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Full text of "Official A.A.U. basketball guide"

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mp VII. No. 7 



Price 10 cents 



ATHIiBTIC I/IBRARir 



for 




Edited hy 

GeoT.Hepbron 



American Sports Publishing Co 



trcct\ New YorK 




A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

:; ., MAINTAIN THEIR OWN HOUSES ' , 

FOR DISTRIBUTING THE i. ,^ 

^Spalding 

^^^ COMPLETE LINE OF ^^ .' . 

-^Athletic Goods 

, .' .."'. IN THE FOLLOWINCi CITIES 



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pONSTiTUTE THE Solid Foundation of the Spalding Business 



AmERIC A'SN ATION AL GaME 

By A. G. SPALDING 

Price, $2.00 Net 

A book of 600 pages, profusely illustrated with over 100 
full page engravings, and having sixteen forceful cartoons 
by Homer C. Davenport, the famous American artist 



The above work should have a place in every 
public library in this country, as also in the 
libraries of public schools and private houses. 

The author of "America's National Game 
is conceded, always, everywhere, and by every- 
body, to have the best equipment of any hving 
writer to treat the subject that forms the text 
of tnis remarkable volume, viz., the story ot 
the origin, development and evolution of liase 
Ball the National Game of our country. 

Almost from the very inception of the game 
until the present time— as player, manager and 
magnate— Mr. Spalding has been closely iden- 
tified with its interests. Not infrequently he 
has been called upon in times of emergency 
to prevent threatened disaster. But for him 
the National Game would have been syn- 
dicated and controlled by elements whose 
interests were purely selfish and personal. 
The book is a veritable repository of in- 
formation concerning players, clubs and 
personalities connected with the game in 

its early days, and is written in a most j . j 

interesting style, interspersed with enlivening anecdotes and 
account" of events that have not heretofore been pubhshed. 
The response on the part of the press and the pubhc to 
Mr Spalding's efforts to perpetuate the early history of the 
National Game has been very encouraging and he is in receipt 
of hundreds of letters and notices, a few of which are here given. 
Robert Adamson, New Yoj-k, writing from the office of Mayor 
ravnorsafs— ''Seeing the Giants play is my principal recreation and 
f Im ikteresied in reading everything I can find about the game. I 
espedally enfo? what you [Mr. Spalding] have^, written, because you 
stand as the "highest living authority on the game. ^ 

Barney Dreyfuss, owner of the Pittsburg National League club:— 1 
does honor to author as well as the game. 1 have enjoyed read.ng it 
very much." ... 

Walter Cakp, well known foot ball expert and athlete, says:— It 
is indeed'' a re'm'arkable work and one that I have read with a great 
deal of interest." ^ ^. „ , xt .• i 

John B. Day, formerly President of the^ New York Nationals.- 
"Your wonderful work will outlast all of us. 




W. Irving Snyder, formerly of the house of Peck & Snyder:— -"I 
have read the book from cover to cover with great interest." 
..a"^,^?^^^^!-^^^^' formerly of the celebrated firm of Peck & Snyder-— 

All base ball fans should read and see how the game was conducted 'in 
early years. 

,„^^ELyiLLE E. Stone, New York, General Manager Associated Press-— 
^ 1 find It full of valuable information and very interesting I nr"i7P 
It very highly." T ^ 

George Barnard, Chicago:— "Words fail to express my appreciation 
of the book. It carries me back to the early days of base ball and 
makes me feel like a young man again." 
,.„^HARLEs W. Murphy, President Chicago National League club-— 

Ihe book IS a very valuable work and will become a part of everv 
base ball library in the country." cvciy 

John F. Morrill, Boston, Mass., old time base ball star.— "I did 
not think It possible for one to become so interested in a book on base 
ball. I do not find anything in it which I can criticise." 

Ralph D. Paine, popular magazine writer and a leading authority on 
fnti^^!. ^P?/^^, ^ ¥''^ ^^^" reading the book with a great deal of 
interest It fills a long felt want,' and you are a national benefactor 
lor writing it. 

wiPh^^l* ^111 FuNSTON, hero of the Philippine war:— "I read the book 
with a great deal of pleasure and was much interested in seeing the 

?nr°M.rn.r'= p^ ^^\^' ^T.""^ ^^^ '^"'^^''^ whalers. which I had written 
lor Jlarper s Kound Table so many years ago." 

fr-SfYif'''' Hopper celebrated operatic artist and comedian:— "Apart 
from the splendid history of the evolution of the game, it perpetuates 
the memories of the many men who so gloriously sustained it. It should 
be read by every lover of the Poort." 

T ¥^^^..^'^^°^' Director of Athletics, Purdue University, Lafayette, 
ind.:— I\o one that has read this book has appreciated it more than I 
jS?""/'!?" ^^''^- ^^^" ^l^ -nough. I have been in professional base 
ball, and you can imagine how interesting the book is to me.'-' 

,„^/'-„^^^"°^' °^^'"^'- of the St Louis Nationals, through her treas- 
l^tJ; 7-^ • Se^l^^"lP' writes:— "Mrs. Britton has been very much 
interested in the volume and has read with pleasure a number of 
chapters, gaining valuable information as to the history of the game " 

ve^v^mi^r^n''/'.^- P^^^"^'^s^' ^-D-, New York:-"Although I am not 
very much of a sport,' I nevertheless believe in sports, and just at 
the present time, in base ball particularly. Perhaps if all ?he Giants 

?he AtM''?-P°';'".u'*y ^°- ["^^ ^^^ ^°1""^^ before the recent game (with 
the Athletics) they might not have been so grievously outdone ' 




George W. Frost San D.ego, Calif.:— "You and 'Jim' White Georee 
twf ■; §^''?''' .McVey, p'Rourke, etc., were little godY to us bick 
there m Boston in those days of '74 and '75, and I fecall how indYe 

The'book rs'olJndid" 'T. "^'"^^ us' down'^^Vor the Chicago contracf 
xnc uooK is splendid. 1 treasure it greatly. 

u'^' ■^- ^^^^^.' Philadelphia, old time professional expert-— "It certainlv 
befo e"t was s5 SfJn'fi'n" o^the national game fr?m the time yeS 
the game or taken^^n JnV "^ .*° ^^^ ^'^'V"^- ^hose who have plaved 
gaged Tn it together w?h?lf 'I '^ ^" ^^^ ^^'^' ^^ose at present 'en- 
treat in sJore." ^ '^^° ^'^ *° ^"^^8^^ ^" '^' ^ave a rare 

»,.P'\;o^^'lu^'*, ^- ^u"CK, Russell Sage Founuat:on:— "Mr Soaldins 



Pittsburg Press: — "Historical incidents abound and the book is an 
excellent authority on the famous sport." 

Philadelphia Telegraph: — "In this book Mr. Spalding has written the 
most complete and authoritative story of base ball yet published." 

New York Herald: — "If there is anyone in the country competent to 
write a book on base ball it is A. G. Spalding, who has been interested 
in the game from its early beginnings. 

I. E. Sanborn, Chicago Tribune: — "'America's National Game' has 
been added to the Tribune's sporting reference library as an invaluable 
contribution to the literature of the national pastime." 

O. C. Reichard, Chicago Daily News: — "It is cleverly written and 
presents information and dates of great value to the newspaper man 
of to-day!" 

George C. Rice, Chicago Journal: — "I have read the book through, 
and take pleasure in stating that it is a complete history of the game 
from the beginning until the present time." 

Sherman R, Duffy, Sporting Editor Chicago Journal: — "It is a most 
interesting work and one for which there was need. It is the most 
valuable addition to base ball literature that has yet been put out." 

Joseph H. Vila, New York Sun: — "I have read it carefully and with 
much interest. It is the best piece of base ball literature I have ever 
seen, and I congratulate you on the work." 

Tim Murnane, Sporting Editor Boston Globe: — "You have given to 
the world a book of inestimable value, a classic in American history; 
a book tha' should be highly prized in every home library in the 
country." 

Francis C. Richter, Editor Sporting Life, Philadelphia: — "From a 
purely literary standpoint, your work is to me amazing. Frankly, I 
would not change a line, for the reason that the story is told in a way 
to grip the reader and hold his interest continually." 

Los Angeles Times (editorial); — "Spalding's book has been out six 
months and ninety thousand copies have been sold. We understand 
there will be other editions. America has taken base ball seriously 
for at last two generations, and it is time enough that the fad was 
given an adequate text book." 

Caspar Whitney, Editor Outdoor America, and one of the leading 
authorities in the world on sport: — "You have made an invaluable con- 
tribution to the literature of the game, and one none else could have 
made. Moreover, you've done some very interesting writing, which is 
a distinct novelty in such books — too often dull and uninteresting." 

New York World: — "Albert G. Spalding, who really grew up with 
the sport, has written 'America's National Game,' which he describes 
as not a history, but the simple story of the game as he has come to 
know it. His book, therefore, is full of living interest. _ It is a volume 
generously illustrated and abounds in personal memories of base ball 
in the making." 

New York Sun : — "There is a mass of interesting information regard- 
ing base ball, as might be expected, in Mr. Spalding's 'America's 
National Game.' It is safe to say that before Spalding there was no 
base ball. The book is no record of games and players, but it is 
historical in a broader sense, and the author is able to give his personal 
decisive testimony about many disputed points." 

Evening Telegram, New York; — "In clear, concise, entertaining, nar- 
rative style. Albert G. Spalding has contributed in many respects the 
most interesting work pertaining to base ball, the national game, which 
has been written. 

"There is so much in it of interest that the temptation not to put 
it down until it is completed is strong within the mind of every 
person who begins to read it. As a historical record it is one of those 
volumes which will go further to straighten some disputed points than 
all of the arguments which could be advanced in good natured disputes 
which might last for months." 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



D 



No. 



Giving the Titles of all Spalding Athletic Library Books now 
J in print, grouped lor ready reference c 

SPALDING OFFICIAL ANNUALS 

1 Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide 
lA Spalding's Official Base Ball Record 

iC Spalding's Official College Base Ball Annual 

2 Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide 

2A Spalding's Official Soccer Foot Ball Guide 
4 Spalding's Official Lawn Tennis Annual 

6 Spalding's Official Ice Hockey Guide 

7 Spalding's Official Basket Ball Guide 

7A Spalding's Official Women's Basket Ball Guide 

8 Spalding's Official Lacrosse Guide 

9 Spalding's Official Indoor Base Ball Guide 
I 2A Spalding's Official Athletic Rules 

Group I. Base Ball i Group III. Cricket 



No. 1 Spalding 

Guide. 
No. lA Official Base Ball Record. 
No. Ic College Base Ball Annual. 
No. 202 How to Play Base Ball. 
No. 223 How to Bat. 
No. 232 How to Run Bases. 
No. 230 How to Pitch. 
No. 229 How to Catch. 
No. 225 How to Play First Base. 
No. 226 How to Play Second Base. 
No. 227 How to Play Third Base. 
No. 228 How to Play Shortstop. 
No. 224 How to Play the Outfield. 

How to Organize a Base Ball 

League. [Club 



No. 



Official Base Ball No. 277 Cricket and How to Play It. 

Group IV. Lawn Tennis 

No. 4 Spalding's Official Lawn Ten- 
nis Anyiiial. 
No. 157 How to Play Lawn Tennis. 

Group VI. Hockey 

No. 6 Spalding's Official Ice Hockey 

Guide. 
No. 154 Field Hockey. 
No. ISO Ring Hockey. 

Group VII. Basket Ball 

No, 7 Spalding'sOfficial Basket Ball 

Guide. 
No. 7a Spaldiyig's Official Women's 

Basket Ball Guide. 
How to Play Basket Ball. 



231 



How to Organize a Base Ball 

How to Manage a Base Ball,-'^°- ^^-^ 

Club. I BASKET BALL AUXILIARY 

How to Train a Base Ball Team No. 353 Official Collegiate Basket Ball 
How to Captain a Base Ball Handbook. 

HowtoUmpireaGanTe.CTeam GrOUp VIII. LacroSSC 

M oiQ^ ^'^'^"'r^^ ^""'^ ^^ln^''"'u u ^o.S Spalding's Official Lacrosse Guide 
No. 219 Ready Reckoner of Base Ball ^ ^01 How to Play Lacrosse. 

Percentages. ; „ „ .. 

No. 350 How to Score. ! Group IX. Indoor Base Ball 

BASE BALL AUXILIARIES No. 9 Spaldi7ig's Official Indoor Ba^e 

No. 355 Miner League Base Ball Guide BaU Guide. 

No. 356 Official Book National League GrOUp X. PolO 

XT o.n r^« ?r u^^^K ^f " XT ">^- 1 No. 129 Water Polo. 
No. 340 Official Handbook National v,o. 199 Equestrian Polo. 
Playground Ball Ass n. 

Group II. Foot Ball ^r<^"P ^'- Miscellaneous Games 

XT oo ij- » ^^ ■ ITT *T> n^ J No. 248 Archery. No. 13S Croquet. 
Ko.2SpaldingsOfficial Foot Ball Guide -^(^211 Roque 

M« ^c^A ^ Racquets. Squash -Racquets. 

^°-l^-*\ Court Tennis. 



No. 324 How to Play Foot Ball 

No. 2a Spalding's Official Soccer Foot 

Ball Guide. 
No. 286 How to Play Soccer. 
No. 335 How to Play Rugby. 

FOOT BALL AUXILIARIES 
No. 351 Official Rugby Foot Ball Guide, x^ ,oq 
No. 358 Official College Soccer Footi^^*-^^ 

Ball Guide. I No. 341 



No. 13 
No. 167 
No. 170 
No. 207 



Hand Ball. 

Quoits. No. 14 Curling. 

Push Ball. 

Lawn Bowls. 

Lawn Hockey. Parlor Hockey 

Garden Hockey. Lawn Games 

How to Bowl. 



ANY OF THE ABOVE BOOKS UAILEO POSTPAID UPON RECEIPT OF 10 CENTS 



Group Xll. Athletics 

No. 12a Spalding's Official Athletic 
No. 27 College Athletics. iRules 
No. 182 All Around Athletics. 
No. 156 Athletes' Guide. 
No. 87 Athletic Primer. [Thrower. 
No. 259 How to Become a Weight 
No. 255 How to Run 100 Yards, [ning. 
No. 174 Distance— CrossCountryRun- 
No. 55 Official Sporting Rules. 
No. 246 Athletic Training for School- 
No. 317 Marathon Running. [boys. 
No. 331 Schoolyard Athletics. 
No. 252 How to Sprint. [petition. 
No. 342 Walking for Health and Corn- 
No. 357 Intercollegiate Official Hand- 
No. 314 Girls' Athletics. [book. 
No. 302 Y. M. C. A. Official Handbook. 
No. 313 P. S. A. L. Official Handbook. 

Group XIII. AthleticAccomplishments 

No. 23 Canoeing. 

No. 128 How to Row. 

No. 177 How to Swim. 

No. 209 How to Become a Skater. 

No. 178 How to Train for Bicycling. 

No. 282 Roller Skating Guide. 

Group XIV. Manly Sports 

No. 165 Fencing. (By Senac.) 

No. 236 How to Wrestle. 



Group XIV. Manly Sports Con. 

No. 102 Ground Tumbling. 

Indian Clubs and Dumb Bella 
Medicine Ball Exercises. 
Pulley Weight Exercises. 
How to Punch the Bag. 
Tumbling for Amateurs. 

Group XV. Gymnastics 

No. 254 Barnjum Bar Bell Drill. 

Graded Calis. and D. B. Drills. 
In- and Outdoor Gym. Games. 
How to Become a Gymnast. 
Fancy Dumb Bell and March- 
ing Drills. [Apparatus. 
Pyramid Building Without 
Pyramid Building with 
Wands, Chairs and Ladders. 
Handbook I. C.A. A. Gymnasts 



No. 143 
No. 262 
No. 29 
No. 191 
No. 289 



No. 214 
No. 158 
No. 124 
No. 287 

No 327 
No. 329 



No. 345 

Group XVI. 



Physical Culture 

No. 161 lOMin.ExerciseforBusyMen. 
No. 149 Care of the Body. [nasties. 
No. 285 Health by Muscular Gym- 
No. 208 Physical Education and Hy- 
No. 185 Hints on Health. [giene. 
No. 234 School Tactics and Maze Run- 
No. 238 Muscle Building. [ning. 
No. 288 Indigestion Treated by Gym- 
No. 213 285 Health Answers, [nasties. 
No. 325 Twenty-Minute Exercises. 



ANY OF THE ABOVE BOOKS MAILED POSTPAID UPON RECEIPT O F 10 CENTS 

Spalding ''Red Cover'' Series of Athletic Handbooks 

No. IR. Spalding's Official Athletic Almanac Price 25c. 

No. 2R. Strokes and Science of Lawn Tennis Price 25c. 

No. 3R. Spalding's Official Golf Guide Price 25c. 

No. 4R. How to Play Golf Price 25c. 

No. 5R. Spalding's Official Cricket Guide Price 25c, 

No. 7R. Physical Training SimpHfied Price 25c. 

No. 8R. The Art of Skating Price 25c. 

No. 9R. How to Live 100 Years Price 25c. 

No. lOR. Single Stick Drill Price 25c. 

No. IIR. Fencing Foil Work Illustrated Price 25c. 

No. 12R. Exercises on the Side Horse Price 25c. 

No. 13R. Horizontal Bar Exercises Price 25c. 

No. 14R. Trapeze, Long Horse and Rope Exercises Price 25c. 

No. 15R. Exercises on the Flying Rings Price 25c. 

No. 16R. Team Wand Drill Price 25c. 

No. 17R. Olympic Games, Stockholm, 1912 Price 25c. 

No. 18R. Wrestling Price 25c. 

No. 19R. Professional Wrestling. . , Price 25c. 

No. 20R. How to Play Ice Hockey Price 25c. 

No. 21R. Jiu Jitsu Price 25c. 

No. 22R. How to Swing Indian Clubs Price 25c. 

No. 23R. Get Well ; Keep Well Price 25c. 

No. 24R. Dumb Bell Exercises Price 25c. 

No. 25R. Boxing Price 25c. 

No. 26R. Official Handbook National Squash Tennis Association Price 25c. 

No. 27R. Calisthenic Drills and FancyMarching for the Class Room Price 25c. 

No. 28R. Winter Sports Pri<:e 25c. 

No. 29R. Children's Games Price 25c. 

No. 30R. Fencing. (By Breck.) JPrice 25c. 

No. 31R. Spalding's International Polo Guide Price 25c. 

No. 32R. Physical Training for the School and Class Room. . . Price 25c. 

No. 33R. Tensing Exercises Price 25c. 

No. 34R. Grading of Gymnastic Exercises Price 25c. 

No. 35R. Exercises on the Parallel Bars Price 25c. 

No. 36R. Speed Swimming Price 25c. 




LUTHER HALSEY GULICK. M.D. 



DC 



DC 



3C 



DD 



SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 
GROUP VII. No. 7 



OFFICIAL 
KET 
RULE 



AS ADOPTED BY THE 



AMATEUR ATHLETIC UNION 



AND USED BY 



Athletic Clubs 

Army and Navy Leagues 

Boys' Clubs 

Catholic Athletic Leagues 

Church Leagues 

National Guard 



National Gymneistic Societies 

Playground Leagues 

Public Schools Athletic Leagues 

Recreation Centers 

Settlement Leagues 

Sunday School Athletic Leagues 



Young Men's Christian Associations 



EDITED BY 



GEORGE T. HEPBRON 



18)049114 



AMERICAN SPORTS PUBLISHING COMPANY 
21 WARREN STREET, NEW YORK 



T < ^xr-T- 



DC 



1U 



Copyright, 1913, by American Sports Publishing Company. 




GEORGE T. HEPBRON. 
Editor Spalding's Official Basket Ball Guide. 



^0 

e)GI.A357l26 



^^-y^^ Contents 

Amateur Athletic Union Basket Ball Committee 4 

Auxiliary Basket Ball Committee [^ 

Editorial Comment • • • • ' 

National Amateur Athletic Union Basket Bail Championship of the United 

States J^ 

Basket Ball in the Middle States j± 

Basket Ball in New York City's Park Playgrounds and Recreation Centers 27 

Review of the Eastern Intercollegiate Basket Ball Season 35 

All-Eastern Collegiate Team ^J 

Basket Ball in the Army ^^ 

Basket Ball in the Navy ^^ 

Basket Ball in the Canal Zone ^^ 

Basket Ball in New York City Schools "^ 

Basket Bull in Recreation Centers ^^ 

Basket Ball in Public Gymnasiums ^^ 

Basket Ball in Connecticut ^^ 

Basket Ball in Maine JJ 

Basket Ball in Rhode Island ^^ 

Church Athletic League of New York Championships o^ 

Young Men's Helnew Associations' Athletic League, 1912-13 87 

Basket Ball in Brooklyn •' ^^ 

Buffalo Grammar School League ^' 

Public Athletic League of Baltimore 1"^ 

Basket Ball in Newark Public Schools j^^ 

New Jersey Interscholastic League ^ j^ 

North Jersey High School League | j-^ 

Basket Ball in New Jersey Y. M. C. A JJ;> 

South Jersey Y. M. C. A. Basket Ball J ' 

Basket Ball in Atlantic City, N.J J^^ 

Important Notice 

Official Rules-Season 1913-14 ^/f 

Comments on Changes in Rules. j*^ 

Diagram of Field JJJ 

Where to Get Officials for Important Games |»^ 

Suggestions for Officials !^^ 

Suggestions for Teams V^^ 

How to Register a Basket Ball Team j^' 

How to Score Basket Ball J°° 

Duties of the Captain, the Manager and the Coach aw 

Basket Ball in Delaware ^'f 

Basket Ball in District of Columbia |^ 

Basket Ball in Virginia 

Tidewater Y. M. C. A. League J ' 

Basket Ball in Western Pennsylvania |'^ 

■ Amateur League of Pittsburgh, Pa ^ 

Basket Ball in South Carolina • j°^ 

Basket Ball in Georgia •' • "' 

' Basket Ball in Florida J"^ 

Basket Ball in Honolulu 

- Basket Ball in South America ° 

Basket Ball in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia J^J 

; Records of Teams 

E 



Amateur Athletic Union Basket Ball Committee 

George T. Hepbron, Chairman, P. O. Box 6ii, New York City. 

CENTRAL ASSOCIATION. 

Otto E. Schmidt, c/o E. C. Racey, No. i National Bank Building, 
Chicago, 111. 

METROPOLITAN ASSOCIATION. 
F. J. V. Delaney, No. lo West 20th Street, New York City. 
Major J. J. Dixon, No. 41 Park Row, New York City. 
Dr. C. Ward Crampton, No. 500 Park Avenue, New York City. 
H. D. Henchell, 92nd Street and Lexington Avenue, New York 

City. 
Randall D. Warden, City Hall, Newark, N. J. 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC ASSOCIATION. 
J. P. Gaffney, 1400 Vine Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

NEW ENGLAND ASSOCIATION. 
A. J. Lill, Jr., 387 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

PACIFIC ASSOCIATION. 
Charles Minto, 501 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif, 

SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION. 
W. A. Coker, Room 6, Municipal Building, New Orleans. La. 

SOUTH ATLANTIC ASSOCIATION. 

George J. Turner, No. 116 Chamber of Commerce, Baltimore, 
Md. 

SOUTH PAQFIC ASSOCIATION. 
R. W. Horning, Y. M. C. A. Building, Los Angeles, Calif. 

TEXAS ASSOCIATION. 
N. J. Marshall, c/o Louis Book Store. San Antonio, Tex. 

WESTERN ASSOCIATION. 
J. J. O'Connor, 5048 Ridge Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 



Auxiliary Basket Ball Committee 



Thomas Cornelius, Baltimore, 

Md. 
C. E. Beckett, Washington, 

D. C 
W. E. Reutschi, New Rochelle, 

N. Y. 
W. E. Day, Salt Lake City, 

Utah. 
C. R. H. Jackson, Scranton, Pa. 
W. J. Hunting, Carson City, 

Nev. 
J. F. Torrey, Los Angeles, 

Calif. 
G. W. Adair, Atlanta, Ga. 
Carl H. Reed, Palmer, Mass. 
E. S. Connor, Cleveland, Ohio. 
David Gibbs, Oswego, N, Y. 
C. J. Velte, Waterbury, Conn. 
George W. Ortoo, Philad^l- 

phia. Pa. 
J. E. Haas, Washington, D. C. 
Dr. A. S. Keim, Nashville, 

Tenn. 
G. O. Draper, Atlantic City, 

N.J. 
Ewald C. Stiehm, Lincoln, Neb. 



W. G. Broadhead, Newark, 
N.J. 

Gerald B. Simpson, Billings, 
Mont. 

E. A. Dockstader, Bozeman, 
Mont. 

Hugh T. Shockley, Spartan- 
burg, S .C. 

Dr. William H. Stippich, 
Tampa, Fla. 

E. L. Wheeler, Chicago, 111. 
J. H. McCullough, Pittsburgh, 

Pa. 

William J. Lee, New York 
City, N. Y. 

Charles P. Hutchins, Bloom- 
ington, Ind. 

Franklin E. Edgecomb, Provi- 
dence, R. L 

Charles B. Jamison, Atlanta, 
Ga. 

Nestor Matson, Portland, Me. 

J. Truitt Maxwell, Omaha, 
Neb. 

F. H. Winston, Laurel, Miss. 
U. P. Wetz, Kansas City, Mo. 




I. .T:irvi>. Miiv.: l'. K. 'ritiiuuaiiii : ;j. Iliuiter; 4. Cill: 5, Bird, Asst. Mgr. ; 
6. Scbuiidt: 7, F. Trentiuaun; S. Suehring. Coach: 9. Kliue: Id. Mcl.anahau; 

II, De Witt, Capt.; de la Reiissille: i:i. Briggs: 14. Towsou; 15. Salmon. 

l-niXl^KTON T'XTVFnSTTY TK AM. Wliitf. I'lioto. 




1. Beiiz..ui: 2. I'lait. Mgr. : :;. .Tr.liiiv.,.ii . 4. Coiiuhis: :.. Kirh; f,. Hammond. 
Capt.; 7, 111111111181011; s. r.uiuiie; 9. Keiiiu'dy. Stone, I'boto. 

COLGATE UNIVERSITY TEAM. HAMILTON, N. Y. 



Sl'AIJ)IX(rS OFFICIAL HASKKT BALL GUIDE. 



Editorial Comment 



Growth of Basket Ball 

No game in the history ol' American si)ort has liad such a rapid 
and extensive growth with the possible exception of base ball. 

Basket ball is adaptable to all classes, all ages, both sexes and all 
climates. It is just now being introduced in South America and plans 
are in preparation to push it just as rapidly as an effective organization 
can do it successfully. \ery promising reports have been received 
from the Southern continent regarding plans for the present season. 

There is no doubt whatever but that the season of 1913-14 will be 
the gieatest in the history of the game. 

The Rules 

The Basket Ball Committee never expects to arrive at that perfect 
state where the rules and changes will suit all playei's, but the Com- 
mittee does consider the present rules as striking the happy medium 
between the extremist in both directions. 

A perusal of the correspondence would convince anyone how diverse 
are the ideas of experienced players as to how the game could be 
improved. 

Some argue from the standpoint of the spectators ; others say the 
rules are too strict and do not permit sufficient initiative. This also 
has merit, liut uncontrolled initiative is a thing not to be desired. 
Others complain that the rules are not strict enough, as much unneces- 
sary rough play is indulged in. This surely should be remediinl. 

The Committee feels that the present rules cover all of these fri(>ndly 
criticisms in a "safe and sane" way without favoring absolutely either 
group of experts. 

Spectators may be trained to see the fine points in the present rules 
and enjoy a game played in accordance with the letter and spirit. 

If the "passing" game is taught players the suggestion of "too 
strict" will fadeaway with this improved style of play. 

Those who think they are too lax may be sui'prised at the result if 
the letter as well as the spiiit is insisted upon wlien coaching the 
team and the removal of all players, no matter how efficient in other 
directions, would have a surprising effect in convincing our friends 
how really well the rules make for clean play. 

Comments on Changes 

Rule XI., Section 4 — This rule requires both jumpers to face in the 
direction of their respective baskets and, while seemingly a small 
matter, it has caused a lot of wrangling. It has always been the 
intention of this rule that jump(>rs face the basket they are to throw 
into, so that the apparent change in tTie rule is no change at all, 
simply emphasizing more clearly what the Committee always had 
in mind. 

Rule XI., Section 5 — For several years followers of the game have 
suggested to the Committee the desirability of changing this rule so 
as to prohii)it those "jumping" from catching the ball and limit their 
activities to batting it. The arguments used, in a word, were that a 
tall player had an advantage over one of shorter stature. This will 




1, Grotecloss, Mgr. ; :i, Haughey, Ah^st. Mgr. ; 3, McDonald; 4, J. McLaugLlin; 
5, C. McLaughlin, Capt,; 6, Helfaut; 7, Butcher. 

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY TEAM. 




1. Arras. Ca 
Foltz; 7, Keel 



-, Driggb; ;>, Koekwell; 4, Classen; .">. Jdlmsuu, yiis.v. 
i\ ; S. Duriau, Capt.; 9, Battiste; 10, Kasuiii>><ou. 

GALLAUDET COLLEGE. WASHINGTON. D. C. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 9 

always be the case to some extent, but by the adoption of this change 
the chances of each are more nearly equalized. 

Rule XL, Section 6 — Same as Section 4. 

Rule XI., Section 9 — Same as Section 5. 

Rule XI., Section 13(&) — The additional words after the words 
"but if he" serves to make the rule clearer as to what was always 
Intended. 

Rule XI., Section 22 — The change in this rule is intended to provide 
practically a free thi'bw for the player passing the ball "in" from 
"outside." Heretofore the player "inside" would reach over the line 
and strike the ball in his opponent's hands. This rule does away 
with this. The player on the "inside" is not allowed to extend his 
hands beyond the boundary line, but wait until the ball has passed 
over the line before he can touch it. In the old rule a foul was 
called if a player "knocked the ball out of his opponent's hands twice 
in succession" ; in the new rule, if he touches it while in his oppo- 
nent's possession, "outside," once, a foul is called for delaying game. 
Of course, on a large court, where the "outside" player can stand 
several or more feet back of the line, this change is not of value, but 
on the numerous small courts with only three feet space from boundary 
line to wall, it will be of inestimable value in preventing rough play 
and should help the game very materially. 

Rule XI., Section 26 — Attention has been directed to the violation 
of the clear intent of this rule, so, as a matter of interpretation, the 
rule has been divided into Sections (a) and (b), the latter furnishing 
the new portion. Some players seem to think because their captain 
calls "time out" that the referee is obliged to blow his whistle and 
officially announce "time out" ; such an idea Is farthest from the 
intention of the rule and it is to be desired that no referee will allow 
"time out" unless he is satisfied of just cause for same. The referee 
is the only official in the game, or out of it, who has the authority to 
decide when and under what conditions "time out" shall be called or 
permitted. 

Officials 

Each season's experience assists in convincing those interested in 
basket ball that the success or failure of the game depends upon the 
officials, and forward steps are in evidence each recurring season to 
eliminate poor officials and select only good ones. Efficient officials 
don't grow like Topsy ; they are made or moulded like the potter's 
clay, hence several sections have found it necessary to train their own 
and have established a training class for this purpose. Such a class 
or school is now in progress in the Recreation Centers in New York 
City and the plan and scope is explained in brief in the article in 
this issue. "Basket Ball in Recreation Centers" by Eugene C. Gibney. 
It is not only worth reading but is very profitable for serious study 
and application. 

National Championships 

A national basket ball championship is being planned for the season 
of 191.3-14 and the National Committee solicits the hearty co-operation 
of the Basket Ball Committees of each Association of the Amateur 
Athletic Union in making it a pronounced success. The National 
Committee will probably invite bids from every Association of the 
A. A. IT. and through this method decide, in co-operation with the 
Championship Committee, where and when the next championship 
will be held. In view of the expense in sending teams to conipete it 
might be well to play off all games in one day as was done at Chicago 
In the 1912-13 Championship. 




1, Kiefaber, Coach; 2, Bloom; 3, Mirkil. Mgi. ; 4. Crane; 5, Keedei: 0, Bar 
nett, Asst. Mgr.; 7, Seelbach; S, Reisner; 9. Joiirdet, Capt.; 10, \\ allac-e: 11 



Rolfe, Photo. 



UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA TEAM. 




1. I.anflis; 2. Hnrncr: o. Wardln^w. C 
Mauit'r; 8, Maubeck; 0. Bigler. Capt 



oach; 4. Aukeny ; o, Carroll; 6, Putt; 
JUNIATA COLLEGE TEAM, HUNTINGDON, PA. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 11 

Suggestions for Tournaments — There are a number of ways to 
organize a basket ball tournament, the plan differing in accordance 
with the demands of local conditions, but there are certain funda- 
mental principles common to all which should be emphasized. Some 
of these are : Call a meeting as early as possible and get your plans 
going. Look over your available material for officials, if the right 
kind is not at hand, begin a training class early, the sooner the better. 
Emphasize the successful features of last season and correct the 
failures. 

The following suggestions from the Basket Ball Committee of the 
Southern Pacific Association, in an effort to increase the popularity of 
the game in that section, are so pertinent that they are herewith 
appended for the benefit of all : 

"With the experience received from the past two tournaments as a 
basis, the committee has drawn up the following suggestions, and hope 
that they will prove a help in making the game more popular in our 
section : 

"1. We recommend to the Southern Pacific Association that the 
chairman of the basket ball committee with one or two members be 
appointed during April or May of each year, giving them the privilege 
of increasing the committee at a later date. 

"2. We recommend that the committee get together as early as pos- 
sible and decide upon a progressive policy to encourage the game. A 
meeting should be held not later than the first week in October to 
decide on ways and means of encouraging leagues among the schools, 
colleges, playgrounds, Y. M. C. A.s, athletic clubs, etc., following out 
the weight scheme of teams. We want better basket ball in our sec- 
tion, the way to get it is to make better players — ^we believe the way 
to make better players is to encourage the younger boys by giving 
them a chance to win in their own limited class. The schools at 
present have only the unlimited class championships in their leagues, 
if they are approached early in the season and shown the advantage 
of the weight scheme and assured of a final A. A. U. championship 
along the same lines, they no doubt will be glad to work in conjunc- 
tion with the committee and add the lighter weight, teams to their 
school championships. The playgrounds should be approached in the 
same way. 

■'3. We recommend that the committee adopt a new set of weights 
for next year, making four separate championships instead of three. 
as held this year. We believe that better results will be obtained if 
the limits be placed at an average of 100 pounds, 120 pounds and 
140 pounds, instead of 110 pounds and 135 pounds, as at present. We 
also suggest that only 2 pounds overweight be allowed, instead of 5 
pounds as at present.' 

"4. We recommend that, in addition to encouraging as many leagues 
as possible in our territory, that they hold the usual Annual Cham- 
pionship Tournament, but at a much earlier date than it has been 
held for the past two years. We suggest that said tournament should 
begin not later than the middle of February, but earlier if practicable. 

"5. We recommend that the committee hold a meeting on the first 
Monday in January to decide on ways and means for promoting this 
championship series and that they get the newspapers busy on the 
subject at this time. Sporting news at that season of the year is 
scarce, and the papers will be glad to make the committee's actions 
public. 

"6. We recommend that the committee require that all entries be in 
two weeks before the tournament is to begin, and that the A. A. U. 
registration numbers be in one week before the tournament is to begin. 

••7. We recommend that the committee secure, if possible, trophies 
for each class championship, that they may be exhibited before the 




Bly. Asst. Mgr.: 2. Adviilsro; H. Woilaiit. Mpr.; 4. Moskowitz; 5. Hnpan. 

Coacli: <!. Hale; 7, ScIuh'ii; n. ("arey. ('apt.: !), Neaiy; UK Foulds: n, 

Woodams. Furlong. I'LoUi. 

UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER TEAM. 



r 




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ISi 


HHn M^>^ 


19>M 



1. SmuI, Mirr.: L'. rort.'rtiol.I: .S. Drappor. Coach; 4. Diolil; 5. Savior. Asst. 
.Mi:r. : d. lln«,ti.t t.T: 7. L.ini.a.li; 8. Slriii. Cai>t.: !>. Hrt'iiiuT; 10. Jones. 

Miosse. Photo. 
FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL COLLHiE TEAM. LANCASTER, PA. 



SI'ALDING'.S OFFICIAL liASKIOT I5ALL GUIDE. 13 

tournamont as an Incentive for the players, and for advertising pur- 
poses. We also recommend that the players on each winning team be 
j^iven^ Individual medals." 

Fewer Protests 

Several reports state "there were fewer protests this season than 
ever bel'oro," which is gratifying to all who are interested in the 
character Ituildinj;- possibilitlps of the game. Why were thei-e fewer 
protests? may well be asked. Then an answer must be fortlicoiiiing. 
Here are prol)ably some -of the reasons: Knowledge of the I'uies ; 
intelligent committee in charge of the tournament; eflicicnt oflicials ; 
a standard of fair play for all established, because of the uitolllgent 
committee and efficient officials. The ix'st way lo jjrevcnt protests is 
to anticipate their cause and foi-mulat(! rules to (;over them befort; 
they happen; establisli an atni(jsph(!re of fair play for everyoni' ; 
enforce rules equitably for and against all, largt; or small. If a pro- 
test shows its head, settle it at once ; don't let it drag along and 
gather momentum through those Interested taking sides for or 
against. Protests are the result of dissatisfaction. Prevent dissatls- 
factiiiii and no protests will arise. 

Rough Play 

'inhere are all sorts of opinions as to what constitutes rougli play 
and the Editor's mall last season was full of suggestions regarding 
this subject. C)ne principle, however, may be laid down, whi<h, no 
doubt, will be in accord with tin* views of a majority of those; inter- 
ested, which is, personal contact is the cause of m(')st of the rr)u;4h^ 
play; eliminate this element and n cleanei- gaiiic^ will icsuTt. How' 
to do this to the satisfaction of the two extr<'mo classes is a difficult 
problem and will pi-obably never be entirely solved in this pi-esent 
world. For example, take the rule which permits a player to take 
the ball from his opponent, often rough play I'esults If " the official 
permits them to tussle so one may gain possession, but if the official 
will call "held ball" as soon as he sees rough play, this obiectionablc! 
feature will be eliminated. The rul(> gives him nuthoi-ity to' call "bei<l 
ball" any time after two players have hold of it, and lie should do it 
quickly if rough play is to be stopped. Another element in this plav 
Is the slowness of the player who first got possession of the ball in 
passing to his team mate. (iuick action would prevent, in many 
instances, the opponent even touching the ball. In fact, tiie "(pjick 
passing" game prevents almost all I'ougb tendencies, because the i)all 
is passed so quickly the ojtjionent has only time to guard and no 
time to grab. The "quick passing" game i-eiiuires a high gi-ade of 
coaching, which all teams of course have not had in the past, but 
this is no reason why they should not asjjire to such coaching in 
the future. The secret of the "(piick passing" gairie is to "get fi-om 
under cover." receive the ball, and pass it quickly to one ot vour 
team-mates, who is also "from under cover." 

Suggestions 

Read all the articles in the Ghidb. as they suggest many ways to 
help the game and several of theni recite interesting things which 
occurred last season that will be profitable for other teams and 
leagues to follow. 



Organize Leagues and 
Control the Game. 



is 



1. riaddow. t'oacli: L*. Waltou; ;J. Ufvau. Mgr. ; 4, Hay; 5. Maiithe: ti. Ilartz, 
Capt.; 7, Craig; S, Biuder. 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE TEAM. STATE ('OLLEGE, PA. 



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L MatKis;satk: 2. Yates, ruacli: 3. Twining; 4. Gillam. Mgr. ; 
0. Lucas; 7. Hairy; S, Geig. Capt. ; 9, Lutz; 10. Weaver. 

SWARTILMORE (PA.) COLLEGE TEAM. 



'(, MeGoveiu; 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 15 



National Amateur Athletic Union Basket 

Ball Championship of the 

United States 

By George T. Hepbron. 

The 1913 National Amateur Athletic Union basket ball champion- 
ship was held at Chicago, on July 4, 1913, in connection with the 
International Sports and Games Exhibition, which was conducted at 
Grant Park on the lake front. 

Three teams contended for the coveted honor amid the plaudits of 
a big crowd. The games were played in the open, under conditions 
similar to the championships held during the Pan-American Expo- 
sition at Buffalo, and the Louisiana Purchase Exposition at St. 
Louis, both of these championships being won by the then famous Buf- 
falo Germans, at that time representing the Buffalo German Branch of 
the Y. M. C. A. 

The Chicago championship was won by the Cornell team of Armour 
Square Playground, Chicago. The Buffalo Germans played what is 
known as the "passing" game, and was at that time, I believe, the 
best team in- the United States. The Armour Square five plays a 
game very similar, the "open passing" game, the secret of which is, 
get the ball and get rid of it before your opponent has time to get 
close enough to guard you. 

They played like a machine, seemed to be all over the field at the 
same time, were always ready to receive the ball advantageously from 
a teammate, and before their opponents discovered the location of 
the sphere it was on its way to a forward, who neatly dropped it 
into the basket for a goal, oftimes before his guard could get near 
him. 

They used the signal system to perfection, stayed in their relative 
positions, never grouped under the basket, as some teams do, and 
because of this always knew where the ball was and had a faculty 
of getting into "uncovered" positions to receive and deliver the ball 
in rapid fire fashion. 

Many teams spend most of their time running from one end of 
the field to the other, thus tiring themselves out, but the Armour 
Square team did not do this, but kept pretty well within a given 
area so their teammates with the ball did not have to hunt for 
them when they wished to pass it quickly, a decided advantage 
against your opponents opportunity to guard you. 

Mr. Reynolds, in the executive office of the South Park Playgrounds 
system, had charge of the team, and should feel proud of the way 
they performed under his direction and coaching. 

The way they played on that memorable July 4, they would no 
doubt have defeated any team in the country of their weight, and 
many of greater weight. 

The Quincy Athletic Association team of Quincy, Mass., finished 
second. This was a strong aggregation, but did not play the "open 
passing" game, which is more common in the Central West than 
In tbe East. 

Just here it might be well to emphasize the fact that the cham- 
pionships won at Buffalo, St. Louis and Chicago were by teams play- 
ing the "open passing" game. 




1, Howeh; 2, Roberts; 3, Van Vliet, Capt.; 4. Sutton: 5, McTaggart: 6. 
Canady, Mgr.; 7, Walldron; S, Boyu; 9, lugles, Asst. Mgr. White, I'laoto. 

UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY TEAM. 




1, Kelley. l<ia(li: J. Kitter; 3, Loser, Mgr.; 4, Afflerbach; 5, Copley; 6, Hub- 
bard; 7, Vret'laiid; 8, Leisey. 

MUHLENBERG COLLEGE TEAM. ALLENTOWN, P.^ 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. IT 

The Quincy five arrived at Chicago with a record of having won 
the New England A.A.U. League championship, and the victory of 
the Armour Square team is therefore of greater value. Although 
the Quincy team was handicapped by two players being incapacItattM. 
I feel sure, even if they had their regular team, they could not have 
stopped the point winning of the Armour Square team, which seemed 
to score at will and had the game well in hand from whistle to 
whistle. The Quincy five manager, Mr. Flinn, is a good loser. He 
told me that the fact of his team's losir^g will only tend to streagthem 
the players' determination to annex the championship of 1914. 

Hull House team finished third, after two hard fought games. 
They lacked the experience of either of the other contestants, and 
team work was sadly lacking. 

Basket ball is a team game, pure and simple. A five composed of 
"stars," who never played together, would be at the mercy of an 
Inferior aggregation of individual players who were well trained in 
team work. The Hull House boys, however, deserve credit for their 
sportsmanship in playing out their games, when they probably knew 
after their first defeat they could not win and had a poor chance for 
second. 

The committee was fortunate in securing the services of a good 
referee and umpire, who knew the game, made no speeches to the 
players while calling fouls, and had backbone enough to do their 
duty in a courteous, gentlemanly manner. Mr. Lorenzen I have known 
personally for years as a basket ball enthusiast and oflBcial. His 
associate, Mr. Wingierski, I did not know, but as he was recom- 
mended by Lorenzen, that was suflBcient. Both were well known by 
the local committee They did their work well and were congratu- 
lated by members of each team at the close of the championship. 
E. L. Wheeler, chairman of the Central Association of the A. A. U., 
served acceptably as timer. 

The line-up of the teams and scores of games follow : 

Hull House (10). Position. Quincy A.A. (13). 

Meyers Right Forward S. Duggan 

Shalek Left Forward Manning^ 

Greenwold Center D. Duggan 

Saperstein Right Guard Herbert 

Abrahamson Left Guard Boyle 

Baskets — Shalek 2, S. Duggan 3, D. Duggan 1. Free throws — Greenwold 4, 
S. Duggan 4, Manning. Points awarded — Hull House 2. Umpire — Wingierski, 
Referee — Lorenzen. 

Hull House (5). Position. .Armour Square (40). 

Shalek Right Forward A. Pressler 

Greenwold, Meyers Left Forward Johnson 

Levin Center Feeney 

Abrahamson Right Guard Kohfeldt 

Saperstein Left Guard Freeling, W. Pressler 

Baskets— Shalek, Greenwold, Johnson 4, A. Pressler 6, Feeney 5. Kohfeldt 
2. Freellnp 2, W. Pressler. Free throw — Greenwold. Umpire — Lorenzen. 
Referee — Wingierski. 

Armour Square (27). Position. Quincy A.A. (2). 

Johnson Left Forward.'. Manning 

A. Pressler Right Forward S. Dugg£kn 

Feeney Center D. Duggan, Chapman 

Kohfeldt, W. Pressler Right Guard Boyle 

Freiling Left Guard Herbert 

Baskets— Feeney 7, Johnson 4, W. Pressler, Freiling, S. Duggan. Free 
throws — Johnson, Herbert. 



eM:i:!& 



1. Fiirev. A^^t. Mirr. : 1'. Kiri 
Kyan. Mgr. ; 7, -McDonnell; > 



Coach : 3. Koesran: 4. Lambert; ~k Donnelly; G. 
Ilorau; 9. Clancy, ("apt.; K). Derby. 



(ATIIOI.TC TNIVKRSITY TEAM. 


\vAsinxf;TON. d. c. 




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1. Fisli: 1'. lieglcy. Mj:;r.; 3, Byrnes; 4. Mcguudc; .'.. Flaiity. Capi.; ti. J.mcM 
7, Nugent; S, Kerrigan. 

SETON HALL COLLEGE TEA.AL SOUTH ORANGE. N. J. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 19 

The following points were awarded : 

HULL HOUSE. Field Foul QUINCY A. A. Field Foul 

Goals. Goals. Goals. Goals. 

Meyers S. Duggan 3—1 4 

Shalek .'i Manning 1 

Greenwold 1 5 D. Duggan 1 

Saperstpin O Boyle 

Abraliamsou Herbert 

ARMOUR SQUARE. 

Johnson 4—4 1 Kohfoldt 2 

A. Pressler 6 — 1 Freiling 2 — 1 

Feeney 5 — 7 W. Pressler 1 

The National Basket Ball Committee is open for proposals from 
any association of the A. A. U. to conduct the championship for 1914. 
This should be held in March or April. Address communications to 
George T. Hepbron. P. O. Box 611, New York City. 

Gilbert High School Reserves, Winsted, Conn. — The Reserves claim the 
championship of Northwestern Connecticut, of teams averaging 120 pounds, 
although some of their victories were over quintetsi which averaged 135 
pounds. The Reserves scored 208 points to their opponents' 145. The shoot- 
ing of Cady and the defensive work of Doran and B. Hayes were the fea- 
tures. Cadv led the point-getters with 118. Then followed Brown with 31, 
G. Hayes and Llnuane 14 each, Secor 13. Doran 9, Byron 7, B. Hayes 2. 

Jacksonville (Fla.) Y.M.C.A.— The basket ball conditions in Jacksonville is 
thus described by Dr. Lyman G. Haskell, physical director of the Jackson- 
ville Y.M.C.A.: "While the basket ball situation in Jacksonville still suf 
fers the consequence of isolation and lack of support from the 'public, still 
considerable activity was carried on last season. Public interest is growing 
In this form of sport, and the interests of clean sports are being furthered. 
The Jacksonville Young Men'.s Christian Association first team played several 
games through the season, cot suffering a single defeat. A strong junior 
team was also put into the field for the first time, and made a very creditable 
showing, being defeated only once. The Duval High School had a five con- 
sisting of some strong individual players, but the team as a whole hardly 
equalled the one of the previous year. Clean sport is one feature which has 
been emphasized by the officials the past season, and its effect for good has 
been apparent. Future in basket ball for this section of the country seems 
to be very bright, but it is a matter of education and it is taking some 
time." 

Pittston (Pa.) Team. — The Pittston team claims the independent champion- 
ship of Pennsylvania, for the second time, by defeating all the strongest 
teams of their class, both at home and abroad. In all Pittston played 
thirty-three games, of which they won twenty-seven. Of the twenty played 
at home, five were lost to the leading teams of the Eastern League as fol- 
lows: DeNeri, twice. Reading, Trenton and an All-Star team. Not an inde- 
pendent five won a game on the Pittston floor. Of the thirteen played away 
from home, Pittston won twelve. The single defeat was at the hands of 
the team that was later defeated at Pittston and also on a neutral floor at 
Wilkes-Barre. The big game of the season was played at Wilkes Barre, 
when Pittston defeated Nanticoke in the deciding contest of a series of 
three, and in the presence of an attendance numbering 3,400 paid admissions. 
This game was refereed by Herman Baetzel of the Eastern League. Pittston 
scored a total of 1.087 points to 737 by opponents. In goals thrown. Hill 
led with 130 In 28 games. Then came Harris with 120 in 32 1-2 games 
Haston 85 in 23 games^ MacLachlan 39 in 33 games, Clark 44 in 32 games, 
and Raeder 21 in 22 games. Goals from the foul line were: Hill 139 out of 
168 trials, Haston 79 out of 149 trials, and Clark 2 out of 9 trials. 







I. MacQuown. Mgr. ; 2, Hpiner; 3, Flint. Coach; 4. Straw; 5, Murray. Asst. 
Mjrr. : (!. Ocliseubirt; 7, Baker; S, Frishman; 9, Campbell. Capt.; 10, Graham; 

II, Reise. 

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH. PITTSBURGH. PA. 




1, Hickey; 2, Stallard; 3. Banning; 4, Blair; 5. Brannen; 6. Munger- 7 
Jewell; 8, Hanson; 9. Bennett, Capt.; 10, Ward; 11, Hargiss, Phys. Dir. ' ' 

OTTAWA UNIVERSITY TEAM. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GDIDE. 21 

Basket Ball in the Middle States 

By George W. Orton, University of Pennsylvania. 

COLLEGE BASKET BALL. 

No other section of the country showed better college basket ball last 
season than the Middle States. There were several teams that played 
the game up to a very high standard, and as in the previous season, 
displayed better form than any of the teams in the Intercollegiate 
League, with the possible exception of Cornell. One team in the Middle 
States deserves special mention, namely, the Navy. After taking into 
consideration the fact that the Navy played all their games on their 
home floor, they must be given the credit of leadiijg the Middle States 
colleges without exception. For instance. New York University played 
Princeton an 18 to 30 match, while against the Navy they made the 
game number of points, but had 74 scored against them. Again, Lehigh 
defeated I'ennsylvania, 26 to 14, but were themselves defeated by the 
Navy, 56 to 17. Pennsylvania played Swarthmore to a standstill, but 
the Navy won handily from the Quakers by a 31 to 12 score. The 
entire team played wonderful ball, but Smith, at forward, seemed the 
particular star of the five. 

It seems impossible to classify several teams, all of which deserve 
mention next. Princeton at the end of the season was playing ball 
of a very high grade, but on the work shown against the minor 
college teams, they can hardly be ranked better than on an equality 
with those about to be mentioned. Pennsylvania, another team in the 
Intercollegiate League, can hardly be ranked below Princeton, as they 
defeated them in both games. In addition, Pennsylvania played 
Swarthmore to but one point difference. Columbia, the other team in 
the "Big League," in the Middle States, like Princeton, came fast at 
the end of the season, but they do not deserve to be placed before 
several other teams in this district. For the first time, the Southern 
section of the Middle States deserves high ranking, as, besides the 
Navy, Georgetown, Virginia, and the Catholic University, played ball 
up to a very high standard. All three seemed very evenly matched. 
In Pennsylvania. Lehigh, Pittsburgh, State, Swarthmore and Allegheny 
were on the same high plane, while the Army, Union and Colgate 
deserve practically equal mention. A review of the season of these 
teams would indicate that they played ball of very much the same 
standard. 

There were other teams but little inferior to these, such as Roch- 
ester in New York, St. John's College of Brooklyn, and Franklin and 
Marshall of Pennsylvania. These were followed closely by Gettysburg 
of Pennsylvania, Manhattan College of New York City, and St. John's 
of Annapolis. 

Muhlenberg resumed the game after a period of seven years and 
got out a very creditable five. The College of the City of New York 
put out the best team they have ever had, scoring a notable victory 
over Yale. 

The real feature of the season was the good work of the Southern 
teams, which, for the first time, take rank equal to the fastest teams 
in New York and Pennsylvania. Even though the Navy had not made 
Buch a remarkable record by winning all their games by one-sided 
scores, the play of Georgetown, Virginia and the Catholic University 
against their Northern rivals would show that the Southern section of 
the Middle States must be reckoned with from now on in this branch 
of sport. 




1. Madigaii. Mgr. : 2. Colliflower, Coach; 3, Conroy, Asst. Mgr. ; 4, Wetzel; 
5, Martiu; G. Waldrou. Capt.: 7. Foley; 8, Kelly. Buck, Photo. 

GEOKGETO^YN UNIVEKSITY TEAM, WASHINGTON, D. C. 




1. A. Gorman, Mgr.: 2. Keuhn; 3, Noonau; 4, Schlosser, Coach; 5, Murray: 
G, Regis, Capt.; 7. Nash. 

GEORGE WASriINGTON UNIVERSITY, WASHINGTON, D. C. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 23 

We have refrained from mentioning the «tavs of the different teams 
only because it seemed unfair. Only a few men could be spoken of 
in the limits of this article, while hardly any of the teams noted 
above did not hav(> at least one man deserving of special mention. 
Undoubtedly a team of stars could be chosen from this district that 
would put up a hard battle against any team chosen from any other 
section of the country. 

HIGH SCHOOL BASKET BALL. 

Scores of high schools in the Middle States played basket ball last 
season, and In all sections ball of a very high standard was seen. It 
seems impossible to pick any one team that stood out prominently as 
champions of the whole Middle States. In the Metropolitan District, 
DeWitt Clinton High School was the acknowledged champions. They 
defeated all the high schools of Greater New York and surrounding 
towns, going through the season against a lengthy list of representa- 
tive teams without a defeat. They were thought to be one of the 
best scholastic teams ever developed in New York City. Englewood, 
Stuvvesant. Erasmus Hall and High School of Commerce were other 
teams in and about New York deserving of special mention because of 
their good work. 

The Philadelphia Central High School won the championship of the 
Philadelphia Interscholastic Basket Ball League, but there were other 
teams but little inferior to them. The Southern High School pushed 
Central all the way. while North East Manual Training High School 
and the Roman Catholic High School played up to a high standard. 
Over in Camden, immediately adjoining Philadelphia, the Camden 
High School put out a team that seemed about as good as any in the 
entix-e Middle States. They did not meet the Philadelphia Central 
High, but they met several other teams the latter school also played, 
and they made a good showing against them. Camden High must be 
ranked "among the leaders in this section. They certainly showed a 
higher standard of ball than any other high school in New Jersey 

There were a large number of other teams that played good ball. 
The Rutherford High School team won the championship of the 
Northern New Jersey Interscholastic Basket Ball League. They tied 
with Passaic High School for this honor, but won out in the play off. 
Passaic, therefore, deserves practically eciual mention with Rutherfovd. 
Williamsport High School claimed the championship of the Middle 
States, but they played too few teams of acknowledged caliber to win 
fuch an honor. Thev doubtless had a very good team. Lancaster 
High, Steelton High and Ilarrisburg Central High must be mentioned 
here as they all had teams playing up to the highest standard. Harris- 
burg Technical High had a team only a little inferior to those jus-t 
UK ntioned. 

In Eastern New York, the East High School of Rochester claim the 
championship of their district, and their record bears out this claim. 
Their work gives an idea why the college teams in this section play 
such fine ball. 

In Western Pennsylvania, the Pittsburgh Central High School pre- 
sented one of the best teams. 

In New Jersey, Montclair High won the championship of the New 
Jersey Interscholastic League, indicating a very successful season. 
Wood'bridge, Perth Amboy, New Brunswick and South River composed 
the County Basket Ball League of New Jersey, and they finished in 
the order named. 

Atlantic City had a good team. Jjut they were not quite up to the 
standard set iii recent vcars bv their fives. Lansdowne High, a school 
near Philadelphia, forged to the front by winning several games from 
well known schools. They will bear watching in the future, a^s only a 
little improvement will bring them up to the best. 




1. Price; 2. P. J. White; 3. Keady. (oarli; 4. Green; 5, A. K. ^Yhite: 0. 
Snyder, Asst. xMgr. ; 7, Cole; 8. Mutbart. Cai)t.; 9 Cricbtou; 10. Cosgvove Mgr. 

McCaa, Photo. 
LEHIGH UNIVERSITY TEAM, SOUTH BETHLEHEM, PA. 




1, McNulty; 2, Dr. Donlnp. Ath. Dir. ; ?,. Perlev. Mjrr. : 4. Lindberg': 5, Dunbar; 
6, Cox; 7, Ramsey; S. Graham: 9. Xichnls: 10. Hawk; 11. Mates; 12, Thomas. 

ALLEGHENY COLLEGE, MEADVILLE, PA. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 25 

Hazleton. Easton, York and Chester were other good teams. 
Of the normal schools, Millersville was good, though no better than 
East Stroudsburg or Kutztown. 

PREPARATORY SCHOOL AND ACADEMIC BASKET BALL. 

There was no lowering of standard among the preparatory schools 
and academies of the Middle States. Every district developed one or 
more teams that played the game up to a high standard. Were it 
necessary to choose any one team to head the list of the schools of 
this district, Peddie Institute would have the preference. They played 
representative teams from all over New Jersey an(^ from Philadelphia 
and won by decisive scores. They met the Camden High School team 
and defeated them, ^8 to 23. This was on Peddie's floor, which was, 
of course, an advantage. 

In I'hiladelphia, the Chestnut Hill Academy and the Delancey School 
seemed the strongest. They did not meet so it is impossible to choose 
between them. St. Joseph's College was another good team, in fact, 
a faster five than either of the Philadelphia schools, but they are semi- 
collegiate in character and can hardly be ranked with them. 

In New York, the Adelphi Academy five, the Horace Mann School, 
the Manhattan Prep. School and the Poly. Prep. School led the others, 
all playing very good ball, but generally speaking, as in Philadelphia, 
not showing quite the form put up by the best of the high school 
teams. The Barnard School claimed the preparatory school champion- 
ship of the city, but in the absence of a game between Adelphi and 
Barnard, the matter can hardly be decided. These two schools would 
divide the honor if the matter had to bo settled. 

In Western I'ennsylvania, Wyoming Seminary claimed the champion- 
ship, and they doubtless had a strong five, as their record proves. 

In the South, the Episcopal High School team of Alexandria, Va., 
was to the front, with Woodberry Forest High practically on an 
equality. 

Lawrenceville, generally considered one of the best teams of the 
country, was not up to their standard of former years, though they 
would have to be ranked very high, as would the George School, Wil- 
liamson School, the York Collegiate Institute and the Allentown Prep. 
School. Bethlehem Prep., which led these schools last year, fell off, 
but maintained a high standard. 

Of the schools in the Hudson River Valley, the New York Military 
Academy was about the best. The Manlius School was another team 
in this section that played fine ball. 

In many ways a comparison of the high schools and the preparatory 
schools is impossible. Until 1912, there has been no doubt that the 
best of the preparatory schools were better than the best of the 
high schools. But, for the first time, this statement might be strongly 
contested. In New Y'ork and Philadelphia, the high school teams 
were undoubtedly stronger. Up-state, in Pennsylvania, such schools 
as Y'ork. Steelton and Harrisburg Central defeated practically all the 
preparatory school teams they met. Such facts and others of like kind 
lead one to the conclusion that, in general, the standard of ball 
played in the high schools was at least equal if not superior to that 
shown by the preparatory school teams. This is merely in line with 
the. advancement of the high schools in all branches of athletics, due 
to the greater attention that is being paid more and more to physical 
education as an integral part of the public or high school system. 




WILLIAM J. LEE, 

Sui>eivi>oi- of ra'oioation Onters, Now York City; Secretary-Treasurer 
Inter-park I'laygrouud Athletic Association. 



SPALDING'C OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 27 



Basket Ball in New York City's Park 
Playgrounds and Recreation Centers 

Bi- William J. Lee, 

Supervisor of Recreation, Department of Parlis, Boroughs of IVSanhattan 

and Richmond ; Secretary-Treasurer, Interparli-Playground 

Athletic Association. 

The interpark-playground basket ball tournament in the Park Play- 
grounds and indoor gymnasiums connected with the park system of 
Manhattan during the year 1912-13 met with unprecedented success, it 
being the second tournament conducted under the auspices of the 
league. 

The Bureau of Recreation owes Its increase in attendance, to a 
marked degree, during the Fall, Winter and Spring mainly to the 
increasing popularity of basket ball, as it stands next to the National 
Game of base ball among the boys and young men. 

Park Commissioner Stover, the officials of this Bureau and the boys 
are indebted to the famous Ingersoll Watch Company for the presen- 
tation of prizes to the winners in each grade. Most of the official 
refereeing was done by John J. Downing, James Cinnerty and Samuel 
Liebgold, who are members of the field staff of this Bureau. 

Three hundred teams competed in the elimination outdoor games 
from October, 1912, to February, 1913. The interpark-playground 
games were conducted during February, March and April. The final 
game was held at Queensboro I'ark Athletic Stadium, foot of East 
Fifty-ninth Street on April 19, 1913. The winners of the interpark- 
playground championships were the boys of Seward Park Playground 
in the junior (100-pound) class against Thomas Jefferson and the boys 
of Tompkins Square in the senior (125-pound) class against the boys 
of West Fifty-ninth Street. 

Some rattling contests were the result of the tournament, and it Is 
safe to say that the boys who won the championships would be an 
equal match for any team of their respective weights in America, in the 
game of basket ball. It is the aim of the Bureau of Recreation to 
promote this great game and to teach basket ball to each and every 
playground boy. It is especially popular among the younger boys. 
The game promotes rugged honesty, alertness of body and mind, and 
the team spirit that predominates has its beneficial effect on the boys. 
Care should be taken, however, not to promote a too vigorous and too 
great an amount of basket ball among boys inclined to be delicate, as 
basket ball is a strenuous game and taxes the action upon the heart. 
However, there is excellent practice for the delicate boy in the game 
called "Shooting the Basket." 

The W^olff Jrs. again scored for the point trophy this year. The 
Wolff Club were the winners in the senior division, defeating the 
Hilton Club in hollow style. 

The result of the indoor basket ball championships at Hamilton Fish 
Park was as follows : 




TEOrHY FOR OUTDOOR BASKET BALL CHAMPIONSHIP. 

Donated by William J. Lee, 

Supervisor of Recreation. Department of Parks, New York City. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



HAMILTON FISH PARK INDOOR GYMNASIUM. 

AFTERNOON CLUBS— JUNIORS. 



SCORES 
Men of To-morrow 9, Mohawks 1. 
Fearless Club 12, Liberty A.C. 4. 
Roger A.C. 5, Sterling Jrs. 9. 
Prescott A.C. 9, Saginaw A.C. 15. 
Criterion Club 1, Chelsea Jrs. 23. 
Olympic A.C. 19, Spartan Jrs. 12. 
Napoleon A.C. 0, National A.C. 2. 
Pitman Club 0, Wolff Jrs. 2. 



OF GAMES. 

Fearless Club 0, Men of To-mor. 8. 
Saginaw A.C. 7, Sterling A.C. 0. 
Chelsea Jrs. 15, Olympic A.C. 43. 
Wolff Jrs. 44, National A.C. 11. 
Saginaw A.C. 4, Wolff Jrs. 71. 
M«n of To-mor. 6, Olympic A.C. 34. 
Wolff Jrs. 20, Olympic A.C. 19. 
Wolff Jrs. 51, Olympic A.C. 15. 



CLUB STANDING. 



Won. Lost. PC. 



Won. Lost. PC. 



Wolff Jrs 5 

Olympic A.C 3 

Men of To-morrow . . 2 

Saginaw A.C 2 

Fearless Club 1 

Sterling A.C 1 

Chelsea Jrs 1 

National A.C 1 






1.000 


2 


.600 




.666 




.666 




.500 




.500 




.500 




.500 



Mohawks 

Liberty A.C 

Prescott A.C 

Roger A.C 

Criterion Club 

Spartan Jrs 

Napoleon A.C 

Pitman 





.000 




.000 




.000 




.000 




.000 




.000 




.000 




.000 



EVENING CLUBS— SENIOBS. 
SCORES OF GAMES. 



Wlnfleld A.C. 2, Carlyle A.C. 0. 
Argonauts 34, Lowell Club 5. 
Milton Club 2, Fldells Club 0. 
Freemont Club 5. Thesus Club 19. 
Wolff Club 2, Emerson S.C. 0. 
N, Y. Pub. Lib. 20, Athenians 13. 
Hilton Club 39, Criterion Club 7. 
Phoenix Club 2. Hawthorne Club 0. 
Mendes Club 13, Seneca A.C. 11. 
Warren A.C. 0, Norman Jrs. 2. 
Wlnfleld A.C. 20, Argonauts 11. 
Phoenix Club 14, Hilton Club 17. 
N. Y. Pub. Lib, 18, Wolff Club 19. 



Mendes Club 7, Norman Jrs. 5. 
Milton Club 2, Thesus Club 0. 
Wolff Club 2, Mendes Club 0. 
Hilton Club 13, Milton Club 4. 
Wlnfleld A.C. 15, Hilton Club 9. 
Milton Club 2, Mendes Club 0. 
Wlnfleld A.C. 1, Wolff Club 25. 
Hilton Club 2, Mendes Club 0. 
Mendes Culb 2, Winfleld A.C. 23. 
Wolff Club 29, Milton Club 4. 
Hilton Club 7, Wolff Club 15. 
Wlnfleld A.C. 9, Milton Club 0. 



CLUB STANDING. 



Won. Lost. PC. 

Wolff Club 6 l.OOO 

Winfleld A.C 5 1 .833 

Hilton Club 4 2 .666 

Milton Club 3 3 .500 

H. P. Mendes 2 3 .400 

Argonauts 1 1 .500 

Thesus Club 1 1 .500 

N. Y. Public Library 1 1 .500 

Phoenix Club 1 1 .500 

Norman Jrs 1 1 .500 



Won. Lost. PC. 

Carlyle A.C 1 .000 

Lowell Club 1 .000 

Fidelis Club 1 .000 

Freemont Club 1 .000 

Emerson Social Club. 1 .000 

Athenians 1 .000 

Criterion Club 1 .000 

Hawthorne Club 1 .000 

Seneca A.C 1 .000 

Warren A.C 1 .000 



INTERPARK PLAYGROUND ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

DOWNTOWN DIVISION-nJUNIOR (100 POUNDS). 
SCORES OF GAMES, 
at Columbus, 30. St. Gabriel's, 18; at Tomp. Sq., 20. 
Hamilton Fish, 14; at Seward, 27. 
Hamilton Fish. 6; at Tomp. Sq.. 17. 
St. Gabriel's. 4; at Cher, and M., 9. 



Cher, and Mark.. 
Tomp. Sq.. 7; at St. Gabriel's 
Seward. 8: at Hamilton Fish. 2. 
Columbus 28; at Cher, and Mark., 18 



20. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. Z. 

Columbus. 0; at Seward, 2. Columbus 1, at St. Gabriel's, 18. 

Tomp. Sq., 6; at Hamilton Fish, 16. Tomp. Sq., 3; at Seward, 33. 

Cher, and M., 18; at St. Gabr., 40. C. and M.. 10; at Hamilton FMsh, 16. 

Seward. 17; at Columbus, 6. St. Gabriel's. 14; at Columbus, 16. 

Tompkins Sq., 4; at Columbus, 16. Cher, and M., 8; at Tomp. Sq., 39. 

St. Gabr.. 6; at Hamilton Fish. 20. Columbus, 7; at Hamilton Fish, 3. 

Columbus. 8; at Tomp. Sq., 3. Seward, 4; at St. Gabriel's, 14. 

Hamilton Fish, 12; at St. Gabr., 18. Tomp. Sq.. 18; at Cher, and M., 28. 

Seward, 0; at Tomp. Sq., 8. Hamilton Fish, 10; at Columbus, 17. 

Hamilton Fish 6; at C. and M., 10. St, Gabriel's, 12; at Seward, 30. 

CLUB STANDING. 
Won. Lost. PC. Won. Lost. PC. 

Seward 10 1.000 St. Gabriel's 3 7 .300 

Columbus 8 2 .800 Cherry and Market. . 2 8 .200 

Hamilton Fish 5 5 .500 Tompkins Square ... 2 8 .200 



UPTOWN DIVISION— JUNIOR (100 POUNDS). 
SCORES OF GAMES. 

Chelsea, 0; at DeWitt Clinton, 6. DeW. Clinton, 7; at Yorkville, 15. 

W. 59th St., 5; at Queensboro, 12. W. 59th St., 4; at Chelsea, — . 

Yorkville, 2; at Thos. Jefferson, 24. Queensboro, 10; at Thos. Jefferson, 4. 

DeW. Clinton 10; at Chelsea, 20. W. 59th St., 0; at Yorkville, 2. 

Queensboro. 9; at W. 59th St., 4. DeW. Clinton, 0; at Thos. Jeff'son, 2. 

Thos. Jefferson, 20; at Yorkville. 11. Queensboro, 18; at Chelsea, 14. 

DeW. Clinton, 0; at W. 59th St., 6. Yorkville, 18; at W. 59th St., 10. 

Queensboro, 11; at Yorkville, 2. Thos. Jefferson, 19; at DeW. Clin., 9. 

Thos. Jefferson, .30; at Chelsea, 8. Chelsea. 9; at Queensboro, 19. 

W. 59th St., 5; at DeW. Clinton, 15. DeW. Clinton, 8; at Queensboro, 16. 

Yorkville, 8; at Queensboro, 10. Chelsea, 0; at Yorkville, 2. 

Chelsea, 6; at Thos. Jeflferson, 24. W. 59th St., 2; at Thos. Jefferson, 8. 

Yorkville, 2; at DeW. Clinton, 5. Queensboro, 9; at DeW. Clinton, 2. 

Chelsea, 4; at W. 59th St., 6. Yorkville, 23; at Chelsea, 10. 

Thos. Jefferson, 16; at Queensboro, 6. Thos. Jeff'son, 14; at W. 59th St., 8. 



CLUB STANDING. 

Won. Lost. PC. Won. Lost. PC. 

Thomas Jefferson 10 1 .909 DeWitt Clinton 3 7 .300 

Queensboro 9 2 .818 Chelsea 2 8 .200 

Yorkville 5 5 .500 West 59th Street. ... 2 8 .200 



The final game to decide the city championship of the Junior (100 
pounds) Class in the Interpark-Playground Athletic Association basket 
ball tournament was held at the Queensboro Stadium, April 13, 1913, 
and was won by Seward Park, which defeated Thomas Jefferson, 23 — 9. 

The Seward Park team comprised • the following players : Spinnel 
and Perjansky, forwards ; Kapsack, center ; Goldstein, Benowitz and 
Aswolinsky, guards; Edson and Farber, substitutes. The Thomas Jef- 
ferson team was made up of the following : Weiss and Martin, for- 
wards ; Preiser, center; Sarno and Acquilina, guards, and Ana, Rico- 
boni and Colligura, substitutes. 

The point-makers were : For Seward Park — Spinnel 16, Perjansky 
4. Aswolinsky 2, and Kapsack 1. For Thomas Jefferson — Weiss 2. 
Freiser 4, and Sarno 3. 




1, T. Bailey: 2. F. I'.aihy: ?,. Chambers. Coach; 4, Muriuw; 5, 
Callahan, Capt. ; 7, Miller, Mgr. ; 8, Lyon. 

MARSHALL COLLEGE TEAM, HUNTINGTON. W. VA 



Cjiuiilau: b. 



l^^^^^^^l^"* 


*^^^^^^^^l 




1 


iM 


^^w 


'^^H 




R 


"IS^ 


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^^Sr '^^^H^^^^^^,'^ 




" 7 









1, Bfckett, I'hys. Dir. ; 2, Frazifr; 3. Valk; 4. McDonald; 5, Hall; 6, Varela; 
7, Almon; 8, Hoppe, Capt. ; 9. McKay; 10, Allwine. 

WASHINGTON (D. C.) Y. M. C. A. TEAM. r._ 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 33 

DOWNTOWN DIVISION— SENIOR (125 POUNDS). 
SCORES OF GAMES. 

Cher, and Mark., 0; at Columbus, 2. Columbus, 14; at Tomp. Sq., 80. 

Tomp. Sq., 21; at St. Gabriel's, 16. Hamilton Fish, 0; at St. Gab., 2. 

Seward, 32; at Hamilton Fish, 6. Seward, 0; at Cher, and Mark., 2. 

Columbus, 19; at Cher, and Mark.. 12. Seward, 0; at Tomp. Sq., — . 

St. Gabriel's, 6; at Tomp. Sq., 25. Hamilton Fish, 12; at C. and M., 5. 

Hamilton Fish, 18; at Seward, 51. Columbus, 10; at St. Gabriel's, 6. 

Hamilton Fish, 13; at Tomp. Sq.. 23. Tomp. Sq., 2; at Seward, 0. 

St. Gabriel's, 14; at C. and M., 6. C. and M., 4; at Hamilton Fish, 12. 

Columbus, 2; at Seward, 8. St. Gabriel's, 18; at Columbus, 22. 

Tomp. Sq., 17; at Hamilton Fish, 10. C. and M., 14; at Tomp. Sq., 34. 

C. and M., 13; at St. Gabriel's, 22. Columbus, 11; at Hamilton Fish, 5. 

Seward, 2; at Columbus, 0. Seward, 22; at St. Gabriel's, 8. 

Tomp. Sq., 14; at Columbus, 1©. Tomp. Sq., 16; at C. and M., 4. 

St. Gabr.„ 10; at Hamilton Fish, 16. Hamilton Fish, 2; at Columbus. 0. 

Cher, and Mark., 0; at Seward, 2. St. Gabriel's, 0; at Seward, 2. 

CLUB STANDING. 

Won. Lost. PC. Won. Lost. PC. 

Tompkins Square ... 9 1 .900 Hamilton Fish 4 6 .400 

Seward 7 3 .700 St. Gabriel's 3 7 .300 

Columbus 6 4 .600 Cherry and Market.. 1 9 .100 

UPTOWN DIVISION— SENIOR (125 POUNDS). 

SCORES OF GAMES. 

Chelsea. 14; at DeW. Clinton, 12. DeW. Clinton, 0; at Yorkville. 2. 

W. 59th St., 14; at Queensboro, 22. W. 59th St., 20; at Chelsea, 14. 

Yorkville, 6; at Thos, Jefferson, 14. Queensboro, 0; at Thos. Jefferson, 20. 

DeW. Clinton, 16; at Chelsea, 26. W. 59th St.. 9; at Yorkville, 3. 

Queensboro, 11; at W. 59th St.. 18. DeW. Clinton, 0; at Thos. Jeff'son, 2. 
Thos. Jefferson, 12; at Yorkville, 18. Queensboro, 14; at Chelsea, 17. 

DeW. Clinton, 2; at W. 59th St., 6. Yorkville, 7; at W. 59th St., 16. 

Queensboro, 8; at Yorkville, 14. Thos. Jeff'son, 4; at DeW. Clinton, 6. 

Thos. Jefferson, 24; at Chelsea, 14. Chelsea, 5; at Queensboro, 8. 

W. 59th St.. 5; at DeW. Clinton, 0. DeW. Clinton, 4; at Queensboro, 8. 

Yorkville. 15; at Queensboro, 6. Chelsea, 0; at Yorkville. 2. 

Chelsea, 6; at Thos. Jefferson, 12. W. 59th St., 4; at Thos. Jefferson, 2. 

Yorkville, 0; at DeW. Clinton, 8. Queensboro, 4; at DeW. Clinton, 6. 

Chelsea, 2; at W. 59th St., 8. Yorkville, 10; at Chelsea, 18. 

Thos. Jefferson, 14; at Queensboro, 2. Thos. Jefferson, 6; at W. 59th St., 12. 

CLUB STANDING. 

Won. Lost. PC. Won. Lost. PC. 

West 59th Street 9 1 .900 Chelsea 4 6 .400 

Thomas Jefferson 6 4 .600 DeWitt Clinton 3 7 ..300 

Yorkville 5 5 .500 Queensboro 3 7 .300 

Tompkins Square defeated West Fifty-ninth Street, 30 — 8, in the 
final game to decide the city championship in the Senior (125 pounds) 
Class of the Interpark-Playground Athletic Association basket ball 
tournament, held at the Queensboro Stadium, April 19, 1913. The 
Tompkins Square team, composed of Sondack and Miller, forwards, 
Landberg, center, Sulzberg and Mandel, guards, and Apfel, Itzkowitz 
and Levitsky as substitutes, scored thirteen field goals in the first half 
and two in the second. The goals thrown were by Sondback five, 
Miller two, Landberg three, Sulzberg two and Mandel one in the first 
half, and Landberg and Mandel one each in the second. For West 
Fifty-ninth Street, Williams and McCann, forwards, Hood, center, Gal- 
lagher and Cravin, guards, with Corregina, Bird and Ballard as sub- 
stitutes. McCann scored all the points for West Fifty-ninth Street 
with three field goals in the first half and one in the second. 




ST. LAWRENCE UNIVERSITY TEAM, CANTON, N. Y, 




!. Apfel; li. Weirich; ;;. Suutliwiek, (apt.: 4. Schulbeii;; .'>. Silverstein; 6. 
Feldman; 7, Saltman; 8. Kaplan; 9. Schaffer; 10. Luft; 11, Thomas. Mgr. 
Second Half Season; 12, Palmer, Coach; 13, Isaacson, Mgr. First Half Season. 

COLLEGE OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK TEAM. 



SPALDING'S OFFfCIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 35 

Review of the Eastern Intercollegiate 
Basket Ball Season 

By Nat Fleischer, New York. 

After years of striving and gradual, even development, basket ball 
in the smaller colleges during tbe season of 1912-13 reached the 
highest point in the history of the sport. The aristocracy of the 
big Eastern Intercollegiate League was fairly broken up, and the 
minor institutions, as a group, left their bigger rivals far in the rear. 
Almost in every instance in which a "big league" team met any of 
the smaller fives of consequence, the result was a fair indication of 
the superiority of the so-called lesser lights. 

One of the most striking examples of this fall in "big league" 
stock was the issue of the Cornell-Lehigh game, in the South Bethlehem 
gymnasium. Cornell, the league champion, and by far the best five 
ever turned out at Ithaca, found itself against a whirlwind variety 
of basket ball that was an excellent example of the general game put 
up by most of the good teams outside of the "Big Five." Lehigh won 
by a score of 55 to 25. 

No doubt Lehigh's familiarity with its floor and the rather limited 
proportions of the court had a good deal to do with Cornell's over- 
whelming defeat, but still, did Cornell rank anywhere near the Penn- 
sylvanians, they undoubtedly would have made a far better showing. 
This is not stated in any disparagement of Cornell's standing, or the 
fine work of its rejuvenated five, but the truth, no matter how 
unpleasant Jt may be, is the bitter truth, nevertheless. So far as 
basket ball is concerned, last season was indeed the season of the small 
college. 

Realizing that the minor institutions had reached a point where 
they were no longer to be ignored and were rapidly assuming more 
than their full share of the limelight, oflacials of the Eastern Inter- 
collegiate Basket Ball League made efforts to unite the smaller colleges 
Into several combinations. This would have put intercollegiate basket 
ball on a three or four league basis, and the big association was 
willing to assmne a position of equality with the other bodies, and 
have the Eastern championship settled through a round robin tourna- 
ment among the title winners of the separate leagues. 

This movenaent, fathered by Ralph Morgan of the University of 
Pennsylvania, secretary of the "Big Five," has borne fruit, but has 
not worked out as well as could be desired. The smaller colleges are 
too scattered geographically, and their athletic associations have not 
the financial backtog to permit of extensive traveling. 

Some of the well wishers of college basket ball question the advis- 
ability of banding the minor institutions into leagues. Freedom in 
arranging schedules has been found very beneficial by college managers. 
0*.e of the most striking movements away from the league notion was 
made by Yale, which resigned from the Eastern Intercollegiate Basket 
Ball League. 

To pick an Eastern basket ball champion for the season of 1912-13 
Is a task on a par with choosing the National title winner. It 
cannot be done. Many teams have advanced claims, both just and 
valid, but the claimants are so numerous and their arguments so 
convincing that the critic is left in doubt. 

Cornell, Union, Wesleyan. St. Lawrence, Navy, Army, Lehigh and 
others asserted their rights to the Eastern title. As for Cornell, it 
V 




1, G. Schoening, Coach; 2, S. Harris, League Referee; 3, H. Henschel, Mgr. 
and League Sec; 4. Taub. Capt. ; 5. Brissel; 6, Rosenfeld; 7, Joseph; 8, Glas- 
sel; 9, Ablowich; 10, Keller; 11, Rubin; 12, Miss Rubin. 

92d STREET (NEW YORK) YOUNG MEN'S HEBREW ASSOCIATION TEAM. 
Champions, Y'. M. H. A. Athletic League. 






1, Linueborn; 2. Heerdt. Mgr.; y, E. Miller, Capt.; 4, 11. .Miil.r; .-,, S ii.ll: 

6, Faust; 7, Rohde. Kramer. Fh-Ao. 

ORIOLES (FORMERLY GERMANS) TEAM, BUFFALO, N. Y. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 37 

won the Eastern Intercollegiate Basket Ball League championship, but 
that was about all. Union set a verjr fine record, winning over the 
Army and St. Lawrence, but its defeat at the hands of Rochester, and 
its failure to play a more representative schedule puts the Schenec- 
tady 'varsity out of the running. 

Wesleyan, probably above all others, presents a very strong claim, 
having won the New England title. But then the old bugbear of too 
limited a schedule holds true in that case also. 

The adherents of St. Lawrence present their case very strongly, and 
the victories of the up-Staters make a very convincing argument. How- 
ever, the St. Lawrence five also failed to meet a sufficient number of 
teams of high caliber. The most notable performance of the St. 
Lawrence players was the double defeat of the College of the City 
of New York five, at a time when the Gotham collegians were at the 
height of their form, in the second half of the season. 

The Navy, like its other service rival — the Army — never can be 
seriously considered for basket ball championship honors, because its 
five can play only on the home court, and besides it belongs in the 
Southern classification. The "Middies" on their record for last season 
stand head and shoulders above all teams — East. South or North — and 
come pretty near to the National title. They showed their caliber by 
swamping Lehigh. 56 to 17. Yet a team that plays season after season 
on the same court, with never a game abroad, is bound to have an 
advantage that cannot be gainsaid. As a close follower of basket ball, 
who watched the "Middies" in action on several occasions, said : 

"The Navy men would have had their hands full, and probably 
would have emerged at the shorter end of the score, if the team were 
to have visited a court such as at Lehigh, St. Lawrence, or even 
C. C. N. Y. Conditions in the Annapolis armory are so absolutely ideal 
that they could not be approached anywhere else. A visiting team is 
lost there." 

Almost the same opinion holds true of the Army, whose record was 
a bit marred by erratic playing. The West Pointers lost to Union and 
Swarthmore. St. Lawrence came within two points of defeating them, 
despite the Military Academy five's advantage of home court. The 
up-Staters laid their defeat to the peculiar blocks of which the West 
Point gymnasium floor is built. These blocks made it unusually hard 
for visiting players. 

Lehigh's principal claim to the championship honors is its over- 
whelming defeat of Cornell. 

Throughout the season a very noticeable improvement was shown in 
the clean play of almost all the teams. Coaching also reached a 
higher plane and the attendance everywhere increased. 

Close upon the heels of the leaders in the Eastern tussle, was a 
group of smaller institutions that turned out teams on a par with the 
excellent fives of recent years. 

The College of the City of New Y'ork, after a poor start, underwent 
a complete shake-up for the better after the mid-year examinations, 
and traveled at top speed for the rest of the season. Had the team 
done as well in the first half of the campaign it would have been a 
strong contender for the title. The graduation of "Midg" Silverstein 
from the ranks of the freshmen to the 'varsity squad made the latter 
fifty per cent stronger. Southwick, former star at McKinley High 
School of Washington, was the best center in the East, but was lost 
to the team by graduation In February. 

St. Lawrence, with its veteran five, enjoyed a big advantage in that 
respect. Eddie Calder, at forward, played one of the speediest games 
seen in the East, while Canfield did excellent work as a running guard. 
Griflan at center was a disappointment, the rangy player failing to show 
the form he displayed in previous seasons, when he ranked among top 
notch pivot men. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 39 

ITnion had the satisfaction of compiling the greatest record yet 
made by any of its 'varsity teams. The five went through a really 
hard schedule, and among its triumphs was a 22 to 21 victory over 
West Point, and a 25 to 17 success over St. Lawrence. J. Beaver, 
Dewey, Woods, D. Beaver and Houghton composed the line-up, with 
the Beaver brothers and Houghton the shining lights. 

Lehigh had an excellent all around player in Muthart, the center. 
Pie contributed largely to the team's victory over Pennsylvania and 
Cornell. White, at right forward, played a uniformly high class game 
all season, showing at his best in the Cornell contest. 

St. John's College of Brooklyn did not come up to its fine showing 
■of 1911-12, but nevertheless scored several notable victories. Keenan 
and Carey, two of the stars of 1911-12, played with the Niagara Uni- 
versity five last season, and their loss was keenly felt. Malloy, at 
center, was St. John's mainstay, while Tracey was a tower of strength 
on the forward line. 

Pratt Institute of Brooklyn was represented by a fairly good team, 
which played a schedule of fourteen games, including contests with 
New York University. Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, one of Pratt's 
keenest rivals ; Swarthmore, ITnion and Washington and Lee. Pratt 
defeated Brooklyn "Poly." 28 to 13, but lost to New York University, 
28 to 21. Whitehead, the veteran, was the pivot about which all of 
Pratt's play centered. Welles, at forward, and Johnson, at guard, did 
creditable work. 

New York University, minus a coach and with lax organization, 
put up an in and out game. The team hardly could be classed with 
any of the fives that institution turned out in previous years. Helfant, 
a former DeWitt Clinton High School star, and McDonald, were the 
best players wearing the Violet. De Simone. a speedy little forward, 
for some unknown reason, was kept as a substitute, though he ranked 
higher than the regulars. 

Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute showed some improvement, but the 
severe scholastic duties in the engineering institution made practice 
hours uncertain, and forced most of the good material to forego coming 
out for the team. Segall was a star who would have shone on any 
team, while Main was almost his equal. Both did excellent work. 
Fishel and Waterman showed they knew much about the game, but 
lacked conditioning. 

Fordham, after an absence of two years from intercollegiate basket 
ball, returned to competition with a team below the average. The 
five was composed mostly of freshmen, and lack of a gymnasium kept 
the team from much needed practice. Walsh, Barrett'and Hinchcliffe 
were the quintet's stars. 

Manhattan College won the Catholic title of Greater New York bv 
defeating the Fordham five, .'^..'» to .33. However, Manhattan's claim 
was contested by little Cathedral College, which sprang the surprise 
of the season by defeating its bigger rivals to the tune of 44 to 31. 
Suarez, the Cuban star of 1910 and 1911. Houlihan and the Ward 
brothers were instrumental in the team's victories. Suarez was Man- 
hattan's leading goal getter and a speedy floor man. 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute enjoyed a good season. The team, 
reinforced by two former Brooklyn high school lads, Gallagher and 
Praeger of Erasmus Hall, took a decided brace over the previous 
campaign. Tlie team was greatlv handicapped through the lack of 
time for practice, but at that, the Troy engineers, in all their con- 
tests, gave their rivals a hard tussle. Gallagher was the best of the 
players, his defensive work and keen eye for "the basket being the 
fenture of the ouintet's play. 

Pochester University, which always has turned out a strong team, 
was no excention last season, although the five was not quite un to 
the standard of that of two years ago. The team had three stars in 



t » * e 



* « t 



ft^if!^!^!S^ 



^ 



w^ - 



1. Ensign Wenzell. Coach; 2, Vickerv; 3, Nelson; 4. Cochran; f). Hall; 6, 
McReavy; 7, Ballou; 8, Wilkes; 9. Davis, Mgr. ; 10, Clark; 11. NichoUs; 12, 
McKee; 13, Wild, Capt.; 34, Smith; 15, Cook; 16, Wiltse, Asst. Mgr. 

Boyer, Photo. 
UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY TEAM. 




1. C. Lincoln. Conch: 2. Lnnd. Gen. Mgr.: •".. Incrman: 4. Runbeck: o. Anre- 
lius; e.Nystrom; T.Hultquist; S, Johnson. Asst. Mgr. ; Q.Carlsson; 10, Peterson. 

BETHANY (W. TA.) COLLEGE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 41 

Neary, Moskowitz, and Foulds. Rochester defeated the strong Union 
College team, but was taken into camp by the College of the City of 
New York. 

Syracuse lost many of its stars and was forced to depend mostly 
on new players. The team did not play anything like the schedule of 
past years, and did not display any unusual adeptness in any depart- 
ment of the game. 

The Army's record was an unusually good one. Roberts, star of 
the 1911 aggregation, played one of the best center games in the East, 
while McTaggert. another veteran, went through the season with one 
of the finest records yet compiled by an Army forward. Van Vliet 
worked well in combination with McTaggert. The hardest game the 
"West Point five had was with St. Lawrence, the Army winning by 
22 to 21. Pennsylvania went down to defeat at the hands of the 
Army, 22 to 13. 

Swarthmore's team was about on a par with the speedy five of 1911. 
McKissick, forward, and McGovern, at guard, ranked with the best, 
and were the most potent factors in the team's success. 

The Navy went through the season with a clean slate. The Annapolis 
five had a severe schedule, yet swept its rivals off the floor, and 
rolled up probably the largest aggregate score for a season that ever 
has been made by any college five Wilde, the veteran right guard, was 
an all around star. As a running guard, no player in the East came up 
to him. McKee was the team's best shot, while Cochrane, at center, 
and Smith, a new man, did excellent work. 

Colgate, with Hammond the star, at forward, did quite well, losing 
to the Army by the close score of 25 to 22. 

Yale dropped out of the Eastern Intercollegiate League and decided 
to play independently. The team made several visits around New 
York and engaged in contests with teams that had been on the New 
Haven institution's schedule in former years. Yale's showing in 
Independent games was far better than it would have been in the 
league race, as the team, somehow, never could put up the same 
quality of ball against their league rivals as they could against outside 
teams. Swihart was the star. He was a good shot, a strong man 
on the defense, and his experience enabled him to bolster up what was 
thought, at the opening of the season, to be a poor five. 

The resignation of Yale from the Eastern Intercollegiate League 
forced that body to revise its schedule. No team took Yale's place. 
Dartmouth, which was admitted to membership the previous season, 
received full recognition by getting a place on the Executive Board. 
R. B. Hyatt, the Y'ale coach, who acted as league president, resigned 
Lis ofiice with the withdrawal of Y'ale, and Dr. J. E. Raycroft, the 
Princeton athletic director, was elected to fill the vacancy. The 
other members of the Executive Committee chosen were : E. W. Cuthel. 
•Columbia ; Ralph Morgan, University of Pennsylvania ; Professor C. V. 
P. Y'oung, Cornell ; J. G. Gannon. Dartmouth. The schedule for the 
season called for a home and home round robin tournament, each 
team engaging in nine league games. 

At the annual meeting of the Executive Committee, a few necessary 
changes for the betterment of the game were made. The reforms 
Introduced were minor ones, and aided in forcing the players to play 
the ball instead of the man. 

The race in the "Big Five" resulted in a series of surprises. Colum- 
bia, usuallv the pacemaker from the start of the pennant chase, fell 
before its rivals, and never had a look in for the premier laurels. 
Harry Fisher started with three veterans and two substitutes of the 
previous year, yet the team failed to respond to his coaching and, for 
some unknown reason, fell by the wayside. 

Benson, right forward of the Blue and W^hite five, was the best 
plaver. He alternated at forward and guard. Lee also alternated in 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 43 

the same positions. Fisher was forced to make many changes during 
the season, probably more players being used last season than at any 
time since the veteran coach took charge of the Morningside collegians. 
Dan Meenan showed promise of developing into a star guard of the 
first magnitude, but injuries forced him out at mid-season and broke 
up Columbia's team play. Jaques, the captain, showed great improve- 
ment. The center position was Columbia's weakest spot. It would 
have spoiled a proper combination, even had there been more top 
notch men in the other positions. With all its shortcomings. Columbia 
finished in a tie for third place with Pennsylvania and Dartmouth, 
each winning three games and losing five. 

Cornell came through with a great record. It won the league cham- 
pionship with the loss of only one game, that being to Columbia on 
the latter's court. Sharpe drilled the Ithacans the old time Yale style, 
the basis of which was the theory that a strong attack is the finest 
defense. That type of game proved invincible in the league, but was 
not so successful outside of it. Cornell showed one great failing. It 
played the roughest game in the league, and more fouls were called on 
it than on any of the other four teams. H. C. Halstead, left guard, 
came very near a record for personal fouls in the first half of the 
season, but improved in the second part of the campaign. 

Cornell's rise in the league was expected in many quarters, but 
Princeton's big spurt took almost all of the basket ball sharps by 
surprise. The Tigers finished in second place, with an even record of 
four victories and four defeats, and in many respects played a more 
scientific type of basket ball than did Cornell. 

Salmon, Princeton's star forward, gave one of the speediest exhibi- 
tions yet seen in league competition. He scored 93 points, including 
thirteen field goals and sixty-seven foul goals. In the latter respect 
he was tied for first place with Benson of Columbia. Salmon was 
one of the very few players who had not even a single technical foul 
called on him. Gill, his mate on the forward line, was almost as fast, 
but the team combination play seemed to favor Salmon in goal 
shooting. 

Like Columbia, Princeton had a good deal of trouble in filling the 
center position. MacLanahan occupied the pivot spot in most of the 
games, but showed that he was in need of development and proper 
seasoning. Eddie Trenkman, the former Adelphi Academy star, was a 
tower of strength at right guard, while De Witt, Princeton's foot ball 
star, was not so much "a success, principally because of his proneness 
to use foot ball tactics on the basket ball court. 

Pennsylvania's strength lay in Seelbach, the center ; Jourdet, right 
guard, and Roisner, right forward. Reisner was third in the matter 
of points scored during the season, his total contribution being 80. 
Next to Margeson of Dartmouth, Seelbach was the best center in the 
league, and ranked very high in All-Eastern comparisons. 

Dartmouth, playing its second season in the big league, did not put 
up so impressive a game as in 1911. Sisson. at right forward, was 
fully up to the standard of previous years. He was the team's loading 
point getter. Snow, the other forward, excelled Sisson somewhat in 
scoring from scrimmage and was easily the hardest man in the league 
to guard. With twenty goals from field he held the lead in this 
respect by a margin of five goals over G. C. Halstead and Margeson, 
who were tied for second honors. 

While Columbia's adherents bewailed the poor showing of the team 
and were inclined to look with foreboding on the Blue and White 
future, the rise of Cornell and Princeton is probably the best thing 
that has happened in big league basket ball ever since that body was 
organized. The fight between^'Columbia and Pennsylvania, season after 
season, was not very entertaining for the others In the league and 




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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 45 

had a good deal to do with Yale's deflection. The final standing in 
the league follows : 

Won. Lost. PC. 

Cornell 7 1 .875 Dartmouth 

Princeton 4 4 .500 Columbia 

Pennsylvania 3 5 .375 

Following are the individual records as compiled by Ralph Morgan, 
secretary of the league : 

Games. Goals. Fouls. Points. 

Salmon, Princeton, forward 8 13 67 93 

Halstead, Cornell, guard 8 15 58 88 

Reisner, Pennsylvania, forward... 8 10 60 80 

Benson, Columbia, forward-guard. 8 4 67 75 

Sisson, Dartmouth, forward 8 14 35 63 

Snow, Dartmouth, forward 8 20 1 41 

Margesun, Dartmouth, center 8 15 30 

Lee, Columbia, guard 8 8 11 27 

Cross, Cornell, forward 7 12 24 

Jaques, Columbia, guard 8 12 24 

Gill, Princeton, forward 8 12 24 

Seelbach, Pennsylvania, center.... 8 10 4 24 

Lunden, Cornell, forward 8 10 3 23 

Haeborle, Cornell, center 8 10 20 

H. C, Halstead, Cornell, guard... 8 10 20 

McLanahan, Princeton, center 6 7 4 18 

Graut, Dartmouth, guard 7 6 12 

E. Trenkman, Princeton, guard 8 6 12 

Dedericks, Cornell, forward 2 5 1 11 

Louden, Dartmouth, guard 8 5 10 

Jourdet, Pennsylvania, guard 7 4 19 

NEW LEAGUES ORGANIZED. 

In response to a call issued jointly by the College of the City of 
New York and Ralph Morgan, representatives of various minor colleges 
met in New York, on Thursday, April 17, 191,3. for the purpose of 
forming a second Eastern basket ball association. After a long 
discussion, it was found that the most practical method would be to 
organize three new bodies instead of one. 

St. Lawrence, Rochester, Wesleyan, Union, and Colgate decided to 
band together into a Northern League. The Southern League was 
formed several days later, at a meeting in Philadelphia, but its 
future is very uncertain. Swarthmore, Pennsylvania State. Lehigh, 
Franklin and Marshall. Carlisle, and Delaware were represented. 

The Central League is intended to include the College of the City of 
New York, New York University, Fordham and probably Wesleyan, 
and a long chance of getting West Point to come into a short schedule 
combination. The ultimate plan is to have the champions of each 
division, including the "Big Five," play a post-season series for the 
Eastern title. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 47 

All-Eastern Collegiate Team 

By Nat Fleischer^ New York. 

Intercollegiate basket ball in tbe East has developed to a stage 
where the choice of an all-star team becomes more arbitrary than 
ever, and a task of unusual perplexity. The highly increased standard 
of play, and the growth of top notch teams over a larger geographical 
area have made comparison of tbe various fives a difficult matter, 
even for the expert who has followed the season's results closely and 
has seen most of the teams in action. 

A team's claim to recognition may be largely determined by com- 
parative scores, but a player's standing in the big and capable army 
of collegiate basket ball men is not always to be based upon the mere 
arithmetical summary of his team's games. While the worth of a 
forward or a center can, in a way, be measured by the number of 
field goals he has caged during the season, the caliber of a guard is 
a much harder matter to determine. This is especially true in the 
case of a large number of teams outside of th(> intercollegiate league, 
of whose performances there are no regularly compiled records upon 
which a comparison of players can be based. 

The fact that a guard is mentioned in the summary as having 
scored various goals from scrimmage is not always an indication that 
he was right "pn the job." Of course, there are many high class 
guards who have the faculty of holding down their forwards and 
at the same time breaking through for an occasional score from 
scrimmage. But, nevertheless, a guard's chief function is to guard, 
and his worth will increase in the ratio that he is able to nullify 
the activity of his opposing forwards. This was especially true of 
such men as Pettigrue of Wesleyan, Houghton of Union, McGovern 
of Swarthmore, Jourdet of Pennsylvania, and Silverstein of C. C. N. Y. 

There are many forwards of the "feeder"' type, who are responsible 
for a team's success even more than the man who is able to cage the 
ball. The fast dribbler who brings the ball down into the danger 
zone, from which it is caged by his waiting teammate, is not very 
prominent in the records and must therefore be seen in action to be 
appreciated. Such a man was Van Vliet of the Army, Lunden of 
Cornell, Allison of '^^esleyan. Bloom of Pennsylvania, Meenan of 
Columbia and Chrichton of Lehigh. 

Too often a man's choice on an all-star team has be^n based upon 
his performances in one or two games in which he happened to be 
the bright particular star. Aside from the fact that "one swallow 
does not make a summer," the player may have been opposed by a 
very weak opponent and been left free to score as he pleased. The 
cho'ices made herein are based upon the players' worth during the 
season, taken as an average, and, in some cases, where the critic has 
been unable to get an opportunity to see certain teams in competition 
he has accepted the opinions of experts who have had that opportunity 
and are truly capable of passing judgment. 

Probablv more difficult to fill on an all-star team than any other 
position the past season is that of center. Somehow the pivot men did 
not come up to the general high standard of past seasons. Men who 
were stars only the year before suddenly fell to a level of even 
mediocrity. Of course this is not to be taken to mean that there 
were not many high class pivot men, but the whole group of centers, 
taken as a whole, did not respond to the general development for the 
better in the other four positions. 




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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BAIX GUIDE. 49 

The forwards, especially in the smaller colleges were easily better 
tban in aTy other year, while the guards were only a short distance 
behind. ALL-STAR EASTERN TEAMS. 

First Team. Position. Second Team 

/-I 1/1^^ a4- T nwrpnpp Left Forward Benson, Columbia 

SmoA Princrton ■■.■.•Right Forward. .. .Southwick, C. C N. Y. 

Inh^?ft Armv ■ ■ ". .... • Center Parkinson, Wesleyaa 

Snvwar'd V^ileVan . . . . .Left Guard Jourdet, Pennsylvania 

a^HaYsLrComeli........ Right Guard.... E. Trenckman, Princeton 

ALL-STAR LEAGUE TEAMS. , 

First Team. Position. Second Team. 

i: ?renkman. Sceton Right Guard Jaques, Columbia 

ALL-STAR NEW YORK STATE TEAMS. /, 

First Team. Position. Second Team. 

raider St Lawrence Left Forward McTaggert, Army 

snnthwi?k C C N Y Right Forward Benson, Columbia 

Southwick, c A.. i>.i *v s p Neary, Rochester 

Jauue ' Columbia'. \ \ '. '. '. '. '. '• '. ■- Left Guard Silverstela. C.C N, Y. 

G^alstead!^ Cornell Right Guard Houghton, Union 

FORWARDS. 

Of forwards, the past season produced a dazzling array who were so 
closely matched that the choice of a man ob an all-star team gives 
him the position by the smallest of margins. As in the year before. 
?h?representatives of the smaller colleges came to the fore, and must. 

'%^?oSl/'the'^Tek'''fo'rwrrd'dev'e1oped in Eastern colleges in many 
a da? was Eddie Calder of St. Lawrence. Like his brother, ''Sandy/ 
Sf several years ago, he was an agile floor man whom guards found 
almost imnossible to stop. In addition to being the biggest scorer 
fo?^ St Lawrlnce in a hard schedule that produced victories over some 
of the bes^teams^n the East, Calder directed the up-state five's play 

^iaSon'Sf'princ'e7on%\'oTs'chosen for the other all-star forward 
noSt ?n was almost as fast. He went through the teams in the big 
leSe I'ikl a streak of lightning. In eight games he scored a total of 
ninetv-three points. He was a foul shooter par excellence. _ 

On the second team, and third best forward in the East, is South- 
wiS^ of the College of the City of New York, with Charley Benson 
S Columbia close up. Southwick was a directing influence on the 
r C NY five and showed he could get away from any guarding In 
addition to" possessing a knack of caging the ball from difllcult angles. 
He started the seas?n at center, but with the reconstruction of the 
telmSter the midyear examinations, he went to forward doing 
eauaily weU in both positions. Were he not chosen on the forward 
line he would be given the call at center. ^ ^ , _„„ „f4.„« 

Benson Columbia's main scorer, despite the fact he was often 
shiftSi to guard, was the only man on the Blue and White who reah, 
retained hfs top notch form throughout the season. He scoi-ed i5 
points in the eight league games and was equally as prominent m the 
other contests with other 'varsity teams. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 51 

Gill of Princeton, and Snow of Dartmouth, were about on a par, 
although Snow made the better record, so far as points scored is 
concerned. Standing just below the tirst team choices is McTaggert, the 
great Army forward. McTaggert might have merited being placed 
next to Calder, but the fact that the Army plays all its games on 
its own court would have made such a selection an Injustice to the 
others, who were called upon to show their worth in contests on 
strange floors and often against hostile "rooters." 

J. Beaver and Dewey of Union, McKissick of Swarthmore, Chrichton 
and White of Lehigh, Keisner and Bloom of Pennsylvania, Cross of 
Cornell. Lafferty of St. Lawrence, Tracey of St. Johns, Davidson and 
Allison of Wesleyan, Hammond and Kennedy of Colgate, Whitehead 
of Pratt, Swihart of Yale, Van Vliet of the Army, Lunden of Cornell, 
Kaplan of C. C. N. Y., McDonald of N. Y. U., Walsh of Fordham, 
Suarez of Manhattan, Main of Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute and 
Shoen and Foulds of Rochester, formed a class of forwards who are 
worthy of very high commendation. Dan Meenan of Columbia, were 
it not for the injury that put him out of the game early in the 
season, might have earned a place on the first team. 

CENTERS. 

All star centers form a small coterie from which a selection is not 
s. very hard matter. Roberts of the Army stood at the head of his 
class, and showed all the fine points that a high class pivot man 
should possess. He outjumped every man that faced him, and repeat- 
edly led rallies that pulled an Army defeat out of the fire. His 
scoring record was also phenomenal. 

Parkinson, the Wesleyan veteran, continued in his old time form 
and wound up his intercollegiate basket ball career in a blaze of 
glory. He was the main factor in Wesleyan's success in the New 
England division, and outplayed every opposing center. 

Victor of Williams, Neary of Rochester, Margeson of Dartmouth, 
Seelbach of Pennsylvania, Muthart of Lehigh. Lucas of Swarthmore, 
Woods of Union, Connors of Colgate, Malloy of St. Johns, Griffin 
of St. Lawrence, Smith of Yale, Burghardt of Columbia, Segall of 
Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, Haeborle of Cornell, Bradner of 
C, C. N. Y., McLanahan of Princeton and Dutcher of N. Y. U., all 
deserve honorable mention, with Muthart at the top of the roll. 

GUARDS. 

Hayward, the Wesleyan captain and veteran of many a hard played 
contest, was probably the best guard in the East last season. He 
was a speedy floor man, and could cage the ball on long shots when 
occasion demanded. George Halstead of Cornell enjoyed a peculiar 
position, for despite his assignment he was the second biggest scorer 
in the intercollegiate league, with a total of 88 points. Halstead was 
not what might be called an ideal guard as he was too eager to break 
into the attack, but his fine eye for the basket saved the Ithacans 
from many a defeat. He was undoubtedly the biggest figure in the 
"Big Five." 

Jourdet of Pennsylvania, and Eddie Trenkman, of Princeton, win 
their places on the second team by a hair's breadth from Lee and 
Jaques of Columbia, Pettigrue of Wesleyan. Silverstein of C. C. N. Y., 
Houghton and D. Beaver of Union, H. C Halstead of Cornell, Wheeler 
of St. Lawrence, Sutton of the Army, and Price of Lehigh. 

Other guards worthy of the highest commendation are McGovern 
and Weaver of Swarthmore, Huntington and Bensoni of Colgate, Tur- 
ner of Pratt Institute, Crenny of St. Johns, Helfant of N. Y. U.. Can- 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 53 

field of St. Lawrence, Moskowitz and Hale of Rochester, Howell of 
the Army, Dunn of Yale, Schulberg of C. C. N. Y., and Anderson of 
Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute. Wilde of the Navy, would merit con- 
sideration with the best guards of the country, but must of necessity 
be left out of All Eastern consideration because his team properly 
comes under consideration in the Southern division. 

The above All Eastern and New York State teams compare favor- 
ably with the best that have been produced in past years. In fact, 
last season's intercollegiate crop was the finest in the history of the 
sport, and the all-star teams above named would give a good account 
of themselves against the best that could be produced in the West. 

It may be mentioned that New York State is the inercollegiate basket 
ball center of the country, and furnishes most of the material for the 
selections. To name a New York State champion would be about equal 
to naming the Eastern title winner. St. Lawrence, the Army, C. C. 
N. Y., Cornell, Columbia, Rochester, Rensselaer Poly, Syracuse. St. 
Johns, Colgate, Niagara, Brooklyn Polytechnic, Manhattan, Fordham, 
New York University, Pratt Institute, and Union, an array of seventeen 
college teams furnish an all-star aggregation that could more than 
hold its own against the representatives of any other state in the Union. 



Basket Ball Among- Missouri High Schools. — In reviewing the season of 
1912-1913 among the high schools of Missouri, Coach Todd of the Columbia 
High School, says: "It has been, of course, impossible to determine for 
sure a championship team, though I am inclined to believe the honor belongs 
to Mexico High School, their team having been defeated only once, and that 
by Moberly, at Moberly. Mexico, however, did not play Kemper, and the 
K. M. S. team would probably have defeated them one game anyway. 
Mexico, then, while I do not believe they had at all the strongest team in 
Central Missouri, still is entitled, on games played, to the championship. I 
would place Columbia and Kemper tied for second honors, Missouri Military 
next, then in order, Fayette, Jefferson City, Moberly and University High. 
The last named team failed to win a game all season, and Moberly made 
miserable showings whenever they played off their own dance floor, with 
2 by 4 backstops, which was not often. Mexico played, perhaps, the 
cleanest game, all the season considered, of any team in the bunch, free- 
est, I mean, from vicious or objectionable fouling, though they made, of 
course, the technical sort. Missouri Military was the worst offender, due 
in large part to the incompetent ofBcials they too often had." The indi- 
vidual record follows: 

Field Free 0pp. Field 

Games. Goals. Goals. Fouls. Goals. 

Vogt 14 68 27 32 14 

Stephenson 14 28 3 16 14 

Kishell 15 57 22 60 9 

Church 12 15 36 16 

Robnett 15 17 25 25 

McCowan 5 1 15 7 

Greene 1 2 

Schwabe 3 10 3 

H. Vogt 1 

Spurting 1 1 

Eeilly 7 4 2 1 

Turner 1 1 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 55 



Basket Ball in the Army 

By C. R. Rice, 
Physical Director, Army Y.M.C.A., Ft. Leavenworth, Kan. 

Baslcet ball, especially applied to the men in the army, has proved 
itself the most hygienic and recreative as well as fascinating of 
indoor games. Calling for strength, speed and stamina, both physically 
and mentally, it makes for the all around developed man. 

It has become recognized by the oflBcers as one of the very best 
methods of producing physical fitness and contentment among the 
men, proven by their hearty co-operation in developing ,the sport. 

The old idea of developing an all-star post team has given way to 
the more broad one of "the most good to the greatest 'nj.uniber," so 
naturally the season of 1912-191.'i was spent, in the majority of the 
posts, in the organizing and perfecting of company leagues. Instead 
of being played only by the men who have had experience at college, 
high school, or the Y. M. C. A., as in the past, it has now grasped the 
man from the farm or village, who form by far the greatest per cent 
of the personnel of the service. 

Fortress Monroe gives an example of the work accomplished on 
the Eastern coast. The standing of the teams is as follows : 

Won. Lost. PC. Won. Lost. PC. 

68th Companv 8 1.000 73rd Company 3 5 .375 

168th Company 7 1 .875 ar.th Company 2 6 .250 

41st Company 6 2 .750 6th Company 2 6 .250 

58th Company 5 3 .625 118th Company 8 .000 

169th Company 3 5 .375 

Fort Leavenworth of the Middle West had a very interesting league 
of twelve teams, furnishing some excellent basket ball. Following is 
the standing of the teams : 

Won. Lost. PC. Won. Lost. PC. 

Co. E, Engineers 11 l.OOO Co. G, 7th Infantry.. 5 

Co. D, Signal Corps.. 9 2 .818 Co. G, Engineers 5 

Co. M, Engineers 9 2 .818 Co. L, 7th Infantry.. 4 

Co. C, 19th Infantry. 8 3 .727 Co. B, 7th Infantry.. 1 

Co. A, 19th Infantry. 6 5 .545 Co. K, 7th Infantry.. 

Co. B, 7th Infantry.. 6 5 .545 Field Hospital 3 

At the close of the season Company E, winners of the league, 
played a picked team from Fort Riley, for the championship of the 
Central Division, winning by the close score of 16-15. 

Niokerson (Kan.) Business College. — This team for a first season made an 
enviable record in 1912-1913, winning twelve out of fourteen games played. 
They scored 533 points to 306 for opponents. Captain Detter writes of the 
team as follows: "The players owe much of their success to Spalding's 
Ofiicial No. M ball. We used them throughout the season and they were 
certainly satisfactory." 

Occidental Team, Pittsburgh, Pa. — The season of 1912-13 was a very suc- 
cessful one for the Maroon and Gold, the team winning thirteen out of six- 
teen games. The line-up was alnidst the same as that of the previous 
season, with the exception of McCall, the former college star, who played a 
sensational game at forward. In sixteen games the team scored 618 points 
to 3G7 for opponents. 



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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 57 



Basket Ball in the Navy 

By Lieut. A. M. Cohen, U. S. N., 
Fleet Athletic Officer of the Atlantic Fleet. 

The season of 1912-1913 brought out several more teams, so that 
the league was increased to thirteen ships, with the prospect of four 
additional next season. We find the game peculiarly suitable for our 
men. It affords excellent opportunities as a pastime, as a physical 
developer, and as a scientific study. 

Owing to the restricted quarters aboard ship we are unable to accom- 
plish much at sea. but our loyal friend, the Navy Y.M.C.A., offers us 
the use of its gymnasiums in every port we visit and in that way we 
manage to practise off and on. and as one team has about as much 
time in port as another we find the quality of ball played to be about 
the same throughout the fleet. 

A large part of the contests played are inter-ship games, but owing 
to the fact that there are only two ships at the most, in the Navy 
Yard at the same time and for any length of time, it becomes neces- 
sary to play civilian teams in order to keep our men in shape. By 
so doing our teams get a good many fine points from the civilians. 
It is our intention to encourage these games with outside teams and 
so improve the quality of our play. 

During the season of 1912-1913. we played an elimination series in 
the late summer, in order to be able to run off the finals during the 
Review week in New York in the early part of October. We found 
the heat in Newport during the early games to be a serious drawback, 
and next season we will endeavor to arrange a schedule later in the 
fall. 

We have no trophy at present for this branch of athletics in the 
fleet, but hope soon to have one. The athletic fund, however, presents 
gold watch charms to members of the winning team. 

The tremendous strides taken since the game was introduced in the 
fleet, about three years ago, show that in the near future the sport 
will demand more consideration and call for as much enthusiasm 
among the enlisted men as now follows the base ball and foot ball 
series. 

The results of the fleet championship series were : 

First Division— Utah 31. Delaware 18; Michigan 2, Florida (for) ; 
North Dakota 50. Utah 19 ; Utah 31, Connecticut 15 ; Utah 44, Michi- 
gan 24. 

Second Division — Kansas 29, Vermont 28 ; New Hampshire 60, Kan- 
sas 14 ; Kansas 44, Louisiana 40. 

Third Division — New Jersey 44, Rhode Island 13 ; New Jersey 2, 
Georgia (for.) ; New Jersey 2, Virginia (for.) ; New Jersey 54, 
Nebraska 19. 

The New Hampshire defeated the North Dakota for the First Squad- 
ron Championship, 40 to 1?> : the Illinois defeated the Ohio for the 
Second Squadron Championship ; the New Hampshire defeated the Illi- 
nois for the Fleet Championship, 59 to 1. 

Coleman Memorial Gymnasium Team, Sasrre, Pa. — The Colemans started 
last season in poor shape, losing the first five games. Then the five braced up 
and won the remaining eleven games. The special feature of the campaign 
was the defeat of Towanda in three out of four games for the championship 
of Bradford County. The team was rather light, averaging 140 pounds. The 
coming season, Coleman will play with teams that average 160 i>ounds. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



Basket Ball in the Canal Zone 

By Charles B. Russell, 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., Empire, C. Z. 

For six years now, since tiie establishment on the Canal Zone of 
the Y. M. C. A. club houses, basitet ball has held the most prominent 
place among the indoor sports. This seems to be due to the presence 
on the Canal Zone of so many men who have played the game in the 
States before coming here to work on the "Big Ditch." 

The fact of so many veteran players being present on the club house 
teams each year has raised the standard of playing and made It com- 
paratively easy to get a league started each season. Among these 
players are such men as Sartor, Bartliolomew, Luce. Wcller, Fletcher, 
Sterner and others, representing the University of Nebraska, Arkansas, 
Colgate and Purdue. These men all made enviable records in the early- 
Isthmian leagues. 

During the various seasons, local leagues have been formed in the 
■different club houses, usually a month or two before the Isthmian 
League was formed, and these have served to put the players in good 
condition for the big games of the latter league. The Isthmian league 
games have usually been played during the months of October, Novem- 
ber and December, so as to leave tbo months of January, February 
and March free for the outdoor base ball season, as this is the dry 
season and the only time of the year when this game can be played. 

During the first year of the club houses, basket ball was played 
nearly every Saturday evening at one or more of the club houses, l)ut 
no Isthmian league was established. Not until the latter part of 1908 
was an Isthmian league organized, when the four existing club houses 
were represented. These were located at Cristobal, (lorgona. Empire 
and Culebra. During the last season, as well as in 1907. the games 
played showed very high scores, due to the lack of defensive team 
work, and the teams were evenly matched. The early part of the 
season predicted success for the Cristobal team, but later there came a 
slump due to the lack of fast guards, and at the close of last season 
they were defeated by Empire, which team gained one of Cristobal's 
fast men who was transferred to the Central division work at Empire. 

In the season of 1909 no Isthmian league was organized, but man.v 
local games were played. During the last season, the battleships of 
the Atlantic fleet visited the Isthmus and many games were played 
with the jolly tars. Local leagues were formed, and these, with the 
occasional games between the various club house teams, served to hold 
the Interest in this sport. 

In 1910 another club house was opened at Catun. This opened a 
new field for basket bail, and as there wer<> many men at this place 
ei;»thusiastic for it, a league was formed with five club houses repre- 
sented. During last season basket ball was organized on a better 
basis than before existed and with regularly appointed officials the 
league ran along much better than in the former seasons, when great 
difficulty was experienced in getting competent men to officiate. Gatun 
placed a strong team in the league and they made things interesting" 
for both Cristobal and Culebra. Empire failed to do as well as the 
previous season and finally surrendered first place to Cristobal, which 
team made the splendid record of going through the season without a 
defeat. The able officiating of C. C. Carr and E. D. Christopherson 
added much to the character of the game. 
E 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 61 

The season of 1912 saw many changes in the standing of the teams. 
After several local leagues were run off at the different club houses 
during the early fall, the men felt in condition for another Isthmian 
league. Consequently a league was formed early in October. It was 
■composed of but five teams, Cristobal, Gatun, Gorgona, Empire and 
Corozal, Culebra being forced to give up basket ball on account of the 
tearing down of their club house, which was made necessary by the 
continual shifting of the land underneath the building. 

Twenty league games were played, with the usual enthusiasm. 
Cristobal was defeated in the first game by Empire, and from then on 
dropped down to the bottom of the league and remained there to the 
end, winning only one game out of eight. Gatun started out with 
their usual strong beginning, but on account of the transfer of sev- 
eral of their good men to Corozal and the injury of two others, they 
dropped down in the league for a time. But soon they had other men 
In condition and came back strong in the game with Corozal on. 
November 23, when they defeated Corozal by a score of 27 to 3. The 
Corozal team with the addition of the Gatun men showed up well in 
all the other games, and it was with difficulty that Empire defeated 
them on December 7 by a score of 21 to 19. Empire took a fresh 
start at the beginning of the season and ran through the schedule 
with but one defeat. This was in the last game with Gatun, when 
that team sprung a surprise on them and walked off with a victory, 
thus spoiling Empire's chances for a clean sweep of all thslr games. 

The standing at the close of the season was as follows : 

Won. Lost. PC. Won. Lost. PC. 

Empire 7 1 .875 Gorgona 2 6 .250 

Corozal 6 3 .625 Cristobal 1 7 .125 

Gatun 5 3 .625 

One of the most Interesting features of the past season was the 
visit of the four divisions of the Atlantic fleet and the eight games 
played with teams representing the different battleships during the 
month of January. As in 1909, when they first visited the Isthmus, 
invitations were sent to the various teams to visit the different club 
houses and play basket ball on Uncle Sam's smallest possession. 

These games were very Interesting to the spectators as well as to 
the players, the sailors often giving the "canal diggers" a hard tussle 
before they could win. In all the games the local teams were suc- 
cessful. To add interest to the visit of the sailors, the band from 
■each ship accompanied their respective team and enlivened things dur- 
ing the intermissions with many popular airs. Another Interesting 
feature of the teams was the presence of many of the old basket ball 
warriors from Annapolis, who added much strength to the visiting 
teams. These teams represented the battleships Minnesota, Nebraska, 
Virginia. Georgia, Utah, Ohio, Idaho and Iowa. 

The officiating- during the past season was highly satisfactory. The 
work of C. C. Carr, Sarotor, a former Cristobal player, and H. Bar- 
tholomew stood out prominently. 

The board of of governors of the 1912 league was composed of the 
Superintendent of Club Houses, A. B. Dickson, and the five physical 
directors, R. L. Dwelle of Corozal, G. W. Watson of Gorgona, P. T. 
^ollworth of Gatun, E. Schulte of Cristobal, and C. B. Russell of 
Empire. The board decided to adopt the intercollegiate rules, as in 
1911, with a few changes to suit the size of the fioors and the tropical 
■climate, but after further consideration at the close of the season it 
was felt by all that, If it is possible to run a league next season, the 
A. A. U. rules, with slight modifications, will be more appropriate. 




w s r^ Ci M rH h1 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 63 



Basket Ball in New York City SchooliS 

By Dr. C. Ward Crampton, 

Director Physical Training New York Public Schools ; Secretary 

Public Schools Athletic League. 

The tenth annual basket ball tournament of the Public Schools 
Athletic League started in October, 1912, with a total of eighty teams 
entered, 41 in the 95-pound class and 39 in the 125-pound class. These 
entries were distributed throughout the boroughs as follows : 

Manhattan 30, Bronx 6, Brooklyn 18, Queens IG, Richmond 10. 

Lack of protests and disputes was more marked than in any other 

elementary school basket ball tournament. In most cases, district 

and inter-district games were close and well played. Reports from 

the officials show fewer fouls committed than in any other tournament. 

The borough championships were won by : 

MANHATTAN. 
P. S. 62—95 pounds. P. S. 62—125 pounds. 

BRONX. 
P. S. 25—95 pounds. P. S. 25—125 pounds. 

BROOKLYN. 
P. S. 43—95 pounds. P. S. 43—125 pounds. 

QUEENS. 
P. S. 83—95 pounds. P. S. 83—125 pounds. 

RICH,\IOND. 
P. S. 17—95 pounds. P. S. 17—125 pounds. 

The interborough series started on January 15, 1913. Public School 
62, Manhattan, played Public School 17, Richmond, at Public School 
188, Manhattan. In both the 95-pound and 125-po'und class, Public 
School 62, Manhattan, was victorious. 

On January 16, 1913, the borough champions of Brooklyn played 
the team representing Public School 83, winner of the Queens cham- 
pionship, in both the 95-pound and 125-pound class, at Public School 
117, Brooklyn. 

Public School 43, Brooklyn, won the 95-pound class, by a score of 
16 to 5. Public School 83, Queens, won the 125-pound class, by a 
score of 19 to 10. Both games were well played. 

The winners of the Brooklyn-Queens championship played Public 
School 25, the winner of the Bronx championship. At the Eighth 
Regiment Armory, on Saturday, January 18, 1913, the 95-pound class 
was won by Public School 43, Brooklyn, with a score of 23 to 11. The 
125-pound class was won by Public School 88, Queens, with a score of 
26 to 4. 

The final games for the elementary school championship was played 
at the Forty-seventh Regiment Armory, on Saturday, January 25, 1913, 
at 1 :30 P. M. In the 95-pound class. Public School 62, Manhattan, 
played Public School 43, Brooklyn, and won with a score of 33 to 14. 
In the 125-pound class. Public School 62, Manhattan, played Public 
School 83, Queens, and won with a score of 54 to 9. 

Both games were interesting and well played, very few fouls being 
committed. The attendance was 3,150. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 65 



Basket Ball in Recreation Centers 

By Eugene C. Gibnby, 
Supervisor of Playgrounds, New York City. 

The Recreation Center Athletic League signalized the advent of its 
eighth annual basket ball tourney by a searching inquiry into the 
advantages and defects of its usual system of conducting the yearly 
contest. Suggestions for improvement were solicited from principals 
and coaches. The recommendations thus elicited, together with a 
spirit of progressiveness engendered by past experiences, led to the 
adoption of the following three new rules. 

(1) All games will be played on neutral courts. 

(2) All contests will be controlled and managed by neutral oflScials. 

(3) The tournament will be conducted on the elimination plan^ 
that Is, the loser of each game will be eliminated from the tourna- 
ment. 

An expression of opinion gleaned from principals, coaches, oflBciala 
and players proved conclusively that rules 1 and 2 were not only 
popular, but effective in leading to amicable and undisputed games. 

Rule 3 was not as well received as the others because the loss of 
one game forced a team to retire from the tournament. This rule, 
however, was temporarily necessary because the league did not have 
enough sanctioned courts on which to play a round robin series in 
each district. The fact that only eleven officials were certified for 
the year's work also made the curtailing of the schedules essential. 
It is probable that another rule will replace this one, after a sufficient 
number of neutral courts and officials have been selected. 

The following men were certified as the regular officials of the 
league : Herman Brown, Abraham I. Barbanell, Wesley C. Cox, Wil- 
liam G. Dowd, Irving Gemson, Archibald McClintock, Charles Model, 
Martin Rodgers, Harley H. Thomas, James J. Tully, Augustus E. 
Wetzler. 

The basket ball courts at the following centers were sanctioned for 
league games : E. R. C's. No. 16, No. 158, No. 159, No. 170. No. 188. 
H. S. C, Manhattan, and E. R C's. No. 6 and No. 117, Brooklyn. The 
teams representing these centers never played on their own courts. 

The Recreation Center Athletic League instituted a notable inno- 
vation in establishing a training school for basket ball officials. The 
league is the pioneer In thus undertaking the proper instruction of 
teachers, with a view to developing efficient referees and umpires. A 
special conference with the officials was held at E. R. C. No. 21 before 
the beginning of the tournament. At this meeting each man received 
a copy of the 1913 Basket Ball Guide and a typed copy of the 
special rules adopted by the Recreation Center Athletic League. 

The followiag were exhaustively explained and practically demon- 
strated : 

(a) Proper interpretation of the "dribble" rule. 

(b) Proper Interpretation of "A" and "B" fouls. 

(c) Correct method of putting the ball in play. 

(d) Correct method of deciding a tie game. 

(e) Correct method of timing and scoring. 

(f) Play on which a point may be awarded without the actual 
throwing of a goal, from foul line. 



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SPALDING'S OiFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 67 

The men were admonished to adhere to the following special rules in 
managing and controlling games : 

(1) Officials must always bring to games a copy of the Basket 
Ball Guide. 

(2) Officials, assigned in pairs, must alternate in the capacities of 
referee and umpire. 

(3) The referee of the first half must appoint scorers and timers. 

(4) Officials must be attired for active work. 

(5) The referee, umpire and timer must have whistles that can 
be distinctly heard. 

(6) The referee must be active in following the ball. Inertness on 
the part of the referee leads to a slow and rough game. 

(7) The umpire should be vigilant in watching players behind the 
referee. 

(8) The audience must be kept at least two feet back of the 
boundary lines. If this is not possible, the ball should be considered 
out of bounds when it touches a spectator. 

(9) Compel audiences to treat players with fairness and courtesy. 

The following advice was given as an antidote for rough games : 

(a) Hold a conference with the players before the game begins. 
Explain fouls that will disqualify. 

(b) Call held balls quickly. Do not allow the players to struggle 
too long for the possession of the ball. 

(c) Announce every foul loudly. Indicate the offender and the 
nature of the foul. 

(d) When a player commits a "Class B Foul" notify the scorer 
to record it and inform the offender that another will disqualify. 

(e) Adhere to rule XI. section 22. in regard to outside balls. 

(f) If the audience becomes boisterous in encouraging rough play, 
stop the game until order is restored. 

(g) Allow no coaching on the part of instructors. 

(h) Do not tolerate the holding or the tackling of a player who 
has not actual possession of the ball. 

(1) Allow no offense to go unpenalized, and enter into no contro- 
versy with players, concerning the correctness of your decisions. 
Allow only the captain to state objections in a respectful manner. 

There were thirty-one junior (125 pounds) teams and twenty-nine 
senior teams in the tournament. A total of six hundred players 
engaged in different games. It is a remarkable fact that not one pro- 
test was recorded, and only two games were forfeited. The trained 
•officials gave universal satisfaction, and the plan of playing on neutral 
courts eliminated the friction of diverse nationalities brought about 
by hostile audiences. The success of the tourney last season was 
unqualified. 

We believe that our yearly contest is contributing its mite of 
assistance to our city in her struggle for loyal, efficient citizenship. 
The high standard of physical fitness, encouraged first by the tryouts 
in the different centers, and then by tbe actual struggle for the cham- 
pionship insures our city a goodly crop of vigorous youths each year. 
The habits of obedience to authority and of respect for law and order, 
which are developed by our excellent rules and efficient officials, lead 
many to useful civic careers. The intermingling of immigrants 
around our courts unconsciously acquaints them with our American 
customs and helps to teach them, through use, our language and laws. 

By winning the junior championship three consecutive times, the 
teams of E. R. C. No. 188 gained permanent possession of the William 
H. Maxwell trophy. .Tames M. Motley donated to the league a hand- 
some permanent trophy to replace the Maxwell prize. The new tronhv. 
known as the "Motley Trophy," is the handsomest prize ever offered 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL. BASKET BALL GUIDE. 69 

for basket ball competition. It consists of a silver replica of a 
basket ball mounted on a mahogany base, which is adorned by a silver 
plate. The Winthrop trophy for the senior championship is the 
donation of Hon. Egerton L. Winthrop, Jr. 

The Maxwell, Motley and Winthrop trophies are at present in the 
possession of E. R. C. No. 188. This feat of holding three trophies at 
once is one that has never been duplicated in the basket ball world. 

The final games for the basket ball championship were held in 
connection with the jumping championship at the Sixty-ninth Regi- 
ment Armory, on Saturday evening, March 22, 1913. The music was 
furnished by the excellent band of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum. The 
occasion was a brilliant and successful one, and the games were 
closely contested and well played. 

Success again attended the colors of E. R. C. No. 188, whose junior 
team defeated E. R. C. No. 84 of Brooklyn, by a score of 25 to 10. 
and whose senior team defeated E. R. C. No. 117 of Brooklyn, by a 
score of 23 to 18. 

Following is a detailed summary of the tournaments : 

DISTRICT TOURNAMENTS. 

District No. 1 — All games played at E. R. C. No. 117, Brooklyn. 
Centers in tournament, Nos. 6. 19, 84, 147. 
.Junior division — won by E. R. C, No. 84. 
Senior division won by'E. R. C. No. 147. 

District No. 2 — All games played at E. R. C. No. 6. Brooklyn. 
Centers in tournament, Nos. 30, 117, 146. 
.Junior division — won by E. R. C. No. 117 
Senior division — won by E R. C. No. 117. 

District No. 3 — All games played at E. R. C. No. 188. Centers in' 
tournament, Nos. 1, 12, 16, 20, 62. 

Junior division — ^won by E. R. C. No. 16. 
Senior division — won by E. R. C. No. 1. 

District No. 4 — All games played at E. R. C. No. 16. Centers in 
tournament, Nos. 8, 21, 38, 51. 

Junior division — ^won by E. R. C. No. 3. 
Senior division — won by E. R. C. No. 21. 

District No. 5 — All games played at E. R. C. No. 158. Centers in 
tournament, Nos. 30, 40, 64, 188. 

Junior division — won by E. R. C. No. 188. 
Senior division — won by E. R. C, No. 188. 

District No. 6 — All games played at E. R. C. No. 159. Centers in 
tournament, Nos. 23, 42. 89, 158. 

Junior division — won by E. R. C. No. 42. 
Senior division — won by E. R. C. No. 89. 

District No. 7 — All games played at High School of Commerce. Cen- 
ters in tournament, Nos. 179, 71 Queens, Bryant High School. 
Junior division — won by E. R. C. No. 179. 
Senior division — won by E. R. C. No. 71 Queens. 

District No. 8 — All games played at E. R. C. No. 179. Centers Im 
tournament, Nos. 52. 159, High School of Commerce. 
Junior division — won by E. R. C. No. 159. 
Senior division— won by E. R. C. No. 159. 



SPALDING'S OJ'FICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 71 

INTER-DISTRICT GAMES. 
A — District No. 1 vs. District No. 2, at E. R. C. No. 188. 
Junior — won by E. R. C. No. 84, score, 21-4. 
Senior — won by E R. C. No. 117, score. 27-17. 

B— District No. 3 vs. District No. 4, at E. R. C. No. 188. 
Junior — won by E. R. C. No. 16, score, 23 — 18. 
Senior — won by E. R. C. No. 21, score, 14-11. 

C— District No. 5 vs. District No. 6, at E. R. C. No. 179- 
Junior — won by E R. C. No. 188, score, 34-11. 
Senior — won by E. R. C. No. 188, score, 24-10. 

D— District No. 7 vs. District No. 8, at E. R. C. No. 16. 
Junior — won by E. R. C. No. 159, score, 23-9. 
Senior — won by E. R. C. No. 71, score, 2-0. 

SEMI-FINAL GAMES. 
Winner (A) vs. winner (B), at E. R. C. No. 188. 
Junior — won by E. R. C. No. 84, score. 25-14. 
Senior — won by E. R. C. No. 117, score, 19-14. 

Winner (C) vs. winner (D), at E. R. C. No. 179. 
Junior — won by E. R. C. No. 188, score, 2-0. 
Senior— won by E. R. C. No. 188, score, 31-11. 

FINAL GAMES. 
Played at Sixty-ninth Regiment Armory. 
Junior— E. R. C. No. 84 vs. E. R. C. No. 188 — won by No. 188,, 
score, 25-10. 

Senior— B. R. C. No. 117 vs. E. R. C. No. 188 — ^won by No. 188, 
score, 23-18. 

Syracuse (N. Y.) University. — The Syracuse University basket ball team 
played eleven games, of which eight -were decisive victories. While on the 
road it lost to Colgate, Wesleyan and St. John's. Colgate and Wesleyan 
were both defeated in the return game. But one game was played with 
St. John's, at Brooklyn. However, the St. John's defeat should not mar an 
otherwise excellent record, as a crippled team faced the Brooklyn aggrega- 
tion, and the game was lost by one point. In determining the championship, 
for the year, the Syracuse University team deserves much consideration. 

Riverhead (N. Y. ) High School. — The past season was one of the most suc- 
cessful ever known in the history of athletics at the Riverhead High School, 
both in the quality of the basket ball and attendance. The management by 
B. Lutz, and the coaching by Mr. Witson placed the game upon such a high 
standard that record crowds attended all contests. The high school was rep- 
resented by a first and second team, the former playing fourteen games, 
winning ten, and the second team playing twelve, winning eight. The con- 
sistent star was John Kratoville, who excelled at guard against all comers, 
and places him with ease upon the All-Scholastic team of Long Island. His 
Bhooting was remarkable, for he made about half the points scored by the 
team. His guarding and foul shooting was fine. Ory H. Young, the other 
^ard, also surpassed any guard that he came in contact with, for he was 
quick, clever and accurate in his shooting. Stanley Cihlar played a good 
game at forward. The star of the second team was Cedric Luce, a guard. 
The outlook for next season is very good, as only two men leave for college 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 73 



Rasket Ball in Public Gymnasiums 

By Cyril H. Jones, 
Assistant Secretary Public Recreation Commission, New York City. 

Perhaps the most important result of basket ball games played by 
the teams representing the Public Recreation Commission group, was 
the inculcation among the boys and young men of the spirit of obedience 
to rules and of fair play. The majority of those who attended the 
gymnasiums and played on the teams were unfamiliar with even the 
fundamental rudiments of the game ; they were untrained, but they 
were hard players, and in earnest, and to get them to understand 
that the whole object of the game is not to play roughly was a hard 
matter. It was diflBcult also to have them understand that there 
must be no questioning of the referee's decisions, but under careful 
training the players learnt quickly, and toward the close of the season 
their natural speed enabled them to make a fair showing, although 
there was room for great improvement In team play. 

The teams representing the Rutgers Place Gymnasium were the 
most successful of the group, their heavyweight team losing only one 
of the twenty-five games played ; the game lost was that with the 
Ninety-second Street Y.M.H.A. team, one of the strongest amateur 
teams in the East. The Junior team, 115 pounds, was also very 
successful, winning nineteen out of twenty games, but the 105-pound 
team had the best season of the lot, winning twenty-seven games 
without a defeat. The 85-pound team had a record of twenty wins out 
of twenty-three games played. These games were all with local settle- 
ment, public school and playground teams, and the teams under the 
capable coaching of Instructor Charles E. Salek had a very successful 
season. 

The teams were as follows : Heavyweight — Miller f., Vitolltz c , 
Levlnson g. and manager, Bayllnson g., Maslin f. and captain, and 
Becker and Hurowitz subs. ; 115 pounds — Goldstein f. and manager, 
Gross c. Leftoff g., Weiss g., Hautman f. and captain, Slegel sub. ; 
105 pounds — Gorschen f., dayman f., Pruzan c, Burrls g., manager 
and captain ; Smith g.. Poller sub. ; 85 pounds — Lemer f.. Frost f., 
Alper c, captain and manager ; Maslin g., Jetvltsky g.. Manny sub. 

The teams of the Fifty-fourth Street and Carmine Street gym- 
nasiums had not as successful a season, from the standpoint of games 
won, as the Rutgers Place team, but during the year a number of 
boys and young men who can be developed Into fairly good players 
have joined these gymnasiums and the outlook for the coming season 
Is good. The Fifty-fourth Street heavyweight team won fifteen of the 
nineteen games played, while the Junior team was victorious In 
twenty of twenty-one games played. The members of the heavyweight 
team were : W. Ellas g., S. Kamis g., A. Vogel f., A. Gutherldge f., 
H. Carlson c, captain. Junior team : A. Johnson g., J. O'Hara g., 
George Legay f., manager ; Ellas f., H. Hollander c. 

The heavyweight team from Carmine Street, with Harrlgan c, 
Perrino f.. Levan f., McCarthy g., FracI g. and Archibald c, won 
nineteen of twenty games played. 

Owing to the closing of two gymnasiums for repairs during the 
season it was not possible to have an inter-gymnasium tournament, 
but games were played between the Fifty-fourth Street and Carmine 
Street teams and were productive of much good feeling. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 75 

Basket Ball in Connecticut 

By Charles J. tBLTE, Waterbury. Conn. 

The basket ball season of 1912-1913 in Connecticut was, without 
doubt, the biggest in the history of the game, so many different 
organizations taking part in the sport. There were the usual games 
tot all classes in the Y. M. C. A.s, the Sunday schools of a half 
dozen cities organized local leagues with many teams, the grammar 
schools played local series in several cities, while factory teams, under 
the auspices of the Y. M. C. A.s. and. in some cases, under their own 
management, played the game all winter and drew large audiences. 
A few colleges, preparatory schools and other institutions, including a 
number of local athletic clubs (semi-professional in character), all 
enjoyed the game. 

The only State or intercity league conducted was the high school or 
interscholastic league. Crosby High School of Waterbury won the 
championship honors for the first time in the history of the league. 
Besides making a splendid record in the series, they defeated a number 
of strong independent teams, such as the Yale Rovers, Wesleyan 
Sophomores and the Naugatuck All-Collegians. 

STANDING OF THE INTERSCHOLASTIC LEAGUE. 

Won. Lost. PC. Won. Lost. PC. 

Crosby 10 2 .833 IVKddletown 8 4 .666 

Hartford 8 4 .666 South Manchester.... 6 6 .500 

Naugatuck 8 4 .666 New Britain 2 10 .166 

Reports from over the State prove that the game is as popular as 
ever, as is shown by the attendance figures. Thousands of children 
witnessed the grammar school league games in the several cities con- 
ducting them. The greatest attendance at a high school ^ame on 
record is 1,000, while In one city the shop league games drew an 
average of 350, with 800 for the best single attendance. 

A. A. U. rules were used by nearly all leagues, excepting, of course, 
the colleges and some of the preparatory schools. The games were 
comparatively clean, but not as they should have been. Good oflacials 
made it possible to hold most of the games down to what the rules 
call for, but they were In many cases criticised for being too severe. 





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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 77 



Basket Ball in Maine 

By Nestor Matson, 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., Portland, Me, 

There is no doubt that basket ball was the leading sport In this 
State last season. Many new teams came to the front, and some even 
claim the State championship. 

The game is most active among the preparatory schools, but a large 
iiumber of athletic clubs are phiying throughout the State. Of course, 
the Y. M. C. A.s all have representative teams in the many classes, 
and most of them run inter-association leagues, similar to the plan of 
the Portland association. 

There are few suggestions as to the rules of the .game, but the inter- 
pretation of them differs widely in various sections. In the Eastern 
eection the officials are very liberal, and it seems as though the public 
liked that kind of an exhibition, while in the Western section a much 
cleaner game is played. This is due to the difference in the laxity of 
the ofBcials. 

The Waseca Club, as in the previous season, has the strongest claim 
on the State championship, having defeated some of the fastest teams 
in New England. The Bangor Y.M.(!.A. is undisputed champion of the 
Eastern section, and made a fine record last season. 

The Thirty-seventh Company of Fort McKinley made the best show- 
ing among the fort teams, and won the championship of the Inter-Post 
League. 

The Portland Y.M.C.A. had a decidedly strong team, and played a 
hard schedule. Including many of the best Massachusetts teams. 

The association leagues again proved a great success, in which no 
less than 288 different boys played. 

Tarrytown (N. Y.) Y.M.C.A. — The Tarrytown Y.M.C.A. team enjoyed a 
highly successful season in IDlli-lOl.'J, the first iu its new building. Twenty- 
seven games were played, of which eighteen were won. The team was fast 
and steady. That the game is popular in Tarrytown was shown by the large 
attendances at each contest. Next season is looked forward to with a great 
deal of interest. 

Crescent Athletic Club, Flushing-, N. Y. — The season of 1912-13 was the 
third the Crescents have had a basket ball team to represent them, but it 
was the first that they have had any success. In the previous seasons the 
team had been made up of the same players, but iu V.W2 Vi Captain Gelwicks 
dropped a number of the old players and added new and better ones. Sidey 
and Gelwicks were the only ones to remain. With tliis team the (Crescents 
captured fourteen of their twenty games, which gave them a percentage of 
.700. The tofal number of points scored was 400 against 275 by their oppo- 
nents. Considering the fact that the Crescents had no court on which to 
practice the team did very well and hopes for better success in 1913-14, when 
they expect to be able to hire a court. 

Rumford (Me.) High School. — Having won seventeen out of twenty games, 
and by defeating all the strongest hijjh school teams in the State, the Kum- 
ford quintet claims the high school basket ball championship of Maine. 
Their only defeat by a State team was at the hands of the Edward Little 
five, and Auburn, by 18 to i;^ In this game Kumford was weakened by the 
loss of two of its best players. As an offset to this defeat, however, Kum- 
ford overwhelmed the Edward Little boys to the tune of 49 to 19, at 
Rumford. In the twenty games played, Uumford scored a total of 842 points 
to 300 for opponents. The five also broke all team and Individual records 
when Phillips High Schwl was defeated, l.'i.'i — 6, and Richardson, All-Maine 
forward, scored 409 points during the season. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 79 



Basket Ball in Rhode Island 

By Franklin E. Edgecomb, 
Captain, Coast Artillery Corps, R. I. N. G. 

" The basket ball season of 1912-1913 in Rhode Island was, to a cer- 
tain degree, very successful. So far as individual teams and a few- 
leagues were concerned, the season might be called a marked success, 
jet the general interest in the sport was not what it should have 
been. One reason for this lack of interest was, I think, due to the 
fact that a number of the high and preparatory schools throughout 
the State have given up the sport, and as a result it is impossible 
to form an interscholastic league. Also the fact that Brown Univer- 
sity was not represented by a 'varsity team made it impossible for 
the local followers of intercollegiate basket ball to see any of the 
faster college teams during the season. 

The Providence Armory Basket Ball League, made up of eight teams 
from the National Guard and Naval Militia, played a series of four- 
teen games during the season. The final standing of the teams was 
as follows : 

Won. Lost. PC. W?)n. Lost. PC. 

Battery A 13 1 .929 3cl Company, C.A.C.. 6 8 .429 

Troop C 11 3 .786 1st Company. C.A.C. 5 9 .357 

2d Company, C.A.C. 9 5 .643 17th Co., C.A.C 3 11 .214 

Naval Reserves 8 6 .571 lltli Co., C.A.C 1 13 .071 

The league was, to a certain extent, better balanced than in the 
previous season, as there was no team represented by a large number 
of star players, and as a result the teams as a whole made marked 
Improvement in team work. 

Battery A. after a poor start, completed the season with only one 
defeat, although made up of practically the same players as in the 
previous season, when they tied for sixth place. The championship 
was won by the Battery by good team work, well planned floor work, 
and good passing. Other teams in the league, which at the first of 
the season appeared to have a very good chance for the championship, 
failed to make good because of too much individual work. 

The champions were made up of Nelson and Bullock, forwards ; 
Budlong. center, and Babcock and Chace, guards. Nelson was a fast 
forward and a good shot. Bullock was a hard worker and proved a 
good partner for Nelson. Budlong, although a new man, was very suc- 
<*essful at center, Babcock was a fast guard and assisted greatly in 
the team work, and Captain Chace played a very strong defensive 
game. 

Troop C, which finished second, was fortunate in having two very 
good forwards in Doris and Captain Schofield, and fast guards in 
Haire .and Cauchon. The Second Company, although strong individ- 
ually. Oid not play the game they were expected to. 

The -Naval Reserves team, after a very discouraging start, got a 
fast team together and played a number of very good contests. Kelley 
showed up strong at center, and Captain Carr, aside from being a 
good guard, was very successful at shooting from the foul line, leading 
the league in this department. 

The teams in the second division played some good games, but were 
unfortunate in not having better material to pick from. The players 
seemed to enjoy the games, and are now looking forward to next 
season, with the idea of having a faster league in 1914. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 81 

Although Brown University was not represented by a 'varsity team, 
the students had an opportunity to take part in the interclass games. 
Each class was represented by a fast team, and some interesting 
games took place during the series. The junior team, made up of 
Smith and Sbepard forwards. Hodges center, and Durgin and Gardiner 
guards, won the championship. 

Rho<le Island State College at Kingston was represented by a good 
team last season, and still holds the record of not being defeated on 
their own floor. It is unfortunate that, owing to the fact that this 
college has no natural rival in the vicinity, they are not to be repre- 
sented by a 'varsity team next season. 

There were some very fast teams among the high and preparatory 
schools in the State last season, but, as stated before, there was no 
Interscholastic league, and the teams did not play a series of games. 
The East Greenwich Academy and the team representing Roger High 
School of Newport had the best records, but as they did not meet it 
is hard to choose between them for the State championship. 

There were several independent teams throughout the State which 
played good basket ball. Perhaps the best known were the Colonials 
and the Bast Siders, both of Providence. 

Among the churches and boys clubs there were a number of teams 
made up of younger boys. They played some good games, and some 
of them, especially those in the Church League, turned out a number 
of fast players. 

Many try to make us believe that basket ball is doomed, and that 
because certain colleges have given up the sport the game has lost its 
former hold on the public. To a certain extent this seems true, yet, 
on looking into the matter, we find that in most cases the game has 
been dropped because of lack of a proper floor or adequate seating 
capacity for the public or for local reasons. 

Basket ball is still attractive to a great many people in Rhode 
Island, who enjoy indoor sports, and is, when properly handled, one 
of the best games for the winter season. 

St. Mary's College Third Team, San Antonio, Tex. — St. Mary's five -won 
the minim championship of San Antonio by defeating the Brackenridge 
quintet in two out of three games by the following scores: St. Mary's 19, 
Brackenridge 16; St. Mary's 11, Brackenridge 23; St. Mary's 13, Bracken- 
ridge 10. 

Muskogee (Okla.) Central High School. — The basket ball season of 1912-13 
began in the early part of December. More than seventy aspirants played in 
the games preliminary to the choosing of the squad of twenty, from which 
were chosen the finall seven men for the first team. One and one-half hours 
of strenuous daily practice under the best coaching turned out a champion- 
ship team from the material that had had no experience at all to start with. 
The first game was on January 17, with Sallisaw. at Muskogee. The latter 
was outclassed in every particular. The score was 59 to 12. The next game 
was with Stigler, at Muskogee, but that team was no more of a match than 
Sallisaw. Then came a game with Henry Kendall Academy of Tulsa on 
January 31, at Muskogee. These boys had experience and coaching, but 
lacked team work. They were defeated. 44. to 10. At Van Buren, Ark., on 
a very small court and with crowded side lines, the Muskogee men met their 
first reverse. 32 — 28. Then came the defeat of the Alumni. 32—14. The 
next contests were with Vinita High School, the strongest rival and one of the 
best in the State. The first game was fought desperately, but it was clean 
and fast, close playing and accurate shooting being very much in evidence. 
Muskogee won. 40 to 25. The second game was also won by the Muskogee 
team, which gave them the title of champions of Eastern Oklahoma. On the 
"Western side of the State the claimants for the title were Shawnee. Black- 
well. Duncan and Durant. The title was settled by a tournament at Okla.-- 
homa City, in which Duncan won out. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 83 

Church Athletic League of New York 
Championships 

By Edwin S. Bettelheim, Jr., Secretary. 

Outside of interscholastic and intersettlement matches, organized 
and regulated basket ball among the many clubs on Manhattan Island, 
having teams, is lacking. Thvre are few or no leagues, or tourna- 
ments, for the lovers of the sport. Discouragingly few clubs responded 
to the Metropolitan Association's canvass for the holding of a cham- 
pionship tournament during the season of 1912-13. However, with 
the running off of the Church Athletic League's championships the 
past year, the way has been paved for a big A. A. U. tournament the 
coming season. 

The writer met with some difficulty in starting a tournament out 
of this same chaos of the "Un-Get-Together-Ness." Finally, by the 
1st of January, 1913, teams consisting of eight men each, from the 
St. George A.C., Bronx Church House, Grace Club, Madison Square 
Mens Club, Xavier A.A. and East Harlem Presbyterian Club, were 
entered in the 135-pound class. There were also teams in the 120- 
pound class, from Christ Church Club, East Harlem Presbyterian Club, 
Xavier A. A., and the Bronx Church House. The conditions of the 
tournament were that each club was permitted to enter a team of 
eight men who were weighed in (each man being under the specified 
weight). The contestant's signature and general description were 
taken prior to the opening of the first game of the series. These men 
only were allowed to participate in any match. Whenever a protest 
was made against anv player, the same data was re-taken and com- 
pared with the original. The result of the tournament is as follows : 
STANDING OP THE TEAMS. 
135-POUND CLASS. 
'Won. Lost. PC. Won. Lost. PC. 

Bronx Church House. 9 1 .900 St. George 3 7 .300 

Grace Club 8 2 .800 Madison Square 3 7 .300 

East Harlem 4 6 .400 Xavier 3 7 .300 

120-POUND CLASS. 
"Won. Lost. PC. Won. Lost. PC. 

Christ Church Club. 6 O 1.000 East Harlem 2 4 .333 

Bronx Church House 3 3 .500 Xavier A.A 1 5 .166 

The series lasted from January 2 well on to March. 7. Home and 

home games were played as follows : 

135-POUND CLASS. I 

Bronx Ch. Ho. 44, Xavier 34. Xavier 18, Bronx Ch. Ho. 60. 

East Harlem 34, Mad. Sq. 48. St. George 0, Mad. Sq. 2. 

Xavier 24, Grace 26. Xavier 0, Easti Harlem 2. 

St. George 13, Xavier 72. Mad. Sq. 0, Grace 2. 

Mad. Sq. 33, Bronx Ch. Ho. 52. St. George 0, Bronx Ch. Ho. 2. 

Grace 2, Xavier 0. Grace 26, East Harlem 29. 

Grace 24, Mad. Sq. 19. Bronx Ch. Ho. 2, Mad. Sq. 0. 

Grace 17, Bronx Ch. Ho. 54. Xavier 0, St. George 2. 

East Harlem 17, Bronx Ch. Ho. 61. Bronx Ch. Ho. IS, Grace 30. 

Xavier 0. Mad. Sq. 2. Mad. Sq. 0, East Harlem 2. 

East Harlem 0, Grace 2. Grace 28, St. George 12. 

Bronx Ch. Ho. 54. St. George 33. Mad. Sq. 0, Xavier 2. 

Bast Harlem 0, Xavier 2. Mad. Sq. 0, St. George 2. 

St. George 12, Grace 24. Bronx Ch. Ho. 24, East Harlem 21. 

East Harlem 0, St. George 2. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 85 

120-POUND CLASS. 

Bronx Ch. Ho. 42, Xavler 22. East Harlem 0, Christ Ch. CI. 2. 

Christ Ch. CI. 38, East Harlom 17. Xavier 18, Bronx Ch. Ho. M,. 

Christ Ch. CI. 24, Bronx Ch. Ho. 21. Xavier 0, East Harlem 2. 

Xavier A. A. 38. Christ Ch. CI. 77. Bronx Ch. Ho. 19. Christ Ch. CI. 57. 

East Harlem 21. Bronx Ch. Ho. 28. Christ Ch. CI. 60, Xavier' 16. 

East Harlem 0^ Xavier 2. Bronx Ch. Ho. 0, East Harlem 2. 

The Bronx Church House team played a strong game throughout 
the entire tournament, which they were forced to do, however, as the 
<jrace Club team was dangerously pressing them for the premier 
honors up to the very last game of the season. Each team had defeated 
the other upon its own court. Grace lost to East Harlem near the 
end of the tournament, and then all awaited to see how the Bronx 
Church House team would fare with the same team, which game was 
the last one of the season. If Bronx had lost it would have necessi- 
ta^d their playing off the tie with Grace, so the former were on their 
mettle. The game was well fought, each team holding the other down 
to close scores, but the remarkable shooting of Smith won the game 
and championship for Bronx, by the score of 24 to 21. 

East Harlem, the dangerous opponent to both the above teams, and 
Madison Square both played good ball, but lost a number of their 
games by forfeit. This is a very foolish policy for any team to adhere 
to, because If there ever came a slump in one of the leading teams 
they would not be there to jump into the gap and take the lead. 

St. George and Xavier played an uphill game from the beginning of 
the tournament, by being handicapped with crippled teams just after 
the series started. 

As may be expected, Bronx Church House tejam ran up the high 
score in points, 371, with Grace, 191, and Xavier, 150, their nearest 
opponents. 

Christ Church Club simply ran away with the 120-pound trophy, 
winning every one of their games. There never seemed a doubt of 
their supremacy in this class. Their playing was uniform and clock- 
like. Bronx Church House second team, their nearest opponent, just 
managed to break even on the series. The East Harlems and Xaviers. 
showing was due to that regrettable plague in basket ball, of non- 
appearances and forfeitures. The points scored by each team in this 
class were : Chri.st Church Club 258, Bronx Church House 175, 
Xavier 96, East Harlem 42. 

The tournament, as a whole, was very successful and bids well for 
next season's series and basket ball in general. The play was kept 
clean and open by the religious enforcement of the rules, as found in 
Spalding's Official Basket Ball Guide, by the officials. The play- 
ers learned this after the first few games and by acting accordingly, 
showed the true and desirable sportsmanlike spirit in alj succeeding 
matches. 

In picking an all-round league team, the following players stand out 
prominent : 

First Team. Position. Second Team. 

Geist, Bronx. Church House Forward Steck, Grace 

Brickson, Madison Square Forvs^ard Schmidt, Brooix Church. House 

Enger, Bronx Church House Center Sanders, Christ Church Club 

H. Minervirl. East Harlem Guard Kenny, Xavier 

T. Williams, Grace Guard Schenk, Madison Square 

Hospital Five, Cedar Grove, N. J. — This team, representing the Essex 
County Hospital, completed another successful sea^^on in 1912-1913, winning^ 
twenty-two out of thirty games played. Captain Traubman also led the prev- 
ious season's team, which was credited with twenty-six victories and only five- 
defeats. 



SrALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 87 

Youn^ Men's Hebrew Associations' 
Athletic Leadue, 1912-13 

Secretary Y. M. H. A. Athletic League, New York; ' 

Chairman Metropolitan Association A. A. U. Basket Ball Committee, 

Tlie following teams were represented in the basket ball tournament 
of the Y. M. H. A. Athletic League during the season of 1912-1913 : 
Ninety-second Street (Manhattan) Y.M.H.A., Bronx Y.M.H.A., Yonkers 
Y.M.H.A., Mt. Vernon Y.M.H.A., South Brooklyn Y.M.H.A., Bayonne 
Y.M.H.A., Brownsville Y.M.H.A. and Perth Amboy Y.M.H.A. 

The schedule, consisting of two games with each team, one at home 
and one abroad, commenced on Election Day and ended February 12 
(Lincoln's Birthday). 

The Ninety-second Street Y.M.H.A. team, which had played together 
for several years, and outweighed all other teams in the league, easily 
outclassed their associates, and there was little doubt of its ultimate 
victory from the very beginning. With the exception of the two tail- 
enders, Mt. Vernon and Bronx^ the other teams in the league we're 
quite evenly matched, and there was a close fight for the runner-up 
position. The Brownsville team, with its superior experience, man- 
aged to beat out the others and won second place in the final stand- 
ing. The Yonkers and South Brooklyn teams were tied for third and 
fourth place, with Bayonne and Perth Amboy finishing fifth and sixth, 
all closely bunched. Mt. Vernon and Bronx brought up the rear, in 
the order named. Neither team was able to win a single game from 
any of the other teams, and Mt. Vernon just managed to defeat Bronx 
in two games by close scores. It is a peculiar coincidence that Mt. 
Vernon is one of the "angels" of the league in basket ball, but it has 
twice won the base ball championship of the Y. M. H. A. Athletic 
League. 

In addition to cleaning up the entire league without the loss of a 
single game, the Ninety-second Street team defeated many of the best 
amateur heavyweight fives in the vicinity of New York — that is, those 
teams which were willing to take a chance with it — and lost but two 
games, one to the College Settlement five, which team, however, was 
defeated in two return games. The only other defeat was bv the 
Aranac A.C., at Harrison, N. Y., 27 — 32, which was amply revenged 
later in the season on the Aranac's home court, the Y. M. H. A. team 
winning by the overwhelming score of 48 — 21. 

A special series was arranged with the Y. M. H. A. of Philadelphia, 
which had defeated many of the best teams in the eastern part of 
Pennsylvania, and has also defeated all of the Y. M. H. A.s in and 
about Philadelphia. The series was, therefore, for the championship 
of the Y. M. H. A.s of the eastern part of the United States. The 
rules in vogue in Philadelphia were quite different from those around 
New York, particularly in the strictness of the foul rules and. also, 
the backboard is twelve inches from the basket Instead of six inclies,. 
as required by A. A, U. rules. 

The first game of the Philadelphia series was played on the New 
York's court, directly after the close of the league season, and resulted 
in an easy victory for the home team, 56 — 21. The Philadelphians 
could not become accustomed to the A. A. U. rules until too late to 
save the game. 

A week later a return game was played in Philadelphia, and, as. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 89 

expected, the result was in doubt at all times. The New Yorkers 
were quite handicapped with the strict foul rules, and more especially 
they had a great deal of trouble in locating the basket. The Phila- 
delphians put up a plucky fight, and with but five minutes to play 
in the second half were ahead, 22 — 20, and it seemed that a third 
game, on a neutral court, would be necessary. At this point the 
entire New York team played the locals off their feet and by a won- 
derful spurt bewildered the natives with five successive goals in as 
many minutes, and the final gong found the New Yorkers ahead, 
30—22. 

The final standing of the clubs in the tournament of the league 
was as follows : 

Won. Lost. PC. Won. Lost. PC. 

Ninety-second Street. 14 1.000 Bayonne 8 6 .571 

Brownsville 8 4 .667 Perth Amboy 7 7 .500 

Yonkers 7 5 .583 Mount Vernon 2 12 .143 

South Brooklyn 7 5 .583 Bronx 14 .000 

One of the real features of the league was the efficiency of the 
referees, professionals, consisting of the following staff, under the 
direction of the secretary of the league : Samuel Harris, Ira Streu- 
sand, James Ginnerty, Charles Salek. Harris, in particular, was 
unusually competent. 

The entire tournament was in charge of a committee appointed by 
President Shiman, consisting of the following : Rudolph Friedman, 
South Brooklyn Y.M.H.A. ; Dr. B. Feldman, Perth Amboy Y.M.H.A. ; 
H. M. Propper, Bronx Y.M.H.A. ; Alexander Roseff, Mt. Vernon Y.M. 
H.A. ; H. D. Henschel, Ninety-second Street Y.M.H.A. 

Some of the rules adopted and put in force for the tournament 
were as follows : 

No man was eligible to play who had not been, a bona-fide member 
of his respective Y. M. H. A. at least five weeks before the opening 
of the season. 

No man was eligible to participate in league games who played on 
any other team, such as school, college, etc. 

Spalding's Ofl5cial "M" ball was used in all league games. 

The rules of the Amateur Athletic League were adopted and rigidly 
adhered to at all times. 

At the beginning of the season each manager was required to fur- 
nish the committee the names of ten men eligible to play under the 
rules in league games, and this list was sent to all the managers. 
Only the men shown on the list were allowed to play, which prevented 
teams being changed during midseason. 

For next season, unless the two tail end teams can be very mate- 
rially strengthened, we will probably have a six-team circuit, quite 
likely better balanced than last season. 

On the whole, we can truthfully say that we had a very successful 
season, drew large audiences, and popularized the game more than 
ever among the various Y. M, H. A.'s in and about New York. 




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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 91 



Basket Ball in Brooklyn 

By Joseph F. Hanley, Fordham University. 

The season of 1912-1913 was by far the most successful since the 
game was first introduced to the "Borough of Homes." This can be 
traced to two important factors, namely : the realization by most 
of the teams that a clean game is the only one desired and that rough 
work in no way tends to make basket ball popular, and secondly, tne 
interest displayed by the newspapers, for it is mainly upon the press 
that the success or failure of a sport in a large measure depends. 
Another fact that cannot be overlooked, was the sportsmanlike tactics 
displayed by the spectators at most of the games throughout the 
borough. 

In collegiate circles, St. John's College must again be given first 
honors. They played the longest schedule in years, and while not so 
successful as in the previous year, nevertheless they made a very 
creditable showing. Their list of victories include Yale, Princeton, 
Syracuse, Niagara, Fordham. Manhattan and Toronto. In Tracey 
and Molloy, St. John's had two of the best players in the State and 
it was mainly to their all around work that Claude Allan's combination 
made the record it did. 

Polytechnic Institute had one of the best teams in its history, 
as is evidenced by the defeats of the Crescent A.C. and Niagara, the 
latter being decided after two extra periods of play. Pratt had a 
fair team and played a long and bard schedule. The defeat of Union 
at Schenectady was the most notable victory scored last season by 
Pratt. 

The real interest in basket ball in Brooklyn centers upon the games 
of the athletic and church clubs. It is at these games that one has 
to go in order to really know the real status of the game. The best 
halls are the scenes of some of the greatest games in the Eastern 
states, and I doubt if there is a city, in which no leagues exist, where 
interest is at a higher pitch than it is in this borough. 

The past season marked an mportant epoch in the history of the 
game in Brooklyn. The teams that had formerly played in the light- 
weight division stepped into the shoes of their older brothers, and the 
change was wonderful. It revolutionized the game entirely, for the 
teams that had once been thought to be invincible fell easy victims 
to the awful onslaught of the "young bloods." Toward the close of 
the season of 1911-1912 and at the beginning of the past season. 
Interest in the games of the heavyweight teams was waning, and this 
chanf^e, coming as it did, was just the one thing needed to arouse spirit 
and make the game interesting once more. 

The St. James Triangles, which defeated every lightweight team of 
any note last season, cast its fortune with the heavyweights. Sup- 
plemented by Norman and Ruckert, former stars of St. John's College, 
the team was greatly strengthened. Their record, while not quite as 
phenomenal as last season, was indeed very creditable, inasmuch as 
every team they played against completely outweighed them, man to- 
man. They are now the undisputed champions of the Eastern states, 
and rightly so. In winning the series from the Crescents of Paterson, 
and by their defeating such teams as St. Gabriel's of Manhattan, the 
Winto'n team of Connecticut, the Johnstown team of Pennsylvania, 
Peekskill team of New York State, and a host of others, they justly 
earned the title to the championship. The great passing game for 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 93 

whic'u they were noted was not so conspicuous as in the previous sea- 
son. It took some time for Norman and Ruckert to get used to team 
work, and this often had dire results. Three Brooklyn teams defeated 
the Triangles last season, St. Stephens, Park Circle team, and St. 
Brendans. Inasmuch as the Triangles defeated St. Stephens and St. 
Brendans very often, these defeats take no credit away from this 
hand of youngsters, who, more than any one team playing any sport 
in Brooklyn, have done more to lift the fair name of the borough to 
the top notch in the pages of sportdom. 

On their record, and as the Triangles were the only team to defeat 
them on their home floor, second place must be accorded to St. 
Stephen's Lyceum. This season was not so successful as it might 
have been, as interest was not as great, due to the fact that their team 
was entirely too strong for most of the teams it met. Their court 
was far from ideal, and this occasioned much rough work, which spec- 
tators, as a rule, abhor. They succeeded in defeating the Triangles 
on the latter's court, being the second Brooklyn team to accomplish 
this feat. 

A team which, like the Triangles, entered the lists of the heavy- 
weight class and came out a success, was the Visitation Parish Club. 
Never in the history of this club has so much interest been displayed 
toward basket ball. Playing a schedule that brought to the Point 
flection of the borough some of the best teams of New York and New 
Jersey, and strictly adhering to clean play, it is no small wonder that 
they attained the name they now possess in local basket ball circles. 
In Ewing and Daly of Triangle fame, together with Fitzpatrick of last 
.season's five, this team possessed three of the best all around players 
In Brooklyn. Their list of victories includes such teams as St. Michael's 
Lyceum of Bay Ridge, Cedarhurst, Hempstead. St. Michael's of West 
Hoboken, Trinity A.A. of New York, Diamond Five of Hackensack, St. 
Peter's C.L.A. and many others. They lost but one game on the home 
■court, St. Michael's of Bay Ridge pulling out a victory by the close 
score of 22-21. Their season was a success from every viewpoint, due 
to the untiring efforts of their energetic manager, William Smith. 

St, Brendan's Lyceum of the Gravesend section, was another new 
addition to the heavyweight division. They played a long, hard 
schedule, pulling out victorious in the majority of their games and 
crowning their season with victories over the Triangles and St. 
Stephen's Lyceum. Their new gymnasium contains one of the best 
■courts in the city and this is sure to work wonders with the team next 
year. In Beckman they possessed the best forward in the city and 
many of their victories may be traced to his unerring eye. 

St. Michaels of Bay Ridge put a fair team on the floor, but owing 
to internal dissensions it was forced to abandon its schedule toward 
the close of the season. Malone. formerly of the Triangles; was the 
one bright shining light In all their games. 

St. Peter's C.L.A, had not the team they had the previous season. 
New faces appeared in their line-up at nearly every game. It can 
readily be seen that experimenting of this kind cannot bring good 
results, at least, for the present. However, when next season roHs 
around they hope to develop their team to such a state that it will 
be much more of a contender than it was during the past season. 

The Park Circle team had a short, but noteworthy existence. Their 
best game was their defeat of the Triangles. Owing to lack of interest 
in the Park section their manager was compelled to cancel their 
schedule, 

Thfe Trinity Triangles appeared as one of the contenders for the 
heavyweight title. Although outweighed by nearly every team they 
met, they came out victors in most of their games. Included in their 
list are : the Boys' Club of New York, St. Vincent de Pauls and the 
Knights of St. Anthony, In their line-up appeared Dorr of St, Breu' 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 95 

dans. Drivdahl of St. Stephens and Dolan of St. Agnes. With this 
nucleus for next season great things are expected of this team. 

In the Williamsbui-g section St. Vincent de Paul's Lyceum had 
things their own way. They played a very hard schedule, pulling out 
many victories. They lost two very interesting games, one to Niagara 
University and one to the Catholic University of America team. 
Franznick and Overend were the two men who greatly aided the 
Saints in making the record they did. The Knights of St. Anthony' 
also had a good team, but their schedule could in no way compare 
with St. Vincent's. 

Trinity Club, Patrician Club, Glenmore A.C, of Bath Beach, St. 
Paul's Lyceum and St. Malachys all had good teams, but on their 
season's showing they must give way to their older and more experi- 
enced rivals. 

In the towns suburban to Brooklyn, and especially on Long Island, 
the game received more attention than heretofore. Rockville Centre 
placed a fine quintet on the floor and was easily the best of the Island 
teams. Hempstead, Cedarhurst, Crescent A.C, St. Michaels and many 
other well known teams are listed in their number of victims. They 
"were the only club team that defeated Toronto University, when the 
Canadians made their Christmas trip to Brooklyn. Osterhout, the 
former Columbia University star, and SmoUick were the two who 
made victory possible on many occasions for the Centre men. 

Hempsteads' team was new and consequently much could not be 
expected of them last season. Cedarhurst could not compare with 
either Hempstead or Rockville Centre, as they sustained defeats from 
both of these teams. 

With the younger enthusiasts the game was more popular than it 
has ever been. New teams sprang up, and this, coupled with the fact 
that nearly all the teams in this division were evenly matched, pro- 
duced the situation always watched for by the enthusiast, namely, 
good, clean, hard fought games. St. James' Mahatmas came out on 
top in most of their games, and the exhibition of fast team work that 
was displayed at all their games entitles them to premier honors in 
the lightweight division. Loyola Five, St. Stephen's Cubs, Visitation 
Lightweights, Trinity Triangles, St, Paul's Circles and St. Brendan's 
Arrows all had good teams and played hard and interesting schedules. 

The prospects for the coming season are exceedingly bright. Taking 
the spirit displayed last season, as a criterion, it is safe to assume 
that a league will be safely launched next season which will bring 
together the best teams in and around the borough. The different 
teams realize from past experience that a league, properly conducted, 
is the one thing needed to add interest and eliminate the rough style 
of play that predominates to some extent at games. » 

Another great mark of improvement witnessed last season, was the 
ofl3ciating of college men at the games of the different clubs. All of 
these men had played the game and, hence, were well acquainted with 
all the technique of basket ball. This change of policy on the part of 
managers proved a boon to the game, for whenever these men offici- 
ated, the spectators were sure to witness a good, clean contest, devoid 
of rough work of any kind. 

Lebam (Wash.) High School.— During the 1912-13 season, the Lebam High 
School, a member of the Washington High School Athletic Association, made 
a good record at basket ball. The team won seven out of nine games, the 
opposing fives being from towns on the Willlapa Harbor line, and as a 
result of these encounters the Lebam team is generally credited with the 
■championship of Southwest Washington. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



Buffalo Grammar School League 

Bv Arthur N. Cotton, 
Boj's' Work Director, Buffalo Central Y. M. C. A. 

The Buffalo Grammar School Basket Ball League, which was organ- 
ized in 1905 by the writer, became a part of the Public School Ath- 
letic League, formed in 1907. 

From 1905 to 1907 there was but one division in the league, and 
boys of all size and age were allowed to play on the teams. In 190S 
the league was divided into two classes — class A for the larger boys 
competing for the Y. M. C. A. cup, and class B for the smaller boys 
competing for the King & Eisele trophy. From 1905 to 1910 the games 
were played in the boys' gymnasium of the Central Y.M.C.A.. on Tues- 
day evenings. Since 1911 the games have been played in the schools 
that are equipped with gymnasiums or assembly halls. This change 
was made to do away with the evening games "that a great many of 
the school principals and parents objected to. Under this arrange- 
ment thirty schools entered the league in 1911. 

Last season was the most successful ever handled by the Public 
School Athletic League. Fifty-four teams were entered, and a new 
division created to take care of the smaller boys of the fifth and sixth 
grades. 

School No. 20, having won the Class A cup in 1908, 1909 and 1912, 
the Y. M. C. A. trophy will have a permanent place in its trophy case. 
School No. 51 won the Class B trophy in 1909, 1910 and 1912. the 
King & Eisele cup thus becoming the property of that school. On the 
opening of the Basket Ball League season of 1912 the trophy commit- 
tee had to look for three new trophies. 

G. Barry Rich, Jr., for the Boys' Work Committee, replaced the 
Y. M. C. A. cup for Class A ; King & Eisele duplicated the cup won by 
School No. 51 for Class B competition, and the Buffalo Poultry and 
Pet Stock Association supplied the new trophy for Class C. 

The classifications for last season were : Class A — Unlimited weight 
and height. No boy who had passed his seventeenth birthday on the 
first day of September was allowed to play in the league : Class B— 
For boys less than sixty inches in height ; Class C — For boys less 
than fifty-six inches in height. These divisions seemed the fairest 
possible and entire satisfaction prevailed. 

The teams were divided into sub-leagues for convenience, and the 
winners of these leagues played in the semi-finals. Following were 
the schools entered and their classes : 

Class A— Nos. 6, 8, 16, 17, 18, 19, 22, 24, 26, 28, 38, 44, 53, 56. 
and 60. 

Class B— Nos. 1, 2. 5, 15. 16, 17. 18. 19. 20, 24, 26, 29, 32, 38, 39. 
41. 43, 44. 51. 52, 56, 59, 62 and School of Practice. 

Class C— Nos. 1, 2, 20, 22, 29, 43, 47, 51, and School of Practice. 

Physical directors from the school department, Y. M. C. A., and 
playground employees acted as officials. The behavior of the players- 
was excellent at all times. But one boy was disqualified during the 
season, and only four Class B fouls recorded. It was the first season 
in the history of the Buafflo Public School Athletic League that the 
protest committee did not have a protest to act upon from the basket 
ball committee, thus showing the excellent work of the officials during 
the season. 

The winners in the sub-leagues were as follows : 







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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 99 

Class A — School No. 16 in sub-league one, School No. 17 in sub- 
league t^^o, School No. 19 in sub-league three, School No. 28 in sub- 
league four. 

Class B — School No. 1 in sub-league one, School No. 20 in sub- 
league two. School No. 52 in sub-league three, School No. 41 in sub- 
league four. 

Class C — School No. 60 in sub-league one, School No. 1 in sub- 
league two. School No. 20 in sub-league three. School No. 29 in sub- 
league four. 

A request was made that the semi-finals and finals be played on a 
neutral court, where a larger number of spectators could be accommo- 
dated, than in the assembly rooms or gymnasiums of the schools. This 
"request was granted and the boys' gymnasium of the Central Y.M.C.A. 
secured for Saturday evenings, January 18 and 25, 1913. 

The semi-finals were played before a crowded house on January 18. 
School No. 28 defeated School No. 19 in Class A in a very close 
game, in which guarding featured. School No. 28 made three field 
goals and two foul throws out of four trials. School 19 secured three 
field goals and one from the foul line. The final score was 8 to 7. In 
the second game. School No. 16 defeated School No. 17 by the score of 
13 to 7. The winners secured three field baskets and seven foul throws 
out of eight trials. The losers made two field throws and three from 
the foul line. 

In the first game for Class B teams, School No. 41 defeated School 
No. 52, 12 to 4, the winners making five field goals and two fouls out 
of seven called, and the losers four points on two field goals. In the 
second game School No. 1 defeated School No. 20, 17 to 8. No. 1 
made four field and one foul throw in the first half and three field 
and two foul goals in the second half. School No. 20 made all of its 
eight points on field goals. 

In Class C, School No. 60 defeated School No. 20 in a close game, 
the final score being 8 to 6. School No. 60 made four field goals and 
missed three trials from the foul line. School No. 20 two field goals 
and two from the foul line. In the final game of the evening School 
No. 1 defeated School No. 29. 21 to 7. No. 1 made ten field goals 
and one foul throw, and No. 28 three field and one foul. 

The finals were played on the following Saturday evening, and the 
seating capacity of the gymnasium was taxed to its limit. The first 
game was between Schools Nos. 1 and 60, in the Class C division. 
School No. 1 won by the close score of 6 to 5, the winners securing 
three field goals and the losers one field goal and three foul throws. 
The second game was for the Class B teams. School No. 41 defeating 
School No. 1 for the championship. The score, 8 to 7, will indicate 
that some game was played. The winning team scored three field 
goals and two from the fifteen-foot line. The losers made only one 
field goal, and five out of the seven trials from the foul line. 

The third and last game of the 1912-13 season was a very closely 
fought game, which was in doubt until the final whistle was blown. 
The score was 11 to 9. School No. 28, the winners, secured three 
field baskets and five out of the eight fouls called. The losers. School 
No. 16, made three field goals and three from the foul line. 

With the additional play centers in the two new school buildings 
now under construction, the league looks for a larger entry and a 
better season next fall. 

Orioles of Pennsylvania Railroad Y.M.C.A., Altoona, Pa. — With a record 
of sixteen victories and only two defeats last season, this team won the 
junior basket ball championship of Blair County. The Orioles scored 537 
points against their opponents' 301 points. The team, which was organized 
in November, 1912, rapidly developed into a fast combination, winning a 
number of decisive victories from seemingly strong fives. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. IQL 



Public Athletic League of Baltimore 

By W. Springer Pitman, 
I Supervisor Public School Tournament. 

There were several noteworthy features in the second annual basket 
ball tournament for public school boys. An additional class — making 
three — for players of unlimited weight was organized. Teachers and 
scholars from the schools entering teams were present in large num- 
bers at the games, and sixty-one teams were entered as against thirty 
in 1911-12. 

As in all public school events, entrants were required to have a 
satisfactory rating in deportment and scholarship, and to have received 
the sanction of the principal of the school to play. 

The winners, and other teams showing to best advantage, were those 
wherein the faculty actively stimulated interest, team spirit and loy- 
alty. The time that may be given by teachers for this sort of work 
is very limited, and certainly special mention is due those whose 
interest in their boys' play, and whose cooperation with the objects of 
the league made possible the success of the tournament — free from 
objectionable play or incident. 

District Division — To increase the opportunities for competition, 
also the general interest, five districts were organized, namely, North- 
eastern, Northwestern, Southeastern, Southwestern and Southern. An 
elimination tournament in each district was played in each class. Win- 
ners of district championships played a series of the best two out of 
three games for the city championships. 

A set of six Public Athletic League die medals were awarded to the 
team winning the city championship in each class. The school was 
awarded a picture of the team. 

The entries and results follow : 

NORTHWESTERN DISTRICT. 
95-POUND CLASS. 

No. 78, 14; No. 59, 4y2. No. 78, 10; No. 62, 5%. 

No. 62, 20; No. 11, 2y2. No. 49, IO1/2; No. 55, 2ya. 

No. 49, 8y2; No. 14, 5. No. 49, 12y2; No. 61, 4y2. 

No. 61, 2; No. 60, 2. No. 49, eya; No. 78, 3. 

mpionsh 
?er; C. 
B. Van Ness. 



Championship won by No. 49 team: J. Meyerhoff captain; P. Kollmeyer, 
manager; C. Legg, M. Flnnerman, P. Reinhardt, W. Costin, R. de Barry, 



115-POUND CLASS. 

No. 79, 12%; No. 61, 8. No. 49, 12; No. 78, 1. 

No. 49, 15; No. 59, 4%. No. 49, 14; No. 55, 11» 
No. 79, 20y2; No. 55, 7. 

Championship won by No. 49 team: J. Huppman, captain; A. SlingluCF, 
manager; E. Owings, E. Bans, R. Pierson, E. Burrell, K. Pyles, W. Cover. 

UNLIMITED WEIGHT CLASS. 
No. 79, 23; No. 59, 11. No. 79, 2; No. 78, 0. 

Championship won by No. 79 team: R. Hunter, E, Traynor, L. Rettallata, 
E, Corbin, C. Chambliss, I. Bartholome, C. Llpson. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. lOS 

NORTHEASTERN DISTRICT. 
95-POUND CLASS. 

No. 40, 68% No. 45, 41/2- No. 40, 56; No. 51, SVs- 

No. 51, 2; No. 85, 0. 
Championship won by No. 40 team: B. Collin, captain; L. Silbersteln,. 
manager; J. Schwab, B. Berkow, L. Glazer, S. Michelson, P. Jacobs. 

115-POUND CLASS. 
No. 40, 71/2; No. 51, 21/2. 
Championship won by No. 40 team: M. Aaronson. captain; H. Bermao, 
manager; J. Budnicli, D. Harrison, D. Aaronson, W. Friedman. 

UNLIMITED WEIGHT CLASS. 
No. 45, 2; No. 99, 0. No. 45, 2, No. 85, 0. 

Championshin won by No. 45 team: R. Lamb, captain, R. Metz, manager;. 
H. Shatzer, C. Shipley, William Bates, N. Hankofsliy, L. Schwartzmauu. 

SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT. 
95-POUND CLASS. 

No. 10, 2; No. 1, 0. No. 72, 661/2; No. 10, %. 

No. 72, 131/0; No. 9Sa, GVi- No. 72, lOi/.; No. 1, 10. 

No. 15, 2; No. 98b, 0. No. 75, 17; No. 72, 8. 

No. 75, 2; No. 15, 0. 
Championship won by No. 72 team: C. Granger, captain; G. Wilkersooa,^ 
manager; A. Bock, J. Lenkus, J. Hamison, G. Menmerick. 

115-POUND CLASS. 

No. 75, 59; No. 48, 3. No. 72, 27; No. 98, 914. 

No. 72, 141/2; No. 39, 6. No. 75, 14; No. 72, 71/0. 

Championship won by No. 75 team: G. Disney, captain, C. Cook, manager; 
P. Newberry, W. Jubb, W. Johnson, C. Taylor. 

UNLIMITED WEIGHT CLASS. 

No. 72, 2; No. 10, 0. No. 75, 12%; No. 1, 10 1/2. 

No, 1, 2; No. 48, 0. No. 72, 271/2; No. 75, 71/2. 

Championship won by No. 72 team: B. Dolle, captain; W. Benson, man- 
ager; R. Geidt, J. Eigenbrodt, M. Sternat, E. Plack. 

SOUTHEASTERN DISTRICT. 
95-POUND CLASS. 

No. 93, 48; No. 47a, IVa. No. 2, 2; No. 77, 0. 

No. 2, 2; No. 47b, 0. No. 93, 20 1/2 ; No. 2, 6. 

No. 93, 78; No. 13, 2, 
Championship won by No. 93 team: H. Dopkin, captain; N. Rol)insoni, 
manager; M. Scheer, F. Coplin, I. Goldman, A. Finklestein, J. Schwartz. 

115-POUND CLASS. 

No. 93, 2; No. 77, 0. No. 42, 16y2; No. 93, 3i/n. 

Championship won by No. 42 team: H. Scheer, captain, J. Hettleman, 
manager, I. Deckelman, A. Silesky, L. Klass, M. Epstein, J. Kessler. 

SOUTHERN DISTRICT. 
95-POUND CLASS. 

No. 28, 11; No. -33, 41/2. No. 28, 8y2; No. 84, C. 

No. 84, 2; No. 76, 0. 
Championship won by No. 28 team: J. Lentz, captain; W. Llpplncott,. 
manager; J. McCully, O. Lippincott, H. Booker. 

115-POUND CLASS. 

No. 70 was the only entry. 




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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



105 



CITY CHAMPIONSHIPS. 

115-POUND CLASS. 

No. 42, 25%; No. 49, 8. No. 42, 2; No. 70, 0. 

No. 42, 231/2; No. 49, SVa- No. 42, lOVa; No. 75, 9. 

No. 75, 21; No. 49, 19. No. 75, 20; No. 42, 18, 

No. 75, 18 1/2; No. 40, 10. No. 42, 20 Va; No. 75, 7%. 

No. 42, 2; No. 70. 0. . 72. . 73 

Championship won by No. 42 team: M. Aaronson, H. Berman, J. Budnick, 
I. Harrison, D. Aaronson, W. Friedman. 

UNLIMITED WEIGHT CLASS. 

No. 45, 2; No. 79, 0. No. 45, 251/^; No. 72, 21 1^. 

No. 45, 2; No. 79, 0. No. 72, 22y2; No. 45, 13. 

No. 72, 22; No. 45, 11. 
Championship won by No. 72 team: E. DoUe, captain; W. Benson, man- 
ager; R. Geidt, M. Sternat, J. Eigenbrodt, E. Plack. 

INSTITUTIONAL SECTION. 

The fifth annual basket ball tournament began February 17 and 
ended March 19. 

Classes — Standard weight and age classifications prevailed, except 
that the junior unlimited weight class was added to the list of past 
tournaments. An institution was also allowed to enter more than one 
team in each class. 

Eligibility — The usual rules of eligibility and conditions of compe- 
tition governed. All preliminary games were held in institutional 
gymnasia on neutral courts. Final or championship games were played 
at Central Y.M.C.A. before a large and very enthusiastic audience. 
Sixty-five teams made entry, the largest previous number being fifty- 
four. 

Junior Lightweight, 95-pound class — Cross Street "A", P. S. No. 2 
(afternoon). St. Paul's Guild House, Friends' "B", Northeastern "A", 
Hollins, Northwestern "B", Cross Street '*B", Friends' "O", Jewish 
Educational Alliance "B", Northwestern "A", Friends' "A", North- 
eastern "B", P. S.( No. 2 (evening), Jewish Educational Alliance "A." 

Junior Heavyweight, 11.5-pound class — Cross Street "A", St. Paul's, 
Jewish Educational Alliance "B", Catonsville. Northwestern "A", St. 
Paul's "B", Jewish Educational Alliance "A", Hollins, P. S. No. 2 
(evening), P. S. No. 59, Paret, P. S. No. 51. 

Junior Unlimited Weight— Northeastern, Jewish Educational Alli- 
ance "A", Jewish Educational Alliance "B", Northwestern "B", North- 
western "A", Cross Street. Catonsville. 

Senior Lightweight, 135-pound class — Paret, Cross Street, Hollins 
"A", Northeastern Tip-tops, St. Paul's "A", Northwestern "A", Hol- 
lins "B", Catonsville, P. S. No. 59, Jewish Educational Alliance, 
Northeastern Reaglands, Northeastern Reids, National Jr. Rep., North- 
western "B", Morrell Park, P. S. No. 2 "B", P. S. No. 2 "A", St. 
Paul's "B." 

Senior Unlimited Weight — Paret "A", St. Paul's, Northeastern "B", 
Paret "B", Jewish Educational Alliance, P. S. No. 2 "A", P. S. No. 
59. Northwestern "A", Hollins. 

The scores of games follow : 

JUNIOR 95-POUND CLASS. 
Cross Street "A" 23; Public School No. 2 (afternoon) 11. 
St. Paul's Guild House 2; Friends' Institute "B" 0. 
Northeastern Boys' Club "A" lo; Hollins Hall 1. 
Cross Street "B" 12; Northwestern Boys' Club "B" 9. 
Northwestern Boys' Club "A" 27; Jewish Educational Alliance "B" 20. 
Northeastern Boys' Club "A" 2; Friends' Institute "A" 0. 
Jewish Educational Alliance "A" 66; Public School No. 2 (evening) 8. 




< K cf S ;,-^ 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 107 

Cross Street "A" 26; St. Paul's Guild House 14. 
Northeastern Boys' Club "A'1 11; Cross Street "B" 6. 
Northwestern Boys' Club "A" 2; Friends' Institute "C" 0. 
Jewish Educational Alliance "A" 83; Northeastern Boys' Club "B" 1. 
Cross Street "A" 17; Northeastern Boys' Club "A" 11. 
Jewish Educational Alliance "A" 42; Northwestern Boys' Club "A" 27. 
Jewish Educational Alliance "A" 41; Cross Street "A" 11. 
Championship won by Jewish Educational Alliance team: B. Coehn, B. 
Berkow, M. Yaffe, N. Friedman, I. Deckelman. 

JUNIOR 115-POUND CLASS. 

St. Paul's Guild House "A" 25; Cross Street "A" 19. 

Jewish Educational Alliance "B" 2; Catonsville High School 0. 

Northwestern "A" 27; St^. Paul's Guild House "B" 7. 

Jewish Educational Alliance "A" 49; Hollins Hall 13. 
■ Public School No. 2 (evening) 14; Public School No. 59, 10. 

Public School No. 51, 21; Paret Memorial 5. 

Jev>^ish Educational Alliance "B" 30; St. Paul's Guild House "A" 26. 

Jewish Educational Alliance "A" 27; Northwestern "A" 21. 

Public School No. 2 (evening) 2; Public School No. 51, 0. 

Northwestern "B" 35; Cross Street "A" 22. 

Jewish Educational Alliancfl "A" 29; Jewish Educational Alliance "B" 17. 

Northwestern "A" 32; Public School No. 2 (evening) 20. 

Jewish Educational Alliance "A" 42; Northwestern "B" 11. 

Championship won by Jewish Educational Alliance team: R. Goodman, "L. 
Jacobson, R. Glazer, E. Buckhantz, S. Waxman, C. Goldberg. 

JUNIOR UNLIMITED WEIGHT CLASS. 
Jewish Educational Alliance 22; Northeastern Club 6. 
Northwestern Club "A" 33; Cross Street 20. 
Northwestern Club "A" 2; Catonsville School 0. 
Jewish Educational Alliance "A" 2; Northwestern Club "A" 0. 
Championship won by Jewish Educational Alliance team: S. Simon, J. 
Cohen, I. Cohen, J. Hirsheon, S. Milllman. 

SENIOR 135-POUND CLASS. 
Cross Street 2; Paret Memorial 0. 
Hollins Hall "A" 48; Northeastern Tip-Tops 8. 
St. Paul's Guild House "A" 21? Northwestern Club "A" 19. 
Hollins Hall "B" 2; Catonsville School 0. 

Jewish Educational Alliance 72; Public School No. 59 (evening) 14., 
Northeastern "Reaglands" 27; Northeastern "Reids" 21. 
National Jr. Rep. 42; Northwestern Club 25. 
Public School No. 2 (evening) 2; Morrell Park 0. 
St. Paul's Guild House "B'' 2; Public School No. 2 (evening) 0. 
Jewish Educational Alliance 25; Hollins Hall "A" 9. 
Jewish Educational Alliance 64; St. Paul's Guild House "A" 15. 
National Jr. Rep. 42; Northeastern "Reaglands" 25. 
Jewish Educational Alliance 42; Hollins Hall "A" 15. 
St. Paul's Guild House "B" 42; National Jr. Rep. 33. 
Jewish Educational Alliance 35; St. Paul's Guild House "B" 24. 
Championship won By Jewish Educational Alliance team: A. Abramovltz, 
E. Abramovitz, J. Caplin, J. Cooper, M. Dobres, L. Berkow, E. Roseman. 

SENIOR UNLIMITED WEIGHT CLASS. 
St. Paul's Guild House 19; Paret Memorial "A" 7. 
Jewish Educational Alliance 42; Paret Memorial "B" 24. 
Northeastern "Reaglands" 20; Public School No. 59 (evening) 18. 
Northwestern Club "A" 2; Hollins Hall 0. 
Jewish Educational Alliance 2; Northeastern "Seminoles" 0. 
Cross Street 2; Northwestern Club "B" 0. 
Jewish Educational Alliance 2; St. Paul's Guild House 0. 
Northeastern "Reaglands" 2; Cross Street 0. 
Jewish Educational Alliance 43; Northeastern "Reaglands" 24. 
Championship won by Jewish Educational Alliance team: A. Bravemen, 
P. Jacobs, J. Cohen, A. Wilkins, S. Goldenberg, L. Miller, L. Yeager. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



Basket Ball in Newark Public Schools 

By Randall D. Warden, 
Director Physical Training Newarli, N. J., Public Schools. 

With the addition of two new leagues, making six in all, the basket 
ball season of 1912-1913 for the Newark public schools attained a 
new high mark in the tide of progress. 

The Newark Public School Athletic Association took up the sport in 
1909. when two leagues were formed. The game became popular with 
the j'oungsters and more divisions were added each season. The new 
leagues this time are the Southern Intermediate League and the 
Northern Intermediate League. 

Complete schedules for the leagues were issued bv Principal S. H. 
Mclllroy of the Madison School and Principal Benjamin C. Miner of 
the Central Avenue School, who are at the head of the Southern and 
Northern divisions, respectively. 

The season was a great success. Thirty-six teams were entered 
from the various elementary schools and played, on the whole, very 
clean basket ball. The spectators, while enthusiastic and occasionally 
Inclined to vociferous rooting, conducted themselves well, and were 
usually sufficiently fair-minded to cheer the good plays made by mem- 
bers of both teams. The officials proved the most difficult problem, as 
It is hard to procure properly trained referees for so manv games. 
Most of the officials, however, were watchful and enforced the rules 
very strictly. 

With the opening of several more school gymnasiums next season, 
there will be a considerably increased number of schools entering the 
various leagues in this city. There were six last year — Northern 
Senior, Northern Intermediate. Northern Junior, Southern Senior, 
Southern Intermediate and Southern Junior. The winners were as 
follows : 

Northern League — Intermediate Championship — Won by boys of the 
Morton Street School. No games lost. 

Northern League — Junior Championship — Won by boys of the Mor- 
ton Street School. No games lost. 

Southern League — Intermediate Championship — Won by boys of the 
Belmont Avenue School. No games lost. 

Southern League — Junior Championship — Won by boys of the Madi- 
son School. Owing to the disqualification of an over-age player on 
the Belmont Avenue junior team, 

CITY CHAMPIONS. 

Southern League — City Championship — Won by boys of the Boys' 
InSustrial School. The score of the final game was : Boys' Indus- 
trial' School 52, Morton Street School 36. 

Intermediate League — City Championship — Won by boys of the Mor- 
ton Street School. Championship was played off in a series of three 
games between Belmont Avenue and Morton Street. First game — 
Morton Street School 22, Belmont Avenue School 23. Second game — 
Morton Street School 21, Belmont Avenue School 19. Third game — • 
Morton Street School 36, Belmont Avenue School 15. 

Junior League — ^City Championship — Won by boys of the Morton 
Street School. Championship was played off in a series of two games 
between Madison School and Morton Street School. First game — 
Morton Street 18, Madison 11. Second game — Morton Street 45, 
Madison 5. 




w M - = - y: ja 



SrAIvI)IN(J'.S OKFU'IAI. IJASKKT liMAj OUIDK. HI 



New Jersey Interscholastic League 

By Frederick W. Maroney, 
Physical Director, N<'wark (N. J.) Academy, 

The Interscholastic liCaRuc of Northern New Jersey incliules Har- 
rlnger IliKh School of Nt'wark, East Orange IIlRh School, Montclair 
IIlKh School and the Stevens School of Ilohoken. N. J. With the excep- 
tion of Stevens, the f)ther school had representative teams in the league 
basket ball championship. 

The league games were hard fought and for tiie most part well con- 
tested. The playing in the early imrt of tin; season showed conclu- 
sively that the Barringer teaui was not in the running for champion- 
ship honors. Of their last year's excellent team, they had hut one 
boy remaining in s(;hool. The new members of the team were willing 
but inexperienced. Mucti interest was shown in following the successfjs 
of the Montclair and Kast Orange teams. They played their openinj; 
games in excellent form and finished the league schedule tied for first 
place. In the play-off on the IJloomfield High School court, Mont- 
clair won the championship by the score of liQ — 25, In a game that, 
while very rough, was closely contested and most interesting. 

ALL-INTERRCIIOLASTIC TEAM OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY. 
Starrett (Montclair) and Rretano (East Orange) forwards; Firicher (East 
Orange), center; Grady (Barriugor) and Cox (Montclair), guards. 

Of the teams In New Jersey outside of the Northern New Jersey 
T/eague, exceptional playing was done by the St. Benedict Prep team. 
Peddle InPtitute, Lawrenceville School, Orange High School, Hahway 
High School, and the Central High School of Newark, N. J. The St. 
BencdlctB played a very bard schedule of games, including the best 
teams of New York. Newark and vicinity, as well as the University of 
Pennsylvania Freshmen, without a single defeat. The Peddle team 
also play<'d a series of liard games, meeting many of the Pliiladelphia 
schools, Lawrenceville School and the La Salle College team, without 
a defeat. Thr-se two schools, St. P>enedicts and I'eddie, both claim 
the State championship. I was fortunate in seeing both teams play, 
but as they did not meet as opponents, there is no way of deciding 
their claims for first honors. 'I'hey both have excellent records and 
displayed wonderful ability in the technifiue of the game. Their pass- 
ing, blocking, shooting and team play were all of the highest order 
and showed the results of good coaching and faithful practice. 

ALL-INTERSCHOLASTIC STATE TEAM. 
Stanford (Newark Central ITigh) and M. Noroross (Peddle), forwards; 
MeDerinitt (St. Benedicts), center; Carlin (St. Benedicts) and L. Norcroas 
(I'eddie), guards. 

Emory Team, Jersey City, N. J. — For the past three years the Emory team 
haR aetiuired much distinction. During the season of 1910-1911, It won the 
championship of the Intenhurch Ij<'agne of Jersey City and Newark, and in 
1911-1912 won the Interchnrcli League honors of Jersey City, and in 1912- 
191.3 annexed the championship of the Hudson County Sunday School League, 
made ur» of these teams: St. Stepiiens, St. John, Lafayette, First M. B., 
Second Dutch Reformed, Grove Reformed and Emory. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 113 



North Jersey Hi^h School League 

By W. G. Broadhead. 
Director Physical Training Barringer High School, Newark, N. J. 

The basket ball season of 1912-13 In the Northern New Jersey High 
School League provided quite a number of surprises. It was not only 
the final standing of the teams, but the numbers of individual stars 
that selected this as their season to shine, that caused the surprise. 

Orange High, the 1911-12 champion, put themselves out of the run-' 
ning by playing ineligible men and so had all their games forfeited,- 
when they had a most excellent chance to take another championship. 
Very naturally everyone expected the championship should fall to 
Passaic High as they for two years past had given Orange a hard 
fight for first honors and in a measure they fulfilled expectation but 
they allowed Rutherford to tie them. In the play-ofE Rutherford, the 
hopelessly outclassed tailend team of the previous year, very handily 
disposed of Passaic in an exciting and interesting game by \he score 
33-27. Passaic found themselves unable to break up Rutherford's 
team work that was built around Captain Whitehill. 

The final standing : 

Won. Lost, PC. Won. Lost. PC. 

Rutherford 8 1 .889 Hackensack 2 6 .250 

Passaic 7 2 .780 Orange *8 .000 

Englewood 4 4 . 500 

* Forfeited games. 

The disqualification of Captain Evans of Orange, was due to his 
having played more than four years on his school's team and it 
deprived the league of its best forward so that the North New Jersey 
High School All-Star team (in my opinion) would be Goldstein of 
Passaic and Weiser of Orange, forwards ; Whitehill of Rutherford, 
center ; Fischer of Orange and Hillhouse, Rutherford, guards. White- 
hill. the center, was a wonder, scoring 338 points in 15 games, and 
Fisher of Orange was the steady, sure guard, the man wth the natural 
inclination and ability to lead, and so he should be captain. 

Chattle High School, Long Branch, N. J. — The season of 1912-13 for the 
Chattle team was quite successful. Of the nineteen games played fifteen 
were won. Chattle scored 743 points to 342 for opponents. Captain Gano 
scored 232 points, 198 of which were from baskets. He was closely followed 
by Blaisdell, with 210 points. Tbe guarding was particularly close by 
Arzenti, Hiues, Errickson and Briskey, they holding their opponents to an 
average of ten points a game. The second team of the school, commonly 
known as the "Chattle Cubs," also deserve mention. They were undefeated, 
having scored thirteen victories. They made 393 points to their opponents' 
150. West was high man with 115, Captain Sinclair being second with 109. 

St. Lawrence University, Canton, N. Y. — The special feature of the play- 
ing of the St. Lawrence team last season was its sensational passing. Out 
of seventeen games played the team won twelve. Such elevens as Wesleyan, 
Union, Colgate, West Point and Syracuse were the only ones to conquer the 
wearers of the Scarlet. In these games only the inability of the Canton 
team to cage the ball kept them from reversing the result, so experts con- 
tend. Canfield and Calder were the shining lights of the team, - their phe- ' 
nomenal playing attracting much attention in the basket ball world. Cap- 
tain Griffin will be the only man missing in the line-up next season, but 
there are several candidates waiting to struggle for the position. 




^ CO Z M 00 C^', 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 115 



Basket Ball in New Jersey Y. M. C. A. 

By G. L. Listman, 
Physical Director, Montclair; Chairman New Jersey State Y. M. C.JA. 
Physical Director Society. 

Basket ball was played throughout the State the past season with- 
out a league, due In part to the fact that some Young Men's Chris- 
tian Associations were building, and others had made changes in their 
physical department heads, and had no representative teams. 

The associations having teams played a schedule of games, and 
Montclair, with a veteran team, went through the season without a 
defeat. Belleville also made a splendid showing and with a league 
percentage would easily have taken second place. 

Belleville had a team made up of seasoned players, with a good 
knowledge of the game. Elizabeth would be a close third, though had 
they been able to play their regular team throughout the schedule 
they would no doubt have given a much better account of their abili- 
ties. Rahway had a well balanced team, and Ridgewood a good team 
individually, but lacking in team work. Trenton can hardly be con- 
sidered in the standing as they played only two games with the league 
teams, both with Montclair. The game at Montclair was easily won 
by the latter team ; the return game at Trenton was lost by a close 
score, due to the fact that the Montclair team were not able to get 
acquainted with the peculiar rules played in that section, which are part 
professional and part college. This was the only game lost by the 
Montclair team during the season, out of twetity-four played. 

It would be hard to pick out the best individual players, as all the 
games were not seen by the writer. A few, however, might be men- 
tioned who stood out more prominently. Montclair had Captain 
I'artridge, Calder brothers, Findlay and P.unten, a quintet that have 
played together for years, and their passing and shooting were far 
above the average. 

Belleville had a strong man in Burnside, at forward, and Faust, at 
guard, two as good men as played in the State. Elizabeth was handi- 
capped by not having the regular line-up in all the games, for with 
Seller, at center, Kirkland, at forwaid, and Looser, at guard, they had 
a trio of stars. Ridgewood had two good players in Hernne and 
Ransom, and with another season the whole team should improve. 

Rahway had two fast players in Captain Armstrong, at center, and 
Rltzman, at forward. Trenton's most valuable men were Kahler and 
Captain Bamford. 

In the second division Elizabeth had a team as far ahead of the 
others as Montclair in the seniors. They easily carried off the honors, 
defeating all comers of their weight and size, and taking the first 
place away from Montclair in their series, for the first time In two 
years, Montclair having won the second division honors for two con- 
secutive seasons, and making their notable record of winning all their 
games without a defeat in that time. 

Belleville second also played some good games. With a new team 
another year should see a great deal of improvement. 

In the Boys' Class, Montclair won the title again, making the third 
time in three years, and going through the season without a defeat, 
playing sixteen games. Elizabeth was Its nearest rival, and the games 
were all close and interesting, only a few points separating the teams 
at the end. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 117 



South Jersey Y. M. C. A. Basket Ball 

By G. O. Draper, 
Director of Physical Department, Y. M. C. A., Atlantic City, N. J. 

There are nine Young Men's Christian Associations in South Jersey. 
Three of these, Lakewood, Trenton and Atlantic City, conducted basket 
ball leagues, and five had representative teams : namely, Atlantic 
City, Lakewood, Salem, Trenton, and Wilbur Branch of Trenton. 

An attempt was made to organize a league at the Camden Y.M.C.A. 
It was found impossible, however, with the professional and city 
league games monopolizing the players' and local interest. 

Basket ball games were played on Saturday nights in the gymnasium, 
of the Salem Association, but the sport was not organized. 

The Lakewood Association was represented by the Philorian team, 
which played under both high school and Y. M. C. A. colors. L. 
Wight, Woher, Brower, Wedemeyer, Bennett, J. Wight, and Groflf 
played on the team. Most of the games were keenly contested and 
although the majority were lost they were by but a small margin. A 
two-team league was conducted for the members of the boys' depart- 
ment. The senior boys won out, defeating the juniors, five out of 
eight games. 

At Trenton several leagues were conducted by the association ; three 
for the boys of the association, two Sunday School Athletic Leagues, 
and a City Amateur Basket Ball League. Twenty-two teams played 
In the Sunday School League and ten in the City League. The latter 
series proved very popular. The teams represented social centers. 
Young Men's Christian Associations, potteries, and other manufactur- 
ing concerns. The Columbus team captured the championship, with 
the Y. M. C. A. a close second. These games were fast and clean, and 
good ofl5cials ruled. 

In Atlantic City leagues were conducted for junior, intermediate and 
senior classes. The games were mostly of close scores and keenly 
contested. The Yale team won the junior championship, losing but 
one game. The intermediate schedule ended with two teams tied for 
first place, Princeton and Pennsylvania. The latter finally won. 

Won. Lost. PC. Won. Lost. PC. 

Pennsylvania A.C 6 3 .667 Grey Society 4 4 .500 

Princeton A.C 5 4 .556 Marines 2 6 .250 

Penn 4 4 .500 

Seven teams competed in the senior league. They were well 
matched, and the games drew a good following. A healthy spirit of 
rivalry prevailed between the teams, and the games were remarkably 
clean and fast. The contesting fives were : Dartmouth, Baptist, Win- 
chester, Central, Business Men, Amherst, Chelsea. 

The Atlantic City Y.M.C.A. was represented by two teams in outside 
competition. Its senior team won the city championship and the 
Y. M. C. A. championship of the Philadelphia District. Fifteen games 
were played, eleven of these being victories. The points scored were 
566 to opponents' 344. 

Townsend and Monell played forward in the most of the games. 
Kertland and .Tenkins at times ably filled their positions. Kirk and 
Angelo split up at center. The guards were McClelland, Calkins, 
Hatton and Morris. 

The other team representing the Y. M. C. A. won the boys' cham- 
pionship of the city. They went through the season without a reverse. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



Basket Ball in Atlantic City, N. J. 

By Spencer M. Bennett 
Athletic Director Atlantic City High Schools. 

The high school team started the season with five veterans, and a 
most successful season was expected. However, the team lost all the 
Important games, and for the first time in five years lost the city 
championship to the local Y. M. C. A., being defeated in the extra 
game to decide the championship. 

INDIVIDUAL SCORES. 

Field Foul Tot. Field Foul Tot. 

Goals. Goals. Pts. Goals. Goals. Pts. 

A. Yon 29 22 80 L. Jones 8 1& 

J. Altman 25 26 7G A, McGee 6 12 

P. Eble 34 68 E. Beyer 4 8 

P. Laws 8 41 57 M. Craig 2 4 

H. Gottlieb 20 40 W. Thomas 1 2 4 

H. Parsels 17 34 

Sixteen teams formed the four leagues in the High School Interclass 
League. Each class was represented by a first, second and third team, 
and a special 120-pound league was formed in the sophomore and fresh- 
man classes. All four classes had a championship team. 

The annual faculty game with the first team, interclass champions, 
was won by the "profs" for the first time since the organization of 
the league. The champion freshman team won the first game, but the 
"profs" captured the next two and won the series. 

The following Is the standing of the teams : 

FIRST TEAM. 

Won. Lost. 

Senior 5 4 

Freshman 5 4 

Junior 3 6 

Sophomore 3 6 



THIRD TEAM. 

Won. Lost. 

Senior 6 3 

Freshman 5 4 

Sophomore 4 5 

Junior 3 6 





SECOND TEAM. 




PC. 




Won. Lost. 


PC. 


.555 
.555 


Junior 

Senior 


....9 
4 5 


1.000 
444 


.333 


Freshman 


3 6 


333 


.333 


Sophomore 


.... 2 7 


.222 




FOURTH TEAM. 




PC. 




Won. Lost. 


PC. 


.666 
.555 
.444 
.333 


Sophomore B 

Freshman A 

Sophomore A... 
Freshman B 


6 3 

6 3 

5 4 

2 7 


.666 
.666 
.555 
.222 



CHAMPIONSHIP PLAY-OFF. 
FIRST TEAM. FOURTH TEAM. 

Won. Lost. PC. Won. Lost. PC. 

Freshman 2 1.000 Sophomore B 1 1.000 

Senior 2 .000 Freshman A 1 .000 

In the Grammar School League, the Indiana Avenue colored school 
won the eighth grade championship after a hard struggle with Sec- 
tion D of the Central Grammar School. The seventh grade champion- 
ship was won by Monterey Avenue School. This team made a won- 
derful record, not losing a game all season. This is the first time that 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 121 

^he Central Grammar School has lost the seventh and eighth grade 
'Championships. The results : 

SEVENTH GRADE. EIGHTH GRADE. 



Monterey 12 


Won. 

14 

13 

10 

9 


Lost. 


1 
4 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
12 
13 
14 


PC. 
1.000 
.929 
.714 
.643 
.538 
.500 
.429 
.357 
.231 
.214 
.143 
.143 
.071 
.000 


D 


Won. 
.... 13 


Lost. 

3 

3 

4 

6 

8 
13 
15 
16 


PC. 
.813 
.813 
.750 
.625 
.500 
.188 
.063 
.000 


G 

B 


Indiana 

A 


13 

... 12 


A 


E 

c 


10 

g 


Richmond 


7 

7 

6 


Monterey 17.... 


H 


3 


E 


G 




Indiana 10 


5 

3 

3 


B 





Monterey 11 

H 






Illinois 1 

F 

Illinois 14 

Indiana 16 


2 

2 

1 







The Grammar School champions, seventh and eighth grades, played 
the Y. M. C. A. junior A and B teams and were defeated for the junior 
championship of the city. 

The Industrial and Night School classes formed leagues and were 
named after the National and American League clubs. The games in 
both leagues were hard fought and the championship contests were 
well contested. The standing of the teams follows : 

INDUSTRIAL LEAGUE. NIGHT SCHOOL LEAGUE. 

Won. Lost. PC. Won. Lost. PC. 

New York 8 3 .727 Detroit 6 1 000 

Boston 6 5 . 545 Boston 4 2 667 

Philadelphia 4 7 .363 Washington .3 3 '500 

St. Louis 3 8 .273 Athletics 2 4 ^333 

In the city public school tournament the Senior A championship was 
won by Monterey Avenue, the Intermediate by Texas Avenue, and the 
Midget by Pennsylvania Avenue. 

At the close of the season each league held a foul goal throwing 
contest and the winner of each was presented with a medal Each 
contestant was allowed thirteen free throws from the foul line 
(15-foot mark). The best record was made by Taliafero, a freshman 
who scored ten goals and created a new city record. All the champion 
teams were presented with medals. Following is the summary : 

Fourth Grade — Carmack,, Pennsylvania Avenne, 7 goals. 
Fifth Grade — Boice. Brighton Avenue, 4 goals. 
Sixth Grade — Harley, Texas Avenue, 6 goals. 
Sixth, Grade — Stevenson, Illinois Avenue. goals. 
Seventh Grade — Clarkson, Illinois Avenue, 7 goals. 
Eighth Grade — Cole, Central Grammar, 8 goals. 
High School — Taliafero, 10 goals. 

Too much credit cannot be given to City Superintendent Boyer and 
the principals of the various schools for their support in making the 
season a success, and to Emerson Richards and D. F. MacDonald. 
members of the Board of Education, whose valuable assistance and 
untiring efforts were of great help. 

A number of other teams besides those of the public schools were 
organized, especially in the Y. M. C. A. In closing this article, I wish 
^o congratulate George O. Draper of the local Y. M. C. A. in the devel- 
opment of so many players, and for his efforts to promote clean sport 
in basket ball. 



^ 




;^ 


IMPORTANT 




These Rules in effect 
September 1st, 1913 

Photos, Records of Games, etc., must 
be in possession of the Editor by May 1, 
1914, to guarantee insertion in the next 
issue of the Guide. 

Don't fail to attach the name of team 
and names of players (in typewriting or 
printed in capital letters) on photos, etc., 
with name and address of person who 
may be addressed for further information. 

The committee does not guarantee the 
return of any photos. 

Notify the Editor by post card (not 
letter) when photo, record of games, etc., 
have been mailed. 

Write the Editor, enclosing a self ad- 
dressed stamped envelope, when desiring 
information regarding interpretation of 
rules— registration of players — sanction 
of games— settlement of disputes — photos 
of teams for Guide. 

Address Editor 
Spalding's Official Basket Ball Guide 

p. O. Box 611 

New York City 


y^ 




^d 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 123 

Official Rules-Season 1913-14 

EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER 1, 1913 
Copyright, 1913, by American Sports Publishing Company 

RULE I. 

Section i. Basket Ball may be played on grounds. 
any grounds free from obstruction, said 
grounds not to exceed 4,000 square feet of 
actual playing space. 

Sec. 2. There may be a well defined line with boundary 
marked around the floor or field. When side ^^"®^- 
lines are used they shall be straight and at 
least 3 feet from the wall or fence. The end 
boundaries shall be directly below the surface 
against which the goal is placed. This line 
shall form the boundary of the field of play. 
Upon agreement by both teams the boundary without 
lines may be dispensed with. ' boundary lines. 

Sec 3. The grounds shall be laid out as per How to lay out 

- . r 1 1 t^^ grounds. 

diagram on page i c i of these rules. 

RULE IL 
Section i. The ball shall be round; it shall ball. 
be made of a rubber bladder covered with a 
leather case; it shall be not less than 30 nor size of bail, 
more than 32 inches in circumference ; the 
limit of variableness shall not be more than 



NOTE— "Basket Ball for Women," edited by Mrs. Herbert 
Vaughan Abbott (Miss Senda Berenson), recently of Smith College, 
Associate Editor, Miss Julie Ellsbee Sullivan, A.B., of New York, 
and containing the revised rules for women, is published in 
Spalding's Athletic Library ; price 10 cents. 




124 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 

RULE II. 

one-fourth of an inch in three diameters; u* 
Weight of ball, shall weigh not less than i8 nor more than 
21 ounces. 
Who provides Sec. 2. The ball shall be provided by the 

the ball. , • • i , • i • 

home team; except in serial championships, 
when it shall be furnished by the champion- 
ship committee ; it shall be tightly inflated and 
so laced that it cannot be held by the lacing, 
and shall otherwise be in good condition. 

Sec. 3. The ball made by A. G. Spalding & 
Bros, shall be the official ball. Official balls 
will be stamped as herewith, and will be packed 
in sealed boxes. 
Official ball to Sec. 4. The official ball must be used in all 
match games, match gamcs. The referee may in all match 
games and shall in serial championship games 
declare all games void when this rule is vio- 
lated. 

RULE III. 
BASKETS. Section i. The baskets shall be hammock 
nets of cord, suspended from metal rings i8 
Size and height, jnches in diameter (inside). The rings shall be 
placed 10 feet above the ground in the centre 
of the short side of the actual playing field. 
The inside rim shall extend 6 inches from a 
rigid supporting surface. 

Sec. 2. In case the supporting surface is 
not a wall of the building, a special back- 
Background, ground must be supplied, which shall measure 
at least 6 feet horizontally and 4 feet verti- 




SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 125 

RULE III. 

cally, and extend not less than 3 feet above 
the top of the basket. It may be of any soHd 
material but must be permanently flat, perpen- 
dicular and rigid. 

Sec. 3. The baskets shall be rigidly sup- 
ported. There must be no projections beyond 
the sides nor above the upper edge of the bas 
ket. 

Sec. 4. The baskets made by A. G. Spalding official basket. 
& Bros, shall be the official baskets. 

Sec. 5. The "official" baskets must be used in Official basket to 
all match games. The referee may in all match ^^^^g^ '" "^^^""^ 
games and shall in serial championship games 
declare all games void when this rule is vio- 
lated. 

Sec. 6. No spectators or others shall be per- spectators 
milted nearer than six feet to the baskets in any ^^"^ ^^^* ^'^^^■ 
direction. The referee shall see that this rule 
is enforced and act in accordance with Rule 
VI., sec. 4., and Rule XII., sec. 5. 

RULE IV. 

Sec. I. Teams for match games shall con- TEAMS. 
sist of five players. 

Sec. 2. In match games all players must be piayers must be 
bona fide members of the organization which of^^eamsthey ^" 
they represent. They must be amateurs. represent. 

Sec. 3. In serial championship games no Can represent 
m.ember of one team shall play or act as sub- »" ^^ ^"^ *^^"^- 



126 SPALDING-S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 

RULE IV. 

stitiite on any other team in that champion- 
ship. 
Registration Sec. 4. In match gamcs between two organ- 
of players, j^ations, inclivicluals on both teams must be 
registered. \Mien this rule is violated the 
players disqualify themselves and are ineli- 
gible to play registered teams or compete in 
Amateur Track and Field sports until they 
are reinstated by the proper committee. 

See Rule IV., sec. 8. 

Sec. 5. Teams must be composed entirely 
of amateurs and only play other teams simi- 
larly composed ; w^hen this rule is violated each 
Professionalism, player 15 made a professional thereby and is 
ineligible to further compete with amateurs 
until such time as his 'case may be favorably 
acted upon by the proper committee. 
Sanctions. Sec. 6. lu gamcs bctwcen two organiza- 
tions, the games must be sanctioned and the 
players registered. Annual sanctions and 
registrations are issued by the A.A.U. 
A. A. u. rules Sec. 7. Official A.A.U. rules govern the eli- 
gibility of all players playing under the sanc- 
tion of the A.A.U. (See A.A.U. Official 
Handbook.*) 
Teams from Sec. 8. In gamcs played between teams rep- 
resenting educational institutions, the eligibil- 
itv of players is determined by the rules of 



covem. 



educational 
institutions. 



* Amateur Athletic Union handbook may be secured from 
the publishers of this Guide for 10 cents. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 127 

RULE IV. 

the governing body to which such institutions 
belong. 

Teams "from educational institutions are When teams 
required to s^et sanction and have the individ- from educational 

■^ " . ^ institutions are 

ual players registered in the A. A.U. when they required to get 
plav teams not representing an educational in- sanctionand 

* ^ _ ■^ *^ have mdividua.j 

stitution. (See A. A.U. Official Handbook.*) registered. 

RULE V. 
The officials shall be a Referee, an TJmpire, OFFICBALS. 
a Scorer, a Timekeeper. 

See Rule VI. 
See Rule VIL 
See Rule VIII. 
See Rule IX. 

RULE VL 
Section i. The Referee in all cases must be referee. 
a thoroughly competent and impartial person, 
and shall not be a member of either of the Referee an 

outsider. 

competmg organizations. 

Sec. 2. In all but serial championship games, Home team 
the visiting team shall choose the Referee, but ^^^t be notified 

_ '-' _ about referee. 

shall notify the home team of such selection 
not later than four days before the date fixed 
for the game. Any team neglecting to send 
such notification within the limit specified shall 
forfeit the right to appoint the referee. 

Sec. 3. Li serial championship games the 
Referee shall be selected by the Championship 
Committee. 



* Amateur Athletic Union handbook may oe secured from 
the publishers of this Guide for 10 cents. 



128 SPALT)ING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 

RUIiE VI. 

Alterations in s^c. 4. Beforc the game begins the Referee 
grounds and shall scc that the regulations respecting the 
time, i^aii^ baskets, grounds and spectators (Rule III., 
sec. 6) are adhered to. By mutual agreement 
of the captains, the Referee may allow altera- 
tions in the rules regarding grounds and time, 
but not in baskets, ball, teams or spectators. 
The Referee shall ascertain before the com- 
mencement of the game the time for begin- 
ning, or any other arrangements that have 
been made by the captains or the committee in 
charge. 

See Rule IIL, sec. 6. 
See Rule XII., sec. 5. 

Referee decides Sec. 5. The Referee shall be judge of the 

JiaTandwhen ^^^^' ^^ ^hall dccidc whcu the ball is in play, 

goal has been to whom it bclougs, whcu a goal has been 

made and calls , , , unci 

fouls. i"nade, and have power to call all fouls pro- 
vided for in the rules. 

Sec. 6. The Referee shall approve of the 
timekeepers and scorers before the game 
begins. 
Calling Time. Sec. 7. The Referee shall blow a whistle 
whenever necessary to call ''time out" or a 
foul. In case of a foul he shall indicate the 
offender and announce the nature of the foul, 
so that the offender, scorer and spectators can 
hear him. In case of sickness or accident the 
game continues until the Referee's whistle 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 129 

RULE VI. 

blows. If a claim for "time out" is made and 
for any reason the Referee does not blow his 
whistle before a goal is made, the goal shall 
count, except as provided. 

See Rule VII., sec. 7. 

See Rule XI., sees. 9 and 40. 

Sec. 8. The Referee is the superior officer superior officer, 
of the game and shall decide all questions not 
under jurisdiction of the other officials and all 
questions not covered by the rules. 

Sec. 9. The Referee's term of office shall Referee has no 
only extend from the time the game begins power after game, 
until it is concluded, and his decision award- 
ing the game must then be given. His juris- 
diction shall then end and he shall have no 
longer any power to act as referee. 

Sec. 10. The Referee shall notify the secre- Referee to notify 
tary of the committee under whose jurisdic- co"^™ttee when 

■^ •' man has been 

tion the game has been played, whenever a disqualified, 
player has been disqualified, giving the player's 
name, date, place, name of team and nature 
of the offence. 

RULE VII. 

Section i. The Umpire in all cases must be umpire. 
a thoroughly competent and impartial person, 
and shall not be a member of either of the umpire, outsider, 
competing organizations. 

Sec. 2. In all but serial championship games Visiting team must 
the home team shall choose the Umpire, but '"^^^^^^^'"''^ 
shall notify the visiting team of such selection 



130 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 

RULE VII. 

not later than foifr days before the date fixed 
for the game. A team neglecting to send 
such notification within the limit specified shall 
forfeit to the visiting team its right to appoint 
the Umpire. 

Sec. 3. In all serial championship games the 
Umpire shall be selected by the Championship 
Committee. 
Umpire calls fouls. gg^^ ^ The Umpire shall make decisions 
and call fouls for the violation of all rules ex- 
cept those specifically reserved to the Referee. 

See Rule XL. sees. 3 and 6. 
See Rule XII., sec. 3. 

Umpire not to ^^^^ r^ Xhe Umpire shall make his decisions 

question Referee's . r ^ -n i* !•• 

decisions, independently of the Referee and a decision 

made by either official within his jurisdiction 

shall not be questioned by the other. 

Whistle blown for Sec. 6. The Umpire shall blow a whistle 

ou ony. ^^j^^ when it is necessary to call a foul. He 

shall then indicate the offender, and announce 

the nature of the foul so both the offender and 

the scorer can hear him. He shall have no 

power to call "time" or "time out." 

Official's whistle S£(-^ y^ When the Umpire's whistle sounds 

calling fouls takes . . , . , 1 -n j? > 

precedence. Simultaneously with either the Reieree s or 
Timekeeper's, the ofiiciars whistle calling atten- 
tion to a foul shall take precedence. If both 
blew to indicate fouls on different players, 
both shall count. The Referee or Umpire 
shall have power to call fouls for violation 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 131 

RUI.E VII. 

of rules committed either within or without 
the boundary lines, also at any moment from 
the beginning of play to the call of time at 
the end of a half or game. This includes the 
periods when the game may be momentarily 
stopped for any reason. Fouls may be called 
on any number of players at the same time. 

See Rule VI., sec. 7. 
See Rule XL, sec. 40. 

RULE VIII. 
Section i. The Scorer shall J^e appointed scorer. 
by the management of the home team, subject 
to the approval of the Referee. If the visit- 
ing team so desires they may appoint an 
Assistant Scorer, subject to the approval of 
the Referee. The Assistant Scorer shall have assistant 

"SCORER 

no power to make decisions and shall perform 
such duties as are assigned by the Scorer. The 
Scorer's record is the only "official" score. In 
serial championship games the Scorer and his 
assistant shall be appointed by the Champion- 
ship Committee, and their relation to each 
other shall be the same as the foregoing. 

Sec. 2. The Scorer, before the commence- Scorer to get names 
ment of the game, shall secure from the man- ^"t'b^rf '^''°'' 
agement of each team a list of their players, 
with their positions and registration numbers. 

Sec. 3. He shall notify the Referee when a scorer must 
player has committed two Class B fouls. aboufcLssD 

See Rule XI., sec. 24. fouls. 



132 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 

RULE Tin 

Official score. Sec. 4. Gamcs shall be scored in, and ac- 
cording to, the details in the official score book, 
and this shall constitute the official record of 
the game. 
Blackboards. Sec. 5. The use of blackboard, cards, etc., 
cards, etc., for ^^ announcc the score to spectators, shall be in 

uiinouncmg score, ^ ' 

to be in charge of charge of the Scorci or one of his assistants, 
official scorer. ^^^ ^^j^ ^j^^ official score shall be announced 

thereon. In case of mistake on the board, 
cards, etc., it shall be corrected according to 
the record in the official score book. 

RULE IX. 

TIMEKEEPER. SECTION I. A Timekeeper shall be appoint- 
ed by the management of the home team, sub- 
ject to the approval of the Referee. If the 
visiting team so desires they may appoint an 
Assistant Timekeeper, subject to the approval 
ASSISTANT of the Referee. The Assistant Timekeeper 

TIMEKEEPER, gj^^jj ^^^^ ^^ powcr to make decisions, and 

shall perform such duties as are assigned by 
the Timekeeper. The Timekeeper's record is 
the only "official" time. In serial champion- 
ship games, the Timekeeper and his assistant 
shall be appointed by the Championship Com- 
mittee, and their relation to each other shall 
be the same as the foregoing. 
Blows whistle at gg^^ 2. He shall note when the game starts 

expiration of , 1 n 1 1 t • 1 • 1 • i* • 1 

playing time, and shall Diow his whistlc indicating the ex- 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 133 

BUIiE IX. 

piration of the actual playing time in each 
half. 

Sec. 3. Time consumed by stoppages dur- Time out only on 
ing the game shall be deducted only on order referee's order, 
of the Referee. Time involved in making 
"free throws," etc., shall not be considered 
stoppages. 

RULE X. 

Section i. Captains shall be indicated by captains. 
each team previous to the commencement of 
the game ; they must be players in the game. 

Sec. 2. The Captains shall be the represen- 
tatives of their respective teams. 

Sec. 3. The Captains shall toss for choice of captains speak tc 
baskets and they only shall be entitled, to ad- officials, 
dress the officials regarding any matter arising 
during the game. The Referee shall apply Rule 
XII, sees. 3 and 4, to the captains' conduct when 
necessary. 

RULE XL 

Section i. The game shall consist of two the caivie. 
halves of twenty minutes each, with a rest of Time of halves, 
ten minutes between the halves. This is the 
time of actual play. These times may be 
changed by mutual agreement of the captains, 
except in serial championship games, in which 
case the Championship Committee shall make 
the change if necessary. 

Sec. 2. The teams shall change baskets at change baskets, 
the end of the first half. 



134 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GDIDB. 

RUIiE XI. 

Persistent or Sec. 3. Any pcrsisteiit or intentional de- 

intentional delay | q£ ^^^ ^^^ gj^^jj ^^ COUntcd ES a foul 

of game. . , 

against the team so delaying. The Referee 
shall call this foul. 
•Ball, how and Sec. 4. At the Opening of the game, at 
when put in play the beginning of the second half, after each 
goal, and at such other times as hereinafter 
provided, the Referee shall put the ball in play 
at centre. Whenever the ball is put in play 
at centre the men who are to jump for 
same must face the basket into which they are 
to throw and keep both feet within the circle. 
The Referee shall toss the ball up in a plane 
at right angles to the side lines to a greater 
height than either of the centre men can jump, 
and so that it will drop between them. Sec. 
3 may be applied when players delay game 
by not coming to centre promptly, stepping 
out of circle before or during jumps or not 
facing correctly. 

See Rule XL, sec. 3. 

Sec. 5. (a) When the Referee puts the ball 

in play at centre, he shall blow his whistle 

when the ball reaches its highest point, after 

Ball to be wliich it must be first touched by either or both 

touched first by ^^ ^^iQ ccntrc mcu. If the ball is batted to 

one or both 

centre men. outsidc by onc of the ccntrcs it shall be given 

to an opponent out of bounds. When batted 

to outside by both centres simultaneously ir 

• shall be thrown up between the two players 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. I35 

RULE XI. 

indicated by the Referee, at the place where it 
left the field of play. 

(b) The ball must be batted, not caught, 
by the centre men. The Referee shall call 
a foul for violation of this rule. 

Sec. 6. Whenever the ball is put in play Players who 
other than in the centre, the players who are to ji^t^'s'^stand wkh 
first touch the ball must not stand further than both feet together, 
two feet from the spot indicated by the Ref- 
eree where the ball is to fall, face in the di- 
rection of the basket into which they are to 
throw, and have both feet together until 
the jump is made. If ball is batted 
to outside by one of the jumpers it 
shall be given to an opponent out of bounds. 
If batted to "outside" by both players simul- 
taneously it shall be thrown up again between 
the same players at same spot as before. If 
this rule is violated sec. 3 may be applied by 
the Referee. 

See Rule XI., sec. 3. 

Sec. 7. If the ball is in bounds when ''time when "timeout" is 
out" is called the Referee shall stand between ^^"-d- bail in 

bounds. 

the players and the nearer side line and put the 
ball in play by tossing it up in such a manner 
that it will drop near the spot where it was 
when "time out" was called. The two oppo- 
nents nearest this spot when "time out" was 
called shall jump for the ball. They shall be 
indicated by the Referee. 



136 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XI. 

When "time out" 13 Sec. 8. If the ball is out of bounds when 
'"'"''ofb^nTg! "^^"^^ o^^t" is called, play shall be resumed at 
the whistle of the Referee the same as if "time 
out" had not been called. 
Held ball. Sec. 9. When the ball is held by two players 
for any length of time, the Referee shall 
blow his whistle, stop the play, and throw the 
ball up from where it was held. The players 
jumping for same must not catch it, but bat it. 
Violation of this shall be called a foul by the 
Referee for delaying game. 

See Rule XI., sec. 3. 

When more than 51^(3^ jq_ ^q^ more than One player of each 

one player from r i 1 n 1 ' 

each team tackles tcani shall toiicii the ball at the same time, 
the ball. _Y f Q^i gj-j^ii |3^. called on each player violating 
this rule. If two players of the same team first 
touch the ball no foul shall be called so long 
as they are the only ones touching it ; if, how- 
ever, a player from the other team should touch 
the ball while it is in their possession, a foul 
shall be called on one of the two players of 
the same team. This player shall be indicated 
by the official calling the foul. Either the 
Referee or Umpire may make decision on this 
rule. 

Sec. II. The ball may be thrown or batted 
in any direction with one or both hands. 
Kicking or using Sec. 12. The ball shall not be kicked or 
struck with the fists. The Referee or Umpire 
shall call a foul for violation of this rule. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL CASKET BALL GUIDE. 137 

RUL£ XI. 

Sec. 13. (a) A player shall not advance Baiinottobe 
with the ball while in bounds ; he must play ^^^""^^ ' 
it from the spot on which he catches it. 
Allowance is to be made for one who catches 
it while running, provided he throws it at 
once or stops as soon as possible. This shall 
not be interpreted as interfering with a man's 
turning around without making progress, as 
long as he keeps one foot in place. The 
Referee or Umpire shall call a foul for viola- 
tion of this rule. 

(b) A player shall not advance with the Advancing: with 
ball across the boundary line with either one bounXryHne. 
or both feet, except under circumstances men- 
tioned in this section. If in the judgment of 
the Referee he stops as soon as possible and at 
the end of the run he has one foot over the 
line, touching the floor on the outside, no 
action shall be taken if he immediately with- 
draws the foot that is over the line, but if he 
does not withdraw the foot that is over the 
line, or carries the foot that is inside the field 
of play to the floor on the outside, thus having 
both feet outside, the ball shall be given to an 
opponent out of bounds. The Referee makes 
decision on this play. 

Sec. 14. The ball shall be held by the hands Baiiheidby 
only. The using of any other part of the 
body to hold or assist in holding the ball con- 
stitutes a foul. Hugging the ball is a foul. 



138 SrALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XI. 

The Referee or Umpire shall call a foul for 
violation of this rule. 
"Dribbling" Sec. 15. (a) A dribble is a play in zvhicJi 
butTot with two. if^^ player advances more than tzvo steps while 
throwing, rolling or bouncing the ball against 
one or both hands one or more times, without 
the assistance of another player. 

(b) In a dribble (three or more steps), 
both hands shall not be used simultaneously 
more than once. \'iolation of this rule is a 
foul and may be called by either the Referee 
or Umpire. 

(f) A player who has dribbled may not 
score a goal until the ball has been played 
(that is, received and batted or throv/n) by 
another player. If the ball is thrown into the 
basket at the end of a dribble it shall not be 
scored and the ball shall be thrown up at 
centre ; if not made the ball is in play. Suc- 
cessive tries for goal by one who has not 
dribbled shall not be considered a violation of 
this rule. 

When the ball is Sec. i6. The ball is out of bounds only when 
out of bounds. 1^ j^^g completely crossed the line and is either 
touching the floor or in the possession of a 
player who has one or both feet outside, ex- 
cept as provided in Rule XL, sec. 13. 

When an opponent Sec. 1 7. Whcu the ball is causcd to go out of 
awarded the ball, bounds in auv manner intentionallv or uninten- 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 139 

RUIiE XI. 

tionally (except in violation of sec. 13) and re- 
mains there, the Referee shall give it to an 
opponent at the point where it left the field 
of play. 

Sec. 18. In case of a doubt in the mind of when an outside 
the Referee as to which player touched the ball ^aii is tossed up. 
last, in its flight to "out of bounds," it shall 
be tossed up between two players indicated by 
the Referee. 

Sec. 19. When the ball goes out of bounds when baii returns 
and immediately returns, play shall con- *» field of piay. 
tinue whether or not it was touched while 
out of bounds, except if the whistle of the 
Beferee is blown, the ball shall then be put in 
play as though it had not returned to the field 
of play. 

Sec. 20. A player is allowed five seconds Five seconds to 
to hold the ball out of bounds. A player b°itds" """' "^^ 
must not step over the boundary line until 
after he has played the ball, and if, in the judg- 
ment of the Referee, either of these rules is 
violated, the Referee shall give the ball to an 
opponent. 

Sec. 21. The ball may be thrown into the Must be played by 
field of play in any direction, from any spot ^"° ^^ ^ ^^^^' 
(outside of bounds) on a line drawn at right 
angles to the boundary line at the spot 
where the ball crossed it. The ball may be 
thrown cr bounced into the field of play, and 
riust be played by some other player before 



140 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 

RUUEXI. 

the player who passed it in can again play it. 
When either of these rules are violated the 
Referee shall give the ball to the opponent at 
the same spot. 

Interfering with SeCo 22. There shall be no interfering with 
the player who is returning the ball: that is, 
no part of the person of his opponent shall be 
outside of the field of play, and the ball may not 
be touched until it has crossed the line. If 
either of these rules is violated the Referee 
shall call a foul for delaying game in accord- 
ance with Rule XL, sec. 3. 
Holding. etc. Sec. 23. (a) There shall be no tackling, 
holding, pushing or body checking of an op- 
ponent under any circumstances. Grasping 
the clothing or person of a player with one or 
both hands or putting one or both arms about 
a player shall be considered holding. 

Interfering with {h) The hands, arms or any other part of 
^^^y^l^^^}^^^ the body shall not be used to interfere with the 

not the ball. •' 

progress of a player who has not the ball. The 
Referee or Umpire shall call a foul for viola- 
tion of this rule. 
Roughness will Sec. 24. Thcrc shall be no striking, kicking, 
shouldering, tripping, hacking* or unneces- 
sary roughness of any kind. The Referee or 
Umpire shall call a foul for violation of this 
rule. The Referee may, for the first offence, 

* NOTE— Hacking is shown by photo in "How to Play Basket 
Ball." Spalding's Athletic Library No. 193. price 10 cents. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 141 

RULE XI. 

and sJiall for the second offence, disqualify . 
tJie offender for that game and for such fur- 
ther period as the committee in charge shall 
determine; except that disqualification for 
striking, kicking, hacking shall be for one Disqualification 
year, except by alteration of penalty in any fo^- one year, 
special tase by the proper Registration Com- 
mittee of the Amateur Athletic Union. The. 
Referee has power to disqualify for violation 
of this rule whether a foul was called or not. 

Sec. 25. A substitute shall be allowed for substitute allowed 
a plaver who has been disqualified, and the for disqualified 

^ player. 

Referee shall allow the foul made by the dis- 
qualified player. 

Sec. 26 (a) Whenever, because of sickness Five minutes for 
or accident to a player, it becomes necessary ^^i^^^out." 
in the judgment of the Referee to call "time 
out," play must be resumed in five minutes. If . 
the injured player is unable to resume play by 
that time, a substitute shall take his place, or 
the game start at once without him. If it be- 
comes necessary for any reason to change play- Men to be changed 
ers the Referee mav, upon notice from the o^iy after the 

^ , . . Scorer and Referee 

Captain, call "time out" for the substitution; have been notified. 

providing the Scorer has been notified and the 

new player is ready to start at once. Sec. 3 

mav be applied when necessary. A man once a man once 

. . removed cannot 

removed from the game cannot play again piay again, 
during that game. 

(b) The Referee is the sole judge and the 



142 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XI. 

only official authorized to decide when "time 
out" shall be called. 

The Captain or other officials may request 
''time out" and the Referee may grant or re- 
fuse the request, as his judgment dictates, and 
his decision is final and without appeal. 

Sec. 27. A game must be decided by the 

•winning of the most points in the playing time 

agreed upon; at the end of which time the 

Timekeeper's whistle shall be blown and the 

score announced. 

Requires two Sec. 28. lu casc the scorc is found to be 

points to win in ^ ^^ ^j^^ Eefcrec shall then order the game to 

case oj. a tie. ' *^ 

continue (without change of baskets) until 
either side has made 2 additional points. The 
goals may be made either from field or foul 
line, the team first scoring 2 points wins, ex- 
cept as provided in sec. 29. 
Scoring two points Sec. 29. In casc of a tie and both teams 

simultaneously in - , , . . , , , , 

the play-off. ^^lake the sccoud points Simultaneously through 
both teams scoring on double fouls, the game 
shall continue, as provided for in section 28. 

Scoring of goals. gg^^ ^o. A goal made from the field shall 
count as 2 points ; a goal made from foul line 
shall count as i point ; a goal thrown shall 
count for the side into whose basket the ball is 
thrown, even though it was done by mistake. 

What constitutes To coustitutc 3. goal, tJic ball must enter and 

a goal. ..,j .,- iT«/» 

remain in the basket until after the Referee s 
decision. The Referee decides when a goal 
has been made. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GDIDE. 143 

RULE XI. 

Sec. 31. (a) If the basket or ball is touched Basket or baii 
by an opponent when the ball is on the edge t^^^^^dby 

■> i- ^ o opponent. 

of the basket, the Referee shall award i point 
to opposing team. 

(b) li touched by a team mate under above 
conditions and a goal is made, it shall not 
be scored. Referee makes decision. 

Sec. 32. If a player while trying for goal One point awarded 
from field is fouled by an opponent, and it is ^0^^^°^^- 
called by either the Referee or Umpire, the 
Referee shall award i point to the team whose 
player was fouled, and if the player succeeds 
in making a goal, it shall also count. This shall 
not interfere v/ith an additional free throw for 
goal from foul line. 

Sec. 33. When a foul has been made, the Free throw mark, 
opposite side shall have a free throw for the 
basket at a distance of not less than fifteen 
feet from a point on the floor directly beneath 
the centre of the basket, measuring towards the 
opposite basket. The player having a free 
throw shall not cross the fifteen-foot line until Thrower must 
the ball has entered or missed the basket, "ot cross mark. 
If this rule is violated, a goal, if made, shall 
not be scored, and, if missed, the ball shall be 
dead and put in play in the centre. If the bas- 
ket is missed and no rules have been violated, 
the ball is in play. The Referee renders de- 
cisions on this rule. 

Sec. 34. When trying for goal from the Bail to be thrown 
fifteen foot mark the ball shall not be thrown 



144 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 

RUUB XI. 

to another player; an honest attempt must be 

made to throw it into the basket ; if in the 

judgment of the Referee the ball is purposely 

caromed to another player and he succeeds in 

throwing a goal, it shall not be counted. In 

such case whether the goal is made or missed 

the ball shall be thrown up at the centre. The 

Referee makes the decisions on this rule. 

OfficiaFs whistle Sec. 35. The blowing of any official's whistle 

Tfrei't'hlow! shall not prevent a free throw that has been 

awarded. If for any reason a whistle is 

When an outsider's blowu by anyone other than the officials 

whistle is sounded, authorized to do so, and it is heard by the 

Referee, the game shall stop immediately and 

the Referee shall call "time out" until the ball 

is put in play in the centre. Tf a goal is thrown 

it shall not count unless the Referee decided 

the ball was in the air when he heard the 

whistle. 

Six-foot lane for Sec. 36. No player shall stand nearer than 

players. Penalty j^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ throwcr, uor in a lane six feet 

for interfering with ' 

the thrower-in. wide from the throwcr to the basket, nor in- 
terfere with the ball until after it reaches the 
basket. The player shall not be interfered with 
in any way whatever, either by players or 
spectators. Players shall not cross the six-foot 
lines until the ball has entered or missed the 
basket. If this rule is violated by one of the 
opposing team, and a goal is not made, he 
shall have another free throw. If violated by 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. I45 

RULE XI. 

one of his own team, or by players of both 
teams, and a goal is made, it shall not count, 
and whether missed or made the ball shall be 
thrown up at centre. The Referee renders 
the decisions for violation of this rule. 

Sec. 37. When two or more fouls are Two fouis at once, 
called at same time on opposing teams, they 
shall be thrown in succession and the ball shall 
be put in play at the centre after the last 
throw. When two or more fouls are called 
at the same time on one team, they shall be 
thrown in succession. If a goal is made on the 
last throw, the ball shall be put in play at the 
centre; if missed, the ball is in play. 

Sec. 38. If a player throws for the basket coai counts if 
and the Referee decides the ball was in the air whistle is blown 

when ball is in 

when the whistle of the Referee, Umpire or the air. 
Timekeeper sounded, and the throw results 
in a goal, it shall count, except as provided in 
sees. 39 and 40. 

Sec. 39. When a player makes a throw Goal from outside, 
for the basket and the Referee decides that part 
of his person was touching the floor out of 
bounds, if a goal is thrown it shall not count ; 
if not made, the ball shall be considered in 
play ; if made, shall be thrown up at centre. 

Sec. 40. A goal thrown before the whistle Goals affected 
can be blown for a foul made by the team ^ 
throwing it shall not count. The Referee 
makes decisions on this rule. 

Rule VI., sec. 7. 
Rule VII., sec. 7. 



146 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XI. 

Winning by Sec. 41. If Only One team puts in an ap- 

defauit. pea.rance at the appointed time, the Referee 

shall announce that the team complying with 

the terms agreed upon shall be declared the 

winner of the game by default. (See sec. 44.) 

When neither Sec. 42. When it happens, however, that 

team IS ready. j^gi^j-,gj. ^^^^ [^ ready to begin playing at the 

hour appointed for the game, the team which 

completes its number first and appears on the 

field ready for play cannot claim a default 

from its opponent. The latter shall be entitled 

to fifteen minutes' additional time, and if then 

unable to present a full team shall be obliged 

to play short-handed or forfeit the game. The 

Referee shall be the authority on this rule. 

Sec. 43. Any team refusing to play with- 
in three minutes after receiving instructions to 
do so from the Referee shall forfeit the game. 
(See sec. 44.) 

Sec. 44. The Referee shall announce a team 
defaulting or forfeiting a game the loser by a 
score of 2 to o. 

RULE XII. 
FOULS. Section i. Fouls are classified according to 
their penalties as follows : 

(A) General. — i. Delaying game (Rule XI, 
sec. 3) ; 2. (Rule XI, sec. 5) ; 3. (Rule XI, 
sec. 9) ; 4. Tackling ball (Rule XI, sec. 10) ; 
5. Kicking ball (Rule XI, sec. 12) ; 6. Striking 
ball (Rule XI, sec. 12) ; 7. Advancing with 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 147 

RUL£ XII. 

the ball (Rule XI, sec. is-b) ; 8. Hugging 
ball (Rule XI, sec. 14) ; 9. Dribbling (Rule XI, 
sec. 15) ; 10. (Rule XI, sec. 22) ; 11. Tackling 
opponent (Rule XI, sec. 2^) ; 12. Holding op- 
ponent (Rule XI, sec. 23) ; 13. Pushing op- 
ponent (Rule XI, sec. 23) ; 14. Addressing 
officials (Rule XII, sec. 3). 

(Bj Specific — Fouls for which players may 
be disqualified. — i. Striking opponent (Rule 

XI, sec. 24) ; 2. Kicking opponent (Rule XI, 
sec. 24) ; 3. Shouldering opponent (Rule XI, 
sec. 24) ; 4. Tripping opponent (Rule XI, sec. 
24) ; 5. Hacking opponent (Rule XI, sec. 24) ; 

6. Unnecessary roughness (Rule XI, sec. 24) ; 

7. Using profane or abusive language (Rule 

XII, sec. 4). 

Sec. 2. Officials are expected to be as strict officials to be 
as possible, both with players and spec- strict and tu gu 

T 1, , . , , by spirit of 

tators. In all cases not covered m these rules rules, 
officials are to use their own judgment in ac- 
cord with the general spirit of the rules. 

Sec. 3. Any remarks or actions, whether ad- Derogatory 
dressed to an official or not, on the part of a reinarks about 

^ officials. 

player during the progress of the game derog- 
atory in any way to the officials shall be called 
a foul by the Eeferee. 

Sec. 4. Th'e Referee shall promptly disqualify Profanity 
any player using profane or abusive language, ^^^^^^''^i^^- 

Sec. 5. The home team shall be held re- Behavior of 
sponsible for the behavior of the spectators, ^p^^^^^'^^^- 



148 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XII. 

Failure to keep them from interfering, coach- 
ing, etc., with the progress of the game or for 
discourteous conduct shall, after a warning by 
the Referee, make the home team liable to for- 
feit the game. In serial championship games 
the championship committee is responsible. 

See Rule 3, sec, 6. 

Visiting teams to Sec. 6. In casc of auv doubt on any point, 
^Tf doubt. ^'^^ '^'^ mind of the Referee or Umpire, arising 
from the presence of the spectators, the visit- 
ing team shall have the benefit of the doubt. 
Protesting Sec. 7. There shall be no protests against 

decisions of , , . . - , -~ . . , . . 

officials, '^^^e decisions of the officials except in regard 

to interpretation of rules. 
Questions Sec. 8. All the Questions pertaining to the 

concerning . . . . . 1 r 1 

interpretation mterpfctation of the rules may be referred to 

of rules, the Basket Ball Committee of the Amateur 

Athletic Union, P. O. Box 6ii, New York 

City. Protests must be made in wTiting 

within forty-eight hours. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 149 

Comments on Changes in Rules 

The Committee has voted favorable on the 
following changes: 
Rule XI. Sec. 4. 

Changed to require those jumping for ball, 
when tossed up by Referee, to face in the 
direction of the basket into which their team 
is throwing. 
Rule XI. Sec. 5. 

Changed to prohibit catching the ball when 
tossed up between two players by Referee. 
Rule XI. Sec. 6. 

Changed so player jumping for ball, when 
tossed up by Referee, shall not be permitted 
to catch it. 
Rule XL Sec. 9. 

Changed so as to prohibit catching when 
tossed up by Referee. 
Rule XL Sec. 13 (b). 

Changed so as to meet the play where a 
player with one foot over the line throws the 
ball while in this position. 
Rule XI. Sec. 22. 

Changed so as to prohibit player "inside" 
from touching ball while in opponent's hands 
who is throwing in from "outside." 

Many other suggested changes were sub- 
mitted, some of them of real value, but the 
Committee suggests they be experimented 
with for another season locally before being 
included as part of the Official Rules. 

These changes are discussed in detail under 
Editorial Comment. 



150 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



I 

o 

BASKET 



LEFT FORWARD RIGHT FORWARD 



CENTER 



LEFT GUARD RIGHT GUARD 



BASKET 

o 



DIAGRAM OF BASKET BALL, FIELD. SHOWING POSITION OF FIVE-MAN TEAM. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



151 





<— SO'O" i 






O 




t 





I 




) : 


1 


•5 

■a 

§ 







v-'"'" 

..-"'' 


<c ..O .Ol — 


Boxindary^ Line 





152 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 

Where to Get Officials for Important 
Gaines 

Only tested officials of known ability and sterling character should 
be selected for any game, this being of paramount importance in big 
games. 

To this end a selected list is compiled below, every one of whom 
has been investigated and highly recommended by two or more 
persons in 1;heir locality, who have seen them perform satisfactorily 
and recommend them as efficient, honest and fearless in the perform- 
ance of their duty. 

That thev will suit everybody is too much to be toped for, but 
surely this 'list offers a higher grade of officials than can be secured 
by the former hit or miss plan. 

This list will be enlarged from year to year until all tb» important 
basket ball centers are covered. 

BASKET BALL OFFICIALS. 
California — 

Lees Schlanz, 1235 Pine Street, Apartment 3, San Francisco. 

Edw. Peneluna, Glasgow Apartments, 525 Turk Street, San Francisco. 

Geo. A. Schlitter. Room 638, City Hall, San Francisco. 

Rav Daughertv, .Tackson Playgrounds. San Francisco. 

A. 'Kemp, 20S9 Bush Street, San Francisco. 

Geo. Hammer, 585A Dolores Street, San Francisco. 

Lee Way mire. Ill Liberty Street. San Francisco. 

Frank Boek, Oakland H.S., Oakland. 

Deming Maclise, Y.M.C.A., Oakland. 

District of Columtia — 

J. E. Haas, 1416 A Street, N.E., Washington. 

Haxcaii — 

R. H. Lee. Honolulu. 

Ben Clarke, Honolulu. 

E. H. Hand, Honolulu. 

Fred W. Lau, Y.M.C.A., Honolulu. 

Indiana — 

Hollis Hunter, 761 Water Street, Hammond. 

lou-a-^ 

Arthur B. Epperson, Eddyville High School. Eddyville. 

Louisiana — 

E. H. Watts, care of Armour Packing Co., New O'-ieans. 
Claude Simon, 501 North Rampart Street, New Orleans. 
L. di Benedetto, City Hall Annex, New Orleans. 

Maryland — 

Dr. William Burdick, 602 Continental Building. Baltimore. 

William S. Pitman. 602 Continental Building Baltimore. 

C. C. Beuerleine. 1230 North Gilmore Street. Baltimore. 

M. W. King. 1308 North Broadway, Baltimore. 

L. S. Krake, 131 Jackson Place. Baltimore. 

C. F. Lustnauer. 1534 West North Avenue, Baltimore. 

Latrobe Cogswell, Baltimore A.C., Baltimore. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 153 

Massachusetts — 

John J. Kelliher. 301 Broadway, Cambridge, Mass. 
William F. Coady, 39 Calvin Street, Somerville, Mass. 
George Hoyt, 344 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 
Carl A. Reed, Box 173, Palmer, Mass. 

Minnesota — 

H. E. Gammons, 447 Y.M.C.A. Building, St. Paul. 

Mississippi — 

Fred C. Copp, Chamberlain-Hunt Academy, Pt. Gibson. 

Neio Hampshire — 

Carl A. Reed, Dartmoutli College, Hanover, N. H. 

New Jersey — 

John Murphy, 21 Ascension Street, Passaic. 

Sam Murphy, 21 Ascension Street, Passaic. 

Herman Schutling, 332 Gregory Avenue, Passaic. 

George Thorpe, 53 Ascension Street. Passaic. 

N. P. Randel, Montclair. 

G. L. Listman, Y.M.C.A., Montclair. 

Clarence Keene, Craig Hall, Atlantic City. 

Stacey B. Betzler, Drew Seminary, Madison. 

David Armstrong, Rahway. 

Chester L. Buckley, Rahway. 

James K. Alverson, Board of Education, Newark, 

Carl Anderson. Central High School, Newark. 

Herman C. Beck, Webster School, Newark. 

Hans Bischoff, Avon Avenue School, Newark. 

Carl Baumann, Ridge School, Newark. 

William G. Broadhead, Barringer High School, Newark. 

Horace Butterworth, E. S. High School, Newark, 

Guido Cavallaro. Belmont Avenue School, Newark. 

Lewis Field, Hawthorne Avenue School, Newark. 

Charles H. Kennington, Ungraded School 2. Newark. 

Robert L. Latimer, Hamburg Place School, Newark. 

Mathlas Macherey, Morton Street School, Newark. 

Herbert Meyer, Ungraded School 1, Newark. 

E. Fred Moller, Madison School, Newark. 

James A. Molloy, Peshine School, Newark. 

Lester A. Palmer, City Hall, Newark. 

Harry J. Sargent, Central High School, Newark. 

Ernest H. Seibert. City Hall, Newark. 

George Seikel, Bergen Street, Newark. 

Joseph D'Angola, Barringer High School. Newark. 

Dr. D. M. F. Krogh, Cleveland School, Newark. 

J. M. LaRue, 16 Boulevard. Summit. 

Hunter B. Grant, Y.M.C.A., Orange. 

George Henckel, East Orange High School, East Orange. 

W. B. Howe, care of Y.M.C.A., Elizabeth. 

Chester Grassmuck, 31 Zabriskle Street. Jersey City. 

W. S. Sweeney, 22 Monticello Avenue, Jersey City. 

H. D. Brittin, 305 Palisade Avenue, Jersey City. 

Charles R. Bostwick, 970 Union Street, Plainfield. 

C. C. Shean, High School, Passaic, N. J. 

J. J. McNamee, Daily Press, Plainfield, N. J. 

New York — 

O. C. Skeele, Morris High School, 166th Street and Boston Road, 
Bronx. 



154 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 

Alfred Rado. P. S. 32. 183d Street. Beaumont and Cambrelong Ave- 
nues, Bronx. 

Harry Sperling. Eastern District High Scbool, Marcy Avenue and 
Rodney Street. Brooklyn. 

Albert jolinson. P. S. 38, Elm Avenue and Fresh Pond Road, 
Ridgewood Heights. ^ ,, , „. ,„ . , 

E R. Pierce, P. S. 20. Sanford Avenue and Union Street, Flushing 

H J Silverman, Jamaica High School. Hillside Avenue. Jamaica. 

Thomas M. Smith, P. S. 21, Mott and Elizabeth Streets, between 
Spring and Prince Streets, Manhattan. 

F E Delhi, Flushing High School. Sanford Avenue, Flushing. 

John V. Clark, Stuyvesant High School, 15th Street and First Ave- 
nue. Manhattan. _ 

A. P. Way, Stuyvesant High School, 15^h Street and First Avenue, 
Manhattan. ^^ , , ^^ , ., 

H. E. Aldinger, High School of Commerce, 6oth and 66th Streets, 
west of Broadway, Manhattan. 

W. R. Harper. Teachers' Training School. Park Place, west of Nos- 
trand Avenue, Brooklyn. 

W. Warren Brackett, 158 Garfield Place, Brooklyn. 

Charles Fraenznick, 244 Hewes Street, Brooklyn. 

A. Maurice Levine. 31 Nassau Street. New York. 

Thomas J. Brown, Commercial High School, Brooklyn. 

James R. Adsit, Central Y.M.C.A.. 11 Bond Street. Brooklyn 

William Edmonds, Central Y.M.C.A., 11 Bond Street, Broooklyn. 

Samuel Harris, 2441 Seventh Avenue. Manhattan.. 

Ira Staeneaud. 100 Avenue C, Manhattan. 

J. Frank. McKibbon Park, Brooklyn. 

A. N. Kjellander, High School, Middletown, N. Y. 

Ralph J. Herkimer, Hackley School, Tarrytown. 

W. E. Reutschi, Pleasantville. 

J. N. Shoening, Jr.. Y. M. C. A„ Lexington Avenue and 92nd Street. 

North Carolina — 

William T. Cook. P. D. Davidson College, Davidson, N. C. 

Ohio — 

Harry V. Curtis, 204 Harrison Avenue, Greenville. 

Pennsylvania — 

Peter F. Carney, 1400 Vine Street. Philadelphia. 
Charles W. Bainbridge, Jr., Boys' Club, Germantown. 
Benjamin F. Emory, Y". M. C. A. Central, Philadelphia. 

Rhode Island — 

J. R. Conahay, Y'.M.C.A., Newport. 

Texas — 

R. S. Israel, care 102 Henrietta Street, San Antonio. 
George Wheeler, care 102 Henrietta Street. San Antonio. 
Joe Lovece, care 102 Henrietta Street. San Antonio. 

A. F. Dugosh. care 102 Henrietta Street, San Antonio. 

Vtah— 

B. E. Harker, Deseret Gymnasium, Salt I^ake City. 

R. W. Richardson. Deseret Gymnasium. Salt Lake City. 

Homer Christensen, Springfield. 

Willard Ashton. Granite High School. Salt Lake City. 

Ross Kelley, Bingham City High School, Bingham City. 

A. J. Gunn, L.C.M.I.. Salt Lake City. 

Homer Hoisington. Y.M.C.A.. Salt Lake City. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 15& 



Suggestions for Officials 

By George T. Hepbron 

The fact that a man is a good player is not' sufficient reason for 
selecting him to be an official. In addition, he must have char- 
acter and backbone. 

If, among others, the following characteristics are exhibited by 
the officials, the games this season will be better officered, and 
less friction will be manifested : 

1. Instant recognition of a violated rule and the penalty for 
same. 

2. Backbone enough to make a decision and stick to it. 

3. Abstinence from fault finding. (The duty of officials is to 
make decisions — not to lecture the players.) 

4. Readiness to explain in the fewest possible words why that 
particular ruling was made. 

5. Willingness to produce the rule as authority for action. 

6. Never, under any circumstances, allowing the prolonged 
discussion of a rule during the progress of the game. 

7. Willingness to allow the players the privilege of appeal from 
his interpretation of the rules to the proper committee. 

8. Kindness and courtesy to all and the maintenance of a level 
head under trying circumstances. 

9. A strong purpose to follow the rules in letter and spirit, and 
a determination not to be susceptible to outside influences. 

10. Will not overstep his authority, appreciating at the same 
time his full duty. 

11. Knows the rules so well that a reversal of decision is not 
necessary. 

12. Impartial in all his dealings. 



156 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



Suggestions for Teams 



1. Select a coach that is interested in the well-being of the 
game and is not blinded with the god of victory. 

2. Select a manager that will not lead the team into profes- 
sional games. 

3. Select only competent, impartial officials. If there are none 
in your locality, develop some. 

4. Select teams to play that use only the official rules. 

5. Select only those teams that abide by the recognized rules, 
having their games sanctioned and men registered. 

6. Select teams to play that have suitable floor space so the 
spectators do not interfere. 

7. Select teams to play that do not allow rowdies in to see the 
game, to insult your players and create disorder. 

8. In short, abide by the rules yourself and insist on others 
doing likewise or refuse to play them. 

A letter addressed to the Secretary of the* A. A. U. Basket 
Ball Committee, P. O. Box 611, New York City, will be courte- 
ously treated and information given on interpretation of rules, 
and the names of the persons to whom you may apply for 
registration and sanction, etc. Please enclose self addressed 
stamped envelope for reply. 



SPALDING'S OiFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 157 



How to Register a Basket Ball Team 

Teams desiring to register their players will receive full 
information and blanks by applying to the Amateur Athletic 
Union representative in their state, as indicated below, or to 
George T. Hepbron, P. O. Box 6ii, New York City. 

"J. W. Stumpf, Box 6ii, New York City. — New York, Con- 
necticut, New Jersey, north of Trenton. 

J. Frank Facey, 36 Prospect Street, Cambridge, Mass. — Maine, 
New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 

William Burdick, M.D., Continental Building, Baltimore, 
Md. — Maryland, West Virginia, District of Columbia, Virginia, 
North Carolina and South Carolina. 

Florence J. Curran, care Con P. Curran Printing Co., St. 
Louis, Mo. — Missouri, South Dakota, Kentucky, (excepting 
Powell and Kenton counties), Indian Territory, Nebraska, 
Arkansas, Kansas, Oklahoma, North Dakota and St. Clair 
County, 111. 

H. F. Keator, 421 Rookery Building, Chicago, 111. — Ohio 
(except Jefferson, Columbiana and Belmont counties), Indiana. 
Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota and Illinois, excepting St. 
Clair County, 111., and including Powell and Kenton counties, 
Kentucky. 

L. Di Benedetto, Municipal Office Building, New Orleans, 
La. — 'Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and 
Tennessee. 

George James, 28 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. — Cali- 
fornia, north of Tehachapi Pass, and Nevada. 

T Morris Dunne, Multnomah A. A. C, Portland, Ore. — 
Idaho, Oregon, Washington, Montana and Alaska. 

W. Pyke Johnson. University of Denver, Denver, Colo. — 
Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah. 

Allan P. Cox, 1400 Vine Street, Philadelphia, Pa. — New 
Jersey, south of and including Trenton ; Delaware and Penn- 
sylvania ; Jefferson, Columbiana and Belmont counties, Ohio. 

R. W. Horning, Y. M. C. A., Los Angeles, Cal.— California, 
south of Tehachapi Pass, and Arizona. 

John F. Soper, Myrtle Boat Club, Honolulu, T. H. — Hawaiian 
Islands. 

A. F. DuGOSH, care Louis Book Store, San Antonio, Tex. — 
Texas. 



158 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL, BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



How to Score Basket Ball 

By Luther Halsey Gulick, M.D, 

The increased use of the score book last year resulted in the 
teams getting down to more scientific pla3'ing. Better records 
were kept, and the managers were able to size up their men more 
accurately. This score book is a necessity to the manager of 
a team who wishes to keep accurate record of all his players; 
who made the fouls, and what kind of fouls; who made the 
goals, and under what conditions they were made. A sample 
page for a single team is herewith given. In the first column is 
found the names of the team and the players; in the second 
column, the goals that were made during the first half. In this 
column will be found three sets of marks : an X, which is a 
goal from the field; an O, which is an attempted goal from a 
free throw, but which was missed, and an X inside of an O, 
which means a goal thrown from a free throw. The X, of 
course, counts two points, the O nothing and the X inside an O, 
one point. At the bottom of the column is the total number of 
points made during that half. In the third column are the fouls. 
First, is Ai. By referring to the bottom of the page, under the 
head of FOULS, we see that Ai is for delaying the game. This 
foul, together with A5 and A4, was made by John Jones. If 
A. P. Yost had made another Class B foul, he would have been 
disqualified. In the second half, the captain thought that Chas. 
Brown would best make the free throws, but after two failures, 
he went back to John Jones, who scored two. A score kept in 
this way is of the greatest value, and without it an accurate esti- 
mate of the players is hardly possible. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



(M 



^ 



i 








160 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 

Duties of the Captain, the Manager 
and the Coach 

By Edwin S. Conner. 



THE CAPTAIN. 
The captain is the important man when it comes to the game. 
Generally he is elected to the position because his team-mates think 
that he will make the best leader. After such a place is given him 
he must show by his actions and bearing that he means to ffive 
the best that is in him for the interest of the team. No man of 
the squad is more interested and more eager to turn out a winner 
than he is. So it is up to him to keep the spirit at top-notch all 
the time. To do this, it is well for him to show a dash, an alert- 
ness and a fight which will spur the others on. He must know the 
rules so well that he is able to tell what they are at a minute's 
notice. With fair play on his lips and a determination to set the 
pace for the others, he will make a good captain. 

His real work comes as soon as the team is on the floor. From 
then imtil the end of the game, he is the master of every situation 
which may arise. At the beginning of the game, it is well to flip 
a coin for choice of g6al and to have an understanding with the 
opposing captain in the presence of the officials about the rules and 
ground rules necessary for the contest. Call the men together and 
explain the conditions under which the game is to be played. With 
everything well agreed upon the game ought to run off quickly and 
smoothly. With the first blow of the whistle, the captain should 
assume all rights of his position and see to it that they are strictly 
carried out. If an appeal is to be made to an official, it should be 
made the right way, then the captain should weigh it well before 
going to the official. Unless a decision is directly contrary to the 
rules, it is best to make the disputes as few as possible. 

While the game is in progress the captain must direct the play 
the best that he knows how. If things are breaking badly, call the 
players together, for some of them may see a way out. Do not 
depend upon the coach too much. He will probably be ready to give 
advice between halves. Keep a close watch on the plays and players. 
Often the game will drop down because a man is all in or is shirking. 
In either case the quicker he gets out the bettf. A substitute will 
play a stronger game. 

When on the defence, work hard to solve the opponents' system 
of play. The minute that you find something that will break it up, 
let the others know. If on the offensive, you find that they are 
breaking up your style of play, do not hesitate about changing It. 
Keep the others guessing what you are going to do next. 

Treat the visitors as well as you can. Keep their best respect by 
showing them that you are glad to meet them. At the time when a 
dicker is made for choice of goal, the courtesy of granting the visit- 
ors their choice is always appreciated. Never look for an advantage 
unless you realize that your team is weaker. There is always a lot 
of pleasure in defeating a team with its strongest line-up. Often 
plajers are filled with joy when they hear that a good player on the 
opposing team is laid up. There isn't much credit in defeating a 
sub-team or a team that is not in shape. Keep the spirit of sucli 
a nature that you are not satisfied unless you defeat the best there 
is and conquer them fairly. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 161 

If you are going to play a game, don't protest it before the game. 
Either play or quit. Protests are never in good taste or in the true 
spirit of the game. It helps to keep the tone of the game in a 
low key. 

As soon as the game is over, call the men together and give a yell. 
Show your opponents that you are game to the core whether you win 
or lose. Teams that can take a defeat are the ones which ought to 
win. Never leave the floor disgusted because things did not break 
your way. Begin right then planning for the next game. Your turn 
will come later. 

In choosing a line-up it is well to consider what constitutes a good 

E layer. If a man is in condition, knows the game and likes to play, 
e will generally make good. Sometimes men who are out of condi- 
tion play well, but what could they do if they were in good shape. 
The training of the captain often decides what will be good for the 
others. If he is willing to sacrifice a few things to the welfare of 
the team, the others are not slow in following his example. Such 
a spirit is always catching and if it gets started, it goes a long ways 
towards running through the team. The captain must be the leader 
off the floor as well as on it. 

What you are the team will be. What you demand the team will 
fight for. So it is up to you, the captain, to do all in your power 
to make the game clean, popular and wholesome. 

THE ma:nager. 

Many duties fall on the shoulders of a manager for which, he gets 
but little or no credit. Yet he in the man who keeps th© machine 
oiled and in good running order. Everything crosses his path during 
the season that can be thought of. So it follows that he mUst be one 
of the most essentially well qualified men in connection vvith the 
team. 

The following are among the many duties which he has to per- 
form. First, the making out of a schedule ; second, the choice of 
floors for the game ; third, the choice of officials ; fourth, the finan- 
cial condition of the team ; fifth, the attention given to visiting 
teams ; sixth, the team on a trip ; seventh, the record and the report 
of the games. Other things will come up but can be attended to at 
the time. 

A gobd schedule is of vital importance to the welfare of a team. 
It keeps not only the players enthusiastic with something to look 
forward to, but also all of the followers of the game are interested. 
If it is made out so that the hard games come as the season advances, 
it will greatly aid in the final standing. This will help to work the 
men to an edge, which is the time for the hardest and closing game. 
Still care should be taken to arrange the games in regular order, so 
that they do not come too near together or too far apart. Of course, 
the maturity and the condition of the men determine the frequency 
of the dates. Boys ought to be contented to play for a season of 
ten weeks, with one game a week. Men can play more often, but 
there is a question as to its advisability. Make the schedule as 
short as the season warrants, with no open dates to interfere with 
the interest of the game. If outside trips are planned. It is well 
to make them at the beginning of the season. Let nothing interfere 
with the games which mean most to the team. 

Often a manager is able to save himself a lot of trouble by enter- 
ing a league. If there is no such organization it is well for several 
managers to get together and form one. Then all of the teams will 
play up to the same standard, be nearer equal in strength, have the 
Bame object in mind and will be governed by the same board. This 
means more than it seems to at first glance. For when all are made 



162 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 

to observe the same rules and agree to abide by them good results 
«.re sure to follow. 

Again the managers of the different teams might meet to discuss 
and agree upon the rules. At this meeting it would be possible to 
have the prospective oflBcials present to help determine the meaning 
of the rules. With such a combined understanding and agreement 
of the rules, it means better enforcement and a more satisfactory 
^nd a finer game all around. 

The manager of the independent team has a hard job on his 
hands. Between such teams there is very little in common and the 
games are likely to be of a low grade. Often the strength of a 
team, the age of the players, etc., is misstated so that a team of 
bovs line up against a team of men. Schedules should be made 
according to the strength of the team. It should never be under- 
rated. If there is any glory in a victory, it comes by beating the 
best there is. Sometimes teams will back out at the last minute. 
To meet this a contract should be drawn up at the time of the 
agreement to the effect that the team canceling the game within 
three weeks of the date shall forfeit to the other team a certain 
sum of money. This should be signed by both managers. As soon 
as teams that really want to play basket ball and live up to its 
spirit can be found, fix a game with them. Drop as far as possible 
all the fiend teams and stick to the ones that live nearest to the 
ieart of the game. In time this will bring good basket ball. 

As soon as the schedule is out of the way and the rules are fixed 
upon, find out the size, kind and other particulars of the floor. 
Make it a rule to play on floors as near to the size of the one used 
in practice as possible. Because of the change of floors many teams 
of A-1 caliber have been defeated by a second-rate five. Make the 
conditions for both teams as nearly equal as possible. Don't invite 
"the crane to dinner and feed him from a plate." Be square and 
demand .squareness. 

Most always the kind of a game played depends to a great extent 
upon the officials. Be sure that you engage the best there is in the 
place. Get the ones who are filled with the spirit of the game and 
Tvho know the rules well. Such men are scarce. So when you find 
one who knows, can see and has the backbone to call, stick to him. 
Not only your team needs the man, but the game needs him. Nine 
times out of ten the game turns out to be just what the officials 
make it. Too often the officials don't care for much but the fee 
-which is tagged to the end of the game. If they demand pay, pay 
them well enough to demand a good job. 

Whatever money comes to the team comes by the planning of the 
manager. The financial condition is generally in poor shape. Noth- 
ing is more encouraging than to start the season with a clean slate 
and finish with something to the good. Plan the expenses on a scale 
that can be met. If possible get some man or business house to 
furnish the men with uniforms. Then live well within the means 
of good credit. Do not go away or have a team come to your place 
unless the expenses are a sure thing. It is hard for the players to 
go into their pockets for the support of the team. Look long and 
plan well the money account. 

For the interest of the men, keep score and every little while post 
a record of the work of the players. This together with a good 
report of the games will keep the spirit away up where it belongs. 
Make it a point to report your own games. In doing this try to be 
fair and give each one who was in the game credit for what he did. 
Don't fail to have the game in the papers. 

In a word, a manager should be a wide-awake hustler who is ready 
to drop whatever he has if he can find something better. He should 
be proud of tbe game which he represents and whatever step he 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 163 

takes should be in the direction of putting it on a higher plane and 
on a more solid foundation. 

THE COACH. 

The coach, of the present day means more to the men who are 
under him than the leader of any other profession. He is the 
"Mecca"' of their thought and whatever he says or does always seems 
right to them. He can teach them any kind of a game and they will 
do all that is in their power to follow his instructions. They long 
for his advice and company and will stick to him through, thick and 
thin. This close touch with them gives him a chance to mould into 
their games elements of a quality which will influence them through 
life. 

The real importance of the coach will be more felt in the future 
than ever before. Not long ago a victory would stamp his success. 
In many cases his job depended upon the number of games won. 
To this' end he must turn out a winning team. Two things were 
necessary. First,, men who were physically fit ; second, a variety of 
play that would smother an opponent. When his men went on to 
the floor, he knew they would meet a team fully as strong and 
equally as well trained in all departments of the game. To get some 
kind of an advantage tactics of a low nature were allowed which 
might turn the tide of battle and bring the much-sought crown of 
glory. Things which were on hand, could be borrowed or could be 
invented, were introduced. This ate out the heart of the game until 
it was considered by many as a public nuisance. No game however 
strong will last unless it is a living example of the spirit -which it 
represents. In order to make the game what it was intended to be, 
a stronger demand must be made by all for the best there is in it. 
As soon as the coach demands the elimination of the evil tendencies 
and makes his work develop and stand for the elements of %irness 
in all things, his profession will be more appreciated by all. 

Nothing detracts from a game more than a lax interpretation of 
the rules. Ignoring the rules or their spirit is disregarding the 
rights of others. The rules must be taught. They are a wholesome 
part of the game. The man who can see a chance to crawl around 
a rule and breaks away from its meaning is doing a great injustice 
to a team and also to the game. Keep at all times well within the 
bounds of what the game ought to be. It is easy to let the rules 
go. The audience knows very little about them. They get their 
opinion of the game as it is played and report it to others who 
imagine the game far different from what it really is. If the coaches 
are proud of the game that they teach, they must teach and demand 
better knowledge and better enforcement of the rules. 

There are a few things which mean a great deal to the team. 
Often a young coach will try to develop the team too quickly. He 
has a lot of material on hand, but does not consider the time it took 
to get it. With young and inexperienced men a great deal of patience 
and time must be spent. The coaching that is given must be of a 
simple nature. Complex plays demand too much time and are beyond 
tue ability of the player, and they also demand frequent and long 
practice, which calls for so much energy that by mid-season the 
whole squad is stale. When the contest comes the players will be up 
against plays which they cannot work. The time has been thrown 
away. So teach things that will be used. A fellow cannot go beyond 
his ability. The team will develop faster by giving them a few easy 
plays, each new one to come only after the old one has been well 
learned. The team must be a machine. A simple one that will work 
is better than a complicated one that will not. Then of course older 
paen in experience can be worked longer, harder and given more 



164 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 

different plays. Yet mature players are often out of condition for 
the hardest game. Too much practice is often the reason for a poor 
showing. 

The length and frequency of practice is an important factor. Too 
much work will kill a good team. Here the age and the experience 
of the players must be considered. Most players, unless watched, 
will go beyond the point of all that is good for them. Try to make 
the practice of a limited length. Demand that the players are dressed 
and on hand at the appointed time. Never allow them to wait. Have 
the practice and get through as planned. Boys should not be encour- 
aged to practice more than two (2) hours weekly and thirty (30) 
minutes a day is plenty, while for men the time spent for the best 
work should not exceed three hours a week. The preliminary work, 
if light, may run for a long time, but the actual scrimmage should 
not be longer than the contest. This will put the men in the best 
possible condition. 

A strong, well-trained team speaks very highly of the coach. Noth- 
ing is more pleasing to the coach than a team which has been drilled 
until it is a machine. The team must be fast, sure and in order. It 
must take every advantage of an opponent. It must have a variety 
of play so that a change can be made if it becomes necessary. Endur- 
ance and coolness throughout the game will help to make the pace 
too strong for most to follow. The team-work must be filled with 
accurate, well-timed passing which ends in goal throwing. A team 
that can handle itself as a unit has been well coached. 

All of the work should be in behalf of the team. Individual play- 
ing must not be allowed for a minute. When the star begins to get 
out of his true course in the basket ball system, the whole thing 
goes wrong. Shining will never win basket ball games unless all five 
Bhine. 

The value of good condition is always felt during the game. With 
a good style of play and the boys in good condition, there can be but 
little doubt as to the kind of game played. The w^ord of the coach 
will go as far toward good training as that of anyone. He should 
demand that the players eat wholesome food and that they get plenty 
of rest. If each man is expected tj live right during the season he 
will generally do it. The fellows must be made to feel that this is 
true. It isn't a case of watching over a fellow ; it is a case of his 
willingness not to do the thing which hurts him. Encourage the 
boys to take a good bath with a brisk rub-down following the prac- 
tice. The bath had better come before the player begins to cool off. 

Many coaches coach from the side lines. If this is legal, then it 
is all right, but if the ru'es forbid it. it is poor policy. For it is 
hard to teach a rule if the teacher cannot keep one himself. This 
comes to the point as to whether it is the skill of the coach or the 
skill of the player that he has trained that is being shown. It is 
the best plan to do everything in connection with the game as it 
should be done. 

Advise and encourage the players before the game. Watch their 
playing. Correct it during the time between halves and let them do 
the rest. 

Teach each man what is expected of him. Let him understand that 
he is to give what he has in him to the game. If things arise which 
are against him, have him tell the captain, who will see to the 
trouble. Many teams are run without the players having any idea 
of what they are to do. This means poor basket ball. 

The coaches must work more for the popularity and love of the 
game than for the victory. If they do not some other game will take 
the place of basket ball. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 165 



Basket Ball in Delaware 

By C. H. Meissner, 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., Wilmington, Del. 

Never before in the history of basket ball have so many teams 
played the game as during the past year. Every available hall was 
fitted up with baskets and the game prospered. Several teams had 
outdoor courts and played in the open whenever the weather was not 
too bad. 

Practically all the teams, with the exception of those organized by 
the Y. M. C. A., are playing independent ball, and not a few of these 
are playing non-registered teams. 

Delaware College had a bad year, winning only two out of ten 
games. The team scored but 201 points to opponents' 308. 

Rigney was high scorer, with 20 field goals and 27 foul goals. Lack- 
len caged 17 goals, Weimer 10, Hirshman 6, Wills 6, Thomas 5, Cann 
4, Sawdon 3, Dougherty 2, McNeal 2. Thomas ran close to Rigney on 
fouls, caging 23. Lacklen made 3. 

In scholastic circles both High School and Friends' School had fast 
teams, each winning a majority of games. It would be hard to say 
which team was the better, and it seems that something might be done 
to bring these teams together in athletic games, as was formerly 
the case. 

There were quite a few league games under way during the past 
season. Leagues were organized in the People's Settlement, West End 
Reading Room and Y. M. C. A. All of these leagues had successful 
seasons. 

The Y". M. C. A. Men's League had its most successful season, pla.v- 
ing a very fast article of ball, and the attendance filled the gym each 
game. No men were disqualified, and the rules were strictly adheted 
to. The teams finished in the following order : 

Won. Lost. rc. Won. Lost. PC. 

Delaware 9 3 .750 Eagles 5 7 .417 

Regents 7 5 .583 Runts 3 9 .250 

The champion Delaware team was captained by William Mink, who 
led them a year ago. The line-up was as follows : Mink and Mearns, 
forwards ; Hughes, center ; Brown and Moore, guards ; substitutes, 
Whitehead and Thielman. 

The championship in the Employed Boys' League went to the 
Tigers. In the High School Boys' League the Pirates had an easy 
time winning the championship, playing consistent ball the entire 
season. 

The Grammar School Boys' Leagues were Class A and Class B. This 
was done in order to get the younger and lighter boys into the game 
and proved a success. The Sioux team took the honors in the Class A 
League and the Crows won in the Class B organization. 

Among the independent teams throughout the state the following 
played many games : Wilson Line, Penlyn Hall, Friends' A. A.. Ches- 
mar Academy, Fort DuPont, State Militia, Salesianum A.C., Columbia 
A.C. of Newark, Mt. Vernon and Brownson. The fastest team in the 
state was Brownson, but the latter can hardly be classed among the 
amateurs, having played the Eastern League teams on several 
occasions. 






NEWARK 


(DEL. 


) TEAM. 






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1, iv.rter; 2, Seifert; 3, R. Gray, Capt.; :, : ; ^ 

7, Stothart. Juiiaui 

MILWAUKEE (WIS.) NORMAL, SCHOOL TEAM. 



(iray; 
I'hoto, 




DE LA SALLE INSTITUTE. CHICAGO, ILL. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 167 

Basket Ball in District of Columbia 

By J. E. Haas. 

During the season of 1912-1913. basket ball In Washington flourished 
to a greater extent than in all the previous years in the history of 
the game, and it is confidently expected and prophesied that the coming 
season will see more teams and better playing than ever before. 

Georgetown and Catholic Universities, bolh had fast teams and 
played to larger audiences than ever before. Catholic University had 
one of the strongest teams in the history of that institution, and was 
picked by many as the best college five in the South. 

Gallaudef College had a good season, and was represented by a fast 
quint. Maryland Agricultural College, the institution that is opening 
the eyes of the Southern college world, so far as sports are concerned, 
had a fairly good five and will surely be represented by a more experi- 
enced team next season. 

Among the high schools, Business High had the champion five, only 
being defeated by the Army and Navy Pi*eparatory School, whicti won 
the All-Scholastic League title. 

The Washington City (Amateur) League was stronger than it has 
ever been before. The teams were faster and played much more scien- 
tifically, and the attendance was much better. The league was divided 
into three classes, as follows : A, unlimited weight ; B, weight per 
man 145 pounds ; C, weight per man, 125 pounds. 

Rosedale Playgrounds and Peck Memorial Chapel were tied for first 
place in Class C and played a series of three games to decide the 
leadership. Each team won on its own fioor, and in the third and 
deciding game, which was played in the Boys' Department of the 
Y. M. C. A.. Rosedale won by the score of 22 to 19. 

The Yankees of the Boys' Department. Y. M. C. A., won the cham- 
pionship in Class B, with Epiphany Church, second, and Rosedale 
Playgrounds, third. 

The Y. M. C. A. Regulars were the champions in Class A for the 
fifth consecutive time, losing only one game. The battle for second 
place proved very exciting, as the season drew to a close, between 
Aloysius, District Guards and the Collegians of Georgetown University. 
Aloysius held second place nearly all season, but lost the position in 
their last few games to the Collegians. 

A silver loving cup, the gift of A. G. Spalding & Bros., was pre- 
sented to the winners in each class. 

The following is the standing of the teams in Class A at the end 
of the season : 

Won. Lost. PC. Won. Lost. PC. 

Regulars. Y.M.C.A... 17 1 .944 District Guards 9 9 .500 

Collegians, Georget'n. 11 6 .647 Epiphany 6 14 ..30O 

Aloysius 11 7 .611 Bull Moose, Y.M.C.A. 2 16 .111 

An All-Star Team, picked from the different fives of the league, is 
as follows : 

First Team. Position. Second Team. 

Sliugrue, Collegians Forward Chase. Epiphany 

Frazier, Y.M.C.A Forward Hutton. District Guards 

Valk, Y.M.C.A Center McCarthy, Aloysius 

Givanoni. District Guards Guard McKay. Y.M.C.A. 

Hoppe, Y.M.C.A Guard Beaulac, Aloysius 







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1, D. Donnell; 2. Van Alstyue; 3, Cook; 4, Wegener, Capt.; 5, G. Donnell; 6, 

Wright. White. I'hoto. 

HORACE MANN HIGH SCHOOL TEAM, NEW YORK CITY. 




1, Miller, .Mgr. ; 'J. lUakc: .1. Wateroii^; 4. Leiteiiuaii; .j. Henilriau, Coach; 

6, Shirley; 7. Feurich; 8, Cann, Capt.; ii, Keyes; 10, nolmau. White, Photo. 

HIGH SCHOOL OF COMMETtCE TEAM, NEW YORK CITY. 




1. Grctiiiug. (apt.: 2. .Miller; 3, Hepler; 4, Cashing; 5, Hi. 
Williams, Mgr. ; S, I{u>sell. Coach. 

EMPIRE (C. Z.) Y. M. C. A. TEAM. 



wan; •>. 
Photo 



lawyer; t. 
Co., Photo. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 169 

Special mention should be made of the work of Matthews and 
Rutherford, Bull Mooseis ; Hurlay, Aloysius ; Strausbaugh, Epiphany, 
and McDonald of the Guards. 

There are a large number of girls' teams in the district. Every 
college and preparatory school have teams, and even the churches 
have taken up the sport where gymnasiums have been erected. Na- 
tional Park Seminary, Holton Arms, Madeira, Gallaudet College and 
Central High School were represented by well organized teams. Ingram 
Church, which was considered to have had the greatest in the South 
for the seasons of 1910, 1911-1912, was not represented during 1912- 
1913, but it is hoped that the team will be reorganized for next season. 

The individual record of the regular Y. M. C. A. team is as follows : 

Field Free Field Free 

Name and Position. G. Goals. Thr. Name and Position. G. Goals. Thr. 

Hoppe, f., eg 22 79 8 Varela, f 20 45 2 

Frazier, f., g .22 73 3 McKay, g 22 17 28 

Valk, c 12 57 8 Allwine, g 18 11 

Hall, f.. g. 18 51 1 McDonald, g 8 10 

Almon, f 22 48 3 

West Chester (Pa.) State Normal Sohool. — The basket ball authorities at 
this school contend that they had one of the best school teams in the East 
during the season of 1912-1913. Out of fifteen games played they lost only 
one, that to the Williamson School, by a margin of four points. In fact, 
the two games with the Williamson boys were among the conspicuous fea- 
tures of the season, the second game especially. West Chester being vic- 
torious by only one point. Baldwin, at forward, is credited with outplaylnj: 
all the guards who opposed him. Robert, at center. Shore and Davis, guards, 
and Mautz, in passing and team work, surpassed all other players in the 
same positions opposed to West Chester. 

Catholic Lyceum Jrs. 145-Pound Class Team, Asbury Park, N. J. — Last sea- 
son was the first time the Lyceums had played together, yet out of sixteen 
games contested they won twelve, lost three and one was a tie. One of the 
special features of the campaign was a series of games with the Car- 
dinals of the Asbury Park Y.M.C.A. for the junior championship of Mon- 
mouth County. The best four out of seven games was to decide the title, 
and after six games had been played the Lyceum team won with four vic- 
tories. After this fine showing the team found it d fficult to schedule games, 
only two more being played before the closing of the season. The team met 
with a serious loss by the disabling of Walter Fow, captain and left forward, 
"Who had his shoulder blade dislocated while playing with the senior team 
against Seton Hall College. 

La Salle Academy, New York Oity. — The season of 1912-1913 was the most 
successful that La Salle ever had. There were three teams representing the 
academy, the senior team, the junior team and the midget team. In all, 
fifty-four contests were engaged in, forty-eight resulting in victories for the 
La Salle boys. By having defeated decisively the leading Catholic high 
schools of Greater New York, the senior five claim the title of champions 
of the Catholic high schools of New York City. The team met with but one 
defeat during the entire season, this being at the hands of the^ strong Man- 
hattan prep. team. Later in the season they retrieved this defeat by van- 
quishing the Manhattanites, on the latter's court, by the score of 21 — 13. 
The junior team was one of the fastest combinations around New York. 
They participated in twenty-three games and lost but four. The work of 
this team elicited many favorable comments and notices in the press. Cap- 
tain John Lauria was the most valuable man on the senior team. His play- 
ing was of the highest standard. He was the mainstay of the team, giving 
It stability and staunchness that enabled the five to make such an enviable 
record. Hart, at center, and Horan and Prendergast, as forwards, formed 
one of the fastest combinations seen on local courts. McBreen, at guard, 
earned the name of "Stonewall" because of his wonderful defensive play. It 
was La Salle's best year in, basket ball. There is excellent material for the 
coming season, as few of the players graduated in June, 1913. 



I -hAJ 



1. I.aney: 2. Baker: 3. Hazel; 4, Green, Coach; 5, Mathiasen; 6, Niese. Capt. 
'• ^^^''- MOXTCLAIR (X. J.) ACADEMY TEAM. 



I' S^%,% 



i 



1. l.fliuiiiii. Miii:: '_>. (•(.riiiac: :!. K. La F^r-r: 4. Fountain; 5, Alfrcti M. 
Capt.; (!. Halliett; 7. II. La Forjic 

CURTIS HIGH SCHOOL ANNEX 'JT. \M. To'J TE.N VILLE. > I. 




1, M. Pincus, Instructor: 2, Benowitz: o. Kapsack; 4, I'eltz; 
Perjansky; 7. Spinnel, Capt.; 8, Farber. 



G'lldstein; 6. 



SEWARD PARK 100-LB. TEAM. NEW YORK CITY, N. Y. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 171 

Basket Ball in Virginia 

By D. T. Bridges, B.P.E. 

During the season of 1912-1913 basket ball in the western part of 
the State continued to be as popular as ever. The Lynchburg cham- 
pions found no trouble in holding their record of the previous yeai% 
and did not lose a game with a Y. M. C. A. team during the season. 
A number of association teams from other States were also defeated- 
Roanoke and Danville proved easy for the boys from the Hill City, 
both at home and abroad. Lynchburg's reputation of being the fastest 
team in the State has been a handicap to it, financially, on its home 
floor, as there are few teams able to play a close game to be of interest 
to the spectators. 

Roanoke started the season well, but continual changes affected the 
team work. Danville played its longest schedule in years, and although 
not winning a very large per cent of games was able to finish the 
season without a finarcial deficit. 

Basket ball in the eastern part of the State was not very encourag- 
ing, due to the heavy expenses in travel, and the few games played. It 
is a hard matter, therefore, to judge or compare the teams in that 
section without competition. 

Henderson (Ky.) High School. — ^With the record of ten straight victories 
and only one defeat, that at the hands of the Mt. Vernon. Ind., quintet, th* 
Henderson High School team was acknowledged to be the best team ever 
organized in Western Kentucky and lays claim to the championship of the 
State in 1912-13. This claim is based on the refusal of the two Louisville 
high schools to accept challenges for contests. In 1911-12, Henderson worn 
the State championship by defeating Louisville Male High School, 46 — 19« 
The team was well coached by Professor Montgomery. 

Orioles (Formerly Germans), Buifalo, N. Y. — Under their new name, Orioles, 
the Germans, world's champion basket ball team, made a remarkable show- 
ing last season. Thirty-six games were played, of which twenty-eight Were 
won, and they scored 1,580| points to 849 for opponents. Since their organi- 
zation In 1895 the Germans have won 462 games and lost 51, a percentage of 
.900. Five times they went through the season without the loss of a game, 
and during the campaigns of 1908-1910 the Germans established a world'* 
record by winning 111 straight games. In 1901 they won the Pan-Americat 
championship in Buffalo, and in 1904 the world's championship at the Louis- 
iana Purchase Exposition. Of the present team, the Orioles. Heerdt and B- 
Miller played with the Germans when they organized in 1895. 

Educational Alliance, Boys' Cluhs Department, New York City. — The basket 
ball tournament of the Educational Alliance, Boys' Club Department, of New 
York, proved to be an interesting one, from the point! of view of both play- 
ers and spectators. There were eight clubs entered, and it was evident front 
the start that the tournament would be a close one. The faithful trai"ning 
on the part of the players and the sincere interest of the spectators at alt 
games were big factors in making the competition the big success that It 
was. There were three teams of the eight tied for first place, with only 
three more games to be played. The acquisition of two of these games by 
the Peter Cooper club gave it the championship. The following is the final 
standing of the clubs: 

Won. Lost. PC. Won. Lost. PC 

Peter Cooper 7 1.000 DeWitt Clinton 2 5 .286 

Progress 6 1 .857 Deerfoot 2 5 .28* 

Mark Twain 5 2 .714 Progressive Social... 1 6 .14? 

Robert Fulton 4 3 .570 Outlook 1 « .143 




1, Tihbetts: 2. Stiiielitield: o. Downing. Mgr. : }. I)cck(M-: .",, Skinner. Coach- G, 
Mower; 7, Dana; 8, Tiltou, Capt.; 9, Moulton; 10. Wat^^ou. 

EDWARD LITTLE HIGH SCHOOL TEAM, AUBURN, MAINE 




1, Bingham: L', N. iiiggius; o, iiicbaidson, Capt.; -1, i'earce; 5, C. Higgins; 
6, Wakefield. i.i i i letON (N. H.) HIGH SCHOOL TEAM. 




1, Mulliuk; 2, C. .Mahoney, Mgr. ; 3. Nason; 4. Dwyer; 5, W. Mahoney; 
Walsh, Capt.; 7, Leary. 

ALTAR BOYS' CLUB TEAM. NEWPORT, R. I. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



173 



Tidewater Y. M. C. A. League 

This league last season was made up of six teams, namely : Navy 
:and Central Y. M. C. A.s of Norfolk, Va. ; Hampton, Newport News 
and Army of Old Point Comfort, Va.. and the Battleship New Hamp- 
shire. The tournament ended in a tie, the Navy and Central teams 
winning thirteen games and losing two. The play-off was forfeited 
by Central to the Navy. The individual records follow : 



HAMPTON. 



Field . Foul Missed 
Goals. Goals, fi-'ni ITift 



Monroe 

Sheeban 

Dixou 


. . 1 


Robinson . . . . 
Roberts 


. . 34 

. . ~1 


K. Johnson . . 
Frapp ier . . . . 


.. 21 
.. 38 
. 32 


S. Mitchell . 

Hopkins 

Wilkinson ... 

Hudson 

Morgan 


.. 17 

.' ." l.^> 
.. 33 
. . 7 



Wyatt 

Bertschey . 
Brittingham 
Boynton 
Tucker . . . . 



U. S. S. NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

1 Strauss 

11 21 F. Johnson 

6 7 Rollman . . . 



Field Foul Missed 
Goals. Goals, fr'm 15ft 



NEWPORT NEWS. 

!) Lewis 10 

1 Cottrell 9 

1 S D. Mitchell ... 1 

4 14 Ray 1 

Stuart 4 



Jackson 


. .. 84 


7 


s 


Shaw 


. .. P.0 


o 


5 


Feeman 


...126 


16 


19 
CE 


Armstrong . 


...37 


o 





Thomas 


...60 








Hubbard . . . 


...64 


103 


72 


Pease 


...17 





1 


Lehner 


... 1 








Richer 


9 








Randall 


...23 


26 


6 


Pea 


...46 


12 


13 


Davis 


. .. 30 








Vermuelon . 


...17 








'Golden 


... 23 








Price --.-,. 


... 3 


5 


10 



NAVY. 

Mueller 
Walters 



CENTRAL. 

Bowen 
Stell . 



Waterfield 16 

Whitehurst 11 

ARMY. 

Greene 18 

Rilev n 

Linker 3 

Daly 7 

Kuytendall .... 

Thompson 1 

DeHart 1 





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1, stabler; 2, Ulman, Mgr.: 3. Brown; 4. Otto; 5. Keefer; 6. Mearle. Capt.; 

7, Flock. TurutT. rhoXo. 

WILLlAMSI'OItT (I'A.) IIIOll SCIIOOI. TEAM. 




1. Will; 2. Smith, Mgr.; 3, Patscbke; 4, Gebhanl; f). Uavanl: »;. F.iinMilt. 
Capt.; 7. Zeller. 

LEBANON (PA.) HIGH SCHOOL TEAM. 




1. Esterlj-; 2. Yoiler; 3, Hurnberger; 4, Frey; .'. I'rietzman; 6. Prof. Dietrich, 
Mgr. ; 7. Ziegeaf uss, Capt. ; 8, Bohlor, Coach. 

KEYSTONE STATE NORMAL) SCHOOL TEAM. KUTZTOWN. PA. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 175 



Basket Ball in Western Pennsylvania 

By J. H. McCuLLOUGH, 

Director of Physical Training, Carnegie Technical Institute, 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Basket ball as a whole in Western Pennsylvania received a decided 
etimulus the past year. The professional teams, composed mostly of 
Imported players, which have held sway for a number of years, died a 
natural death as a result of managers outbidding one another for 
iplayers and paying exorbitant prices for their services, and because of 
the loss of patronage in the majority of cities, where the public refused 
to support a losing aggregation that they had no interest in, aside 
irom a scoring machine. . 

An independent league of local men sprung up in its place and 
received the hearty support of the home rooters, who were more inter- 
ested in the personnel of the teams, and while these teams are not 
strictly amateur, it is a step in the right direction, and considerable 
local talent was developed. 

Interscholastic basket ball also had a most prosperous and active 
season. A league of twelve teams was organized and a series of games 
played in two divisions of six teams each, the winners in each division 
to play off for the championship in a post-season series of three games. 

TRe first division was composed of the following teams : Shadyside 
Academy, Allegheny High School, Southside High, Beaver Falls High, 
McKeesport High and Allegheny Preparatory. In this division Shady- 
side got away to a good start, and was never in any real danger of 
heing headed. 

In the second division, made up of Central High, Wilkinsburg High, 
East Liberty Academy, Peabody High, Fifth Avenue High and Wash- 
ington High, the competition was much closer throughout the series, 
none of the teams having a marked advantage at any time. Central 
got away to a poor start, but came from behind strong and tied for 
first place with Wilkinsburg, East Liberty and Peabody. 

In the play-off Central defeated Peabody and Wilkinsburg defeated 
East Liberty, leaving Central and Wilkinsburg to play for first place 
in the second division. In this game Wilkinsburg won by the close 
score of 18 to 15 and was therefore entitled to play Shadyside for the 
championship of the league. 

It was agreed to play the best two out of three games, one on each 
home floor, and if a third game was necessary, it was to be played on 
a neutral floor. Shadyside won the first game on their home floor, 
33 to 38, only to be defeated a few days later on Wilkinsburg court, 
45 to 41. The third game was played on the University of Pittsburgli 
floor and resulted in a victory for Wilkinsburg, 27 to 24. 

ALL-SCHOLASTIC TEAM. 
Paulson (Shadyside Aoadomy) and MoCunmigh (Wilkinsburg High), for- 
wards; Matson (Shadyside Academy), center; McCarter (Beaver Falls) and 
Lloyd (Southside High), guards. 

Paulson was probably the most dependable forward in the league. 
He combines aggressiveness with cool-headedness, is a good shot from 
the floor, and would be picked up to shoot fouls for the team. 

McCullough, although not as steady as Paulson, is without doubt 
•entitled to the other place at forward for his consistent work through- 
out the season. 

Matson, at center, seems to have a little on all of his opponents, 




1, Sheehan; 2, Donovan, M^r.: 3. Groves; 4, Caldwell; 5, Butler; 0. ^^ 'lepling; 

7, Hickson, Coach; S, Alexander, Capt. Speitli, Photo. 

ROUTT COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL TEAM. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 



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1, Dodd, Capt.; 2, Nash; 3, Eood; 4, Ross; 5, Reasoner. 
r,RADENTOWX (FLA.) HIGH SCHOOL TEAM. 




1. StoU: 2. Considine: 3. Bennis; 4, Hayes; 5. Waters, Mgr. ; 6, Lavin: 7, 
Yates, Capt.; S, O'Neill; 9, Leckie. 

ST. JOSEPH'S COLLEGE TEAM. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 177 

though he is closely pressed by Anderson of Wilkinsburg. who might 
possibly be given a place at guard for his all around work, but is 
picked as center on the second team instead. 

McCarter has two good attributes of a good guard in ranginess and 
strength, and is also a good floor man. 

Lloyd is one of the closest sticking guards in the league, is a good 
floor man and a good shot from the foul line. 

SECOND TEAM. 

Scott (Fifth (Avenue) and Clark (Allegheny High), forwards; Anderson 
(Wilkinsburg), center; Wolk (Shadyside) and Page (East Liberty), guards. 

The individual record follows : 

' Games. Goals. Ave. 

Matson, Shadyside 10 74 7 4-10 

McCarter, Beaver Falls 4 16 4 

Miller, McKeesport 8 30 3 6-8 

Bloom, Fifth Avenue 10 37 3 7-10 

Friedman, Central 10 37 3 7-10 

J. Clarke, Allegheny High 10 36 3 6-10 

Paulson, Shadyside 10 34 3 4-10 

Rectenwald, South Side 10 33 3 3-10 . 

Crisswell, Washington 10 33 3 3-10 

Eckley, East Liberty Acad 9 29 3 2-9 

McCullough, Wilkinsburg 10 32 3 2-10 

Heasley, East Lib. Acad 10 31 3 1-10 

Gentille, South Side 10 30 3 

Blair, Washington 1 3 a 

Harkins, McKeesport 1 3 3 

Davidson, Allegheny Prep 9 26 2 8-9 

McKnight, Peabody 9 25 2 7-9 

Hodgson, McKeesport 9 25 2 7-9 

Hellman, South Side 10 27 2 7-10 

Chambers. Allegheny High 10 27 2 7-10 

Scott, Fifth Avenue 10 27 2 7-10 

Faller. East Liberty Acad 8 21 2 5-8 

Horrigan, Peabody 2 5 2 1-5 

Marshall, Peabody 10 24 2 4-10 

Connell. Wilkinsburg 10 24 2 4-10 

Anderson, Wilkinsburg 10 24 2 4-10 

Forter, Allegheny Prep 6 14 2 1-3 

Lloyd, South Side 10 22 2 2-10 

Frishman, Central 10 22 2 2-10 

Meredith. Central 8 17 2 1-8 

Waddell, Central 1 2 2 

Hornick, Allegheny High 10 20 2 

FOULS. 

Frishman, Central 110 Rovnianek, Allegheny Prep 9 

Paulson, Shadyside 109 Loeffler. Beaver Falls 8 

Lloyd, South Side 96 Davidson, Allegheny Prep 7 

Scott, Fifth Avenue 95 Chambers, Allegheny High 7 

Miller, McKeesport 93 Heasley, East Liberty 6 

J. Clarke, Allegheny High 91 Eckley, East Liberty 3 

Anderson, Wilkinsburg 86 Hellman. South Side 2 

Faller, East Liberty 85 Degelman, South Side 2 

Haworth, Allegheny Prep 76 Bloom, Fifth Avenue 2 

Detrick, Peabody 74 Horrigan, Peabody 2 

R. Conley, W^ashington 73 Ruben, Fifth Avenue 2 

McCarter, Beaver Falls 54 George, Beaver Falls 2 

Crisswell, Washington 24 Matson, Shadyside 1 

Marshall. Peabody 20 Forter, Allegheny Prep 1 

Jones, McKeesport 16 Rectenwald, South Side 1 

McCullough. Wilkinsburg 10 McLaren, Peabody 1 

Page, East Liberty 9 




1, Draper. Dir.; 2. Salsburg; 3. Craig: 4, Fruguli; o. Cuuover: G. Bauks; 
Beyer; S, Summers. 

, DARTMOUTH TEAM, Y. M. C. A. LEAGUE. ATLANTIC CITY, X. J. 




I, Wright; 2, Browu; 3, Ilnfford: 4, Musser: 5, Ashburn; 6. Hamincl, .Mm.; 
7, Boldt. 

ORIOLE'S OF PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD Y. M. C. A., ALTOONA, PA. 




EMORY TEAM, JERSEY CITY. N. J. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE, 



179 



Amateur League of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

By P. V. Gahan. 
Pittsburgh Playground Association. 

The Amateur Basket Ball League of Pittsburgh, Pa., closed the 
season of 1912-13 successfully. The same weight basis was used as 
last year, with a restriction in age, all players being under twenty- 
one years of age. They were divided into groups as follows : First 
Group, under 90 pounds ; Second Group, 91 to 110 pounds ; Third 
Group, 111 to 130 pounds; Fourth Group, 131 pounds to unlimited. 

Last season the league was divided into two sections. Eastern and 
Western districts. The Eastern league was composed of 6 units, with 
17 teams. The Western league was composed of 7 units, with 21 
teams. 

The A. G. Spalding & Bros. Co. put up four banners, one for the 
championship in each group. These were won by Kingsley House, 
First Group ; Covode House, Second Group ; Kingsley House, Third 
Group, and Ormsby Park, Fourth (4roup. 

The University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Tech. kindly offered the 
use of their gymnasiums for the finals. The games were largely at- 
tended and closely contested. 

Kingsley House, third group and Covode, second group, have without 
douDt the fastest teams in this section of the State. 

The Federation is composed of the settlements, Y. M. C. A., and 
playgrounds, and its object has been to promote competition in this 
sport on a fair basis,and its efforts along this line have been much 
appreciated. The standing of the teams follow : 

EASTERN DISTRICT. 



FIRST CLASS. Won. Lost. PC. 

Covode House l.OOO 

Washington Park 3 3 .500 

Lawrenceville Y.M.C.A. 2 4 .333 

Lawrence Park 1 5 . 167 

THIRD CLASS. 

Covode House 8 1 .889 

Lawrence Park 7 2 .778 

Boys' Branch, Y.M.C.A. 4 4 .500 

Arsenal Park 2 6 .250 

Lawrenceville Y.M.C.A. 8 .000 



SECOND CLASS. Won. Lost. PC. 

Covode House 6 1.000 

Boys' Branch, Y.M.C.A. 3 3 .500 

Lawrence Park 3 3 . 500 

Arsenal Park 6 .000 



FOURTH CLASS. 

Covode House 6 

Boys' Branch. Y.M.C.A. 4 

Lawrence Park 1 

Arsenal Park 1 



FIRST CLASS. 

Kingsle.v House 6 

0th & Carson 4 

Ormsby Park 2 

Irene Kaufman 



THIRD CLASS. 

Kingsley House 8 

9th & Carson 5 

Ormsby Park 5 

Irene Kaufman 1 

Washington Park 1 



WESTERN DISTRICT. 



1.0<10 

2 .667 

4 .333 

6 .000 






1.000 


3 


.625 


3 


.625 


7 


.125 


7 


.125 



SECOND CLASS. 

Kingsley House 12 

9th & Carson 8 

Soho Baths 7 

Woods Run 6 

Ormsb.v I'ark 5 

Washington Park 3 

Irene Kaufman 

FOURTH CLASS. 

Ormsby Park 6 

Woods Run 5 

Washington Park 5 

9th & Carson 4 

Irene Kaufman 






1.000 


o 


.667 


5 


.167 


5 


.167 





1.000 


4 


.667 


5 


.583 


6 


.500 




.417 


9 


.250 


12 


.000 


o 


.750 


3 


.625 


3 


.625 


4 


.500 


8 


.000 




1, Boland; 2, Vanclerlick; 3. Morton; 4, Hardy. Cia-h; :,. P.auuigarToii : C,. 

Stanton, Capt. ; 7, Hart. Woodhead, I'hoto. 

GUSHING ACADEMY TEAM. ASHBURNHAM. MASS. 




1, G. Rhouan, Coach: l'. Miller. Mascnt; ;;. (ilaiiry; 4. olluurkc: :>. i; 
Mgr. ; 6, Meley; 7, Brady; S. S. Ballcock. Capt.; 9. Moore; 10, \Y. Ballcock 
DIONS TEAM, YONKERS, N. Y. 




TAMAQUA (PA.) HIGH SCHOOL TEAM. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 181 



Basket Ball in South Carolina 

By Hdgh T. Schockley. 

Hastoc School, Spartanburg-, S. C. 

The basket ball season of 1912-13 showed a gratifying increase in 
interest in the game in the State. Its popularity has increased along 
with the increase of the number of teams playing it, and largely 
because of the development of greater skill on the part of the players 
participating. As in the previous season, no definite league was 
formed which would bring the players of the State into closer rela- 
tionship and would produce a more even interpretation of the rules 
of the game. And yet individual teams met much more frequently 
than formerly and the game is on a better footing on this account. 
Also, leagues have been formed, grouped around the Y. M. C. A. teams 
as centers, in several cities, and these have wrought much good. 

The game was played by Y, M. C. A. teams, colleges, and by high 
ichools, all putting up an excellent style of ball. These teams were 
not confined to its own group, but games were played by colleges 
against Y. M. C. A.'s and between Y. M. C. A.'s and high schools, etc. 
More really capable officials were available than last season. Also, a 
good clean game was universally held up as the standard and rules 
were carefully and strictly observed. Class B fouls were rare indeed. 

Plans are already on foot for forming several leagues for the season 
of 1913-14. With the impetus of 1912-13 to start on, next season 
should show a large advance In the sport. 

Butler Guards, Co. A, First Infantry, N.G.S.C., Greenville, S. C. — Although 
seriously handicapped by lack of practise, and practically never having the 
same five on the floor for two games in succession, the guardsmen had a very 
successful season, tieing or winning a majority of games from every team 
played excepting one. They won thirteen out of twenty-three games, scoring- 
390 points against opponents' 333. 

Basket Ball in Green-ville, S. C. — "For the past few years basket ball has 
been growing in popularity in Greenville," writes Fred. M. Burnett. "Fur- 
man University, Monaghan Y.M.C.A. and the Butler Guards all have repre- 
sentative teams in intercollegiate, association and amateur games. It 
remained for the season o£ 1912-13 to develop this popular indoor sport and 
to offer it to the public, played as it should be played. In the beginning 
of the season a league was formed by the Central, Mills. Woodside and 
Monaghan Y.M.C.A.s, and a splendid schedule, with competent officials, was 
played without a hitch. Monaghan had a distinct advantage because of 
being able to place in the field an experienced team. Neither of the other 
associations had placed a team on the field before. The pennant was won 
by the Monaghan Association. Central coming in for second honors. A junior 
league of the four associations mentioned above was conducted at the same 
time and aroused general interest. The Monaghan Jrs. won the pennant 
also. A Greenville city league, which will include teams from the Central 
and Woodside Y.M.C.A.s, the Butler Guards and Furman University, will 
be in the field next season. The Furman Fitting School had a good team, 
and prospects for a league with eight teams for the coming season are good. 
The Central Association team, provided it remains together for another sea- 
son, will be one of the strongest aggregations in the South. The Monaghan 
Association team during the season of 1911-12 won seventeen out of twenty 
games played, and last season did even better, losing only one game out of 
twenty-one played. This record entitles Monaghan to lay strong claims upon 
the Y. M. C. A. championship honors of South Carolina." 




1. Greilich; 2. Dn.haii: :!. .Moure, Jr. .Miri.: 4. \\aMon: .".. Dr. Pfttit, Coach: 
G. BenistL'in; 7, Driggs: S. Wray. Va\>\.: H. ILlmt-cn: 10. Alford. 

.\i)ELi'iii .\cai)i:my ti:.\m. r.iiooKMX n. y. ^^'^'^f- i'i'"to. 




1. Tilley; 2. Lambert. .Mgr. ; 3, Lewis; 4. Bittle.s; o, .Movey, Cuacli: 6. Lent: 
7, Welch, Capt.; S. Hasbiouck; 9, Burueman. Bellaiid. Pliota. 

PEEKSKILL (X. Y.) MILITARY ACADEMY TEAM. 




1. Thweatt, Mgr.; 2, Scliilc; :\. Ellsworth: 4. Jardiiie, Coadi; o, A. iloehu; G. 
liennie; 7, O'Loughliu, Capt.; S, II. lluehii; 9, .Moruingbtar. 

BARNARD SCHOOL TEAM, NEW YORK CITY. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 183 



Basket Ball in Georgia 

By Charles B. Jamison, 
Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Atlanta, Ga. 

There was a notable increase in the number of players, the standard 
of play, competing organizations and the efficiency of officials last 
iseason, over all previous years. Where indoor courts were not avail- 
able, outdoor courts were used. There were few cities or villages that 
did not have one or more teams. 

The organization of the intercollegiate and interscholastic schools 
has tended to place the responsibility for the conduct of the players 
upon the organization they represent, and has done much to eliminate 
roughness and raise the standard of play. 

The schedule of intercompany games, played at Fort McPherson. 
under the direction of Captain Stone, was highly successful and did 
much to raise the standard of clean play. Independent teams, whose 
games more nearly resemble foot ball, are finding it increasingly diffi- 
cult to get satisfactory games. 

Atlanta led in the number of league organizations playing regular 
.schedules. The Atlanta City League completed its third year, and the 
Fulton County and the Junior City Leagues their second season. The 
Fifth Regiment won the pennant in the Atlanta League for the second 
time, and the S. V. D, Boys' Club Association and S. V. D. Juniors 
each made clean sweeps in the other two leagues, winning all of the 
scheduled games — a remarkable feat when the closeness of the scores 
is considered. The Tech. High School won the preparatory school 
pennant, with 1.000 percentage. 

The Atlanta Athletic Club and the Columbus Y.M.C.A. teams easily 
outclassed all other teams in the State. The Athletic Club defeated 
nearly all of the leading college teams of the South, but lost to 
Columbus Y.M.C.A. 

The celebrated incubator, the Columbus IMNI.C.A., again hatched a 
team that outclassed all others in the State and the South, except, 
possibly, the Mobile Y.M.C.A., which tied them in the dual games. 
Ttiere are stronger fives than the Columbus team, but few, if any, put 
up a stronger team game. They show but little of the desperate' dash 
and vim usually seen, but set a swift but easy pace that soon wears 
out their opponents. 

The University of Georgia was easily the fastest college team In the 
State, as well as in the South. Its play was more in accordance with 
the rules than that of any other team seen here, being fast and clean 
and void of foot ball tactics. 

Mercer University, as usual, played a fast, clean game, and finished 
next to Georgia. Georgia Tech. for its first year, put up a remark- 
ably good game and finished third among the colleges of the State. 

The following is our pick for All-State teams : 

College — Peacock (Georgia) and Westmoreland (Mercer), forwards; Brand 
(Gporgia), center; Carter (Atlanta A.C.) and Bradley (Tech.), guards; 
Rodenberry (Mercer), utility. 

Preparatory Schools— Fox (Boys' High) and Jones (Columbus Industrial), 
forwards; Hautman (Stone Mountain), center; Bedell (Tech. High) and 
Rivers (Columbus Industrial), guards; Scott (Boys' High), utility. 

All-State — Peddy (Columbus Y.:M.C.A.) and Kilrease (Columbus Y.M.C.A.), 
forwards; Du Bard (Atlanta A.C.) center; Carter (Atlanta A.C.) and Bosier 
(Columbus Y.M.C.A.), guards; Massey (Columbus Y.M.C.A.), utility. 




1. Post. Mpr. : l', Harasey: :;. Stuckinff, Coacb; 4, liidianls; 7,. Bhi-cker; 0. 
Reyuolils, Capt. ; 7, Appeal; S, Wray. Gilbert & Bacuu, Photo. 

CHESTNUT HILL ACADEMY TEAM, PHILADELPHL\. PA. 




1. Troll: 2, Hartiiian. Coach; :;. IIiiu 
Piauck; 7. Memmiuger; 8, Zimiuermari. 



4, Sbriner, Mgr. ; 5, Mouutz; 

Miesse, Photo. 



FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL ACADEMY TEAM. LANCASTER. PA. 




1, Johnson; 2, Eckert; 3. Moore; 4. Law. Mgr. ; 5. Lobaugh, Capt. ; G, Bell. 
RIDGWAY (PA.) HIGH SCHOOL TEAM. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 185 



Basket Ball in Florida 

By Dr. William H. Stippich, 
Physical Director Y. M. C. .A,, Tampa, Fla. 

During the season of 1912-13 interest in basket ball increased more 
than fifty per cent. Nearly all of the schools and colleges organized a 
team and played a few games. While no organization was afifected, 
the schools and towns showed much interest, and the attendance to 
the games was very encouraging. The Florida climate is such that 
outdoor sports take the place of indoor, and the early starting of base 
ball is, in a measure, a drawback to a full season of basket ball. The 
number of miles between cities is also a drawback. 

However, the following towns and schools placed teams in the field : 
Stetson University, Florida University, Columbia College, Rollins Col- 
lege, Southern College, Florida Military Academy, Bradentown High 
School, Hillsborough High School of Tampa, Duval High School of 
Jacksonville, St. Petersburg High School, Fort Dade Soldiers, Orlando 
Rifles. Tampa Y.M.C.A., Jacksonville Y.M.C.A., Pensacola Y.M.C.A. and 
St. Augustine. A number of these teams play on dirt courts, and play 
very well. 

Jacksonville Y.M.C.A. had a very successful season, defeating a 
number of the strongest teams in the South. A grammer school 
league was a feature of Jacksonville's programme 

A large per cent, of the college teams played only a few games to 
Interest and educate their boys in a measure, and arouse interest 
among the townspeople. 

The Y. M. C. A. teams could not be gotten together because of dis- 
tance and the large guarantees required to pay expenses. 

In and around Tampa for a radius of one hundred miles basket ball 
has had a most prosperous year. Hillsborough High School placed a 
sensational team in the field, playing fifteen games in all, meeting every 
team with whom it could arrange a game, without a defeat. They 
scored 518 points to their opponents' 208. This team defeated Duval 
High School of Jacksonville for the State interscholastic champion- 
ship. This is a wonderful record for a high school team, Many 
coaches and critics regard the members of the team as the fastest 
players ever seen in the State. 

Tampa Y.M.C.A. placed a team in the field, but it was found that 
the city could not well support two teams, so they gave way in favor 
of high school. 

A basket ball league composed of members of the senior class played 
a series of games during January, February and March, six teams 
playing each Thursday night. 

A league of six teams, composed of members of the high school 
group, played games each Wednesday afternoon. 

A number of games between grammar school teams were played, the 
most successful teams being the Hyde Park and E. B. teams. 

Basket Ball in West Virginia. — In reviewing the basket ball season of 1912- 
1913 In West Virginia, J. H. Thornton says: "Enthusiasm over basket ball 
in the high schools of West Virginia showed a tremendous increase last sea- 
son. In Fairmont, Elkins, Clarksburg, Charlestown and Parkersburg a great 
spirit of friendly rivalry was manifested, while in Wheeling, the largest city 
in the State, the high school had the most successful season in its history. 
A schedule of interclass games was played, which was a great agency in 
teaching green men the finer points of the game and also develop good 
material for future years." 




1, Keiser, Asst. Mgr. ; 2, Fister; 3. Batdorf; 4. Shultz. Mgr.; 5, Schall; 6, 
Zucb; 7, Hiunerschots, Capt. ; 8, Sbarpless; 9, Burkhardt. 

WIT.LTA>rSOX sr-TTOOT, TF.\>[. THILADELPHIA. PA. 




1. N'. Buzby. Mgr.: 2, Tbonias; 3. Clymer: 4, Turuer, Coach: 5, Vogt; 6. 

Teller; 7, Scott, Capt.; S, Hecker; 9, K. Busby. Gilbert. Pboto. 

PHILLIPS BROOKS SCHOOL TEAM. PHILADELPHIA. PA. 




1, Sears; 2. Sitler; 3, Rorar; 4, Reed; 5, McDermott, Coacb; 6. Braun; 7, 
Verner; 8, McConnell; 9, Wolfe. 

GIRARD COLLEGE TEAM, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



SrALDlNG-S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 18T 



Basket Ball in Honolulu 

Br Fred W. Lau, 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A. of Honolulu, Hawaii. 

TTonolulu is coming to the front in basket ball. Regardless of the- ' 
f^ct that the cTtv is" so isolated from any other in Hawaii and the 
Smate considered much too warm for this popular game there are 
still enough basket ball enthusiasts in evidence who will not allow tue. 

"^'llei-Jtofire Honolulu never has had an organized basket ball league. ^ 
It is true gimes were played at various times with pick up teams and 

.^ot^cofnett;ed^fi?h an outside cn-ganiza^ Ev..;^nian pjayjng^was 

Vll StLs won evely game of the series, and very seldom were they 
''^Sr^eac.^i'watTsuccess in every particular although the score. 
migSt have been closer in some of the games. The prospects fot the 
coming season is very bright. 

The final standing of the teams follow . 

won. Lost. PC. _ won. Lost. TC^ 

All-Stars 5 1.000 Ilealanis .•.••••••;; ^ i -..oo 

State College, has this to say ^^^out ;)a^^f^:,|^l^.^,ket Mil A larger number 
sees greater development and '"^re inteiest i„ basket^^ ^^^^^^^ 

(,f amateur teams are each year organized and tneieau p _ ^^^^ 

tlonal institutions, both "'"^'giate and scholastic become oa ^^^^.^ 

ficient. Already the.greatestindf|or sport bask|[.it'^.''and wide participation, 
tance all other athletic contests for geneialpopul^nt> ana i ^ ^^^^ 

The general state ^hampionsh p for the yeai ^f^^^^^ ^^^.^^^.^, ,i,^res. Two 
of Billings. 0° the basis of geneia^^^^^^ College, broke 

other teams, the New \oik ^thletics ana yie .i champions, 

even with this team, each winning and Jos ng a game ^.^ ^^^^ 

but a survey of the. season cl«"'Ylf„ ^'?fV^^i^tana State College for the sev- 
intercollegiate championship went o he Montana State ^^^^J^^^^^ ,l^^^„ . 

cnth consecutive year. Last season it ^as "'"-^^ ^^ ^ College breaking 

before, the University of Montana «"J the Montana t^^^^^^ ,^^_^^^ 

even in games, with practically, the ^"/"^/^^^f^/f^V /he latter team. The 
on a neutral court, resulting '^ a ckNir ^ ctor> tor i ^^^^.^ .^ ^^^^^ 

collegiate game is not as yet Pla^f^fl ^y ^^"^„e„Vn|'^oach one to make up its 
the small number of teams m the State cyeningea^^^ ^^^^ amateur 
schedule with a proportion of amateui teams, ami t i ^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ 

rules are played throughout the season. It is hoped ["fj i^^l,,,^i^ title was 
sihle.to turn to the c«nej;ate game. The S^atem ^^^ ^,^^,^,^^, , the 
3ecisively won by the S^^cetGi ass County nig ^.ijmiuation contest, 

annual State tournament, m a gruelling thiee uajs 

E 




1, LeFevre; 2, McGraw; 3, Ballautyne; 4, Hall, Coach; 5, Franzheim; 6, Car- 
ter, Capt. ; 7, Dickey. 

LAWRENCEVILLE (N. J.) ACADEMY TEAM. 




1, Shearer: L\ McGovern, Capt.; 3, Conger; 4. Hoaglaiid: r,. Dav 
7, Johuj^on. 



RUTGERS PRErARAIoKY s 



tj. DiiBoi^ 

\.\i. m:\\ I'.iirxswirK. n. j. 




1, Draper. Director; 2, Leuniiiiiar; 3, Calkins: 4. Kirk: 5. Angelo; 6, Hattou; 
7, McClelland; 8. Mouell; 'J, Townseud; 10, Kertlaud. 

ATLANTIC CITY (N. J.) Y. M. C. A. TEAM. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



Basket Ball in South America 

By Jess T. Hopkins, 
Physical Director Y. M. C. A,, Montevideo, Uruguay. 

The first authentic account of basket ball in South America comes 
from Rio Janeiro. The Y. M. C. A. physical director, M. Salassa, 
Introduced the game in the regular class work of the association early 
in 1912. Mr. Salassa also constructed basket ball courts at Granberry 
College, where the game has been played with more or less enthusiasm 
since. Recentlyi Mr. Watson, student secretary of the Y. M. C. A. ia 
Rio, has revived interest in athletics, and both the men and women are 
now playing basket ball in Granberry College. Henry J. Sims, suc- 
cessor to Mr. Salassa as physical director of the Rio Janeiro Y.M.C.A., 
says that very little skill has been shown by players so far. I am 
indebted to Mr. Sims for the above information. 

In July, 1912, P. P. Phillips, physical director of the Y. M. C. A. 
in Buenos Ayres, introduced the game into Argentina. Since that 
time the game has been played a great deal in the association, but as 
yet has not spread to other institutions. At least one hundred men 
have learned to play, though with not any great degree of skill. Mr. 
Phillips writes that there is no doubt but that basket ball has won a 
place among the sports of the Argentines and it is just a question of 
titoe until it will be played wherever men congregate for exercise and 
pleasure. 

The Y. M. C. A. gymnasium in Montevideo, Uruguay, was opened in 
October. 1912. for a short season of two months, before hot weather 
commenced. Each Saturday night was devoted to basket ball, and 
from the start the enthusiasm was keen. Fully seventy-five men 
learned the fundamentals of the game and one-third of that number 
developed a fair degree of skill. This nucleus furnished a good base 
for the organization of an interclass league. This year five gymnasium 
classes are each putting a representative team into the league. The 
first games have been played, and the scores have been around 20 to 30 
n side, with only fifteen minute halv(>s. The season will last until 
November, and before that time it is hoped that a representative asso- 
ciation team can be picked that can play a series of games with 
Buenos Ayres. 

The international Y. M. C. A. student camp, held at Piriopolis, 
Uruguay, in January, 1913, presented a unique opportunity for the 
sowing of seeds of basket ball as a future sport of this continent. 
The governments of Chili, Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil sent from 
their respective national universities, in all, one hundred and twenty- 
five students for a ten days' outing under Y. M. C. A. auspices. The 
daily athletic programme offered several games of basket ball. Here 
Brazilians. Argentinans, Chilians and Uruguayans played against each 
other in friendly sport. Basket ball was popular, and when the time 
came for the camp to break up, the athletic director was asked by 
many for a copy of the rules. This camp is an annual afEair and it 
presents a wonderful opportunity for the distribution of our good 
North American sports to' the uttermost corners of the continent. 

Another promising outlook is the newly organized playground sys- 
tem of the Uruguayan government. The first of several playgrounds 
lias been opened in Montevideo, and it contains basket ball courts for 
both the girls and boys. This work is being done by a national com- 
mittee of physical education, appointed by the progressive president of 
this republic. A year from now we hope toi see basket ball courts on 
a majority of the vacant lots of the city. 




1, Vauamau; l', Glee^dii. Mgr. ; ;J. Evaus; 4. Fiiltou; 5. Iiisthain; •'>. Stock, 

Capt.; 7, Stumpf; S. CuKgau. " Gilln-'.t. I'liuto. 

DREXEL INSTITUTE TEAM. PHILADELrillA, PA. 




1, White; 2, .1. Youiiis:: ?,. Prof. Shields. Coach; 4. 0. Youiig; .".. Evans 
Ginther; 7, GiifBii, Capt.; S, De Bragga. 

NAZAPETH HALL MILITARY ACADE.MY TEAM, NAZARETH, PA. 




1. riaidiiig; 2. (). Yuuug; U, SLual'lcr; 4, Laviu; 5, Hagan; (J, Ewiug. l^apt. 
7, Alleu; 8, Kempfer. 

NAZARETH HALL MILITARY ACADEMY (JUNIOR) TEAM, 
NAZARETH, PA. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



19f 



Basket Ball in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia 

By Daniel Bell, 
Honorary Member Pastime Athletic Club, New York City. 

Tt 19 rertainlv gratifying to an old timer, who has enjoyed playing 
+hPPxhnriatin- game of basket ball almost a quarter of a century 
So when its meS? Is an amusement was very little known through- 
n^?' t^pTTnited^ States and Canada, to note the appreciation shown 

and t\?'p!a?e.''thl°g?mnasium ot the old Twenty-third Street Branch 

»',i^fn^''wha,*VaV'knoTn\"'thS'^time in New York and vicinity as a 
Po^tim? bov or ■■Indian," it was natural for him to have a preference 
for Se si»rts h!s trilie had tanght him,, namely : shimming, water 

Editor is in possession of a few histoiicai lacts, wuicu j 

'^ll *w"mer 'rar?e?entlV"''?eleb"rS Ssflftyfonrth birthday, March 
ie'^llira\"G^a«'m°'|ova Scotia, in the mijist^o^^^^^^^ 

K-,^^h1.e-mc^af. Sio£.f^\nS£c^M^^ 
In the government of the world, yet ^o^^e is siiu i it ^^^p^efore let 

Force without moral suasion, is crude and ^"J/^^^^^S' ^f\^'aep such 

force should ever be tolera ted by basket ball players. 

Empire (Canal Zone) Y.M.C A Team The Empires on ^ 
winning seventeen games and losmg one a""°^ .^^p-fl, 
tbe cbampionship of the Isthmus and Central America. 



192 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



Records of Teams 



ADEZ.FHI ACADEMT, BBOOKI.YN, N. T. 



2— Richmond Hill H.S. 
21 — Brooklyn Prep. 13 
38— Jamaica H.S. 10 
55— Heffley Inst. 10 

2 — Brown's Bus. Coll. 



-DeWitt Clinton 37 
-Stuyvesant 55 
-Manhattan Prep. 
-Poly Prep. 22 



21— Boys' H.S. 19 
17 — Horace M^nn 19 
10— N. Y. Mil. Acad. 22 
40 — Greenwich Acad. 26 



AI.I.EGHZiirX' (FA.) 

3S— Allegheny Prep. 19 
37 — Allegheny Prep. 27 
22 — Southside 44 
41— Southside IG 



HIGE SCHOOIi. 

18 — Shadyside 24 
39— Shadyside 42 
28— Beaver Falls 26 



34 — Beaver Falls 14 
39— McKeesport 37 
45 — McKeesport 31 



Ai.i.z:aHx:Nv (pa.) preparatory schooii. 

27— Southside 26 29— Beaver Falls 31 22— McKeesport 27 

25— Southside 33 15— Beaver Falls 13 27— Allegheny H.S. 37 

17— Shadyside 45 24— McKeesport 31 19— Allegheny H.S. 38 
15 — Shadyside 77 

AI.I.i:NTOVrN (PA.) HIGH SCHOOI.. 

70— Bangor H.S. 3 21— All-Scholastics 7 

28— Bethlehem H.S. 39 18— Nazareth Hall 36 
33— Norristown H.S. 16 42— Slatington H.S. 21 
13— Camden H.S. 41 42— Nazareth Hall 22 

AZiIiElTTOWN (PA.) PREPARATORY SCHOOI.. 

37— Lafavette Sophs. 16 17— Penn. Fresh. 22 31— Moravian Coll. 33 

39— F. and M. Acad. 22 30— Catholic H.S. 29 43— Phillipsburg 36 

34— Easton H.S. 16 30— Villanova 25 27— Allentown YMCA. 30 

60— Brown Prep. 10 

AI.TAR BOYS' CIiUB, NEWPORT, R. I. 



26 — Calumets 24 
IS— Easton H.S. 22 
26— Bethlehem H.S. 14 



11— Vinland A.C. 12 
24— Vinland A.C, 3 
24— Rogers H.S. 

Jr. Mid. 18 
34— Colonial Five 15 
42— St. Mary Jrs. 21 
23^Rogers H.S. Jrs. 
12— Colonial Five 11 



14 



2 — Rogers H.S. Cres. 
37— Rogers H.S. 

Sr. xMid. 24 
29— Chowder A.C. 4 

2— St. Mary Midgets 
27— St. Mary All-Stars 16 
21— St. Marv All-Stars 30 

2— St. Mary All-Stars 



AMBRIDGE (PA,) HIGH SCHOOI^. 



26— College Hill H.S. 
31— Avalon H.S. 21 
14— Belleveue H.S. 35 
19— Freedom H.S. 9 
35 — Alumni 30 
14— Charleroi H.S. 16 
106— Monaca H.S. 2 



16 21— Leetsdale H.S. 11 
33— Coraopolis H.S. 20 
28— Crafton H.S. 30 
31— Ford City H.S. 22 
60— Leetsdale H.S. 11 
29 — Beaver H.S. 6 
15— New Bright. H.S. 23 



28- St. Mary Fast Five 22 
2— St. Mary Ind. 

70 — Galahad Jrs. 12 
2— Rogers H.S. Speed 
Boys 

36— Tiger Jrs. 16 

32— North Ends 10 



24— New Bright. H.S. i 
23— Tarentum H.S. 41 
35 — Crafton H.S. 15 
10— Ford City H.S. 25 
19— Titusville H.S. 36! 
24— Fc-anklin H.S. 44 



ARROW FIVE, MONROE, N. Y. 

29 — Greenwood Lake 27 33— Suffern 30 

21— SuCfern 18 23— Greenwood Lake 31 

32— Hillburn 30 



-Hillburn 14 
-Greenwood Lake 12 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



193 



ATI.ANTZC CIT-r (N. J.) HIGH SCHOOI.. 



29— Bridgeton H.S. 
42— Brown 5 
12— Weuonah 26 
15— St. Joseph 21 
8— Camden 28 
22 — Lakewood 32 



11 



19— La Salle 33 
29— Y.M.C.A. 24 
14— Girard Coll. 25 
36— Phil. Brooks 19 
23— Barringer H.S. 14 



19— Y.M.C.A. 32 
34— Y.M.C.A. 21 
23— Central H.S. 25 
41— Y.M.C.A, 56 
31— Y.M.C.A. 38 



ATI.ANTIC CITY 

.32 — Big Five 20 
50— Brown Prep. 27 
48 — Lakewood 33 
37— Chester 29 
45 — Juniata 29 



(N. J.) Y.M.C.A. 

53 — Pottstown 17 
24— U. of P. Fresh. 35 
24— High School 29 
42— Roman Cath. H.S. 36 
32— At. City H.S. 19 



BANGOR (ME.) Y.M.C.A. 



37— Searsport A. A. 8 
17— K. O.K. A. 20 
38— Higgins C.I. 26 
42— Bar Harb. YMCA. 37 
14— Carmel A. A. 39 
50 — Jonesport A. A. 14 



25— Higgins C.I. 33 
42— Lincoln A. A 26 
63— Dexter A. A. 24 
35— Newport A. A. 30 
35— Dexter A. A. 40 
67— Bar Harb. YMCA, 18 



38— Lakewood 28 
21— At. City H.S. 34 
25— Chester 36 
56— At. Citv H.S. 41 
38— At. City H.S. 31 



16— Pittsfield A.A. 19 
27— Newport A.A. 38 
41— Portland Y.M.C.A. 12 
22 — Waterville Five 21 
28— Coburn C.I. 19 



BARNARD SCHOOL, NBW YORK CITY. 

34— West End 8 21— St. Nicholas 10 

21— Englewood 24 28— Columbia Gr. 11 

35— Univ. Heights 5 44— Hamilton 27 

29— Ethical Cul. 16 29— Collegiate 8 

32— Cutler 18 17 — Newman 5 

31— Berkeley 5 15— Columbia Gr. 9 



29— Berkeley 15 
32— Poly Prep. 25 
21 — Collegiate 4 
2 — Hasbrouck 
]5— Ethical Cul. 13 
22— Manor iT 



BBAVBR FAI.I.S (FA.) 

16— McKeesport 35 26- 

34— McKeesport 11 14- 

31— Southside 43 31- 

21— Southside 41 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

-Allegheny H.S. 28 
Allegheny H.S. 34 
■Shadyside 26 



-Shadyside 50 
-Allegheny Prep. 15 
-Allegheny Prep. 29 



Bi:i.i.z:vii.Lzs (n. j.) high school. 

28— Faculty 18 21— S. Orange H.S. 16 

47— W. Orange H.S. 5 11— S. Orange H.S. 21 

31— Nutley H.S. 9 25— Clifton H.S. 18 

11— Glen Ridge H.S. 10 27— Ridgewood H.S. 24 

29— Montclair Nor. 18 38— W. Orange H.S. 14 



44— Alumni 10 
22— Glen Ridge H.S. 16 
26— Ridgewood H.S. 35 
25— Harrison H.S. 27 
39— Nutley H.S. 13 



BBN HUR TEAM, 

18 — Spartans 14 
9 — Simsbury 18 
19 — Essex Irovyton 37 
31— Crescents 16 
14 — Tigers 17 
32 — Thompsonville 27 
18-.Rockville 23 
32— Royals 11 
28— Springfleld 48 



HARTFORD, CONN. 

27— Majors 14 
19 — Portland 20 
34— Majors 18 
17 — Thompsonville 24 
53— Southington 21 
29— Spartans 30 
10 — Middletown 
YMCA. 31 
17 — Tigers 16 



10— Winsted Y.M.C.A. 39 
35 — Glastonbury 14 
17 — M ittineague 
Y.M.C.A. 45 
29 — Willimantic 29 
36— Poquonock 25 
14— Meriden Y.M.C.A. 19 
42— Portland 24 
45 — Essex Irovyton 60 



BETHLEHBM (FA.) FREFARATORY SCHOOL. 

11 — Ryan Speed Sch. 7 21 — N. E. Man. of 23— Perkiomen Sem. 29 

30— Wesley Sch. 18 Phila. 27 31— F. and M. Acad. 17 

33— Lehigh Collegians 30 63— Calumets 14 32— R.C.H.S.. Phila. 12 

25— Nativity A.C. 23 24— Hazleton H.S. 18 46— Middletown Big 5, 7 

41 — Lafayette Sophs. 9 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



134 

BERRY SCHaOI., BOMi:. GA. 

eo_Darlington H.S. 9 7&— Hearn Acad. 2 

97_state Mutual 23 55— Y.M.C.A. 7 



23— Cubs 14 

26— McCallie Sell. 24 



butghamton (N. y.) central high schooi.. 

X)5_Owego S 39— Coitland H.S. 18 21— Cortland Nor. 10 



-Owego 3 17— Corning 12 

^9— Elmira 4 56— Montrose 2 

20— Norwich 66 

BLOOMSBURO fPA.) N0R2l£AI. SCHOOIi. 



23— Bucknell Univ. 12 
14 — Hazleton H.S. 18 
§0— Wilkes Barre H.S. 14 
^2— Berwick Y.M.C.A. 17 
13— Pittston 18 



BOYI.STON TTVE. 

S3— Foxboro A.C. 2d 13 
63— Indians 8 
27— Dadmun Five tl 
41— Whittier A.C. 9 
S2— Royal A.C. 3 
43— Adams A.C. 7 
56— Soley A.C. 29 
26— St. Jerome's 10 
28— Winthrop Y.M.C. 17 
21 — Newton lud. 8 
44— Co. K, Hingham 22 



18 — Shippensburg Nor. 14 
28 — Kutztown Nor. 14 
42— Scranton Tech. 19 
4— York 52 
19 — Shippensburg Nor. 21 

MASS. 



BOSTOIT, 

52— Monitor A.C. 7 
37 — Roxbury Five 24 
33— Emerson A.C. 26 
28— Maverick A.C. 6 
33 — Tremont A. A. 15 
14— Newton Y.M.C.A. 22 
10— Brock. YM^A. 2d 14 
51— Hyde Park A A. 2d 18 
27— Tilton A.C. 24 
12— Fltton A.C. 23 
30— Needham Y.P.C. 19 



BRISTOI. (VA.) HIGH SCHOOI.. 



13— Y.M.C.A. 19 
12— Y.M.C.A. 25 
28— Tenn. H.S. 19 
15— Y.M.C.A. 16 
54— John. City H.S. 6 
16— Y.M.C.A. 15 
54— John. City H.S. 24 
56— Tenn. H.S. 16 
39— King Coll. 26 
30— Y.M.C.A. 6 



28— Tenn. H.S. 10 
22— Y.M.C.A. 13 
22— Stone. Jack. Inst. 21 
34— Tenn. High 16 
69— Jonesboro H.S. 12 
16— Mar. Wash. Coll. 16 
15— Tusculum Coll. 30 
18 — Emory Prep. 9 
12— Stone. Jack. Inst. 16 



20 — Cortland Nor. 27 
44— Corning 27 



26— York Y.M.C.A. 27 
14 — Kutztown Nor. 27 
74 — Berwick Y.M.C.A. 17 
40— Wilkes-Barre H.S. 19 



-Lawrence L. Guar. 20 
-Maiden-Dor. C. 8 
-Cleo Five, Camb. 17 
-Charlestown 
W. Sox 14 
-Needham Y.P.C. 7 
-Maiden-Dor. C. 19 
-Webster A.C. 4 
-Technology 2d 
-Brock. YMCA. 2d 12 



13— Mar. Wash. Coll. 12 
30 — Emory and Henry 

2d 15 
47— King Coll. 15 
18— Y.M.C.A. 11 
26— Tenn. H.S. 24 
33— Stone. Jack. Inst. 16 
1.5— Mar. Wash. Coll. 13 
16— Tenn. H.S. 24 



BROCKTON (MASS.) Y.M.C.A. 



20— Mass. Inst, of T. 24 
22 — N. Abington 

Y.M.C.A. 17 
22— Newton Y.M.C.A. 25 
18 — Co. Dof Plymouth 11 
41— Portland Y.M.C.A. 18 
50— Cleo Five 33 
27— Pittsfield Boys' C. 24 



22— Newton Y.M.C.A. 6 26— Worcester YMCA. 22 
57— Co. D of Plymouth 16 36 — Northington 



51— Hyde Park Y.MCA. 16 
56 — Brjdgewater Nor. 25 
34— Pittsfield Boys' C. 27 
31— Co. K of Hingham 15 
35 — Bridgewater Nor. 24 
50— U.S. S. Nebraska 22 



Y.M.C.A. 20 
49— Clapp Mem. Ass'n 20 
39— Co. K of Hingham 24 
22— Fitehtjurg YMCA. 24 
48—01(5 Timers 19 



BUTLER GUARDS, CO. A, FIRST INPAWTRY, N.G.S.C., 



GREENVILLE, S. C 



32 — Furman Fit. Sch. 6 
12 — Furman Univ. 8 
12 — Furman Univ. 15 
11 — Furman Univ. 4 
12— Woodside Y.M.C.A. 6 

7— Monaghan YMCA. 21 
21— Woodside Y.M.C.A. 3 

3— Furman Univ. 14 



10— Monaghan YMCA. 21 
7— Greenvile Y.M.C.A. 9 
2 — Furman Univ. 13 
23— Woodside Y.M.C.A. 5 
15— Greenville YMCA. 12 
11— Monaghan YMCA. 22 
18— Furman Univ. 16 
29— Woodside YMCA. 18 



30— Woodside YMCA. 11 
14 — Furman Univ. 22 
12— Woodside YMCA. 19 
20— Greenville YMCA. 19 
34— Furman Univ. 20 
13— Greenville YMCA. 28 
42— Woodside YMCA. 21 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



195 



CAIMEDEN (N. J.) HIGK SCHOOI^. 



78— Collingswood U.S. 11 

13— St. Joseph Coll. 16 

41' — Alumni 11 

35— West Chester Nor. 19 

44— Phila. Sch. of Fed. 23 

15— Roman Cath. H.S. 27 

89— Glen Mills 8 

33 — Villanova Prep. 14 

Gl — Brown Prep. 8 



27— S. Man. and H.S. 24 
55— Vineland H.S. 20 
37— York H.S. 15 
28— Atlantic City H.S. 8 
41— Reading H.S. 18 
28— St. Joseph Coll. 19 
41— Allentown H.S. 13 
55— St. John's Coll. 
(Brook.) IS 



47 — Roman Cath. H.S. 23 
51— North E'ast Man. 23 
32— Rahway H.S. 16 
37— Norristown H.S. 18 
26— Sq. Man. and H.S. 17 
23— Peddle Inst. 38 
25— Wenonah Mil. A. 14 
47— Chester H.S. 20 



CATHZiDRAI^ COImImUGH, NEW YORK CITY. 



38— St. Fran. Xavier 12 21— Jamaica H.S. 6 



15— St. John's Coll. 50 
23— Seton Hall Coll. 24 
25— St. Benedict's 26 
45— Alumni 24 
29— St. Peter's Coll. 22 
41— Brvant H.S. 18 



29— St. Benedict's 37 
28— Seton Hall Coll. 11 
53— Flushing H.S. 8 
36— Hoboken H.S. 42 
2— St. Peter's Coll. 
(for.) 



22— Manhattan Coll. 32 48— Far Rockaway H.S. 



29 — Eastern 22 
42— Far Rock. HS. 13 
68— St. Francis Coll. 7 
44— Manhattan Coll. 21 
54 — Hoboken 44 

2— PatersonH.S.O (for.) 
41— Orange H.S. 11 



CATHOZ.IC I.VCi:UM JUS. 145-FOUlTD CI.ASS TEAM, ASBX7BY 
PARK, IT. J. 

12— Y.M.C.A. 7 18— Y.M.C.A. 14 16— Y.M.C.A. 20 



-Y.M.C.A. 14 



-Y.M.C.A. 19 



le— YM.C.A. 



CATHOI.IC UNXVERSITY, WASHINGTON, D. C. 



42— Gallaudet 21 
41— Gallaudet 27 
98- Frederick 30 
43— Geo. Washington 14 
42— Geo. Washington 23 
44— St. John's 

(Annap.) 27 



59— Baltimore Med. 
28 — Baltimore Med. 
46— St. John's 

(Brook. ) 12 
26— St. John's 

(Brook.) 36 
35— Loyola 21 



-Univ. of Md. 19 

-U. S. Naval Acad. 59 

-Trinity (S. C.) 27 

-Virginia 32 

-Delaware 15 

-Cath. Club (N.Y.) 21 



CENTRAI. HIGH SCHOOI., PITTSBURGH, PA. 



31— South H.S. 16 
12— Peabody H.S. 19 
38— East Lib. Acad. 20 
35— Sewickley H.S. 21 
32— Peabody H.S. 26 
43— Washington H.S. 27 



27— South H.S. 29 
36— Fifth Ave. H.S. 19 
49— Washington H.S. 33 
16— Rayen Sch. 36 
22— Fifth Ave. H.S. 26 
21— Wilkinsburg H.S. 35 



28— East Lib. Acad. 26 
24— Wilkinsburg H.S. 28 
30— Peabody H.S. 26 
15— W'llkinsburg H.S. 18 
22— Sewickley H.S. 27 



CHATTI.E HIGH SCHOOI., I.ONG BRANCH, N. J. 



14— Chattle H.S. 

Champs. '09 32 
74— Middletown H.S. 12 
26— Red Bank H.S. 6 
42— Neptune H.S. 26 
100— A. Highlands HS. 23 
36— A. Highlands HS. 8 



55 — Fordham Prep. 30 
44— Maroon A.C. 13 

2— Neptune H.S. 
71— Middletown H.S. 11 
53— Red Bank H.S. 5 

2 — Fordham Prep. 
37— Oakwoods 25 



21— Rahway H.S. 36 
56— Red Bank YMCA. 
65 — Wide Awakes 16 
15— Rahway H.S. 33 
2— St. Peter's Coll. 
31— Chattle H.S. 

Champs. '09 42 



24 



CHESTER (FA.) HIGH SCHOOI^. 

.38— Swarthmore H.S. 24 21— Roman Cath. H.S. 16 36— Art and Textile 20 

33— Lansdowne H.S. 20 

20— Northeast Man. 30 

21 — Chesmar Acad. 17 

29— Norristown H.S. 29 

36— W^oodbury H.S. 20 

29— Vineland H.S. 17 



24— Wilm'gton Friends 12 20- 
16 — Lansdowne H.S. 29 
21— West Chester H.S. 16 
31— WilmingtonH.S. 24 
22— Pennington Sem. 29 



Central H.S. 21 
27 — Brown Prep. 11 
15 — Delancey Sch. 51 
30— Wilm'gton Friends 29 
15— W^ilmington H.S. 17 



196 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



CHESTNUT HIXiI. (FA.) ACADEIOir. 

32 — Lower Merion 22 25 — 0. H. Club, 

21 — Haverford Fresh. 18 Princeton 16 

15 — Swarthmore 12 29— Friends' Select 23 

27 — Lansdowne 13 23 — Princeton 2d 26 

24— Haverford 12 31 — Germantown 18 



31— Friends' Select 9 
34— Haverford 13 
32 — Swarthmore 30 
21 — Alumni 18 
44 — Germantown 10 



CIiARKSON SCHOOI. OP TECHNOLOGY, POTSDAM, N. Y. 

48_McGiIl Univ. 12 33— Keuka Coll. 9 64— Ottawa Y.M.C.A. 19 

78— Watertown YMCA. 13 13— Reus. Poly. Inst. 19 33— Niagara Univ. 30 
27— C.C.N. Y. 23 42— Keuka Coll. 12 41— Montreal Y.M.C.A. 24 

32— Niagara Univ. 54 21— St. John's 17 

COI.EMAN MEMOBIAI. GYMNASIUM TEAM, SAYRE, FA. 



12— Watkins U.S. 52 
10 — Laceyville 37 

6— Elnure Y.M.C.A. 66 
12— Cook Acad. 25 
20— Corning N.S. H.S. 22 
IS— Corning N.S. H.S. 13 



2.5— Watkins H.S. 16 

17 — Sayre 11 

13 — Owego Free Acad. 7 

26 — Owego Free Acad. 35 

16— Athens 24 

26— AthenslO 



3(1 — Towanda 20 
18 — Towanda 20 
16— Towanda 7 
20— Towanda 12 
2 — Cook Acad. 



20 — Syracuse 43 
21 — Rochester 17 
26— St. Lawrence 20 



COLGATE UNIVERSITY, HAMILTON, N. Y. 

52— Toronto 34 22— U. S. Mil. Acad. 26 29— Cornell 45 
37 — Rochester 31 .36 — Syracuse 24 
22— Union 28 34— Cornell 23 
19— Williams 23 21— Union 38 
40— Rensselaer 32 22— Williams 24 

COLLEGE OP THE CITY OP NEW YORK. 

22 — U. of Maryland 20 34— Potsdam Nor. 8 27— Y'ale Univ. 22 

25 — Loyola Coll. 11 27— Clarkson Tech. 23 2.3— Rochester Univ. IS 

22 — St. Lawrence U. 28 45 — St. Lawrence U. 20 34 — Wash, and Lee 17 

17_C.C.N.Y. Alum. 31 26— Potsdam Nor. 21 39— Juniata Coll. 13 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, NEW YORK CITY. 

37— Poly. Inst. 16 24— Princeton 35 9— Dartmouth 20 

43— U. of Maryland 12 13— Cornell 19 29— Dartmouth 21 

16— Alumni 17 10— Princeton 20 43--Yale 18 

27— FoTdham 7 23— New York Univ. 10 25— Univ. of Penn. 13 
17— Cornell 19 13— Univ. of Penn. 8 



CURTIS HIGH SCHOOL ANNEX 
ISLAND, N. Y. 

44_Public Soh. 1 17 
34— Perth Amboy H.S. 27 
20— Imperials 18 
64 — Evening Sch. 8 
22— Perth Amboy H.S. 14 



TOTTENVILLE, STATEN 



29— Woodbridge H.S. 13 
36— SoHth River H.S. 22 
17— Woodbridge H.S. 21 
14— Perth Amboy U.S. 28 
32— South River H.S. 8 



DEFENDERS, NEW MILPORD, CONN. 



33— N.M.H.S. Alum. 17 
46— Colonial A.C. 21 
28 — Surveyors 21 
65 — German Five 20 
49— N.M.H.S. Alum. 12 
17 — Surveyors 14 
38— Ridgefield 22 



20— Ramblers 27 
19— Ridgefield 59 
35— Boys 'Club 30 

2 — Ridgefield (for.) 
3&— Church House 21 
32 — Surveyors 21 
27— Church House 37 



2— Keyport H.S. 
.3.3— South River H.S. 9 
56 — Evening Sch. 16 
36— Perth Amboy H.S. 16 
.36— All -Stars 34 



21— Naval 16 
22 — Has Beens 16 
20— All-Bridgeports 46 
54 — Church House 30 
17— Holy Cross Ind. 16 
21 — Church House 46 



DELANCEY SCHOOL, PHTLADELFHIA, FA. 



24 — Southern Manual 12 
33 — Penn. Fresh. 21 
43 — Art and Textile 26 
4— Harrisburg H.S. 36 



12— Lansdowne 28 
33— Swarthmore 21 
IS — Swarthmore 12 
17— Haverford 22 



.52— Chester H.S. 15 

43 — Army and Navy 

Prep. 13 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



197 



DEI.AWABI: COImImUGH, NSVTABK, TJEIm. 

30— Drexel 33 39— Phila. C. of P. 20 20— Leb. Valley SS 



15— Pratt 15 
13— St. John's 37 
17— Gettysburg 16 



15— Cath. Univ. 50 
13 — Muhlenberg 44 



17— Wash. Coll. 24 
16— Mt. St. Marys' 36 



DEI^FOBD ATHIiETIC CI.UB, OBADEI.1^, N. 



14_0ritani 28 
15 — Spring Valley 19 
24 — Jer. Athletics 11 
.20 — Teaneck 30 
14 — Ridgewood 9 
31— Teaneck 22 
24— Nanuet 26 
20 — Leonia 
28— Amer. Five 20 
28 — Teaneck 22 
20— D.E.D. Turners 24 



28 — Teaneck 17 
9 — All-Ridgewood 6 

11 — Englev\ood 24 

23— Alcoe 18 

43— Ridgewood 3 
5 — Amer. Five 25 

15 — Teaneck 2 

25 — All-Ridgewood 11 

33— B'klyn. E.D. 
Turners 36 

11 — Lyceum 4 



J. 

-B'klyn E.D. 
Turners 42 
-Central A.C. 7 
-C.M.S. 26 
-Spring Valley 17 
Bunker Hill 40 
-Central A.C. 12 
-Spring Valley 58 
Nanuet 35 
-I'eerless 14 
C.M.S. 52 



DE VAUX SCHOOI^, NIAGARA FAI.I.S, N. V. 

57— Barker H.S. 12 46— Buffalo Tech. H.S. 16 26- 

18— Niag. Falls H.S. 38 25— Lockiwrt H.S. 33 .37- 



-Ridley Coll. 31 
-Lockport H.S. 28 



DEWITT CI.INT01T HIGH SCHOOI., NEW YORK CITY. 

28— Jersey City H.S. 11 27— Mt. Vernon H.S. 20 31— Stuyvesant H.S. 
49— Hoboken H.S. 14 24— Commerce 16 26— Boys' H.S. 15 

19— Erasmus H.S. 14 .'^7— Cathedral Coll. 19 29 — Englewood 24 

8— C.C.N. Y. Fresh. 7 :i7— Adelphi 18 21— Bushwick 16 

16— Flushing H.S. 12 86— Townsend Harris 12 

EASTHAMFTON (MASS.) HIGH SCHOOL. 



23 



17— Smith Sch. 2d 9 
30— Northampton H.S. 

2d 26 
37— Williamsburg H.S. ( 
23— Will. Easthamp. 18 
40 — Hopkins Acad. 25 



9 — Northampton H.S. 
2d 15 
11— Will. Easthamp. 30 
20— Northampton H.S. 

1914. 18 
30— Holyoke H.S. 2d 29 



EAST LIBERTY (FA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

22— Fifth Ave. 29 32— Wilkinsburg 33 

44 — Wilkinsburg 18 



29— Fifth Ave. 18 



20— Central 38 
26 — Central 28 



33— Washington 27 



EASTON (FA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 



7— Bethlehem H.S. 14 
47— Doylestown H.S. 13 
42— Lebanon H.S. 8 
20 — Tamaqua H.S. 27 
15— Hazleton H.S. 29 
25— Wilkes-Barre H.S. 36 
30— Chi Phi of Laf. 20 



25— Reading H.S. 19 
13 — Bordentown 22 
13 — Harrisburg Tech. 15 
18— Reading H.S. 32 
11— Lebanon H.S. 36 
28— Stroudsburg H.S. 22 
69— Hazleton H.S. 18 



26 — Deerfield Acad. 27 
36— Deerfield Acad. 16 
10 — Northampton H.S, 

2d 26 
18— Pirates 28 



49— Washington 34 
17 — Peabody 16 
19— Peabody 28 



22— Allentown H.S. 19 
50 — Stroudsburg H.S. 15 
60 — Easton B.C. 6 
14— Nazareth Hall 29 
33— Doyle stovirn H.S. 16 
12 — Harrisburg Tech. 37 
26— Alumni 25 



SAST ROCHESTER PERINTONS, FAIRFORT, N. Y. 



28— Pittsford A.C. 11 
36 — Penfield Maple 

Leafs 14 
14 — Roch. Pontiacs 49 
87— Underbill Bus. C. 22 
53 — Roch. Calvary 23 
29— Pittsford A.C. 



-Roch. Belmonts 23 



')8— Roch. Superiors 20 



-Roch. Mt. Carmels 25 36— Holy Name Cadets 27 



16 — Roch. Pontiacs 50 
13— Roch. Mt. Carmels 7 
72— Lyons A.C. 10 
26— Roch. Calvary 40 
58-^Holv Name Cadets 32 



24— Underbill Bus. C. 15 62— Roch. Imperials 32 



30— Roch. Rexalls 21 
34— Boston Coll. Girls 27 
12— Roch. Centrals 40 
55— Marion A.C. 32 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



IIDWABD LITTLE HIGH SCHOOI., AUBURN, ME. 



42 — Bliss Coll. 22 

42 — Alumni 40 

21 — Livermore Falls 

H.S. 21 

48_Freeport H.S. 22 

15— Portland H.S. 26 

124 — N. Yar. Acad. 12 



31— Rumford H.S. 49 
44— I'ortland H.S. 24 
28— Westbrouk H.S. 37 
34— Morse H.S. 36 
26— Westbrook H.S. 39 
27— Cony H.S. 10 



43 — Lewiston H.S. S 
IS — Rumford H.S. 13 
37 — Lewiston H.S. 20 
20— Morse H.S. 15 
81— Cony H.S. 15 
46— Lewiston H.S. 22 



EI.I.ENVII.I.E (N. Y.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

<53_Cornwall H.S. 10 .48— Orange H.S. 26 

54 — Monticello H.S. 20 27— Alumni 25 

39— Hudson H.S. 16 2(5— Catskill H.S. 21 

21— Middletown H.S. 12 77— Saugerties H.S. 4 



-Monticello H.S. 24 
-Middletown H.S. 25 
-Newburgh Acad. 
(for.) 



EMOBV TEAM, JERSEY CITY, N. J. 

46 — Grove Reformed 3 27 — Second Dutch Ref. 

46 — Grove Reformed 12 54 — Second Dutch Ref. 
35— St. John 14 41— St. Stephen's 19 

12— St. John 2 28— St. Stephen's 13 



13 



38— Lafayette Ref. 10 
14— Lafayette Ref. 12 
66— First M.E. 14 
10— First M.E. 



EPISCOPAL HIGH SCHOOL, ALEXANDRIA, VA. 

52— Alexandria H.S. 11 20— Shenandoah Mil. 41— Eastern Coll. 18 

35— Western H.S. 3 Acad. 17 26— Woodberry For. 13 

32— Balto. Poly. 11 21— Woodberry For, 38 43— John Marshall HS. 13 



PENNO PIVE, BOSTON, MASS. 



42— Boston Ind. 29 


21- 


17— Marblehead 6 


13- 


34— Indiana A. A. 67 


57- 


25— Indiana A. A. 25 


78- 


25— Oliver Ames A. A. 26 


27- 


26— St. Mary's C.U. 22 


33- 



-St. Mary's C.U. 18 
-South Boston 23 
-Co. K, Hiugham 25 
-Crowell F. 28 
-Foxboro A.C. 10 
-Co. D, Plymouth 16 



-Roxbury A.C. 16 
-Stoughton A. A. 10 
-Oliver Ames A. A. 27 
-Abington YMCA. 33 
-Foxboro A.C. 21 



PIPTH AVENUE HIGH SCHOOL, 

29— East Liberty 22 19— Central 36 

19 — East Libertv 28 26 — Central 22 

26— Wilkinsburg 22 21— Peabody 32 

28— Wilkinsburg 34 



PITTSBURGH, PA. 

22— Peabody 17 
42 — Washington 39 
58 — Washington 16 



PRANKLIN AND MARSHALL COLLEGE, LANCASTER, PA. 

48— Susquehanna 34 26 — State Coll. 23 45 — Mercersburg 26 

29 — Pratt Inst. 23 22 — Georgetown 38 51— Bucknell 21 

41— Juniata 32 28— Virginia 44 44— Gettysburg 32 

17— U. of Pitts. 24 23— Gettysburg 25 

PURMAN PITTING SCHOOL, GREENVILLE, S. C. 

33— Easley H.S. 9 23— Central H.S. 49— Y.M.C.A. Interm. 11 

13— Butler Guards 2d 2 17— Woflford F.S. 22 3.5— Central H.S. 13 

18— Central H.S. 3 21— Hastoc H.S. 23 56— Hastoc H.S. 13 

23— Easley H.S. 14— WoCford F.S. 10 16— W^ofCord F.S. 26 

19 — Butler Guards 2d 3 18— Furman Univ. 9 



GALLAUDET COLLEGE, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

21— Cath. Univ. 42 12— Virginia 40 27 — Cath. Univ. 41 



9— St. John's 41 
19— Loyola 17 
19 — Aggies 12 



37— Bait. City Coll. 21 
19— Md. Aggies 12 • 



-Geo. Washington 32 
-Balto. Med. Coll. 37 



Sr'ALDlNG'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 
GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY, WASHINGTON, D. C. 



199 



16— U. of Virginia 22 
26— U. of Pitts. 32 
33— Trinity Coll.(N.C.) 14 
40— Md. Agri. ColL IS 
26 — U. of Virginia 19 



Frank, and Marsh. 22 
IS— U. S. Naval Acad. 67 
23 — Princeton 18 
24— Bucknell 23 
22 — Princeton 34 



20 — U. of Maryland IS 
44 — Mt. St. Joseph's 14 
16— Loyola Coll. 33 
16 — New York Univ. 4 
29— St. .John's (Bklyn) 16 
26— Va. Mil. Inst. 11 

GILBERT HIGH SCHOOL RESERVES, WINSTED, CONN. 

S_Teader<5ll 6— Man. Arts Stud. 9— Gilbert Home IS 

o% TorSon 11 S 2d 8 6-T. A. and B. 2d 12 21-Torrington H.S. 2d lO 

itZT A and B 2<1 26 IS-West Ends 17 43-Leaders 10 

23— pine Plains H.S. 27 17— T. A. and B. 2d S 

GIRARD COLLEGE, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

o=;_southern U.S. 20 23— George Sch. 21 16— Southern H.S. 32 

" -Kdagogy 17 26— W. Phila. H.S. 35 25-Atlantic City H.S. 14. 



86- ^^. 

48 — Old Swedes 2' 

39 — Lausdowne H.S. 25 



33— Pa. Inst, for Deaf 26 23— Temple 2i 
23— St. Joseph 27 



GLEN MILLS (PA.) SCHOOL. 



9 — Chesmar Acad. IS 
2 — Wilmington H.^. 

15— Swarthmore H.S. 20 
8— Camden H.S. 86 

35_St. Cecilia's Sch. 34 



19— Suburban A.C. 17 
17— Swede Art Sch. 10 

S— Swarthmore H.S. 19 
19— Vineland H.S. 16 
24 — Brown Prep. 26 



2— Olivets 
18 — Iroquois 16 
20 — At. City H.S. 
All-Stars 11 



GOULD'S ACADEMY, BETHEL, ME. 

42— Bryant's Pond 6 25— Westbrook Sem. 



30 



68— Business Coll. 



92— Rumford H.S. 25 



ll_Westbrook Sem. 10 
.30— Berlin Ind. 9 



GRAFTON (W. VA.) Y.M.C.A. 

16— Fairmont YMCA. 78 
25— Fairmont YMCA. 58 
36— Clarksburg Sch. 31 
29— Broaddus Coll. 10 
1-5- Salem Coll. 21 

GREENVILLE (S. C) CENTRAL Y.M.C.A. 



12 — Clarksburg Scho. 55 2- 

2_Salem Coll. (for.) 
3.3 — W. Va. Bus. Coll. 14 34- 
77_Broaddus Coll. 10 40- 

og — Weslevan Coll. 68 



10 — :Monaghan 30 

25 — :\Ionaghan 30 

23— Woodside YMCA. 11 

36_Mills Mill YMCA. 18 

18 — Monaghan YMCA. 17 

31— Woodside YMCA. 8 

51— Mills Mill 20 

HAMPTON (VA.) Y 

41_Cpntral 42 
38 — Central 46 
18— Central 52 
18— Navy 16 
1.5— Navy 47 



22 — Butler Guards 20 
11 — Monaghan 35 
31 — Spartanburg 

Y.M.C.A. 55 
20— Monaghan YMCA. 21 
34 — Spartanburg 

Y.M.C.A. 29 

,M.C.A. 

27— Navy 33 
30 — New Hampshire 19 
1.5 — New Hampshire 43 
19— New Hampshire 37 
25— Army 30 



-Weslevan Coll. 

(for.) 
-W. Va. Bus. Coll. 30^ 
-Kingwood Ind. 14 



-Woodside YMCA. 2G 
-Furman Univ. 9 
-CI em son Coll. 27 
-Woodside YMCA. 20- 
-Butler Guards 20 
-Furman Univ. 14 



29— Army 33 

45 — Army 25 

43 — Newport News 16 

3.5 — Newport News 27 

.-,4 — Newport News 20 



HARRISBURG (PA.) TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 



,ri7_:Middletown H.S. 18 
44 — Alumni 14 
18 — Shippensburg Nor. 33 
40 — Lebanon H.S. 14 
20— Middletown H.S. 19 
25— Harrisburg U.S. 24 
29 — Lancaster U.S. 42 



21 — Millersville Nor. 
o9_York H.S. 17 
44— Reading H.S. 31 
27— Reading H.S. 35 
1,5 — Easton 13 
oi_steelton H.S. 31 
32— Lancaster H.S. 33 



14— Lebanon H.S. 45 
IS— Harrisburg H.S. 31 
28- Y'ork H.S. 22 
.37— Easton U.S. 12 
17— StefHtou H.S. 47 
27— Harrisburg H.S. 37 



200 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



SASTOC HIGH SCHOOI., SFABTAITBUBG, S. C. 

31_Greenville H.S. 12 14— Furman Fit. Sch. 55 6&— Woodrufif H.S. 13 

23— Furman Fit. Sch. 21 36— Wofford Fresh. 32 51— Converd H.S. 14 

31— Central H.S. 20 

HAZI.ETON (FA.) HIGH SCHOOI^. 



51— Berwick H.S. 6 
29— Easton H.S. 13 
43— Freeland H.S. 28 
18— Bloomsburg S.N.S. 34 
27— Stroudsburg S.N.S. 33 



17— Wilkes-Barre H.S. 41 
18 — Bethlehem Prep. 22 
18— Stroudsburg S.N.S. 51 
15— Easton H.S. 38 
29— Tamaqua H.S. 19 



15_Pottsville H.S. IS 
24— Pottsville H.S. 23 
51— Shenandoah H.S. 8 
25— Lock Haven S.N.S. 9 
10 — Shenandoah H.S. 43 
22— Wilkes-Barre H.S. 31 

HIGH SCHOOI. OF COMMENCE, NEW YOBK CITY. 

19— Hoboken 57 19— Townsend Harris 9 25— Mt. Vernon 14 

25— N. Y. Mil. Acad. 16 31— Stuyvesant 38 12— C.C.N. Y. Fresh. 16 

58— Yonkers 27 23— St. Paul 25 32— Peeksliill 19 
16— Clinton 24 

HII.I.SBOBOUGH HIGH SCHOOI., TAMFA, FI.A. 

S2— Y.M.C.A. 17 52— Columbia Coll. 23 29— Y.M.C.A. 16 

40— Y.M.C.A. 21 24— Bradentown 19 44— Orlando 10 

45— Bradentown 12 40— Southern Coll. 4 35— Y.M.C.A. 19 

'24 — St. Petersburg 14 18— Ft. Dade 15 42 — Duval 15 
52— Ft. Dade 10 

HOBACE ■SILAJSfJSf HIGH SCHOOI., NEW YOBK CITY. 

27— Faculty 3 12— St. John's 21 8— Collegiate 7 

2o — Alumni 15 6 — Kingsley 25 34— Cutler 19 

31— Collegiate 6 27— Adelphi 15 28 — Mackenzie 9 
41 — Hamilton 5 



HOSFITAI. FIVE, 

25— Whirlwinds 29 
•29— St. Peters 20 
55 — Prospects 40 
40— Glenco« 11 
32— All-Sch. 29 
17 — Aronsons 29 
38— Tigers 17 
54 — Murray Five 24 
27 — Prospectors fi 
22— Averne Five IS 



CEDAB GBOVE, N. J. 

25 — Eurekas 15 
26— Magnolias 16 
40— Franklins 15 
19— Bipparts 20 
21 — Eurekas 30 
32— Fulton Five 26 
27 — Nationals 15 
27 — Americans 26 
26— Belmonts 16 
30— AU-Newarks 20 



25— All-Stars 23 
27— Prudential 10 
27— Ajax 16 
49— Victors 16 
54 — Whirlwinds 31 
49— Bay View Sep. 26 
22— Eurekas 10 
19 — Ironsides 28 
IS— Metropolitans 24 
20— Ironsides 30 



IBOQUOIS OF Y. M. C. A., CHESTEB, FA. 

32— All-Stars 19 
•69— U.S. S. Missouri lo 
54— Glenolden YMCA. 11 
53 — Nicetown Boys' C. 28 
-64 — Ger. Bovs' C. Or. 15 
19— Powhattan 30 
70— Heartease 19 



40— All-Scholastics 30 
45— Ardmore Y.M.C.A. 9 
34— Central Y.M.C.A. 4 
29— At. Citv Y.M.C.A. 37 
43— Norristown YMCA. 20 
43 — Nicetown Boys' C. 23 



29 — Germantown 

Y.M.C.A. 34 
37 — All-Scholastics 36 
24— Central Y.M.C.A. 15 
49— Greystock Travel. 24 
37— At. City Y.M.C.A. 25 



JACKSONVH.I.E (FI.A.) Y.M.C.A. 

FIRST TEAM. 
41— Columbia Coll. 18 78— U.S.N. Gunboat 10 

32— Mercer Univ. 14 46— Duval H.S. 39 

32- Mercer Univ. 23 53— Duval H.S. 28 



S&— Duval H.S. 25 
30— Duval H.S. 9 



44— Columbia Coll. 24 
48— Kee Watin Acad. 19 
65— West Palm Beach 12 



JUNIOR TEAM, 
r— Savannah Y.M.C.A. 41— Duval H.S. 18 
Jrs. 22 58- Lake City 10 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



201 



JENKHTTOWN (FA.) HIGH SCHOOI.. 

27— Doylestown U.S. 20 20— Phillips Brooks 55 



-Friends' Select 32 
17— La Salle 2d 15 
49— Ambler H.S. 14 
€6— Abington H.S. 10 



-Moorestown Fr'nds 24 
-Doylestown H.S. 24 
-Abington Friends 17 
-Lansdowne H.S. 25 



29— Jenk. Club 2d 14 
12 — Moorestown Fr'nds 21 
19— Art and Textile 14 
20— Phillips Brooks 25 
29— Abington H.S. 13 



JUNIATA (FA.) COLLEGi:. 

30— HarrisbnrgYMCA. 20 46— Carnegie Tech. 24 42— Albright Coll. 28 

30— Altoona Y.M.C.A. 20 32— Frank, and Marsh. 41 30— Albright Coll. 34 

66— Dickinson Law S..10 54— Susquehanna Univ. 32 13— C.C.N. Y. 39 
29— Univ. of Pitts. 43' 



KANE (FA.) HIGH SCHOOI.. 



20— Corry H.S. 22 
40— Clarendon A.C. 32 
44— Union City 18 
57— Ridgway H.S. 33 
45— Union City 39 
54— Franklin H.S. 8 



20— Brookville H.S. 40 
28— New Beth. H.S. 24 
46— Brookville H.S. 15 
41— Warren H.S. 24 
58— Oorry H.S. 21 
15 — Edinboro Nor. 38 



15— Kittanning H.S. 37 
8— Warren H.S. 50 
14 — Edinboro Nor. 16 
38 — Carnegie Tech. 
Fresh. 5 



KENTS HIX.I. (ME.) SEMINARY. 

51— Keokuk Club 2G 30— Wilton A.C. 45 

57 — Liverniore Falls 35 — Livermore Falls 

H.S. 28 H.S. 37 



50 — Horseshoe Five 13 
75— Wilton A.C. 28 
48— Horseshoe Five 21 



KEYSTONE STATE NOBMAI. SCHOOI., KUTZTOWN, FA. 

101— Nativity. So. Beth. 9 
57 — All-Collegians 7 
30— AllentownYMCA. 15 
29— Crescents 17 
26— Albright C. Res. 15 
32— Calumet 19 

LA SAI.I.E ACADEMY, NEW YORK CITY. 



18- 


-Millersville St. N. 9 


45— Reading Y.M.C.A. 5 


18- 


-Schu.vlkill Sem. 14 


16— Schuylkill Sem. 19 


32- 


-Millersville St. N. 21 


27 — Bloomsburg St. 


14- 


-Bloomsburg St. 


Nor. 14 




Nor. 28 


32— Mohnton 13 



27— Xavier H.S. 26 
24— St. Veronica's 

Club 14 
37_Y.^LC.A., 58th 

Street Br. 11 
50— Manhattan Coll. 

Prep. 17 
47— St. James Acad. 13 
31— Xavier H.S. 19 



15— Gobline. Xav. H.S. 
41— Xavier H.S. 11 
56—0. L. Grace 9 
17— Public Sch. 21. 11 
56 — Holv Name 10 
56— Sacred Heart 19 
64— St. James 
29 — Mercurv Fiv^ 21 
37— Cathedral Coll. 
Midgets 11 

7— Tarpon 9 
22— Holy Name 6 
16 — St. Francis Xav. 
P.S. 18 



SENIORS. 
-Clason Point M.A. 18 
-Man. Coll. Prep. 29 
-Cathedral C. Prep. 3 
-St. John's Prep. 19 
-Stapleton Five 15 



22 — Judson Memorial 
Five 18 
2 — Amitv A.C. 
23— St. James Acad. 12 

JUNIORS. 

60— Fordham Coll. 

Tvros 12 
10— Cathedral Coll. 

Midgets 19 
24— St. Marv's A.C. 38 



21— ^Nlan. Coll. Prep. 13 
40— Clason Point M.A. 14 
2— Y.M.C.A.. 58th 
Street Br. 
37— Metropolitan Life 11 
46 — Our Ladv of Grace 15 
42— La Salle Alumni 18 
19— St. James Acad. 10 



}oblins. Xav. H.S. 28 
86— Man. Coll. Unions 5 
22 — Stuyvesant H.S. 
Midgets 14 



-Hoboken Acad. 
-Public Sch. 21. 20 
-O. L. Grace 18 
-Hoboken Acad. 22 
-Eagle Five 13 
-Metropolitans Jrs. 17 
-Cathedral Coll. 

Tyros 11 
-Manhattan Unions 



MIDGETS. 




35— St. James Acad. 2 
31_St. James 12 
3ft— Carmelite Sch. 5 
38— St. Joseph's 9 


60— Clason Point Yankee 

Res. 12 
17— E'disons 11 
38— Trojan Five 21 



202 



SPALDINGS OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



IiAlTCASTEB (FA.) HIGH SCHOOI.. 

-.7— Manheim Ex-High 9 19— CoatesTille H.S. 33 

46__Coatesville H.S. 24 42— Steelton H.S. 21 

29— Tamaqua H.S. 22 48— Bait. City Coll. 29 

36 — Fatiruas 35 36 — Swartbmore Res. 27 

42 — Harrisburg Tech. 29 19 — Tamaqua H.S. 20 

IiANSDOWiri: (FA.) HIGH SCHOOI.. 



32 — Swarthmoi-e Prep. 16 29- 

oo_chester H.S. 33 39- 

27 — Swarthmoie Prep. 15 13- 

25— Girard Coll. 39 2<>- 

o<;,_>;orristown H.S. 29 48- 

28- Delancey Sch. 12 20- 



-Haverford Sch. 24 
-Chester H.S. 16 
-Chestnut Hill A. 26 
-Williamsou Res. 11 
-Swartbmore H.S. 17 
-S\Yarth. Scrubs 29 



37 — Harrisburg Tech. 36 
47— York. Co. Acad. 34 
20— Steelton H.S. 34 
62— York Co. Ac-ad. 23 
27 — Tamaqua 28 



24 — Lower Merion H.S. 28 
39— Art and Textile S. 15 
58 — Sch. of Pedagogy 22 
41 — Cedarcroft Sch. 32 
25 — Swartbmore H.S. 21 



I.EHIGH UlTIVEBSITY, SOUTH BETHIiEHEM, FA. 



26— U. of Penna. 14 
46— Moravian Coll. 17 
41 — Lovola Coll. 19 
46— Albright 38 
36— Muhlenberg 24 



-Cornell 22 
-State 29 

-U. S. Naval Acad. 
-U. of Pitts. 25 
-State 17 



36 — Swartbmore 26 
48— Buckuell 17 
61 — Brook. Poly. 16 
32 — Swartbmore 30 



IiIBEBTY TEAM, CHESTER, FA. 



36— Girard Coll. Res. 34 
14— Gleuoldeu YMCA. 15 
30— Olivet 7 

21— ArdmoreY.M.C.A. IS 
18— Gleuoldeu YMCA. 35 
14 — Williamsou Res. 43 



20 — Junior Club 16 

14— Gleuoldeu YMCA. 15 

9— All-Stars 15 

9— Olivet 12 
24— Glen Mills 6 
29— Folsom 8 
17 — Progressives 19 

IiOWlTR MEBION (FA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

34— Alumni 12 17— Central H.S. 52 

23— Woodbury 5 22— Chestnut Hill 32 

29— Colliugswood 14 20— Norristowu 38 

32— Brown Prep. 11 49 — West Chester H.S. 24 

25— L. M. Y.M.C.A. 35 10— Wenonah 48 

MANHATTAN COLLEGE, NEW YORK CITY. 



54 — Folsom 14 
36 — Progressives li 
34— All-Stars 28 
42— Vigilauts 29 
16— Ridley Park H.S. 
25 — Norwood 6 



28 — Lansdowne ! 
13— York 37 
20— Rabway 38 
25— La Salle 44 



49— Drexel Inst. 23 

14— Princeton 29 

11 — St. Lawrence 22 

15— U. S. Mil. Acad. 31 

25 — Niagara 22 

2< I— Crescent A.C. 18 



17— Buf. Germans 
23— Niagara 41 
20— Canisius 17 
25 — Syracuse 55 
25— La Salle 22 
35— Fordham 33 



14— Seton Hall 24 
23— St. John's 31 
21— Cathedral 4l 
22— St. John's 33 
32— Cathedral 22 
26 — Alumni 25 



MANSFIELD (FA.) STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

26— Cortland H.S. 11 52— Corning Y.M.C.A. 23 19— Stroudsburg Nor. 35 

46— Corning N.S.H.S. 14 38— Starkev Sem. 18 19— Wyoming Sem. 40 

39— Haverling Acad. 17 19— Elmira Y.M.C.A. 17 29— Horseheads Cres. 9 

10— Wellsboro H.S. 13 14— Wilkes-Barre H.S. 25 16— Syracuse Fresh. 25 

MAURY HIGH SCHOOL, NORFOLK, VA. 

28 — Newport News 37 31 — Louisiana 2d 24 



— Portsmouth 2 (for.) 
42 — William and Mary 10 
43— John Marshall 30 



74— Old Point Coll. 
28— Jobu Marshall 
42— Old Point Coll. 



43— William and Mary 6 
31 — Newport News 25 
36 — Newport News 12 



McKEESFORT (FA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

23— Shadyside 36 22— Soutbside 30 

21— Shadvside 35 32— Soutbside 45 

31— Allegheny H.S. 43 31 — Allegheny Prep. 24 

37— Allegheny H.S. 39 



27— Allegheny Prep. 22 
11 — Beaver Falls 34 
35— Beaver Falls 16 



jPALDIXCrS OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



20$ 



MEBCEBSBURG (FA.) ACADEMY. 

IS— P.R.R. Y.M.C.A. 29 17— Shippensburg Nor. 3 
IS— U. of Penn. Fresh. 23 29— York Y.M.C.A. 19 
13— Schuylkill Sem. 16 28- Shippensburg Nor. 36 



40 — Spring Grove 

Y.M.C.A. 10 
26— Frank, and Marsh. 45 



MIZ.I.ERSVII.Z.E (FA.) STATE NORMAI. SCHOOIi. 

2t>— Harrisburg Tech. 21 4S— Stevens Trade Sch. 14 34— Oonwav Hall 16 
9 — Kutztown Nor. 18 IS — E. Stroudsburg 51 — Lock Haven Nor. 21 

44— Stevens Trade Sch. 14 Nor. 38 42 — Alumni 14 

21 — Kutztown Nor. 32 



MONTCI.ArB (N. J.) ACADEMY. 

2r,— Carteret Acad. 23 17— East Orange H.S. 18 32- 

27— Rutherford H.S. 50 31— Trinity Sch. 23 37- 

27— Bloomfield H.S. 10 46— Mackenzie Sch. 17 31- 

41— N. Y. Mil. Acad. 13 



-St. Paul's Sch. 28 
-Battin H.S. 11 
-Montclair H.S. 28 



MONTCZiAIB (N. J.) HIGH SCHOOII. 

17— Passaic H.S. 24 33— Central H.S. 30 

3.S— Alumni 36 30— East Orange 27 

19— Orange H.S. 24 27— Central H.S. 38 

43— Barriuger H.S. 20 (32— Plaiufield 22 

3(3 — Wilson Mem. A. 23 



3.5 — Barringer 28 
27— East Orange 29 
27— Mont. Acad. 30 
30 — East Orange 25 



MONTCI.AIR (N. J.) Y.M.C.A. 



45— Pat. Pros. 13 
31— Young Men's C. 21 
.56— Oaklev B.B.C. 31 
49— Sokol A.C. 15 
46— Belleville YMCA. 22 
60— Paterson (Bapt.) 23 

2— Hudson CitvYMCA. 
36— Elizabeth YMCA. 34 



37— Summit C.C. 3 
21 — Passaic Invad. 16 
39— Belleville 2d 14 
2— Hudson City 
41— Elizabeth 2d 49 
34— Summit C.C. 12 
30— Red Sox 7 



28— Elizabeth Boys 22 
41— Clintons 15 
42— Clintons 23 
53— Ridgewood 3 
20— 1st Presby. S.S. 10 
52— Belleville Boys 24 



FIRST TEAM. 
-Trenton Y.M.C.A. 32 
-Ridgewood YMCA. 25 
-I'aterson Y.M.C.A. 27 
-Brooklyn 25 
-Sokol A.C. 26 



42— Rahwav Y.M.C.A. 30 
47— Elizabeth YMCA. 13 
52— Belleville YMCA. 28 

SECOND TEAM. 

49— Paterson Pros. 18 
36— City Five 49 
44 — Passaic Invad. 21 
48— Madison A. A. 35 
33— Madison Y.M.C.A. 14 
46— Elizabeth 2d 34 
23— Belleville 2d 15 

BOYS' TEAM. 

22 — Elizabeth Boys 15 
49— Ridgewood Boys 15 
2.5— Invincibles 11 
5.3 — Rahway Boys 6 
61— Elizabeth Bovs 10 
40— Plainfleld Boys 16 



37— 



-Madison Y.M.C.A. 23 
-Elizabeth YMCA. 29 
-Belleville YMCA. 36 
-Trenton Y.M.C.A. .38 
-Plainfleld YMCA. 26 
-Elizabeth YMCA. 18 
-Clifton 37 
-Ridgewood YMCA. 28 



-Rahwav Y.M.C.A. 3S 
-Elizabeth 2d 58 
-Paterson Pros. 18 
-Madison Y.M.C.A. 26 
-Paterson Pros. 23 
-Elizabeth 2d 52 



Clintons 42 
Invincibles 19 
Hillside G.S. 31 
Elizabeth Boys 26 
Ridgewood Boys 34 



M021SE HIGH SCHOOI., BATH, ME. 

22— Lincoln Acad. 19 28— Deering Acad. 10 

11— Portland H.S. 9 IS— Portland H.S. 28 

36— Edw. Little H.S. 34 25— ^Yestbro<,k U.S. 14 
27 — Lincoln Acad. 14 



15— Edw. Little H.S. 20 
32— Cory H.S. 13 
29— Cory H.S. 10 



MT. UNION (FA.) HIG-H SCHOOL. 

62— Tyrone H.S. 19 31— Huntingdon A.C. 32 

.59— Lewistown Jrs. 23 16 — Lewistown H.S. 18 

.30— Tvrone H.S. 26 3S— Burnham Y.MCA. 18 

38— Lewiston H.S. 29 30— Huntingdon H.S. 28 



30— St. John's Club 32 
18— Johnstown B.C. 42 
19— Alumni 31 



204 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 

MUHI.ENBEBa COI.I.EGE, AI.I.ENTOWN, FA. 

24— Lehigh 36 IS— AllentowB Y.MCA. 31 28— St. Peter's 21 

27— Schuvlkill Sem. 33 46— St. Joseph's Coll. 20 15— Pa. Mil. Coll. 23 
35 — Lebanon Valley 20 46 — Del. State 13 46 — Lebanon Valley 24 

21— Albright 44 33— Phila. Coll. of 6»— Phila. Coll. of 

3&— Schuylkill Sem. 22 Pharm. 26 Pbarm. 26 

NAZASETH HAIiZi MTT.ITABY ACADEMY, NAZABETH, FA. 

58 — So. Beth. B.C. 8 25 — Beth. Collegians 23 31— Eureka 21 

38— Holv Infancy 14 104— Oaklyn A.C. 13 34— So. Beth. B.C. 31 

25— Young Men's 66— Lafayette 5 23 — Allentown H.S. 42 

League 12 25 — Stroudsburg H.S. 14 28 — Young Men's 

41— Moravian 2d 10 36— Allentown H.S. 18 League 16 

33— Stroudsburg H.S. 50 17— Moravian Coll. 41 29— Easton H.S. 14 
88— Bangor H.S. 1 

KEW BBUirSWICK (N. J.) HIGH SCHOOIi. 

28— North Plalnfield 22 25— North IMaiufield 65 36— Woodbridge 31 

13 — Perth Ambov 34 44 — Plaiufield 45 18 — Rutgers Prep. 23 

33_South Ambov 11 21— Perth Amboy 31 8— Woodbridge 32 

49 — South River 34 59 — Alumni 3S 12— South River 38 

14_Perth Amboy 24 12— Rutgers Prep. 28 16— Woodbridge 38 
13— Plainfield 60 

NEWPORT NEWS (VA.) HIGH SCHOOI.. 

74_O.P.C.C. 16 26— H. H.S. 15 35— W. & M. A. 6 

45_St. Vincent's 41 37— M. H.S. 28 29— All-Stars 20 

44_St. Vincent's 19 40— H. H.S. 32 54— J. M. H.S. 26 

28— Y.M.C.A. 24 23— J. M. H.S. 14 16— P. H.S. 34 

46— Y.M.C.A. 5 35— W. & M. A. 6 77— W. & M. A. 23 

29— Y.M.C.A. 21 29— All Stars 20 25— M. H.S. 31 

21— P. H.S. 16 54— J. M. H.S. 26 12— M. H.S. 36 

NEWPORT NEWS (VA.) Y.M.C.A. TEAM. 

26 — Central 27 33 — New Hampshire 23 20 — Hampton 54 

14 — Central 45 — New Hamp. 2 (for.) 26 — Army 41 

24— Central 49 0— New Ilamp. 2 (for.) 25— Army 33 

21— Navy 50 16— Hampton 43 16— Army 62 

22— Navy 70 27 — Hampton 35 

NEW YORK MILITARY ACADEMY, CORNWALL, N. Y. 

16— H.S. of Commerce 25 30— Middletown H.S. 28 27— Eastman Coll. 17 

19— St. Paul's Sch. 14 16— West Point Plebes 46 36— Riverview Acad. 20 

56— Cornwall H.S. 9 26— Yonkers H.S. 22 22— Adelphi Acad. 10 

20— East Orange H.S. 19 50— Stone Sch. 4 10— Manlius Sch. 14 

15 — Newburgh Acad. 8 23— Mount Pleasant 37 29— Erasmus Hall 31 

13 — Montclair Acad. 41 37 — Newburgh Acad. 4 

NEW YORK MILITARY ACADEMY SECOND TEAM, 
CORNWALL, N. Y. 

43 — Haverstraw H.S. 7 19— Kingston Acad. 20 36 — Haverstraw H.S. 8 

12— St. John's Brown. 46 12— Horace Mann 2d 16 66— Spencer Bus. Coll. 2 
17— Suffern H.S. 18 

NEW YORK MILITARY ACADEMY JUNIOR TEAM, 
CORNWALL, N. Y. 

6_;Meehanv Midgets 5 C, — Sweet-Orr Five 4 29— Bard Hall 6 

8 — Comets"l5 13— Independent Five 10 13— Pioneers 1 

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY, NEW YORK CITY. 

28— Pratt Inst. 21 4— Georgetown 23 21— U. S. Mil. Acad. 29 

19 — Princeton 39 19— Wesleyan 28 10 — Union 48 

27 — Toronto 39 10— Columbia 23 16 — Williams 39 

18- u. S. Naval Acad. 74 16— Rochester 34 7— Wesleyan 50 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



205 



iriNETY-SSCOXrD STBEET YOVJSfQ MEN'S HEBREW ASSO- 
CIATION, NEW YORK CITY. 

17— Coll. Sett. 27 
20— Coll. Sett. 19 
33— Wolfif Club, E.R.C. 

188, 30 
27— Aranac A.C. 32 



51— Newark Y.M.H.A. 25 47— Point A.C. 15 

50— Rutgers PI. A.A. 21 48— Aranac A.C. 21 

19— Coll. Sett. 15 56— Phlla. Y.M.H.A. 21 

41— Jackson's ERC. 7, 35 30— Phila. Y.M.H.A. 22 



NOBFOI.X (VA.) CENTBAIk Y.M.C.A. 



32— Navy 31 
19— Navy 41 
30— Navy 40 

2— Navy (for.) 
34— New Hampshire 32 
48 — New Hampshire 12 



44 — New Hampshire 26 
42 — Hampton 41 
46— Hampton 38 
52 — Hampton 18 
40— Army 21 



41— Army 27 

28— Army 21 

45 — Newport News 14 

27 — Newport News 26 

49 — Newport News 24 



NOBFOI.K (VA.) NAVY Y.M.C.A. 



41— Central 19 
31— Central 32 
40 — Central 'Ai) 

2— Central O (for.) 
S3 — New Hampshire.5 
22— New Hampshire 17 



2— New Hamp. (for.) 
47 — Hampton 15 
16— Hampton 18 
33— Hampton 27 
35— Army 18 



68— Army 11 
64— Army 28 
70— Army 22 
50— Army 21 
2— Army (for.) 



NOBBISTOWN (FA.) HIGH SCHOOI^. 

37— Pottstown 13 38— Lower Merion 20 

24— Swarthmore 26 16 — Allentown 33 

29— Chester 29 44 — Coatesville 14 

29 — Lansdowne 20 18— Wilmington 22 



54 — Doylestown 24 
18— Camden 37 
17— Northeast 34 
32— Central H.S. 31 



OCCIDENTAI^ TEAliX, FITTSBUBOH, FA. 



49— Columbian Five 13 
27— Turner Gym Club 16 
22— Carnegie All-Stars 18 
52— Allegheny A.A. 21 
17— St. Joseph's Coll. 37 
24— L.Y.M.C.A. 23 



39— Sharon Hill 

Collegians 18 
41— St. Joseph's Coll. 52 
37— St. Joseph's Coll. 34 
79— Union Baptists 3 
11 — East. O. Collegians 30 



28— Park Inst. 17 
36 — St. Francis 14 
60— B.Y.M.C.A. 39 
24 — Altoona All-Stars 21 
62— Crafton Indians 13 



OI.D FOINT COmFOBT (VA.) ABSCY Y.SI.C.A. 

27— Central 41 28 — Navy 54 30 — Hampton 25 

21 — Central 40 43 — New Hampshire 23 25 — Hampton 45 

21— Central 28 20— New Hampshire 29 41 — Newport News 26 

18— Navy 35 25— New Hampshire 73 33— Newport News 25 

11— Navy 68 33— Hampton 29 62— Newport News 16 



OBIOI.ES (FOBMERI^Y GEBMANS), BUFFAI.O, N. Y. 



52— New York 24 
60— Niagara Univ. 14 
32 — Tonawauda 30 
15 — Oswego 24 
13— Oswego 22 
20 — Tonawanda 15 
27— Tonawanda 16 
55— Manhattan Coll. 17 
38 — Oswego 22 
26 — Oswego 24 
SO — Gowanda 9 
25— Cleveland 27 



28— Ada 35 

61— Cincinnati 34 

30— Dayton 43 

38— Lima 18 

47— Archbold 17 

20— Crestline 31 

26— Wooster 33 

42— New Straitsville 22 

31— Mt. Union Coll. 10 

44— Tiffin 27 

42— Akron 24 

51— Rochester 27 



60 — Oxfords 26 
43— Canisius Coll. 20 
52 — Brockport 26 
60— St. Mary's 29 
27— Rochester 33 
36 — Jamestown 19 
70— St. Anthonys 26 
61— St. Bridgets 17 
77— St. Anns 31 
62— All-Buffalo 17 
58— Gardenville 21 
71— St. John's 19 



206 



osioi.es of feitit 

35— Big Five Jrs. 21 
40 — Biff Five Jrs. 7 
23— Juniata Tigers 21 
13— Juniata Tigers 16 
25 — Juniata Tigers 9 
27 — Altoona Tigers IG 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 
AI.TOONA, FA. 



S.B. T.lSil.C.A. 

12 — Cresson Jrs. 30 
24 — Altoona Tigers 21 
33— Hollidaysburg Jrs. 
21 — Hollidaysburg Jrs. 
38— Y.M.A. 28 
28— A.H.S. Res. 10 



-Juniata Tiger? 
-Hollidaysburg Jrs. 15 
-H.S. Reserves 2n 
-Avalons 17 
-St. Mark's Res. IS 
-Y.M.A. Jrs. 21 



FASSAIC (N. J.) BOYS' CLUB CADETS. 



81 — Hoboken Bantams 11 

60— Ridgewood 40 

45— Orange Boys' C. 26 

26— Cathedral 21 

35— Maple 32 

57 — Winonas 18 

80— Glencoe 17 

60— Paterson A.C. 19 

39— All-Ridgewoods 23 



58— Teaneck 14 

4<i — Centrals. Pat. 24 

37— Maple 31 

42— C. M.S. 32 

34 — Invaders 28 

45 — Invaders 24 

50 — All-Ridgewoods 47 

54— Saddle River A.C. 27 

45— C.M.S. 27 



76— Carlstadt T.V. 28 
45 — Newark AnrliKrs 28 
37— Ridgewood YMCA. 30 
87 — Bay view Separates 17 
78- St. John's 14 
37— Passaic Deaf M. 18 
47 — Orange I'rnspects IS 
21— Clintons 26 
31— Jonas 36 



PASSAIC (N. J.) HIGK SCHOOZ.. 



17— Hoboken H.S. 32 
27— Plainfield H.S. 7 
24— Montclair H.S. 17 
44— Hackensack H.S. 9 
10— East Side H.S. 1 
24— Englewood H.S. 13 



IS— Rutherford H.S. 26 25— Invaders 23 

65— Park Ridge H.S. 23 13— Orange H.S. 14 

34— Bavonne H.S. 15 28— Orange H.S. 22 

44— Hackensack H.S. 9 21— Invaders 23 

18- Englewood H.S. 14 27— Rutherford 33 



FEABODY HIGH SCHOOI., FITTSBUBGH, FA. 

19— Central 12 26 — Wilkinsburg 28 29 — East Liberty IS 

26— Central 32 30— Washington 14 32— Fifth Ave. 21 

26 — Central 30 35— Washington 4 17— Fifth Ave. 22 

38— Wilkinsburg 16 16— East Liberty 17 24— Fifth Ave. 21 

PEDDIE INSTITUTE, HIGHTSTOWIT, IT. J. 

58— La Salle Coll. 15 28— Trenton U.S. 19 34— Williamson Trade 

72— Northeast Man. 12 67— R.C.H.S.. Phila. 19 Sch. 28 

44 — All-Collegians 19 28 — Lawrenceville Sch. 27 38 — Camden H.S. 23 

47— N. J. State Schs. 4 54 — N. J. State Schs. 14 62— Trenton H.S. 11 

FEEKSKII.I. (N. Y.) SOLITABY ACADEMY. 

20— Caswell 5 IS— Catskill U.S. 21 9— Poly Pi-ep. 21 

19— H.S. of Commerce 32 24— White Plains H.S. 3] 1.5— Erasmus Hall 12 
64— Ossiniug H.S. 3 16 — Albauv H.S. 26 23— Riverview 28 

26 — Eastman B.C. 27 19— White Plains 21 17— Princeton Fresh. 2S 

20— N.Y.U. Fresh. 12 



FENNSYLVANIA INSTITUTIOMT FOB THE DEAF 
FHrLADELFHIA, FA. 

16— Lona B.B.C. 34 13— St. Joseph's Coll. 22 23 



MT. AIBY, 



10— Roman Cath. U.S. 32 26- 

28— School of Ped. 23 72- 

48— Phila. Deaf Mutes 34- 

Coll. 28 24- 



-Girard Coll. 33 
-Ca.lvn A.C. 10 
-West Phillies 35 
-Emmanuel A. A. 33 



West Phila. H.S. 2 
2— Phila. Deaf Mutes 

Coll. 21 
9— School of Ped. 22 



TBUnSfSYJMYAIflA STATE COLLEGE, STATE COLLEGE, FA. 

48— Pittsburgh Coll. 30 31— Pittsburgh U. 20 28— Lehigh 37 

29 — Lehigh 15 46 — Westinghouse 16 26 — Swarthmore 20 

43— Carnegie Tech. 16 30— Pittsburgh U. 25 23— Frank, and Marsh. 1 

21 — Allegheny 17 34 — Carnegie Tech. 14 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



207 



:PJ!B,K10V£ET<r SUMHTAR-S', FENll^SBUBa, FA. 

44 — Moravian Coll. 28 54 — Art and Textile 15 44 — Pennington Sch. 27 

^61 — Easton Bus. Coll. 6 37 — St. Joseph's 14 32 — Coll. of Phar. 12 

43 — Ryan Speed Sch. 8 31 — Wyoming Sem. 27 29 — Bethlehem Prep. 22 

36— Swarth. Scrubs 26 20— Coll. of Phar. 31 39— Villanova Prep. 16 

33— Swarth. Prep. 31 



FHXLIiIFS BROOKS SCHOOI., FHIi:.ADEI.FHIA, FA. 

15 — West Phila. H.S. 27 11— Cedarcrof t Acad. 21 28 — Woodbury H.S. 18 

57— Abington Friends 12 30 — Cedarcroft Acad. 23 17 — Woodbury H.S. 26 

-Bryn Athyn 49 24 — Germantown Acad. 21 19— Atlantic H.S. 36 



22- 

55 — Jenkintown H.S. 20 33 — Abington Friends 15 

12— Germantown Acad. 26 25 — Jenkintown H.S. 20 



31— Swarthmore H.S. 23 



^HXLI^IFSBURG- (XT. 

15— Easton Ex-High 11 
.31— All-Scholastic 9 
:20 — Crescent 22 
22— AUentown A.A. 16 
3»— Ex-Catholic H.S. 29 
21— Olivet 18 
23— Olivet 13 
42— Webster 17 



J.) TBAIVK. 

25 — Trenton Naf. 28 
18— Stroudsburg Nor. 10 
35 — Slatingtou Nor. 17 
33— AUentown YMCA. 33 
15 — Trenton Prof. 20 
14— Locust Gap 21 
38— All-Collegiate 9 



25— AUentown YMCA, 28 
16 — Stroudsburg Nor. 29 
35— Phila. Prof. 8^ 
21— Hazleton 34 
46 — Trenton Nat. 23 
12— Hazleton 9 
41— St. Peter's Coll. 14 



FINZ: GROVE (W. VA.) ATHI.BTIC ASSOCIATION. 

27— Smithfleld 8 5— Folsom 38 13— Sistersville H.S. 

17— Folsom 19 35— Folsom 6 17 — Folsom 24 



17— New Martinsville 18 
5— Sistersville H.S. 18 



35- 

42— New Martinsville 7 

19— Clarksburg 13 



18- 



-Sistersville 25 
-Clarksburg 14 



FITTSFIEIiD (SCE.) ATHI^ETIC ASSOCIATION-. 

37— Dexter A.A. 31 24— Dexter A.A. 33 19— Bangor Y.M.C.A. 16 

21— Skowhegan A.A. 16 41— Newport A.A. 14 31— Portland Y.M.C.A. 21 

27— Newport A.A. 89 43— Skowhegan A.A. 10 33— Maine Cent. Inst. 32 



I»ITTSTON (FA.) TEAM. 



22— Reading, E.L. 15 
41— Juniata 11 
•34— Rookwood 23 
29 — Fraekville 27 
24— DeNeri, E.L. 33 
23— Middletown 11 
37— Harrisburg 24 
47— New York Nat. 20 
27— Trenton. E.L. 45 
49 — Wilkes-Barre 9 
€1 — Phila. Crusaders 21 



33— Wyoming Sem. 17 
41— York 31 
40 — Nanticoke 19 
22— Reading. E.L. 30 
32— DeNeri, E.L. 42 
24— Wilkes-Barre 20 
44 — Bloomsburg Nor. 17 
23— Eastern L. All-St. 3: 
29 — Rookwood 23 
28— Middletown 22 
44 — Harrisburg 29 



20 — Hazleton 14 
50— Hazleton 13 
18 — Bloomsburg Nor. 13 
23— Nanticoke 40 
23— Wilkes-Barre 17 
49— Wyoming Sem. 23 
36— Nanticoke 23 
37— Freeland 20 
24 — Hazleton 10 
22— Wilkes-Barre 18 
31— Freeland 24 



FOI.TTECHNIC INSTITUTE, BROOKI»7N, N. 7. 

17— Pratt 24 22— Niagara 21 16— Crescent A'.C. 15 



16— Columbia 37 
9— Princeton 30 
16— St. Lawrence 47 



19— Crescent A.C. 31 
40— Yale Rovers 24 



17— Lehigh 61 
32— Poly. Alumni 10 



FOTSDAM (N. Y.) 

30— McGill Univ. 20 
42— St. Mary's Acad. 1 
60 — Ogdensburg Free 

Acad. 12 
24 — Normal Alumni 27 



NORSIAI. SCHOO]^. 

34_C.C.N.Y. 8 
45— Niagara Univ. 20 
72— Montreal YMCA. 21 
29— St. Mary's Acad. 18 



26— C.C.N. Y. 21 

28 — Dartmouth Fresh. 11 
48— Burlington H.S. 28 
67— Wingfoot A.C. 28 



208 



SPALDIXG-S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



PBESQUE ISIiE (IMLE.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

29— Ashland H.S. 16 4ft— Ashland H.S. 10 43— Washburne H.S. 13 

32 — Caribou H.S. IG 51 — Aroostook C. Inst. 19 26 — Caribou H.S. 2(» 

25 — AYashburne H.S. 14 39 — Aroostook C. Inst. 20 16— Rumford H.S. 34 



fbhtceton (n. j.) university. 



35 — Fordham 14 
3(» — Polv. Inst. 9 
20— Manhattan 14 
15 — Pennsylvania 22 
39 — Mittineague 

Y.M.C.A. 21 
22 — Dartmouth 27 



39— New York Univ. IS 
23— St. John's (Bklyn) 2; 
37 — Georgetown 21 
35— Columbia 24 
20— U. S. Mil. Acad. 31 
11 — Pennsylvania 14 
20— Columbia 10 



12 — Rochester 23 
18— Cornell 30 
:.'2— Yale 29 
23— Cornell 20 
21 — Dartmouth 13 
23— Yale 15 



BIDGWAY (FA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 



23— C.S.N. S. 57 
19— Brookville 49 
39— Beechwoods 28 
69— St. Mary's 9 
31— Alumni 30 
33 — Kane 57 
46 — Beechwoods 17 



62 — Business Men 43 

50 — Renovo 17 

33— C.S.N. S. 30 

35 — New Bethlehem 48 

75 — Dubois B.B. 7 

64— Pitt Fresh. 23 



47 — Johnsonburg 20 
45 — New Bethlehem 27 
32— Reynoldsvifle 35 
58— Brookville 26 
73— Kane 28 
62— Renovo 19 



BIDGEWOOD (N. J.) Y.M.C.A. 



39— Belleville YMCA. 44 
49— First Bap. of Pat. 39 
45 — Prospect P'k 28 
28— Belleville YMCA. 45 
23— Montclair YMCA. 47 
Se— Belleville YMCA. 41 
61— Cedar Cliff B.B.C. 23 



-Sokols. N. Y. 21 
-"C.M.S.", Hack. 88 
•Signet Six 15 



38 
31 

47 -..„„. 

44 — Invaders 25 

61— "C. M.S.". Hack. 13 

24— Clifton Train. S. 31 



2 — Passaic Boys' C. 
(for.) 
48— lona Five 33 
49 — Passaic Five 40 
56 — Wanderers 24 
29— Montclair YMCA. 41 



BIVEBHEAD 

66— No-rthport 8 54- 

36— Southampton H.S. IS 47- 

22 — Stuvvesant H.S. 47 54- 

33— All -Collegians 34 64- 

61— Pt. Jefferson H.S. 9 39- 



(N. Y.) HIGH SCHOOL FIRST TEAM. 



-Sag Harbor YMC. 22 
-Pt. Jeffers^on U.S. 23 
-Southampton H.S. 16 
-Northport 42 
-Greenport H.S. 30 



34 — Cyclones 25 
42 — Greenjiort H.S. 3 
34— Pierson H.S. 64 
25 — Pierson H.S. 32 



ROCHESTER (N. Y.) EASTERN HIGH SCHOOL. 



21 — Mechanics Inst. 9 
34— AlbioB H.S. 18 
20— U. of R. Res. 11 
32— Cathedral H.S. 10 
18— East H.S. Alum. 15 
25— Lafayette H.S. 10 



29— Masten Park H.S. 17 
8— Brockport Nor. S. 10 
27— Geneva H.S. 13 
27— Niag. Falls H.S. 21 
41 — Cascadilla Prep. S. 4 



15 — Cook Acad. 4 
38— Keuka Coll. 12 
11— Geneva H.S. 13 
29— Lafayette H.S. 36 
80— Masten Park H.S. 



RUMFORD (ME.) HIGH SCHOOL. 



74— Wilton Acad. 20 
.no_rhillips H.S. 6 
28— Little Falls H.S. 12 
41— Gould's Acad. 10 
30— Ft. Williams 16 
19 — Horace Mann 20 
67— Little Falls 8 



21 



-E. Little H. 
-Wilton H.S. 
-Abbott H.S. 19 
-Bethel H.S. 12 
-West. Sem. 18 
-Winthrop H.S. 60 



13— E. Little H.S. 18 



22— Portland H.S. 17 
46— Westbrook H.S. 26 
135— Phillips H.S. 6 
24— Coburn C.I. 23 
40— Deering H.S. 15 
34 — Presque Isle HS. 16 



RUTGERS FREFARATORY SCHOOL, NEW BRUNSWICK, 

28— Knights Gold. Cir. 17 20— Trenton St. Sch. 14 8— Kingsley 35 



N. X 



37 — Bound Brook H.S. 10 10 — Bordentown M.I. 31 
21— Bound Brook H.S. 19 21— South River H.S. 18 
18— Princeton Prep. 27 21— Somerville H.S. 23 



28— New Bruns. H.S. 12 
23— New Bruns. H.S. 18 
25— Trenton St. Sch. 39 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



209 



KUTHEBFORD (IT. 

e— Bloomflekl H.S. 7 
27— Blodmfiekl H.S. 
61— Orange H.S. 

7— Moutclair Mil. A. 6 

SETON HALI. COI.I.i:aE, SOUTH OUAJSfQJl, N. J. 



J.) HIGH SCKOOI.. 

14 — Hackensack H.S. 3 
39— Orauge H.S. 12 
&— Passaic H.S. 



13— Hackensack H.S. 

6— Passaic H.S. 22 
33— Passaic H.S. 27 



18— Maplewood F.C. 20 
35— Asb. Park YMCA. 19 
42— Univ. of Md. 21 
22— St. John's Coll. 31 
23— Cathedral Coll. 22 



2." — Asb. Park Lye. 20 
23— Niagara 15 
24— Fordham 18 
19— Int'l Y.M.C.A. 14 
23— Maplewood F.C. 13 



14— Cathedral Coll. 28 
24— Manhattan Coll. 14 
22— Bucknell 16 
52 — Drexel Inst. 14 



SHADYSIDE ACADEMY, FITTSBUBaH, FA. 

50— Beaver Falls 25 4.5— Allegheny Prep. 17 30 — Southside 35 

25— Beaver Falls 31 77— Allegheny Prep. 15 24 — Allegheny H.S. 18 

85— McKeesport 21 45— Sonthside 33 42— Allegheny H.S. 39 

36 — McKeesport 23 



SII.ENT WOBKEBS, 

80— Kent A.C. 4 
9 — Trenton Tigers 21 

85— Cadets 8 
2— Bryans 

72— Silent Work. Jr. 16 

16— Y.M.C.A. 82 

40— Cadets 8 

51— Olympic 3 



TBENTON, N. J. 

21 — Mercer Auto 11 

2— Fowler A.C. 

2— Y.M.C.A. 
25— Apha 32 

34 — INIonument Potterv 7 
10— Still house Rangers 17 
31— Trenton Tigers 15 
20— Stillhouse Rangers 26 



21— Alpha 17 
63— Coalport 
64— Rausher A.C. 3 
23— Lenoxville 14 

2— P.R.R. Shops 
36— Lambertville H.S. 14 

2 — Lambertville 



SaUTHEBN HiaH SCHOOL, FHH^ADEIiFHIA, FA. 



51— Sch. of Ped. 21 
20— Girard Coll. 25 
49 — Phlla. Trade Sch. 15 
12— Delancey Inst. 23 
25 — Swart h. Scrubs 14 
40— West Phila. H.S. 36 
24— Camden H.S. 27 



35— Northeast H.S. 31 
25— Roman Cath. H.S. 19 
42— Central H.S. 48 
28— Villanova Prep. 31 
16— West Phila. H.S. 14 
32— Girard Coll. 16 
20— Northeast H.S. 17 



26— West Chester Nor. 43 
38— Central H.S. 21 
16— West Phila. H.S. 14 
16— Camden H.S. 27 
34 — Pennington Sem. 27 
28— Northeast H.S. 22 
26— Central H.S. 30 



SOUTHSIDE HIGH SCHOOI., PITTSBUBGH, FA. 



41— Beaver Falls 25 




16— Allegheny H.S. 


43— Beaver Falls 31 




44— Allegheny H.S. 


26— Allegheny Prep. 


27 


33— Shadyside 45 


33— Allegheny Prep. 


25 





41 



SFABTANBUBG (S. C.) Y.M.C.A. 

21— Wofford Coll. 30 55— Greenville YMCA. 31 

47— Wofford Coll. 16 51— Monoghon YMCA. 19 

38— Wofford Coll. 41 



SFBIN-GVALE (ME.) TEAM. 



16— Haverhill 9 
36— Red Sox 5 
31— Franklin N.H. 9 
15 — Laconia 15 
30— Franklin N.H. 3 
30 — Maiden 27 
16 — Notre Dame 5 



1.3 — Laconia 15 
12 — Franklin, 18 
1.3— Portland 15 
17 — Waseca 10 
22— N. H. Coll. 13 
18 — Laconia Five 5 
29— Waseca 36 



STEEI.TON (FA.) HIOH SCHOOI^. 

44_Tamaqua H.S. 16 44- 

31— INIiddletown H.S. 14 21- 

21— York H.S. 20 70- 

36— Reading H.S. 11 42- 

26— Reading H.S. 27 31- 
20 — Tamaqua U.S. 17 



-Shippiiisburg N.S. 11 
-Lancaster H.S. 42 
-Shanahan Club 18 
-Alumni 30 
-Harrisburg Tech. 21 
3 — Harrisburg Cent. 21 



3.-5— Shadyside 30 
30 — McKeesport 22 
45 — McKeesport 32 



33_Charlotte YMCA. 47 
19— Charlotte YMCA. 45 



9 — Notre Dame 13 
63 — Keunebunk 11 

8— Haverhill 17 
50_North Berwick 12 
48— Saco 13 
40-^Portland 22 
30— Fort Williams 16 



49— Lebanon H.S. 21 

28— Lebanon H.S. 22 

37— York H.S. 22 

34 — Lancaster 20 

47 — Harrisburg Tech. 17 

32— Harrisburg Cent. 33 



210 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



ST. GABBtEIi'S TEAM, NHW YOBE CITY. 

§6— Williainsbridge 21 46— St. Michael's. Hob. 3a 50- 

^1— Park Circle 13 38— St. Michael's, Hob. 32 IS- 

IS— Harrison 27 
56 — Poughkeepsie 14 
34— Gootl Council 20 
31 — Knickerbockers 21 
18 — St. Stephens 15 
30— St. Stephens 19 
30— Crescents, Pat. 49 
66 — Trinity Trian. 6 
45— St. Malachy 15 
22— St. Malachy 20 
38— Montfort Ly. 14 
20— Olvmpia A.C. 23 
«5— Inter-City 26 
38- Yonkers A. A. 28 
17 — Troys, Hob. 28 



46— St. Michael's. Hob. 35 
38- St. Michael's, Hob. 32 
IS— 4th Sep. Co., Yon. 18 
14— 4th Sep. Co., Yon. 11 
15 — 4th Sep. Co., Yon. 22 
34— Corona Mystics 8 
36 — Separates. Bay. 22 
33— 7th Co., Conn. 32 
21— 7th Co., Conn. 38 
16— 6th Co., Conn. 21 
33— 6th Co., Conn. 14 
32— Point A.C. 17 
59— Mosholu C.C. 16 
25— St. James' Trian., 

Bklvn. 26 
21— St. James' Trian., 

Bklyn. 27 



-Cathedral Sep. 30 
-St. James' Trian., 

Bklyn. 25 
-St. James' Trian., 

Bklyn. 36 
-St. James' Trian., 

Bklvn. 22 
-Cortland, N.Y. 17 
-Cortland, N.Y. 23 
-Cortland, N.Y. 32 
-Oswego. N.Y. 24 
-Oswego, N.Y. 21 
-Bay View 24 
-Bay View 29 
-St. Michael's, Bk. 19 
-St. Michael's. Bk. 17 
-St. Michael's, Bk. 27 



ST. JOSEPH'S OOIiIiEGE, PHII.ADEI;FHIA, FA. 



Ift— Camden H.S. 13 
23— Catholic H.S. 17 
17— U. P. Fresh. 21 
37— St. Peter's Coll. 6 
22 — Pennington Sem. 15 
19— St. Joseph's C.C. 31 
22— P.I.D. 13 



47 — Brown Prep. 7 
21— Atlantic Citv H.S. V 
21— Catholic H.S. 20 
17 — Perkiomen Sem. 37 
28— Glrard Coll. 23 
19— Camden H.S. 28 



22— Northeast Man. 24 
15— Penna. Mil. Coll. 36 
3.5— Temple Univ. 24 
20— Muhlenberg Coll. 46 
22— Catholic H.S. 24 
34— Alumni 9 



ST. I.AWXIENCE 17NIVEBSITY, CANTON, N. Y. 



9.3— McGill Univ. 7 
4.5— C.C. N.Y. 20 
55— Ottawa Univ. 13 
31— Niagara 10 
46^R.P.I. 17 
30 — St. John's 20 



-U. S. Mil. Acad. 23 31— R.P.I. 16 



22 — Manhattan 11 
47— Brooklyn Poly. 16 
28— St. John's 20 
34— Crescent A.C. 18 
og_c.c.N.Y. 22 



23— Syracuse 29 
17 — Union 25 
20— Colgate 26 
17— \Yesleyan 30 



ST. PAUIi'S ACADEMY PBEFS., PORTSMOUTH, VA. 

?1 — Independents 5 16 — Shamrocks 15 21— Oceana A. A. 9 

2— Gosiwrts 19— Port Norfolk H.S. 7 4.",— independents 11 

22— Port Norfolk H.S. 4 35— Mercurv A.C. 7 19— Port Norfolk H.S. 

30— Mercury A.C. 5 

SWABTHMOBE (PA.) COIiLEGE. 

30— Univ. of Md. 15 25— U. of Pittsburgh 31 

37— Pratt Inst. 24 12— U. S. Naval Acad. 31 

24— Union Coll. 28 29— Penn State 26 

IS— U. S. Mil. Acad. 21 

TAMAQUA (PA.) HIGH SCHOOI.. 

27— Easton H.S. 20 25 — Lebanon H.S. 17 

17_v;teelti)n H.S. 20 34— Mauch Chunk H.S. 23 

32— Shenandoah H.S. 13 20— Wilkes-Barre H.S. 28 
20— Shamokin H.S. 22 



17 



26_Lehigh 36 

16 — Pennsylvania 15 

31— Lehigh 32 



19— Hazleton H.S. 29 
18— Shenandoah H.S. 17 
28— Lancaster H.S. 27 



TABBYTOWN (N. 

24— Tiger A.C. 33 
32— Dayspring 18 
36— Calverts 53 
52— St. Mark's 10 
39— Peeksklll 8 
41_4th Sep. Co. 38 
37 — Pleasantville 5 
68— St. Peter's 3o 
36— White Plains 35 



Y.) Y.M.C.A. 

43— Fort Slocum 20 
23— White Plains 67 
36— Yonkers A. A. 62 
26— Ossining 18 
18— Pleasantville 20 
18— New Bedford 90 
52— Tiger A.C. 18 
37— Claremonts 23 
64 — Daysprings 19 



35— White Plains 33 
IS— Wash. Heights 46 
41— Dion A.C. 20 
35 — Temco Five 18 
43 — Kappa Kappa 33 
34— Yonkers A. A. 38 
85 — Pleasantville 22 
21 — Ossining 26 
32— W.I. H.S. 24 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



211 



TEAlfl^ECX (N. J.) CLUB. 

25— C. M.S. 32 28— Oritani F.C. 30 59— Lodi Y.M.L. 6 

32— C. M.S. 21 21— Cresskill Y.M.C.A. 15 2— Turners 

25— P. P. Arrows 19 40— Clintons 45 20— Englewood Cubs 19 

19— P. P. Arrows 18 49— Dumont 8 56 — Dumont 32 

44— Mohawk A.C. 15 



'THZ: FIiIEBS," TOTTENVIIiLE, N. Y. 



11 — Iroquois 15 

21— South River A.C. 32 

32 — New Brunswick 

C.C. 20 
33— Parish House A. A. 24 
57 — Goodwill Ass'n 4 
07 — Iroquois 14 
32— Tottenville A.C. 10 



35 — Iroquois 14 

21 — Somersets 15 

23— Xaviers 19 

13— Sterling A. A. 18 

14— Rahwa.v Y.M.C.A. 30 

28— Eflizabeth YMCA. 17 

IS— Owl Five 9 

51— Richmond A.C. 10 



29 — Parish House A.A. 20 
45 — Bayvlews 19 

Parish House A.A, 9 



-Sterling A.A. 23 
-College Settlement 21 
-Sterling A.A. 29 
-Tottenville A.C. 34 



TRINITY TBIANGIiES, BBOOKI.YN, IT. Y. 

45— Our Lad.y of Mercy 6 

37— All-Avonias 2 

40 — €\eystone 8 

24— Holy Trinity 7 

40 — Colonials 1 

24 — Delmar Heavies 25 

68— Clover 11 

40 — Nadrier 4 

49— St. Paul 34 

50 — Seneca 4 

42 — Glenmore 7 

18— Boys' Club 16 

26— Brook. Cent. 12 

39 — Madisons 11 

TWENTY-PIBST COMPANY TEAM, PORT SIiOCTTM, N. 

29— 6th Co. 2 53— 6th Co. 10 83— eth Co. 13 

1»— 25th Co. 17 29— 25th Co. 9 36— 25th Co. 20 

37— 4th Co. 9 34— 4th Co. 17 44— 4th Co. 16 

14— 2nd Co. 15 14— 2nd Co. 8 39— 2nd Co. 15 

UNDERHII.I. BUSINESS SCHOOI., ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



37— Newkirks 11 
40 — K. of Progress 10 
31 — Delmar Heavies 12 
28 — Ariston 9 
45 — Spurgeon Leaguers 18 
43— Mystic Five 12 
39— Suffern Heavies 54 
24— Boys' Club 22 
22— Maplewood F.C. 27 
25— Windsor 19 
28— Poplar Five 10 
41 — Long Island City 
A.C. 12 



41 — Lindwood 24 
40— Centrals 16 
39— Delmar Heavies 16 
15— Boys' Club 15 
21— St. Vin. de Paul 23 
34— Parsons 23 
36— Boys' Club 18 
42— St. Vin. de Paul 29 
13— Visitation Heavies 25 
33— Bronx Ch. Ho. 34 
26— Browne's B. Coll. 14 
32— E. D. Turn Verein 8 
8— Visitation 9 



24— Pitsford H.S. 12 
19_Newark H.S. 38 
18— Albion H.S. 21 
23— Webster H.S. 14 
IS — Spencerport H.S. 
19— Cook Acad. 21 



17 



33 — CanandaiguaAcad. 25 
37— Cook Acad. 27 
14— Geneseo Nor. 42 
26^-Springwater H.S. 20 
12— Cathedral H.S. 27 
22 — Mechanics lust. 20 



29— Ro<>hester Theo. 

Sem. 19 
74 — Newark H.S. 8 
32 — Mechanics Inst. 26 
52— Beth Israel Coll. 13 



UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY, WEST POINT, N. Y. 



35— Yonkers Y.M.C.A. 15 
23— St. Lawrence 22 
22— Pennsylvania 13 
32— Manhattan Coll. 15 



31 — Princeton 20 43— Fordham 19 

29 — Wesleyan 24 .30— Rochester 14 

21 — Swarthmore IS 21— Union 22 

26— Colgate 22 29— New York Univ. 21 

UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY, ANNAPOLIS, MD. 

44— Bait. Med. Coll. 22 49— Crescent A.C. 7 31— Swarthmore 12 

59— Catholic Univ. 33 56— Lehigh 17 46— St. John's (Md.) 30 

74— New York Univ. 18 55— St. John's (Bklyn) 30 67— Georgetown 18 

U. S. S. NEW HAMPSHIRE TEAM. 

12— Central 48 0— Navy 2 (for.) 23 — Army 43 

32— Central 34 19— Hampton 30 29— Army 20 

26— Central 44 43— Hampton 15 23— Newport News 33 

5 — Navy 83 37 — Hampton 19 2 — Newp. News (for.) 

17— Navy 22 75 — Army 25 2 — Newp. News (for.) 



212 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



UNIVERSITY OP PENNSTTLVAlfflA, FHII.ADEZ.FSIA, PA. 

14— Lehigh 26 20— Dajtmouth 17 14— Yale 31 

22 — Princeton 15 14 — Princeton 11 21 — Dartmouth 2S 

13— U. S. Mil. Acad. 23 18— Cornell 26 8— Columbia 13 

18— Pittsburgh 22 13— Rochester 23 9— Cornell 17 

25 — Westinghouse 23 19— Syracuse 31 15 — Swarthmore 16 

26— Indians 12 27 — Yale 22 13— Columbia 25 



UNIVERSITY OP 

22 — Pennsylvania 18 
43— Juniata 29 
26— State 30 
30 — Westinghouse 18 
31— Geneva 19 
38— Bellefonte 23 
43— Mt. Union 21 
32— Georgetown 26 



PITTSBURGH, PITTSBURGH PA. 

25— Mt. St. Mary's 20 20— Penn State 31 

27— Gettysburg 11 .30— Wooster 29 

24— Frank, and Marsh. 17 32— Wash, and Je£f. 19 

31— Swarthmore 25 30— W. Va. Wes. 29 

25— Lehigh 39 24— Allegheny 29 

22 — Reserve 23 29 — Westinghouse 25 

25— Bucknell 15 31— Wash, and Jeff. 19 

.30— Bellefonte 35 19— Allegheny 35 



UNIVERSITY OP ROCHESTER, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



13— Cornell 8 
36— Toronto 31 
30— Alumni 8 
26— Union 25 
31— Colgate 37 



21— Union 23 

23 — Pennsylvania 13 

52— Gettysburg 7 

2.3 — Princeton 12 

34— New Y^ork Univ. 16 



18— C.C.N. Y. 23 
14— U. S. Mil. Acad. 30 
12— Oberlin 10 
17— Colgate 21 



UNIVERSITY OP VIRGINIA, CHARLOTTESVUiIiE, VA. 



40— Gallaudet 11 

35 — Hampden-Sidney 4 

55 — Randolph-Macon 12 

65— M.A.C. 1 

53— A. and M. 10 



39— Va. Mil. Inst. 15 
22 — Georgetown 16 
33— Trinity 11 
28- Wash, and Lee 43 
30— U. of N. C. 19 



.32— Catholic Univ. 41 
19 — Georgetown 26 
21— St. John's 37 
39 — Geo. Washington 14 
44 — Frank, and Marsh. 2 



"VELVET" TEAM, KENNEBUNK, ME. 

26— Kennebunk Post 16 20— Biddeford Hib. 8 
30— Springvale N.P. 7 17— Portland Rovers 28 

6 — Westbrook Sem. 10 9 — Biddeford 8 



21— Westbrook Sem. 20 
57— Old Orchard A. A. 13 
44 — Lincoln Five 11 



VICTORIANS OP 
N. Y. 

29— Federals 20 

38— Mil fords 14 

.30— Del a vans 17 

4.5 — Triangles 9 

26— Yankees 25 

27 — Fnstons 11 

28— Holy Names 2d 24 

2 — Kingston Res. 
27— Milfords 5 
19— Federals 28 
16 — Rosewoods 15 
27 — Fargos 24 
2S— No. 17 Sch. 21 
22— All-Sages 12 
46— Sheldnns 17 
26 — Rexfords 14 
24— Troop 2 18 



ST. JOHN'S PROTECTORY, LACKAWANNA, 



38 — Foxtons 2 

40 — Kingston Res. 10 

17_A11-Sages 23 

2.5— West H. Midgets 

29 — Delaware Jrs. 14 

44 — Delaware Jrs. 18 

17— AU-Arouud Jrs. 23 

31— Sheldons 13 

34— Holv Fam. Midg. 32 

49— All-Sages 9 

42— Also Res. 22 

41— Emeralds 26 

24— No. 32 Sch. 2 

30— Eltryms 35 

3.5 — Marvels 19 

23— Alcos 34 

48— Holy Fam. Res. 28 



50 — Woodsides 
23— Ail-Around Jrs. 24 
44— No. 29 Sch. 31 

2 — Col. Lightweights 
55— Atlantics 13 
27— Hilltops 5 
27— Pioneers 22 
28— B.S.A. Troop 2 14 
3.5— Rexfords 24 
42— No. 28 Sch. 8 
40— Prospect Y.M.C.A. 20 
14 — Ottawas 22 

2— Rices 
34— Niagara Univ. 22 
42 — Delaware Jrs. 16 
27 — Triangles 13 



SrALDINGS OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 
VISITATION FABISH CI.UB, BROOKI.Y1I-, N. T. 



213 



32— Saranac 2 

45— Eagles 

49 — Wanderers 7 

12 — St. Bren. Arrows 18 

2— St. Patrick's (for.) 
12— St. Bren. Arrows 17 
25 — Avonias 2 
32— Mercury A. A, 7 
37— Olive Triangles 11 

2— St. Patrick's (for.) 



-St. Stephen's Cubs 33 
-Olive Triangles 8 
-Warwick Cubs 

(for.) 
-Trinity Circles 22 
-St. Stephen's Cubs 23 
-St. .James' JHNS. 11 
-Brook. Separates 11 



21— Overlands 20 



21— Y.M.C.C. 26 
11— St. Paul's Circles 12 
35— Trinity Cubs 7 
22— Boys' Club, N.Y. 22 
34— Maxwell House 10 
40— Bay Ridge 4 
2 — St. James Mabatmas 

<» (for.) 
12— Jr. H.N.S. 4 



VISITATION PARISH HEAVYWEIGHTS, 

29— Trinity A. A. IS 
28— Cathedral 16 
39 — Diamond Five 12 
19— St. Peter's C.L.A. 17 
37— N. Y. Fire Dept. 9 
22— St. Peter's C.L.A. 14 
32— St. Veronica's 16 
•26— St. Michael's 30 
44— St. Paul's 20 
22— Trinity A. A. 20 
35— N.Y. Health Dept. 14 



35— All-Avonias 13 
31 — Queensboro 7 
19— Cathedral 11 
7 — St. Brenden's 7 
2.3— St. Michael's 46 
12— St. Brenden's 18 
23— St. Michael's 14 
39— Calmar 28 
.50 — New Brunswick 17 
37— St. Malachy's 12 
18— St. Michael's 12 



BBOOKI.YN, N. Y. 

22— St. Malachy's 12 
25— Trinity Triangles 13 
34 — Mayflowers 4 
26— Cathedral Sep. 23 
27— St. George's 23 

2— CentraFY.M.C.A. 
(for.) 

9— Trinity Triangles 8 
38— Cedarhurst 12 

7 — St. Brenden's 7 



WASECA CI.UB, AUBURN, ME. 



91- Riverside A.C. 9 
.53 — Fort Williams 21 
30— Franklin H.S. 20 
23— Franklin H.S. 23 
30— Franklin H.S. 17 
65— Augusta All-Stars 26 
49— Westbrook A.C. 16 
59— So. Portland 36 



36 — Springvale 29 
20— Augusta All-Stars 12 
49— New Hamp. Ind. 28 
10 — Springvale 17 
29— Watterville Five 18 
20 — Notre Dame 27 
24— Newton Y.M.C.A. 19 



.50— Pettingill's Com. 20 
34— Haverhill 21 
35— Notre Dame 22 
38— Pettingill's Com. 7 
39— Fall River 25 
3.3— Portland A.C. 16 
34 — Foresters 11 



WASHINGTON COZ.I.EGE, CHESTERTQWN, MD. 

11— Bait. Med. 54 28— Wilmington Conf. 14— St. John's 64 

8— Mt. St. Joseph's 25 Acad. 25 20 — Bait. Med. 37 

17— Bait. Poly. 19 21— Mt. St. Joseph's 22 27— Delaware 14 
10— St. John's 86 36— Johns Hopk. Ind. 20 

WASHINGTON (PA.) HIGH SCHOOI^. 

24 — Wilkinsburg 40 34 — East Liberty 49 .3.3 — Central 19 

29— Wllkinsburg 26 27— East Liberty 33 .39— Fifth Ave. 42 

14— Peabody 34 27— Central 43 16— Fifth Ave. ^8 
4— Peabody 35 



wesST CHESTER (PA.) STATE NORIVKAI^ SCHOOL. 



29 — Alumni 14 
31 — Chester Co. Teach. 
24— Rookwood 21 
3.5— St. Paul's 24 
30— Greystock Res. 25 



27— All-Scholastics 19 
10 2.5— Williamson Sch. 29 
37— Brown Coll. Preps, i 
3.3— All-Scholastics 21 
19— Williamson Sch. 18 



38— Central H.S. 24 
31— George Sch. 25 
4.3— So. Manual U.S. 22 
4.5— George Sch. 22 
34— N. E. Manual 19 



WHEELING (W. VA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

47— Wellsburg H.S. 13 3.5— Fairmont 18 

18— New Phila. 25 21 — East Liverpool 30 

28— Martin's Ferry 18 31— Parkersburg 19 

43— Bellaire 20 40— Sistersville 16 

19— Sistersville 12 33 — East Liverpool 23 



30— Wellsburg 25 
25— Bellaire 8 
19 — Martin's Ferry 24 
31— Faculty 15 



214 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASKET BALL GUIDE. 



WrLKOTSBUBG (FA.) HIGH SCHOOI.. 



18— Peabody H.S. 36 
33— E. Liberty Acad, 32 
18 — E. Liberty Acad. 44 
31 — Youngstown 45 
35— Central H.S. 21 
28— Peabody H.S. 26 



28— Central H.S. 21 
40— Fifth Ave. H.S. 25 
18— Central H.S. 15 
33— Sbadyside Acad. 38 
45 — Sbadyside Acad. 41 
27— Sbadyside Acad. 24 



41— Cbarleroi H.S. 22 
26 — Alumni 20 
24— Braddock 27 
40— Washington H.S. 24 
oo_Fjfth Ave. H.S. 26 
26— Washington H.S. 29 
34— Fifth Ave. H.S. 28 

WII.I.IAMS01T SCHOOI., FHII.ADX:i.PHIA, FA. 

-2S— Coll. of Pbar. 22 18— West Chester Nor. 19 28— Peddie 34 

31_West Chester Nor. 24 29— Roman Cath. H.S. 24 39— George Sch. 27 

37_Central H.S. 29 45— Suburban A.C. 14 75— Brown Prep. 16 

WII.I.IAMSFOBT (PA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

37— Bucknoll Acad. 15 45 — Milton F.G.P. 35 34 — Lock Haven Nor. 4 

36_Miltou F.G.F. 15 82— Wellsboro H.S. 6 60— Williamsport Big 



n— York H.S. 14 

>6 — Lock Haven Nor. 7 



-York H.S. 18 
-Bucknell Acad. 



Five 44 



WII.MIITGTON (DEI..) CONTEBENCE ACADEIVTY. 

19 — New Castle H.S. 13 25— Washington Coll. 28 17— Wilm'gton Friends 53 



45— Smyrna H.S. 11 
46— Milford H.S. 1 
20— Wilmington H.S. 27 



30 — Wilmington H.S. 45 
19— New Castle H.S. 21 
55— Milford H.S. 7 



36 — Camden Sch. 9 
33 — Salesianum H.S. 



14 



WHiMIITGTON (DEL.) FBIEITDS' SCHOOL. 



€3— Kennett Sq. H.S. 10 
18— Alumni 20 
33— Elkton H.S. 20 
31— Swarthmore H.S. 18 
126— Friends' Sel. Sch. 32 
12— Chester H.S. 22 

WYOMING (FA.) 

35 — Alumni 31 
44 — Keystone Acad. IS 
27 — Perkiomen 31 
17— Pittston 33 



25— Temple Coll. 23 
21— Friends' Sel. Sch. 13 
26— Cedarcroft Sch. 11 
45 — Germantown Fr'ds 20 
24 — Swarthmore Prep. 27 
21— Woodbury H.S. 9 

SBMINASY. 

18— Wilkes-BarreSS 
38— Mansfield Nor. 18 
31 — Keystone Acad, 30 



22— Coatesville H.S. 14 . 
29— Chester H.S. 28 
53 — Wilmington Conf. 

Acad. 17 
12— Cedarcroft Sch. 21 
21 — Swarthmore Prep. 15 



49 — Dickinson Sem, 
23— Pittston 49 
4 — Wilkes-Barre 1 



TOBK (FA.) COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE. 

10— Hanover H.S. 23 21— Ste'<VarTS\OAvn 19 

21 — Fawn Grove 11 2 — Fawn Grove 43 

42— Stewartstown 4 38— Columbia H.S. 23 

14— Hanover H.S. 12 20— P. R,R. Y.M.C.A. 19 

42— Ex. Y.C.I. 20 



43— Gettysburg H.S. 13 
12— F. and M. Acad. 23 
13— York H.S. 46 
13— York H.S. 20 



GUARANTEES 



THE SRALDING(fefTBADE:iyiARir^ 



The Spalding Official Basket BaU 




THE ONLY 

OFFICIAL 

BASKET BALL 



WE GUARANTEE 

this ball to be perfect in mo 
terial and workmanship arid 
correct in shape and size 
when inspected at our fac- 
tory. If any defect is dis- 
covered during the fir^t game 
in which it is used, or during 
the first day's practice use, 
and, if returned at once, we 
will replace same under this 
guarantee. We do not guar- 
antee against ordinary. wear 
nor against defect in shape or 
size that is not discovered im- 
mediately after the first day' a 



OFFICIALLY ADOPTED AND STANDARD The co^^^^^^^ £ainl:nlSTeatlir 

capless ends, and of the finest and most careiully selected Pebb'e gram r. b ^^^ 

We take the entire output of this superior grade of l^^f^^^f^Y^Sra h^^^^^ made 

in the Official Basket Ball use the choicest parts of each hide ™ '^^^^//^J';^ Each ball 
especially for this ball of extra qtiahty pure P^ra libber (not compounQea^i^^ 
packed complete, in sealed box, with rawhide ace ^nf l^cmg "ef ^^^^^ unif^ 

feet in every detail. , To provide that all official ^^^ntest^ may be held under a^^^ ^^^^ 

conditions, it is stipulated that this ball must be used in all match games ot eitner men ^ 

No. M. Spalding "Official" Basket Ball. Each, $6.00 



ixiract from Men's Oiiicia] Rule Book 

Rule II-Ball. 
Sec. 3. The ball made by A. G. Spald- 
ing & Bros, shall be the o fficial ba ll. 
Official balls will be ^g gj-ici3> v 
stamped as here with . /^ CNiJT) ) 
and wiJL^ in sealed V^SSP^^ 
boxes. ^^ "^ 

^0. 4 The official ball must be 
«Md is aU match games. 



Extract irom 
Ofiicial Collegiate Rule Book 

The Spalding Official Basket 
Ball No. M is the official 
ball of the yolffv. 
Intercollegi- ^^' — 
ate Basket 

Ball Associa- . 

tion, and must be used in all 
mi^ 



Extract Irom Women's Official Rule Book 

Rule II-Ball. 
Sec. 3. The ball made by A. G.Spald- 
ing & Bros shall be the official ball 
Official balls will be 
stamped as herewith, 
and will be in sealed. 

boxes. ' ; . 

Sec. 4 The official ball must b» 
used in all match sramea. 



PROMPT ATTEHTIOH GIVEN TO 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

WDBESSEBTOUS 



A.G.SPALDING &, BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



fOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OF THIS BOOK 



'Trt^^U^^ffectJuly 5, 1913. Subject to change without notice For Canadian prices see 



special Canadian Calaloeue, 



..,^^;t3t"e the SPALDING^tgJTRADEIVIARK ^rAiTif 



SpaMia^ Basllet Ball® 





Spalding "Special" No. E 

No. E. Imported pebble grain leather case. Elxtra heavy 
gucu'anteecl pure Para rubber bladder (not compounded). 
Complete in box, with rawhide lace and lacing needle. 
Superior to any other except our No. M Official Ball. 

Each. $4.00 

Spalding "Official" 
Basket Ball Goals 

No. 80. Officially adopted and 
must be used in all match games. 
Pair. $4.00 
No. 90. This ia the only drop 
forged goal made, to the best of 
our knowledge. We can guaran- 
tee that even under the heaviest 
and most severe use it will not 
break. Same size basket, and 
brace same length as on official 
goals. Ejctra heavy nets. This is the 
style goal that should be used in 
all large gymnasiums. Pair. $5.00 




No. 80 

Extract from Offki&l 

Rule Book 

.RULE III.- COALS 

Sec. 3. The goal made 

by A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

•hall be the official goal. 

Sec. 4. The official goal 
must be used in all match 
games, 

Spalding Practice Goals 

No. 70. Japanned Iroiv Flings and Brackets. Complete 
with nets. . . Per pair. $3.00 

Spalding Nets, Separate, for Goals 

Heavy twine; hand knitted; white. The same as supplied 
with No. 80 Goals Per pair. 50c. 

Spalding Bladders 

Guaranteed Quality 
Pure Para rubber (not compounded), and are 

guaranteed. 
No. CM. For Nos. M and E balls. Each, $1.50 
No. A, For No. 18 ball. ... " 1.00 | 

Spalding Canvas Holder 

No. Oil For carrying an inflated basket ball. 
Each, $1.00 



Spalding "Practice" No. 18 

No. 18. Good quality leather cover. Each ball complete 
in bos with pure Para rubber bladder (not compounded). 
guaranteed; rawhide lace and lacing needle. Each. $3.00 

Spalding Detachable Basket 
Ball Goals 




Pat. Mar 25. 1909 Fittings on No. SO Goal* 

No. 50. Detached readily from the wall or upright. 

leaving no bbstrucuon to interfere with other games or" 

with general gyinnasium work. Same size basket, and 

brace. same Je^gth sis on official goals. Per pair, $6.0(1 



jSpalding Referees* Whistles 




No. 7. Nickel-plated, heavy metal whisths. The most 

satisfactory and loudest of any . Each. 50c 

No. 4 HornWhistle. nickel-plated, heavy metal " 75c 
No. 3. Nickel-plated, special deep tone. . . " 75c 

No. 2. Very reliable, popular design. . ' . . " 2Sc 

Spalding Basket Ball Score Books 

No. 1. Paper cover, 10 games Each, 10c 

No. 2. Cloth cover, 23 games " 25c 

No. A. Collegiate, pap^ cover. 10 games. . " 10c 

No. B. Collegiate, cloth cover, 23 games. , , " 25c 



PROMPT AHENTIOX GIVEN TO 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDBESSED TO US 



A. G.SPALDING &. BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STDRES 
SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 
OF THIS BOOi 



"Pricti In tfftcl July 5, 191,3, Subject to change without notice. For C(i.nadian prices tee tpedal Canadian Citalogae. 



iSuUHESPALDINGlf 



ITRADE-MARK'S 




paldlE^g Oasfeet Oall 



s^ee rads ai^d Protectors 



No. 9KP. Solid leather knee cap. heavily 
padded with felt. Conforms to curve of 
knee. Leather strap-and-buckle for fasten- 
ing. . . . ?^ix,%3.SQi^S39.00 Doz.Prs. 

No KP. Made entirely of felt. Otherwise 
similar to No. 9KP. 

Pair. $2.00 * S2J.60 Doz. Prs.. 



No. KE. Combined 
knee pad and 
elastic bandage. 
Leather covered 
roll style pad- 
ding, complete with 
elastic knee bandage, 
which holds pad in 
place and gives addi- 
tional support. 

Pair. $2.50 
^ S27.00 Dos. Pra. 



No. KG. Combined knee 
pad and elastic bandage. 
Canvas covered knee 
pad, lined with heavy 
felt, with elastic band- 
age at top and bottom. 
Pair. $1.00 
i^SIO.SO Dos. Pairs 




No. KC 



No. 1. Knee Pad, knit knee piece, heavily 
padded with woolskin. . . . Pair. 75c. 

The prices printed in italics opposite items marked with # 
will be quoted only on orders (or one- halt dozen or »^reat 
one time. Quantity prices NOT allowed on items NOT 
marked with -k 



PBOMPTAnENTIDXGIVENTOl 

JiNY COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDRESSED TO US 



A. G.SPALDING &, BROS 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



I FOR COMPUTE USr OF STDRES 

SEE INSIDE FBONTIiOVa 

OF THIS Boot 



'Prices in tffeci J(du 5.191,3. Sukiect to change VUhout t»U(e. For QnnoJ/an prieei «ee x 



ASSUME SPALDING 



^x 



mi 



^)JTRADEMARK'=rr,?v'' 







Basket BsiU 



No. 6B 




No. 7B 



No. 6B. Good quality, either 
Gray or White flannel, padded 
lightly on hips; very loose fit- 
ting. Pair, $1.75 -^ S/S.90> Doz. 

No. 5B. Heavy Brown or White 
canvas, padded lightly on hips ; 
very loose fitting. 

Pair, $1.00 -^ $10. SO Doz. 

No, 7B. White silesia, hips pad- 
ded ; loose fitting. 

Pair, lSc.-kSS.W Doz, 

No. 40P. Padded knee length 
pants. White silesia. 

Pair, $1.00 * SIO.SO Dos. 

No. 40. Similar to No. 40P, but 
unpadded. 

Pair, 75c. * $S.10 Doz. 

Stripes down sides of any of 
above pants, extra. 

Pair, 2^<i.i^S2.10 Doz. 




No. 40P 



paldsBTi^ TSmiimlb Protector 




No. T. Substantial support for thumb and wrist; will answer for either right 
or left hand Each, 50c. 

The prices printed in italics opposite items marked irith ir wili be quoted onhi on orders Jor 
one-half dozen or mure. Quantity prices NOT alloucd on items NOT marhtd ivith • 



PROMPT AHENTIDli GIVEN to! 

m COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDRESSED TO US 



A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STjORES 

SEE INSIOE FRONT COVER 

OF THIS BOOH 



"Prica In tffecl fuly 5, 191 J. Subject (o change wUhoul notice. For Canadian price* tu ipecial Canadian Calglogau 



liiliii!litiill'll!I.KW J=H.iJ«H=i!iiimii*ll 






Basket Ball SSnoes 

Spalding "Sprinting" Basket Ball Shoes 
No. BBS. Made with flexible shank, on same principle as on 
"sprinling" base ball and foot ball shoes. Extremely light 
in weight, well finished inside. Improved patented pure 
gum thick rubber suction soles, with reinforced edges, 
absolutely guaranteed to give satisfaction with reasonable 
use. Lace extremely far down. Uppers of best quality 
black genuine kangaroo leather. Light, flexible and 
durable. Strictly bench made. Supplied on special order 
only, not carried in stock. Per pair, $S.OO^ $7.50 per pair. 

On orders for five pairs or more, price in italici, preceded by it will apply. 

SPECIAL NOTICE -In a game like basket ball, which is played 
generally on board floors, there is a strain on the feet altogether different 
from that in almost any other athletic game, and to support this strain, 
properly made shoes with leather uppers and correctly shaped soles are 
absolutely necessary. It is a fact that players on many teams wear can- 
vas top shoes and we supply in our No. P shoes, listed below, absolutely 
the best canvas top basket ball shoes ever made, and the same style as 
worn by some very successful teams, but from our long experience in 
catering to athletes and watching closely, as we have done, the develop- 
ment of basket ball and its effects on the physical condition of players, 
we cannot consistently recommend canvas top shoes for any athletic use 
and especially not for basket ball. 



No.AB. High cut. 
drab calf. Blucher 
cut; heavy suction 
soles, superior 
quality. 

Per pair. $5.00i 



No.BBL. Ladies*. 
High cut. black 
chrome leather, 
good quality suc- 
tion soles. 

Per pair. $4.5Q 



Spalding Special Canvas Top Basket Ball Shoes 

Special quality soft rubber soles. These soles absolutely 
hold on the most slippery floor. Light weight, durable,, 
i correct in design 
' No. P. Per pair. $4.00 * $43.20 Dozen pairs. 

On orders fur five pairf or more, price in italics, preceded ^l/ ♦ wUl apply. 




PflOMPT AnENTlOX GIVEN TO 

m COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDRESSED TO US 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



rOA COMPLETE UST OF STORES 

SE£ INSIDE FRONT COVEI 

OF THIS BOOK 



Prtoa In tfftU July 5. iti^.' Suijtel lo <Jms« VUhoul ooUps. fbr Qipadiaa priea mt tpedd QuiaJian dlologu 



SUBSTITUTE 



THE SPALDING 



SPAILPEHG CANVAS TOP BASMET BAIUL SMOES 



No. HH 



No. HH. High cut white canvas uppers. Sole 
surface is similar to our popular gymnasium 
shoes, but of white, best quality rubber, twice 
as thick as on rubber sole canvas gymnasium 
shoes. Men's sizes, 6 to 12, inclusive. 
Per pair, $2.25 * $2-f.30 Dos. 
No. HHB. Boys', 2;i 

to 5, '2, inclusive. Other- 
wise same as No. HH. 
Per pair. $2.00 
* $n.60 Do:. 
No. HHX. Youths'. II 
to 2, inclusive. Other- 
wise same as No. HH. 
Per pair, $1.80 
ic $19.44 Doz. 
No. H. Men's, same 
as No. HH, but low cut. 
Sizes, 6 to 12, inclusive. 
Per pair, $2.00i 
•k $21.60 Doz! 
Otherwise £s No. H. | No. HX. Youths', 11 to 2, 



:v 



Boys', 2^ to bYz, inclusive 

Per pair, 41.75 * $18. 



No. H. I No 
->0 Doz. I 



inclusive. 
Per pair. 



Otherw 
$1.60 • 



ise as No. \\ 
$17.28 Doz. 



SPALBSHG CAHVAS SMOESp wltllhi R^fobes- Soles 



MEN'S— Size*, 6 to 12, inclusive. 
No. IH. High cut, best quality white 
rubber soles. Men's of white canvas, 
ladies' of black. 

Per pair, $1.75 * $18.90 Doz. 
No. 1. Low cut. Otherwise as No. IH. 

Per pair, $1.50 * $16.20 Doz. 
No.M. Highcut. Pr.,.90 -^ 9.72 " 
No. K. Low cut. ".80-^ S.64 " 



"VOUTHS'-Sizes, 11 to 2, inclusive. 
No. IHX. High cut, best quality white 
rubber 9oles. Youths" of white canvas, 
misses" o' 'ilack. 

Per pair, $1.40 * $14.42 DoS. 
No. IX. Low cut. Otherwise same 
as No. IHX. Pair, $1.25-A-^/J.50Z;(^r. 
No. MX. High cut. .80* 8.64 " 
No. KX. Low cut. .70* 7.J6 " 



BOYS'— Sizes, 2; 2 to 5 'A, inclusive. 
No. IHB. High cut, best quality white 
rubber soles. Boys' of white cahvas, 
girls' of black. r 

Per pair, $1.60 ir $17.28 Doz. 
No. IB. Low cut. Otherwise sam? 
as No. IHB. Pair. $1.50 * $16 20 Doz. 
No.MS.Highcut.Pr.,.85* 9. IS " 
No.KB. Lowcut. " .75* 8.10 " 



SPAIUDIHG ILABEES^ GYMHASIUM SMOES-FaeMM® Sole; 




No. BHL. Good quality selected leather, black color, with elkskin 

soles, high cut V . . . Pet pa\r. $1.50 ir $16.20 Doz. 

No. PL. Elkskin, pearl color, elkskin soles, high cut. 

Per pair, $1.50 * $16.20 Doz.- 

Nb. GPL. Same as PL, except low cut. •• 1-25 * h.SO " 

No. DH L. Sam e as BHL, but low cut. " 1-25* 13.S0 

No. SL. Selected drab color leather, higK 

cut. . . Pei pair. $1.00 -k $10.80 Doz. 

No. OSL. Same as No. SL, except low cut. 

Per pair, SQc. * $9J2 Doz. 



N*1HL 



N». DPI 



G y 2ia la a. s a ua fflm 
Acifofoa^ac 




No. FE 



No. FE. Extra high cut, best quality canvas shoes, with leather soles. 
Made especially for acrobatic work. Per pair, $1.25 * $13. SO Doz. 
No. E. Low cut canvas shoes, canvas soles. . . ,' , Per pair, 35c. 

The prices printid in italics opposite items marked with * ?<■/// be quoted only on orders for one-half dozen pairt 
or more,, Qusnlity prtfCi NOT allowed on items .\0t marked zitth "H 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO I 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDHESSEO TO US 



A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OF THIS BOOK 



T>Mca 61 tffeU Jidt) 5. 1913. Svk/ect to change uUhoui notice. Fot CanaJlan prtca tee tpecial Canadlm Catalogue, 



\CCEPTNO TUC CDAI niMprr^^to^r^^^TD AnC.M ADl^ GUARAN" 



SUBSTITUTE 



T HE SPALDING t g JTRADE MARK 



QUALITY 



•pe^. 



.dini 



No. 15 



No. 155. 




Gymnasium Slhioes 

rmnasium Shoes must be comfortable and easy, yet fit snugly and give the 
Itarer a sure footing — they must also be durable. Spalding Gymnasium Shoes 
all of these good qualities and, in addition, are reasonable in price. 

No. 15. High cut, kanga- 
roo uppers, genuine elk- 
skin soles. Will not slip 
on floor; extra light, hand 
made. Correct shoes for 
boxing. Per pair, $5.00 
No. 155. High cut, elk- 
skin soles, and will not 
slip on floor; soft and flex- 
ible ; ladies' and men's 
sizes. . Per pair, $4.50 
No. 166. Low cut, se- 
lected leather, extra Ught 
and electric soles; ladies' 
and men's sizes. 

Per pair, $3.00 
No. 90L. Ladies'. Low 
cut, black leather, elec- 
tric soles and corrugated 
rubber heels. Pair, $2.50 
No. 21. High cut, black 
leather, electric soles. 
Hand sewed; turned, 
w^hich makes shoes ex- 
tremely Ught and flexible. 

Per pair, $2.50 , , , , , ■ , 

No. 85L. Ladies'. Low cut, black leather, with 

roughened electric soles Per pair, $2.00 

No 20. Low cut. Otherwise as No. 21. Hand 

sewed, turned shoes Per pair, $2.00 

No. 20L. Ladies*. Otherwise as No. 20. Hand 
sewed, turned shoes Per pair, $2.00 

Spalding Special Bowling Shoes 

No. 148. For bowling and general athletic use. Best 
selected light drab chrome tanned leather uppers with 
elkskin soles. Lace extremely low down. Pair, $3,50 





PROMPT AnENTIOH GIVEN TO 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

WORESSEDTOUS 



A. G.SPALDING &, BROS. 

STORES JN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STilRES 

, SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER. 

OF THIS BOOH 



T!k!^r^^edfuly 5.191,3. Subject to change wUhoul noUce. For Canadian prica He special Canadian Calglogat, 



sSbSe THE SPALDING 



SPALDING ATHLETIC STOCKINGS 

Our "Highest Quality" Stockings, Nos. 3-0,3-OS and 3-OC are best quality worsted. They are heavy ribbed, 

full fashioned, hug the leg closely but comfortably, and are very durable. Supplied regularly with white 

mercerized cotton feet, tripled toes and heels, but furnished on special order without feet at no ektra charge. 

No. 3-0. Best worsted, white mercerized feet. Carried in stock in Black, Navy Blue, emd Maroon. Supplied on special 

orders in any color Per pair, $1.50 if S16.20 Dos. 

No. 3-OS. Alternate stripe, best quality worsted, white mercerized feet Made on special orders only, in any colon 

(not more than two colors) Per pair, $1.75 -^ S1S.90 Doi. 

No. 3-OC. Calf with one stripe 4 inches wide, best quality worsted, white mercerized feet. Made on special orders 
in any colors (not more than two colors) Per pair, $1.75 -^ SIS. 90 Dos 

SPECIAL ORDERS"''^^''^ colors— ah Spalding stockings (except No. 4R) are suppUed in any coloi 

^ on special orders without extra charge. 

lors (not more than two color*) on special orders, without extra charge 
Cardinal, and Maroon. Where RED a specified on ordei 



STRIPES— Striped Stockings are supplied (except in No. 4RC) in any 

N.B.— Three different shades are sometimes called RED. They are Scarl 

Cardinal will be supplied. 



SPAI^DING RIBBED CA]LF=>ST]RSFE STOCKHHGS 



BLACK AND SCARLET MAROON AND WHITE 

BLACK AND ORANGE ROYAL BLUE AND WHITE 

SCARLET AND WHITE NAVY AND WHITE 

COLUMBIA BLUE AND WHITE (except in No. 4RC). 

SPECIAL ORDERS— See special note above regarding special orders (except for No. 4RC). 

Supplied on special orders without feet at no extra charge (except No. 4RC). 

No. IRC. Heavy weight, good quality worsted, white mercerized cotton feel. 

tripled toes and heels Per pair, $1.10 if ■512.00 Du:. 

No. 2RC. Medium weight, all wool, white mercerized cotton feet, reinforced 

toes and heels Per pair. $1.00 * $10.60 J)o:. 

No. 3RC. Good quality wool, white cotton feet, with reinforced toes and 

heels Per pair. 75c. -k SS.-/0 Do:. 

No. 4RC. Striped Cotton, white feet. "Furnished in stock colors only. No special 

orders Per pair. 40c. -^ S'-l .32 Do:. 

STRIPED 2.INCH ALTERNATE- Stockings striped alter, 
nately not carried in stock at our stores, but will be made 
on special orders in any colors ( not more than two colors) 
at prices specified below. SuppUed without feet at no 

IR '^'ta^,.. .-^,Ji extra charge. 

No. IRS. Heavy weight, good quality worsted. Feet same as No. IRC Per pair, $1.10 

No. 2RS. Medium weight, all wool. Feet same as No. 2RC " 1.00 

No. 3RS. Good quality wool. Feet same as No. 3RC. . " .75 

SpaSdSffag Rablbed SHocMsags— PSaiia Colors 

WITH WHITE COTTON FEET -REINFORCED AT TOES AND HEELS 
Carried in stock in following colors: BLACK, NAVY BLUE, MAROON. See special note above 

regarding special orders (except for No. 4R). 
No. IR. Heavy weight, good quality worsted. Feet same as No. IRC. Per pair, $1.00 -jf $JO.SO Dos. 

weight, all w^ol. Feet same as No. 2RC " .80 -^ 8.6^^ " 





ir $12.00 Dos. 
if lO.SO " 



No. 2R. Medi. 

No. 3R. Good quality wool. Feet same as No. 3RC 

No. 4R. Cotton. Stock Colors. No special orders. 



.60 • 
.25 • 



6.48 
2.70 



No. BB. Natural white stockings, light weight. 



Sp)ecnsil WThHe SHocE^aiags 



ider regular colored stockings. 



Per pair, 15c 



Spaldiirag Heav^^ Cotlttoira SocSSs for AtllhSeSes 

No. SS. Good quality, ribbed and very full in leg to allow for turn over. Supplied in either light, 
medium or dark gray. Particularly suitable for tramping, snowshoeing and tobogganing. Pair, 50c. 

The pricei printed in italics opposite items marked it'ttft if wilt be quoted only on orders for one- 
hal{ dozen or more at one time. Quantity prices XOT allowed on items NOT marked with ic 




PROMPT AnENTION GIVEN TO 

m COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDRESSED TO US 



A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OF THIS Boot 



^>Jiea6iifftelJl/lgS,i9IS. S^IOeel to cfiantt vOtwi noOca. For Canadlcn prices tecipecial Otnadim Calalogut. 



SUBSTITUTE 



THE SPALDING 



TRADE-MARK '^ru?; 




palding' Atliletic Sliirts 
Tights and Pants 

Spalding Knit Shirts of eitKef worsted or cotton, wjth either Knit Tights 
or Sateen or Silesia Running Pants, have become, both on account of their general utility and 
the excellence of their manufacture, the almost universal outfit for track and field athletics, 
running, jumping, weight throwing and shot putting, pole vaulting, hurdling, walking, etc., 
while with the additional variatipn of full length tights and Y. M.C. A. or Turner pants of 
flannel they cover the needs also' of all those who confine their athletic activities within 
the gymnasium or exercise hall. 

STOCK SIZES— Shirts 26 ta 46 inch chest. Tights, 28 to 42 inch waist. 
Spalding Sleeveless Shirts— Plain Colors. 

No. 600. Good quality. Carried in stock in Gray, White, Navy Bluef, Maroon, and 
Black. Supplied on special order at ho extra charge in any other plain color. 

- . Each, $1.25 * Sn.S^ Dozen. 

No. 6E. Sanitary cotton. Bleached White, Navy Blue, Black, Maroon or Gray only.' 
. Each, 50c. * SSM Dozen. 

Spalding Sleeveless Shirts— Striped 

No. 600S. GooH quality worsted, with 6 inch stripe around chest, carried in stock in 
following combinations of colors: Navy with White stripe, Black with Orange stripe. 
Maroon with White stripe. Black with Red stripe. Gray with Cardinal stripe. 
Supplied on special orders at no extra charge in any other colors, no more than two 
colors in any one garment Each, $1.50 -^^ J'/d..?)^? Z'o^fW. 

No. 6ES. Sanitary cotton, solid color body, with 6 inch stripe around chest, in same regular 
combinations of colors as No. 600S. No special orders. Each, 75c. -^ $8.10 Dozen. 



Spalding Shirts, with Sash 

No, 600D. Good quality worsted, sleeveless, with woven 

sash of different color from body. Supplied in any colors, 

no more than two colors in any one garment. To order 

only ; not carried in stock. Each, $2.00 -^ $21 60 Doscn . 
No. 6WD. Sanitary cotton, sleeveless, with woven sash of 

different color from body. Same regular combinations of 

colors as No. 600S. No other colors furnished. To order 

only ; not carried in stock. Each, $1.25 -^ $13 50 Dozen . 
No. 6ED. Sanitary cotton, sleeveless, solid color body 

with sash stitched on of different color. Same regular 

combinations of colors as No. 600S. No other colors 

furnished Each, 75c. iic S8. 10 Dozen. 

Spalding Full Sleeve Shirts No. 3D. Cotton. Flesh, White. Black. 

No other colors furnished. Each, 1,00 if $10.80 Dozen. 

Spalding Knee Tights — Stock Colors and Sizes. 

No. 604. Good quality worsted. Carried in stock in Gray, White, Navy Blue, 
Maroon, and Black. Supplied on special order at no extra charge in any | 
other plain color. Per paW, $1.25 -k $/J. 30 Dozen: 

No. 4B. Sanitary cotton. Bleached White, Navy Blue, Black, Maroon or 
Gray only Per pair. 50c. ii; $5 .40 Dozen . 

Spalding Juvenile Shirts and Tights 

ONLY SIZES SUPPLIED : Chest, 26 to 30 inch, inclusive. WaUt, 24 to 26 inch, inclusive. 

No. 65. Sleeveless Shirt, quality and colors same as No. 600. . Each, $1.00 
No. 65S. Sleeveless Shirt, quality and colors same as No. 600S . " 1.25 
Qyarter Sleeve Shirt, quality and colors same as No. 601. " 1.25 
Knee Tights, quality and colors same as No. 604. .Per pair, 1.15| 

Spalding Y. M. C. A. Trousers— Regulation Style 

Men's Leaders. Blue or Gray flannel, stripe down side. Per pair, $3.50 

Flannel, of good quality " 3.00 

Flannel, medium quality. . . . . Per pah. $1.75 -^ $1S.90 Dozen. 

Spalding Boys' Knee Pants 

No. 2B. Boys' Leaders. Blue flannel Y. M. C. A. Knee Pants, stripe down 
side Per pair. $2.50 

No. 14B. Boys' Knee Pants, same quality as No. 4 Y. M. C. A. trousers, with 
stripe down side Per pair, $1.00 * $/0.S0 Dozen 

The /Ti. I ^■ printed in xtnlics opposite items marked with it ivill be quoted only on orders fur 
v,u -ln,li',lo:en or mcrre. Quantity prices NOT aUowed on items NOT marked with * 



Spalding Quarter Sleeve Shirts 

No. 601. Good quality worsted. Carried in stock in Gray, 

White, Navy Blue, Maroon, and Black. Supplied on 

special order at no extra charge in any other plain color. 

Each. $ 1 .50 * $16 20 Dozen . 

No. 6F. Sanitary cotton. Bleached White. Navy Blue, Black, 
Maroon or Gray only. . . Each, 50c. -^ $5 40 Dozen. 

Woven Necklace on Shirts 

We will furnish either Nos. 600, 60 1 or 600S Shirts, on special 
orders only, with necklace woven of different color to body 
of shirt, for an extra charge of $1.00 per garment. 



No. 66 
No. 64 

No. 2. 
No. 3. 
No. 4. 




PROMPT AHENTION GIVEN TO 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDRESSED TO US 



A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE IIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OF THIS BOOK 



"Prtcej in effect July 5,1913. Sukieci to change withoui noUce. For Canadian prices tee special Canadian Catalogue. 



SaUHE $PALDING(BJ)TRADE-MARK ''Sf 



\ 



Spalding Running Pants 

Specify size and color when ordering 
No. 1. WKlte or Black Sateen, fly front. laced. . PaiT, $1.25 ^ S/S.5(P DoS. 
No. 2. White or Black Sateen, fly front, laced. . " 1.00* /ff.Si^ " 
No. 3. White or Black Silesia, fly front, laced. . " .75-* S./(? " 

No. 4. White, Black or Gray Silesia, fly front, laced. " .50* 5./^^ " 

No.44. Same quality as No. 4, but in juvenile sizes only, not over 26 inch 

waist. . . . ■. Per pair, 45c. 

Silk Ribbon Stripes down sides of any Silk Ribbon Stripe around waist on 
of these running pants. any of these running pants. 

Pair, extra, 25c * S2. 10 Do^^ Pair, extra. 25c. i^-S2. 70 Do2 . 



Spalding Worsted Trunks Spalding Velvet Trunk$ Spaldi 




iililiililil 
Hiiiiiii 

^lilllil 

!iiiltP"4it 



No. 1 Trunks 
No. 1. Best worsted. Carried in 'stoclc in 
Black, Maroon or Navy. Supplied on special 
order at x\o extra charge in any other 

plain color Per pair, $2.00 

No. 2. Good quality worsted, carried in 
stock in Navy or Black. Supplied on spe- 
cial order at no extra charge in any other 
plain cploj\ . . . ._ Per pair, $1.00 




No. 3 
No. 3. Fine Velvet. Black.NaVy, 
Royal Blue, Maroon. Special 
colors to order at no extra 
charge. . , Per pair, $1.00 
ifSIO.SODoz. 
No. 4. Sateen, Black. White. 
Per £.air. 50c. * S5.-I0 Doz. 




Spalding Wrestling Full Tights 

Not carried in stock. Supplied on Special Orders only. 

No. WA. Best worsted, knit to shape and put together by hand. Rein- 

forced at knees, with strong silk finish worsted. Colors supplied regu- 

ly: Black. Navy Blue, Maroon. Other colors to order at no extra 

charge. Sizes supplied regularly. 28 to 42 inches waist. Per pair, $6.00 



Spalding Special Pads for Wrestling 

To be Sewn on Wrestling Tights. 
■No. B. Soft tanned horse 
hide cover, hair felt pad-' 
ding. . . Per pair. 75c. 
No. 62. Covered with tan 
leather, padded. Pr. 50c. 
No. 61. Cloth covered, 

padded with wool felt. i- pi »o no 

Per pair. 25c No. B No.. 61 and 62 ''"g , bach. $2.00 




Spalding Special 

Combined Wrestling t 

Supporter and Belt & 

No. WS. Mercerized silk elas- ^ 
tic, "strong and durable. A 
really safe supporter for wrest- 



No. 12L 
No. 12L. Corhfei'ning 
athletic shirt and tminks. 
Good quality worsted. 
Not carried in stock. 
Supplied on special 
orders only in any color. 
Each. $2.50 




Spalding Full Length Tights 

No. lA. Best worsted, full fashioned. Stock colors : Black, 
Navy Blue. Maroon. Other colors on special order at no 
extra charge. Sizes: 28 to 42 inch waist. . Per pair, $5.00 
No. 605. Good quality worsted. Stock colors; Gray, White, 
Navy Blue, Maroon, Black. Supplied on special order at no 
extra charge in any other plain color. Sizes: 28 to 42 inch 
waist Per pair, $2.50 * SJl.OO Doz. 

No. 3A. Cotton, full quality. White, Black and Flesh. 
Per pair. $1.00 * SIO.SO Doz., 



'■37i« price* VrinUi in italics opposite items marked with-ktci! 
iOMUd only x>n orders tor one-half dozen or more. Quantitt/ pr 
NOT allowed on iterm NOT marked with -k 




PROMPT AHENTION GIVEN TO I 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDRESSED TO US 



A. G.SPALDING &, BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



IFORCOMPIETEUSTOFSTORES 
SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 
OF THIS BOOl • 



'Prtcafntfftcljfdy 5,1913 Svided to fhaitgt uHlh^d notkt. FoU 



I wcVKial CanaSan Calahgut, 



SUBSTITUTE 



THESRALDINGfe JTRADEMARK 



Spalding Leatlier and Worsted Belts 

Spalding "Special" Leather Foot Ball Belt 

No. 400. Black leather, I^-'nch, specially shaped for athletic use, 

peirticularly foot ball. Heavy harness buckle Elach, 75c. 

No. 801. Fine 1/2 inch leather belt. Tan or Black. Heavy hamesa 

buckle. . Each, 75c 

No. 800. Tan or Black leather belt. IX inch wide. Fine harness 

buckle Each, 60c f $6.48 Dos. 

No. 725. I X inch heavy leather, heavy nickeled harness buckle. Tan, 

Orange OT Black ^cKSOc. if S5. 40 Doz. 

No. 754. JX inch nickel harness buckle. Tan or Black. Each. 40c 

Spalding Cotton Web Belts 

No COLORS : Red, White. Royal Blue, Maroon, Navy BIu* 
23. Cotton Belt, two metal buckles. Ea., 35c. if S3. 78 Dog. 

4. Cotton Belt, single leather strap, 
with tongue buckle . . . Ea., 25c * -?. 7^7 ZJoj. 

5. Cotton Belt. ...... " \Ocic I.OS " 




No. 801 



Spalding Worsted Web Belts 

COLORS : Red, Royal Blue. Navy Blue, Black. White. Maroon 
No. 3-0. Leather lined belt, worsted, web covered, I ^ in. 

Each, 75c -^ S8.10 Dos. 
No. 47. Leather lined belt, felt covered. 

Each, 50c if 5.40 Dos. 

Spalding Leather Wrist Supporters 

Nd. 50. Grain leather, lined, single strap-and-buckle. 

No. 100. Solid belt leather. Tan or Black, single strap-and-buckle. 

No. 300. Solid belt leather, Tan or Black, laced fastening. . . 

No. 200. Solid belt leather. Tan or Black, double strap-and-buckle. 

No. 400. Genuine pigskin, lined, in improved English slitted style. 




in 
Elastic Ban 

Spalding Shoulder Bandage Spalding Knee Cap Bandage 




Give circumference around arm and 

chest. Mention for which shoulder 

required. 

No. 101. Cotton thread. Ea.. $3.50 

No. 101 A. SUk thread. . " 5.00 



Wrist Bandage 



Give circumference around smallest part of wrist, and 
•tate if for light or strong pressure. 

Nio. 106. Cotton thread. 
^ilAUr Each, 50c. 

No. 106 A. Silk thread. 
, r. I Each. 7Sc. 

Spalding Ellastic Bandage 

Compo&ea of tlireads of rubber completely covered. "TThe pres- 
sure can be applied wherever necessary. To 
fasten insert end under last fold. 

No. 30. Width 3 in.. 5 yards long 

(stretched) Each. 60c 

No. 25. Width lYi in.. 5 yards long 
(stretched) Each. 50c. 





Give circumference below knee, at 
knee and just above knee, and state 
if light or strong pressure is desired. 
No. 104. Cotton thread. Ea.. $1.00 
No. 104A. Silk thread. . " 2.00 

Elbow Bandage 

Give circumference above and 

below elbow, and state if for light or strong 



pressure. 

No. 102. Cotton thread. 

No. 102 A. SUk thread. . 



Each, $100 
" 2.0O 




Spalding Ankle Bandage 

Give circumference around ankle and ovet 

instep; state if light or strong pressure ia 

desired. 

No. 105. Cotton thread. Ea.,$ 1.00 

No. 105A. Silk thread. " 2 




Mike Murphy "Rub-In" Athletic Liniment 

THIS PREPARATION is the same as has been used by Mike Murphy, the famous 
athletic trainer, in conditioning the Yale. University of Pennsylvania and other 
college teams which have been under his charge. He is famous for the perfect 
condition in which he brings his athletes into a contest, and the ingredients and 
proper preparation of his "Rub-In" Liniment has been a closely guarded secret. 
He has finally turned the formula over to A. G. Spalding 6c Bros, with perfect con- 
fidence that the proper materials will always be used in preparing the liniment and 

that no considerations vkrill induce us to cheapen it in any way. 
Large bottles Each, SOc Small bottles Each. 25c. 

The prices printed in italics opposite items marked with if will be gvoted only on orders for one- 
haU dozen or more. Quantity prices NOT allowed on items NOT marked with -k 




PfiOMPTAnENTIONGIVENTOl 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDRJESSEO TO US 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS, 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



rOiiCOMPlfTE LIST OF STORES 
SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 
OF THIS BOOK 



'Pricta bt effect July 5, 1913.- Subject to change pllhoul notice. For Canadian pricet see ifiedal Canadian Catalogue 



ACCEPT NO 
SUBSTITUTE 



THE SPALDING^fTRADEMARK "^Elf 



ling neverslfole Collar 
Button 1 




No. AWJP 



listed 



STOCK COLORS-AII Sweater 
on this page carried irt stock in 

Gray White Navy Mardon 
Cardinal Purple Old Gold 

SPECIAL ORDERS- In addition to stock 
colors mentioned we supply these sweaters 
in jiny other color, on special orders, 
without extra charge. 

N.B.— Three different shades are some* 
times called RED. They are Scarlet, Car- 
dinal, Maroon. Where RED is specified 
on ordei* we supply Cardinal. 



For foot ball, automobilingt skiing, training purposes, reducing 
weight, tramping during cold weather, golfing, hunting, tobog- 
ganing, snowshoeing. High collar may be turned down 
quickly, changing into neatest form of button front sweater. 
Stock sizes 28 to 46 inches. 

We allow four inches fo»* stretch in all our sweaters, and sizes are 

marked accordingly. It is suggested, however, that for very heavy 

men a size about two inches larger than coat measurement be ordered 

to insure a comfortable fit. 

No. AWJP. Heaviest weight special quality worsted, with 
pocket on either side. . . Each, $10.00 * $108.00 Doz. 

No. WJP. Highest quality special heavy weight worsted, with 
pocket on either side. Carried in stock also in new shade, 
"Spalding Blue." . .... Each. $8.00*^57.00 Doz. 

No. WJ. Same as No. WJP, but without pockets. Carried 
in stock also in new shade, "Spalding Blue." 

Each, $7.50 •^5/. 00 Doz 

No. WDJ. Firte quality standard weight worsted. Same style 
as No. WJ, but lighter weight and without pockets. 

Each, $6.00 •^6^.60 Doz., 

Above sioealers . are all made with special high reversible style collar 
as shown in cutsron this page. 

Two pocJfets in either Nos. WJ or WDJ Sweaters if ordered at time 
sweater is made, not after, at an extra charge of SOc. 

SPECIAL NOTICE — Above sweaters with pne color )>ody and anothef 
color (not striped) collar and cuffs furnished in any colors, on special 
order, at no extra charge. 



The prices printed iff italics opposite ilefns marked with if will be quoted only on orders for one-half dozen or more. 
Quantity prices NOT altowea on items NOT inar):ed with if PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 




PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDHESSED TJ OS 



A. G.SPALDING &. BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT C0VE8 

OF THIS BOOK 



7>)*» In tfitct Jidy 5. 1913. Sukjtd to changt uHtheul notkt. fot Canadian prtca >tt sfitdal Canadian Catalogue. 



THE SPALDING l g fJTRAD|-M ARK Slf 



^paMlmig Jacfeetl Sm^ea^teirs 



Stock Size* : 28 to 46 inches chest measurement. 

We allow (our tnrfies foy ilrelch in all our. iruralets. and sizes are 

marked accordingly. It is suggested . however, that for very heavy 

inert a size about two inches larger than cnal measurement be ordered 

to insure a coinlortahle fit. 

Spaldnffa^ Jacfeeii Sweavtlers— Heaw weight 

WITH POCKETS 
No. VGP. Best quality worsted, heavy weight, pearl but- 
tons. Pocket on eithei' side; particularly convenient and 
popular style for golf players, also for use in combination 
with CT Collarette during cold or inclement weather. 
Each. $6.50 * $70.20 T>oz. 

WITHOUT POCKETS 
No. VG. Same as No. VGP. but without pockets. 

Each. $6.00 * $64.80 Tioz. 

STOCK COLORS-All Sweaters (except No. 3J) hsted on this 
page carried in stock in Cray, White!, Navy, Maroon, Cardinal, 

Purple, and Old Gold. 
SPECIAL ORDERS.— In addition to stock colors mentioned, we also 
•ilpply any of the sweaters listed on this page in any other color on 

special orders without extra charge. 
SPECIAL NOTICE.— We will furnish any of the solid color sweaters 
listed on this page, (except No. 3J), with one color body and any other 
color (not striped) collar and cuffs, on special orders, at no extra charge. 

Spskldlira^ JsicE^e^ S'wes^tleB's — standard weight 

The standard or lighter weight jacket sweaters are combination providmg the necessary 

especially suitable for wear under regular c6at when warmth and protection required in cold 

■walking or taking ordinary exercise. or inclement weather or while en-. 

No. DJ. Fine worsted, standard weight, pearl buttons, fine gaging in outdoor winter sports. 

khit edging. Each. $5.00 * 554.00 ©oz. No. CT. Spalding Collarette. Carried 

No. 3J. Standard weight, similar style to No. DJ, but in stock in same colors as sweaters 

Shaker knit instead of fine worsted, without fineknit edging. listed on this page, and furnished on 

Pearl buttons. Carried in stock in Gray. Navy. Black, Ma- special orders in any other color 

roon. No special orders. Each. $4.00 "A" $45.00 ^Doz. without extra charge . Each $2.00 

Two pockets in either No. DJ or No. 3J sweaters, put in at PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 

time made, not after, ........ Extra, 50c. WITHOUT NOTICE 

The prices, pr.iilcd in italics ofitosile ilciiis lunrkrd :cilh'*:.i;i he qm^lcd ouly n,i onlei <: (.>r ,i/,.- /;j// dozen or more. 
' Quantily prices NOT allowed on ifcms NOT marked with ^ 




No. VGP Sweater 

Made especially for use with Spald- 
ingjacketand Vest Collar Sweaters.the. 



sMa 




PROMPT ATTENTIDX GIVEN TO 

m COMMUtflCATIONS 

WDIIESSEO TO US 



A. G. SPALDING &, BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIESS 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OF THIS BOOK 



"PHcia in tSttl Jiilu 5, 1913. Subject to chang* tnUhoul notice. Fot Ccinadhn prlca ttt iptcial Canadian Calaloguu 



sSaUHESPALDINGlBllTRADE-iyiARK'^'aif 



SpaMnimg Roll Coll 

The Nos AA. A and B Sweaters, listed below, are made of 
special quality worsted, exceedingly soh and pleasant to 
wear. For straight athletic we&r there is no garment 
more useful than these regular roll collar sweaters which 
we have been making in our factories ior over twenty-five 
years. Full fashioned to body and arms and put together 
by hand, not simply stitched up on a machine, as are the 
majority of garments sold as regular made goods. All 
made with 9-inch roll collars. Sizes: 28 to 46 inches. 

// c c.Hoic four j'irha lot- itxUh i'l nil our suenlcrs. and j/rci are 

711,1) ted ncrorditif;ly. It is iuggeiUd. hoivn'er. that for tery heavy 

men a size ahoul two inches tatger than roat tneasurenient be 

ordered to insure a comfortable fit. 

STOCK COLORS— We carry in stock No*. AA, A and B Sweaters 
in Gray, White. Navy, Maroon, Cardinal, Purple, and Old Gold. 

SPECIAL ORDERS-We also supply No». AA, A and B Sweaters 
in any other color, on special orders, at no extra charge. 

N. B. — Three shades are sometimes called REQ. They are Scarlet, 

Cardinal. Maroon. Where RED is .specified on order, we supply 

C2u'dinal. 
SPECIAL NOTrCE— Solid Color sweaters, with one color body 

and another color (not striped) collar and cuKs furnislied in Any 

of the colors noted, on special order, at no extra charge. 

No. AA. The proper st>'Ie for use after heavy exercise, inducing copious perspiration, for reducing^ 
weight or getting into condition for athletic contests. Particularly suitable also for foot ball and 
skating. Heaviest sweater made. Roll collar Each, $8.00 * $S6.kO Doz, 

No. A. "Intercollegiate." Special weight worsted, lighter than in No. AA. Roll collar. 

Each, $6.00 * $66.00 Doz. 

No. B. Heavy weight, but lighter worsted than in No. A. Roll collar. " 5.00 * SJt.OO " 

Spalding Shaker Knit Roll Collar Sweater 

No. 3. Good quality all wool sweater. Shaker knit, well made throughout. Sizes: 30 to 46 inches. 
Standard weight, slightly lighter than No. B. Roll collar. Carried in stock in Gray, Navy, Black, 
and Maroon. No special orders. ............ Each, $4.00 * $U5.00 Doz. 

The f>'ces l^r.iilcd in italics op/'osile items marked ti'ith •^nutl be quoted oii!y oil orders for one-half dozen or moire. 

Quantity prices NOT alloziied on items NOT marked tv'i//) * .PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WTTHOUT NOTICE 





PROMPT mENTItm GIVEN TO 



ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

mm 



BESSEOTOUS 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS, 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOB COMPlfTE LIST flF STORES 

SEE INSHIE FBONT COVES 

OF THIS BOOt 



Thkabttftd July 5,1913. SuHcd h thanf wOheul nean. Fct CrnaOmt piki tcttfiedal Qmadian Catalosue, 




TRADE-MARK %Xv 




Scraped Jerseys 




Following sizes carried In stock 

regularly in all qualities : 28 to 46 

inch chest. 

We allow two inches for stretch in 
all our Jerseys , and sizes are marked 
accordingly. It is suggested, Jio-w- 
ever, that (or very heavy men a size 
about tivo inches larger than coat 
measurement be ordered to .insure 
acomfortable fit. 

No. lOPX. Special quality worsted, 
fashioned; solid color body, with 
st'riped sleeves, usually alternating 
! two inches of same color as body, 
with narrow stripes of any other 
color. , Each, $3.25 * SJS.IOVo". 
No.l2PX.Goodqual.ty worsted. solid 
color body, striped sleeves, usually 
alternating two inches of same color 

as body, harrow-stripes of any othef , ,,o«/ 

color Each $2.75* :.M'W^'i^Z?c7^. No,. lOPW and 12PW 

Nps.lOPXand 12PX u A . =^A No 1 2PW Good quality worsted ; solid color body and 

NO. lOPW. 'special quality -°»'^^^t''^ ""'f.tv Uer sleeve, with 6 .nch sTripe around body of a-y other 

•^sleeves, with 6' tnch s.ripc ^^itzSi^sId^JODoV: tht. -^ • ' • ^-'^' *2-75 • SMOO Doz 

STOCK COLORS of Nos. Jersey with ^j^ Coal J^B ^gS^ Wov/n Utter 

10PX.12PX.10PWandl2PW - ■ ^^^ ■ ^^^ A»VA 

Jerseys: . ~. , i.inr «-^ 

BLACK AND ORANGE . . Tf *W^\ 

NAVY AND WHITE "^ \^^.1 |^ > ^" \ 

BLACK AND SCARLET < .-^-iSM v ^ 

ROYAL BLUE AND WHITE r jj^^ , j , 

COLUMBIA BLUE AND /^JP^ ^ / / 1 

WHITE /^S*5fc-2S-».V iTl f J 

SCARLET AND WHITE 
MAROON AND WHITE 
Second color mentioned is for 
body stripe or for stripes «n 

...- 1 *■ 

cial orders (not 
than two different 
colors in each jers ey ) 
without extracharge 

N. B. -Three differ- 
ent shades are some- 
times called RED. 
TheyareScarlet.Car- 
dinal. and Maroon 
Where RED is speci- 
fied on order Cardi- 
nal will be ?upphcd MJiiiiMIll ■■■IIUM^^^— ....^ - 

JERSEYS .WITH NECKI ACL _^Nos^^ . P^ . PF^ LlWo'^Z fpMfa'I 
J""''''-^4ers!M^N=.tra charge of Jl. 00 per ga. 



sleeves. 
SPECIAL ORDERS 
We also furnish any 
other colors on !pe- 




ive into our besi 
special colors al 
submitted. 



WOVEN LETTERS OR NUMERALS-We 
„rade Jerseys No IP Lu.crs or Numerals 
de^.r^d. Pricts quoted on application Uesi 

No 6. Co„.n. .ooJ ,„.ll,y,.I.sh J, toll colU,, (.11 Uo..h .le.ve.. Colo... Bl.cfe. N.-y^BI .^^^y^ 

Black With Orange or Red Str.pe : Maroon w.h White ^tr.p^^ J ^i,l, -kz^tll be 'P'^:!fJ^J>'''y ,°Y/'',Z 



reOMTT ATTENTION GIVEN TO 

ANT COMMONICimONS 

ADOHESSED TO US 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



[fORCOMPlETE LIST Of STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OF THIS 8001 



'Frica ft. effect Juh 5. 1913. .S"^-' "> -* ^'"^^ ~««- ^^ C""<«"°" <"'«' »« *«'''' 



Calalosue. 



GUARANl 
QUALI- 



aTuUHESPALDI^ 



SPALDING EXERCISING EQUIPMENT 

For Recreation Rooms, Private U»e and 
Small Athletic Club* 

BASE BALL TEAMS organized for the season 
only, disband usually until the following year 
unless something is done to keep the players 
together during the winter months. A moderate 
priced outfit of Spalding Ejcercising Apparatus 
installed in the club room provides the 
means for healthful recreation that in- 
sures a winning team on the base ball 
diamond next season. 

Employers of office workers, banks Outfit No. G is arranged particularly for' 
and other mercantile establishments, use in recreation room of a private hou»e. 

find a Recreation Room fitted out with It provides a great variety of simple ex- 

shown^to supply as many as are likely to Spalding Exercising Equipment a most ercising apparatus at a very moderate 
be using the room at the same time under profitable investment. The room need cost. The equipment is suitable for ute 
ordinary circumstances, while additional not be very large, the size, of course, by tliose of varying ages of both cezea. 
equipment may be added as required to depending upon the number who are Consign g of : 

take care of a larger number without dis- likely to use the room at the sanie time. I No. 5 Chest Weight Machine. 




No. H Recreation Room Outfit 

Outfit No. H, referred to below, is sug- 
gested exclusively for recreation rooms, 
being suitable for use by those of vary- 
ing ages, with sufficient equipment 




No. G Home Outfit 



arranging the balance of the outfit. 

Consisting of: 
I No. l2Chest Weight Machine. 
I No. 3 Head and Neck Attachm't. 
I pr. No. 3 Swing.Rings.leathei cov 
I No. I 19 Laflin Rowing Machine. 
I No. I Moline Platform. 
I No 18 Striking Bag. 
I No. 74Wall HoTUonl. and Vault. Bar. 

1 No. 03 Mattress. 

2 pairs No. 6 Sandow Dumb Bells. 
I pair No. 5 Sandow Dumb Bells. 
1 set No 15 Boxing Gloves. 

1 set No 118 Boxing Glovey 
I No. 12 Medicine Ball. 
I No 11 Medicine Ball. 



For the purpose of establishing a 1 No. 3 Head and Neck Attachm't 
standard we would recommend a room | No. 2 Foot and Leg Attachment 
.. r . .r. r_.. ..jth^ minimum ceil- , ^o. 20H Bar Stall, 

1 No. 205 Bar Stall Bench. 



25 feet X 40 feet, 

ing height of 16 feet. Recreative rooms 

can be maintained in smaller space, and , », . ^^ li • i r> 

excellent results can be obtained in No. A Doorway Horizontal Bar. 

rooms of 14 feet in height. Good air, ' ^o. I Home Gymnasium. 

with room for "group" games and med- 1 No.,600 Kerns" Row. Machine. 

icine ball, boxing, etc., are desirable, how. I No PR Striking B^g Disk. 

ever, and should be secured if possible. I No. 10 Striking Bag. 

I No. I Abdominal Masseur. 

I pair No. 6 Sandow Dumb Bells. 

I pair No. 2 Sandow Dumb Bella. 

I No. 02 Mattress. 
No. 12 Medicine Ball. 



Price ii F.O.B. nearest A. G. Spalding & Bros. 
Store. List on inside front cover of catalogue. 
|Sbipping weight of complete outfit, 570 lbs. 

No. K Athletic Club OutBt 

J Consisting of: 

2 No 5 Chest Weight Machines. 

I No. 3 Head and Neck Attachment. 

1 No. 2 Foot and Leg Attachment. 

2 No 20H Bar Stalls. 

I No. 600 Kerns' Rowing Machine. 

1 pair No 3 Swinging Rings, leather covered. 

5 only No 3 Swinging Rings, leather covered. , 

(For traveling rings. 40 (t. length of room required; 1 5 to 1 6 ft. height) 

I No. I Moline Striking Bag Platform. 

I No G Striking Bag. 

1 No. 74 Wall Hprizontal and Vaulting Bar. 

1 No. 101 Parallel Bar. 

2 No. 03 Mattresses. 

2 pairs No. 6 Sandow Dumb Bells. 
I pair No. 5 Sandow Dumb Bells. 
I pair No. -2 Sandow Dumb Bells. 
1 set No. 218 Boxing Gloves. 
I set No. I 18 Boxing Gloves. 
I No. 12 Medicine Ball. 
I No. 1 1 Medicine Ball. 
I pair lO-lb. Iron Dumb Bells. 
I only 25-lb. Iron Dumb Bell. 
1 only.50-lb. Iron Dumb Bell. 

Price F.O.B. nearest A. G. Spalding & Bros. Store. List on inside front 
fCOver of this cmtalogue. Shipping weight oi complete ou^it, 1 250 Iba. 




Price i* F.O.B. nearest A. G. Spalding & Bro*. 
Store. List on inside front cover of catalogue. 
Shipping weight of complete outfit, 4S0 )baw 



No. J Athletic Club Outfit 

Contiiting of: 
I No. 5 Chest Weight Machine. 
I No.- 3 Head and Neck Attachment. 
I No. 2 Foot and Leg Attachment. 
I No. 20H Bar Stall. 
1 No. 600 Kerns' Rowing Machine. 
1 pair No. 3 Swinging Rings, leather covered 

1 No. 74 Wall Horizontal and Vaulting Bar 

2 No. 03 Mattresses. 

I No. 1 Moline Striking Bag Platform. 

I No. G Striking Bag. 

1 set No. 15 Boxing Gloves. 

1 set No. I 18 Boxing Gloves. 

2 pairs No. 6 Sandow Dumb Bells. 
.1 pair No. 5 Sandovy Dumb Bells. 

1 pair No. 2 Sandow Dumb Bells^ 
1 No. 12 Medicine Ball. 
1 No. 1 1 Medicine Ball. 



Price F.O.B. nearest A. G. Spalding & Bros. Store. List on inside fi«B» 
cover of this catalogue. Shipping weight of complete outfit, 725 IW 
NOTE — Where space and funds permit we recommend as a deaimbl* 
addition to either of the above Outfits, one of our special WreaUint 
Mats. 



No. WX. Size 12 X 12 feet. 
No. WXX. Size 15x15 feet 
Also Vaulting Horse No. I 



PROMPT ATTENTIO)! GIVEN TO 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDRESSED TO US 



A. G.SPALDING &, BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



1 FOR COMPLETE LIST or STflttS 
SEE INSIDE FRONT COVEI 
OF THIS BOO! ' 



"Prycei in effect July 5, 1 9 {3. Subject to change leUhoul notice. For Canadian prices see special Canadian Catalogtu, 



' ACCEPT NO 
SUBSTITUTE 



UHESPALDINGfeiTRADE-MARK 'Zinl 







Pat Sept 12,1911 




No,J5 . 



Complete, $5.00 



This is the ONLY OFFICIAL^ 
COLLEGE FOOT BALL, 
and is used in every important 
match played in this country. 



GUARANTEED ABSOLUTELY 

IF SEAL OF BOX IS 

UNBROKEN 




Each ball complete in sealed 
box. including leather case, 
guaranteed pure Para rubber 
bladder (not compounded). 



^E GUARANTEE every J5 Spalding Foot Ball to t>e 
perfect in material and workmanship and correct 
in shape and size when inspected at our factory. 
If any defect is discovered during the first game in 
which it is used, or during the first day's practice 
I use, and if returned at once, we will replace same 

under this guarantee. We do not guarantee against ordinary wear 
nor against defect in shape or size that is not discovered imn^edi> 
ately after the first day's use. ^ Owing to the superb quality of 
every Spalding Foot Ball, our customers have grown to expect a 
season's use of one ball, and at times make uweavonable claim* 
under our guarantee 
which we will J/^^ >5^ ^ • ^-— y7 

not allow. . ^>^7^ry ^^-/j^^y ><*/>. - ^J^^V^.y^ 




EE 



SO 



pbohpt attehtiox given to 

jiny communications 

addiTessed to us 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE UST OF STOe 

SEE INSIDE FBONT COVER 

OF THIS Boot 



^cci (n tfftcl Juki 5, 1913. Subject to change Without notice. For Cunadlan prlca tee ipeclal Canadian Calatoeui. 



Spalding' 
"Official National League" 
Bali 

Patent Cork Center 




Adopted by the National 
League in 1878, is the only 
ball used in Championship 
games since that time and has 
now been adopted for twenty 
years more, making a total 
adoption of fifty-four years. 







M 1 f Each, . . $1.25 
llU. 1 I Per Dozen, $15.00 



This ball has the Spalding 
"Patent" Cork Center, 

the same as used since August I, 

1910. without change in size of 

cork or construction 

Each ball wrapped in tinfoil, 
packed in a separate box, and 
sealed in accordance with the 
latest League regulations. 
Warranted to last a full 
game when used under ordi- 
nary conditions. 



The Spalding' ^'Offtcial National League*^ Ball Has 
been the Official Ball of the Game since 187S 

Spalding Complete Catalogoe ol Athletic Goods Mailed Free. 



PIOMPT ATTENTION GIVEN 

TV ANT COHMONICATIOII 

ADDIESSEB Tfl K 



A.G.SPALDING <Sc BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



OMPlfTEUST OF STORES 

DM INSIDE FRONT COVQ 

OF^THIS BOOl 



I In tfftat January i, 191 J. Sutjtet la changt letdioul naUe*. Far 



pilcm jcc tptcial Canadiaa 



UARANTEES 
QUALITY 



sa!!UHESPALDINGia)TRADE MARK 'Zin 



SPALDING'S NEW 
ATHLETIC GOODS CATALOGUE 



The following selection of items from Spalding's latest Catalogue will give 
an idea of the great variety of ATHLETIC GOODS manufactured by 
A. G. SPALDING & BROS. .•/ /.• SEND FOR A FREE COPY. 



SEE UST OF SPALDINQ STORES ON INSIDE 



AnUe Brace.' Skate 
Ankle Supporter 
Athletic Library 
Attachments, 

Chest Weight 



Base 

Basket 

Field Hockey 

Foot, College 

Fool, Rugby 

Foot, Soccer 

CoK 

Hand 

Hurley 

Indoor Base 

Medicine 

Playground 

Polo. Roller 

Polo. Water 

Push 

Squash 

Volley 
Ball Cleaner. CoK 
Bandages. Elastic 
Bar Bells 
Bar Stalls 



Horizontal 

Parallel 
Bases, Indoor 
Bats. Indoor 
Belts- 
Elastic 

Leather and Worsted 

Wrestling 
Bladders- 
■ Basket Ball 

Fighting Dummy 

Foot Ball 

Striking Bag 
Blades. Fencing 
Blankets. Foot Bait 



Sk"uir' 

University 

Water Polo 
Chest Weights 
Crcle. Seven-Foot 
Clock GoH 
Collarette. Knitted 
Corks.Running 
Cross Bars, Vaulting 

Discus. Olympic 

Discs- 
Marking. Golf 
Rubber. CoK Shoe 

Disks. Striking Bag 

putak BcU» 



Emblems 

Embroidery 

Exercisers- 
Elastic 
Home 

Felt Letters 

Fencing Sticks 

Fighting Dummies 

Fmger Protection. Hockey 

Flags- 
College 
Marking. Golf 

Foils, Fencing 
■footBalTs- 
Associatioit 
College 
Rugby 

Foot Ball Clothing 

Foot Ball Goal Neta 

Foot Ball Timer 



Cloves— 
Boeing 
Fencing 
Golf - . 
Hand Ball 
Hockey, Field 
Hockey, Ice 

Coals-"' 

Basket Ball 

Foot Ball 

Hockey. Field 

Hockey. Ice 

Lacrosse 
Coif Clubs 
Golf Sundries 
Colfette 

Athletic 

Golf 
Gymnasium. Home 
Gymnasium Board. Hon.. 
Gymnasium, Home Outfits 



Hammers. Athletic 
Hangers for Dumb Bells 
Hangers for Indian Clubs 
Hats. Umver.ity 
Head Harness 
Health Pull 
Hob Nails 
Hockey Pucks 
Hockey Sticks. Ice 
Hockey Slicks. Field 
Holder. Basket Ball, Canva^ 
Hole Cutter. Golf 
Hole Rim. Golf 
Horse. Vaulting 
Hurdles. Safety 
Hurley Sticks 



Indian Cluba 

Inflaters- 
Foot Ball 
,3tnkingBaS 



Jackets- 
Fencing 
Foot Ball 

Javelins 



Lace. Foot Ball 

Lacrosse Goods 

Ladies'- 

Fencing Goods 
Field Hockey Goods 
Gymnasium Shoes 

Skates, Ice 
Skates. Roller 
Skating Shoes' 
Snow Shoes 

Lanes for Sprints 

J_e? Guards- 
Foot Ball 
Ice Hockey 

Leotards 

Letters- 
Embroidered 

- I^^'' 

Liniment, "Mike Murptiy' 

Masks- 
Fencing 
Nose 

Masseur. AEJomTi.aT 

Mattresses. Gymnasium 

Mattresses. Wiesthng 

Megaphones 

Mitts- 
Handball 

:^StnkingBae 

Moccasins 

Monograms 

Mouthpiece. Fool Ball 

MufHers, Angora 



Needle. Lacing 

Nets- 
Basket Ball 
Golf Driving 
Volley Ball 

Numbers, Competitors* 

Pads- ^ 

Chamois. Fencine 

Foot Ball 

Wrestling 
Paint. Golf 
Pants- 
Basket Ball 

Boys" Knee . 

Foot Ball. College 

Foot Ball. Rugby 

Hockey. Ice 

Running 
Pennants. College 
Pistol. Starter's _ 
Plastrons, Fencinz 
flatcE- 

Teeing, Coif. 



FRONT COVER 

"PfatForms, Stnlun^Bag 

Sk?~ 

Vaulting 
"Polo, Roller. Good* 
Protectors — 

Abdomen 

Eyeglass 

Finger, Field HocW 

Indoor Base Ball 

Knee 

Thumb, Basket Ball 
Protection, Running Shoes 
Pucks. Hockey. Ice 
Push Ball 
Pushers, Chamot» 

Racks. Golf Ball 

Racquet, Squash 

Rapiers. Fencing 

Referee's Whisllc 

Rings- 
Exercising . 
Swinging 

Rowing Machines 



Sandow Dumb BeU» 

Scabbards. Skate 

Score Books- 
Basket Ball 

Shin Guards- 
Association 



Ice Hockey 
Shirts- 
Athletic 

Rubber, KeducinS 
Soccer 

Acrobatic 
Basket Bait 
Bowling 
Clog 

S^oM-""* 

Foot Ball. College 

Foot Ball. Rugby 

Foot Ball. Soccer 

Golf 

Gymnasium 

Jumping 

Running 

Skating 

Snow 

Street 
Walking 
iShot— 
Athletic 
Indoor 
Massage 



<SH 



Ice 



J^oft^ 



OF THIS BOOK 

'Skate Bag 

Skate Keys 

Skate RoUera 

Skate Straps 

Skate Sundriea 

Skis , 

'Snow Shoes 

Sprint Lanes 

Squash Goods 

Standards- 
Vaulting 
Volley BaU 

Straps^ 
For Three-Legged Rac«. 
Skate 

Sticks, Roller Polo 

Stockings 

Stop Boardi 

Striking Bags 

Suits- 
Base Ball. Indoor 
Gymnasium, Ladies* 
Soccer 
Swrimming 
Water Polo 

Supporters — 
Ankle 
Wrist 

Suspensories 

Swivels, Striking Bag* 
Swords, Fencing 
Swords. Duelling 



Tackling Machine 

Take-Off Board 

Tape, Measuring, Steel 

Tees.Goli 

Tennis Posts. Indoor 

Tights- 
Full 
Full. Wrestling 

K^e"' 
■Toboggans 
Toboggan Cushion* 
Toe Boards 
Toques 

Trapeze. Adjustable 
Trapeze, Single 

y."m'c. a. 

Foot BaU 
Trunks- 
Velvet 
Worsted 



Wands. Calisthenlc 
Watches. Stop 
Weights. 56-lk 
Whistles . 

Wrestling Equip'mcnl 

Wrist MMkiaM 



||Pe0MPTAnENTI0N6IYENT0 
1 ANY COMMUNICATIONS 
\\ ADDRESSED TO US 


A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 


FOR COMPUTE LIST OF STOffiS 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVEI 

OFTHISBOOI 



'Prioa b> effect fiJy 5. 1913. Sik/ecl h thangt uHlhout notlec For Canadian prkea tee ipecial Canadian Catalogue. 



OCT 10 1913 

Standard Policy 



A Standard Qyality must be inseparably linked to a Standard Policy. 

Without a definite and Standard Mercantile Policy, it is impossible for a 
Manufacturer to long maintain a Standard Qyality. 

To market his goods through the jobber, a manufacturer must provide a 
profit for the jobber as well as for the retail dealer. To meet these conditions 
of Dual Profits, the manufacturer is obliged to set a proportionately high list 
price on his goods to the consumer. i i • i • i c 

To enable the glib salesman, when bookmg his orders, to figure out 
attractive profits to both the jobber and retailer, these high list prices are 
absolutely essential; but their real purpose will have been served when the 
manufacturer has secured his order from the jobber, and the jobber has secured 
his order from the retailer. , , ,. . r • i , 

However, these deceptive high list prices are not fair to the consumer, who 
does not, and, in reality, is not ever expected to pay these fancy list prices. 

When the season opens for the sale of such goods, with their misleading 
but alluring high list prices, the retailer begins to realize his responsibilities, and 
grapples with the situation as best he can, by offering "specieJ discounts," 
which vary with local trade conditions. 

Under this system of merchandising, the profits to both the rnanufacturer 
and the jobber are assured ; but as there is no stability maintained in the prices 
to the consumer, the keen competition amongst the local dealers invariably 
leads to a demoralized cutting of prices by which the profits of the retailer are 
practically eliminated. ti^ . i . . 

This demoralization always reacts on the manufacturer. 1 he joober insists 
on lower, and still lower, prices. The manufacturer, in his turn, meets this 
demand for the lowering of prices by the only way open to him, viz.: the cheap- 
ening and degrading of the quality of his product. 

The foregoing conditions became so intolerable that 14 years ago, in 1899, 
A. G. Spalding & Bros, determined to rectify this demoralization m the Athletic 
Goods Trade, and inaugurated what has since become known as " The Spalding 

The "Spalding Policy" eliminates the jobber entirely, so far as Spalding 
Goods are concerned, and the retail dealer secures the supply of Spalding 
Athletic Goods direct from the manufacturer by which the retail dealer is 
assured a fair, legitimate and certain profit on all Spalding Athletic Goods, zind 
the consumer is assured a Standard Quality and is protected from imposition. 

The "Spalding Policy" is decidedly for the interest and protection of the 
users of Athletic Goods, and acts in two ways : 

First.— The user is assured of genuine Official Standard Athletic Goods 
and the same prices to everybody. 

Second.— As manufacturers, we can proceed with confidence in 
purchasing at the proper time, the very best raw materials required 
in the manufacture of our various goods, well ahead of their 
respective seasons, and this enables us to provide the necessary 
quantity and absolutely maintain the Spalding Standard of Qyality. 

All retail dealers handling Spalding Athletic Goods are requested to supply 
consumers at our regular printed catalogue prices— neither more nor less— the same 
prices that similar goods are sold for in our New York, Chicago and other stores. 

All Spalding dealers, as well as users of Spalding Athletic Goods, are treated 
exactly alike, and no special rebates or discrirninations are allowed to anyone. 

This briefly, is the "Spalding Policy," which has already been in successful 
operation for the past 14 years, and will be indefinitely continued. 

In other words, "TheSpeJding Policy" is a "square deal" for everybody, 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



By '^^J^^^^^^^^^^^. 

raxsioiirr, d^ 



standard Quality 



An article that is universally given the appellation "Standard" is thereby 
conceded to be the criterion, to which are compared all other things of a similar 
nature. For instance, the Gold Dollar of the United States is the Standard unit 
of currency, because it must legally contain a specific proportion of pure gold, 
and the fact of its being Genuine is guaranteed by the Government Stamp 
thereon. As a protection to the users of this currency against counterfeiting and 
other tricks, considerable money is expended in maintaining a Secret Service 
Bureau of Experts. Under the law, citizen manufacturers must depend to a 
great extent upon Trade-Marks and similar devices to protect themselves against 
counterfeit products — without the aid of "Government Detectives" or "Public 
Opinion" to assist them. 

Consequently the "Consumer's Protection" against misrepresentation and 
"inferior quality" rests entirely upon the integrity and responsibility of the 
" Manufacturer." 

A. G. Spalding & Bros, have, by their rigorous attention to "Quality," for 
thirty-seven years, caused their Trade-Mark to become known throughout 
the world as a Guarantee of Quality as dependable In their field as the 
U. 5. Currency Is in its field. 

The necessity of upholding the Guarantee of the Spalding Trade-Mark and 
maintaining the Standard Quality of their Athletic Goods, Is, therefore, as obvi- 
ous as Is the necessity of the Government In maintaining a Standard Currency. 

Thus each consumer Is not only Insuring himself but also protecting other 
consumers when he assists a Reliable Manufacturer In upholding his Trade- 
Mark and all that It stands for. Therefore, we urge all users of our Athletic 
Goods to assist us in maintaining the Spalding Standard of Excellence, by 
Insisting that our Trade-Mark be plainly stamped on all athletic goods which 
they buy, because without this precaution our best efforts towards malnteuning 
Standard Quality and preventing fraudulent substitution will be Ineffectual. 

Manufacturers of Standard Articles Invariably suffer the reputation of being 
high-priced, and this sentiment is fostered and emphasized by makers of 
*' inferior goods," with whom low prices are the main consideration. 

A manufacturer of recognized Standard Goods, with a reputation to uphold 
and a guarantee to protect must necessarily have higher prices than a manufac- 
turer of cheap goods, whose idea of and basis of a claim for St£Uidard Quality 
depends principally upon the eloquence of the salesman. 

We know from experience that there is no quicksand more unstable than 
poverty In quality — and we avoid this quicksand by Standard Quality. 




<^/?e Spalding 

OFFICIAL 




BASKET BALL 



S^ 






EXTRACTS FROM OFFICIAL RULE BOOK 



nVlM U.~BAU 

Sec. 3. The baU made bj A. G. SPALD- 
ING 6 BROS, chall be the official ball. 
Official baUs wlU be stamped ^gtrKlTf^^ 
•1 herewith, and wiU be la CC^^ixS 
•ealed boxes. M^^Qjii^ 

Sec. 4. The ofTicia) ball mlui be ased 
IB all match gamea. 



ev 




Sec 3. The goal made by A. G. SPALD. 
DfG 6 BROS, shall be the official baskets. 
Sec 4. The official baskeU 
iist be osed Ib aO 



5 



*.