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Full text of "Observations on fox-hunting : and the management of hounds in the kennel and the field. Addressed to young sportsman, about to undertake a hunting establishment"

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JOHNA.SEAVERNS 



. 

















'-C- ; «i. 



OBSERVATIONS 



FOX-HUNTING, 



MANAGEMENT OF HOUNDS 



KENNEL AND THE FIELD. 

ADDRESSED TO 

A YOUNG SPORTSMAN, ABOUT TO UNDERTAKE 
A HUNTING ESTABLISHMENT. 



COLONEL COOK, 

H. P. 28th Drvgoons. 



LONDON : 

PRINTED FOR THE AUTHOR, 

BY WILLIAM NICOL, CLEVELAND ROW, ST. JAMES'S ; 

AND SOLD BY ROWE AND WALLER, BOOKSELLERS, 

FLEET-STREET. 

1826. 



INTRODUCTION. 



X3Y dedicating the following pages to one 
so far better able than myself to judge of 
their merit or their incompetence in the 
harmless celebration of a theme on which 
so much might have been offered with 
propriety, though, comparatively speaking, 
so little has been lately said, I think not to 
obtrude myself on the public as an author, 
or stand forth a candidate for literary fame ; 
especially, having chosen a topic of lighter 
interest, connected neither with the policy 
of governments, the sectaries of religion, 
or the immediate welfare of mankind. But 
may we not sometimes be allowed to treat 
of the recreations, as well as the business of 



[2] 

life ? Let it be remembered, "The Chase" 
has been immortalized by ancient sons; 
nor did Somerville, in modern times, con- 
sider it unworthy of his pen. I shall not, 
therefore, descant on the importance or 
non-importance of Field-Sports ; bearing in 
mind that common, though just observa- 
tion, " whatever is worth doing at all, is 
worth doing well;" and as my chief object 
is the endeavouring to convey instruction 
to the young Sportsman— with now and 
then a friendly souvenir for the old— how- 
ever little the following effort may interest 
the mere pedant, I rest satisfied in the as- 
surance of my friends, that lam advocating 
a manly national amusement, conducive to 
health, and in unison with gentlemanhj 
feeling. Hence, if this humble attempt 
shall in any way tend either to the initia- 
tion, the improvement, or even the amuse- 
ment of a young Sportsman, the end I had 
in view will have been fully answered, while 



[S] 

the time it has cost me from my leisure 
hours will have neither been thrown away 
nor misapplied. 

Having ventured to say thus much as 
to the object of this little Publication, I 
shall conclude my brief Introduction by 
disclaiming every wish to appear either 
too sullenly insensible to the voice of 
censure, or to the smiles of approbation 
too feelingly alive. I wish not for the 
praises of a literary chronicle: let the 
critic lavish his encomiums on the more 
lengthened and maturer labours of the ma- 
thematician, the logician, the poet, and the 
philosopher; thus reserving his patience 
and his praise for works of graver interest 
and weightier materials, to which, so oft 
and so judiciously, 

" Poetic friends prefix each kind address, 

While awe-struck nations hail them from the press." 



[5] 



OBSERVATIONS, &c. 



My dear C. 

I he present improved system of managing 
Hounds is so well known, that any thing I 
may write on the subject you will probably 
have heard before ; nevertheless, if the fol- 
lowing desultory hints afford you any enter- 
tainment, I shall be satisfied ; as to instruc- 
tion, I am persuaded they cannot. You 
wish to know my opinion on various points 
relating to this noble diversion, which con- 
tributes so much to the health and amuse- 
ment of a country life ; I have, therefore, 
put together, in the best manner I could, 
the substance of my observations on every 
thing relating to Fox-hunting, as far as the 



[6] 

experience I may have gained in the kennel 
and the field enables me. 

In the first place, I should recommend 
you to purchase, if possible, a well-bred, 
established Pack of Fox-hounds; and it 
frequently happens that Messrs. Tattersall 
have one to dispose of in the spring. The 
forming such a pack from draughts is by no 
means an easy task ; it requires considerable 
judgment, with long experience ; and you 
will find great difficulty in procuring even 
a few Hounds to start with that are not 
either vicious or worn out : it is very cer- 
tain, no Master of Hounds will part with 
one which is useful and steady. Hunts- 
men will humbug if they can about their 
draughts, but I have very rarely known a 
draught entered Hound good for much. 

Hounds have always been much under- 
valued : we sometimes hear of eight hun- 
dred, or even a thousand guineas, as the 
price of a Hunter, and the sum of three or 



[ 7 ] 

four hundred is often considered a mere 
trifle; whereas, till very lately, a Pack of 
Hounds, on which every thing depends, 
was only considered worth a few hundreds. 
Yet Shakespeare himself appears to have 
known the value of a Hound ; for, in his 
" Induction " to the " Taming of the 
Shrew," a nobleman returned from hunt- 
ing thus speaks of his hounds with delight 
to his huntsman : 

" Lord. Huntsman, I charge thee, tender well my 
hounds ; 
Brach Merriman,— the poor cur is emboss'd, 
And couple Clowder with the deep-mouth'd brach. 
Saw'st thou not, boy, how Silver made it good 
At the hedge-corner, in the coldest fault ? 
I would not lose the dog for twenty pound. 

Hunt. Why, Belman is as good as he, my Lord ; 
He cried upon it at the merest loss, 
And twice to-day pick'd out the dullest scent : 
Trust me, I take him for the better dog." 

The sum of twenty pounds for a single 
Hound in Shakespeare's time (and that not 
the best in the Pack either), was no incon- 



[8] 

siderable price. I am not alluding to " a 
lot of Curs ;" but surely a well-bred, esta- 
blished Pack of Fox-hounds, including 
Brood-bitches and Puppies at walk, must 
be cheap at a thousand or twelve hundred 
pounds. 

I shall first treat on the breeding of 
Hounds. — One of the most essential things 
to keep a Pack of Fox-hounds effective, is 
to breed largely, if you are fortunate in 
commanding good walks for your Whelps; 
but, without them, you will meet with 
nothing but disappointment : I have often 
had fifty couples sent out to inferior walks, 
and not three couples came in again that 
I could enter. From experience I know 
it is impossible to bring up young Hounds 
to any size or shape in a kennel, even if 
they have the good luck to escape the 
distemper. Every Sportsman must know 
how necessary it is to have a clever entry ; 
and if he cannot command good walks 



[9] 

himself, he had better engage the unen- 
tered draughts from some well-known pack, 
whose master is enabled to breed more 
young Hounds than he requires, and which 
are generally the perquisite of the Hunts- 
man, or head man in the kennel. If you 
engage all the draught young Hounds from 
a celebrated kennel, you have a chance of 
having nearly as good an entry as the 
breeder himself. Young Hounds alter so 
much in the course of a few months, that 
you would scarcely know them ; more par- 
ticularly late whelps, which are often 
under size when they are sent home from 
their walks. I have known instances of 
a Master of Hounds losing nearly the whole 
of his entry reserved for himself by the dis- 
temper, while his draught entirely escaped 
it. With those and the few you breed 
yourself, it may thus happen you may have 
the best entry of the two ; and also, which 
is another advantage, you are sure to have 



[ 10] 

well-bred Hounds, — nor is it so likely any 
tricks will be played. 

I have heard many a young master of 
Foxhounds say, " I am strong in old hounds, 
I am therefore quite indifferent about my 
entry, I can do well without any young 
hounds this year, and my pack will be much 
better without them." I allow he would 
not feel the want of them the first season, 
but three or four years afterwards how 
weak the pack would be, and what a loss 
the senior department would have, as no 
pack can be said to be effective unless 
strong in three or four seasons hunters. 

A word now on the subject of Stallion- 
hounds. It is the custom to send bitches 
to the fashionable Stallions of the day ; for 
instance, as formerly, to the late Mr. Mey- 
nell's " Gusman," Lord Fitzwilliam's " Hard- 
wick," Lord Yarborough's " Ranter," Mr. 
Ward's " Charon," the Duke of Rutland's 
" Topper," the Duke of Beaufort's " Jus- 



[ 11 ] 

tice," the Duke of Grafton's " Regent," 
Lord Lonsdale's " Ruler," Mr. Smith's 
" Champion," Mr. Musters's " Collier," 
Lord Middleton's " Vaulter," &c. ; but it 
generally happens that your Brood-bitches 
go to heat much about the same time, it is 
therefore not very probable that one Stal- 
lion-hound can ward many bitches besides 
those of the owner ; nor is it reasonable to 
expect in the heighth of the season that the 
Dog-hounds can be left at home to ward 
bitches from other kennels. I would sug- 
gest, in order to be more certain of your 
breed, that you send your bitch to a well- 
bred dog, brother, if possible, to the Stal- 
lion-hound ; and, to prevent any mistake, 
order your servant to see the bitch warded. 
Speaking of shape and make, it is neces- 
sary to attend particularly to shoulders, 
depth of chest, loins, legs, and feet ; nor is 
bone the least material consideration ; I 
hate a weedy animal of any description, a 



[ 12] 

small Hound, light of bone, is only fit to 
hunt " a cat in a kitchen." 

But let me recommend, whatever you 
do, to breed from noses, as beyond all doubt 
the grand requisite for a Fox-hound is a 
good nose. I should prefer breeding from 
a perfect Hound, though I have known 
some capital ones, the produce of bitches, 
good for nothing themselves, but then they 
were well bred. The greatest and most 
particular attention ought always to be 
paid to the blood of your brood bitches. 
At Newmarket, they will tell you the mare 
is of more consequence than the horse ; 
and it is the opinion of many that some 
mares will breed all runners put them to 
what horse you please, of course I mean a 
thorough bred one. I remember one day, 
being in conversation with the late Sir 
Hedworth Williamson (at old Clarke's, the 
Greyhound, Newmarket,) on the subject of 
breeding Race-horses ; at that time he had 



[ 13 ] 

not quite made up his mind as to what 
horse he should put his famous brood mare 
to, the Dam of Walton, Ditto, Pam, &c. 
but after pausing a short time, he ex- 
claimed, " it's of no consequence, Sir! 
whatever horse I put her to she is sure to 
breed " a winner." Thus some bitches 
will always breed good Hunters ; a favour- 
ite bitch of that description, " Demirep/' 
belonging to Lord Althorp, I believe, 
never bred a bad Hound ; it made no dif- 
ference whether she was put to Mr. Smith's 
" Saladin," the Beaufort " Justice," Sir 
Thomas Mostyn's " Lictor," or any other 
favourite Stallion, the produce was inva- 
riably good ; but the cross with the Duke 
of Beaufort's " Justice " / preferred : and 
in my opinion a bitch by " Justice," out of 
" Demirep," put to Mr. Musters's " Col- 
" lier," would have produced as good 
Hounds as are to be found at this time, 
in any kennel. A bitch I had many years 



[ 14] 

ago also never to my knowledge bred a bad 
hound; her name Desperate. She came 
with a young unentered draught from Sir 
T. Mostyn's pack, when Mr. Shaw hunted 
them. She was got by Sir W. Rowley's Dar- 
ter, out of Mr. Coke of Norfolk's Rally. I 
once put her to the New Forest Senator, his 
dam or gran-dam was got by Lord Stam- 
ford's Rattler, a famous good sort. I gave 
a whelp to the late Mr. Pawlet, of Hamp- 
shire, and when at his kennel, a short 
time before he gave up his hounds, I ob- 
served that I thought that a family likeness 
of old Symmetry, the name of the bitch I 
gave him, ran through the kennel. He said 
" it is very true, half my pack are bred from 
her and Lord Egremont's sort." I know not 
if the present owner of this pack has any of 
the breed, as I could not procure his list. 
Yet we have our partialities, and I confess I 
was always partial to Lord Egremont's sort, 
happening to live near the Duke of Rich- 



[ 1«] 

mond at the time his Lordship gave the 
Duke his Pack, and consequently having fre- 
quent opportunities of witnessing their 
merits. At the time Lord Egremont parted 
with his Hounds, they were hunted by Luke 
Freeman, I believe a Durham man, at least 
he spoke the patois of that country. How- 
ever, come from what part of the kingdom 
he might, few men brought into the field 
a more perfect pack of hounds ; and a 
proof of his entire devotion to his calling, 
and the little value in which he held all 
other pursuits, was afforded by the advice 
which he emphatically gave to one of the 
sons, then a boy, of his noble master, 
the course of whose education necessarily 
interfered with his hunting, " Stoody ! — 
Stoody ! — Stoody ! — always stoodying at 
they books — take I say my advice, Sir, and 
stoody Foox-hunting." Indeed he gave his 
whole body and mind to it, and famously 
he succeeded, as all the country round could 



[ 16] 

testify. A wag, for amusement, and to annoy 
a musical friend that was present, asked the 
old Huntsman " how he employed Ms time 
out of the hunting season," — the veteran 
disdained a reply to a question that showed 
so little knowledge of the duties and cares 
of a Huntsman ; and the Querist proceeded 
with " what think you of musick for an 
amusement ?" " Musick," contemptuously 
echoed Luke, " Aye, — fiddling, Mr. Free- 
man ? " fiddling, — Fiddling, — it's very well 
for cripples and such like, — poor things !— I 
always gives them a halfpenny when I sees 
them at the fairs." 

When I first commenced keeping Fox- 
hounds, I was particularly fortunate in get- 
ting some good draughts from Tom Grant, 
his Grace's Huntsman, at the very time 
Lord Egremont (as I said before), gave his 
Hounds to the Duke of Richmond. His 
Grace possessed an established pack him- 
self, and the Huntsman being naturally 



[ IT ] 

partial to his own sort, many valuable 
Hounds from Lord Egremont's pack were 
draughted ; they were capital hunters, and 
turned with a scent as quick as the animal 
they hunted ; no hounds were stouter, or 
better equal to a second Fox. The " Jum- 
pers," the " Sampsons," the " Dromo's," 
the " Ledger's," all capital ; so much so, 
that when they were presented to His 
Majesty to hunt Deer, I thought it a great 
loss to the sporting world. Mr. Warde, 
who of course is very justly partial to his 
own sort, had never any objection to breed- 
ing from the Beaufort " Justice," and he is 
of Lord Egremont's blood, got by the New 
Forest Justice, and Justice by Mr. Gilbert's 
Jasper, and Jasper was bred by Lord Egre- 
mont. It is almost impossible for me, who 
have been so many years vegetating on the 
Continent, to know the best blood now 
going, except from a chance List which 
may occasionally be sent me. The Yar- 

c 



[18] 

borough's, however, the Meynell's, the 
Warde's, the Grafton's, and though " last 
not least," the Beaufort's, still rank in the 
first class. Half the hounds in the king- 
dom are, it must be acknowledged, of the 
blood of the late Mr. Meynell's " Gusman," 
and Lord Yarborough's " Ranter." I could 
name fifty favourite sorts, but as every thing 
is regulated by fashion, you will of course, 
in some degree, fall under it's influence. 

" Fashion though Folly's child, and guide of fools, 
" Rules e'en the wisest, and in learning rules." 

But never let fashion so completely bias 
you, as to prevent you from breeding from 
good noses. Those that can turn quick 
with a scent, be assured, are the sort of 
hounds to kill Foxes in any country. 

Breeders are generally too partial to 
their own sort; Philip Payne, Huntsman 
to the Duke of Beaufort, is reported to be 
the best judge of breeding in the kingdom ; 
and from His Grace's list I observe he is not 



[ 1»] 

bigoted to any particular sort, but sends his 
bitches to the different Dog-hounds of ce- 
lebrated packs, all over the kingdom. He 
informed me if he heard of one that had a 
particular good nose, and did his work well, 
he sent a bitch to him. His sending the 
Duke's famous Brood-bitch, Gladsome, to 
that celebrated Stallion Hound, Mr. Smith's 
Collier, was from the report he had heard of 
his superior abilities in the field. I have 
lately seen some of the same blood, in the 
Duke's pack, work through difficulties, and 
turn very quick with a scent, which proves 
the advantage of a judicious cross. They 
could also go a killing pace, and carry an 
excellent head across a country, without a 
single hound in the pack being out of his 
place, although they were over-rode most 
shamefully, and often deceived by false hal- 
loos. This must surely be considered suffi- 
cient to make any hounds wild, at least for 
the day; but, in spite of every untoward 



[20] 

circumstance, they put their noses down, 
and to my amazement, hunted in the most 
correct and superior style, as much so, as 
if their followers had behaved according to 
rule, and every thing had been done quietly. 
With regard to the actual setting to 
work, the sooner you can commence Cub- 
hunting the better, and the steadier your 
pack will afterwards be. A friend of mine, 
an excellent sportsman, for want of Foxes 
in his woodlands, cannot begin before the 
end of September, or the beginning of 
October; but by great attention and per- 
severance through the summer, he has his 
pack steady ; and what makes it the more 
meritorious, he is always obliged to enter 
a great number of young hounds, the Fo- 
rest laming so many every season. Not- 
withstanding all these disadvantages, his 
hounds are capital and very effective. His 
Bitch pack is most elegant, ,and what is of 
more consequence, they are perfect at their 



[21 ] 

work. I am pleased to hear you have it 
in contemplation to hunt your own hounds, 
l>ut I would advise you, not to attempt so 
great an undertaking unless you can give 
your whole time to it ; at all events, you 
should never leave your hounds from the 
first day of Cub-hunting until the end of 
the season. Allow me to observe that Cub- 
hunting is very necessary for many reasons ; 
you will gain by it a thorough knowledge 
of your pack ; and they will know you, 
obey you, and when you want them, will 
also carry you through many difficulties 
they otherwise would not. I always con- 
sidered the Cub-Hunting season the time 
when a master of hounds never ought to be 
absent, whether he hunts them himself or 
not ; and, to a real sportsman, it is a great 
pleasure to see his young hounds enter. 

When regular hunting begins, the labo- 
rious part of a Huntsman's duty is over, and 
the pack may then be said to be formed. If 



[22] 

he is satisfied with their performance in 
covert, there is little doubt but that they 
will do well in the open; hounds that can 
kill a Fox quick in covert seldom fail out 
of it. 

I was out the other day in a large wood- 
land in Wiltshire, and very much pleased 
with a pack of hounds I saw at work ; they 
kept close together at their Fox, and killed 
him handsomely in forty-three minutes. I 
only saw them cross two fields out of co- 
vert, but it was enough to convince me 
they could do the thing well over a coun- 
try ; indeed I have heard from an excel- 
lent judge, that they are quite as good out 
of covert as they are in. The pack consisted 
chiefly of the Beaufort sort. 

Sportsmen differ in opinion with regard 
to the best wmj of entering hounds. A very 
celebrated one once told me, he thought 
the most preferable method was to enter 
them to Hare in the spring : I never could 



[23] 

fancy it ; although it might be economical 
to find out their vices, and by tjiat means 
save the expense of keeping them over the 
summer. A much better plan I should 
imagine, if they are well bred, is to put them 
with some veterans into a covert, not too 
small or too large, certain of having a litter 
of Foxes; and continue to hunt the dif- 
ferent coverts you may happen to have in 
your Cub-hunting country, thus giving 
your young hounds plenty of work and 
blood ; when, if I mistake not, you will 
soon find they will " down with their noses " 
without being unnaturally stooped to Hare. 
If you are strong in Utters of Foxes in your 
Cub-hunting country, you cannot give your 
young pack too much work ; do not regard 
their being scratched and disfigured ; it is 
a good sign if they scratch their faces in 
covert Cub-hunting, and it is the most 
rational way of entering them. 

I remember once coming out of Tatter- 



[24] 

sail's in company with a Nobleman, a good 
Sportsman, and a good man ; we were all 
at once joined by another master of Fox- 
hounds, who introduced himself by telling 
us he had found out the only method of 
entering Hounds, and that was to a drag- 
scent. This is certainly one way with a 
vengeance, but / am quite sure you will 
never try it. 

Punishing your hounds before they 
know what a Fox-scent is, and flogging 
them in kennel, is an unnecessary seve- 
rity, but it is almost impossible to break 
them without punishment. To some people 
it may appear cruel to have a young 
hound severely punished, but it stands to 
reason that one good sound flogging when 
he deserves it, is far better than frequently 
tormenting him, and is most likely to ac- 
complish your wish, that of making him 
steady and handy. Still I should ad- 
vise you never to have a young hound 



[25] 

punished unless you are quite certain he 
deserves it. We are often too hasty in 
draughting young hounds ; it is no uncom- 
mon thing with the Distemper hanging 
about them, and when over-worked in hot 
weather, for them to become noisy, or to 
find them tire; and when I have seen 
young hounds do wrong that I knew had 
no vice in the family, I have nursed and 
rested them ; if afterwards they have conti- 
nued their bad habits, I of course draughted 
them. Never be in too great a hurry 
to draught a young hound ; but an old one, 
the first fault he commits, condemn him, 
and never let him go out again if you wish 
to have a perfect pack and the thing done 
as it ought to be. 

Let me name three vices most common 
in hounds, and which are considered incur- 
able, viz. shirting, running mute, and being 
noisy ; when a hound is in the habit of 
skirting, draught him immediately, for he 



[26] 

will never be better, but get worse and 
worse every time he is taken out. A mute 
hound, like a person dumb, never can be 
cured ; on the other hand, it is very un- 
pleasant to hear a hound speak too much 
on a scent, or to find him " throwing 
tongue to cry." One that " throws his 
tongue " where the Fox has never been, like 
a liar, is generally incorrigible. Hounds 
ought never to speak but on a Fox scent, 
and then we may depend upon then- 
tongues as upon those of a Solon or an 
Eldon. 

Perhaps one of the greatest miseries 
attendant upon keeping Fox-hounds is the 
Distemper ! Can any thing be more heart- 
rending to a master of hoimds, than to have 
a clever entry taken oiF a short time before 
hunting ? And, what is very extraordinary, 
no specific remedy for it, to my know- 
ledge, has hitherto been found out. Ca- 
lomel and emetics will sometimes do good ; 



[27 ] 

and garlic has been recommended, when 
this dreadful malady first begins to take 
the animal off his feed ; the French apply a 
blister to his forehead, which they say is a 
sure cure ; if so, the distemper is less vio- 
lent on the Continent ; but Frenchmen, if 
you believe them, have a cure for every 
disease in man, horse, or dog. 

The following receipt I have sometimes 
found efficacious for the Distemper : 

Calomel .... 3 grains. 

Cathartic Ext. . . 7 ditto. 

Soap 7 ditto. 

Emetic Tart. . . ■£ grain. 

Make the above ingredients into three 
pills, and one should be given every other 
day. 

I have heard some medical men give it 
as their opinion, that in the distemper the 
lungs of the animal are diseased, others the 
liver ; I have no doubt myself but that 



[28] 

both are. The late Mr. Pawlett, of Hamp- 
shire, tried the experiment of vaccination 
on half his young hounds, all of which 
lived ; this made him very sanguine as to 
the result, and he fancied he had found out a 
way of conquering the distemper. The next 
year he had the whole vaccinated, but had 
the mortification of having them all die. 

It is generally thought best to keep 
young hounds high in flesh, as in that state 
they are not so liable to have the dis- 
temper, and if they have it, the attack is 
less violent. I am aware all young hounds 
which have been fed high, have gone 
through regular exercise, and in conse- 
quence gained strength, when attacked by 
this horrid malady, are more likely to get 
over it than those which have not been 
so treated ; but I never knew a very fat 
young hound come from his walk and 
catch the distemper immediately, that ever 
recovered. 



[ 29 ] 

It has often appeared to me a good 
plan to have them fed sparingly, and a 
dose of physic given them a short time pre- 
vious to their being sent home to the kennel ; 
but it is most commonly quite the reverse, 
for every one is anxious to send his puppy 
from his walk home fat, in order that he may 
excel his neighbours. So much for the dis- 
temper ; which, certainly, next to a kennel 
lameness, is about the greatest misfortune 
that can befall a master of hounds. 

With regard to the use of Terriers in the 
field; — they are no doubt sometimes of 
service, particularly when Foxes use drains, 
but if they are not perfectly steady, they 
will do a great deal of mischief. They 
should invariably be entered with the young 
hounds, and always be kept in the kennel. 
As a matter of curiosity, I here give you an 
instance or two of the extraordinary length 
of time terriers will exist without food ; one 
occurred the other day. I was staying at a 



[30] 

friend's house in Hertfordshire, who had 
lost a favourite terrier seven days : on going 
out to look at his sporting dogs near the 
house, he thought he heard the voice of 
his lost dog. He recollected the last time 
it was seen was near the mouth of a drain, 
upwards of two hundred yards from the 
spot from whence the sound came. He 
immediately ordered his workmen to open 
the drain, and they found the terrier jammed 
in a narrow part of it ; the animal appeared 
lively, and not the worse for her long fasting, 
except being a little reduced in flesh, and the 
next day very lethargic. I heard at the same 
time a still more extraordinary instance of 
a terrier remaining in an earth for twenty 
days, and I dare venture to vouch for the 
truth of it. The Hatfield hounds had run 
a Fox to ground, and the terrier followed 
it in. They dug many hours without com- 
ing up to the fox or the dog ; and at last 
were obliged to give it up as a hopeless 



[31 ] 

job. The terrier was the property of old 
Joe, the 'then whipper-in, and a great fa- 
vourite. He therefore had the earth watched, 
and on the twentieth day the dog crawled 
out a mere skeleton, but with proper at- 
tention was recovered. 

A healthy kennel must be one of your 
first considerations ; there is nothing so 
much against hounds as a damp one ; — we 
all know the danger to ourselves of a damp 
house; and a kennel in this state causes 
a variety of diseases — lameness, ophthalmia, 
liver-complaints, &c, and frequently occa- 
sions hounds to become chest-foundered ; 
besides a damp kennel never can be sweet. 
The Duke of Richmond's kennel at Good- 
wood is supposed to be the most complete 
in England. The neighbouring Gentlemen 
informed me, that it cost ten thousand 
pounds in building. The lodging-rooms of 
this, I may almost say, gigantic building, 
are fitted up with stoves ; I never thought 



[32] 

them of much use, but no doubt they keep 
the kennel dry ; the Huntsman assured 
me that after a very hard day and much 
fatigue, he had found them of great service, 
he thought the hounds recovered them- 
selves, and were fit to come out again much 
sooner in consequence of the warmth aris- 
ing from them. 

Very few masters of Fox-hounds can 
afford to build so magnificent a kennel; 
but it is my opinion your hounds may be 
equally well lodged in one that may not 
have cost so large a sum. The kennel at 
Puckeridge in Hertfordshire, which cost 
about £500. building, is very convenient, 
dry, and healthy, and the hounds have no 
lameness. The Hampshire Hunt kennel also 
cost only a few hundreds, and is as good a 
one and as convenient as a master of hounds 
could wish for. The hounds that inhabit 
these kennels are very sizable, and do their 
work well in the field, and hunt as Fox- 



[ 33 ] 

hounds should do. Before you begin to 
build your kennel, let me recommend you 
to take a look at one of these. If you 
should find a convenience in having a ken- 
nel in a distant part of your hunt, a roomy 
barn is the building most likely to suit, and 
may be converted into one, at very little 
expence. 

Good water is as necessary for hounds 
as good meal, and the flesh for boiling 
ought also to be attended to ; it frequently 
happens, that this is contracted for, and the 
contractor, of whatever disease ahorse may 
have died, will be too apt to bring the car- 
case to the kennel. We know it is com- 
monly said " any thing will do for dogs;" 
but let me assure you, nothing will put 
hounds so soon out of condition as bad 
flesh. 

Old Oat meal is no doubt the best food 
for hounds to work upon. I have no ob- 
jection occasionally to mix a little old 

D 



[34] 

Barley meal with it, which has been grown 
on light land, but it must be given with as 
much caution as you would beans to a 
horse. 

Wheat meal, mixed with oatmeal in 
equal quantities, is used in some kennels ; 
but the oatmeal requires the longer boiling. 
Feeders are often negligent, and in too 
great a hurry to finish their work, to attend 
properly to this necessary point. Your 
meal should be put into the copper when 
the water quite boils, and then should be 
boiled up a second time; you must allow 
at least an hour and a half from that time 
to boil it well, and if an hour and three- 
quarters, it will be none the worse for it ; 
for nothing will choke hounds so soon as 
meal half boiled. 

In the summer it is of little consequence 
what hounds are fed upon, provided they 
have wholesome food ; but in the hunting 
season, if every thing is not of the very 



[35] 

best quality you cannot have them in con- 
dition. If there is any truth in the report 
of flour having been adulterated with bones, 
plaister of Paris, &c, is it not natural to 
suppose that oatmeal also may have it's 
share of these pernicious ingredients ? You 
ought therefore to be very particular in 
getting good meal ; the Irish is the best, and 
the most likely to be genuine. 

It is quite certain a hound too high in 
condition cannot run a burst, neither can 
a poor half-starved one kill an afternoon 
Fox ; a hound therefore cannot be consi- 
dered as fit to be brought out if he is either 
too high or too low. I like to see their ribs, 
but their loins should be well filled up, 
and they should be hollow in their flanks : 
he that is full in the flanks is sure to be fat 
in the inside, and consequently not fit for 
work. The feeding of hounds, and the 
bringing them to cover able to run a burst, 
or kill an afternoon Fox, is not altogether 



[36] 

a thing so very easy as some people ima- 
gine ; in fact, it requires nearly as much 
trouble to get a hound into condition, as it 
does a horse ; and if the greatest attention 
is not paid to this particular, you cannot 
expect to catch many Foxes. It is the 
condition of a hound, which gives him the 
advantage over the animal he hunts. 
Nevertheless then* constitutions differ as 
much as those of the human species ; some 
require thick food, others thin ; the same 
quantity which may be requisite for Ranter, 
if given to Rally wood, would render him 
unable to run a yard. Sometime before 
hunting commences (say about three weeks), 
they should have plenty of walking exercise, 
and salts given them once a week. 

If a hound at any time is very foul, the 
following recipe is very efficacious. 

3 grains iEthiops Mineral, 

5 grains Calomel, 
made into a bolus ; the hound must 



[ 37 ] 

of course be carefully kept from cold 
water. 

Should your hounds be troubled with 
worms, powdered glass sifted through 
muslin is the best remedy that I know of 
to remove them. The dose should be as 
much as will lie on a shilling, and I have 
seen it cause the ejection of a great quan- 
tity of those destructive animals. 

In the summer months I always fed my 
hounds the last thing in the evening : feed- 
ing them late at that season of the year 
keeps them quiet in the night, and is the 
wisest method I know to prevent their 
rioting in the kennel. Servants in general 
prefer feeding them early, in order that 
they may have the evenings to themselves. 

It appears you wish to be informed of the 
proper time to feed hounds the day before 
hunting ; if you were certain of finding at 
half past ten, and sure of running a burst, I 
should say an early hour was best ; but to 



[38] 

take all chances of finding early or late, 
about ten o'clock is the hour I should prefer. 
In feeding your hounds after hunting, that 
must depend on circumstances ; but in the 
general way I should say feed them imme- 
diately on their return to the kennel ; and 
if after a hard day that happens to be late, 
allow them to eat what they please. And 
again, the last thing before you go to bed, 
endeavour to coax the bad feeders. It is a 
good plan to wash their feet in warm liquor 
when they return from hunting — what the 
French call giving them a bain de pie ; yet 
some people think it makes their feet 
tender. 

I should advise you in the hunting sea- 
son, when the frost sets in, to give your 
hounds some cooling physic, to lower their 
food, and the more they are taken out on 
the turnpike road, the better. To my 
horses also, at that time, I gave a dose of 
physic each, taking care to give it only to a 



[39] 

few at a time in case of a sudden thaw. By 
paying proper attention to things which 
some people may imagine of little import- 
ance, you will save a great deal of trouble 
and unnecessary expense. 

It is equally advisable to bleed and physic 
hounds when the hunting season is over, 
and before it commences. Many people 
dress them twice a year ; I did it, because 
it was the fashion ; but, if ever I have the 
good fortune to keep hounds again, I will 
not resume the practice. Old Tom Grant, 
who was a capital kennel Huntsman, told 
me he never dressed his hounds ! and they 
always looked well in the field throughout 
the season. His idea was, that dressing 
them brought off their coats at an unna- 
tural time, and hounds often dressed sel- 
dom looked well after Christmas. 

The following recipe is frequently made 
use of upon the Continent, particularly by 
the French, to remove any redness or scurf 



[40] 

from the skins of dogs. It certainly has 
the effect of making their coats look as fine 
as if they had been dressed, without taking 
off the hair, and it will destroy ticks and 
all other vermin. In short, I have every 
reason to believe it will answer all the pur- 
poses of dressing without it's inconvenience ; 
at the same time, the mercurial preparation 
in the recipe is so very mild, that the ani- 
mal runs no risk of taking cold. 

Mercurial Ointment . . . . \ oz. 
Stone Brimstone (finely powdered) •§■ oz. 

The ingredients should be well rubbed up 
together, and then thoroughly mixed with 
\ lb. of hogs-lard. 

It is the custom in some kennels to spay 
all the bitches they do not intend to breed 
from ; but the operation is so very severe, 
and the sufferings of the animal so great, 
that I should advise you to avoid it alto- 
gether ; especially as it is a practice by 



[41 ] 

which very little is gained ; while, on the 
other hand, I have observed, that at the 
time the bitches would have been at heat, 
they are often sulky, wild, and not the 
same animals; moreover, if the operation is 
not performed by a very skilful hand, the 
bitch will go to heat after all. It has been 
thought the cutting of dogs strengthens 
them over the loins ; but I must say this 
also is a practice I do not approve. Why 
put forward a young hound if he is weak 
over his loins ? 

You will perceive from what I have 
already written, that if you undertake 
the management of Fox-hounds, you will 
have very little time for any other oc- 
cupation, provided you pay the atten- 
tion to it you ought to do, and which the 
Gentlemen of the country you hunt will 
have a right to expect from you. The 
great expence you must necessarily incur, 
accompanied by a perpetual anxiety of 



[42] 

mind, will be all in vain, unless owners of co- 
verts are determined in earnest to preserve 
Foxes. The time is not so long gone 
by, when it was thought even dishonourable 
to destroy foxes if hounds hunted a coun- 
try ; but we all know, from an unfortunate 
exposure in a trial for trespass, that we 
cannot legally claim any right to hunt. In 
the present day, by courtesy alone, it is 
sanctioned. 

The great mania for Game, and the use- 
less quantity of it with which we find most 
coverts glutted, is a great misfortune to 
Fox-hunting. For some time (may I be 
allowed to say) there has been a war be- 
tween the Pheasant and the Fox ; during 
which period (what may seem not a little 
extraordinary, and I state it with regret) 
the former has generally been victorious. 
Still I am no enemy to shooting, particularly 
to Partridge-shooting, because it is an ac- 
tive amusement, and a healthy exercise, 



[43] 

without both of which, to my mind, no sport 
can exist. I never could make up my 
mind, to go to any of their Batu'es. I 
won't say that the danger attending them 
has kept me away, though it is by no means 
trifling, for the accidents we read of far ex- 
ceed in number those which occur in Fox- 
hunting ; and surely a fall from a horse is 
better than being shot by a friend. 

The feeds given on these occasions are 
generally capital, though to a real Sports- 
man, there is but little amusement. 

Happening to be on a journey in a mail 
coach one Christmas, as we were changing 
horses in a small market town in the lower 
part of Hampshire, I saw an immense quan- 
tity of game lying at the coach office to be 
forwarded to its destination. I enquired 
from whence it came ; and was informed a 
grande batue had taken place not far dis- 
tant. Knowing some of the party, I naturally 
enquired of the landlord of the inn who had 



[44] 

bagged the most game : " I know nothing 
about that, Sir," said he, " but the men who 
beat for the Gentlemen killed one hunched 
and twenty head f now if the foxes had 
only taken one-tenth of what the beaters 
knocked on the head, it would have made a 
great noise in the country, although a single 
fox would have shewn a hundred neigh- 
bouring gentlemen a day's sport. It would 
be no very difficult matter to have pheasants 
driven up so as to shoot them from your 
drawing- Room window, and thus treat 
Mamma and the children with a partie de 
Chasse ; they may then have ocular de- 
monstration what a good shot Papa is! 
I hope my brother Sportsmen of the trigger 
will not be offended ; I am as anxious for 
the preservation of game as any man ; my 
only fear is that it will be carried to too great 
an extent, and in the end defeat its object. 
If I were to say a vixen Fox that had cubs 
would not lay hold of the first eatable thing 



[45] 

she met with, whether game, fowl, or rabbit, 
I should be making a false statement ; but 
if there are plenty of the latter, Foxes will 
destroy but little game ; and I am certain 
game preservers may have it in quantities to 
their heart's content, and Foxes also, if they 
will but pay their keepers' wages in argent 
comptant, and not in rabbits. As a proof 
of this, I will mention an instance which 
happened to me: — I was requested some 
years ago, at the time I hunted the Thur- 
low country, to meet at Chippenham, near 
Newmarket, the owner of which and his 
keeper said we might by chance find a Fox, 
but they were certain no Foxes had been 
bred there, as they had not lost a single 
head of game. I never in my life saw so 
many pheasants of every sort, and hares 
innumerable ; and, to the astonishment of 
all present, in the very middle of the pre- 
serve, and lying with the pheasants, so near 
that they must have almost touched each 



L 46 3 

other, we found a litter of Foxes, six or 
seven in number. We killed the old dog 
and one of the cubs. I must observe, how- 
ever, there were plenty of rabbits — but 
they were not the keeper's perquisite. As 
we are on the subject of preserving Foxes, 
I must relate an occurrence which happened 
some years ago on the borders of the New 
Forest. An estate had been sold to an 
East India Gentleman, which had been 
hunted from the time of William Rufus, 
and Foxes strictly preserved upon it. The 
new owner having taken possession, when 
the hunting season commenced the hounds 
came there as usual, but the old Nabob 
swore he would shoot the men, hounds and 
all, if they persisted in coming on his pro- 
perty. A Right Honourable Gentleman 
(now no more,) a friend to Fox-hunting, 
although no Fox-hunter himself, and who 
was acquainted with all parties, waited 
upon him, and mildly pointed out the 



[47] 

impropriety of his conduct, telling him if he 
wished to live upon friendly terms with his 
neighbours, he must act differently. "What," 
said old Cayenne Pepper, " am I not master 
of my own property ? and am I to be an- 
noyed by the noise of dogs and fellows in 
red coats ? " " It is true," said the Right 
Honourable, " the coverts are yours by law, 
the game and timber also are yours, but by 
the law of honour no gentleman would pre- 
vent his neighbours from taking their ac- 
customed diversion, when the inconvenience 
would be so trifling to himself." The old 
Gentleman began to cool on hearing his 
honour was at stake, and said, " If tliey 
must hunt they must ; but I request they 
will let me know when the hounds come 
into the neighbourhood, that I may get 
out of the way." At length, however, this 
hostile disposition gradually wore away, 
he became friendly to the hunt, and pre- 
served Foxes with a spirit and an anxiety 



[48 ] 

which did him credit, and materially raised 
him in the estimation of his neighbours. 

A stock of old Foxes is as necessary 
for sport as a stock of old hounds ; Foxes 
of the year are weak, and those of two years 
old know but little country. 

To hunt a country and make the most 
of it, so as to give general satisfaction, re- 
quires some consideration. Supposing you 
have a thorough knowledge of it, use your 
own judgment and never be led by others 
for you will find they have most commonly 
some selfish motives, and will often mislead 
you. In the summer months, if you are with 
your hounds, and have not gained that 
local knowledge of your country, at all 
times so indispensable, you will find it use- 
ful and agreeable to ride with them early 
in a refreshing summer's morning. At the 
same time you can receive information re- 
specting your fitters of Foxes ; and, be- 
sides, if any of the young hounds should 



[ 49 ] 

happen to be lost in the succeeding hunt- 
ing season, they will the better know their 
way home. A country ought to be regu- 
larly hunted, the good and the bad alter- 
nately, to give general satisfaction, and in 
the long run you will have a better chance 
of sport. If you are continually disturbing 
your best country, you may have blank 
days, and the foxes will be very shy. 
Where there are many earths they will 
lay at ground. There can be no doubt 
but it must be more agreeable to hunt a 
good country always, if you have extent 
enough for an open season. Provided you 
cannot hunt the inferior one, so as to give 
satisfaction, it is more liberal to give it up 
altogether to some neighbouring pack, or 
even to some one from a distance, who 
might be glad to hunt it regularly. The 
keeping a country, and requiring owners 
of coverts to preserve, without hunting it, 
is too much to expect, and gives people 

E 



[50 ] 

an opportunity of alluding to the story of 
the Dog in the Manger. And for another 
reason, although farmers are liberal, they 
think it hardly fair play, if they rent a farm 
in the best part of the hunt for sport, to 
have their land rode over constantly, whilst 
in the other less favourable part the hounds 
never meet. Their conversation at the 
market dinner, over a bottle, is often upon 
this subject ; whereas if you do but hunt 
the whole country impartially, there can 
be no cause for complaint. 

It is a very common case for a master 
of hounds to be requested to draw such 
and such a covert, merely because it may 
happen to accommodate some of the gen- 
tlemen out, by lying on their way home ; 
now, if an acquiescence in this should cause 
no inconvenience or material alteration in 
the arrangements made for the day, it may 
be all very well to do what you can to 
oblige any particular person or set of men 



[51 ] 

out ; but it should nevertheless be remem- 
bered by all the field, that as people are 
in the habit of coming great distances, in 
every direction, to the point where hounds 
meet in the morning, by thus acceding to 
the wishes of &few, you are likely to in- 
convenience many ; besides the probability 
of occasioning yourself, servants, hounds, 
and horses, (should the draw he from home 
instead of towards it,) to remain out late, 
and undergo the fatigue of creeping home 
along dark muddy lanes, in a wet Decem- 
ber night, without even the moon or stars 
to guide you. Some men will mislead you 
to avoid having their coverts disturbed; 
fearing a tame pheasant may fly away to 
his neighbour's preserves. After all, it is 
best to be firm, and never change the plan 
of drawing which you may have fixed upon, 
and considered to be the most probable 
one for sport. You will, no doubt, now 
and then be requested to meet at a par- 



[ 52 ] 

ticular place, to oblige a friend who may 
have a party of fox-hunters at his house; 
and, provided you can do this without inter- 
fering with your arrangements, and that it 
is not prejudicial to sport in other parts of 
the hunt, there can be no harm in comply- 
ing with it. 

When I have drawn a covert blank, and 
have suspected some trick has been played 
to prevent my coming again that season, I 
always made a point of taking it in its turn, 
and drawing very close. Some illiberals I 
have known, who kill all the foxes, and 
when the hounds meet at their covert, have 
a bag-man ready to turn down, taking care 
to have two or three foot people placed at 
different parts to halloo at the same in- 
stant, that it may appear there are several 
foxes on foot. This may deceive a young, 
inexperienced Sportsman ; but an old one 
it never can. I remember, some years ago, 
a person who I was certain killed foxes, 



[53 ] 

requested me to come when the snow had 
fallen, to observe their tracks into his pre- 
serves : I reminded him of the story in 
i^sop's Fables, of the answer the Fox gave 
the Lion, when he endeavoured to entice 
him into his den — " You will," said the 
Lion, " run no risk ; observe the tracks of 
many of your species into my den." " Very 
true," answered Reynard ; " I see the 
marks of those that entered, but where can 
you point out to me a single trace of one 
returning f" I was well assured, if a fox 
once wandered into my pretended friend's 
preserves, he would never come out again 
alive. I have always preferred an open 
foe, in every station of life ; for a pretended 
friend is the worst of enemies, — and so is 
that person who promises to preserve 
foxes, and at the same time gives secret 
orders to his keepers to destroy them. 

If you are invited to hunt a country, 
with promises of support in every way, it 



[54] 

will be a source of great mortification, dis- 
appointment, and serious inconvenience, if 
they are not sacredly fulfilled. You may 
have various other prospects in view, and 
other countries may be anxious to have 
you to superintend their hunting establish- 
ments ; therefore, before you close, I should 
strenuously advise your having a clear and 
explicit understanding of what is expected 
on both sides, that neither party may have 
it in their power to complain at a future 
period. The country may probably expect 
you to do impossibilities, and more than 
mortal man can perform; and you may 
expect more from them than they had any 
intention of doing. The best plan, there- 
fore, to keep all things right, is to have 
the agreement put down in black and 
white, and signed by both parties. The 
deviating from these instructions may be 
productive of mutual disputes and dissatis- 
faction. 



[55] 

If you should, after a good day's sport, 
run a fox to ground in a neighbouring 
hunt, according to the laws of fox-hunting, 
it is not correct to dig him. If you run 
him into a main earth, the best way will 
be to leave the place with as little delay 
as possible, to prevent any misrepresenta- 
tion that might lead to a misunderstand- 
ing ; for no people (I will not even except 
the riders of the present day,) are so jealous 
of each other as masters of foxhounds. 
But if you should run your fox into a drain, 
or any hole that is not a regular fox-earth, 
it is then thought fair to bolt him in any 
way you can, except by digging; but on 
no account must you allow a spade to 
enter the ground. It may be your hunted 
fox, or it may not ; though, if he goes to 
ground in a main earth, it is most likely 
you have changed, as a fox will seldom go 
into an earth with which he is unacquaint- 
ed. Under-ground fox-hunting is but poor 



[ 56 ] 

fun : waiting shivering in the cold for two 
or three hours is not very agreeable, — 
and your horses are in great danger of 
catching cold. If you have no chance of 
getting him out soon, and the day is not 
too far advanced, it is far better to draw 
for another fox, after having taken proper 
precautions against the probability of his 
being taken by fox-stealers. 

That slow operation of digging for a 
fox, is only allowable when your hounds 
are in great want of blood; from experi- 
ence I know it may be sometimes neces- 
sary, and on such occasions it cannot be 
considered unsportsmanlike. Any thing 
may be done, as I observed before, in 
reason, except turning out " a Bag-man." 

The simple fact of my having had ex- 
cellent sport, and having received the 
greatest kindness and support, in the coun- 
ties of Essex and Suffolk, will, I hope, 
apologize for my giving you some account 



[57 ] 

uf them. The hundreds of Essex, (or what 
is called Lord Petre's side of the country,) 
are particularly good for cub hunting, on 
account of his Lordship having preserved 
strictly before he kept hounds himself. 
His property is very extensive ; the wood- 
lands extremely convenient, and always 
moist at the bottom in a dry autumn, which 
is a great advantage ; and you can generally 
begin cub hunting about the 20th of Au- 
gust. For what reason, I never could rightly 
ascertain, but the foxes in the Roothings 
or Rodings of Essex and part of Suffolk 
are certainly stouter than any I have met 
with in other countries. Stub bred foxes 
are thought to be the stoutest, and in 
the former places they are all bred above 
ground ; for from Myless, near Ongar, to 
Bigods, a covert on the other side of Dun- 
mow, a distance of nearly twenty miles, I 
do not know of a single earth. The en- 
closures are large, the country flat, and you 
can go from point to point, nine miles with- 



[58] 

out meeting with a single covert. From 
Man-wood, one of the best coverts in the 
Roothings, to Lord Maynard's High-wood, 
near Dunmow, a line of country the foxes 
formerly took, and from the latter to Lord 
Petre's High-wood, near Writtle Park, are 
still greater distances. The country is 
chiefly under plough, but well drained, 
and it rides light in comparison with other 
ploughed countries : the ditches are rather 
wide, but not blind ; and the scent, after 
Christmas, is invariably good. I believe 
there never was an instance of an old wild 
Roothing fox having been killed with a 
hunting scent : if you do not go away close 
at him, at the very best pace, he never will 
be caught ; and if you come to a check 
with a hunting scent, it is twenty to one 
he beats you. One thing ought always to 
be attended to, which is, when your fox is 
gone, to be as quick in getting your hounds 
after him as possible. 

Leaden-Roothing is thought to be the 



[59] 

best covert in the hunt ; but I preferred 
Old Park Coppice, a covert at the ex- 
tremity of the Roothings towards Chelms- 
ford, probably because I had the best runs 
from it, and the foxes found in the latter 
are reckoned the stoutest in Essex. A 
pack that hunted the Dunmow country 
before I took it, managed by all the " ta- 
lents " in that neighbourhood, (nor was 
their huntsman considered otherwise than 
a celebrated one,) found from experience 
that an Old Park fox was not so easily 
caught, although they seldom missed their 
foxes in other parts of the hunt. 

A word or two more as to Old Park 
Coppice as a good covert for sport. I had 
four very superior runs from it in one sea- 
son, and killed each day ; and it afforded 
me several good days sport besides ; I will 
mention a few of them. One run of an hour 
and twenty minutes, and killed at Colonel 
Strutt's, near Maldon, 12 miles an end at 



[60] 

least. Another, with a Fox of the year, 
the quickest thing I ever saw, and killed 
him a few fields from Takely Forest, the 
Pack running into him in the open. Again, 
a run of one hour and ten minutes, ten 
miles an end and killed. But a run I had 
from a covert a short distance from Old 
Park, was one of the most brilliant things 
I witnessed during the time I kept hounds ; 
when we found him we considered him an 
Old Park fox ; and as he went away, a 
friend of mine, an old member of the 
" Talents Hunt," said to me, " there he 
goes, he is one of the old sort, my Master, 
he is not to be measured to-day ! You will 
never see him again ! " my answer was, " / 
hope not alive, Sir." My hounds were close 
at his brush when he broke covert, and they 
went the very best pace for fifty-five mi- 
nutes over the open without a check, and 
killed him at the edge of a chain of wood- 
lands, where we were certain of changing. 



[61 ] 

Not forty yards from the place where they 
killed him a fresh fox went away ; if there- 
fore he could have held on only that short 
distance, we should in all probability have 
changed. The greatest distance / ever ran 
a fox in Essex, was from Hempstead Wood 
(a covert notorious also for stout running 
foxes) to between Heddingham and Colne, 
where we killed him, calculated at 17 miles. 
But the most extraordinary run for dis- 
tance was one the Hempstead hounds 
(termed the Invincibles) had from Great 
Hayles, a covert near Saffron Waldon, be- 
longing to Lord Braybrook, to within four 
or five miles of Bury St. Edmond's in Suf- 
folk, near Glemsford earth, where they 
killed him ; I should think the distance 
25 miles at least as the crow flies. I could 
enumerate many more capital runs to prove 
the stoutness of the Essex foxes, which I 
had from Manwood, Brickies, Witney 
Wood, Lord Maynard's High Wood, East 



[ 62 ] 

End, Leaden Roothing, Matching Park, 
Row Wood, Marks, and Offrey. All the 
foxes found in the coverts mentioned are 
stub bred ; I declare to you 1 do not re- 
member ever finding a bad running fox 
from Ongar to Haverhill, a distance of 
thirty miles. The foxes in the Harding- 
green country in Suffolk, which I once 
hunted, are also stout, but the enclosures 
being rather small, and the country some- 
what hilly, it renders it altogether inferior 
to Essex ; but the gentlemen and farmers 
of both countries were very civil and oblig- 
ing, and that contributes to make a country 
agreeable, if in other respects it is not quite 
so good as a sportsman could wish. 

During the time I hunted Essex, we had 
our Dunmow meetings, which I assure you 
enlivened us not a little; and whilst I de- 
voted myself to that part of the country, 
which was usually for a week or ten days 
each time, and perhaps three or four times 



[63] 

during the season, I made that place head 
quarters for myself and hounds, and was 
attended by many gentlemen of the hunt ; 
the Hertfordshire hounds on those occa- 
sions contrived to meet near to us on the 
alternate days ; and the emulation excited 
on the part of each hunt which should 
shew the best sport, made it the more in- 
teresting ; and the dinner at old Maltster's 
(the Saracen's Head, Dunmow,) who did all 
in his power to make us comfortable, always 
went off cheerfully. Taking into consi- 
deration the country altogether, it may be 
ranked as a first rate ruralist. 

Artificial earths, I have been informed, 
if not made in a dry situation, are often the 
cause of foxes being mangy. I have some 
reason to attribute it to another cause : I 
never knew a mangy fox where the owner 
of the covert strictly preserved, and have 
invariably found them in the neighbour- 
hood of those known to be inimical to Fox- 



[64] 

hunting, and where the keepers lay poison. 
If the animal has not taken sufficient to 
kill him it will produce fever, and nature 
throwing it out upon the skin, gives a 
similar appearance to the mange in dogs, 
and it often happens a poor devil in this 
miserable situation lingers for months, and 
at last is starved to death. 

The very idea of poison makes me 
shudder ; I have suffered from it both in 
my house and in my kennel, and it seems 
to me an omission in the Legislature that 
dogs were not included in the "Black Act,' 
for I cannot distinguish any material differ- 
ence between the crime of a person who 
poisons a horse, and that of one who thus 
destroys a valuable dog. In my humble 
opinion, he who has the villainy to do either 
would not hesitate to give you a dose 
likewise ; and the sooner such rascals are 
brought to the scratch at the Old Bailey, 
tant mieux pour tout le monde. 



[65] 

You ask my opinion as to the method of 
establishing earths in a country. The best 
I know is to procure two young badgers, 
a male and female, they will breed and 
make you plenty of strong healthy earths ; 
many other modes are adopted, but I think 
them all bad. 

Having established a sufficient number 
of these earths, your next consideration 
must be the appointment of careful earth- 
stoppers, as their duty extends to the tak- 
ing care of the litters of foxes, as well as 
to the stopping of the earths ; and in order 
to be certain of having them well stopped, 
you will find it safest to pay for each time 
of stopping, and agree with the people who 
perform this necessary service, that if the 
earths are not stopped at the proper time, 
and as they ought to be, they will not be 
paid for that days stopping. 

If, after this notice, you run to ground 
in any particular man's stop, you had better 

F 



[ 66 ] 

discharge Mm immediately. It is nothing 
more than fair that the keepers should 
stop the earths in their own manors, it may 
be the means of saving a litter of foxes. 
Keepers in general will not refuse a sove- 
reign, so that if you make it answer their 
purpose they will not destroy your foxes, 
unless they have secret orders from their 
masters to do it. Earth stoppers that are 
paid annually, if it happens to be an open 
winter, and they have to stop often, think 
it a hardship : whereas, the man who is 
paid every time he stops, takes pleasure in 
doing it, knowing he will be recompensed 
for his trouble. It is his interest also to 
look after the foxes, for the more he has 
in his district, the oftener the hounds will 
be there. 

As the subject of making coverts is one 
of much interest to the sportsman, I shall 
say a few words on the different methods 
of employing land for this purpose. 



[ 67 ] 

A fine gorse covert is a thing by no means 
so easily acquired as some people are inclined 
to imagine. In the first place, great atten- 
tion is necessary in the preparation of the 
ground. Whatever portion you may think 
of devoting to this purpose should be 
trenched all over to a considerable depth 
(say 18 inches, or at the very least 14.) 
You should be exceedingly particular in 
the choice of seed, as there is much sold of 
a very inferior quality. 

I once remember a rather amusing cir- 
cumstance occurring to a gentleman, who 
took it into his head all at once to make a 
chain of gorse coverts on his estates ; he 
spared neither trouble or expense, the 
ground was carefully dug and trenched, and 
in every way properly cleaned, and the 
tenacious roots of that odious weed, the 
couch grass, having been eradicated, abun- 
dance of gorse and broom seed was sown all 
over it, but to the surprise of every one, 



[68 J 

none of the seed took root, and at the time 
the young plants should have made their 
appearance, nothing was visible but weeds. 
This however was not very wonderful, as it 
turned out, for either in a mischievous frolic, 
or with malice prepense to fox-hunting, 
some one had dried, or rather baked, the 
whole of the seed in an oven, previous to 
its having been committed to the ground. 

It should invariably be remembered, that 
for months after the first tender shoots of the 
gorse have made their appearance above 
ground, you must employ hands to weed it 
as attentively as if the whole were a garden 
bed containing so many choice flowers, the 
hopes of the Florist ; for I am clearly of opi- 
nion, it is the neglect of early weeding which 
ruins more than one half of the gorses that 
are made. There is, I am told, a new method 
of making a covert sufficiently thick to ensure 
its holding foxes, or as the term is, to be full 
of " good lyeing," in an almost incredible 



[69] 

short time after it has been made. This 
mode, I must confess, appears to me very 
novel, and I cannot be answerable for its 
success, but here you have it as it was 
given to me. Fence out a certain quan- 
tity of land (waste, of course, if possible,) 
and merely stick up a number of faggots 
endways, at certain distances from each 
other, perhaps a couple of yards apart, 
taking care that the points are stuck deep 
enough into the ground to prevent all 
danger of the wind blowing them down. 
In the course of a very few months, or a 
single summer, the rank grass, and long 
weeds growing between the faggots, will 
make the whole an almost impenetrable 
mass; whilst the long weeds, partly sup- 
ported by the sticks and faggots, are ena- 
bled in a great measure to resist the effects 
of a winter's frost and snow, or at least if 
killed, do not fall to the ground, but con- 
tinue to afford dry lodging for a fox. 



[70] 

But I trust you will have a country that 
will require no such contrivances to give 
you sport, for one good natural covert is 
worth twenty artificial ones, and more likely 
to hold stout foxes ; for the old ones are 
shy fellows, and particularly nice in their 
choice of habitation ; indeed it even re- 
quires judgment to manage your coverts so 
as to get runs from them. 

If you should hunt a country that may 
have a large woodland, in which the foxes 
commonly hang, and seldom go away, it is 
the best plan to hunt it often and kill a fox 
in the covert, and be sure to give him to 
your hounds in the very heart of it. When I 
first commenced, in rather a woodland coun- 
try, several of the members of the hunt said 
to me, it is useless your going to a certain co- 
vert, you never will kill a fox or make him 
break, — " The devil I wont ; I shall meet 
there every Monday" was my answer, " till 
I diminish the foxes ;" the first day I met 



[71 ] 

happened to be a good scenting day, the 
last day in October. The hounds held well 
to their fox for two hours, and killed him in 
the centre of the covert, and eat him ; the 
consequence was, the next time we met at 
the same covert, the animal broke as soon 
as the hounds were put into it ; and we had 
from thence seven good runs over a coun- 
try, and killed each time, in the course of 
the season. In coverts or gorses of a mo- 
derate size, known to be good for sport and 
certainty of finding, you must act quite the 
reverse ; and not only avoid drawing them, 
or disturbing them as little as possible, but 
if you should have the misfortune to kill a 
fox in either, get the fox out as soon as 
possible, and on no account allow the 
hounds to eat him in it. I have known in- 
stances of hounds killing and eating a fox in 
a favourite covert, the consequence of which 
has been that they have not found there 
the whole season afterward. Nothing is so 



[ 72 ] 

prejudicial to sport as meeting too often at 
favourite coverts, or disturbing them un- 
necessarily. A fox is a shy animal, and if 
he is not allowed to remain quiet, will often 
lie in drains and in the fields, and of course 
get killed by greyhounds ; and if you disturb 
your best coverts on bye days, you are not 
acting fairly to the people who hunt with 
you, as you cannot expect to find in a covert 
so recently drawn. 

I have frequently been requested to give 
my opinion on the subject of countries being 
kept together as they were originally hunted. 
In part from my own ideas, formed early in 
life, and in part from those of experienced 
sportsmen with whom I have conversed 
upon the subject, I will endeavour, in the 
clearest manner I am able, to lay down 
what appears to me to be the law on this 
important, though delicate case ; and which, 
in my humble opinion, if rigidly attended 
to, would be most beneficial to the cause 



[73] 

of fox-hunting. If at any future period you 
should be in treaty for a country, (which 
from political disputes, or other causes, has 
not been kept entire, and other hunts have 
taken the advantage during the inter-reg- 
num, of drawing those coverts most conve- 
nient for them to reach from their own 
kennel, or those they may have known to 
be the best situated for sport,) before you 
arrange to hunt it as a country, it is nothing 
more than common justice, according to 
the laws of fox-hunting (as far as I always 
understood them,) and to prevent future 
misunderstanding, that the coverts so drawn 
should be restored, and the hunt given up 
to you entire. 

It is a very bad precedent for any one to 
accept of a covert (which he knows from 
time immemorial has belonged to another 
hunt,) because the master of the hounds 
who happens to hunt it at the time is not 
approved of by the owner of the covert ; 



[74] 

the same sort of prejudice might be taken 
against him in his own hunt, and he may 
likewise have a misunderstanding with some 
one who will easily find an excuse to warn 
him off his property, and at the same time 
make a proposition to some other pack to 
hunt it. What would be his astonishment 
if a neighbouring pack should come into 
the heart of his country, and into one of 
his best coverts, find a fox, have a good 
run, and kill him ? 

If customary laws are to be invaded to 
answer the caprice of individuals, the con- 
fusion and anarchy that would naturally 
occur in a short time would set a whole 
country together by the ears, and threaten 
the very existence of fox-hunting. A 
master of hounds is as liable to the misfor- 
tune of having a misunderstanding as other 
people — therefore when a covert is offered 
to another under such circumstances, he 
ought politely to refuse it. We all know, 



[ 75] 

by law the owners of coverts can allow 
whom they please to hunt them ; if, there- 
fore, the boundary of a country is not held 
sacred, it is impossible to say what will be 
the consequence, or how it will end. I 
mention this subject of course in a way 
which I hope will not be thought offensive 
or personal towards any one; I have no 
motive but to give you my observations and 
opinion formed from experience. 

I remember an anecdote related of a 
friend of mine and his neighbour, not many 
miles from Blandford, in Dorsetshire, which 
happened some years ago, both parties, alas ! 
are now gone to that bourne from whence 
no traveller returns. My friend was fond 
of shooting, and had a tolerable domain, 
and preserved strictly ; his neighbour also 
was partial to the trigger, his property was 
the most extensive, he therefore had less 
excuse for sporting on that of another, 
One day, after my friend returned from 



[76] 

hunting, he was informed that in his ab- 
sence his neighbouring friend had been 
shooting pheasants in a distant part of his 
manor. Instead of shewing any hostility, 
the next morning, about 11 o'clock, he went 
to his neighbour's preserve, near the man- 
sion, and began shooting the pheasants 
right and left, having sent his servant on 
before with his clothes, and desired his best 
compliments ; adding, that as the gentle- 
man had done him the honour to shoot on 
his manor the day before, he was come to- 
day to return the compliment, and to take 
a family dinner with him ; of course an ex- 
planation took place, and they lived on 
friendly terms ever afterwards. I must 
in justice say, of both these gentlemen, 
although they were strict game preserv- 
ers, I have seen more foxes on foot at 
one time in their coverts, when the 
hounds drew them, than I ever have seen 
in any other country after regular hunting 



[ 77 ] 

commenced. I will relate to you ano- 
ther anecdote, bearing upon this point. 
Being a good deal annoyed by some hounds, 
which often disturbed a covert belong- 
ing to the late Lord Maynard, I men- 
tioned the circumstance to his Lordship, 
who was a strict preserver of foxes, and 
one of the best of men ; he said, " if you 
insist upon it I will send them a written 
discharge ; but I, as an old sportsman, would 
advise you to arrange with them in a milder 
way ; it is a bad precedent, and they may 
retaliate by instigating persons to send you 
a similar discharge in another part of your 
hunt, and annoy you very considerably." 

A man may have too great an extent 
of country for his establishment, and so 
give permission to another pack for a time, 
to draw some of his distant coverts. It 
may happen at a future time he may want 
them, or another person who succeeds 
him, with a larger establishment, may hunt 



[78] 

oftener, and require the coverts to be re- 
turned ; in that case the person who has 
had the temporary enjoyment of them 
has no alternative but to give them up 
quietly. 

The giving up a certain part of your 
country, held by the concurrence of the 
neighbouring gentlemen, without their sanc- 
tioning the measure, is by no means the 
same thing as only allowing another hunt 
to draw some of your coverts, when you 
can do without them. 

" It needs no ghost to tell us " that 
Leicestershire stands pre-eminent for fox- 
hunting ; but I have heard from some old 
sportsmen, the foxes do not run so straight 
as formerly, owing to canals, and so many 
new gorses. I met, the other day, some 
Leicestershire men, who told me, (what all 
the youngsters of the day had told me before,) 
that such sport never was known, nor such 
riding, and that Melton never was so full. 



[ 79 ] 

A good pack of hounds will always show 
sport in any country; and it cannot be de- 
nied, but a very superior one now hunts the 
country, and the owner spares no trouble 
or expense to show sport. I have no doubt 
the Meltonians over a country are very 
superior; but if the young men of the 
present day ride more scientifically than 
they did in the time of the late Mr. Mey- 
nell, they must be very good indeed. I 
was pleased to hear Melton was so very 
full ; no doubt many go for the sake of 
hunting, — and it is said, many go also for 
the sake of playing Short Whist, and that 
fascinating game Ecarte. For many rea- 
sons, men at a certain time of life are fond 
of their own fire-side, and it is not con- 
venient for every one to leave home to 
hunt " in the great countries;" but is that 
any reason they should be deprived of 
their amusement, because they live in a 
country less favourable to fox-hunting ? I 



[80] 

have not patience to hear men (who for- 
merly, when in Leicestershire, never saw a 
hound after they had found) say, " no 
other country is fit to hunt in !" 

I have seen very good sport out of Lei- 
cestershire, and I hope I shall again. If gen- 
tlemen would preserve foxes more liberally 
in the rural countries, people would hunt 
and reside more at home ; and, in conse- 
quence, more money would be circulated 
in their own neighbourhood, the agricul- 
turist benefited, the lower orders employ- 
ed, and the poor rates reduced. I re- 
member an instance in a parish of some 
considerable extent, where only one gen- 
tleman kept an establishment, the poor 
rates were double what they were in a 
neighbouring one of the same magnitude, 
where several gentlemen resided. 

I was very much surprised to hear of a 
bill being brought into Parliament to make 
game private property, and by a Yorkshire- 



[81 ] 

man too ! Formerly, a Yorkshire-man and 
a Sportsman were synonymous. If the 
bill passes, it will annihilate fox-hunting! 
Is it likely a marchand de gibier, (of 
which, no doubt, there will be many,) will 
allow hounds to draw his coverts, or even 
a gun to be fired, or a dog to enter his 
premises? No more elevated barrels or 
percussion locks will be necessary, and the 
name of a sportsman in a few years will be 
forgotten. 

The game laws in France are not clearly 
understood by the lawyers : the old de- 
spotic law is done away with ; and the new 
ones, made since the revolution, are so very 
indefinite, as not to be understood. I had 
the misfortune to be prosecuted for a 
trespass by an old Countess who lived at 
Harfleur; and having consulted my soli- 
citor, he advised me to wait on the lady, 
and acquaint her that she had been misin- 
formed by her " Garde" that I had not 

G 



[82 ] 

committed a trespass on her land. She 
received me very graciously, but made 
some unpleasant remarks on the conduct 
of the English, — one of which was so very 
absurd, that I could scarcely refrain from 
telling her she was a silly old woman. She 
accused the English of causing Louis the 
16th to be beheaded! The proces verbal 
was brought into court, not to be decided 
by a jury, but by an old worn-out judge, 
who determined on the declaration made 
by the garde de chasse, who swore I was 
shooting in a turnip field, the property of 
Madame la Comptesse, though at the same 
time I had a respectable witness, the son 
of an English clergyman, to prove to the 
contrary ; they would not, however, allow 
him to give his evidence, but without 
hesitation fined me, and I had all the ex- 
penses to pay. 

Again, I cannot resist relating what 
seemed a flagrant instance of illiberality 



[83] 

and oppression. I went out one morning 
with my dog and gun, to endeavour to kill 
a bird for a sick father-in-law. I did not 
leave home till after eleven o'clock. On 
my way I met the keeper, and informed 
him of the country I was going to beat ; he 
answered, "fort bien, Monsieur." Shortly 
afterwards, in a small field of beet root, I 
killed an unfortunate quail: some people 
were at work at the very time on a public 
road near the spot, and a shepherd was 
keeping some sheep a mile at least from 
the field. The next morning, I was in- 
formed by a friend a proces verbal was 
made against me, that I had killed a doe 
hare with young, close to the proprietor's 
chateau. I answered, " it is impossible ; I 
am not aware I was on his land ; and as to 
a beau lievre, I did not see one the whole 
day." Still, however, the shepherd, a per- 
fect stranger, and a mile off at the time, 
swore to my person, and insisted that I 



[84] 

had killed a hare with young. Thus I had 
no alternative but either to go into court, 
or to compromise the matter; and from 
what I experienced on a previous occasion 
with the Countess, I had no wish for the 
former, — knowing to a certainty I should 
be beat. It was therefore agreed to com- 
promise ; and the mean wretch took 75 
franks to settle the affair, although he was 
a man of large fortune in France. — This is 
behaving towards Englishmen with grati- 
tude and liberality, and a kind return for 
our generous conduct to the unfortunate 
emigrants during the revolution ! But these 
are not every-day instances ; nor would it 
be difficult to enumerate French families 
that are in the habit of showing many kind 
attentions to the English ; but as the say- 
ing is, " On trouve des bons et des mauvais 
par tout." 

Having before stated the necessity of 
keeping your kennel effective, I must now 



[85] 

tell you it will be necessary to keep your 
stable effective also ; for if your men are 
not well mounted, they cannot be of much 
service in the field, and you are well aware, 
if you have not good hunters for your own 
riding, you never can be with your hounds 
at a time when you may be most wanted. 
One thing is certain, a man cannot ride 
over a country if he is not well mounted, 
neither can he show sport if he has not a 
good pack of hounds. Horses and hounds, 
if good in nature, are animals that will do 
wonders, if common sense will but assist 
them. If you have not the opportunity of 
purchasing horses that the late Mr. Corbet 
had, I should advise you to procure them 
from the dealers in London, where you will 
have a better chance than in the country : 
the great breeders generally sell their 
young horses in one lot to the London 
dealers, they are brought to town untried, 
and they know no more of them than the 



[ 86 ] 

purchaser : if the latter buys an ill shaped 
horse, he has nobody to blame but himself. 
That flourishing and brilliant capital, Lon- 
don, is the place to get the best of every 
thing ; for where the highest price is given, 
superior things of every description will 
be taken. 

If you wish to give a large price for 
what is called a well known made hunter, 
from one cause or other, there are always, 
every spring, some such valuable horses to 
be purchased at Tattersalls, which has been 
the rendezvous of sportsmen from time 
immemorial, arising from the civility of the 
late Mr. and the present Messrs. Tatter- 
sall to all ranks. I sincerely hope they 
will ever continue to meet with the en- 
couragement their meritorious conduct so 
eminently deserves. It is the fountain of all 
sporting information; sporting men could 
not exist in town in the spring, if there 
was no " Tattersalls." Independent of its 



[87 ] 

great utility, it is a lounge three times a 
week, where you are sure to meet your 
friends, and can listen with pleasure to 
their reports of the achievements of the 
different packs of hounds the season past, 
and the arrangements for the future. 

Suppose you purchase half a dozen 
young horses, at a hundred guineas each, 
to carry fourteen stone ; if two out of the 
six turn out well, you ought to be satisfied, 
as there is every probability of your selling 
the remaining four for fifty each, barring 
accidents. Many fox-hunters prefer tho- 
rough-bred horses, others cock-tails ; I 
always gave the preference to the former, 
if it was possible to get them. It is 
the general opinion, that thorough-bred 
horses cannot leap so well as " cock-tails :" 
I think otherwise ; and if you will try the 
experiment, by taking ten young horses 
of the former, and ten of the latter sort, 
I am convinced you will find the thorough- 



[88] 

bred ones to have the advantage, and na- 
turally to clear their fences with more ease 
to themselves. Horses that have been in 
training for years cannot be expected to 
make hunters ; but, nevertheless, what su- 
periority a thorough-bred one has in every 
respect, — above all, in speed, bottom, and 
wind ? It often happens, when a cock-tail 
is at the height of his speed, a thorough- 
bred horse is only at three-quarters, and 
the latter will always go through dirt (as 
the term is) best. I have been very much 
astonished in hearing men whom I have 
known to be good sportsmen, and who 
were in the habit of riding well to hounds, 
argue in favour of the former ; but some per- 
sons, for the sake of argument, will even at- 
tempt to lay down positions at variance with 
their own opinion. Many also differ about 
turning horses out for what is called a 
summer's run : I did it, because I could not 
afford to do otherwise. I always thought 



[89] 

my horses in the best condition when I left 
off hunting ; the turning them out to eat 
sour grass not only puts them entirely out 
of condition, but very often injures them 
materially. I am all for dry food, given 
in a straw-yard, where the animal can have 
a barn or open stable to go to, and plenty 
of good water. By this means how much 
sooner your horse will be in condition, and 
what an advantage it will give you before 
Christmas ! Horses that have a summer's 
run at grass, seldom are in condition before 
January. I shall not here trespass upon 
your patience, by enlarging upon a topic 
which from time to time has been treated 
upon in the Sporting Magazine, by one of 
its ablest writers. 

Of course you will be aware that I am 
alluding to those well known articles on 
the condition of hunters, by " Nimrod;" 
in favour of whose system and ideas I 
have ever most perfectly coincided. Ano- 
ther advantage will be gained by it, your 



[90] 

horses will be less likely to be stolen, and 
from what we read in the public papers? 
horse stealing is now so very common, and 
the rogues know the trick so well, that it 
has become one of our greatest evils, and 
I hope the police will take it into their 
serious consideration. During my sojourn 
in France, in the neighbourhood where I 
resided, I never heard of a thief of any de- 
scription. The reason given is, when a 
person is robbed, he has nothing to do but 
to make his declaration (as they call it,) be- 
fore a magistrate, which is merely the par- 
ticulars of the robbery. The king's attor- 
ney general then carries on the prosecution 
at the expence of government, and with the 
assistance of the police, the culprit seldom 
escapes. The person robbed is at no ex- 
pence, nor has he the odium of bringing a 
man to justice. I believe there lies the 
great secret, and the cause of there being 
so few robberies on the Continent. When 
a poor Englishman is robbed of his horse, 



[91 ] 

if he prosecutes he must pay all the ex- 
pences himself, which will very probably 
amount to more than the value of the 
horse, should he be so fortunate as to re- 
cover him. 

Another proof of the superiority of the 
police on the Continent is, that the Esta- 
fette, who daily carries the letters and other 
valuables for the merchants from Havre de 
Grace to Paris, and from Paris again to the 
sea-coast, is nothing more than a common 
post-boy on horseback, with a portmanteau 
strapped behind his saddle, in the same 
way that our letters were formerly conveyed 
in England before mail coaches were esta- 
blished. These boys at times carry immense 
sums, and have nothing to defend themselves 
with but their whips, which they are conti- 
nually smacking, yet it is confidently asserted 
by the merchants, there never has been an 
instance of any of them having been robbed, 
or even attempted to be stopped. If a similar 



[92] 

Estafette, or express, was established by 
the English merchants between London 
and Liverpool, do you suppose it would 
arrive at its destination unmolested ? — 
Query, would it ever pass beyond Finchley 
Common in safety ? 

Mr. Corbet thought it necessary to bring 
forward a certain number of young horses 
to keep his establishment effective in that 
department ; his plan was to purchase in 
their raw state the promising young horses 
of four and five years old, bred in his own 
country (Shropshire), celebrated at that 
time for its excellent breed of hunters, par- 
ticularly those from the Bridgenorth Snap, 
which were pleasant horses to ride, free at 
their leaps, but always collected ; with ex- 
cellent constitutions, fine action, and no 
tire in them; they would have thought 
themselves disgraced to have been dis- 
mounted after a twenty minutes burst over 
any country. When broke, and made handy 



[93] 

with hounds, they were turned out for 
twelve months, and then taken into the 
hunting stable, to supply the place of the 
old worn out horses, which time had inca- 
pacitated for active service. 

This great sportsman had in consequence 
a stud of very superior hunters. I cannot 
say I admired his hounds in kennel; it 
was nothing but " Trojan," " Trojan," 
" Trojan." We always drank, at his hos- 
pitable mansion at Sundorn, " to the blood 
of old Trojan," and yet he did not even 
know how this famous hound was bred. I 
was informed he was a stray hound, that 
either joined the pack hunting, or else came 
to the kennel by accident. I liked the 
appearance of Sir Richard Puleston's 
hounds better than those of his father-in- 
law, Mr. Corbet ; they were a powerful 
pack, with a great deal of bone, and very 
clever. Mr. Corbet himself was extremely 
popular in Warwickshire, and gave ge- 



[94] 

neral satisfaction ; his sport was excellent, 
his natural good temper and condescending 
manners to every description of people 
gained him the esteem of all parties ; and 
during his reign such a thing as a blank 
day was totally unknown. 

The subject upon which I am now about 
to treat is, I am well aware, a very delicate 
one ; but as you have requested me to 
give my candid opinion upon every thing 
which relates to fox-hunting, I should con- 
sider myself remiss if I did not do so. 

Gentlemen should recollect, let their 
situation in life be ever so exalted, if they 
condescend to hunt their own hounds, that 
when in the field they are huntsmen; a 
huntsman is a public character, and as such 
is liable to have remarks and criticisms made 
by the Field (who it is always to be remem- 
bered are but lookers on, and as such, are 
apt to flatter themselves they know as much 
of the game as the actual player,) and 



[95 ] 

to be spoken to by farmers and others on 
the occurrences which commonly happen 
in the day's hunting ; if things go on well, 
and the sport is good, the master of the 
pack is no doubt the person most pleased, 
feeling conscious that his exertions con- 
tribute much to the amusement of the 
day; and there is certainly no pleasure 
more gratifying to ourselves than that of 
pleasing others. On the contrary, if every 
thing should go on untowardly, which will 
frequently happen on a bad scenting day, 
he ought to be mindful that the Field like- 
wise participates in his disappointment. 
There is not a greater misery than return- 
ing home after bad sport ; every thing ap- 
pears to go wrong; but suppose the hounds 
to have done their work well the whole 
day, having no wild horsemen to over-ride 
them, and you kill your fox handsomely 
after a run of an hour and a quarter ; then 
I can imagine I hear you talking to your 



[ 96 } 

hounds on your way home, — " Justice, old 
fellow, you made a capital hit when the 
sheep brought us to check ; and. Will, did 
you see Gamestress turn like lightning with 
the scent, when the fox was headed ? the 
young ones too, they began to work and 
enjoy a scent ; and old Sophy, she was at 
the head of affairs when the fox was sink- 
ing." With happy thoughts like these, 
when you sit down to dinner, every thing 
goes right, the soup is excellent, the fish 
delicious, the venison of the highest qua- 
lity, and the wine of superior flavour. The 
Ladies too appear more than usually fasci- 
nating, and every thing they do pleases 
you. 

It is said a master of fox hounds should 
be possessed of the patience of Job, but 
even if he were, it would too often be put 
to the test. For instance, — to have your 
hounds over-rode by some jealous horse- 
man, who pays no attention to their work 



[97 ] 

on a bad scenting day, when unable to go 
the best pace, but brings them to a check, 
and by incautiously riding amongst them 
disables many, is unhappily a circumstance 
but too well calculated to ruffle and de- 
range the best of tempers ; for who could 
refrain on such an occasion from speaking 
rather warmly ? " So jealous are some men 
(said a distinguished huntsman to me the 
other day at the covert side,) that they will 
not even allow my Lord's hounds to work 
with a hunting scent, although they have 
every disposition to do so." When such an 
incident occurs, the Field, as a body, ought 
to interfere, and not suffer the sport of the 
day to be marred by the malevolence or ig- 
norance of every individual who chooses to 
over-ride the hounds. And is it not rather 
too much to expect a master of hounds, on 
all occasions, to be under the disagreeable 
necessity of calling to account every stranger, 
whose too great eagerness and want of 

H 



[98 ] 

patience, renders him a nuisance in the 
Field ? Many, many a day's sport is spoilt 
by the sole circumstance of hounds being 
over-rode. 

Much mischief is also often done when 
a fox first goes away. All crowd to the spot 
where he is halloo'd, before the hounds can 
possibly get there ; every one being anxious 
for a good start, fearing Jack so and so will 
have a better than himself. They are not 
aware of the injury they are doing by rid- 
ing over the scent and foiling the ground. 
It frequently happens at these times the 
hounds never run him a single yard. If 
people would only have a little patience, 
and be cautious where they ride, first al- 
lowing the pack to settle to their fox, they 
would have every chance of sport. 

A misery of this sort once happened 
to me ; a fox was halloo'd away at the 
farther end of the covert to that where 
the hounds were, by a man at work, whom 



[ 99 ] 

I knew. I got to him with as little delay 
as possible, and naturally said, which way 
is he gone ? " I zee'd um, Zir, where 
them there gemmen are ; they be all over 
the zcent ; and I could zee um no varder 
than where thick mon is on a grey horse ; 
I telt im you would be angry, and they 
swear at me unmarcifully, but as 1 noo some 
of them there red coats can boxy a little, I 
heeled my tongue till your honour came 
up." The hounds in consequence could not 
hunt him an inch. Many said " make a 
wide cast down wind ; he is gone to such a 
covert ;" another, " to such an earth ;" "no, 
Gentlemen," I replied, " I shall do no such 
thing, I will not spoil my hounds to please 
any man's fancy, by galloping over a coun- 
try, the Lord knows where, on almost a 
forlorn hope ; you have spoiled your own 
sport, and must suffer for it. Foxes are 
scarce in this part of the hunt ; there is but 
very little chance of finding again !" This 



[ wo] 

was the case : we did not find afterwards, 
although to please them (which was more 
than they deserved,) I drew till very late. 
It is nevertheless a bad plan at any time to 
draw late in the day. I know many masters 
who make it a rule not to go on after three 
o'clock, which is a very good one ; in the 
middle of winter a great deal of misery is 
often caused by finding too late. You will 
almost to a certainty be beat, and the pack 
will not be very easily stopped in the dark. 
It once happened to me to lose my whole 
pack ; it was a good scenting day ; we found 
early, and had a sharp thing of one hour and 
five minutes without a check ; and as a good 
deal of it was in covert, I found another 
fox, had a long run over a country, and run 
our fox, quite beat, into a small covert, 
where I thought they were catching him 
every moment ; but unfortunately another 
fox was in the same covert, and the hunted 
one laid down ; it was nearly dark, and I 



[ ioi ] 

fancied him our own ; but to my great sur- 
prize, a fresh one broke away with the 
hounds close at him, over a difficult country 
to ride ; they killed him by themselves, 
after running him several miles. The conse- 
quence was, most of the hounds remained 
out all night, and I did not get them right 
again for a length of time. 

The method of riding to hounds is so 
much altered within the last few years, that 
you will have no small trouble in prevent- 
ing your Field from getting too forward. 
Most men of the present day, if they can 
find cash to purchase a good hunter, have 
nerves to ride him. The first two requi- 
sites in riding to hounds are, a good eye, 
and a good hand; a man that rides close 
at the tail of the pack (as the term is), and 
follows them every where, may have the 
name of a bold rider, but never that of a 
good one ; he must naturally ride over a 
great deal of unnecessary ground, and in 



[ 102 ] 

consequence will the sooner tire his horse. 
If you observe a good sportsman in the 
field, he will ride a little to the right or to 
the left, so as to command the pack, with 
his eye on the leading hounds, and take 
every advantage of ground when they turn 
with the scent on either side. Of course, 
I do not mean to recommend skirting ; for a 
skirting rider is as bad as a skirting hound, 
and will often do as much mischief. How 
valuable, therefore, is a horse with a good 
mouth; a hunter cannot be said to be perfect 
without it. When the pack comes suddenly 
to a check, if a sportsman has his eye on 
the leading hounds (which he ought to 
have), he will in a moment see the event, 
and of course halt short of the spot to 
which they brought the scent. When I 
make use of the word halt, I don't mean 
that every man should go to drill; but 
I know this, if many that call themselves 
sportsmen had a little drillings it would do 



[ 103 ] 

them a great deal of good ! It is the general 
opinion that when hounds check, the fox is 
forward ; and the first cast a huntsman 
ought to make is a forward one. I cannot 
say I think so ; on the contrary, if there 
are no sheep, deer, cattle, &c. to foil the 
ground, and the fox has not been coursed 
by a cur-dog, why should they check if he is 
gone on ? The greatest probability is, that 
he has headed, or made a short turn to 
the right or left ; therefore, if you cast at 
all, a forward one is the least likely to suc- 
ceed. There is one rule however, from 
which you should never deviate, — let your 
hounds try first before you attempt to 
make a cast yourself; hounds that are 
not accustomed to be " lifted," will make 
a superior one to any human being. It is 
very extraordinary, yet nevertheless true, 
that many people go out for the sake of the 
riding part only; the hunting is a minor 
consideration ; and if the hounds do their 
work well or ill, it is of little consequence 



[ 104 ] 

to them ; and their conversation after din- 
ner usually turns to the subject of riding 
onlij. To such as these, I have often 
thought a few couples of curs, running the 
drag of a red herring, (care being taken 
that a torn cat should be turned out at the 
end,) if they only went the pace, would 
answer quite as well as the finest pack of 
fox-hounds. 

An anecdote, related to me by a friend, 
who hunted constantly with the late Mr. 
Meynell, is very apropos to some riders of 
the present day, and I give it you in his 
words. 

" Many years ago, I recollect a gentle- 
man who kept ten horses in Leicestershire, 
and who had been riding near me often in 
a very fine run, in which two of the most 
interesting and beautiful things happened 
that I ever remembered to have seen, and 
on remarking them to him when the run was 
over, — ' Good God ! Sir,' said he ; 'I saw 
nothing of them !' This was a hard rider, 



[ 1"5 ] 

who, from his own account saw nothing, 
while riding his horse as hard as he could 
go, and as near the tail of the hounds as 
he could possibly get ! And how should 
he ? For a man behind the hounds cannot 
be a judge of what is going on in front ; 
and is the principal cause (by pressing upon 
them,) to bring them to a check. 

But still, as I have above stated, great 
as is the mischief done by persons who 
over-ride your hounds, you may even put 
up with it, although very annoying, if they 
will but refrain from hallooing. There may 
be some faint hope of improving a field that 
ride too forward, but a noisy one you can 
never mend. To prove it, in some mea- 
sure, I will relate the following fact, — it 
happened some years ago. I was out cub- 
hunting, and had found a litter of foxes in 
some small coverts detached as much as a 
field or two from each other; a farmer joined 
us whom I knew to be free with his tongue, 



[ 106 ] 

and when the hounds were holding merrily 
together on one fox, and had nearly beat 
him, he was sure to halloo them to a fresh 
one, and swear it was the same we were 
hunting. After begging him to desist with- 
out effect, I rode up and spoke to him in 
any thing but gentle language; when he 
instantly got into a violent passion, and 
declared, nothing on earth should ever 
make him halloo another fox for me! I 
thought, for once, he was silenced; but 
before the words were scarcely out of his 
mouth, a fresh fox crossed the main ride 
in the covert, and the moment he viewed 
him, he was at it again, — " Tally-ho! Tally- 
ho! Tally-ho! — I will he d d, Sir, if 

that is not the hunted fox /" 

In a country that shall be nameless, 
where every one not only fancied himself a 
huntsman, but would on some occasions put 
his fancy into practice, a farmer actually 
came out one day with a horn, and began 



[ 101.] 

blowing when we found. The manager was 
also a good deal annoyed by a hound 
named " Thunder," a great favourite in the 
hunt, before he had the management of 
the hounds ; and to do him justice, he was 
a good finder, steady from hare ; and when 
he threw his tongue, (which he was very 
free with,) it was so singular a one, the 
whole neighbourhood knew it, — and he was 
a most determined skirter. Now, in the 
country alluded to, there is a long suc- 
cession of small coverts, and a fox generally 
visited them. " Thunder " had a trick of 
going alone from one covert to another 
down wind, after the hounds found, and of 
throwing his tongue either on the hunted 
fox or a fresh one ; and at most of these 
little coverts there was a shirting rider, 
who, the moment he heard " Thunder's " 
voice, began hallooing and cheering him ; 
so that very often it was nothing but 
" hark to Thunder" the whole day through. 



[108] 

On one of these occasions, the Master's 
patience was quite exhausted, and the 
prospect of a good day's sport totally lost. 
Returning home not very well pleased, in 
conversation with the whipper-in, he said : 
" What do you think of Thunder ?" " Why, 
I think, Sir, we shall never kill a fox 'till 
he is hung !" " I am of your opinion," an- 
swered he ; " and you may have his skin." 
Will was so anxious to get him out of the 
way, fearing his master might change his 
mind, that when he went out to feed his 
hounds, a few minutes after his return 
home, " Thunder " was no more ! The 
next hunting day, when the hounds found, 
many exclaimed, " it cannot be a fox, it is 
only riot, — for we do not hear ' Thunder's ' 
voice!" " Indeed," said the Master; "and 
what is more wonderful, you never will 
again." It was soon whispered about, that 
poor " Thunder " was dead, — so many long 
faces were scarcely ever seen before. One 



[ 109] 

gentleman was observed going up to a rich 
farmer, — " What do you think has hap- 
pened ?" " What ?" answered the farmer, 
with the greatest anxiety ; " have any more 
banks stopped ?" " No," replied the gen- 
tleman ; " worse than that — poor ' Thun- 
der ' is draughted, and we shall never have 
any sport again." The means taken had the 
desired effect for a time ; but a subscriber 
was lost, — who coolly observed, he never 
would go out hunting again, if he was not 
permitted to halloo to the hounds whenever 
he pleased. 

It gave me much pleasure to find from 
your last letter, that you had decided upon 
hunting your own hounds; I can see no 
great crime in a gentleman performing the 
office of huntsman, — and no reason why a 
man with a good education should not 
succeed in every thing he undertakes bet- 
ter than a person who has had, compara- 
tively speaking, but an indifferent one, or 
perhaps none at all. A distinguished noble- 



[ no] 

man in Yorkshire, has hunted his own 
hounds uninterruptedly for thirty-eight sea- 
sons, with high reputation to himself, and 
satisfaction to the sportsmen who hunted 
with him. 

A gentleman who hunts his own hounds 
is sure to be fond of the sport, and he will 
do all in his power (for his own credit) to 
show it. On the contrary, servants hunt 
hounds for their livelihood; and I have 
seen some of them, now and then, more 
anxious to go home to a two o'clock dinner, 
that to find a second fox. 

The noble successor to Mr. Corbet, in 
the Warwickshire country, — a good sports- 
man, and always anxious to show sport, — 
would sometimes say to his huntsman, 
" Harry, Harry, you are thinking more of 
your mutton chops, than of your hunting /" 
It is very difficult to get a good huntsman, 
such as Tom Rose, or Sam Lawley, — the 
former, the Duke of Grafton's, the latter, 
the late Lord Vernon's; Charles King, 



[Ill ] 

also, who hunted Lord Althorp's hounds, 
and Mr. Shaw, were excellent sportsmen. 
If you could be sure of meeting with such 
men, it would not be so indispensable for 
you to hunt your own hounds ; but hunts- 
men, generally speaking, are conceited, 
headstrong, and ignorant, — and fancy they 
know better where the fox is gone than 
the hounds do; although a very clever 
man, and an admirable judge of hunting, 
assures us, 

" That foxhound never yet could tell, 
Unless he took the pains to smell, 
Where Reynard went I" 

Many servants think lifting hounds, halloo- 
ing, and blowing the horn, are the only 
qualities requisite for a huntsman. 

A system once followed by a huntsman 
(now gone to ground), is so very bad a one, 
that I anticipate it will not for a moment 
meet your approbation ; it was always con- 
demned by me, and quite different to the 



[ 112] 

one I practised. The hounds were never 
permitted to hunt through difficulties; the 
moment they came to a check they were 
galloped away to some earth or covert, 
either with the false notion of " giving him 
a meeting " (as they termed it,) or else to 
take the chance of his having gone into the 
wood, cr of finding a fresh fox, which of 
course was always claimed as the hunted 
one. I was informed the pack were so ac- 
customed to it, that the moment they came 
to a check their heads were up, and they 
were ready to start with the huntsman 
wherever his genius might direct. This 
beautiful pack, in consequence, never put 
their noses down ; they had been so well 
disciplined, that the words " heads up" 
were unnecessary, but to get them down 
again was impossible. 

Another wild system I witnessed in a 
rural country : the hounds were running 
their fox well, he was viewed by the hunts- 



[ 113 ] 

man, who set to riding and mobbing him, 
and the consequence was they came to a 
check ; however, fortunately getting the 
scent again, they had one of the best runs 
of the season, but did not kill. In my opi- 
nion, if this unsportsmanlike act had not 
taken place at so critical a moment, the 
hounds would in all probability have killed 
their fox. 

Some people think it fair to mob and ride 
a fox, and fancy it takes something out of 
him, and that the hounds will sooner run 
into him ; but nine times out of ten it is 
the means of his beating them, as it bothers 
the hounds, foils the ground, and it fre- 
quently happens when a fox has been rode, 
the pack cannot hunt him afterwards. 
When before speaking of servants, I should 
have observed, that I was formerly an advo- 
cate for cap-money, thinking it did no harm, 
saved a little in servant's wages, and, hunt- 
ing my own hounds, I took care no unfair 
i 



C 114] 

advantage of this privilege should be taken ; 
but we " live and learn :" I have seen so 
many days sport marred by it, that I now 
disapprove of it, and think it better to allow 
your servants to take Christmas boxes, a 
thing in the end perhaps more beneficial 
to them ; but you will have some difficulty 
in persuading them to it. I have heard, 
with some packs near London, on a Satur- 
day (" Le grand jour de la Chasse" ) the 
huntsmen will ocasionally turn down a bag- 
man (of course unknown to their master) ; 
they cannot resist the temptation, when 
they are certain of a large Field, and the 
cap-money on those days amounts to some- 
thing considerable. 

A good-tempered sensible first whipper- 
in, that will obey, and has the sport of the 
day, and his master's interest at heart, is 
not very often to be met with. I have had 
some very good ones, and some very bad ; 
of the latter, the very worst tempered man 



[ 115 ] 

I ever had, although a good sportsman, was 
at the verv time I was in the greatest need 
of a good one. I was commencing making a 
pack from draughts (not an easy task I can 
assure you) ; we were going on as well as 
we could possibly expect ; the hounds were 
getting handy, and to know each other, and 
we were beginning to place some confidence 
in them ; but what was of the greatest con- 
sequence, they had got into blood, and we 
fixed to meet at a good covert likely for a 
run. The hounds immediately found, and 
were going away well with their fox, when 
my malevolent fellow stopped them, and 
halloo'd them on to hare : but, unfortu- 
nately for him, a friend of mine saw the 
whole transaction, informed me of it, and I 
of course turned my man away. He owned 
afterwards he did it to spite some gentle- 
men who were out, and were anxious to 
have a run, because they did not " cap " for 
him the day before, after killing a fox with 



[ HO] 

a short run. This is another instance of 
the bad effects of allowing servants to take 
cap-money. I have had other whippers-in 
of a different character, men who were good 
sportsmen, fond of the thing, attentive, and 
good servants in every respect. For instance, 
Will Neverd, now Mr. Warde's huntsman ; 
Jack Cane, Abraham Farrow, Zach. God- 
dard, the latter many years whipper-in to 
Lord Middleton, and now with Mr.Boycot; 
old Jack Cole (not a bad one), now living 
with Mr. Conyers ; and John Neal, an excel- 
lent servant. The best groom I ever had, 
who took a pride in his master's horses being 
in condition, was William Tompkins, now 
I believe head groom in the hunting stable 
of the Duke of Grafton. It often happens 
as soon as a whipper-in knows his business, 
he wishes to be a huntsman ; and will take 
every opportunity of getting alone with the 
hounds, in order that he may hunt them 
himself. One of the best men in the field 



[ "7 ] 

I ever knew was Richard Bennet ; he lived 
with the late Lord Stamford, afterwards 
with Mr. John Calcraft, and lastly with his 
present Majesty ; he was quiet with hounds, 
and always in his place ; a capital horseman, 
and what is a great virtue in a whipper-in, 
he never wished to hunt the hounds himself. 
I have often heard him say, if he were 
offered a huntsman's place he should hesi- 
tate before he accepted it. — " I know, Sir, 
said he, I understand my business as 
whipper-in ; if I take a huntsman's place, I 
may not succeed, and it would be hard to 
go back into my old situation again." He 
died at the Six-Miles Bottom, near New- 
market, where he lived very comfortably, 
having been well provided for by His Ma- 
jesty. A good feeder is very rarely to be 
met with ; he ought to obey very exactly 
the orders given him, and on no account 
should he be absent without leaving some 
steady person in the kennel. I will relate 



[ H8] 

to you an unfortunate accident, which hap- 
pened in consequence of the absence of a 
feeder. I was staying at a friend's house 
who kept hounds, the men had been out 
early with the young ones, and returning 
home very hungry to their breakfasts, for- 
got to uncouple them, in consequence they 
began to fight, and although the servants 
were only absent ten minutes, three were 
killed, and several severely bitten. It is 
necessary a feeder should be cleanly, active, 
and good tempered ; the keeping the ken- 
nel, coppers, troughs, &c. clean and dry, 
will contribute not a little to the health of 
your pack ; it is needless to say he ought 
to be trust-worthy. A man of a good dis- 
position will much sooner make young 
hounds handy than one with a different 
temper ; coaxing and encouragement are 
far better than severe discipline, and in the 
breeding season much depends upon the 
feeder's attention to the bitches when they 



C 119 ] 

are going to heat ; and about the whelping 
time. It is a mistaken idea to suppose any 
hard working man will do for a feeder — it 
requires a diligent person, with some head. 
In reply to your enquiry regarding 
scent. It is so speculative a subject, and 
governed by such an apparent contrariety 
of circumstances, that I am more at a loss 
w r hat to say upon it than upon any thing I 
have written on the score of fox-hunting. 
We all know Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, 
Rutlandshire, and Northamptonshire, to be 
the best scenting counties in England, and 
where hounds have a greater advantage 
over a fox than in any other ; for in almost 
all kinds of weather (I mean of course frost 
excepted,) there is a sufficient scent for 
hounds to hunt, and you are sure of some 
sort of sport if you will but have patience. 
In what are called the rural-countries, un- 
less you have favourable weather, it often 
happens you cannot run a yard ; therefore 



[ 120] 

a pack of hounds that can kill their fox in 
good style in a " plough country," must be 
still more brilliant in a grass or better 
scenting one. The last two or three sea- 
sons have been very open, and scarcely any 
stop put to hunting ; but I have heard 
great complaints of the badness of scent 
irom various parts of the kingdom. Query, 
whether an old fashioned winter, with a 
fortnight or three weeks frost only, about 
Christmas, is not desirable ? The weather 
in general then becomes moderate, less 
boisterous, and more favourable to scent. 
In corn countries, it is usual for managers 
of fox-hounds to call out (" ware wheat ! ") 
meaning, beware, don't ride over the wheat. 
It has however been often proved, that 
riding over wheat does it little injury, and 
farmers never have the least scruple in gal- 
loping over it themselves. An instance hap- 
pened much to the credit of the parties, 
which was told me by a friend, whose 



[ 121 ] 

veracity I never had reason to doubt. Lord 
Derby's stag-hounds came up with the stag 
in a fine field of wheat, where he was taken ; 
it was so trodden that the next morning 
not a blade of wheat could be seen ; upon 
which his Lordship, with his usual liberality, 
ordered his steward to have the supposed 
damage valued, and to send the farmer the 
amount of the valuation ; at the harvest 
time, the latter waited on his Lordship to 
return the money, having housed the best 
crop of wheat he ever had in his life. Lord 
Derby was so pleased with the conduct 
of the honest farmer, that he begged his 
acceptance of the money. This is as it 
should be ! 

The hunt club dinners are of great ser- 
vice; they keep up the spirit of the thing. 
Those country gentlemen who are liberal 
minded, fond of Society, and favourably in- 
clined towards the noble science, although 
from some cause or other they do not hunt 



C 122 ] 

themselves, like occasionally to meet Sports- 
men from different parts of the country. The 
meeting of gentlemen of landed property 
together at these dinners, shews a cordiality 
in the support of fox-hunting ; and it often 
deters the illiberal from destroying foxes. 
They will reason thus, — " I hate the sight 
of a hound, and it annoys me to see people 
riding over my land ; yet, if I act contrary 
to the wishes of so many of my neighbours 
and friends, and endeavour to thwart their 
favourite amusement, I shall be looked 
shyly upon by all ; no, I will join the hunt, 
and if I cannot attend them in the field, I 
will at the club dinner. It is only the sacri- 
fice of a pheasant or two, and a few rabbits, 
and I shall then be on friendly terms with 
the whole neighbourhood." I also am a 
great advocate for a ball and supper, to 
please the ladies, being convinced things 
cannot go on right unless they are in good 
humour ; and I am certain nothing on earth 



[ 123 ] 

is more gratifying to a good sportsman than 
to give pleasure to the fair sex. I have 
known it the means of saving many a fox 
from being trapped ; for instance, a known 
vulpicidal character, who had three or four 
daughters that were " come out," and Mama, 
wishing to introduce them at the hunt 
ball, aware of the awkwardness of the case, 
begins the attack at breakfast, — " Sure, Mr. 

B , its very hard our poor girls cannot 

go to the hunt-ball because of your nasty 
pheasants ! You can't refuse them, when I 
inform you that the eldest son of Sir G. 

R , Bart. M. P. is to be there ; and you 

Tcnow he has lately paid some attention to 
our dear daughter Charlotte !" Miss also 
says, " Papa cannot be so unkind as to pre- 
vent his Charlotte from going to the only 
ball this winter." Then Sophia, the second 
daughter has at him, — " My own dear 
Papa always said he was delighted when 
he saw his children happy ; pray, pray, my 



[ 124] 

own dear Papa, grant your affectionate 
child one great favour, and that is to order 
old Killfox, the keeper, not to destroy any 
more foxes. We then can go to the ball like 
our neighbours, the Miss C 's." The fa- 
ther was a short time undecided, and at first 
wished the ball and the hunt at the Devil ; 
but his natural affection for his children pre- 
vailed over every other consideration, and 
old Killfox, to his great amazement and 
mortification was sent for, and ordered to 
stay his hand and slay no more. The ladies 
went to the hunt-ball in great glee, and 
Miss, in a few months after, was married to 
the son of the Baronet ! So far all was right, 
and the advantages of a hunt ball very con- 
spicuous. 

It will add much to your sport and your 
own peace of mind if your Field consist 
of real sportsmen. They will make every 
allowance for accidents and bad weather, and 
give you merit where merit is due. " The 



[ 125] 

would-be Managers," on the contrary, make 
no allowance whatever for unavoidable cir- 
cumstances ; I mean those who do not enter 
into the spirit, and have no knowledge of 
hunting, but at times are ambitious to be at 
the head of affairs, and they are the greatest 
tormentors a master of fox-hounds can en- 
counter, always finding out some cause 
for complaint ; you are " too late" or " too 
soon" at the covert; you never draw to 
please them; your meeting-places are 
wrong ; even if the weather is unfavour- 
able, they will endeavour to make it ap- 
pear your fault; and every untoward cir- 
cumstance is attributed to your bad 
management. When you are established 
in a country, never interfere with politics ; 
when you turn politician, give up your 
hounds. If possible, be on terms with all 
parties, and if they have liberality they will 
preserve foxes for you ; but you must in 
return do all in your power to oblige them, 



[ 126 ] 

consistently with the general good of 
the hunt. You should also endeavour 
to gain the good will of the farmers ; if any 
respectable body of persons suffer from 
hunting, it is them; and I think it not 
only ungentlemanly, but impolitic, to treat 
them in the field, or elsewhere, other- 
wise than with kindness and civility. They 
have a great deal in their power, and if 
once you gain their respect and esteem, 
whilst becoming popular amongst them in 
general, it will save you many a litter of 
foxes, and you will go on pleasantly with- 
out any grumbling. 

I considered the hunt giving a farmer's 
" silver cup," to be run for either at the 
hunt races, or at the annual county meet- 
ing, as one of the most popular things they 
could do; and I know from experience, 
nothing pleases the yeomanry so much. 
No doubt it is often won by trick, I mean 
by a horse which belongs to some one out 



[ 127 ] 

of the hunt, that has been a winner before, 
and is named by some obscure farmer ; and 
the cup frequently ornaments the side- 
board of one who is the least deserving of 
it ; but that is no reason at all why it should 
be discontinued. It is the intention of the 
thing which pleases, as a sort of grateful 
return for the supposed injury done to 
the farmer. I am confident, that by this 
means, I have gained the good will of 
many an opulent yeoman, who was before 
inimical to fox-hunting. I have heard them 
say to each other, " it is very kind of the 
gentlemen to think of us." I remember 
a farmer coming up to me at one of our 
hunt-races, whom I before suspected of 
killing foxes, and addressing me thus, — 
" My woodman, Sir, told me, he thought an 
old vixen would lay up her cubs in our 
home-wood ; if it should so happen, I give 
you my word, Sir, not one of them shall be 
destroyed." The woodman was right in 



C 128 ] 

his conjecture ; my friend kept his word ; 
we found a litter of foxes in the home-wood, 
and the honest farmer ever afterwards was 
a sincere well-wisher to the hunt. 

I have avoided as much as possible writ- 
ing on subjects unconnected with fox-hunt- 
ing, but I cannot resist saying a word or 
two in behalf of my friends, the farmers, 
arising from the experience I have had in 
France. I am fully convinced if the ports 
were open at home, it would be a great hard- 
ship upon them; for they cannot possibly af- 
ford to sell their grain at so low a price as 
the growers on the Continent can export it. 
The latter have so great an advantage in 
having neither poor-rates or tythes to pay. 
I have read, among the advertisements in 
the English papers, of farms to be let tythe- 
free, but never remember having met with 
one that was exempt from poor-rates. 

Another great advantage a farmer has 
on some parts of the Continent over the 



[ 129 ] 

agriculturist here, is that the land is divided 
into small farms, seldom exceeding one 
hundred acres, and the greatest part of 
of them are under fifty ; a farmer and his 
family will therefore almost have it in their 
power to cultivate the land without hiring 
labourers. Supposing he has a wife, three 
sons, and two daughters, and rents a farm 
of fifty acres, the females will do as much 
hard work out of doors as the men, and the 
whole of the business will thus be carried 
on by the family, except threshing out the 
corn, which they think beneath them. And 
their manner of living too is so differ- 
ent to that of our yeomanry, that the ex- 
pense of the table is a mere trifle. The 
paupers in any poor-house in England 
would fancy they were going to be starved 
if only allowed the same food upon which 
many of the farmers in France live. I am 
here speaking of those parts of Normandy 
which, for a length of time I was in the 

K 



[ 13 ° 3 

frequent habit of visiting. In Lent, their 
chief food is beans, with a little butter 
and a few onions (if the latter are not 
too dear), and sour milk curds, with very 
coarse brown bread, which they eat in 
large quantities. The ordinary beverage 
is weak sour cider. At other times of the 
year they certainly have some boiled beef 
once a week, but their general food is 
vegetables. When labourers are employed, 
they work very hard, and continue at their 
labour the whole day, with the exception 
of one hour allowed for dinner. Our far- 
mers, thank God ! live better, and have 
more of the enjoyments of human beings, 
and many of them occasionally indulge in 
hunting, the only desirable recreation they 
can enjoy. From this it will appear, that 
under all circumstances, the English farmer 
cannot possibly sell his corn at so low a 
price as the foreigner. 

But now to my text; formerly, in the 



[ 131 ] 

New Forest, it was the custom in the 
spring for the hounds to meet at break of 
day, to enable them to find their fox, with 
what is called a drag. No doubt it would 
be gratifying to sportsmen and masters of 
hounds to see them work on this drag, if it 
could be done without a great destruction 
of vixen foxes. But if you should happen 
to get upon the drag of a wet vixen, or one 
heavy in cub, what chance can she pos- 
sibly have in that state ? The New Forest 
is a peculiar sort of hunting ; sportsmen that 
are accustomed to it prefer it to any other. 
In no country can you see the work of 
hounds so well, although the riding to 
them is thought nothing of. 

Leicestershire-men are often at a loss 
here, as much as Foresters would be in 
that great country. I have frequently seen 
in the Forest brilliant and gratifying tilings 
to a sportsman, in which hounds that were 
perfect at their work had an opportunity 
of showing themselves to the greatest pos- 



[ 132 ] 

sible advantage. Formerly, when the New 
Forest was hunted by the late Mr. Gilbert, 
there certainly were no inclosures. To 
those who have never visited the New 
Forest, it may be here necessary to explain 
these inclosures. His Majesty's Govern- 
ment thought proper to fence in a certain 
number of acres, in different parts of the 
forest, which they considered the most 
eligible for planting, as nurseries for the 
growth of young timber, which were called 
" The New Inclosures ;" but I am informed 
they are no impediment to sport. The 
great bogs are so generally known, and 
bridges or " bog passages " made to cross 
in every direction, that no one has any 
thing to fear on that head ; the lesser ones 
are of no consequence, and a knowledge of 
them is soon acquired. 

We all know the Forest is very extensive, 
stocked with animals of every description ; 
in a still morning, meeting there at break 
of day, has a fine effect. I sometimes 



[ 133 ] 

hunted with the hounds when Mr. G. man- 
aged them, and I perfectly recollect the 
impression made on one of these occasions : 
old Tom Seabright, the father of Lord Fitz- 
william's present huntsman, hunted them ; 
the sound of his melodious voice cheering 
the hounds when they first challenged on 
the drag, — the red deer and other wild 
animals passing, — the sun rising, and dis- 
persing the morning mists, and gradually 
disclosing the more distant and varied 
objects, — altogether produced such an ex- 
hilarating scene, that I could have wished 
for the talent of a poet or a painter. 

I have seen great sport in the Forest, — 
hounds running the best pace 13 miles an 
end. In crossing the heathy part, it was 
beautiful to see the energy of the pack, 
flinging to catch the scent where the fox 
had made his turnings ; and if they came 
to a hunting scent, (as I said before,) in no 
country can you see their work to so great 
an advantage, or the cunning and tricks of 



[ 134] 

the hunted animal. Another superiority 
the New Forest possesses ; that is, you can 
very often hunt there when you cannot 
elsewhere. 

I remember once leaving Staffordshire* 
at a time when the frost had stopped hunt- 
ing in that county for at least a fortnight ; 
having some business in the Forest, I took 
the opportunity of going there, when, to 
my great surprise, I found on my arrival 
there was no appearance of frost, nor had 
the hounds been prevented hunting a single 
day. I of course returned home as quickly 
as possible, thinking I should hunt imme- 
diately; but the difference of climate, in 
the short distance of 140 miles, was so 
great, that no hounds were able to hunt 
in less than ten days after my return. In 
dry easterly winds, when hounds in other 
countries cannot run a yard, in the lower 
part of the Forest they often have good 
sport. 

There is one serious objection to the 



[ 135 ] 

New Forest : experience has proved that 
the country at times brings on an in- 
curable lameness; and no master of hounds, 
to my knowledge, who has ever hunted it, 
could find out the real cause. It has been 
attributed by some people to the kennel, — 
but why should all the kennels in the 
Forest lame hounds ? It is well known, 
that, when kept by the late Mr. Compton, 
in a kennel built on an eminence, they had 
the lameness to a great degree. In the 
present day, it is the same in a kennel 
built some distance from it. There are 
persons who have attributed it to the " foot 
furze," a plant peculiar to the Forest, and 
which I have seen prick hounds' feet so 
severely, that it prevented their carrying 
that head they were in the constant habit 
of doing. Others fancy it is owing to their 
jumping the high paling surrounding the 
new inclosures : it cannot be that ; or why 
should the lameness have occurred before 



[ 136] 

the new inclosures were made ? If I may 
be allowed to hazard an opinion, I should 
say it was occasioned by the hounds cross- 
ing the cold black bogs, when heated by 
their exertions in the chase, which in some 
places will not bear their weight, and which 
they must wade through : the sudden chill 
appears to me likely to cause this horrid 
calamity ; for I have seen them return from 
hunting shivering with cold, from the black 
bog dirt sticking so long upon them. 

I cannot quit the New Forest without 
once more mentioning Mr. Gilbert. He 
was a man that loved fox-hunting, a good 
sportsman without conceit; but yet the 
sporting world formed ct good opinion of 
him. He had a natural genius particular 
to himself: I have seen him often recover 
a fox in a wonderful way, when all chance 
of hitting him again appeared hopeless. 
But, alas ! he is no more. His great friend 
and ally, thank God, still remains, and 



C 137 ] 

shines a brilliant star in the Forest, — and 
that he may continue so for many, many 
years, is the wish, I need not add, of all 
who know him. If you wish to draw for so 
worthy a character, — a straight-forward, 
staunch, good man, — you will be sure to 
find at Fritham any hour of the day. 

The late Sir Edward Littleton, of Ted- 
desley Park, Staffordshire, whom we may 
be allowed to call the last fox-hunter of 
the " old school" regularly was out at 
" peep of day." An old friend of mine 
often used to hunt with him in the morn- 
ing, return home to breakfast, and take 
a fresh horse and hunt with another pack 
at the usual hour, half-past ten. On one 
occasion, two gentlemen who were not 
acquainted with the baronet's early hour 
of hunting, called at Teddesley, to inquire 
what time the hounds went out that day, 
as they wished to join them : the an- 
swer was, " they had been out and were 



[ 138 ] 

returned, had had a good run, and killed 
their fox." 

An eccentric sportsman (Old Land), who 
formerly kept some hounds adjoining what 
was the then Duke of Richmond's hunt, 
always met at break of day, that he might 
find his fox by the drag of him. He often 
threw off at his kennel, it being no great 
distance from large woodlands on either 
side. Foxes will sometimes prowl about a 
kennel at night, probably attracted by the 
smell of horse-flesh, &c. ; and the hoimds 
frequently hit upon the drag of one imme- 
diately. It is told of this radical sports- 
man, (who often bivouacked the night be- 
fore under the covert he was to meet at 
the next morning, if at any great distance 
from home,) that he was in the constant 
habit of disturbing the Duke's country, and 
drawing his best coverts, if he could not 
find elsewhere. On one occasion, the Duke 
sent a messenger, requesting him to for- 



[ 139 ] 

bear, and to keep within a certain line of 
country: the person was received with 
great hospitality, and after a long confer- 
ence, in the course of which many bumpers 
were drank, and no arrangement made, old 
Land sent the messenger back to Good- 
wood, a little the worse for liquor, with the 
following laconic answer, ( not very respect- 
ful, you will say,) — " That he had hunted 
the country before his Grace was born, 
and he hoped to do it after he was dead 

and d d." Mr. L. was, however wrong 

in his calculation, — as the Duke outlived 
him many years. 

In modern times, hunting early is un- 
necessary ; the breed of hounds, the feed- 
ing, and the whole system is so much im- 
proved, that the majority of foxes are found 
and killed in the afternoon, (I mean after 
twelve o'clock). In former times, the only 
advantage of finding a fox early must have 
been that his belly was full; for perhaps 



[ 140] 

he had scarcely finished his repast by that 
time in the morning. In the present day, 
we are anxious to find a stout fox; and, 
instead of his being full, we wish him to be 
as empty as possible, and to stand one 
hour and twenty minutes, the best pace, 
before the hounds. 

A celebrated writer on fox-hunting, the 
late Mr. Beckford, (if I remember right, not 
having read his book for many years,) is of 
opinion that break of day is the most de- 
sirable time to hunt, and that you have 
a better chance of sport early in the 
morning. For the reason I before stated, 
there is certainly a greater probability of 
killing your fox; and in cub-hunting, in 
the end of August and beginning of Sep- 
tember, the weather is often so warm, you 
cannot hunt after ten o'clock ; but if it is 
not too hot, and the ground too dry, I 
never thought there was any great advan- 
tage gained by hunting so very early.— 



[ 141 ] 

Sometimes the scent is better early in- the 
morning, but very often it is worse ; and, 
on an average, it is better after nine o'clock 
than before. 

In cub-hunting, the great object is to 
get blood for your young hounds. If you 
find a litter of cubs, the stouter they are 
and the longer they run the better, and the 
more good will be done to your hounds ; 
you are sure of killing, if you will but have 
patience and perseverance, — two necessary 
virtues, with which a huntsman above all 
men should be endued. 

I never found any benefit in getting up 
in the middle of the night, which you must 
do if you have any distance to go, and 
purpose meeting at day-break in the be- 
ginning of September. At the same time, 
I do not approve of working hounds in 
very hot weather : I know from experience, 
it is sometimes attended with fatal conse- 
quences, — I once suffered very severely 



[142 ] 

from it. I had killed a cub early, and it 
being a good scenting morning, I allowed 
the hounds to try for another ; we unfor- 
tunately found an old fox, and as he did 
not attempt " to break" we fancied it was 
a cub. The hounds ran him well for two 
hours, and I expected every moment they 
would kill him; being over anxious, we 
were not aware the day was getting warm. 
The hounds at last killed their fox ; but I 
lost three valuable dogs, which died in 
convulsions, in consequence of their great 
exertions; they were three dog-hounds 
that I prized very highly, bred by Lord 
Althorp, and got by the Duke of Beaufort's 
" Justice," which made me regret their loss 
the more. I must own, this unfortunate 
circumstance caused me ever afterwards to 
pay double attention to that most material 
point, condition. 

A pack of fox-hounds formerly was quite 
a different thing to what it is now-a-days ; 



[ 143 ] 

nor was one tenth part of the money ex- 
pended on the establishment. The breed- 
ing of hounds, comparatively speaking, was 
very little attended to; and the servants 
were mounted on horses of inferior value. 
Few packs hunted oftener than three times 
a week ; they certainly had long runs, and, 
(if you believe the stories of old sports- 
men,) killed their foxes at great distances 
from the places where they found them, — 
but they all allowed it was often tedious ; 
and about St. Thomas's day, Reynard com- 
monly escaped in the dark. 

In modern times, the system of hunting 
is so much improved, so much more atten- 
tion is paid to the condition of hounds and 
their style of work, that, in this enlightened 
age, a master of hounds thinks it a reflec- 
tion on his judgment if one hound in his 
pack is detected in a fault. The men, too, 
are well mounted ; and none but servants 
who conduct themselves in every respect 



[ 144 ] 

properly are retained in a hunting establish- 
ment. The expense, however, is consider- 
ably augmented ; but in what way can a 
man spend his money with more satisfaction 
to himself and friends ? 

If fox-hunting should be annihilated, our 
superior breed of horses would degenerate; 
the farmers would give up breeding, if the 
chance of selling a horse for a hunter, at a 
profitable price, was hopeless : the conse- 
quence would be, the country in general 
would suffer; it would be impossible to 
procure horses for His Majesty's cavalry, and 
the present very expeditious mode of tra- 
velling must naturally be retarded, for want 
of the superior animals we now have, (unless 
we go by steam). Can it be expected 
farmers will be at the expense, trouble, and 
risk of breeding, if they have not a chance 
of selling their horses occasionally for 
hunters; the inferior price given by go- 
vernment for horses to mount the cavalry ? 



[ 145 ] 

and the low price coach-masters purchase 
theirs at, would be very little encourage- 
ment to a breeder to select well-bred mares, 
and put them to strong thorough-bred bony 
horses, and pay that attention so necessary 
to put forward a clever four years old, if 
they have not the chance of being remu- 
nerated. The breed of men also would 
degenerate, and the characteristic of the 
nation would be changed: instead of the 
hardy, open-hearted, liberal-minded Briton, 
you would see nothing but an effeminate 
race, that would only meet once a year at 
a grand battue, to shoot a tame pheasant, 
and that would be the only chasse in Eng- 
land. Amongst a thousand other advan- 
tages belonging to fox-hunting, the bring- 
ing together the different ranks of society 
is not the least : you can see a great deal 
of life, — and it is no bad school to study 
mankind in. The emigration to the con- 
tinent is very great at the present day, but 

L 



[ 146 ] 

in general confined to people who have 
small incomes and large families, — educa- 
tion being much cheaper, and no taxes to 
pay, are the principal inducements ; but if 
the national amusements are done away 
with, more particularly fox-hunting, which 
affords enjoyment to all ranks, and the 
utility, of which to every grade is so very 
conspicuous, not only the needy will emi- 
grate, but the opulent and even the higher 
orders, for they will be deprived of their 
chief amusement in the winter. — But let 
us leave such sad forebodings and get on 
the line again. 

There are those who think hounds go 
too fast, and fancy a fox has no chance with 
them. How is it, then, he so often beats 
the pack ? No doubt, if hounds, on a good 
scenting day, go away close at his brush, 
they have every prospect of killing him, 
if they do not change, which will often hap- 
pen where foxes are plentiful. In the long 



[ 147 ] 

runs we read of, an end, when hounds are 
beat, unless they have gone a very slow 
pace, to a certainty the pack must have 
changed foxes; and nothing disheartens 
hounds so much as changing. Perhaps no 
fox can stand more than an hour the best 
pace before hounds of the present day, ex- 
cept in the Roothings of Essex, and in some 
parts of Suffolk, where I have seen them 
often run an hour and twenty minutes. 
Some sportsmen have an idea that parti- 
cular breeds of foxes are better than others, 
and there is some reason in the observa- 
tion ; every one must allow they differ often 
in size, colour, and shape ; you may prob- 
ably smile, and call me too fanciful, yet 
I certainly have observed that the best 
runners and the stoutest, are the long dark 
coloured foxes ; but I beg to be understood 
that this depends chiefly upon their age. 
With regard to naming your hounds, it 
strikes me to be of little consequence what 



[ 148 ] 

names you give them ; some prefer words of 
three syllables, others two-, the latter are 
thought to be the easiest to halloo to. The 
dog hounds are generally named from he- 
roes, ancient and modern, and there is 
scarcely a pack in the kingdom that does 
not boast its Wellington. As to the colour 
of hounds, I was always partial to the 
badger pied ones, or indeed any except yel- 
low, till the descendants of the Beaufort 
" Justice" put me in conceit with even that 
colour. And you will allow when hounds 
are going well together over a country, no 
one pays any attention to their colour. The 
dress of yourself or servants is of little con- 
quence, whether pink, yellow, or blue and 
buff: Charlemagne says " it is not the dress 
of a man I look to, but his actions." 

Should you happen to keep hounds at no 
great distance from London, you will find 
many of the inhabitants of that capital (cock- 
neys if you please), good sportsmen, well 



[ 149 ] 

mounted, and riding well to hounds ; they 
never interfere with the management of 
them when in the field, contribute liberally 
to the expense, and pay their subscriptions 
regularly. The sum of fifty or a hundred 
pounds is nothing out of an individual's 
pocket ; but to a manager of a subscription 
pack, the fact of twenty subscribers, each 
paying his fifty to a day, is a thing of no 
small consequence, as he is required to 
pay for almost every article in advance, 
old oats, hay, meal, &c. and the interest of 
the money amounts to one subscription at 
least. Whenever I went to town I received 
the greatest kindness and hospitality from 
these Gentlemen ; capital dinners, and the 
choicest wines. We occasionally went " the 
best pace over the mahogany," and often 
ran the Portuguese a sharp burst, and whoo- 
whooped many a long corked Frenchman ! 
Blood is so necessary to a pack of fox- 
hounds, that if you are long without it, you 



[ 150] 

cannot expect sport ; many say the art of fox- 
hunting is keeping your pack in blood. All 
hounds are liable to get out of it ; even in 
Leicestershire I have heard of such things. 
I remember being once with a pack, which 
had been out of blood for some time : it was 
a good scenting day, they found their fox 
well, and went away close at him; the 
owner observed to me, " Now look at them, 
— do they appear to be out of blood ?" Very 
true, I answered, but it won't last long ; 
they soon came to a check, which brought 
them to a hunting scent, then to difficul- 
ties, and as last they lost their fox. If they 
had been in blood, it is my firm opinion 
they would have killed him. 

Hounds will not work through difficul- 
ties, nor will they exert themselves in that 
killing sort of manner when they are out of 
blood. If after all you should, owing to 
ill luck and bad weather, be in want of it, 
the best way is to leave an earth open in a 



[ 151 ] 

country where you can spare a fox, and 
where you can, without much trouble dig 
him, give him to the hounds on the earth, 
and go home. But whatever you do never 
turn out a bag-man ; it is injurious to your 
hounds, makes them wild and unsteady ; be- 
sides, nothing is more despicable, or held in 
greater contempt by real sportsmen than the 
practice of hunting bag-foxes. It encourages 
a set of rascals to steal from other hunts ; 
therefore keep in mind, " if there were no 
receivers there would be no thieves." What 
chiefly contributes to make fox-hunting so 
very far superior to other sports, is the 
wildness of the animal you hunt, and the 
difficulty in catching him. It is rather ex- 
traordinary, but nevertheless a well known 
fact, that a pack of hounds, which are in 
sport and blood, will not eat a bag-man. I 
remember hearing an anecdote (when I was 
in Shropshire many years ago), of the late 
Lord Stamford's hounds, which I will relate 



[ 152] 

to you as I heard it. The present Lord 
Forrester and his brother Mr. Frank For- 
rester, then boys, were at their uncle's for 
the holidays. A farmer came to inform 
them a fox had just been seen in a tree. All 
the nets about the premises were collected 
and the fox was caught ; but the Squire of 
Willey, a sportsman himself, and a strict 
preserver of foxes, sent the fox immediately 
to Lord Stamford by one of his tenants, 
that he might be informed of the real cir- 
cumstance. The next day the hounds were 
out, and also the Squire's tenant ; they had 
drawn some time without finding, when the 
farmer reminded his Lordship of the fox 
caught ; " do you think, said he, I will al- 
low my hounds to hunt a bag-fox ? I should 
never be forgiven by my huntsman !" At 
last, after drawing several coverts without 
finding, his Lordship gave his consent (but 
it was to be kept a great secret), and the 
bag was to be touched upon the ground 



L 153] 

in a line for a covert they were going to 
draw, to have the appearance of a disturbed 
fox, and the fox to be turned down in it. 

On going to covert, a favourite hound, 
called Partner, feathered on the scent. The 
huntsman exclaimed in exstacy, " old 
Partner touches on him ; a fox by G — d ! 
we shall certainly find in the next covert ;" 
they found the bag-man, and had a tolerable 
run ; but when they killed him, not a 
hound would eat him ! " Now, Sir," said 
his Lordship to the farmer, " you have de- 
ceived the huntsman and the field, but you 
cannot deceive my hounds." 

Next to turning out bag-men, lifting 
of hounds is the most prejudicial. They 
should seldom be taken " off their noses," 
nothing is gained by it in the end ; hounds 
that are seldom lifted, will kill more foxes 
in the course of a season than those that 
frequently are. Some years ago, when hunt- 
ing with the Duke of Grafton's hounds in 



[ 154 ] 

Suffolk, they came to a check all in a mo- 
ment at a barn near some cross roads ; they 
were left alone, and made a fling of them- 
selves, in a perfect circle, without hitting 
the scent; many gentlemen exclaimed " It 
is all over now, Tom ; the only chance you 
have is to make a wide cast." " No," an- 
swered the huntsman, " if the fox is not in 
that barn, my hounds ought to be hung." 

Dick Foster, the whipper-in, now hunts- 
man to Mr. Villebois (and a very good one 
he is), was ordered to dismount and see if 
he could discover the fox ; he returned and 
said he was not there." Tom Rose still 
was positive ; at last he was viewed on a 
beam in the barn, and they killed him, after 
a further run of about a mile. I mention this 
trivial circumstance to shew you clearly, 
that if the hounds had been hurried up 
either of the roads on a wild cast, made 
by an ignorant huntsman, the fox would 
inevitably have been lost. They say chang- 



[ 155 ] 

ing countries is much against hounds ; from 
a good scenting country to a bad one cer- 
tainly is against them, but from a bad one 
to a good one I should imagine to be quite 
the reverse. Sam Lawley, at the time he 
hunted the late Lord Vernon's hounds, 
when he went into the Bosworth country, 
had nothing to do but ride as fast as he 
could ; it was all racing, heads up and sterns 
down ; but when they returned home to 
an inferior scenting country, it was some 
time before they settled to their usual way 
of hunting. I knew a pack that went from 
Hampshire to a good scenting part of Suf- 
folk and Essex, where the cubs were all 
taken or destroyed, it not being known any 
one would hunt the country ; notwithstand- 
ing these disadvantages, subsequent to the 
first of November, they killed 14 brace of 
foxes successively, and most of them with 
good runs. I attributed their great sport 
to a favourable change of country, but they 



C 136] 

were a gallant little pack, and three parts 
of them were of Lord Egremont's sort. 
Hunting too late is attended with great 
destruction of foxes, and in consequence 
you often pay dear, the next season, for 
your spring hunting. About the second 
week in March I was always in anxious 
doubt on finding, to know whether it was a 
vixen fox; on those occasions there is ge- 
nerally some quick-sighted fellow, who vo- 
lunteers his opinion one way or the other 
(which alarms you the more) ; and I have 
seen hounds by mistake stopped from a 
dog fox, and halloo'd to the scent of a 
vixen. A friend of mine, who was a strict 
preserver, and took pleasure in seeing other 
people amused through his means, used to 
exclaim, " if you hunt late, and kill my old 
bitch fox that has bred you so many litters, 
I never will forgive you." 

I have no doubt you will think it a bold 
assertion on my part when I say, I have seen 



[ 157 ] 

hounds hunt too much ; what I mean to infer 
is, they never ought to hunt when they can 
run. I have known hounds from custom 
reduce the scent to a hunting one, after 
running a few fields the best pace. No man 
is fonder of seeing hounds hunt in a fox- 
hunting style than myself, but I cannot say 
I approve of pottering, " Bellman, well hit, 
he is come so far, old fellow ;" then, " Thun- 
der," makes another hit, a few yards further 
on ; that is not the way to hill your fox. I 
like to see, the instant a hound makes a hit, 
the whole pack join him like lightning, and 
guide the scent with energy ; no flashers or 
dashers. In some play Bannister acted 
the character of a servant to a sick gentle- 
man, who was dangerously ill, — his nephew 
called to inquire after his uncle's health, 
when the servant informed him, he had no 
time to lose, as Lawyer Dash was up stairs 
making his will, " and he will dash you 
out or dash you in in the twinkling of an 



[ 158] 

eye." Now, if you have any dashers or 
flashers in your pack, they will lose your 
fox for you " in the twinkling of an eye." 
For my own part, I am never pleased with 
a run, unless the hounds do their work well. 
Were I to have some sporting friends 
coming to see my hounds in the field, I 
should prefer going away close at him for 
twenty minutes, then a short check, to 
bring the hounds to a hunting scent, and a 
quick thing at last, and run into him, in 
order that my friends might be convinced 
the hounds could hunt as well as rim ; for 
of this I am certain, if they cannot do both, 
they merit not the name of fox-hounds. It 
is a mistaken idea to suppose that a south- 
ern hound, or any other species, has a 
better nose than a fox-hound. I once had 
some dogs to hunt hare, they consisted of 
every description, — the rough tanned and 
blue mottled harriers, and among them a 
few fox-hounds from George Sharpe, his 



[ 159 ] 

present Majesty's huntsman at that time ; 
the fox- hounds always showed a supe- 
riority of ?wses, and it is my opinion no 
animal of the canine race has so fine a nose 
as they have. A pointer, with a cross of 
a fox-hound, (in short, he was got by one,) 
was the best I ever had. Often in bad 
scenting days I have known him find game, 
which other pointers had passed by with- 
out winding. 

Now that we are upon the subject of 
what is called winding game, let me ob- 
serve, that it is a great advantage to hounds 
to draw up wind; but if you meet at the 
furthest end of your hunt up wind, you 
may lose half the morning in trotting down 
wind to begin drawing ; therefore, when I 
have been obliged to draw down wind, it 
was not from choice, but from necessity. 

The number of days you intend to hunt 
must be regulated according to your esta- 
blishment, the extent of your country, and 



[ 160] 

the stock of foxes you have in it. I should 
say four days a week, for a pack of fifty 
couples, will keep your hounds and horses 
in regular work. You had better divide 
them into two separate packs ; for hounds 
that are hunted together will give less 
trouble, be more handy, and not so jea- 
lous of each other. It is decidedly a bad 
plan to take out too many hounds, and 
never by any means take out one that is 
not quite fit and in condition. If you can 
muster twenty or one-and-twenty couples 
in each pack, all effective, it is as many 
as you ever ought to take into the field. 
On no occasion rob either pack to make up 
the number of the other; even sixteen 
couples, that know each other, willdo th e 
thing better by themselves, and, if well 
matched, will carry a good head across a 
country, and not appear contemptible either. 
How disgusting it is to see a large pack 
out, and only a few couples at head! 



[ 161 ] 

In a run across the open nothing has a 
more unsightly appearance than detached 
bodies of hounds scattered all over the 
country, some here and some there ; and 
in woodlands, with several foxes on foot, 
there is a still worse prospect, and less 
chance of their again uniting : the division 
of hounds on your hunted fox becomes 
weaker every minute, your ears are an- 
noyed by tongues on a variety of scents in 
every direction, whilst your head of hounds 
dwindles away to nothing, and you are left 
at last " tooting " your horn without three 
hounds upon the line. I have known a 
few hounds, kept by some farmers, (not 
exceeding sixteen couples,) that seldom 
missed a fox, — they were named " the In- 
vincibles ;" 

" There was 
Invincible Tom and invincible Towler, 
Invincible Jack and invincible Jowler." 

Although they were occasionally a great 
annoyance to me, and disturbed the cream 

M 



[ 162 ] 

of the country formerly hunted by the late 
Mr. Panton, I could not be displeased with 
them; the farmers who managed them 
were respectable people, fond of the sport, 
and had as much right to hunt as I had. 
I could set the conduct of an individual on 
that occasion in no very favourable light ; 
but, as we are taught by the moralist to 
" forget and forgive," I shall bury the cir- 
cumstance in oblivion. 

An Irish gentleman, a friend of mine, sent 
me a Limerick Paper containing the follow- 
ing description of a late " fox chase " which, 
being in a different style to what we are 
accustomed to in England, may probably 
be amusing to you ; I have therefore copied 
it for your perusal. 

" On Wednesday last, the Ormond hounds 
had another brilliant heading run of thir- 
teen miles from point to point, in an in- 
conceivably short time, over a most sport- 
ing country. Having drawn Milltown and 



[ 163] 

Glasshouse without finding, intelligence was 
brought that a fox had been seen near 
Skinsmore. 

" Men, boys, and girls ! 
Desert the unpeopled village, and wild crowds 
Spread o'er the plain, by the sweet frenzy seized. 

The intelligence wanted but confirmation. 
Harmony and Merlin, the heralds of the 
pack, soon proclaimed the joyful tidings — 

" They cheer the pack, 
Opening in concerts of harmonious joy, 
But breathing death. 

The fox had gone a considerable time be- 
fore to Cangort Wood ; but it is not for 
time or distance to silence these sons of 
Harmony, Handel, Highlander, and Har- 
per; in a dreadful crash, 

" The pack wide opening, load the trembling air 
With various melody ; .... 

The forest thunders, and the mountains' shake, 
The chorus swells :..... 

. and now 
In vain each earth he tries, — the doors are barr'd 
Impregnable ; nor is the covert safe, — 
He pants for purer air. 



[ 164 ] 

This pack and game cannot be partners 
of the same wood, though boundless the 
extent. The horn calls, the Captain harks, 
Tony halloo s; he breaks! — and at his 
brush fly eighteen couples of this unerring 
pack, of Tonys own, for twenty genera- 
tions. In Cangort Park he seeks for safety 
from his fleet pursuers ; to them the walls, 
though ten feet high, no barrier prove, — 
they take them in their flight, Tamerlane 
and Telegraph at the head, and all the 
kindred blood; then across to Quakers- 
town, through the demesne of Coralauty, 
along the banks of the Brusna the scent 
lay burning. 

" Tumultuous soon they plunge into the stream, 
and, in greedy joy, 

From shore to shore they swim ; while clamour 
loud 

And wild uproar torment the troubled flood. 

Here he showed himself a most sporting 
fox : passing the earth of Sharavogue un- 
tried, he crossed the race-course ; 



[ 165 ] 

" Now far behind 
The hunter crew, wide straggling o'er the plain ; 
The panting courser now with trembling nerves 
Begins to reel. 

Now to Ratlimore-hill, by the Castle ; here 
there was a disposition to stop the hounds, 
when Tony swore 'His Majesty's guards 
could not stop them !' 

" And leaves the lagging multitude behind. 

From Rathmore he inclined towards Golden 
Grove ; then changing his route, he made 
for Knock, over a continuation of the most 
beautiful country, by the Leap Castle, 
through Ballybut, when, the hounds being 
very near him, he crossed the Roscrea road, 
and made directly for the mountains, leaving 
Summer Hill to the right, — 

" And o'er the plain, and o'er the mountain's edge, 
Away he flies ; nor ships with wind and tide, 
And all their canvas wings, went half so fast. 

Now to Cashrow Glen, where taking leave 
of the lowland country, he made for the 
Gap of Glandine, where the hounds were 



[ 160 ] 

with difficulty stopped, and life given to 
one of the most sporting foxes this country 
or perhaps any other ever produced. — Con- 
sidering the great number of sportsmen in 
the field that day, it may be remarked as 
extraordinary, that only the four following 
rode through, and were at the end of the 
hunt : Mr. M. H. Draught ; Mr. Richard 
Hammersley, riding Coriolanus ; Mr. J. 
Doolan, on Paddy from Cork; Mr. P. 
Chadwick, on his famous chesnut mare; 
and Tony, though last, not least, riding 
Kate, the best mare in Ireland." 

It gave me great pleasure to find from 
this animated description, that they keep 
up the spirit of the chase with unabated ar- 
dour, and fox-hunting still continues the 
most fashionable amusement in the sister 
country. In Scotland several new packs 
have been recently established. Wales, 
too, can boast many very keen lovers of 
the sport; though there, I am told, the 



[ 167 J 

management of a pack of fox-hounds is 
conducted in rather a different manner to 
what it is with us. The neighbourhood of 
Usk, in Monmouthshire, I believe, has 
claimed, almost from time immemorial, a 
very excellent pack ; and the attention paid 
to the breeding, and the judgment shown 
in the field, have reflected equal honour on 
the possessors. The persevering style in 
which this indefatigable pack stick to their 
fox, through those truly " awful woods" de- 
nominated " Wert- Wood "(in comparison of 
which, a friend of mine fancied even the 
" Foret d Orleans " would appears mall,) is 
actually beyond all praise. When such strict 
attention is invariably paid to the main and 
essential points in an establishment, we 
willingly pass over the more trifling pecu- 
liarities or omissions, which prejudice or 
chance so long may have encouraged ; and 
he indeed must be extremely prone to cavil, 
who seriously objected to these hounds, 



[ 168 ] 

merely because their master tenaciously 
adhered to the antediluvian long-eared 
custom of not having them " rounded." 

The French emigrants who were in Eng- 
land have endeavoured in many places 
through France to introduce the English 
mode of hunting, but in general without 
success ; although their king, Charles the 
Tenth, and most of the royal family, are 
particularly fond of it. The farmers have 
no idea of people riding over their land, or 
what they call " chasse a cheval" In some 
places, even if you attempted riding par- 
tridge shooting, the whole country would 
be up in arms. Several English and French 
families were anxious for me to establish a 
subscription pack on the Continent ; but, 
after the experience I had had in shooting, 
I knew it was impossible to have procured 
leave, either from the owners of coverts or 
the farmers. I never could convince a 
Frenchman, who had not been in England, 



C 169] 

that it was practicable to make hounds suf- 
ficiently steady to hunt nothing but a fox- 
scent ; they fancy if a pack were to enter 
a covert, they would destroy every living 
animal in it. 

As a proof of what I have stated, I had 
about ten couples of old fox-hounds sent 
to me from a friend in England, to forward 
to a gentleman who was in Paris. As 
they were not sent for immediately after 
their arrival, I thought I would endeavour 
to kill a French fox with them. I requested 
permission of several owners of coverts to 
hunt but was refused, on account of the 
hares and rabbits, which they said the 
hounds would kill ; I however got permis- 
sion of the Duke de Albufera, (Suchet), at 
Tankerville ; our turn out was not very 
splendid, I was mounted on a Norman 
mare, and borrowed a cow's horn from a 

farmer ; Mr. A and Mr. C- • were 

my whipper's-in. At the covert we were 



[ 170] 

met by the Duke's keepers in their state 
liveries, and we began immediately " yoiks, 
wind him, my boys,." It being a cold dry 
March day, and the earths imperfectly stop- 
ped, we did not find, although I knew 
there were plenty of foxes. Every time a 
hare or rabbit got up before the hounds, 
the keepers exclaimed " Sacre bleu, les 
chiens Anglois are good for nothing, they 
will not hunt either hares or rabbits !" To 
give you a further idea of the notions 
of a Frenchman with regard to fox-hunt- 
ing, I will relate to you another circum- 
stance which I know to have occurred, but 
it was in England. A French gentlemen 
being out one day, when several coverts 
having been drawn without success, the 
master of the hounds, to the great joy of 
the field, trotted off to a piece of gorse in 
an open country, at a great distance from 
any other coverts. They found, but unfor- 
tunately Reynard was immediately headed 



[ 171 ] 

into the mouth of the hounds ; — when the 
Monsieur riding up to the gentleman, and 
taking off his hat, exclaims, " Sir ! I congra- 
tulate you on catching him so soon, and 
with so little trouble." 1 have been in- 
formed an English gentleman has esta- 
blished a pack of fox-hounds near Tours, 
to hunt wild boar ; and for that description 
of hunting has excellent sport, and kills 
every season a great number of these ani- 
mals. He being well known in England 
as a good sportsman, I have no doubt the 
thing is done as well as it can be. 

Now for the Chapter of Accidents, so 
often quoted in the drawing-room and 
boudoir, against our noble sport. Doubt- 
less casualties will happen in hunting, but 
not more frequently in the pursuit of 
that than of other sports ; and they most 
commonly occur to men attempting to 
leap large fences when their horses are 
blown. How much oftener do we hear of 



[ 172 ] 

accidents happening on the road, and what 
numbers also to persons shooting ! When 
you take into consideration, that on a mo- 
derate calculation, at least ten thousand 
people hunt constantly throughout the 
season, with fox-hounds only, and many of 
them young men full of emulation, no 
judges of what sort of cattle are proper for 
their weight, and all anxious to be first, 
riding at every thing that comes in their 
way ; you cannot but be surprised that so 
few accidents happen. During my sojourn 
in France (now a number of years), I of 
course have had to lament the loss of many 
of my friends and acquaintances ; I scarcely 
ever take up a newspaper but it contains 
the death of some one I have known, yet 
although the majority of my friends are fox- 
hunters, it is not a little singular, that I 
have only lost one of that description, 
during the whole period of my absence. 
This fact speaks forcibly for the healthiness 



L 173 ] 

of our amusement, so stick to it, if you 
wish for longevity. 

We read in history, that young ladies of 
the highest quality and greatest beauty 
spent much of their time in the chase ; so 
strong and universal was the passion for 
hunting among our ancestors ; and I was 
gratified when you told me that in your 
part of England the fair sex still sanction 
hunting, and occasionally grace the field 
with their presence. Although I confess 
they appear more in their element in the 
drawing-room or in Kensington Gardens, 
than in the kennel or the field. Still I 
must say it looks well, and shews a dis- 
position to promote their brother's or their 
husband's amusement, and in consequence 
contributes much to domestic happiness. 
This the wife will find is the surest " way 
to keep him," and prevent the husband 
running riot. A man naturally expects his 
wife to humour him a little, and allow him 



[ 174 ] 

occasionally to ride his hobby, provided it 
be a rational one. 

A certain late great potentate, who was 
very inimical to the chace, wished also to 
make it appear " cruel, and no occupation 
for the mind." The first of these ideas 
came with a bad grace from this great man 
(but hunting was not his taste) ; and as to 
the " occupation," I think I may venture 
to affirm, if there be one out-of-door 
amusement which employs the mind more 
than another, it is fox-hunting ; and men 
of the first rate abilities keep their hunters, 
and indulge in this noble diversion. I have 
occasionally read in the newspapers insi- 
nuations against fox-hunters ; for what rea- 
son I am at a loss to know ; I see no just 
cause why a fox-hunter, if he conducts him- 
self as a gentleman, is not as respectable a 
character as one who follows other pursuits 
less manly and more enervating. Whenever 
I hear persons of either sex repeating sto- 



[ 175 ] 

vies unfavourable to the lovers of the chace, 
the following lines always occur to me, — 

" Believe not each aspersing tale, 
As most weak people do ; 
But always think that story false 
Which ought not to be true." 

But I am " shirting' a little, you will no 
doubt say ; I told you before that my ob- 
servations would be desultory, and you to 
your cost find them so ; however, you asked 
for them, and must pay the penalty of pa- 
tience for putting a pen in my hand. 

To return, therefore, to the subject of 
accidents; those to our horses frequently 
arise from their being out of condition, and 
too fat. We all know it is not an uncommon 
thing for a horse to get too full of flesh, and 
out of wind after long rest, during frost, or 
from any other cause ; and grooms will give 
their horse the usual allowance of corn, hay, 
and water, without due attention to their 
necessary exercise ; although in frost you 



[ 176] 

cannot gallop them, you may lengthen 
their walks as much as you please, and at 
the same time do not omit a dose of 
physic, or the consequence will be they 
will get fat in their insides, and the first 
hunting day, if the hounds go the pace, 
and your horse is not rode with great 
judgment, he will soon have the " puff" 
out of him ; and if forced on, and put to 
a fence in this state of exhaustion, he is 
almost sure to fall, and will probably 
break a blood-vessel, or injure himself so 
seriously, as not to be worth five pounds 
afterwards. 

I am convinced that most accidents hap- 
pen to both man and horse from the un- 
fortunate animal being thus urged on 
(after he is blown), by an injudicious 
rider, one who will not condescend to 
" drop a stern " for a few seconds to 
give his horse wind, even to save the life 
of a valuable hunter. To prevent the 



[ H7 ] 

possibility of so much cruelty on the part 
of my boys, if I thought they had ever any 
chance of fox-hunting, I would send them 
out on foot with the harriers ; that when 
they got blown in running, they might at 
a future period have compassion for their 
horses in a similar situation. 

Horses, according to the present system 
of riding, unless it should be a very long 
day, have little to do, not sufficient to keep 
them in wind ; la mode is, to have two or 
three out each day. Light weights can 
have no excuse for this practice, unless 
they have some bad ones which they wish 
to sell. A horse that is in good condition, 
and cannot go for an hour the best pace 
with twelve stone upon his back, is not 
worth the corn he eats, — and in a long 
hunting chase he likewise ought not to 
tire. What merit is there in being with the 
hounds, if you have a fresh one to mount 
every fifteen minutes ? In my opinion, a 

N 



[ 178 ] 

man who sees the most of a run of an hour 
on one horse, and is in when the hounds 
kill their fox, deserves the most credit as a 
rider to hounds. If my memory do not 
fail me, I believe Lord Sefton was the first 
person who introduced a " second horse ;" 
and very properly so, his lordship riding a 
great weight. 

One of the most material things in a 
hunting establishment is, to have hounds 
perfect at their work, with no vice ; and 
the being as near each other as possible 
during the chase is indispensable. It is 
certainly very pleasing to the eye to see a 
pack equal in size, but it is of more conse- 
quence to attend to their shape. How 
often do we see at Newmarket a large 
horse and a small one run a dead heat ? I 
have seen " Violante " and " Meteora " run 
with large horses, and beat them : the for- 
mer was beat by " Currycomb," but she 
made a proper example of Mr. Shakespear's 



[ 179 ] 

" Brainworn," not only at short distances, 
but over the " Beacon Course." Shape and 
blood are what should chiefly be attended 
to. The late Mr. Meynell, (the so long 
celebrated master of the Quorndon hounds,) 
never cared about the size of a hound ; the 
last time I was at his kennel in Derbyshire, 
the dog hounds were powerful, the bitches 
small, but very clever and possessing plenty 
of bone. When I here say small, I would 
have it understood that small in height is 
meant ; for, as a very excellent sportsman 
observes, when speaking of a hunter, " the 
height of a horse, Sir, has nothing to do 
with the size of him." 

A veteran sportsman, a friend of mine, 
well known in the sporting world, who for 
many years was intimate with the late Mr. 
Meynell, and who hunted in Leicestershire 
nearly the whole of the time that great 
fox-hunter kept his hounds there ; and as 
no man now living, with the exception of 



[ 180 ] 

Mr. Lorrain Smith, can be better informed, 
or give so correct an account of every thing 
that relates to this inimitable sportsman, I 
have inserted, verbatim, a few anecdotes 
which my friend has been so kind as to send 
me, thinking they may be interesting to a 
young beginner. — He commences his letter 
by informing me, that he spent twenty 
years of the most pleasing apprenticeship 
to the late Mr. M. ; whom he speaks of as 
the " Primate of Science," and declares his 
equal never was, and he is inclined to think 
never will be. 

" The life of Mr. Meynell was spent in 
contemplating the characters of all and 
every animal and thing that came under his 
observation: his first object was to ascer- 
tain the probable cause that produced the 
various effects in man, animals, &c. such as 
perfection, defects, and propensities ; hence 
he had an analysis of most things which he 
had to encounter. His perception was so 







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^w *. 2%*»» ^ j^ ^jaraz 3EYJTM2M « m&fMwneffa £w^ 



[ 181 ] 

quick, and his judgment so strong, that he 
seldom erred in his decisions ; and thus, 
through the whole of his kennel, he could 
discover and fully explain the distinct cha- 
racter of every hound. To their health, 
condition, legs, and feet, he was particularly 
attentive, and watched them with strict 
attention ; as he found by experience, that 
a defect in any one of them made a ma- 
terial alteration in their performances in 
the field, — observing, drily, that you could 
not play upon an instrument out of tune. 
Perfect legs and feet, with tolerable sym- 
metry, were his great objects to begin 
with ; he was rather partial to large hounds, 
but he never drafted a small one that he 
liked, which made his pack less sightly than 
was generally admired ; but as he built all 
his foundation of merit upon power, he 
was less anxious as to appearances. In the 
latter years of his life he always saw the 
pack drawn out for hunting; and on his 



[ 182 ] 

return in the evening, he generally (even if 
he had company) went to see them fed 
before his dinner. He observed, how ne- 
cessary it was in man to guard against 
propensities ; and although too much refine- 
ment was dangerous, he was often obliged 
to make sacrifices to it. Yet to him there 
was no real pleasure without it : such sen- 
timents could only emanate from a superior 
and refined understanding. — Mr. Meynell 
was a second son. His father having dis- 
inherited his elder brother, he came into a 
fine estate at an early age, and soon had 
the good sense to discover that he had not 
made the best use of his education to 
qualify him for the proper enjoyment of 
fortune; and he immediately engaged a 

clergyman, a Mr. C , as his tutor and 

companion, and studied diligently under 
him two or three years. This speaks vo- 
lumes ! — I remember Mr. Meynell first set- 
ting out with a pack of hounds to hunt fox, 



[ 183 ] 

and often met him in Staffordshire hunting 
them himself; he was then, according 
to my recollection, the worst sportsman 
and wildest huntsman that I ever saw out 
with hounds. That wildness he soon re- 
strained to proper eagerness, keeping in 
bounds the finest spirits and energy that 
perhaps man ever possessed. His voice 
and articulation were delightfully harmoni- 
ous and energetic, — his view-halloo thrilled 
every one near him, — and his language was 
too pertinent to be misunderstood. His 
indignation in the field was sometimes ex- 
cessive; frequently expressed by looks, 
sometimes by deputies, — but when by 
words, he seldom or ever degenerated to 
rudeness. After rebuking a man once or 
twice, he would tell him he was incor- 
rigible, and it was of no use to admonish 
him. He complained of having to find 
fault with the Universities of Oxford and 
Cambridge, for disgorging annually such a 



[ 184 ] 

parcel of fools to torment him ; to whom, 
if they attempted a vindication of their 
riding, or being troublesome, he would 
courteously reply, " You may be perfectly 
right, gentlemen, and I may be wrong ; but 
there is gross ignorance on one side or the 
other." As a zealous and steady friend 
and a sportsman, Mr. Meynell's memory 
will ever rank with the highest characters 
on record; he was a man to whom I 
feel much indebted for his friendship and 
the benefits I derived from his experience. 
His life was replete with anecdote in the 
field and in society, some of which do not 
exactly appertain to fox-hunting." 

It occurs to me, that you may expect that 
I should give you my idea of perfection in 
a run, and my memory furnishes me with 
the following. Imagine all at once in the 
middle of a thick brake that you hear Wel- 
lington challenge, — " Wellington has found 
him !" — and before the huntsman has time 



[185] 

to say, " Hark to Wellington, my brave 
fellows !" the whole pack joins him in an 
instant, the fox is halloo' d, and they go 
away close at his brush. It is indeed a 
glorious sight to see one-and-twenty cou- 
ples of powerful animals going with velo- 
city, " best pace," over a country, all crowd- 
ing a-head and exerting their energetic 
powers to the utmost, not a hound out of 
his place, like a Lacedemonian phalanx, all 
intent on victory, and so steady that no- 
thing can take off their attention, — five- 
and-fifty minutes, without a check, — and 
then, whoo-whoop, they " kill him." 

The annual meeting of the masters of 
fox-hounds, I always considered, if followed 
up with spirit, as likely to be of great ad- 
vantage to the sport, from the rank, for- 
tune, and respectability of those gentlemen. 
I was indeed in hopes, at some of those 
meetings, a plan to prevent the great de- 
struction of foxes might not only have been 



[ 186 ] 

proposed, but carried into execution. At 
the agricultural meetings " breeding " is 
encouraged " in all its branches," and prizes 
given to the breeders of the best animals. 
Why not encourage the breed of hounds ? 
At the annual meeting, if a prize were 
given to him who bred two couples of the 
cleverest young hounds, a couple of dogs 
and a couple of bitches, it would create 
emulation; and after the decision, the 
hounds should be allowed to be shown at 
Tattersalls for three or four days, for the 
benefit of the feeders ; I write in their be- 
half, because they have no chance of pre- 
sents from the field, " cap money," or 
draught hounds ; and a great deal depends 
upon their attention to the bitches and 
their whelps before they are put out to 
walks. If such a thing were accomplished, 
what a treat it would be to a sportsman to 
see thirty or forty couples of the most 
perfect young hounds, selected from the 



[ 18 ? ] 

best packs in the kingdom ! Such a sight 
would afford me more gratification than to 
to have witnessed the coronation of Charles 
the Tenth of France, — " Chacun a son 
gout." 

Unless I have been misinformed, the 
B. D. C. have a fund to relieve super- 
annuated coachmen, and those with fami- 
lies, who from accidents or sickness are 
obliged to " he still," (that, I believe, is 
the dragsman's term.) A similar one for 
huntsmen and whippers-in, of good cha- 
racter, you would, I am sure, be friendly 
to, knowing your charitable disposition. 

A friend of mine, the other day, who 
had some thoughts of taking rather a con- 
fined country, which would only allow of 
being hunted twice a week, requested me 
to give him my opinion what number of 
hounds, horses, &c. he should require. At 
the present rate of taxes, supposing the 
price of corn, meal, hay, &c. to be what 
it is now, I should say, for twice a week 



[ 188] 

only, twenty-five couples of effective hounds 
would be sufficient; and, supposing you 
hunted your own hounds, and had only 
one whipper-in, five horses, and a hack 
for yourself and servant, would be quite 
enough. You must also have a groom, 
helper, and a feeder : making in the 
whole, four men, five-and-twenty couples 
of hounds, fi\e hunters, and a hack. The 
earth-stopping expenses will depend upon 
the country. The calculation I have made 
is as follows : 

The expenses for twice a week. 

Six horses, including groom and £. 

helpers, 300 

Hounds' food, for 25 couples, . . 150 

Firing, 30 

Taxes, 80 

Whipper-in and feeder, . . . . 140 

Earth-stopping, 50 

Sadlery, 40 

Farriery, shoeing, medicine, &c. . . 50 



[ 189 ] 

Brought over . . 840 
Young hounds purchased, and ex- 
penses at walks, 60 

Casualties, 100 

1000 
A second whipper-in, and two horses 

in addition, 170 

£1170 

Expenses for three times a week. 

£. 

Twelve horses, groom, helpers, &c. . 600 

Hounds' food, for forty couples, . . 220 

Firing, 40 

Taxes, 100 

Two whippers-in and feeder, . . . 210 

Earth-stopping, 65 

Sadlery, 80 

Farriery, shoeing, medicine, &c. . . 80 
Young hounds purchased, and ex- 
penses at walks, 80 

Casualties, 150 

£1625 



C 190] 

Expenses for four times a week. 

£. 

Fourteen horses, &c 700 

Hounds' food, for fifty couples, . . 275 

Firing, 50 

Taxes, 120 

Two whippers-in and feeder, . . . 210 

Earth-stopping, 80 

Sadlery, 100 

Farriery, shoeing, medicine, &c. . . 100 
Young hounds purchased, and ex- 
penses at walks, 100 

Casualties, 200 

£1935 

If you do not attend to the kennel de- 
partment yourself, but keep a huntsman, 
the expense will be at least £300 more. 
I have no hesitation in saying either four 
times or twice a week are preferable to 
three times ; either of the two former will 
keep your horses and hounds in regular 
work. I have only made my calculation 



[ 191 ] 

on the number I think necessary ; too 
many horses would be an useless expense, 
and they would be continually laming 
themselves, from their being too fresh and 
above their work. Too many hounds, also, 
are an useless incumbrance ; for they never 
can be worked often enough to keep them 
steady and in wind. And if you have too 
many servants, they will be continually 
quarrelling, for want of something better 
to do. 

Earth-stopping is very expensive in some 
countries, and it may amount to more than 
I have calculated. There is also another 
expense, which I cannot estimate ; that is, 
money paid to keepers and others for the 
preservation of foxes : a few pounds occa- 
sionally given with judgment, will often be 
of great service ; but a large sum, given 
indiscreetly, will do more harm than good. 

I subjoin a list (with the local names or 
those of the masters) of the numerous hunts 



[ 192 ] 

in the kingdom, to which you may some- 
times find it useful to refer, and which 
proves the high respect in which this grand 
national amusement is held throughout the 
kingdom, and how popular among the dif- 
ferent ranks of society it has *been, is, and 
(I trust, for the honour of our country,) 
ever will he. 

Bedfordshire. 

The Oakley, Marquis of Tavistock. 
The Marquis of Salisbury. 

Berkshire. 

Mr. Harvey Combe. 

Mr. Horlock, late Mr. Warde. 

Sir John Cope. 

Buckinghamshire. 

Duke of Grafton. 

The Old Berkeley, Mr. H. Combe. 

The Oakley. 

Sir Thomas Mostyn. 



Mr. Hurrell. 



[ 193 ] 
Cambridgeshire. 

Cheshire. 



The Delamere Forest Hounds, Sir Harry 
Mainwaring, Bart. 

Cornwall. 
Sir Rose Price, Bart. 

Derbyshire. 

Mr. Meynell. 

Sir George Sitwell, Bart. 

Dorsetshire. 

Mr. Farquharson. 
Mr. Yeatman. 

Durham. 

Mr. R. Lambton. 
Lord Darlington. 

o 



[194] 

Essex. 

Lord Petre. 

Mr. Conyers. 

Mr. Charles Newman. 

Mr. Hanbury. 

Gloucestershire. 

Duke of Beaufort. 
Colonel Berkeley. 

Hampshire. 

Mr. Villebois. 

Mr. Nicoll. 

Sir John Cope, Bart. 

Mr. Beevor, late Mr. Chute. 

The Hambledon Hounds, Mr. Smith. 

Mr. Thomas Asheton Smith. 

Hertfordshire . 

Marquis of Salisbury. 

Mr. Hanbury. 

The Old Berkeley, Mr. Harvey Combe. 



[ 195 ] 

Huntingdonshire. 
Lord Fitzwilliam. 

Kent. 

Mr. Oxenden. 

The Old Surry, Mr. Haigh. 

Leicestershire. 

The Quorn, Mr. Osbaldeston. 
Duke of Rutland. 
Lord Lonsdale. 
Lord Anson. 

Lincolnshire. 

Lord Yarborough. 

Sir Richard Sutton, Bart. 

The South Wold, or Gillingham. 

Duke of Rutland. 

Middlesex. 
The Old Berkeley, Mr. H. Combe. 



[ 196 ] 

Monmouthshire. 

The Llangibby Hounds, Mr. Williams. 
Mr. Morgan. 

Northamptonshire. 

The Pytcheley, Mr. Musters. 

Duke of Grafton. 

Lord Fitzwilliam. 

Sir Thomas Mostyn, Bart. 

Northumberland. 

The Northumberland Hounds, Sir M. W. 
Ridley, Bart. 

Nottinghamshire. 

Mr. Foljambe. 

The Hon. and Rev. R. Lumley Saville. 

The Quorn, Mr. Osbaldeston. 

The Duke of Rutland. 

Oxfordshire. 
Sir Thomas Mostyn, Bart. 



[ 197 ] 
Duke of Beaufort. 
Mr. Harvey Combe. 

Rutlandshire. 
Lord Lonsdale. 

Shropshire. 

Sir B. Graham, Bart. 

Mr. Boycott. 

Sir Richard Puleston, Bart. 

Somersetshire. 

The Somersetshire Hounds. 
Mr. Farquharson. 

Staffordshire. 

The North Staffordshire, Mr. Wicksted. 

Mr. Meynell. 

The South Staffordshire, Mr. Chadwick. 

Lord Anson. 

Mr. Boycott. 



[ * 98 ] 

Suffolk. 
Mr. Charles Newman. 

Sumj. 

The Old Surry, Mr. Haigh. 
Colonel Jolliffe. 
The Union, Mr. Boulton. 
Colonel Henry Wyndham. 

Sussex. 

Lt. Col. G. Wyndham. 
Colonel H. Wyndham. 
Major Carter. 

Warwickshire. 

Mr. Hay. 

Mr. Chadwick. 

Lord Anson. 

Wiltshire. 
Mr. Codrington. 



[ 199 ] 

Mr. Horlock, late Mr. Warde. 
Mr. T. A. Smith. 

Worcestershire. 

The Worcestershire. 
Mr. Chadwick. 

Yorkshire. 

Lord Harewood. 

Sir Tatton Sykes, Bart. 

The York and Ainsty. 

The Badsworth, The Hon. E. Petre. 

The Holderness, Mr. Hodgson. 

Lord Darlington. 

The Sinnington. 

Mr. Foljambe. 

Richard Hill, Esq. 



Lists of various packs you may find 
viseful as a sort of stud-book. If you wish 
to breed from any particular stallion hound, 



[ 200 ] 

you can refer to them for his pedigree. I 
have therefore added a large collection, 
which I have been favoured with by their 
noble and distinguished owners. The alpha- 
betical order has been followed, as I cannot 
pretend to settle the nice point of which 
is the oldest or the father pack ; but from 
what I have heard, I should think either 
Lord Fitzwilliam's or Lord Yarborough's 
was ; the former has been in possession of 
the noble owner fifty-three years, and were 
purchased of Messrs. Crew and Foley, who 
hunted Warwickshire or Oxfordshire. I 
remember having heard, when I inspected 
the yeomanry of the North Inland Dis- 
trict, at one of the hospitable chateaus of 
a Mr. Noel, who monopolized, if I may be 
allowed to make use of the expression, as it 
was not possible for one person to hunt the 
whole, — Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, 
Rutlandshire, and Nottinghamshire, — it was 
called old Noel's hunt; I therefore con- 



[201 ] 

elude, whosoever had his hounds must have 
had the oldest in the kingdom. 

Since writing the above, I have received 
the following information. Lord Yarbo- 
rough's hounds have been kept in a straight 
line since the year 1700 certain; but they 
think consider 'ably longer, (more than 120 
years.) The present Smith, Lord Y.'s hunts- 
man, his father, and his grandfather, have 
hunted the hounds in succession "from 
generation to generation!' The father of 
the present Smith hunted them fifty-five 
years without interruption. 

The Hertfordshire (Mr. Hanbury's) lay 
claim to considerable antiquity, with justice, 
— as an earth-stopper has lately proved his 
grandfather's employment with the pack, 
then Mr. Calvert's, so far back as 1727. 

In answer to your observation, that the 
pack of hounds that kill the greatest num- 
ber of foxes are considered the best, I 
acknowledge they are, if you make a fair 
calculation of the number of days they 



[ 202 ] 

hunt, and the stock of foxes they have, — 
but no fox should be counted before the 
1st of November, or after the 10th of 
March. I remember one season being very 
successful in cub-hunting ; this was report- 
ed to the invincible huntsman, (Mr. J. A.) 
who was a little jaloux, — his answer was 
" I never kill them while they suck." 
There is certainly no merit in killing cubs ; 
a pack of beagles, if there were no hares, 
would seldom miss one. 

A most extraordinary instance of dis- 
cipline in hounds occurs to me, which I 
ought to have mentioned when speaking 
of that unrivalled sportsman, the late Mr. 
Meynell. He met in the Harborough 
country, at a small patch of gorse on the 
side of a hill, in a very large pasture field : 
the hounds feathered as they went in, and 
found instantly. The covert being only 
about two acres, and open, Mr. Meynell 
immediately saw that the fox was in danger 
of being chopped ; he therefore called out 



[ 203 ] 

to Jack Raven, the huntsman, " Jack, take 
the hounds away ;" and at one of his usual 
rates every hound stopped, and the pack 
were taken to the hedge side, when Mr. 
Meynell called out three steady hounds 
and threw them into the cover. The fox 
was so loath to break, that the three 
hounds kept hunting him for ten minutes, 
in the hearing of all the pack, who lay 
perfectly quiet at Raven's horse's feet till 
the fox went away over the finest part of 
the country ; and the moment Mr. Meynell 
gave his most energetic thrilling halloo, 
(which has been noticed before,) every 
hound flew to him, — the burst was the 
finest that any sportsman ever beheld, and 
after an hour and ten minutes they killed 
their fox. 

I think you will already say that my 
observations are sufficiently protracted ; yet 
the hunting recollections, that your ques- 
tions have given rise to, crowd upon my 



[ 204 ] 

memory, and I could certainly give you 
several anecdotes of the principal hunts- 
men in the kingdom, as you require ; but 
they must be reserved for a future time, 
when, after a day of sport, you give me a 
corner by your fireside, — both of which I 
think I deserve from you as a grateful 
pupil, after so long a lecture ; in which 
I doubt not, long before this, you must 
have thought me, like " Old Thunder " and 
" Bellman," pottering on the scent; I there- 
fore candidly tell you I am " beat ; and as 
the time is almost at hand when you will 
meet your brother sportsmen in the field, 
where you will be much better amused 
than by reading my dull observations, I 
shall bid you farewell, — wishing health, 
happiness, good sport, " and long life," and 

remaining, my dear friend, 

Ever yours very sincerely. 



LISTS OF HOUNDS. 



[ 207 ] 
LORD ALTHORFS HOUNDS. 

October 20, 1815. 



Abigail , 



Alfred 



Tipsy. 



Demirep . . 
Harmony . 
Promise . . 
Victory 



Argus 

Mr. Smith's Halberd 

Duke of Grafton's Prosper 
Viner 



Darling. 
Careless. 
His Lavender. 
Cowslip. 



Basilisk . . \ 
Baronet . . J 
Basker 



Charon 

Lord Vernon's Basker. 



Caroline. 
His Careless. 



Abelard 
Emily . . . . \ 
Eleanor . . J 
Gossamer . . 

Niobe 

Prophetess . . 

Pilot 

Saracen . . \ 
Symphony / 
Tiffany 



Charon 

Sir Thos. Mostyn's Lazarus. 

Mr. Smith's Pontiff. 

Mr. Smith's Pontiff 

Mr. Smith's Pontiff. 

Mr. Powlett's Pilot 



Mr. Smith's Courtier 

Sir Thos. Mostyn's Duncan 



Aniseed. 

Helice. 

Billingsgate. 
Dainty. 
Arrogant. 

fDuke of Richmond's 
\ Cambric. 

Victory. 

Artless-. 



Ariel 

Bluecap . . 

Blowzy . . 
Champion 
Chariot... 
Cyprian . . 
Chaplet. . . 
Dandy . . . 
Dimity . . . 
Gregory . . 
Guileful . . 
Ladybird . 
Regent . . . 
Telltale .. 
Transport 



Charon 
Charon 
Outlaw. 



Roderick. 



Admiral 

Arthur 

Amulet 



y 



Sir Thos. Mostyn's Lazarus 
Sir Thos. Mostyn's Lazarus 

Mr. Smith's Pontiff 

Mr. Smith's Facer 

Duke of Beaufort's Justice . 

Duke of Beaufort's Justice 



Outlaw 



Mr. Smith's Heroine. 
/ Duke of Grafton's 
\ Daphne. 
Amazon. 

Racket. 

Helice. 
Nosegay. 

Modish. 

Liberty. 
Hyale. 

Demirep. 



Emilv. 



[ 208 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


3 Years. 


Almeric .... 

Brazen 

Cicely \ 

Curious . . f 

Dairymaid ] 
Dexterous > 
Desperate J 
Dalliance .... 

Emerald 

Ebony 

Factious . . "1 
Freedom . . > 
Fallacy .... J 

Imogen \ 

Innocence J 

Lionel "| 

Larceny . . 1 
Lovely . ... f 
Lightfoot. . J 
Phyllis 

Tamerlane \ 
Treachery J 
Witchcraft . . 


Sir Thos. Mostyn's Lucifer .. 
Sir Thos. Mostyn's Libertine 

Sir Thos Mostyn's Lucifer . . 

Sir Thomas Mostyn's Lucifer 

Sir Thomas Mostyn's Lazarus 

Sir Thos. Mostyn's Lazarus. . 
Sir Thos. Mostyn's Lazarus . . 
Sir Thos. Mostyn's Lazarus . . 

Sir Thos. Mostyn's Looby... . 
Mr. Smith's Pontiff 


His Agnes. 
Mr.Otway'sTermagant. 

Niobe. 

Hyale. 

Helice. 

Paradise. 
Promise. 
Beatrice. 

Victory. 
Spiteful. 

Arrogant. 

His Gracious. 

Demirep. 

Eleanor. 




Mr. Smith's Pontiff 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Presto 

Duke of Beaufort's Justice . . 
Duke of Grafton's Rummager 




Fanatic. . . . "1 
Fashion . . J 
Guardian. . "| 
Gauntlet .. j- 
Goneril . . J 
Grecian . . 1 
Governor.. > 

Guider J 

Harpy • • • \ 
Hopeful . . J 
Laughable \ 
Luscious . . J 

Memory .... 
Madcap . . "| 
Matchless 1 
Mopsy .... | 
Merkin.... J 

Nancy 

Orator . . . . "1 
Ottoman . . > 
Orpheus . . J 
Palafox .... 


Outlaw 


Brilliant. 






Mr.Otway'sTermagant. 
Tiffany. 

Betsy. 

Comfort. 

Victory. 

Aniseed. 
TeUtale. 

Demirep. 

Hyale. 
Harmony. 

Helice. 

Acme. 




Sir Thos. Mostyn's Looby.... 

Sir Thos. Mostyn's Looby. . . . 

Sir Thos. Mostyn's Lictor 

Sir Thos. Mostyn's Censor .. 

Mr. Smith's Champion 

Duke of Beaufort's Justice . . 
Duke of Beaufort's Justice . . 

Duke of Beaufort's Justice . . 

Duke of Beaufort's Justice . . 



[ 209 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


2 Years. 


Rosemary "1 




. 




Rarity. ... 1- 


Duke of Beaufort's Abelard . . 


Concubine. 




Roundelay J 








Sacripant \ 
Sylvia .... J 


Lord Lonsdale's Wonder 


Dimity. 




Voucher .... 


Duke of Richmond's Bachelor 


Fury. 


1 Year. 


Adrian "1 

Aconite . . J 




Tiffany. 
Caroline. 














Amadis 


Outlaw 


Emerald. 






Dimity. 




Adamant... \ 
Attica .... J 




Diadem. 










Angler .... "1 
Anodyne . . J 




Lord Tavistock's 






Trespass. 




Bashful 




Mr. Otway's Damsel. 
Concubine. 




Sir Thos. Mostyn's Looby 






Sir Thos. Mostyn's Looby 


Lord Tavistock's 
Billingsgate. 




Chorister. . "1 
Comedy . . J 


Sir Thos. Mostyn's Looby. . . . 


Lord Tavistock's 
Cowslip. 




Emigrant. . . . 


Sir Thos. Mostyn's Lictor .... 


Demirep. 






Sir Thos. Mostyn's Lictor 


Helice. 






Sir Thos. Mostyn's Lictor 


Harmony. 




Falconer .... 


Sir Thos. Mostyn's Lictor. . . . 


Victory. 




Fisherman "1 
Flexible . . J 


Sir Thos. Mostyn's Lictor .... 


Blowzy. 




Fleecer . . . . "1 
Favola .... J 


Sir Thos. Mostyn's Lictor. . . . 


Lord Tavistock's 
Simpleton. 




Fabulist .... 


Sir Thos. Mostyn's Lictor... . 


Lord Tavistock's 
Chauntress. 




Februa . . . . \ 
Florida .... J 


Sir Thos. Mostyn's Fleecer . . 


Lord Tavistock's 
Sloven. 






Sir Thos. Mostyn's Harbinger. 


Roguish. 




General . . "1 
Gabriel.... J 


Sir Thos. Mostyn's Harbinger. 


Aniseed. 




Helicon .... 


Sir Thos. Mostyn's Censor . . 


Dexterous. 






Sir Thos. Mostyn's Censor . . 


Treachery. 






Duke of Grafton's Castor. . . . 


His Rosebud. 




Knicknack . . 


Duke of Grafton's Castor .... 


His Blameless. 






Duke of Grafton's Rampart. . 


His Syren. 




Posthumous.. 


Lord Yarborough's Piper .... 


His Bluebell 


iVerderer . . \ 
Venison . . J 


Lord Fitzwilliam's Galloper . 


Spiteful. 




Lord Fitzwilliam's Patron .... 


Lord Tavistock's 
Scandalous. 




Zodiac 




Dairymaid. 



I have inserted Lord Althorp's List of the last year his Lordship kept Hounds, 
knowing them to have been particularly well bred, having had his young 
draughts for many years. 



[ 210 ] 



LORD ANSON'S HOUNDS. 

November, 1825. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


9 Years. 


Cerberus 




Charity. 


8 Years. 


Gravity 


Grinder 


Madrigal. 






7 Years. 


Jugler .... \ 
Joiner . . . . J 
Wanton .... 
Woodman . . 


Mr. Osbaldeston's Wonder . . 


Rachel. 

Tinsel. 

His Willing. 
His Billington. 


6 Years. 


Admiral . . \ 
Amazon . . J 
Bluoher .... 

Chlora 

Desperate.... 

Tyrant "| 

Tipsy 1 

Tickler. ... J 
Whimsey .... 


Abelard 


Bilburv. 




Sir B. Graham's Cruizer 

Duke of Grafton's Dardan . . 


Mr. Smith's Sylvia. 
His Wanton. 
Curricle. 

f Milliner. 




Mr. Osbaldeston's Wonder . . 


1 Raffle. 
Fairy. 


b Years. 


Actor 

Comrade . . \ 
Columbine J 

Guilty 1 

Gambler . . > 

Goblin J 

Myrmidon . . 
Malcolm . . \ 
Mermaid. . J 

Niobe 

Puritv 

Spiteful .... 


Sir T. Mostyn's Notary 

Sir B. Graham's Marmion . . 
Lord Sonde's Witchcraft 


His Columbine. 

SirR. Sutton's Ghastly. 

Lord Sonde's Gaylass. 

His Luxury. 

His Niobe. 

Ditto Purity. 

Sir R. Sutton's Sylvia. 


4 Years. 


Dorimont. . . . 
Guardian 

Harriet \ 

Heroine . . J 

Merrylass.... 
Rovster .... 


Lord Sonde's Ottoman 

Sir R. Sutton's Manager .... 
Duke of Rutland's Random . . 
Duke of Beaufort's Rallywood 


His Dalliance. 
His Cora. 
Gossamer. 

Lord Sonde's Rosebud. 

His Gaudy. 
His Modesty. 
Active. 



[211] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


4 Years. 


Romulus .... 
Stormer .... 


Lord Sonde's Ottoman 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Tapster . . . 


His Rally. 

D. of Rutland's Harpy. 


3 Years. 


Amethyst . . . 

Cromwell . . . 
Comedy . . \ 
Countess . . J 

Editor 

Joker 

Lucifer. • ■ • \ 
Lictor .... J 

Winnifred . . . 




Amazon. 






Agatha. 






Harriet. 






"Selima. 




Sir T. Mostyn's Warrior 
Comrade 


Cora. 

His Amethyst. 

Judy. 

Bonnybell. 

Vanity. 
Lucy. 




Sir T. Mostyn's Warrior , 
Ditto Ditto 


2 Years. 


Bachelor .... 

Claudius . . \ 
Costly .... J 

Minister . . "1 
Madrigal . . J 
Norval • ■ ■ \ 
Nightshade J 

Pilot 

Rosebud .... 
Sailor .... I 
Selima .... ^ 
Sylvia .... J 
Saladine . . "1 
Symmetry J 


Lord Lonsdale's Brunswick . . 


Bonnybell. 
Amazon. 




Sir B. Graham's Marmion 


Harmony. 
Chlora. 

Niobe. 




Lord Lonsdale's Roderick .... 


Columbine. 
Harriet. 

Selima. 






Sorcery. 






1 Year. 


Ardent "1 

Amorous . . j- 
Active .... J 
Barmaid . . "1 
Bravery ... J 
Commodore . 
Comfort .... 
Coral V 
Conqueror J 

Dreadnought 

Dauntless . . . 
Gertrude . . ] 
Graceful . . 1 
Garnish ... J 


Mr. Osbaldeston's Chorister . . 


Amazon. 
Baroness. 






Lucy. 

Lord Sonde's Hyale. 

Merrylass. 

Chlora. 




Mr. Osbaldeston's Caliban . . . 










Desperate. 

Agatha. 
Lucy. 











C 212 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1 Year. 


Marmion . . ~| 
Minstrel... [ 
Melody.... J 

Newsman .. ~| 
Nautilus ... 1 
Needwood . [ 
Nelson J 

Proctor ■ .. > 
Prodigal ... J 




Harriet. 




Mr. Osbaldeston's Caliban. . . . 


Niobe. 
Tidings. 

Heroine. 



THE DUKE OF BEAUFORT'S HOUNDS. 

November, 1825. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


11 Years. 


Nectar 


Mr. Heron's Nectar 


Diligent. 






10 Years. 


Waterloo . . "] 
Wellington 1 
Whimsey . . [ 




Gladsome. 








8 Years. 


Dorimont.... 
Rival 


Denmark 


Dalliance. 






Affable. 








7 Years. 


Dreadnought 

Dandy 

Rifleman . „ . 
Gaylass.... \ 
Governess . J 
Plunder ... "1 
Playful..../ 




Dorcas. 






Paragon. 
Honesty. 
Dalliance. 




Ditto 










Lovely. 
Gladsome. 

Prophetess. 




Lord Middleton's Roman .... 
Duke of Grafton's Cardinal . . 




Libertine 

Ranter "1 

Ruby , . \ 
Raffle J 




Graceful. 




Ditto 


Laundress. 




Ditto 


Ditto. 






Rival. 









[ 213] 



AGES. 



Racket 
Rubens 
Rustic 
Diomede 
Vaulter, 
Vanity , 
Darter 
Dashwood . "| 
Diligent . . . > 
Dauntless . J 



::::} 



Roderick 
Rutland 
Nectar . . 
Ditto . . 



Lord Middleton's Vanguard , 
Lord Middleton's Danger . . . 

Ditto 



Bravery. 
Paragon. 
Rarity. 
Dalliance. 

Sprightly. 

Brilliant. 

Gladsome. 



5 Years. 



Guzman 
Ransom , 
Rampish 
Rarity .. 
Dorcas . 



::} 



Denmark 

Dexter 

Lord Middleton's Denmark. 
Ditto's Damper 



Gladsome. 

Rival. 

Ruin. 
Brilliant. 



Conqueror ... 



From Lord Middleton. 
Commodore 



Elegant. 



4 Years. 



Platoff.. 
Pontiff . . 
Princess 
Purity .. 
Pastime . 
Lancaster . 
Edgar .... 
Empress . 
Wildair ... 
Wonder... 
Daphne . . . 
Jasper 
Jessamine 
Workman 
Wilful ... 
Bluster . . . 
Brusher .. 
Boxer .... 
Harbinger 
Partner.... 
Pilgrim . . . 



:•] 



Nectar , 

Nectar , 
Nectar , 



Denmark 
Waterloo 
Waterloo 



:} 



Wellington 



Dorimont , 

Lord Lonsdale's Julian 
Mr. Ward's Pilgrim . . 



Playful. 

Lively. 
Emily. 

Wary. 
Doxy. 
Jesse. 

Prophetess. 

Bravery. 

Honesty. 
Brilliant. 



3 Years. 



Dashavvay .. 

Driver 

Dainty 

Duncan.... "1 
Dexter .... J 
Ragland . . . 
Rallywood 
Rutland ... 



Duncan . 
Duncan . 
Dorimont. 



Jesse. 
Wary. 
Rival. 



[214] 



Dragon . 
Dalliance 
Gaiety . . 
Niobe . . . 
Nimrod . 
Aimvvell . 
Edwin . . . 
Elegant . 
Barrister . 
Bluebell . 
Rafter . . . 



:} 



:} 



Pugilist . . . "I 
Pillager . . . / 



Dorimont . 

Dorimont 
Nectar . . . 
Nectar . . . 
Absolute . 
Waterloo 
Waterloo 



Waterloo 

Lord Althorp's Ottoman 
Mr. Codrington's Pugilist , 



Bravery. 

Gaylass. 

Prophetess. 

Gertrude 

Governess. 

Emily. 

Emily. 

Brilliant. 

Restless. 
Paraxon. 



Restless . . 
Pasquin . . 
Parasol . . 
Policy. 
Valiant . . 
Vanguard . . 
Victor. 
Archer 
Amorous . 
Piper 

Pelican . . , 
Prophetess 
Duster 
Destiny . . . 
Delicate . . 
Rapture . . . 
Rachel 
Reveller . . . 
Rhapsody . 
Rosamond . 

Costly 

Columbine 
Charmer . . 
Waverley. . 
Wrangler . 
Wanton . . 
Woodbine . 



Nectar . . . 
Nectar . . . 

Nectar . . . 
Jason . . . 
Vaulter . 
Plunder . 

Dorimont 
Waterloo . 
Warrior . 



Sir Thomas Mostyn's Edward 



Sir Thos. Mostyn's Wrangler 



Restless. 
Playful. 

Playful. 
Vanity. 
Amorous. 
Doxy. 

Emily. 

Rampish. 

Rival. 

Whimsey. 
Wary. 



Denmark . 
Dimity . . . 
Daffodil .. 
Whirlwind 
Whisker . . 
Willing . . . 
Damsel . . . 
Latimer . . . 



Dorimont 



Dorimont 

Dorimont 
Warrior . 



Rival. 



Wilful. 

Diligent. 
Lightfoot. 



[215 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1 Year. 


Vulcan. . . . \ 
Vanquisher J 
Ravager .... 
Grecian . . *| 
Gossip ... 1 
Gladsome . [ 
Garland . . J 
Proctor .... 
Tandem . . "| 
Toilet .... 1 
Tuneful . . J 
Winifred .... 

Benedict.. "1 
Baronet . . J 


Plunder 


Vanity. 




Ravager 




Nectar 


Gaylass. 

Paragon. 

Rampish. 

Wary. 
Pastime. 

Emily. 




Vaulter 




Sir Thomas Mostyn's Tandem 

Mr. Codrington's Pugilist. . . . 
Mr. Shirley's Guardsman 



THE BERKELEY HOUNDS. 

December 1, 1825. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


9 Years. 


Frantick 




LordAlthorp'sSociable. 


8 Years. 


Wilful 

Dairymaid . . 
Wrangler . . . 


Sir T. Mostyn's Warrior 


His Ida. 

His Treachery. 

His Lovely. 


7 Years. 


Vanguard . . . 
Fairmaid .... 

Workman.... 


Sir T. Mostyn's Tudor 
Duke of Grafton's Fabulist . . 
Sir T. Mostyn's Cottager .... 
Duke of Richmond's Winder . 


His Victorv. 

SirT.Mostyn'sTiffaney. 

His Harlot. 

Mr. Chute's Helen. 


6 Years. 


Whipster 

Harmony .... 
Rosamond . . . 
Flourish 

Rattler 

Wormwood. . 


Sir T. Mostyn's Warrior .... 
Duke of Grafton's Guardian. . 

Lord Yarborough's W T onder . . 

Mr. Saville's Rally wood 

Lord Yarborough's Finder. . . . 


His Malaprop. 

SirT.Mostyu's Bridget. 

Rustick. 

Anguish. 

His Medley. 

J Lord Yarborough's 

t Traffick. 

His Wisdom. 


5 Years. 




Sir T. Mostyn's Luther 


His Fearless. 



[ 21G ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


5 Years. 


Gamesome 
Trouncer. . "1 


Lord Fitzwilliam's Genial .... 


f Sir T. Mostyn's 
1 Laudable. 




Tomboy . . > 
Trinket J 




TifFaney. 








Trueman. . . . 




Their Jewel. 




Resolute .... 


Duke of Grafton's Satellite . . 


His Relish. 




Trentham .... 


Sir M. Sykes's Trentham .... 


His Merrvlass. 




Trouncer 


Lord Harewood's Tomboy . . 


His Termagant. 






Mr. Saville's Tyrant 


f Lord Yarborough's 
\ Drowsy. 




Vanity \ 

Vestal .... J 




Their Vocal. 



4 Years. 


Lucifer. . . 
Lavish ... 

Artful . . . 
Anguish . . 
Saladine . 

Virgin . . . 

Prudence . 


:} 


Lionel '..... 


Dairymaid. 






Lovely. 




Duke of Beaufort's Saladine.. 


His Fearless. 

Mostyn's Bridget. 
Mostyn's Agony. 
Mostyn's Venus. 






SirT. Mostyn's Goneril 




Mr. Ward's Pilgrim 


.SirT. Mostvn's Ransom. 






Mostyn's Trollop. 




Trollop. . . 




Sir R. Sutton's Cerberu- .... 
Lord Scarbro's Rally wood. . .. 

Mr. Codrington's Pugilist. . . . 


His Toilet. 




Fallacy. . . 
Ravager . 
Gossamer 




His Frantick. 
Badsworth Lavish. 
Badsworth Rarity. 

His Gamesome. 


3 Years. 


Random . 
Ramper . 
Garnet . . . 
Gladsome 
Traffick . 
Gamboy . 

Nectar. . . 

Noble . . . 

Sparkler . 
Wildboy . 
Stormer . 
Marmion. 
Monitor . 
Tarnish . 
Toilet ... 


} 




Dairymaid. 
Resolute. 

Harlot. 
Rosamond. 






Gamesome. 




"} 
.} 


Duke of Beaufort's Nectar . . . 

Duke of Beaufort's Nectar. . 
Duke of Beaufort's Saladine 

Sir R. Sutton's Splendour 

Sir R. Sutton's Marmion 


/ Sir T. Mostyn's 
Malaprop. 
f SirT. Mostyn's 
.Malaprop. 

Sir R. Bridget. 

His Welcome. 

Badsworth Dimity. 

Badsworth Governess. 
Badsworth Tinsel. 



[ 217 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


2 Years. 


Hermit . . . ] 
Hotspur . . > 
Helen ...J 
Heedless .... 

Striver \ 

Stately J 

Lifter 

Regicide . . "1 

Radical I 

Rattle ...J 

Forester .... 
Cardinal . . "1 
Cottager . . J 

Fatal 

Dreadnought 


Sir R. Sutton's Archer 

Sir R. Sutton's Lucifer 

Sir R. Sutton's Galliard 
Rifler 

Hazard 


Badsworth Tuneful. 
Badsworth Gaylass. 
Badsworth Rarity. 
Memory. 

Trinket. 

Trinket. 




Sampson 


Harlot. 




Lionel 


Vocal. 






Rival. 
Rosamond. 






Dairymaid. 
Fairmaid. 

SirT.Mostyn's Comedy. 

His Clio. 

Their Harlot. 




Sir J. Cope's Dustiefoot .... 
Duke of Beaufort's Vaulter . . 
Duke of Rutland's Chanter . . 

Hatfield Hopeful 




Mr. Codrington's Pugilist .... 


His Dimity. 
His Gaily. 




Latimers .... 

Racer ...- \ 
Rosebud . , J 

Lictor \ 

Lounger . . f 
Sprightly .... 
Sovereign.. .. 
Archer. ■ ■ • \ 
Abelard . . j 
Dabster . . "1 

Dainty I 

Damsel.... J 

Marplot .... 

Rifler 

Rakish "1 

Redwing .. J 




Rival. 






Garnet. 






Riot. 

Harmony. 
Wanton. 




Mr. Warde's Ashton 

Duke of Grafton's Dorimont 

Union Marplot 


D.of Grafton'sBrilliant. 
Traffick. 

Union Vestal. 

His Orderly. 
Their Prudence. 




Duke of Beaufort's Ranter . . 
Sir T. Mostyn's Wrangler. . . . 


His Rapid. 

SirT. Mostyn'sAnodyne 

His Emblem. 



<! 



[ 218 ] 



THE BROCKLESBY HOUNDS. 

November 1, 1824. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


7 Years. 


Comrade. . . 






6 Years. 


Drowsy . . "1 
Daphne . . J 

Melody \ 

Merrylass. J 
Tattler 
Wanton . . "1 
Watchful, * J 


Minor 


Dolly. 

Betsy. 
Mira. 










Legacy. 


5 Years. 


Amulet .... 
Bashful .... 
Curious .... 
Harbinger . . 

Jailor "J 

Joyous, s . . 1 
Junket,*.. J 
Prompter . . 

Rector "1 

Remnant. . J 


D. of Rutland's Abelard 
Minor 


Blossom. 
Bluebell. 




Trimbush 


Celia. 






Betsy. 

Jessamy. 

Actress. 




Marplot 




Martial 




Mr. Saville's Rallywood . . . 


Traffick. 


4 Years. 


Baronet .... 
Chastity . . "1 
Comedy . . J 
Marplot . . \ 
Milkmaid J 

Skilful.... \ 
Stately. ... J 
Victory.... "1 
Vanity. ... J 


Trimbush 


Betsy. 
Empress. 

Tattler. 












Duke of Rutland's Ruler .... 
Mr. Osbaldeston's Sailor 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Vanquisher 


Sanguine. 
Melody. 

Tidings. 


3 Years. 


Artful, s . . . . 
Caroline .... 

Fairplay .... 
Violet 


Trimbush 


Amulet. 






Whimsey. 
Empress. 
Flourish. 








Trimbush 




Lord Fitzwilliam's Darter. . . . 


Vengeance. 


2 Years. 


Alfred .... "I 
Aumwell . . V 
Angler J 




Daphne. 







s. spayed. 



[ 219 ] 



:;.} 



Albion . 

Bluecap 

Brevity. 

Cruiser.... 

Cardigan . , 

Coaxer . . . 

Columbine 

Driver 

Emperor 

Finder 

Ferryman 

Lucifer \ 

Lavish J 

Lazarus . . "\ 
Laundress J 
Merrvman 
Mindful .. 
Music, s . . 
Senator. . . . 
Tarquin . . 
Termagant 
Trophy . . 
Victor .... 



Alderman . 
Boaster. . . . 
Chanticleer 



Norman 

Trimbush 

Royster 

Ferryman 

Sir Richard Sutton's Lucifer 
Lord Fitzwilliam's Thwackum 



Comrade 



Trimbush 
Jailor . . . 
Trimbush. 
Trajan . . . 



Comedy. 
Traffick. 
Eleanor. 

Milkmaid. 

Drowsy. 
Empress. 
Flourish. 
Amulet. 

Betsy. 
Legacy. 

Tidings . 
Sanguine. 
Tragedy. 
Vanity. 



Admiral . 
Archer . . 
Bertram . 
Brusher . 
Bowler . 
Dutchess, 
Diamond. 
Doubtful. 
Edgar . . . 
Earnest . 
Ermine . 

Friendly . 

Hector . 
Harlot . . . 
Limner . . 
Mannion. 
Platoff . . . 
Pontiff. . . 
Pleader . . 
Romulus . 
Relish . . . 
Tyrant. . . 
Trifle ... 
Toilet, s . 
Turban 



Minister 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Bachelor. 



Mr. Foljambe's Jailor 
Norman , 



Mr. Foljambe's Jailor 

Lord Middleton's Denmark. 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Comus. . . 

Sir R. Sutton's Lucifer 

Minister 

Comrade 



Trajan . . 
Trajan . , 
Royster 

Trajan . 



Amazon. 

Vengeance. 

Drowsy. 
Daphne. 

Empress. 

J" Sir Tatton Sykes's 
\ Wanton. 
Eleanor. 

Tattler. 

South Wold Frantick. 

Bashful. 

Violet. 
Rapid. 
Dainty. 

Vanity. 



[ 220 ] 



NAMES. 

Warlike .. 
Wisdom . . 
Champion 
Cottager. . 
Challenger 
Courtly . . 
Crafty. . . . 
Coroner .... 

Comet 

Celia -| 

Caution . . I 
Charmer . . | 

Costly J 

Darter 

Favourite . . 
Freeman .... 
Gallant .... 
Granby . . ~| 
Gamester.. I 
Ganymede 
Glory .... J 
Graceful .... 

Joker 

Juliet 

Monitor . . > 
Matron ... ( 

Midnight. . . . 

Ratler 

Reveller . . ) 

Riot i 

Roderick. . .. 
Royal . . . . "J 
Rarity .... I 
Redrose, s 
Rally, s . J 
Statesman "1 
Sanguine . . J 
Singwell 
Vengeance . . 
Whirl wi nd. . 



SIRES. 

Warrior 

Jailor 

Comrade 

Conqueror 

Jailor 

Comrade 

Jailor 

Comrade 

Fairplay 

Lord Howard's Gallant 

Sir Richard Sutton's Grumbler 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Darter 
Sir R. Sutton's Rattler .... 
Sir R. Sutton's Archer .... 

Comrade 

Lord Harewood's Rubens . . 

Rector 

Rector 

Conqueror 

Mr. Foljambe's Royal .... 

Minister 

Boaster ... 

Duke of Rutland's Chimer 



Factious. 
Warble. 



Remnant. 



Audrey. 
Curious. 



Comedy. 

Drowsy. 
Troublesome. 
Chastity. 
Tragedy. 

Rapid. 

Ld.Harewood'sGaylass. 

Jealousy. 

His Jubilee. 

Mindful. 

J Lord Darlington's 
\ Margery. 
Violet. 

Bashful. 

Riot. 

Factious. 



Constant. 

Vanity. 
Wanton. 



October 12, 1825. 



Old . . . 
Young. 



43 
19 



Total. . . 62 



[221 ] 
MR. CHADWICK'S HOUNDS. 

June 1, 1826. 



STUD HOUNDS. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


8 Years. 


Ottoman 

Patriot 

Sovereign . . 


Mr. Warde's Storm er 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Patriot. . . . 
Sir T. Mostyn's Lazarus .... 


His Sylvia. 

His Mischief. 

Mr. Warde's Sylvia. 



WORKING HOUNDS. 



S Years. 


Lumpkin. . . . 
Nameless .... 
Foreman 


Lord Fitzwilliam's Noble .... 
Sir B. R. Graham's Charon . . 


His Amorous. 

His Fortune. 

His Delia. 

Lord Anson's Tinsel. 

Lord Anson's Rachel. 


7 Years. 


Demagogue.. 
Admiral .... 
Whimsey. . . . 
Precious .... 

Gertrude 

Jupiter .... 


Sir T. Mostyn's Wrangler . . 
Mr. Osbaldeston's Wonder . . 
Mr. Warde's Maniac 


His Fearless. 

His Bilbury. 

Lord Anson's Fairy. 

His Ariel. 

His Florist. 

His Glory. 

His Sportly. 


6 Years. 


Garnboy 

Arthur 


Duke of Rutland's Fearnought 
Mr. Warde's Asheton 

Mr. Warde's Rebel 


His Belmaid. 
His Rarity. 
His Goneril. 

f Sir T. Mostyn's 
\ Nettletop. 
His Rival. 
His Amorous. 
SirR. Sutton's Ghastly. 

( Mr. Meynell's 
\ Bridesmaid. 




Diligent 

Benedict .... 


puke of Beaufort's Dexter . . 
Pytchley Abelard 






5 Years. 


Pilgrim . . \ 
(Place man. . J 


Duke of Beaufort's Collier . . 

Mr. Warde's Pilgrim 

Duke of Beaufort's Ragland. . 


f Sir T. Mostyn's 
\ Treachery. 

Sir T. Mostyn's Venus. 

Sir T. Mostyn's Harlot. 



[ 222 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


5 Years. 


Sycorax 

Valiant.. .. \ 
Vanquisher J 


Duke of Beaufort's Denmark 
Duke of Beaufort's Vaulter . . 


SirT.Mostyn'sFortune, 
SirT. Mostyn'sFortune. 


4 Years. 


Anthony 

Bumpkin. . . . 
Grievous, * _ 

Plaything 


D. of Beaufort's Dorimont 

Sir T. Mostyn's Tandem 


His Florist. 
His Larceny. 
His Amorous. 
His Jenny. 
His Gertrude. 


3 Years. 


Bargainer. . . . 
Bertram . . \ 
Bonnylass J 
Dorcas, * . . . . 

Dorimont 

Fearless, s . . 
Furnace .... 
Memory .... 

Bachelor 

Ragland 


Mr. Warde's Butler 


Mr. Nicoll's Waspish. 

His Bridget. 

His Lovely. 

SirT.Mostyn's Larceny. 

His Fearless. 

His Notable. 

His Memory. 

Ld. Anson's Bonnybell. 

D. of Rutland's Joyous. 




Sir T. Mostyn's Wrangler .... 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Darter. . . . 
D. of Beaufort's Dorimont . . 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Flambeau 
Sir T. Mostyn's Wrangler .... 
Lord Lonsdale's Brunswick . . 
Mr. Osbaldeston's Rasselas . . 


2 Years. 


Sultan .... \ 
Sparkler . . / 
Gadfly 

Prosody . . J 
Gleaner .... 
Playmate. . . . 

Lofty ...."I 

Lictor J 

Ragman 


Mr. Osbaldeston's Vaulter .... 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Proctor . . 
Mr. Osbaldeston's Chorister 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Piper 

Sir H. Mainwaring's Gleaner 
Mr. Warde's Guardian ...... 

Lord Middleton's Vanguard . . 
Mr. Jolliffe's Marlborough . . 


His Songstress. 

His Gratitude. 

Lord Anson's Amazon, 

Lord Anson's Heroine. 

His Careless. 

His Plaything. 

His Audible. 

Mr. Meynell's Joyful. 

Lord Lonsdale's Levity. 

His Comfort. 




Mr. Codrington's Woldsman 


His Lightfoot. 


1 Year. 


Regicide . . ~] 
Radical . . . . 1 
Rasselas . . [ 
Rhapsody. . J 
Sindbad . . "J 
Streamer. . > 
Symmetry J 
Danger.... \ 

Dromo / 

Bruiser . . \ 
Bacchanal J 
Pillager .... 
Rummager . . 


Mr. Meynell's Nathan 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Chorister 

Mr. Meynell's Bajazet 

Duke of Beaufort's Boxer . . 
Mr. Osbaldelstou's Rocket. . . . 
Mr. Osbaldeston's Rocket.... 


Mr. Meynell's Ruby. 

His Symmetry. 

Mr. Meynell's Destiny. 

His Bonnybell. 

His Parasol. 
His Hermia. 
His Amulet 



[ 223 ] 



1 Year. 



Mufti -] 

Mousetrap [ 
Malaprop.. [ 

Mira J 

Marmaduke . 
Mussulman. . 
Duncan 



cher < 

Woldsman -| 

Guzman 

Marmion . . < 



Duke of Beaufort's Ranter . . 

| Sir T. Mostyn's Rangier . . 

Sir T. Mostyn's Notary 

Duke of Grafton's Rummager 

Duke of Grafton's Wildfire . . 
Duke of Beaufort's Plunder . . 
Duke of Beaufort's Ranter . . 



f Sir T. Mostyn's Ma- 
X laprop. 

His Misty. 

Lord Anson's Desperate . 
f Sir T. Mostyn's 
\ Anodyne. 
J Duke of Beaufort's 
\ Willing. 
His Gaiety, 
f Sir T. Mostyn's 
t Myrtle. 



MR. CODRINGTON'S HOUNDS. 



October 1, 1825. 



SEASONS. 



7th. 



Diligent . . 
Gamesome 
Tuneful .. 



SIRES. 

Duke of Beaufort's Denmark 

Bred by Lord Lonsdale 

Bred by Lord Lonsdale 

Woodman 

Woodman 

Cryer 

Lord Althorp's Grecian 

Cryer 

Duke of Beaufort's Wellington 
Duke of Beaufort's Saracen . 

Cheshire Banger 

Mr. Smith's Cerberus 

Mr. Warde's Pilgrim 

Reveller 

Ruffler 

Pugilist 



Rachel. 



6th. 



Whimsey. . . . 
Woldsman . . 
Comely 

Wildfire 



Coral. 

Wanton. 

Damsel. 

J Duke of Beaufort's 

X Whimsey. 



5th. 



Collier. ... \ 
Comedy . . J 
Whipster. . . . 
Boundless . . 

Betsy 

Rapture .... 
Prospero .... 



Wanton. 

His Rosalind. 

His Boundless. 

Mr. Smith's Countess. 

His Rapture. 

His Ariel. 



4th. 



Lively 

Nosegay .... 
Greatridge \ 
Grovely . . J 



Luna. 
Nora. 

Gamesome. 



[ 224 ] 



Jason . . . 
Jasper . . . 
Jingle . . 
Wily ... 
Roderick . 
Beauty. . . 



Duke of Beaufort's Jason. . . . 

Duke of Beaufort's Waterloo 
Duke of (irafton's Bondsman 
Duke of Grafton's Bondsman 



DAMS. 



Dainty. 

Diligent. 
Ransom. 

Dalliance. 



Pilot. . . . 
Painter . 
Patty . . 
Pastime 
Primrose 
Twister . 
Tomboy 
Lady . . 
Bapton . 
Bobadil 
Buxom . 
Blowsy . 
Brasher 
Bouncer 



Pugilist 

Pugilist 

Cryer 

Cryer 

Duke of Grafton's Bondsman 

Duke of Grafton's Bondsman 

Duke of Grafton's Bondsman 



Wliimsey. 

Gamesome. 
Tuneful. 
Paragon. 
Ringtail. 

Nora. 

Boundless. 



Plunder . . 
Pillager . . 
Phoenix . . 

Ranter. . . . 
Ru filer.... 
Racket. . . . 
Wellington 
Waterloo. . 
Pretty 

Prattle 

Lusher. . . . 
Royal .... 

Rattler 

Relish .... 
Bustler . . 



Pugilist 

Pugilist 

Woldsman 

Duke of Beaufort's Wellington 

Duke of Beaufort's Plunder . 
Duke of Beaufort's Hermit . . 

Duke of Grafton's Bondsman 

Duke of Grafton's Bondsman 



Whimsey. 
Winsome. 

Rachel. 

Gamesome. 

Paragon. 
Lightfoot. 

Rapture. 

Nora. 



Policy . . 
Wishful 
Welcome 
Ragland 
Rubens 
Rioter 
Roister ... I 
Rutland . . J 
Libertine. . \ 
Lovely . . . / 
Rampish .... 



Pugilist . . 
Woldsman 
Puirilist .. 



nd . . -n 

«... ( 



Duke of Beaufort's Rubens 



Duke of Beaufort's Rubens . . 
Duke of Beaufort's Rubens . . 



Gamesome. 

Lightfoot. 

Winsome. 



Bonny. 



Luna. 
Gossamer. 



[ 225 ] 



SEASONS. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1st. 


Partner . . . ~| 








Pleasant . . 1 
Promise . . f 


Duke of Beaufort's Plunder . . 


Paragon. 




Playful ... J 
Wildboy .... 
Comet 


Duke of Beaufort's Plunder . . 
Mr. Nicoll's Chirper 


Wanton. 
His Gadfly. 



SIR JOHN COPE'S HOUNDS. 

September 1, 1825. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


7 Years. 


Gramarie. . . . 
Gaiety . . . . "| 
Gladsome . > 
Gladish ... J 
Robinhood . . 
Sampson .... 




Gossip. 
Guilty. 
Blossom. 








Rutland 






Goldfinch. 








6 Years. 


Goodman . . \ 
Guilty J 

Royalty .... 

Rashly "1 

Reprobate J 




Guilty. 

His Rachel. 
Graceful. 




Lord Fitzwilliam's Pilgrim . . 






Blossom. 






Goldfinch. 










Bathsheba . . 
Bonnyly .... 
Chorus . . . \ 
Crotchet . . J 
Gambia . . . "1 

Ganza J 

Patience . . "1 
Policy .... > 
Prevalent . . J 

Ramekin . . "1 
Rhymester J 




Garland. 






Bounty. 
Graceful. 










Gossip. 

Rosemary. 

Rosemary. 
Blossom. 




Duke of Beaufort's Pilgrim . . 
Duke of Beaufort's Pilgrim . . 








4 Years. 


Forester .... 
Frolicksome . 


1 Mr. Nicoll's Ratler 


Goldfinch. 



R 



[ 22G ] 



Gulmore .... 

Hardwick 

Luxury 

Margaret .... 
Marmaduke . . 

Noblet 

Pensioner . "1 
Pillager ... 1- 
Placeman. . J 
Reginald .... 
Rhodope . . ~] 
Roguish . . I 
Roadster . . | 
Roman. ... J 



Dancer 

Gloster 

Lictor 

J- Granby 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Nimrod . 



Gloster . . 
Rutland . 

Grappler 



Gossip. 

Harmony. 

Drollery. 

Maiden. 

Royalty. 

Proserpine. 

Graceful. 

Rosemary. 



Albion 

Arbiter . . . 
Amoret . . . 
Benison . . 
Fancy .... 
Grateful . . \ 
Gravity.. .. J 
Hecuba . . . 
Pamphila . 
Rosebud . . 



Mr. Warde's Ashton Gramarie 



Mr. Warde's Ashton . 
Bluster 

Mr. Warde's Remus . 

Mr. Bolton's Galloper. 

Drunkard 

Syrus 

Grappler 



His Gertrude. 
Crotchet. 
His Florist. 

Giglet. 

Harmony. 
Prevalent. 
Rosemary. 



Agnes 
Andrian . . 
Dairymaid 

Damsel 

Dexterous 
Gallantry . 
Jealousy . 
Richmond 
Rochester 
Rumsey . 
Saraband . 
Warrener . 
Whisker . 
Wedlock . 
Vigilance. . 



Mr. Warde's Ashton 



Drunkard 



Duke of Grafton's Dorimont 
Duke of Beaufort's Jason .... 

Grappler 

Somerset 

Duke of Grafton's Watchman 

Duke of Beaufort's Wellington 
Mr. NicolPs Vigilant 



Gramarie. 



Bonnyly. 

Guilty. 
Royalty. 

Rosemary. 

Rashly. 

Giglet. 

Bathsheba. 
His Comet. 



Arrogance 

Artifice 

Audax 

Auditor ... J 
Dagon . . . . \ 
Domina . . J 
Guernsey. . . . 
Handsome \ 
Hermitage J 



Drunkard 



Dustiefoot 

Mr. Nicoll's Rattler 

Duke of Beaufort's Hermit 



Amoret. 

Proserpine. 

Gramarie. 

Guilty. 



[ 227 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1 Year. 


Lexicon . . "] 
Lounger . . > 
Luscious . . J 
Provost.... \ 
Pucelage . . J 
Raymond., -x 
Rodney . . . s 
Rolliston . . y 

Ruby J 

Taffeta ") 

Tiffany I 

Trusty J 

Watchful . . \ 
Waxy .... J 


Somerset 


Luxury. 




Somerset 




Seneca 


Rashly. 

Ganza. 
Gambia. 




Duke of Grafton's Wildfire . . 
Duke of Grafton's Watchman 



DELAMERE FOREST HOUNDS. 

August 1, 1825. 
STUD HOUNDS. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 




10 Years. 


Villager . 
Bangor . . . 


... 


Bedford 


Victory. 
Constance. 






Bedford 










HUNTING HOUNDS. 


9 Years. 


Climbank . 

Clara 

Belmaid . 


:} 




Venus. 

Mr. Chaworth's 






Lord Middleton's Conqueror . 


Bauble. 


8 Years. 


Daunter .... 
Annabell 


Rafter 


Darling. 
Victory. 










7 Years. 


Bilberry .... 


Blucher 


Constance. 
Blowsey. 






Rafter 










6 Years. 


Albion . . . 
Adeline . . . 
Artful ... 


i 




Malice. 






i 







[ 228] 



Valiant . . 
Votary 

Vixen 

Rally 

Sophy . . . . \ 
Songstress J 



'•"} Bedford 

Gulliver 
Rafter . 



Mr. Smith's Sovereign 



Victory. 

Venus. 
Blowzy. 

Margery. 



Ganymede . \ 
Graceful . . J 
Ringwood . \ 
Ruler .... J 
Rallywood \ 

Rarity J 

Charon . . 
Crafty. . . . 
Croney . . 
Comely . 
Captious . 
Chieftain 
Dashwood 
Partner . . 



Gulliver . . 
Gulliver . . 
Rallywood 



Bangor , 



Bluster 

Climbank «. 

Regent 

Mr. Lamb ton's Challenger 
Lord Middleton's Palafox . 



Amazon. 

Riot. 

Frantic. 

Chauntress. 

Charmer. 

Columbine. 

Concord. 

Destiny. 

Victory. 



Gulliver . . 
Grecian . . 
Affable . . . 
Arrogance . 
Active .... 
Gloster . . . 
Gleaner . . . 
Glory 

Woodman . 
Wildair . . . 
Watchful . . 
Batchelor . 
Vaulter . . . 
Lasher ... 
Leveller . . 
Cerberus . . 
Carver 
Challenger 

Looby 

Liberty 
Margery . 



Gulliver 
Gulliver 
Bangor . 



Mr. Osbaldeston's Wonder 



Mr. Osbaldeston's Wonder . 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Wonder . 
Mr. Lambton's Lasher 



Mr. Lambton's Lasher . . . 

Lord Middleton's Commodore 

Lord Lonsdale's Looby . . . 
Mr. Osbaldeston's Proctor. 



Riot. 

Amazon. 

Airy. 

Gamesome. 

Ruby. 

Blowzy. 
Vestal. 

Annabell. 

Careless. 

Mr.Chaworth'sDamsel. 
Margery. 



Rapid . 
Boaster 
Bangor 
Vigilant 
Verity . . 



Bangor , 
Bangor , 

Bangor. 



Ruby. 
Belmaid. 

Vixen. 



[ 229 ] 



Villager . . 
Varnish . . 
Vanquish . , 
Delamere. 
Destiny . . 
Sailor 
Match'em . 
Factor 
Forester . . 
Careful . . . 
Coroner . . 

Costly 

Gracious . . 

Gaily 

Woodbine . 



Villager 

Fearnought 

Climbank 

Sir B. Graham's Clencher. . 

Sir B. Graham's Clencher . . 

Sir B. Graham's Marmion.. 
Sir B. Graham's Vanquisher 
Lord Middleton's Damper.. 

Lord Middleton's Forester. . 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Wonder 



Daphne. 

Diligent. 

Songstress. 
Modish. 

Freedom. 

Clara. 
Caroline. 

Careless. 

Graceful. 
Artful. 






Client \ 

Capable . . J 
Sampson . 
Stately. . . 
Skilful . .. 
Rosy 
Rhapsody 
Roguish 
Reveller 
Resolute 

Riot 

Roman. • • • \ 
Romulus . . J 
Vanguard . "1 
Vanquisher J 

Victory 

Guilty' 

Lightsome . . 
Courtesy .... 
Judgment . . . 
Menacer . . ~) 
Mittimus . . I 
Monarch . . [ 
Minion. ... J 



Climbank 
Abelard . 



Crafty. 
Sophy. 



Ramper Rarity. 



Bangor 



Valiant 

Random 

Villager 

Gulliver 

Lasher 

Sir B. Graham's Jasper 
Sir B. Graham's Jasper 



Mr. Osbaldeston's Marmion 



'Ruby. 

'Rally. 

Victory. 

Croney. 

Belmaid. 

Comely. 

Captious. 

Bilberry. 

Adeline. 



YOUNG HOUNDS. 



Galloper . 
General . . 
Gamester . 
Syren 
Selima . . . 
Royster . . 
Rant i pole. 
Rival 



Valiant 



Valiant. 



Challenger 



Glory. 
Sophy. 
Rubv. 



[ 230 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIEES. 


DAMS. 


1 Year. 


Charity 

Leader . . . . "| 
Lawless.... V 
Lofty . J 
Adamant . . \ 
Archer ... J 
Gaylass . . . \ 
Gossamer . J 
Corsican . . "1 
Cypher ... J 
Jovial . . . . \ 
Jewess .... J 

Marksman . . 
Dairymaid 1 
Dimity. ... 1 

Dozy J 

Lazarus .... 
Craftsman "| 
Cottager . . 1 
Concord . . J 


Challenger 


Annabell. 






Liberty. 
Adeline. 




Climbank 




Gleaner 


Careless. 




Duke of Rutland's Jovial .... 

Duke of Rutland's Jovial .... 

Duke of Rutland's Jovial .... 
Duke of Rutland's Conqueror 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Damon . . 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Damon . . 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Dapper . . 


Crafty. 

Votary. 

Graceful. 
Modish. 

Vixen. 

Lavish. 

Comely. 



Stud Hounds 1 couple. 

Old Hounds 47J couples. 

Young Hounds 14| couples. 

Total 63 



MR. FARQUHARSON'S HOUNDS. 



YEARS. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1818. 


Gladsome 

Ganymede \ 
Guardsman J 
Comus . . . . \ 
Conquest . / 
Ransom .... 
Painter .... 




Gertrude. 


1819. 




Stately. 
Bonnylass. 

Heedless. 








Cossack 




Duke of Grafton's Rampart .. 
Woodman 


Minstrel. 
Pastime. 




Fencer .... 
Bergami . . "| 
Bumper . . 1 
Bacchus . . | 
Bridesmaid J 


Duke of Grafton's Fencer 

Bachelor, bred by Mr. C. Grove 


Doubtful. 
Sportive. 



[ 231 ] 



YEARS. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1820. 


Grerman 

Woodman . . 
Methodist .. 

Honesty 

Charon . . -v 
Cottager. . j 
Charmer. . > 

Crazy 1 

Comet. . . . J 

Ferryman . . 

Waverley 


Woodman 


Graylass. 

Songstress. 

Music. 




Ruler 




Duke of Beaufort's Hermit . . 
Cossack 


Doubtful. 

Bonnylass. 

i Mr. Osbaldeston's 
\ Fairmaid. 
Playful. 




Cossack 




Woodman 






1821. 


Selim . . . . \ 
Senator . . j 
Rallywood "1 
Ringwood J 
Pillager . . "| 
Patience . . 1 

Punty f 

Priestess . . J 

Hotspur 

Hypocrite "1 

Hero > 

Handmaid J 
Trifle . . . . 1 
Merriman I 
Tarquin . . J 


Selim 


Jollity. 
Rosamond. 

Pastime. 




Selim 




Hannibal 


Symphony. 
Prophetess. 




Bred by Sir T. Sykes. 


1822. 


Prodigy . . \ 
Prettylass . / 

Admiral 

Statesman . . 
Sorcerer . . 1 
Sanguine. . J 

Waterloo . . . 
Duncan . . "] 
Diligent . . j- 
Daphne . . J 
Jovial ...."] 

Jollity I 

Jasper .... J 

Cobbett 

Minstrel 


Wrangler 


Abigail. 

Prophetess. 

Pastime. 




Abelard 




Abelard 




Duke of Beaufort's Waterloo . 
D. of Beaufort's Wellington. . 

Duke of Beaufort's Duncan .. 
Hannibal 


Brilliant. 

Playful. 

Doubtful. 
Graceful. 

Ransom. 

Jollity. 
Fairmaid. 




Mr. Warde's Cobbett 

♦Marksman 


Sampler. 

Minstrel. 



Marksman by Justice. His Dam Mr. Osbaldeston's Graceful. 



[ 232 ] 



Wanderer 
Workman 
Waspish . . 
Chancellor 
Comely . . 
Concord . . 
Roderick. . 
Bondsman 
Spinster . . 
Spiteful . . 
Rutland . . 

Rival 

Rarity 
Watchman 
Winsome . 
Carver. . . . 
Careless . . 
Gradus . . . 
Governess 
Grandison 
Granby . . . 
Gloster . . . 



Wrangler 

Wrangler 

Wrangler 

Wrangler 

Selim 

Selim. 

Wildair 

Mr. NieolPs Carver 
Tarquin 

Hannibal 

Bergami 

Ringwood 

Bergami 

Bergami 

Tarquin 

Fencer 

Tarquin 

Wrangler 



Modish. 



Columbine. 

Relish. 
Bounty. 

Wanton. 



Rachel. 

Pastime. 

Pliant. 

Gladsome. 

Gambol. 



Bluecap . 
Bruiser . . . 
Romulus . . 

Remus 

Roman . . . 

Ruin 

Bachelor . . 
Bellmaid . . 
Denmark. . 
Damsel.... 
Darling . . 
Dairymaid 
Timour. ... 
Foreman . . 
Falstaff . . . 
Fleecer . . . 

Tyrant 

Tidings . . . 
Warrior . . 
Whimsey. . 
Wishful . 
Willing . . 



Abigail. 

Fairmaid. 

Garland. 

Daffodil. 

Bounty. 
Comet. 

Charmer. 
Patience. 



Comrade . . 
Chorister... 
Cardinal . . . 
Coroner . . . 
Commodore 



Guardsman. 



Charmer. 



[ 233 ] 



SIRES. 

Fencer 

Mr. Codrington's Pugilist. . . 

Fleecer 

Ringwood 

Fencer 

Selim 

Wrangler 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Vigilant . 

Ringwood 

Duncan 



r....-| 



Partner . . . "I 
Priam .»../ 
Pugilist .... 
Forester .... 
Rhapsody 
Stroller.... 
Shylock 
Stately 
Guardian 

Gossip I 

Gaudy' ^ 

Garland . . 
Gertrude. . J 

Pleader 1 

Pilot I 

Pastime . . | 
Playful.... J 
Valiant . . . \ 
Viceroy . . J 
Harmony . \ 
Hackwood j 
Dragon . .. "I 
Desperate J 



Patience. 

Caroline. 

Bonnylass. 

Gladsome. 

Sampler. 
Gambol. 

Purity. 

Doxy. 

Harriet. 
Relish. 



LORD FITZWILLIAM'S HOUNDS. 



YEARS. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1817. 


Notable 


Noble 


Nelly. 


1818. 


Juggler .... 




Riot. 


1819. 


Medler 

Phoebe 




Sempstress. 
Promise. 






Lissom. 






Crazy. 






1820. 


Goldfinch .... 

Nullity 

Pontiff 

Sally 


Glider 


Darling. 
Faithful. 




Noble 






Ruthless. 






Jessy. 
Nimble. 








. * „ 


Phrenzy. 
Jiiter. 







[ 234 ] 



YEARS. 



1821. 



Captive . . 
Comfort . . 
Dabble . . . 
Flambeau . 
Joiner 
Janty .... 
Shiner .... 
Splendor . . 
Spangle . . 
Sappho . . . 
Singer .... 
Telltale . . . 



Champion . . 

Chider 

Dreadnought 
Fairplay .... 

Genial 



Shiner. , 



Cheerful . . 
Jolliboy . . 
Joker .... 
Merriman . 
Mermaid . . 
Nelly .... 
Parable . . , 

Parody 

Perilous . . 

Riot 

Ruin 

Skilful .... 
Speedwell . 
Sempstress 
Spinster . . 
Tipsy 



Shiner . . . 
Singwell . 
Trulliber . 



Chider , 
Jovial . 



Meanwell 
Neptune . 
Pagan . . . 
Pagan . . . 
Rover . . . 



Singwell . 
Trulliber . 



Joyful. 
Peeress. 
Ruthless. 
Darling. 

Damsel. 

Novice. 

Nameless. 

Judith. 

Melody. 



Noisy. 
Phrenzy. 

Novel. 

Churlish. 

Jessy. 

Lissom. 

Rally. 

Nameless. 
Crazy. 



Derby . . . 

Fatal 

Fretful. . . 
Juliet . . . 
Javelin . . 
Jewel . . . 
Maiden . . 
Madam . . 
Norman . 
Norval . . . 
Nigel ... 
Noma . . . 
Random . 
Ringwood 
Sybil .... 
Trifle ... 



:} 



Darter . . . 

Fairplay . 

Juggler . 

Jovial . . . 

Meanwell 
Masker . 



Chaunter 
Comedy , 
Daphne . . . 1 
Dryad.... J\ 



Neptune 



Rover .... 
Rover 
Sifter 
Thwack' em . 



Mr. Osbaldeston's Chorister. 
Mr. Osbaldeston's Chorister. 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Chorister. 



Lightfoot. 

Goldfinch. 

Pensive. 

Nimble. 

Spangle. 
Dainty. 

Phoebe. 

Funny. 
Dilly. 
Darling. 
Sappho. 



Pensive. 
Fancy. 

Lovelv. 



[235 ] 



YEARS. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1824. 


Fulgur 




Notable. 




Joyful "| 

Jubilee .... 1 

Judith J 




Rachel. 






Telltale. 




Melody 




Janty. 




Marplot . 
Mirable . . 
Momus . , . 


:} 




Phoenix. 




Masker 


Syren. 




Ratler . . . 
Rambler . 

Ranter . . . 


:■} 




Dashaway. 




Duke of Beaufort's Ravager . . 
Duke of Rutland's Rummager 


Sally. 
Churlish. 




Nimble 


Goldfinch. 










1825. 


Dolphin . . 1 

Damsel.... J 
Dowager . . "1 

Dusky J 

Dorothy 

Fountain . . ") 
Fruitful... 1 

Flamer . . . . \ 
Frantic . . ^ J 
Lawyer .... "1 
Lucifer .... > 
Linguist . . J 
Minstrel 

Novel . \ 

Pasquin "] 

Pander > 

Pastime ... J 

Plunder 

Pilgrim \ 

Priestess .. / 
Rover . . . . "i 
Runaway . . 1 

Rivulet r 

Rarity .... J 
Roister . . . $\ 
Rummager | 
Rebel '....>- 

Regan j 

Ransom . .J 
Ruthless 
Streamer 




Sempstress. 
Pensive. 










Nameless. 






Jessy. 


■ 




Gaylass. 
Spinster. 




Lawver 






Phoenix. 




Neptune 


Parody. 
Parable. 




Neptune > 




Lord Lonsdale's Reveller 

Lord Lonsdale's Reveller 


Juliet. 

Comfort. 
Perilous. 

Syren. 

Janty. 

Sprightly. 
Lightfoot. 









Total .... 55! couples, 



[ 236 ] 
MR. FOLJAMBES HOUNDS. 

November 1, 1825. 
WORKING HOUNDS. 



Friendly . 



Duke of Rutland's Fleecer 



Darling. 



Conqueror 
Ligktfoot . 



Lord Althorp's Cardinal . , 
Lifter 



Rally. 
Stately. 



Comely . 
Rantipole 



Lord Althorp's Cardinal 
Lord Lonsdale's Rover . . 



|Vanish. 

His Rosamond. 



Crafty . . . 
Gager . . . 
Harmony 
Royal . . . 
Speedwell 



Wellington 

Galloper 

Dexter 

Lord Lonsdale's Roderick 
Galloper 



Charmer. 
Sanguine. 
Hopeful. 
His Courtly 
Singwell. 



Archer. . . 
Bluecap . 
Clinker . 
Darter . . . 
Damper . 
Flasher . . 
Helen . . . 
Hasty . . . 
Jealousy . 
Racer . . . 
Ranter . .. 
Sparkler . 
Welcome 



Mr. Savile's Ajax 

Sir R. Sutton's Lucifer 
Mr. Savile's Champion . . 

Jailor 

Duke of Rutland's Fleecer 

Jailor 

Jailor 

Rallywood 

Sir R. Sutton's Splendour . 
Wellington 



Friendly. 
Bluebell. 
Sanguine. 

Dextress. 

Rarity. 

Hopeful. 

Helen. 

Dainty. 

Skilful. 
Rally. 



Benedict . 
Bacchanal 
Gaylass . 
j Graceful . 
Hopeful . 
|Jovial . . . 
Jupiter . . 
Reveller . 
Rival ... 
Songster . 



Stroker 

Gamester 

Conqueror 

Mr. Savile's Damper 

Mr. Savile's Dabster . 
Craftsman 



Bluebell. 

Comely. 
Hopeful. 
Jollity. 

Rally. 
Singwell. 



[ 237 ] 

From the Duke of Rutland's. 



4 Years. 



Barrister Lord Middleton's Benedict 

Lazarus .... i Sultan 

Merlin Lord Middleton's Damper. . 

Suitan ISultan 



Jessamine. 
Lightsome. 
Modesty. 
Wisdom. 



From Lord Lonsdale's. 



Actress . . . 
Dowager . . 
Dauntless . 
Julian .... 
Milliner .. 



Saracen 

Looby 

Lord Fitzvvilliam's Thwack'em 

Julian 

Roderick 



Agnes. 

Dowager. 

Destiny. 

Columbine. 

Matron. 



3 Years. 



Comus 

Columbine , 
Donovan . . 
Fearnought 
Favourite . 

Frolic 

Gaiety .... 
Senator . . . 
Statesman 
Sprightly. . 
Termagant 
Workman . 
Woldsman 



2 Years. 



Mr. Savile's Conqueror 

Mr. Savile's Conqueror 

Dexter 

Royal 

Galloper 

Lord Middleton's Roman 

Lord Lonsdale's Trouncer. . . . 
Lord Yarborough's Woldsman 



Bluebeard . 
Baffler.... 
Crony .... 
Countess . . 
Chancellor 
Cheerful . . 
Dorimont . 
Diligent . . 
Doxy .... 
Doublet . . 
Dewdrop . . 
Dimity. . . . 

Duster 

Finder 
Falconer . . 
Foreman . . 

Guider 

Hotspur . . 
Hostess . . . 
Jollity 



Royal 

Gager 



Damper 

Duke of Beaufort's Dorimont 
Mr. Osbaldeston's Clincher . . 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Rasselas . 

Darter 

Royal 

Gager 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Chorister . . 
Conqueror 



Vanish. 
Rarity. 
Whiter ose. 

Friendly. 

Riot. 

Speedwell. 

Rantipole. 
Harmony. 

Bluebell. 

Captious. 

Comely. 

Happy. 

Destiny. 

Dowager. 

Rival. 

Friendly. 

Helen. 

Harmony. 

Joyful. 



[ 238 ] 



Lionel . . . 
Proctor . . 
Priestess . 
Piper . . . 
Pastime . 
Playful. . . 
Prosody . 
Relish . . 
Rosemary 
Random . 
Rector . . . 
Stately. . . 
Whisker . 
Watchful. 
Wildfire . 



Conqueror 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Proctor 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Piper . . 

Conqueror 

Duke of Beaufort's Ranter 
Conqueror 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Wonder 



Lady. 
Hopeful. 

Graceful. 

Rantipole. 

Hasty. 
Sempstress. 

Riot. 



YOUNG HOUNDS, 1826. 



Bellman . 
Boaster . . 
Brevity . . 
Coroner . . ~) 
Chider.... | 
Caroline . . I 
Carnival . . f 
Constant . . j 
Capable . . J 
Chorister. . \ 
Chauntress J 
Denmark.. "I 

Danger J 

Fugleman . "") 
Forester . . 
Fairplay . . f 
Frantic. .. 
Fallacy... . J, 
Guardsman 
Gambler . . 
Gulliver . . 
Gamesome 
Limner... . 
Latimer . . 
Marksman 
Messmate . 
Marplot . . 

{Monitor . . 
Melody . . . 
Pillager . . 
Prodigal . . 
Plunder . . 



Duke of Rutland's Boaster 

Gager 

Duke of Rutland's Chaunter 
Conqueror 

Gager 

Royal 

Gager 

Lazarus 

Gager 

Duke of Rutland's Pilot. . .. 



Harmony. 

Costly. 

Jessamine. 
Dowager. 

Favourite. 

Graceful. 

Captious. 
Termagant 

Milliner. 
Helen. 



[ 239 ] 



Prompter.. "1 
Purity .... J 
Romulus.. -v 
Roman . . I 
Rapture . . > 
Ransom . . j 
Restless . . J 
Scornful .. \ 
Susan . . . . / 
Traveller .... 



SIRES. 



Duke of Rutland's Piper . . 



Bluecap 

Conqueror 

Sir R. Sutton's Trimbush . . 

Couple 2 1 1 Young 

Ditto 45 Old. 

Total GGi 



Bashful. 

Rantipole. 

Sprightly. 
Comely. 



DUKE OF GRAFTON'S HOUNDS. 

January 1, 1826. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


9 Years. 


Bawble 

Guardian 


Lord Yarborough's Gallant . . 


His Agate. 

Lord Lonsdale's Hasty. 


8 Years. 


Whisker 


Lord Yarborough's Monarch . 


Rapture. 
Minion. 


7 Years. 


Myrmidon . . 
Dorimont \ 
Diligent . . J 


Lord Yarborough's Monarch . 


Crystal. 
Dorcas. 




Roderick 


Rarity. 






6 Years. 


Gertrude .... 
Wildfire . . 1 
Welcome. . j> 
Wanton . . J 
Belman . . \ 
Blowzy . . J 
Rifleman . . "1 
Rummager J 




Rakish. 






Wowsky. 
Bawble. 










Milkmaid. 








5 Vears. 


Ruler 

Gossamer., "j. 
Gaylass .... 1- 
Governess J 


Roderick 


Witchery. 






Rakish. 









[ 240 ] 



Gossip 

Dreadnought 

Music 

David 

Regent 

Anthony . . \ 
Anxious . . j 



Guardian . 
Roderick . 
Roderick . 
Dulcimer. 
Rustic . . . 

Abelard . , 



Governor. . 
Delegate . . 
Diadem . . 
Marmion . . 
Waldemar 
Wasteful . . 
Whirligig . 
Juniper . . 
Javelin . . . 

Julia 

Bountiful. . 
Wilful 
Cicero 
Caliban . . . 
Hotspur . . 
Bosphorus 



Roderick . 
Whisker. . . 
Watchman. 
Roderick . 
Watchman 



Fencer. 



Fencer 

Watchman , 

Dexter 

Cruizer 

Sir T. Mostyn's Notary. 
Watchman 



Fatima. 

Dilisrent. 

Milkmaid. 

Fallacy. 

Witchery. 

Daffodil. 

Glory. 

Diligent. 

Minuet. 

Witchery. 

Minstrel. 

Jessica. 

Bawble. 

Wanton. 

Captive. 

Rosy. 

Hasty. 

Bittern. 



Proctor . . 
Masker . 
Merriman 
Magic . . . 
Wonder . . "| 
Whirlwind J 
Wamba . . v 
Wowsky . . ( 
Wary .... 
Whiz gig . . J 
Mercury .... 
Romulus. . "1 
Remus. . . . / 

Rustic 

Midas 

Mountebank 

Hermit 

Warrener . . 
Hymen . . . "I 
Hecuba . . J 

Diomed 

Bacchus . . 1 
Bachelor . . I 
Basilisk . . [ 
Barbara . . J 



Mr. Osbaldeston's Proctor. 
Wildfire 



Wildfire. 



Watchman . 

Dorimont . 

Rummager 
Watchman. 
Dorimont . . 
Regent. . . . 
Watchman 

Harlequin 

Whisker . . . 



Dorimont 



Brilliant. 
Magic. 

Gossip. 

Malady. 

Rapid. 

Restless. 

Minuet. 

Milkmaid. 

Heroine. 

Wowsky. 

Minstrel. 

Diligent. 

Bawble. 



[241 ] 



Dewdrop . "1 
Dabchick . J 



Bashful . 
Betsy . . . 
Beldam . 
Buxom . 
Beatrice . 
General . 
Grasper . 
Gladsome 
Dorothy . . . 
Denmark . . , 
Goldfinch . . , 
Margaret. . . 
Regulus . . . 
Ruby .... 
Rival .... 
Rosemary 
Ravager . . 
Wellington 
Wisdom . . 
Wishful .. 
Rubicon 
Rosalind 
Royalist 
Reginald 
Bajazet 
Bluecap 



:} 
:"} 



Dorimont. 



Guardian... 

Ruler 

Whisker . . 
Dorimont . . 

Rocket 

Wildfire . . . 
Regent . . _ 

Rummager 

Ruler 

Wildfire . . 

W T ildfire 

Whisker . . 
Dorimont. . 

Harlequin. . 

Rummager 

Belman. . . 
Dorimont. . 
Crier 

Dorimont . . 

Watchman 

Wildfire. 

Proctor 

Rummager 
Guardian. . . 

Whisker... . 



Witchery. 



Blowzy. 



Gertrude. 

Daffodil. 

Magic. 

Governess. 

Modish. 

Minstrel. 

Malady. 

Gossamer. 

Gay lass. 

Restless. 

Roundelay. 
Rally. 

Bawble. 



Bolivar 

Boundless 
Brilliant .. 
Benedict . . 
Bacchanal 
Dardan . . 
Daffodil . . 
Cardinal . . 
Chancellor 
Dulcimer. . 

Dainty 

Delia 

Doedalus 
Fencer . . . . 
Ferdinand 
Forester . . 
Justice. . . . 
Meddler . . 
Merrilass. . 
Roman 
Rarity 



Blowzy. 

Wary. 

Gossip. 

Welcome. 

Bawble. 

Dewdrop. 

Fanciful. 

Jessica. 

Minstrel. 

Malady 

Roundelay. 



T 



[ 242 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1 Year. 


Runaway. . . . 
Roderick. . x 
Rufus .... 1 
Rector . . > 
Rakish. . . . 1 
Roundelay J 
Rantipole . . 
Watchman "1 
Waspish . . J 
Witchery. . . . 




Gertrude. 




Regent. 

Ruler 


Whizgig. 
Governess. 




Wildfire 


Wasteful. 






Wowsky. 



48 couple of Old. 
15| Do. of Young. 

63 i 



SIR BELLINGHAM GRAHAM'S HOUNDS. 

September 1, 1825. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


10 Years. 


Brevity . . . 




Cruizer 


Blameless. 














From Mr. Warde. 




7 Years. Ashton . . . 
Goosecap. 
Mariner . . 
Monster .. 


•1 


From Mr. Warde. 





6 Years. 



Cruiser 

Wonder 

Wonder 

New Forest Rattler . . . 
Bred by Mr. Lambton. 
Mr. Warde's Lazarus . 
Ritler 



Comet 

Watchman . 
Wildboy ... 
Termagant. . 
Terrible .... 

Bustler 

Merryman . . 

Ranger 'Damper 

Songstress ... Sailor 

Comus....| Commodore 
Conqueror J 

PhoLix "" } From Mr ' Warde ' 

Jewess 

[Prompter .... 



Mr. Osbaldeston's Proctor. 



i Wanton. 
(Gaylass. 
Remnant. 
Tremulous. 

IBellmaid. 
jHarmony. 
Ruin. 
Picture. 

Rhapsody. 



Rival. 



[243 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


5 Years. 


Paragon .... 
Lofty 

Junket 

Patience 


Hengist 


Treachery. 
Comet. 




From Lord Tavistock. 

New Forest Rattler 




Duke of Beaufort's Ragland. . 
Ludlow. 


Ruby. 
Gamesome. 

Gossamer. 




From Mr. Warde. 

Abelard 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Proctor. . . . 


Purity. 

Paradise. 

Jubilee. 


4 Years. 


Roderick 

Niobe 

Wildfire .... 

Rosebud 

Pontiff 
Cerberus 

Relish 

Rambler . . \ 
Careless . . J 


Roderick 


Violet. 




Ferdinand 


Glory. 






Welcome. 




Proctor 


Whimsey. 






Brevity. 




Roman 


Rosebud. 




From Lord Yarborough. 
From Sir R. Sutton. 


Actress. 






Vengeance 




Prompter 


Fatima. 




Rovster 


Rachel. 






Chauntress. 




Marmion 


Brevity. 






3 Years. 


Bouncer . . \ 
Brimstone J 

Ranter \ 

Gaylass J 

Ambrose .... 

Wilful 
Placid 




Woful. 






Jezabel. 






Joyful. 
Paragon. 
Brevity. 
Witchcraft. 


















Rantipole. 

Caroline. 

Costly. 

Rachel. 




Lord Lonsdale's Saracen 






Woful. 




Rubens 


Termagant. 
Rosebud. 




Wildboy 




From Mr. Warde. 




2 Years. 


Tickler.... \ 
Twister ... J 
Random .... 
Dorimont . . 
Rushlight . . . 
Welcome . . . 




Abigail. 




Bred by Sir E. Smythe. 


Darling. 

Priestess. 

Welcome* 




Lord Lonsdale's Roderick 

Lord Lonsdale's Roderick 



[ 244 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


2 Years. 


Fleecer • • • "1 








Famous . . j- 


Lord Lonsdale's Reveller 


Factious. 




Furious ... J 








Reveller .... 


Lord Lonsdale's Reveller 


Fatiina. 




Cruizer . . . "l 








Comrade . . > 


Lord Lonsdale's Comrade .... 


Susan. 




Chaunter. . J 








Comely .... 


Lord Lonsdale's Lucifer .... 


Comely. 








Primrose. 




Caroline .... 




Caroline. 




Forester 


Duke of Beaufort's Warrior. . 


Rival. 




Folly 


Lord Fitzwilliam's Flambeau. 






Gallant . . . "] 








Gamester . . > 




Gossamer. 




Glider .... J 








Parasol . . . "1 

Purity J 

Timely 

Lightfoot. . . . 


From Mr. Warde. 






Woldsman 


Tigress. 






Lavish. 




Palestine 


Famous. 






Hoyden. 




Wildair 
Voucher .... 
Prompter .... 


Chorister 


Wilderness. 




Prcctor 


Violet. 




Pilot 


Whisper. 








Jubilee. 




Prowler 


Bachelor 


Patience. 


1 Year. 


Bellman .. "i 








Barmaid . . L 




Annabell. 




Barbara . . J 








Royal ") 








Ruby .... 1 




Paragon. 




Rarity J 








Valiant... . -| 








Vault er . . . 








Victor r 




Vanity. 




Venus .... J 








Beauty ] 


Render 


Rakish. 










Bashful.... L 




Brevity. 




Brilliant . . J 








Corsican . . 




Careless. 




Petticoat . . 


Pilot 


Brimstone. 




Royster . 


Royster 


Rally. 

Fatima. 




Pangloss 






Rasselas . . i 








Roger .... 1 
Randy J 


Rasselas 


Juliet. 










Joker . . t 








Juliet I 


Mr. Osbaldeston's Piper .... 


Lord Lonsdale's Joyful. 




Jingle .... J 







[ 245 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1 Year. 


Jollity . . . 
Jealousy . 
Jessamy . 


} 


Mr. Osbaldeston's Piper 


Lord Lonsdale' 


5 Joyful. 




Nimrod . . 
Newsman 
Fancy . . . 


I 


Lord Lonsdale's Comrade 

Lord Lonsdale's Palafox .... 


Niobe. 

Fancy. 
Judith. 














Stormer . 
Statesman 


I 


Lord Lonsdale's Roderick 


Stately. 






Jasper . . . 
Jubilee . . 


} 


Lord Lonsdale's Rambler. . . . 


Jessamy. 










Lord Lonsdale's Rambler 


Susan. 





MR. HANBURY'S HOUNDS. 



enter'd. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1818. 


Fretful 




Sir T. Mostyn's Fretful. 


1819. 


Forester . . 
Gambler . . \ 
Juryman . . J 
Minstrel .... 


Lord Fitzwilliam's Fairplay . . 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Genial 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Monarch. . 


His Sempstress. 
His Comic. 
His Rally. 


1820. 


Dorothy .... 

Jollity 

Voucher .... 


L. Fitzwilliam's Dreadnought 
Lord Fitzwilliam's Genial. . . . 

His Majesty's Voucher 


His Painful. 

Lord Lonsdale's Jessica. 

His Jollity. 

J" Duke of Richmond's 

\ Blowzy. 


1821. 


Actor "1 

Alfred .... J 

Harlequin "1 
Harmony . . J 

Margaret. . . . 

Pastime .... 
Seaman .... 


Herts. Jumper 


Their Artful. 




Herts. Jumper 


Their Audrey. 
His Nimble. 

Their Rosalind. 




Lord Fitzwilliam's Craftsman 
Herts. Hotspur 




Lord Fitzwilliam's Champion 
Lord Fitzwilliam's Darter . . . 
Lord Fitzwilliam's Shiner. . . . 
Herts. Champion 


His Joyful. 
His Modish. 
His Novice. 
Their Prudence. 






His Selina. 


1822. 


Gratian .... 


Duke of Rutland's Rummager 


His Harmony. 
His Joyous. 



[ 246 ] 



Joyful 

Lucifer . . . 
Mayfly .... 
Pagan .... 
Pillager . . 
Sempstress 
Tulip .... 
Tuneful . . 



Comical 
Crafty . . , 
Darling 
Duster. . 
Gaudy . . , 
Hayden 
Jovial . . , 
Loiterer , 
Meddler . 
Nimble , 
Placid . . . 
Pliant . . . 
Primrose , 
Rarity . . . 
Ready . . . 
Restless . 
Singwell . 
Voyager . 



Lord Fitzwilliam's Meanwell 
Mr. Oxenden's Woodman. . . 
Duke of Rutland's Render . 
Lord Fitzwilliam's Pagan . . . 
Lord Fitzwilliam's Priam . . . 
Duke of Rutland's Ruler . . . 
Lord Fitzwilliam's Thwack'em 
Herts. Milton 



Lord Fitzwilliam's Gayman . . 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Chider 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Sifter 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Darter 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Meanwell 

Colonel Berkeley's Rifler 

Lord Yarborough's Jailor 

Duke of Grafton's Rustic 

Herts. Meddler 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Mirable . . 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Pilgrim . . 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Juggler . . 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Rover 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Rover .... 
Lord Fitzwilliam's Meanwell 
Lord Sondes's Valiant 



His Joyful. 
His Lavender. 
His Modish. 
His Jessy. 
His Mischief. 
His Sportly. 
His Graceful. 
Their Tuneful. 



His Churlish. 

His Nullity. 

His Darling. 

His Lightfoot. 

His Spangle. 

His Harmony. 

His Celia. 

Mr.Oxenden'sLa vender 

Their Primrose. 

His Novel. 

His Sally. 

His Pensive. 

His Funny. 

His Needful. 
His Spangle. 
His Laundress. 



Artful 

Bondsman . . 

Carver 

Champion \ 
Conqueror / 
Eleanor .... 

Ferdinand . . . 

Hamlet 

Hotspur 

Jasper 

Jezabel 

Lovely 

Matchless . . . 

Phrenzy 

Rachel 

Ravager . . \ 
Roderick . . j 
Romulus 
Tomboy 
Tiueman 



Herts. Aimwell 

Mr. Osbakleston's Bachelor . . 

Mr. Osbaldcston's Chorister. . 

Mr. Osbakleston's Chorister. . 

Lord Yarborough's Comus . . 

Lord Lonsdale's Reveller 

Mr. Shard's Foreman 

Marq. of Tavistock's Hercules 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Jovial .... 
Lord Fitzwilliam's Juggler . . 
Lord Yarborough's Lucifer . . 
Lord Fitzwilliam's Marker . . 
Marq. of Tavistock's Hannibal 
Herts. Alfred 



:} 



Duke of Beaufort's Ravager 
Lord Yarborough's Trojan . 
Lord Yarborough's Comrade 



Their Perdita. 

J Duke of Rutland's 

\ Bonnybell. 

Mr. Foljambe's Destiny. 

Sir R. Sutton's Light- 
ning. 
His Eleanor. 

Sir R. Sutton's Fac- 
tious. 
Mr. Chute's Handsome, 
f Lord Fitzwilliam's 
\ Jealous. 
His Lightfoot. 
His Rachel. 
His Pattle. 
His Pastime. 
L. Fitzwilliam's Phoebe. 
Their Rachel. 

L. Fitzwilliam's Sally. 

His Rapid. 

His Troublesome. 



[ 247 ] 



enter'd 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1824. 


Triumph .... 


Herts. Triumph 






Mr. Osbaldcston's Vaulter . . 


J" Lord Fitzwilliam's 
t Dabble. 
His Warble. 






Lord Yarborough's Jailor . . . 




Woldsman . . 


Lord Yarborough's Woldsman 


/ Mr. Foljambe's 
I Harmonv. 




Woodman . . 


Lord Yarborough's Jailor 


His Warble. 


1825. 


Aimvvell .... 


Mr. Osbaldeston's Comus. . . . 


/Lord Yarborough's 




Billington . . 


Duke of Rutland's Bloomer. . 


His Bluebell. 




Bluecap .... 


Duke of Rutland's Bloomer . . 


His Comfort. 




Bachelor .... 


Lord Yarborough's Fairplay . . 


His Blossom. 




Comrade .... 


Lord Yarborough's Comrade . 


His Remnant. 




Courtly .... 


Lord Yarborough's Minister. . 


His Constant. 




Columbine "1 
Chaunter . . J 


Sir R. Sutton's Chancellor . . 


His Malice. 






Lord Yarborough's Jailor .... 


His Drowsy. 




Damper .... 


Sir T. Sykes's Denmark .... 


His Crafty. 




Dreadnought 


Duke of Rutland's Duster . . . 


His Pastime. 




Galloper 


Lord Fitzwilliam's Flambeau 


His Gaylass. 






Herts. Alfred 


Their Legacy. 




Lightfoot .... 


Lord Fitzwilliam's Sifter .... 


His Lightfoot. 




Melody .... 


Sir T. Sykes's Denmark 


His Termagant. 






Duke of Rutland's Bloomer . . 


His Comfort. 








His Artless. 




Playful 


Duke of Rutland's Pontiff . . . 


His Comely. 




Patriot 


Lord Fitzwilliam's Pontiff. . . . 


His Jealous. 




Prodigal . . . 




His Pastime. 




Regent . . . . ] 








Roman > 


Lord Yarborough's Rector . . . 


His Bashful. 




Rosebud . . J 








Rally wood . . 


Lord Yarborough's Rector . . . 


His Violet. 






Lord Fitzwilliam's Flambeau 


His Ruin. 




Reveller 




His Victory. 




Siren 


Lord Fitzwilliam's Sifter .... 


His Playful. 




Twilight .... 




His Tidings. 




Willing .... 


Sir T. Sykes's Wellington. . . . 


His Comfort. 



HATFIELD HOUNDS. 



enter'd. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1819. 


Emmeline . . 
Nettleton . . . 


Lord Althorp's Emigrant .... 


Patience, 
f Rachel, late Mr. 
t Lloyd's. 







[ 248 ] 



enter'd. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1820. 


Adamant 

Weaver .... 

Meddler 

Joyful 

Arbiter .... 
Bluebell .... 


Duke of Rutland's Abelard . . 

Lord Yarborough's Finder . . 
Lord Yarborough's Monitor . 

Mr. Warde's Justice 

Mr. Warde's Ashton 

From Mr. Warde. 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Sailor 


/Lord Yarborough's 
I Blossom. 
His Wisdom. 
Brilliant. 
His Abbess. 
His Ariel. 

/ Lord Lonsdale's 
\ Gaylass. 


1821. 


Abelard .... 
Dreadnought 
Gladsome . . . 
Cleaver • ■ ■ \ 
Chaunter. .• J 
Conqueror "1 
Candid.... / 
Primrose .... 

Hopeful 

Prudence. . . . 


Duke of Grafton's Abelard . . 
Duke of Grafton's Delamere . 
Mr. Warde's Granby 

Mr. Warde's Clasher 

Own Cottager 


Daffodil. 

Fallacy. 

Armstead. 

/ Rachel, late Mr. 

t Lloyd's. 

Own Resolute. 




Own Cottager 


Own Patience. 




Lord Lonsdale's Hannibal 

Lord Sondes's Ottoman 


His Lightfoot. 

Lord Lonsdale's Safety. 


1822. 


Envv ] 

Eager .... 1 

Echo J 

Bachelor . . \ 
Baneful . . / 
Clasher . . . "] 

Carver I 

Conquest . . J 
Leveller .... 
Marmion .... 


Own Emperor 


/ Lord Althorp's 
I Sprightly. 

Brevity. 

His Rachel. 

Lord Lonsdale's Lively. 
His Hasty. 




Mr. Lloyd's Bachelor 

Mr. Lloyd's Castor 

Lord Yarborough's Medler . . 
Marq. of Tavistock's Marmion 


1823. 


Famous .... 
Blameless . . 
Needful .... 


Mr. Lloyd's Nathan 

Mr. Warde's Sovereign 

Mr. Lloyd's Nathan 


Florist. 
Brimstone. 
Own Equity. 


1824. 


Gambler . . ~\ 
Gamester. . 1 
Guilty.... f 
Gaylass ... J 
Monitor . . \ 
Marplot .. J 
Manager .... 

Heedless 

Guardian 

Gaiety . . . . \ 
Gravity ... J 
Boaster 




Own Gladsome. 




Own Meddler 

Own Meddler 

Hopeful 


Own Equity. 

Rachel, late Lloyd's. 
Countess, 




Adamant 


Harlot. 




Emperor 

Mr. Warde's Guardian 

Mr. Warde's Jovial 


Mr. Warde's Junket. 
His Blissful. 

His Galliot. 




Mr. Warde's Rustic 


His Benefit. 




Collier | 


jord Yarborough's Collier. . . . 


His Celia. 



[ 249 ] 



enter'd. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1824. 




Lord Yarborough's Minister . 


His Florist. 




Dabster .... 


Lord Yarborough's Dabster . . 


His Dairymaid. 


1825. 


Songster .."] 








Sprightly.. 1 
Spiteful . . | 
Sempstress J 




Gladsome. 










Gamboy 


Mr. Villebois' Gamester .... 


His Countess. 




Settler \ 

Splendor . . J 


Mr. Villebois' Splendor 


His Precious. 








His Daphne. 




Pilot 




His Proserpine. 




Latimer .... 




His Notable. 




Fatal 


Mr. Villebois' Monitor 


His Friendly. 




Truelove .... 




His Juliet. 






Lord Yarborough's Ratler 


His Jealousy. 






Lord Lonsdale's Ranger 


/Lord Fitzwilliam's 
1 Sybil. 






Lord Fitzwilliam's Jovial .... 


His Novelty. 




Bruizer 




His Careful. 




Arrogant .... 




His Amy. 




Caroline .... 


Duke of Grafton's Abelard . . 


His Comedy. 






Duke of Grafton's Dorimont . 


His Wasteful. 




Druid 


Duke of Grafton's Dorimont . 


His Modish. 




Wanderer.... 


Duke of Grafton's Watchman 


His Wovvsky. 




Columbine . . 















LORD LONSDALES HOUNDS. 



Gertrude . 
Lashwood. 
A\*elcome . 



. Gaylass 
.! Jollity ... 
. jMargaret , 



Lounger. 
Lounger. 
Wonder. 



Chaunter . 
Charm ... 
Comrade . 
Fortune 

Pilot 

Patriot . . , 
Playful.., 
Reveller 
Sparkler , 
Striver . . 



Agnes . . 

Levity . . 

Nimble 

Dowager 
Matron 



J Mr. Osbaldeston's 
\ Chaunter. 

Fencer. 

J Mr. Osbaldeston's 
\ Jargon. 

Roderick. 

Julian. 



U 



[ 250 ] 



NAMES. 

Glancer... 
Grasper . . 

Griper 

Hector . . . 

Jupiter 

Jessamy .. 
Judith 

Merlin 

Pillager . . \ 
Palafox..../ 

Relish 

Racer \ 

Rally J 

Sultan 

Sorcerer .. \ 
Sailor J 



Comedy . 
Flighty. . . 
Lightfoot 

Lady . . . 



Madrigal . 

Rantipole. 
Rachel. . . . 
Whiterose 
Ruby ... 
Legacy . . . 



Gager. 
Gainer. 
Hannibal. 

Jupiter. 

f Mr. Osbaldeston's 

I Proctor. 

/ Mr. Osbaldeston's 

\ Jargon. 

Roderick. 

Mr. Smith's Rubens. 

Julian 

Julian. 



Welcome. 



Glider .... 1 
Gambler . . / 

Hazard 'Watchful. 

Ortolan Silvia 

Orpheus 

Priestess 



Prophet 

Pilgrim . . 

Rambler 

Rival 

Ribster . . 
Streamer 
Stickler 
Stately 



Lightfoot. 
Flighty. . . 



'■;::.} 



Lady 

Wary . . . 

Dowager . 
Fancy . . . 
Nimble . 

Agnes . . . 

Woodbine 



Gainer. 

Hannibal. 

Lord Sondes's Ottoman. 

Lord Sondes's Ottoman. 

J Mr. Osbaldeston's 

\ Proctor. 

f Mr. Osbaldeston's 

1 Proctor. 

{Lord Fitzwilliam's 
Pilgrim. 
Roderick. 
Roderick. 
Roderick. 
Julian. 

Julian. 



Chancellor 
Challenger 
Chanticleer 
Gracious . . 
Guzman . . 
Juggler 
Javelin .... 

Jason 

Plaintiff . . . 

Pleader 

Newsman . . 
Niobe .... 
Ranger 
Soldier 
Susan. .... 



i Caroline 



I Factious . . 
.Courtly .. 
, Joyful .... 
.Columbine 
.Welcome . 



> Jessamy 

> Nimble 



Judith . . . 
Lightfoot. 



Saracen. 

Gainer. 
Gainer. 
Julian. 
Julian. 
Julian. 

Pirate. 

Roderick. 
Roderick. 
Julian. 



[251 ] 



NAMES. 

Tamerlane 
Telamon . . 
Trinket.... 
Vandal . . . 



Wary 

Wliiterose 



DAMS. 



Piper. 

Piper, 



Alaric . . 
Auditor . 
Admiral . . . 

Ariel 

Abigail 

Aimwell .. 
Achmet . . . 
Actress 
Bachelor . 
Benedict .. 
Baronet... 
Careful . . . 

Castor 

Coiner ... 
Dominic . 
Dorimont . 
Guider . . . 
Garnet . . . 
Janus . . . 
Jealousy . 

Lifter 

Pontiff . . . 
Pamela . . . 
Patience . 
Royalist . 
Ringwood 
Rover . . . 
Ratler . . . 
Regan . . . 
Rosebud . 
Rasselas . 
Rallyvvood 



• O 



Jovful 



Jessamy 



Sempstress 

Relish 
Caroline . . 

Susan 



Destiny 

Gertrude 

Primrose 
Lady 

Playful . . 



Factious 
Fatima . 



Welcome 
Audrey . . 



Pillager. 



Pillager. 

Brunswick. 

Brunswick. 

Sir R. Sutton's Coroner. 

Comrade. 

Proctor. 

Sir B. Graham's 
Pangloss. 

Julian. 

Piper. 

(" Sir B. Graham's 
\ Pangloss. 

Reveller. 

Reveller. 

Roderick. 

Roderick. 



Alfred .. 
Angler . . 
Audible . 
Amulet . . 
Abelard.. 
Crafty .. 
Dainty ., 
Genial . , 

Lasher .. 

Pastime.. 
Primate . 
Prudence 



Ruby. 



:;} 



Nosegay 

Niobe 

Relish 

Lady . ^ 

Duke of Rutland's 

Fortune..^. 

Fancy 



Pillager. 

Pillager. 
Comrade. 
Proctor. 
Glancer. 

f Duke of Rutland's 
\ Leader. 
Palafox. 

Palafox. 



[252 ] 



SIRES 

Joyful 

Stately 

Jessamy 

Susan 

Trinket 

Caroline 

Judith 

Welcome 



1825. 



Pedlar . . 

Regent. . 
Rifler .. 
Rarity . . 
Regicide 
Royal . . 
Rasper. . 
Saracen . 
Seapoy. . 
Statesman 
Stormer 
Silvia . . 
Voucher 
Victor . . 
Windsor 
Warder 



f Mr. Osbaldeston's 
t Pedlar. 

Roderick. 

Rambler. 
Rambler. 

Julian. 

Julian. 

Piper. 
Reveller. 



MR MEYNELL'S HOUNDS. 

September 1, 1825. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


10 Years. 


Bridemaid \ 
Bacchanal J 


Bachelor 


Dauntless. 








9 Years. 


Courtesy. . . . 


Lord Althorp's Champion 


Lord Sondes's Actress. 


8 Years. 


Baronet .... 
Fallacy 




Damsel. 

His Fairmaid. 


7 Years. 


Wilful 

Foreman . . \ 
Fairy .... J 
Ranter . . . . \ 
Rambler . . J 
Abelard .... 
Barbara . . \ 
Bonnybell J 




Wanton. 
Delia. 

Heedless. 






Abigail. 
Rival. 




Bachelor 








6 Years. 


Dauntless . "1 
Dorcas. ... J 


Wilfred 


Damsel. 
Abigail. 



[ 253 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


6 Years. 


Regent . . . "1 

Rarity J 

Jovful 


Wilfred 


Rival. 
Joyful. 


5 Years. 


Bajazet . . . ") 
Bertram . . j 
Benedict . . V 
Beatrice . . j 
Basilisk . . J 
Danger . . . ") 
Daffodil .. 1 
Destiny . . J 
Ganymede . . 

Norval 

Victory 


Abelard 


Bridemaid. 
Damsel. 




Glaucus 


Nelly. 

His Nimble. 

Vanity. 




Mr. Arkwright's Villager .... 
Needwood 






4 Years. 


Ruby .... \ 
Rival .... J 
Champion . . 
Commodore. . 
Caroline .... 
Symmetry . . 
Barrister . . "1 
Bashful .. J 
Vengeance . . 
Columbine . . 


Baronet 


Rival. 




> Needwood 


Courtesy. 
Brilliant. 




Mr. Osbaldeston's Vaulter . ... 
Duke of Grafton's Cruiser . . . 


Bonnybell. 

Lord Sondes's Rosebud. 
His Rosy. 


3 Years. 


Darter 

Nathan . . . \ 
Nelson .... J 
Wonder . . "1 
Wildboy . . 1 
Woodbine . J 
Needwood . . 
Harmony. . \ 
Hyacinth. . J 
Forester . . "1 
Falstaff.... J 
Blowzy... . "1 
BluebeU . . J 
Warrior .... 


Lord Sondes's Gabriel 

Ravager 


His Dalliance. 

Nelly. 

Winifred. 
Nectarine. 




Ravajrer 


Heedless. 




Rambler 


Fallacy. 
Bacchanal. 




Bertram 








-2 Years. 


Melody.... \ 
Mira , J 
Woodman . . 
Bachelor . . 1 
Bravery . . J 
Confidence . . 
Dragon . . . "| 
Diligent . . >■ 
Daphne . . J 


Bajazet 


Madcap. 
Wanton. 




Bajazet 




Ravager 


Basilisk. 
Courtesy. 

Destiny. 







[ 254 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


2 Years. 


Fencer 


Bertram 


Fairmaid. 








1 Year. 


Justice "| 

Juvenal 1 

Jessamine . | 
Jessica .... J 
Fairmaid . . "1 

Frantic j 

Stella 

Comrade . . "1 
Challenger I- 
Comedy. .. J 
Harbinger "1 
Hannibal . . [■ 
Hercules . . J 

Tarquin .... 

Joker "1 

Jester J 


Lord Middleton's Vanguard . . 


Joyful. 

Fallacy. 
Symmetry. 

Caroline. 
Heedless. 




Nathan 




Bajazet 




Sir T. Mostyn's Tandem .... 
Duke of Beaufort's Jason . .. . 


/ Duke of Beaufort's 
\ Rampish. 

His Brilliant. 



Old Hounds 33 couples. 

Young Hounds 81 couples. 

Total 411 



SIR THOMAS MOSTYN'S HOUNDS. 

August 1, 1825. 
WORKING HOUNDS. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


9 Years. 


Welfare .... 




Wrongful. 


8 Years. 




Lionel 


Emily. 




Goneril . . 
Goosecap. 
Malaprop . 
Memory . 

Midnight. 

Wrangler. 


.} 

} 


Lord Middleton's Vanguard . . 
Lord Lonsdale's Wonder . . . 


Mr. Warde's Goneril 

Margaret. 

Nettletop. 
Clamorous. 


7 Years. 


Agony . . . 
Anguish 


} 




Aconite. 









[ 255 ] 



ACES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


7 Years. 


Teucer 




Jewess. 






Trollop. 






6 Years. 


Admiral .... 
Bountiful. . . . 

Comedy 

Tandem 

Vesta \ 

Virgin .... J 
Wary 


Lord Middleton's Admiral . . 
Duke of Grafton's Guardian . . 
Mr. Warde's Maniac 

Notary 


Abbess. 

Bridget. 

His Beatrice. 

Caroline. 

Elegant. 

Fretful. 

Margaret. 

Larceny. 

Tiffany. 

Ransom. 

Malaprop. 




Duke of Beaufort's Denmark 

Duke of Beaufort's Rutland . . 
Warrior 






5 Years. 


Byron "1 

Belzebub. . > 
Burlington J 

Fretful 
Fortune . . .'. 
Goblin 
Newman .... 


Luther 


Bridget. 

Elegant. 
Fretful. 




Notary 




Wrangler 






Duke of Beaufort's Rutland . . 
Lord Fitzwilliam's Newman . . 


Goneril. 

Agony. 


4 Years. 


Anchorite "1 
Apathy. ... J 
Disputant 
Delegate . . > 
Diadem . . J 

Gamestress "1 
Gossip. ... J 
Lancer. . . . \ 
Lenity .... J 
Margery .... 

Misty 

Paradox 

Reuben .... 

Wowsky. . "1 
Waspish . . J 
Wanton 


Duke of Beaufort's Rallywood 

Mr. Warde's Pilgrim 

Duke of Beaufort's Duncan . . 

Duke of Beaufort's Dorimont 
Wrangler 


Bawble. 

Malaprop. 

Elegant. 
Goosecap. 

Libra. 

Margaret. 

Majesty. 

Vesta. 

Rosebud. 

Fanciful. 

Trollop. 

Midnight. 

Bountiful. 




Edwin 




Mr. Warde's Pilgrim 

Duke of Beaufort's Wellington 
Duke of Grafton's Satellite . . 


3 Years. 


Abjer . . . . "I 
Ancram . . 1 
Anodyne., f 
Amulet ... J 
Chieftain . . 1 
Charity . . J 


Mr. Osbaldestou's Proctor . . 


Bawble. 
Comedy. 



[ 256 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


3 Years. 


Chauntress \ 
Chaplet .. J 

Euclid "I 

Emblem . . 1 
Emily .... [ 
Endless ... J 
Freeman . . "| 

Faithless . . J 

Myrtle 

Talisman .... 


Mr. Osbaldeston's Proctor. . .. 
Mr. Osbaldeston's Aimwell . . 

Duke of Beaufort's Vaulter . . 
Duke of Beaufort's Dorimont 
Teucer 


Comedy. 
Elegant. 

Fortune. 

Hydra. 
Marcia. 
Nettletop. 




Mr. Osbaldeston's Pontiff 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Sailor . . . 


Midnight. 

Wary. 

Harlot. 








2 Years. 


Amy "1 

Agatha. ... J 

Bertha 

Counseller 1 
Columbine V 
Concord . . J 

Egbert \ 

Ernest .... J 
Eldon . . . . 1 
Edmund . . J 

Juniper .... 
Michael . . -\ 
Minion . . 
Modish .. \ 
Matron . . 
Magic .... J 

Saladin 1 

Sympathy . J 
Starlight .... 
Tomboy .... 
Whisker . . "] 
Whimsey. . > 
Whirligig . J 
Woful .... "I 
Witless .. J 


Wrangler 


Bawble. 
Bridget. 

Comedy. 

Elegant. 

Elegant. 

Agony. 
Merriment. 

Misty. 

W T ary. 

Stella. 




Duke of Beaufort's Vaulter . . 

Duke of Beaufort's Vaulter . . 

Duke of Beaufort's Vaulter . . 

Duke of Beaufort's Dorimont 
Duke of Beaufort's Dorimont 




Duke of Beaufort's Saladin . . 
Despard 




Wrangler 


Harlot. 






Midnight. 
Memory. 


1 Year. 


Artist \ 

Amorous . . j 

Beresford. . .. 

Client 

Discord .... 
Elegant .... 
Excellent 


Duke of Grafton's Guardian . . 


Bawble. 
Bridget. 






Bountiful. 






Comedy. 
Malaprop. 

Endless, 










Emblem. 



[ 257 J 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1 Year. 


Lounger . . ~| 


Wrangler 


Merriment. 




Linkboy . . 1 
Luckless . . [ 


Mr. Osbaldeston's Chorister. . 


Myrtle. 




Lily J 








Paleface . . "1 
Profligate.. J 


Mr. Codrington's Pugilist 


Wowski. 




n„„,.„i^„V r Duke of Grafton's Guardian. . 
Querulous J 


Agony. 






Chauntress. 




Taunter .... 


Tandem 


Memory. 
Apathy. 




Thais . . . . > 
Thisbe f 






Wisdom .... 




Marcia. 




Vaultress. . . . 


Duke of Beaufort's Rubens .. 


Chaplet. 



MR. NEWMAN'S HOUNDS. 



November 1, 1825. 



NAMES 

Ravager . 

Rector . . , 
Foreman 

Damsel . 
Charon . . 
Comet . . . 
Comedy . 

Rally 

Fretful 

Magistrate . . 

Amorous . . \ 
Argent. ... J 
Statesman . . 
Whimmy 
Standard . . \ 
Splendour J 

Melody 

Dimity .... 



8 Years. 



Lord Althorp's Zodiac 



His Madriffal. 



7 Years. 



Regent 

Duke of Rutland's Harlequin 



Artless. 
His Fallacy. 



6 Years. 



Duke of Rutland's Ardent. . 
Mr. Osbaldeston's Comet . , 



Mr. Saville's Rally wood..... 

Lord Althorp's Orpheus 

Lord Yarborough's Monarch 



His Sanguine. 

Lord Althorp's Phyllis. 

J Duke of Rutland's 
t Songstress. 
His Syren. 
Lord Althorp's Cicely 



5 Years. 



Abelard 



Statesman , 

Duke of Rutland's Abelard 

Statesman 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Wonder 
Danger 

X 



Toilet. 

Rarity. 
Whisper. 

Anna. 

'.Lord Althorp's Fairy. 
(February. 



[ 258 ] 



Gamboy . 

Tomboy 
Tuneful . 
Adjutant 



Fleecer 

Myrtle 

Admiral . . "1 
Artless . . . . J 



Baronet . 
Launcelot . 
Lunatic... 
Lovely ... 

Lady 

Levity ... 
Lictor . . . 
Modish . . . 

Anna 

Amulet... 

Alpha 

Hurricane 
Jealousy . 
Stormer . 



Gamboy . 
Amervell . 



Frantic. 
Artless. 



Gamboy 
Abelard 

Abelard 



Frantic. 
Matchless. 

Toilet. 



Abelard 
Abelard 



Fondler 
Gamboy 

Abelard 



Trinculo 

Mr. Hornyhold's Duncan 
Sir T. Mostyn's Tandem 



Honesty. 
Fretful. 



Affable. 
Melody. 

Toilet. 

Comedy. 
His Jessica. 
His Memory. 



Amervell . 
Merkin . . . 
Victory . . . 
Voucher . 
Cheviot . . , 
Nimrod... 
Nectar . . . 
'Matchless. 



Amervell 

Abelard , 

Admiral 

Lord Petre's Corsican 

Amervell , 

Gamboy 



Dimity. 
Melody. 

Comedy. 

Stately. 

Tuneful. 

Matchless. 



Governor, 
j Grafton... 
Grasper . . 
Regent . . . 
Ranter . . . 

Racer 

Fisherman 
Frantic . . . 
Mischief . 
Artless ... 
Aflable... 
Abelard . . 
Alfred ... 
Notable . 
Manager . 
Minister . 
Madcap . . 



Admiral 



.} 



Rector 
Gamboy . . 
Fisherman 
Adjutant . . 



Gamboy 

Gamboy . 
Standard 



Gravity. 

Lady. 
Rectitude. 
Artless. 
Melody. 

Actress. 

Amorous. 
Dimity. 



[ 259 ] 



1 Year. 



Madcap. 
Barrister . "I 
Blusterer. . I 
Bruiser . . f 

Boaster J 

Hasty . . . . "1 

Harlot J 

Champion 
Countess . . 
Comely . . 



Standard 
Baronet. . 



Admiral 
Admiral 



Dimity. 
Fretful. 

Honesty. 
Comedy. 



MR. NICOLL'S HOUNDS. 

September, 1824. 
fc$" Those marked B. from the Duke of Beaufort. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


7 Years. 


Trophy 




Termagant. 








6 Years. 


Ransome 




Gamesome. 
Jollity. 








5 Years. 


Pillager . . "] 
Polly. , I 
Pleasant . . J 
Aimwell .... 
Bonnybell, B. 
Whimsey, B. 




Joyful. 

Jollity. 
Boundless. 










Whimsey. 








4 Years. 


Chirper 

Harmony 

Gamester. . . . 
Toilet 
Bridemaid . . 

Gadfly 

Terrible .... 




Comet. 






Pleasant. 






Gamesome. 






Tremulous. 






Barmaid. 




Lord Lonsdale's Julian 

Lord Middleton's Traitor .... 


Fatima. 
Flighty. 
Ruby. 
Caroline. 


3 Years. 


Victory 

Gallant 

Wriggle . . \ 
Wagtail .. J 




Laundress. 






Gamesome. 




Waterloo, B 


Joyful. 









[ 260 ] 



Dolly 

Sweetlips. . .. 
Patty 

Jumper .... 

Pastime 

Barbara .... 

Sally 

Nancy, B. \ 
Nonsuch,B. J 
Latimer, B.. . 
Charmer,B 1 
Crier, B. . . / 
Waverly, B... 
Absolute, B. 
Posthumous B 
Prettylass, B. 
Editha, B. .. 
Denmark, B. 
Moppet 

Dexter 

Juggler .. 1 
Jingle .... J 

Ranter 

Comedy .... 

Noble 

Piper 

Wellington B, 
Bravery, B. . . 
Boundless, B. 
Why not, B. 
Flambeau, B. 
Flamer, B. . . 
Flasher, B. . . 

Lucifer 

Bustler 

Comet 

Chorister. . "1 
Chorus. ... J 
Dorothy . 
Dainty . . 
Damsel. . 
Abelard . . \ 
Artful ...,/ 

Stately 

Sultan 

Gratitude . . . 
Argyle . . . . "1 

Amy / 

Donative .... 



Lord Lonsdale's Roderic 

Lord Lonsdale's Julian 

From Mr. Warde 

Chirper 

Prophet 

Ratler 

Ratler 

Nectar 

Plunder 

Mr. Codrington's Crier 

Mr. Codrington's Waverley . . 
Absolute 

| Potent 

Waterloo 

Duncan 

From Mr. Warde. 

Duplicate 

Joker 

Whipster 

Vigilant 

Mr. Villebois' Workman 

Banker 

Warrior 

Bondsman 

Nectar 

Waterloo 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Flambeau 
Lord Fitzwilliam's Flambeau 
Lord Fitzwilliain's Flambeau 



Dowager. 

Agnes. 



Chirper 

Pillager 

Juniper 

Abbot 

Senator 

Ratler 

Mr. Warde's Ashton . 

Mr. Warde's Ashton 

Mr. Warde's Rustic. 



Joyful. 
Glory. 
Barmaid. 

Songstress. 

Gertrude. 

Lively. 

Winifred. 

Whimsey. 
Governess. 

Boundless. 

Emily. 
Wary. 



Rantipole. 

Judy. 

Gaudy. 

Comet. 

Terrible. 

Petticoat. 

Rival. 

Gaylass. 

Bravery. 

Rampish. 

Ruby. 

Paragon. 

Lovely. 



Gadfly. 
Chorus. 

Diligent. 

Abigail. 

Nancy. 
Sweetlips. 

Gaylass. 

Goody. 
Damsel. 



[261 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1 Year. 


Jessy, B... . 
Pugilist, B. . . 
Roundelay . . 




Audible. 




Mr. Codrington's Pugilist. . . . 


Wary. 
Relish. 



MR. OSBALDESTON'S HOUNDS. 

1825. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


8 Years. 


Vaulter "1 

Volatile .. J 


Vigilant 


Venus. 








7 Years. 


Crafty 

Rocket ... . 
Gossamer . . . 


Chaunter 


Promise. 




Rallvwood 


Baroness. 




Orpheus 


Comedy. 
Charmer. 




Charon 








6 Years. 


Violet 

Hermia 


Vanquisher ; 


Lively. 




Lord Lonsdale's Fairplay .... 


Telltale. 


5 Years. 


Damsel 

Hermit 

Singwell . . . 
Drugger .... 
Gratitude... . 

Prattle 

Valentine . . . 
Hostess .... 
Nimble 


Dexter 


Rhapsody. 
Fallacy. 
Lively. 
Pastime. 




Duke of Rutland's Saladine. . 
Duke of Beaufort's Hermit . . 
Sailor 




Batchelor 


Felony. 




Granby 

Cypher 


Boozer. 

Purity. 
Lady. 




Duke of Rutland's Corsican. . 
Duke of Beaufort's Nectar .. 


Handmaid. 
Dalliance. 


4 Years. 


Beatrice .... 
Chorister . . . 

Lunatic .... 
Rasselas . . \ 
Roundelay J 

Brevity .... 




Emerald. 

Harpy. 

Milliner. 




Granby 


Cobweb. 






Felony. 
Damsel. 




Proctor 






Blameless. 






Active. 










Lord Lonsdale's 

Mr. Smith's Rasselas 


Crafty. 



[ 262 ] 



Wonder .... 

Clencher .... 
Caliban . . \ 
Caroline . . J 

Comely 

Cruiser 

Pastime .... 

Pilot 

Ruin 

Vanity. . . . "1 
Vengeance J 
Barbary . . . 
Comedy .... 
Diomed . . "I 
Dandy ..../ 
Emperor .... 

Racer 

Mortimer . \ 
Margaret . J 

Lady 

Orpheus .... 



Vanquisher 



Clencher 

Chorister 

Duke of Rutland's Chaunter. 

Clencher 

Proctor 

Proctor 

Lord Lonsdale's Roderick. . . 

Vaulter 

Marmion 

Cypher 

Duke of Rutland's Chaunter. 

Duke of Rutland's Chaunter 
Rocket 



Lord Lonsdale's Piper . 

Lord Lonsdale's Looby. 
Pytchley Ottoman .... 



Welcome. 

Volatile. 

Wanton. 

Welcome. 

Actress. 

Concord. 

Abigail. 

Vengeance. 

Jubilee. 

Brevity. 
Curricle. 

Lightning. 

Witchcraft. 
Crafty. 

Gertrude. 

Whiterose. 
Lightfoot. 



Archer. . . 
Actress . . 
Amulet . . 
Jessamy . . . 
Vanquisher . 
Royster . . 
Ransom . . 
Rachel.. . . 
Rosemary . 

Nancy 

Trywell . . 
True love . . 
Prodigal . 
Pilgrim . 
Primrose . 
Victory... 
Woodman 
Careful . 
Pontiff... 
Brusher . 
Musical . 
Venus . . . 
Vocal , . . 
Benedict . 



Chorister , 

Aimwell . 
Proctor. . , 



Rocket 



Jasper . 
Tarquin 



Rocket . 



Proctor 

Senator 

Chorister 

Pangloss 

Marmion 

Lord Ludlow's Hero 

Vanquisher 

Marmion 



Artful. 

Jubilee. 
Violet. 

Witchcraft. 

Nimble. 
Welcome. 

Primrose. 

Venus. 

Woodbine. 

Volatile. 

Patience. 

Jezabel. 

Milliner. 

Joyful. 

Vengeance. 



Dairymaid . . Marmion 
Syntax Pilot .... 



Decent. 
Comedy. 



[ 263 ] 



NAMES. 

Harmony . 
Hardvvick. 
Hasty . . . 
Herwin... 
Vicious . . . 
Varnish . 
Sampson . 
Junket ... 
Golding... 
Gilder ... 
Gay lass... 
Placeman . 
Prizer . . . 
Promise . 
Bachelor . 
Bloomer . 
Welcome . 
Woful ... 
Vagrant . 
Castor . . . 
Justice ... 
Joyous ... 
Oddity ... 
Ornament 



:} 



Vaulter 



Chorister. . 

Proctor . . 
Ottoman . . 
Old Jasper 

Chorister. . 



Piper .... 

Bachelor . . 

Wonder . . 

Proctor . . 
Rocket. . . . 

Old Jasper 
Ottoman .. 



Hennia. 

Vicious. 

Singwell. 

Joyful. 

Jealousy. 

Gossamer. 
Jubilee. 

Volatile. 

Joyful. 

Violet. 
Crafty. 

Hostess. 
Vengeance. 



Bred by the Duke of Rutland. 



Mindful .... 
Rhapsody . "I 

Ruby J 

Danger 

Paragon . . \ 

Pliant J 

Bender 

Courtly 

Carnage 
Ragland 

Careful 

Warble 

Watchful 



Miracle 

Rummager 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Bachelor 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Pontiff .. 

Bloomer 

Shifter 

Contest 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Rasselas 

Chaunter 

Shifter 



Sally. 

Jessamy. 

Damsel. 

Syren. 

Gamble. 

Columbine. 

Racket. 

Joyous. 

Ladyblush. 

Waspish. 



YOUNG HOUNDS. 



Ranter 
Gadbout . . 
Gipsy 
Trickster. . 
Topper 
Trinket 



::} 



Vaulter 
Proctor. 

Rocket . 



Roundly. 
Gratitude. 

Truelove. 



[ 264 ] 



Toilet ... 
Joker . . . 
Jargon. . . 
Jewel . . . 
Rebel ... 
Redrose . 
Racket. . . 
Luther. . . 
Lavender , 
Legacy. . . 
Corsican . 
Rosalind . 
Rally ... 
Ravager . 
Remus . . . 
Rosebud . 
Vulcan . . . 
Vestal . . . 
Jailor . . . 
Juliet . . . 
Chaunter . 
Cardinal . 
Cruel ... 
Constant . 
Valiant . . . 
Vixen . . . 
Virgin . . . 
Sparker . 
Splendour 
Stormer . 
Statesman 
Sultan . . . 
Symmetry 
Crimson. 
Nabob . . . 
Niobe . . . 
Necton . . . 
Nelly ... 
Rambler . 
Ringwood 
Regal ... 
Relish . . . 
Rapid . . . 
Ruler . . . 
Ajax .... 
Abigail . . . 
Daphne . 



■1 



•J 



Rocket. 
Vaulter 

Rocket 



Chorister 



Rocket. 
Vaulter 



Rocket. 



Clencher 
Rocket. . 



Chorister 
Vaulter . 

Vaulter . 

Clencher . 
Chorister 



Rocket. 



Rocket. 



Truelove. 
Jealousy. 

Young Violet. 

Lady. 

Caroline. 
Ruin. 

Black Joyful- 
Rachel. 
White Joyful. 

Hostess. 
Harlot. 

Songstress. 

Vengeance. 
Nimble. 

Nancy. 
Remnant. 



Rasselas Primrose. 

Vaulter Artful. 

. Strange Bitch. 

Old Hounds 62| couples. 

Young Hounds 27| couples. 



Total 90 couples. 



[ 265 ] 



LORD PETRE'S HOUNDS. 

November, 1825. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


7 Years. 




Mr. Osbaldeston's Dashwood 


His Glory. 


6 Years. 


Liberty 

Painter 

Roderick . . "1 
Ruby J 

Ranter 

Wonder 

Whynot .... 

Lifter 

Pilot 

Sparkler .... 

Cowslip 

Delicate 

Jovial 


Oaklev Blucher 


Sir G. Leeds's Labrador. 




Duke of Beaufort's Roderick 

Lord Middleton's Ravager. . . . 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Wonder . . 
Mr. Osbaldeston's Wonder . . 
Mr. Chad's 


Their Pamela. 

His Boundless. 

f Duke of Beaufort's 
\ Dorcas. 
His Gaylass 
His Billington. 
Mr. Chad's. 






Surrey Union. 
Mr. Chad's. 




Mr. Chad's 




Lord Fitzwilliam's 


Lord Fitzwilliam's. 




Sir George Leeds's Gulliver. . 
Sir George Leeds's Speedwell 
Mr. Chad's 


His Cowslip. 
His Delicate. 
Mr. Chad's. 




Lord Fitzwilliam's 










5 Years. 


Delver 

Daffodil ..\ 
Daisy ....J 

Figaro 

Waster "1 

Welcome . . J 

Alderman . . ... 


Sir George Leeds's Doncaster 

Sir George Leeds's Doncaster 

Sir George Leeds's Darlington 
Sir George Leeds's Forester. . 

Sir George Leeds's Wiseton . . 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Genial. . . . 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Ottoman . . 
Lord Yarborough's Tyrant . . 
Sir Mark Sykes's Aimwell . . 
Lord Harewood's Capital .... 


His Crafty. 

Sir Geo. Leeds's Mimic. 

His Crystal. 
His Gambol. 

His Counterfeit. 

J Sir George Leeds's 
\ Brevity. 
Badsworth Handmaid. 
His Drowsy. 
Badsworth Lightsome. 
Badsworth Lecherous. 


4 Years. 


Nimrod . . . \ 
Nelson . . . . j 

Dorimont.... 

Mortimer .... 

Dalliance .... 
Rummager .. 


Sir George Leeds's Gauntlet. . 

Mr. Surridge's Norah 

Duke of Grafton's Marmion. . 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Champion 
Lord Scarborough's Rallywood 


J Lord Fitzwilliam's 
t Noody. 
f Duke of Beaufort's 
\ Dainty. 
J Mr. Surridge's 
\ Matchless. 
J Sir George Leeds's 
\ Dairymaid. 
Badsworth Rarity. 



[ 266 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


4 Years. 


Trickster 

Affable 
Diligent ... 

Pedlar 


York and Ainsty Talisman . . 
Ld. Scarborough's Wellington 

Charles Newman's Abelard . . 
Mr. Chad's Duster 


Their Tarnish. 
Badsworth Tinsel. 

f Lord Yarborough's 
\ Dexterous. 

f Lord Fitzwiltiam's 

1 Ruthless. 

Mr. Chad's Hopeful. 

Policy. 




Duke of Beaufort's Rallywood 
Duke of Beaufort's Rallywood 


3 Years. 


Primer 
Trueman 

Dimity 

Lavender 

Lightfoot 

Prophetess .. 
Restless . . . 1 
Rallv J 

Cipher "l 

Twilight .. 1 
Truelove . . J 

Warrior 

Tomboy 


Corsican 


Dauntless. 

Cowslip. 

Tuneful. 




Darlinsrton 




Crier 


Harmless. 




Duke of Beaufort's Nectar . . 

Mr. Codrington's Pugilist . . . 

Duke of Beaufort's Jason . . . 
Duke of Beaufort's Duncan . . 
Duke of Beaufort's Nectar . . 

Mr. Hornyhold's Hudibras . . 

Mr. Hornyhold's Cipher 

Sir Thomas Mostyn's Warrior 


His Prudence. 
J Duke of Beaufort's 
\ Demirep. 
His Lavender. 
His Lightfoot. 
His Prophetess. 

His Rosamond. 

His Twilight. 

Lord Anson's Verity. 
Their Countess. 


2 Years. 


Fairplay 

Governess .... 

Paragon 

Harmony . . "1 
Hasty .... J 
Candy . . . . \ 
Cardigan . . J 
Harbinger . . 
Wafter 

Vigilant 

Amethyst 

Costly \ 

Columbine J 
Abelard 
Gamboy .. \ 
Gambol.... J 


Lord Fitzwilliam's Flambeau 

Duke of Beaufort's Nectar . . 
Duke of Beaufort's Hermit . . 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Flambeau 
Lord Fitzwilliam's Flambeau 

Badsworth Tickler 


f Duke of Beaufort's 
t Lovely. 
His Restless. 
His Diligent. 

f Duke of Beaufort's 
1 Governess. 

/ Duke of Beaufort's 
\ Paragon. 

Their Harpy. 

Their Termagant. 
Their Handmaid. 




Badsworth Leader 


Their Willing. 
Badsworth Whimsey. 
Badsworth Vigilant. 
Actress. 




Lord Fitzwilliam's Jovial .... 
Lord Fitzwilliam's Darter . . . 
Doublet 




Corsican 


Daffodil. 




Alderman 


Rosy. 

Gaudy. 

Favourite. 




Monitor 




Doublet 



[ 267 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


2 Years. 


Benedict . . "j 








Boundless . > 


Duke of Beaufort's Dorimont 


His Boundless. 




Dromo .... J 








Boxer \ 

Boaster ... J 


Duke of Beaufort's Nectar . . 


His Bravery. 




Finder .... "1 
Ruin J 


Lord Fitzwilliam's Flambeau 


f Duke of Beaufort's 
I Ruby. 




Cruiser . . . . \ 
Caroline . . J 


Corsican 


Ruby. 








Landmark 1 
Legacy . . . . / 


Duke of Beaufort's Roderick 


Lavish. 


1 Year. 


Tuneful . . . \ 
Traffic .... J 


Lord Fitzwilliam's Juggler . . 


Badsworth Telltale. 




Fleecer 


Mr. Osbaldeston's Rasselas . . 


Badsworth Famous. 






Lord Fitzwilliam's Joker . . 


Badsworth Famous. 




Crafty 


Mr. Foljambe's Royal 


Badsworth Crafty. 






Badsworth Fairplay 


Their Madcap. 




Libertine 


Badsworth Leader 


Their Levity. 
Badsworth Rival. 




Mr. Osbaldeston's Proctor . . 




Wildboy . . 1 
Waterloo . . > 


Mr. Osbaldeston's Rasselas . . 


Badsworth Lavish. 




Mr. Foljambe's Royal 


His Willing. 




Wellington J 








Damon * 


Duke of Beaufort's Dashwood 


Mr. Foljambe's Rosebud 




Hotspur . . \ 
Honesty . . / 




His Hoyden. 




Wilder ~| 








Willing.... 1 
Witchcraft f 


Mr. Osbaldeston's Wonder . . 


Mr. Foljambe's Riot. 




Wilful ...J 










Mr. Osbaldeston's Piper .... 


f Mr. Foljambe's 
1 Graceful. 




Ringwood . \ 
Racer J 




Rapid. 




Dreadnought 
Dexterous . . 


1 Duke of Beaufort's Dori- "1 


Delicate. 




Comedy .... 


Mr. C. Newman's Admiral . . 


His Comedy, 



[ 268 ] 



PYTCHELEY HOUNDS. 



December 1, 1825. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


7 Years. 


Ambrose .... 
Boundless.... 


Abelard 


Dairymaid. 




Lord Yarborough's Bluecap . . 


Brilliant. 


6 Years. 


Doubtful .... 

Pilot 

Singwell .. "1 
Speedwell . J 
Bouncer .... 

Collier ..„ "1 
Champion J 
Dreadnought 
Monitor 


Duke of Rutland's Ardent 

Castor 


Dashaway. 
Porcupine. 

Harlot. 




Saladine 






Bauble, 




Mr. Chaworth's Bellman .... 

Mr. Chaworth's Bellman 

Lord Yarborough's Trimbush 
Lord Yarborough's Masker . . 


Rival. 

Charmer. 

Cella. 
Bravery. 


5 Years. 


Woodman . . . 

Actress "1 

Artful .... J 

Sultan \ 

Scornful . . J 
Willing 


Mr. Chaworth's Chancellor .. 
Mr. Osbaldeston's Auditor . . . 

Mr. Chaworth's Chancellor . . 
Duke of Rutland's Warbler . . 


Watchful. 
Prettylass. 

Singwell. 
Rival. 


•4 Years. 


Careless .... 
Gulliver . . "1 

Gaudy > 

Glory J 

Forester . . "1 
Fortune . . . J 

Columbine .. 

Topper 

Harlequin 

Stormer . . 1 
Saladine . . 1 
Stately . . . . | 
Symphony J 
Ottoman 


Vanquisher 


Cheerly. 
Caroline. 




Royster 




Cipher 


Gaiety. 

Fairy. 

Laughable. 
Charming. 








Justice 




Justice 




Vaulter. 


Thetis. 




Lord Lonsdale's Brunswick . . 
Justice 


Harmony. 
Siren. 






Stately. 

Purity. 
Speedwell. 




Orpheus 




Chancellor 






3 Years. 




Duke of Rutland's Hopeful .. 


Bonnybell. 



[ 269 ] 



Charity..., 

Benedict . , 

Bacchanal 

Wonderful 

Susan . . . 
Wildboy . 



Lord Lonsdale's Roderick . 

Lord Middleton's Benedict 
Byblow 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Wonder. 
Mr. Osbaldeston's Saladine 
Lord Middleton's Timour . 



J Duke of Rutland's 
\ Columbine. 
Jessamine. 
Woodbine. 
Gaylass. 
Ruin. 
Willing 



Cardinal .. 
Chauntress 
Crafty .... 
Monarch . . 
Matchless . 
Modish 

Hector 

Hotspur .. 

Harriet 

Playful.... 
Pleasant . . 
Pastime . . 

Archer 

Active .... 

Duster 

Proctor 
Diligent . , 
Bachelor . 
Vanguard . . 



Conrad. 



Conrad. 



Conrad. 



Pilot 



Pilot.... 

Pilot . . . 
Pilot 
Pilot . . . 
Bachelor 
Walter . . 



Desperate. 

Madrigal. 

Amulet. 



Pilot. 

Abigail. 

Doubtful. 
Cheerly. 
Dalliance. 
Buxom. 

Stately. 



•J 



Riot 

Chanticleer ~) 
Chirper ... J 
Careful. 
Cheerly 
Comedy 
Abigail . . . 
Amazon . 
Sailor . . . 
Songstress 
Safety . . . 
Conrad . . . 
Castor . . . 
Comely. . . 
Conqueror 
Cottager . 
Welcome . 
Arthur ... 
Adeline... 
Carver ... 
Governor . . \ 
Governess . / 
Dexter 



Pilot. 
Pilot. 



Pilot. . 
Conrad. 

Conrad. 



:} 



Chancellor 

Pilot 

Conrad. . . . 

Pilot 

Gamboy . . 
Chancellor 



Actress. 
Cheerly. 

Airy. 
Singwell. 

Charming. 

Desperate. 

Watchful. 

Artful. 

Careless. 

Careful. 

Dalliance. 



[ 270 ] 



SIRES. 

Duke of Grafton's Wildfire . . 

Chancellor 

Sportsman 

Pilot 

Sir Richard Sutton's Trimmer 

BROOD BITCHES. 



1 Year. 



Jessica .... \ 
Juliet .... J 
Dash wood "1 
Driver .... J 

Wonder 

Painter 

Racket 



Judy. 

Daphne. 

Willing. 

Doubtful. 

Ransom. 



Fortune . . 
Charming 
Sanguine. , 



Duke of Beaufort's Justice 
Duke of Beaufort's Justice 
Lord Middleton's Forester.. 



Fairy. 

Charming. 

Siren. 



RABY HOUNDS. 

September 1, 1825. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1 1 Years. 


Brimstone . . 


Baronet Costive. 


10 Years. 




Benedict Costive. 


9 Years. 


Monitor .... 


Merryman Dorothy. 


8 Years. 


Bolsover .... 

Messmate . . 
Countryman 
Brutal 




Mayday. 

Cora. 

Rattle. 




Malton 




Chesterfield 


Tawdry. 
Chauntress. 






7 Years. 


Banister 

Crimson .... 
Meanwell. . . . 

Jester P 




Mary. 

Mr Warde's Beatrice. 

Mary. 

Tipsy. 

Costive. 

/ Sir R. Puleston's 

\ Sempstress. 



[271 ] 



7 Years. 



Victor P Mr. Osbaldeston's Vanquisher 

Me's Juliet } ^Lonsdale's Jackimo . . . . 



J Mr. Osbaldeston's 
I Lively. 
JLord Lonsdale's 
\ Truelove. 



6 Years. 



Marigold 
Blunder . . \ 

Ballina J 

Caroline s. . . 
Battery .... 
Capable s. . . 
Mentor .... 
Lord Lons- \ 
dale'sJovial J 



Manager . . . 

Brusher 

Chesterfield 
Brusher. . . . 
Cruiser . . . 
Miracle .... 



Lord Lonsdale's Julian 



Tipsy. 

Terrible. 

Tawdry. 
Devilish. 
Lady. 

Billingsgate. 
Lord Lonsdale' 
Jollity. 



5 Years. 



Myrtles. .. 
Bishopton 
Boaster . . . 

Bruiser 

Frampton . \ 
Flora ... J 
Barrister .... 

Casket 

Menial 

Coaster 

Merlin, York 



Miracle 
Brutal , 



4 Years. 



Mr. Warde's Forester. ... 

Brusher 

Caliban 

Mendicant 

Duke of Grafton's Champion 
Lord Fitzwilliam's Chider. . , . 



Cherish . 
Bangor. . . 
Bosphorus 
Beresford. 
Bansted . . \ 
Botsham . . J 

Singwell .... 

Montressor. . 

Brazen* 

Follv 

Masker .. \ 
Mountain J 
Sunderland "1 
Sprightly. . J 
Barbara *. . . 
L. Lonsdale's 
Ranter. . . 
L. Lonsdale's 

Prior 
York Bonds- 
man 

Beaufort, P. 



Chesterfield 
Brusher 



Billingsgate. 
Mayday. 

Minikin. 

Dido. 

Gaudy. 
Bramble. 
Brevity. 
Monica, York. 



Brusher 

J Mr. Warde's Boniface or 

\ Sentinel 

Miracle 

Brutal 

Mr. Ward's Forester 

Mendicant 



Mr. Warde's Sentinel 

Brutal 

J- Lord Lonsdale's Roderick. . 

I Mr. Osbaldeston's Proctor 

> Lord Darlington's Brusher 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Workman.. 

s. spayed. 



Lovely. 
Credible. 

Minikin. 

Costive. 

Courteous. 

Crony. 

Bounty. 

Mary. 

Lady. 

Meanwell. 

J Lord Lonsdale's 

\ Dowager. 

f Lord Lonsdale's 

I Flighty. 

York Countess. 

Sir J. Cope's Bounty. 



[ 272 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


4 Years. 


Lavish, P. . . 


Mr. Osbaldeston's Workman . 


Lord Ludlow's Lunacy. 


3 Years. 


Monster 

Latimer . . "") 
Leveller . . | 
Luther. . . . y 
Lightly . 
Lovesome s_ 
Ledston . . 
Landsman > 

Myrmidon "1 
Middleton J 
Lenient .... 
Borrowby "] 
Barrington > 
Beatrice . . J 
Minstrel .... 
Lonsboro' \ 
Lousy . . . . / 
Chancellor . . 
Chambermaid 
L. Lonsdale's 

Justice. . . . 
L. Lonsdale's 

Flexible .. 

Marmion, P. 


Miracle 


Patty. 
Minikin. 

Ballina. 








Mendicant 


Casket. 






Brimstone. 






Lovely. 
Buxom. 










Costive. 




1 Lord Lonsdale's Julian 

V Lord Lonsdale's Piper .... 
Sir R. Puleston's Malcolm 


Lady. 

/ Lord Lonsdale's 
\ Primrose. 

Ld. Lonsdale's Fancy 

J Sir R. Puleston's 
\ Garland. 


2 Years. 


Searcher .... 
Lancaster "j 
Lecherous 1 
Lazarus . . f 
Lavender. . J 
Mattersey \ 
Marcia. ... J 
Crowner. . "1 
Clinker .. J 
Billingsgate.. 
Challenger . . 
Maximus. . . . 

Sarah 

Somerset. . "1 
Sukey .... J 
Scarborough 
Sempstress . . 

Shiny 

Loversal, P.\ 
Ludlow, P. / 

Chandler, P. j 


Sentinel 


Mindful. 






Courteous. 






Credible. 






Singwell. 
Minikin. 










Symphony. 

Ballina. 

Folly. 

Gaudy. 

Battery. 

J" Sir R. Puleston's 
\ Lunacy. 
J Mr. Osbaldeston's 
\ Countess. 












Sir R. Puleston's Workman. . 
Sir R. Puleston's Workman . . 



{ 273] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


1 Year. 


Cruel....... 

Thrasher .... 

Cromwell "1 
Clio . , \ 
Comedy . . J 
Mortimer. . "1 
Merrylass > 
Mayfly ....J 

Boreas . . . . \ 

Bosky .... J 

Manchester \ 
Milton. ... J 

Lexicon . . ~\ 
Lorimer . . [ 
Longitude '. 
Latitude . . f 
Leinster . . | 
Laundress J 
Lusty ....") 

Lofty .... V 

Lanchester J 
Brilliant . . "j 
Badsworth I 
Beautiful. . J 
Barterer . -» 
Brighton. . 1 
Brocklesby > 
Blowzy . . 
Bedford . . J 
Chanticleer . . 
Binchester . 
Brixton . . \ 
Barker. ... J 


Sentinel 


Costive. 




Titchfield . 


Louzy. 
Marigold. 




Mirabeau 








Meanwell. 




Mendicant 


Cherish. 




Duke of Beaufort's Lexicon. . 

Duke of Beaufort's Lexicon. . 
Brutal 


Mindful. 

Ballina. 
Casket. 




Bosphorus 


Folly. 

Courteous. 
Sprightly. 

Flora. 




Brutal. 



Total.... 134. 



DUKE OF RUTLAND'S HOUNDS. 

November 12, 1825. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


7 Years. 


Rummager . . 

Sally 

Welcome. . . . 
Wildboy .... 


Mr. Saville's Rallywood .... 
Saladin 


Songstress. 
Harlot. 




Warbler 


Amazon. 




Z 


Whisper. 



[ 274 ] 



Boaster . 
Bloomer . 
Cruiser . 
Countess . 
Chimer . 
Sweeper . 



Singer 

Fleecer 

Fearnought 

Fleecer 

Mr. Saville's Rallywood . . . 

Warbler 

Saladin 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Wonder . 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Proctor . 

Lord Lonsdale's Roderick . . 

Duke of Beaufort's Roderick 
Mr. Saville's Dragon .... 
Lord Lonsdale's Roderick . 
Abelard 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Chorister. 

Rummager 

Saladin 

Chanter 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Juggler... 

Rummager 

Chanter 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Prompter . 

Render 

Ruler 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Vaulter. . . 

Lord Middleton's Benedict . 
Lord Lonsdale's Roderick... 
Chanter. 

> Chanter 

Saladin 

Hopeful 

Sir R. Sutton's Lucifer 

Lord Middleton's Damper. . . 



Bonnybell. 

Columbine. 

Clio. 
Sempstress. 



Boundless . . 

Duster 

Jason 

Marplot 

Pilot \ 

Proctor . . J 
Rover .... 
Rector. . . . 
Rarity . . . 
Roderick. . 

Sailor 

Stately. . . . 
Wanton . . 



Bonnybell. 
Damsel. 
Jessamine. 
Modish. 

Capable. 

Favourite. 

Rally. 

Symphony. 
Songstress. 
Whisper. 



Contest . . 
Craftsman 
Crafty 
Crier .... 
Concord . . 
Frolic 
Jester 
Justice. . . . 

Jollity 

Jailor .... 
Lionel 
Piper .... 
Prosper . . 
Pastime . . 
Roman. . . . 
Singer .... 
Vanquish . , 



Songstress. 

Chantress. 

Clio. 

Favourite. 

Fallacy. 

Joyous. 
Lightsome. 

Jessamine. 

Wisdom. 
Sportly. 
Harpy. 



Bellman .. 
Chancellor 
Comfort . . 
Coroner . . . 
Commodore 
Clamorous 
Comely . . 
Hermit . . 
Hero .... 
Lashwood 
Manager . . 
Marksman 



Jessamine. 

Columbine. 

Fallacy. 

Clio. 

Harpy. 

Bonnybell. 

Sportly. 

Modesty. 



[ 275 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


3 Years. 


Splendour . . 
Watchman \ 
Woeful....; 
Woldsman "1 
Wonder . . 1 
Warrior . . J 


Lord Middleton's Forester . . 
Lord Lonsdale's Roderick. . . . 

Lord Middleton's Warrior 


Syren. 
Whisper. 

Rally. 


2 Years. 


Bedford .. "| 

Broker V 

Brilliant . . J 
Bellmaid. . \ 
Bashful..../ 
Crown er . . "] 
Cautious . . 1 
Curious . . J 

Champion "1 
Challenger J 

Menacer 

Plunder . . "| 
Prior .... j- 
Playful.... J 
Pleader. . . . "| 
Proserpine j- 
Pleasant . . J 
Pilgrim .... 
Skilful .... 
Topper . . \ 
Truemaid J 
Vaulter .... 
Wildman. . " 
Worthy .. 
Warbler . 
Woodbine f 
Watchful.. 
Worry .... | 
Witchcraft J 


Mr. Osbaldeston's Bachelor. . 


Buxom. 
Boundless. 






Columbine. 






Ladyblush. 




Mr. Osbaldeston's Bachelor . . 


Chantress. 

Damsel. 

Sally. 




Mr. Osbaldeston's Pontiff 

Pilot 


Concord. 
Syren. 




Pilot 


Whisper. 
Songstress. 

Pastime. 








Mr. Osbaldeston's Vaulter . . 


Stately. 
Waspish. 








Cardinal .... 
Clinker.... I 
Clasper . . . > 
Charmer . . J 
Climbbank "1 
Comrade . . > 
Crony .... J 

Hector "j 

Hannibal . V 
Harbinger J 




Comfort. 






Woeful. 
Whimsey. 

Racket. 








Pilot 


Harpy. 
Jessamine. 







1 Year. 



[ 276 ] 



Juniper . . 
Juggler... 
Joiner 
Jealousy . , 
Lexicon . . 
Layman . 
Limner . , 
Lucifer . , 
Leveller . 
Legacy. . . 
Prompter. 
Ragland . 
Ransom . 

Riot 

Rival . . . 
Rosy . . . 
Rampart . 
Ruby . . . 
Remnant. 
Ruirsey . 
Trueman. 



Chimer 
Lifter.. 



Leader. . . 
Roderick 



Pilot 
Roderick 



Lord Yarborough's Woldsman 
Rover 



Ms. Osbaldeston's Rasselas 
Trimbush 



Jessamine . . 
Jollity. 

Chantress. 

Lady blush. 

Songstress. 
Lightsome. 

Rarity. 
Watchful. 



Concord. 
Factious. 



Old Hounds 441 couples. 

Young Hounds 16^ couples. 

Total 61 couples. 



SIR RICHARD SUTTON'S HOUNDS. 

December 5, 1825. 
Those marked *. after the name are spayed. 



SEASONS. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


12th. 


Vanguard .... 


From Lord Middleton. 


Lofty. 


8th. 


Betsy, s 

Alfred 
Marmion 


Mr. Heron's Bedford 


Blameless. 
Amulet. 






Monody. 


7th. 


Cottager 


Lord Middleton's Vanguard . . 


His Chauntress. 
Ruin. 



[ 277 ] 



7th. 



Archer . 
Diligent 
Costly . 



From Mr. Warde. 
Mr. Savile's Dragon 
Cerberus 



His Watchful. 
Rosamond. 



6th. 



Actress 

Driver 

Faithful .... 

Rarity 

Sportsman . 
Brevity, s. . 
Sovereign.. ] 
Selima, s. . . J 
Commodore 
Chauntress . 

Jubilee 

Challenger . 
Ransom . . 
Rarity, s. . 
Wisdom, *. . 
Empress ... 



Lord Middleton's Timon . . 
Lord Middleton's Denmark 
Lord Middleton's Denmark 
Lord Middleton's Denmark 
From Mr. Chaworth. 
Mr. Heron's Blucher 

Mr. Warde's Sovereign . . . 



His Abigail. 
His Riot. 
His Frantic. 
His Rampant. 

Friendly. 
Misery. 



Mr. Warde's Bertram Comfort. 



Mr. Warde's Bertram 

Lord Lonsdale's Roderick . , 

Lord Lonsdale's Rover 



Lord Lonsdale's Fairplay . . , 
Duke of Beaufort's Ragland. 



Jessamine. 
Cherish. 

Roundelay. 

Witchcraft. 
Emily. 



5th. 



Ferryman . . 
Countess .. 

Gallant 

Grumbler. . 

Gravity 

Gaietv .... 
Flourisher 

Airy 

Arrogant . . 

Artless 

Coroner . . 
Caution . . 
Lightning.. 
Legacy . . . . 
Trimmer .. 
Captain . . 
Gamestress 

Ratler 

Rival 

Rallywood 



Lord Middleton's Forester 
Mr. Heron's Bangor 

Mr. Heron's Bangor 

Mr. Warde's Aim well 

Mr. Warde's Lazarus 

Reubens 



Mr. Warde's Lazarus 

Duke of Beaufort's Ragland. 
Duke of Beaufort's Ragland. 
From Lord Yarborough. 

Glancer 

Reubens 

Solyman 

Rasper 



His Virgin. 
Countess. 

Ghastly. 

Gertrude. 
Friendship. 

Ardent. 

Candid. 

Lapwing. 
Lucy. 

Carnage. 
Glory. 

Roundelay- 
Factious. 



4th. 



Symmetry 

Trusty 

Vanity, s. 
Chorister. . 
Comus 
Constant . . 
Tuneful . 
Vaulter . , 
Victory . 



Lord Middleton's Vanguard , 
Lord Middleton's Triumph . 
Lord Middleton's Traitor . . 



Mr. Warde's Lazarus. 



Lord Yarborough's Trimbush 
Mr. Osbaldeston's Vaulter. . . . 



His Symmetry. 
His Trinket. 
His Victory. 

Cherish. 

Candid. 
Ardent. 



[ 278 ] 



SEASONS. 



4th. 



Chancellor 
Bellman . . 
Malice . . . 



SIRES. 

Ahelard 

Solyman 

Cerberus 

Lord Middleton's Denmark . . 

Lord Middleton's Forester . . 

Lord Middleton's Porester . . 
Lord Middleton's Vanguard . . 

Lord Middleton's Vanguard . . 

From Mr. Chute. 

Lord Yarborough's Trimbush 

Lord Yarborough's Woldsman 
Duke of Rutland's Rummager 



Lord Foley's Random 
Lord Foley's Random 



Costly. 

Brilliant. 

Matchless. 



Constant . . . 
Coaster . . "1 
Cowslip, s. J 

Finder 

Desperate . . 
Random . . "1 
Relish, s. . . J 
Watchman . . 
Trimbush . "J 
Tomboy . . | 
Tarquin . . V 
Traffic... f 
Tigress, s. . J 
Woeful .... 

Relish \ 

Rosemary,* J 
Darter . . 
Damon . . 
Destiny, s. 
Random . 
Ringworm 

Riot 

Stormer . 
Sally .... 
Susan, s. . 
Roman. • • ■ \ 
Rhapsody,*. J 
Earnest ... "I 
Endless, s. f 

Editor 

Jesse, s. . . \ 
Jessamine J 

Admiral 

Helmet 

Lounger .... 
Myrtle 



Galliard 



Galliard 



Editor . . 

Editor . . 

Editor . . 

Alfred . . 
Archer 
Lucifer 
Marmion , 



His Comedy. 

His Caroline. 

His Fancy. 
His Duchess. 

His Rakish. 



Candid. 

Wisdom. 
Captious. 

Diligent. 
Artless. 



Sylvia. 

Rapture. 

Amulet. 

Cherish. 

Jessamine. 

Ardent. 
Costly. 
Comely. 
Witchcraft. 



Airy, s 

Bridemaid, s. 
Danger ... "I 
Duster. ... J 
Romulus . . 1 
Rhapsody,*. J 
Rakish, s. . . 

Violet, s 

Wildfire, *. . . 



Lord Middleton's Damper . 
Lord Middleton's Benedict . 

Lord Middleton's Traitor . . . 

Lord Middleton's Roman . . . 

Lord Middleton's Richmond. 
Lord Middleton's Vanguard . 
Lord Middleton's Warrior. . . 



His Airy. 
His Virgin. 

His Darling. 

His Abigail. 

His Fancy. 
His Jollity. 
His Chastity. 



[ 279 ] 



Roderick . 
Rosebud . 
Dorimont 
Dexter . . 
Delia . . . 
Remnant, s. \ 
Roguish, s. J 

Nelly 

Ranter . . . 
Richmond 
Rector . . . 
Marksman 
Midnight . 
Modish .. 
Woldsman \ 
Wonder . . J 
Fearnought . . 
Reubens . . "1 
Rally . . . . / 
Charon 



Lord Lonsdale's Roderick 

Duke of Beaufort's Dorimont 

Duke of Beaufort's Regent . . 
Duke of Beaufort's Nectar . . 



Ratler 



Reubens 



Woldsman 

From Lord Yarborough. 
Reubens 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Chorister. . 



Gaudy. 

Artless. 

Amethyst 
Wisdom. 

Comedy. 

Malice. 
Matchless. 

Gaiety. 
Lightning. 



Bluecap . . 
Bluebell . . 
Jumper . . 
Joyful, s . . 
Traveller . . 

Trial 

Conqueror , 
Capable, s. , 
Climbank . , 
Clinker . . 
Clasher . . 
Gambler . . , 
Gadfly .... 
Gaylass . . 
Falstaff 
Sailor .... 
Vanguard . 
Vanquisher 
Villager . . 
Roister 
Ravager . . 

Ruin 

Rapid 
Junket 
Lexicon . . 
Warrior . . 
Woodman 
Maltster .. 



Mr. Osbaldeston's Emperor . . 
Lord Middleton's Justice .... 

Lord Middleton's Vanguard . . 

Lord Middleton's Vanguard . . 
Lord Middleton's Vanguard . . 
From the Duke of Rutland. 

Duke of Rutland's Rallywood 

Gallant 

Cardinal 



Trimbush 

Lord Middleton's Vanguard . . 
Lord Middleton's Vanguard . . 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Vanquisher 



Reubens . . 

Archer 

Trimmer . 

Watchman 

Chancellor 



/ Lord Middleton's 
t Bashful. 

His Comedy. 

His Tempest. 

Captious. 
Comedy. 



Chauntress. 

Active. 

Gaiety. 

Factious. 

Sally. 

Traffic. 

Lightning. 

Victory. 

Jubilee. 
Legacy. 

Gravity. 

Malice. 



Old Hounds 61 \ couples — Young Hounds 14 couples — Total 75| couples. 



[ 280 ] 



MARQUIS OF TAVISTOCK'S HOUNDS. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


9 Years. 


Hercules 




Scandalous. 


8 Years. 


Cowslip 


Duke of Grafton's Cardinal . . 


Stately. 


7 Years. 


Jasper 


Crispin 


Gamesome. 
Glory. 


6 Years. 


Handmaid "| 
Hannibal . . 1 
Heroine ... J 


Hercules 


Flyaway. 


5 Years. 


Gaffer 
Hawthorn . . . 

Jobson . . . . \ 

Jingle J 

Minus 

Remus \ 

Resolute . . J 
Redcap . . . \ 
Ruby J 


Sir B. Graham's Justice ... 

Sir B. Graham's Marmion . . 
Mr. Osbaldeston's Proctor . . 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Vaulter . . 


Liberty. 
Symphony. 
Goneril. 
Welcome. 

Delia. 

Hasty. 
Rosebud. 

Guilty. 

Wary. 
Gaylass. 


4 Years. 


Anthony . . *> 
Absolute . . j 
Handicap . . \ 
Harmony. . J 
Harborough . 

Manuel ~| 

Marmion . . > 
Milliner . . J 
Posthumous. . 

Roderick 

Verderer . . "1 
Villager .. 1 
Vintager . . J 

Vagrant . . "| 
Vagabond . > 

Varlet J 

Valentine 


Hercules 

Sir B. Graham's Marmion . . 

Duke of Grafton's Roderick.. 

Sir B. Graham's Villager .... 

Sir B. Graham's Villager 

Sir B. Graham's Villager .... 

Sir B. Graham's Villager .... 

Sir B. Graham's Villager .... 


Rosebud. 

Ladybird. 

Welcome. 
Gladsome. 

Lapwing. 

Wary. 

Lawless. 

Waspish. 

Gaylass. 
Rhapsody. 

Lavender. 

Garnet. 



[ 281 ] 



I Caleb .. 
Comus .. 
Cherry . . 

Felix 

Fairy "1 

Frenzy J 

Foreman . . ~] 
Freeman . . I 
Fair maid . . [ 
Famous . . J 

Flora 

Hazard 

Rarity 

Jessy 

Bashful 



Charon 

Fingal 

Fingal 

Fingal 

Flora 

Hercules 

Duke of Grafton's Roderick. . 

Lord Lonsdale's Julian 

Lord Lonsdale's Brunswick . . 



Lapwing. 

Rapture. 

Heroine. 



Beldam. 

Gaylass. 

Caroline. 

J Lord Lonsdale's 

\ Welcome. 

Primrose. 

Ruby. 



Counsellor ~| 
Captious . . | 
Cressida .. 
Comedy . . J 
Cannibal ... 
Commodore 
Caraway . . . 

Celery 

Harbottle.. "] 

Harriet 

Hyacinth .. . 
Hurricane... 

Jaffier ~ 

Junius .... 
Jealousy . . 

Jubilee 

Juniper . . . 



Mr. Osbaldeston's Clencher 



-Mr. Osbaldeston's Clencher 



Hercules 



Mr. Osbaldeston's Hermit 



Jobson. 



Jobson. 



Caroline. 

Gaylass. 

Rosemary. 
Rapture. 

Blissful. 

Symphony. 



Carver "l 

Clara I 

Charmer . . J 

Edgar i 

Edwin .... I 

Effie f 

Ellen J 

Flighty 

Garland 

Hotspur . . . j 

Jubal 

Justice ~| 

Judgment I 

Junket f 

Judy J 



Lord Lonsdale's Chanticleer. 



Mr. Osbaldeston's Emperor . 

Fingal 

Glancer 

Hercules 

Jobson 

Jobson 



His Patience. 



Rarity. 

Heroine. 
Fairy. 
Whisper. 
Rueful. 

Rosemary. 



a a 



[ 282 ] 



1 Year. 



Marksman 
Merlin ... 
Messmate 
Meynell . 
Midnight . 
Myrtle . . . 
Pindar ... 
Plavful... 
Pliant ... 
Priestess . . 
Prudence 
Random . . 

Ranter 

Rector 
Regent 
Rebel .... 

Rival 

Riddance . . 
Riddle .... 
Ringdove . . 
Wildfire .. 



L::} 



Marmion 

Lord Lonsdale's Proctor 

Lord Lonsdale's Prophet 
Roderick 

Roderick 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Rasselas . . 

Duke of Grafton's Wildfire . . 

BROOD BITCHES. 

Hercules 

Mr. Warde's Guardian 

Duke of Grafton's Roderick. . 
Wonder 



Syren. 

Jingle. 

His Niobe. 
Cora. 

Riotous. 
Vestris. 



5 Years. 



Hopeful 

Misery . 

Rueful . 
Whisper 



Cowslip. 

His Marcia. 

J Lord Lonsdale's 

\ Dowager. 

Graceful. 



MR. VILLEBOIS' HOUNDS. 



August 1, 1825. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIR^S. 


DAMS. 


7 Years. 


Notable .... 
Milliner 




Nelly. 

His Modish. 




Lord Fitzwilliam's Leader. . . . 


6 Years. 


Prodigal . . ) 
Priestess . . / 




Lofty. 
Vengeance. 




Pontiff 



[ 283 ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


6 Years. 


Merlin 

Torment 


Maskwell 


Tempest. 

f Mr. S. Hanbury's 
I Tuneful. 




Ld Fitzwilliam's Gulliver 


5 Years. 


Affiible.... 1 
Amorous . . / 

Melody 

Lawless .... 

Riot 

Fairmaid .... 

Famous 

Patriot.. ,.~] 
Painter ... J 
Proserpine '• 
Precious . . f 
Prudence. . j 
Penitent . . J 
Handmaid . . 
Magic 


Almeric 


Nelly. 
Mischief. 




Vaunter 


Levity. 
Restless. 








Falstaff 


Artful. 




Falstaff 


Primrose. 




Pontiff 

Markwell 

Maskwell 


Vengeance. 

Harlot. 
Active. 


4 Years. 


Monitor . . ~) 
Monarch . . j 
Minion ... )• 
Madcap . . 

Matron __ 

Prophet . . " 
Prosper . . 1 
Paragon . . f 
Princess . . _, 
Nelson. . . . ~j 

Norval 1 

Nelly .... r 
Novice. ... J 

Alfred 

Juryman 

Rosalind .... 
BluebeU .... 

Countess 

Truelove 


Pontiff 


Milliner. 




Pontiff 


Vengeance. 
Notable. 




Pontiff 




Voucher 


Junket. 
Promise. 






Daphne 
Jewel. 

His Rosalind. 
His Buxom. 
His Daphne. 
His Twilight. 




Maskwell 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Dancer . . 
Lord Harewood's Capital'. . . . 
Lord Harewood's Counsellor. . 
Lord Harewood's Bowman . . 


3 Years. 


Achmet .... 

Mindful 

Jovial . . . . \ 
Jolly .... J 
Proctor . . "1 
Pontiff. ... J 
Mortimer. . "] 
Marplot .. 1 
Maiden.... J 


Almeric 

Maskwell 


Mischief. 
Darling. 

Jewel. 




Pontiff 




Pontiff 


Vengeance. 
Milliner. 









[ 284 ] 



Voucher . 
Vanity . . . 
Vestal #. 
Lounger .... 
Tancred . . \ 
Telltale .. J 

Drorao 

Gamesome . . 
Stormer . . "1 
Sailor .... > 
Symphony J 
Workman . . 
Chorister. . ~| 
Columbine I 
Courtly . . | 
Pastime . . J 



Patriot 



■::} 

::} 



Joker . . . 
Jezebel... 
Jealousy . 
Jessica. . . 
Laborer 
Lunatic . 
Levity . . . 
Lofty '. 
Dexter. 
Darling 
Modish . 
Mischief 
Tronncer 
Triumph 

Vexer "i 

Vocal .... I 
Victory . . f 
Vanquish . . J 
Aim eric . . "1 
Artful .... f 
Ferryman 
Falstaff. . 
Foreman . . 
Manager . . 
Mask well . 
Madrigal . 
Dauntless . 
Rifleman . . 

Racket 

Rarity . . . 

Smuggler 

Sempstress 



Monitor 

Telamon 

Dexter 

Sir J. Cope's Gondolier 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Sailor . . . 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Wildair. . . 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Chorister. 

Duke of Beaufort's Nectar . 



Patriot 



Patriot. 
Patriot 
Dexter. 
Norval. 



Year. 



Telamon. 



Telamon 



Almeric ^. 



A.lmeric 



Lavish Patrigt 



Merlin 

Merlin 

Dragon 

Sir John Cope's Rifleman. 
Mr. Chute's Smuggler . . 



Melody. 

Levity. 

Precious. 

Torment. 
Frailty. 

Lady. 

Tempest. 

Magic. 

His Prudence. 



Jewel. 

Lady. 

Lady. 

Novelty. 

Magic. 

Precious. 

Vengeance. 

Active. 

Friendly. 

Notable. 
Notable. 
Milliner. 

Arrogant. 

Daphne. 

Lady. 



[ 285 ] 



AGES. 



1 Year. 



NAMES. 

Laura .... 
Lightfoot.. 
Prompter 
Pilgrim . . 
Playful . . . 
Justice. . . . 
Joyful .... 
Junket. . .. 
Nestor. . . . 
Nominal .. 
Noble .... 
Nimrod . . 
Nimble . . 
Grappler . . 
Miser 

Trojan 

Lasher. . . . 
Lifter .... 
Lively .... 
Cottager . . 
Cruiser . . 
Marmion. . 
Favourite . 
Festive 
Friendly . . 
Vanguard . 
Volatile . . . 
Music 
Sultan 
Skilful . . . 
Syrus 

Sparkler . . 
Somerset. . 
Songstress 
Waverly . . 
Warrior . 
Welcome. . 

Crier 

Caroline . 
Charmer . . 
Whipster. . 
Wonder . . 
Willing... 



Patriot ., 
Juryman 

Juryman 
Norval . . 



Norval. 



Gamester. 
Merlin . . 
Trojan . . 



Lasher , 



Chorister 
Monitor. . 



Monitor 



Victor 

Mr. Chute's Larkspur . . 
Sir John Cope's Seneca 

Sir John Cope's Syrus 

Mr. Nicoll's Waverly . 
Mr. Nicoll's Crier 



DAMS. 



Mr. Nicoll's Whipster 



Lady. 
Proserpine. 

Priestess. 
Magic. 

Magic. 

Countess. 

Symphony. 

Mindful. 

Notable. 

Daphne. 
Active. 

Friendly. 

Novelty. 
Milliner. 
Precious. 

Rosalind. 

Jewel. 

Madcap. 

Torment. 



[ 286 ] 
THE UNION HOUNDS. 

June, 1825. 



Charon . . . 
Marplot . . . 
Palafox . . . 



Sir B. Graham's Charon . . 
Duke of Beaufort's Lucifer 
Lord Lonsdale's Piper .... 



Mr. Fox's Redrose. 

Merkin. 

D. Beaufort's Junket. 



Hedger 
Lifter , 
Lady... 



Helper 
Helper 



Laundress. 
Liberty. 



Curious. 
Marquis 



Ld. Darlington's Chesterfield 
Leader 



His Tawney 

Merkin. 



Gainsboro' 
Grosvenor 
Gratitude , 
Holiness .... 
Pastime . . . \ 
Prudence. . J 
Rosamond . . 
Speedwell . . 
Trinket .. "1 
Truelass . . J 



Galloper 

Hotspur 

Sir J. Cope's Gondolier. . . 

Duke of Grafton's Rasper. 
Leader . . ^ 

Trueman 



Primrose. 

Vital. 

Pastry. 

Truelove. 
Strumpet. 

Jewel. 



Actress 

Latimer . . "1 

Lofty I 

Ladyblush [ 

Legacy J 

Lincoln .... 
Mortimer.... 

Princess 

Rector 

Sorceress 

Troublesome 



Leader 
Leader 



Sir John Cope's Gloster. 
Mr. Jolliffe's Leveller. . 

Hotspur 

Ragland 

Galloper 

Mr. Jolliffe's Tarquin . 



Artful. 

Vocal. 

Lenity. 

Merkin. 

Princess. 

Vital. 

Susan. 

Rapid. 



Actor 

Archer . . . 
Baronet . , 
Garrulous 
Handy ..., 
Harlequin 
Leader . . . 



Leader 

Sir John Cope's Bluster 
Sir John Cope's Gloster. 

Lincoln 

Leader 



Artful. 

Merkin. 
Heedless. 

Harlot. 

Trinket. 



[ 28 ? ] 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


3 Years. 


Manager 

Nimrod .... 


Marquis 


Sally. 




Nelson 


Scornful. 




Galloper 


Royalty. 
Skilful. 










Susan. 


2 Years. 


Abelard . . "1 
Adjutant . J 
Garnish . . \ 
Graceless.. J 

Marksman "i 

Maiden 1 

Modish .. f 
Modesty ..J 
Proserpine . . 
Rambler . . "| 
Rival [■ 
Ranter .... J 

Whynot .... 




Artful. 






Prudence. 






Heedless. 






Gratitude. 






i 
Merkin. 






Royalty, 

Nancy. 

Susan. 














His Whynot. 


1 Year. 


Auditor .... 
Benedict .... 
Countess .... 
Harmony. . . . 
Limner . . . "1 
Lapwing . . J 
Lashvvood . . 

Music "1 

Memory . . J 
Matchem. . \ 
Minor .... J 
Pilot 

Paragon .... 
Pillager ... "1 
Playful..../ 
Pimrose .... 

Sultan "1 

Stormer . . J 
Vanguard . . \ 
Vestal J 


Mr. Shirley's Ribster 

Duke of Beaufort's Hermit . . 
Lord Harewood's Twister .... 
Duke of Beaufort's Hermit . . 

Duke of Beaufort's Hermit . . 

Traveller 


Amazon. 
Bashful. 
His Careful. 
Gratitude. 

Ladyblush. 

Lady. 




Marplot 


Prudence. 






Scornful. 




Sir B. Graham's Pilot 


His Wishful. 
His Paragon. 

Truelass. 






Merkin . 




Lord Lonsdale's Reveller 


His Welcome. 

Skilful. 






Virgin. 




Sir Tatton Sykes's Woodman 
Duke of Rutland's Piper 


J Lord Harewood's 
\ Guilty. 
His Pastime. 



[ 288 ] 



MR. WARDE'S HOUNDS. 

June 1, 1825. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS. 


7 Years. 


Ottoman .... 


Stormer 


Sylvia. 


IDog. 




6 Years. 
4h 


Marcia . . . 
Minion . . . 
Precious . 

Stirling. . . 
Stella . . . 

Gertrude . 
Jupiter ... 


:} 

:'} 
:■} 


Maniac 

Pilgrim 


Florist. 
Ariel. 


Couples. 


Sentinel 


Benefit. 




Bertram 


Glory. 

Sportly. 
Amorous. 




Lazarus 




Lethe 












5 Years. 

4 
Couples. 


Barber . . . 




Lazarus 


Bellmaid. 


Minor . . . 
Minstrel . 
Lusher . . . 


:.} 




Blissful. 




Amorous. 


Sovereign 

Anna 


Asheton 


Benefit. 
Gonerel. 




Jessamine . . 
Solyman .... 




Active. 






Sylvia. 


1 Years. 




Aimwell 


Amethyst. 
Brilliant. 


4 


Guardian .... 
Promise .... 
Grinder 


Gertrude. 


Couples. 




Ariel. 


Asheton 


Relish. 




Amey 


Gonerel. 




Comfort . 

Crafty ... 


:} 




Benefit. 


S Years. 

8 


Roman . . . 
Rosy 


'I 




Glory. 
Chorus. 


Couples. 


Galliot 


Gaylass. 

Bellmaid. 

Levity. 
Buxom. 

Gracious. 


Bondsman 
Bluebell . 
Logic 


:} 




bnendly . 
Gladsome . 

Goody 

Gadfly ... 


I 









[ 289 ] 



3 Years. 



Jerker ... 
Jewess ... 
Amethyst , 
Possum... 
Plaything. 



> Jasper . . 
Asheton 
Panglos 



Sportly. 

Florist. 

Gertrude. 



2 Years. 
Couples. 



Fudler ... 
Frouzy . . . 
Voucher . 
Vanity ... 
Verity . . . 
Virgin . . . 
Vestal . . . 
Dolphin . 
Desperate 
Demirep . 
Mimic . . . 
Plaintiff. . . 
Sapling. . . 
Smicket . 
Strang-er . 



Remus . 
Lazarus 

Lazarus 



Remus . 



Guardian 
Profit .., 

Searcher . 

Searcher . 



Florist. 
Audible. 

Audible. 

Dowager. 

Marcia. 
Bounty. 

Gracious. 

Lethe. 



1 Year. 

11 
Couples. 



Atlas 

Abel 

Antic . . . 
Ardent ... 
Anguish . 
Beauty ... 
Banquet . 
Barmaid ., 
Bantling ., 

Baby , 

Downright 

Dragon 

Dryden 

Dolly 

Slyboots .. 
Saucebox . 

Sabine 

Mercy 
Modish 
Abraham ., 
Ferryman . . 
Blarny 



Asheton 



Guardian. 



Guardian , 



Shiner 



Guardian. 

Sovereign 
Shiner . . . 
Rustic . . . 



Lethe. 



Blissful. 



Damsel. 



Comfort. 



Marcia. 

Amey. 

Friendly. 

Benefit. 



Entry of March, 1825. 



Whelps. 



141 



Couples 



Ruler.... 
Rascal .. 
Romulus 



Remus 



Anna. 



Bb 



[ 290 ] 



Ringlet . . 
Grampus 
Gentile . . 
Genius .. 
Garland 
Greniio . . 
Valiant . . 
Vernon . . 
Ragabell 
Rasselas 
Dormer . 
Dandy .. 
Delicate 
Dulcet .. 
Vandal . . 
Vexer . . 
Violet .. 
Venus . . 
Limner . . 
Lifter . . 

Lucy 

Primate . 
Pensive . . 
Primrose 
Playmate 
Garnish.. 



Remus . . 
Remus . . . 

Sovereign 
Rustic . . . 

Rustic . . 

Voucher , 

Lumpkin 

Voucher 

Guardian 
A she ton 



Anna. 
Glory. 

Verity. 
Comfort. 

Damsel. 

Frouzy. 

Audible. 

Precious. 

Plaything. 
Gaylass. 



STALLION HOUNDS. 



Voucher . 
Mimic . . . 
Bondsman 
Sapling . . . 
Guardian . 
Sovereign . 
Minor . . . 
Dryden . . . 
Jupiter . . . 
Stranger . 



Lazarus.. 

Guardian 

Jasper .. 

Searcher 

Aimwell 

Sentinel 

Maniac . . 

Guardian 

Jasper . . 

Searcher 



Audible. 

Marcia. 

Bellmaid. 

Gracious. 

Gertrude. 

Benefit. 

Blissful. 

Damsel. 

Sportly. 

Lethe. 



[291 ] 



MR. WICKSTED'S HOUNDS. 

November 1, 1825. 



AGES. 


NAMES. 


SIRES. 


DAMS 


8 Years. 


Daphne .... 
Telamon .... 


Mr. Villebois' Latimer ....<. 
Mr. Villebois' Factor 


His Destiny. 
His Thoughtless. 


7 Years. 


Governess . . 

Novelty 

Trinket .... 
Wisdom . . . 


Lord Sondes's Dinger 

Lord Yarborough's Gimcrack 
Lord Fitzwilliam's Singwell . . 

Duke of Rutland's Warbler . . 


His Amorous, 
f Mr. Chaworth's 
X Sempstress. 
His Wisdom. 
His Novice. 
His Trinket. 
His Amazon. 


6 Years. 


Roundelay "1 
Ruby J 
Strumpet 


Lord Yarborough's Marplot . . 
Duke of Grafton's Rustic .... 
Mr. Chaworth's Sampson. . . . 


His Jessamine. 

His Fallacy. 

Mr. Saville's Victory. 


5 Years. 


Rhapsody . .. 


Mr. Hay's Neptune 

Lord Sondes's Ottoman 


His Diligent. 
His Monitress. 
His Heedless. 


4 Years. 


Caroline 

Countess .... 
Royster 

Wellington . . 


Lord Yarborough's Warrior . . 


His Comedy. 
His Traffic. 


3 Years. 


Abelard . . \ 
Alpha ..../ 
Bellman .... 
Diligent 
Tinker . . . \ 
Tomboy . . J 


Lord Yarborough's Boaster . . 
Mr. Hay's Tamerlane 

Mr. Hay's Tamerlane 


His Alpha. 

His Traffic. 
His Diligent. 

Trinket. 


2 Years. 


Dashaway 

Laughable . . 
Novelty 


Mr. Osbaldeston's Bachelor . . 
Duke of Grafton's Warrior . . 

Mr. Osbaldeston's Proctor . . 


f Duke of Rutland's 

\ Damsel. 

His Matchless. 

Sir T. Sykes's Modish. 

His Violet. 


1 Year. 


Boldface .... 
Cardinal .... 

Champion . . 




Strumpet. 


«r 


Lord Yarborough's Comrade 
f Sir H.Mainwaring's Chal-1 


His Troublesome. 
His Annabel!. 



[292] 



1 Year. 



Chaplet. . . . 
Chaun tress 

Cranberry 
Dalliance . . 



Dandy 

Gertrude .._ 
Hotspur 

Jovial 



Mousetrap "1 
Mufti .... J 

Nathan 

Racket . . . „ "1 
Ringwood J 

Regent 

Tarter 



Virgin 
Woful 



Duke of Rutland's Charon . . 

Duke of Rutland's Rallywood 

Sir H.Mainwaring's Chal- \ 

lenger J 

SirT. Sykes's Denmark 

Lord Fitzwilliam's Dapper .. 

Sir R. Sutton's Galliard 

Mr. Oxenden's Rattler 

Duke of Rutland's Jovial 

Lord Sondes's Valiant 

Mr. Meynell's Nathan 

/ Sir H. Mainwaring's Chal- \ 

X lenger J 

Duke of Rutland's Rover 
Mr. Hay's Tamerlane 

Duke of Rutland's Jovial 

Sir R. Sutton's Chancellor . . 



His Woeful, 
f Sir R. Sutton's 
\ Chauntress 

His Bilberry. 

His Wanton. 
J Sir H. Mainwaring's 
X Watchful. 
His Gaudy. 
His Italy. 

r Sir H. Mainwaring's 
t Crafty. 
/ Mr. Oxenden's 
X Bridesmaid. 
His Dauntless. 

Ruby. 

His Watchful. 
His Blossom, 
f Sir H. Mainwaring's 
X Votary. 
His Woful. 



Printed by W. Nicol, Cleveland-row, St. James's.