(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Official bulletin issued by the Shasta county committee of the Council of national and state defense; containing menus, recipes and suggestions for the use of the those materials which will conserve food following the directions of the National food administration;"

Txssr 

-Cus 



r 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



014 233 133 



rx 357'" :f icial Bulletin issued by 

C23 / 

'■''' ' ' Shasta County Com- 
mittee of the Council of 
National and State 
Defense 



Containing Menus, Recipes and Suggestions for 

the use of those Materials which will conserve 

Food following the dired:ions of the National 

Food Administration 



cApproved by 



MISS CHARLOTTE EBBETS 

State Chairman -of Home Economics 

MRS. ROBERT J. BURDETTE 

State Chairman of Food Administration 



COPYRIGHT, rsie 

H. S. CROCKER COMPANY 
SAN TRANCISCO 



OFFICIAL BULLETIN OF SHASTA COUNTY WOMEN'S 

FOREWORD— TO HOUSEWIVES: 

There is nothing new or oriRinal in this booklet. It has been compiled by Flousewivea 
For Housewives from authoritative sources. It ^vea in compact form what seems to us for 
the moment to be the most timely foot! information. 

The ability of our armies to endure the trying times ahead will depend in a measure upon 
the efficiency and adaptability of American women. 

It is a compliment to our mtelligence as well aa to our patriotism to ask u^to understand 
and practice the stTiSTrrmoN of a seldom-used food for one often used without affecting the 
total food value of the meal. The thought and study involved in such substitdtio.n is a 
patriotic contribution for women toward winning the war. 

The patriotic housewife of today will make it her business to read market reports of food- 
stuffs in the djiilj' papers as well as the Food Administration literature, in which she will find 
information about "WHAT SHALL WE EAT?" 



The wheat, fat, sugar, condensed milk, which 

our allies need, 
The wheat, bacon, beef, tinned goods, which 

our army requires. 
The lamb for wool, 
The difficulties of transportation to this coast 

when cars are needed for moving troops and 

equipment, 
The time when a new crop comes in. 
The time when a big order for certain food for 

the allies must be filled. 
Accurate and economical purchasing of war food depends on: — 

(1) Knowledge of food needs of each member of family. 

(2) Knowledge of food values, food substitutes. 

(3) Menu planning. 

(4) Estimates of amount of food in standardized measurements. 



All play their part In determin- 
ing which foods we should 
save. 

The Food Administration, In 
touch with all varying con- 
ditions, will keep housewives 
who have signed a food pledge 
Informed of what is expected 
of them. 



SUGGESTIONS FOR MENUS 

The housekeeper should know how to substitute for wheat amd meat new and unusual foods, 
and yet have palatable, nourishing, well balanced meals. The three groups of food, suggested 
below, building, fuel, and regulating foods, should be included in the meals for each day. 
A — Building Foods: 
1. Proteins: 

Milk and eggs for children. 

Meat or its substitutes, as milk, cheese, beans, peas, lentils, nuts, at least once 
a day, for adults. 
B — Fuel Foods: 

1. Fats in some form at every meal: 

a. A choice of butter, oleomargarine, egg yolk; olive or cottonseed (salad) oil; 
Crisco; or vegctole; meat fats, as lard and drippings; or the mixtures, aa 
califcne, cottolene, or compound lard, 
b. Nuts, olives, and soy beans. 

2. Starches, two or three times a day: 

In place of wheat starch use: 

a. For breakfast, cereals, rolled oats or oatmeal, commcal, cornflakes, pop- 
corn or puffed com; rice, riceflakes or puffed rice; barley meal. 

b. For vegetables, instead of macaroni products, brown or white rice, hominy, 
commeal or potatoes. 

c. For broad, com breads, or instead of part of patent flour, use graham flour, 
rice flour, commeal or com flour, oatmeal, rolled oats, rye flour, barley 
flour, soy bean flour, or cottonseed flour. 

3. Sugars two or three times a day: 
White or brown sugar or their substitiitcfl, such as honey, molasses, fruit and 

com syrup: sweet fresh fruit, or dried fruit, as figs, raisms, dates, prunes. 
C — Regulation Fooda: 

1. Cellulose, once or twice a day: 
A choice between celery, radi.shes, root vejjetables, greens salad plants, cab- 
bage, bran of grains, mcluding whole grain products, such as rolled oats, 
cracked wheat, brown rice, graham flour and the skins of fruit and vegetables. 

2. Mineral matter at least i^ce a day: * . 
Fruit and vegetablea.C'Ci'. At:<<JG45 •\'^^ iBlSiB 



COMMITTEE, COUNCIL OF NATIONAL AND STATE DEFENSE 






CHILDREN'S MENUS 



Suggested Menus Suitable for Various Ages up to Ten Years 
Build children's menus around milk and milk dishes. Even at present high prices, it is the 
cheapest source of protein for them. 



AGE 


6 A. M. 10 A. M. 


2 P. M. 


5 P.M. 


16 months 


Milk 1 cup or bot- Strained cereal 
tie 8-oz. and 1 cup milk. 


Chicken broth, J^ 
baked potato, 
spinach, milk 1 cup 


Milk 1 cup 


22 months 
} 


Milk one cup. Coddled egg, toast, 
milk 1 cup. 


Lamb broth with 
rice, asparagus 
tips, prune juice 
and pulp. 


Milk 1 cup with 
mush or zwie- 
back. 


AGE 


BREAKFAST 


DINNERS 


SUPPERS 



2 to 3 years 



Apple sauce Cream of 
Wheat or coddled 
egg, 1 cup milk, 
toast and butter. 



Bread and butter, 
broiled lamb chop 
baked potato, car- 
rots finely mashed, 
Floating Island. 



Milk toast or mush 
and milk, 1 cup 
milk to drink. 



3 to 6 years 



Stewed apricots, oat- 
meal and milk or 
coddled egg, toast 
and butter, milk to 
drink, 1 cup. 



Broiled hamburg 
steak or boiled 
Halibut with cream 
gravy, baked or 
mashed potatoes, 
string beans or 
boiled onions, choc- 
olate pudding. 



Bread and milk or 
milk vegetable 
soup with croutons 
sponge cake, milk 
to drink. 



6 to 10 years. Note 
large amount of 
protein food to 
prepare for second 
dentition. 



Raw apple, poached 
egg on toast, corn 
bread, milk to 
drink. 



Bread and butter, 
roast beef, creamed 
macaroni, green 

geas, orange jelly, 
read pudding. 



Rice with milk and 
sugar stewed 
peaches and gin- 
gerbread, milk to 
drink (bread and 
butter if desired, 
also). 



If children eat with the family at the night meal, give them the vegetables and simple 
dessert omitting the meat and substituting milk. 

BODY NEEDS 
(Measured in Calories) 

Mary Schwartz Rose. 

A Calorie is amount of heat necessary to raise 1-lb. of water 4 degrees Fahr., or to make a tea- 
spoonful of water boil. 

3,500 Calories daily for active adult men. 
2,500-3,000 Calories daily for active adult woman. 
2,500-3,000 Calories daily for youth, 14-19 years. 
1,000-2,500 Calories daily for child, 2-6 years. 
1,000 Calories daily for child, 2-6 years. 

Limited space does not permit the publication in this Booklet of a table of 100 calorie 
portions. Further information on food values will be published as a separate Bulletin. 



Page Three 



OFFICIAL BULLETIN OF SHASTA COUNTY WOMEN'S 

ADULT MENUS FOR ONE WEEK OF WAR FOODS 

The numbers refer to the numbered recipes in Recipe Chart. 



Breakfast 



SUNDAY 
Lunch or Supper 



Apples Toasted Rye Bread 

Rolled Oats, top milk and sugar Baked Pctaluma Cheese — 53 
Honey Syrup Orange Marmalade 

Corn Bread— 20 Hoover Cookies— 78 

Coffee, Cocoa or Milk Chocolate 



Dinner 

Clear Vegetable Soup 

Chicken Fricassee with Rice 

Braised Celery — 39 

Rye Bread— :i4 

Orange Water Ice 

War Chocolate Cake — 75 



Stewed Figs 
Cream of Barley 
Oatmeal Muffins — 24 
CofTee or Milk 



MONDAY 

Rice Croquettes — 51 

Cheese Sauce 

Spinach 

Oatmeal Bread — 33 

Spice Cake 



Onion Soup au gratin — 6 
Virginia Corn HrcHd — 20 
Soy Beans and Rice — 56 
Scalloped Carrots — 41 
Fruit Cocktail 
Oatmeal Cookies 



Baked Apples with Raisins 
Cornflakes 

Buckwheat Gems — 29 
Eggs a la Moniay — 54 
CofTee or Cocoa 



TUESDAY (Meatless) 

Clam Bisque — IS 
Gnocci a la Romain — 52 
Fniit Salad 
Honey and Butter 
Bran Muffins 



Combination Vegetable Salad 
Baked Fish— 16 
Baked Potatoes 
Entire Wheat Bread 
Economy Pudding — 68 



Oranges 

Comnieal Mush 

Toasted Oatmeal Bread— 33 

Rhubarb 

Marmalade 

CofTee or Milk 



WEDNESDAY (WheaUess) 

Kedgeree (fish) — 14 

Sour Milk Combread— 21 

Honey 

Tapioca Cream Pudding — 73 

Tea or Milk 



Split Pea Roast— 63 
Tomato Sauce — 61 
Bvets—SS. 
liarley Bread — 37 
Baked Fruit 
Bran Cookies 



Sliced Bananas 
Cooked Bran with Dates 
Eggs a la goldenrod 
Oatmeal .Muffins — 24 
CofTee or Cocoa 



THURSDAY 

Soup Soubise — 5 Gardener's Wife Soup — i 

Crouton Dried Bread Turkish Pilaf— 50 

Hominy, baked with cheese — 48 licet Top Greens 
StufTed Dates and Raisins Rice W hrat Broad 

Pineapple and Neufchatel cheeM 
salad 



FRIDAY 

Prunes Devilled Crab— 19 

Hominy Potato 

Creamed Fish— 16 Oatmeal Bread— 33 

Toast«>d Rico-Wheat Bread— 35 StufTed Dates— 1 10 
CofTee or Chocolate 



Cioppino — 9 

Potatoes au gratin 

Turnips 

Berries 

Sponge Cake — ^76 



Apple Sauce 
Graham Flour Mush 
One Kgg MufTms 
CofTee or Milk 



SATURDAY 

Cream Soup 
Nut I^)af— ')n 
WarMumns— 31 
Peach Marmalade 



Red Kidney Beans with Spa- 
ghetti — 17 
Sweot Potatoes — 13 
Cauliflower 
Chocolate Cereal Pudding— 72 



f'agt Four 



COMMITTEE, COUNCIL OF NATIONAL AND STATE DEFENSE 



CEREALS 

The cheaper the diet when cereals play a greater part. 
Cereals 

Oatmeal Ic 

Rolled oats Ic 

Farina Ic 

Graham flour Ic 

Commeal Ic 

Hominy Ic 

Rice Ic 

Rice, steamed Ic 

Use double boiler or tireless cooker. A cereal which will lump easily (like graham flour or 
commeal) should be mixed first with cold water. Boil five minutes directly over the fire before 
putting in lower rack of fireless cooker or double boiler. Figs, raisins or dates chopped may be 
added. 

BUTTER SUBSTITUTE— 1 

1-lb. kidney suet cut into small pieces — place in clean kettle. Add \% cup cold water, render 
over a slow fire, strain off liquid fat. To 1 cup of the liquid fat allow 1 cup cottonseed oil and 
J^ teaspoon salt. Beat as it cools until it is thick and white. Use for frying or as a substitute 
for butter. This costs about 34 cents altogether and makes 2^ lbs. of good wholesome fat. 



Boiling Water 


Salt 


Time of Cooking 


4c 


2 teaspoons 


4 hours. 


2Hc 


2 « 


H hour. 


4c 


2 " 


3^ to 1 hour. 


3c 


1 « 


H to 1 hour. 


4c 


1 « 


3 hours. 


4c 


1 « 


4 hours. 


8c 


1 « 


20 min., drain 
dry. 


3c 


1 « 


50 minutes. 



Do Not Serve in One Meal 

1. Beef, macaroni and cheese, and baked beans. 

2. Rice, cooked in milk; poached egg with creamed 

chipped beef on toast, popovers and milk. 

3. Pork, fried potatoes, suet pudding with hard sauce. 

4. Cream-of-tomato soup, mutton chops, creamed 

potatoes, salad with mayonnaise dressing, and 
whipped cream dessert. 

5. Sliced bananas with cream, com cakes with maple 

syrup, rolls or toast and cocoa. 

6. Curried chicken with rice, mashed potatoes, sweet 

potatoes, beets, biscuits, cake and ice cream. 



Because you would have 
too much protein. 



•Because you would have 
too much fat. 



Because you would have 

too much starchy and 

sweet foods. Both are 

heat producing, but not 

J muscle-building. 

Each meal should have contrast and variety, both as to the foods served, and the way in 
which they are served. 

POT-HERBS AND SIMPLE FLAVORINGS 

Parsley, chives, tarragon, thyme, chervil and mint are easy to grow, and, used judiciously, 
add "snap" to otherwise plain fare. 

Grated lemon rind for sponge cake, and grated orange peel for blanc-mange and gelatine 
sponges. 

Peach leaves give custards a flavor not unlike that of almonds, and the meats of apricot 
pits are also good in puddings, if used sparingly. 

When the vanilla bean has been used a number of times it may be cut into small pieces 
and mixed with sugar. When it has stood for several days, the sugar may be used in desserts. 



SOUPS 

CORN CHOWDER— 2 

1 can com; \^ cup oil; \^ cup onion, sliced; 4 cups potatoes, cut in 3^-iiich slices; 4 cups 
scalded milk; 2 cups boiling water; 8 common crackers; 2 tablespoons oil, or other fat; IH 
teaspoon salt-pepper. Heat oil, add onion until yellow, strain into stew pan. Parboil potatoes 
5 minutes in boiling water, cook till potatoes are soft, add corn and milk which have been 
heated thicken with flour and butter. Put crackers on top. 

Put California Raisins in your Cereal and save Sugar for Uncle Sam. 



Page Five 



OFFICIAL BULLETIN OF SHASTA COUNTY WOMEN'S 

CEREAL SOUP— 3 
Cook cereal in water in usual way. Put through colander, add enough milk for right con- 
sistency and season with salt and pepper. 

GARDENER'S WIFE SOUP— 4 • 

2 cups chopped cabbage, 1 small head shredded lettuce, 1 chopped beet, J^ cup diced 

turnip, 1 cup diced potatoes, 1 quart water, Monterey cheese, croutons, J^ cup chopped celery, 

1 cup fresh peas (if convenient) 1 teaspoon salt, V^ teaspoon butter, 1 quart stock. 

Add salt, pepper and butter to the water, put in the vegetables and simmer until thoroughly 

cooked, add more water if necessary. Turn in the stock, which should be well seasoned and 

serve with croutons and Monterey cheese. 

HEARTY SOUPS 
SOUP SOUBISE— 5 
1 large Spanish onion or 3 ordinary onions, 2 cups cold water, IJ^ teaspoon salt, \/i teaspoon 
pepper, 1 quart milk or soup stock, 2 teaspoon butter, 2 teaspoon constarch. 

Slice onion and cook 20 minutes in water, press through colander into double boiler in which 
is the thickened hot milk. Strain and serve. 

ONION SOUP AU GRATIN— 6 

1 large onion or 3 small ones (sliced thin, 1 tablespoon oil or dripping, 4 cups soup stock, 
6 cups round crackers, ^ cup grated cheese, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon pepper, 1 teaspoon 
Worcestershire. 

Cook onion in the fat until softened, then cook 20 minutes in the stock. Put in cups set 
in pan of boiling water. Drop one cracker sprinkled with cheese in each cup. Set in oven to 
melt cheese. Serve in the cups. 

MEAT SOUP WITH CEREAL AND VEGETABLES— 7 
2H lbs. soup beef, 1 cup barley or oatmeal, 2 tablespoons onion, 2 tablespoons celery leaves 

or parsley, 2 cups turnips or cabbage, 2 cups carrots or celery root, salt and pepper to taste. 
Choose soup meat ^ lean meat rest bone with a little fat. Cover meat with cold water 

and allow to cook slowly below the boiling point for six hours. Add cereal two hours before 

serving. Vegetables 1 hour before serving. 

SOY BEAN SOUP— 8 

Bacon, 1 cup tomatoes (canned or fresh), salt, pepper (garlic, if desired), 1 cup soy beans, 
1 onion, 2 small carrots, 1 stalk celery, Vi-lb. salt pork. 

Pick over and wash beans, and soak over night; drain and cook until soft (about three 
hours) in water with the pork cut in small pieces. Mash and force them through a sieve together 
with the tomatoes. Add the carrots cut in shreds and the celery cut fine. Add one quart of 
water and cook until the vegetables are soft. Add salt and pepper to taste. If too thick add 
more water. 



With these hearty dishes use light salads or desserts, bread and butter. 
Makes a complete meal. 



I' act S%M 



COMMITTEE, COUNCIL OF NATIONAL AND STATE DEFENSE 



FISH 

Crab season closes in August and opens in November. 

Trout season closes in October and opens in June. 

Salmon season closes in September and opens in November. 

Striped bass season closes in September and opens in November, 

Perch in all other months in the year, except May, in market. 

CIOPPINO— 9 
(Italian Fish Stew) 

2 pounds of fish together with ingredients in this recipe will be enough for four to five 
people. Use a solid, firm fish, such as large sole, striped bass, chili pepper, boccaccio or rock 
cod. Do not use salmon or halibut. 

Take one good sized onion, chop up fine; put in pot with a little olive oil or butter and 
cook to a golden brown. Take pot off fire and add a little chopped parsley and garlic and 
then let cook about five minutes with slow fire, then take pot off fire and place fish in pot piece 
by piece, about an inch thick, and add four medium sized, good, ripe tomatoes, chopped up 
or canned tomatoes to equal same; stir gently so as to mix ingredients with fish. Put on stove 
again and let cook twenty to twenty-five minutes with moderate fire. Season with salt and 
pepper to your own taste. Do not stir fish while cooking. (To be cooked in a pot that is used 
for boiling or stewing.) 

BAKED FISH— 10 
Take whatever fish may be desired and place in baking pan. Chop up a little onion, garlic 
parsley and tomatoes and spread over fish; then moisten with a little olive oil or butter and 
bake in moderate oven for about 20 minutes. (This recipe will be found very good for small 
sole, rex sole, or sandabs). Add salt and pepper to taste. 

SKATE— 11 

Take enough skate, according to your needs, and put in pot of boiling water with plenty 
of salt. Boil for about 20 minutes, then take skate out and place in a large platter; chop up 
a little garlic and parsley and sprinkle over fish; then season with paprika and a little vinegar 
and serve with pieces of lemon. 

FISH TIMBALES— 12 
Cook 1 tablespoon butter, 1 tablespoon flour thoroughly, add 1 cup milk, H tea- 
spoon salt, dash cayenne, 1 teaspoon lemon juice, 1 teaspoon minced parsley; add 1 cup minced 
fish. When boiling remove from the fire, add 3 egg yolks, slightly beaten, beat until cool, 
fold in 3 egg whites, beaten stiff. Fill moulds % full. Bake 15 or 20 minutes and turn out and 
serve at once. 

SCALLOPED SALT FISH— 13 
lyi cup cooked shredded fish, 2 cups thin white sauce (well seasoned), 3 cups bread crumbs 
(moistened with butter or other fat). Fill a baking dish with alternate layers of fish and 
crumbs. When baking dish is nearly filled pour over white sauce and cover with bread crumbs. 
Bake until crumbs are brown, chopped pimiento or small green peppers may be added to 
shredded fish. 

KEDGEREE— 14 
Cook 1 tablespoon of chopped green pepper in 2 tablespoons oil for 5 minutes, then add 
6 tablespoons of strained tomato juice, 1 cup cold cooked fish, 1 cup boiled rice, 2 hard boiled 
eggs cut fine, H teaspoon salt and dusting of pepper. Cook 5 minutes and serve on slices of 
toast. 

Page Seven 



OFFICIAL BULLETIN OF SHASTA COUNTY WOMEN'S 

TO USE LEFT OVER COOKED FISH 

SCALLOPED FISH— 16 
Free from skin and boncfl, flake it, put in RreaseH baking dish or pan, pour over it a white 
sauce, then a second layer of fish, then sauce to moisten. Cover the top with greased bread 
crumbs (stale) and bake until the crumbs are brown. 

FISH A LA CREME— 16 

4 to 6 lbs. of fish, 1 cup cracker crumbs moistened in 14 cup melted fat, 1 to IH pinta of 
cream sauce, 2 tablespoons grated cheese. 

Make as for scalloped dish, using the cracker crumbs to spread over the top after com- 
bining them with the grated cheese. Brown in oven. Do not mash the fish or get it too moist. 

FISH PUDDING— 17 
1 cup fresh bread crumbs, 2 tablespoons butter substitute, 2 eggs, H lbs. white, 1 table- 
spoons chopped parsley— white sauce (use cornstarch), 1 cup milk, salt and pepper to taste, 
1 tea-spoon lemon juice. Boil fish, remove skin and bones and chop it. Add crumbs, parsley^ 
seasoning, milk, melted butter substitute and eggs, well beaten; turn into greased mold, cover 
with greased paper, steam 1 hour, turn out on a hot dish, pour white sauce over. 

SHELL FISH 
CLAM BISQUE— 18 
1 dozen clams chopped fine, 1 slice of onion. H bay leaf, 1 tablespoon drippings, 1 table- 
spoon cornstarch, 1 pint soup stock, H teaspoon salt. 2 drops tabasco, 1 teaspoon Worcester- 
shire, 1 pint hot milk. 

Drain liquor from clams, boil, skin, strain, add to clams, simmer 3 minutes, add to flavored 
stock, when boiling add clams and serve. Could be made with oysters or crabs, thickening 
with rice poured through sieve. 

DEVILLED CRABS— 19 
Flour 1 cup white sauce with 14 teaspoon each of salt, mustard; either 2 teaspoons grated 
cheese or 1 tablespoon lemon juice, 2 drops tabasco sauce, 1 teaspoon parsley, H teaspoon 
Worcestershire. Add flaked crab, 

FISH CH0WDER-19-A 

Rabbit, fowl, or any meat may be uso.l instead of the fish, or tomatoes instead of milk 
Carrots may be omitted. 

IH pov.nds fish (fresh, salt, or canned); 9 potatoes, peeled and cut in small pieces; 1 onion, 
sliced; 2 cups carrots cut in pieces; H pound salt pork; 3 cups milk; pepper; 3 tablespoons flour. 

Cut pork m small pieces and fry with the chopped onion for five minutes. Put pork onions 
carrots, and potatoes in kettle and cover with boiling water. Cook until vegetables arc tender. 
Mix three tablespoons of flour with one-half cup of the cold milk and stir in the lic.uid in the 
pot to thicken Add the rest of the milk and the fish which has lxK:n removed from the bone 
and cut m small pieces. Cook until the fish is tender, about 10 minutes. Serve hot. You can 
omit salt pork luid use a tablespoon of other fat. 



fagf Eigkl 



COMMITTEE, COUNCIL OF NATIONAL A ND STATE DEFENSE 

LIBERTY BREADS TO SAVE WHEAT 

Tested Recipes Enable Cut in Use of White Flour. 

OTHER CEREALS ARE USED 

Cornmeal, Oatmeal and Barley found to be good substitutes in making excellent breads. 

The world needs wheat. It is depending on the United States and Canada for its supply. 

America must divide what she has with the other nations. To enable her to save sufficient 

wheat, experts have perfected Liberty breads, each loaf of which saves from 20 to 35 per cent 

of the amount of wheat flour usually used. 

To freshen stale bread, dip it in cold water quickly, and rebake in a medium hot oven. 
Gems or rolls are easily reheated in a paper bag and are much more wholesome and digestible 
than freshly cooked hot bread. 

QUICK BREADS 

VIRGINIA CORN BREAD— 20 

1 tablespoon sweetening, 2 tablespoons shortening or fats, \i cup milk, 4 teaspoons baking 
powder, Y^ cup flour, \\i cups com meal, 1 egg, 1 teaspoon salt. 

Put milk in saucepan and let come to boil. Remove from fire, stir in cornmeal quickly. 
When lukewarm add salt, beaten egg yolk, baking powder and beaten white of egg. Put in 
hot well greased baking dish, bake in quick oven until brown. 

SOUR MILK CORN BREAD— 21 

IH cups melted lard, 1 pint sour milk, \i teaspoon powder, ^/i teaspoon soda, 1 egg, 1 pint 
cornmeal, Yi teaspoon salt. 

Slightly beat egg, add milk, salt and soda. Stir in meal, beat well and add melted lard 
and baking powder. Bake in hot greased pan, in moderate oven for % hour. 

NUT BREAD— 22 

H cup sugar, 1 cup rolled walnuts, 2 cups milk, 4 teaspoons baking powder, 2 cups white 
flour, 2 cups graham flour, 1 egg, 1 teaspoon salt. 

Mix well in greased pan, let stand 20 minutes. Bake in moderate oven about Yi hour. 

RYE MUFFINS— 23 

4 teaspoons sugar, 1 tablespoon butter or other fat, 1 cup milk, 4 teaspoons baking powder, 
2 cups rye flour, Y2 teaspoon salt. 

Mix sugar and butter thoroughly, add baking powder and salt to flour, add milk and flour 
to sugar and butter alternately. Bake in hot oven 20 minutes. 

OATMEAL MUFFINS— 24 

2 tablspoons of sweetening, 2 tablespoons butter or butterine, IJ^ cups milk, 4 teaspoons 
baking powder, V/i cups flour, 1 cup cooled oatmeal, 1 egg, Yi teaspoon salt. 

Mix and sift dry ingredients, add egg well beaten and half amount of milk. Mix the 
remainder of milk with cereal, and beat it thoroughly, add the butter. Bake in buttered 
muffin or gem tins. Bake in moderate oven 30 minutes. 

HOMINY MUFFINS— 25 

1 cup soft boiled or left-over hominy, 1 teaspoon salt, lYi tablespoons shortening, 1 egg, 
^/i cup milk, 2 cups corn flour, 4 teaspoons baking powder. 

Mix together hominy, salt, melted shortening, beaten egg and milk; add flour which has 
been sifted with baking powder. Beat well and bake in greased muffin tins or shallow pan 
in hot oven, 25 to 30 minutes. 

Page Nine 



OFFICIAL BULLETIN OF SHASTA COUNTY WOMEN'S 

RYE AND CORNMEAL MUFFINS— 26 

IH cupa rye flour, }^i cup cornmeal, yi teaspoon salt, 1 tablespoon shortening, 4 teaspoons 
baking powder, 1 tablespoon sugar, H cup milk. 

Sift together dry ingredients, add milk and water and melted shorteniM. Beat well. 
Bake in greased muffin tins in hot oven, 30 to 35 minutes. 

OATMEAL BISCUITS— 27 

IJ^ cupa flour, IH teaspoons baking powder, H teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons sugar, IJ^ 
cups oatmeal, 6 tablespoons shortening, ^ cup water. 

Sift flour, baking powder, salt and sugar together. Add oatmeal, melted shortening and 
enough water to make a soft dough. Roll out thin on floured board; cut with biscuit cutter 
and bake in greased pan in moderate oven about 20 minutes. 

CORNMEAL MUFFINS— 28 

^ cup cornmeal, IK cups flour, H teaspoon salt, 4 teaspoons baking powder, 2 tablespoons 
sugar, 1 cup milk, 2 tablespoons shortening. 

Sift dry ingredients together into bowl; add milk and melted shortening and beat well. 
Bake in greased mufiEn tins in hot oven about 20 minutes. 

MUFFINS— BUCKWHEAT— 29 

1 cup buckwheat flour, 1 cup wheat flour, }4 cup sugar, 6 teaspoons baking powder, 1 
teaspoon salt, 1 egg, 1 cup milk, 3 tablespoons melted fat. 

Sift dry ingredients. Beat egg. Add milk and first mixture with melted fat. Bake in 
greased muffin pans in hot oven, 20 minutes. 

MUFFINS— CORNMEAL WITH DATES— 30 
No Sugar 
1 cup white cornmeal, 1 teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons fat, l^i cups milk, 1 cup wheat flour, 
4 teaspoons baking powder, 1 egg, J^ cup dates cut into small pieces. 

Cook first four ingredients 10 minutes in double boiler, cool; add egg, dates and flour sifted 
with baking powder. Beat thoroughly. Bake in quick oven in muffin pans or in loaf. 

MUFFINS (no Wheat) DeUclous— 31 

1 cup white cornmeal, 1 cup rolled oats, 1 egg, ^ cup sugar, H teaspoonful salt, 3 teaspoons 
baking powder, 1 tablespoon fat, % cup milk. 

Mix and sift dry ingredients. Add milk and melted fat and egg beaten. Bake in muffin 
pans about 25 or 30 minutes in moderate oven. All measurements are level. 

SOY BEAN MUFFINS— 32 

1 egg, 1 cup cold baked soy bean pulp, H to ^4 cupful milk, 1 teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons 
melted fat, 2 cups flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder. 

Add the egg well beaten, to the bean pulp. Mix and sift together the dry ingredients and 
add them alternately with the milk, to the first mixture. Stir in the melted shortening and 
beat well. Bake in greased muffin pans for twenty-five minutes in a moderate oven. This 
recipe makes twelve muffins. 



"Try Barley^ Flour — Recipes go with Every Sack — Try it Todays 
oAnd let Uncle Sam send the White Flour You Save to the Front. 



f'agt Ttn 



COMMITTEE, COUNCIL OF NATIONAL AND STATE DEFENSE 

WAR BREADS 

Measurements are leveL 
CORNMEAL OR OATMEAL AND WHEAT— 33 

2 teaspoons sweetening, 2 cups boiling water, 3 cups flour, 5i cup commeal or oatmeal, 
2 teaspoons salt, 1 yeast cake, sugar stirred in yeast. Moderate oven, bake 1 hour. 

RYE BREAD— BUCKWHEAT— 34 

2 tablespoons sweetening, 2 cups milk, 3^ cup water, 2 tablespoons butter or drippings, 
6 cups rye flour, 1 teaspoon salt, 1^ cups white or whole wheat flour, 1 yeast cake. Mod- 
erate oven, bake 50 minutes. 

RICE AND WHEAT— 35 

2 teaspoons sugar, 1 cup scalded milk, 1 cup water, 1 cup rice flour, 4 cups wheat flour, 
1 yeast cake, sugar stirred with cake, 2 teaspoons salt. Moderate oven, bake 1 hour. 

BUCKWHEAT BREAD— 36 

]/i cup molasses, \\i cups milk, 1 cup water, 2 tablespoons butter or drippings, 1^ cup white 
flour, 2J^ cups buckwheat flour, 1 teaspoon salt. Moderate oven, bake one hour. 

BARLEY BREAD— 37 

2 tablespoons molasses, 1 cup water, 1 cup milk, 4 cups whole wheat flour, 2 cups barley 
meal, 1 yeast cake, 1 teaspoon salt. Hot oven, bake K to 1 hour. 

Directions 

Boil the water or scald the milk, add sugar and salt and pour over the fat in the mixing 
bowl, add the yeast already mixed with a little of luke warm liquid. Stir and knead the flour 
into mixture. Set aside to rise until double its bulk. EJiead, shape and put into greased pans. 
Let rise to double its bulk again. 

Place your order for bread at least 24 hours in advance. This allows the bakery to bake 
only enough to fill their orders. In San Francisco in one day alone more than 10,000 loaves 
were not taken by retailers and were returned to bakeries and used as chicken feed. 



VEGETABLES 

WILD EDIBLE GREENS 

Dandelion, wild mustard,^wild lettuce, sorrel, water cress, lambs quarter. 

CULTIVATED GREENS 

Spinach, mustard, kale, kohlrabi, horseradish, beet tops, turnip tops, lettuce, romaine 
chickory, cardon, chard. 

Wash thoroughly to remove sand, cook, parboil if of strong flavor. 

No. 18. Nasturtiums may be used as a garnish for potato salad, the leaves and flowers may 
be used in sandwiches and the young seeds pickled. 

BEETS— 38 

2 cups boiled potatoes diced, 2 cups boiled beets diced, 2 cups thin white sauce, mix and 
serve. 

"Have you Tried Oatmeal Bread and Cookies, 
They are delicious." 

Pagt Eltvtn 



BULLETIN OF SHASTA COUNTY WOMEN'S COMMITTEE 

BRAISED CELERY— 39 
Trim off leaves, split celery including root in 4 pieces; boil or strain until tender, drain, put 
in pan with 1 tablespoon oil or drippings, 1 tablespoon tomato catsup, 1 tablespoon Worcester- 
shire sauce, cook 10 minutes, turning often. 

SPINACH LOAF— 40 
2 quarts cooked spinach, 1 cup grated cheese, salt, bread crumbs, 1 table8F>oon butter. 
Mix and bake in moderate oven. 

ESCALLOPED CARROTS— 41 
Grease a baking dish and sprinkle breadcrumbs over the sides and bottom. Put in layers of 
cooked carrots, breadcrumbs, and milk gravy or cream; sprinkle fine breadcrumbs and bits of 
butter substitute over the top and bake H hour. 

POTATO CRATERS— 42 

Arrange cones of mashed potatoes, make a hole in each and fill with paste, 1 tablespoon oil, 
2 tablespoons cheese, paprika, salt. Dust with grated cheese. Brown 20 minutes in hot oven. 

SWEET POTATOES— 43 
6 sweet potatoes, boil 10 minutes, drain and cut in slices, ]/i cup molasses, 4 tablespoons 
water, 2 tablespoons oleomargarine, boil 5 minutes, put potatoes in buttered pan and cover with 
molasses water and oleomargarine. Bake 30 minutes, basting often. 

TOMATO RAREBIT— 44 
1 pound soft American cheese, ^ pint strained tomato, 1 teaspoon salt, pepper, I cup soft 
white bread crumbs, clove of garlic, 1 teaspoon kitchen bouquet, grate cheese and mix all the 
ingredients with it, rub the chafing dish with clove of garlic, turn the mixture into the pan and 
stir rapidly until hot and smooth. Serve at once on toast, accompanied with cucumber salad 
and French dressing. 

ONIONS STUFFED WITH PEANUT BUTTER— 45 
Select mild onions of medium size, peel and boil until tender, cut center from each to leave 
thin shell of onion, chop removed onion, add equal quantity fine bread crumbs; for 1 pint material 
add V^ cup peanut butter, H teaspoon salt, \^ teaspoon paprika or finely chopped chili pepper, 
mix and use to fill onions, cook in oven 15 minutes, baste with nut milk when setting in oven and 
twice after. Serve with cream sauce, using milk in dish to flavor. 



GO back to the simple life, be contented with simple 
food, simple pleasures, simple clothes. Work 
hard, pray hard, play hard. Work, eat, recreate and 
sleep. Do it a 1 courageously. 

We have a victory to win. 

—HOOVER. 



Pag* Ttttlrv* 



IMBUED with the spirit sT 
the times we are co-operating 
heartly, not only with the 
regulations sT the Food Admin- 
istration, but with our patrons, 
in seeing that they are supplied 
with the new food stuffs, the 
"substitutes" which are called 
for in these and other 
war-time recipes. 



"FOOD WILL WIN THE 
WAR." 

Let's stand together on the 
firing line. 



BULLETIN OF SHAST A COUNTY WOMEN'S COMMITTEE 

MEAT SUBSTITUTES 

Using Beans 

KIDNEY BEAN STEW— 46 

1 quart kidney beans, 2 cups water, 2 cups tomatoes, 3 tablespoons Crisco. 1 onion chopped, 
% cup dried celery, 3 small potatoes, salt, pepper and parsley to taste. 

Method— Put all the ingredients except the potatoes in a kettle and let simmer H hour, 
add the potatoes, cut in cubes, cook H hour longer or until potatoes are done, then add fat if 

desired. 

RED KIDNEY BEANS WITH SPAGHETTI-47 

1 cup red kidney beans, 1 cup spaghetti, 1 teaspoon salt, H cup strained tomato, 2 table- 
spoons minced onion, 2 tablespoons olive oil, 2 tablespoons cornstarch, H cup grated cheese. 

Method— Soak the beans over night, cook in boiling salted water until tender and dry. 
Cook the spaghetti until soft in boiling salted water. Make a sauce of the tomatoes by sauteing 
the minced onion in the hot olive oil, adding the f^our to thicken, lastly the hot strained tomato. 
Season well, then add the cooked spaghetti. Pour the beans on a platter, surround with the 
spaghetti, over which sprinkle grated cheese and serve. 

HOMINY BAKED WITH CHEESE— 48 
Alternate layers of cooked hominy or rice and grated cheese. Moisten with thin white 
sauce, or a cream tomato soup or )/2 can tomatoes. Cover with bread crumbs and bake. 

CHEESE AND MACARONI, ITALIAN STYLE— 49 

1 cup macaroni, 2 tablespoons com starch or potato (lour, salt and paprika, 2 tablespoons 
Crisco or other fat, VA cup scalded milk, % cup grated cheese. 

Break the macaroni in one inch pieces and cook in boiling salted water until soft. Make 
a sauce of the flour, fat and milk to which has been added the grated cheese. Drain the hot 
macaroni, and add to the sauce, cooking imtil the cheese is melted. Season with salt and 
paprika. Turn out on a serving dish, and sprinkle with chopped parsley. (Chopped ham 
sprinkled on top makes a tasty dish when not in war-time.) 

TURKISH PILAF— 50 
3 cups rice, IH cups tomatoes, IH cups water, 2 cups chopped meat. 
Not a meat substitute as it contains meat. 

RICE CROQUETTES— 61 
Served With Cheese Sauce 
Place in baking dish alternate layers of rice and meat; cover with bread crumbs and brown 
in moderate oven. 

GNOCCI A LA ROMAINE— 52 

2 cups milk, \i cup cornstarch, K cup oleo, 2 egg yolks, H teaspoon salt, M teaspoon 
paprika, H cup grated cheese. 

Scald IH cups milk; add cornstarch mixed with rest of milk, cream oleo; add other mgre- 
dients to it; stir gradually into milk mixture; cook until the cheese is melted, turn into buttered 
pan to make a sheet H inch thick When cold cut with cookie cutter, sprinkle with grated 
cheese and set another piece on top. Place in hot oven for 10 minutes. Serve with green salad 

or cooked fruit. /^^ 

BAKED PETALUMA CHEESE— 63 ^^ 

Sprinkle Petaluma cheese with paprika and H teaspoon sugar. Cover and set in hot OVMI 
for 5 minutes or until it pufTs up. Serve immediately with marmalade and toasted crackers. 

Pagt Fourlttn 



WHO Serves His Country Best? 

He who "DOES HIS BIT" 

by producing most 



All California soils are deficient in one 
essential element — Carbonate of Lime. 

GROUND 
LIMESTONE 

at one tenth the cost of commercial fertilizers liberates 

the dormant elements, corrects acidity 

and granulates the soil. 

Let us test your soil and supply the needed amount 
of finely ground limestone. 

HOLT CBb GREGG CO. 

RSOIjIInCi', CALi, Write for pamphlets and prices 



Buys Sells 

Everything Everything 

McCARLEY (®, SMITH 
MERCANTILE CO. 

General Merchandise and Lumber 
Cottonwood : : : : : California 



BULLETIN OF SHASTA COUNTY WOMEN'S COMMITTEE 

SfflRRED EGGS A LA MORNAY— 64 
1 cup milk, 2 tablespoons cornstarch, 2 tablespoons oleo, )i teaspoon paprika, 3 eggs, l^i cup 

grated cheese, M teaspoon salt. 

Break an egg into a greased cup, pour over l^i of the white sauce. Set the cups in pan of hot 

water and leave in oven until eggs set. • 

SOY BEAN LOAF WITH TOMATO SAUCE— 55 

J^ pound soy beans, 3 teaspoons salt, 1 small onion, chopped fine, K teaspoon pepper, 2 cups 
dry bread crumbs, 2 eggs, well beaten, 2 cups milk. 

Pick over and wash beans and soak them overnight. Drain and cook with the salt until 
tender. When done, drain, mash and cool; add all the other ingredients. Hake in a well 
greased loaf pan for half an hour in a moderate oven. Serve with plenty of well seasoned tomato 
sauce. 

SOY BEANS AND RICE— 56 

1 pound soy beans, 2 large onions, 2 large green peppers, 1 large slice bacon, 2 tablespoons 
olive oil, G drops tabasco sauce, 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce, H teaspoon paprika, I/2 tea- 
spoon soda, salt, boiled rice. 

Pick over and wash the beans; soak them in cold water to cover overnight. In the morning 
drain; add water to cover, onions and green peppers sliced, and the soda. Let this come to a 
boil, then add a tablespoon of salt. Simmer 2 hours; add the bacon cut into small pieces, the 
Worcestershire, tabasco, and paprika; add more salt if needed. Let this simmer one hour or 
until the beans are soft, then in a small frying pan heat the olive oil; add six tablespoons of the 
beans with their liquor, and with a large spoon or fork crush and mix the beans with the oil. Let 
cook for five minutes: add it to the rest of the beans. Stir well and serve with rice. 

ENGLISH MONKEY— 67 
4 cups bread crumbs, 2 cups milk, ^ cup grated cheese, salt and pepper. 
Heat bread crumbs and milk; add cheese and stir till cheese is melted. Serve on toast. 

NUT LOAF (I)— 68 

5i cup cooked com meal, 14 cup sifted bread crumbs, 2 cups nut meats ground, H teaspoon 
salt, 14 teaspoon pepper, H teaspoon thyme, H teaspoon sage, 1 egg. 

Mix all ingredients with well beaten egg, shape into cakes and bake in oven 20 minutes. 
Serve with tomato sauce and baked bananas. 

NUT LOAF (II)— 69 

1 cup chopped nuts, 1 egg (well beaten), 1 cup boiled rice, H teaspoon celery salt, 1 cup 
bread crumbs, 2 tablespoon onion, finely minced. 

Mix above ingredients with well beaten egg. Bake and baste with drippings and water. 
Any left-over cereal may be used in place of rice. (Serves 8.) 

MOCK BEEF STEAK— 60 

1 cup cereal, 4 cups water, 1 teaspoon salt, J4 cup ground nut meats, 2 tablespoon chopped 
IKjppcr. 

Cook 2 hours, turn into bread pan; when cold cut in slices; brush with olive oil and broil; 
serve with tomato sauce. 

TOMATO SAUCE— 61 

1 can tomatoes, 2 cups water, 4 riovcs, 4 popper corns, 2 teaspoons mixed herbs, 4 sprigs 
parsley, 2 tablespoons chopped onion, 2 tablespoons Crisco, 2)^ tablespoons cornstarch, 1 tea- 
spoon salt, 14 teaspoon pepper, f. g. cayenne. 

lioil the tomatoes with spices and herbs together in a saucepan. Heat the Crisco in a 
frying pan and in this cook the cut-up onion. Slowly add the cornstarch, stirring to keep from 
lumping. Add to the hot tomato. Add the salt, pepper and cayenne. Let cook to thick«n, 
then strain over the fiah. 

Pagt S\-rle*n 



Redding- Steam Laundry 



INCORPORATED 



IN CONNECTION 

Sanitary Cleaning and 
Dye Works 

C. F. BROUILLARD, Manager 

10 NORTH CALIFORNIA STREET 
TELEPHONE MAIN 99 

We pa^ parcel post one way^ on all out-of-town orders 




WS.S. 



IDBUt SAVINGS SIAMPS 

ISSUED BY THR 

UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT 



Do you own the land you think you ow^n 
Our Abstracts and Certificates of Title will tell 

CARL R. BRIGGS ABSTRACT CS, TITLE CO. 

REDDING, CALIFORNIA 



BULLETIN OF SHASTA COUNTY WOMEN'S COMMITTEE 

BEANS AND LENTILS— 62 

4 cups white beans (cooked), 132 teaspoon molasses, 2 teaspoon vinegar, ^ teaspoon mua- 
tard, yi teaspoon pcpp>er. 

Drain water from cold boiled beans; mash and mix with other ingredients. Form into 
cakes and bake on both sides on a griddle. • 

SPLIT PEA LOAF— 63 
4 cups split peas, cooked; 2 cups bread crumbs, 1 beaten egg, 1 teaspoon minced onion, 1 
tablespoon minced parsley, celery or other flavoring, salt and pepper to taste. 

(A little grated lemon peel and 1 teaspoon lemon juice added gives a good flavor.) 

VEGETABLE TURKEY— 64 

2 cups bread crumbs, 2 cups chopped peanuts or walnuts or mixed, 2 eggs beaten, 2 table> 
spoons Crisco or other fat seasonings. 

Mix the above ingredients, seasoning with salt, pepper and a little bit of p>owdered sage. 
Add sufficient water or milk, to make very moist, put into a greased and floured pan and bake. 
Serve with a good meat sauce. 

NUT AND BARLEY ROAST— 65 

1 pint boiled pearl barley, 1 cup fine bread crumbs (use any of the white breads, save wheat, 
1 cup chopped nuts, 2H tablespoons Crisco, 1 cup water or stock, 1 onion, 2 tablespoons browned 
flour, yi teaspoon nutmeg. 

Fry the onion in the fat, add the browned flour, and water or stock, and boil three minutes. 
Mix with the other ingredients and season with salt and pepper to taste. Put in a greased pan, 
and bake in a hot oven 45 minutes. Baste frequently. Serve with tomato, olive or caper sauce. 

BARLEY SURPRISE— 66 

14 cup barley, 1 quart water (cook till soft — drain), 2 cups cooked, chopped left-over meat, 
14 cup tomato sauce or stock, seasoning. 

Line mold with barley. Fill with seasoned meat. Cover with barley. Bake or steam 
40 minutes. (Serves 8.) 



TO COOK RICE 

PLAIN BOILED WHITE RICE 

After washing the white rice in cold water until water clears, use 1 part rice to IJ^ parts 
cold water for cooking, bringing to boiling point quickly, then slow fire down just so it does not 
boil over. Cook thirty minutes. Do not stir or add more water or uncover. When done leave 
in kettle until serving. A flat bottom black iron porcelain-lined heavy kettle should be used. 
Seasoning of any kind tends to destroy the natural sweetness and delicate flavor. Rice should 
be eaten plain. 

16 ounces of a good quality white rice dry will make 43 ounces when cooked according to 
these directions. 

PLAIN BOILED NATURAL RICE 

Using 1 part brown or natural rice to 3 parts cold water, bring to boiling point quickly, 
then slow fire down just so thai it does not boil over. Cook forty minutes. Do not stir or add 
more water or uncover. When done leave in kettle until serving. A flat bottom black iron 
porcelain-lined heavy kettle Hhould be used. Seasoning of any kind tends to destroy the nat- 
ural sweetness and delicate flavor. Rice should be eaten plain as a vegetable, with meat, 
fish or beans. 

10 ounces of a good quality natural rice dry will make 48 ounces when cooked according 
to these recipes. 

Pag* Einkletn 



FIRE-INSURANCE-BAKER 

A Strictly American general insurance office 

Patronize American Companies and take no chances 

REAL ESTATE LOANS 

S. C. BAKER, MANAGER 

Golden Eagle Block REDDING, CALIF. PHONE 94 

REDDING LUMBER COMPANY 

Wholesale and Retail 

LUMBER 

Beaver Board and Best Felt Roofing 
Phone 56 REDDING, CALIFORNIA 



PHONES: PARLORS 2241, RESIDENCE 2243 

A. M. DICK 

FUNERAL DIRECTOR AND MANAGER 
L,ad^ (_ylssistant When Rj,equ ired 

Houston Undertaking Company 

CORONER'S OFFICE 

602 MARKET STREET 
REDDING, CALIFORNIA 



FOUNDERS MACHINISTS BLACKSMITHS BOILERMAKERS 

I. J. Johnson Iron W^orks 

SUCCESSORS TO 

Northern California Engineering Works 



All Kinds of Castings and Bronzes REDDING 

Made to Order CALIFORNIA 



BULLETIN OF SHASTA COUNTY WOMEN'S COMMITTEE 

PUDDINGS 

EGOLESS PLUM PUDDING— 67 

1 cup bread crumbs, 2 cups rye flour, 4 teaspoons baking powder, ^ teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon 
cloves, I teaspoon cinnamon, 1 cup chopped suet, 1 cup seeded raisins, 1 chopped apple, 1 cup 
molasses, 1 cup milk. 

Mix the dry ingredients thoroughly, add the suet and the prepared fruit. Mix well and add 
gradually the molasses and milk, steam 23^ hours. Serve with hard sauce. 

ECONOMY PUDDING— 68 
Line greased pudding dish with layer of apples, then layer of stale crumbled cake, a sprink- 
ling of chopped walnuts, repeat, bake in oven about 20 minutes, sure. Thicken cornstarch in 1 
cup of water (cold), while hot beat in half cupful of maple syrup and small piece of butter. 
Instead of maple syrup, fruit juices may be used. 

SQUASH DESSERT— 69 
Do not peel squash, cut off top and bottom, trim slightly and boil, when soft mash and add 
14 cup brown sugar, salt, cinnamon, 3^ teaspoon ginger and \i pint squash, add 2 beaten eggs, 
% pint of milk, cook in unbuttered molds and bake. Serve 8 people. 

INDIAN PUDDING— 70 

4 tablespoons commeal, 6 cups milk, salt, 14 cup sugar, I teaspoon cinnamon, little ginger, 
stir cornmeal into 3 cups cold milk placed in double boiler and stirred until it thickens, add l^ 
cup molasses, 1 egg and remaining 3 cups milk, pour mixture into baking dish. Cook in slow 
oven 4 hours. 

CARROT PUDDING— 71 

H cup grated carrots, J^ cup mashed salted potatoes (no milk), H cup chopped suet, H 
cup seeded raisins, H cup brown sugar, H cup flour, H teaspoon soda dissolved in water, season 
with spice to suit taste. Mix ingredients in order named. Steam I hour. This amount serves 
6 persons, serve with hard sauce. 

CHOCOLATE CEREAL PUDDING— 72 
1 cup left over breakfast cereal, 2 tablespoons chocolate, 14 cup sugar, cinnamon to taste, 
white of one egg, mix chocolate, sugar and cinnamon and add to cereal, fold in stiffly beaten 
white, mold, chill. Serve with whipped or plain cream. Serves 6. 

TAPIOCA CORNMEAL PUDDING— 73 

5 tablespoons minute tapioca, 4 tablespoons commeal, 5 cups skim milk, 14 cup molasses, 
H cup sugar, 3 tablespoons butter, 3^ teaspoon salt. Combine the tapioca (minute), commeal, 
sugar and salt; add gradually the skim milk. Cook in a double boiler fifteen minutes, then 
add the molasses and fat, and cook about thirty minutes or until thick. Serve with whipped 
cream. 

SPANISH CREAM— 74 

I tablespoon gelatin, 2 cups milk, 2 eggs, 3-2 ci'P sugar, Vi teaspoon vanilla. Pour the milk 
over the gelatine and let stand one hour; strain, put on the stove and let come to a boil; stir in 
the beaten yolks of th« eggs and the sugar; cook one minute. Take from stove and add the 
whites whipped stifT; flavor, pour into moulds. Serve with cream. 



CAKES AND COOKIES 

WAR CHOCOLATE CAKE— 76 
2 oz. chocolate, H cup milk, yolk of egg, 1 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon butter substitute, 1 
teaspoon vanilla, 1}^ cups rye flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon soda; dust with 
powderoil sugar. Cook in double boiler until it thickens. 
Pagt Ttitnty 



UNITED STATES SMELTING 
REFINING CSi. MINING CO. 

Mammoth Plant 

KENNET, CALIFORNIA 

Buyers sf 

GOLD, SILVER CS, 
COPPER ORES 

Terms on application in person or by letter. Please bring 
or send samples of the ore you wish to sell 



Golden Eagle Hotel 

The Gronwoldt Company 
George H. Gronwoldt August H. Gronwoldt 

OWNERS AND MANAGERS 

REDDING, CALIFORNIA 



BULLETIN OF SHASTA COUNTY WOMEN'S COMMITTEE 

SPONGE CAKE— 76 
Separate 4 egRS, beat yolks thick, add I cup sugar (5i or 1 cup will do), beat well, pinch of 
Bait beat whites stiff, sift H cup potato flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder into yolks, then add 
the beaten whites. Bake slowly in moderate oven, 30 miDUtes. Makes 12 cakes in muihn tins. 

CAKE— 77 

Yolk 4 eggs, 1 cup sugar well beaten, add 23-^ soda crackers rolled fine, 1 cup chopped nuts, 

beaten whites. Bake in moderate oven, spread mashed berries on top and thin layer of whipped 

cream. 

HOOVER COOKIES— 78 

2 cups brown sugar, butter (size of small egg), 2 well beaten eggs, ^i cup milk, 1 cup 
chopped raisins or currants, 1^ cups white flour, H cup bran flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 
3 cups golden rod oats, or enough to make stiff batter, and salt. Drop from spoon into greased 
pan, bake in very slow oven. 

SPICE CAKE— 79 

1 cup brown sugar, 2 tablespoons fat or butter, l-i teaspoon salt, 1 egg well beaten, 1 cup 
Bour milk or buttermilk, H cup wheat flour, VA cups rye flour, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon 
cinnamon, 14 teaspoon cloves, 1 cup chopped nuts, 1 cup washed seeded raisina. 

Mix in the order given, bake in moderate oven. 

CORNMEAL NUT PATTIES— 80 
1 cup cooked commeal, 1 slice pimiento, 3 tablespoons chopped nuts, }4 teaspoon baking 
powder, 1 tablespoon chopped pickle, salt and pepper. Mix, shape. Brown in oven or sautr 
May substitute other cereal. (6 patties.) 

PEANUT DROP COOKIES— 81 

Beat }4 cup sugar in }4 cup shortening, beat in H cup honey, H cup chopped peanuts, 1 

egg beaten light, V/i cup flour, 14 cup barley flour, J^ teaspoon salt, 3 teaspoons baking 

powder. Drop in greased pan by teaspoonful, put J^ peanut on top of each. Bake in quick oven. 



«! 



BARLEY DROP MOLASSES COOKIES— 82 
Cream, }4 cup shortening, beat in K cup sugar, J^ cup molasnes, 1 egg beaten light, ^ 
cup thick sour milk, sift together 1 cup wheat flour, H cup barley flour, 1 teaspoon soda, H 
teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon ginger, J^ teaspoon cinnamon. Mix liquid and dry ingredien 
Drop on greased tin. Bake in quick oven. 



I 



BARLEY LEMON QUEENS— 83 
Grate rind of lemon in bowl in which is J^ cup butter or other fat; cream fat, beat in graduall 
1 cup suger, beaten yolks of 4 eggs. 2 tablespoons lemon juice, sift together J^ cup sifted flour, 
yi cup sifted barley flour, J^ teaspoon soda. Beat flour into butter and egg yolks. Beat in 
whites of 4 eggs beaten light. Bake in cup cake tins. 

BUCKWHEAT DROP COOKIES— 84 

Ji cup Crisco, H cup sugar, 2 eggs, H cup milk (scant), 1 teaspoon lemon juice, J^ cup 
buckwheat, H cup flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder. }^i teaspoon salt, 1 cup chopped nuts. 

Combine as cake. Drop by spoonfuls on a baking sheet two inches apart. Bake 10 minutes 
in a moderate oven. (Makes 3 dozen.) 

HONEY CAKES— 86 



3 tablespoons fat, 1 cup honey, 1 egg, well beaten, 1^ cups wheat flour, % cup rye, ri 
com or buckwheat flour, 4 teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon cinnnamon, J^ teaspoon sail 
yi cup water, scant. 

Mix dry ingredients; rub in the fat; add honey and egg; add water; bake in muffin tins 
(Makes 20 to 24 small muffms.) 



Pat* Tw«nty-two 



4! 



i 



Jacobson Grocery Co. 



GROCERIES 
CROCKERY 
GLASSW^ARE 

cAND 

HOUSEHOLD GOODS 
Phone 12 REDDING, CALIFORNIA 



WE GIVE YOU ENTIRE SATISFACTION 

THROUGH 

Q UALITY— SER VICE - PRICE 

CARL MUNTER 

General Merchandise 

ANDERSON . . . CALIFORNIA 



Redding Iron Works 

Foundry and 
Machine Work 



REDDING - - CALIFORNIA 



BULLETIN OF SHASTA COUNTY WOMEN'S COMMITTEE 

SUGAR SUBSTITUTES 
FRUIT PUNCHES FOR AFTERNOON TEAS ^ 

86 . 

1 quart cold water, H cup lemon juice, 2 cupe chopped pineapple, 1 cup orange juice, glucose 
or Karo syrup to taste. 

Method— Combine water, glucose and pineapple, let cook about 20 minutes, add the strained 
fruit juices, let cool and dilute with sufficient ice-water to retain pleasant flavor. , 

87 

1 cup water, IH cup glucose or Karo syrup, 1 cup tea infusion, 1 quart Apollinaris water, 
2 cups strawberry syrup or juice, juice of 5 lemons, juice of 5 oranges, 1 can grated pineapple, 1 cup 
Maraschino cherries. 

Method— Make a syrup of water and sweetening; awld the tea and fruit juices and grated 
pineapple, let stand H hour, strain and add sufTicient ice-water to make l^i gallons of liquid. 
Put in a large bowl with block of ice and add the cherries and Apollinaris just before serving. 

88 

y^ to 1 cup glucose, 1 cup hot tea infusion, 5^4 cup orange juice, }i cup lemon juice, I pint ginger 
ale, 1 pint Apollinaris water, few slices orange. 

Method — Combine tea and glucose, stir well; add the fniit juices, strain into a punch bowl 
over a large piece of ice. Just before serving add ale, Apollinaris and slices of orange. 

89 

9 oranges, 6 lemons, 1 cup grated pineapple, I cup strawberry or raspberry syrup, l^i ci^M 
tea infusion, IH to 3 cups glucose, 1 cup hot water, 1 quart Apollinaris water. 

Method — Mix the fruit juices, syrup and tea together, make a syrup of water and glucose; 
pour into punch bowl over block of ice; chill thoroughly and add Apollinaris just before serving. 

GINGER PUNCH— 90 

I quart cold water, 1 to IJ^ cups glucose or Karo, l^ pound Canton ginger, H cup orange 
juice, l^ cup lemon juice. 

Method — Chop the ginger; combine with water and glucose; boil 15 minutes; add fruit 
juices, cool; strain and dilute with crushed ice. 



AFTERNOON TEA CAKES 

NUT MACAROONS— 91 

White of 1 egg, 1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup pecan nut meat« finely chopped, 14 teaspoon salt. 

Method— Beat the egg white until light and arid gradually while beating constantly the 
sugar. Fold in the finely chopped nut meats and sprinkle with salt. Drop from tip of spoon 
one inch apart on a buttered sheet and bake in a moderate oven until delicately browned. 

NUT BARS— 92 

2 tablespoons brown sugar, }4 cup Crisco, }4 cup boiling water, H cup brown sugar, J^ cup 
flour, '/K teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons English walnut meats finely chopped, halves of walnuts 
or almonds. 

Method— Put the 2 tablespoons of aug.ir on fire in aaurcpan and let heat a littio; then add 
the shortening and water; let boil two minutes. Remove from fire and add remaining sugar, 
flour mixed with salt and the walnut moats. Spread as rolled wafers, crease in two inch squares 
and lay a nut meat on top. Bake in a slow oven, removing from pan as soon as done. 

/"a;* Twtntyfovr 



GET ACQUAINTED WITH 

**THE BANK THAT COVERS THE COUNTY" 



Redding National Bank 

AND 

The First Savings Bank 
of Shasta County 

Headquarters in Redding, California 
Branches in Kennet and Anderson 



Combined Resources over $2,300,000 



If you are not already one of our depositors, call at the 
branch nearest you and let us tell you of the advantages 
to yourself of a commercial or savings account, in such 
an institution, and at a time when wise saving and wise 
spending helps not only yourself but your country. 



BULLETIN OF SHASTA COUNTY WOMEN'S COMMITTEE 

SMALL CAKES FOR RECEPTIONS, ETC —93 
3 eggs, ^ cup Crisco, V^ cup brown sugar, 3 squares Baker's chocolate, 1 cup stale bread 
crumbs, 3 tablespoons barley flour. 

Method — Beat the eggs until light; cream the Crisco by softening it a little, add the sugar; 
combine with the eggs, then add the chocolate melted, bread crumbs and flour; spread the 
mixture in a shallow greased pan, and bake in a slow oven. Shape with a small biscuit cutter and 
put together in pairs, putting maple sugar cream or any other filling between and on top. 

COCOANUT CAKES— 94 

}r^ pound fresh grated cocoanut, 13^ egg whites, 6 ounces sugar and glucose mixed. 

Method — Cook the cocoanut, sugar and glucose in double boiler until mixture clings to the 
spoon, add the whites of the eggs, stir vigorously, and cook until mixture feels sticky when tried 
between the fingers. Spread in a wet pan cover with wet paper, and chill on ice. Shape in 
small balls, first dipping hands in cold water. Bake in slow oven on a tin sheet greased with 
paraffin for 20 minutes. 

MAPLE SUGAR CREAM— 96 

1 pound soft maple sugar, 14 cup boiling water, 2 egg whites. 

Method — Break the sugar in small pieces, put in saucepan with boiling water and stir 
occasionally until sugar is dissolved, boil without stirring until syrup will thread when dropped 
from tip of spoon; pour the syrup gradually over the stiffly beaten egg whites, beating the mixture 
constantly and continue beating until right consistency to spread. 



ICES FOR AFTERNOON RECEPTIONS OR TEAS 
PINEAPPLE FRAPPE— 96 
2 cups water, 5i cups Karo or 1 cup glucose, juice 3 lemons, 2 cups ice water, 1 can grated or 
1 shredded pineapple. 

Method — .Make a syrup by boiling together the water and Karo, or glucose. Add the fruits 
and juice; cool; strain; add the ice water and freeze to a mush, using equal parts of ice and salt. 
More sweetening may be needed if fresh fruit is used. 



i 



APRICOT SORBET— 97 

1 can apricots, 1 cup glucose or ^ cup Karo, H cup wine, red or white, ^ cup lemon juice, 
1 pint cream. 

Method — Drain the apricots, rub the pulp through a sieve and combine with fruit syrup; 
add sweetening, wine and lemon juice, freeze to a mush; fold in the cream whipped. Let st 
to chill IH hours. Serve in glasses. 



tand 



FROZEN PEACHES OR APRICOTS— 98 

1 can fruit, 11^ cups glucose or 1 cup Karo water. 

Method — Drain the fruit from its syrup, cut in small pieces. To the sjrup add sufficient 
water to make 4 cups, cook with sweetening for about 5 minutes; strain; add the cut fruit; cool 
and freeze. 2 cups whipped cream may be added after mixture is frozen to a mush, if so desired. 
Continue freezing. 

STRAWBERRY ICE— 99 

4 cups water, 2 cups glucose or 1 cup Karo, 2 cups strawberry juice, 1 tablespoon lemon juice. 
Method — Make a syrup with the water and sweetening; cool; add the mashed fruit; add 
lemon j\iicc and freeze. Use 3 parts ice to 1 part salt for freezing. 

t^agt Tutntytijt 



YOU can buy up-to-date ready- to- w^ear garments 
for every member of the family at 

The Leslie Jones Department Store 

BEST MERCHANDISE LOWEST PRICES 

Money- Back Guarantee 

Phone 34 Redding, California 

When you want your clothes laundered 
in a modern, sanitary fashion 

SEND FOR THE 

PHOENIX LAUNDRY 

Phone 17 Redding, California 

After June 1, 1918, we shall be equipped to do high-grade cleaning, after the newest processes 

Let Those Who Serve You Best Serve You Most 



C. C. KEEN 
Proprietor 



Turtle Bay Lumber Yard, 

^ . . ( PAINTS 
? i^' ^ ROOFING 
ieea ^ VARNISHES 

BLACK ROCK WALLBOARD 

Free Delivery Redding, California 



THE REDDING FEED COMPANY 

MILLERS of FEED and MERCHANTS of 
FLOUR, HAY, GRAIN, SPUDS and COAL 

Phone 74 Redding, California 



BULLETIN OP SHASTA COUNTY WOMEN'S COMMITTEE 

CANDIES MADE WITHOUT THE USE OF CANE OR BEET SUGAR 
MAPLE FUDGE— 100 

1 pound maple sugar, 2 tablespoons butter, 1 cup milk, 1-16 teaspoon salt, 1-16 teaspoon 
soda. 

Method — Melt butter and sugar, add the soda and bring to boiling t>o>nt, add the milk 
slowly, stirring constantly, add salt, cook without stirring until it forms a soft ball when 
dropped in cold water. Let stand in cold wat«r until it cools, then beat until it can be handled. 
Pour out in greased pan. Mark and cut in shape desired. 

CLAIRE CREAMS— 101 

2 cups brown sugar, 1 cup cream, 1 cup nuts, 1 cup candied cherries, 1 pound marshmallows. 
Method— Boil the cream and sugar together to "soft ball" stage, beat until creamy and 

add 1^ cup chopped nut meats. Pour out in pan, as other fudge. Melt the marshmallows, 
stirring constantly. When soft, add the second half of chopped nut meats and cherries chopped. 
Pour this mixture over top of fudge mixture. 



Jl 



MOLASSES CANDY— 102 

3 cups brown sugar, H cup molasses, 1 cup water, 1 tablespoon butter, ]4. teaspoon sods, 
2 tablespoons vanilla. 

Method — Cook all the ingredients together except the soda and vanilla — until the mixture 
cracks when dropped into cold water. Beat in the soda and vanilla, then pour on a buttered 
plate. Draw the edges in toward center until cold enough to handle; pull until smooth and 
light colored. Cut into inch pieces with sharp scissors. 

BUTTER SCOTCH— 103 

3 cups brown sugar, ^ cup water, 2 tablespoons butter, \i teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon 
flavoring, few grains salt. 

Method — Boil together all the ingredients until a thread is formed when dropped from a 
spoon. Pour into hot, greased pans, crease, and let stand until hard. 

BUTTERCUPS— 104 ^ft 

2 cups molasses, 2 tablespoons butter, 1 cup brown sugar, ^^ cup boiling water. 

Method — Cook all the ingredients together until brittle when tried in cold water. Pour 

onto a hot, greased platter. Pull when cold enough to handle; shape in a sheet two inches 

wide; cover with a layer of molasses candy, then another layer of the first mixture — press 

together and cut into inch pieces. 



i^ 



CHOCOLATE CARAMELS— 105 

K pound grated unsweetened chocolate, 4 ounces butter, 1 pound brown sugar, \^ ci 
molasses, \^ cup cream, 1 teaspoon vanilla powder. 

Method — Put all the ingredients into a saucepan and cook over a slow fire until thoroughly 
mixed, stirring constantly, then allow to boil slowly without stirring, to the "crack" stage 
(or until it cracks when dropjxid into cold water), pour out into greased, shallow pans, about 
H inch thick; let partially cool, cut through part way into inch squares, using a sharp knife 
dipp>ed in olive oil. When cold and hard, break caramels apart and wrap in wa.xed paper. 



" Buy cTMolasses, Honey or Corn Syrup Candy for the Children 
c>4nd let Our Boys on the Firing Line have the White Sugar." 



Pagt Tn-enly-tighl 



— the store with a 
conscience 



J. F. Bedford Company 

Anderson, California 



HARE CS, HILL CO. 

LIFE INSURANCE 
FIRE INSURANCE 
ACCIDENT INSURANCE 
COMPENSATION INSURANCE 
and REAL ESTATE 

REDDING, CALIFORNIA 



BULLETIN OF SHASTA COUNTY WOMEN'S COMMITTEE 

COFFEE CARAMELS— 106 

I cup molasses, 1 cup brown sugar, 2 ounces butter, 3 tablespoons strong coffee infusion 
(2 ounces cofTee to H cup water.) 

Method— Put the molasses and sugar into granite saucepan and stir over moderate fire 
until sugar is dissolved, then boil slowly to the "soft ball" stage; add butter Mid cofTee flavor- 
ing. Continue boiling until the mixture is hard and brittle when tried in ice-water. Finish 
as with chocolate caramels. 

NUT CARAMELS— 107 
Make chocolate caramels, and when mixture h;i8 reached the "crack" stage, stir in )^ 
pound each of finely chopped almonds and Ekiglish walnuts. Finish same as for chocolate 
caramels. 

BITTER SWEETS— 108 

An attractive variety of candies may be made by dipping sweet fruits in bitter chocolate. 
Use for this purpose dates, citron, candied orange peel or crystallized fruit. Melt unsweetened 
chocolate in a double boiler. Keep the chocolate just warm enough to prevent solidifying. 
With a silver fork drop pieces of fruit in chocolate. See that each piece is completely coated, 
then remove to waxed paper to harden. 

STUFFED DATES-109 
Remove the stones; fill with peanuts, walnuts, hickory nuts or any nuts available. Pea- 
nut butter makes a good filling that is different. Press dates in shape and roll in granulated 
sugar, chopped nuts or a mixture of cocoa and powdered cinnamon. 

CHOCOLATE DAINTIES— 110 
Put through the meat chopper H cup each of dates, figs, and nut meats; add one tablespoon 
orange juice, a little grated orange peel, and one square of melted unsweetened chocolate. 
Mould into balls and roll in chopped nuts or granulated sugar. This mixture may be packed 
in an oiled tin, put under a weight until firm, then cut in any shape desired. 

MAPLE CREAMS— 111 
Boil one cup maple sugar with one cup water until it forms a soft ball when dropped in 
cold water. Remove from the fire and stir rapidly until it becomes creamy. Form into balls 
the size of marbles and put nut meats on either side. Lay on wax paper to cool. 

FRUIT PASTE— 112 

Put through the meat chopper enough cherry, peach or quince preserves to make a half- 
pint with the juice. Heat fruit and add two tablespoons of gelatine, previously softened in a 
very little cold water. Stir well, and continue stirring until it begins to cool and thicken, 
then pour into oiled dish to make a layer one-inch thick. Let dry slowly, sprinkle with sugar 
and place in box with waxed paper between the laj'ers. A mixture of dried apricots and dates 
may l>e used for this paste. Wash apricots and soak over night in enough water to cover. 
Pour off water, bring to a boil, pour over apricots and let sttuid till cool. Put apricots and 
dates through a meat chopper and proceed with the proportions as given. 



"If you would be Healthy, Wealthy" and Wise 
Eat less cT^eat. Waste less Wheat, 
Cut down on Su^ar and Pies." 



I 



Pat* Thirty 



W^EBB CBi, STRITE 

'PEOPLE'S CASH STORE" 

Staple and Fancy Groceries in line with the 
Food Administration regulations 

401 MARKET STREET 

(OPPOSITE TEMPLE HOTEL) Phone 60 



REDDING 



CALIFORNIA 



Auto Repairing 



Auto Supplies 



BOGGS GARAGE 

W. C. BOGGS, Proprietor 
c_/lgent for 

OVERLAND CS, CHALMERS 
Redding, California 



HOTEL LORENZ 

oA pleasant home- like residence for permanent guests, 

and for those who are spending a few days 

only in the county seat 

THE LORENZ CO., Proprietors 

Mrs. Emma Hoyle, Manager 
REDDING, CALIFORNIA 




Army Shoes 

FOR BOTH MEN 

cAND WOMEN 

At Sechrist's Shoe Store 



Call or send for prices. Free Parcel-Post 
Delivery 

REDDING. CALIFORNIA 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



In Response to the Instruction 014 233 133 t 

NATIONAL FOOD 
ADMINISTRATION 

we have for the period of the war ceased 
making our high-grade flour known as 

SHASTA'S BEST 

and are conserving wheat by making a 
straight-grade flour which uses more of the 
wheat, and is tlierefore more nutritious 
as well as more economical. This flour 
is milled according to the U. S. Food Ad- 
ministration regulations, and is called 

SHASTA DAISY 

Ask your grocer for it 

when buying white flour 

In using a local product such as Shasta 
Daisy you are also co-operating with the 
Government in its recommencation that 
we use food manufactured near home in or- 
der to release transportation for war needs 

Tryr Our BARLEY FLOUR Also 

BROWN ca, SONS 

COTTONWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



rkKss ur ii.s.cioCKri Co. 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



M 



014 233 133