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Full text of "Obiter"

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Obiter 1980 vol. 64 



Bloomsburg State College 
Bloomsburg, Pa. 
)o Ann Borski, Co-editor 
Todd Moyer, Co-editor 






Student Life ... Living 16 

Faculty and Administration 

. . . Guiding 38 



Academics . . . Learing 

Sports . . . Striving 

Seniors . . . Achieving. 

Events . . . Exciting 

Organizations . . . Doing 
Epilogue . . . Closing 



...54 
...62 
.108 
.172 
.208 
.266 




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Academics 
Learning 




10 




11 




12 




13 



Organizations 
Doing 










14 




15 



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By Todd Moyer 

College days at Bloomsburg were filled 
with experiences one could never have 
at home. Getting away, meeting other 
people, and living on one's own is 
what college life is about. It is 
living in the dorm, going to a party 
it is barely passing a test, it is 
staying up all night with a friend to 



study for a final. Playing pinball, 
reading a chapter, then watching 
General Hospital in the T, V. lounge 
is what makes up a student's life. Yet, 
there are those who say there is nothing 
to do here. There is plenty to do, but 
one must make the initiative to find 
it. College is what one makes it. 






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Clocwise from top right: School pride is shown 
by the Husky pin, while another kind of school 
spirit is shown at the student demonstration. To 
enjoy yourself is the name of the game whether 
it be a daring night at the Commons, 
participating in homecoming, or fraying in the 
winter, students enjoyed themselves. 





Living in dorms 
is an experience 
for everyone. 

Walking down the hall, one can hear a 
variety of sounds. Albums blaring from 
their stereo speakers, laughter, scream- 
ing, swearing, and more laughter. This 
is a dorm. The place that houses the 
freshmen, sophomores, and some jun- 
iors. For many students, this was the 
first time they had a roommate. Most 
of the students found their roommates 
likable or at least tolerable. Then of 
course one has the neighbors. It soon 
gets to the point where no one really 
stays in their own rooms. Constant 
motion and activity, along with the 
concert level music from stereos, 
makes the dorm an exciting place. It 
seems as though the only time the 
place is quiet is at 3 a.m. or during 
finals. On the last day, a bit of sorrow 
is felt as one packs away the memories 
of the year in the dorm. 




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Wash days are never really that exciting. Students 
soon discovered what mothers knew for years, 
that doing the wash was no picnic. With his 
Presto cornpopper, below, John Updegrove 



makes some popcorn to help stop the midnight 
munchies. Poppers were great to have in the 
dorm to make a quick snack. 




Door decorations, for birthddss or when 
pledging a sorority, hung in the girls' dorm to 
add some brightness to the dreary hall. 




Sporting events, game shnu. .mil even General 
Hospital brought the students from their rooms 
to take in a few hours of T. V. before hitting the 



books. Of course there were the days, below, 
when students like Laura DeAngelis had to stay 
in and finish typing their papers. 




Making a crucial move is Kevin Gallagher, left, 
during a backgammon match. Backgammon was 
a popular game in the dorms along with poker. 



Packmg up his memories with his suitcases and 
bags as he prepares to leave the dorm, the noise, 
the shaving cream, and his friends. 




Buckets of brushes, soap, shampoo, curling irons, 
and who knows what else, were always the 
companions of the girls as they strolled to the 
showers. 




Off campus living is enjoyable 
with odds and ends and friends 



\ k\ 



Off campus living can be alot of fun, 
but it can also be alot of work. To 
begin with, one must gather a group of 
friends that have the want to make a 
go of apartment living. The next ob- 
stacle is finding a place to live and 
dealing with the world of landlord, 
rents and people who resent the col- 
lege population. No matter how hard a 
student tries, one never knows the 
type of apartment they will have until 
they live there. One group of girls this 
year discovered peep holes in their 
apartment walls while another house 
was condemned. Despite these few 



setbacks, there are some advantages. 
One gets to live in a more home-like 
atmosphere that no dorm could sup- 
ply. Parties can be held without worry. 
There are no resident assistant's (R.A.'s) 
around to bust the party and no dorm 
deans to explain to about the bust. 
Decorating the apartment is always in- 
teresting. Odds and ends from every- 
one's homes are used to create inter- 
esting and comfortable surroundings. 
With the group of friends and no rules 
and odds and ends, the year seems 
easier to handle. 





(iinirelc sKiirs, above, lead up to the campus 
and provide daily exercise to those who live on 
Lightstreet road pictured below. 



Living with four to six people can be alot of fun 
especially in those times when a warm spring 
day rouses one from the house and into a lively 
game of volleyball with the roommates. Close 



relationships are formed between friends by 
living together each day and growing together 
each day. 




20 





ApcirtmtMit hunting can be very discouraging at right, add yet another problem to living oft 

times. Even some residents of Bioomsburg do not campus. Parking tickets were very popular with 

like to rent to students of the college. In security this year, 
addition to apartment hunting, parking tickets, 




Mailboxes In the Kehr Union are where off campus students go to see if by some accident there is a letter In the box for them from a 
friend. 



21 



New Look for 
campus fashion 
trends in 1980 



Students began to dress up this year 
more than they did in other years. The 
faded blue jeans and T-Shirts, although 
still around, were replaced with de- 
signer jeans and velour tops. Velour 
was also popular with the men on 
campus who chose to wear them with 
various shades of cords or cotton 
pleated pants. Blazers and the prepie 
look were definitely a part of this year. 
For both men and women, blazers, 
cords, sweaters, small collared cotton 
shirts and docksider shoes made up 
the prepie look. Formal wear consisted 
of the slit skirt and ankle strapped 
shoes for the women and suits with 
small lapels, small collared shirts and 
the skinny tie for the men. Shoes con- 
sisted of "duckies," clogs with heels 
and candies. Even the hair changed as 
braids and combs were used for 
women as the hair length went short 
for men. For school use, backpacks for 
books and down vests were popular. 
The most popular T-Shirt was Mr. Bill. 
It was a dress-up year at B.S.C. 




Three-piece suits are worn by many women. The 
new addition is the skirt and the heavy use of 
tweeds for the fall and winter months. 



Slit skirts are really popular this year for both 
formal and casual wear, along with the velour 
top. The prepie look, right, is also popular. 




On her way to class is Mary Beth Kotanchik with 
her books in her backpack while she begins her 
walk up to the campus grounds. 



Blazers are popular for the college men as shown 
by Tom Jones, left, and Mark Bujno. Tom also is 
wearing the small collared cotton shirt with an 



additional shirt to create a layered look. Mark 
decided to go prepie today as he wore his blazer 
and sweater along with his cords. 



22 





Chilly winter mornings are perfect for the warm 
down vests which come in many styles and 
colors to brighten up cold winter days. 



Hairstyles for women were the popular Bo Derek 
braids which hung down to the shoulders with 
beads on the ends. Another popular style is for 
girls to braid their hair to the scalp and gather it 



in the back as shown by Helen Marie Carr who 
also is wearing the popular sweater and shirt 
combination. 





Shoe styles, from right to left, clogs with heels included ankle strapped shoes and for the warm 

and candies, docksiders for the prepie look and a weather tri-colored thongs in blues, reds, and 

new shoe called "duckies" which are worn browns. 
mostly in the wet weather. Other shoe styles 



Disco is the look for ludy Horn with her baggie 
pants, ankle strapped shoes, and the "Chineese" 
styled quilted jacket with small lapels. 



23 









Luzerne Hall residents are hanging their banner expressing their feelings about the high cost of tuition In Pennsylvania. 

Class boycott and demonstration 
fight high cost of college tuition 



On October 24, students rallied 

in a demonstration against higher 

tuition for the spring semester. 

The protest was sponsored 

by C. A. S. (Commonwealth Association 

of Students) who urged, not forced, 

students to boycott their classes. 

According to C. A. S., the empty 

classroom symbolized three different 

events. First, the empty seats 

refered to students who will 

no longer be able to attend college 

due to rising costs. Secondly, 

no professor symbolized the personnel 

either retrenched or facing that 

fate. Finally, an empty classroom 

showed a dim picture of the possible 

deterioration of higher education. 

The day started out briskly; the 

picketers outside the classrooms 



walked, jumped, and stamped their 

feet to keep warm. They appeared at 

the classroom buildings at 7:45 a. m. 

Around 10 a. m. a large crowd gathered 

outside the library to chant and 

picket to the music of WBSC. 

A few of the members of the marching 

band also joined the demonstration 

and led the throngs in a grand 

march around the campus and then 

up to the administration building 

to show the administrators how 

the students felt. A small group 

of demonstrators went inside the dorms 

to get the rest of the students 

out of their beds. Later that 

afternoon approximately 1,500 students 

turned out to listen to faculty 

and officials state their feelings 

towards the boycott and the protest. 




Students were urged to phone into Harrlsburg 
and voice their opinions about tuition as a 
prelude to the actual demonstration on the 24th. 



24 




Music is provided by WBSC, the college radio 
station, as early as 8 a. m. on the day of the 
protest to keep the spirits of the demonstrators 
moving and to make announcements, while 



below, the students gather at the library prior to 
the march about the campus and to the 
administration area. 



In addition to the protest, 
C. A. S. also sponsored two other 
events. One was a phone in day 
when students would go to the 
C. A. S. office and call Harrisburg 
and ask them not to raise the 
tuition. This was done to jam the 
telephone lines for one day. The 
other event was the signing of $50 
monopoly money bills and sending 
them to Harrisburg, since the tuition 
would be raised by $50. The real 
victory came after a few days of 
the boycott when Secretary of 
Education Robert Scanlon told 
in a news conference that tuition 
would not be raised in the spring 
semester. C. A. S. had proved what 
students can really accomplish. 




Approximately 1,500 students joined the grand 
march around the campus and then to the 
administration building where the chanting 



became louder so that the administrators could 
hear through the windows. Even the husky, right, 
wears a sign protesting the cost of tuition. 



25 




Weekends seem to be the best time to sleep in 
until late in the afternoon. Students don't have 
to worry about classes or parents saying that they 



have slept long enough. Saturday's and Sunday's 
were made to be days where students did nothing 

or at least got caught up Irom the prior week. 





Those who are 21, or those who look like they 
are, visit the Good Old Days. Other popular bars 
are the well known Hess's and the Little Dutch 
Inn. 



After a day of hard classes it just seemed like the 
thing to do. Order a pitcher have a little 
something to eat, and waste an afternoon. 



Luigis, Two Boys or Debbies Kitchen are popular 
food places that delivered to help put an end to 
the weekend munchies. 




Party games begin as Darlene Harris deals Starting the second keg is Carroll Truran, 

another round of the drinking card game of the party continues. Most parties lasted 

"99.", as other people suggest the game of up until midnight or one in the morning. 
"spoons" or "quarters." 



right, as 
at least 



26 




Neither the exception not the rule, the smoking 
of pot did occur on the weekends and 
occasslonally during the week. Some students 
decided that the weekend was the time to get 



"high" while others went to parties. The bus 
station, right. Is used by those who went home 
or elsewhere for the fun 




Brought about by the popular movie "Anim'al House" the campus frats and sororities sometimes held a toga party which always proved 
interesting. 

Weekends; a time for letting loose and enjoying 



Weekends were the best part 
of the week. Parties 
flourished, students let loose 
and everyone seemed to be more 
relaxed. It was the time for 
each student to do what 
they wanted. At the parties 
there was beer and at some 
there was even such drinking 
games as "quarters," and "spoons," 



and the favorite "99." The beer 
and the party always seemed 
especially good if the prior 
days were filled with tests and 
due dates for term papers. 
Ordering out to Luigi's, Two Boys, 
and Debbies for food was also a 
weekend tradition. Pizzas, hoagies, 
and steak sandwiches made their way 
into the dorms from 7 p.m. to about 



3 a.m. Weekends also held the promise 
that the students could sleep as 
long as they desired. Other students 
decided that home was a better place 
to go or to another college for 
excitement. Whatever the students 
did, they enjoyed it. Weekends were 
something to treasure, not something 
to waste. Afterall, what other way 
is there to end a week, than a weekend. 



27 




Union tables are filled at lunchtime by those 
students unable to tolerate the commons lunch 
or by those who just want a quick bite to eat 



before the 1 p.m. class begins. An information 
table, below, about contraceptives is one of the 
educational displays sponsored by the union 





Food IS perhaps the main attraction of the union 
as this student munches out on some fries, a 
drink and a cream pie for desert. 



"1-27," shouts the caller as Kathy McCloskey 
looks to see if she has the lucky number during 
the bingo game held in the union. For a quarter 
per card, a student can play all night in the 



hopes of winning money. Bingo, in addition to 
the "Nile Club," was one of the more popular 
union events. 




Skill is needed as Karen ReichI attempts lo sink 
another pool ball In the right corner pocket. If 
she makes it, she will win her match. 



28 




. ..(itJiilMMI H 
Master at pinball. Randy Yoh, controls the flippers and sends the ball to the lit special which will win him an extra game. 




Ready to throw her shot is this student as she 
strives for a spare in the last frame of the game. 
She is practicing for bowling class. 



A place to go, th 
people to see; th 

Aside from the usual schoolwork 
and greek parties, the Kehr Union 
offered something for the students 
to do. It was a place to go, it 
was something to do, and it was a 
place to meet one's friends. If 
one had a spare quarter, a game 
of pinball could be played. Some 
of the most popular ones were the 
"Hulk," "Gogar," and the space age 
moans of "Meteor." Other games 
for a quarter were the computer 
games of the football, basketball, and 
one where the student was the 
commander of a spaceship. Bingo 
was a popular union event where 
students could win money, and for 
those with the disco beat, a "Nite 



ings to do, 
at is the union 

Club" was sponsored several times 

throughout the year. Education 

was not neglected. The union 

served as the spot for displays 

of art, photography, and educationa' 

information such as contraception. 

During pledging was when the union 

was the most active. Greeks would 

claim the one side of the snack bar 

area and work their pledges. Food 

at the snackbar was a lifesaver when 

the commons decided to serve veal 

for the third time in a week. Hamburgers, 

fries, and soft drinks could be purchased. 

Even if there was no quarter, 

or a student did not have the urge 

to play a game, one could always 

call a friend friend and sit and talk. 



29 



Employment earns bucks for bills and spending 



Whether it be the need of money 
for college bills or the need for 
extra spending money, students found 
jobs around the campus. The Scranton 
Commons was one of the biggest 
employers of students. Although it was 
not one of the most sought after positions, 
students still found it to be a way 
to receive that paycheck. Other jobs 



included working the computer room in 
Ben Franklin, the snack bar, the library, 
and doing secretarial work among other 
possibilities. In the beginning of 
the year there was some confusion 
as to who would be able to work. The 
state announced that it might not be 
able to pay all the students under state 
aid so many students 



were asked to switch to federal employ- 
ment. Turmoil reigned in the financial 
aid office as students hoped to keep 
their jobs, others were not 
lucky enough to be switched, and had 
to do without the extra income. 
Even though the jobs might be boring, 
it was indeed a job that payed for 
books or whatever the student needed. 




Lycoming desk is in safe hands with Lisa Yocum 
as she takes messages and makes sure that all 
male guests are escorted into the hall. 



Students using the computer room often need 
some extra help. Fixing a program for this 
student is Don Steiner who was lucky enough to 
find a |ob that is in his major. Working in the 



computer room, Don gains alot of experience 
with the equipment and helps others learn his 
knowledge. 




cccDX/F DESK 



"How many hours do I have left," thinks Gail 
Hickey, as she refills the salad bar at the Scranton 
Commons during the evening meal. 



Finding time to catch up on some homework is 
Wanda FHusick who works at the Andruss library. 
The reserve desk is Wanda's position where she 



helps students locate microfilms that are needed 
for term paper research or a special magazine 
that is kept in the back stock area 



30 




Cheerfully serving up a grilled cheese sandwich Onion rings are brought out to the serving line from dishwasher, to server, to the dreaded 
at the union snack bar during the busy lunch by Bill Williams. The Scranton Commons is slopline where the garbage from the meal trays 
rush of hungry, starving studts. perhaps the biggest campus employer. )obs range are emptied while riding on a conveyor belt. 




Pledging: A wild and crazy 
time for perspective Greeks 



Fall semester and the spring semester 
mark the times when Creeks begin 
their rush parties and activities. At 
these parties, students not in the Greek 
system meet the brothers and sisters of 
various fraternities and sororities. After 
a few weeks bids are given out to 
certain students that meet the 
requirements of certain Greek 
organizations. It is at this time students 
accept the bids and begin pledging 
activities. On the average, pledging 
lasts about four weeks. Stunts ranged 
from scavenger hunts to basketball 
dribbling and other events which are 
not allowed to be mentioned because 
they are a secret to those members of 
the sorority and fraternity. By the 
beginning of the third week, the 
pledges were showing signs of wear 
and tear, yet they persisted in order to 
be termed a brother or a sister. Finally, 
the arrival of "FHell week." It is during 
this week that the pledges are really 
tested by their soon-to-be brothers and 
sisters. The closing of the week is the 
notorious "FHell night." The night when 
the pledges are finally initiated into the 
Greek organization, and the night that 
the brothers and sisters talk about in 
hushed tones. After all of this is over. 



most of the reactions are basicly the 
same. They were glad that they 
pledged, but would not like to go 
through it again. It was an experience 
to go through and one that none 
would easily forget. 



Nestled in Pam Dudley's arm is the Theta Tau 
swan and her omega man as she sits in front of 
the library checking her pledging schedule. 




Up and down the stairs goes this lucky Phi Sigma 





my duck" asks a Beta Sigma pledge as, 

, Pam Schultz wears a paper frog ontop o' t\ . - 

xie hat and, right, Lambda Chi pledges M;C»'v.ri? *' 

heir sign. 





Portraying the "Blues Brother's" Is the fith pledge 
(lass of TKE. Dressed In their suits and red arm 
bands, they proclaim their pledge to TKE. 



pledge with his wooden symbol of his fraternity while he counts the remaining pledge days 



Helping their sorority with tissue flowers, these spend alot of time getting to know the other Donned with his blue pants and red cape is 
Alpha Sigma Alpha pledges are doing one of the members by helping out with various projects super Zeta Psi pledge Bob Starner who was 
tasks of their pledging period. Pledges usually with the brothers or sisters. awarded this honor by his soon to be brothers. 



33 





Bio classes, lecture classes, plays, musicals, on the top floor and on special occassions, 
concerts and practically any main event was held movies were shown on the bottom level. Many 
in the Haas Auditorium. Art exhibits were shown will remember the huge lecture classes which 

were easily cut. 




Montour Hall is one ui Uk liunniiwucs on Composition I and II classes as well as other on the fourth iluui, they will remember the 
campus which housed men. This is the last year English classes along with Art and Foreign Lang. winding staircase which seemed impossible to 
for men since next year Montour will be co-ed. classes were held in Bakeiess. If one had a class climb on those early morning classtimes. 




Special Education majors were often in Navy Hall 
since it is the main building for that vocation. It 
also houses the Speech Pathology department 



Many offices such as Financial Aid, Reading 
Development Clinic and the Registrar are located 
in the Ben Franklin building. On the lower level 



is the computer room which is used by computer 
majors, faculty, and students whose classwork is 
to be done on the computer 



34 



m 



Buildings are 
more than just 
brick and stone 



Buildings on cannpus are often neg- 
lected, ignored and forgotten, but who 
could forget what went on inside of 
the brick buildings. Carver Hall, one of 
the oldest buildings on campus is a 
landmark of the college. Its picture ap- 
pears almost everywhere the school's 
name is posted. Then there are the 
buildings where students spend hours 
learning new facts, equations and tech- 
niques. English in Bakeless, Intro to 
Special Ed. in Navy, Chemistry in Hart- 
line and perhaps an hour or more in 
the computer room of Ben Franklin, 
students prepare for their vocations. 
All buildings do not hold such memo- 
ries of hard work. One should not 
forget the dorms where at times it 
seems as though everyone just lets go 
while the stereos scream, baby powder 
fills the air in a mist and everyone 
seems to be in high spirits. One should 
not forget about the other buildings 
such as the Union and the snack bar, 
the Andruss library, the Commons and 
the College Store where one could go 
and buy a candybar, a T-Shirt, food, 
paper and do not forget the lines when 
everyone seems to be ahead of you 
when buying books. These are the 
buildings on campus. They are made 
of more than brick and stone, they are 
made of memories. 



Hartline Science Center housed the classes 
One of the original buildings left on campus is below, is where students can buy practically which students took in the areas of math and 
Carver Hall which greets incoming students and anything that they would need from pencils to science. Getting the course was easier than 
says farwell to those leaving. The College Store, paper, from food to clothing, the store has It finding the room In Hartline. 






Monday morning classes seem to be the hardest a students life such as a fresh snowfall that Secrets shared between friends either in the 
to get up for, perhaps because it is Monday, or allows the students to act like kids and romp and commons, above, or in a quiet place away from 
maybe because it is a class. A few things brighten roll in the snow. it all, below hplp m,il- p the rl.iv ,ililtlp nicer. 




Meals at the Scranlon Commons cannot be 
described by words alone. The expression on the 
girl's face relates the feelings of the majority of 



the students when asked about the food. 
Although the students are told that other school 
food is worse, many find it hard to believe. 



Hugs from someone special, or just a good 
friend, can be the one of the best ways to boost 
one's spirit and confidence to get through the 
day. 



36 




Crazlness is always a part of college life as this 
student show, above, while right, the mad dash 

for the door signals the end of class 



Expressions tell 
more than words 
could ever say 

At times, there is no story 
needed. The expression of a 
face is the story. Presented 
for your approval are some of 
the common expressions seen 
on and about the campus. By 
no means are these ail of 
the unique faces to behold, 
but they are among the most 
noticable. The expression 
of a secret, the meals at the 
Commons, or the relaxing 
smile in the warm spring 
weather. These are some of 
the feelings that make up 
the portion of college referred 
to as student life. 




Catching some of the sun's rays is this student who found the perfect way to spend a warm spring afternoon at the library. 



J7 



.CTunw 




By Cindy Bell, Wendy Mitros, Cheryl St. Clair 



Throughout the year the administration 
has worked hard to keep.the college 
running smoothly. They had to 
deal with such issues as a party policy, 
a student demonstration, and the loss 
of a few administrators due to 
retirement and resignation. However, 
the administration pulled through another 
year. Along with the administration 
comes the faculty. Usually thought of 
as sitting behind a desk, correcting 
papers and thinking up difficult 
essay questions, the faculty this 
year will be pictured in a different 



way. Although not all the faculty 
could be pictued, we have caught a few 
of them doing what they do when not 
in school. Their hobbies, favorite 
sports, and crafts are on display for 
the 1980 year. It is hoped that by 
this rendition, the professors are 
looked at, once again, as people. 
We look at fencing, woodworking, 
bowling, toy collecting, and others. This 
year has not been easy, yet it will 
carry memories for everyone as involved 
in the school as the administration and 
faculty has shown that they are. 





Countercloskwise from top right Answering the 

phone and talking to a student about job 
placement is Tom Davies of the administration, 
while George Stetson displays some of his old 
toys and right, Betty Ross duals with one of her 
students. 



^ 





Clockwise from top left: Showing a student how 
to give an eye exam is Dr. Lauretta Pierce, 
Robert Solenberger as he helps his students in 
the dig at Danville, Charles Chronister, left, as 
he gives these students some pointers in 
basketball at the Nelson Fieldhouse. 



Jf 



McCormick is 
no stranger 
to the students 

While most presidents of colleges 

and universities imprison 

themselves within their homes. 

Dr. James McCormick proves 

to be the exception. Not being 

afraid of his students, he does 

not hide behind his gates or 

his title. He came out to talk 

with and meet the students during 

the protest against higher 

tuition, he walked the campus 

with Gov. Thornburgh and 

met with various students. For 

Christmas, McCormick remembered the 

student leaders with a 

buffet dinner at his home. 

Dr. McCormick makes himself 

known to the students on campus. 

It is because of his 

open way of upholding his title 

that he is known and respected. 

Clockwise from top right: Listening to another 
person's opinion is Dr. lames McCormick, later 
he listens to Thronburgh and then the rally. 




40 



Party policy topic of discussion for administration 



A party policy was one of the major 
topics dealing with both adminis- 
tration and students. The policy was 
discussed with the Bloomsburg police 
and the state liquor control board. The 
policy reflected a crackdown on the 
use of alcohol off-campus, in the 
dorms and at football games. Vice 
president for student life. Dr. )errold 
Griffis said, "I am concerned about the 
reputation of the campus, it has been 
slipping." Griffis had stated that B.S.C. 
was becoming known as the party 
school on the Susquehanna. According 
to lennie Carpenter, dean of Lycoming 
Hall, alcohol found in students' rooms 
will be turned over to the security po- 
lice and arrests will be made. Sgt. |ohn 
Reigle and Sgt. Al Batista, of the 
Bloomsburg police explained that on 
the basis of an initial telephone com- 
plaint, and at the discretion of the 
officer involved, the offender will ei- 
ther be arrested immediately or be giv- 



en a warning. The police further ex- 
plained that the crackdown was 
brought on by the students themselves. 
Private parties or those held by frats or 
sororities were usually called and 
warned about the noise which disturb- 
ed local neighbors. After a while, the 
students began to ignore the warnings, 
so the crackdown began. The police 
reminded students that they still had a 
responsibility towards the people who 
were lifetime citizens of Bloomsburg 
and were not only here four years. 
Neighbors in the community usually 
complained about the noise and the 
vandalism which occurred as people 
left the parties. Although party van- 
dalism was not the rule, it was neither 
the exception. Litter from cups, the 
breaking of car antennas, and a few 
other small instances were the trouble. 
Legal action was said to be taken 
against party holders if only one per- 
son was underage. The L.C.B. also 




stated that party holders who charge 
admission to the party could also be 
charged with selling liquor without a 
license. Students were then asked to 
keep a list of guests at their parties so 
if the L.C.B. wanted to, they could 
check to see if all persons present were 
of age. Parties began to quiet down 
and were brought back under some 
control. 

Police Chief Shellenberger said, "I 
don't want to stop them from having a 
good time, but I do have a responsi- 
bility towards the residents of Blooms- 
burg." He also added that he wished 
that a compromise and an under- 
standing could be reached with the 
department and the students. The po- 
lice once again began to warn the par- 
ty holders of excessive noise and the 
students began to listen. Drinking in 
the dorms and at football games was 
handled by security. 



Dr. James McCormick 

President 

Boyd Buckingham 

V.P. for Administration 
John Walker 

Exec. Asst to the Pres. 

William Williams 

Spec, Adv. to the Pres. 



M.L. Muehlhof 

Sec. to Pres, 

Dr. Frank Davis 

Asst, V.P for Admin, 
Joan Walton 

Staff Assoc, for Acad, Affairs 

Robert Norton 

Dean of Student Life 



Dr. Jerrold Griffis 

V.P, for Student Life 
Dr. Howard Macauley 
Dean of School of Prof, Studies 
Dr. Richard Wolfe 
Dean of School of Ext Prog. 
Dr. Alfred Forsyth 
Dean of School of Arts 
and Science 



41 



Wolfe, Lorah resign to take other positions 



Resignation is in the air as 
two administrators find other jobs. 
Dr. Richard Wolfe and Frank Lorah 
have both decided to further 
their careers. Wolfe joined the 
faculty in 1967 as an assistant 
professor of education and was 
promoted to the rank of associate 
and full professor in 1970 and 1972, 
respectively. He served as Dean of 
Continuing Education and Summer 



Phillip Krause 

Asst. to V.P. of Acad Affairs 
Dr. Jesse Bryan 

Dir, of CAD 

Deborah Ellis 

Affirmative Action, 
Desegregation Ofc 

Donald Watts 

Exec. DIr. Alumni Assoc. 



Kenneth Schnure 

Asst. Registrar 

George Birney 

Personnel 

Paul Conard 

DIr. of Admin, and Personnel 



Schools before he was named Dean 
of Extended Programs in 1974. Wolfe 
went to Gonzaga University, Washington, 
on June 15. His duties will include 
directing a new doctoral program in 
education leadership which will be 
implemented in the summer. Frank Lorah 
began his new position at California 
State LIniversity, California, on 
Feb. 25. His duties at B.S.C. 



included controlling funds from 
community activities fees, handling 
the dispersment of funds to student 
organizations and anything else 
involving the students control of funds. 
Lorah will have much of the same 
duties at California, but they 
will be on a much broader scale. 
B.S.C. will miss both Wolfe 
and Lorah because of the fine 
work each man did for the school. 



Peggy Bailey 

Admin, Asst., Grants Ofc. 



Bernard Vinovrski 

Asst. DIr, of Admis, 

Tom Cooper 

Dean of AdmIs, and Records 

Carol Barnett 

Asst. DIr, Financial Aid 

Thomas Lyons 

DIr, of Financial Aid 



Frank Lorah 

Comptroller, Comm, Act 

Dr. Charles Carlson 

Dean of School of Crad, Stu(j\ 

Anne French 

Admin, Couns 
Dr. Emory Rarig 

Dean of School of Bus 




42 



Board of Trustees 




Seated: )oseph Nespoli, Mrs. Cailey Keller, Dr. lames McCormick. Standing: Dr. Edwin Weisbond, Kevin O'Connor, Richard Walton. 




Library Staff 

Seated: Marilou Zeller, Janet Oslen. Standing: William 
Frost, Patricia Wiegel, Peggy lewkes, Scott Miller. 



43 



Hunsinger retires after 431/2 yrs.; 
Testimonial dinner held Nov. 3 



In the Scranton Commons on Nov. 3, 
a testimonial dinner was held for 
Elton Hunsinger. "Dean" Hunsinger, 
as he was affectionately known from 
his previous positions as dean 
of men and dean of students, retired 
on Dec. 28 after AiVi years of sen/ice 
in the fields of education and 
athletics. For the past three years 
he has been the administrator 
for grants and federal relations at 
the college. Following a reception, 
a surf and turf dinner was served. 
The invocation was given by Dr. John 
A. Hoch, dean emeritus. Special remarks 
were made by President Emeritus Harvey 
A. Andruss and President James H. 
McCormick. Introductions and welcom- 
ing remarks were made by Dr. lack Mulka, 
chairman of the event. Hunsinger 



Kenneth Hoffman 

College Relations 

Bruce Dietterick 

Dir. of Public Info, 
Dr. John Mulka 

Dir. of Student Act. 

John Abell 

Asst. Dean of Student Life, 
Dir, of Housing 



John Trathen 

Asst. Dir. of Student Act. 
JoAnne Day 

Asst. Dir Career Dev 
and Placement 

Thomas Davies 

Dir of Career Dev 
and Placement 



came to B.S.C. as dean of men in 1961. 
He also served the college as director 
of placement. In his last position, 
Hunsinger's responsibilities included 
working with local, state and federal 
officials to obtain grants. 
Prior to his years at B.S.C, Hunsinger 
served from 1936 to 1948 as a teacher, 
athletic director and coach of all 
varsity sports at Conyngham Twp. 
High School in Aristes. From 1948 to 
1961 he was a teacher and coach 
at Ashland High School. One gift 
contributed by friends through the 
sale of tickets was a vacation trip 
for the Hunsingers to Freeport, Grand 
Bahamas. After the activities on campus, 
the group spent the remainder of the 
evening socializing at the Rainbow 
room of the Bloomsburg Elks Club. 




After 43'/2 years of service, Elton Hunsinger retires. 
Hunsinger, left, was given a testimonial dinner of 
surf and turf in the Commons, The night also 



Marianne Montague 

Prog. Coord. KCU 



Mike Sowash 

Recreation Rm Mngr 
Lloyd Anderson 

Purch, Agent 

Donald Hock 

Dir, of Budget 

Doyle Dodson 

Dir, Comp, Serv 




44 




Ronald Digiondomenico 

Tutorial Serv. 

Dr. Lee Hopple 

DIr Inst Planning 



Dr. Hugh McFadden 

Dir. of Inst, Research 

Thaddeus Piotrowski 

DIr. of Lrng Research 



Ruth A. Bond 

Dir. Upward Bound 
Dr. Arthur Lysiak 

Corr, Acad. Adv. 

Irvin Wright 

Asst. Dir. CAD 

Charles Thomas 

Counseling 



Robert Davenport 

Counseling 

John Scrimgeour 

Counseling 
William Ryan 

Dir. of Library Serv. 

William Bailey 

College Store Mngr. 



Richard Neufer 

Chief of Safety and Security 

David Ruckel 

Investigations and Safety 

Charles Robbins 

Dir, of Phys. Plant 
Joseph Metro 

Asst. Dir. of Phys. Plant 



45 



Chess interest developes as profs 
brother battles with scarlet fever 



Chess, a game of the mind, 
is the pass time of 
Robert Ross. Being interested 
in the game, Ross helps the 
chess team by filling in 
for someone or driving the 
van to competitions. On 
January 12 and 13 of this 
year, he participated in 
the Pennsylvania State 
Team Championships where 
he won 5 out of 13 games. 
Although he admits to not 
being very good, his 
enthusiasm makes up for 
the loss. This deep interest 

Juliette Abell 

Mathematics 
Dr. Moshar Afshar 

Educational Studies and Service 
Dr. Richard Alderfer 

Speech, Mass Communications 
and Theatre Arts 

Dr. Wayne Anderson 

Chemistry 



Dr. Christopher Armstrong 

Sociology 

Joan Auten 

Health, Physical Education 
Dr. Raymond Babineau 

Secondary Education 

Dr. William Baillie 

English 



Dr. John Baird 

Psychology 

Donald Bashore 

Psychology 

Karl Beamer 

Art 

Dr. Stephen Beck 

Mathematics 



Dr. Barrett Benson 

Chemistry 

R. Clark Boler 

Physical Education 

Dr. George Boss 

Speech, Mass Communications 

and Theatre Arts 

Dr. Charles Brennan 

Mathematics 



in the game was first 
instilled at age 11. "My 
brother was stricken with 
scarlet fever," explained 
Ross, "the house was quarantined, 
so the local 

minister taught me the game 
to keep me busy." Ross wishes 
that more people would become 
interested in the game because 
people of any age can play. 
"Even when one gets too old 
to participate in other 
games, one can still," 
commented Ross, "push around 
a wooden playing piece." 




Concentrating on the next move is professor 
Robert Ross, seated left, as he gets a lesson from 

this student. Ross has been interested in chess 




46 




Dr. Stephen Bresset 

Health, Physical Education 
Leroy Brown 



Mathematics 



Dr. C. Whitney Carpenter 

Foreign Languages 

Charles Chronister 

Health, Physical Education 



Dr. Margaret Chu 

Chsmistry 

Ellen Clemens 

Business Education 

Dr. Paul Cochrane 

Mathematics 

Dr. Andrew Colb 

Chemistry 



Dr. James Cole 

Biology 

Joan Collins 

Nursing 

Catherine Constable 

Communication Disorders 

Dr. James Creasy 

Business Administration 



Dr. Russell DeVore 

Physics 

John Dietrich 

History 

Dr. Edson Drake 

History 

Dr. John Enman 

Geography and Earth Science 



Dr. Phillip Farber 

Biology 

Dr. Gertrude Flynn 

Nursing 

Dr. Ariane Foureman 

Foreign Languages 

Dr. Wendelin Frantz 

Geography and Earth Science 



47 



Erich Frohman 

Speech, Mass Communications 
and Theatre Arts 

Dr. Joseph Garcia 

Physics 
Dr. Halbert Gates 

Physics 
Dr. Nancy Gilganon 

EcJucational Studies 



Dr. Nancy Gill 

English 
Dr. Paul Hartung 

Mathematics 

Dr. David Henry 

Chemistry 



Dr. Michael Herbert 

Biology 
Dr. Charlotte Hess 

Elementary Education 
Dr. Norman Hilgar 

Business Administration 

Dr. Frederick Hill 

Biology 



Dr. Mary Hill 

Special Education 

Carl Hinkle 

Health, Physical Education 

Dr. Melville Hopkins 

Speech, Mass Communications 
and Theatre Arts 

Dr. John Hranitz 

Elementary Education 



Dr. Kenneth Hunt 

Special Education 

Dr. Mary Lou John 

Foreign Languages 

Dr. Brian Johnson 

Geography and Earth Science 

Terry Jones 

Business Administration 



Dr. William Jones 

Special Education 
Dr. Andrew Karpinski 

Special Education 

Janice Kerlin 

Business Education 

Dr. John Kerlin 

Mathematics 




48 



Three Professors explain their favorite hobbies 



Hobbies and special interests 

can begin in many different 

ways. At times, they begin at 

an early age, other times they become 

a spin-off of an earlier project, 

or even stem from having nothing to do. 

Dr. David Henry became interested 

in music and the piano while 

he was in the sixth grade. His 

mother, who was a professional singer, 

inspired him and sparked his musical 

talent. His favorite type of music 



is jazz which he used to play 
in Baltimore nightclubs with his 
band. Unfortunately, Henry does 
not have the time to play a lot 
because of his busy schedule. A busy 
schedule is perhaps what got Dr. Stephen 
Bresett's hands into woodworking. 
Carving wood became a spin-off when 
Bresett built furinture for his home. 
"I like working with wood," explained 
Bresett, "because it's a natural 
element." His favorite figures to 



carve are animals and sport figures. 
Even the lack of something to do 
can inspire a hobby, or such is the 
case of Dr. Carroll Redfern. Bowling 
has been his special sport for 15 
years. When he first moved to the area 
there was little to do and bowling was 
the most popular sport here. Redfern 
bowls once a week with an average of 
181. 




Carved from a single piece of solid wood is this 
interlocking chain with a caged ball at the end. 
This project took a week to complete along with 



a lot of patience. Bresett has been carving wood 
for the last nine years. Animals, such as bears, 
dogs, tigers, and sport figures are also carved. 



Ready to strike is Dr. Carroll Redfern as he 
practices his bowling, while. Dr. David Henry 
takes time to practice as he strikes up another 
tune. 



49 



Fencing fun and 
enjoyable says 
professor Rost 

After teaching for nine years, 
four sections each term, an ap- 
proximately 1400 students, Betty 
Rost still finds fencing enjoyable. 
She began to fence at East Stroudsburg, 
as an undergraduate, through a 
physical education skills course. She 
continued fencing through graduate 
school and also gave demonstrations. 
At Lawerence University, she instructed 
drama majors how to fence for the scenes 
in Hamlet and their other productions. 
Rost continued to learn more about 
fencing by attending workshops. What 
Rost enjoys most about the sport, 
that some people also call an art, 
is watching other people develope a 
sense of respect for the sport as they 
learn it's techniques. "All of my 
students are beginners," explained Rost, 
"and I find a great deal of satisfaction 
as I watch their progress in a sport that 
is mentally and physically demanding." 

Robert Koslosky 

Art 

Sharon Kribbs 

Nursing 

Dr. Julius Kroschewsky 

Biology 
Dr. Robert Kruse 

Communication Disorders 



Charles Laudermilch 

Sociology 

James Lauffer 

Geography and Earth Science 

Ann Lee 

Special Education 

Dr. Woo Bong Lee 

Economics 



Margaret Legenhausen 

Nursing 

Dr. Arthur Lyslak 

History 

Dr. John Masters 

Music 

Dr. Jerry Medlock 

Health, Physical Education 




Instructor of fencing for nine years is Betty Rost, 
shown here in one of her classes. Rost has been 
interested in fencing since she was an 
undergraduate at East Stroudsburg. Later, at 



Lawerence 
department 
fencing seen 



Llniversity, 
by giving 
e in Hamlet 



she aided the 
them pointers 




50 




Mark Melnychuk 

Biology 

Dr. Donald Miller 

Elementary Education 

G. Donald Miller 

Communication Disorders 
Dr. Gorman Miller 

Elementary Education 



Dr. Louis Mingrone 

Biology 

Dr. Rajesh Mohindru 

Economics 

Corrine Muldoon 

Sociology and Social Welfare 

James Muller 

Reading Coor. 



Allen Murphy 

Foreign Languages 

George Neel 

Foreign Languages 

lames Neiswender 

Educational Studies and Service 
Ronald Novak 

Mathematics 



Dr. William O'Bruba 

Elementary Education 

Thomas OhI 

Mathematics 

Clinton Oxenrider 

Mathematics 

Dr. Lauretta Pierce 

Nursing 



Dr. Roy Pointer 

Chemistry 

Dr. James Pomfert 

Mathematics 

Dr. H. Benjamin Powell 

History 

Dr. Gerald Powers 

Communication Disorders 



Dr. Donald Rabb 

Biology 

Dr. James T. Reifer 

Special Education 

Dr. Emily Reuwsaat 

Special Education 

Robert Richey 

Speech, Mass Communication 

and 

Theatre Arts 



51 



Dr. Percival Roberts III 

Art 

Dr. Robert Rosholt 

Political Science 

Robert Ross 
Betty Rost 

Health, Physical Education 



Dr. Ray Rost 

Educational Studies and Services 

Dr. Tobias Scarpino 

Physics 

Rex Selk 

Chemistry 

Dr. Riley Smith 



English 



Sam Slike 

Communication Disorders 

Dr. Eric Smithner 

Foreign Languages 

Bruce Sneidman 

Business Education 

William Sproule 

Health, Physical Education 



Dr. Richard Stanislaw 

Music 

Dr. George Stetson 

Geography and Earth Science 



Harry Strine III 

Speech, Mass Communication and 
Theatre Arts 

Dr. Gene Taylor 

Physics 



Dr. Louis Thompson 

English 

Dr. June Trudnak 

Mathematics 




"A stitch in time saves nine," thinks Dr. Emily 
Reuwsaat as she shows some of her more 
favorite needlework creations that she has done. 
Needlework is her craft because it relaxes her as 



52 




George Turner 

History 

Dr. Stephen Wallace 

Music 

Peter Walters 

Educational Studies and Service 
Dr. Robert Warren 

History 



Dorette Welk 

Nursing 

Dr. Norman White 

Chemistry 

Patrick Wotus 

Mathematics 

Dr. William Woznek 



Elementary Education 



Stephen Wukovitz 

Physics 

Dr. William Yourd 

Business 

Joseph Youshock 

Special Education 

Dr. Matthew Zoppetti 

Educational Studies 




Crafts that need patience are 
done by Reuwsaat and Melynchuk 



she works on the designs. Reuwsaat had tried 
crocheting but did not find It as much fun as her 
needlework. 



Needlework, the craft 
using canvas, yarn, and 
patience, is the hobby 
of Dr. Emily Reuwsaat. 
"One of the main reasons 
I enjoy needlework," 
explains Reuwsaat, 
"IS because it relaxes 
me. I used to crochet, 
but I found needlework 
more enjoyable." Two 
types of needlework 
done by Reuwsaat are 
bargello and needlepoint. 
"Bargello needlework 
requires more attentiveness," 
said Reuwsaat, "There 
is no pattern on the 
canvas when you begin 
so your design requires 
you to count the holes 
in the canvas. In 
needlework, the design 



is already shown." 
After retirement, 
Reuwsaat plans to try 
her luck at quilting, 
applique work and making 
pillows. Another tedious 
craft is done by 
Mark Melnychuk. 
Admiring the stained 
glass creatins in various 
shops, but not admiring 
the prices, Melnychuk 
decided to try it for 
himself. "I felt that 
I could do just as good 
a job as others," said 
Melnychuk, "and save 
money at the same time." 
Melynchuk does not sell 
his stained glass creations, 
rather he uses them to 
decorate his home or as 
gifts for family and friends. 



53 



By Cindy Bell, Wendy Mitros, Cheryl St. Clair 
Students do not learn by books alone. 
They learn by doing experiments, by 
using machines, and by classroom 
activities. College is thought of as an 
institutipn for education. Education in 
the 80's was an experience education. 
Students were learning by actually 
doing experiments with frogs and rats, 
while others went on area digs. One 
student spends time in the library, 
another spends time in the radio. 
Whatever, each learns. 



Clockwise from right: A night in the library is 
sometimes essential for proper class preparation while 
other students imagine themselves in a one-on-one 
match with the UNIVAC 9200 in the clattering 
computer room in Ben Franklin Hall. In other work 
situations, whether the specimen is animal or human, 
to have the proper equipment is perhaps the major 
point that decides the outcome of the experiment. Still 
surviving is the nostalgic classroom. 






=^ 



Countercloskwise from top left: Learning by 
ovserving is a common occurance on the 
campus From timing the heart of her new found 
love to creating new solutions in the chemistry 
lab, these students are learning by other ways in 
addition to the traditional textbook. Lost in the 
stack of periodicals is this student searching for 
an answer to his term paper needs, and his 
personal questioning. 





Muscles ol the human body are examined by Dawn Prena, right. The class went on a dig, in 

Pam Keller as part of her assignment. Pam gets Danville, under the supervision of Robert 

some help from her muscle-man friend. Solenberger 
Shoveling and digging for her archeology class is 

Learning by doing is best for 
most college students today 



Learning can occur in many ways, 
but the best way is by actually doing 
sonnething. It is fine to read 
passages from a text or to 
see pictures of an event or experiment 
but students learn much more 
when they do it for themselves. 
To actually dissect a frog and examine 
the parts of its body is more 
beneficial than looking at clear 
transparencies in the encyclopedia. 
To be able to hold an instrument 



in one's hand or a tool 
of some kind, allows 
the student to see, to feel, 
and to experience what is happening. 
This kind of "doing" learning will 
not be quickly forgotten in a 
matter of minutes or in the 
course of a year. Students enjoy a 
break in the classroom monotony. 
An activity helps to refresh the 
course and arouse interest in the 
students. In addition to the academic 




Reactions of these feathered friends are noted by psychology students during various experiments. Rats are also used in their studies. 





Hoping for a strike Is Cathy Miller during her 



Ready to focus in on her subject is Arlene Taferra Stretching is permitted, below, in this class for 
, , , _ . . , as she operates the camera during a taping of a nursing students. They are demonstrating the 

bowling class in the Kehr Union, Getting a strike ^^^^ demonstrating the use of the video different positions the body can assume, 
is easier than getting the class. 

° equipment. 




Although the dissection of a frog is common in 
biology, students also dealt with fruit flies for 
genetics, and long hours of microscopic work 



On the last day of their aquatic life, the frogs are 
observed by Gary Burke. Tomorrow the frogs will 
begin their new chapter in dissection. 



value, usually the whole class 
participates in the activity. As 
a singular body, the entire class 
discovers together, creates 
together, and works together to find 
the solution, or aquire a certain 
skill. The acquiring of certain skills 
is apparent in the physical education 
classes. Bowling, archery, tennis, 
volleyball, and all the other courses 
require that the students learn some 
kind of skill. In these courses, 
as well as others, the students start 
as beginners and help each other 
through the course. Learning fronn each 
other, whether by a mistake or a correct 
step, it is the intermingling of the 
students that creates a unique learning 
environment. They learn from each 
other, by feeling, by touching, by 
experimenting with their class 
projects and assigmnents the students 
get a closer look at their learning. 



57 




Frustrated with the Keypunch machine is Dave 
Busch, as he types onto computer cards the 
program which is one of his class projects. Dave 



will then run his program through the mam 
computer and hope that it will run, A student 
typist, right, practices his skills on the homerow. 



Learning with machines gives students experience 



Machines have often been accused 
of taking away the jobs of others, 
yet, what better way for a computer 
major, for example, to learn than 
actually working with a computer. 
These machines do have a place in the 
educational system because they 
offer the real life experiences that 
students will have to deal with 
after their graduation. These 



"electronic" professors help students 
find out what working with the 
different kinds of equipment in 
their chosen fields will be like to 
operate. Although one cannot forget 
the film projectors and phonographs 
which helped children learn in the 
early school years, we must not exclude 
the other helpful devices. For 
practical experience in the area of 



Mass Communications, what could be 
better than an actual radio station. 
WBSC offers students the chance to 
create, construct, and broadcast 
their very own programs. One can 
learn how to spin records and run 
commercials which is a part 
of the every day job of a radio disc 
jockey. In the fields of biology and 
especially the nursing field it goes 




After typing a program into the main computer Two students are using the E.K.G. machine in the 

this student observes his readout. These vert, physiology lab. This machine can be used 

computers are used by several departments for for a multitude of purposes on both humans and 
class work. 



animals, such as recording the heart rate, pulse, 
locating abnormalities of the heart and testing 
blood pressures of the subject. 



58 




Students of the mass communication dept. check Visual aids are often helpful in learning difficult way to apply a dressing. Many other hospital 
the main control panel as they begin to make a procedures and techniques. These nursing techniques are also learned through the use of 
videotape on the use of television equipment. students are watching a videotape on the proper the tapes, and other visual aids that are available, 

without question the importance of 
having the actual equipment to work 
with in the labs. The visual aids 
that helped students in the elementary 
years still help at the 
college level. Films and filmstrips 
on anything from the correct 
way to spike 

a volleyball to ancient man help 
students to visualize what the textbook 
states. Working with the machines also 
gives the students a break from 
reading the course book or listening 
to a lecture. If the saying that a 
picture is worth a thousand words 
then surely a machine that actually 
allows one to experience a career 
situation is worth a thousand books. 
Machines, in 1980 and the future, are 
sure to remain in school. 

Live on the air at WBSC is Kathy Campall 
learning how to spin records and conduct a radio 
program which gives her experience in radio 
broadcasting. 




"I think I found it," says Arlene Taffera as she Arlene is a mass communications major and is a 

looks for the problem in the microphone as member of the radio station where she 

preparations are made before the actual show broadcasts her news show and learns to operate 

begins. the instruments. 




59 




Those 8 a.m. classes or Is It because of the 
"rough" night. Whatever the reason, there are 
always those days when 40 winks seems more 



Important than any lecture or assignment. For 
some reason this student gave up fighting and 
surrendered himself to the world of slumber. 



Away from the noise of the Union and his room 
Is Bryan Key as he finds a quiet place in the 
library to begin his research paper. 



Kehr Union, professors, and sleep effect learning 



There are times in a student's lite when 
nothing else will help them learn the 
academic concepts better than a booth 
in the Kehr Union or a few seconds 
with a professor. Each day in the 
Union, students sit and color their text- 
books with blue, pink, yellow and 
green highlighters. At the same time 
there is the "three for a quarter" music 
blaring from the speakers hung above 
the tables. For some students this was 
the way to study about Freud, or a 
mathematical equation while "Foxy," 
"Foreinger," and the "Eagles" played 
their tunes in the background. In addi- 
tion to the music there were also the 
friends who stopped by and asked if 



you were studying. Nothing, however, 
can replace the one-to-one learning 
that occurs when a professor takes 
time out to personally explain a ques- 
tionable part of the day's lesson to a 
student. At least for the moment the 
concept is clear to the student. There 
are also those times when nothing, 
absolutely nothing, will ever help the 
student learn. The 8 a.m. class is one of 
those reasons. For some reason, the 
alarm rings to early as students force 
themselves from their beds. There are 
also the night classes in which the 
student finds it hard to concentrate on 
the subject when people outside are 
playing frisbee or sleding in snow. One 



can never forget the class where the 
professor, according to the student, 
was so boring that they could never 
stay awake in class. It is at these times 
when 40 winks seemed more impor- 
tant than anything else. The desk top 
looks inviting at times, especially when 
the head nods an inch yet the student 
swears it was a foot. Unable to tolerate 
it anymore, the student crosses his 
arms, rests his head on the desk, and 
the professors voice drifts softly away. 
Still, that in itself was a lesson worth 
learning, especially if the student was 
called on by the professor. Whether it 
be in the Union, the library or class, 
the students learned. 



60 




Extra help is given by professor luliette Abell to a 
student who, for the moment, is confused about 
an in class assignment. 



Students who are having difficulty understanding 
a particular math concept can also go to the 
math lab in the basement of Hartline Science 
Center 



Here a student is helped to understand a chapter 
In the book by professor Elizabeth Peslllo. Labs 
are also available for reading and writing. 




( becking her work Is Cindy Cllne as she studies 
in the Kehr Union amongst the music and the 
students' eating and socializing. 



Microscopic work can be very tedious and 
confusing for students. Raising a question about 
the lab Is Dave Lescinski as Dr. George Cellos 
offers assistance and checks for possible mistakes 



or where Dave seems to be confused. It is this 
one-to-one contact that most students find 
helpful. 



61 



by Brenda Friday and Todd Moyer 

Sports are always very popular with 
schools: BSC is no exception. This year 
football, although the games were at- 
tended, had it's spotlight stolen by 
wrestling and soccer. The cheers from 
the crowds, whether it was on a brisk 
fall afternoon for football or a warm 
spring day for baseball and softball, 
gave the team members that extra in- 



centive to go the extra yard and give 
just a little bit more of themselves. 
Even more important than the games 
which were won, were also the friend- 
ships that were formed. The friends 
that made winning exciting, and losing, 
not that bad. This is sports; blood, 
sweat, and the forming of team and 
individual friendships. 



Clockwise from top: lumping with the ball is 
Mary Ann Durkes of the women hoopsters as her 
teammates get ready for a rebound. As a Husky 
gridder kicks at the pigskin, the stickwomen 
chase the ball downfield. 






'^ 



Counter-clockwise from top left: The new Husky 
mascot gets some laughs from the fans. Mat 
action was exciting this year as BSC ranked 17th 
in the college rankings which is quite a victory 
equalling those attained by the soccer team 



t 




Coach encourages Husky Harriers; 
young talent, improvement shown 



With signs of overall growth, the 
young men and women of the cross 
country squad finished with a very 
successful season. There was a great 
deal of young talent exhibited that 
somehow made their efforts more 
gratifying. Sophomore, Tom Croft, and 
senior co-captain, Steve Johnson, led 
the pack of young harriers through 
muddy courses and annoying corn 
fields with determination and 
dedication. Head coach, Clark Boler 
commented, "I'm pleased with both 
their efforts." He further said, "I am 
semi-optimistic about this season. It's 
hard to tell how we'll make out. It 
depends on how our young people 
come around." With hopeful seasons 
ahead the Husky Harriers finished with 
an overall 2-7-0 record, scoring a team 



total of 259 points which locked them 
in eleventh place in conference 
competition. Both teams are very 
young with improvements shown by 
their successes. The individual 
members look forward to an even 
better season next year. 



Running with the pack is Bob and )ohn Feeley as 
they set the pace for the Husl<y harriers in the 
meet against West Chester. 






Ft , . .^i 






Harriers, Steve Johnson, above, and Bob Feeley, 
below, share the same scenic course for the last 
few miles of the meet. 







'/^* 



Setting the pace for the entire team are, (from are the most important factors as these runners ^rfj^- ", 
left to right), Mike Mosakowski, Bill Harte and force themselves to move on to edge out their ^^ -*' 

Dennis Raub. Concentration and determination opponent and gain another victory. !■- 





y 



64 




All set to start the race, the harriers line up to face West Chester State College 
for the first Husky meet of the year 




■Bsr ^ ^sc ^*C «9c 



\ / 






WE 




THEY 


16 


West Chester 


47 


39 


Mansfield 


22 


25 


Kutztown 


33 


37 


Kings 


21 


20 


East Stroudsburg 


41 


22 


Lock Haven 


39 


23 


U. of Scranton 


34 


15 


Millersvilie 


47 


19 


Shippensburg 


42 



reammate Bill Harte begins his warm up 
exercises to prepare himself for the meet as he 
and the other harriers await the start. 

Row one: Susan Hartman, Mary Urban, Anne 
Crab, Donna Nemeth, Terri Purcell, Wendi 
Farrell. Row two: Steve McGeady, Brian 
Mcintosh, Charles Martin, Mike Mosakowski, Bill 
Harte, Bob Neiderer, Alan Musselman, Tom 
Groff Row three: Stu Nagle, Clark Boler (head 
coach), lohn Feeley, Rick Amato, Dennis Raub, 
Bob Feeley, Steve lohnson 



65 



Stickwomen rally; Connelly and 
Rice chosen for national honors 



Women's field hockey 

had a very impressive season; 

the varsity finishing 

with a 5-4-4 mark 

and the junior varsity 

casting a 6-2-1 record. 

The Huskies worked well together 

under the direction and supervision 

of Headcoach, Ian Hutchinson. 

After the Wilkes exhibition game, 

Hutchinson commented, 

"We played good hockey — 

it was only an indication 

of the talent that has 

yet to be tapped. 

We're on our way." 

Losing their first two games 

of the regular season, 

the Huskies bounced back 

to defeat Bucknell, snapping 

a four year losing streak. 



Side by side is Denlse Rath, left, and Kathy 
Connelly as they run down the field towards a 
possible in total concentration. 



:% ff ^M ^^J 


m 


£b\/\ J 






IP 




"C'mon, let's go!" shouts Lauren May, captain to 
her teammates while, below, Kim Rice is ready 
to collide with an opposing players. 







Eye on the ball, Rita Washburn makes a lunge for 
the ball as Mary Ann Carter eyes the play. Field 
hockey can be a dangerous sport, right, as shown 



by Kim Rice who sustained a pulled muscle 
earlier in the season yet continued to play with 
both strength and determination 




66 



As the season closed, 
two varsity stickwomen, 
Kathy Connelly 
and Kim Rice, 
were selected to an 



all-Mid-East team 

that later competed 

in the National U.S. 

Field Hockey Association Tournament. 

It was the first time 



that players 

from the squad 

were selected for nationals. 

It was a striking way 

to end the year. 




WE 




THEY 


' 


Kutztown 


2 


S 1 


Indiana 


2 


•■ 2 


Bucknell 


1 


i 6 


Statewood 





1 


Wilkes 


1 


2 


Messiah 


2 





Lock Haven 


5 


■ 4 


Marywood 








Millersville 


1 





Scranton 





4 


Mansfield 





1 


Shippensburg 


1 


2 


Susquehanna 









Row one: Nancy Campbell, Ann Bright, Susan 
Hammer, Barbara Blye, Denise Rath, Lauren May, 
Patrice Surdoval, Denise Olive, Chris Kazal. 
Row two: Karen Lichtenwalter, lane Reed, Mary 
Ann Carter, Susan Lutz, Kimberly Rice, Sharon 
Rush, Peggy Whitenight, Diane Imboden, Rita 
Washburn, loan Mahoney, Jeanne Fetch, Trish 



Nixon. 

Row three: Cheryl Krause (assistant coach), 

Carolyn Wernstedt (assistant coach), )an 

Hutchinson (head coach), Teresa Smith, Beth 

Millhouse, Karen Narolewski, Kathy Connelly, 

lane Seislove, Marita Pepper, Donna Wiest, Sue 

Nye. 



67 



Tough season for gridders; Pettis 
and Morrucci scouted for pro picks 



Husky gridders experienced 

a very disappointing 

season. Under the supervision 

of Head Coach, Ron Puhl, 

and the leadership 

of senior captains, 

Howie Gulick and Mike Morrucci 

The squad was only able to 

pull in two victories; 

accompanied by eight defeats. 

According to one source, 

the losing season 

was caused by intersquad 

disputes among coaches 

and team members. 

In addition, 

the Husky team 

lost two starting quarterbacks. 

Rick Knisely and Matt Figard, 

early in the season 

due to major injuries. 

Despite these drawbacks, 

several players 

had a great deal 

of good fortune 

come their way. 

Mike Morrucci, ECAC Player 

of the Year 

for Division III All Conference, 

and Kurt Pettis, 



4^ 










mi 



Determination is reflected on the faces of these 
Husky gridders as the tension mounts before the 
next plan of action is put into motion. 

were prospective NFL and 

Canadian Football League picks. 

Morrucci led the league 

in rushing with 

two consecutive seasons 

each totalling 

over 1,000 yards, 

as both he and Pettis 

were selected 

to be on the first 

team of All Conference. 

Others were; Ed Bugno, 

senior wide receiver, 

and Bob Schalm, 





Split second timing is needed by Mike 
below, as he catches the ball in 
Throughout the season, Morucci 
exceedingly well, 



mid air. 
played 




rressuif IS d(,|,li,-(l h, Ihi- luektield from the Tozar, 39, as lh.'\ ki^'-' fig-'ril tinif I.) Iduiuli j 

Wilkes defensive line as Bobby Crosetto, 64, successful play as the team progresses farther to 

makes an agressive tackle on a Colonel lineman, the goal. 
Aiding in the play is Ernie lackson, 75, and Bentz 




68 




defensive tackle. 

Before sustaining 

a shoulder separation during 

the Husky's game 

with West Chester State, 

quarterback, Matt Figard, 

was able to lead 

the league in passing. 

Place kicker, Pete McKenna, 

also reached for a new mark 

as he kicked 

a 50 yard field goal 

against East Stroudsburg 

to set a new school record. 

Although the team's record 

did not generate 

a winning spirit among fans, 

the players held on 

to their individual ambitions 

and made a few 

extraordinary marks 

for themselves 

as a part of 

the gridiron action 

and atheletic dedication 

that belongs solely to the Huskies. 



Husky gridder, |oe Hepp, 44, holds the pigskin 
firmly as he attempts to mark off another first 
down for his team and the watching fans. 



and caught the attention of many pro scouts 
Making an exceptional run, above, with the 
pigskin is Paul Ziegenfuss, 24, as he heads down 
field. 





Adding humor to an already serious football 
season, is Husky fan, |im Knechtel who wears his 
pigskin proudly despite the team's difficult 
season. 



^,.4^» j^^.^ ^ '^^- 



A c)ui( k st.irl IS needed .is I'aiil /legeiiluss jn,l 
Shaun Serf ass lead their squad in a series of plays 
which will clinch the first victory of the season 
against the Mansfield Mounties. The game ended 



rejoiced, and readii 
game. 



d themselves for the next 



69 




Ready for action is |ohn )ola and his Husky D,-u-n... I,n..rn,.n ar.- t,r,.,l up an.i readv t,, Husks leam, the l,.yal tans, below, st.ll came to 

teammates as they run onto the field in attack the Wilkes quarterback during the see the games and lend their moral support to 

anticipation of another challenging Homecoming game which closed with a 27-3 the gridders, 

confrontation victory. Despite the staggering record of the 



Puhl finishes 
season as new 
coach is assigned 



The season came to 

a close with the 

surprising news 

of Head Coach Puhl's 

resignation from 

the Husky coaching roster. 

When asked about 

his decision, Puhl 

simply stated that 

the subject was 'closed.' 

His replacement will be 

Rodrick "Clark" Boler. 

The new Head Coach 

has been an instructor 

and baseball coach here 

for the past 11 years, 

but looks forward 

to tackling 

this new job. 

The new football mentor 

was backed by a 

recommendation from 

Paul "Bear" Bryant, 

infamous Alabama 

atheletic director and 

football coach. 

Boler is well received 

here by the players 

and fans as he strives 

to make the Huskies bigger and better. 




Defensive coordinator, Frank Williams, drills his 
linemen with plays and encouragement. Left to 
right: pensive gridders Steve Haire, Dave 
Reidamover, Sal Lobue, Howie Gulick, and Kurt 



Pettis listen attentivly hoping to interpret 
William's ideas and put them into motion on the 
field. 



70 




Concentrating of the execution of the next play is Figard as he calls the signals and awaits the snap from center as Ihc Imjl seconds tick 
off. 




Row one: Dale Crooks, Shaun Serfass, Dave 
Reidenouer, Mike Morucci, Howie Gulick, Kurt 
Pettis, Dale Hockenberry, Ed Bugno. Row two: 
)ohn Bilyk, John jola, Lurrell Alston, Carl Bowen, 
Mike Maguire, Sal LoBue, Chuck Muller, Bob 
Schwalm, Bob Hoffman. Row three: Frank Horan, 
jim Neary, Kurt Werkheiser, Ernie lackson, Rich 
Michaels, Scott Schutz, Bentz Tozer, Mark 
McCauslin. Row four: Rick Morgan, Geoff 



Johnson, Gary Fetter, Paul Ziegenfuss, Dino 
Darbenzio, )ohn Wolak, Duane Frantz, Steve 
Haire. Row five: Bryan Smith, Matt Figard, Barry 
Lupini, Ken Breuer, |im Zaccheo, Mark Beeson, 
lack Hess, Chris Blackburn. Row six: Frank 
Desjardins, Jamie Sochovka, Bob Crosetto, Kevin 
Pike, Dave Montagna, Mike Sullivan, Chad Barr. 
Row seven: Alan McElroy, Mike Blake, Pete 
McKenna, Brad Tozer, John Bolton, Chip Albert. 



WE 




THEY 


6 


Ithaca 


13 


13 


Shippensburg 


16 


21 


Lock Haven 


31 


24 


Mansfield 


7 


27 


Wilkes 


3 


7 


West Chester 


15 


7 


Millersville 


47 


3 


Cheyney 


9 


7 


Kutztown 


12 


3 


East Stroudsburg 


31 



71 




Propelling the ball past the opponent is player 
Toby Rank. Receiving the ball is Dave Stock as 
he leads the ball downfield to the goal. 



Booters play a 
super season; 
coach pleased 



This was the year 

of good fortune 

and winning ways 

for our soccer team. 

Husky booters had 

an outstanding season 

ending the year 

with an 11-1-0 record. 

The soccer team was 

strong behind the very 

influencial and tactful 

coaching abilities 

of Louis Mingrone. 

After the Kutztown game, 

Mingrone commented, 

"the team was working 

on improving style 

and attacking approaches." 

Managing to pull 

in victory upon victory 

they lived up to their 

One quick is all it takes for Dave Stock to steal 
the ball from the other player as Mark Fedele, 
Glene Chestnut, and Ken Neuherk helfi out 




Skill and performance are utilized by Dave Stock despite the efforts of the other team to gain 

to slide the ball through the oppoent's legs in control of the ball, also aiding in the play is Toby 

order In spi up rinother Husky score, while Rank 

l)(hn\ (,.1)1^, sie.Ii> pups the ball into play 



r^ f }^ 





72 




Teamwork and concentration weigh heavy on 
the minds of Bob Fitzgerald and Ken Nuebeck as 
they bring their team down the playing field into 
scoring [losilion Lali-r, hclnw, Ihc Irani takf^ i 



break in the action to revise their strategies and 
take a moment to relax before the second half 
begin-^ 



coach's expectations 

until they took an unexpected fall 

to the East Stroudsburg Warriors. 

by the score of 2-1. 

Toby Rank, a two-time 

All-Conference player, 

and Jim Mailey, 

a three time All-American 

and All-Conference player, 

were the all important 

co-captains that kept 

the team together 



WE 


THEY 


15 Juniata 





4 Shippensburg 
1 U. of Scranton 






9 Wilkes College 
5 Millersville 


1 




5 U. of Maryland 


1 


4 Lycoming 
8 Indiana U. (PA) 




1 


6 Susquehanna 





3 Kutztown 


1 


7 Cheyney 
1 East Stroudsburg 



2 


ECAC Tournament (1st 


place) 


3 Moravian College 


2 


3 East Stroudsburg 


2 



In a one to one confrontation, this Husky booter, 
Dave Stock, stands his ground to regain control 

of the ball In pass il l(. a nearliy tcarnnicit.' 




73 




Came over, and another victory for the booters, the team, exhausted but happy, slowly leaves the field accompanied by the officials. 




and set everyones' 
spirits soaring. 
Teams were broken, 
shut-out, and defeated 
with the accurate timing 
and skilled maneuvears 
of the Husky squad. 
The team lead 
their league and division 
through a very 



productive and dominant period. 

The Booters drilled 

and practiced 

with integrity, expertise, 

and showmanship. 

Coach Mingrone 

was very pleased 

with the soccer progress 

in terms of team 

and individual participation. 






















* 'o')j^ ^jf^!^:j^A^ 



^. 






V 



♦^-JK 




By using his head, jimmy Mailey keeps the ball in 
play as Toby Rank sweeps in from the side to aid 
in the field action of the booters. 



Row one: Scott Troutman, Pat Elliolt, Mark 
Hassinger, Scott McNulty, Ron Mattern, Bill 
Sypawka, Leo Quinn, Mark Rinkus. Row two: 
Mark Mull, Bill Bent, Tony Bloom, Bob Fitzgerald, 
Dave Mulligan, Ken Neubeck, |im Mailey, 
George Steele, Toby Rank, Glenn Chestnut, Steve 



Buch, Lou Mingrone (toiuli) Row three: Tim 
Knoster (asst. coach), Craig Rotile, Greg Kane, 
Gary Gallagher, |eff Ehring, Greg Malloch, Dave 
Stock, Mike Connell, Brian Farrell, Roger Stetler, 
John Millhouse, Nick Ciliberto. Not pictured, 
Bryan Tarlicki, Mark Fedele. 



74 



A new mascot 
highlights squad 
and spirits soar 



The Husky cheerleading squad came 
alive this season with the new addition 
of a Husky mascot. In his custom 
made attire, Mike Wasieiczyk did an 
outstanding job of keeping the fans 
interested in Husky action. The squad 
highlighted the football and basketball 
seasons with an occasional visit to 
Husky soccer games or wrestling 
matches, under the direction of co- 
captains, Kim Leslie and Wendi Farrell. 
But their energy did not stop there. 
They were also involved in the com- 
munity as well. The cheerleaders held 
a clinic for all area children where they 
were given the opportunity to learn 
new chants, cheers and routines, and 
then they were given the floor to 'strut 
their stuff for all to see. Many mem- 
bers of the squad also visited high 
schools where they judged try-outs 
and helped area squads to develop 
their skills. The Huskies had a fine 
season. 





Pep and spirit is the name of the game here as 
the cheerleaders take the floor to give Husky 
basketball fans something to cheer about in the 



Nelson Fieldhouse while below, the Husky 
mascot tries to steal some attention on the court 
with his own brand of humor and enthusiasm. 




Looking for action, lliis Husky i lieerieader gets 
ready to lead the football fans at Redman 
Stadium in another spirit lifting cheer. 



Kneeling: Kim Leslie (co-captain), Donna Greco, Marcelli, Mike Wasieiczyk (Husky mascot), Cina 
Sandy Modestine, Susan Dayoc. Standing: Wendi Wolfe, Sue Otto, and Diane Crawford 
Farrell (co-captain), Susan Ceilings, Marta 



75 



Husky matmen rank with the best; 
Wrestlers develop style and depth 



As a family, the husky wrestling squad 
developed the style and depth to be 
consistently ranked as one of the top 
20 teams in the nation this year. At one 
point the matmen were as high as 
tenth in the nation. With an 11-3-0 
record in dual meets there is every 
indication that their program is not 
about to alter the standing. It is a very 
solid program with a good foundation. 
Five years ago these husky achieve- 
ments were hopes and dreams not ex- 
pectations. The result is that fans are 
now supporting the team with en- 
thusiasm and spirit. In the PSAC tour- 
nament Bloomsburg placed first with 
five champions; Mike Nock, Tony 
Caravella, Bucky McCollum, Dominic 



DiGioacchino and Butch Snyder. This 
was a repeat of the state crown victory 
from the year before. The eastern wres- 
tling league championships followed 
the dual meet season. Clarion, whom 
the huskies had beaten in the PSAC 




Face of wrestler Mike Nock shows the expression 
of determination as he rides Glenn Maxwell in 
the competition against Pitt. 




Ready for the first sign of attack is |oe Dougherty 
as he positions himself to pin his opponent as 
fast as possible. 




Head to head confrontation between Dom DiGioacchino, right, and |mi Vargo from ESSC showed DiCioacchmo's championship skills. 



76 




Official eyes are on Dom DiCioacchino as he This year he is in 2nd place for the best winning Leg riding is used by Tony Caravella as his 
conquers ; his West Virginia opponent. percentage overall for the team with an 83%. opponent attempts to break free from the 

DiCioacchino is one of BSC's talented wrestlers. position. 




tournament, was not to be denied 
again. Bloomsburg finished second 
with three champions; Reese, Cara- 
vella, and DiCioacchino. The NCAA I 
tournament had Bloomsburg attending 
with six qualifiers, one more than last 
year. They were able to place one win- 
ner in Tony Caravella with a registered 
4-2 record, placing him seventh in the 
nation. It has been a good year. Husky 
matmen have had their problems with 
injuries, officiating and illness. How- 
ever, there were a lot of strengths as 
well. As the season concluded Di- 
Cioacchino, McCollum, Fiorvanti, 
Knock and Caravella became the top 
point earners in dual meets. These 
wrestlers along with the entire Husky 
squad of promising athletes has made 
our wrestling squad a national pow- 
erhouse. 



Wrestling his best is Ed Fiorvanti top, while his 
opponent struggles to break free from his hold. 
Team mates congratulate each other, below, as 



Dom DiCioacchino holds the trophy that the 
team won at the BSC Invitational. 




Mat action continues as Tom Fiorvanti topples 
his opponent and attempts to pin him and win 
the match. 



77 




First period action gets underway as Dom Pain and anguish is seen on the face of the closer to yet another victory for the Bloomsburg 
DiGioacchino, right, wrestles against Clarion's opponent being wrestled by BSC's Dom matmen who are ranked 17th in the college 
Charles Heller in the 177 pound bout. DiGioacchino bringing the end of the match rankings 



Husky grapplers 
become 

champions 
in competition 



One of the reasons the huskies have 
enjoyed such great success is their 
head coach Roger Sanders, a West 
Chester State grad and former Palymira 
high coach. Backed by a very rigid 
coaching staff Sanders feels that there 
is more to wrestling than stepping 
onto the mat. For him, continuity is 
the name of the game and recruiting is 
the backbone of the continuity. His 
efforts have been devoted to the mid- 
states for his recruits. "We're working 
on a stronger schedule. If the kids 
want to wrestle we'll get the matches," 
says Sanders. Another area of exposure 
Sanders would like to see at Blooms- 
burg is in the area of scholastic wres- 
tling. He'd like to see district and re- 
gional tournaments in Nelson Field 
house. But for now he's pleased with 
taking great pride in the husky squad. 
Popularity and interest have reached 
their highest peak ever for the matmen 
and as they found the season drawing 
to a close the huskies had a PSAC 
record of 6 wins and one loss and 




Bandaged, bruised, and exhausted the matmen 
watch and concentrate on the wrestling action, 
observing the techniques of their own team and 



the visitors while, below, Dom DiGioacchino 
finishes off his opponent in the finals at the BSC 
tournament. 




78 




eastern wrestling league record based 
on four wins and 2 defeats. They were 
ranked 17th in the most widely read 
amature wrestling paper in the country 
and were widely known in wrestling 
locker rooms throughout the state as 
well as throughout the country. 



Resting after a tough bout, Don Reese reflects 
the mat action that has just finished. Reese is a 
two time eastern wrestling league champion. He 



also placed second, along with Ed Fiorvanti, 
the PSAC competition. 



TEAM RECORD 




Dual Meets 


11-3-0 


Eastern Wrestling League 


4-2 


Pennsylvania State Conference 6-1 


Tournaments; 




East Stroudsburg 


1st 


Lehigh-Billy Sheridan 




Invitational 


2nd 


Bloomsburg State College 




Invitational 


1st 


Wilkes Open 


2nd 


Midlands no 


place 


University of Delaware 


1st 


PSAC's 


1st 


Eastern Wrestling League 


2nd 


NCAA 1 


28th 



^R- Tf 




Row one: Don Reese, Todd Cummings, Bob 
Ortman, Mike Nock, Woody Fry, Brian Clark, |oe 
Dougherty, Darrell Keck. Row two: Todd 
Gerstemier, Mark McLaren, Mike Lynch, Brian 
Taylor, Tom Fiorvanti, Scott Wood, Paul Bass, Bill 



Corcoran, Tony Caravella, |oe Schoffstall. Row 
three: Coach Roger Sanders, Rex Lutz, Gibbes 
Johnson, Bucky McCollum, Keith Fairman, Tyrone 
Johnson, FHarry )ames, Gus Sacavage, Mike 
Mirora, Pat Kelley. Row four: Rob Johnson, Frank 



Breslin, Butch Snyder, Ed Fiorvanti, Dom 
DiGioacchino, Brian Jeremiah, Alan McCollum, 
Tom Williams, Tom Mazzante. 



79 



Wenrich goes for 
two; Odgen and 
Tillman battle on. 



Although the team was considered 
young, they proved themselves in abili- 
ty. The team won 14 games and lost 13, 
but provided Husky fans with many 
exciting games. The team won its 
home opener by downing Mansfield, 
80-75, making a great start for the sea- 
son. At the Clarion tournament, the 
Huskies lost in the finals, 93-80. Mike 
Wenrich, the leading scorer in both 
games, was named to the all-tourna- 
ment team for his outstanding play. 
Other court action took place during 
the game against Cheyney. Despite the 
Husky loss, a few players did shine. 
Freshmen Mike Wenrich and Terry 
Conrad led attacks in the first and sec- 
ond halves, respectively. Wenrich fired 
in seven field goals while Conrad, 
leading a Husky comeback, hit a field 
goal and two free throws in addition to 
dishing out two assists to Mike Wen- 
rich. Against Kutztown, this pair again 
showed their worth with Wenrich's ten 
field goals and four free throws and 
Conrad's netted ten shots. Tillman and 
Bardsley also made the double digits in 




Side-stepping and dribbling closer to the basket 
is Dave Ogden as a Bucknell player attempts to 
steal the ball, while below. Bill Tillman tries to 



take control of the ball after an unsuccessful 
play. 




Basketball action continues as Mike Wenrich 
shoots the ball in the game against Mt. St. Mary 
which finished 75 to 83. 



80 




Row one: Rantly Colone, Bill Tillman, Dave Row two: Oave Heimbach, Ron Zynel, Ed Wennch, Mark Cable, Brad Weber, Doug 
Ogden, Terry Conrad, Ion Bardsley. Nichols, Mark Bennett, Dave Kersnowski, Mike Greenholt. 



81 





A\% 



o 'V. 



Surrounded, Doug Creenhold leaps into the air and shoots the ball before the final seconds tick away. 



BSC Netters hit 
the hoop; Weber 
dunks his shots. 



points to help BSC down the Bears. 
Brad Weber was the one to shine in 
the game against York. His five 
rebounds and 14 points led the team, 
as the netters sank 17 of 23 free throws 
to bag the game with a 75-60 victory. 
An overtime loss at Millersville, an ex- 
tremely close match, had Conrad lead- 
ing the BSC scorers with Wenrich, Til- 
lman and Zynel making up the double 
figure performers. The Huskies can 
look for an even better season to 
come, as most of the team members 
will be returning. And with that return 
will be the needed experience and 
confidence of having played a season 
together with team work. 




Battling by leaps and bounds against Mt. St, Mary, Bill 
control of the ball. 



illman oul|umps his op()onenls and keeps 



82 



WE 




THEY 


89 


Buffalo Sfate 


80 


80 


Clarion 


93 


70 


Mansfield 


65 


75 


Philadelphia Textile 


83 


78 


Millersville 


68 


66 


Lock Haven 


65 


62 


kutztown 


69 


81 


Susquehanna 


75 


69 


Franklin & Marshall 


50 


53 


Bucknell 


64 


48 


East Stroudsburg 


47 


81 


Shippensburg 


72 


77 


LeMoyne 


61 


58 


Cheyney 


68 


75 


York 


60 


75 


Millersville 


82 


89 


Mansfield 


77 


89 


Kutztown 


75 


78 


East Stroudsburg 


69 


11 


University of Scranton 


74 


73 


Shippensburg 


79 


79 


Cheyney 


80 


79 


Wilkes 


67 


75 


Mt. St. Mary 


83 


74 


Shippensburg 


92 


74 


W, Virginia Wesleyan 


93 


64 


St. Vincent 


66 




Control IS lost as Brad Weber tumbles and tries for a basket as Mike Wenrich stands ready for the 
rebound, while, below, court action is under the control of )on Bardsley as he dribbles and awaits a 
chance to pass the ball. 




Brad Weber shows his expertise as he 
outstretches his guard in a layup shot for two 
points. 



83 




Sh^ ' fct^-:5^ 



The women's basketball team huddles together 
before the game for a moment of inspiration, a 
word of encouragement, and a plan for another 

win 




All sights are set high as Patty Lyons battles her 
opponent to put the ball in play as she nets 
another score to bring the team another victory. 
As tension mounts and pressure is applied, Sally 



WE 




THEY 


62 


Mary wood 


60 


58 


Trenton 


41 


58 


Ithaca 


64 


46 


Villanova 


78 


83 


Kings 


86 


38 


Kutztown 


46 


57 


Lehigh 


63 


70 


East Stroudsburg 


81 


76 L 


uzerne Community Co 


lege 58 


56 


Lock Haven 


57 


70 


LaSalle 


97 


77 


Wilkes 


63 


60 


Shippensburg 


58 


58 


Millersville 


55 


75 


Bucknell 


61 


68 


U. of Scranton 


79 


70 


Indiana U. (PA) 


80 




Houser prepares to launch another shot while 
Cheryl Sedlak, 45, and Hilarie Runyon, 40, try to 
protect Sally's carom from a very aggressive LHSC 



opponent. The Huskies' dynamic defensive 
abilities are exhibited in the action under the 
boards. 




Women's Basketball Team for 1979-80. Kneeling: 
Cheryl Sedlak, Cathy Pladus, Mindy Lerit, and 
Debbie Chuhinka. Standing: Coach Sue Hibbs, 



Trma Knittel, Hilarie Runyon, Gail Hopkins, Patty 
C. Lyons, Loretta Sutcliffe, Sally Houser, and 
Teresa Tafelski. 



84 




Women hoopsters rebuild team; 
Lyons, Hopkins share M.V.P. award 



The Women's Basketball season 
weathered the departure of eight sen- 
iors and the addition of 12 talented 
frosh players. This rebuilding year pro- 
duced a 7-10 record and a positive 
outlook for the season ahead. Al- 
though it was a losing campaign, the 
caliber of competition and closeness of 
the games tempered the won-loss 
record. Eight of the ten defeats were by 




Hoopster, Sally Houser, 32, shoots for two in a 
crowded zone under the boards, as her 
opponents test her shooting ski 



While her teammates watch on, Gail Hopkins 
finds herself boxed in a corner as the tough 
Lehigh team applies a full court press. 



eleven or less points. As a Division III 
A.I.A.W. team, the Huskies played a 
schedule including two Division I 
schools and six Division II clubs. Un- 
der the coaching talents of Head 
Coach, Sue Hibbs, the able tri-captains 
for the Husky squad, all seniors, 
proved to be performance leaders too. 
Patty Lyons led the women in 
rebounds, assists, and steals while her 
counterpart, Gail Hopkins, netted the 
most points. These two players shared 
the M.V.P. award for the season. Cen- 
ter Sally Houser was the year's leading 
blocker and captured the second spot 
in shooting percentage and rebounds 
for the team. The outside shooting and 
offensive quarterbacking was handled 
by junior, Mindy Lerit. She was a close 
second to Hopkins in the total points 
tally and second to sophomore Trina 
Knittel in percentage from the charity 
strip. Knittel and Lerit will join forces 
to co-captain the Huskies next season. 
Several freshmen also made their mark 
this year including center, Hilarie Ru- 
nyon and guards Susie Hicks and Cher- 
yl Sedlak on the varsity line-up while 
Diane Alfonsi and Maureen McDonald 
led the ranks of the junior varsity con- 
tingency. These young players are anx- 
ious for next year's schedule and the 
season expansion to 22 games, but 
they will always reflect on this past 
season as one of growth and ex- 
perience for all. 




Making a difficult basket looks like an easy task An aggressive LHSC team surrounds Patty C, are; Hilarie Runyon, 40, and Gail Hopkms, 43, 
for Hilarie Runyon, 40, while she puts the ball in Lyons, 24, as she tnes to connect for another The hoopsters display a fine effort throughout a 
play as Houser observes. Husky score. Also in play for the Husky women growing season. 



85 




Excitement reigns supreme at poolside as Pete 
Dardaris swims in the 200 yard backstroke at the 
same time he qualified for the Nationals. 
Dardaris swam the 200 yard backstroke In 2:00 



minutes and In addition to qualifying for 
Nationals, he also gained "All America" honors 
for himself and the team. 
Nearing the end of the 100 fly in the 400 meter 



race Is swimmer Randy Spence as he approaches 
the wall In order to finish the race against the 
clock. 



Dardaris team captain and BSC All American 



Senior Pete Dardaris, captain of the 
Men's Varsity Swim Team, gained All 
American honors while competing in 
the NCAA Division II National Swim- 
ming and Diving Championships at 
Youngstown, Ohio. After qualifying in 
both the 100 and 200 yard backstroke 
events at the Pennsylvania State Con- 
ference Championships, where he took 
first and second respectively, he went 
on to stroke his way to a 15th place in 
the 100 yard backstroke and an 8th 
place finish in the 200 yard backstroke. 
For Dardaris, this was his fourth trip to 
the Nationals and his second trip 
home as an All American. This year, in 
his final performance for Bloomsburg, 
Dardaris pulled out a second place 



finish in his consolation-final heat of 
the 200 yard backstroke to place him 
eighth over all. His time of 1:56.9 shat- 
tered last year's efforts by two full sec- 
onds. Coach Eli McLaughlin, earlier in 
the season, referred to Dardaris as "Mr. 




Churling the water and slicing It like a knife, this 
swimmer Is just a few feet away from the end of 
the race and a victory for the Huskies. 



Everything," and commented, "Pete 
has always been a very tough com- 
petitor. He's so flexible it's hard to pin 
him down to just one event." During 
his final season, Dardaris went on to 
demonstrate his versatility by setting 
four BSC all-time records: 100 yard 
backstroke, 54.4; 200 yard backstroke, 
1:56.9, 200 yard individual medley, 
2:03.2 and the 1,000 yard freestyle, 
10:22.8. Dardaris has provided many 
thrills for both spectators and team- 
mates over the past four years. His 
dedication and hard work during that 
time have both been tremendous and 
have resulted in his extensive achieve- 
ments. According to his teammates, 
Pete's talents will be missed. 




Poised and in position are the swimmers as they 
wait for the signal to dive Into the pool to make 
their mark while Coach Ell McLaughlin, right. 



shouts directions and urges his swimmer to move 
faster and to Improve his style which will help 
both the swimmer and the team. 






86 




Other super swimmers were soph- 
omore Randy Spence, who gained 
valuable experience competing in the 
Nationals on the 400 yard medley relay 
swimming the 100 yard butterfly leg, 
will be counted on quite heavily. Re- 
turning to the team this year were jun- 
ior lettermen Reik Foust and Tom Cole, 
backstroker and diver respectively. Tal- 
ented freshmen this year were |eff Bas- 
kin, Tim Briddes and Phil Spampinato. 
McLaughlin commented earlier in the 
year that the team had a tough season 
before them and that it would take 
complete dedication from each team 
member in order to gain victories from 
the tough teams on the schedule. Al- 
though the team lost seven matches, 
iheir pride rests in team spirit. 




riming is very important as the swimmer on the switch takes place, the diver on the block takes a On the side of the pool are the swimmers from 

board readies himself and begins to spnng off quick look to where the other divers are BSC watching one of their teammates complete 

the block just as the swimmer in the water positioned in the pool, his turn from the wall and begin another lap. 

finishes his lap. In these few moments before the __^^^^_^_^^^_^_^_^^__^^^^_^^^^ 




First Row: Glenn Miller, Tim Briddes, )eff Baskin, 
John Conte, Tom Reilly, Aris Carpousis, Phil 
Spaminato. Second Row: Reik Foust, Mike 
Henderson, |eff Ludroff, Bill Richardson, Randy 



Spence, Frank lacoby, Pete Dardaris, Eric 
Slingerland, Bill Wolfe, Scott Wiegand, Eli 
McLaughlin (coach). 



WE 




THEY ; 


37 


Bucknell 


76 \ 


68 


Towson 


45 


40 


Temple 


73 


77 


East Stroudsburg 


36 


65 


West Chester 


46 


57 


Susquehanna 


44 


52 


Shippensburg 


61 


60 


Edinboro 


53 


48 


Kutztown 


65 


45 


Clarion 


67 


33 


Penn State 


79 


43 


Indiana 


65 



87 



Coach Eli McLaughlin serves 
18 years as swimming coach 




Eli McLaughlin finished his 18th year as 
swimming coach. McLaughlin, who is 
the senior coach in the Pennsylvania 
State College Conference, has done an 
outstanding job building a highly re- 
spected varsity program at the college. 
He recorded ten consecutive winning 
seasons from 1965-66 through 1974-75. 
Although his last four seasons have 
been below the ,500 mark, McLaughlin 
still had some exciting meets and 
qualified a number of swimmers for 
national competition. A "big victory" 



of his career was having Pete Dardaris 
become the first Husky swimmer to 
break 2:00 minutes in the 200 yard 
backstroke and gain "All America" 
honors. McLaughlin received both his 
Bachelor of Science and Master of Edu- 
cation degrees from West Chester State 
College and has taken additional work 
towards his doctorate at West Virginia 
University. He is an associate professor 
in the Health and Physical Education 
Department and is also the Director ot 
Aquatics at the college. 



?f 




Tucking his head to his knees is this Husky diver 
as he competes against himself and other divers 
for that perfect dive to win the match. 




Even though most of the dive has been 
completed this swimmer must still concentrate 
on his entry into the water while this diver, right, 



is just starting to unfurl from his launch off the 
diving board as his teammates watch and study 
his form in order to improve the next dive 



88 



Kitt, Smith become team strengths in Super Season 



Once, again, the Husky Women's 
Swim Team turned in another out- 
standing year. Many new team records 
and individual talents were exhibited 
throughout the season according to 
Head Coach, Mary P. Gardner. The 
team finished with a 7-2 dual meet 
record and a 10th place finish at the 
AIAW National Collegiate Champion- 
ship where 110 colleges represented 
the first Division 111 Nationals. 



The All-American 200 and 400 yard 
freestyle relay team of Linda Smith, 
Leah Stratton, Susan Brophy and 
Joanne Kitt captured PSAC Conference 
titles in both events and finished third 
and fourth respectively at the National 
Championships. Tri-captain and Ail- 
American Joanne Kitt took the Confer- 
ence Championship in the 100 yard 
backstroke and set a new team record 
in the event. 



Kitt has also bettered herself and her 
old records in the 50 and 200 yard 
backstroke events. She received Ail- 
American honors again this season in 
all three events. Linda Smith captured 
a Conference title again this season in 
the 50 yard freestyle. She repeated her 
All-American performance in the 50 
yard freestyle and 100 yard individual 
medley at the Nationals. Other out- 
standing swimmers were; freshman All- 




Mii)\c ciiul .11 riKhl I-, the Husky Women's Swim 
Team's lone diver, Patty lezzoni. Her 
contributions to the team were very crucial, and 



her perfornitiiu I- ua^ a vital make-up tor the 
rosier. Patty's talents, as the others', made this 
season a great one. 



89 





At poolside. Coach Mary P. Gardner talks with her team as they take a short practice break. Many hours of long, hard work were 
dedicated to an overall team effort by all of the women to become champions; and their goal became a reality far beyond many people's 
wildest dreams. 



Women Swimmers 10th in Nation; 
freestyle relay team hits title 



'v \ \ 




Diving is another aspect of women's swimming 
that is very important to the team, and individual 
talents of these fine Huskies. 

American Leah Stratton who set a new 
teatn record in the 200 yard freestyle 
event, Susan Brophy who was the 
Husky's strength throughout the sea- 



son in the butterfly event, Tri-captain 
Lee Ann Pietrzykoski who clocked her 
best career times in the 500, 1000 and 
1650 yard freestyle events, setting new 
team records in all three. Nancy Sem- 
isch who added strength in all distance 
events, and Vickie Orme who became 
the top breaststroker and repeated her 
performance in the nationally ranked 
200 yard medley relay. Other swimmers 
contributing to success were; Tri-cap- 
tian Ann Fadner, Lori Danner, Sherry 
Hildebrand, Nina Stratton, Peggy Laird, 
Gail Hickey and the Husky's lone diver 
Patty lezzoni. 




As the competition 
swimmers take to the 



women 
n search 



90 




♦ ^ "'^ 



%.^ 



^'ij^ - 





of a good time and a winning place in the race. 
In the backstroke event, the Huskies were strong 
because of the uniform talents of some fine 



young women athletes that set high goals. 

The butterfly event was also another Husky 

strength to compete with, with Susan Brophy 



taking the reigns. Competition for the team this 
year has been difficult, but the Huskies seem to 
have no limitations on what they can do. 




r^. 





Another Husky swimmer makes waves in quest 
of another overwhelming victory for the ever 
popular ladies. 



WE 




THEY 


52 


Shippensburg 


88 


81 


Lehigh 


•«> 


89 


West Chester 


50 


92 


Ithaca 


•46 


95 


Millersville 


44 


91 


East Stroudsburg 


49 


77 


Glassboro 


63 


91 


Lock Haven 


49 


56 


Bucknell 


84 




Breaststroker, Vickie Orme, settles into the water 
to better her time and take home a few more 
honors- 




A good starting 
essential to all 
swimming. 



time coming off of the blocks is 
substantial placings in events like 



Row one: Cathy Stemmler, Sue Brophy, Ann 
Fadner, Patty lezzoni, Sherry Hildebrand, Kodi. 
Row two: Sue Bower, Renee Greenberg, Lori 
Danner, Nina Stratton, Jennifer Delia, Vickie 



Orme, Cyndy Curry, Nancy Semisch. Row three: 
Mary Gardner, Linda Smith, Lee Ann Pietrzyskosi, 
Leah Stratton, Joanne Kitt, Peggy Laird, Gail 
Hickey, Lori Lebo. 



91 



These pages are dedicated to those students. 
Who were stricken by Apathy, 
Those who did not care if we won, lost 
or even played the game. 



92 



And now on with more sports action. 



93 










Finishing a set. Coach Reese chuckles as he returns to the back line while, below right, Lorie Keating, right, and Mary Lou Hnatin discuss 
the upcoming match 

Netters finish fantastic season 



Top player for the men's tennis team 
was Rob Vance who was 4-2 for the 
spring and tied BSC graduate Jim Hol- 
lister's career win record of 95. After 
completing a southern tour, the tennis 
team stood at 4-2 on the spring season. 
For the year, the Huskies stood at 11-2. 



The women's tennis team also per- 
formed well this year under the coach- 
ing efforts of Coach Michael "Doc" 
Herbert. They captured the champion- 
ship of the Annual College Bowl tour- 
nament held at the Doubletier Racquet 
Club in Scranton. 





■%^.Bfrir Mv J^ 



First Row: Lone Keating, ,Mjr\ Lou Hnatin, Deb Gundrum, Marina Giamo, Susan Hermsen, Jeanne 
Orendorff. Second Row: Jane Kautman, Deb Fetch, Tricia Grace. 



WE 




THEY 


7 


Villanova 


2 


6 


Susquehanna 


3 


8 


Penn State-Hazelton 


1 


2 


Elizabethtown 


5 


8 


Marywood 


1 


4 


Lehigh 


5 



94 




Spinning out from his position and getting ready 
to return the tennis ball with a backhand is Dave 
Williams. Being ready to use any kind of a stroke 



Is essential to a well trained tennis plavcr < )nc 
never can be quite sure what an opponent will 
do so being prepared is the best defense 




Kneeling: Dave Superdock, Steve Blechschmidt, 
Marty Coyne, Craig Diehl, Ken Grove, Rob 
Vance. 



Second Row: Tim Blanchard, Rick Wilders, )oe 
Lesko, Gary Golbitz, Chuck Tirendi, )im Krause, 
Dave Williams. 



WE 




THEY 


6 


Cornell 


3 


9 


George Mason 





3 


Navy 


5 


7 


Richmond 


2 


9 


Salisbury State 





3 


William and Mary 


6 


7 


Haverford 


2 


9 


Dickinson 





9 


Lycoming 





9 


Kutztown 





8 


Bucknell 


1 


7 


Temple 


2 


6 


Lock Haven 


3 


9 


Oneota 





7 


East Stroudsburg 


2 


4 


Penn State 


5 


7 


Scranton U. 


2 


9 


Lehigh 







Great return is made by Steve Blechschmidt as he 
drives the ball deep into his opponent's court in 
order to attempt to win the set. 



95 




Sitting: Sue Kelly, )ay MItroka, Chrissie Kazal, Sue 
Hicks, Maureen McDonald, Lorrie Morris, 
Carolyn Bartoni, Roberta Spezialetii, Donna 



Bontiglio. Second Row: Cathy Constable, Cathy 
Kercher, Cheryl Sedlak, Sally Houser, Beth 



Rohrbach, Roni Brube, 
Hutchinson (coach). 



Gail Gerberich, ian 



Coach Hutchinson says team has 
talent and faces tough competition 



The 1980 edition of the women's soft- 
ball team took to the field on March 
31. The head coach for the Husky hurl- 
ers, Mrs. Janet Hutchinson, looked for- 
ward to a great season and felt that her 
team had a lot of talent because many 
of the girls could play multiple posi- 
tions. Forty women tried out for the 
team this year; the team was slimmed 
to a 16 player roster. There were seven 
players returning to the team and nine 
new players this year. It was hoped by 
Hutchinson that the returning girls 
would add experience to the other girls 
because of the tough season the girls 



had scheduled. In the beginning of the 
season. Coach Hutchinson stated that 
this year's team was both enthusiastic 
and dedicated. The team's outlook 
surely became apparent when the final 
scores of the season were released. 
Finishing the year with 12 wins and 
only two losses, the team should be 
congratulated for showing what can be 
accomplished with a positive outlook 
and some enthusiasm. This was the 
third season for Hutchinson who ex- 
pected this to be one of her best sea- 
sons. 



WE 




THEY 


8 


Messiah College 


3 


8 


Messiah College 


2 


15 


Susquehanna 


11 


20 


Susquehanna 


11 


6 


Millersville 


5 


3 


Millersville 


10 


7 


Wilkes 


6 


10 


Wilkes 


6 


2 


Shippensburg 


4 


8 


Shippensburg 


3 


3 


Luzerne Comm. College 


2 


11 


Luzerne Comm. College 


1 


15 


Bucknell 


11 


8 


Bucknell 


2 



96 



WE 




THEY 


1 


Bucknell 


7 


4 


Bucknell 


3 


2 


Millersville 





3 


Millersville 


1 


20 


Susquehanna 


4 


8 


East Stroudsburg 


12 


4 


East Stroudsburg 


4 


2 


Oneonta 


1 


3 


Oneonta 


4 


8 


Lock Haven 


2 


4 


Lock Haven 


6 


5 


Mansfield 


11 


5 


Mansfield 


6 


2 


Wilkes 


4 


3 


Wilkes 


4 


17 


Scranton U. 


11 


5 


Scranton U. 


11 


4 


Kutztown 


3 


10 


Kutztown 


9 





Shippensburg 


5 


3 


Shippensburg 






Season starts with Virginia trip 
and hopeful outlook from coach 



The Husky baseball team opened its 
1980 season with a trip to Virginia and 
returned with a 1-2 record. Coach Bo- 
ler's troops lost a double-header 
against Liberty Baptist, but came out a 
winner in a game versus Bridgewater 
College. In the opener of the twinbill 
with Liberty Baptist, the Husky bats 
were silenced by the three hit pitching. 
The Huskies lost the game by a 2-0 
score. Bloomsburg dropped the second 
game by a 10-8 count. The Huskies 
scored seven runs in the first two in- 
nings, but then watched their lead 
shrink into one run deficit, 8-7. BSC 
was able to tie the score at 8-8, and 
later at 9-9, but Liberty Baptist got a 
run in the last of the seventh to pull 
out the win in the slugfest. Miller was 
the winning pitcher. 



Mark McCue absorbed the loss for the 
Huskies. Liberty Baptist had 10 runs on 
10 hits. Bloomsburg had a pair of bat- 
ters come up with two hits in the 
game. Phil Fenton had a double and 
single while Glenn Hoffman rapped 
two solid singles. Ted Ritsick also 
roped a double for the Huskies. Doug 
Richie and McCue combined to hold 
back Bridgewater College 4-3 for the 
first win of the season. Bloomsburg 
out-hit Bridgewater eight to six in the 
victory. When asked about the trip Bo- 
ler commented, "The kids got a lot out 
of it. We were ready to play once we 
got some practice." Boler continued, 
"This season we anticipate a better 
year than last year, but it will depend 
on how the young players play." 




Seated: Ted RItsIck, Dennis Lavan, Bill Hobson, 
Doug Richie, Kevin Crosley, lohn Tucker, Tim 
Konsowitz, Bob Graham. Second Row: Kevin 
Sobocinski, Dave George, Ron Lockwood, Steve 



Miller, Mark McCue, )eff Koscelansky, Glenn 
Hoffman, Bob Schwab, |eff Long. Third Row: )im 
Quinn, leff Young, Bill Bixler, George Krezmer, 



Kevin Moyer, lack LaCesa, Gary Thorp, Mark 
Samson, Frank Coll, Clark Boler (coach), Todd 
Hoover (capt.). 



97 




First Row: Sharon Clauss, loanne Whiteley, Yovanovich, Lisa Williams, Robin Eisner, Lucie Lisa Vogel, Patty Cerami. Patty Rooney, Cindy 
Denise Danz, Terri Taylor, Pam Peckman, |udy Capozzolo, Barbara Barrow, Terry Garrigan, Vicky Haas, Trina Knittel, Gail Hopkins, Ellen Gonder, 
Brazil, lane Seislove Second Row: Carol Calpaldi, Susan Kesslar Third Row: Gloria Prey, Cindy Bomba, B.j. Rost (coach). 




Lacrosse is a rough sport that is not to be taken 
lightly as shown above and left where the action 
on the field is very competitive. 



WE 




THEY 


5 


Millersville 


9 


5 


Kutztown 


5 


1 


Shippensburg 


17 


3 


Oneonta 


2 


5 


Slippery Rock 


12 



98 




standing: Kevin Pike, Mike Miller, Kevin Lemair, 
Steve Shultz, Steve Lenhart, Eric McKee, Dave 
Cichan, John Labosky, )oe Roeder, Bob Reeder 
(coach), members of the Golf Team. 



Due to the weather and the changing sports 
schedules, the staff apologizes to the coaches 
and teams of spring sports for not being able to 
cover their events better than presented. 




First Row: Renee Crouse, Lynn Vander Does, Karen Scuti, 

Kumiko Ohara, Pat Ernest, Wendi Farrell, Laurene Reed, Kay 

Meymaris, Beth Ann Wallace. Second Row: ludy Wernstedt 

Kapuschinsky, Marie Hoffner, Susan Hartman, Crouthamel, 



Hranichny, Third Row: Carol 
(coach), Terri Purcell, Sherry 
Dawn Hutchinson, Anne Grab, 



LjuiuII ,\1uul'i\, KaLJijcl Lung, Boniiiu .Mbertson, 
Deb Sabalesky, Carol Miller, Beth Banaszek, 
Diane Alfonsi, Jennifer Reed, The Women's 
Track Team. 



99 



Salute to 1980 sports stars 



Whether it was fall, winter or spring. In the 1979-80 sport season, many vic- 
each sport season has its own super- tors arose to capture the spotlight for 
stars. Those team players who give their respective teams. It is for their 
more than 100 percent to go that extra outstanding performance they are sa- 
mile, inch, stroke or minute to win a luted. Congratulations to these super- 
Husky victory. stars. 





John Labosky, left, Dave Cichan . . . golf 



Todd Hoover . . . baseball 




\ 



-Ul 



Rob Vance . . . tennis 



Carolyn Bartoni . . . softball 



100 




Dan McCallum . . . track 



f >• 



Gail Hopkins, top, Patty Lyons . . . bas- 
ketball 





Tony Caravello, above, Dom 
DiGioacchino, below . . . wrestling 



Peter Dardaris . . . swimming 




101 



Coaches shape individual teams 



Very seldom is there a look at the 
leaders of the teams that provide the 
sense of school spirit and competition 
throughout the school year. The in- 
structor, counselor, player and friend, 
otherwise known as a coach, are often 
neglected during the course of the 
year. It is the coach who shapes every 



mass of sport minded students mto a 
unit of one, commonly called a team. 
Working together and receiving the 
single goal of victory or the deepest 
loss of defeat, a close bond is formed 
that no one but the players can de- 
scribe. It is here that the coaches have 
their last words about the 1980 teams. 




"Our dual match record (12-2) 
reflects the total effort ot a fine 
group of competitive women. To 
single out one individual as out- 
standing is extremely difficult. 
However, lane Kaufman won the 
PSAC championship at third sin- 
gles while Debbie Orendorff set a 
new school record with 1 I vic- 
tories in a row." 
Mike Herbert 

"We had a young team that was 
characterized by inconsistency. I 
think we have some outstanding 
young people that will develop 
individually and collectively into 
one of the finest teams seen at 
Bloomsburg in recent years." 
Charles Chronister 

"The 1980 softball season was a 
very exciting and rewarding one 
with the team in only its third 
year as a varsity sport, finishing 
with a 14-4 record, a 3rd place in 
the PSAC Softball Championship 
behind ESSC and Lock Haven, 
and a 2nd place finish behind 
Slippery Rock in the EAIAW Re- 
gional Championships. With only 
two players graduating, Carolyn 
Bartoni and Sally Houser, 
things look very promising for the 
next few years. Eight players were 
freshmen. The most outstanding 
players, Carolyn Bartoni and Sally 
Houser, were 4 year starting play- 
ers." 
Jan Hutchinson 

"This graduating class of 1980 has 
been responsible for the success 
of the soccer program and has 
developed a winning attitude for 
B.S.C. to grow with. |im Mailey, as 
a leader, has contributed to this 
winning attitude with his prolific 
scoring ability which gave the 
team confidence and poise as a 
soccer contender matured." 
Lou Mingrone 

"It's nice to play good, solid com- 
petitors and to win, but this year's 



Clark Boler . . . baseball 




Charles Chronister . . . men's basketball Mary Gardner . . . women's swimming 





Mike Herbert . . . women's tennis 



Sue Hibbs . . . women's basketball 



^^. 





Carl Hinkle . . . men's track 

team was exceptional. To coach a 
group of young people with such 
cooperation and caring for each 



|an Hutchinson . . . softball 

other is worth a decade of wins. 
The 79-'80 outstanding players, 
Gail Hopkins and P.C. Lyons, 




Eli McLaughlin . . . men's swimming Lou Mingrone . . . soccer 





Ron Puhl . .. football 



Robert Reeder . . . golf 





Burt Reese . . . men's tennis 



B.l. Rose . . . lacrosse 





Roger Sanders . . . wrestling 



Carolyn Wernsted . . . women's track 



shared K4.V,P. honors that were 
elected by the team and coaches 
votes. They were point and 
rebound players and captained 
the team. They were excellent 
teachers for the entire team." 
Sue Hibbs 

"No comment." "Mike Morucci 
was an outstanding player who 
received 7th round NFL draft 
choice of the New Orlean Saints. 
He was a very valuable asset." 
Ron Puhl, football 

"All the members of the team 
gave 100 percent plus. We played 
against real tough teams which 
helped us prepare for State 
Championships. I feel quite a 
challenge to come up with a per- 
son like Pete Dardaris, who was 
most valuable to the team, since 
he was instrumental in many of 
the victories over the last four 
years. This year we are also losing 
two good divers, Scott Weigan 
and Eric Slingerland. Overall, we 
are trying to build and strengthen 
the program. We are now about 
two years away to getting the 
program back to where it was a 
few years ago. Presently we have 
a young team and with recruiting 
efforts we hope to provide the 
squad with 8-10 good freshman 
prospects." 

Eli McLaughlin 

"The team was basicly a young 
and inexperienced team yet, their 
performance was admirable and 
with that they won the 2nd Pa. 
Conference in a row in addition 
to finishing 17th in the nation. 
The team was really great and 
very mature. Two of the out- 
standing players were Tony Cara- 
vello and Dom DiGioacchino 
who placed 7th in the NCAA in 
addition to 3rd time Pa. Confer- 
ence champion and 3rd time East- 
ern Wrestling League Champion, 
respectively. 
Roger Sanders 

"This year we were working on 
quality and not the number of 
participants. The team was small- 
er yet, competed well. The small- 
er team allowed for more individ- 
ual coaching. Dan McCallum was 
very valuable to the team because 
of his skills and flexibility." 
Carl Hinkle 



103 




^ 



vr4 



WM. 



by Roberta Clemmens and Janet Rusnak 

Senior classes graduate once a year, it's 
a fact of life. Each class, however, has 
their own individual leaders, sportstars, 
and students that participated in the 
school's activities. As one looks 
through the senior class portraits, look 
for the faces that helped to make the 
school better because of their activi- 
ties. This section also includes the 
faces of past roommates, friends and 



past loves. These people too should be 
remembered since they were a part of 
the life which was lived at Bloomsburg. 
Graduation begins this part of the 
book with all the excitement and the 
feeling of something being lost. After 
the graduation pages, there will unfold 
the pages of portraits, the friends, the 
leaders, and the lovers. Study each face 
and remember the class of 1980. 



Entertaining the students before 
Haas auditorium is Toby Lloyd v 



a concert in 
ho played at 



coffee houses as well as other school events. 





'^ 



Counterclockwise from top left: Many students 
helped to make the school better with their 
talents. Music is provided by Hester Huffnagle as 
she plays her violin. )im Peffley is the editor of 
the Campus Voice along with lanet Rusnak the 
editor of the Olympian. Radio station Dl's 
provided the school with music as Willard 
Bradely leads the student body as president of 
the student government. 





Present during the 1980 May commencement are, 
left to right. Dr. Emery W. Rarig, |r.. Dean of 
School of Business, Dr. Charles W. Carlson, Dean 




One last look at fellow seniors are taken by the 
graduates as they prepare to begin the 
graduation ceremonies. Watching the stands, 



of School of Graduate Studies, Dr. Loretta, Graduation speaker Dr. Loretta Long, T.V. 
commencement speaker, and Dr. James Mitchell, personality and well known educator talks to the 
Vice President of Academic Affairs. class of 1980 about education and its role. 



''Sesame Street'' 
speaker talks to 
1980 graduates 

Speaker for the May commencement 
was educator and T.V. personality Dr. 
Loretta Long. Playing the role of "Su- 
san" on the educational show "Sesame 
Street", Long talked about education 
and the role of T.V, with children. She 
then directed her remarks to the gradu- 
ates. "Learn from the present," said 
Long, "learn from the past in order to 
shape the future." Continuing with her 
presentation, Long said, "We really 
can't teach children today the way we 
were taught. They are so much more 
aware of things, even national prob- 
lems and situations." One of her clos- 
ing messages was directed to the par- 
ents present in which she quoted a 
poem about parents and how they 
compare to bows and children the ar- 
rows. Parents being launching pads 
and children the rockets. The arrow or 
rocket is shot into space just as chil- 
dren are launched into their own 
world of reality after receiving their 
education. The class of 1980 listened 
intently to these last words as they 
looked back at their college life. 



they try to get a glimpse of mom, dad, and other 
family members and friends, while others are 
thinking of the cold beer and parties soon to 



106 




lollow to line up, adjust their mortarboards, and still try 

Confusion always abounds as the seniors begin to appear to be calm to the public. 



Last minute joking takes place as these graduates 
remember the hard exams, long nights, wild 




parties, embarrassing moments and how they 
wish they could do it all over again. 
Commencement marshall, right. Nelson A. Miller 



107 



Graduation 
begins, ^ 

LaRuffa speaks on 
future changes 

Over 4,000 people attended the com- 
mencement exercises on Saturday, May 
10 at the Bloomsburg Fairgrounds. Bac- 
calaureate was held at 10 a.m. that 
morning in Haas Auditorium under the 
direction of Rev. Greg Osterberg. Dur- 
ingthe graduation exercises, Vincent La- 
Ruffa, senior class president, stated in 
his speech, "Regardless of our plans as 
graduates, we all face change, and 
there is little we can do about it. if we 
see change as an opportunity, we will 
welcome it as a challenge, with no fear 
that we will not be able to handle the 
present situation or any future devel- 
opments." He then presented the col- 
lege with a check for $3,000 on behalf 
of the class of 1980 for books for the 
Andruss Library, Willard Bradley, Com- 
munity Government Association presi- 
dent, thanked the citizens for the op- 
portunity of obtaining an education 
and hoped that his classmates would 
use their education appropriately to 
meet the challenge of today's prob- 
lems and issues in our society. 

Sneakers and a gown prove that this senior has 
not lost his sense of humor during the 





graduation ceremony that could become quite between the rows of the seniors moments before 

heavy with memories and the ending of college, commencement. 

while below, an effective mood picture is taken Friend of a graduate waves to his friends in the 



grandstand in the few moments before the class 
of 1980 is declared graduated. 




108 









For some reason, no matter how many bobby front, perhaps down the back and finally as the commencement when they are told to move 

pins or one of the many ways tried, the lightest last bobby pin pulls free, it cascades towards the their tassle to their right side and are 

breeze or nod of the head can slide the ground. pronounced graduates, 

mortarboard down the side of the face, or the Class of 1980 await the final moments of 




Parents, grandparents, brothers, sisters and friends file through the fairground gates in order to find a seat in the grandstands. 



109 



Maureen Accardi 

Joseph F. Aceto 

Joyce Aimone 

Lunnell R. Alston 



Diane Altieri 

Victoria A. Altieri 

Richard Amato 

Richard J. Anastasi 



Joan J. Andrews 

Margaret L. Andrews 

Richard Andrews 

Dawn A. Andrus 



Anthony Angelo 

Joseph A. Antellocy 

Martin D. Appel 

Doug Arch 



Kathy Ann Arvia 

Claudia Marie Ashton 

Johanna W. Astler 

Brian A. Auchey 




110 




M. jean Augello 
Kathy A. Augustine 
Christopher Aurand 
Joel Aurand 



Michael J. Azar 
Marid Bacchia 
Karen Baer 
Leigh Ann Bal<er 



Susan Emily Baldwin 
)im Ball 

John W. Ballantine 
Valerie Roxanne Baloga 



Karen Barber 
Byron E. Barksdale 
Kathryn A. Barnhart 
Marie E. Barone 



Lesly Beth Barr 
Marie A. Barr 
Roger F. Barr 
Virginia Grace Barr 



111 



Sandra ). Barrall 

Michael Bartol 

Carolyn J. Bartoni 

Cynthia L. Bartynski 



Mona G. Bastide 

Barbara A. Bator 

Kathleen Bauman 

Richard D. Baylor 



Brenda Bean 

Willaim |. Begley Jr. 

lack Behan 

David A. Belkoski 



Karen Bell 

Joseph Bell 

Diana Benasutti 

John C. Berquist 



Vanessa R. Besecker 

John L. Beshada 

Irvin |. Betsker Jr. 

Deborah A. Biago 




112 




Michael Bierly 
Mindy Sue Bielitsky 
Robert V. Bittel 
Lori A. Bizup 



Margaret A. Blacklock 
Karia J. Blankenhorn 
Timothy J. Blaze 
Victoria A. Bloss 



Michele Bloszinsky 
Barbara Blye 
Deborah Bogansky 
Cheri L. Bohler 



Jerry L. Bolig 
Bruce E. Boncal 
Jeri Ann Boose 
Betty |. Bordash 



Alan Bowen 
Carl J. Bowen 
Michael D. Bower 
Susan Patricia Bower 



113 



Willard E. Bradley 

Gerald Robert Brazil 

lames F. Brecker 

Julie B. Breitenberg 



Joanie M. Brojack 



Arthur |. Brosius 



Marie T. Brown 



Robert A. Brown 



Todd A. Brown 



Martha Bryden 



Dennis Bucher 



Elizabeth A. Buck 



Jill Buhrman 

Marianne Buker 

Diane Marie Bukoski 

Francine Ann Bullet 



Eris-Marie B. Bunnell 

Linda Gale Bupp 

Pamela |o Burd 

Diane L. Burger 




114 




Brian Joseph Burke 
Bonita A. Burns 
Debra Marie Butler 
Joseph C. Button 



Eileen Callahan 

Kyle Calvello 

Paula Dietrich Campbell 

Thomas C. Canfield 



Barbara Cantrelle 
Anthony Caravella 
Donna Marie Carcaci 
Debra Cardene 



David Michael Carey 
Peggy Carlin 
Jeffrey W. Carson 
Debbie Cassels 



Joanne Marie Castelli 
Cheryl Ann Checchi 

Glenn A. Chestnut 

Joy Chestnutt 



115 



David |. Cichan 

Christine Clapper 

J. Scott Clayton 

Cindy A. Cline 



Betty L Cluley 

Daryl Coach 

Carolyn D. Coldren 

lames Edward Columbus 



Suzanne Conlan 

Denise Connelly 

William S. Corby 

Catherine A. Cortellessa 



Mary Louise Cortright 

Susan L. Cossack 

George 1. Coughlin 

Brian D. Cox 



G. Scott Cox 

Randall Cox 

Karen M. Coyne 

Cindy Craver 




116 




David Preston Crawford 
Dale Crooks 
Carol Cunningham 
Terry Lee Curran 



Heidi Lynn Custer 
Helene Czajkowski 
William F. Dalius Jr. 
James A. Dalton II 



Tracey K. Daniel 
Lenore Dankulich 
Cynthia Darazdi 
Caria Marie Davis 



Diane L. Davis 
Joan Davis 
Sandra Kay Davis 
Sharon Davidson 



Douglas F. Deihm 
Nancy Ann Deiling 
Jeffery Deisher 
Randy Deitrich 



117 



Tammy Marie Dalano 
Mary P. Dellegrotto 
Susan Kay Deppen 
Marianne P. Deska 



Tina Marie Devlin 

Betsy Anne Dice 

Patricia L. Dick 

Brian Dietterick 



Michael A. Dilarso 

Alfred Ebongue Din 

Melissa Ditty 

Robert E. Divers 



Laurie G. Dockeray 

Carol Ann Domansky 

Charles D. Donahue Jr. 

Richard F. Donahue 



Theresa M. Donko 

Paula Dooley 

Lawrence F. Dooling 

Paula Doran 




118 




Olen L. Dorney 
Dana L. Dortode 
Ann Therese Dougherty 
Elizabeth Dougherty 



James Anthony Dougherty Jr. 
Anthony J. Downey II 
John Douglas Downey 
Deborah L. Drada 



Randolph M. Dry 
Pamela Jeane Duart 
Mark Dublisky 
Ronald D. Dudeck 



Karol Duffy 
Teresa Duffy 
Daniel Duimstra 
Joan M. Dule 



Vicki Dumm 

Kathryn Rebecca Duncan 

Mark G. Dunkel 

Joan Durant 



119 



Marian Michelle Durkes 

Ronald Duser 

Linda Duzick 

David A. Dygert 



Tim Eadline 

Susan Egizi 

Anat Eliav 

Robert B. Elliott 



Nancy J. Ellis 

Edgar H. Emery Jr. 

Steven R. Ems 

Debra A. Engel 



Jeffrey Engle 

Harry English 

Mary Beth English 

Melanie Rose Epier 



Kevin G. Erdman 

Linda M. Evans 

Margaret M. Evans 

Maura Evans 




120 




Karen Louise Everett 
Greg Fackler 
Thomas Fager 
Antoinette Farano 



Deborah R. Farrell 
Michael S. Fasnacht 
Mary Ann Fazio 
Dana I. Feaster 



« Edwin H. Feather III 
Mark Fedele 
Mary Fedorko 
Mark Fegley 



Elaine Felker 
Amy V. Fenstermacher 
Peggy Ferguson 
Richard Ferri 



Catherine M. Feskanin 
Cynthia S. Fetherman 
Ann Marie Fiamoncini 
Audrey F. Fiebig 



121 



Carrie Fielding 

Patti L. Fink 

Lenore Ann Firsching 

Donna J. Fischer 



Janet Frances Fisher 

Vernon E. Fisher 

William Fizzano Jr. 

Theresa Flannelly 



Michael P. Flavelle 

Catherine Mary Flynn 

George Theodore Foedisch 

Luanne Foley 



Cathy M. Folk 

Cathleen A. Folkes 

John D. Ford 

Mike Ford 



Debra Ann Fortuna 

Jane Fought 

Lee Francis 

Terese Frank 




122 




Michael Frant 
Patricia M. Fuchs 
Patricia Fullerton 
Gary Leon Fullmer 



Gregory Robert Funk 
Jane L. Gabriel 
Suzanne M. Gaechter 
Cheryl Gaffney 



Anthony Gallo 
Faith L. Ganss 
Joan Maria Ganssle 
David A. Gardner 



Steven H. Garrett 
Deborah Gaudiano 
Gerald J. Geiger 
Brian Geigus 



Lisa Gerhard 
Sally A. Gerich 
Kevin Gerald Gildea 
Tom Gildea 



123 



Laurie Ann Gill 

Paul M. Gill 

David A. Gimbi 

Jolene M. Gino 



David G. Girton 

Janice Lynne Gitomer 

Steve Giuliani 

Eileen Glowatski 



Laure Glunz 

Douglas Godfrey 

H. Michael Goebel 

Gary S. Golbitz 



Bruce J. Goldberg 

Gregory V. Goodridge 

Frederic Howell Gordon Jr. 

Robert T. Graham 




Martha Anne Greenleaf 

Sharon E. Greiss 

Tamye Griffin 



124 




James M. Gudknecht 
Howard Gulick 
Phyllis E. Guillaume 
Stephanie Guilliams 



Heidi Gunther 
Mary E. Guravage 
Barry R. Gurgal 
Thomas R. Gutekunst 



Ann Haas 
Robert M. Hafner 
M. Elizabeth Hager 
Steven Randall Haire 



Paul |. Halligan 
Gregory R. Hamilton 
George E. Hamlen 
Susan B. Hampton 



Jerry S. Handord 
Robert Hanson 
Charles A. Harper 
C. Heather Harper 



125 



Carl D. Harraden 

Karen Harris 

Debra K. Hartzel 

Joanne Hartzel 



Pamela S. Hartzell 

Nancy Haydt 

Kathy Hayes 

Jamie L Heckman 



Margaret A. Heffernan 

Debra A. Heffner 

JoAnne Heimbach 

Joan Hepler 



Jeffrey S. Hertz 

Lois Hertzog 

Martin Hickey 

Ellen R. Highberger 



Margaret Ann Hilgar 

Deborah J. Hill 

Andrew Philip Hilla 

Debora K. Hilldale 




126 




mt^kd^Mk 



^-^ 




Linda A. Hirst 
Victoria L. Hitt 
Laurel Elizabeth Hobyak 
Richard Hocker 



Susan A. Hodge 



Paul E. Hoffman 



Robert A. Hoffman III 



Gregory C. Hogan 



Russell James Hogg 
Michele Teresa Hohlfeld 
Andrea Hoholick 
Jane M. Holocomb 



Philip Eric Holmer 
Cathy Homish 
Gail Ann Hopkins 
Sally Ann Houser 



Peter J. Howatt 
Jean D. Hudson 
Hester Jane Huffnagle 
Suzanne Lynne Huffnagle 



127 



Nedra Hughes 

Melani Anne Humenick 

Pamela M. Humes 

Roxanna Hunsinger 



Suzanne Hunter 

Wanda Husick 

Augustus S. Husselton 

Gary Edward Ibberson 



Michael Anthony Incitti 

DeForrest E. inman Jr. 

Sherry L. Irwin 

Michael laggard 



Cheryl Arlene Janiec 

Denise Ann Janosik 

Colleen Jaraczewski 

Lynn Strausser Jeffery 



Debra Ann |emiola 

Theresa M. Jenks 

Christine Johnson 

Cynthia M. Johnson 




k^il^ L 




128 




Dwight D. Johnson 
Steven P. Johnson 
Murray J. Johnson Jr. 
Barbara C. Jones 



Joanne Jones 
Marsha B. Jones 
Elaine C. Jurgill 
Sherri Kaiserman 



1 Dennis Kane 
Cynthia A. Kania 
Ann Kapuschinsky 
Mark Karanovich 



Micheal Karpinski 
Carol Karpovich 
Pamela Ann Katica 
Lisa A. Kaufman 



Lorrie Keating 
Malcom Keilon 
Justine L. Keim 
Dennis W. Keiser 



129 



Dennis Keith 

Bruce H. Kelley 

John Kelley 

Laurie A. Kemmerer 



Maureen Kenna 

Robert Kerris Jr. 

Janet W. Keyser 

Donna Kinder 



Susan M. Kingeter 

Susan Kingsley 

Richard Klebon 

Edward Klepeisz 



Richard J. Kline 

Dotti Koch 

Jill Koch 

Maribeth Kodash 



Patti Koelsch 

David F. Kohler 

Bruce T. Koller 

Brenda Lee Koppenhaver 




130 



i 




* Rebecca K. Koppenhaver 
|ohn A. Koser 
Deborah ). Kospiah 

^1 Jean M. Kovalchik 



Sharon Kozura 

Rita Anne Krashefski 

Kelli L. Krebs 

Wilfred Brian Kreutzer 



Jill Krick 
Larry Krizansky 
Lori J. Kroener 
Patsy L. Krommes 



Robert M. Kuhn II 
Elaine Kulesa 
Michelle Kummerer 
Louise Ann Kurtz 



Barbara Kwiatkowski 
Particia M. Lafferty 
Kim M. Lago 
Lynn Marie Landon 



131 



Janice Langendorf 
Denise M. LaPenna 
|ohn R. LaPenna Jr. 

Carole Y. LaRoche 



Michael A. Larso 

Vincent J. La Ruffa 

Richard Keith Laubach 

Diane Laughlin 



Gregory S. Lawrence 

Danette Lawson 

Roberta J. Lawvere 

Jill Laylon 



Diane Leaver 

James K. Leberknight 

Daniel C. Lechner 

Barry Leiby 



Dennis A. Leighow 

Donna M. Lemons 

David M. Lescinski 

Cheryl A. Levenoskie 




dU.M 




132 




Carol Denise Lewis 
Christine A. Lewis 
Diane Marie Lewis 
Robyn Lewis 



Rusty Lewis 
Dietrich Lichtner 
Robyn J. Liggins 
Marsha Ann Linn 



James Robert Linn 
Lawrence C. Linsenbigler 
Wendy Litrides 
Steven Livermore 



Denise J. Llewellyn 
Jeffrey C. Long 
Suzanne M. Long 
Ann Lorusso 



Lisa Lougee 
Melody A. Lowry 
Deborah Lukashefski 
Janice Lukawetski 



133 



Antoinette Lupino 

Lisa Lupinacci 

John R. LuxFord 

Geraldine Lynch 



Patricia R. Lyons 

Michael E. Maguive 

Samuel J. Malandra Jr. 

Lorri Malinski 



Frank T. Maloney 

Donna Marie Mancuso 

Eiisa R. Mancuso 

Richard P. Maniscaico 



Deborah Markle 

Joanne Markle 

William Scott Markley 

Michael Scott Marr 



Rebecca A. Marr 



Charles W. Martin Jr. 
Judy Masloski 



Janine M. Massar 




k'-iik, 



134 




f Sandra J. Massaro 
Gretchen Master 
Joann Marie Matani 
Rene R. Matsko 



Thomas J. Matukaitis 
Marian Rose Matusick 
Thomas A. Mazzante 
Scolt McCabe 



Katie McCarthy 
Mary Ann Mc Carthy 
Carol M. McClain 
Maureen McDonald 



Lynn A. McFadden 
Eloise S. McGarry 
William Michael McGraw 
Michelle McHale 



I Gerald M. McHugh 
David W. Mcilwaine 
Jeffrey E. McLean 
Mary McMaster 



135 



Robert A. McMullin III 

Susan Moshinsky 

Bethany G. Moser 

James G. Mortimer 



Pamela Darlene Morse 

Francis J. Moroz 

Pamela S. Morgan 

Michael Morgan 



Jody Beth Morgan 

Doreen Elizabeth Morgan 

Robert A. Morana 

Mike Moran 



Robert B. Moore Jr. 

Karen Lynne Moore 
Earle J. Moore 
Linda Mooney 



Judith A. Momorella 

Dante Carmen Molino 

Terry Mizdol 

Michael L. Mixell 




136 




Lawrence Thomas Mitchell 
John H. Millhouse 
Robbin Miller 
Mary Jane Miller 



Jeffrey William Miller 
Catherine Miller 
Barbara C. Miller 
Caria J. Mikovich 



Mark A. Mikatavage 
David E. Michno 
Theresa Michno 
Daniel Merk 



Barbara A. Mensch 
Richard S. Menniti 
James Mark Menapace 
Ann Medeiros 



Alice Ann Mease 
Charles L. Meachum 
John W. McNaughton 
Thomas J. McNamara 



137 



John R. Moyer 

Kevin J. Moyer 

Susan Elizabeth Murray 

Wendy Lynn Murray 



Brian R. Musselman 

Jeanne Musser 

Brenda Jane Myers 

Debra Ann Myers 



Joel Lance Myers 

Michael Francis Myers 

Sandra Marie Myers 

Vicki Myers 



Lorette A. Mylet 

James M. Nagg Jr. 

Donna Nahodil 

Gloria Jean Nardone 



Lisa Marie Narke 

James Steven Nash 

Linda F. Natter 

Robert Naumovitz 




v CM 




138 




Sandy Neerenberg 
Malcolm Neilon 
Greg C. Nelson 
Cheryl A. Newton 



Robert A. Nolan 
J. Eric Nordquist 
Carolyn D. Nork 
Wendy Nyborg 



^^|B Kristine Marie Oakland 
Angel O'Brien 
Donald J. O'Conner Jr. 
Mary O'Day 



1 Bernadette Odyniec 
Susan J. Olcese 
Colleen A. O'Neill 
Sharon Marie Opiela 



Karen L. Orzol 
Susan E. Palangi 
Donna J. Pankeri 
Carolyn Pantalone 



139 



Sandra Parks 

Susan Michele Pascarello 

Georgeanne Pasch 

Linda Pasierb 



Caria Y. Patrick 

Ernestine Patterson 

Joe Patti 

Nadine S. Payne 



Cindy S. Payonk 

Barbara Paxton 

Melissa Ann Pealer 

Alice L. Pedergnana 



James J. Peffley Jr. 

Cynthia Pellock 

Kristin Perkins 

Daniel Perry 



Karen Peterman 

Cheryl A. Peterson 

Jean Petro 

Nancy Petrovich 




140 




Kurt W. Pettis 
Carol Ann Phillips 
John Pickering 
Howard Andrew Pillot 



Dominic R. Pino 
Dominic A. Pisano 
Jeffrey Gilbert Pittenger 
Robert Pletchan 



Emilee Ann Plucenik 
Joan Polaski 
Brett Eugene Polenchar 
Sandra Powley 



Stephen F. Polinsky 
Leslie Pollizzotti 
Linda Polombo 
John J. Poltrock 



Sharon P. Potera 
Linda Marie Potter 
Susan Carol Potter 
Steven E. Poust 



141 



Kimberly Powell 



Joan L. Preston 



Bonnie Jean Price 



E. Malinda Price 



L. John Prim 

Rick Alan Pritchard 

Barbara Ann Prosick 

Raissa Prus 



Jean Pulaski 

Kenneth J. Pulcini 

William Keith Pursel 

Heidi Ann Purvis 



Lisa Quiggle 

James Lawrence Quinn 

Leo I. Quinn III 

Loise Rabenold 



Robert Thomas Raker Jr. 

M. Dee Raski 

Denise L. Rath 

Mark Raynes 




142 




Cathleen Mary Readdy 
Joanne Mary Recupero 
Bob Reeder 
John Reenstra 



Vicki L. Reeser 

Lisa Regan 

David Lee Reichelderfer 

William B. Reineberg 



Jane Reiner 
Annette ReinI 
Joanne C. Reisch 
Jane Maria Renaldo 



Sally J. Rhodes 
Rebecca Richard 
Scott E. Richards 
Leslie L. Richcreek 



Douglas B. Richie 
Lori Richter 
Lee William Riegel 
Christine M. Ritro 



143 



Mark N. Ritter 


H 


i 


P^l 


Tony Rodriguez 




i 




Eliud Rodriguez 




1 


t r 


Aaron D. Roetenberg 


_^ 




^- .- i 




A 




A 



Charles William Ropars Jr. 

Gail Marie Rossbauer 

Thomas C. Roth 

Victoria Rothermel 



Brett Rothwell 

Norann Elizabeth Rowe 

Nancy Lynn Rowlands 

Joseph W. Rowley Jr. 



Patti Beth Rubincam 

Pamela Rumberger 

Janet Rusnak 

Susan Rutledge 



Kathleen Ryan 
Tammy Marie Ryan 

Theodore Rysz 
Rosemarie Sabatini 




144 




Mary Frances Sabin 
Cheryl L. Sampsell 
Cynthia Dawn Sander 
William Peter Saras 



Leonard A. Sauers 
William E. Sauerzopf 
Christine V. Saverio 
Lucille F. Scarponi 



■'* David Schaefer 

Raymond F. Scheetz 
Linda Scheier 
Edward Schellhammer 



Janet M. Schipp 
I Mishell Schlegel 
Heidi Schmalfuhs 
Brian J. Schmidt 



Keith A. Schoch 
Mark C. Schoenagel 
Leslie John Scholl 
Wendi L. Schuck 



145 



Andrew E. Schwalm 

Janet Karen Scott 

Susan Scozzari 

Janet Kay Seidel 



Shaun Serf ass 

Scott Shalter 

Kathy Ann Sheats 

Debra A. Shelly 



William Shelton 
Christine Shepps 
Neal P. Sheptock 
Susan Shervanick 



Ronald T. Shoemaker 

Constance Shope 

Johnny S. Shtatman 

Kathy M. Shughart 



Paul John Shustack 

Audrey Shyrock 

Diane P. Siebert 

Micheie Sies 




146 




Ann L. Silvonek 
Gerald R. Simkonis 
Leslie Ann Simon 
Mathew W. Simone 



Carol Sitler 



William R. Skocik 



Michael Paul Slick 



Eric W. Slingerland 



Karen D. Slusser 
Craig Robert Smith 
Denise Smith 
Nanci A. Smith 



Novelou Smith 
Richard A.D. Smith 
Janice L. Snelhaker 
Joan B. Snook 



Karen Sue Snyder 
Kathryn L. Snyder 
Kathy Ann Snyder 
Robert Snyder 



147 



William C. Snyder Jr. 

Beverly Ann Soback 

Kathleen M. Solley 

Robert Someps 



Rebecca M. Sorber 
Mickey L. Sours 
Nancy Spangler 
Debbie Spohrer 



Kathy Staab 

Gary Stair 

Julie Grace Stamets 

Stephen J. Stancker 



David S. Standarowski 

Eugene A. Staschak 

Susanne Steczak 

George G. Steele III 



Peggy Ann Steeley 
Joseph Brian Steever 
Ann Marie R. Stelma 
Holly June Stephens 




< 



148 




Pam Stephens 
Paul Michael Stoudt 
Patricia Ann Stoutenburgh 
Lorraine G. Stoutt 



Camille Strausser 
Albert M. Sukowaski 
Louise Susner 
Loretta F. Sutcliffe 



Daniel J. Swank 
Patricia J. Swanson 
Valerie A. Swanson 
Carol A. Swartz 



Carol L. Swatko 
Richard J. Sweeney 
Arlene Taffera 
Gregory P. Talese 



Angela Taormina 
Deborah B. Taylor 
Rolland M. Taylor 
Theresa A. Taylor 



149 



Linda A. Tellefsen 

Bonita M. Thomas 

Larry Thomas 

Kathleen Tiernan 



Jonathan Tillett 

John Austin Touey Jr. 

Matthew J. Trageser 

Ed L. Trehster 



Martha M. Tryba 

Martin Turnowchyk Jr. 

Vanessa D. Tyler 

Andrew A. Udinski 



Bernadette Uritis 

Elaine A. Uzick 

Michael Valenti 

Robert Mark Vance 



Karen Vannicola 

Louis M. Vannicola 

Joseph H. Vaughn Jr. 

Donna Veach 




150 




James M. Velopolcak 
Marilyn E. Verna 
Carol Vincenti 
Lee Gary Vivian 



Jeanmarie Vojtek 
Heidi Wadlinger 
Bob Wagner 
Pamela J. Walker 



Carol Jane Wallace 
Robert D. Walp 
Maureen R. Walsh 
Patrick M. Walsh 



Karen L. Walters 
Deborah M. Walton 
Louise Ann Ward 
Harry Wark Jr. 



Allison D. Watts 
Elizabeth Watts 
Judith A. Weaver 
Terry Weaver 



151 



John F. Weber 


^ ^Jl 


Leslie S. Weber 


f^ 


Robin L. Weidemoyer 


? '^- 




1 ^- 


Gail D. Weidman 


T^ 

¥ 



Mark J. Weinberger 

Katharine E. Wiener 

Gayle A. Weisenfluh 

Martin J. Weiss 



Steve Alien Wendt 

John J. Wengrenovich 

Michael Wentz 

Sharon L Wertman 



Cynthia West 

Wayne E. Whitaker Sr. 

Penny Sue Whitenight 

Nancy J. Whitman 



M. Scott Wiegand 

Mariann E. Wiencek 

Debra L. Wiest 

Kathleen A. Wilds 




152 




Barbara Williams 
Bonnie Williams 
Megen L. Williams 
William C. Williams Jr. 



t. Amy Williamson 
Jan Maureen Wilson 
Laurie K. Winey 
Joyce Renee Wingert 



Donal Winston 
Daniel E. Witmer 
Julia S. Wood 
Timothy P. Wood 



Cheryl L. Worman 
Cynthia W. Womer 
Jae Wu 
Karen A. Wuest 



Mary Jane Wydila 
Pamela Yacina 
Doreen Ann Yacuboski 
John Yanniello 



153 



Michelle L. Yocum 

Ruth Patrice Yoder 

John N. Yodock )r. 

Sally Ann Yohn 



Maureen K. Yori 

Elizabeth Young 

Harriet Young 

Jeffrey Young 



Walter T. Zabicki 



Stephen J. Zajac 
Deborah Kay Zak 



Len Zanowicz 



Susan M. Zapko 

Keith Michael Zehner 

David A. Ziegler 

Jean Marie Ziegler 



Michael E. Ziemak 
Edward Zikoski 
Hank Zimbardi 

Gail E. Zimmerman 




mMi^ 




154 





Lee E. Zimmerman 
David Zinkler 
Valerie Zoppetti 
Linda E. Zuba 



Debra Ann Zubris 
Kimberly Zucal 
Alan Zurawski 



155 



SENIOR INDEX 



CLASS OF '80 



MAUREEN A. ACCARDI 
714 Fairview Ave. 
Bristol, PA 19007 

JOSEPH F. ACETO 
400 Llanerch Ave. 
Havertown, PA 19083 

lOYCE H. AIMONE 
230 Sprjngbrook Trail 
Sparta, N| 07871 

LORREL R.ALSTON 
246 S. Felton St. 
Phila., PA 19139 

DIANE M. ALTIERII 

102 Pitney Street 

South Waverly, PA 14892 

VICTORIA A ALTIERI 
354 Washington St. 
Berwick, PA 18603 

RICHARD AMATO 
422 Sequoia Dr. 
Pittsburgh, PA 15236 

RICHARD I. ANASTASI 
980 W. Main St. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

lOAN I. ANDREWS 
11 Paul Drive 
Succasunna, N| 07876 

MARGARET L. ANDREWS 
840 Wheeler Avenue 
Scranton, PA 18510 

DAWN ANDRUS 

Box 31 

Coogan Sta., PA 17728 

ANTHONY lOHN ANGELO 
1035 Parkwood St. 
Hazleton, PA 18201 

lOSEPH A. ANTELLOCY 
68 Marcy Street 
Wilkes Barre, PA 18702 

MARTIN D. APPEL 
770 East Cedar St. 
Allentovi/n, PA 18103 

DOUGLAS N. ARCH 
219 S. Third St. 
Frackville, PA 17931 

KATHY A. ARVIA 

18 Briarwood Court 

RD 3 Allentown, PA 18104 

CLAUDIA M. ASHTON 
1206 Upper Gulph Rd. 
Radnor, PA 19087 

lOHANNA W. ASTLER 
741 )ohns Lane 
Ambler, PA 19002 



BRIAN A. AUCHEY 
RD 1 Fox Hill Road 
Newburg, PA 17240 

M. )EAN AUGELLO 
239 South Franklin St. 
Shamokin, PA 17872 

KATHY A. AUGUSTINE 
2153 West Market St. 
Pottsville, PA 17901 

CHRISTOPHER P. AURAND 
415 W. Fourth Street 
Nescopeck, PA 18653 

JOEL P. AURAND 
RD1 

Millville, PA 17846 

MICHAEL j. AZAR 
1619 Tilghman Street 
Allentown, PA 18102 

MARIO I. BACCHIA 
3327 Carter Lane 
Chester, PA 19013 

KAREN M. BAER 
739 Church Street 
Millersburg, PA 17051 

LEIGH ANN BAKER 
1825 Bond Street RD 3 
Montoursville, PA 17754 

SUSAN BALDWIN 

101 Sesame St. Apt. #54 

Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

lAMES P. BALL 
105 Lynbrook Road 
Paoli, PA 19301 

)OHN W. BALLANTINE 
40Wausau Rd. 
Middleburg, PA 17842 

VALERIE R. BALOGA 
lOMillcrest Drive 
Dallas, PA 16612 

KAREN L. BARBER 

Box 64 

Hop Bottom, PA 18824 

BYRON BARKSDALE 
5808 Cedarhurst St 
Phil, Pa 19143 

KATHRYN A, BARNHART 
%65E. High St. 
Bellefonte, PA 16823 

MARIA E. BARONE 
1015 Stanbridge St. 
Norristown, PA 19401 

LESLY B. BARR 
124 South Main St. 
Watsontown, PA 17777 



MARIE A, BARR 
541 Herman Avenue 
Lemoyne, PA 17043 

ROGER F. BARR 
325 Mt. Boulevard 
Watchung, N) 07060 

VIRGINIA G, BARR 

325 Mountain Boulevard 

Watchung, N| 08060 

SANDRA |. BARRALL 
RD5 Box 210 
Shavertown, PA 18708 

MICHAEL E. BARTOL 
RD 1 Box 15 
Sugarloaf, PA 18249 

CAROLYN I. BARTONI 
154 South Seventh St. 
Coplay, PA 18037 

CYNTHIA LYNN BARTYNSKI 
601 North Sherman 
Allentown, PA 18103 

MONAG. BASTIDE 
Box 1690 
Hawley, PA 18428 

BARBARA ANN BATOR 

508 Haven Lane 

Clarks Summit, PA 18411 

KATHLEEN A. BAUMAN 
104 Ninth Street 
Matamoras, PA 18336 

RICHARD D. BAYLOR 

RD1 

Muncy, PA 17736 

BRENDA L. BEAN 
122 South River St. 
Athens, PA 18810 

WILLIAM I. BEGLEY 
600 Valley Rd. 
Warrington, PA 18976 

)OHN ANDREW BEHAN 
43 Hickory Road 
Nutley, N) 07110 

DAVID A BELKOSKI 
6910 Scenic Drive 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

KAREN L. BELL 
530 Lexington Road 
Lancaster, PA 17603 

lOSEPH R BELL 

943 Wyoming Avenue 

West Pittston, PA 18643 

DIANE BENASUTTI 

514 Haven Lane 

Clarks Summit, PA 18411 

lOHN BERGUIST 
1404 Cider Knoll Way 
West Chester, PA 19380 



VANESSA R. BESECKER 
Analommk, PA 18320 



lOHN L. BESHADA 
7 Monarch Rd, 
Wilkes Barre, PA 18702 



156 



IRVIN I. BETSKER 
RD3 Box131C 
Middleburg, PA 17842 

DEBBIE A. BIAGO 
134 Mason Street 
Exeter, PA 18643 

MICHAEL A. BIERLY 
C/O Bloomsburg St. Coll. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

MINDY S. BIELITSKY 
10 Clenolden 
Yardley, PA 19067 

ROBERT I BITTEL 

Box 1 79 

Greeley, PA 18425 

LORI A. BIZUP 
252 Waltham Road 
Fairless Hills, PA 19030 

MARGARET A BLACKLOCK 
435 MIninger Road 
Souderton, PA 18964 



SUSAN P. BOWER 
43 Webster Drive 
Berkeley Hghts, N| 07922 

WILLARD BRADLEY 
2709 W 7th Street 
Chester, PA 19013 

GERALD R. BRAZIL 
103 Cherry St. 
Dunmore, PA 18512 

)AMES F BRECKER 
816 Monroe St 
Stroudsburg, PA 18360 

lULIE BREHENBERG 
2425 Douglas Ave. 
Irving, Texas 75062 

)OAN M. BROJACK 
303 Layton Rd. RD 1 
darks Summit, PA 18411 

ARTHUR ). BROSIUS 
312 North Grape St. 
Mount Carmel, PA 17851 



BRIAN I. BURKE 
7 Lebanon Drive 
Cortland, NY 13045 

BONITA A. BURNS 
68 Elm Street 
Milton, PA 17847 

DEBRAM. BUTLER 
4300 Woodcrest Lane 
Camp Hill, PA 17011 

JOSEPH C BUTTON 
507 Market St. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

EILEEN D. CALLAHAN 
123 Makefield Rd. 
Morrisville, PA 19067 

KYLE D. CALVELLO 
360 Holly Drive 
Levittown, PA 19055 

PAULA CAMPBELL 
RD #4 Box #1 
Sunbury, PA 17801 



KARLA BLANKENHORN 
711 N. Second St. 
Pottsville, PA 17901 



MARIE T. BROWN 
501 Haverford Ave. 
Narbert, PA 19072 



THOMAS C CANFIELD 
1631 Centre Street 
Ashland, PA 17921 



TIMOTHY I. BLASE 
115 North Vine St. 
Mount Carmel, PA 17851 

MICHELE A. BLOSZINSKY 
5161 Washington Ave. 
Whitehall, PA 18052 

VICTORIA A. BLOSS 
75 Crestview Drive 
Lebanon, PA 17042 

BARBARA BLYE 

Merry Meadows Farm RD 1 

Chester Springs, PA 19425 

DEBORAH ANN BOGANSKY 
140 Middlelown 
Freeland, PA 18224 

CHER! L. BOHLER 

RD 2 Box 528 

Pine Grove, PA 17963 

jERRYL. BOLIG 

302 West Sassafras St. 

Selinsgrove, PA 17870 

BRUCE E. BONCAL 
10 W. Union Street 
Nanticoke, PA 18634 

lERI ANN BOOSE 
39 Fairview Dr. 
Akron, PA 17501 

BETTY I BORDASH 
26 Jackson Street 
Edwardsville, PA 18704 

ALAN L. BOWEN 
1317 Fifth Street 
Whitehall, PA 18052 

CARL I. BOWEN 
314 South Main St. 
Taylor, PA 18517 

MICHAEL D. BOWER 
1821 Poco Lane 
Williamsport, PA 17701 



ROBERT A BROWN 
131 King David Rd 
Stroudsburg, PA 18360 

TODD A. BROWN 
2260 Barrington Rd. 
Bethlehem, PA 18018 

MARTHA A. BRYDEN 
701 Grandview Place 
5 Williamsport, PA 17701 

DENNIS BUCHER 
252 W. Fifth St. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

ELIZABETH A. BUCK 
262 Flynn St. 
Dunmore, PA 18512 

JILL E. BUHRMAN 
RD3 Box 416 
Harrisburg, PA 17112 

MARIANNE BUKER 
Box 872 
Wellsboro, PA 16901 

DIANE M. BUKOSKI 
4 Central St. 
Nanticoke, PA 18634 

FRANCINE A. BULLEY 
315 Dwight Avenue 
lermyn, PA 18433 

ERIS MARIE B. BUNNELL 
1031 Ave D 
Riverside, PA 17868 

LINDA G. BUPP 
310 N. Eighth St. 
Selinsgrove, PA 17870 

PAMELA]. BURD 

RD1 

Port Royal, PA 17082 

DIANE L. BURGER 
RD 2 Box 61 
Drums, PA 18222 



BARBARA A. CANTRELLE 
1302 lames Street 
Sinking Spring, PA1%09 

ANTHONY CARAVELLA 
573 Alabama Avenue 
Bricktown, N) 08723 

DONNA MARIE CARCACI 
44 Christopher Drive 
Holland, PA 18966 

DEBRAS. CARDENE 
3410 Thomas 
Whitehall, PA 18052 

DAVID M. CAREY 
419 Prospect 
Morrisville, PA 19067 

PEGGY S. CARLIN 
Park Street 
Montrose, PA 18801 

jEFFEREY W. CARSON 
1156 Log College Dr. 
Warminster, PA 18974 

DEBBIE). CASSELS 

29 Underrock Road 
Sparta, N) 07871 

lOANNE M, CASTELLI 
221 Christian St. 
Nanticoke, PA 18634 

CHERYL A. CHECCHI 
Box 83 RD1 
Paxinos, PA 17860 

GLENN A. CHESTNUT 

30 Whestgate Drive 
Sparta, N| 97871 

lOYCE E. CHUSNUTT 
30 Whestgate Drive 
Sparta, N) 07871 

DAVID I. CICHAN 
851 Wright Drive 
Maple Glen, PA 19002 



157 



CHRISTINE CLAPPER 
375 Redcoad Lane 
Wayne, PA 19087 

I. SCOTT CLAYTON 
%7 Welkel Road 
Lansdale, PA 19446 

CINDY CLINE 
754 lune St. 
York, PA 17404 

BETTY L. CLULEY 
IIS. Terrace Ave. 
Upper Darby, PA 19082 

DARYL P. COACH 
289 Frederick St. 
Kingston, PA 18704 

CAROLYN D. COLDREN 
45 Scarsdale Drive 
Camp Hill, PA 17011 

)AMES E. COLUMBUS 
300 N Twenty Fifth St. 
Camp Hill, PA 17011 

SUZANNE CONLAN 
679 Wallace Dr. 
Wayne, PA 19087 

DENISE CONNELLY 

329 Croft Rd. 

North Wales, PA 19454 

WILLIAM S. CORBY 
71 West Catawissa St. 
Nesquehoning, PA 18240 

CATHERINE CORTELLESSA 

366 Maiden Lane 

King of Prussia, PA 19406 

MARY LOUISE CORTRIGHT 
341 East Nesquehoning 
Easton, PA 18042 

SUSAN L. COSSACK 
314 Atherton St. 
Old Forge, PA 18642 

GEORGE COUGHLIN 

Raven Run 

Lost Creek, PA 17946 

BRIAN D. COX 
126 Lynwood Drive 
Palmyra, PA 17078 

G. SCOTT COX 
RD 4 Box 343 
Tyrone, PA 16686 

RANDALL C. COX 
23 Plymouth Road 
Springfield, PA 19064 

KAREN M. COYNE 

217 East Cowen Avenue 

Phila., PA 19119 

CYNTHIA L. CRAVER 
40 South Wisconsin Dr. 
Binghamton, NY 13901 

DAVE P. CRAWFORD 
58 Laurel Rd. 
Southampton, PA 18966 

DALE CROOKS 

469 Stacey Dr. 

King of Prussia, PA 19406 



CAROL A. CUNNINGHAM 
1144 Vine Avenue 
Williamsport, PA 17701 

TERRY L. CURRAN 
RD 1 Box 87C 
Shamokin, PA 17872 

HEIDI L. CUSTER 
31 East West Street 
Wind Gap, PA 18091 

HELENE). CZAIKOWSKI 
42 Lee Park Ave. 
Wilkes Barre, PA 18702 

WILLIAM F. DALIUSIR. 

RD2 

Selinsgrove, PA 17870 

JAMES DALTON 
Church Hill Manor 
Reedsville, PA 17084 

TRACEY DANIEL 
2310 So. Lumber St. 
Allentown, PA 18103 

LENORE A. DANKULICH 
116'/2 Washington St. 
West Pittston, PA 18643 

CYNTHIA DARAZSDI 
3555 Ironstone Court 
Bethlehem, PA 18017 

CARLA MARIE DAVIS 
302 So. 60th St. 
Phila., PA 19143 

DIANE L. DAVIS 
Box 185 
Mifflinville, PA 18631 

)OAN L. DAVIS 
810 Paxinosa Ave. 
Easton, PA 18042 

SANDRA K. DAVIS 

RD 1 

Catawissa, PA 17820 

SHARON M. DAVIDSON 
223 Center St 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

DOUGLAS F. DEIHM 
1710 Buttercup Rd. 
Lancaster, PA 17602 

NANCY ANN DEILING 
413 West Areba Ave. 
Hershey, PA 17033 

JEFFERYW. DEISHER 
RD 4 Box 531 
Williamsport, PA 17701 

RANDY L. DEITRICH 
307 Oak Street 
Wiconisco, PA 17097 

TAMMY M. DELANO 
34 Nestingrock Lane 
Levittown, PA 19054 

MARY P. DELLEGROTTO 
1101 First Avenue 
Berwick, PA 18603 

SUSAN K. DEPPEN 
Box 164 RD2 
Selinsgrove, PA 17870 



MARIANNE P, DESKA 
217 Centennial Rd. 
Warminster, PA 18974 

TINAM. DEVLIN 
Box 23 RD 1 
Malvern, PA 19355 

BETSY A. DICE 
1125 Walnut Street 
Montoursville, PA 17754 

PATRICIA L DICK 
906 Center St 
Shamokin, PA 17872 

BRIAN C DIETTERICK 
1961 N. Market St. 
Berwick, PA 18603 

ALFRED E. DIN 
Box 3860 Kubbse 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

MELISSA DITTY 

5223 Woodlawn Drive 

Harrisburg, PA 17109 

ROBERT DIVERS 

Box 82 

Pottsgrove, PA 17865 

LAURIE G DOCKERAY 
92 Oak Drive RD 4 
Dallas, PA 18612 

CAROL A DOMANOSKY 
1055 Murray St. 
Forty Fort, PA 18704 

CHARLES D. DONAHUE )R. 

229 Pike Street 

Port Carbon, PA 17%5 

RICHARD F DONAHUE III 
200 Lower Valley Rd. 
North Wales, PA 19454 

THERESA M. DONKO 

462 Anthony Rd. 

King of Prussia, PA 19406 

PAULA DOOLEY 
806 Washington St. 
Susquehanna, PA 18847 

LAWRENCE F DOOLING 
67 Gelder Drive 
Holland, PA 18966 

M. PAULA DORAN 
261 East Morton St. 
Old Forge, PA 18518 

OLEN L. DORNEY 
607 Acacia Avenue 
Reading, PA 19605 

DANA L. DORTONE 
340 North Malin Rd. 
Newtown Square, PA 19073 

ANN T. DOUGHERTY 
512 AltaVista Ave. 
Harrisburg, PA 17109 

ELIZABETH A. DOUGHERTY 
28 West Birch St. 
Hazleton, PA 18201 

lAMES A DOUGHERTY, )R. 
209 Keats Drive 
Sinking Spring, PA 1%08 



158 



ANTHONY]. DOWNEY II 
127 Forest Road 
Pottsville, PA 17901 

lOHN D, DOWNEY 
127 Forest Rd. 
Pottsville, PA 17901 

DEBORAH L. DRADA 
21 Woodland Place 
Pompton Plain, N| 07444 

RANDOLPH M. DRY 
121 Noble Street 
Kutztown, PA 19530 

PAMELA I DUART 

RD2 

Canton, PA 17724 

MARKT. DUBLISKY 
800 Adams Drive 
Brookhaven, PA 19015 

RONALD D. DUDECK, |R. 
538 East Cranberry Ave. 
Hazleton, PA 18201 

KAROL R. DUFFY 
523 South River St. 
Wilkes Barre, PA 18702 

TERESA M. DUFFY 
335 Front Street 
Minersville, PA 17954 

DANIEL). DUIMSTRA 
720 Franklin St. 
Belvidere, Nj 07823 

lOAN DULL 
18 School Lane 
Ashley, PA 18706 

VICKI |. DUMM 
1670 Scotland Ave. 
Chambersburg, PA 17201 

KATHRYN R. DUNCAN 

RD8 

Gettysburg, PA 17325 

MARKG. DUNKEL 

104 S. Sixth Ave. 

W Reading, PA 19611 

jOAN M. DURANT 
1209 Mason Ave. 
Drexel Hill, PA 19026 

MARIAN M. DURKES 
205 McLean St. 
Wilkes, Barre, PA 18702 

RONALD M. DUSER 
204 Second Street 
Weatherly, PA 18235 

LINDA L. DUZICK 
1310 West Arch St. 
Shamokin, PA 17872 

DAVID A. DYGERT 
123 Welsh Hill Road 
Clarks Summit, PA 18411 

TIM EADLINE 
416 Revere Rd. 
Lafayette Hill, PA 19444 

SUSAN ). EClZI 

200 East Summit Ave. 

Haddonfield, N| 08033 



ANAT ELIAV 

C/O Bloomsburg, St. Coll. 

Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

ROBERT B. ELLIOTT 
158 W. 3rd St. 
Bloomsburg, PA 1781 5 

NANCY ). ELLIS 
456 Durham Rd. 
Langhorne, PA 19047 

EDGAR H. EMERY JR. 
R207 S. Fourth Street 
Sunbury, PA 17801 

STEVEN R. EMS 
706 Blue Hill Road 
Wallingford, PA 19086 

DEBRA A. ENGE 
13 Maple Avenue 
Williamsport, PA 17701 

JEFFREY D. ENGLE 
RD 2 Box 99 
Mifflinburg, PA 17844 

HARRY E. ENGLISH 
Third St. Box 129 
Benton, PA 17814 

MARY B. ENGLISH 
412 Willow Street 
Montoursville, PA 17754 

MELANIE R. EPLER 
127 Orwigsburg St. 
Tamaqua, PA 18252 

KEVIN C. ERDMAN 
Box838RDl 
Dornsife, PA 17825 

LINDA M. EVANS 
49 Chester Street 
Wilkes Barre, PA 18705 

MARGARET M. EVANS 

55 Wells St. 

Forty Fort, PA 18704 

MAURA EVANS 
15 Jones Street 
Wilkes Barre, PA 18702 

KAREN L. EVERETT 
Vinemont Rd. RD8 
Reading, PA1q608 

GREGORY C. FACKLER 

56 Juniper Street 
Wescosville, PA 18106 

THOMAS B. FAGER 
2708 Walnut Street 
Camp Hill, PA17C11 

ANTOINETTE FARANO 
8 Colonial Drive 
Wyoming, PA 18644 

DEBORAH R. FARRELL 
127 North Vernon Street 
York, PA 17402 

MICHAELS. FASNACHT 
Box 212 RD6 
Manheim, PA 17545 

MARY ANN FAZIO 

508 School St. 

Clarks Summit, PA 18411 



DANA FEASTER 

204 Shakespeare Drive 

Sinking Spring, PA 19608 

EDWIN FEATHER 
26 Newman Rd. 
Pennsburg, PA 18073 

MARK R. FEDELE 
248 Candlebrook Rd. 
King of Prussia, PA 19406 

MARY FEDORKO 
2000 Round Top Rd. 
Montoursville, PA 17754 

MARK D. FEGLEY 
402 East Main Street 
Fleetwood, PA 19522 

ELAINE K. FELKER 
44851 Deer Run Rd. 
Plymouth, Ml 48170 

AMY S. FENSTERMACHER 
87'/! West Avenue 
Wellsboro, PA 16901 

MARGARET A. FERGUSON 
226 Felton Avenue 
Sharon Hill, PA 19079 

RICHARD FERRI 
611 Spruce St. 
Kulpmont, PA 17834 

CATHERINE M. FESKANIN 
RD 4 N. Irving St. 
Allentown, PA 18103 

CYNTHIA S. FETHERMAN 
1743 Honeysuckle Lane 
Stroudsburg, PA 18360 

ANN MARIE E. FIAMONCINI 
436 West Girard St. 
Atlas, PA 17851 

AUDREY F. FIEBIG 
132 South First St. 
Shamokin, PA 17872 

CAROLYN L. FIELDING 
1021 Westwood Drive 
Springfield, PA 19063 

PATTI L. FINK 

RD 1 

Benton, PA 17814 

LENORE A. FIRSCHING 
RD1 Box142-A 
Montgomery, PA 17752 

DONNA FISCHER 
252 Minor St. 
Emmaus, PA 18049 

JANET F. FISHER 

Box 124 

Snydertown, PA 17877 

VERNON E. FISHER 
RD 4 Haven Fair Lawn 
Pottsville, PA 17901 

WILLIAM I. FIZZANO, jR. 
44 jonquil Lane 
Levittown, PA 19055 

THERESA A. FLANNELLY 
736 Hemlock Street 
Scranton, PA 18503 



159 



MICHAEL P. FLAVELLE 
742 Washington St. 
Easton, PA 18042 

CATHERINE MARY FLYNN 
3518 AinslieSt. 
Phila., PA 19129 

GEORGE T. FOEDISCH 

537 Lynn Drive 

South Hampson, PA 18966 

LUANNE FOLEY 
18 Birch Street 
Wilkes Barre, PA 18702 

CATHY M. POLK 
401 Surrey Lane 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

CATHLEEN FOLKES 
606 Nelson Ave. 
Lansdale, PA 19446 

)OHN D. FORD 
1801 Cambridge 
Wyomissing, PA 1%10 

MIKE FORD 
70 Alice Rd. 
West Islip, NY 11795 

DEBRA ANN FORTUNA 
RD 2 Box 901 
Newville, PA 17241 

lANE A. FOUGHT 
304 Cemetery Street 
Hughesville, PA 17737 

TERESE M. FRANK 
89 Grove Street 
Wilkes Barre, PA 18702 

MICHAEL W. FRANT 
314 Second Street 
Easton, PA 18042 

PATRICIA M. FUCHS 
1173 Cambridge Lane 
Bridgewater, N) 08807 

M. PATRICIA FULLERTON 
33% Harrowgate Rd, 
York, PA 17402 

GARY L. FULLMER 
500 Center Street 
Milton, PA 17847 

GREGORY R. FUNK 
RD2 

Watsontovi-n, PA 17777 

JANE L.GABRIEL 
606 Third Street 
Athens, PA 18810 

SUZANNE M. GAECHTER 
RR3 Box 168 
Sussex, Nl 07461 

CHERYL A. GAFFNEY 
540 West Third St. 
Mount Carmel, PA 17851 

ANTHONY). GALLO 
872 Harold Avenue 
Washington, PA 15301 

FAITH GANSS 
654 N. Laurel St. 
Hazleton, PA 18201 



lOAN M. GANSSLE 
Cleveland Circle 
Skillman, Nj 08558 

DAVID A. GARDNER 
RD 1 

Millville, PA 17846 

STEVEN H. GARRETT 
33 State Road Apt F15 
Media, PA 19063 

DEBORAH M. GAUDIANO 
533 South Poplar St. 
Hazleton, PA 18201 

GERALD). GEIGER 
1025 Four Mile Drive 
Wllliamsport, PA 17701 

BRIAN M. GEIGUS 
McBrlde Drive 
Spring City, PA 19475 

LISAS. GERHARD 
105 Fausnacht Drive 
Denver, PA 17517 

SALLY ANN CERICH 
R1522 Cedar Avenue 
Scranton, PA 18505 

KEVIN G. GILDEA 
434 Salem Street 
Archbald, PA 18403 

THOMAS E. GILDEA 
107 West Kline Avenue 
Lansford, PA 18232 

LAURIE ANN GILL 

RD 1 

Schuylkill Haven, PA 17972 

PAULM. GILL 
735 Scott Street 
Kulpmont, PA 17834 

DAVID A. GIMBI 
Box 658D RD 4 
Mountaintop, PA 18707 

)OLENE M. GINO 
1455 Logan Street 
Reading, PA 19607 

DAVID G. GIRTON 
Hawthorne Avenue 
Boyertown, PA 19512 

JANICE L. GITOMER 
20 Holiday Court 
Kingston, PA 18704 

STEVE GIULIANI 
2400 Third St. Apt. 8 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

EILEEN M. GLOWATSKI 
240 S. Spruce Street 
Mount Carmel, PA 17831 

LAURE). GLUNZ 
1929 West Market St. 
Pottsville, PA 17901 

DOUGLAS K. GODFREY 
30 Dougal Avenue 
Livingston, N| 07039 

HENRY M. GOEBEL 
314 Richardson Rd. 
Lansdale, PA 19446 



GARY S. COLBITZ 
1319 Campbell 
Wllliamsport, PA 17701 

BRUCE ). GOLDBERG 
22 Candle Road 
Levittown, PA 19057 

GREGORY V. GOODRIDCE 
330 West Montgomery 
North Wales, PA 19454 

FREDERIC H. CORDON )R. 
3 Line Road 
Malvern, PA 19353 

ROBERT GRAHAM 
226 Lexington Rd. 
Schwenksville, PA 19473 

MARTHA ANNE GREENLEAF 
701 Hermleigh Road 
Silver Spring, MD 20902 

SHARON E. GREISS 
RD 3 Box 34 
Slatington, PA 18080 

TAMYED. GRIFFIN 
RD 3 Box 255 
Wellsboro, PA 16901 

NADINES. GROSS 

RD1 

Alexandria, PA 16611 

JAMES CUDKNECHT 
Eastern Dawn Park, St. 
Langhorne, PA 19047 

HOWARDS. GULICK 
3770Timberland Drive 
Easton, PA 18042 

PHYLLIS E GUILLAUME 
RD1 Box 183 
Trout Run, PA 17771 

HEIDI D. GUNTHER 
1672 Fite Terrace 
Langhorne, PA 19047 

MARY E. GURAVAGE 
26 Washington Blvd. 
Wllliamsport, PA 17701 

BARRY R. GURGAL 

6 Cindy Street 

West Hazleton, PA 18201 

THOMAS R. GUTEKUNST 
Box 1640 Delaware Dr 
Easton, PA 18042 

ANN M. HAAS 
52 Elm Street 
Plymouth, PA 18651 

ROBERT M. HAFNER 
113 Sherwood Drive 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

STEVEN R. HAIRE 
RD 1 Box 32 
Mifflinburg, PA 17844 

PAUL). HALLIGAN 
35 Park Avenue 
Rumson, N) 07760 

GREGORY HAMILTON 
2441 N. 56th St. 
Phila., PA 19131 



160 



GEORGE E, HAMLEN 

RD 2 Box 343 

E. Stroudsburg, PA 18301 

SUSAN HAMPTON 
437 Columbia Ave. 
Aristes, PA 17920 

lERRY HANFORD 
1434 Country Club 
Willlamsport, PA 17701 

ROBERT HANSON 
560 Conestoga Rd. 
Berwyn, PA 19312 

CHARLES HARPEK 

700 Matlack Ave. Apt. 303 BIdg I 

Lewisburg, PA 17837 

C HEATHER HARPER 

700 Matlack Ave. Apt, 303 BIdg ( 

Lewisburg, PA 17837 

CARL HARRADEN 
448 Horseshoe Dr. 
Media, PA 19063 

KAREN HARRIS 
RD 1 Box 390 
Millersburg, PA 17061 

DEBRA HARTZEL 

RD 1 

Biglerville, PA 17307 

JOANNE HARTZELL 
3147 Colony La, 
Plymouth Mtg., PA 19462 

PAMELA HARTZELL 
1009 Monocacy St. 
Bethlehem, PA 18018 

NANCY HAYDT 
131 Packer St. 
Sunbury, PA 17801 

KATHLEEN HAYES 
227 Spohn Rd. 
Reading, PA 19608 

MARGARET HEFFERNAN 
46 Fairway La. 
VVescosvile, PA 18106 

DEBRA HEFFNER 
RD2 Box 137 
Mertztown, PA 19539 

JOANNE HEIMBACH 
57 So Third St. 
Perkasie, PA 18944 

lOAN HEPLER 
153 Nassau Rd. 
Lancaster, PA 17602 

lEFFREY HERTZ 
3840 Oakwood Trail 
Allentown, PA 18103 

LOIS HERTZOG 
20 Clover La. 
Wayne, PA 19087 

MARTIN HICKEY 
44 Viewpoint La. 
Levittown, PA 19054 

ELLEN HIGHBERGER 

916 Tyson Dr. 

West Chester, PA 19380 



MARGARET HILGAR 
13 York Rd. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

DEBORAH HILL 
2007 N. 3rd St. 
Phila., PA 19122 

ANDREW HILLA 
456 Church St. 
Swoyersville, PA 18704 

HILLDALE 

DEBORAH 625 Jordan Ave. 

Montoursville, PA 17754 

LINDA HIRST 
2268 Garden Ave, 
Warrington, PA 18976 

VICTORIA HITT 
1849 Dillon Rd. 
Maple Glen, PA 19002 

LAUREL HOBYAK 
732 Campwoods Rd. 
Villanova, PA 19085 

RICHARD HOCKER 
1548 Terrace Dr. 
Maple Glen, PA 19002 

SUSAN HODGE 

132 S. Washington St. 

Taylor, PA 18517 

PAUL HOFFMAN 
Box 431 RD1 
Linden, PA 17744 

ROBERT HOFFMAN III 
74 Alene Rd, 
Ambler, PA 19002 

GREGORY HOGAN 
RD 1 

Sunbury, PA 17801 

RUSSELL HOGG 

3 Plymouth Rd, 

Newtown Square, PA 19073 

MICHELE HOHLFELD 
1515 Powell St. 
Norristown, PA 19401 

ANDREA HOHOLICK 
RD 1 Box 119 
Forest City, PA 18421 

lANE HOLCOMB 

Box 95 

Leroy, PA 1 7743 

PHILIP HOLMER 
861 Yorktown St. 
Lansdale, PA 19446 

CATHY HOMISH 
170 HandleySt. 
Eynon, PA 18403 

GAIL HOPKINS 
347 Brighton Rd, 
Norristown, PA 19403 

SALLY HOUSER 

RD1 

Port Trevorton, PA 17864 

PETER HOWATT 
Box 3438, Kehr Union 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 



jEAN HUDSON 
624 Green St, 
Willlamsport, PA 17701 

HESTER HUFFNAGLE 
170 E. 11th St. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

SUZANNE HUFFNAGLE 
170 E. 11th St. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

NEDRA HUGHES 
1047 Lilac St. 
Indiana, PA 15701 

MELANI HUMENICK 

RR 1 Box173B 

Beaver Meadows, PA 18216 

PAMELA HUMES 
230 E. Main St. 
Giaradville, PA 17935 

ROXANNA HUNSINGER 

RD5 

Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

SUZANNE HUNTER 
104 Forest Dr 
Camp Hill, PA 17011 

WANDA HUSICK 
127 Stedman St. 
Sayre, PA 18840 

AUGUSTUS HUSSELTON 

838 W. 3rd St. 

Lock Haven, PA 17745 

GARY IBBERSON 
249 Market St. 
Millersburg, PA 17061 

MICHAEL INCITTI 
1025 Oliver Ave. 
Willlamsport, PA 17701 

DEFORREST INMAN, jR, 
2555 Trenton Rd, 
Levittown, PA 19056 

SHERRY IRWIN 
210 Woodward Ave. 
Lock Haven, PA 17745 

MiCHAELjAGGARD 

2209 Badian Dr, 

Silver Spring, MD 20904 

CHERYL lANlEC 

1516 Meadowbrook, La. 

West Chester, PA 19380 

DENISE lANOSIK 
192 Cooper St. 
Pringle, PA 18704 

COLLEEN jARACZEWSKI 
201 Avon Rd. 
Cherry Hill, Nj 08034 

LYNN lEFFERY 
44 Penn Ave. 
Elysburg, PA 17824 

DEBRA lEMIOLA 

349 River St. 

Old Forge, PA 18518 

THERESA lENKS 
187 Willow Dr. 
Warminster, PA 18974 



161 



CHRISTINE JOHNSON 
RD 1 Box 305B 
Muncy, PA 17756 

CYNTHIA JOHNSON 
89 RT 57 
Hackettstown, N| 07840 

DWIGHTD. JOHNSON 
314 Weymouth, Rd. 
Norrlstown, PA 19401 

STEVEN JOHNSON 
704 E 3RD St 
Berwick PA 18603 

MURRAY lOHNSON, |R, 
16 Dey St. 
Danville, PA 17821 

BARBARA jONES 
713 Winchester Rd. 
Broomall, PA 19008 

lOANN jONES 

Box 855 Hazelton PO Broad St. Sta. 

Hazleton, PA 18201 

MARSHA lONES 
1637 Prospect Ave 
Willow Grove PA 19090 

ELAINE jURGILL 
709 N. Paxton St. 
Centralia, PA 17937 

SHERI KAISERMAN 
275 Bryn Mawr Ave. 
Bryn Mawr, PA 19010 

DENNIS KANE 

1518 Meadowbrook Rd. 

Feasterville, PA 19047 

CYNTHIA KANIA 
Box 399 RD 8 
Mountaintop, PA 18707 

ANN KAPUSCHINSKY 
753 Lincoln St. 
Hazleton, PA 18201 



DENNIS KEISER 
493 W. Pine St. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

DENNIS). KEITH 

RD 1 Box 57 

Jersey Shore, PA 17740 

BRUCE H. KELLEY 
Box418CRD2 
Reading, PA 19605 

JOHN J. KELLEY 
130 West Line St. 
Olyphant, PA 18447 

LAURIE A. KEMMERER 
631 Pierce Street 
Easton, PA 18042 

MAUREEN P, KENNA 
513 Old Mill Road 
Easton, PA 18042 

ROBERT I. KERRIS 
Box 219 RD 1 
Elysburg, PA 17824 

JANET W. KEYSER 
701 Main St. 
Peckville, PA 18452 

DONNA KINDER 
1419 Carlisle Rd. 
Camp Hill, PA 17011 

SUSAN M, KINGETER 
212 Bethlehem Pike 
Ambler, PA 19002 

SUSAN M. KINGSLEY 
308 N. Sumner Ave. 
Scranton, PA 18504 

RICHARD R. KELBON 
844 Lott Street 
Shamokin, PA 17872 

EDWARD KLEPEISZ 
511 East Lawn Road 
Nazareth, PA 18064 



REBECCA KOPPENHAVER 
Klingerstown, PA 17941 

JOHN KOSER 

4951 Berkley St. 
Harrisburg, PA 17107 

DEBORAH KOSPIAH 
527 Atlantic St. 
Bethlehem, PA 18015 

JEAN KOVALCHIK 
llOMc Dermott St. 
Jessup, PA 18434 

SHARON KOZURA 
590 Sunbury St. 
Mmersville, PA 17954 

RITA KRASHEFSKI 

438 W 2nd St. 

Mt. Carmel, PA 17851 

KELLI KREBS 
802 N 8th St. 
Selmsgrove, PA 17870 

WILFRED KREUTZER 
414 Arlington Rd. 
Camp Hill, PA 17011 

JILL KRICK 

1651 Delaware Ave. 

Wyomissing, PA 1%10 

LARRY KRIZANSKY 
R1025 Peace St. 
Hazleton, PA 18201 

LORI KROENER 
Cathcart & Twp Line Rd, 

Gwynedd Valley, PA 19437 

PATSY KROMMES 
Box 139 RD1 
Pitman, PA 17964 

ROBERT KUHN II 
141 Lynbrook Dr. N. 
York, PA 17402 



MARK KARANOVICH 

9301 Barneslake, Rd. 

N. Huntingdon, PA 15642 

MICHAEL KARPINSKI 
2 West Park St. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

CAROL KARPOVICH 
102 Swatara Rd. 
Shenandoah, PA 17976 



RICHARD J. KLINE 
410 Second St. 
Whitehall, PA 18052 

DOTTI KOCH 
619 W. 5th St 
Hazleton, PA 18201 

IILL KOCH 

55 Oakwood Circle 

Schnecksville, PA 18078 



ELAINE KULESA 
3322 Olyphant Ave. 
Scranton, PA 18509 

MICHELLE KUMMERER 
RR3 Box 138 
Hamburg, PA 19526 

LOUISE KURTZ 
101 Dey St 
Danville, PA 17821 



PAMELA KATICA 

Box 84A Woodlawn Prk RD 2 

Hazleton, PA 18201 



MARYBETH KODASH 
570 E. Lawton St. 
Saint Clair, PA 17970 



BARBARA KWIATKOWSKI 
244 W, Cirard St. 
Atlas, PA 17851 



LISA KAUFMAN 
228 S. Main St. 
Sellersville, PA 18960 

LORIE KEATING 
10 White OakCt. 
Montvale, N] 07645 

MALCOLM KEILON 
133 Skyline Dr. 
Glen Mills, PA 19342 

JUSTINE KEIM 
12 Mill La. 
Linfield, PA 19468 



PATRICIA KOELSCH 
106 New Haven Dr. 
Lititz, PA 17543 

DAVID KOHLER 
1107 Lincoln St. 
Easton, PA 18042 

BRUCE KOLLER 
Sanders Alley 
Kutztown, PA 19530 

BRENDA KOPPENHAVER 
1945 Penna Ave. 
Allenlown, PA 18103 



PATRICIA LAFFERTY 
27 Paul Revere Rd. 
Oil City, PA 16301 

KIM LAGO 

1124]effery 
Wanamassa, N| 07712 

LYNN MARIE LANDON 
330 E. First Street 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

JANICE LANGENDORF 

10 Elm La. 

Stony Brook, NY 11790 



162 



DEMISE LAPENNA 
34 Indian Pk Rd. 
Levittown, PA 19057 

CAROLE LA ROCHE 
RD #3 Box 251 
Danville, PA 17821 

MICHAEL A.D. LARSO 
535 Cedar Drive 
Lafayette Hill, PA 19444 

VINCENT LARUFFA 
Meetinghouse Rd. 
Ambler, PA 19002 

RICHARD LAUBACH 

69 E. Lawn Rd. 
Nazareth, PA 18064 

DIANE LAUCHLIN 
662 lohn O'Hara St. 
Pottsville, PA 17901 

DANETTE LAWSON 

8 lames PI, 

White Haven, PA 18661 

IILL LAYLON 
5 Round Top Rd. 
Williamsport, PA 17701 

DIANE LEAVER 
1000 lames 
Monongahela, PA 15063 

lAMES LEBERKNIGHT 
207 Marshall Ave. 
Collingdale, PA 19023 

DANIEL LECHNER 
Box A 292 RD 1 
Hellertown, PA 18055 

BARRY LEIBY 

70 E. Harrison St. 
Tunkhannock, PA 18657 

DENNIS LEIGHOW 
1320 Bloom St. 
Danville, PA 17821 

DONNA LEMONS 
437 Ridge Rd. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

DAVID LESCINSKI 
130 Morse Ave. 
Simpson, PA 18407 

CHERYL LEVONSKIE 
105 Park Ave. 
Swoyersville, PA 18704 

CAROL LEWIS 

606 Stony Battery Rd. 

Landisville, PA 17538 

CHRISTINE LEWIS 
151 Windsor Ave. 
Southampton, PA 18966 

DIANE LEWIS 
728 Market St. 
Bangor, PA 18013 

ROBYN LEWIS 
318 Hill St, 
Peckville, PA 18452 

RUSTY LEWIS 
Island Pk Rd. 
Easton, PA 18042 



DIETRICH LICHTNER 
932 Pulinski Rd. 
Ivyland, PA 18974 

ROBYN LICGINS 
512 So. Queen St. 
York, PA 17403 

MARSHA ANN LINN 
126 North Third St. 
Catiwissa, PA 17820 

lAMES ROBERT LINN 
133 N. Second St. 
Catavi/issa, PA 17830 

LAWRENCE LINSENBICLER 
Clendale Ave. 
Bethlehem, PA 18018 

WENDY j. LITRIDES 
360 Barett Rd. 
Eammaus, PA 18044 

STEVEN LIVERMORE 
RD2 Fox Hollow Rd. 
Williamsport, PA 17701 

DENISE LLEWELLYN 
17 Hedge PI. 
Kingston, PA 18704 

lEFFREYC. LONG 
Boxl80Oakwood, Dr. 
Hanover, PA 17331 

SUZANNE LONG 

RD 4 Box 535 Idetown Rd. 

Dallas, PA 18612 

ANN LORUSSO 
374 W. Academy St. 
Wilkes Barre, PA 18702 

MELOOY LOWRY 

RD 1 

Forest City, PA 18421 

lANICE LUKAWETSKI 
1453 Poplar St. 
Kulpmont, PA 17834 

DEBORAH LUKASHEFSKI 
25 Hill St 
Mocanaqua, PA 18655 

ANTOINETTE LUPINO 
65 Big Mine Run 
Ashland, PA 17921 

LISA LUPINACCI 
216 Upper Stump Rd 
Chalfont, PA 18914 

)OHN R. LUXFORD 
34 Broad St. 
Montgomery, PA 

GERALDINE LYNCH 

RD 2 Box 99 

New Cumberland, PA 17070 

PATRICIA LYONS 

711 Market St. 

New Cumberland, PA 17070 

MICHAEL MAGUIRE 
RD 3 Box 91 
Duncannon, PA 17020 

SAMUEL MALANDRA.jR. 
4026 Ellendale Rd. 
Drexel Hill, PA 19026 



FRANK T. MALONEY 
903 lohns Drive 
Moosic, PA 18507 

DONNA MANCUSO 

6 Briar La. 

Camp Hill, PA 17011 

ELISA MANCUSO 
815 W. George St. 
Pen Argyl, PA 18072 

RICHRD MANISCALCO 
16 Westwood Cir. 
Norristown, PA 19401 

DEBORAH MARKLE 
16 Valentine Lane 
Levittown, PA 19054 

lOANNE MARKLE 

RD2 

Glen Rock, PA 17327 

WILLIAM SCOTT MARKELEY 
1024 Sparrow Rd, 
Audubon, PA 19407 

MICHAEL MARR 
RD 2 Box 100 
Milton, PA 17847 

REBECCA MARR 

Box 175 

Harford, PA 18823 

CHARLES W. MARTIN, )R. 
1778 Memorial Ave. 
Williamsport, PA 17701 

lUDITH MASLOSKI 
763 Pine St. 
Kulpmont, PA 17834 

lANINE MASSAR 
5 S. Chestnut St. 
Treschow, PA 18254 

SANDRA MASSARO 
1514 Virmay Dr. 
Gilbertsville, PA 19525 

GRETCHEN MASTER 
253 Iron St 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

)OANN MATANI 

287 Tripp St. 

West Wyoming, PA 18644 

RENE MATSKO 
1325 Pottsville St. 
Pottsville, PA 17901 

THOMAS MATUKAITIS 

321 W. 5th St. 

Mt. Carmel, PA 17851 

MARIAN MATUSICK 

RD2 

Drums, PA 18222 

TOM MAZZANTE 

306 W, 8th Ave. 

S. Williamsport, PA 17701 

SCOTT MCCABE 
RD #3 Box 332 
Newton, NJ 07860 

MARY MCCARTHY 
62 Sand St. 
Carbondale, PA 18407 



163 



MARY ANN MC CARTHY 
1626 Woodford Way 
Norristown, Pa 19403 

CAROL MC CLAIN 
1033 W. Spruce St. 
Shamokin, PA 17872 

AUREEN MC DONALD 
417 Pierce St, 
Pottsville, PA 17901 

LYNN MC FADDEN 
1411 Sunny Hill La, 
Havertown, PA 19083 

ELOISEMC GARRY 

Hillside Manor RD #3 Box 1011 

Newport, PA 17074 

WILLIAM MCGRAW 
3902 Laurel Ave. 
Moosic, PA 18505 

H. MICHELLE MC HALE 

438 S. Mill St. 

Saint Clair, PA 17970 

GERALD MC HUGH 
1061 Creamery Lane 
West Chester, PA 19380 

DAVID MCILWAINE 
53 Brenner St 
Millersville, PA 17551 

JEFFREY MCLEAN 
86 Lycoming St 
Canton, PA 1772 

MARY MC MASTER 

475 Hampton Rd. 

King of Prussia, PA 19406 

ROBERT MCMULLIN III 
902 Montogmery Ave. 
Ft, Washington, PA 19034 

THOMAS MC NAMARA 
1017 Race St. 
Williamsport, PA 17701 

lOHN MC NAUGHTON 
33 N 5th St. 
Newport, PA 17074 

CHARLES MEACHUM 
121 N. Water St. 
Lewisburg, PA 17837 

ALICE MEASE 
2371 Hillside Ave. 
Williamsport, PA 17701 

ANN MEDEIROS 
11 Montello Rd, 
Sinking Spring, PA 19608 

lAMES MENAPACE 
201 W. Saylor St. 
Atlas, PA 17851 

RICHARD MENNITI 
215 Grampian Blvd. 
Williamsport, PA 17701 

BARBARA MENSCH 
501 Columbia Ave. 
Aristes, PA 17920 

DANIEL MERK 
1117 First Ave. 
Williamsport, PA 17701 



THERESA MICHNO 
338 E, Nable St. 
Nanticoke, PA 18634 

DAVID MICHNO 
336 E. Noble St. 
Nanticoke, PA 18634 

MARK MIKATAVAGE 
321 Saint Francis St. 
Minersville, PA 17954 

CARLAMIKOVICH 
300 W. Railroad St. 
Nesquehoning, PA 18240 

BARBARA MILLER 
402 Cheltena Ave, 
lenkintown, PA 190 

CATHERINE MILLER 
50 Knoll La 
York, PA 17402 

lEFFREY MILLER 
24 Donna Dr. 
Coplay, PA 18037 

MARY JANE MILLER 

RD 3 

Clarks Summit, PA 18411 

ROBBIN MILLER 
528 Main St. 
Bally, PA 19503 

lOHN MILLHOUSE 
406 Shuman St. 
Middleburg, PA 17842 

LAWRENCE MITCHELL 
1 Skyline Dr. 
Audubon, PA 19407 

MICHAEL MIXELL 
Burgners Rd. 
Plainfield, PA 17081 

TERRY ANN MIZDOL 
7 Reservoir Ct. 
Wallington, N) 07057 

DANTE MOLINO 
929 W. Diamond Ave. 
Hazleton, PA 18201 

lUDITH MOMORELLA 
627 Launfall Rd. 
Plymouth Mtg, PA 19462 

LINDA MOONEY 
128 E. Bennett St. 
Kingston, PA 18704 

EARLE MOORE 
850 Iron St. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

KAREN MOORE 
2899 Pennview Ave. 
Broomall, PA 19008 

ROBERT MOORE 
18 W. Congress 
Corry, PA 16407 

MICHAEL MORAN 
220 Jefferson St. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

ROBERT MORANA 
190 N. Wyoming 
Hazleton, PA 18201 



DOREEN MORGAN 
428 N. Maple Ave. 
Kingston, PA 18704 

JODY MORGAN 
273 Sweetbriar Or. 
King of Prussia, PA 19406 

MICHAEL MORGAN 
139 S. Main St 
Taylor, PA 18517 

PAMELA MORGAN 
105 Annasmead Rd, 
Ambler, PA 19002 

FRANCIS MOROZ 
116 Delwhit Dr. 
Feasterville, PA 19047 

PAMELA MORSE 
6147 Lansdowne Ave. 
Phila., PA 19151 

James Mortimer 
2660 Stephen St. 
Easton, PA 18042 

BETHANY MOSER 
RD 3 Box 193 

Mifflinburg, PA 17844 

SUSAN MOSHINSKY 
227 Meadow Dr. 
Yardley, PA 19067 

JOHN MOYER 
824 E. Dewart St. 
Shamokin, PA 17872 

KEVIN MOYER 
554 Prince St. 
Northumberland, PA 17857 

SUSAN MURRAY 

RD2 

Danville, PA 17821 

WENDY MURRAY 
135 N. Broad St. 
Hughesville, PA 17737 

BRIAN MUSSELMAN 
3937 Rutland St. 
Bethlehem, PA 18017 

JEANNE MUSSER 
65 Oak La. 
Lancaster, PA 17603 

BRENDA MYERS 
273 Grimesville Rd. 
Williamsport, PA 17701 

DEBRA MYERS 
RD #1 Box66B 
Muncy Valley, PA 17758 

JOEL MYERS 

100 Montgomery St. 

Montgomery, PA 17752 

MICHAEL MYERS 
3632 St. Davids Rd. 
Newtown Sq., PA 19073 

SANDRA MYERS 

RD2 Box 165 

Seven Valleys, PA 17360 

VICKI MYERS 
109 S. 17th St, 
Camp Hill, PA 17011 



164 



LORETTA MYLET 
628 Landmesser St. 
W. Hazleton, PA 18201 

lAMES NACC, |R. 
1550 Lower State Rd. 
Chalfont, PA 18914 

DONNA NAHODIL 
76 E. Sunbury St. 
Shamokin, PA 17872 

GLORIA NARDONE 

29 Barney St. 

Wilkes Barre, PA 18702 

LISA NARKE 
1261 Scott St. 
Kulpmont, PA 17834 

lAMES NASH 

241 Merrybrook Dr. 

Havertown, PA 19083 

LINDA NATTER 
1743 Clinton Dr. 
Ambler, PA 19002 

ROBERT NAUMORITZ 
44 Shadyland Drive 
Dickson City, PA 18519 

SANDRA NEERENBERG 
8508 Summerdale Ave. 
Philadelphia, PA 19152 

GREG NELSON 
15 Begonia La. 
Levittown, PA 19054 

CHERYL NEWTON 
447 N 9th St. 
Lehighton, PA 18235 

ROBERT NOLAN 
743 Spring St. 
Avoca, PA 18641 

lAMES NORDQUIST 
2446 E. Millheim Rd. 
Bath, PA 18014 

CAROLYN NORK 
213 Kirby Ave. 
Mountaintop, PA 18707 

WENDY NYBORG 
318 Palmers La. 
Wallingford, PA 19086 

KRISTINE OAKLAND 
160 W. Spruce St. 
Ramsey, Nj 07446 

ANGEL O'BRIEN 
392 W. Academy St. 
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702 

DONALD O CONNOR 
207 N. Whitehall Rd. 
Norristown, PA 19401 

BERNADETTEODYNIEC 
10955 Ellicott Rd. 
Phila., PA 19154 

SUSAN OLCESE 
1007 N. Shamokin St. 
Shamokin, PA 17872 

COLLEEN O NEILL 
370 N. Hanover St. 
Pottstown, PA 19464 



SHARON OPIELA 
425 Penn Ave. 
Dupont, PA 18641 

KAREN ORZOL 
364 Heston Ave. 
Norristown, PA 19403 

SUSAN PALANGI 
163 Carmita Ave. 
Rutherford, N) 07070 

DONNA PANCKERI 
RD 1 Box 73 

Weatherly, PA 18255 

CAROLYN PANTALONE 
48 Half St. 
Hershey, PA 17033 

SANDRA PARKS 
13 Vassar Dr. 
Quakertown, PA 18951 

SUSAN PASCARELLO 

Box 144 

Marshails Creek, PA 18335 

GEORGEANNE PASCH 

Box 215 

Martins Creek, PA 18063 

LINDA PASIERB 
21 N 2nd St. 
Shamokin, PA 17872 

CARLA PATRICK 
319 Owl Creek Rd. 
Tamaqua, PA 18252 

ERNESTINE PATTERSON 
1121 W. Silver 
Phila., PA 19133 

lOSEPH PATTI 
815 Delene Rd. 
Rydal, PA 19046 

CYNTHIA SIEGRIST PAYONK 
3810Hillcresl Dr. 
Columbia, PA 17512 

BARBARA PAXTON 

600 Barry Dr 
Springfield, PA 19064 

MELISSA PEALER 
110 Colonial Ave. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

ALICE PEDERGNANA 

349 S. Vine St. 

Mt. Carmel, PA 17851 

lAMES PEFFLEY, |R. 
Riverview Apt. 4 RD 8 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

CYNTHIA PELLOCK 
605 W. Arch St. 
Frackville, PA 17931 

KRISTIN PERKINS 

601 Mc Cosh St. 
Hanover, PA 17331 

DANIEL PERRY 
3814 Brytton La. 
Harrisburg, PA 17110 

KAREN PETERMAN 

RD1 

Muncy, PA 17756 



CHERYL PETERSON 
733 Nocturn Way 
Toms River, N) 08753 

jEAN PETRO 
40 Harris Hill Rd. 
Trucksville, PA 18708 

NANCY PETROVICH 
29 lean Terrace 
Parsippany, N) 07054 

KURT PETTIS 
2622 Walnut St 
Camp Hill, PA 17011 

CAROL PHILLIPS 
373 Stratford Ave. 
Collegeville, PA 19426 

)OHN PICKERING 
136 Culver St. 
Forty Fort, PA 18704 

HOWARD PILLOT 
8 East Third St. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

DOMINIC PINO 
227 Winters Ave. 
W. Hazleton, PA 18201 

DOMINIC PISANO 
871 Grandview Blvd. 
Lancaster, PA 17601 

lEFFREY PITTENGER 

RD 1 

New Ringgold, PA17%0 

ROBERT PLETCHAN 

4740 Main 
Whitehall, PA 18052 

EMILEE PLUCENIK 
593 Milwaukee Ave. 
Old Forge, PA 18518 

jOAN POLASKI 

225 So. Vine 

Mt. Carmel, PA 17851 

BRETT POLENCHAR 
630 Hamilton Ave. 
Bethlehem, PA 18017 

STEPHEN POLINSKY 
209 Parkview Dr. 
Springfield, PA 19064 

LESLIE POLLIZZOTTI 

Raintree No. 402 Sugartown & King Rds. 

Malvern, PA 19355 

LINDA POLOMBO 

37 Barney St. 

Wilkes Barre, PA 18702 

)OHN POLTROCK 
RD 1 Box 71 
Nescopeck, PA 18635 

SHARON POTERA 
R 826 N. Laurel St. 
Hazleton, PA 18201 

LINDA POTTER 
RD2 

Albion, PA 16401 

SUSAN POTTER 
Box 311 RD1 
Downingtown, PA 19335 



165 



STEVEN E. POUST 

Laurel St. 

Picture Rocks, PA 17762 

KIMBERLY POWELL 
1801 Quentin Rd. 
Stroudsburg, PA 18360 

lOAN PRESTON 

16 Dexter St. 

Wilkes Barre, PA 18702 

BONNIE PRICE 
1866 Fair Ave. 
Honesdale, PA 18431 

E. MALINDA PRICE 

RD5 

Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

lOHN PRIM 
210 Fair St. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

RICK PRITCHARD 
207 E. 2nd St, 
Wind Gap, PA 18091 

BARBARA PROSICK 
RR 1 Box 250 
Ringtown, PA 17967 



CATHLEEN READDY 
65 Cheltenham Dr. 
Wyomissing Hills, PA 19610 

JOANNE RECUPERO 
258 Hawthorne Cir 
North Wales, PA 19454 

ROBERT REEDER 
1908 Devon Rd 
Williamsport, PA 17701 

lOHN REENSTRA, |R 
10 Ronnie Rd. 

Wayne, N| 07470 

VICKI REESER 
Box102B RD 3 
Reading, PA 10606 

LISA REGAN 

201 Runnymede Ave. 

lenkintown, PA 19046 

DAVID REICHELDERFER 
Box 272 RD 2 
Milton, PA 17847 

WILLIAM REINEBERG 
1004 W. Locust St. 
York, PA 17404 



ANTONIO RODRIGUEZ 
830 N lames 
Hazleton, PA 18201 

ELIUD RODRIGUEZ 

633 Union Court Apts. Apt A 

West Chester, PA 19380 

AARON ROETENBERG 
3503 N 4th St. 
Harrisburg, PA 17110 

CHARLES ROPARS 
802 Eldridge Rd. 
Fairless Hills, PA 19030 

GAIL ROSSBAUER 
1 Monroe Way 
Newtown, PA 18940 

THOMAS ROTH 
233 Liberty St. 
Nazareth, PA 18064 

VICTORIA ROTHERMEL 
Box 336A RD 2 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

BRETT ROTHWELL 

Box 238 

Drums, PA 18222 



RAISSA PRUS 

14 Sherwood Ave. 

E. Brunswick, N| 08816 

lEAN PULASKI 

225 S. Vine 

Mt. Carmel, PA 17851 

KENNETH PULCINI 

Box 1% 

Martins Creek, PA 18063 

WILLIAM PURSEL 

Box 129 

Turbotville, PA 17772 

HEIDI PURVIS 
32 N, Marmic Dr. 
Holland, PA 18966 

LISAQUIGGLE 
20 Quiggle Ave. 
Castanea, PA 17745 

lAMESQUINN 
87 Windsor Ave. 
Narberth, PA 19072 

LEOQUINN III 
1276 Barness Dr. 
Warminster, PA 18974 



JANE REINER 
135 E Grand Ave 
Tower City, PA 17980 

ANNETTE REIHL 
542 A. Norris Rd. 
Furlong, PA 16925 

JOANNE REISCH 
47 E. Summit St. 
Mohnton, PA 19540 

lANE M. RENALDO 
841 N. Garibaldi Ave. 
Roseto, PA 18013 

SALLY RHODES 
106 9th St. 
Upland, PA 19015 

REBECCA RICHARD 
230 So. 4th St, 
Lewisburg, PA 17837 

SCOTT RICHARDS 
746 Barbara Ann Dr. 
Lebanon, PA 17042 

LESLIE RICHCREEK 

RD 1 

Middletown, PA 17057 



NORANN ROWE 
572 Hammond Dr. 
Morrisville, PA 19067 

NANCY ROWLANDS 
1008'/; W. Mam St. 
Plymouth, PA 18651 

lOSEPH ROWLEY, |R. 
1093 Little La. 
Warminster, PA 18974 

PATTI BETH RUBINCAM 
704 W. 2nd Ave. 
Parkesburg, PA 19365 

PAMELA RUMBERGER 
RD 1 Box 264 
Millerstown, PA 17062 

JANET RUSNAK 
342 S. Poplar St. 
Mt. Carmel, PA 17851 

SUSAN RUTLEDGE 
221 George St. 
Hanover, PA 17331 

KATHLEEN RYAN 
191 Honeywell, Dr. 
Claymont, DE 19703 



LOIS RABENOLD 
436 Wade Ave. 
Lansdale, PA 19446 

ROBERT THOMAS RAKER, |R 
741 Market St. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

M. DEE WHITENIGHT RASKI 
RD 1 Box 452 
Millville, PA 17846 

DENISE RATH 
3130 Providence Rd. 
Norristown, PA 19401 



DOUGLAS RICHIE 
Box813 RD #2 
Elysburg, PA 17824 

LORI RICHTER 
Box 1 78 
Ottsville, PA 18942 

LEE RIEGEL 

RD 1 Dunkelberger Rd. 

Leesport, PA 19533 

CHRISTINE RITRO 
335 W Preston Ave. 
Girardville, PA 17935 



TAMMY RYAN 
118 Spring St. 
Danville, PA 17821 

THEODORE RYSZ 
828 Woodlawn Ave. 
Moosic, PA 18507 

ROSEMARIE SABATINI 

137 Park Ave, 

Wilkes Barre, PA 18702 

MARY SABIN 
407 N. Hopkins St. 
Sayre, PA 18840 



MARK RAYNES 
980 W. Main St. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 



MARK RITTER 
2736 South St. 
Allentown, PA 18103 



CHERYL SAMPSELL 
206 Mam St. 
Turbotville, PA 17772 



166 



CYNTHIA SANDER 
194 Mt Horeb Rd. 
Warren, N| 07060 

WILLIAM SARAS 
36 W Walnut St. 
Hazleton, PA 18201 

LEONARD SAUERS 
RD 5 Box 67 
Lewisburg, PA 17837 

WILLIAM SAUERZOPF 
646 Seip Ave. 
Nazareth, PA 18064 

CHRISTINE SAVERIO 
936 W. 3rd St. 
Lansdale, PA 19446 

LUCILLE SCARPINO 
2934 White Birch La. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

DAVID SCHAEFER 
ri39 Dixon La. 
Rydal, PA 19046 

RAYMOND SHCEETZ 
211 S. 11th St. 
Trevorton, PA 17881 

LINDA SCHEIER 
RD5 Box 119 
Flemmgton, N| 08822 

EDWARD SCHELLHAMMER 

206 Analomink St. 

East Stroudsburg, PA 18301 

lANETSCHIPP 
102 New York St. 
Scranton, PA 18509 

MISHELLSCHLEGEL 

RD3 

Bellefonte, PA 16823 

HEIDI SCHMALFUHS 

Box 14 

Midland Pk, Nj 07432 

BRIAN SCHMIDT 
857 Poplar Rd. 
Hellertown, PA 18055 

KEITH SCHOCH 

RD1 

Mertztown, PA 19539 

MARKSCHOENAGEL 
227 W. Main Apt. 1 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

LESLIE SCHOLL 

RD 1 Box 367 

Center Valley, PA 18034 

WENDI SCHUCK 
RD 2 Box 72 
Montoursville, PA 17754 

ANDREW SCHWALM 
803 W. Main St. 
Valley View, PA 17983 

JANET SCOTT 
RD 1 Box 466 
Lewisburg, PA 17837 

SUSAN SCOZZARI 
24 Woodbine Ave. 
West Babylon, NY 11704 



lANETSEIDEL 
2547 Second St. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

SHAUN SERPASS 
334 N. Broadway 
Wind Gap, PA 18091 

SCOTT SHALTER 
2212 Lincoln Ave. 
West Lawn, PA 1%09 

KATHY ANN SHEATS 
104 Loch Raven Rd. 
Salisbury, MD 21801 

WILLIAM SHELTON 
3713 Lancaster Ave. 
Phila., PA 19104 

DEBRA SHELLY 
61 N Grant St. 
Manheim, PA 17545 

CHRISTINE SHEPPS 
913 Apple Dr. 
Mechanicsburg, PA 17055 

NEAL SHEPTOCK 
637 Pine St. 
Kulpmont, PA 17834 

SUSAN SHERVANICK 
909 N. Orange St. 
Shamokin, PA 17872 

RONALD SHOEMAKER 

1200 Walnut St. 
Wilhamsport, PA 17701 

CONSTANCE SHOPE 
412 Drexel PI. 
Quakertown, PA 18951 

JOHN S. SHTATMAN 
30 Red Bowen Lane 
Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462 

KATHY SHUGHART 
4906 Colorado Ave. 
Harrisburg, PA 17109 

PAULSHUSTACK 
359 S. Lehigh Ave. 
Frackville, PA 17931 

DIANE SIEBERT 
33 Huntington Rd. 
Edison, N| 08817 

MICHELESIES 
26 N. 14th St. 
Easton, PA 18042 

ANN SILVONEK 
253 S 3rd St. 
Lehighton, PA 18235 

GERALD SIMKONIS 
122 Pine St. 
Nanticoke, PA 18634 

LESLIE SIMON 
172 College Ave. 
Factoryville, PA 

MATHEW SIMONE II 

RD 1 

Berwick, PA 18503 

CAROL SITLER 
3726 Orth St. 
Bethlehem, PA 18017 



WILLIAM SKOCIK 
34D E. Columbia Ave. 
Atlas, PA 17851 

MICHAEL PAUL SLICK 
1419 White Oak Rd. 
Allentown, PA 18104 

ERICSLINGERLAND 

RD2 

Troy, PA 16947 

KAREN SLUSSER 

RD 3 

Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

CRAIG R. SMITH 

543 D 

Berwyn, PA 19312 

DENISE SMITH 
336 Parker St. 
Chester, PA 

NANCY A. SMITH 
671 Landmesser St. 
West Hazelton, PA 18201 

NOVELLOU SMITH 
602 S. Main St. 
Taylor, PA 18517 

RICHARD SMITH 
RT 2 Box 355 
Slatington, PA 18080 

JANICE SNELBAKER 
104 N. Clearview Dr. 
Camp Hill, PA 17011 

jOAN SNOOK 
RD 1 Bx 74 
Augusta, N| 07822 

KAREN SNYDER 
56 W. Main St. 
Dallastown, PA 17313 

KATHRYN SNYDER 
Lonely Cottage Dr. 
Upper Black Eddy, PA 18972 

KATHY SNYDER 
515 N. 25th St. 
Allentown, PA 18104 

ROBERT SNYDER 
1780 Colonial Manor 
Lancaster, PA 17603 

WILLIAM SNYDER, |R. 
234 2nd St. 
Northumberland, PA 17857 

BEVERLY SOBACK 
110 S. Mercer 
Berwick, PA 18603 

KATHLEEN SOLLEY 
330 High St. 
Williamsport, PA 17701 

ROBERT SOMERS 
220 Ferdinand St. 
Scranton, PA 18508 

REBECCA SORBER 
RD #3 Box 283 
Hunlock Creek, PA 18621 

MICKEY SOURS 
7115 Chapins Rd. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 



167 



NANCY SPANGLE 

567 E. Hummelstown St. 

Elizabethtown, PA 17022 

DEBRASPOHRER 

1420 E. Locust St. 
Scranton, PA 18505 

KATHY STAAB 
486 Druid Hill Dr. 
Mountville, PA 17554 

GARY STAIR 
223 E 9th St. 
Berwick, PA 18603 

lULIESTAMETS 
129 Penn St. 
Montgomery, PA 17752 

STEPHEN STANCKER 

RD2 

Berwick, PA 18603 

DAVID STANDAROWSKI 
147 Chapel St. 
Pittston, PA 18640 

EUGENE A, STASCHAK 
198 Fairview St. 
Carbondale, PA 18407 

SUSANNESTECZAK 
20 Beechwood Dr. 
Coatesville, PA 19320 

GEORGE STEELE III 
1815 Webster La. 
Ambler, PA 19002 

PEGGY ANN STEELEY 
7 loann La. 
Milton, PA 17847 

ANN MARIE STELMA 
33 Carroll St. 
Pittston, PA 18640 

HOLLY STEPHENS 
RD 3 Box 135 
Honesdale, PA 18431 

PAMELA STEPHENS 

RD 3 

Tamaqua, PA 18252 

PAULSOUDT 
536 Garfield Ave 
Souderton, PA 18964 

PATRICIA STOUTENBURGH 
345 Forest Ave. 
Ambler, PA 19002 

LORRAINE STOUTT 
1 10 Tamaqua St. 
Audreid, PA 18201 

CAMILLE STRAUSSER 

RT2 

Berwick, PA 18603 

ALBERT SUKOWASKI 
347 E. Church St. 
Nanticoke, PA 18634 

LOUISE SUSNER 
46Townshipline #222 
Elkins Park, PA 19117 

LORETTA SUTCLIFFE 
207 Carpenter La. 
Ambler, PA 19002 



DANIEL SWANK 
35 Washington Ave. 
Northumberland, PA 17857 

PATRICIA SWANSON 
40 Miner St. 
Coaldale, PA 18218 

VALERIE SWANSON 
212 6th St 
Renovo, PA 17764 

CAROL SWARTZ 
826 Chestnut St. 
Kulpmont, PA 17834 

CAROL SWATKO 
43 Perrm Ave. 
Shavertown, PA 18708 

RICHARD SWEENEY 

428 Dorothy Dr 

King of Prussia, PA 19406 

ARLENE TAFFERA 
59 N. Welles Ave. 
Kmgston, PA 18704 

GREGORY P. TALESE 
116 Kenilworth Rd. 
Villanova, PA 18085 

ANGELA TAORMINA 
232 Fenna Ave. 
Mill Hall, PA 17751 

DEBORAH TAYLOR 
7238SansomSt. 
Upper Darby, PA 19082 

ROLAND TAYLOR 
23 Ferry St. 
Warminster, PA. 19874 

THERESA TAYLOR 
3184 Aldan Rd. 
Plymouth Mtg., PA 19462 

LINDA TELLEFSEN 
3 Buena Vista Dr. 
Hillsdale, N| 07642 

BONITA THOMAS 
2021 W. 10th St. 
Chester, PA 19013 

LARRY THOMAS 
RD 1 Box 274 
Sunbury, PA 17801 

KATHLEEN TIERNAN 
31 Thruway Dr. 
Bridgewater, N| 08807 

JONATHAN TILLETT 

Box 151 

Elysburg, PA 17924 

JOHN TOUEY 
394 Ridge Ave. 
Kingston, PA 18704 

MATTHEW TRAGESER 
305 Seminole Dr. 
Erie, PA 16505 

ED TREASTER 
6798 Fairway Dr. 
Dougla5ville,GA 30134 

MARTHA TRYBA 
201 loan Terrace 
Trenton, N) 08629 



MARTIN TURNOWCHYK, |R. 
RD 2 Charlestown Rd. 
Lancaster, PA 17603 

VANESSA TYLER 
4141 Parrish St. 
Phila., PA 19104 

ANDREW A. UDINSKI 
39 Warden Rd. 
Doylestown, PA 18901 

BERNADETTE URITIS 
109 N. White St. 
Shenandoah, PA 17976 

ELAINE UZICK 

RD #3 

Tamaqua, PA 18252 

MICHAEL VALENTI 
464 Broad 
Pittston, PA 18640 

ROBERT VANCE 
211 Norris Ave. 
Phoenixville, PA 19460 

KAREN VANNICOLA 
RD 1 Box CH 60 
Reedsville, PA 17084 

LOUIS VANNICOLA 
1400 Mangold Dr. 
Easton, PA 18042 

JOSEPH VAUGHN, |R. 
27 Starlight Rd. 
Oak Ridge, N| 07438 

DONNA VEACH 

332 S. Oak St. 

Mt. Carmel, PA 17851 

lAMES VELOPOLCAK 

3rd Ave 

Martins Creek, PA 18063 

MARILYN VERNA 
2067 Baker Dr. 
Allentown, PA 18103 

CAROL VINCENTI 
16 Clark La. 
Plains, PA 18705 

LEE VIVIAN 

RD 1 Mountain Rd. 

Plymouth, PA 18651 

JEAN VOITEK 
37 McHale St. 
Swoyersville, PA 18704 

HEIDI WADLINGER 
204 W. 40th St. 
Reading, PA 19606 

ROBERT WAGNER 
2115 RodgersSt. 
Bethlehem, PA 18017 

PAMELA WALKER 
345 Park Ave. 
Milton, PA 17847 

CAROL WALLACE 

180 Blooming Grove Rd. 

Hanover, PA 17331 

ROBERT WALP 
535 E 2nd St. 
Nescopeck, PA 18635 



168 



MAUREEN WALSH 
261 GeddingSt, 
Avoca, PA 18641 

PATRICK M. WALSH 
914 Macclesfield Rd, 
Furlong, PA 18926 

KAREN WALTERS 
125 E. Logan St. 
Reedsvllle, PA 17084 

DEBORAH WALTON 

Rt 1 

Berwick, PA 18603 

LOUISE WARD 

220 C^ St. 

Pen Argyl, PA 18072 

HARRY WARK, jR- 
225 Maple Rd. 
Berwick, PA 18603 

ALLISON WATTS 
Box 117 4th St. 
Bernville, PA 19506 

ELIZABETH WATTS 
451 Russell Ave. 
Wyckoff, N| 07481 

JUDITH WEAVER 
Box 122 RD4 
Muncy, PA 17756 

TERRY WEAVER 
359 S. Spring 
Bellefonte, PA 16873 

JOHN F. WEBER 
725 N. Wales Rd. 
North Wales, PA 19454 

LESLIE S. WEBER 
118 Bonny Lane 
Collegeville, PA 19426 

ROBIN WEIDEMOYER 
303 Colonial Ave. 
Telford, PA 18969 

MARK WEINBERGER 
19 Wells Court 
Clifton, N) 07013 

KATHERINE WIENER 
560 Gibson Ave. 
Kingston, PA 18704 

GAYLE WEISENFLUH 
1122 RundleSt. 
Scranton, PA 18504 

MARTIN I.WEISS 
1045 Cushmore Rd 
Southampton, PA 18966 

STEVE WENDT 

RD2 

Selinsgrove, PA 17870 

lOHN WENGRENOVICH 
RD 2 Box 134 
Elysburg, PA 17824 

MICHAEL WENTZ 
335 York St. 
Gettysburg, PA 17325 

SHARON WERTMAN 

RT 1 

New Tripoli, PA 18066 



CYNTHIA WEST 
9 Windsor Dr. 
Freehold, N) 07728 

WAYNE WHITAKER 
5515 Upland St. 
Phila., PA 19143 

PENNY WHITENIGHT 

RD2 

Orangeville, PA 17859 

NANCY WHITMAN 
521 East Tennis Ave. 
Ambler, PA 19002 

M. SCOTT WIEGAND 
683 Mueller Rd. 
Warminster, PA 18974 

MARIANN WIENCEK 

500 Perry St. 

Ridley Park, PA 17522 

DEBRAWIEST 
2075 W. Main St. 
Ephrata, PA 17522 

KATHLEEN WILDS 

RD 3 

Danville, PA 17821 

BARBARA WILLIAMS 
RD 1 Box 332 
Northumberland, PA 17857 

BONNIE WILLIAMS 
65 Girard Ave 
Plymouth, PA 18651 

MEGEN WILLIAMS 
111 Lafayette St. 
Tamaqua, PA 18252 

WILLIAM WILLIAMS, |R. 

Box 356 RD 1 

West Decatur, PA 16878 

AMY WILLIAMSON 
%4 7th St. Circle 
Emmaus, PA 18049 

jAN WILSON 
612 Cowpath Rd. 
Hatfield, PA 19440 

LAURIE WINEY 
512 Wagenseller St. 
Middleburg, PA 17842 

JOYCE WINGERT 
RT 3 Box 324 
Elizabethtown, PA 17022 

DONALD WINSTON 
709 E Front St. 
Berwick, PA 18603 

DANIEL WITMER 
261 Redwood St. 
Hummelstown, PA 17036 

lULIA WOOD 
304 Colonial Dr. 
Wallingford, PA 19086 

TIMOTHY WOOD 

7 New Rd. 

Lost Creek, PA 17946 

CHERYL WORMAN 
4264 Bverly Ct Rd. 
Allentown, PA 18104 



CYNTHIA WYSOCKI WOMER 
815 E. Market St. 
Danville, PA 17821 

JANICE WU 
137 Rutgers PI. 
Clifton, N) 07013 

KAREN WUEST 
318 S Broad St. 
Nazareth, PA 18064 

MARY lANE WYDILA 

549 W 2nd St. 

Mt. Carmel, PA 17851 

DOREEN YACUBOSKI 

R13Coal St. 

Glen Lyon, PA 18617 

lOHN YANNIELLO 

608 Main St. 

Old Forge, PA 18518 

MICHELLE YOCUM 

965 W 4th St. 

Lock Haven, PA 17745 

RUTH YODER 
922 E. Dewart St. 
Shamokin, PA 17872 

|OHN YODOCK, |R. 
58 Middle Ave. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

SALLY YOHN 
1231 Edison Ave. 
Sunbury, PA 17801 

MAUREEN K. YORI 
100 Maple St. 
Freeland, PA 18224 

ELIZABETH YOUNG 
2847 Westminster Rd. 
Bethlehem, PA 18017 

HARRIET YOUNG 
665 Wenz St. 
Phila., PA 19128 

JEFFREY YOUNG 
3000 lones Bid. 
Easton, PA 18042 

WALTER ZABICKI 
1212 Harrison Ave. 
Phoenixville, PA 19460 

STEPHEN ZAjAC 

41 ID RD 3 Old Forge Dr. 

Annville, PA 17003 

DEBORAH ZAK 
1103 N. Vine St. 
Shamokin, PA 17872 

LEONARD ZANOWICZ 
2129 Mapleview Court 
Scotch Plains, N| 07076 

SUSAN ZAPKO 
202 So Olds Blvd. 
Fairless, PA 19030 

KEITH ZEHNER 
30 N. 39th St. 
Allentown, PA 18104 

DAVID ZIEGLER 
408 Cheltena Ave. 
lenkintown, PA 19046 



169 



lEAN ZIEGLER 
24 Race Ave. 
Lancaster, PA 17603 

MICHAEL ZIEMAK 
45 Old Spring Rd. 
Coatesville, PA 19320 

EDWARD ZIKOSKI 
812 LandisSt. 
Scranton, PA 18504 

HANK ZlMBARDl 
1243 Hall Ave. 
Roslyn, PA 19001 



GAIL ZIMMERMAN 

RD2 

Hughesville, PA 17737 

LEE ZIMMERMAN 

296 S. Main St 

Pine Grove, PA 17963 

DAVID ZINKLER 
RD 2 Box 28 
Saylorsburg, PA 18353 

VALERIE ZOPPETTl 

RD2 

Orangeville, PA 17859 



LINDA ZUBA 
39 Memorial St. 
Exeter, PA 18643 

DEBRA ZUBRIS 
3438 E. Fourth St. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

KIMBERLY ZUCAL 

125E3 RDSt. 

Wind Gap, PA 18091 

Alan Zurawski 
335 S. Mam Rd. 
Mountaintop, PA 18707 



GALLERY GALLERY GALLERY GALLERY GALLERY GALL 



Gallery is exactly what it says, it is a 
collection of pictures that have no real 
meaning except what the viwer de- 
cides. They can elicit any emotion de- 
sired, even the feeling of apathy or 
indifference. 



These pictures were taken by the 
photo studio that also photographed 
the seniors. Through the camera's eye, 
life is caught in it's most candid posi- 
tions. Simple actions which are seen 
every day take on new meaning as the 



angle is slanted, the focus is adjusted a 
different way or perhaps it is the light 
as it reflects the subject and his mood. 
This is the gallery. Look, feel, and en- 
joy the photography. 




Gazing out the window of the Kehr Union on a 
cold and bitter day is this one student, as, right 
lonely drink at the snackbar. 



170 




Morning Is greeted by Carver Hall, one of the original buildings of the campus, as it stands amidst the change of B.S.C. 




< 'llll 

1 




» 


p. - 



Many students have passed through these doors, 
left, in search of answers while others above, 
wait and contemplate the questions. 



171 



by lo Ann Borski 

Everyone enjoys entertainment. And 
that's exactly what the events here at 
BSC have tried to do. With happenings 
in the cultural and musical side to the 
political and academic side there is 
something for everyone. Although 
dances and movies and weekend 
parties are also happenings there are 
those that rate special attention. These 
include the events such as 
Homecoming, Dance Marathon, the 



Mock Convention and other 
occurances whose enjoyment comes 
through the hard work and planning 
many people put into these activities 
making them a success. College life 
wouldn't be complete without these 
fun times which makes each year a 
special one with its unique good times 
and exciting happenings. For those 
involved there is joy and triumph, for 
the others, fun and games. 



Clockwise from below: William WIndom and Gill 
Eagles kept their audiences captivated with 
Thurber and ESP, The three man string band was 
part of our fall jamboree and a surprise visit by 
Governor Thornburgh was one highlight of the 
year. 




Marc Black and Friends, from Woodstock, 
NY, play jazz and blues. The friends 
section is made up of Billy MacDonald 
on the electric violin and Jennifer Condos 
on the electric bass guitar. Marc Black 
plays the electric guitar and is lead singer 
for the group. The Cranberry Lake )ug 
Band is made up of four guys and a gal, 
all who add to the oldtime down-home 
sound of the group. Scrubbing boards, 
ukeleles and jugs add to their unique 
sound. Spiritwood, made up of husband 
and wife are a popular team. They not 
only perform at coffeehouses but can be 
heard at BSC jamborees and festivals. 
They specialize in children's songs. 
Richard Johnson got his share of acclaim 
as he played his numerous guitars. The 
music from his guitars, especially the one 
shown here, brought a round of applause. 
Desperado consists of Walton Amey, 
electric lead guitar and banjo, Doug 
Robinson, electric bass, and Carol Lee, 
vocals. The group is extremely popular 
and can play a variety of songs from blue 
grass to swing band. They add humor to 
their repertoire and get alot of laughs. 
They played to a packed audience when 
they gave their performance. The 
coffeehouses this year were a great 
success in providing entertainment to 
BSC students. 





Billy MacDonald and lenniter Condos make up the friends of Marc Black and Friends. 




The Cranberry Lake jug Band is shown here with their iugs, guitars, fiddles and ukuleles. 




The male part of Spiritwood is shown here singing 
to the music from his guitar. 



The Lawsons make up Spiritwood whose popularity is due to their lovable songs and character. 



174 




Carol Lee of Desperado gives a little extra rhythm to Richard lohnson shows he can really play as he manipulates the strings, 

the song as she handles her Instrument 




The group Desperado played blue grass, folk and swing band to a packed audience. 



175 



Concerts 

Dave Mason appeared on 
March 13 to an eagerly wait- 
ing audience. Hans Olson 
had played as warm up and 
the crowd was ready. How- 
ever, Mason couldn't sing 
due to a cold and promised 
to be back. A promise he 
kept on April 16 when he 
returned to BSC. Unfortu- 
nately, his show wasn't up 
to par. He played only 75 
minutes with no new mate- 
rial. For those who enjoy his 
earlier music, the concert 
wasn't bad, but for those 
who wanted to hear new 
sounds it was a dis- 
appointment. Noel Paul 
Stookey, who performed at 
the last coffeehouse, was 
one member of the Peter, 
Paul and Mary trio. With 
these two he enjoyed suc- 
cess with several hits. Now 
on his own he is gaining the 
heights again. His coffee- 
house was packed as people 
came to listen to good mu- 
sic. 




Dave Mason '*'P^'' '^ 




Noel Paul Stookey April 20 



176 



Band Day 




These two bands (above and below) are a couple ol the bands that performed their halftime routines at Redman Stadium. 




The Maroon and Gold Band hosted Band Day at Redman Stadium on October 13, 1979. Band Day is a 
time when numerous area high school bands perform their halftime routines in a competion. The 
photographs above caught two bands in action. 



177 



Oedipus The King 



Sophocles' "Oedipus the King" was performed 
by the Bloomsburg Players during the weekend 
of October 19, 1979. Richey directed the 
performance in which Dr. Ralph Smiley played 
as Oedipus. Allen Murphy, another faculty 
member, portrayed Creon. The unusual feature 
of this play was the use of the masks worn by 
the leading characters. Daniel Kessler 
constructed them along Greek lines. Rebecca 
Ermisch created the setting, masks and the 
costumes which provided an impressive 
atmosphere for the tragic play. This production 
also used a chorus in the true Creek fashion to 
comment on and further the action. 





178 



Gill Eagles 




Gill Eagles correctly Indentifles the serial number on the dollar bill his Mr. Eagles' subjects nervously await being hypnotized by the master of the 
volunteer assistant holds m his hand. show. 




Gill Eagles, a hypnotist, kept the BSC stu- 
dent audience captivated with his perfornn- 
ance. Blindfolded, he identified shapes and 
colors of objects, plus their texture and ma- 
terial they were made of. He also identified 
numbers on dollar bills and written sen- 
tences his volunteers wrote on paper. The 
highlight of the show was the hypnotizing 
of about ten students whom he had do 
various skits at a certain sound signal. Eagles 
received a hearty round of applause at the 
end of the show. 



The enthusiastic audience watches with amazement as Gill Eagles does another ESP 
identification. 



179 



1979 Fall 
Jamboree 




Richard lohnson brought his music to life as he artistically strummed his guitar. 



The Saint Regis String Band provided the 
music for this year's Fall )amboree. They had 
a little help from Richard lohnson who 
accompanied himself with his guitar.. 
Students either gathered in groups on the 
lawn, leaning back to relax and enjoy the 
bluegrass music, or showed some energy by 
square dancing and attempting clogging, the 
latter done with varying degrees of success. 
As partners were swung to the beat of the 
music and dose-dos were done, other 
students walked passed the numerous 
stands where homemade crafts sat 
temptingly on their colored clothes. The 
crafts ranged from silver jewelry with 
semiprecious stones to leather pants patches 
and belts to plants and macrame hangings. 
Numerous townspeople joined in the 
activities as they listened to the music and 
laughter and looked at the displays. This 
weekend proved to be a success because 
plenty of time was provided for students to 
put away their books and have fun. 

BSC students swing their partners as the bluegrass music plays on. Square dancing was exhibited by these foot-stomping enthusiasts. 






Livingston Taylor 

McGuinn, Clark & Hillman . 



Concerts 



Students felt worlds away when they found themselves 
amid the beautiful music brought to us live and in 
concert here on campus. It all began Homecoming 
weekend, October 4, when Livingston Taylor, 
McCuinn, Clark & Hillman, former members of the 
Birds, and The Cooper Brothers came to Haas 
Auditorium to set off a spectacular performance. They 
ignited a magical spark that kindled the entire 
Homecoming atmosphere. Later in that same autumn 
month of October, America welcomed fans in Nelson 
Fieldhouse. Bunnell and Beckley, the only remaining 
originals, gave it everything they had, and reminded us 
that the talent that gave them fame has remained 
strong and overwhelmingly real over an unbelievably 
long period of time. Music found its way into the air 
and into the hearts of many students because of the 
astounding concerts that were provided for all to 



October 4 enjoy 




Donkey Basketball 

Sponsored by the Newman Student 
Association, donkey basketball was played 
on Saturday, November 10, 1979 in 
Centennial Gym. The BSC faculty versed the 
WHLM Dl's with the radio station winning 
36-34 in sudden death overtime. The game 
got off to a shakey start when Dr. )im Creasy 
had trouble getting his donkey to get up to 
play the game. However once up the game 
got into full swing. The first quarter was 
spent getting used to getting on and off the 
donkeys. After halftime, WHLM's Tom 
Brown had some added fun as his donkey 
took a trip around the hallway. Professor 
Ann Lee had some trouble when her donkey 
simply refused to move. Several other antics 
were done by donkeys and players alike as 
each team tried to out do the other. 
Everyone enjoyed themselves and the game 
was a total success. 





This player is en|oying |ust 
their donkeys. 



,ittlng and watching the rest try for a basket while maneuvering 




These three players are trying to get the ball down to their end of the court in order to try to 
score a point. 




Assistance was on its way as a toot was tried in 
desperation to get the donkey's head up and pointing 
forward. 



Toby Loyd clenched his fist in triumph as he made his first basket. 



182 




Salt II Debate 

David S. Sullivan of the National 
Strategy Information Center spoke 
against the Salt II Treaty at the Debate 
in Kehr Union during the last week in 
September. John Salmon of the State 
Department was the affirmative 
speaker. Each tried to stress that the 
Soviet Union and United States must 
live in peace, but two sides of the 
issues were given. Salmon believes U.S. 
progress will not be restricted but in 
fact actually aided. Sullivan on the 
other hand believes that the treaty 
hasn't eliminated the competition 
between the two countries but has 
started it. Dr. Melvin Hopkins, 
chairperson of Speech Communication 
and Theater Arts Department 
moderated the debates which were a 
success. 



The debaters 5it and listen as a general discussion ensues. 





David Sullivan makes a point as he engages the 
attention of the audience with his arguments 
against the treaty. 



lohn Salmon talks convincingly on the issues for the Salt II Treaty. 



183 



Homecoming 1979 



"BSC 

Takes A 

Station 

Break" 




McCuinn and Hlllman were two of the highlights of the Homecoming concert. 

Chi Sigma Rho and Tau Kappa Epsilon nabbed first runner-up with their NBC-ABC-CBS float theme. 




184 





A Homecoming first tor our new spirited Husky 
mascot as he parades down Main Street. 



Alpha Sigma Alpha and Phi Sigma Xi are stuck on 
Bandaids as their theme implies. 



As this float's theme predicted the Colonels were Freshman Sweetheart Marina Ashmar and Dr. Mulka look on as TKE representative Denise Hulse 
sure killed dead. receives roses from Dr. McCormick as the 1979 Homecoming Queen. 

Livingston Taylor was a fantastic 
opening for the three group 
Homecoming concert on Wednesday, 
October 4. The Cooper Brothers came 
second on the agenda with a grand 
finale finish of McCuinn, Clark & 
Hillman. This night lit a spark of 
enthusiasm for the remainder of the 
weekend as the mellow music of Liv 
Taylor and McGuinn, Clark & Hillman 
filled the auditorium. 

The Homecoming Parade was started 
at 6:30PM on Friday night, October 6. 
The night parade was an innovation 
this year and almost didn't get off the 
ground because of a possible 
cancelation due to a threatening 
downpour. Fifteen organizations 
constructed floats for the parade with 
the help of monetary support from 
CCA and despite the drizzle these 
floats were proudly marched down 
Main Street in the true BSC fashion. 

The float that best depicted this year's 
theme "BSC Takes A Station Break" 
was put together by Phi lota Chi and 
Zeta Psi. Their theme was "FTD 
Florist". Luzerne Hall came in first with 
the theme "Commercials of the 
Future" with Columbia's "Keebler 
Cookie Elf Factory" a close second in 
the dorm decoration contest. The 
weekend continued a success with 
soccer and football victories. Denise 
Hulse, TKE's representative, was named 
Homecoming Queen during halftime 
of the football game. Beta Sigma Delta 
and Lambda Alpha Mu won awards for 
high cums and Phi Sigma Xi and 
Lambda Alpha Mu, receiving their 
second, got awards for most involved. 
A Pops Concert was held on Sunday 
evening ending a great weekend. 




185 



Atlanta Ballet 



The Atlanta Ballet, a member of the 
American Association of Dance 
Companies, was here at Bloomsburg 
on Tuesday, November 16, 1979 to 
perform Sergie Projofiev's 
"Cinderella." The company's 
assistant director, Tom Pazik, 
choreographed "Cinderella" to 
include slapstick, legend and 
spectacle. Caron Osborn excelled in 
the title role of Cinderella. Prince 
Charming was portrayed by 
Nicholas Minns. David 
Shimotakahara performed some of 
the most exciting dance features 
incorporating skill and enthusiasm 
into his role of the lester. The dancing 
coupled with the fairy tale 
atmosphere provided plenty of 
enjoyment for those who attended. 
"Cinderella" was sponsored by the 
Community Arts Council. 




Manlya Barredo and Joseph Carman in TZIGANE. 



186 




The Philharmonic and Michalak take a bow after completing a beautiful melody. 




The orchestra's string section played with wonderful harmony. 




Northeastern 
Pennsylvania 
Philharmonic 

The Northeastern Pennsylvania 
Philharmonic conducted by Thomas 
Michalak presented an evening of 
romantic music, sponsored by the 
Community Arts Council. The 
orchestra played a continually varying 
selection from pizzicatos to a legato. 
The expertness with which the 
transitions were handled were greatly 
appreciated by the audience. Guest 
pianist lorge Bolet added to the 
concert by having a flawless 
performance complimented by the 
orchestra. The performances were 
greeted with a well deserved standing 
ovation. 



Bolet and Michalak take a well deserved bow. 



187 



Madrigal Christmas Banquet 



"A Traditional 
Bloomsburg Christmas" 

A Christmas tradition of BSC is to have 
a Madrigal Christmas Banquet. This 
year was no exception as the Madrigal 
singers entertained students and 
townspeople with familiar songs 
depicting their theme "A Traditional 
Bloomsburg Christmas." The banquet 
was held in the Scranton Commons 
where red covered tables and 
handmade centerpieces awaited the 
diners. As the first courses were served, 
the Madrigals, in their tuxedos and 
gowns, moved in groups of twos and 
threes to each table to serenade 
everyone. As the dinner progressed, 
the singers held their audience 
enraptured as they sang from the stage 
which was decorated to represent a 
home with a fireplace and Christmas 

Mary Kate Wilson entertained the audience with 
her violin 




tree. They also performed skits to 
several songs. A dance from "Toyland" 
and a skit to "Fruitcake" by a group of 
"Bakers" who showed how to make a 
fruitcake are two examples. During the 
banquet, Mary Kate Wilson put bow to 
strings as she brought her violin to life. 
After dessert and coffee were served, 
the Madrigals sang their last Christmas 
carols as they brought the banquet to 
an end. 

The "bakers", Marta, luiie, Kim, Lee, Ion, Steve 
and Frank, demonstrate how to bake a fruitcake. 





Barb. Carolyn and lill are three of the dancers 
who performed to a song from "Toyland". 



The Madrigal singers entertained everyone with 
familiar Christmas carols. 




Dance Marathon 

The sixth annual Dance Marathon was 
sponsored by the KUB Program Board 
to benefit the Mental Health Society. 
The dancers numbered 179 as the 
marathon began on Feb. 1, WBSC and 
WHLM kept the music playing along 
with six local bands. The theme, 
"Famous Faces of the '70's", was 
depicted by several couples. Eric Fiarriz 
and Carole Stauffer, 50 hour dancers, 
won for their version of Kermit and 
Miss Piggy. They also won the Disco 
dance contest. |an Walters and Bob 
Crawford won first prize for the best 
costume in the mini-marathon. Robin 
Weidomoyer and loan Ganssle won 
the Bump contest, Barb Kwiatkowski 
and Michele Blozinsky won the Freak, 
the Rock and trophies for best dancers. 
Deb DiMarco and Camille Strausser 
won as the most exciting couple. At 
the end, 52 dancers were on their feet 
with about $8,000 raised. 

Camille Strausser and Deb DiMarco show off 
their trophies. 




"Famous Faces 
of the 70's" 



Kermit and Miss Piggy, 
portrayed by Ian Walters and 
Bob Crawford, put in a guest 
appearance at the marathon. 




189 



Governor Thornburgh 



Governor Thornburgh surprised BSC 
with a visit on Thursday, October 11, 
1979. He gave a speech in the Union 
where he expressed his interests in 
energy and education costs. Energy 
should be conserved by using mass 
transit, weatherization of homes and 
industries and efficient home heating. 
As for education costs, the Governor 
stated that he didn't want more money 
for tuition but to classify everything 
under one system to cut 
costs. Thornburgh also talked to the 
townspeople at the court house. 




As Governor Thornburgh shakes hands with these students, an Interested spectator snaps a picture. 




The Governor listens attentively to the questioner at the question 
and ansvi/er session In the Union. 



Thornburgh chatted with Carol Hidlay as President McCormIck and CGA president 
Wllard Bradley look on. 



190 



Paratore Brothers 




loseph and Anthony Paratore illustrate their ability to play piano duos. 

loseph and Anthony Paratore 
performed to a packed house on 
Thursday, January 24, 1980, when they 
brought their mastery to Bloomsburg 
State College. The brothers performed 
various duo-piano pieces to the 
audience's pleasure. The dexterity of 
the brother's hands amazed everyone. 
The concert was sponsored by the 
Community Arts Council and was one 
of the many successful performances 
of the school year. 



191 



The Hot L Baltimore 

This play revolved around three prostitutes, a man 
seeking his long-lost grandfather and an elderly 
clairvoyant. The scene was set in a run-down, soon- 
to-be-leveled hotel. 

)o Anne Millard portrayed April, a rotund slovenly 
prostitute, in such a convincing manner with her 
cackles, cursing and wit that she definitely came off 
as the best actor. Another prostitute, the typical 
dimwitted variety was brought to life by Laurie 
Hobyak. 

The young man was played by Dave Good, while 
the clairvoyant was portrayed by Sue Mohinsky. 
Gary Miller as Morse, an elderly negro tenant, had 
his share of success as he stole the limelight several 
times. 

The scenic design was superbly created by John 
Beady, while Randy Lutz's "dawning day" was 
superbly carried off. The Hot L Baltimore offered a 
different type of entertainment that kept the 
audience on their toes. 




Dave Good, as Paul Granger, contemplates finding his grandfather as Morse, played 
by Gary Miler, reads a magazine. 




Checkers was the favorite pastime of this particular group in Hot L Baltimore. 



192 



S Thurber Carnival 




Is Eric Harris acting or taking a catnap between skits on Sato's modern bed? 



This Bloomsburg Player appears to be seriously contemplating 
her lines for her skit. 





This couple could almost be playing in "Oklahoma" instead of performing a rendition of 
Thurber. 



Gary Miller and his partner are positioned to dance in their 
Thurber scene. 



Produced by William Acierno this 
revue was an animated anthology 
of hilarities by one of America's 
greatest humorists of the 20th 
century — Thurber. It was 
presented by the Bloomsburg 
Players on March 13, 14 and 15 in 
Carver Auditorium, With the set 
being designed by Hitoshi Sato, 



the program consisted of sixteen 
staged versions of Thurber's cher- 
ished writings. These sixteen ren- 
ditions included "The Wolf at the 
Door", "The Macbeth Murder 
Mystery", "The Night the Bed 
Fell", "The Secret Life of Walter 
Mitty", and "Gentlemen Shop- 
ping", 



193 



Die Fledermaus 





One of many dances choreographed by Nancy Sanders and Marcella Proch Stella Is shown here, 
performed at Prince Orlovsky's ball. 



Disguised as a Hungarian countess, Rosalinda, 
played by Mary Decker, sings the famous Czardas in 
order to "prove" her Hungarian heritage. 





Lee Mueller, as Eisenstein, reconciles with Rosalinda, as below, Adele, posing as an actress, laughs 
when Eisenstein calls her a chambermaid. 



Behind the scenes, Marta Herr and )ulie Slamets, 
members of Madrigals and Concert Choir, pose for a 
picture. 

194 





Frank, the prison warden, Adele, Prince Orlovsky, Ida and Dr. Faike listen and watch as Rosalinda sings at 
the ball 



Produced by the music 
department, Die Fledermaus, an 

operetta by )ohann Strauss, was 
held on April 24, 25 and 26. The 
plot involves a trick played by Dr. 
FaIke in revenge on Eisenstein. 
FaIke arranges to have Rosalinda, 
Eisenstein's wife, Adele, a 
chambermaid and Frank, the 
prison warden attend Prince 
Orlovsky's ball. Eisenstein was to 
go to jail for dueling, but goes to 
the ball instead. When Rosalinda 
finds out, she sends Alfred, 
played by Ken Gardner a former 
BSC student and well known 
tenor in Phila., to jail in 
Eisenstein's place. The play 
resolves when the real Eisenstein 
arrives at the jail to find a fake 
(Alfred) is already there and FaIke 
explains his revenge. 




Wendy Nyborg as Adele, a chambermaid, 
describes her invitation to a fancy ball and 
plots to get the night off. 



Eric Harris, Steven Lindenmuth, Michael Incitti and Tim Latshaw show their sexy legs during an 
intermission. 




The entire cast takes a bow as the audience applauds for a job well done. 



195 



Speakers of 1979-1980 

The speakers at Bloomsburg this year proved to be very 
interesting. Bettina Gregory, ABC TV's Federal Regulatory Agency 
Correspondent, was the first major woman speaker in the history 
of the Journalism Institute. Talks on TV )ournalism and on 
Regulatory Agencies of the federal govenment were on her 
agenda. The program for Amy Greenfield involved films and 
video work in the BSC Fall Festival of Films, Videotapes and 
Holographs. Secretary of Education in Pennsylvania, Dr. Robert 
Scanlon, spoke to BSC students concerning the tuition hike on 
which he received many students letters. A dynamic trio of Julian 
Bond, William Windom, and Cicely Tyson highlighted the 
Minority Awareness Week. Julian Bond is a popular and 
prominent politican who works for human ideals and concerns. 
William Windom gave his one man show consisting of the works 
of Thurber, for which he is best know. Cicely Tyson was well 
received as her dramatic readings caused many emotions to flit 
across the faces of her audience. FHector Marroquin proved to be 
interesting as he explained his reasons for needing political 
asylum in the US. All in all there was quite a variety of interesting 
speakers. 





William Windom gave a one man show before a packed auditorium 
which loved his performance. 



L. 




■nw 



A spokesman for politics at the human level carried out for human Ideals is the Bettina Gregory was one of the two major speakers at the journalism 

dynamic Julian Bond. Institute. 



196 




Dr. Robert Scanlon spoke to BSC students regarding the tuition hike in the The internationally known filmmaker, Amy Greenfield, held her 

coming year. presentation of her work on October 18. 



197 



1980 Mock Republican Convention 




Senator |ohn Heinz of Pennsylvania was the keynote speaker 
of the Convention, giving his address on Friday, April 17. 



Carlton Whittington sang the Battle Hymn of the Republic with rhythm and 
enthusiasm plus alot of jive as the audience clapped and cheered. 




A view of the floor shows the number of delegates present early on Saturday tor the endmg items of the Convention. 



Reverend Ralph Abernathy began the convention 
week with a speech on April 15, His appearance was 
sponsored by the Human Relations Planning 
Commission and the Mock Convention. Abernathy 
is known for helping to organize the now famous 
Montgomery, Ala. bus boycott in 1955-56. Since 
then he has been arrested 38 times for acts of civil 
disobedience done to "advance the cause of 
freedom." Abernathy was met with a warm 



welcome. The Convention also offered two films, 
"The Candidate" and "The Champ", plus a mini- 
concert by Toby Lloyd and a dance with music by 
Risk. The actual proceedings for the convention 
began on Friday April 18 at 7:00 PM. Approximately 
1,500 delegates gathered in Centennial Gym. An 
Invocation was given by Reverend Langen followed 
by a welcome from President McCormick 
and Wilard Bradley. The Keynote Address was 



198 




Democrat George McGovern was the Convention's "Distinguished 
Lecturer" whose presence continued the practice o( having both parties 
represented. 



Reverend Ralph Abernathy, president of the Southern 
Christian Leadership Conference, spoke to students on April 
15, the official start of the Convention. 




Scot McCabe, as the Democratic Donkey, Doug Taylor, and Mike Ford, as the Republican Elephant, illustrate that both 
parties are represented with good feeling all around. 



then given by Senator )ohn Heinz who 
received a hearty welcome. Voting began on 
amendments to the Party's Platform with a 
temporary adjournment until 9:00 Saturday 
morning when the voting was continued. 
George McGovern, the Convention's 
Distinguished Lecturer, then gave a speech on 
"the Democratic Alternative in 1980" which 
captured everyone's attention. Next were the 



nominations for President. Mr. Bill, one of the 
nominees, was strongly objected to, however 
he remained a nominee despite the 
opposition. Surprisingly, Mr. Bill carried 
enough votes to come up second in the race 
with the nomination going to Anderson. The 
convention proved to be a lot of fun for many. 



199 



Spring Jamboree 




This little tike, bundled against the dampness in the air, 
enjoyed a bite to eat in an uncrowded corner. 



As the St. Regis Band played, everyone stomped and twirled in a true square dance fashion. 




This group of dancers showed what they could do as they changed the direction of their Sidewalk drawing kept these two children engrossed for a 
square dance circle. short time during the fun filled day. 



200 




These two students admire furs, one of many items on 
sale during this year's jamboree. 





Fiddles, banjo, guitar and bass gave the atmosphere an added country flavor which seems to be 
keeping the three below dancing to the music. 




Entertainment was provided by this group of dancers 
while the spectators snuggled in their seats. 



Renaissance lamboree '80, 
sponsored by the college and town, 
was held on April 25 and 26. The 
event began on campus in the 
union on Friday with Jack's 
Mountaineers, playing Pennsylvania 
fiddle music, first on the agenda. 
Carolyn Odell and the Rhythm 
String Band also helped to supply 
the music. Saturday morning was 
dedicated to kids. Bloomsburg 
Dance Studio performed, as did 



Spiritwood, for the enjoyment of 
children of all ages. A bubble 
blowing contest and sidewalk 
drawing were set aside for the 
young ones, while a fiddlin' 
competition was held for the big 
kids. The music and entertainment 
included Danjo Wheeler, Nomad 
Dancers, Bloomsburg Theater 
Ensemble, Skipback Cindies, and the 
St. Regis Band who ended the day 
with a square dance. 

201 



Greek Week 



Greek Week began on Sunday with 
Olympic Day. With the weather being 
spectacular everyone showed up to 
watch. Lambda Alpha Mu and Delta Pi 
were triumphant winners and off to a 
good start for the week. Monday was 
given over to the same two winners as 
each won the Tug O' War event. On 
Tuesday, the chariot races were run 
with great showings from Delta Pi, Tri 
Sig and Pixies. Doc, making a good 
overall showing, won their first event 
with the hamburger eating contest on 
Wednesday. Thursday saw the beer 
rally run for the fun of it, with Friday 
having the Greek Games. Tri Sig and 
Delta Pi were victorious. The last 
event, Greek Sing, held on the final 
Sunday, had Zeta Psi and Pixies getting 
the points. Overall, Delta Pi, Tri Sig 
and Lambda did outstanding. 




Tri Sig sisters sit in a crowd and give happy smiles to the photographer as their sorority competitors 
do well on Olympic Day. 




As the pyramid is completed and the top girl's hands go up, these ASA 
sisters give triumphant grins. 



This fraternity brother strains in effort as others watch this event of the 
Olympic Day. 



202 




The riders of the homemade chariots are the ones 
taking the risks as the grimace of this Tri SIg sister 



testifies 



The beer rally, held on Thursday, began at the far end of town with these runners ready and 
eager to go. 




Tug O' War is usually fun, but from the looks on these girls' faces it 
appears to be a real battle of strength. 



203 



Siblings Weekend 




This brother and sister are waiting impatiently for 
the potter to return to his wheel. Here the two at the left, plus several others, watch as the craftsman molds clay into a beautiful piece 

of pottery 




One of many games Is shown here as the young boy is chased around the circle in order to reach his 
former position before being tagged 



This little boy, with this hands stuck in his 
pockets, stands with his eyes closed as if 
he was falling asleep on the job. 



204 



Siblings Weekend was held this year 
on the beautiful weekend of April 17, 
18 and 19. On Saturday the youngsters 
were invited to sit in on the Mock 
Convention. There was also many 
games and booths set up on the bas- 
ketball courts by Luzerne. One crafts- 
man had set himself up outside the 
Union where he gathered a crowd in- 
terested in watching him make a pot. 
The movie "The Champ" was run, in 



conjunction with the Convention, on 
Saturday night to provide entertain- 
ment for the younger (and older) set. 
On Sunday siblings were escorted to 
religious services and then onto 
brunch. Afterwards, they were packed 
up and ready to go when their parents 
came to pick them up. As they left 
many students gave a sigh of relief as 
yet another Siblings Weekend was a 
success. 




Running through the crowds is this little girl 
searching for her brother or sister to show them 
her artwork. 



Roberta Clemens and her younger sister take a break in the Union with a soda to sooth parched 
throats. 




A big cloth was used in this game, held tightly by this ring of participants as other George takes the names of these younsters as he gets them ready 

travel under its expanse. to begin another game. 



205 



College Bowl 

A question and answer game has made 
it to BSC! The College Bowl was begun 
to see just how intelligent we students 
really are. The games were begun in 
April and were held every Monday and 
Wednesday nights in the multipurpose 
rooms of the Union. Numerous rounds 
were played to ultimately find the 
champions. Four groups who enjoyed 
the games were Red House I and 11, 
Zeta Psi and the Campus Voice, all 
pictured here in the first and second 
rounds. Hopefully the interest of many 
has been sparked to make the College 
Bowl a success next year as it was this 
year. 




Linda of Red House II hopefully gives a correct answer, which could 
give them the victory. 




Red House I smiles in victory as they defeat Red House II in the first round of competition. 




Zeta Psi contemplates a question in round two, while the Campus Voice, the loser, waits impatiently for their answer. 



206 



Quiet Riot 




On Sunday, March 30, BSC students were 
entertained by a mime performance. The 
mime team called the Quiet Riot was made 
up of Bill Mettler and Kevin O'Connor, both 
who hail from Philadelphia. Mettler, once a 
teacher, and O'Connor, a youth counselor, 
met at a mime workshop where the 
partnership was started. Part time at first, 
their shows were done for children, but as 
they attracted notoriety they performed in 
several large festivals in Philadelphia and 
later at theaters and colleges. Now mime is 
their full time job. Their work is a 
celebration of life; a fun, exciting, energetic 
journey into the foibles and beauty of 
humanity. Two of their skits at BSC involved 
a crazy truck driver and a lady in a public 
restroom. They were sensational. 



Bill Mettler and Kevin O'Connor begin their show with some feats of strength and grace as 
shown here. 



207 



JDxoaf^ 



by |o Ann Borski 

Getting involved in college life usually 
means joining some campus 
organization. BSC offers social, athletic, 
cultural and academic groups whose 
interests range from parties and a good 
time to becoming informed on job 
interviews and opportunities in the 
working world. These organizations are 
open to anyone with the interest to go 
through with any prerequisites needed 
to join. These prerequisites include 



certain cum levels, frat and sorority 
pledging, and specific areas of study for 
certain honor societies. With 
approximately 130 organizations on 
campus most areas of interest are 
represented but new ideas for groups 
are always welcome. Each organization 
is unique in its own way with its own 
personality brought to life by its 
members, who are all individuals 
themselves. 



Clockwise from below; A Chi Sig sister picks up a 
dropped coin on Main Street because every 
penny counts, while the guys carry their canoe 
for an overnight trip. Bottom left shows two 
Lambda sisters waiting to be posed with one of 
their "MU" friends, as the singers perform a song 
involving a fat baker and his art. 



t 




Counterclockwise from left; Pixes' FTD florist float captured a prize at 
Homecoming. Preston Hey smiles, while trying to ignore the camera and 
pay attention to Dave George, Most of the little sisters of Zeta Psi are 
congregated here, while Roberta Schullz shows what IMAGE can do. 




The OBITER is the student yearbook. 
Our staff consists of ten members. Our 
purpose is to put together a book 
which contains all the events and hap- 
penings and people of the 1979-1980 
school year. We have a fund raiser in 
the form of a patron drive and we have 
an annual banquet with one or more 
of the other campus media. We are an 
organization which tries our best to 
serve the BSC student body. 

Obiter 1980 




Clockwise: Al Sukowaski, Brenda Friday, Cindy Bell, Todd Muyt-i, vVciKly iWitru^, ilnaron Frace, |o Ann Bui^ki, lantt Kui>ndk, Kobtrtd 
Clemens. 



210 




Todd Moyer, Co-editor 



|o Ann Borski, Co-editor 




Al Sukowaski, Photography Editor 



Sharon Frace, Business Manager 



211 



Campus Voice 




Row one. lulie Stamets, Maik lloutk, Beth Mays, Linda Whipple, lean Kraus, Pat Hager, Elaine Baron, Brenda Friday, Carol Shelhamer, |ill 
Tyndall Row two: Barb Kwiatkowski, Helde Schmalfuhs, lanice Gitomer, Roberta Clemens, |anet Rusnak, Renee Crouse, Todd Reichart, 
Larry Buela, Dorothy Messe, Cindy Peck, Denise Rath. Row three: Bill Reineberg, Dave Stoudt, )im Peffley, left Nietz, Lee Vivian, A! 
Sukowaski, Craig Trout, Lamont Bain, Lorrie Garber, Mr. Richard Savage, Penny Pfleegor, Aaron Roetenberg. 



212 




Exec. Staff: Mark Hauck, Larry Buela, Dave Stoudt, Janet Rusnak, Roberta Clemens, Denise Rath, Bill 
Relneberg, Al Sukowaski, )im Peffley, lulie Stamets, Beth Mays, lean Kraus, Mr. Richard Savage. 



The Campus Voice is the student 
newspaper. It brings the news 
and events of the college 
community to its populace. 
Anyone can submit articles of any 
sort to the paper. 





|im Petlley, Editor 



Bill Reineberg, Business Manager 



213 



WBSC Radio Station 




Scott Mix, WBSC Chief Engineer 




Kevin Erdman, WBSC Program Director 



Rick Menniti, WBSC Business Manager 



214 




Vince DiBiase, W8SC General Manager 



WBSC is the campus radio station. At present, WBSC's 
music can be found on the AM dial, but hopefully it will 
become FM in the near future. The D)'s and Behind-the- 
Scene-People put forth their best effort to provide the BSC 
campus with the best music possible. When our own D|'s 
aren't on the air, WMMR from Philadelphia is piped in to 
campus listeners. As Vince's and Cal's T-shirts say "WBSC is 
Bloomsburg's Best Rock." 




Row one: Kris Krenz, Samantha Yost, Dave WisneskI, Vince DiBiase, Arlene Taffera, Kevin Erdman. Row two: Bill Scott, Gene Staschak, 
aMike Kiceluk, Rick Menniti, Charlie Regec, Cal Deininger, William Acierno (Advisor), |ohn Ukleya, Scott Mix, Al Sukowaski, Peggy Ann 
Sappington, )im Moran. 



215 



Photography 



The photographers work 
hand-in-glove with the 
Campus Voice, Olympian 
and Obiter, providing 
pictures for all 
occasions. They not only 
take the photographs, but 
they must also develop 
them. They do their best 
to provide black & whites 
and color prints to each 
publication. 




Row one: Al Sukowaski, Todd Reichart Row two; Aaron Roetenberg, Renee Douse, Larry Buela, Lorrie Garber, Lee 
Vivian, leff Nietz, Lament Bain. 




Larry Buela, Photo Editor 



Al Sukowaski, Photo Editor 



216 



Pilot 



Olympian 




)anet Rusnak, Editor 



Al Sukowaski, Janet Rusnak, Roberta Clemens. 



Society For Collegiate Journalists 




The Pilot is the campus 
handbook. It supplies 
information concerning 
student life to the college 
community. It contains the 
rules and regulations, a list of 
organizations on campus, 
financial aid information and 
campus policies. 
The Olympian is the campus 
magazine to which all students 
may submit their prose. 
Photographs are used to 
highlight some of the poetry 
and short stories. The Society 
for Collegiate lournalists is an 
honorary organization for all 
areas of the media. 
Representatives from the 
paper, yearbook, radio station, 
and campus magazine are 
members of the BSC chapter. 



Front; lean Kraus, Carol Shelhamer, Beth Mays. Back: Mr. Richard Savage, Dorothy Messe, Denise Rath, Janet 
Rusnak, Cindy Peck, Elaine Baron, Arlene Taffera, Roberta Clemens, Jim Peffley, Scott Mix, Mark Houck, Dave 
Stoudt, Al Sukowaski, Lee Vivian. 



217 



Community Government Association 



The Community Government 
Association funds 150 
organizations including athletics. 
They also aid Homecoming 
Weekend, Parent's Weekend and 
Siblings Weekend. The 
organization helps promote 
student awareness of current 
campus issues and ways to 
protect student's rights. The 
members try to respond to the 
total needs of students. CGA 
consists of twelve commities 
including student representation 
in the representative assembly 
and food services. 




Exec. Council Row one: Patti Tenore, Frank Maloney. Row two: Francisco Collado, Dean Norton, Vince 
LaRuffa, Mike Azar, Willard Bradley, Paula Dooley, Mike Ford, Kathie Shugart, Scott McCabe, Doug Taylor, 
)eff Ringhoffer. 




Col. Council: Chris Oakland, )eff Ringhoffer, Frank Maloney, Sue Scalamandre, |amie Freezer, Dr Shanoski, Diane Langley, Patti Tenore, 
Kathie Shugart, Willard Bradley, Doug Taylor, Dean Norton, Jeff Krill, Ton Wright, Sheri Lippowitsch, Robin Weidemoyer, Cretchen 
Norman, Greg Downey, Debbie Kospiah, Marshall Geiger, Francisco Collado, Paula Dooley, loan Canssle, Carol Lewis, |ill Mahnken, 
Denise Rath 



218 



Food Service Row one; Dean Norton, Stan 
Kashuba. Row two; Frank Maloney, Chris 
McPhillips. 




Rep Assembly; Robin Weidemoyer, Carol 
Lewis, Linda Copethwaite, Lisa Stoudt, Beth 
Mays, Barb Jones. 



Elected Off; Paula Dooley, Willard Bradley, Doug Taylor, Kathie Shugart. Appointed Off; Frank Maloney, leff Ringhoffer, Patti Tenore, Mike Ford. 



219 



Commonwealth Association of Students 




Row one: Bob Klein, Donna Fischer, |oe Patti. Row two: Steve Slampyak, David Simon, lohn Berquist, )eff Wasilewski, Mike Alexander, 
lodi Mahan, Leslie Lauver. 



CAS is the student lobby in Harrisburg, 
representing the voice of 76,000 
students for Pennsylvania's 14 state- 
owned colleges and university. The 
purpose of CAS is to represent and 
defend the interests and rights of 
students to those legislators, officials 
and agencies when actions affect the 
students. 



Phi Omega Pi is a national business 
fraternity. It is concerned primarily 
with business education. You must be 
in this major with a 3.0 cum and a 3.2 
current cum. You must also have a 
certain number of credits to join. At 
their meetings they talk about 
opportunities in the area of jobs and 
education theories and practices. 



220 



Pi Omega Pi 




Row one: Toni Roccograndi, Patricia Nixon, Row two: Carey Huels, LuAnne Martin, Rosemarie Sabatini, Sandy Neerenberg, Tina Ritro, 
Diane Carl, Angela Matteo, Dr. Ellen Lensing, Mr. Clayton Hinkle, )oan Dule. Row three: Dean Emory Rarig, Bruce Boncal, Dominic Pino, 
Debbie Kirkpatrick, Edward Klepeisz, Kathy Sheats, Joel Myers, Sonia Ressler, Steve Poust, Pam Romberger, Bruce Sneidman, Dr. Ellen 
Clemens, Dr. Francis Radice. 



221 



The Marketing Club 
here at BSC brings onto 
campus guest speakers 
from big name 
companies to talk on 
sales, advertising and 
production. The club 
also has a BSC 
graduate who has been 
successful come back 
to Bloomsburg and talk 
about business. The 
club also has fund 
raisers and social 
functions. 




£^#i>. 



Marketing Club 




Row one: Eric Fehr, Gary Gerhart, Warren Friel, Laurie Vachris, Sue Bebenek, Carl Franklin, Row two: Karrie Myers, Mark 
Dublisky, Tom Basar, Dave Brokenshire, Doug Meir, Denise Hulse, Wendy Litrides, Thomas Wright. Row Three: Bob 
Zarkoski, Mike Wentz, Terri Starner, |im Nagg, Floyd Moyer, Carol Lewis, Barb Downes, ludy Bullen, Beth Ann Bailey. 



American Society for Personnel Administration 



ASPA is an active 
business organiza- 
tion on campus. 
Although most of its 
members are in 
business, anyone 
can join. The club 
has meetings with 
speakers who talk 
about personnel and 
management, plus 
the group has 
various field trips to 
places such as Wall 
Street in N. Y. ASPA 
has a banquet and 
picnic each year 
plus fund raisers. 




Row one: Pat Schoener, Pam Hazen, Rick Flynn, Dave Cichan, Row two: )eff Ludrof, )im DiCiandomenico, Murray Johnson, 
Rich Hocker. Row three: Holly Uhler. Row four: Kim Zucal, Gina Troutman, Gloria Mastracchio. Row five: Keith Cogel, Brad 
Northrup, Doug Sheats, Marilyn Verna, Maribeth Kodash. Row six: Mark Sampson, Michele Sies, Ed Bamford. 



222 



Phi Beta Lambda 




Exec. Staff Row one: Dave Heltman, Audrey Bitler, Tony Mendola, Diane Laughlin, Susan 

Lisiewski, Deb Lukashepski. Row two: Angela Matteo, Helene Czajkowski, Aaron Roetenberg, Cheryl Levenoskie, Dean Rarig. 



Phi Beta Lambda 
is a professional 
business frater- 
nity. This is a 
coed organiza- 
tion. They have 
speakers at their 
meetings who talk 
on various aspects 
of business, plus 
they have field 
trips to different 
businesses and 
business districts. 




Row one: Rick Menniti, David Williams, Rosemary Santanasto, lill Peirson, )ane Blauch, )udi Leo, Toni Roccograndi, Mary Ann Smith. Row 
two: Lew Fellin, Wendy Wilson, Suzanne Vicari, )o Ann Redington, Pat Hagann, Kathy McBride, Roanne Heisner, Ellen Roan, Beth Ann 
Bailey, Thomas Wright. Row three: Lorrie Garber, Alice Melchiore, Dennis Beaver, Kathy Green, Carol Landes, Pam Kirk, Carol Hickman, 
Ann Furey, Sue Cordon. Row four: Erich Olson, Tim Tkach, Ron Manbeck, Michael Perfetto, Gloria Mastracchio, Diane Hundermark, 
Michele Weltzer, Krista Clauser, Loraine Lucas, Pam Hartzell, Estelle Scopelliti. Row five: Elizabeth Letcavage, |oe Bariek, Rosemarie 
Sabatini, Phil Holmer, Kirk Bower, Debbie Kospiah, Sandy Massaro, Robbin Miller. 



223 



Advertising Club 




Dave Stoudt, Tom Wright, Rich Hocker, Linda, Larry, Barb |ones. Barb Downes. 



Newman Student Association 



The Newman Student Association 
is an organization which brings 
Catholic Christian presence to 
BSC. This is done socially, with 
parties, and group projects such 
as visiting nursing homes 
educationally through discussion 
groups and seminars, and 
religiously by retreats. Anyone 
can join regardless of religion. 




Row one: Tom Post, Barb Preston, Jackie Epps, Mike Goc, Bernie Odyniec, Irene Cherchuck, Ann Mrozek, 
Ray D'Alessio. Row two: Dan Witmer, Sherrie Meagher, Lynn Berman, )ulie Casale. 



224 



Association of Resident Students 




Exec. Council Row one: Angela Dotole, Vicky Lysek, Debbie Kospiah, Row two; George, 
Mike Ford, Dan Mcllwaine, )oe Ozmina. 



A coed representation of the whole campus is 
the Association of Resident Students. This 
organization is open to everyone whether on 
campus or off. The club sponsers trips, such as 
shopping to N.Y. or Reading, and to see the 
"76'ers." They also have a Toys For Tots contest 
where the winner gets a pizza party. They also 
have an Easter Egg Hunt for the daycare center. 
They help with Homecoming, Parent's 
Weekend, have all night movies, and sponser 
the street hockey league. 




Row one: Angela Dotoli, Barb Stover, Valerie Smith, Steve Lyio, Mike Huben, Linda Natter, Debbie Kospiah, Row two Vicky Lysek, 
Barb Steckel, |oe Ozmina, Kevin O'Niell, Craig Traut, Sandi Gettler, Chris Nycz, Anthony Bloom. 



225 



Lacrosse Club 




Row one: |oe Aceto, Steve Morlock, Cliff Tillman, lohn Sheelen, Bruce Anderson, Greg Talese, Gary Lewis, Tony Duran, Steve KInosky, 
)im Oste. Row two: Tom Jones, )ohn Castaldl, Tom Cramer, Don Winstom, lohn Williamson, Tom Sharp, Tom Godfrey, Scott Harrar, 
Craig McMinn, Frank Aceto, Bob Hermer, Vito Thatcher, Roy Saithertwail, Chuck Phillips, Marc Winter, Vince Osadshy, Bob Cramer, 
Scott McNulty. 



International Relations Club 




Ellud Rodriguez, Cheryl DeMont, Dr. Carlough, Rosalba Chaves, Kazuya Ishil, Kumiko Ohara, Sandeep Talwar, Francisco Collado, Alfred 
Din, Carlos Igleslas, Stefan Mueller, Brian Kreutzer, Cathy Barry, Terry Ngwafor, Temesghen Hagos, Miriam Choque, Nhi Phan, 
Enriqueta Vasquez 



226 



Women's Recreation Association 




Front to back Nancy Delling, Kathy Witmer, |o Ann Borski, KathI Warfel, Lisa DIcasimirro, Nancy 
Campbell, Karen Toborowskl, Clockwise for circle: Carol Miller, Sandy Smith, Phyllis Hause, Eileen 
Connolly, Margaret Sanders, Gail Gerberich, Sharon Weber, lulie Lewis, Nancy Cotton. 



The BSC Lacrosse Club has 40 members 
who have gotten together to play a sport 
which is relatively new to almost 
everyone. Anyone can join and no 
experience is needed. The games they 
have are scrimmages with 5 to 10 being 
played each spring season. This year is 
the first for home games. They play other 
state colleges and some universities. They 
have hopes to be a varsity sport in the 
near future. 

The International Relations Club is made 
up of Americans and foreign students, 
who have come from Columbia, |apan, 
Switzerland, South Viet Nam and Mexico 
plus many other parts of the world. The 
group held a Disco Nite this semester 
plus they sponser trips and have movies. 
They also give lectures to the 
townspeople to inform them of the 
different cultures in the world which this 
club truly represents. 
WRA runs the women's, plus some of the 
coed, intramural program. The officers do 
their best to provide the time periods and 
space for the games to be held. They are 
open to suggestions of new sports and 
keep the interest high by having rules 
suitable for playing with good 
sportsmanship. Clinics are provided for 
everyone to learn new sports, so no 
experience is needed to play in the 
intramural program. 



227 



Quest 




228 




Dr. Stephen Breset runs Quest, an 
organization which allows students 
to do things they otherwise might 
not have the opportunity to do. It is 
not a club or "outing organization", 
but is designed to strengthen 
participants' self confidence by 
persuading them to excel beyond 
their preconceived limit of ability. 
No experience is needed for any 
Quest adventure. Quest allows 
students to develop trust in others, a 
sense of responsibility, and a feeling 
of accomplishment through 
experiences including rock climbing, 
backpacking, bicycling and more. 



229 



Association For Childhood Education International 



ACEI is an 
organization 
serving area 
children. Going to 
hospitals to read 
to children is one 
service the 
intationally 
known organiza- 
tion does. In the 
past they have 
made up a 
booklet of 
children's activi- 
ties. This year the 
pres. and vice- 
pres. went to a 
conference in Cal. 
to represent BSC. 
The Ski Club has 
its season from 
Dec. to Mar. 
During this time 
the members have 
a meeting every 
week plus a trip 
to the slopes 
every Thursday. 
Even the most 
inexperienced can 




Sue Hampton, Elaine Coltermen, Carole McClain, Lee Francis, Barb Kwait. Kim Shipton, Lmda Labraico, Carol Olack, Dr. Hrantz 



Ski Club 




Nancy Catton, Kim Gobora, Janet Griffieth, Tom Godfrey, Mane Hoffner, Preston Hay, Becky Klahr, Danielle Martin, Lauren Phleiger, 
Rachael Price, Rob Strewig, Lisa Stoudt, Ed Schellhammer, Donna Leppert, Tricia Carossin, Karen Becher, Donna Lippit. 



230 



Student Art Association 




The Student Art Association is composed of art 
majors but it is open to all students. The group 
sponsors trips to cultural centers such as 
Washington, DC, N.Y., and Philadelphia. They have 
an annual Art Show to which any student can 
submit work. They also buy art work for the 
permanent art collection on campus. 
The Sociology Club is open to anyone. This year 
90% are sociology majors with some anthropology, 
psychyology and business majors. Dues are $2.00 
per year. They have speakers on social welfare and 
business personnel. They run field trips to Berwick 
Nuclear Power Plant and area federal prisons. They 
are also working to get the sociology department 
approved for a BSW program by 1983. 



Kevin Wixted, Dennis Kaiser, Kathy Arvie, Debbie Zak, Cindy Morris, Barbara 
Strohman, Sally Small. 



Sociology Club 




Steve Cuiliani, |an Herold, Carol McClein, Sherry Thomas, Nancy Erwine, Sally Williams, |o Ann Matani, Lisa Stoudt, Don Sewerd, Kathy 
Sturgeon, Vanessa Tyler, Harry English, Roseann Swiderski, Janet Scott, Linda Zuba, Lisa Martine, Susan Zaiesky, Gail Weidman, Mary 
Cahill, Annette Starrantino, Tom Maker, Sue Lincowick, Trish Grace, Carol Vincenti. 



231 



United Women's Organization 



The purpose of the United Women's 
Organization is to provide an avenue for 
BSC women to find out about careers, 
health, cultural awareness, social being 
and self image. The members number 45 
and the organization is open to any 
student on campus. This year the group 
put on a fashion show and has helped 
with the planning of the Cultural 
Minority Awareness Week. 




Row one: Deborah Payne, La'Tonya lohnson, lean Hudson. Row two Amanda Cowan, Laronda 
Davis, Marsha B. |ones, Row three: Lydua Eato, Caryl King, Robyn Liggins, Valane Richardson. 



232 



Council For Exceptional Children 




Row one: Peg| 
Lois Thomson, 



;y Ann Sappington, Diane Boston Row two: lulie Casale, lane Stewart, 
Mrs. Ann Lee. 



CEC here at BSC is a student chapter of an 
international professional organization. The club has 
dctivities for exceptional children which include a 
weekly story hour every Saturday, visits to Danville 
Mental Hospital, monthly guest speakers at 
meetings and a prom held once a year for 
exceptional high school students. PSEA is part of a 
national group. They have meetings once a month 
where their programs include such items as 
mainstreaming, resume writing and interviews. The 
organization is made up of education majors. 
Several of the group represented Bloomsburg at a 
conference in Harrisburg in the Spring of 1980. 



Pennsylvania State Education Association 




loanne Relsch, Nancy Fumanti, Barb Bradley, Valerie Wollfray, Karen ToborowskI, Linda Selling, Lisa DeCasimirro, Lori Medvetz, 
Caria MIkovlsch. 



233 



Photography Club 



The Photography Club has approximately 15 
members. It Is open to anyone and no 
experience is needed. The only thing you 
need is a camera, all other equipment is 
provided. This includes chemicals for 
developing and film. There are $2.00 dues 
per year. Field trips are run to scenic areas 
so photographs can be taken. 
CARC is an organization which serves 
Selinsgrove and Whitehaven. Their service 
includes getting the residents out into the 
community to perform and function in 
every day situations, having parties at 
holidays and arts and crafts. Every year 
CARC sponsers a bike hike. This year the 
benefits go to Camp Future. The group also 
sponsers Special Olympics. 
A new club this year is the Medical 
Technology Club which is for med tech 
students. This organization helps students 
schedule courses, apply to schools and give 
pointers for interviews. They have speakers 
for monthly meetings and have programs 
dealing with the Health area. 




Tim Blanchard, loan Bono, Craig Fisher, Patti Fuchs, )im Cross, Bob Krajci, Linda Shuliga, David 
Kuhn, Leslie Pollizzotti, Paul Boyd. 



Columbia Association For Retarded Citizens 




Row one: Lori Crum, Lisa Wilkins, Sue Thompson, Row two: Diane Sohn, Marsha Rehrig, Leslie Fordyce, Row 
three: Pam Waltman, Todd Moyer, Rose Ann Musello. 



234 



Student Speech and Hearing Association 




Row one: Pam Creasy, Kathi Riley, Janet Roberts, Joanne Baryla, Amy Rutil Row two: SJiaron Mutchler, Pat Scaran, 
Bernadette Hruby, Jeanette Smith, Nancy Hughes, Patricia Christoff. Row three: Karen Scott, Barb Whitman, Nancy 
Campbell, Nanette Kramer, Eileen Penyak, Sharon Demko. Row four: Donna Lippert, Ida Pedergnana, Lori Crum, Kelly 
Calosi, Patricia Moyer, Jennifer Guild Row five: Donna Coldschmidt, Rita KonoPka, Karen Singiser, Becky Dennin, Mary 
Louise Puhak, Kay Hranichny. Row six: A, J. Mclvor, Sally Kissinger. 

Medical Technology Club 




Row one: Diane Overa, Ruth Shuhler, Ann \larie Stula. Bambi Lutte, Barbara Shaloka, Yvette Slapinsky, Sue Huhn, Row two: 
Joyce Aughey, Randy Rhodes, Larry Quinton, Dwight Walters, Sandy Yeager, Fran Tomashefski. Row three: Patty lezzoni, Lori 
Horosky, Lori Entenman, Dave Delvecchio, Row four: Donna Zeiher, Sue Kirby, Chris Nyca, Sue Savage, Wendy Waughen. 



235 



Kappa Mu Epsilon 




Row one: lanel Carpenter, Louise Kurtz, Kim Yarnall, Cathy Folk, Laura Sloma, Kim Hellerman, Pat Ernest, Anne Sobeck. Row two: 
Joseph Aceto, |ohn LaPenta, Scott Mix, )im Pomfret, Timothy Scripko, Dave Fox, William Purse! 



American Chemical Society 




* V. Jt - . ■' I 





* 



Row one Chris Mycz, Lori Horosky, Angela Ciampi, Ruth Shuhler, Thuy Le, Diana Pietkiewicz, Nancy Mayhew, Gina Onuscho, Tom 
Matukaitis, Row two: Mr. Dan Pantaleo, LeAnn Moch, Barbara Shaloka, Donna Feather, Peggy Lowthert, Scott Mix, Dwight Walters, 
Randy Rouch, Michele Kennedy, )im Marshall, Chris Peterson. 



236 



Tau Beta Sigma 
Kappa Kappa Psi 




TBS: Carolyn Gross, Karen Sinnwell, Brenda Koppenhaver, Tracey Daniel, Becky Marr, Roxanne 
Bull, Mary Nahlen, Ellen McDonnell, lulie Mitchell, Cindy Herzog, Nancy Royer, Sally Williams, 
KKP: Bob Hafner, Kurt Williams, Tom Dennis. 



Alph Phi Omega 



The math honor society is Kappa Mu 
Epsilon. To join you must be a 
Sophomore who has completed up 
through Analysis 3. The organization is 
involved in conventions, math contests 
and Math Day for area high school 
students. 

The American Chemical Society is a 
student organization directly affliliated 
with the nationally recognized 
professional ACS. The club brings 
speakers to campus who talk on the Now 
topics in science. This spring the group is 
having a science fiction film festival with 
two feature length films. 
TBS and KKP, National Honorary sorority 
and fraternity for bands, serves the band, 
college and community. Their service 
includes selling programs at ball games, 
giving a spring concert, ushering at art 
funcitons and recruiting new freshman 
for the band. 

APO is the service fraternity on campus. 
It is a coed group with 17 members. Their 
purpose is in service to students and 
townspeople. They accomplish this by 
helping with the blood mobile, campus 
tours and collecting for the Heart Fund. 
They also oversee an explorer's post in 
the area. 




Row one: Dr. R.B. DeVore, Kris Krenz, Brian Auchey, Brett Meckley, Raymond D'Alessio, Charles Regec. Row two: Daniel Witmer, 
William Pursel, Kurt Seller, Dave Heltman. 



237 



Alpha Psi Omega 




Mr. William Acierna, Karia Blankenhorn, Pam OhI, Todd Cunther, Rob Novelli, Melanie Apple, Randy Lutz, Cathy Tanski. 



Delta Mu Delta 




Row one. Donna Miller, Jim Adamowicz, Tom Reilly, Keith Schoch, Dave George, Faith Ganss, Tracey Daniel, Linda Duzick. Row two: 
Pattie Shoener, Laurie Vachris, Bernadette Uritis, Deb Fortuna, Mike Mixell, loyce Thompson, Sharon Greiss, Karen Gallucce, Rosemary 
Santanasto, Cindy Kuhns. Row three; Mickey Sours, loanne Westwood, Karen Pierog, Rich Minniti, Dave Cimbe, Tim Blase, Lori Imboden 
lanice Young, joann Snyder. Row four: Brian Auchey, Valerie Swanson, Linda Telletsen, Michael Azar, Robert Thomas, Dennis Swanger, 
Thomas Friel, )ohn Cross, Robert Kuhn II, Holly Uhler, Peggy Kemp, Gerald Knepp, Robbin Miller, Cheryl Sampsell, Debbie Kospiah. 



238 



Image 




Row one: Mickey Magri, Cathy Flynn, lackie Cagglano, Roberta Schultz, Kathy McCormick. Row two: Kim Stephens, Barb Miller, Cayle 
Welsenfluh, Kathy Staab, KathI Riley, Charlotte Brady, 



Alpha Psi Omega is a national 
honorary dramatic fraternity. The 
dramatic organization is coed with a 
total of 8 members. To join you must 
have a cum of 2.5 plus have worked in 
the theater. The group gets involved 
with BSC productions and many are 
members of the Bloomsburg Players. 
Delta Mu Delta is the honorary 



business fraternity here on campus. As 
with all honorary groups, cum averages 
must be above a certain score. The 
organization is coed with 
approximately 45 members. Their 
advisor is Mr. Francis Gallagher. IMAGE 
is a group which does interpretive sign 
language to music. They give a new 
performance each semester. Not only 



do they give their performances here 
on campus but they also travel to 
various other areas to perform. This 
year's performances include Kutztown 
State College, Keystone lunior College 
and local schools. Their 
director/producer is G. Donald Miller. 



239 



Bloomsburg Players 




Row one: Gary Miller, Pam OhI, Gregg GiannuzzI, Todd Gunther, Audrey SIbbald, Sean Metzgar, Lora Mumbaver, Row two: loan 
Davis, Karia Biankenhorn, Dave Kuhn, David Hill, Amy Lee Hancock, Patrick Leonard, Row three: Cathy Tandski, Melanie Apple, 
Randy Lutz, Dwight Walters, Eric Harriz, Carole Stauffer, Karen Pingar, Ion Riesberg. 



The acting group on campus is the 
Bloomsburg Players. This group is open 
to anyone. They give about two plays a 
semester, plus a musical production in 
the spring. This year the club also had 
several workshops, one of which was a 
dance workshop. The Studio Band is a 
jazz band which plays music from the 
swing era to popular songs. The band 
has 20 members who play the trumpet, 
trumbone and baritone saxaphone, 
bass guitar, drums and piano. 
They play at Briar Heights for 



scholarship dinners, dances in the 
union, campus visitation and 
downtown for Renaissance Day. The 
Conert Band provides music for many 
functions. The Pep Band plays at home 
basketball games. The Brass Sextet 
plays for the Women's Choral 
Ensemble and will be at Spring 
Commencement this year. They give an 
annual concert with the Studio Band 
and they also have a picnic and 
concert at Knoebel's Grove. 



240 



Studio Band 




Concert Band 




241 



Husky Singers 



t: ^^- 




The all male singing group, the Husky Singers, 
is a group of 30-35 members. No auditions are 
held and group sings for enjoyment. They have 
three concerts on campus, some with the 
Women's Choral Ensemble, plus three or four 
concerts off campus. They have traveled to 
other campuses for concerts with these 
schools' girl's singing groups. They welcome 
any interested males. 

The women's singing group on campus is the 
Women's Choral Ensemble. Auditions are held 
to find voice range and no one is refused. They 
sing contemporary, pop and church music, 
most of which is written for female voices. Fall 
and spring concerts are given every year. This 
year the group was on tour in Pennsylvania 
during Spring Break. 



Row one: Randy Beaver, Greg Ciannuzzi, Mark Rinkus, Marly Filmore, Row two Ed 
Walburn, left Wasllewski, Manny Stivers, letf Wilcox Row three: Paul Bowman, George 
Groom, Kevin Crosley, Rick DiLiberto Row four: Greg Notestine, Charles Regec, Bill 
Ruggiero, Al Spangenberg. Row five: Gary Miller, Mark Rinkus, Leslie Reiz, Craig Trout, |ohn 
Oren. Row six; Mike Incitti, )im Vitale, Lee Mueller, |im Robiscn. 



242 



Women's Choral Ensemble 




Row one Mary Uelletrotto, Mary Cjuyer, Margie Andrew'^, Mary Brill, Laurie Hiipkins, Anne sobeck Row two then Kamse\, iJeb Hellner 
Marsha Oviatt, Karen SIngiser, Karen lacoby, Robin DePrefontaine, Ann Marie Potter, Carole Wimmer, Lois Snyder, Bernadette Hruby, 
Row three Nancy Becker, Amy Lee Hancock, Maureen Held, joni Hower, Row four: jean Retro, Melanie Conrad, Rochelle Stout, Audrey 
Bitler, Row five: Kristin Morris, |ill Pike, Patty Loughin, Ruth Herbert. Row six: Mary Williams, Marci Basham, Kathy McCinley, Kathy 
Snyder Row seven: Wendy Wagner, Lisa Christiansen, Kathy Simpson, Connie Ryalls. 



243 



Madrigals 




Cathie Readdy, Lee Mueller, Wendy Nyborg, )on Shaffer, |amie Heckman, Steve Livermore, Pat Walsh, lulie staniots, Marta Herr, Steve 
Kanouse, Frank )acoby, Kim Smith, Lois Thompson, )im Robison, Rob Nodstein, Vicki Bloss, Leslie Watson, Gregg Giannuzzi, 

The Madrigal Singers are an ensemble 
singing group of 12-16 members. They 
sing early music to popular and show 
tunes. They give concerts on campus 
and for the community plus a 
Christmas Banquet. They have tryouts 
for open spots and they sing without 
accompaniment. This year they are 
going on a three week singing tour of 
England, Wales, Holland, Belgium, and 
France in |uly. 



244 



Concert Choir 




itt^' 



Barbara Brabant, Lenore Firsching, Diane Leaver, Maureen McCanney, Wendy Myborg, Amy Ruhl, Leslie Watson, Nancy Whitmore, Ruth 
Herbert, Phyllis Hurd, Sue Kestler, Michelle Rader, janel Schwoyer, Lois Tomson, Beth Wenrlch, lulle Wood, Karen Wuest, Rebecca 
Dersham, Kathleen Harvey, Marta Herr, Cindl lohnson, lulle Miller, Sharon Mutchler, Constance Shope, Kimberly Smith, Carole Stauffer, 
Eileen Walsh, Brenda Wissinger, lean Yoder, Carrie Fielding, Ian Herrold, Carol Lapham, Lee McCool, Cathleen Readdy, Dianna Schneider, 
lulle Stamets, Donna Sittler, Fay Walter, Paul Bowman, Tib Bunnell, Tim Latshaw, Seth Knarr, )eff Mitchell, Craig Trout, )oel Aurand, Carl 
Davis, Gregg Gianuzzi, Todd Gunther, Ken lones, Greg Kovalik, Manny Stivers, leff Wilcox, Paul Baskin, Eric Harriz, David Kuhn, Lee 
Mueller, Rob Novelli, Mike Price, |im Robison, Doug Sheats, |im Vitale, Randy Beaver, Stephen Kanouse, jon Shaffer, Fran Tomashefski, 
Mike Yoder, 



245 



Maroon and Gold Band 




tlii-n \U Ijonncil, >dil\ V'v liluims, Lheryl Crispart, Diane Kistler, Pam Ellis, Cayle Kirk, Virginia Baker. 




Carey Huels, Judy Mingora, Dawn Shortall, Nancy Prettack, Vickie Tarnok, |amy Waha, |an Lutcher, Sharon 
Wertman, Karen Scott, Kathy Murphy. 



246 




Kelly Kiely, Lisa Swartzbaugh, Pat Peterson, Diane Sohn, Linda Ballner, Lorraine Lucas, Peggy Homcheck, Elizabeth Ganss, 




The Maroon and Gold Marching Band 
participates in many college activities. 
These include playing at football 
games during the halftime plus leading 
cheers with music in the stands. They 



also participate with pep songs at the 
bonfire for Homecoming. They march 
in parades and host Band Day when 
high school bands come to BSC to 
perform. 



247 



Little Sisters of TKE 




Row one; Marty Tryba, Donna Muro, Cindy Mihalow, Debi Gaul, Deb Richards, Marybeth Vanik, Debbie bhulta Row two: Kierna ieitert, 
Mari Conway, Kathy Hughes, Kathy Muhog, Cindy Sieger, Donna Nemeth, Amy Larson. Row three; Wendl Schuch, Mary Urban, Barb 
Burgert, Carol Kollmeyer, Sue McNulty, Cyd Cohen, Tone Harzinski, Deb Walmer, Cheryl Zackary, Shawn McCreary. 



The Little Sisters of TKE participate in 
most any activity associated with TKE. 
The Sisters are united with the brothers 
during any service project, fund raiser 
or social event. They are a very active 
part of the organization. 
The Little Sisters of Zeta Psi are a sub- 



organization of the fraternity. They 
consist of 25 members whose purpose 
is to help the brothers with social 
events. This group also has their own 
social events plus their own fund 
raisers. 



248 



Little Sisters of Zeta Psi 




loanne Hylen, Tr,sha Ruhle, Kelly K,rkland, Deb Kirchdoefer, Linda Hresko, Laila Brand, Connie Weber, Kassy Halloran^ Debb^ 
Preputnick, Auderey Fiebig. Sue Rummel, Wendy Clelan, Debbie Muscelh, Lorraine lones, Mar,e Concannon, Holly Whitmoyer. 



249 



Phi Sigma Pi 





Mr. Richard Donald, Leslie Buck, Carrie Fielding, Stacey Swisher, Mike Goebel, Keith Gogel, |im Kelly, Al Langelli, Mark Locey, Randy 
Mcintosh, Bob McMullen, Scott Simkins, Kent Smithgall, Dave Wiest, Tom Alderfer, Marci Basham, joe Bosevich, |im Card, Kevin Hulsizer, 
Linda jackovitz, Greg Jones, Lori Imboden |oe Koziesky, Brad Northrup, Pat Reed, Monica Reilly, Bruce Richie, Audrey Sibbals, Bill 
VanDeLinde, |im Waselik, Mary Williams, |oe Aceto, Rich Baylor, Deanna Beaver, Scott Behrent, Michele Bloszinsky, Barbara Bradley, Brian 
Fry, David Gardner, Kim Hessert, Andy Krueger, LuAnne Marshall, Maureen McCanney, Carol McClain, Maureen McLaughlin, Rick 
Menniti, Mike Mixell, Sharon Remington, Delta Roman, Tricia Ruble, Linda Selling, Lou Vannicola, )anice Werkheiser, Valerie Woolfrey, 
Bob Wagner, Tim Ulshafer. 



Phi Sigma Pi is a national honor 
fraternity. Your cum must be a 2.75 the 
semester you pledge with a 3.0 the 
previous semester. The organization is 
coed. They do service projects for the 
Heart Fund and Muscular Dystrophy, 



sponser a foster child and help clean 
up the townpark in the spring. They 
are the largest chapter in the state with 
55 members and have won most 
outstanding chapter in the country. 



250 



ntersorority Counci 




Patty Swanson, Julie Daniels, Donna Keleshian, Kathy Ptasinski, Carol Somanosky, Diane Lamgley, Cindy Clayton, Sue 
Scalamandre, Elaine Felker, Ellen Roan, Carroll Truran, joy Troxell, Helen Marie Cair, Bambi Lutte, Patti Noone, Kathy 
Guyer, Peggy Kemp, Lyn Rudolph, Pam Hazen, Terry Mizdol, Kathy Boyle, Linda Zyla. 



ISC is a council tor sororities where 
rules and regulations concerning 
pledging and various other aspects of 
sororities are set down. Each sorority 
has representation according to their 
members. 



251 



The national sorority, Alpha Sigma Alpha 
was founded at BSC January 26, 1979. 
There were 45 founding sisters, two 
pledge classes and total of 58 active sis- 
ters. They are known by red and white 
and the ladybug. Their national project 
this year is to aid the Mentally Retarded 
by selling frustration pencils. 

Alpha Sigma Alpha 




mmfi 



"m 



f " • f - -'Ay 



mfmiiim 



mwffm 



Iheicsd AntelluLv, Ciiuly B.jciibd, Pdiii Bo(jlj, ludy Briansky, Linda Brown, Pam Brown, Nancy Callahan, lacki Campbell, Kim Case, Connie 
DeLessio, Olwyn DeMarco, Marianne Devers, Dana DeVlto, Angela Dotoli, Radune Enger, Linda Fangio, Chris Ferrise, Sandi Gettler, Gail 
Goldschmidt, Char Gray, Pat Hemmerle, Carey Huels, Debbie Houseknecht, Kathy Kline, Kathy Kostelac, )an Lutcher, Bambi Lutte, |udy 
Lutz, Vicky Lysek, Kns Mendler, Nancy Mowry, Gisele Nikop, Tracy Oswald, MaryAnn Perugino, Karen Pierog, Sue Poust, Carolyn Reed, 
Sonia Ressler, Linda Rinaldi, Toni Roccograndi, Liz Rosati, Cheryl Roulin, Nancy Schappert, Anne Shortess, Donna Smith, Nanci Smith, 
Sherry Smith, Linda Sobotka, Barb Steckel, Sandy Takach, Nellie Udovich, Dianne Urciuoli, loanne Westwood, Karen Wizorek, Cindy 
Woody, lane Yoder. 



252 



Alpha Sigma Tau 






253 



Chi Sigma Rho 




Row one lanet Kavnas, Karen Reilly, Ellen Rothwell, Ton! Farano, Harriet Young, Lynn Pezak, Carol |o Yuskanish, Betty Bordash, loann 
Matani loan Andrews, Caria Patrick, Lillian Walker. Row two: Michele Russell, Oscar McClafferty, Audrey Bitler, Karen Cum, Melissa 
Pealer, Denise Fnck, Peggy Lowthert, Cindy Thomas, Maureen McOscar, Kathy lones, Carol Domanosky, Barb Mann, Gloria Nardone, 
Sheila Lowe, |oy Chestnut, Maria Mushinski, Kim Leslie. Row three: Kim Osborne, loann Ravina, Gail Hickey, Denise Connelly, Mary Ellen 
Baker, Dori Gottshall, CarIa Hause, Ardeth Bader, Debbie )oseph, Chris Kutza, Sharon Brutico, Eileen Veneski, Ann Markowski, Deb Biago, 
Kelli Krebs, Pam Shimp, Kathy Ptasinski, Carolyn Bader, Sue Supulski, Sue Otto, Ann Marie Savoca, Denise Antolik, Donna Keleshian, Mary 
Lynn Williams Row four: Tammy Shank, Ann Barliar, Barb Elfman, |oni Bilyk, Marie Veneski, lane Belinsky, lulie Daniels, Meg Heffernan, 
Diane Lewis, |erri Smith, Sue Marshall, Lori Krotec, Pat Swanson, Laurie Hobyak, Laurie Kemmerer, Collen Shoemaker, Terri Sotak, Lynn 
Ellman, Lisa Dell'albe, Lori Lebo. 

XEP, a social sorority, was founded in 
1969 and presently has 80 active mem- 
bers. They have two service projects 
per semester and two banquets per 
year. They participate in inter sorority 
sports, Creek Week and Greek Sing. 
Their colors are yellow and grey and 
their flower is a yellow carnation. 



254 



Delta Epsilon Beta 




Row one Cathy Robson, Nanci Hanzek, Peggy Kemp, )udy Geiger, Ann Files, Sue Whitenite, loan Dule, lulie Breitenberg, Mary |o 
Kuzmack, Peg Hllgar, Maria D'Amigo, Nancy Rice, Barb Paxton, Row two; Dottie Cienlec, Peg Mills, Patli Noone, Nancy Amone, Sally 
Laros, Mary Lieb, Holly Va|cJa, Marbeth Burgess, lane Fritz, Roanne Heisner, CincJy West, Deb Cassells, Emilee Plucenik, lane Fought. Row 
three: Kim Feher, Bonnie Canter, ludy Lally, Lori Shoneker, Nancy Becker, Cathy Ritner, Sue Tymuszuk, Beth Thomas, Kathie Guyer, |ane 
Schropp, Rose Santanasto, lay Mitruka, Melody Matthews, Cheryl Snyder, Karen Renninger Karen Harris, Kim Robinson, Andi Shaefer, 
Shelly Bonner, Holly Straub, Pam Morgan, Mindy Bielitsky, Diann Callahan. 



255 



Delta Omega Chi 



LffCUS BROTH E RS 




X-S~BD03l 



256 



Delta Pi 




Dave Crawford, Paul Rajkowski )r., Phil Ferdinand, Phil Fenton, Randy Mackenzie, |im 
Dougherty, |im Snyder, Scott Feinstein, Tim Barrett, Dwight |oson, Mike Moors, Drew King, 
Curt Spong, Tom Keisling, Greg Hayton, Keith Walz, Mike Grady, Gabe Penles, Steve Garrett, 
Bill FHower, Kit Carson, Dan Perry, Leo Camara, Mark Creasy, Kevin McKloskey, Dave Huff, joe 
Antelocy, |im Gross, Dennis Copp, Mike Polkowski, |oe Patti, )im Cudknecht, Don Yazurlo, 
|ohn Gillespi, Bill Hanchak, Frank Konschnik, )eff Miller, Eric Kudrich. 



Delta Pi is a social fraternity. The initials of 
their name stand for diligence and 
perseverance. They are known for their 
bricks which their pledges carry. They keep 
good relations with their neighbors by 
having meetings to discuss problems. Their 
service project is the Explorer's Club which 
is part of the Boy Scouts. 



257 



"Winner of the 1980 Obiter Picture Contest' 



Lambda Alpha Mu is a service/social 
sorority. Their services for the college 
and community include helping with 
the blood mobile, the radio auction, 
ushering at concerts, doing visitation 
tours and similar activities. They have 
parties, banquets, fund raisers, and 
date parties. They are known by their 
Raggedy Anne dolls. 

Lambda Alpha Mu 




Row one: Chris Huat, Nancy O'Connell, Donna Wilson, Lynn Rudolph, Lambda, Ann Strause, Linda Pinchot, Beth Childo, Kate Ackley, 
Marie Cummings, Klinger Dissman, Michele Dilorio, Nancy Kushnenck, Wendy Lengel Row two: Marilee Baumbartner, Pam Hartzell, 
Becky Koppenhaver, Grandeur, Deb DiMarco, Pam Ellis, Acute, Sharon Creiss, Brenda Myers, Deb Fabian, Rhonda Frederick, Cream, Flossy 
Bronson, Diana Wells, Audrey Fiebig, Linda Hresko, Elaine Pelletier, Hopi, Barb Walker, Karen Talmadge, Sue Van Aken, Carol Thompson, 
Mary Jacques, Pam Kirk, Alia, Chris Lewis, Lynda Wiest, Kink, Marina Ashmar, Karen Webb, George, Sharon Nichols, Pam Hazen, Karen 
Moran. 



258 



Lambda Chi Alpha 




Row one: T. Nicolosi, M. Dowling, T. Mcintosh, ). McLean, Row two: R. McCormick, E, McKee, T. Canfield, S. Mitchell, D. Phelps, R. 
Tezak, M. Raynes, R. Buzzard, T. Brown, E. Treaster, W Townsley, L. Richards. Row three: D. Hessler, T. Miller, D. Walp, K. Moore, R. 
Smith, S. Schaffer. Row four: D. Kohler, M. Keener, C. Golbitz, ). Weldon, R. Willders, P. Hopkins, B. Tomalavage, K. Schaeffer, M. Gitt, I 
Williams, D. Davis. 



259 



Phi lota Chi 



PIC is a social sorority with 60 members. 
Their motto is friendship, individuality 
and courage. They help with the blood 
mobile and collect for the Heart Fund as 
service projects. They also help with 
Special Olympics, working at a home for 
the aged and similar activities. The group 
has fund raisers, date parties and 
banquets. 




Row one: April Nicolais, Ann Medieros, Michele Goodman, Kris Oakland, Lisa Gerhard. Row two: 
)odi Goldberg, Debbie Hodge, Betty Rowe, Maureen Kenna, Lisa Hause, Kathy Quinlan. Row 
three; |ill Koch, Gma Troutman, Cheryl Worman, Pam Schultz Row four; Mari Phillips, Denise 
Mayrosh, Kathy Kornacki, Lois Hertzog, Maureen Yori, Row five; Sarah Fay, Kim Krayer, April 
Beesburg, Karen Murphy, Diane Waldron, Row six: Terry lenks, Darlene Harris, |oy Troxell, Row 
seven; Karen Orzol, Helen Lukachko, Kathy Greco, Mary Ann Kupec, Kim Zucal. Row eight; 
Roxanna Husinger, Carroll Truran, )udy Horn, Tracey Volscko, Rene Hovenstein. Row nine: Betsy 
Dice, Betty Buck, Ellen Roan, Cheryl Muller, Betsy Young. 



260 



Sigma lota Omega 




Row one: Scott Smith, |im Brecker, Al Bowen. Row two: Brian Mahlstedt, Bob Spezialetti, Dan Swank, Bob Reltz, |im Vitale Row three 
Steve Buch, Ray Scheetz, Tom Gombert, )im Buccella, Ed Scheetz, Tim Eadline. Row four: Scott Richards, Mike Frant, Mike Rotelle, Dave 
Gimbi, Gregory McHugh, Shane Creasy, |oe Early. Row five: Ted Feather, )ohn Settelen, Doug Bielefeld, Dan Wiest, Bob Avil, Brian 
Callahan, John McNaughton, John Sheelen, Brian FHessenthaler. Row six; Dominick LaCava, Clem Reck, Tim Miller, Dave Kurecian, Les 
Scholl. 



Sio was the first social fraternity on 
campus. The group consists of 84 
members. Their service projects 
include collecting for the United Way 
and UNICEF, and cleaning up the 
townpark in the spring. They also take 
care of the BSC Husky-Sam. Their 



emblem's rising sun symbolizes their 
being the first social frat. The goblet 
stands for brotherhood and fellowship. 
The book and flambau mean 
knowledge and achievement, while 
tenacity and strength are shown by the 
lion. 



261 



i ^f 



Sigma Sigma Sigma 



Vf/'/'' 



C'"- 



cr CLASS 1916 




Beth Arbeital, Theresa Bartek, Sue Bebenek, Lori Beck, Mary Behney, )eri Boose, Kathy A. Boyle, Kathy M. Boyle, Martha Bryden, Amy 
Galium, Lori Cassidy, Beth Clifford, Tami Conaway, loan Davis, Laurs DeAngelis, Marianne Deska, Cheryl Dreisbach, Barb Dziadosz, Nancy 
Farrell, Suzanne Feeney, Cindy Grasmeder, Harriet Gulla, Gloria Hazeltine, Janice Holmgren, Dorothy Howard, Gail Hurst, lane Hutsko, 
Donna Kinder, Susan Kingeter, lean Kraus, Karen Koble, Mary Beth Kotanchik, lean Lawless, Karen Lawrence, |ill Laylon, Debbie Lee, Patty 
Loughin, Elisa Mancuso, ludi Mastroianni, Sandy Mayer, Anna lean Mclvor, Linda McNicholas, Lori McNicholas, Eileen Miller, Terry Mizdol, 
Maggie Monoghan, Kate Murray, Jean Pascale, Carmela Perrotta, Suzi Pollack, Mary Price, Nancy Reynolds, Denise Ross, Kathy Ryan, Mary 
Fraces Sabin, Kathy Savitts, Pamela Shay, Ann Silvonek, Marianne Smith, Patti Smith, lessica Spangler, Stacey Talbott, Karen Tomaszewski, 
Gini Trille, Lynn VanderDoes, Betsy Watts, Mary Beth Weeks, Gail Weidman, Linda Whipple, Nancy Whitman, Linda Wright. 



262 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 




Row one; Gary Gettschack, Shawn McCreary, Tracy Schooly, Thomas Reilly, |lm Popp, Mark Swigonski, Eric Slingerland, )im Rube Row 
two; Brian Duart, Scott Wertman, Dean Snyder, Todd Trach, Chris Cleaver, Preston Hay, Dave Pautsch, Randy Letterhouse. Row three; 
Frank Prencavage, Andy lackson, Tony DiValerio, Reik Foust, Brian Wisdo, Bill Richardson, lerry FHanford, Bo Renko, Troy Anglestein, Tib 
Bnell, Keith Schoch, Kerry Kedl, Dave Stoudt, joe Brady, Keith Kirchdoerfer, Row fourTom Ballantyne, Greg Rodgers, Rodger May, Mike 
Ball, Tom Common, Nick Baldo, Cliff Tillman, Paul FHailigan, )im Knecktel, Steve Englehardt. 



263 



i 



Theta Tau Omega 




264 



Zeta Psi 




r 

it* 


\ 



265 




by )o Ann Borski and Todd Moyer 

The Epilogue is the Closing of the 
book. Here a jumble of things are put 
on the pages to try in these last few 
pages to get something in with which 
everyone can identify. It is also a 
section where the year's news is 
brought together to remind one of the 
events making that year a different one 
from all the others. The editors' 
messages are here because their thanks 



for all the help are saved to the end. 
Patrons are usually placed here to 
show the support given to the book 
even before its final pages were 
complete. This ending of the book is 
not to be a stopping of memories but a 
section where your memories can live 
on. Remember your college year as you 
glance through the final pages — the 
best for last. 



Clockwise from below: One guy stands in a 
spotless hallway at the beginning of the 
semester, while the man on the bike is beating 
the gas line hassles. Studying usually fills the 
week nights as this girl sits and reads her text. 





Clockwise from below: The geometric pattern of the stairway outside of 
Haas is a familiar sight whereas this unusual view gives a different slant to 
The Union's inside stairs. These three play basketball while the pope tours 
the US. 






NEWS BRIEF NEWS BRIEF NEWS BRIEF NEWS BRIEF ND 




Gas crunch was a common phrase in the 
summer of 1979. The gas shortage 
continued into the beginning of the fall 
semester. Lines at the pumps started as 
early as 5 a.m. Frustration levels built and 
rose in the drivers as fights and tempers 
flared. Prices rose beyond the one dollar 
per gallon mark as the rumor of gas 
rationing spread throughout the country. 
However, rationing by stamps was put 
aside as the odd and even rationing took 
its place. Suddenly, everyone was 
concerned whether their license plate 
ended with an odd or even number and 
if the day's date was odd or even. If one 
missed their day, they could, and did, 
find someone with the appropriate plate 
and then sped to the gas station to get 
into the line. 



Spine replacement, a medical 
first, took place on August 30, 
1979. lessie Thomas, undergoing a 
19 hour operation, had a metal 
device implanted to replace a 
section of lower spine lost to a 
cancerous tumor. The tumor and 
spine were replaced with a metal 
prothesis to protect her spinal 
cord until a bone transplant 
could be performed. Dr Charles 
C. Edwards, chief of orthopedic 
surgery at University Hospital, 
explained the operation which 
began by placing two steel rods 
on the back of Thomas' spine to 
keep the spinal column from 
twisting. The prothesis, designed 
to protect the spinal cord and 
give support, was then implanted. 



Pope John Paul II made his U.S. tour in 
October. He visited Boston, New York, 
Philadelphia, Chicago and Washington, 
D.C. He spoke outwardly and told the 
governments that only the safe 
guarding of human rights can insure 
peace; he told the young that they 
should turn from escapist drugs and 
sexual pleasure; he told the rich that 
they had a pressing obligation to treat 
the poor like guests at the family table. 
The Pope's conservative views on such 
disputed issues as birth control, the 
celibacy of priests, abortion and the 
role of women in the church were 
disappointing. Yet, the country opened 
its heart to the leader. 



268 



American hostages in Iran were in their 
200th day of captivity as of the writing 
of this article, presented is a list of the 
highlights up until this the 200th day. 
Nov. 4 - Iranian militants seize the 
U.S. Embassy and take 66 Americans 
hostage demanding that the U.S. send 
the deposed Shah back to Iran. 
Nov. 6 — The Iranian gov. of Premier 
Mehdi Bazargan resigns. 
Nov. 12 — Carter, president of U.S., 
halts oil import orders to Iran. 
Nov. 14 - Carter orders the freezing of 
all Iranian assets in the U.S. 
Nov. 19-20 — Thirteen American 
hostages — five women and eight black 
men — are released. 
Nov. 29 - The U.S. asks the 
International Court at The Hague, 
Netherlands, for a ruling against Iran. 



Dec. 12 - U.S. State Department orders 

the expulsion of 183 Iranian diplomats. 

Dec. 15 - The Shah flies to Panama 

and International Court orders Iran to 

free hostages. 

Jan. 25 - Abolhassan Bani-Sadr is 

elected president. 

Jan. 29 - The Canadian Embassy in 

Tehran spirited six non-hostage 

Americans out of Iran. 

Feb. 3 - Iran agrees to an international 

commission to investigate Iran's 

charges against the Shah and the U.S. 

March 3 - Iran's ruling Revolutionary 

Council approves a visit to the 

hostages by U.N. commission. 

March 6 — Militants say they will give 

hostages to Iranian gov. 

March 8 - Dispute with Bani-Sadr 

gov., militants refuse to turn over 




5 BRIEF NEWS BRIEF NEWS BRIEF NEWS BRIEF NEWS B 



Volcano eruptions were in the news 
for the first time since 1857, the last 
time Mt. St. Helens of Washington 
erupted. Mt. St. Helens, on May 18, 
1980, blew its top with a blast felt 200 
miles away, belching ash which 
blotted the air black for more than 100 
miles with a plume 9 miles high. Once 
snow-covered and 9,677 ft. high, Mt, 
St. Helens now stood at 8,377 ft. with a 
\'i mile across crater. "The devastation 
on the mountainside is incredible," 
said A.F. Lt. D.E. Schroeder "Trees are 
knocked down, animals are standing 
around in shock covered with ash." 
The cloud of ash spread hundreds of 
miles eastward from Mt. St. Helens on 



May 19, stifling dozens of towns with 
fallout ranging from a "talcum 
powder" dusting to gritty ash ankle 
deep, closing schools and businesses 
in Washington and Montana on May 
21, the missing persons list grew to 98 
as families of missing loggers 
complained that the government 
search was disorganized. There had 
been 14 deaths. Geologists estimated 
that since the eruption, an explosion 
equivalent to a nuclear blast, the 
volcano has spewed almost as much 
ash and rock as Vesuvious desposited 
on Pompeii in 79 A.D. killing 2,0(X) 
people. Officials stated on May 29 that 
the chances of fmding any of the 



people still missing from the explosion 
of Mt. St. Helens were "nil" and 
suspended their air search. The resuce 
helicopters had flown up to 35 
missions a day. Search crews rescued 
128 persons in the first two days, but 
since then have found only bodies and 
a few surviving dogs. The death toll 
jumped to 22. Scientists believed that 
the mountain was already rebuilding 
itself with the formation of a volcanic 
"dome" on the floor of the mountain's 
crater. A volcanic dome is a thick plug 
of magma pushed up from below. 
Officials feel that there will not be 
another eruption. 




Cuban refugees continued to be 
received by the U.S. as of May 19, 1980. 
President Carter stated, "Ours is a 
country of refugees. We'll continue to 
provide an open heart and open arms 
to refugees seeking freedom from 
communist domination and from the 
economic deprivation brought about 
by Fidel Castro and his government." 
Yet, as dangerously crowded boats 
continued into Key West, Fla., the 
incoming tide rose to nearly 31,000. 
How many would follow, nobody was 
sure. Some officials speculated 
upwards towards a quarter of a million. 
Responses from the refugees were 
interesting. A cuban schoolteacher 
said, "There is nothing in Cuba. 



You cannot express what you feel. The 
only ones who have a good social life 
are the Communist leaders. They have 
cars, nice houses. In the last couple of 
years there has been a lot of hunger, 
little clothing. Sometimes we don't get 
soap for three months. In Key West, 
one 75 year old man slowly climbed 
off a shrimp boat and somebody asked 
him, "You've come here to live in 
freedom?" The volunteer took the old 
man's arm and helped him from the 
boat. The man quietly replied, "No, 
I've come to die in freedom." Where 
the Cubans will go and how they 
survive will depend on the reactions of 
Americans. 



hostages. 

March 10 - Ayatollah Khomeini sides 

with militants, hostages stay with them. 

March 23 - The shah flies to Egypt. 

April 7 - Khomeini rules the hostages 

remain with militants. U.S. breaks 

diplomatic relations with Iran and 

imposes economic sanctions. 

April 25 - U.S. military operation to 

free hostages is aborted due to 

helicopter failure. Eight servicemen 

killed. 

April 28 — Sec. of State Cyrus Vance 

resigns in protest of U.S. rescue 

mission. Vance is succeeded by Sen. 

Edmund Muskie. 

April 30 - London's Iranian Embassy is 

attacked, demand release of claimed 

political prisoners. 

May 21 - Day 200. America held 

Hostage. 

Skinheads are out of the army as of 
this year. Army recruits won't have to 
endure "skinhead" haircuts and will be 
given the same respect and dignity 
accorded to all soldiers. That was the 
order from the Army's training and 
Doctrine Command to all recruit 
reception stations and basic training 
centers. Although the Army did not say 
so, the new policy undoubtedly is 
intended to avoid "turning off" 
potential volunteers the Army badly 
needs because it is failing to meet 
recruiting goals. The new order also 
put a stop to referring to recruits as 
"trainee" by the sergeants. They will be 
called "private" or "soldier." 



269 



Editor's Message 



Thank God! It's finally over. The yearbook is at the printers and Todd and myself hope you enjoy 
it. We tried to fill the book with things to interest you, the reader. In doing this I think the two 
of us have just gone through an extremely strenuous year, my grey hairs testify to this! The stress 
started last summer when we battled for a new office in place of the one we lost; in the fall, 
camera ecjuipment was stolen bringing production almost to a standstill. Then came fighting for 
money, one more battle we could put behind us with smiles of success. Our biggest problem 
occurred when most spring sporting events were rained out and with conflicting schedules they 
didn't get the coverage we wanted. I ask for the understanding of those involved — we tried our 
best. Another reoccurring incident was the clash of personalities and ideas which occurred with 
regularity between Todd and myself However we are still good friends who can laugh at the 
past and realize that we effectively tapped each other's talents to produce what we feel is the 
best BSC book ever. With all the frustrations the year contained it was still enjoyable, at least I 
had fun. And with this in mind, I wish to thank those who helped fill the year with memories. To 
my co-editor, Todd Moyer, I just want to say "thanks for everything". I'll try to remember the 
good times (like ZORRO) and forget the bad. Here's hoping next year will turn out okay, jim 
Peffley deserves a kiss for listening to my complaints about school and for helping me when I 
needed it. To my roommates, Pam, Leslie and Lee, thanks for being my sounding board when 
things got tough. To Albert Sukowaski, thanks for your work, even though I could have killed 
you at times. To the rest of the yearbook staff, Sharon, Wendy, Cindy, Cheryl ("those four girls") 
and Brenda, your help is greatly appreciated; without it the book would have been impossible. 
Thanks to Mr. Hoffman, our advisor, who didn't pry into anything, but was there when trouble 
arose. My thanks also goes to Alex for taking some super photos and to Mike Gilroy, our 
publisher, for lending his support and suggestions when they were needed, plus for putting up 
with late deadlines. Special thanks and my love goes to my parents, Bernard and )oan Borski, 
who have always been there when I needed them most, not only for money but for moral 
support and loving concern. To my sister Barb, thanks for getting me into this mess! I think its 
done me some good, by making me channel my resources into something constructive. Last, 
thanks to you, the reader, for enjoying a book which contains sweat, tears and triumphant 
smiles. 



270 



Editor's Message 



Completed, finished, but hopefully not forgotten. 1980 holds special remembrances within each 
of us who experienced the first year ot a new decade. College life, and the people involved in it, 
are represented in these pages. )o Ann and I have done our best to give you complete coverage 
of the year. Not everyone will like the book and 1 am sure we will hear those voices next year, 
but then there are those who are never satisfied. We put in the hours, more than we care to 
think about, to give the students and faculty a terrific book, we hope you enjoy it, I'd like to use 
my alloted space to thank the people who helped me through this year. To |o Ann Borski, my 
co-editor, I thank you for putting up with my humor and my stubborness throughout the year. 
We had some terrific fights, yet remained friends. To Cindy Bell, Sharon Frace, Wendy Mitros and 
Cheryl St. Clair, I thank you all for helping me this year through everything, "those four girls". 
Brenda Friday, I wish to thank for her help with sports. I'd like to thank some people who had 
nothing to do with the yearbook at all, but helped me to forget the "yearbook frustrations" and 
keep my sense of humor: Richard Bales, leff Rauenzahn and Doug Long. A special thank-you 
goes to David Leggett, who caught a lot of my fury, was let down in the last minute before 
lunch or dinner, was pushed aside for days, yet came back with a smile and boost for my 
confidence. I wanted a picture of him in the yearbook, but he was too modest. Maybe next year 
Dave. To those who are still reading this, there are just a few more. Thank-you to those who 
inspired me. Miss Marjorie Lazarus, who edited my first story in high school and continues yet to 
guide me, Mrs. Agnes Robertson, Barb Robertson and Carole Reinert, all three who are involved 
in journalism and in my life. Another person who should be thanked is my close friend Beth 
Radio, to whom 1 only called three times and wrote even less. Finally, I'd like to thank my 
parents, Larry and Sandra Moyer, and my sister Allison. This book is for them, proof that I do 
more at college than fool around and watch TV. 



Specifications 



Cover: 160 pt. binders board; special Antique Green Leather- 
ette with Sand Grain, and embossed die work for front lid and 
spine with non-standard PMS Ivory color applied to all ele- 
ments. Endsheets: 65 lb. EX 10 Ivory stock, Beckett Paper 
Company, with non-standard PMS Green color ink applied. 
Paper: pages 1-16, 177-192 and 273-288 on 100 lb. Bordeaux; 



pages 17-176 and 209-272 on 100 lb. Calais; and pages 193-208 
on Ivory CX 10 Colortext, Beckett Paper Company. Type Face: 
Optima; Divider type in Windsor Outline, by |ohn Sullivan, Art 
Department FIj/KELLER. Color: Color processing by Davor 
Photo Inc. and varnish printed by FIJ/KELLER Company. Senior 
Portraiture: Davor Photo Inc., Bensalem, Pa. Publisher: 
F1I/KELLER Company, Gettysburg, Pa. 



Patrons 



Ash & Naunas 
390 East St. 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

Ms. Barbara Borski 
147 Colonial Dr. 
Warminster, PA 18974 

Mr. & Mrs. Bernard Borski 
147 Colonial Dr. 
Warminster, PA 18974 

Mr. & Mrs. lames Eberly 

RD3 

Danville, PA 17821 

Mr. & Mrs. James Feuda 

Melrose Court Apts, Willow and York Rds. 

Melrose, PA 191 26 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald Frace 

RD1 

Nescopeck, PA 18635 





Mrs. Florence McStravick 
811 Garfield Ave. 
Ardsley, PA 19038 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert O'Barr 
520 Boyer Rd. 
Cheltenham, PA 19012 

Ralph Dillon's Flowers 
Corner of East and Third 
Bloomsburg, PA 17815 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles St. Clair 
RD 6 Box 20 
Danville, PA 17821 



Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Garvin 



Thanks for all your support! 



Madeline Foshay 



Krazy Eddie's Prices are Insane 



Edward lames Mordan 



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