the war, 
Yarmouth was bombarded. The attack 

began at 10.55 p.m., and was heralded by the 

tiring of a star-shell. By its light, the enemy 

craft (of what 

kind is not 

known) open- 
ed fire, and 

kept it up for 

about five 

minutes. 

Some twenty 

shells fell into 

the town. Six 

persons were 

killed, and 

ten injured. 

The material 

damage was 

slight. The 

citizens took 
the ordeal 
calmly ; but 
they felt a 
little sore 
that the as- 
s a i 1 a n t s 
seemed, as 
far as was 
known, to 
have escaped 
scot-free. The 
words of an 
ancient mari- 
ner, quoted 
by the Daily 
Chronicle cor- 
respondent, 
deserve to be 
handed down 
to posterity. 
This worthy, 
who, the cor- 
responde nt 
says, " might 
have been Mr. 
Peggotty's 
brother," de- 
clared that 
" they were 
getting man- 
ured to it." 
By this time the shade of the immortal Charles 
must have enjoyed the malapropism, which even 
he could not have bettered. But he cannot relish 
the defenceless state of his chosen seaport. 

Dr. Macnamara, replying on Jan. 16 to a 
question in the House, acknowledged that on 
Dec. 26 two ships were torpedoed One was 




THE ENTRY INTO JERUSALEM : BRITISH TROOPS MARCHING INTO THE CITY, 
TO LINE THE STREETS. [Photograph by the American Colony, Jerusalem.'] 



g uaranteed 
safe by the 
enemy. The 
agree ment 
related only 
to the Medi- 
terranean. It 
is a humili- 
ating pill for 
British Naval 
prestige that 
we should 
have to sub- 
mit to these 
insolent and 
inhumane 
German pre- 
scriptions in 
respect of ves- 
sels which 
ought, on the 
very lowest 
terms of 
warfare, to be 
immune. But 
until the 
hoarded naval 
might of 
Britain is 
allowed to 
strike with 
full weight, 
the case is 
parlous. 
Meanwhile, 
the recon- 
struction at 
the Admiralty 
proceeds 
apace, and the 
public wait 
patiently for 
results. The 
subm arine 
ret urns for the 
week ending 
Jan. 12 were 



at least more 
encouraging. From 18 large ships sunk, the 
number had dropped to 6 in the tables, and of 
these 2 belonged to earlier dates. Smaller ships, 
2, as against 3, and of these I did not belong 
to the week in question. Fishing vessels, 2, 
as against 4 ; i being an earlier sinking. The 
four weeks' curve in larger vessels is indicated 

[Continued on page to. 



S8-f N> p ;" ,**.,] THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEW* Jan. 23. 1918 



Cavalry and a Onk : Old and )Scw Jvlctbods 




Tnecava,ry it wil, be recalled c 

the Tanks Cleared the* wly* by ' 8^^ on d the m 

' 



WESTi 



' m^tf "* beginning of the British attack near Cambrai, when 
P Ured thr Ugh the breach in the 



m 

pursue thenemy. The cavalry had fewer ca'nce in h "^ P Ured thr Ugh the breach in the G >"^ "" to 

__ " S m the preV10US Ptions of last year. Sir Douglas Haig says in his 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, Jan. 23, 1918 [^"series] S 



ar Used by the British Hrtny in f ranee 




'NT: MOUNTED TROOPS ON THE MOVE, WITH A TANK IN THE DISTANCE. 

ecently published despatch : "During the first days of the Battle of Arras the depth of our advance enabled a limited use a 
* made of bodies of mounted troops. The cavalry showed much promptness and resource in utilising such opportunities as 
we offered them, and at Monchy-le-Preux, in particular, performed most valuable service." [Official I 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



Jan 23. 1318 






by the figures n, 18, 18, 6, which if reasonably 
maintained, will mean a substantial drop in the 
average, and will afford strong presumption of 
Micecssiul defensive measures. 

In Russian affairs a notable incident was the 
declaration of independence by Turkestan. The 
Hrest-Litovsk Conference went its sensational 
way, producing every day some new turn of the 
unexpected. On the i.ith, the news was of a 
German poli- 
tical crisis. 
and the lead- 
ing Socialist 
organ hinted 
at a sudden 
change in 
domestic and 
foreign policy. 
Both Kulil- 
mann and 
Hertling were 
said to be 
tottering to a 
(all, on the 
question of 
their peace 
policy. The 
Pan- Germans 
showed an 
increasing 
hostility to 
the negotia- 
tions, and 
. were believed 
to be aiming 
at their total 
destruction. 
But these re- 
ports were 
subject to 
many limita- 
tions, and it 
was more 
than doubtful 
if the real 
sense of the 
p rop o s e d 
terms was 
u nderstood 
outside the 
circle most in- 
timately con- 
cerned. The 
Russians al- 
I'-ged that 
everything 
made public 
was manipu- 
lated in case 




THE ENTRY INTO JERUSALEM : ITALIAN TROOPS MARCHING PAST INDIA!) TROOPS 

OUTSIDE THE JAFFA GATE AFTER THE READING OF THE PROCLAMATION. 

Photograph by the American Colony, Jerusalem. 



any particulars might excite 
popular feeling in Germany. A Bolshevist 
ultimatum to Roumania, and the alleged arrest 
of the Roumanian Minister, placed that party in 
a less favourable light, if the story was true ; but 
amid the cloud of dubious information, no clear 
judgment was possible. Lenin was said to have 
been fired at in Petrograd, and a German rumour 
had it that that leader would shortly resign, and 



be succeeded by Trotsky. The German Crown 
Prince was credited with extraordinary influence 
in Berlin, and the war-party with a readiness to 
sacrifice the Kaiser, who has never seen eye to 
eye with his son. 

The Balkan reports still spoke of artillery 
activity in the Monastir region ; but there was no 
word of further developments in that quarter. 
Allied aviators had dropped bombs on the rail- 
way from 
Seres to 
Drama, and 
o n e'n e m y 
bases at Demi- 
Hissar and 
Alchar. 

Air - raids 
took place 
also on the 
Palestine 
front, despite 
unfavourable 
weather. The 
points at- 
tacked were 
an enemy 
aerodrome at 
Jenin, 30 miles 
south-east of 
Haifa, and 
the Amman 
Station of the 
Hedjaz rail- 
way, 47 miles 
north-east of 
J e ru salem. 
Nearer Jeru- 
salem brisk 
patrol work 
was carried 
out at Birch, 
Mar Saba, 
J e b a, and 
M u k h m a s 
At Mukhmas 
an e n e m y 
post was raid- 
ed, the village 
cleared and 
prisoners 
taken. On the 
coast there 
was similar 
patrolactivity 
at Mezeirah, 
i6j miles 
north-east of 
Jaffa, and 



Arsuf, loj miles north of that port. 

It was reported recently that Sir Douglas Haig 
was making drastic changes at General Head- 
quarters. " It is a matter of common know- 
ledge," said the Times a day or two ago, " that 
his new Chief of Staff is Lieut. -General Sir Her- 
bert Lawrence, a son of the first Lord Lawrence, 
and (like Sir Douglas Haig himself) an old iyth 
Lancer." LONDON: JAN. 19, 1918. 



LONDON: Published Weekly at the Office. 172. Strand, in the Paris"h of St. Clement Danes, in the County of London, hyTHR ILLUSTRATED LONDON NPWS AN1> SKKTCH, 
172. Strand, aforesaid : and Printed by THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON News AND SKETCH. LTD.. Milford Lane. W.C. :! WEDNESDAY. JAN. 23. 1918. 
Entered as Second-Class Matter at the New York (N.Y.) Post Office. 1916. 



The Uluitrated War New,. Jan. 30, 1918.-Part 86, New Seriet. 



Cbc Illustrated War news 




French Official Photograph. 

TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE WIRES AT THE FRONT MUST LIE LOW : FRENCH FIELD ENGINEERS 
RUNNING A LINE BELOW THE SURFACE IN A TRENCH. 



Part US 

ew Series 



Jan. IU, 1918 



THE LULL IN THE FIGHTING-MINOR ACTIONS IN FLANDERS, FRANCE, AND ITALY- 
BRISK AVIATION WORK- A WEEK'S POLITICAL EVENTS-THE PREMIER AND LABOUR- 
POPULAR MOVEMENTS AT HOME AND ABROAD-STORM SIGNALS. 

increasing vigilance of that arm of the service. 
Good visibility early in the week enabled the 
British airmen to engage with success a great 
many hostile batteries. Over 300 bombs were 
dropped on miscellaneous targets, one of which 
was a large ammunition dump near Courtrai. At 
the same time, low-flying aeroplanes peppered the 
enemy in his trenche . with machine-gun fire. 
The 2oth saw excellent observation work as long 
as daylight lasted, and many photographs were 
taken in the hostile forward areas. Bombing and 
machine-gun fire from the air went on steadily. 1 



1"HAW and mud, taking the place of frost and 
snow, continued the lull on the Western 
trout. The daily communique was often no more 
than a line repeating the well-worn formula 
" nothing of interest." But all the time the guns 
were busy around Ypres, Neu,ve Chapelle, and 
Lens ; and patrols went out nearly every day, 
bombing trenches and bringing back a few 
prisoners. The enemy attempted raids on the 
Cambrai front on Jan. 20, and a point east of 
Ypres on Jan 22, but these were driven back. 
The same day the enemy's guns were lively on the 




GOING TO CHURCH NEAR THE FRONT LINE : CANADIANS ENTERING ST. GEORGE'S, ON THE WESTERN FRONT. 

Canadian War Records. 



Cambrai front. That night another abortive raid 
was made on the British trenches south-west of 
St. Quentin, and a similar attack was beaten off 
from our posts south of La Bassee. Between 
St. Quentin and the Scarpe, and south-east of 
Messines and near Zonnebeke, the enemy guns 
searched the British front at various points. On 
the 24th, the earlier British reports were blank. 
The night communique had little to record except 
some activity of enemy artillery in the neigh- 
bourhood of Passchendaele and on the Scarpe. 
The state of the weather had again interrupted 
aviation. 

During the period reviewed the aviation 
reports continued to prove the incessant and 



Next day the frequent rain-storms confined the 
air work to bombing and artillery observation ; 
but at nightfall, when the weather cleared, our 
night-flying machines got to work with good 
effect on the enemy aerodromes near Courtrai. 
and on German billets at Roulers and Runbeke. 
At the same time other machines crossed the 
frontier, and again gave the steel-works at Thion- 
ville a taste of their quality to the tune of two 
tons of bombs ; while the railway sidings at 
Bensdorf and the junction at Arneville once more 
received polite attentions. Monday's rain brought 
fine visibility on the following day ; observation 
work and photography were pursued under th 
most favourable conditions, together with vigorous 



Jan. 30. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



f fur. 86 I _ 
|_Ncw Series J~3 



bombing. The billets at Roulers and Menin, a 
dump at Courtrai, and other forward areas 
received nearly 400 bombs. The aerial machine- 
gunners also gave a capital account of themselves, 
harrying troops and transport on the march, and 
batteries and machine-guns in action. In three 
days' fighting, thirteen enemy machines were 




m 



AIRCRAFT WORK FOR WOMEN: MAKING NETWORK FOR AN OBSERVATION- 
BALLOON.^[PAotosra/>* ty Illustrations Enron.} 

brought down, five driven down out of control, 
and one observation balloon brought down in 
flames. Of our aircraft, seven were reported 
missing. 

Meanwhile, on the French front, the period 
opened with an attempt to rush our Allies' lines 
west of the Oise, but the at- 
tacking force was dispersed by 
gunfire. On the Aisne front, 
north of Chavignon, and at 
Bezonvaux, on the right bank 
of the Meuse, the enemy's guns 
were fairly lively. On the 2Oth, 
the French repulsed two raids 
near St. Quentin and Courtecon ; 
artillery was active on both sides 
north-west of Rheims and on 
the right bank of the Meuse : 
an enemy coup-de-main failed 
in the Loivre region ; and north 
of St. Mihiel a patrol took some 
prisoners. Next day, another 
coup-de-main had equally poor 
success in the Argonne ; but 
otherwise, except for gunfire on 
the Meuse, in Alsace, near 
Hartmannsweilerkopf, there was 
little activity. On the 22nd 
there was only raiding by the 
enemy and our Allies in Cham- 
pagne. The French party got 
as far as the third enemy parallel, did extensive 
damage, and brought back a few prisoners. On 
the 23rd, the Germans, after heavy artillery pre- 
para' ion, got a footing in a French forward trench 



on the Belgian sector east of Nieuport. He was, 
however, immediately ejected. In the Verdun 
region. Hill 344 and Chaume Wood were again 
the scene of fairly lively artillery actions, followed 
at one point by an unsuccessful enemy raid on 
Chaume Wood. As on our own front, the French 
airmen had been making the most of their 
opportunities. A return for 
nine days showed that they 
had brought down in aerial 
combat, or by anti-aircraft gun- 
fire, twenty German aeroplanes. 
On the 24th, the French report 
spoke only of a raid in which 
some prisoners were captured at 
Auberive, and of brisk gunfire 
at Maisons-de-Champagne and 
in the Avocourt sector. 

Bad weather in Italy pro- 
duced a state of affairs similar 
to that on other European 
fronts. The earlier operations 
of the present period could be 
summed up in " artillery actions 
and limited patrol activity west 
of the Brenta and between the 
Brcnta and the Piave." The 
liveliest artillery fire was for the 
moment directed against the 
British posts in the Montello 
sector. Our batteries, replying 
vigorously, shelled troops on 
the march between Mina and Cajjaraggia. On the 
2oth, General Plumer reported that air work had 
been much hampered by the weather, but during 
the two days on which our machines had been 
able to go up they had destroyed six enemy 
machines without casualty. On the 2oth also, at 



11 




AIRCRAFT 



WORK FOR WOMEN : WELDING WIRELESS AERIALS. 
Photograph by Illustrations Bureau. 

Sano, in the Southern Trentino, the Italians, in a 
smart little local affair, took several prisoners. 
At Monte Asolone, gun-duels were brief but intense 
British batteries caused a big fire in the enemy's 



. r rt 

[_Nw 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 30. 1918 



lines south of Sernaglia, and his wagon transport 
and patrols had been dispersed at points along Ihe 
I'iave. The following days were a period of calm, 
which was broken on the 24th by lively artillery 
action along the whole front from Chiese and the 
Adige to the Piave and the coast. On the Asiago 
Plateau there were patrol encounters. Eastward, 
at Capo Sile, another surprise action drove back 
an enemy advanced post and captured a good 
store of arms and ammunition. It was announced 
that Field-Marshal Conrad had been superseded 
by the Serbo-Slav, General Boroevitch, in supreme 
command of the Austro-German armies on the 
Italian front. On the 24th, the Italian Premier, 
Signor Orlando, arrived in London. 

There has been an important meeting between 
the Prime Minister and the Labour leaders, 



noteworthy the speech of M. Litvinoff, the 
Bolshevist Plenipotentiary, and that of Mr. 
Purdy, the President. M. Litvinoff "s words may 
not have been of policy and wisdom the very 
button, but his solemn affirmation of belief in 
revolution in Germany (and he hoped, elsewhere) 
found sympathy. On the other hand, Mr. Purdy, 
without fear or favour, virtually followed up the 
Prime Minister's argument of a few days before 
that Germany would not " cash our cheque." He 
declared that, failing that, '' we must fight on," 
He struck a fine patriotic note, and held fast by 
our pledges to France, Belgium, and Serbia. 

The popular unrest declared itself as acutely 
abroad as at home. Strikes in Austria placed the 
Seidler Government in some peril over the food 
Question, Tn Germany, the Vorwaerts fell into 





WITH THE R.F.C. IN INDIA: AT A FOOD MARKET (BAZAAR, IN A VILLAGE. [**#* by S. a,u, C.]. 



through whom Mr. Lloyd George appealed .to 
the workers of the nation to support the 
Government's proposals for reinforcing the 
Army. He trenchantly exposed the recent 
manoeuvres of Kuehlmann, Ludendorff, and 
Hindenburg ; he appealed passionately for fair 
play to our fighting men ; and he ended with the 
warning " Go on, or go under." The Prime 
Minister replied, like the old Parliamentary hand 
he is, to subsequent questions from delegates, and 
his remarks made a deep impression. At the same 
time, the questions showed beyond doubt the 
determination of Labour to take, if possible, the 
question of settlement into its own charge,' and 
its belief that it could rally to its side the opinion 
o: the masses in all countries, Allied and enemy. 
A few days later, : the Nottingham Conference 
afforded further remarkable indications of the 
trend of opinion Two incidents are particularly 



disgrace once more and was suspended for its 
Vienna news ; but the energetic action of the 
Socialist leaders during the censure debate in the 
Reichstag Committee led to the withdrawal of 
the ban. Herr Ebert boldly expressed sympathy 
with the Austrian proletariat ; Herr Scheidemann 
warned the German authorities that they were 
playing with fire, and that the German situation 
differed little from the Austrian. 

In Parliament, Major Davies and Mr. Kennedy 
Jones put questions on the Cambrai affair, in- 
volving criticism of the British High Command. 
Mr. Macphcrson replied that neither the Army 
nor the country had ever lacked confidence in 
Sir Douglas Haig's leadership. Later, Mr. Bonar 
Law expressed the Government's confidence also. 
Another noteworthy political event of the week 
was the resignation, on Jan. 21, of Sir Edward 
Carson from the War Cabinet. -LONDON: JAN. 26, i,,8. 



J.B. SO. 1818 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



CPart 6 T , 
New Series J~ 5 



In Jerusalem during the Occupation by the HUies. 





A MONASTERY AS A MILITARY HOSPITAL : BRITISH WOUNDED. 



It hu been found possible to provide adequate hospital accommo- 
dation within the precincts of Jemmalem itself for many of the 
wounded of General AUenby's Army. In particular, proriiion has 
been made for those who hare been wounded in the engagements 
in the neighbourhood of and to the north of the Holy City, which 
took place with the Turkish rear-guard after the occupation by the 



Allies. Under the Turkish regime, toleration, was extended to * 
number of Christian monastic and other establishments within and 
without the walls of Jerusalem. The buildings, most of which 
are of solid construction and roomy, are proving of great use- 
fulness to the Red Cross and R.A.M.C. at the present time. 
[Official Photograph.} 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 39. 1918 



In "the fiueless Desolation that is Mesopotamia." 





THE BRITISH CAMPAIGN IN MESOPOTAMIA : A HEAVY GUN IN ACTION ; A TRENCH SCENE. 



The (act that for some wMlu there was very little news from 
Mesopotamia was explained by an announcement made on 
January 17 by the War Office, which stated : "The heavy rain In 
Mesopotamia has ceased and the floods hare subsided. There is 
no change in the situation." For previous official information 
about the most distant of our campaigns it is necessary to go 



back some time. Thus on January 4 the War Office announced : 
"The situation in Mesopotamia remains unchanged. During the 
last week of December our aeroplanes dropped bombs on a Turkish 
camp at Kifri, and fired into another camp at Chaman Kupri. 
13 miles south of Kifri. We bombarded also the Turkish aerodrome 
near the junction of the Lesser Zab with the Tigris. During the 

[CoHtiiniHt offostrr. 



Jan 30. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Port 88 I . 

LN sriJ ' 



TThc JMesopotamian front: H fieavy 










THE BRITISH CAMPAIGN IN MESOPOTAMIA: A HEAVY GUN AT THE MOMENT OF FIRING. 



night of December 30-31, Turkish aeroplanes dropped bombs near 
Samarrah and Kiiil Robat, but wi(h insignificant results." Klfri 
is about too miles north-east of Baghdad, on the main road to 
Mosul. The Lesser Zab joins the Tigris 135 miles shore Baghdad. 
Kizil Robat is towards the Persian border. Early in December 
the British right wing adTanced from the Dialah along the Kifrl 



road, and General Marshall secured important pisses in the Jebel 
Hamrin. The weather then turned abnormally cold. The upper 
photograph on our left-hand page here shows the kind of country 
In which our guns hare to operate, a landscape which Mr. Edmund 
Candler, recently described-as "the hueless desolation all round 
that ii Mesopotamia." [Official Photographs.} 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 39. 1918 



In "the fiuelcss Desolation that is Mesopotamia." 





THE BRITISH CAMPAIGN IN MESOPOTAMIA : A HEAVY GUN IN ACTION ; A TRENCH SCENE. 



The fact that lor tome weeks there wis very little news from 
Mesopotmi was explained by an announcement made on 
January 17 by the War Office, which stated : " The heavy rain in 
Mesopotamia has ceased and the floods have subsided. There is 
no change in the situation." For previous official information 
about the moat distant of our campaigns it is necessary to go 



back some time. Thus on January 4 the War Office announced : 
"The situation in Mesopotamia remains unchanged. During the 
last week of December our aeroplanes dropped bombs on a Turkish 
camp at Kifri, and fired into another camp at Chaman Kupri, 
13 miles south of Kifri. We bombarded also the Turkish aerodrome 
near the junction of the Lesser Zab with the Tigris. During the 

[Continued ofpostte. 



Jut 30. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 




tThc Mesopotamia* 1 front: H fieavy 









THE BRITISH CAMPAIGN IN MESOPOTAMIA: A HEAVY GUN AT THE MOMENT OF FIRIMG. 



night of December 30-31, Turkish aeroplane* dropped bomb* near 
Samarrah and Kiiil Robat, but wi(h insignificant reiulti." Klfri 
is about 100 miles north-east of Baghdad, on the main road to 
Mosul. The Lesser Zab joins the Tigris 135 miles abore Baghdad. 
Kizil Robat is towards the Persian border. Early in December 
the British right wing advanced from the Dialah along the Kifri 



road, and General Marshall secured important passes in the Jebel 
Hamrin. The weather then turned abnormally cold. The upper 
photograph on our left-hand page hsre shows the kind of country 
in which our guns hare to operate, a landscape which Mr. Edmund 
Candler, recently described. i "the hueless desolation all round 
that is Mesopotamia." [Official Pkotograplis.] 



p.m M 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 30. 1918 




OTith the British Hrmy in Italy 





ALONG OUR FRONT : LOOKING FROM THE MONTELLO RIDGE TOWARDS COPUNDA ; OUTSIDE BILLETS. 



It was early In December that the British Army in Italy, or the 
main portion of it, took over the lector of the front specialty 
allotted to them, in one district of which the photographs above 
were taken. The British Army lection, as has been described in 
the newspapers by a correspondent at the Italian Headquarters, 
"comprises that angle of the Italian front where the River Piave 



meets the mountains where it debouches into the Venetian Plain 
from the outlyirig Alpine mountain chain." The mountains are 
seen in the background of the upper illustration. The enemy are 
known to be in considerable strength there, but the Austrian activity 
in that quarter has slackened, in consequence, it is understood, of the 
snow in the passes hampering movements. [Official Photographs.} 



Jan. 30. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Part 80 
LNew sere 



CCUth the British Hrmy in Italy. 








OUR AIRMEN AT THE FRONT : A FLIGHT BEING GOT READY ; IN THE NEW FLYING KIT. 



The honour of striking the first blow against the enemy on the 
Italian front fell to our airmen, before the main columns of 
General Plumer's Army had had time to reach the battle-zone. 
And the British airmen in Italy, now in force at their camps and 
stations, hare since then repeatedly given the Austrian airmen 
tastes of the quality they had previously displayed on the Western 



Front in Flanders. Take, for example, the latest official report 
from General Plumer at time of writing. It is dated January 10, 
and runs thus : " The weather lately has been bad. Flying has 
only been possible on two days during the past week. On these 
days, however, we destroyed six enemy machine! without any 
lost to ourselves." (Official Photographs.] 



Pct w 1 

Stie 1 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 30. ItUo 



OTith the Navy in Iar~t:ime : Ship-Building. 






DOCKYARD WORK: VESSELS ON THE BUILDING-SLIPS; A "STANDARD SHIP" IN THE MAKING. 



A glimpse In on* of the many shipyards, where they are working 
night and day on Navy work or food-supply ship-building, which 
are to be found, among other places, on the North and North-East 
coasts, notably along the Clyde and Tyne, is given in these illus- 
trations, and elsewhere in this issue. The upper illustration shows 
vessels under construction on the stocks, on slipways beside a rirer 



bank. The hulls are discernible through the forest of upright 
timbers, steel-girder standards, cranes, and construction-machinery 
gear, that edge each of the building-slips, .lor the purposes of the 
work on each vessel. In the lower illustration we look along the 
partly laid lower-deck of a "standard ship," with men at work 
among the girders and floor-plates. [Official Photographs] 



Ian. 30. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Part 88 |_ , 
LN.W Se<iesJ l 



QXitb the 



in Olar^Cime : engine and Boiler-Mahing 






WORKSHOP WORK : INTERIOR OF A CLYDE MARINE-ENGINE "SHOP" ; A WATER-TUBE BOILER. 



While in the actual ship-construction yards, all hands are hard at 
work incessantly framing and putting together the hulls of ships, 
both for the Nary and for the cargo-carrying service of the nation, 
elsewhere the work of engine, machinery, and boiler-making pro- 
ceeds simultaneously. In certain of the greater establishments 
both the ships are built and their engines constructed for them, 



and put on board by the same firm : all being "done on the 
premises," so to speak. In other cases, one firm builds the ship ; 
another firm, which specialises in the manufacture of marine engine 
machinery or in boiler-making, supplies these "parts " to the 
builders when the hull is ready to be fitted on board usually after 
the launch, or floating out, of the TesseL {Official Photograph*.} 



ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. Ja. 30. IMS 



>! Hn Interesting Discovery onjgouig Over a fland 

^2& |^ _____-_- - " " .. 




AS COMMENCED BY THE ENEMY, BUT HASTILY ABANDONED : THE 

The normal arrangement adopted by the Germans in setting up the framework, or railing, of steel upright bars that fo 
the nucleus of, or "reinforcement" to, the outer walling of concrete slabs and blocks of a "pill-box," is shown in t 
illustration. As one of the correspondents on the Western Front has described, the shape of the ground-plan of an inteni 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. Jin. 30. 1918-[" Ne p > ; r ' s |f ies ]-13 



ttleficld the Beginnings of a "pilUBox." 



_ 





GHTS FORMING THE NUCLEUS FOR THE CONCRETE WALLS OF A PILL-BOX. 

1-box, whether circular or oblong the usual shapes is first staked out with the upright steel bars, as we see above. Lumps 
soft and semi-pasty concrete mixture are then plastered on round and between the uprights, thus embedding them and building 
a solid wall stiffened in the centre by the steel bars. Outside, blocks of solidified concrete are affixed. [Official Photograph.] 



**" 1 

tNe SwtatJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 30, 1918 



ROMANCES OF THE REGIMENTS: LXXXVI. - THE 96ra FOOT. 



THE LOST KNAPSACK. 



LOST equipment is always a serious matter for 
the soldier first for himself, next for the 
Company Q.M.S., then for the Quartermaster, 
and so on until a Board has disposed of the case, 
if it be serious enough to go so far. On active 
service, however, the matter is easier, for no 
account is kept 
of waste in the 
field. There, it 
is obvious, many 
things must go, 
never to be seen 
again ; but curi- 
ous instances of 
resurrection are 
on record, and 
one of the oddest 
occurs in the 
minor annals of 
the Maori War 
of 1845. 

At the fall 
of Kororarika, a 
soldier of the 
g6th (now the 
2nd Manchester 
Regiment), lost 
his knapsack. 
In the circum- 
stances, the 




BIRDS THAT HAVE BEEN BOMBED: BRITISH CARRIER-PIGEONS 

IN THEIR TRAVELLING LOFT, WHICH A GERMAN AIRMAN BOMBED 

AND HIT WITH A SHELL-FRAGMENT. {Official Photograph.] 



of any part of the force to which it belongs, it 
will return certainly to the proj>er unit, and to 
the proper man. 

Many things, which seemed to have no direct 
bearing on this particular accident, happened 
after the fall of Kororarika. The British force 

went on to at- 
tack the " pah," 
or strongly de- 
fended native 
fortress of Ohai- 
owai. It was an 
elaborate work, 
with palisades 
and bomb-proof 
dug - outs, very 
thoroughly and 
intelligently con- 
structed. The 
general operation 
was directed by 
Lieut.-Col. Des- 
pard, of the ggth. 
The forlorn hope 
consisted of 20 
volunteers of 
that corps, under 
Lieut. Beatty, 



article seemed irrecoverable, and the owner, at any 
rate, had little or no hope of seeing it again. It 
is not recorded whether or not he was considered 
to blame. Most likely the mishap was held to be 
part of the general fortune of war. But these 



also a volunteer. 

They were sup- 
ported by 80 grenadiers drawn from the g8th 
and the 99th, and led by Major Macpherson, of 
the latter regiment. Other supporting parties held 
in reserve were made up of 100 men, each of the 
58th and g6th. Lieut.-Col. Hulme, of the 96th, 




A DUGOUT ON THE EDGE OF A BATTLEFIELD IN FLANDERS, WHERE THREE COMRADES WERE QUARTERED: 
THE TWO SURVIVORS; AND THE GRAVE OF THE THIRD MAN.-[Oj?iaJ Photographs.] 



things are remembered, and the Army system 
works with mechanical precision. If the lost 
property falls again by any chance into the hands 



commanded the third suppprt. . A small naval 
detachment under Lieut. Philpotts, R.N., with 
20 pioneers, was in charge of the ladders, hatchets, 



Jan SO. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



f Part 8 "I , . 

LN.W series J 1* 



Portugal Still Standing by the Hllics* 





PORTUGUESE LEADERS : GENERALS TAMAGNINI (C.IN-C., LEFT) AND GOMES DA COSTA, WITH GEN. LAKIN. 



Our photograph, Uken recently on the Western Front in France, 
shows the Portuguese Commander -in-Chief, General Tamagnini 
d'Abreu, and his colleague, General Gomes da Costa, with General 
L-Jtn. (standing between them), of the British Army. General 
Taruagnini had done much in the reorganisation of the Portuguese 
Army before he was appointed to command the forct sent to the 



Western Front. Since the recent change of Gorernmtnt, the new 
Provisional President, Major Sidonio Pact, said to a deputation that 
he was "glad to affirm, before represents tires of British commerce 
and of Portugal's old Ally, that the Government policy WHS one 
of absolute confidence in the Allies and directed to doing: all that was 
materially possible in a frank and loyal manner." [Photo, by C.A.j 



put w n 

ScnJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jn 30. 19 1 S 



and other scaling apparatus for the storming 
party. 

The stormers weie posted in a lavine, per- 
fectly sheltered from the enemy's fire. But the 
whole attacking force had the good fortune to 
reach its positions without drawing a single shot 
from the fort. Unfortunately, the 
naval officer thought the scaling 
apparatus superfluous, and, telling 
his men that they should trust to 
their cutlasses, he ordered the whole 
of the material, ropes, ladders, and 
grapnels to be left in the ravine. 
The attack was delivered with mag- 
nificent spirit, and the stormers 
pulled open the outer fence, but 
could make nothing of that within. 
The Maoris got the British under a 
very heavy fire, men fell fast, and it 
was necessary to withdraw. Colonel 
Hulme, with his detachment of the 
96th, performed most gallant work 
in bringing off the wounded, who 
were very numerous. Captain Grant 
and Lieut. Philpotts, R.N., fell close 
to the enemy's works. Among the 
dead were also 4 sergeants and 36 
men. The wounded numbered about 
70. The dead had to be left behind, 
to the great distress of all ranks. 
The soldiers, knowing that canni- 
balism had existed in New Zea- 
land, and that many of the enemy 



and was told that the bodies would be brought 
to a certain place near an outlying picket, if 
Colonel Despard would send for them. But this 
promise was almost immediately withdrawn, to 
the soldiers' further exasperation. Again the 
enemy relented, and the offer was icnewed. All 




TWENTIETH-CENTURY WAR-AUXILIARIES: ONE OF THE NEW ZEALAND 

ARMY DENTISTS AT WORK. 

A fully equipped dental hospital is attached to the New Zealand troops in the field. 

According to circumstances, it is quartered sometimes in huts, at other times in 

farmhouses behind the lines. [Nat Zealand Official Photograph.} 



had once been cannibals, and might be so 
still, were full of disagreeable apprehensions. 
Two missionaires went forward with a flag of 
truce a handkerchief on a pole and asked for 




TWENTIETH-CENTURY WAR-AUXILIARIES : SOLDIER DENTAL MECHANICS 

IN A WORKSHOP ATTACHED TO THE NEW ZEALAND DENTAL FIELD 

HOSPITAL. [New Zealand Official Photograph.] 



\< vc to remove the bodies. It was refused, and 
the soldiers became more and more uncom- 
'"ortable. Next day, however, a European called 
My-nion, who had been on friendly terms with 
th< Maoris, got into communication with them, 



the bodies, except that of Captain Grant, were 
given up. The Maoris said that Grant had been 
already buried. The British hoped devoutly 
that this might be true. Some days later, a very 
little gun ammunition arrived, and a 
limited bombardment of high-angle 
fire began. That night a strange 
silence fell upon the fort. On ex- 
amination it was found that the 
enemy had slipped away. The high- 
angle fire, although restricted by 
the need for economy, had searched 
the dug-outs very effectively, and 
had made the place untenable. 

Search for Captain Grant's re- 
mains at once began, and many 
newly made graves were opened 
within the precincts of the "pah," 
which was littered with strange 
relics of the spoil of Kororarika 
English and Maori Bibles and Testa- 
ments, English letters, and broken 
pieces- of European furniture. At 
last the body of the gallant officer 
was discovered. He had not been 
stripped of his uniform, and was 
only slightly mutilated. The search 
had an unexpected sequel. Among 
the opened graves was one of a 
Maori chief. The dead native 



"lay like a warrior taking his rest" in literal 
truth, for beneath his head had been placed, 
as martial pillow, the knapsack belonging to the 
man of the gfith. The owner, who was in camp, 
received it back intact. 



30. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



flt Basrah, the Seaport Base of the Hrmy in JMesopotamia. 









ON THE QUAYS : LANDING CATERPILLAR-TRACTORS ; 

Basrah is the base for the Army in Mesopotamia ; the place of 
debarkation and embarkation of troops for the front, going up the 
Tigris by river steamboat or by rail, and of invalids and con- 
valescent wounded sent down from the front. Every soldier, 
every Indian camp-follower, lands there. Artillery and ammuni- 
tion, cavalry horses, mules, transport vehicles all are put ashore 



INDIAN SOLDIERS ABOUT TO GO 



THE TIGRIS. 



there after crossing the sea. The approach to Basrah up the 
Shatt-el-Arab, from the Persian Gulf, has been dredged so that 
ocean-going ships navigate it safely. Before the war, under the 
indolent Turkish rdg,in\e, steamers of my size coming up to Basrah 
required special pilotage owing to the silting-up of the river delta 
channels which the Turks did little to keep clear.- -[Official Photui,.] 



pn n 1 

N.w Seri*J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jn . JU. IUIB 



Indian Stalwarts of the Hrmy in Mesopotamia, 




MUSI AND HEAD-GEAR : BAG-PIPES OF A FRONTIER CORPS ; TURBANS OF A FIGHTING RACE. 



The men Men in the upper illustration of a detachment of Indian 
infaj^ry in Mesopotamia marching out from camp for trench duty 
led by the regimental bag-pipes and a drummer with " tom-tom "- 
like drum, belong to one of the corps recruited among the border* 
land mountaineers on certain" sections of the Indian North-Western 
Frontier. As with our Highlander regiments, (hey maintain bag- 



pipers on the regimental establishment the bag-pipe being a 
national musical instrument common among the mountain in- 
habiting tribes. In the lower illustration the shape of the turbans 
of the men is noteworthy. The various races of India fold, or 
" build up," their turbans in ways of their own, according to 
national ities, castes, or religions. [Official photographs.'] 



Jan 30. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



I Part 8 

I New S 



In Mesopotamia : TTwo British Hitmen's Grave. 




A MEMORIAL AN AEROPLANE'S PROPELLER ERECTED BY THE TURKS : AN INDIAN SOLDIER'S SYMPATHY. 



A characteristic of the Indian comrades-in-arms of our men in 
the British Army is the reverential regard they pay to memorials 
of the fallen, whoever these may be. It has always been so. 
Readers of Macaulay will remember his story of an old sepoy who 
had served under the famous General Sir Eyre Come, in war in 
the days of Warren Hastings, coming suddenly on a portrait of bis 



old commander, then long dead. The veteran instantly drew him- 
self up, and solemnly saluted the portrait The demeanour of the 
Indian soldier in Mesopotamia here seen at the grave of two 
British airmen who fell in fight, suggests a similar mood. The 
propeller -blade was mounted over the grave by tht Turks while 
occupying the' neighbourhood. [Official Photograph.} - 



20 CN.***./! THE ILLUSTRAT 




H Bombardment Glimpse on the frencb (Hcstc 




AN EXTRAORDINARY VISUAL EFFECT AS A HOWITZER GOES ( 

In the centre of the foreground appears a French "canon de 270," which is really a species of long-barrelled mortar, or 
howitzer, in the act of firing an instant after the discharge. As an eye-witness describes, the visual effect at the moment 
the piece goes off is, as it were, of a great, almost globular, blast of flame, a pear-shaped flash, if it may be so described. Thr 



l 



Jn. so. 



it: H " Canon dc 270' at the Moment of firing. 





-OBULAR, FIERY BLAST AND THE DARK STREAK THROUGH FT. 

midst of the fiery vapour seems to shoot forth an elongated dark streak, which to the naked eye can be momentarily risible 
ing through the upper fringe of the flame. The illustration brings out both the effects described. High overhead, a line of 
rvation-balloons may be seen ; also, right across the top of the picture, reconnoitring aeroplanes returning. [Drawn by Gtorgcs Urour.' 



22 -[N.- s.riJ- THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, Jan. SO. II 




"Iron Duke' of bie JVIajeety's Grand Lan< 



J^r C'^y'Tf ^ -* .- 

/s x*^ v . - -, y . -i-L-2 



* ** v * . . ._ ] 

.,-.- /f7^3Sg 

?&$>&?$$ 





"VERY GALLANT AND VALUABLE WORK HAS BEEN ACCOMPLISHED BY TANK COMMANDERS 
Describing the Battle of Arras in his recently published despatch, Sir Douglas Haig said : " Tanks, which on many occasions 
since their first use m September of last year [i.e., 1916] had done excellent sevice, were attached to each Corps for the 
assault, and again did admirable work in co-operation with our infantry. Their assistance was particularly valuable in the 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, Jan. 30. 



eet: H British Onh Going into Hction. 





VS " : A TANK PASSING THROUGH A WRECKED VILLAGE ON ITS WAY TO BATTLE. 

ipture of hostile strong points." At the close of his despatch, reviewing progress in 1917, the Commander-in-Chiel said : 
Very gallant and valuable work has been accomplished by Tank Commanders and crews." When the Cambrai despatch makes 
I appearance, doubtless Sir Douglas Haig will bestow further praise upon hit Majesty's land-ships. {Official Photograph.} 



. f Part H I 
24-~|_Nw SwinJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. SO, 1918 



'Che Mining of the "Goeben" and "Brestou." 




THE SHIPS : THE "GOEBEN," MINED AND BEACHED ; THE "BRESLAU," MINED AND SUNK. 



According to the Admiralty narrative, the " Goeben " and 
" Breslau " were discovered outside the Dardanelles by the destroyer 
" Lizard " early on January 20, steering north for Imbros. The 
destroyer " Tigress " joined the " Lizard " in engaging the 
" Breslau," the " Goeben " meanwhile attacking our monitors in 
Kusu Bay, N.E. of Imbros. Sinking the "Raglan" and "M 28," 



the " Goeben " and " Breslau " turned south, whereupon the 
"Breslau" ran into three mines and sank. The "Goeben," headed 
off by British aircraft, made for the Dardanelles, running into a 
mine. She reached the Narrows, and was beached, under continuous 
bombardment by our airmen, who made direct hits. ^Photos, by 
S- atnl G. and Record Press.] 



Jan 30. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



CPan 86 1 , - 
New SetiesJ25 




In the Lower Regions of a Grand fleet Star-Ship. 



!,-' V,- 







IN 



L 



THE STOKEH9LD : " FEEDING " THE FURNACES BELOW THE BOILERS ; TROLLEYING COAL. 

Mid well looked after, the boiler-room and stokehold being fitted 
with draught in-'.ake and up-Uke pipes, ventilating-lans, etc., and 
also well lighted by electricity. In the upper illustration is seen 
the gangway passage in front of the stokehold furnaces. One 
furnace door is open and a stoker ii seen shovelling in coal.- 
(Official Photograph*.] 



A flimpsf of put ol tht stokers' work on board ship at sea with 
the Griivl Hett duriny duty hours is gien here. The stokers 
are omniied in A'atches, or reliefs, as with the rest of every ship's 
company , so many hours below, so many off duty, when the meh 
. on deck to get a whiff of breeze, or turn in -for a sleep. 
Tht ventilation arrangements below are, of course, amply adequate 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 30. 1918 



THE NEW WARRIORS: XVI I- LOGGING. 



ONE could hear guns, but not quite easily, 
because the strenuous axes would interrupt. 
The wood was full of axes with men on their 
handles, and the axes seemed to know there was 
a war on. They were swinging with a curious 
and almost unnatural vigour. When I had had 
thoughts about chopping down trees I don't 
have many, but still they have happened 
tree - chopping was considered as a slow, 
leisured, almost beautiful exercise. These 
hefty scoundrels 
were lamming 
into trees like 
patent hydrau- 
lic riveters. 
They seemed 
even angry with 
the things ; I 
felt that per- 
haps they were. 
I had said to 
the Several Pips 
whose business 
it was to tear 
the trunks out 
of this wood 
that, on the 
whole, it was 
rather a jolly 
little place, 




ve 1 h 

wouldn't ' have 
it. He said it 



one of those ten-minute lectures that all strong, 
silent experts like to crush the casual with. It 
appears that my jolly brambles, and all that, had 
spoilt the chances of tree-growth ; they had 
starved the birches and oaks and pine (I hope this 
is all right I can no more pick out tree from tree 
than I can pick out a sheep named Albert from 
a sheep named Josephus in a flock), and somehow 
the bushes had prevented their growing up to that 
height and girth which is necessary for cutting 

them down. 
Several Pip went 
off into a jerky, 
lyrical outgush 
on the subject 
of the great, 
solemn, well- 
drilled woods of 
his own Cana- 
dian land. 

I admitted 
that lumbermen 
looked at these 
things with a 
slaughterous eye . 
He answered, 
" Lumberman 
be damned ! 
" I 'm not a 
lumberman." 

" Not in that 
tunic," I ad- 
mitted. " But 
at home " 



BATTERED WITH SHRAPNEL-BULLETS AND SHELL-FRAGMENTS, AND 

FINALLY DITCHED AND LEFT DERELICT: THE REMAINS OF AN 

A ' S ' C ' MOTOR LORRY (Offcai Photograph.] 
was^a filthy place, and all wrong, and wasteful. 
" Look at that mess of underbush," he snarled 
scornfully. I just daren't look at it, because, up 
to now, I had liked the underbush : the friendly 
brambles, and the fern, and all that muck ; the 
Several Pips called it muck, and I suppose he knew. 
And, as a matter of fact, he did. He gave me 



" I 'm a logger," he said ; and I knew that I 
had committed a crime. I have since called an 
American logger a logger, and he also bedamned 
me and said he wasn't a logger he was a lumber- 
man. You can work it out for yourself. 

Several Pips has rather a big company of 
Canadian tree-intimidators under him, and a big 

{ConHtiutd nerliaj. 




W,TH THE BRmSH FORCES ,N .TALY : AT A SMALL ROADSIDE CAMP OF THE ROYAL ENGINEERS. 

Official Photograph. 



J.r 30. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



T Part 80 1 , 
I New SeviesX'2 



forerunners of the Grand fleet: dar-Ships of HU Hgea XVIII. 








A HISTORIC GUN-BOAT: LORD CHARLES BERESFORD'S "CONDOR" OF "WELL DONE!" FAME. 



The "Condor " was the c-lrlrated Tctie! on board which, as her 
Commairlfr. Lord Charles Beiesford won fame at the bombardment 
of Alexandria at the outset of the Egyptian War of 1882. Single- 
handed she fought the Marabout Fort at the western end of 
Alexandria Harbour, and won the famous complimentary signal, 
"Well done, 'Condor'!" She was of the early time composite 



gun-boats and was built in 1876, constructed of wood and iron 
framing, of 774 tons displacement, with engines of 777 hone-power. 
The "Condor " carried three muzzle-loading guns, a 4 (-ton 7-inch 
gun, and two 64-pounders., one at the bows and one astern, mounted 
to be able also to be fought on either broadside. Her complement 
was 100 officers and men. 



,, 

"* 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 30. 1918 



wood " Somewhere " within the sound of the best 
barrages. Personally, I thought his business was 
to cut down trees ; but apparently that is but 
an incidental. He conserves trees too ; teaches 
them to grow better oaks, with a science which 
was very entertaining to hear, but much too 
dangerous for the unskilled to repeat. He also 
deals thoroughly with the trees once they are down. 
Incidentally, I -learnt that this furious attack 
of lu's axemen wasn't hate ; it was merely the 
right, way to do it. These fierce digging blows, 
and not my slow, leisured method, was the correct 
nittier in tree-cutting. 

Several Pips showed me how he had cleared a 
big tract of the wood. The ground was thoroughly 
shaved ; there were thick piles of enticingly 
straight spars, and mounds of brushwood. Not 
many trunks a few that keen men were trimming 



logger Canadian was out on them, walking upon 
them with a Blondin-like unconcern, spearing the 
errant, and sending them across the water towards 
the mill. The mill was going full whack, and 
Several Pips' Canadians were steam-sawing logs 
with unimaginable speed. He has several big 
buzz-saws carving up trees with the uncanny ease 
and swiftness of a patent bread-slicer. 

Several Pips admitted that the demand for 
planks and spars was furious. The army about 
him wanted planks and spars and billets for an 
enormous quantity of things ; it wanted them for 
hutments and duck-boards, it wanted beams as 
dug-out supports, and stakes as revetments, and 
wood for a thousand other things. It was always 
demanding wood, always using it. He said that 
armies were the greediest , wood-eaters in the 
world. And, when one thought that the uses of 




A WINTER AFTERNOON'S OUTLOOK OVER ONE OF THE MOST MEMORABLE OF THE FLANDERS BATTLE- 
FIELDS: ON ONE OF THE ROADS NEAR PASSCHENDAELE.-[Oj7ioal Photograph.} 



with strangely unerring strokes of their axes, no 
more. I began to ask about trunks logs, the 
logger's log, I suppose would be the correct 
address but Several Pips hurried me along, and 
we were just in time to see two men swinging a 
massy-looking trunk to the verge of the hill, 
twisting it with an uncanny dexterity, and then 
sending it wHh an acute push over the hillside. 

Well, not quite, that. Down the hillside 
Several Pips had built himself, from trees he had 
cut down, a really attractive chute. Down this 
chute, several thousand feet long, he sent his logs. 
We watched this log glissading down, until in the 
most thrilling fashion it dived with a gorgeous 
splash into the log-pond. I rather envied that 
log, for it was a hot day and I am fond of chutes. 

We went along by a less impetuous road. 
There was a crowd of logs in the pond, and a 



wood had reached the limit, the Aimy called for 
tree-trunks logs pure and simple and began 
covering the mud with corduroy roads. 

Several Pips is over military age ; so are most 
of his men. They are all experts in their line, 
and have logged from the Yukon snow - line 
down to Vancouver, and eastward as far as you 
like. They have taken in hand the forests of 
France, England, and Scotland, and put them to 
practical warrior use ; and they have dealt 
scientifically with them; for, as I have said, the 
work of the logger is not merely cutting down, but 
cutting down with caie. 

They are doing real, solid work to upset Fritz, 
and they are doing it well, with the science of 
a lifetime's training. They are also training 
others, .and among them the now ubiquitous 
woman. \v. DOUGLAS NEWTON. 



Jan 30. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



f Fan SI ~\ - 
I New Series J~ Z 



H Souvenir of the fieroic Defender of Kut. 





GENERAL TOWNSHEND AT HIS HEADQUARTERS : WITH HIS DIVISIONAL STAFF; HIS PRIVATE ROOM. 



These photographs, which have reached England newly two years 
(t-r they were taken, and now make their fint appuranc* here, 
are of peculiar intereit in tbemelve, forming, a they do, 
souvenirs o( the heroic fire months' defence of Kut. General 
Townshend retired after the battle of Ctesiphon, where hii force 
was outnumbered by nearly fire to one, according to one account, 



and as far as it i possible to gueas the numbers of the enemy, 
and took post at Kut-el-Amara in a U-shaped bend of the Tigris, 
on December 3, 1915. There he held out behind skilfully fortified 
entrenchments until April *9, 1916, when starvation forced the 
sorely tried garrison of Kut to capitulate, alter several efforts - of 
relieving troops to reach him had failed. [Photos, by Smaitte.] 



30-[ N . P 



Part M "I 
SertesJ 



fHE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



Jn. 30, I )18 



Qlith the Hrmy fn JMesopotamia. 





TURKISH PRISONERS : TRAVERSING " PICCADILLY CIRCUS," IN BAGHDAD : HAIR-CLIPPING. 



The upptr illustration showi a light familiar to people in Baghdad 
a column of Turkish prisoneri, taken "up country," passing through 
the city to the river (or embarkation and removal down the Tigri 
to an internment camp. They are Men patting through part of 
"New StrMt," the thoroughfare which, before the war, a 
Turkiih Governor hacked through the ground! of the British 



Residency a piece of gratuitous high-handedness, instigated, it was 
said, by the Germans, then establishing the terminus of their 
Baghdad Railway. The space goes now by the name among our 
men of "Piccadilly Circus." The lower illustration is an intern- 
ment camp scene : Turkish prisoners having their hair clipped 
for sanitary reasons. [Official Photographs.] 



Jan. 30. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



f Pan 88 T , 
LNew Series J 




CQith Our T>oops in Mesopotamia. 





TURKISH PRISONERS: IN A BARBED-WIRE "CAGE" AT THE FRONT; CHECKING NEW PRISONERS. 



Large hauls of Turkish prisoners have been made to the north of 
Baghdad, in the campaign initiated by. the late Sir Stanley Maude, 
and carried further successfully by his successor, General Marshall, 
during the operations on the Tigris, and towards the Euphrates 
to the north-west. As elsewhere, the batches of prisoners, ai 
they come in, are collected temporarily in barbed-wire enclosures, 



beside one or other of our camps, previous to being drafted off by 
rail, on the section of the German Baghdad Railway north of the 
city, which ,we have put in working order and use regularly for 
Army purposes. The bungalow-like building of a German railway 
station can be seen in the background ; In the second illustration 
Turkish prisoners are having their names taken down. [Official Photos.} 



32-[ N " s< St,]-THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. Jan. 30. 1918 




H Helpful and Health -Giving Occupati 




HOW WOMEN OF SOUND PHYSIQUE ARE MAKING IT BETTER, AND AT THE 

There has never been a time or a happening in the history of the Empire when women have proved so fully their abHity tt 

if real value in the discharge of work hitherto considered only capable of being carried out by men. Amonj 

nese occupations is that of foreiuy, which has already not only demonstrated beyond dispute that in physical strength then 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. Jan. 30. I918-[ Nc P u ;" s c ,]-33 



Qlomcn for the Olar : felling a Tree. 





RELEASING MEN FOR ENROLMENT IN THE FORCES : AN OPEN-AIR AVOCATION. 

tie or no difference between the sexes, provided each starts with a sound constitution ; and it is not surprising that, as the 
six hundred employed already in forestry work are proving so satisfactory, the Board of Agriculture, in co-operation with 
men's Forestry Corps, is appealing for more women to take up the work. [Photograph by C.N.] 



. . I 
34 )_(( 



Fan H ) 
, SlteJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 30. 1918 



WOMEN AND THE WAR. 



LADY MACKWORTH'S appointment to the 
post of Chief Controller of Women's Recruit- 
ing means that the work attaching to the post is 
being undertaken by the keenest business woman 
in England. Lady Mackworth who, by the way, 
is Lord Rhondda's only daughter is a standing 
contradiction of the belief that women are in- 
capable of undertaking the management of large 
business enterprises. She managed her father's 
affairs with conspicuous success when, as Mr. 
D. A. Thomas, he visited America on a special 
mission ; and the fact that she is a director of 
twenty-seven companies and chairman of several 
others, is in itself a proof of the possession of 
business ability of a high order. 



any wish to see men displaced, but she is genuinely 
pleased that women should have an opportunity of 
proving their ability in work for which they were 
considered by men, at any rate to be tem- 
peramentally unsuited. 

Her view and no logical reason has yet been 
advanced to show that it is a mistaken one is 
that it is the value of work done that counts, and 
not the sex of the worker. It is not to be won- 
dered at, therefore, that Lady Mackworth holds 
optimistic views of the heights to which women 
will rise in future in the business world. Hitherto 
the woman who earned three hundred a year has 
been regarded rather in the light of a Croesus ; 




BRAVE WOMEN: IN AN OPERATING-THEATRE IN FRANCE. 

The women who are doing such kindly work for the wounded in France are not of the type who would " die of a rose In aromatic pain." 
Strong nerves, technical skill, and unfailing sympathy are the equipment called for 'in women who work in an operating-theatre, as shown In 

our photograph of a scene in France. [French Official Photograph.] 



Much of her success is, no doubt, due to her 
father's training. For, though it is only within 
the last year or two that Lady Mackworth has 
been in the public eye as a director of commercial 
concerns, she has for long taken a keen interest 
in her father's affairs, in much the same way as 
she would have done had she been a son instead 
of a daughter. 

Unlike so many clever and capable women, she 
has a firm belief in the business capabilities of her 
own sex, and makes no secret of hfr delight at 
the fact that so many women are now doing the 
work of men in city offices. Not that she has 



but that is a state of things which will not, in 
the opinion of the Chief Controller of Women's 
Recruiting, long survive the war. Probably it 
won't, if Lady Mackworth's hopes of daughters 
being taken into their fathers' business on equal 
terms with their brothers is realised. Meantime, 
it is worth noting that Lady Mackworth's new 
post is not her first experience in connection with 
women war-workers. She was appointed Com- 
missioner for Wales under the Women's Service 
scheme in February of last year. 

It will probably come as a surprise to many 
people to hear that members of the British Red 

[Continued overleaf. 



Jan. 30. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Prt 811 -) _, 

[.New Series J~" 3S 




forestry for Olomen : H Cdorker. 





TAKING THE PLACE OF A MAN : A TYPICAL WOMAN-HELPER. 



Given a sound and robust physique, a woman war-worker could 
scarcely desire a healthier occupation than that shown in our 
photograph. Wood-women are now largely employed by the 
Government in the healthy work of felling light timber in the 
forests ; but many more than the five or six hundred already engaged 
in it are needed ; and the Board of Agriculture, in co-operation 



with the Women's Forestry Corps, has issued an appeal for more 
workers. The pay is good, and, a our picture shows, a becoming ' 
outfit, including overalls, breeches, top-boots, and hat, is provided. 
The value, physically, of working in the open air, It a strong 
argument in favour of this particular form of war-work being 
taken up by women. [Photo, by C.N.} 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



J.n 30. 1918 



Cross have ever worked on German soil. It was 
in the first swing-back after the Battle of the 
Marne that our French AHics captured a small 
bit of territory in the Vosges. Ever since then 

- the workers manning the ambulances attached to 
the Service de Sante Militaire have been working 

. on this bit of enemy country. The ambulances 
are given by the British Ambulance Committee, 
which exists to provide British am- 
bulances for French wounded, and 
the work now being done close be- 
hind the French lines has been going 
on ever since 1915. In its way the 
thing is a record. There are about 
125 ambulances at the front, as 
well as two sections of motor-cycle 
stretchers a method of transport, by 
the way, that allows of the wounded 
being carried on a stretcher attached 
to one side of the machine. Since 
work began, about 400,000 French 
wounded have been conveyed to 
various hospitals 11,000 were car- 
ried at Verdun alone in the space 
of nine days. 



The undertaking costs money 
the weekly expenses of service 
amount to something approaching 
1200. But the work is worth doing, 
and, what is even more important, 
is enormously appreciated by our 
Allies, who have bestowed one 
M&iaille Militaire and sixty-six 



The " W.A.A.C.'s " are to be divided into two 
branches the mobile and immobile. Hitherto, 
women enlisting in the corps have had to sign on 
for service and go wherever required. The system 
had an obvious disadvantage. Heaps of women 
who might otherwise have offered their services 
were precluded frpm doing so owing to the fact 
that domestic ties prevented their leaving their 




WOMEN'S CARE FOR THE WOUNDED: A WINTER SCENE IN FRANCE. 
The devoted women who are aiding and tending wounded soldiers in France are no 
mere fair-weather friends. Our photograph shows some of them on their way to attend 
the wounded who are arriving in a snow-laden district. [f reach Official Photograph.} 



Croix de Guerre on a staff that numbers 350 
members. Another pleasant feature is the com- 
plete harmony that exists between the workers 
of both nations, for. though the Committee is 




RADIOGRAPHY AND THE WAR: AN X-RAY CAR ARRIVING. 

The miracles wrought by up-to-date science are the vonder of the present great war and 
F the modern marvels is the utilisation of the X-ray system of examining 
patients Our photograph shows the arrival of a Scottish Women's Red Cross Hospitals 
car at its destination. [French Official Photograph.} 



a British organisation, the ambulances, driven 
by British drivers, are used for carrying French 
wounded of whom French nurses are in charge. 



own neighbourhood, and numbers of useful 
recruits were in consequence lost to the corps. 
Under the new rules, however, things will be 
different. The mobile branch of the body, as its 
name implies, will include women 
who are willing to sign or have 
already signed Army Form W 3578 
an action that carries with it 
liability to serve (if enrolled for 
home service only) in any part of 
the United Kingdom or (if for 
foreign service) abroad. 



Recruits to the immobile branch, 
on the other hand, will be women 
who live ordinarily in the neigh- 
bourhood of their work, and these 
will be allowed to live in their own 
homes, and not be liable to transfer 
to any other part of the country. 
Enthusiasm for khaki, however, is 
not to be accepted as an excuse for 
leaving one branch of Government 
employment for another, except 
where special permission has been 
obtained from a head of a depart- 
ment. Women workers in the War 
and Military Pay Offices, in estab- 
lishments under the control of the 
War Office, V.A.D.'s, workers in 



Military and Red Cross Hospitals, and in war 
activities are, except in the circumstances speci 
fied, ineligible as recruits. CLAUDINE CLEVE. 



Jan. 30. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



f Pan S6 -| 
LNcw SerieiJ ' 37 



SUCCESSES AND DISASTERS ON THE HIGH SEAS- SUBMARINE IMPROVEMENT 
THE RUSSIAN ENIGMA A FANTASTIC TRAGEDY-PALESTINE AND SALONIKA. 



THE sea affair sprang into exciting prominence, 
after long quiet, on the 22nd, when it was 
announced that two days earlier a naval action 
had been fought off the entrance to the Dar- 
danelles, with the result that two notorious 
enemy vessels, the Goeben and the Breslau - 
originally German, 
nominally Turkish 
had come to grief 
at last. The Bres- 
lau's business had 
been done finally ; 
she was sunk and 
finished. The 
Goeben still re- 
mained above 
water, but was 
badly damaged and 
stranded on the 
west side of Nagara 
Point, where air- 
craft were bomb- 
ing her without 
intei mission. Early 

on the morning of 

the zoth, the two 

ships came out and 

attacked our naval 

forces north of Im- 

bros. The Breslau 

struck a mine and 

sank. The Goeben 

then ran for the Dardanelles. Turkish destroyers 

on their way to assist the- Breslau were driven off 

by our destroyers. Near the entrance to the 

Straits the Goeben also struck a miae, and began 




IN MESOPOTAMIA : A REGIMENTAL SODA-WATER FACTORY 

AT THE FRONT. 

In the dry season in Mesopotamia each officer and man gets a daily ration 

of two sodas. "Belati [Blighty] Pani " (English water) is the Indian name for 

soda water. [Official Photograph.} 



to settle down aft. Thereupon she beached her- 
self. The British rescued 172 survivors of the 
Breslau. During the action the Raglan and M 28, 
both monitors, were heavily hit and sunk by 
gunfire. On the 24th, the Admiralty issued news 
of a fight between destroyers and German sub- 
marines off Nao, in 
the Canaries. Ger- 
man sailors dis- 
covered ashore.said 
they belonged to 
U-boats 294 and 
295, but they would 
not say what had 
happened to their 
ships. - A later 
report said that 
the sailors acknow- 
ledged the loss of 
U 126 under British 
gunfire. A disaster 
to mercantile ves- 
sels in the Mediter- 
ranean on Dec. 31 
was reported in 
Parliament on 
Jan. 23. The loss 
of life was in one 
case 484, in the 
other 224 approxi- 
mately. Few par- 
ticulars were given, 
the mouth of the 
other on Jan. 20. 



Two vessels were mined at 
Mersey one on Dec. 28, the 
Zeebrugge wa r ; bombed from the air, and Ostend 

from the Sea. [Continued on past f>. 




IN MESOPOTAMIA : CHLORINATING DRINKING-WATER IN A DESERT RESERVOIR. [Official Holograph. 



ILLUSTRATED WAR NEW J.n. 30. 1918 




'Co Gnsure Completeness of Co-operation amoi 




AT THE RECENT MEETING OF THE COUNCIL IN LONDON : SIR ERIC GED 



b 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, Jan. 30, 1 9 1 8 [ N( l?sJries J 



HUied fleets: The JSTaval HlUed Council 




!AL WEMYSS, AND REPRESENTATIVES OF AMERICA, FRANCE, ITALY, AND JAPAN. 

C. Twinin? (U.S.A.) ; Rear-Adm. Baron M. de 1'Ostende ; Capt. T. E. Crease (Great Britain). Front Row Vice-Adm. W, S. 
s (U.S.A.) ; Vice-Adm. F. de Bon (France) ; the Runt Hon. Sir E. Geddes (Great Britain) ; Vice-Adm. Count. Thaon di 
'el (Italy) ; Rear-Adm. K. Funakoshi (Japan) ; Adm. Sir Rosslyn Wemyss (Great Britain). [Photograph by Russell.] 



.-_f- Part 86 "I 
40 LNew Series I 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Jan. 30, 1918 



The submarine returns : ho\ved an encouraging 
continuance of last week's favourable figures. 
Large vessels sunk continued at six (really five 
for the actual period concerned) ; smaller ships, 
two; fishing vessels, nil. The figures showed, 
therefore, a slight decrease in losses, while the 
number of ships unsuccessfully attacked had risen 
from five to eight. Rise hi 
arrivals, 155 ; in sailings, 58. 

It becomes increasingly 
difficult to write with any 
certainty of the Russian 
situation ; events succeed 
one another with such 
kaleido copic alternation, and 
the substratum of truth in 
all the varying reports is 
harder than ever to ascer- 
tain. While Trotsky con- 
tinued to present a bold and 
even defiant front to the 
enemy at Bres -Litovsk, the 
Bolshevists in Petrograd went 
to strange extremes of high- 
handed action and terrorism. 
After one sitting (on the igth) 
the Constituent Assembly was 
arbitrarily dissolved, as it 
had refused to endorse the 
People's Commissaries' peace 
terms. It was sent about its business, and the 
decree to .that effect was promulgated later. 
Street fighting occurred in Petrograd between 
the Bolshevists and the supporters of the 
Assembly. So ended the one body which might 
be said to represent Russia, in the large sense. 
Next r day, Shingareff (a former Minister in the 
Provisional Government) and Kokoshkin, both 
Cadets and prisoners in the Infirmary of the Marie 



rriost monstrous annexations " demanded ' "by 
Germany. Russia aga : n denounced the German 
manipulation of peace terms for publication. At 
the moment of writing, the Brest Conference has 
produced nothing. 

From Palestine came reports of successful 
patrol actions on the coast, and of aeroplane 





WITH THE BRITISH FORCES IN PALESTINE : A CAPTURED GERMAN 
AEROPLANE .Photograph by Topical.} 

Hospital, were shot in their beds by persons sent 
ostensibly to be their guards. Lenin " favoured 
civil war as the only way to Revolution." On the 
23rd, Trotsky in a manifesto, again exposed " the 



IN MESOPOTAMIA : MULE-TRANSPORT. 

raids on camps and stores near the railway 
station of Samaria. A British machine, driven 
down out of control within the enemy h'nes, 
was destroyed by pilot and observer before 
capture. It was further reported that Falken- 
hayn, advancing from Constantinople with 
enemy reinforcements, had lost so heavily on 
the way by desertions 160,000 men being 
said to have left him in three days that 
he had returned to the 
Turkish capital in disgust. 
It was even hinted that 
he had entirely despaired 
of the enemy cause in 
Palestine, and was giving 
it up. From Salonika the 
only news was of gunfiro 
and enemy attacks to no 
purpose on our positions 
west of Vardar. In Meso- 
potamia our airmen bombed 
the Kifri aerodrome. 

On Jan. 24, at the 
Mansion Hous?, Lord 
Rhondda met the Chair- 
men of the London and 
Home Counties Food Com- 
mittees and inaugurated his 
scheme. He desired, he said, 
to begin rationing meat as 
well as butter and marga- 
rine on Feb. 25. Compulsion 



was " inevitable and urgent." The first " meat- 
less" day in London and the,. Home Counties 
was on Friday, January 25. It was loyally 

observed. LONDON: JAN! 26, 1018. 



LONDON : Published Weekly at the Office. 172. Strand, in the Parish of St. Clement Danes, in the County of London, by THR ILLUSTRATED LOMJON NHWS AND SKETCH, LTD, 
171. Strand, aforesaid : and Printed by THR II.LUSTRATPD LONDON NRWS AND SKETCH. LTD.. Milford Lane. W.C. 2 WBONSSDAY. JAN. 30. 1018 
Entered as Second-Class Matter at the New York (N.Y.I Post Office, 1916. 



The Illustrated Wa, News Feb. 6, 1918. Part 87, Neui Series. 




Illustrated War Heu)$ 








DECORATED WITH LEGION OF HONOUR, FOl'RRAGERE. AND SIX CKOIX DE GUERRE 
THE FRENCH FOREIGN LEGION STANDARD, BORNE BY THE COMMANDANT. 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 6. 1918 



THE PROBLEM OF THE GERMAN STRIKERS INCIDENTS ON THE WESTERN FRONT- 
FRENCH ATTACK AND DEFENCE LONDON AIR-RAIDS " AERIAL NAVIES BATTLING"- 

"AVANTI ANCORA ITALIA." 



WHILE the armed contest presented few 
features of major int. rust, except on the 
Italian front, the internal affairs of the nations 
at war l.rld many points of significance. The 
speeches of Count Hertling and Count Czernin 
afforded unmistakable proof of the temper 



a-ain raised the question " Will the overthrow 
of Kaiserism come from without or from within ? " 
The external forces are strong enough to gain 
their end, in time. Recently, however, considera- 
tion:; upon which it would be unwise to build 
prematurely developed wrffii startling rapidity, 




BRITISH AIRCRAFT WHOSE FIGHTING CAPACITY THE AUSTRIANS KNOW : PLANES 

ARMY IN ITALY LINED UP. [Official Photograph.} 



WITH GENERAL PLUMER'S 



which governs the Central Powers. The German 
Imperial Chancellor's truculence was, it is true, 
in some contrast to the more moderate tone of 
Austria with regard to President Wilson's peace 
terms, but the disparity was easily accoun ed for 
by the individual necessities of the two Empires, 
and, fundamentally, both speeches bore the marks 
of a common origin. Count Hertling, at any rate, 
gave the Allies a useful object-lesson in the need 
for meeting force with force, for the military 
parly in Germany is irreconcilable. Towards the 
methods of Potsdam there can be no slackening, 
with safety. Yet the events of the past few days 



and there were at least indications, if nothing 
more, that the drilled and policed ranks of German 
industry had dared, to a degree hitherto unknown, 
to risk self-assertion in the face of their masters. 
But it is safe to take the German strikes, for the 
present, with many grains of salt. Strikes might 
be tolerated, if not engineered, by the authorities 
to induce revolt in Allied countries to Germany's 
advantage. Latest reports, at the time of writing, 
said that a mi'llion workmen were out. If that 
were true, then possibly the affair might have 
some glimmering of national purpose beyond the 
control of wire-pullers in high places. At home, 




TYPES OF ITALIAN AIRCRAFT AT THE FRONT : A CAPRONI TRIPLANE READY TO GO UP, AND A SMALL-SIZE 

SCOUTMG MONOPLANE. [Pl.otograph by C..V.] 



Feb. 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



P.ir. S7 ~l - 
Nfw SenesJ * 



the Engineers' sinister resolutions do not neces- 
sarily represent the temper of the most responsible 
Labour men. Not thus did Mr. Purdy talk, 
Mr Henderson warned Labour generally, and the 
A.S.E. in particular, of the 
grave dangers of disaffection. 

On the Western front, the 
most important movement was 
a further extension of the British 
front. The prolongation, which 
is towards a point slightly south 
of St. Quentin, was carried out 
quietly during the period of com- 
parative calm due to the adverse 
weather. It was effected during 
the period covered by our last 
article, but was not made known 
until a day or two later. So 
successfully had the movement 
been screened that the Germans 
were not aware of it until they 
made an attack, as they believed 
on the French, only to find 
themselves confronted and driven 
off by the British. 

Otherwise, the news contained 
nothing of special remark. On 
the 27th the enemy's guns were 
active about Ribecourt, and the 
previous night a raid south of Lens had been re- 
pulsed with loss. On the night of the 27th the 
Germans raided an advanced British post south- 
east of Langemarck, and took off three of our 
men ; north-west of St. Quentin, at Le Verguier, a 
hostile reconnaissance was dispersed by our ritte- 
"fire ; and about Cambrai, to the north of Lens, 



Monchy-le-Preux. Barrage fire disposed of an 
attempt to raid a British post on the Scarpo, and 
the attacking party retired without entering our 
trenches. Enemy gun-fire about Arras and Ypres 





THE BRITISH FRONT IN FRANCE : HIGHLANDERS REBUILDING A DUG-OUT 
AFTER IT HAD BEEN BLOWN UP BY A SHELL. [Official Photograph.] 



and near Passchendaele the German guns opened 
on various points. On the 28th there was further 
artillery fire on our positions at Havrincourt and 
north-west of Ypres. But the day generally was 
uneventful. The 2gth saw an enemy raid driven 
off east of Vimy, at Arleux-en-Gohelle. At the 
same time the enemy's gun-fire became intense at 



ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE :. THE ONLY SHOP LEFT 
IN A BOMBARDED VILLAGE CLOSE BEHIND THE BATTLE-LINE ; AND SOLDIER- 
CUSTOMERS. [Official Photograph.] 

was the only other incident worthy of remark 
during the same twenty-four hours. On the 3oth, 
one of our patrols fought a successful little action. 
Attacking an enemy po.->t north-east of Havrin- 
court, the British killed and captured many of the 
enomy garrison. The Germans suffered also in 
patrol encounters near Bullecourt, where a 
machine-gun fell into our hands. 
The day closed with en;my gun- 
fire of greater severity than has 
been the rule lately, near Epehy 
and Havrincourt and east of 
Polygon Wood. On the 3ist. 
only various patrol actions and 
hostile gun-fire on the Arras- 
Cambrai front were reported. 
Yet all these "minor" affairs 
mean stiff work for our boys out 
there. Bombing of enemy rail- 
ways, dumps, billets, and aero- 
dromes continued as the weather 
served. On Feb. I a day's bag 
of nine enemy aeroplanes was 
announced. 

The Supreme War Council of 
the Allies, at its meetings at 
Versailles, found itself in com- 
plete agreement on all mili- 
tary questions affecting Britain, 
France, and Italy. 

The course of hostilities on 
front followed a similar course 
during the same period. On the Aisne raids 
were repulsed ; at Verdun there was fair 
activity by both artilleries in the Verdun re- 
gion, where an enemy raid on Caurieres met 
with no success. The Verdun region also saw 
lively artillery work. French airmen again bombed 



the French 



r nn 87 "I 

[_Nw Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 6. 1918 



Thionville, Freiburg (Breisgau), Liuhvigshafen, and 
the ( automnents of Longuyon. On the 28th 
some prisoners and a machine-gun fell to our 
Allies in Champagne ; while they averted a coitp- 
de-main in the Yosges, near La Fontenclle. Brisk 
shelling \\as exchanged near Hartmannsweiler- 
kopf. At Scppois li! Haut, in Upper Alsace, on 
the joth, French detachments destroyed dug-onts 
and took prisoners, and an 
enemy attempt on small 
French posts at Schon- 
holz came to nothing. 
During the week further 
feats of French aviators 
put to their credit one 
aeroplane destroyed and 
three damaged. They 
also bombed the stations 
at Conrlans, and aero- 
dromes and factories 
around St. Privat. The 
enemy reports for the 
same period made special 
mention of the French 
flame-throwers in trench 
ac^'ins. On the 3ist our 
Al s bombed Thiaucourt 
Sta ion ; and .started a 
great fire. 

The season of the last 
full moon brought its ex- 
pected series of air-raids 
on what is called " the 
Home Front." After vari- 
ous abortive approaches 
of which London heard 

was at length issued about eight o'clock on the 
evening of Jan. 28. Some fifteen enemy machines 
crossed the Essex and Kent coast and headed for 
London, but 
not more than 
five got 
through the 
barrage and 
dropped 
bombs. Our 
aviators en- 
gaged the en- 
emy in the 
air, and sev- 
enty British 
aeroplanes are 
said to have 
gone up to 
attackand de- 
fend. At 12.30 
a further 
heavy attack 
was delivered, 
but only one 
m a c <h i n e 
reached the 
capital. The 
casualties were 47 killed and 169 injured. With 
the exception of one person killed and seven 
injur. d, all these casualties occurred in the 
London area. The raiders did not escape scot- 




ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT IN NORTHERN 

FRANCE : HELPING A BROTHER-OFFICER WHILE IN 

DIFFICULTIES IN ATTEMPTING A SHORT CUT ACROSS 

A MUD PATCH.- [Official Photograph.} 



nothing, a warning 




I WESTERN FRONT NEAR SOUCHEZ : PRINCE ARTHUR OF CONNAUGHT 
WITH FRENCH GENERALS AND CANADIAN OFFICERS INSPECTING A BATTLEFIELD. 
Canadian War Records. 



free. After an exciting chase and fight, one 
machine was brought down in Hames in Essex by 
Captain C. H. Hackwill and Second Lieutenant C. 
Banks, both of the Royal Flying Corps. The 
three men on board the enemy machine perished. 
On the following night, about 9.30, raiding aero- 
planes again crossed the coast. Between 10 and 
12.30 p.m. a single machine reached the London 
area and dropped bombs 
in the south-western dis- 
trict. The rest were all 
turned back. Both bran- 
ches of the air-defence, 
the aviators and the anti- 
aircraft gunners, have 
given increasing proofs of 
their skill and efficiency. 
Attack by aerpolane is 
far more serious than that 
by Zeppelin, but the 
enemy's success is on a 
descending 'scale. 

A later report, strictly 
belonging to the period 
reviewed last week, an- 
nounced the further heavy 
bombing of Thionville, 
Treves, and Mannheim 
On the 3oth, four enemy 
squadrons bombed Paris ; 
45 persons were killed, 
and over 200 injured. 
Two hospitals were hit. 

Italy, refreshed and 
re-armed, began a great 
action on the east of the Asiago Platean, and . 
continued the fight with the capture of the Col 
del Rosso and the Col d'F.chelle, until on the 
2gth they seized the positions west of the Frenzela 

Valley, the 
success cul- 
minating on 
Monte Val 
Bella. The 
enemy suf- 
fered very 
heavily in 
casualties. He 
also lost 100 
officers and 
2500 otheir 
ranks prison- 
ers, 6 heavy 
g u 11 s , i o o 
trench - mor- 
tars, thou- 
sands of small 
arms, and a 
great quan- 
tity of stores. 
The enemy 
admitted the 
loss of the 
positions in question. On the 3ist the Italians 
improved their position north-east of the Col 
del Rosso. Their air work continued to yield 

excellent results. LONDON: FEB. 2, iQi8. 



Fb. 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Pirt SJ 1 , 
LNew SeriesJ" 5 



Slith the Hrmy in Mesopotamia. 





IN THE DESERT: PART OF THE RUINS OF WHAT IS LOCALLY CALLED "THE KHALIF'S HOUSE." 



The desert in Mesopotamia, the sandy, sterile wastes that extend 
between the Tigris and Euphrates, holds many secrets of former-day 
civilisation. In the far-off ages of Nineveh and Babylon, the 
greater part of the country, now like the Sahara, was under culti- 
vation, irrigated and densely populated by peoples who, in their 
cities and towns, as il is, of course, common knowledge, had attained 



to a very high degree of civilisation and of luxury. Arab and 
Saracen, Persian and Turkish conquerors at various epochs have 
swept over the face of the land, but, as exploration work after the 
war can hardly fail to show in due time, numerous now de*eu- 
sand-covered remains, dating from Assyrian and Babylonian times, 
will be brought to the light of day again. 



/ P*rt 87 1 
.N. SerlwJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 6. 1918 



the Navy at Sea. 





SEEN FROM A RESCUING DESTROYER-A TORPEDOED LINER : SINKING ; GONE-THE LAST SMOKE. 



Two exceptionally interesting sea scenes are shown on this page . 
photographs of a torpedoed ship, as sighted from the deck of a 
destroyer while the latter is racing through the water to rescue 
those on board, or get at the U-boat, at a speed of between thirty 
and forty miles an hour an average pace at full speed for a 
destroyer. In the upper illustration, the stricken liner is seen on 



the horizon sinking by the itern, and with a heavy list. The 
stern and half the after-end of the ship are already submerged. The 
second photograph shows the coming of the end for the torpedoed 
ship : the final up-pouring of steam and smoke as the hull gofs 
under, and the inrushing sea reaches the furnaces and stokehold 
a scene at once picturesque and tragic. 



Feb. 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



CPart 87 ~|_. 
New SerlesJ ' 



on Active Service. 




IN PORT : A DIVER DESCENDING TO EXAMINE 

Ships' propeller* are exposed to damage at all times at tea, and the 
contributory. causes are many and various. Two of the most 
common, perhaps, are damage resulting from propeller! coming into 
contact with or "fouling," solid wreckage floating invisible beneath 
the surtax, or from such misadventures as a vessel's grounding. 
On getting od into deep water, if anything is wrong with th 



A PROPELLER ; A DEFECTIVE GUN-MOUNTING. 

propellers, it soon makes itself apparent to the engine-room watch, 
and the vessel has to heave-to, and the ship's diver be lowered 
to examine and report. Serious damage is mostly repaired with 
appliances available in port, often without the ship docking. In 
the lower illustration a defective light-gun mounting is shown, 
with the gun and casemate-shield lifted for repairs. 



ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. Feb. 6. 1918 



Optimietic and Confident " : Can ad 




IN THE CANADIAN TRENCHES NEAR LENS: MEN VIGOROUSLY ENGAGED 

,,., H .v. . .. _ Dominion's 

Club in London the other 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. F.b. 6. 



airing Frenches after Bad (Heather. 




IS RENDERED NECESSARY BY THE AFTER-EFFECTS OF FROST AND SNOW. 

it, as they believe, that the enemy will never break through the Canadian lines. And I believe, from the information that 
to me, that applies to the other lines along the whole front We entered this war (he concluded) in defence of a great 
iple ; we shall carry on until victory is achieved." {Canadian War Reconb.] 



Part 87 T 
o" Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 6. 19U 



Hrmament of German HeropUincs. 





A RUMPLER CAPTURED BY THE FRENCH : 

The photographs reproduced on these two pages show the type of 
machine-gun carried by German aeroplanes, their position when 
mounted, and their relation to the propeller. The subject will no 
doubt be of special interest to those of our readers who had the 
privilege of forming the audience to the aerial entertainment over- 
head during the recent air-raids on London. They will doubtless 



ITS MACHINE-GUN AND PROPELLER CONNECTION. 

recollect having perceived a somewhat novel note in the orchestra, 
heard during pauses in the diapason of the guns. It was a kind 
of rapid trill in a minor key, and it proved to have been the sound 
>f machine-gun fire interchanged between British and German 
machines flying at a great height above the ground. It was thus 
that one raider was brought down, from a height of 10,000 ft., 



Feb. 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



f Part 87 T_, . 
lNe Series J * 



H Captured German Heroplane and its Machine-Gun. 




CAPTURED BY THE FRENCH ON THE OISE FRONT : A RUMPLER AEROPLANE AND ITS MACHINE-GUN. 

page, showing the mechanism by which the fire of the machine-gun 
is regulated in connection with the propeller. It seems incredible 
to th lay mind that the quick fire of a machine-gun can be 
directed through the whirling revolutions of a propeller without 
hitting it ; but such appears to be ..e case. The Rumpler typ 
comprises both aeroplanes and seaplanes. [French Official Photos.} 



by Capt. HackwiM and Lieut. Banks, who are seen examining the 
debris of their victim in a photograph giren on another page of 
''is number. The German machine shown in the four illustrations 
he. was of a different type not a Gotha, b. a Rumpler, and it 
was bi j.ight down and captured by the French on the Oise front. 
Particularly interesting it the lower photograph on the left-hand 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Fab. 6. IBIS 



On the British Olestcm front 





THE CANADIANS : A VILLAGE UNDER LONG-RANGE SHELLING ; NEARING THE BATTLE-ZONE. 



No place within rtn(e of the heary guns escapes attention from 
the artillerymen now and again. Whether the filing it on informa- 
tion from airmen that troop* are quartered there or passing 
through, or random firing to "search" the place, villages some 
way behind the fighting front at intervals suffer a visitation of 
heavy shells. A village undergoing such treatment is seen in the 



upper illustration, with a column of Canadians passing through 
to the front while women inhabitants are clearing out to the rear. 
In the lower illustration a battalion is traversing a village nearer 
the lines. The men's gas-masks, hung round their necks in bags, 
are ready to put on when the bugle sounds the " Alert." (Cahadian 
War Records.] 



F.b. 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Part SI 
[N 



ew Series 



On the British Cdeatem front. 




WITH THE CANADIANS : 

In the upper illutrtion is Men * sandbag-P t t ct <1 shelterlng-shed 
v " shanty," built up with a thick planking front wall, and sand- 
bag roofing and side, to serve (or * sentry-box at the end of the 
brick wll of home in a Tillage behind the linet, where a 
Canadian detachment had Itt quarteri at the time the photograph 
was taken Against stray rifle-bulleO from the enemy, fired at 



A SAND-BAG BUILT SENTRY-BOX ; A POPULAR AND APPRECIATED JOKE. 



long range, or from shrapnel bullets, the protection would ordinarily 
suffice in the circumstances. Shrapnel-bullets depend for their 
effectiveness largely on the comparative nearness of the " target." 
At extreme long range, the velocity at which the bullets would 
spread on the shell bursting and opening becomes decreased and 
their penetrative power appreciably lessened. [CanJt/k.'H H'nr /tarc'i/s.* 



r>n n i 

ie SerieiJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 6, 1918 



ROMANCES OF THE REGIMENTS: LXXXVII.-THE R.H.A. 

A SUBALTERN'S " BILLET-MOTHER." 



NOT long after the battle of Orthes, a young 
Lieutenant of the Royal Horse Artillery 
found himself the guest of a French lady, an 
aristocrat and former dmigrfa, in the town of Pan. 
The reason for his presence in a French town at 
a moment when we were at war with France was 
political rather than 
military. Wellington 
believed that the 
south of France was 
ready to turn against 
Napoleon and restore 
the Bourbons, and 
that the movement 
was most lively in the 
old capital of Navarre. 
Accordingly, he sent 
to Pau Major-General 
Fane, with the i4th 
Light Dragoons and 
two guns of the Horse 
Artillery, to see what 
could be done to sup- 
port disaffection. But 
beyond a polite re- 
ception the British 




General had no luck, 

and had to return 

empty-handed. But 

for the kindness of 

the French widow 

lady to his subordinate he would not have come off 

so well. The night was windy and bitterly cold. It 

was known that a French force lay a few leagues 



FOUND WHILE EXPLORING AMONG ENEMY DEBRIS IN 

A CAPTURED TRENCH: THE REMAINS OF A GERMAN 

OFFICER'S LOOTED BED BESIDE' A BLOWN-UP DUG-OUT. 

Canadian War Records. 



proper precautions. Our young Artilleryman 
parked his guns in the public square, saw to the 
quartering of his men and the stabling of the 
horses, and went to his own billet, which was all 
that weary soldier could desire, rfis aged and 
gracious hostess had but one fault : she was 

oblivious to the fact 
that her guest was 
very tired, and she 
prolonged the conver- 
sation much further 
into the night than 
the young man 
wished. But the 
lady's talk was in- 
teresting ; she had 
been through the 
worst of the Terror, 
her husband had per- 
ished under the guil- 
lotine, and thereafter 
she had for a time 
sought refuge in Eng- 
land. Hence a deep 
affection for that 
country, where 
Madame la Marquise 
had been most hos- 
pitably received. She 
could not do enough 
to entertain an Eng- 
lish officer. They sat late, but at last the young man 
was forced to plead the toils of the previous day's 
duty and the claims of to-morrow's in order to 




IN THE CANADIAN LINES ACROSS THE OUTSKIRTS OF LENS: PART OF ONE OF OUR TRENCHES IN A 
STREET WITH A DUG-OUT UNDER A HOUSE.-[CYn<tt.H War Records.] 



distant from Pau, but there was little immediate 
apprehension. Fane, however, posted vedettes 
and picquets on the main roads, and took all 



make his escape to bed. He was not long in 
falling sound asleep ; he had no apprehensions, 
no guard duty for the night had fallen to his 



Feb. 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



"Ocita: per Hmica Silentia 





THE MOON AT THE FRONT : MOONLIGHT EFFECTS ON FLANDERS MUD-FIELDS EAST OF YPRES. 



The moon as a natural phenomenon ha* received a good deal more 
atter.Uon from the man in the street during the war than was 
formerly the case. In the old days interest in it was practically 
confined to astronomers, poets, and lovers. Nowadays its uprisings 
and its down-goings attract a larger circle of observers. Even 
during the war the moon has undergone, so to speak, social phases. 



In the Zeppelin period, for instance, it was rather popular, but 
to-day it is regarded with dislike Meantime Mr. W. B Yeats 
has published a book called "Per Arnica Silentia Lunar." a 
quotation from Virgil that refers to the Greek ships speeding over 
the moonlit deep to attack Troy. Mr. Yeats, however, has not 
written about Gothas speeding to attack London. [Official Photo.} 






THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Ffc. 6. 118 



share. He could rest undisturbed until morning. 
But long before morning, as it seemed, the day 
had dawned. He awoke, confused, to find the 
glare of a lamp beating upon his eyes. Blinking, 
he recognised his hostess, who was leaning over 
him in great concern. She asked him if it was 
usual for English soldiers to sleep undressed and 
disarmed in presence of the enemy. The boy 




WITH ONE OF THE BATTALIONS OF THE YORK AND LANCASTERS 

ON THE WESTERN FRONT: ADJUSTING THE MECHANISM OF A TRENCH 

MACHINE-GUN.-fOJiciV./ Photopapk.} 



Very soon he was awakened once more by a 
sound of distant firing. Confused noises, the 
clatter of horses' hoofs, the tramp of armed men, 
and, above all, the trumpet call to arms told him 
that something serious was afoot. He ran down 
and joined his detachment, which, thanks to the 
precautions already taken, had got the guns horsed 
and ready for action. A picquct had been sur- 
prised ; the French were in the 
town. Our gunner and his men 
stood to arms, but they were 
not required. After a period of 
anxious waiting, they heard that 
the 1 4th Light Dragoons had 
dealt with the enemy, who had 
made off, leaving the town clear. 
It turned out that the Brit- 
ish or at 'least one of their 
picquets had been surprised, 
despite General Fane's adequate 
dispositions. The post in ques- 
tion was stationed on one of 
those causeways which rise to 
considerable height about the 
surrounding country. The night, 
be it remembered, was bitterly 
cold ; a shrewd wind was blow- 
ing from the north-east full 
in the faces of the picquet. 
Accordingly, their officer, think- 
ing all sale, withdrew hi.s men 
from the exposed side of the 
causeway and allowed them to 
shelter in its lee. They were thus sixteen 
feet below the level of the roadway, upon 
which a solitary vedette remained. The enemy 
discovered what had occurred, and sent a 



replied that the enemy was not very near and the 
watch sufficient. But the good lady demurred, 
saying that her guest did not know the foe he had 
to deal with. The subaltern, a little piqued, 
replied that this was not his first 
campaign. To appease his kind 
hostess, however, he promised to 
dress and arm at once. He lis- 
tened until her footstep died 
away, whereupon the faithless 
rascal rolled over and went to 
sleep again, just as he was. 

But Madame was taking no 
risks. In a few minutes she re- 
turned and scolded the Lieu- 
tenant for his carelessness. The 
English officer might live to re- 
gret it if he neglected her warn- 
ings. Madame grew very earnest 
and urgent. Her scapegrace 
guest began to think there might 
be something in it. He shook 
sleep from his eyes, promised to 
be a good boy this time, and, as 
soon as the lady retired, he got 
up, dressed, girded on his sword, 
and went out to call his senior OF THE TRE NCHES HELD BY SOME OF THE YORK AND 

N.C.O. He Withdrew the runs LANCAST ERS: INSPECTING THE CASES IN WHICH GAS-MASK RESPIRATORS 

from the square, and posted '.-WP*J Ftaor^J 

them at the fork of a cross-roads on the side of 
the town furthest from the enemy ; he had the 
horses harnessed, and ordered the men to sleep 
beside them in the stables. This done, he returned 




to his quarters, hoping to finish the night in peace. 
But he slept ill and briefly. 



party of horse along the causeway. The vedette 
fired, and fled. The French Dragoons galloped 
right past the picquet below, and so entered 
the town. Their ejection was comparatively 
easy, thanks to the French lady's urgent 
warnings. 



F.b. 8. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



CPart 87 1 
New series J 



Destroyers of a Gotba in a London Raid. 




R.F.C. OFFICERS WHO BROUGHT DOWN A GOTHA : CAPT. HACKWILL (CENTRE) AND LIEUT. BANKS. 

The names of (he two gallant airmen who brought down one of 
the Gothas that raided London on the night of Monday. January 38, 
were eiren in Parliament Capt. G. H. Haekwill, R.F.C , and 
Lieut. C. C. Banks, R.F.C. The official report of their exploit ran : 
' Two of our scouU encountered an enemy aeroplane over Essex. 
After a brief fight at close range the raider took fire and fell in 



flames to the ground 10,000 ft. below. All three members of its 
crew were burnt to death." In our photograph! the officers are 
seen examining part of the destroyed machine. Capt. Hackwill, 
who is 26, hails from Langtree in North Devon, and was in the 
Somerset Light Infantry. Lieut. Banks is 2$. He left the Royal 
Welsh Fusiliers for the R.F.C. last May. [Photo, by L.N.A.] 



. r Prt 87 T 
1* -|_N Soiirf J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 6. 1918 




t:hc Gotba Raid on London on 7anuary 28. 












WHERE THE BROUGHT-DOWN RAIDER FELL: THE WRECKAGE; CANVAS "PAINTED LIKE CLOUDS." 

What is 10,000 feet altitude, the height in the air t which the fight pavement to the cross on the dome, as unit of meaurement, 10,000 

with the destroyed German Gotha ended, and from which height feet is a height equal to about thirty times that of the Cathedral ; 

it fell to the earth In flames, may be gauged roughly by comparing or not fnr short of two miles up. The canvas of the Gotha '.s 

uch an altitude with the known height of some tall building with planes, seen, in their torn and scorched condition lying on th 

which everyone is familiar. If, for present purposes of comparison, ground in the lower illustration, are described as being ' painted to 
for instance, we take the height of St. Paul's Cathedral, from the . look like clouds. "--[Photos, by C.N., and Famngdon Photo. Cu.] 



Feb. 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 




The Gotba Hir-Raid on London on January 28. 




WHERE THE BROUGHT-DOWN GERMAN RAIDER FELL IN FLAMES: OFFICERS EXAMINING DEBRIS. 



A correspondent of th "Daily Express" tent this account of the 
bringing down of the Goth* which crashed in flumes from a height 
of 10,000 feet : "One Gotha, apparently lame, banged and bumped 
her way homewards, in safety apparently, until the moon showed 
her up against the background of the sky. ' Archies ' roared out 
at her, ths face of the moon was covered with little smoke-clouds, 



and the Gotha turned from the barrage, wheeled in the sky, ana 
droned on only to meet more guns. Then the guns ceased again 
and gave place to the machine-gun crackle, and suddenly the raider 
turned over and came down in flames." A local farmer is said 
to have been first to reach the scene of the fall immediately after- 
wards, and saw the three bodies of the crew. \Phato. by C.N.] 



2Q Lsif *! i- ' 1 Hfc ILLUi 1 RA Itl 




"Che (3otba Hir^Raid on Lor 




THE DEBRIS OF THE ONE BROUGHT DOWN IN FLAMES DURING 

In his official communique issued on the Gotha air-raid on London during the night of January 28, Viscount French, as 
officer Commanding-in-Chief the Home Forces, makes this reference to the bringing-down of one of the raiding aeroplanes : ' 
number of machines of the Royal Flying Corps went up. Two of our scouts encountered an enemy aeroplane over Essex. A 



>. r-eb 6, 118. ["<, i - , 



the Night of 



28. 







ENT WITH TWO BRITISH PLANES : EXAMINING THE WRECKAGE. 

I fight at close range, the raider took fire and fell in flames to the ground 10,000 ieet below. All three members oi its 
*ere burnt to death." The wreckage of the destroyed Gotha, as it appeared next day, is seen here at the place where it 
down ablaze. A number of officers and men from a garrison are inspecting the burnt-out and charred debris _[7'//oto. *j< C..V.' 



r Part 87 "I 
~|_N" Serlts J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 6. 1818 



Olith the 



Watching in the Hrctic Circle. 




FF LAPLAND : OFFICERS AT A FUR STORE ; IN A FISHING VILLAGE RUSSIAN SOLDIERS. 



Much as the streets of cities, and where main arteries of traffic 
pass or cross, are policed by "fixed points," constables stationed 
on special duty, so it is, generally, with certain naval squadrons 
of the British Fleet in various parts of the world. At one of 
these, in Northern European waters within the Arctic Circle, the 
photographs on this page and elsewhere in the number were 



taken. Ever since the war began, naval squadrons have kept 
watch off Lapland, the northernmost belt of territory across northern 
Norway, Sweden, and part of Russia, lying within the Arctic 
Circle. Along the sparsely populated coast are numerous fishing 
villages, or "settlements," some garrisoned by Russian outposts, 
which are visited by parties from passing cruisers. [Photos. C.-V.; 



Feb. 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Craft 87 ")_ 
New Soicsj * 




OTith the 



hatching in the Hrctic Circle. 






SHI 




SALVING A SHIP FIRED BY INCENDIARISM AND 

Besides the war work which falls to naval men serving off the 
coast of Northern Europe within the Arctic Circle, extra work, 
arising from war mishaps, has from time to time to be undertaken. 
One of these was the "job" illustrated on this page: the salving 
of a vessel set on fire, it is suspected, by incendiarism. Twenty- 
Are Russians, cut off below by the flames, perished in the fire. 



SCUTTLED : SUCCESS ; OPENING THE SAFE. 

The vessel, formerly a West African liner, was scuttled in shallow 
water to extinguish the fire. The upper illustration shows the 
inscription, exemplifying the feelings of the crew (under an R.N.R. 
officer), which was painted on the bridge screen after the salving. 
The lower illustration shows men between-decks, amid frozen ice 
lumps, forcing open the ship's sale. [I'ttotos. by C.N.] 



J 



24-' N .''"U".L''- THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. Fb 6. 1918 




(flitb the J^avy (Hatching in the Hrctic CircU 









TO GIVE EXERCISE TO OFFICERS AND MEN WHEN OFF DUTY : A SKA1 

To vary the monotony of life on board ship at places in the Arctic Circle at which vessels of the Navy are stationed, where 
the harbour is frozen up, various devices for amusement and exercise and occupying time off duty are resorted to. One is 
shown in the above illustration a skating-rink on the ice, formed near a ship. It was made by chipping off the rough 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. Feb. 6. l18-[ N ft s tes ~J-a5 



:>ngeide an Ice ^ Bound British Cruiser, 



~ . : " 













I ARTIFICIALLY FORMED NEAR A FROZEN-IN SHIP IN HARBOUR. 

Mace-ice, which was heaped up at the sides and made a bank round. A hot-water hose from the ship flooded the "floor," 
id a, it cooled, a smooth, flat ice-surface was formed. Archangel is seen in the background, with on the extreme right, the 
ire of the Lutheran Church built at the Kaiser's expense. \Pholi. hy c./v.i 



M 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



1 Feb. 6. 1913 



THE NEW WARRIORS: XVIII. -THE COURRIER DES BLESSES. 



BILLIE insists that he is now only a sort of 
doctor. Of course, he was born with a 
silve'r stethoscope in his mouth, and he has more 
degrees than he can stamp on the side of his 
valise, but that 's about the end of his military 
therapeutics for the present. He declares he is 
not so much a medico as a mechanician. He has 
been to the front ; but, as he says, having gone 
up in 1914, he has since spent all his time on the 
means of getting away from it. 

Please don't write to the Daily Guillotine 
about this. Billie is not thimble-rigging for a 
cushy job somewhere unshelled. He is not think- 
ing of himself when he is cranking up his mind on 



canal-barge transport has been incorporated to 
fit certain needs. 

Billie was among the first to insist that petrol 
came into the world to .speed ihe wounded on the 
way to V.A.D.s. It looks obvious now, but in 
the early days there were some who thought it 
Utopian merely. Billie developed petrol in all 
its convolutions. He incited various stubborn as 
well as generous creatures to break out in a rash 
of motors ; and the effect was excellently chronic. 
Motor-transport in a growing degree of excellence 
expanded behind the battle lines, even went up 
into the battle lines, putting ringers to nose at 
pavt roads and the minor kind of shell-hole. 




AT A TRENCH-POST ON THE WESTERN FRONT: YORK AND LANCASTER? 

Official Photograph. 



DURING A QUIET INTERVAL. 



means of getting away from the gas-mask area. 
He is being kind to others. Billie, one time 
lord of the anti-tetanus syringe and aseptic 
whatevcr-they-are's, has changed his spots and 
has developed into a bright little petrol-scented 
angel of Red Cross Transport. 

Of course, Billie hasn'i done it all by himself ; 
he has only helped a mortal lot. M'hen Billie 
first set out to ginger up the " returned Blighty's," 
horse-transport was the slow and jolty device used 
for evacuating the wounded. Billie cursed the 
system, and, with some others, went in with both 
hands to smite some swift, modern methods 'into 
the processes. He, and others, were quite success- 
ful. . Every swift modern method is now doing its 
swiftest, and any old slow modern method like 



l_ 



But don't imagine petrol stops at cars. Billie 
organised some quite attractive cycle side-car 
stretchers, which ran the wounded down to the 
Clearing Stations at record speed. He also found 
that motor-cars that could no longer run on roads 
could, with a little cajolery, run on places where 
there weren't any. That is, he started the idiotic 
and supremely useful train-tramway service with 
motors he had stripped from broken-down auto- 
mobiles for engines ; behind these the woundeds 
chug down to the Advance Dressing Station with 
a reasonable swiftness and rather more comfort 
than usual. 

He and his kind did not stop at the transport 
of the wounded from the line either ; he took the 
means of healing up to the line. Motor-cars 



Feb 6. 1918 



THE ILLUS I KA I ED WAR NEWS. 



f Vat 7 1 
[New Senc.J 



OUth the ftavy hatching in the Hrctic Circle. 







COALING SHIP ACROSS THE ICE : SLEIGHS RETURNING AFTER FILLING A VESSEL'S BUNKERS. 



In tht ice-bound harbour* where certain war-ships on duty in the 
Far North are frozen up during the rigorous Arctic winter, the 
ships usually moor off shore, in the harbour approach. There, on 
emergency, they can clear out to sea at short notice, with the aid 
of ice-breakers to cut a channel. Where they lie, all supplies 
from shore hare to be brought alongside over the ice on sleighs, 



prorisions and food stores for the ships' companies, also, (or the 
ship herself, supplies of tacks of bunker coal. In the illus" ration, 
coal-sleighs are seen returning empty from coaling a ship, acrow 
the two and a-half miles of ice lying between the cruiser in question 
and the city coal-wharves. One drawback of the method is its slowness 
as compared with coaling alongside a collier or wharf [Photo. C.N.] 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Kb. 6. 1818 



turned themselves into operation theatres and 
dental theatres, containing in the smallest space 
a brilliantly compact assortment of every kind of 
operating weapon necessary, from X-ray to catgut ; 
with a very little manipulation, he could turn his 
car-caravan into a field hospital on the spot, and 
it would be self-supporting from 
the first minute. 

Billie and his kind have set 
their mark on the trains. Before 
the war there were special 
hospital - trains ; I had met 
them myself on the L.S.W. 
Railway at Southampton, where- 
local V.A.D.s did minor miracles 
in preparing for the war that 
nobody there seemed to dream 
would ever happen. There may 
have been hospital - trains in 
France probably there were ; 
but there were not enough. The 
first woundeds came down in 
box-cars, and their beds were 
straw on the truck floors ; and 
ever)' jolt of the rigorous springs 
jarred them. Billie and his guild 
altered that. Hospital-trains de 
luxe were created, and became 
commonplace in France ; and 
these trains have steadily gone 
on from perfection to perfection : 
in them are wards with slung 
cots, fresh air, and electric fans 
for more air if necessary ; they are electric-lighted 
throughout ; their springs are soothing, not 
jarring ; they have operating theatres, dispen- 
saries, and special cars for doctors and nurses, and 
special kitchens, and every conceivable requisite. 



that wander along the more tight-waisted canals 
you will know the sort of barge that the Red 
Cross uses. In the hatch-battens <(! hope it is 
hatch-battens) on the deck are skylights ; and 
below, in the hold of the barge, are the two rows 
of the thirty beds about the central aisle. Elec- 








DINNER-TtME IN A WESTERN-FRONT TRENCH: YORK AND LANCASTERS 
GETTING THEIR SOUP. [Official Photograph.}. 



The French use the barges more than the 
British; but these must be noted down asamongthe 
wonders that Billie and his kind have created out 
of the war. If you have met one of the biggish 
Thames barges not the narrow, pinchbeck sort 



A GOTHA "STRAFER" WHO RECENTLY BROUGHT DOWN ONE OF THE 

GERMAN BOMBING GOTHAS WITH ITS CREW OF THREE: ONE OF OUR 

UNNAMED AIR-WARFARE HEROES. [Official Photographs.] 



tricity is again a feature of the barges ; they have 
an operating theatre, accommodation for doctors 
and nurses, and in the bows of each a, first-class 
kitchen. For wounded men who can with diffi- 
culty stand the strain of even a train journey, the 
passage in these barges along the 
I^HBI^B^ canals and rivers of France is 

almost idyllic. 

Billie is probably proud of all 
these things he has helped to do 
or rather, he would be proud if 
he had time to think about it ; 
but he hasn't. The easy move- 
ment of the wounded from firing 
line to Dressing Station, from 
thence by trench motor-train, 
motor-transport, hospital-train, 
hospital-ship, hospital-trains, and 
motor-transport again that brings 
them to the home hospital, needs 
perpetual attention, perpetual 
oiling up, perpetual innovation. 
Billie says that new ideas and 
new methods are being dis- 
covered and put into play every 
minute. They were always 
going one better improving. 
" How can you ? " I asked. 

" Unless you use aeroplanes " 

"Well," reflected Billie, "why 



not ? These big Handley-Page 'planes how 
many do they carry ? Twenty ? Well, with a 

little more accommodation " 

I can see Billie using Red Cross aeroplanes 
yet- W. DOUGLAS NEWTOS. 



Fb. 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



(Hatching in the Hrctic Circle. 





SPORT WITH ROD AND LINE : AN OFFICER EQUIPPED AGAINST THE UNIVERSAL FLY PLAGUE. 



Watch off the north of Europe within the Arctic Circle has been 
maintained erer since the war began. It a kept up at all seasons, 
with occasional short ipelU off duty, pasted, al convenient, at coast 
anchorages, or in port, or off one of the inlets fringing the northern 
shores of Norway. Excellent fishing is to be had with rod and line, 
and officers take advantage in season of their opportunities. As 



the illustration shows, there are drawbacks to personal comfort 
and inconveniences from the teeming insects, midges, stinging flies, 
etc., which swarm . . a veritable plague, requiring the fishermen 
to equip themselves with face-nets, gloves, and to smoke hard. The 
fishing at most places is satisfactory ; the inland waters and upper 
reaches of the inlets teem with big fish. [P*o/o. by C.N.] 



ft r i* 

30 |_^ ew 



FHE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 6. 1918 



Indian Ocops in Mesopotamia 




THE MESOPOTAMIA CAMPAIGN : CROSSING A BRIDGE ; INDIAN 



At the moment of writing the latest news from Mesopotamia comes 
from an enemy source a Turkish communique of January 27 
which reported more lively aerial activity on both sides, but no 
other event of importance. A week or two ago the War Office 
announced that the heavy rain in Mesopotamia had ceased and 
the floods had subsided. That Indian troops have played a brilliant 



part in Mesopotamia was made evident in the late Sir Stanley 
Maude's posthumous despatch. Among the regiments mentioned 
were the 5ist Sikhs, ooth Punjabis, 5th and 8th Gurkhas, 39th 
Garhwhalis, and Indian cavalry and Lancers. General Maude 
thanked the Ruling Chiefs for maintaining the Imperial Service 
troops at such a high standard. [Official Photograph.] 



F.b. 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 




OleU-TZreated "Curhish prisoners in Mesopotamia. 




GENERAL MAUDE'S LAST VICTORY: PRISONERS AT RAMADIE ; RECEIVING BOOTS AND OUTFIT. 



The upper photograph shows some of the Turkish prisoners taken at 
Ramadie, where, it may be recalled, the enemy were hemmed in 
by the late Sir Stanley Maude's fine strategy, and surrendered with 
their whole force. Between three and four thousand prisoners were 
. taken, including the Turkish commander, Ahmed Bey, and a large 
quantity of war material. The battle was described in General 



Maude's recently published posthumous despatch. In it he mentions 
that during the spring campaign of last year, before the summer 
heat compelled a cessation of major operations, about 3000 Turks 
had been taken prisoners in one month. In the lower photo- 
graph, Turkish prisoners are receiving new boots. Following a hath, 
each prisoner is supplied with a complete outfit. [Official 



, r Part 87 T 
2--|_Nc. Serki] 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 6. 1918 



Roumania at 



with the Bolshevists. 






IN 



THE LINES : THE CROWN PRINCE (LEFT) AND A FRENCH OFFICER ; WATCHING MUSKETRY. 



The Roumanians, after being compelled to assent to a cessation of 
active hostilities with the Austro- German forces confronting them, 
through the defection of the Russian troops previously co-operating 
with them, ir. the third week of January were attacked by Russian 
Bolshevist troops. The Russian 9th and loth Siberian Divisions 
attempted to force their way from their former lines across the 



Roumanian Danube front in the neighbourhood of Galatz, in order, 
It is stated, to regain Russian territory. They were opposed by 
the Roumanians, and the attempt was foiled. Roumanian heavy 
artillery and three Danube monitors beat back the Russians. The 
Bolshevist "Council of Commissaries" at Petrograd has "broken 
off relations" with the Roumanian Government (l*hoto$. l>v C.N.' 



Feb. 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, 



forerunners of the Grand fleet: CCLir-Ships of HU Hges. -XIX. 











A WONDER OF THE WORLD, AND THE " DREADNOUGHT " OF HER DAY: THE "INFLEXIBLE." 



Hie " Inflexible " marked an epoch. Completed in 1881, she 
fought at '!:* bombardment of Alexandria, Captain John Fisher, 
now Lord Fisher, commanding her. She was the largest war-ship 
in the world .11,880 tons), carried the heaviest guns in the British 
service, four 81 -urn guns of ifi-inch calibre, with the thickest 
armour ever seen afloat (24 inches), besides being fitted with 



hydraulic and electrical machinery, which made her " unique and 
unparalleled as an engine of war." One special feature WAS her 
being only armoured amidships. The rest of the hull for two. 
thirds of its length was left to water-tight compartments for 
flotation in action. Also her turrets were echeloned, not, as hitherto, 
on the centre line. She cost three-quarters of a million sterling. 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 6. I9) 



WOMEN AND THE WAR. 



THOUGH even the most prejudiced are now 
quite ready to admit that the members of 
the Women's Auxiliary Army Corps are filling a 
real want, there is still a good deal of ignorance 
about the kind or, to be more accurate, different 
kinds of work its members are doing. It is 
admitted by most that discipline and uniform 
need not of necessity rob even the most womanly 
woman of the " charm " which is popularly sup- 
posed to be her most precious possession ; but 
few, perhaps, are 

aware of the ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
amount of hard 
work and discipline 
that go to make 
up the life of a 
" Wack." There 
are still not a few 
people to whom the 
khaki girls, who 
have now become 
a commonplace of 
life, are simply 
" women who are 
doing work to set 
free fellows for the 
Army, you know," 
and, so far as 
they are concerned, 
there the matter 
ends. 



follows, as a matter of course, that there will 
be a corresponding increase in the work that 
women are doing for the military authorities, and 
consequently in the numbers of women required 
to do it. There will have to be more cooks, more 
waitresses, more clerks, more engineers to men- 
tion only a few of the activities of the " Wacks." 
If there is an urgent need of men in the Army 
at the front, the need for fresh recruits in the 
ranks of the feminine army that stands behind 

them is not less 










AWARDS FOR WOMEN LAND-WORKERS: RECIPIENTS FROM 

THE MIDLAND COUNTIES. 

Some three hundred women land-workers from the Midland Counties paraded 

in Birmingham the other day, and marched in procession to the Council 

House to receive the awards they had won at a recent Test Meetinf . 

Photograph by Topical. 



Bu : more women 
are wanted, and 
still more will be 
required when the 
long - promised "comb-out" of young men 
becomes a fact. Sir Auckland Geddes has 
said quite plainly that hundreds of thousands 
of men must be found for the Army. It 



imperative. 



It is with the 
twofold object of 
demonstrating the 
national value of 
the work that 
women are now 
undertaking, and 
of showing those 
who have not yet 
enrolled how they 
may best help their 
country, that the 
authorities have 
organised an jxhi- 
biiion to be held, 
by the courtesy of 
Sir Woodman ISur- 
bidge, at Har- 
rod's, in l!ronip!(/u 
Koad. "1 lu- exhibi- 
tion will embrace 
the activities uf 



the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps, the Women's 
Royal Naval Service, as well as the varied flu ties 
that devolve on feminine employees of tlie Koyal 
Flying Corps. Photographs will illustrate every 



[CartttnrieJ ovtrtta/. 




AWARDS FOR WOMEN LAND-WORKERS : PART OF THE PROCESSION.-[W^^ 6v 



Fb. 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Part 87 "I 
[.New Series J 



CClitb General plumer's Hrmy in Italy. 






HIGHLANDERS : PIPERS ON A MAIN ROAD ; VILLAGERS AND CHILDREN WATCHING A PIPER PLAY. 



Not only U almost every arm of the service represented In the 
British contingent assisting the Italian* to hold Venetia and the 
northern plains against the Auttro-German invaders, but also most 
at the nationalities in the British Army are represented in General 
Plumer's Army. Our illustrations show some of the Highlanders 
who are on that front. The pipers of one regiment are seen in 



the upper photograph on a snow-covered road, one of the main 
roads, fringed along each side with rows of the Lombard? poplars 
characteristic of the highways of Northern Italy. The Highlanders, 
as correspondents have related, are everywhere a source of interest 
and wonder to the people of the villages, and their pipers, in 
particular, attract young and old. (Official Photographs.] 



M_r fi i i 
I N>. Af rin J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 6. 1918 



phase of life in the three services, and, because 
even the most enthusiastic worker .still takes an 
interest in her personal .appearance, uniforms, 
badges, rank-marks, and other details relating to 
the all-important subject of clothes will be on 
show. Practical hints are always useful, and officers 
of the Coips will be present to give daily lectures 
on what life in the Woman's Army really means. 

But the khaki and blue women represent, 
after all, only a fraction of those who have been 
mobilised 'for " war " service of one kind and 
another. The historian of the future will, no 
doubt, put together an interesting half-dozen 
volumes dealing with " what women did in the 
Great War," and ii won't by any means be the 
least interesting section of the complete history 
of the event. But history is, after all, something 
for future generations. There is the present to 



Naval Service ; and that, as well as a real desire 
to be useful, is bringing in recruits in numbers 
almost greater than can be dealt with by the 
authorities until definite arrangements for their 
housing have been cariied some steps further, and 
the needs of the various areas affected accurately 
estimated. That, however, does not mean that 
work is at a standstill. On the contrary, the 
business of training officer.-, is going steadily for- 
ward, and some of the rank and file are already 
at work. Batches of " Wrens," in their neat 
hi ue coat-frocks (the equipment served out, by 
the way, reaches a high level of excellence), are 
already at work in a London suburb as Writers to 
the Navy the nautical equivalent of short-hand 
typist or clerk. 

Of the two sections, mobile and immobile, into 
which the new service is to be divided, it is esti- 




UNCONVENTIONALITY IN THE STRAND: AMERICAN LADY MUSICIANS ENTERTAIN U.S.A. SOLDIERS AND SAILORS. 

The exieencics of war-time have swept many conventionalities into oblivion, and thinp, are seen and done to-day which before the war would 

hjve been conferee! unconventional in the extreme. Such is the scene our photograph shows: a party of good-natured American lady musicians 

entertaining soldiers and tailors from the United States, outside the Eagle Hut in the Strand.- - [Photograph by L N A ] 



be taken into consideration, and the many con- 
nected with the members of the Women's Army 
using the term in its widest sense would welcome 
some account of the work the women are now 
carrying on. So it is interesting to know that 
the publication, at an early date, of a quarterly 
magazine dealing with various aspects of women's 
war work is in contemplation by the authorities. 

* * * 

Though they are the junior service, the 
" Wrens " are forging ahead. There is no ques- 
tion of its members being detailed for service 
afloat or abroad, yet the romance that somehow 
always clings to anything associated with the sea 
u.anj's about the title of the Women's Hoyal 



mated that the latter will be by far the larger. 
So far as it is possible, the women enlisted will 
work in the district adjoining their own homes. 
A large mobile section would entail, of course, the 
provision of hostels for the accommodation of its 
members an expensive and a rather difficult 
business these " restricted " times. On the other 
hand, the decision to make use of the services 
of as many women as possible in the neigh- 
bourhood from which they are recruited means, 
whenever it can be put into practice, a substan- 
tial saving of public money, and Dame Katharine 
Furse has publicly stated that the Corps is 
to be run as economically as is compatible 
with efficiency. CLAUDINE CI.EVK. 



Feb.S. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Part 87 "1 * 
LNew Series \~ J 



Captured German Iar JMateriel and .Spoil 







IN THE CAMBRAI AREA : GERMAN EXPLOSIVE TUBES FOR ROAD DESTRUCTION ; STEEL HELMETS. 



In the upper illustration is shown a collection of German engineer 
corps' road-destruction maUrul, as found at a magazine store-dump 
on the outskirts of a captured village. The tubes were loaded 
with dynamite ready for laying below the road surface, or insertion 
in culverts, or for inserting in the ground, to blow up roads and 
render them impassable by the wheeled traffic of an advancing 



force. They are fired by electric wires, and are employed also 
on roads as land-mines. Designed for emergency purposes, 
primarily, the enemy, owing to the rapidity of the attack at the 
place where they were taken, had no time to use them. In the 
lower illustration is seen a heap of German steel helmets of the 
regulation pattern collected at Cambrai. [Official Photographs.] 



3S 



f l',rt S7 -I 
| s.-w S ,,..-sJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



Feb. 6. 1918 




WA: 



A LONG TALE OF SEA DISASTERS - NAVAL AIRMEN'S EXPLOITS - SUBMARINE 
DAMAGE GREATER -RUSSIAN CHAOS - HITS AT HERTLING - ARAB SUCCESSES - 

BRAZIL'S NAVAL AID -RATIONS. 



THE tales of the sea this week were full of 
interest, not always of the pleasantest kind. 
At the beginning of the period under review, the 
Cunard liner Andania, with 40 passengers and 200 
of a crew, was torpedoed off the Ulster coa-;t. All 
on board, with two exceptions, a ship's boy and 
an able seaman, were saved. The vessel remained 
afloat for 30 hours, and for a time it was hoped 
that she would be got into port, but finally she 
sank. The survivors were gallantly rescued by 



driven down out of control. The same afternoon 
/((brugge was bombed with unusual severity. 
On several earlier days attacks were delivered 
on enemy aerodromes in Belgium, at points to 
the south-west of Bruges. Direct hits were 
recorded. 

A slight increase was shown by the return'.; of 
losses by submarines for the week ending Jan. zfr. 
The figures were : Large 'vessels, 9 ; smaller vessels, 
6 ; fishing craft, i ; unsuccessfully attacked, 8. 




THE CONFERENCE OF INDIA'S RULING PRINCES, HELD AT DELHI : THE VICEROY. LORD CHELMSFORD, 

AND THE PRINCES. 
The Begum of Bhopal, veiled, is seated next the Viceroy. [Photo, by Bourne and Skepkcnl.] 



trawlers and patrol-boats Not quite 24 hours 
later, the Cork, a steamer belonging to the City 
of Dublin line, was torpedoed amidships. She 
had 42 persons on board, including 12 passengers. 
Of these, 24 were saved. Among naval losses 
recently announced by the Admiralty were those 
of H.M.S. Mechanician, armed escort vessel, tor- 
pedoed in the English Channel; and H.M.S. Hazard, 
torpedo gunboat, sunk in collision, also in the 
Channel. Of the former vcssfel's crew, 3 officers 
and 10 men were lost ; of the latter's, three men 
were lost. The transports Aragon and Osmanieh 
were sunk in the Eastern Mediterranean on 
Dec. 30 and 31 respectively, 800 lives were lost. 
(Announced by Admiralty, Jan. 30.) 

The Naval Air Service was engaged in several 
vigorous actions. On the 2oth Coolkerke Aero- 
drome, two miles N.E. of Bruges, was bombed 
and set on fire. Frequent combats in the air had 
good results, enemy craft being destroyed and 



To find a similar loss in smaller ships we have 
to go back as far as Dec. 6, when 7 were sunk. 
The totals under this head have not risen above 
3 for the past 6 weeks. The loss in larger ships, 
although less good than the two previous weeks, 
is still only half the number for Jan. 5 and Dec. 29. 
Arrivals increased by 97 ; sailings, by 67. From 
Washington came a suggestion that the U-boats 
are recoiling for a fiercer spring at the American 
troop-ships. The U.S.A. speeds up preparations, 
and speaks of ability to put 500,000 men in the 
field at an early date. 

The Goeben, it appeared from enemy reports 
had been refloated and towed further up the 
Dardanelles. It was understood, however, that 
even then she was not beyond the ministrations 
of our aircraft, from which the vessel had mani- 
festly suffered. Another enemy message of 
February i announced that .'he had rea hed 
Constantinople once more. 



Feb. 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, 



r Part S7 -| , 
|_New Sc.iesJ^ 3 



alb 



'Cbe Portuguese on the Cdestern front. 





IN AND NEAR THE LINES : A GAS SENTRY AT AN ALARM-ROCKET POST ; ON PARADE. 



A considerable force of Portuguese are in the lines at the front. 
As has been illustrated in many previous numbers, many of the 
Portuguese battalions, after a preliminary training at home, were, 
for a time, in camp in England to complete their training. Accord- 
ing to the testimony of the official communiques, many of the 
trained Portuguese have not only been under shell-fire, but have 



fought the enemy at close quarters. At it was officially stated, 
further, they showed the steadiness of experienced soldiers, and 
acquitted themselves with credit. As to the lower illustration, in 
particular, it may be explained that the uniform of the Portuguese 
is khaki, like the British. Their steel helmets in shape follow the 
British pattern, with a corrugated crown. [Official Photographs.] 



. r Parts? "1 

10 [ New Scries 1 v 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 6. 1918 



Among the conflicting tales from Russia were 
ilur of \vav definitely made by the Bolshevik 
forces against Uoumania and Ukrania. Lutxk 
was n ported taken by the Ukranian troops. The 
I'kranian Government was 
said to have fallen. The ^^ 
Bolsheviks claimed to have 
raptured Kieff. Revolution 
in Finland was another re- 
ported item of the general 
turmoil. One day the 
Bolshevik Government' is 
declared to be tottering ; the 
next we have a fiery docu- 
ment trouncing Germany. 
One of the latest of these, 
circulated by the Russian 
Government wireless stations. 
was a powerful censure of 
Count Hertling a sort of 
leading article by telegraph 
(Hertzian waves for Hert- 
ling), which made remark- 
ably good reading, qua read- 
ing. Its personalities recalled 
the controversial style 
favoured by the Italian 
scholars of the Renaissance, 
when they fell out on points 
of grammar. The audience 
was obviously the German 
and Austrian proletariat, 
particularly the former. The 
manifesto contained a curi- 
ously able nutshell review of Germany's educa- 
tional, economic, and social position, admittedly 



high, yet prostituted to " feed with her blood a 
dung-heap of vermin, military millionaires." 
The tirade ended with dark hints of a German 
upheaval " in the March days." The tongue of 




ON THE BELGIAN FRONT : OFFICERS OF THE JAPANESE MISSION VISITING 

THE BELGIAN LINES, TOGETHER WITH THEIR HOSTS OF THE BELGIAN 

HEADQUARTERS STAFF. [Uclgian Official Photograph.] 



Bolshevism has tones innumerable, an utterance 
strongly confused and dim, yet not wholly with- 
out purpose. 

Further Arab successes 
were reported from the 
Hedjaz. On Jan. 26 a Turkish 
force advancing westward 
from Maan was repulsed by 
Arab troops at Ain Uheida, 
seven miles west of the former 
town. A Baghdad hospital 
was bombed by Turkish air- 
craft. For this speedy re- 
prisals were taken on Turkish 
headquarters, units, and 
aerodromes in Mesopotamia. 
Spain issued a strong 
note to Germany on ques- 
tions arising out of the sink- 
ing of the Giralda. .Brazil 
announced its intention to 
senci ships to co - operate 
with the British Navy. In 
the House of Lords, Lord 
Rhondda announced an im- 
mediate scheme of national 
compulsory rationing. Sir 
Eric Geddes is : aid to 
have told a United States 
newspaper interviewer that 
the U-boat menace "is 
held." 

LONDON : FEB. 2, 1918. 




ON THE BELGIAN FRONT : MEMBERS OF THE CHINESE MILITARY MISSION 
VISITING THE WESTERN FRONT IN THE STREETS OF FURNES. 



The Chinese General Tcheng, who is at the head of the Mission, was formerly a student at the 

Brussels Military School. He has been warmly received by numerous Belgian officers who were 

formerly fellow-students with him. [Iti'liiian Official Photograph.} 



LONDON : Published Weekly at the Office. 172. Strand, in the Parish of St. Clement Danes, in the County of London, by THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS AND SKETCH, LTD, 
173, Strand, aforesaid ; and Printed by THF ILLUSTRATPD LONDON NEWS AND SKETCH, LTD.. Milford Lane, W.C. 2 WEDNESDAY. FEB. 6. 1918. 
Filtered as Second-Class Matter at the New York (N.Y ) J'..st < >tik:, 1916. 



The illustrated War Newt, Feb. 13, 1918.-Part 88, New Serie*. 



Che Illustrated War news 




IN HIS WINTER KIT : A SERBIAN INFANTRYMAN. 
Photograph by C.lf. 



_ r Part KM -I 
Z~|_New SceiesJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 13. 1918 




GERMAN STRIKE FABLES-ENEMY FEELERS ON THE WEST GUN-FIRE AND RAWS 
THE ENEMY'S GROWING ACTIVITY FURTHER SUCCESSES IN THE AIR BIG ITALIAN 

BAG OF HOSTILE AIRCRAFT. 



BY the time this article appears the German 
strikes will seem almost prehistoric. As 
anticipated by all but fond optimists, the Mailed 
Party crushed the 
" movement," such 
as it was, with a 
turn of the fist. The 
whole incident, like 
the report of Mark 
Twain's death, was 
greatly exaggerated. 
Its popular signi 
ficance was almost 
nil. For effect, Herr 
Dittmann, the Social- 
ist Minority leader, 
was sent to a fort- 
ress for five years 
and to prison for two 
months for attempt- 
ing to address a meet- 
ing. Berlin Wireless 
sent out a lurid and 
circumstantial story 
of rioting and blood 
shed in Oxford Street. 
The object of pub- 
lishing such a fable 
is not clear, unless it 
were to afford the 
German public encouraging proof that Great 
Britain is breaking up internally. Similarly, the 
German strike stories could only have been allowed 




WONDERING TO WHAT EXTENT THE GERMANS USED IT : 
TESTING A PILLORY FOUND IN A VILLAGE EVACUATED 
BY THE ENEMY.- [Official Photograph.} 



out in order to comfort us with the idea that 
Germany was in a bad way. Had their own 
domestic disturbances meant anything, the 

authorities would not 
have heartened a 
" rebellious " German 
democracy with 
British parallels. 

I luring the wt-i-k 
under review the 
enemy became more 
active in raiding and 
in artillery fire. Ik- 
searched the British 
line up and down 
with local attacks 
and gun-fire. His ar- 
tillery opened first at 
Gouzeaucourt and 
Lens, points thirty 
miles apart ; next 
day the bombard- 
ment had shifted very 
little, the fire being 
rather more to the 
south of Lens ; while, 
before Cambrai, La 
Yacquerie was now 
getting what Gou- 
zeaucourt had re- 
ceived. Then Ypres and Armentierci had a 
dose. The Lens district was the next subject of 
attention ; but positions north-east of Gavrelle, 



' 




WHERE THERE'S A WILL 'THERE'S A WAY: SOLDIERS ANGLING ON A WESTERN-FRONT BATTLEFIELD, WITH 
A RIFLE AND A WIRE-ENTANGLEMENT SUPPORTING STEEL UPRIGHT FOR FISHING RODS. [Official Mold? fills.] 



Feb. 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



| rar. OS I _ 
l_NVw SenesJ~' 



in the Arras region, were also " strafed," which 
meant that the centre of the Lens-Cambrai line 
wa^ being tested. The chief artillery activity now 
shifted further north to Armentieres and east of 
Ypres, and the Cambrai front was for the moment 
left alone ; but on the jth the enemy guns broke 
into great activity 
once more south of 
Marcoing and north 
of the Bapaume- 
Cambrai road ; 
while, northward, 
the Lens and Ypres 
regions were vigor- 
ously shelled. Mean- 
while, our guns 
were silent, except 
for a time on the 
5th, when they 
opened on enemy 
positions at Har- 
gicourt and south 
of Lens. The 6th 
saw the enemy guns 
again very active 
southward at Hav- 




forty miles away, the Germans approached a post 
south of Armentieres. Mericourt and Avion, 
Zaandvoorde, south of Gheluvelt, and Neuve 
Chapclle were next on the list. None of the 
enemy attempts except that at Zaandvoorde : 
where a British post was rushed came to any 




TORPEDOED OFF THE IRISH COAST WHILE SERVING AS A TRANSPORT WITH U.S. TROOPS : 
THE ANCHOR LINER " TUSCANIA." 

Owing to the fine discipline on board, and the rescue work of British destroyers, not more than 166 
lives were lost, out of 2401 on board. {Photograph by C..V.] 



ricourt, on the 

Cambrai front, and 

in the Lens region 

by that town, and 

near the Menin Road. On the 7th some activity 

in gun-fire was shown by the enemy south-west 

of Cambrai and south of Lens 

The enemy grew brisker also in the matter of 
raids in some force, while the British were content 
with incidental affairs of patrols. These German 
raids were also in the nature of feelers. The 
points first attempted were Arleux-en-Gohelle, 
east of Vimy, and Gheluvelt ; Poelcapelle had the 




AT ALBERT, WHERE THE NOW WORLD-FAMED MADONNA AND CHILD STATUE STILL 

REMAINS BENDING FORWARD ON THE HALF- WRECKED CATHEDRAL SPIRE : BRITISH 

HEAVY GUNS PASSING THROUGH ON THE WAY TO THE FRONT. [Official Photograph.] 

next vi it ; then came the turn of the Polygon 
Wood, which lies between the two former points 
attacked. Then the Cambrai front had remem- 
brances north of Havrincourt and the Bapaume- 
Cambrai road ; while about the same time, some 



success. The majority of the raids were on points 
of the Ypres- Armentieres-Neuve-Chapelle sector. 
During the same period the British reported 
having undertaken patrol encounters at Mericourt, 
south of Lens, and Hargicourt, nine miles north- 
west of St. Quentin points separated by at least 
forty miles ; further north, similar affairs took 
place on the Ypres-Staden railway and at Fleur- 
baix. south of Armentieres. These operations were 

all to our advan- 
tage. At Fleurbaix 
the enemy suffered 
severely in killed 
and wounded. We 
took prisoners and 
a machine-gun. 

While the in- 
crease in enemy ar- 
tillery activity was, 
perhaps, most pro- 
nounced on theCam- 
brai front, his raid- 
ing energy was ex- 
pended principally 
on the more north- 
erly sectors. Out 
of nine consecutive 
attempts, only two 
weje delivered on 
points further south 
than Mericourt. 
Little -happened 

bstween that position and the Bapaume-Gam- 
brai road, a distance of twenty miles. It was 
another eleven miles to the most southerly point 
at which a little action was reported that of our 
troops north-east of St. Quentin. Consequently, 



>w Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 13. 19IE 



the Cambrai front had little trouble in respect of 
local attack-; for the greater part of the period here 
considered. In brief, raids in the north, fairly 
active gun-fire in the north and the centre, with 
str. ng cannonades in the south, increasing in 
frequency and intensity, was the order of the week 








ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT : FIXING UP A ROAD 

CAMOUFLAGE I SCREEN TO PREVENT THE ENEMY OBSERVING 

TROOP MOVEMENTS ALONG lT.~[Official Photograph.} 

on the British front. On the night of the 6th, 
Liverpool troops carried out a successful raid east 
of Armentidres, capturing prisoners and a machine- 
gun, and suffering only light casualties. On the 
7th, the British took prisoners 
in a raid near Queant, and re- 
puhed an attack west of La 
Bassee. Enemy guns were again 
busy at Le Verguier and Monchy- 
le-Preux. 

" Marked artillery activity " 
opened the week on the French 
front north of the Aisne. The 
guns were also violent west of 
Fresnes, between the Oise and 
the Aisne, in preparation for a 
raid, which our Allies had no 
difficulty in repelling. On the 
4th, the batteries on both sides 
fired heavily in the Verdun 
region, and the duel extended 
with some intensity to the north 
of the Aisne, to Mount Cornillet 
(in Champagne), to the Argonne, 
and Upper Alsace. The follow- 
ing day the guns continued 
" fairly lively " at certain points 
north of the Chcmin des Dames. 
An attempted enemy raid at Cor- 
beny, in that region, was dispersed 
with loss before it reached the 
French lines. At Fille Morte, in the Argonne, our 
Allies returned with some piisoners from a success- 
ful raid. The same night, in the neighbourhood 
of the Bois des Fosses, the artillery fire became 
violent. The 6th was quiet along the whole front. 



except seme gun-fire on both fides at Auberive. 
An increase of liveline s was reported on 1he 7th 
from the Ai: ne, the right bank of the Meu: e at 
Samogneux, at Hill 344, and Hartmann weiler- 
kopf. At Braye-en-Layonnais and Mor,ir Wood 
enemy attacks were reputed ; the French made 
a successful raid ea t of the Teton, 
in Champagne ; the guns were violent 
in Al ace, and two enemy raids 
were foiled in the Banholz. 

The air fighting of the period was 
even brisker than that la - 1 recorded, 
and again formed the principal part 
of the military operation, in the 
West. Many tons of bombs were 
dropped on po: itions behind the 
enemy lines. Malle ( outh-ea t of 
Ghent), Ingehnunster (,outh-eat of 
Routers), Lichtervelde (oulh-ea c t 
of Thorout), the Menin railway 
station, and an aerodrome : omh-east 
of Cambrai were the principal points 
visited. The French airm< n were 
equally busy. On the 3rd they 
destroyed fourteen enemy machines 
in aerial combats ; on the ^th 
they brought down five, and dis 
abled three others ; and t ho : ame 
day 3^ tons of bombs were dropped 
on Saarbruck railway. 

A period of calm follov-od the 
recent fine success of the Italian-', and ihe chief 
fighting of the week fell to their airmen, who 
between Jan. 26 and Feb. 6th brought down. 
fifty-six hostile machines. On the yth a blight 




ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE-R.F.C. SALVAGE WORK : 

AEROPLANES (THAT TO THE RIGHT, THE GIFT OF A BRITISH COLONY) 

BEING PUT TOGETHER FOR FURTHER SERVICE AFTER RENOVATION. 

Official Photograph. 

reawakening of gun-fire wa- reported from the 
Stelvio, and patrol encounters between the 
Adige and the Brenta. During the period, 
Padua, Treviso, and Mestre were again bombed 
by the enemy. LONDON: FKB. 9, IQIH. 



Fb. 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Part f H . 
New Scries J"~ 5 




H JVotable British Hirman. 





A FINELY CHARACTERISTIC "ORPEN" PORTRAIT: SEC. LIEUT. A. P. F. RHYS DAVIDS, M.C., D.S.O. 

Sec. Lieut. Rhjri Dridi, who at the time of writing ii reported 
missing, has A brilliant record. No fewer than fifty-fix times hai 
this intrepid young airman crossed lines on offensive patrols, and 
has accounted for twenty-two enemy aeroplanes, including those of 
the crack German pilot Schafer, and also Vou, whose Fokker 
triplane crashed in Allied territory after a desperate engagement. 



Lieut. Rhys Daridi Is only twenty, and was Captain of the School 
at Eton. Our fine, virile portrait of him Is after the painting by 
William Orpen, A.R.A., one of the official British war-artisti, and 
is a striking representation of a remarkable personality, whose 
name will always be honourably associated with the great war In 
the air. 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 13, 1918 



OTbere fighting Goes on Incessantly 





AT LENS : A WATER-STATION WITHIN 



The enemy in Leni are held fast with a bull-dog grip by 
Canadian!, who are firmly established close by, and keep on 
attacking Lens with little intermission. The Germans are entrenched 
in the central portions of the town amidst a congested mass of 
fortified houses, with underground tunnels and works, like the runs 
and passages in a rabbit warren. The British forces hold a section 



HALF 
the 



A MILE OF THE CENTRE OF THE TOWN. 

of the outskirts and suburban mining Tillages on one side, steadily 
biting their way in. Every foot of ground has, literally, to be 
gained by incessant encounters at the closest quarters. The house 
seen, where the Canadians have a water-station to supply their 
posts near by, is within half a mile of the centre of Lens, and 
is continually under fire. [Canadian War Rtcords.} 



Feb. 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Prt "I _ 
I New Series I" 




On the Olestern front: H Barn Rest-Barrack. 





BEHIND THE LINES : A BARN WITH TIERS OF MATTRESS-HAMMOCKS AS SLEEPING QUARTERS. 



The curioui open doll's-house-interior effect tht the illustration 
on this page >t first glance luggesU shows one of the ingenious 
and very effective housing devices which have been adopted where 
opportunity offered in tome of the roomy farmstead buildings at 
places behind the lines on the Western Front. The large and 
spacious barn in which a number of Canadians are seen, through 



the method adopted, was converted into barracks providing sleeping 
accommodation for three times the number of men that the floor 
space available in the building could have housed ordinarily. The 
spacious interior between the barn floor and the roof is fitted up 
with tiers of spring-mattress hammocks, each tier having a narrow 
gangway down the centre. [Canadian War Records.} 



8-[N.Ts"S.]-THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, Fb. 13, 1918 




Lena: Crossing a Barrage of Germa 






SHRAPNEL-BURSTS IN MID-AIR AS A SCOUTING AIRMAN TRAVERSED THE GEM 

One of our airmen on scouting duty is seen in the above illustration, being fired at by shrapnel while running the gauntli 
of a barrage of German "Archies" in the day-time, while crossing the enemy's lines near Lens. The aeroplane is seen we 
across to the right, towards the lower corner of the illustration, with, in rear of It and above, the woolly looking puffs < 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. F.b. 13. 



Hrcbics ' firing Shrapnel in the Daytime. 








II : A DARING RUNNING OF THE GAUNTLET AND AN INSPIRING SIGHT. 

oke from the bursting Ctrmin shrapnel. The speed at which the plane travelled may be judged by tht diiUnce in rear at 
ich the shells are bursting. Obviously the guns were laid for their projectiles to explode close to and in advance of the 
nchine, so that it might be peppered in by the fan-like spread of the shrapnel bullets. [Canadian War Records.] 



... r p>tt n i 

10 LN,. Son.. I 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



F,b. 13. 1818 



On the deatern front: Battlefield Gleanings. 





ENEMY 



SPOIL : WILTSHIRES WEARING THEIR TROPHIES ; A GUN-PIT TAKEN BY A TANK. 



" Findi " of tnsmy ipoil and trophies continue to be nude in nd 
about the captured maze of German trenches of the First and 
Second Hindenburg Lines near Cambrai, which we hold. Trench- 
raids on portions of the enemy positions, also, now and again bring 
in additional trophies. Detachments returning from our own 
trenches on relief are constantly to be seen got up, as the party 



of the -Wiltshire! shown in the upper illustration, in German cap* 
and helmets. One helmeted man near the head of the column is 
also carrying a German "can" bomb. The German gun-pit in 
the second illustration was captured by the Tank seen in the back- 
ground. The dibris of the gun it held, as " knocked out " by the 
Tank, lies in the gun-pit. [Official Photographs.] 



Fob. IS. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 




february fill-Dyke" on the Cdcstcrn front. 





MULES .IN THE MUD : TOWING ONE ON 

" February Fill-dyke " hold! the greater part of the Western Front 
lor the time being thick in the mud ; rendering offeniire more- 
roents on mnjr Kale impoibl. There could hardly be a more 
tellinf picture of the condition and appearance of the .urface of 
the ground, near the lines, than that shown in these two illui- 
iritioni. Near and far the lurface appears al a muddy moraN ; 



TO ITS FEET : TWO HAULING UP ANOTHER. 

dep, iticky, limy mud, kept water-logged by patches everywhere of 
slowly thawing snow. In the upper Illustration one of the mules 
o a transport team is shown trying, with the aid of some men, to 
tow on to its feet a fallen mule. In the lower illustration a pair" 
of mules are needed, to haul out another mule that has slipped 
into a shell-hole. [Official Photofrapki.} 



, - r Part 88 "1 
l*-|_Nw Stria I 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 13. 1918 




On the Olcstcrn front: "Ravoch" and the R.f.H. 





RUIN AND WRECKAGE IN THE WEST : 

Since the word was given, " Cry Havock ! and let slip the dogs 
of war," Kenes such u that ihown in our photographs hare been 
among the ''common objects of the countryside" with our own 
brare soldiers and their allies. They are full of detolation, but 
the human element shown tells of anything rather than despair. 
In the Arst photograph the Tillage church has been reduced to a 



HALF A SHELTER BETTER THAN NONE. 

mere shell, yet the horses stand peacefully in the shelter of the 
wrecked walls, and the gallant men of the Royal Field Artillery 
go placidly about their duties. In the second picture there is even 
a suggestion of grim humour in the calm content with which 
Tommy smokes while his comrade completes hii horse's toilet, be- 
neath the semi-shelter of a shell-wrecked shed. [Official Pkotograph.} 



Feb. IS. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



CPart 88 1_t 
New Series J-I3 



H "Typical transport Camel in Palestine. 





V 



ONE OF A "FLEET" OF 30,000: THE "SHIP OF THE DESERT" AS TRANSPORT ANIMAL. 



The camel has played a conspicuous part in the Palestine cam- 
paifn both as mount for the Imperial Camel Corps, and for trans- 
port. General Allenby says in hit despatch : "The chief diffi- 
cultin were those of water and transport. . . . There were no 
(ood roads south of the line Gaa-Beeraheba, and no reliance 
could, therefore, be placed on the use of motor transport. Owlnf 



to the sleep banks of many of the w*dis. the route! passable by 
wheeled transport were limited, and the going was heary and 
difficult. Practically the whole of the transport arailable, includinf, 
30,000 pack camels, had to be allotted to one portion of the 
fore* to enable It to be supplied with food and ammunition 15 
to 10 mile* in adrance of railhead." [Photo, by Topical.} 



Nw HNMj 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. IS. 1918 



ROMANCES OF THE REGIMENTS: LXXXVHI.-THE 30TH FOOT. 

BROTHERS OF "THE CRAFT" AT WATERLOO. 



THE 3oth Foot, the Cambridgeshire (now the 
East Lancashire Regiment), who formed 
their square at Waterloo together with the 73rd, 
with the 33rd and 6gth in support, repulsed the 
rear and right column of the Grenadiers of the 
Imperial Guard. Some time earlier, they came 
in for the memor- 
able charges of the 
French Cuirassiers. 
These onsets pro- 
duced unusual in- 
cidents, for at times 
single horsemen would 
break away from the 
main body, and, 
galloping round the 
square, would at- 
tempt, by drawing 
the British fire upon 
themselves, to give 
their massed com- 
rades a better op- 
portunity of charging 
home. Four times 
the Cuirassiers over- 
rode the Dutch sup- 




surrender. The Frenchman rode off and rallied 
his men to another charge. 

The fresh onset had no better success. More 
men and horses went down in a weltering mass 
before the British fire. As the enemy again drew 
off, an officer of the 3Oth noticed a young French 

Adjutant lying pinned 
down under his horse. 
His helmet had been 
shot off, exposing a 
very handsome head 
and a face of sin- 
gular beauty and 
attractiveness. Al- 
ready several bayo- 
nets were pointed at 
the fallen man, and 
short shrift would 
have been his had 
not the British Cap- 
tain, who felt a 
strange and sudden 
interest in his help- 
less foe, interposed 
and commanded his 



porting batteries on 
the right ; four times 
they were beaten off 
and the guns re 
covered. Almost despairing of success, they 
tried another ruse de guerre. A squadron com- 
mander rode up to Sir Colin Halkett, com- 
manding the Fifth Brigade, and offered his 
sword. But that wary old campaigner saw 
through the trick, and ignored the feigned 



ON A CANADIAN SECTOR ON THE WESTERN FRONT: 

AT A LIGHT - RAJLWAY MATERIAL DUMP BOLTING 

SLEEPERS TO SHORT LENGTHS OF RAIL IN READINESS 

FOR REMOVAL FORWARD. [Canadian War Records.] 



men to desist. The 
Captain, rushing for- 
ward, disentangled 
the Adjutant from 
his horse and raised 
The young man, who 



him from the ground. 

was unhurt, at once grasped the hand of his 
preserver. It was not an ordinary hand- 
clasp : it conveyed the secret sign of a sacred 
brotherhood. 

The Frenchman was the first to speak. " I 

[Continued mrtta/. 




k CANADIAN SECTOR ON THE WESTERN FRONT: FILLING A LARGE WATER. TANK W.TH.N RANGE 
THE ENEMY'S SHELLS FOR HAULAGE FORWARD BY AN ARMOURED TRACTOR ALONG A BATTLEFIELD 

LIGHT-RAILWAY LINE. [Canadian War Records.} 



Feb. IS. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



LN4W srtetj~ 



On the dcatcm front: In a "Bach Hrea" Village. 




THE WORK OF A LONG-RANGE RANDOM SHELL : WHERE EVERYBODY, AND THE DOG, ESCAPED HARM. 



The Tillage in which the above photograph of a partially destroyed 
house WAS taken lie* at some distance in rear of the Canadian 
lines i in the "back-area" as the Canadians call the district, 
because of its being well to the rear. The place is, however, within 
long-range shell-fire from the Germans, and occasionally shells drop 
on the village; more or less random shots, to "search " the neigh- 



bourhood. The result of a hit by a shell, the velocity bf which 
presumably was nearly spent by reason of the long range, so that 
on impact the projectile only penetrated the upper part of the 
house, is shown here. It is stated that there were no casualties. 
The girl on \ht left is holding her pet dog, which escaped with a 
bad fright. \('attatlwn War Kecnrd*.} 



[_NW sffefj 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



F.b. IS. ItIS 



claim," he said, " your protection as a brother- 
Mason." 

" You have it already, man ami," replied 
the Englishman ; " you had it even before you 

" 






to move down the slope. The young Adjutant 
watched with kindling eyes, not wholly free of 
apprehension. His companion asked what men 
were these. 

^.-ci.- ta - z-stts-agss 

The Captain smiled, and made 
no reply. 

Suddenly the Frenchman's 
mood changed. " For God's sake," 
he cried, " send me to the rear." 

'.' But, my dear boy, you would 
almost certainly be killed. If you 
stay here you have a chance, 
and, after all, we run an equal 
risk." 

" Ah, but there is a differ- 
ence I If you fall, you fall by 
your enemy ; but I I fall by 
the hands of my friends. You 
can understand my feelings ? " 
Any reply was lost in the 
onset of the Guard. In that 
final moment of grim tussle the 
British Captain's attention was 
wholly occupied with his men. 
When he had time to remember 
his prisoner, Waterloo was won. 
The last hope of Napoleon had 
melted away. The Old Guard 
lay in ghastly heaps around the 
unbioken British squares. At 
length the Captain of the 3oth looked about 
for the Frenchman. He was nowhere to be 
seen. The odds were all against his escape. 
His rescuer saw his face no more, and had little 
doubt that the boy was dead. He mourned 




ON THE OUTSKIRTS OF LENS: CANADIANS EMERGING AFTER EX- 

PLORING ONE OF THE FORMER GERMAN CONCRETE- BUILT TUNNELS 

WHICH RAMIFY IN ALL DIRECTIONS UNDERNEATH OUR PRESENT 

POSITION [Canadian War Records.] 

of battle, each touched with a curious, inexplicable 

emotion. Apart from the claims of their esoteric 

craft, they liked each other at first sight, and, 

forgetting their surroundings, sought better 

acquaintance. The Captain withdrew his prisoner 

to the shelter of the square, and 

the young Frenchman, Unking his 

arm in the Englishman's, stood 

beside him to watch the fortunes 

of the day. As far as the Cap- 

tain's duty allowed, they con- 

trived to hold much friendly 

conversation, and found them- 

selves in wonderful sympathy. 

Their first instincts had not been 

false. The Cuirassier Adjutant 

was very young, very impetuous, 

very amiable a charming boy, 

full of gratitude to a generous 

foe ; anxious, too, for the fortunes 

of his beloved France. Like his 

leader, he hoped to the end ^in 

Napoleon's star. Never perhaps, 

in the heat of combat had two 

men, technically enemies, experi- 

enced such a conflict of feeling. 

" If we come out of this," 
said the Briton, " and see happier 
times, we must keep touch." 

" But certainly, Monsieur. And 
my mother, how she will thank 
you 




GENERAL CURRIE, OF THE CANADIANS, DECORATED BY A BELGIAN 

GENERAL WITH THE BELGIAN " CROIX DE GUERRE" AND "ORDER 

OF THE CROWN": THE GENERALS MEET AND SALUTE. 

Canadian War Records. 



For the moment there was a lull. The smoke 
cleared a little. New events were preparing. On 
the opposite ridge a dark mass formed and began 



him as sincerely as though he had known him 
for a lifetime. Their friendship had lasted 
just three crowded hours. 



Feb. 13. 1*18 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



[Pn us "}_.- 
New Scries J " 




On the Cdestern front: H Roadside "Canh Incident. 




TRAPPED IN A DITCH : A TANK STOPPED OWING TO THE WATER-LOGGED SOIL COLLAPSING. 

A somewhat unuiutl scan* by the romdiide on the Weftirn Front the ponderoui null of the Ttnk, preventing iU lifting motive 

near Pamcourt, if ihown In the illuitration on thii pie Tank power from raising iti end sufrlciently to cUtr th edge of the 

trapped In the deep ditch at the aide of a highway acrow which bank on the further aide. A Tank, alio, after being hard hit In 

Its path lay. PretummMy the immediate cauie of the misadventure action, or with its machinery partially crippled, might be liable 

was the toft state of the water-logged soil, which caused the to breakdown in similar circumstances. The disablement In many 

ground to give way on one bank of the ditch, and collapse under cases can often be remedied a little liter.- [official Photograph.] 



r Fart m I 
l~|_N Strir. I 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



Feb. 13. 1818 



With the Onhs on the Okstern front. 





TOWARDS CAMBRAI : IN A HINDENBURG-LINE TRENCH, NOW OURS ; TANKDROME SUPPLIES. 



Various accidental local circumstances occasionally bring Tanks to 
a halt in action, in spite of the marvellous "agility " If one may 
use the word in connection with so cumbrous and ponderous a 
structure as a Tank they display in getting over apparently 
impassable obstacles. A direct hit from a heavy shell, or some 
suddenly developed defect in the machinery, is also, of course, 



responsible for some breakdowns ; but the percentage of stoppages 
from this cause is comparatively small. In the upper illustration 
a Tank, bearing the quaintly dainty name of " Hyacinth," is sen 
temporarily come to grief in the second trench-system of the 
Hindenburg Line, while negotiating a stiff climb out. We captured 
the trench ; some '* Letcestershires " are seen there. [Official Photo _ 






Feb. 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Put M T_,o i 

I N.... !.,., | 1 \ 



OTtth the "Can he on the Cambrai Battlefield. 



>. 
v 

- 

t. 
aiL--: 








IN ACTION : CHARGING A GERMAN BARBED-WIRE ENTANGLEMENT ; TACKLING A WOOD. 



Tht upper illustration shows an episode of the victorious onset of 
the Tanks in the opening attack at Cambrai, of which the war 
correspondents made mention the way in which the Tanks "went 
for ' ' the German barbed- wire entanglements. The entanglements 
tackled by the Tanks were spoken of as being exceptionally for- 
midable- at, indeed, the portion shown here looks. The Tanks, 



wt are totd, burst into the entanglements, ploughed them up, 
crumpled and rolled up the wire and iron stakes in matted masses, 
and passed orer, rolling them out as a housewife's rolling-pin 
flattens out a pancake. How the Tanks crashed through the 
woods on the battlefield, like elephants trampling through a cane- 
brake, the second illustration shows. [Official Photographs.] 



. ' 



20 - [ N ^ ai LS ] THE ILLUSTRATE! 




SQinter JVlountain Cflarfare above the 




FILING IN OPEN ORDER ON SKIS ACROSS A SNOWFIELD : AN ITALIAN RECONH 

One purpose of the Austro-German northern thruit from the Trentino wa to break through the defence line across the mount! 
in the Lake Garda region and drive the Italians down to the plains of Lombard? and Venetia. The stubborn resistance of 
Italians in that quarter foiled the effort. They have held on to the southern ranges of the Trentino Alps, and are maintair 



(EWS, Feb. 13. l18.-U'iSL] 



on the Italian J^ortbern front. 









! N FORCE MOVING FORWARD, PREPARED TO ATTACK IF OPPORTUNITY OFFERS. 

ir positions there continuous mountain warfare throughout the winter being the result. The Italians have repeatedly taken 
t offensive with attacks by reconnoitring patrols in force across the snowfieldi at high altitudes. A detachment on skis is shown 
ossing the Vedretta del Mandrone, out on a reconnaissance in force i.e., prepared to attack. (Italia* Official 



2Z - LN J?; M J-THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. F.b. 13. 1918 




L 



Ht a "Onkdrome' on the CHeetern front 




RANGED LIKE A FLEET AT ANCHOR, IN REGULAR DIVISIONS AND SQUADRONS : 

The Tanks _on the Western Front have their own "lines," within easy reach of the battle-area, exactly as the other branches, 

arms, of the service have theirs. " Tankdromes " is the authorised name for these, on the analogy of the corresponding 

air service name for aeroplane camps and hangars, of "Aerodromes." There the crews of the Tanks are encamped, with, 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. F.b. 13. l8-[ N " S c, > U]-23 



lank Squadrons on a JVlustcr-Cround in Camp. 








THE " TANKDROMES " WHERE THE TANKS ARE STATIONED BETWEEN BATTLES. 

close at hand, repair-workshops, store-sheds for petrol, and gun-ammunition magazines. As seen in the illustration, the Tanks 
themselves are kept drawn up by squadrons and divisions on the outskirts of the Tankdrome, ready to move off as ordered. 
A suggestive detail, shown in the illustration, is the number " 528 " on the nearest Tank. [Official Photograph.} 



Pan 811 1 
W SnJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 13. 1018 




On the Western front at a British Herodrome. 






UF.C. MACHINES : A BOMBING SQUADRON LINED UP TO START ; A SCOUT-PLANEBY MOONLIGHT. 



The upper illustration shows aeroplanes of a Royal Flying Corps 
bombing squadron lined up at the aerodrome in readiness lor starting 
off on an expedition at the appointed hour. Just as every regiment 
parades on its assembly ground before going to the trenches or into 
action in the open, and the arms and ammunition of every man 
mrt closely Inspected, company by company, by the officers In 



charge, so inspections are made before air squadioiu start. Every 
machine leaves the hangar, so to speak, tuned up to concert pitch, 
after being inspected and tested in every detail by the officers who 
are to man them, each one of whom well knows that his life may 
depend on efficiency in the smallest particulars of the aeroplane- 
mechanism of his plane. [Official Photographs.} 



F.h. 13. 1118 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Ht an R.f.C. Camp Before a Bombing-Raid. 





SATISFACTORY : A BOMBING-RAID PILOT BEING SHOWN CERTAIN MECHANISM OF A 25-LB. BOMB. 



An R.F.C. officer, about to fo on board hi* plane and itart with 
tht squadron he helonfs to, ii wen here, lookinf at one of the 
lifhter type of S-lb. bomb* carried by certain aeroplanes of various 
squadrons, or "flight" (five aeroplanes comprise a "flight"), in 
addition to heavier projectile*. One kind of bomb may be used 
again*! troop* caught in close formation in the open, or in swoopinf 



long a line of trenchet, much a* hawk* on the quest for prey fly 
along hedge-rows. Heavier bombs, carrying large charge* of high 
explosive, are mostly used for dropping on aerodromes, magazines, 
railway itations, barrack*, etc. Bomb*, with (teadying vanes at 
the tail, are on the ground ; and underneath one wing of the lower 
plane are light bomb* fixed for dropping. [Official Polograpks.] 



._/ P.II 88 "I 
L"* SeriesJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 13. 1918 



THE NEW WARRIORS: XIX- " TRAFFIC." 



WILLIBRORD tried to be bad - natured 
about it, but he suffers from ingrowing 
amiability. Stepping fiom behind the hand' of 
one of his I.evites, he said, " Thus far and no 
farther can your er " he looked closely 
" motor vehicle go. Sorry ! " I think he should 
have said " Please," as though he were a minute ; 
but I passed over that. 

" It 's very inconvenient," 1 said. " The 



three-ton lorry. This is a three-ton loiry road." 
" As a matter of fact," I said, very cleverly, 

" this is really an R.F.C. tender or an R.A.M.C. 

ambulance. They can use any load, can't they ? " 
" Quite," he admitted. " Any road they like 

anywhere " 

" Thank you," I nodded. " Good-day." 

on the production of their permit when 

stopped," he clinched. 




WITH A TANK IN THE BACKGROUND OF THE PICTURE: HORSES OF MOUNTED TROOPS HALTING AT A 
PLACE CLOSE IN REAR OF THE FRONT-LINE TRENCHES WHERE A TANK IS AWAITING ORDERS. 

Official Pkotofraph. 



Great Something or Other in the West is kicking 
its heels and cursing at my tardiness. In the 
circumstances-. ? " 

" Sorry," he said. " No Inspection cars, 
Brigade cyclists, Salvage or Sanitary wheeled 
traffic allowed on this road." 

I asked haughtily, " What do you take this 
for ? " 

" Please don't ask me," he said. " I hate to 
be rude. One of the things it isn't is a lorry a 



" On second thoughts," I murmured, but not 



without dignity, " I think I would rather walk. 
I can at least walk ? " 

" Quite," he agreed again ; " also, on the pro- 
duction of your pass." 

I sat back and scowled. " Who are you ? " I 
snarled. " Arp you the Almighty of the district ? " 

" Next but one," he said. " I 'm his assistant." 

" His ? " 

" A.P.M.'s but only in an administrative 

ICimHnue* ntrliaj. 




THE K,NG OF THE BELGIANS ON A FORMER BRITISH BATTLEFIELD: KING ALBERT STANDING BESIDE 
A BR.T.SH TANK, DISABLED IN ACTION AND DISMANTLED.-^/ 



Feb. 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



f Pa 
iNew 



rt 88 



Hir-iHarfare : Our OTell-darmect Hirmen. 





WHERE THE ALLIES LED : ELECTRICALLY WARMED CLOTHING R.FX. OFFICERS FIXING APPARATUS. 



In the earlier winter months many Londoners congratulated them- 
Mlvt* that the coming cold would check German air-raideri becauw 
it would be insupportable at the altitude* at which the raiders 
kept. Air-raids, however, continued, and It was then said that 
the Germans supplied their airmen with garments electrically wired 
by a method invented by them, and unknown to the Allies, which 



kept the wearers warm, however cold the air was. It should be 
known to everybody that devices for electrically keeping airmen 'n 
clothing warm were invented among the Allies and in use by our 
airmen before the Germans adopted anything of the kind. Through- 
out the winter our airmen have been so equipped, alike on home- 
defence service and on the Flanders front. {Official Photograph. \ 



r 

18 LN 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 13. 191S 



sense. Actually I 'ra an independent command. 
I'm 'Traffic.'" 

" I 'm C.-in-C. Division, myself," I said. 
" Does that impress you ? " 

" Not unless you have it on a bit of paper a 
necessary bit of paper," he answered significantly. 




READY FOR A FLIGHT OVER THE GERMAN LINES: A BRITISH 
SCOUT AEROPLANE ON THE WESTERN FRONT [Official Photograph.] 

" Otherwise, I 'm sorry. No pass, no permission 
to go along this road, walking. Sorry ! " 

He seemed to be a great " sorryer," and I said 
so. I asked him what it felt like to spend one's 
life in perpetual apology, 

" I don't," he answered tersely. " This is my 
day when subalterns seem almost human, and I 
can't really strafe. I am more 
ferocious at most times ; so would 
you be. All the roads in this area 
are mine all of 'em. I 'm respon- 
sible for their right use and ap- 
portionment and other things as 
the book of rules says. I 've 
mapped 'em all out oh, very 
prettily so that lorries shall go 
on lorry routes, and Quarter- 
masters' horse bugbears on 
Quartermaster routes, and cy- 
clists on cyclist routes, and im- 
portant people and idiots who 
wander round in cars should go 
on their routes. 

" I don't hurl them all 
back," he admitted. " I pick out 
the amusing ones occasionally 
as you may notice. The whole- 
sale hurling is done by these " 
he pointed to his Levite, who, 
so that nobody should make any 
mistake, wore on his arm a 
brassard with the strange device " Traffic. 



The whole business is perfectly plain sailing. 
If the reasonably intelligent are in any doubt, 
they have only to look at the Boards. You have 
noticed the Boaids about ? Nice Boards, with 
nice lettering saying ' Ambulances Only,' or 
' Three-Ton Lorries Only,' or ' No Lorries,' or 
' Horse Vehicles Only,' and all 
that. Those boards are mine. 
I have them made and put up 
in conspicuous places on all my 
roads ; and, in case people are 
unreasonably dull, I have made 
my lettering big and plain, 
and not faint and indecipher- 
able, as do some others ; also 
I have put them about in con- 
siderable profusion still hoping 
against hope to arrest the at- 
tention of the unreasonably 
dull. . . . Perhaps your atten- 
tion was not arrested by a 
'notice not twenty yards back, 
explaining that this was a road 
for Thiee-Ton Lorries Only, and 
No Other Wheeled Traffic." 

" I even admired it," I told 
him. 

He beamed, but with a 
frosty glint. " Yet you brought 
that unspeakable thing along." 



" Or it brought me," I agreed. " You see, I 
was told that a man named Willibrord was a 
powei about here." 

" He is," agreed Traffic grimly. " I 'm 
Willibrord." 

" And that I could leave my car at his billet, 
and then he would let me walk in to the town." 




WITH THE BRITISH NIGHT-BOMBERS: A MACHINE RETURNING 
AFTER A FLIGHT. [Official Photograph.] 



" I have a young army of these intimidators 
of lorries, wanderers, and others. At their 
broad and uplifted hand, chauffeurs of all carats 
become as little children. They keep the roads 
in pioper traffic order, and control the crossings, 
and ' shoo ' the Outgoing off the Ingoing roads. 



but let you 



" You can leave your car, yes 
walk into the town NO ! " 

" No ? " I gasped in dismay. 

" NO sorry I If you had a pass, it would 
be " 

" That *s all right." I said, hopping out. 
have a pass." W. DOUGLAS NEWTON. 



Keb 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r K.ctt* -, 

LNew SetlciJ" 



french Chasseurs Hlpins on the Italian front. 





MONTE TOMBA HEROES : PARADING WITH ALLY-COMRADES ; DECORATING THE FLAG. 



The counter-ofJensire on the Ittllui front opened with the excep- 
tionally brilliant covp it main against the tnemj'i strongly fortified 
position on Monte Tomb*. It wu feat of arms daringly planned 
and executed. The Avutro-Gtrman petition, held In force by Jafer 
dtviiiont of both nationalities, wai captured. The " ipear-head " 
ol the attack wat comprlMd of that notable regiment, the French 



Chaoeuri Alpine. Some of the rictori appear In thaw Illustra- 
tions. In the upper photograph, a British soldier (right) and an 
Italian (left) stand In front, beside a piper of the Chasseurs 
Alpins. A French' General, fastening the Crovx tit Gutrrt to the 
battalion flag in honour of the exploit. Is seen in the lower 
Illustration. [French Official Photographs.} 






... r Pin M "I 

S0-|_vew SnJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 13. 1918 



H 



German Gas-jVIash: H "find" at kens. 





PROOF THAT THE ENEMY IS VERY SHORT OF RUBBER : A CAPTURED GAS-MASK OF LEATHER. 



Long ago the public were told through the medium of interviews 
with neutral travellers in Germany, on returning to their own 
countries, that the shortage of rubber in Germany was becoming 
serious. One returned neutral recently related that not a rubber- 
tyred vehicle was to be seen in Berlin or anywhere, all rubber 
baring been commandeered for the Army. In regard to the 



rubber shortage in the Army, we have ocular proof in the illus- 
trations on this and the adjoining page. It indicates a lack of 
rubber for indispensable articles of military equipment. The 
German gas-mask seen was among spoil recently taken by the 
Canadians. The flexible portions for which the only really ''safe" 
material is rubber are entirely of leather. [Canadian War Records,} 



Feb. 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Part 88 ~] . 

LN srieJ-3I 






H New German Gas-Maek: H ''find" at Lens. 











PROBABLY FOR " RUNNERS " : AN ENEMY GAS-MAS X, LEAVING THE EYES UNPROTECTED. 



As it Is generally known, asphyxiating gas afiects the eyes almost 
as seriously as it does the respiratory organs. Gas-masks have 
hitherto been provided with goggles to protect the eyes. The 
shortage of rubber in German war maUrifl factories has, however, 
of late become so serious that a new kind of mask has been 
introduced for men on special duties, in performance of which 



risk to the eyes ma; be somewhat lessened. In the specimen 
shown (recent Canadian spoil at Lens) there is no eye-protection ; 
just a mouthpiece and leather respiratory-box of the ordinary 
pattern, clipped on to the nose. It is presumably for trench 
messenger-runners, who take the risk of dashing at top speed 
through gas with half-closed eyet ^Canadian War Raordi.} 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 13. 1918 



The Palestine Campaign and the British deader. 




THE BRITISH IN PALESTINE s A CATERPILLAR-TRACTOR ; THE COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF, GENERAL ALLENBY. 



The upper photograph showi t British cattrpilUr-tiactor with iti 
" nOM " In the air w it negotiate! a desert trotting. In the lower 
one General Allenby li teen ttanding betide a captured German 
aeroplane. In a recent despatch, it may be recalled, he stated : 
"During the night of January 30 our line wai adranced aligbtly 
near Arnutieh da milet north of Jerutalem). On the morning of 



January 31 a reconnoitring detachment penetrated the village of 
Mufchmat (8 milet N.N.E. of Jerutalem), repulted enemy counter- 
attackt, and withdrew during the night, having accomplithed itt 
object. During the night of February 3 enemy patrolt were active 
between Arnutieh and Sheikh Abdulla. Attemptt to penetrate our 
linn were repulted." [Photos, by Topical.] 






Feb. IS. 1918 



FHE ILLUSTRATED WAR .NEWS. 



CIMrt 88 1 -, 
New SrieJ~ 3 



frencb Crophice; and a Mechanical t>encb-DCgger. 




WAR-MECHANISM: SPOILS TAKEN BY THE FRENCH AT MT. TOMBA ; A TRENCH-DIGGING 



The upper photograph thowl tome of th fpolli captured by the 
French on the Italian (ront In their brilliant action on Monte Tomba. 
An Italian communiqu* at the time Bated : " Alter careful 
artillery preparation, Intemriried early In the afternoon, French 
troop* itormed with magnificent lan the enemy poaltionl between 
OtMria dl Monleena and Nararulne. Marine orercome the 



MACHINE. 

itubborn reilltance ol the enemy, our rallant AHlei eatabllihed 
ihcmielTti firmly on the poaltloni gained. They captured 44 officer! 
and 1348 other rank>, 60 machine-guns, 7 cannon, tereral rapid- 
firing trench-guni, and a large quantity of other war material." 
In the lower photograph li Men a power-drlren trench-digg 
uaed by the French Army. [French Official Photographs.] 



S4 ^ 



Pan 81 I 

* SwtosJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Frb 13. 1918 



WOMEN AND THE WAR. 



THE flapper has had some hard things said 
about her since the war began. She has, 
for example, been accused of deliberately cul- 
tivating a spirit of frivolity unworthy of an 
English girl in war-time. That she raised enter- 
taining " 2nd Loots " to 
the dignity of war work 
wasn't altogether her 
fault. In point of fact, 
circumstances conspired 
to thrust the work upon 
her, and it is a wise girl 
who combines duty with 
pleasure whenever the 
opportunity arises of 
doing it. Frankly, when 
war began, the flapper 
was in a difficult posi- 
tion. Officially, she 
wasn't wanted. She was 
too young to nurse, and 
during the early stages 
of the conflict there was 
little else a woman could 
do. Flapperdom there- 
fore took upon itself 
the task of giving youth 
in khaki a good time, 
and did it with a 
thoroughness and effici- 
ency that their elders 
envied in secret, even if 
they derided it openly. 




THE FOOD CONTROLLER LOOKING AHEAD: WOMEN 

IN A "VEGETABLE -DRYING FACTORY," WASHING 

POTATOES FOR DRYING, IN VIEW OF A POSSIBLE 

VEGETABLE SHORTAGE (Photograph by Alfieri.] 



War, however, is no respecter of persons, and 
the flapper has at last been drawn into his toils, 
and is now 
enlisted in 
the army of 
women who 
stand behind 
the army of 
men. To her 
credit it must 
be said that 
she is throw- 
ing herself in- 
to the new 
work with all 
the energy 
and enthusi- 
asm she dis- 
played in her 
former occu- 
pation, and is 
showing, too, 
a hitherto 
wholly unsus- 
pected busi- 
ness instinct. 




THE FOOD CONTROLLER LOOKING AHEAD: WOMEN WORKING AT A 
VEGETABLE-PEELING MACHINE IN A "VEGETABLE-DRYING FACTORY," 
FORMERLY A KENTISH HOP-KILN, TAKEN OVER TO PREPARE FOOD IN 
THE EVENT OF A POSSIBLE VEGETABLE SHORTAGE. [Photograph by Alfieri.} 



If you are 
able to get sugar with clockwork regularity, and 
later the amount of meat and margarine which 
the authorities allot you, or the elusive butter 



whose taste is merely a pleasant memory, part of 
the credit will be due to Lord Rhondda and his 
immediate subordinates, but some of it will be- 
long to the recently enrolled regiment of flappers, 
800 strong, that is spending its days dealing with 
the nation's sugar cards 

MMMBM^^BB^MMH and the complicated 

conundrums attaching 
thereto at the Imperial 
Institute, Kensington. 

The war has accus- 
tomed us to many 
strange things. Giro's, 
the home of gaiety and 
good food, is now a 
Y.M.C.A. canteen 
where, by the way, you 
can still, if you happen 
to have a " private " 
friend, get the best tea 
that 's going in Town 
for the sum of sixpence. 
The transformation of 
the Hotel Cecil into a 
Government office with 
an amazingly bewilder- 
ing number of depart- 
ments has had no effect 
on the uneven tenour of 
our lives ; but there is a 
curious piquancy about 
the change that has 
been worked at the Im- 
perial Institute, which we all remember as the 
home of Royal Jubilee presents, and glass cases 

filled with 
fauna and 
flora gathered 
from all parts 
of the British 
Empire, to say 
nothingof the 
liberal sam- 
ples illustrat- 
ing its min- 
eral wealth 
and food pro- 
ducing capa- 
city. 



The food- 
cases have 
gone. Perhaps 
their contents 
have been 
eaten at any 
rate, official- 
dom has not, I 
believe, made 
any announce 



ment as to their present resting-place. Their place 
has been taken by long trestle tables strewn with 
the buff-coloured cards that bear, amongst other 



t txrttaf. 



F.b. IS. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Series J 



-35 




H 



Tillage Industry: H Scene in Kent. 




OLD HOP-KILNS PRESSED INTO SERVICE IN WAR-TIME : DRYING VEGETABLES. 



Een though It it difficult to take long views in these days of 
kaleidoscopic change, the wise folk re they who do ll that it 
ponible to forestall ny emergencies which might riie. More 
than In anything else it thii permissible in cases where the larger 
supply that ii available, the better it is for the public at large. 
Acting upon thU principle, the Miniitry of Food ha organiwd a 



factory for drying regetables in case there should be any shortage 
during the coming spring. Old hop-kilns in Kent are enlisted In 
the service, and women do the manual labour. Very workmanlike 
they look, in 'their oreralls and breeches, as seen in our photo- 
graph, carrying swedes to the peeling machine. It is healthy work, 
and well within the power of women. [/>'/<*>. fry Alfiiri.] 




run M 

- 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



F.b. 13. 1910 



things, the carefully guarded age-secrets of women, 
as well as information that bears more directly on 
the matter they concern. But something of the 
old atmosphere still remains. You can, if you 
wish, read just how the loyal inhabitants of Fiji 
or some equally distant spot sent greetings to 
their beloved Sovereign ; and there is still an 
elephant's head or two perhaps as a gentle hint 




THE FOOD CONTROLLER LOOKING AHEAD: WOMEN DRYING VEGET- 
ABLES IN A "VEGETABLE-DRYING FACTORY."-[io/ogra/>A by Alfim.] 

that we, like the French in 1870, may be called 
upon to pay fifteen shillings a pound for the 
privilege of eating its flesh. 

But that is a side-issue. The main interest lies 
in the sugar-cards, and the 800 flappers 'who deal 
with them in their thousands, and 
will soon, in all probability, be 
handling our ration cards. They 
are themselves dressed in buff- 
tinted overalls, almost of the 
same shade as the cards they 
handle. Some of them still wear 
the pigtail of extreme youth ; 
others the coils or curls or " bun " 
that indicates that their owner 
has achieved, or is fast approach- 
ing, the dignity of being " grown 
up." None are under sixteen or 
over eighteen ; all have passed the 
seventh standard in an elementary 
school, or hold an equivalent 
qualification ; and hardly one but 
wears a brightly tinted bow ih 
her hair, which helps to produce 
an atmosphere of cheerfulness, 
and goes to show that the old Eve 
will out, even though camouflaged 
in the uniform of officialdom. 



the war ; and each, if appearances go for any- 
thing, looks like making a good job of the work 
she has to do. Even the company of forty whose 
duty it is to open the papers as they come in and 
lay them in piles ready for examination and filing, 
contrive to carry out their not very exciting task 
with an appearance of interest greatly to their 
credit. Another group of eighty deals with the 
forms incorrectly filled in ; and 
one can't help wondering whether 
human perversity or sheer in- 
ability to grasp what was re- 
quired of them prompted appli- 
cants to fill in some of the entries 
that are a source of bewilderment 
as well as mirth to the youthful 
clerks. 

It is possible that the regiment 
of 800 will soon be increased to 
1000, for, with the advent of 
rations, the services of the na- 
tion's flappers are likely to be 
more in demand than ever. The 
idea of 1000 girls being deliber- 
ately engaged for what at first 
sight appears to be merely a blind- 
alley occupation is a sight to 
make horrified educationists weep; 
but the truth is far otherwise. The 
Government has no intention of 
defrauding the girls of the chance 
of earning a decent living when war is a thing 
of the past. So the authorities have, as was in- 
dicated a week or two ago, arranged for classes 
whereby their young employees can continue 
their education as well as serve their country. 
The welfare of the girls is not neglected. The 




THE FOOD CONTROLLER LOOKING AHEAD: WOMEN STOKING A 
BOILER FIRE IN A "VEGETABLE-DRYING FACTORY." [Photograph by Alfieri.] 



Here are some other facts about them. Those 
who are sixteen years of age earn a pound a week ; 
those between the ages of seventeen and eighteen 
a guinea ; and work lasts from nine until five. 
Each has signed on for a year or the duration of 



Government has by now realised that it is simply 
good business to ensure decent conditions for 
employees, and that money spent on procuring 
them is repaid with interest in the quality of the 
work done. CLAUDINE CLEVE. 



F<b 13. 191 S 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



TThc Court-JMartial on Bolo for HUeged fiigb treason. 




THE ACCUSED : BOLO (THE CIVILIAN ON LEFT IN DOCK) AND HIS ALLEGED ACCOMPLICE, PORCH^RE. 



The trial by court-martial of Bolo " Pasha," and his accountant 
and alleged accomplice, Porchre, at the Palais de Justice in Paris, 
opened on February 4. Seven officers constituted the tribunal. 
The setting of the scene was severely martial, as a " Times " 
correspondent notes. The customary Public Prosecutor's brilliant 
scarlet and ermine robes were replaced by the sombre uniform of 



dark blue. No more was the Judge's bench a curve of flashing 
colour. The black-robed ushers were absent, and in their place was 
a squad of soldiers with fixed bayonets. Bolo, as principal prisoner, 
was charged with entering into treasonable relations wit-i Germany, 
through, among others, the ex-Khedive Abbas, and with receiving 
money from Berlin for corrupting the French Press. \P''otos. Alfieri.] 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



Feb. 13. 1913 



AMERICAN TROOP-SHIP SUNK - OTHER SEA CASUALTIES -THE SEETHING POT OF 
RUSSIA-POLAND AND UKRANIA EAST AFRICA PALESTINE-PARLIAMENT PROROGUED- 

BOLO ON TRIAL 



THK warning quoted la^t week from 'Washington 
that the I'-lioats were gathering up to atU'.rk 
American troopships proved, unfortunately, to be 
well founded. On the night of Feb. 5 the Anchor 
liner Titscania was torpedoed off the Irish coast. 
No submarine was seen, the vessel was struck lull 
amidships ;uul a second torpedo just missed her 
.stern. Out of a total ship's complement of 2401, 
which included, in addition to the crew, United 
States military officers and soldiers, 2235 were 



sunk was not numerically great. Of larger vessels, 
10 were sunk, as against g for the previous week ; 
the rise was balanced by the return for smaller 
vessels 5, as against 6 ; fishing-vessels 4, as 
against i. The number of vessels unsuccessfully 
attacked remained constant at 10. A year's 
results of the intensified U-boat war show the 
loss of 799 large vessels, 289 smaller vessels, 
and 178 fishing vessels. Lord Jellicoe, address- 
ing the members of the Pacific Exchange at 




THE HEROIC DEFENDER OF LIEGE AT LAST RESTORED TO FREEDOM 

Photograph by Alfie'i. 



THE ARRIVAL IN PARIS OF GENERAL LEMAN. 



saved. An unofficial report said that the vessel was 
one of a convoy. As soon as she was struck she took 
a heavy list, which prevented the proper lowering 
of the life-boats. The Tuscania was built in 1914, 
and was of 14,348 tons gross. Among other naval 
losses reported was H.M. submarine E 14, which 
was entering the Dardanelles to complete the 
destruction of the Goeben. She was sunk off 
the Kum Kale point. Seven men were eaved. 
Another rather belated Admiralty report an- 
nounced the loss in the Eastern Mediterranean 
of H.M. armed boarding-steamer Louvain, with 
7 officers and 217 men. Ths vessel was tor- 
pedoed by a German submarine. Among the 
lost are 70 Maltese the heaviest toll which 
the island ha; suffered since the Battle of 
Jutland. 

The week's submarine returns show that the 
U-boats are .still capable of giving considerable 
trouble, although the increase in merchantmen 



Hull on Feb. 8, said that by the " late 
Mimmsr," August, we really .should be able 
to say that the submarine menace was 
killed. He based his view on his know- 
ledge of " what is ready and what is in pre- 
paration." 

From the " confusion worse confounded " 
which represents Russian news a few salient 
particulars which one dare not call absolute 
fact may at least be quoted. The Central 
Powers, in spite of Trotsky's protest, were reported 
to have recogni-ed the Ukranian Republic as an 
independent State. The greater part of the 
Kieff garrison has gone over to the Ukrainian 
Soviet Government. At Brest. Conference 
Trotsky raised the question of Kuhlmann's 
proposed admission of Polish delegates. These 
reports were somewhat belated, as was the news 
of a rising of the Polish Legions, which, 26,000 
strong, were said to have seized the Mohilrft 



Feb. 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



On Vimy Ridge: Building a jVIcmoruii. 




A CANADIAN ARTILLERY TRIBUTE : THE MONUMENT; PREPARING THE CROSS UNDER FIRE. 

Exactly as the battlefields of the 1870-71 war between Germany in the process of erection at Vimy Ridge by the Canadian artillery, 

and France in Alsace and Lorraine, and round Metz in particular, in memory of fallen comrades. We did much the same in the 

are thickly strewn with monuments, pyramids, stone columns, etc., Crimea, in front of Sebastopol, where the monuments stand thickly 

raised by regiments that suffered heavy casualties on the spot. in many places, and have hitherto been carefully kept and tended 

already similar memorials have been set up on battlefields in by the Russians, as officers of the British Army who visited the 

Flanders and Northern France. These two illustrations show one Crimea before the war have recorded. [Canadian War Records.} 



. 1 ran 
40 1 >;,, 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 13. 1918 



district a", long ago us Jan. 26. Russian main 
headquarters were reported occupied, and Kry- 
lenko, the En ign Commander-in-Chicf of the 
Bol hevik forces, was understood to be a 
pri oner; but of 1his there was no definite con- 
fnmvi'in. From 
Poland and Ukrania 
many 'I'-' ail of: harp 
fighting were re-i\ 
ed, but nothing 
deci ive. In Ukrainia 
General Alexeifl \va> 
reported to have 
taken the field on 
the ide of the Rada 
again t the Bol he- 
vik forces. The 
situa'ion wa; con- 
stan' ly changing, 
and. al hough Petro- 
grad claimed the 
uppor hand in the 
Ukraine little sta- 
biliiy could be ex- 
pected. In Petro- 
grad the Bol hevik 
Government wa em- 
barra ed by antag- 
oni ts who taunted 
them with having 

failed to get peace and to secure the recognition 
of the Alliei. That section of opinion which 
is convinced of Bol hevik honesty strong I v 
advoca'e; such recognition a<? the only way of 
aver, ing an un ati factory peace. Communica- 
tion wi h Bre t was interrupted for four day-. 

A d3 pa^ch from Portugue- e Ea t Africa 
amnounccd the unopposed occupation of Mwembe 



driven down the I.ujenda Valley towards Ntarka. 
The e operations were again' ,t the enemy remnant 
which fled into Portugue e territory whi-n German 
Ea t Africa wa; cleared. 

" No military operations " was the latest 




WITH THE ARMY IN PALESTINE : A BIVOUAC AMONG THE SAND - HILLS 
HEAT OF THE DAY- EVERYBODY GONE TO GROUND. 



DURING THE 




WITH THE ARMY IN PALESTINE : A TYPICAL CAMP " KITCHEN " WHERE THE BREAD IS 
BAKED AND MEALS ARE PREPARED ; ALSO, SOME OF THE COOKS WAITING. [Photo, by C.N.} 



report from Me: opotamia. News of further pro- 
gress came from Pale tine. On Feb. 2 patrols were 
active beyond Ainutieh, twelve miles north of 
Jeru alem, and enemy raids were repul ed there. 
During la t month twelve Turki h aeroplanes were 
destroyed. On the 3rd and 4th our machines 
made eighty-four direct hits on camps at Mi keh. 
The King prorogued by Commi ;: ion the Third 
Parliament of the 
war on Feb. 6. His 
Majesty reviewed 
the situation, and 
commended his 
sailors, soldiers, and 
all sections of his 
people and the Allies 
for their " noble 
courage, high con- 
stancy, and fixed 
determination." 

In Paris, the 
trial of Bolo began 
on Feb. 4. The pro- 
cess is in the As^i/e 
Court, before i-ix 
military judges, pre- 
sided over by 
Colonel Voyer, Pre- 
sident of the Third 
Court -Mar : ial of the 
Paris Military Dis- 
trict. Since the trial 



on Jan. 21 ; the capture of Pamuri Hill on Jan. 24, 
with thirty tons of food supplies. Between the 
2/th and the 2gth a strong enemy column was 



of Mme. Caillaux 
the Palais de Justice has seen no such sen alional 
ca e. Side by side with Bolo, two of hi; alleged 
confederates are arraigned Porchere and Cavallini. 

LONDON: FEB. o, iqi8. 



: Published Weekly at the Office, 172, Strand, in the Parish of St. Clement Danes, in the County of London, by THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON Np.ws ANn SKF.TCH. LTD, 
172. sir .ml aforesaid and Printed by THF Il.l.llSTH.Tun LONDON Nw ANI> SKVV-H. LTD.. Milford Lane. W.C. S WRDNHSDAY. FEB. 13. 1918 
Entered as Second-Class Mailer at the New Yuri; IN. V.I P-ost Office. .016. 



The Illustrated War Newt, Fefr. 20, 1918. Part 89, New Seriel. 



ClK Illustrated War Rcius 




MASCOTS OF A SCOTTISH REGIMENT IN THE BALKANS : A PAIR OF EAGLE-OWLS. 

Photograph by ( . V. 



r p 

2 l_Ne. 



Series. 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 20. 1918 



A POLITICAL BREEZE-THE OUTLOOK IN THE WEST- 

FRENCH RA, D ON A WIOE FRONT-U.S. BATTERIES IN ACTiON- BRITISH LINE 

IN ITALY LENGTHENED. 



the Allied Council. The interlude, reminiscent of 
party politics, was represented as a " scene." 
At any rate, personal and party feeling was 





AT the reopening of P.uliament, on Keb. 12, 
after a week's prorogation, the King. \vh<> 
attended in semi-State, briefly reafiinm-d tin- 
determination of the Empire to 
see this thing through to a 
sitisf ictory and righteous peace. 
Until the German Government 
shows signs of penitence, " oui 
duty is to prosecute the war 
with all the vigour we possess." 
U?he King again expressed his 
fconfidence in his Forces and 
those of the Allies, and also in 
his people, to " ensure the ulti- 
nate triumph of -a righteous 
cause." The ensuing Debate on 
the Address produced an incident 
which gave rise to much un- 
fortunate Press discussion. Mr. 
Asquith pressed the Prime Mini- 
ster for definite information re- 
garding the recent extension of 
the powers of the Supreme War 
Council of the Allies. Mr. Lloyd 
George, while admitting a de- QN THE WESTERN FRONT : A SHELL BURSTING NEAR A BATTERY. 

velopment from the original cjn,,n., n 'r Records. 

constitution of last November, . 

refused on grounds of national safety, to regrettably displayed. The virus of party has so 
give a detailed explanation of the Allied impregnated certain scribes and politicians that 
Control as that would convey useful information even in this supreme hour, when all should be 

for the State, they must be at 
the old stale game of " Ins and 
Outs," imputing motives and 
exposing alleged petty devices. 
It is deplorable that the enemy 
should thus be given occasion to 
hug himself over supposed fis- 
sures in our front. No more in- 
opportune moment could have 
been found for such a recrudes- 
cence of discussions alien in their 
spirit to the Speech just deli- 
vered by the King. The only 
axe to be lawfully ground to-day 
is the battle-axe. At present, 
the country has no room for the 
wheel of the jobbing party cutler. 
Next day Mr. H. Samuel 
attacked the Premier's war policy, 
and was crushed by Mr. Bonar 
Law with a splendid report 

SOLDIERS LEARNIHG TO MANAGE MOTOR-TRACTORS : FOOD-PRODUCTION WORK f Pg reSS efficiency. Rumour 

was busy sending Sir Vv ilham 

AT GODSTONE, UNDER THE WAR AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT.- (Photo. CAM Robeits on to Versailles. 

to the enemy. He hid not received the cus- The prophets were also busy expounding the 

ternary notice of the question, and, speaking omens of the Western Front. They had definite 

information of great preparations behind the 



v.-ith some heat, reaffirmed the unanimity of 



Feb. 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



CPart 89 ~1 
New Se.iesJ" 3 



enemy's lines, and of his strenuous rehearsals 
with masses of shock-troops. But the week 
closed without any further signs of the grand 
attack than the customary raids and gunfi.-e. 
The Germans were still seeking infoimation from 
chance prisoners, and it was said that rewards in 
hard cash were offered to their raiding parties for 
such useful knowledge. In at least one instance 
this increment remained signally unearned, and 
what Thomas Atkins, captive, has to impart is 
understood to be ingenious rather than 
illuminating. 

The story of fighting on the Flanders front 
may be briefly summarised. The period opened 
with hostile raiding south of Arras and at Oppy, 
south-east of Vimy. The same day the enemy's 
guns were active now and again at Flesquieres, 
three miles south of Bourlon Wood, between 



On the Cambrai front, the I2th saw a fine raid 
by the Canadians south-east of Hargicourt. The 
Dominion men killed many Germans in open 
fighting, destroyed 17 dug-outs and 4 trench- 
mortars, and captured 13 prisoners and 2 machine- 
guns. At Hill 70, north of Lens, the Canadians 
were also busy. There, after a hard fight, they 
took some prisoners and one machine-gun. The 
13th opened with local fighting at Passchendaele, 
where the enemy got a footing in two of our posts, 
but was speedily driven out. Patrol encounters 
took place south-east of Lens. Air-raids beyond 
the German frontier resulted in a vigorous attack 
on Offenburg ^aden), where ij tons of bombs 
were dropped or barracks and railway works. 
German aerodromes were also visited. On the 
1 4th the Canadians made another brisk and 
successful raid at Lens. Otherwise, but for gun- 




WITH THE MASCOT GOAT THEY BROUGHT ACROSS THE SEAS WITH THEM : PIPERS OF A CANADIAN KILTED 
REGIMENT LEADING THEIR COMRADES TO A REST CAMP ON THE WESTERN FRONT. [Canadian War Records.] 



Bullecourt and the Scarpe, and, to a less degree, 
north of Lens and north-east of Ypres. The day 
following, a post was. raided north-west of 
St. Quentin. Next day, undei cover of his trench- 
mortar fire, the enemy raided the British line west 
of Gonnelieu, on the right of the Cambrai front. 
Another raid south of Houthulst Forest was 
repulsed with loss. On the i ith, one of the most 
important of our recent raids was undertaken 
near Warneton by the Australians. The affair 
developed into a considerable battle in trenches 
and dug-outs. The enemy's casualties were at 
least 100, and the Commonwealth troops brought 
back 37 prisoners. Sir Douglas Haig sent the 
Australians a special telegram of thanks and 
praise. The same evening Manchester troops 
made a successful raid west of La Bassee, inflicted 
many casualties, and took prisoners and a 
machine-gun. On the i2th a hostile raid was 
repulsed north-east of Epehy. 



fire at Epehy and Bullecourt, there was nothing 
of special interest to report on the British front. 

During these days spasmodic gunfire broke out 
with varying intensity at Houthulst, also to the 
south-west of Cambrai, at Epehy, north-east of 
Ypres, and, later, south and west of Lens. It was 
of that intermittent kind which has recently been 
noticeable all up and down the front sudden 
short outbreaks and long lulls at many points, 
with a careful avoidance of any sustained firing 
that would serve to locate large concentrations 
of batteries. Sudden simultaneous firing of 
several pieces is another device to the same end. 
Towards the middle of the week reports of gun- 
fire were less numerous than reports of raids. 
Our own guns seemed to be employed only when 
they were required to disperse enemy troops. 

The French reports told a similar tale, except 
that the artillery was perhaps rather livelier and 
the enemy raids more persistent During a period 



4-[ N t>'!,] 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 20. 1918 



of six days our Allies made successful raids at 
Forges, north-west of Verdun, on trenches in 
Champagne, the Woevre, and at Auberive, in the 
Vosges. Simultaneously, their patrols were en- 
gagrd in a series of affairs at Badonvilliers in the 
Vosges, in Upper Alsace, and north of the Ailette. 
In the last-named region the 
patrol activity was " great." The 
same peiiod saw the enemy 
attempt at least thirteen raids, 
all easily repulsed. These, taken 
in order, occurred north of the 
Chemin des Dames, in the 
Woevre, north of Craonne, at 
Choppy Wood, in the Argonne, 
and in the Vosges. On the zoth 
a coup-de-main collapsed in the 
Argonne, and between the i ith 
and the I2th a surprise was frus- 
trated at Juvincourt. Another 
surprise at Caurieres Wood led 
to a lively combat, but gave the 
enemy no advantage. At the 
Bois de Fosses, before Verdun, 
three enemy detachments at- 
tacked without result. In Cham- 
pagne, the Woevre, and the 
Vosges, other attacks were beaten 
off. Both artilleries were mean- 
while very active from the 
French sector on the coast 
to the Vosges, the localities 
bursts being on successive days Verdun and the 
Vosges ; Nieuport, Juvincourt, Champagne ; both 
sides of the Meuse (violent), the Vosges, north 
of the Aisne, Corbeny, Juvincourt, Bezonvaux ; 



an extended scale. On tha I3th the usual French 
night report was delayed, but late on the I4th 
news came through that on the previous day an 
operation of great importance had been under- 
taken in Ch'impagne. General Pctain announced 
that his troops, supported by American batteries, 




WITH THE U.S. 
ON 

of the out- 




OM THE WESTERN FRON 



: AN OLD MILL USED AS A 
( anidian War Records. 



Alsace (great. activity), Champagne, the right bank 
of the Meuse, and points in the Vosges ; between 
Soissons and Laon, and north-west of Rheims. 
While speculation was rife as to where the great 
German blow would fall, the French suddenly took 
the initiative and carried out a brilliant raid on 



EXPEDITIONARY FORCE IN FRANCE : AMERICAN MARINES 
THEIR WAY TO THE FRONT. [Official Photograph.] 

raided an enemy front, about five-eighths of a 
mile in extent. The region was south-west of the 
Butte-de-Mesnil. Our Allies thrust forward as 
far as the third line of the enemy's defences. 
Many dug-outs were destroyed, and on a 
first reckoning the prisoners 
numbered 100. The artillery 
preparation lasted six hours. In 
it the American batteries bore 
a brilliant part. 

The most interesting news 
to us from the Italian front was 
that of the extension of the 
British line to the east of the 
Montello Ridge along the Piave. 
The British extreme right flank 
now rests on a point some miles 
east of JSIervesa. The week's 
fighting was marked by activity 
at Sasso Rosso and Frenzela, 
where the enemy lost heavily in 
massed infantry attacks. Patrol 
encounters were general along 
the front. In Val Lagarina, 
in the Trentino, enemy patrols 
on the march were dispersed by 
gunfire, and a mine at Pasubio 
did great damage to hostile 
positions. On the west of the 
Asiago front both artilleries 
became more active. At Col Caprile a strong 
attempt to break through was smartly countered 
by the Italian infantry and artillery. On the /4th 
only gun duels were reported from the Val 
Giudicaria, the Asiago Plateau, and the Middle 

Piave. LONDON: FEB. 16, 1918. 



DRESSING-STATION. 



Fa*. 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Part 81 1 . 

|_New SriJ 8 




During the Lull on the dcatern front. 





ITEMS HERE AND THERE : ROAD-MAKING IN A BATTLEFIELD VILLAGE ; DITCHED TO AVOID A COLLISION. 

The upper illustration will htlp to' flrt an Idea of thi nature ol 

on* tort of everyday work which la alway* going on within th* 

battle-are.. Th job U proceeding In the lluch of a February 

thaw ; a piece of road.nuking through and acrou the wreckage 

at a battered-down Tillage. The roadway it completed at Iti far 



end, where the track bendi In the background towardi the left 



In the foreground the di'tbrit-itrewn turface ie being levelled ; 
broken brlcke and itonei are being ipread for road-metal. A 
motor-car that had to ditch iUelf, narrowly 'mining a trre, to 
arotd running into the leading horiee of a Canadian forage convoy, 
which euddenly confronted it, ii teen in the teconcf illustration after 
it adrenture. [Canadian War Records.) 



Frt W T 

Nt srt.J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



F.b. 10, 1918 



ti 



Duchboarda" for the Western front. 





THB ARRIVAL OF A SUPPLY OF DUCK-BOARDS : ORIENTALS OF THE LABOUR CORPS UNLOADING. 



Th* tirm " duckboard " 1* one of thott nunuroui new words which 
w* owt to th w4r. It ilfnlflM, of count. > track ot ftnfwif 
oTtr (round that ofttn bc4ri a itronf rtttmbltnce to a duck*pond. 
Thi duck-boardi arr uitd both (or " parlnn " tht trmchM, which 
la wtt wMthM loiTttimM tak* on tht charactirlitlci of a ralnlatutt 
canal, and alto tot maklni path* In rarlout dirKtloni about tht 



battl*.aria. Without them much of thi ground would b* Im* 
pambli In a rafrty ip*U, or aftar a haaTjr thaw. Th Labour 
Coroi comprlHa mm of many ntionliti, Including lafft number! 
of Chlnw* and other Orltntali. Thtjr art occupitd In work bahlnd 
tht front, and on tht lino of communication. Tht colourad battalion* 
ata not *ant Into tht dan.ton. [Official Photognpla^ 



Fk. 20. It IS 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



f fart Nt 1 . 
[New SerieiJ 



On the British GCtestern front: H Crench periscope Sentry. 





THE ONLY SAPB WAY : A TRENCH-END SENTRY WITH PERlbCOPE CAMOUFLAGED IN SACKING. 



Ont at the point* In thi bettlt-lint where Immlnint personal danger 
to tho nun occupying the place threatens ertrjr moment, perhaps 
mote eren than anywhere else, li ihown In the illustration. It la a 
trench-sentry'i look-out pott, at the extreme end of a trench within 
a short distance of the enemy ; a place where one dare hardljr raise 
a finger abore the trench crest-line. Watch on the enemy has to 



b* kept without Intermission, and the only way ol mana|inf that 
with safety Is shown here by means of the periscope. The 
periscope l> bandaged in sacking, or coarso canras, to look, from 
a short way off, like a clod of auth on the edge of the trench. 
Into Its lower reflecting mirror the sentry gates, Ilka a lynx on the 
watch. [Official Photograpk.} 



I'm n 1 
* SarlnJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



F.b. 20. 1918 



On a Olestcrn front Battlefield tn february 





TEMPORARILY MUD-TRAPPED DERELICTS : A TANK STUCK FAST ; A POSITION-GUN IN LIKE CASE. 



Hooeletaly dreary, desolate nd forlorn-lookint under the grey 
February sky, li the battlefield. Kent on the British Wutern Front 
pffcMnttd by these two IlluittrmtJoni. Yet the outlook all round Is 
only, nd uctl7, chtraettristlc and typical of what the (yes of our 
man at tha front look out upon from their trench-lines day after 
day, clot* up with tha German front, while awaltlnf the opening 



i ' the spring campaign. A Tank, left derelict for the time being 
through its being bogged in a slough of mud while trying to work 
forward acroas the labyrinth of she!l-craters, is aeen in the upper 
illustration. The lower illustration shows a position-gun, a haary 
dead weight, temporarily come to grief and abandoned in like manner 
from similar causes. [Canzdtan War Records.] 



Feb. 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



i* -| 




Hrmy Salvage Corps Cdorh on the Olestern front. 








HAMPERED BY BULLETS AND SHELL- SPLINTERS IN THE WOOD: FELLING BATTLEFIELD TREES. 



The W*Urn Front battleneldi art gleaned orer ltr action to uln 
di'bna capable of further service. Irerj thing that can be repaired 
if deepatched to workahope In rear, and everything that can be 
turned into utilitable material, collected and sent to depoti and 
munition-factor!* for working up Into tomething or other. To 
upplenunt the tupplie* of timber cut for war purpoaea by corpi 



ol lumbermen in all the Allied countries, nen the remaint of 
the ahot-and-ihell ahattered treea on battlefield! are laid under 
contribution. Canadian pioneer! are here aten at wofk within the 
batt!e.ara* in Flanden. Their tawing and chopping ii a difficult 
Job, owing to bulleti and aheU-fragmentt embedded In tht tree- 
trunks, which ha to be a?olded [Caimfian War Rtcmdt.} 



rut 



FHK ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



F.h. .SO. 1818 



Olar Material Secondhand and 




SAVE OHM STONES 




ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT ; INSTRUCTIONS IN ECONOMY ; FRESH SUPPLIES OF BARBED WIRE. 

From the wording of the notice-board icen In the upper photograph, articlei can be Mired from the Utter of the battlefield! and placed 

M will be leen that the principle! of economy in the uie of war upon the salvage dumps, with a Tiiw to bring eorted and rendered 

material are Impretied upon the troop! at the Front, ai they are, once more fit for lervice. The lower photograph li of intereet at 

in other direction!, upon the dTilian population at home. Economy showing the form In which fresh tuppllei of barbed wire reach the 

at the Front meant care In the UH of tuppllet and the thorough Front; in neatly coiled reels of a tin easy to handle.--[O#.wt 
performance of salvage operation!, whereby large quantities of useful 



Fb. 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Hart it) I 

LN 



On the British deatern front: Hrtillery Camouflage. 





SCREENED ABOVE BY NETTING AND FIR-BOUGHS, 

The nearer tht camouflage ftntttlly on b* mtdi to approach 
complMi coneulmnt, In addition to ditfuiM, the bttttr, and In 
rtfard to artillery trwy tHort at conccalraant that ingenuity In 
dric can >Uf(Wt li continually made. What would appaat to b 
an octptlonallr afltetlTt plact of prottctlTt camouflaft, to hid* 
th poaitlon <A a h*y, lonf-ranf* bombardlnj gun, It ahown In 



AND SHUT IN ALL ROUND : A GUN-POSITION. 

tha Illuilrttlea. Ortthaad, by maani of fa and er r n bough. 
and'daad laarca ipiaad ortr netting, tha fun and iti team are 
quite ctged In, and at tha llta and In front eretything la wall 
hidden. From a height of aoma thouaand fait up, at which a 
reconnoitring enemy airman would hate to keep, tha fun-pxaitlon 
should ba practically Inrlalbla. [OJWal 



. r prf T 

II [_Ntw SiiJ 



1-HE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 




Feb. 20. IS IB 



On the British ttlestcrn front 




EVERYDAY WORK : REPAIRING WIPES SAGGING UNDER SNOW ; FUSING " STOKES BOMBS." 



Everybody knowt what happens to the overhead wires of the great 
trunk telegraph linet in England alter heavy uiowfallt, followed 
by frott to bind the snow on the wires. The papers are full of 
accounts of how "the wires ate- down" everywhere, and the 
G.P.O. ' usually criticised for not laying all lints underground. 
On the Western Front, wherever possible, both telegraph and tele- 



phone lines are laid underground to protect them primarily from 
damage by enemy projectiles ; but in many localities overhead 
wires only are used. One effect of the winter weather on the 
telegraph wires and posts is shown in the upper Illustration. . The 
lower shows a supply of the redoubtable "Stokes bombs" being 
fitted with fuzes .at an ammunition-dump. [Official Pkotograpks .] 



Ft*. 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED.. WAR NEWS. 



r Pan mi.. 
(.New serkij ' 



Railways and Water-Supply at the front. 





WITH THE CANADIANS : A LIGHT RAILWAY GOODS YARD ; BUILDING A WATER TANK AT PASSCHENDAELE. 



The upper photograph show* a lijht railway food* yard behind the 
Canadian Una* and an engine which did raluable terrU* In getting 
up lupplies to the guna behind Vimr Ridge. In the lower photo- 
graph tome Canadians are seen constructing a small water tank at 
Passchendaele, at a point where the state of the ground suggested 
the experiences of the " Ancient Mariner," with " Water, water 



ererywhere, But not a drop to drink." Regarding this district, 
we may recall, Sir Douglal Haig reported in hit communique of 
February 13 : " Local fighting took place at dawn this morning 
north-west of Paaschendaele, when a hostile party attacked and 
temporarily occupied two of our posts. The enemy was subse- 
quently ejected . . . and both posts were regained." [Official 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



K.b 20. lllfe 



ROMANCES OF THE REGIMENTS: LXXXIX.-THE 19TH HUSSARS. 



GILLESPIE AT VELLORE. 



FOR dashing personal exploits, few com- 
manders hold a finer record that Sir Robert 
Rollo Gillespie, to whom our Indian Empire may 
fairly be said to owe a second lease of life, after 
it had been delivered 
from its earlier perils 
in the time of Hyder 
AH. The present ro- 
mance is connected 
with the igth Light 
Dragoons (now the 
lyth Hussars), whom, 
on the occasion in 
question, Gillespie led 
to victory ; but, curi- 
ously enough, although 
he was at their head 
that day, he was not 
himself a member of 
the igth. but of the 
8th. 

It was in the year 
1806. Tippoo Sahib's 
children were still 
living at Vellore. 




Their guardians en- 
tered into a con- 
spiracy with the 
native Princes, in order to surprise the English 
garrison, exterminate it, and seize the place. 



ARTISTIC CAMOUFLAGE AT THE FRONT: A SOLDIER DOING 
A BIT OF DECORATIVE PAINTING OUTSIDE HIS HUT 
BY WAY OF CAMOUFLAGING IT. [Official 



barracks where the 23rd Regiment and four 
companies of the <x)th were quartered, and fell 
upon them with such fury and suddenness that 
no defence was possible. The troops were mas- 
sacred almost before 
they could fire a shot. 
A few survivors, 
with women and 
children, contrived to 
reach a bastion at the 
top of the gateway, 
where in desperate 
case they managed to 
hold out. News was 
sent to Arcot, twenty 
miles away ; but the 
defenders had little 
hope of deliverance. 
The native troops 
fought inch by inch 
nearer, and hope was 
burning low indeed. 
Meanwhile, at Arcot 
things had not been 
Standing still. It was 
lucky that the com- 
mander there was Hie 
lion-hearted Gillespie, 
who had not long arrived in Indi.1, with a great 
reputation for bravery won in the West Indies, 




WINTER TUBBING AT THE FRONT: HARDY CANADIANS IN THE SNOW WAITING FOR THEIR TURN 
TO ENTER A BATH-HOUSE AT A REST CAMP.-[Carf( War *(.,.] 

No where his single sword had delivered him from 
eight armed assassins. 

From the walls of the beleaguered bastion the 
handful of soldiers and women were looking out 



The plot was contrived with great secrecy. .. 
one had any inkling of what was afoot until the 
storm burst. The native troops attacked when 
the garrison was asleep. They sunounded the 



heb. 20. 1I8 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



CPrt 89 
New serie 



On the Cttestern front: Hn exclusive Dog-Messenger. 




KNOWN TO MANY BY SIGHT, BUT NOTHING MORE : A DESPATCH-DOG CONSTANTLY ABOUT THE TRENCHES. 

name to not known (tntraliy, and at headquu-ttn one man only 
hat to do with him ; feedinj and looking alter him. For mry> 
body cite thtrt to a Handing order that the dog it not to bt taken 
notice of, not to be called to, or petted, ur In any way Interfered 
with, whether while on hit errand* or at any time. [Official 
PluXografli.} 



Everybody in t ciruln Innch Mctlon of tht Britiih flrlnf-llnt, 
In a certain locality on tht Weitern Front, knowi tht dog ihown 
In tht abort IlluttraUon by ti,ht ; but acquaintanceship, b r order, 
itopi it that Tht dog tmplojtd rtfulvlr U * trench meu<|i- 
etrrltr bttwttn etrUIn jolu and their tool hudqiutUrt, and it 
to bt Men pmlnj to ind fro tt til houri with dttpildiM. Hii 



, r pin t> i 

-(.N.W S.h-J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



F.b 20. 1*18 



upon a situation that grew every moment more 
desperate. But suddenly, amid their despair, a 
joyful exclamation broke from the lips of Sergeant 
Brady, of the 6gth. Pointing across the burning 
plain, he drew the attention of his comrades to 
what seemed to be the approach of horsemen. 
Were they enemy or friends ? That they would 




THE SPIRIT AT THE FRONT WHILE WAITING FOR THE NEXT BATTLE: 

A SOLDIER-ARTIST IN HIS SHELL-BATTERED "STUDIO" PAINTING POSTERS 

FOR CANTONMENT ENTERTAINMENT^. [Official Photograph.] 



know before long. The approaching force grew 
more distinct. The watchers could see that in 
front there spurred a horseman whose fiery im- 
petuosity marked him out from all the rest. It 
was upon this rider that Brady's attention was 
fixed. The sight seemed to him 
to be full of meaning. " Cheer 
up, boys, now ! " he cried. " If 
Colonel Cillespie is in India, 
that 's he and God has sent 
him to help us." The Colonel 
swept on, with the igth behind 
him ; and, further to the rear, 
two guns which he had ordered 
to follow. As he came in front 
of the gate, he was greeted by a 
wild cheer from the Europeans. 
But Gillespie's mere arrival did 
not mean an end of the trouble 
the little garrison was still at 
the mercy of the raging Sepoys. 
The gate was closed, and, until 
the guns could come up, it 
could not be battered in. The 
moat still lay between the igth 
and those they had come to 
save. But Gillespie was not of 
the stuff to be beaten on the 
post. He knew that he must 
get into the bastion at all costs. 
Taking his sword between his 
teeth, he plunged into the fosse, and, under 
heavy fire, swam through it. Meanwhile, the 
British soldiers on the bastion had buckled 



their belts together, and by these he was drawn 
up to the top of the gateway. His presence gave 
the defenders new life ; they continued to struggle 
against the Sepoys until the guns arrived and the 
gate was blown in. No sooner was the passage 
cleared than the Dragoons swarmed through. 
There was a short and bloody struggle, and the 
fortress of Vellore was once more 
in British hands. 

The grim affair was not to 
end without that serio-comic in- 
terlude which seems ever to dog 
the steps of an Irishman even 
in the most desperate places. 
Among the 'refugees was an 
English lady who distinguished 
herself by the courage with 
which she animated the British 
troops to continue their resist- 
ance. At a moment when it 
seemed that the hearts of some 
of the men were failing, she 
ran forward among the com- 
batants and was for a moment 
in the hottest of the battle. 
Then, either by way of further 
encouragement or because fem- 
inine emotion had overcome 
her, she rushed at Colonel Gil- 
lespie, threw her arms round his 
neck, and kissed him heartily. 
The gallant Colonel, although 
he had much else to think of 



at the moment, did not let chivalry desert him. 
Gently disengaging the lady's arms, he thanked 
her for what he had received, and gave orders 
that she should be removed at once to a 
place of safety, but not before he had added 




"ARE WE DOWNHEARTED? NO I " IN CANTONMENTS AT THE FRONT' 
>OSTERS, DONE BY SOLDIER-ARTISTS, ADVERTISING PERFORMANCES 
( A SOLDIER "COMPANY." "THE TONICS."-[O^/ Photograph.} 

that he hoped before long, in happier circum- 
stances, to have the pleasure of renewing the 
acquaintance. 



Feb. 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



[run 8U I , 
New SilJ 1 




Snugly ensconced under the JVfctple Leaf. 






1 





A WELL-STAGED CANADIAN GUN-EMPLACEMENT: THE "PROSCENIUM"; THE FALL OF THE "CURTAIN." 



A umplf ol Canadian ctii(y w mtntioned rtcentlj, on 
Pebtuwy 13, by Sir DouiUi Hi tht r*Jd nM Hu-fincourt. 
In addition to 13 priiontrt tnd i n>4chine-(uni which were 
btoufht back to our UnM, nunjr Ottmtat wire killed in A(ht- 
jn| ftbovi! ground, and 4 Uench-morUti were dfttroyed. Seven 
dug-out* In th enemy'i front line tnd otheri in hn lupport line, 



whose occupants refuted to come out when summoned, were 
bombed. The casualties were slight, and were all brought in. 
Another successful raid was carried out last night by Canadian 
troops in the neighbourhood of Hill 70, north of Lens. ... Six 
prisoners and a machine-gun were captured. Our casualties are 
again reported to hare been light. [Official 



l8-lN. P i'sS]-THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. Fb. 10. 1(18 




On the British Olcetcm front: Heavy <3u 








J..f~.r. 
%>M- 
I ; ' iL-u 

-V 




** 



*^ 

<'. 



&& 

~ v^tj- ' M^^^H 








sH^.-.i l/ 4 - 
>-, <A .. 

'%>\- "* 



CARR ED STRAIGHT THROUGH THE RUINS OF A DESTROYED TOWN OF NORTHH 

There ii hardly mile tnywhcrt along the many miles of the British front in Flanders and Northern Franc* that It not 
traversed by field railway linei of the light-railway narrow-gauge type, directly Unking the trenches with the main railway 
lyitemt in rear. At certain placet tome of the linei are of only ifi-inch gauge, but M a rule they are constructed on the 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, Feb. 20. m8-[ N n s".]-l! 




Ammunition being Brought up by Light Railway, 



- 




I MICE : ONE OF THE LIGHT RAILWAYS ON" A CANADIAN SECTION. 

sit 6 in. Decuvill iundrd. Thtir ipci*l raiton d'etre it, u M*n in the iliuitrttion, to tupply th bttteriei and mtn in the 
trtnchei with ammunition. Tht Iini run, i directly at can be engineered, .allowing for gradienti, from point to point They 
ft taken rifht through ihlld and dftroyd towni and village along the fornMr itrMti, whtrt TiUbl. (Canadian War Ruordt.} 



ILLUSTRATED 




preparing for the JSear future : Hmmul 




GROWING LARGER WITH FRESH ARRIVALS OF SUPPLIES, HOURLY, DAY AND 



oi. t !i.^M-!f 7 ^? '.1? Amerlc *" *P C111 correspondent on the Western Front, says this of the present ammunition 

In the matter of ammunition, the Allies will have an incontestable superiority. Ever since the 

ui*. of last April, when the French artillery were able to fire ,,000,000 shell, . day, the Alhei have had . super.ority 



EWS. Feb. 20. 1918.-4 N n s2L]- 21 



^Collecting for the Spring Campaign. 





!'T A LARGE ROADSIDE AMMUNITION-DUMP CLOSE TO THE BATTLE-LINE. 
stock, of shell, at their disposition. Thi, superiority will be greater than ever this coming aprlng, and .hould prove one 
greatest element, in spellmg v.ctory for the Allies. Shell, will largely win the war thi, year. The Allies are J 
a super.or.ty in shells over the Germans, and an ever-increasing superiority will shorten the war.' "-[&*. W,, K, 



ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. Feb. 10. HIS 




On the t>o Sectors of the Italian front 





ONE FACING NORTH, THE OTHER, EAST : PART OF A ROYAL ENGINEER CAM) 

In the upper Illustration it seen part of a camp of an R.E. detachment serving on the sector of the Italian Northern Front 
allotted to General Plumer'i command. As hai been officially stated, a British force il in position at the bend of the (eneral 
Allied line, where the northern mountain range terminates, and the Piave, altering iU course to due south, leaves the mountains 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR_NEWS. Feb. 20. 19IS-LN.TiiJrie.J-Z3 



field by Divisions of General plumer'e Hrmy. 





LOOKING ACROSS THE PIAVE TO THE ENEMY'S POSITION AT JfERVESA. 

and debouehei on to the low ground of the Venetian plain. The snow-covered, rocky mountain rani* to the north it Men In 
the background. In the second illuitration it Men part of one of our river-front entrenched position! on the middle Piave, 
fronting directly acrou the river to the iloping hills on the eait bank of the river, held by the enemy. [Official Photograph*. \ 



ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. F.k. 10. 118 




On the Ovo Sectors of the Italian front 




ONE FACING NORTH, THE OTHER, EAST : PART OF A ROYAL ENGINEER CAM) 

In the upper illustration ii seen part of a camp of an R.E. detachment carving on the taetor of the Italian Northern Front 
allotted to General Plumer'j command. A* hat been officially stated, a Britiih forct it in petition at the band of the ganeral 
Allied line, where the northern mountain range terminates, and the Piave, altering itt course to due south, leavei the mountains 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. Feb. 20. 



Reid by Divisions of General plumer'e Hrmy, 





LOOKING ACROSS THH PIAVE TO THE ENEMY'S POSITION AT NERVESA. 

and debouchei on to the low ground of the Venetian plain. The snow-covered, rocky mountain range to the north ii Men in 
the background. In the second illustration it seen part of one of our rivtr-front intrenched positions on the middle Piave, 
fronting directly aeroii the river to the iloping hillt on the eait bank of the river, held by the enemy. [Official Photographs. i 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 20. 1918 



Gas-JMashed Serbian Colonels on the British front. 







-' ff* ' ' * 4 

r f <\ 

* . tt 

>' " f*j ' ..'*'- V* 5 




GAS TESTS FOR SERBIAN VISITORS : DONNING MASKS ; ABOUT TO ENTER A " GASSED " DUG-OUT. 



Since the Germans first introduced poiion-fis into the war, near 
Ypres, over two years ago, its use and preventive measures have 
like developed. A strong appeal on the subject was issued a few 
days ago by the International Committee of the Red Cross at 
Berne, which said : " Far from mitigating the evils attendant on 
war. the progress of science in aeronautics, ballistics, or chemistry, 



has but intensified its evils. . . We are desirous of raising our 
voice against an innovation which science is tending to perfect. . . . 
We refer to that use of asphyxiating and poisonous gases. . . . 
The terrible sufferings caused by these gases are more painful 
to witness than those of the most cruel wounds. . , . There is 
no question here of an act which an enemy can reject because 

[Continued offosih. 



Feb. 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



|- Prt 89 1 

I New Serial j 



f o. B 



H Liquid-fire Display for Serbian Visitors. 




DISPLAYED BEFORE SERBIAN COLONELS ON THE BRITISH FRONT: WORKING FLAME-PROJECTOR. 



it is repugnant to him. An army's rery existence is at stake. 
Fighting against an enemy employing these gases, an army Is 
forced against its will to imitate him. ... We hear tell of new 
gaseous poisons, the manufacture of which in great quantities Is 
more easy in that the raw material from which it is taken -s easily 
available. ... We protest with all our hearts against this 



fashion of waging war. . . . Beneath the Red Croat ... we 
addren ourielret to the Sovereigns and Gorernmehtt and Cenerala, 
In the first instance, and then to the peoples drawn up against 
each other. ... We do not hesitate to ask out loud that this 
fashion of waging war be abandoned. . . . We need an immediate 
agreement, carried loyally Into execution." [Official Photographs.] 



- I 
l.N 



r.n is , 
w Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Kb. 20. 1913 



THE NEW WARRIORS: XX. -A TRAVELLING TRIO. 



ALLOW me to introduce you to " Home 
Fir**," " Baths," and " Sports." Not 
really so Torquemadaish this trio, though " Home 
Fires " looks rather pomptlous. They are good 
fellows really, and of all the Special Service 
Intelligentia about they are the three not endowed 
with faculties for garrotting junior officers, or 
saying " Really 1 " in exasperating voices at 
critical times. 

As a matter of fact, they are not littered 
about to strafe, but to soften the slings and 
5 - 9's of war. They are elements of moral 
support. If you want an exact definition of 



of having to live in them are made as cheery as 
possible. He is a pundit on rot-proof tents, leak- 
proof huts, and such-like amenities. Under his 
conspiratorial cheeriness all hutments have to be 
well supplied with dryness and fire ' and fuel 
and warmth ; and officers and men, while they 
are in camp, have the greatest reasonable de- 
gree of comfort and comforts. He has little 
else to do but make things good for one 
though that is enough to do these days, God 
wot I 

He is also the lord of the band. He sees that 
there is a band, and that it is good. He sees that 






- 




ON THE PRINCIPLE OF "ANY PORT IN A STORM": A MOTOR-CAR DRIVER AT THE FRONT SHELTERING 
ON THE NEAR SIDE OF HIS CAR AS A BIG SHELL BURSTS CLOSE BY. (.Canadian War Rtcerds.] 



them, I must say their line is that of a 
spiritual Haig and Haig. They are thereabouts 
not for smashing up the Hun, but cheering up 
the troop's. 

" Home Fires " does his job with a certain 
amount of gilt edge. He is really rather a " high 
up " one but a floating planet at that. Officially 
he is Camp Commandant ; also officially, he is 
the Major-General's senior A.D.C. ; but these 
things do not really matter save that they give 
more power to his elbow which is most useful, 
seeing that his main reason for living and 
breathing is Comfort. 

He is Comforts O.C. He looks after and 
controls and makes homey the camps. He sees 
that they are clean and attractive, and have 
north lights ; he sees to it that' the circumstances 



it plays well, and often, and that everybody gets 
the benefit of it. A band is not so unmitigated as 
it seems. Bands are very coy. Quite stout bands 
have been known to take a chill at the most 
fruitful moment of their lives, and wilt and die 
or decompose in faint and terrible gasps of the 
" William Tell " Overture. " Home Fires " has 
to keep his band healthy and revuey, with a dash 
of Beecham ; and to see that it is continuously 
category A in men and instruments especially 
instruments : the number of cornets that develop 
trench-feet is phenomenal. And he has to fix up 
dates. It is no good any band playing regularly 
and monotonously outside H.Q. Moss ; the band 
has to travel and spread its good effects all round. 
" Home Fires " has to have an elaborate tour list, 
and send his band to the four corners of the 

[CCHN'titeti ovtrltaj. 



I eh. 10. ItlS 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Infantry of the Reorganised Serbian Hrmy. 





AT THE FRONT : A CROUP WITH A MACHINE-GUNNER (SECOND FROM THE RIGHT) ; IN A TRENCH. 



Thl Strbtan infantrymen wen on thii paft belong to thi rtcon- 
rtltund, reformed and rtorfanited, re-armed and re-equipped 
Strblan Army, tht bulk of which fornu n Important put of tht 
lalonlk* Atmjr on tht Balkan front. Tht Itrblan Army ihowtd 
how lubbornly It could Afht durlnf tht |r<at rttrtmt to tha 
Adriatic Likt Napolton'i Old Guard at Waterloo, thouaandt of 



ofrlcira and man died rather than iur render. The turrlrori, ihlpptd 
by tht AlUtf to Corfu, wtrt formed there Into an entirely new 
forrt, and In numben of tht itrenjth of tht rtorfaniMd Btlflan 
Army now at lu poit on the Weitern Front France and Cieat 
Britain bttwttn them re-made tht Serbian Army ; drilled it, armed It, 
clothed It, and aupplltd It with field and machlm-guna. [/>*(*). C.N.] 



r ptf M -\ 

(.New SorlttJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 20. 1918 



Division in arms in a just and apposite routine 
taking care that it visits a Brigade district when 
that Brigade has " come out " and not when it 
is " in " the firing line. 

" Baths " is what he sounds like. He, too, is a 
wanderer, but tinctured with carbolic and trailed 
with a shining tail of Heating's. He is usually an 




A WINTER'S DAY SUGGESTION OF PIONEER EXPERIENCES IN THE 

FAR WEST : A FORMER GERMAN DUG-OUT NEAR LENS CONVERTED 

INTO A CANADIAN SOLDIERS' " SHACK." {Canadian Wat Records.] 



R. A.M.C. doctor, who spends his wild and un- 
specific career travelling up and along Divisional 
areas, seeking whom he may wash. He scrubs 
battalions and de-vermins com- 
panies. Attached to nothing in 
particular, he drifts where he 
likes ; and where his feet fall 
bath-houses spring up in ranked 
profusion. He can, and does, 
mark out, plan, erect, and fit 
up bath-houses in unimagin- 
able spots, like old breweries 
and sugar - refineries ; and he 
can get hot water laid on by 
celestial khaki plumbers. He 
also calls into being the plant 
that is fatal to all those inti- 
mate insects that cling to one 
with embarrassing passion when 
one is in the first line. 

And, having brought bath- 
houses (bathing-pools in sum- 
mer) into being with a wave of 
his special functions, he sees 
you clean before he allows 
you to evade the circumstances 
of his soap and water. He 
arranges and times regiments 
into tubs ; and he takes the 
cast-off clothes of that regi- 
ment, and while it washes he 
life within those garments. 



he is for evei trying to " catch up " ; 
but he inevitably does it, and his success 
is mighty. 

" Sports " real name is " amusements officer." 
He is, however, not connected with the local 
foot-lights of Divisional " Follies," but with 
games. He organises sports and sport fields. 
The regimental football and 
cricket teams, and their League 
events, are under his care. 
He sets out and makes seemly 
the fields for them, and arranges 
the matches. He organises the 
means of sport, and sees that 
the weapons of skill are kept 
up to the scratch. He works 
nobly in the matter of harriers 
and runs ; and of the " sports " 
meetings, whose pictures appear 
in the daily and weekly news- 
papers, he is the engineer. 
Boxing-rings and contests are 
part of his efforts to ' make 
life in war cheery, and all 
that is breezy, hefty, and 
vigorous. 

He is top-notch man over 
Recreation Huts too ; makes 
them " f roust -tight," and takes 
care that they are thoroughly 
equipped with books, papers, 
games, and pianos if he can 
beg, borrow, or steal them. He 
is a great thruster, and a lively 
He and " Home Fires " and " Baths " 
as useful as they make "em. 



_ 



soul. 

are about 



There 's nothing very splashy about their 




SHORT OF STATURE, BUT EVERY INCH A SOLDIER: THE SMALLEST 
" MAN " IN THE CANADIAN FORCES GETTING A LEG-UP ON HORSEBACK. 

The youth Is eighteen years old. Before the war he was a bugler-boy in the Canadian 
Militia. In November 1914 he enlisted a a private. [Canadian War Records.} 



devastates the 
As there 



are 



many regiments and not always many tubs, 



work ; it doesn't bulk largely and gloriously 
in the annals of war ; but it tells and tells 
enormously. W. DOUGLAS NEWTON. 



F.b. 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Ht a Canadian Camp on the Western front. 





> -Tar 



PU, 



BASEBALL AT CAMP SPORTS : LIEUT. PEARSON, Y.M.C.A., UMPIRING DURING PLAY ; AND IN AN INTERVAL 






Battball, tht unlrtrial or, II ont my UM th term, national ftmt 
aeroM tht Atlantic, Jik la th* United Suit, tod In Cn*4, it 
lug,lj pUytd In cmp an th Watcrn Front. All oil duty oppor- 
tunfe of pl4yinf biMhall u* Ukm, and, In addition, nhlbltlon 
fame* and match* art plirtd rtfimenuJljr, or by pjcktd ttarm, 
at tht tportf jtthtrlnji which talu plac* now and again durlnf 



tht lullt In actlra hcatiUtiw aloof tht dont. That U tht cait 
with tht Canadian*. Tht United Stitet troopt In Franct, during 
Inttrvali ol rt in tht courit of their hard and continuous battlt- 
tralning, find tlmt al>o for baitball "frltndlltf" and malchaf ; to 
tht tnttrtalnmtnt of tht inhabitant! of tht ntiihbourhoodi whtrt 
thtlr campt and cantonmtnti art. [Canadian War Records,} 



30-[ N .w*sS.,"r-THR ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. F.b. SO. lll 




Strategic Camouflage by the Grand fleet 







AFTER TAKING HER PART AT SEA AND NOW SERVING AS A BREAKWATER : Tl 

"Dummy" wooden battle-ships, described in an American account, quoted in a London paper recently ai "a secret now 
disclosed," hav* long been employed in the war, and cruised in the North Sea before the Dogger Bank battle, their pretence 
affecting the enemy's plant. The Germans took them for the "real thing." Two years ago, the "Illustrated London Newt" 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. F.b. 10. 1 9 1 S 



3 I 



Dummy BattUsSbips that fooled the Cnemy. 









WOODEN DUMMY SUPER-DREADNOUGHT "ORION" IN KBPHALO HARBOUR, 

publlih.d on January a?, 1916, jllctur. ol on* t th Drdnelli, In th. n.ljhbourhood of which ple thi i " bttl-ihip " 
Jhown In tS. .boT. llluttrttion liei. Th. ..M!, con.truchd .nd painted to look Ilk. . > .up.r-Dr..dnought, bMri ita n.m. 
" Orion." Affcr doing h.r " bit " t ., th. " Orlon,"M en, rv,i ti * brt.kwattr t K.ph*lo, in -0wi PMopak.* 



Part 8V 1 

.W s, n J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



F.b. 20. 1818 




Olitb the Hrtny in Mesopotamia. 





AT ONE OF OUR AERODROMES : HANGARS WITH SCREENS DOWN ; AN AEROPLANE IN A HANGAR 



If, for one reason or another, we in England do not hear much in 
detail of the doings of our airmen with the Army in Mesopotamia, 
it it not because they are not well occupied, or in no force to 
count. Ai a fact, the; are at buiy, according; to opportunities, a> 
our airmen everywhere elie are ; alto General Marthall'i army ii 
well provided with flrit-clau aircraft. The Britiih airmen in 



Mesopotamia, it may be interesting to recall, hare made two 
records. While the expedition to try and relieve Kut was pre- 
paring, one airman took the Chief of the. Staff from the base to 
hold conference in Kut with General Townshend, and brought him 
back. Others supplied provisions, ammunition, and tobacco, on 
different occasions, to the beleaguered garrison. (Photos, by Mtndont.} 



Fob, 20, 1*18 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r fun 1 . 

I New Series I" 33 




Olitb the Hrmy in Mesopotamia. 





IN CAMP : AN OFFICERS' HOME-MADE HORIZONTAL BAR FOR PHYSICAL EXERCISE ; AND A LOOK-OUT POST. 



Two incidental dctiitt of life tt the front in Mesopotamia are 
combined in the mbor< photographi. It WM liken on the outtkiitf 
of camp In the T/grii Velley, nur * palm-gror*, > the illut- 
tretion thow>. I" the foreground It i horizontal her, homt-mtdt, 
>o to tpeak, from ruteritli on the ipot, uied bj offlctri of one of 
the regjmtntt In the camp, to at to help In keeping thtmtclYM 



phytictlljr fit. In the background, at a reminder of wir-condltioni, 
lUndi tht lofty framework of a camp look-out post, whencr, on 
the top platform, under a screen agalntt the tun't hett, a sentry 
keept watch acron to the horlton ill around. From the hel(ht at 
which the look-out man ttandt, the flat mpantc of the river valley 
aflordi a wide rlew in erery dlrettlon. [Photo, by MtivloM.} 



* f fart M 
<- 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



F.k 10. IBIS 



WOMEN AND THE WAR. 



THE food difficulties have provided women 
with opportunities for new forms of war 
work. Lord Rhondda may be more responsible 
for providing the nation with food ; but the duty 
of serving it in a form that is appetising as well 
as nourishing rests, for the most part, with the 
women of the country. 

It has taken three years of war to rouse 
a sense of her limitations in the English house-' 
keeper. No 
one made ^^^_ 
it their busi- 
ness to show 
her what a 
food shortage 
would mean 
until the short- 
age became an 
accomplished 
fact, and har- 
assed: house- 
wives found 
the ms elves 
c onf ronted 
with the duty 
of dealing with 
strange and 
unfamiliar 
" cuts " or, 
what was 
worse, of man- 
ufacturing a 
palatable meal 
out of sub- 
stances hither- 
to regarded 
rather as 
" trimmings " 
than solid 
food. It was 
hard on Mrs. 
John Bull. It 
was even 
harder on her 
family; and 
the woman 
who tries to 
grapple with 
culinary 
puzzles with a 
view to letting 
other people 
profit by her 
experiences is 



A pudding that looks good to eat, and in practice 
does not belie its appearance, made from carrots, 
is an achievement of which any woman may be 
proud. Carrots are still to be had ; they are 
wholesome as well as nourishing three facts 
which make the latest method of utilising them 
all the more valuable. Napoleon's chef gave a 
warring world Poulet Marengo ; Mrs. Archibald, 
acting. under necessity, has given it a new form of 
Sauce Hollandaise made chiefly from custard- 
powder, and a 




HOW THE WOMEN OF IRELAND HELP IN THE WAR: AT THE IRISH 

WAR HOSPITAL SUPPLY DEPOT. 

The women of Inland are doing valuable work for the wounded at the Supply Depot of 
which the Marchioness of Waterford Is Patron. There are two thousand members who, 
free of charge, send acme 15,000 requisites weekly to the hospitals In the United Kingdom. 
Our photograph shows a life-saving jacket, of which hundreds are made and fitted on the 
workers. [Photograph try Illustrations Bureau.] 



doing really useful war work. 



Major Archibald Weigall is Surveyor of Food 
Consumption of all the public services. It is, 
therefore, only natural that his wife should be 
tackling the subject of war-time cookery, with a 
view to " doing her bit " for the country. It is 
not by any means Mrs. WeigalTs only contribution 
to the cause ; but, for the moment at least, it is 
the one to which she is devoting especial attention. 



suet crust that 
requires no 
suet in the 
making. Could 
ingenuity go 
further ? 



More than 
that, Mrs. 
Weigall is 
anxious that 
as many people 
as possible 
shall benefit 
from her ex- 
perience as a 
cookery ex- 
plorer. If the 
menus at cer- 
tain public 
restaurants 
feature dishes 
more dainty 
than one has a 
right to expect 
in war - time, 
much of the 
credit will be 
due to her in- 
itiative and 
energy, for her 
kitchen is con- 
stantly being 
thrown open 
to those who, 
anxious to 
make the best 
of what food 
there is, at- 
tend, by in- 
vitation, de- 
monstrations 
given in the 
kitchen of her private house on the best and most 
economical methods of " camouflage " cookery. 

Authority is stepping in to supplement private 
effort. The plight of the hostess in Mayfair and 
Belgravia under the new food regulations has not 
received the sympathy it deserved. She too, like 
untold numbers of British housekeepers, has had 
to face the menace of the empty larder, and not 
seldom come out of the ordeal rather worse than 

[CoHtintttet evtrtiaf. 



Ftb. 10. lilt 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Pert H "\ , 
I New Serioi |- -3ft 



forerunners of the Grand fleet: <Oar-Sbtp8 of HU Hges. XX. 





A FIRST-CLASS BATTLE-SHIP OP THB 'EIGHTIES OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY: THE " COLLINGWOOD." 

Th "Colllnfwood" wu ant of the celebrated "Admiral" claat 
built bttwttn iMl and 1115. Thtjr wtr battleehlpi with trmour*d 
proUctlon, en tht qnMm introduced In the " Inflexible " t central 
heirlly armoured portion and unarmourad or "toft" and*. The 
" Admirah " had, howtrar, on* Important modlncatlon : two-thlrda 
o( tht hull wu armoured initead ol only one-thlrd u la the 



"Inflexible." Thty were (alt ! lor tht ptrlod, and lair ie- 
boata. Tht " ColUnfwood," tht tarllttt of tht poup, wat c 
9500 toni, and :6'5 knoti tpttd, with lour u-inch funt u htr 
main armamtnt. Tht "waak tpot " In tht " Admlrala " wat 
their unarmourad tnda, It wu declared b r critic, ol tht dtalfn 
that ihot-holc. would cauit tht tndt to become wattr-lofftd 



sf-ur,^.] 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



F*b. 20. 1918 



her less exalted sister. One hardly expects a 
wearer of strawberry -leaves to understand more 
about food than is comprised in the business of 
eating it. But, unfortunately for her Grace, as 
well as other pillars of society, a knowledge of 
" substitute " foods and how to cook them forms 




HOW THE WOMEN OF IRELAND HELP IN THE WAR: 

WAR HOSPITAL SUPPLY DEPOT. 
Our photograph shows war-workers finishing surgical requisites. The 



made from rags and paper collected In the city of Dublin. 
Photograph by Illustrations Bureau. 

no part of the training of the chefs who, one 
always read, earned princely incomes cooking 
dinners for ducal and other dining-tables. 

Grosvenor House has now PHBMBBMBH 
become the rendezvous of aristo- 
cratic but worried housekeepers, 
who meet there in conference 
whilst authority explains how 
best they may adjust their house- 
keeping arrangements to meet 
the difficulties inseparable from 
a great war. 

But " Mistress proposes, ser- 
vant disposes," is the war-time 
version of an old proverb, the 
truth of which has been often 
brought home by bitter experi- 
ence to women since the food 
problem became acute. It is not, 
except here and there, so much 
that the staff is reluctant to 
adapt itself to changed circum- 
stances as that the " staffs " 
of the great are themselves 
almost as much in the dark 
as to what is the best thing 
to eat as the mistresses them- 
selves. In peace-time, the spec- 
tacle of the haughty autocrats of the kitchen 
learning to turn out humble dishes from com- 
modities once despised as unfit for any lady, 
would have its humorous side. At the moment. 



the cooks of the wealthy are regularly attending 
especially organised classes in what is generally 
known as "war cookery," with an earnestness 
that augurs well for the future comfort and well- 
being of those whom they serve. It is one of 
those curious and unexpected minoi results of 
the war which will form such an 
interesting chapter of history 
some day. 



The necessity for enlisting 
the services of women to help 
in producing food for the 
country has been emphasised 
over and over again. To do 
her justice, " Miss Hodge " has 
risen to the occasion and come 
forward with an alacrity and 
willingness for which she de- 
serves the thanks of the nation. 
What has not been quite so 
generally recognised is that 
women who work must, if they 
are to " carry on " with any 
success, now and again play. 
The new club for members of 
the Land Army, opened by Mr. 
Prothero the other day, is in- 
tended to give land-women who 
may want to spend a few days 
in London an opportunity of 
getting quiet and comfortable 
lodging, as well as good meals, 
at a price within their means. The club habit 
is growing so rapidly among women that 
there is no fear of a scarcity of members ; and 



AT THE IRISH 



papier machi " Is 




HOW THE WOMEN OF IRELAND HELP IN THE WAR : AT THE IRISH 
WAR HOSPITAL SUPPLY DEPOT. 

Our photograph shows some of the women of Dublin cutting up surgical bandages. 
Photograph by Illustrations Bureau. 

in any case, the opportunity of joining a well- 
furnished club for a nominal annual subscription 
is something which no woman these days could 
afford to neglect. CLAUDINE CLKVE. 



Feb. 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



FPstt 99 
N 







NAVAL MATTERS SUBMARINE RETURNS HIGHER THE "MARY ROSE" THE RUSSIAN 
PEACE PUZZLE FOR THE HUNS - BOLSHEVIKS AND MR. WILSON; NO* ABLE 

PARALLEL -BOLO TO DIE. 

THE returns of losses by submarine again 
showed an upward trend. Of larger vessels 
sunk, 13 were on the list ; but two belonged to an 
earlier period, making a rise of one. Losses in 
smaller vessels had also risen by one ; while 
fishing craft were down by a unit. The number 
of ships unsuccessfully attacked was n, as against 
13. Arrivals and sailings continued to show a 
steady increase 
2 401, as 
against 2339 
and 2274, 
against 2373 
respectively. 
The Admiralty 
continues to 
distinguish it- 
self as a teller 
of brave old 
tales of the sea. 
The fight to 
the death of 
the Marv Rose 
(Command er 
Fox), an ex- 
ploit of last 
October, has 
just escaped 
from official 

pigeon-holes. It is a gallant and glorious story, 
worthy o Gr^nville and the little Revenge. Single- 
handed the Mary Rose tackled three of Ger- 
many's best light cruisers. The odds were too 
great, but that only made the old spirit of 
British seamen shine the brighter. 

The Russian news was definite on certain 




FRENCH WOMEN ON AEROPLANE WORK : 
French Official Photograph. 



points, and these unwelcome. First, on the gth, 
cime confirmation of peace signed with Ukrania. 
On the loth, 'Trotsky, at Brest-Litovsk, an- 
nounced that a state of war with Germany, 
Austria-Hungary, Turkey, and Bulgaria had 
ceased. At the same time he would not sign a 
formal peace treaty. He gave orders for the 
complete demobilisation of the Russian forces on 

all fronts. The 
last provision 
does not 
amount to so 
much 'as it 
sounds, for the 
Russian Aimy 
has for months 
been to all 
intents and 
purposes de- 
mobilised. The 
Hi itish Govern- 
ment refused to 
recognise the 
Ukranian 
Peace. It was 
reported that 
Gerrmny had 
issued an ulti- 
matum to Rou- 

mtnia, now completely isolated, to make peace 
within four days. Roumania replied that she 
would parish or survive with the Allied cause. 

The Russian peace has been represented as 
the final defeat and exposure of Bolshevism, and 
a proof of the bankruptcy of its professions ; or, 
at least, of their utter impotence against the 

Contitiiitd on past jo 



'DOPING" WINGS. 




AEROPLANE MAKING IN FRANCE : IN A WORKSHOP. [French Official Photograph.] 



, I P-m 9 "I 

38 ~[ New Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



Feb. 20. 



Camouflaged Serbian Hrtillery Hrnrnunition, 




AGAINST ENEMY AIRCRAFT : A HILLSIDE SHELL-CAVE ; BURIED AT THE FOOT OF A RIDGE-SLOPE. 



"Cache-ing," something after the Red Indian, or Rocky Mountain 
trapper style, and also in a manner that may appeal to Boy 
Scouts, is suggested in the two specimens of rough-and-ready 
countryside camouflaging shown in these two illustrations. They 
are, as stated, instances f r om the Serbian f r ont in Western 
Macedonia, where the Serbs hold their line. In the upper illus- 



tration a hillside cave is seen in use as a shell-magazine, with a 
camouflage screen of boughs and brambles, partially draping the 
mouth of the cave, so that the snouts of a double row of shells 
should not be readily spotted by airmen cruising overhead. The 
second illustration shows a similar precaution along the lower slope 
of a ridge, with ammunition-cases embedded. [Photos, by CJV.] 



Feb. 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



I Part 9 -| 
LlVeiv Seties_|~ J 



Serbian Infantry at Rifle Grenade practice. 




FIELD FIRING : READY TO FIRE A RIFLE-GRENADE VOLLEY : A VOLLEY FIRED GOOD BURSTS. 



The Allies, the French and British in the first place, have between 
them brought the present Serbian Army into a state of good 
working efficiency, and all-round completeness in the matter of war 
equipment The reorganisation of the old Army, after landing in 
Corfu after the great retreat, and their uniforming and re-arming, 
were carried out in the island. The Serbian Army, when transported 



to Salonika, was already in good fighting trim, and after further 
training, it was fully supplied for the Monastir campaign, with 
transport, artillery, and everything that the most up-to-date Army 
in the field possesses for service. One detail is shown in the two 
illustrations here of Serbian troops being trained to use rifle- 
grenades. [Photos, by C.N.] 



.- 

40 |_ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



Feb. 20. IB 18 



Mailed Fist. Tint view has yet to be justified 
by events. Despite the allegations that Messrs. 
Lenin and Trotsky were in German pay, these 
gentlemen are not altogether the easy tools of 
the Central Powers. M. Trotsky's highly original 
attitude " There is no more war, but 1 will not 







IM MESOPOTAMIA: A TIGRIS " MAHALA " FITTED UP FOR R.F.C. 

Pl.otogrvpli by Mendoza Galleries. 

sign a peace " is not to be assessed amid present 
passions. To the majority, it seems unreasonable. 
At first the enemy rejoiced greatly over what 
seemed like the " unconditional surrender " of 
Bolshevism. After a day or two's reflection, 
however, the affair did not look quite so rosy, 
even to War Lords armed with thunderbolts. 
For this move is a subtle declaration of war on 
Junkerdom, and not the Junkerdom of Germany 
^lone. " By oiu decision," says a Bolshevik, 
" we have not given a finger 
to the Germans : we have 
not signed anything ; we 
have not recognised German 
principles." The words de- 
serve attention. They look 
like imbecility to those who 
ask what is the use of 
reasoning with a burglar and 
his revolver. We confess it 
has superficially a futile 
sound. But M. Trotsky is 
not shot out of hand. The 
burglar continues the argu- 
ment in a mood of growing 
uneasiness. He does not 
argue with Bolshevism alone. 
On the very day of the 
Russian peace, President 
Wilson replied to Counts 
Hertlinganc' Czernin. Speak- 
ing also to the democracies 
of the world, he rejected 

" a bargaining peace bstween Governments," 
and advocated " a peace of justice openly dis- 
cussed by all mankind." To that peace there 
was but one obstacle, German militarism. America 
could know no peace till that cause is removed. 



Here, again, is a declaration of war on Junkerdom. 
Take with Mr. Wilson's " peace openly discussed 
by all mankind," the Kussian claim to have 
" kept a free hand to set forth our principles 
anew at the general peace conference." If this 
be imbecility, it is intluentially supported. Mr. 
Wilson's statesmanship grows 
clearer every day. Mt-'ii- 
while, Geimany mutters 
threats that if Trotsky 
opposes the Ukraine with 
arms, it may be necessary 
for the Central Powers to 
resume hostilities. Tint is 
a proposition involving many 
difficulties. 

From the Salonika front 
come reports of a French 
infantry raid west of Seres, 
and artillery actions near 
the mouth of the Struma, 
west of Doiran, and north 
of Monastir. The Doiran 
Strumitza railway was heavily 
bombed, and similar damage 
done to a Bulgar encamp- 
ment in Cerna Valley. 

The King of the Hedjaz 

continued his useful efforts north of Medina, 
and his troops demolished important enemy 
works. Australian airmen bombed El Kutrani 
railway station, eighty miles north of Maan, 
scoring fourteen direct hits on rolling stock. 
At Tul Keram, forty miles N.W. of Jerusalem, 
two enemy aeroplanes were driven down. 

Bolo was, on Feb. 14, condemned to death, 
the sentence to be carried out by a firing party 
at Vincennes. Cavallini was condemned to 





IN MESOPOTAMIA : AN AEROPLANE AND ITS HANGAR. 

Photograph fry Mt'ndoz:i Galleries. 

death, in absence ; and Porchere to three 
years' imprisonment. -Meanwhile Bolo has the 

right to appeal against hi > sentence to the 

Court of Ca-sation, and, finally, to President 

Poincar >.'. LONDON : Ftn. :6, 1018. 



LONDON' : Published Weekly at the Office. 172, Strand, in the Parish ol St. Clement Danes, in the County of London, by THE ILLUSTRATKU LONDON NRWS AND SKP.TCH. LTD, 
172. Strand, aforesaid ; and Printed by THK ILLUSTRATHO LONIXJN NKWS AND SKBTCH. LTD.. Milford ,.ane. W.C. 2 WEDNESDAY. 1 : EB. =o. I9> 8 - 
Entered as Second-Class Matter at the New York (N.V I Post Office, 1916. 



Thm Ittuitrated Wmr Na*t. Feb. 27, 1918. Part 90, New Series. 




Illustrated War Reios 




GAS-MASKED FRENCH GUNNERS AT WORK : A SHOT JUST FIRED. 
French OfikM Photograph. 



2_r Pan 00 1 
|_Nw SwtaJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 27, 19 18 



THE VERSAILLES INCIDENT CLOSED-RAIDS, GUN-FIRE, AND PATROL WORK ON 

THE BRITISH AND FRENCH FRONT DASHING PENETRATIONS A REMARKABLE WEEK 

IN AIR-FIGHTING THE LONDON RAIDS -ITALIAN INCIDENTS. 

He wished, it appeared, that the Versailles repre- 
sentative should be his subordinate. Sir William 
himself proposed to attend the Council, as 

occasion might per- 
mit. The Govern- 
ment's view that 
the British repre- 
sentative on the 
Supreme Allied 
Council must have 
liberty of instant 
independent action 
led to the recent 
difficulty, which 
was finally solved 
by Sir William 
Robertson's accep- 
tance of the East- 
ern Home Com- 
mand, the appoint- 
ment of Sir Henry 
Wilson to be Chief 
of the Imperial 
General Staff, while 
Sir Henry Rawlin- 
son went to Ver- 
sailles. The pro- 
ceedings in Par- 
liament dissipated all uncomfortable rumours of 
crisis. Mr. Asquith welcomed the explanation, 
merely regretting that it came a week late. He 



' ENERAL satisfaction, needless to say, resulted 
\J from the outcome of the Versailles incident 
in Parliament. When Mr. Lloyd George, on 
Feb. 19, delivered 
his more detailed 
explanation to the 
House of Com- 
mons, he made it 
clear that the pro- 
posed changes 
arose from no per- 
sonal motives, but 
were prompted 
solely by consider- 
ations of public 
expediency. On the 
granting of execu- 
tive functions to 
the Council, Sir 
William Robertson 
had been offered 
the position of 
British military re- 
presentative, with 
an increase of 
salary. This he 
did not see his 
way to accept. A 
further proposal that he should remain Chief of the 
Imperial General Staff, subject to certain modifica- 
tions, also failed to obtain Sir William's consent. 




ON ONE OF THE SECTORS OF THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT ; 

CANADIAN PIONEERS CROSSING A FLANDERS RIVER BY A FIELD 

BRIDGE MADE WITH "DUCK-BOARDS" FOR ROADWAY. 

Canadian War Records. 




PASSING THROUGH LONDON WHILE ON THEIR WAY TO JOIN U.S. RED CROSS UNITS ON THE WESTERN 
FRONT : AMERICAN NURSES WAITING FOR ADMISSION TO SEE THE HOUSE OF LQSDS. [Photograph by C.N.] 



Feb. 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



l',,r. y.t 1 , 
[.tin SenesJ 3 



made no criticisms that challenged a division, but 
put on record his opinion that the Government 
should have acceded to Sir William Robertson's 
request that the Versailles representative should 
be his (Sir William's) deputy. With high tributes 
to the late Chief of the Imperial General Staff 
who has been much praised not only for his great 
work, but for his patriotic and soldierly acceptance 
of a lesser post a threatening, and for a time 
sinister, Incident was closed. 

To " get on," therefore, " with the war." The 
period opened with brief reports of the usual kind 
from the Western Front. Patrol encounters, 
raids, and intermittent gun-fire were again the 
chief features. These it becomes tedious to 
describe the less important of in detail, for one 
week differeth little from another in these times. 
But something, perhaps, is to be learnt from 



together with a machine-gun. On the igth both 
artilleries exchanged compliments at Epehy and 
Armentieres. During the night the hostile gun- 
fire became very heavy east of Arleux-en-Gohelle, 
east of Vimy, and declared itself as preparation 
for an attack, which -was duly delivered in some 
force, only to be completely repulsed. At the 
same time, the British pulled off a smart local 
operation north-west of Wytschaete, and took 
prisoners. On the aoth a hostile raid near 
Armentieres came to nothing. The enemy's gun- 
fire during the same twenty-four hours was 
directed chiefly to points near St. Quentin and 
La Bassee. On the 2ist New Zealand troops 
made a useful raid near Polygon Wood, and enemy 
guns were busy at Flesquieres. It is now known 
that the recent extension of the British front 
carries the line from St. Quentin to a point .near 






' 





1.1 MEMORY OF CANADIANS WHO FELL IN THE FIGHTING AT "HILL 70": THE OPEN-AIR 
GENERAL CURRIE AND HIS STAFF ATTENDED -(Canadian War Records.] 



SERVICE WHICH 



noting the localities of the actions. On the i7th 
the principal patrol work was undertaken by our 
troops between St. Quentin and Cambrai ; the 
British beat off a hostile raid at Poelcapelle ; and 
during the day the enemy's guns were busy in the 
St. Quentin, Lens, and Armentieres sectors, and 
also north-east of Ypres. The British artillery 
was not reported active. On the i8th a post in 
the Arras region was unsuccessfully raided by the 
enemy ; the Portuguese troops took some prisoners 
near Neuve Chapelle ; patrol encounters and 
successful British raids occurred near Messines and 
Epehy. Gun-fire, chiefly enemy, rose to some 
activity south of the Arras-Cambrai road, at Lens, 
Armentieres, and north-east of Ypres. The 
Canadians scored a neat success south of Lens ; 
while, south of Houthulst Forest, Lancashire, 
Border, and Yorkshire troops raided German 
positions on a wide front, killed many of the 
enemy, and captured twenty-seven prisoners, 



La Fere. The clean country is a welcome change 
to our troops. 

While these operations fill up the immediate 
days, the British troops await with quiet con- 
fidence the coming great attack in the West. 
They are resolved to make the enemy pay the 
full price when he comes. 

After the fine French exploit near the Butte- 
du-Mesnil, recorded in our last article, a sharp 
artillery duel continued in that sector for the 
best part of twenty-four hours. On the Meuse, 
in the Woevre, and in Upper Alsace gun-fire on 
both sides was also fairly violent, and numerous 
raids were reported. The western end of the 
Aisne front next woke up, and at Chavignon the 
artillery activity was " somewhat great." The 
same description applied to the sectors east of 
Rheims and in Champagne. At Auberive the 
enemy undertook a raid without result. On the 
i8th the duel was continued around Bois Mortier 



. r cart Wl ~\ 
4-|_New SwfclJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 27. 1918 



and Vauxillon, on the Aisne, and in Champagne a 
heavy burst of gun-fire was the prelude to a 
determined attempt of the enemy to win back 
the positions he had lost on the i3th at the Butte 
du Mesnil. The Germans gained a brief footing 
in some advanced trenches, but were driven out 
after a lively fight which gave our Allies a few 
prisoners. The igth passed with- 
out any raiding or patrol opera- 
tion worthy of note, but the artil- 
lery fire rose to violence again at 
Chavignon. Similar heavy fire 
was reported from St. Gobain 
(west of Laon) and Bezonvaux (in. 
the Verdun region) . On the 2oth, 
enemy raids were reported from 
Coucy and the Argonne. In Lor- 
raine the French made another 
deep penetration on a wide front 
north of Bures and east of Moncel. 
The operation resembled that of 
the Butte-du -Mesnil in its method 
and result a sharp and sudden 
attack carried through with bril- 
liant dash and success. The first 
estimate of prisoners was 400, 
corrected later to 525, The gun- 
fire record of the aoth showed 
both sides " fairly violent " in 
Champagne, at the Butte-du- 
Mesnil, and in the Vosges. On the 
2ist an enemy raid in the Oivre 
region failed under French fire. 

Perhaps the most notable feature of the week's 
fighting was the Allies' splendid record of successes 
in the air. In four days the British brought down 
and destroyed 48 machines, and drove down 50 ; 



received twenty-six heavy bombs on the rail- 
way station, and on the 2oth large factories 
and the railway works suffered at Permasens. The 
attack on Thionville was the third during the week. 
A few days earlier, 400 bombs were dropped on 
aerodromes near Ghent, Tournai, and Laon ; 
while the station and sidings at Conflans were 




ROUTE-MARCHING 
A MACHINE-GUN 




RAILWAY TRACK LAVING ON A CANADIAN SECTION OF 
FRONT : ADJUSTING AND BENDING ONE OF THE RAILS 
Canadian War Records. 

in the same period the French accounted for 26, 
and the Italians for 2 making a total enemy loss 
of 126 machines. On the night of the igth another 
raid was made on German towns ; Thionville 



ON THE WESTERN FRONT: CANADIAN CAVALRY, WITH 
SECTION, ON THE MOVE IN REAR OF THE BATTLE-LINE. 

Canadian War Records. 

visited by low-flying machines and heavily hit. 
The list of attacks lengthened day by day, and 
thirty-six hours' continuous activity was reported. 
Troves gasworks burst into flames, an ammunition 
dump near Courtrai and numerous 
billets were soundly bombed. 
Down to Feb. 20 only one of 
our machines was reported miss- 
ing in the series of combats. 

On three consecutive nights 
Feb. 16, 17, and 18 hostile air- 
craft crossed the British coast. 
On the first occasion only one 
machine reached the capital, and 
killed ii persons and injured i. 
On the second occasion, 19 were 
killed and 34 injured. On the 
third night there were no casual- 
ties, none of the enemy machines 
having got through. 

On the Italian front the artil- 
lery struggled in spasms in Val 
Giudicaria, on Mont Tomba, and 
on the Piave, which the British 
again forded to raid the enemy's 
advanced trenches. Brisk air 
warfare on both sides and hostile 
bombing of towns in Venetia knew 
no pause. The town populations 
now migrate to the country for 
the night. Three hostile aviation camps were 
attacked, and Innsbruck station bombed. Venice 
and Padua were again visited by enemy aero- 
planes. LONDON : Fee. 23, 1918. 



THE WESTERN 
AT A CURVE. 



Feb. 27, 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



CPart 9O -I . 
New Series |~* 




Bombardment-Raiding by Rail on the Cdcstcrn front. 




MANNED BY SEAMAN-GUNNERS FROM FRENCH NAVAL PORTS : AN ARMOURED TRAIN STANDING BY. 






From the fint week of the war, in Aujuit 1914, detachment! of 
French nary gunners (canonnurs tnnrtns) hare been at the front 
as heary artillerymen. They hare done notable work on many 
sectors of the Western Front. * During the German advance towards 
Paris they garrisoned forts round the capital. Then some of them 
Mired at Verdun, taking heaTy naval guns with them ; others, on 



the Belgian coast and at Dunkirk ; others, again, in Champagne, 
In Lorraine, and on the Somme. On certain sectors, the canonnitrs 
marins serve in armoured trains, such as that shown here, the 
armoured cars mounting lo-centimetre (7-6 inch) guns. They hare 
carried out many successful railway bombardment raids, and hare 
repeatedly been "mentioned" in Army orders. 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 27. 1918 




'Che British Military Representative at Versailles. 





TO REPRESENT BRITAIN ON THE WAR COUNCIL AT VERSAILLES ; GENERAL SIR HENRY RAWLINSON. 



General Sir Henry Rawlinson, whose appointment as British Military 
Representative on the Allied War Council at Versailles was recently 
announced by the Prime Minister, has taken a memorable part in 
the war on the Western Front. He went out first in October 1914 
in command of the 4th Corps (including the famous 7th Division) 
which so heroically held the line near Ypres, and later fought at 



Neuve Chapelle and Loos, In 1916 he was appointed to command 
the new Fourth Army, and when the Battle of the Somme began 
was at first in command on the whole front there, later handing 
over part to Sir Hubert Cough. General Rawlinson's men captured 
Contalmaison, High Wood, Delville Wood, and Guillemont, entered 
Pcronne, and advanced dose to St. Quentin. [Photo, by Kuaseti,} 



Feb. 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Pan so -| 

l_Ne Series J~ 




"Che 



Chief of the Imperial General Staff. 




APPOINTED CHIEF OF THE GENERAL STAFF AT THE 

General Sir Henry Wilson, who succeeds Sir William Robertson as 
Chief of the Imperial General Staff, went out in August 1914 
is Assistant Chief of the Central Staff to Sir John French. He 
has held important positions as Corps Commander and as 
liaison officer with the French Higher Command. He is very 
popular with the French Army, and his appointment has been 



WAR OFFICE : GENERAL SIR HENRY WILSON, K.C.B. 

warmly welcomed in France. Before the war he had been for 
four years Director of Military Operations, and had previously been 
Commandant at the Staff College. He served in South Africa, 
first as Brigade-Major of an infantry brigade, and afterwards as 
D.A.A.G. at Army Headquarters. He also fought in the Burmese 
Expedition of 1886-88, and was wounded. [/'Mo. by Lafayette.} 



. r Part 90 "I 
8 "(New Seriei I 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 27. IHlft 



I 




Glith the Canadians on the Cdestem front 





CAVALRY DURING TRAINING : AN INSPECTION BY GENERAL SIR CHARLES CAVANAGH, K.C.B. ; A CHARGE. 



For one reason or another, many people, when they hear the 
Canadians talked about, think only of infantry, or, perhaps, sometimes, 
artillery. One has heard so often of the marvellous heroism of 
Canadian battalions, from the time of the second battle of 
Ypres in 1915, and mor so than ever since the epic exploit of 
Vimy, that one is apt to overlook that all arms of the service are 



represented among the divisions of the Canadian Army at the 
Front. For that reason, other things apart, the illustrations on 
this page and elsewhere of Canadian cavalry units in training on 
the fringe of the battle-area work that goes on continuously at 
all times- should serve as a useful reminder. [Canadian War 
Records.} 



Feb. 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



LP.m 90 1 . 
New Series J 



CQith the Canadians on the Cdcetcrn front. 









A CAVALRY MACHINE-GUN UNIT DURING TRAINING: ABOUT TO COME INTO ACTION'; FIELD COVER. 



These photographs md the companion pair in the present number, 
of Canadian cavalry troopers on the Western Front during training 
in the late autumn, hare jut been officially releaaed for pub- 
lication. The actual subjects here seen show how complete is the 
organisation for battlefield work of the Canadian cavalry brigades 
in France and Flanders. Every cavalry unit is completely fitted 



out for taking the field, and the general organisation is equal. y 
complete. Each mounted corps is provided with its own section 
of mounted machine-gunner*- exactly as are t^he regiments of the 
Mother Country cavalry brigades. Mule teams, as seen in the 
upper illustration, are mostly employed to carry the machine-guns, 
with mountings and gear. [Canadian War Records.] 



ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. Feb. 27, 1918 




"Cbc Italian JSfavy's piavc flotilla Service, 









L 



ON PATROL DUTY ON THE COASTWISE CANALS AND THE LAGOONS 01 

The Lower Piave in the neighbourhood where the river enters the Adriatic, becomes largely a delta of marshy, reed-grown 
islets amid swamps and shallow lagoons. A number of canals intersect the district, linking inland places on the Venetian 
Plain with the main river channels, for barge and small craft traffic in ordinary times. These minor waterways are proving 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. Feb. 27. 



to Bar the passage Heroes the River t>9tuarv. 







ji ** I 




THE LOWER PIAVE : ONE OF THE ITALIAN NAVY MOTOR GUN-BOATS. 

of value to the Italian defence-system towards the mouth of the Piave. Motor gun-boats of the Italian Navy and armed launches 
of shallow draught keep constantly patrolling the waterways, in readiness to concentrate at any point within the delta of the 
river where the enemy may threaten a crossing. The gun-boats bombard Austrian riverside outposts. [Italian Official 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 27, 1918 



CQitb the R.f.C. on astern Campaigning Grounds. 





IN MESOPOTAMIA AND PALESTINE : FITTING AN AEROPLANE ENGINE ; LINED UP FOR A FLIGHT. 



Alike on the wiJp-stretching, open plain* of Mesopotamia, and 
cross the low sand-hills and arid scrub-covered wastes of Palestine, 
which extend in belts and tracts between the fertile patches in 
parts of the country, aircraft prove invaluable for, in particular, 
scouting and reconnaissance work. Even at low altitudes a wide 
expanse can be overlooked and hostile movements observed for 



prompt report by wireless to headquarters. At about a thousand 
feet up a horizon range of something like thirty miles all round 
can be efficiently observed from the pilot's seat. It is good to 
know that the armies of both General Marshall and ot Sir Edmund 
Allenby, on the Mesopotamia and Palestine fronts, have all the 
aeroplanes they require. [Photograph No. i by Alficri,} 




THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



fieroes of the Drifter "Violet 




IEN WHO SAVED THEIR BURNING SHIP : CHIEF ENGINEMAN J. EWING AND SECOND ENGINEMAN A. NOBLE. 



Great heroHm wu ihown by the crewl of the p.trol-bo.ts tht 
were .ttacked by German dwtroyer. in the Str.it> of Dover in the 
rkneu .t .bout I ..m. in the morning of February 15, when . 
trawler .nd seren drifter, were sunk in one of the enemr 1 . "tip- 
nd run n.T.1 r.id.. Chief Eninem.n J. Ewinj .nd Second 
Entmem.n A. Noble, the two men tiiown in our photograph, (in the 



upper one, with their .hip'. Uttered flf) belonged to the crew of 
. drifter th.t w.i let on fire. They eKtped in . sm.ll boit, 
uking with them two wounded comr.de. ; but, when thr German 
dertroyer. h.d gone, they gallantly returned to their burning (hip, 
nd uicceeded in extingui.hing the ft.mei and bringing her safely 
into port. [Photos, by G.P.U.] 



Pan 90 
cw Si 



1 
ieJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 27. 1918 



ROMANCES OF THE REGIMENTS: XC.-THE 20ra LIGHT DRAGOONS. 



THE PHANTOM TRUMPETER. 



WHEN Sir David Baird took an expeditionary 
force out. to the Cape of Good Hope in 
1805, he disembarked the larger part of his troops 
in Table Hay ; but, on 
account of the safer 
landing, and also to 
guard against any failure 
at Cape Town, he de- 
tached the aoth Light 
Dragoons and the 38th 
Foot to go ashore at 
Sal dan ha Bay. There 
the beach was admir- 
ably suited for a land- 
ing, which General Beres- 
ford carried out suc- 
cessfully. The shores 
of Saldanha Bay were 
not, even in those early 
days, entirely inhos- 
pitable. The British 
troops found a few 
stores at the waterside, 
and these places of 
business had also some 
pretensions to the dig- 
nity of hotels or rest- 
aurants. At any rate, 
they could provide a 
meal, and the troops 
halted for their first 
dinner ashore. This was 
doublv v-olcome. for the 
voyage had beci: tedious. 
It bad been even irk- 
some, for Sir David had gone mad on the 
goose-step and had kept all ranks continually 
at drill when the weather made it at all possible. 




ON THE ITALIAN MOUNTAIN FRONT: MR. G. 
WARD PRICE, BRITISH CORRESPONDENT (LEFT); 
AND M. GEORGES SCOTT, THE WELL-KNOWN 

FRENCH ARTIST. 

It will be noted that both are wearing goggles to protect 

their eyes from the dazzling light of the snow. 

Italian Official Photograph. 



The newly disembarked, therefore, fell upon 
their meal merrily. The menu included the 
novelty of ostriches' eggs. These, wit It the top- 
knocked off, were cooked 
in hot ashes ; they 
tasted not unlike an 
omelette, and were pala- 
table but very indi- 
gestible, as the ban- 
queters were to discover. 
I-ate in the after- 
noon, the 2oth and the 
38th were ordered to 
fall in for the march 
inland to The Fontein, 
a distance of twenty- 
seven miles. The first 
look of South Africa 
was not inviting. The 
Saldanha country seemed 
an interminable waste 
of sand on which ap- 
peared few signs of life. 
Now and then an os- 
trich would be sil- 
houetted against the 
skyline. Once or twice 
the column stinted one 
of these birds, whereat 
a trooper or two gave 
chase to no purpose, 
for the ostrich at full 



stretch can beat any 
horseflesh. But these 
diversions \\cre welcome 
enough in a toilsome march, %\here the deep 
sand caused at least one-third of every pace 
to be lost. No more irritating thing c;tn 

{Continue 




ON THE EGYPTIAN FRONT: HIGH EXPLOSIVES BURSTING NEAR AN OUTFOST.tWotoffnf/V supplied by Topical.] 



Feb. 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



T Part 90 -1 . . 
(.New Series J~"' 5 



Ht a funeral of Victims of the pans Hir-Raid. 





A SOLDIER'S WIFE AND CHILDREN KILLED AS THE MAN RETURNED ON LEAVE : FOLLOWING. 



According to the n! rerfsd casualty list of the rictims of the 
air-raid on Paris on fie night of January 30-31, two children were 
mong the 33 persons killrd within the city, while 3 were among 
the 16 persons who were killed in the suburbs. The funerals of 
JI the Ticums took place at the expense of the State, on J.itM 
nd at times left to the families to determine. Special plots in the 



cemeteries were allotted at the public cost. In the case oi the 
funeral illustrated, the circumstances were exceptionally sad. A 
German bomb killed the two children of the soldier (seen follow, 
ing the remains tt the funrral) and their mother, the man's wif<*, 
at the same time. On the rer? next morning the soldier In 
question, an artilleryman, arrired home on ten days' leare. 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 27. 1918 



be endured by the soldier than going that 

cheats him of the full return for energy 
expended. 

Ahead of the little force went the aoth Light 



But as they advanced it now seemed to 
recede. Yet it was never still. The enemy 
seemed content to advertise his whereabouts. 
Orders were given to speed up the pace. Miles 



Dragoons and the Light Company of the 38111, of sand slipped by (in two senses), the ostrich- 



under Sir Robert Wilson. As they trudged along 
and evening approached they began to regret the 




AFTER THE MACHINE HAD BEEN BROUGHT DOWN BY ONE OF OUR 
AIRMEN: REMAINS OF A GERMAN AEROPLANE WHICH CAME OVER 
OUR LINES ON A PHOTOGRAPHIC RECONNAISSANCE.- [British Official -Photo.} 

ostrich-eggs, which sat very heavy on their con- 
sciences. A halt seemed very desirable, and at 
last, just as it was getting dark, the welcome 
relief came. The column reached a farmhouse, 
a most cheerful sight amid the desert, and 
there they hoped to rest for 
the night. But it was not 
to be. 

The quick Southern dark- 
ness had fallen, and the men 
were beginning to enjoy what 
ease they could snatch, when 
a sound broke the silence of the 
plain. 

" What 's that ? " said one 
trooper to another. 

" Sounds like a bugle." 

" None of ours, though." 

" Bad luck for us, if it 
isn't. It '11 be boot and saddle 
again, boys." 

The officers listened also. 
The notes sounded" nearer and 
more distinct. It was no British 
bugle, but undoubtedly that of 
Jansen's advanced guard. The 
Dutch were at hand. So boot 
and saddle it was, and under 
the African starlight the little 
British army went out to look 
for the enemy. And that 
" little British army went a (big drum)long way." 

They steered for the bugle, which had 
seemed to be advancing in their direction. 



eggs lay heavier and heavier, but still duty 

and the one clear call from the wild kept 
the Dragoons at it. Now the 
notes would sound a little to 
the right, now to the left, 
but always ahead. The dis- 
tance could not, it seemed, be 
diminished between the column 
and that elusive trumpeter. 
Was the slim enemy luring 
them on to some ambush ? Was 
he real ? Was it some devil 
of the uncharted African wil- 
derness ? Oh, for a shout, a 
shot anything to make touch 
with the tangible world I Night 
and the desert (and indiges- 
tion), hard going, and ever the 
I eerie bleat of that receding 
horn. 
The soldiers' lot was not a 
happy one. 
Still there was no giving 
up. Midnight came and passed. 
The eldrich trumpeter knew 
no rest. And so, until the east 
brightened to the dawn, they 
followed where he led. With 

weary eyes at sunrise they blinked about them. 

They had come far. Where were they ? 

Back at the farmhouse from which they had 

set out ! 

And away yonder, on a kopje, still blowing his 




AFTER THE MACHINE HAD BEEN BROUGHT DOWN BY ONE OF OUR 
AIRMEN : REMAINS OF A GERMAN AEROPLANE WHICH CAME OVER 
OUR LINES ON A PHOTOGRAPHIC RECONNAISSANCE. [British Official Photo.} 

confounded horn, was a herdsman. All night 
long he had been rounding up his beasts. The 
20th had done the grand round with him. 



F.b, 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r fmtn -\ , 
\ Nc* Series | 17 




Che "Sirens": H Review at the Crystal palace. 





W.R.N.S. : (I) A MARCH-PAST ; (2) COMMODORE SIR R. WILLIAMS-BULKELEY ; DAME KATHARINE PURSE. 



From the time of the raising of the Women's Auxiliary Army 
Corpi, popularly known as the W.A.A.C., it hai often been asked 
whether the Nary would not find a lomewhat aimilar organisation 
of value, and the idea hai taken form and substance In the 
W'ji.,-i.'t Royal Naval Service, which promiHS to be equally valuable 
tht title of the " Wreas." The new naval body hai iu 



quarters at the Crystal Palace, where the first officers and ratings 
who have completed their training were inspected the other da? 
by Commodore Sir Richard Williams-Bulkeley, R.N.R., who is seen 
in our second picture with Dame Katharine Furse, C.B.E., tin- 
Director, who may be congratulated upon the success of her 
organisation. [Photos, by T. H. i'writt.] 



18~[ N "sJ!i]-THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, Feb. 27. 1918. 




"Che "Wrens' at the Crystal palace 




AN ORGANISATION WHICH IS ALREADY POPULAR : A 



"Why should the Navy wait?" That, in effect, was th idea which was very much in the public mind, and has led to 
the organisation of a body of voluntary workers who promise to prove of similar value to the Navy as the W.A.A.C. is to 
the Army. The movement has been fostered and developed under the energetic lead of Dame Katharine Furse, G.B.E. ; and 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. F*. 27. 1918-[ N . P "'sS]- 



H Successful Body of practical Helpers, 






HSPECTION OF THE W.R.N.S. AT THE CRYSTAL PALACE. 

her staff of Director! and Principals work hard and loyally with her and are making the new body a success. Commander Sir 
Richard Henry Williami-Bulkeley, C.B., held an inspection in the Palace grounds, and, the three central fig-'res in our picture are (left 
to right) Commodore Sir Richard Williams-Bulkeley, Dame Katharine Furse, and Staff-Commander RoberU-Wray. [PMo. T. H. Evtrili.} 



20-[ N ft &S'~l THE ILLUSTRATED 




On the Palestine front: "Troopers whose 




CROSSING ONE OF THE SANDY DESERT-WASTES IN SOUTHERN PALESTINE NE 

As for as the war has gone up to the present, only our mounted corps of Yeomanry and Anzacs, attached to the armies in the 
East, in Palestine and to some extent in Mesopotamia, have had opportunities for cavalry fighting, or, at any rate, for cavalry 
work of the orthodox kind. They have, however, it is common knowledge, taken advantage of them brilliantly. Except for 



NEWS. Feb. 27. 



bring Capabilities the tTurke bavc TTested. 








HE DEAD SEA: A NEW ZEALAND HORSE CORPS ON THE LINE OF MARCH. 

occasional affairs during the Western Front battles since the Somme, our cavalry in France and Flanders hare had few oppor- 
tunities for doing more than charging, or riding down, parties of German infantrymen, or detachment] in villages carried at a 
gallop. There are few cases of our Western Front horsemen crossing steel with the enemy's cavalry since the Marne. 



22-[NeTsU]-THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. Fb. 27. 1818. 



Captured German Bomb- 




AIRCRAFT CAMOUFLAGE PAINTING : A RECENTLY BROUGHT-DOWN 



Ctntfe S* Certa ' n P erations ^ hi "> have b en as a thorn in the side of 

of b i' f T ' Germans ke P Persistently trying to harass the garrison of Dunkirk by the 

big shells from rmles away towards Ostend, and constant air-raids. Recently an afternoon's long-range 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. Feb. 27. 



Dropper's " Camouflage" Design, 





COTHA DISPLAYED IN DUNKIRK BEFORE JEAN BART'S STATUE. 

shelling was followed by a night raid of Gothas, in three successive attacks. The adventure cost the enemy a " chaser " plane 
and a. Gotha, th latter remarkably camouflaged, as seen in the illustration, which. shows the Gotha displayed as a trophy in 
the main square of Dunkirk, at the foot of the statue of the old naval hero, Jean Bart. [PMografh by Paul Cappclle] 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 27. 1918 









in the Hir: Observation-Balloon "Garget practice 








READY TO BE ATTACKED : MOORED IN POSITION, ALOFT ; THE AIRCRAFT MARKSMAN SWOOPING. 



In a letter on February 18, Mr. Philip Gibbs, referring to certain 
points in the German preparation* for the long-advertised "Spring 
Offensive," says this: "Each side has been ( trying to blind the 
other's eyes and prevent observation of activity. The German 
gunners and airmen have a 'hate' against our balloons." In 
the baskets below them are two pairs of watchful eyes, noting the 



activity of their trains behind the lines and any movement on 
the roads." We well know the' vulnerability of "sausage" 
balloons, and their liability to take fire when certain projectiles 
are used against them. Experiments by our own aircraft in 
attacking "condemned," or obsolete type, or worn-out observation- 
balloons, take place on occasion. [Official Photographs.] 



L.. 



J 



Feb. 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



p.t 90 i ,. 

e Mm,j_| 25 



in the Hir: Observation-Balloon target practice. 





RESULTS OF A FAIR HIT : BLAZING UP IN MID-AIR ; A DESCENT IN FLAMES. 



An observation-balloon consist* structurally of two parts, just like 
an ordinary circular balloon: the " gas-bag," which "floats" 
overhead, and the basket, suspended btlow by cords, in which the 
observer, or two observers- they generally work in pairs, have 
their post. Against overhead attack, directed to destroy the gas-bag 
envelope, the observers in the basket are to all Intents helpless. 



They can only sit where they are and wtit even's, hoping that the 
hostile airmen may miss their aim, or the incendiary projectiles 
used fail to act. These last seldom fail ; the inflammatory projectile 
on hitting flares up owing to the materials. AJ1 armies use a 
species of instantaneously combustible "dart." Usually "friendly" 
airmen patrol near by on guard. [Official Photuf.raph!,.} 



l'.rt 9O T 
itw Scries J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Fob. 27. 1918 



THE NEW WARRIORS: XXI. -LITTLE BROTHER ODD JOB. 



PERCY is Labour, but not quite ; and he is 
"Canteens," but not bibulous: he is 
another wandering star who does work with 
earnest industry in Die back areas, mainly 
because doctors and other powers forbid him to 
eliminate Frit/.es with an equal industry in the 
front trenches. 

JVrcy is the prime boss of unattached labour, 
and the organiser of cant-Jen workers ; it may 
sound attractive, buv it is not so very. His semi- 
official lank, " Canteens," he, protests, is really in 
the nature of a libel. He is truthfully much too 



the Harridge's level, controlling clerks, counter- 
men, cup-washers, transport < haul's, and all that 
kind of tlung with a sort of D.D I >.(.). M.C,. touch. 
It may not be glorious, as he says, but it is 
infernally exacting : one small canteen can 
exasperate a delicate-minded man more than a 
great offensive or two. 

The canteen is only a bit of his generalship. 
Mis is the mind that gets the odd jobs done also. 
All the paper-scraps picked up in Flanders. 
.France, .Mesopotamia, r.ili-stine, Last Afiica, and 
the British sectors of Italy and Macedonia have 




A BRITISH SUBMARINE: A VIEW OF THE STERN OF ONE OF OUR UNDER-WATER CRAFT RUNNING 

ON THE SURFACE. 



busy to indulge in the comforts and joys of his 
office. Under him are gathered the partly 
crocked and the sedentary. He is the Field- 
Marshal of the employment squads in his 
Divisional area ; all the clerks and unfits who 
have not been embodied in Labour Companies 
or. iiuhed, may be only out of the line for a spell 
until they are keyed up to " A " once more are 
under him. That is, Peicy has not the glory of 
a battalion even Labour Battalion command, 
but has only a mixed and ever-changing galaxy 
of " detached for light duty " pundits upon 
which to wreak his parades. 

He, of course, does many things with them. 
He staffs the canteens, and keeps them up to 



been- gathered at the word of command of the 
I Vn ys. The cigarette "butts" and match 
stales " also collected under his Napoleonic care 
would form a mountain of abnormal height that 
would make almost anybody ill to look at. His 
legions clean the camps, provide fatigues on any 
subject sacred and profane from potting the 
Major-General's tulips to erecting boxing-rings 
and minor granaries. 1 believe he also has a 
sinister influence with batmen and cooks'-mates, 
and has that curious flair, which comes to few 
men of this world, of picking out with but a single 
glance those gouty men who, from their utter 
incapacity, are predestined to clean the boots and 
i.fiierally look after the welfare ot subalterns. 



Ft>. 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Pan wi -i __ 

LNew .Serif J~ Z 







in the Hir: Observation-Balloon Olork. 








ON AN OBSERVATION-BALLOON TAKING FIRE : THE OBSERVER ESCAPING BY PARACHUTE. 



" titr-rt " to.it no place in an airman's kit. The " sausage " 
balloon observer ha to lit Mill alike while thelli aimed at hit 
gai-envelope are bunting all about him, and when enemy air mm 
are milting at hit balloon and when an enemy airman hat made 
a hit on the balloon and the gas envelope in flames is coming 
down, tit must then jump out in mid-air and trust to his 



parachute expanding quickly and drifting clear of the blaring 
fas-b>g as it descends. Each observation-balloon observer has a 
parachute, attached at the side of the basket so as to detach 
quickly in emergency, to which he is securely buckled by utrspj 
and fastened by a length of cord before he goes up. [Official 
Pltolograpli.] 



I 



THE ILLUSTRATEb WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 27. IblS 



When Percy wants to get a real servant for, say, 
a Major or people who can be terrible to one, like 
the M.O., he consults the Sergeant-Major ; for 
anyone else it is a gamble. 

All the small jobs come under Percy's ken ; 
think of anything trivial that needs a man or 




AEROPLANE-BUILDING IN FRANCE: PUTTING A MOTOR 
IN PLACE. [Frmck Official.} 

two, and you know what Percy has to do. He 
also has another job. that has developed since the 
rise of Lord Rhondda and food-cards ; this is, as 
he calls it, wet and dry gardening. In 
some areas there is a special officer, whose 
strange brain is teeming with deadly ideas 
like spring plantings, and pruning and 
transplanting, and equinoctial manures to 
do this sort of salad-and-potato work ; but 
Percy, having an allotment of some 5000 
arable acres at home, from which he has 
managed to extract a steady income, is 
considered to be highly fitted for the 
job. 

In the old days it was a military axiom 
that an army should be able to live on 
the country it goes through ; modern war 
being what it is, it is now laid down that 
an army should live on (even if only in 
the smallest measure) the country it stays 
in. This noble idea being imparted from 
Higher Up, Percy and his labour lot have 
been thoroughly industrious, wheating about, 
and training potatoes, and nurturing young 
greens and hard-bitten cabbages and salads 
and, in fact, anything that can be coaxed 
from its lair in the earth and eaten without 
retaliation. 

Not only does he lend his labour to local 
farmers for ploughing and sowing and reaping 
and barning and the rest, but he does an in- 
ordinate amount of the same kind of thing 
himself. He prowls the earth spotting out allot- 
ments : any stray, uncultivated, and apparently 



unowned field is his prey ; and he sets his gangs 
of men on it, and quickly turns it into a useful, 
producing member of society. 

He is very ruthless in this matter, and if be 
sees the right sort of field, with a good wormy 
loam which was born to breed him turnips or 
broad beans, or whatever he has made up 
his mind to grow, he has that field though 
Lieutenant-Colonels bite at him. It is said 
that Percy is so determined and powerful 
in this matter that he slung a Brigade of 
Heavies out of a Class One alluvial patch 
which he wanted for Divisional brussels- 
sprouts, and in consequence the Major-Gen- 
eral had to go and do his Big Offensive 
elsewhere. This story may not be as 
truthful as it seems, but it illustrates the 
tenacity of Percy. 

He, indeed, gets results. All over the 
back areas he is growing food of all sorts for 
the Army. He has his potato-patches every- 
where, and he has seen to the planting of 
fields that will give him a vast amount o 
forage for Divisional horses. He has placed 
fresh vegetables close at hand to the men ; 
and he has managed to infuse a charm- 
ing variety into his green stuffs, which is 
a boon to men. Besides providing fresh 
vegetables, Percy is also, you understand, 
saving cargo space. His tons of potatoes 
and forage, not to say other grown foods, 
mean transport of all kinds ships, trains, 
and lorries less. He is feeding the troops 
at the source, and freeing space for civilians. 
Percy, however, can't quite see what a useful 
child he is ; he tries to impress upon M.O.'s 




IN 



SERBIA: PLACING THE POWDER-CHARGE IN THE 
BREECH OF A FRENCH GUN. [Photograph by C.N.] 

that his real work is fighting Fritz. . . . He 
is convinced that it is only the M.O.'s love 
of French salad that prevents him being passed 
as fit. W. DOUGLAS NEWTON. 



K.I. 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



CTarl !M> 
New Series 



Cttar in the Hir: Observation -Balloon TTarget practice* 






DOWN -THE LAST OF THE BURNING "GAS-BAG": THE SMOKING MASS; SOLDIERS LOOKING ROUND. 



In the two photograph* we * the spectacle presented on the 
ground after an aircraft marksman hai delivered a successful 
attack on an f Nervation-balloon. The charred and smoking 
tl :ii' ( tiif gas-envelope lie* smouldering and smoking in a heap 
of cordage scraps and fragments tt the place where it finally came 
down. From tht height to which observation- balloons usually 



ascend for the observers to get a [dear view wel! behind il;r 
enemy's lines, and sufficiently far to the rear to make out the 
exact positions of his long-range heavy-gim batteries and the roads 
with massed columns ol transport and infantry reserves, it usually 
happens that the entire balloon becomes burned-out wreckage crash- 
ing to the ground. [Official Photograph, :} 



, rt r Part IM "I 
30 l_Nw Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



af 2 
te 

IE 


jT ] 


tn 





















In Bombarded Hrras on the Outskirts of the Battle Hrea. 




t 



u 





* 






EIGHTY YEARS IN BUILDING : THE CONDITION OF 

Arras, the ancient capital of Artois, and the chief city of the 
Department of the Pas-de-Calajs, although the British offensive 
last year drove .the enemy from the district, may well again 
figure in the communiques. It lies in the path of the Germans, 
in one of the most likely directions for the enemy to thrust during 
their threatened spring offensive. In thi first two years of the 



ARRAS CATHEDRAL AFTER TWO YEARS* SHELLING, 
war, Arras suffered severely from German bombardments, mostly 
with heavy long-range guns ; and as at Rheims, the enemy made 
the Cathedral (built between 1755 and 1835} a principal target, 
Its present utterly wrecked appearance, as sketched by a French 
artist, looking little better than a complete ruin, is shown in the 
illustration. [French Official I'tiotugritph.] 



Feb. 27, 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r fait on -i , , 

I Nc Scries P"*' 




In the "Crack of German Savagery in Northern f ranee. 




A MEDIEVAL FEUDAL STRONGHOLD AND HISTORIC MANSION : THE WRECK OF PLESSIS DE ROYE CHATEAU. 



The Chateau of Pleuii it Roye stands in m region of Northern 
Frne now beyond further ravaging by the Germans. If cruelly 
maltreated, u depicted by the French artist whose drawing it repso- 
duced, the Chilean d* Plenii de Roye hu at least escaped the 
utter demolition that overthrew the hiitoric Chateau of Ham and 
the world-famous Chtteau de Coucy. Many of theaa chiteaux 



have associations going back far into the romantic period of 
mediaeval France. Not a few were the castellated stronghold! of 
feudal barona, which have remained "in the family" ever since, 
weathering the tornado of peasant fury in the French Revolution. 
Later occupants have from time to time modernised the castles 
into habitable country mansions. [French Official Photograph.] 



r Tart UO 

-' 



_ r Ta 

32-|_ Ne ' w 



THE. ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 27, 1918 



Cvi/~'"' 



OTorh of the " 5H.H.H.C." on the Sdestern front. 





CARRYING OUT A NAPOLEONIC DICTUM : MAKING AND BAKING BREAD FOR OUR SOLDIERS. 



One of the secrets of the good health and good spirits of our 
gallant men at the Front is, without doubt, the care and liberality 
with which they are catered for. Napoleon knew well the im- 
portance of a generous commissariat for keeping up the physique 
and moral of troops in the stress and strain of a campaign ; and 
in the present war one of the practical services rendered by the 



Women's Army Auxiliary Corps is the help whkh they are parti- 
cularly qualified to render in this essential detail. Our ur>t illus- 
tration of them at work in the bread-making process shows them 
mixing the flour in capacious troughs, and in the second they 
are seen putting the dough into the ovens. The order anu clean-. ! 
liness of the work make for health and comfuit. [Offitui. Photos.] 



Feb. 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 




Che dorh of the "OLH.H.C. on the Western front. 




PRACTICAL HELP BY WOMEN-WORKERS IN FRANCE : BAKING BREAD FOR THE TROOPS. 



The "W.A.A.C. " ii loiing no time in not merely justifying its 
existence, but in proving the rel, practical MrTice which it can 
fender in adding to the comfort and well-being of our men on 
active service. Appropriately, and rather picturesquely, clad in white 
oreralli and head-gear, they are here seen surrounded by orderly 
and systematically arranged shelves of the bread which they hare 



made and baked ; and a pleasant feature is the obvious and scrupu- 
lous cleanliness of both the place and the products. The old 
historic maxim has from the first days of the war been wisely 
kept in mind, and there is no doubt that the ample quantity and 
excellent quality of their rations have played no inconsiderable part 
in keeping our men fit.- [Official Photograph] 



. ._f Tn w> i 

**~T.DW Sc.lctJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 27. 1918 



WOMEN AND THE WAR. 



OPPORTUNITIES and the necessity for 
women's services are expanding day by 
day. The need for recruits to the " Waacs," 
the " Wrens," the " Penguins " (as the women 
who serve with the Air Force will in future be 
known), and the Women's Land Army is in- 
cessant, and will increase as the war goes on. 
The exhibition illustrating the work done by the 
four services, held 
at Harrod's re- 
cently, gave a clear 
idea of the kind of 
work the women 
are doing. Officials 
of the various corps 
emphasised the fact 
that more and ever 
more women are 
wanted to do it. 



Quite apart from 
its object of demon- 
strating the condi- 
tions of life in the 
different branches 
of service, the ex- 
hibition helped to 
clear up the confu- 
sion that undoubt- 
edly existed as to 
the real need for 
recruics, and acted 
as a direct encour- 
agement to women 




WOMEN'S WORK FOR OUR DEAD: W.A.A.C.'S TENDING THE 

GRAVES OF OUR FALLEN SOLDIERS IN FRANCE. 

Among the duties of the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps Is that of tendim* 

the graves of our brave dead in France, and of affordinj information 1o 

visitors duties which they discharge with commendable care and sympathy. 

Official Photograph. 



to give their services. For instance, the campaign 
of slander against the members of the Women's 
Army Auxiliary Corps was definitely pronounced 



by Mr. Roberts, the Minister for Labour, to be the 
work of those acting in enemy interests. Careful 
inquiry shows that the allegations concerning the 
morals or, to be more precise, the immorality 
of the organisation are wholly untrue. An 
impartial body of half-a-do/cn representative 
women is investigating the matter in France, but 
the authorities have no fear of the results of their 

inquiries. Intend- 
ing recruits need 
not hesitate about 
"joining up." Their 
physical, as well as 
their moral, welfare 
will be in very good 
hands. 



The "Waacs" 
want Administra- 
tors, and they want 
them, roughly, at 
the rate of 120 a 
month. Experience 
proves tliat women 
who have had a 
high school or col- 
lege education, or 
their equivalents, 
are best fitted for 
the work that has 
to be done. The 
idea of taking 
charge of a com- 
pany of women 



may seem strange to those who have hitherto 
had only themselves to look after ; but the war 
has proved that the British woman lacks neither 

\Coitimxd tntrjfa/. 




L 



THE QUEEN AND THE GREEN CROSS: HER MAJESTY INSPECTS MEMBERS OF THE SOCIETY. 
.The Queen, whose interest in all beneficent efforts connected with the war is indefatigable, visited Wellington Barracks recently *;>>. r 
Mary, and Inspected three companies of the Green Cross Society (Women's Reserve Ambulance), under the command of Mrs Cli-'"S 
who, in our photograph, is walking with the Queen. Princess Mary is seen immediately behind. (PlMograpk fry Sport <-' ~'^. 



Kcb. 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Pan no ~\ , 
I N.W seri J- 35 



Olomen Olar-Caorkers of London. 




TRAINED EMPLOYEES OF THE SOUTH METROPOLITAN GAS COMPANY : WORK FORMERLY MEN'S JOBS. 



Toilsome and exacting form of physical labour ai the daily 
routine work at gas works it, quite an army of women find war- 
time employment in the service of London fas companies. These 
illustrations show some of the women employed by the South Metro- 
politan Gas Company, who have organised and trained a large 
staff of wornea, by whom Tarious departments are run. In the 



first illustration members of a gang of women re seen loading 
lorries. The second illustration shows a woman engineer oiling 
machinery a skilled worker's job. The third illustration shows 
another skilled woman worker in a responsible position, attending 
to and opening a valve. Women clearing doors in a retort-housa 
are seen in the fourth illustration. [Photos, by Alfitri.] 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Feb. 17, 1918 



enterprise nor the power to grasp new oppor- 
tunities of usefulness as they arise. 



Health is, of course, an important con- 
sideration. But once again experience has shown, 
as Mrs. Burleigh Leach (the new Controller of 
the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps) explained 
the other day, that life in the 
women's army tends to improve 
rather than otherwise the health 
of its members. It is no part of 
the programme to impair the 
efficiency of the human machine 
by overwork. 

Every woman, however, who 
comes forward to serve in any of 
the services must be prepared to 
make some sacrifice. The " dura- 
tion of the war " may appear a 
long period for which to promise 
one's services to the State ; but 
the work to be done is continu- 
ous, and constant change is the 
surest way to inefficiency. Then, 
again, there are the restrictions, 
which women who have always 
led a free and independent life 
find irksome, and not seldom re- 
gard as entirely unnecessary. A 
little reflection, however, shows 
that no organised body of women 
can exist without rules which 
must be observed by all, and 
a little philosophy is an excellent safeguard 
against the tendency to " grouse " which new and 
unaccustomed regulations are apt to induce. 



as section leaders with a view to possible pro- 
motion later on, as well as others whose ages vary 
from twenty-five to thirty-five, to train as officers 
at once. Dame Furse, explaining the ideals of 
the new service the other day, laid it down that 
such women should have had experience of 
working with women and girls ; that all personal 
considerations must be put aside on behalf of the 





WOMEN'S WORK FOR 



GRAVES 



OUR DEAD: W.A.A.C.'S TENDING THE 

OF OUR SOLDIERS. 

Our photograph shows two of the workers of the W.A.A.C. engaged upon the sympathetic 
and womanly work of caring for the resting-places of our men who have fallen in France. 

Official Photograph. 

It is not only the " Waacs " for whom 
" officers " are required. The Women's Royal 
Naval Service, too, want women who will enrol 



WOMEN'S WORK FOR OUR DEAD: W.A.A.C.'S TENDING THE GRAVES 

OF OUR SOLDIERS IN FRANCE. 

One of the saddest but most sympathetic of the duties of the W.A.A.C. in France is 

caring for the graves of the men who have given their lives for their country. Our 

photograph shows something of the care taken that the graves shall be arranged and 

kept with the order and reverence due to the eallant dead.- -[Official Pki>tog.rapk.} 

service ; that broad - mindedness, tact, and 
courtesy would be looked for in all who aspired 
to lead ; that well-educated women were wanted ; 
that every woman who joined 
the " Wrens " would be ex- 
pected to play the game in every 
sense of the word. 



The Chief of the Women's 
Naval Service realises very well 
that the women have a reputa- 
tion to win. If she can get the 
type of woman she requires 
there will be no difficulty in 
winning in. But the whole idea 
of organising bodies of women 
to replace men is new to the 
country. Though the women 
are welcomed after all, they 
have made good in a wonder- 
fully short time there are 
plenty of people ready to criti- 
cise the failures and camou- 
flage the success. If the organi- 
sation is to succeed, it must 
have the support of the public. 
It lies with the public, who 
benefit in the long run, to see that the support 
is. not withheld as a result of groundless and 
malicious gossip. CLAUDINE CLEVE. 



Feb. 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



I" Part UU ~\ ,, 
[New Series |~37 






77/ CHANNEL RAID DOVER BOMBARDED-SUBMAR1NE STATISTICS DISMEMBERMENT 
OF RUSSIA ALLENBY'S ADVANCE TO JERICHO-SALONIKA ITEMS. 



ONCE more the sea affair produced events of 
consequence. The chief of these belongs to 
our previous period, but was not reported in time 
for mention. Enemy torpedo-boat-destroyers of 
large tonnage made a flying raid upon the Straits 
of Dover on Feb. 15, and attacked trawlers and 




and the enemy, after firing some thirty rounds, 
made off. The casualties were killed, one 
child ; injured, three men, one woman, and 
three children. A glorious exploit ! The child 
victims all belonged to one family. Little damage 
was done to the town itself. 

The returns of losses due to 
r,cnii;in submarine \\arfiirc 
for the week ending Feb. 16 
showed 12 large ships sunk, 3 
smaller vessels, and i fishing- 
boat. Striking out one of the 
larger vessels, which had been 
sunk during the week ending 
Feb. g, a decrease of 2 ap- 
peared ; ships under 1600 tons 
showed a decrease of 3 ; fish- 
ing-vessels a decrease of 2, on 
the previous period. In the 
class over 1600 tons the aver- 
age for the last three weeks is 
ii'6, on the returns as tabu- 
lated. Arrivals showed a slight 
decrease, sailings an increase of 
i if). The average for the three 
weeks preceding the three in 
question was 7. 

What hopes may have been 
entertained for Russia up to 

ON ONE OF THE SECTORS OF THE FRENCH FRONT IN ITALY: A BATTALION OF the date Qf Qur j ast artide are 
CHASSEURS ALPINS ON THE MARCH ALONG A MAIN HIGHWAY. [Italian Official Photo.] nQW heavily discounted, and it 

drifters engaged in hunting a German submarine. would require a very sanguine temperament to 
The fight was short and sharp, the small British cling to belief in any good issue of the present 
vessels making a fine effort against heavy odds. plight. Germany lost no time in resuming hostili- 
One trawler and seven drifters were sunk, and ties, and advanced on Dvinsk and Lutsk. The 
" the enemy destroyers " (says 
the Admiralty report) " re- 
turned rapidly to the north 
before any of our forces could 
engage them." The crew of 
one drifter, which was set on 
fire, at first had to take to the 
boats ; but when the enemy 
retreated they pulled back to 
their ship, boarded her, put 
out the fire, and brought the 
little vessel safely into port. 
Those who have seen the 
battered hull in dock can 
alone appreciate the quality of 
the fishermen's exploit. 

On the morning of the i6th 
Dover waters were the scene 
of another incident. About 
12.10 a.m. an enemy sub- 
marine thrust up its back off 
the Channel port and opened 
fire, lasting for three or four 
minutes, upon the town. The 
Dover land batteries replied, 




ON ONE OF THE SECTORS OF THE FRENCH FRONT IN ITALY: A REGIMENT OF 

THE LINE PASSING THROUGH A TOWN IN NORTHERN ITALY. 

Italian Official Photograph. 



, r Part 90 -1 
* J~ ( N.-w SericsJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



Feb. 27. 1918 



9 

*g 


The 


Prince 


of 


Cdates's 


Visit 


to 


South 


CCLiles. 


.-^W- 







AT PORT TALBOT AND CARDIFF : AT THE STEEL 



In the first illustration the Prince is seen being conducted tirough 
Port Talbot Steel Works. In the second illustration an interesting 
extra incident :s shown. Hearing that an ex-Guardsman, William 
Chilcott, one of the employes, was on duty in London on the 
night the Prince was born, his Royal Highness asked for him. 
In the course of conversation, Chilcott greatly interested and amused 



WORKS ; AN EX-GUARDS SENTRY ; A WELSH CHOIR. 

the Prince by describing several of the enthusiastic scenes he 
witnessed in the streets near Clarence House, where Chilcott was 
on sentry, and where King George, then Duke of York, had his 
London residence. A Welsh choir singing " God Bless the Prince 
of Wales" at the opening of the "Prince of Wales Hospital," 
Cardiff, is shown in the third illustration. [Photos, by Alficri.] 



Feb. 27, 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



-Che prince of CCUles's Visit to South Stales. 




AT PORT TALBOT AMD CARDIFF : AN EX-SOLDIER USING HIS ARTIFICIAL HAND ; AT THE HOSPITAL. 



The Prince of Wales, on arriving t Port Talbot direct from 
London on February zo, at once went to the Steel Works, where 
he was conducted through the works in all departments. By the 
Prince's special wish, all ceremonial and formality was dispensed 
with, and he went among the employ's in the workshops as an 
ordinary visitor. At several places he stopped to shake hands and 



chat for a few moments with some of the workpeople. The 
Prince was able to see in full operation all the various processes 
of steel production. From Port Talbot the Prince went by train 
to Cardiff, where, accompanied by the Lord Mayor, his Royal 
Highness inspected and formally opened the "Prince of Wales 
Hospital " for supplying men with artificial limbs. [Photo. G.P.U.] 



|- Part 90 "I 
40 LN> W SeriesJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, 



Feb. 27. 1918 



Dvina was crossed without opposition ; Dvinsk fell 
an easy prey. Whereupon the Bolshevik Govern- 
ment made known their willingness to sign peace 
terms. The Germans set their faces steadily towards 
Petrograd, and it seemed that nothing could stay 
their advance. Professing a noble anxiety for the 
safety and independence of the infant Ukrainia, 
the ravishers of Belgium and Flanders pressed on 
to defend it against the aggression of " Great 
Russia," and took Lutsk unopposed ; Kieff was 
the objective of this beneficent move. Russia has 
latterly fallen to pieces ; such arms as she still 
possesses pass daily into the hands of the Hun. 
Leal, in Esthonia, was occupied ; and the troops, 
skirting the Gulf of Riga, passed Pernigal, Lemsal, 
and Volmar. Rovno was cleared. From Dvinsk 
to Pinsk the Germans solidly advanced their front 
eastward. They claimed to have captured 9000 
prisoners, 1353 guns, 120 machine-guns, about 
5000 motor-vehicles, and 1000 railway-coaches. 
At the moment of writing, Petrograd is reported 
to be panic-stricken. Anarchy holds everything in 
the clutch of terror, and an eleventh-hour frantic 
call to arms, a levle en masse, has been issued. 




AN AMERICAN " STAR " AIRMAN IN FRANCE : MAJOR 
RAOUL LUFBERY, HITHERTO OF THE FRENCH " LAFAYETTE" 
AIR SQUADRON, IN UNIFORM AS AN AMERICAN AJRMAN. 

Major Lufbery, who has recently been transferred to a U.S. air 
squadron, has 16 enemy planes down to his credit. [P/iofo. by C.N.] 



The granaries of the south lie open to the hand 
of the Central Powers, on whose behalf Prince 
Leopold of Bavaria is advancing to stamp out 
" moral infection " and " defend outraged liberty." 
These are his very words to his troops. The only 
hope is that some unforeseen factor--will make his 




THE FRENCH ARMY MOTOR SERVICE : THE UNIFORM 

NOW GENERALLY WORN BY FRENCHWOMEN DOING DUTY 

WITH THE CORPS. [Photograph by C.N.] 

task more troublesome than at present appears. 
But the debacle seems complete. The Allies can 
only commiserate and gird themselves more 
stoutly for their own task. 

General Allenby's victorious advance was 
resumed on Feb. 20 east of Jerusalem. Moving 
through difficult country and in heavy rainstorms, 
the British and Allied forces overcame obstinate 
resistance and progressed to within four miles of 
the walls of Jericho. The advance was on a front 
of yf miles. At the same time, our troops pushed 
forward a mile on the Jerusalem-Nablus road. 
The air-service co-operated effectively, bombing 
camps and depots about Shun-el-Nimrin, io| miles 
north-east of Jericho. The fall of Jericho took 
place on February 21, cavalry seizing the vil- 
lage. General Allenby's action may give a new 
significance to an ancient piece of cant advice, 
hitherto slightly abusive in its irony. He has 
gone to Jericho in some style. 

From the Salonika front news remained 
scanty. Near Lake Butkovo a British detach- 
ment penetrated enemy positions and carried out 
destructive operations. The Serbs repulsed two 
Bulgarian reconnaissance parties. 

The situation in Mesopotamia remained 

unchanged. LONDON: FEB. 23, 1918. 



LONDON : Published Weekly at the Office, 172, Strand, in the Parish of St. Clement Danes, in the County of London, by THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NFWS AND SKKTCH. LTD, 
173, Strand, aforesaid ; and Printed by THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS AND SKETCH. LTD.. Milford Lam, W.C. S WDISDAY, FEB. 27. 191*. 
Entered as Second-Class Matter at the New York (N.V.) Post Office, iqifc. 



The Illustrated War Newt. March 6, 1918,-Part 91, New Serie,. 



Che Illustrated War Reius 




EFORE BEING USED : A GERMAN ARMOURED CHAMBER FOR A FRONT-LINE PERISCOPE. 

Australian Official Photograph. 



>_r 

z (.N 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 6, 1918 



HERTLING, WILSON, AND BALFOUR EXPOSURE OF HUN AIMS -THE DAILY ROUND 

IN THE WEST GUNS, RAIDS, AND BOMBS STEADY INCREASE IN ALLIED AIR-WORK 

THREE MONTHS' RESULTS- FRENCH AND ITALIAN INCIDENTS. 



WHETHER the " war of movement " ever 
returns to the Western Front or not, it 
has returned with bitter irony in Russia, where 
once more, as in August and September 1914 
nearer home, every day marks the onward sweep 
of German hordes without, however, any splen- 
dour of resistance. The details of that advance 
will be found in their usual place. It is mentioned 



before Mr. Balfour spoke, it was well remarked by 
the leading journal that Count Hertling had been 
answered already by Mr. Wilson. The Foreign 
Secretary still further threw the Chancellor's and 
the President's arguments into sharp categorical 
contrast. He completed the exposure of Germany 
by setting her most recent acts against her pro- 
fessions. Out of her own mouth was she judged. 



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ROYALTY OK RATIONS : THE KING AND QUEEN'S MEAT CARDS. {Photograph by L.N.A.] 



here merely to note the quarter towards which 
the attention of the world has been chiefly directed 
during the period of our weekly precis. Fighting 
on the British and French fronts pursued its 
uniform course, and the reports were chiefly con- 
cerned with aerial combats and bombing raids. 
Another point of interest, scarcely secondary 
to, the German advance on Petrograd, emerged 
in the Reichstag speech of Count Hertling, and 
the immediate and crushing reply which it drew 
from Mr. Balfour in the House 01 Commons. 
These two speeches made an important con- 
tribution to history, and registered most signifi- 
cantly the attitude of the belligerents. The day 



" By all means," said Count Hertling, " restore 
Belgium. We do not want to stay there, but we 
must take care that it shall not become a jumping- 
off ground for enemy machinations." " When," 
asked Mr. Balfour, " was Belgium a jumping-off 
ground for enemy machinations ? " He went on 
to show that German care for economic freedom 
and frontier security were mere cloaks for schemes 
of commercial and territorial gain. Reviewing 
Hertling's quasi-acceptance of Mr. Wilson's great 
points settlement on principles of essential 
justice ; no bartering of peoples and provinces 
from sovereignty to sovereignty Mr. Balfour 
asked when German foreign or military policy had 



MarcS 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Part 91 I , 

~3 



recognised essential justice. He quoted Alsace- 
Lorraine, whose case Germany refuses to consider. 
As to the bartering of peoples and provinces, the 
Ukraine and Poland were sufficient answer. As 
regards the professed benevolent mission of 
Germany in the East, the prevention of atrocities 
and devastation, German policy in the West was 




THE FATE OF A GOTHA BROUGHT DOWN ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT 
THE WRECK OF THE MACHINE AS IT "CRASHED" UPSIDE DOWN. 
Official Photograph. 

entirely occupied with such acts the trampling 
underfoot of treaties, and of the very spirit of 
humanity itself. Finally, Mr. Balfour emphasised 
the dangers of premature negotiations. To begin 
them without a clear certainty of success would 
be " to commit the greatest crime against the 
future peace of the 
world." Diplomacy is 
not of the first import- 
ance at present, but this 
speech of Count Hert- 
ling's, like his last, has 
helped the Allied nations 
to understand German 
war aims. More usefully 
still, it has thrown light 
upon German peace aims. 
It also evaluates the 
War Lord's professed 
assent to Mr. Wilson's 
principles. 

While the voices of 
statesmen rang across a 
desolated world, the 
guns of the enemy 
roared, with somewhat 
increased vigour, across 
No Man's Land. The 
period opened with 
rather hotter German 
artillery-fire at Pas- 

schendaele, round Hill 70, and Lens, where raids 
on our lines were attempted without result. 
Similar conditions held in the Valley of the 
Scarpe, at Monchy, Gavrelle, Flesquieres, 



and Cambrai. The Ypres-Comines Canal, the 
Souchez region, and Armentieres saw similar 
operations. On the 25th the areas of chief 
activity were about St. Quentin and the points 
already named. On the 26th, Arras, FlesquieTes, 
and the sector north-east of Ypres were men- 
tioned as the scene of some hostile gun-fire ; but 
beyond that there was 
nothing of interest to 
report. On the 27th 
German raids were re- 
pulsed north-east of St. 
Quentin, near Bullecourt, 
and east of Vermelles ; 
and the artillery of both 
sides was active north- 
east and east of Ypres. 
The Canadians gave the 
enemy something to oc- 
cupy him and remember 
at Lens ; and, some 
hours later, the German 
guns awoke to consider- 
able liveliness south of 
Cambrai, south of the 
Scarpe, near La Bassee 
and Armentidres, and 
east of Ypres. Enemy 
infantry and transport 
came in for the atten- 
tions of our gunners near 
St. Quentin. The Cana- 
dians suffered no loss. Reports on the 28th an- 
nounced a successful raid by English troops on 
enemy trenches at Greenland Hill ; and another by 
Dorset, Lancashire, Manchester, and Scottish regi- 
ments south of Houthulst Forest, penetrating to a 
depth of 1 200 yards. Enemy artillery active at 




TO STAND BY FOR THE OPENING OF THE SPRING OFFENSIVE : BRITISH WESTERN 
FRONT TROOPS, AFTER A SPELL IN THE FIRE TRENCHES, RETURNING TO WAIT 
AT A REST CAMP. [Official Photograph.] 



Havrincourt and south of the Scarpe ; both artil- 
leries east of Ypres, at Zonnebeke ; also south-east 
of Armentieres and St. Quentin. Our men made 
a successful raid at Gonnelieu (Cambrai front). 



. r 

|_ 



Part 91 1 

New Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 6. 1913 



After a clay or two of indifferent weather for 
flying, our airmen got to work again in force on 
Feb. 26. Long-distance reconnaissances, photo- 
graphy, and artillery-observation were carried out 
with success during all the hours of daylight. 
Railway works at Courtrai, Douai, and Valen- 
ciennes, and aerodromes and billets north of 




DURING ONE OF THE DAILY BOMBARDMENTS ON THE WESTERN 

FRONT, WHILE WAITING FOR THE COMMENCEMENT OF THE SPRING 

OFFENSIVE : BRITISH GUNNERS LOADING AN 8-INCH HOWITZER. 

Official Photograph. 

Douai, received four tons of bombs. Many severe 
air-combats took place. In these the very strong 
west wind greatly favoured the enemy's machines. 
Fourteen German machines were accounted for 
in combats between 'plane and 'plane, while a 
fifteenth was brought down by anti- 
aircraft gun-fire. Eight of our ma- __^_ 
chines failed to return. On the night 
of the 26th-2yth our aviators dropped 
half a ton of bombs on barracks and 
railway stations at Treves, and one- 
and-a-half tons on an aerodrome near 
Metz. All the British machines re- 
turned safely, after having fought 
and brought down a hostile unit. 

Between Dec. 5 and Feb. 19 thirty- 
five aerial raids were made over Ger- 
man territory, and twenty-two tons 
of bombs were dropped, doing enor- 
mous damage to military works, muni- 
tion-factories, railways, aerodromes, 
and billets. The destruction of obser- 
vation-balloons by our airmen is re- 
garded by the French as "significant." 
The enemy will need all his eyes in 
the coming struggle. Garros and 
Marchal, the great French airmen, 
have escaped from a German prison. 

On the earlier of the days in 
question, the French reported fairly 
heavy artillery duels on the Aisne, Champagne, 
and Verdun fronts. On the 25th the gun-fire 
continued in Champagne, particularly in the 
Tahure region, and was very lively also in Upper 



Alsace. On the 26th the artillery activity was 
" marked " on both sides, north of the Chemin 
des Dames, on both banks of the Meuse, at 
Hill 304, the Mort Homme, Beaumont, and Chani- 
brettes. On the ayth the fire was violent on the 
Meuse. On March i a heavy German infantry 
attack on the Chemin des Dames was repulsed. 
The record of the infartry in- 
cluded a dashing penetration on the 
24th of enemy elements at Pont 
d'Anspach and Anspach-le-Bas, in 
Upper Alsace. The raiders burned 
enemy works, inflicted casualties, ard 
brought back prisoners. On the 25th, 
near Urcel, on the Ailette, our Allies 
performed a similar exploit. On the 
26th there was no infantry action. 
On the 2yth they beat off two strong 
enemy raids on the Chemin-des- 
Dames and the Butte-du-Mesnil. 
Enemy aeroplanes bombarded Nancy 
on the night of the 26th-27th, and 
killed a few civilians. On the 28th 
French patrols at Beaumont and in 
Lorraine took some prisoners. 

The principal features of the 
Italian struggle were lively cannon- 
ading, patrol actions, and the feel- 
ing of various points by attacking 
parties of the enemy. The gun-fire 
was liveliest from the Adige to 
Astico, in the Trentino, and moderate 
elsewhere. A British patrol caused 
the enemy considerable loss on the Piave, and 
between that river and the Brenta an enemy 
marching column was caught and dispersed 
by artillery. At Monte Asolone reconnais- 
sance parties were briskly engaged. Air-work 




DURING ONE OF OUR DAILY BOMBARDMENTS OF THE GERMAN 

WESTERN FRONT POSITIONS : BRINGING UP HOWITZER SHELLS FROM 

A BATTERY MAGAZINE. [Official Photograph.} 

was intense over the first lines. Railway stations 
at Mattorello and Primolano were bombed. 
The enemy again bombed Castelfranco, Mestre, 

and Venice. CONDON : MARCH 2, 1918. 



M. ch 6, 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



f Put 91 1_ K 
(.New Strtes. 5 




JMen who Carry TThcir Wvcs in TTbeir Rands. 



-A. 





A TRENCH "RUNNER" TAKING A MESSAGE: THREADING HIS WAY ALONG THE TRENCHES; STARTING. 



The "runner 1 in the linet is one of the indispensable people in 
the war, although, perhaps, but little is t*id about him. He is 
the company, or battalion, messenger, or orderly, for carrying com- 
munications between battalion or company headquarters along the 
trenches to any section with which communication is desired and 
there is no other medium available at the moment. The runner, 



as he takes the shortest and quickest way, has often, in consequence, 
on occasion to pass under fire across the open. In not a few 
cases runners have to take the greatest risks, carrying their lives 
in their hands with every chance palpably against them. Many 
unnamed heroes hare gone to their death while filling the r61e of 
a runner. [New Zealand Official Photographs.] 



- r ran i -i 

-(.New srii!l I 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 6. IMS 








I 



H ''Red Cross" Barge on a frencb Canal. 



&. 








TRANSPORT BY WATER : WOUNDED SOLDIERS BEING CONVEYED UPON A RED CROSS HOSPITAL BARGE. 

The Red Cross Hospital Barge is a form of transport peculiarly | for that reason is a curative influence of very real value. Our 
well suited for the conveyance of our wounded troops from the first photograph suggests with clearness that perfect order and clean- 
Front to the Base, where such a means exists. For transport by liness which in themselves must act as a sedative upon over- 
water, with its smooth method of progress, its simple and cleanly wrought nerves ; our second picture is cheering to look upon, for 
fittings and furniture, its attentive and well-trained nurses, is a the patients ore obviously thoroughly enjoying breakfast and ignoring 
sufficient contra* in itlf to the "stem alarums" of action, and the fact that they have been wounded. [Official Photograph*.} 



e. 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 




'Red Cross" Barge Carrying C&ounded in f ranee 





TRANSPORT OF TROOPS TO HOSPITAL : CARRIED BY RED CROSS BARGES IN THE WESTERN AREA. 



The waterways of France are being turned to valuable account in 
the transport of the wounded on the Western Front. The method 
is peculiarly suitable for such a purpose owing to the absence of 
all shaking or jolting such as must otherwise be sometimes inevi- 
table. Our first photograph shows a group of nurses and the 
doctor, standing on deck, with the Union Jack and Red Croat flags 



waving in the wind. The second picture it of one of the nursing 
sisters giving a light to one of her patients for his cigarette. The 
soothing influence of tobacco upon the wounded has never before 
been made so manifest as It has during the long course of this 
unprecedented war, and cigarettes have been smoked by the 
million with unfailing effect. [Official Photograph.] 




THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



TThe Boy Scout Movement in Serbia. 




SERBIA'S JOLLY BOY SCOUTS AND THEIR ATHLETIC EXERCISES : AT SWORD PRACTICE ; A BOXING MATCH. 

The excellent Boy Scout movement originated by General Baden- 
Powell has extended to many countries, and notably to Serbia, 
where, as our photographs show, the boys are of a fine, intelligent, 
and athletic type, and thoroughly enjoy their training. The 
presence of some little girls among the onlookers in uniform dress 
aor cs to indicate also the existence of an organisation akin to 



our Girl Guides. In this connection it is of interest to recall that 
there are several hundred Serbian boys and elder students in this 
country brought over by the Serbian Relief Fund to continue their 
education. They are at various British schools and Universities, 
and are very keen on all forms of outdoor games and sports. 
They have formed a successful football club. [Photos, by C.N.] 



March 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



f Tat 91 T__ 

(.New Series J 9 




for the Hrmy Dentists Corps: Cdomen dar-OTorhera 





AT THE ROYAL DENTAL HOSPITAL, LONDON : MODELLING "MOUTHS"; PRESSING AND FINISHING PLATES. 



Dentistry , an R.A.M.C. department which has come prominently 
forward during the war ; more than ever ijnce unirersal seryjce 
ho been retorted to in order to fill satisfactorily the ranks of our 
regiments. A we have illustrated in earlier issues, mobile dental 
surgeries on motor -yehicles are attached to military commands on 
all sectors of the front, and dental operators find hourly employ- 



ment as the surgery vans pa8 s f rom place to place, often close in 
rear of the trench lines. Army dental surgeries are also estab- 
lishe.l at base and rest camps. Meanwhile, at the Royal Dental 
Hospital, London, and elsewhere, women dental mechanics and 
mak;rs of appliances for dentistry hare their hands full of work 
in place of called-up men. [Photos, by Clarke and Hyde.} 



r PMI i 

|_New Sri 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 6. 1918 



futurism at the front. 





RECORDING THE WAR FOR FUTURE EYES BY FUTURISM : THE BOMBER AN OFFICIAL ARTIST'S DRAWING ! 



It was an Interesting experiment to send to the front as an official 
artist so noted a member of the modern school as Mr. C. R. W. 
Nevinson, two of whose drawings, from his Exhibition at the 
Leicester Galleries, are here reproduced. In a preface to his 
catalogue Mr. Nevinson discourses freely, and not without denun- 
ciation of others, on his own principles in art. " I have now 



attempted," he writes, "to synthesise all the human activity and 
to record the prodigious organisation of our Army. ... All of 
my work had to be done from the most rapid shorthand sketches, 
and often under trying conditions in the front line, behind the lines, 
above the lines in observation-balloons, over the lines in aeroplanes, 
and beyond them to the country at present held by the enemy. I 

\ContiTtutd 



March 6. IBIS 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



I tan 91 1 . 

UNew Series J '11 



Hn Official Hrtist's Impression of a Shell-Burst. 




METHODS APPLIED TO THE ILLUSTRATION OF MODERN WARFARE : A BURSTING SHELL. 
relied chiefly on memory, a method I learnt a a student in Paris 
and for which I am erer grateful, as Nature is far too confining 
nd anarchic to be merely copied on the spot. Though the followers 
of the ' Plain Art ' school always laid great stress on working 
directly from Nature, their work is none the less pure inrention 



marred by all manner of Nature'! accessories. An artist's business 



i to create, not to copy or abitract, and this can only be done 
when, after close and continuous obserration . . . Tisual know, 
ledge of realities is used emotionally and mentally in the creation of 
a work of art" [From the Exhibition uf 1'iclures by C. R. W 
Nevinson, one of the Official Artists on the Western Front; on view at 
the Leicester Galleries, Leicester SIM.] 



Part 1 I 
Vow Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 6. 191 S 




On the Olestern front in f ranee; labour Corps. 



FROM ENGLAND AND INDIA : CARTING HEAVY TIMBER IN A FOREST ; AN INDIAN SAWING SQUAD. 

" Labour Corps," so termed, soldiers of the Regulars are also 
employed in tree-felling and carting, as seen in the upper illus- 
tration. Squads of natives enlisted in India in connection with 
the Labour Corps are also in France. A party under a natire 
officer is seen in the lower illustration, starting out for wood- 
cutting with their two-handed saws. [Official Photographs.] 



"The Labour Corps," says a correspondent of the "Times," *'is 
at work all over the British war-zone in France, and on the lines 
of communication as well, and its staff has to keep touch with 
units some of which are very close . to that jagged edge of No 
Man's Land where the bayonet gleams and the barrage roars." 
They turn their hands to all sorts of work. In addition to the 




March 6. IBIS 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r fin 91 -] . , 
I New Series F ~ IS 



On the Qlestern front in f ranee: Chinese labour Corps. 





AT ONE OF THE CHINESE CAMPS : RATION-DISTRIBUTION TO THE COOLIES ; IN A WORK-SHED. 



China, which as a nation is at war with Germany, is represented 
in France by labour corps. As all-round workers the Chinese are 
excellent. They can handle stores, and do other things for -which 
reasonable intelligence and initiative are required, and make also 
useful coolies for piling or unloading heavy timber, etc., working 
for hours without tiring. The Chinese labourers in France are 



mostly recruited from the Northern provinces, and are sturdy and 
of good physique. They are docile and obedient, give little trouble, 
and do not get drunk or commit crimes of violence. Incidentally, 
as one Chinaman to European eyes exactly resembles another, to 
prevent personation on pay days the finger-print of every man, 
taken on enrolment, is checked by the payroister. [OfficM Photos.} 






Put 91 T 

[.MM Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 6. 1918 



ROMANCES OF THE REGIMENTS: XCI.-THE 12ra LIGHT DRAGOONS. 

PONSONBY'S CHARGE AT WATERLOO. 



THE 1 2th Light Dragoons, now the I2th Prince 
of Wales's Royal Lancers, was commanded 
at Waterloo by Colonel, afterwards Major-General, 
the Hon. Sir Frederick Ponsonby, who led the 
regiment in one of the most desperate and famous 
charges of that day. It was the second magnifi- 
cent charge in which 
Ponsonby had taken 
part, for at Talavera 
he had, as Major, been 
with the 23rd in an ex- 
ploit equally memorable. 
At Waterloo Pon- 
sonby was with Van- 
deleur's Brigade, and 
in Picton's Division, 
posted on the extreme 
left of the British in- 
fantry. It was getting 
on for twelve o'clock, 
when the Division was 
sharply attacked by 
the French, who were 
driven back after stiff 
fightirg. The repulse 
owed much to a splendid 
charge of a brigade of 
British heavy cavalry, 
commanded by Sir 
Frederick Ponsonby's 
cousin, the Hon. Sir 
William Ponsonby, who 
fell in the moment of 
his success. 




COMMANDING THE FIRST SERBIAN ARMY IN THE 

FIELD ON THE SALONIKA FRONT : GENERAL 

VASSITCH. [Photograph by C.N.] 



As the beaten French force retired, a fresh 
column, which had not previously come into 
action, con- 
tinued to 
press forward 
from the 
enemy's ex- 
treme right. 
The British 
left, just then 
in process of 
re-forming, 
was seriously 
threatened. 
Sir Frederick 
saw the dan- 
ger, but at 
the moment 
could not 
apply to Van- 
deleur for or- 
ders, as that 
officer had 
gone forward 
with the i6th 
Light Dra- 
goons, partly 
to protect his 




IN A TRENCH SECTION ON THE WESTERN FRONT WHILE HELD 
BY THE YORK AND LANCASTERS: A GAS-SENTRY AT HIS LOOK- 
OUT POST. (Official Photograph.} 



own brigade and partly to assist William Pon- 
sonby's heavies. The matter became urgent, 
for the new French attack had developed rapidly. 
It was very formidable. Frederick Ponsonby saw 
himself out-numbered. He had nothing in hand 
except his own regiment. He saw, however, that 

a defensive attitude 
would be fatal. Small 
though his available 
force was, he deter- 
mined, on his own re- 
sponsibility, to take the 
offensive without delay. 
The topography of 
Waterloo is well known : 
even the least expert 
reader can easily picture 
the two opposing ridges, 
with a small valley be- 
tween. The French had 
descended on their side, 
and were now in the 
hollow. On their left 
the enemy had the 
support of a body of 
Lancers; their artillery, 
posted on the rising 
ground in the rear, 
covered them with a 
hot and well-directed 
fire. Ponsonby's idea 
was to move forward at 
once and engage the 
French before they 
should gain the ridge on which he was stationed. 
Very quietly, he spoke to his men. He was 

never thea- 
trical, for all 
his dash and 
fi r e. "Be 
steady, the 
I2th, and do 
your duty. 
Form open 
column ! " 

The order 
was obeyed 
with the pre- 
cision of a 
field - day, 
and the I2tb 
moved off. 
The going was 
at first very 
heavy over 
the ploughed 
land soaked 
with the pre- 
vious night's 
t orre nt ial 
rain. At first 
the Light 

\Continttttt ovtrttaf. 






March 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Par! 91 
ew Series 



-\ . 
J" S 



In Readiness when Called On: Greek T>oops. 




r 



SOLDIERS OF THE REFORMED ARMY AT M. VENIZELOS' DISPOSAL : A BAGGAGE-MULE ESCORT. 



Ever since the abdication . ., A'-thdrawal elsewhere of King Con- 
stant ine, active measure* have been in progress In Greece under 
the auspice* of M. Venizelos and the Allied headquarters staff at 
Salonika to regenerate and reform the Greek Army. Some time 
previous to the abdication of the ex-King, the Greek Army was, 
at the requi-ti of the Allies, removed from its mainland garrisons 



into the Morea, beyond the Gulf of Corinth. During the past 
year the regiments have undergone a drastic reorganisation under 
the supervision of the Allies, and every effort has been made to 
convert the troops into an efficient force in readinest for even- 
tualities. Upwards of a quarter of a million excellent first-line soldiers 
of all arms should be available for M. Venixelos. [Photo, by C.A'.'j 



f Plrt " I 

8 LN Serin] 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 6. 1918 



Dragoons went slowly, but gradually mended 
their pace. The French guns were now taking 
deadly toll, but the I2th never wavered. Their 
desire was to be at the enemy with all speed. At 
last even discipline could not restrain their 
impatience. A little in advance of the leading 




WITH THE FRENCH ON THE SOMME FRONT: A MOTOR-PROPELLED 
GUN-CAR CAMOUFLAGED BY MEANS OF BRANCHES AND LEAVES. 
French Official Photograph. 

squadron rode an officer, who, in, obedience to the Colonel 

orders, was keeping the moderate pace Ponsonby head. 

desired in order to save the horses for the critical 

work that lay ahead. " Go along, Sir we '11 

follow you ! " the men shouted, and pressed 

hard on the squadron's leader's heels, thus 

throwing forward the left a little. 

The line was also slightly broken by MWMM 

the necessity of crossing a small 

road with high banks on each side. 

" Go along, Sir ; go along we '11 

follow." 

But the officer was not to be 
hurried. 

" Dress by the right, men ; dress 
by the right," he replied. " See 
where your Colonel is." 

At that moment Ponsonby 
was riding ahead, more to the 
right than in the centre of the 
advancing line. " Look to the 
right for it, lads ; look to the 
right." 

They picked up their dressing, 
and got a glimpse of their leader. 
" The Colonel, God bless him ! Ay, 
the Colonel ! " Many loud cries 
of regard and affection broke from 
the 1 2th as they came together, 
compact and steady once more, 
and curbing their eagerness until 



thus orderly and obediently in circumstances 
of the most trying kind against vastly superior 
numbers, and entirely unsupported by artillery. 
They were now suffering more severely from the 
French gun-fire, and had by accident been fired 
upon also by their own friends ; but they were 
not to be disconcerted. 

At last, just as they had re- 
ceived a terrific volley from the 
French infantry, Ponsonby let 
them go. They went at it " hell 
for leather," dispersed the enemy 
column, together with the sup- 
porting French cavalry, and drove 
the whole force, shattered, back 
into Napoleon's lines. 

The melee, one of the hottest in 
the annals of war, cost the izth 
dear. Ten minutes later they re- 
formed their ranks sorely thinned. 
Barely two squadrons remained of 
the three that had plunged into 
the opposing mass of the enemy. 
Ponsonby himself was missing. 
Terribly wounded in both arms, 
he had lost control of his horse, 
which galloped forward with him 
to the crest of the French posi- 
tion. Several of the lath gave 
anxious chase, in vain. On the 
top of the ridge, a sabreur cut 
down with a slash across the 



When he was reported missing, the survivors 
of the I2th were frantic. Ponsonby's own groom, 
weeping bitterly, rushed forward to the search, 
and only gave it up, far on in the enemy's lines, 







CAMOUFLAGED WITH PAINT AND POSTED UNDER COVER AMIDST 
CAMOUFLAGED SURROUNDINGS: A FRENCH ANTI-AIRCRAFT GUN'S 
LURKING-PLACE. [French Official Photograf,.. 1 - 



Ponsonby should call on them for the great 
effort. 

An eye-witness has said that no more beautiful 
sight could be imagined than this regiment, 
devotedly attached to their Commander, proceeding 



when the French skirmishers drove him away. 
But Sir Frederick still lived. The story of his 
fearful night on the field, "and his miraculous escape 
from death, has already been told in these 
romances. 



March 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 




forerunners of the Grand fleet: Cdar-Ships of HU Hges. XXI. 




!i 



ONE OF OUR LAST SINGLE-TURRET BATTLE-SHIPS: THE "VICTORIA," ADMIRAL TRYON'S FLAG-SHIP. 
Th "Victoria" it the ill-fated battle-ship that capsized with 
d.sastrou* loss of life after collision with the "Camperdown," while 
flying the flag of Sir George Tryon. She, and her sister ship, 
the "Sans Pareil " (which lasted until just before the "Dread- 
nought " era), were our two last single-turreted battle-ships. They 
closed a series of seagoing single-turreters which began with the 



"Rupert" of 1872, and was continued in the "Hero" and 
"Conqueror " of 1882. AN were, from first to last, comparative 
miscarriages of design. The "Victoria" (launched in Jubilee year, 
1887) and "Sans Pareil," as the sister snip was called, mounted 
only two heavy guns no-ton, l6'5-inch pieces, both in one forward 
turret. An elongated superstructure filled the space aft. 



f Hn HI "I 

"* TN - 



v> Satin J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 6. 1918 




Behind the f rench front : TThe Chinese Labour Contingent. 






ON THE CHINESE NEW YEAR'S DAY AT A CAMP : JUGGLING AND STILT- WALKING DISPLAYS. 

Hundreds of Chinese labourers have crossed the seas and are hard 
it work doing civilian war-tasks of various sorts behind the battle- 
front In France. Many are skilled mechanics and carpenters, and 
are clever and capable in mechanical jobs in the munition fac- 
tories, A large number of the Chinese are employed as wood- 
cutters in certain forestal districts, while others are in daily and 



nightly employment as charcoal-burners. They are quartered in 
camps and cantonments in villages and by small towns in the 
neighbourhood of their work. At one of these the photographs 
on this and other pages in the present issue were taken during 
the celebration of the Chinese New Year. Their New Year's Day 
falls on our February n. [Official Photographs.] 



Mirch 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r fun <>i -, 

I New Scries I** 




Behind the f rench front : TThe Chinese Labour Contingent. 




CHINESE NEW YEAR'S DAY IN CANTONMENTS : DUMB-SHOW LOVE-MAKING DURING A PROCESSION. 



Th Chinese in France gave themielves up on February it, the 
Chinese New Year's Day, to amusements and entertainment! luch 
u they would have had at home. In >ome camps the; went in 
lot one kind of display ; in others, they had other kinds. At one 
cantonment, as the above illustrations show, put of the day was 
given up to an open-air procession with performers acting incidents, 



more or less of a dramatic nature, such as those here seen. The 
great boon of the occasion, in all the camps, was this, as a corre- 
spondent notes : " That night they were permitted to gamble, and 
most of them indulged in their ruling passion to the exclusion of 
sleep ; yet at 7 o'clock next morning they were on their way to 
work as cheerfully as usual." [Official photographs.] 



20 [N.^'s.ri.sl THE ILLUSTRATED 




Hrmy Comrades, Brothers in the fight for the 





- 



* 



AT AN AMERICAN PORT OF DISEMBARKATION IN FRANCE : THE MORNING ARRIVAI 

Troop of the United States have been for a considerable time holding a section of the French front, and a number of them recently 
engaged in their first infantry action, a successful trench-raid at Chevregny, in the Ailette district, north of the Chemin des Dames, 
on February 23, which will thus be a memorable date in their history. A Reuter message said : " Certain additional units of 



EWS. Mwch 6. 1918.-[ N .rss]-21 



c Great Cause": U.S. Ooops at a frencb port. 




IOTOR-LORRIES BRINGING LABOUR COMPANIES EMPLOYED IN DISCHARGING CARGOES. 



American troops have been in the line for tome time at the Chemin des -Dames for instruction. . . . The American units have 
suffered but slight casualties since their entry into the line, where they were greeted by the French General, a hero of the Battle 
of the Marne, as 'Army comrades, brothers in the fight for the same great cause.'" [Drtum on the s/>of by L. Satxittur.] 



fHE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 6, 11118 



In Bombarded Rheims: Ht the hotel de V.Ue. 




SAFE AMID WRECKAGE 

The Hotel de Ville of Rheinu has to * large extent shared the fate 
<A the Cathedral from the shells of the Germans. With its lofty 
campanile tower it offered a long-range target which the enemy 
were not slow in taking evil advantage of ; with general results 
shown in the illustration. The building was begun early in th 
seventeenth century, its architecture being in the Renaissance ityle. 



THE GREAT GALLO-ROMAN MOSAIC IN THE ARCH/EOLOGICAL MUSEUM. 

It served the double purpose of the City Guildhall, and the city 
library, art gallery, and museum. In the museum, among the 
other collections, was a large archaeological section in which were 
displayed numerous Gallo-Roman antiquities, local "finds." One 
notable exhibit is shown here being inspected, a large Roman 
mosaic 35 feet long by 36 feet wide. (French Official Photograph.} 



Mich 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



f fwi :il 
I New Seru-, ) 



In Bombarded Rhcims: Ht the fiotel de Vtlle. 




AS AT VENICE : THE SAND-BAG SCREEN WHICH HAS PROTECTED THE GALLO-ROMAN MOSAIC TREASURE, 



By way at safeguarding AS well as poMible from damage by German 
shells the specially interesting archaeological treasure in the museum 
at Rheims Hctel de Ville, the large Roman mosaic (which is seen 
exposed to Tiew during a recent inspection elsewhere in this issue), 
the elaborate precaution shown above was adopted. As ha* been 
done at Venice and in other Italian cities to protect artistic master- 



pieces or historic monuments, so at Rheims, a sand-bag screen was 
built in front of and round the great mosaic slab. The screen 
was firmly compacted against the wall, and supported and reinforced 
by stonework courses below. The sand-bags were stacked in rows, 
each several sand-bags deep, and the screen built up so as to 
cover the entire face of the mosaic. [French Official Photograph.} 



. r Pirt l 1 

*-LNew Series J 



FHE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



NUreh 6. HHS 



TTuscania" Survivors in a British Camp 




U.S. TROOPS SAVED FROM THE " TUSCANIA " : MARCHING THROUGH CAMP 



It will be recalled that the transport "Tuscania," of the Anchor 
Line, was torpedoed recently off the Irish coast while conveying 
United States troops to Europe. Out of a total on board of 2235 
(including 2030 U.S. officers and men, with the crew and passengers), 
there were 2069 saved by British destroyers. Many of the American 
voldiers were landed in Ireland, and some in Scotland. Later a 



A GAME OF CHEQUERS. 
number of them arrived in London, and went on to another 
destination. Our photographs show them in camp "somewhere 
in England," recuperating and refitting. In the upper illustration 
they are seen marching into camp behind the Stars and Stripes ; 
in the lower one some of the men are shown playing a game of 
chequers in an American Y.M.C.A. hut. [Photos, by Topical.] 



M.rch 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Part l -1 _, 
LNew SertesJ" 25 



H Great Stimulus to Hmerican Recruiting. 





TUSCAN1A" SURVIVORS IN ENGLAND : AT DINNER ; THE SENIOR OFFICER (RIGHT) AND 2ND IN COMMAND. 

action. "It was to be foreseen," said the "New York World," 
" that as the result of the sinking of the ' Tuscania ' by a German 
submarine recruiting would be immediately stimulated. At erery 
point the U-boat ruthless campaign is destined to react upon 
Germany. It brought the United States into the war ; it keeps 
the fighting spirit of the nation at white heat." [Plu#os. by Topical.] 



The Germans were under the delusion that the sinking of the 
"Tuscania" would damp the ardour of the United States. It had 
the opposite effect, and proved, like the air-raids on this country, 
a strong spur to the national determination. One has only to 
look at the fine, resolute faces seen in these photographs to under- 
stand that such would be the natural consequences of Germany's 



_! Part ' 1 

e ~t_New Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 6. 1918 



THE NEW WARRIORS: XXII- BEAU BRUMMELL, P.C. 



DIDACUS looks like the eternal Mr. Pickwick, 
and feels like Ishmael at least, the latter 
part is his idea of it. " Every man's scowl is 
turned against me," he insists ; " and they make 
most lacerating jokes about me in revues." All 
the same, he has great power, and can use it for 
the ends of human progress ; before the war 
t here was a particular guild of mottled sarsaparilla- 
joloured glove which, 
with all the fervour 
in his soul, he tried 
to prevent the British 
nation from wearing. 
Now, when he sees 
that sign of national 
degeneracy, he merely 
says " Your name and 
regiment, please ! " 

You may have 
gathered it Didacus 
is A.P.M. 

One hears a lot 
about A.P.M. ery, but 
very few have ever 
plumbed its depths or 
analysed its spectra. 
Didacus says there 
is more in it than 
merely tapping on the 
shoulder and murmur- 
ing plain chants about 
being improperly 




dressed. His job calls 

for great mental energy, unblushing tact, and 
late hours ; also, one has to make up one's 
mine 1 to join the murderer, the food profiteer, 
the Surveyor of Taxes, and the rest of the con- 
fraternity of really well-hated men from the 
moment one joins the clan. 



Didacus is O.C. all garrison military police ; 
under him is that swarm of red-hats who make 
the area so depressing for those who leave their 
passes at home on the hut (or tent) dressing-table 
" be haccident." He sends his red-hats out in 
relays to keep sweet the streets of the town (or 
area), and, when they have gone a sufficient time, 
he dons his infinitely proper hat, and pulls on 

his ineffably correct 
gloyes, and, sallying 
forth, goes round and 
sees that his police 
are at it with zeal 
and correctitude. 

He and bis minions 
are scattered about to 
see that the general 
behaviour of all troops 
of all kinds is fit and 
proper ; that they 
cirry themselves with 
dignity ; that they 
comport themselves 
to civilians (and others 
of themselves) civilly ; 
that they are dressed 
properly, and all th.it 
sort of thing. If they 
are not as they should 
be if they are rowdy, 
untidy, or in any other 
way blobs on the fair 



TWO OF THE FIRST OF THE U.S. SOLDIERS IN FRANCE 

TO BE WOUNDED: STARTING OUT FROM HOSPITAL FOR 

A MORNING CONSTITUTIONAL. [Photograph by C.N.} 

fame of the Army 

they are " for it." They are stopped ; their name, 
number, and regiment are taken ; and in the course 
of the day the details of man and " crime " are 
sent along by Didacus to the Regimental office, 
and C.B. and the rest are the portion of the guilty. 
If the wrongdoer protests with physical vigour, 

(.CMMHtud mrlt*/. 




BROUGHT OVER WITH THE U.S. ARMY EXPEDITIONARY FORCE IN FRANCE : POWERFUL AMERICAN 
LOCOMOTIVES WAITING TO PROCEED NEAR THE FRONT.-[0^cia/ Photograph.} 



March 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR HEWS. 



Pan 01 

OW Serie 



-i ,_ 

s J 27 



Slith the french Hrrny on the Italian front. 





FRENCH SECTOR 



IN A 

For upwards of three months now the French reinforcing army in 
Italy, despatched after the Italian disasters beyond the Isonro, has 
been in position on the sectors it took over. Both British and 
the French Auny contingents were in yccupation ol their positions 
well before Christmas last, and since tfien they have been able at 
leisure to consolidate those positions. As will be remembered, it 



IN NORTHERN ITALY: INFANTRY RESERVES BIVOUACKING ; ON THE MARCH. 

fell to the French to carry out a daring and brilliantly successful 
stroke on the Northern Italian front, which deprived the enemy of 
one of their most threatening mountain strongholds. The outcome 
of the coup dt m:tiit has been a complete stoppage of the Austro- 
Crman thrust forward from the Trentino for several weeks.- - 
\llalwn Official Photographs.} 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 6. 1918 



Didacus's lictors make no bones about him, and 
run him in determinedly. 

Didacus deals with officers also. The " im- 
properly dressed " officer is " marked over," and 
a corporal sent in chase Didacus" wishes to 
speak to you, Sir." Didacus reprimands in a 
hurt , voice over the absence of gloves (two), or 
the rake of a cap, or the colour of breeches, 
suggests means of leading a blameless life for the 
future, and, in grave cases, takes name and 
address. The more unpleasant crimes of officers 
come under his jurisdiction also, and he deals 
with them even, should that be necessary, to 
removing the offender in a taxi. 

He has the right to enter theatres not as a 
deadhead, but as the depositary of law and order. 
He is there to see that the military element is 



He overlooks the law-abiding spirit in regi- 
mental canteens and in camps, putting his foot 
down heavily on all disorder. He tackles cases 
of theft in camps, and by bis vigilance helps to 
purge them of the petty robber. 

He and his men watch stations, the incoming 
and the outgoing military men who have to 
produce their passes and travelling warrants to 
prove that they have a right to go where they 
want to go, and are not trying to steal a march 
on the regulations, or even absenteeing themselves. 
He is ever on the search for deserters, both in the 
stations and in the street, and when he finds 
them he arrests 'em, puts them in his guard-room, 
and either provides or obtains an escort to take 
the miscreant back to his regiment. 

If he deals .with prisoners and he frequently 




THE PRINCE OF WALES, DUKE OF CORNWALL, DURING HIS TOUR IN THE DUCHY: H.R.H. AND PARTY, 
IN MINERS' HELMETS AND DRESS, COMING UP FROM VISITING A WOLFRAM-MINE. 



Pltolograph 

acting as an audience should, and not turning 
melodrama into 'Bolsheviki peace, meetings, or 
dinning the air with cat-calls and other things no 
actors really like, or rendering discordant pro- 
menades and buffets and is, in fact, behaving 
itself with decorum. He can enter the gilded 
caravanserai and the humble pub. to satisfy 
himself that order is being preserved, that 
regulations are being kept, and that at places 
where drink may not be served it is not being 
given to men who have no right to take it. He 
can enter dance-halls and sweep them clean of 
khaki, if the_ regulations are against that decorative 
effect in that place ; and he can walk or break his 
way into gaming-houses, and make it most 
unpleasant for any military body foolish enough 
to be therein. He can put his veto on any place, 
and can eliminate the questionable premises by 
a word against which there is no redress. 



by S. and G. 

does it is part of his duty to inspect regimental 
guard-rooms and cells, and any prisoners they 
may contain, and to satisfy himself that the former 
are fit for deceit incarceration, and are thoroughly 
seemly and hygienic in all respects, and that the 
latter are being well looked after. 

In order to comport himself as a really gilt- 
edged A. P.M. should, Didacus has to bristle 
Military Law Military Law, not Martial I.aw : 
the things aren't the same at all. The former 
deals with soldiers only ; the latter with the 
whole of the population, civil as well as military. 
Another point is that Didacus can, if he likes, 
attend courts-martial, if his own interests and 
inclinations dictate that course a privilege he 
shares with the courts - martial officers, who 
can do this by a divine right. Didacus is a 
sort of Chief of Police with a Beau Brummell 
touch. W. DOUGLAS NEWTON. 



March 6. 11>: 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Part l ) 
NW Seiiesj 




H Regimental Mascot with a Battle Memento. 





" THE RESULT OF A SHELL-BURST " : NANCY 
Th regimental pet, or mascot, of a battalion from South Africa 
now serving on the Western Front in France, beari, as teen here, 
it, own battle-tear, or memento, like any veteran. "Nancy," as 
the mMCOt t> called, hai, it will be observed, one of her horns 
displaced bent right forward in adTance of the animal's brow, 
instead of being in its natural position, upright above the forehead, 



FROM SOUTH AFRICA AND HER DAMAGED HORN. 

as is the case with the other horn. As stated on thf back of the 
photograph, the deformity is "the result of a shell-burst." It is 
also added that Nancy has been under fire in seveial battles, and 
has come through unscathed, except for the displacement referred 
to. On that occasion, happily, she suffered no other injujy or 
inconvenience. [Official Photograph.] 



f Part HI 

<>~ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 6. 191 b 




The enemy's dar on Italian Hrt Treasures. 




SHATTERED BY ENEM V BOMBARDMENT : RUINED WORKS BY CANOVA , REMOVING A DAMAGED STATUE 

In* world Of art ha* nA.-f1 Ji LI- t 



The worm of art ha, suffered deplorable loe, by enemy action in 
taly. Wntmg from Milan recently, a "Chronicle" correspondent 
During the memorable retreat from the Isonio 42 truck- 
loads of treaiure were got away ufely to thi. side of the Piare 

by dmt of feveri.h toil Dapite their vaunted culture the 

erman invader,, who outwitted their AuMri.n ally by carrying off 



to Berlin in two month, whatever of value remained in Cividale 
Udme, and the re,t of the occupied territory, further destroyed of 
et purpose not only the celebrated temple of Canova at Possapio 
but also the Villa Soderini at Nervesa, well known a, cont.ininf 
T.epolo fre,coe,. The German, kept the whole place under con- 
tant fire." [Italian Official Photographs.'! 



March 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 




On the frcnch eastern front: In Liberated Hlsace. 









AT A VILLAGE FESTIVAL : A FRENCH VETERAN OF 1870 ; ALSATIAN GIRLS AND GAS-MASKED BOYS. 



Err lince, early in the war, the French made their victorious 
thrust into Alsace and liberated whole districts, the people generally 
hare eagerly looked forward to the hour of complete emancipation. 
The people of the Tillages lose no opportunities of testifying to their 
attachment to France and constantly make public displays of their 
loyalty, as here shown. In the centre of the group is a Teteran 



of the war of 1870 wearing his medals. The girls are in Alsatian 
dress, while the boys masquerade in captured German gas-masks. 
Apropos to that it may incidentally be noted that now the Germans 
And the gas of the Allies more efficacious than their own, they 
are putting out "feelers," i'i',i neutral sources, against the future 
use of gas. [French Official Photograph.} 



Mr Part VI 1 
T.New Serin J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 6. 1918 



On the British CKcstern front: Ordnance Repairs. 




AT A FIELD WORKSHOP: A RECOIL-CYLINDER SPRING OPENED OUT; "ASSEMBLING" A REPAIRED GUN. 



Only hopeless incurables, practically, among our guns at the Front 
are ent to England (or repair. Unless a gun is so damaged in 
ction, or so broken down in it mechanism, that only the resources 
of a home arsenal such as Woolwich, li:swick, or Barrow can 
remedy the defects, its "cure" is undertaken at the Front, in one 
of the numerous field repair-workshops. These nowadays abound, 



some quite close up to the lines and near the railway lines and 
main highways near the battle-area, so that transport can be managed 
with the least expenditure of haulage and of time. Ey appliance 
for repair is stocked, and a highly trained staff do the work. The 
jobs ha always to be carried out at high pressure, for fresh repairs 
from one place or another are always coming in. lOtfcial Photos.} 



M,rch 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



C Part SI 1 
New Sire J 




In Our ]Sevo CKcstcrn front Sector. 





A NIGHT GLIMPSE AT THE ENTRANCE TO AN OFFICERS' DUG-OUT : A COSY, FIRE-LIT INTERIOR. 



"It was reTMled a few weeks ago," wrote Mr. Philip Gibfos in a 
recent letter from the Wr Correspondents' Headquarters in France, 
"that we had taken over from the French a part of the line round 
about St. Quenttn, in order to liberate some of the troops of our 
Allies for operations elsewhere. . . . This ground is different in 
its nature from the old battlefields, and is still sweet and clean from 



the absence of continual gun-fire. Our men who came to take 
it over from the French men who had been in the mud and 
fire of Flanders stared around them and said : ' This seems like 
Paradise.' . . . From points of vantage one can look straight 
across to the German lines, where the Hirer Oise and its cmnal 
are in the marshes." [Official Photograph.] 



- . t Han 111 "I 
34 UNr Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 6. 1918 



WOMEN AND THE WAR. 



THE Women's Exhibition held at Harrod's 
recently was, amongst other things, designed 
to impress upon those women who have not 
hitherto been engaged on work of national 
importance that the country had need of their 
services. 

Women's Day, to be held on March 22, has a 
different object. It is meant to bring home to 
those who, by reason of domestic ties, age, health, 
or other causes, are prevented from themselves 
enlisting in the women's army the necessity of 
providing suit- 
able means of 
recreation for 
those who can 
and do. No 
organisation 
has done better 
or more useful 
work in this 
direction than 
the Young 
Women's Chris 
tian Associa- 
tion. " Waacs " 
and " Wrens," 
clerks, chauf- 
feuses, typists, 
and munition- 
workers by the 
hundred would 
be the first to 
acknowledge 
their indebted- 
ness to the re- 
creation huts 
and clubs 
which the 
Association has 
opened all over 
the country in 
areas where 
large numbers 
of women are 
engaged in war 
work. As the 
number -of 
women workers 
increases and 
it becomes 
larger every 
day the need 




AN APPLICANT TO THE BENCHERS OF THE MIDDLE TEMPLE: 

MISS HELENA NORMANTON, B.A. 

Despite the remarkable impetus which the War has given to what is generally termed 
the Woman's Movement, It is curious, and will be very disappointing to many, to 
know that the application of Miss Helena Normanton, B.A., a University Extension 
lecturer, and speaker on social questions, to the Benchers of the Middle Temple, for 
admission as a student of the Inn, has been refused. '^Photograph by L.N.A.] 



for these 
" huts " grows with it. At the moment there is a 
demand for twenty-eight hu^s or clubs in France ; 
England wantfi at least a hundred ; from various 
munition areas comes the cry for ten, and twelve 
more are wanted in London alone. 

Women's Day is to be the culmination of a 
week's effort to raise the 183,000 that is required 
to carry on the necessary work, and will be the 
final day of Blue Triangle Week, during which 



especially organised " teams " will " work " the 
West End in quest of funds. 

Women have been promoted to posts of high 
responsibility during the last three years ; but, 
so far, no woman is entitled to the prefix of 
Lieutenant, Captain, Major, or any other word 
indicating rank before her name, though some 
women are, in fact, graded as " officers," but 
without the privilege of using the title to which 
their rank entitles them. Though British con- 
servatism regards " rank " as a purely masculine 

affair, the Ita- 
lian military 
authorities 
take a more 
enlightened 
view, and two 
women Mrs. 
Mailings and 
Countess Hel- 
ena Gleichen 
are now the 
proud holders 
of the honorary 
rank of Major 
in the Italian 
Army. 



Few women 
have had more 
thrilling war 
experiences. It 
was in April 
1915 that the 
two women 
took up the 
study of radio- 
g r a p h y in 
Paris, with a 
view to serving 
as X-ray opera- 
tors. For six 
months they 
applied them- 
selves to their 
task, working 
often from 
eight in the 
morning until 
ten o'clock at 
night. To 
evolve mobile 
X-ray appari- 



tus .capable of standing the stress and strain 
of constant moving was the aext step. This, 
too, was successfully achieved ; and Mrs. Hall- 
ings and Countess Helena returned to London 
with the object of placing their services at the 
disposal of the British Army medical authorities. 
For six weeks or so they worked under Sir Thomas 
Gallwey, and finally offered themselves to the 
lords of Whitehall. But officialdom did not then 
hold enlightened views as to the value of women's 

[Cimtituud <n>fte<if. 



M.r:h 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



I'art 91 "I _. 
^ew SeriesJ ** 




Church and the T>oop8 on the (Hestern front. 






THE CONSOLATIONS OF RELIGION : ON THE WESTERN FRONT : A NURSE AT HER BROTHER'S GRAVE. 

" padre" in the war-areas conducting a service on the Western 
Front in France, before an altar built up of drums. Our second 
picture records a pathetic incident on the Somme battlefield a 
South African nurse placing a wreath upon her brother's grave, 
the Padre, who was the boy's teacher at school, standing by. 



Not only has the Church, in its broadest sense, given many ministers 
of religion to the Forces men who have given up the duties of 
normal times to take their place side by side where danger 
threatens them every moment, but the solace of their ministrations 
j inestimable, where life is held at a pin's fee. Our first illus- 
ti*,n is of a padre ministers of all denominations arc called 



[Official Photographs.} 



... r Pan 91 "I 
38 (_ N e Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 6. 1918 



services. They had never before heard of a. woman 
radiographer, and were not disposed to be the 
first to give her a chance of proving her worth. 

. . . . 

But the Italian authorities, though no more 
experienced, were willing to make the experiment, 
and the two pioneers and their radiograph-car 




"WHO SWEEPS A ROOM " WOMEN AT WORK AT KINGSTON. 

The women of Kingston are being employed as road-sweepers, and are doing their 

work well. No doubt some at least of them remember the fine lines of George 

Herbert : " Who sweeps a room as for Thy laws. Makes that and th' action fine." 

Photograph by Illustrations Bureau. 

soon found themselves on the Italian front, not 
far from Gorizia, where for eighteen months they 
worked, subjected to almost incessant shell-fire. 
It was not all smooth sailing. For 
some time the new-comers were re- 
garded with suspicion amounting to 
positive distrust. There was even 
an idea that they might be a par- 
ticularly clever pair of German spies. 
But eventually their indisputable 
skill and the excellence of their work 
disarmed the most suspicious, and, 
when civilian motor drivers were 
withdrawn from service and re- 
placed by military ones, the Italians 
conferred field rank on the two 
Englishwomen, holding that it was 
unfair to give them the responsi- 
bility of commanding thirty soldiers 
unless they were at the same time 
given military authority to enable 
them to do so. 



" Majors " were obliged to take shelter in an 
artillery observation post. On another, when 
returning from a visit to an advanced post, bullets 
whizzed around overhead when a gap occurred 
in the houses. 

The Scottish Women's Hospitals are adding a 
fresh chapter to their already glori- 
ous history. The devoted work 
accomplished by the late Dr. Elsie 
Inglis and her band of devoted 
helpers in Serbia and Russia is fresh 
in the minds of most of us. The 
Serbs, at least, have not forgotten. 
What is more, the newly reconsti- 
tuted Jugo-Slav Division, about to 
proceed to the front, have asked for 
a unit to be again sent to their 
assistance. And the authorities at 
headquarters, appreciating the grati- 
tude that lies behind the request, 
have already despatched an aug- 
mented unit to the help of our 
sorely tried Allies. The command- 
ant is Dr. Annette Benson, who has 
been working for some time in the 
Cama Hospital at Bombay ; and 
the reorganisation and expansion of 
the new unit has been carried out 
on lines planned by Dr. Elsie Inglis 
herself not long before her death. 
The King and Queen showed their 
appreciation of the new effort being 
made by the organisation by per- 
sonally inspecting the Serbian unit at Buckingham 
Palace before its departure from this country. 
The King displayed the keenest interest in each 



Whilst working in Italy the two 
" operators " had as intimate an 
experience of war as any women 
could desire. An Italian field-hos- 
pital at the front is rather like a 
British advanced dressing - station, 
only more so ; and on more than 
one occasion it happened that, while X-ray photo- 
graphs were being taken at one end of the hospital, 
the other was being devastated by shell-fire. On 
one occasion shelling was so heavy that the two 




WAR-TIME: SOCIETY WOMEN AT A FOOD KITCHEN. 
The war is no respecter of persons, and has practically abolished differences of class. 
An instance of this is seen in our photograph of Lady Cleveland, the wife of 
Sir Charles Raitt Cleveland, K.C.I. E., being served with a jug of soup at the Maryle- 

bone National Kitchen. [Photograph by the Farringdoti Photo. Co.] 



individual member of the band, most of whom 
have already had experience of the difficulties ami 
dangers attaching to service with the army they 
are setting out to join. CLAUDINE CLEVP. 



March 6. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



P Part 91 -1 , 
LNew Series |~ 3 



T>ee-fdling on the British front in france. 





FORESTRY AT THE FRONT : FELLING TREES IN FRENCH WOODS ; BURNING STUBBLE ON TREE-STUMPS. 



Timber is, of course, required in large quantities at the Front 
for various purposes, such as the construction of buildings, dug-outs, 
and railways, and many goodly "fathers of the forest" have had 
to succumb to the exigencies of war. In a description (quoted 
Also on another page) of the new British line near St. Quenlin, 
Mr. H. Perry Robinson says : " Here it is a singularly peaceful 



country, showing little of the devastation of war, with villages and 
woods largely intact. It is for the most part rolling country of 
hill and hollow, studded with patches of woodland, as far as the 
wide, marshy area of the winding River Oise. Across the marshy 
area one can see in the south-east the great black mass of the 
vast Forest of St. Gobain." [Official Photographs.] 



,o f Part 91 
38 -[ NC Serii 



y 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



March 6. 1918 



YET ANOTHER HOSPITAL-SHIP SUNK -SUBMARINES AND SHIPBUILDING-AMERICAN 
DOCKYARDS HUSTLING -DIARY OF THE RUSSIAN TRAGEDY- JAPAN'S INTENTIONS- 

THE BRITISH BEYOND JORDAN. 



A NOTHER outrage on the high seas was 
\ committed by the Hun seamen at 4 a.m. 
on the morning of Feb. 26. The hospital-ship 
Glenart Castle, formerly the Union -Castle liner 
Galician, was torpedoed and sunk in the Bristol 
Channel. The vessel remained afloat only seven 
minutes after 
being struck. 
Her comple- 
ment was 5 
doctors, i ma- 
tron, 7 sisters, 
2 chaplains, 
42 R.A.M.C. 
orderlies, 4 
o ffi c er s, 5 
engineers, a 
crew of 115, 
and Captain 
B u r t. No 
patients were 
on board. 
Twenty - two 
s u r v i vo r s 
reached Swan- 
sea, after a 
miserable ex- 
perience in a 
boat from 4 to 
10.30 a. m.., 
when they were 
picked up by 
an American 
destroyer. Of 
the rest no 
news had been 
received at the 
time of writing. 
Naval air- 
craft were busy 
during the 
week on enemy 
positions in 
Belgium. Oos- 
tacker Aero- 
drome, Bruges 
Dock, Engel 
dump, and 
Abeele Aero- 
drome were 
bombed with 
good results. 

At Engel 
dump a fire 
was started. 

safely. 

The submarine returns again marked an 

increase ; 14 large vessels (against 12 for the 




THE RUSSIAN BOLSHEVU 



AMBASSADOR " IN LONDON : M. LITVINOFF ; 

AND HIS WIFE. 

It was stated in Parliament on February 28 that M. Litvinoff had "given his promise 
to the Foreign Office to desist from Bolshevii propaganda work in this country." 
On the same day it was announced in the Press that the landlord of the offices in 
Westminster which M. Litvinoff used had terminated the tenancy in advance, and closed 
the rooms to M. Litvinoff, because of propagandist activities from that centre. Mme. 
Litvinoff, seen here, was a Miss Ivy Low, a niece of the eminent litterateur and 
journalist, Sit Sidney Low. She is herself a novelist. She was married to M Litvinofl 
in 1915. [Photograph by L.N.A.] 

All the British machines returned 



previous period), 4 smaller vessels (against 3), and 
7 fishing-boats (against i) made up the unhealthy 
record. For four consecutive weeks the figures 
show a steady rise in losses. Arrivals slightly 
lower ; sailings increased by 5. In the House of 
Commons Mr. Bonar Law, in reply to Mr. H. 

Samuel's criti- 
cisms, pointed 
out that, while 
our shipbuild- 
ing was in 1916 
only 516,000 
tons, in 19 17 it 
had risen to 
over 1,100,000 
tons. E 1 s e- 
where, interest- 
ing informa- 
tion was given 
regarding 
American ship- 
building. Great 
pla,nts have 
been laid down 
in the United 
States, and 
the word is 
" hustle." One 
yard expects to 
turn out 42 
merchantmen 
this year ; and 
another is to 
produce 67 
vessels mer- 
chantmen, des- 
troyers, and 
submarines. 
The largest 
yard has 52 
slipways, 
scheduled to 
produce one 
1 1, ooo-ton ves- 
sel every two 
days. The 
Americans 
have always 
had a special 
genius for the 
rapid driving- 
throughofhuge 
engineer i ng 
works, and 

this aptitude they are now to prove as never 
before. This year's building by the Allies i; 
estimated to exceed sinkings and leave a sur- 



plus. It is a salutary pill 



for Tirpitz. 

\Cont*nutd on fage 40 



March 6, 1918 



CHE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Part 91 . 
New Series J 



TTbe extension of the British front in f ranee. 




OUR LENGTHENING LINE: A REGIMENT WITH ITS 
The upper photograph shows a British regiment, with its goat- 
mascot, marching up to take over part of the French line, In 
the lower one a battalion commander is seen making his first t. 
ol inspection in trenches just taken over near St. Quentin. 
Describing the latter district recently, Mr. H. Perry Robinson writes 
" While the whole line is now generally quiet, nowhere is it quieter 



MASCOT-GOAT MARCHING UP ; A C.O. INSPECTING, 
than in the southern portion of our front, which we have recently 
taken over from the French below St. Quentin. ... The process 
of taking over was accomplished with complete smoothness and with- 
out a hitch, and, as always, the arrangements made by the French 
were admirable, and everything was done by our Allies to facilitate 
our settling down in our new quarters."-^'"' Photogmpks.] 



r Pan st ~\ 

l_New Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



March f. 1918 



The recent acts of the Russian tragedy, taken 
in order of time, were as follows : Feb. 24 The 
Bolshevists intimated their submission to Ger- 
many's peace terms namely, the cession of Cour- 
land, Livonia, and Esthonia ; the evacuation of 
Ukrainia and Finland ; the disbandment of the 








A GERMAN PILL-BOX BUILDER'S YARD, OR DUMP, CAPTURED INTACT : THE HAUL 
OF CONCRETE SLABS AND STEEL GIRDERS. [Australian Official Photograph] 

Russian Army ; the internment of Russian war- 
ships ; the stoppage of Bolshevik propaganda 
against the Central Powers. This surrender did 
not stop the German ad- 
vance. Feb. 25 The Ger- 
mans occupied Pernau, 
Dorp at, Reval, and Pskoff. 
No answer yet returned to 
the submission. Feb. 26 
News received that Pskoff 
had been " desperately de- 
fended." The Germans 
having refused an armistice, 
the Bolshevik leaders re- 
newed their frenzied appeals 
to the country to resist 
the invader. Feb. 27 Ru- 
moured stay of the German 
advance. Large Russian 
detachments said to be 
pouring into the Pskoff dis- 
trict. The Red Army of 
Workmen said to number 
100,000 volunteers. News 
of a German fleet moving 
towards the Gulf of Fin- 
land. The Russian sailors 
resolved to remain at their 
posts till the last minute. 
Japan, in the event of peace 
between Germany and Rus- 



The bullying of Roumania continued. Macken- 
sen and General Averescu held long negotiations 
without definite result. One million of Roumania's 
seven million people has died ; 14,000 Tran- 
sylvanians have been condemned to death for 
patriotic actions ; yet the nation has not lost all 
heart or hope. The King has 
not abdicated, as reported. 
Gun-fire north-east of 
Monastir and the further 
bombing of the Seres- 
Drama railway on Feb. 27 
\\-as the principal news 
from the Salonika front. 

In Palestine, on Feb. 25, 
El Kerak, at the south- 
eastern end of the Dead 
Sea, was bombed by our 
aircraft. On the 26th Brit- 
ish mounted patrols reached 
Rujm-el-Bahr, a small lake- 
port and depot at the north 
end of the Dead Sea, 2! 
miles east of the mouth of 
the Jordan. They took 
also the ford of Mandesi, 
10 miles from the Jordan 
mouth. Patrol encounters 
took place 2} miles north 
of Jericho, near Osh-el- 
Ghorab. The British are 
now " beyond Jordan." 

In Mesopotamia British 

patrols reached Hit, 95 miles west of Baghdad. 
From Hit Babylon drew the asphalt for her walls. 
Its bitumen wells, hot geysers, and smoky lime- 




A WESTERN FRONT TUNNELLING COMPANY'S JOB DONE BY NEW ZEALANDERS : 
BLOWING UP OVER 52 TONS OF DAMAGED SHELLS AND LAND MINES. 
New Zealand Official Photograph. 

sia, to take measures " of the most decided and 
most adequate character." Japan has consulted 
the Allies as to her co-operation in Siberia. 



works have led the Arabs to call Hit the " Mouth 
of Hell." The Turks made little resistance to 

the British advance. LONDON : MARCH 2, 1918. 



I LONDON : Published Weekly at the Office. 172, Strand, in the Parish of St. Clement Danes, in the County of London, by THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NP-WS AND SKKTCH. LTD, 
172. Strand, aforesaid j and Printed by THB IU.USTRJITRD LONDON NHWS AND SKETCH. LTD.. Milford Lane. W.C. 2 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 1918 
Entered as Second-Class Matter at the New York (N.Y.) Post Office, 1516. 



The Illustrated War Neu.3. Match 13, 1918. Part 92, New Ser.es. 




Illustrated War 





French Official Photograph. 
THE PROTECTION OF NATIONAL MONUMENTS IN PARIS AGAINST AIRCRAFT DAMAGE : 

THE BAS-RELIEFS ON THE ARC DU CARROUSEL HOUSED OVER. 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 13, 1918 



JAPAN'S FURTHER ACT/ON: INTERNATIONAL OPINION-THE PROGRESS OF HUN 

AGGRESSION-ROUMANIA CRUSHED OUT OF THE WAR FINE RAIDING BY AUSTRALIANS 

A SERIES OF NEAT EXPLOITS O0ST OF THE WAR TO DATE. 



ONCE more questions of international policy 
took precedence of the local struggles of 
armies, and the fdrther action of Japan in the 
world-war attracted the keenest public interest 
and speculation. Fears were entertaired in 
some quarters that pedantic discussions might 
sacrifice the golden 
opportunity, but 
the Eastern Empire 
held that she re- 
quired no mandate 
frorr the Allies to 
take the needful 
prec autionary 
measures. How- 
ever, the Japanese 
Government was 
anx'ous to have 
the general acqui- 
escence of the 
Powers concerned. 
Any such anxiety 
over undue delay 
w?s to a great ex- 
tent set at rest on 
March 6, when it 
was announced 
from Washington 
that the principles 
of Japanese action 
in Siberia had 




IN HONOUR OF GUNNERS WHO FELL AT VIMY RIDGE : 

UNVEILING A BATTLEFIELD MEMORIAL. 

The memorial was erected by the Canadian Aitille'y. Canon Scott is 

opening the ceremony with a hymn. On his left is the Canadian Corps 

Commander.- [Canadian War Records}. 



on the Trans-Siberian Railway deepened the con- 
viction that action was imperative, and it was 
also well understood that the intervention of 
Japan would have other impoitant effects upon 
the enemy's problem in Russia. President Wilson 
found in the project " no infraction of the prin- 
ciples which he 
has enunciated " ; 
while M. Pichon, 
in a statement to 
the Foreign Affairs 
Committee of the 
Chamber of Depu- 
ties, found the 
scheme " part of 
the duty of the 
Allies." It was, 
he said, " a ques- 
tion of check- 
mating German 
penetra lion , v/hich 
aims at destroying 
the balance of 
power in Asia." 
These clear indica- 
tions of inter- 
national assent 
pointed only one 
way, a.nd mean- 
while, pending defi- 
nite news of action, 




TAKING " NELL " TO HOSPITAL : CANADIAN ARTILLERYMEN HAULING A HEAVY GUN FROM A LIGHT RAILWAY 
TO A MOBILE ORDNANCE WORKSHOP. [Canadian War Record^ 



been agreed upon, although the details had still 
to be worked out. Further information as to the 
vast amount of war-stores accumulated at points 



it may be safely presumed that Japan h?s not 
been idle. Some were even bold enough to 
hint that some work was already in progress. 



March 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r pan 92 

LN 



ew Seri-ji j 



Be that as it may, Japan has never let the 
grass grow under her feet. At the right time, 
and in the right place, her arms will be heard of. 




SIR DOUGLAS HAIG AT A WESTERN FRONT CANADIAN 
CAMP : THE COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF INSPECTING THE GUARD 
OF HONOUR AT A CANADIAN DIVISION'S HEADQUARTERS. 
Canadian War Records. 

With less satisfaction, the friends of liberty 
viewed other political movements nearer home. 
Roumania, driven literally 
into a corner, decided on 
March 2 to accept the peace 
terms of the Central Powers. 
To that end a fresh armistice 
was granted, and the enemy 
intimated that the agreement 
must be signed before noon 
on March 5. On that day, 
accordingly, a preliminary 
treaty was entered into 
betwesn Germany, Austria - 
Hungary, Bulgaria, and Tur- 
key of the one part, and 
Roumania of the other part, 
agreeing to a further truce of 
fourteen days, within which 
peace was to be finally con- 
cluded. The main terms 
were the cession of the 
Dobrudja (an obvious gift 
to Bulgaria), demobilisation, 
support by Roumania with all 
its powers of the transport of 
troops of the Central Empires 
through Moldavia and Bes- 
sarabia to Odessa, evacua- 
tion of occupied territory, 
and large economic conces- 
sions to the victors. The eight articles are on the 
Huns' " seven for me and one for you " principle. 
Roumania receives, after being squeezed like a 
sucked orange, a guarantee that the Central 



Powers will maintain for her a trade route via 
Costenza to the Black Sea. Magnificent ! No 
more dismal consequence of the Russian faihue 
has arisen than this sacrifice of a gallr.nt 
nation, which has staked all and lost all for 
the Allied cause. Her plight is one more 
argument for that grim perseverance which 
will alone secure a day of reparation for 
Roumania and the other martyred countries. 
It was leportecl that the King's abdication 
was also demanded, together with the renun- 
ciation of the throne by his descendants. 

While kingdoms tumbled, Seibia and 
Montenegro reaffirmed their adherence to the 
cause of the Allies. 

In Northern Europe, as well as Southern, 
the foot of the aggressor continued active, and 
the jack-boot of the Junker came down upon 
the Aaland Islands ; but, mark you, in stiict 
benevolence. The islands are merely to be 
used "as a base for the purpose of helping 
the Finnish Government." Oh, matchless ten- 
derness of the Germans towards young and 
struggling republics ! Finland had sent " ap- 
pea.ls for help." Behold the Imperial Prussian 
the universal source of succour to the op- 
pressed ! He is on the spot, like one of his 
own commercial travellers. Nothing if not 
thorough, he has " negotiated " with Sweden, 
who might have a word to say. But 
" Sweden no longer raises objection." Accord- 
ingly., the Finnish Government will receive 
the " military assistance " it requested. And 
Germany, helping others, will help herself. 




CAPTURED AND WOUNDED DURING A TRENCH-RAID : A GERMAN PRISONER 

BEING CONVEYED BY STRETCHER TO A DRESSING-STATION. 

Canadian War Records. 



The wai, advancing on seven-league boots else- 
where in the wrong direction, remained practically 
stationary on the Western Front. Some sharpen- 
ing of activity on both sides earlier in the week was 



ran 92 1 
fv SeriesJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR .NEWS. 



March 13. 1918 



checked by bitter and stoimy weather. A 
successful raid at Aimentieres, and the repulse of 
hostile attempts near St. Quentin and Arleux-en- 
Gohelle, weie the chief earlier incidents. About 
the same time, another enemy raid near Pontruel 
(also in the St. Quentin region) led to fierce hand- 
to-hard fighting. The Australians at Warneton 
and at Gapaarc". (the latter 
east of Messines) delivered 
their attack with their usual 
dash and fire, killing fifty 
of '.he enemy and taking 
prisoners. Commonwealth 
troops also distinguished 
themselves south of Holle- 
bcke. At Passchendaele, 
Middlesex troops carpe off 
with prisoners ; and other 
raids at various points had 
a like result. Our men in 
every case gained their ob- 
jectives, and suffered only 
light casualties. The Aus- 
tralians were out again 
the following night, and at 
Warneton once more gave 
the Germans enough to do. 
They met with a stiff ic- 
sistance, but reached the 
second line, beat off two 
courter-attacks, and killed 
at least forty of the enemy. 
As before, the British casu- 
alties were light. During 
the same peiiod the enemy 
raided posts at St. Quentin 
and Epehy. 
On the 6th, -r: 
the British 
raided tren- 
ches east of 
Bull ecourt, 
and at points 
noith of the 
Scarpe and 
near Lens. 
South-east of 
Gouzeaucourt 
the enemy 
was beaten 
off with loss. 
On the 7th, 
hostile raids 
were checked 
at Ep hy 
and Poelcap- 
elle. Heavy 
artillery fire 
preluded a 
German pen- 
etration in 
thick fog 
near La 
Bassfe. Else- 
where the enemy was repulsed. Enemy artillery 
fire opened first west of Lens on the 3rd, and 
next day at dawn it had risen to " considerable 




" DUC1T AMOR PATRIAE " : AN AIR-RAID 
BADGE FOR BRAVE LONDON TELEPHONE 

GIRLS. 

The badge is given to girls who volunteer for duly 
in certain districts during air-raids. Several tele- 
phone girls were recently decorated with the Order 
of the British Empire. [Photograph by G.P.U.] 




In spite of 



THE "V.C. " PIGEON: A HEROIC EIRD OF WAR 
bullet-wound that broke its leg and drove the message-carrier into its body, 
this pigeon, despatched from the Front line near Merlin Road, flew on 9 miles and 
delivered its missive, dying soon afterwards. It is now preserved in the United Service 
Institution, Whitehall. [Photograph by Sport ami Central] 



activity," which covered a raid. On the 5th the 
enemy fire was rather lively between Flesquieres 
and the Scarpe. Our guns at the same time dis- 
persed hostile working parties. On the 6th the 
German guns were " more active than usual " 
On the 8th the enemy attacked near Houthulst, 
but was beaten back 300 yards beyond his 
original line, mainly by the 
Yorkshire Light Infantry, 

Our last account of the 
fighting on the French front 
held many indications that 
a phase of great activity was 
beginning, but to this the 
weather put a sudden end. 
'The Italian news up to 
March 7 was also of severe 
weather hampering opera- 
tions. Gunfire was general 
along the whole front, but 
the infantry fighting pro- 
duced no event of special 
remark. Air-work shared 
the prevailing disabilities, 
but the British bombed 
Austrian headquarters. The 
enemy admitted that we 
had during the past month 
done great damage to his 
aerodromes and machines. 

In the House of Com- 
mons on March 7 Mr. 
Bonar Law asked for a fur- 
ther credit of 600,000,000. 
The cost of the war to date 
was 6,000,000,000. To- 
wards this, 
1,000,000,000 
pounds has 
been contrib- 
uted by re- 
venue a 
noteworthy 
feat of fin- 
ance. Mr. 
Bonar Law 
reviewed the 
war hopefully. 
The great at- 
tack in the 
West, he held, 
would be in 
vain. He de- 
monstrated 
the uses of 
the Salonika, 
Palestine, and 
Mesopotamia 
campaigns. 

Late on the 
night of 
March 7 
enemy air- 
craft crossed 
the coast and attempted to reach London. 
The Germans estimate their dead in the war 
at 2,500,000. LONDON: MARCH 9, 1918. 




March IS. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



f fart 92 |_ . 

I. New serieij D 




H Railway HCr-Raid Shelter in parts. 




IN THE DENSELY POPULATED MONTMARTRE DISTRICT : THE APPROACH TO PIGALLE STATION. 



An underground railway tUtion air-raid shelter In a densely popu- 
lated quart of Paris, In the Montmartre district in the northern 
quarter of the French capital, ii ahown In the Illustration at lead, 
one approach to It down itept from the open. The nation in 
queetion i> that of Pifalle, on the Nord-Sud Railwar, tituated on 
the Place Pifalle, which, at touritti rUiting the hMoric cemeterr 



at Montmartre may remember, connects wHh the (ate of the 
cemetery by the thoroughfare of the Rue Pifalle. On "Alette," 
or warning elfnali being fiTen by iyrent on house roof* (at we 
hare previously illustrated), the fates at the foot of the stairs are 
opened to the public. A railway station, belonging to the Mitn, 
Is also on the Place Pifalle. [PMo. tiy Naesfaptr lUttstratwta.] 



-_[ I'm ! "I 
6 I New Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 13, 1918 




Our Slestern front Daytime Bombing Raids. 




ABOUT 

As official communiquts hare told us, not a few of the bombing 
raids of the Allies on the Western Front, both by British airmen 
and by the French, have been, and continue to be, carried out in 
broad daylight. Some have been on ammunition dumps and 
military centres behind the German lines, and on enemy aerodromes ; 
others on German towns, where there are munition-factories and 



barracks, as well as on railway junctions. As has been recorded, 
also, in some cases our airmen in bomber machines have descended 
to quite low altitudes, running the gauntlet successfully ot the 
German "Archies" and barrage-firing. In the upper illustration 
a big British "bomber " is seen in the foreground, with a "righting 
scout " near by used for escorting the bombers.- [Official Photos.} 



March 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



f PHH 92 1 
(.New Seri J~ 



Our dcstern front Daytime Bombing Raids. 





AFTER AND BEFORE A RAID : CAMERA EVIDENCE ; SERVING OUT A BOMBER'S AUTOMATIC GUN. 

reporter and auxiliary to the airman, who, in the ruh of carrjrinf 
out hif tpecial bombing tak, may find hinuell handicapped lor 
opportunitiea of detailed obterration or record- taking of damage done. 
An automatic gun is leen in the tecond illustration being handed 
out to the airmen of a bomber at the "gun-room" of a hangar, 
primarily for defentive use againit enemy airmen. [0/jif.i/ Plieut.] 



In addition to the written repoiti which bombinf airmen are 
required to make to headquarter oo returning from their raidl, 
in the cate, in particular, of daytime bombing.raidt, the airmen art 
called on to lurniih photographic evidence to the authorHiei of 
what they have done, wheneier it it pottible to take photographi. 
The camera proe ittell often an invaluable and indispensable 



. r prt n ~\ 

\ New MisJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 13, 1918 



dith the Chinese Labour Corps on the destern front. 



-A. 





PLAY-TIME IN CAMP : BRITISH SOLDIERS TEACHING 

The numerous gngs of Chinese cooliei who hire enrolled, with 
the unction of their Government, now at war with Germany, lor 
war-work in labour corps on the Wes>ern Front, are employed both 
by the French and ourselves on manual work of multifarious kinds 
behind the lines. They worls mostly on the fringe of the war-area, 
and are not sent anywhere within range of the enemy's fire. Arsenal 



CHINESE TO BOX ; SWORD-PLAY WITH STICKS. 

and munition-factory work, of the less intricate kinds, is done by 
many of the Chinese labourers in some parts of France, while hi 
country districts whole armies of them are busily occupied in wood- 
cutting, hut-building, and handicrafts, also many in charcoal burning. 
Soldiers attached to their camps find apt pupils at various forms 
of recreation, as shown above. [Official Photographs.} 



March 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



f PHrt 9) I - 
L New Series J 9 



Hn "Hce" of the frencb Hir Service. 





VICTOR IN 23 AIR FIGHTS : LIEUT. MADON, A FAMOUS FRENCH AIRMAN. BESIDE HIS MACHINE. 



Lieut. VUdon, on* of the crtck fighting pilott, known sometimes 
as "aces," ot (he French ariation serTice, ii emulating the exploiti 
o( Captain Cuynemer. By tht end of last year he had accounted 
for 19 enemy airmen, and he has tinea brought the total up to 93. 
He was at one lime interned in Swftsrland after a descent, tut 
he succeeded in eflectmf his escape, and has continued hi* vie- 



torious career. In our photograph he is seen standing in front of 
his machine, wearing Tarioua well-earned decoration*. Hit Croix 
de Guerre, H will be noticed, has been pinned on to his aeroplane, 
and is seen on the left in the illustration. There are about a dosen 
other French airmen who have brought down ten or more Germans. 
[Pluto, by Illustrations Buftau.] 



, I Kurt 2 T 
> ~|_N.w S.riesJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 13. 1918 



Coming Over and after Arrival a. S. Hrmy Incidents. 





U-BOAT AND GAS PRECAUTIONS : LIFE-BELTS . DURING A STAND-BY ; TRENCH GAS-MASK DRILL. 



On board ill transports, American and British, and also in pas- 
senger liners when traversing watr.r* where U-boats may be I rking, 
ail soldiers and passengers are inquired, by standing ,r,if ,, to 
put on Hie-belts. Thus, in the event of a vessel being juddtnJy 
totpedoed and sinking rapidly, the risk of confusion an buard <s 
reduced to a minimum. Undoubtedly, through the adoption of 



the precautjun, j great many lives in both transports and pastenger 
vessels liave bf-ti saved. In the second illustration, one of the 
gas-mask instruction drillt which ever; soldier ol the Allied Armies 
goes through is shown. An America:] soldier is seen proving the 
value ol the gas-mask by passing in Ins turn through a trench filled 
with gas, before comrades. [PJtoft* / . , v. 7 



March 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r fan M -1 , , 

I New Series I" ' ' 



In Memory of the first a. S. Officer Struck Down in f ranee. 








ON THE SPOT WHERE THE OFFICER WAS WOUNDED : A FRENCH MEMORIAL TABLET. 



The officer in question, D. H. Harben, u the memorial tablet notef 
(hit rank it not specified), was at the time last October a volun- 
teer with the French Army. Already, a> is common knowledge, 
a number of American regulars had landed in France, but had 
not yet been lent into the fighting line. The officer commemorated 
on the tablet wai one of the TOlunteert frojn America then serving 



"on their own" with French battalion*. For his heroism in 
action-- like most of the others of the American volunteer* he 
received the honour of special mention in French Army Orders. 
He was near the entrance of the dug-out seen, when he fell. 
The volunteers, or " legionnaires." all joined the American Army 
in France latt January. - [Photo, by Illustrations Hurt, in. 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 13. 1918 



On the British OTestern front. 





AT A BASE REMOUNT DEPARTMENT DEPOT-CAMP : FEEDING-TIME ; WATERING-TIME. 



A tht pages of "The Illustrated War News " bar witness to 
week by week, there is no end to the variety of multifarious army 
supply department! and establishments serving the needs of our 
force* at the Front. Every arm of the service, every kind of 
unit infantry, cavalry, artillery, engineers, transport, etc. is com- 
pletely provided for and fully equipped in this regard, and has its 



base and intermediate depots along all the lines ot communication 
between for the British armies the base-ports on the sea coast 
and the actual fighting front. These illustrations five glimpses in 
the lines of one of the British Base Remount Department depot- 
camps across the Channel. Animals collected from all over the 
world are stabled in the depot*. [Official Photographs.] 



March IS. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r pn n -| . , 

I New Sris |--13 




"Sammy" Brings in his first German prisoners. 





THE U.S. INFANTRY ON THE WESTERN FRONT : AN AMERICAN SOLDIER WITH PRISONERS. 



Th United Statel troojn en th WeMern Front recently experienced 
their fir* infantry action, with eucceiaful rttuHi. A Reu'er 
correspondent, decribini the incident, Myi : " A pattol o( the 
American force* in the Motor of the Chemin det Damn, cc-ooerttinf 
with a French patrol under a French officer, early on the moraine 
of February aj, oenetrated the German line on a front of a?eral 



hundred yardt, capturlnf two ofncen, twenty men, and a machine- 
pin. Tht Amer.cn tuflered no caeualtlea." They hare mince had 
turther fijhtinf and hare defeated wraral German attacks. American 
Uoop ire preaent at three polnti on the French front, one at the 
Chemin dea Damee and two in Lorraine. They hare been com- 
mended by a French General. [Drawn try J. Simon!.] 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 13. ISIS 



ROMANCES OF THE REGIMENTS: XCII.-THE SENIOR CORPS. 



A CURIOUS RENCONTRE. 



DURING the Napoleonic wars in 1804, to be 
precise an officer of the Royal Scots, 
temporarily attached to a West India regiment, 
had to make the voyage from Barbados to 
Trinidad on some official business. Among his 
shipmates was a Mr. Downie, a Scot abroad, whose 
career had been full of ups and downs. .In early 
life he had been a merchant, to whom fortune 
came quickly. Downie had been very rich, but 
all his earnings were swept away at one stroke by 



when he was ordered to Lisbon with Crauford. 
He was still in very poor health, and the first 
touch of campaigning knocked him over. On his 
way to headquarters he was attacked with 
inflammation of the eyes, and had to halt 
at a post-house at Naval Moral de Placentia. 
There his disorder grew so acute that he 
was forced to keep his bed ; and there he was 
left under the care of his servant, a Creole 
whom he had brought from the West Indies. 




DURING A RECENT VISIT OF M. VENIZELOS TO THE SALONIKA FRONT: THE PREMIER ATTENDING 

THE GREEK CHURCH CEREMONY OF THE " IMMERSION OF THE CROSS." 

French Official Photograph. 



the failure of a Glasgow firm. Thereafter he went 
to the West Indies, became a planter, and served 
in the Colonial Light Infantry as a Captain. He 
next joined Miranda in an expedition against the 
Spanish Main. What he was when the Royal 
Scots officer met him is not recorded. But, as 
might be expected, Downie was an interesting 
person, the pair became friendly, and when their 
paths sepaiated th,ey parted with mutual regret. 
Then they lost sight of each other entirely. 

The officer returned home and rejoined his own 
corps. Five yeais later he was with Sir John 
Moore at Conmna. During the retreat he suffered 
severely from, fever, and had not quite recovered 



As the officer lay at Naval Moral he got news 
of Wellesley's defeat of Joseph Bonaparte at 
Talavera. Then came a rumour less comforting. 
Soult had forced the pass of Banos and was 
advancing on Naval Moral. The inhabitants fled. 
The British officer and his man were left piac- 
tically alone. He was still too ill to think of 
moving. Accordingly, he bade his man keep a 
sharp look-out for the approach of the enemy, 
and claim the protection of the first French 
officer he saw. 

But before the French appeared the Royal 
Scot had an unexpected and welcome visitor, a 
Captain Patison, of the 29th, who had reached 

[CfMiKKtJ ntrliaf. 



M.rch 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



f Part 8S ~1_| 
LNw SoriesJ 1 



British TTanhs in the Palestine Campaign. 








TANKS IN THE HOLY 



LAND : RESTING IN A " WADI " ; A TANKDROME IN THE DESERT. 



The work o( the Tank* wu not specifically mentioned in General 
Allenby's despatch detailing the operation! in Palestine' from the 
time when he assumed command up to the capture ol Jerusalem. 
Proof o( thtir ptewrrr* in Palestine, however, hai reached thi 
country in the form of photograph!. It may well be imagined that 
the nature ol the ground, either in the desert with it! clogging land 



and rough "wadi" (dry torrent bed), or in the rugged mountains 
between Jerusalem and Jericho,' is not favourable .to the movement 
of Tanks. Thus, of the attack on Jericho, Mr. W. T. Maisey 
writes : "For miles the infantry were sliding downhill over smooth, 
slippery stones, slithering in muddy valleyj, or climbing mountain 
irope*." [/>o(0|irra/>*s. fry CJV.l 






THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Much 13. 1918 



Naval Moral with a party of convalescents from 

Placentia. Patison told him that the enemy's 

advanced guard was just at hand, and that no 

time was to be lost. The sick man must make 

an effort to clear out. Still almost blind, and very 

weak from the drastic medical treatment, he 

managed to mount his horse, 

and left the town with the 

other convalescents. Outside 

the walls they formed, and 

had begun their march when 

Patison was seized with the 

praiseworthy but imprudent 

desire to go back to see what 

information he could pick up. 

The others waited for him, in 

vain. The gallant officer had 

been taken prisoner. 

They struggled on to Oro- 
pesa, and there halted again. 
By this time the French were 
at their heels. They were, in 
fact, already in sight. The 
Royal Scots officer bade the 
others go on ; he felt quite 



inflammation and ulceration of the face, the 
last due to the wounds left by a copious appli- 
cation of leeches. Wretched food aggravated 
the officer's plight, but somehow he managed to 
struggle on to Headquarters at Merida, where 
he found that he had been given up for lost. 




unequal to continuing his own flight. But at the 
last moment, for all his bodily wretchedness, he 
resolved to make yet another effort for liberty. 
They went on at a walking pace, the Creole 
leading his master's horse. 

. After dark they fell in with General Cuesta 
and a large body of Spanish cavalry. With these 



THE WAR ACTIVITIES OF M. VENIZELOS : THE CREEK PREMIER WITH THE 

FRENCH GENERAL GULLAUMAT EXAMINING AN AEROPLANE AT SALONIKA. 

Frlttch Official Photograph. 

He was still very ill and quite unfit for duty. 
One day, shaking in a fit of ague, he sat on the 
bridge at Talavera, taking what comfort he could 
from the sun. At that moment up came a party 
of British and Spanish Dragoons. They halted, 
and their chief man took careful note of the invalid, 
whom he hailed as a friend. Who was this but 
the redoubtable Downie, 
playing yet another of his 
Protean parts in life ! He 
was now a British Com- 
missary, riding under escort, 
on a foraging expedition. 
He at once took his old friend 
under his wing, and con- 
veyed him to comfortable 
quarters in Badajos. The 
ride of seven leagues (in- 
creased by a chase of robbers) 
was painful, but the end 
crowned the work. 

The good Downie later 
commanded a Spanish legion, 
and his popularity won him 
the gift of Pizarro's sword 
from one of the conqueror's 
descendants. Wounded and taken prisoner at 
Seville, he flung the famous weapon back among 
his own men and so preserved it. He was 
knighted, reached General's rank, was created a 
Papal Count, and died Alcaide of the Alcazar at 
Seville. 




THE WAR ACTIVITIES OF M. VENIZELOS: AN INSPECTION BY THE GREEK 

PREMIER OF GREEK TROOPS ON THE SALONIKA FRONT. 

French Official Photograph. 

they crossed the Tagus, and, when daylight 
appeared, the invalid, now much worse, was 
picked up and carefully looked after by a 
British artillery officer, -who tended the patient 
for many days. To ophthalmia was now added 
a choice collection of other evils ague, whitloe. 



March 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



p.rt in -]_ , , 

w SoriejJ ' 



Salonika-front Officers on the British Western front. 




SERBIAN VISITORS : A LIQUID-FIRE PROJECTOR, WITH ITS MANIPULATOR HOODED AND CLOAKED. 



Serbian officers of rank hmrc teen visiting the Western Front during 
the winter lull, their tour of inspection including portions of both 
the French and the British lines. The tour was as much probably 
for instructional purposes as with the idea of giTing our Serbian 
allies an inkling of some of the preparatory measures on the 
Western Front for the ipring offensive. Having had the employ- 



ment of liquid fire, as well as gas, forced on us by the German 
adoption of such "weapons," the Allies hare gone one better than 
their antagonists. So, indeed, the Germans guess and dread. In 
witness to that we have the impeded recent German attempt to 
get the Red Cross Society to intervene and stop the further use of gai. 
a more that wts dubious from the first. [Official Photograph.] 



ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. March 13. 1918 




Concerting the Single front" at Sea : The fi 




AT '.UNCH DURING THE ALLIED NAVAL COUNCIL'S COMMITTEE MEETINGS IN ROME : BRITISH, FREW 

Sir Eric Geddes recently visited Rome to attend a committee appointed by the Allied Naval Council to concert anti-submarine 
measures in the Mediterranean, and made a tour of inspection in those waters. " The meeting of the Committee," he told 
Parliament, " accepted fully the anti-submarine proposals put forward by Vice- Admiral Calthorpe, the British Commander-in-Chief 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. March 13. 



lord of the Hdmiralty at a JSaval Gathering in Rome, 





IND ITALIAN REPRESENTATIVES, INCLUDING SIR ERIC GEDDES (FOURTH FROM RIGHT AT BACK). 

in the Mediterranean, who acts under the orders ol the French Commander-in-Chief ; and it was agreed that w should forthwith 
adopt and adapt to the Mediterranean measures which had given success in the waters around these islands, and that the main 
anti-submarine operation decided upon should be undertaken under Admiral Calthorpe's orders." (Pkaograpli by Morano Piseutli.} 



20-U n s,>-THE ILLUSTRATE! 




British Daylight Bombing Raids in Germany: 




MARKING WHERE PART OF "OVER A TON OF BOMBS" WAS Q 



EWS. March 13. 1918. [ N .^s.'rt]- 21 



Aeroplane photograph of Treves under Httack. 





IN THE DAYTIME ATTACK OF FEBRUARY 19 : WELL OVERHEAD. 

9th instant," records the official communique, " another raid in broad daylight, making the third within 36 houri, wat carried 
ut by ui against Treves. On this occasion well over a ton of bombs were dropped on the objective. Eleven bursts were observed 
n the railway station, and six nut-huildings in close proximity to it. Three good fires were started." [Official Photograph.} 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 13. 1918 



H Balkan Ox in a " Chu Chin Chow" headdress. 





WITH ITS HEAD-DRESS OF BEAD-WORK PECULIAR TO THE COUNTRY: A MACEDONIAN OX. 



One of the picturesque customs of the Macedonian peasantry is to 
decorate the heads of their draught oxen with elaborate structures 
of ;ad-work, which, as typified by the example here illustrated, 
are rarher reminiscent of the kind of stage costume popular in 
Oriental plays such as "Chu Chin Chow." To the British troops 
in the Balkan*, probably, the mule is more familiar as a be^st of 



burden than the ox. Describing the work of the waterman, 
Mr. Tretor Allen writes: "His daily or nightly quest of the 
element lakes him into strange places. With his panniers hung 
on pack-mules, he follows tortuous rarine paths among these 
Macedonia hills. ... At times, in places, he and his mules work 
through the night by the glimmer of stars." [Photo, by C.N.] 



March 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



CPatt W -1 , , 
New SeriesJ"'-' 



Serbian Laundress and a Serbian Sdcaver. 





TYPES FAMILIAR TO OUR ARMY IN THE BALKANS : MACEDONIAN WOMEN, WASHING AND WEAVING. 



A$ in France and elsewhere on the Continent, the washing of clothes 
in Macedonia is done large!; out of doors, in streams and ponds. 
The clothes are tied in a bundle and beaten with a kind ol paddle, 
as sen in the upper photograph. There was a curious allusion to 
Ihjw subject in a recent debate in Parliament on the Army in the 
Balkan. Speaking of the need of prcrenting the effects of mono- 



tony on troops, Colonel Sir H. Jesael said : "Always to go into the 
Iront line at the same ild bit, seeing the same old washerwoman, 
was dreadful." The lower photograph shows a Macedonian girl 
weaving mats according to the method of the country. This 
illustration should interest the mill lasses of Lancashire, Yorkshire, 
and Scotland. [Photos, by C.N.] 



. ! Pad M 1 

* "(_Nw SneJ 



tHE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Much 13. rti 




British and Italian Joiners "Torpedoed. 





RECENT VICTIMS OF THE U-BOATS: H.M.S. " CALGARIAN " ; AN ITALIAN STEAMER SINKING. 



An Admiralty announcement of March 7 stated : " His Majesty's 
armed mercantile cruiser ' Calgarian ' (Capt. Robert A. Newton, 
R.N. was torpedoed and sunk on March I. Two officers and 46 
men (including mercantile crew) were lost." It was reported that 
the ihip carried a mercantile crew of 450, in addition to 160 naval 
ratings.' The attack took place off the north coast of Ireland, at 



about four o'clock in the afternoon, and it is said that thre: 
torpedoes were fired. More than 400 survivors were landed at 
Lsrne. The "Calgartan" was a vessel of considerable tonnafe, and 
was a fine ship in the Allan Line. The lower photograph shows 
a large Italian steamer just before it sank alter being torpedoed off 
the coast of Spain. [Photos, by Illustrations Bureau.} 



M ,,ch 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Pin n -\ _. 

I New SrfesJ" 2 5 




OTomen'8 Land Hrm?: Recruiting and Sadging. 





WOMEN'S WORK ON THE LAND : A BRIGHTON PARADE, AND PRESENTATION OF LONG-SERVICE BADGES. 



Bright on, which ii posit irelj packed with people owinf to iff 
pleasant proximity to London, and freedom from some unpleasant 
possibilities of life in the Metropolis which need not be specified, 
showed much interest in the recent parade of the Women's Land 
Army along the front. At the bif hotels, and all vantage points, 
residents and visitors fathered to (ive these very practical women 



workers on the land a cordial welcome. After the parad*, Ladjr 
Chlchester, as seen in our second photograph, presented long-service 
badges to members of the Women's Land Army, at the Exhibition 
In Western Road. The Bui of Chlchester Is a Major in the Rojral 
Sussex Regiment, and, with the Countess, is a cordial supporter of 
patriotic work In the county. [PHoka, by Sport and Gentral.] 



,t I Pjtt IK T 
! "M.W Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Mu-ch 13. 181? 






THE NEW WARRIORS: XXIII. -BONES AND DRIPPING. 



says his rank may sound offalish of 
-/ the one-coupon class, but fundamentally, if 
he had his due, he would wear his Jaegers gold- 
hued. He is as auriferous as that. As a matter 
of mere truth, Egwin's rank is quite all right, and 
would pass melodiously 
at any curate's Iev6e : 
what has happened is 
that he h?s so got into 
the habit of knowing 
himself as " Bones and 
Dripping " that he doesn't 
now recognise the " Eg- 
win, By- Prod nets Officer, " 
in Orders to be himself. 
But that 's what he 
is, the custodian of a 
really priceless job one 
of the few lads in the 
Army who are really 
yielding gold, who are 
actually making money 
instead of consuming it. 
He is a great yielder, 
and through him minted 
Bradburys in uncount- 
able numbers have flowed 
into the Army and regi- 
mental places where such 
things do flow. The 
money return that he 
and his like have made 
for the mere honour of 
being graded " Bones 
and Dripping " runs, 
actually, into millions. 
And it is made 
from all those 
things that 
are thrown 
away or 
rather, were 
thrown away 
until the 
great clan 
Bone McDrip- 
ping came 
on to Army 
strength. 

Egwin just 
saves drip- 
ping oh, and 
bones. It 
seems a little 
uninspired, 
but it isn't. 
It has tech- 
n iq u e. It 
needs care, 
acumen, a 
chin of steel, 
a detective 
eye, and the 




TO MEN WHO DIED FOR FREEDOM AND THE 

FLAG : THE MEMORIAL ERECTED TO MEN OF 

THE IST CANADIAN DIVISION WHO FELL AT 

THE TAKING OF VIMY RIDGE. 

futunfitin War Records. 




TO MEN WHO DIED FOR FREEDOM AND THE FLAG: THE BASE OF A 

MEMORIAL ERECTED IN MEMORY OF MEN OF THE IST CANADIAN DIVISION 

WHO FELL AT VIMY RIDGE. [Canadian War Records.} 



massed forces of the Q.M.G. behind it. Be- 
cause of all these things Egwin, or his sort, 
have ripped from swill - tubs dividends that 
would make a gold - mine pant and strain its 
heart in order to keep up. In the old days 
when, it is said, regi- 
^W mental cooks " flogged " 

the meals to the ulti- 
mate bloatery of their 
suburban banking ac- 
counts, all that was not 
eaten at the mess table 
or utilised as " perks " 
by cooks was dumped 
into the swill-tub. The 
swill-tub is no longer a 
dumping - ground. Swill 
is now Boarded and 
placed in categories, and 
made to do active ser- 
vice. 

Somewhere about the 
keying-up days of the 
war a bright brain 
abruptly realised that, if 
2000 men in a battalion 
were served with 2000 
I Ib. rations of meat, 
there must be a definite 
surplus of (i) suet, 
" butcher's fat," and 
trimmings ; (2) dripping 
and grease, and ex- 
traneous fats ; (3) bones. 
It occurred to this man 
that such surplus must go 
somewhere. 
Some of it. 
was used as 
" dripping, 
white, in lieu 
of m a r g a- 
rine " ; some 
of it was used 
as " dripping, 
best cook- 
ing " but 
the stuff so 
used was but 
a drop in 
the ocean. 
Whither went 
the rest? 
The swill-tub 
and the " flog- 
ging " Army 
cook supplied 
the answer. 
War was de- 
clared on the 
swill - tub ; 
the"flogging" 
Army cook 



March 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



CParl 91 1 - 
New S .,iJ-27 



-A. 



H British Cdcstern front Trench Dug-Out Window. 









EMPTY SODA-WATER BOTTLES IN CEMENT FOR ORDINARY PANES : OUTSIDE ; INSIDE DAYLIGHT. 

provided a type of window which had been found to be, in 
ordinary circumstances, proof against being shattered by the concus- 
tion from shells bursting in the vicinity. In the present illustration 
we see a similar kind of device : empty soda-water bottles em- 
bedded in cement, serving as an above-ground window to a British 
trench parapet dug-out. [Official Photograph.} 



In an earlier issue of "The War News" we illustrated a French 
barrack-hut, in a winter camp within distant range of the enemy 
in a certain sector, with its window panes removed and empty 
wine bottles firmly compacted together in a frame, taking the place 
of the ordinary glass. As stated, the device, while excluding cold 
an and allowing sufficient light to enter the rooms of the hut, 



,- r prt M -i 

z ~ (.New SrleJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Much 13. 1911 



was suppressed, and his ill - gotten pickings 
snatched from him. 

From that moment bones and dripping were 
garnered from every conceivable source and 
turned to account. No shy spot of grease was 
neglected ; from the " superfluous " fat in 




AN AUTOMOBILE FIELD-KITCHEN PRESENTED BY AMERICA TO THE 
ITALIANS: AN AMERICAN RED CROSS OFFICIAL PARTY INSPECTING 
THE KITCHEN BEFORE BEING SENT TO THE FRONT. 
Photograph by C.N. 

uncooked joints, to skimmings from stock-pots, 
baking-dish residue, bacon-fat, and even the 
grease from washing-up water and that which 
collects round the grease-traps in cook-house 
sinks that is, every available blob of fat was 
collected and made much of. The better kinds 
were clarified and used as eating-dripping or for 
cooking ; the grosser kinds, after 
all the good could be extracted 

from them in lard-presses, were sold I KB 
and brought in ripe sums from 
soap and glycerine manufacturers. 

How many thousand tons of 
glycerine the waste fats and bones 
from the Army has brought into 
the world, and how many tons 
of soap, nobody but the expert 
" up-top " ones in By-Products 
know, and very few civilians can 
imagine. The soap has been an 
inestimable boon ; and the glyce- 
rine, besides being itself, has been 
used enormously in the manufacture 
of high explosives, the Army, in its 
thorough-going way, providing itself 
with means of war from the s< raps 
that fall from its table. In actual 
cash transactions the sums of money 
earned by the Army in this way 
have run to an almost incredible 
total. And not only is the fat sold 
to the soap and glycerine makers, 
but the surplus cooking and eating dripping has 
been sold to dealers and has brought in money too. 

Egwin is the gold-winner of his district in this 
department. He is concerned in the proper 



collection of bones and dripping. He knows to a 
place in decimals what to expect over in fats 
from the cooked rations of all the men in all the 
camps under him. He checks all the figures, and, 
if he thinks the returns of any particular regiment 
or camp are falling below the mean, he not only 
overhauls the swill-tub department 
of the guilty, but can examine 
messing figures to see where the 
fault lies. 

He sees that those whom it 
concerns have and are able to use 
the apparatus for collecting, clarify- 
ing, and grading into ist, 2nd, and 
3rd Class Dripping, " Trapped " 
Grease and " Dark " Grease, the 
various fats that cook-houses are 
bound to yield. He sees to it that 
the tins of such drippings and fats 
are collected, and that the bones 
are properly sacked and delivered. 
These are taken to their proper 
depot, if not sold direct, and then 
got rid of in the most profitable way. 
He manages and supervises the 
contracts, which may be local to 
grocery firms or butchers for drip- 
ping, or to factories for grease ; or 
the stuff may be handled in bulk, 
a whole area supplying great soap, 
glycerine, or explosive manufac- 
tories. Much of it goes to plants, 
which were initiated in a blaze of brilliance 
and at a ridiculously small cost, early in the 
war, which by a special process turn the fats 
into glycerine and sell it at a profit. 

Whatever happens to it, the one thing that 
does not is waste. Nothing is wasted. The 
whole of this enormous amount of swill-tub fats 




PRESENTED BY "AMERICA ALL": A FIELD-KITCrfEN FOR ITALIAN 

ARMY SERVICE: THE UNIT STARTING FOR THE FRONT AFTER 

DETRAINING IN THE WAR-ZONE. [Photograph by C.N.} 

is used, and the Egwins of the Army keep a 
jealous eye on returns. Money is saved, money 
is earned, and economy gains triumphs all 
round. W. DOUGLAS NEWTON. 



March 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Visited by Sir GliUiam Robertson. 




AT A FACTORY: GIRLS IN A TANK WORKSHOP "TENDING" MACHINERY FOR CERTAIN SECTIONS. 



Alter taking up tbc Extern Command, Sir William Robertson, in 
an internal of hi dutie, on Saturday, March , paid a Tiit to hi 
natire county of Lincolnshire. In the city of Lincoln itself he was 
receiied with ciTic honours, and presented with an address. In 
hi* reply to that the General, among other thinp, referred in 
terms of high eulofium to certain work being carried out in the 



county in connection with the manufacture of Tanki. One of 
the factories which turn out Tanks the General Tisited, and in 
addition to seeint some of the Tanks, he went round the workshops 
in the various factory departments, and saw somt munitioners, 
largely women, at their tasks among the machinery for making 
parts of Tanks.- [Plioto$, by Topical.] 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March- 13. 1918 



"Bolts in the Run Coffin/' 






V 



TANKS ON AN ENGLISH TESTING GROUND ; TOPPING A RISE : AFTER NEGOTIATING A TRENCH. 



Sir William Robertson, in (peaking at Lincoln of the work done 
in that county in the manufacture of Tanks, said, after con- 
gratulating those concerned on their "success" in that special 
kind of munition-work, of which he had had ocular evidence at 
a place where he had been given opportunity of satisfying 
himself as to the efficiency of the work: "Go on with your 



Tanks. Every bolt in your Tanks is a bolt in the Hun coffin. You 
cannot do without the men behind the guns, but mechanical contri- 
vances help us enormously, especially in the saving of life, and that 
may be said especially ol the Tanks. 1 want to thank you for what you 
are doing for the Tanks. You have had the thanks of the Com- 
mander -in-Chief, and 1 wish to add mine tothem." [Photos. Topical.] 



M.rch 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



CPrfrt 92 1_ 
New SartMj 3 



On a Tank-resting Ground in engtand. 




SIR W. ROBERTSON'S VISIT : WATCHING EVOLUTIONS ; A TRACTOR WITH WOMEN AS DRIVER AND STOKER. 



la the upper illustration Sir William Robertson it Men during the 
day of nil Lincoln visit, while at a Tank factory testing-ground. 
A Tank " resting " appears jn the background, and to the right 
are other "engines of war." Sir William Robertson is in the 
centre, watching other Tanks manoeuvring. Two of the evolutions 
they went through are shown elsewhere in the present issue : in 



on cue a Tank "taking" a steep rise ; in the other, a Tank 
clearing a ditch. Sir William Tritton and Colonel Lucas, the 
General's A.D.C., are to the left. Another product at munition- 
works visited by the General was a steam-tractor, which was 
driven by a woman who was accompanied by a woman stoker, 
as seen in the second illustration. [Photos, by Topical.] 



Mf Part ! 
-(.New Stri 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 13. I91fi 




TTbe prince of OZales's TTour among Clyde CKar-CKorhers. 






AT THREE YARDS : SHAKING HANDS ; TALKING 
Incidents at three of the great shipbuilding and munition manu- 
factory establishments on the Clyde, visited by the Prince of Wales 
during his Royal Highnesi's tour on both sides of the rivsr, are 
shown here. In the first, the Prince is seen among the work- 
people at Messrs. D. and W. Henderson'! works, where, among 
other things, he saw a number of standard ships being built. At 



TO WOUNDED ; A " BLACK SQUAD " WELCOME. 

Messrs. Napier and Miller's works at Old Kilpatrick, the Prince ook 
the opportunity of speaking with a number 'of wounded soldiers 
from the local hospital, Sir William McEwen accompanying him 
meanwhile. On another day of his visit, Harland and Wolff's 
shipyard, at Govan, was visited. A telling episode there was the 
- Squad's " welcome to the Prince. [Photos, by Topical.} 



M.rch 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED. WAR NEWS. 



f Van 82 1 
I New SetletJ 



Che prince of SLilcs's TTour among Clyde 



-A. 





ON ONE MORNING : WATCHING WORK AT A ROTARY 'PLANE MACHINE ; WITH A SHOP-FOREMAN. 

on which blue-garbed gir!-munitioneri laboured with deft fingers. 
At Harland and Wolff's Goran yards tht rmriouj constructs 
departments were Tiiited, (oremm, forewomen, and long -service 
mplojPMt b*in( prewnttd to th* Prince on tht way." A (rut 
proceuion o( workeri followed, and crowded round hit Royal 
Highntu whtrtrcr a halt wat calltd. [Photos, by Topical.] 



The Prince, on the third day of hit Clyde tour, riiited, among other 
ertabllahimnti, the works of Meaan. Weir, of Cathcart. " The Prlnc*," 
dejcribti a newspaper correspondent, "was conducted through the 
works by Mr. ]. R. Richmond, manaffnf-dlrector, and witnessed 
a great drrersrty of industry, ranging from the construction of 
turbine engines to the fitting of the most delicate aeroplane parts 



. f Pan U 

~ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 13. 1918 



WOMEN AND THE WAR. 



T^VERYONE realises, or professes to realise, 
-I / that the country must really tackle the 
problem of child welfare in earnest if England's 
future citizens are to be a healthy race. Most 
people luive theories about the best way in which 
1o do it. But theories, like good intentions, are 
of little use unless translated into action, so it is 
interesting to know that, while some people are 
talking of the possible formation of a Health 
Ministry, Lady Plunket is making a definite start 
to improve the health of the nation's children 
by starting a day nursery in a large house close 
to Gloucester Road Station, where small people 



There are plenty of women who have been 
obliged, during the absence of their husbands on 
active service, or for other reasons, to " turn to " 
and help to increase the family exchequer. There 
are others who, from one cause or another not 
necessarily connected with the war have had to 
adopt a profession in order to make a living for 
themselves and their children. Not seldom the 
children are the greatest difficulty in the way of 
success. No woman likes to leave her child all 
day to the care of a landlady or in charge of an 
inefficient nurse. The anxiety she suffers is bad 
for the mother ; the fact of being so left may 




AN OFFICIAL LADY-GUIDE IN PARIS: MISS JOHNSTON. 

The British Army and Navy Leave Club, in Paris, has appointed an Irish girl, Miss Johnston, a clever horsewoman, to take soldiers 
on leave out in parties three times a week. Miss Johnston is seen in our photograph riding with a party of them in the Bois de 

Boulogne. [Photograph by C.N.] 

be attended with serious consequences for the 
child. 



up to the age of seven years can be looked after 
during the absence of their mothers at work. 

Of course, there are plenty of crSches -in 
London, though none that exactly meet the need 
that Lady Plunket's first Basil Blackwood Nursery 
is meant to fill. A great deal has been done by 
the establishment of Child Welfare Centres, 
Schools for Mothers, creches, and similar institu- 
tions, to help the working-class mother, who is 
obliged very often to leave her home for many 
hours during the day, in her task of rearing 
healthy children. Hitherto, however, no one 
seems to have given a thought to the educated 
woman forced by circumstances to earn her own 
living until Lady Plunket decided that she too 
ought to have some place where her children 
could be cared for during her working hours. 



Lady Plunket decided that something must be 
done to help the educated working mother, with 
the result that women who come under the head- 
ing of the class Lody Plunket's scheme is intended 
to help can take their children to the new nursery 
assured that they will be properly cared for 
throughout the day. 

Painful experience has already shown many 
women that the war and domestic service are 
closely connected. The women's army, which 
already numbers many thousands, is largely 
recruited from the ranks of domestic workers. 
The girl who punches your tickets smartly in the 
Underground, or whirls you up and down in the 

[Ctmtinttftt cttrleaf. 



March 13. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



r i-.iti 

LN * 



Serbian piety and Serbian Hrtillery. 



*UX4^ 




. 




IN THE BALKANS : BUILDING A CHURCH OF EMPTY PETROL-CASES ; SERBIAN MOUNTAIN GUNNERS. 



Uti; has been hrd ol late about the Serbian troops, aaTe a brief 
report Irom time to lime of tome successful raid upon the Bui* 
garian trenches. A fine tribute to the qualities of the Serbian 
soldier was paid recently by Sergeant Flora Sandes, the woman- 
soldier who, jt will be remembered, fought in their ranks. "The 
remnants of the plucky Serbian Army," the said, "are still grimly, 



silently carrying on. ... These men in the trenches would (i>t 
me anything they had. ... To rescue me when I was wounded 
and unable to moe tome of my men ritked their lives, and more 
than their lires. . . . They refused point blank to sare themselTe! 
unless they could carry me with them. This is the spirit the 
Serbian soldier shows towards his Allies." [Photos, by C.N.] 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 13. 1918 



lift every day, may quite possibly have spent her 
time before the war as parlour-maid in a well- 
conducted house whose inmates would have been 
scandalised at the thought of her forsaking the 
cap and apron of domesticity for the uniform of 
independence. But that is not all. A complete 




AEROPLANES FOR THE ALLIES: THE IPSWICH DESTROYER FUND 

PROCESSION. 

The ambition of Ipswich Is to rival any town of its size in national war-work ; and our 

photograph show: aeroplane-girls helping to launch the local Destroyer Fund. 

Photograph by Farringdon Photo. Co. 

reconstruction in the conditions of domestic ser- 
vice is going to be one of the minor results of 
the war. The Women's Industrial Council says 
so, and the Women's Industrial 
Council knows what it is talking 
about, for it has been carrying on 
an extended inquiry into the 
whole subject, with the result 
that it has already issued a little 
volume of almost a hundred and 
fifty pages, with an appreciable 
number of appendices into the 
bargain, dealing with the whole 
matter. 



of the things the war has killed beyond hope of 
any future resurrection. The mistress of the 
f utuf e will have to dispense with - much of the 
personal service which pre-war housewives ex- 
pected as a matter of course from the members of 
their domestic staffs, who will, in addition to 
other privileges, expect, except 
in specially favourable circum- 
stances, to " live out." 

Just to help the housewife out 
of her difficulty, the W.I.C. have 
evolved the following scheme for 
" Domestic Workers " after the 
war. It is suggested that centres 
should be established in large 
towns from which domestic 
workers shall be supplied daily to 
those who need their services. 
The woman who needs the help of 
the highly skilled worker will be 
able to get it, whilst the housewife 
whose demands are more modest 
in character will be equally well 
provided for. Workers will only 
be employed for a limited number 
of hours every day, and if it 
should happen that early as well 
as late service is required the em- 
ployer will have to content herself 
with relays of different workers. 
There are several other proposals, 
but enough has been said to 
show that the woman who has 
hitherto relied on a return of the old domestic 
re'gime' after peace is signed must banish any such 
mistaken notion. War is always full of surprises, 



It has done more than that. 
If women find themselves in an 
awkward position as regards ser- 
vants after the war, it won't be 
the fault of the Council, who 
have already drawn up a definite 
scheme for the reorganisation of 
domestic service as a modern in- 
dustry. If there is one thing 
more certain than another, it is 
that the domestic worker who has 
forsaken her old profession for 
work of national importance is 
not, after tasting the sweets of 
independence, going to return to 
the old rigid conditions that used 
to govern the employment of household servants. 
Domestic service, as the term was once under- 
stood, is, it is said, " a dying industry." It is one 




THE IPSWICH DESTROYER FUND: SHELL -GIRLS HELPING THE CAUSE. 

Ipswich Is very keen on raising a big fund for a destroyer to aid In the great war, and 

our photograph shows some of the girls of the famous old Suffolk town, who are makers 

of shells, taking part in a big procession held for that purpose. 

Photograph fry Farringdon Photo. Co. 

but not many people who bewailed the " servant 
trouble " in the old days expected Mars to suggest 
a solution. CLAUDINE CLEVK. 



March 13. 1918 



(HE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



f P-rt 02 1 ._ 
LNcw Series J -37 



THE "CALGARIAN" TORPEDOED THE QUESTION OF TONNAGE RETURNS -SUBMARINE 

WARFARE- THE FIRST LORD'S OPTIMISM RUSSIA DAY BY DAY PEACE BOMBS ON 

PETROGRAD PROGRESS IN PALESTINE IRELAND ; A LOST LEADER. 

in 1914 for the Canadian service. She was a 
magnificent boat, the largest but one of the Allan 
fleet, and was built to carry 1700 passengers. 

Small German naval vessels were mined off 
the Dutch coast. 

The date of the Calgarian's loss puts this sink- 
ing within the scope of the latest submarine 
returns, and so gives the tonnage of at least one 
of the larger vessels lost. It is said that the 



OXCE more the tale of the sea is the record 
of a big disaster, although this week che 
act is one of legitimate warfaie, to be accepted as 
such among inevitable losses. On March i (as 
announced on March 7) the armed merchant 
cruiser Calgarian, formerly oi the Allan line, was 
torpedoed and sunk off the Irish coasl. She 
carried a crew of 450, besides 150 n?.val ratings : 
394 survivors were landed at Larne, Poitrush, 




DRIFTER-PATROL " WRENS " AT ONE OF THEIR WORKING-PARTY STATIONS NEAR THE COAST : 
FIXING FLOATS TO MINE - NETS. [Photograph by Alfieri.} 



and Londonderry ; 2 officers and 46 men were 
lost. The vessel was first torpedoed near the 
forward boiler, and an explosion in the engine- 
room was the principal cause of the loss of life. 
Perfect order and discipline were shown by all 
hands. Two more torpedoes struck the Calgarian 
in quick succession, and it was seen that she could 
not long remain afloat. The ship's company then 
took to the boats, without panic, and, after trying 
experiences, were picked up by patrols. The 
rescuers fought the submarine, and exploded 
depth charges. The gunners are convinced that 
the U-boat cannot have escaped. The Calgarian 
was a vessel of 17,500 tons, and was completed 



publication of tonnage figures is being considered. 
If that is possible, corsistently with the demands 
of " Dora," the public would be ?.tle to judge better 
of this most important national profit-and-loss 
account. It might be bitter medicine at times ; 
but the nation is good at taking nasty pills, and 
even finds them strengthening The feeling that 
the pill has often been gilded has not made for 
moral health in this war. In submarine warfare 
it is tonnage that matters. If Dora, therefore, 
can see her way, the public will take the starkest 
truth with tightened resolution. Numerical re- 
turns of craft sunk this week show twelve large 
vessels, against fourteen ; eight smaller ships, 

\Cont'.tlited on page 40 



38 r*v r so!?,-i] THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, March 13. 191! 




" Shopping' at the front: H Second~F>and St 




"OUR STOCK MUST BE CLEARED REGARDLESS OF COST": AN ENTERPRISING ! 






THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, March 13. 1 918-[ N ^ rt Se 9 ;y-- 39 



all Goode, from a ]NewsLaid Bgg to a Cradle. 




UNIVERSAL PROVIDERS ON THE WESTERN FRONT DOING A LITTLE DEAL IN HATS. 

hung up for sale, the former on the left, and the latter on the right. There may also be seen a notice (between the two men 
and the bird-cage) bearing the legend "New-laid eggs daily," and another (to the right of the "salesman ) ann. 
" Our stock must b cleared regardless of cost " [Photograph by Canadian War Records.] 



r Part 92 "I 
40 |_New Series .1 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



March 13. 1918 



against four ; no fishing-boats, against seven. 
Arrivals an-1 sailings were considerably reduced. 
Sir Kric Geddes made an optimistic statement to 
the House of Commons, and spoke of a down- 
ward curve " of losses. 

Continuing the diary of 
Russia's humiliation, the 
following, amid much con- 
fusion, are the main 
authentic facts : March 3 
Dissensions rife in Petro- 
grad, the Soviets still cling 
ing to hopes of upsetting 
Germany, the Opposition 
advocating a fighting re- 
treat ; Kars and Batoum 
ceded to Turkey. The 
Turks occupied Trebizond. 
March 4 A German des- 
cent on Finland imminent. 
Announcement from Berlin, 
dated the previous day, 
that, by reason of the sign- 
ing of the peace treaty 
military movements in 
Great Russia had ceased. 
Yet, on this day, when the 
" peace " was twenty-four 
hours old, German aero- 
planes bombed Petrograd, 
where prepai ations for 
armed resistance continued. 
Russian Armenia presented 
Turkey. 



Bessarabia. March 7-8 The State departments 

evacuating Petrograd and proceeding to Moscow. 

The foreign diplomatic bodies had already gone. 

In Palestine General Allenby's forces made a 




' WRENS " IN ONE OF THEIR NESTS : WOMEN AND GIRLS OF THE SPECIAL NAVY 

CORPS FOR SHORE WORK, THE COUNTERPART OF THE ARMY "WAACS," PREPARING 

MATERIAL FOR MINE-NETS. [Photograph by Alfteri.] 



by Germany to 

iui ^. March 5 News, four days old, of an 
agreement between Russia and Finland, evidently 
enforced by Germany, on terms humiliating to 
Russia. Finland restive under German threats. 




IN A PIER-SHELTER WORKSHOP WHERE THEY WORK DAILY ON DRIFTER-PATROL 
JOBS: "WRENS" WHILE ENGAGED IN FIXING MINE - CIRCUITS. [Photograph by A Ifieri] 

March 6 Krylenko protests against the 
continuance of hostilities. Austria reported to 
have ordered further operations in Volhynia and 



further advance on March 2 and 3. The operation 
was carried out on a front of 12 miles, and pene- 
trated to a depth of 3000 yards. The direction 
of the advance was northward towards Nablus, 
the ancient Srhechem, and the troops moved 
astride of the Jerusalem- 
Nablus road. Between 
March 4-7, a general ad- 
vance north was made on 
a front of 18 miles. The 
Ghoranieh bridge, taking 
the main road from 
Jericho over the Jordan 
to the Hedjaz railway, 
was blown up by the 
enemy owing to our pres- 
sure east of the river. Turk- 
ish troops and transport, 
and stations on the 
Hedjaz lailway, have been 
bombed. 

A curious feature of the 
moment was the revival 
in Irish news. For a very 
long time silence has been 
the rule. The news now 
" released for publication " 
was none of the best, and 
only confirmed what has 
long been known that law- 
lessness and sedition pre- 
vail. At such a time Ire- 
land is doubly unfortunate in the loss of Mr. 
John Redmond, her sanest patriot, who died on 
March 6. LONDON: MARCH g, 1918. 



The Illustrated War Newt March 20. I918.-Part 93, New Seriet, 



CD* Illustrated War 










Official Photograph. 

GERMAN PROPAGANDA AT THE FRONT : A BRITISH OFFICER WITH AN ENEMY BALLOON 
CARRYING LEAFLETS WRITTEN IN FRENCH DECRYING THE BRITISH EFFORT. 



fcmSS -I 
New Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 20. 1918 



THE ALLIES' STERN TASK IDEALS CONTRASTED- KAISER AND PREMIER THE WESTERN 

FRONT -VIGOROUS AERIAL WARFARE STRONG ENEMY RAIDS REPULSED -PORTUGUESE 

SUCCESS -A FRANCO-AMERICAN EXPLOIT NAPLES BOMBED. 



THE task before the Allies has not been 
lightened bv recent events, but nowhere is 
there any sign of slackened resolution. That the 
enemy should be 
congratulating him- 
self very heartily 
is only natural. 
It is not dis- 
quieting to us. He 
has, as the Scots 
proverb says, " Cut 
great whangs off 
ither folks' cheese," 
and has dealt por- 
tions out to his 
friends with the 
liberality usual in 
such cases, at the 
same time taking 
good care of him- 
self. The Kaiser, 
in a recent jubilant 
telegram, sees the 
Baltic lands " as- 
sured to Germany, 
humanly speaking, 
for all time." This 
is to his Majesty " a great joy and satisfaction." 
Only in the phrase " humanly speaking " is there 
It may be mere piopitiation 




DURING A RECENT ADVANCE IN MESOPOTAMIA : ROYAL ENGINEERS 

LAYING A TELEPHONE WIRE ACROSS AN OPEN SANDY STRETCH 

OF PLAIN. [Official Pkotograph.] 



any trace of doubt. 



f f his Deity ; on the other hand, it may be a 
betrayal of uneasy suspicion that in the end the 
German sword may not keep what the German 

sword has rav- 
ished. To the 
breaking of that 
sword the Allies 
have pledged them- 
selves anew, in the 
face of all delays 
and setbacks. Mr. 
Lloyd George, in 
an address to the 
Free Churches, 
urged the stren- 
uous prosecution 
of the war as the 
only way to ensure 
an actual League 
of Nations, "band- 
ed together for 
the protection of 
the world as a 
whole against the 
force, fraud, and 
greed of the 
mighty. To falter 
ere all this be achieved would be to doubt the 
justice of the Ruler of the world. To carry 
the war on a single hour after those aims 




SHAKESPEARE IN PALESTINE: FIELD-AMBULANCE PLAYERS GIVING A SCENE FROM "HENRY IV." BEFORE 

WOUNDED AND OTHER SOLDIERS. 

As the caption on the photograph states, this is probably the first time Shakespeare has ever been acted in Palestine. Men of the 

London Field Ambulance are shown as they gave a scene from "Henry IV." before wounded in hospital at the Latin Monastery at 

Kurvet-el-Enab, and trops stationed in the neighbourhood. The costumes are hardly Lyceum style. [Official Photograph.] 



March 20. 191S 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Part 93 1 - 
I New Series J~3 



can be attained would be to abandon the 
world to the spirit of evil." The Piime Mini- 
ster's speech and the Kaiser's telegram may 
be taken as the expression in microcosm of the 
two spirits now at war. No more instructive 
contrast is possible. It is also encouraging, and 
appeals as a timely reminder that, although 
" force, fraud, and greed " have for the moment 
done very well for themselves, their policy is fore- 
doomed. Knowing this, and holding fast by 
their own principles, the Allies cannot fail. 

The period under review has been remarkable 
for incidents of aerial warfare. In the moonless 
raid on London, noted without details in last week's 
article, 20 persons were killed and 45 injured. On 



districts, where they unloaded their bombs before 
retreating. 

Over the battle area, meanwhile, aerial com- 
bats continued with increased energy and fre- 
quency. In two days' fighting forty-three enemy 
machines were brought down. The first half of 
March is said to hold the record for achievements 
in bombing, reconnoitring, photography, and 
fighting. Our airmen have been dropping ten 
bombs to the enemy's one on positions behind the 
lines ; they have also so harried his observers 
that they could not spot for their guns. Feats of 
low flying in brilliant and successful attacks on 
hostile aerodromes grew more fiequent. German 
machines ready to start never left terra firma. 




FOR HOME-GROWN FOOD SUPPLIES : THE ROYAL VISIT TO READING, THE KING INSPECTING ROOT-CROP 

SPECIMENS OF MESSRS. SUTTON'S SEED ESTABLISHMENT. 

The King and Queen visited Reading on March iz, and after inspecting a soldiers' hospital, where they saw a man with a finger 

(raited on in place of a lost thumb, went over Messrs. Sutton's seed establishment. While going through, the King met an old sailor who 

was in the "Bacchante" when his Majesty was a Midshipman. [Photograph by L.K.A.] 



the nights of the 8th and the loth many enemy 
bombing squadrons raided Paris, killing 113 
persons and injuring 129. On the gth, our air- 
craft bombed Stuttgart and Mayence, dropping 
over a ton of bombs on each city. On the izth 
our airmen again raided the Rhine area, and 
bombed Coblenz, attacking and burning munition 
factories, the railway station, and barracks. On 
the I3th, Freiburg was bombed. Hostile airships 
crossed our north-eastern coast and attacked 
Hull and Hartlepool on the nights of March 12 
and 13. At Hull some damage was done, 
but no one was injured. At Haitlepool 5 per- 
sons were killed and 9 injured. The airships 
seemed to lose their way over remote country 



The railway sidings at Mons and Baval, and dumps 
at St. Quentin, came in for attention, while 
billets at' Lille and Cambrai also suffered severely. 
Twenty-two en8rny machines brought down were 
later added to the previous bag of forty-three. 
Every day marks an increase in British aerial 
superiority, and this most hellish war rises more 
and mere, by a grim paradox, into the heavens. 
It is satisfactory to note that the threat of 
reprisals effected the release of the two British 
airmen who were sentenced by the Germans to 
long periods of imprisonment for dropping leaflets. 
They have returned to their camps. A little more 
firmness at an earlier date might have served the 
Allied cause equally well. The enemy understands 



. r Part 93 1 
?~LNew Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 20. 1913 



that language, and the more he hears of it the 
better, for it conveys conclusive arguments. 

Although not falling strictly within our present 
dates, a Western Front incident of which details 
aie now to hand should find brief mention here 
the fine exploit of the King's Royal Rifle Corps 
and the Royal Fusiliers at Polderhoek, east of 
Ypres. They met and broke a strong attack on 
a mile-long front, and the Fusiliers ejected tne 
enemy from a portion of trench where he had 
gained a footing. This combat marked another of 
those failures which make up the sum of the 
Germans' recent performances in Flanders 
Hostile raids, however, have been more incess- 
ant and in stronger force. 

On the French front, near Reillon in Lorraine, 
American troops came into action with our Allies 



kilogrammes of bombs. On the nth, infantry 
ni-.ide further coups-de-main near Fresnes and 
Courtecon, and beat back an attack in Cham- 
pagne. A heavy bombardment left of the Meuse 
preluded a double attack in some force by special 
German troops against Goose Hill and Mort 
Homme. Some lively gun-fire on both sides in 
the Caurieres Wood and another daring raid in 
Lorraine by Franco-American troops completed 
the more noteworthy incidents of the day. On 
the 1 2th, the artillery fire was intermittent in the 
Argonne and the Vosges, and violent on the 
heights in Champagne. On the i3th at Lom- 
baartzyde, the Belgians did neat and useful 
work in German first and second line trenches, 
where they gained a footing, and stopped a 
violent counter-attack by hand-to-hand fighting. 




FROM THE FAR EAST TO VISIT THE WESTERN ALLIES : MEMBERS OF THE SIAMESE MILITARY MISSION IN LONDON. 

A number of Siamese officers, as a Military Mission, have arrived in England and are guests of the British Government. They have 
been received by the King at Buckingham Palace. \Pkotograph by Baldwin. \ 



on a " works-destruction " expedition. This is 
the first time the U.S.A. men have taken part in 
an operation of this kind. Fifty infantrymen of 
the Ohio Regiment went out with sixty French 
sappers, and, under German barrage-fire, seized, 
their objectives, destroyed wire, and blew up 
shelters and an observation-post. The Americans' 
chief duty was to keep the enemy off while the 
sappers did their duty. They went forward 
500 yards, remained out two hours, and came 
back completely successful. None were killed, 
and only four wounded. A similar exploit was 
carried out at Neuvillers. 

French aeroplanes were busy on the loth over 
enemy positions, on which they dropped 10,000 



On the I4th, enemy ra'ds broke down under gun- 
fire at Maisons de Champagne, Vauquois, and 
Hoaville. 

The news from Italy was chiefly of air-fighting, 
but some effective artillery work was reported 
from Salettuol and Fagare. On March n, Naples 
was bombed for the first time ; sixteen peisons 
were killed and forty injured. Hospitals and 
churches were the chief sufferers. An attempt on 
Venice failed. During the week's operations, 
British and Italian airmen did great damage to 
enemy bases. On the i/jth Italy closed her 
^200,000,000 War Loan, which may be augmented 
by foreign subscriptions. On the i-jth, patrols 
were active on the Piave. LONDON: MARCH 16, 1918. 



March 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Part S3 I - 
I New series j~ S 



On the British OTcstcrn front: andcrground Cookery. 





WHERE SHELLS FALL : A COOKHOUSE DEEP UNDERGROUND ; DINNERS AT THE SURFACE ; COOKS. 



Whether our nun dug tht underground cookhouie In the battle- 
field rea which ii shown on this page, or madt UM of on of 
the dttply ttwaTtttd Gtrmtn thilttrinf hole* wt find constantly 
behind captured enmy positions, it not lUttd In tht official nott 
to the photofiapha. What Ii statad is that tht plact i " a fully 
-.v.ipod cookhouat down in tht bowtls of tht earth, near our 



front lint In Francs." Tht upptf photograph shows how tht 
getting up of cooked food at tht optnlnf at tht surfact Is tfltcttd 
by meam of winch and tackle, just as a water bucket ii worked 
In 4 well. It ii dinner time in a neighbouring trench, and com- 
pany mats orderlies with their cant art arriving, while now and 
again German shtlls burst ntar by. [Official Plictogrtflu.} 






THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 20, 1918 




Hrmy JMusic- at Kneller Rail School. 






DURING WORKING HOURS : IN 



THE BAND-PRACTICE ROOM A REHEARSAL; "HEAVY BRASS. 
Th Army School of Music t Kneller H*ll was established some 
forty or flity-odd years ago, under the auspice* of the late Duke 
of Cambridge, then Commander- in-Chief of the British Army. The 
idea of tuch an institution dates back to the Crimean War, or, 
really, a little later than that. A story goes that "at a certain 



grand reriew, at which foreign royally was present, on Queen 



Victoria driving on to the ground to the saluting-base, the regi- 
mental bands massed to play the National Anthem all struck 
up in different keys, the discard angering the Duke of Cambridge. 
The outcome was a musical reorganisation, and Kneller Hall, which 
trains bandmasters and bandsmen for all army units, followed. 
[Pkotos. ty S. and C.] 



March 20. 1818 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



Hrmv Music at Kncller Rail School. 




WORK TIME, AND OFF DUTY : CLASS-ROOM INSTRUCTION ; A MESS ANTE-ROOM. 



Incidentally, the ettabliahment of the Army School of Muelc *t 
Kneller H1I purged the gerrice of the German muaiciani, who 
Had held away until 'hen, (rom the firit eitabliihment of Army 
recirnenUI bndj, towarde the latter end of the eighteenth century. 
Before that time druma and flfei had been the " muaick " of the 
Sritnh Army, with aKernatlre hautboU in certain corjx. Copying 



the Idea from the Pruuian Army of Frederick the Great, and 
enlltllnf German miuiciara, band, were commuted between the 
Seven Yeari War and the Peninsular War lor mot regiments. 
In iereral regimentt nefroei, to claih cymbals and " Jincluig 
Johnniej," were added. Negro entiitmenti died out, and Kneller Hall 
iwept away the Germain.- [Pkotos. by S. and 0.] 



r 
~| 



Part \n -\ 
New srijj 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 20. 1918 



In lerusalem : Guarding the fioly places. 




f 




TWO FAITHS : CHANGING GUARD AT THE CHURCH OF THE HOLY SEPULCHRE ; A SENTRY. 



In hit proclamation to the people of Jeruialem on entering the 
Holy- City, General Allenby nude this announcement : " Every 
sacred building, monument, holy ipot, ihrine, tradition*! alte . . . 
or customary place of prayer, ol whatsoever form of the three 
religions (Christian, Jewish, and Moslem) will be maintained and 
protected according to the existing customs and belieti of thoee 



to whoee faiths they are sacred." Guards and sentries of British 
corpi were potted over the Holy Sepulchre, while the Mosque of 
Omar wai "placed under Moslem control, and a military cordon, 
composed of Indian Mahomedan officers and soldiers, was estab- 
lished round the Moaqur." "Vaughan'i Rifles." the 58th Regiment 
of the Indian Line, has four Mahomedan companies. [Official 



March 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 




In Palestine during the Coast 'Hdvance. % 



< 
.. . 






ENEMY DEVILRY AT JAFFA : DESECRATED AND DESTROYED GRAVES IN THE ARMENIAN CEMETERY. 



The Uitial impreuion at the Tuiki hu ctrt.inly been that they 
Art, AS A rule, rtapectert of monuments and rutinf-placei of the 
dead, whAtcrer the creed of thote in tht (TAVts nuy hAte ben. 
l< hAi, however, proved ctherwiie where the unlortunAU Armenians 
were concerned, tht memberi of the hApleu ChriitUn ccmm.initiei 
which hAT* ivffered to Awfully durmf the wr from the fAMtic 



frenxy of th Turki, lniti(*l>d by tht Gormana. Tht tmjrt' 
ciTiliied world 11 natlona . outtldt Gtrmany and Awtria hare 
been horrified and appalltd at tht Atndith atrodtitt of tht mac 
sacrta of Armtniani rtptattdly ptrpttrattd ainca Turkey entered mo 
the war. Inatancti of tht ltnth to which tht dtrilrita ha 
gone art leen in than illuitrationa. [Official Photographs.] 



ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. March 20. 1918 




On the Palestine front, in One of tbi 




BRINGING A HEAVY GUN INTO CAMP : A PLATOON OF MEN HAUL 

In the valley tracts, and along the regions bordering on the Jordan river basin, Palestine, no doubt, still remains as of old, 
to a considerable extent, a land "flowing with milk and honey." Elsewhere, however, and very largely along the routes by 
which the troops of General Allenby's army have been advancing and fighting their way forward, the country is, in the main, 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. March 20. 1918 



Sandy COastes on the Line of 





THE PIECE WITH DRAG-ROPES THROUGH THE DEEP, SOFT SAND. 

a land overflowing with sand. Barren rocky uplands and rugged mountainous ridges, with wide intermediate sand wastes, hav 
been the prevailing features of most of our campaigning ground in Palestine, and country as difficult to traverse as the Sinai 
Desert proved for our "marching regiments" and batteries during their crossing between the Suez Canal and El Arish. 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 20. 1918 



& 



fighting Vandalism in f ranee : Salving Sacred paintings. 





THE WESTERN FRONT: OUR SOLDIERS TAKING MEASURES TO CHECKMATE GERMAN 



It ii no uncommon thine, of court*, lor tht track of war to be 
marked by ruin, destruction, and desolation, but when enemy bar- 
bar|n a dntroyin( sacred buildings and thir contents wantonly, 
when it cannot even be asserted that any material or military 
advantage is obtained, the outrage is unpardonable. But this 
consideration does not weigh with the German. Such measures, 



BARBARISM. 

hen, as are possible are taken on the British Western Front to 
aroid the damage and destruction which might otherwise (all upon 
the churches and the art treasures which many of them contain. 
Our photographs illustrale a number of British soldier! remoring 
pictures and other examples of sacred art from a bomb-destroyed 
church In Armentlires. {Official Pkotograpks.] 



March 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r ftit N i , , 

I New Series \--l3 



fighting Vandalism : Salving Statues on the Cdest front. 





CHECKMATING GERMAN BARBARISM : BRITISH SOLDIERS REMOVING SACRED STATUES 



From wanton and unrestrained love of destruction, the German 
loldiery ha not hesitated to attack and dtttrojr many sacred 
buildings, statues, and sxamples 'of ecclesiastics! art. Our photo- 
liaphi ihow how meuurei are taken, when possible, to enable 
our troopt to remove many itatuel, held in hi|h rererence and 
honour by the congregation! and their prierti, to placet of greater 



taietr, where they can be protected should the Germans again 
commence .helling the (acted building. Our photographs at* oi a 
partially destroyed church at Armentlerss, and our soldiers, under 
tht guidance of one of the prlMts, are taking steps to remove the 
sacred images to a place of safety from any possible rebelling 
of the building on the part of the Germans.- [Official Photographs.} 



tVf * 9* 1 
** w .*ifieJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 20. 191 S 



ROMANCES OF THE REGIMENTS: XCIII.-THE SCOTS GUARDS. 

HOME'S COMMAND AT HOUGOMONT. 






WHEN " the tumult and the shouting dies," 
and sometimes even earlier, military 
operations offer endless occasions for controversy ; 
and the captains concerned find amusement for 
their leisure, and provide instruction for the 
public, in fighting their old battles over again on 




TO PREVENT SUFFERING ON THE FIELD OF BATTLE: INDIAN 

AMBULANCE ORDERLIES, AFTER AN ACTION IN MESOPOTAMIA, 

PICKING UP WOUNDED TURKS. [Official Photograph.] 

paper in order to prove this or that individual 
view. Aftei 1815, the combats of the previous 
twenty years kept the old campaigners' pens busy 
until far on in the 'fifties of last 
century, and we may look forward to 
a certain liveliness of a similar kind 
on a larger scale after the present 
war. The prospect is somewhat 
appalling when we consider the in- 
creased opportunities for learned dis- 
putations ; but it is not without its 
own interest. The huge literature 
of the Napoleonic struggle abounds 
in curious points of this sort, and 
not a few of them are confirmatory 
of the old commonplace " what great 
events from little causes spring." 

One of these was the question 
of Colonel Home's command at 
Hougomont. That gallant officer, 
with six hundred of the Fusilier 
Guards (since 1877 the Scots Guards) 
played a very memorable part in the 
defence of the famous chateau at 
Waterloo, and throughout the brunt 
of the action he had to act quite 
independently, believing that he 
was the senior officer present. His 
belief arose from the blunder of a stupid 
sergeant, of which hereafter. But the N.C.O.'s 
mistake had no evil consequences as far as the 



defence of the position was concerned rather 
the reverse, for Home's conduct of his part of 
the work was entirely satisfactory. The obscuring, 
however, of his actual status led to some after- 
confusion which attributed Home's operations to 
Colonel Hepburn. It was even represented that 
that officer's /Hepburn's) services 
had not found the public recogni- 
tion due to them, and that Home 
held no separate command entitling 
him to the credit he received. But, 
although it was not the Duke of 
Wellington's original intention that 
Home should act separately, a 
chain of odd circumstances threw 
him into that position, which he 
maintained throughout the best part 
of the day, with the Duke's full 
knowledge and consent. 

Between the buildings of Hougo- 
mont and the enemy lay a wood, 
which was held at the opening of 
the action by Colonel M'Donnel. 
As is well known, the overwhelming 
attack of the French tirailleurs drove 
M'Donnel back upon the farm, of 
which the great gates were closed by 
main force when some of the enemy 
were already within. M'Donnel had 
lost heavily, and the Nassau con- 
tingent he had with him was utterly 
dispersed. Wellington, knowing that the position 
was critical, now sent down Colonel Woodford with 
the Coldstream Guards. This reinforcement drove 




NO ILL FEELING ON OUR SIDE AFTER FIGHTING: GIVING WATER 

TO A WOUNDED TURKISH PRISONER IN MESOPOTAMIA. 

Official Photograph. 

back the enemy, and thereafter Woodford joined 
M'Donnel in the garden of Hougomont, and there 
they stayed during the rest of the affair, with 

{ConttntteJ wtrltaf. 



March 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r i-art wt -| 

I Ne.v Series | 1 5 



United States TTroops preparing for Hction. 





THE AMERICAN FRONT : MACHINE-GUNNERS MOVING TO POSITION BEFORE AN ASSAULT ; INFANTRY. 



"American troops took part for the firit time yesterday," said a 
Reuter message of March 10, " in destruction operations against 
enmy work*. Two simultaneous raid* had been planned on the 
Franco- American front In Lorraine, one to the east of Reillon, the 
other to the east of NeuvUfers and before Badonvillers. The 
Reillon raiding detachment, consisting of 60 French sappers and 



50 American infantrymen belonging to the Ohio Regiment, left 
the trenches at 5.30 after a vigorous artillery preparation. They 
traversed 500 yards in the open, under a German barrage, and 
seised upon the objectives. In the Neuvillers operation, carried 
out by two French companies and one American, the enemy were 
driven out of three lines of trenches.- -[Photos, by Topical.] 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 20. 1918 



their hands full of work immediately concerned 
with the defence at that point. 

Not long after the arrival of the Coldstream 
Guards, a second reinforcement appeared. This 







A FRIENDLY TURN TO A WOUNDED- " FRIENDLY " : 

HELPING A MESOPOTAMIA ARAB MOST OF THE 

LOCAL ARABS ARE ON OUR SIDE THROUGH A 

SHELL-HOLE IN A WALL. [Official Pliologiaplt.] 

was Colonel Home with five companies of the 
Fusilier Guards. He had orders to hold the 
exits of the wood, and communicate with 
and report to the officers commanding in 
the chateau and the garden to wit, to 
M'Donnel and Woodford. 

Home took up his position accordingly 
on the right flank of the post, and, having 
done so, sent a sergeant into the house to 
make the necessary report of the presence 
of the Fusilier Guards and the task assigned 
to them namely, the defence of the extreme 
right. But the sergeant returned to say 
that he had looked everywhere, but had 
failed to find the officers in question. 

Home therefore concluded quite properly 
that he must carry on alone. His duty was 
one of the heaviest responsibility, for he held 
the most vulnerable side of the position. 
His responsibility was soon further increased 
by a circumstance which threw him, as sole 
commander, into direct relation with the 
Duke. This circumstance was the appear- 
ance of an aide-de-camp, Major Hamilton, 
who asked for the senior officer. Hamilton 
was taken at once to Home. 

" Do you command here ? " the aide-de- 
camp inquired. 

" I believe so," replied Home. " I have 
seen no officer superior to myself. It has 
been reported to me that Colonels M-'Donnel 
and Woodford are not to be found." 



On this, Hamilton delivered an urgent message 
from the Commar.der-in-Chief. " You are to 
hold the position to the very last, and on no 
account to give it up or abandon it." 

" The Duke's orders shall be obeyed." 

Hamilton retired ; but in a minute or two. 
fearing he had not been sufficiently explicit, he 
came back and said, " Do you, Colonel Home, 
perfectly understand the full extent of the Duke's 
order ? He holds the maintaining of this post to 
be essential to the success ot the day's operations. 
It must on no account be given up." 

" I perfectly understand," Home replied, " and 
the order shall be punctually obeyed. Tell the 
Duke from me, if the enemy do not attack us 
much more vigorously than anything I have as 
yet seen, we shall continue to hold our ground 
without much difficulty " 

Home " carried on " with complete success 
until half-past three, when the stables took fire. 
Thereupon he went into the house to see to the 
removal of the wounded. Passing thence into the 
garden, he found M'Donnel and Woodford, who 
were ignorant of his presence. He delivered the 
Duke's message to them, and on rejoining the 
Fusiliers found himself superseded by Colonel 
Mercer, who had hitherto held the orchard, but 
was now sent to the right flank with the remainder 
of the regiment. After four o'clock, Hepburn 
joined them, but took no oversight and made no 
changes. He had no special mission. He did not 
even enter the house or grounds. He had come 
to Hougomont merely because all his command 
on the main front of battle had fallen, and he had 
nothing left to do there. Wellington fully recog- 
nised the responsibility which Home had assumed 
owing to the sergeant's error, and admitted 
his title to the rewards of duty finely done. 




A WAY THEY HAVE IN THE ARMY: AN R.A.M.C. OFFICER 

IN MESOPOTAMIA GIVING A CIGARETTE TO A WOUNDED 

TURKISH PRISONER. (Official Photograph.] 



NUrch 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



f 'Part 93 ~|_ . _ 

[N sriJ 17 




On the front: CQith an Huatralian Tunnelling Company. 




DEEP DOWN : WORKING UNDERGROUND ; A RESCUE-STATION FOR MEN OVERCOME BY THE AIR. 



" Tunnelling Companies" explain thir mum d'ftrt in th 
itMlf. Thty do rariout lorti at underground work, *nd are *]*o 
employed at many poinlf *lon( the front to run mint (tllerin under 
enemr outwork*. Adrtnturo at tinua com* their wy. Sorm- 
timei partita havt arriTtd, in tht course of thtir underjround 
rcaalioni, clot* toou(h to where German mininf or counttr- 



mininf partitj are at work, to hear, through the inttrTtning earth, 
tht clink of tht enemy'i pidu and ihorek. And on occasion it has 
happened that tht tunntllen of ont aide or tht other have broken 
through into their oppontnlt' worlta, the fierce fighting with pidu 
and ihortli that followed rMuKing, almott alwayt, in tht rout of 
the Ctrmanj.- [Xurtm/ian Official 



. r Hart W I 
|_Nc Seri,:. J 



FHE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 20. 1918 



The British Hrmy Messenger pigeon Service 



S 





TRAINING YOUNG BIRDS : A FLIGHT HOMING IN MID-AIR ; AT A TOWN TRAINING CENTRE. 



Casualties to pigeon-messenger* at the front are, in the nature of 
thinfs, heavy and conitant. Bullets and ihrapnel take their toll 
of them, especially those made use of in carrying messages from 
trenches, and there are other ways in which the pigeons meet 
their deaths. In the 1870 War, the Germans employed hawks to 
harry French messenger-pigeons, but, so far, nothing has been said 



of the use of hawk* in the present war. Owing to the expend.* 
ture of pigeon life, constant supplies of young birds arrive at the 
training stations birds of about three months old, on the average. 
They are taken out daily to ever -increasing distances from their 
lofts, and leaAi to find their way back, until they become reliable 
and are "passed" for first-line service. [Photos, by S. and G.} 



__ 



M.rch 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



r Part 93 1 ... 
LNw Series J~' * 







TTbe British Hrmy JMeasenger pigeon Service. 





TAKING BIRDS OUT : TO THE TRENCHES BY 

A regular going and cominj supply-senrice oi birdj between the 
pigeon homing loin at Dirisional and other headquarters U part 
o( the ordinary Army routine at the Front. Concurrently with it 
ihe treinlnj of pigeons goei on elsewhere. Between the loltt of 
trained bird! t rioui hed<iur1er itationi in the neW nd the 
trenches, and alo, ai we hae preTiouly illustrated, irom auto- 



DESPATCH-RIDER ; TO LET FLY FOR TRAINING. 

mobile pigton-lolti clow to the battle-lront, at all hour, cyclist 
dapatch.riderl are about, carrying cratM of pigeoru to whererer 
they are wanted. In the training routine detail shown in the 
tecond illuitration, a motor-car load of pigeon-crates with young 
birds is stalling for the places where the birds are to be freed to 
learn to make their way to their loits. [PJicte: by S. and G.] 



20 - [ N /,"^U- THE ILLUSTRATED 




Hn "Hrm of the Service' that has pr< 





ONE OF OUR CAMEL CORPS IN PALESTINE : A DETACHMENT PAS! 

Several of our Camel Corps are at the front in various war-areas. In one field of operations, for instance, the famous India 
" Imperial Service " camelry, the Bikanir Camel Corps, which is permanently maintained as a regular contingent by the State e 
Bikanir, has 05 several occasions proved its fighting value. There are also British -Yeomanry and Anzac camel corps, .and Egyptia 



SWS. March 20. 1 9 1 8. fs^ 



2 1 



its (Hortb witb General HUenbv's forces. 





;ROUGH A PALM-GROVE WHILE ON A HUNT FOR TURKISH PATROLS. 

Army camel coro. .11 of which have made their mark. British and Anzac camel Corp. have rp.t.dly done 
on the E^roban fiontier^in th. Senui campaign., and during the advance aero., the Sma. Detert-and al.o 

a detachment of a camel cor?, in Pale.tin. moving acroM country on a reconnoitring and .lc.rmi.hing exped, 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 20. IBIS 




pigeons as a Substitute for direless at Sea. 











CARRIER-PIGEONS : SKIPPER CRISP'S HISTORIC BIRD ; A DRIFTER EMBARKING PIGEONS. 



Carrier-pigeons, familiar to Londoners through the Tank Bank, are 
used not only by the Army for sending messages back from the 
front line, but also by the Navy, especially on board smaller 
auxiliary crait not carrying wireless installations, and on seaplanes, 
for communicating with the shore in case of submarine attack or 
other emergencies. These birds have saved many a life. Such 



a pigeon (seen in the upper photograph on the left-hand page) was 
used by the heroic Skipper Thomas Crisp, of the trawler "Nelson," 
as he lay mortally wounded by a German shell, to convey the 
following message : " ' Nelson ' being attacked by submarine. 
Skipper killed. Send assistance at once." Skipper Crisp was 
awarded a posthumous V.C. The bird delivered its message in timr 



March 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



f Part ttl I 
LXfw SeriesJ 




pigeons Carried by SeapCanes for Distress Messages. 





A SEAPLANE'S WINGED MESSENGERS : RELEASING 

./i<.j 

for help to reach the crew, though it was wounded in one of its 
wine* b T German shrapnel. At least two pigeons are carried in 
ercry ieaplane, to that messages for help may be Mnt in duplicate. 
Describing the French Fleet's similar hydroplane pigeon-poll, 
Mr. C. D. Knox writes : " Each bird has tied to ill leg a little 
aluminium cartridge that is about the length of the cap of a 



A PIGEON ; FIXING A MESSAGE TO THE BIRD. 

stylographic pen, and about half as wide across. . . . The bird 
alightf [i*., on reaching its shore quarters] on a carefully balanced 
platform, and is at once entrapped. Its weight rings a bell to 
summon an attendant. ... It is rare that a pilot of a hydroplane 
has not time to write a note indicating his exact position. "- 
[Hrilisli \aval Official PhotograplK.} 



Port Ml 1 
M SerfcJ 



fHE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 20. IB 18 



TThc "first-Hid Nursing Yeomanry" at Olorh. 




'THE FANNIES": CLEANING UP ; SETTING A DEFECT RIGHT, CHAUFFEiK-FASWON 



March 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r " M ~\ . 

(.New Serte.T Z * 



The " first-Hid pursing Yeomanry" at dork. 




AMONG "THE FANNIES": LOADING UP WITH DISINFECTED BLANKETS; READY TO START. 



The "Firit-A!d Hurling Yeomanry " h.i won th admiration Mid 
esteem o< *U who he come In conUct with the organisation, 
jtut aa have the "Voluntary Aid Detachmenti of the Brltith Red 
Croe 'Socif," the "Territorial Force Nuriinj Aiocition," etc., 
and alo, worklnf In other way, the "W.A.A.C.," or "Woman't 
Array Auxiliary Corp.," the "Weed," and the newer " W.R.M.S.," 



the Womm'e >ea->erTice helpen, the "Wreni." Without laying 
ouraelree open to a charge of attempting to perpetrate too far- 
fetched a compariton, for the way they hare come forward, and 
for the "yeoman service" they are rendering to the Army and 
nation, they deaene the thanki of all, equally with their homrlund 
brothers, the Yeomanry, at the Iront- [Official ' 



' 1 

SetksJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



M.r.-h 20. 1918 



THE NEW WARRIORS: XXIV- "COOKIE." 



1 



METHODIUS is really rather glittering ; no 
one can thrill you with puttees as 
Methodius, and his touch in sticks and hats is 
almost holy perhaps, after all, it is rather a 
shame to call him " Cookie." 

His other name is Messing Officer. He will 
tell you that the things he was apparently 
(and unfortunately) 
born for were to 
sniff lethal odours 
from cook - house 
boilers, try to per- 
suade privates that 
an occasional fish- 
menu is really to 
their good, in addi- 
tion to being most 
baffling to U-boats, 
and, finally, to do 
dizzying financial 
operations with the 
5id. 

That 5jd. is an 
extreme and funda- 
mental factor in Arma- 
geddon. It is the 
thing that " Cookie " 
can spend lavishly 
nay, royally on the 
luxuries and frilleries 
of eating. TheA.S.C. 
provide the backbone 
of rations, so to speak that is, bread, meat, 
bacon, salt, sugar, and tea ; the sid. is the 
human side of Tommy's appetite. This allowance 




AT RAMADIE ON THE EUPHRATES, WHERE GENERAL 

MARSHALL HAD HIS ADVANCED BASE BEFORE MOVING 

AGAINST HIT: ARABS ON COOLIE WORK AT A SUPPLY 

DUMP BY THE RIVERSIDE. (Official Photograph.] 



per man per day over and above rations is ex- 
pended by " Cookje " wilh the Army Canteens 
Committee for fish, jam, vegetables, margarine, 
the basic sorts of puddings, and every mortal 
thing else that forms the extra. Fivepence, 
even with a ha'penny, may not sound a glorious 
sum to those who have to buy vegetarian dishes 

at patriotic restau- 
rants ; but multiply 
that 5jd. by num- 
bers by sections, 
companies, and bat- 
talions, and so on 
and you will see that 
the high-finance side 
of it can be pretty 
extensive. 

Methodius, >n fact, 
insists that it is 
damnably extensive. 
He wanted to initiate 
me into the mystical 
figures of Army 
Book 48 (in which 
all returns were made 
daily), and he tried 
to ensnare me in the 
triplicated complica- 
tions that go on be- 
tween him and the 



Army accountants ; 

but I hate being 
suffocated by returns, and we considered other 
things though it might be noted in passing that 
the Messing Officer has to show economy, wisdom 

[Continued averhaj. 




ORIGINALLY THE RESIDENCE AT RAMADIE ON THE EUPHRATES OF A BRITISH REPRESENTATIVE IN 
MESOPOTAMIA: AND AFTER THAT A DIVISIONAL HEADQUARTERS OF THE TURKS: THE ROOFLESS WALLS 

AS THEY NOW STAND. 

Ramadl. w the scene of a brilliant victory by Sir Stanley Maude at the end of last September. From there, as an advanced base, 
General Marshall advanced to the recent capture of Hit. [0.0fci<iJ Photograph.] 



M..-ch 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



f I'art in , 
|_Nc..- SwicJ 2' 



OTith General Marshall's Hrmy in Mesoootamia. 





ADVANCING FROM RAMADIE : INDIAN TRANSPORT CORPS FIRST LINE UNITS ; R.H.A. EN ROUTE. 



Tb* Indian Army "Supply and Truuport Corp* " ii more than 
juftiiying itl creators in the present stages of tht Mesopotamia cam- 
paign, in the overland operationi acrois country between the Tigris 
ind the fiuphrateg. It was firit organised fome eighteen or 
twenty yeart ago, and rendered capable of the indefinite expansion 
a hat ihown itielf ready for, during Lord Kitchener'i reign at 



Simla, when the reorganisation of the corps was completed. It 
comprises mule corps, camel cadres, and pony-cart train cadres, 
of all of which we hare from time to time given illustrations 
during the advance to Baghdad, where the various units were 
employed between camps, independently and in conjunction with 
the rirer transport and supply wrrice. [Official Photograph.] 



. I Pr M -I 

Inn S.rn.J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEW1 



March 20. 1818 



as well as reasonable lavishness. Though 
Methodius was but a lawyer before the war, he 
has now turned himself into an expert caterer. 
Naturally, he has other duties the specialty 
about these Army specialists is that they always 
have other duties. His, of course, are all more or 
less cook-housery. He is responsible for the 
catering of his battalion. In conspiracy with the 




IN THE LINES AT AN INDIAN COLUMN'S HALTING-PLACE IN MESOPO- 
TAMIA: A LEAN-TO STRETCHER-SHELTER AGAINST THE NOON-DAY SUN. 

Official Photogiaph. 

Master-Cook he draws up the Diet Sheet ; and., 
being a wise man, sees tb it that it is infinitely 
varied, so that his victims will not die of ennui 
brought on by brown stew. In time he becomes 
rather a virtuoso in meals, and by intensive study 
of the " Manual of Military Cooking " sees to it 
that the variety and unexpected- 
ness of the menus become really 
pleasant excitement. 

In co - operation with the 
Quartermaster he orders the foods 
that are to make up these meals, 
checks the A.S.C. rations when 
they arrive and also those which, 
of his own sweet initiative, he 
has bought from the A.C.C. 
seeing that not only the quantities 
of these are correct, deviating not 
by one ration of pepper from the 
fixed Regulation, but also that 
their quality is good and their 
purity unblemished. 

Having constructed his scheme 
of meals and having ordered them, 
he sees that they are cooked in 
seemly manner, and eaten with 
satisfaction. The test of perfec- 
tion in cook-housing is the men's 
mess, and Methodius goes straight 
to the experts, inquiring of the men 
at meals what complaints there 
are and why. If there are any 
complaints Methodius examines 
them and puts them right. 



He is also the master of the plate. No sinecure 
this in a land where " cups, enamel, pint," have a 
way of disappearing into the blue in a perfectly 
astonishing manner. The plate may not be 
costly, but, as implied, its production is rather 
continuous ; Methodius finds it so, since he has 
to keep a full battalion adequately supplied with 
plates, mugs, dixies, pepper-castors, and the like. 
These he buys from the certain 
amount allowed him by the sale 
of " by-products " dripping and 
bones. This money must not be 
spent in food, but on comforts 
and mess plate are such. 

And, of course, the lad must 
be an enemy of waste every- 
body in every position in the 
Army nowadays is a sworn 
enemy of waste. Methodius's 
special bulge is the waste that 
dwelleth but should not in 
the swill-tub. He is downright 
and fearful about waste in bread, 
and that casual slice or half- 
loaf that finds its way thither 
will mean unlimited wrath. 
Nothing that can be turned to 
account may be thrown away 
and, it might be said, nothing 
is. The By-Products Officer and 
himself have put the fear of 
heaven into all ranks. 

Methodius leads a large, 
hurried, harassed, and com- 
plex life, he assures everyone ; he has an idea 
that he is on the verge of something whether 
more complications or miraculous efficiency he 
does not know or cannot say. It is a mystery, 
like the sex his cook-house is just being taken 
over by W.A.A.C.'s. W. DOUGLAS NEWTON. 




A MEASURE UNIVERSALLY ADOPTED IN MODERN WAR: BLINDFOLDING 

A TURKISH PRISONER IN MESOPOTAMIA BEFORE TAKING HIM THROUGH 

OUR TRENCH-LINES. 

The precaution Is obviouily necessary, in the event of the man's escape back to his own 
side with information about things he had seen. [Official Photograph.} 



March 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



I r * n ** "i_o 
1 N>- Series j~ 28 



In the field with the Mesopotamia Hrmy. 





>. 



DURING AN ADVANCE : DIVISIONAL HEADQUARTERS ; A REAL " YOUNG TURK " AS PRISONER. 



In the upper illustration j, , e n pail of the headquarters entourage 
of a DiTitional General, while temporarily in the Tlcinfty of what 
had not lonf before been one of the Turkish trenches. A group 
of Staff officers is seen in the foreground during a brief inter- 
mtdUK spell, while the advance is proceeding ahead, within Tiew 
oi :the officer watching the course of the engagement through his 



field glass. Good Staff work is characteristic of the Mesopotamia 
command, as borne testimony to in the despatches of the late Sir 
Stanley Maude. In the lower Illustration is shown an interest ing 
episode during the interrogation of Turkish prisoners, seen standing 
by in the background, after an action between Ramadie and Hit 
on the Euphrates, on March 9. [Official 



3*>-[N" r so 9 rL~l THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. M.rch 20. 1918 




CKitb General fireball's "Croope it 




BETWEEN RAMADIE AND THE EUPHRATES VALLEY : RESERVES DURING AN ACT1 



One gets a fair idea of the general flat, barren, stony nature of the country over which General Marshall's troops in Meso- 
potamia are operating between the Tigris and Euphrates, from this photograph and others in the present issue. Our advancing 
columns are in force on the Euphrates side of the district, as the recently announced capture of Hit on the Euphrates, and 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. March 20. 1918-f N >'"'sS M ]- 31 



lesopotamia, 


in 


the Country towards Hit, 


w 







- 



!% J 

>3f 







. 




U.TING WHILE THE TROOPS OF THE FIRING-LINE PRESS BACK THE ENEMY. 

tb driving of the Turks itill further back, make evident. In the valley of each river sparse palm-groves are scattered over 
the country. They stretch inland ai far ai the annual inundations caused by the overflowing of the rivers when the snows of 
Armenia and the northern tableland of Asia Minor melt and pour down in widespread floods. [Official Photograph.^ 



I'.rl ,, 

e* Serlt- 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 20. I91S 




dtth the Hrmy in Mesopotamia. 



ft* ? 

> 4 











WHILE ADVANCING : A DIVISIONAL SIGNALLING UNIT ; A TURK ARTILLERY OBSERVATION-MOUND. 



Every Army divition has iti ngnalling corp, unit! or companies 
belonging to the Royal Engineer!. In both the Britiih and Indian 
services, inch companies are maintained ai organisations per- 
manently attached to division!. Signalling units, jo constituted, 
are on service with all our armies, wherever they are before the 
enemy, on all war front* from Flanders to Mesopotamia. One of 



the signalling company parties with General Marshall's army is 
shown in the upper photograph, at an advanced-line halting-place, 
together with its train of pack-mules lor carrying equipment and 
gear. An artificial mound of reeds and grass, like a big Mack, 
dumped by the Turks in the open for an artillery observation-post, 
is seen in the lower illustration. [Official Photographs.: 



March 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r p.m >3 "i ., , 
I NV Series J ' 3 * 



During an Hdvance of the Mesopotamia Hrmy. 






* I 

i 


1 




\ 




f 

! 






BETWEEN 




J 



A CAPTURED TURKISH "CROW'S-NEST" FOR OBSERVATION. 



In the flat, level plain of arid Mnd waste and desert which extend! 
over wide tracts of the country all over Mesopotamia, away from the 
nvcr valleys ol the Tifri> and Euphrates, tht Tiew is only bounded 
by extent o< the horiion, as at sea. The higher up, therefore, that 
an observer can be posted the fieater scope lor observation he has. 
That was the ration d'ftr* ol the structure shown In this illus- 



tration of a Turkish crow's-nest observation and signalling put. 
Some of our men, off duty, are seen exploring it after rts capture. 
The look-out platform would be lowered to ground-level or raised 
on its standard or pole, by pulleys and tackle as required. When 
up, a rope-ladder, as seen, gave access. The pole itself is h<*la 
steady and upright by stays all round.- [Official 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



M.rch 20. 1318 



WOMEN AND THE WAR. 



HOUSEHOLD management is, by common 
consent, woman's work. Curiously enough, 
house-planning is almost universally looked upon 
as something that only a man can undertake 
successfully. Why the housewife, who has prac- 
tical experience at her back, should know less 
about a given subject than a man, who has ncne 
at ail, is one of the minor mysteries of life that 
women have long been trying to solve. Mean- 
time, sad experience has driven not a few of them 
to the conclusion that, to quote an expert, if 
" the architect designed the drawing-rooms, the 
devil designed 
the kitchens." 
Women have 
submitted for 
so long to the 
inconvenience of 
houses planned 
with an eye to 
anything but 
domestic com- 
fort and hygiene 
that it is not, 
perhaps, surpris- 
ing that archi- 
tects should 
have persisted 
in their bad 
habits. But all 
that is now to 
end. The well- 
planned from 
the housewife's 
point of view 
dwelling is to 
be one of the 
" after the war" 
improvements 
with which the 
Ministry of Re- 
construction is 

now dealing. "OUR DAY" IN INDIA: NATIVES LOOKING AT THE GIFTS SENT 

BY H.M. THE QUEEN TO BE SOLD FOR THE CAUSE. 

To quote the 
official an- 
nouncement re- 
cently made, a 
Woman's Sub- 
committee of 
the Advisory 

Council has been appointed by the Minister of 
Reconstruction to collect information and to give 
advice on house plans from the point of view of 
the housewife. It is felt that in the past, in the 
preparation of plans for working-class houses, 
sufficient consideration has not been given to the 
comfort and convenience of the women who are to 
live in the houses. It is hoped that no con- 
siderable scheme of house-building will be under- 
taken in the future without careful attention 




The King, last month, sent a telegram to the Viceroy of India, In which he said : 
" I have just learned with pleasure and satisfaction that the appeal for funds on 
' Our Day ' met with so hearty a response throughout India, resulting in the collection 
of a sum amounting to nearly a crore. It is especially gratifying that in this effort 
all classes and creeds united in thus testifying to their feelings of admiration and 
sympathy towards those who have been stricken while fighting for the honour and 
security of the Empire." A crore of rupees Is worth about 666,656. 



being given to the saving of labour for the 
wife and to the convenience and health of the 
family generally. 

The Sub-Committee consists of a number of 
women the majority of whom belong to organisa- 
tions that deal with various social problems. 
Lady Emmott, the Chairman, is President of the 
London Branch of the National Union of Women 
Workers, an active worker in the Suffrage cause, 
a woman gifted with practical commonsense, and 
during her work has been brought into close and 

intimate touch 
with problems 
affecting the 
life and welfare 
of the working 
classes. Mrs. 
C. S. Peel, an- 
other member, 
has the well- 
deserved repu- 
tation of being 
the most prac- 
tical woman on 
household af- 
fairs in the 
United King- 
dom. She has 
more than once 
expressed the 
opinion that in 
English houses 
at least a third 
of each day is 
wasted in doing 
work which in 
no way adds to 
the comfort of 
its inmates. If 
half the sugges- 
tions she will 
surely have to 
offer ever reach 
the stage of 
being put into 
practice, the 
English house 
will be the 
most comfort- 
able living place 
most contented 



and the English servant 
creature alive. 



the 



Here are one or two of her views on the house 
as it should be : " In a labour-saving house, all 
rooms should be under rather than over furnished, 
and free of heavy, stuffy draperies. There should 
be a gas-ring or electric-heater in each room or 
on each floor, so that in case of illness food c.<n 
be prepared. Hot water there will always be, .lay 



VUrch 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Ht a Chinese Labour Corps Camp in f ranee 




KEEPING THE CHINESE NEW YEAR : A DANCING DISPLAY ; " AT HOME TO CALLERS AT A HUT. 



The Chinese New Year's Day (February II In the Weitern CIen<lr) 
wu obserred u a festival after the natiTe manner, at far ai 
possible, by the Chinamen of the Labour Corpi In France. They 
were allowed to be off duty for the day, and made high holiday. 
The night before wal spent in feasting, ai t home, and. the day 
itself in merrymaking, Titi to joss (or prayer) houses, temporarily 



erected, band processions, and sports. One " event" at a camp 
porti attembly is ihown in the firit illustration, with a British 
soldier keeping time by clashing two steel helmets for cymbals. 
A, Chinaman receding New Year's callers outside the door of his 
decorated hut, to exchange the compliments of the season, is seen 
in the lower illustration.- [Official Photograph.} 



_r ) -i 

I Nrw Sir, J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 20. 181B 



and night." " There are people who build houses, 
and there are more people who rebuild houses, and 
large numbers who do up houses ; and, if one 
cannot do all one would like, it is generally 
possible to achieve some of one's ambitions." 
" Life is too short and time too valuable to waste 
in doing work which is unnecessary, and which, 
adds little or nothing to our comfort." " Unless 




OUR DAY" IN INDIA: CHILDREN SELLING FLAGS IN BOMBAY. 



great changes are made in our households, it will 
become even more difficult to obtain servants, 
beQause so many professions are now open to 
young women that they are in a position to choose 
how they will earn a living." 

* . * 

The constitution of the Women's 
Sub-Committee, however, does not 
apparently mean that the woman 
architect, who has for so long been 
striving to gain recognition, is to 
have a chance in planning the 
houses in which other women will 
have to live. As at present denned, 
the duties of the newly elected will 
consist in examining plans for new 
buildings submitted by the Archi- 
tects' Committee, and visiting and 
reporting on specimen houses. Doors 
and windows will come in for their 
inspection, they will have something 
to say about the number of rooms 
and their size, keeping at the same 
time a keen eye on everything that 
concerns the comfort and conveni- 
ence of the woman who will one day 
be called upon to " run " the house 
under examination. The feminine 
point of view is not to be restricted 
to the Committee, who will visit different dis- 
tricts in the country and get into touch with 
women whose experience is likely to make their 
advice of value. 

* 

In America they don't have the prejudice 
against the woman architect that appears to 



exist in this country. The fact that so few 
women, comparatively speaking, take up the 
profession of architecture in this country is due 
not to the fact that they consider their presence 
in it unnecessary, but because until recently so 
many difficulties were placed in the way of their 
success. But America, in the person of Miss 
Marcia Mead, owns the first woman who planned 
and sketched every detail of a 
scheme for a model community 
of workmen's houses, designed in 
such a way that the exteriors 
are as attractive as the interiors 
are convenient, and in conformity 
with every known modern notion 
of domestic hygiene. 

Each house is regulated to the 
size of the family destined to oc- 
cupy it. There are flats with two 
rooms, or three or four rooms, 
and houses with five ; and each 
flat, as well as each house, has its 
separate entrance and, what is 
interesting, a separate backyard 
ior each family. The provision 
of the backyards to flats is 
made possible by arranging that 
the flats shall be only two 
storeys in height, each having 
the same privacy as a house. 
Fences are replaced by a shrubbery division, 
the object of this particular feature being 
to make backyards so attractive that they, 
instead of the streets, shall become the centre of 
social life. From the feminine point of view, the 




OUR DAY" IN INDIA: EAST AND WEST AN ENGLISH LADY 
SELLING A FLAG TO AN INDIAN GENTLEMAN. 



most important innovation is the way in which 
sinks and other domestic fixtures have been 
placed with a view to making her work as com- 
fortable as possible for the woman who will 
use them. Each house, too, is designed to 
preserve privacy within the house as well as 
outside it. CLAUDINE CLEVE. 



March 20. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



Part 93 

NCW Eeti 



3 "I _i 

iosJ"" 3 ' 






-AT 



A HOSPITAL-SHIP'S ESCAPE NAVAL AIR VICTORY- SUBMARINES AND SHIP-BUILDING 
THE RUSSIAN CHAOS DESPOILING ROUMANIA PIN-PRICKS FOR HOLLAND-PALESTINE. 

MESOPOTAMIA, AND EAST AFRICA. 



ONCE more the tale of sea-happenings opens 
with an attempt on a hospital-ship ; but 
this time it was happily a failure. On March 10 
the Guildford Castle, home- 
ward bound from the mm^^^^^^^^^^ 
Cape, with 400 wounded 
on board, was entering 
the Bristol Channel, when 
she was fired at by an 
enemy submarine. One 
torpedo missed and passed 
astern ; the second hit 
the vessel, but did not 
explode. The ship carried 
all her proper lights and 
flags, and daylight was 
still good, although visi- 
bility was low. The Gtiild- 
fjrd Castle made Avon- 
mouth under her own 
s'.eam. There were no 
casualties. 

On the 1 2th a fine 
aerial combat took place 
in the North Sea between 
two British seaplanes and 
five enemy aircraft. 
Fighting lasted for half 
an hour, and ceased only 
when our airmen had 
exhausted their ammu- 
nition. An enemy two- 
seater was shot down and 
destroyed, the observer 
of a second 
machine was RKUBBI 
killed, and a 
third was 
driven down 
into the 
water. Both 
our machines 
returned 
safely. It was 
probably the 
remnant of 
one of these 
German ma- 
chines which 
was washed 
up on the 
Kent coast 
the same day, 
and. supposed 
at first to be 
the wreckage 
of a Gotha 
engag:d in 




DURING AN ADVANCE IN MESOPOTAMIA : A PRIVATE 
OF AN INDIAN "SAPPERS AND MINERS" COMPANY 
TRACKING ALONG A TELEPHONE WIRE, LAID AT 

THE SURFACE, TO LOCATE A BREAK. 

The man, having picked up the wire at starling, runs 

the wire through the crescent fork 'on top of the staff, 

until the break is come to. [Official Photograph.} 







ON THE LINE OF MARCH 
UNREELING THE WIRE OF 



ADVANCE. [Official Photograph.] 



the last raid on London. The Royal Naval Air 
Service raided Engel aerodrome and Engel dump 
cm the nth, and started fires. Three enemy 
machines were destroyed, 
and four driven down. 
During the same period 
our naval aviators 
bombed Bruges Dock with 
three tons of explosives. 
They attacked also billets 
and railway sidings at 
St. Pierre Capelle, south 
of Ostend, and registered 
good results. Attacks on 
trenches and combats in 
the air were frequent. 
Two enemy machines and 
a kite-balloon were de- 
stroyed in these opeia- 
tions. 

The returns of sub- 
marine sinkings remained 
unsatisfactory. Fifteen 
large ships, three small, 
and one fishing-boat were 
the recorded victims. Sail- 
ings and arrivals slightly 
increased. The agitation 
for the publication of 
tonnage statistics gained 
force, in view of the 
threatening prospects in 
shipbuilding. It is be- 
lieved, not without rea- 
son, that full 
understanding 
of the serious 
position would 
move the 
workmen to 
greater energy 
and persuade 
them that 
strikes are 
treason. Mas- 
t e r s h i p- 
builders are 
c o'n v i n c e d 
that they 
should be en- 
trusted with 
full responsi- 
bility for the 
carrying out 
of contracts. 
Government 
management 
of the yards 

\Cont'.inted on pane JO 




MESOPOTAMIA : A 
FIELD TELEPHONE 



ROYAL ENGINEER PARTY 
LINE AS THE TROOPS 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 20. 1918 



i:hc British Hdvance on the Buphrates. 




AT RAMADIE : EFFECTS OF DIRECT HITS ON A TURKISH DUMP ; RECOVERED PUMPING APPARATUS. 



The Euphrates has latterly been more prominent than the Tigris 
in the despatches from Mesopotamia. General Marshall's new 
advance on the Euphrates has already led to the capture of Hit 
and the Turks' retreat thence under heavy punishment from air- 
craft. Photographs of these recent operations have not yet, of 
course, reached this country, and those given above illustrate the 



capture of Ramadie on the Euphrates by the late General Sir 
Stanley Maude, who described the battle in his last despatch. The 
Dorsets, Hussars, Horse Artillery, and Indian troops were specially 
mentioned. The General's strategy was masterly. Having led the 
Turks to expect attack in another direction, he hemmed them in 
on three sides, ' ' on the south-east and south by our infantry, 

[Co} t miea opposite. 



March 20, 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Guphratcs Hdvance in Mesopotamia. 








CAPTURED RAMADIE : INDIAN CAVALRY AT THE TURKS' AMMUNITION DUMP ; TURKISH BOMBS. 

and on the west by the cavalry, while to the north ran the river being mainly instrumental in heading the enemy off." Later : 

Euphrates. At 3 a.m. (he continues), the enemy made a deter- "By n a.m. the whole of the Turkish force had surrendered. A 

mined effort to break through our cavalry and retreat by the salient factor in these successful operations was the pait played by 

Aleppo Road, but after an action lasting for Ij hours, they were the cavalry." The pumping machinery shown in one photograph 

driven back into Ramadie, the Hussars and part of a regiment belonged to Sir Edward Jackson's Mesopotamian irrigation scheme, 

of Indian cavalry, with some Horse Artillery and Hotchkiss guns, and was recaptured from the Turks at Ramadie. [Official Pkotos.} 



.- r Part ttf -| 
40 [New Senes | 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



March 20. 1918 



is said to have had the usual paralysing conse- 
quences of bureaucratic contiol. The easy-going 
spirit of the Circumlocution Office has killed that 
necessary hustle which private concerns, working 
against time, could easily command. 

According to the Bolshevik Pravda, Prince 
Lvoff, ex-President of the Council of Ministers of 




THE COAST CAMPAIGN IN PALESTINE : THE MILL AT JERISHEH 
THREE MILES NORTH OF JAFFA, NEAR WHERE THE SCOTTISH 
THEIR CROSSING. {Official Photograph.} 



Revolutionary Russia, set up at Peking a new 
Russian Government which awaits the landing of 
the Japanese at Vladivostok in order to enter 
Siberian territory together with them. At Vladi- 
vostok the Soviet was reported to be forming a Red 
Army. Meanwhile, 
exchanges of views 
between the Allies 
and Japan con- 
tinued, and a report 
from the Elder 
Statesmen to the 
Throne was held to 
be significant of im- 
mediate action. In 
Petrograd misery 
and stagnation pre- 
vailed, and through- 
out the country 
all was confusion. 
Bodies of troops, 
once the Russian 
regular army, hold 
the railways and 
travel aimlessly 
hither and thither. 
They refuse to go 
home. Probably 
they have no idea 
how to get there. 
Outrage is com- 
mon ; hunger and 

pestilence are not far away. German troops were 
within nine miles of Odessa, and occupation was 
reported on the I4th. Erzeroum was reoccupied 
by the Turks. The Empress-Dowager of Russ ; a 



is said to have applied to the Council of the 
People's Commissioners at Petrograd for pecuniary 
help, as she has been left destitute by the con- 
fiscation of the funds of the Impeiial Family. 
The ex-Grand Duke Michael, the Tsar's brother, 
was exiled to Perm. The Grand Duke Nicholas 
is said to be under arrest. 

Germany got 
busy with the spoils 
of Rumania, par- 
ticularly the oil- 
fields. At the same 
time she further 
extended her care 
for small nations by 
squeezing Holland 
over shipping mat- 
ters, and giving 
Denmark, Sweden, 
and Norway sundry 
pinches of mailed 
fingers. 

In Palestine, 
General Allenby is 
still pressing for- 
ward, sometimes 
sharply opposed, as 
at Deir Ballut and 
El Mir, but always 
victorious. On the 
I3th he again ad- 
vanced his lines east of the Jerusalem-Nablus 
road. On the coast our troops advanced three 
miles, captured five villages, and again went on. 

The Mesopotamian messages confirmed the 
captuie of Hit, and a further advance of twenty- 



ON THE RIVER AUJA, 
TERRITORIALS FORCED 




THE COAST CAMPAIGN IN PALESTINE : THE RIVER AUJA, WHERE THE TURKS IN POSITION 

WERE DRIVEN BACK, AND A CROSSING MADE BY FORDING. 

"The crossing of the Auja," says Mr. Massey, the war correspondent, "will stand as one of the finest 
achievements of the Scottish Territorials. At the price of fewer than loo casualties, they captured some 
350 prisoners, killed with the bayonet as many more Turks, and drove the enemy's artillery leagues beyond." 

Official Photograph. 

two miles to Khan Baghdadi, on the Euphrates. 
On the I3th General Van Deventer drove an 
enemy remnant from Poluvu. The Germans desert 
steadily in East Africa. LONDON : MARCH 16, 1918. 



; LONDON : Published Weekly at the Office. 172. Strand, in the Parish of St. Clement Danes, in the County of London, by THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NF.WS AND SKETCH, LTD, 
173, Strand, aforesaid ; and Printed by THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NRWS AND SKETCH. LTD.. Milfnrd Lane. W.C. 1 WEDNESDAY. MARCH 20, I9'8. 
Entered as Second-Class Matter at the New York (N.Y.) Post Office, 1016. 



TVit. Illustrated Wat New March 27. 1918 -Part 94, New Serit 



Che Illustrated War 





ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT : A TRUCK OF AMMUNITION FOR THE GUNS NEAR YPRES. 

Unti.li Official Photograph. 



,_(- rait 94 
z 



rait 94 "I 

N*w Scries J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 27. 1913 



REPRISAL RAIDS: INTERESTING STATISTICSPARLIAMENT PROUD OF OUR AIRMEN 

A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF RECENT WORK-WINGED WAR AND EARTH-BOUND 

WAR THE ATTACK IN THE WEST-ITALIAN INCIDENTS. 



IN view of the growing importance of carrying 
aerial warfare into enemy territory, Mr. 
Macpherson's statistical account of the work done 
in that direction by 
our airmen since 
October impressed 
the House of Com- 
mons and the public 
with its appropriate 
timeliness. It is a 
wonderful record. 
During the five 
months in question, 
thirty - eight raids 
were made on Ger 
man towns, c.n 1 in 
these operations 
forty-eight tons of 
explosives were 
dropped. Individual 
flights numbered up- 



wards of 250, 
a loss to us of 
ten machines, 
con litions of 



with 
only 
The 
war- 




fare had been excep- 
tionally severe, the 
aviators having to 
contend with hazy 



excellent results. About the last there is no 
uncertainty, for the photographic work has 
become so efficient that fine pictorial registers 

are now brought 
back by the raiders. 
Some of these photo- 
graphs have already 
been reproduced in 
this journal. The 
public is well aware 
that the phrase in 
official reports, " di- 
rect hits were ob- 
served," represents 
no mere romantic 
guess, but is ascer- 
tained fact. Burst - 
in; bombs appear 
unmistakably on the 
plate ; and in the 
case of towns and 
cities, of which aerial 
photography gives 
r.n architectural 
ground-plan, the In- 
telligence Depart 
ment is left in no 
doubt as to the pre- 
cise localities struck. 



UNDER THE COMMANDING OFFICER'S EYE: MEN OF 

A WELSH REGIMENT AT WORK DIGGING A TRENCH 

ALONG THE BATTALION FIRST LINE. [Official Photograph] 

an 1 stormy weather, intense cold, and the dim- It is possible to identify even individual build- 
culties of fin ling their way. The cold proved a ings as, for example, the recent instance of the 
very formidable obstacle machine-guns froze, Daimler works at Stuttgart. In that raid a dozen 




A BATTERY AMMUNITION-SUPPLY MOTOR-LORRY TRACTOR ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT : 
TAKING UP FIELD-GUN SHELLS FROM A DUMP. [Official Phctograph.] 

and the men suffered occasionally from frost-bite. machines took part ; eleven reached their object- 
But through it all our sky-pilots went gaily and ive, one failed to return. The amount of 
gallantly, losing no favourable chance, and scoring explosives dropped on that occasion was as 



March 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r '" B < i_<i 

|_N?w SenesJ 



follows : Three bombs of 230 Ib. each, sixteen 
of 112 Ib., an 1 nine of 40 Ib. ; total weight, 
2842 Ib. In all, thirty-six photographic plates 
were exposed, with admirable results. Trains, 
railway stations, munition and electric works, 
gas-works, and similar points of military im- 
portance were shown to have been closely or 
directly touched. On March 18, Mannheim was 
bombed for the third time by British airmen. 
The previous raids were made on Dec. 24 an 1 
Jan. 24-25. In the affair of last week our men 
dropped over a ton of bombs, and secured eight 
direct hits on the Badische Soda Factory, two on 
the docks, and one on another large factory. Our 
aviators fought and drove off enemy squadrons. 
They sent down two German machines out of 
control, and returned without loss to themselves. 



an:l cultured Mannheim to bomb ! " said the 
angry Teuton in a recent Punch. He will get 
many more opportunities to taste his own physic. 
It is the only way. The hotter war, the sooner 
peace. The Under-Secretary for War held out 
hopes that the iron-works in Lorraine would not 
be forgotten, as weather conditions improve. 

Nor did these exploits exhaust the work of the 
airmen. Besides the raids upon German towns, 
the usual attacks upon enemy posts and bases 
went forward at accelerated pace on every possible 
day. The week opened with great activity, and 
on the first of the days here included fighting was 
intense during the morning, slackening slightly in 
the afternoon. After dark, billets were heavily 
bombed. Next day, aerodromes came in for their 
share of the 15 \ tons of explosives representing 



1 




ON THE WESTERN FRONT: ONE OF HINDENBURG'S FORMER ENTRENCHED LINES NOW TRAVERSED BY A BRITISH 

BATTLEFIELD ROAD. [Official Photograph.] 

the twenty-four hours' unloading. The locali- 
ties attacked were round about Douai, Menin, 
and St. Quentin. Thereafter some mist inter- 
fered for a time with operations ; but on the 
i8th the aeroplanes got to business again, bombing 
Busigny railway station and two aerodromes one 
of these the home of big hostile bombing-machines. 
Night-flying machines went out later and dropped 
600 more bombs on Gotha-nests, dumps; and 
billets. 

The event of the week on the British Western 
Front was the opening, on the morning of the 2ist, 
of what is apparently the long advertised German 
offensive heralded by a German bombardment 
along sixty miles of front. Infantry attacks, 
with very severe fighting, followed, delivered in 
mass-formations as usual, and costing the enemy 
correspondingly heavy losses. Outposts were, 
of course, driven in, but, as Sir Douglas Haig 



The statement was received with enthusiasm 
by the Commons, ani Mr. Joynson Hicks asked 
Mr. Macpherson if he would convey to the Corn- 
man ler-in-Chief how enormously proud the House 
was of our airmen. This Mr. Macpherson said he 
would gladly do. The sentiments of Parliament 
are endorsed with emphasis by the nation. 

In this connection it may not be out of place 
to give a list of the German towns bombed 
between March 9 and 18. These were : Mayence, 
on the gth ; Stuttgart, loth ; Coblens, i2th; 
Freiburg, I3th ; Zweibriicken, i6th ; Kaiserlau- 
tern, i7th ; and Mannheim, i8th. Were it not 
necessary to consult the Clerk of the Weather, the 
motto of the Air Service would be " No day 
without a town." Even so, they come very near 
it ; and as " winter passes off " and the " blasts 
obey and quit the howling hill " there will be more 
howling elsewhere. " The fiends ! Our so peaceful 



. r Part <H 
4 ~l_N 



ew Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 27. 1918 



reported, "On no part of the long front of the 
attack did the enemy attain his objectives." 
On the Belgian Front, on the i8th, at dawn, 
the Germans launched powerfil offences in the 
neighbourhood of Nieuport, Dixmude, and Mer- 
cken. Towards Nieuport the 
enemy gained a footing in some 
forward trenches, but was soon 
driven out. They got in also on 
a short trench sector on the 
western bank of the Yser. Their 
flame-throwers aided these first 
rushes ; but the Belgians, counter- 
attacking in broad daylight, re- 
captured all that had been tem- 
porarily lost and gave the enemy 
severe punishment. 

On the same day English troops 
made a successful raid at Ache- 
ville, good patrol work was 
done at Zonnebeke, while enemy 
guns were again active at the 
Bapaume - Cambrai road, and 
more active than usual against 
our forward areas in the Armen- 
tidres and Ypres sectors. The 
enemy carried out raids at Poel- 
capelle. On the igth, on the 
southern extremity of the Cam- 
brai front, English troops came 
back with prisoners from success- 
ful raids. The Poituguese did like- 
wise at Neuve Chapelle ; hostile raiders were driven 
off at Armentidres. The gun-fire rema.ined as before 
in the sectors already mentioned. On the night 
of the igth-2oth Portuguese troops repulsed raids 



Poelcapelle. These attacks were beaten off 
with loss. 

On the French front the usual activities pre- 
vailed, now at this point, now at that, the artillery 
tempest meanwhile rising and falling on all 





IAUND3Y DAY ' WITH A BATTLE-LINE BRITISH DETACHMENT ON THE 

WES ERV FROXT : HANGING OUT THE WASHING TO DRY AMONG 

THE DEBRIS OF A FRENCH FACTORY. [Official Photograph.] 

at Fauquissant, north of Neuverchapelle. On the 
th aoth the enemy attacked two posts of 
ours south of Passchendaele and two north of 



BRITISH WESTERN FRONT TROOPS COLLECTING BATTLEFIELD SALVAGE 
MATERIAL : REMOVING STEEL GIRDERS FROM A DESTROYED FRENCH 
FACTORY. [Official Photograph} 

sectors Chemin des Dames, Champagne, and on 
the Meuse. On the night of the i6th-iyth our 
Allies penetrated enemy trenches to a depth of 
1500 yards at Bois de Malancourt, north-west of 
Verdun, and took 160 prisoners. 
On the i8th, raids were smartly 
repulsed at Juvincourt and Cor- 
beny ; artillery " fairly vigorous " 
at Samogneux, Bezonvaux, and 
in Lcrraine. On the igth, near 
Rheims, trenches were destroyed 
on five-eighths of a mile. Artillery 
was violent at Hill 344. French 
aviators dropped eleven tons of 
bombs in two days on enemy 
bases. On the 2oth, a strong at- 
tack at Arracourt, in Lorraine, 
was frustrated by hand-to-hand 
fighting. Other attacks were 
checked completely at Brule 
Wood, in the Woevre, and at 
Souain, in Champagne. 

On the Italian front, the i8th 
brought livelier artillery duels and 
patrol encounters about Montello, 
Zenson, and Nervesa, where 
enemy working parties were dis- 
persed by machine-gun fire. The 
aviators engaged in several aerial 
combats on the right bank of 
the Piave, and shot down five 
enemy machines. Livenzia aerodrome was again 
bombed. The artillery was active at many 
points. LONDON: MARCH 23, 1918. 



March 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



I fan S4 \ f 
LN Series J 5 




Our HUies at the front in Palestine. 











A SPA HI IN PALESTINE : A NATIVE TROOPER OF THE FRENCH ALGERIAN ARMY CORPS. 



OeUehmenb of Che Western Allies' forces Are seizing in Palestine 
with the columns of General Allenby's army. As will be remem- 
bered, on the occasion of the British Commander-m-Chief'^ formal 
entry into Jerusalem, both French anJ Italian troops had * part 
with our own during the State ceremony. After mentioning the 
.trpaer.ct in the vicinity of the Jaffa Gate, and in conjunction with 



the guard of honour; of " men from English, Scottish, Welsh, and 
Irish counties," and " Australian and New Zealand horsemen," 
Mr. Mas*y ( the war correspondent, added this : " Inside the walls 
were 20 French and 20 Italian troops from the detachments sent 
by their countries to take part in the Palestine operations." The 
French and Italian commanders entered with General Allenby. 



-'[% "sSU] THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. March 27. 1918 




Ht a British Bombing -School 




AT PRACTICE, HELMETED AS IN ACTION : FOLLOWING UP A 

Smoke-bombs made their first appearance in the war after the close of the deadlock trench-warfare on the Aisne, when th 
Allies began their series of thrusts forward and breaks-in along the German entrenched lines of front, inaugurated by th> 
advance on the Somme and Ancre in July 1916. They were used both as hand-missiles to assist rushes of troops at clos> 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. March 27. ll-[ N ' t s J M ]-7 



ngland during SmohcBornb practice. 







SMOKE-BOMBS JUST THROWN TAKING COVER BEHIND THE SMOKE. 

uarters, and also by the enemy largely to form smoke-screens, special shells, fired by the German artillery to cover withdrawals 
uring action while the assailants were still at a distance. Both sides employ smoke-bombs at the present time, and schools for 
ombers in England include smoke-grenade drill in the courses of instruction [Photograph by Bassano.] 



, r Part IM ~\ 

| New Sera- j 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Match 27. 1!)IS 



Ht a British Bombing School in Bngland. 




AT THE SCHOOL HEADQUARTERS : MEMBERS OF * THE INSTRUCTION STAFF ; OFFICERS IN CHARGE. 



As behind the front in Flanders and ^Northern France, on the 
fringe of the war-area, there are numerous bombing schools for 
the Instruction locally of men serving in the lines with their 
regiments, there are, in like manner, numerous bombing schools 
a!! over Great Britain. They are organised in the various 
"Commands," or Territorial districts allotted to the charge of 



general officers for recruiting and training purposes, which include 
groups of military centres, camps, and garrisons, and regiment) 1 
and battalion depSts and schools of special instruction for purposes 
of the war. In previous issues we have given illustrations of 
soldiers practising bomb-throwing, both with dummy and wifi 
"live" bombs of the ordinary explosive type. (Photos, by Ba<sr.n~ 



Ms.ch 27. 191S 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



' I'.il '.,4 -\ 

. .Ne Serie-J 9 



In German Bast Hfrica: H Cdcapon of Supreme Value. 






ON A CAMP PRACTICE-RANGE : A LEWIS-GUN K.A.R. SQUAD AND BRITISH OFFICERS. 






In: Lsn* gun. with its ready portability and genet*] handiness, 
has. thruugh its terrific rapidity of fire, proved itself an ideal 
weapon for bush and Telat actions in Eait Africa. Our tturdy 
f.ghtef* of the King's African Rifles have taken quickly to their 
use as battle-line pieces. A party of K.A.R., with British officers, 
is seen in the above photograph, apparently at a camp practice- 



ground. " Pumping lead " was the expressive phrase that the 
Soudanese Arabs used to employ In talking of the battlefield effect 
of the old-time, comparatively speaking, Catlings, Nordenfelts, 
Gardners, etc., with which the soldiers of Lord Wolseley's Nile 
campaign were equipped. In East Africa our Maxims and Lewis 
guns have proved yet more deadly and efficient "pumpers of lead." 



10-W?LT-TH1 ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, March 27. 1918 




future JVlarksmen of the Smpirc 









- 





- 








WINNERS OF THE IMPERIAL CHALLENGE SHIELD AND A MESSAGE FROM THE KI 

Major-General Lord Cheylesmore, who is an ex-Grenadier Guardsman, a former commandant of a Grenadier Guards battalion, 
and also of the regiment as a whole, as President of the National Rifle Association (under whose auspices the Btsley Meeting 
is held), has throughout the war shown exceptional interest in school and cadet corps rifle practice. As President of the 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAP NEWS. IVUrch 27. 1 91 S-^'^]- H 



Sastboume School Cadet Corps' Hcbievement. 





RD CHEYLESMORE AT THE PRESENTATION TO ST. CYPRIAN'S SCHOOL CADET CORPS. 

N.R.A., he visited Eastbourne to present the Imperial Challenge Shield to the Cadets of St Cyprian's Preparatory School, in 
testimony to their achievement in winning the trophy in an open competition in which 224 school teams participated. The 
sent St. Cyprian's a message of congratulation, read to the assembled boys by Lord Cheylesmore. [Photograph by Lank.} 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Much 27. i9:S 




i:hc Stones of Venice" protected against Bombs. 






PROTECTION FOR VENICE : THE DOGES' PALACE AND ST. MARK'S ; THE PALACE COURTYARD. 



The architectural treasures of Venice have been protected as far 
as may be from the air-vandals by sand-bags and brickwork and 
other coverings. The great air-raid on the night of February 26, 
when 300 bombs were dropped, was the forty-fifth which Venice 
had endured, and several famous churches were damaged. " The 
details given in the official statement," writes Mr. Ward Price, 



" set one free to refer to the extremely narrow escape which the 
Doges' Palace had. Fifteen bombs fell near it, fortunately into 
the waters of the lagoon . . . one, indeed, according to some re- 
ports . . . missing by very little the Bridge of Sighs. Another 
building ... the destruction of which was deliberately attempted, 
is the Rialto Bridge." [French Official Motograpks.] 



March 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r P m -| , . 

I New Series I" 'I* 



pans Monuments protected against Bombs. 




PROTECTION FOR FRENCH MONUMENTS : 
At in Venire, so in Paris, the authorities hare protected famous 
'Hidings and sculptures with sand-bags and otherwise against bombs 
irom enemy aircraft In this connection it may be recalled that 
tii commander of the German air forces was recently reported to 
:.i<- said: "It is true tfat the aerial attack on Paris on the 
nights of Jtnuaiy 33-31. March 8-9. and March ll-u had no 



direct military aims in view, and that they also were not 
against the fortress, but against the City of Paria. The r.-encli 
hare no reaion to be indignant, as these attacks were a punishment 
for the enemy's attacks last Christmas Ee and in January. . . . 
We are now waiting to see whether the French Government will 
take these severe penalties to twut."[Fmu'i Official 



i 



P.irt HI 
ew Sei.; 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



M./ck 27. 1918 



ROMANCES OF THE REGIMENTS: XCIV.-THE HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY. 

A HIGHLAND LINGUIST. 



"DARRALLIER of the yist, was down on his 
.1 ' luck It was the subaltern's usual trouble, 
the old story a purse not over-well filled ; and 
in the Peninsula, with its incidental gaieties, the 
pleasant summer weather of the South, and the 
jolly, happy-go-lucky, Charles O'Malley way of 
life in the inter- 
vals of hard cam- 
paigning, not to be 
flush was a double 
jnisfortune. It was 
May, the route had 
been full of interest, 
and the march from 
Abrantes pictur- 
esque. The Lieu- 
tenant had an eye 
for the fascinations 
of the old Portu- 
guese towns and 
fortresses through 
which he passed. 

On the i gth of 
the merry month 
his brigade stormed 
the forts of Al- 
moraz and took 
three hundred 
prisoners. Therein, 
as it turned out, 
lay further worry 
for the sub., as he was to discover during the 
halt at Truxillo. 

" Colonel Cadogan wishes to see you, Sir." 
" The deuce he does ! " said the Lieutenant to 




ON THE ITALIAN PIAVE FRONT: 
ARMED PONTOON RAFTS AND 
LOWER PIAVE. [Italian 



But he was in no row, it appeared. The 
Colonel was not on the seat of judgment. 

" Ah, Mr. Barrallier, I have a little mission 
for you." 

Come, this was not so bad i But the Lieu- 
tenant's face fell as the Colonel went onto explain. 

" You are aware 
that the French 
Command ant whom 
we took prisoner 
at Almoraz was 
allowed to keep two 
officers in attend- 
ance on him his 
aide and a surgeon. 
Orders have now 
come to send these 
two prisoners to 
Lisbon under the 
safeguard of an 
officer. I wish you 
to undertake the 
duty. Should you, 
however, fall in on 
the road with Lieu- 
tenant Langstaff of 
ours, who is now 
proceeding to Lis- 
bon on sick leave, 



ONE OF THE ITALIAN NAVY'S 
A STEAM LAUNCH ON THE 
Naval Official Photograph.] 



you are to hand 
the prisoners over 
to him." The subaltern saluted and withdrew, 
his heart in his boots. First of all, it was 
abominable to have to leave one's regiment in 
the height of a campaign ; and secondly, this 




ON THE ITALIAN PIAVE FRONT: A PONTOON-RAFT, MOUNTING MEDIUM-CALIBRE NAVAL GUNS, ON A CANAL 
OF THE LOWER PIAVE. {Italian Naval Official Photograph.} 



himself. " What 's up now, I wonder ? " " Very 
well," he remarked to the .orderly who brought the 
message, and off he hurried to the Chief's quarters. 



prisoner-escort business was, of all in the world, 
just the most awkward thing ^fhat could have 
happened to Barrallier at the moment. For it 

[Continued overleaf. 



March 27. 1818 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, 



f Kurt 94 "I 
|_New series J~ 



Hmerica's Rclp with Locomotives to france* 





AT A RAILWAY CENTRE : U.S. ENGINEERS ASSEMBLING ENGINES UNDER COVER ; FINISHING DETAILS. 



Th* Americans h*ve been able to send acrou the Atlantic a 
number of their large and powerful railway engines for war-work 
on the French railway systems, in much the same manner that 
we have very greatly assisted our Allies in France from the very 
beginning of the war, by shipping acrow the Channel railway 
engine*, trucks, VRIU, and carriages and rolling stock of erery 



kiryi. As everybody knows, that, in addition to the railway equip- 
ment supplies sent for campaign purposes yet further afield, to 
Egypt and Mesopotamia for instance, is one of the reasons for the 
curtailment of the train services all over the United Kingdom. 
With the material, also, have gone railway staffs, in addition to 
the railway men at the Front with the colours. [Official Photographs.^ 



18_l Hart 94 1 

18 (.New SeriesJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 27. 1918 



was the custom for officers on that duty to de- 
fray all expenses of the journey out of their 
own pockets, never permitting their captives 
to pay for anything. 

The Lieutenant mounted his horse. His man 
walked at his stirrup. The prisoners rode the 
mules. The escorting officer felt very mulish 
himself, and was not far from sulks. His prisoners, 



apfif j: 

iv -*vWt ', 7 ''<?. 




I need hardly remind you that I have but to hold 
my finger up and you would find yourselves in 
no very enviable position. Of course, you might 
assassinate me, but what would become of you 
afterwards ? ' ' 

Provencal of the Var on the tongue of a 
Highland officer gave the prisoners a chastening 
shock. At last the doctor spoke 

" Might I make bold to ask 
V your name ? " 

The Lieutenant gave it. 
Another thunderbolt ! ^Escula- 
pius leaped off his mule, and, 
running up, embraced his gaoler. 



We are cousins 



he cried. 



DURING THE COAST CAMPAIGN OF GENERAL ALLENBY'S ARMY IN 
PALESTINE: QUITTING ENTRENCHED LINES. 

like good Frenchmen, tried to be agreeable. They 
were both Proven9als, and pleasant fellows. But 
their guardian would give them nothing but a 
curt " yes " or " no." Accordingly, they soon 
left him out of the conversation, and talked to 
each other in their native dialect, 
the Proven9al of the Var. 

Little did they dream that the 
young Highland officer at their 
side had more than French of 
Stratford - atte - Bowe more even 
than French of Paris. He forgot 
his worries, sat up in his saddle, 
and began to take notice. What 
was that the aide-de-camp was 
saying ? 

" Cy vourian a que soun sabie ; 
n'en serian bon lean quite " which 
is, being interpreted, " If we wished, 
we could easily get rid of him ; 
he has only his sword." 

Barrallier reined up at the 
words, and, looking hard at his 
companions, remarked, " Messieurs, 
avan de parla un lengage, aurias 
dugu vous informa, ce la per- 
sounne 6m6 que sias, vous conmpren 
pas " that is, " Gentlemen, before 
you speak a language, you ought 
to be certain that the person with whom you 
happen to be does not understand it." 

" I am here," Barrallier continued, " simply 
and solely to protect you from the peasantry, and 
I am very sorry indeed to find that there should 
be any bad feeling on your part for, gentlemen. 



" I am Dr. Arteau, of Toulon I 
am related by marriage to your 
father's family." 

Relations now became as cordial 
as they had been strained before. 
That evening, during dinner at 
Talavera, Dr. Arteau asked his kins- 
man why he had seemed so cross 
at the outset. Barrallier confessed 
the fiscal difficulty, and the Pro- 
ven9als at once put their hands in 
their pockets. But the Lieutenant 
would not permit them to pay. He 
had, luckily, enough for the moment, 
and he would uphold Army custom 
to the last peseta. Barrallier had 
at the back of his mind the Colonel's 
saving clause, which was his one loophole. Ac- 
cordingly, when dinner was over, he went out and 
made some inquiries. By great good fortune, he 
heard that Lieutenant Langstaff was in Talavera' 
Barrallier lost no time in seeking his brother officer 




DURING THE COAST CAMPAIGN OF GENERAL ALLENBY'S ARMY IN 
PALESTINE: TROOPS FORMING UP IN A WADI. 

out, and to him he handed over the prisoners. 
He was relieved, yet sorry ; for the adventure in 
its latter part had been very agreeable. 

Next morning saw the end . The members of the 
party took their several ways the Frenchmen to 
further detention, the Lieutenant to rejoin the yist. 



March 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r ran w '\_ t , 

(.New SeriesJ * ' 



hold the home frontf" "Che Queen and the Land Girls. 










GIRLS 0* TOT LAMD ARMY AT BUCKINGHAM PALACE: REVIEWED BY HER MAJESTY. 

. . . . i . ..:,! M j(j;alv lull." nlLtlll CoGL'C l.i 

rni 01 IT. 1 ** 



Tie *oir.-i o, Cnfm : - e ju.tilyin t th .e.tion th.t phyc.lly 
a woaun - - >^ong M . man. n<l c.p.ble of <loin the ui*x- 
p'te ' nd : .. > work which .he h been ked to underUke 
1 n - l e G'Wt V'r enJiJted the MTTJCM of o lre number of 
ner' O.. M.^r 19. tome of the Women'. Und A.my- .for*. 
Mitt.- h.ppy-looking lirl.. marched to Buckingham P.lace. 



headed by a handsome girl " divinely Ull," 
coat, knee-breeches, and leggings, and carrying c t 
the procewion we.e forester girlj, motor-tractor c< 
girl.. The Queen talked with several of them, and si:ow 
interest in the motor-tractor girls, two o{ wl.c:n hold the 
County Championship for Ploughing.- -\Pholm. I-:. C.A .] 



and 



a long 





Part Bl T 
Ne ScnrJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 27, 1918 



for reaching Special trades to french Disabled Soldiers- 





AT THE COLE JOFFRE, PARIS: IN A TOY-PAINTING .i'TKUERi MAIMED SOLDIERS ON METAL-WORK. 






In France, as in England, everything that can be thought of, and 
ii practicable, U being done to train and help disabled soldiers in 
various callings by means of which they may be able to earn a 
livelihood. Many institutions devoted to that particular purpose 
have been established, and are in working order in the cities and 
towns all over France. Our illustrations show two scenes in the 



workshops, one of these institutions, the ' ' Ecole Joff re, ' ' which 
exists for very much the same purposes in essentials as our own 
" Lord Roberts Memorial Workshops." At both institution; 
disabled soldiers work at making useful articles and toys. As i> 
common knowledge, the British toy trade was practically mono- 
polised by Germany before the mr t ~[l f rcnih Official ritot^raphs.} 



March 21. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



LP.m 94 T . 
New Series J 19 



Ireland and ficr future In and Hfter the C&ar. 




THE NEW LEADER OF THE IRISH PARTY, MR. REDMOND'S SUCCESSOR : MR. JOHN DILLON, M.P. 

Mr. John Dillon was elected Leader of the Irish Party on March 12, Speaking at Enniskillen on March 16, Mr. Dillon declared that ! 

in succession to the late Mr. John Redmond. He it 67 yean of had accepted his post of Leader "not as champion of ciril war 

age, and first entered Parliament in 1880. From 8oo to 1900, or disorder, but as champion of the party whose ideal was to 

Mr. Dillon led the anti-Parnellite section of the Irish Nationalist!, obliterate for ever the religious distension and party conflict which 

as successor to Mr. Justin McCarthy. He gave place to Mr. had been the curse of the Irish nation for so long." [Pkuto. > 

Redmond in the latter year, on the reunion of the Irish Party. Haines.] 



20 - [ N^sc^l- THE ILLUSTRATEI 




The Devilry of the Germans in the 







;K /!" ix *^-- 

L"V i , 








THE MALIGNANT, WANTON DESTRUCTION OF PEASANTS' PROPERTY TO DEPRIVE' THE 
>res of miles, one travels through deserted battlefields, and there is not a village standing nor a house bu 
,, Sf.T l nd "" re entan e |ements . and machine-gun posts where thousands of men once fough 

slaughter. So Mr: Phihp G.bbs, the war correspondent, describes, speaking of one part of the war-area recently visite< 



EWS. March 27. 



ritry Districts of the Olestern front. 







1! 




NINO THEIR DAILY BREAD : WRECKED AND DESTROYED FARMING IMPLEMENTS. 



urn. At many places, as other correspondents tell us, extend acres of cut-down fruit trees and orchards, destroyed by the 
ly, with hundreds of mutilated agricultural implement* of the peasantry, farm carts and wagons, ploughs by the hundred, 
harrows and the iron or wooden field-troughs out of which cattle and sheep feed. [Drawn by J. Raymond Koenif..} 



. r Hurt W 1 

22 1_N CW Series J 



IHE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



March 27. 1! I- 



flax-Growing as a State Cttar Industry. 




SPREADING STALKS TO DRY ; THE RETTING TANK FOR DECOMPOSING THE STALKS. 



A FACTORY 

The flax industry, organised in Somerset by the Board of Agri- 
culture to supplement supplies, and as far as possible make good 
the deficiency for war purposes resulting from the defection of 
Russia under present conditions, is being largely extended. The 
flax, after being cut, goes through the processes of drying and 
de-seeding, retting and scutching. In the upper illustration women 




are seen spreading flax stalks in the open to lie out exposed to 
weather. The coarser stalks go to the scutching machine Icr 
de-threading, and the finer to the retting tank (see the lower 
illustration), where they are steeped in water in the open for between 
a fortnight and a month, according to temperature. Thence. ; \ 
turn, these are taken to the scutching machine.- --[Plioto*. by S. am/ <, 



_J 



March 27. 191 S 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r fan O4 1 . 

I Neiv Series I "2 3 



flax-Growing ae a State CQar Industry. 





WORKERS AT A FACTORY : A STALK-BREAKING MACHINE FEEDING SCUTCHING MACHINES. 



In th-,e illustrations are two processes in the preparation ot manu- 
facture of flu (or war uses at the Board o( Agriculture's new 
establishment at Yeoril, in SomerMtthire. In the upper illmtration 
Uds are seen feeding and minding a breaking machine, where the 
staOu of tne plant are broken in order to enable the all-important 
scutching machine to take the fibrei or thread*. Scutching machines 



at work are seen in the lower. The threads are here removed 
from the flax rtalks, the finer being used for linen manufacture, 
and the coarier for rope and string. The process consists 01 
placing the flax in handfuls orer an upright slab, where, by mtuni 
ol rerolTing wooden blades, the fibres are beaten until all the 
"bone" is cleared from them. [Photos, by .S. and G.[ 



ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. Mreh 27. 1918 




Hn Svcnt that Harden ed the (Jdar Spirit of tl 





SINGING "THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER" OVER THE GRAVES OF LOST COMRADES: AMERII 

If anything haJ been needed to harden the war spirit of the United States, nothing could have better produced that effect 
than the German submarine attack on the transport " Tuscania," which was torpedoed and sunk off the Irish coast on the 
night of February 5, when a number of American soldiers on board lost their liyes. It was stated at the time that the 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. March 27. 



Tilted States: Ox Burial of "Cuscama" Victims. 





DIER3 LANDED ON THE ISLAND OF ISLAV AFTER THE SINKING OF THE TRANSPORT " TUSCANIA.' 

117 i Incers and 2060 other ranks. Many of the rescued landed in Scotland including 7 .->:".cer &:A 10 01 tM 
;rew. 11 i, ;ers , 126 bodies were recovered and buried. Our photograph was taken i-i the island of I:!a/. off ths coi?r 

if Arfx: right background are some local volunteers who fired a salute over the gravel.- I7'*<*-.-: ,-' < ..V. 



26 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 21. ' '; 



THE NEW WARRIORS: XXV.-G.O.C. "HOMERS." 



WHEN the Heavies have cut the telephone- 
wire, even down to the armoured cables, 
and the barrage is death to runners, and the 
smoke-bombs, the gas, and the confusion of 
fighting prevent visible and even light signalling 
the pigeons get through. 

When something becomes ungummed in the 
wireless, and the spotter machine has the very 
" sitter " of a target far beneath if only he can 
get the news back 
to the guns the 
pigeons take it 
through. 

When most 
things are jammed 
on the submarine, 
and with dumb 
engines she lays 
helplessly a- wallow 
in the sea far from 
sight and help, un- 
able to speak, the 
pigeons go home 
with the S.O.S. 

From the ad- 
vance cyclists out 
on patrol, and the 
raiding party that 
has bumped its 
way deep into the 
German line, to 
the drifter locating 
" suspicious sub- 
marine track " and 
the tramp skipping for cover from U-boat guns, 
the pigeons speed baseward to carry the news, 
to call the guns, to spur up destruction, and 
to clamour for help. 

The pigeon is the rival to Marconi, and does 




ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT: A BRITISH OFFICER 

SEATED IN A GERMAN " ALBATROS " SCOUT AEROPLANE 

FORCED DOWN WITHIN OUR LINES BY HIM. 

Official Photograph. 



service as yeoman. Asaph is of opinion that it is 
all due to him, and has a dropsical pride in 
consequence. 

At one time, before the Kaiser thought of 
sending an ultimatum to Asaph, he was an amiable 
sort of man, inclined to dribble bird-seed from a 
score of points if you hit him on the back. He 
used to utter monologues about pigeons 
" Homers," and other strange names, he called 

'em; but, being un- 
versed, I shall not 
attempt to repro- 
duce his utter- 
ances though 
they seemed to me 
more bitter than 
golf. When war 
began he went 
aside and thought, 
and then vanished 
into the unutter- 
able khakiness that 
took hold of the 
land. The other 
day I saw him 
standing in the 
sunlight with a 
thousand wings 
aflash like flames 
about his head. 
And he said to me, 
" Oh, didn't you 
know ? I 'm G.O.C. 
' Homers.' What 
do you think of my Army Group ? " 

Asaph's Army Group at that moment was 
made up by a jumble of old and outraged motor- 
'buses. One had to look at them twice to recall 
that once they queened it in splendid impudence 




ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT: A GERMAN "ALBATROS," AS BROUGHT DOWN 
OUR LINES EXPLORING THE PRIZE. [Official Photograph.} 



INTACT WITHIN 



M.rch 27, 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



CPan 94 T _ 
New Series J 27 



Ht the front with Our Hrmics in france. 








CAMBRAI VICTOR AND CANADA'S LEADER: GENERALS SIR JULIAN BYNG.(L.) AND SIR ARTHUR CURRIE. 



. Jhe two Wettern Front British Generals teen here in conversation 
.are soldiers whoM name* are as familiar at household words to 
everybody in England, and alt over the Empire at laige, and very 
specially interesting to all Canadian*. General Sir Julian flyng 
it, of course, the famous leader of the successful offensive battle 
at Cambraj. He has served at the Front from the early trying dayi 



of the retreat from Mons. .There, he did marvels in keeping the 
enemy at bay and covering the retirement of our infantry. Later, 
as Commander of the Canadian Army in France, he won enthusiastic 
admiration. General Sir Arthur Currie, who now commands the 
Canadians in France, brilliantly won his rank step by step. He is 
a Canadian, and deservedly idolised. [Canadian MW /fcvwrf.s.j 



M 
" 



J'art !M -1 
'w Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 27. 1918 



from Peckham to Oxford Circus and the utter- 
most ends of Shepherd's Bush. The seats on the 
roof had vanished, and in their place had been 
erected a cage, and the cage was positively a-flutter 
with wings. But that was not all. The old 
'buses were not merely homes for " Homers," but 
for the keepers of the birds. The insidd had 
become a travelling caravan in which the three 
or four men, including the chauffeur, who repre- 
sented the staff per 'bus, live, sleep, and have their 
being. Asaph commands them and all the 'buses 
in his area. 

These 'buses are the homes to which the 
pigeons fly from the trenches, covering the journey 
at the rate of a mile in two-and-something 
minutes. When they arrive they announce them- 
selves, for, entering through a special trap, they 
ring a bell, and at once a pigeon expert nips aloft 



wherever that home may find itself in the course 
of circumstances ; but some may wander, others 
may fall wounded by the wayside, and yet others 
have been led astray by the Grand Passion. For 
this reason the duplicated message, when sent, is 
not divided among the sexes, but conveyed by 
one gender only. Two males or two. females of 
pigeon may go together, but never one of each. 
It would never do to have A Great Offensive held 
up while Romeo strayed with Juliet down the 
shrapnel -sprayed paths of dalliance, and in this 
respect there is the danger of the Scarlet Woman. 
Another fact that Asaph begs me to bear in 
mind is that pigeons can't bear being bored. To 
take pigeons to the front line and keep them there 
in their baskets until something really worth while 
happens is not good for them ; they become stale. 
It is necessary to release them after certain 



' 




ON THE FRENCH VOSCES FRONT, WHERE WINTER CONDITIONS STILL HOLD: A MULE TRANSPORT TRAIN 
COMPANY LEAVING ITS STABLES WITH A CONVOY OF PROVISIONS. [Photograph by Moreau.] 



to the cage to collect the message. This is sent 
off to the nearest signals, and is put across the 
wires to H.Q., or whatever destination, at once. 

The pigeons themselves are taken to the front 
line, or over the front line in aeroplanes, or under 
the sea in submarines, in special wicker baskets 
not one, but a few ; for, wisely, the important 
message is not trusted to one bird only, but sent 
in duplicate : where bullets and barrages are, 
pigeons as well as men die. The pigeons have 
their own identity disc, a numbered ring about 
the leg, and when on service carry a neat little 
cylinder snapped close to the leg, in which is 
contained the message. 

The whole strategy and tactics of pigeoning, 
however, does not end at this. Although they 
are aristocratic, highly prideful birds of dis- 
tinguished pedigree, the pigeons are wayward, 
quite as much as human beings are wayward. 
They are not always and altogether reliable. On 
the whole, their instinct for home is unerring. 



periods, so that the homing flair is kept in form, 
message or no message. 

All said and done, Asaph and his birds have 
helped considerably towards winning the war. 
Asaph can give facts to support this. A bird 
winging its way out of a mystery of noise and 
smoke has often enabled reserves to be got to a 
critical point at a critical moment. Birds, too, 
have pushed their way heavily through the sweep 
of shrapnel, have fallen and died of wounds, but 
not until their message has reached the proper 
hands, and the help the front needed in shell fire, 
ammunition supplies, and so on, been sent up. 
Asaph tells of pigeons which have come out of the 
waste of the waters and have killed U-boats as 
certainly as if they had bombed them, or have 
sent M.L.s scurrying to the rescue of men in 
open boats who otherwise were without hope. 
"We're one better than wireless," he insists, 
"and nothing can jam us save death or flirta- 
tion." \v. Dorot.As NEWTON. 



-'7 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



1' ' f* ., 

I Ni-w Seri.s^ ' 



Che Visit of the Secretary of State for India to Bengal. 




COMPLIMENTARY LUNCHEON 



AT A 

So.ne of the guests and hosts at a complimentary luncheon which 
nil given in honour o( the recent riiit of Mr. MonUgue, the 
Secretary o( SUte (or India, to Bengal, re shown in the abore 
photographs. Mo.t of thoic iecn re notable Bengalee peliticiani 
in letdinf position*. In the upper photograph, of gueiU standing 
-(King the singing of the Bengalee " national anthem " are. reading 



SINGING THE BENGALEE ANTHEM ; AT TABLE. 

from left to rijht : Sir J. Bose, Sir P. K. Tagore, Sir K. Cupta. 
Sir Goamiir Baerjte, the Maharajah of Bardwan, Mr. MonUguf, 
tne Hon. B. K. B.e. la the lower of the two photographs re 
seen, at ths top end of the table in the background, side sy side, 
Mr. MonUguc on the' left ; on the right, Mr. B. N. Bose. ;p.'i.o!. 
by S. <ml G.} 



n f 

O L 



1>art M 

New Serin 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 27. 1918 




draining Disabled Soldiers to JVfahe a Living on the Land. 




AT THE FIRST CROWN COLONY : A ONE-ARMED SOLDIER FEEDING CHICKENS 



The establishment of Crown Colonies for agricultural and farming 
work by wounded and discharged soldiers has been progressing 
steadily and successfully in several parts of the country. Paitialiy 
disabled men, in cases where the disability does not incapacitate 
from the regular performance of the various kinds of work pro- 
vided, are taken in hand by experts in the various callings at the 



RIDDLING POTATOES. 
Colonies. After a term of probation, on being passed as proficient,' 
they are each allotted a cottage with ten acres of ground. The 
illustrations on this page and on that adjoining show men at the 
Colony at Holbeach in Lincolnshire, which is in a flourishing 
condition. It takes in 1000 acres, and has a large number of men 
at work on it, under charge of Captain Boddy.- [Pkolos. by Alfieri., 



March 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



f Part 4 "I . , 

LNcw Scries j~ 31 




'Training Disabled Soldiers to JMahe a Living on the Land. 





AT THE FIRST CROWN COLONY : ADJUSTING A PLOUGH ; REPAIRING A MOTOR-TRACTOR. 



The Discharged Soldiers' Crown Colonies have been established by 
meant of Government resources, of much the same nature as those 
(ranted in aid of the numerous army camp market gardens for 
local supplies, as part of the National Food Saving organisation 
and, incidentally, for assisting camp canteen . funds. These grow 
large quantities of potatoes and vegetables of all kinds by means 



of soldier labour. Expert guidance is available in regard to 
treatment of soils and technical matters. Officers who, before 
the war, were in business as farmers, market gardeners, and land 
agents, undertake the direction of local arrangements. The Army 
Agricultural Committee assists in regard to the provision of farm 
and agricultural implements and seed. {Photo, by Alfieri,} 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS- 



MarcS 27. 2&1S 



r- 




CHitb General plumer's Men "Behind the front" in Italy 







SPRING DAYS BEFORE THE FIGHTING : IN GOOD BILLETS ; HELPING AMONG THE VINES. 



1 



O:ir men of General Pluraer's reserve and luppoit battalions, 
quartered in billets or canton -nents among the Italian villages and 
lesser country towns at the " back of the Front," ought soon to 
be enjoying real spring weather. Soring, of course, comes to 
Italy much earlier than to us. Some of our readers may recall 
M*'nilay's lines: "In April's ivory moonlight beneath the 



chestnut shade" hardly an English April experience. Incidental!-', 
those who remsmbtr their Virgil and Horace will be interested in 
the lower illustration of one of our men with Italian peasant women 
in a vineyard. The women are " linking " the vine-branches among 
poplar saplings, as they do in Italy every springtime, to grow 
aa Virgil and Horace saw them growing. [Official Photographs.] 



Marcs 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r rn st <*- 

LNr Sennj * 




CCUth General plumer's Men " Behind the front" in Italy. f||? 





IN SATISFACTORY QUARTERS: MUTUAL -ADMlRVrJON. 

, admiration ia the order of th day among the Tillig;r <[ 
Northern Italy and our men. as, indeed, ii aptly dej:-4 in tn 
upper illustration. It thowa men of a Brithh detachment, nol 
long arrired in an Italian Tillage, being stored at br the inhabitant!, 
while from the other aide of a htdge our men are itaring buck 
rh intwert at the good folk CorresfwdenN' ''"en fiom the 



"MAZE. 



SOLDIERS AND PEASANTS ; IN A 

Italian front haie told ut of the warm welcome ou: men get 
eer-.-wh--t !rom the Italian rillagert, and the admirition thew 
rxpie.. tad Uow oer "Tommy." A Hampton Court uggeat:on 
will be :eiivu!c<. in the iecon>! illu;trat : on o( ofRreri i.i a mttt 
in the ground! of an Italian Tilla. It wai Italy t 1 -*' in mfl:atal 



Part 94 T 

ew Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



March 27. 1918 



WOMEN AND THE WAR. 



THE Women's Legion has already done 
splendid work. Probably no organised body 
of women workers has a finer record of useful- 
ness, and, in a sense, they broke the ground for 
W.A.A.C.'s, whose activities are well known to 
the public. Even Lady Londonderry, who 
founded the Legion something like three years 
ago, with the object of raising a disciplined body 
of women whose services could be used in what- 
ever direction they might be most useful, could 
scarcely have hoped for a greater success than 
has attended her undertaking. 

The Army authorities suddenly decided to 
employ the services of women cooks, and the 



Quite lately the body has extended its useful- 
ness in a new direction. Its recentjy formed 
Soldiers and Sailors' Work Section, with Lady 
Titchfield as Chairman, aims at establishing a 
permanent industry for the benefit of disabled 
soldiers and sailors, by training them in embroidery 
and allied crafts, and selling their work at the 
market rate. The scheme is already being worked 
under the Ministry of Munitions, and a training 
school started in Oxford Street. It is hoped 
gradually to establish other schools in districts 
where they are likely to be useful. 

At first glance embroidery hardly suggests 
itself as a likely medium by which disabled men 




WINNING THE WAR ON THE LAND: MACHINERY FIGHTING WAR IN PEACEFUL FIELDS. 

As day by day the war goes on, it leaves its mark upon places hitherto associated only with peaceful pursuits. New and up-to-date methods 
are being employed to break up the land so that every square yard may be turned to profitable and patriotic account in the production of 
food. The latest mechanical inventions are also being turned to good account, as seen in our picture of a Mogul tractor, ploughing. Its 

labour-saving capacity is enormous. [Photograph by J. T. Newman.} 



Legion supplied them with workers of a kind that 
very soon dissipated any doubts that may have 
existed as to the wisdom of the experiment. 
Women were wanted in agriculture, and once 
again the Legion came forward with assistance. 
The War Office decided to employ women motor- 
drivers in the Mechanical Transport section, and 
it was not long before women motor-drivers took 
the wheel. There are hospital orderlies who wear 
the uniform of the Legion, canteen helpers who 
own allegiance to the same body, as well as a 
host of other workers who belong to an organisa- 
tion formed when women in uniform especially 
khaki uniform were looked on with reserve, if 
not actual suspicion. 



may earn their living. But it is not, perhaps, 
generally known that the badges which play so 
important a part in official dress, whether military 
or civilian, were xisually worked by men. The 
war has given a tremendous stimulus to the trade. 
Accoutrement-makers are demanding badges faster 
than it is possible to supply them, and the demand 
is not likely to decrease. 

It is not merely a question of naval and 
military insignia. Railway hands, tram con- 
ductors, 'busmen all have to be provided with 
the badges of their craft. The disabled students 
at the Broiderie School started by the Women's 
Legion are not reversing the war-time order of 

{Continued ovtrteaf. 



March 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



f K..rl 94 
I New Bmn 



flax as a lar-]Munition State production. 





WAR-WORKERS AT A FACTORY : DE-SEEDING STALKS WITH ROLLERS ; A LINSEED REFINING MACHINE. 



A. i. said elMwhere in this tew. the Board of Agriculture 
extending the fla* industry in EngLnd in otter to pro^de 
m.tBi.I for wr ut. The cutting-ofl cl Runian luppUe., wtfc 

hd bttn a r"T "li""- " i0ur "' il h " b " n *" ted ate ' " M " 
ol the imnwdUle u.. of the meuure.. A. .Ho h.ppens, before 
the w.r the bt and flnett quality of linen, iuch i. required 



for the wingi o( aeroplanes, came from the Courtrai diiirict, now 
amidit the devaitated war-area in Northern France. A quality 
in the water of tht River Lys is found to be particularly iuitable 
for the procwa of "retting," or itezplng the rtalks, during which 
fermentation take, place, and the gum binding the fibres inside 
the stalk, .s dissolved. [Photos, by S. and G.) 



,- r Part 94 T 
38 (_ N Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Much 27. 1918 



things and undertaking women's work, but are 
simply fitting themselves to work in an expanding 
industry in which men have, for some reason 
for needlework would seem essentially to come 
within woman's sphere played the chief part. 

There is no flavour of charity about the 
scheme, which is to be run on purely business 
lines. The man who works 
a regimental crest in hospital 
which is ultimately bought 
by some " kind lady " may 
feel, in a sense, that he is 
an object of charity. The 
learner at the Broiderie 
School knows that, when 
proficient, he will take his 
place in the ranks of workers 
the fruits of whose industry 
have a definite market value, 
and meet a definite demand 
from a given trade. 



Students who enrol for 
training earn nothing for the 
first three months. During 
the next three they are paid 
five shillings a week, and for 
the next three ten shillings 
a week, after which time 
they should be in a posi- 



even two hands are not essential to success. 
There are others who, though they possess their 
full complement of limbs, are debarred, on account 
of some internal injury, from taking a share in 
hard manual labour. To them, too, the work 
affords an opportunity of augmenting incomes all 
too small for the needs and prices of the times. 
Learners are, after a brief period of training, 




"WRENS" IN TRAINING AT THE CRYSTAL PALACE: W.R.N.S. OFFICERS 

PARADING PAST THE CORPS' DIRECTOR, DAME KATHERINE FURSE, AND 

STAFF OFFICERS (Official Photograph.} 



tion to augment their incomes by any sum up 
to 2 a week. Occasionally, if the worker has 
been an architect's clerk, or had experience of 
a similar kind, his services can be utilised in 
the drafting and preparing department, in 
which case he may receive as much as 5 a week. 



_ 



given an opportunity of withdrawing from the 
work if they find that it is not to their liking. 
If they elect to remain, they are expected to 
finish the course which, by the bye, is given by 
an instructress provided free by the Women's 
Legion, who also undertake to provide the 
necessary equipment for the 
schools. The scheme is still in 
its infancy, but is already show- 
ing signs of developing into a 
healthy youngster. As has al- 
ready been said, there is an 
enormous demand for badges of 
every description, and the open- 
ing for the work is not of the 
kind that will cease to exist 
after the war is over. The 
Women's Legion have no idea 
of wasting time and money on 
founding a temporary industry. 
Inquiry has shown that the work 
of the broiderers will always be 
required. 







TRAINED "WRENS": DAME KATHERINE FURSE, WITH COMMODORE 

SIR R. WILLIAMS BULKELEY, R.N.R., INSPECTING W.R.N.S. OFFICERS 

TO BE DRAFTED TO STATIONS. [Official Photograph.] 

The scheme is intended to benefit disabled 
soldiers and sailors. The man with only one leg, 
or the man with no legs at all, is under no dis- 
advantage at work that only requires the use of 
one's eyes, or even of one eye, and hands, though 



Those who have already begun 
work are enormously interested 
in their new craft. One, a 
worker with an injured knee, 
and a brewer's stenciller before 
the war called him to a more 
adventurous life, was learning 
motoring until he decided to learn the art of 
the needle. A printer with an injured spine is 
another pupil. He cannot stoop, nor lift the 
heavy formes at his old job. He is rapidly 
becoming an expert broiderer. CLAUDINE CLEVE. 



March 27. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



f Part 94 
|_Ncw Series 



TONNAGE FIGURES DISCLOSED - THE WORLD'S COLOSSAL SHIPPING LOSSES THE 

EQUIVALENT OF 2187 1600-TON VESSELS SUNK-BRISK SEAPLANE FIGHT-GERMANS 

PRESS ON TO PETROGRAD AND MOSC&W BALKAN ACTIVITY. 



TO a deeply interested House of Commons, and 
a no less interested country, Sir Eric 
Geddes, speaking on the Navy Estimates, made 
his promised statement on shipbuilding. For the 
first time, official returns of tonnage were given 
to the public, and further returns were promised ; 
but the First Lord made the reservation that it 
would not be .in 
the national in- 
terest to bring 
these precisely 
down to date. Half 
a loaf, however, is 
better, etc., and 
the facts and 
figures disclosed 
were sufficient to 
stimulate even the 
most sluggish. 
During the twelve 
months to Dec. 31 
the world's ton- 
age fell by 2 
million tons net. 
This was exclusive 
of enemy - owned 
vessels. Of British 
tonnage, 3 J million 
tons had been 
sunk, the higher 

percentage here being due to the fact that the 
main enemy attack was against our shipping. 
The enemy's claim to have sunk g$ million 
tons was thus shown to be exaggerated by 
58 per cent. So much for the hole knocked in 
our marine. As regards the other side of the 




ON THE PALESTINE ARMY'S LINE 
PRISONERS BEING ESCORTED 

FRENCH 



account, the First Lord had some fair encourage- 
ment to offer. He said that during the last 
quarter of 1917 the Allies came within 100,000 tons 
per month of making good their losses. Of the 
losses, 75 per cent, was being made good by our 
Allies. As regards the increase of pioduction, the 
fourth quarter of last year showed an output of 

420,000 tons, as 
against 213,000 for 
the corresponding 
period of 1916. At 
present, 47 large 
yards, with 209 
berths, were at 
work on ocean- 
going merchant- 
vessels. From 
October to Decem- 
ber 1917 the sin- 
ings by enemy 
submarine were the 
lowest on record 
since " intensive " 
piracy began. On 
present-day figures 
the First Lord 
held that it was 
within the pro- 
vince of the ship- 
yards to make good 

the world's losses. Sir Eric Geddes deprecated 
concern on the part of the public. But the 
public does well to be concerned, without 
panic, for only thus can a proper stimulus be 
applied. The present is not the best of all 
possible worlds, and, the more we realise that fact, 

\CanKitiitti on page 40 



OF COMMUNICATIONS : TURKISH 
TO A DETENTION CAMP BY 
SPAHIS. 




L 



ON THE PALESTINE ARMY'S LINE OF COMMUNICATIONS : BEDOUIN MARAUDERS BEING BROUGHT IN 

BY A DESERT POLICE CAMEL PATROL. 



- 



8-fitovlJne.n THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. March 27. 1918 




Palestine Hrmy Camels in Sport : H 




BASE CAMP 

The inc'dcnt shown here is surely the first time ^that camels have had a part in a tug-of-war. At any rate, it must be t 

oont " so engaged. The display in question came off at a camp spor 



first photograph, or picture, ever taken of the 

meef.ng held in Palestine, where troops of both the British and Indian Armies "furmed spectators. 



The competing teams, 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, March 27. 1 9 1 8-[ N ^'^.,]-3 



It for JVlr. Kipling's Immortalised " Oont." 




i 








[NG, ABOUT TO BEGIN : AUSTRALIANS I'. INDIANS. 



wn in the illustration, were men of one of the Anzac camel corps on one side, and camel sowars, Indian soldiers as their 
agonists. The tug-of-war is shown just as it was about to open, with umpire standing by the centre mark 
t over the dividing line. How the camels comported themselves, anyone knowing the ways of the beast can 





40 L 



Part 04 

Kew Se 



4 ~] 

nes | 



THE ILLVSTRATED WAR NEWS 



March 27. 1918- 



the more energy we shall produce for the task 
that still lies ahead. The figure 3^ million tons 
sunk conveys to the average man only a vaguely 
vast idea of ships sunk. Taking, however, the 
minimum " laige ship " classification of the weekly 
table of losses namely, 
1600 tons the total would 
represent over 2187 large 
vessels sunk by submaiine 
within the year, or 182^ ships 
of that size lost per month. 
Obviously the actual number 
is less, but the object-lesson 
holds good, for the task of 
replacing the lost tonnage is 
equally arduous. This con- 
crete view of the case may 
be commended with confi- 
dence to the British work- 
man. We should like to 
see it treated pictorially on 
posters, with the legend : 
" Our lost merchant fleet 
make it good." 

The week's returns of 
sinkings were eleven large, six 
small, and two fishing-vessels 
sunk, a reduction of four in 
large craft lost. 

On the igth a British seaplane patrol engaged 
two enemy seaplanes ten miles north-east of 
Borkum. One German machine was driven, 
down in flames. All our aircraft returned. 

On March 21 a Franco-British destroyer 
squadron fought two actions off Zeebiugge with 
two German squadron;, sinking, it is believed, 
at least four enemies. British imnitois also 
bombarded Ostend. 



can make the necessary beneficent arrangements. 
By the lime these lines are published, the Germans 
may have occupied Petrograd. On the aoth they 
were moving also on Moscow, and were reported 
at Dno, half-way between Moscow and Petrograd. 





DOING 
THE 



DUTY 
SUEZ 



ON< THE SINAI DESERT FIELD LIGHT 
CANAL AND SOUTHERN PALESTINE : TWO 



The violation of the peace proceeded apace on 
Russian soil. The Germanisation of Lithuania 
and Courland was practically fait accompli ; that, 
of Livonia and Esthonia imminent. The same 
good fortune threatens Finland, as soon as the Hun 



ACROSS MANY CENTURIES : WELLS, TRADITIONALLY SAID TO HAVE BEEN DUG BY 
ISAAC, RE-EXCAVATED BY BRITISH R.E. AFTER BEING BLOCKED UP BY THE TURKS. 

The Moscow Congress ratified the Peace, but the 
Social Revolutionaries intend to fight on. Lenin 
still dreams of an international proletariat rising, 
and thence salvation. Pushing east in Ukrania, 
the Austro-Germans occupied Soumy, five hours' 
march from Kharkoff, where the Bolshevik 
Government had its seat. It is an odd distortion 
of the old tag, " Peace hath her victories no less 
renowned than war." 

The Roumanian armistice 
was extended to March 22. 
Peace was still not formally 
concluded, but the new 
Roumanian Cabinet of Mar- 
ghiloman a packed body of 
Central Powers supporters 
could be trusted to do its 
duty by its masters. 

An unusual activity on all 
sectors was reported from the 
Balkans. British and French 
artillery and aviators gave 
the enemy very considerable- 
annoyance in the Struma, 
Vardar, and Doiran regions. 
The question of an enemy 
attack in foice in Macedonia 
was once more discussed. A 
train was bombed at Porna 
station by our airmen. 

From other Eastern war 
areas there was no further 
news of any importance. 
Baluchistan has necessitated a puni- 




RAILWAY, BETWEEN 
OF OUR ENGINES. 



Trouble in 
tive expedition. 

The New Curfew (to econon-.ise light an 1 f ael) 
is to close playhouses at 10.30, and restaurants 

at IO. LONDON: MARCH 23, 1918. 



LONDON : Pubjished Weekly at the Office. 172. Strand, in the Parish ol St. Clement Danes, in the County of London, by THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NRWS AND SKETCH. LTD, 
173, Strand, aforesaid ; and PrinteJ by THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS AND SKETCH. LTD.. Milford I.ane. W.C. 2 WEDNESDAY. MARCH 27, 1018 
Entered as Second-Class Matter at the New York (N.Y.) Post Office. 1916. 



The Illustrated War Newt. April 3, 1918.-Part 95, New Seriet. 



Cbe illustrated War 





Official Photograph. 

PREPARED FOR THE GREAT BATTLE : AT A BRITISH LONG-RANGE HEAVY ARTILLERY 
FIELD-MAGAZINEGIANT SHELLS STACKED IN RESERVE. 



Part 95 

*w Se,,c, 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 3. 1918 



THE STORM-OVERWHELMING GERMAN PRESSURE-MAGNIFICENT BRITISH RESISTANCE- 
WITHDRAWAL TO THE SOMME ENEMY'S DEAR-BOUGHT GAINS-FRENCH CO-OPERA- 
TIONMYSTERY GUN BOMBARDS PARIS GREAT AIR-WORK-ITALIAN REPORTS. 



THE storm which broke, as briefly noted in 
our last article, before dawn on March 21 
still rages, and the issue must remain long in 
suspense. One thing alone is sure the steadfast 
courage of the Allies under the fiercest ordeal 
that troops in any age have ever been called 
upon to endure. The first brunt of the action 
fell upon the British on the Cambrai front, from 
Vendeuil, south 
of St. Quentin, 
to the River 
Scarpe. While it 
was still dark, a 
heavy enemy 
bombardme n t 
opened up on the 
whole line. 
High - explosives 
and gas - shells 
searehed the 
British forward 
positions and 
back areas until 
about eight 
o'clock, when a 
powerful infan- 
try attack was 
launched by the 
enemy with sev- 
enty divisions on 
the entire front 
of fifty miles. 
All day the Ger- 
mans came on in 
unending waves 
of massed form- 
ations, between 
La Fere, near 
the Oise, and the 
Croisilles region, 
on the Sensee 
river. They met 
the most splen- 
did and stubborn 
resistance ; our 
men mowed 
them down as 
they advanced, inflicting incredible losses ; but 
of these the enemy took no account, and con- 
tinued to pour in fresh reinforcements of specially 
trained troops, which included .units of the Guard. 
Such pressure was bound to tell. Positions, held 
to the last man, were at length taken, after heroic 
defences of which the complete story will never be 
told, for our men died where they stood. These 
isolated penetrations made it necessary to re- 
adjust the line. During the first day's fighting 
the British, attacked by 600,000 Germans, were 




SUGGESTING HOW THE ENEMY HAS DRAINED GERMANY FOR MEN 

FOR THE GREAT BATTLE : UNDERSIZED PRISONERS, WITH OTHERS 

IN REAR. [Official Photographs} 



pressed back behind Bullecourt, Croisilles, Ecoust, 
and Noreuil. Next morning the enemy tide still 
surged onwards, covered by a terrific bombardment 
and helped by flammenwerfer. They struck north- 
west from Croisilles, west from Fontaine-les- 
Croisilles, and south from Cherisy, to converge at 
Ht-nin Hill, which our troops, doing immense 
execution with their machine-guns, held mag- 
\ nificenl ly until 

three p.m., when 
they had to fall 
back, for the 
enemy masses 
had passed the 
hill on both 
sides. The 
British save/d . 
their guns and 
material. Mean- 
while, southward 
of these posi- 
tions, a struggle 
equally fierce was 
going on around 
St. Leger, Vaulx- 
Vaucourt, Mor- 
chies, and Velu. 
Vaulx - Vaucourt 
was saved for a 
time by a bril- 
liant counter- 
attack, and the 
Leicesters still 
hung on there ; 
but after dark 
new enemy 
masses forced a 
withdrawal. Fur- 
ther south still, 
the 5ist Division 
of Highlanders 
and the gth Scot- 
tish Division, 
held fast all the 
first day, around 
Gauche 'Wood, 
Hermies, and 
Havrincourt, and would never have moved, 
but for the need of keeping touch with the 
rest of the line. Other hostile attacks, pressing 
from the direction of Hargicourt through Roisel, 
threatened Peronne ; while enemy forces front the 
line of St. Quentin advanced by Savy, Ronpy, and 
Flesquieres on Ham. From Vendeuil, the Crozat 
Canal was crossed, with Chauny as the objective. 
Such was, in outline, the position up to the night 
of the 23rd. The morning of Sunday, the 24th, 
brought a renewal of attacks in great strength 



April 3. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



Part 95 ' 
Jew Series 



along the whole front. Before nightfall the 
enemy claimed to have taken Peronne South of 
that town German detachments had crossed the 
Somme at several points, and were there, in Sir 
Douglas Haig's terms, " dealt with." At Licourt 
and Brie these bodies were counter-attacked and 
driven back to the east bank of the river. North 
of Peronne, attacks " of the greatest violence " 




THE STEADY STREAM OF MEN THAT KEPT OUR LINE UNBROKEN DURING 

THE FIRST STAGES OF THE GREAT BATTLE : SUPPORTS MOVING UP. 

Official Photograph. 

against the line of the River Tortille led to a 
further withdrawal. Furftier north, at Henin and 
Wancourt, the British hurled back the enemy 
with heavy losses, but the menace to Eapaume 
became hourly more intense. Immediately to the 
south of that place a terrific combat swayed on 
the line passing through Le Trans- 
loy, Combles, and Maurepas. 

On the night of the 25th it was 
known that the Germans were in 
Bapaume, which they had hard 
work to take. The struggle in 
that region was now centred on 
Combles. Opposite Peronne we 
still held the line of the Somme 
as far south as Pargny, whence 
the new line ran south-westwards 
to Nesle, four miles west of the 
river. From Nesle, taken by 
storm on the evening of the 24th, 
it bent back to the south-east 
towards Guiscard, which lies 
about eleven miles due west of 
La F6re. The combat continued 
on every sector, and the first 
momentum of the German attack 
showed no signs of slackening. 
Everywhere the pressure re- 
mained severe, and its effects 
were only too visible. But the 



to a depth of ne?,rlv fifteen miles, but for that 
advantage he had paid a fearful price. The 
British had held every position till the last moment, 
and then relired in good order, still fighting and 
still rear'y to fight. Though weary, they were 
in good heart. The line held together from end 
to end. There was no question of rout, no isolation 
of any sector or serious break - through. The 
Commander-in-Chief remarked 
that our losses, though heavy, 
were not out of proportion. On 
the 27th he announced : " Our 
troops have thrown back the 
enemy all along the British 
Front." 

Hitherto, it was understood, 
only the most economical use 
had been made of the British 
reserves. Our gallant lads upon 
whom the first shock fell used 
the last ounce of their unaided 
strength to dispute the ground 
inch by inch. On the 23rd they 
began to receive assistance from 
the French, who -relieved part of 
our forces, and took up the 
struggle on the sector opposite 
La Fere. In the region of Noyon 
they closed with the enemy in a 
furious battle for the heights on 
the right bank of the Oise. Here, 
as elsewhere, the Germr.ns brought 
up very formidable reinforcements without pause, 
and the French, acting under orders, gave ground 
gradually, always returning to deliver vigorous 
counter-attacks which cost the enemy dear. 
At Nesle, too, our Allies were desperately engaged, 
losing and retaking the town several times. 




TAKEN IN THE GREAT BATTLE WHILE THE ENEMY WERE PRESSING US 
HARD : GERMAN PRISONERS AND WOUNDED COMING IN. 

Official Photograph. 



retirement, however unwelcome, was not the 
defeat claimed by the enemy, who on the afternoon 
of the 24th described the battle as won. It was 
true he had pushed our troops back, at one point 



The news of March 26, referring to events late 
the previous night, was of a comparative slacken- 
ing of enemy pressure in the north, while furious 
fighting continued south of the Somme, where a 



art 95 1 
Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April ?. 1918 



new attack seemed to be developing against the 
British and French around Roye and Chaulnes. 
During the day the Germans pressed vigorously 
with fresh divisions against Noyon and Roye. In 
the afternoon new hostile attacks developed. 
Roye was taken ; Noyon was evacuated. The 
new British front then stood on the line Bray- 
Albert- Beaumont - Hamel-Puisieux-Ayette-Eoiry- 
Henin-Wancourt to the Scarpe, and northwards of 
that as before. Hard pressed, but steady, the 
British and French stood, fought, and then made 
their orderly retirement, again and again. Their 
spirit, like their ranks, remained unbroken. They 
had punished the enemy beyond his calculations, 
and he was said to be bringing reinforcements 
from all parts of his front. There are limits even 
to German prodigality. The thrust at Amiens, 



range of about seventy-five miles. The weapon is 
believed to lurk somewhere in the Forest of 
St. Gobain. At first, the fall of projectiles in the 
suburbs of Paris was taken to be the work of 
hostile aircraft, but the examination of fragments 
of shell soon proved that the feat had been per- 
formed by the enemy's artillerists. What the 
piece is like, and what its charge, has yet to be 
discovered. It fires a 9'5 (or thereby) projectile, 
of no very great destructive power, and Paris is 
not much disturbed by its periodic reminders. 

Air-work continued vigorous. Mannheim, the 
Metz district, and the Treves district were again 
bombed. The railway stations at Cologne received 
half-a-ton of explosives. Enemy bases behind the 
lines came in for further attention, and aerial com- 
bats increased. In one day our aviators disposed 




SMOKING, CHEERFUL, AND TIRELESS : SOME OF OUR MEN BRINGING UP FRESH SHELLS TO A BATTERY 

DURING THE GREAT BATTLE. [Official Photograph.} 



although serious, might yet be parried. Our men 
looked eagerly for the moment of recoil. 

On the other parts of the French front, although 
no overwhelming attack developed up to the 27th, 
there was a decided quickening of activity. 
Violent artillery actions took place to the north- 
west of Rheims, upon which 175 shells fell during 
March 24-25. At Suippes, in Champagne, two 
enemy coups-de-main broke down ; the enemy 
artillery became violent between Arracourt and 
the Vosges. Enemy attacks east of Blemery and 
Badonvillers were repulsed with heavy losses. 

Much has been said of German " surprises "in 
new methods of warfare, reserved for this battle. 
These were thought most probable in the depart- 
ment of gas and Tanks, of which nothing very 
wonderful or uncommon has been heard. But 
one remarkable novelty has been unmasked the 
" mystery gun," which can tombard Paris at a 



of seventy German machines. Their special work 
in the great battle itself was beyond all praise. 
Hundreds of tons of bombs were dropped on enemy 
positions, dumps, and billets ; and low-flying 
'planes harassed hostile troops with machine- 
gun fire. Artillery observation and scouting was 
carried out continuously with no less efficiency. 

Speculation as to the opening of a great 
Austrian offensive on the Italian front about the 
middle of April hinted at an event not im- 
probable. For the moment, however, the situa- 
tion showed few signs of change. Spasmodic 
outbursts of gun-fire from Lake Garda to the 
Brenta and great aerial activity were the order 
of the day. Infantry action remained almost at 
zero. General Diaz returned to the front, after 
attending an urgent military conference in Rome. 
The troops in the Trentino stood ready for 



any test. 



LONDON : MARCH 28, 1918. 



3. lt 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



f Pa 

I New 



Part W ! 
Series j 



Garly in the German Offensive in Northern france. 





BEHIND THE FRONT: RESERVES MOVING TO THE SUPPORT LINE; GERMAN PRISONERS. 



In none of hi. communiqu*. during the nrtt four day.' fighting did 
Sir Dougla. Haig .peak of the German priaoner. that we had 
taken. Thl. characterise rertraint and reticence on the part of 
the Britih Commander-in-Chief .rand, out in marked contradi^ 
tinction to the Taingloriou. Hindenburg and Kaiter telegram, to 
Berlin and Germany In general announcing thouund. of British 



prtaoneri at haring been captured plus gun. galore. Al to the 
enumeration of the priioner. who mar hare been taken by the 
Cermana, it ihould be alway. borne in mind that it hat long been 
notoriou. that the enemy'l regular practice, in their official reports, 
1. to innate their total, of priwner. by counting in wounded men 
found lying incapacitated on the ground,-rO/Wfl) 



ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. April 3. itS 




The Great Battle: H Sample of tl 




MOVING UP ONE OF OUR HEAVY BIG-PROJECTILE GUNS TO REINFi 

This is one of the first photographs to reach England received from the battlefield during the great battle which opened in 
Northern France against the British Front on March ai. It is a useful reminder of the kind of weapons that Sir Douglas 
Haig has at his disposal m ample quantities for the final stemming of the tide of the tremendous German onset in which 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. April 3, 



British Heavy Hrtillery in the field 




SUPPORT SECTOR: HEAVY METAL AND CHEERFUL GUNNERS. 

rripoun, m: * _ . 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 3. 19:8 




Road-Making on the British front in francc. 






MILITARY ROAD-MAKERS : A PLOUGH OR " SCRATCHER " LOOSENING THE EARTH ; SCOOPING IT UP. 



Roads and light railways are * TiUI element in the operations of 
a (teat modern army, mch aa our> now fighting to heroically against 
the great German onslaught in France. As in all other parts of 
the great fighting machine, mechanical apparatus of the latest type 
has to be provided and brought up. Thus in the above photo- 
graphs we see on the left-hand page the preliminary work of 



driring a mule-drawn plough, or "scratcher," over the ground 
to loosen the soil, 'and (in the lower subject) the subsequent 
operation of a scooping machine. On the right-hand page the 
upper photograph shows a general riew of a cutting in which the 
road-makers are at work, with a light railway running along one 
side. In the lower photograph one of the scoops is seen at the 

(CmiHinir.t .iff itt. 



Airil S. 1918 



CHE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



f Part M I . 
[New Series J~ 



Road-Making on the British front in francc. 





OUR MILITARY ROAD-MAKERS : A CUTTING ; UNLOADING SCOOPS AT THE END OF THE EMBANKMENT. 

potentially under gas. One may see Labour platoons, equipped 
with helmet! and mask!, remaking road! and Ailing in craters on 
a strip of country which a few day! earlier was in German occu- 
pation, and is still well within range of hostile artillery. The 
sound of exploding shells shakes the air all round. The work 
goes 01 steadily and calmly." [Official Photographs.] 



moment of unloading ; that is, tipping out its content! on the end 
of the embankment. "A great deal of this work," write* a 
"Time*" correspondent, "is now performed by the Labour Com- 
panies, which are the efficient, and now, it may be said, the 
. indispensable, auxiliaries of the Army Service Corps and mobile 
Transport Columns. Much of it is done actually under Are, and 



-. r Pan a., i 

10--[_N, Sw.r, I 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR. NEWS. 



April 3. I91S 



Hnti-Hircraft OTorh on the British front. 





ARCHIES" IN FRANCE: RANGE-FINDER .AND TELEPHONIST; GUNNER AND TELEPHONIST. 



As these interesting photographs show, the work of anti-aircraft 
gunners is a highly technical and specialised operation. Unlike the 
sportsman taking high birds, who trusts merely to his good sight 
and steady hand, the men who shoot from the ground at human 
"birds of prey" find their range and aim with the aid of rariouc 
scientific, instruments. On the left-hand page here we see, in the 



upper photograph, a British officer on the Western Front in France 
using an anti-aircraft range-finder, while a man stands by with 
a telephone to communicate the results of his calculations to the 
gunners. In the lower photograph the telephonist at the other 
end of the line is shown standing by an anti-aircraft gunner who 
if getting the height of an enemy aeroplane. The other pair of 

\Canltnited aff.-: --, 



Y.r.l J. 19 IS 



fHE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



f I'art l> 1 
[New Series j 



Hnti-Hircraft Slorh on the British front. 








OUR "ARCHIES" IN FRANCE: GETTING THE RANGE OF AN ENEMY AEROPLANE; FIRING AT IT. 



photographs, on the right-hand pag*, similarly illustrate the 
co-operation of range-finden and gunners in a more general view, 
showing the different kinds of apparatus used by the range-finders 
(in the upper subject) and (in the lower one) an anti-aircraft 
section in action against an enemy machine, with their guns mounted 
motor-Yehicles, The " Archies," as the anti-aircraft guns are 



familiarly termed, are often in action by night as well as day ; 
indeed, it is only at night, as a rule, that the German airmen 
succeed in crossing far orer the British lines, under corer of 
darkness. Of one such occasion, Mr. Philip Gibbs writes, "Our 
anti-aircraft guns kept up a barrage fire with the aid of tht 
searchlights, which swept the sky." (Official Photographs.} 



. - r Prt t 
*2--LN Seri 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 3. 1918 



British and German Cdoundcd from the Great Battle. 




. 




THE GREAT BATTLE : PLACING GERMAN WOUNDED IN AN AMBULANCE TRAIN ; OUR WALKING CASES. 



A great battle, such as that which began with the German Offensive 
on the British front on March 21, means incessant toil for those 
engaged 'In attending to the wounded. Friend and enemy alike 
are treated with equal care by the British medical services. In 
the upper photograph is seen a wounded German being helped of! 
his stretcher into a British ambulance train ; the lower one shows 



some British "walking cases" (men slightly wounded) being ghren 
a lift in a lorry. "The slightly wounded," writes Mr. Philip Gibes, 
" hare only one interest : it is to know how the day has gone ; and 
when I told them that on balance it was rery bad for the enemy, 
who had failed in all his larger plans, they said : ' Thank goodness 
for that' " [Official Photographs.} 



N-.nl 3. IIS 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 




"Che Great Battle: Olounded of Both Sides. 




STRETCHER-CASES: BRITISH AND GERMAN SOLDIERS WOUNDED IN THE GREAT BATTLE IN FRANCE. 



In his report on the second day of the great battle, opened on 
March i by the German oflenaive against the British front, Sir 
Douglas Haig said : " Our losses hate inevitably been considerable, 
but not out ot proportion to the magnitude of the battle." All 
account* agree that the Germans, on their side, have suffered 
extremely h*avy losses, their troopi having been sent forward to 



the attack with the usual prodigality of life. Our photograph 
shows a number of severely wounded men, both British and German, 
laid on stretchers on the ground, awaiting their turn to be carried 
a further stage on their journey from the battlefield to hospital. 
There they lie, friend and foe together, suffering witnesses to'the 
cruelty of war. \Oficial Photograph .1 






THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 3. 1918 



ROMANCES OF THE REGIMENTS : XCV -THE lira UGHT DRAGOONS. 



THE TRAGEDY OI- SERGEANT TURNER. 



SERGEANT TURNER was one of the best 
fellows in the i ith, but he had a temper 
which, when it got badly out of hand, threw him 
into a state hardly to be distinguished from 
insanity. In the end, there can be no doubt that 
it utterly unhinged his mind. Usually, however, 
he kept it well under control, or he would not 
have been the 
popular man he 
was. Everything 
was in his favour. 
He was young, 
very handsome and 
pleasant, and, al- 
though only an 
N.C.O., well con- 
nected. His com- 
rades liked him, 
even loved him, 
and forgave him 
his failing. When 
at last it proved 
his undoing they 
were inconsolable. 
After Waterloo, 
when th regiment 
was quartered at 
Moul, in Dutch 
Flanders, Turner found that place attractive, for 
the Mayor had two pretty (laughters. With one of 
these the Sergeant fell violently in love, and had 
the happiness of knowing that his passion was not 
hopeless. On the contrary, the gill surrendered 
at once, and took care to let everybody know that 
she too had lost her heart. The Mayor, it appears, 
was perfectly well pleased at the prospect of 
having so gallant and good-looking a soldier for 




THE 



hard campaigning ; their laurels, still fresh, gave 
them a halo of romance. At all the gaieties of 
the countryside they were welcome. And so the 
days went on, bringing round the village fete at 
Moul. Turner was in great spiiits. This was to 
be the festivity of his life. He had taken good 
care to engage Annette for every dance, or for as 

many as she would 
give him. He had 
little doubt that 
she would let him 
have them all 

But in stepped 
inexorable Duty. 
The Sergeant was 
kept rather late at 
his quarters, and 
when he reached 
the scene of the 
fete he saw some- 
thing not at all to 
his mind. A very 
dashing young 
French Hussar 
from a neighbour- 
ing village, corning 
early and finding 
Annette partner- 
less, offered to take her up for a turn. The right 
man, being late, shmild have a small punishment, 
so up the damsel got merrily enough. There could 
be no harm. Besides, she was free by all the 
laws of Terpsichore and the custom of the country. 
But poor Turner took a different view very 
unreasonably, to be sure ; but then, he was in 
love. He stood with folded arms, watching the 
pair, and letting his darker nature get the upper 



UNITED. STATES TROOPS IN FRANCE: CLEANING 
QUICK- FIRERS. [FrtMli Official.] 




THE UNITED STATES TROOPS IN FRANCE: AT TRAINING,- [Frtnch 



his future son-in-law. For a time, therefore, all 
went well with the Sergeant's wooing. 

Those were agreeable days for our soldiers 
,%hroad. They enjoyed tlii relief from recent 



hand. Jealousy made him imagine that the 
Hussar was being allowed more favours than the 
circumstances warranted. His British ideas were 
outraged by what was, after all, only a Frenchman's 



April 3. 18 IS 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



During the Closing Stage of the east Hfrican Campaign. 




WITH ONE OF OUR COLUMNS : A PICKET 

Military operation! in German East Africa proper, . within Ihe 
frontier! f the former enemy colony, cme to an end, u fr u 
til* colonial territory was concerned. *ith the hustling over into 
P;;-^ue*e East Africa of the rtill-resiitiiuj fragments of the 
e(ieiy' originally powerful and numerous forcea. But fighting of 
. guerrilla warfare nature Itill tontinuM with the cattered band. 



AT AN ARAB SHANTY ; A NATIVE SEN1RV. 

of Germans and what continents of their black Askari !vi 
remain with General von Lettow and hi surviving lieutenants. 
All however, are being gradually rounded up by General Van de 
Venter', troops, men of certain corps of which ire hown in th 
illustrations. According to utegrami at the time of writing, tt.p 
have landed to take the Germans in retf. 



Serlw 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



. April 3. 1918 



natural gallantry to a pretty partner. Turner 
could bear it no longer. He rushed to his 
quarters, crammed two blank cartridges into his 
pistol, and, shouting to two comrades to put 
on their swords and follow him, returned to 
the f6te. 

Very much surprised, but curious, the other 
two Dragoons went after the Sergeant. The 
moment they reached the ball-room they under- 




THE BRITISH FORCES IN GERMAN EAST AFRICA: LEWIS-GUNNERS. 

stood. A dance was just ending, and they hoped 
to persuade Turner to leave before he made a 
scene, but they were too late. The music stopped. 
The Sergeant sprang forward, and, seizing the 
Hussar by the collar, beat him with his pistol and 
dragged him round the room. The Flemish 
farmers, by whom Turner 
was liked and respected, 
did their best to bring him 
to reason, all to no purpose. 
Then one of them caught him 
round the neck and tried to 
drag him clear of the Hussar. 
It was the worst thing he 
could have done. The struggle 
now became triangular, with 
increased danger to all con- 
cerned. 

There was a flash and a 
roar. Turner had not fired, 
but the pistol had gone off 
by accident. The Hussar lay 
on the ground, to all appear- 
ance hon ibly wounded . But, 
by great good luck, he was 
only badly scorched by the 
double blank charge. 

In a moment the Ser- 
geant's blind rage left him. 
He was all contrition, and his 
rival all magnanimity. The Frenchman, who had 
meant no harm, made haste to say that the inci- 
dent was closed. There must be no more of it. The 
villagers agreed. On the spot, the Mayor drew up 



and signed a paper attributing the Hussar's wound 
entirely to accident. The worthy fonctionnaire 
understood ; he was not going to spoil a good 
match. They got the wounded man to bed. He 
was doing well. All was forgiven, and would 
soon be forgotten. 

But Turner covfld not forgive himself. He 
was of the unhappy race of self-tormentors. 
Murder had been in his heart, although he had 
done no murderous act. 
He had not even pulled a 
trigger, but that consider- 
ation weighed little with 
a nature over-sensitive. He 
was a fellow of the most 
delicate honour. All his 
gaiety left him. Even his 
victim's complete recovery 
made no difference. The 
Sergeant's comrades watched 
him with the deepest con- 
cern. 

One day, pleading sud- 
den illness, Tuiner rushed 
to his quarters. Friends, 
following later, found there 
a letter to the Sergeant- 
Major. It sent that officer 
and a party out hot-foot. 
They found the Sergeant 
sitting in a dry ditch, with 
his pistols beside him. He 
dared them to approach. The Sergeant-Major 
fell on his knees and begged the boy, whom he 
loved, to do himself no harm, and be reasonable. 
Turner threw one pistol away. His friends, 
in agony, hoped against hope. Would he 
throw away the other ? He took it up. . . . 




POLICEWOMEN, ON AMBULANCE DUTY : A STRETCHER - PARTY, UNDER 

A SERGEANT, CONVEYING AN INJURED GIRL TO A FIRST-AID HUT. 

Photograph by L.N.A. 

Whatever the Crowner might have said, the 
nth "-found it Christian burial." The detach- 
ment, to a man, attended unofficially, and 
Lieutenant Wood read the Service. 



April S, 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



f Tin M I . , 
L New Series J~ ' 



Rome front Cttar-CHorkers in the Midlands. 




r 

i 

I 



1 T.N.T. 



MAKING: FITTING EMERGENCY GAS-MASKS-ONE, OPEN, IS SEEN 



The factory where mn-worker. we Men here U one ol thote wrueh 
h. come Into existence .inee Augurt 1014, ' rtn .pec, 

.rlment. o< w munition. mmkin(. It i.. lUted. one thrt 
bH tarfly <<* > * manufacture ri T.N.T. ruih-plo.,e, 
or W-nitrltoiuo., a. the fall name of the .pM- " " 
- it. chemical ingrecJenta. T.N.T., o( courw, wa. well know, 



ON THE RIGHT. 

to us before the war. to ingredient, and action, 

and eruptir, propertie., are ascribed and explained m War 

Ammunition text-book, of tome time ago. Men at t 

are Men fitting on and wearing their emergency ga.-. 

breathing appwatu., which are obligatory In cue 

A man (right) hold, muk ready.-[P*<*<. * *"<*" 




. :* i 
*>. Seric J 



THE ILLUSTRATED VVAk NEWS. 



April 3. 1918 



In "Cwo Departments at Birmingham jMunition-dorhe. 





WOMEN'S WORK: CAMOUFLAGING GUN-CARRIAGES AND LIMBERS ; AEROPLANE-WING RIB MAKING. 



The guns and artillery tnatfrif!, r. ^ out from England to all 
ftonU, leaves the country in * : ,;. lately equipped and finished 
r,titf, down to the smallest dcUite One of the last processes is 
ah awn in the upper illustration, c- 'iflage patches and dabs of 
colour being added with the p.nnt-' :-i*h to otherwise ready gun- 
carriag^s and limbers at a wo:n,-., n the Midlands, where they 



have been turned out. Camouflage painting of guns and artiller/ 
vehicles and gear, it is curious to recall, first came in during our 
Boer War of eighteen years ago. It was thenceforward adopted 
wholesale throughout the service alike at home and abroad 
Coast forts, as at Portsmouth, had palisades streaked yellow, red. 
and blue, and so on. [Photos, bv Newspaper Illustrations. | 



L 1 - 



Auri! 3. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, 



r p<m u i , 

L New Sane. .(19 




Ht the Manufacturing Capital of the JMidlancts. 




SHELL PARTS: FORGING CASES FOR 4'5-INCH HOWITZER PROJECTILES: BRASS FOR FUSES. 



The works l which these photographs were Uken are among 
the new munition-factoties " create ii " at Birnningham during the 
wat. In addition, former-ilay hardware anrt ironmongery factories 
nd workshops, devoted previously to making " Brumrnagem goods," 
and inepensie jewelkry, to electro-pliting spoons and forks, and to 
metml work o< minor sorts, have been turned orer to the control 



of the Ministry of Munitions. The Illustrations here represtnt 
stages of shelt-msking. in which man-labour is employed, owing 
to the severe and strenuous muscular work of the tasks in hand. 
Men are seen in the upper illustration forging steel cases for 
4'5-inch howitzer shells. Brass-casting for shell-fuses is shown 
in the lower illustration. ^rli'XM. ly Kcwspaptr IJfatsjMtiM*.] 






, f Pirt W 1 
2 <>-| Ne<v Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 3, 1918 




Out to m\n the C&ar in the Hir: Midland Cttorhers. 




WORK FOR THE HOUR : WOMEN SEWING 
The place where these photographs were taken was, before the 
war, a large centre of specialised activities in Birmingham. An 
immense number of highly trained artisans and workmen, in one 
of our 'most important commercial and industrial 'undertakings, were 
engaged there. During the war, the kind of work done' there 
has been entirely suspended and laid aside for munition services, 



COVERS ON LARGE AEROPLANE-WINGS, 
among them the building of artillery gun-carriages for all manner 
and sizes of guns and howitzers, artillery wagons and limbers, 
pontoons, Tank parts, and shells. More recently, in view of the 
all.important air warfare of this year's campaign, the workers have 
had added to their other duties that of the construction of aero- 
planes, in ever increasing numbers. [Photo, by News. Illustrations. 



April 3. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 




Out 



n the mar in the Hir: JMidUnd dorhcrs. 




BADGING AEROPLANES : PAINTING ON THE RINGS WHICH DISTINGUISH ALLIED MACHINES. 



Aeroplane* - more aeroplanes still mere aeroplanes, ii the call 
from the Western Front and from all Fronts, and the authorities 
concerned hare buckled to with the intention and power, happily, 
ol aiuwerinf all demands, At munition factories all orer the 
country, additional departments, allotted to the manufacture of 
aeroplanes, hare been established and staffed with competent hands- - 



largely women and (iris, who prove adept at the work and tat 
now in full working order, turning out aeroplanes in numbers that 
may startle the enemy. A finishing operation is shown taking place 
at a Birmingham aeroplane factory the painting on *he wings 
of the concentric rings of red, white, and blue, w!.' ' form the 
badge of British and French planes. [PJinfns. by AV'S. //. i, ; i!.'.>ns] 



Illti. lU-USTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 3. >9 IS 



domen Munitioners in their 




TWO KINDS OF WORK : TROLLEYING T.N.T. TO THE 
The upper photograph shows some of the women and girls who 
are employed at a high-explosive T.N.T. factory in the Midlands. 
The party seen are doing their part in pushing trolleys laden with 
boxes of T.N.T., ready for issue, taking them from the departments 
wheie the finished explosive is packed, to place the boxes ready 
for loading on the railway. Every precaution possible, or imagin- 



TRAIN ; THE " BRENELL TEST" FOR SHELL STEEL. 

able, to prevent undue jolting of the boxes or rough travelling is 
taken, although T.N.T. is said not to be dangerous, with prdin- 
ary care, to handle or move about. In the lower illustration 
women are engaged on a detail of a very important technical kind. 
They are at work applying what is called the " Brenell test " to 
ensure the hardness of shell steel. [Photos, by AVws. Illustration*.} 



13. 1913 



THE ILLUSTKAIi.o WAR NEWS. 



Ci'-m if- Y 
Ne Series I '2^ 



Ht a Munitions-factory where Shells are Made. 





WOMEN-WORKERS IN A FINISHING WORKSHOP : WEIGHING 4*5-lNCH SHELLS ; GAUGING 9*2'S. 



A considerable part in the manufacture of shells of all size* can 
b done, and is being done, by women and girl munition-workers 
all orer the country. In the upper of the illustration* women 
are seen weighing 4'5-inch shells. The exact and correct weight 
of the shells he uses is necessarily an all -important matter, from 
a ballistic point of view, to the artilleryman. A shell proving too 



light or too heavy in flight when fired makes all the difference to 
accuracy of fire and aiming. In particular is this so when there 
is long-range firing. Women gauging for the copper bands fixed 
round at the base ends of shells to grip the spirals of the gun- 
barrel grooving, of lifting, on firing, are seen in the lower illustra- 
tion. (Photos, by Newspaptr Illustrations.] 



_) rjn vi , 
- * ~L N " iHhtJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 3. 1918 



Women's Work at a Birmingham Munition-factory. 



,.-,;, 
^ 





MAKING GAS-MASKS : MACHINES FOR BREATHING-TUBES AND FOR OTHER PARTS. 



In addition to doing their share in regard to various processes in 
th making of shells, Tank pans and sections, high explosives, 
guru, fun-carriages, aeroplanes, etc., Birmingham women-workers 
are showing themselves remarkably adept in the manufacture of 
gas-masks for the battlefield and trenches. For the delicate and 
intricate handling that many details in the manufacture of gas- 



masks necessitate, women's fingers and natural deftness of touch 
prove invaluable. And the women are no less capable i.i 
managing mechanical appliances. Women are shown in the illus- 
trations at work at power machines for pressing out the angle- 
tubes belonging to the breathing apparatus and other gas-mask 
fittings. tPos. by Naespapit Illustrations.] 



April 3. 191C 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



TTbe Great Battle: fiorses in a Shelled Hrea, 




Horses, both transport-wagon animals and artillery hones, ire 
lwtyi gas-masked, u well as their drlTers, when about to go 
where (U It expected. So sereral illustrations from photographs 
fien in aarller ianiee hare depicted. Like eoldieri in general, 
the horiet hare, of count, to become accuttomed to having maikt 
on, and it il not arwajl an tuy taak to get them to wear them. 



HIS HORSES' GAS-MASKS. 

Attention hu further to be constantly paid, by drireri and otheri. 
to the close fitting of the (a>-maiki on entering gat danger-routs. 
HorMt, when uncomfortable with munle appendages uch as masks, 
hare a habit of shaking thir heads riolently to free :h:-.'Ka 
from the encumbrance jut at one sees them do in the streets 
on occasion with their ordinary nose-bags. (Official Phototraplt .] 



itics J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 3. 1918 



THE NEW WARRIORS: XXVI. -LIGHTS ACROSS THE SKY. 



LINUS is " Lights." When you see the beams 
come out and jump round among the stars 
after Gothas, you do not, perhaps, realise that 
words of command and order and authority bid 
them waggle and wander across the skies. They 
are things so imponderable and aloof that fixed 
laws do not seem proper to them. If you think 
(of course, vaguely) 
like this you will be 
entirely wrong. Linus 
(or one of his guild) is 
behind 'em ; he is law 
and order, and he 
bends the beams to 
his will. 

The raid -area lights 
are not, of course, all 
the lights ; the simple 
may be astonished to 
leani that, taking the 
lights as a mass, the 
raid - area lights are 
but a drop in the 
ocean. This is, how- 
ever, a_ fact. The 
whole way round Eng- 
land and Scotland 
and, no doubt, Ire- 
land there are lights 
and lights in batteries ; 
and these lights are 
working doggedly all 




through the war, comb- 
ing the waters as well 
as the sky for enemies, 
and doing it with any amount of tactical skill which 
not merely exposes, but confounds the enemy. 

The commander of searchlights is sometimes 
an officer, sometimes a warrant officer ; under his 
control may be many searchlights or one only, 



PALESTINE CHILDREN INTERESTED IN A BRITISH 

SOLDtER: A PICTURESQUE SCENE AT THE ENTRANCE 

TO THE TOMB OF ABRAHAM, ISAAC, AND IACOB. 

Official Photograph. 



and in the handling of it he must be finished and 
(as 1 will show) frequently ignorant, but always 
reliable. If he is an officer, like Linus, and is 
coastal rather than A.A., he is, more often than 
not, an Engineer, and his designation is that he 
is attached to Fort, or Port, or Coast Defences. 
The mere humdrumery of his work is 
monotonously ordin- 
ary. He has to keep 
the lights in thorough 
working order ; he has 
anything up to twenty 
men under him, and 
woe to them if they 
do not click as light- 
begetters should. They 
have to clean lights 
and gears ; keep effi- 
cient the engine that 
supplies the power for 
the light, and keep it 
working ; and they are, 
usually, electric-light 
experts and fitters for 
the whole of the camp 
or fort in which they 
are stationed. 

The light itself 
needs scrupulous at- 
tention ; it must work 
delicately on its bear- 
ings, and its beams must 
never falter. While it 
is raying its best, 
there is always a 
fellow studying through a special window the 
line burning of the arcs, and he never allows his 
attention to wander from them, even though 
the beam has caught a Gotha or Zeppelin in 
its tenacious radiance, and that wriggling foeman 




THE BRITISH CAMPAIGN IN PALESTINE: ESCORTING TURKISH PRISONERS THROUGH A NATIVE MARKET. 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



One of the Historic events of the Palestine Campaign. 





CAPTURE OF JERICHO : THE ROAD FROM JERUSALEM ; MOUNTING GUARD IN THE CITY. 



There were no walls to fall down at Jericho on that February 
day of the present year when General Alienby's troops, in the 
course of a brisk skirmishing fight with a Turkish rear-guard, 
approached the historic place. Re-walled later, in spite of Joshua's 
curse on whoever did so, and taken and retaken in war several 
limes during the history of Palestine. Jericho for many a long 



year past has been without walls. Where the walls stood ire 
rubble mounds of sun-dried mud and desert-sand heaps. Under Saracen 
and, later, Turkish domination, what was at one time the second 
city of Judaea has literally crumbled to ruin becoming an open 
Arab village, with one hotel, a European-style house, where tourists 
to see the Dead Sea lodged. --(Official Pkt*ograt>lit.\ 



M 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 3. 1918 



is just about to be struck down to his doom. 
The man who works the light frequently, by 
the way, it is a twin must be an expert 
practised in every trick of the trade. Not 
only must he know the usual movements for 




WITH THE BRITISH FORCE IN CAPTURED JERICHO: SOLDIERS 
DRAWING WATER AT A WELL (Official Photograph.] 

raking the sky and getting on to his quarry, 
and working in conjunction with other dis- 
tant beams so as to move across the sky 
with them, holding the enemy 
craft lightly and well ; he must 
also know the moves, -almost psy- 
chological, which will enable him 
to snatch after and pin once more 
an enemy craft that has slipped, 
shot up, or dropped down, out of 
his beam. Practice has made him 
an uncanny fellow in this matter, 
and, though the enemy may have 
seemed to nip off into a whole uni- 
verse of sky, a swing of his light and 
he has him again, like a ball caught 
in a cup. Practice, too, has given 
him a vision along his light that would 
seem unreal if I mentioned it ; it is 
said that, with glasses, a man can 
pick out the print of a newspaper not 
yards, but miles, along the beam, so 
intense is it and so skilled the man. 
The light itself is subjected to fre- 
quent tests ; these tests are not 
always visible in the sky, for the face 
of the light is closed by shutter- 
screens, and the light can be turned on 
and tested in this way : it is only when 
the screens are flung open that the sword 
of light leaps into the sky. 



I have said that the officer works with 
ignorance as well as with skill. This is a 
fact. He is always on duty, but he never 
knows how many or which of his lights will 
be on duty that night. 

On the coast, lights have to 
sweep a certain area for a cer- 
tain period, and while they are out 
Linus has to note every mortal thing 
that comes within their purview and 
to " report on same." His report 
must be complete. 

He uses his beam as a signal- 
ling-rod, either to carry messages 
overseas or up to aircraft wait- 
ing for news of a raider or for their 
own recall ; he may " Morse " along 
the beam, or talk by swinging it in 
the air. Sometimes the beam is 
a steady guiding light to give 
other beams direction, or to give 
aeroplanes a beating for their re- 
turn home. 

It is steady work on the 
light, mainly monotonous, and 
only sometimes wildly exciting. 
It is not peace work by any means. The 
light is a perfect mark for any gunner or 
machine-gun fellow, and Linus and his crew 




CAPTURED AT RAMAD1E, ON THE EUPHRATES: THE TURKISH 

COMMANDER (AHMED BEY) AND HIS STAFF UNDER BRITISH 

GUARD A NEWLY ARRIVED PHOTOGRAPH FROM MESOPOTAMIA- 

Photograph by C.N. 

aie well aware of it. They carry on cheer- 
fully, and all live for the night when a " Mark 
Over " may mean the death of a raiding 
brute. W. DOUGLAS NEWTON. 



April S. IQIS 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 




OUtb the Palestine Hrmy in Jericho. 



*^ 








DURING OUR OCCUPATION : NEW ZEALANDERS RETURNING TO QUARTERS ; THE MAIN STREET. 



The capture of Jericho placed General Allenby in a petition to 
clear out the enemy from the weit of the Dead Sea. Jericho had 
been used by the Turin aa a bue, doling the hill road from 
Jerusalem. With the capture of Jericho, the Dead Sea littoral 
on the western side and the mouth of the Jordan, with the 
Turkish motor-boat flotilla and iu workshops and a strategically 



important bridge-head, became exposed to the attack our troops 
hare carried out with completely satisfactory results. By the 
capture we passed from hill country to plains where marching is 
easier and water all round the year plentiful. The rapidity of our 
advance In consequence has been much accelerated at every point, 
as the later communiques record. [Official PMographs.} 



U::: 



30-[ N v- rt sU]-THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. April 3. 19 18- 




HUenby'9 Hnzace: 



first of 










,., 
P w 



li 



GALLOPING INTO THE PLACE : ONE OF THE NEW ZEALAND SQUADRON! 

The taking of the village of Jericho, on the morning of February 21, fell to the lot of the mounted Anzacs. After wo i 
along the outskirts of the hills, along the steep, rugged Jerusalem-to-Jericho road towards the Jordan Valley and the I 
Sea, as closely as possible on the heels of the retreating Turkish rear-guard during the previous day, afternoon, and evei 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. April 3. 



British forces to Bntcr Jericho. 





IROUCH THE VILLAGE STREETS AT SPEED, WITH EYES ALERT AND RIFLES READY. 

as they pressed them back, at dawn the Aiuacs were again on the move. Quite early they found Jericho and its outskirts 
abandoned and practically clear of the Turks, and they made a dash at the village. In orthodox style they galloped through 
with flankers skirting the boundaries. [Official Pkotoerapk.j 



32-[ N t 'w"s.s I-THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. April s. ma. 




Indian Soldiers' Services in the 











AT A WAR-MEDAL PRESENTATION BY THE VICEROY HELD IN 

One of the interesting ceremonies of the cold-weather season in India connected with the war took place at the Imp 
capital, Delhi, during the presence of the Viceregal Court. The occasion was the public presentation by the Viceroy of 
medals to Indian soldiers who had returned to India after service on various war-fronts. The enemy has had plei 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, April 3. ms-fV 1 "* 94 - 3 

, L-^CW ae'v 



^turned JVlen Receiving their Decorations. 






DELHI : MEN OF MANY REGIMENTS PASSING BEFORE THE DAIS. 

| experience of the fighting qualities of the IndUn Army, infantry, cavalry, and mountain-battery gunners sowars and sepoys ot 
classes and creeds, Sikhs, Dogras, Jits, Punjabi, Musalmans, Gurkhas, Rajputs, Baluchis, and Pathans. Imperial Service troops 
>m the trained forces of the Native States of India, volunteered for active service by their Princes, have also taken their part. 



srics] 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 3. 1918 



WOMEN AND THE WAR. 



HP HE need for woman's labour on the land is 
A urgent. The Women's Land Army is asking 
for 12,000 recruits. What is more, it wants them 
at once. The Rally of Landswomen in Trafalgar 
Square the other day was something more than 
a mere picturesque demonstration to attract 
recruits for the force that, in the words of the 
President of the Board of Agriculture, is holding 
the Home Front. It helped to bring home to a 
great many people the vital importance of the 
work that is be- 
ing done by the 
Land Girl. 



In view of the 
demand for her 
services, it is 
curious to reflect 
that, two years 
ago, the woman 
who volunteered 
for agricultural 
work was re- 
garded with 
hardly concealed 
scorn by most 
people, and by 
the farmer with 
ill-concealed sus- 
picion, if not ac- 
tual dislike. That 
that attitude has 
been replaced by 
one of admira- 
tion for her 
capacity as an 
efficient worker 
is very largely 
due to the efforts 
of the agricultu- 
ral section of the 
Women's Legion, 
of which Miss 
Brocklebank is 
Commandant. 
Space forbids a 
detailed account 
of the practical 
work it has ac- 
complished, but 
the increasing 
demand for 




A PEER'S DAUGHTER WORKING ON THE LAND: LADY HtRMIONE 

BUXTON, AND HER CHILDREN. 

Lady Hermione Buxton, who has taken up farm work at her husband's place at 
Castor, Peterborough, and Is initiating her children into the rudiments of the duties, 
is the wife of Commander Bernard Buxton, D.S.O., R.N., to whom she was married 
in 1904, and daughter of the Earl of Verulam. {Photograph by Illustrations Bureau.} 



the lines indicated by the Legion. The Agricul- 
tural Section of Lady Londonderry's corps is still 
carrying on its work. Any number of farmers have 
expressed their gratitude for the workers supplied 
from its Dairy-Farming Hostel at Oakham, 
Rutland, where women can, at a very moderate 
cost, be trained in all branches of dairy work. 

The Cottesmore Hunt Kennels, as well as four 
cottages, have been furnished and equipped for 

the students, 
thirty of whom 
can be accom- 
modated at a 
time. The object 
of starting the 
centre was to ask 
women of inde- 
pendent means 
to undergo a 
three - months' 
training, so that 
they might either 
undertake the 
management of 
their own dairies 
or be able to help 
others less expe- 
rienced living in 
their own neigh- 
bourhood. In the 
second place, it 
was hoped to at- 
tract women who 
wanted to earn 
their own living 
by helping them 
to qualify as 
dairy workers and 
instructresses, 
and the arrange- 
ments made were 
such that a 
thorough train- 
ing under com- 
petent teachers 
was available at 
a minimum cost. 
More than that, 
the Legion au- 



women's labour on the land is one of the results 
of its efforts to train women for all branches of 
work in farm and field. 

It is interesting, too, to remember that the 
Women's Legion were the pioneers of the Land 
Movement. It was that body that first under- 
took to train them on a large scale. The methods 
adopted were so successful that, when the Govern- 
ment established the Women's War Agricultural 
Committees, they modelled their schemes along 



thorities find 
paid employment 

for trained students who prove themselves to be 

efficient at their work. 

The shortage of sugar and the consequent 
difficulty of preserving fruit is a problem which 
every housekeeper has to face, and circumstances 
this year combine to make it even more 'difficult 
than it was last. Last year the Legion threw 
itself into the breach, organised a Fruit-Bottling 
Section, formed centres all over the country, 
distributed 10,000 seven-pound bottles and 3000 

[Continued ffff'taf. 



\::r,\ .4. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, 



:< Somewhere at Sea"-H British patrol on its Beat. 




AT THE SAME SPEED, WITH REGULAR INTERVALS BETWEEN VESSELS : DESTROYERS IN LINE AHEAD. 



In s*ntry-go fashion, from day to day ail over the North Sea, 
destroyer patrolling quadrons paw to and fro, on specialty appointed 
' teats," steaming at regulated speeds usually in " line-ahead/' 
as the TMels shown in the illustration are doing. Bach vessel 
ke*ps exactly at so many yards - or " cables " in nautical par- 
lance from the next ahead, the intervals being fixed by the 



senior officer. They cruise on various duties, including enemy 
submarine destruction, the interception of German " tip-and-run " 
raiders, trade route and mine-field " lane " policing. Normally, 
"Line Ahead" is the fighting formation at sea. The "scraps" 
between destroyers of the Dover Patrol and the German Zeebrugge 
flotilla would probably mostly open with both sides in that formation. 



r Pact 95 "1 
3 [_ New Sri< J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAft NEWS. 



April 3. 1918 



thrcp-pound ones, and, as the result of an agree- 
ment with the Navy and Army Canteen Board, 
bought back the filled bottles at fixed prices. 
This year an even more ambitious scheme is 
contemplated. What the Legion hopes to do is 
to supply something like 100,000, or even 150 ooo, 



MB 




the Legion directly helps those who, owing to 
heavy cost and transport difficulties, would be un- 
able to dispose of their fruit by any other means. 

But the Agricultural Section does more than 
train students and bottle fruit. Its fleet of motor- 
tractors has been the salvation 
of farmers in the Midlands, as 
well as "other parts of England. 
The pioneer work it accomplished 
in this direction set an example 
which was afterwards followed 
by the Government, for a Tractor 
Department was started under 
the Board of Agriculture in 1917. 
Of course, we all know that im- 
itation is the sincerest form of 
flattery, but perhaps the proudest 
moment in the life of the Agricul- 
tural Section was when Professor 
White, of the North Wales Agri- 
cultuial College, said, after seeing 
a Legion tractor at work, that 
of all the tractor ploughing he 
had inspected that of the Legion 
was the best. 



A PEER'S 



HERM10NE BUXTON. 



DAUGHTER AS GOAT-FARMER : LADY 

AMONG HER PETS. 

At Castor, neat Peterborough, Lady Hermione Buxton, wife of Commodore Bernard 

Buxton, D.S.O., R.N., and daughter of the Earl of Verulam, has taken up farming 

with success, and is here seen with a group of her weU-cared-for and docile goats. 

Photograph by Illustrations Bureau. 

26-oz. bottles of sterilised plums and gooseberries, 
and other fruits, for the use of His Majesty's Forces. 



If enterprise deserves success, 
the Agricultural Section has only 
met with its deserts. Not con- 
tent with the activities already 
mentioned, .its Market Garden 
Supply Committee has bought 
fruit and vegetables from country 
growers for the use of the Army and Navy 
Canteen Board, and delivered them in its own 



The difficulty of transporting 
the bottles, which promises to be 
greater this year than when the 
operations were first started, has 
led to the decision on the part of 
the authorities to cut down the 
number of centres from thirty- 
four to ten ; but, as these will 
only be established in districts 
where a liberal fruit-crop is ex- 
pected, the output will not be 
affected. The advantages of the 
scheme will be clear to every 
woman with a practical know- 
ledge of housekeeping in country 
districts. The Government have 
already made it clear that very 
little sugar will be available for 
fruit -preserving purposes, so that 
those who have their own fruit, 
as well as those who in normal 
times buy it for jam -making 
and- bottling, will have to do 
without. The Women's Legion 
bottle fruit without using sugar 
at all. What is more, they do it 
in such a way that it will, so long 
as it is unopened, keep good for an indefinite 
length of time. Another point in favour of the 
idea is that, by buying fruit from small growers, 




A PEER'S DAUGHTER AS LAND-WORKER: LADY HERMIONE BUXTON 

WITH HER GOATS. 

Lady Hermione Buxton, wife of Commander Bernard Buxton, D.S.O., R.N., and daughter 

of Lord Verulam, has taken up farm work at her husband's place at Castor, Peterborough, 

and is very successful with her goats.- [Photograph try Illustrations Bureau.] 



lorry to camps or brought them to railway 
stations. In Rutlandshire a Herb Section was 
formed. CLAUUINK CLFVE. 



April 3. 1910 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



r P.m 95 1 ,_ 
[New Series] -3T 



VARIOUS NAVAL SCRAPS ENEMY DESTROYERS SUNK AND BOMBED SEA CASUALTIES- 
REPORTS FROM RUSSIA -JAPANESE INTERVENTION RUMOURS UKRAINIAN LOOT- 
BOLSHEVISM AND ANTI-BOLSHEVISMBRITISH ACROSS JORDAN-EAST AFRICA. 



WHILE every other phase of warfare seems 
for the moment insignificant beside the 
fateful wrestle on the Western Front, some minor 
incidents of note both by sea and land fall to be 
recorded. During the days immedi?,tely following 
the close of our last article, two naval actions took 
place off the French coast. British monitors 
bombarded Ostend , 
and naval aircraft 
destroyed enemy 
flying machines 
which attacked the 
seaplanes spotting 
for the monitors' 
guns. In the Heli- 
g o 1 a n d Bight, 
British seaplanes 
on reconnaissance 
duty attacked 
enemy mine- 
sweepers with 
machine-gun fire. 
We had no casual- 
ties. Air patrols 
destroyed or lamed 
seventeen enemy 
machines. Enemy 
destroyers were 
bombed in Bruges 
Dock. The same 

afternoon a destroyer action was fought off 
Dunkirk, which had been bombarded for ten 
minutes by enemy vessels. Two German des- 
troyers and two torpedo-boats were believed .to 
have been sunk. We lost no ships, but one of 
our destroyers was damaged. It was able, hov,'- 







ON THE PALESTINE FRONT- A THIRTY - HOURS ENGINEERS' JOB : 

A RAILWAY CUTTING 150 YARDS LONG AND 9 FEET DEEP 

AT THE CENTRE. 



ever, to reach port. French destroyers co-oper- 
ated in the action, without loss. On the 22nd, 
one of H.M. mine-sweeping sloops was sunk by 
a mine ; and on the 23rd a British destroyer 
was sunk after a collision. One officer and one 
man were lost. 

Little was heard from Russia in the days 

under considera- 
tion. The Socialis s 
of the Extreme 
Left had declared 
the treaty of peace 
With Germany null 
and void, and there 
was a talk ol the 
need for the form- 
ation of a new and 
well -disciplined 
army. In the 
centres of Eastern 
Siberia, Bolshevism 
was reported to be 
still strong, and a 
" force " of 15,000 
was "holding " 
Vladivostok, with- 
out, however, 
effecting any de- 
predations on the 
stores accumulated 
there. These were still in the hands of the 
Customs authorities, and the Bosheviks had the 
fear of the foreign war - ships well before their 
eyes. The problem of Japanese intervention 
found no solution. At one moment it was said 
to be agreed upon, but a If.ter report pointed 

\Cont 1 nitt(i on fafft 40 




KEEPING THE BRITISH LINE UNBROKEN DURING THE GREAT WESTERN - FRONT BATTLE : TROOPS MOVING INTO 
THE FIGHTING AREA IN MOTOR-LORRIES. [Official Photographs.] 



, r ?<" S5 1 
38 LNew series] 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 3. 1918 



During the Great Battle: In the Second Lines* 




AT TWO POINTS : A SUPPORT-BATTERY GUNNERS' TEAM ; INFANTRY RELIEVED AFTER ACTION. 



In the upper illustration a gun of one of our supporting, or 
second-line, batteries, is seen preparing for action. Men of its 
team are shown engaged in getting the gun to its firing position 
with drag-ropes, and making ready for laying and opening fire as 
soon as the enemy are reported within range and the front clear 
of our first-line defending troops, as these reach their prepared 



second positions. The lower illustration shows men of a battalion 
which was in the thick of the fighting during the opening days of 
the Gret Battle, while temporarily halted towards the rear of 
the battle-srone for a breathing space and rest on being relieved at 
the front in the battle-line by fresh troops from the support*. 
[Official Photographs.} 



April 3. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



During the Great Battle : Supporting Hrtillery 







WITH OUR GUNNERS : GETTING A SUPPORT-LINE GUN READY FOR ACTION ; DRAG-ROPE WORK. 



The following is an episode typical of the way our gunners have 
fought in the Great Battle. During the fighting on the second 
day of t'.ie great battle in the neighbourhood of Epehy " two bat- 
teries of our fietd guns for some four hours, at ranges of from 
600 yards downwards, fired at point-blank range into masses of 
the enemy. Two of the guns were smashed and two more we 



blew up before retiring. The rest we'e got away, and the men 
who saw it, say that two batteries of guns can hardly ever have 
killed so many men in action. ' ' So one correspondent related. 
Said another of the firing of our artillery in general, on the dense 
masses of the enemy : " Our artillery fired with open sights and 
could not miss." [Official Photographs.] 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS 



April 3. 1918 



the other way. Replying to an interpellation 
in the Japanese House of Peers, the Premier is 
srjd to have stated that the Government had 
not considered the question. " The Empire was 
not so powerless as to be frightened so much 
by German penetration in 
the East." This Parliamen- 
tary statement is not necess- 
arily a categorical denial that 
any action would be taken. 
In European Russia German 
penetration continued its 
beneficent labours. The loot- 
ing of Ukrainia proceeded 
systematically, and the re- 
quisitioning of small quanti- 
ties of wheat led to a peasant 
disturbance and sundry 
shootings. Odessa's protest 
against occupation, on the 
grounds that the city is no 
part of Ukrainian territory, 
was over-ruled by a truculent 
German pronouncement. On 
March 28 it was reported 
that Odessa had been re- 
captured by a Russian 
Ukraine force, after severe 
fighting. 

The Roumanian Premier, 

the tool of the Central Powers, accepted 
the German peace terms. 

Aerial bombing of Bulgarians was the chief 
news from Salonika. Greek patrols were active. 

General Allenby's campaign in Palestine con- 
tinued to make uninterrupted progress. Early on 
the morning of March 22 our forces crossed the 



British had progressed nine miles, and were within 
three miles of Es Salt. An enemy battery WG.S 
captured by a London battalion. The King of 
Hedjaz has again scored in a smart little affair 
near Jedahah, on the Hedjaz railway, where his 




U.S. TROOPS PASSING THROUGH LONDON TO JOIN THEIR WESTERN - FRONT 
COMPATRIOTS, FIGHTING AS SIR DOUGLAS HAIG DESCRIBED " SHOULDER TO 
SHOULDER WITH THE BRITISH AND FRENCH " : A LINE UNIT [Photo. S. and G.] 



all 




O.M THE WAY TO FIGHT "SHOULDER TO SHOULDER WITH THE BRITISH AND 

FRENCH " : AMERICAN INFANTRY, WITH THEIR PACK EQUIPMENT ON, PASSING 

THROUGH LONDON. [Photograph by S. and G.] 

Jordan, secured their positions on the eastern bank 
and struck eastwards. They met and overcame 
considerable resistance from both Turkish and 
German troops. On the evening of the 24th the 



Arabs destroyed a Turkish camel unit. The 
Duke of Connau^ht's tour of inspection in the 
Holy Land has greatly encouraged our troops, and 
has been the occasion of several memorable and 
interesting ceremonies. On the igth, H.R.H. 
held an investiture on Mount Zion, and decorated 
General Allenby with the insignia of the G.C.M.G. 
and with that of a Knight 
of Grace of the Order of 
St. John of Jerusalem. The 
Duke has also personally 
distributed awards for 
gallantry in the field. 

Jerusalem has already 
shown signs of the advan- 
tages of British rule. \Yhen 
our forces entered the Hely 
City it was unspeakably 
neglected and filthy, after 
the most approved Turkish 
manner. But great reforms 
have already been carried 
oat in the way of cleansing 
"nd sanitation, and now 
t lere is a more wholeson e 
atmosphere. 

No military action was 
reported from Mesopotamia, 
where movements of troops 
were retarded by heavy rains. 
General Van Deventer's 
forces operating in Portu- 
guese East Africa continued to round up small 
and scattered remnants of the German forces. 
Nampula was occupied by fresh troops lately dis- 
embarked at Mozambique. LONDON: MARCH 28, 1918. 



LONDON ; Published Weekly at the Office. 172. Strand, in the Parish of St. Clement Danes, in the County of London, by THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON Np.ws AND SKRTCH, LTD, 
173. Strand, aforesaid ; and Printed by THE II.LUSTRATRO LONDON NfiWs AND SKRTCH. LTD.. Milford Lane, W.C. 2 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1918. 
Hntered as Second-Class Matter at the New York (N.Y.) Post Office. (916. 



77l Illustrated War New,, April 10. 1918.-Part 96, New Sefigl, 



Cbe Illustrated War 




Official Photograph. 
THE GREAT BATTLE : ONE OF THE BRITISH LONG-RANGE HEAVY GUNS CHECKING THE GERMAN 



ADVANCE AT A HALTING-PLACE ON A ROAD. 




__[ Part % 

2 l_New Se..c 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 10. 1918 



THE STRUGGLE DAY BY DAY A FATEFUL EASTERTIDE-STEMMING THE TORRENT- 

THE ALLIED POSITION STEADIED- BRILLIANT FRENCH AND BRITISH EXPLOITS PARIS 

MASSACRE THE KING AT THE FRONT AMERICAN AID THE ATTACK RENEWED. 

frequently. Two days later, it became clear that 
the bid for Arras and Yimy had been foiled, at 
great expense to the enemy. South of the Somme 



HP HE close of the most momentous Holy Week, 
1 save the first, in the history of the world, 
brought no lightening to the tense anxiety of 
the nations. But Easter Day dawned with some 
promise, faint yet 
definite, of the " bud- 
ding morrow in mid- 
nigh 1 .." During the 
previous three days, 
local retiiements had 
carried the British 
line still further to 
the west, and, al- 
though the distances 
were compaiativeiy 
small, they were suf- 
ficient to prove the 
continued severity of 
enemy pressure. On 
the z8th the whole 
line from south of the 
Somme to Arras had 
been the scene of 
heavy fighting. A 
determined thrust on 
a wide front north 
and south of the 
Scaipe was made at 
Arras and Yimy 
Ridge. On the north, 
the attacks were re- 
pulsed ; south of the 
river the day closed in uncertainty, although the 
enemy, using eleven divisions, had made only 
partial penetrations. De^nancourt had been lost 
and won again, and many places changed hands 




THE GREAT BATTLE: "HOW GOES IT : "ASKING "WALKING 

WOUNDED" FROM THE BATTLE-LINE FOR NEWS. 

* 
Official Photograph. 



the struggle had also swayed backwards and 

forwards around Ar- 
villers, Vrely, and 
Hamel, with little 
definite advantage to 
either side. That 
part of the line 
formed a deep salient, 
of which Vrely was 
the apex, pointing 
eastward. It was here 
that the chief modi- 
fication occurred on 
the 2g'.h, when our 
men, " although net 
pressed, retired from 
Vrely to Mezieres, 
thus greatly reducing 
the dangerous salient. 
Fiom Montdidier to 
Ncyon, meanwhile, 
the enemy had made 
precisely no impres- 
sion. Heavy enemy 
thrusts on the 3oth 
along the valleys of 
the Luce and the 
Avre brought our 
line back from 
Mezieres to Moreuil. On the 313*: the enemy's 
attacks north of the Somme were not renewed, 
but on the south he launched a heavy stroke 
south of the Peronne-Amiens road, with the 







THE GREAT BATTLE: "JOCKS," ON COMING OUT OF THE FIGHTING LINE, BEING PIPED BACK TO REST QUARTERS 

FOR A BRIEF INTERVAL. [Official Photograph.] 



April 10. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



f Par; 96 ' _ 
[New Series J~ 3 



venerable capital of Picardy for its obvious 
objective. Anxiety for Amiens was for a time 
the chief emotion of the moment, and the final 
messages of Easter evening told of a fierce contest 
for tactical features, woods, and villages between 
the Luce and the Avre. Nevertheless, in com- 
parison with previous bulletins, the reports 
pointed to a general retardation of the enemy 
onrush. North of the Somme the lull was mani- 
fest ; while to the south the Allies were evidently 
profiting by the readjustment which they had 
secured by a vigorous counter-attack during the 
fighting on the 3oth. 

On April i the whole front remained com- 
paratively quiet. No appreciable gain or loss of 
ground fell to be recorded. \Ve gained small 



These successes, it is true, amounted only to the 
capture of a post, as at Serre, the knocking out of 
an enemy battery at short range, or the crushing 
of a local counter-attack ; but such incidents, if 
small, spoke of a resilient Allied line and gave 
good auguiy for the work still to be done. No 
sane observer believed for a moment that the 
Germans were bought to a standstill : the lull 
could be only temporary ; further, and perhaps 
fiercer, tempests had yet to be weathered ; but 
the slackening of speed was an asset not negligible. 
Once more, as in 1914, the Germans were working 
to a time-table. By April i, it is said, they had 
undertaken to be in Paris. If so, their errand 
has appropriately miscarried. In any case, they 
certainly intended to be much further on by this 









1 




THE GREAT BATTLE: LONG-RANGE GUNS IN SUPPORT, SHELLING A GERMAN mkCK.-[OffuM_PMo S r<:p/..} 



points, but the map of the front remained sub- 
stantially as it had been drawn on the evening 
of the 3ist. Local attacks were attempted near 
Albeit by small bodies of the enemy. These were 
repulsed, and few of the attacking force returned 
to their own lines. The fighting south of the 
Somme was also local, chiefly about Moreuil and 
Hangard, where some ground was gained by a 
brilliant cavalry counter-attack. South of Moreuil 
the French fought with advantage, beating off an 
attack. On the rest of their line nothing of 
importance occurred. 

April 2 passed quietly or the whole of the 
British front, and from the French front no 
serious fighting was reported. The lull had 
deepened. Sir Douglas Haig's message dealt 
chiefly with more particular details of the previous 
twenty-four hours' operations. Attacks on the 
2nd sunk to the dimensions of trench-raids once 
more. There had been smart give-and-take 
encounters in which our men had the best of it. 



time than they are. The main incidents of the 
2nd were a strong attack near Fampoux, east of 
Arras ; a smart raid by Lincolnshires at Loos ; 
and the recapture of Ayette, south of Arras, with 
about 200 prisoners and three machine-guns. 
The main situation remained unchanged. 

Working in close liaison with the British on 
the south, the French during the days in question 
did invaluable and brilliant service. On the 2yth 
and 28th, finding it impossible to make headway 
'at Lassigny, the Germans thrust hard at Mont- 
didier. A struggle of the utmost bitterness and 
obstinacy ensued, and at last our Allies retired to 
the heights west of the town. The enemy then 
tried to extend his gains south and west, but was 
baulked by the magnificent counter-attack which 
drove him out of Courtemanche, Fesnil, St. Georges 
and Assainvillers. These villages our Allies kept, 
and thus secured an advance at some points 
reaching a depth of ij miles on a 6J miles front. 
On the 2 9 th the French pressed their advantage, 



. r 
* [ 



I'art 96 1 
New Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 10. 1918 



and carried Mondial by storm, thereby greatly 
improving their position due south of Montdidier. 
The villages taken the day before remained in 
our Allies' possession, despite the enemy's vigorous 
efforts to retake them. Towards evening the fury 
of the German onslaught on the whole Oise front 
decreased in violence. The French line stood 
solid, and was being hourly reinforced. On the 
3 ist the combat surged without rest about Moreuil 
and Montdidier. In a memorable bayonet charge, 
French and British, including Canadians, fighting 
shoulder to shoulder, drove the enemy out of 
Moreuil, which had again been temporarily lost. 
The woods to the north of the town were also 
wrested from the Germans. Between Moreuil and 
Lassigny the check to the enemy was complete. 
On the ist, the only outstanding incident south of 



units will be brigaded with the French and British, 
and will finish their training in the firing line. It 
is as momentous a decision as that which placed 
General Foch in supreme command. 

The King went over to France on the a8th, and 
stayed for two days. He went out and in among 
his soldiers, giving them the right hand of com- 
radeship, and hearing their stories of the battle. 
His Majesty has done no more kingly act than 
this. He had a right royal welcome, and was 
received with boundless enthusiasm by all ranks. 

On Good Friday, a shell from the German long- 
range gun hit a historic church in Paris while 
Divine service was in progress ; seventy-five 
persons were killed, and ninety injured. 

During the lull, the Allies prepared for further 
storm. It broke on the morning of April 4, after 




THE GREAT BATTLE: A GROUP OF GERMAN PRISONERS HALTED TO REST A FEW MINUTES ON THE WAY 

TO THE REAR [Offi:ial Photograph.] 



the Somme was the enemy's heavy thrust between 
Montdidier and the Peronne-Amiens road, with 
the design of widening his gains west of Hangard- 
en-Santerre. The Franco-British troops smashed 
the attacking waves, which never got into the 
open, and a splendid counter-attack recovered the 
village. Before nightfall the Allies, in sharp local 
fighting, had made appreciable progress between 
the Somme and Demuin. On the 2nd there was 
a lively artillery duel, especially between Mont- 
didier and Lassigny, but no infantry fighting of 
importance. This brisk gun-fire continued and 
increased on the 3rd, and the enemy made desul- 
tory attacks without advantage. On the whole, 
the 3rd passed in comparative quiet. Amiens was 
" guaranteed " by General Foch. 

America has put all her resources at the Allies' 
disposal. Until United States divisions are ready, 



heavy artillery preparation, on the whole front 
between the Somme and the Ancre. It was a 
new bid for Amiens. Our line held fast on the 
right and centre, but bent back a little near 
Hamel. A later attack west of Albert was com- 
pletely repulsed. South of the Luce the Canadian 
. cavalry did magnificent work. 

The French were at the same time violently 
attacked north of Montdidier. Two villages near 
Moreuil and a few hundred yards of ground at 
one point were all the enemy's gains. Grivesnes 
was held, our Allies shattering all assaults, and 
making progress in vigorous counter-attacks. 

Patrol actions and desultory encounters were 
the rule on the Italian front. Our Allies had a 
success in Albania. Indications pointed still 
more clearly to a great Austrian offensive in 
preparation. LONDON: APRIL 6, 1918. 



April 10. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



[ Part m 1 e 
lN. Series J~ 5 



Cbe Great Battle: Che Hllies' Generalissimo. 





THE VICTOR OF THE MARNE NOW IN SUPREME COMMAND ON THE WESTERN FRONT : GENERAL FOCH. 



General Foch hmi beta appointed by the uniTerul uxnt of the 
French, Britiih, Belgian, and American Governments, Generalissimo 
of all the Armies on the Western Front. He i sixty-Are, and 
comes ot a family of soldiers, the earlier memberi of which fought 
under Napoleon. Ai a Lorrainer, he is a compatriot of Marshal 
Ney, the " Bravest of the Brare." Before the war, at head of the 



French Staff College, General Foch had a European celebrity among 
soldiers as a master of the art of war. In the war his stubborn- 
ness and sangfroid, and his masterly tactic*, turned the retreat to 
the Marne into an epoch-makinf rictory. He helped us mafni- 
ncently at Ypres, and throughout has been ever since the 
brain of the French Headquarters Staff. [PMo. by S. and C.] 



- r Pan M I 
LN.W senei I 



FHE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 10. 



Great Battle: TThe King at the front. 






INCIDENTS OF THE TOUR : MEETING NEW ZEALANDERS ; TALKING TO AN AMERICAN OFFICER. 



Keen to revisit hii armies in the field on the Western Front, and 
encourage them during the fighting of the great April battle in 
holding- back the enemy,, the King, in the first week of the fighting, 
crossed to France. Immediately on arrival he started for the 
battle-area. He met troops just out of the fighting-line on his 
way, and talked with several of the men, who all showed un- 



bounded delight at seeing the King among them. Both overseas 
troops and Scottish battalions were among those amidst whom the 
King went, as illustrated on this page and elsewhere in the present 
number. Also, at places, officers, both British and American, met 
his Majesty, as seen in the lower illustration on this page. The King 
is teen speaking to an American officer . {Official Photographs.} 



April 10. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



I Pirt 86 

IN.. 




TTbe Great Battle: "Che King at the front. 





ON THE EDGE OF A BATTLEFIELD : WITH SCOTS JUST FROM THE LINE ; INSPECTING A UNIT. 



On returning from his risit to the Western Front while the great 
battle was still in its first week, the King addressed a letter to 
Sir Douglas Haig as Commander-in-Chief of the British Armies. 
In it he said, among other things, referring, in particular, to his 
tour as close as possible to the actual fighting line : " I obtained 
personal testimony to the indomitable courage and unflinching 



tenacity with which my splendid troops ha^ withstood the supreme 
effort of the greater part of the enemy's fighting power. 1 was 
also fortunate enough to see some units recently withdrawn from 
the front line, and listened with wonder as officers and men narrated 
the thrilling incidents of a week's stubborn fighting. I was present 
at the entraining of fresh troops eager to reinforce." [Official 



-\ 

, | 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 10. 1918 




french and British fighting "as One Hrmy." 






THE- GREAT BATTLE : A FRENCH CAVALRY PATROL WITH THE BRITISH ; AWAITING THE ENEMY. 



Writing from French headquarters during the great battle, a 
"Times" correspondent says : "The (act that we are fighting as 
one Army, and that the main pressure of the original thrtut was 
delivered on thlt part of the line with mawet of troopt far out- 
numbering our men, rendered thii transference of French troopi 
westward an euential manoeuvre and an obvious necessity of the 



military situation. But that does not in the least detract from 
the promptitude and self-sacrificing valour with which it was 
carried out. . . . Nothing shows better the spirit of comradeship 
existing between the French Armies and our own . . . than the 
way they pass on from one to another stories of particular British 
feats of arms." [Official Photographs.] 



April 10. 19 IS. 



fHE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Prt IIS T - 
l_Ne SlisJ~8 



french Macbine-Gunners and British SOounded. 




THE GREAT BATTLE: BRITISH STRETCHER-BEARERS BRINGING A MAN THROUGH FRENCH LINES. 



A> mentioned on other pages '" th *> number, Britiih and French 
troops here lou|ht lid* by tide in ceiUin lections of the (rut 
b4ttle on the Western Front. The remit hu been to increase their 
mutual respect for each other's righting qualitin, dreadT peat, 
end the itronfert ipirlt of camaradtnt Htitti between them. While 
the Britiih highly appreciated the timely aid which the French 



broufht them at a critical moment of the trule, the Flench are 
no lew grateful to our men for the tremendoui fight they hae 
put up to prerent the common foe (rom twarming oer further 
tract, of their natire country. Thi. attodation on the balHe/Wd 
mutt cement the friendihip of the two nations for long years to 
come', and, indead, it may be hoped, for all time.-[O^Wn( 



10-[ N i'w' t !*!U] THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. April 10. 1B18 





O>e Great Battle : "Troops Resting after Hcti 








TEMPORARILY RELIEVED AFTER TAKING THEIR PART IN HOLDING UP THE G! 

There is one significance of this illustration which cannot fail to be reassuring. It shows that we possess, at least at presen 

sufficient men for holding the line unbroken, and relieving front-line troops. The contrast from the state of things durin 

the battles of the first year of the war, between the first and second battles of Ypres, in this regard is most marked. I 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. April 10. 



a Village in Rear of the Battle Hrea, 







UVE : BRITISH INFANTRYMEN-CHEERFUL AND CONFIDENT AS USUAL. 

days, owing to our shortage of men, the same troops had repeatedly to be thrown into the battle-line, often without 
tervening intervals for rest The " New Army " was still in the malting to a large extent ; only first contingents from 
rteas were in the field to support the survivors of the " Old Contemptible* " and the Territorials. [Official Photograph.} 



ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. April 10. 1918 



Shoulder to Shoulder": British and french Hssemb 




THE SOLDIERS OF THE TWO COUNTRIES WERE INTERMINGLED " : FRENCH (IN THE Cl 



" British, French, and American troops," said Sir Douglas Haig in one of his reports of the great battle, " ire fighting should 
to shoulder, and French reinforcements are rapidly coming up." This help was invaluable to our hard-pressed troop 
Describing one episode in a section of the battlefield, Mr. Percival Phillips writes : " The Germans attacked heavily, on Voyeni 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. April 10. 



together (Halting to Go into the firing-Line. 





kND BRITISH TROOPS (ON THE LEFT) WHO FOUGHT SIDE BY SIDE IN THE GREAT BATTLE. 



the neighbouring bridges . . . and .ftor heavy fighting at Rouy we (ell back. . . . It wa. a dangerous line, and could 
be held far any considerable time by the troops then at our disposal. Fortunately French dmsions . . . helped to i restor 
tituation . . The soldiers of the two countries were intermingled in the fighting of that night' -{.Official Ptotognpli.} 



and 
not 

rh* tituation 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 10. IBIS 



ROMANCES OF THE REGIMENTS : XCVI.-THE 43RD NATIVE INFANTRY. 

THE DEATH AND RESURRECTION OF MEER ALL 



MEER AH was one of the handsomest and 
best-behaved young men in the 43rd Madras 
Infantry. From the time when he had been only 
an orderly-boy he acted as personal servant to a 
British Subaltern, whose liking for the Sepoy 
amounted to affection. They were together in 
the Burmese War 
of 1825, and took 
part in the dis- 
astrous little affair 
outside Prome, in 
which the 43rd 
lost nearly all its 
officers. The brig- 
ade to which the 
regiment was at- 
tached attacked 
what was thought 
to be a weak posi- 
tion, only to find 
it very formidable, 
and, after much 
confused fighting, 
had to fall back, 
severely mauled. 
The Subaltern, who 
had escaped un- 
hurt, was doing 
his best to bring 
off the wounded, but was forced to fall behind 
the main body, for the ground was difficult and 
the progress of the party necessarily very slow. 
But with him he had still his faithful Meer 
Ali, who had done yeoman service in the 
fight, and to whom he still looked for aid in a 




He had been badly wounded in the side 
during the engagement, but had said nothing 
about it. The regimental surgeon, a Scot, 
looked at the Sepoy and shook his head. Meer 
Ali understood ; he pressed his master's hand, 
exclaimed " Feroza " (Turquoise), and fell back, 

lifeless. The Sub- 
altern was not 
ashamed to shed 
tears for his hench- 
man ; he implored 
the doctor to give 
him some hope 
even yet, but Saw- 
bones said the 
injury had been 
mortal. They must 
press on with the 
living. 

But the Sub 
altern was unwill- 
ing to leave Meer 
Ali's comely body 
to the wild beasts. 
He bade the others 
go on, and he 



THE GREAT BATTLE- SCOTTISH TROOPS READY FOR THE 
ENEMY IN A SUPPORT-TRENCH. [Official Photograph.] 



would catch them 
up. It was im- 
possible to bury 
the dead, but he tore down branches and 
made a rough screen for the remains. As he 
worked, he wondered what his servant's last 
word had meant. More than likely Feroza 
was the name of some native girl. From 
Meer Ali's wrist he took a silver amulet, to 




THE GREAT BATTLE: A SUPPORT-TRENCH MANNED BY "KILTIES." [Official Photograph.} 



tight place. But suddenly the Mussulman 
grenadier, who was marching just in front of 
his master, pitched heavily forward and fell. 



give to his mother, the widow of a native officer. 
Then, having finished his pious task, he set about 
rejoining bis comrades. 



\CcntiHnrJ overleaf. 



April 10. 19X8 



IKE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



TIbe Great Battle: Contrasting Scenes. 





EFFECTS OF GERMAN FIRE: A "DUMP" BURNING; WOUNDED MEN ENTRAINING REFRESHMENTS. 



Before launching their treat offensive against the British front the 
Germans opened a terrific artillery fire. " The bombardment of 
the front lines," writes Mr. Perry Robinson, "was probably as heavy 
as any sen in this war, and certainly the depth over which the 
shelling extended was quite unprecedented. Not only were the 
forward trenches, support and reserve lines put under a heavy fire, 



but the whole area behind was shelled back even to remote towns 
and villages and open country, which could only be reached by 
high-velocity guns of large calibre. In all, it was probably the 
greatest aiti.'lery concentration ever known." The upper photo- 
graph shows an ammunition " dump " on fire. In the lower photo- 
graph wounded men receive a drink before starting. [Official Photos.} 



,_| fin w T 
18 -(.No* SriwJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 10. 1818 



But very soon the Subaltern found that he 
had lost his way in the jungle. He tried this path 
and that, only to go more hopelessly astray. 
The sudden tropical darkness caught him still 
uncertain as to the direction his friends had 
taken. Utterly spent, he sank 
down and ate some cassia seeds, 
which brought sleep. He must 
have slept for some hours. 
When he awoke it was still 
dark, the forest was full of 
eerie sounds, and, to increase 
his discomfort, a snake was 
slowly crawling over his face. 
He lay still until it had glided 
off. Then he sat up and 
listened. Surely there were 
voices, and that must be the 
gleam of a fire ! 

He moved closer ; but, fear- 
ing the enemy, was careful to 
take cover in a thicket. From 
his ambush he saw a strange 
sight. Around a fire of crackling 
thorns a , group of weird women 
were performing ( some incanta- 
tion. In their midst lay the 
body of a man, about which 
they revolved to a rhythmic 
chant. He recognised the women 



firelight fell upon the face of the resuscitated 
man. The Lieutenant's heart beat faster, for 
the face was that of his good Meer Ali ! All 
night the British officer had walked in a 
circle. He had returned to his original point. 




THE GREAT BATTLE: LOADING UP SHELLS TO BE SENT FORWARD. 
Official Photograph. 



for Buddhist nuns, by their white stoles, 
yellow girdles, and unveiled heads. Their 
rites, then, were -not likely to be infernal, 
but the officer could not for a time fathom 
their meaning. 

At length, however, the women raised a cry 




THE GREAT OFFENSIVE: SCOTTISH "TOMMIES' GOING UP TO SUPPORT. 
Official- Photograph. 

of joy. The corpse moved first an arm, then 
a leg, and finally sat up. The ministering 
angels busied themselves with bandages and 
dressings of plantain leaves. A gleam of 



Overjoyed, he leaped from his hiding-place. 
The priestesses received him gladly, and Meer 
Ali, whose strength was fast returning, gave 
his master an affectionate greeting. At dawn 
they moved on under the nuns' guidance to 
a monastery not far distant, where the wounded 
man had proper medical atten- 
tion ; but the nuns had al- 
ready treated him so admirably 
that only time was necessary 
for his complete recovery. 

When master and man were 
at last able to rejoin Regi- 
mental Headquarters, where the 
Lieutenant as well as Meer Ah' 
had been given up for lost, the 
Surgeon was unmercifully chaffed 
about the Sepoy's resurrection. 
But the Scot took it all in 
good part. 

" Weel, weel, lads," he re- 
plied, "gin I 'd meddled wi' the 
wound, maybe the loon wouldrta 
be livin' the day." 

Meer Ali, at the time of 
the Prome incident, had been 
marked for early promotion. 
When he returned to duty, 
he went up steadily. Four 
years later, having risen to 
the rank of Havildar, he got 
married. His wedding was a great event in 
the corps. It interested his master especially, 
for it explained the Havildar's " dying words." 
The bride's name was Feroza. 



\pril 10. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



I. New' series J~ 17 



Great Cattle: British Infantry and Gunners, 




REPELLING THE GERMAN ONSLAUGHT : BRITISH TROOPS MOVING UP ; A BRITISH GUN IN ACTION. 



In the grtat battle In France our troops hare foufht with wonderful 
heroiun (flint OTtrwhtlmlng odda. "They fo marching up to 
th< battle-lint," writM Mr. Philip Gibbi. "with untalttrlng (Mt . . . 
the** long columni of nun In itMl hati. ahouldtrlng hury pck. 
with thdr rtflM ilunj, and thM milM long of transport, and thM 
tndlMi t<anu of mule-drirtri and wafon-drlrtri." Of tht work 



of tht funntri hi iayt, rtfardlnf an enemy attack ntar Arrai : 
" They [tht Ctrraana] did not trartl far . . - . Our fleld-funt rnadt 
tarftti of them and tore (apt in their wei " ; and again : "Our 
artillery had to many targttl that they could hardly twitch on to 
them fait tnough. Tht enemy lottti were fantastic in their 
horror." [Official Photographs.} 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 10. 1018 




Great Battle : Hmbulances and Stretcber-Bearers. 



BRITISH TROOPS AND FRENCH BRAKCARDILRS; OUR AMBULANCE MEN WITH GERMAN WOUNDED. 



The great battle has meant pirn and ceaseless toil for those 
whose duty it is to tend the wounded. The upper photograph 
hows French stretcher-bearers, with British infantry moving up. 
Below, British stretcher-bearers are seen placing wounded Germans 
in a motor-ambulance. A tribute to the medical services was paid 
by the King in writing to Sir Douglas Haig after his recent visit 



ness of those ministering to their 




rants." {Official Phatnrafiks.', 



April 10, 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



TTbe Great Battle: franco-British Co-operation. 









ON THE BRITISH FRONT : FRENCH AND BRITISH SOLDIERS HALTED ; MOVING UP AND RESTING. 

In parts of the great battle British and French troopi have been when the action began, part of the British sector, has been in- 

co-operating with the utmost goodwill. In an account of recent valuable. ... We are fighting as one Army. ... The French 

ercntj west o( the Oise, a "Times" correspondent writes from the put no limit to the enthusiasm with which they express thdt 

French Headquarters : " The fighting has been of the most desperate admiration of the way our men hare fought, or the self-sacrifice, 

character, and the relief which the French have given to the sorely discipline, and devotion to duty which they have shown. The two 

pressed British troops, by extending their front to cover what was, Armies work in perfect and most friendly unity." (Official Photos..] 



20-[ N a!L"l THE ILLUSTRATE 




Cbc Great Battle on the Olestem front : Splen 




THE STRAIN 



"*** 



ifint,v 
borne itself magnificently. 



UPON THE MEN WITH THE HEAVY GUNS HAS BEEN STUPENDOUS, AND THE 
on the Western Front, Mr. H. Perry Robinson writes : " No troops could possibly have behaved bett 
I would especially say that I do not mean field-gunners alone. The Royal Garrison Artillery h 
strain upon the men with the heavy guns has been stupendous, and their endurance, their resourc 



fNEWS. April 10. 



[orh by Our Heavy HrtWery a Big British Gun. 





ANCE, RESOURCE, AND COURAGE HAVE BEEN BEYOND ALL PRAISE " : A TYPICAL EXAMPLE. 

ad courage have been beyond all praise. . . . From all directions one hears the same story of the splendid heart in which the 
inners have kept in spite of almost intolerable weariness, of the utter absence of any demoralisation, and of the refusal of the 
uns erer to jet back until absolute necessity compelled." [Official Pkatotnpli.\ 



22-[ N ' t s2 ! .s]-THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. ApriMO. 1918. 




Great Battle : Loading up Shell 



\ 







WORK INCESSANTLY GOING ON AS FAST 

It is practically impossible from all accounts that there can be any deficiency of shells at the Front, although it is as well, 
in view of the immense expenditure of projectiles, that our munition-workers gave up their Easter holiday to make more. 
Every kind and size of shell is needed in the great battle, both field artillery shells, shrapnel for shooting " into the brown " 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. April 10. I9IS-[ N "s2,]-M 



for Batteries, on Railway Trucks. 





IE TRAINS ARRIVE AT AN AMMUNITION DUMP. 

.itionT^n 8 no"""* m f sse f,' and high-explosive shells of large calibre, for keeping under the German batteries and destroying 
s dapp ul . The railway system, along the Front and behind the battle-area are doing invaluable 
ntly between battery firing lines and dumps where ammunition in tons is stacked.-[00W/ Photograph.} 



. r 

~| 



Part !M -I 

New S*rie<J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 10. 1918 



ttlitb a Squadron of the Grand fleet at Sea. 




CRUISING IN LINE AHEAD: A "NEXT ASTERN," FROM THE TAFFRAIL OF HER IMMEDIATE LEADER. 

In the immediate foreground it Men the swirling wake of foaming, 
bubbling, white water, caused by the propellers of the ship from 
on board which, right at the stern, the photograph was taken. 
Away in rear is seen her " next astern," following and keeping 
, in exact line according to the usual cruising "line-ahead" 
formation : the stem of the ship astern making a big bow-ware 



as the cutwater drives ahead through the sea. The officer of the 
watch on the bridge of a following ship is responsible for his ship's 
station. With his sextant at his eye, he is ever measuring the 
space between the vessels, with the foremast of the ship astern 
for his point. By quickening or reducing the revolutions of the 
screw, exact station is kept. 



Ai>ril 10. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



f . P.rt W -I 
I NVw Sen., | 2.1 



H Distinguished Guest of the 



in Greek (Haters. 




ON BOARD A BRITISH WAR-SHIP AT SALONIKA : THE CHIEF RABBI OF THAT CITY. 



The Chief R*bU at Salonika is, at count, head of th< Jmrlth 
community theft. Regmrdinj the naval utu.tion in Greek waters, 
Sir Eric Ceddts uud recently in Parliament, after hit Tiitt to tht 
Medjterrtnean : " At tht request of tht Greek Corernment, Brrtiih 
ntTtl officeri ue uiiitinc our Creek alUet in the reconitruction 
end reorftniution of their N4*y and dockyard*. . . . The 



reorganlted naTal forces of Greece are already co-operating in the 
war in the Mediterranean, and rendering increasingly valuable MT- 
Tice to the common cauae. . . . Admiral Clifton-Brown is en- 
thusiastic about tht Greek Nary, and cannot speak too highly of 
tht officer! and men alike." Admiral Clifton-Brown, head of the 
British Naval Mission, Is Chief Naval Adviser to Greece [Pkoto. C..Y. 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 10. 191 




On the Palestine front of the Bgypt expeditionary force 
L 





WATER-SUPPLY : FILLING CAMEL " FANATIS " AT A WADI SPRING ; A CAMP ROAD TO A SPRING. 



The Palestine Front army has been fortunate throughout the war 
in being able to draw on an almost inexhaustible reserve of camels 
for war purposes, from the breeding grounds of the Soudan, where 
the Arabs and native tribes "grow" camels and keep immense 
herds of them. Both swift-riding camels and the slower thicker. 
built transport and weight-carrying camels have been forthcoming 



as required, thanks to the foresight of the authorities immediately 
there was a prospect of the Turks joining against us. and a 
frontier war on a large scale began to threaten. As we have 
previously illustrated, camels by the thousand carry stores on the 
lines of communication. Here we see camels, and mules on 
water -transport duty near a camp. \Photos. by Topical.'] 



4pril 10. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



27 



On the Palestine front of the Ggypt expeditionary force. 




A NATIVE LABOUR CORPS AT WORK : QUARRYING 

In Egypt there i> no need to introduce lor war-work coolies from 
our orerseas tropical colonies, or India, for manual labour, as 
behind the Western Front The Egyptian lellaheen "the teeming 
myriads of Father Nile" of whom some poet speaks, if one may 
quote from memory and the Soudanese Arabs can, and do, supply 
all the "hands" requisite. Well treated and liberally paid, and 



STONE IN A ROCKY GORGE FOR ROAD-MAKING. 

generally well looked after by the Gorernment authorities, tlfj 
have come forward in as large numbers as are needed They 
work as strenuously as the Egyptians of old did in the building 
of the Pyramids for the Pharaohs. Their thews and sinews 
give good results in road-making across the Sinai desert and quarry- 
ing for Palestine Front roads as seen here. [Pholos. by Tofi.-ul 



ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. April 10. 1818- 




Scientific Military Hppliancee in an eastern Campaig 




WHERE BRITISH TROOPS HAVE BEEN RAIDING TURKISH POSITIONS EAST OF THE JOR 

As our photograph shows, General Allenby's forces in Palestine are provided with the latest scientific appliances in motor- 
transport Much of the fighting, however, has been in country where suitable roads were non-existent, and most of the 
transport had to be done by pack-mules and camels. A War Office statement issued on April 3 regarding the Palestine 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS, April 10. !18-[ N e P " I s *i < . s J-29 



British Caterpillars*Cractor at (flork in Palestine. 




HE PALESTINE CAMPAIGN-A CATERPILLAR-TRACTOR TAKING IN FUEL AT A DUMP. 



l"n 1W 1 

f Series J 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 10. 1918 



Visit of the U.S. OTar Secretary to Burope. 





DURING A TOUR ALONG THE FRONT : AT AN AVIATION CAMP ; MAP-STUDYING EN ROUTE. 



Mr. Baker, the American Secretary for War, has for some time 
past been on this side of the Atlantic, engaged over arrangements 
of all kinds in conjunction with General Pershing, the Commander- 
in-Chief of the U.S. Army in France, mostly in connection with 
matters of organisation. He and the principal U.S. War Office 
officials who accompanied him have for the time being made Paris 



their centre of activity, proceeding thence to visit troops at several 
places at the Front. The upper illustration shows Mr. Baker's 
party at an aviation camp. Three machines are seen circling over- 
head. In the lower illustration, Mr. Baker is seen with General 
Pershing and Brigadier -General Walpole, during a tour round by 
rail, studying details with the map. [Official Photographs.] 



April 10. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



r Pan M -i , , 

(.New Series J~3J 



The Visit of the U.S. Star Secretary to Gurope. 





IN PARIS : LEAVING THE U.S. HEADQUARTERS FOR A TOUR ; MR BAKER AND PARTY. 



In the upper illustration, Mr. Baker, the U.S. Wu Secretary, il 
seen with General Penhing and others when leaving the War 
Secretary's headquarters in Paris for a tour, before a crowd of 
onlookers. Mr. Baker has had the experiences of Wing in Paris 
during a German air-raid, and also during the bombardment by the 
German " mystery gun." In the lower illustration, Mi. Baker 



and party are shown. Reading from left to right, the names re : 
Back Row Captain de Marenches (French Army), Colonel C. Boyd 
(Chief of Staff), Lieut-Col. Brett, Col. Conner, Commr. White (U.S. 
Navy), Mr. Ralph A. Hayes (Secretary); Front Row : General Pershing, 
Mr. Secretary Baker, Mr. Sharp (U.S. Ambassador to France), and 
Major-Gen. Black (Chief U.S. Engineers).- 'Official Pkotiigriipli- . 



Part M -I 
\>. SrieJ 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 10. 1918 



Cttitb the JSavy in dar-'Cime: Cleanliness Coal. 




AT A CERTAIN SQUADRON STATION : BATHING ALONGSIDE IN THE SEA ; COALING SHIP AT SEA. 



In cruiM in warm weather, and in the Mediterranean, West 
Indies, and elsewhere, during the dof-watchei between 4 and 8 p.m., 
after ertning Divisions, and the day's work is done, all on board 
can bathe in the sea. It is optional. The side accommodation- 
ladder is lowered for getting down to the water and back on board. 
A boat meanwhile lays off near the swimmers to be handy in 



emergencies. Some take headers from the upper deck (as a man 
is seen doing in the upper illustration). Extreme experts have 
sometimes dived and swum under the ship thirty-odd feet below 
the water-line, and beneath the fifty feet or so width of the ship's 
bottom. As to the lower illustration coals are not yet ousted by 
oil-fuel, nor likely to be. (Photos, by C.N.] 



April 10. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



I'art US ) 
scrieij 




OTith the 



in CHar-Time: Officers' Diversions. 





AT ANCHOR: OFFICERS AT HOCKEY; A FLYING LEAP, TO LAND ON HANDS AND TOES. 






Evening DWiiooi and watch-muttering take, place in ordinary 
urcumtlance. on boud erery ahlp at M .t or .bout foul o'clock 
in th. mftrnoon. AJtr tht, during th two " dog wtch 
th "Srit dog," from lour o'clock to iix, ud th " iond dog" 
from it* to ight, untU iuppr-tim, J1 In the ihlp'i compwiy, 
offlun and mn ini, urt th wtch-kpri of COUTM, and 



duty-mtn, are, In ordinary drcunutancet, free to haw recreation. 
U there li nothing doing outalde the ahlp boat, pulling round in 
a match, or men bathing all may plaae thenuelrei. Many go 
in for athletlo, or boUng, or tingle - itlck play, according to the 
weather and the time of year. Some of the officer, keep phyiic- 
ally fit by roch partlmee u are ahown here. [PAoios. fry C.N.] 




THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 10. 1*18 



WOMEN AND THE WAR. 



WE, the women munition - workers of 
Manchester, strongly condemn the 
attempt to prevent, by means of a strike, the 
comb-out of men of military age rendered neces- 
sary by the secession of Russia and the German 
offensive on the Western Front. We pledge our- 
selves to carry on the production of war material 
needed by our brave soldiers in order to win the 
war and save us from German oppression." 

The resolution quoted, passed by a mass 
meeting of women munition-workers at Messrs. 
Armstrong, Whitworth's works, Openshaw, the 



was only the other day that the Land Army 
stated its needs in Trafalgar Square. The 
immediate response was followed up by a flow of 
recruits ; and others are, no doubt, thinking the 
matter over before throwing up one form of 
employment for another. The Penguins will soon 
be asking for members. It is safe to prophesy 
that the Penguins will be "up to strength " 
within a short time of issuing their appeal. It 
is some time now since Mr. Lloyd George declared 
that "the women are splendid." There is no 
indication that British womanhood is not still 
maintaining that reputation, and, what is even 




AT WOOLWICH ARSENAL: CARTRIDGE-CASES BEING SHOVELLED INTO BOXES. -[Pkotograph by Alfieri.] 



other day, is an indication of the resolute spirit 
of the women in the fourth year of war. Critics 
may grow sarcastic at the expense of the woolly- 
headed young woman whose war-enthusiasm has 
not been equal to a prolonged strain ; and sceptics 
point to the dilettante war-worker as being 
typical of the rest of her sex. Those in touch 
with the vast amount of work directly or in- 
directly connected with the war that women are 
carrying on know that for every such inglorious 
exception there are scores of patient, plodding 
workers whose patriotism and desire to be of 
national service is something that will last " the 
duration," however long it may be. 

Once women know that their services are 
really required, there is no lack of volunteers. It 



more important, means to go on doing it. 
Meantime, women are constantly making fresh 
discoveries likely to help the national cause. 
Lady Amherst of Hackney, whose work it is to 
direct the National Waste Collection, has, for 
instance, found a use for the tufts of wool left 
by sheep in their passage through hedges and 
bushes. The wool is useful, and Lady Amherst 
wants it collected. Properly treated, it can be 
turned into blankets for our men, and wool- 
collecting parties are already being organised. 

Sheep, however, are not the only beasts who 
can contribute of their substance to the national 
cause. Lord C.aud Hamilton said, rather un- 
kindly, the other day that he would like to see 
all pet dogs turned into pies without, of course, 

\CmNmad ntrltaf. 



April 10. 1918 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



f Pan W 1 ., _ 
[.New SriesJ~ 35 




domcn-Olorhers on the kand: Hmong the Moles. 





REPLACING MEN NOW SERVING : WOMEN MOLE-CATCHERS ON AN ESTATE IN THE COTSWOLDS. 



To enumerate, or particularise, the various way* in which women 
and girli are helping on the land in the national interest, is really 
impossible. That, of course, is quite apart from the equally in- 
numerable other ways In which the army of women war-workers, 
in one form or another, from munitioners to telegraph messenger 
firli, are helping to victory. A comparatively novel occupation 



on the land for women is shown in this illustration : women mole- 
catchers at work. Like the rabbit in its way, the mole, in 
particular in certain kinds of soil, is a veritable plague, by reason, 
among other things, of the damage its mole-hills cause to the 
surface, rendering it difficult to deal with for many. uses. Most 
of the men mole-catchers are at the war. [Photo, ///us. Burma. .! 



.~ r Pit 98 
' I N Sorto* . 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 10. 1B18 



realising that his words, if translated into action, 
would deprive the British Red Cross Society of 
a quite appreciable amount of its wool supply. 
The fact is that " Fido " is doing his bit and a 
very useful bit, as the authorities at the Central 
Workrooms of the British Red Cross in Burlington 
House would be the first to admit. Lady Gosford, 
the President, is responsible for having founded 




to what you would expect from an aristocratic 
little beast, does not yield material for the softest 
wool, though what it does give is amazingly 
strong, but not quite so softly fluffy as chow wool, 
or a lovely white skein that was described as being 
a blend of white poodle and Clumber spaniel. 

For the combings can be intermingled, though 
only an expert should attempt to do 
it, as it takes a spinner perfectly at 
home with the work to present a 
satisfactory " mixed " wool. How- 
ever, it is of no use every dog-owner 
reading these words hastening to 
pack a parcel of combings for 
despatch to Lady Gosford. The 
Red Cross have their own methods 
of dealing with the woolly contribu- 
tions ; and just how they should be 
treated before packing, as well as 
the best and most useful varieties 
for the work, are carefully described 
and enumerated in a paper of in- 
structions which can be had from 
the Central Work-rooms. 



AT WOOLWICH ARSENAL: INDENTING CARTRIDGE-CASES. 

Photo fraph by A I fieri. 

and started what looks like turning into a 
flourishing industry after the war is over. 

Briefly, it is the solemn duty of every owner 
of a chow, Pekingese, poodle, sheep-dog, and other 
long-haired dogs to send the comb- 
ings of their pets to the British Red 
Cross workrooms, there to be spun 
into wool for jerseys, bed-socks, 
mufflers, operation stockings, and 
other comforts for our wounded 
men. To the hum of activity that 
always pervades the workrooms has 
now been added the gentle whirr of 
a spinning - wheel' the very latest 
recruit to national service, and a 
genuine specimen of the " real thing," 
contributed " for the duration " by 
Lady Guillum Scott. All day long a 
uniformed worker sits, and first cards 
and then spins the wool - combings 
into soft wool that reminds one of 
the Shetland that used to be so 
popular before the war. There is. 
of course, still Shetland wool, but, 
except in rare instances, it is not 
the Shetland we used to know be- 
fore the war. But the doggy wool 
very nearly approximates to the 
vanished peace-time luxury. Quite 



Then, when the wool is re- 
ceived, it is first sterilised, and 
then oiled the better to work it 
up into knitting form and carded, 
the grease being removed by wash- 
ing after the spinning process is complete. The 
response to the appeals for the raw wool has 
already been so generous that the one spinner 
finds herself scarcely able to cope with the work. 
More voluntary spinners are therefore wanted, as 




AT WOOLWICH ARSENAL: SEMI-ANNEALING CARTRIDGES. 

Semi-*nneallng o< cartridges is done on revo'ving machines, which pass the cartridge- 

cies through a flame at the back. [Photograph by Alfitri.] 



one of the most attractive dog's-wool garments is 
a short-sleeved jersey made from the combings of 
a chow, the whole thing weighing only five-and-a- 
half ounces. A comparison of the different kinds 
of wool showed that the Pekingese, quite contrary 



well as spinning-wheels on which they can carry 
on their work. Spinning, by-the-bye, has a 
wonderfully soothing effect on the nerves, and 
is, in consequence, a splendid occupation for 
strenuous war-time days. CLAUDINK CLEVK. 



April 10. 1913 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS> 



( Nci Series J~37 



DECREASE IN SHIPS SUNK SPEEDING UP NEW VESSELS-LABOUR AWAKE AT LAST- 
NEW CALLS TO SERVICE MAN-POWER RUSSIAN RUMOURS AND FACTS- PALESTINE 
SUCCESSES MARVELLOUS MESOPOTAMIAN ADVANCE VALEDICTORY. 

LAST week saw an encouraging decrease in the 
number of ships sunk by submarine. The 
loss in large vessels had fallen from sixteen to 



eight ; in those under 
1600 tons from twelve 
to seven ; in fishing- 
vessels it had, how- 
ever, risen from one to 
five. Whether the rea- 
son was the enemy's pre- 
occupation with other 
concerns it is, perhaps, 
idle to speculate. The 
fact remains, and the 
drop is substantial. On 
the other hand, arri- 
vals and sailings showed 
a slight decrease. But 
there is help at hand. 
The month of March 
has shown a record 
output in ship - build- 
ing 161,674 gross tons, 
an increase of over 
60,000 on the February 
returns. And America 
is speeding up her 
construction. by all 
means in her power. 
The lessons of the past 
days have not been in 
vain. Nevier befoitt&as 
public opinion been so keenly awake to the 
urgent needs of the moment. In shipyards and 
munition-factories the workers took no Easter 




A WAR "TIP" FROM PALESTINE FOR STAMP COLLECTORS : 
THE NEW POSTAGE STAMP, NOW IN USE SINCE 
THE CAPTURE OF JERUSALEM. {Photo, by lllus Bureau.] 



rest, and labour troubles seem likely to abate (we 
trust, to vanish) at the call of patriotism. 

The same consideration is producing a further 
effort towards the re- 

^^^^^^^^^^^_^_ inforcement of our 
armies in the field. A 
fresh call on the man- 
power of the nation 
points to fifty as the 
probable age - limit for 
military service. With 
this call goes a revision 
of existing exemptions 
for younger men, in so 
far as these can be 
spared from the indus- 
trial campaign, which 
must proceed at full 
strength. 

From Russia there 
was no news of strik- 
ing moment. The con- 
flict of parties continued 
without definite issue, 
and the German aggres- 
sion followed its custo- 
mary course. The Red 
Guards received the 
conqueror's orders to 
withdraw frcm Finland, 
and 60,000 German 
troops, with 300 guns, 
Before the arrival of the 

German troon-ships, the commanders of several 
Russian war-ships, which were wintering at 

{Continued o>t past 10 



landed in that country. 




THE GREAT BATTLE 



IN ONE OF THE BATTLE-AREA VILLAGES AT A LITTLE DISTANCE FROM THE FIRING LINE. 
Official Photograph. 



38 



-Tx, P ,C"s?,!U]- THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. Apiil 10. 19 IS 




The Great Battle: Oe Hard fate that 




QUITTING THEIR HOMES IN THE WAR-RACKED VILLAGE DISTRICTS TO SEEK SA 

As was to be expected, the advance of the Germans during the offensive of the last ten days of March, by converting a widr 
tract of country into a battlefield, has meant the dispossession wholesale of the inhabitants within the 'area of comtat. Thr 
district was depopulated to a large extent before, at an earlier period of the war. The first German onset in the autumn of 1914 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. April 10. I918-f Ne p ^ r | J!L]-39 



tlen on the Inhabitants of the Battle Hrea, 









REAR: PEASANTS AND VILLAGERS GETTING AWAY DURING THE FIGHTING, 
.wept across this part of the country, the invaders harrying the unfortunate people everywhere 
atrocities, as too well founded accounts which have been officially published by the French and 
Many returned to their ruined homes, but again the fortune of war has made these take to nig 



"ar: II;; 

** ^,,-i.r 



THE ILLUSTRATED WAR NEWS. 



April 10. 1918 



:izrn 



Hangoe, blew up their vessels. The ships de- 
stroyed included four submarines. The Russian 
fleet in Finnish waters was reported in danger. 
The Germans used a Russian ice-breaker to 
prepare a passage for their transports. The pillage 
of Ukrainia has not produced brilliant results, r.nd 
the Germans are said to be disappointed in their 
net haul of food - stuffs 
from that region. The 
Ukrainian Soviet forces 
retired to the Vorke; 
Rada troops, aided by 
Germans, occupied Pol- 
tava. The recapture of 
Odessa by the Bolshe- 
viks was confirmed. A 
German force of 6000 
wa.s reported at Irkutsk. 
The Japanese decision as 
to action in Siberia still 
hung fire, amid the 
usual conflict of rumours. 
Optimists spoke of the 
day of" Russia's return 
a far cry. Armenians 
and Georgians have 
raised an army of de- 
fence. The Armenians 
recaptured Erzeroum. 

Macedonian communiques remained brief and 
monotonous. West of the Vardar and on the 
Serbian front both artilleries were active. French 
and Serbia a aviators bombed enemy cantonments 
in the Pardovica region. 

Once more General Allenby's ever-victorious 
army gave a good account of itself. Raids east 
of the Joidan demolished several miles of the 
Hedjaz railway, tearing up the track and destroy- 
ing culverts and bridges. There was hot fighting at 
the village of Amman. In six days the Biitkh 



A further striking success w?.s reported on 1he 
Euphrates. On April 2 General Marshall's forces 
had advanced 73 miles beyond Ana- that is, 156 
miles beyond Hit. In seven days' fighting they 
had covered the wonderful distance of 134 miles, 
and the Euphrates was pr?.ctic?lly cleared of the 
Tuiks, who are now onlv a soundly be?ten 




GENERAL ALLENBV IN PALESTINE : ONE OF OUR CAM2L 
UP AT AN INSPECTION [Photograph supplied by C.N.] 



CORPS LINED 



remnant, in full retreat. 
over 5000. 



The prisoners numbered 




WITH GENERAL ALLENBY IN PALESTINE : AT AN AFTERNOON 
IN CAMP A TEAM CAMEL-BACK WRESTLING MATCH. [Photogm 

took 1700 prisoners and four guns, besides other 
rratenal. Having done their work, the raiding 
parties returned to Es Salt. At the same time, 
encounters took place west of the Jordan. 



We had hoped that, in the fulness of time, the 
present abstract and brief chronicle of the Great 
War would end with the word Peace that Peace 
for which so rmich has been and must still be 
sacrificed. Dis aliter visum. This journal has, as 
it were, been torpedoed by the German submarine, 
for the shortage of paper precludes its continuance 
beyond this number, and the story breaks off, as 
far as we are concerned, 
at its most critical and 
exciting moment. The 
terrible drama of a 
world's agony has many 
acts to play, and none 
can forecast the final 
issue. But the cause of 
the Allies, although it 
trembles on the razor's 
edge, holds many ele- 
ments of hope. To de- 
spair of its triumph were 
to deny the existence of 
Right and Justice. There- 
fore, if we cannot yet 
say, with Charles Reade's 
Denis, " The Devil is 
dead," there are signs 
that he is at least in the 
article of death, and the 
honest French soldier's 
unfailing " Courage, mes 

amis; le diable est moit," is the proper watchword 
for the hour. It is the watchword of Thomas 
Atkins and of the Poilu. At that we leave it, as the 

best possible good-bye. LONDON : APRIL 6, 1918. 



SPORTS MEETING 
h supplied by C.A'.] 



LONDON: Published Weekly at the Office, 172, Strand, in the Parish ol St. Clement Danes, in the County of London, by THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS AND SKETCH. LTD, 
172, Strand, aforesaid ; and Printed by THH ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS AND SKETCH. LTD.. Milford Lane, W.C. 2 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 1918. 
Entered as Second-Class Matter at the New York (N.Y.) Post Office, 1916. 









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