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Full text of "Oak"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2009 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/oakyearb1985indi 




# 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY 
OF PENNSYLVANIA 
INDIANA, PA 15705 
VOLUME LVII 




Introduction 4-25 

Student Life 26-51 

Academics 52-77 

Activities 78-117 

Organizations 118-135 

Greeks 136-173 

Sports 174-225 

Seniors 226-275 

Closing 276-296 




Jackie Janosik 
Nicole Sichak 
Sue Kielarowski 
Jim Devlin 
Laurie Kozbelt 
Alison Rigby 
Lisa Trassert 
Paula Anderson 

Cindy Ccrmickle 
Laurie Buck 
Lisa DeHoinaut 
Susan Homola 



Editor-in-Chief 
Business Manager 
Marketing Manager 
Adviser 
Literary Editor 
Assistant Managing Editor 
Academics Editor 
Organizations and 
Greeks Editor 
Sports Editor 
Seniors Editor 
Photography Editor 
Secretary/Mis 





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Due to the faithi, optimism and hiard worl< of its leaders, 
Indiana University ofPennsylvania expanded into one of the 
finest institutions in the Commonwealth. 

Over a period of one-hundred and ten years the school 
has maintained unusually high academic standards. Since 
May 17, 1875 when the first building, John Sutton Hall, was 
opened, the facilities of the university have also been con- 
stantly improved. 

In this year of our one-hundred and tenth anniversary, we 
ore proud of the progress that has been achieved 

We are proud to dedicate this issue of THE OAK to those 
who contributed to this progress. 




li \\}0S a uooM. o\j ^vlafee.- 
belleDt . . . 

i^Qppiness COvie. so eosify iRek. 
'Eut iRot liiras sud a bug i[^vle. 
ago. 





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'Eii I hamd io cope. 



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r iad to be potieKt 

mMJ^ tiM£S wRfiR 
r dick't (aXM to be. 

r ^ad io be quiet 
fijRen r wQKted to sRoat . . . 
. . . go id^i I rc<iied io Stay, 
Oid sowietiKies I icos Ro/it 
wRen r uAiiSKt accepted. 






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successes. 




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27 






1. lUP's Big Indians played their way 
to national ranking 2. Rain didn't 
stop this drummer from marching 3. 
The lUP Marching Band, always shin- 
ing and polished 4. lUP cheerleaders 
keep their spirit flowing 5. Mere pain 
keep Brent from cheering? No wayi 









1^ ma^ i^Li 
THA T MAROON AND SLA TE SPIRIT 



By wearing the old and worn lUP sweatshirt from freshman 
year or making the "wave" at the Saturday afternoon 
football games, lUP students have shown "that maroon and 
slate spirit." 



28 




This past year has been one that gives lUP students 
reason to be proud. A University w\1h a nationally-ranked 
football team, high academic standards and many 
campus renovations in process have given enough reason 
to say "We're lUP Proud." 



29 



1 . These students curb the munchies 
with a snack from the new bagel 
wagon 2. Playing a game of hacky 
sack between classes is quite popu- 
lar on campus 3. There is always 
room between the Oaks for passing 
frisbee 4. No creature was stirring 
not even a squirrel 5. Are my eyes 
deceiving me or does this student 
have two heads'' 6. The Oak Grove 
is a great place to relax between 
classes^ 




OAK GROVE 



In the center of lUP's campus lies a grove of Oak trees, which 

are divided by countless v»/all<ways that go in nnany different 
directions. The Oak Grove has been the central point of cam- 
pus even when lUP was a State Teachers College. Since then 
the sidewalks have been widened but the Oak Grove still 
serves as the place to study under a shady tree, walk and talk 
to friends, feed the squirrels and listen to visiting preachers or 
leaders of various organizations. 



30 



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31 



1. University Check-In is just the be- 
ginning of the Dorm Life Experience 

2. An array of luggage types await 
to be unpacked by one lucky stu- 
dent 3. Mom and Dad are usually 
eager to help unload the car 4. 
Writing a letter home and watching 
a soap opera are whot these dorm 
roommates chose to do for an 
afternoon 5. Wallace Hall residents 
just hangin' around 6. A sports buff's 
collage brightens up this boring 
dorm wall 




DORM LIFE 



32 










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For any resident of Esch, Scronton, Whitmyre, Gordon 
any of lUP's thirteen dormitories, DORM LIFE provides 
at unique way of life which is an interesting learning 
<perience in many different ways. Memories of pizza 
-id popcorn parties, making new friends, going to the 
3f with everyone on the floor, fighting for the last shower 
3ll, putting up with blaring music, praying there's a letter 
the mailbox, catching the shuttle to the mall, calling 
)me for money, doing a bundle of laundry, exercising in 
e spa and watching soaps in the lounge all mean differ- 
it things to different people, but nevertheless, DORM 
E is an experience no college student will ever forget! 



1. "The landlord is here, hide the dog!" 

2. "Sure, I'm brave, I'll taste your 
chocolote peanut butter egg sou- 
flette" 3. "I love having dishes duty!" 4. 
There's always someone to be a "par- 
ty animal" vi/ith wUen you live off cam- 
pus 5. "We're just vi/aiting for the kegs 
to arrive" 6. Some students got into the 
Christmas spirit December 1st. 





34 




^•. 









OFF CAMPUS LIVING 



"Did anybody pay the telephone bill?," "Whose turn is it to 
take out the trash?," "Let's have a party Friday night or how 
about a cool<out?," "Tm hungry, let's order strombolli," 
"Come watch Days of Our Lives." These were some of the 
sounds heard from the mouths of lUP students living in off- 
campus dwellings, whether it was University Towers, Car- 
riage House, Essex, a fraternity house or a privately-owned 
house 

Moving off campus provided the opportunity to live a 



preferable lifestyle with all the benefits and detriments of 
living in the "real world." 

Though there were times they got tired of eating oodles 
of noodles and popcorn for dinner, waiting for the bath 
room, battling for the kitchen study table, paying utility bills 
and dealing with landlords and leaky ceilings, these students 
found comfort in knowing they had some companions to 
share with, care for and party with. 



35 



1. These students managed to trudge 
up the hill to Foster Hall during the sub- 
zero weather 2. To curb the midnight 
munchies there was always an array of 
pizza delivery services 3. The Bagel 
Wagon offered snacks for between 
classes 4. & 5. Santa came to lUP with 
cakes and goodies in his bag 6. The 
food tastes better when dining with 
friends. 




36 



EA TING IN OR OUT 

lUP students who ate in the cafeteria this year enjoyed a 
"breakfast of champions" since a branch of ARA Services, 
Inc., supplied the meals to the Olympic athletics this summer in 
Los Angeles. 

ARA replaced the Freshie Co. on May 23, 1984. Frank Caru- 
so, the Resident Food Service Director, said that their main 
concerns were to moke students aware of the cafeteria ser- 
vice and its benefits through promotions and to emphasize a 
strong support of lUP, 

"ARA is one of the largest food service companies in the 
country," Caruso said, and I keep in mind that I'm ARA, but 
while I'm here, I'm lUP." 



. -^1 m 




ARA encouraged lUP's image-building by painting their 
truck gray and maroon with "lUP Dining Service" written on it 
and displaying the lUP logo on employees' uniforms and ban- 
ners that hung from the dining hall ceilings. 

He also made some other "changes," such as making dif- 
ferent dining hours and seating arrangements, creating the 
All American Menu and Special Salad Bar, and they created 
new services, which include Itza Pizza Delivery, the Oakroom 
Coffee Shop downstairs of Foster Dining Hall and the Bagel 
Wagon in the Oak Grove. 

In order to stir student interest in the dining service, ARA 
planned promotions such as, a drawing for an Apple Comput- 



er and two 10-speed bikes, a 10K race and a Coke mug give- 
away. 

Although some students living off campus ate at the cafe- 
teria, the majority either fixed their own meals or selected 
from among Indiana's array of eateries. 

In addition to fulfilling those sudden midnight cravings or 
post-party munchies, eating was a good excuse for students 
to "blow-off" studies for awhile and keep track of the latest 
news and gossip. To cater to lUP student's tastes, Indiana 
offers a variety of eating establishments. Students fulfilled 
their pangs while munching on pizza from Domino's, a sub 
from the Subway or a taco from Pedro's. 





WORKING STUDENTS 



To help finance their education, many lUP students took 
part-time jobs over the course of the year. Some worked at 
off-campus businesses as delivery people, file clerks and 
employees at the various fast food restaurants, while others 
were involved in the Federal Work Study Program. These 
students were employed on the lUP campus as cafeteria 



workers, library aides, office clerks, tutors and drivers of uni- 
versity-owned vehicles. 

Most students worked because it supplied them with the 
extra spending money, while others looked on their jobs as a 
way of developing social contacts. Too, there were those 
who actually enjoyed the work itself! 



38 




1. Library assistants l<eep the 
shelves in order 2. Hall counseling 
requirers devotion as well as re- 
sponsibility 3. Welconne to ROYS 
4. Just one of the people behind 
lUP dining services 



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39 




TOWN 



The city of Indiana, Pennsylvania, Christmas Tree Cap- 
itol of the World, Jimmy Stewart's home and everybody's 
home during the school year. Some say it's too slow/- 
paced or out in the country, others say they feel right at 
home. Whichever it may be, Indiana served all the needs 
of lUP students. 

In the past few years, town never seemed to change, 
but this year Troutmon's, The End Result, Wee Willie's Pizza, 



Hoagie Heaven, McSorley's Restaurant and Outdoor Ex- 
perience all went out of business, however, the Atrium 
Town Mall, a new Sheetz convenient store, Bochicchio's 
Pizza, new Fox's Pizza Den and Campus Closet were some 
of the new establishments opened. All of these options 
and that Indiana hometown charm helped make our stay 
here a fun, exciting one. 



40 





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1. What better way to spend a 
worm afternoon! 2. Summer is a 
great time for outdoor entertain- 
ment. 3. A common sigtit in the Oak 
Grove; FRISBEE! 4. Somehow the 
warm weather brings out the kid in 
ali of us, 5. Even the squirrels are 
friendly at lUP, 








SUMMER SCHOOL 



It's the end of the spring semester. May Madness is in the 
air, and every lUP student sighs with relief that finals are over. 

Someone asked, "What are you doing for the summer?" 
"We're working at the shore," "I have an internship," "I'll be 
traveling California until August," "We're going to SUMMER 
SCHOOL." 

While some students left in. May to travel, intern, earn 
some money and bask in the sun, others returned to lUP to 
catch-up on credits in order to graduate on time or earn 
credits to graduate early. 



The Summer Sc/ioo/ setting at lUP was quite different from 
the fall and spring. It was a more relaxed atmosphere with 
fewer students, but plenty of activities to choose from. 

Students fled to Homer City Reservoir, Two Lick Lake, 
Mack Pool and Yellow Creek to cool-off during the hot, July 
days, and they attended many outdoor concerts and mov- 
ies at Flagstone in the evenings. 

Summer School at lUP — for those students who never 
went, missed out on an indescribable summer. 



42 




43 




CHANGING 



The students of lUP saw several changes around campus 
this year. For instance, in every direction they looked, there 
was Sonne kind of construction or repairs taking place. 

There was the construction of Johnson Hall, the rebuilding 
of John Sutton Hall's porches, the expansion of the sidewalks 
on the south side of campus, the creation of the parking lot 
beside each Hall and of course, the construction and ren- 
ovation of the new S. Trevor Hadley Student Union. 






44 




riMES 



The Student Cooperative Association's construction plans 
3egan on Marchi 1, 1984, As of this date, the main building is 
;ompleted and the site worl< and recreation center will be 
:ompleted by the summer of 1985. 

At its twentieth anniversary of university status, lUP has 
adapted well to change. During the 1984-85 school year, lUP 
Dossed through a critical development stage and many 
Changing Times. 



45 




S. TREVOR HADLEY UNION 



Over the years, as the campus population increased, the 
Union went through many changes to accomodate the dy- 
namic needs of the lUP campus. But, as the decade of the 
'80's began, it became increasingly clear that the Student 
Union had reached its limits. As a result, a Long Range Plan- 
ning Commission of the Student Cooperative Association 
Board of Directors began studying the possibility of a major 
renovation/expansion of Student Union facilities in 1981. 



46 




WEW^I^f 



r * *sJirB«i*"i 




Today this major renovation/expansion plan includes such 
eatures as the information/service desk area, a program 
ounge, a multi-purpose room, student organizational oftice 
space, the lUP Shop, meeting rooms, the Co-op Store, a 
>tudent cafe, Roy Rogers' and a recreation center. On Sot- 
jrday, April 20, 1985, the newly-named S, Trevor Hadley 
Jnion Building, which its namesake portrayed as a place to 
earn about others, was officially dedicated. 



47 



1. Homecoming King and Queen at 
lUP Armstrong County Campus: 
Dawn Harrington and Michael Kaye. 

2, & 3. A Friday night dance at the 
lUP Armstrong County Campus 4. 
An Academic Hall at Armstrong 




48 



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BRANCH CAMVSES 



After graduation, besides memories of ttieir experiences 
at lUP's main campus, many former students will take with 
them memories from a year or two spent at one of lUP's 
branch campuses: the Punxsutawney branch, which 
opened in 1962; and the Kittaning campus, which opened in 
1963. The existence of these branch campuses lends a cer- 
tain prestige to lUP. These campuses serve their purpose 
quite well. They provide an atmosphere where learning and 



changing are not very different from life on lUP's main cam- 
pus. They also serve as a pleasant and memorable transition 
to main campus for many of us. 

Both of the branches have many extra-curricular activities 
available to their students, such as movies, annual semi- 
formal dances, and intramural sports. Also, each campus 
has its own Student Government Association and Student 
Union, where much of the social life takes place. 



49 





COMMUTERS 



They are seen pouring onto campus early in the morning in 
order to fight for the new parl<ing spaces available. The 
commuters come by all modes of transportation — car, 
truck, motorcycle, moped and plain old walking Even 
though coping with — A degree weather, o lock of parking 
spaces, and dead engines were a hassle for commuters this 



50 





Mihrn 






By ORDER or POLICE DEPA 



1 lUP traveling students battle the 
traffic jams on Ptiiladelphia Street 
otter a long day ot classes, 2, These 
commuters circle the student union 
parking lot one more time in hopes 
of finding a place to park, 3 This 
photo speaks for itself 



year, they have the parking lot near Esch Hall to look forward 
to next year. 

Besides, the various car and commuting problems were 
great excuses for students who overslept and missed or cut 
a class. Instructors have heard them all — from the flat tire to 
the traffic jam. 



51 




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63 



1. Dean J Christopher Benz 2. The 
Oak Grove is an excellent place for 
an art student to sketch 3. A steady 
hand is a must for sculpture class 4. 
Practice makes pertect 5. If you en- 
joy using your hands then sculpture 
class is the place for you 




COLLEGE OF 



When the College of Fine 
Arts was formed in 1965 un- 
der the odministrotion of 
Dean Harold Orendorf, the 
school included just two de- 
partments; art and music. In 
1974, Dr, John Benz became 
the second dean of the Col- 



lege and has maintained 
that position ever since. Un- 
der his guidance, the big- 
gest change the college has 
seen is the addition of the 
department of theatre to 
the curriculum in 1977 
Changes have also oc- 



curred within the depart- 
ments of the college, ac- 
cording to Benz. "In the de- 
partment of art, we have 
added a new graduate pro- 
gram in art therapy, and in 
the department of music, 
we've added a jazz studies 



54 







\ \ '■ 




FINE ARTS 



program," Benz said. 

Another modification 
which is not new but which 
may not be well-known is 
the general fine arts major. 
"A student can take 
coursework in art, music and 
theatre and get a bachelor 



of arts degree in Fine Arts" 
Benz said. "They do what 
amounts to a minor in all 
three rather than a major in 
any one " in addition to the 
three departments in the 
College of Fine Arts there 
ore three other depart- 



ments on campus that stu- 
dents con do coursework in 
to apply toward the general 
fine arts major — the de- 
partments of communica- 
tions media, dance and in- 
terior design. 

The theatre department 
also sow '85 as the year to 
move. Benz, said, "This year 
for the first time, all of the 
main-stage productions in 



1. The only serious choice the xylo- 
phone 2. No matter how long you 
look at it, it's not going to get ony 
bigger 3. An aspiring artist 4. Soft 
sculpture is easier on the hands. 5. 
Sitting down on the job again 6. 
O.K.. who broke this piece of pot- 
tery'' 




theatre are being put on in 
Waller Hall. In the past, they 
were put on in Fisher." 

Currently Benz is looking at 
the possibility of trying to in- 
crease the dance offerings 
at l.U.P. "New courses were 
added two years ago," 
Benz said, but dance at l.U.P. 
is not yet even a minor much 
less a major." 



55 



1 , Dr. Oliver J. Ford, Dean of the Col- 
lege of Humanities and Social Sci- 
ences. 2- Students gather outside of 
Walsh Hall, where many criminology 
classes are held, to pass the time 
between classes 3 An anthropolo- 
gy student gathers information tor a 
field study 




COLLEGE OF 
SOCIAL 



"Change in institutions 
tends to be a rather com- 
plex thing," said Dr. Oliver 
Ford, fourth-year dean of 
the College of Hunnanities 



56 



1 . Kefth Hal and Keith Hot Aimex are 
.•/here most onttvopoiogy. FWftical 
science and history classes ore tiekJ 

2. Computers ore becoming on inv 

ccrfont and essential port of ol 
'e'cs of study 3. Dr. Ford is dways 
.'. " 3 to lend a (leaping hand 




HUMANITIES AND 
SCIENCES 



and Social Sciences. But 
Ford was able to isolate a 
kind of "historical transition" 
as the biggest single change 
during the 84-85 academic 



year 

Ford explained that transi- 
tion resulted from the retire- 
ment of many faculty mem- 
bers who were hired during 



I.U.P.'s first big growth in the 
'60s. 

In the past few years sev- 
eral temporary part-time 
and full-time staff members 
have been added to the 1 3 
departments which make 
up the College. 

"When you add new peo- 



ple you add new areas of 
expertise as well. " Fofd ex- 
plained "This introduces 
new possibifities for subjects 
n areas of speciaization fcx 
Our students." 



57 




The Blue Room in Sutton 
Hall, a place some of us get 
to see at least twice a year. 
We get our computerized 
notification slips toward the 
end of each semester telling 
us what day we get to 
schedule We sit peering at 
a screen, all the time praying 
that the phone doesn't ring 

Sound all too familiar'^ 
Welcome to the wonderful 
world of scheduling for 
classes at I. UP. For some of 
us it IS an enjoyable exper- 
ience. For the rest of us, we 
there have been more 
pleasant times. We stroll into 
Sutton at least an hour be- 
fore we schedule, that is, if 
we plan on having enough 
time to start from scratch on 
our schedules. Sometimes 
we feel like we're playing 
"beat the clock" with the 
television set listing closed 
sections. The phone call no- 
tifying us to go down stairs 
comes all too quickly. In the 
mean time we've been 
mumbling under our breath 
because we missed the sec- 



REGISTRA TION 



tions we were searching for 
on the set. 

We eventually get to- 
gether what we hope is a 
decent schedule. At this 
point we're not too picky as 
to what "prof" we get, 
we're just praying for a 
piece of paper that tells us 
we have a future at I.U.P. 



The time comes just about 
ten minutes before we are 
scheduled to go down, and 
the phone rings At this point, 
self-assured that our time will 
be called down any mo- 
ment to finalize our sched- 
ule, we relax. Then the 
dreaded words are sounded 
— course number 0652 is 



closed Of course it is then 
that we realize that we ne- 
glected to schedule alter- 
nates. We run downstairs 
anyway in fear of missing our 
time. Looks like drop/add, 
but that's another story. 



58 




1. Night classes are a favorite for 
those who like to sleep-in, 2. It's 6:00 
am. and it's time to rise and shine 
for that eight o'clocker 3. Sweat 
pants and shirt make It for the per- 
fect '■got-up-at-7.40-for-my-8.00- 
class" look 



EARL Y VS. LA TE 



Coke, chocolate or cof- 
fee They all have that spe- 
cial ingredient called caf- 
feine Caffeine helps you 
through those 8:00 classes 
Yes, the dreaded 8:00 The 
class that gets you up by 
7:00, get's you out of bed by 
7:30 and out the door by 
quarter-till. 



Eight o'clock classes wer- 
en't a fun thing. Who could 
possibly enjoy trying to stay 
awake and pay attention, 
and even worse, take on 
exam at 8:00 a.m.'' Eight 
o'clockers are at their worst 
when it follows a night out 
like when you just hod to go 
uptown Thursday night. So 



what if you got in at 2: 15 and 
hod four hours of sleep? 

But you still did, and some- 
how made it to class on 
time. You walked in and 
looked around. Hmmmm. 
Strange how the class used 
to be — bigger. But then 
again, the absentees prob- 
ably had good excuses for 



not being there. Their alarm 
broke. They're just not morn- 
ing people. They're hung 
over. It was too cold to get 
out of bed. They forgot. 

Well you take your seat. 
Next to you is this girl who is 
just raring to go. She brightly 
says, "Hi." You mumble a 
greeting and open your no- 
tebook. 

The professor enters and 
begins class. Somehow, you 
manage to get through the 
anthropology lecture. After- 
ward you realize it really 
wasn't so bad. It was just 
that initial motivation that 
needed to be dealt with. 

The motivation problem 
was very familiar to us. We 
went around saying, "I can't 
help it. I'm just not motivat- 
ed." And it really was hard to 
get motivated under those 
circumstances. 

And the circumstances 
get worse at night. You 
guessed it — the 6 to 9. The 
marathon class. There was a 
great temptation to miss this 
class. But you didn't. Not un- 
less you wanted to recopy 
ten pages of notes, missing 
one class was like missing a 
week. And during class, it 
really did feel like a week . Oh 
sure, you get a ten minute 
break, but it still took a cer- 
tain amount of stamina to 
pull a night class. 

Those three-hour classes 
were really a test of endur- 
ance. Staying awake and 
attentive took practice. 
Perhaps the only good point 
of it was that it was only 
once a week. 

The eight o'clock and 
night class students were a 
rare breed. Some students 
were forced to take them 
because of scheduling prob- 
lems. Others, believe it or not 
enjoyed them. 



59 



1. McElhaney Hall — where most 
business classes are held 2. Dr Cyrus 
A Altimus. Jr . Dean of the e College 
of Business 3. Even a typing class 
can be an annusing experience 




60 



1. Typing and clerical skills are es- 
sential for most business majors 2. A 
small sample of thie many costly 
textbooks used in this college 3. A 
breath of fresh air can help you 
through another long lecture 




BUSINESS 



What type of changes oc- 
cured in the College of Busi- 
ness this year? According to 
Dean Cyrus Altimus, the stu- 
dents are good and they 
keep getting better each 
year. 

"Each class has greater 



expectations because of 
the type of quality lUP of- 
fers," Altimus said. 

Speaking on the topic of 
quality, beginning at sum- 
mer school this year Altimus 
said business students will be 
able to use the new IBM per- 



sonal computer lab in McEI- 
haney Hall. 

There are seven areas of 
specialization within the col- 
lege; Business Administra- 
tion, Accounting, Finance, 
General Business, Human Re- 
sources Management, Mar- 



keting. Management Infor- 
mation Systems and Office 
Administration, 

In all of these areas the 
programs are designed to 
enrich the student's under- 
standing of the modern busi- 
ness system. 



61 




COLLEGE OF NA TURAL 



The College of Natural Sci- 
ences end Mathematics at- 
tempts to introduce differ- 
ent scientific techniques 
through illustrative exper- 
iences. The College also 
strives to teach its students 
to develop an understand- 
ing of the basics of all scienti- 



fic disciplines. 

Several years ago the 
psychology department ini- 
tiatedopsychology doctoral 
program, but it wasn't until 
this year that tv\/enty stu- 
dents enrolled. 

Along with the doctoral 
program, other changes 



62 




1. Figuring out chemical formulas is 
made easier with a calculator 2. 
Where would this world be without 
a handy-dandy hand-held calcula- 
tor'' 




SCIENCES AND MA TH 



were made In the College of 
Natural Sciences and Math- 
ematics. Dr, Gerald Buriok 
became acting dean of the 
college when Dr. Fuget 
moved up to acting vice 
president of Student Affairs 
"There has been an in- 
crease in the micro-proces- 



sor Instrumentation in the 
college over the past year," 
Buriok sold 

"Significant progress was 
made in replacing obsolete 
instrumentation and pur- 
chasing new equipment 
over the post year", Buriok 
said, adding that much of 



the instrumentation pur- 
chased reflects growing ap- 
plications of computerized 
instruments." One example 
he gave was the state of the 
art NMR spectrometer that 
the chemistry department 
received. 
Biology, Chemistry, Com- 



puter Science ana Physics 
ore offered through the col- 
lege as well as Geoscience, 
Mathematics, Psychology 
and a general Natural Sci- 
ence program. 



63 



1 . Time to study'' 2. StL n 
a lonely experience 3 
con also occomockate T,-,oie c; ^s 
who need study breaks 4. O the 
Kxary can be just a pkx;e to study 
5. Group study rooms ore dlwoys in 
use 6. Studying is much more fun 
with a friend 7. Study lounges are o 
good place to get work done 




giar?T^ 



> m 








TIME TO STUDY 



Imagine this: It's 3:25 a.m. 
and you have just awak- 
ened from a sound sleep to 
find that your roommate is 
no longer in bed and has 
mysteriously disappeared. 
You panic, wondering if your 
roomie has been carried off 
by a band of gypsies or per- 



64 







1. Looks like everyone showed up 
for test day 2. Is that on off icial No 2 
pencil'' 3. Hopefully all that studying 
paid off 



IT'S TEST TIME 



haps ran away from home 
and you'll never see him or 
her again. And then you 
calm yourself as it dawns on 
you, no, nothing terrible has 
happened. Your roommate 
is just off studying for a major 
calc. test. Now if you only 
knew where . . . 



This scene is a common 
one at lUP because passing 
required courses is neces- 
sary for graduation. Most 
students find that study is es- 
sential — at least once in a 
while. So they study quietly in 
their rooms and later in the 
laundry room waiting for the 



rinse cycle to end. They 
study in the morning, in the 
afternoon or frantically cram 
all night. Some use lounges 
or the library to study while 
others pick more unortho- 
dox locales like in the dining 
hall or under a tree in the 
Oak Grove, But wherever. 



whenever, or however all lUP 
students go through the 
long, lonely hours of study in 
order to pass those thou- 
sands of tests that everyone 
of us must take during our 
four (plus) years at lUP. 



65 



1. student teaching could be excit- 
ing with kids like these 2. Dr. Charles 
Ryan, dean 3. Being in the class- 
rooms with elementary students 
gives student teachers first-hand 
experience. 




\ 



H 



iTlV 




COLLEGE OF 



Dr. Charles Ryan, dean of 
the College of Education, 
feels the biggest recent 
change in I.U.P. is its transition 
from o university that em- 
phasizes teaching to a uni- 
versity that emphasizes 
scholarship and professional 
service in addition to teach- 
ing. 

"I.U.P. faculty members 



are involving themselves 
more and more in scholarly 
activities and professional 
public service," Ryan said. 
'"There is an expectation 
that faculty members will be 
involved in other activities in 
addition to their teaching." 
Ryan believes that en- 
couraging the faculty mem- 
bers to broaden their area of 



scholarly interest will, in turn, 
help improve the quality of 
teaching at I.U.P. According 
to Ryan, "The quality of 
teaching at I.U.P. can be 
better than it is, and we ex- 
pect it to improve dramati- 
cally by 1990." 

Ryan also observed sever- 
al significant changes. The 
Center for Educational Stud- 



66 




* ^ 




1. Kids will be kids? 2. Elementary 
teachers tielp ttieir student teach- 
ers with the children in class. 




EDUCA TION 



ies was created for faculty 
to investigate educational 
problems and issues in tlie 
schools. By emphasizing 
scholarship and professional 
service, the college tripled 
the amount of money put 
into faculty travel to allov^ 
members to be active in 
professional associations, 
according to Ryan. 



For the students, Ryan 
would like to see an increase 
in terms of course require- 
ments, reading, presenta- 
tions and workload. 

"You can't expect much if 
you don't demand much," 
Ryan said. "The state and 
national reputation of I.U.P. 
has increased; the quality of 
the students has increased. 



The goal of our college is 
quite clear: to select the 
best possible students we 
can." 

According to Ryan, there 
is a different attitude in the 
college, one of excitement, 
enthusiasm and inquiry to do 
more than ever before. 

"We're trying to create a 
message in the College of 



Education that academics 
ore very improtont," Ryan 
said, "and that the purpose 
of attending I.U.P. is to get 
an education first." 



67 



I.Dr. Harold E. Wngard, dean of the 
College of Healtti Sciences 2. Phys 
ed. classes aren't always this much 
fun. 3. How otDOut a quick game of 

'■■^o-c'O jnd-the-rosey . 








COLLEGE OF 



68 




i^i^Jmsf:^ 




1. I think my head is getting flat, 2. 
Another Billy Jean King in the mak- 
ing, 3. A quick warm-up lap around 
the track is a good start to a wor- 
kout 4. Zink Hall is where most 
health and physical activity classes 
are held. 




HEALTH SCIENCES 



The College of Health Sci- 
ences is comprised of four 
academic departments: Al- 
lied Health, Health and Phys- 
ical Education, Nursing and 
Safety Sciences. Each de- 
partment provides theoreti- 
cal, laboratory and practi- 
cal experiences for students 



and prepares the graduate 
for licensure or certification 
in their chosen field of study. 
Programs of study estab- 
lished in health and physical 
education, industrial safety, 
medical technology, mining 
safety, nursing, physical edu- 
cation and sport and respi- 



ratory therapy. 

Specific goals of the col- 
lege are to emphasize the 
promotion of positive health, 
physical and emotional fit- 
ness, restoration of optimal 
health after illness and occu- 
pational safety. 



69 



1. Dr. Jotvi D. Wetty 




INTERIM PRESIDENT 



One of the biggest 
changes that occured this 
year at I.U.P. was the resig- 
nation of former I.U.P. presi- 
dent. Dr. John E. Worthen. 
The position was taken over 
by interim president. Dr. John 
D. Welty. 

Dr. Welty is a candidate 
for the presidency of I.U.P. 
Before becoming interim 



70 




1. Dr. John Welty at the ground 
breaking ceremony for the Sally B. 
Johnson building, 2. Dr. Welty social- 
izing at a dinner for student leaders. 
3. The I U.P Council of Trustees 
1984-85 First row Patrick J Staple- 
ton, Chairperson, John B. Mccue. 
Vice-Chairperson. Frank Gorell, 
Secretary, David L. Johnson, Trea- 
surer. Second row: John D. Welty. 
University Interim President, Samuel 
W. Jock. Jr.. Charles J. Potter, Ralph 
F. Roberts, Kim E. Lyttle. Miriam K. 
Bradley. James A, Kimbrough, Re- 
nee G Forne 




BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



president Dr. Welty was 
president of academic af- 
fairs hiere at I. U.P. Other can- 
didates for the presidency 
are Eric R. Gilbertson, presi- 
dent of Johnson State Col- 
lege, Johnson, Vermont, Wil- 
liam C. Merwin, provost and 
vice-president for aca- 
demic affairs at the Universi- 



ty of North Florida, Jackson- 
ville, Florida and James E. Gil- 
bert, vice-president of 
academic affairs at Pitts- 
burg State University, Pitts- 
burg, Kansas. 

Dr. Welty accomplished 
some very important things 
this past year. One of the 
most outstanding things was 



to announce that I. U.P. will 
participate in an Egyptian 
educational exchange pro- 
gram through a proposed 
$1.5 million grant from the 
Supreme Council of Egyp- 
tian Universities. 

This program would allow 
I. UP. students to visit Egypt 
on a short-term vocation- 



type excursion. This project 
represents a continuous re- 
lationship that has evolved 
between I. U.P. and Egypt, 
according to Welty. 

This program is Just one 
small example of Dr. Welty's 
involvement in the students 
academic and cultural edu- 
cation. 



71 



1. Home Ec display that gives on 
example of a balanced meal, 2. Dr 
Kathleen Jones, dean. 3. Soup's on 




COLLEGE OF 



72 



1. Cafeteria meals are the best, es- 
pecially when they are served by 
Home Ec. majofs. 2. A Home Ec. stu- 
dent demonstrating how to oper- 
ate a weaving machine. 3. Acker- 
man Hall — home for most Home Ec . 
majors 




HUMAN ECOLOGY 



As of February of 1985 fhe 
School of Home Economics 
became the School of Hu- 
meri Ecology due to the 
changing times across the 
nation in home economics. 

The School of Human Ecol- 
ogy is doing more today 
than in the past, which was 
the main reason for the 
name change. The School of 



Human Ecology includes the 
studies of family relations 
and human development, 
resource management and 
consumer economics, food 
and nutrition, clothing and 
textiles and housing and in- 
terior design. 

In these programs stu- 
dents are given the founda- 
tion to enter a diversity of 



careers in education, busi- 
ness, industry and communi- 
ty services. Also, the pro- 
gram attempts to prepare 
students to lead useful lives 
as individuals, family mem- 
bers and citizens. 

Consumer Service majors 
have the opportunity to at- 
tend the Fashion Institute of 
Technology (F.I.T.) in New 



York City and to earn an as- 
sociate degree from FIT. as 
well as a bachelor's degree 
from lUP. 

Educating lUP students to 
develop competencies and 
skills needed for various pro- 
fessions dealing with human 
interaction is what the 
School of Human Ecology is 
all about. 

73 



1. A ROTC student jumps Into the 
pool with weapon in hand 2. Dr. 
Welty congratulated Professor of 
Mllitarv Science, Col. W. L. Robinson 
and the I UP ROTC for their selec- 
tion as the first alternate winner of 
the Order of Founders and Patriots 
of America award. 3. Colonel Wil- 
lard L Robinson 4. Cadet Horry 
Brown receives the award as No 1 
Army ROTC Cadet in Pennsylvania 
from Gov Dick Thornburgh. 





DEPARTMENT OF 



74 




MILITARY SCIENCE 



The Army Reserve Officers 
Training Corps (ROTC) at 
I.U.P. is the top Army ROTC in 
Pennsylvania and ranks No. 2 
of 1 1 1 ROTC detachments in 
the eastern United States 
Army ROTC students earn 
academic credit account- 
able toward graduation. 



and experience the chal- 
lenge of leadership, decision 
making and management 
skills. Young men and wom- 
en who complete the mili- 
tary science requirements in 
the four of two-year Army 
ROTC program will receive a 
commission as second lieu- 



tenant in the U.S. Army, 
Army Reserve of Army Na- 
tional Guard, 

ROTC students are also 
trained in practical skills such 
as adventure training, rap- 
pelling, marksmanship, orien- 
teering, first aid techniques 
and water safety. There is 



1. A fine looking company 2. Dr. 
Welty occepts the Governor's tro- 
phy for ROTC Excellence from Dick 
Thornburgh 3. Second Lieutenant 
Scott Rudy III receives his commis- 
sion as an Army Officer from l,U,P. 
Professor of Military Science Colonel 
Willard L, Robinson 



normally no obligation to the 
Army during freshman and 
sophomore years of ROTC, 
Four, three and two-year 
full tuition Army ROTC schol- 
arships ore available on a 
competitive basis to quali- 
fied students. 



75 



iO:00 P.M. You scurry home 
from Sheetz with o bog full of 
junk food and No-Doz, which 
will hopefully keep you in on 
alert state long enough to 
dash off a 6-8 page paper 
on the differences between 
12- volt modular digital pro- 
cessors and Dr. Leakey's 
theory of social class devel- 
opment in Cro-Magnon 
Man. It is due in exactly 12 
hours and 20 minutes. Never 
mind how much time you 
had to do it, the allnighter of 
doom has arrived. 

10:15 P.M. You install yourself 
at your desk to tackle the 
hardest part of the paper — 
the opening sentence For- 
tunately you still hove the 
presence of mind to do so 
Slowly, the first sentence 
takes form. It's going to be a 
long night. 

12:00 A.M. One whole page 
is finished. One down, five to 
go. Just as you're about to 
start the second, the mun- 
chies hit Lots of 'em. This 
calls for a large economy- 
size bag of sour cream and 
onion potato chips, it goes 
down quickly, but you need 
something to wash it down 
with, so you turn on your hot 
pot and prepare for your first 
deliciously rancid cup of cof- 
fee. 

12:30 A.M. You begin to wish 
you could go to bed, but 
with only a page and a half 
done, it's out of the ques- 
tion. Best to grab 2 No-Doz 
and a cup of coffee and 
pretend the bed isn't there. 

12:45 A.M. Your stomach is 
filled with the terrible realiza- 
tion that you should not 
have taken 2 No-Doz with a 
cup of coffee. Your eyes 
hurt like hell. 



1:30 A.M. Your hands shake 
from overdosing on caf- 
feine. All your friends return 
from a night out drinking. 
You ask yourself why profes- 
sors insist on making papers 
due on Friday. With 2 pages 
done, you're one-third fin- 
ished. 

2:30 A.M. Whatever you've 
just written, it looks really 

blurry, but at least it com- 
pleted the third page, and 
your task is half over. Neigh- 
bors politely ask you to turn 
your stereo down so they 
con go to sleep. In doing so, 
you stop playing records 
and turn on the radio, so you 
don't feel so lonely. 

2:45 A.M. The sour cream 
and onions didn't cut the 
mustard and the munchies 
have penetrated your piti- 
fully under-rested corpse 
again. Time for a munchy 
run. 

3:15 A.M. After walking all 
the way to Sheetz you trium- 
phantly return with two Ka- 
mikaze dogs in hand. If that 
doesn't keep you awake, 
nothing will. You pop an- 
other No-Doz just to be sure. 
There's so much more to be 
written, but somehow you 
know you'll finish in time. 

4:00 A.M. The words slide ef- 
fortlessly out from your pen 
and dribble over the page in 
a confusion of ideas. You 
vaguely realize that what 



ings, and your stomach is in 
the clutches of those 2 Kami- 
kaze dogs you ate The D.J. 
on the radio is playing ob- 
scure music. 

4:35 A.M. Four and a half 
pages and you're more than 
two-thirds finished. You feel 
like unadulterated scum. 

4:55 A.M. You begin to 
catch your second wind. This 
does not make your writing j 
more coherent, but at least , 
you feel semi-awake De- 
spite feeling extremely fat, ; 
you also feel extremely 
hungry, and you're obliged ] 
to dive into a waiting box of ■ 
chocolate chip cookies. J 

5:30 A.M. Whatever was left '■ 
of your second wind has 
blown away, and you're 
finding it extremely hard to 
stay awake. You pop an- 
other No-Doz and hope for 
the best Your hot pot bub- 
bles away in the back- 
ground, but you don't even 
notice. You stare at the fifth 
page you just completed 
and the words move all over 
the page You don't re- 
member what you've writ- 
ten, but you assume it was 
appropriate. 

6:00 A.M. As the sky begins 
to brighten, you tear 
through the conclusion in a 
flurry of illogical statements. 
Your eyelids weigh a ton 
apiece and your stomach 
begs for mercy. 




1 




CHRONOLOGY OF 



you've written doesn't 
make sense to anybody but 
you, but at this point your 
main goal is to get some- 
thing down on the paper. 
Your coffee cup is darkly 
stained from repeated fill- 



6:30 A.M. The sun pokes its 
head over the hilltops and 
the allnighter is made offi- 
cial. But it's not over yet. You 
may have finished the pa- 
per, but you still have to type 
it. Breakfast will open in a half 



hour. Typing doesn't require 
any thought, just coordina- 
tion. This is questionable in 
your condition, but you push 
ahead. The hard part is over. 

7:00 A.M. Enough is enough 



76 




AN ALL-NIGHTER 



and you decide to take a 
shower before breakfast. 
The water feels good, so 
good you nearly fall asleep. 
Other people are just get- 
ting up. It must be nice. 
7:15 A.M. You stumble out to 



Folger to get breakfast. The 
brisk air wakes you up a little 
and you realize that the 
campus is kind of pretty this 
early in the morning. You 
vow to get up really early 
more often, fully realizing the 



absurdity of your idea. 
8:30 A.M. You just can't 
believe how slowly you 
type. You can't be- 
lieve how sick you feel. 
You can't believe you 
stayed up all night for a 



lousy stinking paper. 
You can't believe you 
ate so much. 

7:30 A.M. Two eggs, 
three sausages, a bowl 
of Fruit Loops and four 
cups of coffee later 
you wonder how many 
of these people have 
been up all night and 
how many actually 
have the self-discipline 
to get up so early. 

9:30 A.M. You really be- 
gin to wonder if you'll 
even be able to make 
it to class to hand this 
thing in. You vow to 
never blow off a paper 
again. You type and 
type and type some 
more. In the process 
you realize what a terri- 
ble paper you've just 
written. 

9:55 A.M. The last page 
is typed, the staple has 
been inserted and you 
stagger bleary-eyed 
into the morning. 
Somehow you can tell 
that everyone knows 
you just stayed up all 
night. It could be your 
walk. It could be the 
bags under your eyes. 
It could be a lot of 
things. 

10:10 A.M. The profes- 
sor fades in and out 
and your head nods up 
and down like a light 
switch. You can't stay 
awake and you can't 
fall asleep. It's aca- 
demic torture. It's 
brainwashing. It's a cru- 
el form of humor. 

11:15 A.M. You dig in 

for an amazing 15 hours 

of sleep.lt never felt so 

good. 

— Doug Johnson 



77 




78 



T 




m 



■g^^ 



wSiiiS^iV * ■ ktii -^dS**', 




79 




The crown, the roses, the find walk down the runwoy. 
Although the moment was special for the 1985 Miss lUP, it 
wasn't a first. 

Yvette Johanna Walp, a senior from Dayton, Pa,, cap- 
tured the title on March 2, 1985. The 21 -year-old communi- 
cations education major also held the Miss Armstrong Coun- 
ty title in 1983 and is a former Miss Western Pa. Laurel Queen. 

"It's such a challenge because it builds you inside and 

outside into a whole person," Walp said. "At first I wasn't 

sure if I wanted to get into pageantry again, but competing 

allows you to learn so much about yourself and fine-tune all 

80 



MISS lUP 



the talents God gives you." 

Walp was selected from a field of 11 contestants who 
were judged on bathing suit, evening gown, private inter- 
view and talent segments. The 1985 Miss lUP wore a light 
blue evening gown, a blue bathing suit and song "Kiss Me in 
the Rain" as her talent. 

If for some reason Walp cannot attend the state pag- 
eant, the first-runner up, Jennifer Bradley, a junior math- 
ematics education major from McMurray, Pa., will take her 
place Second runner-up to the crown was Michel Wood, a 
sophomore business administration major from Home, Pa. 





A 



MISS BLACK lUP 



Lorraine C. Brown, a freshman pre-engineering major 
from Philadelphia, was crowned Miss Black lUP March 29, in 
Beard Audiforium. 

"It is a true honor to be Miss Black lUP," Brown said. "It 
symbolizes achievement for Black women and all women 
at lUP. The pageant is a tradition to instill pride in yourself 
and womanhood," 

The contestants were judged in four categories; 



sportswear, talent, formal wear, and question and answer. 
The contestants also performed a group skit and dance 
which wasn't judged. 

Monica Butts, a junior journalism major from Harrisburg, 
was named first runner-up and Miss Talented. 

Bonduree Lewis of Clairton was named second runner- 
up and Miss Congeniality. 



81 




The lUP Marching Band 
joined the Shriners, and the 
Greeks with their colorful 
floats to march In the Home- 
coming parade. 



HOMECOMING 



it was a beautiful day to come home. The sun was bright, 
the sky was blue and the Indian summer air was warm 
enough to make the Oct. 20 Homecoming a special day for 
the returning alumni 

The Greeks' floats returned for the 1984 parade with its 
theme. "Great Movies." While "E.T.," ""Casablanca," "Ani- 
mal House" and "The Wizard Of Oz" all made great show- 
ings. Alpha Gamma Delta's and Phi Sig's "Pink Panther" float 
came out the winner in the competition. 



82 






--r-> 

01 


^H ^^^■fag'^.'wl^^R^^^B 


e 


^ 

« 





Area bands and candy-throwing clowns made their 
annual contributions to the parade, while the Shrlners pro- 
vided memorable entertainment once again with their 
race cor antics. 

A double royalty graced the 1984 Homecoming. Barry 
Foster and Cindy Miller were crowned the Homecoming 
King and Queen during the half-time ceremonies of the 
football game, while the King and Queen of the Uglies, 
Bruce Morgan of lUP and Katie Neidhold of the University 
of Alaska, made their appearance — much to the delight 
of the enthusiastic crowd. 

The returning alumni were also able to cheer on their 
nationally-ranked Big Indians and rejoiced in an lUP victory 
over Lock Haven to round out the exciting Homecoming 
afternoon. 




83 




Homecoming 1984 proved 
to be o huge success. From 
the parade highlighted by 
the "Pink Panther" float to 
the record crowd that wit- 
nessed the Big Indians sixth 
straight victory. lUP students 
and alumni shared the sun 
and fun that made the day 
one to remember. 



84 




Tlt^i 



85 



Young and old alike shared 
the Homecoming traditions 
of the crowning of the 
Queen, tail-gaiting, cheer- 
leading and enjoying the ar- 
ray of foods and games at 
the carnival. 





86 




87 




1. "Hey, Gimme an I C Lite" 

2. A shot of this will make it 
"punch" 

3. Ccleco's is the place to be ot 
lUP 

4. That'll be a buck please 

5. These bears really "tied one 
on" 

6. Let's Stroh a party! 



AFTER HOURS 



At lUP, everybody's not working for the weekend. In 
fact, on any given week night, the bars and fraternity or 
private parties had numerous ways to coax the students 
out of the dorms, the library and after night classes. 

A typical party night at lUP — first a private party at 
9:00 p.m. a trip to the establishments uptown, such as 
Wolfendales, Calec6s and Al Patti's and then a quick stop 
at Sheetz before hitting a two-o'clock fraternity party. 

Whatever your partying needs, you were always satis- 
fied at lUP. 



88 




89 



The discovery that lUP has the ug- 
liest male population in the USA is 
not new. why rock superstar Bruce 
Springsteen pays tribute to the "ugly 
men" of tUP with two singles from his 
••Born in the USA" album, or haven't 
you heard . . 

"Romancing in the Dark" 

I get up in the evening 

A paper bag to hide my face be- 

hind 

Isometimes think of leaving but lUP's 



a haven for my kind 

I ain't nothin' but ugly 'round this 

place 

Hey there. Baby 

Close your eyes and kiss my face 

CHORUS: 

You can't fall for me babe 

A scary monster in the Oak 

Grove park 

I guess at lUP babe 

We'll have to do our 

romancing in the dark 

My face ain't getting clearer 



Somebody blazed a trail across my 
chin 

Can't see myself in the mirror 
It got cracked the first day I looked 
in 

But there ain't nobody better 
Indiana's filled with ugly men 
Just wrap my head with your sweat- 
er 

Turn off the lights and we can just 
pretend 
CHORUS: 
You won't fall for me babe 



You'd just as soon go out 

with a great white shark 

If you were blind, you'd see babe 

We could do our romancing in the 

dark 

BRIDGE: 

You can say that I'm just an ogre 

There's a mask here somewhere 

and it's for me 

I've pulled the bag to my shoulders 

C'mon baby the masks on me 

Can't go to Sheetz in this town 




lUP UGLIES 



What started out as on "ugly" rumor turned into lUP's best 
publicity campaign ever. The "place for all reasons" be- 
came the "place for ugly men" when author Lisa Birnboch 
helped put lUP on the map. 

After researching nearly 200 college campuses across the 
nation for her latest work, "Lisa Birnbach's College Book," Birn- 
boch selected lUP as having the ugliest mole student body. 



90 



"ant walk the aisles for food cause 
t's too brigtit 

Vou say ttrat you're getting tiungry 
-ley babyi I can't go out into the 
ight 

lust hold onto your bfindfold 
was serious wtien I said blind date 
/^t lUP (or so I'm told) 
Wtien it comes to u^ men . . . 
we rate 
CHORUS: 

We can't start a fight 
o'er some poll taken by some witch 



on a k3rk 

I guess we'll pull an all-nighter 

And try to do our romancing in the 

dark 

Sincerely. 

John Jackson and Tom Dellaquila 
PS. The other single is "Cover Me 
(With a Paper Bag) " 




The initial reaction at lUP was mixed. Some students were 
very defensive and criticized Birnbach's observation. 

"Lisa Birnbacti was off -base in her generalization of lUP 
men, especially since she was here only a short time and only 
saw a small fraction of the male student body," said sopho- 
more Dave Brumbaugh 

"I've never seen Lisa Birnboch, so I don't know if she is ugly 
or not," said freshman Jim Wusinich. "But I don't think she has 
any right to categorize all of us guys like she did." 

Other students strongly defended the men of lUP. 

"Beauty is in the eye of jne beholder," quoted freshman 
George Stewart, "beauty radiates from the inside to the 
outside, and that goes beyond physical features." 

"Birnboch is wrong," said junior Barb Springer. "I think the 
guys at lUP ore cute and shouldn't be worried about what is 
being said about them." 




America's Ugliest Man," 
Bruce Morgan met his coun- 
terpart from the home of 
ugly women. The University 
of Alaska at Fairbanks, for a 
night on the town at Alpha 
Phi Omega's "Ugliest Blind 
Date Ever." 






:^''/\^TS ,?T9^ 






Yet, others agree with Birnbach's conclusion. 

It's about time someone put lUP men in their place," said 
senior Ramona Barkley. "The men here think they have it made 
because there are two women to every one of them, but that 
doesn't give them the right to walk all over us like they do. As 
far as I'm concerned, who'd really want one of them?" 

But most students took the news as merely a joke. 

"Yeah, I know I'm ugly," said sophomore Roy Collins. But I'm 
planning to transfer to the University of Alaska next semester so 
I con be with the ugly women." 



92 



For the next few weeks men could be seen walking 
around campus with bogs over their heads wearing T-shirtj 
with the slogan, "I'm ugly but proud." The Delta Sigma Ph 
fraternity even changed their motto from "Life is Madness" 
to "Life is Ugliness." 

As national attention focused on lUP, a search began to 
uncover the university's ugliest man. More than 3,000 peo- 
ple nominated their favorite ugly mole, and 24-year-old 
Bruce Morgan, a senior criminology major, was chosen as 
America's ugliest male college student in a contest spon^ 
sored by Clem Pontolone, owner of Caleco's College Pub 
where the contest was held. 



M 



Lisa Birnbach rated lUP as 
possessing the ugliest male 
student body, but iUP 
proved that yes we're ugly, 
we're ugly and we're proud 
of it! 




HHHHiiUUUlimillU 



inmilsggg g^gffiirHfifiiinmmniiia igibgsg^gM 



HHHslUUIliUliUiUI 



Bruce Morgan cyid Katie Heidhold 
showed the entire country how 
ugly, ugly really is. and just how 
much fun it can be. 




THE UGLIEST 



But the fun didn't stop there. The Alphi Phi Omega service 
fraternity phoned the University of Alaska and encouragec 
them to hold a similar contest to determine the nation's 
ugliest famaie college student Katie Neidhold of Fairbanks, 
Alaska emerged with the crown, and the lUP fraternity paic 
for her flight to Indiana for the "Ugliest Blind Date Ever" on 
Oct. 19. 

The couple wore bags over their heads at a news confer- 
ence, then exchanged Eskimo kisses and dined on fast fooo 
and champagne in Memorial Field House before an enthusi- 
astic crowd of some 600 students. 



94 




BLIND DATE 



Proceeds went to 3-year-old Amanda Starry, a local vic- 
m of spinal meningitis, and her family. Over $1000 was 
ollected and donated as a result of the ugly-mania at lUP. 

The ugliest couple also appeared during the Homecoming 
larade and festivities before Neldhold returned to Alaska. 

Just when everyone thought It was all over, Lisa Blrnbach 
3turned to lUP Nov, 11 to be greeted by a not-so-warm 
;rowd of students. Haunted by hecklers throughout the 

vening, Birnbach was forced to cut her presentation short, 
)ut not before she encountered King Ugly himself. 



"and a very good 



"Bruce is charming," Blrnbach said, 

sport." 

Although Blrnbach announced after her presentation 
that, if she could make a new category in her book, she 
would call iUP the "rudest school," she did note that she was 
impressed with the way the IUP men handled their title. 

"I'm glad it was taken the way it was originally intended — 
as a fun sort of thing," Birnbach added. "The book really 
wasn't trying to be objective." 



95 







1. Everyone but the squirrels can be 
found in the Oak Grove during the 
winter months 

2. I think you start out like this , . . 

3. Do I really vv/ont to go through 
with this? 



WINTER ESCAPADES 

Snowball fights, skating at Mack Park, skiing at the Lodge 
— Winter Escapades at lUP. 

Although lUP students experienced the sub-zero weather 
this past winter, they managed to make the best of it. 

Wintertime is the time lUP students bundle up to play in the 
snow, build snowmen in dorm quod courtyards, admire the 
snow-covered Oak Grove and venture to the Lodge or 
Mack Park for an afternoon. 



96 




But there are certainly unpleasant winter experiences 

too For instance, a five-minute walk to class can seem like 

oSver When the snow is blowing and the thermometer . 

falling. And everybody dreads the embarassrr^ent of s Ippmg 

on the ice and falling in front of hundreds of students 

Wintertime at lUP. fun sometimes and not so much fun at 
other times. 



97 




I 



^^ 



1. These sisters of Alpha Sigma Tau 
sorority enjoyed the Spring Break 
sites. 2. The reliable road map 
helped road trippers reach their 
destiny. 3. "Hey. throw us a beer will 
va?!" 




SPRING BREAK 



At the Reef Hotel's ocean-front pool deck, the air was 
thick with Panama Jack suntan oil. Stereo speakers shook 
with the sounds of Bruce Springsteen and Madonna. Plastic 
pitchers in hand, 100 students in bikinis or fraternity T-shirts 
lined up for beers and entered suntan, hula-hoop and swim- 
nning contests. 

March 9-16 ... SPRING BREAK. Every lUP student had a 
different plan, some went to visit their boyfriends or girl- 



friends, some went home or to a friend's, others took road 
trips North, but many of them went to FLORIDA. 

The Activities Board and the Marketing Club were two of 
the groups that organized trips to Daytona and Fort Lauder- 
dale. 

These Spring Breakers joined thousands of college stu- 
dents from the U.S. and Canada to experience an amazing 
and indescribable week of fun in the sun. 



98 




99 




FUN IN 



As the warm weather arrived in Indiana, lUP students 
turned their thoughts from studying to sunning. Dorm court- 
yards began to resemble beaches, and afternoon classes 
became smaller and smaller. 

Spring at lUP — it was the time of the year when the end of 
the semester was in sight, and for seniors, graduation looked 
OS if it was really going to happen. It was the time when 
academics took a back seat to the pursuit of sun and fun. 

Everyone pulled on their swimsuits or shorts, grabbed a 



100 




1. Sunning wasn't always fun when you 
hod to study too 2. Miller Stadium was a 
hot spot for many sun bathers 3. Wild 
looking shades were a must this year 4. 
These Elkin Hall coeds chose to ploy vol- 
leyball until someone spiked it up onto 
the roof 5. The Governor's Quad — 
better known as THE BEACH! 




THE SUN 



towel or blanket and headed for the nearest plot of grass in 
the sun. Radios and stereos provided the musical entertain- 
ment OS many students opened their dorm windovys and 
propped their speal<ers onto the sills. In no time at all, a real 
party was going on. 

When the sunny weekends arrived it got worse with road 
trips, trips to Mack Park and block parties as the available 
activities. Spring at lUP — it was a time to forget about 
college pressures for awhile and just have a good time. 



101 



i There's always a sore loser on ev- 
ery team 2.Get on your marks 3. 
Not exactly Olympic style 4. Could 
that be Bryznikov? 5. "Fancy meet- 
ing you here" 





INTRAMURALS 



The lUP Intramural program, which is directed by Mr. Grove of 
the Health and Physical Education Department, offers 47 sports 
for men, women and co-ed teams. 

Any lUP student, faculty or staff member is eligible to com- 
pete in any event ranging from tug-of-war to inner tube water 
polo. 

Champions are recognized in each sport and teams vie for 
the overall or "All Points" Championship. This year Dead Meat 
Athletic Club placed first in the men's division. Thumbs Up A.C. 
won the women's division. Kappa Sigma was tops of the frater- 
nities and Wahr Machine placed first for the dorm team. 



102 




103 




CPrMSS 05 TH£ <H£AQT 



104 



October 12-14, 16-20 
CAST 

Lenny Magrath Peggy NO'Neill 

Chick Boyle Jennifer Sanders 

Doc Porter David Surtasky 

Meg Magrath Jennifer Abrann 

Babe Botrelle Donna Lubrano 

Barnette Lloyd Chip Salerno 

Understudies Garry Bellis 

Camille Halstronm 

Marty George 

Directed By Barbara Blackledge 





CM ADO ABOUT Moth 




November 30, December 1, 2, 4-8 
CAST 

Don Pedro Bill Mortinok 

Benedick Chip Salerno 

Beatrice Natalie Wolt 

Cloudio Kevin Renshaw 

Hero Jennifer Sanders 

Don John Gory Bellis 

Conrode Derek Wallman 

Borochio Keith Edwards 

Dogberry Gene Haldeman 

Verges Joe Pino 

Directed By Dr. Malcolm Bowes 



105 




TH£ CM£!QQ[i OQCMAQD 



February 22-24, 26-28, March 1. 2 

Case Lyubov Camille Hallstrom 

Anya Jennifer Sanders 

Varya Peggy O'Neill 

Leonid Ian Gallanar 

Yermolai Gary Bellis 

Pyotr David Surtasky 

Boris Larry Sadecky 

Charlotta Donna Lubrano 

Semyon Michael O'Reilly 

Directed by Dr. Donald Eisen 




Tu£ GLASS M^AUGsPrs 



Amanda 


April 


19-21 
CAST 


23-27 


Gigi Grill 


Laura 








..Deborah Hanson 
Dave Dallas 


Tom 








Jim 








.... Steve Hammer 


Understudy for Tom .... 
Directed By 






.Benjamin G. Bellis 
..A. Lynn Lockrov^/ 





107 



It 




i 






108 



"X. 



.?*»■: > j^' -J 








u 



Is 



x-^ 



V 





TGIF 



The TGIFs returned to lUP when the multi-purpose room of 

the new Union opened. 

Every Friday afternoon, the Activities Board sponsored the 
TGIF events to enable students to get their weekend off to a 
good sounding start with such bonds as, Haywire, Caruso 
Brothers, The System, The Form, Gigolo and The Other Half. 



109 




110 




ACTIVITIES GALOREI 

Beside all of these campus activities, ttiere were many "ex- 
tras" that were presented throughout the year. Some of 
these "extras" were comedians, hypnotists, magicians, 
mimes. Politicians, dancers. Six 0'Clocl< Series, lUP Star 
Search, and Air Band, and of course there were special 
guests such as, David Brenner, Autograph, John Cafferty 
and the Beaver Brown Band and John Anderson. With such a 
variety of activities presented, life at lUP was always excit- 
ing! 



111 



1.IUP students at the Armstrong 
Branch campus got devilish at a Hal- 
loween dance 2 Everyone wi 
pouse wtien Droculo enters 3 I 
not sure what I'm dressed as'' 4 Ac- 
tuolly . this is our normal attire 5 Even 
a scarecrow needs a teddy bear to 
cuddle 




HALLOWEEN 



While Halloween may have been one of our favorite holi- 
days as youngsters — planning our costumes weeks ahead 
of time and decorating the house with cardboard skeletons 
and witches. When we departed for college, along with 
homecooked meals and the privacy of our rooms, we also 
left behind our childish excitement for Halloween, or did we?! 

As darkness fell on the lUP campus October 31 lurking in 
the shadows were hundreds of us, masked and anonymous. 



112 




who had been anxiously awaiting the occasion to don 
homemade costumes from Goodwill and hit the party 
scene, enjoying our annual opportunity to forget our inhibi- 
tions and have a ghoulishly good time. Dressed as ghosts, 
goblins and ghostbusters, we partied the night away at Hal- 
loween parties all over campus and uptown at the bars 
complete with drink specials like Coleco's Rotton Apple, 
disregarding what we looked like or who we were talking to. 



Perhaps there were those of us who missed Halloweens 
past, when we raced through the neighborhood with our 
pumpkin containers bulging with candy and played pranks 
on those we disliked, but the opportunities for great Hallow- 
een fun at lUP helped us to set aside those bygone days and 
made us glad we weren't kids anymore. 



113 




ACTIVITIES FAIR 



Each year lUP's campus organizations have what is known 
as the Activities Fair. At this event, which is sponsored by the 
New Student Orientation Program, most of the campus or- 
ganizations put up displays and tell people what makes 
them special. 

The organizations that participated ranged from the 
Greeks to the Geology Club. The Fair was held on January 



114 




1 Who's the "head " of this table? 2. 
vVIUP made the Union rock 3. "I'll 
Day anyone a dollar rf they get me 
out of this sign." 4. The chemistry is 
definitely here 



31 in the multi-purpose room of the new Student Union. 

The Fair gives all of the students a chance to see what the 
campus activities have to offer them and what's going on 
at the lUP campus. The organization's main goal was to seek 
recognition and possible new members through the fair rath- 
er than to make a profit. 



115 




1 Bachelor no 1. what's the best 
way to stay warm in Alaska? 2 Oh 
BACHELOR no 3. you're embarass- 
ing me 3. You two will receive dinner 
for two at Bruno's 4 I think these two 
have met somewhere before 5 
Pick me and you'll have no regrets 




MA TCHES MADE 



Roses are red 
Violets are blue 
I love my mother. 
And I'd love you. too. 

This romantic poem got Bachelor number tvyo a date with 
one of lUP's most eligible bachelorettes. No, he wasn't on 
television's "Dating Game" hosted by Jim Lange, he was on 



116 




IN HE A VEN 



lUP's own "Dating Game" sponsored by the Activities Board 
Recreation Committee, Michelle Rains was the emcee for 
the event, which featured four lUP bachelors and bachelor- 
ettes. 

Indiana merchants donated prizes for the winners' dates 
— a night on the town and who knows, maybe even an 
evening that lead to a lasting relationship. 



117 





hWVfif^*^"fi'WV-^-ri^'- ■•^'--•r 



■'■•■ ■ ^i."' ^/•■•■A .-,/ .■■ ^r*?^ 




118 







OWOvi^OiiOie 



'•^wiiqri;;'!^. 



L.*:Si«5»-.BK. _.. 




119 




ACTIVITIES BOARD 



Tne board ,s rr.ade up of 
several committees which 
organize specific events. 
The cinema committee se- 
lects the blockbuster films 
that are shown throughout 
the year The contemporary 
music committee is responsi- 
ble for the TGIFs and the 



mini-concerts as well as the 
annual Air Band Competi- 
tion. The recreation commit- 
tee planned and organized 
bus trips to concerts as well 
as activities, such as the Dat- 
ing Game, the College Bowl 
and the lUP Star Search. The 
special programs commit- 



tee brings to lUP the various 
comedians, magicians and 
speakers. The hospitality 
committee sees that visiting 
performers are comfortable 
during their stay at lUP. The 
public relations/graphics 
committee is responsible for 
advertising all of the board's 



events through posters while 
the public relations/media 
committee takes care of 
advertising in the Penn and 
on the loco! radio stations. 

The AB is also responsible 
for the annual spring break 
trip to Daytona, Florida. 



120 




<QNAL SERVICE FRATERNH 







ALPHA PHI OMEGA 



The Mu Chi Chapter of Al- 
pha Phi Omega National Ser- 
vice Fraternity has been ac- 
tive on the lUP campus since 
1960. This year the chapter 
has 60 active brothers under 
the direction of three advis- 
ers: Dr Richard Lamberski, 
Major Philip Spence and Mrs, 
Elaine Carbaugh. 

In the past, the fraternity 



has been involved with such 
projects as the Ugly-Man 
Blind Dote, floats to carry the 
court in the Homecoming 
parade, danceathons, the 
phonathon for the Founda- 
tion of lUP. Christmas tree 
projects, santa phone colls, 
blood drives and many 
more. 
The major fundraising ef- 



fort is the Book Exchange, 
v\/hich is held every semester 
to generate profits that are 
donated entirely to charita- 
ble organizations. 

Some of the organizations 
that Alpha Phi Omega has 
donated money to include 
Birthright, Operation Uplift, 
Big Brothers/Big Sisters, Four- 
Footed Friends and the Alice 



Paul House, 

Mu Chi chapter recently 
celebrated its 25th anniver- 
sary and is looking forward 
to many more years at lUP, 
living up to its motto: In 
Leadership, In Friendship, In 
Service 



121 




CONCERT DANCE COMPANY 



The Concert Dance Com- 
pany was created 16 years 
ago to promote all aspects 
of dance witti an emphasis 
on production and perfor- 
mance. Its three companies 
— beginners, intermediates 
and advanced — perform 
on campus at special 
events, including Homecom- 



ing, Mr. lUP. Miss lUP and the 
Activities Fair. In addition, 
the company traditionally 
gives a special performance 
each semester at the Zink 
Dance Theater as v^^ell as 
competing at the American 
Dance Festival each year. 
All performances ore chor- 
eographed by students. 



The entire company is 
composed of about 120 
members Mrs. Jane Dukok 
instructs the advanced 
group Vk/hile the beginners 
and intermediates ore 
taught by four students 
elected to council. 



122 




DELTA OMICRON 




HOME ECONOMICS ASSOCIA TION 



The lUP HEA, made up of 
the student members of the 
American Home Economics 
Association (AHEA), was 
founded in 1909 with the 
purpose of fostering pro- 
fessionalism among students 
in the College of Home Eco- 
nomics, It IS the only pre-pro- 



fessional organization open 
to all students of this college. 

A new feature during the 
1984-85 academic year was 
an indoor picnic for all Col- 
lege of Home Economics 
students and their families on 
Parent's Day. 

Delta Omicron. the only 



professional music fraternity 
founded by undergraduate 
students, was designed to 
create and foster fellowship, 
to develop character and 
to arouse and encourage 
the appreciation of good 
music and performance 
among student musicians in 



order that each individual 
moy come to realize his or 
her fullest potential. 

Open to all male and fe- 
male music majors and mi- 
nors, it was the first music fra- 
ternity to establish a chapter 
In another country — Korea. 



123 




GAh/MA SIGMA SIGMA 



Gamma Sigma Sigma, the 
national service sorority, 
strives to serve the campus 
and community by gener- 
ously volunteering time and 
help. To achieve this goal, 
members have participated 
in a number of events, such 
as the Foundation for lUP 
Phonathon, the 30-Hour Fast, 



the Activities Fair and the Su- 
perdance for Muscular Dys- 
trophy. 

The sorority also assists lo- 
cal organizations such as the 
March of Dimes, UNICEF, the 
Alice Paul House and the So- 
ciety of Drug and Alcohol 
Abuse. In addition, the soror- 
ity is responsible for ushering 



at football games, artists se- 
ries and Theoter-By-The- 
Grove productions. 

The sorority's constitution- 
al convention was held in 
October 1952 in Nev^^ York 
City. The campus chapter. 
Beta Psi, was chartered in 
1969 



124 




lUPisces 



lUPicses, a synchrionized 
swimming club, was orga- 
nized nine years ago with 
the purpose of promoting 
the knowledge and further 
enhancing the growth of the 
sport on compus- 



always put on exhibitions in 
the fall and a show in the 
spring. This year the spring 
show, "Watercolors," was 
held from April 25-28. 

The 1984-85 season, how- 



nized swimming clubs. The 
swimmers went to state and 
regional meets after the 
competitions ended. 

The lUPisces, which is con- 
sisted of 18 women and 



routines for a successful 
show. 



ever, found lUPisces in com- three men, practice year 



In the past years lUPisces petitions with other synchro- round in order to perfect 



125 




KAPPA OMICRON PHI 



Kappa Omicron Phi is a na- 
tional honor society in the 
field of home economics. 
Emphasis is placed on intel- 
lectual and scholastic excel- 
lence, personal values and 
concern for fellow humans. 
Thus, KOPhi focuses on the 
total development of stu- 
dents and their commitment 
to professional and personal 
126 



ideals. 

KOPhi began as a local 
home economics club at the 
suggestion of Mabel Cook 
during function of Hettie 
Margaret Anthony's dietet- 
ics class at Northwest Mis- 
souri State Teachers Col- 
lege, Maryville. 

The colors of KOPhi are 
red and gold and the flower 



is the red poppy. Activities of 
the organization include Fel- 
lowships and Project Grants 
for alumni member projects 
and for chapters, leadership 
development worl<shops 
and Sponsor training Work- 
shops are held to help stu- 
dents and chapters reach 
the goals they seek to ac- 
complish. 



As a national service pro- 
ject KOPhi coniributes to 
Crossnore School, Inc. This 
school enrolls school-aged 
children who, for various rea- 
sons, need institutional care. 

This year the Tau Chapter 
at lUP will host the biennial 
Regional Meeting. 




MARKETING CLUB 



The lUP Marketing Club of- 
fers the opportunity for inter- 
ested students to make 
valuable contacts with nnen 
and women already out in 
the business world. An affili- 
ate of the American Market- 
ing Association (AMA), the 
club is made up of about 160 
members who meet at least 



once a month. 

The activities of the orga- 
nization include the Fall Mar- 
keting Symposium, the Stu- 
dents in Free Enterprise Fall 
Conference in Pittsburgh. 
AMA luncheons and the 
sponsoring of various speak- 
ers at the club's monthly 
meetings. 



The 1984 officers were, 
Stephanie Turner, president; 
Judy Miller, vice president; 
Dave Crittendon, secre- 
tary; Gary Siefert, treasurer; 
Dorothy Weible, activities; 
and Sue Kielarowski, public- 
ity. Fred Anderson and Dr. 
Ron Weires are the advisers 



127 





THE PENN 



The Penn has undergone 
many changes since its first 
publication m 1928. It started 
as a once a week paper 
and is now published three 
times a weel< on Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday. 
Over 10,500 copies are 



printed on these days. As 
the fifth largest paper in the 
state, the Penn employs 
over 100 students, including 
writers. 

Paid advertising was be- 
gun in 1969, and today, ad- 
vertising revenues make up 



nearly 80 percent of the 
Penn's $200,000 — plus bud- 
get. 

Another change for the 
Penn has been the reloca- 
tion of its office from Pratt 
Hall to the new Student 
Union. 



128 




1. Rob Boston. Pern EOfor 2. Busi- 

-e-:? ="orff 3. Stcx»Y Hmmetjefger. 
^^.-^^i Edtor 4. Edtoriol Staff 5. 



129 



Providing a Catholic aca- 
demic, spiritual and social 
presence for thie 5,100 Ro- 
man Catholics and the em- 
ployees and students of lUP is 
the Newman Center, also 
known as the University Par- 
ish of Saint Thomas More 

The first Newman Center 




NEWMAN CENTER 



was built in 1958 and was lo- 
cated at the location of the 
present Zink HalL The current 
location is on Oakland Ave- 
nue and was established at 
lUP in 1927. 

People of all religions are 
welcome. 



130 




PHI BETA LAMBDA 




STUDENT ACCOUNTING ASSOCIATION 



The goals of Phi Beta 
Lambda ore to: 1. Develop 
competent, aggressive 
business leaderstiip, 2. 
Strengthen the confidence 
of students in themselves 
and their work. 3, Create 
more interest in and under- 
standing of American busi- 
ness enterprise, 4. Encour- 
age members in the devel- 
opment of individual 
projects which contribute to 



the improvement of home, 
business and community. 5. 
Develop character, prepare 
for useful citizenship and fos- 
ter patriotism. 6. Encourage 
scholarship and promote 
school loyalty, 7. Encourage 
and practice efficient mon- 
ey management. 8- Assist 
students in the establishment 
of occupational goals and 
9, Facilitate the transition 
from school to work. 



The Student Accounting 
Association was organized in 
1974 to aid students in the 
development of career 
choices within the account- 
ing profession 

A local organization open 
to all lUP accounting majors, 
the Student Accounting As- 
sociation, helps students 
make valuable connections 
in all areas of the accounting 
world by sponsoring a vari- 



ety of events to aid its mem- 
bers. 

In addition, the SAA spon- 
sors tutoring and tours of 
public accounting firms. 

At its meetings, the orga- 
nization covers such sub- 
jects as resume writing, inter- 
view techniques, preparing 
for the CPA exam and com- 
puters in business. 

131 




PHI GAMMA NU 



Phi Gamma Nu i z' .z' zi- 
a\ Fraternity in Dusiness. The 
aim of the fraternity is to pro- 
mote high academic 
achievement and provide 
contact with professionals in 
many areas. Founder's Day is 
celebrated February 17. This 



year the fraternity had 
speakers on campus oppor- 
tunities and business eti- 
quette, and has been in- 
volved with other organiza- 
tions on professional 
projects. 



132 




RESIDENCE HALL ASSOCIATION 



The RHA works to promote 
and protect the welfare of 
the students living in the resi- 
dence halls and to encour- 
age a sense of interest, re- 
sponsibility and participation 
among the residents. 

Serving as the "voice" for 
the residents, the RHA aims 
to foster friendship among 



the students through spe- 
cially designed social pro- 
grams while establishing the 
necessary policies and 
guidelines in the residence 
halls. 

The RHA sponsored a Hal- 
loween Haunted House and 
Fall Ball in Whitmyre Hall to 
raise money for UNICEF and 



the Alice Paul House. 

The lUP chapter belongs to 
the North Atlantic Associ- 
ation of College and Univer- 
sity Residence Halls, the na- 
tional chapter, while the re- 
gional chapter is located at 
Penn State. 



133 




STUDENT DIETETICS ASSOCIATION 



The purpose of the lUP Stu- 
dent Dietetics Association is 
to increase awareness of 
the dietetics field by serving 
as a guide to student in- 
volvennent. The club informs 
students on the various as- 
pects of the field, increases 
involvement in food and nu- 



trition activities through edu- 
cational experiences and 
further educates the com- 
munity with sound food and 
nutrition information 

The organization has been 
involved with the Big Broth- 
er/Big Sister Program, Ca- 
reer Day, the Homecoming 



Booth, and the Health Fair. In 
addition, SDA participates in 
many activities during 
March, National Nutrition 
Month, as well as in road 
shows throughout the se- 
mester at various locations. 
The lUP SDA was one of the 
original charter members of 



the Pennsylvania Student Di- 
etetics Association, a state- 
wide organization com- 
posed of 12 colleges and 
universities, established in 
1978. 



134 




PHI MU ALPHA 



Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia is a 
professional fraternity for 
men in music. The primary 
purpose of this national or- 
ganization is to encourage 
and actively promote the 
highest standards of creativ- 
ity, performance, education 



and research in music in 
America. 

The Zeta Tau chapter at 
lUP was very active in 1984- 
85 sponsoring a record ex- 
change, staging all recitals 
and giving scholarships. The 
chapter also sponsored its 



annual composer's forum 
Students and professors per- 
formed their newly created 
works of music This year 
some well-known American 
composers took part in mak- 
ing this event a truly educa- 
tional effort. 



As one of 244 chapters 
across the United States, Phi 
Mu Alpha's Zeta Tau chap- 
ter works hard to enrich the 
musical atmosphere at lUP 
and to foster mutual broth- 
erhood among the students 
of music. 



135 




136 





»>->.:-- "it^.M 



137 




INTERFRA TERNITY COUNCIL 



The Interfraternity Council 

is an organization whose 
central purpose is to direct 
the goals of all Greek organi- 
zations, serve as a forum for 
exchange of ideas and es- 
tablish local governing and 
rush regulations Each frater- 



nity is represented m the 
council by a member from 
their organization. IFC meets 
weekly and works jointly with 
the Panhellenic Council in es- 
tablishing rules and regula- 
tions for all Greeks. The offi- 
cers for the 1984-85 year 



are: President — Michael 
Bova (Phi Kappa Psi), Vice- 
President — Lee Zoeller (Phi 
Sigma Kappa), Secretary — 
Timothy Vojtasko (Phi Sigma 
Kappa), Treasurer — Mark 
Martin (Phi Kappa Theta.) 



138 




PANHELLENIC COUNCIL 



The Panhellenic Council is 

an organization whose cen- 
tral purpose IS to direct the 
goals of the sorority system, 
serve as a forum for ex- 
change of ideas and estab- 
lish local governing and rush 
regulations. Each sorority is 



represented in the council 
by a member from their or- 
ganization. The Panhellenic 
Council meets v\/eekly and 
works jointly with IPC in es- 
tablishing rules and regula- 
tions for all Greeks. The offi- 
cers for the 1984-85 year 



are: President — Debie Re- 
maley (Alpha Gamma Del- 
ta), Vice-President — Susan 
DelGrippo (Phi Mu), Secre- 
tary — Carol Lcuer (Alpha Xi 
Delta), Treasurer — Kathy 
Dennehy (Alpha Sigma Tou). 



139 









•7. \ 'if^ 



>^ 





V 




ATA 



President: Carol Parmelee 
Chapter: Alpha Sigma 
Flower: Red and Buff Roses 
Colors: Red, Green, Buff 
Nickname: Alpha Gam's 
Phiilanttiropy: Juvenile Dia- 

oetes 
Symbol: Mushrooms 
Mascot: Squirrel 



140 




Dressed in a Hawaiian shirt 
and strumming a ukelele to 
ttie tune ot "Little Grass 
Shack," Mark Strategos 
charmed his way into the 
hearts of the judges and was 
crowned Mr. lUP 1984. 

Eleven contestants, 
judged by a panel of lUP pro- 
fessors and members of the 
community, competed in 
talent, formal wear and 
swimwear portions of the 
pageant held Nov, 17 in Fish- 
er Auditorium. 

Stategos, a senior market- 
ing major sponsored by Del- 
ta Sigma Phi, also won the 
talent and formal wear por- 
tions. 

Darrin Wheeler, a sopho- 
more sports medicine major 
sponsored by the Block Stu- 
dent League, finished sec- 
ond in the overall competi- 
tion but won the swimwear 
portion of the contest. 

The remaining nine con- 
testants were Jeff Bevan — 
who won the congeniality 
and spirit portions — Joe 
Giacobello, Ron Grigg, Mark 
Martin, Ron Monach, Brian 
Skoletsky, Al Stevens, Tim 




MR. lUP 



Vojtosko and Dan Woodr- 
ing. 

The pageant was spon- 
sored by the Alpha Gamma 
Delta sorority, which donat- 
ed the proceeds to the Ju- 
venile Diabetes Foundation. 

Barry Baker, Mr, lUP 1983, 
and Colleen Lehman, a for- 
mer lUP student and AGD sis- 
ter, co-hosted the evening, 
which opened with all the 
contestants dancing to 



"Wake Me Up Before You 
Go-Go". Additional enter- 
tainment was provided 
throughout the pageant by 
the Concert Dance ensem- 
ble and the winners of the 
comedy and dance cate- 
gories of the lUP Star Search. 
After tabulating contes- 
tants' scores, the judges se- 
lected Strategos, Wheeler, 
Grigg, Monach and Woodr- 
ing as five finalists. Each was 



asked a different unre- 
hearsed question, such as, 
"If you could go anywhere in 
the world, where would you 
go and why?" The winners 
were announced. Strategos 
and Wheeler received their 
trophies. 

"I was really surprised to 
win," Strategos said af+er 
the competition. "My only 
goal was to finish in the top 
five." 




ASA 



J 



142 



m 



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President: Chris Rutherford 

Chapter: Alpha Gamma 

Flower: Narcissus 

Colors: Ruby Red and Pearl 
.'. "i 'e 

Motto: Aspire, Seek. Attain 

Nickname: -SA's 

Philanthropy: Special Olym- 
pics 

Symbol: Ragedy Ann 

Mascot; Turtle 




AST 



President: Sheila Mowry 
Chapter: Delta 
Flower: Yellow Rose 
Colors: Emerald Green, 

Gold 
Motto: "Active, Self-Reliant, 

Trustworthiy" 
Philanthropy: Pine Mountain 

School 
Symbol: Anchor 
Mascot: Frog 




V^ -(A# 



c^W \(P- 



143 




1 . This is what the fkxrts look like be- 
fore the pomps are put on. 2. Theto 
Xi's took advantage of their balco- 
ny on a warm day 3. Waiting for the 
floats to appear during homecom- 
ing 4. Shoring a few secrets with one 
of the brothers 5 Kappa SIgs go all 
out for the alums at the new house 
6. Having a good time at the TKE 
house 7 Two girls for every guy 8. A 
familiar site during rush 





lA. c^r ■ 











144 







^ 


rl 


1 












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CANDIDS 



145 




j¥ 



¥> 






\) 




ASA 



President: Kathy Ogilvie 
Chapter: Delta Nu 
Flower: Pink Rose 
Colors: Light Blue, Dark Blue, 

and Gold 
Nicknames: Alpha Xi. AXiD 
Philanthropy: American 

Lung Association 
Symbol: Quill 
Mascot: Teddy Bear 



146 




A Z 



President: Lizanne Pezzetti 
Chapter: Gamma Phi 
Flower: Kilarney Rose 
Colors: Pink and Green 
Nickname: Dee Zee's 
Philanthropy: Deaf and 

Hearing Handicap 
Symbol: Roman Lamp 
Mascot: Turtle 



V 




fi 



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147 




A r 



V 





President: Amy Bailey 
Chapter: Epsilon Eta 
Flower: Cream-colored 

Rose 
Colors: Bronze Pink and Blue 
Nickname: Dee Gee's 
Ptiilonthropy: Aid to ttie Blind 

and Sight conservation 
Symbol: The Golden Anchor 
Mascot: "Hannah" — Rag- 
gedy Ann 



148 




1. Tri Sigs exchanged strategies tor 
their next event 2. "We're not in last 
o'oce. are we''" 3. King and Shjeen 
■ .ec- jne came out of the water for 
nis shot 4. Team members and DG 
coaches stood at pool side to 
cheer the swimmers on 




— ■**'^'Cr * t • ^/r^ t - - * 



AHqmoQ sviAsH 



The Delta Gamma sorority 
raised a splashing $500 for 
their philanthropy: Aid to the 
Blind and Sight Conserva- 
tion, by conducting their 
fourth annual Anchol Splash 
on Oct 28 Twenty-one so- 
rority and fraternity teams 
dropped anchor in Zink Pool 
to compete in the events. 



which included spirit compe- 
tition, water games and a 
bathing beauty contest. 

Alpha Gamma Delta won 
the spirit competition by dis- 
playing the most enthusiasm 
throughout the event. The 
"almost anything goes" wa- 
ter competition was won by 
the Phi Delta Theta fraternity 



and the Alpha Sigma Tau so- 
rority. 

Bathing beauties, Dave 
Westermon of Phi Delta The- 
ta and Jennifer Meyers of 
Sigma Kappa won the 
beauty contest and were 
crowned King and Queen 
Neptune The couple was 
judged on appearance. 



originality and presentation. 
"It went really well, and 
we all had a lot of fun," said 
Julia Alarcon, chairwoman 
of the Anchor Splash and 
Delta Gamma sister "We're 
looking forward to doing it 
again next year 



149 




^*'^'' ^# 



KA 



President: Rebecca Bloom 
Chapter: Delta Nu 
Flower: White Rose 
Colors: Olive Green and 
Pearl Whiite 

Motto: "Let us strive for that 
which is honorable, beautiful 
and highest." 

Ptiilonttiropy: Crippled Chil- 
drens' Hospital 
Mascot: Alligator 



150 





'^^oi>^. 



1 . Judy Miller with her ' dream ' ' dote 

2. "Did I soy something fimy?" 3. 
Some of the contestants during 
questioning 




DATING GAME 



Kappa Delta sponsored 
their annual dating game, 
Marcti 26, at Pratt Audito- 
rium. Five students partici- 
pated in the event. They 
vjeie sponsored by various 
groups on campus, these 
were Phi Beta Lambda, Al- 
pha Tau Omega Fraternity, 
Delta Zeta Sorority and Phi 
Kappa Psi Fraternity. The 
contestants were Betty 



Anne Cawley, Jim Bigham, 
Judy Miller, Scott Weber and 
Dvjayne Allison (the un- 
known date). 

Proceeds for the event 
were donated to the Crip- 
pled Children's Hospital in 
Richmond, VA, Child Abuse 
Prevention and Big Brothers 
and Sisters of Indiana Coun- 
ty. A total of $200 was 
raised. 



151 




^ K T 





^9^ 



President: Raymond Kraus 
Chapter: Nu 

Flower: Jacqueminot Rose 
Colors: Cardinal Red and 

Hunter's Green 
Motto: "Excellence through 

wisdom and change." 



152 



fmmmrm MiCl»/}~ tf^t 




^ K 



President: Gary Graitge 
Chapter: Kappa Theta 
Flower: Red Tea Rose 
Colors: White, Gold, and 

Cardinal Purple 
Motto: "Give expecting 

nothing thereof " 
Nickname: Phi Kaps 
Ptiilonthropy: Indiana Young 

Adult Handicapped 
Mascot: Alma 




.a 



^^(# ^^ 



153 




^ M 





.vy 



President: Sandy Ostermann 
Chapter: Beth Sigma 
Flower: ^ose Carnation 
Colors: Rose and White 
Motto: "Les soeurs tideles" 
Philanthropy: Project HOPE 
Symbol: Lion 
Mascot: Pinl< Elephant 



154 




^ S K 



President: Mike Wengryn 
Chapter: Theta Pentaton 
Flower: Red Carnation 
Colors: Silver and Magenta 
Nicknames: Phi Sigs, Phi 

Scoobies 
Ptiilanthropy: Ebensburg 

Center, Special Olympics 




6« 



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155 



B 




S N 



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^\y 



President: Paul Serluco 
Chapter: Iota Alpha No 185 
Flower; White English Flora- 

bunda 
Colors: Black, Gold, White 
Motto: A cut above " 
Nickname: Snakes 
Philanthropy: Cystic Fibrosis 
Symbol: Serpent 
Mascot: Serpent 



156 




s s s 



President: Cindy Sliga 
Chapter: Lambda 
Flower: Purple Violet 
Colors: Royal Purple, White 
Motto: "Faithful unto 

death " 
Nickname: Tri-Sigs 
Ptiilanthropy: Robbie Page 

Memorial 
Symbol: Sailboat 



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157 




X 



^» 



.\0 




President: Mike Kirk 
Chapter: Epsiion Eta 
Flower: 7ed Carnation 
Colors: Military Red and 

Wtiite 
Philanthropy: Big Brothers 

and Sisters of Indiana 
Motto: "Lend a helping 

hand " 



158 




E 



President: Pete Strahler 
Chapter: Beta Lambda 
Flower: Blue Iris 
Colors: Blue and Silver 
Motto: Juncti Juvant — 

"United They serve" 
Philanthropy: Multiple Scle- 

Symbol: The Unicorn 



^^ 



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159 









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160 



President: Nancy Ann Smith 
Chapter: Gamma Zi 
Flower: White Violet 
Colors: Turquoise Blue and 
Steel Grey 

Motto: "Be the best you can 
be be a Zeta." 
Nickname: Zeta Bunnies 
Philanttirapy: Association 
tor Retorted Children (ARC) 
Symbol: Crown 
Mascot: Bunnies 





0^^ 



ALlVf/f 




5 



ABrAEZHOlKAMNJ:^ 

the leliers go or» and on... 
especiailL| if you're, a greel6. 
tohat do they mean ? hell u)eeU.. 
rush, floats, smokers, bids, f 
happy hours... afid ualnen"it% all 
said and done. what% left is greeld 
unity, "there's a bond betu>een 
brothers and sister5.not.| 
related by blood, but by J 
common interests, goals, and 
a sense cjf -togetherness."^ 

1 





j# ^(^ 



o*^ 



^ 



ATfl 



President: Jim Bigham 
Chapter: Theta Chi 
Flower: White Tea Rose 
Colors: Green, White, Gold, 
and Azure 

Motto: "Pi Epsilon Pi" 
NicknorDes: ATO, Taus, Re- 
gas 

Philonttiropy: American Dia- 
betes Association 
Symbol: Maltese Cross 




1. Kappa Delta memorabilia 2. 
Pledging is an important aspect of 
Greek life 3. One of the many lUP 
Greeks 4. Alpha Gams showing 
pride in their sorority 5. Partying with 
the brothers at homecoming 




CANDIDS 



163 




both rushees and sisters. 
Many new friends, as well as 
pledges, are gained, 
1 . Getting to know the girls is 
important 2. "Let me tell you 
about Delta Gamma" 3. A 
happy time is just a small port 
of rush 4. "I am majoring in 
..." 5. The friendly faces of 




the sisters of Alpha Sigma 
Tau 6. Waiting between par- 
ties is nerve-racking 7. Mak- 
ing new friends is a port of 
rush 8. "Welcome to Alpha 
Sigma Alpha" 




SORORITY RUSH 



Twice a year the thirteen 
sororities at lUP have rush. 
Rush IS an informal period 
where girls unfamiliar with 
the Greek system get to 
meet with members of the 
various sororities and learn 
what it means to be a soror- 
ity sister. 



Fall rush is conducted in a 
structured formal manner. 
This year the process 
changed by lasting two 
weeks rather than one, 
which was divided into three 
rounds. The first round lets 
the rushees meet each so- 
rority. In round two the girls 



return to the groups they 
liked best. During round 
three, after picks and cuts, 
each girl returns only to their 
favorite top two , sororities. 
Then the anxiety sets in wait- 
ing for the bids to be given 
out. 
Spring rush is much less for- 



mal, allowing eocn soronTy 
to plan and schedule parties 
at its own convenience. A 
variety of themes, such as 
western, winter wonderland, 
night club, Hawaiian and 
nautical are used to attract 
the attention of the females 
Rush is very rewarding to 



165 




1>^ 

! * 

HOMECOMING 



Homecoming '84 brought The alumni made Home- 
back the floats, the parade, coming all worthwhile for the 
the carnival, the fundraisers, Greeks. And coming home 
the formals, the tail-gaters, on October 20 was a special 
but best of all it brought day for the returning alumni, 
back the alumni 



166 




1 All njshees first sign in 2 Talking is 
the best way to get to know each 
other 3 Hey. aren't you in my bus 
law class? 4 "The line up" of ru- 
shees and brothers 5 Alcohol wii 
not be a part of next year's rush 6 
Creating life-long friends is part of 
the Greek systenn 



168 




FRA TERNITY RUSH 



Rush is the life blood of 
Greeks. It's held the first few 
weeks of each semester 
when Greeks recruit new 
members for pledgeship. But 
rush is a year-round process 
for Greeks so they can grow 
in numbers as well as in 
strength. There are four 
steps to a successful rush: 1. 



Go out and meet with peo- 
ple, 2. Moke these people 
your friends. 3 Introduce 
them to other members of 
the group and 4. Integrate 
them into the membership. 
Friendship is the most impor- 
tant and valued part of our 
Greek system. 
Fraternity rush is faced 



with a change m the coming 
year. Dry rush will be the ma- 
jor change at lUP next year. 
Fraternities will look to stress 
friendship and group unity to 
convince the rusheos to put 
down roots and to make a 
home in which to come 
back after graduation. 



169 



1. Pri: Mu Old Theta Chi — Over-al\ 
winners Of Greek Week 2. LamtxJa 
Chi's keo* the audience laughing 3. 
A great ending to a medley per- 
fofmed by Sigma Kappa and Theta 
Xi 4. A survivof from the depths of 
tfie jelo 5. Look out bekawl 6. Sigma 
Nu defends their 160-lb tug-o-war 
title 

Spring is in the air, and it's 
the time of year when iUP 
Greel<s hold their annual 
Greek Week. 

Starting Sunday, April 14 
and continuing through Fri- 
day, April 19 members of 
lUP's sororities and fraterni- 
ties came together for a fun- 
filled week of games and 
competition. 

The first competition, 
Greek Sing, was held on Sun- 
day. It presented a display 
of the sororities and fraterni- 
ties singing and dancing tal- 
ents to songs of their choice. 
Both greeks and non-greeks 
alike enjoyed coming to the 
Memorial Field House for this 
amusing and delightful after- 
noon of entertainment. 

Events on Monday started 
off with a Jello Jump at Roy 
Roger's parking lot. The au- 
dience was entertained as a 
representative from each 
sorority and fraternity took a 
jump into a trash dumpster 
filled with cherry jello. As on- 
lookers may tell you, the 
jumpers weren't the only 
ones covered with jello upon 
the completion of the 
event. Also on this day, the 
Greeks' banners promoting 
Greek Week were judged in 
the Oak Grove Ending the 
day was the arm wrestling 
competition which took 
place at Theta Chi. 





GREEK 



Tuesday brought about a 
battle of muscles as Greeks 
pulled away in a tug-o-war 
competition at Keith Field. 
The day finished with volley- 
ball at the Field House. The 
fun continued on Wednes- 
day with Frisbee Football 
taking place at Keith Field. 












WEEK 



The day ended with teams 
from the sororities and fra- 
ternities eating pizza as fast 
as possible during the Pizza 
Eating Competition at 
Lambda Chi Alpha. Besides a 
few participants vowing to 
never again eat pizza, all in- 
volved hod fun. 



Thursday provided more 
fun OS Greel<s flaunted their 
decorated chariots and 
tool< off to the track for an 
afternoon of races. Weight- 
lifting completed the events 
for the day at Sigma Nu. Fri- 
day ended the week of 
competition with awards 



going to the overall and indi- 
vidual competition winners 
at the Greek Events Cere- 
mony in the Oak Room, 

Overall winners this year 
were Theta Chi and Phi Mu. A 
week of fun, a week of sur- 
prises — yes, that was Greek 
Week at lUP. 



171 



m^jm/ii' 



V-l V 





\ 




111 



and 



? 



Tvio shakes of o 

for ^^^ 



^ 



This year's Derby Days, 
sponsored by Sigma Chi fra- 
ternity, tooK place April 10- 
13. Participating in this year's 
events were the following 
sororities: Delta Gamnna, 
Zeta Tau Alpha, Alpha Sig- 
ma Alpha, Sigma Sigma Sig- 
ma, Alpha Xi Delta, Kappa 
Delta, Phi Mu and Alpha Sig- 



ma Tau. 

Events started off 
Wednesday evening with 
the search for black derby 
hats. The derbies were hid- 
den all over campus by the 
brothers of Sigma Chi. Every 
hat that was found added 
to the accumulation of each 
sororities' points. This search 



continued until Friday at 1 
p.m. when the Golden 
Derby was hidden. This was 
considered the prize catch, 
for the sorority finding it was 
awarded numerous points. 

Members of the partici- 
pating sororities were sta- 
tioned at various phones on 
campus awaiting clues ev- 



172 




1 One of the many signs promoting 
Derby Days 2 ASA's getting ready 
for the games to begin 3. Some of 
the participants 4. A coach for 
Kappa Delta 5 Having fun during 
Derby Days 6 A few Sigma Chi 
brothers at their finest 




DERBY DAYS 



ery half hour as to where the 
Golden Derby was hidden. 
Examples of clues given 
were "It's a beautiful day 
outside" and "The land 
down under." This year the 
hat was hidden under the 
steps by the construction in 
front of John Sutton Hall. 
Saturday called for more 



fun and games as the sorori- 
ties battled it out for points in 
such games as bat-spin, 
three-legged race, egg toss 
and dress a Sigma. Points 
were also awarded to the 
sorority that collected the 
most money for Sigma Chi's 
philanthropy. Camp 

Orenda. Finally, all the points 



were accumulated and the 
winning sororities were an- 
nounced. This year in overall 
competition Alpha Sigma Al- 
pha placed first, with Sigma 
Sigma Sigma and Zeto Tou 
Alpha placing second and 
third respectively. 





«---»C'-, ?-.^:, - t-v-> >- . - J-> 





174 




175 




VpiiaMS 



1. Coach Chaunp yels inslructions 
out to the field. 2. Bryan Gnswold sits 
and soofcs on the side*ne. 3. TTie RJP 
defense faces off against Ecinbofo 





FOOTBALL 



It was a great year for The 
lUP Big Indian football team. 
They were ranked seventh in 
the National Division II stand- 
ings during the season and 
they lead the East for the 
Lambert Trophy for a few 
weeks, according to head 
coach George Chaump. 



"We had a good season 
with a primarily underclass- 
men team. I'm looking for 
bigger and better things 
next season," said Chaump. 

Chaump sited four big 
wins over Edinboro. Clarion, 
West Chester and Southern 
Connecticut as highlights of 



the season. The football 
teams overall record was 7- 
3 and 4-2 in the conference. 
Tight end Bill Thompson 
commented on the season. 
"The hard work and dedica- 
tion of the players and 
coaches paid off with a win- 
ning season. The best part of 



176 




tfvi4ii4tAS4lii»ininiB4r4i 






5^i^g» 




5. The 1984 football team: Row 1: 

Roger Evans, Pete Gerula, Jim An- 
gelo. Mark Zilinskas, Rick Radato- 
vich. John Pettlna, Chuck Rice, Don 
Santoro, Kevin McCorkle, Clayton 
Palmer, Jeff Sovino, Allen Lane; Row 
2: Gus Branch, Joe Hessom, Tyrone 
Dixon, John Moore, Lou Tomasetti, 
Mike Kormozyn, Gregg Brenner, Ke- 
vin Cottrell, Paul Scruppi, Matt Ma- 
tis. Brent Urbanovich, Bobby Buriok, 
Row 3 Bryan Griswold, Thod Bud- 
zinski. Bill Scott, Scott Byerly, Bill 
Thompson, Bob Ligashesky, Dean 
LaSalvia, Doug Niesen, Chris Bache, 
Jim Thimons, Dan Thompson, Mark 
Chalfant, Kevin Mercer: Row 4. Jim 
Latsko, Mike Pitcairn, Roger Nickol, 
Scott Rhodes, Brian Toothman, John 
Sondstrom, Joe Mohan, Bob Walk- 
er, Scott Stillmak, Mike Perone, 
Vaughn Hewitt, Rich Johnson, Stacy 
Robinson, Row 5: Billy Moss, Tony 
Trove, Jimmy Calhoun, Dennis Heg- 
gins, Paul Stefani, Mike Hudzick, Riz- 
wan Khan, Rich Ingold, Dennis Wal- 
lace, Charlie Buckshaw, Bob Kelly. 
Bob Kiel, Milan Moncilovich, Row 6: 
Rob Allen, Rob Dominick, Steve Girt- 
ing, Paul Roybo, Dan Santia, Darel 
Patrick, Jim Ambrose, Frank Cig- 
netti. Gene Sommanva, Kevin 
Boche, T,J Kakabar, Joe Peduzzi. 
Kelvin Lewis, Row 7 Neil Ziegler, 
Chris Patte, Derek BartI, Dove Sei- 
del. John Palamaro. Scott Parker, Al 
Arrisher, Joel Prawucki, Mark Pleve- 
iich, Kevin Donahue, John Robinson, 
Bill Buhite: Row 8: Don Nicklos (mgr), 
graduate assistant Kenny Moore, 
assistant coaches Som Shaffer and 
Joe Marx, graduate assistant Terry 
Totteri, head coach George 
Chaump, assistant coaches Mark 
Kaczanowicz, John Chakot, Dave 
Rackovan and Charlie Donnor, gra- 
duate assistant Marty Barrett, and 
Vinny Koshute (mgr ), 6. Quarter- 
back Bob Kiel looks tor a receiver. 7. 
"Touchdown!" 



he season was being 
anked in the Top 10 nation- 
ally and our consecutive 
vins over West Chester, 
idinboro and Clarion." 

Quarterback Bob Kiel said, 
'I think the biggest highlight 
)f the year was being no- 
ionally ranked, and our 
arge victories over bigger 
earns like Edinboro, West 
"hester, Clarion and South- 



ern Connecticut, I believe 
that the people of the uni- 
versity have begun to real- 
ize that lUP has a strong and 
improving football team. 
The players and myself have 
realized that we can and will 
win." 

The season produced sev- 
en PSAC vyestern Division 
first team All Stars: on the of- 
fense were tight end 



Thompson, center Mark Ple- 
velich and wide receiver 
Gregg Brenner, on the de- 
fense were defensive end 
Kevin Cottrell, linebacker 
Bob Buriak. secondary Kelvin 
Lewis and punter Rob Allen. 
This season gave way to 
the birth of the lUP "Wave," 
a feat performed by spirited 
football fans. "Heartwarm- 
ing" was what Coach 



Chaump called this crowd 
spirit. 

A low point in the season 
was losing junior quarter- 
back I^ich Ingold to a spleen 
injury which he suffered in 
the Edinboro game. He is ex- 
pected to be well by the 
1985 season. 



177 




1. The 1984 soccer team: Row 1: 

Tom Neslund, Marc Van Den Boo- 
gaard. Dove Morky, Mark Wohlge- 
muth, Scott Russell. Todd Weaver, 
Marc Yeadon, Row 2: Dave Hoover, 
Chris Young, Kevin DuMond, Rich 
Betts, Dan Gehers, Todd Hammond, 
Owen Dougherty, Row 3 Coach 
Vince Celtnieks, Andy Cole, Dove 
Langton, Leory Peart, John Sharkey. 
Frank Paz, John Pepia. Andy Gur- 
wood. George Schoedel. Dean 
Koch, and Assistant Coach Greg 
Joseph, 2. Mark Wohlgemuth fights 
for possession as Dave Langton 
stands ready. 




The 1984 soccer team 
knew it would be hard to top 
the 1983 season of 12-1-1, 
however, despite the loss of 
seven seniors to graduation, 
the booters came close to 
equaling the sensational 
season of the previous year. 



"We thought we would be 
struggling more this season 
to stay on top of things, but it 
didn't turn out that way," 
said Coach Vince Celtnieks. 

With a record of 11-3-1, 
the booters were ranked 
fourth in the region and won 



the Southern Division WPSC 
championship for the sec- 
ond straight year. 

"We played well with a 
different kind of attack using 
our passing and our speed," 
Celtnieks said, "We had 
more midfielders and de- 



178 




3. Gaining control of the boll Todd 
Hammond beats his opponent 4. 
Senior Dave Longton is congratulat- 
ed by Todd Hammond 5. The soc- 
cer team congratulate one an- 
other after a goal 6. George 
Schoedel manuvers the ball upfield. 




.'^ 



fenders score this year than 
ever before. It was the bal- 
ance of our attack that was 
a definite factor in our play- 
ing well." 

The highlight of the season 
centered around senior 
Dave Langton breaking 
Frank Wolk's all-time scoring 
record of 41 goals set in 
1983, By the end of the sea- 
son, Langton had set a new 



school record of 43 goals 
scored in four years of com- 
petition. 

"It (setting the a scoring 
record) wasn't something 
that I really thought about 
too much. Team perfor- 
mance was more important 
and the key to us having a 
good season," said Lang- 
ton. 

Steady performances 



helped the team cope with 
the loss of two key players to 
early injuries, according to 
Celtnieks. 

"By working hard and hav- 
ing a good attitude, we 
were able to keep it togeth- 
er and do a good job," Celt- 
nieks said 

"Most of the guys were 
new to the team," added 
senior Frank Paz. "For a team 



that really just got together 
at the beginning of the year, 
I think we had a great sea- 
son overall." 

"We have established a 
solid base for next year," 
said Celtnieks. "Even though 
we are losing four seniors, 
we have some promising 
young men to fill the void, 
and we will be in fine shape 
for the future." 



179 




FIELD HOCKEY 



With nine returning start- 
ers, the women's field hocl<- 
ey teann scored 27 goals 
during the 1984-85 season, 
the most goals scored in a 
single season in the history of 
lUP, according to Coach Ko- 
fie Montgomery. 

"Eleven of the teams we 



competed against were 
ranked nationally in the Top 
20," Montgomery said, "and 
we performed well against 
them." 

"Our record (5-13) 
doesn't reflect the effort 
that we put into it," said sen- 
ior Wendy Fairman. "We 



dominated a lot of the 
games but lost them be- 
cause of one bad breal<. The 
scores didn't show our hard 
work and ability." 

"This year we had more of 
a team," Montgomery com- 
mented, "I've had higher- 
skilled individuals in the past. 



180 




51-& 




31 4 17^ 




M ^ 






^^ 





but this was a very good 
team of individuals who 
worked well together and 
played like a team." 

The season ended on a 
positive note with wins 
against Slippery Rock and 
Buffalo, and both the team 
and Montgomery are look- 
ing toward the future 

"We're a young team," 
Fairman said, "a group that 
shows a great deal of po- 



tential. There is a lot of terrific 
material to work with." 

"We expect to continue 
with the consistent team ef- 
fort we established this 
year," Montgomery said. 
"Our goal for next year is to 
score at least as many goals 
as we scored this year and 
to have fewer scored 
against us." 



5. The 1984 field hockey team: Row 
1- Booo riOTieny, Nanene Kehter, 
Lisa Hulsizef. Cindy Davis, Lisa Uttte. 
Wendy Fairman, Lynn Christina, 
Deneen Etsing, Nkncy Zygarowicz. 
Row 2 Coach Kofie Montgomery, 
Robin Crawford, Karen Jones, Kris 
Feici<, Harriet Taglieri, Robin Sol- 
bach, Assistant coach Donna De- 
Fkxe, Row 3: Carol Alarie, Aretha 
Carr, Laurie Parker, Patti Lavan, 
Denise Fry, Kay ZeJ, Terri Sacchetti, 
<ris Kauer. Row 4: Virginia Hunt, Moty 
Burke, Donna Waker, Condi Gin- 
grich, Karia Anderson, Kathy 
Schlingmann, and Peggy l^eiy 6. 
Regional Al-Star Kris Feick covers 
her Stppery l?ock opponent. 



181 




1. Tennis team members prepare 
the coolers for ttieir matcties. 2. Re- tl 
turning ttie ball is Eileen McArdle, 3. 
Pam Howell hits the ball out of sight , , 
4. Sue McCalmont takes a refresh- 
ing drink of water. 




WOMEN'S TENNIS 



The women's tennis team 
has never seen a losing sea- 
son in its history at lUP, an 
achievement that Coach 
Mary Louise Eltz is very proud 
of. The 1984 team did its 
best to keep Coach Eltz 
bragging. 

With an overall record of 



10-2, the team placed sec- 
ond in the PSAC champion- 
ships — the best lUP has ever 
done at the state level. 

"We had three state 
champions this year: number 
three doubles champions 
Peggy Walkush and Cathy 
Crumrine and number six sin- 



gles chomp Eileen McArdle," 
Eltz explained. 

"No one really expected 
us to do as great in states as 
we did," Walkush said. "The 
team was really close; ev- 
eryone was pulling for each 
other which helped moke 
this season the best season 



182 




1984 women's tennis teonn: ?o«v 1: 
Theresa Rito, Cathy Crumrine, Shar- 
on Relich; Row 2: Peggy Wokush, 
Sue McCalmont, Cathy McNamora, 
Katie Roch; Row 3: Coach Mary 
LOuise Eltz, Sue Smidlein, Eileen 
McArdle. Pam HoweO, Undo Honkxi 
and Lori Ludwig 7. Coach Btz intro- 
duces the lUP players to the Ship- 
pensdurg players. 



in my four years here." 

"The team came togeth- 
er in the end to prove how 
good we really were," add- 
ed Pam Howell, who started 
second doubles. "Our best 
win was against Pitt, who we 
beat for the second year in 
a row." 

"Edinboro was also a very 
strong opponent who did 
beat us last year," Eltz said, 
"it was a feather in our cap 



for us to take them this 
year." 

Depth was the key factor 
in the success of the team 
this season according to Eltz. 

"The team had more 
depth this year than ever 
before," she said. "I think we 
felt very coorident in each 
position, which doesn't hap- 
pen very often. That kind of 
confidence is really the ex- 
ception rather than the 



rule." 

According to Eltz, the 
team has a lot of good ma- 
terial left over for next year 
since a number of starting 
positions were held by un- 
derclassmen this season. 

"All in all we have a good 
nucleus, and there's no rea- 
son we can't be even stron- 
ger next year," Eltz re- 
marked. 



183 



n 








1. The 1984 men's cross country 
team: Row 1 Paul Rogers, Tim Lud- 
wig, Craig Graver, Mike McGee, 
Tom Rush, Scott Madlll, Dave 
Brightwell, Jim Sullivan, Larry McDon- 
ough, Row 2: Coachi Lou Sutton, 
Gavin Ctiafin, Matt Seigford, John 
Flaherty, Mike Patton, Tom Doron, 
Tim Moul, Brian McPeake, Mark 
Knepp, Jim Elder, Dave Williams. 
Row 3 Mike Novak, Bob Strain, Chris 
Flynn, Jeff Coleman, Pete Fleming, 
Tim Buckley, Joe Cavi/ley, Brendon 
O'Connor, Paul Prox and Assistant 
coach Ed Fry 2. Coasting to the fin- 
ish is Mike Patton 3. Associate Di- 
rector of Athletics, Ruth Podbielski 
and Dave Brightwell wait for the 
race results. 



MEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 



184 



They have consistently 
been the top teem in the 
Northeast for the last dec- 
ade. They have gone to the 
NCAA Division II National 
Meet for 10 consecutive 
years, more than any other 
team in the East, They quali- 
fied as an All-American 
team in 1976 and 1977, and 
they have produced four 



Olympic marathon qualifiers 
since 1980. 

Who are they? They're the 
members of the men's cross 
country team, and despite 
the impressive record 
they've compiled over the 
years, their sport is one that 
"lUP doesn't know very 
well", according to Coach 
Lou Sutton, Perhaps this is 



their motivation to excel. In 
any event, the 1984 team 
with 10 returning lettermen 
upheld the proud "lUP dis- 
tance tradition", compiling 
a 91-12 overall record for 
the season and placing sev- 
enth in the 1984 NCAA Divi- 
sion II National Championship 
in Clinton, Mississippi. 
The team placed second 





4. Sophomore Tom Doran crosses 
the finish line 5. Tom Rush races 
along the course, 6. Jim Sullivan pre- 
pares to run, 7. Coach Lou Sutton 
announces the results of the lUP Invi- 
tational 



in the LaFayette hvitational, 
the lUP Invitational, the Notre 
Dome Invitational and the 
PSAC State Championship, 
and placed fifth in the Mar- 
shall University Invitational, 

lUP also placed fifth in the 
NCAA Division II Regionals, a 
competition of 47 teams 
from an 11-state area, 
Vk/hich lUP hosted on Novem- 
ber 3, 

"While we were a rela- 
tively young team, we 
showed signs of maturity, es- 



pecially toward the end of 
the season, and we per- 
formed best at the PSAC 
meet," Sutton noted, 

"Our top seven runners 
this year were completely 
new," explained co-captain 
Dove Brightwell, "At first, we 
didn't know what we could 
expect from them. It's tough 
to get a whole new top sev- 
en and still run well consis- 
tently," 

"But the team evolved 
over the season into a 



strong team despite the in- 
experience," added co- 
captain Mike McGee. 

The 1984 season was ex- 
tra special for Sutton, who 
passed his 1,000- win mark in 
his 17-year coaching career 
at lUP. He ended the season 
with on overall coaching re- 
cord of 1,037-124-4. includ- 
ing all invitational and cham- 
pionship meets. Yet, Sutton 
has already turned his atten- 
tion toward the future, 

"We hove a large group 



of sophomores that I'm ex- 
pecting good things to 
come," Sutton said, "They 
ran well this season as soph- 
omores, and they will run 
even better as they get 
older and gain more exper- 
ience If everyone stays to- 
gether and works hard, the 
next two years look very 
bright for our team." 



185 




1. Ail-American Weezje Benzoni 
iooks tired after a fxard race 2. Sen- 
ior Jon Loffert crosses the finish line 
3. Taking long strides is Al-American 
►^elen Gibey. 



WOMEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 



What lUP team finished the 
1984 season with 102 wins 
and two losses, won the 
PSAC Conference meet for 
the second straight year 
and placed fifth in Nation- 
als? 

The women's cross coun- 



try team has all of these dis- 
tinctions along with many 
others. 

The team placed first at 
the California State Universi- 
ty Invitational, the lUP Invita- 
tional, the Frostburg Invita- 
tional, and the Bucknell Invi- 



tational. 

'It was a very successful 
season," said Coach Ed Fry. 
"We were very happy to win 
states, to place second to 
Holy Cross at Regionals and 
then to place fifth at Nation- 
als and beat Holy Cross." 



186 




1. Chris Skarvelis runs a close race 
against her Shippensburg oppo- 
nent. 2. The 1984 women's cross 
country team: Row 1. Korlo Hort- 
mon, Becky Schuster. Debbie 
Moyer. Colleen Zubey, Julie Can- 
cilia, Tommy Donnelly, Jennifer Ritz; 
Row 2 Coach Ed Fry, Helen Gilbey, 
Jon Loffert, Mary Alico, Chris Skar- 
velis, Elizabeth Urquhart, Nonci Line. 
Lynn Robbins, Jennifer Rohrer, Wee- 
zie Benzoni, Row 3 Jill Swavely, Lisa 
Bonaccorsi, Irish Goldencamp, 
G-l-na DeBridge, Cindy Recten- 
wald, Kathy Ewing. Dana Piccolini 
ond Michelle Brown 




At the NCAA Division II 
Women's Notional Cross 
Country Chonnpionstiip 
Meet in Clinton, Mississippi, 
two of thie lUP women run- 
ners were named Ail-Ameri- 
cans by placing in ttie top 25 
finistiers. Graduate student 
Helen Gilbey placed eigti- 
teentti and freshman Wee- 
zie Benzoni placed twenty- 
third to achieve his honor. 



"I really enjoyed the sea- 
son," said Benzoni. "It was a 
good experience for me 
and going to Nationals was 
fun!" 

Considering the 1984 sea- 
son, Coach Fry summed it all 
up in one sentence, that any 
coach with a team as suc- 
cessful as his would agree 
with, "I was proud of the 
whole team", said Fry. 



187 



/ 








-A 



1. Waiting for the game to begin, 
thie volleyball sits alone, 2. Senior 
Donna Miklausic shows concentra- 
tion 3. The volleyball team talks 
over their play 



V 







WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL 



When you play good vol- 
leyball, you're supposed to 
set ttie ball "up" and ttien 
spike it "down", but ttiat 
wasn't wtiat Lynn Silk, cap- 
tain ot ttie women's volley- 
ball team, meant wtien shie 
said, "This has been on up 



and down year for us," 
Silk was referring to her 
team's lack of consistent 
playing which resulted in a 
deceiving season record of 
13-19 

"We played extremely 
well at times, and at other 



times we didn't play up to 
our potential at all". Silk 
commented, 

"When you're winning but 
then you lose games that 
you know you shouldn't lose, 
it really hurts the morale of 
the team and affects the 



188 



i^ 




^f ^.9. 





*t 16 4 




way you play the next 
time," explained Coach 
Nancy Barthelemy. "Our re- 
cord really doesn't indicate 
how we played. Our biggest 
problem was that we lacked 
consistency." 

Barthelemy related the in- 
consistency to the youthful- 
ness of the team. 

"Of our 18 players, there 
were just three seniors and 



one junior," Barthelemy said 
"All the rest were freshmen 
and sophomores." 

However, if it was the 
youth and inexperience of 
the team that were respon- 
sible for mistakes like touch- 
ing the net or hitting the ball 
out-of-bounds, it was the 
maturity and leadership of 
the seniors that added the 
balance and stability of the 



team. Senior team members 
included Diane Holler, Donna 
Miklausic and Silk, 

"We're really going to miss 
the seniors," said Barthe- 
lemy "Diane Is 6-feet-tall, 
and she could really bring 
that ball to the floor in a 
spike, and Lynn really did a 
nice job as captain. But we 
do have six sophomores that 
will move up to be juniors 



4. Margaret Evangeiisri wotcfies the 
action 5. Tea~ ~e-r5" :-3'e 
.hands with ther ;cc :-e'"; 6. Hie 
1984 women's volleyball team: 
?CA * _ncc "'CiS'i Z'or<e "caie'', 
Lynn Silk, Zcr-c '.'ikousc. Laurie 
Beiriger, Lor, ?rsrr,igvienr\. Row 2: 
','icneJe Ferns. Sandra Look. Penny 
Starr. Suscn Dutcher, Tracy Puzo, 
Margaret Evongeiisti, Row 3 Coocfi 
Nancy Barthelemy. Amy Hughes, 
Student Coach Shawn Chsweil. 
Christine Scnade. Sje Crowley. 
Kathy Shearef. Lisa Golosso. Karen 
Delfine. Graduate Assistant Kim 
Johnson and Assistant Coach Nan- 
cy Stefoneill 



next year, arxj I tfiink wef be 
able to do a lot better." 

Silk also said she thriks ttie 
team she left behind looks 
promising. 

"A lot of progress has 
been made over the .ea- 
and a lot of experience has 
been gained." Silk ex- 
plained. "The future stxxild 
be strong for women's vol- 
leyball at mP." 



189 



1. Coach Tom Beck intently watch- 
es ttie oction on the court 2. The 
1984-85 men's basketball team: 
Dave Knaub, Dave Beck, Jerry 
Shonahan, Brad Fink. Les Logsdon, 
Mike Bertness, Jay Invin, Ellison Hug- 
gins, Bob luzzolino, Freddie Sandifer, 
Bradley Finchbock, Kevin Bouknight 
and Tim Sampson. 3. Fighting for 
two points, Dave Beck makes a 
shot. 






ititimin! 





MfA/'S BASKETBALL 



For the men's basketball 
team it was a season of 
playing Division I teams, a 1 7- 
10 overall record, a nine 
game winning streak and an 
upsetting loss in the PSAC 
playoffs. 

"I think it was a good year 
for us," said head coach 



Tom Beck. "When you play 
five Division I schools, you ex- 
pect some losses." 

lUP played West Virginia 
University, Duquesne, Pitt, 
Robert Morris and Penn 
State, all Division I schools. 
Five of the 10 lUP basketball 
losses were to these teams. 



Beck was especially pleased 
with his team's game 
against Penn State saying, 
"we lead most of the way." 
Perhaps the most exciting 
gome of the year for lUP bas- 
ketball was the first-round 
PSAC playoff contest 
against California State Uni- 



190 




4. Dave Knaub tries for a basket 5. 
Freddie Sanditer adds to the lUP 
score. 6. Coach Tom Beck discusses 
lUP's play with Kevin Bouknight 



versify. lUP lead the game 
;with only two exceptions) 
jntll the final three seconds 
A'hen California's Mike Wil- 
ion dunked the basket 
vhich left lUP behind 67-65, 
3nd eliminated them from 
urther play. 

The Tribe ended the sea- 
on in second place in the 
'SAC Western Division. Both 
)ave Knaub and Les Logs- 
Ion were named Eastern 



Collegiate /\thletic Confer- 
ence Player of the Week 
during the season. 

Commenting on the year. 
Beck noted, '-Qf course 
you're never satisfied. We 
felt we could have won 
against California in the 
playoffs." 

Beck said next season lUP 
will continue to ploy Division I 
schools, as well as their con- 
ference games, tournament 



gomes, etc. 

"We are playing five Divi- 
sion I schools again next 
year, which will help us — it's 
excellent competition." 



191 




WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 



Their record may only 
have been 13-12 but the 
worr.en's basketball team 
pk3yed some "heart stop- 
ping" baskettx3ll. 

The fact is seven of their 
twelve losses came with only 
minutes to go on ttie dock; 
indudhg a loss to UPJ in the 



lasT 40 seconas of The game. 
"The season v*/as not what 
we expected coming off a 
19-8 season (1983-84) with 
the same personnel," com- 
mented Coach Carolyn 
Thompson "We failed to un- 
derstand that we couldn't 
be the same as last year but 



we haa to ce ce"e' . Our 
cccc^ents improved im- 



~- z~ z !cn's team was 
ranKeo as nigh as number 
ten in the NCAA Division II Re- 
gion II standings during the 
season. They were number 
three in the PSAC Western 



192 



4. Senior Cindy Davies goes up for 
"two." 5. Sue Brecko looks for a 
teammate to pass to, 6. Team 
members discuss play during a time- 
out. 




Division. 

The Lady Braves faced 
their "traditional rival". Slip- 
pery Rock, in the PSAC play- 
offs, where lUP lost at the foul 
line by two points after rally- 
ing back from a 17 point 
deficit, 

"We were very pleased 
with the quality of our ploy. 
We never got blown away in 
any game; We were in ev- 
ery game," said Thompson. 



"We just didn't seem to 
have the punch at the end 
of the game. It was disap- 
pointing but the season 
wasn't a loss or a negative." 
A "positive" of the season 
was "senior" Cindy Davies 
record breaking game 
against Clarion. Davies 
scored 38 points in the Lady 
Braves' 81-67 victory, to 
break lUP's single game scor- 
ing record in a women's bas- 



ketball game. The record 
was formerly held by Terri 
Piatak, who scored 33 points 
in a double overtime game 
against University of Charles- 
ton in 1979. 

Davies was named Most 
Valuable Player of the PSAC 
Western Division and was se- 
lected as one of the top five 
All American candidates in 
Pennsylvania, Delaware, 
New York and New Jersey. 



Looking back on the sea- 
son, Davies said, "I really 
think the team had a lot of 
talent, but we didn't go as 
far as we had hoped. There 
were a lot of expectations 
for us: we had a few bad 
breaks. The team is still very 
young and there are plenty 
of people to step in next 
year." 




1. The 1984-85 wrestling team; i7cvv 

1 Bill Blacksmith Jr , Greg Zhor- 
ancky. Kevin Little. Jaron Talotta, 
Ken Harold; Row 2: Coach Bill Blacks- 
mith Sr.. Lenny Davis, Rich Bonac- 
cofsi, Carl Muzi, Roger Wigman, As- 
sistant Coach Rick DeLong 2. 134 
pounder Greg Zhorancky controls 
his opponent 3. Wrestling team 
captain Rich Bonaccorsi gets 
psyched-up for his match. 



WRESTLING 



Injuries plagued the 1984- 
85 lUP Vi/restling season, 
which ended with an overall 
team record of 2-10. 

"Injuries hurt us overall," 
said Coach Bill Blacksmith. 
"There were injuries in five 
weight classes during the 



season, they hit us hard this 
year " 

Team captain. Rich Bon- 
accorsi commented, "Al- 
though the team went 
through some hard times, 
the dedication and loyalty 
of certain individuals made 



the overall experience a 
positive one." 

A positive note of the sea- 
son was two lUP wrestlers 
earning second place hon- 
ors in the NCAA Division II Re- 
gional Championships. Kevin 
Little and Bonaccorsi placed 



194 




4. Lemy Davis figlhts his way out of a 
diA^tine. 5. Coach Bi BkKlcsmith 
gives Joron Tototta some odvice on 
his rrKjfch 




second in the 142 pound 
and 177 pound weight 
classes, respectively. 

Looking into the future, 
the 1985-86 season will be a 
chance for innprovement as 
every wrestler will be return- 
ing. 

There will be a new head 
coach because Blacksmith 
has resigned his position and 
a replacement has not yet 



been named. 

Assistant coach Rick De- 
Long has been doing some 
recruiting for next year's 
team 

DeLong said, "Most of our 
top recruits will be coming 
from the light and middle 
weights (126-158). We're 
getting a lot of good kkjs 
coming in." 







1. The lUP freestyle relay gets ready 
to race, 2. Junior Troy Wlirielm holds 
the "set" position. 3. All American 
Scott Nagel catches his breath 
after his event. 




MEN'S SWIMMING 



Highlighting the 1984-85 
men's swimming season was 
a trip to Puerto Rico, a re- 
cord breaking medley relay 
team, an All American honor 
and "team spirit." 

According to head swim- 
ming coach Dave Watkins 
"team spirit" was at its peak 



during their meet against 
Fairmont. In the 67-46 victory 
five swimmers — Scott Na- 
gel, Matt Hrdlicka, Chris 
Lang, Kevin Clougherty and 
Matt Macek — qualified for 
Nationals. 

"Everyone wanted every- 
one else to do well during 



the Fairmont meet," said 
Watkins. 

Over Christmas Break both 
the men's and women's 
swimming teams traveled to 
Puerto Rico for an invita- 
tional meet at Ponce. The 
lUP teams then combined 
their scores and captured 



196 





4. 1984-85 men's swimming team: 

Row 1: Doug Macel<, Matt Macek. 
Ron Feigles, Matt Hrdlicka, Scott Na- 
gel, Thad Meckley, Row 2: Chris 
Lang, Kevin Louis, Doug Olson, Greg 
Reiser, Mike Donahue, Steve Kraus, 
Assistant Coach Bill Cook, Assistant 
Coach Brian Bishop: Row 3 Kevin 
Clougherty, John Wingfield, Ed 
Lovi/e, Mike Puz, Steve Simon, Brian 
Young and Assistant Coach Chuck 
LaCroix. 5. Coach Dave Watklns 
cheers for his svi^immers, 6. Freestyler 
Matt Macek prepares for his race. 



first place in the invitationai, 
topping such schools as Divi- 
sion I Boston College. 

The season ended up at 4- 
4. The team placed fourth in 
the PSAC Championships, 
where Nagel became lUP's 
first conference champion 
since the late 1970's by win- 
ning the 200 bacl<strol<e in 
1:58.86. 

"I feel proud of the efforts 
of the team as a whole. I'm 



proud of the accomplish- 
ments of everyone as indi- 
viduals too: everyone hod a 
personal best this season," 
said Watklns. 

Maybe the most recog- 
nized "personal best" of the 
seaon was the performance 
of the 400 medley relay 
team of Lang, Hrdlicka, Ma- 
cek and Nagel at Nationals 
in Orlando, Florida. These 
four swimmers broke the lUP 



school record by two sec- 
onds with a time of 2:34.50. 
Each swimmer clocked per- 
sonal best split times in the 
race. 

Also at Nationals, Nagel 
captured eleventh place in 
the 200 backstroke with per- 
sonal best of 157.34. This 
eleventh place gave Nagel 
the honor of being an All 
American because the top 
sixteen finishers were named 



All Americans. 

Last season's team cap- 
tain, diver John Wingfield 
said, "I feel that we devel- 
oped the basis for a poten- 
tial powerhouse in the fu- 
ture. The team left the sea- 
son with a caring attitude 
that went beyond the swim- 
ming pool — B.O.H.A.!" 



197 




1. Members of the 400 freestyle re- 
lay warm-up, 2. Jennifer Helneman 
keeps count of the lops 3. The 
1984-85 women's swimming team: 

Row 1: Diane Meyers, Brenda Fire- 
stone, Kris Hotchkiss, Leigh Lincoln, 
Patty Hay, Elaine Tihansky, Donna 
Visnofsky, Pom Jackson. Amy Lin- 
coln, BethAnn Boyer. Kelly Freidenb- 
loom. Row 2 Diane Cohill, Gwen 
Thompson, Chris Formoso. Sue Mar- 
burger, Jackie Pollick, Sherry Miller, 
Dee Hixson, Monica Maier, Kristen 
Shearer, Caren Lezanic, Kim Stano- 
vich. Row 2 Head Coach Kofie 
Montgomery, Assistant Coach Lois 
Clark, and Graduate Assistant Ivan 
Romaguero. 




yNOhAEH'S SWIMMING 



The lUP women swimmers 
filled the year or should it be 
"pool" with personal bests," 
tallying an overall record of 
7-5. 

"I think it was a very good 
season, a productive sea- 
son," said head swimming 
coach Kofie Montgomery. 



"We hit a number of person- 
al bests; whether it was a 
top swimmer or a third or 
fourth swimmer. The some 
was true with the divers who 
learned new dives," 

The season's most exciting 
meet, according to Mont- 
gomery, was against Slip- 



pery Rock. lUP "shocked" 
the Rock. "We swam and 
dove extremely well and it 
(the meet) was decided in 
the final replay. It was an 
outstanding meet," con- 
cluded Montgomery. The 
Lady Braves lost the meet 73 
to 67. 



198 



4. Leigh Lincoln gets ready for take- 
off. 5. Jennifer Heineman and Diane 
Cohill start ttie backstroke event in 
ones 3 and 5 respectively, 6. Bren- 
da Firestone springs lorward 7. Tim- 
ers Molly Burke and Patty Lavan get 
Chris Formoso's time. 8. Graduate 
Assistant Ivan Romaguera gives 
Monica Maier a quick massage 




At the PSAC meet held at 

lUP, the women swimmers 
placed fourth. Senior Leigh 
Lincoln lead the scoring with 
26.5 points in six events. Chris 
Formoso was close behind 
with 26 points in six events. 
Monica Maier captured 18 
points in three events, and 
both Amy Lincoln (four 
events) and Kris Hotchkiss 
(two events) scored 17 
points each. 



Next season the team will 
be losing seven swimmers to 
graduation. They are Diane 
Cohill, Patty Hoy, Dee Hixson, 
Leigh Lincoln, Sue Mar- 
burger, Jackie Pollick and 
Gwen Thompson. 

Assistant swimming coach 
Lois Clark commented on 
the 84-85 season. "Time- 
wise we broke a number of 
team records. Some injuries 
hurt a number of key peo- 



ple. On the whole, the team 
did a lot better ... we made 
progress." 



199 



1. Holding form on the bar is Robin 
Miller 2. Dan Kendig coaches his 
gymnasts. 




GYMNASTICS 



The lUP lady gymnasts 
may have had a slow start in 
the 1984-85 season but the 
extra energy they showed 
at the end of the year was 
sensational. 

Their regular season was a 
bit sluggish, compounded by 
the loss of Ail-American Chris 



Beck to medical problems. 
However, when the PSAC 
gymnastics championships 
rolled around in March, the 
team picked up. The lUP 
"gymers" went into this 
championship meet ranked 
fourth. They left the meet 
with the title under their belts 



(or leotards), successfully 
defending their 1984 title. 
They beat second place 
West Chester by only .85 of 
a point — 168.65 to 167.80. 
Two weeks later the gym- 
nasts entered the NCAA Di- 
vision II Southeast Regionals 
Championship Meet. They 



200 




3. - -ny SJnnms Shows great cofTcen- 
-z-zn 4. ®rc 3:.=" -eec: -~ 
: : :-ce 5. The 1984-85 gYmnas- 

tics team '-:,: ' ',':- :; ^'c-e 

-~ , iir-ms. Tonya KustobOfder. as- 
; rc-iT-student coach Darlene 
- . 5- /?ow 2: Coach Don KencSg. 
. ;; .'.egener. Bfenda Petennan, 
'= - z ^rvef. Lisa Engl. Gerry 
e - ;;■ : _e '. :}hl. Laira Kraft. asss- 
■; ■ -_:^ - ::achKelyEschboch 
;- : :;;;■;-■ :oach Karen Pok*. 




f 







were ranked fourth again, 
and like the PSAC meet re- 
sults, they walked away with 
the title. The lUP team 
scored 174.55 points to de- 
feat Towson (170.05), Wil- 
liam and Mary (168.20), Slip- 
pery Rock (166.10), Long- 
wood (166.10) and West 
Chester (161.25). 

The Lady Braves then trav- 
eled to Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts for the NCAA Divi- 



sion II National Champion- 
ships. They placed eighth in 
the competition scoring 
167,35 points; the winners — 
Jacksonville State of Ala- 
bama, scored 176.85 

The hopes of the team 
seem to be focused on the 
1985-86 season The gym- 
nasts want to improve using 
the experiences of the 1984- 
85 season 



201 



1. Rifle Coach Tom Campisano gets 
everything together for the match 

2. Steve Hornick takes careful aim 
at his target 




RIFLE 



The rifle team exper- 
ienced a disappointing sea- 
son ttiis year. With four wins 
and six losses, one team 
member joked, "at least the 
donuts (which the team had 
to eat) were consistent." 

Rifle Coach Tom Campi- 
sano said, "This was a build- 



ing year. It was a season in 
which we lost five people in 
the middle of the season, 
and it was a bad year." 

The rifle team gathered 
their four victories by de- 
feating Washington and Jef- 
ferson University, Clarion 
State University and Saint 



Francis College, who they 
beat twice. Captain for the 
rifle team was Brett Brum- 
baugh. 

Following this down sea- 
son, Campisano can look to- 
ward the 1985-86 season 
with positive expectations. 

"We've got eight or nine 



202 




IHEARING PROTECTION 
RECOMMENDED J 



good new prospects," com- 
mented Campisano. 



3. The 1984-85 rifle team: Coach 
Tom Campisano, Steve Homick. 
Dave Hozlock, Sue Steele, Matt Sa- 
lerno and Fred Hohman, 4. A cou- 
tion given to all people v/ho enter 
the rifle range 5. Dave Hozlock pre- 
pares to shoot. 



203 




1. Lisa Philipkosky faces off against 
her opponent 2. Fencing Captain 
Mary Williams controls the scoring 
equipment as Kothy Fuge looks on 
3. The 1984-85 mens and women's 
fencing team: Row 1: Jeff Baird, 
Dwayne Allison, Kathy Fuge, Mary 
Wililanns. Tim Powala, Brett Schoen- 
ecker. Brendon Stokes: Row 2 Jeff 
Sullivan, Larry Howard, Rick Heiges, 
Mike Dibert, Anthony Fennell, Bob 
Lepley, Brad Garrett, Row 3: Coach 
Nancy Barthelemy, Grace Merry- 
man, Lisa Philipkosky. JoAnn Cay- 
ton. Betsy Peelor arKi Donna Miklau- 
sic. 



§ (f^ © ^ ^ 




♦ ® '^ 





t,.t' e 



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ZN^ 




FENCING 



A person who is not famil- 
iar v\/ith the lUP fencing team, 
may picture them as a small 
group who go about wear- 
ing white suits, poking peo- 
ple with long pointed things; 
but this person is under a 
false impression. 

The lUP fencers actually 



moke up four teams — a 
men's varsity, a women's 
varsity, a men's JV and a 
women's JV. They do wear 
white suits which hove a 
mesh lining covering the 
fencer's torso. The "long 
pointed things" are called 
foils. One other interesting 



fact about the lUP fencers is 
they ore all coached by one 
person, Nancy Barthelemy. 
This season three of the 
fencing teams finished their 
1984-85 season with more 
wins than losses. Leading the 
teams were the JV men, 
who were undefeated with 



204 




4. Brett Schoenecker, Captain Tim 
Powalc, Dwayne Allison, Bob Lepley 
and Jeff Sullivan watch their team- 
mates fence. 5. Brendon Stokes 
stands ready 6. Brad Garrett lunges 
at his opponent 7. JoAnn Cayton 
holds her ground. 





a 6-0 record. The men's var- 
sity were 4-2, The women's 
varsity were 3-3 and the 
women's JV were 3-2. 

"I think the whole team 
was stronger than it has 
been in the past. This season 
was the fastest I've been 
able to go with any group," 
said Berthelemy, adding that 
this team was one of the 
"most talented" she had 
ever worked with. 



The highlight match of the 
season was a four way vic- 
tory over rival Carnegie- 
Mellon University at the end 
of the season. Barthelemy 
cited this victory as a sign of 
"improvement from the be- 
ginning of the season to the 
end of the season." 

There were outstanding 
individual performances dur- 
ing the season as well. Senior 
Brett Schoenecker won first 



place honors at the USFA 
meet and a second place at 
the CMU Intercollegiates. 
Senior Mary Williams cap- 
tured second place at the 
CMU Intercollegiates and a 
third at the USFA meet. JV 
fencers Anthony Fennell and 
Jeff Sullivan placed second 
and third respectively in the 
novice division at the CMU 
Intercollegiates. Women's 
JV fencer Betsy Peelor 



placed fourth in the wom- 
en's novice division at the 
CMU Intercollegiates. 

The team will be losing 
Schoenecker, Williams, 
Kathy Fuge, Tom Powala 
and Dwayne Allison to 
graduation; however, with 
the strong JV teams, next 
year looks as if it will be suc- 
cessful for the fencers. 



205 




1. standing ready Keath Conti waits 
for the pitch, 2. Tri-Captain Bill 
Thompson and assistant coach 
Kennedy watch the baseball game. 
3.The 1985 baseball team: Row 1: 
Coach John Johnston, Mark Lehew, 
Bill Thompson, Jay Ciamacco, Jim 
Lamey (the three tri captains), Joe 
Caldone; Row 2 Garry Wurm, Dave 
Wille, Rob Bedillion, Mike Meyer, Joe 
Carpenter, Rob Wilshire; Row 3: 
Gary Morken, Greg Ribar, Bill Roush, 
Dave Fazzini, Joe Caricoto, Jeff Bul- 
vin. Row 4: Greg Greczek, Gene 
Startari, Mike Sabota, Wayne Van 
Newkirk, Eddie Hartman, Keith 
Conti; Row 5. Joe Flickinger, Scott 
Miller, Chuck Rouda and Greg Cele- 
donia. 








',«♦'?■■ (!f% 



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BASEBALL 



The highlight of the 1985 
baseball season was a dou- 
ble header W\n over Division I 
Penn State, Senior Bill 
Thompson pitched the first 
game which lUP won 8-0, 
Jeff Lloyd was on the mound 
for game two, a 3-1 victory 
for lUP. Senior Jim Lamey had 



five RBIs for the day. 

The team's overall season 
record as 14-22, and they 
will be losing seven seniors to 
graduation including tri- 
captains Jay Ciamacco, 
Thompson and Lamey. 
Thompson was named the 
team's MVP of the 1985 sea- 



son, 

"The season was very frus- 
trating," said coach John 
Johnston, "We played so 
well against Penn State and 
Slippery Rock, and then we 
did so poorly in other games. 
The Penn State games are 
how we could have played 



206 




4. "Here it comesi" 5. Scott Lamey 
winds up for the pitch, 6. Scott Miller 
catches the action from the du- 
gout 7. Gory Markin grabs the 
base. 8. Giving the signal tor the 
"bunt defense" is Gary Wurm. 



all season." 

lUP had a chance at the 
PSAC playoffs if they could 
have knocked off California 
State in the last double 
header of their season, 
downing the Indians 2-0 and 
3-2. 

"It was one of the great- 
est games I've ever been in- 
volved in as a coach," said 
Johnston. "California hod all 
the important plays when 



they had to." 

According to Johnston 
next season will be a time to 
"rebuild." 

"We need to rebuild our 
pitching and catching staff. 
We will continue to be a 
force in the conference," 
concluded Johnston. 



207 




-T^» ^: 





V 



1. Debbie BIckley concentrates on 
her next bat 2. Betti Bloisdel mokes 
the wind up, while Irish Wood 
stands reody 3. The softbci team 
has pre-gome pep tak. 4. Car- 
meto Ronco nx*es a fine catch 





SOFTBALL 



A mid-season double 
heoder victory over Clarion 
was the bright spot of the 
year for the lUP softball 
team. 

The Lady Braves started 
the season with an eight 
game losing streak, scoring 
their first of four notches in 



the win column against Clar- 
ion. 

"We went out bound and 
determined to win it (the 
double header against Clar- 
ion)," said coach Cathy Sui- 
linger 

According to Sullinger, the 
outstanding player against 



Clarion was pitcher Beth 
Bloisdell. In the first gome she 
lead the lUP team to a 10-2 
win, contributing seven stri- 
keouts. Karen Palisin pitched 
in the second game, a 5-4 
victory for lUP. 

"I think we gained a lot this 
season," commented Sul- 



208 




5. The 1985 soffball team: Row 1: 

Deb Blakley. Sharon Wiegand, Kim 
Boyer, Lori Stormberg. Karen Del- 
fine, Linda Ireland, Becky Koboy, 
Daria McKnigInt, Row 2: Coach 
Cattiy Sullinger. Colleen Hurd, Lenny 
Meketa. Beth Blaisdell, Sue Burig, 
Jennifer Lee, Mary Kline, Karen Pali- 
sin, Irish Wood, Carmela Franco, 
'?obin Crawford and assistant 
coach Cindy Haigh, 6. Sharon Wei- 
gand heads for first base. 7. Irish 
Wood just can not wait to make an 
important play. 



L. 



linger. "We got better as the 
season went on. With such a 
young team there's all kinds 
of possibilities for next year, 
everything looks positive." 

The team is indeed 
"young", they will be losing 
only one senior and there will 
be new players coming in for 
the 1986 season, according 
to Sullinger. 

Softball player Carmella 
Franco said,' "We had a 



young team, I think we'll 
have a really good team 
next year." 



209 




1. The 1985 men's track and field 
team: .7oiv ' Matt Seigford, Tom 
Doran. Ralph Bortsour, Craig Garver, 
Rich Dickman, Dave Moudie. Row 2 
PoU KSne, Dove Brightwell, Mike Pat- 
ton, Jim Suffivan. Paul Prox. Tim Foot, 
Fran Brancato, Row 3: Brian 
McPeake. Rich Rouse, Jeff Uhrig, 
Grant McDonald, Matt Keisling, 
John Mejasic, Rob Houk, Dave Med- 
vetz. Row 4 Paul Rodgers, Scott 
Madill, Larry McDonough, Chris 
Flynn, Marty Fees, Robert O'Neil, 
Jerry Evans, Row 5 Field event 
coach Jim Wooding, assistant 
coach Ed Fry, Greg Coprara, Rich 
Salvadore, Robert Allen and Head 
cooch Robert RoerrvDre 2. Ttie lUP 
rurviers head for the line. 



Lf*e 



-1 



0^mi 




MEN'S TRACK AND FIELD 



"Towson," was coach 
Robert Raemore's immedi- 
ate response when he was 
asked to name the meet 
which was the most out- 
standing this season for the 
men's track and field team. 

The Towson Invitational 
was the only team scored 



meet of the regular season 
and this year, lUP won it. 

"This is the first time ever, 
ever, ever, we've won in all 
the years we've gone to 
Towson. We've been sec- 
ond every other time," said 
Raemore. 

Everyone on the team 



performed well according 
to Raemore, "we had ev- 
erything hit on the right 
day." lUP beat over twenty 
teams to win the invitational. 
In the PSAC conference 
championship, the team 
placed fifth. Dave Maudie 
turned in a record breaking 



210 




3. Roger Sloan flies over the hurdle. 

4. "What a race!" 5. John Mejasic 
takes a deep breath 6. Making 
their way to the front of the pack 
are the lUP tracksters 



throw in the javelin, throwing 
a 228-3 eliminating the old 
stadium record of 221-6; 
teammate Rob Allen placed 
fourth in the event. Decath- 
lete Dave Medvetz placed 
first in his event, while Roger 
Sloan took second place in 
the 110 meter high hurdles 
(15.17.3). Other lUP place 
winners at the PSACs includ- 
ed: Richard Rouse — third, 
800 meter run; Robert O'Neil 



— fifth, 800 meter run; Mile 
relay — Robert Houk, O'Neil, 
John Mejasic and Fran Bran- 
cato, third; 400 relay — 
Houk, Sloan, Broncato and 
Matt Keisling, fifth; and Craig 
Garver — fifth, 3,000 meter 
steeple chase. 

At the NCAA Division II 
Championships, senior Rob 
Allen became on All-Ameri- 
con by placing fifth in the 
javelin with 226 feet; Moudie 



placed eighth with 221 feet. 
Cross Country All-Americon 
Tom Doron placed tenth in 
the 5,000 meter; and Med- 
vetz took eleventh place in 
the decathlon, with "pr's" in 
both javelin and the 400 me- 
ter events. 

Commenting on the entire 
season, Roemore said, "I 
think we did reasonably well. 
We need help in some 
places but I think we'll get it 



next season." 



211 




1. KathI Ewing and her teammate 
walk across the field, 2. Helen Gil- 
bey, Jan Loffert and Mary Alico 
keep a tight pack 3. The 1985 
women's track and field team: 
Row 1. Mary Alico, Julie Cancillo, 
Judy Hrehocik, Patty Brown, Tammy 
Donnelly. Row 2 Aimee Gorda, Cin- 
dy Steiner, Jan Loffert, Helen Gilbey, 
Weezie Benzoni, Colleen Zubey, 
Chris Skarvelis, Lisa Bonaccorsi, Row 
3. Coach Ed Fry, Lynn Robbins. Beth 
Walton, Michelle Brown. Kathi 
Goode, Kathy Ewing, Barb Walsh. 
Cindy Rectenwald. Natalie Musci. 
Row 4; Field Coach John Wooding, 
Betsy Bianco, Jill Sherrod, Jill Swave- 
ly, Tricia Goldcamp, Phyllis Botson, 
Kim Weber and assistant coach 
Robert Roemore 




WOMEN'S TRACK AND FIELD 



If women's track and field 
coach Ed Fry could have 
had one thing this season, he 
would have asked for "bal- 
ance." 

"The season was domi- 
nated by the middle and 
long distance runners," said 
Fry. "Next year I'm hoping 



for more balance through- 
out the events." 

The team finished fourth in 
the PSAC meet at East 
Stroudsburg University. It was 
at this meet that Tammy 
Donnelly ran a 17.01,45 in 
the 5,000 meter race, finish- 
ing first and shattering the 



stadium record of 17.19.90; 
Helen Gilbey and Lisa Bonac- 
corsi placed fourth and sixth 
respectively in this event. In 
the 800 meter run Kathy Ew- 
ing placed third, followed by 
teammates Nanci Line, fifth, 
and Colleen Zubey, sixth. 
Ewing took second place in 



212 




r, 




4. Three of ttie lUP rurmers Ine up fof 
the start 5. Chris Skarveiis re<axes 
□efore her next race 6. 3etn Wal- 
ton makes a fine finisfi. 



the 1500 meter run and Zu- 
bey received fifth. Donnelly 
continued to do well, plac- 
ing second in ttie 3,000 me- 
ter, along witti Gilbey wtio 
took fourth in the event. In 
the 10,000 meter, lUP's Chris 
Skarveiis, Jan Loffert and 
Weezie Benzoni went three, 
four, five to pack in the 
points for lUP. 

Coach Fry proudly noted, 
"We scored more from the 



800 meter on up than any 
other two teams put to- 
gether at the PSAC meet." 

Fry said it was one of the 
closest state meets ever. 
Championship winners. West 
Chester won by only 2 points 
(97) over Slippery Rock who 
scored 95, lUP scored 67 
points. 

The season ended in Los 
Angeles, California at the 
NCAA Division II Nationals. It 



was here that Donnelly 
achieved All-American hon- 
ors by placing fourth in the 
10,000 meter, Gilbey placed 
tenth in this event — both 
runners had "pr's" in the 
race. 



213 




1. Tom Majeski completes his serve. 

2. A vital part of every gome is a 
good racket, 3. The beginning of a 
perfect lUP serve is shovi/n by Dow 
Misenhelter. 



MEN'S TENNIS 



According to coach 
Vince Celtnieks the 1985 
men's tennis team had a 
"good" season but they fell 
short of their potential at the 
end of the year. 

"As I look back, I thought it 
was a good season. We 
didn't play our best near the 



end," said Celtnieks, "With a 
little more effort and con- 
centration, the players 
could have done even bet- 
ter." 

The tennis team ended 
the season with a 10 win — 4 
loss record. They finished 
sixth in their PSAC confer- 



ence. In this competition, 
senior Tom Majeski and 
freshman Brad Hones were 
the second seeded doubles 
team, but they were elimi- 
nated in the PSAC semi-finals 
by Bloomsburg, 

During the season the top 
five players for lUP were Brad 



214 





^'^^^^' ^fc*' y fx 4. Brad Hcnes leave; ^ ::.:: 

^^ y ViJEz trxAe the shot. 5l E:: -;-e; :;- 

f^BB cusses his game wr- ;• ■^-; 6. The 

^jjj^ "^ ^ f^E ^''^ men's tennis leor- ": 

i^^^^ ' - ■ ■ Cooch VnceCetthe'S ^; 

^v v/ v®^ Tom Mcqesic .:~^ 

I ^ ^" fitow 2 Brad HCTies - = 

^.^^^ A HH JoeFadden. 

4l 



Hanes (1), Tom Majeski (2), 
Tony Medvetz (3), Dow Mis- 
enhelter (4) and Tim Nuss (5). 
Majeski and Medvetz are 
the team's "leaving" sen- 
iors. Majeski ends four years 
of collegiate play with a 33- 
11 individual record and a 
33-10 doubles record. Med- 
vetz's three year playing 
span tallied a 20-15 individ- 
ual record and a 24-10 dou- 
bles record. 



FrestifTKin Tmn Nuss com- 
mented on the season, 
"Overall, we had an excel- 
lent season. We had a tough 
schedule but came out 9-2 
for a regular season record, 
losing only to Division I Pitt 
and highly ranked EcSnfcxxo. i 
think we'H hove on excelent 
season next year, and I'm 
looking forward to it very 
much." 



215 




'^ v-^^a*9 



1. The 1985 gotf team. Coach Ed 
Sioniger. Dan Petczorski. Joe Kin- •: 
chock. Ben Witter. Kerth Stouffer 
and Doug Gradwei 2. The gotf txt 
sits waiting on its tee 



^"^^ 


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1 


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J^m^HIKI.HI 



GOAF 



The lUP golf team may 
have been snnoll but they 
were certainly big on win- 
ning, as they consistently 
placed at the top during 
their season. 

The golfers won the lUP In- 
vitational and the Wooster 
Invitational. They placed 



second in the Navy Invita- 
tional, the Slippery Rock Invi- 
tational and the West Liber- 
ty Invitational. Third place 
honors were taken by lUP at 
the Miami Invitational and 
the Penn State Invitational. 
There was also a fourth 
place showing by the lUP 



gc *e'3 at the Camp Le- 
^e^Pie Invitational. 

At the Pennsylvania Con- 
ference Championship 
Meet, lUP captured the run- 
ner-up spot They later trav- 
elled to Sam Houston State 
of Texas for the NCAA Na- 
tional Championship Tourna- 



216 




3. C'^cs ore an essential pert of a 
zz'i-: ^;.c~^-- 4. Ben Witter 
:: 5. ^ob Gerfter con- 
gratulates Wooster's Brendan 
Walsh on winning ttie lUP Invita- 
tional, while lUP's Joe Klinctiock and 
Ben Wrtter look on; lUP won the invi- 
tational. 



ment where the team 
placed eighth. 

Golf coach Ed Sloniger 
thought the year could have 
been a bit better for the 
team but he was not disap- 
pointed with the season's re- 
sults. 

"We had a good year 
We had a veteran team," 
said Sloniger. 

Out of that "veteran 
team" came three 1985 



NCAA Division II All-Ameri- 

cans; Dan Pelczarski, who 
finished twentieth in the 
NCAA Division II Champion- 
ship Tournament; Ben Witter, 
who captured the NCAA Di- 
vision II Long Drive Cham- 
pionship (336 yards), and 
Joe Klinchock. Each of these 
golfers were awarded "hon- 
orable mention," according 
to Sloniger. 



217 





t 



^ 



^^^ 



[1 







Mi 



> 



1. Two lUP Cheerleaders give a 
crveer 2. The cheefleodefs ine up 
dtrtTg a bosketbol time-out 3. The 
ctieerteodefs encourage ttte foot- 
bol fans 




CHEERLEADERS 



They lift, flip, yell, scream, 
cheer, build human towers 
and clap. They do oil of this in 
front of crowds of people, 
while wearing maroon and 
slate-colored uniforms. 

In case you haven't 
guessed, "they" are the lUP 
cheerleaders. They give it 



their all to rally for scnooi spir- 
it during the fall football 
games and winter basket- 
ball gomes. 

lUP has a varsity co-ed 
cheerleading squad that 
cheers at football and bas- 
ketball games. This squad 
leads verbal cheers, as well 



as performing certain lifts 
and human pyramid rou- 
tines. 

There is also a JV female 
cheerleading squad who 
cheer at these events plus 
at other sports activities like 
soccer games and wrestling 
matches 



218 



4. The lUP cheerleaders make their 
outside tower 5. The lUP mascots 
show their talent 6. The JV cheer- 
leaders wait to cheer. 7. The cheer- 
leaders create an indoor pyramid. 




The cheerleaders pro- 
mote a school spirit that lUP 
can be proud of. 



219 



1. Pat Pettina and Sports Informa- 
tion Director Larry Judge ctieck the 
final arrangements for the All- 
American dinner 2. All-Americans 
Helen Gilbey, Sally Johnson, Tammy 
Donnelly and Weezie Benzoni take 
time out for a television camera- 
man. 3. Ail-American Frank Paz is 
shown in action. 4. Ail-American 
Weezie Benzoni completes the lUP 
Cross Country Invitational, 5. Presi- 
dent John Welty and Ruth Podbielski 
pose outside the library with All- 
Americans Weezie Benzoni, Tom 
Doran, Gregg Brenner and Helen 
Gilbey 




ALL-AMERICANS 



220 



On April 30, 1985, lUP hon- 
ored its All-Americans with a 
dinner and awards presen- 
tation. The event, coordi- 
nated by lUP's sports infor- 
mation office, recognized 
thirteen lUP athletes from 
seven different sports. 

The golf team, which was 
unable to attend the dinner 
because of the Pennsylvania 
Conference Championship 
Meet, had the most All- 



Americans honorees. Joe 
Klinchock, Dan Pelczarski 
and Ben Witter each 
achieved this honor lost 
spring. Klinchock placed 
eleventh in the 1984 NCAA 
Division II tournament; while 
Pelczarski and Witter both 
gained honorable mention 
status according to the 
NCAA Division II standards, 

lUP's football, soccer, 
women's cross country and 



women's track and field 
teams each had two All- 
Americans per sport. 

In the spring of 1984, wom- 
en's track and field team 
members Tammy Donnelly 
and Sally Johnson earned 
Ail-American honors at the 
NCAA Division II Champion- 
ship meet in Missouri, Donnel- 
ly finished fourth in the 10,000 
meter and Johnson finished 
fifth in the 1500 meter run. 




The two football Ail- 
Americans were Gregg 
Brenrier and Bill Thompson. 
Brenner was named first 
team wide receiver in the 
Associated Press "small col- 
lege" Ail-American ballot- 
ing. Thompson was named 
third team All-American in 
this same survey, he was also 
nationally ranked in the 
NCAA Division II standings as 
a leading pass receiver. 

lUP soccer players Dave 
Longton and Franl< Paz were 
selected as Ail-Americans 
by the Notional Association 



of Soccer Coaches of Amer- 
ica, following the 1984 soc- 
cer season. Longton has 
been recognized twice be- 
fore but this year was his first 
first-team honor. 

Also in the fall of 1984, two 
women's cross country run- 
ners gained All-American 
Status. Racing in the NCAA 
Division II National Chami- 
ponship at Clinton Mississippi, 
graduate student Helen Gil- 
bey and freshman Elisa 
"Weezie" Benzoni placed 
eighteenth and twenty-third 
respectively. The top twen- 



ty-five runners were named 
All- Americans. 

Sophomore Tom Doran re- 
presented the men's cross 
country at the All-American 
dinner. Doran, also racing in 
the NCAA Division II Notional 
Chomiopnships in Mississippi, 
placed thirteenth to 
achieve his honor. 

The lone winter sport to be 
represented during the 
celebration was men's 
swimming. Freshman Scott 
Nogel swam to on eleventh 
place finish in the 200 back- 
stroke to gain All-American 



honors at the NCAA Division II 
Nationals in Orlando, Florida. 
Each athlete was intro- 
duced by his or her coach 
and presented with on lUP 
medallion. Dr. Gene Lepley 
was the master of ceremo- 
nies, and Dr. John D. Welty, 
Ruth Podbielski and Frank 
Cignetti each mode re- 
marks. 



221 




1. lUP fans begin their "stream" of 
sjppcxt during a tx3skettx3l game 

2. MarV StTotegos gets fans ready 
for the KP Wave 



FANS 



"WAVE! WAVE! WAVE!" 
Chanted the crowds at the 
homecoming football 
game. In a matter of sec- 
onds, one sow Mark Strate- 
gos run to a section in the 



stadium and give them 
quick instructions on how to 
do the "wave." He would 
continue explaining the 
wave from section to sec- 
tion. Then after everyone in 



Miller Stadium within hearing 
range of the instructions 
knew the procedure, one 
section would gradually 
stand up, wave their arms in 
the air and sit down. This 



222 




Cham reacTion way of show- 
ing team spirit was enjoy- 
able and a great sight to 
see One opposing football 
coach was rumored to have 
told his team. "If you don't 
do anything else in the 
game, make sure you see 
lUP's wave, it's great" 

To all the dedicated fans 
of any lUP athletic team, 
your support is always ap- 
preciated, even if the crowd 



isn't large enougn to ao rne 
"wave." 



223 



1. Assistant wrestling coach Rick De- 
Long gives Lenny Davis some words 
of encouragement, 2. Rugby play- 
ers get valuable playing exper- 
ience during an inter-squad scrim- 
mage 




M 




CLUB SPORTS & 
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 



Twenty-one varsity sports 
hove appeared in this year- 
book but they are not the 
only lUP teonns. lUP has nu- 
merous "club sports" such as 
men's rugby, women's 



rugby, women's soccer, 
equestrian, ski, ice hockey, 
water polo and men's vol- 
leyball. 

Durng the 84-85 season, 
various honors were 



achieved by these teams. 
Chuck LaCroix, Mike 
Scherer, Greg Shibley, A! Wil- 
liams and Brian Young were 
named Division II water polo 
Ail-Americans. 



224 









3. Football trainers take care of a 
football player. 4. A field hockey 
player speaks with the trainer be- 
fore the game. 5. Waiting for the 
action to resume, two Apache ice 
hockey players wait patiently. 




The Apache ice hockey 
team placed second in the 
West Penn Ice Hockey Divi- 
sion and their coach Jim 
Hickey was named Coach 
of the Year by the West 
Penn College Hockey Asso- 
ciation. Three of the players, 
Dave Brown. Loran Tyler and 
Lloyd Cravenerwere named 
West Penn All-Stars. 

The men's volleyball team 
placed second in the East Di- 



vision II competition. There 
were also three equestrian 
team members who quali- 
fied for Regional competi- 
tion: they were Dona Gir- 
ouard, Bernie Bishop and 
Dora Edison, These teams, 
though not directly support- 
ed by the university, hove 
brought great credit to lUP. 



/ vjouia like to thank Larry 
Judge and Pat Petfina of SI 
for the team pictures that 
appear in this section I also 
owe A HUGE THANK YOU to 
all the coaches ana players 
who gave their time in inter- 
views and picture identifica- 
tions. This section wouldn't 
have been possible without 
you! 

Sincerely. 
Cindy Carmickle 
Oak sports editor 



225 




226 




•jKtP^gyr* 



227 



Roommates ... I'm convinced that roommates make ttie difference between eight semesters of anguish and the best 
four years of your life. I speak from experience, for I've been cursed with the worst and blessed with the best of them at lUP. 

The problem is that there is no way to tell a good roommate from a bod roommate in the beginning. There are no 
standardized tests to help you select a good roommate, and there are no consistent personality traits to look for. It's good if 
you know the prospective roommate before you move in. It's better if you're not friends; but, even then, there are no 
guarantees. 

It's only after months of living together that you realize whether or not you made the right decision. Looking back at my 
roommate experiences at lUP, I'm proud that I've made some good decisions that I know will produce life-long relationships. 
Others have produced headaches that I'm still trying to get rid of. But all of these experiences have taught me one thing — I 
know now what it means to have a good roommate. 

For example, good roommates know when you have to study for an exam. They have enough sense not to blast the ste- 
reo at dangerous levels, and they'll freely sacrifice watching their favorite television show that week for the sake of your 
grade. 

Good roommates let you experiment in the kitchen and will eat that slightly over cooked chili-asparagus souflette (and 
other accidents) just to make you feel good. 

Good roommates think the Easter eggs colored with magic markers look just as nice as the ones colored with expensive 
dyes 

When "Weird George," the geek from your Intro, to Fortran class, calls to ask if you'd like to program his computer for him 
Friday night, good roommates will tell him you just left for Bulgaria and won't be bock until mid-semester. 

Good roommates don't mind if you're running late and don't hove time to make your bed. Chances are, their beds aren't 
made either. 

Good roommates don't argue about whether to watch "General Hospital" or "Santa Barbara", they just smile and turn 
on "The Flintstones." 

If you're not at home when the landlord comes to inspect your no-pets-allowed apartment, good roommates will hide 
your forbidden kitten for you. 

Good roommates will stay up all night to help you finish your project that's due in the morning even though they know 
you've had the past 10 weeks to complete it. 

Good roommates help you rationalize at least eight reasons why you should blow off your 3:30 to 5:30 biology lab on a Fri- 
day afternoon. 

But most of all, good roommates can make every day a little special. That's what makes good roommates valuable 
investments, and that's why you will never forget them. 

My most-cherished memories come from a small, broken-down apartment on Nixon Avenue and the three roommates I 
shared the best time of my life with. May the rest of the Class of 1985 be fortunate enough to take with you memories as 
golden as mine. 

By Laurie Kozbelt, 
Literary Editor 
1985 Graduate 



'^■*. 





LAURIE ALEXANDER 
Colts Neck 

Journalism 



LISA ALLEN 

Pittsburgh 
Nursing 



C. ALPHONSO 

Harrisburg 
Sponisri 



JOSEPH AMATO 

Douglassville 
MIS 



LARRY AMENT 

LatroDe 
Marketing 



K. AMOROSO 

Corry 
Accounting 





C. ANDERSON 

G'eenscj'g 
Va'/e* ng 



JILL ANDERSON 

BamesDC'c 



PAULA ANDERSON 

5a"iesoc'o 
MIS 



T. ANDERSON 

Journalism 



TERRY ARBLE 

t'aTesfccro 
Business Admin. 



JOSEPH ARMEZZANI 

Pec^vihe 
Accounting 




G. ARMSTRONG 


LELA AUGUSTINE 


R. AUGUSTINE 


LISA AUMILLER 


SUSAN AUSTIN 


CHRISTINE BABIK 


Port MoTiiao 


Saegerrown 


Pniiaoeipnio 


Mitfiinrown 


industry 


jonns7o*n 


Safety Science 


Rehabilitation 


Psychology 


Comouter Science 


Psychology 


Speech. Heoring 



229 



SANDRA BACKES 


S. BADSTIBNER 


GLENN BAFIA 


CHARLES BAHUS 


AMY BAILEY 


KIMBERLY BAILEY 


Glenshaw 


Elizabeth 


Johnstown 


Home 


Waynesboro 


Pittsburgh 


Chemistry 


MIS 


Elementary Ed 


Business 


Hearing 


Human Res Mgt 




BARBARA BAIRD 


SARA BAKER 


Perkosie 


Greensburg 


Marketing 


Marketing 



BETSY BARNICLE DEBORAH BARRY 

Hollidaysburg Lebanon 

MIS Fashion Merch 



MITCHELL BARRY 

McKeesport 
Finance 



DONNA BARTHA 

Indiana 
Safety Science 




J. BARTOLOMUCCI 

Pittsburgh 
Accounting 



C. BASCHMANN 

Elma 
Elementary Ed 



DEBORA BASILE 

Greensburg 
Journalism 



DEBORAH BAUDER 

Bethlehem 
Journalism 



SCOTT BAUM 

Conneaut Lake 
Applied Math 



WENDY BEADLING 

Scottdale 
Music Education 




SUSAN BEAHM 

Beech Creek 
Accounting 



CHERYL BEAM 

Girard 
Nursing 



KENNETH BEAN 

Philipsburg 



DAVID BEATTY 

Punxsutawney 
Accounting 



ELIZABETH BEEGLE 

Schellsburg 
Management 



J. BEEMILLER 

Monroeville 
Art 



230 



DAVID BEGA 



LORI BEGO 

Monaco 
Journalism 



BETH BELCASTRO 

vVosnington 
Fashion Merch 



KIMBERLY BENDER 

Phillipsburg 
Music Education 



MARTA BERGMAN 

Gibsonia 
Nursing 



WILLIAM BERNICKER 

Glodwyne 
Fine Arts 




.LIAM BEUCHAT 


JAMES BIGHAM 


KIMBERLY BIGLER 


BRENDA BILLIG 


CHRISTI BLACK 


RUTH BLACK 


Meadviiie 


Fairfield 


Pittsburgh 


Greensburg 


Pittsburgh 


Marion Center 


Cnmmoiogv 


Management 


Food Service Mgt 


Biology 


Child Development 


Accounting 




LORI BLACKSMITH 

Management 



TAMI BLAHNIK 

Goso^iO 
Music Eojco'ion 



ELEANOR BLAND 

Indiana 
Morketing 



SUSAN BLASS 

Harnsburg 
Child Development 



CAROL BLOOM 

Indiana 
Food Service Mgt 



SHARON BLY 

Server 

Bu3ine5s Mat, 




JANE BOFINGER 



WALTER BOHINSKl 
iVIcKeesporf 
Accounting 



BETH BOLTZ 

Sorver 
Nursing 



J. BONGIANINO 

Biairsville 
MIS 



J. BONIVICH 

Clairton 
Business Education 



L. BONNINGTON 

Orefieid 
Criminology 



S\/e sioM. dl be coiCeiiMjd about cm ^^hm bemuse, lut dM ioDt to 
Spe^d 1^ /lest o|j ou/L toes iReAe. 

Charles F. Kettering 



231 



CYNTHIA BOPP 


KARLA BORDER 


LINDA BORTELL 


CHRISTINE BORTZ 


ROB BOSTON 


LISA BOUGHTER 


Ebensburg 


Hopewell 


Nazareth 


Dubois 


Altoona 


Shermans Dole 


MIS 


Criminology 


Psychology 


Human Res Mgt 


Journalism 


Office Admin. 




C. BOULTON 


CHARLES BOVE 


PATRICIA BOWMAN 


SUSAN BOWMAN 


DANIEL BOYD 


MARY BOYD 


Lancaster 


Morrisville 


Lebanon 


Indiana 


Guys Mills 


Towanda 


Nursing 


Geology 


Journalism 


Geology 


MIS 


Biology 




LYNN BRACKBILL 


MARK BRASHEAR 


SALLY BRESLIN 


JOE BREZICKI 


CATHLEEN BRIGHT 


ANDY BRLETRICK 


Nazareth 


Tarentum 


Glenside 


Greensburg 


Aliquippa 


Barnesboro 


Public Service 


MIS 


Food Service Mgt 


Marketing 


Nursing 


Biology 




D. BROCHETTO 

Kittanning 
Child Development 



RAYMOND BROWN 

Lake City 
Accounting 



TERRY BROWN 

Hollidaysburg 
Office Admin, 



SCOTT BRUNK 

York 
Environ Health 



dies 

KEVIN BRYAN 

Verona 
Accounting 



R. BUCHOVECKY 

Roaring Spring 
Applied Math 



232 



LESLEY BUCKLES 

riTtsourgn 
Criminology 



JONI BUELL 

Corry 
Accounting 



DAVID BUFALINI 

CheswiCk 
Biology Education 



SUSAN BUHLER 

3lairsv;lle 
Accounting 



DONNASUE BURGER 

Sfiiilirigton 
Music Education 



RICHARD BURKE 

Pirrscurgln 
Marketing 




ROBERT BURNS 


LAURA BUTCHKO 


LINDA BYBEL 


SHERRY CABLE 


S. CACCXMO 


RAYMOND CAHIU. 


Lowber 


Irwin 


Connellsviile 


Pottstown 


Lancaster 


SC-rgr 


Criminology 


Office Admin 


Nursing 


Accounting 


Public Service 


Accc^n-rg 




JOSEPH CALDONE 

Communications 



JILL CAMPBELL 

McDcnQiC 
Art 



V 

SESTINA CAMPBELL 

PhiiadelDHia 
Computer Science 



STEPHEN CAMPBELL 

'ndiano 



CHARLES CAPETS 

S'Qte College 
C'minoiogy 



/I- I 

POUY CAPOTS 

5eaver 'alls 




D. CAPUANO D. CARACCIOLO 

GoKmont Foils CreeK 

Management Child Development 



DONNA CARLSON 

Freeporr 
MIS 




233 




MAXINE CARLSON 

Hollidaysburg 
Elementary Ed. 



JILL CARHAHAN S. CARROLL DAWN CARSON DIANE CARTER 

New Alexandria Greensburg Pittsburgh Hollidaysburg 

Phy Ed, and Sport Child Development Finance Elementary Ed. 



NOMETHA CARTER 

Philadelphia 
Satety Science 




KAREN CARUSO 


LISA CASSEL 


JOHN CASSIDY 


GREG CASTELLO 


C. CEPULLIO 


DIANNE CESTELLO 


Ford City 


Mechanicsburg 


Monroeville 


Reading 


Greensburg 


Latrobe 


Finance 


Music Education 


Computer Science 


Geology 


Nursing 


Communications 




INKEN CHAMBERS 


PHILIP CHAPMAN 


LISA CHATTIN 


COLLEEN CHESLER 


PETER CHIAPPA 


BETH CHIEPPOR 


Cos Cob, CT 


West Chester 


Dix Hills 


Verona 


Doylestown 


Philipsburg 


Art Education 


Phy Ed and Sport 


Fashion Merch 


Fashion Merch 


Accounting 


Elementary Ed 




U. CHIGEWE 

Umuahia 
Marketing 




LORI CHOLOVICH 

Bethel Park 
Business Education 



LORI CHUCHKO 

Doylestown 
Marketing 



ELIZABETH CIPOLLINI 

Waterman 
Sociology 



LISA CIRINCIONE 

New Kensington 
Communications 



KAREN CLARKE 

Gibsonia 
Interior Design 



234 



MARK COCCO 
Winckier 

Safety Science 



USA COCCOtJ 
Coroopcis 

Hijmon Pes. Mgt 



MAfilS£ COCO 
JonnsTown 

Sementorv Ed 



BSIAN cowej 
PsvctxDiogv 



DIANE COHIU TAMMY COLEMAN 




K. CONNEUY 
Human Res Mgt 



PAMELA CONNER KAREN COOPER 



NIKKI COOPER JUUA COPPERSMITH 



EDWARD COPUS 




TERESA CORBEtr SANDRA CORNELL MARI JO CORNISH THOMAS CORNUET CAROLYN CORP 



Ciiic ^e.ecc~ent 



Geokjgy 



-c - - c- 



ELAINE COTE 



DtstaMC£, oh5l) ?£uds e^OKt^ei^ Houg^ iRe oc^qk nxires diDick, 
yibseMC£, tviofees iRe ^at Q/iax' jjOiida, Lo^giKg io bt m3x you/i sick 

— Arthur Gillespie 



235 



TRACY COUSINS 


AMY COVALT 


JILL COVEY 


CHRISTOPHER COX 


LINDA COX 


JAMES CRANE 


Woodbine 


Johnstown 


Wescosville 


Pittsburgh 


Coraopolis 


West Wyoming 


Ed. of Ex. Children 


Psychology 


Management 


MIS 


Human Res Mgt 


Marketing 




HELEN CREIGHAN 

Pittsburgh 
Accounting 



DAVID CRITTENDON 

Martinsburg 
Marketing 



MIKE CROCE 

Pittsburgh 
Criminology 



MATTHEW CROSS 

Pittsburgh 
Finance 



SHERRI CULP 

Harrisburg 
Public Service 



KAREN CURNOW 

Blairsvilie 
Biology 






lib JT ^ ^k -Fx Jf^tL 




fP^WM 



CATHERINE CURRY 


KENNETH CURRY 


PATRICK CUSICK 


JULIE CUSPUD 


DAVID CUTRI 


S, CYGNAROWICZ 


Pittsburgh 


Punxsutawney 


Mt. Lebanon 


Philadelphia 


Erie 


Pittsburgh 


Accounting 


Accounting 


Marketing 


Marketing 


Accounting 


Marketing 




RENEE DADOWSKI 


WILLIAM DALE 


JUDITH D'AMICO 


PATRICIA DANIELS 


LISA DASCOMBE 


L. DAUBENSPECK 


Coraopolis 


Altoona 


Pittsburgh 


Gienshaw 


Knox 


Petrolic 


Accounting 


Psychology 


Accounting 


Fashion March. 


Nursing 


Elementary Ed. 



O.-^A 




TROY DAUGHERTY MICHAEL DAVIS TERRI DAVIS 

Music Education Fooa Service Mg' C"e~ ="■. 



SUSAN DAY CRAIG DAYMON JEAN DECKER 

'.':-.-erng -zcsc'/zr- Scc-s" 




MATTHEW DEETER DIANE DEGENKOLB LISA DeHAINAUT SHARON DELEO SUSAN DELGRIPPO ANNE DELUCIA 



denin 
Marketing 






Lock Haven 
J<x»nc*sm 





LAURA DEMYANEK AMY DERR 

East Petersourg Lock Haven 

Marketing E'e~e-'ar, Ea 



; 1 / 

GUY DESMOND AMY DESS 

Washington '■^■■. Zzn 

[>e*e*ics Ee-e----. l 




MARK DEVER 



STEVE DIBERT 
Deny 




MAUREEN DICKENS ANDREA KAY KIETZ LORi DIFATTA J. DOMBROWSKI BARBARA DONDERS R. DOUGHERTY 
Fooa Service Mgt Mar<e'-z Acco\jnTing re~6~"ary ea ^*S C c:?- 



Ht ^Ao tougfe, fasts. 



— Anonymous 



237 



CHRISTI DOWD 

Connersville 
Accounting 



LISA DOYLE 

Cecil 
Hearing Impaired 



M. ORESSMAN 

Pittsburgh 
Phys Ed and Sport 



r<Iv I 
LINDA DREW 

Pittsburgh 
Fashion Merch 



LYNETTE DROAN DIANNA DRONKO 

Hughsville Meadville 

Elementary Ed Accounting 




LISA DUBEL 

Lancaster 
Fashion Merch. 



KEVIN DUDDY 

Allentown 
Human Res Mgt 




DENISE DUNION 

Media 
Fashion Merch 



JEFF EBBITT 

Huntingdon 
Environ Health 



JOSEPH EBBITT 

Huntingdon 
Criminology 



THOMAS EDINGER 

Meadville 
MIS 



238 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Spaniel 




Cindy Roan and Lori 



EICHER 


FILITSA ELEAMOS 


PAUL ELMER 


LINDA EMBER 


- ::^ 


:c-c-32org 


Brookhaven 


York 




5^sness EOuCa'^iCn 


MIS 


Rehabilitation 



scon EMMEL 

Johnstown 
Computer Science 



JANEEN ERB 

Mercer 
Nursing 




DOUGLAS ERICH 
;• '.'3',; 

MIS 



KAY FABINY 
Computer Sc:ence 



MARK FAGAN 
Safety Mgt 



DONA FAILS 

Eiementory Ed 



WENDY FAIRMAN 

\azare-n 
-ea*~ and Phy, Ed. 



CAROLINE FARLING 

3cv.oing-0A^: 
Elementary Ed 




JOHN FEDERINKO 

Indiana 
Industrial Safety 



FAITH FEDORNOCK 
Pittsburgh 



LINDA FEDUIK 

Moscow 

Food and Nutrition 



TIMOTHY FEELEY 

Southampton 
Environ Health 



JANINE FERDINAND 

Trevose 
Nutrition Education 



C. FERGUSON 

LarroDe 
Art 




JOANN FENICCHIA 

Be'.-. c< 
Dietetics 



WILLIAM FERREN 

Ambler 

Economics 



PAT FERRINGER 

Clymer 
Joumalism 



WILLIAM FETCHKO 


DAVID FIELDS 


C. FIORAVANT 


Natrona Heights 


Belle Vernon 


Turtle Creek 


Pre-Dentistry 


MIS 


Rehabilitation 



239 



kNNE FIORILLA 


LARRY FIORITO 


ANITA FISANICH 


ERIC FISCHER 


E. FITZPATRICK 


CATHY FLAHERTY 


Harrisburg 


Allentown 


Indiana 


Punxsutawney 


Ebensburg 


Lemont Furnace 


Journalism 


Marketing 


Business Education 


Satety Science 


Biology 


English 




CATHY FLEIG 


EDWARD FLOHR 


SUSAN FLORI 


AMY LYNN FOGELIN 


RENEE FORNE 


RANDY FOSTER 


Butler 


Pittsburgh 


Windber 


Cnesv/c.' 


Ere 


Brush Valley 


Computer Science 


Accounting 


Accounting 


Management 


MIS 


Political Science 




DIANE FOUST 


VICKI ANN FOX 


C. FRANKS 


RICH FRAZIER 


PETER FREEDMAN 


LAURIE FREIDHOFF 


Lower Burrell 


Towonaa 


Philadelphia 


Sienshaw 


Lancaster 


jonnsTown 


Management 


Dietetics 


Communications 


Criminology 


Fine Arts 


Finance 




HELEN FRENCH 


SCOTT FRYE 


KATHRYN FUGE 


BRIDGET GALVIN 


SUSAN GARDNER 


SUSAN GARREn 


Miltonvale 


Johnstown 


Johnstown 


Aston 


Sewicl<ley 


Mohnton 


Nursing 


Communications 


MIS 


Computer Science 


Political Science 


Applied Moth 



240 



RUTH GATHERS 


JAMIE GAYDOS 


KEVIN GAYDOSH 


SANDY GEARING 


KIMBERLY GEARY 


MIA BETH GEIGER 


Sharon 


Sarver 


Commodore 


Perryopolis 


Latrobe 


Philadelphia 


Food Service Mgt, 


Rehabilitation 


Communications 


Accounting 


Marketing 


Journalism 




ALYSSA GENTILE 

Beaver 
Food Service Mgt. 



MARIA GERARD! 

Gouldsboro 
Communications 



BARRY GETZOW 

Hovertovi'n 
Criminology 



JOE GIACOBELLO 

Eric 
Accounting 



JANICE GIEL 

Pittsburgh 
Journalism 



CARLA GIGLIOTTI 

Verona 
Marketing 




WILLIAM GOERTEL 


J. GOLACINSKI 


RONALD GOLIAS 


AMY GRABOWSKI 


BARBARA GRANT 


MARY GREEN 


Easton 


Pittsburgh 


Bridgeviile 


Manor 


Elkin Park 


Johnstovi/n 


MIS 


Elementary Ed. 


MIS 


l^ehabilitation 


Nursing 


Child Development 




SALLY GRENTZ 


LISA GRESS 


BRENDA GRESSLEY 


JOSEPH GRIECO 


EILEEN GRIFFIN 


SHERRY GRIFFITH 


York 


Stevens 


Spongier 


Pittsburgh 


Pittsburgh 


Exton 


Dietetics 


Elementary Ed. 


Dietetics 


Business 


Marketing 


Ed. of Ex. Children 




241 



RONALD GRIGG 


SUZEHE GRISIN 


LISA GROOME 


LANA GROVE 


P. GUARNESCHELL 


SHERRY GUELLA 


South Fork 


Johnstown 


Monroeville 


Pittsburgh 


Hornsburg 


Monroeville 


Safety Science 


Music Education 


Sociology 


Marketing 


General Business 


Communications 




GRANT GUENZEL 


TRACY HABOUSH 


DEANN HADIX 


M. HAECKLER 


KATHLEEN HAEFNER 


SUSAN HAGER 


Monroeville 


Pittsburgh 


Johnstown 


Warrington 


Mars 


Uniontown 


Accounting 


Marketing 


Communications 


Economics 


Criminology 


Elementary Ed 




GAYLE HAGGERTY 


LORI ANN HAHN 


DAVID HALE 


MICHAEL HALE 


C. HALLOCK 


LORI HAMILTON 


Bethel Park 


Nazareth 


Bethel Park 


Murrysville 


Stroudsburg 


New Kensington 


Marketing 


Psychology 


Human Resource 


Art 


Comm Media 


Nursing 




CATHERINE HANNA 


SANDRA HARDESTY 


LYNN HANRATY 


AUDREY HARKINS 


CHARLES HARKINS 


SUSAN BETH HARR 


Pottsfown 


Beaver 


Pittsburgh 


Mechanicsburg 


North Huntingdon 


Irwin 


Communications 


Marketing 


Management 


Finance 


Spanish 


Interior Design 



242 



JOHN HARRIS 



REBECCA HARRIS 

Annvi.ie 
Diete*cs 



DANNY HARTONO 



CAROL HASKINS 

Spnng Grove 

Dietetics 



BRIAN HAVYER 
Pottstown 
Mdketing 



LYNDA HAWK 



PATRICIA HAY 

West Chester 

Political Science 



KAREN LYNN HAYES 

- son Park 
Finance 




ANNE HECKLER 

Landsaa e 
Dietetics 



SARAH LYNN HESS 

West Chester 

Finance 



BEniNA HEITZ MICHAEL HELMAN 



Dietetics 



Office Admin. 



Phys; 



:2'on 




M . i 

MARY HAYES LORI HEADLEE LINDA HEARY C. HEASLEY 

A s;- =ov ,■.::-;.-_ ;-o =n aoeohia Tionesia 

Accocwrnng home tc Eo- ViS RetKJbilitotion 




CLAUDIA HERBERT 


JOSEPH HESS 


MICHAEL HESS 


-C-;'. ~-^^ 


Cc s'e 


Hugnesv'i.e 


Nursing 


C- — :ogy 


Communications 




DEBBIE HETZ 



BARBARA HEYL 
©ensfxjw 

V!S 



MICHELE LICKEY 

Bedford 
Eiementary Ed 



MEGAN HIGGINS 

Newtown Square 
Nursing 



MARIE HIU 

Penn Run 
Communications 



Ihjit is no su(i ikvq os "best" k Q ujojiki ojj iKclio-tduak. 

— Hugh Prather 



243 



S. HIUfBRAND 


S. HIMMELBURGER 


KIMBERLY MINER 


DEANNA HIXSON 


GARY HOBAR 


LISA HODOVANICH 


St Marys 


Bobesonia 


Do. 3S. e 


Pittsburgh 


Alexandria 


Allquippa 


!>e*e+krs 


_10jrTXjfem 


AcCG„rr.ng 


Meai+h, Phys Ed 


Marketing 


Marketing 




TERRY HOFFER 



ALICE HOGAN 



--~e nc ca 



JEAN HOHENDEL 



Jffice Aomin 



DADID HOLBEN 



JANICE HOLTZ 

^as--gs 
Office Admn 



SUSAN HOMOLA 



Political Science 




SANDRA HOPPERT EDWARD HOUCK 

Exe'z :- : : ence Education 




A. HROMOKO DIANE HUBERT 

Ecesct'c -- aaeonia 

C'.~..r;0.cg> Po..T,ca. Scervce 



JASON HOUSTON 

Pn zzec~ z 

Ma-, e- ' 3 



CHERYL HUGHES 

P^-SD^-g" 
\„.-s.ng 



ROBBIN HOUSTON 



BEATRICE HOWARD 

~~ acec- z 
£z z' E> C" a'en 



LORI HOWARD 

Mr jewett 
Speech. Hearing 





COLLEEN HUGHES 



JENNIFER nUGHES 
Monroe vjle 
Accounting 



KERRY HUGHES 

Erie 
Consumer Affars 



244 



LISA HULSIZER 


PAMELA HUMPHRIES 


BRIDGET IMGRUND 


JEFF IMMEL 


PAULA INDOVINA 


MARCIA INGHRAM 


Stroudsburg 


Pittsburgh 


Johnstown 


Mt, Pleasant 


Hermitage 


Delmont 


Ed, of Ex. Children 




General Business 


Health and Phy. Ed, 


Dietetics 


Accounting 




TONYA IZZARD 

Philadelphia 
English 



E. JACKSON 

Dover 
Nursing 



ELIZABETH JACOBS 

Mechanicsburg 
Phy. Ed. and Sports 



M, JACOVIDESKAISI 



MIKE JAMES 

Pittsburgh 
Criminology 



LAURE JAMIESON 

Uniontown 
Biology 




JACKIE JANOSIK 


JANE JANSON 


ERIK JANSONS 


LILLIAN JENERSON 


BONNY JOHNSON 


JESSE JOHNSON 


Smithfield 


Williamsport 


Malvern 


Philadelphia 


Aliquippa 


Indiana 


Journalism 


Nursing 


Biology 




Criminology 


Finance 




E. JOHNSON 


LORI JOHNSON 


GAIL JOHNSTON 


LISA JOHNSTON 


M. JOHNSTON 


CARL JONES 


Kittanning 


Mechanicsburg 


Fredericktown 


lovjei Burrell 


Pittsburgh 


Greenville 


Biology 


Psychology 


Psychology 


Elementary Ed. 


Child Development 


Biology 



He. idM ojj suoQ^ss is notfcug wioht iRok dokq \Aot you can do iKjdi, 
and doing doM lAoteDex u^o{\ do, iA)rAout a Aovqk ojy jjOie. 

— Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 



245 



CHERYL JONES 


KELLY JONES 


MARY JOSEPH 


RICHARD JOSUN 


LAUREN JOYCE 


CHRYSTAL KAISER 


Brownsville 


Mohoffey 


Conemaugh 


West Springfield 


Medford 


Chambersburg 


Computer Science 


Journalism 


Child Development 


Computer Science 


Human Res Mgt 


Accounting 




MELPO KAISIDES 

Cyprus 

Accounting 



JOHN KAMPSEN 

Bradford Woods 
Marketing 



ALLAN KAPLAN 

McConnellsburg 
MIS 



JOYCE KAPLON 

Kittanning 



K.KARCHER 

PIttsburgti 

Biology 



MARIANNE KARG 

Aveaa 
Marketing 





LINDA KARLIK 

Pittsburgh 
Consumer Services 



LAWRENCE KASTEN 

Pittsburgh 
InternatI Studies 



DONNA KAUFFMAN 

Lower Burrell 
Journalism 



PATRICIA KEIRN 

Clearfield 
Elementary Ed 



KARL KELLER 

Danville 
Computer Science 



RAYANNE KELLER 

Nazaretn 
Elementary Ed. 




246 





COLEEN KELLY 

Gienmore 
Dietetics 



S. KIELAROWSKI 

Pittsburgh 
Marketing 



RAYMOND KILLEN 

Pittsburgh 
Marketing 



TANGY KIMP 

Philadelphia 



DEBORAH KINNEER MICHAEL KIRK 



-cme 
^orriCJ'e' SC'ence 



Monroeville 
Accounting 




KEVIN KIRKPATRICK 


PEGGY KISSLING 


M. A. KITZING 


PAUL KLINE 


S. KLINGENSMITH 


DANIEL KLINGER 


Ephrota 


Wernersville 


Altoono 


New Cumberland 


Apollo 


Camp Hill 


Criminology 


Journalism 


Speech. Hearing 


Finance 


Food and Nutrition 


Journalism 







JAMES KNAPP 


LOIS KOBUS 


TAMMY KOEGLER 


KAREN L. KOLEK 


MARK KONCHAN 


KURT KONDRICH 


Downingtown 


Monroeville 


Sarver 


Bethel Park 


Beaver Falls 


Pittsburgh 


Marketing 


Accounting 


Accounting 


Journalism 


Safety Science 


Criminology 




DANA KONTOR 


JOHN KOPAS 


P. KOWNACKI 


LAURIE KOZBELT 


M.G. KOZIEL 


REGINA KROCHTA 


Export 


Fairchonce 


Boiling Springs 


Youngstown 


Pittsburgh 


Ford City 


Accocnting 


Criminology 


Chemistry 


Journalism 


Journalism 


Office Admin. 



247 



MICHAEL KROLICK 

Curwensville 
Accounting 



PATRICIA KUBA 

New Kensington 
MIS 



NANCY KUBITZ 

Pittsburgh 
Psychology 



NITIN KULKARNI 

Indiana 
Computer Science 



MARY JEAN KUNETZ 

Hershey 
Dietetics 



JEFFREY KUNTZ 

Punxsutawney 
Elementary Ed 




E. KUSUMOWIDAQDO 


MARY KUZIAR 


MARK LANDRY 


DAVID LANGTON 


ANGELA LAROSA 


EDWARD LARSON 


Indiana 


Pittsburgh 


Towonda 


Pittsburgh 


Mill Hall 


Pittsburgh 


MIS 


Computer Science 


Computer Science 


MIS 


Human Res. Mgt. 


Marketing 




CARRIE LASSER 

Blairsville 
Applied Moth 



CRISTEN LAVELLE 

Coraopolis 
Interior Design 



MICHAEL LAVRA 

Pittsburgh 
Criminology 



S. LAWRENCE 

Philadelphia 
Child Development 



B. LEAMER 

Erie 
Interior Design 



SHARON LECRONE 

Altoono 
Consumer Services 



MICHAEL LEFEVER 

Strasburg 
Industrial Mgt. 



MARK LEHEW 

Pittsburgh 
MIS 



DONNA LENG 

Pittsburgh 
Nursing 



SANDRA LENZ 

Pittsburgh 
Nursing 



SUSAN LECKRONE 

York 
Elementary Ed, 




DANIEL LEONARD 

Nanty Glo 
Family Medicine 



Sowetkes I wonden wReJie l'i)t baen, w^o I Qm., do I fji't i^^? T inoy not win, but I can be siiiong — ouc t^ne on i*Uj oim. 

— Fame 



248 



SUSAN L£ONE 

^feC^G^lC3C■-r5 

Cnr-irc'Cg-. 



THEOOOSE L£PICH S. LEVi'ANDOWSKI ICBIY LYNN LEWIS 






SUZAMNE LEWIS 

C'r-irC'CC . 



THOMAS LEWIS 




TTf^ 



LEIGH UNCOLN 

Be~e' -ar< 
Crir-rC'CG .■■ 



MASK UNDeERG JOY LINDERMAN LAURE UPINSKI 



FRANCIS LITTLE DARREN LITZ 




CHERYL LiOYD LOfil LOCKOVICH 

New Kensing^O'" hermitage 



JANICE LOfFERT LEA LOMBAROO 



ANDREA LONG KATHLEEN LONG 

^iz :- :- Tiri(hamock 

'■'Z'-i'ra -'c.fXJfer" 




KiUY LONG 

inalanc 
Fosfiion Merch 



SUSAN LONG TAMARA LONG TRACI LONG GREGORY LONGO TIMOTHY LOVAS 



249 



THERESE LOWERY 



SPRING LOWMAN CYNTHIA LUCAS THOMAS LUDWIG L. LUEBKEMANN 



JUDITH LUNDY 
-cc-z Se'- ce '.'3- 



DAVID MACMAIN 
Crimrotogy 



MELODY LUKER 




KEVIN LYNCH DALE ROBERT LYNN DEBBIE LYONS GREGORY LYONS 



Co—o-'e- Sce-ce 



--e^c 



MANDY LYONS 
'-:— --'•"gclon 

r- 3 Development 





STEVEN MAHR MARGARET MAJOR SUSAN MARBURGER A M. MARISKANISH 

'.' S .;_"2:~ Siememary Ed Comm Services 



R. MARCOTUaiO BEVERLY MARTIN 

Newcastle lez.e- 

'n'e'ior Desigr C" r le. e ;D~^en' 



MARK MARTIN 

Soege-CA' 



KIMBERLY MASSIE 



A. MARKWOOD 

zezfz'z 
Elementary Ed 




RHONDA MATEER 

C. a-c~3 
-s.c-c-gv 



250 



TERRI MATTHIS 

Philadelphia 
Speech Pathology 



SHERYL MAUTINO 

Cheswick 
Elementary Ed. 



LISA MCCALL 

Bethel Pork 
Nursing 



ROBERT MCCARL 

Pitcairn 
Marketing 



D. MCCONNELL 

Butler 
Criminology 



JOHN MCCRAY 

Coatesville 
Criminology 




L. MCDONOUGH 


JENNIFER MCELORY 


P. MCFADDEN 


MARY MCGOWAN 


SCOTT MCGUIGAN 


SUSAN MCILWAIN 


Duncansville 


Pittsburgh 


Media 


Bethel Pork 


Pittsburgh 


Kittanning 


Sociology 


Speech, Hearing 


MIS 


Marketing 


Business Admin. 


Criminology 




NANCY MCINTURF 


T. MCLAUGHLIN 


MARCIA MCNALLY 


C. MCNAMARA 


C. MCNAMARA 


JUDITH MEEHAN 


Greenville 


Kittanning 


Pittsburgh 


Pittsburgh 


Mechanicsburg 


Pittsburgh 


Fashion March. 


Accounting 


Interior Design 


Marketing 


Journalism 


Finance 





£r^ 



DEBORAH MEINTEL 


BETH MELBER 


E. MERCHBAKER 


SUSAN MERRITTS 


KIM MERTZ 


SUSAN MICHAEL 


Hollidaysburg 


Emmaus 


Meadville 


Johnstown 


Kutztown 


Pittsburgh 


Journalism 


Speech, Hearing 


Computer Science 


Consumer Aftairs 


Interior Design 


Accounting 



251 



ROBIN MICHAELS 

Homer City 
Environ Health 



RICHARD MIHOCI 

Conneout Lake 
Applied Math 



GARY MILLER 

New Castle 
Criminology 



JUDITH MILLER 

Allison Park 
Marketing 



KATHLEEN MILLER 

Mechanicsburg 
Public Service 



MICHAEL MILLER 

York 
Phy, Ed. and Sport 




RICHARD MILLER 

Indiana 
Accounting 



JENNIFER MILLS 

Orchard Park 
Accounting 



MARY MILLS 

Huntingdon Valley 
Fashion Merch 



MARC MIMS 

Philiadelphia 
Personnel Mgt 



JOHN MINOR 

Portage 
Communications 



ARNELL MISHLER 

Holsopple 
Public Service 




WALTER MITCHELL 

Mt. Pleasant 
Music Performance 



D. MIZIKAR 

Norvelt 
Industrial Mgt 



COLLEEN MOONEY 

Pittsburgh 
Special Education 



MARY MORAN 

Johnstovi/n 
Family Medicine 



JUNE MORGAN 

Waynesburg 
Consumer Services 



KELLY MORRIS 

North Warren 
Elementary Ed 





4H^K A « JB9H 



LAURIE MOYER 


LAURIE MUELLER 


P. MURDOUGH 


KAREN SUE MURRAY 


BARRETT MYERS 


DAVID NAGLE 


Cochranton 


Monroeville 


Womelsdorf 


Monroeville 


York 


Southampton 


Elementary Ed. 


Accounting 


Food Service Mgt 


Natural Science 


Nursing 


Communications 



252 



LOIS NAGLE 


THOMAS NAGY 


K. NAVECKY 


CHARLIE NEIDRICH 


ANNETTE NERONE 


JANET NETOSKIE 


Temple 


Portage 


Girord 


Miil Hall 


Armagh 


New Kensington 


Music Education 


Music Education 


Food and Nutrition 


MIS 


Eiementory Ed, 


Fashion Merch. 




D. NEWHOUSE 


MARYBETH NOBERS 


JAN NOLL 


SHEILA NORMAN 


MARGARET NORRIS 


TAMMY NULPH 


Latrobe 


industry 


Fleetwood 


Yeodon 


Wiliiamsport 


Ford City 


Special Education 


Medical Tech. 


Home Ec, Ed, 


Communications 


Human Resource 


Accounting 




BONGANI NZAMA 


DEBORAH OAKES 


CATHERINEOBENSKI 


JOSEPH OBRIEN 


NANCY OBRIEN 


M. OCALLAGHAN 


Indiana 


Ciymer 


Greensburg 


Foicroft 


Amity 


West Mifflin 


Economics 


Elementary Ed, 


Oftice Admin. 


Finance 


Speech, Hearing 


Nursing 




KAREN ODELL 


BARBARA OGDEN 


LYNN OLIVER 


M. OMOGROSSO 


ROBERT ONEILL 


KELLY ORNDORFF 


Montoursviile 


Cieorfieid 


Library 


Beaver Falls 


Morrisville 


Shippensburg 


Elementary Ed. 


Nursing 


Marketing 


Math Education 


MIS 


Math Education 




i 




ABBY ORSTEIN 


S. OSTERMANN 


N. PACALO 


DARLA PACCONI 


R. PADDOCK 


PATRICIA PAGE 


Lancaster 


Feosterville 


Indiana 


Indiana 


Troftord 


Ctialfont 


Consumer Services 


Safety Mgt 


MIS 


Elementary Ed. 


Marketing 


Art Studio 




MINDY PALUMBO 

Pittsburgh 
Phy, Ed. and Sport 



JANIS PANICHELLA 

Greensburg 
Ed of Exceptional 




JAMES PANIZZI 

Derry 
Personnel Mgt 



SPIRO PAPPAN 

Beaver Falls 
Marketing 



ANNE PARK 

Indiana 
Art Education 




CAROL PARMELEE 

Fairview 
Marketing 



LORI PASSIOS 

Pittsburgh 
Ed. of Exceptional 



DANIEL PATASNIK 

Holland 
Criminology 



BRIAN PATTERSON 

Chambersburg 
Physics 



SUSAN PATTON 

Harrisburg 
Criminology 



MARK PAULICK 

Butler 
English 




DAWN PAULMEIER 


THOMAS PAVLOCK 


LORI PEDMO 


C. PEDUZZI 


MARY PELLEGRINO 


LUCINDA PENNELL 


Bridgeville 


Curwensville 


Hawk Run 


Ebensburg 


Pittsburgh 


Greensburg 


MIS 


Accounting 


Anthropology 


Communications 


Journalism 


Food and Nutrition 



254 



JEANNE PEOPLES 

Volant 
Computer Science 



JOAN PEOPLES 

Volant 
MIS 



RICHARD PERFETTA 

Export 
Computer Science 



KAREN PERRI 

Pittsburgh 
Office Admin, 



GINA PESCARINO 

Pittsburgti 
Interior Design 



BETHANN PETERSON 

Coctiranton 
Journalism 




£kA 



JEFFREY PETERSON 

Allison Park 
Political Science 



GARY PETRAKES 

Carnegie 
Management 



LIZANNI PEZZETTI 

West Ctiester 
Marketing 



AARON PHILLIPS 

Mercer 
Elementary Ed. 



JERRY PHILLIPS 

Girard 
Criminology 



PATRICIA PHILLIPS 

Pittsburgh 

Ma'«et'r,a 




,^r^i 




J. PIERNIKOWSKI 

Indiana 
Computer Science 



MICHELE PINA 

Philadelphia 
Elementary Ed. 



KAREN PLETCHER 

N, Huntingdon 
French Education 



TODD PLEVINSKY 

Philadelphia 
MIS 



DARLENE PLYER 

Irwin 
Mathematics 




JOANNE POLINSKY 

Scottdale 
Nursing 



JACKIE POLLICK 


MICHAEL POLOSKY 


CAROL POPCHAK 


Clearfield 


Latrobe 


Johnstown 


Hearing Impaired 


History 


Consumer Affairs 




255 



JOYCE POSTUFKA 

McKees Rocks 
Accounting 



LAURIEANN POHS 

Pittsburg 
Management 



STEPHANIE POWELL 

Meodville 
Nursing 



DANA PROLA 

Blairsville 
Elementary Ed. 



THOMAS PURCELL 

Pittsburgh 
Accounting 



DOROTHY PUSKAR 

Carnegie 
MIS 




KIM PYSHER 

Stroudsburg 
Physical Education 



CHERYL QUICK 

Elma 
Special Education 



KELLY QUINN 

West Homestead 

Marketing 



CAROL RAABE 

Bradford 
Elementary Ed. 



V. RAMICONE 

Murrisville 
Journalism 



MEG RANDOLPH 

Warren 
Criminology 




ROBERT RAY 

Pittsburgh 
Safety Science 



BARBARA REGINA 

N Huntingdon 
Marketing 



THERESA REINER 

Pocono Lake 
Home Ec Ed 



DEBORAH REMALEY 

Export 
MIS 



BRUCE RENDE 

Coraopolis 
Political Science 



DANA RENZ 

Pittsburgh 
MIS 




C. REXFORD 

Fairview 
Food Service Mgt. 



KELLY RHOADS 

Roscoe 
Accounting 



RHONDA RHODES 

Smithton 
Elementary Ed. 



PAULA RICCHE 

Altoona 
Psychology 



ANNABELLE RICE 

Ebensburg 
Dietetics 



DONALD RICEHI 

McDonald 
MIS 



256 



VENISE RICH 

Baden 
Personnel Mgt. 



TERESA ROACH 

Somerset 
Marketing 



. RICHARDSON 

Bethel Park 
Accounting 



CATHERINE RIDDLE 

Johnstown 
Dietetics 



BERNARD RIEVEL 

Johnstown 
Rehabilitation 



MONICA RISALTI 

Ebensburg 
Dietetics 



THERESA RITO 

Bornesboro 
Elennentary Ed. 




JANEIU ROBERTS 

Chester 
Accounting 



JENNIFER ROBERTS 

Bethel Park 
Nursing 



u 

ROBIN ROBERTS M. ROBINSON 

Philadelphia IVIurrysville 

Ed. of Exceptional Marketing 



STACY ROBINSON 

New Castle 
Communications 




SUSAN ROPER 


MARY ROSSI 


JOYCE ROTHMEYER 


ELIZABETH ROWELL 


DAWN ROWLES 


PATRICIA ROYER 


Swiftwater 


Pittsburgh 


Pittsburgh 


Berkeley Heights 


Elizabeth 


New Holland 


MIS 


Computer Science 


'■Marketing 


Dietetics 


MIS 


Nursing 




N. ROZDILISKI 

Meridian 
Speech. Hearing 



JUDITH RUBY 

Utica 
Marketing 



CYNTHIA RUCKER 

Sewickley 
Journalism 



COLLEEN RUFF 

Pittsburgh 
Nursing 



MELINDA RUFFING 

Clairton 
Accounting 



COLETTE RULLO 

Latrobe 
Business Education 



Jh best ts yet io be. 



Robert Browning 



257 



LISA RUMSEY KIMBERLY RUSNICA MARGARET RYAN MARK SADLER ROBERT SALA A. SALVADORE 

Meadville Numine Wynnewood Indiana Norristown Newtown 

Management MIS Nursing Finance Marketing Safety Science 




F. SAMARELLI 


MOLLY SANDERS 


RONALD SARVER 


DIANE SATALIA 


Seosioc Heights, NJ 


Hotboro 


Ligonier 


Pittsburgh 


Criminology 


Fashion Merch 


Chemistry 


Criminology 



JENNIFER SATROPE ANN SCHAFER 

Erie Pittsburgh 

Computer Science Communication 




JAMES SCHALL 


KIMBERLY SCHEHR 


DANA SCHETTER 


TODD SCHICK 


CONNIE SCHLUTZ 


CATHLEEN SCHMIDT 


Ford City 


N, Huntingdon 


Allison Park 


Traftord 


Cononsburg 


Charleroi 


Economics 


Accounting 


Psychology 


Computer Science 


Marketing 


Journalism 





NANCY SCHNEIDER GEORGE SCHOEDEL ANGELA SCHULZ 

Pittsburgh Finleyville Lancaster 

MIS Marketing Music Education 



258 



A. SCHUMACHER 
Camp niN 
Journalism 



F. SCHWEIGERT 

Corry 
Elementary Ed. 



4 V 

AMY SCHWEITZER 

Cinnaminson. NJ 
Dietetics 



JAMES SCHWENDER 

Hoilanc3 
Economics 



JAMES scon 

New CasTie 
Criminology 



KEVIN scon 

Monessen 
Business 




PATRICIA SEBBENS 

McKeesport 
Accounting 



JANET SERVINSKY 

Indiana 
Office Admin. 



JO ANN SHADLE 

Lykens 
Business Admin. 



DEBORAH SHAFFER 

Coral 
Psychology 



KEVIN SHANKEL COLLEEN SHARPE 

Kittannmg \' 'era 

Finance Fcoc 5e'.ce Mgt. 




WENDY SHARP 


DIANNE SHAW 


KELLY SHAW 


LISA SHAY 


WILLIAM SHEPERD 


THERESA SHEVUN 


Philadelphia 


McKeesport 


Cherry Tree 


Kittannmg 


Cherry ''ee 


Carlisle 


Elementary Ed 


Art Education 


Sociology 


Nursing 


HiSTCr, 


Music Education 




KELLY SHIELDS 

Philadelphia 
Speech, Hearing 



L. SHINDLEDECKER 

New BeThienem 
Sociology 



KATE SHOLTIS 

BarnesDoro 
Accounting 



ELI SHORAK 

inaustry 
Accounting 



ANNEHE SHUSKO 

SiicKvilie 
Safety Science 



W. SIBOLBORO 

inaiono 
Medical Tech 



259 



NICOLE SICHAK 


MARY SICHER 


DEBRA SIDONE 


GARY SIEFERI 


.,-a:-2 


^.a^e 


zze'izy:: 


,',er '.e.'.-on 


Marketing 


Hima- "^; '.;- 


"■-'=' 3 


'.'Z-- e"-3 



LYNN SILK 

Johnstown 

-eatth and Pny Ed 



SHEELA SIMMONS 



; ^e.e cc~e''^ 




DALE SMITH 



GARY SMITH 



JILL SMITH 

PhKide0hia 

PubSc Sen/ice 



KIMBERLY SMITH 



"'ce. e 



ANDREA SMYERS 

Prttstxjrgh 

Accounting 



LEIGH ANN SNEEDIN 
'.'c"" E^-COtion 




LAWRENCE SNOW 
Poiticol Sc e^.ce 



LISA SNOW 
MS 



CONNIE SNYDER 
Elementary Ed. 



LORI SNYDER 
Ea of ExceptKxial 



'J:l : 
MONICA SOFFA DEBORAH SOISSON 



Fashion Merch. 



-ce-sc.-g 










SOMERHALDER 


BRIAN SOMMERS 


LISA SONTHEIMER 


LAURA ANN SOTIR 


CONNIE SOUDERS 


LORI LYNN SPANIEL 


Pittsburgh 


Waynesburg 


Bethel Park 


Hazelton 


Wells Tanne^v 


Eilwooa Ci'y 


Nursing 


Economics 


Nursing 


Accounting 


MIS 


JGuriaiism 




ANTOINETTE SPARTE 


CONNIE SPEEDY 


ROBERT STABY 


CARLA STAFF 


T. STAHLMAN 


GARY STANKOVIK 


Pittsburgh 


Blairsville 


Little Meadows 


Indiana 


Computer Science 


Pittsburgh 


Phy. Ed. and Sport 


Criminology 


Criminology 


Nursing 




MIS 




LISA STARESINIC 


S. STARKS 


DAVID STASKIN 


JODI STAUB 


GEORGE STAUFFER 


KIM STAUFFER 


Indiana 


Broomall 


New Cumberland 


Hanover 


Yardley 


Glenshaw 


Marl<eting 


Ps,r":':a. 


Psychology 


Biology 


Marketing 


=svchC'Og> 




CARLA STEELE 


FONDA STEELE 


BARBARA STEEN 


CARLA SHEHLE 


MARK STEICH 


l?OBERT STEWART 


Indiana 


Harrisburg 


Lower Burrell 


Pittsburgh 


Conneiis.'iue 


"ac"c 


Hearing Impaired 


Criminology 


Nursing 


Home Ec Ed. 


MIS 


Accounting 



261 



ROBIN STEWART 

Johnstown 
Elementary Ed 



TRACY STEWART 

York 
Elementary Ed 



ERIC STOCK 

Cloirton 
Human Res Mgt 



S. STONEBACK 

Hollidaysburg 
Fashion March 



SHARON STOTLER 

Pittsburgh 
Child Deveiopr^ent 



WILLIAM STOWMAN 

Brockway 
Music Education 



PETER STRAHLER 


r 

TRICIA STRAITIFF 


FRED STRAUB 


CATHERINE STRAW 


M. J. STRAZISAR 


LORIE STROBEL 


Bethlehem 
MIS 


Pittsburgh 


Mt Joy 
Criminology 


Ebensburg 
Marketing 


Mineral Point 
Clinical Sociology 


Erie 
Nursing 




CLIFFORD STROUD 

Natrona Heights 
Communications 



WENDY STROUSE 

Reynoldville 
Natural Science 



LAURIE ANN STURM 

Pittsburgh 
Journalism 



JOHN SULLIVAN 

New Britain 
Marketing 



CARRIE SUTILLA 

Pittsburgh 
Communicotions 



STACEY SWANSON 

Dagus Mines 
Food Service Mgt. 



K. SWARDEN 

Carrolltown 
Speech Pathology 



MARIKAY SWARTZ 

Holland 
Criminology 



JILL SWEELY 

Shippensburg 
Health and Phy. Ed. 



KAREN SWOPE 

Ebensburg 
Human Resource 



TERRY SUTTON 

Wormelysburg 
Business 




M. SYMCZAK 

Beaver Falls 
Communication 



'Et Good 

bt good, 
bt COL^O 

— Harrington Tate 



262 




^^ AEP 



DONNA SZABO 

jonnstown 
Elementary Ed. 



DANTE TAMBELLINI 

inaiona 
Ed of Exceptional 




JAMES TANDA 


R. TAORMINA 


Coiver 


Will nQii 


Criminology 


Consumer Services 


^^■■I^H 


w^^^-'-^ 




^H% 


^^^m'* ^ B^^il 


Vu^V 


^M .k. ff'^ 


^^y—C^S 


^^K.^ -'^E* 


■^V.<rA 



LYNN TAYLOR 


MELISSA TAYLOR 


Morrisville 


Allison Parl< 


Human Res, Mgt 


Englisti 




JLM^h 



KATHI TAYMANS 


KURT TEBBS 


L. THARRINGTON 


LISA THOMAS 


SUSAN THOMAS 


BILL THOMPSON 


Pittsburgh 


Indiana 


Furlong 


Sharon 


Hatboro 


Blairsvie 


Child Development 


Biology 


Marketing 


Nursing 


Nursing 


MtS 




C. THOMPSON 


GWEN THOMPSON 


JAMES TICE 


K. TOMAYKO 


PAUL TOOHEY 


KAREN TROUT 


Phicsec- : 


Cc-acco s 


=^evase 


N Cha^^e'C 


Charieroi 


LoncosTer 


CommunicaTions 


Marke--g 


Ma'Ke'ng 


Accounting 


Finance 


Criminology 




M. TRUMBAUER 

Epnra'Q 

Child Development 



KEVIN TRUMBLE 

New KensingioTi 

Management 



AMY TUITE 

riTTSDurgn 

Elementary Ed. 



KATHRYN TURNER 

KiTTonmng 
Dietetics 



STEPHANIE TURNER 

Fiemmgton, Nj 

Marketing 



E. UFFELMAN 

York 



263 



V' 


.^V - ^vi 




^i^ 


^■^^^H 




LYNN URBAN 


SANDRA URSINYI 


NGOZI lAVAKWE 


DARRLY VASEY 


VICKI VITUUO 


M. VOCKROTH 


Stcre Col«ege 


f^urang 


VwasTir^-ori. DC 


~c . es'c/^^i 


C-airior, 


vV 'v'^aesex 


Intenor Design 




Economics 


Vave-'ig 


Elernenlarv Ed. 


■•-■5"3 




BETH ANN VOGT MARTHA WACHNA THERESA WACHNA DAVE WAGNER GWEN WAGNER 

Came0e S'e Ene Ee--e ~z'- hzz^z'z .'. :;35 

Morttetrig -:-e 5: Ea Co'Tirr>unications Co—.p-^e- Sce'ce '.'a'-e'^g 



DEBBIE WAITER 

.•.c:--5C.-g 
Eie-e^-Q', Ed. 




KHIY WAKff laO 


EDDIE WALKER 


BRIAN WALLACE 


3-e' Ca~ccei 


= - ZZBC- z: 


* • ^" !^ - " 


C'~iroo3 . 


r:~c.-e- ;;e-;e 


- 'O'ce 



WENDY WALLS CHRISTINE WALSH JOHN WALSH 

Viorke'ing PsyCioogy 




BETH WALTER 



DOUGLAS WALTER 



BRAD WALTERS 



J. WANNSTEDT 

PittsD^irgr, 
MIS 



JULIE ANN WARGO 

DeTnei PkXk 
Nursing 



BRYAN WARNER 

Danville 
Chemistry 



264 



ANNA WARWICK 

Perkasie 
Nursing 



DENISE WASH 

Lancaster 
Marketing 



BETH WATERS 

Phiiladelphia 
Journalism 



DAVID WATT 

Apollo 
Applied Math 



USA WEAVER 

Homer City 
Environ, Healtti 



NANCY WEBER 

Pittsburgh 
Finance 




SHARIN WEBER 


BRUCE WEINSTEIN 


ANDREW WEIR 


LINDA WELLER 


PAMELA WERNER 


NARDA WHITE 


Carnegie 


Somerset 


Doylestown 


Boston 


Pittsburgh 


Bernville 


Marketing 


MIS 


Safety Science 


MIS 


Marketing 


Computer Science 




PAMELA WHITE 

Dover 
Safety Science 



JANE WHITMAN 

Mechonicsburg 
Marketing 



LUCY WIDDOWSON 

Indiana 
Finance 



KATHY WILKINS 

Enon Valley 
Child Development 



NAN WILLIAMS 

Nevv^town 
Nursing 



LISA WILSON 

Darlington 
Office Admin. 




265 



LUCINDA WILSON 


JOHN WINGFIELD 


STEVEN WITUCKI 


TAMARA WOLBER 


KELLY WOLFE 


LISA WOOD 


Biglerville 


New Stanton 


Brackenndge 


Delmont 


Carlisle 


Indiana 


Finance 


MIS 


Personnel Mgt 


Marketing 


Internatl. Studies 


Food Serivce Mgt, 





)^ 




S. WORKMAN 


BENEDICT WREH 


New Park 


Indiana 


Psychology 


MIS 


tP^ 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 


^>^ 




Vf 


^^m 


v: I 


^f^^^B^ 



DANIEL WRIGHT 

Lebanon 
Criminology 



BETH WRYE 

Philipsburg 
Speech, Hearing 



CYNTHIA WUTZKE 

Pittsburgh 
Computer Science 



SIPHO ZABA 

Lothair 
Finance 




JAMES YAKSICK 


JENNIFER YALICH 


M. YANICKO 


DAVID YOUNG 


WILLIAM YOUNG 


NICHOLAS YUTKO 


Elizabeth 


Uniontown 


Gibsonia 


Aliquippa 


Ford City 


Orwigsburg 


Marketing 


Computer Science 


MIS 


Biology 


Accounting 


Computer Science 



XSMS. 




CONNIE ZABROSKY 


MARK ZACUR 


TANYA ZADOYKO 


SUSAN ZAMBERLAN 


STEPHEN ZBUR 


KEVIN ZDURIENCIK 


Apollo 


Indiana 


Pottstown 


Lewis Run 


Indiana 


New Castle 


Accounting 


Safety Science 


Consumer Affairs 


Marketing 


Geology 


Marketing 



Do not to tfcs po/Lttng gileiyt ik^. 
^kgL hmmbex ikot ik. best o\j jjAiends 

kvlUSt po/it. 

— Anonymous 



266 



1\ ♦ 

TRACY ZEU 

Philadelphia 
MIS 



LISA ZEOLLA 

Kittanning 
Elementary Ed 



CYNTHIA ZIRBRIDA 

Richeyvilie 
Accounting 



KELLY JO ZIEGLER 

Pittsburgh 
Journalism 



JAMES ZIMINSKI 

Bethlehem 
Marketing 



NANCY ZMUDA 

Pittsburgh 
Finance 




JOHN ZOnER 


JUDY ZUROVCHAK 


LORI ANN ZWACK 


LEANNE JONES 


CYNTHIA KORTIER 


JOHAN KOSASIH 


Pittsburgh 


Titusville 


Exton 


Munnal; 


Monroevilie 




Accounting 


Accounting 


Office Admin. 


Fashion Merch 


Ed. of Exceptional 






LORI SHUMAKER 

Natrona Heights 

MIS 




267 



** 



k?m 



t 




Cf^ERS TO THE 





CLASS OF '65 




"^ 



^— <y I I.I « f < 

1 ^. 








270 





Look Ma, . . , 
We Did It! . . 

It all climaxed on Satur- 
day, May 11, 1985. Four 
years of college came to on 
end OS the Class of 1985 
gathered en masse at Miller 
Stadium in the 80-degree 
weather. It was a culmina- 
tion of four years of dorms, 
mixers, eight o'ciocks, TGIF's, 
English II papers, professors, 
Caleco's, long lines and all- 
nighters. Family and friends 
helped us to remember past 
experiences on this special 
day, they shared our laugh- 
ter and our tears. They 
joined us in saying "WE DID 
IT!" 




271 





COMGQAlViAHoMs 4 



I 



Mr 
Mr 



QfXJ Mrs "ncTiOS F Abcctf- 

Tonk ond Joyce Andrews 

Lawrerice E. and V'arjorie Arrient 
end Mrs -' -^ Artale 
and Mrs I -.. 5c: ey Sr. 

arci Mrs George 3 Ee-gg 
ana V's. Chortes Ber<"9imer, Jr 
and V!rs. L.W Bjfolini 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Caidc^e 

Janet Marie Campbell 

G Bwood and Mabel ' Carlson 

Z c^/ton and Petra Chambers 

ChorloTte Cieser 

.'.'' and Vrs. Denis Cnoppa 
and "As Ca^me' C. Coco 
and Mrs. Robert Covait 
arxj Mrs. Jirr Cro'-e 
Wiam G (Jane; Cribbs 
and Mrs. G:na C'oce 
or z Mrs. Frank L Doie i 
-2" z Virs. Nicholas D'Amico 
S-e a and Mike Daniels 
Q-d Mrs. Andrew Demyanek 
CTd Mrs. Guy Desmond 

The Rev and Mrs. George E. Doran 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Robert Dougherty 
3"d Mrs. Robert J. Dubel 
an:! Mrs '? c^orc! V '^e'ds 
OTid '■'■'■- :" Fisanich 

Bob andBeiTy =sc'~ier 

jonn ana teoto Fte'g 

Lou ana Mo'ge Ftori 

Mr and ^v^rs. Vtctor t FogeSn 

'.'- ana V'S A'a''a C ^'ench 

A'aeth Frye 

Mr and Mrs. Jerome W Gearing 

John and June George 

Mr. and Mrs. Vito N. Gerardi 

Mamie GocicrisV 

Bert arto 5 arah Gren:z 

Mr. ana M's. Joseph Grieco Jr. 

Evelyn one Emer E G'^ftn 

and Kelly G'se" c 
pn^ ip G Guo-^esche* 
Gregc, Suenzel 
James Z '-'oy- Jr. 
R. Gene Heodtee 
and Mrs Pou. Herber* 



Mr. 

Mr 

M' 

Mrs 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr 



Mr. 
Mr 
Mr 





Jce, Joanne 
'A arxJ Mrs 
Mr and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs 

M^ 3na Mrs, 
"e. Fathe- 
.a~es R. hess Ann 3 
: 3nd Jane' ness 
V' and Mrs Jay ~ 
Ecward and .'3'^' 
Mr. arxJ Mrs Bruce F. 




Mess 



Houston 
~ — Tiei 



- z' z-o and Jo^,et Jackson 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Josec^ ctobs 



Mr. and Mrs Hcry C Jarres 
Mr. or 3 Mrs. Allen .amieson 
'•Ar. o^C M'S RorxJld JorK>sik 
Beth Ann and Douglas Janosik 
Anra '.'a'ie Janosik 
Hcc d and Constortce Jones 
She on Keller 
JOjO 
"^LTC and I.'-s Paul J. Kirie 
,.'*' Re , one Anzonena KIriger 

Mr and Mrs 2e'nara A Kownocki 

John arxa C go Kuzniar 

Dad and 'viom LaRosa 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald H. Lefever 

Ted and Eileen Lepich 

Robe^ P. and Chc^lotte 3. Lewis 

„.- 3'i Mary Lou Lombo'cJd 

=eggv' and Huey Lc^g 

Roy and Kaye Long 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Varcotullio 

Mr. and Mrs Robert J Manr 

Mr. and Mrs. Sa-^ MarisKonish 

Emmett and Sandy Mcllwoin 

Mr. and Mrs Doncid M. McNomoro 

Joe and Jjditn Michael 

Bob and Norma Mikoci 

K'- and Mrs. DeWoife H. Miller Jr. 

.en- ~ and Joyce Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Miller 

Ron and Jane Miller 

Mr and Mrs Wftom R. Minor Sr 

W. Foot arKl Maryeiien Miishler 

Dr. one Mrs. Anthony N. Moron 

Free ana Annexe Mueller 

Mr and Mrs Gene L. Myers 

Mr and Mrs E. Robe't Nagy Sr 

Mr ancfWlrs John A Neronc 

Mr. andMrs J'aul A Newhouse Sr. 

K'J and Mrs Cor '<tol 

C'3:.otte and Terry Nuiph 

N'ary Lou ana Bab Omdorff 

N'r and Mrs Josep>h Ostermor. 

Nick and Rose Pacalo 

Mr. and Mrs. James Passios 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth L Patterson 

Lorraine Pern 

Richard and Jean Roy 

Mr and Mrs Anthony Rich 

Mr. John M. Rito 

Mr and Mrs. Ivan Rhc ' 

Robert M Rucke' ;' 

Mr. ar>d Mrs. Tirrc-ny Russell 

Eugene and Donna Solvodore 

Mr. OTKa Virs Donaid Shodle Sr. 

Williams W and Shirley E Shonkel 

Patricia and Robert D Shorpe 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip J. Shevim 





i 



K: 



TO TcNSGL^SS 



tA 




05 '85 



k -f 



1 f 



Ben and May Lou Shindiedecker 

Mike and Pc^ Shorak Njt ^ 

Mary Shaffer :»_JmBk ' 

Crystal and Chuck Smith ^^i 

Mr and Mrs. Edward C. Smyefs Jr. 

Mr and Mrs. Donald J. Soisson 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Souders 

Mom and Dad Storks 

Mr and Mrs. Eugene Staskm 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Richard Stauffer 

Mrs. Clara B. Steele 

Mr ana Mrs. Ralph G. Stehle 

Mr and Mrs Kenneth W. Straw 



/ 



r. 



Mr. and Mrs. Richard Truble 
Mr. and Mrs Joseph B. Turner 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert R. Vish 
Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Vitullo 
Mr. and Mrs. John Wachna 
Nancy K. Walsh 
Dr and Mrs. Joe R, Wardell. Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence R, Werner 
Mr. and Mrs. Doran C. White 
Jim and Jon White 
William and Linda Young 
Dr and Mrs. Maurice M. Zacur 
Mary Ann Zmuda and Family 







vsC 



ift# 



■»»^ 





\ 



V 



\^f»> 






Pi 






Good LucTcolleen Dougherty! Love, Mom and Pop 

Congratulations and Good Luck, Filitsa Eleamos, Fetes and De^noTI^mof 

Congratulations William Ferren, Love You Always, Pat and Dick 

Jaci<,e Janosik, Congratulations on a job well done. Good Luck Always. Love. Mom - and Joio 

Sue. Congratulations with our love and best wishes for your future. Love. Mom and Dad Leckrone ^^ 

^sood Luck Janice Golacinski. Love, Mary Ann and Joey iW 

Greg Longo Congratulations for a job well done. We are very proud of you. Our wish for you is a future of health and 

happiness. You deserve it. Love, Mom and Dad 

Good Luck Debbie Lyons 

Congratulations Nicole Sichak Love Mom, Dad, Alison and David MT 

Best wishes to the Class of '85 and personal success to Bruce Marcia S WeinstelF 

Congratulations Lisa Wilson on a job well done. Good Luck Always. Love Mom and Dad 




273 



The Chang 



Volume LI' 1 1 



Indiana University 



Construction to begin on Johnson Hall 



lUP Public Inlorwalion 

A groundbreaking ceremony 
for the new lUP safety science 
building will be held at 10: 30 a.m. 
Saturday, Sept. 29, at the parking 
lot in front of Stright Hall on the 
lUP campus. 

The Sally B. Johnson Hall ce- 
remony will open with welcoming 
comments by Interim President 
John Welty , who will also introduce 
ptetformmemBers, recognize architects 
and contractors, and speak of the 
need for the new building. 

Following a dedication of the 
building by former lUP trustee 
PartickF. McCarthy. lUP trustee 
and son of Sally Johnson, David 
Johnson, will acknowledge the 
honor. He will then join Sen. Pa- 
trick Stapleton. lUP Council of 
Trustees president, in turning over 
the first spade of ground. 

The facility will house safety 



sciences classrooms and labs, a 
library and offices on the first floor. 
Offices, a large classroom, and a 
computer terminal area, designed 
for 24-hour access, will be estab- 
lished on the second floor. 

The architectural firms for the 
building are Curry, Martin and 
Highberger. and Anna Guzman, 
both of Pittsburgh. Contractors for 
the construction are: George 
Danko Inc. , general contractor of 
Latrobe; Delmar Corp., heating, 
ventilating and air conditioning 
contractor of Pittsburgh: Breco 
Mechanical Contractors, plumb- 
ing contractor of Johnstown: and 
Darr Construction Co., electrical 
contractor of Berlin. 

The building is being named 
after Sara B. 'Sally" Johnson, a 
former Indiana resident active in 
community and university affairs. 

Johnson served as an lUP 



trustee from 1954-1956, received 
the lUP Distinguished Afumni Cila- 
tion for Outstanding Service in 

1958, served as chairman of the 
Project Committee for John Sutton 
Hall preservation and was vice' 

president and member of the board 
of directors of the Foundation for 
lUP 



SEPTEMBER 
Film Schedule 

5 Best Friends 
6.7.8 Hot Dog 

9 'The Black Stallion 

MacBeth 
12 Klute 
13.14,15 Danielle 

15 Rocky Horror Picture Show 

16 *The Wizard o( Oz 
Romeo and Juliet 

19 The Way We Were 
20.21.22 Yentl 

23 'Rescuers 

Hanilet 



This week in sports 

Tuesday: 

Women's Tennis — Clarion (A) 3 p.m. 

Wednesday: 

Soccer — St, Vincent (H) 3 p.m. 

Thursday: 

Women's Tennis — West Liberty (A) 3 p.m. 

Saturday: 

Football - West Chester (H) 1:30 p.m. 

Soccer- UPJ (A) 1 p.m. 



lUP Graduate places seventh in Olympics 



Penn Sports Slaft 

True sports fans already know 
that Daley Thompson of Great 
Britain once again outdueled West 
German Jurgen Hingsen to win 
the decathlon gold medal in the 
Summer Olympics. But how many 
know who came in seventh? 

It was an .American by the 
nameof Jim Wooding, a 1977 grad 
uate of lUP. Wooding was the se- 
cond American finisher. Only John 
Crist, who won the Olympic trials, 
did better. 

Upon graduating from Avon 
Grove High School, where he ear- 
ned 11 varsity letters. Wooding 



joined lUP's track team under 
coach Lou Sutton. He earned AU- 
American honors seven times, four 
as a decathlete. 

Wooding set several national 
records for Division II schools 
during his career at lUP and be- 
came the first lUP decath'ete to 
score 7000 points in the event in 
1977. 

The two-day event is not con- 
ducted at every college meet, 
which hindered Wooding's ability 
to be competitive. 

"I only competed in two or 
three a year, " said Wooding. 

Current lUPtrackcoach Bob 



Raemore was an assistant during 
Wooding's tenure on the Bravp 
track team. In an interview con- 
ducted over the summer, Raemore 
said that Wooding has improved 
most in the field events since his 
college days. 

Raemore said that Wooding's 
performances in 1976 would make 
him one of HP's top men in eight 
events on the 1984 squad, a testa- 
ment to his athletic prowess. 

"The one event he does need 
pushed in is the 1500," said Rae- 
more. who coached Wooding in 
sprint running for four years. 

Wooding pushed himself in the 



field events by developing a per- 
sonal weightlifting program after 
he left lUP. 

"The results were worth the 
effort," he said. "If I were a coach 
today . I would have everyone lift- 
ing wie^hts." 

Wooding is still setting per- 
sonal records at the age of 30 He 
also credits this to his weight 
training. 

Wooding said that Americans 
are placed at a disadvantage 
against athletes from other nations 
who are able to train year round. 



Marquee 



nAk-'<:TAVir'MVo;i"„L'.A,^iVv,; ^..Ti- ACCOUNTINGCAREERDAY' Tues- 

UAKaiArr: Meeting tonight at 5 Id , ~ . „, .u m r>„„„ i„v,r, 

in yearbook room (Conference Room day Sept 25 .nOie Blue Room John 

5. Lawrence Hall) . Sutton Hall 8: 30a.m.^ll 30a.m^. .30 

p.m. -3: 10 p.m., 11:30 am -1:30 lun- 

The' ^ew 'edition Vf 'the'rOLiTicAL '^heon at the Indiana Country Oubjaoo 

SCILNCE DEPARTMENT HAND- a Person. 

BOOK is now available in the Political •,• • ■ " • " ' ;,' ' ,' ' ^i',j^ ' 'j' »."„'; 'Jo' 

Science Department and other inter- EL Ed and Earb; Childhood Ma ors 

ested persons are encouraged to obtain '^^L'""",",? n ^'^ vt^A^J^l, nf ' 

. . . . f 4: 00 Room 330 Davis. Election of of- 

Circle K: All are welcome to come ficers. New members welcome! 

and join. Pizza Party Sept. 25 in 243 

Keith Hall at 8: 00. Please bring dues The IntemaUonal Students Club wel- 

and a twoliter bottle. comeseveryone to itsexciting activities 

and meetings. Come rap with foreign 



HOMECOMING PARADE COM- 
MITTEE MEETING will be held on 
Tuesday. Sept 25at4 45p m in Room 
8, McElhaney Hall Allcampusorgan- 
izations planning to be in the Home- 
coming parade should have a repre- 
sentative present. 

AUS.^ meeting in Pierce Hall on Sept 
25 at 7:00 p m Volunteers for blood 
drive sign up now We will be discussing 
the Washington. DC trip. 



The Indiana Chapter of the American 
Diabetes Association will meet Thurs- 
day. Sept 27. in 106 Pratt Lounge Social 
7 00: meeting 7 30 

Public .Accounting Careers Day is Tues. 
Sept 25 in the Blue Room. Sutton Hall. 
Come meet represeentati ves from the 
major CPA firms 8: 30 to 3: 30. All in- 
terested students are welcome! Spon- 
sored by S.A.A 



274 



ing Times 



of Pennsylvania 



September 1984 — April 1985 



Nuclear build-up threatens mankind 



By ANNE SCHUMACHER 

Penn Managing Editor 

Unless major reductions are 
made in the total number of nu- 
clear warheads housed in world 
arsenals, mankind is faced with 
an ensuing nuclear war that will 
spur massive changes in the 
Earth's climate creating a "nu- 
clear winter." according to re- 
nowned astronomer and re- 
searcher Dr Carl Sagan 

Speaking at Fisher Audito- 
rium Wednesday night. Sagan de- 
fined nuclear wfnter 9s the result 
of the large quantities of sooty 
smoke and dust produced from 
massive fires generated by nu- 
clear explosions. 

"Fire dust would be put up in 
the atmosphere by high-yield 
ground bursts. Sagan said, "which 
would propel large quantities of 
the dust into the stratosphere " 

"Almost one-half of the human 
population— approximately 2billion— 
would be killedby a nuclear war " 
Sagan said "The environment 
would be characterized as cold, 
dark and possessing radioactive 
fallout." 

Sagan said the temperature 
would slowly drop to about minus 
10 degrees and would probably 
take a year to even reach freezing 
level again. "Even if there are 
survivors in fall-out shelters, there 
is a whole different world waiting 
for them when they walk outside." 

One of the biggest factors to 
contend with, Sagan said, is tfie 



massive burning within the cities 
and the poisonous gases which will 
be inhaled in the smoke. "Explo- 
sions will reach the stratosphere 
and have an incineratory effect, ' ' 
Sagan said "The nitrogen would 
be burned in the air and when this 
process combines with oxygen, it 
would create a nitrogen oxide 
which will attack the ozone layer ' 

Theozonelayeris vital, Sagan 
said, in the Earth's protection 
against solar radiation. "It is a 
very thin layer, however, and any 
destruction of it could cause wi- 
de-spread cancer. 

Sagan used slides to illustrate 
several of the points concerning 
the drastic changes that would 
create a "global climatic catas- 
trophy," or nuclear winter. Sagan 
said the exploration of Mars pro- 
vided an excellent opportunity to 
view a dust storm, one that would 
be similar to what the Earth would 
experience. 

The photos from the Voyageur's 
exploration in 1980 clearly illus- 
trated the extreme darkness that 
Sagan said would beset an area 
during nuclear attack. "It would 
seem darker than even a moonless 
night. " Sagan said. 

With the total amount of nu- 
clear weapons standing at 50,000 
and 17, 000 more still in production, 




lUP women's tennis Welcome tO lUPH 

team aces Clarion 7-2 



By KERRI L. COLVIN 

PBon Contributing Writer 

lUP's Lady Netters defeated 
Clarion yesterday at the Clarion 
courts with a score of 7-2. 

Top-seeded Sue McCalmont 
beat Susie Fritz of Clarion 7-6. 6-2. 
McCalmont said she felt she was 
coming off of a bad weekend. She 
also stated that she thought the 
team played well, and it was a 
good win. "Everyone did well." 
she said. 

Peggy Walkush. lUPs No. 2 
seed, topped Clarion s Kim De- 
Maio6-2.6-l Lynne Fye defeated 
lUP's Katy Rock 6-2. 7-5. 



No. 4 seed Sue Smidlein beat 
Vicki Verni 6-0,6-0. 

Cathy McNamara , seeded no. 
5, defeated Clarion's Susan Reeder 
6-0, 6-1 .No. 6 seed Eileen McArdle 
beat Vena Hefflin 6-3, 3-6, 6-2. 

In doubles, McCalmont and 
Linda Hanlon lost to the team of 
Fritz and Fye of Clarion 7-5. 6-4. 
Smidlein and Pam Howell topped 
DeMaio-Funya 6-3, 6-0. The team 
of Walkush-McNamara beat Hef- 
flin and Darla Kneevone 6-1, 6-2 

The Lady Netters' record is 
now 5-1 Their next match is 
Thursday at West Liberty, 3 p.m 




Everyday student affordable 

prices at student convenient 

Hours! 

ATTENTION: 

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12-5 pm Sundays 
Hey Greeks! — Check out our styles! 

275 



Homecoming will feature space shuttle 



First American 
woman 

carnival, 90-unit parade ''"^ ^ack Friday .p^cewaiks 



(UP Public Inlormalion 

From a carnival to a 90-unit 
parade, from a Theater-By-The- 
Grove comedy to a Big Indians 
football game, lUP's 19«4 Home- 
coming weekend will feature a 
variety of activities. 

Homecoming weekend will get 
underway at noon Friday, Oct. 19, 
on the lawn between Sutton and 
Clark halls with the Homecoming 
carnival, sponsored by the Alumni 
Office and Alumni Association. 
With approximately two dozen 
lUP organizations participating, 
the carnival will offer many ac- 
tivities, from food sales to a mod- 
em medicine show. 

International foods baked 
goods, funnel cakes and caramel 
apples are only a few examples of 
the array of food that will be 
available. Organizations will also 
offer games, lUP memorabilia 
sales, plant sales and information 
booths. Carnival activities will 
come to a close at 6 p.m. 



The carnival will resume at 
10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 20, with 
added special events Carnival- 
goers will have the opportunity to 
meet the Pittsburgh Steelers' 
Terrible Fan from 12:30-1 p.m., 
the Pirate Parrot from 3: 30-5: 30 
p.m. and Terrible Fan and his 
Rock and Gold Dancers from 4-5 
p.m. 

Entertainment will include 
storyteller Dorothy Lingenfeller 
from 1-1: 30p.m. and lUP's Concert 
Dance from 5: 30-6 p.m. 

Another added attraction will 
be the health fair, or modem med- 
icine show. Free health screenings 
— including blood pressure and 
hearing tests and nutrition and 
vision checks— will be conducted 
free of charge throughout the week- 
end. Also, the health program will 
Include CPR demonstrations and 
such physical titness programs as 
gymnastics, yoga, exercises for 
children and aerobics. 



Caleco's crowns 
lUP's king of uglies 



CAPECANAVERALFla. (AP)- 
Shuttle Challenger is said to soar 
into orbit Friday with the largest 
space crew ever— five men and 
two women who will study the 
Earth and its oceans. 

In the quickest tumaround 
between space shuttle flights. 
Challenger is to lift of f exactly one 
month after sister ship Discovery 
retumed to Earth from its maiden 
joumey. 

It will be a mission of firsts: 

—The first seven person crew, 
one more than on any previous 
flight. 

—The first time two women 
will be on the same spacecraft. 
The crew members are Sally Ride 
and Kathy Sullivan. 

—The first spacewalk by a 
U.S. woman, Ms. Sullivan. 

—The first American woman 
to make a second space trip, Sally 
Ride. 

—The first astronaut to make 
four shuttle flights. Commander 
Bob Crippen. 



By KATHY LONG 

Penn Features Editor 

He's six feet, three inches tall, has brown hair, 
blue eyes and weighs 300 pounds. His name is Bruce 
Morgan, better known as lUPs Ugliest Man. 

.As the winner of Caleco's Ugliest Man contest 
held Saturday night. Morgan said he felt great about 
being selected as .America s Ugliest Man. 

"If I thought I was ugly. I never would have 
entered the contest. " Morgan said 

However, the 24-year-old senior criminology 
major from Canonsburg, Pa., urged his fellow ugly 
men to "stand up and be counted " 

The men of lUP were being counted on Saturday 
night ^hen chants of "lUP " rose from the crowd 
after the introduction of media representatives was 
made 

"We had representatives from KDKA in Pitts- 
burgh, CBS and NBC affiliates. Pittsburgh Evening 

■ Magazine and USA Today," Clem Pantalone, man- 

■ agerof Caleco's. said. "USA Today almostguaranteed 
us a front page photo." 

For the past week, Pantalone has been fielding 
calls from all over the world from people who want 
to know about the contest. » 

"Its a great thing that happened to lUP, " Pan- 
talone said. ""I've had calls from Seattle (Wash.), 
San Jose (Calif.) and Rochester. N.'V," he said. 
Pantalone also said that he received a phone call 
from a reporter in Germany who picked up on the 



story. 

Morgan and Pantalone will be on National News 
Radio from Canada Monday moming for an eight 
minute interview. Pantalone said that he was con- 
tacted by a moming program "Good Moming Am- 
erica " for a spot. 

"Good Morning .America called and asked us if 
we would mind it too much if they flew us to New 
Yorkfortheshow." he said. Tmnot trying to make 
this a big deal for Caleco's. I really just wanted to 
get something going with this school We're not 
showing .America that we have the ugliest guy-were 
showing them we are a jumping place." 

Caleco's celebrated the event with different 
contests during the night's activities. Paper bags 
were distributed to patrons upon entry and a prize 
was given for the ugliest bag A new drink called 
"the rotten apple " was served in honor of the contest 
.All the activities were concluded with the "Ugly 
Hour " before the crowning at midnight. 

Morgan, who was one of three finalists, won the 
event by a measure of crowd reaction. He was pres- 
ented with several bouquets of dead flowers and 
wore a crown made from an old wig and a fox fur. 
"He's 300 pounds of true American college spirit, ' ' 
Pantalone said. 

"I don't know if I could have done it if I were 
sober," Morgan said the next day. "However, I did 
receive three offers of marriage." 



CAPE CANAVERAL, FLA 

(AP) Astronaut Kathy Sulli 

van became America's first ( 
woman spacewalker Thursday, t 
declaring "this is really great" i 
as she floated outside the shuttle ^ 
Challenger with a male colleague 
to test tools for refueling spent sa- 
tellites. 

Sullivan and astronaut 
Uavid Leestma moved gingerly 
into the open cargo bay, bundled 
in $2.1 million space suits that 
protected them from radiation 

micrometeorites and the extremes 
of heat and cold outside the orbiting 
ship. 

Leestma, 35 year-old navy lieu- 
tenant commander, was the first 
to leave Challenger's airlock, 
slipping out at 11:42 a.m. and 
quickly clamping a 50-foot safety 
tether onto a guideline mnning the 
60 foot length of the bay. 

Sullivan, a 33-year-old 

ocean geologist, followed four 
minutes after Leestma had att- 
ached her tether to the guideline. 
For a minute their lines became 
tangled, but they quickly got them 
straightened out. "I've got my 
tether clear, " she said. 

Television pictures beamed to 
Mission Control in Houston showed 
the two white-clad figures moving 
stiffly to the rear of the bay where 
two fuel tanks were mounted, each 
containing more than 70 pounds 
of volatile hydrazine. 

" "Everything's looking good so 
far, ' Leestma reported as they| 
reached the work station. 



/-^NFu-,(r3 







y 



276 



^'^rT-\ 



Brenner humors crowd at Fisher 



By KATHY LONG 

Ptnn Hatuna Editor 

The weather, airport life, re- 
ligion, dating and prison sentences 
were the subjects of comedian 
David Brenner's performance ir 
Fisher Auditorium Sunday night. 
Opening his act with remarks 
about the age of Fisher Audito- 
rium, Brenner kept the audience 
night's show came partially from 
pre-planned dialogue, and the rest 
was made-up as lie performed. 
Many of his topics come from news 
events. He joked about ' 'the family 
next door " being ugly (yes, he 
has heard that lUP has ugly men) . 
"I find it more challenging 
getting laughs being clean, " he 
entertained for an hour and a half 
of constant jokes. 

"I have a degree of luck with 
anything I do, " Brenner said back- 
stage after the show. "I change 
my material a lot " Altogether, 
he has more than 23 hours of 
material. 

Brenner's material for last 



said in regard to his material. "Im 
still thought of as a bright young 
comedian." 

However. Brenner said that 
there is a difference between his 
material and that of other young 
comedians. 

"The problem with new co- 
medians is the interchangeable 
partsof new comedians, "he said. 
Brenner explained that new co- 
medians could exchange material 
and still receive the same amount 
of laughs. 

"The old can't exchange 
laughs," he said. 

A lot of Brenner's inspiration 
came from his father, who was a 
vaudeville comedian, .After gra- 
duating from Temple University, 
Brenner was a writer, producer 
and director of documentaries. 

"I was a fluke (at documen- 
taries) .' Brenner said. "I took a 
year off. After that year, I had a 
following in New "V'ork " 



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The problem Brennersaidhe 
had with documentaries was that 
he said he was "carbon-copying" 
life. That is, he made 13 docu- 
mentaries about poverty, and they 
all were the same. 

"Besides, "he said, "I wanted 
to be rich." 

Brenner said he enjoyed per- 
forming at lUP, and that he works 
in front of all different audiences; 
nightclubs, gambling casinosand 
colleges. 

Despite his variety in au- 
diences, Brenner said he would 
like to do a movie. 

"I'd also like to write some- 
thing good," he said, 'I'd like to 
do something about street life. 
That's what I'm all about. " Bren- 
ner grew up in south and west 
Philadelphia. 

Brenner has written his first 
book, "Soft Pretzels With Mus- 
tard" ai^anotherdue for release 
in November 



Phony Izod 
distributor pleads 

guilty 



PHIL.ADELPHIA (AP) A 

New Jersey man has pleaded 
guilty to federal conspiracy 
charges in the manufacture and 
distribution of 168.000 phony Izod 
alligator shirts. 

Cosmos Kiello, 52, of Caldwell, 
W.I. pleaded guilty to one count of 
conspiracy in federal court Wed- 
nesday in return for an agreement 
to drop five other charges in in- 
dictment, according to federal 
prosecuters. 



Springsteen 

Bruce Springsteen is still The Boss. 
as thousands of adoring fans learned over 
the weekend in Pittsburgh's Civic .Arena. 
Several lUP students were among those 
lucky enough to have secured tickets. 
Loyal fan and I UP student 
Jeff Lloyd brought these by for The Penn's 
use. 

Left. Springsteen shows some of the 
enthusiasm and energy that has made 
his shows famous. Below left. Bruce jams 
with reedman Clarence Clemmons. Below 
right. The Boss gets together with his 
guitarist and bassist. 

Were told Bruce played a solid show 
of rock and roll throughout, giving the 
fans their money's worth and then some. 
Just ask anyone around campus wearing 
a tour jersey. 

The Boss 
is back 



277 



REAGAH WINS IN LANDSLIDE; 
TAKES 49 STATES 



Associatea Hress 

WASHINGTON - Ronald 
Reagan swept to a 49 state runa- 
way re-election over Walter F. 
Mondale Tuesday night, but Re- 
publicans struggled to translate 
hisconservati ve landslide into sign- 
ificant gains in Congress. The 
president won every state but Mon- 
dale's Minnesota. 

The victorious president told 
cheering supporters in Los An- 
geles, "Our work isn't finished, 
there is much more to be done." 
He said his second term goals are 
"strong economic growth without 
inflation and to keep .America 
strong. ■ ' adding he hopes to reduce 
nuclear weapons and "ultimately 
ban them from the earth entirely . " 

"Youaintseennothingyet," 
the president said in an echo of a 
campaign refrain. 

Mondale conceded defeat, tele- 
phoned his congratulations to Rea- 



Democi:aticSen. WalterHuddle- 
gan and told cheering supporters 
in St. Paul. Minn., "He has won 
We are all Americans; he is our 
president and we honor him to- 
night." 

Democratic running mate Ger- 
aldineFerraro phoned Vice Pres- 
ident George Bush, who praised 
his Democratic opponent — draw- 
ing some jeers from his Houston 
supporters. "She campaigned 
hard. She was a strong opponent," 
Bush said. 

Republicans held the Senate. 
Democrats renewed control of the 
House but by a reduced margin. 

Sen. Jesse Helms won a bit- 
terly contested fight in North Ca- 
rolina, butfellow RepublicanSen 
Roger Jepsen lost to Rep Tom 
Harkininlowa. In Illinois. Foreign 
Relations Committee Chairman 
Charles Percy was trailing De- 
mocratic Rep. Paul Simon. 



ston was defeated in Kentucky by 
Mitch McConneU. and another Demo- 
cratic incumbent. Carl Levin, trail- 
ed Republican challenger Jack 
Lousma in a long, late count in 
Michigan. 

The presidents victory was 
predicted by all the polls, but im- 
pressive even so. He and Bush 
came close to the 50 state sweep 
they sought as Mondale won the 
District of Columbia, garnering 
three electoral votes, and claimed 
victory for Minnesota's 10. 

Reagan won the other 49 slates 
with 525 electoral votes. In the 
Associated Press count, the elec- 
toral votes of South Dakota pushed 
his total past the 270 majority 
mark. Television networks fore- 
cast the landslide between 8 p.m. 
EST and 9 p.m. 

Ms. Ferraro hailed Mondale 
in remarks from New York City, 
saying he won anothex_battle 



Reagan favored in student poll 



By DAVE KEEBLER 

P9nn Sttft Wnttr 

President Reagan was 
favored 36-24 in a straw poll of 60 
lUP students and faculty con- 
ducted by the Penn. 

This poll is not intended to 
accurately project the vote of this 
campus. Its purpose is to randomly 
report the sentiments at lUP to- 
ward tomorrow's presidential 
race. 

Some of the comments made 
by students and faculty who said 
they preferred Reagan were: 

- "I feel he's kept the Russians 
in control." 

-■'I thought he did a good job 
in his first four years." 

- "I don't like Mondale, he's 
shady looking." 

- "I think he'll keep us out of 
war." 

-"lie's a stronjjercandidate." 

RIDES 

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-"I'm for nukes and I don't 

like Democrats." 

-"He brought inflation down " 
Supporters of Mondale had the 

following comments: 

-"He's for education." 
-"I'm a Democrat and I like 

Mondale's position on nuclear 

freeze." 

-"Reagan scares me." 



-"I think he's better informed 
on the issues." 

-"I really don't care to look 
at Reagan's face for another four 
years." 

-"I like Moodale's stand on 
abortion." 

-"I think he has a better per- 
spective (rf the economic ccnditioas 
for the United States." 



Within our limits 

Local Republican candidates gathered at the Omni last week 
lo discuss the issues of their campaigns. To find out why they thatk 
you should vote for them, turn to pmgel. 

The absolute last word on the election from our readers 
appears on pages 8 and 9. 

The football team traveled to New Haven. Conn., and raised 
Its record to 7-2 by beating Southern Connecticut by 24-14 See 
page 16. 

tm one ear — In political discussion, heat is in inverse proportion 
to knowledge. ^.C. C. A#«c*ii 



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"That battle forequal opportunity . 

he opened a door that will never 

be closed again " by naming her 

first woman on a national ticket. 

"There is absolutely nothing 
not to be proud of , " she said as the 

returns were counted. "No one 
should shed any tears." 

With votes counted in 77 per- 
cent of the precincts, Reagan was 
polling 59 percent to 41 for Mon- 
dale 

Democratic House Speaker 
Thomas P. O'Neill of Massachu- 
settes said Reagan's victory was 
the result of "the tremendous pop- 
ularity of the president of the Uni- 
ted States . we've never seen his 
equal " But he said there were no 
coattails and there was no man- 
date forhisprogrmas' whatsoever." 




Library 

OK, you party animals, this 
is your weekend to catch up with 
youracademiclife — whereverit 
maybe. The library's 'Late Night 
Study Center" is open tonight until 
11:45, as if it we re a regular week- 
day. Sunday through Thursday you 
can study on first floor from 10: 30 
to 11:45. It closes Friday at 1p.m. 

I happen to take full advantage 
of this opportunity. In fact, four 
library workers woke me up last 
Monday so I could go home and 
study at 11:45. It's too noisy to 
sleep at home. 



students warned of 
rabid squirrels 



by KATHLEEN KELLY 

Ptnn Contributing Wnter 

An increasing number of stu- 
dents are being bitten by squirrels 
each year, according to the Office 
of Campus Planning. 

"The office is asking students 
not to feed the squirrels because 
of the increased number of rabies 
being reported," said Robert 
Marx, director of campus plan- 
ning. 

"Although a student's chance 
of getting rabies are slim, they 
should know the risks, " Marx said. 

The Center of Disease Control 
examined over 2,000 small rodents 
including squirrels, mice and chip- 
munks. Only one animal in the 
2, 000 had rabies, according to Dr. 
Jan Humphreys, professorof biology . 



"A student would have a better 
chance of getting hit by a car than 
getting rabies from a squirrel." 

The reason why there is such 
concern over rabies this year is 
that raccoons are the animal most 
affected, said Humphreys. Two- 
thirds of the reported cases have 
been about racoons. 

"Racoons are animals that are 
found in close contact with peo- 
ple," Humphreys said. 

"Other animals that are sus- 
ceptible to rabies are skunks, bats, 
foxes and groundhogs," Humph- 
reys said. "Rabies is a virus dis- 
ease of the central nervous system 
that affects warm blooded anim- 
als, althoueh some cases have 

shown that it can be found in 
birds." 



Co-op to open in Union 



The Coop Store will open in its 
new location in the expanded 
Student Union Building at 8 a.m. 
Thursday, Nov. 8. The present 
store location will close at 5 p. m. 
on Tuesday and will not be open 
on Wednesday. 

Since the Student Union 
expansion is not completed, 
access to the store will be 
through the West Avenue en- 



trance of the new wing to the 
north of the old Student Union 
Building. 

' 'The store is moving at this 
time to enable construction to 
begin on the Rec Center, which 
will be in the old store location," 
Chris Knowlton, executive di- 
rector of the Student Coopera- 
tive Association, said. 



MR. ILPV 



Conning 
November 1 7 

8:00 p.m. 
Fisher Auditorium 



Benefits: 
Juvenile Diabetes 

and 

Founders Memorial 

Fondation 

Tickets can be purchased 
at the front door or in 
front of the New Co-op 
Store. 

Tickets are $2.00 

Sponsored by: 
ALPHA GAMMA DELTA 




Fun 

with 
acronyms 



Editor: 

Recently we received question- 
naires from the Maroon and Slate 
Department regarding the degree 
of success already attained 
by the lUP logo in separating us 
from some "other Indiana." It 
seems that sports reporters have 
trouble deciding which Indiana 
plays against Notre Dame, Ohio 
State, Slippery Rock, etc.. and we 
have a program to help them. As 
a recent communique from that 
office states, acronyms have 
brought success to UCLA, IBM, 
BPOE. UPI. ITT, et cet. 

So I asked a Clymerite about 
lUP, and he said he prefers ATT 



for the long term. But an obste- 
trician answered that he prefers 
UPS. especially COD, due to their 
overnight delivery. The one who 
stated that lUD was ' safer than a 
diaphragm" turned out to be a 
gynecologist. A newspaperman said 
he preferred API to the United 
Press International, especially for 
out of town events. (The one who 
confused FDR with Rural Free 
Delivery was probably a victim 
of aural dyslexia.) 

The recent pilgrimmage to 
Bawl State presages future hope 
forus, though. If the Huckster can 
move his illogo-abilities to there, 
still another "Indiana" will rise 
to national sports fame (B.S. 
YOUl). Then Bobby Knight can 
contend with them as to which is 
the Indiana university . . forget 
Pennsylvania! 

Under the last president it was 
decided to advertise ourselves to 
us. The University has outlasted 
him, now we need to escape from 
his image. It will not be done with 
logos, questionnaires, puffs or 
otherbuffoonery. Let's Slate ihem 
to be Marooned! 
■ «...••■ ■ • K. Broae 



The Shunie 



WEEKDAY OEPAflTURES - All Times Approumaie 



12* 3 4 5 

North Oowrtown • Regency Indiana 

Plaza Indiana lUP Mall Mall 



9:00 9:07 

9:40 9:47 

1020 10:27 

1100 11:07 



9:09 916 

9:49 9.56 

10:29 10.36 

11:09 11:16 



1:00 

1:40 

2 20 

3:00 
3:40 

420 

5:00 
5:40 

6 20 

7 00 

7 40 

8 20 

3 10 



1:07 
1:47 

227 

3:07 
3:47 
4:27 

507 

5:47 
6:27 
7:07 

7:47 

827 

9:17 



1:09 
1:49 
2:29 
3:09 
3:49 
4:29 
5:09 

549 

6:29 
7:09 

749 
8 29 

919 



'Oo^ntown times Slop ai B 



1:16 

156 
236 

3:16 

356 

4:36 
5:16 
5:56 
8:36 
7:16 
7:56 

836 

9.26 

[h & Phila 



9:20 
10:00 
10:40 
11:20 



1:20 
2:00 
2:40 
3:20 
4:00 
4:40 
5:20 

600 

6:40 
7:20 
8:00 
8:40 

935 



4 
Regency 

lUP 



3 2 

Oowniown 

TC^ana F'aa 



Nor* 



924 

10:04 
10:44 

1124 



124 

2 04 
244 

3 24 
404 

4 44 

5:24 
6:04 
6:44 

7 24 

8 04 
844 

9 39 



9:29 9:31 

10:09 10:11 

10 49 10.51 

11:29 11:31 



1:29 
2:09 
2:49 

329 

4:09 
4:49 
5:29 
6:09 
6:49 
7:29 
8:09 

849 

9:44 



1:31 
2:11 
2:51 
3:31 
411 

4 51 

531 
6 11 

6:51 

731 

811 
8 51 
947 



9:40 

10:20 
11:00 

1 1 40 



1:40 
2:20 
3:00 
3:40 
4:20 
5:00 
5:40 

620 

7:00 

740 

8:20 

900 

9:55 



BLOOM COUNTY 



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sm^ 




By JOHNNA PRO 

The snow outside hjsn't stop- 
ped the fashion industry- at all. Its 
time once again to start thinking 
about your spring wardrobe, and 
some local experts have some 
suggestions to help you look great 
in the new year. 

Last year's pastels have given 
way to high-fashion neon colors 
for both men and women. 

Blue, yellow and fushia, ac- 
cording to June McClead. Brody's 
sportswear buyer, along with mint 
green and peach will be hot this 
spring. 

The patterns will be news- 
paper or graphic printing rather 
than the 1984 safari theme Mc- 
Clead added. 

The most popular items for 
women w ill be the cotton sweater 
which is no longer thought of as 
winter wear, she said. The sweat- 
ers can be worn alone or teamed 
with a blouse. .■Xnd the look in 
blouses is oversized and detailed. 

Pants will remain cropped 
vith the tapered leg McClead said. 
•ind the pattern.'< will be striped or 
(Tint. 

For summer fun. walking 
>horts will be a popular look and 
sporty short coordinates w ill show - 
olf your best athletic style. 

If you're getting ready for a 
spring break on the beach, be 
ready to show off those sexy legs 
in a new high-cut bathing suit . The 
suits will feature vibr.int colors. 



latice work and lots of d« tails, said 
McClead. 

.\ satiny-chiffion chemise in 
a vibrant color will be great for 
formals or a night out on the tow n. 

The accessories for 1985 w ill 
be just as fun as the clothes, ac- 
i-ordingtoX'ickie.Altman. Brody's 
accessory buyer. Hose, jewelry, 
belts and scarves will be necessary 

to create a total look. 

Ho.-^e. textured orcolored. will 
bo verv popular this season and 
add just the right accent to longer 
skirts, cropped pants or evening 
dresses. 

Jewi-lry will be big. bold and 
bright said .■\ltman Wooden neck- 
laces will feature animal shaped 
dangles. Colors will be neutral or 
very bold Pearls, as long as 60 
inches, will be a must for your 
accessory wardrobe 

In addition to large-buckled 
belts, scarves will be an interesting 
addilioT for 1985. .ind they've 
takenona newdimension. "You'll 
see a lot of head and waist wrap- 
ping this year " .Mtman said 

Lace gloves forcasual evening 
wear will be seen this year. .Mtman 

added, and hals adorned with feat- 
hers, ribbons or veiling will top 
off your style. 

The right purse is important 
to your 1985 look as well, and this 
season sees the return of the do 'im 
bag. .Allman said. Large, textured 
purses, in high-fashion colors or 
small suit bags will be great buys. 



Union contest opens 



By DEREK WALLMAN 

Oenr, Sla'l Writer 

The Student Cnion Committee 
is looking for a few good names. 
The committee is going to be tak- 
ing suggestions for the name of 
the new Student Cnion in the form 
of a contest beginning the first day 
of the 1985 spring semester and 
continuing until March 8. 1985. 
.According to Stephen Keller, 
the chairperson <>f the Student 
Union Committee, the rules of the 

contest are as follows: 

1! Anyone except employees 
or members of the Student Cnion 
Corp. can submit a name 

2! A person can submit as 
manv names as thev wish. 



3! The entry must be post- 
marked before March 8. 1985 

■•.After all the names are sub- 
mitted, the Screening Committee 
will pick seven to 10 from those 
submitted. " Kellersaid. TheCo- 
op Board w ill pick a final three to 
five names from the Screening 
Committee's nominations Then 
those names will be put on the 
spring election ballot in which all 
the Co-op membership will vote 
on the names ' 

The contest does have a prize 
for the winning name, a $150 gift 
certificate at the Co-op. ' 




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Reagan pledges 
a "renewal" 



WASHINGTON (AP) -Ronald 
Wilson Reagan, standing on the 
landing of the White House grand 
staircase, swore the presidential 
oath for a second term yesterday 
before 96 guests and a national 
television audience. Outside, icy 
winds foretold the rigors of Mon- 
day's outdoor ceremony when Rea- 
gan reenacts his swearing in with 
public pomp and a declaration of 
".American renewal." 

The Republics 50th Inaugura- 
tion was the sixth to fall on a 
Sunday. Tradition held that the 
pageantry would come Monday, 
and allowed the president to relax 
and watch the Super Bowl with 
100 million other Americans 

It was 9 degrees outside when 
Reagan took his oath in the red- 
carpeted elegance of the executive 
mansions's State Floor. Forecast- 
ers were warning parade-goers 
that Monday could be the coldest 
public inaugural in history 

Presidential spokesman Larry 
Speakessaid Monday's inaugural 
speech — to be delivered from the 
West Front of the Capitol — would 
look forward to "an American 
renewal, continuing America's 
proud revolutionary tradition." 

Vice President George Bush 
was sworn in a minute before 
Reagan, with his friend, retired 
Supreme Court Justice Potter Ste- 
wart, returning from New Hamp- 
shire to administer the oath. 

Chief Justice Warren D. Bur- 
ger administered the oath to Rea- 
gan, who said: "I Ronald Reagan. 




Extra pounds sneak up 
49ers win Super Bowl during the college years 



By DAVE GOLDBERG 
Assoc/ared Pmss 

STANFORD, Calif. - If there 
is a league higher than the National 
Football League, the Miami Dol- 
phins will be glad to nominate Joe 
Montana and the San Francisco 
49ers for membership. 

Like a surgeon teaching his 
craft to a medical student, Mon- 
tana made a shambles of his quarter- 
back showdown with Dan Marino 
and the 49ers demolished the Dolp- 
hins 38-16 yesterday in Super Bowl 
XIX, leaving no question that the 
49ers are the NFL's Super team. 

"Dan Marino is a great quar- 
terback, but in my mind Joe Mon- 
tana is the best quarterback in 
the game today and maybe of all 
time, " said an exultant 49er coach 
Bill Walsh. 

"Marino will have hisday, but 
this was Montana's day and this 
was a San Francisco 49er year. 

"Without a doubt, this is the 
best football team in the National 
Football League today," Walsh 
added. "I think it's one of the best 
teamsof all time." 

The record book will verify 
that. The 49ers finished with an 
NFL-record 18 victories against 
one loss, and Montana, who en- 
tered the day as the league's No. 2 
quarterback behind Marino, emerg- 
ed No. 1. 

He threw three touchdown pas- 
ses and ran for another and set 
Super Bowl records with his 331 
yards passing and 59 yards rushing 
on five scrambles to win the MVP 
award for the second time in four 
years. 

He had exemplary help from 
Walsh's bag-of-tricks offense, 
from fullback Roger Craig, who 
caught two TD tosses and ran for 
a record third score, and from a 
defense whose pressure on Marino 
exceeded anything a Dolphin op- 
ponent had been able to do in this 
record-breaking season. 

"Our team did not rise to the 
occasion," Miami coach Don Shula 
said. "They're a heckuva offensive 
football team and we did not have 
the answer." 

Marino was intercepted twice 
and sacked four times. In two NFL 
seasons, Marino had not been 
sacked more than three times: he 
had been dumped only 13timesin 
18 games this season and not at 
all in two playoff games. 

"I think our whole offensive 
unit was great," Montana said. 
"We were hearing all week long 
about Miami and 'how are you go- 
ing to stop them''' I don't think 
people were thinking about our 
offense. That probably helped us." 

The game was portrayed as a 
dream contest between the NFL's 



And for this day at least, so 
was Walsh in his "genius" match 
with Miami's Don Shula. 

In fact, the game was com- 
petitive only in the first period. 

Miami took a 3-0 lead on the 
first of three field goals by Uwe 
von Schamann, lost it on a 33-yard 
TD pass from Montana to reserve 
running back Carl Monroe, 
then got it back on a brilliantly 

executed six-play, 70-yard drive 
engineered by Marino. 

Butthat 10-7first-quarterlead 
lasted only until Montana got the 
ball back. By halftime it was 28-16, 
by midway through the third pe- 
riod 38-16. That was fine with most 
of the 84,059 fans in Stanford Sta- 
dium, just 30 miles south of the 
49ers' home base at Candlestick 
Park. 

But there were other heroes 
besides Montana. 

His offensive line allowed him 
to be sacked only once and more 
often than not, he could have been 
in a rockingchair, looking around 
for receivers. When there were 
no receivers open, he simply took 
off. 

The 49erdefense, meanwhile, 
did what few teams did this year 
against Marino in a season in 
which he shattered NFL records 
with 48 touchdown passes and 5,084 
yards. 

With few exceptions — once 
on that first-quarter drive in which 
the Dolphinsoperated twice with- 
out a huddle to keep San Francisco 
from running its multiple defenses 
— Marino was forced to dump off 
rather than throw his customary 
deep patterns to the Marks Broth- 
ers. Clayton and Duper. 

Much of the credit went to a 
secondary that forced Marino out 
of his quick-release rhythm and 
forced him to hold the ball a second 
longer, as Fred Dean, Dwaine 
Board and the rest of the defense 
poured in on him. 

For the 49ers, it was also a 
victory for balanced offense. 

San Francisco picked up 211 
yards on theground, with Wendell 
Tyler leading the way with 65 yards 
in 13 carries and Craig adding 58 
on 15 runs. The Dolphins, mean 
while, could pick up only 25 against 
a 49er defense that gave up only 
one touchdown in three playoff 
games. 

Montana's 59 yards on five 
rushes broke the record of 37 set 
in Super Bowl XIII by Dallas' 
Roger Staubach, and his 331 yards, 
on 24-of-35 passing, broke the re- 
cord of 318 set by Pittsburgh's 
Terry Bradshaw in Super Bowl 
XIV. 

Marinofinished with 318 yards 
on 29 of 50. 



College Pnss Service 

STATE COLLEGE, PA - If 
you're a college freshman, arm 
yourself for a four-year battle of 
the bulge. 

A just-released study of Penn 
State students by nutritionist Jean 
Harvey and two other researchers 
reveals men gain an average of 
9. 1 pounds during their first year 
of college. Women average a nine- 
pound gain. 

And, the extra pounds sneak 
up each year. Sophomores gain 
7.3pounds while juniorsputon 7.8 
pounds and seniors 6.5 pounds, the 
study found. 

Many students blame fatten- 
ing dorm food, but Harvey says 
the study exonerates it. 

"Residence (on or off campus) 
wasn'ta factor in weight change," 
she states. "So students' claims 
that dorm or cafeteria food caused 
the gains aren't accurate." 

The questionnaire, sent to 
2,400 Penn State undergraduates, 
drew about 1,000 responses to 36 
questions about weight, eating, and 
exercise. Results show 67 percent 
of the men questioned and 62 per- 
cent of the women admitted gain- 
ing weight. 

Only senior respondents lost 
weight, apparently thanks to ex- 
ercise, Harvey says. 



Emotional and psychological 
factors, such as living away from 
home, weren't surveyed, but 
Harvey has "a feeling people at 
Penn State are planning a study 
to determine the influence of these 
factors on student weight gain." 

No one knows if all students 
put on pounds at the same clip 
Penn State students do. 

The American College Health 
Association shows no record of any 
national surveys similar to the 
Penn State study, though a 1978 
federal study determined college 
students were an average of six 
pounds heavier than the students 
of 1%8. 

Yet overweight students and 
health and nutritional concerns 
have prompted many colleges to 
implement diet and exercise pro- 
igrams. 

Wayne State University in 
Detroit bases weight control on 
behavioral methods to improve 
eating habits. 

Many student health clinics 
publish diet tips in campus news- 
papers, especially during the 
spring "get in shape" rush. 

In 1982, Stanford developed a 
dorm nutrition program, posting 
nutritional information for caf- 



lUP swim teams 
bring home tans, wins 



By CINDY CARMICKLE 

Penn Stall Writer 

Sporting their tans from a 
Christmas trip to Puerto Rico, the 
lUP men's swimming team swam 
to a 66-31 victory over first-year 
team Mercyhurst on Friday af- 
ternoon. 

Both the men's and women's 
swimming teams left for Puerto 
Rico on December 31 to workout 
and to compete in an invitational 
meet at Ponce. 

The lUP teams won the Invi- 
tational meet with 290 points (a 
combination of the men's and wo- 
men's scores) topping Division I 
Boston College by 45 points. 

The lUP swimmers stayed at 
the University of Puerto Rico at 
Mayaguez, a university similar to 
lUP in size, according to the men's 
coach Dave Watkins. The swim- 
mers swam twice a day in a 50- 
meter or long-course pool. They 
also visited six different beaches, 
which was evident from their tans. 

Watkins said that the people 



in Puerto Rico were very gracious 
and as far as he knows this was 
the lUP swim team's "first in- 
ternational experience." 

The men's team will be facing 
Clarion on Wednesday at lUP, it 
will be a tough meet for the men. 
"We should give them some good 
races. They always have great 
recruiting, ihey should win, "said 
Watkins. 

NOTES: The men's team swam 
the 500 yard freestyle, the 100 yard 
breaststroke, the 400 yard freestyle 
relay and dove the 1 meter diving 
for exhibition (no points) in the 
meet with Mercyhurst. 

Steve Kraus swam a 2.08 and 
captured first place in the 100-yard 
individual medley , qualifying him 
for the 400-meter individual med- 
ley at the conference meet. 

100 yard backstroke: 
First place - Doug Macek, 1.02.5i 
Second place - Jeff Vaughn, 51.7-( 
Third place - Mercyhurst. 



General education requirements reviewed 



By LINDA R. MILLER 

P»nn Staff Writar 

The student General Educa- 
tion Committee began Thursday 
to review the 52 credit hours re- 
quired for graduation in order to 
provide recommendations on the 
future of the general education 
curriculum. 

Chairwoman Diane Miller, a 
Student Government Association 
representative, said at the com- 
mittee's first meeting that she 
would like to bring out student 
concerns and complaints to better 



explain the need for any possible 
changes. 

The committee is comprised 
of two SGA representatives, two 
University Senate members and 
student representatives from 
lUP's school of business, educa- 
tion, fine arts, home economics, 
natural sciences and mathematics 
and humanities and social scien- 
ces. 

The group discussed problems 
that students have had or discre- 
pancies they have found within the 
realm of general education. Each 



$6 activity fee 
favored by 40 percent 



Results from Wednesday's act- 
ivity fee referendum indicate that 
students favor a $6 increase in the 
fee, but would sooner see cuts then 
pay $10 more. 

Official results show that 40 
percent of those who voted put a 
$6 increase as their first choice. 
20 percent put $10 first, 27 percent 
put zero first and 13 percent listed 
$3 first. 

1,440 I-card holders voted in 
the referendum, according to Co- 
op Board member Joe Johnson. 

Johnson said the results indi- 
cate that 62 percent of the voters 
favor at least a $6 increase, but 



that voters would sooner pay a $3 
increase then $10. 

Based on these results, John- 
son said he "can't justify" voting 
to raise the activity fee above $6. 

The referendum is non-bind- 
ing, and a two-thirds vote of the 
entire BOD is required for any in- 
crease. Several members of the 
Board have indicated they will vote 
according to the sentiment ex- 
pressed in the referendum. 

Percentages for the second 
choice were: $10 - 22 percent; $6 
-26 percent; $3- 45 percent; $0-8 
percent. 



member was asked to bring back 
suggestions in order to point out 
the most prevalent student con- 
cerns. 

"I definitely think we should 
broaden the numberofchoicesfor 
some general education 
electives," Suzanne Meyer, 
representative for the School of 
humanities and social sciences, 
said. Meyer explained that the 52 
general education hours make up 
almost half of an entire college 

career. 

Andy Yanosick, who repres- 
ents the health and physical edu- 
cation department, pointed out 
that some general education re- 
quirements become a problem for 
upperclassmen on the verge of 
graduation. Seniors often have 
difficulty in scheduling the 
remainder of their required 
courses, Yanosick said. Some of 
these seniors have needed special 
help on the pa rt of administration 
"just tograduate on time," he said. 

The committee also 
considered the possibility that 
some general education classes 
may be combined, deleted or 
added. Miller said that general 
education serves to offset the ma- 
jor courses that students are so 
concerned about doing well in. 



Cupid' ^ Seenel Wmpm 

^Cfl^lt and Cwvu^ CafimiiMA S.^Vh^i 

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Open tonight till 8:00 p.m. 
Valentine's Day, till 8:00 p.m. 



USSR 



Editor: 

We were rather disappointed 
with Mr. Arkady Shevchenko's 
speech on the U.S.S.R. for a 
number of reasons: 

1. he adopted a very superfi- 
cial approach on the subject; 

2. he used a number of cliches 
that are common-place in the 
American press; 

3. he underestimated our in- 
tellectual level by delivering a 
speech that would suit the 
"Housewives' Committee of Kit- 
tanning" nicely, but not University 
students. 

We were even more perplexed 
by reading the editorial in The 
Penn on Friday. February 22, 
vvlu'ii llic cr-jlif coiiip^rx'd Shev- 
chenko's speech with the one given 
by Dr. Sagan. How could he not 
see why Mr. Shevchenko would 
not make negative propaganda for 
the USSR.? Whatdo you expect 
from someone who quits or is ex- 
pelled from a business in which 
he/she had partaken for years? If 
you expect this person to make 
any sort of reliable statements on 
the subject you are showing a high 
degree of mgenuity. Please, do 
open your eyes. 

As the saying goes: "The 
worst blind man is the one who 
does not want to see." 

Sincerely, 
Oswaldo Faria 
Sanjay Avasthi 



Some of the general education 
requirements the committee dis- 
cussed include English I, II and 
III; foreign languages; physical 
education; humanities and social 
science electives; and education 
courses. 

SGA Representative Tina 
Buterbaugh said that many of the 
general education classes are not 
consistent from professor to pro- 
fessor. "One student's 'A' grade 
may only be equivalent to another 
person's 'C fromanothersection," 
Buterbaugh explained. 

The committee also addressed 
concern over classroom seats filled 
by students who are above the level 
of instruction. Yanosick said it 
would be better to "give the course 
to someone who really needs it." 

Soviet doctor 

says Chernenko 

'not' dying 

LOS ANGELES (AP) - A 
prominent Soviet heart specialist 
on Saturday sought to dispel 
speculation about Konstantin 
Chemenko's health, saying the 
Soviet president has been working 
and "that means he's not dying." 

However, Dr. Evgueni 
Chazov, director general of the 
USSR Cardiology Research Center 
and deputy minister of public 
health, declined to say whether 
the 73-year-old president and 
Communist head was healthy or 
ill. 

He cited strict adherence to 
the Hippocratic oath, saying he 
could reveal nothing about any 
patient's medical condition. 

"He is working, and if he's 
working that mean's he's not dy- 
ing" Chazov said at a news con- 
ference at the Physicians for Social 
Responsibility convention here. 



The group called Chazov the top 
cardiologist in the Soviet Union. 

Chazov would not say when 
ne had last seen Chernenko, but 
claimed Chernenko spoke to the 
USSR's ruling Politburo last 
Thursday. The Soviet news 
agency Tass also reported the 
speech. 

He said he is not Chernenko's 
personal physician but refused to 
say if he is his cardiologist. A 
London newspaper recently 
reported Chernenko had suffered 
a heart attack. 

Chazov instead repeated a 
recent statement by industrialist 
Armand Hammer, who has long 
had business relations with the 
Soviets. , 

"If you think Dr. Chazov is 
Mr. Chemenko's physician, and 
if he, Chazov, is here in the United 
States, that means everything is 
all right," Hammer said last week. 



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Intramural 

News 



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Intramural men's volley- 
ball has reached the midway 
point of competition, with sev- 
eral teams boasting perfect 
records. 

Sigma Tau Gamma and 
Sigma Nu are two such teams- 
Bolh are atop league A with 
records of 5-0. Sigma Nu has 
climbed from a fourth-place 
finish last year. Delta Tau Delta 
"A" holds a close second with 
a 4-1 record. 

League B is led by Kappa 



Sigma with a 4-0 record. After 
completing five games, Phi 
Sigma Kappa 'A" holds second 
in the league with a 4-1 record. 

Golden Express A.C. "A" 
dominates League C after 
winning all of its f iv-e scheduled 
matches. Two teams. Dirty 
Dealers A.C. "A" and Under- 
dogs AC "B " are tied for the 
second-place position with re- 
cords of 3-L 



9 
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-HAPPY WUHTIHES ;;• '■' ^ 

NG TOU SO rOU BHTER NOT ShuGGLE TOO 



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Ski Hut Hours: 

Mon, Tues, Wed, 
3:00 pm - 7:00 pm 

Van transportation leaving 
the Union each half hour. 



International peace key to 
Russia's economic problems 



By NANCY CONCELMAN 

Penn Conlributing Whl»r 

In order to solve domestic 
economic problems, the Soviet 
leadership needs a "peaceful in- 
ternational environment, " 
Russian defector Arkady 
Shevchenko said Wednesday night. 

Schevchenko, the Soviet Un- 
ion's highest-ranking defector 
since World War II, told a standing 
room only crowd in Fisher Audit- 
orium ' There is no unemployment 
in the Soviet Union, but nobody 
works." 

Forty percent of the people in 
the Soviet Union are manual la- 
borers, he said, and some of those 
laborers' salaries are less than 
some Americans' unemployment 
l)enefits. 

Contrary to a Soviet program 
which predicted that by 1980 the 
Soviet Union would surpass the 
United States in production, the 
Soviet Union's production is four 
times less than that of any deve- 
loped European country, Shevc 
chenko said. 



Although the arms talks' ob- 
jectives of the Kremlin and the 
U.S. government are contradic- 
tory, Schevchenko said, the talks 
are necessary because "the sur- 
vival of mankind may depend very 
much on how these relationships 
develop." 

The Sovi/et leadership is very 
comfortable with the military 
balance that exists between the 
Soviet Union and the United States, 
according to Shevchenko. 

Although the Soviets are ahead 
of the United States in conventional 
military forces and actual nuclear 
weapons, he said, the United States 
is ahead in technology with its 
"Star Waars" concept. 

The Soviets believe that the 
United States should stop 
researching and trying to create 
a "Star Wars " mililtary, he said. 

"The more sophisticated 
weapons technology becomes, the 
more we become prisoners of that 
technology," he said. 

In addition to working on its 



military relations and economic 
problems, the Soviet Union is 
preparing for the next conference 
of the Communist Party, Shev- 
chenko said. 

He rejected the belief that 
Mikhail Gorbachev has been 
chosen to succeed Chemenko. 

If that choice were made now , 
Shevchenko said, it would create 
two centers of power in the Polit- 
buro. 

Shevchenko also said that the 
United States shouldn't be fooled 
by "Soviet misinformation" that 
Gorbachev is more liberal and 
more involved with the Soviet 
people than other leaders were. 
Gorbachev,, has adopted the 
Kremlin ideology of isolation from 
the Soviet people and involvement 
with only high Soviet officials, 
according to Shevchenko. 

In dealing with the Soviet Un- 
ion, he said, the United States must 
understand that Soviet leadership 
emphasizes economic, military 
and political strength . If the United 
States fails to recognize this, the 
Soviets will "bully" the United 
States, Shevchenko said. 

At the same time, he said, the 

United States must remember that 

there is "not only a regime and a 

system within the Soviet Union, 

_there is a people there " 



Candidates for lUP presidency selected 



Four candidates for the lUP 
presidency will be interviewed 
on campus between Feb. 27 and 
March 20, according to the chair- 
man of the lUP presidential 
search committee. 

Dr. Charles J. Potter, also 
a member of the lUP Council 
of Trustees, has announced the 
candidates and their interview 
times as Eric R. Gilbertson, 
president of Johnson State Col- 
lege, Johnson, VT., Feb. 27-28; 
John D. Welty, lUP interim 
president, March 5 and 17; Wil- 
I'am C. Merwin, provost and 
vice president for academic 



affairs at the University of North 
Florida, Jacksonville, Fla., 
March 7-8; and James E. Gil- 
bert, vice president for aca- 
demic affairs at Pittsburg State 
University, Pittsburg, Kan., 
March 20-21. 

During their campus inter- 
views, the candidates will meet 
with the presidential search 
committee and with represen- 
tatives of various constituen- 
cies. 

According to Potter, the 
search committee anticipates 
recommending the names of 
three finalists to the lUP Coun- 



cil of Trustees at a soecial 
meeting to oe scheduled before 
ine end of March. Following 
council action, the finalists' 
names will t>e submitted as 
nominations to the chancellor 
and Board of Governors of the 
State System of Higher Edu- 
cation. 

Potter said there will be no 
furtner public cqmmeni about 
the search until after official 
action by the Council oi Trus- 
tees. 



Fencers top CMU 



By CINDY CAflMICKLE 

Psnn Statt Wriltr 

Ending its season on a positive 
note, the lUP fencing team de- 
feated CMU in all four areas of 
competition in their last match of 
the season. 

"CMU was our most formid- 
able opponent. We fenced with fury 
and beat them— I thank the whole 
team for that, " said senior Tim 
Powala. 

The lUP men fencers were 
divided into three teams for the 
contest. The "A team" was made 



up of varsity fencers Powla, Brett 
Schoenecker, Brendon Stokes and 
Brad Garrett. This team beat CMU 
10-6. 

The men's junior varsity fen- 
cers divided into "teams B and 
C", registering double victories 
(11-5 and 7-5 respectively) and 
•r.aking the JV team undefeated 
in the 1985 season. The memberi. 
of the JV team fencing against 
CMU were Mike Dibert, Dwayne 
Allison, Tony Fennell, Jeff Sulli- 
van, Rick Beiges, Jeff Baird and 
Robert Lepley. 



"We would like to credit Coach 
Nancy Barthelemy with our un- 
defeated season . She showed a lot 
of patience with us, " said the JV 
fencers in a group quote. 

Senior Mary Williams won all 
five of her bouts against CMU 
fencers. JoAnn Cayton, Kathy 
Fuge, Lisa Philipkosky and Betsy 
Peelor were all 3 and 2, which gave 
lUP a 17 to 8 victory over CMU. 

Williams said, "I see a lot of 
talent in the team coming back 
next year." 

"It was a great way to end the 
season," Schoenecker said. 



Columnist says 

Reagan made 

secret arms deal 



WASHINGTON (AP) -Pres- 
ident Reagan, in a "backroom 
deal, " informed the Soviet Union 
in September 1981 he woQId not 
seek ratification of the SALT II 
treaty. Jack Anderson reports in 
his Sunday column. 

The result of the secret 
arms deal," Anderson says, was 
that the Soviets built 500 more 
strategic missiles than the Stra- 
tegic Arms Limitation Treaty al- 
lows. 

"Not only was the American 
public kept in the dark about this 
possibly unconstitutional exercise 
of presidential authority, but 
Reagan didn't even tell the Senate 
about the secret agreement until 
two weeks ago, ' ' Anderson wrote. 

Calling it "Ronald Reagan's 
Yalta," the columnist said sena- 
tors who inquired about the 
"backroom deal " six months ago 
were led to believe no such agree- 
ment had been reached. Anderson 
said it came to light in a secret 
document sent to the Senate two 
weeks ago. He said the document 
contained the following "stunning 
admission: " 

In September 1981, the U.S. 
notified the USSR that it would 
not seek ratification of SALT II, 
thus relieving both parties under 
international law of any obligation 
with respect to the treaty." 

The document Anderson re- 
ferred to apparently was the clas- 
sified report Reagan sent to the 
Senate to supplement a public re- 
port accusing the Soviets of several 
violations of arms control agree- 
ments with the United States. 

White House spokesman 
Larry Speakes would not comment 
on the report. A State Department 
official, who insisted on anonym- 
ity, called the account of a secret 
agreement with Moscow "fan- 
tasy." He recalled that former 
Secretary of State Alexander M. 
Haig Jr. had declared SALT II to 
be dead. 

The Soviets knew from this 
and other public statements the 
treaty would not be submitted to 
the Sen ate, the official said. 

want to get away? 




r^^v 



Men's tennis opens against St. Vincent 



By GREGG LABAR 

Penn Stall V^nier 

The lUP men's tennis team 
opens its season tomorrow at home 
against St. Vincent. 

Leading the Big Indians into 
battle will be their top two players, 
freshman Brad Hanes and senior 
Tom Majeski. both graduates of 
North Hills. 

Majeski, the -No. 1 singles play- 



er last year, who was named In- 
tercollegiate Tennis Association 
Scholar-.Athlete of the Year, is 
expected to be spelled in the top 
spot by Hanes, a transfer from 
James Madison 

■'We're fortunate to get him 
(Hanes) here, " coach VinceCelt- 
nieks said. "Now we have two 
players who are better than most 
teams' top guy." 



Steady Ailck's opens 



"A Night You Can Remember," will be sponsored this 
Saturday at the Union. BACCHUS, Boost Alcohol Consciousness 
Concerning the Health of the University Students, is presenting 
the grand-opening of Steady Mick's. 

The non-alcoholic niteclub's name is a takeoff of steady 
mix, referring to alcoholic drinks. BACCHUS President Tim 
Vojtasko said the club's name is also the name of the greek god 
of wine. 

"BACCHUS is not a prohibition group," Vojtasko said, 
"We're interested in responsible drinking. We want to give 
students an alternative to fraternity parties and the bars." 

Vojtasko said that Steady Mick's will be held between Roy 
Rogers and the stairway in the basement of the Union. It will be 
open from 9 p.m.-l a.m. 

Next semester the niteclub will be held more frequently, 
Vojtasko said, if the idea catches on in the next weeks. 

"On the opening nights of non-alcoholic niteclubs at other 
schools," Vojtasko said "there have been around 900 people." 

He said that the most expensive drink will run about $1.25, 
and that will include chunks of fruit. Fruit drinks, fruit juices, 
soda pop and non-alcoholic Zing beer will be served at the bar. 
Non-alcoholic Tom Collins', Daquiris and other drinks will be 
available. 

Vojtasko explained, "If you want to go to a teno'clockparty 
and then come to the niteclub, that's OK. We are also hoping 
that we will get business from the movies shown at Pratt on 
Saturday niEhts. It would be a total evening's entertainment. 
The band (Nick Danger) is supposed to be very good this week- 
end. 

He said that BACCH uS includes about 20 students and advisors 
Kelly Heryla and Frank DeStaphano. The group is associated 
with the Pechan Health Center and has counterparts across the 
country. Their meetings are held in the conference room of the 
health center on Thursdays at 7 p.m. 

This weekend, enjoy yourself at the Union. It's an idea 
worth supporting. Good music, good friends and good fun. 
There's no admission charge; only a charge for drinks 



Another benefit of this year s 
team is its flexibility. Usually, 
Majeski and Hanes will be the No. 1 
doubles team and the No. 3 and 
four will team up and so w^ill five 
and six 

"We could easily switch this 
kind of thing (the doubles teams) 
but when things go well, and every^- 
body IS winning, there is no reason 
to consider any changes." Celt- 
nieks said 

.According to Celtnieks, this 
liexibility could be one of the im- 
portant aspects necessary for suc- 
cess. 

"The pressure is not on one 
guy to come through every time, 
Celtnieks sajd. 'It's not always 
the same guys who play well." 

Replacing last year's gradu- 
ates in the No. 3 and four spots are 
senior Tony Medvetz and jumoi 
Dan Misenhelter, Medvetz played 
in exhibition in his freshman year, 
and Misenhelter is a transfer from 
.Alliance College, where he played 
basketball. 

"The players have to realize 

XJR INK 



that there's also competition a- 
mong themselves. ' ' Celtnieks said. 
"There's always the chance to 
move up " 

Freshman Tim Nuss and jun- 
ior Les Laubscher round oiit the 
top six. However, Celtnieks. citing 
the case of Majeski, who started 
his lUP career as the No. 6 player, 
said that he expects some lineup 
shuffling. 

.After all. when one guy con- 
tinually beats another, you know 
that he deserves the higher spot." 
Celtnieks said. 

In the case of his squad. Celt- 
nieks said he expects this season 
to be an improvement over 1984. 

■'We were 5-1 on our trip down 
South without a lot of practice, 
and Brad was 3-3 against some 
pretty good players." Celtnieks 
said. "Sometimes we lack a little 
hustle, but we've got the talent to 
be better than last year " 

Of course, it will be no small 
chore to improve on an 8-4 record 
with Division I t«ams like Pitt and 
Robert Morris on the schedule. 




lUP's gymnasts break four records 



lUP Spans Information 

Despite the second-place fin- 
ish in Sunday's gymnastics meet 
against Division I schools, West 
Virginia and Eastern Michigan, 
lUP head coach Dan Kendig and 
his team are proud because they 
broke four school records 

West Virginia won the meet 
with a score of 180.15, lUP came 
insecondwith 171.50 and Eastern 
Michigan came in third with 170. 15. 

The team total vault score of 
45.05 and an individual record of 
9.35. broken by freshman Gina 



Cover, made up two of the broken 
records. With that score, Cover 
placed first in competition, fol- 
lowed by W'VU's Jan Funderburk 
with a 9.25 and Cahty Price with a 
9.20. 

"I feel that we've been doing 
so well on vault, " Kendig said. 
"The great thing is we have a few- 
other girls that can do even better 
than they did today. Because it is 
the first event in competition, it 
gives the team a lot of incentive 
and adds to their adrenalin. " 



These broken records con- 
tinued in the floor exercise, with a 
broken team score of 44.35. and 
sophomore .Amy Simms broke an 
Individual record with a score of 
9.25. Despite her high score. 
Simms came in "tfii'rd, next to 
first-place Funderburk and WVU's 
Cathy Price, with a 9.40. 

Unlike these events, the beam 
competition has been the weakest 
for the Lady Braves. WVU swept 
all three places, with Funderburk 
taking first with a 9,50. Price in 



second with a 9.35 and Shari Retton 
in third with 8.90. Going into the 
meet, Kendig felt that if his team 
hit beam in this meet that he would 
feel better about competing in the 
PS AC Championship. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Sufnme' positions S7 05 Sunmq rra N^unal hm has 
full line summer posioons m Akgheny/West UofMnc 
County areas Eiira hom availaUe- PossAe cole^ 
credii. schlorsnips Car netded. Intenm noa. son after 
finals Call H ain-4 pm in Ahgtatif Couiiy. cal 
8236690. Wesimoretand Counif. cal 832 8033 



1985: The Year in Sports 



By EDWARD R. JACOBS 

Pann Contributing Writer 

The athletic year of 1984-85 at 
times provided lUP with triumphs, 
and at times disappointments, but 
at all times interest. 

Space limits our opportunity 
to enumerate all of lUP's achieve- 
ments, but The Penn has attemp- 
ted to come up with a list of the 
most outstanding. 



September 

10 — lUP opens its football season 
at Bucknell and comes away an 
18- 17 loser thanks to a last-second 
field goal by the Bisons' Al Yunkus. 



October 

6 — The Big Indians defeat Edin- 
boro 56-16 but lose quarterback 
Rich Ingold for the remainder of 
the season. 

16 — Shippensburg beats lUP 2-1 
to eliminate the Lady Braves from 
the PSAC field hockey playoffs. 

19 — lUPobtains its first national 
ranking in football since 1969 — 
ranking seventh in the NCAA Div- 
ision II. 

20 — The women's tennis team 
places second in the 14-team PSAC 
championship in Hershey. 



November 

10 — A good news, bad news day 
as the soccer team defeats Gannon 
to win the Western Pennsylvania 
Intercollegiate Soccer Confer- 
ence title and the tootball team 
lost 31-14 to keep lUP out of the 
playoffs. 



December 

Helen Gilbey and Elisa "Weezie" 
Benzoni attain All-American sta- 
tus in women's cross country. 



January 

Five lUP water polo players are 
named Division II AU-Americans. 
Chuck LaCroix, Mike Scherer and 
Greg Shibley make the first team 
while Al Williams and Brian 'Young 
make the second. 
26 — lUP places nth at the PSAC 
wrestling tournament in Blooms- 
burg. 



February 

Langton and Frank Paz are named 
Ail-Americans in soccer. 
13 — Cindy Davies sets a school 
record with 38 points in the Lady 
Braves 81-67 victory over Clarion. 



27 — Mike Wilson's slam dunk as 
time runs out sent California on to 
the playoffs and ended the Big 
Indians' season. 



March 

2 — The Lady Braves gymnastics 
team wins the PSAC crown in a 
meet held at lUP. 

3 — Gannon defeats the Apache 
hockey team, 4-2, to eliminate lUP 
from the playoffs for the fifth 
consecutive year. 

21 — Davies is named the PSAC 

Western Division Most Valuable 

Player. 

30 — The gymnasts finish eighth 

at Nationals in Springfield, Mass. 



April 

Apache coach Jim Hickey is nam- 
ed the West Penn College Hockey 
Association coach of the year, and 
three of his players make all-stars. 
Dave Brown, Loran Tyler and 
Lloyd Cravener receive those ho- 
nors. 

25— The lUP golf team took its own 
Invitational with a nine-stroke vic- 
tory over Slippery Rock. 



May 

4 — California sweeps a double- 
header from lUP's baseball team 
to keep it from making the PSaC 
•playoffs. 

S. Trevor Hadle> 

Union Building 

dedicated 



Great disappointments of '84- '85 

By EDWARD R. JACOBS appointments of 1984-84. Union " I was expecting something 

Penn ConiributingWnier Bruce Morgan was not on the exciting like "The Teepee." 

The 1984-85 academic year David Letterman Show Paul Wass did not get in a 

turned out to be an action packed Bruce Morgan did not receive fist-fight with any students during 

year for lUP. An individual's ugli- phone call from President Reagan. his campaign visits here, 
ness suddenly become an asset. ITZAPizza went under. I know Paul Wass won again. 

Spaghetti and Jello transcended you're all crying. The Atrium, 

the dinner table and became a ^° O"^ asked me to audition _ The Football Team, 

wallowing medium. While most for The Men of lUP Calendar Part ' The Basketball Team, 

students try desperately to avoid " The Baseball Team. Why did 

the language requirement, some No one ran a pig for Home- they all lose the only games thuc 

students were upset that they could coming Queen. mattered. 

not have a particular Spanish No one asked me if I wanted Someonespentmy money for 

professor. Welty to be President again. David -Brenner and didn't throw 

Somehow, it all seemed to fade The lUP Shop did not sell co- in an exciting bombscare. What's 

in the recent dreams of no more P'es of tests or diplomas the Activity Fee for anyway? 

finals, but beforeyougoaway with The lUPShopdidnt .sell any- The M.I.M. Weekend Need I 

those fond memories, let's look Ihing I would ever want to buy. say more. 

back on wha*. turned out to be a The Union was inventively I neverhad Dr. DeCostafora 

year of big flops and disappoint- named "The S. Trevor Hadley class, 

ments. . 

Here they are; The great dis- house for summer PFR^DNAL'^ 

BIG. INEXPENSIVE, 1 5 girls across from McDonalds, _ '^ *- ''^ 

Single rooms. Call X5486, X5491 „ ,; ,5 „j„j, „,„„^q^,„^ ,„ „3„„,„„,, „ , „ ,^ 

ArAn I Mb NTS •••• ••••■•, here' Manequmsm Maumonyi M 1 M IS HERE 

NEEDED 1 or 2 girls lor summer house Call Michelle ai 

One gill needed 10 fill apaiimeni on Philly Sueei Fall and 349 6719 ' '- 

Spring Will have OWN ROOM Call 349 6?37 "'"- Congraiulaiions on becoming our new ANCHOR 

One MAIE need'edio l.ll'hiu'se' o'l lour,' one' blo'ck'ir'om "*""" «'"""' *<>"'« """Derf"" t"", ihe Sisiers and 

HOUSE FDR RENT Summer S250 including ulilmes 1 4 campus Call 463 D7 11 or 349 3663, ^"S" ° °* " ^"""^ 

people needed locaied behind Prait CallVicki357 4663 

Pun.yCampus.Furnishedhumene'ar'c;m'p;s;.'he'aor;ni °° ""^ ^"^ GRADUATION BASHi Roas, pig, chicken, 

THE GOOD TIME RANCH needs a lew good men, 12. °"' ""* "°" ""'"""^ beverages 10 be M.ti Buy your 

reasonable rent Imeresied" 465 7668, NOW" Summer housing, 1-2 girls Ouiei' raohb'orhn'nrt "h,'„ '"^^"^ " "'' ^"""^ "°*" ^"^^ '"*' '""^ "" ^"^^ 

, ... hark.arrt S9n ,l».t r.ii o.o „-,,.' """^ "'' "ouse houdy. sianing al noonin DON T MISS ITm 



By KAREN A. TIESLER 

Penn Contributing Writer 

Saturday, April 20, marked thi 
official dedication ceremonies o 
the newly-named S. Trevor Hadle; 
Union Building which its name 
sake portrayed as a place to learn] 
about others. 

"We dedicate this building t 
the highest education-a concern 
for others, " said S. Trevor Hadley. 

A 50-year veteran of the Stu- 
dent Cooperative Association ati 
lUP, Hadley was described by C. 
Shaw Smith, the dedicatory 
speaker, as having made the union 
possible. 

" "His clear vision of need and 
understanding of students made 
possible the dedication of this 
building today, " Smith said. 

"The union is a statement of 
genuine concern for the welfare 
of others and of a sense of com- 
munity, " said Hadley. "It is a 
house that belongs to us." 

A brief history of the Union 
was given by President John D. 
Welty. ( 

In April, 1981 a committee of 1 
the Student Cooperative Associa 
tion recommmended expansion 
and renovation of the Student Un 
ion be looked into. By September 
1983 a design proposal was ap 
proved on a campus referendum, 
which meant a $19 rise in the ur- 
tivities fee. 

To raise the $6.6 millinn 
needed, "tax-exempt bond funding; 
was decided on," according le 
Welty, and work on the new Union , 
began in February 1984. 

The dedication address w.is 
given by C. Shaw Smith, a well- 
known advocate and speaker on 
behalf of the college union concept 
Later in the day. Smith performed ^ 
as the Wacky Wizard, his second 
career being a professional ma 
gician. 

From a recent survey of un 
known origin. Smith cited that "75 
percent of the young people toda 
feel no reason to pass anyth 
on." That can't be possible, a 
cording to Smith, or the Uni( 
building would not be here toda 



idav 1 
liiigf 



Seniors create scholarship /^rFiP^^ 

■The senior class is going to The committee has also in- V ,! t}A ^ S^^ To™fH^y^''^T *"'!"»!' ™ 

D ,t like its never been done be- troduced a competition among all ^sS^^'Sfe "0^^^ "^ ' ' ''""' "' "^'^ 

»re' according to ReneeFome, campus organizations to promote \f~if 1 iM ^ \ 

nairperson for the Senior Schol- the endowment. Theorgan;zation f t i \^ ^ V^ OGi«mmm'a'l>is.-nK^i,^'H^'Ja!q^xii 

rship Fundraising Campaign, that raises the most money will t^m^^ t^^^m^r' What else could gossWy 30 wnoNG^ *tia else coJd 

ThpniimospofthUramDaiPr^^'"'''''^^'°2"^"^^'"^'^^P"'"-'*"'" d -J ^tt ^-^ 4 g" mp' What elsa could « fa-get' it «s fun iny«aY5i ITB. 

s fonhS^rclIss'^^ucfa^he President's Apartment hosted 4^^tU^ ^ 

and-ra.ser to estabU.sh a $10^00^ 5,>^;>;-|,'J T-IiTb?"! ffciau" ?ec: M® *'^ ^etaVau-a^-haV^^.- ■.^■{.i^;,^ 

ndowment for student scholar- /, .. ^^^ physique booybuilding contest fisteA«(ta™in,. 

hips. The SIO.OOO will be invested^S"'^'^""^^'^'^""'^ TTTT"""""""""^""" Sunday. Aflnizi 5 pm . Aa proceeds GO to asso 

)v the Foundation ior lUP. and "lam^xtremely proudof the i«ts rhank3fof8»«Y*-rgaiGreei.s.ng Youguysitd ciation FOMETAflOEO Citizens" 

he earnings from it will be used toseniors who have provided the [^^^^"^ ""' "" "^ "" ' 9'^' °™' L»«- ™ 

ponsorasecond-sen;iesterjunior leadership in developing the Se- Robyn Yog looked great add 1 dad Die best ome at the 

vith an overall grade point aver nior'S Society." Welty said. ~VlM BEflNVeEV' togra^^n; oVa ioi Wll toe J^-^^^S-a forn^. Thanfc so much and dave a good t>me 

ige of 3.0, who is involved anc the members of the win- Wecouidnttiave done .t«ttioui»ou'iTKEs and ZTAs 

ictive on campus. ^.^^ organization aren't the only '" ""^ '°° "'""'" ^'- ^ ^^ ^"^ °'"«'^ -tYimE MfHw;Y'-c<;„g,;t;a;oo; '..'^om^'iie 

Because the original SlO.OOOonestoreceiverecognition. Every- •PAuipfl'EOMOflrtobfV^inV'o'u; te'g^et ne«Panheiien,cSec™o'Lo«. alpha gamma oaTA 

.•ill never be used, this will enable one who contributes to the fund :>ng such a good omei You Ma great ,otisrgmg Love iinif^'«imfB'HU"L"*,VJo4';;„HL',l^f' 

ollowing classes to add to the en- will not only become a member of D,ane ps Be.™ •« ■ g.dua,e. *e .a,e ,0 panyn Zlm'^X^^^T^Z^l 

lowment, and continue the tradi- the Senior s Society but, will also ^^^ ^ 

ion receive a button. These contribu- sisters and pledges Of asa.eee. ha. kd. phi mu. 

The lUP council .f Trustees 1°-:;SJ3^-^^^^^^^^^ m IZ ^E Vs'X^.^^^I^Z ^-^-^^^^^.^^^^n '^ 

.as agreed to donate S4,400 on a in the foundation for IL P s 1984-85 „y(;Es,j^„33 thanks for your pahticipa^on 3«' -"i « d« foma. Big Lauta 

me-to-one gift matching basis for Annual Kepon. j^o niuiuBlR you are au winners in our .nj*,;; ".'J k' ' V ; 

his first-time event this leaves .^we <the committee, have ,^,^^«^^s^;vE. the pledges and brothers of Z::^Zf:.Z"t<^J^::t:L'!Z'^ 

he remainder for the senior class also received support from the ^"-•««'-"' 

raise. senior class officers who have O 1 a 

■inordertoa.hieveourgoaa^^todonatet^^^^^^^ StUdent StrCSS HlOUntS 

torthescholarship.thecommittefthe Senior Bash to this ettort, 

needs every senior to donate a' Fome commented. 4. "U * 4.' ' £" 

least $3,- Forne said. "This support also gives up- tlllS time 01 VCar 

-Due to the generosity of the coming graduating classes a won- ^^,,^ ^^^„, ^„ "^ 

10 committee mem.bers and sev- derful opportunity to raise the By DAVE KEEBLHR it affects us physically and emo- 

>ral senior class n:embers, we amount of the original endow-men; Penn staff wmer tionally." 

lavealreadv received S360m pledges for desening student scholarships, CoUege students face an in- Lunberg also spoke about the 

»,d cash donations,' she added, added Kathleen L. Mack Foun- credib e amount of stress at this main stressors in college 'One is 

dation representative for the com- time of year, according to Kelly separation from your family for 

mittee Lunberg, a counselor at Indiana an extended period. You meet new 

TTr 7 V T Guidance. Tests, Christmas and people and make new friends," 

1/1/ O I T^J V^ n V^l/I n ri possible money problems com- Lunberg said. 

YY icily riLirrlt^Cl pound the stress problem. "Another is freedom-you 

y Lunberg spoke to an audience have no one to tell you what to 

^^ ^^^ , of about 50 Monday night on how do," Lunberg said. -Competition 

TT TT> D »* XI o -f' ^ x^ T^ ^ '° '^. 1^ '" ^ '*"'* *°J"^- , A . *s another. You compHe for 

I LJ r rrPSluPVlT }^'V^l^ ^" ^^J"^ ^'^ ^r g^-^des, jobs, friends a^ more. 

X.^^-1. J. /l^iJI^Ht^/l^l. mand, Lunberg said. ".Any ad- How much stress is worth it- 

lustment up or down is stress. In addition. Lunberg said peer 

HARRISBURG-Dr. JohnD. Welty, 40, will receive an an- Everyone has stress thresholds; pressure and career are stressors 

iVelty was named lUP president, nual salary of $58,500, some are higher than others." "You're urged to make a decision 

yesterday, effective July 1, 1985 McCormick said that he based There are several factors contri- Maybe your parents want some- 

)y the Board of Governors of the his recommendation to the Board luting to stress, according to Lun- thing different than you do " 

;tate System of Higher Education, on interviews he and his staff ''^'"S- 'Stress can be biological Lunberg also said there are 

Welty, formerly lUP vice pres- conducted with the three candi- (inherited, , psychosocial (caused two types of people AanlB "Atype-A 

dent of student and universitiaf- dates for the position that lUPs by parents,, social<ultural (social person is eager, competitive, does 

airs, has served as interim jjres- Council of Trustees selected for class, or roles (a woman seeking things rapidly, cant sit still and 

dent of the university since July his consideration. ^ career,, " she said. do^s everything at a fa'st pace " 

The appointment became of- lUP trustees voted on March Stress can also be a good thing, she said. "A type-B person is op- 

icial when the 16-member BOG 29 to forward the names of Welty, ' " is thednve that motivates us, posite, more laid back " 

oted unanimously at its public L'niversity of North Florida Pro- Lunberg said. "We dd need U in Because ofthe stress, a type-A 

aeeting to accept SSHE Chancel- ^'o^t William C. Merwin and Vice °^^ lives Jbut we must know how person runs a higher risk of having 

irJamesH.McCormick'srecom- P'"^s'^^"'f°'''^cacemic Affairs at """■ 
lendation that Weltv be chosen Pittsburg State University (Kan- 

,fin»K„r,„o. „o^.,.<.^K,.r>.. i„hr, sas, James E. Gilbert to McCor- 
J fill the post vacated bv Dr. John ^.^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^ 

'.. Worthen, who serv'ed as TUP f^om a list of four candidates 
iresident from 1979-84. presented to the Council by the 

I very deliberately with my university presidential search com- 
taff interviewed the candidates, mittee. which reportedly reviewed 
IcCormick said. 'I tned to look yi applications during its nation- 
ery carefully at their track record wiae search 



/' 



O 



•rr^o-"; 



nd academic credentials. 



"I've been very impressed 



Welty was also interviewed by ^ith the way Dr. Welty has been 
le 16 members of the BOG. able to bring together the lUP 

academic community." McCormick 
said. " I'm sure he will do a very 
fine job." 



BEAIWORLD 



^^^^ 




1. Oak Advertising Representatives 2. 
Thie 1985 OAK Staff 3. Oak Photogra- 
phy staff 



* 





THE PEOPLE BEHIND THIS BOOK 



In 1912 the first regular yearbook was produced at Indi- 
ana; it was called the INSTANO (INdiana STAte NOrnnal 
School). This class annual was renamed the OAK in 1928 
when Indiana became a state teachers college. The staff, 
which consisted of an Editor-in-chief, section editors and 
assistants, a business staff, a literary staff, a photography 
staff and advertising representatives, worked hard this year 
to create an interesting and accurate record of the years' 
Changing Times. 



289 





\ 



\) 



i 



f i 



/ 1)1 ^ *' 



I 



Jackie Janosik 

The 1985 OAK saw many "Changing Times" throughout 
the year, but through them all, somehow, some way, Nicole 
and I made it to the end. Unbelievably, I really did. I graduat- 
ed two weeks ago, but right at this moment as I type my last 
piece of copy for the '85 OAK, I finally feel graduated. This 
school year turned out to be an incredible learning exper- 
ience. Starting out from scratch, the staff and I hod to learn 
not only to work with each other, but to find the most effec- 
tive way of taking photos, writing copy, doing layouts and 
staying "organized." Some extra thanks to: My patient 
roommates who transferred all my calls to the yearbook 
office and took a million messages for me, Janice for keep- 
ing me sane, Davor Photo employees for printing all the 
photos that I ordered even though I went way over my print 
allowance, C.T, Miller for helping me with the entire book 
and for passing Memo Writing 101 Colleen for visiting me 
down in the cellar of Lawrence Hall always with a D.C., and 
for helping me with The Changing Times, Mary Lou for writing 
all of those last minute stories, and The Penn staff and Jim for 
their photos and, articles and for taking the senior portrait 
phone calls. Most of all I would like to thank the Staff that 
kept with me till the end of the Times! 



Nicole Sicliak 

While the editorial end of the Oak was presided over by 
Jackie, I was responsible for the business end. In other 
words, I am the reason you are now holding this yearbook 
in your hands. You see, your check had to pass through 
my hands along with the telephone bills, postage bills, 
printing bills — you get the picture. As busines manager of 
the 1985 OAK, I learned a lot about what it takes to get a 
book into print and then out to the customer. Together, 
Jackie and I put a lot of time into producing and selling this 
book, and I think we did a pretty good job? (I won't 
guarantee you'll get anything for it at the annual Co-op 
book-buy-back). It wasn't all fun and games working in 
our cramped little office in the basement of Lawrence Hall 

— yes, that's where the yearbook office was this yeor — 
but with our great staff and adviser, Jim Devlin, our prob- 
lems were minimal. So, as I leave lUP, with my marketing 
degree, I'll also take with me my experience with the Oak 

— one I'm sure I'll never forget. 



291 



CARD CONNECTION 



731 Phitadelphia St. 

hdana, PA 15701 

349-6333 



you can 
count on us! 

for all 

your banking 
needs! 






National Bank 
of the Commonwealth 

.the people you can count on 
for your money! 







THE CO-OP 
BOOKSTORE 

Your headquarters for all UP items 
Cong-Qtiiotes the graduates of 1985 



GATTI PHARMACY 

840 Philadelphia St 

Indiana, PA 15701 

349-4200 



The OAK Staff 

Congratulates 

me Class of 1985 



292 




293 





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TOM'S PIZZA 

Open 7 days a week 

4 p.m.-1 a.m. 

Fri. & Sat. 4p.m. -2 p.m. 

Call us, we deliver free 

463-7960, 463-7494 



294 




295 



1985 OAK STAFF 

Editor-ln-Chief 
JACKIE JANOSIK 

Business Manager 
NICOLE SICHAK 

Photography Editor 
LISA DeHAINAUT 

Asssitant Editor 
AUSON RIGBY 

Academics Editor 
LISA TRASSERT 

Assistant Academics 
MELISSA TAYLOR 

Activities Editor 
DEBBIE COX 

Assistant Activities 
CANDI NACE 

Organizations and Greeks Editor 
PAULA ANDERSON 

Assistants 
DEBI BAUDER and JIM BIGHAM 

Sports Editor 
CINDY CARMICKLE 

Seniors Editor 
LAURIE BUCK 

Marketing Manager 
SUE KIELAROWSKI 

Literary Editor 
LAURIE KOZBELT 

Literary Assistants 

AMY GRABOWSKI 

MARY ALTMIRE 

Contributing Writers 

MIA GEIGER. MARY LOU KILEY 

MOLLY SANDER. PENN STAFF WRITERS 

Photography Staff 
Bin MUSANTE, DEANN HADIX, KAREN STEINMETZ. ANNETTE 
PUZZO. EILEEN McGILL. LAURIE MOYER 



COLOPHON 



Volume 57 of the Indiana University of Pennsylvania 
OAK, produced and edited by the 1985 OAK Staff, was 
published by Herff Jones Yearbooks in Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania. 

It was printed in offset lithography in a limited edition of 
800 copies with 296 pages 

The paper stock used throughout the book is 80-pound 
bordeaux gloss. The cover is a vibratex special material 
in brushed silver. All the elements are silkscreen in dork 
red. It is mounted on 120 point binder's board. 
The endsheets are school designed in two colors on 
100-pound white paper stock. 
The book is smyth sewn in 16-page signatures, trimmed 
to 8 X 11, rounded and backed with head and foot 
bands. 

In oddition to the black ink used throughout, there are 
four flats of four-color and seven of spot color. 
All captions and body copy is done in 8 and 10 point 
Avont Garde Book using bold, italic and bold/italic as 
the emphasis type faces. Times Roman is an additional 
type face used on pages 276-287. Heads appear in 18, 
36, and 42 point Avant Garde Book, Avant Garde 
Demi Italic and Bingham Script, 
Photography done by Davor Photo Inc., 654 Street 
Road, Bensalem, Pennsylvania. 
For further information contact the 1985 OAK Year- 
book Office, Pratt Hall, Indiana, PA 15705, 357-2728 



Contributing Photographers 
BRETT BRUMBAUGH, JEFF LLOYD, PENN STAFF PHOTOG- 
RAPHERS 

Adviser 
JIM DEVLIN 

Advertising Representatives 
SUSAN BEAHM, GWEN WAGNER, KAREN STEINMETZ, 
JUDY SECRETO, EILEEN McGILL 



296 



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